Science.gov

Sample records for ion scattering spectrometry

  1. Computer simulation program for medium-energy ion scattering and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Tomoaki

    2016-03-01

    A computer simulation program for ion scattering and its graphical user interface (MEISwin) has been developed. Using this program, researchers have analyzed medium-energy ion scattering and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry at Ritsumeikan University since 1998, and at Rutgers University since 2007. The main features of the program are as follows: (1) stopping power can be chosen from five datasets spanning several decades (from 1977 to 2011), (2) straggling can be chosen from two datasets, (3) spectral shape can be selected as Gaussian or exponentially modified Gaussian, (4) scattering cross sections can be selected as Coulomb or screened, (5) simulations adopt the resonant elastic scattering cross section of 16O(4He, 4He)16O, (6) pileup simulation for RBS spectra is supported, (7) natural and specific isotope abundances are supported, and (8) the charge fraction can be chosen from three patterns (fixed, energy-dependent, and ion fraction with charge-exchange parameters for medium-energy ion scattering). This study demonstrates and discusses the simulations and their results.

  2. Ion mobility-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kanu, Abu B; Dwivedi, Prabha; Tam, Maggie; Matz, Laura; Hill, Herbert H

    2008-01-01

    This review article compares and contrasts various types of ion mobility-mass spectrometers available today and describes their advantages for application to a wide range of analytes. Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS), when coupled with mass spectrometry, offers value-added data not possible from mass spectra alone. Separation of isomers, isobars, and conformers; reduction of chemical noise; and measurement of ion size are possible with the addition of ion mobility cells to mass spectrometers. In addition, structurally similar ions and ions of the same charge state can be separated into families of ions which appear along a unique mass-mobility correlation line. This review describes the four methods of ion mobility separation currently used with mass spectrometry. They are (1) drift-time ion mobility spectrometry (DTIMS), (2) aspiration ion mobility spectrometry (AIMS), (3) differential-mobility spectrometry (DMS) which is also called field-asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) and (4) traveling-wave ion mobility spectrometry (TWIMS). DTIMS provides the highest IMS resolving power and is the only IMS method which can directly measure collision cross-sections. AIMS is a low resolution mobility separation method but can monitor ions in a continuous manner. DMS and FAIMS offer continuous-ion monitoring capability as well as orthogonal ion mobility separation in which high-separation selectivity can be achieved. TWIMS is a novel method of IMS with a low resolving power but has good sensitivity and is well intergrated into a commercial mass spectrometer. One hundred and sixty references on ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IMMS) are provided. PMID:18200615

  3. Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) and Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.

    2010-04-20

    In a media of finite viscosity, the Coulomb force of external electric field moves ions with some terminal speed. This dynamics is controlled by “mobility” - a property of the interaction potential between ions and media molecules. This fact has been used to separate and characterize gas-phase ions in various modes of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) developed since 1970. Commercial IMS devices were introduced in 1980-s for field detection of volatile traces such as explosives and chemical warfare agents. Coupling to soft-ionization sources, mass spectrometry (MS), and chromatographic methods in 1990-s had allowed IMS to handle complex samples, enabling new applications in biological and environmental analyses, nanoscience, and other areas. Since 2003, the introduction of commercial systems by major instrument vendors started bringing the IMS/MS capability to broad user community. The other major development of last decade has been the differential IMS or “field asymmetric waveform IMS” (FAIMS) that employs asymmetric time-dependent electric field to sort ions not by mobility itself, but by the difference between its values in strong and weak electric fields. Coupling of FAIMS to conventional IMS and stacking of conventional IMS stages have enabled two-dimensional separations that dramatically expand the power of ion mobility methods.

  4. Atomistic structure of a spinel Li4Ti5O12(111) surface elucidated by scanning tunneling microscopy and medium energy ion scattering spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitta, Mitsunori; Matsuda, Taishi; Maeda, Yasushi; Akita, Tomoki; Tanaka, Shingo; Kido, Yoshiaki; Kohyama, Masanori

    2014-01-01

    Spinel lithium titanate (Li4Ti5O12, LTO) is one of the promising anode materials for high-performance lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). It is crucial to investigate atomistic structures of LTO surfaces to understand the phenomena at LTO/electrolyte interfaces such as CO2-gas generation which greatly affects the performance and safety of LIBs. By applying scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and medium energy ion scattering spectrometry (MEIS) to a LTO(111) film prepared from a TiO2 wafer, we found that there exist two kinds of Li-terminated (111) terraces bounded by steps with different heights. In the major terraces, the top hexagonal Li layer is stacked above the oxygen layer, while the top Li layer is stacked above the Ti-Li layer in the minor terraces. The relative stability between the two surface structures seems to depend on the atmosphere due to different stoichiometry. For the major terraces, the LTO surface should have electronic holes due to oxygen-rich stoichiometry, which is a possible origin of CO2 generation via redox interaction with electrolyte molecules.

  5. Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Eiden, Greg C.

    2005-09-01

    This chapter describes research conducted in a few research groups in the 1990s in which RF quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometers were coupled to a powerful atomic ion source, the inductively coupled plasma used in conventional ICP-MS instruments. Major section titles for this chapter are: RF Quadrupole Ion Traps Features of RF Quadrupole Ion Trap Mass Spectrometers Selective Ion Trapping methods Inductively Coupled Plasma Source Ion Trap Mass Spectrometers

  6. Characterisation of an intrinsically disordered protein complex of Swi5-Sfr1 by ion mobility mass spectrometry and small-angle X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Saikusa, Kazumi; Kuwabara, Naoyuki; Kokabu, Yuichi; Inoue, Yu; Sato, Mamoru; Iwasaki, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Toshiyuki; Ikeguchi, Mitsunori; Akashi, Satoko

    2013-03-01

    It is now recognized that intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) play important roles as hubs in intracellular networks, and their structural characterisation is of significance. However, due to their highly dynamic features, it is challenging to investigate the structures of IDPs solely by conventional methods. In the present study, we demonstrate a novel method to characterise protein complexes using electrospray ionization ion mobility mass spectrometry (ESI-IM-MS) in combination with small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). This method enables structural characterisation even of proteins that have difficulties in crystallisation. With this method, we have characterised the Schizosaccharomyces pombe Swi5-Sfr1 complex, which is expected to have a long disordered region at the N-terminal portion of Sfr1. ESI-IM-MS analysis of the Swi5-Sfr1 complex revealed that its experimental collision cross-section (CCS) had a wide distribution, and the CCS values of the most dominant ions were ∼56% of the theoretically calculated value based on the SAXS low-resolution model, suggesting a significant size reduction in the gas phase. The present study demonstrates that the newly developed method for calculation of the theoretical CCSs of the SAXS low-resolution models of proteins allows accurate evaluation of the experimental CCS values of IDPs provided by ESI-IM-MS by comparing with the low-resolution solution structures. Furthermore, it was revealed that the combination of ESI-IM-MS and SAXS is a promising method for structural characterisation of protein complexes that are unable to crystallise. PMID:23324799

  7. Developments in ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Collins, D C; Lee, M L

    2002-01-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) has been used for over 30 years as a sensitive detector of organic compounds. The following is a brief review of IMS and its principles with an emphasis on its usage when coupled to mass spectrometry. Since its inception, IMS has been interfaced with quadrupole, time-of-flight, and Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. These hybrid instruments have been employed for the analysis of a variety of target analytes, including biomolecules, explosives, chemical warfare degradation products, and illicit drugs. PMID:11939214

  8. Third International Workshop on Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, John H. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    Basic research in ion mobility spectrometry has given rise to rapid advancement in hardware development and applications. The Third International Workshop on Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) was held October 16-19, 1994, at Johnson Space Center to provide a forum for investigators to present the most recent results of both basic and applied IMS research. Presenters included manufacturers and various users, including military research organizations and drug enforcement agencies. Thirty papers were given in the following five sessions: Fundamental IMS Studies, Instrument Development, Hyphenated IMS Techniques, Applications, and Data Reduction and Signal Processing. Advances in hardware development, software development, and user applications are described.

  9. Coulombic Effects in Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Clowers, Brian H.; Belov, Mikhail E.; Smith, Richard D.

    2009-01-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) has been increasingly employed in a number of applications. When coupled to mass spectrometry (MS), IMS becomes a powerful analytical tool for separating complex samples and investigating molecular structure. Therefore, improvements in IMS-MS instrumentation, e.g. IMS resolving power and sensitivity, are highly desirable. Implementation of an ion trap for accumulation and pulsed ion injection to IMS based on the ion funnel has provided considerably increased ion currents, and thus a basis for improved sensitivity and measurement throughput. However, large ion populations may manifest Coulombic effects contributing to the spatial dispersion of ions traveling in the IMS drift tube, and reduction in the IMS resolving power. In this study, we present an analysis of Coulombic effects on IMS resolution. Basic relationships have been obtained for the spatial evolution of ion packets due to Coulombic repulsion. The analytical relationships were compared with results of a computer model that simulates IMS operation based on a first principles approach. Initial experimental results reported here are consistent with the computer modeling. A noticeable decrease in the IMS resolving power was observed for ion populations of >10,000 elementary charges. The optimum IMS operation conditions which would minimize the Coulombic effects are discussed. PMID:19438247

  10. Spectrometry of the Rutherford backscattering of ions and the Raman scattering of light in GaS single crystals irradiated with 140-keV H{sub 2}{sup +} ions

    SciTech Connect

    Garibov, A. A.; Madatov, R. S.; Komarov, F. F.; Pilko, V. V.; Mustafayev, Yu. M.; Akhmedov, F. I.; Jakhangirov, M. M.

    2015-05-15

    The methods of the Raman scattering of light and Rutherford backscattering are used to study the degree of structural disorder in layered GaS crystals before and after irradiation with 140-keV H{sub 2}{sup +} ions. It is shown that the distribution of the crystal’s components over depth is homogeneous; for doses as high as 5 × 10{sup 15} cm{sup −2}, the stoichiometric composition of the compound’s components is retained. The experimental value of the critical dose for the beginning of amorphization amounts to about 5 × 10{sup 15} cm{sup −2} and is in accordance with the calculated value. The results obtained by the method of the Raman scattering of light confirm conservation of crystalline structure and the start of the amorphization process.

  11. Fundamentals of Trapped Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelmann, Karsten; Silveira, Joshua A.; Ridgeway, Mark E.; Park, Melvin A.

    2015-01-01

    Trapped ion mobility spectrometry (TIMS) is a relatively new gas-phase separation method that has been coupled to quadrupole orthogonal acceleration time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The TIMS analyzer is a segmented rf ion guide wherein ions are mobility-analyzed using an electric field that holds ions stationary against a moving gas, unlike conventional drift tube ion mobility spectrometry where the gas is stationary. Ions are initially trapped, and subsequently eluted from the TIMS analyzer over time according to their mobility ( K). Though TIMS has achieved a high level of performance ( R > 250) in a small device (<5 cm) using modest operating potentials (<300 V), a proper theory has yet to be produced. Here, we develop a quantitative theory for TIMS via mathematical derivation and simulations. A one-dimensional analytical model, used to predict the transit time and theoretical resolving power, is described. Theoretical trends are in agreement with experimental measurements performed as a function of K, pressure, and the axial electric field scan rate. The linear dependence of the transit time with 1/ K provides a fundamental basis for determination of reduced mobility or collision cross section values by calibration. The quantitative description of TIMS provides an operational understanding of the analyzer, outlines the current performance capabilities, and provides insight into future avenues for improvement.

  12. Accelerator mass spectrometry with heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberstock, Günther; Heinzl, Johann; Korschinek, Gunther; Morinaga, Haruhiko; Nolte, Eckehart; Ratzinger, Ulrich; Kato, Kazuo; Wolf, Manfred

    1986-11-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry measurements with fully stripped 36Cl ions have been performed at the Munich accelerator laboratory in order to date groundwaters and palaeontological samples, to study anthropogenic 36Cl produced through nuclear tests and to determine the fast neutron flux of the Hiroshima A-bomb.

  13. Method and apparatuses for ion cyclotron spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Dahl, David A.; Scott, Jill R.; McJunkin, Timothy R.

    2012-03-06

    An ion cyclotron spectrometer may include a vacuum chamber that extends at least along a z-axis and means for producing a magnetic field within the vacuum chamber so that a magnetic field vector is generally parallel to the z-axis. The ion cyclotron spectrometer may also include means for producing a trapping electric field within the vacuum chamber. The trapping electric field may comprise a field potential that, when taken in cross-section along the z-axis, includes at least one section that is concave down and at least one section that is concave up so that ions traversing the field potential experience a net magnetron effect on a cyclotron frequency of the ions that is substantially equal to zero. Other apparatuses and a method for performing ion cyclotron spectrometry are also disclosed herein.

  14. Transient ions in electron and positron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    d'A Sanchez, Sergio; de Oliveira, Eliane M.; dos Santos, Josué S.; da Costa, Romarly F.; Bettega, Márcio H. F.; Lima, Marco A. P.; Varella, Márcio T. do N.

    2009-11-01

    We report on recent advances in studies of transient ions formed in electron and positron scattering by molecules. We briefly discuss elastic electron collisions against pyrrole and glycine, as well as electron affinities of glycine-water clusters. Positron scattering and annihilation on small molecules is also discussed.

  15. Simulation of low-energy ion scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langelaar, M. H.; Breeman, M.; Mijiritskii, A. V.; Boerma, D. O.

    A new simulation program `MATCH' has been developed for a detailed analysis of low-energy ion scattering (LEIS) and recoiling data. Instead of performing the full calculation of the three-dimensional trajectories through the sample from the ion source towards the detector, incoming trajectories as well as reversed-time outgoing trajectories are calculated, separately. Finally, these trajectories are matched to obtain the yield. The program has been tested for spectra and azimuthal scans of scattering and recoiling events of various sample species in different scattering geometries.

  16. Ion Beam Scattering by Background Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grillet, Anne; Hughes, Thomas; Boerner, Jeremiah

    2015-11-01

    The presence of background gases can cause charged particle beams to become more diffuse due to scattering. Calculations for the transport of an ion beam have been performed using Aleph, a particle-in-cell plasma modeling code, and verified against a general envelop equation for charged particle beams. We have investigated the influence of background helium on the coherence and transmitted current of the ion beam. Collisions between ions and neutral particles were calculated assuming isotropic elastic scattering. Since this tends to predict larger scattering angles than are expected at high energies, these are conservative estimates for beam scattering. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration.

  17. Relative sensitivity factors for submicron secondary ion mass spectrometry with gallium primary ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satosh, Hitomi; Owari, Masanori; Nihei, Yoshimasa

    1993-08-01

    Relative sensitivity factors (RSFs) of thirteen elements in the oxide glass matrix in secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) excited by a gallium focused ion beam were determined. RSFs were obtained by analyzing powder particles of standard glass samples. Whole volumes of each particles were analyzed in the 'shave-off' mode in order to avoid topographic effects. Reproducibility of RSFs was good, and sample-to-sample scattering of values was relatively small. Dependence of RSFs on the first ionization potential was shown to be reasonable. In order to with the data obtained through the bulk chemical analysis.

  18. Chemical Standards in Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Maestre, Roberto; Harden, Charles Steve; Ewing, Robert Gordon; Crawford, Christina Lynn; Hill, Herbert Henderson

    2010-01-01

    In ion mobility spectrometry (IMS), reduced mobility values (K0) are used as a qualitative measure of gas phase ions, and are reported in the literature as absolute values. Unfortunately, these values do not always match those collected in the field. One reason for this discrepancy is that the buffer gas may be contaminated with moisture or other volatile compounds. In this study, the effect of moisture and organic contaminants in the buffer gas on the mobility of IMS standards and analytes was investigated for the first time using IMS directly coupled to mass spectrometry. 2,4-dimethylpyridine, 2,6-di-tert-butyl pyridine (DTBP), and tetrabutylammonium, tetrapropylammonium, tetraethylammonium, and tetramethylammonium chlorides were used as chemical standards. In general, the mobility of IMS standard product ions was not affected by small amounts of contamination while the mobilities of many analytes were affected. In the presence of contaminants in the buffer gas, the mobility of analyte ions is often decreased by forming ion-molecule clusters with the contaminant. To ensure the measurement of accurate reduced mobility values, two IMS standards are required: an instrument and a mobility standard. An instrument standard is not affected by contaminants in the buffer gas, and provides an accurate measurement of the instrumental parameters, such as voltage, drift length, pressure, and temperature. The mobility standard behaves like an analyte ion in that the compound’s mobility is affected by low levels of contamination in the buffer gas. Prudent use of both of these standards can lead to improved measurement of accurate reduced mobility values. PMID:20369157

  19. Chemical standards in ion mobility spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Maestre, Robert; Harden, Charles S.; Ewing, Robert G.; Crawford, Christina L.; Hill, Jr, Herbert H.

    2010-08-01

    In ion mobility spectrometry (IMS), reduced mobility values (K0) are used as a qualitative measure of gas phase ions, and are reported in the literature as absolute values. Unfortunately, these values do not always match with those collected in the field. One reason for this discrepancy is that the buffer gas may be contaminated with moisture or other volatile compounds. In this study, the effect of moisture and organic contaminants in the buffer gas on the mobility of IMS standards and analytes was investigated for the first time using IMS directly coupled to mass spectrometry. 2,4-Dimethylpyridine, 2,6-di- tertbutylpyridine (DTBP), and tetrabutylammonium, tetrapropylammonium, tetraethylammonium, and tetramethylammonium chlorides were used as chemical standards. In general, the mobility of IMS standard product ions was not affected by small amounts of contamination while the mobilities of many analytes were affected. In the presence of contaminants in the buffer gas, the mobility of analyte ions is often decreased by forming ion–molecule clusters with the contaminant. To ensure the measurement of accurate reduced mobility values, two IMS standards are required: an instrument and a mobility standard. An instrument standard is not affected by contaminants in the buffer as, and provides an accurate measurement of the instrumental parameters, such as voltage, drift length, pressure, and temperature. The mobility standard behaves like an analyte ion in that the compound’s mobility is affected by low levels of contamination in the buffer gas. Prudent use of both of these standards can lead to improved measurement of accurate reduced mobility values.

  20. High-Sensitivity Ion Mobility Spectrometry/Mass Spectrometry Using Electrodynamic Ion Funnel Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Keqi; Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.; Lee, Hak-No; Prior, David C.; Buschbach, Michael A.; Li, Fumin; Tolmachev, Aleksey; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2007-01-01

    The utility of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) for separation of mixtures and structural characterization of ions has been demonstrated extensively, including in the biological and nanoscience contexts. A major attraction of IMS is its speed, several orders of magnitude greater than that of condensed-phase separations. Nonetheless, IMS combined with mass spectrometry (MS) has remained a niche technique, substantially because of limited sensitivity resulting from ion losses at the IMS-MS junction. We have developed a new electrospray ionization (ESI)-IMS-QToF MS instrument that incorporates electrodynamic ion funnels at both front ESI-IMS and rear IMS-QToF interfaces. The front funnel is of the novel “hourglass” design that efficiently accumulates ions and pulses them into the IMS drift tubes. Even for drift tubes of two meter length, ion transmission through IMS and on to QToF is essentially lossless across the range of ion masses relevant to most applications. The RF ion focusing at the IMS terminus does not degrade IMS resolving power, which exceeds 100 (for singly-charged ions) and is close to the theoretical limit. The overall sensitivity of present ESI-IMS-MS system is comparable to that of commercial ESI-MS, which should make IMS-MS suitable for analyses of complex mixtures with ultra-high sensitivity and exceptional throughput. PMID:15889926

  1. High-Sensitivity Ion Mobility Spectrometry/Mass Spectrometry Using Electrodynamic Ion Funnel Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Keqi; Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.; Lee, Hak-No; Prior, David C.; Buschbach, Michael A.; Li, Fumin; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2005-05-15

    The utility of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) for separation of mixtures and structural characterization of ions has been demonstrated extensively, including in the biological and nanoscience contexts. A major attraction of IMS is its speed, several orders of magnitude above that of condensed-phase separations. Nonetheless, IMS combined with mass spectrometry (MS) has remained a niche technique, substantially due to limited sensitivity resulting from ion losses at the IMS-MS junction. We have developed a new electrospray ionization (ESI)-IMS-QToF MS instrument that incorporates electrodynamic ion funnels at both front ESI-IMS and back IMS-QToF interfaces. The front funnel is of the novel ''hourglass'' design that efficiently accumulates ions and pulses them into the IMS drift tubes. Even for drift tubes of two meter length, ion transmission through IMS and on to QToF is essentially lossless across the range of ion masses relevant to most applications. The RF ion focusing at IMS terminus does not degrade IMS resolving power, which exceeds 100 (for singly-charged ions) and is close to the theoretical limit. The overall sensitivity of present ESI-IMS-MS system is shown to be comparable to that of commercial ESI-MS, which should make IMS-MS suitable for analyses of complex mixtures with ultra-high sensitivity and exceptional throughput.

  2. STRUCTURAL CHARACTERIZATION OF SULFONATED AZO DYES USING LIQUID SECONDARY ION MASS SPECTROMETRY/TANDEM MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Eight monosulfonated and disulfonated azo dyes were analyzed using liquid secondary ion mass spectrometry/tandem mass spectrometry, in the negative ion mode, under low-energy conditions (110-150 eV). any structurally characteristic fragment ions were obtained, several of which ha...

  3. In situ secondary ion mass spectrometry analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Groenewold, G.S.; Applehans, A.D.; Ingram, J.C.; Delmore, J.E.; Dahl, D.A.

    1993-01-01

    The direct detection of tributyl phosphate (TBP) on rocks using molecular beam surface analysis [MBSA or in situ secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS)] is demonstrated. Quantities as low as 250 ng were detected on basalt and sandstone with little or no sample preparation. Detection of TBP on soil has proven to be more problematic and requires further study. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) is more difficult to detect because it is very reactive with surfaces of interest. Nevertheless, it is possible to detect EDTA if the acidity of the surface is controlled. The detection of EDTA-metal complexes is currently an open question, but evidence is presented for the detection of ions arising from a EDTA-lead complex. Carboxylic acids (i.e., citric, ascorbic, malic, succinic, malonic, and oxalic) give characteristic SIM spectra, but their detection on sample surfaces awaits evaluation.

  4. Process analysis using ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Baumbach, J I

    2006-03-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry, originally used to detect chemical warfare agents, explosives and illegal drugs, is now frequently applied in the field of process analytics. The method combines both high sensitivity (detection limits down to the ng to pg per liter and ppb(v)/ppt(v) ranges) and relatively low technical expenditure with a high-speed data acquisition. In this paper, the working principles of IMS are summarized with respect to the advantages and disadvantages of the technique. Different ionization techniques, sample introduction methods and preseparation methods are considered. Proven applications of different types of ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) used at ISAS will be discussed in detail: monitoring of gas insulated substations, contamination in water, odoration of natural gas, human breath composition and metabolites of bacteria. The example applications discussed relate to purity (gas insulated substations), ecology (contamination of water resources), plants and person safety (odoration of natural gas), food quality control (molds and bacteria) and human health (breath analysis). PMID:16132133

  5. Environment applications for ion mobility spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritchie, Robert K.; Rudolph, Andreas

    1995-01-01

    The detection of environmentally important polychlorinated aromatics by ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) was investigated. Single polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) isomers (congeners) having five or more chlorine atoms were reliably detected in isooctane solution at levels of 35 ng with a Barringer IONSCAN ion mobility spectrometer operating in negative mode; limits of detection (LOD) were extrapolated to be in the low ng region. Mixtures of up to four PCB congeners, showing characteristic multiple peaks, and complex commercial mixtures of PCBs (Aroclors) were also detected. Detection of Aroclors in transformer oil was suppressed by the presence of the antioxidant BHT (2,6-di-t-butyl4-methylphenol) in the oil. The wood preservative pentachlorophenol (PCP) was easily detected in recycled wood shavings at levels of 52 ppm with the IONSCAN; the LOD was extrapolated to be in the low ppm region.

  6. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry of Environmental Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Gaspar, Daniel J.; Cliff, John B.

    2010-08-01

    Atmospheric particles influence many aspects of climate, air quality and human health. Understanding the composition, chemistry and behavior of atmospheric aerosols is a key remaining challenge in improving climate models. Furthermore, particles may be traced back to a particular source based on composition, stable isotope ratios, or the presence of particular surface chemistries. Finally, the characterization of atmospheric particles in the workplace plays an important role in understanding the potential for exposure and environmental and human health effects to engineered and natural nanoscale particles. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is a useful tool in determining any of several aspects of the structure, composition and chemistry of these particles. Often used in conjunction with other surface analysis and electron microscopy methods, SIMS has been used to determine or confirm reactions on and in particles, the presence of particular organic species on the surface of atmospheric aerosols and several other interesting and relevant findings. Various versions of SIMS instruments – dynamic SIMS, time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry or TOF-SIMS, nanoSIMS – have been used to determine specific aspects of aerosol structure and chemistry. This article describes the strengths of each type of SIMS instrument in the characterization of aerosols, along with guidance on sample preparation, specific characterization specific to the particular information sought in the analysis. Examples and guidance are given for each type of SIMS analysis.

  7. Secondary ion mass spectrometry of MCsn+molecular ion complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Biswajit; Chakraborty, Purushottam

    2007-05-01

    Excellent detection sensitivity, high dynamic range and good depth resolution make the SIMS technique extremely powerful for the analysis of surfaces and interfaces. However, a serious problem in SIMS analysis is its "matrix effect" that hinders the quantification of a certain species in a sample and consequently, probing the composition of surfaces or interfaces by SIMS is greatly hindered. Appropriate corrective measures are therefore, needed to calibrate the secondary ion currents into respective concentrations for accurate compositional analysis. Working in the MCs+-SIMS mode (M - element to be analyzed, Cs+ - bombarding ions) can circumvent the matrix effect. The quantitative potential of the MCs+-SIMS method is understood by assuming that an MCs+ ion is generated by the combination of a secondary neutral M0 atom with a re-sputtered Cs+ ion in the near-surface region. The emission process for the species M0 is thus decoupled from the subsequent MCs+ ion formation process, in analogy with the ion formation in secondary neutral mass spectrometry (SNMS), resulting in a drastic decrease in matrix effect. Although this technique has found its applicability in direct quantification, it generally suffers from a low useful yield. In such cases, detection of MCsn+(n = 2, 3, …) molecular ions offers a better sensitivity as the yields of such molecular ion complexes have often been found higher than that of MCs+ ions. This is true in most of the cases where the elements are strongly electronegative with respect to cesium. Several works have been reported on the emission of MCsn+molecular ions in the SIMS process, but a complete understanding on the formation mechanism of these ion complexes is still lacking. The kinetic energy distributions of secondary MCsn+molecular ion complexes has been found to be an effective approach to estimate the local instantaneous surface work function changes under various surface exposure conditions, thereby enabling one to elucidate on

  8. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry SIMS XI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillen, G.; Lareau, R.; Bennett, J.; Stevie, F.

    2003-05-01

    This volume contains 252 contributions presented as plenary, invited and contributed poster and oral presentations at the 11th International Conference on Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS XI) held at the Hilton Hotel, Walt Disney World Village, Orlando, Florida, 7 12 September, 1997. The book covers a diverse range of research, reflecting the rapid growth in advanced semiconductor characterization, ultra shallow depth profiling, TOF-SIMS and the new areas in which SIMS techniques are being used, for example in biological sciences and organic surface characterization. Papers are presented under the following categories: Isotopic SIMS Biological SIMS Semiconductor Characterization Techniques and Applications Ultra Shallow Depth Profiling Depth Profiling Fundamental/Modelling and Diffusion Sputter-Induced Topography Fundamentals of Molecular Desorption Organic Materials Practical TOF-SIMS Polyatomic Primary Ions Materials/Surface Analysis Postionization Instrumentation Geological SIMS Imaging Fundamentals of Sputtering Ion Formation and Cluster Formation Quantitative Analysis Environmental/Particle Characterization Related Techniques These proceedings provide an invaluable source of reference for both newcomers to the field and experienced SIMS users.

  9. New Cs sputter ion source with polyatomic ion beams for secondary ion mass spectrometry applications

    SciTech Connect

    Belykh, S. F.; Palitsin, V. V.; Veryovkin, I. V.; Kovarsky, A. P.; Chang, R. J. H.; Adriaens, A.; Dowsett, M. G.; Adams, F.

    2007-08-15

    A simple design for a cesium sputter ion source compatible with vacuum and ion-optical systems as well as with electronics of the commercially available Cameca IMS-4f instrument is reported. This ion source has been tested with the cluster primary ions of Si{sub n}{sup -} and Cu{sub n}{sup -}. Our experiments with surface characterization and depth profiling conducted to date demonstrate improvements of the analytical capabilities of the secondary ion mass spectrometry instrument due to the nonadditive enhancement of secondary ion emission and shorter ion ranges of polyatomic projectiles compared to atomic ones with the same impact energy.

  10. Field applications of ion-mobility spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Patricia A.

    1997-02-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) is an excellent tool for detection of controlled substances under field conditions. Plasmagrams and tables showing the results of field applications will be discussed. Residues of drugs, such as cocaine and heroin, can be left anywhere including vehicles, boats, and houses. In houses, the carpets, walls, and floors are good locations for residues to adhere. Individual clothing can also be contaminated with drug residue. Vehicles that are suspected of having previously smuggled illegal substances can be vacuumed and screened. Tablets that look similar and respond the same when screened with the Marquis reagent can be differentiated by IMS. With Southern California being the 'methamphetamine capital of the world' and the resurgence of phencyclidine, IMS has proven extremely valuable in the screening of abandoned clandestine laboratory sites and vehicles in which the clandestine laboratories; chemicals and glassware were transported. IMS is very responsive to ephedrine/pseudophedrine, a precursor of methamphetamine and 1-piperidinocyclohexanecarbonitrile, an intermediate of phencyclidine. Once residues are detected, vacuum samples, and/or methanol wipes are collected and analyzed at the DEA Laboratory for confirmation of the suspected substance using GC-IRD or Mass Spectrometry.

  11. Ion Mobility Spectrometry of Heavy Metals.

    PubMed

    Ilbeigi, Vahideh; Valadbeigi, Younes; Tabrizchi, Mahmoud

    2016-07-19

    A simple, fast, and inexpensive method was developed for detecting heavy metals via the ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) in the negative mode. In this method, Cl(-) ion produced by the thermal ionization of NaCl is employed as the dopant or the ionizing reagent to ionize heavy metals. In practice, a solution of mixed heavy metals and NaCl salts was directly deposited on a Nichrome filament and electrically heated to vaporize the salts. This produced the IMS spectra of several heavy-metal salts, including CdCl2, ZnSO4, NiCl2, HgSO4, HgCl2, PbI2, and Pb(Ac)2. For each heavy metal (M), one or two major peaks were observed, which were attributed to M·Cl(-) or [M·NaCl]Cl(-)complexes. The method proved to be useful for the analysis of mixed heavy metals. The absolute detection limits measured for ZnSO4 and HgSO4 were 0.1 and 0.05 μg, respectively. PMID:27321408

  12. Relative Sensitivity Factors for Submicron Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry with Gallium Primary Ion Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satoh, Hitomi; Owari, Masanori; Nihei, Yoshimasa

    1993-08-01

    Relative sensitivity factors (RSFs) of thirteen elements in the oxide glass matrix in secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) excited by a gallium focused ion beam were determined. RSFs were obtained by analyzing powder particles of standard glass samples. Whole volumes of each particles were analyzed in the “shave-off” mode in order to avoid topographic effects. Reproducibility of RSFs was good, and sample-to-sample scattering of values was relatively small. Dependence of RSFs on the first ionization potential was shown to be reasonable. In order to check the validity of the RSFs, coal fly ash particles were analyzed. The results were in reasonable agreement with the data obtained through the bulk chemical analysis.

  13. On the structural denaturation of biological analytes in trapped ion mobility spectrometry - mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fanny C; Kirk, Samuel R; Bleiholder, Christian

    2016-06-01

    Key to native ion mobility/mass spectrometry is to prevent the structural denaturation of biological molecules in the gas phase. Here, we systematically assess structural changes induced in the protein ubiquitin during a trapped ion mobility spectrometry (TIMS) experiment. Our analysis shows that the extent of structural denaturation induced in ubiquitin ions is largely proportional to the amount of translational kinetic energy an ion gains from the applied electric field between two collisions with buffer gas particles. We then minimize the efficiency of the structural denaturation of ubiquitin ions in the gas phase during a TIMS experiment. The resulting "soft" TIMS spectra of ubiquitin are found largely identical to those observed on "soft" elevated-pressure ion mobility drift tubes and the corresponding calibrated cross sections are consistent with structures reported from NMR experiments for the native and A-state of ubiquitin. Thus, our analysis reveals that TIMS is useful for native ion mobility/mass spectrometry analysis. PMID:26998732

  14. Examining the Influence of Phosphorylation on Peptide Ion Structure by Ion Mobility Spectrometry-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Glover, Matthew S; Dilger, Jonathan M; Acton, Matthew D; Arnold, Randy J; Radivojac, Predrag; Clemmer, David E

    2016-05-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) techniques are used to study the general effects of phosphorylation on peptide structure. Cross sections for a library of 66 singly phosphorylated peptide ions from 33 pairs of positional isomers, and unmodified analogues were measured. Intrinsic size parameters (ISPs) derived from these measurements yield calculated collision cross sections for 85% of these phosphopeptide sequences that are within ±2.5% of experimental values. The average ISP for the phosphoryl group (0.64 ± 0.05) suggests that in general this moiety forms intramolecular interactions with the neighboring residues and peptide backbone, resulting in relatively compact structures. We assess the capability of ion mobility to separate positional isomers (i.e., peptide sequences that differ only in the location of the modification) and find that more than half of the isomeric pairs have >1% difference in collision cross section. Phosphorylation is also found to influence populations of structures that differ in the cis/trans orientation of Xaa-Pro peptide bonds. Several sequences with phosphorylated Ser or Thr residues located N-terminally adjacent to Pro residues show fewer conformations compared to the unmodified sequences. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26860087

  15. Examining the Influence of Phosphorylation on Peptide Ion Structure by Ion Mobility Spectrometry-Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glover, Matthew S.; Dilger, Jonathan M.; Acton, Matthew D.; Arnold, Randy J.; Radivojac, Predrag; Clemmer, David E.

    2016-05-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) techniques are used to study the general effects of phosphorylation on peptide structure. Cross sections for a library of 66 singly phosphorylated peptide ions from 33 pairs of positional isomers, and unmodified analogues were measured. Intrinsic size parameters (ISPs) derived from these measurements yield calculated collision cross sections for 85% of these phosphopeptide sequences that are within ±2.5% of experimental values. The average ISP for the phosphoryl group (0.64 ± 0.05) suggests that in general this moiety forms intramolecular interactions with the neighboring residues and peptide backbone, resulting in relatively compact structures. We assess the capability of ion mobility to separate positional isomers (i.e., peptide sequences that differ only in the location of the modification) and find that more than half of the isomeric pairs have >1% difference in collision cross section. Phosphorylation is also found to influence populations of structures that differ in the cis/ trans orientation of Xaa-Pro peptide bonds. Several sequences with phosphorylated Ser or Thr residues located N-terminally adjacent to Pro residues show fewer conformations compared to the unmodified sequences.

  16. Examining the Influence of Phosphorylation on Peptide Ion Structure by Ion Mobility Spectrometry-Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glover, Matthew S.; Dilger, Jonathan M.; Acton, Matthew D.; Arnold, Randy J.; Radivojac, Predrag; Clemmer, David E.

    2016-02-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) techniques are used to study the general effects of phosphorylation on peptide structure. Cross sections for a library of 66 singly phosphorylated peptide ions from 33 pairs of positional isomers, and unmodified analogues were measured. Intrinsic size parameters (ISPs) derived from these measurements yield calculated collision cross sections for 85% of these phosphopeptide sequences that are within ±2.5% of experimental values. The average ISP for the phosphoryl group (0.64 ± 0.05) suggests that in general this moiety forms intramolecular interactions with the neighboring residues and peptide backbone, resulting in relatively compact structures. We assess the capability of ion mobility to separate positional isomers (i.e., peptide sequences that differ only in the location of the modification) and find that more than half of the isomeric pairs have >1% difference in collision cross section. Phosphorylation is also found to influence populations of structures that differ in the cis/trans orientation of Xaa-Pro peptide bonds. Several sequences with phosphorylated Ser or Thr residues located N-terminally adjacent to Pro residues show fewer conformations compared to the unmodified sequences.

  17. Positron scattering and annihilation in hydrogenlike ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, D. G.; Gribakin, G. F.

    2013-09-01

    Diagrammatic many-body theory is used to calculate the scattering phase shifts, normalized annihilation rates Zeff, and annihilation γ spectra for positron collisions with the hydrogenlike ions He+, Li2+, B4+, and F8+. Short-range electron-positron correlations and longer-range positron-ion correlations are accounted for by evaluating nonlocal corrections to the annihilation vertex and the exact positron self-energy. The numerical calculation of the many-body theory diagrams is performed using B-spline basis sets. To elucidate the role of the positron-ion repulsion, the annihilation rate is also estimated analytically in the Coulomb-Born approximation. It is found that the energy dependence and magnitude of Zeff are governed by the Gamow factor that characterizes the suppression of the positron wave function near the ion. For all of the H-like ions, the correlation enhancement of the annihilation rate is found to be predominantly due to corrections to the annihilation vertex, while the corrections to the positron wave function play only a minor role. Results of the calculations for s-, p-, and d-wave incident positrons of energies up to the positronium-formation threshold are presented. Where comparison is possible, our values are in excellent agreement with the results obtained using other, e.g., variational, methods. The annihilation-vertex enhancement factors obtained in the present calculations are found to scale approximately as 1+(1.6+0.46ℓ)/Zi, where Zi is the net charge of the ion and ℓ is the positron orbital angular momentum. Our results for positron annihilation in H-like ions provide insights into the problem of positron annihilation with core electrons in atoms and condensed matter systems, which have similar binding energies.

  18. Positron scattering and annihilation from hydrogenlike ions

    SciTech Connect

    Novikov, S.A.; Bromley, M.W.J.; Mitroy, J.

    2004-05-01

    The Kohn variational method is used with a configuration-interaction-type wave function to determine the J=0 and J=1 phase shifts and annihilation parameter Z{sub eff} for positron-hydrogenic ion scattering. The phase shifts are within 1-2% of the best previous calculations. The values of Z{sub eff} are small and do not exceed unity for any of the momenta considered. At thermal energies Z{sub eff} is minute with a value of order 10{sup -50} occurring for He{sup +} at k=0.05a{sub 0}{sup -1}. In addition to the variational calculations, analytic expressions for the phase shift and annihilation parameters within the Coulomb wave Born approximation are derived and used to help elucidate the dynamics of positron collisions with positive ions.

  19. Nonlinear ion acoustic waves scattered by vortexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohno, Yuji; Yoshida, Zensho

    2016-09-01

    The Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (KP) hierarchy is the archetype of infinite-dimensional integrable systems, which describes nonlinear ion acoustic waves in two-dimensional space. This remarkably ordered system resides on a singular submanifold (leaf) embedded in a larger phase space of more general ion acoustic waves (low-frequency electrostatic perturbations). The KP hierarchy is characterized not only by small amplitudes but also by irrotational (zero-vorticity) velocity fields. In fact, the KP equation is derived by eliminating vorticity at every order of the reductive perturbation. Here, we modify the scaling of the velocity field so as to introduce a vortex term. The newly derived system of equations consists of a generalized three-dimensional KP equation and a two-dimensional vortex equation. The former describes 'scattering' of vortex-free waves by ambient vortexes that are determined by the latter. We say that the vortexes are 'ambient' because they do not receive reciprocal reactions from the waves (i.e., the vortex equation is independent of the wave fields). This model describes a minimal departure from the integrable KP system. By the Painlevé test, we delineate how the vorticity term violates integrability, bringing about an essential three-dimensionality to the solutions. By numerical simulation, we show how the solitons are scattered by vortexes and become chaotic.

  20. Total hydrocarbon analysis by ion mobility spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, John H.; Limero, Thomas F.; James, John T.

    1994-01-01

    Astronauts must be alerted quickly to chemical leaks that compromise their health and the success of their missions. An ideal leak detector would be equally sensitive to all compounds that might constitute a hazard and insensitive to nontoxic compounds. No ideal sensor exists; thus, selection of a methodology is a series of compromises. The commonly used methods are either insensitive at the low exposure levels set by OSHA, NASA, and other organizations or are selectively insensitive to important classes of chemicals such as Freons. After extensive study and experience, the Toxicology Group at JSC has selected ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) for development into a broad range, sensitive detector. In addition to the sensing method, signal processing is important leak detection because a background signal can be expected at all times. The leak-detecting instrument must be programmed to discriminate between authentic leaks and background fluctuations caused by routine operations. The results of an evaluation of the prototype THA is presented in terms related to spacecraft operations. The evaluation included determination of instrumental parameters such as stability and response times. We also included responses to some common components of spacecraft atmospheres in pure form and in binary and ternary mixtures. The output of the four algorithms to the mixtures was found to be noticeably different. These responses are compared on the basis of their utility for signaling a chemical leak. As a means of evaluating its resistance to a falsely positive response, the THA was challenged with carbon dioxide and methane, compounds whose concentrations normally increase in spacecraft air during human habitation. The instrument showed virtually no response to these interferences. Although the prototype THA is designed for space flight, this detector is expected to be useful for field screening at chemical waste dumps and other environmentally sensitive locations.

  1. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Dictyostelium discoideum Aggregation Streams

    SciTech Connect

    Debord, J. Daniel; Smith, Donald F.; Anderton, Christopher R.; Heeren, Ronald M.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Gomer, Richard H.; Fernandez-Lima, Francisco A.

    2014-06-09

    High resolution imaging mass spectrometry could become a valuable tool for cell and developmental biology, but both, high spatial and mass spectral resolution are needed to enable this. In this report, we employed Bi3 bombardment time-of-flight (Bi3 ToF-SIMS) and C60 bombardment Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance secondary ion mass spectrometry (C60 FTICR-SIMS) to image Dictyostelium discoideum aggregation streams. Nearly 300 lipid species were identified from the aggregation streams. High resolution mass spectrometry imaging (FTICR-SIMS) enabled the generation of multiple molecular ion maps at the nominal mass level and provided good coverage for fatty acyls, prenol lipids, and sterol lipids. The comparison of Bi3 ToF-SIMS and C60 FTICR-SIMS suggested that while the first provides fast, high spatial resolution molecular ion images, the chemical complexity of biological samples warrants the use of high resolution analyzers for accurate ion identification.

  2. Universal collisional activation ion trap mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    McLuckey, S.A.; Goeringer, D.E.; Glish, G.L.

    1993-04-27

    A universal collisional activation ion trap comprises an ion trapping means containing a bath gas and having connected thereto a noise signal generator. A method of operating a universal collisional activation ion trap comprises the steps of: providing an ion trapping means; introducing into the ion trapping means a bath gas; and, generating a noise signal within the ion trapping means; introducing into the ion trapping means a substance that, when acted upon by the noise signal, undergoes collisional activation to form product ions.

  3. Universal collisional activation ion trap mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    McLuckey, Scott A.; Goeringer, Douglas E.; Glish, Gary L.

    1993-01-01

    A universal collisional activation ion trap comprises an ion trapping means containing a bath gas and having connected thereto a noise signal generator. A method of operating a universal collisional activation ion trap comprises the steps of: providing an ion trapping means; introducing into the ion trapping means a bath gas; and, generating a noise signal within the ion trapping means; introducing into the ion trapping means a substance that, when acted upon by the noise signal, undergoes collisional activation to form product ions.

  4. NEGATIVE-ION MASS SPECTROMETRY OF SULFONYLUREA HERBICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sulfonylurea herbicides have been studied using neg-ion desorption chem.-ionization (DCI) mass spectrometry (MS) and DCI-MS/MS techniques. Both {M-H]- and M.- ions were obsd. in the DCI mass spectra. The collisonally activated dissocn. (CAD) spectra were characteristic of the str...

  5. Advances in imaging secondary ion mass spectrometry for biological samples

    SciTech Connect

    Boxer, Steven G.; Kraft, Mary L.; Weber, Peter K.

    2008-12-16

    Imaging mass spectrometry combines the power of mass spectrometry to identify complex molecules based on mass with sample imaging. Recent advances in secondary ion mass spectrometry have improved sensitivity and spatial resolution, so that these methods have the potential to bridge between high-resolution structures obtained by X-ray crystallography and cyro-electron microscopy and ultrastructure visualized by conventional light microscopy. Following background information on the method and instrumentation, we address the key issue of sample preparation. Because mass spectrometry is performed in high vacuum, it is essential to preserve the lateral organization of the sample while removing bulk water, and this has been a major barrier for applications to biological systems. Furthermore, recent applications of imaging mass spectrometry to cell biology, microbial communities, and biosynthetic pathways are summarized briefly, and studies of biological membrane organization are described in greater depth.

  6. Advances in imaging secondary ion mass spectrometry for biological samples

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Boxer, Steven G.; Kraft, Mary L.; Weber, Peter K.

    2008-12-16

    Imaging mass spectrometry combines the power of mass spectrometry to identify complex molecules based on mass with sample imaging. Recent advances in secondary ion mass spectrometry have improved sensitivity and spatial resolution, so that these methods have the potential to bridge between high-resolution structures obtained by X-ray crystallography and cyro-electron microscopy and ultrastructure visualized by conventional light microscopy. Following background information on the method and instrumentation, we address the key issue of sample preparation. Because mass spectrometry is performed in high vacuum, it is essential to preserve the lateral organization of the sample while removing bulk water, and this hasmore » been a major barrier for applications to biological systems. Furthermore, recent applications of imaging mass spectrometry to cell biology, microbial communities, and biosynthetic pathways are summarized briefly, and studies of biological membrane organization are described in greater depth.« less

  7. Ion mobility–mass spectrometry for structural proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Yueyang; Hyung, Suk-Joon; Ruotolo, Brandon T

    2012-01-01

    Ion mobility coupled to mass spectrometry has been an important tool in the fields of chemical physics and analytical chemistry for decades, but its potential for interrogating the structure of proteins and multiprotein complexes has only recently begun to be realized. Today, ion mobility– mass spectrometry is often applied to the structural elucidation of protein assemblies that have failed high-throughput crystallization or NMR spectroscopy screens. Here, we highlight the technology, approaches and data that have led to this dramatic shift in use, including emerging trends such as the integration of ion mobility–mass spectrometry data with more classical (e.g., ‘bottom-up’) proteomics approaches for the rapid structural characterization of protein networks. PMID:22292823

  8. Scattering of Ions beyond the Single Scattering Critical Angle in HIERDA

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, P.N.; Bubb, I.F.; Franich, R.; Cohen, D.D.; Dytlewski, N.; Arstila, K.; Sajavaara, T.

    2003-08-26

    In Heavy Ion Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis (HIERDA), Rutherford scattering determines the number of scattered and recoiled ions that reach the detector. Because plural scattering is a major contributor to the spectrum and can mask important features and otherwise distort the spectrum it needs to be described correctly. Scattering more than once is a frequent occurrence so many ions scatter beyond the maximum scattering angle possible by a single scattering event. In this work we have chosen projectile/target combinations which enable the exploitation of the scattering critical angle to obtain spectra which are from ions which have all been scattered more than once. Monte Carlo simulation of the ion transport is used to study the plural scattering using a fast FORTRAN version of TRIM. The results of the simulations are compared with experimental measurements on samples of Si, V and Co performed with 20-100 MeV beams of Br, I and Au ions using ToF-E HIERDA facilities at Lucas Heights and Helsinki.

  9. Coulomb Repulsion in Miniature Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, J.; Whitten, W.B.; Ramsey, J.M.

    1999-08-08

    We have undertaken a study of ion mobility resolution in a miniature ion mobility spectrometer with a drift channel 1.7 mm in diameter and 35 mm in length. The device attained a maximum resolution of 14 in separating ions of NO, O{sub 2}, and methyl iodine. The ions were generated by pulses from a frequency-quadrupled Nd:YAG laser. Broadening due to Coulomb repulsion was modeled theoretically and shown experimentally to have a major effect on the resolution of the miniature device.

  10. Time-of-flight direct recoil ion scattering spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Krauss, A.R.; Gruen, D.M.; Lamich, G.J.

    1994-09-13

    A time-of-flight direct recoil and ion scattering spectrometer beam line is disclosed. The beam line includes an ion source which injects ions into pulse deflection regions and separated by a drift space. A final optics stage includes an ion lens and deflection plate assembly. The ion pulse length and pulse interval are determined by computerized adjustment of the timing between the voltage pulses applied to the pulsed deflection regions. 23 figs.

  11. Time-of-flight direct recoil ion scattering spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Krauss, Alan R.; Gruen, Dieter M.; Lamich, George J.

    1994-01-01

    A time of flight direct recoil and ion scattering spectrometer beam line (10). The beam line (10) includes an ion source (12) which injects ions into pulse deflection regions (14) and (16) separated by a drift space (18). A final optics stage includes an ion lens and deflection plate assembly (22). The ion pulse length and pulse interval are determined by computerized adjustment of the timing between the voltage pulses applied to the pulsed deflection regions (14) and (16).

  12. Negative ion spectrometry for detecting nitrated explosives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boettger, H. G.; Yinon, J.

    1975-01-01

    Ionization procedure is modified to produce mainly negative ions by electron capture. Peaks of negative ions are monitored conventionally. Nitrated organic materials could be identified directly from sample sniff inlet stream by suitably modified mass spectrometer because of unique electronegativity which nitro group imparts to organic material.

  13. Mass spectrometry and inhomogeneous ion optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, F. A.

    1973-01-01

    Work done in several areas to advance the state of the art of magnetic mass spectrometers is described. The calculations and data necessary for the design of inhomogeneous field mass spectrometers, and the calculation of ion trajectories through such fields are presented. The development and testing of solid state ion detection devices providing the capability of counting single ions is discussed. New techniques in the preparation and operation of thermal-ionization ion sources are described. Data obtained on the concentrations of copper in rainfall and uranium in air samples using the improved thermal ionization techniques are presented. The design of a closed system static mass spectrometer for isotopic analyses is discussed. A summary of instrumental aspects of a four-stage mass spectrometer comprising two electrostatic and two 90 deg. magnetic lenses with a 122-cm radius used to study the interaction of ions with solids is presented.

  14. Method and apparatus for ion cyclotron spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Dahl, David A [Idaho Falls, ID; Scott, Jill R [Idaho Falls, ID; McJunkin, Timothy R [Idaho Falls, ID

    2010-08-17

    An ion cyclotron spectrometer may include a vacuum chamber that extends at least along a z-axis and means for producing a magnetic field within the vacuum chamber so that a magnetic field vector is generally parallel to the z-axis. The ion cyclotron spectrometer may also include means for producing a trapping electric field within the vacuum chamber that includes at least a first section that induces a first magnetron effect that increases a cyclotron frequency of an ion and at least a second section that induces a second magnetron effect that decreases the cyclotron frequency of an ion. The cyclotron frequency changes induced by the first and second magnetron effects substantially cancel one another so that an ion traversing the at least first and second sections will experience no net change in cyclotron frequency.

  15. Ion microprobe mass spectrometry using sputtering atomization and resonance ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Donohue, D.L.; Christie, W.H.; Goeringer, D.E.

    1985-01-01

    Resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) has recently been developed into a useful technique for isotope ratio measurements. Studies performed in our laboratory (1-6) have been reported for a variety of elements using thermal vaporization sources to produce the atom reservoir for laser-induced resonance ionization. A commercial ion microprobe mass analyzer (IMMA) has been interfaced with a tunable pulsed dye laser for carrying out resonance ionization mass spectrometry of sputtered atoms. The IMMA instrument has many advantages for this work, including a micro-focused primary ion beam (2 ..mu..m in diameter) of selected mass, complete sample manipulation and viewing capability, and a double-focusing mass spectrometer for separation and detection of the secondary or laser-generated ions. Data were obtained demonstrating the number and type of ions formed along with optical spectral information showing the wavelengths at which resonance ionization occurs. 7 refs.

  16. Ion Mobility Spectrometry-Hydrogen Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry of Anions: Part 1. Peptides to Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donohoe, Gregory C.; Khakinejad, Mahdiar; Valentine, Stephen J.

    2015-04-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) coupled with hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX)-mass spectrometry (MS) has been used to study the conformations of negatively-charged peptide and protein ions. Results are presented for ion conformers of angiotensin 1, a synthetic peptide (SP), bovine insulin, ubiquitin, and equine cytochrome c. In general, the SP ion conformers demonstrate a greater level of HDX efficiency as a greater proportion of the sites undergo HDX. Additionally, these ions exhibit the fastest rates of exchange. Comparatively, the angiotensin 1 ions exhibit a lower rate of exchange and HDX level presumably because of decreased accessibility of exchange sites by charge sites. The latter are likely confined to the peptide termini. Insulin ions show dramatically reduced HDX levels and exchange rates, which can be attributed to decreased conformational flexibility resulting from the disulfide bonds. For the larger ubiquitin and protein ions, increased HDX is observed for larger ions of higher charge state. For ubiquitin, a conformational transition from compact to more elongated species (from lower to higher charge states) is reflected by an increase in HDX levels. These results can be explained by a combination of interior site protection by compact conformers as well as decreased access by charge sites. The elongated cytochrome c ions provide the largest HDX levels where higher values correlate with charge state. These results are consistent with increased exchange site accessibility by additional charge sites. The data from these enhanced IMS-HDX experiments are described in terms of charge site location, conformer rigidity, and interior site protection.

  17. Modeling vapor uptake induced mobility shifts in peptide ions observed with transversal modulation ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rawat, Vivek K; Vidal-de-Miguel, Guillermo; Hogan, Christopher J

    2015-10-21

    Low field ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) techniques exhibit low orthogonality, as inverse mobility often scales with mass to charge ratio. This inadequacy can be mitigated by adding vapor dopants, which may cluster with analyte ions and shift their mobilities by amounts independent of both mass and mobility of the ion. It is therefore important to understand the interactions of vapor dopants with ions, to better quantify the extent of dopant facilitated mobility shifts. Here, we develop predictive models of vapor dopant facilitated mobility shifts, and compare model calculations to measurements of mobility shifts for peptide ions exposed to variable gas phase concentrations of isopropanol. Mobility measurements were made at atmospheric pressure and room temperature using a recently developed transversal modulation ion mobility spectrometer (TMIMS). Results are compared to three separate models, wherein mobility shifts due to vapor dopants are attributed to changes in gas composition and (I) no vapor dopant uptake is assumed, (II) site-specific dopant uptake by the ion is assumed (approximated via a Langmuir adsorption model), and (III) site-unspecific dopant uptake by the ion is assumed (approximated via a classical nucleation model). We find that mobility shifts in peptide ions are in excellent agreement with model II, site-specific binding predictions. Conversely, mobility shifts of tetraalkylammonium ions from previous measurements were compared with these models and best agreement was found with model III predictions, i.e. site-unspecific dopant uptake. PMID:26051323

  18. LABORATORY DETECTION OF PLASTICS IN SEEDCOTTON WITH ION MOBILITY SPECTROMETRY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The US cotton industry wants to increase market share and value by supplying pure cotton. Removing contamination requires developing a means to detect plastics in seedcotton. This study was conducted to determine if Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) could be used to find small amounts of plastic in ...

  19. C60 Secondary Ion Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Donald F.; Robinson, Errol W.; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Heeren, Ronald M.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana

    2011-12-15

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) has seen increased application for high spatial chemical imaging of complex biological surfaces. The advent and commercial availability of cluster and polyatomic primary ion sources (e.g. Au and Bi cluster and buckminsterfullerene (C60)) provide improved secondary ion yield and decreased fragmentation of surface species, thus accessibility to intact molecular ions. Despite developments in primary ion sources, development of mass spectrometers to fully exploit their advantages has been limited. Tandem mass spectrometry for identification of secondary ions is highly desirable, but implementation has proven to be difficult. Similarly, high mass resolution and high mass measurement accuracy would greatly improve the chemical specificity of SIMS. Here we combine, for the first time, the advantages of a C60 primary ion source with the ultra-high mass resolving power and high mass measurement accuracy of Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. Mass resolving power in excess of 100,000 (m/Δm50%) is demonstrated, with mass measurement accuracies below 3 parts-per-million. Imaging of mouse brain tissue at 40 μm pixel size is shown. Tandem mass spectrometry of ions from biological tissue is demonstrated and molecular formulae can be assigned to fragment ions.

  20. Resonating Rays in Light Ion Scattering from AN Optical Potential.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoyanov, Basil John

    Recent experimental investigations reveal that resonances of composite ion-ion systems are a general phenomenon in light- and heavy-ion scattering. The experimentally observed phenomenon known as the anomalous large-angle scattering (ALAS) of alpha-particle from certain isotopes, such as (alpha)-('40)Ca, manifests itself in the form of successive peaks in the back-scattering excitation function. Earlier theoretical studies were mainly concentrated either on the surface-wave or geometrical-wave description of these phenomena, whereas the pont of view taken here, which is based on the results of physical acoustics, is that the ion-ion scattering amplitude contains both the surface-wave and the geometrical-wave contributions. Therefore a comprehensive approach would be to investigate both of these contributions simultaneously. This is achieved in the present work through a decomposition, by applying the Sommerfeld-Watson and Imai transformations, of the scattering amplitude into its ingredients and by analyzing both the resulting geometrical rays and the surface waves in terms of resonances. This procedure generates a precise mathematical description of resonance processes in ion scattering (via the S-function poles) and at the same time leads in a semi -classical framework to their thorough physical interpretation (via the generalized Bohr-Sommerfeld quantization condition). The existence of resonances in both the geometrical and surface waves emerges from such a description, and is exemplified by numerical calculations for (alpha)-('40)Ca elastic scattering.

  1. Detection of gaseous organophosphorus compounds using secondary ion mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Groenewold, G.S.; Todd, P.J.

    1985-04-01

    Molecular secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) has been investigated for sensitivity and selectivity in the analysis of gaseous organophosphorus compounds. Abundant analyte ions were observed when the gaseous organophosphorus compounds were admitted into the secondary ion source, where a matrix was under primary ion bombardment. The best matrix for the detection of dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP), trimethyl phosphate (TMP), and diisopropyl methylphosphonate (DIMP) was determined to be polyphosphoric acid. The abundance of secondary analyte ions was observed to be linear with the introduction rate of gaseous analyte. The introduction rate necessary to produce a 3:1 signal-to-noise ratio in the intensity of secondary protonated molecular ions from DMMP was estimated to be 4 x 10/sup -11/ mols/sup -1/. Substantially more analyte fragmentation is observed by using SIMS than by using methane chemical ionization mass spectrometry. Ten compounds representative of other compound classes were investigated in the same manner as the organic phosphonates; characteristic secondary protonated molecular ions were detected from amines only.

  2. Crystal effects in the neutralization of He+ ions in the low energy ion scattering regime.

    PubMed

    Primetzhofer, D; Markin, S N; Juaristi, J I; Taglauer, E; Bauer, P

    2008-05-30

    Investigating possible crystal effects in ion scattering from elemental surfaces, measurements of the positive ion fraction P+ are reported for He+ ions scattered from single and polycrystalline Cu surfaces. In the Auger neutralization regime, the ion yield is determined by scattering from the outermost atomic layer. For Cu(110) P+ exceeds that for polycrystalline Cu by up to a factor of 2.5, thus exhibiting a strong crystal effect. It is much less pronounced at higher energies, i.e., in the reionization regime. However, there a completely different angular dependence of the ion yield is observed for poly- and single crystals, due to massive subsurface contributions in nonchanneling directions. PMID:18518602

  3. Ion mobility spectrometers and methods for ion mobility spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Dahl, David A; Scott, Jill R; Appelhans, Anthony D; McJunkin, Timothy R; Olson, John E

    2009-04-14

    An ion mobility spectrometer may include an inner electrode and an outer electrode arranged so that at least a portion of the outer electrode surrounds at least a portion of the inner electrode and defines a drift space therebetween. The inner and outer electrodes are electrically insulated from one another so that a non-linear electric field is created in the drift space when an electric potential is placed on the inner and outer electrodes. An ion source operatively associated with the ion mobility spectrometer releases ions to the drift space defined between the inner and outer electrodes. A detector operatively associated with at least a portion of the outer electrode detects ions from the drift space.

  4. Thomson scattering diagnostic for the measurement of ion species fraction

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, J. S.; Park, H.-S.; Amendt, P.; Divol, L.; Kugland, N. L.; Glenzer, S. H.; Rozmus, W.

    2012-10-15

    Simultaneous Thomson scattering measurements of collective electron-plasma and ion-acoustic fluctuations have been utilized to determine ion species fraction from laser produced CH plasmas. The CH{sub 2} foil is heated with 10 laser beams, 500 J per beam, at the Omega Laser facility. Thomson scattering measurements are made 4 mm from the foil surface using a 30 J 2{omega} probe laser with a 1 ns pulse length. Using a series of target shots the plasma evolution is measured from 2.5 ns to 9 ns after the rise of the heater beams. Measuring the electron density and temperature from the electron-plasma fluctuations constrains the fit of the two-ion species theoretical form factor for the ion feature such that the ion temperature, plasma flow velocity and ion species fraction are determined. The ion species fraction is determined to an accuracy of {+-}0.06 in species fraction.

  5. Thomson scattering diagnostic for the measurement of ion species fraction

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, J S; Park, H S; Amendt, A; Divol, L; Kugland, N L; Rozmus, W; Glenzer, S H

    2012-05-01

    Simultaneous Thomson scattering measurements of collective electron-plasma and ion-acoustic fluctuations have been utilized to determine ion species fraction from laser produced CH plasmas. The CH{sub 2} foil is heated with 10 laser beams, 500 J per beam, at the Omega Laser facility. Thomson scattering measurements are made 4 mm from the foil surface using a 30 J 2{omega} probe laser with a 1 ns pulse length. Using a series of target shots the plasma evolution is measured from 2.5 ns to 9 ns after the rise of the heater beams. Measuring the electron density and temperature from the electron-plasma fluctuations constrains the fit of the two-ion species theoretical form factor for the ion feature such that the ion temperature, plasma flow velocity and ion species fraction are determined. The ion species fraction is determined to an accuracy of {+-}0.06 in species fraction.

  6. Effective Ion Mobility Calculations for Macromolecules by Scattering off Electron Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Alexeev, Yuri; Fedorov, Dmitri; Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.

    2014-08-19

    Broad commercialization and increasing resolving power of ion mobility spectrometry/mass spectrometry (IMS/MS) platforms has engendered an explosion of IMS applications to structural characterization of gas-phase biomolecules. That has renewed interest in more accurate and rapid ion mobility calculations needed to elicit ion geometries from the measurements. An approach based on scattering off electron density isosurfaces (SEDI) that mirrors the physics of molecular collisions was proven superior to the common methods involving atomic coordinates a decade ago, but has remained impractical for large ions because of extreme computational demands. Here, we accelerate SEDI by up to ~500 times using the fragment molecular orbital (FMO) approach for surface generation and the multiplexed scattering algorithm in conjunction with the new grid extrapolation procedure for cross section evaluations. Parallelization of the code on a supercomputer has produced major further speed gains, allowing SEDI calculations for proteins (defined by over a million surface points) with the precision of <0.1% in one minute. Initial tests reveal the anticipated dependences of mobility on the ion charge state and lower cross sections in view of reduced surface roughness. Present developments are expected to lead to broad application of SEDI in IMS studies of macromolecules, enabling more accurate and reliable structural assignments.

  7. Characterization of protonated phospholipids as fragile ions in quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Garrett, Timothy J.; Merves, Matthew; Yost, Richard A.

    2011-01-01

    Some ions exhibit “ion fragility” in quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry (QIT-MS) during mass analysis with resonance ejection. In many cases, different ions generated from the same compound exhibit different degrees of ion fragility, with some ions (e.g., the [M+H]+ ion) stable and other ions (e.g., the [M+Na]+ ion) fragile. The ion fragility for quadrupole ion trap (QIT) mass spectrometry (MS) for protonated and sodiated ions of three phospholipids, 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, PC (16:0/16:0), 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phophoethanolamine, PE (16:0/16:0), and N-palmitoyl-D-erythro-sphingosylphosphorylcholine, SM (d18:1/16:0), was determined using three previously developed experiments: 1) the peak width using a slow scan speed, 2) the width of the isolation window for efficient isolation, and 3) the energy required for collision-induced dissociation. In addition, ion fragility studies were designed and performed to explore a correlation between ion fragility in QIT mass analysis and ion fragility during transport between the ion source and the ion trap. These experiments were: 1) evaluating the amount of thermal-induced dissociation as a function of heated capillary temperature, and 2) determining the extent of fragmentation occurring with increasing tube lens voltage. All phospholipid species studied exhibited greater ion fragility as protonated species in ion trap mass analysis than as sodiated species. In addition, the protonated species of both SM (d18:0/16:0) and PC (16:0/16:0) exhibited greater tendencies to fragment at higher heated capillary temperatures and high tube lens voltages, whereas the PE (16:0/16:0) ions did not appear to exhibit fragility during ion transport. PMID:22247650

  8. Mass spectrometry. [in organic ion and biorganic chemistry and medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlingame, A. L.; Cox, R. E.; Derrick, P. J.

    1974-01-01

    Review of the present status of mass spectrometry in the light of pertinent recent publications spanning the period from December 1971 to January 1974. Following an initial survey of techniques, instruments, and computer applications, a sharp distinction is made between the chemistry of organic (radical-)ions and analytical applications in biorganic chemistry and medicine. The emphasis is on the chemistry of organic (radical-)ions at the expense of inorganic, organometallic, and surface ion chemistry. Biochemistry and medicine are chosen because of their contemporary importance and because of the stupendous contributions of mass spectroscopy to these fields in the past two years. In the review of gas-phase organic ion chemistry, special attention is given to studies making significant contributions to the understanding of ion chemistry.

  9. Ion mobility spectrometry after supercritical fluid chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Morrissey, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    In this work, a Fourier transform ion mobility spectrometer (FT-IMS) was constructed and evaluated as a detector for supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC). The FT-IMS provides both quantitative and qualitative data of a wide range of compounds, selective and nonselective modes of chromatographic detection, and it is compatible with a wide range of SFC mobile phases. Drift spectra are presented for a number of samples, including polymers, lipids, herbicides, antibiotics, and pharmaceuticals. The unique properties of supercritical fluids made it possible to introduce these compounds into the spectrometer. While the drift spectra presented are generally simple, showing only a quasi-molecular ion, a few are surprising complex. Examples of selective and non-selective detection demonstrate the usefulness of the detector. Examples are presented for fish oil concentrate, bacon grease extract, soil extract, and polymer mixtures. In the case of Triton X-100, a non-ionic surfactant, the FT-IMS was able to selectively detect individual oligomers in the polymer mixture. In the case of a polydimethylsilicone mixture the detector isolated a contaminant in the mixture.

  10. Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Isomeric Disaccharide Precursor, Product and Cluster Ions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongli; Bendiak, Brad; Siems, William F.; Gang, David R.; Hill, Herbert H.

    2015-01-01

    RATIONALE Carbohydrates are highly variable in structure owing to differences in their anomeric configurations, monomer stereochemistry, inter-residue linkage positions and general branching features. The separation of carbohydrate isomers poses a great challenge for current analytical techniques. METHODS The isomeric heterogeneity of disaccharide ions and monosaccharideglycolaldehyde product ions evaluated using electrospray traveling wave ion mobility mass spectrometry (Synapt G2 high definition mass spectrometer) in both positive and negative ion modes investigation. RESULTS The separation of isomeric disaccharide ions was observed but not fully achieved based on their mobility profiles. The mobilities of isomeric product ions, the monosaccharide-glycolaldehydes, derived from different disaccharide isomers were measured. Multiple mobility peaks were observed for both monosaccharide-glycolaldehyde cations and anions, indicating that there was more than one structural configuration in the gas phase as verified by NMR in solution. More importantly, the mobility patterns for isomeric monosaccharide-glycolaldehyde product ions were different, which enabled partial characterization of their respective disaccharide ions. Abundant disaccharide cluster ions were also observed. The Results showed that a majority of isomeric cluster ions had different drift times and, moreover, more than one mobility peak was detected for a number of specific cluster ions. CONCLUSIONS It is demonstrated that ion mobility mass spectrometry is an advantageous method to assess the isomeric heterogeneity of carbohydrate compounds. It is capable of differentiating different types of carbohydrate ions having identical m/z values as well as multiple structural configurations of single compounds. PMID:24591031

  11. Tandem ion mobility spectrometry coupled to laser excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, Anne-Laure; Choi, Chang Min; Clavier, Christian; Barbaire, Marc; Maurelli, Jacques; Dagany, Xavier; MacAleese, Luke; Dugourd, Philippe; Chirot, Fabien

    2015-09-15

    This manuscript describes a new experimental setup that allows to perform tandem ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) measurements and which is coupled to a high resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometer. It consists of two 79 cm long drift tubes connected by a dual ion funnel assembly. The setup was built to permit laser irradiation of the ions in the transfer region between the two drift tubes. This geometry allows selecting ions according to their ion mobility in the first drift tube, to irradiate selected ions, and examine the ion mobility of the product ions in the second drift tube. Activation by collision is possible in the same region (between the two tubes) and between the second tube and the time-of-flight. IMS-IMS experiments on Ubiquitin are reported. We selected a given isomer of charge state +7 and explored its structural rearrangement following collisional activation between the two drift tubes. An example of IMS-laser-IMS experiment is reported on eosin Y, where laser irradiation was used to produce radical ions by electron photodetachment starting from doubly deprotonated species. This allowed measuring the collision cross section of the radical photo-product, which cannot be directly produced with an electrospray source.

