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Sample records for ion track structure

  1. On the structure of etched ion tracks in polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hnatowicz, V.; Vacik, J.; Apel, P. Y.

    2016-04-01

    A simple model describing the radial structure of latent tracks produced by energetic ions in polymers is presented and used for examination of the process of preferential track etching and determination of the shape of the etched pores. The model is based on the assumption that the local composition of the latent track results from chemical reactions of transient degradation products created by ion passage, but it does not take into account details of the whole process. In accordance with the established idea the model calculations lead to the latent track structure with an easily etchable core surrounded by a relatively thin layer of cross-linked structures and a far reaching halo with a progressively decreasing concentration of the degradation products. The etching of the latent track with such a structure leads to funnel-type pores which have been observed in recent conductometric experiments.

  2. Track structure of carbon ions: measurements and simulations.

    PubMed

    Conte, V; Colautti, P; Moro, D; Grosswendt, B

    2014-10-01

    The likelihood of radiation to produce clustered damages in irradiated biological tissue and the reparability of such damages are closely related to the stochastics of localised ionising interactions within small volumes of nanometre sizes, determined by the particle track structure. Track structure investigations in nanometre-sized volumes have been subject of research for several decades, mainly by means of Monte Carlo simulations. Today, the 'track-nanodosimeter', installed at the TANDEM-ALPI accelerator complex of LNL, is a measuring device able to count the electrons produced in a 20-nm equivalent sensitive site (De Nardo et al. A detector for track-nanodosimetry. Nucl. Instrum. Methods. Phys. Res. A 484: , 312-326 (2002)). It allows studying track structure properties both in the near neighbourhood of a primary particle trajectory and separately in the penumbra region. An extended study for different ionising particles of medical interest has been recently performed with the track-nanodosimeter (Conte et al. Track structure of light ions: experiments and simulations. New J. Phys. 14: , 093010, (2012)). Here, new experimental data and results of Monte Carlo simulations for 240- and 96-MeV (12)C-ions are presented and discussed. PMID:24249779

  3. Observations on ion track structure in semiconductors : a phenomenological study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selva, L. E.; Wallace, R. E.

    2001-01-01

    An ion track structure model at the nanometer scale is presented. The model is based on electrostatic principles and is supported by observed experimental results conducted on power MOSFETs. The model predicts the existence of a transient induced electric field following the passage of an energetic heavy ion. There are two segments to the field (a radial and an axial component). It is the interaction of this transient electric field with the local environment that can trigger a catastrophic failure.

  4. Low energy electrons and swift ion track structure in PADC

    SciTech Connect

    Fromm, Michel; Quinto, Michele A.; Weck, Philippe F.; Champion, Christophe

    2015-05-27

    The current work aims at providing an accurate description of the ion track-structure in poly-allyl dyglycol carbonate (PADC) by using an up-to-date Monte-Carlo code-called TILDA-V (a French acronym for Transport d’Ions Lourds Dans l’Aqua & Vivo). In this simulation the ion track-structure in PADC is mainly described in terms of ejected electrons with a particular attention done to the Low Energy Electrons (LEEs). After a brief reminder of the most important channels through which LEEs are prone to break a chemical bond, we will report on the simulated energetic distributions of LEEs along an ion track in PADC for particular incident energies located on both sides of the Bragg-peak position. Lastly, based on the rare data dealing with LEEs interaction with polymers or organic molecules, we will emphasise the role played by the LEEs in the formation of a latent track in PADC, and more particularly the one played by the sub-ionization electrons.

  5. Low energy electrons and swift ion track structure in PADC

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fromm, Michel; Quinto, Michele A.; Weck, Philippe F.; Champion, Christophe

    2015-05-27

    The current work aims at providing an accurate description of the ion track-structure in poly-allyl dyglycol carbonate (PADC) by using an up-to-date Monte-Carlo code-called TILDA-V (a French acronym for Transport d’Ions Lourds Dans l’Aqua & Vivo). In this simulation the ion track-structure in PADC is mainly described in terms of ejected electrons with a particular attention done to the Low Energy Electrons (LEEs). After a brief reminder of the most important channels through which LEEs are prone to break a chemical bond, we will report on the simulated energetic distributions of LEEs along an ion track in PADC for particularmore » incident energies located on both sides of the Bragg-peak position. Lastly, based on the rare data dealing with LEEs interaction with polymers or organic molecules, we will emphasise the role played by the LEEs in the formation of a latent track in PADC, and more particularly the one played by the sub-ionization electrons.« less

  6. Low energy electrons and swift ion track structure in PADC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fromm, Michel; Quinto, Michele A.; Weck, Philippe F.; Champion, Christophe

    2015-10-01

    The current work aims at providing an accurate description of the ion track-structure in poly-allyl dyglycol carbonate (PADC) by using an up-to-date Monte-Carlo code-called TILDA-V (a French acronym for Transport d'Ions Lourds Dans l'Aqua & Vivo). In this simulation the ion track-structure in PADC is mainly described in terms of ejected electrons with a particular attention done to the Low Energy Electrons (LEEs). After a brief reminder of the most important channels through which LEEs are prone to break a chemical bond, we will report on the simulated energetic distributions of LEEs along an ion track in PADC for particular incident energies located on both sides of the Bragg-peak position. Finally, based on the rare data dealing with LEEs interaction with polymers or organic molecules, we will emphasise the role played by the LEEs in the formation of a latent track in PADC, and more particularly the one played by the sub-ionization electrons.

  7. Cryogenic Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry: Tracking Ion Structure from Solution to the Gas Phase.

    PubMed

    Servage, Kelly A; Silveira, Joshua A; Fort, Kyle L; Russell, David H

    2016-07-19

    Electrospray ionization (ESI) combined with ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) is adding new dimensions, that is, structure and dynamics, to the field of biological mass spectrometry. There is increasing evidence that gas-phase ions produced by ESI can closely resemble their solution-phase structures, but correlating these structures can be complicated owing to the number of competing effects contributing to structural preferences, including both inter- and intramolecular interactions. Ions encounter unique hydration environments during the transition from solution to the gas phase that will likely affect their structure(s), but many of these structural changes will go undetected because ESI-IM-MS analysis is typically performed on solvent-free ions. Cryogenic ion mobility-mass spectrometry (cryo-IM-MS) takes advantage of the freeze-drying capabilities of ESI and a cryogenically cooled IM drift cell (80 K) to preserve extensively solvated ions of the type [M + xH](x+)(H2O)n, where n can vary from zero to several hundred. This affords an experimental approach for tracking the structural evolution of hydrated biomolecules en route to forming solvent-free gas-phase ions. The studies highlighted in this Account illustrate the varying extent to which dehydration can alter ion structure and the overall impact of cryo-IM-MS on structural studies of hydrated biomolecules. Studies of small ions, including protonated water clusters and alkyl diammonium cations, reveal structural transitions associated with the development of the H-bond network of water molecules surrounding the charge carrier(s). For peptide ions, results show that water networks are highly dependent on the charge-carrying species within the cluster. Specifically, hydrated peptide ions containing lysine display specific hydration behavior around the ammonium ion, that is, magic number clusters with enhanced stability, whereas peptides containing arginine do not display specific hydration around the

  8. Track Structure in DNA Irradiated with Heavy Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, Michael K.; Becker, David; Sevilla, Michael D.; Zimbrick, John D.

    2005-04-01

    The spatial properties of trapped radicals produced in heavy ion-irradiated solid DNA at 77 K have been probed using pulsed Electron Paramagnetic Double Resonance (PELDOR or DEER) techniques. Salmon testes DNA hydrated to twelve water molecules per nucleotide was irradiated with 40Ar ions of energy 100 MeV/nucleon and LET ranging from 300 to 400 keV/?. Irradiated samples were maintained at cryogenic temperature at all times. PELDOR measurements were made using a refocused echo detection sequence that allows dipolar interaction between trapped radicals to be observed. The EPR spectrum is attributed to electron loss/gain DNA base radicals and neutral carbon-centered radicals that likely arise from sugar damage. We find a radical concentration of 13.5*1018 cm-3 in the tracks and a track radius of 6.79 nm. The cross section of these tracks is 144 nm2 yielding a lineal radical density of 2.6 radicals/nm. Based upon the yields previously determined for particles having calculated LET values of 300-400 keV/mm and our measured lineal density, we obtain an LET of 270 keV/mm, which is in good agreement with the calculated range of values. These measurements of radical density and spatial extent provide the first direct experimental determination of track characteristics in irradiated DNA.

  9. Fine Structure in Swift Heavy Ion Tracks in Amorphous SiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluth, P.; Schnohr, C. S.; Pakarinen, O. H.; Djurabekova, F.; Sprouster, D. J.; Giulian, R.; Ridgway, M. C.; Byrne, A. P.; Trautmann, C.; Cookson, D. J.; Nordlund, K.; Toulemonde, M.

    2008-10-01

    We report on the observation of a fine structure in ion tracks in amorphous SiO2 using small angle x-ray scattering measurements. Tracks were generated by high energy ion irradiation with Au and Xe between 27 MeV and 1.43 GeV. In agreement with molecular dynamics simulations, the tracks consist of a core characterized by a significant density deficit compared to unirradiated material, surrounded by a high density shell. The structure is consistent with a frozen-in pressure wave originating from the center of the ion track as a result of a thermal spike.

  10. Energy dependent track structure parametrisations for protons and carbon ions based on nanometric simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Frauke; Villagrasa, Carmen; Rabus, Hans; Wilkens, Jan J.

    2015-09-01

    The BioQuaRT project within the European Metrology Research Programme aims at correlating ion track structure characteristics with the biological effects of radiation and develops measurement and simulation techniques for determining ion track structure on different length scales from about 2 nm to about 10 μm. Within this framework, we investigate methods to translate track-structure quantities derived on a nanometre scale to macroscopic dimensions. Input data sets were generated by simulations of ion tracks of protons and carbon ions in liquid water using the Geant 4 Monte Carlo toolkit with the Geant4-DNA processes. Based on the energy transfer points - recorded with nanometre resolution - we investigated parametrisations of overall properties of ion track structure. Three different track structure parametrisations have been developed using the distances to the 10 next neighbouring ionisations, the radial energy distribution and ionisation cluster size distributions. These parametrisations of nanometric track structure build a basis for deriving biologically relevant mean values which are essential in the clinical situation where each voxel is exposed to a mixed radiation field. Contribution to the Topical Issue "COST Action Nano-IBCT: Nano-scale Processes Behind Ion-Beam Cancer Therapy", edited by Andrey Solov'yov, Nigel Mason, Gustavo García, Eugene Surdutovich.

  11. Free ion yields in liquids: Molecular structure and track effects

    SciTech Connect

    Holroyd, R.

    1992-05-01

    The signal generated in a liquid-filled ionization chamber is proporational to the ions that escape, the free ion yield or, G{sub fi}. Recent results show how molecular structure, rate of energy loss (dE/dx) and pressure affect G{sub fi} and give further insight into the ionization process in liquids. As a consequence of the passage of high energy charged particles through a liquid, molecules are ionized and excited. The electrons have kinetic energy initially which allow them to travel some distance away from their geminate cations. The electrons may lose energy to vibrational modes but a significant fraction of the separation occurs while the electrons have subvibrational (near thermal) energy. When the electron finally thermalizes it is within the coulombic field of its parent cation and the two ions constitute a geminate pair. The free ion yield is determined by the fraction of geminate pairs which separate to form free ions as against those that recombine to form excited states.

  12. Free ion yields in liquids: Molecular structure and track effects

    SciTech Connect

    Holroyd, R.

    1992-01-01

    The signal generated in a liquid-filled ionization chamber is proporational to the ions that escape, the free ion yield or, G{sub fi}. Recent results show how molecular structure, rate of energy loss (dE/dx) and pressure affect G{sub fi} and give further insight into the ionization process in liquids. As a consequence of the passage of high energy charged particles through a liquid, molecules are ionized and excited. The electrons have kinetic energy initially which allow them to travel some distance away from their geminate cations. The electrons may lose energy to vibrational modes but a significant fraction of the separation occurs while the electrons have subvibrational (near thermal) energy. When the electron finally thermalizes it is within the coulombic field of its parent cation and the two ions constitute a geminate pair. The free ion yield is determined by the fraction of geminate pairs which separate to form free ions as against those that recombine to form excited states.

  13. Cross-section scaling for track structure simulations of low-energy ions in liquid water.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, E; Friedland, W; Kundrát, P; Dingfelder, M; Ottolenghi, A

    2015-09-01

    Radiation damage by low-energy ions significantly contributes to the high biological efficiency of ion beams in distal Bragg peak regions as well as to the energy-dependent efficiency of neutron irradiation. To enable assessing biological effects of ions at energies <1 MeV u(-1) with track-structure based models, a Barkas-like scaling procedure is developed that provides ion cross sections in liquid water based on those for hydrogen ions. The resulting stopping power and range for carbon ions agree with the ICRU 73 database and other low-energy stopping power data. The method represents the basis for extending PARTRAC simulations of light ion track structures and biological effects down to the keV u(-1) range. PMID:25969528

  14. Heavy-ion effects: from track structure to DNA and chromosome damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballarini, F.; Alloni, D.; Facoetti, A.; Ottolenghi, A.

    2008-07-01

    The use of carbon ions for the treatment of certain tumour types, especially radioresistant tumours, is becoming more frequent due to the carbon-ion dose localization and high relative biological effectiveness (RBE) in the Bragg peak region. Human beings can also be exposed to heavy ions in space, since galactic cosmic rays are a mixed field consisting of not only high-energy protons and He ions, but also heavier ions including iron. Due to their high linear energy transfer (LET), heavy ions have peculiar track structures, characterized by a high level of energy deposition clustering. Furthermore, high-energy ions produce energetic secondary electrons ('delta rays') which can give rise to energy depositions several micrometres away from the core of the primary particle track. Also in view of hadron therapy and space radiation applications, it is therefore important to characterize heavy-ion tracks from a physical and biophysical point of view. In this framework, herein we will discuss the main physical features of heavy-ion track structure, as well as heavy-ion-induced DNA double-strand breaks, which are regarded as one of the most important initial radiobiological lesions and chromosome aberrations, which are correlated both with cell death and with cell conversion to malignancy.

  15. Calculation of Heavy Ion Inactivation and Mutation Rates in Radial Dose Model of Track Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wilson, John W.; Shavers, Mark R.; Katz, Robert

    1997-01-01

    In the track structure model, the inactivation cross section is found by summing an inactivation probability over all impact parameters from the ion to the sensitive sites within the cell nucleus. The inactivation probability is evaluated by using the dose response of the system to gamma rays and the radial dose of the ions and may be equal to unity at small impact parameters. We apply the track structure model to recent data with heavy ion beams irradiating biological samples of E. Coli, B. Subtilis spores, and Chinese hamster (V79) cells. Heavy ions have observed cross sections for inactivation that approach and sometimes exceed the geometric size of the cell nucleus. We show how the effects of inactivation may be taken into account in the evaluation of the mutation cross sections in the track structure model through correlation of sites for gene mutation and cell inactivation. The model is fit to available data for HPRT (hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase) mutations in V79 cells, and good agreement is found. Calculations show the high probability for mutation by relativistic ions due to the radial extension of ions track from delta rays. The effects of inactivation on mutation rates make it very unlikely that a single parameter such as LET (linear energy transfer) can be used to specify radiation quality for heavy ion bombardment.

  16. Experimental investigation of ionisation track structure of carbon ions at HIL Warsaw.

    PubMed

    Bantsar, A; Hilgers, G; Pszona, S; Rabus, H; Szeflinski, Z

    2015-09-01

    In view of the upcoming radiation therapy with carbon ions, the ionisation structure of the carbon ion track at the nanometre scale is of particular interest. Two different nanodosimeters capable of measuring track structure of ionising particles in a gas target equivalent to a nanometric site in condensed matter were involved in the presented experimental investigation, namely the NCBJ Jet Counter and the PTB Ion Counter. At the accelerator facility of the HIL in Warsaw, simulated nanometric volumes were irradiated with carbon ions of 45 and 76 MeV of kinetic energy, corresponding to a range in the tissue of ∼85 µm and ∼190 µm, respectively. The filling gas of both nanodosimeters' ionisation volume was molecular nitrogen N2, and the ionisation cluster size distributions, i.e. the statistical distribution of the number of ionizations produced by one single primary carbon ion in the filling gas, were measured for the two primary particle energies. PMID:25897141

  17. Impact of track structure calculations on biological treatment planning in ion radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsässer, Thilo; Cunrath, Richard; Krämer, Michael; Scholz, Michael

    2008-07-01

    Treatment planning for ion therapy requires precise knowledge about the biological effectiveness of particle beams, which is strongly determined by the microscopic radial energy deposition around individual ion tracks. We analyse different amorphous track structure models based on simple analytical formulae as well as on radial dose distributions derived by means of Monte Carlo simulations. Moreover, these track structure representations are used as input for the local effect model (LEM) in order to determine their impact on the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of cell inactivation. It demonstrates the relevance of the inner part of the ion track with a radius of the order of a few nanometres. We show that simple analytical formulae for the radial dose distributions give good results for the prediction of cell inactivation. However, they strongly depend on the assumptions about the local dose in the track core. Additionally, we discuss the interdependence of track structure calculations with other model constituents such as target size and the choice of the biological input data for conventional photon irradiation.

  18. Monte-Carlo Simulations of Heavy Ions Track Structures and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plante, Ianik; Cucinotta, Francia A.

    2013-01-01

    In space, astronauts are exposed to protons, high ]energy heavy (HZE) ions that have a high charge (Z) and energy (E), and secondary radiation, including neutrons and recoil nuclei produced by nuclear reactions in spacecraft walls or in tissue. The astronauts can only be partly shielded from these particles. Therefore, on travelling to Mars, it is estimated that every cell nucleus in an astronaut fs body would be hit by a proton or secondary electron (e.g., electrons of the target atoms ionized by the HZE ion) every few days and by an HZE ion about once a month. The risks related to these heavy ions are not well known and of concern for long duration space exploration missions. Medical ion therapy is another situation where human beings can be irradiated by heavy ions, usually to treat cancer. Heavy ions have a peculiar track structure characterized by high levels of energy ]deposition clustering, especially in near the track ends in the so ]called eBragg peak f region. In radiotherapy, these features of heavy ions can provide an improved dose conformation with respect to photons, also considering that the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of therapeutic ions in the plateau region before the peak is sufficiently low. Therefore, several proton and carbon ion therapy facilities are under construction at this moment

  19. High-resolution heavy ion track structure imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laczko, G.; Dangendorf, V.; Krämer, M.; Schardt, D.; Tittelmeier, K.

    2004-12-01

    Radiation action in matter depends on the details of the spatial distribution of energy transfer events on the nanometer scale. In this contribution, we present an instrument for experimental investigation of spatial ionisation patterns of ions in matter. The experimental system is based on a time projection chamber with a parallel drift field, parallel-plate charge and light amplification layers and optical readout with an image-intensified CCD camera (OPtical Avalanche Chamber (OPAC)). The chamber is operated with low pressure gas (4-40 hPa) to achieve a resolution of down to 50 nm in tissue density. Preliminary results of measurements and simulations are presented.

  20. Fast ion conductivity in strained defect-fluorite structure created by ion tracks in Gd2Ti2O7

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aidhy, Dilpuneet S.; Sachan, Ritesh; Zarkadoula, Eva; Pakarinen, Olli; Chisholm, Matthew F.; Zhang, Yanwen; Weber, William J.

    2015-11-10

    The structure and ion-conducting properties of the defect-fluorite ring structure formed around amorphous ion-tracks by swift heavy ion irradiation of Gd2Ti2O7 pyrochlore are investigated. High angle annular dark field imaging complemented with ion-track molecular dynamics simulations show that the atoms in the ring structure are disordered, and have relatively larger cation-cation interspacing than in the bulk pyrochlore, illustrating the presence of tensile strain in the ring region. Density functional theory calculations show that the non-equilibrium defect-fluorite structure can be stabilized by tensile strain. The pyrochlore to defect-fluorite structure transformation in the ring region is predicted to be induced by recrystallizationmore » during a melt-quench process and stabilized by tensile strain. Static pair-potential calculations show that planar tensile strain lowers oxygen vacancy migration barriers in pyrochlores, in agreement with recent studies on fluorite and perovskite materials. Lastly, in view of these results, it is suggested that strain engineering could be simultaneously used to stabilize the defect-fluorite structure and gain control over its high ion-conducting properties.« less

  1. Fast ion conductivity in strained defect-fluorite structure created by ion tracks in Gd2Ti2O7

    PubMed Central

    Aidhy, Dilpuneet S.; Sachan, Ritesh; Zarkadoula, Eva; Pakarinen, Olli; Chisholm, Matthew F.; Zhang, Yanwen; Weber, William J.

    2015-01-01

    The structure and ion-conducting properties of the defect-fluorite ring structure formed around amorphous ion-tracks by swift heavy ion irradiation of Gd2Ti2O7 pyrochlore are investigated. High angle annular dark field imaging complemented with ion-track molecular dynamics simulations show that the atoms in the ring structure are disordered, and have relatively larger cation-cation interspacing than in the bulk pyrochlore, illustrating the presence of tensile strain in the ring region. Density functional theory calculations show that the non-equilibrium defect-fluorite structure can be stabilized by tensile strain. The pyrochlore to defect-fluorite structure transformation in the ring region is predicted to be induced by recrystallization during a melt-quench process and stabilized by tensile strain. Static pair-potential calculations show that planar tensile strain lowers oxygen vacancy migration barriers in pyrochlores, in agreement with recent studies on fluorite and perovskite materials. In view of these results, it is suggested that strain engineering could be simultaneously used to stabilize the defect-fluorite structure and gain control over its high ion-conducting properties. PMID:26555848

  2. Amorphous tracks induced by energetic ions in strongly anisotropic solids with layered structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szenes, G.

    2006-07-01

    Common features of ion-induced tracks in layered structures are analysed in YBaCuO, BiSrCaCuO and in semiconducting GeS and MoS2 . In all crystals, the conduction is poor along the normal layer. The anisotropic electron properties lead to the formation of an ion-induced broad and a narrow thermal spike in these solids. The contribution of the two spikes to the formation of tracks can be separated in GeS. When the gap energy is low or zero (YBaCuO, BiSrCaCuO, MoS2), only the narrow spike controls the track formation, and the localization of the energy deposition is the same as in insulators. However, the fraction of the deposited energy transferred to the narrow spike is only about one-third of that in insulators. The anisotropic features of tracks show the effect of the energy bands. Good quantitative agreement is found between the experimental data and the predictions of the authors thermal spike model.

  3. Heavy ion track-structure calculations for radial dose in arbitrary materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Katz, Robert; Wilson, John W.; Dubey, Rajendra R.

    1995-01-01

    The delta-ray theory of track structure is compared with experimental data for the radial dose from heavy ion irradiation. The effects of electron transmission and the angular dependence of secondary electron ejection are included in the calculations. Several empirical formulas for electron range and energy are compared in a wide variety of materials in order to extend the application of the track-structure theory. The model of Rudd for the secondary electron-spectrum in proton collisions, which is based on a modified classical kinematics binary encounter model at high energies and a molecular promotion model at low energies, is employed. For heavier projectiles, the secondary electron spectrum is found by scaling the effective charge. Radial dose calculations for carbon, water, silicon, and gold are discussed. The theoretical data agreed well with the experimental data.

  4. Controlled Structure of Electrochemically Deposited Pd Nanowires in Ion-Track Templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Jinglai; Lyu, Shuangbao; Yao, Huijun; Mo, Dan; Chen, Yonghui; Sun, Youmei; Maaz, K.; Maqbool, M.; Liu, Jie

    2015-12-01

    Understanding and controlling structural properties of the materials are crucial in materials research. In this paper, we report that crystallinity and crystallographic orientation of Pd nanowires can be tailored by varying the fabrication conditions during electrochemical deposition in polycarbonate ion-track templates. By changing the deposition temperature during the fabrication process, the nanowires with both single- and poly-crystallinities were obtained. The wires with preferred crystallographic orientations along [111], [100], and [110] directions were achieved via adjusting the applied voltage and temperature during electrochemical deposition.

  5. Track structure based modelling of light ion radiation effects on nuclear and mitochondrial DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Elke; Ottolenghi, Andrea; Dingfelder, Michael; Friedland, Werner; Kundrat, Pavel; Baiocco, Giorgio

    2016-07-01

    Space radiation risk assessment is of great importance for manned spaceflights in order to estimate risks and to develop counter-measures to reduce them. Biophysical simulations with PARTRAC can help greatly to improve the understanding of initial biological response to ionizing radiation. Results from modelling radiation quality dependent DNA damage and repair mechanisms up to chromosomal aberrations (e.g. dicentrics) can be used to predict radiation effects depending on the kind of mixed radiation field exposure. Especially dicentric yields can serve as a biomarker for an increased risk due to radiation and hence as an indicator for the effectiveness of the used shielding. PARTRAC [1] is a multi-scale biophysical research MC code for track structure based initial DNA damage and damage response modelling. It integrates physics, radiochemistry, detailed nuclear DNA structure and molecular biology of DNA repair by NHEJ-pathway to assess radiation effects on cellular level [2]. Ongoing experiments with quasi-homogeneously distributed compared to sub-micrometre focused bunches of protons, lithium and carbon ions allow a separation of effects due to DNA damage complexity on nanometre scale from damage clustering on (sub-) micrometre scale [3, 4]. These data provide an unprecedented benchmark for the DNA damage response model in PARTRAC and help understand the mechanisms leading to cell killing and chromosomal aberrations (e.g. dicentrics) induction. A large part of space radiation is due to a mixed ion field of high energy protons and few heavier ions that can be only partly absorbed by the shielding. Radiation damage induced by low-energy ions significantly contributes to the high relative biological efficiency (RBE) of ion beams around Bragg peak regions. For slow light ions the physical cross section data basis in PARTRAC has been extended to investigate radiation quality effects in the Bragg peak region [5]. The resulting range and LET values agree with ICRU data

  6. Peculiarities of latent track etching in SiO2/Si structures irradiated with Ar, Kr and Xe ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al'zhanova, A.; Dauletbekova, A.; Komarov, F.; Vlasukova, L.; Yuvchenko, V.; Akilbekov, A.; Zdorovets, M.

    2016-05-01

    The process of latent track etching in SiO2/Si structures irradiated with 40Ar (38 MeV), 84Kr (59 MeV) and 132Xe (133 and 200 MeV) ions has been investigated. The experimental results of SiO2 etching in a hydrofluoric acid solution have been compared with the results of computer simulation based on the thermal spike model. It has been confirmed that the formation of a molten region along the swift ion trajectory with minimum radius of 3 nm can serve as a theoretical criterion for the reproducible latent track etching tracks in SiO2.

  7. Effects of track structure and cell inactivation on the calculation of heavy ion mutation rates in mammalian cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W.; Shavers, M. R.; Katz, R.

    1996-01-01

    It has long been suggested that inactivation severely effects the probability of mutation by heavy ions in mammalian cells. Heavy ions have observed cross sections of inactivation that approach and sometimes exceed the geometric size of the cell nucleus in mammalian cells. In the track structure model of Katz the inactivation cross section is found by summing an inactivation probability over all impact parameters from the ion to the sensitive sites within the cell nucleus. The inactivation probability is evaluated using the dose-response of the system to gamma-rays and the radial dose of the ions and may be equal to unity at small impact parameters for some ions. We show how the effects of inactivation may be taken into account in the evaluation of the mutation cross sections from heavy ions in the track structure model through correlation of sites for gene mutation and cell inactivation. The model is fit to available data for HPRT mutations in Chinese hamster cells and good agreement is found. The resulting calculations qualitatively show that mutation cross sections for heavy ions display minima at velocities where inactivation cross sections display maxima. Also, calculations show the high probability of mutation by relativistic heavy ions due to the radial extension of ions track from delta-rays in agreement with the microlesion concept. The effects of inactivation on mutations rates make it very unlikely that a single parameter such as LET or Z*2/beta(2) can be used to specify radiation quality for heavy ion bombardment.

  8. Track structure based modelling of light ion radiation effects on nuclear and mitochondrial DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Elke; Ottolenghi, Andrea; Dingfelder, Michael; Friedland, Werner; Kundrat, Pavel; Baiocco, Giorgio

    2016-07-01

    Space radiation risk assessment is of great importance for manned spaceflights in order to estimate risks and to develop counter-measures to reduce them. Biophysical simulations with PARTRAC can help greatly to improve the understanding of initial biological response to ionizing radiation. Results from modelling radiation quality dependent DNA damage and repair mechanisms up to chromosomal aberrations (e.g. dicentrics) can be used to predict radiation effects depending on the kind of mixed radiation field exposure. Especially dicentric yields can serve as a biomarker for an increased risk due to radiation and hence as an indicator for the effectiveness of the used shielding. PARTRAC [1] is a multi-scale biophysical research MC code for track structure based initial DNA damage and damage response modelling. It integrates physics, radiochemistry, detailed nuclear DNA structure and molecular biology of DNA repair by NHEJ-pathway to assess radiation effects on cellular level [2]. Ongoing experiments with quasi-homogeneously distributed compared to sub-micrometre focused bunches of protons, lithium and carbon ions allow a separation of effects due to DNA damage complexity on nanometre scale from damage clustering on (sub-) micrometre scale [3, 4]. These data provide an unprecedented benchmark for the DNA damage response model in PARTRAC and help understand the mechanisms leading to cell killing and chromosomal aberrations (e.g. dicentrics) induction. A large part of space radiation is due to a mixed ion field of high energy protons and few heavier ions that can be only partly absorbed by the shielding. Radiation damage induced by low-energy ions significantly contributes to the high relative biological efficiency (RBE) of ion beams around Bragg peak regions. For slow light ions the physical cross section data basis in PARTRAC has been extended to investigate radiation quality effects in the Bragg peak region [5]. The resulting range and LET values agree with ICRU data

  9. Latent ion tracks in amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Bierschenk, Thomas; Giulian, Raquel; Afra, Boshra; Rodriguez, Matias D; Schauries, D; Mudie, Stephen; Pakarinen, Olli H; Djurabekova, Flyura; Nordlund, Kai; Osmani, Orkhan; Medvedev, Nikita; Rethfield, Baerbel; Ridgway, Mark C; Kluth, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    We present experimental evidence for the formation of ion tracks in amorphous Si induced by swift heavy ion irradiation. An underlying core-shell structure consistent with remnants of a high density liquid structure was revealed by small-angle x-ray scattering and molecular dynamics simulations. Ion track dimensions dier for as-implanted and relaxed Si as attributed to dierent microstructures and melting temperatures. The identication and characterisation of ion tracks in amorphous Si yields new insight into mechanisms of damage formation due to swift heavy ion irradiation in amorphous semiconductors.

  10. An assessment of galactic cosmic radiation quality considering heavy ion track structures within the cellular environment.

    PubMed

    Craven, P A; Rycroft, M J

    1996-01-01

    Beyond the magnetic influence of the Earth, the flux of galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) represents a radiological concern for long-term manned space missions. Current concepts of radiation quality and equivalent dose are inadequate for accurately specifying the relative biological "efficiency" of low doses of such heavily ionising radiations, based as they are on the single parameter of Linear Energy Transfer (LET). Such methods take no account of the mechanisms, nor of the highly inhomogeneous spatial structure, of energy deposition in radiation tracks. DNA damage in the cell nucleus, which ultimately leads to the death or transformation of the cell, is usually initiated by electrons liberated from surrounding molecules by the incident projectile ion. The characteristics of these emitted "delta-rays", dependent primarily upon the charge and velocity of the ion, are considered in relation to an idealised representation of the cellular environment. Theoretically calculated delta-ray energy spectra are multiplied by a series of weighting algorithms designed to represent the potential for DNA insult in this environment, both in terms of the quantity and quality of damage. By evaluating the resulting curves, and taking into account the energy spectra of heavy ions in space, a relative measure of the biological relevance of the most abundant GCR species is obtained, behind several shielding configurations. It is hoped that this method of assessing the radiation quality of galactic cosmic rays will be of value when considering the safety of long-term manned space missions. PMID:11538985

  11. Formation of ion damage tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tombrello, T. A.; Wie, C. R.; Itoh, N.; Nakayama, T.

    1984-01-01

    A new model is proposed to explain both localized damage regions and preferential etching of damage tracks caused by the passage of energetic ions in insulators. The formation of each region of extended defects is initiated by the Auger decay of a vacancy produced in an inner electronic shell of an atom of the insulator by an incident ion. This decay produces an intense source of ionization within a small volume around the decaying atom, which causes decomposition of the material in a manner similar to that observed in pulsed laser irradiation. The resulting chemical or crystalline modification of the material is the latent track, which can be preferentially etched due to its changed structure.

  12. Track structure in biological models.

    PubMed

    Curtis, S B

    1986-01-01

    High-energy heavy ions in the galactic cosmic radiation (HZE particles) may pose a special risk during long term manned space flights outside the sheltering confines of the earth's geomagnetic field. These particles are highly ionizing, and they and their nuclear secondaries can penetrate many centimeters of body tissue. The three dimensional patterns of ionizations they create as they lose energy are referred to as their track structure. Several models of biological action on mammalian cells attempt to treat track structure or related quantities in their formulation. The methods by which they do this are reviewed. The proximity function is introduced in connection with the theory of Dual Radiation Action (DRA). The ion-gamma kill (IGK) model introduces the radial energy-density distribution, which is a smooth function characterizing both the magnitude and extension of a charged particle track. The lethal, potentially lethal (LPL) model introduces lambda, the mean distance between relevant ion clusters or biochemical species along the track. Since very localized energy depositions (within approximately 10 nm) are emphasized, the proximity function as defined in the DRA model is not of utility in characterizing track structure in the LPL formulation. PMID:11537218

  13. SU-E-T-334: Track Structure Simulations of Charged Particles at Low and Intermediate Energies: Cross Sections Needs for Light and Heavy Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Dingfelder, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose/Methods: Monte Carlo (MC) track structure simulations follow the primary as well as all produced secondary particles in an event-by-event manner, from starting or ejection energy down to total stopping. They provide useful information on physics and chemistry of the biological response to radiation. They depend on reliable interaction cross sections and transport models of the considered radiation quality with biologically relevant materials. Most transport models focus on sufficiently fast and bare (i.e., fully ionized) ions and cross sections calculated within the (relativistic) first Born or Bethe approximations. These theories consider the projectile as a point particle and rely on proton cross sections and simple charge-scaling methods; they neglect the atomic nature of the ion and break down at low and intermediate ion energies. Heavier ions are used in particle therapy and slow to intermediate and low energies in the biologically interesting Bragg peak. Lighter and slower fragment ions, including alpha particles, protons, and neutrons are also produced in nuclear and break up reactions of charged particles. Secondary neutrons also produce recoil protons and ions, mainly in the intermediate energy range. Results/Conclusion: This work reviews existing models for track structure simulations and cross section calculations for light and heavy ions focusing on the low and intermediate energy range. It also presents new and updated aspects on cross section calculations and simulation techniques for ions and discusses the need for new models, calculations, and experimental data.

