Science.gov

Sample records for ion-atom collisions results

  1. Multiple-electron processes in fast ion-atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Schlachter, A.S.

    1989-03-01

    Research in atomic physics at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Super-HILAC and Bevalac accelerators on multiple-electron processes in fast ion-atom collisions is described. Experiments have studied various aspects of the charge-transfer, ionization, and excitation processes. Examples of processes in which electron correlation plays a role are resonant transfer and excitation and Auger-electron emission. Processes in which electron behavior can generally be described as uncorrelated include ionization and charge transfer in high-energy ion-atom collisions. A variety of experiments and results for energies from 1 MeV/u to 420 MeV/u are presented. 20 refs., 15 figs.

  2. Ionization Phenomena in Ion-Atom Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deveney, Edward Francis

    Two many-electron ion-atom collision systems are used to investigate atomic and molecular structure and collisional interactions. Electrons emitted from MeV/u C^{3+} projectile target -atom collisions were measured with a high-resolution position -sensitive electron spectrometer at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The electrons are predominantly ionized by direct projectile -target interactions or autoionizing (AI) from doubly excited AI levels of the ion which were excited in the collision. The energy dependence of directly scattered target electrons, binary-encounter electrons (BEE), is investigated and compared with theory. AI levels of the projectile 1s to nl single electron excited series, (1s2snl) n = 2,3,4,....infty, including the series limit are identified uniquely using energy level calculations. Original Auger yield calculations using a code by Cowan were used to discover a 1/{n^3} scaling in intensities of Auger peaks in the aforementioned series. This is explained using scattering theory. A nonstatistical population of the terms in the (1s2s2l) configuration was identified and investigated as a function of the beam energy and for four different target atoms. Two electron excited configurations are identified and investigated. The angular distribution of a correlated transfer and excitation AI state is measured and compared to theory. The final scattered charge state distributions of Kr^ {n+}, n = 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, projectiles are measured following collisions with Kr targets in the Van de Graaff Laboratory here at The University of Connecticut. Average scattered charge states as high as 12 are observed. It appears that these electrons are ionized during the lifetime of the quasimolecular state but a complete picture of the ionization mechanism(s) is not known. Calculations using a statistical model of ionization, modified in several ways, are compared with the experimental results to see if it is possible to isolate whether or not the electrons originate

  3. Newly appreciated roles for electrons in ion-atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Sellin, I.A. . Dept. of Physics and Astronomy Oak Ridge National Lab., TN )

    1990-01-01

    Since the previous Debrecen workshop on High-Energy Ion-Atom Collisions there have been numerous experiments and substantial theoretical developments in the fields of fast ion-atom and ion- solid collisions concerned with explicating the previously largely underappreciated role of electrons as ionizing and exciting agents in such collisions. Examples to be discussed include the double electron ionization problem in He; transfer ionization by protons in He; double excitation in He; backward scattering of electrons in He; the role of electron-electron interaction in determining beta parameters for ELC; projectile K ionization by target electrons; electron spin exchange in transfer excitation; electron impact ionization in crystal channels; resonant coherent excitation in crystal channels; excitation and dielectronic recombination in crystal channels; resonant transfer and excitation; the similarity of recoil ion spectra observed in coincidence with electron capture vs. electron loss; and new research on ion-atom collisions at relativistic energies.

  4. Ion-Atom Cold Collisions and Atomic Clocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Maleki, Lute; Tjoelker, Robert L.

    1997-01-01

    Collisions between ultracold neutral atoms have for some time been the subject of investigation, initially with hydrogen and more recently with laser cooled alkali atoms. Advances in laser cooling and trapping of neutral atoms in a Magneto-Optic Trap (MOT) have made cold atoms available as the starting point for many laser cooled atomic physics investigations. The most spectacularly successful of these, the observation of Bose-Einstein Condensation (BEC) in a dilute ultra-cold spin polarized atomic vapor, has accelerated the study of cold collisions. Experimental and theoretical studies of BEC and the long range interaction between cold alkali atoms is at the boundary of atomic and low temperature physics. Such studies have been difficult and would not have been possible without the development and advancement of laser cooling and trapping of neutral atoms. By contrast, ion-atom interactions at low temperature, also very difficult to study prior to modern day laser cooling, have remained largely unexplored. But now, many laboratories worldwide have almost routine access to cold neutral atoms. The combined technologies of ion trapping, together with laser cooling of neutrals has made these studies experimentally feasible and several very important, novel applications might come out of such investigations . This paper is an investigation of ion-atom interactions in the cold and ultra-cold temperature regime. Some of the collisional ion-atom interactions present at room temperature are very much reduced in the low temperature regime. Reaction rates for charge transfer between unlike atoms, A + B(+) approaches A(+) + B, are expected to fall rapidly with temperature, approximately as T(sup 5/2). Thus, cold mixtures of atoms and ions are expected to coexist for very long times, unlike room temperature mixtures of the same ion-atom combination. Thus, it seems feasible to cool ions via collisions with laser cooled atoms. Many of the conventional collisional interactions

  5. Treatment of Ion-Atom Collisions Using a Partial-Wave Expansion of the Projectile Wavefunction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, T. G.; Foster, M.; Colgan, J.; Madison, D. H.

    2009-01-01

    We present calculations of ion-atom collisions using a partial-wave expansion of the projectile wavefunction. Most calculations of ion-atom collisions have typically used classical or plane-wave approximations for the projectile wavefunction, since partial-wave expansions are expected to require prohibitively large numbers of terms to converge…

  6. Atomic-orbital expansion model for describing ion-atom collisions at intermediate and low energies

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, C.D.; Fritsch, W.

    1983-01-01

    In the description of inelastic processes in ion-atom collisions at moderate energies, the semiclassical close-coupling method is well established as the standard method. Ever since the pioneering work on H/sup +/ + H in the early 60's, the standard procedure is to expand the electronic wavefunction in terms of molecular orbitals (MO) or atomic orbitals (AO) for describing collisions at, respectively, low or intermediate velocities. It has been recognized since early days that traveling orbitals are needed in the expansions in order to represent the asymptotic states in the collisions correctly. While the adoption of such traveling orbitals presents no conceptual difficulties for expansions using atomic orbitals, the situation for molecular orbitals is less clear. In recent years, various forms of traveling MO's have been proposed, but conflicting results for several well-studied systems have been reported.

  7. Coherence and correlations in fast ion-atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Burgdoerfer, J.

    1987-01-01

    This paper focusses on the description, classification and interpretation of coherent excitation of atomic or ionic systems with Coulombic two-body final state interactions. A group-theoretical approach is used to classify and interpret coherent excitation. The most significant result is that the state of excitation represented by a density operator can be mapped one to one onto expectation values of a set of operators. Examples are used to illustrate what can be learned about the collision process from investigations of coherent excitation. (JDH)

  8. Correlated charge-changing ion-atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Tanis, J.A.

    1992-04-01

    This report summarizes the progress and accomplishments in accelerator atomic physics research supported by DOE grant DE-FG02-87ER13778 from March 16, 1991 through March 15, 1992. This work involves the experimental investigation of fundamental atomic processes in collisions of charged projectiles with neutral targets or electrons, with particular emphasis on two-electron interactions and electron correlation effects. Processes involving combinations of excitation, ionization, and charge transfer are investigated utilizing coincidence techniques in which projectiles charge-changing events are associated with x-ray emission, target recoil ions, or electron emission. New results have been obtained for studies involving (1) resonant recombination of atomic ions, (2) double ionization of helium, and (3) continuum electron emission. Experiments were conducted using accelerators at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, Michigan State University, Western Michigan University, and the Institute of Nuclear Research, Debrecen, Hungary. Brief summaries of work completed and work in progress are given in this report.

  9. Effect of electron-nuclei interaction on internuclear motions in slow ion-atom collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolstikhina, Inga Yu.; Tolstikhin, Oleg I.

    2015-10-01

    The electron-nuclei interaction affects the internuclear motion in slow ion-atom collisions, which in turn affects theoretical results for the cross sections of various collision processes. The results are especially sensitive to the details of the internuclear dynamics in the presence of a strong isotope effect on the cross sections, as is the case, e.g., for the charge transfer in low-energy collisions of He2+ with H, D, and T. By considering this system as an example, we show that internuclear trajectories defined by the Born-Oppenheimer (BO) potential in the entrance collision channel, which effectively accounts for the electron-nuclei interaction, are in much better agreement with trajectories obtained in the ab initio electron-nuclear dynamics approach [R. Cabrera-Trujillo et al., Phys. Rev. A 83, 012715 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevA.83.012715] than the corresponding Coulomb trajectories. We also show that the use of the BO trajectory instead of the Coulomb trajectory in the calculations of the charge-transfer cross sections within the adiabatic approach improves the agreement of the results with ab initio calculations.

  10. Forward electron production in heavy ion-atom and ion-solid collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Sellin, I.A.

    1984-01-01

    A sharp cusp in the velocity spectrum of electrons, ejected in ion-atom and ion-solid collisions, is observed when the ejected electron velocity vector v/sub e/ matches that of the emergent ion vector v/sub p/ in both speed and direction. In ion-atom collisions, the electrons originate from capture to low-lying, projectile-centered continuum states (ECC) for fast bare or nearly bare projectiles, and from loss to those low-lying continuum states (ELC) when loosely bound projectile electrons are available. Most investigators now agree that ECC cusps are strongly skewed toward lower velocities, and exhibit full widths half maxima roughly proportional to v/sub p/ (neglecting target-shell effects, which are sometimes strong). A close examination of recent ELC data shows that ELC cusps are instead nearly symmetric, with widths nearly independent on v/sub p/ in the velocity range 6 to 18 a.u., a result only recently predicted by theory. Convoy electron cusps produced in heavy ion-solid collisions at MeV/u energies exhibit approximately velocity-independent widths very similar to ELC cusp widths. While the shape of the convoy peaks is approximately independent of projectile Z, velocity, and of target material, it is found that the yields in polycrystalline targets exhibit a strong dependence on projectile Z and velocity. While attempts have been made to link convoy electron production to binary ECC or ELC processes, sometimes at the last layer, or alternatively to a solid-state wake-riding model, our measured dependences of cusp shape and yield on projectile charge state and energy are inconsistent with the predictions of available theories. 10 references, 8 figures, 1 table.

  11. High charge state, ion-atom collision experiments using accel-decel

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, E.M.; Clark, M.W.; Tanis, J.A.; Graham, W.G.

    1987-01-01

    Recent studies of /sub 16/S/sup 13 +/ + He collisions between 2.5 and 200 MeV, which were made using the accel-decel technique with the Brookhaven National Laboratory coupled MP tandem Van de Graaff accelerators, are discussed. Cross sections were measured for single electron-capture and -loss as well as K x rays correlated to electron-capture. Other planned ion-atom collision experiments requiring accel-decel are also presented. 18 refs., 3 figs.

  12. Single electron capture in fast ion-atom collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milojević, Nenad

    2014-12-01

    Single-electron capture cross sections in collisions between fast bare projectiles and heliumlike atomic systems are investigated by means of the four-body boundary-corrected first Born (CB1-4B) approximation. The prior and post transition amplitudes for single charge exchange encompassing symmetric and asymmetric collisions are derived in terms of twodimensional real integrals in the case of the prior form and five-dimensional quadratures for the post form. The dielectronic interaction V12 = 1/r12 = 1/|r1 - r2| explicitly appears in the complete perturbation potential Vf of the post transition probability amplitude T+if. An illustrative computation is performed involving state-selective and total single capture cross sections for the p - He (prior and post form) and He2+, Li3+Be4+B5+C6+ - He (prior form) collisions at intermediate and high impact energies. We have also studied differential cross sections in prior and post form for single electron transfer from helium by protons. The role of dynamic correlations is examined as a function of increased projectile energy. Detailed comparisons with the measurements are carried out and the obtained theoretical cross sections are in reasonable agreement with the available experimental data.

  13. Assessment of ion-atom collision data for magnetic fusion plasma edge modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phaneuf, R. A.

    Cross-section data for ion-atom collision processes which play important roles in the edge plasma of magnetically-confined fusion devices are surveyed and reviewed. The species considered include H, He, Li, Be, C, O, Ne, Al, Si, Ar, Ti, Cr, Fe, Ni, Cu, Mo, W and their ions. The most important ion-atom collision processes occurring in the edge plasma are charge-exchange reactions. Excitation and ionization processes are also considered. The scope is limited to atomic species and to collision velocities corresponding to plasma ion temperatures in the 2 to 200 eV range. Sources of evaluated or recommended data are presented where possible, and deficiencies in the data base are indicated.

  14. Treatment of ion-atom collisions using a partial-wave expansion of the projectile wavefunction

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, M; Colgan, J; Wong, T G; Madison, D H

    2008-01-01

    We present calculations of ion-atom collisions using a partial-wave expansion of the projectile wavefunction. Most calculations of ion-atom collisions have typically used classical or plane-wave approximations for the projectile wavefunction, since partial-wave expansions are expected to require prohibitively large numbers of terms to converge scattering quantities. Here we show that such calculations are possible using modern high-performance computing. We demonstrate the utility of our method by examining elastic scattering of protons by hydrogen and helium atoms, problems familiar to undergraduate students of atomic scattering. Application to ionization of helium using partial-wave expansions of the projectile wavefunction, which has long been desirable in heavy-ion collision physics, is thus quite feasible.

  15. Near-threshold photoionization of hydrogenlike uranium studied in ion-atom collisions via the time-reversed process.

    PubMed

    Stöhlker, T; Ma, X; Ludziejewski, T; Beyer, H F; Bosch, F; Brinzanescu, O; Dunford, R W; Eichler, J; Hagmann, S; Ichihara, A; Kozhuharov, C; Krämer, A; Liesen, D; Mokler, P H; Stachura, Z; Swiat, P; Warczak, A

    2001-02-01

    Radiative electron capture, the time-reversed photoionization process occurring in ion-atom collisions, provides presently the only access to photoionization studies for very highly charged ions. By applying the deceleration mode of the ESR storage ring, we studied this process in low-energy collisions of bare uranium ions with low- Z target atoms. This technique allows us to extend the current information about photoionization to much lower energies than those accessible for neutral heavy elements in the direct reaction channel. The results prove that for high- Z systems, higher-order multipole contributions and magnetic corrections persist even at energies close to the threshold. PMID:11177990

  16. Delta-ray production in ion-atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, W.E.; Toburen, L.H.

    1980-07-01

    The stochastic energy concentrations randomly deposited in submicron volumes in and near the paths of charged particles is needed. Computational methods, especially Monte Carlo methods, required a comprehensive set of basic interaction cross sections for the primary and all secondary radiation products. Of particular importance for high LET radiations are the cross sections for the production of energetic secondary electrons, delta-rays, in primary ionizing events. In this paper, we review the present state of available data on the production of delta-rays by fast positive ions in collision with targets of biological interest. The systematics in the cross sections for proton ionization of molecular targets are discussed, indicating what scaling is possible and summarizing what can be concluded regarding the dependence of the mean delta-ray energies on the chemical makeup of the medium. A comparison of typical data is made with the binary-encounter approximation to illustrate the limitations of this theoretical treatment of the ionization process. A bibliography of relevant published works on this topic is included.

  17. Wave-packet continuum-discretization approach to ion-atom collisions: Nonrearrangement scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdurakhmanov, I. B.; Kadyrov, A. S.; Bray, I.