  12. Shower approach in the simulation of ion scattering from solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodyrev, V. A.; Andrzejewski, R.; Rivera, A.; Boerma, D. O.; Prieto, J. E.

    2011-05-01

    An efficient approach for the simulation of ion scattering from solids is proposed. For every encountered atom, we take multiple samples of its thermal displacements among those which result in scattering with high probability to finally reach the detector. As a result, the detector is illuminated by intensive “showers,” where each event of detection must be weighted according to the actual probability of the atom displacement. The computational cost of such simulation is orders of magnitude lower than in the direct approach, and a comprehensive analysis of multiple and plural scattering effects becomes possible. We use this method for two purposes. First, the accuracy of the approximate approaches, developed mainly for ion-beam structural analysis, is verified. Second, the possibility to reproduce a wide class of experimental conditions is used to analyze some basic features of ion-solid collisions: the role of double violent collisions in low-energy ion scattering; the origin of the “surface peak” in scattering from amorphous samples; the low-energy tail in the energy spectra of scattered medium-energy ions due to plural scattering; and the degradation of blocking patterns in two-dimensional angular distributions with increasing depth of scattering. As an example of simulation for ions of MeV energies, we verify the time reversibility for channeling and blocking of 1-MeV protons in a W crystal. The possibilities of analysis that our approach offers may be very useful for various applications, in particular, for structural analysis with atomic resolution.

  13. Combining ion mobility spectrometry, mass spectrometry, and photoelectron spectroscopy in a high-transmission instrument.

    PubMed

    Vonderach, Matthias; Ehrler, Oli T; Weis, Patrick; Kappes, Manfred M

    2011-02-01

    We have developed a novel instrument that combines ion mobility spectrometry, mass spectro-metry, and photoelectron spectroscopy. The instrument couples an electrospray ion source, a high-transmission ion mobility cell based on ion funnels, a quadrupole mass filter, and a time-of-flight (magnetic bottle) photoelectron spectrometer operated with a pulsed detachment laser. We show that the instrument can resolve highly structured anion arrival time distributions and at the same time provide corresponding photoelectron spectra-using the DNA oligonucleotide ion [dC(6) - 5H](5-) as a test case. For this multianion we find at least four different, noninterconverting isomers (conformers) simultaneously present in the gas phase at room temperature. For each of these we record well-resolved and remarkably different photoelectron spectra at each of three different detachment laser wavelengths. Two-dimensional ion mobility/electron binding energy plots can be acquired with an automated data collection procedure. We expect that this kind of instrument will significantly improve the capabilities for structure determination of (bio)molecular anions in the gas phase. PMID:21214198

  14. Proton-bound cluster ions in ion mobility spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewing, R. G.; Eiceman, G. A.; Stone, J. A.

    1999-01-01

    Gaseous oxygen and nitrogen bases, both singly and as binary mixtures, have been introduced into ion mobility spectrometers to study the appearance of protonated molecules, and proton-bound dimers and trimers. At ambient temperature it was possible to simultaneously observe, following the introduction of molecule A, comparable intensities of peaks ascribable to the reactant ion (H2O)nH+, the protonated molecule AH+ and AH+ H2O, and the symmetrical proton bound dimer A2H+. Mass spectral identification confirmed the identifications and also showed that the majority of the protonated molecules were hydrated and that the proton-bound dimers were hydrated to a much lesser extent. No significant peaks ascribable to proton-bound trimers were obtained no matter how high the sample concentration. Binary mixtures containing molecules A and B, in some cases gave not only the peaks unique to the individual compounds but also peaks due to asymmetrical proton bound dimers AHB+. Such ions were always present in the spectra of mixtures of oxygen bases but were not observed for several mixtures of oxygen and nitrogen bases. The dimers, which were not observable, notable for their low hydrogen bond strengths, must have decomposed in their passage from the ion source to the detector, i.e. in a time less than approximately 5 ms. When the temperature was lowered to -20 degrees C, trimers, both homogeneous and mixed, were observed with mixtures of alcohols. The importance of hydrogen bond energy, and hence operating temperature, in determining the degree of solvation of the ions that will be observed in an ion mobility spectrometer is stressed. The possibility is discussed that a displacement reaction involving ambient water plays a role in the dissociation.

  15. Direct Liquid Sampling for Corona Discharge Ion Mobility Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sabo, Martin; Malásková, Michaela; Harmathová, Olga; Hradski, Jasna; Masár, Marián; Radjenovic, Branislav; Matejčík, Štefan

    2015-07-21

    We present a new technique suitable for direct liquid sampling and analysis by ion mobility spectrometry (IMS). The technique is based on introduction of a droplet stream to the IMS reaction region. The technique was successfully used to detect explosives dissolved in methanol and oil as well as to analyze amino acids and dipeptides. One of the main advantages of this technique is its ability to analyze liquid samples without the requirement of any special solution. PMID:26154532

  16. Conditioning of ion sources for mass spectrometry of plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Dylla, H.F.; Blanchard, W.R.

    1983-02-01

    Mass spectrometry is a useful diagnostic technique for monitoring plasma species and plasma-surface interactions. In order to maximize the sensitivity of measurements of hydrogen-fueled fusion plasmas or hydrogen-based discharge cleaning and etching plasmas, the ion sources of mass spectrometers are operated at or near the high pressure limit of 10/sup -4/ Torr (10/sup -2/ Pa). Such high ambient pressures of hydrogen give rise to high background levels of residual gases such as H/sub 2/O, CO, and CH/sub 4/, due to surface reactions on the ion source electrodes. For a commonly used ion source configuration, the residual gas production is a linear function of the ambient H/sub 2/ pressure. Hydrogen conditioning can reduce the absolute residual gas levels. Steady-state residual gas production is observed in a conditioned ion source, which is related to a balance of diffusion and sorption on the electrode surfaces.

  17. Detection of gunpowder stabilizers with ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    West, C; Baron, G; Minet, J-J

    2007-03-01

    This study is the first reported ion mobility detection of ethyl centralite and diphenylamine (DPA) smokeless gunpowder stabilizers, together with the nitroso and nitro derivatives of diphenylamine. First, the applicability of the ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) for the substances of interest was determined. The existence of numerous peaks, both in positive and negative modes, clearly demonstrates the success of these experiments. All mono and di-nitro derivatives of DPA tested were detected with this method. Unfortunately, many of the ions generated were not accurately identified. However, reduced mobility constants representative of each ion generated under defined operating conditions could be used for purpose of compound identification. The method was then successfully tested on real gunpowder samples. By the use of IMS, we managed to establish a rapid, simple and sensitive screening method for the detection and identification of smokeless gunpowder organic components. PMID:16828537

  18. Review on ion mobility spectrometry. Part 1: current instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Cumeras, R; Figueras, E; Davis, C E; Baumbach, J I; Gràcia, I

    2015-03-01

    Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) is a widely used and 'well-known' technique of ion separation in the gaseous phase based on the differences in ion mobilities under an electric field. All IMS instruments operate with an electric field that provides space separation, but some IMS instruments also operate with a drift gas flow that provides also a temporal separation. In this review we will summarize the current IMS instrumentation. IMS techniques have received an increased interest as new instrumentation and have become available to be coupled with mass spectrometry (MS). For each of the eight types of IMS instruments reviewed it is mentioned whether they can be hyphenated with MS and whether they are commercially available. Finally, out of the described devices, the six most-consolidated ones are compared. The current review article is followed by a companion review article which details the IMS hyphenated techniques (mainly gas chromatography and mass spectrometry) and the factors that make the data from an IMS device change as a function of device parameters and sampling conditions. These reviews will provide the reader with an insightful view of the main characteristics and aspects of the IMS technique. PMID:25465076

  19. Review on Ion Mobility Spectrometry. Part 1: Current Instrumentation

    PubMed Central

    Cumeras, R.; Figueras, E.; Davis, C.E.; Baumbach, J.I.; Gràcia, I.

    2014-01-01

    Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) is a widely used and ‘well-known’ technique of ion separation in gaseous phase based on the differences of ion mobilities under an electric field. All IMS instruments operate with an electric field that provides space separation, but some IMS instruments also operate with a drift gas flow which provides also a temporal separation. In this review we will summarize the current IMS instrumentation. IMS techniques have received an increased interest as new instrumentation has become available to be coupled with mass spectrometry (MS). For each of the eight types of IMS instruments reviewed it is mentioned whether they can be hyphenated with MS and whether they are commercially available. Finally, out of the described devices, the six most-consolidated ones are compared. The current review article is followed by a companion review article which details the IMS hyphenated techniques (mainly gas chromatography and mass spectrometry) and the factors that make the data from an IMS device change as function of device parameters and sampling conditions. These reviews will provide the reader with an insightful view of the main characteristics and aspects of the IMS technique. PMID:25465076

  20. Cluster Ion Spectrometry (CIS) Data Archiving in the CAA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dandouras, I. S.; Barthe, A.; Penou, E.; Brunato, S.; Reme, H.; Kistler, L. M.; Blagau, A.; Facsko, G.; Kronberg, E.; Laakso, H. E.

    2009-12-01

    The Cluster Active Archive (CAA) aims at preserving the four Cluster spacecraft data, so that they are usable in the long-term by the scientific community as well as by the instrument team PIs and Co-Is. This implies that the data are filed together with the descriptive and documentary elements making it possible to select and interpret them. The CIS (Cluster Ion Spectrometry) experiment is a comprehensive ionic plasma spectrometry package onboard the four Cluster spacecraft, capable of obtaining full three-dimensional ion distributions (about 0 to 40 keV/e) with a time resolution of one spacecraft spin (4 sec) and with mass-per-charge composition determination. The CIS package consists of two different instruments, a Hot Ion Analyser (HIA) and a time-of-flight ion Composition Distribution Function (CODIF) analyser. For the archival of the CIS data a multi-level approach has been adopted. The CAA archival includes processed raw data (Level 1 data), moments of the ion distribution functions (Level 2 data), and calibrated high-resolution data in a variety of physical units (Level 3 data). The latter are 3-D ion distribution functions and 2-D pitch-angle distributions. In addition, a software package has been developed to allow the CAA user to interactively calculate partial or total moments of the ion distributions. Instrument cross-calibration has been an important activity in preparing the data for archival. The CIS data archive includes also experiment documentation, graphical products for browsing through the data, and data caveats. In addition, data quality indexes are under preparation, to help the user. Given the complexity of an ion spectrometer, and the variety of its operational modes, each one being optimised for a different magnetospheric region or measurement objective, consultation of the data caveats by the end user will always be a necessary step in the data analysis.

  1. Analysis of explosives using corona discharge ionization combined with ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jihyeon; Park, Sehwan; Cho, Soo Gyeong; Goh, Eun Mee; Lee, Sungman; Koh, Sung-Suk; Kim, Jeongkwon

    2014-03-01

    Corona discharge ionization combined with ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) was utilized to investigate five common explosives: cyclonite (RDX), trinitrotoluene (TNT), pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), cyclotetramethylenetetranitramine (HMX), and 2,4-dinitrotoluene (DNT). The MS scan and the selected ion IMS analyses confirmed the identities of the existing ion species and their drift times. The ions observed were RDX·NO3(-), TNT(-), PETN·NO3(-), HMX·NO3(-), and DNT(-), with average drift times of 6.93 ms, 10.20 ms, 9.15 ms, 12.24 ms, 11.30 ms, and 8.89 ms, respectively. The reduced ion mobility values, determined from a standard curve calculated by linear regression of (normalized drift times)(-1) versus literature K0 values, were 2.09, 1.38, 1.55, 1.15, 1.25, and 1.60 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1), respectively. The detection limits were found to be 0.1 ng for RDX, 10 ng for TNT, 0.5 ng for PETN, 5.0 ng for HMX, and 10 ng for DNT. Simplified chromatograms were observed when nitrogen, as opposed to air, was used as the drift gas, but the detection limits were approximately 10 times worse (i.e., less sensitivity of detection). PMID:24468343

  2. Online deuterium hydrogen exchange and protein digestion coupled with ion mobility spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Donohoe, Gregory C; Arndt, James R; Valentine, Stephen J

    2015-05-19

    Online deuterium hydrogen exchange (DHX) and pepsin digestion (PD) is demonstrated using drift tube ion mobility spectrometry (DTIMS) coupled with linear ion trap (LTQ) mass spectrometry (MS) with electron transfer dissociation (ETD) capabilities. DHX of deuterated ubiquitin, followed by subsequent quenching and digestion, is performed within ∼60 s, yielding 100% peptide sequence coverage. The high reproducibility of the IMS separation allows spectral feature matching between two-dimensional IMS-MS datasets (undeuterated and deuterated) without the need for dataset alignment. Extracted ion drift time distributions (XIDTDs) of deuterated peptic peptides are mobility-matched to corresponding XIDTDs of undeuterated peptic peptides that were identified using collision-induced dissociation (CID). Matching XIDTDs allows a straightforward identification and deuterium retention evaluation for labeled peptides. Aside from the mobility separation, the ion trapping capabilities of the LTQ, combined with ETD, are demonstrated to provide single-residue resolution. Deuterium retention for the c- series ions across residues M(1)-L(15) and N(25)-R(42) are in good agreement with the known secondary structural elements within ubiquitin. PMID:25893550

  3. Characterization of triacetone triperoxide by ion mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry following atmospheric pressure chemical ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, Robert G.; Waltman, Melanie J.; Atkinson, David A.

    2011-04-28

    The atmospheric pressure chemical ionization of triacetone triperoxide (TATP) with subsequent separation and detection by ion mobility spectrometry has been studied. Positive ionization with hydronium reactant ions produced only fragments of the TATP molecule, with m/z 91 ion being the most predominant species. Ionization with ammonium reactant ions produced a molecular adduct at m/z 240. The reduced mobility value of this ion was constant at 1.36 cm{sup 2}V{sup -1}s{sup -1} across the temperature range from 60 to 140 C. The stability of this ion was temperature dependent and did not exist at temperatures above 140 C, where only fragment ions were observed. The introduction of ammonia vapors with TATP resulted in the formation of m/z 58 ion. As the concentration of ammonia increased, this smaller ion appeared to dominate the spectra and the TATP-ammonium adduct decreased in intensity. The ion at m/z 58 has been noted by several research groups upon using ammonia reagents in chemical ionization, but the identity was unknown. Evidence presented here supports the formation of protonated 2-propanimine. A proposed mechanism involves the addition of ammonia to the TATP-ammonium adduct followed by an elimination reaction. A similar mechanism involving the chemical ionization of acetone with excess ammonia also showed the formation of m/z 58 ion. TATP vapors from a solid sample were detected with a hand-held ion mobility spectrometer operated at room temperature. The TATP-ammonium molecular adduct was observed in the presence of ammonia and TATP vapors with this spectrometer.

  4. Ion scattering experiment on Ni(110) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholas, B.; Rambabu, B.; Collins, W.E.

    1986-01-01

    Light emission from excited neutral scattered Ne and sputtered Ni were investigated using the LEIS method. A 5-keV Ne/sup +/ beam was used to bombard a Ni(110) surface. Results of the light emission data is presented and compared with neutral production of Ne. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  5. High Performance Ion Mobility Spectrometry Using Hourglass Electrodynamic Funnel And Internal Ion Funnel

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Richard D.; Tang, Keqi; Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.

    2005-11-22

    A method and apparatus enabling increased sensitivity in ion mobility spectrometry/mass spectrometry instruments which substantially reduces or eliminates the loss of ions in ion mobility spectrometer drift tubes utilizing a device for transmitting ions from an ion source which allows the transmission of ions without significant delay to an hourglass electrodynamic ion funnel at the entrance to the drift tube and/or an internal ion funnel at the exit of the drift tube. An hourglass electrodynamic funnel is formed of at least an entry element, a center element, and an exit element, wherein the aperture of the center element is smaller than the aperture of the entry element and the aperture of the exit elements. Ions generated in a relatively high pressure region by an ion source at the exterior of the hourglass electrodynamic funnel are transmitted to a relatively low pressure region at the entrance of the hourglass funnel through a conductance limiting orifice. Alternating and direct electrical potentials are applied to the elements of the hourglass electrodynamic funnel thereby drawing ions into and through the hourglass electrodynamic funnel thereby introducing relatively large quantities of ions into the drift tube while maintaining the gas pressure and composition at the interior of the drift tube as distinct from those at the entrance of the electrodynamic funnel and allowing a positive gas pressure to be maintained within the drift tube, if desired. An internal ion funnel is provided within the drift tube and is positioned at the exit of said drift tube. The advantage of the internal ion funnel is that ions that are dispersed away from the exit aperture within the drift tube, such as those that are typically lost in conventional drift tubes to any subsequent analysis or measurement, are instead directed through the exit of the drift tube, vastly increasing the amount of ions exiting the drift tube.

  6. Electron Attachment Studies for CHCl3 Using Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Hai-yan; Feng, Hong-tao; Li, Hu; Wang, Hong-mei; Jiang, Hai-he; Chu, Yan-nan

    2011-04-01

    The dissociative electron attachment process for CHCl3 at different electric field have been studied with nitrogen as drift and carrier gas using corona discharge ionization source ion mobility spectrometry (CD-IMS). The corresponding electron attachment rate constants varied from 1.26×10-8 cm3/(molecules s) to 8.24×10-9 cm3/(molecules s) as the electric field changed from 200 V/cm to 500 V/cm. At a fixed electric field in the drift region, the attachment rate constants are also detected at different sample concentration. The ion-molecule reaction rate constants for the further reaction between Cl- and CHCl3 are also detected, which indicates that the technique maybe becomes a new method to research the rate constants between ions and neural molecules. And the reaction rate constants between Cl- and CHCl3 are the first time detected using CD-IMS.

  7. Determination of ammonia in ethylene using ion mobility spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, J. H.; Limero, T. F.; Lane, J. L.; Wang, F.

    1997-01-01

    A simple procedure to analyze ammonia in ethylene by ion mobility spectrometry is described. The spectrometer is operated with a silane polymer membrane., 63Ni ion source, H+ (H2O)n reactant ion, and nitrogen drift and source gas. Ethylene containing parts per billion (ppb) (v/v) concentrations of ammonia is pulled across the membrane and diffuses into the spectrometer. Preconcentration or preseparation is unnecessary, because the ethylene in the spectrometer has no noticeable effect on the analytical results. Ethylene does not polymerize in the radioactive source. Ethylene's flammability is negated by the nitrogen inside the spectrometer. Response to ammonia concentrations between 200 ppb and 1.5 ppm is near linear, and a detection limit of 25 ppb is calculated.

  8. Identification of carbohydrate anomers using ion mobility-mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, J.; Hahm, H. S.; Seeberger, P. H.; Pagel, K.

    2015-10-01

    Carbohydrates are ubiquitous biological polymers that are important in a broad range of biological processes. However, owing to their branched structures and the presence of stereogenic centres at each glycosidic linkage between monomers, carbohydrates are harder to characterize than are peptides and oligonucleotides. Methods such as nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy can be used to characterize glycosidic linkages, but this technique requires milligram amounts of material and cannot detect small amounts of coexisting isomers. Mass spectrometry, on the other hand, can provide information on carbohydrate composition and connectivity for even small amounts of sample, but it cannot be used to distinguish between stereoisomers. Here, we demonstrate that ion mobility-mass spectrometry--a method that separates molecules according to their mass, charge, size, and shape--can unambiguously identify carbohydrate linkage-isomers and stereoisomers. We analysed six synthetic carbohydrate isomers that differ in composition, connectivity, or configuration. Our data show that coexisting carbohydrate isomers can be identified, and relative concentrations of the minor isomer as low as 0.1 per cent can be detected. In addition, the analysis is rapid, and requires no derivatization and only small amounts of sample. These results indicate that ion mobility-mass spectrometry is an effective tool for the analysis of complex carbohydrates. This method could have an impact on the field of carbohydrate synthesis similar to that of the advent of high-performance liquid chromatography on the field of peptide assembly in the late 1970s.

  9. Depth resolution improvement in secondary ion mass spectrometry analysis using metal cluster complex ion bombardment

    SciTech Connect

    Tomita, M.; Kinno, T.; Koike, M.; Tanaka, H.; Takeno, S.; Fujiwara, Y.; Kondou, K.; Teranishi, Y.; Nonaka, H.; Fujimoto, T.; Kurokawa, A.; Ichimura, S.

    2006-07-31

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry analyses were carried out using a metal cluster complex ion of Ir{sub 4}(CO){sub 7}{sup +} as a primary ion beam. Depth resolution was evaluated as a function of primary ion species, energy, and incident angle. The depth resolution obtained using cluster ion bombardment was considerably better than that obtained by oxygen ion bombardment under the same experimental condition due to reduction of atomic mixing in the depth. The authors obtained a depth resolution of {approx}1 nm under 5 keV, 45 deg. condition. Depth resolution was degraded by ion-bombardment-induced surface roughness at 5 keV with higher incident angles.

  10. Inclusive inelastic scattering of heavy ions and nuclear correlations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Wilson, John W.; Khandelwal, Govind S.

    1990-01-01

    Calculations of inclusive inelastic scattering distributions for heavy ion collisions are considered within the high energy optical model. Using ground state sum rules, the inclusive projectile and complete projectile-target inelastic angular distributions are treated in both independent particle and correlated nuclear models. Comparisons between the models introduced are made for alpha particles colliding with He-4, C-12, and O-16 targets and protons colliding with O-16. Results indicate that correlations contribute significantly, at small momentum transfers, to the inelastic sum. Correlation effects are hidden, however, when total scattering distributions are considered because of the dominance of elastic scattering at small momentum transfers.

  11. Supercharging with Trivalent Metal Ions in Native Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flick, Tawnya G.; Williams, Evan R.

    2012-11-01

    Addition of 1.0 mM LaCl3 to aqueous ammonium acetate solutions containing proteins in their folded native forms can result in a significant increase in the molecular ion charging obtained with electrospray ionization as a result of cation adduction. In combination with m-nitrobenzyl alcohol, molecular ion charge states that are greater than the number of basic sites in the protein can be produced from these native solutions, even for lysozyme, which is conformationally constrained by four intramolecular disulfide bonds. Circular dichroism spectroscopy indicates that the conformation of ubiquitin is not measurably affected with up to 1.0 M LaCl3, but ion mobility data indicate that the high charge states that are formed when 1.0 mM LaCl3 is present are more unfolded than the low charge states formed without this reagent. These and other results indicate that the increased charging is a result of La3+ preferentially adducting onto compact or more native-like conformers during ESI and the gas-phase ions subsequently unfolding as a result of increased Coulomb repulsion. Electron capture dissociation of these high charge-state ions formed from these native solutions results in comparable sequence coverage to that obtained for ions formed from denaturing solutions without supercharging reagents, making this method a potentially powerful tool for obtaining structural information in native mass spectrometry.

  12. Transient Ion-Pair Separations for Electrospray Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hanghui; Lam, Lily; Chi, Bert; Kadjo, Akinde F; Dasgupta, Purnendu K

    2016-02-16

    We report a novel ion-pair chromatography (IPC) approach for liquid chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS), where the eluent does not contain any ion-pairing reagent (IPR). The IPR is injected on the column, much like the sample, and moves down the column. Significant amounts of a high retention factor IPR is injected, resulting in a transient but reproducible regional coating that progresses along the column. The sample is injected after a brief interval. The sample components interact with the IPR coated region during their passage; the chosen eluent gradient elutes the analytes of interest into the mass spectrometer before the IPR. Following analyte elution, the gradient is steeply raised, the IPR is washed out, and the effluent is sent to waste via a diverter valve until it is fully removed. As the nature of the analyte retention continuously changes along the column and with time, we call this transient ion-pair separation (TIPS). As the IPR never enters the MS, TIPS addresses two major drawbacks of IPC for ESI-MS: it avoids both ion suppression and ion source contamination. The potential of the generic approach for other modes of separation is discussed. An illustrative separation of two small inorganic ions, iodate and nitrate, is demonstrated on a reverse phase column by a transient prior injection of hexadecyltrimethylammonium chloride as IPR. PMID:26765166

  13. Ion-molecule adduct formation in tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Alechaga, Élida; Moyano, Encarnación; Galceran, Maria Teresa

    2016-02-01

    Nowadays most LC-MS methods rely on tandem mass spectrometry not only for quantitation and confirmation of compounds by multiple reaction monitoring (MRM), but also for the identification of unknowns from their product ion spectra. However, gas-phase reactions between charged and neutral species inside the mass analyzer can occur, yielding product ions at m/z values higher than that of the precursor ion, or at m/z values difficult to explain by logical losses, which complicate mass spectral interpretation. In this work, the formation of adduct ions in the mass analyzer was studied using several mass spectrometers with different mass analyzers (ion trap, triple quadrupole, and quadrupole-Orbitrap). Heterocyclic amines (AαC, MeAαC, Trp-P-1, and Trp-P-2), photo-initiators (BP and THBP), and pharmaceuticals (phenacetin and levamisole) were selected as model compounds and infused in LCQ Classic, TSQ Quantum Ultra AM, and Q-Exactive Orbitrap (ThermoFisher Scientific) mass spectrometers using electrospray as ionization method. The generation of ion-molecule adducts depended on the compound and also on the instrument employed. Adducts with neutral organic solvents (methanol and acetonitrile) were only observed in the ion trap instrument (LCQ Classic), because of the ionization source on-axis configuration and the lack of gas-phase barriers, which allowed inertial entrance of the neutrals into the analyzer. Adduct formation (only with water) in the triple quadrupole instruments was less abundant than in the ion trap and quadrupole-Orbitrap mass spectrometers, because of the lower residence time of the reactive product ions in the mass analyzer. The moisture level of the CID and/or damper gas had a great effect in beam-like mass analyzers such as triple quadrupole, but not in trap-like mass analyzers, probably because of the long residence time that allowed adduct formation even with very low concentrations of water inside the mass spectrometer. PMID:26700446

  14. Ring Current Ion Losses by Pitch Angle Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walt, M.; Voss, H. D.

    2001-12-01

    The Source/Loss Cone Energetic Particle Spectrometer (SEPS) on the Polar Satellite observes ions above 155 keV with an angular resolution of about 1.5 degrees. When the axis of SEPS is pointing within 10 degrees of the magnetic field direction, the detector measures particles in both the downward and upward loss cones. Measurements of the loss cone fluxes during the magnetic storms of August 6, 1998, August 27, 1998, September 25, 1998, October 19, 1998, and November 13, 1998 often show large fluxes of ring current ions moving downward inside the loss cone. At times these fluxes are comparable to the trapped ion population, indicating that strong pitch angle scattering is taking place at least locally. Although Polar encounters the ring current region at only two magnetic local times during any given storm, the frequent observation of precipitation suggests that pitch angle scattering is an important loss mechanism for ring current ions.

  15. Ion mobility spectrometry for pharmacokinetic studies – exemplary application

    PubMed Central

    Ruzsanyi, V.

    2013-01-01

    Breath analysis is an attractive non-invasive method for diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring. It uses endogenously produced compounds and metabolites of isotopically labelled precursors. In order to make such tests clinically useful, it is important to have relatively small portable instruments detecting volatile compounds within short time. A particularly promising analytical technique is ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) coupled to a multicapillary column (MCC). The present paper focuses on demonstrating the suitability of breath analysis for pharmacokinetic applications using MCC-IMS with respect to practicability and reproducibility testing the model substrate eucalyptol. Validation of the MCC-IMS measurements were performed using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) and resulted in an excellent correspondence of the time-dependent concentrations presented by the two different analytical techniques. Moreover, the good accordance in variance of kinetic parameters with repeated measures, and the determined inter-subject differences indicate the eligibility of the analysis method. PMID:24287589

  16. External Second Gate-Fourier Transform Ion Mobility Spectrometry.

    SciTech Connect

    Tarver, Edward E., III

    2005-01-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) is recognized as one of the most sensitive and versatile techniques for the detection of trace levels of organic vapors. IMS is widely used for detecting contraband narcotics, explosives, toxic industrial compounds and chemical warfare agents. Increasing threat of terrorist attacks, the proliferation of narcotics, Chemical Weapons Convention treaty verification as well as humanitarian de-mining efforts has mandated that equal importance be placed on the analysis time as well as the quality of the analytical data. (1) IMS is unrivaled when both speed of response and sensitivity has to be considered. (2) With conventional (signal averaging) IMS systems the number of available ions contributing to the measured signal to less than 1%. Furthermore, the signal averaging process incorporates scan-to-scan variations decreasing resolution. With external second gate Fourier Transform ion mobility spectrometry (FT-IMS), the entrance gate frequency is variable and can be altered in conjunction with other data acquisition parameters to increase the spectral resolution. The FT-IMS entrance gate operates with a 50% duty cycle and so affords a 7 to 10-fold increase in sensitivity. Recent data on high explosives are presented to demonstrate the parametric optimization in sensitivity and resolution of our system.

  17. Study of coal structure using secondary ion mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Tingey, G.L.; Lytle, J.M.; Baer, D.R.; Thomas, M.T.

    1980-12-01

    Secondary-ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) is examined as a tool for studying the chemical structure of coal. SIMS has potential for analysis of coal because of the following characteristics: sensitivity to chemical structure; high sensitivity to all masses; application to solids; excellent depth resolution; and reasonable spatial resolution. SIMS spectra of solid coals show differences with respect to coal rank, the spectra of high rank coal being similar to that of graphite, and the spectra of low rank coal being similar to that of wood. Some functional group analysis is also possible using SIMS. Low rank coals show a larger peak at 15 amu indicating more methyl groups than found in the higher rank coals. Fragments with two and three carbon atoms have also been examined; much larger fragments are undoubtedly present but were not evaluated in this study. Examination of these groups, which are expected to contain valuable information on coal structure, is planned for future work. It has been observed that mineral atoms present in the coal have large secondary ion yields which complicate the interpretation of the spectra. Studies on mineral-free coals and model compounds are therefore recommended to facilitate determination of organic coal structure. In addition, mass spectrometry with much greater mass resolution will aid in distinguishing between various ion species.

  18. Gas phase ion chemistry of an ion mobility spectrometry based explosive trace detector elucidated by tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kozole, Joseph; Levine, Lauren A; Tomlinson-Phillips, Jill; Stairs, Jason R

    2015-08-01

    The gas phase ion chemistry for an ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) based explosive detector has been elucidated using tandem mass spectrometry. The IMS system, which is operated with hexachloroethane and isobutyramide reagent gases and an ion shutter type gating scheme, is connected to the atmospheric pressure interface of a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer (MS/MS). Product ion masses, daughter ion masses, and reduced mobility values for a collection of nitro, nitrate, and peroxide explosives measured with the IMS/MS/MS instrument are reported. The mass and mobility data together with targeted isotopic labeling experiments and information about sample composition and reaction environment are leveraged to propose molecular formulas, structures, and ionization pathways for the various product ions. The major product ions are identified as [DNT-H](-) for DNT, [TNT-H](-) for TNT, [RDX+Cl](-) and [RDX+NO2](-) for RDX, [HMX+Cl](-) and [HMX+NO2](-) for HMX, [NO3](-) for EGDN, [NG+Cl](-) and [NG+NO3](-) for NG, [PETN+Cl](-) and [PETN+NO3](-) for PETN, [HNO3+NO3](-) for NH4NO3, [NO2](-) for DMNB, [HMTD-NC3H6O3+H+Cl](-) and [HMTD+H-CH2O-H2O2](+) for HMTD, and [(CH3)3CO2](+) for TATP. In general, the product ions identified for the IMS system studied here are consistent with the product ions reported previously for an ion trap mobility spectrometer (ITMS) based explosive trace detector, which is operated with dichloromethane and ammonia reagent gases and an ion trap type gating scheme. Differences between the explosive trace detectors include the [NG+Cl](-) and [PETN+Cl](-) product ions being major ions in the IMS system compared to minor ions in the ITMS system as well as the major product ion for TATP being [(CH3)3CO2](+) for the IMS system and [(CH3)2CNH2](+) for the ITMS system. PMID:26048817

  19. High-Performance Ion Mobility Spectrometry Using Hourglass Electrodynamic Funnel And Internal Ion Funnel

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Richard D.; Tang, Keqi; Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.

    2004-11-16

    A method and apparatus enabling increased sensitivity in ion mobility spectrometry/mass spectrometry instruments which substantially reduces or eliminates the loss of ions in ion mobility spectrometer drift tubes utilizing an hourglass electrodynamic ion funnel at the entrance to the drift tube and/or an internal ion funnel at the exit of the drift tube. An hourglass electrodynamic funnel is formed of at least an entry element, a center element, and an exit element, wherein the aperture of the center element is smaller than the aperture of the entry element and the aperture of the exit elements. Ions generated in a relatively high pressure region by an ion source at the exterior of the hourglass electrodynamic funnel are transmitted to a relatively low pressure region at the entrance of the hourglass funnel through a conductance limiting orifice. Alternating and direct electrical potentials are applied to the elements of the hourglass electrodynamic funnel thereby drawing ions into and through the hourglass electrodynamic funnel thereby introducing relatively large quantities of ions into the drift tube while maintaining the gas pressure and composition at the interior of the drift tube as distinct from those at the entrance of the electrodynamic funnel and allowing a positive gas pressure to be maintained within the drift tube, if desired. An internal ion funnel is provided within the drift tube and is positioned at the exit of said drift tube. The advantage of the internal ion funnel is that ions that are dispersed away from the exit aperture within the drift tube, such as those that are typically lost in conventional drift tubes to any subsequent analysis or measurement, are instead directed through the exit of the drift tube, vastly increasing the amount of ions exiting the drift tube.

  20. Dynamically multiplexed ion mobility time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Belov, Mikhail E; Clowers, Brian H; Prior, David C; Danielson, William F; Liyu, Andrei V; Petritis, Brianne O; Smith, Richard D

    2008-08-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (IMS-TOFMS) has been increasingly used in analysis of complex biological samples. A major challenge is to transform IMS-TOFMS to a high-sensitivity, high-throughput platform, for example, for proteomics applications. In this work, we have developed and integrated three advanced technologies, including efficient ion accumulation in an ion funnel trap prior to IMS separation, multiplexing (MP) of ion packet introduction into the IMS drift tube, and signal detection with an analog-to-digital converter, into the IMS-TOFMS system for the high-throughput analysis of highly complex proteolytic digests of, for example, blood plasma. To better address variable sample complexity, we have developed and rigorously evaluated a novel dynamic MP approach that ensures correlation of the analyzer performance with an ion source function and provides the improved dynamic range and sensitivity throughout the experiment. The MP IMS-TOFMS instrument has been shown to reliably detect peptides at a concentration of 1 nM in the presence of a highly complex matrix, as well as to provide a 3 orders of magnitude dynamic range and a mass measurement accuracy of better than 5 ppm. When matched against human blood plasma database, the detected IMS-TOF features were found to yield approximately 700 unique peptide identifications at a false discovery rate (FDR) of approximately 7.5%. Accounting for IMS information gave rise to a projected FDR of approximately 4%. Signal reproducibility was found to be greater than 80%, while the variations in the number of unique peptide identifications were <15%. A single sample analysis was completed in 15 min that constitutes almost 1 order of magnitude improvement compared to a more conventional LC-MS approach. PMID:18582088

  1. Negative thermal ion mass spectrometry of oxygen in phosphates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmden, C.; Papanastassiou, D. A.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1997-06-01

    A novel technique for the precise measurement of oxygen isotopes by negative thermal ion mass spectrometry (NTIMS) is presented. The technique is ideally suited to the analysis of oxygen isotopes in phosphates which form intense P03 ion beams. Since P is monoisotopic, the mass spectrum for P0 3- at 79, 80, and 81 corresponds to 1660, 170, and 180. Natural and synthetic phosphates are converted and loaded on the mass spectrometer filament as Ag 3PO 4 precipitated directly from ammoniacal solution. To lower the work function of the filament, BaCl, is added in a 1:1 molar ratio of PO 4:Ba. Using these procedures, Br - mass interference (at 79 and 81 amu) is eliminated for typical analyses. Experiments with 180-enriched water show less than 1 % O-exchange between sample PO 4 and adsorbed water, and there is no O-exchange with trace OZ present in the mass spectrometer source chamber. The ionization efficiency of PO 4, as P0 3- is >10% compared to 0.01% for both conventional dual inlet Gas Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (GIRMS) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). Therefore, NTIMS offers exceptional sensitivity enabling routine and precise oxygen isotope analysis of sub-microgram samples of PO 4, (<21 nmoles equivalent CO 2 gas) without need for lengthy chemical pre-treatment reproducibility of the sample. Overall external precision is ±1%c (2σ) for 18O/16 O and 170/15O with of instrumental isotope fractionation (calculated from 18O/16O of ±0.5%c amu -1. Small phosphate samples including single mineral grains from meteorites, or apatite microfossils, can be analyzed by this technique.

  2. Uncovering biologically significant lipid isomers with liquid chromatography, ion mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kyle, Jennifer E; Zhang, Xing; Weitz, Karl K; Monroe, Matthew E; Ibrahim, Yehia M; Moore, Ronald J; Cha, Jeeyeon; Sun, Xiaofei; Lovelace, Erica S; Wagoner, Jessica; Polyak, Stephen J; Metz, Thomas O; Dey, Sudhansu K; Smith, Richard D; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E; Baker, Erin S

    2016-02-15

    Understanding how biological molecules are generated, metabolized and eliminated in living systems is important for interpreting processes such as immune response and disease pathology. While genomic and proteomic studies have provided vast amounts of information over the last several decades, interest in lipidomics has also grown due to improved analytical technologies revealing altered lipid metabolism in type 2 diabetes, cancer, and lipid storage disease. Mass spectrometry (MS) measurements are currently the dominant approach for characterizing the lipidome by providing detailed information on the spatial and temporal composition of lipids. However, interpreting lipids' biological roles is challenging due to the existence of numerous structural and stereoisomers (i.e. distinct acyl chain and double-bond positions), which are often unresolvable using present approaches. Here we show that combining liquid chromatography (LC) and structurally-based ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) measurement with MS analyses distinguishes lipid isomers and allows insight into biological and disease processes. PMID:26734689

  3. Uncovering biologically significant lipid isomers with liquid chromatography, ion mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kyle, Jennifer E.; Zhang, Xing; Weitz, Karl K.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Moore, Ronald J.; Cha, Jeeyeon; Sun, Xiaofei; Lovelace, Erica S.; Wagoner, Jessica; Polyak, Stephen J.; Metz, Thomas O.; Dey, Sudhansu K.; Smith, Richard D.; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Baker, Erin S.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how biological molecules are generated, metabolized and eliminated in living systems is important for interpreting processes such as immune response and disease pathology. While genomic and proteomic studies have provided vast amounts of information over the last several decades, interest in lipidomics has also grown due to improved analytical technologies revealing altered lipid metabolism in type 2 diabetes, cancer, and lipid storage disease. Liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry (LC-MS) measurements are currently the dominant approach for characterizing the lipidome by providing detailed information on the spatial and temporal composition of lipids. However, interpreting lipids’ biological roles is challenging due to the existence of numerous structural and stereoisomers (i.e. distinct acyl chain and double-bond positions), which are unresolvable using present LC-MS approaches. Here we show that combining structurally-based ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) with LC-MS measurements distinguishes lipid isomers and allows insight into biological and disease processes.

  4. Separation of steroid isomers by ion mobility mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ahonen, Linda; Fasciotti, Maíra; Gennäs, Gustav Boije Af; Kotiaho, Tapio; Daroda, Romeu J; Eberlin, Marcos; Kostiainen, Risto

    2013-10-01

    Ion mobility mass spectrometry performed in a compact traveling wave cell (TWIM-MS) is shown to provide a reliable, fast and repeatable method to separate derivatized steroid isomers. Three steroid isomer pairs were analyzed in their native form and as their p-toluenesulfonyl isocyanate derivatives. The native steroids were separated from each other, but no separation could be attained for the isomers. The derivatized steroid isomers were, however, properly separated by TWIM-MS with peak-to-peak resolutions close to or as high as baseline resolution (Rp-p=0.77-1.08). PMID:23992881

  5. Ion mobility spectrometry for detection of skin volatiles

    PubMed Central

    Ruzsanyi, Veronika; Mochalski, Pawel; Schmid, Alex; Wiesenhofer, Helmut; Klieber, Martin; Hinterhuber, Hartmann; Amann, Anton

    2012-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) released by humans through their skin were investigated in near real time using ion mobility spectrometry after gas chromatographic separation with a short multi-capillary column. VOCs typically found in a small nitrogen flow covering the skin are 3-methyl-2-butenal, 6-methylhept-5-en-2-one, sec-butyl acetate, benzaldehyde, octanal, 2-ethylhexanol, nonanal and decanal at volume fractions in the low part per billion-(ppb) range. The technique presented here may contribute to elucidating some physiological processes occurring in the human skin. PMID:23217311

  6. Cryogenic Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry: Tracking Ion Structure from Solution to the Gas Phase.

    PubMed

    Servage, Kelly A; Silveira, Joshua A; Fort, Kyle L; Russell, David H

    2016-07-19

    Electrospray ionization (ESI) combined with ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) is adding new dimensions, that is, structure and dynamics, to the field of biological mass spectrometry. There is increasing evidence that gas-phase ions produced by ESI can closely resemble their solution-phase structures, but correlating these structures can be complicated owing to the number of competing effects contributing to structural preferences, including both inter- and intramolecular interactions. Ions encounter unique hydration environments during the transition from solution to the gas phase that will likely affect their structure(s), but many of these structural changes will go undetected because ESI-IM-MS analysis is typically performed on solvent-free ions. Cryogenic ion mobility-mass spectrometry (cryo-IM-MS) takes advantage of the freeze-drying capabilities of ESI and a cryogenically cooled IM drift cell (80 K) to preserve extensively solvated ions of the type [M + xH](x+)(H2O)n, where n can vary from zero to several hundred. This affords an experimental approach for tracking the structural evolution of hydrated biomolecules en route to forming solvent-free gas-phase ions. The studies highlighted in this Account illustrate the varying extent to which dehydration can alter ion structure and the overall impact of cryo-IM-MS on structural studies of hydrated biomolecules. Studies of small ions, including protonated water clusters and alkyl diammonium cations, reveal structural transitions associated with the development of the H-bond network of water molecules surrounding the charge carrier(s). For peptide ions, results show that water networks are highly dependent on the charge-carrying species within the cluster. Specifically, hydrated peptide ions containing lysine display specific hydration behavior around the ammonium ion, that is, magic number clusters with enhanced stability, whereas peptides containing arginine do not display specific hydration around the

  7. Dynamic Reactive Ionization with Cluster Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Hua; Wucher, Andreas; Winograd, Nicholas

    2016-02-01

    Gas cluster ion beams (GCIB) have been tuned to enhance secondary ion yields by doping small gas molecules such as CH4, CO2, and O2 into an Ar cluster projectile, Arn + ( n = 1000-10,000) to form a mixed cluster. The `tailored beam' has the potential to expand the application of secondary ion mass spectrometry for two- and three-dimensional molecular specific imaging. Here, we examine the possibility of further enhancing the ionization by doping HCl into the Ar cluster. Water deposited on the target surface facilitates the dissociation of HCl. This concerted effect, occurring only at the impact site of the cluster, arises since the HCl is chemically induced to ionize to H+ and Cl- , allowing improved protonation of neutral molecular species. This hypothesis is confirmed by depth profiling through a trehalose thin film exposed to D2O vapor, resulting in ~20-fold increase in protonated molecules. The results show that it is possible to dynamically maintain optimum ionization conditions during depth profiling by proper adjustment of the water vapor pressure. H-D exchange in the trehalose molecule M was monitored upon deposition of D2O on the target surface, leading to the observation of [Mn* + H]+ or [Mn* + D]+ ions, where n = 1-8 hydrogen atoms in the trehalose molecule M have been replaced by deuterium. In general, we discuss the role of surface chemistry and dynamic reactive ionization of organic molecules in increasing the secondary ion yield.

  8. Profiling of phospholipids and related lipid structures using multidimensional ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimpin, Sarah; Tan, Bo; Bohrer, Brian C.; O'Dell, David K.; Merenbloom, Samuel I.; Pazos, Mauricio X.; Clemmer, David E.; Walker, J. Michael

    2009-10-01

    Increasingly comprehensive questions related to the biosynthesis of lipids relevant to understanding new signaling pathways have created daunting tasks for their chemical analysis. Here, ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) and mass spectrometry (MS) techniques combined with electrospray ionization have been used to examine mixtures of closely related lipid structures. The drift time distributions of sphingomyelins show baseline separations for ethylene chain length differences ([Delta] ~ 1.2 ms) and partial separations in single unsaturation differences ([Delta] ~ 0.3 ms) revealing that the most compact structures are observed with shorter chains and increasing unsaturation. Drift time distributions of different ionizations frequently fall into families with the same drift times (isodrifts) indicating that the ion attached to the lipid has little structural influence. The present data show that phospholipids, especially phosphatidylinositol, aggregate to form inverted micelles. Phospholipids (phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, sphingomyelin, and phosphatidylinositol) are effectively separated according to their polar head groups. This method also provides information about the mixture composition of the chemically different lipids N-palmitoyl glycine, N-arachidonoyl ethanolamide, and phosphatidylcholine existing over an array of charge states and sizes (inverted micelles) depending on mixture concentration. Multidimensional IMS3-MS introduces an additional dimension to fragmentation analysis by separating the fragmented ions into groups related to size, shape and charge and allows determination of sn-1 and sn-2 substitution as is shown for phosphatidylglycerols. This contribution provides evidence for extending the targeted approach to global lipidomics analysis using the high-efficiency gas-phase separation afforded by multidimensional IMS-MS.

  9. Formation of negative ions in grazing scattering from insulator surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Auth, C.; Mertens, A.; Winter, H.; Borisov, A.G.; Sidis, V.

    1998-01-01

    Substantial fractions of fast atoms or ions are converted to negative ions during grazing scattering from a clean and flat monocrystalline surface of alkali-metal halides. We interpret the experimental data by a model of local electron capture from the halogen sites of the crystal in binary-type collision events. Due to the band gap of the insulator, the probability for subsequent electron loss is low, resulting in large fractions of negative ions that survive from the collisional formation. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  10. Trace level perchlorate analysis by ion chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Johnson; Gandhi, Jay; Hedrick, Joe

    2005-08-26

    Perchlorate is commonly used as an oxidant in solid fuel propellant for rockets and missiles. Recently perchlorate contamination was found in many aquifers associated with Colorado River and other sites. Perchlorate was also found at elevated level in crops that use contaminated water for irrigation. Ion chromatography with conductivity detection could be used to measure perchlorate levels in drinking and wastewaters as per United States Environmental Protection Agency method 314, but at lower levels and with complexity of the matrix there could be false positive and/or false negative. This study was done to demonstrate the detection of perchlorate with lower detection limit with high ionic matrix by ion chromatography-mass spectrometry. PMID:16106848

  11. In situ secondary ion mass spectrometry analysis. 1992 Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Groenewold, G.S.; Applehans, A.D.; Ingram, J.C.; Delmore, J.E.; Dahl, D.A.

    1993-01-01

    The direct detection of tributyl phosphate (TBP) on rocks using molecular beam surface analysis [MBSA or in situ secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS)] is demonstrated. Quantities as low as 250 ng were detected on basalt and sandstone with little or no sample preparation. Detection of TBP on soil has proven to be more problematic and requires further study. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) is more difficult to detect because it is very reactive with surfaces of interest. Nevertheless, it is possible to detect EDTA if the acidity of the surface is controlled. The detection of EDTA-metal complexes is currently an open question, but evidence is presented for the detection of ions arising from a EDTA-lead complex. Carboxylic acids (i.e., citric, ascorbic, malic, succinic, malonic, and oxalic) give characteristic SIM spectra, but their detection on sample surfaces awaits evaluation.

  12. Electrospray Ionization Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry of Human Brain Gangliosides.

    PubMed

    Sarbu, Mirela; Robu, Adrian C; Ghiulai, Roxana M; Vukelić, Željka; Clemmer, David E; Zamfir, Alina D

    2016-05-17

    The progress of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS), together with its association to mass spectrometry (MS), opened new directions for the identification of various metabolites in complex biological matrices. However, glycolipidomics of the human brain by IMS MS represents an area untouched up to now, because of the difficulties encountered in brain sampling, analyte extraction, and IMS MS method optimization. In this study, IMS MS was introduced in human brain ganglioside (GG) research. The efficiency of the method in clinical glycolipidomics was demonstrated on a highly complex mixture extracted from a normal fetal frontal lobe (FL37). Using this approach, a remarkably rich molecular ion pattern was discovered, which proved the presence of a large number of glycoforms and an unpredicted diversity of the ceramide chains. Moreover, the results showed for the first time the occurrence of GGs in the human brain with a much higher degree of sialylation than previously reported. Using IMS MS, the entire series starting from mono- up to octasialylated GGs was detected in FL37. These findings substantiate early clinical reports on the direct correlation between GG sialylation degree and brain developmental stage. Using IMS CID MS/MS, applied here for the first time to gangliosides, a novel, tetrasialylated O-GalNAc modified species with a potential biomarker role in brain development was structurally characterized. Under variable collision energy, a high number of sequence ions was generated for the investigated GalNAc-GQ1(d18:1/18:0) species. Several fragment ions documented the presence of the tetrasialo element attached to the inner Gal, indicating that GalNAc-GQ1(d18:1/18:0) belongs to the d series. PMID:27088833

  13. Combined electron and focused ion beam system for improvement of secondary ion yield in secondary ion mass spectrometry instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, L.; Ji, Q.; Leung, K.-N.; Gough, R. A.

    2006-10-16

    Using a combined electron and focused ion beam system to improve performance of secondary ion mass spectrometry instruments has been investigated experimentally. The secondary ion yield for an Al target has been enhanced to about one order of magnitude higher with the postionization induced by the low energy electrons in the combined beam. It can be further improved with the increase of electron beam current. When the combined beam is applied to insulating targets, sample charging is also eliminated. For Teflon targets, the secondary ion signal is increased by more than a factor of 20.

  14. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry with transmission of energetic primary cluster ions through foil targets

    SciTech Connect

    Hirata, K.; Saitoh, Y.; Chiba, A.; Yamada, K.; Matoba, S.; Narumi, K.

    2014-03-15

    We developed time-of-flight (TOF) secondary ion (SI) mass spectrometry that provides informative SI ion mass spectra without needing a sophisticated ion beam pulsing system. In the newly developed spectrometry, energetic large cluster ions with energies of the order of sub MeV or greater are used as primary ions. Because their impacts on the target surface produce high yields of SIs, the resulting SI mass spectra are informative. In addition, the start signals necessary for timing information on primary ion incidence are provided by the detection signals of particles emitted from the rear surface of foil targets upon transmission of the primary ions. This configuration allows us to obtain positive and negative TOF SI mass spectra without pulsing system, which requires precise control of the primary ions to give the spectra with good mass resolution. We also successfully applied the TOF SI mass spectrometry with energetic cluster ion impacts to the chemical structure characterization of organic thin film targets.

  15. Separation and Classification of Lipids Using Differential Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.; Isaac, Giorgis; Leveque, Nathalie; Smith, Richard D.; Metz, Thomas O.

    2011-07-01

    Correlations between the dimensions of a 2-D separation create trend lines that depend on structural or chemical characteristics of the compound class and thus facilitate classification of unknowns. This broadly applies to conventional ion mobility spectrometry (IMS)/mass spectrometry (MS), where the major biomolecular classes (e.g., lipids, peptides, nucleotides) occupy different trend line domains. However, strong correlation between the IMS and MS separations for ions of same charge has impeded finer distinctions. Differential IMS (or FAIMS) is generally less correlated to MS and thus could separate those domains better. We report the first observation of chemical class separation by trend lines using FAIMS, here for lipids. For lipids, FAIMS is indeed more independent of MS than conventional IMS, and subclasses (such as phospho-, glycero-, or sphingolipids) form distinct, often non-overlapping domains. Even finer categories with different functional groups or degrees of unsaturation are often separated. As expected, resolution improves in He-rich gases: at 70% He, glycerolipid isomers with different fatty acid positions can be resolved. These results open the door for application of FAIMS to lipids, particularly in shotgun lipidomics and targeted analyses of bioactive lipids.

  16. Separation and Classification of Lipids Using Differential Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.; Isaac, Giorgis; Leveque, Nathalie; Smith, Richard D.; Metz, Thomas O.

    2011-01-01

    Correlations between the dimensions of a 2-D separation create trend lines that depend on structural or chemical characteristics of the compound class and thus facilitate classification of unknowns. This broadly applies to conventional ion mobility spectrometry (IMS)/mass spectrometry (MS), where the major biomolecular classes (e.g., lipids, peptides, nucleotides) occupy different trend line domains. However, strong correlation between the IMS and MS separations for ions of same charge has impeded finer distinctions. Differential IMS (or FAIMS) is generally less correlated to MS and thus could separate those domains better. We report the first observation of chemical class separation by trend lines using FAIMS, here for lipids. For lipids, FAIMS is indeed more independent of MS than conventional IMS, and subclasses (such as phospho-, glycero-, or sphingolipids) form distinct, often non-overlapping domains. Even finer categories with different functional groups or degrees of unsaturation are often separated. As expected, resolution improves in He-rich gases: at 70% He, glycerolipid isomers with different fatty acid positions can be resolved. These results open the door for application of FAIMS to lipids, particularly in shotgun lipidomics and targeted analyses of bioactive lipids. PMID:21953096

  17. Monitoring Trace Contaminants in Air Via Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Peter T.; Karr, Dane; Pearson, Richard; Valero, Gustavo; Wong, Carla

    1995-01-01

    Recent passage of the Clean Air Act with its stricter regulation of toxic gas emissions, and the ever-growing number of applications which require faster turnaround times between sampling and analysis are two major factors which are helping to drive the development of new instrument technologies for in-situ, on-line, real-time monitoring. The ion trap, with its small size, excellent sensitivity, and tandem mass spectrometry capability is a rapidly evolving technology which is well-suited for these applications. In this paper, we describe the use of a commercial ion trap instrument for monitoring trace levels of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in air. A number of sample introduction devices including a direct transfer line interface, short column GC, and a cryotrapping interface are employed to achieve increasing levels of sensitivity. MS, MS/MS, and MS/MS/MS methods are compared to illustrate trade-offs between sensitivity and selectivity. Filtered Noise Field (FNF) technology is found to be an excellent means for achieving lower detection limits through selective storage of the ion(s) of interest during ionization. Figures of merit including typical sample sizes, detection limits, and response times are provided. The results indicate the potential of these techniques for atmospheric assessments, the High Speed Research Program, and advanced life support monitoring applications for NASA.

  18. Analysis of biogenic amines using corona discharge ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hashemian, Z; Mardihallaj, A; Khayamian, T

    2010-05-15

    A new method based on corona discharge ion mobility spectrometry (CD-IMS) was developed for the analysis of biogenic amines including spermidine, spermine, putrescine, and cadaverine. The ion mobility spectra of the compounds were obtained with and without n-Nonylamine used as the reagent gas. The high proton affinity of n-Nonylamine prevented ion formation from compounds with a proton affinity lower than that of n-Nonylamine and, therefore, enhanced its selectivity. It was also realized that the ion mobility spectrum of n-Nonylamine varied with its concentration. A sample injection port of a gas chromatograph was modified and used as the sample introduction system into the CD-IMS. The detection limits, dynamic ranges, and analytical parameters of the compounds with and without using the reagent gas were obtained. The detection limits and dynamic ranges of the compounds were about 2ng and 2 orders of magnitude, respectively. The wide dynamic range of CD-IMS originates from the high current of the corona discharge. The results revealed the high capability of the CD-IMS for the analysis of biogenic amines. PMID:20298897

  19. Laser desorption lamp ionization source for ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qinghao; Zare, Richard N

    2015-01-01

    A two-step laser desorption lamp ionization source coupled to an ion trap mass spectrometer (LDLI-ITMS) has been constructed and characterized. The pulsed infrared (IR) output of an Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm) is directed to a target inside a chamber evacuated to ~15 Pa causing desorption of molecules from the target's surface. The desorbed molecules are ionized by a vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) lamp (filled with xenon, major wavelength at 148 nm). The resulting ions are stored and detected in a three-dimensional quadrupole ion trap modified from a Finnigan Mat LCQ mass spectrometer operated at a pressure of ≥ 0.004 Pa. The limit of detection for desorbed coronene molecules is 1.5 pmol, which is about two orders of magnitude more sensitive than laser desorption laser ionization mass spectrometry using a fluorine excimer laser (157 nm) as the ionization source. The mass spectrum of four standard aromatic compounds (pyrene, coronene, rubrene and 1,4,8,11,15,18,22,25-octabutoxy-29H,31H-phthalocyanine (OPC)) shows that parent ions dominate. By increasing the infrared laser power, this instrument is capable of detecting inorganic compounds. PMID:25601688

  20. On-site analysis of old deposited chemical warfare agents by combined use of ion mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Stach, J.; Adler, J.; Brodacki, M.; Doering, H.R.; Flachowsky, J.; Loudon, A.

    1995-12-31

    The factory site of an old mustard gas plant was investigated with on-site analysis methods. Using ion mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry a lot of degradation products of mustard gas could be detected. Sulfur mustard was found in one soil sample and in ceramic material of a bunker used for storage of the produced warfare agents. Concentrations of the mustard gas are in the sub ppb level. The results of ion mobility and mass spectrometry agreed in 95 % of the investigated samples.

  1. Ion mobility spectrometry for food quality and safety.

    PubMed

    Vautz, W; Zimmermann, D; Hartmann, M; Baumbach, J I; Nolte, J; Jung, J

    2006-11-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry is known to be a fast and sensitive technique for the detection of trace substances, and it is increasingly in demand not only for protection against explosives and chemical warfare agents, but also for new applications in medical diagnosis or process control. Generally, a gas phase sample is ionized by help of ultraviolet light, ss-radiation or partial discharges. The ions move in a weak electrical field towards a detector. During their drift they collide with a drift gas flowing in the opposite direction and, therefore, are slowed down depending on their size, shape and charge. As a result, different ions reach the detector at different drift times, which are characteristic for the ions considered. The number of ions reaching the detector are a measure of the concentration of the analyte. The method enables the identification and quantification of analytes with high sensitivity (ng l(-1) range). The selectivity can even be increased - as necessary for the analyses of complex mixtures - using pre-separation techniques such as gas chromatography or multi-capillary columns. No pre-concentration of the sample is necessary. Those characteristics of the method are preserved even in air with up to a 100% relative humidity rate. The suitability of the method for application in the field of food quality and safety - including storage, process and quality control as well as the characterization of food stuffs - was investigated in recent years for a number of representative examples, which are summarized in the following, including new studies as well: (1) the detection of metabolites from bacteria for the identification and control of their growth; (2) process control in food production - beer fermentation being an example; (3) the detection of the metabolites of mould for process control during cheese production, for quality control of raw materials or for the control of storage conditions; (4) the quality control of packaging materials during

  2. Structures of Metallosupramolecular Coordination Assemblies Can Be Obtained by Ion Mobility Spectrometry-Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Brocker, Erin R.; Anderson, Stanley E.; Northrop, Brian H.; Stang, Peter J.; Bowers, Michael T.

    2010-01-01

    Rigid rectangular, cyclobis[(2,9-bis[trans-Pt(PEt3)2(PF6)]anthracene)(4,4′-dipyridyl)], triangular, cyclotris[(2,9-bis[trans-Pt(PEt3)2(PF6)]phenanthrene)(4,4′-dipyridyl)], and prismatic, cyclotris[bis-[cis-Pt(PEt3)2)(CF3SO3)2](tetrakis(4-pyridyl)cyclobutadienecyclopentadienylcobalt(I))] supramolecular assemblies, based on dipyridyl ligands and square planar platinum coordination, have been investigated by ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (IMS-MS). ESI-quadrupole and TOF spectra have been obtained and fragmentation pathways assigned. Ion mobility studies give cross sections that compare very well with cross sections of the supramolecular rectangle and triangle species based on X-ray bond distances. For the larger prism structures, agreement of experimental and calculated cross sections from molecular modeling is very good, indicating IMS-MS methods can be used to characterize complex self-assembled structures where X-ray or other spectroscopic structures are not available. PMID:20815390

  3. Ion Mobility Spectrometry Reveals Duplex DNA Dissociation Intermediates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burmistrova, Anastasia; Gabelica, Valérie; Duwez, Anne-Sophie; De Pauw, Edwin

    2013-11-01

    Electrospray ionization (ESI) soft desolvation is widely used to investigate fragile species such as nucleic acids. Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) gives access to the gas phase energetics of the intermolecular interactions in the absence of solvent, by following the dissociation of mass-selected ions. Ion mobility mass spectrometry (IMS) provides indications on the tridimensional oligonucleotide structure by attributing a collision cross section (CCS) to the studied ion. Electrosprayed duplexes longer than eight bases pairs retain their helical structure in a solvent-free environment. However, the question of conformational changes under activation in MS/MS studies remains open. The objective of this study is to probe binding energetics and characterize the unfolding steps occurring prior to oligonucleotide duplex dissociation. Comparing the evolution of CCS with collision energy and breakdown curves, we characterize dissociation pathways involved in CID-activated DNA duplex separation into single strands, and we demonstrate here the existence of stable dissociation intermediates. At fixed duplex length, dissociation pathways were found to depend on the percentage of GC base pairs and on their position in the duplex. Our results show that pure GC sequences undergo a gradual compaction until reaching the dissociation intermediate: A-helix. Mixed AT-GC sequences were found to present at least two conformers: a classic B-helix and an extended structure where the GC tract is a B-helix and the AT tract(s) fray. The dissociation in single strands takes place from both conformers when the AT base pairs are enclosed between two GC tracts or only from the extended conformer when the AT tract is situated at the end(s) of the sequence.

  4. Losses of ring current ions by strong pitch angle scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walt, M.; Voss, H. D.

    High angular resolution measurements of 155 keV ions in the ring current during the magnetic storm of August 6, 1998 show filled loss cones indicating that very rapid pitch angle scattering is taking place above the satellite location. The measurements were made with the SEPS detector on the Polar satellite during its passages through the ring current regions, usually at magnetic latitudes near ±45° and at magnetic local times of about 04:00 and 16:00 hrs. The observed strong pitch angle scattering implies a trapping lifetime of less than an hour and may explain the early rapid recovery of Dst during magnetic storms.

  5. Dynamically Multiplexed Ion Mobility Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Belov, Mikhail E.; Clowers, Brian H.; Prior, David C.; Danielson, William F.; Liyu, Andrei V.; Petritis, Brianne O.; Smith, Richard D.

    2010-01-01

    Ion Mobility Spectrometry–Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (IMS-TOFMS) has been increasingly used in analysis of complex biological samples. A major challenge is to transform IMS-TOFMS to a high-sensitivity high-throughput platform for e.g. proteomics applications. In this work, we have developed and integrated three advanced technologies, including efficient ion accumulation in the ion funnel trap prior to IMS separation, multiplexing (MP) of ion packet introduction into the IMS drift tube and signal detection with an analog-to-digital converter (ADC), into the IMS-TOFMS system for the high-throughput analysis of highly complex proteolytic digests of e.g. blood plasma. To better address variable sample complexity, we have developed and rigorously evaluated a novel dynamic MP approach that ensures correlation of the analyzer performance with an ion source function, and provides the improved dynamic range and sensitivity throughout the experiment. The MP IMS-TOF MS instrument has been shown to reliably detect peptides at a concentration of 1 nM in the presence of highly complex matrix, as well as to provide a three orders of magnitude dynamic range and a mass measurement accuracy of better than 5 ppm. When matched against human blood plasma database, the detected IMS-TOF features were found to yield ~ 700 unique peptide identifications at a false discovery rate (FDR) of ~ 7.5 %. Accounting for IMS information gave rise to a projected FDR of ~ 4 %. Signal reproducibility was found to be greater than 80 %, while the variations in the number of unique peptide identifications were < 15 %. A single sample analysis was completed in 15 min that constitutes almost an order of magnitude improvement compared to a more conventional LC-MS approach. PMID:18582088

  6. Fundamentals of Trapped Ion Mobility Spectrometry Part II: Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silveira, Joshua A.; Michelmann, Karsten; Ridgeway, Mark E.; Park, Melvin A.

    2016-04-01

    Trapped ion mobility spectrometry (TIMS) is a new high resolution (R up to ~300) separation technique that utilizes an electric field to hold ions stationary against a moving gas. Recently, an analytical model for TIMS was derived and, in part, experimentally verified. A central, but not yet fully explored, component of the model involves the fluid dynamics at work. The present study characterizes the fluid dynamics in TIMS using simulations and ion mobility experiments. Results indicate that subsonic laminar flow develops in the analyzer, with pressure-dependent gas velocities between ~120 and 170 m/s measured at the position of ion elution. One of the key philosophical questions addressed is: how can mobility be measured in a dynamic system wherein the gas is expanding and its velocity is changing? We noted previously that the analytically useful work is primarily done on ions as they traverse the electric field gradient plateau in the analyzer. In the present work, we show that the position-dependent change in gas velocity on the plateau is balanced by a change in pressure and temperature, ultimately resulting in near position-independent drag force. That the drag force, and related variables, are nearly constant allows for the use of relatively simple equations to describe TIMS behavior. Nonetheless, we derive a more comprehensive model, which accounts for the spatial dependence of the flow variables. Experimental resolving power trends were found to be in close agreement with the theoretical dependence of the drag force, thus validating another principal component of TIMS theory.

  7. Fundamentals of Trapped Ion Mobility Spectrometry Part II: Fluid Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Joshua A; Michelmann, Karsten; Ridgeway, Mark E; Park, Melvin A

    2016-04-01

    Trapped ion mobility spectrometry (TIMS) is a new high resolution (R up to ~300) separation technique that utilizes an electric field to hold ions stationary against a moving gas. Recently, an analytical model for TIMS was derived and, in part, experimentally verified. A central, but not yet fully explored, component of the model involves the fluid dynamics at work. The present study characterizes the fluid dynamics in TIMS using simulations and ion mobility experiments. Results indicate that subsonic laminar flow develops in the analyzer, with pressure-dependent gas velocities between ~120 and 170 m/s measured at the position of ion elution. One of the key philosophical questions addressed is: how can mobility be measured in a dynamic system wherein the gas is expanding and its velocity is changing? We noted previously that the analytically useful work is primarily done on ions as they traverse the electric field gradient plateau in the analyzer. In the present work, we show that the position-dependent change in gas velocity on the plateau is balanced by a change in pressure and temperature, ultimately resulting in near position-independent drag force. That the drag force, and related variables, are nearly constant allows for the use of relatively simple equations to describe TIMS behavior. Nonetheless, we derive a more comprehensive model, which accounts for the spatial dependence of the flow variables. Experimental resolving power trends were found to be in close agreement with the theoretical dependence of the drag force, thus validating another principal component of TIMS theory. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26864793

  8. Dynamically Multiplexed Ion Mobility Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Belov, Mikhail E.; Clowers, Brian H.; Prior, David C.; Danielson, William F.; Liyu, Andrei V.; Petritis, Brianne O.; Smith, Richard D.

    2008-08-01

    Ion Mobility Spectrometry–Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (IMS-TOFMS) has been increasingly used in analysis of complex biological samples. A major challenge is to transform IMS-TOFMS to a high-sensitivity high-throughput platform for e.g. proteomics applications. In this work, we have developed and integrated three advanced technologies, enabling (1) efficient ion accumulation in the ion funnel trap prior to IMS separation, (2) multiplexing (MP) of ion packet introduction into the IMS drift tube and (3) signal detection with an analog-to-digital converter (ADC), into the IMS-TOFMS system for the high-throughput analysis of highly complex proteolytic digests of e.g. blood plasma. To better address variable sample complexity, we have additionally developed and rigorously evaluated a new dynamic MP approach that ensures correlation of the analyzer performance with an ion source function, and provides the improved dynamic range and sensitivity. The MP IMS-TOF MS instrument has been shown to reliably detect peptides at a concentration of 1 nM in a highly complex matrix, as well as to provide a four orders of magnitude dynamic range and a mass measurement accuracy of better than 5 ppm. When matched against human blood plasma database, the detected IMS-TOF features yielded ~ 700 unique peptide identifications at a false discovery rate (FDR) of ~ 7.5 %. Accounting for IMS information gave rise to a projected FDR of ~ 4 %. Signal reproducibility was found to be greater than 80 %, while the variations in the number of unique peptide identifications were < 15 %. A single sample analysis was completed in 15 min, corresponding to approximately an order of magnitude improvement compared to a more conventional LC-MS approach.

  9. Nanowire dopant measurement using secondary ion mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chia, A. C. E.; Dhindsa, N.; Boulanger, J. P.; Wood, B. A.; Saini, S. S.; LaPierre, R. R.