  14. Nanoscale Phase Transitions under Extreme Conditions within an Ion Track

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jiaming; Lang, Maik; Ewing, Rodney C.; Devanathan, R.; Weber, William; Toulemonde, M.

    2011-01-31

    The dynamics of track development due to the passage of relativistic heavy ions through solids is a long-standing issue relevant to nuclear materials, age dating of minerals, space exploration, and nanoscale fabrication of novel devices. We have integrated experimental and simulation approaches to investigate nanoscale phase transitions under the extreme conditions created within single tracks of relativistic ions in Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}(TiO{sub 2}){sub x} and Gd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2–x} Ti{sub x} O{sub 7}. Track size and internal structure depend on energy density deposition, irradiation temperature, and material composition. Based on the inelastic thermal spike model, molecular dynamics simulations follow the time evolution of individual tracks and reveal the phase transition pathways to the concentric track structures observed experimentally. Individual ion tracks have nanoscale core-shell structures that provide a unique record of the phase transition pathways under extreme conditions.

  15. Nanoscale Phase Transitions under Extreme Conditions within an Ion Track

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jiaming; Lang, Maik; Ewing, Rodney C.; Devanathan, Ramaswami; Weber, William J.; Toulemonde, Marcel

    2010-06-30

    The dynamics of track development due to the passage of relativistic heavy ions through solids is a long-standing issue relevant to nuclear materials, age-dating of minerals, space exploration, and nanoscale fabrication of novel devices. We have integrated experimental and simulation approaches to investigate nanoscale phase transitions under the extreme conditions created within single tracks of relativistic ions in Gd2O3(TiO2)x and Gd2Zr2-xTixO7. Track size and internal structure depend on energy-density deposition, irradiation temperature, and material composition. Molecular dynamics methods based on the thermal spike model have simulated, for the first time, the internal structure of individual tracks, consistent with experimental observations. Individual ion tracks have nanoscale core-shell structures that provide a unique record of the phase transition pathways under extreme conditions.

  16. Multiple lesion track structure model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Shinn, Judy L.

    1992-01-01

    A multilesion cell kinetic model is derived, and radiation kinetic coefficients are related to the Katz track structure model. The repair-related coefficients are determined from the delayed plating experiments of Yang et al. for the C3H10T1/2 cell system. The model agrees well with the x ray and heavy ion experiments of Yang et al. for the immediate plating, delaying plating, and fractionated exposure protocols employed by Yang. A study is made of the effects of target fragments in energetic proton exposures and of the repair-deficient target-fragment-induced lesions.

  17. Track Structure Model for Radial Distributions of Electron Spectra and Event Spectra from High-Energy Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Katz, R.; Wilson, J. W.

    1998-01-01

    An analytic method is described for evaluating the average radial electron spectrum and the radial and total frequency-event spectrum for high-energy ions. For high-energy ions, indirect events make important contributions to frequency-event spectra. The method used for evaluating indirect events is to fold the radial electron spectrum with measured frequency-event spectrum for photons or electrons. The contribution from direct events is treated using a spatially restricted linear energy transfer (LET). We find that high-energy heavy ions have a significantly reduced frequency-averaged final energy (yF) compared to LET, while relativistic protons have a significantly increased yF and dose-averaged lineal energy (yD) for typical site sizes used in tissue equivalent proportional counters. Such differences represent important factors in evaluating event spectra with laboratory beams, in space- flight, or in atmospheric radiation studies and in validation of radiation transport codes. The inadequacy of LET as descriptor because of deviations in values of physical quantities, such as track width, secondary electron spectrum, and yD for ions of identical LET is also discussed.

  18. Tomographic study of ion tracks by ion energy loss spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Vacik, J.; Havranek, V.; Hnatowicz, V.; Lavrentiev, V.; Horak, P.; Fink, D.; Apel, P.

    2013-04-19

    Ion energy loss spectroscopy is suggested to determine the shape of the (latent, etched and filled) ion tracks in polymers using ion probes of various beam sizes. For a milli-probe, it can be considered as a one-dimensional tomography of many identical (rotationally symmetric) objects. For a micro-probe, the technique can be understood as a micro-tomography of the single ion track. In both cases, the ion energy loss spectroscopy requires monoenergetic ions with a low intensity (< 10{sup -3} s{sup -1}) and a well defined angular beam set-up. Here we present a study of the possible use of the ion milli-and micro-probes in a tomographic study of the ion track 3D geometry and its evolution during chemical etching.

  19. Online Simulation of Radiation Track Structure Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plante, Ianik

    2015-01-01

    Space radiation comprises protons, helium and high charged and energy (HZE) particles. High-energy particles are a concern for human space flight, because they are no known options for shielding astronauts from them. When these ions interact with matter, they damage molecules and create radiolytic species. The pattern of energy deposition and positions of the radiolytic species, called radiation track structure, is highly dependent on the charge and energy of the ion. The radiolytic species damage biological molecules, which may lead to several long-term health effects such as cancer. Because of the importance of heavy ions, the radiation community is very interested in the interaction of HZE particles with DNA, notably with regards to the track structure. A desktop program named RITRACKS was developed to simulate radiation track structure. The goal of this project is to create a web interface to allow registered internal users to use RITRACKS remotely.

  20. Nanodosimetric track structure in homogeneous extended beams.

    PubMed

    Conte, V; Moro, D; Colautti, P; Grosswendt, B

    2015-09-01

    Physical aspects of particle track structure are important in determining the induction of clustered damage in relevant subcellular structures like the DNA and higher-order genomic structures. The direct measurement of track-structure properties of ionising radiation is feasible today by counting the number of ionisations produced inside a small gas volume. In particular, the so-called track-nanodosimeter, installed at the TANDEM-ALPI accelerator complex of LNL, measures ionisation cluster-size distributions in a simulated subcellular structure of dimensions 20 nm, corresponding approximately to the diameter of the chromatin fibre. The target volume is irradiated by pencil beams of primary particles passing at specified impact parameter. To directly relate these measured track-structure data to radiobiological measurements performed in broad homogeneous particle beams, these data can be integrated over the impact parameter. This procedure was successfully applied to 240 MeV carbon ions and compared with Monte Carlo simulations for extended fields. PMID:25848108

  1. Ion-counting nanodosemeter with particle tracking capabilities.

    PubMed

    Bashkirov, V; Schulte, R; Breskin, A; Chechik, R; Schemelinin, S; Garty, G; Wroe, A; Sadrozinski, H; Grosswendt, B

    2006-01-01

    An ion-counting nanodosemeter (ND) yielding the distribution of radiation-induced ions in a low-pressure gas within a millimetric, wall-less sensitive volume (SV) was equipped with a silicon microstrip telescope that tracks the primary particles, allowing correlation of nanodosimetric data with particle position relative to the SV. The performance of this tracking ND was tested with a broad 250 MeV proton beam at Loma Linda University Medical Center. The high-resolution tracking capability made it possible to map the ion registration efficiency distribution within the SV, for which only calculated data were available before. It was shown that tracking information combined with nanodosimetric data can map the ionisation pattern of track segments within 150 nm-equivalent long SVs with a longitudinal resolution of approximately 5 tissue-equivalent nanometers. Data acquired in this work were compared with results of Monte Carlo track structure simulations. The good agreement between 'tracking nanodosimetry' data acquired with the new system and simulated data supports the application of ion-counting nanodosimetry in experimental track-structure studies. PMID:17283009

  2. Fast ion conductivity in strained defect-fluorite structure created by ion tracks in Gd2Ti2O7

    SciTech Connect

    Aidhy, Dilpuneet S.; Sachan, Ritesh; Zarkadoula, Eva; Pakarinen, Olli; Chisholm, Matthew F.; Zhang, Yanwen; Weber, William J.

    2015-11-10

    The structure and ion-conducting properties of the defect-fluorite ring structure formed around amorphous ion-tracks by swift heavy ion irradiation of Gd2Ti2O7 pyrochlore are investigated. High angle annular dark field imaging complemented with ion-track molecular dynamics simulations show that the atoms in the ring structure are disordered, and have relatively larger cation-cation interspacing than in the bulk pyrochlore, illustrating the presence of tensile strain in the ring region. Density functional theory calculations show that the non-equilibrium defect-fluorite structure can be stabilized by tensile strain. The pyrochlore to defect-fluorite structure transformation in the ring region is predicted to be induced by recrystallization during a melt-quench process and stabilized by tensile strain. Static pair-potential calculations show that planar tensile strain lowers oxygen vacancy migration barriers in pyrochlores, in agreement with recent studies on fluorite and perovskite materials. Lastly, in view of these results, it is suggested that strain engineering could be simultaneously used to stabilize the defect-fluorite structure and gain control over its high ion-conducting properties.

  3. LET, track structure and models. A review.

    PubMed

    Kraft, G; Krämer, M; Scholz, M

    1992-01-01

    Swift heavy ions when penetrating through matter strip off those electrons having a smaller orbital velocity than the ion velocity. The remaining electrons screen the nuclear charge yielding an effective charge. The effective charge of the ions interacts predominantly with the target electrons causing excitation and ionizations of the target atoms. Using the Bethe Bloch formula for the energy loss combined with the Barkas formula for effective charge, the energy loss values as well as unrestricted and restricted linear transfer can be calculated within a few percent of accuracy. From the primary energy loss only a small fraction of 10% or less is transformed into excitation. The major part of the energy loss is used for the ionization of the target atoms and the emission of the corresponding electrons with a high kinetic energy. These electrons form the track around the trajectory of the primary ion in which two thirds of the primary energy is deposited by collisions of primary, secondary and later generations of electrons with the target molecules. In the electron diffusion process the energy is transported from the center of the track into the halo. The radial dose decreases with the square of the radial distance from the center. The diameter of the track is determined by the maximum range of the emitted electrons, i.e. by the maximum energy electrons. All ions having the same velocity i.e. the same specific energy produce electrons of the same energy and therefore tracks of the same diameters independent of the effective charge. But the dose inside the track increases with the square of the effective charge. Track structure models using this continuous dose distributions produce a better agreement with the experiment than models based on microdosimetry. The critical volume as used in microdosimetry is too large compared to the size of the DNA as critical structure inside the biological objects. Track structure models yield better results because the gross-structure

  4. RITRACKS: A Software for Simulation of Stochastic Radiation Track Structure, Micro and Nanodosimetry, Radiation Chemistry and DNA Damage for Heavy Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plante, I; Wu, H

    2014-01-01

    The code RITRACKS (Relativistic Ion Tracks) has been developed over the last few years at the NASA Johnson Space Center to simulate the effects of ionizing radiations at the microscopic scale, to understand the effects of space radiation at the biological level. The fundamental part of this code is the stochastic simulation of radiation track structure of heavy ions, an important component of space radiations. The code can calculate many relevant quantities such as the radial dose, voxel dose, and may also be used to calculate the dose in spherical and cylindrical targets of various sizes. Recently, we have incorporated DNA structure and damage simulations at the molecular scale in RITRACKS. The direct effect of radiations is simulated by introducing a slight modification of the existing particle transport algorithms, using the Binary-Encounter-Bethe model of ionization cross sections for each molecular orbitals of DNA. The simulation of radiation chemistry is done by a step-by-step diffusion-reaction program based on the Green's functions of the diffusion equation]. This approach is also used to simulate the indirect effect of ionizing radiation on DNA. The software can be installed independently on PC and tablets using the Windows operating system and does not require any coding from the user. It includes a Graphic User Interface (GUI) and a 3D OpenGL visualization interface. The calculations are executed simultaneously (in parallel) on multiple CPUs. The main features of the software will be presented.

  5. Characterisation of a track structure imaging detector.

    PubMed

    Casiraghi, M; Bashkirov, V A; Hurley, R F; Schulte, R W

    2015-09-01

    The spatial distribution of radiation-induced ionisations in sub-cellular structures plays an important role in the initial formation of radiation damage to biological tissues. Using the nanodosimetry approach, physical characteristics of the track structure can be measured and correlated to DNA damage. In this work, a novel nanodosimeter is presented, which detects positive ions produced by radiation interacting with a gas-sensitive volume in order to obtain a high resolution image of the radiation track structure. The characterisation of the detector prototype was performed and different configurations of the device were tested by varying the detector cathode material and the working gas. Preliminary results show that the ionisation cluster size distribution can be obtained with this approach. Further work is planned to improve the detector efficiency in order to register the complete three-dimensional track structure of ionising radiation. PMID:25877534

  6. Interaction of ion tracks in spatial and temporal proximity.

    PubMed

    Kreipl, Maximilian Stephan; Friedland, Werner; Paretzke, Herwig G

    2009-11-01

    In the present work, a systematic analysis of the impact of spatial and temporal proximity of ion tracks on the yield of higher-order radiolytic species as well as of DNA damage patterns is presented. This potential impact may be of concern when laser-driven particle accelerators are used for ion radiation therapy. The biophysical Monte Carlo track structure code PARTRAC was used and, to this end, extended in two aspects: first, the temporal information about track evolution has been included in the track structure module and, second, the simulation code has been modified to enable parallel multiple track processing during simulation of subsequent modelling stages. Depending on the spatial and temporal separation between ion-track pairs, the yield of chemical species has been calculated for incident protons with start energies of 20 MeV, for He(2+) ions with start energies of 1 and 20 MeV, and for 60 MeV C(6+) ions. Provided the overlap of the considered ion tracks is sufficient in all four dimensions (space and time), the yield of hydroxyl radicals was found to be reduced compared to that of single tracks, for all considered ion types. The biological endpoints investigated were base damages, single-strand breaks, double-strand breaks, and clustered lesions for incident pairs of protons and He(2+) ions, each with start energies of 20 MeV. The yield of clustered lesions produced by 20 MeV protons turned out to be influenced by the spatial separation of the proton pair; in contrast, no influence was found for different start times of the protons. The yield of single-strand breaks and base hits was found neither to depend on the spatial separation nor on the temporal separation between the incident protons. For incident 20 MeV He(2+) ions, however, a dependence on the spatial and temporal separation of the ion pair was found for all considered biological endpoints. Nevertheless, spatial proximity conditions where such intertrack effects were obtained are not met in

  7. Influence of electrodeposition parameters on the structure and morphology of ZnO nanowire arrays and networks synthesized in etched ion-track membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Movsesyan, Liana; Schubert, Ina; Yeranyan, Lilit; Trautmann, Christina; Toimil-Molares, Maria Eugenia

    2016-01-01

    This work presents the synthesis and characterization of two different zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowire assemblies: arrays of parallel-oriented cylindrical wires and three-dimensional (3D) networks of highly interconnected wires. Both are synthesized by electrochemical deposition in the pores of etched ion-track polycarbonate membranes. The crystallinity and crystallographic properties of the wires are influenced by the deposition parameters. In particular, we investigate how the diameter of the membrane nanopores and the deposition potential affect crystal orientation and morphology during nanowire growth. X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive x-ray analysis demonstrated that all wires are pure ZnO with a wurtzite hexagonal structure and free of impurities. The unique architecture of the synthesized 3D networks of nanowires with a high aspect ratio and enhanced mechanical stability is discussed.

  8. Industrial applications of ion track technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanot, H.; Ferain, E.

    2009-03-01

    It4ip sa is a spin out from the Université Catholique de Louvain (Belgium) dedicated to the development and production of unique templates and membranes based on the combination of ion track technology of polymers. It supplies customers with hi-tech products, state-of-the-art research and product development services with template capability to make high value added membranes. Notably based on results coming from several collaborative R&D projects supported by European and Regional funding, recent improvements of ion track technology open new doors for fast growing applications in niche markets. This paper reviews some of these Hi-Tec applications in different fields such as in healthcare (oncology, drug control release combined to implant and artificial organs etc.), energy (fuel cells and batteries etc.), water de-contamination and electronics (OLED etc.).

  9. Field Emitter Arrays and Displays Produced by Ion Tracking Lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Felter, T E; Musket, R G; Bernhardt, A F

    2004-12-28

    When ions of sufficient electronic energy loss traverse a dielectric film or foil, they alter the chemical bonding along their nominally straight path within the material. A suitable etchant can quickly dissolve these so-called latent tracks leaving holes of small diameter ({approx}10nm) but long length - several microns. Continuing the etching process gradually increases the diameter reproducibly and uniformly. The trackable medium can be applied as a uniform film onto large substrates. The small, monodisperse holes produced by this track etching can be used in conjunction with additional thin film processing to create functional structures attached to the substrate. For example, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Candescent Technologies Corporation (CTC) co-developed a process to make arrays of gated field emitters ({approx}100nm diameter electron guns) for CTC's ThinCRT{trademark} displays, which have been fabricated to diagonal dimensions > 13. Additional technological applications of ion tracking lithography will be briefly covered.

  10. Atomistic simulation of track formation by energetic ions in zircon

    SciTech Connect

    Moreira, Pedro A.F.P.; Devanathan, Ram; Weber, William J

    2010-01-01

    We have performed classical molecular dynamics simulations of fission track formation in zircon. We simulated the passage of a swift heavy ion through crystalline zircon using cylindrical thermal spikes with energy deposition (dE/dx) of 2.5-12.8 keV nm{sup -1} and a radius of 3 nm. At a low dE/dx of 2.55 keV nm{sup -1}, the structural damage recovered almost completely and a damage track was not produced. At higher values of dE/dx, tracks were observed and the radius of the track increased with increasing dE/dx. Our structural analysis shows amorphization in the core of the track and phase separation into Si-rich regions near the center of the track and Zr-rich regions near the periphery. These simulations establish a threshold dE/dx for fission track formation in zircon that is relevant to thermochronology and nuclear waste immobilization.

  11. High-energy ion tracks in thin films.

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, Barney Lee; Follstaedt, David Martin; McDaniel, Floyd Del; Rossi, Paolo; Norman, Adam K.; Bringa, Eduardo M

    2004-08-01

    High-energy ion tracks (374 MeV Au{sup 26+}) in thin films were examined with transmission electron microscopy to investigate nanopore formation. Tracks in quartz and mica showed diffraction contrast. Tracks in sapphire and mica showed craters formed at the positions of ion incidence and exit, with a lower-density track connecting them. Direct nanopore formation by ions (without chemical etching) would appear to require film thicknesses less than 10 nm.

  12. Atomistic two-temperature modelling of ion track formation in silicon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leino, A. A.; Daraszewicz, S. L.; Pakarinen, O. H.; Nordlund, K.; Djurabekova, F.

    2015-04-01

    We study swift-heavy-ion track formation in α-quartz using the two-temperature molecular dynamics (2T-MD) model realised as a concurrent multiscale scheme. We compare the simulated track radii to the existing experimental ones obtained from small-angle X-ray scattering and Rutherford backscattering experiments. The 2T-MD model provides an explanation of the origin of the track radii saturation at high electronic stopping power. Furthermore, we study the track structure and show that defects formed outside the region of density fluctuations after a swift-heavy-ion impact may explain the conflicting track radii produced by the two experimental techniques.

  13. Effect of track structure and radioprotectors on the induction of oncogenic transformation in murine fibroblasts by heavy ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. C.; Martin, S. G.; Hanson, W. R.; Marino, S. A.; Hall, E. J.; Wachholz, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    The oncogenic potential of high-energy 56Fe particles (1 GeV/nucleon) accelerated with the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron at the Brookhaven National Laboratory was examined utilizing the mouse C3H 10T1/2 cell model. The dose-averaged LET for high-energy 56Fe is estimated to be 143 keV/micrometer with the exposure conditions used in this study. For 56Fe ions, the maximum relative biological effectiveness (RBEmax) values for cell survival and oncogenic transformation were 7.71 and 16.5 respectively. Compared to 150 keV/micrometer 4He nuclei, high-energy 56Fe nuclei were significantly less effective in cell killing and oncogenic induction. The prostaglandin E1 analog misoprostol, an effective oncoprotector of C3H 10T1/2 cells exposed to X rays, was evaluated for its potential as a radioprotector of oncogenic transformation with high-energy 56Fe. Exposure of cells to misoprostol did not alter 56Fe cytotoxicity or the rate of 56Fe-induced oncogenic transformation.

  14. Insights on dramatic radial fluctuations in track formation by energetic ions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sachan, Ritesh; Lang, Maik; Trautmann, Christina; Zhang, Yanwen; Chisholm, Matthew F.; Weber, William J.; Zarkadoula, Eva

    2016-06-02

    We discuss the insights on the unexpected dramatic radial variations in the ion tracks formed by energetic ion (2.3 GeV 208Pb) irradiation at a constant electronic energy-loss (~42 keV/nm) in pyrochlore structured Gd2TiZrO7. Though previous studies have shown track formation and average track diameter measurements, this work brings further clarity on why quantitative analysis of ion track formation in Gd2TixZr(1-x)O7 systems can be more complicated than the currently accepted behavior for ion tracks. The ion track profile is usually considered to be diametrically uniform at constant values of the electronic energy-loss. This study shows the diameter variations to be asmore » large as ~40% within an extremely short incremental track length of ~20 nm. Our molecular dynamics simulations show that these fluctuations in diameter of amorphous core and overall track diameter are attributed to (i) the stochastic nature of inelastic energy loss along the track and (ii) the random substitution of Ti atoms by Zr atoms on the B-site in the pyrochlore lattice. Furthermore, the partial substitution of Ti by Zr increases the favorability of the defect-fluorite structure formation over amorphous phase stochastically, by introducing localized inhomogeneity in atomic structure, density and strain.« less

  15. Insights on dramatic radial fluctuations in track formation by energetic ions

    SciTech Connect

    Sachan, Ritesh; Lang, Maik; Trautmann, Christina; Zhang, Yanwen; Chisholm, Matthew F; Weber, William J

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the insights on the unexpected dramatic radial variations in the ion tracks formed by energetic ion (2.3 GeV 208Pb) irradiation at a constant electronic energy-loss (~42 keV/nm) in pyrochlore structured Gd2TiZrO7. Though previous studies have shown track formation and average track diameter measurements, this work brings further clarity on why quantitative analysis of ion track formation in Gd2TixZr(1-x)O7 systems can be more complicated than the currently accepted behavior for ion tracks. The ion track profile is usually considered to be diametrically uniform at constant values of the electronic energy-loss. This study shows the diameter variations to be as large as ~40% within an extremely short incremental track length of ~20 nm. Our molecular dynamics simulations show that these fluctuations in diameter of amorphous core and overall track diameter are attributed to (i) the stochastic nature of inelastic energy loss along the track and (ii) the random substitution of Ti atoms by Zr atoms on the B-site in the pyrochlore lattice. The partial substitution of Ti by Zr increases the favorability of the defect-fluorite structure formation over amorphous phase stochastically, by introducing localized inhomogeneity in atomic structure, density and strain.

  16. Ionization cross section data of nitrogen, methane, and propane for light ions and electrons and their suitability for use in track structure simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bug, Marion U.; Gargioni, Elisabetta; Nettelbeck, Heidi; Baek, Woon Yong; Hilgers, Gerhard; Rosenfeld, Anatoly B.; Rabus, Hans

    2013-10-01

    Track structure Monte Carlo simulations are frequently applied in micro- and nanodosimetry to calculate the radiation transport in detail. The use of a well-validated set of cross section data in such simulation codes ensures accurate calculations of transport parameters, such as ionization yields. These cross section data are, however, scarce and often discrepant when measured by different groups. This work surveys literature data on ionization and charge-transfer cross sections of nitrogen, methane, and propane for electrons, protons, and helium particles, focusing on the energy range between 100 keV and 20 MeV. Based on the evaluated data, different models for the parametrization of the cross section data are implemented in the code ptra, developed for simulating proton and alpha particle transport in an ion-counting nanodosimeter. The suitability of the cross section data is investigated by comparing the calculated mean ionization cluster size and energy loss with experimental results in either nitrogen or propane. For protons, generally good agreement between measured and simulated data is found when the Rudd model is used in ptra. For alpha particles, however, a considerable influence of different parametrizations of cross sections for ionization and charge transfer is observed. The ptra code using the charge-transfer data is, nevertheless, successfully benchmarked by the experimental data for the calculation of nanodosimetric quantities, but remaining discrepancies still have to be further investigated (up to 13% lower energy loss and 19% lower mean ionization cluster size than in the experiment). A continuation of this work should investigate data for the energy loss per interaction as well as differential cross section data of nitrogen and propane. Interpolation models for ionization and charge-transfer data are proposed. The Barkas model, frequently used for a determination of the effective charge in the ionization cross section, significantly

  17. Ionization cross section data of nitrogen, methane, and propane for light ions and electrons and their suitability for use in track structure simulations.

    PubMed

    Bug, Marion U; Gargioni, Elisabetta; Nettelbeck, Heidi; Baek, Woon Yong; Hilgers, Gerhard; Rosenfeld, Anatoly B; Rabus, Hans

    2013-10-01

    Track structure Monte Carlo simulations are frequently applied in micro- and nanodosimetry to calculate the radiation transport in detail. The use of a well-validated set of cross section data in such simulation codes ensures accurate calculations of transport parameters, such as ionization yields. These cross section data are, however, scarce and often discrepant when measured by different groups. This work surveys literature data on ionization and charge-transfer cross sections of nitrogen, methane, and propane for electrons, protons, and helium particles, focusing on the energy range between 100 keV and 20 MeV. Based on the evaluated data, different models for the parametrization of the cross section data are implemented in the code ptra, developed for simulating proton and alpha particle transport in an ion-counting nanodosimeter. The suitability of the cross section data is investigated by comparing the calculated mean ionization cluster size and energy loss with experimental results in either nitrogen or propane. For protons, generally good agreement between measured and simulated data is found when the Rudd model is used in ptra. For alpha particles, however, a considerable influence of different parametrizations of cross sections for ionization and charge transfer is observed. The ptra code using the charge-transfer data is, nevertheless, successfully benchmarked by the experimental data for the calculation of nanodosimetric quantities, but remaining discrepancies still have to be further investigated (up to 13% lower energy loss and 19% lower mean ionization cluster size than in the experiment). A continuation of this work should investigate data for the energy loss per interaction as well as differential cross section data of nitrogen and propane. Interpolation models for ionization and charge-transfer data are proposed. The Barkas model, frequently used for a determination of the effective charge in the ionization cross section, significantly

  18. Secondary ionisations in a wall-less ion-counting nanodosimeter: quantitative analysis and the effect on the comparison of measured and simulated track structure parameters in nanometric volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilgers, Gerhard; Bug, Marion U.; Gargioni, Elisabetta; Rabus, Hans

    2015-10-01

    The object of investigation in nanodosimetry is the physical characteristics of the microscopic structure of ionising particle tracks, i.e. the sequence of the interaction types and interaction sites of a primary particle and all its secondaries, which reflects the stochastic nature of the radiation interaction. In view of the upcoming radiation therapy with protons and carbon ions, the ionisation structure of the ion track is of particular interest. Owing to limitations in current detector technology, the only way to determine the ionisation cluster size distribution in a DNA segment is to simulate the particle track structure in condensed matter. This is done using dedicated computer programs based on Monte Carlo procedures simulating the interaction of the primary ions with the target. Hence, there is a need to benchmark these computer codes using suitable experimental data. Ionisation cluster size distributions produced in the nanodosimeter's sensitive volume by monoenergetic protons and alpha particles (with energies between 0.1 MeV and 20 MeV) were measured at the PTB ion accelerator facilities. C3H8 and N2 were alternately used as the working gas. The measured data were compared with the simulation results obtained with the PTB Monte-Carlo code PTra [B. Grosswendt, Radiat. Environ. Biophys. 41, 103 (2002); M.U. Bug, E. Gargioni, H. Nettelbeck, W.Y. Baek, G. Hilgers, A.B. Rosenfeld, H. Rabus, Phys. Rev. E 88, 043308 (2013)]. Measured and simulated characteristics of the particle track structure are generally in good agreement for protons over the entire energy range investigated. For alpha particles with energies higher than the Bragg peak energy, a good agreement can also be seen, whereas for energies lower than the Bragg peak energy differences of as much as 25% occur. Significant deviations are only observed for large ionisation cluster sizes. These deviations can be explained by a background consisting of secondary ions. These ions are produced in the

  19. Track structure model of cell damage in space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Robert; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wilson, John W.; Shinn, Judy L.; Ngo, Duc M.

    1992-01-01

    The phenomenological track-structure model of cell damage is discussed. A description of the application of the track-structure model with the NASA Langley transport code for laboratory and space radiation is given. Comparisons to experimental results for cell survival during exposure to monoenergetic, heavy-ion beams are made. The model is also applied to predict cell damage rates and relative biological effectiveness for deep-space exposures.

  20. Extending ion-track lithography to the low-energy ion regime

    SciTech Connect

    Musket, R.G.

    2006-06-01

    Ion tracking and ion-track lithography have been performed almost exclusively using ions with energies near or above the maximum in electronic stopping, which occurs at {approx}1 MeV/amu. In this paper, ion-track lithography using ions with energies well below this maximum is discussed. The results of etching ion tracks created in polycarbonate films by ions with energies just above the anticipated threshold for creating etchable latent tracks with cylindrical geometry have been examined. Low-energy neon and argon ions with 18-60 keV/amu and fluences of {approx}10{sup 8} cm{sup -2} were used to examine the limits for producing useful, etchable tracks in polycarbonate films. By concentrating on the early stages of etching (i.e., {approx}20 nmion was correlated with the creation of etchable tracks. The experimental results are discussed with regard to the energy losses of the ions in the polycarbonate films and to the formation of continuous latent tracks through the entire thickness of the films. The probability distributions for large-angle scattering events were calculated to assess their importance as a function of ion energy. All these results have significant implications with respect to the threshold for formation of etchable tracks and to the use of low-energy ions for lithographic applications of ion tracking.

  1. Extending ion-track lithography to the low-energy ion regime

    SciTech Connect

    Musket, R G

    2005-10-14

    Ion tracking and ion-track lithography have been performed almost exclusively using ions with energies near or above the maximum in electronic stopping, which occurs at {approx}1 MeV/amu. In this paper, ion-track lithography using ions with energies well below this maximum is discussed. The results of etching ion tracks created in polycarbonate films by ions with energies just above the anticipated threshold for creating etchable latent tracks with cylindrical geometry have been examined. Low-energy neon and argon ions with 18-60 keV/amu and fluences of {approx}10{sup 8}/cm{sup 2} were used to examine the limits for producing useful, etchable tracks in polycarbonate films. By concentrating on the early stages of etching (i.e., {approx}20 nm < SEM hole diameter < {approx}100 nm), the energy deposition calculated for the incident ion was correlated with the creation of etchable tracks. The experimental results are discussed with regard to the energy losses of the ions in the polycarbonate films and to the formation of continuous latent tracks through the entire thickness of the films. The probability distributions for large-angle scattering events were calculated to assess their importance as a function of ion energy. All these results have significant implications with respect to the threshold for formation of etchable tracks and to the use of low-energy ions for lithographic applications of ion tracking.

  2. Composition dependent thermal annealing behaviour of ion tracks in apatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadzri, A.; Schauries, D.; Mota-Santiago, P.; Muradoglu, S.; Trautmann, C.; Gleadow, A. J. W.; Hawley, A.; Kluth, P.

    2016-07-01

    Natural apatite samples with different F/Cl content from a variety of geological locations (Durango, Mexico; Mud Tank, Australia; and Snarum, Norway) were irradiated with swift heavy ions to simulate fission tracks. The annealing kinetics of the resulting ion tracks was investigated using synchrotron-based small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) combined with ex situ annealing. The activation energies for track recrystallization were extracted and consistent with previous studies using track-etching, tracks in the chlorine-rich Snarum apatite are more resistant to annealing than in the other compositions.

  3. Monte-Carlo Simulation of Heavy Ion Track Structure Calculation of Local Dose and 3D Time Evolution of Radiolytic Species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plante, Ianik; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2010-01-01

    Heavy ions have gained considerable importance in radiotherapy due to their advantageous dose distribution profile and high Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE). Heavy ions are difficult to produce on Earth, but they are present in space and it is impossible at this moment to completely shield astronauts from them. The risk of these radiations is poorly understood, which is a concern for a 3-years Mars mission. The effects of radiation are mainly due to DNA damage such as DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), although non-targeted effects are also very important. DNA can be damaged by the direct interaction of radiation and by reactions with chemical species produced by the radiolysis of water. The energy deposition is of crucial importance to understand biological effects of radiation. Therefore, much effort has been done recently to improve models of radiation tracks.

  4. HIBRA: A computer code for heavy ion binary reaction analysis employing ion track detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamil, Khalid; Ahmad, Siraj-ul-Islam; Manzoor, Shahid

    2016-01-01

    Collisions of heavy ions many times result in production of only two reaction products. Study of heavy ions using ion track detectors allows experimentalists to observe the track length in the plane of the detector, depth of the tracks in the volume of the detector and angles between the tracks on the detector surface, all known as track parameters. How to convert these into useful physics parameters such as masses, energies, momenta of the reaction products and the Q-values of the reaction? This paper describes the (a) model used to analyze binary reactions in terms of measured etched track parameters of the reaction products recorded in ion track detectors, and (b) the code developed for computing useful physics parameters for fast and accurate analysis of a large number of binary events. A computer code, HIBRA (Heavy Ion Binary Reaction Analysis) has been developed both in C++ and FORTRAN programming languages. It has been tested on the binary reactions from 12.5 MeV/u 84Kr ions incident upon U (natural) target deposited on mica ion track detector. The HIBRA code can be employed with any ion track detector for which range-velocity relation is available including the widely used CR-39 ion track detectors. This paper provides the source code of HIBRA in C++ language along with input and output data to test the program.

  5. Track formation and dislocation loop interaction in spinel irradiated with swift heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinkle, S. J.; Skuratov, V. A.

    1998-05-01

    The microstructure of polycrystalline stoichiometric magnesium aluminate spinel (MgAl 2O 4) has been examined by cross-section electron microscopy following 430 MeV Kr + or 614 MeV Xe + ion irradiation near room temperature up to a fluence of 1.1 × 10 16 ions/m 2. In addition, the microstructure was examined for two spinel specimens which had been preirradiated with either 2 MeV Al + ions or 3.6 MeV Fe + ions and subsequently irradiated with 430 MeV Kr + ions. The Al + and Fe + preirradiated specimens contained a high density (10 21-10 23 m -3) of interstitial dislocation loops with diameters between 5 and 30 nm prior to the swift heavy ion irradiation. Near-continuous latent ion tracks were observed in all of the specimens irradiated with swift heavy ions. The swift heavy ions also appeared to efficiently destroy pre-existing dislocation loops with diameters <5 nm, whereas larger loops remained intact following the swift heavy ion irradiation. The swift heavy ions caused structural disordering of the octahedral cautions, but did not appear to produce amorphous cores in the ion tracks. The disordered ion track diameters were ˜2.0 and ˜2.6 nm for the 430 MeV Kr and 614 MeV Xe ion irradiations, respectively.