    2016-08-01

    A general single-center close-coupling approach based on a continuum-discretization procedure is developed to calculate excitation and ionization processes in ion-atom collisions. The continuous spectrum of the target is discretized using stationary wave packets constructed from the Coulomb wave functions, the eigenstates of the target Hamiltonian. Such continuum discretization allows one to generate pseudostates with arbitrary energies and distribution. These features are ideal for detailed differential ionization studies. The approach starts from the semiclassical three-body Schrödinger equation for the scattering wave function and leads to a set of coupled differential equations for the transition probability amplitudes. To demonstrate its utility the method is applied to calculate collisions of antiprotons with atomic hydrogen. A comprehensive set of benchmark results from integrated to fully differential cross sections for antiproton-impact ionization of hydrogen in the energy range from 1 keV to 1 MeV is provided. Contrary to previous predictions, we find that at low incident energies the singly differential cross section has a maximum away from the zero emission energy. This feature could not be seen without a fine discretization of the low-energy part of the continuum.

  18. Correlated charge-changing ion-atom collisions. Progress report, February 16, 1990--February 15, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Tanis, J.A.

    1993-02-01

    This report summarizes the progress and accomplishments in accelerator atomic physics research supported by DOE grant DE-FG02-87ER13778 from February 16, 1990 through February 15, 1993. This work involves the experimental investigation of atomic interactions in collisions of charged projectiles with neutral targets or electrons, with particular emphasis on two-electron interactions and electron-correlation effects. The processes studied are of interest both from fundamental and applied points of view. In the latter case, results are obtained which are relevant to the understanding of laboratory and astrophysical plasmas, highly-excited (Rydberg) and continuum states of atoms and ions, atomic structure effects, the interaction of ions with surfaces, and the development of heavy-ion storage-rings. The results obtained have provided the basis for several M.A. thesis projects at Western Michigan and several Ph.D. dissertation projects are currently underway. Summaries of work completed and work in progress are given below in Section II. This research has resulted in 26 papers (in print and in press), 12 invited presentations at national and international meetings, and 28 contributed presentations as detailed in Section III.

  19. A Investigation of a Possible Molecular Effect in Ion Atom Collision Using a Gaseous Argon Target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, Sanjeev

    1992-01-01

    The present work deals with an investigation of the molecular effect, which is defined as the difference in experimental results using isotachic atomic ion and molecular ion beams in ion atom collisions. Previous studies have dealt almost exclusively with total cross section measurements. This thesis explores the idea that the molecular effect may be more pronounced in the differential ionization probability of the target atoms. Also, a gaseous argon target of sufficiently low density was used in order to ensure that the two correlated protons in the H _2^{+} beam did not interact with two adjacent target atoms simultaneously. We report that, contrary to the expectations noted above, the molecular effect in the K shell differential ionization probability of argon for scattering angles up to 90^circ appears to be no more than the molecular effect in the total ionization probability. The uncertainity in our results is statistical in nature and can be improved upon by running the experiment for a longer duration of time.

  20. Transport properties derived from ion-atom collisions: 6Li-6Li+ and 6Li-7Li+ Cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouledroua, Moncef; Bouchelaghem, Fouzia; LPR Team

    2014-10-01

    This investigation treats quantum-mechanically the ion- atom collisions and computes the transport coefficients, such as the coefficients of mobility and diffusion. For the case of lithium, the calculations start by determining the gerade and ungerade potential curves through which ionic lithium approaches ground lithium. Then, by considering the isotopic effects and nuclear spins, the elastic and charge-transfer cross sections are calculated for the case of 6Li+and7Li+ colliding with 6Li. Finally, the temperature-dependent diffusion and mobility coefficients are analyzed, and the results are contrasted with those obtained from literature. The main results of this work have been recently published in. This work has been realized within the frames of the CNEPRU Project D01120110036 of the Algerian Ministry of Higher Education.

  1. Differential electron-Cu5+ elastic scattering cross sections extracted from electron emission in ion-atom collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, C.; Hagmann, S.; Bhalla, C. P.; Grabbe, S. R.; Cocke, C. L.; Richard, P.

    1999-04-01

    We present a method of deriving energy and angle-dependent electron-ion elastic scattering cross sections from doubly differential cross sections for electron emission in ion-atom collisions. By analyzing the laboratory frame binary encounter electron production cross sections in energetic ion-atom collisions, we derive projectile frame differential cross sections for electrons elastically scattered from highly charged projectile ions in the range between 60° and 180°. The elastic scattering cross sections are observed to deviate strongly from the Rutherford cross sections for electron scattering from bare nuclei. They exhibit strong Ramsauer-Townsend electron diffraction in the angular distribution of elastically scattered electrons, providing evidence for the strong role of screening played in the collision. Experimental data are compared with partial-wave calculations using the Hartree-Fock model.

  2. The role of prompt electrons in the post-collision effect in fast ion - atom collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Víkor, Gy; Ricz, S.; Kövér, Á.; Gulyás, L.; Pelicon, P.; Sulik, B.

    1997-10-01

    The influence of the post-collision Coulomb effect of direct-electrons on the Auger-line energy shift has been studied in fast proton - atom collisions. KLL and LMM Auger spectra of neon and krypton target have been measured and analysed with high precision. The semiclassical theory of the post-collision interaction (PCI) has been extended to include the effect of both the receeding projectile ion and the ejected prompt electron. Experimental and theoretical line-energy shifts exhibit a reasonable agreement in the entire angular range of the Auger emission. In a narrow cone around 0953-4075/30/19/020/img9, the line-energy shift is influenced mainly by the PCI with the projectile ion, while at backward angles, it is predominantly governed by the ejected electron - Auger - electron interaction.

  3. Coincidence measurements of electron capture and loss in ion-atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    DuBois, R.D.

    1990-09-01

    Collisions between fast, fully stripped projectiles and atomic targets predominantly result in target electrons being ejected to the continuum. For fast partially stripped projectiles which bring weakly bound electrons into the collision, projectile ionization can also contribute to the observed electron spectra. At lower impact velocities, electron capture by the projectile ion becomes important and higher order processes, often referred to as transfer ionization, can be a significant source of free electrons. In recent years, coincidence techniques have been used to evaluate the relative importance of electron capture and loss in free electron production, to separate the capture and loss contributions from those resulting from target ionization alone, and to provide more detailed information about electron capture and loss mechanisms than is available from total cross section measurements. A brief survey of these experiments will be presented. 23 refs., 9 figs.

  4. Correlated charge-changing ion-atom collisions. Progress report, March 16, 1991--March 15, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Tanis, J.A.

    1992-04-01

    This report summarizes the progress and accomplishments in accelerator atomic physics research supported by DOE grant DE-FG02-87ER13778 from March 16, 1991 through March 15, 1992. This work involves the experimental investigation of fundamental atomic processes in collisions of charged projectiles with neutral targets or electrons, with particular emphasis on two-electron interactions and electron correlation effects. Processes involving combinations of excitation, ionization, and charge transfer are investigated utilizing coincidence techniques in which projectiles charge-changing events are associated with x-ray emission, target recoil ions, or electron emission. New results have been obtained for studies involving (1) resonant recombination of atomic ions, (2) double ionization of helium, and (3) continuum electron emission. Experiments were conducted using accelerators at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, Michigan State University, Western Michigan University, and the Institute of Nuclear Research, Debrecen, Hungary. Brief summaries of work completed and work in progress are given in this report.

  5. Studies of electron correlation effects in multicharged ion atom collisions involving double capture

    SciTech Connect

    Stolterfoht, N.; Sommer, K.; Griffin, D.C.; Havener, C.C.; Huq, M.S.; Phaneuf, R.A.; Swenson, J.K.; Meyer, F.W.

    1988-01-01

    We review measurements of L-Coster Kronig and Auger electron production in slow, multicharged collision systems to study electron correlation effects in the process of double electron capture. The n/sup /minus/3/ law was confirmed for the production of the Coster-Kronig configurations 1s/sup 2/2pn/ell/ (n greater than or equal to 6) in O/sup 6 +/ + He collisions. Enhancement of high angular momentum /ell/ in specific 1s/sup 2/2pn/ell/ configurations was observed by means of high-resolution measurements of the Coster-Kronig lines. The importance of electron correlation effects in couplings of potential energy curves leading to the 1s/sup 2/2pn/ell/ configurations is verified by means of Landau-Zener model calculations. 32 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Charge transfer reactions in multiply charged ion-atom collisions. [in interstellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steigman, G.

    1975-01-01

    Charge-transfer reactions in collisions between highly charged ions and neutral atoms of hydrogen and/or helium may be rapid at thermal energies. If these reactions are rapid, they will suppress highly charged ions in H I regions and guarantee that the observed absorption features from such ions cannot originate in the interstellar gas. A discussion of such charge-transfer reactions is presented and compared with the available experimental data. The possible implications of these reactions for observations of the interstellar medium, H II regions, and planetary nebulae are outlined.

  7. Classical-quantum correspondence for ionization in fast ion-atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Burgdoerfer, J. |; Reinhold, C.O.

    1994-10-01

    We analyze the interplay between classical and quantum dynamics in ionization of atoms by fast charged particles The convergence to the classical limit is studied as a function of the momentum transferred to the electron during the collision, the impact parameter. the energy and angle of the emitted electron, and the initial state of the target. One goal is to assess the validity of exact classical (CTMC) methods and approximate classical models such as the Thomson model. Applications to data for electron ejection at large angles are presented. The connection between collisional ionization by charged particles and ionization by half-cycle pulses is discussed.

  8. Inner shell contribution to multiple ionization in ion-atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    DuBois, R.D.; Toburen, L.H.; Manson, S.T.

    1984-08-01

    Energetic proton impact ionization data for atomic targets is useful in testing our theoretical understanding of atomic collisions. In general, our understanding of bare projectile impact leading to single target ionization is quite good. Multiple ionization mechanisms are, however, less well understood. In certain cases, multiple ionization can account for as much as 50% of the total ionization cross section and thus cannot be neglected in modeling the collision process. Multiple target ionization can occur in a variety of ways. In order to fully analyze the collisional process, cross sections for each of these ionization pathways are necessary but, in general, are unavailable. However, in certain cases combining various experimental and theoretical data allows us to obtain some information about channels heretofore unmeasured. Our purpose here is to outline a procedure that we are currently using to unravel the complex multiple ionization process. In some cases, cross sections for specific ionization pathways can be obtained while in others only information about total contributions of specific ionization channels is available.

  9. The Role of High-Energy Ion-Atom/Molecule Collisions in Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkić, Dževad

    2014-12-01

    The need for ions in radiotherapy stems from the most favorable localization of the largest energy deposition, precisely at the tumor site with small energy losses away from the target. Such a dose conformity to the target is due to heavy masses of ions that scatter predominantly in the forward direction and lose maximal energy mainly near the end of their path in the vicinity of the Bragg peak. The heavy masses of nuclei preclude noticeable multiple scattering of the primary ion beam. This occurrence is responsible for only about 30% of ion efficiency in killing tumor cells. However, ionization of targets by fast ions yields electrons that might be of sufficient energy to produce further radiation damage. These δ-electrons, alongside radicals produced by ion-water collisions, can accomplish the remaining 70% of tumor cell eradication. Electrons achieve this chiefly through multiple scattering due to their small mass. Therefore, energy depositions by both heavy (nuclei) and light (electrons) particles as well as highly reactive radicals need to be simultaneously transported in Monte Carlo simulations. This threefold transport of particles is yet to be developed for the existing Monte Carlo codes. Critical to accomplishing this key goal is the availability of accurate cross section databases. To this end, the leading continuum distorted wave methodologies are poised to play a pivotal role in predicting energy losses of ions in tissue as discussed in this work.

  10. Ion-neutral chemistry at ultralow energies:Dynamics of reactive collisions between laser-cooled Ca+ or Ba+ ions and Rb atoms in an ion-atom hybrid trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulieu, O.; Hall, F. H. J.; Eberle, P.; Hegi, G.; Raoult, M.; Aymar, M.; Willitsch, S.

    2013-05-01

    Cold chemical reactions between laser-cooled Ca+ or Ba+ ions and Rb atoms were studied in an ion-atom hybrid trap. Reaction rate constants were determined in the collision energy range Ecoll /kB = 20 mK-20 K. Product branching ratios were studied using resonant-excitation mass spectrometry. The dynamics of the reactive processes including the radiative formation of CaRb+ and BaRb+ molecular ions has been analyzed using accurate potential energy curves and quantum-scattering calculations for the radiative channels. It is shown that the energy dependence of the reaction rates is governed by long-range interactions, while its magnitude is determined by short-range non-adiabatic and radiative couplings. The quantum character of the collisions is predicted to manifest itself in the occurrence of narrow shape resonances at well-defined collision energies. The present results highlight both universal and system-specific phenomena in cold ion-neutral collisions. This work was supported by the Swiss National Science Foundation and the COST Action ''Ion Traps for Tomorrow's Applications''.

  11. Measurements of scattering processes in negative ion: Atom collisions. Technical progress report, 1 September 1991--31 December 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Kvale, T.J.

    1994-09-27

    This report describes the progress made on the research objectives during the past three years of the grant. This research project is designed to study various scattering processes which occur in H{sup {minus}} collisions with atomic (specifically, noble gas and atomic hydrogen) targets in the intermediate energy region. These processes include: elastic scattering, single- and double-electron detachment, and target excitation/ionization. For the elastic and target inelastic processes where H{sup {minus}} is scattered intact, the experimental technique of Ion Energy-Loss Spectroscopy (IELS) will be employed to identify the final target state(s). In most of the above processes, cross sections are unknown both experimentally and theoretically. The measurements will provide total cross sections (TCS) initially, and once the angular positioning apparatus is installed, will provide angular differential cross sections (ADCS).

  12. Ionization at the Noble Gases Ion-Atom Collisions in the 1-7 KeV Energy Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikiani, Boris; Chitaladze, Marika; Japaridze, Josif; Kavlashvili, Nana

    2002-10-01

    The absolute total cross sections for production of free electrons, all positive show target gas ions and partial cross sections for production of double charged slow target gas ions at these collisions have been measured. The measurements were carried out by improved transfers electric field ("condenser") and magnetic mass-analyzer methods[1]. It was shown that in the investigated energy range practically there are now slow ions with charged state more than two. Control experiments have been shown that process of electron's liberation from fast particles ("stripping" process) is unlikely in the investigated energy range. Therefore, one can to suppose that total cross sections for productions of free electrons are equal to the total cross sections of ionization of the target gas atoms. For symmetrical pairs of colliding particles (He+ _ He, Ne+ _ Ne , etc) and for pairs He+ _ Ne, Ar+ _ Kr and Kr+ _ Xe values of partial cross-sections are negligible. In the cases of He+ _ Kr and He+ _ Xe pairs value of these partial cross sections increases with colliding energy and reaches about three percent at the energy 4kev. However, in the cases of He+ _ Ar, Na+ _ Ar, Kr, Xe the values of relative portion of the double charged ions in the total amount of slow positive ions are significant (for example in He+ _ Ar collision at the energy of 4kev this portion is about 20-25 percent). Analyzes of the correlation diagrams of the diabetics terms of colliding particles system (MS) [2] show that the electron capture processes are accompanying by simultaneous excitation of auto- ionization states of target gas ions. The decay of these states are responsible for realize of double ionization process of the target gas atoms. 1. B. Kikiani, R.Lomsadze, N. Mosulishvili, Proceedings of Tbilisi State University, Physics, 34, 114, 1999; 2 M. Barat, W.Lichten, Phys. Rev, A6, 211, 1972.

  13. Fraunhofer-type diffraction patterns of matter-wave scattering of projectiles: Electron transfer in energetic ion-atom collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agueny, Hicham

    2015-07-01

    We present results for single and double electron captures in intermediate energies H+ and 2H+ projectiles colliding with a helium target. The processes under investigations are treated using a nonperturbative semiclassical approach in combination with Eikonal approximation to calculate the scattering differential cross sections. The latter reveals pronounced minima and maxima in the scattering angles, in excellent agreement with the recent experimental data. It turns out that the present structure depends strongly on the projectile energy and shows only slight variations with different capture channels. The observed structure demonstrates the analogy of atomic de Broglie's matter-wave scattering with λd B=1.3 -3.2 ×10-3 a.u. and Fraunhofer-type diffraction of light waves.