    2015-09-01

    A method is presented to improve the quantitative determination of dopant concentration in semiconductor nanowire (NW) arrays using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). SIMS measurements were used to determine Be dopant concentrations in a Be-doped GaAs thin film and NW arrays of various pitches that were dry-etched from the same film. A comparison of these measurements revealed a factor of 3 to 12 difference, depending on the NW array pitch, between the secondary Be ion yields of the film and the NW arrays, despite being identically doped. This was due to matrix effects and ion beam mixing of Be from the NWs into the surrounding benzocyclobutene that was used to fill the space between the NWs. This indicates the need for etched NWs to be used as doping standards instead of 2D films when evaluating NWs of unknown doping by SIMS. Using the etched NWs as doping standards, NW arrays of various pitches grown by the vapour-liquid-solid mechanism were characterized by SIMS to yield valuable insights into doping mechanisms.

  10. Nanowire dopant measurement using secondary ion mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Chia, A. C. E.; Boulanger, J. P.; Wood, B. A.; LaPierre, R. R.; Dhindsa, N.; Saini, S. S.

    2015-09-21

    A method is presented to improve the quantitative determination of dopant concentration in semiconductor nanowire (NW) arrays using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). SIMS measurements were used to determine Be dopant concentrations in a Be-doped GaAs thin film and NW arrays of various pitches that were dry-etched from the same film. A comparison of these measurements revealed a factor of 3 to 12 difference, depending on the NW array pitch, between the secondary Be ion yields of the film and the NW arrays, despite being identically doped. This was due to matrix effects and ion beam mixing of Be from the NWs into the surrounding benzocyclobutene that was used to fill the space between the NWs. This indicates the need for etched NWs to be used as doping standards instead of 2D films when evaluating NWs of unknown doping by SIMS. Using the etched NWs as doping standards, NW arrays of various pitches grown by the vapour-liquid-solid mechanism were characterized by SIMS to yield valuable insights into doping mechanisms.

  11. Resolving Interferences in Negative Mode Ion Mobility Spectrometry Using Selective Reactant Ion Chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Daum, Keith Alvin; Atkinson, David Alan; Ewing, Robert Gordon; Knighton, W. B.; Grimsrud, E. P

    2001-04-01

    During the investigation of the degradation products of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) using ion mobility spectrometry (IMS), 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and 2,4-dichlorophenol (DCP) were found to have IMS responses which overlapped those of the TNT degradation products. It was observed that the Cl- reactant ion chemistry, often used for explosives analysis, was not always successful in resolving peak overlap of analytes and interferents. It is shown here that resolution of the analytes and interferences can sometimes be achieved using only air for the formation of reactant ions, at other times through the use of Br- as an alternative to Cl- for producing reactant ions, and also through the promotion of adduct stability by lowering the IMS temperature.

  12. Spatial Ion Peak Compression and its Utility in Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Garimella, Sandilya V. B.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Tang, Keqi; Webb, Ian K.; Baker, Erin S.; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Chen, Tsung-Chi; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2016-01-01

    A novel concept for ion spatial peak compression is described, and discussed primarily in the context of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS). Using theoretical and numerical methods, the effects of using non-constant (e.g., linearly varying) electric fields on ion distributions (e.g., an ion mobility peak) is evaluated both in the physical and temporal domains. The application of linearly decreasing electric field in conjunction with conventional drift field arrangements is shown to lead to a reduction in IMS physical peak width. When multiple ion packets (i.e. peaks) in a selected mobility window are simultaneously subjected to such fields, there is ion packet compression, i.e., a reduction in peak widths for all species. This peak compression occurs with only a modest reduction of resolution, and which can be quickly recovered as ions drift in a constant field after the compression event. Compression also yields a significant increase in peak intensities. Ion mobility peak compression can be particularly useful for mitigating diffusion driven peak spreading over very long path length separations (e.g., in cyclic multi-pass arrangements), and for achieving higher S/N and IMS resolution over a selected mobility range. PMID:27052738

  13. Spatial Ion Peak Compression and its Utility in Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garimella, Sandilya V. B.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Tang, Keqi; Webb, Ian K.; Baker, Erin S.; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Chen, Tsung-Chi; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2016-06-01

    A novel concept for ion spatial peak compression is described, and discussed primarily in the context of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS). Using theoretical and numerical methods, the effects of using non-constant (e.g., linearly varying) electric fields on ion distributions (e.g., an ion mobility peak) is evaluated both in the physical and temporal domains. The application of a linearly decreasing electric field in conjunction with conventional drift field arrangements is shown to lead to a reduction in IMS physical peak width. When multiple ion packets (i.e., peaks) in a selected mobility window are simultaneously subjected to such fields, there is ion packet compression (i.e., a reduction in peak widths for all species). This peak compression occurs with only a modest reduction of resolution, which can be quickly recovered as ions drift in a constant field after the compression event. Compression also yields a significant increase in peak intensities. Ion mobility peak compression can be particularly useful for mitigating diffusion-driven peak broadening over very long path length separations (e.g., in cyclic multi-pass arrangements), and for achieving higher S/N and IMS resolution over a selected mobility range.

  14. Spatial Ion Peak Compression and its Utility in Ion Mobility Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Garimella, Sandilya V B; Ibrahim, Yehia M; Tang, Keqi; Webb, Ian K; Baker, Erin S; Tolmachev, Aleksey V; Chen, Tsung-Chi; Anderson, Gordon A; Smith, Richard D

    2016-06-01

    A novel concept for ion spatial peak compression is described, and discussed primarily in the context of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS). Using theoretical and numerical methods, the effects of using non-constant (e.g., linearly varying) electric fields on ion distributions (e.g., an ion mobility peak) is evaluated both in the physical and temporal domains. The application of a linearly decreasing electric field in conjunction with conventional drift field arrangements is shown to lead to a reduction in IMS physical peak width. When multiple ion packets (i.e., peaks) in a selected mobility window are simultaneously subjected to such fields, there is ion packet compression (i.e., a reduction in peak widths for all species). This peak compression occurs with only a modest reduction of resolution, which can be quickly recovered as ions drift in a constant field after the compression event. Compression also yields a significant increase in peak intensities. Ion mobility peak compression can be particularly useful for mitigating diffusion-driven peak broadening over very long path length separations (e.g., in cyclic multi-pass arrangements), and for achieving higher S/N and IMS resolution over a selected mobility range. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27052738

  15. Spatial Ion Peak Compression and its Utility in Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garimella, Sandilya V. B.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Tang, Keqi; Webb, Ian K.; Baker, Erin S.; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Chen, Tsung-Chi; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2016-04-01

    A novel concept for ion spatial peak compression is described, and discussed primarily in the context of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS). Using theoretical and numerical methods, the effects of using non-constant (e.g., linearly varying) electric fields on ion distributions (e.g., an ion mobility peak) is evaluated both in the physical and temporal domains. The application of a linearly decreasing electric field in conjunction with conventional drift field arrangements is shown to lead to a reduction in IMS physical peak width. When multiple ion packets (i.e., peaks) in a selected mobility window are simultaneously subjected to such fields, there is ion packet compression (i.e., a reduction in peak widths for all species). This peak compression occurs with only a modest reduction of resolution, which can be quickly recovered as ions drift in a constant field after the compression event. Compression also yields a significant increase in peak intensities. Ion mobility peak compression can be particularly useful for mitigating diffusion-driven peak broadening over very long path length separations (e.g., in cyclic multi-pass arrangements), and for achieving higher S/N and IMS resolution over a selected mobility range.

  16. Secondary-ion mass spectrometry of genetically encoded targets.

    PubMed

    Vreja, Ingrid C; Kabatas, Selda; Saka, Sinem K; Kröhnert, Katharina; Höschen, Carmen; Opazo, Felipe; Diederichsen, Ulf; Rizzoli, Silvio O

    2015-05-01

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is generally used in imaging the isotopic composition of various materials. It is becoming increasingly popular in biology, especially for investigations of cellular metabolism. However, individual proteins are difficult to identify in SIMS, which limits the ability of this technology to study individual compartments or protein complexes. We present a method for specific protein isotopic and fluorescence labeling (SPILL), based on a novel click reaction with isotopic probes. Using this method, we added (19) F-enriched labels to different proteins, and visualized them by NanoSIMS and fluorescence microscopy. The (19) F signal allowed the precise visualization of the protein of interest, with minimal background, and enabled correlative studies of protein distribution and cellular metabolism or composition. SPILL can be applied to biological systems suitable for click chemistry, which include most cell-culture systems, as well as small model organisms. PMID:25783034

  17. Development of Ion Mobility Spectrometry for Exobiology Flight Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kojiro, Daniel R.; Carle, Glenn C.; Humphry, Donald E.; Shao, Maxine; Takeuchi, Nori; Chang, Sherwood (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) can provide gas chromatography with sample identification independent of sample retention time, with minimal interface. Initial commercial methods of IMS however, did not possess sufficient analytical capabilities and presented operational parameters which were unsuitable for exobiology missions. Subsequent development of IMS technology, with the focus on exobiology analytical requirements and mission imposed operational limitations, has produced an IMS interfaced with a GC capable of fulfilling the analytical requirements of several exobiology missions. Future exobiology missions will require further development of the IMS, particularly in the areas of overall instrument miniaturization and complex sample identification. The evolution of the exobiology focused IMS will be presented up to the current prototype design, which is a component of several proposed exobiology instruments. Areas of future development will also be discussed.

  18. Interrogating viral capsid assembly with ion mobility-mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uetrecht, Charlotte; Barbu, Ioana M.; Shoemaker, Glen K.; van Duijn, Esther; Heck, Albert J. R.

    2011-02-01

    Most proteins fulfil their function as part of large protein complexes. Surprisingly, little is known about the pathways and regulation of protein assembly. Several viral coat proteins can spontaneously assemble into capsids in vitro with morphologies identical to the native virion and thus resemble ideal model systems for studying protein complex formation. Even for these systems, the mechanism for self-assembly is still poorly understood, although it is generally thought that smaller oligomeric structures form key intermediates. This assembly nucleus and larger viral assembly intermediates are typically low abundant and difficult to monitor. Here, we characterised small oligomers of Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and norovirus under equilibrium conditions using native ion mobility mass spectrometry. This data in conjunction with computational modelling enabled us to elucidate structural features of these oligomers. Instead of more globular shapes, the intermediates exhibit sheet-like structures suggesting that they are assembly competent. We propose pathways for the formation of both capsids.

  19. Secondary-Ion Mass Spectrometry of Genetically Encoded Targets**

    PubMed Central

    Vreja, Ingrid C; Kabatas, Selda; Saka, Sinem K; Kröhnert, Katharina; Höschen, Carmen; Opazo, Felipe; Diederichsen, Ulf; Rizzoli, Silvio O

    2015-01-01

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is generally used in imaging the isotopic composition of various materials. It is becoming increasingly popular in biology, especially for investigations of cellular metabolism. However, individual proteins are difficult to identify in SIMS, which limits the ability of this technology to study individual compartments or protein complexes. We present a method for specific protein isotopic and fluorescence labeling (SPILL), based on a novel click reaction with isotopic probes. Using this method, we added 19F-enriched labels to different proteins, and visualized them by NanoSIMS and fluorescence microscopy. The 19F signal allowed the precise visualization of the protein of interest, with minimal background, and enabled correlative studies of protein distribution and cellular metabolism or composition. SPILL can be applied to biological systems suitable for click chemistry, which include most cell-culture systems, as well as small model organisms. PMID:25783034

  20. Surface diagnostics by ion scattering spectroscopy in gaseous environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamedov, N. V.; Kurnaev, V. A.; Sinelnikov, D. N.; Kolodko, D. V.

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, it is important to perform in-situ analysis of composition and thickness of ultra-thin (∼5-50 Å) surface layers in the course of the surface exposure to plasma or its components. For this aim, a new experimental facility based on the MEPhI Mass Monochromator is being developed, where low and medium energy ion spectroscopy of samples is used just after or during plasma exposure/ion treatment. A differentially pumped energy analyzer is used for recoil ion spectroscopy under grazing incidence conditions in the automated ion mass monochromator. A built-in Penning plasma source is used for plasma/ion treatment of samples. In this paper, the influence of the working gas (during the plasma source operation) on the energy spectra of reflected and recoil ions is studied. It is shown that the peak shape of the energy spectrum of scattered H+ ions increases during gas injection, and, at the same time, the signal intensity of the ionized recoils from the sample decreases. Nevertheless, analysis of the surface composition and thickness of the outer layer could be done at pressures ranging up to 10-4 Torr.

  1. Anomerization of Acrylated Glucose During Traveling Wave Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chendo, Christophe; Moreira, Guillaume; Tintaru, Aura; Posocco, Paola; Laurini, Erik; Lefay, Catherine; Gigmes, Didier; Viel, Stéphane; Pricl, Sabrina; Charles, Laurence

    2015-09-01

    Anomerization of simple sugars in the liquid phase is known as an acid- and base-catalyzed process, which highly depends on solvent polarity. This reaction is reported here to occur in the gas phase, during traveling wave ion mobility spectrometry (TWIMS) experiments aimed at separating α- and β-anomers of penta-acrylated glucose generated as ammonium adducts in electrospray ionization. This compound was available in two samples prepared from glucose dissolved in solvents of different polarity, namely tetrahydrofuran (THF) and N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMAC), and analyzed by electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS) as well as traveling wave ion mobility (ESI-TWIMS-MS). In MS/MS, an anchimerically-assisted process was found to be unique to the electrosprayed α-anomer, and was only observed for the THF sample. In ESI-TWIMS-MS, a signal was measured at the drift time expected for the α-anomer for both the THF and DMAC samples, in apparent contradiction to the MS/MS results, which indicated that the α-anomer was not present in the DMAC sample. However, MS/MS experiments performed after TWIMS separation revealed that ammonium adducts of the α-anomer produced from each sample, although exhibiting the same collision cross section, were clearly different. Indeed, while the α-anomer actually present in the THF sample was electrosprayed with the ammonium adducted at the C2 acrylate, its homologue only observed when the DMAC sample was subjected to TWIMS hold the adducted ammonium at the C1 acrylate. These findings were explained by a β/α inter-conversion upon injection in the TWIMS cell, as supported by theoretical calculation and dynamic molecular modeling.

  2. Structurally selective imaging mass spectrometry by imaging ion mobility-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    McLean, John A; Fenn, Larissa S; Enders, Jeffrey R

    2010-01-01

    This chapter describes the utility of structurally based separations combined with imaging mass spectrometry (MS) by ion mobility-MS (IM-MS) approaches. The unique capabilities of combining rapid (mus-ms) IM separations with imaging MS are detailed for an audience ranging from new to potential practitioners in IM-MS technology. Importantly, imaging IM-MS provides the ability to rapidly separate and elucidate various types of endogenous and exogenous biomolecules (e.g., nucleotides, carbohydrates, peptides, and lipids), including isobaric species. Drift tube and traveling wave IM-MS instrumentation are described and specific protocols are presented for calculating ion-neutral collision cross sections (i.e., apparent ion surface area or structure) from experimentally obtained IM-MS data. Special emphasis is placed on the use of imaging IM-MS for the analysis of samples in life sciences research (e.g., thin tissue sections), including selective imaging for peptide/protein and lipid distributions. Future directions for rapid and multiplexed imaging IM-MS/MS are detailed. PMID:20680602

  3. Simulation of ion beam scattering in a gas stripper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxeiner, Sascha; Suter, Martin; Christl, Marcus; Synal, Hans-Arno

    2015-10-01

    Ion beam scattering in the gas stripper of an accelerator mass spectrometer (AMS) enlarges the beam phase space and broadens its energy distribution. As the size of the injected beam depends on the acceleration voltage through phase space compression, the stripper becomes a limiting factor of the overall system transmission especially for low energy AMS system in the sub MV region. The spatial beam broadening and collisions with the accelerator tube walls are a possible source for machine background and energy loss fluctuations influence the mass resolution and thus isotope separation. To investigate the physical processes responsible for these effects, a computer simulation approach was chosen. Monte Carlo simulation methods are applied to simulate elastic two body scattering processes in screened Coulomb potentials in a (gas) stripper and formulas are derived to correctly determine random collision parameters and free path lengths for arbitrary (and non-homogeneous) gas densities. A simple parametric form for the underlying scattering cross sections is discussed which features important scaling behaviors. An implementation of the simulation was able to correctly model the data gained with the TANDY AMS system at ETH Zurich. The experiment covered transmission measurements of uranium ions in helium and beam profile measurements after the ion beam passed through the He-stripper. Beam profiles measured up to very high stripper densities could be understood in full system simulations including the relevant ion optics. The presented model therefore simulates the fundamental physics of the interaction between an ion beam and a gas stripper reliably. It provides a powerful and flexible tool for optimizing existing AMS stripper geometries and for designing new, state of the art low energy AMS systems.

  4. Ion trap simulation program, ITSIM: A powerful heuristic and predictive tool in ion trap mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bui, Huy Anh

    The multi-particle simulation program, ITSIM version 4.0, takes advantage of the enhanced performance of the Windows 95 and NT operating systems in areas such as memory management, user friendliness, flexibility of graphics and speed, to investigate the motion of ions in the quadrupole ion trap. The objective of this program is to use computer simulations based on mathematical models to improve the performance of the ion trap mass spectrometer. The simulation program can provide assistance in understanding fundamental aspects of ion trap mass spectrometry, precede and help to direct the course of experiments, as well as having didactic value in elucidating and allowing visualization of ion behavior under different experimental conditions. The program uses the improved Euler method to calculate ion trajectories as numerical solutions to the Mathieu differential equation. This Windows version can simultaneously simulate the trajectories of ions with a virtually unlimited number of different mass-to-charge ratios and hence allows realistic mass spectra, ion kinetic energy distributions and other experimentally measurable properties to be simulated. The large number of simulated ions allows examination of (i) the offsetting effects of mutual ion repulsion and collisional cooling in an ion trap and (ii) the effects of higher order fields. Field inhomogeneities arising from exit holes, electrode misalignment, imperfect electrode surfaces or new trap geometries can be simulated with the program. The simulated data are used to obtain mass spectra from mass-selective instability scans as well as by Fourier transformation of image currents induced by coherently moving ion clouds. Complete instruments, from an ion source through the ion trap mass analyzer to a detector, can now be simulated. Applications of the simulation program are presented and discussed. Comparisons are made between the simulations and experimental data. Fourier transformed experiments and a novel six

  5. Stimulated Brillouin scatter and stimulated ion Bernstein scatter during electron gyroharmonic heating experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, H.; Scales, W. A.; Bernhardt, P. A.; Samimi, A.; Mahmoudian, A.; Briczinski, S. J.; McCarrick, M. J.

    2013-09-01

    Results of secondary radiation, Stimulated Electromagnetic Emission (SEE), produced during ionospheric modification experiments using ground-based high-power radio waves are reported. These results obtained at the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility specifically considered the generation of Magnetized Stimulated Brillouin Scatter (MSBS) and Stimulated Ion Bernstein Scatter (SIBS) lines in the SEE spectrum when the transmitter frequency is near harmonics of the electron gyrofrequency. The heater antenna beam angle effect was investigated on MSBS in detail and shows a new spectral line postulated to be generated near the upper hybrid resonance region due to ion acoustic wave interaction. Frequency sweeping experiments near the electron gyroharmonics show for the first time the transition from MSBS to SIBS lines as the heater pump frequency approaches the gyroharmonic. Significantly far from the gyroharmonic, MSBS lines dominate, while close to the gyroharmonic, SIBS lines strengthen while MSBS lines weaken. New possibilities for diagnostic information are discussed in light of these new observations.

  6. Trying to detect gas-phase ions? Understanding Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Cumeras, R.; Figueras, E.; Davis, C.E.; Baumbach, J.I.; Gràcia, I.

    2014-01-01

    Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) is a widely used and ‘well-known’ technique of ion separation in gaseous phase based on the differences of ion mobilities under an electric field. This technique has received increased interest over the last several decades as evidenced by the pace and advances of new IMS devices available. In this review we explore the hyphenated techniques that are used with IMS, especially mass spectrometry as identification approach and multi-capillary column as pre-separation approach. Also, we will pay special attention to the key figures of merit of the ion mobility spectrum and how data is treated, and the influences of the experimental parameters in both a conventional drift time IMS (DTIMS) and a miniaturized IMS also known as high Field Asymmetric IMS (FAIMS) in the planar configuration. The current review article is preceded by a companion review article which details the current instrumentation and to the sections that configures both a conventional DTIMS and FAIMS devices. Those reviews will give the reader an insightful view of the main characteristics and aspects of the IMS technique. PMID:25465248

  7. Total residue analysis of swabs by ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Strege, Mark A

    2009-06-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) is a technique attractive for use within the pharmaceutical industry for at-line determination of residues on swabs taken from the surfaces of manufacturing equipment for the purposes of cleaning validation or verification. In this study, the development of a novel IMS method to provide a measurement of total residue present on a swab is described. The technique is based upon quantitation of charged atmospheric gas reactant ion consumption (RIC) within the instrument as a direct measure of the mass of total ionizable residue. Coupled with the conventional analysis of the active pharmaceutical ingredient within a single 2 min analysis, RIC determination provided the benefit of a single measure representative of the presence of multiple residue components or unknown components. To account for differences in response between components of a model drug product (Cymbalta) and its associated cleaning agents, a strategy was proposed to determine a "worst case" total residue test result based on RIC. A limitation of the IMS method was its incompatibility with cleaners containing a high concentration of inorganic components. The methodology provided a range from 5-50 microg per 25 cm(2) surface area and acceptable analyte recovery (50-100%). PMID:19476393

  8. Low-temperature plasma ionization differential ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kuklya, Andriy; Engelhard, Carsten; Uteschil, Florian; Kerpen, Klaus; Marks, Robert; Telgheder, Ursula

    2015-09-01

    A low-temperature plasma (LTP) was used as an ionization source for differential ion mobility spectrometry (DMS) for the first time. This ionization source enhances the potential of DMS as a miniaturized system for on-site rapid monitoring. The effects of experimental parameters (e.g., discharge/carrier gas composition and flow rate, applied voltage) on the analysis of model aromatic compounds were investigated and discussed. It was found that the nature of reactant ion positive (RIP) is dependent on the discharge/carrier gas composition. The best response to the analyte was achieved when pure nitrogen was used as the discharge/carrier gas. The ability to perform analysis with zero helium consumption is especially attractive in view of the potential application of LTP-DMS for online (and on-site) monitoring. Analytical performance was determined with six environmentally relevant model compounds (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, p-xylene, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, and naphthalene) using LTP and directly compared to APPI and APCI ((63)Ni) ionization sources. When LTP was coupled to DMS, calculated LOD values were found to be in the range of 35-257 ng L(-1) (concentration in the carrier gas). These values are competitive with those calculated for two DMS equipped with traditional ionization sources (APPI, (63)Ni). The obtained results are promising enough to ensure the potential of LTP as ionization source for DMS. PMID:26266836

  9. Liquid extraction surface analysis field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry mass spectrometry for the analysis of dried blood spots.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Rian L; Dexter, Alex; Creese, Andrew J; Cooper, Helen J

    2015-10-21

    Liquid extraction surface analysis (LESA) is a surface sampling technique that allows electrospray mass spectrometry analysis of a wide range of analytes directly from biological substrates. Here, we present LESA mass spectrometry coupled with high field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) for the analysis of dried blood spots on filter paper. Incorporation of FAIMS in the workflow enables gas-phase separation of lipid and protein molecular classes, enabling analysis of both haemoglobin and a range of lipids (phosphatidylcholine or phosphatidylethanolamine, and sphingomyelin species) from a single extraction sample. The work has implications for multiplexed clinical assays of multiple analytes. PMID:26198596

  10. Ion Trap with Narrow Aperture Detection Electrodes for Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagornov, Konstantin O.; Kozhinov, Anton N.; Tsybin, Oleg Y.; Tsybin, Yury O.

    2015-05-01

    The current paradigm in ion trap (cell) design for Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) is the ion detection with wide aperture detection electrodes. Specifically, excitation and detection electrodes are typically 90° wide and positioned radially at a similar distance from the ICR cell axis. Here, we demonstrate that ion detection with narrow aperture detection electrodes (NADEL) positioned radially inward of the cell's axis is feasible and advantageous for FT-ICR MS. We describe design details and performance characteristics of a 10 T FT-ICR MS equipped with a NADEL ICR cell having a pair of narrow aperture (flat) detection electrodes and a pair of standard 90° excitation electrodes. Despite a smaller surface area of the detection electrodes, the sensitivity of the NADEL ICR cell is not reduced attributable to improved excite field distribution, reduced capacitance of the detection electrodes, and their closer positioning to the orbits of excited ions. The performance characteristics of the NADEL ICR cell are comparable with the state-of-the-art FT-ICR MS implementations for small molecule, peptide, protein, and petroleomics analyses. In addition, the NADEL ICR cell's design improves the flexibility of ICR cells and facilitates implementation of advanced capabilities (e.g., quadrupolar ion detection for improved mainstream applications). It also creates an intriguing opportunity for addressing the major bottleneck in FTMS—increasing its throughput via simultaneous acquisition of multiple transients or via generation of periodic non-sinusoidal transient signals.

  11. The combined use of a singly charged ion beam and undulator radiation for photoelectron spectrometry studies on atomic ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizau, J. M.; Cubaynes, D.; Richter, M.; Wuilleumier, F.; Obert, J.; Putaux, J. C.

    1992-01-01

    We present the first photoelectron spectrometry experiment on a singly charged ion beam. Taking advantage of the high photon flux emitted in the undulator SU6 of Super-ACO, we have measured photoelectron spectra produced in the resonant photoionization of Ca+ ions at 33.2-eV photon energy. The success of this experiment depended strongly on the photon flux available. We demonstrate the capability of photoelectron spectrometry to precisely calibrate the photon spectrum emitted in the undulator.

  12. Electron Flood Charge Compensation Device for Ion Trap Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Appelhans, Anthony David; Ward, Michael Blair; Olson, John Eric

    2002-11-01

    During secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) analyses of organophosphorous compounds adsorbed onto soils, the measured anion signals were lower than expected and it was hypothesized that the low signals could be due to sample charging. An electron flood gun was designed, constructed and used to investigate sample charging of these and other sample types. The flood gun was integrated into one end cap of an ion trap secondary ion mass spectrometer and the design maintained the geometry of the self-stabilizing extraction optics used in this instrument. The SIMION ion optics program was used to design the flood gun, and experimental results agreed with the predicted performance. Results showed the low anion signals from the soils were not due to sample charging. Other insulating and conducting samples were tested using both a ReO4- and a Cs+ primary ion beam. The proximity of the sample and electron source to the ion trap aperture resulted in generation of background ions in the ion trap via electron impact (EI) ionization during the period the electron gun was flooding the sample region. When using the electron gun with the ReO4- primary beam, the required electron current was low enough that the EI background was negligible; however, the high electron flood current required with the Cs+ beam produced background EI ions that degraded the quality of the mass spectra. The consequences of the EI produced cations will have to be evaluated on a sample-by-sample basis when using electron flood. It was shown that the electron flood gun could be intentionally operated to produce EI spectra in this instrument. This offers the opportunity to measure, nearly simultaneously, species evaporating from a sample, via EI, and species bound to the surface, via SIMS.

  13. Gas phase studies on terpenes by ion mobility spectrometry using different atmospheric pressure chemical ionization techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borsdorf, H.; Stone, J. A.; Eiceman, G. A.

    2005-11-01

    The ionization pathways and drift behavior were determined for sets of constitutional isomeric and stereoisomeric non-polar hydrocarbons (unsaturated monocyclic terpenes, unsaturated and saturated bicyclic terpenes) using ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) with different techniques of atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) to assess how structural and stereochemical differences influence ion formation. Depending on the structural features, different ions were observed for constitutional isomers using ion mobility spectrometry with photoionization (PI) and corona discharge (CD) ionization. Photoionization provides ion mobility spectra containing one major peak for saturated compounds while at two peaks were observed for unsaturated compounds, which can be assigned to product ions related to monomer and dimer ions. However, differences in relative abundance of product ions were found depending on the position of the double bond. Although IMS using corona discharge ionization permits the most sensitive detection of non-polar hydrocarbons, the spectra are complex and differ from those obtained using photoionization. Additional cluster ions and fragment ions were detected. Only small differences in ion mobility spectra were observed for the diastereomers while the enantiomers provide identical spectra. The structure of the product ions formed was checked by investigations using the coupling of ion mobility spectrometry with mass spectrometry (IMS-MS).

  14. A voltage control unit for ion scattering spectroscopy analyzers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roos, W. D.; Henson, R. P.; van Wyk, G. N.

    1993-04-01

    A voltage control unit for a spherical sector analyzer used in the energy analysis of scattered ions is described. Three modes of operation, namely, automatic, manual, and computer control is possible. The unit is directly calibrated in terms of the scattered energies which is displayed on a liquid crystal unit. The scanning time in the auto mode is adjustable from 1 to 999 s in 1-s steps for any selected energy range. A 0-10-V recorder output is available regardless of the energy window selected. The basic operation and the functioning of the various components are explained with the help of block diagrams and a final evaluation of the system is given. Complete circuit diagrams are available from the Physics Auxiliary Publication Service (PAPS) of the American Institute of Physics.

  15. Design and performance of an instrument for electron impact tandem mass spectrometry and action spectroscopy of mass/charge selected macromolecular ions stored in RF ion trap*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranković, Milos Lj.; Giuliani, Alexandre; Milosavljević, Aleksandar R.

    2016-05-01

    A new apparatus was designed, coupling an electron gun with a linear quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer, to perform m/z (mass over charge) selected ion activation by electron impact for tandem mass spectrometry and action spectroscopy. We present in detail electron tracing simulations of a 300 eV electron beam inside the ion trap, design of the mechanical parts, electron optics and electronic circuits used in the experiment. We also report examples of electron impact activation tandem mass spectra for Ubiquitin protein, Substance P and Melittin peptides, at incident electron energies in the range from 280 eV to 300 eV. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Advances in Positron and Electron Scattering", edited by Paulo Limao-Vieira, Gustavo Garcia, E. Krishnakumar, James Sullivan, Hajime Tanuma and Zoran Petrovic.

  16. Analytical Chemistry of Surfaces: Part III. Ion Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hercules, David M.; Hercules, Shirley H.

    1984-01-01

    The fundamentals of two surface techniques--secondary-ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and ion-scattering spectrometry (ISS)--are discussed. Examples of how these techniques have been applied to surface problems are provided. (JN)

  17. Fast ion dynamics measured by collective Thomson scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bindslev, Henrik

    2001-10-01

    In magnetically confined fusion plasmas, fast ions, from fusion reactions and auxiliary heating, typically carry a third of the total plasma kinetic energy, and even more of the free energy. This free energy must be channelled into heating the bulk plasma, but is also available for driving waves in the plasma, affecting confinement of bulk and fast ions. We know that fast ions can drive Alfvén waves, affect sawteeth and fishbones. In turn all three can redistribute or ejects the fast ions. Wave particle interaction, also the basis of Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH), depends crucially on the phase space distribution of the fast ions. Conversely the effect waves and instabilities have of fast ions will manifest itself in the detail of the fast ion phase space distribution. To explore the dynamics of fast ions and their interaction with the plasma thus begs for measurements of the fast ion distribution resolved in space, time and velocity. This has long been the promise of Collective Thomson Scattering (CTS) [1]. First demonstrated at JET [2]and subsequently at TEXTOR [3], CTS is living up to its promise and is now contributing to the understanding of fast ion dynamics. With the TEXTOR CTS, temporal behaviours of fast ion velocity distributions have been uncovered. The fast ion populations are produced by ICRH and Neutral Beam Injection (NBI). At sawteeth, we see clear variations in the fast ion population, which depend on ion energy, pitch angle and spatial location. Investigating the region just inside the inversion radius, we find that ions with small parallel energy, and with perpendicular energies up to a soft threshold well above thermal, are lost from the high field side near the inversion radius, while more energetic ions in the same pitch angle range remain insensitive to the sawteeth. The sensitive population could include the potato and stagnation orbit particles identified theoretically as being sensitive the sawteeth [4]. Under the same conditions

  18. Modular calibrant sets for the structural analysis of nucleic acids by ion mobility spectrometry mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lippens, Jennifer L; Ranganathan, Srivathsan V; D'Esposito, Rebecca J; Fabris, Daniele

    2016-06-20

    This study explored the use of modular nucleic acid (NA) standards to generate calibration curves capable of translating primary ion mobility readouts into corresponding collision cross section (CCS) data. Putative calibrants consisted of single- (ss) and double-stranded (ds) oligo-deoxynucleotides reaching up to ∼40 kDa in size (i.e., 64 bp) and ∼5700 Å(2) in CCS. To ensure self-consistency among reference CCS values, computational data obtained in house were preferred to any experimental or computational data from disparate sources. Such values were obtained by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and either the exact hard sphere scattering (EHSS) or the projection superposition approximation (PSA) methods, and then plotted against the corresponding experimental values to generate separate calibration curves. Their performance was evaluated on the basis of their correlation coefficients and ability to provide values that matched the CCS of selected test samples mimicking typical unknowns. The results indicated that the predictive power benefited from the exclusion of higher charged species that were more susceptible to the destabilizing effects of Coulombic repulsion. The results revealed discrepancies between EHSS and PSA data that were ascribable to the different approximations used to describe the ion mobility process. Within the boundaries defined by these approximations and the challenges of modeling NA structure in a solvent-free environment, the calibrant sets enabled the experimental determination of CCS with excellent reproducibility (precision) and error (accuracy), which will support the analysis of progressively larger NA samples of biological significance. PMID:27152369

  19. Detection and characterization of smokeless powders with ion mobility spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, Neiza M.; Rosario, Santa V.; Hernandez, Samuel P.; Mina, Nairmen

    2005-05-01

    Smokeless Powders are a class of propellants that were developed in the late 19th century to replace black powder; it has been used as an explosive in shotguns, rifles, firearms and many other larger caliber weapons. These propellants can be placed into one of three different classes according to the chemical composition of their primary energetic ingredients. Advance equipment have been designed and used for the detection of explosives devices and compounds potentially energetic. In this research we are developing an analytical methodology to detect different formulation of smokeless powders: Alliant-American Select, Alliant-Bullseye, and Alliant-Red Dot using the ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) technique. We used different surfaces like computer diskettes, CD"s, book covers and plastics to study their adsorption/desorption process. Using micropipettes, we delivered solutions with different amounts of Smokeless Powders from a 1000 ppm solution and deposit it on various types of filters to make a calibration curve. Several amounts of Smokeless Powder were deposited to the different surfaces and collected with filter paper. The samples were desorbed directly from the filter to the instrument inlet port. Subsequently, the percentage of explosive recovered was calculated.

  20. Towards metals analysis using corona discharge ionization ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Mohammad T; Saraji, Mohammad; Sherafatmand, Hossein

    2016-02-25

    For the first time, the capability of corona discharge ionization ion mobility spectrometry (CD-IMS) in the determination of metal complex was evaluated. The extreme simplicity of dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) coupled to the high sensitivity of CD-IMS measurement could make this combination really useful for simple, rapid, and sensitive determination of metals in different samples. In this regard, mercury, as a model metal, was complexed with diethyldithiocarbamate (DEDTC), and then extracted into the carbon tetrachloride using DLLME. Some parameters affecting the extraction efficiency, including the type and volume of the extraction solvent, the type and volume of the disperser solvent, the concentration of the chelating agent, salt addition and, pH were exhaustively investigated. Under the optimized condition, the enrichment factor was obtained to be 142. The linear range of 0.035-10.0 μg mL(-1) with r(2) = 0.997 and the detection limit of 0.010 μg mL(-1) were obtained. The relative standard deviation values were calculated to be lower than 4% and 8% for intra-day and inter-day, respectively. Finally, the developed method was successfully applied for the extraction and determination of mercury in various real samples. The satisfactory results revealed the capability of the proposed method in trace analysis without tedious derivatization or hydride generation. PMID:26851088

  1. Improving Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry Image Quality with Image Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Tarolli, Jay G.; Jackson, Lauren M.; Winograd, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    The spatial resolution of chemical images acquired with cluster secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is limited not only by the size of the probe utilized to create the images, but also by detection sensitivity. As the probe size is reduced to below 1 µm, for example, a low signal in each pixel limits lateral resolution due to counting statistics considerations. Although it can be useful to implement numerical methods to mitigate this problem, here we investigate the use of image fusion to combine information from scanning electron microscope (SEM) data with chemically resolved SIMS images. The advantage of this approach is that the higher intensity and, hence, spatial resolution of the electron images can help to improve the quality of the SIMS images without sacrificing chemical specificity. Using a pan-sharpening algorithm, the method is illustrated using synthetic data, experimental data acquired from a metallic grid sample, and experimental data acquired from a lawn of algae cells. The results show that up to an order of magnitude increase in spatial resolution is possible to achieve. A cross-correlation metric is utilized for evaluating the reliability of the procedure. PMID:24912432

  2. Fundamentals of ambient metastable-induced chemical ionization mass spectrometry and atmospheric pressure ion mobility spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Glenn A.

    Molecular ionization is owed much of its development from the early implementation of electron ionization (EI). Although dramatically increasing the library of compounds discovered, an inherent problem with EI was the low abundance of molecular ions detected due to high fragmentation leading to the difficult task of the correct chemical identification after mass spectrometry (MS). These problems stimulated the research into new ionization methods which sought to "soften" the ionization process. In the late 1980s the advancements of ionization techniques was thought to have reached its pinnacle with both electrospray ionization (ESI) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI). Both ionization techniques allowed for "soft" ionization of large molecular weight and/or labile compounds for intact characterization by MS. Albeit pervasive, neither ESI nor MALDI can be viewed as "magic bullet" ionization techniques. Both techniques require sample preparation which often included native sample destruction, and operation of these techniques took place in sealed enclosures and often, reduced pressure conditions. New open-air ionization techniques termed "ambient MS" enable direct analysis of samples of various physical states, sizes and shapes. One particular technique named Direct Analysis In Real Time (DART) has been steadily growing as one of the ambient tools of choice to ionize small molecular weight (< 1000 Da) molecules with a wide range of polarities. Although there is a large list of reported applications using DART as an ionization source, there have not been many studies investigating the fundamental properties of DART desorption and ionization mechanisms. The work presented in this thesis is aimed to provide in depth findings on the physicochemical phenomena during open-air DART desorption and ionization MS and current application developments. A review of recent ambient plasma-based desorption/ionization techniques for analytical MS is presented in

  3. Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry Direct Isotope Abundance Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Manuel J. Manard, Stephan Weeks, Kevin Kyle

    2010-05-27

    The nuclear forensics community is currently engaged in the analysis of illicit nuclear or radioactive material for the purposes of non-proliferations and attribution. One technique commonly employed for gathering nuclear forensics information is isotope analysis. At present, the state-of-the-art methodology for obtaining isotopic distributions is thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). Although TIMS is highly accurate at determining isotope distributions, the technique requires an elementally pure sample to perform the measurement. The required radiochemical separations give rise to sample preparation times that can be in excess of one to two weeks. Clearly, the nuclear forensics community is in need of instrumentation and methods that can expedite their decision making process in the event of a radiological release or nuclear detonation. Accordingly, we are developing instrumentation that couples a high resolution IM drift cell to the front end of a MS. The IM cell provides a means of separating ions based upon their collision cross-section and mass-to-charge ratio (m/z). Two analytes with the same m/z, but with different collision cross-sections (shapes) would exit the cell at different times, essentially enabling the cell to function in a similar manner to a gas chromatography (GC) column. Thus, molecular and atomic isobaric interferences can be effectively removed from the ion beam. The mobility selected chemical species could then be introduced to a MS for high-resolution mass analysis to generate isotopic distributions of the target analytes. The outcome would be an IM/MS system capable of accurately measuring isotopic distributions while concurrently eliminating isobaric interferences and laboratory radiochemical sample preparation. The overall objective of this project is developing instrumentation and methods to produce near real-time isotope distributions with a modular mass spectrometric system that performs the required gas-phase chemistry and

  4. Determination of N-linked glycosylation in viral glycoproteins by negative ion mass spectrometry and ion mobility

    PubMed Central

    Bitto, David; Harvey, David J.; Halldorsson, Steinar; Doores, Katie J.; Pritchard, Laura K.; Huiskonen, Juha T.; Bowden, Thomas A.; Crispin, Max

    2016-01-01

    Summary Glycan analysis of virion-derived glycoproteins is challenging due to the difficulties in glycoprotein isolation and low sample abundance. Here, we describe how ion mobility mass spectrometry can be used to obtain spectra from virion samples. We also describe how negative ion fragmentation of glycans can be used to probe structural features of virion glycans. PMID:26169737

  5. Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization of fluorinated phenols in atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry, tandem mass spectrometry, and ion mobility spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eiceman, G. A.; Bergloff, J. F.; Rodriguez, J. E.; Munro, W.; Karpas, Z.

    1999-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI)-mass spectrometry (MS) for fluorinated phenols (C6H5-xFxOH Where x = 0-5) in nitrogen with Cl- as the reagent ion yielded product ions of M Cl- through ion associations or (M-H)- through proton abstractions. Proton abstraction was controllable by potentials on the orifice and first lens, suggesting that some proton abstraction occurs through collision induced dissociation (CID) in the interface region. This was proven using CID of adduct ions (M Cl-) with Q2 studies where adduct ions were dissociated to Cl- or proton abstracted to (M-H)-. The extent of proton abstraction depended upon ion energy and structure in order of calculated acidities: pentafluorophenol > tetrafluorophenol > trifluorophenol > difluorophenol. Little or no proton abstraction occurred for fluorophenol, phenol, or benzyl alcohol analogs. Ion mobility spectrometry was used to determine if proton abstraction reactions passed through an adduct intermediate with thermalized ions and mobility spectra for all chemicals were obtained from 25 to 200 degrees C. Proton abstraction from M Cl- was not observed at any temperature for phenol, monofluorophenol, or difluorophenol. Mobility spectra for trifluorophenol revealed the kinetic transformations to (M-H)- either from M Cl- or from M2 Cl- directly. Proton abstraction was the predominant reaction for tetra- and penta-fluorophenols. Consequently, the evidence suggests that proton abstraction occurs from an adduct ion where the reaction barrier is reduced with increasing acidity of the O-H bond in C6H5-xFxOH.

  6. Evolution of instrumentation for the study of gas-phase ion/ion chemistry via mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yu; McLuckey, Scott A

    2008-02-01

    The scope of gas-phase ion/ion chemistry accessible to mass spectrometry is largely defined by the available tools. Due to the development of novel instrumentation, a wide range of reaction phenomenologies has been noted, many of which have been studied extensively and exploited for analytical applications. This perspective presents the development of mass spectrometry-based instrumentation for the study of the gas-phase ion/ion chemistry in which at least one of the reactants is multiply charged. The instrument evolution is presented within the context of three essential elements required for any ion/ion reaction study: the ionization source(s), the reaction vessel or environment, and the mass analyzer. Ionization source arrangements have included source combinations that allow for reactions between multiply charged ions of one polarity and singly charged ions of opposite polarity, arrangements that enable the study of reactions of multiply charged ions of opposite polarity and, most recently, arrangements that allow for ion formation from more than two ion sources. Gas-phase ion/ion reaction studies have been performed at near atmospheric pressure in flow reactor designs and within electrodynamic ion traps operated in the mTorr range. With ion trap as a reaction vessel, ionization and reaction processes can be independently optimized and ion/ion reactions can be implemented within the context of MSn experiments. Spatial separation of the reaction vessel from the mass analyzer allows for the use of any form of mass analysis in conjunction with ion/ion reactions. Time-of-flight mass analysis, for example, has provided significant improvements in mass analysis figures of merit relative to mass filters and ion traps. PMID:18083527

  7. Evolution of Instrumentation for the Study of Gas-Phase Ion/Ion Chemistry via Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Yu; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2008-01-01

    The scope of gas phase ion/ion chemistry accessible to mass spectrometry is largely defined by the available tools. Due to the development of novel instrumentation, a wide range of reaction phenomenologies have been noted, many of which have been studied extensively and exploited for analytical applications. This perspective presents the development of mass spectrometry-based instrumentation for the study of the gas phase ion/ion chemistry in which at least one of the reactants is multiply-charged. The instrument evolution is presented within the context of three essential elements required for any ion/ion reaction study: the ionization source(s), the reaction vessel or environment, and the mass analyzer. Ionization source arrangements have included source combinations that allow for reactions between multiply charged ions of one polarity and singly charged ions of opposite polarity, arrangements that enable the study of reactions of multiply charged ions of opposite polarity, and most recently, arrangements that allow for ion formation from more than two ion sources. Gas phase ion/ion reaction studies have been performed at near atmospheric pressure in flow reactor designs and within electrodynamic ion traps operated in the mTorr range. With ion trap as a reaction vessel, ionization and reaction processes can be independently optimized and ion/ion reactions can be implemented within the context of MSn experiments. Spatial separation of the reaction vessel from the mass analyzer allows for the use of any form of mass analysis in conjunction with ion/ion reactions. Time-of-flight mass analysis, for example, has provided significant improvements in mass analysis figures of merit relative to mass filters and ion traps. PMID:18083527

  8. Developing Fieldable Systems for Chemical Sensing Using Field Asymmetric Ion Mobility Spectrometry and Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin Kyle, Stephan Weeks, R. Trainham

    2008-03-01

    Currently, there is an urgent need for field-rugged and field-programmable sensor systems that provide highly selective, universal monitoring of vapors and aerosols at detectable levels from persons or areas involved with illicit chemical/biological/explosives (CBE) production. These devices must be portable, low cost, robust, and provide accurate measurements to avoid both false positive and negative results. Furthermore, the information provided by the devices must be received in a timely manner so that informed decisions can be immediately made and the appropriate actions taken. Two technologies that are unparalleled in their sensitivity, selectivity, and trace-level detection capabilities are field asymmetric ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) and mass spectrometry. Here, we will show progress that has been made toward developing fieldable FAIMS systems and mass spectrometers. Working in collaboration with Sionex Corporation, the microDMx detector was equipped with a continuous air sampling system to develop selective methods for the analysis of compounds of interest. A microdiaphragm pump (KNF Neuberger, Inc.) is used to pull in gas-phase analytes directly from the air for separation and detection with the FAIMS system. The FAIMS evaluation platform (SVAC) unit currently measures 9.8-inch x 4.6-inch x 3.2-inch, weighs 3.1 lb, and utilizes a {sup 63}Ni source to ionize incoming compounds. Analytes entering the unit are separated and identified by their characteristic response to the compensation voltage (V{sub c}) at a given rf field strength (V{sub rf}). This response has been observed to be unique for a wide range of substances studied. If additional verification were required or a targeted analyte present in a complex chemical matrix, a FAIMS unit equipped with a fast gas chromatography column has been evaluated. The unit combines the separation capabilities of gas chromatography with the selectivity of FAIMS. It measures 9.5-inch x 5.25-inch x 3.5-inch

  9. Decomposition of cyclohexane ion induced by intense femtosecond laser fields by ion-trap time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Takao; Watanabe, Yusuke; Kanya, Reika; Yamanouchi, Kaoru

    2016-01-01

    Decomposition of cyclohexane cations induced by intense femtosecond laser fields at the wavelength of 800 nm is investigated by ion-trap time-of-flight mass spectrometry in which cyclohexane cations C6H12+ stored in an ion trap are irradiated with intense femtosecond laser pulses and the generated fragment ions are recorded by time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The various fragment ion species, C5Hn+ (n = 7, 9), C4Hn+ (n = 5-8), C3Hn+ (n = 3-7), C2Hn+ (n = 2-6), and CH3+, identified in the mass spectra show that decomposition of C6H12+ proceeds efficiently by the photo-irradiation. From the laser intensity dependences of the yields of the fragment ion species, the numbers of photons required for producing the respective fragment ions are estimated.

  10. Low-Energy Grazing Ion-Scattering from Alkali-Halide Surfaces: A Novel Approach to C-14 Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Fred W; Galutschek, Ernst; Hotchkis, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Carbon-14 labeled compounds are widely used in the pharmaceutical industry, e.g., as tracers to determine the fate of these compounds in vivo. Conventional accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is one approach that offers sufficiently high sensitivity to avoid radiological waste and contamination issues in such studies, but requires large, expensive facilities that are usually not solely dedicated to this task. At the ORNL Multicharged Ion Research Facility (MIRF) we are exploring a small size, low cost alternative to AMS for biomedical 14C tracer studies that utilizes ECR-ion-source-generated keV-energy-range multicharged C beams grazingly incident on an alkali halide target, where efficient negative ion production by multiple electron capture takes place. By using C ion charge states of +3 or higher, the molecular isobar interference at mass 14, e.g. 12CH2 and 13CH, is eliminated. The negatively charged ions in the beam scattered from the alkali halide surface are separated from other scattered charge states by two large acceptance ({approx}15 msr) stages of electrostatic analysis. The N-14 isobar interference is thus removed, since N does not support a stable negative ion. Initial results for C-14 detection obtained using C-14 enriched CO2 from ANSTO will be described.

  11. An overview of resid characterization by mass spectrometry and small angle scattering techniques.

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, J. E.; Winans, R. E.

    1999-07-14

    The purpose of this presentation is to discuss what is known about the molecular structures found in petroleum resid from mass spectrometry and small angle neutron and X-ray scattering methods. The question about molecular size distributions and the occurrence of aggregation in the asphaltene fraction will be examined. Our understanding of this problem has evolved with the application of new analytical methods. Also, correlations with results from other approaches will be discussed. In addition, the issue of the nature of the heteroatom-containing molecules will be examined and the challenges that remain in this area.

  12. Ion-Surface Collisions in Mass Spectrometry: Where Analytical Chemistry Meets Surface Science

    SciTech Connect

    Laskin, Julia

    2015-02-01

    This article presents a personal perspective regarding the development of key concepts in understanding hyperthermal collisions of polyatomic ions with surfaces as a unique tool for mass spectrometry applications. In particular, this article provides a historic overview of studies focused on understanding the phenomena underlying surface-induced dissociation (SID) and mass-selected deposition of complex ions on surfaces. Fast energy transfer in ion-surface collisions makes SID especially advantageous for structural characterization of large complex molecules, such as peptides, proteins, and protein complexes. Soft, dissociative, and reactive landing of mass-selected ions provide the basis for preparatory mass spectrometry. These techniques enable precisely controlled deposition of ions on surfaces for a variety of applications. This perspective article shows how basic concepts developed in the 1920s and 1970s have evolved to advance promising mass-spectrometry-based applications.

  13. Advances in ion trap mass spectrometry: Photodissociation as a tool for structural elucidation

    SciTech Connect

    Stephenson, J.L. Jr.; Booth, M.M.; Eyler, J.R.; Yost, R.A.

    1995-12-01

    Photo-induced dissociation (PID) is the next most frequently used method (after collisional activation) for activation of Polyatomic ions in tandem mass spectrometry. The range of internal energies present after the photon absorption process are much narrower than those obtained with collisional energy transfer. Therefore, the usefulness of PID for the study of ion structures is greatly enhanced. The long storage times and instrumental configuration of the ion trap mass spectrometer are ideally suited for photodissociation experiments. This presentation will focus on both the fundamental and analytical applications of CO{sub 2} lasers in conjunction with ion trap mass spectrometry. The first portion of this talk will examine the fundamental issues of wavelength dependence, chemical kinetics, photoabsorption cross section, and collisional effects on photodissociation efficiency. The second half of this presentation will look at novel instrumentation for electrospray/ion trap mass spectrometry, with the concurrent development of photodissociation as a tool for structural elucidation of organic compounds and antibiotics.

  14. Mass spectrometry on the nanoscale with ion sputtering based techniques: What is feasible

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veryovkin, Igor V.; Calaway, Wallis F.; Tripa, C. Emil; Pellin, Michael J.

    2007-08-01

    The potential of ion sputtering based mass spectrometry applied to materials characterization on the nanometer scale is discussed. Analytical approaches and required instrumental capabilities are outlined, and the current state-of-the-art is summarized. A new generation of analytical instruments specifically optimized for laser post-ionization secondary neutral mass spectrometry has been developed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). Experimentally verified (or anticipated after near-future upgrades) analytical capabilities of these instruments, capable of quantitative analysis at the nanometer-scale, are reported and compared to secondary ion mass spectrometry.

  15. The Influence of Drift Gas Composition on the Separation Mechanism in Traveling Wave Ion Mobility Spectrometry: Insight from Electrodynamic Simulations

    PubMed Central

    May, Jody C.; McLean, John A.

    2013-01-01

    The influence of three different drift gases (helium, nitrogen, and argon) on the separation mechanism in traveling wave ion mobility spectrometry is explored through ion trajectory simulations which include considerations for ion diffusion based on kinetic theory and the electrodynamic traveling wave potential. The model developed for this work is an accurate depiction of a second-generation commercial traveling wave instrument. Three ion systems (cocaine, MDMA, and amphetamine) whose reduced mobility values have previously been measured in different drift gases are represented in the simulation model. The simulation results presented here provide a fundamental understanding of the separation mechanism in traveling wave, which is characterized by three regions of ion motion: (1) ions surfing on a single wave, (2) ions exhibiting intermittent roll-over onto subsequent waves, and (3) ions experiencing a steady state roll-over which repeats every few wave cycles. These regions of ion motion are accessed through changes in the gas pressure, wave amplitude, and wave velocity. Resolving power values extracted from simulated arrival times suggest that momentum transfer in helium gas is generally insufficient to access regions (2) and (3) where ion mobility separations occur. Ion mobility separations by traveling wave are predicted to be effectual for both nitrogen and argon, with slightly lower resolving power values observed for argon as a result of band-broadening due to collisional scattering. For the simulation conditions studied here, the resolving power in traveling wave plateaus between regions (2) and (3), with further increases in wave velocity contributing only minor improvements in separations. PMID:23888124

  16. Field ion spectrometry: a new technology for cocaine and heroin detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carnahan, Byron L.; Day, Stephen; Kouznetsov, Viktor; Tarassov, Alexandre

    1997-02-01

    Field ion spectrometry, also known as transverse field compensation ion mobility spectrometry, is a new technique for trace gas analysis that can be applied to the detection of cocaine and heroin. Its principle is based on filtering ion species according to the functional dependence of their mobilities with electric field strength. Field ion spectrometry eliminates the gating electrodes needed in conventional IMS to pulse ions into the spectrometer; instead, ions are injected in to the spectrometer and reach the detector continuously, resulting in improved sensitivity. The technique enables analyses that are difficult with conventional constant field strength ion mobility spectrometers. We have shown that a filed ion spectrometer can selectively detect the vapors from cocaine and heroin emitted from both their base and hydrochloride forms. The estimated volumetric limits of detection are in the low pptv range, based on testing with standardized drug vapor generation systems. The spectrometer can detect cocaine base in the vapor phase, at concentrations well below its estimated 100 pptv vapor pressure equivalent at 20 degrees C. This paper describes the underlying principles of field ion spectrometry in relation to narcotic drug detection, and recent results obtained for cocaine and heroin. The work has been sponsored in part by the United States Advanced Research Projects Agency under contract DAAB10-95C-0004, for the DOD Counterdrug Technology Development Program.

  17. Noise reduction in negative-ion quadrupole mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Chastagner, Philippe

    1993-01-01

    A quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) system having an ion source, quadrupole mass filter, and ion collector/recorder system. A weak, transverse magnetic field and an electron collector are disposed between the quadrupole and ion collector. When operated in negative ion mode, the ion source produces a beam of primarily negatively-charged particles from a sample, including electrons as well as ions. The beam passes through the quadrupole and enters the magnetic field, where the electrons are deflected away from the beam path to the electron collector. The negative ions pass undeflected to the ion collector where they are detected and recorded as a mass spectrum.

  18. Noise reduction in negative-ion quadrupole mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Chastagner, P.

    1993-04-20

    A quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) system is described having an ion source, quadrupole mass filter, and ion collector/recorder system. A weak, transverse magnetic field and an electron collector are disposed between the quadrupole and ion collector. When operated in negative ion mode, the ion source produces a beam of primarily negatively-charged particles from a sample, including electrons as well as ions. The beam passes through the quadrupole and enters the magnetic field, where the electrons are deflected away from the beam path to the electron collector. The negative ions pass undeflected to the ion collector where they are detected and recorded as a mass spectrum.

  19. Fast-ion dynamics in the TEXTOR tokamak measured by collective Thomson scattering.

    PubMed

    Bindslev, H; Nielsen, S K; Porte, L; Hoekzema, J A; Korsholm, S B; Meo, F; Michelsen, P K; Michelsen, S; Oosterbeek, J W; Tsakadze, E L; Westerhof, E; Woskov, P

    2006-11-17

    Here we present the first measurements by collective Thomson scattering of the evolution of fast-ion populations in a magnetically confined fusion plasma. 150 kW and 110 Ghz radiation from a gyrotron were scattered in the TEXTOR tokamak plasma with energetic ions generated by neutral beam injection and ion cyclotron resonance heating. The temporal behavior of the spatially resolved fast-ion velocity distribution is inferred from the received scattered radiation. The fast-ion dynamics at sawteeth and the slowdown after switch off of auxiliary heating is resolved in time. The latter is shown to be in close agreement with modeling results. PMID:17155690

  20. Ion and electron bombardment-related ion emission during the analysis of diamond using secondary ion mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Guzman de la Mata, Berta; Dowsett, Mark G.

    2007-02-01

    In recent years, the ability to grow single crystal layers of both doped and pure diamonds has improved, and devices for applications in high power electronics and microelectronics are being developed, most of them based on boron doped diamond. In this work, convoluted angular and energy spectra (so-called secondary ion mass spectrometry energy spectra) have been measured for {sup 11}B{sup +}, {sup 12}C{sup +}, {sup 16}O{sup +}, CO{sup +} and CO{sub 2}{sup +} ions ejected from a single crystal boron doped diamond layer under ultralow energy oxygen and electron beam bombardment. A low energy tail was observed in the {sup 12}C{sup +}, CO{sup +}, and CO{sub 2}{sup +} signals, corresponding to ions produced in the gas phase. Changing the bombardment conditions, we have identified interaction with the electron beam as the main ionization mechanism. In the case of {sup 12}C{sup +} it appears that the gas phase ions are produced by electron stimulated desorption and postionization of surface species created by the oxygen beam. We have detected high signals for CO{sup +} and CO{sub 2}{sup +} ionized in the gas phase, which supports a mechanism previously suggested to explain the anomalously fast diamond erosion under oxygen ion beam bombardment. We also observe that some species appearing in the mass spectrum are produced by electron stimulated desorption and this needs to be remembered when analyzing these on insulating diamond with charge compensation.

  1. Enhancement of mass spectrometry performance for proteomic analyses using high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS).

    PubMed

    Bonneil, Eric; Pfammatter, Sibylle; Thibault, Pierre

    2015-11-01

    Remarkable advances in mass spectrometry sensitivity and resolution have been accomplished over the past two decades to enhance the depth and coverage of proteome analyses. As these technological developments expanded the detection capability of mass spectrometers, they also revealed an increasing complexity of low abundance peptides, solvent clusters and sample contaminants that can confound protein identification. Separation techniques that are complementary and can be used in combination with liquid chromatography are often sought to improve mass spectrometry sensitivity for proteomics applications. In this context, high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS), a form of ion mobility that exploits ion separation at low and high electric fields, has shown significant advantages by focusing and separating multiply charged peptide ions from singly charged interferences. This paper examines the analytical benefits of FAIMS in proteomics to separate co-eluting peptide isomers and to enhance peptide detection and quantitative measurements of protein digests via native peptides (label-free) or isotopically labeled peptides from metabolic labeling or chemical tagging experiments. PMID:26505763

  2. Increasing Confidence of LC-MS Identifications by Utilizing Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Crowell, Kevin L.; Baker, Erin Shammel; Payne, Samuel H.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Slysz, Gordon W.; Lamarche, Brian L.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Piehowski, Paul D.; Danielson, William F.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2013-09-05

    Ion mobility spectrometry in conjunction with liquid chromatography separations and mass spectrometry offers a range of new possibilities for analyzing complex biological samples. To fully utilize the information obtained from these three measurement dimensions, informatics tools based on the accurate mass and time tag methodology were modified to incorporate ion mobility spectrometry drift times for peptides observed in human serum. A reference human serum database was created using 12,139 peptides, tracking the monoisotopic mass, liquid chromatography normalized elution time, and ion mobility spectrometry drift time(s) for each peptide. We demonstrate that the use of three dimensions for peak matching during the peptide identification process resulted in increased numbers of identifications and lower false discovery rates relative to the use of only the mass and normalized elution time dimensions.

  3. Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry: From Cluster Ions to Toxic metal Ions in Biology

    SciTech Connect

    Lentz, Nicholas B.

    2007-01-01

    This dissertation focused on using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry to study cluster ions and toxic metal ions in biology. In Chapter 2, it was shown that primary, secondary and quarternary amines exhibit different clustering characteristics under identical instrument conditions. Carbon chain length also played a role in cluster ion formation. In Chapters 3 and 4, the effects of solvent types/ratios and various instrumental parameters on cluster ion formation were examined. It was found that instrument interface design also plays a critical role in the cluster ion distribution seen in the mass spectrum. In Chapter 5, ESI-MS was used to investigate toxic metal binding to the [Gln11]-amyloid β-protein fragment (1-16). Pb and Cd bound stronger than Zn, even in the presence of excess Zn. Hg bound weaker than Zn. There are endless options for future work on cluster ions. Any molecule that is poorly ionized in positive ion mode can potentially show an increase in ionization efficiency if an appropriate anion is used to produce a net negative charge. It is possible that drug protein or drug/DNA complexes can also be stabilized by adding counter-ions. This would preserve the solution characteristics of the complex in the gas phase. Once in the gas phase, CID could determine the drug binding location on the biomolecule. There are many research projects regarding toxic metals in biology that have yet to be investigated or even discovered. This is an area of research with an almost endless future because of the changing dynamics of biological systems. What is deemed safe today may show toxic effects in the future. Evolutionary changes in protein structures may render them more susceptible to toxic metal binding. As the understanding of toxicity evolves, so does the demand for new toxic metal research. New instrumentation designs and software make it possible to perform research that could not be done in the past. What was undetectable yesterday will

  4. Ion scattering analysis of alumina supported model catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Josek, K.; Linsmeier, Ch.; Knözinger, H.; Taglaucr, E.

    1992-02-01

    The surface of supported oxide and metal catalysts, namely MoO 3/Al 2O 3 or Rh/Al 2O 3, is systematically studied using model systems. For this purpose, plane Al samples were oxidized in different ways and this support material was impregnated from the liquid phase or by evaporation. The elemental depth distribution was examined by low energy ion scattering and sputter etching (ISS) at different primary energies. By fitting Gaussian- or Lorentzian-type functions to the spectra, the use of peak heights or integrals for the interpretation is discussed. The dependence of the peak width on the chemical character is related to inelastic energy losses during scattering. ISS results from model systems are compared with those from real powder catalysts. The surface coverage with the active component was studied by additionally using Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS). These methods, combined with energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX), lead to an explanation of the adsorption kinetics of molybdate on alumina from aqueous solution by pore-filling.

  5. Ion trajectories in an electrostatic ion guide for external ion source fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Marto, J A; Marshall, A G; May, M A; Limbach, P A

    1995-10-01

    An electrostatic ion guide (EIG) that consists of concentric cylinder and central wire electrodes can transport ions efficiently from an external ion source to an ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) ion trap for mass analysis, with several advantages over current injection methods. Because the electrostatic force of the EIG captures ions in a stable orbit about the wire electrode, ions with initially divergent trajectories may be redirected toward the ICR ion trap for improved ion transmission efficiency. SIMION trajectory calculations (ion kinetic energy, 1-200 eV; elevation angle, 0.30 °; azimuthal angle, 0.360°) predict that ions of m/z 1000 may be transmitted through a strong (0.01 → 3.0-T) magnetic field gradient. Judicious choice of ion source position and EIG potential minimizes the spread in ion axial kinetic energy at the ICR ion trap. Advantages of the EIG include large acceptance angle, even for ions that have large initial kinetic energy and large radial displacement with respect to the central z-axis, low ion extraction voltage (5-20 V), and efficient trapping because ions need not be accelerated to high velocity to pass through the magnetic field gradient. PMID:24214038

  6. Neutron scattering effects on fusion ion temperature measurements.

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegler, Lee; Starner, Jason R.; Cooper, Gary Wayne; Ruiz, Carlos L.; Franklin, James Kenneth; Casey, Daniel T.

    2006-06-01

    To support the nuclear fusion program at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), a consistent and verifiable method to determine fusion ion temperatures needs to be developed. Since the fusion temperature directly affects the width in the spread of neutron energies produced, a measurement of the neutron energy width can yield the fusion temperature. Traditionally, the spread in neutron energies is measured by using time-of-flight to convert a spread in neutron energies at the source to a spread in time at detector. One potential obstacle to using this technique at the Z facility at SNL is the need to shield the neutron detectors from the intense bremsstrahlung produced. The shielding consists of eight inches of lead and the concern is that neutrons will scatter in the lead, artificially broaden the neutron pulse width and lead to an erroneous measurement. To address this issue, experiments were performed at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics, which demonstrated that a reliable ion temperature measurement can be achieved behind eight inches of lead shielding. To further expand upon this finding, Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) was used to simulate the experimental geometric conditions and perform the neutron transport. MCNPX was able to confidently estimate results observed at the University of Rochester.

  7. Effects of Select Anions from the Hofmeister Series on the Gas-Phase Conformations of Protein Ions Measured with Traveling-Wave Ion Mobility Spectrometry/Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Merenbloom, Samuel I.; Flick, Tawnya G.; Daly, Michael P.; Williams, Evan R.

    2011-01-01

    The gas-phase conformations of ubiquitin, cytochrome c, lysozyme, and ↦-lactalbumin ions, formed by electrospray ionization (ESI) from aqueous solutions containing 5 mM ammonium perchlorate, ammonium iodide, ammonium sulfate, ammonium chloride, ammonium thiocyanate, or guanidinium chloride, are examined using traveling-wave ion mobility spectrometry (TWIMS) coupled to time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry (MS). For ubiquitin, cytochrome c, and ↦-lactalbumin, adduction of multiple acid molecules results in no significant conformational changes to the highest and lowest charge states formed from aqueous solutions, whereas the intermediate charge states become more compact. The transition to more compact conformers for the intermediate charge states occurs with fewer bound H2SO4 molecules than HClO4 or HI molecules, suggesting ion-ion or salt-bridge interactions are stabilizing more compact forms of the gaseous protein. However, the drift time distributions for protein ions of the same net charge with the highest levels of adduction of each acid are comparable, indicating that these protein ions all adopt similarly compact conformations or families of conformers. No change in conformation is observed upon the adduction of multiple acid molecules to charge states of lysozyme. These results show that the attachment of HClO4, HI, or H2SO4 to multiply protonated proteins can induce compact conformations in the resulting gas-phase protein ions. In contrast, differing Hofmeister effects are observed for the corresponding anions in solution at higher concentrations. PMID:21952780

  8. Solution-phase secondary-ion mass spectrometry of protonated amino acids.

    PubMed

    Pettit, G R; Cragg, G M; Holzapfel, C W; Tuinman, A A; Gieschen, D P

    1987-04-01

    Although sulfolane proved unexpectedly to be a poor solvent for solution-phase secondary-ion mass spectrometry of underivatized amino acids in the presence of thallium(I) salts, glycerol was somewhat more effective. Also, the addition of trifluoromethanesulfonic acid proved more effective than addition of the metal in generating molecular ion complexes. A convenient and reliable method for rapidly determining amino acid molecular ions is based on these observations. PMID:3037939

  9. Ion source for high-precision mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Todd, Peter J.; McKown, Henry S.; Smith, David H.

    1984-01-01

    The invention is directed to a method for increasing the precision of positive-ion relative abundance measurements conducted in a sector mass spectrometer having an ion source for directing a beam of positive ions onto a collimating slit. The method comprises incorporating in the source an electrostatic lens assembly for providing a positive-ion beam of circular cross section for collimation by the slit.

  10. Ion source for high-precision mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Todd, P.J.; McKown, H.S.; Smith, D.H.

    1982-04-26

    The invention is directed to a method for increasing the precision of positive-ion relative abundance measurements conducted in a sector mass spectrometer having an ion source for directing a beam of positive ions onto a collimating slit. The method comprises incorporating in the source an electrostatic lens assembly for providing a positive-ion beam of circular cross section for collimation by the slit. 2 figures, 3 tables.