  6. Insights on dramatic radial fluctuations in track formation by energetic ions.

    PubMed

    Sachan, Ritesh; Zarkadoula, Eva; Lang, Maik; Trautmann, Christina; Zhang, Yanwen; Chisholm, Matthew F; Weber, William J

    2016-01-01

    We report on unexpected dramatic radial variations in ion tracks formed by irradiation with energetic ions (2.3 GeV (208)Pb) at a constant electronic energy-loss (~42 keV/nm) in pyrochlore-structured Gd2TiZrO7. Though previous studies have shown track formation and average track diameter measurements in the Gd2TixZr(1-x)O7 system, the present work clearly reveals the importance of the recrystallization process in ion track formation in this system, which leads to more morphological complexities in tracks than currently accepted behavior. The ion track profile is usually considered to be diametrically uniform for a constant value of electronic energy-loss. This study reveals the diameter variations to be as large as ~40% within an extremely short incremental track length of ~20 nm. Our molecular dynamics simulations show that these fluctuations in diameter of amorphous core and overall track diameter are attributed to the partial substitution of Ti atoms by Zr atoms, which have a large difference in ionic radii, on the B-site in pyrochlore lattice. This random distribution of Ti and Zr atoms leads to a local competition between amorphous phase formation (favored by Ti atoms) and defect-fluorite phase formation (favored by Zr atoms) during the recrystallization process and finally introduces large radial variations in track morphology. PMID:27250764

  7. Insights on dramatic radial fluctuations in track formation by energetic ions

    PubMed Central

    Sachan, Ritesh; Zarkadoula, Eva; Lang, Maik; Trautmann, Christina; Zhang, Yanwen; Chisholm, Matthew F.; Weber, William J.

    2016-01-01

    We report on unexpected dramatic radial variations in ion tracks formed by irradiation with energetic ions (2.3 GeV 208Pb) at a constant electronic energy-loss (~42 keV/nm) in pyrochlore-structured Gd2TiZrO7. Though previous studies have shown track formation and average track diameter measurements in the Gd2TixZr(1−x)O7 system, the present work clearly reveals the importance of the recrystallization process in ion track formation in this system, which leads to more morphological complexities in tracks than currently accepted behavior. The ion track profile is usually considered to be diametrically uniform for a constant value of electronic energy-loss. This study reveals the diameter variations to be as large as ~40% within an extremely short incremental track length of ~20 nm. Our molecular dynamics simulations show that these fluctuations in diameter of amorphous core and overall track diameter are attributed to the partial substitution of Ti atoms by Zr atoms, which have a large difference in ionic radii, on the B-site in pyrochlore lattice. This random distribution of Ti and Zr atoms leads to a local competition between amorphous phase formation (favored by Ti atoms) and defect-fluorite phase formation (favored by Zr atoms) during the recrystallization process and finally introduces large radial variations in track morphology. PMID:27250764

  8. Insights on dramatic radial fluctuations in track formation by energetic ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachan, Ritesh; Zarkadoula, Eva; Lang, Maik; Trautmann, Christina; Zhang, Yanwen; Chisholm, Matthew F.; Weber, William J.

    2016-06-01

    We report on unexpected dramatic radial variations in ion tracks formed by irradiation with energetic ions (2.3 GeV 208Pb) at a constant electronic energy-loss (~42 keV/nm) in pyrochlore-structured Gd2TiZrO7. Though previous studies have shown track formation and average track diameter measurements in the Gd2TixZr(1‑x)O7 system, the present work clearly reveals the importance of the recrystallization process in ion track formation in this system, which leads to more morphological complexities in tracks than currently accepted behavior. The ion track profile is usually considered to be diametrically uniform for a constant value of electronic energy-loss. This study reveals the diameter variations to be as large as ~40% within an extremely short incremental track length of ~20 nm. Our molecular dynamics simulations show that these fluctuations in diameter of amorphous core and overall track diameter are attributed to the partial substitution of Ti atoms by Zr atoms, which have a large difference in ionic radii, on the B-site in pyrochlore lattice. This random distribution of Ti and Zr atoms leads to a local competition between amorphous phase formation (favored by Ti atoms) and defect-fluorite phase formation (favored by Zr atoms) during the recrystallization process and finally introduces large radial variations in track morphology.

  9. A 3D feature point tracking method for ion radiation.

    PubMed

    Kouwenberg, Jasper J M; Ulrich, Leonie; Jäkel, Oliver; Greilich, Steffen

    2016-06-01

    A robust and computationally efficient algorithm for automated tracking of high densities of particles travelling in (semi-) straight lines is presented. It extends the implementation of (Sbalzarini and Koumoutsakos 2005) and is intended for use in the analysis of single ion track detectors. By including information of existing tracks in the exclusion criteria and a recursive cost minimization function, the algorithm is robust to variations on the measured particle tracks. A trajectory relinking algorithm was included to resolve the crossing of tracks in high particle density images. Validation of the algorithm was performed using fluorescent nuclear track detectors (FNTD) irradiated with high- and low (heavy) ion fluences and showed less than 1% faulty trajectories in the latter. PMID:27163162

  10. A 3D feature point tracking method for ion radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouwenberg, Jasper J. M.; Ulrich, Leonie; Jäkel, Oliver; Greilich, Steffen

    2016-06-01

    A robust and computationally efficient algorithm for automated tracking of high densities of particles travelling in (semi-) straight lines is presented. It extends the implementation of (Sbalzarini and Koumoutsakos 2005) and is intended for use in the analysis of single ion track detectors. By including information of existing tracks in the exclusion criteria and a recursive cost minimization function, the algorithm is robust to variations on the measured particle tracks. A trajectory relinking algorithm was included to resolve the crossing of tracks in high particle density images. Validation of the algorithm was performed using fluorescent nuclear track detectors (FNTD) irradiated with high- and low (heavy) ion fluences and showed less than 1% faulty trajectories in the latter.

  11. Effect Of Auger Recombination In An Ion Track

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmonds, Larry D.

    1993-01-01

    Report presents theoretical calculations of contribution of Auger recombination to depletion of charge carriers from ionization track left by passage of energetic heavy ion through silicon-based electronic device.

  12. Advances in Understanding of Swift Heavy-Ion Tracks in Complex Ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, Maik; Devanathan, Ram; Toulemonde, Marcel; Trautmann, Christina

    2015-02-01

    Tracks produced by swift heavy ions in ceramics are of interest for fundamental science as well as for applications covering different fields such as nanotechnology or fission-track dating of minerals. In the case of pyrochlores with general formula A2B2O7, the track structure and radiation sensitivity shows a clear dependence on the composition. Ion irradiated Gd2Zr2O7, e.g., retains its crystallinity while amorphous tracks are produced in Gd2Ti2O7. Tracks in Ti-containing compositions have a complex morphology consisting of an amorphous core surrounded by a shell of a disordered, defect-fluorite phase. The size of the amorphous core decreases with decreasing energy loss and with increasing Zr content, while the shell thickness seems to be similar over a wide range of energy loss values. The large data set and the complex track structure has made pyrochlore an interesting model system for a general theoretical description of track formation including thermal spike calculations (providing the spatial and temporal evolution of temperature around the ion trajectory) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations (describing the response of the atomic system).Recent MD advances consider the sudden temperature increase by inserting data from the thermal spike. The combination allows the reproduction of the core-shell track characteristic and sheds light on the early stages of track formation including recrystallization of the molten material produced by the thermal spike.

  13. Structure tracking aided design and synthesis of Li3V2(PO4)3 nanocrystals as high-power cathodes for lithium ion batteries

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Liping; Bai, Jianming; Gao, Peng; Wang, Xiaoya; Looney, J. Patrick; Wang, Feng

    2015-07-30

    In this study, preparing new electrode materials with synthetic control of phases and electrochemical properties is desirable for battery applications but hardly achievable without knowing how the synthesis reaction proceeds. Herein, we report on structure tracking-aided design and synthesis of single-crystalline Li3V2(PO4)3 (LVP) nanoparticles with extremely high rate capability. A comprehensive investigation was made to the local structural orderings of the involved phases and their evolution toward forming LVP phase using in situ/ex situ synchrotron X-ray and electron-beam diffraction, spectroscopy, and imaging techniques. The results shed light on the thermodynamics and kinetics of synthesis reactions and enabled the design ofmore » a cost-efficient synthesis protocol to make nanocrystalline LVP, wherein solvothermal treatment is a crucial step leading to an amorphous intermediate with local structural ordering resembling that of LVP, which, upon calcination at moderate temperatures, rapidly transforms into the desired LVP phase. The obtained LVP particles are about 50 nm, coated with a thin layer of amorphous carbon and featured with excellent cycling stability and rate capability – 95% capacity retention after 200 cycles and 66% theoretical capacity even at a current rate of 10 C. The structure tracking based method we developed in this work offers a new way of designing battery electrodes with synthetic control of material phases and properties.« less

  14. A simple and rapid method for high-resolution visualization of single-ion tracks

    SciTech Connect

    Omichi, Masaaki; Choi, Wookjin; Sakamaki, Daisuke; Seki, Shu; Tsukuda, Satoshi; Sugimoto, Masaki

    2014-11-15

    Prompt determination of spatial points of single-ion tracks plays a key role in high-energy particle induced-cancer therapy and gene/plant mutations. In this study, a simple method for the high-resolution visualization of single-ion tracks without etching was developed through the use of polyacrylic acid (PAA)-N, N’-methylene bisacrylamide (MBAAm) blend films. One of the steps of the proposed method includes exposure of the irradiated films to water vapor for several minutes. Water vapor was found to promote the cross-linking reaction of PAA and MBAAm to form a bulky cross-linked structure; the ion-track scars were detectable at a nanometer scale by atomic force microscopy. This study demonstrated that each scar is easily distinguishable, and the amount of generated radicals of the ion tracks can be estimated by measuring the height of the scars, even in highly dense ion tracks. This method is suitable for the visualization of the penumbra region in a single-ion track with a high spatial resolution of 50 nm, which is sufficiently small to confirm that a single ion hits a cell nucleus with a size ranging between 5 and 20 μm.

  15. Micro- and Nanoengineering with Ion Tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trautmann, Christina

    In nature, particle tracks are formed over millions of years whenever radioactive elements decay by fission processes, producing energetic fragments of sufficiently large mass (˜ 100 u) and energy (˜ 100 u).

  16. Preserving Structure in Model-Free Tracking.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu; van der Maaten, Laurens J P

    2014-04-01

    Model-free trackers can track arbitrary objects based on a single (bounding-box) annotation of the object. Whilst the performance of model-free trackers has recently improved significantly, simultaneously tracking multiple objects with similar appearance remains very hard. In this paper, we propose a new multi-object model-free tracker (using a tracking-by-detection framework) that resolves this problem by incorporating spatial constraints between the objects. The spatial constraints are learned along with the object detectors using an online structured SVM algorithm. The experimental evaluation of our structure-preserving object tracker (SPOT) reveals substantial performance improvements in multi-object tracking. We also show that SPOT can improve the performance of single-object trackers by simultaneously tracking different parts of the object. Moreover, we show that SPOT can be used to adapt generic, model-based object detectors during tracking to tailor them towards a specific instance of that object. PMID:26353198

  17. Conducting ion tracks generated by charge-selected swift heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Srashti; Gehrke, H. G.; Krauser, J.; Trautmann, C.; Severin, D.; Bender, M.; Rothard, H.; Hofsäss, H.

    2016-08-01

    Conducting ion tracks in tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) thin films were generated by irradiation with swift heavy ions of well-defined charge state. The conductivity of tracks and the surface topography of the films, showing characteristic hillocks at each track position, were investigated using conductive atomic force microscopy measurements. The dependence of track conductivity and hillock size on the charge state of the ions was studied using 4.6 MeV/u Pb ions of charge state 53+, 56+ and 60+ provided by GANIL, as well as 4.8 MeV/u Bi and Au ions of charge state from 50+ to 61+ and 4.2 MeV/u 238U ions in equilibrium charge state provided by UNILAC of GSI. For the charge state selection at GSI, an additional stripper-foil system was installed at the M-branch that now allows routine irradiations with ions of selected charge states. The conductivity of tracks in ta-C increases significantly when the charge state increases from 51+ to 60+. However, the conductivity of individual tracks on the same sample still shows large variations, indicating that tracks formed in ta-C are either inhomogeneous or the conductivity is limited by the interface between ion track and Si substrate.

  18. Formation of Well-defined Nanocolumns by Ion Tracking Lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Felter, T E; Musket, R G; Macaulay, J; Contolini, R J; Searson, P C

    2003-04-12

    Low dimensional systems on the nanometer scale afford a wealth of interesting possibilities including highly anisotropic behavior and quantum effects. Nanocolumns permit electrical and mechanical contact, yet benefit from two confined dimensions. This confinement leads to new optical, mechanical, electrical, chemical, and magnetic properties. We construct nanocolumn arrays with precise definition and independent control of diameter, length, orientation, areal density and composition so that geometry can be directly correlated to the quantum physical property of interest. The precision and control are products of the fabrication technique that we use. The process starts with an ion of sufficient energy to ''track'' a dielectric such as a film applied uniformly onto a substrate. The energy loss of the ion alters chemical bonding in the dielectric along the ion's straight trajectory. A suitable etchant quickly dissolves the latent tracks leaving high aspect ratio holes of small diameter ({approx}10nm) penetrating a film as thick as several microns. These small holes are interesting and useful in their own right and can be made to any desired size by continuing the etching process. Moreover, they serve as molds for electrochemical filling. After this electro-deposition, the mold material can be removed leaving the columns firmly attached to the substrate at the desired orientation. A variety of structures can be envisioned with these techniques. As examples, we have created arrays of Ni and of Pt nanocolumns ({approx}60 nm diameter and {approx}600 nm long) oriented perpendicular to the substrate. The high aspect ratio and small diameter of the columns enables easy observation of quantum behavior, namely efficient electron field emission and Fowler Nordheim behavior.

  19. Strategies towards advanced ion track-based biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfonta, L.; Bukelman, O.; Chandra, A.; Fahrner, W. R.; Fink, D.; Fuks, D.; Golovanov, V.; Hnatowicz, V.; Hoppe, K.; Kiv, A.; Klinkovich, I.; Landau, M.; Morante, J. R.; Tkachenko, N. V.; Vacík, J.; Valden, M.

    Three approaches towards ion track-based biosensors appear to be feasible. The development of the first one began a decade ago [Siwy, Z.; Trofin, L.; Kohl, P.; Baker, L.A.; Martin, C.R.; Trautmann, C. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2005, 127, 5000-5001; Siwy, Z.S.; Harrell, C.C.; Heins, E.; Martin, C.R.; Schiedt, B.; Trautmann, C.; Trofin, L.; Polman, A. Presented at the 6th International Conference on Swift Heavy Ions in Matter, Aschaffenburg, Germany, May 28-31, 2005] and makes use of the concept that the presence of certain biomolecules within liquids can block the passage through narrow pores if being captured there, thus switching off the pore's electrical conductivity. The second, having been successfully tested half a year ago [Fink, D.; Klinkovich, I.; Bukelman, O.; Marks, R.S.; Fahrner, W.; Kiv, A.; Fuks, D.; Alfonta, L. Biosens. Bioelectron. 2009, 24, 2702-2706], is based on the accumulation of enzymatic reaction products within the confined volume of narrow etched ion tracks which modifies the pore's electrical conductivity. The third and most elegant, at present under development, will exploit the charge transfer from enzymes to semiconductors embedded within etched tracks, enabling the enzymes undergoing specific reactions with the biomolecules to be detected. These strategies can be realized either within carrier-free nanoporous polymeric membranes embedded in the corresponding bioliquids, or within contacted nanoporous insulating layers on semiconducting substrates, the so-called TEMPOS structures [Fink, D.; Petrov, A.; Hoppe, H.; Fahrner, W.R.; Papaleo, R.M.; Berdinsky, A.; Chandra, A.; Biswas, A.; Chadderton, L.T. Nucl. Instrum. Methods B 2004, 218, 355-361]. The latter have the advantage of exhibiting a number of peculiar electronic properties, such as the ability for logic and/or combination of input signals, tunable polarity, negative differential resistances, tunability by external parameters such as light, magnetic fields, etc. and self-pulsations, which

  20. Dynamic kirigami structures for integrated solar tracking

    PubMed Central

    Lamoureux, Aaron; Lee, Kyusang; Shlian, Matthew; Forrest, Stephen R.; Shtein, Max

    2015-01-01

    Optical tracking is often combined with conventional flat panel solar cells to maximize electrical power generation over the course of a day. However, conventional trackers are complex and often require costly and cumbersome structural components to support system weight. Here we use kirigami (the art of paper cutting) to realize novel solar cells where tracking is integral to the structure at the substrate level. Specifically, an elegant cut pattern is made in thin-film gallium arsenide solar cells, which are then stretched to produce an array of tilted surface elements which can be controlled to within ±1°. We analyze the combined optical and mechanical properties of the tracking system, and demonstrate a mechanically robust system with optical tracking efficiencies matching conventional trackers. This design suggests a pathway towards enabling new applications for solar tracking, as well as inspiring a broader range of optoelectronic and mechanical devices. PMID:26348820

  1. Dynamic kirigami structures for integrated solar tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamoureux, Aaron; Lee, Kyusang; Shlian, Matthew; Forrest, Stephen R.; Shtein, Max

    2015-09-01

    Optical tracking is often combined with conventional flat panel solar cells to maximize electrical power generation over the course of a day. However, conventional trackers are complex and often require costly and cumbersome structural components to support system weight. Here we use kirigami (the art of paper cutting) to realize novel solar cells where tracking is integral to the structure at the substrate level. Specifically, an elegant cut pattern is made in thin-film gallium arsenide solar cells, which are then stretched to produce an array of tilted surface elements which can be controlled to within +/-1°. We analyze the combined optical and mechanical properties of the tracking system, and demonstrate a mechanically robust system with optical tracking efficiencies matching conventional trackers. This design suggests a pathway towards enabling new applications for solar tracking, as well as inspiring a broader range of optoelectronic and mechanical devices.

  2. Dynamic kirigami structures for integrated solar tracking.

    PubMed

    Lamoureux, Aaron; Lee, Kyusang; Shlian, Matthew; Forrest, Stephen R; Shtein, Max

    2015-01-01

    Optical tracking is often combined with conventional flat panel solar cells to maximize electrical power generation over the course of a day. However, conventional trackers are complex and often require costly and cumbersome structural components to support system weight. Here we use kirigami (the art of paper cutting) to realize novel solar cells where tracking is integral to the structure at the substrate level. Specifically, an elegant cut pattern is made in thin-film gallium arsenide solar cells, which are then stretched to produce an array of tilted surface elements which can be controlled to within ±1°. We analyze the combined optical and mechanical properties of the tracking system, and demonstrate a mechanically robust system with optical tracking efficiencies matching conventional trackers. This design suggests a pathway towards enabling new applications for solar tracking, as well as inspiring a broader range of optoelectronic and mechanical devices. PMID:26348820

  3. Engineering cell-fluorescent ion track hybrid detectors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The lack of sensitive biocompatible particle track detectors has so far limited parallel detection of physical energy deposition and biological response. Fluorescent nuclear track detectors (FNTDs) based on Al2O3:C,Mg single crystals combined with confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) provide 3D information on ion tracks with a resolution limited by light diffraction. Here we report the development of next generation cell-fluorescent ion track hybrid detectors (Cell-Fit-HD). Methods The biocompatibility of FNTDs was tested using six different cell lines, i.e. human non-small cell lung carcinoma (A549), glioblastoma (U87), androgen independent prostate cancer (PC3), epidermoid cancer (A431) and murine (VmDk) glioma SMA-560. To evaluate cell adherence, viability and conformal coverage of the crystals different seeding densities and alternative coating with extracellular matrix (fibronectin) was tested. Carbon irradiation was performed in Bragg peak (initial 270.55 MeV u−1). A series of cell compartment specific fluorescence stains including nuclear (HOECHST), membrane (Glut-1), cytoplasm (Calcein AM, CM-DiI) were tested on Cell-Fit-HDs and a single CLSM was employed to co-detect the physical (crystal) as well as the biological (cell layer) information. Results The FNTD provides a biocompatible surface. Among the cells tested, A549 cells formed the most uniform, viable, tightly packed epithelial like monolayer. The ion track information was not compromised in Cell-Fit-HD as compared to the FNTD alone. Neither cell coating and culturing, nor additional staining procedures affected the properties of the FNTD surface to detect ion tracks. Standard immunofluorescence and live staining procedures could be employed to co-register cell biology and ion track information. Conclusions The Cell-Fit-Hybrid Detector system is a promising platform for a multitude of studies linking biological response to energy deposition at high level of optical microscopy

  4. Ion track reconstruction in 3D using alumina-based fluorescent nuclear track detectors.

    PubMed

    Niklas, M; Bartz, J A; Akselrod, M S; Abollahi, A; Jäkel, O; Greilich, S

    2013-09-21

    Fluorescent nuclear track detectors (FNTDs) based on Al2O3: C, Mg single crystal combined with confocal microscopy provide 3D information on ion tracks with a resolution only limited by light diffraction. FNTDs are also ideal substrates to be coated with cells to engineer cell-fluorescent ion track hybrid detectors (Cell-Fit-HD). This radiobiological tool enables a novel platform linking cell responses to physical dose deposition on a sub-cellular level in proton and heavy ion therapies. To achieve spatial correlation between single ion hits in the cell coating and its biological response the ion traversals have to be reconstructed in 3D using the depth information gained by the FNTD read-out. FNTDs were coated with a confluent human lung adenocarcinoma epithelial (A549) cell layer. Carbon ion irradiation of the hybrid detector was performed perpendicular and angular to the detector surface. In situ imaging of the fluorescently labeled cell layer and the FNTD was performed in a sequential read-out. Making use of the trajectory information provided by the FNTD the accuracy of 3D track reconstruction of single particles traversing the hybrid detector was studied. The accuracy is strongly influenced by the irradiation angle and therefore by complexity of the FNTD signal. Perpendicular irradiation results in highest accuracy with error of smaller than 0.10°. The ability of FNTD technology to provide accurate 3D ion track reconstruction makes it a powerful tool for radiobiological investigations in clinical ion beams, either being used as a substrate to be coated with living tissue or being implanted in vivo. PMID:23965401

  5. Ion track reconstruction in 3D using alumina-based fluorescent nuclear track detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niklas, M.; Bartz, J. A.; Akselrod, M. S.; Abollahi, A.; Jäkel, O.; Greilich, S.

    2013-09-01

    Fluorescent nuclear track detectors (FNTDs) based on Al2O3: C, Mg single crystal combined with confocal microscopy provide 3D information on ion tracks with a resolution only limited by light diffraction. FNTDs are also ideal substrates to be coated with cells to engineer cell-fluorescent ion track hybrid detectors (Cell-Fit-HD). This radiobiological tool enables a novel platform linking cell responses to physical dose deposition on a sub-cellular level in proton and heavy ion therapies. To achieve spatial correlation between single ion hits in the cell coating and its biological response the ion traversals have to be reconstructed in 3D using the depth information gained by the FNTD read-out. FNTDs were coated with a confluent human lung adenocarcinoma epithelial (A549) cell layer. Carbon ion irradiation of the hybrid detector was performed perpendicular and angular to the detector surface. In situ imaging of the fluorescently labeled cell layer and the FNTD was performed in a sequential read-out. Making use of the trajectory information provided by the FNTD the accuracy of 3D track reconstruction of single particles traversing the hybrid detector was studied. The accuracy is strongly influenced by the irradiation angle and therefore by complexity of the FNTD signal. Perpendicular irradiation results in highest accuracy with error of smaller than 0.10°. The ability of FNTD technology to provide accurate 3D ion track reconstruction makes it a powerful tool for radiobiological investigations in clinical ion beams, either being used as a substrate to be coated with living tissue or being implanted in vivo.

  6. Spread Of Charge From Ion Tracks In Integrated Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoutendyk, John A.; Schwartz, Harvey R.; Watson, R. Kevin; Nevill, Leland R.

    1989-01-01

    Single-event upsets (SEU's) propagate to adjacent cells in integrated memory circuits. Findings of experiments in lateral transport of electrical-charge carriers from ion tracks in 256K dynamic randon-access memories (DRAM's). As dimensions of integrated circuits decrease, vulnerability to SEU's increases. Understanding gained enables design of less vulnerable circuits.

  7. Ion track enabled multiple wire microvia interconnects in printed circuit boards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousef, H.; Lindeberg, M.; Hjort, K.

    2008-04-01

    As the call for higher wiring density in packaging and vertical microvia interconnections (microvias) rapidly evolves, the need for smaller lateral dimensions in printed circuit boards (PCB) microvias must be met. The ion track lithography described in this paper allows for high throughput micromachining of small, deep, vertical microvias in flexible PCB and all-polymer laminates. Ion track lithography makes use of swift heavy ion irradiation to enhance the selectivity and directionality of chemical etching. Within the areas exposed to the ion irradiation, small sub-micron pores (capillaries) are created, one for every ion. If etching is prolonged, the pores become merged. Electrodeposition from a metallic seed layer is used to fill these structures with metal. The lithography masks define either the areas where the ion tracks are developed or where the tracks are metallized. The smallest achievable size of the microvias is only limited by the resolution of the mask; microvias below 10 μm in diameter can also be achieved also in thick polyimide foils. Since each impinging ion forms one track, the foil's porosity can be controlled by adjusting the irradiation dose, as well as by etching the pores to a suitable size. Depending on the porosity and material, the resultant metallized microvia consists of either individual or interlaced wires (like strands in a bundle wire), or is a solid. As an individual sub-micron wire may have an aspect ratio of several hundreds, this allows for the fabrication of truly vertical microvia structures, allowing ultra-high density microvia batch production. Demonstrator microstructures with highly vertical microvias have been fabricated in foils up to 125 μm thickness. Several components integrated in flexible PCB have been presented by us, e.g. magnetoresistive sensors, thermopile IR-sensors and microwave components like inductor elements.

  8. Investigation of the breakthrough point of ion track etching by capacitometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Fink, D.; Dhamodaran, S.

    2007-01-01

    Nanoscale size definition and flexible device structures are presently among the most ambitious development goals in the semiconductor field. One approach to attain these goals is based on the use of hybrid structures, combining the flexible etched ion track templates as substrates with the device functions of filled inorganic semiconductor. It is a critical issue to determine precisely the moment of breakthrough in order to use the etched ion track templates to fabricate vertical nano electronic device. This study tries to shed some light upon these processes by means of a novel approach, the so-called capacitometry measurement for investigating the breakthrough moment and etching processes. It is shown that the capacitometry is a simple but quite reliable technique to determine precisely the moment of track etching breakthrough.

  9. Monte Carlo track structure for radiation biology and space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikjoo, H.; Uehara, S.; Khvostunov, I. G.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, W. E.; Goodhead, D. T.

    2001-01-01

    Over the past two decades event by event Monte Carlo track structure codes have increasingly been used for biophysical modelling and radiotherapy. Advent of these codes has helped to shed light on many aspects of microdosimetry and mechanism of damage by ionising radiation in the cell. These codes have continuously been modified to include new improved cross sections and computational techniques. This paper provides a summary of input data for ionizations, excitations and elastic scattering cross sections for event by event Monte Carlo track structure simulations for electrons and ions in the form of parametric equations, which makes it easy to reproduce the data. Stopping power and radial distribution of dose are presented for ions and compared with experimental data. A model is described for simulation of full slowing down of proton tracks in water in the range 1 keV to 1 MeV. Modelling and calculations are presented for the response of a TEPC proportional counter irradiated with 5 MeV alpha-particles. Distributions are presented for the wall and wall-less counters. Data shows contribution of indirect effects to the lineal energy distribution for the wall counters responses even at such a low ion energy.

  10. Controlled fabrication of ion track nanowires and channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spohr, Reimar; Zet, Cristian; Eberhard Fischer, Bernd; Kiesewetter, Helge; Apel, Pavel; Gunko, Igor; Ohgai, Takeshi; Westerberg, Lars

    2010-03-01

    We describe a system for fabricating prescribed numbers of ion track nanochannels and nanowires from a few hundred down to one. It consists of two parts: first, a mobile tape transport system, which, in connection with an ion beam from a heavy-ion accelerator (nuclear charge Z above 18 and specific energy between 1 and 10 MeV/nucleon) tuned down to low flux density by means of defocusing and a set of sensitive fluorescence screens, can fabricate a series of equidistant irradiation spots on a tape, whereby each spot corresponds to a preset number of ion tracks. The tape transport system uses films of 36 mm width and thicknesses between 5 and 100 μm. The aiming precision of the system depends on the diameter of the installed beam-defining aperture, which is between 50 and 500 μm. The distance between neighboring irradiation spots on the tape is variable and typically set to 25 mm. After reaching the preset number of ion counts the irradiation is terminated, the tape is marked and moved to the next position. The irradiated frames are punched out to circular membranes with the irradiation spot in the center. The second part of the setup is a compact conductometric system with 10 picoampere resolution consisting of a computer controlled conductometric cell, sealing the membrane hermetically between two chemically inert half-chambers containing electrodes and filling/flushing openings, and is encased by an electrical shield and a thermal insulation. The ion tracks can be etched to a preset diameter and the system can be programmed to electroreplicate nanochannels in a prescribed sequence of magnetic/nonmagnetic metals, alloys or semiconductors. The goal of our article is to make the scientific community aware of the special features of single-ion fabrication and to demonstrate convincingly the significance of controlled etching and electro-replication.

  11. Cellular track model for study of heavy ion beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shinn, Judy L.; Katz, Robert; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wilson, John W.; Ngo, Duc M.

    1993-01-01

    Track theory is combined with a realistic model of a heavy ion beam to study the effects of nuclear fragmentation on cell survival and biological effectiveness. The effects of secondary reaction products are studied as a function of depth in a water column. Good agreement is found with experimental results for the survival of human T-l cells exposed to monoenergetic carbon, neon, and argon beams under aerobic and hypoxia conditions. The present calculation, which includes the effect of target fragmentation, is a significant improvement over an earlier calculation because of the use of a vastly improved beam model with no change in the track theory or cellular response parameters.

  12. Ion tracking in an electrostatic potential distribution. Ph.D. Thesis; [photomultiplier tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, D. P.

    1978-01-01

    An ion tracking system utilizing a single detector was designed to resolve two dimensional potential distributions in a vacuum. The ion detector consisted of a continuous dynode electron multiplier tube mounted behind a series of aperture plates. The detector was located on a track below a wedge shaped structure used to produce the desired potential distribution. A 150 volt electron beam aimed at selected regions, ionized the residual gas in the chamber. The ions were ejected from their source points by electrostatic forces causing them to drift downward toward the detector. Measurements of particle energy, detector position, and entry angle of the incoming particle flux were used to initialize a computer trajectory-tracing program. The program assumes a known theoretically calculated potential distribution near the wedge for computation of particle trajectories, providing a basis for evaluating the data. Special attention was given to characterization of the ion detector.

  13. Predictive modeling of synergistic effects in nanoscale ion track formation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zarkadoula, Eva; Pakarinen, Olli H.; Xue, Haizhou; Zhang, Yanwen; Weber, William J.

    2015-08-05

    Molecular dynamics techniques and the inelastic thermal spike model are used to study the coupled effects of inelastic energy loss due to 21 MeV Ni ion irradiation and pre-existing defects in SrTiO3. We determine the dependence on pre-existing defect concentration of nanoscale track formation occurring from the synergy between the inelastic energy loss and the pre-existing atomic defects. We show that the nanoscale ion tracks’ size can be controlled by the concentration of pre-existing disorder. This work identifies a major gap in fundamental understanding concerning the role played by defects in electronic energy dissipation and electron–lattice coupling.

  14. Calculation of heavy-ion tracks in liquid water

    SciTech Connect

    Hamm, R.N.; Turner, J.E.; Ritchie, R.H.; Wright, H.A.

    1985-01-01

    Detailed Monte Carlo calculations are presented of proton and alpha-particle tracks in liquid water. The computations treat the interactions of the primary particle and all secondary electrons on a statistical, event-by-event basis to simulate the initial physical changes that accompany the passage of an ion through water. Our methods for obtaining the cross sections needed for such calculations are described. Inelastic scattering probabilities (inverse mean free paths) are derived from a complex dielectric response function constructed for liquid water, based on experimental and theoretical data. Examples of partial cross sections for ionization and excitation by protons are shown. The computation of electron transport and energy loss includes exchange, elastic scattering, and a scheme for the delocalization of energy shared collectively by a large number of electrons in the condensed medium. Several examples of calculated proton and alpha-particle tracks are presented and discussed. The meaning and significance of the concept of a ''track core'' is briefly addressed in the light of this work. The present paper treats only the initial, physical changes produced by radiation in water (in approx. 10/sup -15/ sec in local regions of a track). The work described here is used in calculations that we have reported in other publications on the later chemical development of charged-particle tracks. 10 refs., 6 figs.

  15. Cosmic heavy ion tracks in mesoscopic biological test objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Facius, R.

    1994-01-01

    Since more than 20 years ago, when the National Academy of Sciences and the National Research Council of the U.S.A. released their report on 'HZE particle effects in manned spaced flight', it has been emphasized how difficult - if not even impossible - it is to assess their radiobiological impact on man from conventional studies where biological test organisms are stochastically exposed to 'large' fluences of heavy ions. An alternative, competing approach had been realized in the BIOSTACK experiments, where the effects of single cosmic as well as accelerator - heavy ions on individual biological test organisms could be investigated. Although presented from the beginning as the preferable approach for terrestrial investigations with accelerator heavy ions too ('The BIOSTACK as an approach to high LET radiation research'), only recently this insight is gaining more widespread recognition. In space flight experiments, additional constraints imposed by the infrastructure of the vehicle or satellite further impede such investigations. Restrictions concern the physical detector systems needed for the registration of the cosmic heavy ions' trajectories as well as the biological systems eligible as test organisms. Such optimized procedures and techniques were developed for the investigations on chromosome aberrations induced by cosmic heavy ions in cells of the stem meristem of lettuce seeds (Lactuca sativa) and for the investigation of the radiobiological response of Wolffia arriza, which is the smallest flowering (water) plant. The biological effects were studied by the coworkers of the Russian Institute of Biomedical Problems (IBMP) which in cooperation with the European Space Agency ESA organized the exposure in the Biosatellites of the Cosmos series. Since biological investigations and physical measurements of particle tracks had to be performed in laboratories widely separated, the preferred fixed contact between biological test objects and the particle detectors

  16. Effect of valence holes kinetics on material excitation in tracks of swift heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rymzhanov, R. A.; Medvedev, N. A.; Volkov, A. E.

    2015-12-01

    A considerable part of the excess energy of the electronic subsystem of a solid penetrated by a swift heavy ion (SHI) is accumulated in valence holes. Spatial redistribution of these holes can affect subsequent relaxation, resulting in ionizations of new electrons by hole impacts as well as energy transfer to the target lattice. A new version of the Monte Carlo code TREKIS is applied to study this effect in Al2O3 for SHI tracks. The complex dielectric function (CDF) formalism is used to calculate the cross sections of interaction of involved charged particles (an ion, electrons, holes) with the target giving us ability to take into account collective response of a target to excitations. We compare the radial distributions of the densities and energies of excited electrons and valence holes at different times to those obtained under the assumption of immobile holes used in earlier works. The comparison shows a significant difference between these distributions within the track core, where the majority of slow electrons and valence holes are located at femtosecond timescales after the ion impact. The study demonstrates that the energy deposited by valence holes into the lattice in nanometric tracks is comparable to the energy transferred by excited electrons. Radii of structure transformations in tracks produced by these energy exchange channels are in a good agreement with experiments.