  14. LHCb results from proton ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massacrier, Laure

    2016-07-01

    Proton-lead and lead-proton data taking during 2013 has allowed LHCb to expand its physics program to heavy ion physics. Results include the first forward measurement of Z production in proton-lead collisions as well as a measurement of the nuclear modification factor and forward-backward production of prompt and displaced J/ψ, ψ(2S) and ϒ. Angular particle correlations have also been measured for events of varying charged particle activity.

  15. Stripping Cross Sections of Fast Ions in Ion-Atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kecskemeti, S. R.; Kaganovich, I. D.; Startsev, E. A.; Davidson, R. C.

    2004-11-01

    Knowledge of ion-atom ionization cross sections is of great importance for many accelerator applications. We have recently investigated theoretically and experimentally the stripping of more than 18 different pairs of projectile and target particles in the range of 3-38 MeV/amu to study the range of validity of both the Born approximation and the classical trajectory calculation. In most cases, both approximations give similar results. However, for fast projectile velocities and low ionization potentials, the classical approach is not valid and can overestimate the stripping cross sections by neutral atoms by an order-of-magnitude [1]. Therefore, a hybrid approach has been developed, which automatically chooses between the Born approximation and the classical mechanics approximation depending on the parameters of the collision. When experimental data and theoretical calculations are not available, approximate formulas are frequently used. Based on experimental data and theoretical predictions, a new fit formula for ionization cross sections by fully stripped ions is proposed. [1] I. D. Kaganovich, E. A. Startsev and R. C. Davidson, Phys. Rev. A 68, 022707 (2003). [2] I. D. Kaganovich, E. A. Startsev and R. C. Davidson, Physics of Plasmas 11, 1229 (2004).

  16. JPL Ultrastable Trapped Ion Atomic Frequency Standards.

    PubMed

    Burt, Eric A; Yi, Lin; Tucker, Blake; Hamell, Robert; Tjoelker, Robert L

    2016-07-01

    Recently, room temperature trapped ion atomic clock development at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has focused on three directions: 1) ultrastable atomic clocks, usually for terrestrial applications emphasizing ultimate stability performance and autonomous timekeeping; 2) new atomic clock technology for space flight applications that require strict adherence to size, weight, and power requirements; and 3) miniature clocks. In this paper, we concentrate on the first direction and present a design and the initial results from a new ultrastable clock referred to as L10 that achieves a short-term stability of 4.5 ×10(-14)/τ(1/2) and an initial measurement of no significant drift with an uncertainty of 2.4 ×10(-16) /day over a two-week period. PMID:27249827

  17. Ion-atom association reactions in the rare gases.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickinson, A. S.; Roberts, R. E.; Bernstein, R. B.

    1972-01-01

    A simple resonance theory of three-body ion-atom association reactions is presented. The reaction is considered as proceeding through the formation of a long lived orbiting resonance complex between the atom and the ion. The population of these quasi-bound states is estimated assuming thermal equilibrium. A stable molecular ion may then be formed upon deactivation of the complex by collision with a third body. Various simplifying approximations to the potential curves and surfaces are employed. Furthermore, the deactivation cross sections for the relevant complexes are estimated from the corresponding atomic 'sizes.' A simple analytical formula for the three-body rate constant is thus derived. Reasonable agreement with experiment is obtained for He(+) in He and fair agreement for other light systems.

  18. First results on d+Au collisions from PHOBOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Becker, B.; Betts, R. R.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; Gburek, T.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Harrington, A. S.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołyński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Khan, N.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lee, J. W.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; Mignerey, A. C.; Noell, A.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Sedykh, I.; Skulski, W.; Smith, C. E.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sukhanov, A.; Teng, R.; Tonjes, M. B.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Veres, G. I.; Wadsworth, B.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wysłouch, B.; Zhang, J.

    2004-02-01

    We have measured transverse momentum distributions of charged hadrons produced in d+Au collisions at √SNN = 200 GeV, in the range 0.25 < pT < 6.0 GeV/c. With increasing collision centrality, the yield at high transverse momenta increases more rapidly than the overall particle density, leading to a strong modification of the spectral shape. This change in spectral shape is qualitatively different from observations in Au+Au collisions at the same energy. The results provide important information for discriminating between different models for the suppression of high-pT hadrons observed in Au+Au collisions.

  19. Sixteenth International Conference on the physics of electronic and atomic collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Dalgarno, A.; Freund, R.S.; Lubell, M.S.; Lucatorto, T.B.

    1989-01-01

    This report contains abstracts of papers on the following topics: photons, electron-atom collisions; electron-molecule collisions; electron-ion collisions; collisions involving exotic species; ion- atom collisions, ion-molecule or atom-molecule collisions; atom-atom collisions; ion-ion collisions; collisions involving rydberg atoms; field assisted collisions; collisions involving clusters and collisions involving condensed matter.

  20. Uncertainty of calculation results in vehicle collision analysis.

    PubMed

    Wach, Wojciech; Unarski, Jan

    2007-04-11

    In the analysis of road accidents two types of calculation result uncertainty can be distinguished: modelling uncertainty and uncertainty in calculation results [R.M. Brach, M. Brach, Vehicle Accident Analysis & Reconstruction Methods, SAE International Publisher, Warrendale, 2005]. The problem becomes very important first of all when minor modifications of input parameters or application of different models of the phenomenon lead to a fundamentally different answer to the question posed by the court. The aim of the paper was to prove the necessity of including the problem of uncertainty in calculations related to vehicle collision mechanics and to justify the application of different error analysis methods recommendable in vehicle collision reconstruction. The data file from crash test No. 7 [H. Burg, M. Lindenmann, Unfallversuche, Verlag Information Ambs, Kippenheim, 1982] was used, the selection restricted to the range typical of average police records of collision place. Collision speeds were calculated using two methods: reconstruction and simulation. The analysis of uncertainty was carried out. Maximum and mean square uncertainty were calculated by means of total differential of relevant forms. Since the reconstruction resulted in very broad error intervals of uniform distribution, additional calculations were performed by the Monte Carlo method using algorithm described in [W. Wach, J. Unarski, Determination of vehicle velocities and collision location by means of Monte Carlo simulation method, Special Publication Accident Reconstruction SP-1999, SAE Paper No. 2006-01-0907, 2006]. PMID:16884874

  1. Alignment and orientation in ion/endash/atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, M.; Lane, N.F.

    1987-01-01

    Recent progress in the theoretical study of alignment and orientation in atom-atom and ion-atom collisions at intermediate energies is reviewed. Recent systematic studies of the alignment and orientation of electronic charge cloud distributions of excited states resulting from such collisions clearly have provided more detailed information about the underlying collision dynamics. However, since accurate determination of these parameters is quite difficult, both theoretically and experimentally, a close collaboration between theory and experiment is necessary for a deeper understanding of the collision dynamics. A more complete approach, where the full density matrix is determined, is also discussed.

  2. Scaling Cross Sections for Ion-atom Impact Ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Igor D. Kaganovich; Edward Startsev; Ronald C. Davidson

    2003-06-06

    The values of ion-atom ionization cross sections are frequently needed for many applications that utilize the propagation of fast ions through matter. When experimental data and theoretical calculations are not available, approximate formulas are frequently used. This paper briefly summarizes the most important theoretical results and approaches to cross section calculations in order to place the discussion in historical perspective and offer a concise introduction to the topic. Based on experimental data and theoretical predictions, a new fit for ionization cross sections is proposed. The range of validity and accuracy of several frequently used approximations (classical trajectory, the Born approximation, and so forth) are discussed using, as examples, the ionization cross sections of hydrogen and helium atoms by various fully stripped ions.

  3. First Results from Pb+Pb Collisions at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Berndt; Schukraft, Jürgen; Wysłouch, Bolesław

    2012-11-01

    At the end of 2010, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN started operation with heavy-ion beams, colliding lead nuclei at a center-of-mass energy of 2.76 TeV per nucleon. These collisions ushered in a new era in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion physics at energies exceeding that of previous accelerators by more than an order of magnitude. This review summarizes the results from the first year of heavy-ion physics at the LHC obtained by the three experiments participating in the heavy-ion program: ALICE, ATLAS, and CMS.

  4. Theoretical investigation of electron-positive ion/atom interactions. [Clark Atlanta Univ. , Atlanta, Georgia

    SciTech Connect

    Msezane, A.Z.

    1992-01-01

    Very brief summaries are given on three research topics. Electron impact elastic, excitation, and total cross sections for K were investigated by using elaborate Cl target wave functions in the close-coupling approximation. Photoionization cross sections from ground-state Na were calculated near the 2s[sup 2]2p[sup 5]3s and 2s2p[sup 6]3s inner-shell thresholds; also, the photoionization cross sections of excited 3p [sup 2]P[sup o] and 3d [sup 2]D states were calculated with the R-matrix methodology near the 2s2p[sup 6]3s thresholds. A numerical approach was developed to calculate the charge transfer matrix elements for ion-atom(ion) collisions; this was used for the proton-hydrogen collision problem as an illustration.

  5. Selected experimental results from heavy-ion collisions at LHC

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Singh, Ranbir; Kumar, Lokesh; Netrakanti, Pawan Kumar; Mohanty, Bedangadas

    2013-01-01

    We reviewmore » a subset of experimental results from the heavy-ion collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) facility at CERN. Excellent consistency is observed across all the experiments at the LHC (at center of mass energysNN=2.76 TeV) for the measurements such as charged particle multiplicity density, azimuthal anisotropy coefficients, and nuclear modification factor of charged hadrons. Comparison to similar measurements from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at lower energy (sNN=200 GeV) suggests that the system formed at LHC has a higher energy density and larger system size and lives for a longer time. These measurements are compared to model calculations to obtain physical insights on the properties of matter created at the RHIC and LHC.« less

  6. Results on angular distributions of thermal dileptons in nuclear collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usai, Gianluca; NA60 Collaboration

    2009-11-01

    The NA60 experiment at the CERN SPS has studied dimuon production in 158 AGeV In-In collisions. The strong pair excess above the known sources found in the mass region 0.2results on the associated angular distributions for M<1GeV, as measured in the Collins-Soper reference frame, are presented. The structure function parameters λ, μ, ν are consistent with zero and the projected polar and azimuth angle distributions are uniform. The absence of any polarization is consistent with the interpretation of the excess dimuons as thermal radiation from a randomized system.

  7. Discrepant Results in a 2-D Marble Collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalajian, Peter

    2013-03-01

    Video analysis of 2-D collisions is an excellent way to investigate conservation of linear momentum. The often-desired experimental design goal is to minimize the momentum loss in order to demonstrate the conservation law. An air table with colliding pucks is an ideal medium for this experiment, but such equipment is beyond the budget of many schools. Substituting marbles on a table for air pucks introduces angular momentum and sliding friction so that simple video analysis will demonstrate that linear momentum is not conserved.1,2 Nevertheless, these labs offer students insights into the real-world application of physics. During a recent classroom trial, an unexpected result forced my students to think creatively and critically about what happened in the experiment.

  8. Experimental results on p (d) + A collisions at RHIC and the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sickles, Anne M.

    2014-11-01

    Recent experimental results at both the LHC and RHIC show evidence for hydrodynamic behavior in proton-nucleus and deuteron-nucleus collisions (p + A). This unexpected finding has prompted new measurements in p + A collisions in order to understand whether matter with similar properties is created in A + A and p + A collisions or whether another explanation is needed. In this proceedings, we will discuss the new experimental data and its interpretation within the context of heavy-ion collisions.

  9. Compact, Highly Stable Ion Atomic Clock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John

    2008-01-01

    A mercury-ion clock now at the breadboard stage of development (see figure) has a stability comparable to that of a hydrogen-maser clock: In tests, the clock exhibited an Allan deviation of between 2 x 10(exp -13) and 3 x 10(exp -13) at a measurement time of 1 second, averaging to about 10(exp -15) at 1 day. However, the clock occupies a volume of only about 2 liters . about a hundredth of the volume of a hydrogen-maser clock. The ion-handling parts of the apparatus are housed in a sealed vacuum tube, wherein only a getter pump is used to maintain the vacuum. Hence, this apparatus is a prototype of a generation of small, potentially portable high-precision clocks for diverse ground- and space-based navigation and radio science applications. Furthermore, this new ion-clock technology is about 100 times more stable and precise than the rubidium atomic clocks currently in use in the NAV STAR GPS Earth-orbiting satellites. In this clock, mercury ions are shuttled between a quadrupole and a 16-pole linear radio-frequency trap. In the quadrupole trap, the ions are tightly confined and optical state selection from a Hg-202 radio-frequency-discharge ultraviolet lamp is carried out. In the 16-pole trap, the ions are more loosely confined and atomic transitions resonant at frequency of about 40.507 GHz are interrogated by use of a microwave beam at that frequency. The trapping of ions effectively eliminates the frequency pulling caused by wall collisions inherent to gas-cell clocks. The shuttling of the ions between the two traps enables separation of the state-selection process from the clock microwave- resonance process, so that each of these processes can be optimized independently of the other. The basic ion-shuttling, two-trap scheme as described thus far is not new: it has been the basis of designs of prior larger clocks. The novelty of the present development lies in major redesigns of its physics package (the ion traps and the vacuum and optical subsystems) to effect

  10. Effects of Ion Atomic Number on Single-Event Gate Rupture (SEGR) Susceptibility of Power MOSFETs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Goldsman, Neil; Liu, Sandra; Titus, Jeffrey L.; Ladbury, Raymond L.; Kim, Hak S.; Phan, Anthony M.; LaBel, Kenneth A.; Zafrani, Max; Sherman, Phillip

    2012-01-01

    The relative importance of heavy-ion interaction with the oxide, charge ionized in the epilayer, and charge ionized in the drain substrate, on the bias for SEGR failure in vertical power MOSFETs is experimentally investigated. The results indicate that both the charge ionized in the epilayer and the ion atomic number are important parameters of SEGR failure. Implications on SEGR hardness assurance are discussed.

  11. Discrepant Results in a 2-D Marble Collision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalajian, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Video analysis of 2-D collisions is an excellent way to investigate conservation of linear momentum. The often-desired experimental design goal is to minimize the momentum loss in order to demonstrate the conservation law. An air table with colliding pucks is an ideal medium for this experiment, but such equipment is beyond the budget of many…

  12. Characterization of acoustic emissions resulting from particle collision with a stationary bubble.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen; Spencer, Steven J; Coghill, Peter

    2013-05-01

    The present work characterizes the acoustic emissions resulting from the collision of a particle driven under gravity with a captive bubble. Conventional methods to investigate the bubble particle collision interaction model measure a descriptive parameter known as the collision time. During such a collision, particle impact may cause a strong deformation and a following oscillation of the bubble-particle interface generates detectable passive acoustic emissions (AE). Experiments and models presented show that the AE frequency monotonically decreases with the particle radius and is independent of the impact velocity, whereas the AE amplitude has a more complicated relationship with impact parameters. PMID:23654360

  13. Next Generation JPL Ultra-Stable Trapped Ion Atomic Clocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burt, Eric; Tucker, Blake; Larsen, Kameron; Hamell, Robert; Tjoelker, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade, trapped ion atomic clock development at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has focused on two directions: 1) new atomic clock technology for space flight applications that require strict adherence to size, weight, and power requirements, and 2) ultra-stable atomic clocks, usually for terrestrial applications emphasizing ultimate performance. In this paper we present a new ultra-stable trapped ion clock designed, built, and tested in the second category. The first new standard, L10, will be delivered to the Naval Research Laboratory for use in characterizing DoD space clocks.