  11. Evaluation of Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry for Comparative Analysis of Monoclonal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Carly N; Gucinski-Ruth, Ashley C

    2016-05-01

    Analytical techniques capable of detecting changes in structure are necessary to monitor the quality of monoclonal antibody drug products. Ion mobility mass spectrometry offers an advanced mode of characterization of protein higher order structure. In this work, we evaluated the reproducibility of ion mobility mass spectrometry measurements and mobiligrams, as well as the suitability of this approach to differentiate between and/or characterize different monoclonal antibody drug products. Four mobiligram-derived metrics were identified to be reproducible across a multi-day window of analysis. These metrics were further applied to comparative studies of monoclonal antibody drug products representing different IgG subclasses, manufacturers, and lots. These comparisons resulted in some differences, based on the four metrics derived from ion mobility mass spectrometry mobiligrams. The use of collision-induced unfolding resulted in more observed differences. Use of summed charge state datasets and the analysis of metrics beyond drift time allowed for a more comprehensive comparative study between different monoclonal antibody drug products. Ion mobility mass spectrometry enabled detection of differences between monoclonal antibodies with the same target protein but different production techniques, as well as products with different targets. These differences were not always detectable by traditional collision cross section studies. Ion mobility mass spectrometry, and the added separation capability of collision-induced unfolding, was highly reproducible and remains a promising technique for advanced analytical characterization of protein therapeutics. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26988372

  12. Evaluation of Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry for Comparative Analysis of Monoclonal Antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, Carly N.; Gucinski-Ruth, Ashley C.

    2016-05-01

    Analytical techniques capable of detecting changes in structure are necessary to monitor the quality of monoclonal antibody drug products. Ion mobility mass spectrometry offers an advanced mode of characterization of protein higher order structure. In this work, we evaluated the reproducibility of ion mobility mass spectrometry measurements and mobiligrams, as well as the suitability of this approach to differentiate between and/or characterize different monoclonal antibody drug products. Four mobiligram-derived metrics were identified to be reproducible across a multi-day window of analysis. These metrics were further applied to comparative studies of monoclonal antibody drug products representing different IgG subclasses, manufacturers, and lots. These comparisons resulted in some differences, based on the four metrics derived from ion mobility mass spectrometry mobiligrams. The use of collision-induced unfolding resulted in more observed differences. Use of summed charge state datasets and the analysis of metrics beyond drift time allowed for a more comprehensive comparative study between different monoclonal antibody drug products. Ion mobility mass spectrometry enabled detection of differences between monoclonal antibodies with the same target protein but different production techniques, as well as products with different targets. These differences were not always detectable by traditional collision cross section studies. Ion mobility mass spectrometry, and the added separation capability of collision-induced unfolding, was highly reproducible and remains a promising technique for advanced analytical characterization of protein therapeutics.

  13. U/Th dating by SHRIMP RG ion-microprobe mass spectrometry using single ion-exchange beads

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bischoff, J.L.; Wooden, J.; Murphy, F.; Williams, Ross W.

    2005-01-01

    We present a new analytical method for U-series isotopes using the SHRIMP RG (Sensitive High mass Resolution Ion MicroProbe) mass spectrometer that utilizes the preconcentration of the U-series isotopes from a sample onto a single ion-exchange bead. Ion-microprobe mass spectrometry is capable of producing Th ionization efficiencies in excess of 2%. Analytical precision is typically better than alpha spectroscopy, but not as good as thermal ionization mass spectroscopy (TIMS) and inductively coupled plasma multicollector mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Like TIMS and ICP-MS the method allows analysis of small samples sizes, but also adds the advantage of rapidity of analysis. A major advantage of ion-microprobe analysis is that U and Th isotopes are analyzed in the same bead, simplifying the process of chemical separation. Analytical time on the instrument is ???60 min per sample, and a single instrument-loading can accommodate 15-20 samples to be analyzed in a 24-h day. An additional advantage is that the method allows multiple reanalyses of the same bead and that samples can be archived for reanalysis at a later time. Because the ion beam excavates a pit only a few ??m deep, the mount can later be repolished and reanalyzed numerous times. The method described of preconcentrating a low concentration sample onto a small conductive substrate to allow ion-microprobe mass spectrometry is potentially applicable to many other systems. Copyright ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Incoherent scatter radar measurement of the average ion mass and temperature of a nighttime sporadic layer

    SciTech Connect

    Tepley, C.A.; Mathews, J.D.

    1985-04-01

    We report the results of incoherent scatter radar, total power, and ion line observations of a nighttime sporadic layer centered at 92-km altitude. The height variation of the absolute widths of the ion line yields a layer temperature of 210/sup 0/ +- 5 /sup 0/K and a mean ion mass of 50 +- 10 amu. This ion mass, when compared with average meteor composition, indicates that the layer is composed totally of metallic ions.

  15. Multidimensional Separation of Natural Products Using Liquid Chromatography Coupled to Hadamard Transform Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wenjie; Zhang, Xing; Knochenmuss, Richard; Siems, William F.; Hill, Herbert H.

    2016-05-01

    A high performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC)was interfaced to an atmospheric drift tube ion mobility time of flight mass spectrometry. The power of multidimensional separation was demonstrated using chili pepper extracts. The ambient pressure drift tube ion mobility provided high resolving powers up to 166 for the HPLC eluent. With implementation of Hadamard transform (HT), the duty cycle for the ion mobility drift tube was increased from less than 1% to 50%, and the ion transmission efficiency was improved by over 200 times compared with pulsed mode, improving signal to noise ratio 10 times. HT ion mobility and TOF mass spectrometry provide an additional dimension of separation for complex samples without increasing the analysis time compared with conventional HPLC.

  16. Multidimensional Separation of Natural Products Using Liquid Chromatography Coupled to Hadamard Transform Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wenjie; Zhang, Xing; Knochenmuss, Richard; Siems, William F.; Hill, Herbert H.

    2016-02-01

    A high performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC)was interfaced to an atmospheric drift tube ion mobility time of flight mass spectrometry. The power of multidimensional separation was demonstrated using chili pepper extracts. The ambient pressure drift tube ion mobility provided high resolving powers up to 166 for the HPLC eluent. With implementation of Hadamard transform (HT), the duty cycle for the ion mobility drift tube was increased from less than 1% to 50%, and the ion transmission efficiency was improved by over 200 times compared with pulsed mode, improving signal to noise ratio 10 times. HT ion mobility and TOF mass spectrometry provide an additional dimension of separation for complex samples without increasing the analysis time compared with conventional HPLC.

  17. Ion mobility tandem mass spectrometry enhances performance of bottom-up proteomics.

    PubMed

    Helm, Dominic; Vissers, Johannes P C; Hughes, Christopher J; Hahne, Hannes; Ruprecht, Benjamin; Pachl, Fiona; Grzyb, Arkadiusz; Richardson, Keith; Wildgoose, Jason; Maier, Stefan K; Marx, Harald; Wilhelm, Mathias; Becher, Isabelle; Lemeer, Simone; Bantscheff, Marcus; Langridge, James I; Kuster, Bernhard

    2014-12-01

    One of the limiting factors in determining the sensitivity of tandem mass spectrometry using hybrid quadrupole orthogonal acceleration time-of-flight instruments is the duty cycle of the orthogonal ion injection system. As a consequence, only a fraction of the generated fragment ion beam is collected by the time-of-flight analyzer. Here we describe a method utilizing postfragmentation ion mobility spectrometry of peptide fragment ions in conjunction with mobility time synchronized orthogonal ion injection leading to a substantially improved duty cycle and a concomitant improvement in sensitivity of up to 10-fold for bottom-up proteomic experiments. This enabled the identification of 7500 human proteins within 1 day and 8600 phosphorylation sites within 5 h of LC-MS/MS time. The method also proved powerful for multiplexed quantification experiments using tandem mass tags exemplified by the chemoproteomic interaction analysis of histone deacetylases with Trichostatin A. PMID:25106551

  18. Ion Mobility Tandem Mass Spectrometry Enhances Performance of Bottom-up Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Helm, Dominic; Vissers, Johannes P. C.; Hughes, Christopher J.; Hahne, Hannes; Ruprecht, Benjamin; Pachl, Fiona; Grzyb, Arkadiusz; Richardson, Keith; Wildgoose, Jason; Maier, Stefan K.; Marx, Harald; Wilhelm, Mathias; Becher, Isabelle; Lemeer, Simone; Bantscheff, Marcus; Langridge, James I.; Kuster, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    One of the limiting factors in determining the sensitivity of tandem mass spectrometry using hybrid quadrupole orthogonal acceleration time-of-flight instruments is the duty cycle of the orthogonal ion injection system. As a consequence, only a fraction of the generated fragment ion beam is collected by the time-of-flight analyzer. Here we describe a method utilizing postfragmentation ion mobility spectrometry of peptide fragment ions in conjunction with mobility time synchronized orthogonal ion injection leading to a substantially improved duty cycle and a concomitant improvement in sensitivity of up to 10-fold for bottom-up proteomic experiments. This enabled the identification of 7500 human proteins within 1 day and 8600 phosphorylation sites within 5 h of LC-MS/MS time. The method also proved powerful for multiplexed quantification experiments using tandem mass tags exemplified by the chemoproteomic interaction analysis of histone deacetylases with Trichostatin A. PMID:25106551

  19. Multidimensional Separation of Natural Products Using Liquid Chromatography Coupled to Hadamard Transform Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenjie; Zhang, Xing; Knochenmuss, Richard; Siems, William F; Hill, Herbert H

    2016-05-01

    A high performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC)was interfaced to an atmospheric drift tube ion mobility time of flight mass spectrometry. The power of multidimensional separation was demonstrated using chili pepper extracts. The ambient pressure drift tube ion mobility provided high resolving powers up to 166 for the HPLC eluent. With implementation of Hadamard transform (HT), the duty cycle for the ion mobility drift tube was increased from less than 1% to 50%, and the ion transmission efficiency was improved by over 200 times compared with pulsed mode, improving signal to noise ratio 10 times. HT ion mobility and TOF mass spectrometry provide an additional dimension of separation for complex samples without increasing the analysis time compared with conventional HPLC. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26914233

  20. Negative thermal ion mass spectrometry of osmium, rhenium, and iridium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creaser, R. A.; Papanastassiou, D. A.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes a technique for obtaining, in a conventional surface ionization mass spectrometer, intense ion beams of negatively charged oxides of Os, Re, and Ir by thermal ionization. It is shown that the principal ion species of these ions are OsO3(-), ReO4(-), and IrO2(-), respectively. For Re-187/Os-187 studies, this technique offers the advantage of isotopic analyses without prior chemical separation of Re from Os.

  1. Collisional activation with random noise in ion trap mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    McLuckey, S.A.; Goeringer, D.E.; Glish, G.L.

    1992-07-01

    Random noise applied to the end caps of a quadrupole ion trap is shown to be an effective means for the collisional activation of trapped ions independent of mass/charge ratio and number of ions. This technique is compared and contrasted with conventional single-frequency collisional activation for the molecular ion of N,N-dimethylaniline, protonated cocaine, the molecular anion of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene, and doubly protonated neuromedin U-8. Collisional activation with noise tends to produce more extensive fragmentation than the conventional approach due to the fact that product ions are also kinetically excited in the noise experiment. The efficiency of the noise experiment in producing detectable product ions relative to the conventional approach ranges from being equivalent to being a factor of 3 less efficient. Furthermore, discrimination against low mass/charge product ions is apparent in the data from multiply charged biomolecules. Nevertheless, collisional activation with random noise provides a very simple means for overcoming problems associated with the dependence of single-frequency collisional activation on mass/charge ratio and the number of ions in the ion trap. 45 refs., 7 figs.

  2. Resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization/secondary neutral mass spectrometry and cesium attachment secondary ion mass spectrometry of bronze : a comparison.

    SciTech Connect

    McCann, M. P.; Calaway, W. F.; Pellin, M. J.; Veryovkin, I. V.; Constantinides, I.; Adriaens, A.; Adams, F.; Materials Science Division; Sam Houston State Univ.; Univ. of Antwerp

    2002-05-01

    Archaeologists have considerable interests in ancient bronzes. They want to know how these alloys were produced and how they corroded with time. Modern bronzes, with compositions very close to that of some ancient bronzes, have been produced and two methods were examined to characterize one of these modern bronzes. Analysis of this modern bronze using resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization/secondary neutral mass spectrometry (REMPI/SNMS) is examined in detail and compared to cesium attachment secondary ion mass spectrometry (CsAMS) results. Both REMPI/SNMS and CsAMS were used to quantify the composition of Fe, Ni and Mn in a modern quaternary bronze designed to serve as a certified reference material for an ancient bronze. Both methods exhibit reduced matrix effects when compared to secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and thus quantification should be simplified. It was found that when relative sensitivity factors obtained from a standard bronze material are used to calibrate the instruments, the REMPI/SNMS measurements yield results that were more sensitive and more accurate.

  3. Structural insights into interactions between ubiquitin specific protease 5 and its polyubiquitin substrates by mass spectrometry and ion mobility spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Daniel; Layfield, Robert; Oldham, Neil J

    2015-01-01

    Nanoelectrospray ionization-mass spectrometry and ion mobility-mass spectrometry have been used to study the interactions of the large, multidomain, and conformationally flexible deubiquitinating enzyme ubiquitin specific protease 5 (USP5) with mono- and poly-ubiquitin (Ub) substrates. Employing a C335A active site mutant, mass spectrometry was able to detect the stable and cooperative binding of two mono-Ub molecules at the Zinc-finger ubiquitin binding protein (ZnF-UBP) and catalytic site domains of USP5. Tetra-ubiquitin, in contrast, bound to USP5 with a stoichiometry of 1 : 1, and formed additional interactions with USP5's two ubiquitin associated domains (UBAs). Charge-state distribution and ion mobility analysis revealed that both mono- and tetra-ubiquitin bound to the compact conformation of USP5 only, and that tetra-ubiquitin binding was able to shift the conformational distribution of USP5 from a mixture of extended and compact forms to a completely compact conformation. PMID:25970461

  4. Extracting p Λ scattering lengths from heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapoval, V. M.; Erazmus, B.; Lednicky, R.; Sinyukov, Yu. M.

    2015-09-01

    The source radii previously extracted by the STAR Collaboration from the p -Λ ⊕p ¯-Λ ¯ and p ¯-Λ ⊕p -Λ ¯ correlation functions measured in 10% most central Au+Au collisions at top Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) energy, √{sN N}=200 GeV, differ by a factor of 2. The probable reason for this is the neglect of residual correlation effect in the STAR analysis. In the present paper we analyze baryon correlation functions within the Lednický and Lyuboshitz analytical model, extended to effectively account for the residual correlation contribution. Different analytical approximations for such a contribution are considered. We also use the averaged source radii extracted from hydrokinetic model (HKM) simulations to fit the experimental data. In contrast to the STAR experimental study, the calculations in HKM show both p Λ and p Λ ¯ radii to be quite close, as expected from theoretical considerations. Using the effective Gaussian parametrization of residual correlations we obtain a satisfactory fit to the measured baryon-antibaryon correlation function with the HKM source radius value 3.28 fm. The baryon-antibaryon spin-averaged strong interaction scattering length is also extracted from the fit to the experimental correlation function.

  5. Submicron mass spectrometry imaging of single cells by combined use of mega electron volt time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and scanning transmission ion microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Siketić, Zdravko; Bogdanović Radović, Ivančica; Jakšić, Milko; Popović Hadžija, Marijana; Hadžija, Mirko

    2015-08-31

    In order to better understand biochemical processes inside an individual cell, it is important to measure the molecular composition at the submicron level. One of the promising mass spectrometry imaging techniques that may be used to accomplish this is Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (TOF-SIMS), using MeV energy heavy ions for excitation. MeV ions have the ability to desorb large intact molecules with a yield that is several orders of magnitude higher than conventional SIMS using keV ions. In order to increase the spatial resolution of the MeV TOF-SIMS system, we propose an independent TOF trigger using a STIM (scanning transmission ion microscopy) detector that is placed just behind the thin transmission target. This arrangement is suitable for biological samples in which the STIM detector simultaneously measures the mass distribution in scanned samples. The capability of the MeV TOF-SIMS setup was demonstrated by imaging the chemical composition of CaCo-2 cells.

  6. Analysis of Ultra-Pure Gases by Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stimac, Robert M.; Wernlund, Roger F.; Cohen, Martin J.

    1995-01-01

    Work has continued with the evaluation of the Ion Mobility Spectrometer (IMS) for the analysis of gases having low parts-per-billion (10(exp -9)) water concentration. A modified PCP, inc. MMS-160 Mobility Mass Spectrometer System was used for the analysis of ultra-pure argon and nitrogen. The MMS-160 system permits the mass-identification of unique reactant and product ions observed in the reduced-water host gases. When the water is removed to low ppb levels, higher energy reactant ions are observed. In nitrogen, distinct odd- and even-numbered nitrogen cluster ion mobility peaks are observed, as well as adduct ion peaks from the trace contaminants in the gas. Argon also produces a cluster ion mobility peak and adduct ion peaks from trace components in the gas. Levels of contaminants in these ultra-pure gases can be determined from the ion mobility spectra. A calibrated source was used to provide variable known quantities of water to the pure gas supply of the IMS.

  7. Searching For A Suitable Gas Ion Source For 14C Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Reden, Karl von; Roberts, Mark; Han, Baoxi; Schneider, Robert; Wills, John

    2007-08-10

    This paper describes the challenges facing 14C Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) in the effort to directly analyze the combusted effluent of a chromatograph (or any other continuous source of sample material). An efficient, low-memory negative gas ion source would greatly simplify the task to make this a reality. We discuss our tests of a microwave ion source charge exchange canal combination, present an improved design, and hope to generate more interest in the negative ion source community to develop a direct-extraction negative carbon gas ion source for AMS.

  8. Temporal evolution of confined fast-ion velocity distributions measured by collective Thomson scattering in TEXTOR.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, S K; Bindslev, H; Porte, L; Hoekzema, J A; Korsholm, S B; Leipold, F; Meo, F; Michelsen, P K; Michelsen, S; Oosterbeek, J W; Tsakadze, E L; Van Wassenhove, G; Westerhof, E; Woskov, P

    2008-01-01

    Fast ions created in the fusion processes will provide up to 70% of the heating in ITER. To optimize heating and current drive in magnetically confined plasmas insight into fast-ion dynamics is important. First measurements of such dynamics by collective Thomson scattering (CTS) were recently reported [Bindslev, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 205005 2006]. Here we extend the discussion of these results which were obtained at the TEXTOR tokamak. The fast ions are generated by neutral-beam injection and ion-cyclotron resonance heating. The CTS system uses 100-150kW of 110-GHz gyrotron probing radiation which scatters off the collective plasma fluctuations driven by the fast-ion motion. The technique measures the projected one-dimensional velocity distribution of confined fast ions in the scattering volume where the probe and receiver beams cross. By shifting the scattering volume a number of scattering locations and different resolved velocity components can be measured. The temporal resolution is 4ms while the spatial resolution is approximately 10cm depending on the scattering geometry. Fast-ion velocity distributions in a variety of scenarios are measured, including the evolution of the velocity distribution after turnoff of the ion heating. These results are in close agreement with numerical simulations. PMID:18351944

  9. Ion mobility mass spectrometry of peptide, protein, and protein complex ions using a radio-frequency confining drift cell.

    PubMed

    Allen, Samuel J; Giles, Kevin; Gilbert, Tony; Bush, Matthew F

    2016-02-01

    Ion mobility mass spectrometry experiments enable the characterization of mass, assembly, and shape of biological molecules and assemblies. Here, a new radio-frequency confining drift cell is characterized and used to measure the mobilities of peptide, protein, and protein complex ions. The new drift cell replaced the traveling-wave ion mobility cell in a Waters Synapt G2 HDMS. Methods for operating the drift cell and determining collision cross section values using this experimental set up are presented within the context of the original instrument control software. Collision cross sections for 349 cations and anions are reported, 155 of which are for ions that have not been characterized previously using ion mobility. The values for the remaining ions are similar to those determined using a previous radio-frequency confining drift cell and drift tubes without radial confinement. Using this device under 2 Torr of helium gas and an optimized drift voltage, denatured and native-like ions exhibited average apparent resolving powers of 14.2 and 16.5, respectively. For ions with high mobility, which are also low in mass, the apparent resolving power is limited by contributions from ion gating. In contrast, the arrival-time distributions of low-mobility, native-like ions are not well explained using only contributions from ion gating and diffusion. For those species, the widths of arrival-time distributions are most consistent with the presence of multiple structures in the gas phase. PMID:26739109

  10. Laser desorption mass spectrometry and small angle neutron scattering of heavy fossil materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, J.E.; Winans, R.E.; Thiyagarajan, P.

    1997-09-01

    The determination of the structural building blocks and the molecular weight range of heavy hydrocarbon materials is of crucial importance in research on their reactivity and for their processing. The chemically and physically heterogenous nature of heavy hydrocarbon materials, such as coals, heavy petroleum fractions, and residues, dictates that their structure and reactivity patterns be complicated. The problem is further complicated by the fact that the molecular structure and molecular weight distribution of these materials is not dependent on a single molecule, but on a complex mixture of molecules which vary among coals and heavy petroleum samples. Laser Desorption mass spectrometry (LDMS) is emerging as a technique for molecular weight determination having found widespread use in biological polymer research, but is still a relatively new technique in the fossil fuel area. Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) provides information on the size and shape of heavy fossil materials. SANS offers the advantages of high penetration power even in thick cells at high temperatures and high contrast for hydrocarbon systems dispersed in deuterated solvents. LDMS coupled with time of flight has the advantages of high sensitivity and transmission and high mass range. We have used LDMS to examine various heavy fossil-derived materials including: long chain hydrocarbons, asphaltenes from petroleum vacuum resids, and coals. This paper describes the application of laser desorption and small angle neutron scattering techniques to the analysis of components in coals, petroleum resids and unsaturated polymers.

  11. Analysis of Supramolecular Complexes of 3-Methylxanthine with Field Asymmetric Waveform Ion Mobility Spectrometry Combined with Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arthur, Kayleigh L.; Eiceman, Gary A.; Reynolds, James C.; Creaser, Colin S.

    2016-05-01

    Miniaturised field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS), combined with mass spectrometry (MS), has been applied to the study of self-assembling, noncovalent supramolecular complexes of 3-methylxanthine (3-MX) in the gas phase. 3-MX forms stable tetrameric complexes around an alkali metal (Na+, K+) or ammonium cation, to generate a diverse array of complexes with single and multiple charge states. Complexes of (3-MX)n observed include: singly charged complexes where n = 1-8 and 12 and doubly charged complexes where n = 12-24. The most intense ions are those associated with multiples of tetrameric units, where n = 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 24. The effect of dispersion field on the ion intensities of the self-assembled complexes indicates some fragmentation of higher order complexes within the FAIMS electrodes (in-FAIMS dissociation), as well as in-source collision induced dissociation within the mass spectrometer. FAIMS-MS enables charge state separation of supramolecular complexes of 3-MX and is shown to be capable of separating species with overlapping mass-to-charge ratios. FAIMS selected transmission also results in an improvement in signal-to-noise ratio for low intensity complexes and enables the visualization of species undetectable without FAIMS.

  12. Analysis of Supramolecular Complexes of 3-Methylxanthine with Field Asymmetric Waveform Ion Mobility Spectrometry Combined with Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arthur, Kayleigh L.; Eiceman, Gary A.; Reynolds, James C.; Creaser, Colin S.

    2016-02-01

    Miniaturised field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS), combined with mass spectrometry (MS), has been applied to the study of self-assembling, noncovalent supramolecular complexes of 3-methylxanthine (3-MX) in the gas phase. 3-MX forms stable tetrameric complexes around an alkali metal (Na+, K+) or ammonium cation, to generate a diverse array of complexes with single and multiple charge states. Complexes of (3-MX)n observed include: singly charged complexes where n = 1-8 and 12 and doubly charged complexes where n = 12-24. The most intense ions are those associated with multiples of tetrameric units, where n = 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 24. The effect of dispersion field on the ion intensities of the self-assembled complexes indicates some fragmentation of higher order complexes within the FAIMS electrodes (in-FAIMS dissociation), as well as in-source collision induced dissociation within the mass spectrometer. FAIMS-MS enables charge state separation of supramolecular complexes of 3-MX and is shown to be capable of separating species with overlapping mass-to-charge ratios. FAIMS selected transmission also results in an improvement in signal-to-noise ratio for low intensity complexes and enables the visualization of species undetectable without FAIMS.

  13. Analysis of Supramolecular Complexes of 3-Methylxanthine with Field Asymmetric Waveform Ion Mobility Spectrometry Combined with Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Arthur, Kayleigh L; Eiceman, Gary A; Reynolds, James C; Creaser, Colin S

    2016-05-01

    Miniaturised field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS), combined with mass spectrometry (MS), has been applied to the study of self-assembling, noncovalent supramolecular complexes of 3-methylxanthine (3-MX) in the gas phase. 3-MX forms stable tetrameric complexes around an alkali metal (Na(+), K(+)) or ammonium cation, to generate a diverse array of complexes with single and multiple charge states. Complexes of (3-MX)n observed include: singly charged complexes where n = 1-8 and 12 and doubly charged complexes where n = 12-24. The most intense ions are those associated with multiples of tetrameric units, where n = 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 24. The effect of dispersion field on the ion intensities of the self-assembled complexes indicates some fragmentation of higher order complexes within the FAIMS electrodes (in-FAIMS dissociation), as well as in-source collision induced dissociation within the mass spectrometer. FAIMS-MS enables charge state separation of supramolecular complexes of 3-MX and is shown to be capable of separating species with overlapping mass-to-charge ratios. FAIMS selected transmission also results in an improvement in signal-to-noise ratio for low intensity complexes and enables the visualization of species undetectable without FAIMS. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26914231

  14. Rapid profiling and identification of anthocyanins in fruits with Hadamard transform ion mobility mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenjie; Zhang, Xing; Siems, William F; Hill, Herbert H; Yin, Dulin

    2015-06-15

    The use of Hadamard transform ion mobility mass spectrometry (HT-IMMS) in the profiling of anthocyanins from different fruits is presented. Samples extracted with acidic methanol and purified with solid phase extraction were analyzed with direct IMMS infusion. The separation of various anthocyanins was achieved within 30s with resolving powers up to 110. The ion mobility drift times correlated with their mass-to-charge ratios with a correlation coefficient of 0.979 to produce a trend line that was characteristic for anthocyanins. Isomers with the same anthocyanidin but different hexoses were differentiated by ion mobility spectrometry. Furthermore, mobility separated ions underwent collision induced dissociation at the IMMS interface to provide MS/MS spectra. These fragmentation spectra aided in the identification of anthocyanidins via the loss of the saccharide groups. IMMS appears to be a rapid and efficient approach for profiling and identifying anthocyanins. PMID:25660880

  15. Fragmentation of HCN in optically selected mass spectrometry: Nonthermal ion cooling in helium nanodroplets

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, William K.; Bemish, Raymond J.; Miller, Roger E.

    2005-10-08

    A technique that combines infrared laser spectroscopy and helium nanodroplet mass spectrometry, which we refer to as optically selected mass spectrometry, is used to study the efficiency of ion cooling in helium. Electron-impact ionization is used to form He{sup +} ions within the droplets, which go on to transfer their charge to the HCN dopant molecules. Depending upon the droplet size, the newly formed ion either fragments or is cooled by the helium before fragmentation can occur. Comparisons with gas-phase fragmentation data suggest that the cooling provided by the helium is highly nonthermal. An 'explosive' model is proposed for the cooling process, given that the initially hot ion is embedded in such a cold solvent.

  16. Ion deposition by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, K.; Houk, R.S.

    1996-03-01

    An atmospheric pressure inductively coupled plasma (ICP) is used with a quadrupole mass spectrometer (MS) for ion deposition. The deposited element is introduced as a nebulized aqueous solution. Modifications to the ICP-MS device allow generation and deposition of a mass-resolved beam of {sup 165}Ho{sup +} at 5{times}10{sup 12} ions s{sup {minus}1}. The ICP is a universal, multielement ion source that can potentially be used for applications such as deposition of mixtures of widely varying stoichiometry or of alternating layers of different elements. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Vacuum Society}

  17. Ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) for on- and offline analysis of atmospheric gas and aerosol species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krechmer, Jordan E.; Groessl, Michael; Zhang, Xuan; Junninen, Heikki; Massoli, Paola; Lambe, Andrew T.; Kimmel, Joel R.; Cubison, Michael J.; Graf, Stephan; Lin, Ying-Hsuan; Budisulistiorini, Sri H.; Zhang, Haofei; Surratt, Jason D.; Knochenmuss, Richard; Jayne, John T.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Jimenez, Jose-Luis; Canagaratna, Manjula R.

    2016-07-01

    Measurement techniques that provide molecular-level information are needed to elucidate the multiphase processes that produce secondary organic aerosol (SOA) species in the atmosphere. Here we demonstrate the application of ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) to the simultaneous characterization of the elemental composition and molecular structures of organic species in the gas and particulate phases. Molecular ions of gas-phase organic species are measured online with IMS-MS after ionization with a custom-built nitrate chemical ionization (CI) source. This CI-IMS-MS technique is used to obtain time-resolved measurements (5 min) of highly oxidized organic molecules during the 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) ambient field campaign in the forested SE US. The ambient IMS-MS signals are consistent with laboratory IMS-MS spectra obtained from single-component carboxylic acids and multicomponent mixtures of isoprene and monoterpene oxidation products. Mass-mobility correlations in the 2-D IMS-MS space provide a means of identifying ions with similar molecular structures within complex mass spectra and are used to separate and identify monoterpene oxidation products in the ambient data that are produced from different chemical pathways. Water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) constituents of fine aerosol particles that are not resolvable with standard analytical separation methods, such as liquid chromatography (LC), are shown to be separable with IMS-MS coupled to an electrospray ionization (ESI) source. The capability to use ion mobility to differentiate between isomers is demonstrated for organosulfates derived from the reactive uptake of isomers of isoprene epoxydiols (IEPOX) onto wet acidic sulfate aerosol. Controlled fragmentation of precursor ions by collisionally induced dissociation (CID) in the transfer region between the IMS and the MS is used to validate MS peak assignments, elucidate structures of oligomers, and confirm the

  18. Analysis of paralytic shellfish toxins using high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Beach, Daniel G; Melanson, Jeremy E; Purves, Randy W

    2015-03-01

    The analysis of paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs) by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry remains a challenge because of their high polarity, large number of analogues and the complex matrix in which they occur. Here we investigate the potential utility of high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) as a gas-phase ion separation tool for analysis of PSTs by mass spectrometry. We investigate the separation of PSTs using FAIMS with two divergent goals: using FAIMS as a primary separation tool for rapid screening by electrospray ionization (ESI)-FAIMS-MS or combined with LC in a multidimensional LC-ESI-FAIMS-MS separation. First, a survey of the parameters that affect the sensitivity and selectivity of PST analysis by FAIMS was carried out using ESI-FAIMS-MS. In particular, the use of acetonitrile as a gas additive in the carrier gas flow offered good separation of all PST epimeric pairs. A second set of FAIMS conditions was also identified, which focussed PSTs to a relatively narrow CV range allowing development of an LC-ESI-FAIMS-MS method for analysis of PST toxins in complex mussel tissue extracts. The quantitative capabilities of this method were evaluated by analysing a PST containing mussel tissue matrix material. Results compared favourably with analysis by an established LC-post-column oxidation-fluorescence method with recoveries ranging from 70 to 106%, although sensitivity was somewhat reduced. The current work represents the first successful separation of PST isomers using ion mobility and shows the promise of FAIMS as a tool for analysis of algal biotoxins in complex samples and outlines some critical requirements for its future improvement. PMID:25619987

  19. Hydrogen Attachment/Abstraction Dissociation (HAD) of Gas-Phase Peptide Ions for Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hidenori; Sekiya, Sadanori; Nishikaze, Takashi; Kodera, Kei; Iwamoto, Shinichi; Wada, Motoi; Tanaka, Koichi

    2016-04-01

    Dissociation of gas-phase peptide ions through interaction with low-energy hydrogen (H) radical (∼0.15 eV) was observed with a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry. The H radical generated by thermal dissociation of H2 molecules passing through a heated tungsten capillary (∼2000 °C) was injected into the ion trap containing target peptide ions. The fragmentation spectrum showed abundant c-/z- and a-/x-type ions, attributable to H attachment/abstraction to/from peptide ion. Because the low-energy neutral H radical initiated the fragmentation, the charge state of the precursor ion was maintained during the dissociation. As a result, precursor ions of any charge state, including singly charged positive and negative ions, could be analyzed for amino acid sequence. The sequence coverage exceeding 90% was obtained for both singly protonated and singly deprotonated substance P peptide. This mass spectrometry also preserved labile post-translational modification bonds. The modification sites of triply phosphorylated peptide (kinase domain of insulin receptor) were identified with the sequence coverage exceeding 80%. PMID:27002918

  20. Determination of electron affinity of carbonyl radicals by means of negative ion mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Muftakhov; Vasil'ev; Mazunov

    1999-06-01

    Appearance energies of [M-H](-) ions from carbonyl compounds R-CO-R' (R,R' = H, CH(3), NH(2), OH) have been measured by means of negative ion mass spectrometry in resonant electron capture mode. Values of electron affinity of the corresponding radicals, CH(2)&dbond;C(X)O, NH&dbond;C(X)O and O&dbond;C(X)O, have been determined. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:10407285

  1. Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry Channeling Study of Ion-Irradiated 6H-SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Weilin; Weber, William J.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; McCready, David E.

    1999-04-01

    Studies damage accumulation and defect annealing (up to 1170 K) using in-situ 2.0 MeV He Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry combined with ion channeling methods. Observes that the defect concentration at the damage peak increases sigmoidally with increasing ion fluence during irradiation at low temperatures and that the isochronal recovery of the damage induced at low temperatures follows an exponential dependence on temperature.

  2. Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization studies of non-polar isomeric hydrocarbons using ion mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry with different ionization techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borsdorf, H.; Nazarov, E. G.; Eiceman, G. A.

    2002-01-01

    The ionization pathways were determined for sets of isomeric non-polar hydrocarbons (structural isomers, cis/trans isomers) using ion mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry with different techniques of atmospheric pressure chemical ionization to assess the influence of structural features on ion formation. Depending on the structural features, different ions were observed using mass spectrometry. Unsaturated hydrocarbons formed mostly [M - 1]+ and [(M - 1)2H]+ ions while mainly [M - 3]+ and [(M - 3)H2O]+ ions were found for saturated cis/trans isomers using photoionization and 63Ni ionization. These ionization methods and corona discharge ionization were used for ion mobility measurements of these compounds. Different ions were detected for compounds with different structural features. 63Ni ionization and photoionization provide comparable ions for every set of isomers. The product ions formed can be clearly attributed to the structures identified. However, differences in relative abundance of product ions were found. Although corona discharge ionization permits the most sensitive detection of non-polar hydrocarbons, the spectra detected are complex and differ from those obtained with 63Ni ionization and photoionization. c. 2002 American Society for Mass Spectrometry.

  3. Enhancing Secondary Ion Yields in Time of Flight-Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry Using Water Cluster Primary Beams

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Low secondary ion yields from organic and biological molecules are the principal limitation on the future exploitation of time of flight-secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) as a surface and materials analysis technique. On the basis of the hypothesis that increasing the density of water related fragments in the ion impact zone would enhance proton mediated reactions, a prototype water cluster ion beam has been developed using supersonic jet expansion methodologies that enable ion yields using a 10 keV (H2O)1000+ beam to be compared with those obtained using a 10 keV Ar1000+ beam. The ion yields from four standard compounds, arginine, haloperidol, DPPC, and angiotensin II, have been measured under static+ and high ion dose conditions. Ion yield enhancements relative to the argon beam on the order of 10 or more have been observed for all the compounds such that the molecular ion yield per a 1 μm pixel can be as high as 20, relative to 0.05 under an argon beam. The water beam has also been shown to partially lift the matrix effect in a 1:10 mixture of haloperidol and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) that suppresses the haloperidol signal. These results provide encouragement that further developments of the water cluster beam to higher energies and larger cluster sizes will provide the ion yield enhancements necessary for the future development of TOF-SIMS. PMID:23718847

  4. Measurements of Intrinsic Ion Bernstein Waves in a Tokamak by Collective Thomson Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korsholm, S. B.; Stejner, M.; Bindslev, H.; Furtula, V.; Leipold, F.; Meo, F.; Michelsen, P. K.; Moseev, D.; Nielsen, S. K.; Salewski, M.; de Baar, M.; Delabie, E.; Kantor, M.; Bürger, A.

    2011-04-01

    In this Letter we report measurements of collective Thomson scattering (CTS) spectra with clear signatures of ion Bernstein waves and ion cyclotron motion in tokamak plasmas. The measured spectra are in accordance with theoretical predictions and show clear sensitivity to variation in the density ratio of the main ion species in the plasma. Measurements with this novel diagnostic demonstrate that CTS can be used as a fuel ion ratio diagnostic in burning fusion plasma devices.

  5. Measurements of ion temperature and plasma hydrogenic composition by collective Thomson scattering in neutral beam heated discharges at TEXTOR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stejner, M.; Salewski, M.; Korsholm, S. B.; Bindslev, H.; Delabie, E.; Leipold, F.; Meo, F.; Michelsen, P. K.; Moseev, D.; Nielsen, S. K.; Bürger, A.; de Baar, M.; the TEXTOR Team

    2013-08-01

    A method is developed to perform plasma composition and ion temperature measurements across the plasma minor radius in TEXTOR based on ion cyclotron structures in collective Thomson scattering spectra. By gradually moving the scattering volume, we obtain measurements across the outer midplane of the plasma. Results for the ion temperature are compared with ion temperatures measured by active charge-exchange recombination spectroscopy.

  6. Energy and charge transfer for Na+ ions scattered from a Ag(001) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, M. P.; Lake, R. E.; Marston, J. B.; Sosolik, C. E.

    2015-05-01

    We present energy- and charge-resolved measurements of low and hyperthermal energy Na+ ions scattered from a Ag(001) surface. With the primary ion beam oriented along the [110] crystal direction, distinct peaks in the energy distributions of the scattered beam flux that correspond to single or multiple collisions with target atoms are observed. A classical trajectory simulation reveals that these collisions can occur either at the surface or within the [110] channels, depending on incident beam energy. Within the simulation we probe the role of finite temperature and thermally displaced atoms on specific scattering events and show that contributions to the scattered distributions from single and double collisions dominate within the [110] channels. We also report velocity dependent measurements of the neutral/ion ratio of the scattered beam flux. A deviation between the data and simulated charge transfer results is observed for Na trajectories which penetrate the surface.

  7. ANALYSIS OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS BY ION TRAP TANDEM MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    An ion-trap mass spectrometer with a wave board and tandem mass spectrometry software was used to analyze gas chromatographically separated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) by using collision-induced dissociation (CID). The nonresonant (multiple collision) mode was used to...

  8. Coulomb crystal mass spectrometry in a digital ion trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deb, Nabanita; Pollum, Laura L.; Smith, Alexander D.; Keller, Matthias; Rennick, Christopher J.; Heazlewood, Brianna R.; Softley, Timothy P.

    2015-03-01

    We present a mass spectrometric technique for identifying the masses and relative abundances of Coulomb-crystallized ions held in a linear Paul trap. A digital radio-frequency wave form is employed to generate the trapping potential, as this can be cleanly switched off, and static dipolar fields are subsequently applied to the trap electrodes for ion ejection. Close to 100% detection efficiency is demonstrated for Ca+ and CaF+ ions from bicomponent Ca+-CaF+ Coulomb crystals prepared by the reaction of Ca+ with CH3F . A quantitative linear relationship is observed between ion number and the corresponding integrated time-of-flight (TOF) peak, independent of the ionic species. The technique is applicable to a diverse range of multicomponent Coulomb crystals—demonstrated here for Ca+-NH 3+ -NH 4+ and Ca+-CaOH +-CaOD + crystals—and will facilitate the measurement of ion-molecule reaction rates and branching ratios in complicated reaction systems.

  9. Atmospheric pressure ionization of chlorinated ethanes in ion mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, Robert G.; Atkinson, David A.; Benson, Michael T.

    2015-05-16

    This study investigates the APCI mechanisms associated with chlorinated ethanes in an attempt to define conditions under which unique pseudo-molecular adducts, in addition to chloride ion, can be produced for analytical measurements using IMS and MS. The ionization chemistry of chlorinated compounds typically leads to the detection of only the halide ions. Using molecular modeling, which provides insights into the ion formation and relative binding energies, predictions for the formation of pseudo-molecular adducts are postulated. Predicted structures of the chloride ion with multiple hydrogens on the ethane backbone was supported by the observation of specific pseudo-molecular adducts in IMS and MS spectra. With the proper instrumental conditions, such as short reaction times and low temp.

  10. Ion chromatography/mass spectrometry for the determination of organic ammonium and sulfate compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Conboy, J.J.; Henion, J.D. ); Martin, M.W.; Zweigenbaum, J.A. )

    1990-04-15

    The ion spray liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) interface is coupled via a postsuppressor split with an ion chromatography (IC) system. The micromembrane suppressor selectively removes over 99.9% of the ion-pair agents required for ion chromatography from the eluent. The resulting solution consists of analyte, organic modifier, and water, which is compatible with ion evaporation mass spectrometry. A flow rate of 0.8 or 1.0 mL/min from the column was split after suppression such that approximately 10-20 {mu}L/min was directed to the ion spray LC/MS interface, which was coupled to an atmospheric pressure ionization (API) mass spectrometer. This system provided a convenient way to effect isocratic and gradient separations of organic ions under chromatographic conditions incompatible with most forms of mass spectrometric ionization. This work describes the separation and positive ion detection of quaternary ammonium drugs and tetraalkylammonium compounds of industrial importance using both single and tandem mass spectrometric detection (e.g., IC/MS and IC/MS/MS).

  11. Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Sources Used in The Detection of Explosives by Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Waltman, Melanie J.

    2010-05-01

    Explosives detection is a necessary and wide spread field of research. From large shipping containers to airline luggage, numerous items are tested for explosives every day. In the area of trace explosives detection, ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) is the technique employed most often because it is a quick, simple, and accurate way to test many items in a short amount of time. Detection by IMS is based on the difference in drift times of product ions through the drift region of an IMS instrument. The product ions are created when the explosive compounds, introduced to the instrument, are chemically ionized through interactions with the reactant ions. The identity of the reactant ions determines the outcomes of the ionization process. This research investigated the reactant ions created by various ionization sources and looked into ways to manipulate the chemistry occurring in the sources.

  12. Plasma Ion Sources for Atmospheric Pressure Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jian-Guo

    1994-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure ionization (API) sources using direct-current (DC) and radio-frequency (RF) plasma have been developed in this thesis work. These ion sources can provide stable discharge currents of ~ 1 mA, 2-3 orders of magnitude larger than that of the corona discharge, a widely used API source. The plasmas can be generated and maintained in 1 atm of various buffer gases by applying -500 to -1000 V (DC plasma) or 1-15 W with a frequency of 165 kHz (RF plasma) on the needle electrode. These ion sources have been used with liquid injection to detect various organic compounds of pharmaceutical, biotechnological and environmental interest. Key features of these ion sources include soft ionization with the protonated molecule as the largest peak, and superb sensitivity with detection limits in the low picogram or femtomole range and a linear dynamic range over ~4 orders of magnitude. The RF plasma has advantages over the DC plasma in its ability to operate in various buffer gases and to produce a more stable plasma. Factors influencing the performance of the ion sources have been studied, including RF power level, liquid flow rate, chamber temperature, solvent composition, and voltage affecting the collision induced dissociation (CID). Ionization of hydrocarbons by the RF plasma API source was also studied. Soft ionization is generally produced. To obtain high sensitivity, the ion source must be very dry and the needle-to-orifice distance must be small. Nitric oxide was used to enhance the sensitivity. The RF plasma source was then used for the analysis of hydrocarbons in auto emissions. Comparisons between the corona discharge and the RF plasma have been made in terms of discharge current, ion residence time, and the ion source model. The RF plasma source provides larger linear dynamic range and higher sensitivity than the corona discharge, due to its much larger discharge current. The RF plasma was also observed to provide longer ion residence times and was not

  13. Liquid Nebulization-Ion Mobility Spectrometry Based Quantification of Nanoparticle-Protein Conjugate Formation.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Seongho; Oberreit, Derek R; Van Schooneveld, Gary; Hogan, Christopher J

    2016-08-01

    Despite the importance of examining the formation of nanoparticle-protein conjugates, there is a dearth of routine techniques for nanoparticle-protein conjugate characterization. The most prominent change to a nanoparticle population upon conjugate formation is a shift in the nanoparticle size distribution function. However, commonly employed dynamic light scattering based approaches for size distribution characterization are ineffective for nonmonodisperse samples, and further they are relatively insensitive to size shifts of only several nanometers, which are common during conjugate formation. Conversely, gas phase ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) techniques can be used to reliably examine polydisperse samples, and are sensitive to ∼1 nm size distribution function shifts; the challenge with IMS is to convert nanoparticle-protein conjugates to aerosol particles without bringing about nonspecific aggregation or conjugate formation. Except in limited circumstances, electrospray based aerosolization has proven difficult to apply for this purpose. Here we show that via liquid nebulization (LN) with online, high-flow-rate dilution (with dilution factors up to 10 000) it is possible to aerosolize nanoparticle-protein conjugates, enabling IMS measurements of their conjugate size distribution functions. We specifically employ the LN-IMS system to examine bovine serum albumin binding to gold nanoparticles. Inferred maximum protein surface coverages (∼0.025 nm(-2)) from measurements are shown to be in excellent agreement with reported values for gold from quartz crystal microbalance measurements. It is also shown that LN-IMS measurements can be used to detect size distribution function shifts on the order of 1 nm, even in circumstances where the size distribution function itself has a standard deviation of ∼5 nm. In total, the reported measurements suggest that LN-IMS is a potentially simple and robust technique for nanoparticle-protein conjugate characterization

  14. Dual mode ion mobility spectrometer and method for ion mobility spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Jill R [Idaho Falls, ID; Dahl, David A [Idaho Falls, ID; Miller, Carla J [Idaho Falls, ID; Tremblay, Paul L [Idaho Falls, ID; McJunkin, Timothy R [Idaho Falls, ID

    2007-08-21

    Ion mobility spectrometer apparatus may include an ion interface that is operable to hold positive and negative ions and to simultaneously release positive and negative ions through respective positive and negative ion ports. A first drift chamber is operatively associated with the positive ion port of the ion interface and encloses an electric field therein. A first ion detector operatively associated with the first drift chamber detects positive ions from the first drift chamber. A second drift chamber is operatively associated with the negative ion port of the ion interface and encloses an electric field therein. A second ion detector operatively associated with the second drift chamber detects negative ions from said second drift chamber.

  15. Ion beam sputtering of Ag - Angular and energetic distributions of sputtered and scattered particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feder, René; Bundesmann, Carsten; Neumann, Horst; Rauschenbach, Bernd

    2013-12-01

    Ion beam sputter deposition (IBD) provides intrinsic features which influence the properties of the growing film, because ion properties and geometrical process conditions generate different energy and spatial distribution of the sputtered and scattered particles. A vacuum deposition chamber is set up to measure the energy and spatial distribution of secondary particles produced by ion beam sputtering of different target materials under variation of geometrical parameters (incidence angle of primary ions and emission angle of secondary particles) and of primary ion beam parameters (ion species and energies).

  16. Predicting reaction observables from back-scattering measurements in low-energy heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz-Torres, A.; Sargsyan, V. V.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.; Gomes, P. R. S.; Lenske, H.

    2016-01-01

    A simplified, reliable and useful method, based on reaction theory, for calculating a number of integrated and differential cross sections in low-energy heavy-ion collisions is presented. Simplified formulae provide predictions of reaction, capture and elastic-scattering differential cross sections, using experimental information about elastic and quasi-elastic back-scattering excitation functions.

  17. Control of Ion Distortion in Field Asymmetric Waveform Ion Mobility Spectrometry via Variation of Dispersion Field and Gas Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Errol W.; Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D.

    2008-10-01

    Field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) has emerged as an analytical tool of broad utility, especially in conjunction with mass spectrometry. Of particular promise is the use of FAIMS and 2-D ion mobility methods that combine it with conventional IMS to resolve and characterize protein and other macromolecular conformers. However, FAIMS operation requires high electric fields and ions are inevitably heated by above-thermal collisions with buffer gas molecules. This may induce ion isomerization and dissociation that distort separation properties determined by FAIMS and subsequent stages and/or reduce instrumental sensitivity. As FAIMS employs a periodic waveform, the ion temperature can be characterized at the maximum or average field intensity (E). Which method is most applicable to temperature sensitive ions, such as protein ions, has been debated. Here we address this issue by measuring the unfolding of compact ubiquitin ion geometries as a function of waveform amplitude (dispersion field, ED) and gas temperature, T. The field heating is quantified by matching the dependences of structural transitions on ED and T. Increasing ED from 12 to 16 or from 16 to 20 kV/cm is equivalent to heating the (N2) gas by ~15 - 25 oC. The magnitude of field heating for any E can be calculated using the two-temperature theory, and raising ED by 4 kV/cm augments heating by ~15 - 30 oC for maximum and ~4 - 8 oC for average E in the FAIMS cycle. Hence, isomerization of ions in FAIMS appears to be governed by the maximum internal temperature at waveform peaks.

  18. Resolving the bulk ion region of millimeter-wave collective Thomson scattering spectra at ASDEX Upgrade.

    PubMed

    Stejner, M; Nielsen, S; Jacobsen, A S; Korsholm, S B; Leipold, F; Meo, F; Michelsen, P K; Moseev, D; Rasmussen, J; Salewski, M; Schubert, M; Stober, J; Wagner, D H

    2014-09-01

    Collective Thomson scattering (CTS) measurements provide information about the composition and velocity distribution of confined ion populations in fusion plasmas. The bulk ion part of the CTS spectrum is dominated by scattering off fluctuations driven by the motion of thermalized ion populations. It thus contains information about the ion temperature, rotation velocity, and plasma composition. To resolve the bulk ion region and access this information, we installed a fast acquisition system capable of sampling rates up to 12.5 GS/s in the CTS system at ASDEX Upgrade. CTS spectra with frequency resolution in the range of 1 MHz are then obtained through direct digitization and Fourier analysis of the CTS signal. We here describe the design, calibration, and operation of the fast receiver system and give examples of measured bulk ion CTS spectra showing the effects of changing ion temperature, rotation velocity, and plasma composition. PMID:25273723

  19. Resolving the bulk ion region of millimeter-wave collective Thomson scattering spectra at ASDEX Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Stejner, M. Nielsen, S.; Jacobsen, A. S.; Korsholm, S. B.; Leipold, F.; Meo, F.; Michelsen, P. K.; Rasmussen, J.; Salewski, M.; Moseev, D.; Schubert, M.; Stober, J.; Wagner, D. H.

    2014-09-15

    Collective Thomson scattering (CTS) measurements provide information about the composition and velocity distribution of confined ion populations in fusion plasmas. The bulk ion part of the CTS spectrum is dominated by scattering off fluctuations driven by the motion of thermalized ion populations. It thus contains information about the ion temperature, rotation velocity, and plasma composition. To resolve the bulk ion region and access this information, we installed a fast acquisition system capable of sampling rates up to 12.5 GS/s in the CTS system at ASDEX Upgrade. CTS spectra with frequency resolution in the range of 1 MHz are then obtained through direct digitization and Fourier analysis of the CTS signal. We here describe the design, calibration, and operation of the fast receiver system and give examples of measured bulk ion CTS spectra showing the effects of changing ion temperature, rotation velocity, and plasma composition.

  20. Corona discharge ion mobility spectrometry with orthogonal acceleration time of flight mass spectrometry for monitoring of volatile organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Sabo, Martin; Matejčík, Štefan

    2012-06-19

    We demonstrate the application of corona discharge ion mobility spectrometry with orthogonal acceleration time of flight mass spectrometry (CD IMS-oaTOF) for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) monitoring. Two-dimensional (2D) IMS-oaTOF spectra of VOCs were recorded in nearly real time. The corona discharge atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) source was operated in positive mode in nitrogen and air. The CD ion source generates in air H(3)O(+)(H(2)O)(n) and NO(+). The NO(+) offers additional possibility for selective ionization and for an increase of the sensitivity of monoaromatic compounds. In addition to H(3)O(+)(H(2)O)(n) and NO(+), we have carried out ionization of VOCs using acetone as dopant gas ((CH(3))(2)COH(+)). Sixteen model VOCs (tetrahydrofuran, butanol, n-propanol, iso-propano, acetone, methanol, ethanol, toluene, benzene, amomnia, dioxan, triethylamine, acetonitrile, formaldehyde, m-xylene, 2,2,2-trifluoroethylamine) were tested using these ionization techniques. PMID:22594852

  1. Characterization of methyl methacrylate oligomers using secondary ion mass spectrometry, APCI mass spectrometry and molecular orbital theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, T.; Iwai, K.; Momoji, K.; Miyamoto, I.; Saiki, K.; Hashimoto, K.

    2003-01-01

    The ionization efficiency and fragmentation mechanism of methyl methacrylate (MMA) oligomers (3-mer˜8-mer) were investigated by using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and APCI mass spectrometry (APCI-MS). Protonation and fragmentation mechanisms of MMA oligomers were clarified by using molecular orbital (MO) methods. MMA oligomers were synthesized in anionic polymerization, and the oligomers were fractionated into 3-mer˜8-mer using gel permeation chromatography (GPC). In SIMS of MMA oligomers (3-mer˜8-mer), [MH] +, [MH-CH 3OH] +, [MH-methyl formate] + and [MH-2CH 3OH-methyl formate] + appeared. The peak intensities of adduct ions [M+Li] +, [M+Na] + and [M+K] + increased with the increase of the polymerization degree. The optimized geometries and H +, Li +, Na + and K + affinities of MMA monomer (1-mer), dimer (2-mer), and trimer (3-mer) were calculated using the PM3 and ab initio MO methods. The calculated H +, Li +, Na + and K + affinities increased in order of 1-mer, 2-mer and 3-mer of MMA.

  2. Ab initio calculation of the ion feature in x-ray Thomson scattering.

    PubMed

    Plagemann, Kai-Uwe; Rüter, Hannes R; Bornath, Thomas; Shihab, Mohammed; Desjarlais, Michael P; Fortmann, Carsten; Glenzer, Siegfried H; Redmer, Ronald

    2015-07-01

    The spectrum of x-ray Thomson scattering is proportional to the dynamic structure factor. An important contribution is the ion feature which describes elastic scattering of x rays off electrons. We apply an ab initio method for the calculation of the form factor of bound electrons, the slope of the screening cloud of free electrons, and the ion-ion structure factor in warm dense beryllium. With the presented method we can calculate the ion feature from first principles. These results will facilitate a better understanding of x-ray scattering in warm dense matter and an accurate measurement of ion temperatures which would allow determining nonequilibrium conditions, e.g., along shock propagation. PMID:26274290

  3. Experimental investigations of trimer ion contributions in the low resolution mass spectrometry of hydrogen isotope mixtures.

    PubMed

    Bidica, Nicolae

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on some preliminary experimental results of a work in progress regarding a problem involving the quantitative analysis of hydrogen isotopes by mass spectrometry of low resolution: the triatomic (trimer) ions interferences with the isotopic hydrogen species having the same mass/charge. These results indicate that, in complex mixtures of hydrogen isotopes, trimer ions are strongly affected by the presence of other species, and a new approach that takes into account the destruction mechanism of trimer ions is necessary for a proper determination of their contributions. PMID:23149602

  4. Tandem mass spectrometry and ion mobility mass spectrometry for the analysis of molecular sequence and architecture of hyperbranched glycopolymers

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiumin; Cool, Lydia R.; Lin, Kenneth; Kasko, Andrea M.; Wesdemiotis, Chrys

    2015-01-01

    Multidimensional mass spectrometry techniques, combining matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) or electrospray ionization (ESI) with tandem mass spectrometry (MS2), multistage mass spectrometry (MSn) or ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS), have been employed to gain precise structural insight on the compositions, sequences and architectures of small oligomers of a hyperbranched glycopolymer, prepared by atom transfer radical copolymerization of an acrylate monomer (A) and an acrylate inimer (B), both carrying mannose ester pendants. The MS data confirmed the incorporation of multiple inimer repeat units, which ultimately lead to the hyperbranched material. The various possible structures of n-mers with the same composition were subsequently elucidated based on MS2 and MSn studies. The characteristic elimination of bromomethane molecule provided definitive information about the comonomer connectivity in the copolymeric AB2 trimer and A2B2 tetramer, identifying as present only one of the three possible trimeric isomers (viz. sequence BBA) and only two of the six possible tetrameric isomers (viz. sequences BBA2 and BABA). Complementary IM-MS studies confirmed that only one of the tetrameric structures is formed. Comparison of the experimentally determined collision cross-section of the detected isomer with those predicted by molecular simulations for the two possible sequences ascertained BBA2 as the predominant tetrameric architecture. The multidimensional MS approaches presented provide connectivity information at the atomic level without requiring high product purity (due to the dispersive nature of MS) and, hence, should be particularly useful for the microstructure characterization of novel glycopolymers and other types of complex copolymers. PMID:25519163

  5. Pendular proteins in gases and new avenues for characterization of macromolecules by ion mobility spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.; Noskov, Sergei Y.; Purves, Randy W.; Smith, Richard D.

    2009-01-01

    Polar molecules align in electric fields when the dipole energy (proportional to field intensity E × dipole moment p) exceeds the thermal rotational energy. Small molecules have low p and align only at inordinately high E or upon extreme cooling. Many biomacromolecules and ions are strong permanent dipoles that align at E achievable in gases and room temperature. The collision cross-sections of aligned ions with gas molecules generally differ from orientationally averaged quantities, affecting ion mobilities measured in ion mobility spectrometry (IMS). Field asymmetric waveform IMS (FAIMS) separates ions by the difference between mobilities at high and low E and hence can resolve and identify macroion conformers based on the mobility difference between pendular and free rotor states. The exceptional sensitivity of that difference to ion geometry and charge distribution holds the potential for a powerful method for separation and characterization of macromolecular species. Theory predicts that the pendular alignment of ions in gases at any E requires a minimum p that depends on the ion mobility, gas pressure, and temperature. At ambient conditions used in current FAIMS systems, p for realistic ions must exceed ≈300–400 Debye. The dipole moments of proteins statistically increase with increasing mass, and such values are typical above ≈30 kDa. As expected for the dipole-aligned regime, FAIMS analyses of protein ions and complexes of ≈30–130 kDa show an order-of-magnitude expansion of separation space compared with smaller proteins and other ions. PMID:19351899

  6. Pendular Proteins in Gases and New Avenues for Characterization of Macromolecules by Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.; Noskov, Sergei; Purves, Randy; Smith, Richard D.

    2009-04-21

    Polar molecules align in electric fields when the dipole energy (proportional to field intensity E × dipole moment p) exceeds the thermal rotational energy. Small molecules have low p and align only at inordinately high E or upon extreme cooling. Many biomacromolecules and ions are strong permanent dipoles and may align at E achievable in gases and room temperature. The collision cross sections of aligned ions with gas molecules generally differ from orientationally averaged quantities, affecting ion mobilities measured in ion mobility spectrometry (IMS). Field asymmetric waveform IMS (FAIMS) separates ions by the difference between mobilities at high and low E and hence can resolve and identify macroion conformers based on the mobility difference between pendular and free rotor states. An exceptional sensitivity of that difference to the ion geometry and charge distribution holds the potential for a powerful new method for separation and characterization of macromolecular species. Theory predicts that the pendular alignment of ions in gases at any E requires a minimum p depending on the ion mobility, gas pressure, and temperature. At ambient conditions used in current FAIMS systems, the p for realistic ions must exceed ~300 - 400 Debye. The dipole moments of proteins statistically increase with increasing mass, and such values are typical above ~30 kDa. FAIMS analyses of protein ions and complexes of ~30 - 130 kDa show an order-of-magnitude expansion of separation space compared to smaller proteins and other ions, consistent with expectations for the dipole-aligned regime.

  7. Rhodium Oxide Cluster Ions Studied by Thermal Desorption Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mafuné, Fumitaka; Takenouchi, Masato; Miyajima, Ken; Kudoh, Satoshi

    2016-01-28

    Gas-phase rhodium oxide clusters, RhnOm(+), were investigated by measuring the rate constants of oxidation and thermal desorption spectrometry. RhnOm(+) was suggested to be categorized into different states as m/n ≤ 1, 1 < m/n ≤ 1.5, and 1.5 < m/n in terms of energy and kinetics. For m/n ≤ 1, the O atoms readily adsorbed on the cluster with a large binding energy until RhO was formed. Under the O2-rich environment, oxidation proceeded until Rh2O3 was formed with a moderate binding energy. In addition, O2 molecules attached weakly to the cluster, and Rh2O3 formed RhnOm(+) (1.5 < m/n). The energetics and geometries of Rh6Om(+) (m = 6-12) were obtained using density functional theory calculations and were found to be consistent with the experimental results. PMID:26730616

  8. Fast detection of narcotics by single photon ionization mass spectrometry and laser ion mobility spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laudien, Robert; Schultze, Rainer; Wieser, Jochen

    2010-10-01

    In this contribution two analytical devices for the fast detection of security-relevant substances like narcotics and explosives are presented. One system is based on an ion trap mass spectrometer (ITMS) with single photon ionization (SPI). This soft ionization technique, unlike electron impact ionization (EI), reduces unwanted fragment ions in the mass spectra allowing the clear determination of characteristic (usually molecular) ions. Their enrichment in the ion trap and identification by tandem MS investigations (MS/MS) enables the detection of the target substances in complex matrices at low concentrations without time-consuming sample preparation. For SPI an electron beam pumped excimer light source of own fabrication (E-Lux) is used. The SPI-ITMS system was characterized by the analytical study of different drugs like cannabis, heroin, cocaine, amphetamines, and some precursors. Additionally, it was successfully tested on-site in a closed illegal drug laboratory, where low quantities of MDMA could be directly detected in samples from floors, walls and lab equipments. The second analytical system is based on an ion mobility (IM) spectrometer with resonant multiphoton ionization (REMPI). With the frequency quadrupled Nd:YAG laser (266 nm), used for ionization, a selective and sensitive detection of aromatic compounds is possible. By application of suited aromatic dopants, in addition, also non-aromatic polar compounds are accessible by ion molecule reactions like proton transfer or complex formation. Selected drug precursors could be successfully detected with this device as well, qualifying it to a lower-priced alternative or useful supplement of the SPI-ITMS system for security analysis.

  9. Reduced matrix effects for anionic compounds with paired ion electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hongyue; Breitbach, Zachary S; Armstrong, Daniel W

    2016-03-17

    It is well-known that matrix effects in high performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS) can seriously compromise quantitative analysis and affect method reproducibility. Paired ion electrospray ionization (PIESI) mass spectrometry is an approach for analyzing ultra-low levels of anions in the positive ion mode. This approach uses a structurally optimized ion pairing reagent to post-column associate with the anionic analyte, subsequently forming positively charged complexes. These newly formed complex ions are often more surface-active as compared to either the native anion or the ion pairing reagent. No studies have examined whether or not the PIESI approach mitigates matrix effects. Consequently, a controlled study was done using five analytes in highly controlled and reproducible synthetic groundwater and urine matrices. In addition, two different mass spectrometers (linear ion trap and triple quadrupole) were used. Compared to the negative ion mode, the PIESI-MS approach was less susceptible to matrix effects when performed on two different MS platforms. Using PIESI-MS, less dilution of the sample is needed to eliminate ionization suppression which, in turn, permits lower limits of detection and quantitation. PMID:26920775

  10. Servo-amplifiers for ion current measurement in mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stacey, J.S.; Russell, R.D.; Kollar, F.

    1965-01-01

    A servo-voltmeter can provide a useful alternative to the d.c. amplifier or vibrating reed electrometer for the accurate measurement of mass spectrometer ion currents, and has some advantages which recommend its use in certain applications. A generalized analysis based on servomechanism theory is presented as an aid for understanding the design criteria for this type of device. Two existing systems are described and their operation and performance are examined.

  11. Neutron scattering for analysis of processes in lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balagurov, A. M.; Bobrikov, I. A.; Samoylova, N. Yu; Drozhzhin, O. A.; Antipov, E. V.

    2014-12-01

    The review is concerned with analysis and generalization of information on application of neutron scattering for elucidation of the structure of materials for rechargeable energy sources (mainly lithium-ion batteries) and on structural rearrangements in these materials occurring in the course of electrochemical processes. Applications of the main methods including neutron diffraction, small-angle neutron scattering, inelastic neutron scattering, neutron reflectometry and neutron introscopy are considered. Information on advanced neutron sources is presented and a number of typical experiments are outlined. The results of some studies of lithium-containing materials for lithium-ion batteries, carried out at IBR-2 pulsed reactor, are discussed. The bibliography includes 50 references.

  12. When API Mass Spectrometry Meets Super Atmospheric Pressure Ion Sources.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lee Chuin

    2015-01-01

    In a tutorial paper on the application of free-jet technique for API-MS, John Fenn mentioned that "…for a number of years and a number of reasons, it has been found advantageous in many situations to carry out the ionization process in gas at pressures up to 1000 Torr or more" (Int. J. Mass Spectrom. 200: 459-478, 2000). In fact, the first ESI mass spectrometer constructed by Yamashita and Fenn had a counter-flow curtain gas source at 1050 Torr (ca. 1.4 atm) to sweep away the neutral (J. Phys. Chem. 88: 4451-4459, 1984). For gaseous ionization using electrospray plume, theoretical analysis also shows that "super-atmospheric operation would be more preferable in space-charge-limited situations."(Int. J. Mass Spectrom. 300: 182-193, 2011). However, electrospray and the corona-based chemical ion source (APCI) in most commercial instrument are basically operated under an atmospheric pressure ambient, perhaps out of the concern of safety, convenience and simplicity in maintenance. Running the ion source at pressure much higher than 1 atm is not so common, but had been done by a number of groups as well as in our laboratory. A brief review on these ion sources will be given in this paper. PMID:26819912

  13. When API Mass Spectrometry Meets Super Atmospheric Pressure Ion Sources

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lee Chuin

    2015-01-01

    In a tutorial paper on the application of free-jet technique for API-MS, John Fenn mentioned that “…for a number of years and a number of reasons, it has been found advantageous in many situations to carry out the ionization process in gas at pressures up to 1000 Torr or more” (Int. J. Mass Spectrom. 200: 459–478, 2000). In fact, the first ESI mass spectrometer constructed by Yamashita and Fenn had a counter-flow curtain gas source at 1050 Torr (ca. 1.4 atm) to sweep away the neutral (J. Phys. Chem. 88: 4451–4459, 1984). For gaseous ionization using electrospray plume, theoretical analysis also shows that “super-atmospheric operation would be more preferable in space-charge-limited situations.”(Int. J. Mass Spectrom. 300: 182–193, 2011). However, electrospray and the corona-based chemical ion source (APCI) in most commercial instrument are basically operated under an atmospheric pressure ambient, perhaps out of the concern of safety, convenience and simplicity in maintenance. Running the ion source at pressure much higher than 1 atm is not so common, but had been done by a number of groups as well as in our laboratory. A brief review on these ion sources will be given in this paper. PMID:26819912

  14. Application of ion scattering spectroscopy to measurement of surface potential of MgO thin film under ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Nagatomi, T.; Kuwayama, T.; Takai, Y.; Yoshino, K.; Morita, Y.; Kitagawa, M.; Nishitani, M.

    2008-02-25

    An experimental approach was proposed for the measurement of the surface potential (SP) induced on an insulator surface during ion irradiation by ion scattering spectroscopy (ISS). The resultant ISS spectra obtained for a MgO thin film of 600 nm thickness on a Si substrate under 950 eV He{sup +} irradiation revealed that the surface is positively charged by approximately 230 V. In addition, the onset energy of a secondary ion peak indicated a SP of approximately 205 V. The present results confirmed that ISS is an effective technique for measuring the SP during ion irradiation.

  15. GlycoMob: an ion mobility-mass spectrometry collision cross section database for glycomics.

    PubMed

    Struwe, Weston B; Pagel, Kevin; Benesch, Justin L P; Harvey, David J; Campbell, Matthew P

    2016-06-01

    Ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) is a promising analytical technique for glycomics that separates glycan ions based on their collision cross section (CCS) and provides glycan precursor and fragment masses. It has been shown that isomeric oligosaccharide species can be separated by IM and identified on basis of their CCS and fragmentation. These results indicate that adding CCSs information for glycans and glycan fragments to searchable databases and analysis pipelines will increase identification confidence and accuracy. We have developed a freely accessible database, GlycoMob ( http://www.glycomob.org ), containing over 900 CCSs values of glycans, oligosaccharide standards and their fragments that will be continually updated. We have measured the absolute CCSs of calibration standards, biologically derived and synthetic N-glycans ionized with various adducts in positive and negative mode or as protonated (positive ion) and deprotonated (negative ion) ions. PMID:26314736

  16. Resonant charge transfer in low-energy ion scattering: Information depth in the reionization regime.

    PubMed

    Primetzhofer, D; Spitz, M; Taglauer, E; Bauer, P

    2011-11-01

    Time-Of-Flight Low-energy ion scattering (TOF-LEIS) experiments were performed for He(+) ions scattered from Cu(100) and Cu(0.5)Au(0.5)(100). Probabilities for resonant neutralization and reionization in close collisions were deduced in a wide energy range. To learn about the information depth in LEIS, in a next step ion spectra were analyzed for polycrystalline Cu samples. The relative yield of backscattered projectiles, which have undergone distinct charge exchange processes, was calculated. Results indicate a strong contribution to the ion yield that origins from particles reionized in a close collision in deeper layers when experiments are performed at energies where reionization is prominent. The surface sensitivity of the ion signal at different energies is quantified. Based on these results, the total ion spectrum was quantitatively modelled by two consistent, but different approaches. PMID:22053118

  17. Electronic bath approach to thermal effects in ion-surface scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulston, Kenneth W.; Goodman, Frank O.