  17. Top marine predators track Lagrangian coherent structures.

    PubMed

    Tew Kai, Emilie; Rossi, Vincent; Sudre, Joel; Weimerskirch, Henri; Lopez, Cristobal; Hernandez-Garcia, Emilio; Marsac, Francis; Garçon, Veronique

    2009-05-19

    Meso- and submesoscales (fronts, eddies, filaments) in surface ocean flow have a crucial influence on marine ecosystems. Their dynamics partly control the foraging behavior and the displacement of marine top predators (tuna, birds, turtles, and cetaceans). In this work we focus on the role of submesoscale structures in the Mozambique Channel in the distribution of a marine predator, the Great Frigatebird. Using a newly developed dynamic concept, the finite-size Lyapunov exponent (FSLE), we identified Lagrangian coherent structures (LCSs) present in the surface flow in the channel over a 2-month observation period (August and September 2003). By comparing seabird satellite positions with LCS locations, we demonstrate that frigatebirds track precisely these structures in the Mozambique Channel, providing the first evidence that a top predator is able to track these FSLE ridges to locate food patches. After comparing bird positions during long and short trips and different parts of these trips, we propose several hypotheses to understand how frigatebirds can follow these LCSs. The birds might use visual and/or olfactory cues and/or atmospheric current changes over the structures to move along these biologic corridors. The birds being often associated with tuna schools around foraging areas, a thorough comprehension of their foraging behavior and movement during the breeding season is crucial not only to seabird ecology but also to an appropriate ecosystemic approach to fisheries in the channel. PMID:19416811

  18. Top marine predators track Lagrangian coherent structures

    PubMed Central

    Tew Kai, Emilie; Rossi, Vincent; Sudre, Joel; Weimerskirch, Henri; Lopez, Cristobal; Hernandez-Garcia, Emilio; Marsac, Francis; Garçon, Veronique

    2009-01-01

    Meso- and submesoscales (fronts, eddies, filaments) in surface ocean flow have a crucial influence on marine ecosystems. Their dynamics partly control the foraging behavior and the displacement of marine top predators (tuna, birds, turtles, and cetaceans). In this work we focus on the role of submesoscale structures in the Mozambique Channel in the distribution of a marine predator, the Great Frigatebird. Using a newly developed dynamic concept, the finite-size Lyapunov exponent (FSLE), we identified Lagrangian coherent structures (LCSs) present in the surface flow in the channel over a 2-month observation period (August and September 2003). By comparing seabird satellite positions with LCS locations, we demonstrate that frigatebirds track precisely these structures in the Mozambique Channel, providing the first evidence that a top predator is able to track these FSLE ridges to locate food patches. After comparing bird positions during long and short trips and different parts of these trips, we propose several hypotheses to understand how frigatebirds can follow these LCSs. The birds might use visual and/or olfactory cues and/or atmospheric current changes over the structures to move along these biologic corridors. The birds being often associated with tuna schools around foraging areas, a thorough comprehension of their foraging behavior and movement during the breeding season is crucial not only to seabird ecology but also to an appropriate ecosystemic approach to fisheries in the channel. PMID:19416811

  19. Predictive modeling of synergistic effects in nanoscale ion track formation

    SciTech Connect

    Zarkadoula, Eva; Pakarinen, Olli H.; Xue, Haizhou; Zhang, Yanwen; Weber, William J.

    2015-08-05

    Molecular dynamics techniques and the inelastic thermal spike model are used to study the coupled effects of inelastic energy loss due to 21 MeV Ni ion irradiation and pre-existing defects in SrTiO3. We determine the dependence on pre-existing defect concentration of nanoscale track formation occurring from the synergy between the inelastic energy loss and the pre-existing atomic defects. We show that the nanoscale ion tracks’ size can be controlled by the concentration of pre-existing disorder. This work identifies a major gap in fundamental understanding concerning the role played by defects in electronic energy dissipation and electron–lattice coupling.

  20. Monitoring structure movement with laser tracking technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barazzetti, Luigi; Giussani, Alberto; Roncoroni, Fabio; Previtali, Mattia

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents the use of laser tracking technology for structure monitoring. In this field the use of this precise instrument is innovative and therefore new investigations are needed for civil structures, especially for applications carried out during unstable environmental conditions. On the other hand, as laser trackers are today very used in industrial applications aimed at collecting data at high speed with precisions superior to +/-0.05 mm, they seem quite promising for those civil engineering applications where numerous geodetic tools, often coupled with mechanical and electrical instruments, are usually used to inspect structure movements. This work illustrates three real civil engineering monitoring applications where laser tracking technology was used to detect object movements. The first one is a laboratory testing for the inspection of a beam (bending moment and shear). The second experiment is the stability inspection of a bridge. The last experiment is one of the first attempts where laser trackers tried to substitute traditional high precision geometric leveling for monitoring an important historical building: the Cathedral of Milan. The achieved results, pro and contra along with some practical issues are described.

  1. Secondary particle tracks generated by ion beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, Gustavo

    2015-05-01

    The Low Energy Particle Track Simulation (LEPTS) procedure is a powerful complementary tool to include the effect of low energy electrons and positrons in medical applications of radiation. In particular, for ion-beam cancer treatments provides a detailed description of the role of the secondary electrons abundantly generated around the Bragg peak as well as the possibility of using transmuted positron emitters (C11, O15) as a complement for ion-beam dosimetry. In this study we present interaction probability data derived from IAM-SCAR corrective factors for liquid environments. Using these data, single electron and positron tracks in liquid water and pyrimidine have been simulated providing information about energy deposition as well as the number and type of interactions taking place in any selected ``nanovolume'' of the irradiated area. In collaboration with Francisco Blanco, Universidad Complutense de Madrid; Antonio Mu noz, Centro de Investigaciones Energéticas Medioambientales y Tecnológicas and Diogo Almeida, Filipe Ferreira da Silva, Paulo Lim ao-Vieira, Universidade Nova de Lisboa. Supported by the Spanish and Portuguese governments.

  2. WE-D-BRF-01: FEATURED PRESENTATION - Investigating Particle Track Structures Using Fluorescent Nuclear Track Detectors and Monte Carlo Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Dowdell, S; Paganetti, H; Schuemann, J; Greilich, S; Zimmerman, F; Evans, C

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To report on the efforts funded by the AAPM seed funding grant to develop the basis for fluorescent nuclear track detector (FNTD) based radiobiological experiments in combination with dedicated Monte Carlo simulations (MCS) on the nanometer scale. Methods: Two confocal microscopes were utilized in this study. Two FNTD samples were used to find the optimal microscope settings, one FNTD irradiated with 11.1 MeV/u Gold ions and one irradiated with 428.77 MeV/u Carbon ions. The first sample provided a brightly luminescent central track while the latter is used to test the capabilities to observe secondary electrons. MCS were performed using TOPAS beta9 version, layered on top of Geant4.9.6p02. Two sets of simulations were performed, one with the Geant4-DNA physics list and approximating the FNTDs by water, a second set using the Penelope physics list in a water-approximated FNTD and a aluminum-oxide FNTD. Results: Within the first half of the funding period, we have successfully established readout capabilities of FNTDs at our institute. Due to technical limitations, our microscope setup is significantly different from the approach implemented at the DKFZ, Germany. However, we can clearly reconstruct Carbon tracks in 3D with electron track resolution of 200 nm. A second microscope with superior readout capabilities will be tested in the second half of the funding period, we expect an improvement in signal to background ratio with the same the resolution.We have successfully simulated tracks in FNTDs. The more accurate Geant4-DNA track simulations can be used to reconstruct the track energy from the size and brightness of the observed tracks. Conclusion: We have achieved the goals set in the seed funding proposal: the setup of FNTD readout and simulation capabilities. We will work on improving the readout resolution to validate our MCS track structures down to the nanometer scales.

  3. Ion track annealing in quartz investigated by small angle X-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schauries, D.; Afra, B.; Rodriguez, M. D.; Trautmann, C.; Hawley, A.; Kluth, P.

    2015-12-01

    We report on the reduction of cross-section and length of amorphous ion tracks embedded within crystalline quartz during thermal annealing. The ion tracks were created via Au ion irradiation with an energy of 2.2 GeV. The use of synchrotron-based small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) allowed characterization of the latent tracks, without the need for chemical etching. Temperatures between 900 and 1000 °C were required to see a notable change in track size. The shrinkage in cross-section and length was found to be comparable for tracks aligned perpendicular and parallel to the c-axis.

  4. Size characterization of ion tracks in PET and PTFE using SAXS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schauries, D.; Rodriguez, M. D.; Afra, B.; Bierschenk, T.; Trautmann, C.; Mudie, S.; Kluth, P.

    2015-12-01

    Ion tracks in polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) were created by swift heavy ion irradiation and subsequently characterized using small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Due to their reduced density compared to the surrounding matrix, cylindrical geometry, and parallel orientation, ion tracks produce a characteristic scattering pattern which allows quantitative analysis of their radius with high precision. For ion tracks in PET thermal annealing led to a gradual fading with a decrease in density difference yet a simultaneous increase in ion track radius. Such an increase in radius is the direct opposite compared to temperature induced ion track shrinking in inorganic materials, and suggests a very different thermal response of the polymer.

  5. Lateral charge transport from heavy-ion tracks in integrated circuit chips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoutendyk, J. A.; Schwartz, H. R.; Nevill, L. R.

    1988-01-01

    A 256K DRAM has been used to study the lateral transport of charge (electron-hole pairs) induced by direct ionization from heavy-ion tracks in an IC. The qualitative charge transport has been simulated using a two-dimensional numerical code in cylindrical coordinates. The experimental bit-map data clearly show the manifestation of lateral charge transport in the creation of adjacent multiple-bit errors from a single heavy-ion track. The heavy-ion data further demonstrate the occurrence of multiple-bit errors from single ion tracks with sufficient stopping power. The qualitative numerical simulation results suggest that electric-field-funnel-aided (drift) collection accounts for single error generated by an ion passing through a charge-collecting junction, while multiple errors from a single ion track are due to lateral diffusion of ion-generated charge.

  6. Swift heavy ion tracks in Y2Ti2O7 nanoparticles in EP450 ODS steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skuratov, V. A.; Sohatsky, A. S.; O'Connell, J. H.; Kornieieva, K.; Nikitina, A. A.; Neethling, J. H.; Ageev, V. S.

    2015-01-01

    Structural changes induced by 1.2 MeV/amu xenon, krypton and argon ion irradiation in Y2Ti2O7 pyrochlore nanoparticles in EP450 ODS steel have been studied using high resolution transmission electron microscopy. It was found that diameters of amorphous latent tracks formed by Kr and Xe ions are in the range 3-7 nm when electronic stopping powers vary from 10 to 24 keV/nm. The threshold for track formation is estimated to be between 7.4 keV/nm and 9.7 keV/nm.

  7. Status and Perspectives of Ion Track Electronics for Advanced Biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, D.; Muñoz, H. Gerardo; Alfonta, L.; Mandabi, Y.; Dias, J. F.; de Souza, C. T.; Bacakova, L. E.; Vacík, J.; Hnatowicz, V.; Kiv, A. E.; Fuks, D.; Papaleo, R. M.

    New multifunctional ion irradiation-based three-dimensional electronic structures are developed for biotechnological applications, specifically for sensing of biomaterials, bacteria and mammalian cells. This is accomplished by combined micrometric surface and nanometric bulk microstructuring of insulators (specifically of polymer foils and SiO2/Si hybride structures) by adequate ion beams. Our main goal is the production of a cheap small universal generic working platform with multifunctional properties for biomedical analysis. Surface engineering of this platform enables cell bonding and its bulk engineering enables the extraction of cell secrets, for the sake of intercepting and analyzing the biomolecules used in cell communication. The exact knowledge of the spectrum of these cell-secreted signalling molecules should enable one to identify unambiguously the cell type. This knowledge will help developing strategies for preventive quorum sensing of bacteria, with the aim of fighting bacterial infections in an ecologically secure way.

  8. Impact of Track Structure Effects on Shielding and Dosimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Schimmerling, W.; Kim, M. Y.

    1999-01-01

    Galactic cosmic rays (GCR) consisting of nuclei of all the known elements with kinetic energies extending from tens to millions of MeV pose a significant health hazard to future deep space operations. Even half of the radiation exposures expected in ISS will result from GCR components. The biological actions of these radiations are known to depend on the details of the energy deposition (not just linear energy transfer, LET, but the lateral dispersion of energy deposition about the particle track). Energy deposits in tissues are dominated by the transfer of tens to hundreds of eV to the tissue's atomic electrons. In the case of low LET radiations, the collisions are separated by large dimensions compared to the size of important biomolecular structures. If such events are also separated in time, then the radiation adds little to the background of radicals occurring from ordinary metabolic processes and causes little or no biological injury. Hence, dose rate is a strong determinant of the action of low LET exposures. The GCR exposures are dominated by ions of high charge and energy (HZE) characterized by many collisions with atomic electrons over biomolecular dimensions, resulting in high radical- density events associated with a few isolated ion paths through the cell and minimal dose rate dependence at ordinary exposure levels. The HZE energy deposit declines quickly laterally and merges with the background radical density in the track periphery for which the exact lateral distribution of the energy deposit is the determinant of the biological injury. Although little data exists on human exposures from HZE radiations, limited studies in mice and mammalian cell cultures allow evaluation of the effects of track structure on shield attenuation properties and evaluation of implications for dosimetry. The most complete mammalian cell HZE exposure data sets have been modeled including the C3H10T1/2 survival and transformation data of Yang et al., the V79 survival and

  9. A novel approach to study radiation track structure with nanometer-equivalent resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casiraghi, Margherita; Bashkirov, Vladimir; Hurley, Ford; Schulte, Reinhard

    2014-05-01

    Clustered DNA damages are considered the critical lesions in the pathways leading from the initial energy deposition by radiation to radiobiological damage. The spatial distribution of the initial DNA damage is mainly determined by radiation track-structure at the nanometer level. In this work, a novel experimental approach to image the three-dimensional structure of micrometric radiation track segments is presented. The approach utilizes the detection of single ions created in low-pressure gas. Ions produced by radiation drift towards a GEM-like 2D hole-pattern detector. When entering individual holes, ions can induce ion-impact ionization of the working-gas starting a confined electron avalanche that generates the output signal. By registering positive ions rather than electrons, diffusion is reduced and a spatial resolution of the track image of the order of water-equivalent nanometers can be achieved. Measurements and simulations to characterize the performance of a few detector designs were performed. Different cathode materials were tested and ionization cluster size distributions of 241Am alpha particles were measured. The electric field configuration in the detector was calculated to optimize the ion focusing into the detector holes. The preliminary results obtained show the directions for further development of the detector. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Nano-scale Insights into Ion-beam Cancer Therapy", edited by Andrey V. Solov'yov, Nigel Mason, Paulo Limão-Vieira and Malgorzata Smialek-Telega

  10. Fine-Tuning of Electronic Structure of Cobalt(II) Ion in Nonplanar Porphyrins and Tracking of a Cross-Hybrid Stage: Implications for the Distortion of Natural Tetrapyrrole Macrocycles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiuhua; Zhang, Xi; Zeng, Wennan; Wang, Jianxiu; Zhou, Zaichun

    2015-11-01

    The core size of the porphyrin macrocycles was closely related to their stability of the different electron structure in the central metal ion. Cobalt(II) ions can undergo a conversion in electron configurations upon N4 core contraction of 0.05 Å in nonplanar porphyrins, and these ions still maintain low spin forms after and before conversion. The structural fine-tuning can induce the appearance of a cross-hybrid stage [d(x(2)-y(2))sp(2) ↔ d(z(2))sp(2)] based on quadrilateral coordination of the planar core. The results indicate that the configuration conversion plays a key role in electron transfer in redox catalysis involving cobalt complexes. The electronic properties of six monostrapped cobalt(II) porphyrins were investigated by spectral, paramagnetic, and electrochemical methods. The macrocyclic deformations and size parameters of Co-containing model compounds were directly obtained from their crystal structures. PMID:26461496

  11. Ion-ion dynamic structure factor of warm dense mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, N. M.; Heinonen, R. A.; Starrett, C. E.; Saumon, D.

    2015-06-25

    In this study, the ion-ion dynamic structure factor of warm dense matter is determined using the recently developed pseudoatom molecular dynamics method [Starrett et al., Phys. Rev. E 91, 013104 (2015)]. The method uses density functional theory to determine ion-ion pair interaction potentials that have no free parameters. These potentials are used in classical molecular dynamics simulations. This constitutes a computationally efficient and realistic model of dense plasmas. Comparison with recently published simulations of the ion-ion dynamic structure factor and sound speed of warm dense aluminum finds good to reasonable agreement. Using this method, we make predictions of the ion-ion dynamical structure factor and sound speed of a warm dense mixture—equimolar carbon-hydrogen. This material is commonly used as an ablator in inertial confinement fusion capsules, and our results are amenable to direct experimental measurement.

  12. Ion-ion dynamic structure factor of warm dense mixtures.

    PubMed

    Gill, N M; Heinonen, R A; Starrett, C E; Saumon, D

    2015-06-01

    The ion-ion dynamic structure factor of warm dense matter is determined using the recently developed pseudoatom molecular dynamics method [Starrett et al., Phys. Rev. E 91, 013104 (2015)]. The method uses density functional theory to determine ion-ion pair interaction potentials that have no free parameters. These potentials are used in classical molecular dynamics simulations. This constitutes a computationally efficient and realistic model of dense plasmas. Comparison with recently published simulations of the ion-ion dynamic structure factor and sound speed of warm dense aluminum finds good to reasonable agreement. Using this method, we make predictions of the ion-ion dynamical structure factor and sound speed of a warm dense mixture-equimolar carbon-hydrogen. This material is commonly used as an ablator in inertial confinement fusion capsules, and our results are amenable to direct experimental measurement. PMID:26172810

  13. Structure tracking aided design and synthesis of Li3V2(PO4)3 nanocrystals as high-power cathodes for lithium ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Liping; Bai, Jianming; Gao, Peng; Wang, Xiaoya; Looney, J. Patrick; Wang, Feng

    2015-07-30

    In this study, preparing new electrode materials with synthetic control of phases and electrochemical properties is desirable for battery applications but hardly achievable without knowing how the synthesis reaction proceeds. Herein, we report on structure tracking-aided design and synthesis of single-crystalline Li3V2(PO4)3 (LVP) nanoparticles with extremely high rate capability. A comprehensive investigation was made to the local structural orderings of the involved phases and their evolution toward forming LVP phase using in situ/ex situ synchrotron X-ray and electron-beam diffraction, spectroscopy, and imaging techniques. The results shed light on the thermodynamics and kinetics of synthesis reactions and enabled the design of a cost-efficient synthesis protocol to make nanocrystalline LVP, wherein solvothermal treatment is a crucial step leading to an amorphous intermediate with local structural ordering resembling that of LVP, which, upon calcination at moderate temperatures, rapidly transforms into the desired LVP phase. The obtained LVP particles are about 50 nm, coated with a thin layer of amorphous carbon and featured with excellent cycling stability and rate capability – 95% capacity retention after 200 cycles and 66% theoretical capacity even at a current rate of 10 C. The structure tracking based method we developed in this work offers a new way of designing battery electrodes with synthetic control of material phases and properties.

  14. Irradiation of nuclear track emulsions with thermal neutrons, heavy ions, and muons

    SciTech Connect

    Artemenkov, D. A. Bradnova, V.; Zaitsev, A. A.; Zarubin, P. I.; Zarubina, I. G.; Kattabekov, R. R.; Mamatkulov, K. Z.; Rusakova, V. V.

    2015-07-15

    Exposures of test samples of nuclear track emulsion were analyzed. Angular and energy correlations of products originating from the thermal-neutron-induced reaction n{sub th} +{sup 10} B → {sup 7} Li + (γ)+ α were studied in nuclear track emulsions enriched in boron. Nuclear track emulsions were also irradiated with {sup 86}Kr{sup +17} and {sup 124}Xe{sup +26} ions of energy about 1.2 MeV per nucleon. Measurements of ranges of heavy ions in nuclear track emulsionsmade it possible to determine their energies on the basis of the SRIM model. The formation of high-multiplicity nuclear stars was observed upon irradiating nuclear track emulsions with ultrarelativistic muons. Kinematical features studied in this exposure of nuclear track emulsions for events of the muon-induced splitting of carbon nuclei to three alpha particles are indicative of the nucleardiffraction interaction mechanism.

  15. Irradiation of nuclear track emulsions with thermal neutrons, heavy ions, and muons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemenkov, D. A.; Bradnova, V.; Zaitsev, A. A.; Zarubin, P. I.; Zarubina, I. G.; Kattabekov, R. R.; Mamatkulov, K. Z.; Rusakova, V. V.

    2015-07-01

    Exposures of test samples of nuclear track emulsion were analyzed. Angular and energy correlations of products originating from the thermal-neutron-induced reaction n th +10 B → 7 Li + (γ)+ α were studied in nuclear track emulsions enriched in boron. Nuclear track emulsions were also irradiated with 86Kr+17 and 124Xe+26 ions of energy about 1.2 MeV per nucleon. Measurements of ranges of heavy ions in nuclear track emulsionsmade it possible to determine their energies on the basis of the SRIM model. The formation of high-multiplicity nuclear stars was observed upon irradiating nuclear track emulsions with ultrarelativistic muons. Kinematical features studied in this exposure of nuclear track emulsions for events of the muon-induced splitting of carbon nuclei to three alpha particles are indicative of the nucleardiffraction interaction mechanism.

  16. Characterization of multiple-bit errors from single-ion tracks in integrated circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoutendyk, J. A.; Edmonds, L. D.; Smith, L. S.

    1989-01-01

    The spread of charge induced by an ion track in an integrated circuit and its subsequent collection at sensitive nodal junctions can cause multiple-bit errors. The authors have experimentally and analytically investigated this phenomenon using a 256-kb dynamic random-access memory (DRAM). The effects of different charge-transport mechanisms are illustrated, and two classes of ion-track multiple-bit error clusters are identified. It is demonstrated that ion tracks that hit a junction can affect the lateral spread of charge, depending on the nature of the pull-up load on the junction being hit. Ion tracks that do not hit a junction allow the nearly uninhibited lateral spread of charge.

  17. Ion tracks developed in polyimide resist on Si wafers as template for nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skupinski, Marek; Toulemonde, Marcel; Lindeberg, Mikael; Hjort, Klas

    2005-11-01

    Ion track technology makes it possible to produce low-cost templates for nanowires. In this study we have studied ion tracks in a polyimide resist on silicon. Spin coated, 1.5 μm thick polyimide resist on 4 in. Si wafers was irradiated by 129Xe27+ ions at low fluence. The irradiated resist was etched in sodium hypochlorite (NaClO) solution, and Ni nanowires were electroplated in the pores. Using scanning electron microscopy observations the ion track etch properties were obtained. The linear track etch rate of 0.6-1.0 μm/min was calculated from the conical aspect ratio of the nanowire, and from the pore diameter at the surface at different etch times the bulk etch rate in the halo at a distance longer than 5 nm from the ion axis was found to be 0.3 nm/min, while at a long distance from the ion axis the track etching velocity of the virgin material was 0.01 nm/min. Taking into account the big difference in the track etch velocity between the latent track and the material outside, a latent track diameter of 11 nm could be estimated. Such a diameter value is in good agreement with a prediction obtained from an inelastic thermal spike model. Furthermore, fabrication of 1.5 μm long magnetoresistive nanowires electroplated in ion tracks in the IC compatible polyimide resist may be a way to develop low-cost CMOS integrated magnetoresistive sensors.

  18. Ultraheavy cosmic ray tracks in meteorites: A reappraisal, based on calibrations with relativistic ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perron, C.

    1985-01-01

    Experiments were carried out on tracks of high energy U ions in olivine, a common meteoritic mineral. The results offer an explanation for the lack of success of previous attempts to derive the Ultraheavy Cosmic Ray composition from the study of tracks in meteorites. They also suggest how such experiments should be performed. The methods tested are described and illustrated.

  19. Heavy ion tracks in polycarbonate. Comparison with a heavy ion irradiated model compound (diphenyl carbonate)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferain, E.; Legras, R.

    1993-09-01

    The chemical modifications induced by energetic heavy ion irradiation of polycarbonate (PC) film are determined by GPC, HPLC, ESR, TGA, IR and UV spectrophotometry. The main results of the irradiation are creation of radicals, chain scission, cross-linking and appearance of new chemical groups in the main polymer chain. As far as the creation of new groups is concerned, they are determined by means of a model compound of PC: the diphenyl carbonate (DPC). The following compounds are identified after energetic heavy ion irradiation of DPC: salicylic acid, phenol, 4,4'-biphenol, 2,4'-biphenol, 2,2'-biphenol, 4-phenoxyphenol, 2-phenoxyphenol, phenyl ether, phenyl benzoate, phenyl salicylate, 2-phenylphenol and 2-phenoxyphenyl benzoate. A similarity between the heavy ion irradiation and a heat treatment has also been established with DPC. On the basis of these results, we try to give an explanation of the preferential attack along the tracks of the irradiated film. Also, an explanation of the well-known beneficial effect of an UV exposition of the irradiated film on the selectivity of this preferential chemical attack is suggested.

  20. Distributions of deposited energy and ionization clusters around ion tracks studied with Geant4 toolkit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burigo, Lucas; Pshenichnov, Igor; Mishustin, Igor; Hilgers, Gerhard; Bleicher, Marcus

    2016-05-01

    The Geant4-based Monte Carlo model for Heavy-Ion Therapy (MCHIT) was extended to study the patterns of energy deposition at sub-micrometer distance from individual ion tracks. Dose distributions for low-energy 1H, 4He, 12C and 16O ions measured in several experiments are well described by the model in a broad range of radial distances, from 0.5 to 3000 nm. Despite the fact that such distributions are characterized by long tails, a dominant fraction of deposited energy (∼80%) is confined within a radius of about 10 nm. The probability distributions of clustered ionization events in nanoscale volumes of water traversed by 1H, 2H, 4He, 6Li, 7Li, and 12C ions are also calculated. A good agreement of calculated ionization cluster-size distributions with the corresponding experimental data suggests that the extended MCHIT can be used to characterize stochastic processes of energy deposition to sensitive cellular structures.

  1. Ion-ion dynamic structure factor of warm dense mixtures

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gill, N. M.; Heinonen, R. A.; Starrett, C. E.; Saumon, D.

    2015-06-25

    In this study, the ion-ion dynamic structure factor of warm dense matter is determined using the recently developed pseudoatom molecular dynamics method [Starrett et al., Phys. Rev. E 91, 013104 (2015)]. The method uses density functional theory to determine ion-ion pair interaction potentials that have no free parameters. These potentials are used in classical molecular dynamics simulations. This constitutes a computationally efficient and realistic model of dense plasmas. Comparison with recently published simulations of the ion-ion dynamic structure factor and sound speed of warm dense aluminum finds good to reasonable agreement. Using this method, we make predictions of the ion-ionmore » dynamical structure factor and sound speed of a warm dense mixture—equimolar carbon-hydrogen. This material is commonly used as an ablator in inertial confinement fusion capsules, and our results are amenable to direct experimental measurement.« less

  2. Theoretical prediction of the impact of Auger recombination on charge collection from an ion track

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmonds, Larry D.

    1991-01-01

    The theoretical analysis presented indicates that Auger recombination can reduce charge collection from very dense ion tracks in silicon devices. It is of marginal importance for tracks produced by 270-MeV krypton, and therefore it is of major importance for ions exhibiting a significantly larger loss. The analysis shows that recombination loss is profoundly affected by track diffusion. As the track diffuses, the density and recombination rate decrease so fast that the linear density (number of electron-hole pairs per unit length) approaches a nonzero limiting value as t approaches infinity. Furthermore, the linear density is very nearly equal to this limiting value in a few picoseconds or less. When Auger recombination accompanies charge transport processes that have much longer time scales, it can be simulated by assigning a reduced linear energy transfer to the ion.

  3. Theoretical prediction of the impact of Auger recombination on charge collection from an ion track

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmonds, Larry D.

    1991-01-01

    A recombination mechanism that significantly reduces charge collection from very dense ion tracks in silicon devices was postulated by Zoutendyk et al. The theoretical analysis presented here concludes that Auger recombination is such a mechanism and is of marginal importance for higher density tracks produced by 270-MeV krypton, but of major importance for higher density tracks. The analysis shows that recombination loss is profoundly affected by track diffusion. As the track diffuses, the density and recombination rate decrease so fast that the linear density (number of electron-hole pairs per unit length) approaches a non-zero limiting value as t yields infinity. Furthermore, the linear density is very nearly equal to this limiting value in a few picoseconds or less. When Auger recombination accompanies charge transport processes that have much longer time scales, it can be simulated by assigning a reduced linear energy transfer to the ion.

  4. Tracks and voids in amorphous Ge induced by swift heavy-ion irradiation.

    PubMed

    Ridgway, M C; Bierschenk, T; Giulian, R; Afra, B; Rodriguez, M D; Araujo, L L; Byrne, A P; Kirby, N; Pakarinen, O H; Djurabekova, F; Nordlund, K; Schleberger, M; Osmani, O; Medvedev, N; Rethfeld, B; Kluth, P

    2013-06-14

    Ion tracks formed in amorphous Ge by swift heavy-ion irradiation have been identified with experiment and modeling to yield unambiguous evidence of tracks in an amorphous semiconductor. Their underdense core and overdense shell result from quenched-in radially outward material flow. Following a solid-to-liquid phase transformation, the volume contraction necessary to accommodate the high-density molten phase produces voids, potentially the precursors to porosity, along the ion direction. Their bow-tie shape, reproduced by simulation, results from radially inward resolidification. PMID:25165936

  5. Latent tracks of swift heavy ions in Cr23C6 and Y-Ti-O nanoparticles in ODS alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skuratov, V. A.; Sohatsky, A. S.; O'Connell, J. H.; Kornieieva, K.; Nikitina, A. A.; Uglov, V. V.; Neethling, J. H.; Ageev, V. S.

    2016-05-01

    The radiation stability of dielectric nanoparticles embedded into a metallic matrix is of considerable practical value due to the growing interest in oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels as promising nuclear reactor materials. In this report the results of a TEM study of structural changes in Cr23C6 and Y-Ti-O nanoparticles in several ODS alloys irradiated with 1.2 MeV/amu Xe and 3.4 MeV/amu Bi ions is presented. It was found that swift heavy ion irradiation leads to the formation of amorphous latent tracks in both materials. The upper limit of the threshold electronic stopping power for track formation in carbides is estimated to be around 35 keV/nm. Multiple ion track overlapping leads to complete amorphization of carbide and Y-Ti oxide nanoparticles. Microstructural analysis have revealed a strong influence of the ferritic matrix on track morphology in Y2Ti2O7 nanoparticles in pre-thinned TEM targets after postradiation annealing and irradiation at elevated temperatures.

  6. Code System for Calculating Ion Track Condensed Collision Model.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1997-05-21

    Version 00 ICOM calculates the transport characteristics of ion radiation for applicaton to radiation protection, dosimetry and microdosimetry, and radiation physics of solids. Ions in the range Z=1-92 are handled. The energy range for protons is 0.001-10,000 MeV. For other ions the energy range is 0.001-100MeV/nucleon. Computed quantities include stopping powers, ranges; spatial, angular and energy distributions of particle current and fluence; spatial distributions of the absorbed dose; and spatial distributions of thermalized ions.

  7. High-LET ion radiolysis of water: oxygen production in tracks.

    PubMed

    Meesungnoen, Jintana; Jay-Gerin, Jean-Paul

    2009-03-01

    It is known that molecular oxygen is a product of the radiolysis of water with high-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation, a result that is of particular significance in radiobiology and of practical relevance in radiotherapy. In fact, it has been suggested that the radiolytic formation of an oxygenated microenvironment around the tracks of high-LET heavy ions is an important factor in their enhanced biological efficiency in the sense that this may be due to an "oxygen effect" by O(2) produced by these ions in situ. Using Monte Carlo track simulations of pure, deaerated water radiolysis by 4.8 MeV (4)He(2+) (LET approximately 94 keV/microm) and 24 MeV (12)C(6+) (LET approximately 490 keV/microm) ions, including the mechanism of multiple ionization of water, we have calculated the yields and concentrations of O(2) in the tracks of these irradiating ions as a function of time between approximately 10(-12) and 10(-5) s at 25 and 37 degrees C. The track oxygen concentrations obtained compare very well with O(2) concentrations estimated from the "effective" amounts of oxygen that are needed to produce the observed reduction in oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) with LET (assuming this decrease is attributable to the sole radiolytic formation of O(2) in the tracks). For example, for 24 MeV (12)C(6+) ions, the initial track concentration of O(2) is estimated to be more than three orders of magnitude higher than the oxygen levels present in normally oxygenated and hypoxic tumor regions as well as in normal human cells. Such results, which largely plead in favor of the "oxygen in the heavy-ion track" hypothesis, could explain at least in part the greater efficiency of high-LET radiation for cell inactivation (at equal radiation dose). PMID:19267566

  8. Effect of Coulomb Explosion on Track Formation in Metals Irradiated by Heavy Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Ryazanov, A.I.; Pavlov, S.A.; Metelkin, E.V.; Zhemerev, A.V.

    2005-07-01

    The existing descriptions of the process of track formation in metals bombarded with high-energy heavy ions are usually based on the T-spike model. However, this model fails to explain high temperatures developed in some target materials (e.g., in copper). We present a comparative analysis of track formation in metals under the action of heavy ion bombardment, as described using the Coulomb explosion model and the T-spike model in various modifications. Both models are used to calculate changes in the temperatures of the electron and ion subsystems in the track region in amorphous alloy Fe{sub 85}B{sub 15}) and copper targets bombarded with identical high-energy (E > 1 MeV/nucleon) heavy ions. The results show that the Coulomb explosion model predicts stronger heating of the ion subsystem in the track region (with the possible formation of a melt-through zone) as compared to the T-spike model. The formation of point defects in copper as a result of the ionization losses has been also described using the two models and compared to the available experimental data. The Coulomb explosion model provides for a more adequate description of track formation as compared to the T-spike model.