  14. Recent results on central Pb+Pb collisions from experiment NA49

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appelshäuser, H.; Bächler, J.; Bailey, S. J.; Barnby, L. S.; Bartke, J.; Barton, R. A.; Biał Kowska, H.; Billmeier, A.; Blyth, C. O.; Bock, R.; Bormann, C.; Brady, F. P.; Brockmann, R.; Brun, R.; Bunč Ić , P.; Caines, H. L.; Cebra, D.; Cooper, G. E.; Cramer, J. G.; Csato, P.; Dunn, J.; Eckardt, V.; Eckhardt, F.; Ferguson, M. I.; Fischer, H. G.; Flierl, D.; Fodor, Z.; Foka, P.; Freund, P.; Friese, V.; Fuchs, M.; Gabler, F.; Gal, J.; Gaź Dzicki, M.; Gł Adysz, E.; Grebieszkow, J.; Günther, J.; Harris, J. W.; Hegyi, S.; Henkel, T.; Hill, L. A.; Huang, I.; Hümmler, H.; Igo, G.; Irmscher, D.; Jacobs, P.; Jones, P. G.; Kadija, K.; Kolesnikov, V. I.; Kowalski, M.; Lasiuk, B.; Lévai, P.; Malakhov, A. I.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Melkumov, G. L.; Mock, A.; Molnár, J.; Nelson, J. M.; Oldenburg, M.; Odyniec, G.; Palla, G.; Panagiotou, A. D.; Petridis, A.; Piper, A.; Porter, R. J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Poziombka, S.; Prindle, D. J.; Pühlhofer, F.; Rauch, W.; Reid, J. G.; Renfordt, R.; Retyk, W.; Ritter, H. G.; Röhrich, D.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rudolph, H.; Rybicki, A.; Sandoval, A.; Sann, H.; Semenov, A. Yu.; Schäfer, E.; Schmischke, D.; Schmitz, N.; Schönfelder, S.; Seyboth, P.; Seyerlein, J.; Sikler, F.; Skrzypczak, E.; Squier, G. T. A.; Stock, R.; Ströbele, H.; Szentpetery, I.; Sziklai, J.; Szymanski, P.; Toy, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Trentalange, S.; Ullrich, T.; Vassiliou, M.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vranić , D.; Wang, F.; Weerasundara, D. D.; Wenig, S.; Whitten, C.; Wienold, T.; Wood, L.; Yates, T. A.; Zimanyi, J.; Zhu, X.-Z.; Zybert, R.

    1998-08-01

    In this paper we present recent results from experiment NA49 on single- and multiparticle distributions obtained for Pb+Pb collisions at 158GeV/nucleon at the CERN SPS. NA49 aims at a complete description of the hadronic final state of nuclear collisions, which will eventually allow us to establish whether an equilibrated, deconfined state of partonic matter, the quark gluon plasma (QGP), is created in the early stages of these collisions. New experimental results regarding the evolution of the hadron source through transverse expansion to chemical and thermal freeze-out are presented. We find that the available data can be understood in terms of simple physical pictures, indicating that sufficient energy densities for QGP creation are indeed reached in the early stage of the collision. The NA49 results on particle abundances are discussed in comparison with nuclear collisions at lower energy and elementary collisions at various energies. This comparison demonstrates that simple extrapolation from these systems fails to describe the results for Pb+Pb collisions at the CERN SPS.

  15. Theoretical investigation of electron-positive ion/atom interactions. Progress report, November 15, 1991--July 14, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Msezane, A.Z.

    1992-12-31

    Very brief summaries are given on three research topics. Electron impact elastic, excitation, and total cross sections for K were investigated by using elaborate Cl target wave functions in the close-coupling approximation. Photoionization cross sections from ground-state Na were calculated near the 2s{sup 2}2p{sup 5}3s and 2s2p{sup 6}3s inner-shell thresholds; also, the photoionization cross sections of excited 3p {sup 2}P{sup o} and 3d {sup 2}D states were calculated with the R-matrix methodology near the 2s2p{sup 6}3s thresholds. A numerical approach was developed to calculate the charge transfer matrix elements for ion-atom(ion) collisions; this was used for the proton-hydrogen collision problem as an illustration.

  16. Compact 2.45 GHz microwave ion/atom source

    SciTech Connect

    Sakamoto, Y.; Kasuya, T.; Wada, M.; Maeno, S.

    2008-02-15

    Characteristics of a microwave driven 3.4 cm diameter compact ion/atom source equipped with permanent magnets were tested. The source can be mounted to a standard copper gasket flange, and microwave power is supplied through an N-type microwave connector. The ion source plasma was observed through an ion extraction hole with an optical emission spectrometer. Peak height of an optical line spectrum emission corresponding to atomic nitrogen increased in proportion to the microwave input power. Quadrupole mass spectrometer showed that N{sup +} and N{sub 2}{sup +} were the dominant species in the extracted ion beam. Nitrogen ion current density of 0.23 mA/cm{sup 2} was obtained with only 10 W discharge power and 6x10{sup -3} Pa source surrounding pressure.

  17. Recent results on identified particle spectra from d+Au collisions at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jena, Chitrasen

    2009-10-01

    The Cronin effect [1], the enhancement of hadron spectra at intermediate pT in p + A collisions as compared to those in p + p collisions, has received renewed interest at RHIC [2]. It is thought that this effect may reflect on the early parton scatterings in high-energy nuclear collisions. In order to further investigate the Cronin effect, and shed light on the initial conditions at RHIC, we have analyzed the rapidity dependence of φ meson production in d + Au collisions at RHIC. In this talk, we report on STAR preliminary results of φ meson transverse momentum distributions(using the hadronic decay mode φ -> K^+K^-) and charged hadrons spectra from 200 GeV d + Au collisions. The dataset used for this analysis is from STAR's year 8 d + Au collisions with significantly reduced material (˜1/10) and high statistics (˜3) compared with previous runs. The particle species and the mass dependence of the nuclear modification factor as a function of rapidity will be presented.

  18. e/sup +/e/sup -/ collisions: results from PETRA

    SciTech Connect

    Hilger, E.

    1982-01-01

    A selection of most recent results obtained by the five experiments CELLO, JADE, MARK J, PLUTO, and TASSO at PETRA is presented. The many interesting new results include, for example, the observation of effects of 2nd order QCD, details of inclusive hadron production, and the measurement of the forward-backward asymmetry in lepton pair production due to weak and electromagnetic interference.

  19. Atomic-orbital close-coupling calculations for collisions involving fusion relevant highly charged impurity ions using very large basis sets

    SciTech Connect

    Igenbergs, Katharina; Wallerberger, Markus; Schweinzer, Josef; Aumayr, Friedrich

    2012-05-25

    The atomic-orbital close-coupling formalism is a well-known method for the semiclassical treatment of ion-atom collisions. Cross sections for these kinds of collisions are mainly needed in the analysis of certain spectroscopic data from nuclear fusion experiments as well as astrophysical data. We shall outline how the computational implementation can be improved in such a way that collisions involving heavy, highly charged impurity ions, such as Ar{sup 18+} can be treated. Furthermore we show and discuss exemplary results.

  20. Recent results of k-shell ionization by ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Avaldi, L.; Milazzo, M.; Mitchell, I.V.; Trivia, G.

    1983-04-01

    The experimental K-shell ionization cross sections of /sub 48/Cd, /sub 50/Sn, /sub 52/Te, /sub 53/I and /sub 56/Ba for alpha particles, between 2.2 MeV and 2.8 MeV, and of /sub 52/Te for protons, between 1.6 and 3 MeV, are presented. The justification for making these measurements comes, on the one hand, in filling a region where, at present, data are sparse: for example, /sub 52/Te ionization cross sections by alpha particles have never been reported before, and, on the other hand, checking between previously reported and diverging sets of experimental results: for example, for alpha particles on tin. In addition, the K-shell ionization cross sections of /sub 52/Te for protons can be considered as an extension of Khelill's measurements.

  1. Measurements of single-electron detachment cross-sections for Cu- and Ag- in collision with He and N2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuemei; Wu, Shimin; Li, Guangwu; Lu, Fuquan; Tang, Jiayong; Yang, Fujia

    2001-12-01

    Electron detachment of negative ions, in collision with a static gas target, is known to be one of the most fundamental processes occurring in negative-ion-atom collisions. The experimental results of cross-section data for transition element ions in collision with gases are of great interest not only for their potential application value, but also as a challenge to a theoretical study of complex negative ions in collision with atoms or molecules. In the present work, the single-electron detachment (SED) cross-sections for Cu- and Ag- in collision with He, N2 have been obtained in the energy region of 10-30 keV. By using a single-particle detector for both neutral atoms and ions, the experimental uncertainty of the results is improved in this work.

  2. Non-unique results of collisions of quasi-one-dimensional dissipative solitons.

    PubMed

    Descalzi, Orazio; Brand, Helmut R

    2015-12-13

    We investigate collisions of quasi-one-dimensional dissipative solitons (DSs) for a large class of initial conditions, which are not temporally asymptotic quasi-one-dimensional DSs. For the case of sufficiently small approach velocity and sufficiently large values of the dissipative cross-coupling between the counter-propagating DSs, we find non-unique results for the outcome of collisions. We demonstrate that these non-unique results are intrinsically related to a modulation instability along the crest of the quasi-one-dimensional objects. As a model, we use coupled cubic-quintic complex Ginzburg-Landau equations. Among the final results found are stationary and oscillatory compound states as well as more complex assemblies consisting of quasi-one-dimensional and localized states. We analyse to what extent the final results can be described by the solutions of one cubic-quintic complex Ginzburg-Landau equation with effective parameters. PMID:26527813

  3. Influence of Earth crust composition on continental collision style in Precambrian conditions: Results of supercomputer modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavyalov, Sergey; Zakharov, Vladimir

    2016-04-01

    A number of issues concerning Precambrian geodynamics still remain unsolved because of uncertainity of many physical (thermal regime, lithosphere thickness, crust thickness, etc.) and chemical (mantle composition, crust composition) parameters, which differed considerably comparing to the present day values. In this work, we show results of numerical supercomputations based on petrological and thermomechanical 2D model, which simulates the process of collision between two continental plates, each 80-160 km thick, with various convergence rates ranging from 5 to 15 cm/year. In the model, the upper mantle temperature is 150-200 ⁰C higher than the modern value, while the continental crust radiogenic heat production is higher than the present value by the factor of 1.5. These settings correspond to Archean conditions. The present study investigates the dependence of collision style on various continental crust parameters, especially on crust composition. The 3 following archetypal settings of continental crust composition are examined: 1) completely felsic continental crust; 2) basic lower crust and felsic upper crust; 3) basic upper crust and felsic lower crust (hereinafter referred to as inverted crust). Modeling results show that collision with completely felsic crust is unlikely. In the case of basic lower crust, a continental subduction and subsequent continental rocks exhumation can take place. Therefore, formation of ultra-high pressure metamorphic rocks is possible. Continental subduction also occurs in the case of inverted continental crust. However, in the latter case, the exhumation of felsic rocks is blocked by upper basic layer and their subsequent interaction depends on their volume ratio. Thus, if the total inverted crust thickness is about 15 km and the thicknesses of the two layers are equal, felsic rocks cannot be exhumed. If the total thickness is 30 to 40 km and that of the felsic layer is 20 to 25 km, it breaks through the basic layer leading to

  4. Baseball-bat collisions and the resulting trajectories of spinning balls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watts, Robert G.; Baroni, Steven

    1989-01-01

    The collision between a baseball and a bat has been analyzed using the classical theory of rigid body collisions. Also computed are the ranges of batted balls for a variety of launch angles and rotation rates, accounting for both drag and lift forces. If the coefficient of friction is not too small, the batter can give the ball fairly large backspin without fouling it off by swinging under the ball by as much as 1 to 2.5 cm. The increased range resulting from backspin is large, of the order of several tens of meters. The effect of the weather on the ranges has been analyzed briefly and it is found that under extreme conditions it can be surprisingly large.

  5. Development of an Ex Vivo Protocol to Model Bone Fracture in Laying Hens Resulting from Collisions

    PubMed Central

    Toscano, Michael J.; Wilkins, Lindsay J.; Millburn, Georgina; Thorpe, Katherine; Tarlton, John F.

    2013-01-01

    Fractures of the keel bone, a bone extending ventrally from the sternum, are a serious health and welfare problem in free range laying hens. Recent findings suggest that a major cause of keel damage within extensive systems is collisions with internal housing structures, though investigative efforts have been hindered by difficulties in examining mechanisms and likely influencing factors at the moment of fracture. The objectives of this study were to develop an ex vivo impact protocol to model bone fracture in hens caused by collision, to assess impact and bird-related factors influencing fracture occurrence and severity, and to identify correlations of mechanical and structural properties between different skeletal sites. We induced keel bone fractures in euthanized hens using a drop-weight impact tester able to generate a range of impact energies, producing fractures that replicate those commonly found in commercial settings. The results demonstrated that impact energies of a similar order to those expected in normal housing were able to produce fractures, and that greater collision energies resulted in an increased likelihood of fractures and of greater severity. Relationships were also seen with keel’s lateral surface bone mineral density, and the peak reactive force (strength) at the base of the manubrial spine. Correlations were also identified between the keel and long bones with respect to both strength and bone mineral density. This is the first study able to relate impact and bone characteristics with keel bone fracture at the moment of collision. Greater understanding of these relationships will provide means to reduce levels of breakage and severity in commercial systems. PMID:23785487

  6. Ion-Atom and Atom-Atom Collisional Processes and Modeling of Stellar Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihajlov, A. A.; Ignjatovic, Lj. M.; Sreckovic, V. A.; Dimitrijevic, M. S.; Dimitrijevic, M. S.

    2015-09-01

    We report the results obtained in our previous works on the influence of two groups of collisional processes (ion--atom and atom--atom) on the optical and kinetic properties of weakly ionised plasma. The first group includes radiative processes of the photodissociation/association type and radiative charge exchange, the second one -- chemi-ionisation/recombination processes. The effect of the radiative processed is assessed by comparing their intensities with those of the known competing processed in application to the solar photosphere and to the photospheres of DB white dwarfs. The studied chemi-ionisation/recombination processes are considered from the viewpoint of their influence on the populations of the excited states of the hydrogen atom (the Sun and an M-type red dwarf with an effective temperature of 3800~K) and helium atom (DB white dwarfs). The effect of these processes on the populations of the excited states of the hydrogen atom has been studied using the PHOENIX code, which generates the model of the considered atmosphere. The reported results demonstrate the unquestionable influence of the considered radiative and chemi- ionisation/recombination processes on the optical properties and on the kinetics of the weakly ionised layers in stellar atmospheres. It can be expected that the reported results will be a sufficient reason for including these processes in the models of stellar atmospheres.

  7. Attosecond timing the ultrafast charge-transfer process in atomic collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, S. X.

    2011-04-15

    By solving the three-dimensional, time-dependent Schroedinger equation, we have demonstrated that the ultrafast charge-transfer process in ion-atom collisions can be mapped out with attosecond extreme uv (xuv) pulses. During the dynamic-charge transfer from the target atom to the projectile ion, the electron coherently populates the two sites of both nuclei, which can be viewed as a 'short-lived' molecular state. A probing attosecond xuv pulse can instantly unleash the delocalized electron from such a ''transient molecule,'' so that the resulting photoelectron may exhibit a ''double-slit'' interference. On the contrary, either reduced or no photoelectron interference will occur if the attosecond xuv pulse strikes well before or after the collision. Therefore, by monitoring the photoelectron interference visibility, one can precisely time the ultrafast charge-transfer process in atomic collisions with time-delayed attosecond xuv pulses.