    2000-02-01

    McDowell's 1985 electronic bath theory of charge transfer is used to investigate the effect of varying surface temperature on the process of ion scattering from a solid surface. As a specific example, the system of Na+ scattered from W is modeled. The neutralization probability is found to have a significant temperature dependence only if the ion orbital energy is fairly close (within 1 eV) to the Fermi level, at closest approach. As well, the temperature effect is greatest when the ion's incident energy is small (on the order of a few eV).

  18. Ultrasensitive Identification of Localization Variants of Modified Peptides Using Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.; Smith, Richard D.; Belov, Mikhail E.

    2011-01-01

    Localization of the modification sites on peptides is challenging, particularly when multiple modifications or mixtures of localization isomers (variants) are involved. Such variants commonly coelute in liquid chromatography and may be undistinguishable in tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) for lack of unique fragments. Here, we have resolved the variants of singly and doubly phosphorylated peptides employing drift tube ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Even with a moderate IMS resolving power of ~80, substantial separation was achieved for both 2+ and 3+ ions normally generated by electrospray ionization, including for the variant indistinguishable by MS/MS. Variants often exhibit a distribution of 3-D conformers, which can be adjusted for optimum IMS separation by prior field heating of ions in a funnel trap. The peak assignments were confirmed using MS/MS after IMS separation, but known species could be identified using just the ion mobility ‘tag”. Avoiding the MS/MS step lowers the detection limit of localization variants to <100 attomoles, an order of magnitude better than that provided by electron transfer dissociation in an Orbitrap MS. PMID:21692493

  19. Ultrasensitive Identification of Localization Variants of Modified Peptides Using Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.; Smith, Richard D.; Belov, Mikhail E.

    2011-05-28

    Localization of the modification sites on peptides is challenging, particularly when multiple modifications or mixtures of localization isomers (variants) are involved. Such variants commonly coelute in liquid chromatography and may be undistinguishable in tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) for lack of unique fragments. Here, we have resolved the variants of singly and doubly phosphorylated peptides employing drift tube ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Even with a moderate IMS resolving power of ~80, substantial separation was achieved for both 2+ and 3+ ions normally generated by electrospray ionization, including for the variant indistinguishable by MS/MS. Variants often exhibit a distribution of 3-D conformers, which can be adjusted for optimum IMS separation by prior field heating of ions in a funnel trap. The peak assignments were confirmed using MS/MS after IMS separation, but known species could be identified using just the ion mobility "tag". Avoiding the MS/MS step lowers the detection limit of localization variants to <100 attomoles, an order of magnitude better than provided by electron transfer dissociation in an Orbitrap MS.

  20. Control of Ion Distortion in Field Asymmetric Waveform Ion Mobility Spectrometry via Variation of Dispersion Field and Gas Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Errol W.; Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D.

    2009-01-01

    Field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) has emerged as an analytical tool of broad utility, especially in conjunction with mass spectrometry. Of particular promise is the use of FAIMS and 2-D ion mobility methods that combine FAIMS with conventional IMS to resolve and characterize protein and other macromolecular conformers. However, FAIMS operation requires a strong electric field and ions are inevitably heated by energetic collisions with buffer gas molecules. This may induce ion isomerization or dissociation that distort the separation properties of FAIMS (and subsequent stages) and/or reduce instrumental sensitivity. As FAIMS employs a periodic waveform, whether those processes are controlled by ion temperature at maximum or average field intensity has been debated. Here we address this issue by measuring the unfolding of compact ubiquitin ion geometries as a function of waveform amplitude (dispersion field, ED) and gas temperature, T. The field heating is quantified by matching the dependences of structural transitions on ED and T: increasing ED from 12 to 16 or from 16 to 20 kV/cm is equivalent to heating the (N2) gas by ∼15 – 25 °C. The magnitude of field heating for any ED can be estimated using the two-temperature theory, and raising ED by 4 kV/cm augments heating by ∼15 – 30 °C for maximum and ∼4 – 8 °C for average field in the FAIMS cycle. Hence, isomerization of ions in FAIMS appears to be determined by the excitation at waveform peaks. PMID:18729473

  1. Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Serum N-linked Glycans from Esophageal Adenocarcinoma Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Gaye, M. M.; Valentine, S. J.; Hu, Y.; Mirjankar, N.; Hammoud, Z. T.; Mechref, Y.; Lavine, B. K.; Clemmer, D. E.

    2012-01-01

    Three disease phenotypes, Barrett’s esophagus (BE), high-grade dysplasia (HGD), esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC), and a set of normal control (NC) serum samples are examined using a combination of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS), mass spectrometry (MS) and principal component analysis (PCA) techniques. Samples from a total of 136 individuals were examined, including: 7 characterized as BE, 12 as HGD, 56 as EAC and 61 as NC. In typical datasets it was possible to assign ~20 to 30 glycan ions based on MS measurements. Ion mobility distributions for these ions show multiple features. In some cases, such as the [S1H5N4+3Na]3+ and [S1F1H5N4+3Na]3+ glycan ions, the ratio of intensities of high-mobility features to low-mobility features vary significantly for different groups. The degree to which such variations in mobility profiles can be used to distinguish phenotypes is evaluated for eleven N-linked glycan ions. An outlier analysis on each sample class followed by an unsupervised PCA using a genetic algorithm for pattern recognition reveals that EAC samples are separated from NC samples based on 46 features originating from the 11-glycan composite IMS distribution. PMID:23126309

  2. Matrix-enhanced secondary ion mass spectrometry: The Alchemist's solution?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delcorte, Arnaud

    2006-07-01

    Because of the requirements of large molecule characterization and high-lateral resolution SIMS imaging, the possibility of improving molecular ion yields by the use of specific sample preparation procedures has recently generated a renewed interest in the static SIMS community. In comparison with polyatomic projectiles, however, signal enhancement by a matrix might appear to some as the alchemist's versus the scientist's solution to the current problems of organic SIMS. In this contribution, I would like to discuss critically the pros and cons of matrix-enhanced SIMS procedures, in the new framework that includes polyatomic ion bombardment. This discussion is based on a short review of the experimental and theoretical developments achieved in the last decade with respect to the three following approaches: (i) blending the analyte with a low-molecular weight organic matrix (MALDI-type preparation procedure); (ii) mixing alkali/noble metal salts with the analyte; (iii) evaporating a noble metal layer on the analyte sample surface (organic molecules, polymers).

  3. Scattering of sulfur ions by carbon: Classical-trajectory Monte Carlo results

    SciTech Connect

    Slabkowska, Katarzyna; Polasik, Marek; Janowicz, Maciej

    2003-01-01

    We analyze classically the scattering of sulfur ions by carbon using the classical-trajectory Monte Carlo method. It is assumed that the scatterer and scattered nuclei are coupled to each other as well as to all electrons, but there is no coupling between electrons themselves. To initialize the state of both atoms, quasiexact energies are used that are obtained from the Dirac-Fock method. Effective charges are used to partially take into account the intra-atomic interactions between electrons. We concentrate on the cross sections for production of vacancies in the K and L shells and capture of electrons to K, L, and M shells of the sulfur ions. The dependence of these cross sections on the energy of the projectile sulfur ions and on the initial charge states of these ions is analyzed. Our results will be helpful in the interpretation of x-ray spectra from highly ionized fast sulfur projectiles passing through a carbon foil.

  4. Nonadiabatic dynamics in energetic negative fluorine ions scattering from a Si(100) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lin; Qiu, Shunli; Xiong, Feifei; Lu, Jianjie; Liu, Pinyang; Ding, Bin; Li, Yuan; Cui, Ying; Guo, Yanling; Chen, Ximeng

    2015-09-01

    The dependence of the negative-ion fractions on incident energy and angle is reported for 8.5-22.5 keV F- ions scattered from a Si(100) surface at a fixed scattering angle of 38°. The negative-ion fraction increases monotonically with incident velocity for specular scattering. In particular, the variation of the fraction with incident angle is bell shaped for a given incident energy. We interpret this variation using the incident-velocity effect at short distances where the yield of negative ions depends on the number of initial neutrals. It strongly indicates that at short distances, a dynamical equilibrium population is never achieved. This nonadiabatic feature is supported by simple calculations using modified rate equations.

  5. Speciation of Nitrogen-Bearing Species Using Negative and Positive Secondary Ion Spectra with Nano Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Kexue; Sinha, Baerbel; Hoppe, Peter

    2016-03-15

    In this study, we demonstrate that Nano Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (NanoSIMS) can be used to differentiate different nitrogen-containing species commonly observed in atmospheric aerosol particles with micrometer or submicrometer spatial resolution, on the basis of the relative intensity of secondary ion signals, both in negative and positive secondary ion mode, without the need to chemically or physically separate the samples. Compounds tested include nitrate, nitrite, ammonium salts, urea, amino acids, sugars, organic acids, amides, triazine, imidazole, protein, and biological tissue. We show that NO2(-) secondary ions are unique to the decomposition of nitrate and nitrite salts, whereas NH4(+) secondary ions are unique to samples containing ammonium ions, with low signal intensities observed from amino groups but none from biological tissue. CN(-) signals are obtained from all nitrogen-bearing compounds, but relative signal intensities are the highest for organic nitrogen-containing compounds. We demonstrate that quantitative determination of the elemental fractions of carbon, oxygen, and nitrate in nanometer-sized aerosol samples using normalized secondary ion intensities is possible. We further demonstrate that stable isotope ratios measured on in-house standards of unknown isotopic composition using the (12)C(15)N(-)/(12)C(14)N(-) ratio (all nitrogen-containing species), the (15)N(16)O2(-)/(14)N(16)O2(-) ratio (nitrate and nitrite species), and the (15)NH4(+)/(14)NH4(+) ratio (ammonium salts, amino acids, and urea) are stable and sufficiently precise for nitrogen isotope analysis. PMID:26854563

  6. Advances in ion mobility spectrometry–mass spectrometry reveal key insights into amyloid assembly☆

    PubMed Central

    Woods, L.A.; Radford, S.E.; Ashcroft, A.E.

    2013-01-01

    Interfacing ion mobility spectrometry to mass spectrometry (IMS–MS) has enabled mass spectrometric analyses to extend into an extra dimension, providing unrivalled separation and structural characterization of lowly populated species in heterogeneous mixtures. One biological system that has benefitted significantly from such advances is that of amyloid formation. Using IMS–MS, progress has been made into identifying transiently populated monomeric and oligomeric species for a number of different amyloid systems and has led to an enhanced understanding of the mechanism by which small molecules modulate amyloid formation. This review highlights recent advances in this field, which have been accelerated by the commercial availability of IMS–MS instruments. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mass spectrometry in structural biology. PMID:23063533

  7. Optimization of an ion-to-photon detector for large molecules in mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dubois; Knochenmuss; Zenobi

    1999-10-15

    Ion packets can be detected in time-of-flight mass spectrometry by collecting the photons that are produced during the impact of the packets with a scintillator. The photon yield is a function of the ion energy. It was found that post-acceleration of the particles in front of the scintillator was an efficient way of increasing signal intensities. For the same total ion energy, the intensities were larger with post-acceleration than when only increasing the initial ion kinetic energy. A venetian blind dynode, converting the primary ion beam into electrons/secondary ions, was also introduced. Positive or negative secondary particles produced on the dynode surface could be accelerated to the scintillator. Electrons were found to give the highest signals. Intensities similar to those measured with microchannel plates were found. The linearity and onset of saturation of the microchannel plates and the ion-to-photon detector were compared. At optimum operating conditions, the ion-to-photon detector gave around 10 times higher signals than the microchannel plates for heavy ions (150 kDa), with similar mass resolution. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:10487943

  8. Using a Buffer Gas Modifier to Change Separation Selectivity in Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Maestre, Roberto; Wu, Ching; Hill, Herbert H.

    2010-01-01

    The mobilities of a set of common α-amino acids, four tetraalkylammonium ions, 2,4-dimethyl pyridine (2,4-lutidine), 2,6-di-tert-butyl pyridine (DTBP), and valinol were determined using electrospray ionization-ion mobility spectrometry-quadrupole mass spectrometry (ESI-IMS-QMS) while introducing 2-butanol into the buffer gas. The mobilities of the test compounds decreased by varying extents with 2-butanol concentration in the mobility spectrometer. When the concentration of 2-butanol increased from 0.0 to 6.8 mmol m−3 (2.5×102 ppmv), percentage reductions in mobilities were: 13.6% (serine), 12.2% (threonine), 10.4% (methionine), 10.3% (tyrosine), 9.8% (valinol), 9.2% (phenylalanine), 7.8% (tryptophan), 5.6% (2,4-lutidine), 2.2% (DTBP), 1.0% (tetramethylammonium ion, TMA, and tetraethylammonium ion, TEA), 0.0% (tetrapropylammonium ion, TPA), and 0.3% (tetrabutylammonium ion, TBA). These variations in mobility depended on the size and steric hindrance on the charge of the ions, and were due to formation of large ion-2-butanol clusters. This selective variation in mobilities was applied to the resolution of a mixture of compounds with similar reduced mobilities such as serine and valinol, which overlapped in N2-only buffer gas in the IMS spectrum. The relative insensitivity of tetraalkylammonium ions and DTBP to the introduction of 2-butanol into the buffer gas was explained by steric hindrance of the four alkyl substituents in tetraalkylammonium ions and the two tert-butyl groups in DTBP, which shielded the positive charge of the ion from the attachment of 2-butanol molecules. Low buffer gas temperatures (100 °C) produced the largest reductions in mobilities by increasing ion-2-butanol interactions and formation of clusters; high temperatures (250 °C) prevented the formation of clusters, and no reduction in ion mobility was obtained with the introduction of 2-butanol into the buffer gas. Low temperatures and high concentrations of 2-butanol produced a series of

  9. Formation of high-mass cluster ions from compound semiconductors using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry with cluster primary ions.

    PubMed

    Goacher, Robyn E; Luo, Hong; Gardella, Joseph A

    2008-05-01

    The detection of high-mass, nonstoichiometric, GaxAsy and InxPy secondary ion clusters using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry is reported for the first time. The GaxAsy and InxPy clusters are detected in both positive and negative ion spectra and extend to masses of at least 6000 dalton (Da). Consecutive clusters differ by the addition of one gallium (indium) atom. This leads to nonstoichiometric clusters at high mass (i.e., Ga15As3 at 1270 Da) which are metastable above a critical mass. The relative secondary ion yields of high-mass GaxAsy clusters detected using several primary ion sources (Cs+, Bi+, Bi3+, Bi32+, Bi52+, C60+, and C602+) are compared. The relative secondary ion yield of high-mass GaxAsy clusters is significantly enhanced by the use of cluster primary ions and the best relative secondary ion yield is obtained using Bi3+ primary ions. An application of the high-mass GaxAsy clusters is presented, in which these clusters are utilized to distinguish between contaminant levels of Ga and bulk GaAs structure in a depth profile of a MnAs/GaAs heterojunction. These results illustrate improved analysis of inorganic materials using cluster primary ions and break the paradigm of stoichiometric secondary cluster ion formation for SIMS of inorganic compounds. PMID:18358011

  10. Recent developments in ion mobility spectrometry detection technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritchie, Robert K.; Kuja, Frank J.; Jackson, Ronald A.; Loveless, Arthur J.; Danylewich-May, Lucy L.

    1994-03-01

    Barringer's new IONSCANTM model 350 provides improved operational flexibility, reliability, and effectiveness in the rapid on-site detection and identification of narcotics and explosives. The model 350 is a modular integrated design, with DC-power capabilities, and wheels or vehicle mounts to facilitate transportation to and operation in a variety of operational locations. Recent developments in IONSCAN ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) technology in the model 350 include a long-life air dryer/purification system and new software for improved substance detection and false alarm rate performance. New multiple peak detection capabilities for more reliable substance identification are described. Studies on IMS temperature and pressure effects are reported and their possible future use to further improve peak detection performance are discussed. Some recent applications in narcotics interdiction are described.

  11. Soft Supercharging of Biomolecular Ions in Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chingin, Konstantin; Xu, Ning; Chen, Huanwen

    2014-06-01

    The charge states of biomolecular ions in ESI-MS can be significantly increased by the addition of low-vapor supercharging (SC) reagents into the spraying solution. Despite the considerable interest from the community, the mechanistic aspects of SC are not well understood and are hotly debated. Arguments that denaturation accounts for the increased charging observed in proteins sprayed from aqueous solutions containing SC reagent have been published widely, but often with incomplete or ambiguous supporting data. In this work, we explored ESI MS charging and SC behavior of several biopolymers including proteins and DNA oligonucleotides. Analytes were ionized from 100 mM ammonium acetate (NH4Ac) aqueous buffer in both positive (ESI+) and negative (ESI-) ion modes. SC was induced either with m-NBA or by the elevated temperature of ESI capillary. For all the analytes studied we, found striking differences in the ESI MS response to these two modes of activation. The data suggest that activation with m-NBA results in more extensive analyte charging with lower degree of denaturation. When working solution with m-NBA was analyzed at elevated temperatures, the SC effect from m-NBA was neutralized. Instead, the net SC effect was similar to the SC effect achieved by thermal activation only. Overall, our observations indicate that SC reagents enhance ESI charging of biomolecules via distinctly different mechanism compared with the traditional approaches based on analyte denaturation. Instead, the data support the hypothesis that the SC phenomenon involves a direct interaction between a biopolymer and SC reagent occurring in evaporating ESI droplets.

  12. Restrained Ion Population Transfer: A Novel Ion Transfer Method for Mass Spectrometry.

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, Nathan K.; Skulason, Gunnar; Weisbrod, Chad R.; Wu, Si; Zhang, Kai; Prior, David C.; Buschbach, Michael A.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Bruce, James E.

    2008-06-30

    With modern Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) mass spectrometers, ions are created and accumulated exterior to the mass analyzer. The ion accumulation event takes place in a region of higher pressure which allows ions to be thermally cooled before being given kinetic energy and accelerated toward the ICR cell where they are to be decelerated and re-trapped. When gated trapping is used to collect ions in the ICR cell for analysis, mass discrimination can occur due to time-of-flight effects. Also, trapping ions with large axial kinetic energy can decrease the performance of the ICR instrument when compared to the analysis of thermally-cooled ions located at the trap center. Therefore, it is desirable to limit the energy imparted in the ions within the ICR cell as well as minimize time-of-flight effects. The approach presented here for ion transfer called restrained ion population transfer or RIPT provides complete axial control of an ion population throughout the entire transfer sequence from the accumulation region to the ICR cell. This is accomplished by utilization of a number of quadrupole segments arranged in series with independent control of the dc bias voltage applied to each segment of the quadrupole ion guide. This approach circumvents problems associated with time-of-flight effects and minimizes the energy imparted to the ions allowing transfer of the cooled ion packet from the ion accumulation region to the ICR cell. Initial data are presented to illustrate feasibility of restrained ion population transfer. RIPT was also modeled with SIMION 7.0 and simulation results that support our feasibility studies of the ions transfer process are presented.

  13. Structural Elucidation of Enzymatically Synthesized Galacto-oligosaccharides Using Ion-Mobility Spectrometry-Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Carević, Milica; Bezbradica, Dejan; Banjanac, Katarina; Milivojević, Ana; Fanuel, Mathieu; Rogniaux, Hélène; Ropartz, David; Veličković, Dušan

    2016-05-11

    Galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS) represent a diverse group of well-characterized prebiotic ingredients derived from lactose in a reaction catalyzed with β-galactosidases. Enzymatic transgalactosylation results in a mixture of compounds of various degrees of polymerization and types of linkages. Because structure plays an important role in terms of prebiotic activity, it is of crucial importance to provide an insight into the mechanism of transgalactosylation reaction and occurrence of different types of β-linkages during GOS synthesis. Our study proved that a novel one-step method, based on ion-mobility spectrometry-tandem mass spectrometry (IMS-MS/MS), enables complete elucidation of GOS structure. It has been shown that β-galactosidase from Aspergillus oryzae has the highest affinity toward formation of β-(1→3) or β-(1→6) linkages. Additionally, it was observed that the occurrence of different linkages varies during the reaction course, indicating that tailoring favorable GOS structures with improved prebiotic activity can be achieved by adequate control of enzymatic synthesis. PMID:27109424

  14. Dark-Field Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy via Detection of Forward-Scattered Helium Ions with a Microchannel Plate.

    PubMed

    Woehl, Taylor J; White, Ryan M; Keller, Robert R

    2016-06-01

    A microchannel plate was used as an ion sensitive detector in a commercial helium ion microscope (HIM) for dark-field transmission imaging of nanomaterials, i.e. scanning transmission ion microscopy (STIM). In contrast to previous transmission HIM approaches that used secondary electron conversion holders, our new approach detects forward-scattered helium ions on a dedicated annular shaped ion sensitive detector. Minimum collection angles between 125 mrad and 325 mrad were obtained by varying the distance of the sample from the microchannel plate detector during imaging. Monte Carlo simulations were used to predict detector angular ranges at which dark-field images with atomic number contrast could be obtained. We demonstrate atomic number contrast imaging via scanning transmission ion imaging of silica-coated gold nanoparticles and magnetite nanoparticles. Although the resolution of STIM is known to be degraded by beam broadening in the substrate, we imaged magnetite nanoparticles with high contrast on a relatively thick silicon nitride substrate. We expect this new approach to annular dark-field STIM will open avenues for more quantitative ion imaging techniques and advance fundamental understanding of underlying ion scattering mechanisms leading to image formation. PMID:27153003

  15. Fundamental studies of gas phase ionic reactions by ion mobility spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, K.; Knighton, W. B.; Sahlstrom, K. E.; Grimsrud, E. P.

    1995-01-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) provides a promising approach to the study of gas phase ionic reactions in buffer gases at unusually high pressures. This point is illustrated here by studies of the Sn2 nucleophilic displacement reaction, Cl(-) + CH3Br yields Br + CH3Br, using IMS at atmospheric pressure. The equilibrium clustering reaction, Cl(-)(CHCI3)(n - 1) + CHCI3 yields Cl(-)(CHCI3)(n), where n = 1 and 2, and the effect of clustering on the Sn2 reaction with CH3Br have also been characterized by this IMS-based kinetic method. Present problems and anticipated improvements in the application of ion mobility spectrometry to studies of other gas phase ionic processes are discussed.

  16. Separation of a Set of Peptide Sequence Isomers Using Differential Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.; Creese, Andrew J.; Smith, Richard D.; Cooper, Helen J.

    2011-08-15

    Protein identification in bottom-up proteomics requires disentangling isomers of proteolytic peptides, a major class of which are sequence inversions. Separation of sequence isomers using ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) has been reported, but limited to pairs of species. Here we demonstrate baseline separation of all seven sequences for a tryptic peptide with eight residues using differential IMS or FAIMS. Evaluations of peak capacity of the method indicate that even larger libraries should generally be separated for heavier peptides with higher charge states.

  17. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry for Mg Tracer Diffusion: Issues and Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Tuggle, Jay; Giordani, Andrew; Kulkarni, Nagraj S; Warmack, Robert J Bruce; Coffey, Kevin; Sohn, Yong Ho; HunterJr., Jerry

    2014-01-01

    A Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) method has been developed to measure stable Mg isotope tracer diffusion. This SIMS method was then used to calculate Mg self- diffusivities and the data was verified against historical data measured using radio tracers. The SIMS method has been validated as a reliable alternative to the radio-tracer technique for the measurement of Mg self-diffusion coefficients and can be used as a routine method for determining diffusion coefficients.

  18. Novel sampling methods for use with thermal desorption ion trap mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Barshick, S.A.; Buchanan, M.V.

    1994-12-31

    Novel sampling approaches have been investigated to improve the analytical utility of thermal desorption Direct Sampling Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry (DSITMS). Because DSITMS involves the direct introduction of samples into an ion trap mass spectrometer, problems with detection capabilities (sensitivity and selectivity) can often occur when performing trace analysis in complex matrices. Various sampling approaches have been evaluated to improve thermal desorption detection capabilities and to extend the utilities of DSITMS methodologies without significantly increasing analysis times or the cost-effectiveness of DSITMS methods. Three sampling approaches have been investigated including solid phase microextraction (SPME), solid phase extraction columns (SPEC), and purge and trap.

  19. The Spontaneous Loss of Coherence Catastrophe in Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Aizikov, Konstantin; Mathur, Raman; O’Connor, Peter B.

    2009-01-01

    The spontaneous loss of coherence catastrophe (SLCC) is a frequently observed, yet poorly studied, space-charge related effect in Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS). This manuscript presents an application of the filter diagonalization method (FDM) in the analysis of this phenomenon. The temporal frequency behavior reproduced by frequency shift analysis using the FDM shows the complex nature of the SLCC, which can be explained by a combination of factors occurring concurrently, governed by electrostatics and ion packet trajectories inside the ICR cell. PMID:19013078

  20. Design and implementation of embedded ion mobility spectrometry instrument based on SOPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Genwei; Zhao, Jiang; Yang, Liu; Liu, Bo; Jiang, Yanwei; Yang, Jie

    2015-02-01

    On the hardware platform with single CYCLONE IV FPGA Chip based on SOPC technology, the control functions of IP cores of a Ion Mobility Spectrometry instrument was tested, including 32 bit Nios II soft-core processor, high-voltage module, ion gate switch, gas flow, temperature and pressure sensors, signal acquisition and communication protocol. Embedded operating system μCLinux was successfully transplanted to the hardware platform, used to schedule all the tasks, such as system initialization, parameter setting, signal processing, recognition algorithm and results display. The system was validated using the IMS diagram of Acetone reagent, and the instrument was proved to have a strong signal resolution.

  1. Vacuum Ultraviolet Photodissociation and Fourier Transform-Ion Cyclotron Resonance (FT-ICR) Mass Spectrometry: Revisited.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Jared B; Robinson, Errol W; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana

    2016-03-15

    We revisited the implementation of 193 nm ultraviolet photodissociation (UVPD) within the ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) cell of a Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometer. UVPD performance characteristics were examined in the context of recent developments in the understanding of UVPD and in-cell tandem mass spectrometry. Efficient UVPD and photo-ECD of a model peptide and proteins within the ICR cell of a FT-ICR mass spectrometer are accomplished through appropriate modulation of laser pulse timing, relative to ion magnetron motion and the potential applied to an ion optical element upon which photons impinge. It is shown that UVPD yields efficient and extensive fragmentation, resulting in excellent sequence coverage for model peptide and protein cations. PMID:26882021

  2. Advanced Automation for Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry-New Opportunities for Real-Time Autonomous Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Peter T.; Wong, C. M.; Salmonson, J. D.; Yost, R. A.; Griffin, T. P.; Yates, N. A.; Lawless, James G. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The utility of MS/MS for both target compound analysis and the structure elucidation of unknowns has been described in a number of references. A broader acceptance of this technique has not yet been realized as it requires large, complex, and costly instrumentation which has not been competitive with more conventional techniques. Recent advancements in ion trap mass spectrometry promise to change this situation. Although the ion trap's small size, sensitivity, and ability to perform multiple stages of mass spectrometry have made it eminently suitable for on-line, real-time monitoring applications, advance automation techniques are required to make these capabilities more accessible to non-experts. Towards this end we have developed custom software for the design and implementation of MS/MS experiments. This software allows the user to take full advantage of the ion trap's versatility with respect to ionization techniques, scan proxies, and ion accumulation/ejection methods. Additionally, expert system software has been developed for autonomous target compound analysis. This software has been linked to ion trap control software and a commercial data system to bring all of the steps in the analysis cycle under control of the expert system. These software development efforts and their utilization for a number of trace analysis applications will be described.

  3. Pushing the Frontier of High-Definition Ion Mobility Spectrometry Using FAIMS

    PubMed Central

    A. Shvartsburg, Alexandre; A. Anderson, Gordon; D. Smith, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Differential ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) separates ions in gases based on the difference between their mobilities in strong and weak electric fields, captured directly employing a periodic waveform with dissimilar profiles in opposite polarities. As that difference is not tightly correlated with the ion size or mass, FAIMS separations are generally quite orthogonal to both conventional IMS (based on the absolute ion mobility that reflects the physical ion size) and mass spectrometry (based on mass). Until a few years ago, that advantage was largely offset by poor FAIMS resolving power (∼10–20), an order of magnitude below that achieved with conventional (drift-tube) IMS. This article summarizes the major recent technical developments that have raised FAIMS resolving power up to ∼500. These include use of higher and more stable voltages provided by new waveform generators, novel buffer gas compositions comprising high helium or hydrogen fractions, and extended filtering times up to ∼1 s. These advances have enabled previously unthinkable analyses such as broad baseline separations of peptide sequence inversions, localization variants (post-translationally modified peptides with differing PTM attachment sites) even for the larger “middle-down” peptides and smallest PTMs, and lipid regioisomers. PMID:24349930

  4. Direct Analysis in Real Time (DART) of an Organothiophosphate at Ultrahigh Resolution by Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry and Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Prokai, Laszlo; Stevens, Stanley M.

    2016-01-01

    Direct analysis in real time (DART) is a recently developed ambient ionization technique for mass spectrometry to enable rapid and sensitive analyses with little or no sample preparation. After swab-based field sampling, the organothiophosphate malathion was analyzed using DART-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry (MS) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Mass resolution was documented to be over 800,000 in full-scan MS mode and over 1,000,000 for an MS/MS product ion produced by collision-induced dissociation of the protonated analyte. Mass measurement accuracy below 1 ppm was obtained for all DART-generated ions that belonged to the test compound in the mass spectra acquired using only external mass calibration. This high mass measurement accuracy, achievable at present only through FTMS, was required for unequivocal identification of the corresponding molecular formulae. PMID:26784186

  5. Direct Analysis in Real Time (DART) of an Organothiophosphate at Ultrahigh Resolution by Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry and Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Prokai, Laszlo; Stevens, Stanley M

    2016-01-01

    Direct analysis in real time (DART) is a recently developed ambient ionization technique for mass spectrometry to enable rapid and sensitive analyses with little or no sample preparation. After swab-based field sampling, the organothiophosphate malathion was analyzed using DART-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry (MS) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Mass resolution was documented to be over 800,000 in full-scan MS mode and over 1,000,000 for an MS/MS product ion produced by collision-induced dissociation of the protonated analyte. Mass measurement accuracy below 1 ppm was obtained for all DART-generated ions that belonged to the test compound in the mass spectra acquired using only external mass calibration. This high mass measurement accuracy, achievable at present only through FTMS, was required for unequivocal identification of the corresponding molecular formulae. PMID:26784186

  6. Determining the Locations of Ions and Water around DNA from X-Ray Scattering Measurements.

    PubMed

    Meisburger, Steve P; Pabit, Suzette A; Pollack, Lois

    2015-06-16

    Nucleic acids carry a negative charge, attracting salt ions and water. Interactions with these components of the solvent drive DNA to condense, RNA to fold, and proteins to bind. To understand these biological processes, knowledge of solvent structure around the nucleic acids is critical. Yet, because they are often disordered, ions and water evade detection by x-ray crystallography and other high-resolution methods. Small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) is uniquely sensitive to the spatial correlations between solutes and the surrounding solvent. Thus, SAXS provides an experimental constraint to guide or test emerging solvation theories. However, the interpretation of SAXS profiles is nontrivial because of the difficulty in separating the scattering signals of each component: the macromolecule, ions, and hydration water. Here, we demonstrate methods for robustly deconvoluting these signals, facilitating a more straightforward comparison with theory. Using SAXS data collected on an absolute intensity scale for short DNA duplexes in solution with Na(+), K(+), Rb(+), or Cs(+) counterions, we mathematically decompose the scattering profiles into components (DNA, water, and ions) and validate the decomposition using anomalous scattering measurements. In addition, we generate a library of physically motivated ion atmosphere models and rank them by agreement with the scattering data. The best-fit models have relatively compact ion atmospheres when compared to predictions from the mean-field Poisson-Boltzmann theory of electrostatics. Thus, the x-ray scattering methods presented here provide a valuable measurement of the global structure of the ion atmosphere that can be used to test electrostatics theories that go beyond the mean-field approximation. PMID:26083928

  7. Determining the Locations of Ions and Water around DNA from X-Ray Scattering Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Meisburger, Steve P.; Pabit, Suzette A.; Pollack, Lois

    2015-01-01

    Nucleic acids carry a negative charge, attracting salt ions and water. Interactions with these components of the solvent drive DNA to condense, RNA to fold, and proteins to bind. To understand these biological processes, knowledge of solvent structure around the nucleic acids is critical. Yet, because they are often disordered, ions and water evade detection by x-ray crystallography and other high-resolution methods. Small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) is uniquely sensitive to the spatial correlations between solutes and the surrounding solvent. Thus, SAXS provides an experimental constraint to guide or test emerging solvation theories. However, the interpretation of SAXS profiles is nontrivial because of the difficulty in separating the scattering signals of each component: the macromolecule, ions, and hydration water. Here, we demonstrate methods for robustly deconvoluting these signals, facilitating a more straightforward comparison with theory. Using SAXS data collected on an absolute intensity scale for short DNA duplexes in solution with Na+, K+, Rb+, or Cs+ counterions, we mathematically decompose the scattering profiles into components (DNA, water, and ions) and validate the decomposition using anomalous scattering measurements. In addition, we generate a library of physically motivated ion atmosphere models and rank them by agreement with the scattering data. The best-fit models have relatively compact ion atmospheres when compared to predictions from the mean-field Poisson-Boltzmann theory of electrostatics. Thus, the x-ray scattering methods presented here provide a valuable measurement of the global structure of the ion atmosphere that can be used to test electrostatics theories that go beyond the mean-field approximation. PMID:26083928

  8. Afterglow of a microwave microstrip plasma as an ion source for mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeuffer, Kevin P.; White, Allen; Broekaert, José A. C.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2015-01-01

    A microwave-induced plasma that was previously used for optical emission spectrometry has been repurposed as an afterglow ion source for mass spectrometry. This compact microwave discharge, termed the microstrip plasma (MSP), is operated at 20-50 W and 2.45 GHz in helium at a flow of 300 mL/min. The primary background ions present in the afterglow are ionized and protonated water clusters. An exponential dilution chamber was used to introduce volatile organic compounds into the MSP afterglow and yielded limits of detection in the 40 ppb to 7 ppm range (v/v). A hydride-generation system was also utilized for detection of volatile hydride-forming elements (arsenic, antimony, tin) in the afterglow and produced limits of detection in the 10-100 ppb range in solution. The MSP afterglow was found capable of desorption and ionization of analyte species directly from a solid substrate, suggesting its use as an ion source for ambient desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

  9. Nanometer scale elemental analysis in the helium ion microscope using time of flight spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Klingner, N; Heller, R; Hlawacek, G; von Borany, J; Notte, J; Huang, J; Facsko, S

    2016-03-01

    Time of flight backscattering spectrometry (ToF-BS) was successfully implemented in a helium ion microscope (HIM). Its integration introduces the ability to perform laterally resolved elemental analysis as well as elemental depth profiling on the nm scale. A lateral resolution of ≤54nm and a time resolution of Δt≤17ns(Δt/t≤5.4%) are achieved. By using the energy of the backscattered particles for contrast generation, we introduce a new imaging method to the HIM allowing direct elemental mapping as well as local spectrometry. In addition laterally resolved time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) can be performed with the same setup. Time of flight is implemented by pulsing the primary ion beam. This is achieved in a cost effective and minimal invasive way that does not influence the high resolution capabilities of the microscope when operating in standard secondary electron (SE) imaging mode. This technique can thus be easily adapted to existing devices. The particular implementation of ToF-BS and ToF-SIMS techniques are described, results are presented and advantages, difficulties and limitations of this new techniques are discussed. PMID:26725148

  10. Separation of Peptide Isomers with Variant Modified Sites by High-Resolution Differential Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.; Creese, Andrew J.; Smith, Richard D.; Cooper, Helen J.

    2010-01-01

    Many proteins and proteolytic peptides incorporate the same post-translational modification (PTM) at different sites, creating multiple localization variants with different functions or activities that may coexist in cells. Current analytical methods based on liquid chromatography (LC) followed by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) are challenged by such isomers that often co-elute in LC and/or produce non-unique fragment ions. The application of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) was explored, but success has been limited by insufficient resolution. We show that high-resolution differential ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) employing helium-rich gases can readily separate phosphopeptides with variant modification sites. Use of He/N2 mixtures containing up to 74% He has allowed separating to >95% three monophosphorylated peptides of identical sequence. Similar separation was achieved at 50% He, using an elevated electric field. Bisphosphorylated isomers that differ in only one modification site were separated to the same extent. We anticipate FAIMS capabilities for such separations to extend to other PTMs. PMID:20843012

  11. Secondary ion mass spectrometry and x-ray analysis of superconducting Nb/Pd multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerardi, C.; Tagliente, M. A.; Del Vecchio, A.; Tapfer, L.; Coccorese, C.; Attanasio, C.; Mercaldo, L. V.; Maritato, L.; Slaughter, J. M.; Falco, C. M.

    2000-01-01

    We report on accurate structural investigations of sputtered Nb/Pd multilayers by means of high-resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry and x-ray reflectivity. The combined use of secondary ion mass spectrometry and x-ray specular reflectivity techniques allows us to study the chemical configuration of the interfaces and to relate it to the observed superconducting properties. Secondary ion mass spectrometry analyses reveal a distinct Nb and Pd modulation and very sharp profiles with abrupt interfaces indicating a negligible interdiffusion of Nb and Pd at the interfaces. Moreover, analyzing the features in the Nb and Pd profiles and correlating them to the oxygen distribution in the multilayers and to the low-angle x-ray patterns, thin layers (3-4 nm thick) of niobium oxide were noticed at the Nb/Pd interfaces, while no oxide layers at the Pd/Nb interfaces could be detected. The role of this oxide layer in the determination of the crossover between three- and two-dimensional superconducting behavior in parallel external magnetic field, is discussed.

  12. Interlaboratory study of the ion source memory effect in 36Cl accelerator mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavetich, Stefan; Akhmadaliev, Shavkat; Arnold, Maurice; Aumaître, Georges; Bourlès, Didier; Buchriegler, Josef; Golser, Robin; Keddadouche, Karim; Martschini, Martin; Merchel, Silke; Rugel, Georg; Steier, Peter

    2014-06-01

    Understanding and minimization of contaminations in the ion source due to cross-contamination and long-term memory effect is one of the key issues for accurate accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) measurements of volatile elements. The focus of this work is on the investigation of the long-term memory effect for the volatile element chlorine, and the minimization of this effect in the ion source of the Dresden accelerator mass spectrometry facility (DREAMS). For this purpose, one of the two original HVE ion sources at the DREAMS facility was modified, allowing the use of larger sample holders having individual target apertures. Additionally, a more open geometry was used to improve the vacuum level. To evaluate this improvement in comparison to other up-to-date ion sources, an interlaboratory comparison had been initiated. The long-term memory effect of the four Cs sputter ion sources at DREAMS (two sources: original and modified), ASTER (Accélérateur pour les Sciences de la Terre, Environnement, Risques) and VERA (Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator) had been investigated by measuring samples of natural 35Cl/37Cl-ratio and samples highly-enriched in 35Cl (35Cl/37Cl ∼ 999). Besides investigating and comparing the individual levels of long-term memory, recovery time constants could be calculated. The tests show that all four sources suffer from long-term memory, but the modified DREAMS ion source showed the lowest level of contamination. The recovery times of the four ion sources were widely spread between 61 and 1390 s, where the modified DREAMS ion source with values between 156 and 262 s showed the fastest recovery in 80% of the measurements.

  13. Lunar surface composition and solar wind-induced secondary ion mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Elphic, R.C.; Funsten, H.O. III; Barraclough, B.L.; McComas, D.J.; Paffett, M.T.; Vaniman, D.T.; Heiken, G. )

    1991-11-01

    The Moon has no strong global magnetic field and only a tenuous atmosphere, so solar wind ions ({approximately}95% H{sup +}, 5% He{sup ++}) directly bombard the lunar surface, sputtering atoms and secondary ions from the exposed grains of the regolith. The secondary ions potentially provide surface composition information through secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), a standard laboratory surface composition analysis technique. In this paper the authors report the results of laboratory SIMS experiments on lunar soil simulants using solar wind-like ions. They find that H{sup +} and He{sup ++}, while not efficient sputterers, nevertheless produce significant fluxes of secondary lunar ions, including Na{sup +}, Mg{sup +}, Al{sup +}, Si{sup +}, K{sup +}, Ca{sup +}, Ti{sup +}, Mn{sup +} and Fe{sup +}. They predict that lunar surface secondary-ion fluxes range between {approximately}10 and 10{sup 4} ions cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}, depending on the species.

  14. T-wave Ion Mobility-mass Spectrometry: Basic Experimental Procedures for Protein Complex Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Michaelevski, Izhak; Kirshenbaum, Noam; Sharon, Michal

    2010-01-01

    Ion mobility (IM) is a method that measures the time taken for an ion to travel through a pressurized cell under the influence of a weak electric field. The speed by which the ions traverse the drift region depends on their size: large ions will experience a greater number of collisions with the background inert gas (usually N2) and thus travel more slowly through the IM device than those ions that comprise a smaller cross-section. In general, the time it takes for the ions to migrate though the dense gas phase separates them, according to their collision cross-section (Ω). Recently, IM spectrometry was coupled with mass spectrometry and a traveling-wave (T-wave) Synapt ion mobility mass spectrometer (IM-MS) was released. Integrating mass spectrometry with ion mobility enables an extra dimension of sample separation and definition, yielding a three-dimensional spectrum (mass to charge, intensity, and drift time). This separation technique allows the spectral overlap to decrease, and enables resolution of heterogeneous complexes with very similar mass, or mass-to-charge ratios, but different drift times. Moreover, the drift time measurements provide an important layer of structural information, as Ω is related to the overall shape and topology of the ion. The correlation between the measured drift time values and Ω is calculated using a calibration curve generated from calibrant proteins with defined cross-sections1. The power of the IM-MS approach lies in its ability to define the subunit packing and overall shape of protein assemblies at micromolar concentrations, and near-physiological conditions1. Several recent IM studies of both individual proteins2,3 and non-covalent protein complexes4-9, successfully demonstrated that protein quaternary structure is maintained in the gas phase, and highlighted the potential of this approach in the study of protein assemblies of unknown geometry. Here, we provide a detailed description of IMS-MS analysis of protein

  15. Analysis of saturated hydrocarbons by redox reaction with negative-ion electrospray Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xibin; Shi, Quan; Zhang, Yahe; Zhao, Suoqi; Zhang, Rui; Chung, Keng H; Xu, Chunming

    2012-04-01

    A novel technique was developed for characterization of saturated hydrocarbons. Linear alkanes were selectively oxidized to ketones by ruthenium ion catalyzed oxidation (RICO). Branched and cyclic alkanes were oxidized to alcohols and ketones. The ketones were then reduced to alcohols by lithium aluminum hydride (LiAlH(4)). The monohydric alcohols (O(1)) in the products obtained from the RICO and RICO-LiAlH(4) reduction reactions were characterized using negative-ion electrospray ionization (ESI) Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR MS) for identification of iso-paraffins, acyclic paraffins and cyclic paraffins. Various model saturated compounds were used to determine the RICO reaction and ionization selectivity. The results from the FTICR MS analysis on the petroleum distillates derived saturated fraction were in agreement with those from field ionization gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (FI GC-TOF MS) analysis. The technique was also used to characterize a petroleum vacuum residue (VR) derived saturates. The results showed that the saturated molecules in the VR contained up to 11 cyclic rings, and the maximum carbon number was up to 92. PMID:22424498

  16. Description of Gas-Phase Ion/Neutral Interactions in Differential Ion Mobility Spectrometry: CV Prediction Using Calibration Runs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auerbach, David; Aspenleiter, Julia; Volmer, Dietrich A.

    2014-09-01

    Differential ion mobility spectrometry (DMS) coupled to mass spectrometry is increasingly used in both quantitative analyses of biological samples and as a means of removing background interferences for enhanced selectivity and improved quality of mass spectra. However, DMS separation efficiency using dry inert gases often lacks the required selectivity to achieve baseline separation. Polar gas-phase modifiers such as alcohols are therefore frequently employed to improve selectivity via clustering/declustering processes. The choice of an optimal modifier currently relies on trial and error experiments, making method development a tedious activity. It was the goal of this study to establish a means of CV prediction for compounds using a homologous series of alcohols as gas-phase modifiers. This prediction was based on linear regression of compensation voltages of two calibration runs for the alcohols with the lowest and the highest molecular weights and readily available descriptors such as proton affinity and gas phase acidity of the modifier molecules. All experiments were performed on a commercial quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometer equipped with a DMS device between electrospray ionization source and entrance quadrupole lens. We evaluated our approach using a homologous series of 4-alkylbenzoic acids and a selection of 23 small molecules of high chemical diversity. Predicted CV values typically deviated from the experimentally determined values by less than 0.5 V. Several test compounds changed their ion mobility behavior for the investigated gas phase modifiers (e.g., from type B to type A) and thus could thus not be evaluated.

  17. Structural Characterization of Anticancer Drug Paclitaxel and Its Metabolites Using Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry and Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hong Hee; Hong, Areum; Cho, Yunju; Kim, Sunghwan; Kim, Won Jong; Kim, Hugh I.

    2016-02-01

    Paclitaxel (PTX) is a popular anticancer drug used in the treatment of various types of cancers. PTX is metabolized in the human liver by cytochrome P450 to two structural isomers, 3'- p-hydroxypaclitaxel (3 p-OHP) and 6α-hydroxypaclitaxel (6α-OHP). Analyzing PTX and its two metabolites, 3 p-OHP and 6α-OHP, is crucial for understanding general pharmacokinetics, drug activity, and drug resistance. In this study, electrospray ionization ion mobility mass spectrometry (ESI-IM-MS) and collision induced dissociation (CID) are utilized for the identification and characterization of PTX and its metabolites. Ion mobility distributions of 3 p-OHP and 6α-OHP indicate that hydroxylation of PTX at different sites yields distinct gas phase structures. Addition of monovalent alkali metal and silver metal cations enhances the distinct dissociation patterns of these structural isomers. The differences observed in the CID patterns of metalated PTX and its two metabolites are investigated further by evaluating their gas-phase structures. Density functional theory calculations suggest that the observed structural changes and dissociation pathways are the result of the interactions between the metal cation and the hydroxyl substituents in PTX metabolites.

  18. Visibility of Young's Interference Fringes: Scattered Light from Small Ion Crystals.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Sebastian; Wechs, Julian; von Zanthier, Joachim; Schmidt-Kaler, Ferdinand

    2016-05-01

    We observe interference in the light scattered from trapped ^{40}Ca^{+} ion crystals. By varying the intensity of the excitation laser, we study the influence of elastic and inelastic scattering on the visibility of the fringe pattern and discriminate its effect from that of the ion temperature and wave-packet localization. In this way we determine the complex degree of coherence and the mutual coherence of light fields produced by individual atoms. We obtain interference fringes from crystals consisting of two, three, and four ions in a harmonic trap. Control of the trapping potential allows for the adjustment of the interatomic distances and thus the formation of linear arrays of atoms serving as a regular grating of microscopic scatterers. PMID:27203319

  19. Selected Ion Flow-Drift Tube Mass Spectrometry: Quantification of Volatile Compounds in Air and Breath.

    PubMed

    Spesyvyi, Anatolii; Smith, David; Španěl, Patrik

    2015-12-15

    A selected ion flow-drift tube mass spectrometric analytical technique, SIFDT-MS, is described that extends the established selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry, SIFT-MS, by the inclusion of a static but variable E-field along the axis of the flow tube reactor in which the analytical ion-molecule chemistry occurs. The ion axial speed is increased in proportion to the reduced field strength E/N (N is the carrier gas number density), and the residence/reaction time, t, which is measured by Hadamard transform multiplexing, is correspondingly reduced. To ensure a proper understanding of the physics and ion chemistry underlying SIFDT-MS, ion diffusive loss to the walls of the flow-drift tube and the mobility of injected H3O(+) ions have been studied as a function of E/N. It is seen that the derived diffusion coefficient and mobility of H3O(+) ions are consistent with those previously reported. The rate coefficient has been determined at elevated E/N for the association reaction of the H3O(+) reagent ions with H2O molecules, which is the first step in the production of H3O(+)(H2O)1,2,3 reagent hydrate ions. The production of hydrated analyte ion was also experimentally investigated. The analytical performance of SIFDT-MS is demonstrated by the quantification of acetone and isoprene in exhaled breath. Finally, the essential features of SIFDT-MS and SIFT-MS are compared, notably pointing out that a much lower speed of the flow-drive pump is required for SIFDT-MS, which facilitates the development of smaller cost-effective analytical instruments for real time breath and fluid headspace analyses. PMID:26583448

  20. Electron-ion collision-frequency for x-ray Thomson scattering in dense plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faussurier, Gérald; Blancard, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Two methods are presented to calculate the electron-ion collision-frequency in dense plasmas using an average-atom model. The first one is based on the Kubo-Greenwood approach. The second one uses the Born and Lenard-Balescu approximations. The two methods are used to calculate x-ray Thomson scattering spectra. Illustrations are shown for dense beryllium and aluminum plasmas. Comparisons with experiment are presented in the case of an x-ray Thomson scattering spectrum.

  1. Multiple scattering of slow ions in a partially degenerate electron fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Popoff, Romain; Maynard, Gilles; Deutsch, Claude

    2009-10-15

    We extend former investigation to a partially degenerate electron fluid at any temperature of multiple slow ion scattering at T=0. We implement an analytic and mean-field interpolation of the target electron dielectric function between T=0 (Lindhard) and T{yields}{infinity} (Fried-Conte). A specific attention is given to multiple scattering of proton projectiles in the keV energy range, stopped in a hot-electron plasma at solid density.

  2. Inversion problem for ion-atom differential elastic scattering.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rich, W. G.; Bobbio, S. M.; Champion, R. L.; Doverspike, L. D.

    1971-01-01

    The paper describes a practical application of Remler's (1971) method by which one constructs a set of phase shifts from high resolution measurements of the differential elastic scattering of protons by rare-gas atoms. These JWKB phase shifts are then formally inverted to determine the corresponding intermolecular potentials. The validity of the method is demonstrated by comparing an intermolecular potential obtained by direct inversion of experimental data with a fairly accurate calculation by Wolniewicz (1965).

  3. Direct analysis of pharmaceutical drug formulations using ion mobility spectrometry/quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry combined with desorption electrospray ionization.

    PubMed

    Weston, Daniel J; Bateman, Robert; Wilson, Ian D; Wood, Tim R; Creaser, Colin S

    2005-12-01

    A novel approach to the rapid analysis of pharmaceutical drug formulations using hyphenated ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) and time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ToF-MS) that requires no sample pretreatment or chromatographic separation is described. A modified quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer containing an ion mobility drift cell was used for gas-phase electrophoretic separation of ions prior to ToF-MS detection. The generation of sample ions directly from tablets and cream formulations was effected by desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) using a modified electrospray ion source. The analysis of a range of over-the-counter and prescription tablet formulations is described, including histamine H2 receptor antagonist (ranitidine), analgesic (paracetamol), opiate (codeine), and aromatase inhibitor anticancer (anastrozole) drugs. The successful determination of active drugs from soft formulations, such as an antiseptic cream (chlorhexidine) and a nicotine-containing skin patch, is also presented. Limits of detection for the active drugs using the DESI/IMS/ToF-MS method fell within the high-picomole to nanomole range. In all cases, the use of ion mobility drift tube separation showed increased selectivity for active drug responses (present as low as 0.14% w/w) over excipient responses such as poly(ethylene glycol). Tandem mass spectrometric analysis of precursor ions separated by IMS allowed positive confirmation of active drugs with little loss of ion mobility efficiency. The ability to analyze hard or soft pharmaceutical formulations directly by DESI combined with ion mobility spectrometry/mass spectrometry in approximately 2 min demonstrates the potential applicability of this novel method to pharmaceutical screening of low-molecular-weight drug formulations with high selectivity over the formulation vehicle. PMID:16316164

  4. Specific O₂⁻ generation in corona discharge for ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sabo, Martin; Matúška, Ján; Matejčík, Stefan

    2011-07-15

    This study deals with O(2)(-) generation in corona discharge (CD) in point to plane geometry for single flow ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) with gas outlet located behind the ionization source. We have designed CD of special geometry in order to achieve the high O(2)(-) yield. Using this ion source we have achieved in zero air conditions that up to 74% all negative ions were O(2)(-) or O(2)(-)(H(2)O). It has been demonstrated that the non-electronegative nitrogen positively influences the efficiency of O(2)(-) generation in O(2)/N(2) mixtures. The reduced ion mobility of 2.27 cm(2)V(-1)s(-1) has been measured for O(2)(-)/O(2)(-)(H(2)O) ions in zero air. Additional ions detected in zero air (less than 200 ppb CO(2)) using the mass spectrometric and IMS technique were, NO(2)(-), N(2)O(2)(-) (2.37 cm(2)V(-1)s(-1)), NO(3)(-), N(2)O(3)(-) and N(2)O(3)(-)(H(2)O). The CO(3)(-) and CO(4)(-) ions have been detected after the introduction of 5 ppm CO(2) into zero air. PMID:21645716

  5. Brominated Tyrosine and Polyelectrolyte Multilayer Analysis by Laser Desorption VUV Postionization and Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Melvin Blaze, M.T.; Takahashi, Lynelle K.; Zhou, Jia; Ahmed, Musahid; Gasper, Gerald L.; Pleticha, F. Douglas; Hanley, Luke

    2011-01-01

    The small molecular analyte 3,5-dibromotyrosine (Br2Y) and chitosan-alginate polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEM) with and without adsorbed Br2Y were analyzed by laser desorption postionization mass spectrometry (LDPI-MS). LDPI-MS using 7.87 eV laser and tunable 8 – 12.5 eV synchrotron vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation found that desorption of clusters from Br2Y films allowed detection by ≤8 eV single photon ionization. Thermal desorption and electronic structure calculations determined the ionization energy of Br2Y to be ~8.3±0.1 eV and further indicated that the lower ionization energies of clusters permitted their detection at ≤8 eV photon energies. However, single photon ionization could only detect Br2Y adsorbed within PEMs when using either higher photon energies or matrix addition to the sample. All samples were also analyzed by 25 keV Bi3+ secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), with the negative ion spectra showing strong parent ion signal which complemented that observed by LDPI-MS. However, the negative ion SIMS appeared strongly dependent on the high electron affinity of this specific analyte and the analyte’s condensed phase environment. PMID:21548612

  6. Review on ion mobility spectrometry. Part 2: hyphenated methods and effects of experimental parameters.

    PubMed

    Cumeras, R; Figueras, E; Davis, C E; Baumbach, J I; Gràcia, I

    2015-03-01

    Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) is a widely used and 'well-known' technique of ion separation in the gaseous phase based on the differences of ion mobilities under an electric field. This technique has received increased interest over the last several decades as evidenced by the pace and advances of new IMS devices available. In this review we explore the hyphenated techniques that are used with IMS, specifically mass spectrometry as an identification approach and a multi-capillary column as a pre-separation approach. Also, we will pay special attention to the key figures of merit of the ion mobility spectrum and how data sets are treated, and the influences of the experimental parameters on both conventional drift time IMS (DTIMS) and miniaturized IMS also known as high Field Asymmetric IMS (FAIMS) in the planar configuration. The present review article is preceded by a companion review article which details the current instrumentation and contains the sections that configure both conventional DTIMS and FAIMS devices. These reviews will give the reader an insightful view of the main characteristics and aspects of the IMS technique. PMID:25465248

  7. Brominated Tyrosine and Polyelectrolyte Multilayer Analysis by Laser Desorption VUV Postionization and Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    University of Illinois at Chicago; Blaze, Melvin M. T.; Takahashi, Lynelle; Zhou, Jia; Ahmed, Musahid; Gasper, Gerald; Pleticha, F. Douglas; Hanley, Luke

    2011-03-14

    The small molecular analyte 3,5-dibromotyrosine (Br2Y) and chitosan-alginate polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEM) with and without adsorbed Br2Y were analyzed by laser desorption postionization mass spectrometry (LDPI-MS). LDPI-MS using 7.87 eV laser and tunable 8 ? 12.5 eV synchrotron vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation found that desorption of clusters from Br2Y films allowed detection by≤8 eV single photon ionization. Thermal desorption and electronic structure calculations determined the ionization energy of Br2Y to be ~;;8.3?0.1 eV and further indicated that the lower ionization energies of clusters permitted their detection at≤8 eV photon energies. However, single photon ionization could only detect Br2Y adsorbed within PEMs when using either higher photon energies or matrix addition to the sample. All samples were also analyzed by 25 keV Bi3 + secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), with the negative ion spectra showing strong parent ion signal which complemented that observed by LDPI-MS. The negative ion SIMS depended strongly on the high electron affinity of this specific analyte and the analyte?s condensed phase environment.

  8. Uranium passivation by C+ implantation: a photoemission and secondary ion mass spectrometry study

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, A J; Felter, T E; Wu, K J; Evans, C; Ferreira, J; Siekhaus, W; McLean, W

    2005-01-20

    Implantation of 33 keV C{sup +} ions into polycrystalline U{sup 238} with a dose of 4.3 x 10{sup 17} cm{sup -2} produces a physically and chemically modified surface layer that prevents further air oxidation and corrosion. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry were used to investigate the surface chemistry and electronic structure of this C{sup +} ion implanted polycrystalline uranium and a non-implanted region of the sample, both regions exposed to air for more than a year. In addition, scanning electron microscopy was used to examine and compare the surface morphology of the two regions. The U 4f, O 1s and C 1s core-level and valence band spectra clearly indicate carbide formation in the modified surface layer. The time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry depth profiling results reveal an oxy-carbide surface layer over an approximately 200 nm thick UC layer with little or no residual oxidation at the carbide layer/U metal transitional interface.

  9. Thomson-Scattering Study of the Subharmonic Decay of Ion-Acoustic Waves Driven by the Brillouin Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandulet, H. C.; Labaune, C.; Lewis, K.; Depierreux, S.

    2004-07-01

    Thomson scattering (TS) has been used to investigate the two-ion decay instability of ion acoustic waves generated by stimulated Brillouin scattering in an underdense CH plasma. Two complementary TS diagnostics, spectrally and spatially resolved, demonstrate the occurrence of the subharmonic decay of the primary ion acoustic wave into two secondary waves. The study of the laser intensity dependence shows that the secondary ion acoustic waves are correlated with the SBS reflectivity saturation, at a level of a few percent.

  10. Gas molecule scattering & ion mobility measurements for organic macro-ions in He versus N2 environments.

    PubMed

    Larriba-Andaluz, Carlos; Fernández-García, Juan; Ewing, Michael A; Hogan, Christopher J; Clemmer, David E

    2015-06-14

    A pending issue in linking ion mobility measurements to ion structures is that the collisional cross section (CCS, the measured structural parameter in ion mobility spectrometry) of an ion is strongly dependent upon the manner in which gas molecules effectively impinge on and are reemitted from ion surfaces (when modeling ions as fixed structures). To directly examine the gas molecule impingement and reemission processes and their influence, we measured the CCSs of positively charged ions of room temperature ionic liquids 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium dicyanamide (EMIM-N(CN)2) and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (EMIM-BF4) in N2 using a differential mobility analyzer-mass spectrometer (DMA-MS) and in He using a drift tube mobility spectrometer-mass spectrometer (DT-MS). Cluster ions, generated via electrosprays, took the form (AB)N(A)z, spanning up to z = 20 and with masses greater than 100 kDa. As confirmed by molecular dynamics simulations, at the measurement temperature (∼300 K), such cluster ions took on globular conformations in the gas phase. Based upon their attained charge levels, in neither He nor N2 did the ion-induced dipole potential significantly influence gas molecule-ion collisions. Therefore, differences in the CCSs measured for ions in the two different gases could be primarily attributed to differences in gas molecule behavior upon collision with ions. Overwhelmingly, by comparison of predicted CCSs with selected input impingement-reemission laws to measurements, we find that in N2, gas molecules collide with ions diffusely--they are reemitted at random angles relative to the gas molecule incoming angle--and inelastically. Meanwhile, in He, gas molecules collide specularly and elastically and are emitted from ion surfaces at determined angles. The results can be rationalized on the basis of the momentum transferred per collision; in the case of He, individual gas molecule collisions minimally perturb the atoms within a cluster ion

  11. Specific interaction between negative atmospheric ions and organic compounds in atmospheric pressure corona discharge ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sekimoto, Kanako; Sakai, Mami; Takayama, Mitsuo

    2012-06-01

    The interaction between negative atmospheric ions and various types of organic compounds were investigated using atmospheric pressure corona discharge ionization (APCDI) mass spectrometry. Atmospheric negative ions such as O(2)(-), HCO(3)(-), COO(-)(COOH), NO(2)(-), NO(3)(-), and NO(3)(-)(HNO(3)) having different proton affinities served as the reactant ions for analyte ionization in APCDI in negative-ion mode. The individual atmospheric ions specifically ionized aliphatic and aromatic compounds with various functional groups as atmospheric ion adducts and deprotonated analytes. The formation of the atmospheric ion adducts under certain discharge conditions is most likely attributable to the affinity between the analyte and atmospheric ion and the concentration of the atmospheric ion produced under these conditions. The deprotonated analytes, in contrast, were generated from the adducts of the atmospheric ions with higher proton affinity attributable to efficient proton abstraction from the analyte by the atmospheric ion. PMID:22528201

  12. Surface enhanced Raman scattering of amino acids assisted by gold nanoparticles and Gd(3+) ions.

    PubMed

    López-Neira, Juan Pablo; Galicia-Hernández, José Mario; Reyes-Coronado, Alejandro; Pérez, Elías; Castillo-Rivera, Francisco

    2015-05-01

    The surface enhanced raman scattering (SERS) signal from the l-tyrosine (tyr) molecule adsorbed on gold nanoparticles (Au-tyr) is compared with the SERS signal assisted by the presence of gadolinium ions (Gd(3+)) coordinated with the Au-tyr system. An enhancement factor of the SERS signal in the presence of Gd(3+) ions was ∼5 times higher than that produced by l-tyrosine adsorbed on gold nanoparticles. The enhancement of the SERS signal can be attributed to a corresponding increase in the local electric field due to the presence of Gd(3+) ions in the vicinity of a gold dimer configuration. This scenario was confirmed by solving numerically Maxwell equations, showing an increase of 1 order of magnitude in the local electric scattered field when the Gd(3+) ion is located in between a gold dimer compared with naked gold nanoparticles. PMID:25860315

  13. The effect of residual gas scattering on Ga ion beam patterning of graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Thissen, Nick F. W. E-mail: a.a.bol@tue.nl; Vervuurt, R. H. J.; Weber, J. W.; Kessels, W. M. M.; Bol, A. A. E-mail: a.a.bol@tue.nl; Mulders, J. J. L.

    2015-11-23

    The patterning of graphene by a 30 kV Ga{sup +} focused ion beam (FIB) is studied by in-situ and ex-situ Raman spectroscopy. It is found that the graphene surrounding the patterned target area can be damaged at remarkably large distances of more than 10 μm. We show that scattering of the Ga ions in the residual gas of the vacuum system is the main cause of the large range of lateral damage, as the size and shape of the tail of the ion beam were strongly dependent on the system background pressure. The range of the damage was therefore greatly reduced by working at low pressures and limiting the total amount of ions used. This makes FIB patterning a feasible alternative to electron beam lithography as long as residual gas scattering is taken into account.

  14. Tailored Noise Waveform/ Collision-Induced Dissociation of Ions Stored in a Linear Ion Trap Combined with Liquid Chromatography/Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Vilkov, Andrey N.; Bogdanov, Bogdan; Pasa-Tolic, Liljiana; Prior, David C.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Masselon, Christophe D.; Moore, Ronald J.; Smith, Richard D.

    2004-11-01

    A new collision-induced dissociation (CID) technique based on broadband tailored noise waveform (TNW) excitation of ions stored in a linear ion trap has been developed. In comparison with the conventional sustained off-resonance irradiation (SORI) CID method commonly used in Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry, this MS/MS technique increases throughput by eliminating the long pump-down delay associated with gas introduction into the high vacuum ICR cell region. In addition, the TNW-CID method speeds spectrum acquisition since it does not require Fourier transformation, calculation of resonant frequencies and generation of the excitation waveforms. We demonstrate TNW-CID coupled with on-line capillary reverse phase liquid chromatography separations for identification of peptides. The experimental results are compared with data obtained using conventional quadrupole ion trap MS/MS and SORI-CID MS/MS in an ICR cell.

  15. Global structural changes of an ion channel during its gating are followed by ion mobility mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Konijnenberg, Albert; Yilmaz, Duygu; Ingólfsson, Helgi I.; Dimitrova, Anna; Marrink, Siewert J.; Li, Zhuolun; Vénien-Bryan, Catherine; Sobott, Frank; Koçer, Armağan

    2014-01-01

    Mechanosensitive ion channels are sensors probing membrane tension in all species; despite their importance and vital role in many cell functions, their gating mechanism remains to be elucidated. Here, we determined the conditions for releasing intact mechanosensitive channel of large conductance (MscL) proteins from their detergents in the gas phase using native ion mobility–mass spectrometry (IM-MS). By using IM-MS, we could detect the native mass of MscL from Escherichia coli, determine various global structural changes during its gating by measuring the rotationally averaged collision cross-sections, and show that it can function in the absence of a lipid bilayer. We could detect global conformational changes during MscL gating as small as 3%. Our findings will allow studying native structure of many other membrane proteins. PMID:25404294

  16. The influence of inner-shell electron promotion on charge exchange processes in low energy ion scattering from surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting Li; MacDonald, R. J.

    1997-11-01

    The influence of inner-shell electron promotion on charge exchange in low energy (1-7 keV) Ne + ions scattered from the Cu (1 0 0), Ni (1 0 0) and Fe (1 1 0) surfaces has been studied systematically. The yield of Ne + ion scattered from these surfaces has been measured as a function of incident ion energy under various scattering geometries. The relative Ne + ion fraction, which is proportional to the normalised ion yield divided by the differential scattering cross section, is studied and an empirical formula for relative ion fraction has been extracted. The formula combines the charge exchanges along the incoming trajectory, during the close encounter, and along the outgoing trajectory into one simple expression. It can be concluded that inner-shell electron excitations during close encounters contribute significantly to the charge exchange in the scattering systems studied in this work.

  17. Final Report - Advanced Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry Program - Oak Ridge National Laboratory - Sandia National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Whitten, W.B.

    2002-12-18

    This report covers the three main projects that collectively comprised the Advanced Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry Program. Chapter 1 describes the direct interrogation of individual particles by laser desorption within the ion trap mass spectrometer analyzer. The goals were (1) to develop an ''intelligent trigger'' capable of distinguishing particles of biological origin from those of nonbiological origin in the background and interferent particles and (2) to explore the capability for individual particle identification. Direct interrogation of particles by laser ablation and ion trap mass spectrometry was shown to have good promise for discriminating between particles of biological origin and those of nonbiological origin, although detailed protocols and operating conditions were not worked out. A library of more than 20,000 spectra of various types of biological particles has been assembled. Methods based on multivariate analysis and on neural networks were used to discriminate between particles of biological origin and those of nonbiological origin. It was possible to discriminate between at least some species of bacteria if mass spectra of several hundred similar particles were obtained. Chapter 2 addresses the development of a new ion trap mass analyzer geometry that offers the potential for a significant increase in ion storage capacity for a given set of analyzer operating conditions. This geometry may lead to the development of smaller, lower-power field-portable ion trap mass spectrometers while retaining laboratory-scale analytical performance. A novel ion trap mass spectrometer based on toroidal ion storage geometry has been developed. The analyzer geometry is based on the edge rotation of a quadrupolar ion trap cross section into the shape of a torus. Initial performance of this device was poor, however, due to the significant contribution of nonlinear fields introduced by the rotation of the symmetric ion-trapping geometry. These nonlinear resonances

  18. Detecting and Removing Data Artifacts in Hadamard Transform Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry Measurements

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Prost, Spencer A.; Crowell, Kevin L.; Baker, Erin Shammel; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Clowers, Brian H.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.; Payne, Samuel H.

    2014-05-06

    Applying Hadamard transform multiplexing to ion mobility separations (IMS) can significantly improve the signal-to-noise ratio and throughput for IMS coupled mass spectrometry (MS) measurements by increasing the ion utilization efficiency. However, it has been determined that both fluctuations in ion intensity as well as spatial shifts in the multiplexed data lower the signal-to-noise ratios and appear as noise in downstream processing of the data. To address this problem, we have developed a novel algorithm that discovers and eliminates data artifacts. The algorithm uses knowledge of the true signal peaks derived from the encoded data and allows for both artifacts andmore » noise to be removed with high confidence, decreasing the likelihood of false identifications in subsequent data processing. The result is that IMS-MS can be applied to increase measurement sensitivity while avoiding artifacts that have previously limited its utility.« less

  19. Detecting and Removing Data Artifacts in Hadamard Transform Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prost, Spencer A.; Crowell, Kevin L.; Baker, Erin S.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Clowers, Brian H.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.; Payne, Samuel H.