  9. Production and distribution of aberrations in resting or cycling human lymphocytes following Fe-ion or Cr-ion irradiation: Emphasis on single track effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deperas-Standylo, Joanna; Lee, Ryonfa; Nasonova, Elena; Ritter, Sylvia; Gudowska-Nowak, Ewa

    2012-09-01

    In the present study we examined the cytogenetic effects of 177 MeV/u Fe-ions (LET = 335 keV/μm) and 4.1 MeV/u Cr-ions (LET = 3160 keV/μm) in human lymphocytes under exposure conditions that result on average in one particle hit per cell nucleus. In non-cycling (G0-phase) lymphocytes the induction and the repair of excess fragments was measured by means of the premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique and the distribution of breaks among cells was analysed. The PCC-data were further compared with those reported recently for stimulated lymphocytes at the first post-irradiation mitosis. Our experiments show that a single nuclear traversal by a Fe-ion produced more initial chromatin breakage than one Cr-ion, but after 24 h of repair the number of excess fragments/cell was similar for both ion species. All distributions of aberrations were overdispersed. For low energy Cr-ions, where the track radius is smaller than the radius of the cell nucleus, the data could be well described by a Neyman type A distribution. In contrast, the data obtained for high energy Fe-ions were fitted with a convoluted Poisson-Neyman distribution to account for the fact that the dose is deposited not only in the cell actually traversed but also in neighbouring cells. By applying metaphase analysis a different picture emerged with respect to the aberration yield, i.e. more aberrations were detected in cells exposed to Fe-ions than in those irradiated with Cr-ions. Yet, as observed for non-cycling lymphocytes all aberration distributions generated for metaphase cells were overdispersed. The obtained results are discussed with respect to differences in particle track structure. Additionally, the impact of confounding factors such as apoptosis that affect the number of aberrations expressed in a cell population is addressed.

  10. Track Structure and the Biological Effectiveness of Accelerated Particles for the Induction of Chromosome Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, K.; Hada, M.; Chappell, L.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2011-01-01

    Track structure models predict that at a fixed value of LET, particles with lower charge number, Z will have a higher biological effectiveness compared to particles with a higher Z. In this report we investigated how track structure effects induction of chromosomal aberration in human cells. Human lymphocytes were irradiated in vitro with various energies of accelerated iron, silicon, neon, or titanium ions and chromosome damage was assessed in using three color FISH chromosome painting in chemically induced PCC samples collected a first cell division post irradiation. The LET values for these ions ranged from 30 to195 keV/micron. Of the particles studied, Neon ions have the highest biological effectiveness for induction of total chromosome damage, which is consistent with track structure model predictions. For complex-type exchanges 64 MeV/ u Neon and 450 MeV/u Iron were equally effective and induced the most complex damage. In addition we present data on chromosomes exchanges induced by six different energies of protons (5 MeV/u to 2.5 GeV/u). The linear dose response term was similar for all energies of protons suggesting that the effect of the higher LET at low proton energies is balanced by the production of nuclear secondaries from the high energy protons.

  11. Fluence-based dosimetry of proton and heavier ion beams using single track detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimpki, G.; Mescher, H.; Akselrod, M. S.; Jäkel, O.; Greilich, S.

    2016-02-01

    Due to their superior spatial resolution, small and biocompatible fluorescent nuclear track detectors (FNTDs) open up the possibility of characterizing swift heavy charged particle fields on a single track level. Permanently stored spectroscopic information such as energy deposition and particle field composition is of particular importance in heavy ion radiotherapy, since radiation quality is one of the decisive predictors for clinical outcome. Findings presented within this paper aim towards single track reconstruction and fluence-based dosimetry of proton and heavier ion fields. Three-dimensional information on individual ion trajectories through the detector volume is obtained using fully automated image processing software. Angular distributions of multidirectional fields can be measured accurately within  ±2° uncertainty. This translates into less than 5% overall fluence deviation from the chosen irradiation reference. The combination of single ion tracking with an improved energy loss calibration curve based on 90 FNTD irradiations with protons as well as helium, carbon and oxygen ions enables spectroscopic analysis of a detector irradiated in Bragg peak proximity of a 270 MeV u-1 carbon ion field. Fluence-based dosimetry results agree with treatment planning software reference.

  12. Fluence-based dosimetry of proton and heavier ion beams using single track detectors.

    PubMed

    Klimpki, G; Mescher, H; Akselrod, M S; Jäkel, O; Greilich, S

    2016-02-01

    Due to their superior spatial resolution, small and biocompatible fluorescent nuclear track detectors (FNTDs) open up the possibility of characterizing swift heavy charged particle fields on a single track level. Permanently stored spectroscopic information such as energy deposition and particle field composition is of particular importance in heavy ion radiotherapy, since radiation quality is one of the decisive predictors for clinical outcome. Findings presented within this paper aim towards single track reconstruction and fluence-based dosimetry of proton and heavier ion fields. Three-dimensional information on individual ion trajectories through the detector volume is obtained using fully automated image processing software. Angular distributions of multidirectional fields can be measured accurately within  ±2° uncertainty. This translates into less than 5% overall fluence deviation from the chosen irradiation reference. The combination of single ion tracking with an improved energy loss calibration curve based on 90 FNTD irradiations with protons as well as helium, carbon and oxygen ions enables spectroscopic analysis of a detector irradiated in Bragg peak proximity of a 270 MeV u(-1) carbon ion field. Fluence-based dosimetry results agree with treatment planning software reference. PMID:26757791

  13. Swift heavy ion irradiation of CaF2 - from grooves to hillocks in a single ion track.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Elisabeth; Salou, Pierre; Bergen, Lorenz; El Kharrazi, Mourad; Lattouf, Elie; Grygiel, Clara; Wang, Yuyu; Benyagoub, Abdenacer; Levavasseur, Delphine; Rangama, Jimmy; Lebius, Henning; Ban-d'Etat, Brigitte; Schleberger, Marika; Aumayr, Friedrich

    2016-10-12

    A novel form of ion-tracks, namely nanogrooves and hillocks, are observed on CaF2 after irradiation with xenon and lead ions of about 100 MeV kinetic energy. The irradiation is performed under grazing incidence (0.3°-3°) which forces the track to a region in close vicinity to the surface. Atomic force microscopy imaging of the impact sites with high spatial resolution reveals that the surface track consists in fact of three distinct parts: each swift heavy ion impacting on the CaF2 surface first opens a several 100 nm long groove bordered by a series of nanohillocks on both sides. The end of the groove is marked by a huge single hillock and the further penetration of the swift projectile into deeper layers of the target is accompanied by a single protrusion of several 100 nm in length slowly fading until the track vanishes. By comparing experimental data for various impact angles with results of a simulation, based on a three-dimensional version of the two-temperature-model (TTM), we are able to link the crater and hillock formation to sublimation and melting processes of CaF2 due to the local energy deposition by swift heavy ions. PMID:27518588

  14. Tracking Coherent Structures in a Mach 4 Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subbareddy, Pramod; Moss, Alin; Marusic, Ivan; Candler, Graham

    2000-11-01

    We describe a study of different criteria for the detection and tracking of coherent vortical structures in a turbulent compressible boundary layer. Several vortex identification methods are presented, with special attention to methods based on the eigenvalues of the velocity gradient tensor. We find that for the Mach 4 compressible flow, the discriminant of the characteristic polynomial of the tensor is most suitable in the sense that the near wall coherent features are better defined. The vortex connection/reconnection process that we observe is tracked in time and studied. The visualizations are done using a classical ray-casting volume renderer which makes it possible to color-fill specific structures and follow their motion through the flow field. A qualitative comparison with an incompressible wall turbulence is also made. The long term goal of this study is to develop feature extraction tools which can track the evolution of structures in large data sets efficiently.

  15. Tracking Non-rigid Structures in Computer Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Gezahegne, A; Kamath, C

    2008-01-10

    A key challenge in tracking moving objects is the correspondence problem, that is, the correct propagation of object labels from one time step to another. This is especially true when the objects are non-rigid structures, changing shape, and merging and splitting over time. In this work, we describe a general approach to tracking thousands of non-rigid structures in an image sequence. We show how we can minimize memory requirements and generate accurate results while working with only two frames of the sequence at a time. We demonstrate our results using data from computer simulations of a fluimix problem.

  16. Relative Displacement Method for Track-Structure Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Óscar Ramón; Pantaleón, Marcos J.

    2014-01-01

    The track-structure interaction effects are usually analysed with conventional FEM programs, where it is difficult to implement the complex track-structure connection behaviour, which is nonlinear, elastic-plastic and depends on the vertical load. The authors developed an alternative analysis method, which they call the relative displacement method. It is based on the calculation of deformation states in single DOF element models that satisfy the boundary conditions. For its solution, an iterative optimisation algorithm is used. This method can be implemented in any programming language or analysis software. A comparison with ABAQUS calculations shows a very good result correlation and compliance with the standard's specifications. PMID:24634610

  17. Relative displacement method for track-structure interaction.

    PubMed

    Schanack, Frank; Ramos, Óscar Ramón; Reyes, Juan Patricio; Pantaleón, Marcos J

    2014-01-01

    The track-structure interaction effects are usually analysed with conventional FEM programs, where it is difficult to implement the complex track-structure connection behaviour, which is nonlinear, elastic-plastic and depends on the vertical load. The authors developed an alternative analysis method, which they call the relative displacement method. It is based on the calculation of deformation states in single DOF element models that satisfy the boundary conditions. For its solution, an iterative optimisation algorithm is used. This method can be implemented in any programming language or analysis software. A comparison with ABAQUS calculations shows a very good result correlation and compliance with the standard's specifications. PMID:24634610

  18. Characterization of Ion Dynamics in Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations

    SciTech Connect

    Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Webb, Ian K.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Garimella, Venkata BS; Zhang, Xinyu; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2014-08-23

    Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulation (SLIM) represent a novel class of ion optical devices based upon electrodes patterned on planar surfaces, and relying on a combined action of radio frequency and DC electric fields and specific buffer gas density conditions. Initial experimental studies have demonstrated the feasibility of the SLIM concept. This report offers an in-depth consideration of key ion dynamics properties in such devices based upon ion optics theory and computational modeling. The SLIM devices investigated are formed by two surfaces, each having an array of radio frequency (RF) "rung" electrodes, bordered by DC "guard" electrodes. Ion motion is confined by the RF effective potential in the direction orthogonal to the boards, and limited or controlled in the transversal direction by the guard DC potentials. Ions can be efficiently trapped and stored in SLIM devices where the confinement of ions can be ‘soft’ in regard to the extent of collisional activation, similarly to RF-only multipole ion guides and traps. The segmentation of the RF rung electrodes and guards along the axis makes it possible to apply electric field profiles to stimulate ion transfer within a SLIM. In the case of a linear DC gradient applied to RF rungs and guards, a virtually uniform electric field can be created along the axis of the device, enabling ion mobility separations.

  19. Characterization of Ion Dynamics in Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulation (SLIM) represent a novel class of ion optical devices based upon electrodes patterned on planar surfaces, and relying on a combined action of radiofrequency and DC electric fields and specific buffer gas density conditions. Initial experimental studies have demonstrated the feasibility of the SLIM concept. This report offers an in-depth consideration of key ion dynamics properties in such devices based upon ion optics theory and computational modeling. The SLIM devices investigated are formed by two surfaces, each having an array of radiofrequency (RF) “rung” electrodes, bordered by DC “guard” electrodes. Ion motion is confined by the RF effective potential in the direction orthogonal to the boards and limited or controlled in the transversal direction by the guard DC potentials. Ions can be efficiently trapped and stored in SLIM devices where the confinement of ions can be “soft” in regard to the extent of collisional activation, similarly to RF-only multipole ion guides and traps. The segmentation of the RF rung electrodes and guards along the axis makes it possible to apply static or transient electric field profiles to stimulate ion transfer within a SLIM. In the case of a linear DC gradient applied to RF rungs and guards, a virtually uniform electric field can be created along the axis of the device, enabling high quality ion mobility separations. PMID:25152178

  20. Large solid angle tracking of Monte Carlo events of heavy ion collisions in TPC magnetic spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Lindenbaum, S.J.; Etkin, A.; Foley, K.J.; Hackenburg, R.W.; Longacre, R.S.; Love, W.A.; Morris, T.W.; Platner, E.D.; Saulys, A.C.; Asoka-Kumar, P.P.V.

    1986-01-01

    The collision of 15 GeV/nucleon sulfur and carbon or oxygen ions with various fixed targets such as carbon, sulfur, and gold is to be observed in the MPS magnetic spectrometer with a time projection chamber (TPC) module. This TPC will be placed just downstream of the target and be able to track approximately 50% of all charged particles. The design and construction of the TPC is proceeding, and prototypes of the TPC readout system have been tested and production devices are to be delivered. A TPC track reconstruction program has been developed. Monte Carlo events have been generated and tracked. The track reconstruction program consists of three parts: a local pattern recognition which associates contiguous readouts on adjacent readout wires to form a single hit; a subroutine which positions the hits into slices in the vertical plane; and the track reconstruction section. (LEW)

  1. Zn nanoparticles irradiated with swift heavy ions at low fluences: Optically-detected shape elongation induced by nonoverlapping ion tracks

    SciTech Connect

    Amekura, H.; Mitsuishi, K.; Nakayama, Y.; Kishimoto, N.; Ishikawa, N.; Okubo, N.; Ridgway, M. C.; Giulian, R.; Buchal, Ch.; Mantl, S.

    2011-05-15

    Elongation of metal nanoparticles (NPs) embedded in silica (SiO{sub 2}) induced by swift heavy-ion (SHI) irradiation, from spheres to spheroids, has been evaluated mainly by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) at high fluences, where tens to thousands of ion tracks were overlapped each other. It is important to clarify whether the high fluences, i.e., track overlaps, are essential for the elongation. In this study the elongation of metal NPs was evaluated at low fluences by linearly polarized optical absorption spectroscopy. Zn NPs embedded in silica were irradiated with 200-MeV Xe{sup 14+} ions with an incident angle of 45 deg. The fluence ranged from 1.0x10{sup 11} to 5.0x10{sup 13} Xe/cm{sup 2}, which corresponds to the track coverage ratio (CR) of 0.050 to 25 by ion tracks. A small but certain dichroism was observed down to 5.0x10{sup 11} Xe/cm{sup 2} (CR = 0.25). The comparison with numerical simulation suggested that the elongation of Zn NPs was induced by nonoverlapping ion tracks. After further irradiation each NP experienced multiple SHI impacts, which resulted in further elongation. TEM observation showed the elongated NPs whose aspect ratio (AR) ranged from 1.2 to 1.7 at 5.0x10{sup 13} Xe/cm{sup 2}. Under almost the same irradiation conditions, Co NPs with the same initial mean radius showed more prominent elongation with AR of {approx}4 at the same fluence, while the melting point (m.p.) of Co is much higher than that of Zn. Less efficient elongation of Zn NPs while lower m.p. is discussed.

  2. Cortical Tracking of Hierarchical Linguistic Structures in Connected Speech

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Nai; Melloni, Lucia; Zhang, Hang; Tian, Xing; Poeppel, David

    2016-01-01

    The most critical attribute of human language is its unbounded combinatorial nature: smaller elements can be combined into larger structures based on a grammatical system, resulting in a hierarchy of linguistic units, e.g., words, phrases, and sentences. Mentally parsing and representing such structures, however, poses challenges for speech comprehension. In speech, hierarchical linguistic structures do not have boundaries clearly defined by acoustic cues and must therefore be internally and incrementally constructed during comprehension. Here we demonstrate that during listening to connected speech, cortical activity of different time scales concurrently tracks the time course of abstract linguistic structures at different hierarchical levels, e.g. words, phrases, and sentences. Critically, the neural tracking of hierarchical linguistic structures is dissociated from the encoding of acoustic cues as well as from the predictability of incoming words. The results demonstrate that a hierarchy of neural processing timescales underlies grammar-based internal construction of hierarchical linguistic structure. PMID:26642090

  3. Monte-Carlo Simulation of Radiation Track Structure and Calculation of Dose Deposition in Nanovolumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plante, I.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The radiation track structure is of crucial importance to understand radiation damage to molecules and subsequent biological effects. Of a particular importance in radiobiology is the induction of double-strand breaks (DSBs) by ionizing radiation, which are caused by clusters of lesions in DNA, and oxidative damage to cellular constituents leading to aberrant signaling cascades. DSB can be visualized within cell nuclei with gamma-H2AX experiments. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In DSB induction models, the DSB probability is usually calculated by the local dose obtained from a radial dose profile of HZE tracks. In this work, the local dose imparted by HZE ions is calculated directly from the 3D Monte-Carlo simulation code RITRACKS. A cubic volume of 5 micron edge (Figure 1) is irradiated by a (Fe26+)-56 ion of 1 GeV/amu (LET approx.150 keV/micron) and by a fluence of 450 H+ ions, 300 MeV/amu (LET approx. 0.3 keV/micron). In both cases, the dose deposited in the volume is approx.1 Gy. The dose is then calculated into each 3D pixels (voxels) of 20 nm edge and visualized in 3D. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: The dose is deposited uniformly in the volume by the H+ ions. The voxels which receive a high dose (orange) corresponds to electron track ends. The dose is deposited differently by the 56Fe26+ ion. Very high dose (red) is deposited in voxels with direct ion traversal. Voxels with electron track ends (orange) are also found distributed around the path of the track. In both cases, the appearance of the dose distribution looks very similar to DSBs seen in gammaH2AX experiments, particularly when the visualization threshold is applied. CONCLUSION: The refinement of the dose calculation to the nanometer scale has revealed important differences in the energy deposition between high- and low-LET ions. Voxels of very high dose are only found in the path of high-LET ions. Interestingly, experiments have shown that DSB induced by high-LET radiation are more difficult to

  4. Cosmic heavy ion tracks in mesoscopic biological test objects

    SciTech Connect

    Facius, R.

    1994-12-31

    Since more than 20 years ago, when the National Academy of Sciences and the National Research Council of the U.S.A. released their report on `HZE particle effects in manned spaced flight`, it has been emphasized how difficult - if not even impossible - it is to assess their radiobiological impact on man from conventional studies where biological test organisms are stochastically exposed to `large` fluences of heavy ions. An alternative, competing approach had been realized in the BIOSTACK experiments, where the effects of single cosmic as well as accelerator - heavy ions on individual biological test organisms could be investigated. Although presented from the beginning as the preferable approach for terrestrial investigations with accelerator heavy ions too (`The BIOSTACK as an approach to high LET radiation research`), only recently this insight is gaining more widespread recognition. In space flight experiments, additional constraints imposed by the infrastructure of the vehicle or satellite further impede such investigations. Restrictions concern the physical detector systems needed for the registration of the cosmic heavy ions` trajectories as well as the biological systems eligible as test organisms. Such optimized procedures and techniques were developed for the investigations on chromosome aberrations induced by cosmic heavy ions in cells of the stem meristem of lettuce seeds (Lactuca sativa) and for the investigation of the radiobiological response of Wolffia arriza, which is the smallest flowering (water) plant. The biological effects were studied by the coworkers of the Russian Institute of Biomedical Problems (IBMP) which in cooperation with the European Space Agency ESA organized the exposure in the Biosatellites of the Cosmos series.

  5. Synergy of elastic and inelastic energy loss on ion track formation in SrTiO₃.

    PubMed

    Weber, William J; Zarkadoula, Eva; Pakarinen, Olli H; Sachan, Ritesh; Chisholm, Matthew F; Liu, Peng; Xue, Haizhou; Jin, Ke; Zhang, Yanwen

    2015-01-01

    While the interaction of energetic ions with solids is well known to result in inelastic energy loss to electrons and elastic energy loss to atomic nuclei in the solid, the coupled effects of these energy losses on defect production, nanostructure evolution and phase transformations in ionic and covalently bonded materials are complex and not well understood due to dependencies on electron-electron scattering processes, electron-phonon coupling, localized electronic excitations, diffusivity of charged defects, and solid-state radiolysis. Here we show that a colossal synergy occurs between inelastic energy loss and pre-existing atomic defects created by elastic energy loss in single crystal strontium titanate (SrTiO₃), resulting in the formation of nanometer-sized amorphous tracks, but only in the narrow region with pre-existing defects. These defects locally decrease the electronic and atomic thermal conductivities and increase electron-phonon coupling, which locally increase the intensity of the thermal spike for each ion. This work identifies a major gap in understanding on the role of defects in electronic energy dissipation and electron-phonon coupling; it also provides insights for creating novel interfaces and nanostructures to functionalize thin film structures, including tunable electronic, ionic, magnetic and optical properties. PMID:25578009

  6. Swift-heavy ion irradiation-induced latent tracks in few- and mono-layer MoS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Hang; Sun, Youmei; Zhai, Pengfei; Yao, Huijun; Zeng, Jian; Zhang, Shengxia; Duan, Jinglai; Hou, Mingdong; Khan, Maaz; Liu, Jie

    2016-04-01

    The latent tracks in mono- and few-layer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) induced by 209Bi ions with energies of 0.45-1.23 GeV were characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The hillock-like latent tracks were observed on the surface of irradiated monolayer MoS2. The diameter of the hillock after deconvolution procedure is 15.8 ± 1.7 nm and the height is 1.0 ± 0.3 nm. Hillock-like tracks are induced by energy transfer from energetic 209Bi ions to electron system of MoS2, resulting in the ionization and excitation and then the displacement of target atoms. Since Raman spectroscopy is sensitive to damages induced by swift-heavy ion irradiation, the in-plane E 2 g 1 mode (~385 cm-1) and the out-of-plane A 1 g mode (~408 cm-1) of MoS2 were investigated. With increasing ion fluence, the A 1 g peak shifts to higher frequencies, and the intensity ratio between A 1 g and E 2 g 1 peak increases. Besides, the A 1 g peak narrows. The evolution of the structural and vibrational properties of MoS2 with fluence is discussed. It can be concluded that the blue shift and narrowing of A 1 g peak in irradiated MoS2 is due to the adsorption of oxygen molecules at latent tracks. With decreasing thickness of MoS2, the irradiation resistance decreases.

  7. 1. EXISTING TRASH RAKE STRUCTURE AND STEEL IBEAM TRACK, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. EXISTING TRASH RAKE STRUCTURE AND STEEL I-BEAM TRACK, LOOKING EAST/NORTHEAST. - Washington Water Power Spokane River Upper Falls Hydroelectric Development, Gates & Gate-Lifting Mechanisms, Spokane River, approximately 0.5 mile northeast of intersection of Spokane Falls Boulevard & Post Street, Spokane, Spokane County, WA

  8. Tracking Coherent Structures and Source Localization in Geophysical Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forgoston, Eric; Hsieh, Ani; Schwartz, Ira; Yecko, Philip

    There has been a steady increase in the deployment of autonomous underwater and surface vehicles for applications such as ocean monitoring, tracking of marine processes, and forecasting contaminant transport. The underwater environment poses unique challenges since robots must operate in a communication and localization-limited environment where their dynamics are tightly coupled with the environmental dynamics. This work presents current efforts in understanding the impact of geophysical fluid dynamics on underwater vehicle control and autonomy. The focus of the talk is on the use of collaborative vehicles to track Lagrangian coherent structures and to localize contaminant spills. Research supported by the National Science Foundation and the Office of Naval Research.

  9. Damage around the ion path in cellulose triacetate. II. A track model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decossas, J. L.; Vareille, J. C.; Moliton, J. P.; Teyssier, J. L.

    1984-07-01

    In this paper, a model of an ion track is proposed. It is justified by experimental results obtained by electron microscopy. These results show that a track is composed of two parts: (i) a core in which the material is totally destroyed, and (ii) a ``halo'' in which the damage decreases when the distance from the ion path increases. The overall results given in paper I and the calculation of deposited energy density of Fain [J. Fain, M. Monnin, and M. Montret, Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Nuclear Photo., S.S.N.T.D., Bucarest (1972), p. 34, and J. Fain, M. Monnin, and M. Montret, Radiat. Res. 57, 379 (1974)] led us to the volume density of free radicals at every point inside the latent track. The core radius is established for ions of Z≤18 and E≤10 MeV/amu. A great density of damage close to the ion path is shown, and the influence of this phenomenon on track etching is studied.

  10. Track damage and erosion of insulators by ion-induced electronic processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tombrello, T. A.

    1984-01-01

    Track damage and the associated ejection of atoms and molecules from insulators, which occur as a result of ion-induced electronic excitation, are of interest both in their own right and because of the mechanisms through which the energy in the excited electrons is transformed into atomic motion. In this paper an overview is given of the phenomena that are observed. We show that there is a remarkable similarity between the damage profile along the ion's track in the solid and the yield of ejected atoms at the energy that corresponds to each point on the track. It is also seen that the density of extended defects (or, correspondingly, the ejected particle yield) appears to have a 'universal' form that is weakly dependent on the type of material. In the model presented this is a consequence of the inner-shell ionization of light elements in the solid by the incident ion; the resulting Auger decay produces an intense ionization spike that locally triggers the track formation/erosion process. This model allows the estimation of erosion yields/damage profiles for different ions and materials.

  11. Direct determination of track etch rate and response of CR-39 to normal incidence high-energy heavy ions.

    PubMed

    Awad, E M

    2001-12-01

    Response of CR-39 to high-energy heavy ions was investigated by using optical microphotographs of track profiles for Ar (480 MeV/n) and Ni (300 MeV/n). The depth dependence of track etch rate (VT) was determined experimentally by track length measurement. The results indicate that VT for the low REL Ar tracks is depth independent but for the high REL Ni tracks VT is gradually decreasing with depth. The region beyond 30 m depth inside the detector shows a stable region regarding the detector response for both ions. PMID:11688501

  12. Measurement of energy deposition near high energy, heavy ion tracks. Progress report, December 1982-April 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Metting, N.F.; Braby, L.A.; Rossi, H.H.; Kliauga, P.J.; Howard, J.; Schimmerling, W.; Wong, M.; Rapkin, M.

    1986-08-01

    The microscopic spatial distribution of energy deposition in irradiated tissue plays a significant role in the final biological effect produced. Therefore, it is important to have accurate microdosimetric spectra of radiation fields used for radiobiology and radiotherapy. The experiments desribed here were designed to measure the distributions of energy deposition around high energy heavy ion tracks generated at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Bevalac Biomedical Facility. A small proportional counter mounted in a large (0.6 by 2.5 m) vacuum chamber was used to measure energy deposition distributions as a function of the distance between detector and primary ion track. The microdosimetric distributions for a homogeneous radiation field were then calculated by integrating over radial distance. This thesis discusses the rationale of the experimental design and the analysis of measurements on 600 MeV/amu iron tracks. 53 refs., 19 figs.

  13. Latent tracks and associated strain in Al2O3 irradiated with swift heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connell, J. H.; Rymzhanov, R. A.; Skuratov, V. A.; Volkov, A. E.; Kirilkin, N. S.

    2016-05-01

    The morphology of latent ion tracks induced by high energy heavy ions in Al2O3 was investigated using a combination of high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), exit wave reconstruction, geometric phase analysis and numerical simulations. Single crystal α-Al2O3 crystals were irradiated with 167 MeV Xe ions along the c-axis to fluences between 1 × 1010 and 1 × 1013 cm-2. Planar TEM lamella were prepared by focused ion beam (FIB) and geometrical phase analysis was performed on the phase image of the reconstructed complex electron wave at the specimen exit surface in order to estimate the latent strain around individual track cores. In addition to the experimental data, the material excitation in a SHI track was numerically simulated by combining Monte-Carlo code, describing the excitation of the electronic subsystem, with classical molecular dynamics of the lattice atoms. Experimental and simulation data both showed that the relaxation of the excess lattice energy results in the formation of a cylinder-like disordered region of about 4 nm in diameter consisting of an underdense core surrounded by an overdense shell. Modeling of the passage of a second ion in the vicinity of this disordered region revealed that this damaged area can be restored to a near damage free state. The estimation of a maximal effective distance of recrystallization between the ion trajectories yields values of about 6-6.5 nm which are of the same order of magnitude as those estimated from the saturation density of latent ion tracks detected by TEM.

  14. Charge collected by diffusion from an ion track under mixed boundary conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmonds, Larry D.

    1991-01-01

    Charge-carrier diffusion from an ion track in a silicon substrate at least a few hundred microns thick is analyzed. The substrate upper surface is treated as reflective except for a small section, intended to represent a reverse-biased junction, which is treated as a sink. Total charge collected by the sink is calculated by assuming transport to be governed by an ambipolar diffusion equation with temporally constant and spatially uniform carrier lifetime and diffusion coefficient. Present results apply to a normally incident track but could easily be generalized to arbitrary track direction. The collected charge is found to depend on track length and on the electrostatic capacitance, rather than the area, of the sink. Theoretical predictions are compared to the results of a numerical simulation called the Poisson and Continuity Equation Solver (PISCES) for three cases and are found to agree within a factor of two in the worst case.

  15. Manufacturing cost analysis for photovoltaic concentrator tracking structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heller, B.; Pass, N.; Blackwell, R.

    1983-11-01

    Detailed manufacturing, transportation and installation costs are developed for the current design of three different photovoltaic concentrator tracking structures at a production rate of 10 to the 5th power/sq m per year. These costs are combined with array field performance estimates to obtain cost per watt and levelized energy costs for 500 kW fields. Installed structure costs for the three arrays (including G and A and profit but not module FOB costs) range from $166 to $208/sqm, or $1.04 to $1.28/W sub ap in 1982 dollars. The pedestal tracking structure has a lower cost than the post/frame or pylon/torque tube arrays.

  16. Non-invasive monitoring of therapeutic carbon ion beams in a homogeneous phantom by tracking of secondary ions.

    PubMed

    Gwosch, K; Hartmann, B; Jakubek, J; Granja, C; Soukup, P; Jäkel, O; Martišíková, M

    2013-06-01

    Radiotherapy with narrow scanned carbon ion beams enables a highly accurate treatment of tumours while sparing the surrounding healthy tissue. Changes in the patient's geometry can alter the actual ion range in tissue and result in unfavourable changes in the dose distribution. Consequently, it is desired to verify the actual beam delivery within the patient. Real-time and non-invasive measurement methods are preferable. Currently, the only technically feasible method to monitor the delivered dose distribution within the patient is based on tissue activation measurements by means of positron emission tomography (PET). An alternative monitoring method based on tracking of prompt secondary ions leaving a patient irradiated with carbon ion beams has been previously suggested. It is expected to help in overcoming the limitations of the PET-based technique like physiological washout of the beam induced activity, low signal and to allow for real-time measurements. In this paper, measurements of secondary charged particle tracks around a head-sized homogeneous PMMA phantom irradiated with pencil-like carbon ion beams are presented. The investigated energies and beam widths are within the therapeutically used range. The aim of the study is to deduce properties of the primary beam from the distribution of the secondary charged particles. Experiments were performed at the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center, Germany. The directions of secondary charged particles emerging from the PMMA phantom were measured using an arrangement of two parallel pixelated silicon detectors (Timepix). The distribution of the registered particle tracks was analysed to deduce its dependence on clinically important beam parameters: beam range, width and position. Distinct dependencies of the secondary particle tracks on the properties of the primary carbon ion beam were observed. In the particular experimental set-up used, beam range differences of 1.3 mm were detectable. In addition, variations in

  17. Strain fields around high-energy ion tracks in {alpha}-quartz

    SciTech Connect

    Follstaedt, D. M.; Norman, A. K.; Doyle, B. L.; McDaniel, F. D.

    2006-09-15

    Transmission electron microscopy has been used to image the tracks of high-energy {sup 197}Au{sup +26} (374 MeV) and {sup 127}I{sup +18} (241 MeV) ions incident in a nonchanneling direction through a prethinned specimen of hexagonal {alpha}-quartz (SiO{sub 2}). These ions have high electronic stopping powers in quartz, 24 and 19 keV/nm, respectively, which are sufficient to produce a disordered latent track. When the tracks are imaged with diffraction contrast using several different reciprocal lattice vectors, they exhibit a radial strain extending outward from their disordered centerline approximately 16 nm into the crystalline surroundings. The images are consistent with a radial strain field with cylindrical symmetry around the amorphous track, like that found in models developed to account for the lateral expansion of amorphous SiO{sub 2} films produced by irradiation with high-energy ions. These findings provide an experimental basis for increased confidence in such modeling.

  18. ION MANIPULATIONS IN STRUCTURES FOR LOSSLESS ION MANIPULATIONS (SLIM): COMPUTATIONAL EVALUATION OF A 90° TURN AND A SWITCH

    PubMed Central

    Garimella, Sandilya V.B.; Ibrahim, Yehia. M; Webb, Ian K.; Ipsen, Andreas B.; Chen, Tsung-Chi; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Baker, Erin S.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2015-01-01

    The process of redirecting ions through 90° turns and ‘tee’ switches utilizing Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations (SLIM) was evaluated at 4 Torr pressure using SIMION simulations and theoretical methods. The nature of pseudo-potential in SLIM-tee structures has also been explored. Simulations show that 100% transmission efficiency in SLIM devices can be achieved with guard electrode voltages lower than ~10 V. The ion plume width in these conditions is ~1.6 mm while at lower guard voltages lead to greater plume widths. Theoretical calculations show marginal loss of ion mobility resolving power (<5%) during ion turn due to the finite plume widths (i.e. race track effect). More robust SLIM designs that reduce the race track effect while maximizing ion transmission are also reported. In addition to static turns, the dynamic switching of ions into orthogonal channels was also evaluated both using SIMION ion trajectory simulations and experimentally. Simulations and theoretical calculations were in close agreement with experimental results and were used to develop more refined SLIM designs. PMID:26289106

  19. A thermalized ion explosion model for high energy sputtering and track registration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiberling, L. E.; Griffith, J. E.; Tombrello, T. A.

    1980-01-01

    A velocity spectrum of neutral sputtered particles as well as a low resolution mass spectrum of sputtered molecular ions was measured for 4.74 MeV F-19(+2) incident of UF4. The velocity spectrum is dramatically different from spectra taken with low energy (keV) bombarding ions, and is shown to be consistent with a hot plasma of atoms in thermal equilibrium inside the target. A thermalized ion explosion model is proposed for high energy sputtering which is expected to describe track formation in dielectric materials. The model is shown to be consistent with the observed total sputtering yield and the dependence of the yield on the primary ionization rate of the incident ion.

  20. Toward an Automated Analysis of Slow Ions in Nuclear Track Emulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamatkulov, K. Z.; Kattabekov, R. R.; Ambrozova, I.; Artemenkov, D. A.; Bradnova, V.; Kamanin, D. V.; Majling, L.; Marey, A.; Ploc, O.; Rusakova, V. V.; Stanoeva, R.; Turek, K.; Zaitsev, A. A.; Zarubin, P. I.; Zarubina, I. G.

    Application of the nuclear track emulsion technique (NTE) in radioactivity and nuclear fission studies is discussed. It is suggested to use a HSP-1000 automated microscope for searching for a collinear cluster tri-partition of heavy nuclei implanted in NTE. Calibrations of α-particles and ion ranges in a novel NTE are carried out. Surface exposures of NTE samples to a 252Cf source started. Planar events containing fragments and long-range α-particles as well as fragment triples only are studied. NTE samples are calibrated by ions Kr and Xe of energy of 1.2 and 3 A MeV.