  8. PILOT RESULTS ON FORWARD COLLISION WARNING SYSTEM EFFECTIVENESS IN OLDER DRIVERS

    PubMed Central

    Lester, Benjamin D.; Sager, Lauren N.; Dawson, Jeffrey; Hacker, Sarah D.; Aksan, Nazan; Rizzo, Matthew; Kitazaki, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Summary Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) have largely been developed with a “one-size-fits-all” approach. This approach neglects the large inter-individual variability in perceptual and cognitive abilities that affect aging ADAS users. We investigated the effectiveness of a forward collision warning (FCW) with fixed response parameters in young and older drivers with differing levels of cognitive functioning. Drivers responded to a pedestrian stepping into the driver’s path on a simulated urban road. Behavioral metrics included response times (RT) for pedal controls and two indices of risk penetration (e.g., maximum deceleration and minimum time-to-collision (TTC)). Older drivers showed significantly slower responses at several time points compared to younger drivers. The FCW facilitated response times (RTs) for older and younger drivers. However, older drivers still showed smaller safety gains compared to younger drivers at accelerator pedal release and initial brake application when the FCW was active. No significant differences in risk metrics were observed within the condition studied. The results demonstrate older drivers likely differ from younger drivers using a FCW with a fixed parameter set. Finally, we briefly discuss how future research should examine predictive relationships between domains of cognitive functioning and ADAS responses to develop parameter sets to fit the individual. PMID:27135061

  9. NA49 Results on Single Particle and Correlation Measurements in Central PB+PB Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, F.

    1998-12-01

    Single-particle spectra and two-particle correlation functions measured by the NA49 collaboration in central Pb+Pb collisions at 158 GeV/nucleon are presented. These measurements are used to study the kinetic and chemical freeze-out conditions in heavy ion collisions. We conclude that large baryon stopping, high baryon density and strong transverse radial flow are achieved in central Pb+Pb collisions at the SPS.

  10. Lithospheric-scale geoelectrical characterisation of a continental collision zone in Pyrenees: preliminary results.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campanyà, J.; Ledo, J.; Queralt, P.; Marcuello, A.; Liesa, M.; Muñoz, J. A.; Jones, A. G.

    2012-04-01

    Continental collision orogenic systems, responsible of large mountains ranges like the Himalaya and the Alps, play a primary role in the development of the continents creating, shaping and destroying the lithosphere over millions of years. A particular case of continental collision between the Iberian and European plates resulted in the Pyrenees during the Alpine orogeny. The significant amount of available geophysical data and the well-constrained geological evolution make this mountain chain an ideal area to study orogenic processes. Although the geological evolution is as well constrained as possible from surface and crustal geophysics, lithospheric-scale physical processes are less well characterised and their interpretations differ significantly. To aid understanding of this orogen we have undertaken a series of magnetotelluric studies with the latest in 2011. In total, data at 70 broadband magnetotelluric (BBMT) sites and 27 long period magnetotelluric (LMT) sites were recorded in the Pyrenees, mixing old BBMT data with new BBMT and LMT data. Sites are distributed on four along-strike profiles from the Eastern to the Western part of the Pyrenees that border France and Spain. Each profile crosses the mountain range approximately from south to north and their lengths are from 70 km, the shortest, to 180 km, the longest. Additionally, some sites were located between MT profiles helping to constrain the three-dimensional geometries of the geoelectrical structures inbetween them. The geoelectrical information obtained from MT data is independent of other physical properties typically analyzed in lithospheric studies like density and velocity anomaly. Comparison of the MT data with independent available geological and geophysical data helps us to determine better the geological and physical processes of the study area. The results obtained in this study characterise the geological structures and the physical properties of the Pyrenees at lithospheric scale and

  11. Multielectron transitions resulting from interactions between target and projectile electrons in ionizing collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Manson, S.T. ); DuBois, R.D. )

    1992-12-01

    Interactions between target and projectile electrons leading to ionization of one of the collision partners and simultaneous excitation of the other are investigated for fast clothed-particle--clothed-particle collisions. For H-atom impact, the first Born approximation is used to demonstrate that the low-energy-electron emission is dominated by electron-electron rather than by electron-nucleus interaction processes. For a broad class of structured particle collision systems, the electron-electron interaction is shown to play an important, non-neglibible, role. Doubly differential cross sections for energetic H-He collisions illustrate this point.

  12. First Results on Angular Distributions of Thermal Dileptons in Nuclear Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Arnaldi, R.; Colla, A.; Cortese, P.; Ferretti, A.; Oppedisano, C.; Scomparin, E.; Banicz, K.; Damjanovic, S.; Castor, J.; Devaux, A.; Fargeix, J.; Force, P.; Manso, F.; Chaurand, B.; Cicalo, C.; Falco, A. de; Floris, M.; Masoni, A.; Puddu, G.; Serci, S.

    2009-06-05

    The NA60 experiment at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron has studied dimuon production in 158A GeV In-In collisions. The strong excess of pairs above the known sources found in the complete mass region 0.2results on the associated angular distributions. Using the Collins-Soper reference frame, the structure function parameters {lambda}, {mu}, and {nu} are measured to be zero, and the projected distributions in polar and azimuth angles are found to be uniform. The absence of any polarization is consistent with the interpretation of the excess dimuons as thermal radiation from a randomized system.

  13. Preliminary results of characteristic seismic anisotropy beneath Sunda-Banda subduction-collision zone

    SciTech Connect

    Wiyono, Samsul H.; Nugraha, Andri Dian

    2015-04-24

    Determining of seismic anisotropy allowed us for understanding the deformation processes that occured in the past and present. In this study, we performed shear wave splitting to characterize seismic anisotropy beneath Sunda-Banda subduction-collision zone. For about 1,610 XKS waveforms from INATEWS-BMKG networks have been analyzed. From its measurements showed that fast polarization direction is consistent with trench-perpendicular orientation but several stations presented different orientation. We also compared between fast polarization direction with absolute plate motion in the no net rotation and hotspot frame. Its result showed that both absolute plate motion frame had strong correlation with fast polarization direction. Strong correlation between the fast polarization direction and the absolute plate motion can be interpreted as the possibility of dominant anisotropy is in the asthenosphere.

  14. Glauber calculations of polarization of Lyman-alpha resulting from e/-/-H/1s/ collisions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerjuoy, E.; Thomas, B. K.; Sheorey, V. B.

    1972-01-01

    We have calculated the polarization fraction of the Lyman-alpha radiation emitted in e/-/-H/1s/ collisions using the Glauber, Born, and various Vainshtein approximations, and have compared these predictions with observation. We find that the Born, Glauber and all forms of the Vainshtein yield results which are very close to each other and to the data in the energy range from 30 to 700 eV. The comparatively small differences between the various approximations are detailed in the text; also, the reason for the close agreement of the predicted polarization fractions - although the computed 1s-2p total and differential cross sections are not so close - is explained. With respect to the Glauber approximation, the importance of computing the phase integral along a direction perpendicular to the momentum transfer q at each value of q, is stressed.

  15. An estimating formula for ion-atom association rates in gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatterjee, B. K.; Johnsen, R.

    1990-01-01

    A simple estimating formula is derived for rate coefficients of three-body ion atom association in gases and compare its predictions to experimental data on ion association and three-body radiative charge transfer reactions of singly- and doubly-charged rare-gas ions. The formula appears to reproduce most experimental data quite well. It may be useful for estimating the rates of reactions that have not been studied in the laboratory.

  16. Anomalous positrons from heavy ion collisions: Past results and future plans

    SciTech Connect

    Betts, R.R.

    1989-01-01

    The current status of the experimental study of anomalous lines observed in the spectra of positrons produced in heavy ion collisions is reviewed. A new experiment to measure positron-electron coincidences is discussed. 26 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Reinterpretation of the lithospheric structure beneath the Hidaka collision zone, Hokkaido, Japan 2. - Results for the northern collision zone from Hokkaido Transect 1998-2000 -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, T.; Tsumura, N.; Ito, T.; Sato, H.; Kurashimo, E.; Hirata, N.; Arita, K.; Noda, K.; Fujiwara, A.; Abe, S.; Kikuchi, S.; Suzuki, K.

    2013-12-01

    crust, there exists a 10-km thick reflective zone, expressing the deformation associated with the collision process. The most important finding in the present processing is a series of reflection events imaged at a 30-45 km depth below the obducted crust. These events, showing gradual increase in eastward dip to the east, are probably representing the lower crust and Moho within the Northeast Japan Arc descending down to the east under the collision zone. Refraction tomography was undertaken to map the deformed structure around the shallower part of collision zone. The obtained image is well consistent with the previous result (Iwasaki et al. 2004), showing a thick (4-5 km) undulated sediments in the hinterland, the outcrop of crystalline crust beneath the Hidaka Metamorphic Belt with higher Vp and Vp/Vs, probably expressing the obduction of the middle/lower crustal materials, and an enormously thick (>8-10 km) sedimentary package beneath the foreland. Weak later phases appearing at rather distant offsets (> 80-100 km) in the wide-angle data, which were not explained in the former study, are refractions/reflections from the descending lower crust and Moho of the Northeast Japan Arc as indicated by the CRS/MDRS imaging.

  18. Factors contributing to the amount of vehicular damage resulting from collisions between four-wheel drive vehicles and passenger cars.

    PubMed

    Broyles, R W; Clarke, S R; Narine, L; Baker, D R

    2001-09-01

    This study examines the vehicular damage resulting from motor vehicle crashes involving four-wheel drive vehicles and passenger cars in the state of Oklahoma. In particular, the focus of the analysis is on differences in vehicular damage to passenger cars and four-wheel drive vehicles. Results indicate that passenger cars sustain significantly greater vehicular damage than four-wheel drive vehicles. In addition, several other factors significantly influence the level of damage resulting from collisions between four-wheel drive vehicles and passenger cars. Driver behavior or unsafe acts, represented by the rate of travel prior to the collision, failure to yield, failure to obey a stoplight or a stop sign, the consumption of alcohol and the use of drugs, also contributed to the amount of vehicular damage. In addition, results also indicate that the level of damage was influenced significantly by environmental factors, represented by a reduced intensity of light, wet or slippery roadways and the type of collision. The findings reinforce the importance of a number of policy initiatives that may reduce the vehicular damage resulting from collisions involving four-wheel drive vehicles and passenger cars. For example, the study indicates a need to initiate legislation that lowers the speed limit during dark and twilight hours, commits additional resources to road maintenance to reduce unsafe road conditions, and stimulates improvements in automotive design that provide better lateral protection to vehicles. PMID:11491248

  19. Construction of a physics minimal formalism using the collision symbols: systematical condensing of the resulting laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rioux, Ch.

    1998-01-01

    In this article, a formalism of physics is built by using only algebric combinations of symbols which represent collisions between bodies. The connection with reality is made by measures of time. The formalism is brought down to that of Dirac's matrices in a constant curvature space (De Sitter space). As a result it becomes possible to condense most of the physical basic laws, that are moreover written in a unified symbolism. The general application of this formalism will be the numerical treatment of physical problems. L'article bâtit un formalisme de la physique ne mettant en œuvre que les combinaisons algébriques de symboles représentatifs des chocs entre objets; le raccord au réel s'effectue par l'intermédiaire des mesures de temps. Le formalisme se ramène à celui d'une algèbre des matrices de DIRAC dans un espace à courbure constante (espace de De Sitter). Il en résulte la possibilité potentielle de condenser la plupart des lois physiques de base, écrites de surcroît dans un symbolisme unifié. L'application générale de ce formalisme est le traitement numérique des problèmes de physique.

  20. First results from experiment NA49 at the CERN SPS with 158 GeV/nucleon Pb on Pb collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolph, H.; NA49 Collaboration

    1995-03-01

    CERN experiment NA49 had its first beam time in November/December 1994 with a {sup 208}Pb beam of 158 GeV/nucleon. The experimental setup to study Pb+Pb collisions is described and first results on two particle correlations and transverse energy production are discussed.

  1. Results from Cu+Au collisions at 200 GeV in PHENIX Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdnikov, Ya. A.; Ivanishchev, D. A.; Kotov, D. O.; Riabov, V. G.; Riabov, Yu. G.; Samsonov, V. M.; Safonov, A. S.

    2016-01-01

    Collisions of asymmetric nuclei (Cu+Au) differ essentially from the case of symmetric nuclei (Cu+Cu, Au+Au) collisions in the geometry of overlap region. This leads to a number of consequences, which provide more absolute and accurate information about fundamental properties of matter under extreme conditions. Nuclear modification factors for π-mesons in Cu+Au interactions at 200 GeV were measured in PHENIX Experiment at RHIC. New experimental data on measurement of flows of different order (v1, v2) for light hadrons in Cu+Au interactions at 200 GeV will be discussed in this paper.

  2. Charge transfer in slow collisions between hydrogen atoms and metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahrim, B.; Thumm, U.

    2002-05-01

    We have developed a new two-center close-coupling approach [1] for slow ion (atom)-surface collision in which the continuum of metal conduction-band states is discretized by using Weyl wave packets [2] to represent the motion of the active electron in the metal subspace. Results for the time evolution of the atomic and metallic population amplitudes for a hydrogen atom in colliding at perpendicular incidence with an model aluminum surface are shown and discussed. For the n=2 hydrogenic manifold, we have obtained converged atomic populations amplitudes by including all projectile levels up to the n=5 manifold and 480 Weyl wave packets in the close-coupling expansion. We will discuss the electron dynamics in particular in view of possible dephasing effects (in distance and time) and recurrence effects that may arrise due to our continuum discretization in term of a finite number of localized Weyl packets. [1] B. Bahrim and U. Thumm, Surf. Sci. 451, 1 (2000), and to appear in Phys. Rev. A. [2] B.H. Bransden and M.R.C. McDowell, "Charge Exchange and the Theory of Ion-Atom Collisions" Clarendon Press (Oxford 1992). Supported by NSF and by the Division of Chemical Sciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Energy Research, U.S. DOE

  3. Collision tectonics

    SciTech Connect

    Coward, M.P.; Ries, A.C.

    1985-01-01

    The motions of lithospheric plates have produced most existing mountain ranges, but structures produced as a result of, and following the collision of continental plates need to be distinguished from those produced before by subduction. If subduction is normally only stopped when collision occurs, then most geologically ancient fold belts must be collisional, so it is essential to recognize and understand the effects of the collision process. This book consists of papers that review collision tectonics, covering tectonics, structure, geochemistry, paleomagnetism, metamorphism, and magmatism.

  4. Results from particle identification in pp, p-Pb and Pb-Pb collisions measured with ALICE at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barile, F.

    2014-06-01

    The particle identification capability of the ALICE apparatus is unique among the LHC experiments as it exploits almost all known techniques. In this paper, the working principles of the relevant PID detectors in the central barrel will be discussed. A particular emphasis will be given to recent results on identified particle spectra and production yield ratios at mid-rapidity in pp, p-Pb and Pb-Pb collisions.

  5. Femtosecond laser field induced modifications of electron-transfer processes in Ne{sup +}-He collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Zhenzhong; Chen Deying; Fan Rongwei; Xia Yuanqin

    2012-01-02

    We demonstrate the presence of femtosecond laser induced charge transfer in Ne{sup +}-He collisions. Electron transfer in ion-atom collisions is considerably modified when the collision is embedded in a strong laser field with the laser intensity of {approx}10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}. The observed anisotropy of the He{sup +} angular distribution confirms the prediction of early work that the capture probability varies significantly with the laser polarization angle.