    2014-12-01

    Applying Hadamard transform multiplexing to ion mobility separations (IMS) can significantly improve the signal-to-noise ratio and throughput for IMS coupled mass spectrometry (MS) measurements by increasing the ion utilization efficiency. However, it has been determined that fluctuations in ion intensity as well as spatial shifts in the multiplexed data lower the signal-to-noise ratios and appear as noise in downstream processing of the data. To address this problem, we have developed a novel algorithm that discovers and eliminates data artifacts. The algorithm employs an analytical approach to identify and remove artifacts from the data, decreasing the likelihood of false identifications in subsequent data processing. Following application of the algorithm, IMS-MS measurement sensitivity is greatly increased and artifacts that previously limited the utility of applying the Hadamard transform to IMS are avoided. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  20. Organic secondary ion mass spectrometry: signal enhancement by water vapor injection.

    PubMed

    Mouhib, Taoufiq; Delcorte, Arnaud; Poleunis, Claude; Bertrand, Patrick

    2010-12-01

    The enhancement of the static secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) signals resulting from the injection, closely to the sample surface, of H(2)O vapor at relatively high-pressure, was investigated for a set of organic materials. While the ion signals are generally improved with increasing H(2)O pressure upon 12 keV Ga(+) bombardment, a specific enhancement of the protonated ion intensity is clearly demonstrated in each case. For instance, the presence of H(2)O vapor induces an enhancement by one order of magnitude of the [M + H](+) static SIMS intensity for the antioxidant Irgafos 168 and a ∼1.5-fold increase for polymers such as poly(vinyl pyrrolidone). PMID:20864353

  1. Detecting and Removing Data Artifacts in Hadamard Transform Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Prost, Spencer A.; Crowell, Kevin L.; Baker, Erin Shammel; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Clowers, Brian H.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.; Payne, Samuel H.

    2014-12-01

    Applying Hadamard transform multiplexing to ion mobility separations (IMS) can significantly improve the signal-to-noise ratio and throughput for IMS coupled mass spectrometry (MS) measurements by increasing the ion utilization efficiency. However, it has been determined that both fluctuations in ion intensity as well as spatial shifts in the multiplexed data lower the signal-to-noise ratios and appear as noise in downstream processing of the data. To address this problem, we have developed a novel algorithm that discovers and eliminates data artifacts. The algorithm uses knowledge of the true signal peaks derived from the encoded data and allows for both artifacts and noise to be removed with high confidence, decreasing the likelihood of false identifications in subsequent data processing. The result is that IMS-MS can be applied to increase measurement sensitivity while avoiding artifacts that have previously limited its utility.

  2. Human Biomonitoring of DNA Adducts by Ion Trap Multistage Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jingshu; Turesky, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    Humans are continuously exposed to hazardous chemicals in the environment. These chemicals or their electrophilic metabolites can form adducts with genomic DNA, which can lead to mutations and the initiation of cancer. The identification of DNA adducts is required for understanding exposure and the etiological role of a genotoxic chemical in cancer risk. The analytical chemist is confronted with a great challenge because the levels of DNA adducts generally occur at <1 adduct per 10(7) nucleotides, and the amount of tissue available for measurement is limited. Ion trap mass spectrometry has emerged as an important technique to screen for DNA adducts because of the high level sensitivity and selectivity, particularly when employing multi-stage scanning (MS(n) ). The product ion spectra provide rich structural information and corroborate the adduct identities even at trace levels in human tissues. Ion trap technology represents a significant advance in measuring DNA adducts in humans. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27584705

  3. Detecting and Removing Data Artifacts in Hadamard Transform Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Prost, Spencer A.; Crowell, Kevin L.; Baker, Erin Shammel; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Clowers, Brian H.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.; Payne, Samuel H.

    2014-05-06

    Applying Hadamard transform multiplexing to ion mobility separations (IMS) can significantly improve the signal-to-noise ratio and throughput for IMS coupled mass spectrometry (MS) measurements by increasing the ion utilization efficiency. However, it has been determined that both fluctuations in ion intensity as well as spatial shifts in the multiplexed data lower the signal-to-noise ratios and appear as noise in downstream processing of the data. To address this problem, we have developed a novel algorithm that discovers and eliminates data artifacts. The algorithm uses knowledge of the true signal peaks derived from the encoded data and allows for both artifacts and noise to be removed with high confidence, decreasing the likelihood of false identifications in subsequent data processing. The result is that IMS-MS can be applied to increase measurement sensitivity while avoiding artifacts that have previously limited its utility.

  4. Label free biochemical 2D and 3D imaging using secondary ion mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, John S.; Vickerman, John C.; Winograd, Nicholas

    2011-01-01

    Time-of-flight Secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) provides a method for the detection of native and exogenous compounds in biological samples on a cellular scale. Through the development of novel ion beams the amount of molecular signal available from the sample surface has been increased. Through the introduction of polyatomic ion beams, particularly C60, ToF-SIMS can now be used to monitor molecular signals as a function of depth as the sample is eroded thus proving the ability to generate 3D molecular images. Here we describe how this new capability has led to the development of novel instrumentation for 3D molecular imaging while also highlighting the importance of sample preparation and discuss the challenges that still need to be overcome to maximise the impact of the technique. PMID:21664172

  5. Separation of Peptide Isomers with Variant Modified Sites by High-Resolution Differential Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.; Creese, Andrew; Smith, Richard D.; Cooper, Helen J.

    2010-10-01

    Many proteins and proteolytic peptides incorporate the same post-translational modification (PTM) at different sites, creating multiple localization variants with different functions or activities that may coexist in cells. Current analytical methods based on liquid chromatography (LC) followed by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) are challenged by such isomers that often co-elute in LC and/or produce non-unique fragments. Application of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) has previously been explored, but success was limited by insufficient resolution. We show that the recently developed high-resolution differential ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) using helium-rich gases can readily separate phosphopeptides with variant modified sites. Specifically, use of He/N2 mixtures containing up to 74% He has allowed separating to >95% three monophosphorylated peptides of identical sequence. Similar separation was achieved at 50% He, using an elevated electric field. Bisphosphorylated isomers that differ in only one modification site were separated to the same extent. We anticipate the FAIMS capabilities for such separations to extend to other PTMs.

  6. Comprehensive study of the surface peak in charge-integrated low-energy ion scattering spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Draxler, M.; Gruber, R.; Bauer, P.; Beikler, R.; Taglauer, E.; Schmid, K.; Ermolov, S. N.

    2003-08-01

    Low-energy ion scattering is very surface sensitive if scattered ions are analyzed. By time-of-flight (TOF) techniques, the neutral and the charge-integrated spectra (ions plus neutrals) are obtained, which yield information about deeper layers. It is well known that charge integrated spectra may exhibit a surface peak which is more pronounced for heavier projectiles, e.g., Ne ions. Aiming at a more profound physical understanding of this surface peak, we performed TOF experiments and computer simulations for H, He, and Ne projectiles scattered from a polycrystalline copper target. Measurements were done in the range of 1-9 keV for a scattering angle of 129 degree sign under UHV conditions. The simulations were performed using the MARLOWE code for the given experimental parameters and a polycrystalline target. In the experiments, a pronounced surface peak was observed at low energies, which fades away at higher energies. This peak is quantitatively reproduced by the simulation. Several atomic layers may contribute to the surface peak, depending on the energy. Analyzing the contributions of the individual outermost atomic layers, one finds that the binary collisions of the projectiles with atoms in the first and the second layer yield a narrow energy distribution, while the contribution from the deeper layers is dominated by multiple scattering and therefore exhibits a very broad energy spectrum. It is shown that the appearance of a more or less pronounced surface peak is due to the relative contributions of single scattering and multiple scattering and thus depends on the projectile energy and mass.

  7. The Role of Oxygen in the Formation of TNT Product Ions in Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Daum, Keith Alvin; Atkinson, David Alan; Ewing, Robert Gordon

    2002-03-01

    The atmospheric pressure ionization of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) in air yields the (TNT-H)- product ion. It is generally accepted that this product ion is formed by the direct proton abstraction of neutral TNT by O2- reactant ions. Data presented here demonstrate the reaction involves the formation of an intermediate (TNT·O2)-, from the association of either TNT+O2- or TNT-+O2. This intermediate has two subsequent reaction branches. One of these branches involves simple dissociation of the intermediate to TNT-; the other branch is a terminal reaction that forms the typically observed (TNT-H)- ion via proton abstraction. The dissociation reaction involving electron transfer to TNT- appeared to be kinetically favored and prevailed at low concentrations of oxygen (less than 2%). The presence of significant amounts of oxygen, however, resulted in the predominant formation of the (TNT-H)- ion by the terminal reaction branch. With TNT- in the system, either from direct electron attachment or by simple dissociation of the intermediate, increasing levels of oxygen in the system will continue to reform the intermediate, allowing the cycle to continue until proton abstraction occurs. Key to understanding this complex reaction pathway is that O2- was observed to transfer an electron directly to neutral TNT to form the TNT-. At oxygen levels of less than 2%, the TNT- ion intensity increased with increasing levels of oxygen (and O2-) and was larger than the (TNT-H)- ion intensity. As the oxygen level increased from 2 to 10%, the (TNT-H)- product ion became predominant. The potential reaction mechanisms were investigated with an ion mobility spectrometer, which was configured to independently evaluate the ionization pathways.

  8. Signals of strong electronic correlation in ion scattering processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonetto, F.; Gonzalez, C.; Goldberg, E. C.

    2016-05-01

    Previous measurements of neutral atom fractions for S r+ scattered by gold polycrystalline surfaces show a singular dependence with the target temperature. There is still not a theoretical model that can properly describe the magnitude and the temperature dependence of the neutralization probabilities found. Here, we applied a first-principles quantum-mechanical theoretical formalism to describe the time-dependent scattering process. Three different electronic correlation approaches consistent with the system analyzed are used: (i) the spinless approach, where two charge channels are considered (S r0 and S r+ ) and the spin degeneration is neglected; (ii) the infinite-U approach, with the same charge channels (S r0 and S r+ ) but considering the spin degeneration; and (iii) the finite-U approach, where the first ionization and second ionization energy levels are considered very, but finitely, separated. Neutral fraction magnitudes and temperature dependence are better described by the finite-U approach, indicating that e -correlation plays a significant role in charge-transfer processes. However, none of them is able to explain the nonmonotonous temperature dependence experimentally obtained. Here, we suggest that small changes in the surface work function introduced by the target heating, and possibly not detected by experimental standard methods, could be responsible for that singular behavior. Additionally, we apply the same theoretical model using the infinite-U approximation for the Mg-Au system, obtaining an excellent description of the experimental neutral fractions measured.

  9. Mobility-Resolved Ion Selection in Uniform Drift Field Ion Mobility Spectrometry/Mass Spectrometry; Dynamic Switching in Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, Ian K.; Garimella, Venkata BS; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Chen, Tsung-Chi; Zhang, Xinyu; Cox, Jonathan T.; Norheim, Randolph V.; Prost, Spencer A.; Lamarche, Brian L.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Smith, Richard D.

    2014-10-07

    A Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations (SLIM) module that allows ion mobility separations and the switching of ions between alternative drift paths is described. The SLIM switch component has a “Tee” configuration and allows switching of ions between a linear path and a 90-degree bend. By controlling switching times, ions can be deflected to an alternative channel as a function of their mobilities. In the initial evaluation the switch is used in a static mode and shown compatible with high performance ion mobility separations at 4 torr. In the “dynamic mode” we show that mobility-selected ions can be switched into the alternative channel, and that various ion species can be independently selected based on their mobilities for time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOF MS) IMS detection and mass analysis. This development also provides the basis for e.g. the selection of specific mobilities for storage and accumulation, and key modules for the assembly of SLIM devices enabling much more complex sequences of ion manipulations.

  10. Digitally-multiplexed nanoelectrospray ionization atmospheric pressure drift tube ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kwasnik, Mark; Caramore, Joe; Fernández, Facundo M

    2009-02-15

    One of the shortcomings of atmospheric pressure drift tube ion mobility spectrometry (DTIMS) is its intrinsically low duty cycle (approximately 0.04-1%) caused by the rapid pulsing of the ion gate (25-400 micros) followed by a comparatively long drift time (25-100 ms), which translates into a loss of sensitivity. Multiplexing approaches via Hadamard and Fourier-type gating techniques have been reported for increasing the sensitivity of DTIMS. Here, we report an extended multiplexing approach which encompasses arbitrary binary ion injection waveforms with variable duty cycles ranging from 0.5 to 50%. In this approach, ion mobility spectra can be collected using conventional signal averaging, arbitrary, standard Hadamard and/or "extended" Hadamard operation modes. Initial results indicate signal-to-noise gains ranging from 2-7-fold for both arbitrary and "extended" Hadamard sequences. Standard Hadamard transform IMS provided increased sensitivity, with gains ranging from 9-12-fold, however, mobility spectra suffered from defects that appeared as false peaks, which were reduced or eliminated when using arbitrary or "extended" Hadamard waveforms for multiplexing. Digital multiplexing enables variation of the duty cycle in a continuous manner, minimizing the contribution of imperfect modulation on spectral defects without the need for complex spectral correction methods. By reducing the frequency of gating events employed in the variable duty cycle sequences, the contributions of factors such as ion depletion prior to gating, interaction of successively injected ion packets, and the cumulative effect of imperfect gating events were mitigated. PMID:19133785

  11. Dynamics of fast ions during sawtooth oscillations in the TEXTOR tokamak measured by collective Thomson scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, S. K.; Salewski, M.; Bindslev, H.; Bürger, A.; Furtula, V.; Kantor, M.; Korsholm, S. B.; Koslowski, H. R.; Krämer-Flecken, A.; Leipold, F.; Meo, F.; Michelsen, P. K.; Moseev, D.; Oosterbeek, J. W.; Stejner, M.; Westerhof, E.; TEXTOR Team

    2011-06-01

    Experimental investigations of sawteeth interaction with fast ions measured by collective Thomson scattering on TEXTOR are presented. Time-resolved measurements of localized 1D fast-ion distribution functions allow us to study fast-ion dynamics during several sawtooth cycles. Sawtooth oscillations interact strongly with the fast-ion population in a wide range of plasma parameters. Part of the ion phase space density oscillates out of phase with the sawtooth oscillation during hydrogen neutral beam injection (NBI). These oscillations most likely originate from fast hydrogen ions with energies close to the full injection energy. At lower energies passing fast ions in the plasma centre are strongly redistributed at the time of sawtooth collapse but no redistribution of trapped fast ions is observed. The redistribution of fast ions from deuterium NBI in the plasma centre is found to vary throughout velocity space. The reduction is most pronounced for passing ions. We find no evidence of inverted sawteeth outside the sawtooth inversion surface in the fast-ion distribution function.

  12. Advancing the High Throughput Identification of Liver Fibrosis Protein Signatures Using Multiplexed Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Erin Shammel; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Diamond, Deborah L.; Brown, Roslyn N.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Orton, Daniel J.; Piehowski, Paul D.; Purdy, David E.; Moore, Ronald J.; Danielson, William F.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Crowell, Kevin L.; Slysz, Gordon W.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Sandoval, John D.; Lamarche, Brian L.; Matzke, Melissa M.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Simons, Brenna C.; McMahon, Brian J.; Bhattacharya, Renuka; Perkins, James D.; Carithers, Robert L.; Strom, Susan; Self, Steven; Katze, Michael G.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2014-04-01

    Rapid diagnosis of disease states using less invasive, safer, and more clinically acceptable approaches than presently employed is an imperative goal for the field of medicine. While mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics approaches have attempted to meet these objectives, challenges such as the enormous dynamic range of protein concentrations in clinically relevant biofluid samples coupled with the need to address human biodiversity have slowed their employment. Herein, we report on the use of a new platform that addresses these challenges by coupling technical advances in rapid gas phase multiplexed ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) separations [1, 2] with liquid chromatography (LC) and MS to dramatically increase measurement sensitivity and throughput, further enabling future MS-based clinical applications. An initial application of the LC-IMS-MS platform for the analysis of blood serum samples from stratified post-liver transplant patients with recurrent fibrosis progression illustrates its potential utility for disease characterization and use in personalized medicine [3, 4].

  13. Site-Specific Mapping of Sialic Acid Linkage Isomers by Ion Mobility Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Guttman, Miklos; Lee, Kelly K

    2016-05-17

    Detailed structural elucidation of protein glycosylation is a tedious process often involving several techniques. Glycomics and glycoproteomics approaches with mass spectrometry offer a rapid platform for glycan profiling but are limited by the inability to resolve isobaric species such as linkage and positional isomers. Recently, ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) has been shown to effectively resolve isobaric oligosaccharides, but the utility of IMS to obtain glycan structural information on a site-specific level with proteomic analyses has yet to be investigated. Here, we report that the addition of IMS to conventional glycoproteomics platforms adds additional information regarding glycan structure and is particularly useful for differentiation of sialic acid linkage isomers on both N- and O-linked glycopeptides. With further development IMS may hold the potential for rapid and complete structural elucidation of glycan chains at a site-specific level. PMID:27089023

  14. Accelerator mass spectrometry with fully stripped 26Al, 63Cl, 41Ca and (su59)Ni ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faestermann, H.; Kato, K.; Korschinek, G.; Krauthan, P.; Nolte, E.; Rühm, W.; Zerle, L.

    1990-04-01

    The detection system of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) with completely stripped ions of 26Al, 36Cl, 41Ca and 59Ni at the Munich accelerator laboratory and measurements with these ions are presented. Detection limits are given. The presented applications are: dating of groundwater of the Milk River aquifer and deduction of the neutron fluence and spectrum of the Hiroshima A-bomb.

  15. Determination of Cu Concentrations in CdTe/CdS Devices by High Mass Resolution Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Asher, S. E.; Reedy, R. C.; Dhere, R.; Gessert, t. A.; Young, M. R.

    2000-01-01

    We have used secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) to quantitatively determine the concentration of Cu in CdTe/CdS devices. Empirical standards were fabricated by ion implantation of Cu into single-crystal and polycrystalline CdTe and single-crystal CdS.

  16. Imaging ion and molecular transport at subcellular resolution by secondary ion mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Subhash; Morrison, George H.

    1995-05-01

    The transport of K+, Na+, and Ca2+ were imaged in individual cells with a Cameca IMS-3f ion microscope. Strict cryogenic frozen freeze-dry sample preparations were employed. Ion redistribution artifacts in conventional chemical preparations are discussed. Cryogenically prepared freeze-fractured freeze-dried cultured cells allowed the three-dimensional ion microscopic imaging of elements. As smaller structures in calcium images can be resolved with the 0.5 [mu]m spatial resolution, correlative techniques are needed to confirm their identity. The potentials of reflected light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and laser scanning confocal microscopy are discussed for microfeature recognition in freeze-fractured freeze-dried cells. The feasibility of using frozen freeze-dried cells for imaging molecular transport at subcellular resolution was tested. Ion microscopy successfully imaged the transport of the isotopically tagged (13C, 15N) amino acid, -arginine. The labeled amino acid was imaged at mass 28 with a Cs+ primary ion beam as the 28(13C15N)- species. After a 4 h exposure of LLC-PK1 kidney cells to 4 mM labeled arginine, the amino acid was localized throughout the cell with a preferential incorporation into the nucleus and nucleolus. An example is also shown of the ion microscopic imaging of sodium borocaptate, an experimental therapeutic drug for brain tumors, in cryogenically prepared frozen freeze-dried Swiss 3T3 cells.

  17. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry of Zeolite Materials: Observation of Abundant Aluminosilicate Oligomers Using an Ion Trap

    SciTech Connect

    Groenewold, Gary Steven; Kessinger, Glen Frank; Scott, Jill Rennee; Gianotto, Anita Kay; Appelhans, Anthony David; Delmore, James Edward

    2000-12-01

    Oligomeric oxyanions were observed in the secondary ion mass spectra (SIMS) of zeolite materials. The oxyanions have the general composition AlmSinO2(m+n)H(m-1)- (m + n = 2 to 8) and are termed dehydrates. For a given mass, multiple elemental compositions are possible because (Al + H) is an isovalent and isobaric substitute for Si. Using 18 keV Ga+ as a projectile, oligomer abundances are low relative to the monomers. Oligomer abundance can be increased by using the polyatomic projectile ReO4- (~5 keV). Oligomer abundance can be further increased using an ion trap (IT-) SIMS; in this instrument, long ion lifetimes (tens of ms) and relatively high He pressure result in significant collisional stabilization and increased high-mass abundance. The dehydrates rapidly react with adventitious H2O present in the IT-SIMS to form mono-, di-, and trihydrates. The rapidity of the reaction and comparison to aluminum oxyanion hydration suggest that H2O adds to the aluminosilicate oxyanions in a dissociative fashion, forming covalently bound product ions. In addition to these findings, it was noted that production of abundant oligomeric aluminosilicates could be significantly increased by substituting the countercation (NH4+) with the larger alkali ions Rb+ and Cs+. This constitutes a useful tactic for generating large aluminosilicate oligomers for surface characterization and ion-molecule reactivity studies.

  18. Chemical noise reduction via mass spectrometry and ion/ion charge inversion: amino acids.

    PubMed

    Hassell, Kerry M; LeBlanc, Yves C; McLuckey, Scott A

    2011-05-01

    Charge inversion ion/ion reactions can provide a significant reduction in chemical noise associated with mass spectra derived from complex mixtures for species composed of both acidic and basic sites, provided the ions derived from the matrix largely undergo neutralization. Amino acids constitute an important class of amphoteric compounds that undergo relatively efficient charge inversion. Precipitated plasma constitutes a relatively complex biological matrix that yields detectable signals at essentially every mass-to-charge value over a wide range. This chemical noise can be dramatically reduced using multiply charged reagent ions that can invert the charge of species amenable to the transfer of multiple charges upon a single interaction and by detecting product ions of opposite polarity. The principle is illustrated here with amino acids present in precipitated plasma subjected to ionization in the positive mode, reaction with anions derived from negative nanoelectrospray ionization of poly (amido amine) dendrimer generation 3.5, and mass analysis in the negative ion mode. PMID:21456599

  19. Trajectory analysis of low-energy and hyperthermal ions scattered from Cu(110)

    SciTech Connect

    McEachern, R. L.; Goodstein, D. M.; Cooper, B. H.

    1989-05-15

    We have investigated the trajectories of Na/sup +/ ions scattered from the Cu(110) surface in the <1/bar 1/0> and <001> azimuths for a range of incident energies from 56 eV to 4 keV. Our goal is to explain the trends observed in the energy spectra and determine what types of trajectories contribute to these spectra. Using the computer program SAFARI, we have performed simulations with trajectory analyses for 100-, 200-, and 400-eV scattering. We show results from the 100-eV simulations in both azimuths and compare them with the experimental data. The simulated energy spectra are in excellent agreement with the data. Ion trajectories and impact parameter plots from the simulations are used to determine the relative importance of different types of ion--surface-atom collisions. The simulations have shown that the striking differences observed in comparing the <1/bar 1/0> and <001> spectra are mostly due to ions which scatter from second-layer atoms. This system exhibits strong focusing onto the second-layer atoms by the first-layer rows, and the focusing is very sensitive to the spacing between the rows. At the lower beam energies, scattering from the second layer dominates the measured spectra.

  20. Trajectory analysis of low-energy and hyperthermal ions scattered from Cu(110)

    SciTech Connect

    McEachern, R.L.; Goodstein, D.M.; Cooper, B.H.

    1989-05-15

    Trajectories of Na{sup +} ions scattered from the Cu(110) surface in the <1 1bar 0> and <001> azimuths were studied for a range of incident energies from 56 eV to 4 keV. The goal is to explain the trends observed in the energy spectra and determine what types of trajectories contribute to these spectra. Using the computer program SAFARI, simulations were performed with trajectory analyses for 100-, 200-, and 400-eV scattering. We show results from the 100-eV simulations in both azimuths and compare them with the experimental data. The simulated energy spectra are in excellent agreement with the data. Ion trajectories and impact parameter plots from the simulations are used to determine the relative importance of different types of ion-surface-atom collisions. The simulations have shown that the striking differences observed in comparing the <1 1bar 0> and <001> spectra are mostly due to ions which scatter from second-layer atoms. This system exhibits strong focusing onto the second-layer atoms by the first-layer rows, and the focusing is very sensitive to the spacing between the rows. At the lower beam energies, scattering from the second layer dominates the measured spectra.

  1. Multiple-scattering model for inclusive proton production in heavy ion collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.

    1994-01-01

    A formalism is developed for evaluating the momentum distribution for proton production in nuclear abrasion during heavy ion collisions using the Glauber multiple-scattering series. Several models for the one-body density matrix of nuclei are considered for performing numerical calculations. Calculations for the momentum distribution of protons in abrasion are compared with experimental data for inclusive proton production.

  2. BRIEF COMMUNICATIONS: Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering by excited ions in a laser plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladkov, S. M.; Zheltikov, Aleksei M.; Koroteev, Nikolai I.; Rychev, M. V.; Fedotov, Andrei B.

    1989-07-01

    The coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) method was used in observation of excited Al II, Al III, In II and N II in an optical breakdown plasma. The feasibility of CARS spectroscopy of multiply charged ions in a laser plasma was established.

  3. Cross sections for medium energy He ions scattered from Hf and Au atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Tomoaki; Mitsuhara, Kei; Visikovskiy, Anton; Kido, Yoshiaki

    2012-06-01

    The elastic scattering cross sections for medium energy He ions incident on Ni, Hf and Au atoms were measured precisely using a toroidal electrostatic analyzer. We prepared the targets of Ni(˜1 nm)/HfO2(1.5 nm)/Si(0 0 1) and Ni(˜1 nm)/Au(˜0.5 nm)/Si(1 1 1) and performed in situ ion scattering measurement under ultrahigh vacuum condition. The absolute amounts of Ni, Hf and Au were determined by Rutherford backscattering using 1.5 MeV He ions at a scattering angle of 150°. The scattering cross sections for Hf and Au were normalized by those for Ni to avoid the ambiguities of the number of incident particles, solid angle subtended by a detector, detection efficiency and the He+ fractions for the emerging He ions from the surfaces. The results obtained are compared with the simple Lee-Hart formula and the calculated values using the Molière and ZBL potentials and the potentials derived from the Hartree-Fock-Slater wave functions.

  4. Optimizing a microwave gas ion source for continuous-flow accelerator mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Reden, K. F. von; Roberts, M. L.; Burton, J. R.; Beaupre, S. R.

    2012-02-15

    A 2.45 GHz microwave ion source coupled with a magnesium charge exchange canal (C x C) has been successfully adapted to a large acceptance radiocarbon accelerator mass spectrometry system at the National Ocean Sciences Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) Facility, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. CO{sub 2} samples from various preparation sources are injected into the source through a glass capillary at 370 {mu}l/min. Routine system parameters are about 120-140 {mu}A of negative {sup 12}C current after the C x C, leading to about 400 {sup 14}C counts per second for a modern sample and implying a system efficiency of 0.2%. While these parameters already allow us to perform high-quality AMS analyses on large samples, we are working on ways to improve the output of the ion source regarding emittance and efficiency. Modeling calculations suggest modifications in the extraction triode geometry, shape, and size of the plasma chamber could improve emittance and, hence, ion transport efficiency. Results of experimental tests of these modifications are presented.

  5. Structural Characterization of Unsaturated Phosphatidylcholines Using Traveling Wave Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hugh I.; Kim, Hyungjun; Pang, Eric S.; Ryu, Ernest K.; Beegle, Luther W.; Loo, Joseph A.; Goddard, William A.; Kanik, Isik

    2009-01-01

    A number of phosphatidylcholine (PC) cations spanning a mass range of 400 to 1000 Da are investigated using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry coupled with traveling wave ion mobility spectrometry (TWIMS). A high correlation between mass and mobility is demonstrated with saturated phosphatidylcholine cations in N2. A significant deviation from this mass-mobility correlation line is observed for the unsaturated PC cation. We found that the double bond in the acyl chain causes a 5% reduction in drift time. The drift time is reduced at a rate of ~1% for each additional double bond. Theoretical collision cross sections of PC cations exhibit good agreement with experimentally evaluated values. Collision cross sections are determined using the recently derived relationship between mobility and drift time in TWIMS stacked ring ion guide (SRIG) and compared to estimate collision cross-sections using empiric calibration method. Computational analysis was performed using the modified trajectory (TJ) method with nonspherical N2 molecules as the drift gas. The difference between estimated collision cross-sections and theoretical collision cross-sections of PC cations is related to the sensitivity of the PC cation collision cross-sections to the details of the ion-neutral interactions. The origin of the observed correlation and deviation between mass and mobility of PC cations is discussed in terms of the structural rigidity of these molecules using molecular dynamic simulations. PMID:19764704

  6. LC-IMS-MS Feature Finder. Detecting Multidimensional Liquid Chromatography, Ion Mobility, and Mass Spectrometry Features in Complex Datasets

    SciTech Connect

    Crowell, Kevin L.; Slysz, Gordon W.; Baker, Erin Shammel; Lamarche, Brian L.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Payne, Samuel H.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2013-09-05

    We introduce a command line software application LC-IMS-MS Feature Finder that searches for molecular ion signatures in multidimensional liquid chromatography-ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (LC-IMS-MS) data by clustering deisotoped peaks with similar monoisotopic mass, charge state, LC elution time, and ion mobility drift time values. The software application includes an algorithm for detecting and quantifying co-eluting chemical species, including species that exist in multiple conformations that may have been separated in the IMS dimension.

  7. Atom-scattering study of Ar + ion damaged GaAs(110)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, B. D.; Frankl, D. R.; Blumenthal, Rik; Winograd, N.

    1989-11-01

    Helium atom scattering has been used to probe the surface damage created on GaAs(110) by Ar + ion bombardment. The scattering cross section, Σ, of a single monovacancy is found to be ~150 Å 2. The average number of defects comprising isolated impact craters, estimated from the scattering cross section per crater, is found to decrease with increasing crystal temperature during bombardment. This decrease occurs during or shortly following the bombardment event, and is different from simple thermal annealing. We propose that thermal accommodation of target adatom energy, which requires the number of adatom hops before freezing to increase with increasing crystal temperature, increases the adatom-vacancy recombination probability. Increasing the ion energy from 600 to 2400 eV does not change the cross section per single crater, but apparently impedes the probability of recombin

  8. Ion track annealing in quartz investigated by small angle X-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schauries, D.; Afra, B.; Rodriguez, M. D.; Trautmann, C.; Hawley, A.; Kluth, P.

    2015-12-01

    We report on the reduction of cross-section and length of amorphous ion tracks embedded within crystalline quartz during thermal annealing. The ion tracks were created via Au ion irradiation with an energy of 2.2 GeV. The use of synchrotron-based small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) allowed characterization of the latent tracks, without the need for chemical etching. Temperatures between 900 and 1000 °C were required to see a notable change in track size. The shrinkage in cross-section and length was found to be comparable for tracks aligned perpendicular and parallel to the c-axis.

  9. Resolving Structural Isomers of Monosaccharide Methyl Glycosides Using Drift Tube and Traveling Wave Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongli; Giles, Kevin; Bendiak, Brad; Kaplan, Kimberly; Siems, William F.; Hill, Herbert H.

    2013-01-01

    Monosaccharide structural isomers including sixteen methyl-D-glycopyranosides and four methyl-N-acetylhexosamines were subjected to ion mobility measurements by electrospray ion mobility mass spectrometry. Two ion mobility-MS systems were employed: atmospheric pressure drift tube ion mobility time-of-flight mass spectrometry and a Synapt G2 HDMS system which incorporates a low pressure traveling wave ion mobility separator. All the compounds were investigated as [M+Na]+ ions in the positive mode. A majority of the monosaccharide structural isomers exhibited different mobility drift times in either system, depending on differences in their anomeric and stereochemical configurations. In general, drift time patterns (relative drift times of isomers) matched between the two instruments. Higher resolving power was observed using the atmospheric pressure drift tube. Collision cross section values of monosaccharide structural isomers were directly calculated from the atmospheric pressure ion mobility experiments and a collision cross section calibration curve was made for the traveling wave ion mobility instrument. Overall, it was demonstrated that ion mobility-mass spectrometry using either drift tube or traveling wave ion mobility is a valuable technique for resolving subtle variations in stereochemistry among the sodium adducts of monosaccharide methyl glycosides. PMID:22339760

  10. Time-of-flight secondary neutral & ion mass spectrometry using swift heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breuer, L.; Meinerzhagen, F.; Bender, M.; Severin, D.; Wucher, A.

    2015-12-01

    We report on a new time-of-flight (TOF) spectrometer designed to investigate sputtering phenomena induced by swift heavy ions in the electronic stopping regime. In this experiment, particular emphasis is put on the detection of secondary ions along with their emitted neutral counterparts in order to examine the ionization efficiency of the sputtered material. For the detection of neutral species, the system is equipped with a pulsed VUV laser for post-ionization of sputtered neutral atoms and molecules via single photon ionization at a wavelength of 157 nm (corresponding to 7.9 eV photon energy). For alignment purposes and in order to facilitate comparison to nuclear sputtering conditions, the system also includes a 5 keV Ar+ ion beam directed to the same sample area. The instrument has been added to the M1-branch beam line at the German accelerator facility in Darmstadt (GSI) and was tested with 4.8 MeV/u Au26+ ions impinging onto various samples including metals, salts and organic films. It is found that secondary ion and neutral spectra obtained under both bombardment conditions can be acquired in an interleaved manner throughout a single accelerator pulse cycle, thus making efficient use of valuable beam time. In addition, the keV ion beam can be intermittently switched to dc mode between subsequent data acquisition windows and accelerator pulses in order to ensure reproducible surface conditions. For the case of a dynamically sputter cleaned metal surface, comparison of secondary ion and neutral signals obtained under otherwise identical instrumental conditions reveals a nearly identical ionization probability of atoms emitted under electronic and nuclear sputtering conditions.

  11. Applicability of ion mobility spectrometry for detection of quarantine pests in wood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewing, K. J.; Sanghera, J.; Myers, S. W.; Ervin, A. M.; Carey, C.; Gleason, G.; Mosser, L.; Levy, L.; Hennessey, M. K.; Bulluck, R.

    2016-05-01

    Visual inspection is the most commonly used method for detecting quarantine pests in agricultural cargo items at ports. For example, solid wood packing material (SWPM) at ports may be a pathway for wood pests and is a frequent item of inspection at ports. The inspection process includes examination of the external surface of the item and often destructive sampling to detect internal pest targets. There are few tools available to inspectors to increase the efficiency of inspection and reduce the labor involved. Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) has promise as an aid for inspection. Because pests emit volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as hormone like substances, Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) was investigated for possible utility for detecting pests during inspection. SWPM is a major pest pathway in trade, and fumigation of many kinds of wood, including SWPM, with methyl bromide (MeBr) following a published schedule1 is regularly conducted for phytosanitary reasons prior to shipment to the United States. However, the question remains as to how long the methyl bromide remains in the wood samples after fumigation such that it could act as an interferent to the detection of pest related VOC emissions. This work investigates the capability of ion mobility spectrometry to detect the presence of residual methyl bromide in fumigated maple and poplar wood samples at different times post fumigation up to 118 days after fumigation. Data show that MeBr can be detected in the less dense poplar wood up to 118 days after fumigation while MeBr can be detected in the denser maple wood 55 days after fumigation.

  12. Differential mobility spectrometry with nanospray ion source as a compact detector for small organics and inorganics

    PubMed Central

    Coy, Stephen L.; Krylov, Evgeny V.; Nazarov, Erkinjon G.; Fornace, Albert J.; Kidd, Richard D.

    2013-01-01

    Electrospray ionization (ESI) is an important tool in chemical and biochemical survey and targeted analysis in many applications. For chemical detection and identification electrospray is usually used with mass spectrometry (MS). However, for screening and monitoring of chemicals of interest in light, low power field-deployable instrumentation, an alternative detection technology with chemical selectivity would be highly useful, especially since small, lightweight, chip-based gas and liquid chromatographic technologies are being developed. Our initial list of applications requiring portable instruments includes chemical surveys on Mars, medical diagnostics based on metabolites in biological samples, and water quality analysis. In this report, we evaluate ESI-Differential Mobility Spectrometry (DMS) as a compact, low-power alternative to MS detection. Use of DMS for chemically-selective detection of ESI suffers in comparison with mass spectrometry because portable MS peak capacity is greater than that of DMS by 10X or more, but the development of light, fast chip chromatography offers compensating resolution. Standalone DMS provides the chemical selectivity familiar from DMS-MS publications, and exploits the sensitivity of ion detection. We find that sub-microliter-per-minute flows and a correctly-designed interface prepare a desolvated ion stream that enables DMS to act as an effective ion filter. Results for a several small organic biomarkers and metabolites, including citric acid, azelaic acid, n-hexanoylglycine, thymidine, and caffeine, as well as compounds such as dinitrotoluene and others, have been characterized and demonstrate selective detection. Water-quality-related halogen-containing anions, fluoride through bromate, contained in liquid samples are also isolated by DMS. A reaction-chamber interface is highlighted as most practical for portable ESI-DMS instrumentation. PMID:23914140

  13. Carboxymethylated polyethylenimine-polymethylenepolyphenylene isocyanate chelating ion exchange resin preconcentration for inductively coupled plasma spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Horvath, A.; Barnes, R.M.

    1986-06-01

    A carboxymethylated polyethylenimine-polylmethylenepolyphenylene isocyanate chelating ion exchange resin was prepared, characterized, and used for metals preconcentration for inductively coupled plasma spectrometry. The uptake of copper, cadmium, lead, and zinc by the resin was quantitative in the presence of high concentrations of ammonium, calcium, magnesium, potassium, sodium, and acetate and citrate salts. These metals could be collected from artificial seawater, Dead Sea water, and dissolved bone with a recovery of nearly 100%. The resin also chelates heavy metals and rare earths. Complexed metals can be eluted from the resin column with strong acids. The resin does not change volume with ionic form changes and can be regenerated for repeated use.

  14. High Throughput Proteomics Using Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Weijun; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2004-06-01

    The advent of high throughput proteomics technology for global detection and quantitation of proteins creates new opportunities and challenges for those seeking to gain greater understanding of cellular machinery. Here, we review recent advances in high-resolution capillary liquid chromatography coupled to Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometry along with its potential application to high throughput proteomics. These technological advances combined with quantitative stable isotope labeling methodologies provide powerful tools for expanding our understanding of biology at the system-level.

  15. Cometary and interstellar dust grains - Analysis by ion microprobe mass spectrometry and other techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinner, E.

    1991-04-01

    A survey of microanalytical measurements on interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and interstellar dust grains from primitive meteorites is presented. Ion-microprobe mass spectrometry with its capability to determine isotopic compositions of many elements on a micron spatial scale has played a special role. Examples are measurements of H, N, and O isotopes and refractory trace elements in IDPs; C, N, Mg, and Si isotopes in interstellar SiC grains; and C and N isotopes and H, N, Al, and Si concentrations in interstellar graphite grains.

  16. Ion mobility-mass spectrometry strategies for untargeted systems, synthetic, and chemical biology

    PubMed Central

    May, Jody C.; Goodwin, Cody R.; McLean, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Contemporary strategies that concentrate on only one or a handful of molecular targets limits the utility of the information gained for diagnostic and predictive purposes. Recent advances in the sensitivity, speed, and precision of measurements obtained from ion mobility coupled to mass spectrometry (IM-MS) have accelerated the utility of IM-MS in untargeted, discovery-driven studies in biology. Perhaps most evident is the impact that such wide-scale discovery capabilities have yielded in the areas of systems, synthetic, and chemical biology, where the need for comprehensive, hypothesis-driving studies from multidimensional and unbiased data is required. PMID:25462629

  17. Negative ion mass spectrometry and the detection of carbonyls and HCN from clover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Custer, Thomas G.; Kato, Shuji; Fall, Ray; Bierbaum, Veronica M.

    2000-12-01

    We have demonstrated that negative ion-chemical ionization mass spectrometry (NI-CIMS) can be used to distinguish several isomeric volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that are emitted from wounded plants. Reaction chemistry with HO-, hydrogen/deuterium exchange patterns, and collision-induced dissociation spectra allow identification of the isomers. Laboratory studies of emissions from wounded clover using NI-CIMS show several previously detected VOCs, but also clearly demonstrate the emission of HCN. This compound is presumably formed by the decomposition of cyanogenic glycosides which also form aldehyde and ketone byproducts. These results suggest that NI-CIMS may be a valuable tool for investigating VOCs and HCN release from vegetation.

  18. Demonstrated Potential of Ion Mobility Spectrometry for Detection of Adulterated Perfumes and Plant Speciation

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Jared Matthew; Daum, Keith Alvin; Kalival, J. H.

    2003-01-01

    This initial study evaluates the use of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) as a rapid test procedure for potential detection of adulterated perfumes and speciation of plant life. Sample types measured consist of five genuine perfumes, two species of sagebrush, and four species of flowers. Each sample type is treated as a separate classification problem. It is shown that discrimination using principal component analysis with K-nearest neighbors can distinguish one class from another. Discriminatory models generated using principal component regressions are not as effective. Results from this examination are encouraging and represent an initial phase demonstrating that perfumes and plants possess characteristic chemical signatures that can be used for reliable identification.

  19. Separation and Identification of Isomeric Glycans by Selected Accumulation-Trapped Ion Mobility Spectrometry-Electron Activated Dissociation Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pu, Yi; Ridgeway, Mark E; Glaskin, Rebecca S; Park, Melvin A; Costello, Catherine E; Lin, Cheng

    2016-04-01

    One of the major challenges in structural characterization of oligosaccharides is the presence of many structural isomers in most naturally occurring glycan mixtures. Although ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) has shown great promise in glycan isomer separation, conventional IMS separation occurs on the millisecond time scale, largely restricting its implementation to fast time-of-flight (TOF) analyzers which often lack the capability to perform electron activated dissociation (ExD) tandem MS analysis and the resolving power needed to resolve isobaric fragments. The recent development of trapped ion mobility spectrometry (TIMS) provides a promising new tool that offers high mobility resolution and compatibility with high-performance Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometers when operated under the selected accumulation-TIMS (SA-TIMS) mode. Here, we present our initial results on the application of SA-TIMS-ExD-FTICR MS to the separation and identification of glycan linkage isomers. PMID:26959868

  20. Simulations on the electron back-scattering characteristics of ion barrier film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Shencheng; Sun, Bo; Wang, Qi; Jiao, Gangcheng; Feng, Liu; Li, Ye

    2013-08-01

    The simulation calculation and analysis of electron back-scattering characteristics for ion barrier films (IBFs) of Al2O3 was performed by Monte Carlo methods. A physical model for the interaction of low-energy electrons with solid was described. Trajectory and spatial distribution of the electrons were simulated with MATLAB software.The maximum ratio of the back-scattered electrons was 19% at the incident energy of 0.24 keV. Beyond this value, the number of backscattered electron decreased slowly with the increase of the incident energy. The back-scattering ratio increased almost linearly with the increase of IBF density. When the incident energy was 0.7 keV and the film thickness is higher than 7 nm, the electron back-scattering ratio was always ~17% for the Al2O3 IBF. This work provided a theory support for fabricating high performance low-level-light device.

  1. Mass determination of megadalton-DNA Electrospray Ions usingCharge Detection Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, Jocelyn C.; Hack, Christopher; Benner, Henry W.

    1997-10-01

    Charge detection mass spectrometry (CD-MS) has been used to determine the mass of double-stranded, circular DNA and single-stranded, circular DNA in the range of 2500 to 8000 base pairs (1.5-5.0 MDa). Simultaneous measurement of the charge and velocity of an electrostatically accelerated ion allows a mass determination of the ion, with instrument calibration determined independently of samples. Positive ion mass spectra of electrosprayed commercial DNA samples supplied in tris(hydroxymethyl)ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid buffer, diluted in 50 vol. percent acetonitrile, were obtained without cleanup of the sample. ACD mass spectrum constructed from 3000 ion measurements takes 10 min to acquire and yields the DNA molecular mass directly (mass resolution = 6). The data collected represent progress toward a more automatable alternative to sizing of DNA by gel electrophoresis. In addition to the mass spectra, CD-MS generates charge versus mass plots, which provide another means to investigate the creation and fate of large electrospray ions.

  2. [Preliminary study of atomic emission spectrometry of Ti (H) plasma produced by vacuum arc ion source].

    PubMed

    Deng, Chun-Feng; Wu, Chun-Lei; Wang, Yi-Fu; Lu, Biao; Wen, Zhong-Wei

    2014-03-01

    In order to study the discharge process of vacuum arc ion source, make a detail description of the discharge plasma, and lay the foundation for further research on ion source, atomic emission spectrometry was used to diagnose the parameters of plasma produced by vaccum arc ion source. In the present paper, two kinds of analysis method for the emission spectra data collected by a spectrometer were developed. Those were based in the stark broadening of spectral lines and Saba-Boltzmann equation. Using those two methods, the electron temperature, electron number density and the ion temperature of the plasma can be determined. The emission spectroscopy data used in this paper was collected from the plasma produced by a vacuum are ion source whose cathode was made by Ti material (which adsorbed hydrogen during storage procedure). Both of the two methods were used to diagnose the plasma parameters and judge the thermal motion state of the plasma. Otherwise, the validity of the diagnostic results by the two methods were analyzed and compared. In addition, the affection from laboratory background radiation during the spectral acquisition process was discussed. PMID:25208416

  3. A novel approach to increasing cocaine detection confidence utilizing ion mobility spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jadamec, J. Richard; Su, Chih-Wu; Rigdon, Stephen; Norwood, Lavan

    1995-01-01

    When a positive detection of a narcotic occurs during the search of a vessel, a decision has to be made whether further intensive search is warranted. In terms of unwarranted delays of vessels and possible property damage, the accuracy of the analytical determination is very important. Analytical accuracy becomes critical when the data may be used in court actions as evidence. For this purpose, the U.S. Coast Guard has been investigating several confirmatory ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) field methods for the detection and identification of cocaine. This paper presents the findings of our investigations on the use of catalytic pyrolysis and base hydrolysis as confirmatory methods. The catalytic effects of various metals on the pyrolysis reaction are reported. In addition, the effects of several different ion mobility spectrometer sample transfer mediums and varying laboratory conditions on the base hydrolysis of the cocaine molecule are also be reported.

  4. Measurement of drug facilitated sexual assault agents in simulated sweat by ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Demoranville, Leonard T; Verkouteren, Jennifer R

    2013-03-15

    Ion mobility spectrometry has found widespread use for the detection of explosives and illicit drugs. The technique offers rapid results with high sensitivity and little sample preparation. As such, it is well suited for field deployed screening settings. Here the response of ion mobility spectrometers for three drug-facilitated sexual assault (DFSA) agents - flunitrazepam, ketamine, and MDMA - and related metabolites has been studied in the presence of a simulated sweat. While all three DFSA agents present certain challenges for qualitative identification, IMS can provide useful information to guide the early treatment and investigation of sexual assault cases. Used as a presumptive test, the identification of DFSA agents would later require confirmatory analysis by other techniques. PMID:23598140

  5. Automated Gain Control Ion Funnel Trap for Orthogonal Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Belov, Mikhail E.; Liyu, Andrei V.; Smith, Richard D.

    2009-01-01

    Time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF MS) is increasingly used in proteomics research. Herein, we report on the development and characterization of a TOF MS instrument with improved sensitivity equipped with an electrodynamic ion funnel trap (IFT) that employs an automated gain control (AGC) capability. The IFT-TOF MS was coupled to a reversed-phase capillary liquid chromatography (RPLC) separation and evaluated in experiments with complex proteolytic digests. When applied to a global tryptic digest of Shewanella oneidensis proteins, an order-of-magnitude increase in sensitivity compared to that of the conventional continuous mode of operation was achieved due to efficient ion accumulation prior to TOF MS analysis. As a result of this sensitivity improvement and related improvement in mass measurement accuracy, the number of unique peptides identified in the AGC-IFT mode was 5-fold greater than that obtained in the continuous mode. PMID:18512944

  6. Fast-ion energy resolution by one-step reaction gamma-ray spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salewski, M.; Nocente, M.; Gorini, G.; Jacobsen, A. S.; Kiptily, V. G.; Korsholm, S. B.; Leipold, F.; Madsen, J.; Moseev, D.; Nielsen, S. K.; Rasmussen, J.; Stejner, M.; Tardocchi, M.; Contributors, JET

    2016-04-01

    The spectral broadening of γ-rays from fusion plasmas can be measured in high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry (GRS). We derive weight functions that determine the observable velocity space and quantify the velocity-space sensitivity of one-step reaction high-resolution GRS measurements in magnetized fusion plasmas. The weight functions suggest that GRS resolves the energies of fast ions directly without the need for tomographic inversion for selected one-step reactions at moderate plasma temperatures. The D(p,γ)3He reaction allows the best direct fast-ion energy resolution. We illustrate our general formalism using reactions with and without intrinsic broadening of the γ-rays for the GRS diagnostic at JET.

  7. Characterization of dihydrostreptomycin-related substances by liquid chromatography coupled to ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pendela, Murali; Hoogmartens, Jos; Van Schepdael, Ann; Adams, Erwin

    2009-06-01

    Dihydrostreptomycin sulphate (DHS) is a water-soluble, broad-spectrum aminoglycoside antibiotic. For quantitative analysis, the European Pharmacopoeia (Ph. Eur.) prescribes an ion-pairing liquid chromatography/ultraviolet (LC/UV) method using a C18 stationary phase. Several unknown compounds were detected in commercial samples. Hence, for characterization of these unknown peaks in a commercial DHS sample, the Ph. Eur. method was coupled to mass spectrometry (MS). However, since the Ph. Eur. method uses a non-volatile mobile phase, each peak eluted was collected and desalted before introduction into the mass spectrometer. The desalting procedure was applied to remove the non volatile salt, buffer and ion-pairing reagent in the collected fraction. In total, 20 impurities were studied and 14 of them were newly characterized. Five impurities which are already reported in the literature were also traced in this LC/UV method. PMID:19449319

  8. Positive-ion thermospray liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry: detection of organic acidurias.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, D N; Muenzer, J; Thoene, J G

    1990-12-14

    Positive-ion thermospray liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (TSP-LC-MS) is used to detect organic acids via the direct injection of untreated urine from newborns and infants. Two methods are reported for the separation of organic acids. The separation of urinary organic acids is effected in either an acidic, pH 2.5 sulfuric acid, or a non-acidic, 0.05 M ammonium acetate, pH 6.8, mobile phase. Use of pH 2.5 sulfuric acid and an HPX-87H organic acid column produces better separation but has less sensitivity than the use of 0.05 M ammonium acetate, pH 6.8 and a C18 column. Positive ion TSP-LC-MS has been used to detect methylmalonic aciduria, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaric aciduria, propionic aciduria, isovaleric aciduria and argininosuccinic aciduria. PMID:1709942

  9. Ion mobility spectrometry as a high-throughput analytical tool in occupational pyrethroid exposure.

    PubMed

    Armenta, S; Blanco, M

    2012-08-01

    The capabilities of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) as a high throughput and green analytical tool in the occupational health and safety control, using pyrethroids as models has been evidenced. The method used for dermal and inhalation exposure assessment is based on the passive pyrethroid sampling using Teflon membranes, direct thermal extraction of the pyrethroids, and measurement of the vaporized analytes by IMS without reagent and solvent consumption. The IMS signatures of the studied synthetic pyrethroids under atmospheric pressure chemical ionization by investigating the formed negative ion products have been obtained. The main advantages of the proposed procedure are related to the obtained limits of detection, ranging from 0.08 to 5 ng, the simplicity of measurement, the lack of sample treatment, and therefore, solvent consumption and waste generation, and finally, the speed of analysis. PMID:22159370

  10. Silica-fiber microextraction for laser desorption ion trap mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Cisper, M.E.; Earl, W.L.; Nogar, N.S.; Hemberger, P.H. )

    1994-06-01

    We have coupled sample collection by solid-phase microextraction on disposable fused silica optical fibers with analysis by laser desorption ion trap mass spectrometry for rapid screening of organic contaminants in complex matrices. Because the silica-fiber probe serves as both the sampling medium and the sample support for laser desorption, traditional methods of sample preparation are eliminated with the expected gains in speed and simplicity. Pyrene was the benchmark compound in these experiments but we show that the technique is also applicable to other polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and semivolatile compounds, laser dyes, pesticides, and peptides. Derivatizing the silica fiber improves the analyte collection efficiency, and firing the laser during a ring electrode rf ramp promotes dependable trapping of laser-desorbed ions. 32 refs., 5 figs.

  11. Electrospray liquid chromatography quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry determination of phenyl urea herbicides in water.

    PubMed

    Draper, W M

    2001-06-01

    Phenyl urea herbicides were determined in water by electrospray quadrupole ion trap liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (ES-QIT-LC-MS). Over a wide concentration range [M - H](-) and MH(+) ions were prominent in ES spectra. At high concentrations dimer and trimer ions appeared, and sodium, potassium, and ammonium adducts also were observed. In the case of isopturon, source collision-induced dissociation (CID) fragmentation with low offset voltages increased the ion current associated with MH(+) and diminished dimer and trimer ion abundance. In the mass analyzer CID involved common pathways, for example, daughter ions of [M - H](-) resulted from loss of R(2)NH in N',N'-dialkyl ureas or loss of C(3)H(5)NO(2) (87 amu) in N'-methoxy ureas. A 2 mm (i.d.) x 15 cm C(18) reversed phase column was used for LC-MS with a linear methanol/water gradient and 0.5 mL/min flow rate. Between 1 and 100 pg/microg/L the response was highly linear with instrument detection limits ranging from <10 to 50 pg injected. Whereas the positive ES signal intensity was greater for each of the compounds except fluometuron, negative ion monitoring gave the highest signal-to-noise ratio. Analysis of spiked Colorado River water, a source high in total dissolved solids and total organic carbon, demonstrated that ES-QIT-LC-MS was routinely capable of quantitative analysis at low nanogram per liter concentrations in conjunction with a published C(18) SPE method. Under these conditions experimental method detection limits were between 8.0 and 36 ng/L, and accuracy for measurements in the 20-50 parts per trillion range was from 77 to 96%. Recoveries were slightly lower in surface water (e.g., 39-76%), possibly due to suppression of ionization. PMID:11409961

  12. Cluster Ion Spectrometry (CIS) data quality indexes as a support for analysing magnetospheric measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dandouras, Iannis; Barthe, Alain; Brunato, Sylvain; Rème, Henri; Laakso, Harri

    2016-04-01

    The Cluster Science Archive (CSA) aims at preserving the complete set of the measurements collected by the four Cluster spacecraft, so that they are usable in the long-term by the world-wide scientific community as well as by the instrument teams. This implies that the instrument data, properly calibrated, are filed together with the descriptive and documentary elements making it possible to select and interpret them. The CIS (Cluster Ion Spectrometry) experiment is a comprehensive ionic plasma spectrometry package onboard the Cluster spacecraft, capable of obtaining full three-dimensional ion distributions (about 0 to 40 keV/e) with a time resolution of one spacecraft spin (4 sec) and with mass-per-charge composition determination. For the archival of the CIS data a multi-level approach has been adopted. The CSA archival includes processed raw data, moments of the ion distribution functions, and calibrated high-resolution data in a variety of physical units. The latter are 3-D ion distribution functions, 2-D pitch-angle distributions and 1-D omni-directional fluxes. The CIS data archive includes also experiment documentation, graphical products for browsing through the data, data caveats and data quality indexes. The later constitute a novel product, which has been prepared in order to help the user asses the quality of the data acquired in different magnetospheric regions and during various operational modes. It provides information on which are in each case the issues that can affect the data quality, which are the data products affected, and gives a simple quantitative measurement of the severity of these issues. The principle of the CIS data quality indexes will be described and the various issues, that can under some conditions affect the data quality and are thus taken into account in generating the data quality indexes, will be discussed.

  13. Site-Specific Characterization of d-Amino Acid Containing Peptide Epimers by Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Traditionally, the d-amino acid containing peptide (DAACP) candidate can be discovered by observing the differences of biological activity and chromatographic retention time between the synthetic peptides and naturally occurring peptides. However, it is difficult to determine the exact position of d-amino acid in the DAACP candidates. Herein, we developed a novel site-specific strategy to rapidly and precisely localize d-amino acids in peptides by ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) analysis of mass spectrometry (MS)-generated epimeric fragment ions. Briefly, the d/l-peptide epimers were separated by online reversed-phase liquid chromatography and fragmented by collision-induced dissociation (CID), followed by IMS analysis. The epimeric fragment ions resulting from d/l-peptide epimers exhibit conformational differences, thus showing different mobilities in IMS. The arrival time shift between the epimeric fragment ions was used as criteria to localize the d-amino acid substitution. The utility of this strategy was demonstrated by analysis of peptide epimers with different molecular sizes, [d-Trp]-melanocyte-stimulating hormone, [d-Ala]-deltorphin, [d-Phe]-achatin-I, and their counterparts that contain all-l amino acids. Furthermore, the crustacean hyperglycemia hormones (CHHs, 8.5 kDa) were isolated from the American lobster Homarus americanus and identified by integration of MS-based bottom-up and top-down sequencing approaches. The IMS data acquired using our novel site-specific strategy localized the site of isomerization of l- to d-Phe at the third residue of the CHHs from the N-terminus. Collectively, this study demonstrates a new method for discovery of DAACPs using IMS technique with the ability to localize d-amino acid residues. PMID:24328107

  14. Analysis of a series of chlorogenic acid isomers using differential ion mobility and tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Willems, Jamie L; Khamis, Mona M; Mohammed Saeid, Waleed; Purves, Randy W; Katselis, George; Low, Nicholas H; El-Aneed, Anas

    2016-08-24

    Chlorogenic acids are among the most abundant phenolics found in the human diet. Of these, the mono-caffeoylquinic acids are the predominant phenolics found in fruits, such as apples and pears, and products derived from them. In this research, a comprehensive study of the electrospray ionization (ESI) tandem mass spectrometric (MS/MS) dissociation behavior of the three most common mono-caffeoylquinic acids, namely 5-O-caffeoylquinic acid (5-CQA), 3-O-caffeoylquinic acid (3-CQA) and 4-O-caffeoylquinic acid (4-CQA), were determined using both positive and negative ionization. All proposed structures of the observed product ions were confirmed with second-generation MS(3) experiments. Similarities and differences between the dissociation pathways in the positive and negative ion modes are discussed, confirming the proposed structures and the established MS/MS fingerprints. MS/MS dissociation was primarily driven via the cleavage of the ester bond linking the quinic acid moiety to the caffeic acid moiety within tested molecules. Despite being structural isomers with the same m/z values and dissociation behaviors, the MS/MS data in the negative ion mode was able to differentiate the three isomers based on ion intensity for the major product ions, observed at m/z 191, 179 and 173. This differentiation was consistent among various MS instruments. In addition, ESI coupled with high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (ESI-FAIMS-MS) was employed for the separation of these compounds for the first time. By combining MS/MS data and differential ion mobility, a method for the separation and identification of mono-caffeoylquinic in apple/pear juice samples was developed with a run time of less than 1 min. It is envisaged that this methodology could be used to identify pure juices based on their chlorogenic acid profile (i.e., metabolomics), and could also be used to detect juice-to-juice adulteration (e.g., apple juice addition to pear juice

  15. Resonant inelastic contact scattering of X-ray photons on atoms and ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopersky, A. N.; Nadolinsky, A. M.; Yavna, V. A.

    2006-10-01

    The existence of an extended resonance structure outside the X-ray emission regions is theoretically predicted in the total double differential cross section for the scattering of linearly polarized photons on free atoms (ions). This structure is almost entirely determined by inelastic photon scattering of the contact type. The amplitude of the inelastic contact scattering probability is described using an analytical expression for a non-relativistic transition operator, which was previously obtained by the author outside the dipole and momentum approximations. The resonant inelastic contact scattering of X-ray photons on a neon atom and neonlike ions of argon, titanium, and iron has been studied. Calculations were performed in a nonrelativistic approximation for the wave functions of the scattering states, with allowance for many-body effects of the radial relaxation of one-electron orbitals in the Hartree-Fock field of a deep 1 s vacancy and (for neon atom) the double excitation/ionization of the ground atomic state.

  16. Application of Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry to the Study of Ionic Clusters: Investigation of Cluster Ions with Stable Sizes and Compositions

    PubMed Central

    Ohshimo, Keijiro; Komukai, Tatsuya; Takahashi, Tohru; Norimasa, Naoya; Wu, Jenna Wen Ju; Moriyama, Ryoichi; Koyasu, Kiichirou; Misaizu, Fuminori

    2014-01-01

    Stable cluster sizes and compositions have been investigated for cations and anions of ionic bond clusters such as alkali halides and transition metal oxides by ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS). Usually structural information of ions can be obtained from collision cross sections determined in IM-MS. In addition, we have found that stable ion sizes or compositions were predominantly produced in a total ion mass spectrum, which was constructed from the IM-MS measurement. These stable species were produced as a result of collision induced dissociations of the ions in a drift cell. We have confirmed this result in the sodium fluoride cluster ions, in which cuboid magic number cluster ions were predominantly observed. Next the stable compositions, which were obtained for the oxide systems of the first row transition metals, Ti, Fe, and Co, are characteristic for each of the metal oxide cluster ions. PMID:26819887

  17. Machine learning based prediction for peptide drift times in ion mobility spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Anuj R.; Agarwal, Khushbu; Baker, Erin S.; Singhal, Mudita; Mayampurath, Anoop M.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Kangas, Lars J.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Zhao, Rui; Belov, Mikhail E.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2010-01-01

    Motivation: Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) has gained significant traction over the past few years for rapid, high-resolution separations of analytes based upon gas-phase ion structure, with significant potential impacts in the field of proteomic analysis. IMS coupled with mass spectrometry (MS) affords multiple improvements over traditional proteomics techniques, such as in the elucidation of secondary structure information, identification of post-translational modifications, as well as higher identification rates with reduced experiment times. The high throughput nature of this technique benefits from accurate calculation of cross sections, mobilities and associated drift times of peptides, thereby enhancing downstream data analysis. Here, we present a model that uses physicochemical properties of peptides to accurately predict a peptide's drift time directly from its amino acid sequence. This model is used in conjunction with two mathematical techniques, a partial least squares regression and a support vector regression setting. Results: When tested on an experimentally created high confidence database of 8675 peptide sequences with measured drift times, both techniques statistically significantly outperform the intrinsic size parameters-based calculations, the currently held practice in the field, on all charge states (+2, +3 and +4). Availability: The software executable, imPredict, is available for download from http:/omics.pnl.gov/software/imPredict.php Contact: rds@pnl.gov Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:20495001

  18. Determination of perchlorate in infant formula by isotope dilution ion chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Z.; Lau, B.P.-Y.; Tague, B.; Sparling, M.; Forsyth, D.

    2011-01-01

    A sensitive and selective isotope dilution ion chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (ID IC-MS/MS) method was developed and validated for the determination of perchlorate in infant formula. The perchlorate was extracted from infant formula by using 20 ml of methanol and 5 ml of 1% acetic acid. All samples were spiked with 18O4 isotope-labelled perchlorate internal standard prior to extraction. After purification on a graphitised carbon solid-phase extraction column, the extracts were injected into an ion chromatography system equipped with an Ionpac AS20 column for separation of perchlorate from other anions. The presence of perchlorate in samples was quantified by isotope dilution mass spectrometry. Analysis of both perchlorate and its isotope-labelled internal standard was carried out on a Waters Quattro Ultima triple quadrupole mass spectrometer operating in a multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) negative ionisation mode. The method was validated for linearity and range, accuracy, precision, sensitivity, and matrix effects. The limit of quantification (LOQ) was 0.4 μg 1−1 for liquid infant formula and 0.95 μg kg−1 for powdered infant formula. The recovery ranged from 94% to 110% with an average of 98%. This method was used to analyse 39 infant formula, and perchlorate concentrations ranging from

  19. Protocol of single cells preparation for time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bobrowska, Justyna; Pabijan, Joanna; Wiltowska-Zuber, Joanna; Jany, Benedykt R; Krok, Franciszek; Awsiuk, Kamil; Rysz, Jakub; Budkowski, Andrzej; Lekka, Malgorzata

    2016-10-15

    There are several techniques like time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF SIMS) that require a special protocol for preparation of biological samples, in particular, those containing single cells due to high vacuum conditions that must be kept during the experiment. Frequently, preparation methodology involves liquid nitrogen freezing what is not always convenient. In our studies, we propose and validate a protocol for preparation of single cells. It consists of four steps: (i) paraformaldehyde fixation, (ii) salt removal, (iii) dehydrating, and (iv) sample drying under ambient conditions. The protocol was applied to samples with single melanoma cells i.e. WM115 and WM266-4 characterized by similar morphology. The surface and internal structures of cells were monitored using atomic force, scanning electron and fluorescent microscopes, used to follow any potential protocol-induced alterations. To validate the proposed methodology for sample preparation, ToF SIMS experiments were carried out using C60(+) cluster ion beam. The applied principal component analysis (PCA) revealed that chemical changes on cell surface of melanoma cells were large enough to differentiate between primary and secondary tumor sites. Subject category: Mass spectrometry. PMID:27318241

  20. Amyloid-β / Neuropeptide Interactions Assessed by Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Soper, Molly T.; DeToma, Alaina S.; Hyung, Suk-Joon; Lim, Mi Hee; Ruotolo, Brandon T.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, small peptides have been shown to modulate aggregation and toxicity of the amyloid-β protein (Aβ). As such, these new scaffolds may help discover a new class of biotherapeutics useful in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. Many of these inhibitory peptide sequences have been derived from natural sources or from Aβ itself (e.g., C-terminal Aβ fragments). In addition, much earlier work indicates that tachykinins, a broad class of neuropeptides, display neurotrophic properties, presumably through direct interactions with either Aβ or its receptors. Based on this work, we undertook a limited screen of neuropeptides using ion mobility-mass spectrometry to search for similar such peptides with direct Aβ binding properties. Our results reveal that the neuropeptides leucine enkephalin (LE) and galanin interact with both the monomeric and small oligomeric forms of Aβ1-40 to create a range of complexes having diverse stoichiometries, while some tachyknins (i.e., substance P) do not. LE interacts with Aβ more strongly than galanin, and we utilized ion mobility-mass spectrometry, molecular dynamics simulations, gel electrophoresis/Western blot, and transmission electron microscopy to study the influence of this peptide on the structure of Aβ monomer, small Aβ oligomers, as well as the eventual formation of Aβ fibrils. We find that LE binds selectively within a region of Aβ between its N-terminal tail and hydrophobic core. Furthermore, our data indicate that LE modulates fibril generation, producing shorter fibrillar aggregates when added in stoichiometric excess relative to Aβ. PMID:23612608

  1. Ultrahigh-Resolution Differential Ion Mobility Spectrometry Using Extended Separation Times

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Richard D.