  1. Preparation of ion-track membranes of poly( p-phenylene terephthalamide): Control of pore shape by irradiation with different ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Yamaki, Tetsuya; Koshikawa, Hiroshi; Asano, Masaharu; Voss, Kay-Obbe; Neumann, Reinhard; Yoshida, Masaru

    2007-07-01

    The preparation of ion-track membranes of thermally stable poly( p-phenylene terephthalamide) (PPTA) was performed by ion beam irradiation followed by chemical etching with a sodium hypochlorite solution. Cylindrical pores were observed in the membrane irradiated with 197Au and 238U ions at an energy of 11.1 MeV/n. In contrast, funnel shape pores appeared in the membrane irradiated with 84Kr, 102Ru and 129Xe ion at energies of 6.2, 3.6 and 3.5 MeV/n, respectively. The 197Au and 238U ion irradiation was found to exhibit more than four times larger sensitivity to the track etching under the same etching conditions. Consequently, the pore shape can be controlled by the masses and energies of the irradiated ions, in close relation to the etching sensitivity of the track.

  2. The Influence of Spatial Variations of Diffusion Length on Charge Collected by Diffusion from Ion Tracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmonds, L. D.

    1996-01-01

    Charge collected by diffusion from ion tracks in a semiconductor substrate may be influenced by the substrate diffusion length, which is related to recombination losses. A theoretical analysis shows that, excluding some extreme cases, charge collection is insensitive to spatial variations in the diffusion length funciton, so it is possible to define an effective diffusion length having the property that collected charge can be approximated by assuming a uniform diffusion length equal to this effective value.

  3. Exploring structural phase transitions of ion crystals

    PubMed Central

    Yan, L. L.; Wan, W.; Chen, L.; Zhou, F.; Gong, S. J.; Tong, X.; Feng, M.

    2016-01-01

    Phase transitions have been a research focus in many-body physics over past decades. Cold ions, under strong Coulomb repulsion, provide a repealing paradigm of exploring phase transitions in stable confinement by electromagnetic field. We demonstrate various conformations of up to sixteen laser-cooled 40Ca+ ion crystals in a home-built surface-electrode trap, where besides the usually mentioned structural phase transition from the linear to the zigzag, two additional phase transitions to more complicated two-dimensional configurations are identified. The experimental observation agrees well with the numerical simulation. Heating due to micromotion of the ions is analysed by comparison of the numerical simulation with the experimental observation. Our investigation implies very rich and complicated many-body behaviour in the trapped-ion systems and provides effective mechanism for further exploring quantum phase transitions and quantum information processing with ultracold trapped ions. PMID:26865229

  4. Estimation of spatially restricted LET using track structure models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiefer, J.

    1994-01-01

    The spatial distribution of energy deposition is an important determinant in the formation of biologically significant lesions. It has been widely realized that Linear Energy Transfer (LET) being an average quantity is not sufficient to describe the situation at a submicroscopic scale. To remedy this to some extent 'energy-cut-off' values are sometimes used but since they are related to secondary electron energy and only indirectly to their range they are also not adequate although they may be easily calculated. 'Range-restricted LET' appears to be better but its determination is usually quite involved. Xapsos (1992) suggested a semi-empirical approximation based on a modified Bethe-formula which contains a number of assumption which are difficult to verify. A simpler and easier way is to use existing beam-models which describe energy deposition around an ion's path. They all agree that the energy density (i. e., energy deposited per unit mass) decreases with the inverse square of the distance from the track center. This simple dependence can be used to determine the fraction of total LET which is deposited in a cylinder of a given radius. As an example our own beam model. Energy density depends on distance x (measured in m) from the track center according to the presented formula.

  5. Fine structure of track-plated Au-Cu alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, K.A.; Staudhammer, K.P.

    1982-01-01

    The burnishing process, i.e., mechanical rubbing of the deposit during electrodeposition, produces continuous nucleation of new grains during deposition which effectively prevents large columnar grains and macroporosity. In addition, track plating produces a uniform subgrain and substructure. By the use of STEM and TEM we were able to define a number of structural features of this material. Evident from the micrographs is the non-uniform polishing of the layers resulting from the chemical variation in the plating process. Microstructural features of the Au rich regions are shown. The unit size of this structure is about 22 nm. The fine-grained structure does not have well defined boundaries but does contain a slight amount of preferred alignment. Each equivalent unit has periodic fine structure measurable to approx. 2 nm.

  6. Scanning-force-microscopy study of MeV-atomic-ion-induced surface tracks in organic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Kopniczky, J.; Reimann, C.T.; Hallen, A.; Sundqvist, B.U.R. ); Tengvall, P.; Erlandsson, R. )

    1994-01-01

    We present scanning force microscope images of craterlike defects induced by individual 78.2-MeV [sup 127]I ions incident on organic single-crystal [ital L]-valine surfaces. For grazing incidence ions, the craters are elongated along the ion azimuth of incidence and display a raised tail in the surface above the ion track. This permanent plastic deformation of the surface indicates that a hydrodynamic pressure-pulse phenomenon occurs in response to the electronically deposited energy.

  7. Phosphorylation of DNA damage-recognizing proteins at heavy-ion track

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnishi, T.; Takahashi, A.; Nojima, K.; Furusawa, Y.; Ohnishi, K.

    To identify the repair dynamics for high LET-radiation-induced DNA damage we analyzed the focus formation after exposure to iron-ion beams 500 MeV u 200 KeV um using immunocytochemical methods Since the focus formation of phospho-H2AX gamma-H2AX which is well understood to be activated at radiation-induced double strand breaks DSBs we performed the visualization of the tracks spatial distribution of lesions from an aspect of dose dependency The number of this track induced by iron-ion beams was well corresponded with the value of a calculation well In addition we demonstrate that DNA damage-recognizing proteins such as phospho-serine 1981 of ATM phospho-threonine 2609 of DNA-PKcs phospho-serine 343 of NBS1 and phospho-threonine 68 of Chk2 co-localized with gamma-H2AX at high LET-radiation-induced portion These findings suggest that iron-ion beams were quite effective for detection of DNA damages of DSBs recognized with DNA repair enzymes used here after phosphorylation of them because iron-ion beams can be used to generate extremely localized at DNA damages within restricted regions of the nuclei

  8. Tunable nanoporous silicon oxide templates by swift heavy ion tracks technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaniukov, E. Yu; Ustarroz, J.; Yakimchuk, D. V.; Petrova, M.; Terryn, H.; Sivakov, V.; Petrov, A. V.

    2016-03-01

    Nanoporous silicon oxide templates formed by swift heavy ion tracks technology have been investigated. The influence of the heavy ion characteristics, such as type of ion, energy, stopping power and irradiation fluence on the pore properties of the silicon oxide templates, has been studied. Furthermore, the process of pore formation by chemical etching with hydrofluoric acid has been thoroughly investigated by assessing the effect of etchant concentration and etching time. The outcome of this investigation enables us to have precise control over the resulting geometry of nanopores arrays. As a result, guidelines for the creation of a-SiO2/Si templates with tunable parameters and general recommendations for their further application are presented.

  9. Tunable nanoporous silicon oxide templates by swift heavy ion tracks technology.

    PubMed

    Kaniukov, E Yu; Ustarroz, J; Yakimchuk, D V; Petrova, M; Terryn, H; Sivakov, V; Petrov, A V

    2016-03-18

    Nanoporous silicon oxide templates formed by swift heavy ion tracks technology have been investigated. The influence of the heavy ion characteristics, such as type of ion, energy, stopping power and irradiation fluence on the pore properties of the silicon oxide templates, has been studied. Furthermore, the process of pore formation by chemical etching with hydrofluoric acid has been thoroughly investigated by assessing the effect of etchant concentration and etching time. The outcome of this investigation enables us to have precise control over the resulting geometry of nanopores arrays. As a result, guidelines for the creation of a-SiO2/Si templates with tunable parameters and general recommendations for their further application are presented. PMID:26878691

  10. Separation of ions using polyelectrolyte-modified nanoporous track-etched membranes.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Jason A; Bernal, Edxon Eduardo Licón; Yaroshchuk, Andriy; Bruening, Merlin L

    2013-08-13

    Selective ion exclusion from charged nanopores in track-etched membranes allows separation of ions with different charges or mobilities. This study examines pressure-driven transport of dissolved ions through track-etched membranes modified by adsorption of poly(styrene sulfonate) (PSS)/protonated poly(allylamine) (PAH) films. For nominal 30 nm pores modified with a single layer of PSS, Br(-)/SO4(2-) selectivities are ∼3.4 with SO4(2-) rejections around 85% due to selective electrostatic exclusion of the divalent anion from the negatively charged pore. Corresponding membranes containing an adsorbed PSS/PAH bilayer are positively charged and exhibit average K(+)/Mg(2+) selectivities >10 at 8 mM ionic strength, and Mg(2+) rejections are >97.5% at ionic strengths <5 mM. The high rejection of Mg(2+) compared to SO4(2-) likely results from both a smaller pore size after deposition of the PAH layer and higher surface charge because of Mg(2+) adsorption. Simultaneous modeling of K(+) and Mg(2+) rejections using the nonlinearized Poisson-Boltzmann equation gives an average modified pore diameter of 8.4 ± 2.1 nm, which does not vary significantly with ionic strength. This diameter is smaller than that calculated from hydraulic permeabilities and estimated pore densities, suggesting that narrow regions near the pore entrance control ion transport. In addition to simple electrostatic exclusion, streaming potentials lead to differing rejections of Br(-) and acetate in PSS/PAH-modified pores, and of Li(+) and Cs(+) in PSS-modified pores. For these cases, electrical migration of ions toward the feed solution results in higher rejection of the more mobile ion. PMID:23902372

  11. Microdosimetry for a carbon ion beam using track-etched detectors.

    PubMed

    Ambrožová, I; Vondráček, V; Šefl, M; Štěpán, V; Pachnerová Brabcová, K; Ploc, O; Incerti, S; Davídková, M

    2015-09-01

    Track-etched detectors (TED) have been used as linear energy transfer (LET) spectrometers in heavy ion beams for many years. LET spectra and depth-dose distribution of a carbon ion beam were measured behind polymethylmethacrylate degraders at Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba, Japan. The measurements were performed along monoenergetic beam with energy 290 MeV u(-1) in different positions: (1) at beam extraction area, (2) at beginning, (3) maximum and (4) behind the Bragg peak region (0, 117, 147 and 151 mm of water-equivalent depth, respectively). The LET spectra inside and outside of the primary ion beam have been evaluated. TED record only heavy charged particles with LET above 8-10 keV µm(-1), while electrons and ions with lower LET are not detected. The Geant4 simulation toolkit version 4.9.6.P01 has been used to estimate the contribution of non-detected particles to absorbed dose. Presented results demonstrate the applicability of TED for microdosimetry measurements in therapeutic carbon ion beams. PMID:25862534

  12. Rectangular Ion Funnel: A New Ion Funnel Interface for Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Tsung-Chi; Webb, Ian K.; Prost, Spencer A.; Harrer, Marques B.; Norheim, Randolph V.; Tang, Keqi; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Smith, Richard D.

    2015-01-06

    A recent achievement in Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations (SLIM) is the ability for near lossless ion focusing, transfer, and trapping in sub-atmospheric pressure regions. While lossless ion manipulations are advantageously applied to the applications of ion mobility separations and gas phase reactions, ion introduction through ring electrode ion funnels or more conventional ion optics to SLIM can involve discontinuities in electric fields or other perturbations that result in ion losses. In this work, we investigated a new funnel design that aims to seamlessly couple to SLIM at the funnel exit. This rectangular ion funnel (RIF) was initially evaluated by ion simulations, fabricated utilizing printed circuit board technology and tested experimentally. The RIF was integrated to a SLIM-TOFMS system, and the operating parameters, including RF, DC bias of the RIF electrodes, and electric fields for effectively interfacing with a SLIM were characterized. The RIF provided a 2-fold sensitivity increase without significant discrimination over a wide m/z range along with greatly improved SLIM operational stability.

  13. Rectangular Ion Funnel: A New Ion Funnel Interface for Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Structures for lossless ion manipulations (SLIM) have recently demonstrated the ability for near lossless ion focusing, transfer, and trapping in subatmospheric pressure regions. While lossless ion manipulations are advantageously applied to the applications of ion mobility separations and gas phase reactions, ion introduction through ring electrode ion funnels or more conventional ion optics to SLIM can involve discontinuities in electric fields or other perturbations that result in ion losses. In this work, we developed and investigated a new funnel design that aims to seamlessly couple to SLIM at the funnel exit. This rectangular ion funnel (RIF) was initially evaluated by ion simulations, fabricated utilizing printed circuit board technology, and tested experimentally. The RIF was integrated to a SLIM-time of flight (TOF) MS system, and the operating parameters, including RF, DC bias of the RIF electrodes, and electric fields for effectively interfacing with a SLIM, were characterized. The RIF provided a 2-fold sensitivity increase without significant discrimination over a wide m/z range and well matched to that of SLIM, along with greatly improved SLIM operational stability. PMID:25409343

  14. Atom ejection from a fast-ion track: A molecular-dynamics study

    SciTech Connect

    Urbassek, H.M. ); Kafemann, H. ); Johnson, R.E. )

    1994-01-01

    As a model for atom ejection from fast-ion tracks, molecular-dynamics simulations of a cylindrical track of energized particles are performed. An idealized situation is studied where every atom in a cylindrical track of radius [ital R][sub 0] is energized with energy [ital E][sub 0]. The emission yield [ital Y]([ital E][sub 0],[ital R][sub 0]) shows the existence of two ejection regimes. If the particle energy [ital E][sub 0] is below the sublimation energy [ital U] of the material, a threshold regime is seen in which [ital Y] rises roughly like the third power of [ital E][sub 0]; for high-energy densities [ital E][sub 0][approx gt][ital U], the yield rises much more slowly, roughly linearly. In both cases, ejected particles mostly originate from the track, rather than from its surroundings, and from the first or the first few monolayers. The behavior found is interpreted here in terms of emission due to a pressure-driven jet (linear regime) or due to a pressure pulse (threshold regime). These both behave differently from the often-used thermal-spike sputtering model.

  15. Resonant structures in heavy-ion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, S.J.; Henning, W.; Ernst, H.; Geesaman, D.F.; Jachcinski, C.; Kovar, D.G.; Paul, M.; Schiffer, J.P.

    1980-01-01

    An investigation of heavy-ion resonance structures using the /sup 24/Mg(/sup 16/O, /sup 12/C)/sup 28/Si reaction is presented. The data are analyzed in the context of Breit-Wigner resonances added to a direct-reaction background.

  16. Structural foundations of optogenetics: Determinants of channelrhodopsin ion selectivity.

    PubMed

    Berndt, Andre; Lee, Soo Yeun; Wietek, Jonas; Ramakrishnan, Charu; Steinberg, Elizabeth E; Rashid, Asim J; Kim, Hoseok; Park, Sungmo; Santoro, Adam; Frankland, Paul W; Iyer, Shrivats M; Pak, Sally; Ährlund-Richter, Sofie; Delp, Scott L; Malenka, Robert C; Josselyn, Sheena A; Carlén, Marie; Hegemann, Peter; Deisseroth, Karl

    2016-01-26

    The structure-guided design of chloride-conducting channelrhodopsins has illuminated mechanisms underlying ion selectivity of this remarkable family of light-activated ion channels. The first generation of chloride-conducting channelrhodopsins, guided in part by development of a structure-informed electrostatic model for pore selectivity, included both the introduction of amino acids with positively charged side chains into the ion conduction pathway and the removal of residues hypothesized to support negatively charged binding sites for cations. Engineered channels indeed became chloride selective, reversing near -65 mV and enabling a new kind of optogenetic inhibition; however, these first-generation chloride-conducting channels displayed small photocurrents and were not tested for optogenetic inhibition of behavior. Here we report the validation and further development of the channelrhodopsin pore model via crystal structure-guided engineering of next-generation light-activated chloride channels (iC++) and a bistable variant (SwiChR++) with net photocurrents increased more than 15-fold under physiological conditions, reversal potential further decreased by another ∼ 15 mV, inhibition of spiking faithfully tracking chloride gradients and intrinsic cell properties, strong expression in vivo, and the initial microbial opsin channel-inhibitor-based control of freely moving behavior. We further show that inhibition by light-gated chloride channels is mediated mainly by shunting effects, which exert optogenetic control much more efficiently than the hyperpolarization induced by light-activated chloride pumps. The design and functional features of these next-generation chloride-conducting channelrhodopsins provide both chronic and acute timescale tools for reversible optogenetic inhibition, confirm fundamental predictions of the ion selectivity model, and further elucidate electrostatic and steric structure-function relationships of the light-gated pore. PMID

  17. Ion-track based single-channel templates for single-nanowire contacting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chtanko, N.; Toimil-Molares, M. E.; Cornelius, T. W.; Dobrev, D.; Neumann, R.

    2005-07-01

    This work reports a procedure for the fabrication of membranes containing only one single channel with diameter down to 20 nm and with well-defined geometry. Foils of different types of polymer (polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and polycarbonate (PC)) were tested with respect to their suitability as ion-track template for single-nanowire growth. Membranes with one pore were created by the track-etching technique. The pore size was characterized by electrical conductivity measurements in 1 M KCl. Furthermore, we developed also a method for the preparation and electrical contacting of single metallic nanowires. Cylindrical single pores were filled with Bi by electrochemical deposition. The resulting wires, remaining embedded in the polymer foil, are very suitable for measurements of electrical resistance as a function of parameters such as wire diameter and temperature.

  18. Analyzing and Tracking Burning Structures in Lean Premixed Hydrogen Flames

    SciTech Connect

    Bremer, Peer-Timo; Weber, Gunther; Pascucci, Valerio; Day, Marc; Bell, John

    2009-06-01

    This paper presents topology-based methods to robustly extract, analyze, and track features defined as subsets of isosurfaces. First, we demonstrate how features identified by thresholding isosurfaces can be defined in terms of the Morse complex. Second, we present a specialized hierarchy that encodes the feature segmentation independent of the threshold while still providing a flexible multi-resolution representation. Third, for a given parameter selection we create detailed tracking graphs representing the complete evolution of all features in a combustion simulation over several hundred time steps. Finally, we discuss a user interface that correlates the tracking information with interactive rendering of the segmented isosurfaces enabling an in-depth analysis of the temporal behavior. We demonstrate our approach by analyzing three numerical simulations of lean hydrogen flames subject to different levels of turbulence. Due to their unstable nature, lean flames burn in cells separated by locally extinguished regions. The number, area, and evolution over time of these cells provide important insights into the impact of turbulence on the combustion process. Utilizing the hierarchy we can perform an extensive parameter study without re-processing the data for each set of parameters. The resulting statistics enable scientist to select appropriate parameters and provide insight into the sensitivity of the results wrt. to the choice of parameters. Our method allows for the first time to quantitatively correlate the turbulence of the burning process with the distribution of burning regions, properly segmented and selected. In particular, our analysis shows that counter-intuitively stronger turbulence leads to larger cell structures, which burn more intensely than expected. This behavior suggests that flames could be stabilized under much leaner conditions than previously anticipated.

  19. Robustness of target dose coverage to motion uncertainties for scanned carbon ion beam tracking therapy of moving tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eley, John Gordon; Newhauser, Wayne David; Richter, Daniel; Lüchtenborg, Robert; Saito, Nami; Bert, Christoph

    2015-02-01

    Beam tracking with scanned carbon ion radiotherapy achieves highly conformal target dose by steering carbon pencil beams to follow moving tumors using real-time magnetic deflection and range modulation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the robustness of target dose coverage from beam tracking in light of positional uncertainties of moving targets and beams. To accomplish this, we simulated beam tracking for moving targets in both water phantoms and a sample of lung cancer patients using a research treatment planning system. We modeled various deviations from perfect tracking that could arise due to uncertainty in organ motion and limited precision of a scanned ion beam tracking system. We also investigated the effects of interfractional changes in organ motion on target dose coverage by simulating a complete course of treatment using serial (weekly) 4DCTs from six lung cancer patients. For perfect tracking of moving targets, we found that target dose coverage was high ({{\\overline{V}}95} was 94.8% for phantoms and 94.3% for lung cancer patients, respectively) but sensitive to changes in the phase of respiration at the start of treatment and to the respiratory period. Phase delays in tracking the moving targets led to large degradation of target dose coverage (up to 22% drop for a 15° delay). Sensitivity to technical uncertainties in beam tracking delivery was minimal for a lung cancer case. However, interfractional changes in anatomy and organ motion led to large decreases in target dose coverage (target coverage dropped approximately 8% due to anatomy and motion changes after 1 week). Our findings provide a better understand of the importance of each of these uncertainties for beam tracking with scanned carbon ion therapy and can be used to inform the design of future scanned ion beam tracking systems.

  20. Robustness of target dose coverage to motion uncertainties for scanned carbon ion beam tracking therapy of moving tumors.

    PubMed

    Eley, John Gordon; Newhauser, Wayne David; Richter, Daniel; Lüchtenborg, Robert; Saito, Nami; Bert, Christoph

    2015-02-21

    Beam tracking with scanned carbon ion radiotherapy achieves highly conformal target dose by steering carbon pencil beams to follow moving tumors using real-time magnetic deflection and range modulation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the robustness of target dose coverage from beam tracking in light of positional uncertainties of moving targets and beams. To accomplish this, we simulated beam tracking for moving targets in both water phantoms and a sample of lung cancer patients using a research treatment planning system. We modeled various deviations from perfect tracking that could arise due to uncertainty in organ motion and limited precision of a scanned ion beam tracking system. We also investigated the effects of interfractional changes in organ motion on target dose coverage by simulating a complete course of treatment using serial (weekly) 4DCTs from six lung cancer patients. For perfect tracking of moving targets, we found that target dose coverage was high ([Formula: see text] was 94.8% for phantoms and 94.3% for lung cancer patients, respectively) but sensitive to changes in the phase of respiration at the start of treatment and to the respiratory period. Phase delays in tracking the moving targets led to large degradation of target dose coverage (up to 22% drop for a 15° delay). Sensitivity to technical uncertainties in beam tracking delivery was minimal for a lung cancer case. However, interfractional changes in anatomy and organ motion led to large decreases in target dose coverage (target coverage dropped approximately 8% due to anatomy and motion changes after 1 week). Our findings provide a better understand of the importance of each of these uncertainties for beam tracking with scanned carbon ion therapy and can be used to inform the design of future scanned ion beam tracking systems. PMID:25650520

  1. Robustness of Target Dose Coverage to Motion Uncertainties for Scanned Carbon Ion Beam Tracking Therapy of Moving Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Eley, John Gordon; Newhauser, Wayne David; Richter, Daniel; Lüchtenborg, Robert; Saito, Nami; Bert, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Beam tracking with scanned carbon ion radiotherapy achieves highly conformal target dose by steering carbon pencil beams to follow moving tumors using real-time magnetic deflection and range modulation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the robustness of target dose coverage from beam tracking in light of positional uncertainties of moving targets and beams. To accomplish this, we simulated beam tracking for moving targets in both water phantoms and a sample of lung cancer patients using a research treatment planning system. We modeled various deviations from perfect tracking that could arise due to uncertainty in organ motion and limited precision of a scanned ion beam tracking system. We also investigated the effects of interfractional changes in organ motion on target dose coverage by simulating a complete course of treatment using serial (weekly) 4DCTs from 6 lung cancer patients. For perfect tracking of moving targets, we found that target dose coverage was high (V̄95 was 94.8% for phantoms and 94.3% for lung cancer patients, respectively) but sensitive to changes in the phase of respiration at the start of treatment and to the respiratory period. Phase delays in tracking the moving targets led to large degradation of target dose coverage (up to 22% drop for a 15 degree delay). Sensitivity to technical uncertainties in beam tracking delivery was minimal for a lung cancer case. However, interfractional changes in anatomy and organ motion led to large decreases in target dose coverage (target coverage dropped approximately 8% due to anatomy and motion changes after 1 week). Our findings provide a better understand of the importance of each of these uncertainties for beam tracking with scanned carbon ion therapy and can be used to inform the design of future scanned ion beam tracking systems. PMID:25650520

  2. Structural foundations of optogenetics: Determinants of channelrhodopsin ion selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Berndt, Andre; Lee, Soo Yeun; Wietek, Jonas; Ramakrishnan, Charu; Steinberg, Elizabeth E.; Rashid, Asim J.; Kim, Hoseok; Park, Sungmo; Santoro, Adam; Frankland, Paul W.; Iyer, Shrivats M.; Pak, Sally; Ährlund-Richter, Sofie; Delp, Scott L.; Malenka, Robert C.; Josselyn, Sheena A.; Carlén, Marie; Hegemann, Peter; Deisseroth, Karl

    2016-01-01

    The structure-guided design of chloride-conducting channelrhodopsins has illuminated mechanisms underlying ion selectivity of this remarkable family of light-activated ion channels. The first generation of chloride-conducting channelrhodopsins, guided in part by development of a structure-informed electrostatic model for pore selectivity, included both the introduction of amino acids with positively charged side chains into the ion conduction pathway and the removal of residues hypothesized to support negatively charged binding sites for cations. Engineered channels indeed became chloride selective, reversing near −65 mV and enabling a new kind of optogenetic inhibition; however, these first-generation chloride-conducting channels displayed small photocurrents and were not tested for optogenetic inhibition of behavior. Here we report the validation and further development of the channelrhodopsin pore model via crystal structure-guided engineering of next-generation light-activated chloride channels (iC++) and a bistable variant (SwiChR++) with net photocurrents increased more than 15-fold under physiological conditions, reversal potential further decreased by another ∼15 mV, inhibition of spiking faithfully tracking chloride gradients and intrinsic cell properties, strong expression in vivo, and the initial microbial opsin channel-inhibitor–based control of freely moving behavior. We further show that inhibition by light-gated chloride channels is mediated mainly by shunting effects, which exert optogenetic control much more efficiently than the hyperpolarization induced by light-activated chloride pumps. The design and functional features of these next-generation chloride-conducting channelrhodopsins provide both chronic and acute timescale tools for reversible optogenetic inhibition, confirm fundamental predictions of the ion selectivity model, and further elucidate electrostatic and steric structure–function relationships of the light-gated pore. PMID

  3. Ion track symmetric and asymmetric nanopores in polyethylene terephthalate foils for versatile applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apel, P. Yu.; Blonskaya, I. V.; Dmitriev, S. N.; Orelovich, O. L.; Sartowska, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    In this report we present several fabrication methods which allow production of ion track nanopore membranes with different pore configurations. Polymer foils, typically polyethylene terephthalate with a thickness of 5-23 μm, are irradiated with accelerated heavy ions (energy of 1-10 MeV/u) and then subjected to different physico-chemical treatments. Depending on the procedure, symmetric or asymmetric pores with nanoscale-sized narrowing are obtained. The asymmetric configurations include conical, funnel-like and bullet-like shapes. In electrolyte solutions the asymmetric nanopores exhibit diode-like properties which strongly depend on the pore shape. The peculiar features of such pores provide a basis for various applications.

  4. Efficient parallel algorithm for statistical ion track simulations in crystalline materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Byoungseon; Grønbech-Jensen, Niels

    2009-02-01

    We present an efficient parallel algorithm for statistical Molecular Dynamics simulations of ion tracks in solids. The method is based on the Rare Event Enhanced Domain following Molecular Dynamics (REED-MD) algorithm, which has been successfully applied to studies of, e.g., ion implantation into crystalline semiconductor wafers. We discuss the strategies for parallelizing the method, and we settle on a host-client type polling scheme in which a multiple of asynchronous processors are continuously fed to the host, which, in turn, distributes the resulting feed-back information to the clients. This real-time feed-back consists of, e.g., cumulative damage information or statistics updates necessary for the cloning in the rare event algorithm. We finally demonstrate the algorithm for radiation effects in a nuclear oxide fuel, and we show the balanced parallel approach with high parallel efficiency in multiple processor configurations.

  5. Optimal Variable-Structure Control Tracking of Spacecraft Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crassidis, John L.; Vadali, Srinivas R.; Markley, F. Landis

    1999-01-01

    An optimal control approach using variable-structure (sliding-mode) tracking for large angle spacecraft maneuvers is presented. The approach expands upon a previously derived regulation result using a quaternion parameterization for the kinematic equations of motion. This parameterization is used since it is free of singularities. The main contribution of this paper is the utilization of a simple term in the control law that produces a maneuver to the reference attitude trajectory in the shortest distance. Also, a multiplicative error quaternion between the desired and actual attitude is used to derive the control law. Sliding-mode switching surfaces are derived using an optimal-control analysis. Control laws are given using either external torque commands or reaction wheel commands. Global asymptotic stability is shown for both cases using a Lyapunov analysis. Simulation results are shown which use the new control strategy to stabilize the motion of the Microwave Anisotropy Probe spacecraft.

  6. Fabrication of hard-coated optical absorbers with microstructured surfaces using etched ion tracks: Toward broadband ultra-low reflectance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amemiya, Kuniaki; Koshikawa, Hiroshi; Yamaki, Tetsuya; Maekawa, Yasunari; Shitomi, Hiroshi; Numata, Takayuki; Kinoshita, Kenichi; Tanabe, Minoru; Fukuda, Daiji

    2015-08-01

    Broadband low reflectance materials have various applications in the field of optical energy management; however, materials with ultra-low reflectance (below 0.1%) have been considered as mechanically delicate. We have developed a novel hard-surface optical absorber with microstructured, diamond-like carbon coated ion tracks on CR-39 plastic substrate. The spectral reflectance of the first prototype was below 2% for wavelengths ranging from 400 nm to 1400 nm; moreover, the optical absorber had mechanically hard surface and exhibited temporal durability. Choosing the appropriate design of the surface structure and coating layer is likely to reduce the reflectance to the order of 0.1%. This technique yields easy-to-handle broadband ultra-low reflectance absorbers.

  7. 3D Visualization of Monte-Carlo Simulation's of HZE Track Structure and Initial Chemical Species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plante, Ianik; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2009-01-01

    Heavy ions biophysics is important for space radiation risk assessment [1] and hadron-therapy [2]. The characteristic of heavy ions tracks include a very high energy deposition region close to the track (<20 nm) denoted as the track core, and an outer penumbra region consisting of individual secondary electrons (6-rays). A still open question is the radiobiological effects of 6- rays relative to the track core. Of importance is the induction of double-strand breaks (DSB) [3] and oxidative damage to the biomolecules and the tissue matrix, considered the most important lesions for acute and long term effects of radiation. In this work, we have simulated a 56Fe26+ ion track of 1 GeV/amu with our Monte-Carlo code RITRACKS [4]. The simulation results have been used to calculate the energy depiction and initial chemical species in a "voxelized" space, which is then visualized in 3D. Several voxels with dose >1000 Gy are found in the penumbra, some located 0.1 mm from the track core. In computational models, the DSB induction probability is calculated with radial dose [6], which may not take into account the higher RBE of electron track ends for DSB induction. Therefore, these simulations should help improve models of DSB induction and our understanding of heavy ions biophysics.

  8. Data Analysis of Tracks of Heavy Ion Particles in Timepix Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, S.; Vilalta, R.; Pinsky, L.; Kroupa, M.; Stoffle, N.; Idarraga, J.

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we describe some of the computational challenges that need to be addressed when developing active Space Radiation Monitors and Dosimeters using the Timepix detectors developed by the Medipix2 Collaboration at CERN. Measurement of the Linear Energy Transfer (LET), the source and velocity of incident ionizing radiation, are of initial interest when developing such operational devices because they provide the capability to calculate the Dose-equivalent, and to characterize the radiation field for the design of radiation protective devices. In order to facilitate the LET measurement, we first propose a new method for calculating azimuth direction and polar angle of individual tracks of penetrating charged particles based on the pixel clusters they produce. We then describe an energy compensation method for heavy ion tracks suffering from saturation and plasma effects. Finally, we identify interactions within the detector that need to be excluded from the total effective Dose-Equivalent assessment. We make use of data taken at the HIMAC (Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator Center) facility in Chiba, Japan and NSRL (NASA Space Radiation Laboratory) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory in New York, USA for evaluation purposes.

  9. Making porous membranes by chemical etching of heavy-ion tracks in β-PVDF films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasselli, M.; Betz, N.

    2005-07-01

    Production of porous membranes using heavy ion bombardment and subsequent chemical etching of poly(vinylidene difluoride) (PVDF) films has been reported several years ago. However, porous membranes with pore diameter in the nanometer scale requires a better understanding of the chemical etching mechanism. In this work PVDF foils irradiated with Sn ions (2.85 MeV per nucleon) were exposed to several etching conditions which involved permanganate oxidation in different alkaline environments. The solution of KOH 9 mol L-1 and saturated in KMnO4 was the best etching reactant for PVDF. Functional groups created in the alkaline and oxidative attack by permanganate were studied by FT-IR and UV-vis spectroscopy. The spectroscopic data reveals that the formation of pores occurs by a two-step mechanism: (i) double bonds as a result of dehydrofluorination induced by alkaline media and (ii) oxidation of these double bonds in permanganate solution. The etching temperature and time can be attuned to prepare track-etched membrane with a desired pore diameter in the range of few hundred nanometers. Temperatures ranged between 55 °C and 65 °C were optimal to produce cylindrical pores. Temperatures higher than 85 °C induce conical-shaped track-etched pores while temperatures lower than 50 °C slow down the chemical attack. The addition of a phase-transfer agent enhances the chemical attack and allows the decrease of the etching temperature and/or time.

  10. Early stage of the electron kinetics in swift heavy ion tracks in dielectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Medvedev, N. A.; Rethfeld, B.; Volkov, A. E.; Shcheblanov, N. S.

    2010-09-15

    A Monte Carlo approach was applied for simulations of the early stage (first tens of femtosecond) of kinetics of the electronic subsystem of silica (SiO{sub 2}) in tracks of swift heavy ions (SHIs) decelerated in the electronic stopping regime. At the first step multiple ionizations of target atoms by a projectile (Ca{sup +19}, E=11.4 MeV/amu) were described that gave the initial spatial distributions of free electrons having different momenta as well as distributions of holes in different atomic shells. Spatial propagation of fast electrons results in secondary ionizations of target atoms as well as in energy transfer to the lattice at times much shorter than the times of atomic oscillations (phonons). The well detected front of excitation in the electronic and ionic subsystems is formed due to this propagation which cannot be described by models based on diffusion mechanisms (e.g., parabolic equations of heat diffusion). At times {approx}10 fs after the projectile passage, about {approx}0.1% of the energy is already transferred to the lattice. About 63% of the energy deposited by the ion is accumulated in holes at these times. Calculated distributions of these holes through the atomic shells are in excellent agreement with the spectroscopy experiments. Comparison with these experiments demonstrated also that relaxation of the electronic subsystem in SHI tracks in solids cannot be described adequately without taking into account intra-atomic and interatomic Auger (Knotek-Feibelman) processes.

  11. The effect of track structure on the induction of chromosomal aberrations in murine cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durante, M.; Cella, L.; Furusawa, Y.; George, K.; Gialanella, G.; Grossi, G.; Pugliese, M.; Saito, M.; Yang, T. C.