  6. Circular dichroism in laser-assisted proton-hydrogen collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niederhausen, Thomas; Feuerstein, Bernold; Thumm, Uwe

    2004-08-01

    We investigate the effects of a strong laser field on the dynamics of electron capture and emission in ion-atom collisions within a reduced dimensionality model of the scattering system in which the motion of the active electron and the laser electric field vector are confined to the scattering plane. We examine the probabilities for electron capture and ionization as a function of the laser intensity, the projectile impact parameter b , and the laser phase ϕ that determines the orientation of the laser electric field with respect to the internuclear axis at the time of closest approach between target and projectile. Our results for the b -dependent ionization and capture probabilities show a strong dependence on both ϕ and the helicity of the circularly polarized laser light. For intensities above 5×1012W/cm2 our model predicts a noticeable circular dichroism in the capture probability for slow proton-hydrogen collisions, which persists after averaging over ϕ . Capture and electron emission probabilities defer significantly from results for laser-unassisted collisions. Furthermore, we find evidence for a charge-resonance-enhanced ionization mechanism that may enable the measurement of the absolute laser phase ϕ .

  7. Circular dichroism in laser-assisted proton-hydrogen collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Niederhausen, Thomas; Feuerstein, Bernold; Thumm, Uwe

    2004-08-01

    We investigate the effects of a strong laser field on the dynamics of electron capture and emission in ion-atom collisions within a reduced dimensionality model of the scattering system in which the motion of the active electron and the laser electric field vector are confined to the scattering plane. We examine the probabilities for electron capture and ionization as a function of the laser intensity, the projectile impact parameter b, and the laser phase {phi} that determines the orientation of the laser electric field with respect to the internuclear axis at the time of closest approach between target and projectile. Our results for the b-dependent ionization and capture probabilities show a strong dependence on both {phi} and the helicity of the circularly polarized laser light. For intensities above 5x10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 2} our model predicts a noticeable circular dichroism in the capture probability for slow proton-hydrogen collisions, which persists after averaging over {phi}. Capture and electron emission probabilities defer significantly from results for laser-unassisted collisions. Furthermore, we find evidence for a charge-resonance-enhanced ionization mechanism that may enable the measurement of the absolute laser phase {phi}.

  8. From subduction to collision: results of French POP2 program on Taiwan-Philippine festoon

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchet, R.; Stephan, J.F.; Rangin, C.; Baladad, D.; Bouysse, Ph.; Chen, M.P.; Chotin, P.; Collot, J.Y.; Daniel, J.; Drouhot, J.M.; Marsset, B.; Pelletier, B.; Richard, M.; Tardy, M.

    1986-07-01

    A sea-beam, seismic, magnetic, and gravimetric survey was conducted with the R/V Jean-Charcot in three key regions off the Taiwan-Philippine festoon in the western Pacific: (1) Ryukyu active margin and its junction with Taiwan; (2) northern part of the Manila Trench and its junction with the Taiwan tectonic prism; and (3) southern termination of Manila Trench in front of Mindoro Island. Transitions between active subduction along the Manila Trench and collision of Taiwan and Mindoro, and relations between active subduction and extension in the Okinawa-Ryukyu and the northeastern Taiwan systems are particularly studied.

  9. Energetic ion, atom, and molecule reactions and excitation in low-current H2 discharges: H(alpha) Doppler profiles.

    PubMed

    Petrović, Z Lj; Phelps, A V

    2009-12-01

    Absolute spectral emissivities for Doppler broadened H(alpha) profiles are measured and compared with predictions of energetic hydrogen ion, atom, and molecule behavior in low-current electrical discharges in H2 at very high electric field E to gas density N ratios E/N and low values of Nd , where d is the parallel-plate electrode separation. These observations reflect the energy and angular distributions for the excited atoms and quantitatively test features of multiple-scattering kinetic models in weakly ionized hydrogen in the presence of an electric field that are not tested by the spatial distributions of H(alpha) emission. Absolute spectral intensities agree well with predictions. Asymmetries in Doppler profiles observed parallel to the electric field at 4result primarily from excitation by fast H atoms directed toward the cathode and diffusely reflected from the cathode. (1 Td=10(-21) V m(2)) The effects of reflection of hydrogen particles and of changes with cathode material are modeled accurately without adjustable parameters. Maximum measured wavelength shifts result from acceleration of H+ ions and charge transfer to fast H atoms. The Doppler profiles are consistent with models of reactions among H+, H2+, H3 , H, and H2 leading to fast H atoms and then fast excited H(n=3) atoms. PMID:20365280

  10. Calculations of fast ion collisions with multi-center molecular targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchner, Tom

    2011-05-01

    The theoretical treatment of ion-molecule collisions is challenging for several reasons: the systems have many degrees of freedom, a rather complex geometry, and the electron dynamics might be nonperturbative and involve electron-electron interaction effects. However, the interest in accurate calculations has been growing recently. An important reason for this development is the relevance of ion-molecule collisions for a number of fields, such as atmospheric science, and the understanding of radiation damage of biological tissue. We have developed a new approach to meet these challenges. It disregards rovibrational motion, but it does address the multi-center geometry of the system and the generally nonperturbative nature of the electron dynamics. The key ingredients are an expansion of the initially populated molecular orbitals in terms of a single-center basis and a spectral representation of the molecular Hamiltonian. This facilitates a separation of molecular geometry and collision dynamics and makes it possible to use well-established ion-atom methods with relatively minor modifications. We have extended our basis generator method to deal with the collision dynamics and report on results for ionization and fragmentation of water molecules by proton and He+ ion impact over wide ranges of collision energies. For the case of He+ impact this will include a discussion of effects due to the presence of the projectile electron. This work has been supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada.

  11. Small UAV Automatic Ground Collision Avoidance System Design Considerations and Flight Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorokowski, Paul; Skoog, Mark; Burrows, Scott; Thomas, SaraKatie

    2015-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Armstrong Flight Research Center Small Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (SUAV) Automatic Ground Collision Avoidance System (Auto GCAS) project demonstrated several important collision avoidance technologies. First, the SUAV Auto GCAS design included capabilities to take advantage of terrain avoidance maneuvers flying turns to either side as well as straight over terrain. Second, the design also included innovative digital elevation model (DEM) scanning methods. The combination of multi-trajectory options and new scanning methods demonstrated the ability to reduce the nuisance potential of the SUAV while maintaining robust terrain avoidance. Third, the Auto GCAS algorithms were hosted on the processor inside a smartphone, providing a lightweight hardware configuration for use in either the ground control station or on board the test aircraft. Finally, compression of DEM data for the entire Earth and successful hosting of that data on the smartphone was demonstrated. The SUAV Auto GCAS project demonstrated that together these methods and technologies have the potential to dramatically reduce the number of controlled flight into terrain mishaps across a wide range of aviation platforms with similar capabilities including UAVs, general aviation aircraft, helicopters, and model aircraft.

  12. Monte Carlo Collision method for low temperature plasma simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taccogna, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    This work shows the basic foundation of the particle-based representation of low temperature plasma description. In particular, the Monte Carlo Collision (MCC) recipe has been described for the case of electron-atom and ion-atom collisions. The model has been applied to the problem of plasma plume expansion from an electric Hall-effect type thruster. The presence of low energy secondary electrons from electron-atom ionization on the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) have been identified in the first 3 mm from the exit plane where, due to the azimuthal heating the ionization continues to play an important role. In addition, low energy charge-exchange ions from ion-atom electron transfer collisions are evident in the ion energy distribution functions (IEDF) 1 m from the exit plane.

  13. Theory of inelastic ion-atom scattering at low and intermediate energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, G. B.; Garcia, J. D.

    1977-01-01

    Ab initio calculations are presented of inelastic energy loss and ionization phenomena associated with Ar(+)-Ar collisions at small distances of closest approach and for laboratory collision energies ranging from several keV to several hundred keV. Outer-shell excitations are handled statistically; inner-shell excitations are calculated from the viewpoint of quasidiabatic molecular orbital promotion. Auger electron yield, average state of ionization, and average inelastic energy loss are calculated per collision as a function of distance of closest approach of the collision partners for several laboratory collision energies. Average charge-state probabilities per collision partner are calculated as a function of the average inelastic energy loss per atom. It is shown that the structure in the data is due to the underlying structure in the inner-shell independent-electron quasimolecular promotion probabilities.

  14. Description of ionization in the molecular approach to atomic collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Harel, C.; Jouin, H.; Pons, B.; Errea, L.F.; Mendez, L.; Riera, A.

    1997-01-01

    Molecular treatments of atomic collisions have traditionally been restricted to low nuclear velocities because of their failure to reproduce the fall of the capture cross sections at higher velocities. The limitation has recently been seen to be due to their description of ionizing processes. This feature is shown here to be a general one for multicharged ion-atom collisions. Its origin and characteristics are described and illustrated for the prototypical Li{sup 3+}+H(1s) reaction. Ionization appears as a result of the inertia of the electron cloud to adiabatically follow the nuclear motion. This gives rise to nonadiabatic transitions, which represent an ionizing flux whenever the nuclear velocity is high enough that the energy of the traveling molecular orbitals involved is positive in both moving atomic reference frames. Two strongly connected mechanisms appear, corresponding to the relative translational and rotational nuclear motions. Because of the finiteness of the basis, these mechanisms terminate with unphysical trapping effects. While interesting {ital per se}, knowledge of these features is also useful with respect to improving molecular treatments of atomic collisions with the addition of pseudostates. {copyright} {ital 1996} {ital The American Physical Society}

  15. Recent results in relativistic heavy ion collisions: from 'a new state of matter' to 'the perfect fluid'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tannenbaum, M. J.

    2006-07-01

    Experimental physics with relativistic heavy ions dates from 1992 when a beam of 197Au of energy greater than 10 A GeV/c first became available at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) soon followed in 1994 by a 208Pb beam of 158A GeV/c at the Super Proton Synchrotron at CERN (European Center for Nuclear Research). Previous pioneering measurements at the Berkeley Bevalac (Gutbrod et al 1989 Rep. Prog. Phys. 52 1267-132) in the late 1970s and early 1980s were at much lower bombarding energies (<~1A GeV/c) where nuclear breakup rather than particle production is the dominant inelastic process in A+A collisions. More recently, starting in 2000, the relativistic heavy ion collider at BNL has produced head-on collisions of two 100 A GeV beams of fully stripped Au ions, corresponding to nucleon-nucleon centre-of-mass (cm) energy, \\sqrt{s_NN}=200\\,GeV , total cm energy 200 A GeV. The objective of this research program is to produce nuclear matter with extreme density and temperature, possibly resulting in a state of matter where the quarks and gluons normally confined inside individual nucleons (r < 1 fm) are free to act over distances an order of magnitude larger. Progress from the period 1992 to the present will be reviewed, with reference to previous results from light ion and proton-proton collisions where appropriate. Emphasis will be placed on the measurements which formed the basis for the announcements by the two major laboratories: 'A new state of matter', by CERN on Febraury 10 2000 and 'The perfect fluid' by BNL on April 19 2005.

  16. Influence of ion/atom arrival ratio on structure and optical properties of AlN films by ion beam assisted deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Jian-ping; Fu, Zhi-qiang; Liu, Xiao-peng; Yue, Wen; Wang, Cheng-biao

    2014-10-01

    In order to improve the optical properties of AlN films, the influence of the ion/atom arrival ratio on the structure and optical characteristics of AlN films deposited by dual ion beam sputtering was studied by using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, spectroscopic ellipsometry and UV-vis spectroscopy. The films prepared at the ion/atom arrival ratio of 1.4 are amorphous while the crystalline quality is improved with the increase of the ion/atom arrival ratio. The films deposited at the ion/atom arrival ratio of no less than 1.8 have an approximately stoichiometric ratio and mainly consist of aluminum nitride with little aluminum oxynitride, while metallic aluminum component appears in the films deposited at the ion/atom arrival ratio of 1.4. When the ion/atom arrival ratio is not less than 1.8, films are smooth, high transmitting and dense. The films prepared with high ion/atom arrival ratio (≥1.8) display the characteristic of a dielectric. The films deposited at the ion/atom arrival ratio of 1.4 are coarse, opaque and show characteristic of cermet.

  17. Recent results of gluon and sea quark polarization measurements in polarized proton-proton collisions at STAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuan; Star Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    The STAR experiment at RHIC is carrying out a comprehensive high-energy spin physics program to understand the internal structure and dynamics of the proton in polarized proton-proton collisions at = 200 GeV and = 500/510 GeV. STAR has the capability, with nearly full azimuthal coverage, to reconstruct leptons, hadrons and jets in the mid-rapidity region (|η| < 1). The results for inclusive jet longitudinal double spin asymmetries taken during the 2009 RHIC run indicate the first non-zero gluon contribution (Δg(x,Q2)/g(x,Q2)) to the proton spin for 0.05 < x < 1 (Bjorken-x: momentum fraction of partons). Recent longitudinal single-spin asymmetry measurements of W+/- bosons at = 500/510 GeV in polarized proton-proton collisions provide a direct probe of the polarized anti-u and anti-d quark distributions (Δū(x, Q2), Δbar d(x, Q2)). These results better constrain the polarized gluon and sea quark distributions of the proton in the RHIC sensitive kinematic region. Future measurements with continuing high energy polarized proton-proton run at RHIC and detector upgrade will explore the gluonic contribution to the proton spin in extended range.

  18. Geology of the d'Entrecasteaux-New Hebrides arc collision zone: results from a deep submersible survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collot, J.-Y.; Lallemand, S.; Pelletier, B.; Bissen, J.-P.; Glacon, G.; Fisher, M.A.; Greene, H. Gary; Boulin, J.; Daniel, J.; Monzier, M.

    1992-01-01

    During the SUBPSO1 cruise, seven submersible dives were conducted between water depths of 5350 and 900 m over the collision zone between the New Hebrides island arc and the d'Entrecasteaux Zone (DEZ). The DEZ, a topographic high on the Australian plate, encompasses the North d'Entrecasteaux Ridge (NDR) and the Bougainville guyot, both of which collide with the island-are slope. In this report we use diving observations and samples, as well as dredging results, to analyse the geology of the Bougainville guyot and the outer arc slope in the DEZ-arc collision zone, and to decipher the mechanisms of scamount subduction. These data indicate that the Bougainville guyot is a middle Eocene island arc volcano capped with reef limestones that appear to have been deposited during the Late Oligocene to Early Miocene and in Miocene-Pliocene times. This guyot possibly emerged during the Middle and Late Miocene, and started to sink in the New Hebrides trench after the Pliocene. The rocks of the New Hebrides arc slope, in the collision zone, consist primarily of Pliocene-Recent volcaniclastic rocks derived from the arc, and underlying fractured island-arc volcanic basement, possibly of Late Miocene age. However, highly sheared, Upper Oligocene to Lower Miocene nannofossil ooze and chalk are exposed at the toe of the arc slope against the northern flank of the NDR. Based on a comparison with cores collected at DSDP Site 286, the ooze and chalk can be interpreted as sediments accreted from the downgoing plate. East of the Bougainville guyot an antiform that developed in the arc slope as a consequence of the collision reveals a 500-m-thick wedge of strongly tectonized rocks, possibly accreted from the guyot or an already subducted seamount. The wedge that is overlain by less deformed volcaniclastic island-arc rocks and sediments includes imbricated layers of Late Oligocene to Early Miocene reef and micritic limestones. This wedge, which develops against the leading flank of the guyot

  19. Grazing Ion-Surface Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gravielle, M. S.

    Electron emission after grazing ion-surface collisions is studied for high impact velocities. We have focused on glancing angles of electron emission where the dominant mechanism is the ionization from atomic bound states. To describe this process, we introduce a quantum model called field distorted-wave (FDW) approximation, which takes into account the effect of the surface interaction on the electronic transition. The FDW model is applied to analyze electron distributions produced by impact of protons on Al and LiF surfaces, which are metal and insulator materials respectively. In the case of metals, we also evaluate the contibution coming from the valence band by employing the binary collisional formalism. Calculated electron emission yields are in reasonable agreement with the available experimental data. We find that the maximum of the convoy electron distribution is accelerated for Al and decelerated for LiF, with respect to its position in ion-atom collisions, in quantitative accordance with experiments.