    2010-01-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS), and particularly differential IMS or FAIMS, is emerging as a versatile tool for separation and identification of gas-phase ions, especially in conjunction with mass spectrometry. For over two decades since its inception, the utility of FAIMS was constrained by resolving power (R) of less than ~20. Stronger electric fields and optimized gas mixtures have recently raised achievable R to ~200, but further progress with such approaches is impeded by electrical breakdown. However, the resolving power of planar FAIMS devices using any gas and field intensity scales as the square root of separation time (t). Here, we extended t from the previous maximum of 0.2 s up to fourfold by reducing the carrier gas flow and increased the resolving power by up to twofold as predicted, to >300 for multiply-charged peptides. The resulting resolution gain has enabled separation of previously “co-eluting” peptide isomers, including folding conformers and localization variants of modified peptides. More broadly, a peak capacity of ~200 has been reached in tryptic digest separations. PMID:21117630

  2. Electrospray ion mobility mass spectrometry of positively charged sodium bis[2-ethythexyl)sulfosuccinate aggregates.

    PubMed

    Bongiorno, David; Indelicato, Serena; Giorgi, Gianluca; Scarpella, Simona; Liveri, Vincenzo Turco; Ceraulo, Leopoldo

    2014-01-01

    Collision cross-sections (CCS) of positively singly and multiply charged aggregates of the surfactant sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate (AOTNa) in the gas phase have been measured by quadrupole ion mobility time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Calibration of the observed drift times to the CCS of the AOTNa non-covalent aggregates was achieved by collecting, under the same experimental conditions, the drift times of a range of singly and multiply charged polyalanine peptides whose CCS had been obtained by conventional ion mobility spectrometry. Together with an obvious increase of the aggregate cross-section with the aggregation number, it was found that the aggregate cross-section increases with the charge state due to the sodium counterions steric effect and the augmented electrostatic repulsion. This finding is consistent with the result of a previous molecular dynamics study on positively charged AOTNa aggregates in the gas phase showing that, by increasing the charge state, the aggregates become progressively more oblate; implying a rise of their CCS. Moreover, the occurrence at each aggregation number and extra charge of a unique value of cross section points toward aggregates whose conformations do not show discernible shape change in the experiment time scale. PMID:24895777

  3. CO2 Cluster Ion Beam, an Alternative Projectile for Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tian, Hua; Maciążek, Dawid; Postawa, Zbigniew; Garrison, Barbara J; Winograd, Nicholas

    2016-09-01

    The emergence of argon-based gas cluster ion beams for SIMS experiments opens new possibilities for molecular depth profiling and 3D chemical imaging. These beams generally leave less surface chemical damage and yield mass spectra with reduced fragmentation compared with smaller cluster projectiles. For nanoscale bioimaging applications, however, limited sensitivity due to low ionization probability and technical challenges of beam focusing remain problematic. The use of gas cluster ion beams based upon systems other than argon offer an opportunity to resolve these difficulties. Here we report on the prospects of employing CO2 as a simple alternative to argon. Ionization efficiency, chemical damage, sputter rate, and beam focus are investigated on model compounds using a series of CO2 and Ar cluster projectiles (cluster size 1000-5000) with the same mass. The results show that the two projectiles are very similar in each of these aspects. Computer simulations comparing the impact of Ar2000 and (CO2)2000 on an organic target also confirm that the CO2 molecules in the cluster projectile remain intact, acting as a single particle of m/z 44. The imaging resolution employing CO2 cluster projectiles is improved by more than a factor of two. The advantage of CO2 versus Ar is also related to the increased stability which, in addition, facilitates the operation of the gas cluster ion beams (GCIB) system at lower backing pressure. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27324648

  4. CO2 Cluster Ion Beam, an Alternative Projectile for Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Hua; Maciążek, Dawid; Postawa, Zbigniew; Garrison, Barbara J.; Winograd, Nicholas

    2016-06-01

    The emergence of argon-based gas cluster ion beams for SIMS experiments opens new possibilities for molecular depth profiling and 3D chemical imaging. These beams generally leave less surface chemical damage and yield mass spectra with reduced fragmentation compared with smaller cluster projectiles. For nanoscale bioimaging applications, however, limited sensitivity due to low ionization probability and technical challenges of beam focusing remain problematic. The use of gas cluster ion beams based upon systems other than argon offer an opportunity to resolve these difficulties. Here we report on the prospects of employing CO2 as a simple alternative to argon. Ionization efficiency, chemical damage, sputter rate, and beam focus are investigated on model compounds using a series of CO2 and Ar cluster projectiles (cluster size 1000-5000) with the same mass. The results show that the two projectiles are very similar in each of these aspects. Computer simulations comparing the impact of Ar2000 and (CO2)2000 on an organic target also confirm that the CO2 molecules in the cluster projectile remain intact, acting as a single particle of m/z 44. The imaging resolution employing CO2 cluster projectiles is improved by more than a factor of two. The advantage of CO2 versus Ar is also related to the increased stability which, in addition, facilitates the operation of the gas cluster ion beams (GCIB) system at lower backing pressure.

  5. CO2 Cluster Ion Beam, an Alternative Projectile for Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Hua; Maciążek, Dawid; Postawa, Zbigniew; Garrison, Barbara J.; Winograd, Nicholas

    2016-09-01

    The emergence of argon-based gas cluster ion beams for SIMS experiments opens new possibilities for molecular depth profiling and 3D chemical imaging. These beams generally leave less surface chemical damage and yield mass spectra with reduced fragmentation compared with smaller cluster projectiles. For nanoscale bioimaging applications, however, limited sensitivity due to low ionization probability and technical challenges of beam focusing remain problematic. The use of gas cluster ion beams based upon systems other than argon offer an opportunity to resolve these difficulties. Here we report on the prospects of employing CO2 as a simple alternative to argon. Ionization efficiency, chemical damage, sputter rate, and beam focus are investigated on model compounds using a series of CO2 and Ar cluster projectiles (cluster size 1000-5000) with the same mass. The results show that the two projectiles are very similar in each of these aspects. Computer simulations comparing the impact of Ar2000 and (CO2)2000 on an organic target also confirm that the CO2 molecules in the cluster projectile remain intact, acting as a single particle of m/z 44. The imaging resolution employing CO2 cluster projectiles is improved by more than a factor of two. The advantage of CO2 versus Ar is also related to the increased stability which, in addition, facilitates the operation of the gas cluster ion beams (GCIB) system at lower backing pressure.

  6. Simultaneous imaging electron- and ion-feature Thomson scattering measurements of radiatively heated Xe

    SciTech Connect

    Pollock, B. B.; Meinecke, J.; Kuschel, S.; Ross, J. S.; Divol, L.; Glenzer, S. H.; Shaw, J. L.; Stoafer, C.; Tynan, G. R.

    2012-10-15

    Uniform density and temperature Xe plasmas have been produced over >4 mm scale-lengths using x-rays generated in a cylindrical Pb cavity. The cavity is 750 {mu}m in depth and diameter, and is heated by a 300 J, 2 ns square, 1054 nm laser pulse focused to a spot size of 200 {mu}m at the cavity entrance. The plasma is characterized by simultaneous imaging Thomson scattering measurements from both the electron and ion scattering features. The electron feature measurement determines the spatial electron density and temperature profile, and using these parameters as constraints in the ion feature analysis allows an accurate determination of the charge state of the Xe ions. The Thomson scattering probe beam is 40 J, 200 ps, and 527 nm, and is focused to a 100 {mu}m spot size at the entrance of the Pb cavity. Each system has a spatial resolution of 25 {mu}m, a temporal resolution of 200 ps (as determined by the probe duration), and a spectral resolution of 2 nm for the electron feature system and 0.025 nm for the ion feature system. The experiment is performed in a Xe filled target chamber at a neutral pressure of 3-10 Torr, and the x-rays produced in the Pb ionize and heat the Xe to a charge state of 20{+-}4 at up to 200 eV electron temperatures.

  7. Kinetic model of collective scattering off fast ion generated electromagnetic fluctuations in magnetized Vlasov plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Heikkinen, J.A.; Dumbrajs, O.

    1996-02-01

    From the general three-wave coupling formalism in magnetized nonrelativistic Vlasov plasma, an expression is derived that gives the differential cross section for the scattering of incident radiation off of thermal fluctuations induced by ions in a hot magnetized plasma. The model is valid to any order in thermal parameters, and can thus generalize the previous theory models to regimes where either the electron Larmor radius or the electron cyclotron resonance are significant for the scattered wave. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. Experimental evidence of the effect of heat flux on thomson scattering off ion acoustic waves

    PubMed

    Amiranoff; Baton; Huller; Malka; Modena; Mounaix; Galloudec; Rousseaux; Salvati

    2000-02-01

    Thomson self-scattering measurements are performed in a preionized helium gas jet plasma at different locations along the laser propagation direction. A systematic and important variation of the intensity ratio between the blue and the red ion spectral components is observed, depending on whether the location of the probed region is in front of or behind the focal plane. A simple theoretical calculation of Thomson scattering shows that this behavior can be qualitatively understood in terms of a deformation of the electron distribution function due to the return current correlated with the classical thermal heat flux. PMID:11046481

  9. Rainbows in energy- and angle-resolved ion scattering from surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Tenner, A.D.; Gillen, K.T.; Horn, T.C.M.; Los, J.; Kleyn, A.W.

    1984-06-11

    The angular and energy distributions of K/sup +/ ions scattered at normal incidence with an initial energy of 35 eV on a W(110) surface were measured for various crystal orientations. The complex distributions show rainbows, which are due to both to extrema in the deflection functions for the two scattering angles as well as to an extremum in the final energy as a function of the impact parameter. With use of computer simulations with a nonadditive model potential all observed structures can be explained.

  10. Real-time 2D separation by LC × differential ion mobility hyphenated to mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Varesio, Emmanuel; Le Blanc, J C Yves; Hopfgartner, Gérard

    2012-03-01

    The liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis of complex samples such as biological fluid extracts is widespread when searching for new biomarkers as in metabolomics. The success of this hyphenation resides in the orthogonality of both separation techniques. However, there are frequent cases where compounds are co-eluting and the resolving power of mass spectrometry (MS) is not sufficient (e.g., isobaric compounds and interfering isotopic clusters). Different strategies are discussed to solve these cases and a mixture of eight compounds (i.e., bromazepam, chlorprothixene, clonapzepam, fendiline, flusilazol, oxfendazole, oxycodone, and pamaquine) with identical nominal mass (i.e., m/z 316) is taken to illustrate them. Among the different approaches, high-resolution mass spectrometry or liquid chromatography (i.e., UHPLC) can easily separate these compounds. Another technique, mostly used with low resolving power MS analyzers, is differential ion mobility spectrometry (DMS), where analytes are gas-phase separated according to their size-to-charge ratio. Detailed investigations of the addition of different polar modifiers (i.e., methanol, ethanol, and isopropanol) into the transport gas (nitrogen) to enhance the peak capacity of the technique were carried out. Finally, a complex urine sample fortified with 36 compounds of various chemical properties was analyzed by real-time 2D separation LC×DMS-MS(/MS). The addition of this orthogonal gas-phase separation technique in the LC-MS(/MS) hyphenation greatly improved data quality by resolving composite MS/MS spectra, which is mandatory in metabolomics when performing database generation and search. PMID:22006241

  11. Time resolved mass spectrometry of positive ions originated from atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selakovic, Nenad; Puac, Nevena; Maletic, Dejan; Malovic, Gordana; Petrovic, Zoran Lj.

    2013-09-01

    We present time-resolved measurements of positive ions originated from the atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) by using HIDEN HPR60 mass energy analyzer. APPJ was made of Pyrex glass tube with two transparent electrodes (15 mm wide PET foil). The gap between the electrodes was 15 mm, excitation frequency 80 kHz and applied voltage 6-10 kVpeak - to - peak. Helium flow rate was kept constant at 4 slm. In all measurements the distance between the plasma source and mass spectrometer orifice was 15 mm. Spectrometer detector gating was synchronized with the applied current and voltage signals in order to track in time the signal of detected ions. The internal gate width of HPR60 analyzer was 0.1 μs. We performed time resolved mass spectrometry of most abundant ion species originated from plasma jet: N2+(36%),N+(20%), O2+(18.5%),O+(16.8%), H2O+(6.1%), OH+, NO+, N2H+ and Ar+ (a few percentage). Results have shown that maximum intensity of nitrogen ions is lagging the maximum of current and voltage signal and maximum intensity for oxygen species is in opposite phase with current-voltage signals. Supported by MESTD, RS, III41011 and ON171037.

  12. Metal oxide collectors for storing matter technique applied in secondary ion mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miśnik, Maciej; Konarski, Piotr; Zawada, Aleksander

    2016-03-01

    We present results of the use of metal and metal oxide substrates that serve as collectors in 'storing matter', the quantitative technique of secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). This technique allows separating the two base processes of secondary ion formation in SIMS. Namely, the process of ion sputtering is separated from the process of ionisation. The technique allows sputtering of the analysed sample and storing the sputtered material, with sub-monolayer coverage, onto a collector surface. Such deposits can be then analysed by SIMS, and as a result, the so called 'matrix effects' are significantly reduced. We perform deposition of the sputtered material onto Ti and Cu substrates and also onto metal oxide substrates as molybdenum, titanium, tin and indium oxides. The process of sputtering is carried within the same vacuum chamber where the SIMS analysis of the collected material is performed. For sputtering and SIMS analysis of the deposited material we use 5 keV Ar+ beam of 500 nA. The presented results are obtained with the use of stationary collectors. Here we present a case study of chromium. The obtained results show that the molybdenum and titanium oxide substrates used as collectors increase useful yield by two orders, with respect to such pure elemental collectors as Cu and Ti. Here we define useful yield as a ratio of the number of detected secondary ions during SIMS analysis and the number of atoms sputtered during the deposition process.

  13. Application of a nonradioactive pulsed electron source for ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gunzer, Frank; Zimmermann, Stefan; Baether, Wolfgang

    2010-05-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) is a well-known method for detecting hazardous compounds in air. Typical applications are the detection of chemical warfare agents, highly toxic industrial compounds, explosives, and drugs of abuse. Detection limits in the low part per billion range, fast response times, and simple instrumentation make this technique more and more popular. Common ion mobility spectrometers work by employing a radioactive source to provide electrons with high energy to ionize analytes in a series of chemical reactions. General security as well as regulatory concerns related to radioactivity result in the need for a different ionization source which on the other hand produces ions in a similar manner as a radioactive source since the ion chemistry is well-known. Here we show the application of a novel nonradioactive source that produces spectra similar to those obtained with radioactive tritium sources. Using this source in a pulsed mode offers the additional advantage of selecting certain analytes by their recombination time and thus significantly increasing the selectivity. The successful isolation of a target signal in the presence of contaminants using a pulsed electron beam or more precisely the difference in recombination times will be demonstrated for the case of dimethyl-methylphosphonate (DMMP) showing the potential of this source to reduce the possibility for false-positive detection of corresponding chemical warfare agents (CWA) by IMS. PMID:20353158

  14. Quantitative determination of residual active pharmaceutical ingredients and intermediates on equipment surfaces by ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Qin, C; Granger, A; Papov, V; McCaffrey, J; Norwood, D L

    2010-01-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) is an analytical technique that separates ions based on their gas phase mobility at atmospheric pressure. Since gas phase ion mobility is a function of the shape and structure of the ion, this technique has the potential to provide unique specificity and selectivity. Furthermore, IMS is very sensitive (subnanogram detection limits for many small molecules), and a single analysis is typically completed within 1 min. In principle, these features of IMS should make it an ideal choice for use in cleaning verification analysis of pharmaceutical manufacturing equipment. This report describes the successful development and validation of three different equipment cleaning verification methods using IMS. The methods were developed for a specific intermediate (Compound A) in the synthetic route for a drug substance as well as for final drug substances (active pharmaceutical ingredients Compounds B and C). The cleaning verification methods were validated with respect to specificity, linearity, precision, accuracy, stability, and limit-of-quantitation. In all cases, the limits-of-quantitation were determined to be at the nanogram or sub-nanogram level. Both swab and rinse samples collected from the equipment surfaces were successfully analyzed and manufacturing equipment down-time was significantly minimized due to the reduction in cleaning verification analysis time (for example, the total analysis time for more than 30 samples using IMS was reduced to less than 2h). PMID:19758781

  15. Trace element siting in iron sulfides from coal determined by secondary ion mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Wiese, R.G. Jr. ); Muir, I.J.; Fyfe, W.S. )

    1990-01-01

    Intact samples of coal have been analyzed by SIMS (secondary ion mass spectrometry) ion imaging and ion probe techniques for determination of the distribution of trace elements in pyrite and marcasite and in the associated clay minerals. Ion mapping of site-specific concentrations of trace elements is important as one considers the environmental consequences of not only the combustion of coal, but also the disposal of coal-washing plant refuse and the placement of mine spoils during reclamation. Iron sulfides and clays are both involved in the oxidation-hydration reactions that result in the formation of acid waters and the release of trace elements into the ecosystem. Iron sulfides from selected Ohio coals contain site-specific concentrations of Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, As, and Pb. Clay minerals found within and marginal to the sulfides contain V, Cr, and also As and Co. The distribution of trace elements in the sulfides and associated clays clearly is related to microenvironments that existed during the formation of successive parts of the sulfide grains. The sulfide-clay relationships determine the extent to which the sulfides break down in oxidation-hydration reactions.

  16. Profiling measurements of metal ion distribution in thin polymer inclusion membranes by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guedioura, B.; Bendjaballah, N.; Alioui, N.

    2014-05-01

    Polymer inclusion membranes (PIMs) composed of a homogeneous mixture of cellulose triacetate matrix, 2-nitro-phenyl-octyl-ether as plasticizer and tri-octyl-phosphine-oxyde as carrier were synthesized by the spin coating method. Synthesized membranes were doped with molybdenum metal ions and then characterized by four experimental techniques: thermo gravimetric and differential analyses, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering (RBS) spectrometry using a 3.2 MeV He+ ion beam. The RBS analysis has established both the elemental composition as well as the Mo+ metal profiling of the studied PIMs. The experimental irradiation conditions were optimized in order to determine the ion fluence thresholds resulting in measurable changes in elemental composition of membranes. Changes in physico-chemical properties of the irradiated PIMs vs He+ ion fluence were observed with the ATR-FTIR analysis. Also, the SEM analysis of PIMs surfaces has revealed a porous texture, while the thermal analysis of annealed PIMs at 105°C has showed no significant changes of mass (∼1%) of the studied samples.

  17. Differential mobility spectrometry of isomeric protonated dipeptides: modifier and field effects on ion mobility and stability.

    PubMed

    Blagojevic, Voislav; Chramow, Alexander; Schneider, Bradley B; Covey, Thomas R; Bohme, Diethard K

    2011-05-01

    The ability to resolve isomeric protonated dipeptides was investigated with the new technique of differential ion mobility mass spectrometry that uses "modifier" molecules to enhance differential mobility. Two pairs of protonated peptides [glycine-alanine (GlyAla) and alanine-glycine (AlaGly), glycine-serine (GlySer) and serine-glycine (SerGly)] and eight different modifiers (water, 2-propanol, 1,5-hexadiene, 2-chloropropane, chlorobenzene, dichloromethane, acetonitrile, and cyclohexane) were used in the initial study. Separation of the protonated peptides was found to be dependent on the mass and proton affinity of the modifier and combinations of functionalities present in the modifier and the analyte ion. Six of the eight modifiers (water, 2-propanol, chlorobenzene, cyclohexane, dichloromethane, and acetonitrile) were able to separate the protonated isomeric peptide pairs, and generally, modifiers with electron-rich groups performed the best. In the presence of some modifiers, a reduction of ion current was observed under the highest field conditions (>115 Td). Dopant-catalyzed isomerization, likely by proton-transport catalysis, and field-induced fragmentation may have contributed to these losses. Two high vapor pressure modifiers, 1,5-hexadiene and 2-chloropropane, significantly influenced ion formation leading to the formation of stable cluster populations that could be observed in the mass spectrometer. Although not a major concern, both fragmentation and influence of modifier evaporation warrant further studies in order to fully understand and possibly eliminate them. PMID:21504141

  18. Time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry: A powerful high throughput screening tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smentkowski, Vincent S.; Ostrowski, Sara G.

    2007-07-01

    Combinatorial materials libraries are becoming more complicated; successful screening of these libraries requires the development of new high throughput screening methodologies. Time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) is a surface analytical technique that is able to detect and image all elements (including hydrogen which is problematic for many other analysis instruments) and molecular fragments, with high mass resolution, during a single measurement. Commercial ToF-SIMS instruments can image 500μm areas by rastering the primary ion beam over the region of interest. In this work, we will show that large area analysis can be performed, in one single measurement, by rastering the sample under the ion beam. We show that an entire 70mm diameter wafer can be imaged in less than 90min using ToF-SIMS stage (macro)rastering techniques. ToF-SIMS data sets contain a wealth of information since an entire high mass resolution mass spectrum is saved at each pixel in an ion image. Multivariate statistical analysis (MVSA) tools are being used in the ToF-SIMS community to assist with data interpretation; we will demonstrate that MVSA tools provide details that were not obtained using manual (univariate) analysis.

  19. Characterization of drug-eluting stent (DES) materials with cluster secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahoney, Christine M.; Patwardhan, Dinesh V.; Ken McDermott, M.

    2006-07-01

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) employing an SF 5+ polyatomic primary ion source was utilized to analyze several materials commonly used in drug-eluting stents (DES). Poly(ethylene- co-vinyl acetate) (PEVA), poly(lactic- co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) and various poly(urethanes) were successfully depth profiled using SF 5+ bombardment. The resultant molecular depth profiles obtained from these polymeric films showed very little degradation in molecular signal as a function of increasing SF 5+ primary ion dose when experiments were performed at low temperatures (signal was maintained for doses up to ˜5 × 10 15 ions/cm 2). Temperature was determined to be an important parameter in both the success of the depth profiles and the mass spectral analysis of the polymers. In addition to the pristine polymer films, paclitaxel (drug released in Taxus™ stent) containing PLGA films were also characterized, where it was confirmed that both drug and polymer signals could be monitored as a function of depth at lower paclitaxel concentrations (10 wt%).

  20. Differential electron-Cu5+ elastic scattering cross sections extracted from electron emission in ion-atom collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, C.; Hagmann, S.; Bhalla, C. P.; Grabbe, S. R.; Cocke, C. L.; Richard, P.

    1999-04-01

    We present a method of deriving energy and angle-dependent electron-ion elastic scattering cross sections from doubly differential cross sections for electron emission in ion-atom collisions. By analyzing the laboratory frame binary encounter electron production cross sections in energetic ion-atom collisions, we derive projectile frame differential cross sections for electrons elastically scattered from highly charged projectile ions in the range between 60° and 180°. The elastic scattering cross sections are observed to deviate strongly from the Rutherford cross sections for electron scattering from bare nuclei. They exhibit strong Ramsauer-Townsend electron diffraction in the angular distribution of elastically scattered electrons, providing evidence for the strong role of screening played in the collision. Experimental data are compared with partial-wave calculations using the Hartree-Fock model.

  1. Ion Scattering Studies of Silicon Surfaces and Interfaces: Structure and Neutralization.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haight, Richard Alan

    This thesis chronicles three experiments which represent the major thrust of studies performed during my tenure as a graduate student at the State University of New York at Albany. Chapter 1 introduces the fundamental considerations of the physics of ion scattering and its applications to studies of surfaces, interfaces and ion neutralization. Basic formula are stated and the two atom model using the Coulomb interaction potential is developed as an approximate prediction of the surface peak intensity. The second chapter discusses a study of the neutralization of 75-180 KeV He ions scattered from clean and Cs covered Si (100); an experiment performed at Bell Laboratories. It is shown that ion neutralization occurs at the surface of the solid; the ion retains no memory of its journey within the bulk. It is also observed that the ion fraction exhibits no dependence upon takeoff angle, a result which differs markedly from the exponential angular dependence observed at lower velocities. Changes in the Si scattered ion fraction upon cesiation of the Si surface are correlated with the work function change observed by other workers. A model is proposed, and developed in mathematical detail, which includes resonant transitions to the motionally broadened He n=2 quantum level and is compared with the experimental data. The third chapter discusses an ion scattering study of the interfacial structure of the Si-SiO(,2) interface. It is shown that the oxide is stoichiometric to within (TURN)1 monolayer of the interface. Measurements to determine the magnitude and direction of the Si atomic displacements at the interface were compared with Monte Carlo computer simulations and show small lateral and larger vertical displacements in two layers. A model, consistent with the data, is proposed and the effects of these displacements are related qualitatively with theory. The fourth chapter describes a thin Si (111) crystal transmission channeling experiment. In this experiment, the use

  2. Structural characterization of phospholipids by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Marto, J A; White, F M; Seldomridge, S; Marshall, A G

    1995-11-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry provides for structural analysis of the principal biological phospholipids: glycerophosphatidylcholine, -ethanolamine, -serine, and -inositol. Both positive and negative molecular or quasimolecular ions are generated in high abundance. Isolated molecular ions may be collisionally activated in the source side of a dual trap mass analyzer, yielding fragments serving to identify the polar head group (positive ion mode) and fatty acid side chains (negative ion mode). Azimuthal quadrupolar excitation following collisionally activated dissociation refocuses productions close to the solenoid axis; subsequent transfer of product ions to the analyzer ion trap allows for high-resolution mass analysis. Cyro-cooling of the sample probe with liquid nitrogen greatly reduces matrix adduction encountered in the negative ion mode. PMID:8633761

  3. A Critical Review of Ion Mobility Spectrometry for the Detection of Explosives and Explosive Related Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, Robert Gordon; Atkinson, David Alan; Eiceman, G. A.; Ewing, G. J.

    2001-05-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry has become the most successful and widely used technology for the detection of trace levels of nitro-organic explosives on handbags and carry on-luggage in airports throughout the US. The low detection limits are provided by the efficient ionization process, namely, atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) reactions in negative polarity. An additional level of confidence in a measurement is imparted by characterization of ions for mobilities in weak electric fields of a drift tube at ambient pressure. Findings from over 30 years of investigations into IMS response to these explosives have been collected and assessed to allow a comprehensive view of the APCI reactions characteristic of nitro-organic explosives. Also, the drift tube conditions needed to obtain particular mobility spectra have been summarized. During the past decade, improvements have occurred in IMS on the understanding of reagent gas chemistries, the influence of temperature on ion stability, and sampling methods. In addition, commercial instruments have been refined to provide fast and reliable measurements for on-site detection of explosives. The gas phase ion chemistry of most explosives is mediated by the fragile C---ONO2 bonds or the acidity of protons. Thus, M- or M·Cl- species are found with only a few explosives and loss of NO2, NO3 and proton abstraction reactions are common and complicating pathways. However, once ions are formed, they appear to have stabilities on time scales equal to or longer than ion drift times from 5–20 ms. As such, peak shapes in IMS are suitable for high selectivity and sensitivity.

  4. Detection of artificially created negative ion clouds with incoherent scatter radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sultan, Peter J.; Mendillo, Michael; Oliver, William L.; Holt, John M.

    1992-01-01

    The physical mechanisms by which negative ions change the shape of the incoherent scatter spectrum, and the way in which shape changes may be used to detect the presence of heavy positive and negative ions in an ambient ionosphere are investigated. In order to detect heavy negative ions, the temperature structure of the ionosphere is fixed to a prevent average measurement, and any changes in spectral shape during the experiment are interpreted as being caused by changes in composition, and not by changes in the temperature ratio Te/Ti. The spatial and temporal development of heavy negative ion plasma clouds created during four active chemical release experiments was observed. Concentrations of 10-40-percent SF6(-) were detected in SPINEX 1, SPINEX 2, and IMS data sets. An average uncertainty of +/-10-percent SF6(-) is present in all three experiments. Concentrations of 30-percent Br(-) were detected in the NICARE 1 release, with uncertainties of +/-4 percent.

  5. Structural characterization of product ions of regulated veterinary drugs by electrospray ionization and quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (part 3) Anthelmintics, thyreostats, and flukicides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    RATIONALE: Previously we have reported a liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method for the identification and quantification of regulated veterinary drugs. The methods used three selected transition ions but most of these ions lacked structural characterization. The work presented here ...

  6. Current fast ion collective Thomson scattering diagnostics at TEXTOR and ASDEX Upgrade, and ITER plans (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Korsholm, S. B.; Bindslev, H.; Meo, F.; Leipold, F.; Michelsen, P. K.; Michelsen, S.; Nielsen, S. K.; Tsakadze, E. L.; Woskov, P.; Westerhof, E.; Oosterbeek, J. W.; Hoekzema, J.; Leuterer, F.; Wagner, D

    2006-10-15

    Fast ion physics will play an important role on ITER where confined alpha particles will affect plasma dynamics and overall confinement. Fast ion collective Thomson scattering (CTS) using gyrotrons has the potential to meet the need for measuring the spatially localized velocity distributions of confined fast ions in ITER. Currently, CTS experiments are performed at TEXTOR using a 150 kW, 0.2 s, 110 GHz gyrotron and a receiver upgraded at the Risoe National Laboratory. The gyrotron and receiver optics have also been upgraded for rapid scanning during a plasma shot. The receiver consists of a nine-mirror quasioptical transmission line including a universal polarizer and a 42-channel data acquisition system, which allows complete coverage of the double sideband scattered spectrum for localized ({approx}10 cm) time resolved (4 ms) measurements of the ion velocity distribution. At ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) a similar 50-channel CTS receiver has been installed. This CTS system will use the 105 GHz frequency of a dual frequency gyrotron. The gyrotron is presently being commissioned. CTS campaigns are scheduled for the summer of 2006 with a probe power of up to 1 MW for 10 s. This report presents the alignment of the quasioptical transmission line, calibration, and gyrotron tuning of the TEXTOR and AUG CTS systems. We will also review the progress on the design of the proposed fast ion CTS diagnostic for ITER. It is envisaged that scattered radiation from two 60 GHz probe beams launched from the low field side midplane port will be received by two arrays of receivers located on the low and high field sides of the plasma. This geometry will allow the ion velocity distribution near perpendicular and near parallel to the magnetic field to be measured in ten or more spatial locations covering the full plasma cross section. The temporal resolution can be significantly better than the required 100 ms.

  7. An effective approach for coupling direct analysis in real time with atmospheric pressure drift tube ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Keelor, Joel D; Dwivedi, Prabha; Fernández, Facundo M

    2014-09-01

    Drift tube ion mobility spectrometry (DTIMS) has evolved as a robust analytical platform routinely used for screening small molecules across a broad suite of chemistries ranging from food and pharmaceuticals to explosives and environmental toxins. Most modern atmospheric pressure IM detectors employ corona discharge, photoionization, radioactive, or electrospray ion sources for efficient ion production. Coupling standalone DTIMS with ambient plasma-based techniques, however, has proven to be an exceptional challenge. Device sensitivity with near-ground ambient plasma sources is hindered by poor ion transmission at the source-instrument interface, where ion repulsion is caused by the strong electric field barrier of the high potential ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) inlet. To overcome this shortfall, we introduce a new ion source design incorporating a repeller point electrode used to shape the electric field profile and enable ion transmission from a direct analysis in real time (DART) plasma ion source. Parameter space characterization studies of the DART DTIMS setup were performed to ascertain the optimal configuration for the source assembly favoring ion transport. Preliminary system capabilities for the direct screening of solid pharmaceuticals are briefly demonstrated. PMID:24903510

  8. An Effective Approach for Coupling Direct Analysis in Real Time with Atmospheric Pressure Drift Tube Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keelor, Joel D.; Dwivedi, Prabha; Fernández, Facundo M.

    2014-09-01

    Drift tube ion mobility spectrometry (DTIMS) has evolved as a robust analytical platform routinely used for screening small molecules across a broad suite of chemistries ranging from food and pharmaceuticals to explosives and environmental toxins. Most modern atmospheric pressure IM detectors employ corona discharge, photoionization, radioactive, or electrospray ion sources for efficient ion production. Coupling standalone DTIMS with ambient plasma-based techniques, however, has proven to be an exceptional challenge. Device sensitivity with near-ground ambient plasma sources is hindered by poor ion transmission at the source-instrument interface, where ion repulsion is caused by the strong electric field barrier of the high potential ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) inlet. To overcome this shortfall, we introduce a new ion source design incorporating a repeller point electrode used to shape the electric field profile and enable ion transmission from a direct analysis in real time (DART) plasma ion source. Parameter space characterization studies of the DART DTIMS setup were performed to ascertain the optimal configuration for the source assembly favoring ion transport. Preliminary system capabilities for the direct screening of solid pharmaceuticals are briefly demonstrated.

  9. Application of alpha spectrometry to the discovery of new elements by heavy-ion-beam bombardment

    SciTech Connect

    Nitschke, J.M.

    1983-05-01

    Starting with polonium in 1898, ..cap alpha..-spectrometry has played a decisive role in the discovery of new, heavy elements. For even-even nuclei, ..cap alpha..-spectra have proved simple to interpret and exhibit systematic trends that allow extrapolation to unknown isotopes. The early discovery of the natural ..cap alpha..-decay series led to the very powerful method of genetically linking the decay of new elements to the well-established ..cap alpha..-emission of daughter and granddaughter nuclei. This technique has been used for all recent discoveries of new elements including Z = 109. Up to mendelevium (Z = 101), thin samples suitable for ..cap alpha..-spectrometry were prepared by chemical methods. With the advent of heavy-ion accelerators new sample preparation methods emerged. These were based on the large momentum transfer associated with heavy-ion reactions, which produced energetic target recoils that, when ejected from the target, could be thermalized in He gas. Subsequent electrical deposition or a He-jet technique yielded samples that were not only thin enough for ..cap alpha..-spectroscopy, but also for ..cap alpha..- and ..beta..-recoil experiments. Many variations of these methods have been developed and are discussed. For the synthesis of element 106 an aerosol-based recoil transport technique was devised. In the most recent experiments, ..cap alpha..-spectrometry has been coupled with the magnetic analysis of the recoils. The time from production to analysis of an isotope has thereby been reduced to 10/sup -6/ s; while it was 10/sup -1/ to 10/sup 0/ s for He-jets and 10/sup 1/ to 10/sup 3/ s for rapid chemical separations. Experiments are now in progress to synthesize super heavy elements (SHE) and to analyze them with these latest techniques. Again, ..cap alpha..-spectrometry will play a major role since the expected signature for the decay of a SHE is a sequence of ..cap alpha..-decays followed by spontaneous fission.

  10. Quantitative confirmation of dimetridazole and ipronidazole in swine feed by capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with multiple ion detection.

    PubMed

    Morris, W J; Nandrea, G J; Roybal, J E; Munns, R K; Shimoda, W; Skinner, H R

    1987-01-01

    Extracts from 4 types of swine feed containing 0.11 ppm each of dimetridazole (DMZ) and ipronidazole (IPR) were analyzed by capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) using multiple ion detection (MID) techniques. We demonstrate in this paper that the quantitative results obtained by capillary GC/MS with MID are comparable for both compounds to results obtained by liquid chromatography and have a lower coefficient of variation for DMZ. Moreover, consistency in the ion ratios (5 ions in DMZ and 6 ions in IPR) permits identification of these compounds by electron ionization MS. PMID:3624166

  11. Observed Dependence of Stimulated Raman Scattering on Ion-Acoustic Damping in Hohlraum Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, J.C.; Cobble, J.A.; Failor, B.H.; DuBois, D.F.; Montgomery, D.S.; Rose, H.A.; Vu, H.X.; Wilde, B.H.; Wilke, M.D.; Chrien, R.E. ||

    1996-09-01

    The reflectivity of a laser due to stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) from long scale-length hohlraum plasmas is shown to depend on the damping of ion-acoustic waves. This dependence is observed in plasmas with either low or high ionization states. Since the SRS process itself is unrelated to acoustic waves, these data are evidence of a nonlinear coupling of SRS to other parametric processes involving daughter acoustic waves. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  12. Disappearance of Mott Oscillations in Sub-barrier Elastic Scattering of Identical Nuclei and Atomic Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, M. S.; Canto, L. F.; Donangelo, R.; Mittig, W.

    2016-03-01

    The scattering of identical nuclei at low energies exhibits conspicuous Mott oscillations which can be used to investigate the presence of components in the predominantly Coulomb interaction arising from several physical effects. It is found that at a certain critical value of the Sommerfeld parameter the Mott oscillations disappear and the cross section becomes quite flat. We call this effect Transverse Isotropy (TI). The critical value of the Sommerfeld parameter at which TI sets in is found to be {ηc = √{3s + 2}}, where s is the spin of the nuclei participating in the scattering. No TI is found in the Mott scattering of identical Fermionic nuclei. The critical center of mass energy corresponding to {η_c} is found to be {E_c = 0.40} MeV for {α + α} (s = 0), 1.2 MeV for {6}Li + {6}LI (s = 1) and 7.1 MeV for {^{10}}B + {^{10}}B (s = 3). We further found that the inclusion of the nuclear interaction induces a significant modification in the TI. We suggest measurements at these sub-barrier energies for the purpose of extracting useful information about the nuclear interaction between light heavy ions. We also suggest extending the study of the TI to the scattering of identical atomic ions.

  13. An ion mobility-mass spectrometry investigation of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenauer, Matthew R.; Leary, Julie A.

    2009-10-01

    In the present article we describe the gas-phase dissociation behavior of the dimeric form of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) using quadrupole-traveling wave ion mobility spectrometry-time of flight mass spectrometry (q-TWIMS-TOF MS) (Waters Synapt(TM)). Through investigation of the 9+ charge state of the dimer, we were able to monitor dissociation product ion (monomer) formation as a function of activation energy. Using ion mobility, we were able to observe precursor ion structural changes occurring throughout the activation process. Arrival time distributions (ATDs) for the 5+ monomeric MCP-1 product ions, derived from the gas-phase dissociation of the 9+ dimer, were then compared with ATDs obtained for the 5+ MCP-1 monomer isolated directly from solution. The results show that the dissociated monomer is as compact as the monomer arising from solution, regardless of the trap collision energy (CE) used in the dissociation. The solution-derived monomer, when collisionally activated, also resists significant unfolding within measure. Finally, we compared the collisional activation data for the MCP-1 dimer with an MCP-1 dimer non-covalently bound to a single molecule of the semi-synthetic glycosaminoglycan (GAG) analog Arixtra(TM); the latter a therapeutic anti-thrombin III-activating pentasaccharide. We observed that while dimeric MCP-1 dissociated at relatively low trap CEs, the Arixtra-bound dimer required much higher energies, which also induced covalent bond cleavage in the bound Arixtra molecule. Both the free and Arixtra-bound dimers became less compact and exhibited longer arrival times with increasing trap CEs, albeit the Arixtra-bound complex at slightly higher energies. That both dimers shifted to longer arrival times with increasing activation energy, while the dissociated MCP-1 monomers remained compact, suggests that the longer arrival times of the Arixtra-free and Arixtra-bound dimers may represent a partial breach of non

  14. Characterization of the Cathode Electrolyte Interface in Lithium Ion Batteries by Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yao-Min; G Nicolau, Bruno; Esbenshade, Jennifer L; Gewirth, Andrew A

    2016-07-19

    The solid electrolyte interface (SEI) formed via electrolyte decomposition on the anode of lithium ion batteries is largely responsible for the stable cycling of conventional lithium ion batteries. Similarly, there is a lesser-known analogous layer on the cathode side of a lithium ion battery, termed the cathode electrolyte interface (CEI), whose composition and role are debated. To confirm the existence and composition of the CEI, desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) is applied to study common lithium ion battery cathodes. We observe CEI formation on the LiMn2O4 cathode material after cycling between 3.5 and 4.5 V vs Li/Li(+) in electrolyte solution containing 1 M LiPF6 or LiClO4 in 1:1 (v/v) ethylene carbonate (EC) and dimethyl carbonate (DMC). Intact poly(ethylene glycol) dimethyl ether is identified as the electrolyte degradation product on the cathode surface by the high mass-resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometer. When EC is paired with ethyl methyl carbonate (EMC), poly(ethylene glycol) dimethyl ether, poly(ethylene glycol) ethyl methyl ether, and poly(ethylene glycol) are found on the surface simultaneously. The presence of ethoxy and methoxy end groups indicates both methoxide and ethoxide are produced and involved in the process of oligomerization. Au surfaces cycled under different electrochemical windows as model systems for Li-ion battery anodes are also examined. Interestingly, the identical oligomeric species to those found in the CEI are found on Au surfaces after running five cycles between 2.0 and 0.1 V vs Li/Li(+) in half-cells. These results show that DESI-MS provides intact molecular information on battery electrodes, enabling deeper understanding of the SEI or CEI composition. PMID:27346184

  15. Towards analytically useful two-dimensional Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    van Agthoven, Maria A; Delsuc, Marc-André; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey; Rolando, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry (MS) achieves high resolution and mass accuracy, allowing the identification of the raw chemical formulae of ions in complex samples. Using ion isolation and fragmentation (MS/MS), we can obtain more structural information, but MS/MS is time- and sample-consuming because each ion must be isolated before fragmentation. In 1987, Pfändler et al. proposed an experiment for 2D FT-ICR MS in order to fragment ions without isolating them and to visualize the fragmentations of complex samples in a single 2D mass spectrum, like 2D NMR spectroscopy. Because of limitations of electronics and computers, few studies have been conducted with this technique. The improvement of modern computers and the use of digital electronics for FT-ICR hardware now make it possible to acquire 2D mass spectra over a broad mass range. The original experiments used in-cell collision-induced dissociation, which caused a loss of resolution. Gas-free fragmentation modes such as infrared multiphoton dissociation and electron capture dissociation allow one to measure high-resolution 2D mass spectra. Consequently, there is renewed interest to develop 2D FT-ICR MS into an efficient analytical method. Improvements introduced in 2D NMR spectroscopy can also be transposed to 2D FT-ICR MS. We describe the history of 2D FT-ICR MS, introduce recent improvements, and present analytical applications to map the fragmentation of peptides. Finally, we provide a glossary which defines a few keywords for the 2D FT-ICR MS field. PMID:23076397

  16. Microfabricated ion trap mass spectrometry for characterization of organics and potential biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, Daniel

    Mass spectrometry is a powerful analytical technique with a strong history in planetary exploration, and is the method of choice for detection and identification of organic and biological molecules. MS instrumentation can also be combined with techniques such as gas chromatography, liquid chromatography, or chiral separation, which are particularly important for analysis of complex mixtures or possible homochirality. Ion traps have several inherent advantages, including speed of analysis (important for GC-MS), MS/MS capabilities (important to identification of unknown compounds), excellent sensitivity, and ease of coupling with ambient ionization techniques that are under development for biomolecule detection. We report on progress in using microfabrication techniques to produce radiofrequency quadrupole ion traps that are much smaller, lighter, and lower power than existing instruments. We produce ion traps using an assembly of two ceramic plates, the facing surfaces of which are lithographically patterned with electrodes. This approach allows great flexibility in the trap geometry, and we have demonstrated working mass spectrometers with quadrupole, linear, and toroidal trapping fields. The approach also allows correction of higher-order terms in the electric field. With this system, mass resolution of up to 1300 has been demonstrated, which is adequate for identification of a wide range of potential biomarkers. Capabilities such as tandem analysis have also been demonstrated. Of particular interest is an ion trap that contains both quadrupole and toroidal trapping regions simultaneously and coaxially. Ions can be trapped as a large reservoir in the toroidal region and introduced in small batches to the quadrupole region for mass analysis. This capability is particularly valuable where the sample of interest is very small, such as microfossil with trace organics, and where the organic inventory is both complex and unknown. Development and results of this device

  17. Ram ion scattering caused by Space Shuttle v x B induced differential charging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, I.; Davis, V. A.

    1987-01-01

    Observations of secondary, high-inclination ions streams have been reported in the literature. The authors of these previous papers attributed the source of the secondary ions to a disturbed region in the plasma about 10 m from the Space Shuttle Orbiter. A new theory has been developed which shows how v x B induced differential charging on the plasma diagnostics package (PDP) can scatter the ram ion flux. Some of these ions are reflected back to the PDP and may be the sorce of the observed ion distributions. The effect is unique to large spacecraft; it occurs only when the magnitude of the induced v x B potentials are much larger than the electron thermal energy and of the order of the ion ram energy. That the ion streams observed at large angles must have been reflected from the PDP surface is demonstrated with three-dimensional sheath and particle trajectory calculations using the low earth orbit version of the NASA Charging Analyzer Program (NASCAP/LEO).

  18. Cluster secondary ion mass spectrometry and the temperature dependence of molecular depth profiles.

    PubMed

    Mao, Dan; Wucher, Andreas; Brenes, Daniel A; Lu, Caiyan; Winograd, Nicholas

    2012-05-01

    The quality of molecular depth profiles created by erosion of organic materials by cluster ion beams exhibits a strong dependence upon temperature. To elucidate the fundamental nature of this dependence, we employ the Irganox 3114/1010 organic delta-layer reference material as a model system. This delta-layer system is interrogated using a 40 keV C(60)(+) primary ion beam. Parameters associated with the depth profile such as depth resolution, uniformity of sputtering yield, and topography are evaluated between 90 and 300 K using a unique wedge-crater beveling strategy that allows these parameters to be determined as a function of erosion depth from atomic force microscope (AFM) measurements. The results show that the erosion rate calibration performed using the known Δ-layer depth in connection with the fluence needed to reach the peak of the corresponding secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) signal response is misleading. Moreover, we show that the degradation of depth resolution is linked to a decrease of the average erosion rate and the buildup of surface topography in a thermally activated manner. This underlying process starts to influence the depth profile above a threshold temperature between 210 and 250 K for the system studied here. Below that threshold, the process is inhibited and steady-state conditions are reached with constant erosion rate, depth resolution, and molecular secondary ion signals from both the matrix and the Δ-layers. In particular, the results indicate that further reduction of the temperature below 90 K does not lead to further improvement of the depth profile. Above the threshold, the process becomes stronger at higher temperature, leading to an immediate decrease of the molecular secondary ion signals. This signal decay is most pronounced for the highest m/z ions but is less for the smaller m/z ions, indicating a shift toward small fragments by accumulation of chemical damage. The erosion rate decay and surface roughness buildup

  19. Comparison of reactant and analyte ions for ⁶³Nickel, corona discharge, and secondary electrospray ionization sources with ion mobility-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Crawford, C L; Hill, H H

    2013-03-30

    (63)Nickel radioactive ionization ((63)Ni) is the most common and widely used ion source for ion mobility spectrometry (IMS). Regulatory, financial, and operational concerns with this source have promoted recent development of non-radioactive sources, such as corona discharge ionization (CD), for stand-alone IMS systems. However, there has been no comparison of the negative ion species produced by all three sources in the literature. This study compares the negative reactant and analyte ions produced by three sources on an ion mobility-mass spectrometer: conventional (63)Ni, CD, and secondary electrospray ionization (SESI). Results showed that (63)Ni and SESI produced the same reactant ion species while CD produced only the nitrate monomer and dimer ions. The analyte ions produced by each ion source were the same except for the CD source which produced a different ion species for the explosive RDX than either the (63)Ni or SESI source. Accurate and reproducible reduced mobility (K0) values, including several values reported here for the first time, were found for each explosive with each ion source. Overall, the SESI source most closely reproduced the reactant ion species and analyte ion species profiles for (63)Ni. This source may serve as a non-radioactive, robust, and flexible alternative for (63)Ni. PMID:23598216

  20. Systematic Temperature Effects in the Argon Cluster Ion Sputter Depth Profiling of Organic Materials Using Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seah, Martin P.; Havelund, Rasmus; Gilmore, Ian S.

    2016-08-01

    A study is presented of the effects of sample temperature on the sputter depth profiling of two organic materials, NPB ( N,N'-Di(1-naphthyl)- N,N'-diphenyl-(1,1'-biphenyl)-4,4'-diamine) and Irganox 1010, using a 5 keV Ar2000 + cluster ion beam and analysis by secondary ion mass spectrometry. It is shown that at low temperatures, the yields increase slowly with temperature in accordance with the Universal Sputtering Yield equation where the energy term is now modified by Trouton's rule. This occurs up to a transition temperature, T T, which is, in turn, approximately 0.8 T M, where T M is the sample melting temperature in Kelvin. For NPB and Irganox 1010, these transition temperatures are close to 15 °C and 0 °C, respectively. Above this temperature, the rate of increase of the sputtering yield rises by an order of magnitude. During sputtering, the depth resolution also changes with temperature with a very small change occurring below T T. At higher temperatures, the depth resolution improves but then rapidly degrades, possibly as a result first of local crater surface diffusion and then of bulk inter-diffusion. The secondary ion spectra also change with temperature with the intensities of the molecular entities increasing least. This agrees with a model in which the molecular entities arise near the crater rim. It is recommended that for consistent results, measurements for organic materials are always made at temperatures significantly below T T or 0.8 T M, and this is generally below room temperature.

  1. Systematic Temperature Effects in the Argon Cluster Ion Sputter Depth Profiling of Organic Materials Using Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Seah, Martin P; Havelund, Rasmus; Gilmore, Ian S

    2016-08-01

    A study is presented of the effects of sample temperature on the sputter depth profiling of two organic materials, NPB (N,N'-Di(1-naphthyl)-N,N'-diphenyl-(1,1'-biphenyl)-4,4'-diamine) and Irganox 1010, using a 5 keV Ar2000 (+) cluster ion beam and analysis by secondary ion mass spectrometry. It is shown that at low temperatures, the yields increase slowly with temperature in accordance with the Universal Sputtering Yield equation where the energy term is now modified by Trouton's rule. This occurs up to a transition temperature, T T, which is, in turn, approximately 0.8T M, where T M is the sample melting temperature in Kelvin. For NPB and Irganox 1010, these transition temperatures are close to 15 °C and 0 °C, respectively. Above this temperature, the rate of increase of the sputtering yield rises by an order of magnitude. During sputtering, the depth resolution also changes with temperature with a very small change occurring below T T. At higher temperatures, the depth resolution improves but then rapidly degrades, possibly as a result first of local crater surface diffusion and then of bulk inter-diffusion. The secondary ion spectra also change with temperature with the intensities of the molecular entities increasing least. This agrees with a model in which the molecular entities arise near the crater rim. It is recommended that for consistent results, measurements for organic materials are always made at temperatures significantly below T T or 0.8 T M, and this is generally below room temperature. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27106601

  2. Systematic Temperature Effects in the Argon Cluster Ion Sputter Depth Profiling of Organic Materials Using Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seah, Martin P.; Havelund, Rasmus; Gilmore, Ian S.

    2016-04-01

    A study is presented of the effects of sample temperature on the sputter depth profiling of two organic materials, NPB (N,N'-Di(1-naphthyl)-N,N'-diphenyl-(1,1'-biphenyl)-4,4'-diamine) and Irganox 1010, using a 5 keV Ar2000 + cluster ion beam and analysis by secondary ion mass spectrometry. It is shown that at low temperatures, the yields increase slowly with temperature in accordance with the Universal Sputtering Yield equation where the energy term is now modified by Trouton's rule. This occurs up to a transition temperature, T T, which is, in turn, approximately 0.8T M, where T M is the sample melting temperature in Kelvin. For NPB and Irganox 1010, these transition temperatures are close to 15 °C and 0 °C, respectively. Above this temperature, the rate of increase of the sputtering yield rises by an order of magnitude. During sputtering, the depth resolution also changes with temperature with a very small change occurring below T T. At higher temperatures, the depth resolution improves but then rapidly degrades, possibly as a result first of local crater surface diffusion and then of bulk inter-diffusion. The secondary ion spectra also change with temperature with the intensities of the molecular entities increasing least. This agrees with a model in which the molecular entities arise near the crater rim. It is recommended that for consistent results, measurements for organic materials are always made at temperatures significantly below T T or 0.8 T M, and this is generally below room temperature.

  3. The Effect of Grain Orientation on Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) Analysis of Rutile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, R.; Clark, C.; Reddy, S. M.

    2011-12-01

    In situ high precision uranium-lead (U-Pb) analysis of rutile by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) reveals that instrumental bias for isotope ratios and count rates vary due to crystal orientation. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) techniques have been combined with SIMS data to show consistent and systematic crystal orientation effects, whilst confirming that all analyses are on single crystals and that there is random variation from grain to grain. The result of the orientation effect is to produce an extremely large calibration slope, more than an order of magnitude larger than for other minerals, which can result in highly inaccurate and spurious U-Pb ages from rutile if not taken into account. We present a large standard dataset to highlight this effect and show that by collecting good standard data, from grains in multiple orientations, these effects can be negated and accurate U-Pb SIMS data for rutile can be obtained using a standard calibration slope of ln(Pb/U) vs ln(UO2/UO) = 1.12. Examples from the Anantangiri region, Eastern Ghats, India are used to show the magnitude of these effects on the calibration of unknowns. Evidence is presented to show that the cause of these orientation effects is most likely a combination of channelling of primary ions into the crystal and preferential emission of secondary ions along preferred lattice directions.

  4. Sizing Large Proteins and Protein Complexes by Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry and Ion Mobility

    PubMed Central

    Kaddis, Catherine S.; Lomeli, Shirley H.; Yin, Sheng; Berhane, Beniam; Apostol, Marcin I.; Kickhoefer, Valerie A.; Rome, Leonard H.; Loo, Joseph A.

    2009-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) and ion mobility with electrospray ionization (ESI) have the capability to measure and detect large noncovalent protein-ligand and protein-protein complexes. Using an ion mobility method termed GEMMA (Gas-Phase Electrophoretic Mobility Molecular Analysis), protein particles representing a range of sizes can be separated by their electrophoretic mobility in air. Highly charged particles produced from a protein complex solution using electrospray can be manipulated to produce singly charged ions which can be separated and quantified by their electrophoretic mobility. Results from ESI-GEMMA analysis from our laboratory and others were compared to other experimental and theoretically determined parameters, such as molecular mass and cryoelectron microscopy and x-ray crystal structure dimensions. There is a strong correlation between the electrophoretic mobility diameter determined from GEMMA analysis and the molecular mass for protein complexes up to 12 MDa, including the 93 kDa enolase dimer, the 480 kDa ferritin 24-mer complex, the 4.6 MDa cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV), and the 9 MDa MVP-vault assembly. ESI-GEMMA is used to differentiate a number of similarly sized vault complexes that are composed of different N-terminal protein tags on the MVP subunit. The average effective density of the proteins and protein complexes studied was 0.6 g/cm3. Moreover, there is evidence that proteins and protein complexes collapse or become more compact in the gas phase in the absence of water. PMID:17434746

  5. Determination of some metal ions in various meat and baby food samples by atomic spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Daşbaşı, Teslima; Saçmacı, Şerife; Ülgen, Ahmet; Kartal, Şenol

    2016-04-15

    In this paper, we report a simple and rapid solid phase extraction system for the separation/preconcentration and determination of Cd(II), Co(II), Cu(II), Fe(III), Cr(III), Pb(II), and Zn(II) ions by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). This method is based upon the retention of metal ions on a column packed with poly[N-(3-methyl-1H-indole-1-yl)]-2-methacrylamide-co-2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propane sulphonic acid-co divinylbenzene] (MMAD) resin as a solid-phase extraction (SPE) sorbent at pH 8. At the optimized conditions, the limits of detection (3 s/b) between 0.12 and 1.6 μg L(-1), preconcentration factor of 100, and the relative standard deviation of ⩽1.8% were achieved (n=10). The accuracy of the method was verified by analyzing certified reference materials (CRMs) and performing recovery experiments. The developed method was successfully applied to the various natural water, meat products and baby food samples. The recoveries of analyte ions were found in added real samples and CRMs from 95% to 102%. PMID:26616930

  6. Gas chromatography/ion mobility spectrometry as a hyphenated technique for improved explosives detection and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mercado, AL; Marsden, Paul

    1995-01-01

    Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) is currently being successfully applied to the problem of on-line trace detection of plastic and other explosives in airports and other facilities. The methods of sample retrieval primarily consist of batch sampling for particulate residue on a filter card for introduction into the IMS. The sample is desorbed into the IMS using air as the carrier and negative ions of the explosives are detected, some as an adduct with a reagent ion such as Cl(-). Based on studies and tests conducted by different airport authorities, this method seems to work well for low vapor pressure explosives such as RDX and PETN, as well as TNT that are highly adsorptive and can be found in nanogram quantities on contaminated surfaces. Recently, the changing terrorist threat and the adoption of new marking agents for plastic explosives has meant that the sample introduction and analysis capabilities of the IMS must be enhanced in order to keep up with other detector developments. The IMS has sufficient analytical resolution for a few threat compounds but the IMS Plasmogram becomes increasingly more difficult to interpret when the sample mixture gets more complex.

  7. Electron flood gun damage effects in 3D secondary ion mass spectrometry imaging of organics.

    PubMed

    Havelund, Rasmus; Seah, Martin P; Shard, Alexander G; Gilmore, Ian S

    2014-09-01

    Electron flood guns used for charge compensation in secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) cause chemical degradation. In this study, the effect of electron flood gun damage on argon cluster depth profiling is evaluated for poly(vinylcarbazole), 1,4-bis((1-naphthylphenyl)amino)biphenyl and Irganox 3114. Thin films of these three materials are irradiated with a range of doses from a focused beam of 20 eV electrons used for charge neutralization. SIMS chemical images of the irradiated surfaces show an ellipsoidal damaged area, approximately 3 mm in length, created by the electron beam. In depth profiles obtained with 5 keV Ar(2000)(+) sputtering from the vicinity of the damaged area, the characteristic ion signal intensity rises from a low level to a steady state. For the damaged thin films, the ion dose required to sputter through the thin film to the substrate is higher than for undamaged areas. It is shown that a damaged layer is formed and this has a sputtering yield that is reduced by up to an order of magnitude and that the thickness of the damaged layer, which increases with the electron dose, can be as much as 20 nm for Irganox 3114. The study emphasizes the importance of minimizing the neutralizing electron dose prior to the analysis. PMID:24912434

  8. [Determination of alditols in foods by ion chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hongbin; Xiong, Zhiyu; Li, Ping; Li, Jing; Sun, Li; Zhao, Yunxia

    2013-11-01

    A method for the determination of alditols in foods by ion chromatography-mass spectrometry (IC-MS) has been developed. The samples were extracted and cleaned up with the solid phase extraction (SPE). Then, the ion chromatographic separation was performed on a CarboPar MA1 column. The alditols were determined by MS with the selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode and quantified by the external standard method. The calibration curves showed good linearity in the certain ranges with the correlation coefficients (R2) greater than 0.99. The limits of quantification (S/N = 10) of erythritol, xylitol, D-sorbitol, D-mannitol, lactitol, maltitol were 0.98, 1.99, 2.24, 5.92, 13.56, 13.21 mg/kg and the limits of detection (S/N = 3) were 0.28, 0.59, 0.71, 1.74, 4.14, 4.03 mg/kg, respectively. The spiked recoveries of the alditols in the foods at different levels were in the range of 82.5%-108.0% with the relative standard deviations (RSDs) of 1.5%-7.6%. The sensitivity, accuracy and precision of the method meet the technical standards of the determination. The method can be applied to the determination of alditols in foods. PMID:24558846

  9. Chemical Imaging of Lipid Domains by High-Resolution Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kraft, M L; Weber, P K; Longo, M L; Hutcheon, I D; Boxer, S G

    2005-09-30

    Lipid microdomains within supported lipid bilayers composed of binary phosphocholine mixtures were chemically imaged by high-resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry performed with the NanoSIMS 50 (Cameca Instruments). This instrument images the sample components based on the elemental or isotopic composition of their atomic and small molecular secondary ions. Up to five different secondary ions can be simultaneously detected, and a lateral resolution of 50 nm can be achieved with high sensitivity at high mass resolution. In our experiments, the NanoSIMS 50 extensively fragmented the supported membrane, therefore an isotopic labeling strategy was used to encode the identities of the lipid components. Supported lipid membranes that contained distinct lipid microdomains were freeze-dried to preserve their lateral organization and analyzed with the NanoSIMS 50. Lipid microdomains as small as 100 nm in diameter were successfully imaged, and this was validated by comparison to AFM images taken at the same region prior to chemical imaging. Quantitative information on the lipid distribution within the domain was also determined by calibrating against supported membranes of known composition. We believe this will be a valuable approach for analyzing the composition of complex membrane domains with high spatial resolution.

  10. Spectroscopic characterization of a microplasma used as ionization source for ion mobility spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michels, Antje; Tombrink, Sven; Vautz, Wolfgang; Miclea, Manuela; Franzke, Joachim

    2007-11-01

    We report a miniaturized excitation source for soft ionization of molecules based on a dielectric barrier discharge. An atmospheric plasma is established at the end of a 500 μm diameter capillary using He as buffer gas. The plasma jet which comes out of the capillary is dependent on the gas flow rate. The mechanism of the production of N 2+ outside the capillary, which is relevant for the protonation of molecules and sustains the production of primary ions, is investigated by spatially resolved spectroscopic measurements throughout the plasma. Possible application of such miniaturized plasmas is the ionization of gaseous compounds under atmospheric pressure as an alternative to traditional APCI (atmospheric pressure chemical ionization). The miniaturized plasma was applied as ionization source for ion mobility spectrometry where the common sources are radioactive, thus limiting the place of installation. First measurements of gaseous compounds with such a plasma ion mobility spectrometer with promising results showed detection limits comparable or even better than those obtained using common radioactive ionization sources.

  11. Hydrophobic derivatization of N-linked glycans for increased ion abundance in electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Walker, S Hunter; Lilley, Laura M; Enamorado, Monica F; Comins, Daniel L; Muddiman, David C

    2011-08-01

    A library of neutral, hydrophobic reagents was synthesized for use as derivatizing agents in order to increase the ion abundance of N-linked glycans in electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI MS). The glycans are derivatized via hydrazone formation and are shown to increase the ion abundance of a glycan standard more than 4-fold. Additionally, the data show that the systematic addition of hydrophobic surface area to the reagent increases the glycan ion abundance, a property that can be further exploited in the analysis of glycans. The results of this study will direct the future synthesis of hydrophobic reagents for glycan analysis using the correlation between hydrophobicity and theoretical non-polar surface area calculation to facilitate the development of an optimum tag for glycan derivatization. The compatibility and advantages of this method are demonstrated by cleaving and derivatizing N-linked glycans from human plasma proteins. The ESI-MS signal for the tagged glycans are shown to be significantly more abundant, and the detection of negatively charged sialylated glycans is enhanced. PMID:21953184

  12. Determination of migration of ion-implanted Ar and Zn in silica by backscattering spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szilágyi, E.; Bányász, I.; Kótai, E.; Németh, A.; Major, C.; Fried, M.; Battistig, G.

    2015-03-01

    It is well known that the refractive indices of lots of materials can be modified by ion implantation, which is important for waveguide fabrication. In this work the effect of Ar and Zn ion implantation on silica layers was investigated by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) and Spectroscopic Ellipsometry (SE). Silica layers produced by chemical vapour deposition technique on single crystal silicon wafers were implanted by Ar and Zn ions with a fluence of 1-2 ×1016 Ar/cm2 and 2.5 ×1016 Zn/cm2, respectively. The refractive indices of the implanted silica layers before and after annealing at 300°C and 600°C were determined by SE. The migration of the implanted element was studied by real-time RBS up to 500°C. It was found that the implanted Ar escapes from the sample at 300°C. Although the refractive indices of the Ar-implanted silica layers were increased compared to the as-grown samples, after the annealing this increase in the refractive indices vanished. In case of the Zn-implanted silica layer both the distribution of the Zn and the change in the refractive indices were found to be stable. Zn implantation seems to be an ideal choice for producing waveguides.

  13. Peak deconvolution in high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) to characterize macromolecular conformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Errol W.; Sellon, Rachel E.; Williams, Evan R.

    2007-01-01

    Protonated poly(ethylene glycol), produced by electrospray ionization (ESI), with molecular weights ranging from 0.3 to 5 kDa and charge states from 1+ to 7+ were characterized using high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS). Results for all but some of the 3+ and 4+ charge states are consistent with a single gas-phase conformer or family of unresolved conformers for each of these charge states. The FAIMS compensation voltage scans resulted in peaks that could be accurately fit with a single Gaussian for each peak. The peak widths increase linearly with compensation voltage for maximum ion transmission but do not depend on m/z or molecular weight. Fitting parameters obtained from the poly(ethylene glycol) data were used to analyze conformations of oxidized and reduced lysozyme formed from different solutions. For oxidized lysozyme formed from a buffered aqueous solution, a single conformer (or group of unresolved conformers) was observed for the 7+ and 8+ charge states. Two conformers were observed for the 9+ and 10+ charge states formed from more denaturing solutions. Data for the fully reduced form indicate the existence of up to three different conformers for each charge state produced directly by ESI and a general progression from a more extended to a more folded structure with decreasing charge state. These results are consistent with those obtained previously by proton-transfer reactivity and drift tube ion mobility experiments, although more conformers were identified for the fully reduced form of lysozyme using FAIMS.

  14. Hydrophobic Derivatization of N-linked Glycans for Increased Ion Abundance in Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, S. Hunter; Lilley, Laura M.; Enamorado, Monica F.; Comins, Daniel L.; Muddiman, David C.

    2011-08-01

    A library of neutral, hydrophobic reagents was synthesized for use as derivatizing agents in order to increase the ion abundance of N-linked glycans in electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI MS). The glycans are derivatized via hydrazone formation and are shown to increase the ion abundance of a glycan standard more than 4-fold. Additionally, the data show that the systematic addition of hydrophobic surface area to the reagent increases the glycan ion abundance, a property that can be further exploited in the analysis of glycans. The results of this study will direct the future synthesis of hydrophobic reagents for glycan analysis using the correlation between hydrophobicity and theoretical non-polar surface area calculation to facilitate the development of an optimum tag for glycan derivatization. The compatibility and advantages of this method are demonstrated by cleaving and derivatizing N-linked glycans from human plasma proteins. The ESI-MS signal for the tagged glycans are shown to be significantly more abundant, and the detection of negatively charged sialylated glycans is enhanced.

  15. Distance-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry with IonCCD Detection and an Inductively Coupled Plasma Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennis, Elise A.; Ray, Steven J.; Enke, Christie G.; Gundlach-Graham, Alexander W.; Barinaga, Charles J.; Koppenaal, David W.; Hieftje, Gary M.

    2016-03-01

    Distance-of-flight mass spectrometry (DOFMS) is demonstrated for the first time with a commercially available ion detector—the IonCCD camera. Because DOFMS is a velocity-based MS technique that provides spatially dispersive, simultaneous mass spectrometry, a position-sensitive ion detector is needed for mass-spectral collection. The IonCCD camera is a 5.1-cm long, 1-D array that is capable of simultaneous, multichannel ion detection along a focal plane, which makes it an attractive option for DOFMS. In the current study, the IonCCD camera is evaluated for DOFMS with an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) ionization source over a relatively short field-free mass-separation distance of 25.3-30.4 cm. The combination of ICP-DOFMS and the IonCCD detector results in a mass-spectral resolving power (FWHM) of approximately 900 and isotope-ratio precision equivalent to or slightly better than current ICP-TOFMS systems. The measured isotope-ratio precision in % relative standard deviation (%RSD) was ≥0.008%RSD for nonconsecutive isotopes at 10-ppm concentration (near the ion-signal saturation point) and ≥0.02%RSD for all isotopes at 1-ppm. Results of DOFMS with the IonCCD camera are also compared with those of two previously characterized detection setups.

  16. Distance-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry with IonCCD Detection and an Inductively Coupled Plasma Source.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Elise A; Ray, Steven J; Enke, Christie G; Gundlach-Graham, Alexander W; Barinaga, Charles J; Koppenaal, David W; Hieftje, Gary M

    2016-03-01

    Distance-of-flight mass spectrometry (DOFMS) is demonstrated for the first time with a commercially available ion detector-the IonCCD camera. Because DOFMS is a velocity-based MS technique that provides spatially dispersive, simultaneous mass spectrometry, a position-sensitive ion detector is needed for mass-spectral collection. The IonCCD camera is a 5.1-cm long, 1-D array that is capable of simultaneous, multichannel ion detection along a focal plane, which makes it an attractive option for DOFMS. In the current study, the IonCCD camera is evaluated for DOFMS with an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) ionization source over a relatively short field-free mass-separation distance of 25.3-30.4 cm. The combination of ICP-DOFMS and the IonCCD detector results in a mass-spectral resolving power (FWHM) of approximately 900 and isotope-ratio precision equivalent to or slightly better than current ICP-TOFMS systems. The measured isotope-ratio precision in % relative standard deviation (%RSD) was ≥0.008%RSD for nonconsecutive isotopes at 10-ppm concentration (near the ion-signal saturation point) and ≥0.02%RSD for all isotopes at 1-ppm. Results of DOFMS with the IonCCD camera are also compared with those of two previously characterized detection setups. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26552388

  17. Identification of ion series using ion mobility mass spectrometry: the example of alkyl-benzothiophene and alkyl-dibenzothiophene ions in diesel fuels.

    PubMed

    Maire, Florian; Neeson, Kieran; Denny, Richard; McCullagh, Michael; Lange, Catherine; Afonso, Carlos; Giusti, Pierre

    2013-06-01

    Ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IMMS) has been presented as a promising method for analysis of highly complex mixtures. This coupling adds an additional postionization separation dimension to MS. The IM separation of ions is obtained in the millisecond time scale and can be particularly helpful when chromatographic separation is not possible. For obtaining relevant information about the samples, data processing is usually the bottleneck because of the high amount of data generated with IMMS. In the current work, we present a new workflow using specific comparison software dedicated to IMMS data, which allows one to compare m/z-drift time plots to highlight differences between samples. Two diesel fuels have been compared, i.e., the feed and the product of hydrodesulfurization (HDS) process, and this approach allowed us to clearly highlight the variation of intensity of several ions distributed along the plots of both samples. Accurate mass measurements and post IM collision induced dissociation experiments allowed us to identify two series of polycyclic aromatic sulfur-containing heterocycle (PASH) compounds among the matrix ions. PMID:23638962

  18. Studying re-scattering effect in heavy-ion collision through K* production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singha, Subhash; Mohanty, Bedangadas; Lin, Zi-Wei

    2015-05-01

    We have studied the K* production within a multi-phase transport model (AMPT) for Au+Au collisions at √ {sNN} = 200 GeV to understand the hadronic re-scattering effect on the measured yields of the resonance. The hadronic re-scattering of the K* decay daughter particles (π and K) will alter their momentum distribution thereby making it difficult to reconstruct the K* signal through the invariant mass method. An increased hadronic re-scattering effect thus leads to a decrease in the reconstructed yield of K* in the heavy-ion collisions. Through this simulation study, we argue that a decrease in K*/K ratio with the increase in collision centrality necessarily reflects the hadronic re-scattering effect. Since the re-scattering occurs in the hadronic phase and K* has a lifetime of 4 fm/c, we present a toy model-based discussion on using measured K*/K to put a lower limit on the hadronic phase lifetime in high energy nuclear collisions.