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: To measure chromosome aberrations in C3H 10T1/2 mouse fibroblasts using FISH painting at the first mitosis following exposure to 30 keV/microm hydrogen or neon ions. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Cells in plateau-phase were irradiated with 0.86 MeV protons at the TTT-3 Tandem accelerator in Naples (Italy), or with 400 MeV/n Ne ions at the HIMAC accelerator in Chiba (Japan). Colcemid-blocked cells were harvested at the first mitosis following exposure, and chromosome spreads were hybridized in situ with a fluorescein-labelled composite mouse DNA probe specific for chromosomes 2 and 8. RESULTS: Protons were more efficient than neon ions at the same LET in the induction of chromosome interchanges and breaks. Yields of complex exchanges were similar for both particles at the same dose, but protons produced mostly insertions, while with Ne exposure non-reciprocal exchanges were the most frequent complex-type exchange. CONCLUSIONS: Charged particles with the same LET produce different yields of chromosome aberrations, and some observed differences can be explained based on the available track-structure models.

  12. The structure of the dithionite ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, L.; Meyer, B.

    The Raman spectra of aqueous and solid sodium dithionite have been recorded. Differences in the location, intensity, and number of observed bands are attributed to conformational changes in the dithionite ion. The structure of the aqueous ion is non-planar with a C2h symmetry with an SS bond distance estimated to be 0.220-0.226 nm, as opposed to the dithionite structure in the Na2S2O4·2H2O salt which is known to have C2ν structure with a bond distance of 0.2389 nm. The Raman spectra of aqueous dithionite are assigned to Ag (SO) = 997 cm-1; Bg (SO) at 912 cm-1, Bg SO2 twist at 324 cm-1. The remaining bands are a strong Ag, the SO2 wag, the SO2 scissor, and the SS stretch at 584, 461, and 232 cm-1, respectively, but due to coupling all three motions are expected to exhibit substantial SS character. The variation of the spectra of the solid and aqueous sodium dithionite indicate strong environmental effect on the structure of the anion.

  13. The structure of the dithionite ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, L.; Meyer, B.

    1982-11-01

    The Raman spectra of aqueous and solid sodium dithionite have been recorded. Differences in the location, intensity, and number of observed bands are attributed to conformational changes in the dithionite ion. The structure of the aqueous ion is non-planar with a C2h symmetry with an SS bond distance estimated to be 0.220-0.226 nm, as opposed to the dithionite structure in the Na 2S 2O 4·2H 2O salt which is known to have C2 ν structure with a bond distance of 0.2389 nm. The Raman spectra of aqueous dithionite are assigned to Ag (SO) = 997 cm -1; Bg (SO) at 912 cm -1, Bg SO 2 twist at 324 cm -1. The remaining bands are a strong Ag, the SO 2 wag, the SO 2 scissor, and the SS stretch at 584, 461, and 232 cm -1, respectively, but due to coupling all three motions are expected to exhibit substantial SS character. The variation of the spectra of the solid and aqueous sodium dithionite indicate strong environmental effect on the structure of the anion.

  14. Jet Structure in Heavy Ion Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaizot, J.-P.; Mehtar-Tani, Y.

    We review recent theoretical developments in the study of the structure of jets that are produced in ultra relativistic heavy ion collisions. The core of the review focusses on the dynamics of the parton cascade that is induced by the interactions of a fast parton crossing a quark-gluon plasma. We recall the basic mechanisms responsible for medium induced radiation, underline the rapid disappearance of coherence effects, and the ensuing probabilistic nature of the medium induced cascade. We discuss how large radiative corrections modify the classical picture of the gluon cascade, and how these can be absorbed in a renormalization of the jet quenching parameter hat q. Then, we analyze the (wave)-turbulent transport of energy along the medium induced cascade, and point out the main characteristics of the angular structure of such a cascade. Finally, color decoherence of the incone jet structure is discussed. Modest contact with phenomenology is presented towards the end of the review.

  15. Tracks to therapy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, R.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    1999-01-01

    Studies of the structure of particle tracks have led to models of track effects based on radial dose and radiobiological target theory that have been very successful in describing and predicting track effects in physical, chemical, and biological systems. For describing mammalian cellular inactivation two inactivation modes are required, called gamma-kill and ion-kill, the first due to synergistic effects of delta rays from adjacent ion paths thus resembling the effects from gamma rays, and the second to the effects of single ion transits through a cell nucleus. The ion-kill effect is more severe, where the fraction of cells experiencing ion kill is responsible for a decrease in the oxygen enhancement ratio, and an increase in relative biological effectiveness, but these are accompanied by loss of repair, hence to a reduction in the efficiency of fractionation in high LET therapy, as shown by our calculations for radiobiological effects in the "spread out Bragg Peak".

  16. Growth and morphological analysis of segmented AuAg alloy nanowires created by pulsed electrodeposition in ion-track etched membranes

    PubMed Central

    Burr, Loic; Trautmann, Christina; Toimil-Molares, Maria Eugenia

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background: Multicomponent heterostructure nanowires and nanogaps are of great interest for applications in sensorics. Pulsed electrodeposition in ion-track etched polymer templates is a suitable method to synthesise segmented nanowires with segments consisting of two different types of materials. For a well-controlled synthesis process, detailed analysis of the deposition parameters and the size-distribution of the segmented wires is crucial. Results: The fabrication of electrodeposited AuAg alloy nanowires and segmented Au-rich/Ag-rich/Au-rich nanowires with controlled composition and segment length in ion-track etched polymer templates was developed. Detailed analysis by cyclic voltammetry in ion-track membranes, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy was performed to determine the dependency between the chosen potential and the segment composition. Additionally, we have dissolved the middle Ag-rich segments in order to create small nanogaps with controlled gap sizes. Annealing of the created structures allows us to influence their morphology. Conclusion: AuAg alloy nanowires, segmented wires and nanogaps with controlled composition and size can be synthesised by electrodeposition in membranes, and are ideal model systems for investigation of surface plasmons. PMID:26199830

  17. Differential thermal voltammetry for tracking of degradation in lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Billy; Yufit, Vladimir; Merla, Yu; Martinez-Botas, Ricardo F.; Brandon, Nigel P.; Offer, Gregory J.

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring of lithium-ion batteries is of critical importance in electric vehicle applications in order to manage the operational condition of the cells. Measurements on a vehicle often involve current, voltage and temperature which enable in-situ diagnostic techniques. This paper presents a novel diagnostic technique, termed differential thermal voltammetry, which is capable of monitoring the state of the battery using voltage and temperature measurements in galvanostatic operating modes. This tracks battery degradation through phase transitions, and the resulting entropic heat, occurring in the electrodes. Experiments to monitor battery degradation using the new technique are compared with a pseudo-2D cell model. Results show that the differential thermal voltammetry technique provides information comparable to that of slow rate cyclic voltammetry at shorter timescale and with load conditions easier to replicate in a vehicle.

  18. Sodium hypochlorite as a developer for heavy ion tracks in polyimide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klintberg, Lena; Lindeberg, Mikael; Thornell, Greger

    2001-12-01

    The developing and etching of heavy ion tracks in polyimide with sodium hypochlorite have been studied to gain control over the parameters that affect the etch result. The shape of the resulting pores is a function of both alkalinity and hypochlorite content of the solution. Sodium hypochlorite decomposes during etching, and the rate constant has been determined as a function of the alkalinity at 62 °C. Polished cross-sections have been examined to determine the pore shape, and this method has shown to be a straightforward way to characterise the pores. Decreasing the alkalinity gives more cylindrical pores, but increases the decomposition rate of the hypochlorite solution and decreases the etch rate.

  19. A Phase-tracking Snow Micro-structure Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slaughter, A. E.; Zabaras, N.

    2012-12-01

    Utilizing a methodology derived from models for phase transitions in alloy solidification [1], a 3D finite element (FE) model for snow metamorphism was developed. Avalanches are known to occur due to the existence of a weak-layer of faceted crystals, which form due to temperature gradients within the snow through a process known as kinetic metamorphism [2]. In general, snow models are limited in their ability to model these microstructural changes, especially in three dimensions, and rely on effective properties. To enhance the tools available to avalanche researchers a finite element model was developed capable of tracking vapor deposition within the snow. This is accomplished using a fixed-domain, stabilized finite element solution for the energy, mass, momentum, and transport equations. Using a level-set parameter the domain is separated into either solid or fluid components and along the phase-change boundary a "mushy-zone" is establish [1, 3]. This zone is modeled as porous media that includes the effects of shrinkage and density changes [1]. The basis of the model is the open-source C++ libMesh FE library, as such the model includes adaptive mesh coarsening and refinement and relies on domain decomposition for optimum parallel performance. This work is the initial phase of an ongoing research project that aims to demonstrate the ability to model snow at the micro-structural level and move away from the common coarse, effective property modeling techniques. It will serve as the deterministic basis for a multi-scale, stochastic model of snow that will account for uncertainties such as poorly understood growth properties and measurement variability. Future applications may include the inclusion of liquid melt and include external forces, yielding a comprehensive thermo-mechanical model that could evolve and fracture. [1] D. Samanta, N. Zabaras (2005), Modelling convection in solidification processes using stabilized finite element techniques, J. Numer. Meth. Eng

  20. Synergy of elastic and inelastic energy loss on ion track formation in SrTiO3

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Weber, William J.; Zarkadoula, Eva; Pakarinen, Olli H.; Sachan, Ritesh; Chisholm, Matthew F.; Liu, Peng; Xue, Haizhou; Jin, Ke; Zhang, Yanwen

    2015-01-12

    While the interaction of energetic ions with solids is well known to result in inelastic energy loss to electrons and elastic energy loss to atomic nuclei in the solid, the coupled effects of these energy losses on defect production, nanostructure evolution and phase transformations in ionic and covalently bonded materials are complex and not well understood due to dependencies on electron-electron scattering processes, electron-phonon coupling, localized electronic excitations, diffusivity of charged defects, and solid-state radiolysis. Here we show that a colossal synergy occurs between inelastic energy loss and pre-existing atomic defects created by elastic energy loss in single crystal strontiummore » titanate (SrTiO3), resulting in the formation of nanometer-sized amorphous tracks, but only in the narrow region with pre-existing defects. These defects locally decrease the electronic and atomic thermal conductivities and increase electron-phonon coupling, which locally increase the intensity of the thermal spike for each ion. This work identifies a major gap in understanding on the role of defects in electronic energy dissipation and electron-phonon coupling; it also provides insights for creating novel interfaces and nanostructures to functionalize thin film structures, including tunable electronic, ionic, magnetic and optical properties.« less

  1. Synergy of elastic and inelastic energy loss on ion track formation in SrTiO3

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, William J.; Zarkadoula, Eva; Pakarinen, Olli H.; Sachan, Ritesh; Chisholm, Matthew F.; Liu, Peng; Xue, Haizhou; Jin, Ke; Zhang, Yanwen

    2015-01-12

    While the interaction of energetic ions with solids is well known to result in inelastic energy loss to electrons and elastic energy loss to atomic nuclei in the solid, the coupled effects of these energy losses on defect production, nanostructure evolution and phase transformations in ionic and covalently bonded materials are complex and not well understood due to dependencies on electron-electron scattering processes, electron-phonon coupling, localized electronic excitations, diffusivity of charged defects, and solid-state radiolysis. Here we show that a colossal synergy occurs between inelastic energy loss and pre-existing atomic defects created by elastic energy loss in single crystal strontium titanate (SrTiO3), resulting in the formation of nanometer-sized amorphous tracks, but only in the narrow region with pre-existing defects. These defects locally decrease the electronic and atomic thermal conductivities and increase electron-phonon coupling, which locally increase the intensity of the thermal spike for each ion. This work identifies a major gap in understanding on the role of defects in electronic energy dissipation and electron-phonon coupling; it also provides insights for creating novel interfaces and nanostructures to functionalize thin film structures, including tunable electronic, ionic, magnetic and optical properties.

  2. Tumor tracking based on correlation models in scanned ion beam therapy: an experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seregni, M.; Kaderka, R.; Fattori, G.; Riboldi, M.; Pella, A.; Constantinescu, A.; Saito, N.; Durante, M.; Cerveri, P.; Bert, C.; Baroni, G.

    2013-07-01

    Accurate dose delivery to extra-cranial lesions requires tumor motion compensation. An effective compensation can be achieved by real-time tracking of the target position, either measured in fluoroscopy or estimated through correlation models as a function of external surrogate motion. In this work, we integrated two internal/external correlation models (a state space model and an artificial neural network-based model) into a custom infra-red optical tracking system (OTS). Dedicated experiments were designed and conducted at GSI (Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung). A robotic breathing phantom was used to reproduce regular and irregular internal target motion as well as external thorax motion. The position of a set of markers placed on the phantom thorax was measured with the OTS and used by the correlation models to infer the internal target position in real-time. Finally, the estimated target position was provided as input for the dynamic steering of a carbon ion beam. Geometric results showed that the correlation models transversal (2D) targeting error was always lower than 1.3 mm (root mean square). A significant decrease of the dosimetric error with respect to the uncompensated irradiation was achieved in four out of six experiments, demonstrating that phase shifts are the most critical irregularity for external/internal correlation models.

  3. Tumor tracking based on correlation models in scanned ion beam therapy: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Seregni, M; Kaderka, R; Fattori, G; Riboldi, M; Pella, A; Constantinescu, A; Saito, N; Durante, M; Cerveri, P; Bert, C; Baroni, G

    2013-07-01

    Accurate dose delivery to extra-cranial lesions requires tumor motion compensation. An effective compensation can be achieved by real-time tracking of the target position, either measured in fluoroscopy or estimated through correlation models as a function of external surrogate motion. In this work, we integrated two internal/external correlation models (a state space model and an artificial neural network-based model) into a custom infra-red optical tracking system (OTS). Dedicated experiments were designed and conducted at GSI (Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung). A robotic breathing phantom was used to reproduce regular and irregular internal target motion as well as external thorax motion. The position of a set of markers placed on the phantom thorax was measured with the OTS and used by the correlation models to infer the internal target position in real-time. Finally, the estimated target position was provided as input for the dynamic steering of a carbon ion beam. Geometric results showed that the correlation models transversal (2D) targeting error was always lower than 1.3 mm (root mean square). A significant decrease of the dosimetric error with respect to the uncompensated irradiation was achieved in four out of six experiments, demonstrating that phase shifts are the most critical irregularity for external/internal correlation models. PMID:23774669

  4. Structure and selectivity in bestrophin ion channels

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yang, Tingting; Liu, Qun; Kloss, Brian; Bruni, Renato; Kalathur, Ravi C.; Guo, Youzhong; Kloppmann, Edda; Rost, Burkhard; Colecraft, Henry M.; Hendrickson, Wayne A.

    2014-09-25

    Human bestrophin 1 (hBest1) is a calcium-activated chloride channel from the retinal pigment epithelium, where it can suffer mutations associated with vitelliform macular degeneration, or Best disease. We describe the structure of a bacterial homolog (KpBest) of hBest1 and functional characterizations of both channels. KpBest is a pentamer that forms a five-helix transmembrane pore, closed by three rings of conserved hydrophobic residues, and has a cytoplasmic cavern with a restricted exit. From electrophysiological analysis of structure-inspired mutations in KpBest and hBest1, we find a subtle control of ion selectivity in the bestrophins, including reversal of anion/cation selectivity, and dramatic activationmore » by mutations at the exit restriction. Lastly, a homology model of hBest1 shows the locations of disease-causing mutations and suggests possible roles in regulation.« less

  5. Structure and selectivity in bestrophin ion channels

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Tingting; Liu, Qun; Kloss, Brian; Bruni, Renato; Kalathur, Ravi C.; Guo, Youzhong; Kloppmann, Edda; Rost, Burkhard; Colecraft, Henry M.; Hendrickson, Wayne A.

    2014-09-25

    Human bestrophin 1 (hBest1) is a calcium-activated chloride channel from the retinal pigment epithelium, where it can suffer mutations associated with vitelliform macular degeneration, or Best disease. We describe the structure of a bacterial homolog (KpBest) of hBest1 and functional characterizations of both channels. KpBest is a pentamer that forms a five-helix transmembrane pore, closed by three rings of conserved hydrophobic residues, and has a cytoplasmic cavern with a restricted exit. From electrophysiological analysis of structure-inspired mutations in KpBest and hBest1, we find a subtle control of ion selectivity in the bestrophins, including reversal of anion/cation selectivity, and dramatic activation by mutations at the exit restriction. Lastly, a homology model of hBest1 shows the locations of disease-causing mutations and suggests possible roles in regulation.

  6. Co-visualization of DNA damage and ion traversals in live mammalian cells using a fluorescent nuclear track detector.

    PubMed

    Kodaira, Satoshi; Konishi, Teruaki; Kobayashi, Alisa; Maeda, Takeshi; Ahmad, Tengku Ahbrizal Farizal Tengku; Yang, Gen; Akselrod, Mark S; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Uchihori, Yukio

    2015-03-01

    The geometric locations of ion traversals in mammalian cells constitute important information in the study of heavy ion-induced biological effect. Single ion traversal through a cellular nucleus produces complex and massive DNA damage at a nanometer level, leading to cell inactivation, mutations and transformation. We present a novel approach that uses a fluorescent nuclear track detector (FNTD) for the simultaneous detection of the geometrical images of ion traversals and DNA damage in single cells using confocal microscopy. HT1080 or HT1080-53BP1-GFP cells were cultured on the surface of a FNTD and exposed to 5.1-MeV/n neon ions. The positions of the ion traversals were obtained as fluorescent images of a FNTD. Localized DNA damage in cells was identified as fluorescent spots of γ-H2AX or 53BP1-GFP. These track images and images of damaged DNA were obtained in a short time using a confocal laser scanning microscope. The geometrical distribution of DNA damage indicated by fluorescent γ-H2AX spots in fixed cells or fluorescent 53BP1-GFP spots in living cells was found to correlate well with the distribution of the ion traversals. This method will be useful for evaluating the number of ion hits on individual cells, not only for micro-beam but also for random-beam experiments. PMID:25324538

  7. Defining the Biological Effectiveness of Components of High-LET Track Structure.

    PubMed

    Sridharan, Deepa M; Chappell, Lori J; Whalen, Mary K; Cucinotta, Francis A; Pluth, Janice M

    2015-07-01

    During space travel, astronauts are exposed to a wide array of high-linear energy transfer (LET) particles, with differing energies and resulting biological effects. Risk assessment of these exposures carries a large uncertainty predominantly due to the unique track structure of the particle's energy deposition. The complex damage elicited by high charge and energy (HZE) particles results from both lesions along the track core and from energetic electrons, δ rays, generated as a consequence of particle traversal. To better define how cells respond to this complex radiation exposure, a normal hTERT immortalized skin fibroblast cell line was exposed to a defined panel of particles carefully chosen to tease out track structure effects. Phosphorylation kinetics for several key double-strand break (DSB) response proteins (γ-H2AX, pATF2 and pSMC1) were defined after exposure to ten different high-LET radiation qualities and one low-LET radiation (X ray), at two doses (0.5-2 Gy) and time points (2 and 24 h). The results reveal that the lower energy particles (Fe 300, Si 93 and Ti 300 MeV/u), with a narrower track width and higher number and intensity of δ rays, cause the highest degree of persistent damage response. The persistent γ-H2AX signal at lower energies suggests that damage from these exposures are more difficult to resolve, likely due to the greater complexity of the associated DNA lesions. However, different kinetics were observed for the solely ATM-mediated phosphorylations (pATF2 and pSMC1), revealing a shallow induction at early times and a higher level of residual phosphorylation compared to γ-H2AX. The differing phospho-protein profiles exhibited, compared to γ-H2AX, suggests additional functions for these proteins within the cell. The strong correspondence between the predicted curves for energy deposition per nucleosome for each ion/energy combination and the persistent levels of γ-H2AX indicates that the nature of energy distribution defines

  8. Electrical conduction of ion tracks in tetrahedral amorphous carbon: temperature, field and doping dependence and comparison with matrix data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauser, J.; Gehrke, H.-G.; Hofsäss, H.; Amani, J.; Trautmann, C.; Weidinger, A.

    2015-12-01

    This paper gives an extended overview of the electrical properties of ion tracks in hydrogen-free tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) with a sp3 bond fraction of about 80%. The films were grown by mass selected ion beam deposition of 100 eV 12C+ ions. The ion tracks are generated by irradiation of ta-C films with uranium ions of 1 GeV kinetic energy. Along the ion path a conversion from diamond-like (sp3) carbon to graphite-like (sp2) carbon takes place. Topography and current measurements of individual ion tracks were performed by atomic force microscopy at ambient temperature. The temperature dependence of the electric conductivity was studied between 15 and 390 K by means of 0.28 mm2 large contact pads averaging over about 107 tracks. For each sample and at each temperature the conductivity as a function of the applied electrical field (non-ohmic behaviour) was measured separately and the data were extrapolated to field zero. In this way, the zero-field conductivity was determined independent from the field dependence. In spite of large differences in the absolute values, the temperature dependence of the zero-field conductivities is found to be very similar in shape for all samples. The conductivities follow a {T}-{1/4} law up to temperatures slightly below room temperature. At higher temperatures a transport mechanism based on over-barrier hopping dominates with an activation energy of about 220 meV for tracks and 260 meV for the ta-C matrix. The field dependence measurements show that the deviation of the I-V characteristics from ohmic behaviour decreases with increasing zero-field conductivity. We also tested Cu-doped ta-C samples and found that they conduct significantly better than pure ta-C. However, the doping also increases the zero-field conductivity resulting in a weaker contrast between the track and matrix. The data are interpreted within the so-called ‘barrier model’ where the electrons are assumed to move fairly freely in well-conducting sp2

  9. Ion spectral structures observed by the Van Allen Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferradas, C.; Zhang, J.; Spence, H. E.; Kistler, L. M.; Larsen, B.; Reeves, G. D.; Skoug, R. M.; Funsten, H. O.

    2015-12-01

    During the last decades several missions have recorded the presence of dynamic spectral features of energetic ions in the inner magnetosphere. Previous studies have reported single "nose-like" structures occurring alone and simultaneous nose-like structures (up to three). These ion structures are named after the characteristic shapes of energy bands or gaps in the energy-time spectrograms of in situ measured ion fluxes. They constitute the observational signatures of ion acceleration, transport, and loss in the global magnetosphere. The HOPE mass spectrometer onboard the Van Allen Probes measures energetic hydrogen, helium, and oxygen ions near the inner edge of the plasma sheet, where these ion structures are observed. We present a statistical study of nose-like structures, using 2-years measurements from the HOPE instrument. The results provide important details about the spatial distribution (dependence on geocentric distance), spectral features of the structures (differences among species), and geomagnetic conditions under which these structures occur.

  10. Response of a metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor to a cosmic-ray ion track

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benumof, Reuben; Zoutendyk, John

    1987-01-01

    A cosmic-ray ion track passing perpendicularly through the oxide layer of an enhancement-mode metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) forms a conducting path, the resistance of which is proportional to the stopping power of the cosmic ion and independent of the cross-sectional area of the ion track. The voltage across the oxide capacitance may drop below the threshold voltage if the gate bias is sufficiently low or if the external resistance in the gate-source circuit is sufficiently high. The first of a pair of MOSFETs forming a flip-flop circuit may thus be turned off, and the second transitor may turn on, providing it has a sufficiently short delay time, thereby completing a single-event upset.

  11. Analysis and design of on-grade reinforced concrete track support structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclean, F. G.; Williams, R. D.; Greening, L. R.

    1972-01-01

    For the improvement of rail service, the Department of Transportation, Federal Rail Administration, is sponsoring a test track on the Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe Railway. The test track will contain nine separate rail support structures, including one conventional section for control and three reinforced concrete structures on grade, one slab and two beam sections. The analysis and design of these latter structures was accomplished by means of the finite element method, NASTRAN, and is presented.

  12. Electronic Structure Calculations of Highly Charged Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bromley, Steve; Ziolkowski, Marcin; Marler, Joan

    2016-05-01

    Exotic systems like Highly Charged Ions (HCIs) are attracting more attention based on their properties and possible interactions. Abundance of HCIs in the solar wind and their interaction with the upper atmosphere puts them in the attention of astro- and atmospheric physicists. Also, their unique properties originating in the high charge make them an excellent candidate for precision measurements and the next generation of atomic clocks. For a better understanding of the dynamics of processes involving HCIs a combined theoretical and experimental effort is needed to study their basic properties and interactions. Both theory and experiment need to be combined due to the extreme nature of these systems. We present preliminary insight into electronic structure of light HCIs, their interactions with neutral atoms and dynamics of charge transfer processes.

  13. Development and tests of an anode readout TPC with high track separability for large solid angle relativistic ion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Lindenbaum, S.J.; Foley, K.J.; Eiseman, S.E.; Etkin, A.; Hackenburg, R.W.; Longacre, R.S.; Love, W.A.; Morris, T.W.; Platner, E.D.; Saulys, A.C.; Chan, C.; Kramer, M.A.; Hallman, T.J.; Madansky, L.; Bonner, B.E.; Buchanan, J.A.; Clement, J.M.; Corcoran, M.D.; Kruk, J.W.; Miettinen, H.E.; Mutchler, G.S.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Nessi, M.; Phillips, G.C.; Roberts, J.B.

    1988-07-18

    We have developed, constructed and tested an anode readout TPC with high track separability which is suitable for large solid angle relativistic ion experiments. The readout via rows of short anode wires parallel to the beam has been found in tests to allow two-track separability of approx.2-3 mm. The efficiency of track reconstruction for events from a target, detected inside the MPS 5 KG magnet, is estimated to be >90% for events made by incident protons and pions. 15 GeV/c x A Si ion beams at a rate of approx.25 K per AGS pulse were permitted to course through the chamber and did not lead to any problems. When the gain was reduced to simulate the total output of a minimum ionizing particle, many Si ion tracks were also detected simultaneously with high efficiency. The resolution along the drift direction (parallel to the MPS magnetic field and perpendicular to the beam direction) was <1 mm and the resolution along the other direction /perpendicular/ to the beam direction was <1 mm also. 3 refs., 5 figs.

  14. Robust feature tracking for endoscopic pose estimation and structure recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speidel, S.; Krappe, S.; Röhl, S.; Bodenstedt, S.; Müller-Stich, B.; Dillmann, R.

    2013-03-01

    Minimally invasive surgery is a highly complex medical discipline with several difficulties for the surgeon. To alleviate these difficulties, augmented reality can be used for intraoperative assistance. For visualization, the endoscope pose must be known which can be acquired with a SLAM (Simultaneous Localization and Mapping) approach using the endoscopic images. In this paper we focus on feature tracking for SLAM in minimally invasive surgery. Robust feature tracking and minimization of false correspondences is crucial for localizing the endoscope. As sensory input we use a stereo endoscope and evaluate different feature types in a developed SLAM framework. The accuracy of the endoscope pose estimation is validated with synthetic and ex vivo data. Furthermore we test the approach with in vivo image sequences from da Vinci interventions.

  15. Load tracking and structural health monitoring of unmanned aerial vehicles using optical fiber sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handelman, A.; Botsev, Y.; Balter, J.; Gud's, P.; Kressel, I.; Tur, M.; Gali, S.; Pillai, A. C. R.; Hari Prasad, M.; Yadav, A. Kumar; Gupta, Nitesh; Sathya, Sakthi; Sundaram, Ramesh

    2011-08-01

    An airborne, high resolution, load tracking and structural health monitoring system for unmanned aerial vehicles is presented. The system is based on embedded optical fiber Bragg sensors interrogated in real time during flight at 2.5 kHz. By analyzing the recorded vibration signature it is now possible to identify and trace the dynamic response of an airborne structure and track its loads.

  16. Load tracking and structural health monitoring of unmanned aerial vehicles using optical fiber sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handelman, A.; Botsev, Y.; Balter, J.; Gud'S, P.; Kressel, I.; Tur, M.; Gali, S.; Pillai, A. C. R.; Hari Prasad, M.; Yadav, A. Kumar; Gupta, Nitesh; Sathya, Sakthi; Sundaram, Ramesh

    2010-12-01

    An airborne, high resolution, load tracking and structural health monitoring system for unmanned aerial vehicles is presented. The system is based on embedded optical fiber Bragg sensors interrogated in real time during flight at 2.5 kHz. By analyzing the recorded vibration signature it is now possible to identify and trace the dynamic response of an airborne structure and track its loads.

  17. Simulations of DSB Yields and Radiation-induced Chromosomal Aberrations in Human Cells Based on the Stochastic Track Structure Induced by HZE Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponomarev, Artem; Plante, Ianik; George, Kerry; Wu, Honglu

    2014-01-01

    The formation of double-strand breaks (DSBs) and chromosomal aberrations (CAs) is of great importance in radiation research and, specifically, in space applications. We are presenting a new particle track and DNA damage model, in which the particle stochastic track structure is combined with the random walk (RW) structure of chromosomes in a cell nucleus. The motivation for this effort stems from the fact that the model with the RW chromosomes, NASARTI (NASA radiation track image) previously relied on amorphous track structure, while the stochastic track structure model RITRACKS (Relativistic Ion Tracks) was focused on more microscopic targets than the entire genome. We have combined chromosomes simulated by RWs with stochastic track structure, which uses nanoscopic dose calculations performed with the Monte-Carlo simulation by RITRACKS in a voxelized space. The new simulations produce the number of DSBs as function of dose and particle fluence for high-energy particles, including iron, carbon and protons, using voxels of 20 nm dimension. The combined model also calculates yields of radiation-induced CAs and unrejoined chromosome breaks in normal and repair deficient cells. The joined computational model is calibrated using the relative frequencies and distributions of chromosomal aberrations reported in the literature. The model considers fractionated deposition of energy to approximate dose rates of the space flight environment. The joined model also predicts of the yields and sizes of translocations, dicentrics, rings, and more complex-type aberrations formed in the G0/G1 cell cycle phase during the first cell division after irradiation. We found that the main advantage of the joined model is our ability to simulate small doses: 0.05-0.5 Gy. At such low doses, the stochastic track structure proved to be indispensable, as the action of individual delta-rays becomes more important.

  18. Simulations of DSB Yields and Radiation-induced Chromosomal Aberrations in Human Cells Based on the Stochastic Track Structure iIduced by HZE Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponomarev, Artem; Plante, Ianik; George, Kerry; Wu, Honglu

    2014-01-01

    The formation of double-strand breaks (DSBs) and chromosomal aberrations (CAs) is of great importance in radiation research and, specifically, in space applications. We are presenting a new particle track and DNA damage model, in which the particle stochastic track structure is combined with the random walk (RW) structure of chromosomes in a cell nucleus. The motivation for this effort stems from the fact that the model with the RW chromosomes, NASARTI (NASA radiation track image) previously relied on amorphous track structure, while the stochastic track structure model RITRACKS (Relativistic Ion Tracks) was focused on more microscopic targets than the entire genome. We have combined chromosomes simulated by RWs with stochastic track structure, which uses nanoscopic dose calculations performed with the Monte-Carlo simulation by RITRACKS in a voxelized space. The new simulations produce the number of DSBs as function of dose and particle fluence for high-energy particles, including iron, carbon and protons, using voxels of 20 nm dimension. The combined model also calculates yields of radiation-induced CAs and unrejoined chromosome breaks in normal and repair deficient cells. The joined computational model is calibrated using the relative frequencies and distributions of chromosomal aberrations reported in the literature. The model considers fractionated deposition of energy to approximate dose rates of the space flight environment. The joined model also predicts of the yields and sizes of translocations, dicentrics, rings, and more complex-type aberrations formed in the G0/G1 cell cycle phase during the first cell division after irradiation. We found that the main advantage of the joined model is our ability to simulate small doses: 0.05-0.5 Gy. At such low doses, the stochastic track structure proved to be indispensable, as the action of individual delta-rays becomes more important.

  19. Experimental impact features in Stardust aerogel: How track morphology reflects particle structure, composition, and density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearsley, Anton T.; Burchell, Mark J.; Price, Mark C.; Cole, Michael J.; Wozniakiewicz, Penelope J.; Ishii, Hope A.; Bradley, John P.; Fries, Marc; Foster, Nicholas J.

    2012-04-01

    The Stardust collector shows diverse aerogel track shapes created by impacts of cometary dust. Tracks have been classified into three broad types (A, B, and C), based on relative dimensions of the elongate "stylus" (in Type A "carrots") and broad "bulb" regions (Types B and C), with occurrence of smaller "styli" in Type B. From our experiments, using a diverse suite of projectile particles shot under Stardust cometary encounter conditions onto similar aerogel targets, we describe differences in impactor behavior and aerogel response resulting in the observed range of Stardust track shapes. We compare tracks made by mineral grains, natural and artificial aggregates of differing subgrain sizes, and diverse organic materials. Impacts of glasses and robust mineral grains generate elongate, narrow Type A tracks (as expected), but with differing levels of abrasion and lateral branch creation. Aggregate particles, both natural and artificial, of a wide range of compositions and volatile contents produce diverse Type B or C shapes. Creation of bulbous tracks is dependent upon impactor internal structure, grain size distribution, and strength, rather than overall grain density or content of volatile components. Nevertheless, pure organic particles do create Type C, or squat Type A* tracks, with length to width ratios dependent upon both specific organic composition and impactor grain size. From comparison with the published shape data for Stardust aerogel tracks, we conclude that the abundant larger Type B tracks on the Stardust collector represent impacts by particles similar to our carbonaceous chondrite meteorite powders.