  20. Lattice, Time-Dependent Schrodinger Equation Approach for Charge Transfer in Collisions of Be4+ with Atomic Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Minami, Tatsuya; Pindzola, Michael S; Lee, Teck G; Schultz, David Robert

    2006-01-01

    A test of the lattice, time-dependent Schrodinger equation (LTDSE) method for treating inelastic ion-atom collisions is performed by treating state-selective charge transfer in 10-1000 keV/u Be4+ + H collisions. This system possessesa greater charge asymmetry of the colliding nuclei than has been treated in previous applications of the method. Consequently, its ability to represent well the dynamical evolution of the electronic wavefunction within the combination of a shallow and a deep potential well with a single coordinate- and momentumspace discretization is tested. New results are also computed using other, standard approaches, the atomic-orbital close-coupling and classical trajectory Monte Carlo methods, to provide comparisons with the LTDSE results owing to their well-established regimes of applicability and behaviours.

  1. Origin, Evolution, and Imaging of Vortices in Proton-Hydrogen Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, David Robert; Macek, J. H.; Sternberg, J. B.; Ovchinnikov, S. Yu.; Lee, Teck-Ghee

    2010-01-01

    Using a novel computational approach, we have elucidated the origin of unexpected vortices in the electronic wavefunction during ion-atom collisions. It is shown how they could be observed in experiments and how they play a new and wide ranging role in angular momentum transfer and other atomic processes.

  2. Optimization of ion-atomic beam source for deposition of GaN ultrathin films

    SciTech Connect

    Mach, Jindřich Kolíbal, Miroslav; Zlámal, Jakub; Voborny, Stanislav; Bartošík, Miroslav; Šikola, Tomáš; Šamořil, Tomáš

    2014-08-15

    We describe the optimization and application of an ion-atomic beam source for ion-beam-assisted deposition of ultrathin films in ultrahigh vacuum. The device combines an effusion cell and electron-impact ion beam source to produce ultra-low energy (20–200 eV) ion beams and thermal atomic beams simultaneously. The source was equipped with a focusing system of electrostatic electrodes increasing the maximum nitrogen ion current density in the beam of a diameter of ≈15 mm by one order of magnitude (j ≈ 1000 nA/cm{sup 2}). Hence, a successful growth of GaN ultrathin films on Si(111) 7 × 7 substrate surfaces at reasonable times and temperatures significantly lower (RT, 300 °C) than in conventional metalorganic chemical vapor deposition technologies (≈1000 °C) was achieved. The chemical composition of these films was characterized in situ by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy and morphology ex situ using Scanning Electron Microscopy. It has been shown that the morphology of GaN layers strongly depends on the relative Ga-N bond concentration in the layers.

  3. Initial results of a full kinetic simulation of RF H{sup −} source including Coulomb collision process

    SciTech Connect

    Mochizuki, S.; Shibata, T.; Nishida, K.; Hatayama, A.; Mattei, S.; Lettry, J.

    2015-04-08

    In order to evaluate Electron Energy Distribution Function (EEDF) more correctly for radio frequency inductively coupled plasma (RF-ICP) in hydrogen negative ion sources, the Electromagnetic Particle-In-Cell (EM-PIC) simulation code has been improved by taking into account electron-electron Coulomb collision. Binary collision model is employed to model Coulomb collision process and we have successfully modeled it. The preliminary calculation including Coulomb collision has been done and it is shown that Coulomb collision doesn’t have significant effects under the condition: electron density n{sub e} ∼ 10{sup 18} m{sup −3} and high gas pressure p{sub H{sub 2}} = 3 Pa, while it is necessary to include Coulomb collision under high electron density and low gas pressure conditions.

  4. Thermochronologic evaluation of the Arabia-Anatolia collision: new results from Apatite (U-Th)He and Fission Track

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefebvre, Côme; Thomson, Stuart N.; Reiners, Peter W.; Whitney, Donna L.; Teyssier, Christian

    2015-04-01

    To better understand the driving mechanisms behind the transition from collision to escape in a convergent plate tectonic setting, multiple low-temperature thermochronometers were used from the Arabia-Anatolia collisional belt. Within the accreted terranes of the Anatolian plate, Late Cretaceous and Eocene metamorphic and intrusive rocks were targeted to track regional and/or local exhumation patterns that may have occurred since collision initiated ~35-20 Ma. Forty-eight samples were collected in a ~200 km wide swath from the main Arabia-Anatolia suture, along and across three major fault zones: the East Anatolian Fault Zone (EAFZ), the Sürgü Fault, and the Central Anatolian Fault Zone (CAFZ). We report here both Apatite (U-Th)He (AHe) and Apatite Fission Track (AFT) analyses performed on the same samples. (1) From the EAFZ, two ~1200 m high vertical transects were sampled north and south of the main fault strand within the low-grade metamorphic rocks of the Pütürge Massif. Although a majority of apatite grains had extremely low uranium contents preventing acquisition of meaningful AHe ages, results from the few uranium-rich samples indicate ages ranging from 14 to 9 Ma in the northern flank of the EAFZ while the southern flank recorded younger exhumation around 5-3 Ma suggesting differential vertical displacement along the fault since ~10 Ma. In contrast, Zircon (U-Th)He results from both sides of the fault show comparable ages around 25-18 Ma. (2) Exposed in the vicinity of the dextral Sürgü Fault, Eocene granitic bodies from the Berit Mountains were sampled within 5 km south of the fault and over 500 m elevation. AHe results yield ages between 27 and 14 Ma. (3) Along the Ecemiş segment of the CAFZ, the Late Cretaceous Niğde metamorphic complex and its deformed Paleocene-Eocene sedimentary cover show AFT and AHe ages confined between 20 and 15 Ma implying fast cooling and exhumation at this time. Further south, the Eocene Horoz pluton that intruded the

  5. From subduction to collision: Results from seismic profiling, gravity modeling, and earthquake finite fault inversions in Taiwan region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Wu-Cheng

    This study used (1) 132-channel reflection profiles, forward gravity modeling, and (2) finite source inversions of earthquakes to analyze crustal evolution from Subduction to collision in the region of Taiwan. Reflection and gravity data in the offshore region shows that the accretionary prism in the Subduction zone is mainly sedimentary; however, due to tectonic wedging in the initial collision zone, high-density basement materials are incorporated into the rear of the accretionary prism and may extend northward to compose a portion of high-density rocks that underly southeastern Taiwan. Further to the north in the mature collision zone was the site of the 1999, Chi-Chi, Taiwan earthquake. For this earthquake and its large aftershocks, we inverted strong motion data for finite source processes to study the deep fault structures. The mainshock ruptured on a shallow eastward-dipping fault possibly rooted in the proposed decollement of thin-skin deformation model. Several aftershocks either nucleated in or ruptured the basement indicating active deformation below the decollement, suggesting basement-involved deformation. Interpreting finite-source results requires a thorough understanding of the uncertainty in the parameters. Further more, near-realtime applications of finite-source inversions for estimation of near-fault strong ground motion requires well constrained fault orientation and hypocentral parameters. With this in mind, we tested a wide range of hypocenters and focal mechanisms, and the corresponding fits of the synthetics to the observed waveforms when studying the aftershock source parameters. As a result, we obtained optimal waveform fits and determined how the errors reported in hypocenters and focal mechanisms affected the inverted waveforms and the sensitivity of the waveform fits. For example, if the hypocenter was within 5 km of the optimal hypocenter and the focal mechanism was within 20 degrees of optimal strike, dip, and rake, the waveform fits

  6. Mass and isotopic effects in the Li-Li+ collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouledroua, Moncef; Bouchelaghem, Fouzia

    2011-10-01

    We suggest in this work to deal with the ion-atom collision. More precisely, the transport coefficients, the temperature-dependant mobilities, and the charge-transfer phenomena are examined quatum-mechanically. Also is examined the mass and isotopic effects and their behaviour with temperature. To do so, the interatomic potentials are constructed and then injected in the radial wave equation to determine the phase shifts.

  7. Estimation of the Risks of Collision or Strike to Freshwater Aquatic Organisms Resulting from Operation of Instream Hydrokinetic Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Schweizer, Peter E; Cada, Glenn F; Bevelhimer, Mark S

    2010-05-01

    Hydrokinetic energy technologies have been proposed as renewable, environmentally preferable alternatives to fossil fuels for generation of electricity. Hydrokinetic technologies harness the energy of water in motion, either from waves, tides or from river currents. For energy capture from free-flowing rivers, arrays of rotating devices are most commonly proposed. The placement of hydrokinetic devices in large rivers is expected to increase the underwater structural complexity of river landscapes. Moore and Gregory (1988) found that structural complexity increased local fish populations because fish and other aquatic biota are attracted to structural complexity that provides microhabitats with steep flow velocity gradients (Liao 2007). However, hydrokinetic devices have mechanical parts, blades, wings or bars that move through the water column, posing a potential strike or collision risk to fish and other aquatic biota. Furthermore, in a setting with arrays of hydrokinetic turbines the cumulative effects of multiple encounters may increase the risk of strike. Submerged structures associated with a hydrokinetic (HK) project present a collision risk to aquatic organisms and diving birds (Cada et al. 2007). Collision is physical contact between a device or its pressure field and an organism that may result in an injury to that organism (Wilson et al. 2007). Collisions can occur between animals and fixed submerged structures, mooring equipment, horizontal or vertical axis turbine rotors, and structures that, by their individual design or in combination, may form traps. This report defines strike as a special case of collision where a moving part, such as a rotor blade of a HK turbine intercepts the path of an organism of interest, resulting in physical contact with the organism. The severity of a strike incidence may range from minor physical contact with no adverse effects to the organism to severe strike resulting in injury or death of the organism. Harmful effects

  8. Collision Cross Sections for 20 Protonated Amino Acids: Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance and Ion Mobility Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anupriya; Jones, Chad A.; Dearden, David V.

    2016-08-01

    We report relative dephasing cross sections for the 20 biogenic protonated amino acids measured using the cross sectional areas by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (CRAFTI) technique at 1.9 keV in the laboratory reference frame, as well as momentum transfer cross sections for the same ions computed from Boltzmann-weighted structures determined using molecular mechanics. Cross sections generally increase with increasing molecular weight. Cross sections for aliphatic and aromatic protonated amino acids are larger than the average trend, suggesting these side chains do not fold efficiently. Sulfur-containing protonated amino acids have smaller than average cross sections, reflecting the mass of the S atom. Protonated amino acids that can internally hydrogen-bond have smaller than average cross sections, reflecting more extensive folding. The CRAFTI measurements correlate well with results from drift ion mobility (IMS) and traveling wave ion mobility (TWIMS) spectrometric measurements; CRAFTI results correlate with IMS values approximately as well as IMS and TWIMS values from independent measurements correlate with each other. Both CRAFTI and IMS results correlate well with the computed momentum transfer cross sections, suggesting both techniques provide accurate molecular structural information. Absolute values obtained using the various methods differ significantly; in the case of CRAFTI, this may be due to errors in measurements of collision gas pressure, measurement of excitation voltage, and/or dependence of cross sections on kinetic energy.

  9. Collision Cross Sections for 20 Protonated Amino Acids: Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance and Ion Mobility Results.

    PubMed

    Anupriya; Jones, Chad A; Dearden, David V

    2016-08-01

    We report relative dephasing cross sections for the 20 biogenic protonated amino acids measured using the cross sectional areas by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (CRAFTI) technique at 1.9 keV in the laboratory reference frame, as well as momentum transfer cross sections for the same ions computed from Boltzmann-weighted structures determined using molecular mechanics. Cross sections generally increase with increasing molecular weight. Cross sections for aliphatic and aromatic protonated amino acids are larger than the average trend, suggesting these side chains do not fold efficiently. Sulfur-containing protonated amino acids have smaller than average cross sections, reflecting the mass of the S atom. Protonated amino acids that can internally hydrogen-bond have smaller than average cross sections, reflecting more extensive folding. The CRAFTI measurements correlate well with results from drift ion mobility (IMS) and traveling wave ion mobility (TWIMS) spectrometric measurements; CRAFTI results correlate with IMS values approximately as well as IMS and TWIMS values from independent measurements correlate with each other. Both CRAFTI and IMS results correlate well with the computed momentum transfer cross sections, suggesting both techniques provide accurate molecular structural information. Absolute values obtained using the various methods differ significantly; in the case of CRAFTI, this may be due to errors in measurements of collision gas pressure, measurement of excitation voltage, and/or dependence of cross sections on kinetic energy. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27220844

  10. Collision Cross Sections for 20 Protonated Amino Acids: Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance and Ion Mobility Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anupriya; Jones, Chad A.; Dearden, David V.

    2016-05-01

    We report relative dephasing cross sections for the 20 biogenic protonated amino acids measured using the cross sectional areas by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (CRAFTI) technique at 1.9 keV in the laboratory reference frame, as well as momentum transfer cross sections for the same ions computed from Boltzmann-weighted structures determined using molecular mechanics. Cross sections generally increase with increasing molecular weight. Cross sections for aliphatic and aromatic protonated amino acids are larger than the average trend, suggesting these side chains do not fold efficiently. Sulfur-containing protonated amino acids have smaller than average cross sections, reflecting the mass of the S atom. Protonated amino acids that can internally hydrogen-bond have smaller than average cross sections, reflecting more extensive folding. The CRAFTI measurements correlate well with results from drift ion mobility (IMS) and traveling wave ion mobility (TWIMS) spectrometric measurements; CRAFTI results correlate with IMS values approximately as well as IMS and TWIMS values from independent measurements correlate with each other. Both CRAFTI and IMS results correlate well with the computed momentum transfer cross sections, suggesting both techniques provide accurate molecular structural information. Absolute values obtained using the various methods differ significantly; in the case of CRAFTI, this may be due to errors in measurements of collision gas pressure, measurement of excitation voltage, and/or dependence of cross sections on kinetic energy.

  11. Ion-Atom/Argon—Calculation of ionization cross sections by fast ion impact for neutral target atoms ranging from hydrogen to argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McSherry, D. M.; O'Rourke, S. F. C.; Crothers, D. S. F.

    2003-10-01

    A FORTRAN 90 program is presented which calculates the total cross sections, and the electron energy spectra of the singly and doubly differential cross sections for the single target ionization of neutral atoms ranging from hydrogen up to and including argon. The code is applicable for the case of both high and low Z projectile impact in fast ion-atom collisions. The theoretical models provided for the program user are based on two quantum mechanical approximations which have proved to be very successful in the study of ionization in ion-atom collisions. These are the continuum-distorted-wave (CDW) and continuum-distorted-wave eikonal-initial-state (CDW-EIS) approximations. The codes presented here extend previously published codes for single ionization of target hydrogen [Crothers and McCartney, Comput. Phys. Commun. 72 (1992) 288], target helium [Nesbitt, O'Rourke and Crothers, Comput. Phys. Commun. 114 (1998) 385] and target atoms ranging from lithium to neon [O'Rourke, McSherry and Crothers, Comput. Phys. Commun. 131 (2000) 129]. Cross sections for all of these target atoms may be obtained as limiting cases from the present code. Program summaryTitle of program: ARGON Catalogue identifier: ADSE Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/cpc/summaries/ADSE Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: none Computer for which the program is designed and others on which it is operable: Computers: Four by 200 MHz Pro Pentium Linux server, DEC Alpha 21164; Four by 400 MHz Pentium 2 Xeon 450 Linux server, IBM SP2 and SUN Enterprise 3500 Installations: Queen's University, Belfast Operating systems under which the program has been tested: Red-hat Linux 5.2, Digital UNIX Version 4.0d, AIX, Solaris SunOS 5.7 Compilers: PGI workstations, DEC CAMPUS Programming language used: FORTRAN 90 with MPI directives No. of bits in a word: 64, except on Linux servers 32 Number of processors used: any number Has the

  12. Inelastic transitions in slow heavy-particle atomic collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Krstic, P. S.; Reinhold, C. O.; Burgdo''rfer, J.