  19. Ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry examination of the structures, stabilities, and extents of hydration of dimethylamine-sulfuric acid clusters.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Jikku M; He, Siqin; Larriba-Andaluz, Carlos; DePalma, Joseph W; Johnston, Murray V; Hogan, Christopher J

    2016-08-17

    We applied an atmospheric pressure differential mobility analyzer (DMA) coupled to a time-of-flight mass spectrometer to examine the stability, mass-mobility relationship, and extent of hydration of dimethylamine-sulfuric acid cluster ions, which are of relevance to nucleation in ambient air. Cluster ions were generated by electrospray ionization and were of the form: [H((CH3)2NH)x(H2SO4)y](+) and [(HSO4)((CH3)2NH)x(H2SO4)y](-), where 4 ≤ x ≤ 8, and 5 ≤ y ≤ 12. Under dry conditions, we find that positively charged cluster ions dissociated via loss of both multiple dimethylamine and sulfuric acid molecules after mobility analysis but prior to mass analysis, and few parent ions were detected in the mass spectrometer. Dissociation also occurred for negative ions, but to a lesser extent than for positive ions for the same mass spectrometer inlet conditions. Under humidified conditions (relative humidities up to 30% in the DMA), positively charged cluster ion dissociation in the mass spectrometer inlet was mitigated and occurred primarily by H2SO4 loss from ions containing excess acid molecules. DMA measurements were used to infer collision cross sections (CCSs) for all identifiable cluster ions. Stokes-Millikan equation and diffuse/inelastic gas molecule scattering predicted CCSs overestimate measured CCSs by more than 15%, while elastic-specular collision model predictions are in good agreement with measurements. Finally, cluster ion hydration was examined by monitoring changes in CCSs with increasing relative humidity. All examined cluster ions showed a modest amount of water molecule adsorption, with percentage increases in CCS smaller than 10%. The extent of hydration correlates directly with cluster ion acidity for positive ions. PMID:27485283

  20. A low and hyperthemal energy UHV ion beamline for surface scattering spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, M. P.; Moody, S. A.; Sosolik, C. E.

    2006-03-01

    We are using a differentially pumped beamline to provide well- collimated, monoenergetic beams of noble gas and alkali-metal ions that range in energy from <10eV to 10keV. These ion beams are scattered from a surface (e.g. Cu(001)) to study charge transfer effects, energy loss, and the excitation of surface phonons and excitons. The ion beam is focused into a UHV scattering chamber that possesses capabilities for studying and characterizing samples using LEED, Auger spectroscopy, and a Kelvin probe for work function measurements. Recent additions to this setup include replacing diffusion pumps with turbo pumps as well as the addition of a fast entry load-lock sample exchange system. Our current research is focused on developing a source to produce an ion beam of C60 as well as studying charge transfer and energy loss effects at the low and hyperthermal energy range. Also, we are investigating chemicurrents associated with Schottky diodes in this energy regime.

  1. Quantitative determination of medroxyprogesterone acetate in plasma by liquid chromatography/electrospray ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kim, S M; Kim, D H

    2001-01-01

    A sensitive and rapid liquid chromatography/electrospray ion trap mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) method has been developed for the quantitative determination of medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) in human plasma. Plasma samples (1.0 mL) were simply extracted with pentane and the extracts were analyzed by HPLC with the detection of the analyte in the selective reaction monitoring (SRM) mode. The determination of MPA was accurate and reproducible, with a limit of quantitation of 0.05 ng/mL in plasma. The standard calibration curve for MPA was linear (r = 0.998) over the concentration range 0.05-6.0 ng/mL in human plasma. Analysis precision over the concentration range of MPA was lower than 18.8% (relative standard deviation, RSD) and accuracy was between 96.2 and 108.7%. PMID:11675672

  2. Laser desorption with corona discharge ion mobility spectrometry for direct surface detection of explosives.

    PubMed

    Sabo, M; Malásková, M; Matejčík, S

    2014-10-21

    We present a new highly sensitive technique for the detection of explosives directly from the surface using laser desorption-corona discharge-ion mobility spectrometry (LD-CD-IMS). We have developed LD based on laser diode modules (LDM) and the technique was tested using three different LDM (445, 532 and 665 nm). The explosives were detected directly from the surface without any further preparation. We discuss the mechanism of the LD and the limitations of this technique such as desorption time, transport time and desorption area. After the evaluation of experimental data, we estimated the potential limits of detection of this method to be 0.6 pg for TNT, 2.8 pg for RDX and 8.4 pg for PETN. PMID:25118619

  3. Direct determination of ammoniacal nitrogen in water samples using corona discharge ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jafari, M T; Khayamian, T

    2008-09-15

    In this study, direct determination of ammoniacal nitrogen residues in water samples using corona discharge ion mobility spectrometry (CD-IMS) was investigated. Pyridine was used as an alternate reagent gas to enhance selectivity and sensitivity of the method. The results indicate that the limit of detection (LOD) was about 9.2x10(-3)mugmL(-1) and the linear dynamic range was obtained from 0.03 to 2.00mugmL(-1). The relative standard deviation was about 11%. Furthermore, this method was successfully applied to the direct determination of ammoniacal nitrogen in river and tap water samples and the results were compared with the Nessler method. The comparison of the results validates the potential of the proposed method as an alternative technique for the analysis of the ammoniacal nitrogen in water samples. PMID:18761176

  4. Ammonium Ion Exchanged Zeolite for Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry of Phosphorylated Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Mengrui; Fujino, Tatsuya

    2015-01-01

    α-Cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA), an organic matrix molecule for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry, was adsorbed to NH4+-type zeolite surface, and this new matrix was used for the detection of low-molecular-weight compounds. It was found that this matrix could simplify the mass spectrum in the low-molecular-weight region and prevent interference from fragments and alkali metal ion adducted species. CHCA adsorbed to NH4+-type ZSM5 zeolite (CHCA/NH4ZSM5) was used to measure atropine and aconitine, two toxic alkaloids in plants. In addition, CHCA/NH4ZSM5 enabled us to detect phosphorylated peptides; peaks of the protonated peptides had higher intensities than the peaks observed using CHCA only. PMID:26448749

  5. Characterization of the noise in secondary ion mass spectrometry depth profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, D.P.; Dowsett, M.G.; Cooke, G.A.

    1996-12-01

    The noise in the depth profiles of secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) is studied using different samples under various experimental conditions. Despite the noise contributions from various parts of the dynamic SIMS process, its overall character agrees very well with the Poissonian rather than the Gaussian distribution in all circumstances. The Poissonian relation between the measured mean-square error and mean can be used to describe our data in the range of four orders. The departure from this relation at high counts is analyzed and found to be due to the saturation of the channeltron used. Once saturated, the detector was found to exhibit hysteresis between rising and falling input flux and output counts. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Quantitative analysis of biomolecules by time-of-flight secondary-ion mass spectrometry: Fundamental considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Muddiman, D.C.; Nicola, A.J.; Proctor, A.

    1995-12-31

    Static Time-of-Flight Secondary-Ion Mass Spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) has been applied to investigate an extensive assortment of analytical systems; from semiconductors to DNA sequencing. Recently, the TOF-SIMS method has been successfully applied to real biological systems. This report focuses on some important aspects that must be taken into consideration when conducting measurements on biomaterials in order to observe the potential the TOF-SIMS method affords. The current data are presented using Cyclosporin A (CsA, 1202 Da) and cocaine (303 Da) as model compounds. CsA is observed in the TOF-SIMS mass spectrum predominately as a Ag-cationized species and cocaine as a protonated species; thus, they are complementary probe molecules.

  7. Ion mobility spectrometry fingerprints: A rapid detection technology for adulteration of sesame oil.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liangxiao; Shuai, Qian; Li, Peiwu; Zhang, Qi; Ma, Fei; Zhang, Wen; Ding, Xiaoxia

    2016-02-01

    A simple and rapid detection technology was proposed based on ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) fingerprints to determine potential adulteration of sesame oil. Oil samples were diluted by n-hexane and analyzed by IMS for 20s. Then, chemometric methods were employed to establish discriminant models for sesame oils and four other edible oils, pure and adulterated sesame oils, and pure and counterfeit sesame oils, respectively. Finally, Random Forests (RF) classification model could correctly classify all five types of edible oils. The detection results indicated that the discriminant models built by recursive support vector machine (R-SVM) method could identify adulterated sesame oil samples (⩾ 10%) with an accuracy value of 94.2%. Therefore, IMS was shown to be an effective method to detect the adulterated sesame oils. Meanwhile, IMS fingerprints work well to detect the counterfeit sesame oils produced by adding sesame oil essence into cheaper edible oils. PMID:26304320

  8. Low-distortion detection system for frequency-swept ion cyclotron resonance spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wise, M. B.; Freiser, B. S.

    1986-07-01

    A high-performance frequency-swept capacitance bridge detector for ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) spectrometry has been constructed in our laboratory. Although the basic design of the system is similar to that of previously reported bridge circuits, careful design, layout, construction, and component selection have resulted in excellent frequency-swept performance over a bandwidth of 15 kHz to 1 MHz. At a magnetic field strength of 1.0 T, this corresponds to a mass range of 15-1000 Daltons. Problems with base-line drift and frequency-dependent signal distortion common to many other designs have been significantly reduced. Circuit diagrams are included for all parts of the detector and frequency response curves have been included where appropriate. In addition, several simple circuit diagrams for support devices have also been included.

  9. Quantitative Composition Analysis of Lipid Membranes by High-Resolution Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kraft, M L; Weber, P K; Lin, W C; Blanchette, C D; Longo, M L; Hutcheon, I D; Boxer, S G

    2005-04-29

    The lateral organization and interactions of lipid and protein components within biological membranes are essential for their functions. Investigations of the lateral organization within membranes hinge upon the ability to differentiate one component of interest from another. Typically, fluorophores are conjugated to specific components, and the organization is probed with fluorescence microscopy. However, bulky fluorophores may change the physical properties of the components they label, only the labeled components can be visualized, and the diffraction limit of light restricts the lateral resolution. Here we present a method to image microdomains within supported lipid membranes using isotopic labels and high-resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) performed with the NanoSIMS 50 (Cameca). Lateral resolution of 100 nm is achieved with high sensitivity. Quantitative information on the lipid composition within each domain was determined using calibration curves constructed from homogeneous lipid bilayer samples that systematically varied in the isotopically labeled lipid content.

  10. An expert system/ion trap mass spectrometry approach for life support systems monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Peter T.; Wong, Carla M.; Yost, Richard A.; Johnson, Jodie V.; Yates, Nathan A.; Story, Michael

    1992-01-01

    Efforts to develop sensor and control system technology to monitor air quality for life support have resulted in the development and preliminary testing of a concept based on expert systems and ion trap mass spectrometry (ITMS). An ITMS instrument provides the capability to identify and quantitate a large number of suspected contaminants at trace levels through the use of a variety of multidimensional experiments. An expert system provides specialized knowledge for control, analysis, and decision making. The system is intended for real-time, on-line, autonomous monitoring of air quality. The key characteristics of the system, performance data and analytical capabilities of the ITMS instrument, the design and operation of the expert system, and results from preliminary testing of the system for trace contaminant monitoring are described.

  11. Liquid chromatography/coordination ion spray-mass spectrometry for the analysis of rubber vulcanization products.

    PubMed

    Hayen, Heiko; Alvarez-Grima, M Montserrat; Debnath, Subhas C; Noordermeer, Jacques W M; Karst, Uwe

    2004-02-15

    Liquid chromatography/coordination ion spray-mass spectrometry has been used for the identification of reaction products in a model rubber vulcanization process. After LC separation using reversed-phase conditions, AgBF(4) in acetonitrile was added, and strong signals were observed for silica-rubber coupling agents and products of the reaction between these and alkenes. The method performs best for substances containing sulfur chains with chain lengths between two and eight sulfur atoms, but sulfur-free compounds containing triethoxysilyl groups were detected as well. For the latter, the postcolumn addition of NaBF(4) proved to be a suitable alternative. Besides the coupling agents, various reaction products, including sulfur-chain bridged alkenes were identified. PMID:14961739

  12. High-Definition Differential Ion Mobility Spectrometry with Resolving Power up to 500

    SciTech Connect

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.; Seim, Thomas A.; Danielson, William F.; Norheim, Randolph V.; Moore, Ronald J.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2013-01-20

    As the resolution of analytical methods improve, further progress tends to be increasingly limited by instrumental parameter instabilities that could be ignored before. This is now the case with differential ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS), where fluctuations of the voltages and gas pressure have become critical. A new high-definition generator for FAIMS compensation voltage reported here provides a stable and accurate output than can be scanned with negligible steps. This reduces the spectral drift and peak width, thus improving the resolving power (R) and resolution. The gain for multiply-charged peptides that have narrowest peaks is up to ~40%, and R ~ 400 - 500 is achievable using He/N2 or H2/N2 gas mixtures.

  13. Field screening of soils contaminated with explosives using ion mobility spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Crockett, A.B.; Atkinson, D.A.; Jenkins, T.F.

    1996-09-01

    Soils contaminated with explosives constitute a problem at DOE facilities and Army installations. Because explosives in soil are often heterogeneously distributed and require high density sampling, field screening is essential to characterize sites more quickly, economically and accurately. Current immunoassay and colorimetric field screening procedures have proven useful, but have significant per sample costs and limited throughput. At present, several field screening are available for TNT in soil, three procedures for RDX, and one procedure for 2,4-DNTand ammonium picrate/picric acid (AP/PA). Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) has been used to detect explosives in air at ppt levels, but limited work has been done to apply the technique to quantify explosives in soils. The objective of this study has been to evaluate the utility of IMS as a screening technique for quantifying explosive residues in soils.

  14. Secondary ion mass spectrometry of vapor-liquid-solid grown, Au-catalyzed, Si wires.

    PubMed

    Putnam, Morgan C; Filler, Michael A; Kayes, Brendan M; Kelzenberg, Michael D; Guan, Yunbin; Lewis, Nathan S; Eiler, John M; Atwater, Harry A

    2008-10-01

    Knowledge of the catalyst concentration within vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) grown semiconductor wires is needed in order to assess potential limits to electrical and optical device performance imposed by the VLS growth mechanism. We report herein the use of secondary ion mass spectrometry to characterize the Au catalyst concentration within individual, VLS-grown, Si wires. For Si wires grown by chemical vapor deposition from SiCl 4 at 1000 degrees C, an upper limit on the bulk Au concentration was observed to be 1.7 x 10(16) atoms/cm(3), similar to the thermodynamic equilibrium concentration at the growth temperature. However, a higher concentration of Au was observed on the sidewalls of the wires. PMID:18767881

  15. Multi-Capillary Column-Ion Mobility Spectrometry of Volatile Metabolites Emitted by Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Halbfeld, Christoph; Ebert, Birgitta E.; Blank, Lars M.

    2014-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced during microbial fermentations determine the flavor of fermented food and are of interest for the production of fragrances or food additives. However, the microbial synthesis of these compounds from simple carbon sources has not been well investigated so far. Here, we analyzed the headspace over glucose minimal salt medium cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae using multi-capillary column-ion mobility spectrometry (MCC-IMS). The high sensitivity and fast data acquisition of the MCC-IMS enabled online analysis of the fermentation off-gas and 19 specific signals were determined. To four of these volatile compounds, we could assign the metabolites ethanol, 2-pentanone, isobutyric acid, and 2,3-hexanedione by MCC-IMS measurements of pure standards and cross validation with thermal desorption–gas chromatography-mass spectrometry measurements. Despite the huge biochemical knowledge of the biochemistry of the model organism S. cerevisiae, only the biosynthetic pathways for ethanol and isobutyric acid are fully understood, demonstrating the considerable lack of research of volatile metabolites. As monitoring of VOCs produced during microbial fermentations can give valuable insight into the metabolic state of the organism, fast and non-invasive MCC-IMS analyses provide valuable data for process control. PMID:25197771

  16. Quantification of neurosteroids during pregnancy using selective ion monitoring mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pennell, Kurt D; Woodin, Mark A; Pennell, Page B

    2015-03-01

    Analytical techniques used to quantify neurosteroids in biological samples are often compromised by non-specificity and limited dynamic range which can result in erroneous results. A relatively rapid and inexpensive gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was developed to simultaneously measure nine neurosteroids, including allopregnanolone, estradiol, and progesterone, as well as 25-hydroxy-vitamin D3 in plasma samples collected from adult women subjects during and after pregnancy. Sample preparation involved solid-phase extraction and derivatization, followed by automated injection on a GC equipped with a mass selective detector (MSD) operated in single ion monitoring (SIM) mode to yield a run time of less than 11min. Method detection limits for all neurosteroids ranged from 30 to 200pg/mL (parts per trillion), with coefficients of variation that ranged from 3% to 5% based on intra-assay comparisons run in triplicate. Although concentrations of estradiol measured by chemiluminescent immunoassay (CIA) were consistent with values determined by GC-MS values, CIA yielded considerable higher values of progesterone, suggesting antibody cross reactions resulting from low specificity. Mean neurosteroid levels and representative time-course data demonstrate the ability of the method to quantify changes in multiple neurosteroids during pregnancy, including rapid declines in neurosteroid levels associated with delivery. This simplified GC-MS method holds particular promise for research and clinical laboratories that require simultaneous quantification of multiple neurosteroids, but lack the resources and expertise to support advanced liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry facilities. PMID:25541057

  17. Quantification of Neurosteroids During Pregnancy Using Selective Ion Monitoring Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Pennell, Kurt D.; Woodin, Mark A.; Pennell, Page B.

    2014-01-01

    Analytical techniques used to quantify neurosteroids in biological samples are often compromised by non-specificity and limited dynamic range which can result in erroneous results. A relatively rapid and inexpensive gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was developed to simultaneously measure nine neurosteroids, including allopregnanolone, estradiol, and progesterone, as well as 25-hydroxy-vitamin D3 in plasma samples collected from adult women subjects during and after pregnancy. Sample preparation involved solid-phase extraction and derivatization, followed by automated injection on a GC equipped with a mass selective detector (MSD) operated in single ion monitoring (SIM) mode to yield a run time of less than 11 minutes. Method detection limits for all neurosteroids ranged from 30 to 200 pg/mL (parts per trillion), with coefficients of variation that ranged from 3 to 5% based on intra-assay comparisons run in triplicate. Although concentrations of estradiol measured by chemiluminescent immunoassay (CIA) were consistent with values determined by GC-MS values, CIA yielded considerable higher values of progesterone, suggesting antibody cross reactions resulting from low specificity. Mean neurosteroid levels and representative time-course data demonstrate the ability of the method to quantify changes in multiple neurosteroids during pregnancy, including rapid declines in neurosteroid levels associated with delivery. This simplified GC-MS method holds particular promise for research and clinical laboratories that require simultaneous quantification of multiple neurosteroids, but lack the resources and expertise to support advanced liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry facilities. PMID:25541057

  18. Degradation study of enniatins by liquid chromatography-triple quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Serrano, A B; Meca, G; Font, G; Ferrer, E

    2013-12-15

    Enniatins A, A1, B and B1 (ENs) are mycotoxins produced by Fusarium spp. and are normal contaminants of cereals and derivate products. In this study, the stability of ENs was evaluated during food processing by simulation of pasta cooking. Thermal treatments at different incubation times (5, 10 and 15 min) and different pH (4, 7 and 10) were applied in an aqueous system and pasta resembling system (PRS). The concentrations of the targeted mycotoxins were determined using liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. High percentages of ENs reduction (81-100%) were evidenced in the PRS after the treatments at 5, 10 and 15 min of incubation. In contrast to the PRS, an important reduction of the ENs was obtained in the aqueous system after 15 min of incubation (82-100%). In general, no significant differences were observed between acid, neutral and basic solutions. Finally, several ENs degradation products were identified using the technique of liquid chromatography-triple quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometry. PMID:23993608

  19. Early stages of insulin fibrillogenesis examined with ion mobility mass spectrometry and molecular modelling.

    PubMed

    Cole, Harriet; Porrini, Massimiliano; Morris, Ryan; Smith, Tom; Kalapothakis, Jason; Weidt, Stefan; Mackay, C Logan; MacPhee, Cait E; Barran, Perdita E

    2015-10-21

    A prevalent type of protein misfolding causes the formation of β-sheet-rich structures known as amyloid fibrils. Research into the mechanisms of fibril formation has implications for both disease prevention and nanoscale templating technologies. This investigation into the aggregation of insulin utilises ion mobility mass spectrometry coupled with molecular modelling to identify and characterise oligomers formed during the 'lag' phase that precedes fibril growth. High resolution mass spectrometry and collision induced dissociation is used to unequivocally assign species as m/z coincident multimers or confomers, providing a robust analytical approach that supports the use of molecular dynamics to atomistically resolve the observed oligomers. We show that insulin oligomerises to form species In where 2 ≤ n ≤ 12 and within this set of oligomers we delineate over 60 distinct conformations, the most dominant of which are compact species. Modelling trained with experimental data suggests that the dominant compact dimers are enriched in β-sheet secondary structure and dominated by hydrophobic interactions, and provides a linear relationship between Rg and collision cross section. This approach provides detailed insight to the early stages of assembly of this much studied amyloidogenic protein, and can be used to inform models of nucleation and growth. PMID:26369607

  20. Lipid Analysis and Lipidomics by Structurally Selective Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Kliman, Michal; May, Jody C.

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in mass spectrometry approaches to the analysis of lipids include the ability to incorporate both lipid class identification with lipid structural information for increased characterization capabilities. The detailed examination of lipids and their biosynthetic and biochemical pathways made possible by novel instrumental and bioinformatics approaches is advancing research in fundamental cellular and medical studies. Recently, high-throughput structural analysis has been demonstrated through the use of rapid gas-phase separation on the basis of the ion mobility (IM) analytical technique combined with mass spectrometry (IM-MS). While IM-MS has been extensively utilized in biochemical research for peptide, protein and small molecule analysis, the role of IM-MS in lipid research is still an active area of development. In this review of lipid-based IM-MS research, we begin with an overview of three contemporary IM techniques which show great promise in being applied towards the analysis of lipids. Fundamental concepts regarding the integration of IM-MS are reviewed with emphasis on the applications of IM-MS towards simplifying and enhancing complex biological sample analysis. Finally, several recent IM-MS lipid studies are highlighted and the future prospects of IM-MS for integrated omics studies and enhanced spatial profiling through imaging IM-MS are briefly described. PMID:21708282

  1. Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry Reveals the Energetics of Intermediates that Guide Polyproline Folding.

    PubMed

    Shi, Liuqing; Holliday, Alison E; Glover, Matthew S; Ewing, Michael A; Russell, David H; Clemmer, David E

    2016-01-01

    Proline favors trans-configured peptide bonds in native proteins. Although cis/trans configurations vary for non-native and unstructured states, solvent also influences these preferences. Water induces the all-cis right-handed polyproline-I (PPI) helix of polyproline to fold into the all-trans left-handed polyproline-II (PPII) helix. Our recent work has shown that this occurs via a sequential mechanism involving six resolved intermediates [Shi, L., Holliday, A.E., Shi, H., Zhu, F., Ewing, M.A., Russell, D.H., Clemmer, D.E.: Characterizing intermediates along the transition from PPI to PPII using ion mobility-mass spectrometry. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 136, 12702-12711 (2014)]. Here, we use ion mobility-mass spectrometry to make the first detailed thermodynamic measurements of the folding intermediates, which inform us about how and why this transition occurs. It appears that early intermediates are energetically favorable because of the hydration of the peptide backbone, whereas late intermediates are enthalpically unfavorable. However, folding continues, as the entropy of the system increases upon successive formation of each new structure. When PPII is immersed in 1-propanol, the PPII→PPI transition occurs, but this reaction occurs through a very different mechanism. Early on, the PPII population splits onto multiple pathways that eventually converge through a late intermediate that continues on to the folded PPI helix. Nearly every step is endothermic. Folding results from a stepwise increase in the disorder of the system, allowing a wide-scale search for a critical late intermediate. Overall, the data presented here allow us to establish the first experimentally determined energy surface for biopolymer folding as a function of solution environment. PMID:26362047

  2. Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry Reveals the Energetics of Intermediates that Guide Polyproline Folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Liuqing; Holliday, Alison E.; Glover, Matthew S.; Ewing, Michael A.; Russell, David H.; Clemmer, David E.

    2016-01-01

    Proline favors trans-configured peptide bonds in native proteins. Although cis/ trans configurations vary for non-native and unstructured states, solvent also influences these preferences. Water induces the all- cis right-handed polyproline-I (PPI) helix of polyproline to fold into the all- trans left-handed polyproline-II (PPII) helix. Our recent work has shown that this occurs via a sequential mechanism involving six resolved intermediates [Shi, L., Holliday, A.E., Shi, H., Zhu, F., Ewing, M.A., Russell, D.H., Clemmer, D.E.: Characterizing intermediates along the transition from PPI to PPII using ion mobility-mass spectrometry. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 136, 12702-12711 (2014)]. Here, we use ion mobility-mass spectrometry to make the first detailed thermodynamic measurements of the folding intermediates, which inform us about how and why this transition occurs. It appears that early intermediates are energetically favorable because of the hydration of the peptide backbone, whereas late intermediates are enthalpically unfavorable. However, folding continues, as the entropy of the system increases upon successive formation of each new structure. When PPII is immersed in 1-propanol, the PPII→PPI transition occurs, but this reaction occurs through a very different mechanism. Early on, the PPII population splits onto multiple pathways that eventually converge through a late intermediate that continues on to the folded PPI helix. Nearly every step is endothermic. Folding results from a stepwise increase in the disorder of the system, allowing a wide-scale search for a critical late intermediate. Overall, the data presented here allow us to establish the first experimentally determined energy surface for biopolymer folding as a function of solution environment.

  3. Fabrication of highly homogeneous surface-enhanced Raman scattering substrates using Ag ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenqing; Xiao, Xiangheng; Dai, Zhigao; Wu, Wei; Cheng, Li; Mei, Fei; Zhang, Xingang; Jiang, Changzhong

    2016-06-01

    In recent times, surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) has attracted attention for its excellent potential application in chemical and biological detection. In this work, we demonstrate that a highly homogeneous SERS substrate can be realized by Ag ion implantation and the subsequent annealing process. Both the implantation and annealing parameters have been optimized for a high sensitivity SERS substrate. The SERS measurement indicates that a sample implanted by 20 kV Ag ions with a dosage of 3  ×  1016 ions cm‑2 exhibits the highest SERS activity. In addition, the SERS activity of the Ag-implanted substrates depends highly on the annealing temperature and time. Since none of the fabrication processes contain chemical reactions, our substrate is a clean system without any chemical residues.

  4. Highly sensitive detection of chromium (III) ions by resonance Rayleigh scattering enhanced by gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Min; Cai, Huai-Hong; Yang, Fen; Lin, Dewen; Yang, Pei-Hui; Cai, Jiye

    2014-01-01

    Simple and sensitive determination of chromium (III) ions (Cr3+) has potential applications for detecting trace contamination in environment. Here, the assay is based on the enhancement of resonance Rayleigh scattering (RRS) by Cr3+-induced aggregation of citrate-capped gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy were employed to characterize the nanostructures and spectroscopic properties of the Cr3+-AuNP system. The experiment conditions, such as reaction time, pH value, salt concentration and interfering ions, were investigated. The combination of signal amplification of Cr3+-citrate chelation with high sensitivity of RRS technique allow a selective assay of Cr3+ ions with a detection limit of up to 1.0 pM. The overall assay can be carried out at room temperature within only twenty minutes, making it suitable for high-throughput routine applications in environment and food samples.

  5. Fabrication of highly homogeneous surface-enhanced Raman scattering substrates using Ag ion implantation.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenqing; Xiao, Xiangheng; Dai, Zhigao; Wu, Wei; Cheng, Li; Mei, Fei; Zhang, Xingang; Jiang, Changzhong

    2016-06-29

    In recent times, surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) has attracted attention for its excellent potential application in chemical and biological detection. In this work, we demonstrate that a highly homogeneous SERS substrate can be realized by Ag ion implantation and the subsequent annealing process. Both the implantation and annealing parameters have been optimized for a high sensitivity SERS substrate. The SERS measurement indicates that a sample implanted by 20 kV Ag ions with a dosage of 3  ×  10(16) ions cm(-2) exhibits the highest SERS activity. In addition, the SERS activity of the Ag-implanted substrates depends highly on the annealing temperature and time. Since none of the fabrication processes contain chemical reactions, our substrate is a clean system without any chemical residues. PMID:27167880

  6. DETERMINATION OF CHLORINATED ACID HERBICIDES AND RELATED COMPOUNDS IN WATER BY CAPILLARY ELECTROPHORESIS-ELECTROSPRAY NEGATIVE ION MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Capillary electrophoresis electrospray negative ion mass spectrometry was investigated for the determination of chlorinated acid herbicides and several phenols in water. Sixteen analytes were separated as their anions in less than 40 min with a buffer consisting of 5 mM ammonium ...

  7. Studies on the determination of surface deuterium in AISI 1062, 4037, and 4140 steels by secondary ion mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sastri, V. S.; Donepudi, V. S.; McIntyre, N. S.; Johnston, D.; Revie, R. W.

    1988-12-01

    The concentration of deuterium at the surface of cathodically charged high strength steels AISI 1062, 4037, and 4140 has been determined by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). The beneficial effects of pickling in NAP (a mixture of nitric, acetic, and phosphoric acids) to remove surfacebound deuterium have been observed.

  8. SPECIATION OF SELENIUM(IV) AND SELENIUM(VI) USING COUPLED ION CHROMATOGRAPHY: HYDRIDE GENERATION ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROMETRY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A simple method was developed to speciate inorganic selenium in the microgram per liter range using coupled ion chromatography-hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry. Because of the differences in toxicity and adsorption behavior, determination of the redox states selenite, Se(IV), and s...

  9. Increasing the intensity of protonated secondary ions in time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry using a proton-conducting ionic liquid, diethylmethylammonium trifluoromethanesulfonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Yukio; Saito, Naoaki

    2015-07-01

    To increase the secondary ion intensities of organic molecules, room-temperature ionic liquids were investigated in two time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) experiments. First, ionic liquids as well as glycerol were tested as liquid matrices of arginine. The secondary ion intensity of protonated arginine was increased 200-fold by using a proton-conducting ionic liquid, diethylmethylammonium trifluoromethanesulfonate ([dema][TfO]). The matrix effect of [dema][TfO] was higher than that of glycerol, which is a typical matrix in SIMS. Next, ionic liquids were tested as primary ion beams. The number of protonated secondary ions of arginine was significantly increased by using a primary ion beam of [dema][TfO].

  10. Improved Collective Thomson Scattering measurements of fast ions at ASDEX upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, J.; Nielsen, S. K.; Stejner, M.; Salewski, M.; Jacobsen, A. S.; Korsholm, S. B.; Leipold, F.; Meo, F.; Michelsen, P. K.; Schubert, M.; Stober, J.; Tardini, G.; Wagner, D.; Collaboration: ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2014-08-21

    Understanding the behaviour of the confined fast ions is important in both current and future fusion experiments. These ions play a key role in heating the plasma and will be crucial for achieving conditions for burning plasma in next-step fusion devices. Microwave-based Collective Thomson Scattering (CTS) is well suited for reactor conditions and offers such an opportunity by providing measurements of the confined fast-ion distribution function resolved in space, time and 1D velocity space. We currently operate a CTS system at ASDEX Upgrade using a gyrotron which generates probing radiation at 105 GHz. A new setup using two independent receiver systems has enabled improved subtraction of the background signal, and hence the first accurate characterization of fast-ion properties. Here we review this new dual-receiver CTS setup and present results on fast-ion measurements based on the improved background characterization. These results have been obtained both with and without NBI heating, and with the measurement volume located close to the centre of the plasma. The measurements agree quantitatively with predictions of numerical simulations. Hence, CTS studies of fast-ion dynamics at ASDEX Upgrade are now feasible. The new background subtraction technique could be important for the design of CTS systems in other fusion experiments.

  11. Protein Chips Compatible with MALDI Mass Spectrometry Prepared by Ambient Ion Landing.

    PubMed

    Pompach, Petr; Benada, Oldřich; Rosůlek, Michal; Darebná, Petra; Hausner, Jiří; Růžička, Viktor; Volný, Michael; Novák, Petr

    2016-09-01

    We present a technology that allows the preparation of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI)-compatible protein chips by ambient ion landing of proteins and successive utilization of the resulting protein chips for the development of bioanalytical assays. These assays are based on the interaction between the immobilized protein and the sampled analyte directly on the protein chip and subsequent in situ analysis by MALDI mass spectrometry. The electrosprayed proteins are immobilized on dry metal and metal oxide surfaces, which are nonreactive under normal conditions. The ion landing of electrosprayed protein molecules is performed under atmospheric pressure by an automated ion landing apparatus that can manufacture protein chips with a predefined array of sample positions or any other geometry of choice. The protein chips prepared by this technique are fully compatible with MALDI ionization because the metal-based substrates are conductive and durable enough to be used directly as MALDI plates. Compared to other materials, the nonreactive surfaces show minimal nonspecific interactions with chemical species in the investigated sample and are thus an ideal substrate for selective protein chips. Three types of protein chips were used in this report to demonstrate the bioanalytical applications of ambient ion landing. The protein chips with immobilized proteolytic enzymes showed the usefulness for fast in situ peptide MALDI sequencing; the lectin-based protein chips showed the ability to enrich glycopeptides from complex mixtures with subsequent MALDI analysis, and the protein chips with immobilized antibodies were used for a novel immunoMALDI workflow that allowed the enrichment of antigens from the serum followed by highly specific MALDI detection. PMID:27478994

  12. Direct sampling ion trap mass spectrometry vs. GC/MS for monitoring VOCs in groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, M.B.; Merriweather, R.; Guerin, M.R.

    1995-12-31

    Direct Sampling Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry (DSITMS) has been under refinement and demonstration by this laboratory for several years. The general technology is applicable to a wide range of problems which would benefit from high sample throughput, fast availability of results, and relatively low cost per sample analysis when compared with conventional analytical methods. At the present time, DSITMS can be used to determine targeted analytes in air, water, soil, and other media. This is accomplished by equipping an ion trap with a direct inlet system which consists of a splitter, capillary restrictor, and a set of sample inlet modules. The capillary restrictor provides the interface between atmosphere and the vacuum in the ion trap while the splitter enables sampling modules which require high gas flow rates to be used with the system. The sampling modules consist of a purge module for analyzing VOCs in water or soil, a direct air sampling module, and a thermal desorber. These modules are designed to be easily interchanged by means of quick connect fittings and a single electrical cable. In general, the DSITMS sample inlet system works equally well on all of the commercially available ion traps with which it has been tested including the Finnigan MAT ITMS, Finnigan MAT Magnum, Varian Saturn, and the Teledyne 3D-Q. Both the Magnum and 3D-Q instruments have been utilized for field applications as well as laboratory analysis. This particular study is a comparison of DSITMS with a purge and trap GC/MS for compliance monitoring of VOC`s in groundwater.

  13. Identity Efficiency for High-Performance Ambient Pressure Ion Mobility Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kanu, A Bakarr; Leal, Anne

    2016-03-15

    A new approach to reduce the false-positive responses commonly encountered in the field when drugs and explosives are detected is reported for an electrospray ionization high-performance ion mobility spectrometry (ESI-HPIMS). In this article, we report on the combination of reduced mobility and the width-at-half-height of a peak to give a new parameter called conditional reduced mobility (CRM). It was found that the CRM was capable of differentiating between real drugs peaks from that of a false-positive peak and may help to reduce false-positive rates. This effect was demonstrated using 11 drugs (amphetamine, cannabidiol, cocaine, codeine, heroine, methamphetamine, morphine, phentermine, L-phenylepherine, proglitazone, and rosiglitazone) and seven interferences chosen from off-the-shelf products. This report determined and compared CRM, resolving power (R(m)), and diffusion-limited conditional theoretical reduced mobility (DLCTRM) for ESI-HPIMS. The most important parameters for determining CRM are reduced mobility and width-at-half-height of a peak. There is a specific optimum voltage, gate pulse width, resolving power, and now CRM for each ion. DLCTRM indicate the optimum reduced mobility that is not normally possible under field conditions. CRM predicts the condition at which a target compound can be differentiated from a false-positive response. This was possible because different ions exhibits different drifting patterns and hence a different peak broadening phenomenon inside an ion mobility tube. Reduced mobility for target compounds reported were reproducible to within 2% for ESI-HPIMS. The estimated resolving power for the ESI-HPIMS used in this study was 61 ± 0.22. Conditional reduced mobility introduced in this paper show differences between target compounds and false-positive peaks as high as 74%, as was the case for cannabidiol and interference #1 at 70 μs gate pulse width. PMID:26919030

  14. Automated anatomical interpretation of ion distributions in tissue: linking imaging mass spectrometry to curated atlases.

    PubMed

    Verbeeck, Nico; Yang, Junhai; De Moor, Bart; Caprioli, Richard M; Waelkens, Etienne; Van de Plas, Raf

    2014-09-16

    Imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) has become a prime tool for studying the distribution of biomolecules in tissue. Although IMS data sets can become very large, computational methods have made it practically feasible to search these experiments for relevant findings. However, these methods lack access to an important source of information that many human interpretations rely upon: anatomical insight. In this work, we address this need by (1) integrating a curated anatomical data source with an empirically acquired IMS data source, establishing an algorithm-accessible link between them and (2) demonstrating the potential of such an IMS-anatomical atlas link by applying it toward automated anatomical interpretation of ion distributions in tissue. The concept is demonstrated in mouse brain tissue, using the Allen Mouse Brain Atlas as the curated anatomical data source that is linked to MALDI-based IMS experiments. We first develop a method to spatially map the anatomical atlas to the IMS data sets using nonrigid registration techniques. Once a mapping is established, a second computational method, called correlation-based querying, gives an elementary demonstration of the link by delivering basic insight into relationships between ion images and anatomical structures. Finally, a third algorithm moves further beyond both registration and correlation by providing automated anatomical interpretation of ion images. This task is approached as an optimization problem that deconstructs ion distributions as combinations of known anatomical structures. We demonstrate that establishing a link between an IMS experiment and an anatomical atlas enables automated anatomical annotation, which can serve as an important accelerator both for human and machine-guided exploration of IMS experiments. PMID:25153352

  15. Optimization of a Differential Ion Mobility Spectrometry-Tandem Mass Spectrometry Method for High-Throughput Analysis of Nicotine and Related Compounds: Application to Electronic Cigarette Refill Liquids.

    PubMed

    Regueiro, Jorge; Giri, Anupam; Wenzl, Thomas

    2016-06-21

    Fast market penetration of electronic cigarettes is leading to an exponentially growing number of electronic refill liquids with different nicotine contents and an endless list of flavors. Therefore, rapid and simple methods allowing a fast screening of these products are necessary to detect harmful substances which can negatively impact the health of consumers. In this regard, the present work explores the capabilities of differential ion mobility spectrometry coupled to tandem mass spectrometry for high-throughput analysis of nicotine and 11 related compounds in commercial refill liquids for electronic cigarettes. The influence of main factors affecting the ion mobility separation, such as modifier types and concentration, separation voltage, and temperature, was systematically investigated. Despite small molecular weight differences among the studied compounds, a good separation was achieved in the ion mobility cell under the optimized conditions, which involved the use of ethanol as a polar gas-phase chemical modifier. Indeed, differential ion mobility was able to resolve (resolution >4) nicotine from its structural isomer anabasine without the use of any chromatographic separation. The quantitative performance of the proposed method was then evaluated, showing satisfactory precision (RSD ≤ 16%) and recoveries ranging from 85 to 100% for nicotine, and from 84 to 126% for the rest of the target analytes. Several commercial electronic cigarette refill liquids were analyzed to demonstrate the applicability of the method. In some cases, significant differences were found between labeled and measured levels of nicotine. Anatabine, cotinine, myosmine, and nornicotine were also found in some of the analyzed samples. PMID:27173877

  16. Matrix-Assisted Ionization-Ion Mobility Spectrometry-Mass Spectrometry: Selective Analysis of a Europium-PEG Complex in a Crude Mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Joshua L.; Lutomski, Corinne A.; El-Baba, Tarick J.; Siriwardena-Mahanama, Buddhima N.; Weidner, Steffen M.; Falkenhagen, Jana; Allen, Matthew J.; Trimpin, Sarah

    2015-12-01

    The analytical utility of a new and simple to use ionization method, matrix-assisted ionization (MAI), coupled with ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) and mass spectrometry (MS) is used to characterize a 2-armed europium(III)-containing poly(ethylene glycol) (Eu-PEG) complex directly from a crude sample. MAI was used with the matrix 1,2-dicyanobenzene, which affords low chemical background relative to matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) and electrospray ionization (ESI). MAI provides high ion abundance of desired products in comparison to ESI and MALDI. Inductively coupled plasma-MS measurements were used to estimate a maximum of 10% of the crude sample by mass was the 2-arm Eu-PEG complex, supporting evidence of selective ionization of Eu-PEG complexes using the new MAI matrix, 1,2-dicyanobenzene. Multiply charged ions formed in MAI enhance the IMS gas-phase separation, especially relative to the singly charged ions observed with MALDI. Individual components are cleanly separated and readily identified, allowing characterization of the 2-arm Eu-PEG conjugate from a mixture of the 1-arm Eu-PEG complex and unreacted starting materials. Size-exclusion chromatography, liquid chromatography at critical conditions, MALDI-MS, ESI-MS, and ESI-IMS-MS had difficulties with this analysis, or failed.

  17. Lithium Formate Ion Clusters Formation during Electrospray Ionization: Evidence of Magic Number Clusters by Mass Spectrometry and ab initio Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, Anil K.; Bogdanov, Bogdan

    2015-02-10

    Small cationic and anionic clusters of lithium formate were generated by electrospray ionization and their fragmentations were studied by tandem mass spectrometry. Singly as well as multiply charged clusters were formed with the general formulae, (HCOOLi)nLi+, (HCOOLi)nLimm+, (HCOOLi)nHCOO- and (HCOOLi)n(HCOO)mm-. Several magic number cluster ions were observed in both the positive and negative ion modes although more predominant in the positive ion mode with (HCOOLi)3Li+ being the most abundant and stable cluster ions. Fragmentations of singly charged clusters proceed first by the loss of a dimer unit ((HCOOLi)2) followed by sequential loss of monomer units (HCOOLi). In the case of positive cluster ions, all fragmentations lead to the magic cluster (HCOOLi)3Li+ at higher collision energies which later fragments to dimer and monomer ions in lower abundance. Quantum mechanical calculations performed for smaller cluster ions showed that the trimer ion has a closed ring structure similar to the phenalenylium structure with three closed rings connected to the lithium ion. Further additions of monomer units result in similar symmetric structures for hexamer and nonamer cluster ions. Thermochemical calculations show that trimer cluster ion is relatively more stable than neighboring cluster ions, supporting the experimental observation of a magic number cluster with enhanced stability.

  18. Analysis of new synthetic drugs by ion mobility time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sysoev, Alexey A; Poteshin, Sergey S; Chernyshev, Denis M; Karpov, Alexander V; Tuzkov, Yuriy B; Kyzmin, Vyacheslav V; Sysoev, Alexander A

    2014-01-01

    Characteristic ion mobility mass spectrometry data, reduced mobility, and limits of detection (signal-to-noise ratio = 3) were determined for six synthetic drugs and cocaine by ion mobility time-of-flight mass spectrometry (IM-TOF-MS) with electrospray ionization (ESI) and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI). The studied synthetic illicit drugs recently appeared on the recreational drug market as designer drugs and were methylone, 4-MEC (4'-methylethcathinone), 3,4-MDPV (3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone), JWH-210 [4-ethylnaphthalen-1-yl-(1-pentylindol-3-yl)methanone], JWH-250 [2-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1-(1-pentyl-1H-indol-3-yl)ethanone], and JWH-203 [1-pentyl-3-(2'-chlorophenylacetyl) indole]. Absolute reduced mobilities in nitrogen were 1.35, 1.28, 1.41, 1.30, 1.18, 0.98, 1.09, and 1.07 cm2V(-1)s(-1), for methylone [M-H]+, methylone [M+H]+, 4-MEC [M-H]+, 4-MEC [M+H]+, 3,4-MDPV [M+H]+, JWH-210 [M+H]+, JWH-250 [M+H]+, and JWH-203 [M+H]+, respectively. Selected illicit drugs are easily identified by IM-TOF-MS during a 100s analysis. Relative Limits of detection ranged from 4 to 400 nM are demonstrated for these compounds. Such relative limits of detection correspond to 14 pg to 2 ng absolute limits of detection. Better detection limits are obtained in APCI mode for all the illicit drugs except cocaine. ESI mode was found to be preferable for the IM-TOF-MS detection of cocaine at trace levels. A single sample analysis is completed in an order of magnitude less time than that for conventional liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry approach. The application allows one to consider IM-TOF-MS as a good candidate for a method to determine quickly the recently surfaced designer drugs marketed on the internet as "bath salts," "spice," and "herbal blends". PMID:24895779

  19. High-Field Asymmetric-Waveform Ion Mobility Spectrometry and Electron Detachment Dissociation of Isobaric Mixtures of Glycosaminoglycans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kailemia, Muchena J.; Park, Melvin; Kaplan, Desmond A.; Venot, Andre; Boons, Geert-Jan; Li, Lingyun; Linhardt, Robert J.; Amster, I. Jonathan

    2013-11-01

    High-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) is shown to be capable of resolving isomeric and isobaric glycosaminoglycan negative ions and to have great utility for the analysis of this class of molecules when combined with Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS) and tandem mass spectrometry. Electron detachment dissociation (EDD) and other ion activation methods for tandem mass spectrometry can be used to determine the sites of labile sulfate modifications and for assigning the stereochemistry of hexuronic acid residues of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). However, mixtures with overlapping mass-to-charge values present a challenge, as their precursor species cannot be resolved by a mass analyzer prior to ion activation. FAIMS is shown to resolve two types of mass-to-charge overlaps. A mixture of chondroitin sulfate A (CSA) oligomers with 4-10 saccharides units produces ions of a single mass-to-charge by electrospray ionization, as the charge state increases in direct proportion to the degree of polymerization for these sulfated carbohydrates. FAIMS is shown to resolve the overlapping charge. A more challenging type of mass-to-charge overlap occurs for mixtures of diastereomers. FAIMS is shown to separate two sets of epimeric GAG tetramers. For the epimer pairs, the complexity of the separation is reduced when the reducing end is alkylated, suggesting that anomers are also resolved by FAIMS. The resolved components were activated by EDD and the fragment ions were analyzed by FTICR-MS. The resulting tandem mass spectra were able to distinguish the two epimers from each other.

  20. Design and performance of an instrument for electron impact tandem mass spectrometry and action spectroscopy of mass/charge selected macromolecular ions stored in RF ion trap*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranković, Milos Lj.; Giuliani, Alexandre; Milosavljević, Aleksandar R.

    2016-06-01

    A new apparatus was designed, coupling an electron gun with a linear quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer, to perform m/ z (mass over charge) selected ion activation by electron impact for tandem mass spectrometry and action spectroscopy. We present in detail electron tracing simulations of a 300 eV electron beam inside the ion trap, design of the mechanical parts, electron optics and electronic circuits used in the experiment. We also report examples of electron impact activation tandem mass spectra for Ubiquitin protein, Substance P and Melittin peptides, at incident electron energies in the range from 280 eV to 300 eV.

  1. Towards secondary ion mass spectrometry on the helium ion microscope: An experimental and simulation based feasibility study with He{sup +} and Ne{sup +} bombardment

    SciTech Connect

    Wirtz, T.; Vanhove, N.; Pillatsch, L.; Dowsett, D.; Sijbrandij, S.; Notte, J.

    2012-07-23

    The combination of the high-brightness He{sup +}/Ne{sup +} atomic level ion source with secondary ion mass spectrometry detection capabilities opens up the prospect of obtaining chemical information with high lateral resolution and high sensitivity on the Zeiss ORION helium ion microscope. The analytical performance in terms of sputtering yield, useful yield, and detection limit is studied and subsequently optimized by oxygen and cesium flooding. Detection limits down to 10{sup -6} and 10{sup -5} can be obtained for silicon using Ne{sup +} and He{sup +}, respectively. A simulation based study reveals furthermore that a lateral resolution <10 nm can be obtained.

  2. Enhancing Biological Analyses with Three Dimensional Field Asymmetric Ion Mobility, Low Field Drift Time Ion Mobility and Mass Spectrometry (µFAIMS/IMS-MS) Separations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xing; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Chen, Tsung-Chi; Kyle, Jennifer E.; Norheim, Randolph V.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Smith, Richard D.; Baker, Erin Shammel

    2015-06-30

    We report the first evaluation of a platform coupling a high speed field asymmetric ion mobility spectrometry microchip (µFAIMS) with drift tube ion mobility and mass spectrometry (IMS-MS). The µFAIMS/IMS-MS platform was used to analyze biological samples and simultaneously acquire multidimensional information of detected features from the measured FAIMS compensation fields and IMS drift times, while also obtaining accurate ion masses. These separations thereby increase the overall separation power, resulting increased information content, and provide more complete characterization of more complex samples. The separation conditions were optimized for sensitivity and resolving power by the selection of gas compositions and pressures in the FAIMS and IMS separation stages. The resulting performance provided three dimensional separations, benefitting both broad complex mixture studies and targeted analyses by e.g. improving isomeric separations and allowing detection of species obscured by “chemical noise” and other interfering peaks.

  3. Simultaneous depth-profiling of electrical and elemental properties of ion-implanted arsenic in silicon by combining secondary-ion mass spectrometry with resistivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, N. S.; Wong, C. S.; McNally, P. J.

    2016-07-01

    A method is proposed to extract the electrical data for surface doping profiles of semiconductors in unison with the chemical profile acquired by secondary-ion mass spectrometry (SIMS)—a method we call SIMSAR (secondary-ion mass spectrometry and resistivity). The SIMSAR approach utilizes the inherent sputtering process of SIMS, combined with sequential four-point van der Pauw resistivity measurements, to surmise the active doping profile as a function of depth. The technique is demonstrated for the case of ion-implanted arsenic doping profiles in silicon. Complications of the method are identified, explained, and corrections for these are given. While several techniques already exist for chemical dopant profiling and numerous for electrical profiling, since there is no technique which can measure both electrical and chemical profiles in parallel, SIMSAR has significant promise as an extension of the conventional dynamic SIMS technique, particularly for applications in the semiconductor industry.

  4. A new detector for mass spectrometry: Direct detection of low energy ions using a multi-pixel photon counter

    SciTech Connect

    Wilman, Edward S.; Gardiner, Sara H.; Vallance, Claire; Nomerotski, Andrei; Turchetta, Renato; Brouard, Mark

    2012-01-15

    A new type of ion detector for mass spectrometry and general detection of low energy ions is presented. The detector consists of a scintillator optically coupled to a single-photon avalanche photodiode (SPAD) array. A prototype sensor has been constructed from a LYSO (Lu{sub 1.8}Y{sub 0.2}SiO{sub 5}(Ce)) scintillator crystal coupled to a commercial SPAD array detector. As proof of concept, the detector is used to record the time-of-flight mass spectra of butanone and carbon disulphide, and the dependence of detection sensitivity on the ion kinetic energy is characterised.

  5. Monitoring metal ion flux in reactions of metallothionein and drug-modified metallothionein by electrospray mass spectrometry.

    PubMed Central

    Zaia, J.; Fabris, D.; Wei, D.; Karpel, R. L.; Fenselau, C.

    1998-01-01

    The capabilities of electrospray ionization mass spectrometry are demonstrated for monitoring the flux of metal ions out of and into the metalloprotein rabbit liver metallothionein and, in one example, chlorambucil-alkylated metallothionein. Metal ion transfers may be followed as the reactions proceed in situ to provide kinetic information. More uniquely to this technique, metal ion stoichiometries may be determined for reaction intermediates and products. Partners used in these studies include EDTA, carbonic anhydrase, a zinc-bound hexamer of insulin, and the core domain of bacteriophage T4 gene 32 protein, a binding protein for single-stranded DNA. PMID:9828006

  6. Pulsed-gas glow discharge for ultrahigh mass resolution measurements with Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, C.H.; Eyler, J.R.; Barshick, C.M.; Wronka, J.; Laukien, F.H.

    1996-02-01

    A new pulsed-gas glow discharge (GD) source has been developed for use with an external ion source Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometer. With pulsed argon gas introduction into the GD source, the gas load and pressure in the mass analyzer region were greatly reduced; this resulted in improved mass resolution. Mass resolution of greater than 145000 (fwhm) has been achieved for Cu{sup +} ions from a brass sample, the highest reported for any type of GD mass spectrometer. The pulsed-gas GD source promises analytical usefulness for ultrahigh resolution measurements in GD mass spectrometry. 16 refs., 3 figs.

  7. Structural identification of electron transfer dissociation products in mass spectrometry using infrared ion spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Martens, Jonathan; Grzetic, Josipa; Berden, Giel; Oomens, Jos

    2016-01-01

    Tandem mass spectrometry occupies a principle place among modern analytical methods and drives many developments in the 'omics' sciences. Electron attachment induced dissociation methods, as alternatives for collision-induced dissociation have profoundly influenced the field of proteomics, enabling among others the top-down sequencing of entire proteins and the analysis of post-translational modifications. The technique, however, produces more complex mass spectra and its radical-driven reaction mechanisms remain incompletely understood. Here we demonstrate the facile structural characterization of electron transfer dissociation generated peptide fragments by infrared ion spectroscopy using the tunable free-electron laser FELIX, aiding the elucidation of the underlying dissociation mechanisms. We apply this method to verify and revise previously proposed product ion structures for an often studied model tryptic peptide, [AlaAlaHisAlaArg+2H](2+). Comparing experiment with theory reveals that structures that would be assigned using only theoretical thermodynamic considerations often do not correspond to the experimentally sampled species. PMID:27277826

  8. Design for gas chromatography-corona discharge-ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Mohammad T; Saraji, Mohammad; Sherafatmand, Hossein

    2012-11-20

    A corona discharge ionization-ion mobility spectrometry (CD-IMS) with a novel sample inlet system was designed and constructed as a detector for capillary gas chromatography. In this design, a hollow needle was used instead of a solid needle which is commonly used for corona discharge creation, helping us to have direct axial interfacing for GC-IMS. The capillary column was passed through the needle, resulting in a reaction of effluents with reactant ions on the upstream side of the corona discharge ionization source. Using this sample introduction design, higher ionization efficiency was achieved relative to the entrance direction through the side of the drift tube. In addition, the volume of the ionization region was reduced to minimize the resistance time of compounds in the ionization source, increasing chromatographic resolution of the instrument. The effects of various parameters such as drift gas flow, makeup gas flow, and column tip position inside the needle were investigated. The designed instrument was exhaustively validated in terms of sensitivity, resolution, and reproducibility by analyzing the standard solutions of methyl isobutyl ketone, heptanone, nonanone, and acetophenone as the test compounds. The results obtained by CD-IMS detector were compared with those of the flame ionization detector, which revealed the capability of the proposed GC-IMS for two-dimensional separation (based on the retention time and drift time information) and identification of an analyte in complex matrixes. PMID:23083064

  9. 193 nm Ultraviolet Photodissociation Mass Spectrometry for Phosphopeptide Characterization in the Positive and Negative Ion Modes.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Michelle R; Taliaferro, Juliana M; Dalby, Kevin N; Brodbelt, Jennifer S

    2016-08-01

    Advances in liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) have permitted phosphoproteomic analysis on a grand scale, but ongoing challenges specifically associated with confident phosphate localization continue to motivate the development of new fragmentation techniques. In the present study, ultraviolet photodissociation (UVPD) at 193 nm is evaluated for the characterization of phosphopeptides in both positive and negative ion modes. Compared to the more standard higher energy collisional dissociation (HCD), UVPD provided more extensive fragmentation with improved phosphate retention on product ions. Negative mode UVPD showed particular merit for detecting and sequencing highly acidic phosphopeptides from alpha and beta casein, but was not as robust for larger scale analysis because of lower ionization efficiencies in the negative mode. HeLa and HCC70 cell lysates were analyzed by both UVPD and HCD. While HCD identified more phosphopeptides and proteins compared to UVPD, the unique matches from UVPD analysis could be combined with the HCD data set to improve the overall depth of coverage compared to either method alone. PMID:27425180

  10. Automated measurement of permethylated serum N-glycans by MALDI-linear ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Guillard, Maïlys; Gloerich, Jolein; Wessels, Hans J C T; Morava, Eva; Wevers, Ron A; Lefeber, Dirk J

    2009-08-17

    The use of N-glycan mass spectrometry for clinical diagnostics requires the development of robust high-throughput profiling methods. Still, structural assignment of glycans requires additional information such as MS(2) fragmentation or exoglycosidase digestions. We present a setting which combines a MALDI ionization source with a linear ion trap analyzer. This instrumentation allows automated measurement of samples thanks to the crystal positioning system, combined with MS(n) sequencing options. 2,5-Dihydroxybenzoic acid, commonly used for the analysis of glycans, failed to produce the required reproducibility due to its non-homogeneous crystallization properties. In contrast, alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid provided a homogeneous crystallization pattern and reproducibility of the measurements. Using serum N-glycans as a test sample, we focused on the automation of data collection by optimizing the instrument settings. Glycan structures were confirmed by MS(2) analysis. Although sample processing still needs optimization, this method provides a reproducible and high-throughput approach for measurement of N-glycans using a MALDI-linear ion trap instrument. PMID:19577739

  11. Secondary ion mass spectrometry signatures for verifying declarations of fissile-material production.

    PubMed

    Willingham, D; Naes, B E; Burns, K A; Reid, B D

    2015-03-01

    Direct analysis of uranium enrichment facility components were performed using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). A standard protocol was developed to enable preparation of SIMS samples from a corroded pipe piece without disturbing the corrosion layer. Unique uranium, oxygen and fluorine containing signatures were discovered in the corrosion layer by performing a mass scan of the region of interest from 230 to 280amu. These signatures identified the source of the corrosion layer as uranium hexafluoride (UF6) or an associated hydrolysis product. Isotopic analysis of the corrosion layer determined enrichment of (235)U to a value of 0.0116±0.0019 for the (235)U/(238)U isotopic ratio as compared to the NIST traceable standard (CRM 112-A) with a natural (235)U/(238)U isotopic ratio of 0.007254±0.000004. SIMS depth analysis revealed that the corrosion layer was isotopically homogenous to a depth of ~23.5µm. Optical profilometry measurements prior to and following SIMS depth analysis were used to determine a sputter rate of 0.48nm/s for 18.5keV O(-) ion bombardment of the corrosion layer. The data presented is conclusive evidence that SIMS depth analysis can be used to identify novel nuclear archeology signatures from uranium enrichment components and perform meaningful isotopic analysis of these signatures. PMID:25575376

  12. Tetramethylammonium hydroxide as a reagent for complex mixture analysis by negative ion electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lobodin, Vladislav V; Juyal, Priyanka; McKenna, Amy M; Rodgers, Ryan P; Marshall, Alan G

    2013-08-20

    Ultrahigh-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR MS) enables the direct characterization of complex mixtures without prior fractionation. High mass resolution can distinguish peaks separated by as little as 1.1 mDa), and high mass accuracy enables assignment of elemental compositions in mixtures that contain tens of thousands of individual components (crude oil). Negative electrospray ionization (ESI) is particularly useful for the speciation of the most acidic petroleum components that are implicated in oil production and processing problems. Here, we replace conventional ammonium hydroxide by tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH, a much stronger base, with higher solubility in toluene) to more uniformly deprotonate acidic components of complex mixtures by negative ESI FTICR MS. The detailed compositional analysis of four crude oils (light to heavy, from different geographical locations) reveals that TMAH reagent accesses 1.5-6 times as many elemental compositions, spanning a much wider range of chemical classes than does NH4OH. For example, TMAH reagent produces abundant negative electrosprayed ions from less acidic and neutral species that are in low abundance or absent with NH4OH reagent. More importantly, the increased compositional coverage of TMAH-modified solvent systems maintains, or even surpasses, the compositional information for the most acidic species. The method is not limited to petroleum-derived materials and could be applied to the analysis of dissolved organic matter, coal, lipids, and other naturally occurring compositionally complex organic mixtures. PMID:23919350

  13. Membrane-Extraction Ion Mobility Spectrometry for In-Situ Detection of Chlorinated Hydrocarbons in Water

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Yongzhai; Zhang, Wei; Whitten, William B; Li, Haiyang; Watson, David B; Xu, Jun

    2010-01-01

    Membrane-extraction ion mobility spectrometry (ME-IMS) has been developed for in-situ sampling and analysis of trace chlorinated hydrocarbons in water in a single procedure. The sampling is configured so that aqueous contaminants permeate through a spiral hollow polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane and are carried away by a vapor flow through the membrane tube. The extracted analyte flows into an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) chamber and is analyzed in a home-made IMS analyzer. PDMS membrane is found to effectively extract chlorinated hydrocarbon solvents from liquid phase to vapor. The specialized IMS analyzer has been found to have resolutions of R=33 and 41, respectively, for negative- and positive-modes and is capable of detecting aqueous tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE) as low as 80 g/L and 74 g/L in negative ion mode, respectively. The time-dependent characteristics of sampling and detection of TCE are both experimentally and theoretically studied for various concentrations, membrane lengths, and flow rates. These characteristics demonstrate that membrane-extraction IMS is feasible for the continuous monitoring of chlorinated hydrocarbons in water.

  14. Native mass spectrometry and ion mobility characterize the orange carotenoid protein functional domains.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao; Liu, Haijun; Lu, Yue; Wolf, Nathan R; Gross, Michael L; Blankenship, Robert E

    2016-06-01

    Orange Carotenoid Protein (OCP) plays a unique role in protecting many cyanobacteria from light-induced damage. The active form of OCP is directly involved in energy dissipation by binding to the phycobilisome (PBS), the major light-harvesting complex in cyanobacteria. There are two structural modules in OCP, an N-terminal domain (NTD), and a C-terminal domain (CTD), which play different functional roles during the OCP-PBS quenching cycle. Because of the quasi-stable nature of active OCP, structural analysis of active OCP has been lacking compared to its inactive form. In this report, partial proteolysis was used to generate two structural domains, NTD and CTD, from active OCP. We used multiple native mass spectrometry (MS) based approaches to interrogate the structural features of the NTD and the CTD. Collisional activation and ion mobility analysis indicated that the NTD releases its bound carotenoid without forming any intermediates and the CTD is resistant to unfolding upon collisional energy ramping. The unfolding intermediates observed in inactive intact OCP suggest that it is the N-terminal extension and the NTD-CTD loop that lead to the observed unfolding intermediates. These combined approaches extend the knowledge of OCP photo-activation and structural features of OCP functional domains. Combining native MS, ion mobility, and collisional activation promises to be a sensitive new approach for studies of photosynthetic protein-pigment complexes. PMID:26921809

  15. Introduction to time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry application in chromatographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Orinák, Andrej; Arlinghaus, Heinrich F; Vering, Guido; Orináková, Renáta; Hellweg, Sebastian

    2005-08-19

    New on-line analytical system coupling thin layer chromatography (TLC) and high selective identification unit-time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) is introduced in this article. Chromatographic mixture separation and analyte surface deposition followed with surface TOF-SIMS analysis on-line allows to identify the analytes at trace and ultratrace levels. The selected analytes with different detectability and identification possibility were analysed in this hyphenated unit (Methyl Red indicator, Terpinolen and Giberrelic acid). Here, the chromatographic thin layer plays a universal role: separation unit, analyte depositing surface and TOF-SIMS interface, finally. Two depositing substrates and TOF-SIMS compatible interfaces were tested in above-mentioned interfacing unit: modified aluminium backed chromatographic thin layer and monolithic silica thin layer. The sets of positive and negative ions TOF-SIMS spectra obtained from different SIMS modes of analysis were used for analyte identification purposes. SIMS enables analyte detection with high mass resolution at the concentration level that is not achieved by other methods. PMID:16114244

  16. Structural identification of electron transfer dissociation products in mass spectrometry using infrared ion spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Martens, Jonathan; Grzetic, Josipa; Berden, Giel; Oomens, Jos

    2016-01-01

    Tandem mass spectrometry occupies a principle place among modern analytical methods and drives many developments in the ‘omics' sciences. Electron attachment induced dissociation methods, as alternatives for collision-induced dissociation have profoundly influenced the field of proteomics, enabling among others the top-down sequencing of entire proteins and the analysis of post-translational modifications. The technique, however, produces more complex mass spectra and its radical-driven reaction mechanisms remain incompletely understood. Here we demonstrate the facile structural characterization of electron transfer dissociation generated peptide fragments by infrared ion spectroscopy using the tunable free-electron laser FELIX, aiding the elucidation of the underlying dissociation mechanisms. We apply this method to verify and revise previously proposed product ion structures for an often studied model tryptic peptide, [AlaAlaHisAlaArg+2H]2+. Comparing experiment with theory reveals that structures that would be assigned using only theoretical thermodynamic considerations often do not correspond to the experimentally sampled species. PMID:27277826

  17. A new sheathless electrospray interface for coupling of capillary electrophoresis to ion-trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bendahl, Lars; Hansen, Steen Honoré; Olsen, Jørgen

    2002-01-01

    A simple laboratory-made sheathless electrospray interface for coupling of capillary electrophoresis to ion-trap mass spectrometry (CE/MS) was developed. The interface was machined in-house and it was designed to be freely interchangeable with the commercially available ionization sources for the mass spectrometer. Sharpened fused-silica capillaries were coated with nickel by a simple electrodeless plating procedure and were used as all-in-one columns/emitters. The electrodeless plating produced a 2-5- micro m thick smooth nickel layer that lasted for more than 8 h of continuous electrospraying. The performance of the CE/MS interface was examined by using four cationic imipramine derivatives as test substances. Relative detection limits were calculated on the basis of the extracted ion electrophorograms and were in the range 6-130 nmol/L, corresponding to absolute detection limits in the range of 20-400 amol. The system was applied for analysis of impurities in an impure imipramine N-oxide preparation, and two of the impurities could be identified on the basis of online-MS(MS) spectra recorded in scan-dependent mode. PMID:12478579

  18. Direct sampling ion trap mass spectrometry (DSITMS). Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    This report describes the cost, performance, and other key characteristics of an innovative technology for determining the presence or absence, and measuring the concentration, of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) in groundwater and soil, and in gaseous remediation process streams at hazardous waste sites. This new technology is Direct Sampling Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry (DSITMS). DSITMS introduces sample materials directly into an ion trap mass spectrometer by means of a very simple interface, such as a capillary restrictor or a polymer membrane. There is typically very little, if any, sample preparation and no chromatographic separation of the sample constituents. This means that the response of the instrument to the analytes or contaminants in a sample is nearly instantaneous, and that analytical methods based on DSITMS are fast. Analyses are typically completed in less than five minutes, and the analysis cost is generally 50% or less than the amount charged by commercial laboratories using Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) analysis methods.

  19. Characterization of impurities in tylosin using dual liquid chromatography combined with ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Shruti; Van Schepdael, Ann; Hoogmartens, Jos; Adams, Erwin

    2013-03-15

    Investigation of unknown impurities in a tylosin sample was performed using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LC/MS). Separation was performed according to the recently described LC-UV method of Ashenafi et al. (2011) [14]. This method was reported to have a good selectivity as it was able to separate the four main components of tylosin from the already known and 23 unknown impurities. However, as this method uses a mobile phase with non-volatile constituents, direct characterization of these impurities using LC/MS was not possible. The impurity fractions were therefore first collected and then desalted before sending them to the MS. Identification of the impurities in the tylosin sample was performed with a quadruple ion trap (IT) MS, with an electrospray ionization (ESI) source in the positive ion mode. The structure of the impurities was deduced by comparing their fragmentation pattern with those of the main components of tylosin. As several peaks in the LC-UV method contained multiple compounds, using this method in total 41 new impurities were (partly) characterized. PMID:23598092

  20. Boosting Sensitivity in Liquid Chromatography–Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance–Tandem Mass Spectrometry for Product Ion Analysis of Monoterpene Indole Alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Nakabayashi, Ryo; Tsugawa, Hiroshi; Kitajima, Mariko; Takayama, Hiromitsu; Saito, Kazuki

    2015-01-01

    In metabolomics, the analysis of product ions in tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) is noteworthy to chemically assign structural information. However, the development of relevant analytical methods are less advanced. Here, we developed a method to boost sensitivity in liquid chromatography–Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance–tandem mass spectrometry analysis (MS/MS boost analysis). To verify the MS/MS boost analysis, both quercetin and uniformly labeled 13C quercetin were analyzed, revealing that the origin of the product ions is not the instrument, but the analyzed compounds resulting in sensitive product ions. Next, we applied this method to the analysis of monoterpene indole alkaloids (MIAs). The comparative analyses of MIAs having indole basic skeleton (ajmalicine, catharanthine, hirsuteine, and hirsutine) and oxindole skeleton (formosanine, isoformosanine, pteropodine, isopteropodine, rhynchophylline, isorhynchophylline, and mitraphylline) identified 86 and 73 common monoisotopic ions, respectively. The comparative analyses of the three pairs of stereoisomers showed more than 170 common monoisotopic ions in each pair. This method was also applied to the targeted analysis of MIAs in Catharanthus roseus and Uncaria rhynchophylla to profile indole and oxindole compounds using the product ions. This analysis is suitable for chemically assigning features of the metabolite groups, which contributes to targeted metabolome analysis. PMID:26734034