  20. Track structure simulations at relativistic energies: new cross sections for HZE particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dingfelder, Michael

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of charged particle tracks provide detailed information on highly inhomogeneous spatial distributions of energy depositions, interaction types, and radical species produced. This information is used in Radiation Biology to explore and estimate the effects of radiation quality on biological response. Heavy charged and highly relativistic (HZE) particles are of special interest to men's vision of deep space travel. HZE particles are a component of the Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) present in Deep Space but shielded by the Earth's magnetic field. Little is known on their action on biological matter. Monte Carlo track structure simulations follow the primary, as well as all (produced) secondary particles, event-by-event, from starting of ejection energy to total stopping. This requires reliable cross sections for elastic and inelastic scattering events of the incident charged particles with the atoms and molecules of the material under consideration. Liquid water is of special interest since it serves as a substitute for soft tissue. Ionization and excitation cross sections for charged particles are normally calculated within the framework of the (relativistic) plane wave Born approximation (PWBA) or the (relativistic) Bethe approximation. In the PWBA the energyand momentum transfer doubly differential cross section can be written as kinematic factors times the generalized oscillator strength (GOS) for single atoms or the dielectric response function (DF) of the material in the condensed phase. The GOS and the DF are a function of the energy transfer and momentum transfer, are independent of the incoming radiation and fully characterize the target. The GOS can be calculated from first principles while the DF is normally modeled using available experimental information and theoretical constraints. In this talk we will review and present new cross section calculations for electrons, protons and relativistic heavy ions with liquid water and other

  1. Online Deformable Object Tracking Based on Structure-Aware Hyper-Graph.

    PubMed

    Du, Dawei; Qi, Honggang; Li, Wenbo; Wen, Longyin; Huang, Qingming; Lyu, Siwei

    2016-08-01

    Recent advances in online visual tracking focus on designing part-based model to handle the deformation and occlusion challenges. However, previous methods usually consider only the pairwise structural dependences of target parts in two consecutive frames rather than the higher order constraints in multiple frames, making them less effective in handling large deformation and occlusion challenges. This paper describes a new and efficient method for online deformable object tracking. Different from most existing methods, this paper exploits higher order structural dependences of different parts of the tracking target in multiple consecutive frames. We construct a structure-aware hyper-graph to capture such higher order dependences, and solve the tracking problem by searching dense subgraphs on it. Furthermore, we also describe a new evaluating data set for online deformable object tracking (the Deform-SOT data set), which includes 50 challenging sequences with full annotations that represent realistic tracking challenges, such as large deformations and severe occlusions. The experimental result of the proposed method shows considerable improvement in performance over the state-of-the-art tracking methods. PMID:27214901

  2. Visualisation of γH2AX Foci Caused by Heavy Ion Particle Traversal; Distinction between Core Track versus Non-Track Damage

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Nakako Izumi; Brunton, Holly; Watanabe, Ritsuko; Shrikhande, Amruta; Hirayama, Ryoichi; Matsufuji, Naruhiro; Fujimori, Akira; Murakami, Takeshi; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Jeggo, Penny; Shibata, Atsushi

    2013-01-01

    Heavy particle irradiation produces complex DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) which can arise from primary ionisation events within the particle trajectory. Additionally, secondary electrons, termed delta-electrons, which have a range of distributions can create low linear energy transfer (LET) damage within but also distant from the track. DNA damage by delta-electrons distant from the track has not previously been carefully characterised. Using imaging with deconvolution, we show that at 8 hours after exposure to Fe (∼200 keV/µm) ions, γH2AX foci forming at DSBs within the particle track are large and encompass multiple smaller and closely localised foci, which we designate as clustered γH2AX foci. These foci are repaired with slow kinetics by DNA non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) in G1 phase with the magnitude of complexity diminishing with time. These clustered foci (containing 10 or more individual foci) represent a signature of DSBs caused by high LET heavy particle radiation. We also identified simple γH2AX foci distant from the track, which resemble those arising after X-ray exposure, which we attribute to low LET delta-electron induced DSBs. They are rapidly repaired by NHEJ. Clustered γH2AX foci induced by heavy particle radiation cause prolonged checkpoint arrest compared to simple γH2AX foci following X-irradiation. However, mitotic entry was observed when ∼10 clustered foci remain. Thus, cells can progress into mitosis with multiple clusters of DSBs following the traversal of a heavy particle. PMID:23967070

  3. Vortex Dust Structures in the Track Plasma of a Proton Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Fortov, V.E.; Filinov, V.S.; Vladimirov, V.I.; Deputatova, L.V.; Petrov, O.F.; Molotkov, V.I.; Rykov, V.A.; Budnik, A.P.; D'yachenko, P.P.; Rykov, K.V.; Khudyakov, A.V.

    2005-07-15

    Results are presented from experimental and theoretical investigations of the behavior of dust grains in a track plasma produced by a beam of accelerated protons. The dynamic ordered dust structures in a proton-beam-produced plasma are obtained for the first time. The processes leading to the formation of such structures are simulated numerically. The experimentally obtained dynamic vortex dust structures in a track plasma of a proton beam are explained theoretically, and the theoretical model developed to describe such a plasma is verified experimentally. Numerical investigations carried out by the method of Brownian dynamics made it possible to qualitatively explain the characteristic features of the formation of vortex dust structures.

  4. Fission track-secondary ion mass spectrometry as a tool for detecting the isotopic signature of individual uranium containing particles.

    PubMed

    Esaka, Fumitaka; Lee, Chi-Gyu; Magara, Masaaki; Kimura, Takaumi

    2012-04-01

    A fission track technique was used as a sample preparation method for subsequent isotope abundance ratio analysis of individual uranium containing particles with secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) to measure the particles with higher enriched uranium efficiently. A polycarbonate film containing particles was irradiated with thermal neutrons and etched with 6M NaOH solution. Each uranium containing particle was then identified by observing fission tracks created and a portion of the film having a uranium containing particle was cut out and put onto a glassy carbon planchet. The polycarbonate film, which gave the increases of background signals on the uranium mass region in SIMS analysis, was removed by plasma ashing with 200 W for 20 min. In the analysis of swipe samples having particles containing natural (NBL CRM 950a) or low enriched uranium (NBL CRM U100) with the fission track-SIMS method, uranium isotope abundance ratios were successfully determined. This method was then applied to the analysis of a real inspection swipe sample taken at a nuclear facility. As a consequence, the range of (235)U/(238)U isotope abundance ratio between 0.0276 and 0.0438 was obtained, which was higher than that measured by SIMS without using a fission track technique (0.0225 and 0.0341). This indicates that the fission track-SIMS method is a powerful tool to identify the particle with higher enriched uranium in environmental samples efficiently. PMID:22405310

  5. Whole cell structural imaging at 20 nanometre resolutions using MeV ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watt, F.; Chen, X.; Chen, C.-B.; Udalagama, CNB; van Kan, J. A.; Bettiol, A. A.

    2013-07-01

    MeV proton and alpha (helium ion) particle beams can now be focused to 20 nm spot sizes, and ion/matter simulations using the DEEP computer code show that these resolutions are maintained through the top micrometre or so of organic material. In addition, the energy deposition profiles of the transmitted ions are laterally constrained to a few nanometers from the initial ion path. This paves the way for high resolution structural imaging of relatively thick biological material, e.g. biological cells. Examples are shown of high resolution structural imaging of whole biological cells (MRC5) using on-axis scanning transmission ion microscopy (STIM). Nanoparticles have the ability to cross the cell membrane, and may therefore prove useful as drug delivery probes. We show that the combination of on-axis STIM for imaging the cell interior, and off-axis STIM for imaging gold nanoparticles with enhanced contrast within the cell, represents a powerful set of ion beam techniques for tracking gold nanoparticles in biological cells. Whole cell imaging at high spatial resolutions represents a new area for nuclear microprobes.

  6. Ion Trapping, Storage, and Ejection in Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinyu; Garimella, Sandilya V B; Prost, Spencer A; Webb, Ian K; Chen, Tsung-Chi; Tang, Keqi; Tolmachev, Aleksey V; Norheim, Randolph V; Baker, Erin S; Anderson, Gordon A; Ibrahim, Yehia M; Smith, Richard D

    2015-06-16

    A new Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations (SLIM) module, having electrode arrays patterned on a pair of parallel printed circuit boards (PCB), was constructed and utilized to investigate capabilities for ion trapping at a pressure of 4 Torr. Positive ions were confined by application of RF voltages to a series of inner rung electrodes with alternating phase on adjacent electrodes, in conjunction with positive DC potentials on surrounding guard electrodes on each PCB. An axial DC field was also introduced by stepwise varying the DC potentials applied to the inner rung electrodes to control the ion transport and accumulation inside the ion trapping region. We show that ions can be trapped and accumulated with up to 100% efficiency, stored for at least 5 h with no significant losses, and then could be rapidly ejected from the SLIM trap. The present results provide a foundation for the development of much more complex SLIM devices that facilitate extended ion manipulations. PMID:25971536

  7. The structure of the stable negative ion of calcium

    SciTech Connect

    Pegg, D.J.; Thompson, J.S.; Compton, R.N.; Alton, G.D.

    1988-01-01

    The structure of the Ca/sup /minus// ion has been determined using a crossed laser-ion beams apparatus. The photoelectron detachment spectrum shows that, contrary to earlier expectations, the Ca/sup /minus// ion is stably bound in the (4s/sup 2/4p)/sup 2/p state. The electron affinity of Ca was measured to be 0.043 /sup + -/ 0.007 eV.

  8. High-Resolution Tracking Asymmetric Lithium Insertion and Extraction and Local Structure Ordering in SnS2.

    PubMed

    Gao, Peng; Wang, Liping; Zhang, Yu-Yang; Huang, Yuan; Liao, Lei; Sutter, Peter; Liu, Kaihui; Yu, Dapeng; Wang, En-Ge

    2016-09-14

    In the rechargeable lithium ion batteries, the rate capability and energy efficiency are largely governed by the lithium ion transport dynamics and phase transition pathways in electrodes. Real-time and atomic-scale tracking of fully reversible lithium insertion and extraction processes in electrodes, which would ultimately lead to mechanistic understanding of how the electrodes function and why they fail, is highly desirable but very challenging. Here, we track lithium insertion and extraction in the van der Waals interactions dominated SnS2 by in situ high-resolution TEM method. We find that the lithium insertion occurs via a fast two-phase reaction to form expanded and defective LiSnS2, while the lithium extraction initially involves heterogeneous nucleation of intermediate superstructure Li0.5SnS2 domains with a 1-4 nm size. Density functional theory calculations indicate that the Li0.5SnS2 is kinetically favored and structurally stable. The asymmetric reaction pathways may supply enlightening insights into the mechanistic understanding of the underlying electrochemistry in the layered electrode materials and also suggest possible alternatives to the accepted explanation of the origins of voltage hysteresis in the intercalation electrode materials. PMID:27504584

  9. Modeling the multi-ion structure of the solar corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofman, Leon; Provornikova, Elena; Wang, Tongjiang

    2014-06-01

    The solar corona is typically observed in EUV by SDO/AIA and other instruments using the heavy ion emission lines such as Fe IX, Fe XII, and other ion emission lines. However, the relative (to protons) abundance of the emitting ions is very low and the collisional coupling between the Fe ions and electrons decreases rapidly with height in the low corona, while gravitational settling may become significant in quiescent long-lived magnetic structures, such as streamers. Thus, the structure of the weakly collisional solar corona imaged in Fe IX (and other heavy ions) may differ significantly from the structure of the main electron-proton constituents of the corona. The electron structure is observed by white light coronagraphs, and during solar eclipses in the low corona. I present the results of multi-fluid modeling of coronal streamers and other magnetic structures that demonstrate the effects of weak coupling between the heavy ions and the coronal electron-proton components, and show that the multi-ion coronal structure must be taken into account in interpretation of EUV observations.

  10. The Biological Effectiveness of Accelerated Particles for the Induction of Chromosome Damage: Track Structure Effects and Cytogenetic Signatures of High-LET Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, K.; Hada, M.; Chappell, L.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2012-01-01

    Track structure models predict that at a fixed value of LET, particles with lower charge number, Z will have a higher biological effectiveness compared to particles with a higher Z. In this report we investigated how track structure effects induction of chromosomal aberration in human cells. Human lymphocytes were irradiated in vitro with various energies of accelerated iron, silicon, neon, or titanium ions and chromosome damage was assessed in using three color FISH chromosome painting in chemically induced PCC samples collected a first cell division post irradiation. The LET values for these ions ranged from 30 to 195 keV/micrometers. Of the particles studied, Neon ions have the highest biological effectiveness for induction of total chromosome damage, which is consistent with track structure model predictions. For complex-type exchanges 64 MeV/ u Neon and 450 MeV/u Iron were equally effective and induced the most complex damage. In addition we present data on chromosomes exchanges induced by six different energies of protons (5 MeV/u to 2.5 GeV/u). The linear dose response term was similar for all energies of protons suggesting that the effect of the higher LET at low proton energies is balanced by the production of nuclear secondaries from the high energy protons. All energies of protons have a much higher percentage of complex-type chromosome exchanges than gamma rays, signifying a cytogenetic signature for proton exposures.

  11. Secondary ion mass spectrometry combined with alpha track detection for isotope abundance ratio analysis of individual uranium-bearing particles.

    PubMed

    Esaka, Fumitaka; Magara, Masaaki

    2014-03-01

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) was used in combination with alpha track detection for the efficient analysis of uranium-bearing particles with higher (235)U abundances in environmental samples. A polycarbonate film containing particles was prepared and placed in contact with a CR-39 plastic detector. After exposure for 28 days, the detector was etched in a NaOH solution and each uranium-bearing particle was identified through observation of the alpha tracks recorded in the detector. A portion of the film containing each uranium-bearing particle was cut out and put onto a glassy carbon planchet. The films on the planchet were decomposed through plasma ashing for subsequent uranium abundance ratio analysis with SIMS. The alpha track-SIMS analysis of 10 uranium-bearing particles in a sample taken from a nuclear facility enabled n((235)U)/n((238)U) abundance ratios in the range 0.0072-0.25 to be detected, which were significantly higher than those obtained by SIMS without alpha track detection. The duration of the whole analytical process for analysis of 10 particles was about 32 days. The detection efficiency was calculated to be 27.1±6.5%, based on the analysis of the particles in uranium reference materials. The detection limits, defined as the diameter of the particle which produces alpha tracks more than one for a 28-days exposure, were estimated to be 0.8, 0.9, 1.1, 2.1 and 3.0 μm for the particles having the same uranium abundance ratios with NBL CRM U850, U500, U350, U050 and U010 reference materials, respectively. The use of alpha track detection for subsequent SIMS analysis is an inexpensive and an efficient way to measure uranium-bearing particles with higher (235)U abundances. PMID:24468381

  12. Instrumentation by accelerometers and distributed optical fiber sensors of a real ballastless track structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapeleau, Xavier; Cottineau, Louis-Marie; Sedran, Thierry; Cailliau, Joël; Gueguen, Ivan; Dumoulin, Jean

    2015-04-01

    While relatively expensive to build, ballastless track structures are presently seen as an attractive alternative to conventional ballast. Firstly, they are built quickly since the slabs can be cast in place in an automated fashion by a slipform paver. Secondly, with its service life of at least 60 years, they requires little maintenance and hence they offers great availability. Other reasons for using ballastless tracks instead of ballasted tracks are the lack of suitable ballast material and the need of less noise and vibration for high-speed, in particularly. In the framework of a FUI project (n° 072906053), a new ballastless track structure based on concrete slabs was designed and its thermal-mechanical behavior in fatigue under selected mechanical and thermal conditions was tested on a real scale mockup in our laboratory [1,2]. By applying to the slabs both together mechanical stresses and thermal gradients, finite elements simulation and experimental results show that the weather conditions influence significantly the concrete slabs curvatures and by the way, the contact conditions with the underlaying layers. So it is absolutely necessary to take into account this effect in the design of the ballastless track structures in order to guarantee a long target life of at least of 50 years. After design and experimental tests in laboratory, a real ballastless track structure of 1km was built in France at the beginning of year 2013. This structure has 2 tracks on which several trains circulate every day since the beginning of year 2014. Before the construction, it was decided to monitor this structure to verify that the mechanical behavior is conform to the simulations. One part of the instrumentation is dedicated to monitor quasi-continuously the evolution of the curvature of a concrete slab. For this, 2 accelerometers were fixed on the slab under the track. One was placed on the edge and the other in the middle of the slab. The acquisition of the signals by a

  13. Combining structured light and ladar for pose tracking in THz sensor management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engström, Philip; Axelsson, Maria; Karlsson, Mikael

    2013-05-01

    Stand-off 3D THz imaging to detect concealed treats is currently under development. The technology can provide high resolution 3D range data of a passing subject showing layers of clothes and if there are concealed items. However, because it is a scanning sensor technology with a narrow field of view, the subjects pose and position need to be accurately tracked in real time to focus the system and map the imaged THz data to specific body parts. Structured light is a technique to obtain 3D range information. It is, for example, used in the Microsoft Kinect for pose tracking of game players in real time. We demonstrate how structured light can contribute to a THz sensor management system and track subjects in real time. The main advantage of structured light is its simplicity, the disadvantages are the sensitivity to lighting conditions and material properties as well as a relatively low accuracy. Time of flight laser scanning is a technique that complements structured light well, the accuracy is usually much higher and it is less sensitive to lighting conditions. We show that by combining the techniques it is possible to create a robust real time pose tracking system for THz sensor management. We present a concept system based on the Microsoft Kinect and a SICK LMS-511 laser scanner. The laser scanner is used for 2D tracking of the subjects, this tracking is then used to initialize and validate the Microsoft Kinect pose tracking. We have evaluated the sensors individually in both static and dynamic scenes and present their advantages and drawbacks.

  14. Simulation analysis for ion assisted fast ignition using structured targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakagami, H.; Johzaki, T.; Sunahara, A.; Nagatomo, H.

    2016-05-01

    As the heating efficiency by fast electrons in the fast ignition scheme is estimated to be very low due to their large divergence angle and high energy. To mitigate this problem, low-density plastic foam, which can generate not only proton (H+) but also carbon (C6+) beams, can be introduced to currently used cone-guided targets and additional core heating by ions is expected. According to 2D PIC simulations, it is found that the ion beams also diverge by the static electric field and concave surface deformation. Thus structured targets are suggested to optimize ion beam characteristics, and their improvement and core heating enhancement by ion beams are confirmed.

  15. Structural insights into protein-metal ion partnerships.

    PubMed

    Barondeau, David P; Getzoff, Elizabeth D

    2004-12-01

    New metalloprotein structures continue to provide discoveries regarding protein-metal ion partnerships. Many recent structures reveal metal ion sites that control or are controlled by protein conformational change, including modulation by alternative splice variants and striking conformational changes. Only a few novel catalytic metal centers have been revealed recently, such as the surprising Ni-hook superoxide dismutase catalytic site and the cubane-like Mn(3)CaO(4) photosynthetic oxygen-evolving center. However, important new variations on old heme themes, breakthroughs in the fields of metal ion regulation and metallochaperones, and captivating insights into partnerships between proteins and minerals have also been described. Very high resolution metal site structures and metalloprotein design will be increasingly important in order to leverage the wealth of native metalloprotein structures into a deep understanding of metal ion site specificity and activity. PMID:15582401

  16. Simulated tornado debris tracks: implications for inferring corner flow structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, Michael; Lewellen, David

    2011-11-01

    A large collection of three-dimensional large eddy simulations of tornadoes with fine debris have been recently been performed as part of a longstanding effort at West Virginia University to understand tornado corner flow structure and dynamics. Debris removal and deposition is accounted for at the surface, in effect simulating formation of tornado surface marks. Physical origins and properties of the most prominent marks will be presented, and the possibility of inferring tornado corner flow structure from real marks in the field will be discussed. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grants No. 0635681 and AGS-1013154.

  17. Ion Trapping, Storage, and Ejection in Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xinyu; Garimella, Venkata BS; Prost, Spencer A.; Webb, Ian K.; Chen, Tsung-Chi; Tang, Keqi; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Norheim, Randolph V.; Baker, Erin Shammel; Anderson, Gordon A.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Smith, Richard D.

    2015-06-16

    A structure for lossless ion manipulation (SLIM) module was constructed with electrode arrays patterned on a pair of parallel printed circuit boards (PCB) separated by 5 mm and utilized to investigate capabilities for ion trapping at 4 Torr. Positive ions were confined by application of RF having alternating phases on a series of inner rung electrodes and by positive DC potentials on surrounding guard electrodes on each PCB. An axial DC field was also introduced by stepwise varying the DC potential of the inner rung electrodes so as to control the ion transport and accumulation inside the ion trap. We show that ions could be trapped and accumulated with 100% efficiency, stored for at least 5 hours with no losses, and could be rapidly ejected from the SLIM trap.

  18. Computational Model Tracking Primary Electrons, Secondary Electrons, and Ions in the Discharge Chamber of an Ion Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahalingam, Sudhakar; Menart, James A.

    2005-01-01

    Computational modeling of the plasma located in the discharge chamber of an ion engine is an important activity so that the development and design of the next generation of ion engines may be enhanced. In this work a computational tool called XOOPIC is used to model the primary electrons, secondary electrons, and ions inside the discharge chamber. The details of this computational tool are discussed in this paper. Preliminary results from XOOPIC are presented. The results presented include particle number density distributions for the primary electrons, the secondary electrons, and the ions. In addition the total number of a particular particle in the discharge chamber as a function of time, electric potential maps and magnetic field maps are presented. A primary electron number density plot from PRIMA is given in this paper so that the results of XOOPIC can be compared to it. PRIMA is a computer code that the present investigators have used in much of their previous work that provides results that compare well to experimental results. PRIMA only models the primary electrons in the discharge chamber. Modeling ions and secondary electrons, as well as the primary electrons, will greatly increase our ability to predict different characteristics of the plasma discharge used in an ion engine.

  19. A comparative study of the structure and cytotoxicity of polytetrafluoroethylene after ion etching and ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shtansky, D. V.; Glushankova, N. A.; Kiryukhantsev-Korneev, F. V.; Sheveiko, A. N.; Sigarev, A. A.

    2011-03-01

    The ion-plasma treatment has been widely used for modifying the surface structure of polymers in order to improve their properties, but it can lead to destruction of the surface and, as a consequence, to an increase in their toxicity. A comparative study of the structure and cytotoxicity of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) after the ion etching (IE) and ion implantation (II) for 10 min with energy densities of 363 and 226 J/cm2, respectively, has been performed. It has been shown that, unlike the ion implantation, the ion etching results in the destruction of the polymer and in the appearance of the cytotoxicity. The factors responsible for this effect, which are associated with the bulk and surface treatment, as well as with the influence of the temperature, have been discussed.

  20. Characterization of Traveling Wave Ion Mobility Separations in Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations.

    PubMed

    Hamid, Ahmed M; Ibrahim, Yehia M; Garimella, Sandilya V B; Webb, Ian K; Deng, Liulin; Chen, Tsung-Chi; Anderson, Gordon A; Prost, Spencer A; Norheim, Randolph V; Tolmachev, Aleksey V; Smith, Richard D

    2015-11-17

    We report on the development and characterization of a traveling wave (TW)-based Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations (TW-SLIM) module for ion mobility separations (IMS). The TW-SLIM module uses parallel arrays of rf electrodes on two closely spaced surfaces for ion confinement, where the rf electrodes are separated by arrays of short electrodes, and using these TWs can be created to drive ion motion. In this initial work, TWs are created by the dynamic application of dc potentials. The capabilities of the TW-SLIM module for efficient ion confinement, lossless ion transport, and ion mobility separations at different rf and TW parameters are reported. The TW-SLIM module is shown to transmit a wide mass range of ions (m/z 200-2500) utilizing a confining rf waveform (∼1 MHz and ∼300 Vp-p) and low TW amplitudes (<20 V). Additionally, the short TW-SLIM module achieved resolutions comparable to existing commercially available low pressure IMS platforms and an ion mobility peak capacity of ∼32 for TW speeds of <210 m/s. TW-SLIM performance was characterized over a wide range of rf and TW parameters and demonstrated robust performance. The combined attributes of the flexible design and low voltage requirements for the TW-SLIM module provide a basis for devices capable of much higher resolution and more complex ion manipulations. PMID:26510005

  1. Characterization of Traveling Wave Ion Mobility Separations in Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations

    SciTech Connect

    Hamid, Ahmed M.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Garimella, Venkata BS; Webb, Ian K.; Deng, Liulin; Chen, Tsung-Chi; Anderson, Gordon A.; Prost, Spencer A.; Norheim, Randolph V.; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Smith, Richard D.

    2015-10-28

    We report on the development and characterization of a new traveling wave-based Structure for Lossless Ion Manipulations (TW-SLIM) for ion mobility separations (IMS). The TW-SLIM module uses parallel arrays of rf electrodes on two closely spaced surfaces for ion confinement, where the rf electrodes are separated by arrays of short electrodes, and using these TWs can be created to drive ion motion. In this initial work, TWs are created by the dynamic application of dc potentials. The capabilities of the TW-SLIM module for efficient ion confinement, lossless ion transport, and ion mobility separations at different rf and TW parameters are reported. The TW-SLIM module is shown to transmit a wide mass range of ions (m/z 200–2500) utilizing a confining rf waveform (~1 MHz and ~300 Vp-p) and low TW amplitudes (<20 V). Additionally, the short TW-SLIM module achieved resolutions comparable to existing commercially available low pressure IMS platforms and an ion mobility peak capacity of ~32 for TW speeds of <210 m/s. TW-SLIM performance was characterized over a wide range of rf and TW parameters and demonstrated robust performance. In conclusion, the combined attributes of the flexible design and low voltage requirements for the TW-SLIM module provide a basis for devices capable of much higher resolution and more complex ion manipulations.

  2. Characterization of Traveling Wave Ion Mobility Separations in Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hamid, Ahmed M.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Garimella, Venkata BS; Webb, Ian K.; Deng, Liulin; Chen, Tsung-Chi; Anderson, Gordon A.; Prost, Spencer A.; Norheim, Randolph V.; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; et al

    2015-10-28

    We report on the development and characterization of a new traveling wave-based Structure for Lossless Ion Manipulations (TW-SLIM) for ion mobility separations (IMS). The TW-SLIM module uses parallel arrays of rf electrodes on two closely spaced surfaces for ion confinement, where the rf electrodes are separated by arrays of short electrodes, and using these TWs can be created to drive ion motion. In this initial work, TWs are created by the dynamic application of dc potentials. The capabilities of the TW-SLIM module for efficient ion confinement, lossless ion transport, and ion mobility separations at different rf and TW parameters aremore » reported. The TW-SLIM module is shown to transmit a wide mass range of ions (m/z 200–2500) utilizing a confining rf waveform (~1 MHz and ~300 Vp-p) and low TW amplitudes (<20 V). Additionally, the short TW-SLIM module achieved resolutions comparable to existing commercially available low pressure IMS platforms and an ion mobility peak capacity of ~32 for TW speeds of <210 m/s. TW-SLIM performance was characterized over a wide range of rf and TW parameters and demonstrated robust performance. In conclusion, the combined attributes of the flexible design and low voltage requirements for the TW-SLIM module provide a basis for devices capable of much higher resolution and more complex ion manipulations.« less

  3. Ion mixing of III-V compound semiconductor layered structures

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, W.; Pappert, S.A.; Zhu, B.; Clawson, A.R.; Yu, P.K.L.; Lau, S.S. ); Poker, D.B.; White, C.W. ); Schwarz, S.A. )

    1992-03-15

    Compositional disordering of III-V compound superlattice structures has received considerable attention recently due to its potential application for photonic devices. The conventional method to induce compositional disorder in a layered structure is to implant a moderate dose of impurity ions ({similar to}10{sup 15}/cm{sup 2}) into the structure at room temperature, followed by a high-temperature annealing step (this process is referred to as IA here). Ion irradiation at room temperature alone does not cause any significant intermixing of layers. The subsequent high-temperature annealing step tends to restrict device processing flexibility. Ion mixing (IM) is capable of enhancing compositional disordering of layers at a rate which increases exponentially with the ion irradiation temperature. As a processing technique to planarize devices, ion mixing appears to be an attractive technology. In this work, we investigate compositional disordering in the AlGaAs/GaAs and the InGaAs/InP systems using ion mixing. We found that the ion mixing behavior of these two systems shows a thermally activated regime as well as an athermal regime, similar to that observed for metal-metal and metal-semiconductor systems. Ion mixing is observed to induce compositional disordering at significantly lower temperatures than that for the IA process. We have compared the two processes in terms of five parameters: (1) irradiation temperature, (2) dose dependence, (3) dose rate dependence, (4) annealing, and (5) ion dependence (including electrical effects and mass dependence). We found that the IM process is more efficient in utilizing the defects generated by ion irradiation to cause disordering. Both the physical mechanism of ion mixing and possible device implications will be discussed.

  4. Structural dynamic interaction with solar tracking control for evolutionary Space Station concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Tae W.; Cooper, Paul A.; Ayers, J. Kirk

    1992-01-01

    The sun tracking control system design of the Solar Alpha Rotary Joint (SARJ) and the interaction of the control system with the flexible structure of Space Station Freedom (SSF) evolutionary concepts are addressed. The significant components of the space station pertaining to the SARJ control are described and the tracking control system design is presented. Finite element models representing two evolutionary concepts, enhanced operations capability (EOC) and extended operations capability (XOC), are employed to evaluate the influence of low frequency flexible structure on the control system design and performance. The design variables of the control system are synthesized using a constrained optimization technique to meet design requirements, to provide a given level of control system stability margin, and to achieve the most responsive tracking performance. The resulting SARJ control system design and performance of the EOC and XOC configurations are presented and compared to those of the SSF configuration. Performance limitations caused by the low frequency of the dominant flexible mode are discussed.

  5. Functional Insights from Glutamate Receptor Ion Channel Structures

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Janesh; Mayer, Mark L.

    2014-01-01

    X-ray crystal structures for the soluble amino terminal and ligand binding domains of glutamate receptor ion channels, combined with a 3.6 Å resolution structure of the full length AMPA receptor GluA2 homotetramer, provide unique insights into the mechanisms of iGluR assembly and function. Increasingly sophisticated biochemical, computational and electrophysiological experiments are beginning to reveal the mechanism of action of partial agonists, and yield new models for the mechanism of action of allosteric modulators. Newly identified NMDA receptor ligands acting at novel sites offer hope for development of subtype selective modulators. Many issues remain unsolved, including the role of the ATD in AMPA receptor signaling, and the mechanisms by which auxiliary proteins regulate receptor activity. The structural basis for ion permeation and ion channel block also remain areas of uncertainty, and despite substantial progress, molecular dynamics simulations have yet to reveal how binding of glutamate opens the ion channel pore. PMID:22974439

  6. Kinetic structure of slow shocks - Effects of the electromagnetic ion/ion cyclotron instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omidi, N.; Winske, D.

    1992-01-01

    The structure of slow magnetosonic shocks in the low beta regime is analyzed with attention given to ion heating and the effects of waves upstream of the electromagnetic ion/ion cyclotron (EMIIC) instability. Shock formation is assessed by means of three methods - a relaxation method and two based on dynamic flow interactions - to determine the effects of initialization and boundary conditions on the formation. Good solutions are found with the piston method and the similar flow-flow method in which the plasma is injected from two boundaries to form two slow shocks. Plasma parameters and shock normal angle are found to be the key variables dictating the structure of the magnetosonic shocks. Four unique classes of resultant shock structures are described in which classical, steady, or nonsteady behavior is found. The analysis also yields insight into the relationship between EMIIC instability and ion dissipation.

  7. Track structure simulations at relativistic energies: an update on cross section calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dingfelder, Michael

    Charged particle track structure simulations follow the primary, as well as all (produced) sec-ondary particles in an event-by-event matter, from starting or ejection energies down to total stopping. They provide detailed information on the spacial distributions of energy depositions, interaction types, and radical species produced. These quantities provide a starting point to describe the interaction of the radiation with matter of biological interest and to explore and estimate the effects of radiation quality on various biological responses of these systems. Of special interest is liquid water which serves as surrogate for soft tissue. Ionization and excitation cross sections for bare charged particles can be calculated within the framework of the (relativistic) plane-wave Born approximation or the (relativistic) Bethe approximation. Both theories rely on a realistic model of the dielectric response function of the material under consideration and need to address relativistic medium polarization effects like the Fermi-density effect in a consistent way. In this talk we will review and present new and updated aspects of charged particle cross section calculations for relativistic heavy ions with liquid water and other materials of biological interest. This includes an updated model for the dielectric response function of liquid water to better reflect new data from inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) experiments using synchrotron radiation and a model for the dielectric response function of calcium, which serves as a bone surrogate. We will also discuss the implementation of relativistic effect, especially of the Fermi-density effect into the cross section calculations. This work is supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), grant no. NNJ04HF39G.

  8. Eye Tracking Detects Disconjugate Eye Movements Associated with Structural Traumatic Brain Injury and Concussion

    PubMed Central

    Ritlop, Robert; Reyes, Marleen; Nehrbass, Elena; Li, Meng; Lamm, Elizabeth; Schneider, Julia; Shimunov, David; Sava, Maria; Kolecki, Radek; Burris, Paige; Altomare, Lindsey; Mehmood, Talha; Smith, Theodore; Huang, Jason H.; McStay, Christopher; Todd, S. Rob; Qian, Meng; Kondziolka, Douglas; Wall, Stephen; Huang, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Disconjugate eye movements have been associated with traumatic brain injury since ancient times. Ocular motility dysfunction may be present in up to 90% of patients with concussion or blast injury. We developed an algorithm for eye tracking in which the Cartesian coordinates of the right and left pupils are tracked over 200 sec and compared to each other as a subject watches a short film clip moving inside an aperture on a computer screen. We prospectively eye tracked 64 normal healthy noninjured control subjects and compared findings to 75 trauma subjects with either a positive head computed tomography (CT) scan (n=13), negative head CT (n=39), or nonhead injury (n=23) to determine whether eye tracking would reveal the disconjugate gaze associated with both structural brain injury and concussion. Tracking metrics were then correlated to the clinical concussion measure Sport Concussion Assessment Tool 3 (SCAT3) in trauma patients. Five out of five measures of horizontal disconjugacy were increased in positive and negative head CT patients relative to noninjured control subjects. Only one of five vertical disconjugacy measures was significantly increased in brain-injured patients relative to controls. Linear regression analysis of all 75 trauma patients demonstrated that three metrics for horizontal disconjugacy negatively correlated with SCAT3 symptom severity score and positively correlated with total Standardized Assessment of Concussion score. Abnormal eye-tracking metrics improved over time toward baseline in brain-injured subjects observed in follow-up. Eye tracking may help quantify the severity of ocular motility disruption associated with concussion and structural brain injury. PMID:25582436

  9. Scaling behavior and local structure of ion aggregates in single-ion conductors.

    PubMed

    Lu, Keran; Rudzinski, Joseph F; Noid, W G; Milner, Scott T; Maranas, Janna K

    2014-02-21

    Single-ion conductors are attractive electrolyte materials because of their inherent safety and ease of processing. Most ions in a sodium-neutralized PEO sulfonated-isophthalate ionomer electrolyte exist as one dimensional chains, restricted in dimensionality by the steric hindrance of the attached polymer. Because the ions are slow to reconfigure, atomistic MD simulations of this material are unable to adequately sample equilibrium ion structures. We apply a novel coarse-graining scheme using a generalized-YBG procedure in which the polymer backbone is completely removed and implicitly represented by the effective potentials of the remaining ions. The ion-only coarse-grained simulation allows for substantial sampling of equilibrium aggregate configurations. We extend the wormlike micelle theory to model ion chain equilibrium. Our aggregates are random walks which become more positively charged with increasing size. Defects occur on the string-like structure in the form of “dust” and “knots,” which form due to cation coordination with open sites along the string. The presence of these defects suggest that cation hopping along open third-coordination sites could be an important mechanism of charge transport using ion aggregates. PMID:24983107

  10. Simulation of Electric Potentials and Ion Motion in Planar Electrode Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations (SLIM)

    SciTech Connect

    Garimella, Venkata BS; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Webb, Ian K.; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Zhang, Xinyu; Prost, Spencer A.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2014-11-01

    We report a conceptual study and computational evaluation of novel planar electrode Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations (SLIM). Planar electrode SLIM devices were designed that allow for flexible ion confinement, transport and storage using a combination of RF and DC fields. Effective potentials can be generated that provide near ideal regions for confining ions in the presence of a gas. Ion trajectory simulations using SIMION 8.1 demonstrated the capability for lossless ion motion in these devices over a wide m/z range and a range of electric fields at low pressures (e.g. a few torr). More complex ion manipulations, e.g. turning ions by 90o and dynamically switching selected ion species into orthogonal channels, are also feasible. The performance of SLIM devices at ~4 torr pressure for performing ion mobility based separations (IMS) is computationally evaluated and compared to initial experimental results, and both of which agree closely with experimental and theoretical IMS performance for a conventional drift tube design.