    2001-05-01

    It is a generally held belief that inelastic transition probabilities and cross sections in slow, nearly adiabatic atomic collisions decrease exponentially with the inverse of the collision velocity v [i.e., {sigma}{proportional_to}exp(-const/v)]. This notion is supported by the Landau-Zener approximation and the hidden crossings approximation. We revisit the adiabatic limit of ion-atom collisions and show that for very slow collisions radial transitions are dominated by the topology of the branch points of the radial velocity rather than the branch points of the energy eigensurface. This can lead to a dominant power-law dependence of inelastic cross sections, {sigma}{proportional_to}v{sup n}. We illustrate the interplay between different contributions to the transition probabilities in a one-dimensional collision system for which the exact probabilities can be obtained from a direct numerical solution of the time-dependent Scho''dinger equation.

  13. [Demonstration of the impossibility of simultaneous Dupuytren and Destot fractures in the result of the car-pedestrian collision].

    PubMed

    Gusarov, A A; Fetisov, V A; Kucheryavets, Yu O

    2016-01-01

    This article reports the results of the commission forensic medical expertise undertaken to evaluate the possibility of severe injury to the ankle joint resulting from the road traffic accident as exemplified by the collision of a VAS 21043 car moving backward with a pedestrian. It was shown that the injury to the victim's right lower leg included the tear of the right crural deltoid ligament, the open communicated fracture of the lower third of fibular diaphysis with the displacement of the distal fragment, the lacerated wound in the lower third of the right leg, the rupture of distal tibiofibular synedesmosis, the closed communicated fracture of the posterior edge of the tibia without displacement, and outward subluxation of the right foot. According to the classification accepted in orthopedics , this variant of the injury to the ankle joint is a combination of the classical «complete» Dupuytren fracture and the Destot-type fracture. The analysis of the mechanism underlying formation of such injury has shown that it was a consequence of the indirect injurious action in the absence of the primary impact without the car running over the victim's leg. PMID:27500486

  14. Detection of partial melt in continental collision zones using different magnetotelluric tensor relationships: Results from synthetic models and real data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LLovet, Joan Campanya i.; Ledo, Juanjo; Jones, Alan G.; Queralt, Pilar; Marcuello, Alex; Liesa, Montserrat; Antón Muñoz, Josep

    2014-05-01

    Three magnetotelluric (MT) tensor relationships - the single-station MT impedance tensor (Z), the single-station vertical geomagnetic transfer function (GTF) and the multiple-station horizontal geomagnetic transfer function (HGTF) - were investigated for their effectiveness in detecting the presence of partial melt in continental collision zones. Realistic synthetic models, based on prior field studies, were used to characterize the sensitivity of each tensor relationship constraining the presence of partial melt at lower-crustal and upper-mantle depths. From the MT response of the synthetic models, each type of data was inverted separately and jointly with the others, thus determining the properties and advantages of each when modeling the subsurface. Non-linear sensitivity tests were carried out to determine the resolution that can be expected in constraining electrical resistivity anomalies associated with the presence of partial melt. Results obtained show which configuration of the HGTF is more sensitive to partial melt. The analysis of partial melt sensitivity was also performed using real data from a MT survey carried out in the Pyrenees. The data comprise a total of 82 broadband MT sites and 29 long period MT sites distributed along four profiles across the Pyrenean mountain range between the Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea. Using the results from the synthetic models, real MT data in the Eastern Pyrenees were used to constrain if the partial melting area associated with the Iberian subducted lower crust observed below the Western, the West-central and the Central Pyrenees continues to the East. A non-linear sensitivity test was undertaken to determine the boundary to the east of this geoelectrical anomaly associated with partial melt.

  15. Irreversible kinetics on a one-dimensional lattice: Comparison of exact result with a point-process nucleation-growth-collision model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, S.

    1983-02-01

    In this paper we discuss irreversible kinetics on a one-dimensional lattice. We compare the expectation value of the coverage of the lattice, as a function of time, with that predicted by a point-process nucleation-growth-collision model. We conclude that the nucleation-growth-collision model is only applicable to lattice kinetics when the spreading rate of clusters is much greater than their nucleation rate. Although the kinetics of coverage of a one-dimensional lattice are known exactly, the complete solution turns out to be rather complex. In order to facilitate comparison with the point-process nucleation and growth model, we calculate an approximation to the lattice kinetics which is valid when the collision rate of clusters is very fast. The result is complementary to an earlier approximation of McQuarrie, McTague and Reiss, which described the case when the collision rate of clusters was comparable with the spreading rate. We also consider an integral geometrical approach to discreteness effects in lattice models. The general approach which we suggest is to calculate coefficients of variation of the numbers of lattice sites covered by various geometric shapes as a measure of "discreteness". This method uses some mathematical results of Kendall et al.

  16. Three-pion interferometry results from central Pb+Pb collisions at 158A GeV/c.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, M M; Agnihotri, A; Ahammed, Z; Angelis, A L; Antonenko, V; Arefiev, V; Astakhov, V; Avdeitchikov, V; Awes, T C; Baba, P V; Badyal, S K; Barlag, C; Bathe, S; Batiounia, B; Bernier, T; Bhalla, K B; Bhatia, V S; Blume, C; Bock, R; Bohne, E M; Böröcz, Z; Bucher, D; Buijs, A; Büsching, H; Carlen, L; Chalyshev, V; Chattopadhyay, S; Cherbatchev, R; Chujo, T; Claussen, A; Das, A C; Decowski, M P; Delagrange, H; Djordjadze, V; Donni, P; Doubovik, I; Dutt, S; Dutta Majumdar, M R; El Chenawi, K; Eliseev, S; Enosawa, K; Foka, P; Fokin, S; Ganti, M S; Garpman, S; Gavrishchuk, O; Geurts, F J; Ghosh, T K; Glasow, R; Gupta, S K; Guskov, B; Gustafsson, H A; Gutbrod, H H; Higuchi, R; Hrivnacova, I; Ippolitov, M; Kalechofsky, H; Kamermans, R; Kampert, K H; Karadjev, K; Karpio, K; Kato, S; Kees, S; Klein-Bösing, C; Knoche, S; Kolb, B W; Kosarev, I; Koutcheryaev, I; Krümpel, T; Kugler, A; Kulinich, P; Kurata, M; Kurita, K; Kuzmin, N; Langbein, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, Y Y; Löhner, H; Luquin, L; Mahapatra, D P; Manko, V; Martin, M; Martínez, G; Maximov, A; Mgebrichvili, G; Miake, Y; Mir, M F; Mishra, G C; Miyamoto, Y; Mohanty, B; Mora, M J; Morrison, D; Mukhopadhyay, D S; Naef, H; Nandi, B K; Nayak, S K; Nayak, T K; Neumaier, S; Nianine, A; Nikitine, V; Nikolaev, S; Nilsson, P; Nishimura, S; Nomokonov, P; Nystrand, J; Obenshain, F E; Oskarsson, A; Otterlund, I; Pachr, M; Pavliouk, S; Peitzmann, T; Petracek, V; Pinganaud, W; Plasil, F; von Poblotzki, U; Purschke, M L; Rak, J; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ramamurthy, V S; Rao, N K; Retiere, F; Reygers, K; Roland, G; Rosselet, L; Roufanov, I; Roy, C; Rubio, J M; Sako, H; Sambyal, S S; Santo, R; Sato, S; Schlagheck, H; Schmidt, H R; Schutz, Y; Shabratova, G; Shah, T H; Sibiriak, I; Siemiarczuk, T; Silvermyr, D; Sinha, B C; Slavine, N; Söderström, K; Solomey, N; Sørensen, S P; Stankus, P; Stefanek, G; Steinberg, P; Stenlund, E; Stüken, D; Sumbera, M; Svensson, T; Trivedi, M D; Tsvetkov, A; Tykarski, L; Urbahn, J; Pijll, E C; Eijndhoven, N; Nieuwenhuizen, G J; Vinogradov, A; Viyogi, Y P; Vodopianov, A; Vörös, S; Wysłouch, B; Yagi, K; Yokota, Y; Young, G R

    2000-10-01

    Three-particle correlations have been measured for identified pi(-) from central 158A GeV Pb+Pb collisions by the WA98 experiment at CERN. A substantial contribution of the genuine three-body correlation has been found as expected for a mainly chaotic and symmetric source. PMID:11005962

  17. Higher-twist effects in πp collisions at 200 GEV/C results from fermilab experiment E609

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corcoran, M. D.; E609 Collaboration

    1989-05-01

    In a study of jet production in 200 GeV/c πp and pp collisions, we find evidence for pion-induced dijet events with little or no forward energy flow. The cross section and characteristics of these events are compatible with a predicted higher-twist process. No signal is seen in the pp data.

  18. Three-Pion Interferometry Results from Central Pb+Pb Collisions at 158A GeV/c

    SciTech Connect

    Aggarwal, M. M.; Agnihotri, A.; Ahammed, Z.; Angelis, A. L. S.; Antonenko, V.; Arefiev, V.; Astakhov, V.; Avdeitchikov, V.; Awes, T. C.; Baba, P. V. K. S.

    2000-10-02

    Three-particle correlations have been measured for identified {pi}{sup -} from central 158A GeV Pb+Pb collisions by the WA98 experiment at CERN. A substantial contribution of the genuine three-body correlation has been found as expected for a mainly chaotic and symmetric source.

  19. Adakitic (tonalitic-trondhjemitic) magmas resulting from eclogite decompression and dehydration melting during exhumation in response to continental collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Shuguang; Niu, Yaoling; Su, Li; Wei, Chunjing; Zhang, Lifei

    2014-04-01

    Modern adakite or adakitic rocks are thought to result from partial melting of younger and thus warmer subducting ocean crust in subduction zones, with the melt interacting with or without mantle wedge peridotite during ascent, or from melting of thickened mafic lower crust. Here we show that adakitic (tonalitic-trondhjemitic) melts can also be produced by eclogite decompression during exhumation of subducted and metamorphosed oceanic/continental crust in response to continental collision, as exemplified by the adakitic rocks genetically associated with the early Paleozoic North Qaidam ultra-high pressure metamorphic (UHPM) belt on the northern margin of the Greater Tibetan Plateau. We present field evidence for partial melting of eclogite and its products, including adakitic melt, volumetrically significant plutons evolved from the melt, cumulate rocks precipitated from the melt, and associated granulitic residues. This “adakitic assemblage” records a clear progression from eclogite decompression and heating to partial melting, to melt fractionation and ascent/percolation in response to exhumation of the UHPM package. The garnetite and garnet-rich layers in the adakitic assemblage are of cumulate origin from the adakitic melt at high pressure, and accommodate much of the Nb-Ta-Ti. Zircon SHRIMP U-Pb dating shows that partial melting of the eclogite took place at ∼435-410 Ma, which postdates the seafloor subduction (>440 Ma) and temporally overlaps the UHPM (∼440-425 Ma). While the geological context and the timing of adakite melt formation we observe differ from the prevailing models, our observations and documentations demonstrate that eclogite melting during UHPM exhumation may be important in contributing to crustal growth.

  20. Relationship Between Motor Vehicle Collisions and Results of Perimetry, Useful Field of View, and Driving Simulation in Drivers With Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Tatham, Andrew J.; Boer, Erwin R.; Gracitelli, Carolina P. B.; Rosen, Peter N.; Medeiros, Felipe A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the relationship between Motor Vehicle Collisions (MVCs) in drivers with glaucoma and standard automated perimetry (SAP), Useful Field of View (UFOV), and driving simulator assessment of divided attention. Methods: A cross-sectional study of 153 drivers from the Diagnostic Innovations in Glaucoma Study. All subjects had SAP and divided attention was assessed using UFOV and driving simulation using low-, medium-, and high-contrast peripheral stimuli presented during curve negotiation and car following tasks. Self-reported history of MVCs and average mileage driven were recorded. Results: Eighteen of 153 subjects (11.8%) reported a MVC. There was no difference in visual acuity but the MVC group was older, drove fewer miles, and had worse binocular SAP sensitivity, contrast sensitivity, and ability to divide attention (UFOV and driving simulation). Low contrast driving simulator tasks were the best discriminators of MVC (AUC 0.80 for curve negotiation versus 0.69 for binocular SAP and 0.59 for UFOV). Adjusting for confounding factors, longer reaction times to driving simulator divided attention tasks provided additional value compared with SAP and UFOV, with a 1 standard deviation (SD) increase in reaction time (approximately 0.75 s) associated with almost two-fold increased odds of MVC. Conclusions: Reaction times to low contrast divided attention tasks during driving simulation were significantly associated with history of MVC, performing better than conventional perimetric tests and UFOV. Translational Relevance: The association between conventional tests of visual function and MVCs in drivers with glaucoma is weak, however, tests of divided attention, particularly using driving simulation, may improve risk assessment. PMID:26046007

  1. Early Cretaceous paleomagnetic and geochronologic results from the Tethyan Himalaya: Insights into the Neotethyan paleogeography and the India-Asia collision.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yiming; Yang, Tianshui; Bian, Weiwei; Jin, Jingjie; Zhang, Shihong; Wu, Huaichun; Li, Haiyan

    2016-01-01

    To better understand the Neotethyan paleogeography, a paleomagnetic and geochronological study has been performed on the Early Cretaceous Sangxiu Formation lava flows, which were dated from ~135.1 Ma to ~124.4 Ma, in the Tethyan Himalaya. The tilt-corrected site-mean characteristic remanent magnetization (ChRM) direction for 26 sites is Ds = 296.1°, Is = -65.7°, ks = 51.7, α95 = 4.0°, corresponding to a paleopole at 5.9°S, 308.0°E with A95 = 6.1°. Positive fold and reversal tests prove that the ChRM directions are prefolding primary magnetizations. These results, together with reliable Cretaceous-Paleocene paleomagnetic data observed from the Tethyan Himalaya and the Lhasa terrane, as well as the paleolatitude evolution indicated by the apparent polar wander paths (APWPs) of India, reveal that the Tethyan Himalaya was a part of Greater India during the Early Cretaceous (135.1-124.4 Ma) when the Neotethyan Ocean was up to ~6900 km, it rifted from India sometime after ~130 Ma, and that the India-Asia collision should be a dual-collision process including the first Tethyan Himalaya-Lhasa terrane collision at ~54.9 Ma and the final India-Tethyan Himalaya collision at ~36.7 Ma. PMID:26883692

  2. Early Cretaceous paleomagnetic and geochronologic results from the Tethyan Himalaya: Insights into the Neotethyan paleogeography and the India-Asia collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yiming; Yang, Tianshui; Bian, Weiwei; Jin, Jingjie; Zhang, Shihong; Wu, Huaichun; Li, Haiyan

    2016-02-01

    To better understand the Neotethyan paleogeography, a paleomagnetic and geochronological study has been performed on the Early Cretaceous Sangxiu Formation lava flows, which were dated from ~135.1 Ma to ~124.4 Ma, in the Tethyan Himalaya. The tilt-corrected site-mean characteristic remanent magnetization (ChRM) direction for 26 sites is Ds = 296.1°, Is = -65.7°, ks = 51.7, α95 = 4.0°, corresponding to a paleopole at 5.9°S, 308.0°E with A95 = 6.1°. Positive fold and reversal tests prove that the ChRM directions are prefolding primary magnetizations. These results, together with reliable Cretaceous-Paleocene paleomagnetic data observed from the Tethyan Himalaya and the Lhasa terrane, as well as the paleolatitude evolution indicated by the apparent polar wander paths (APWPs) of India, reveal that the Tethyan Himalaya was a part of Greater India during the Early Cretaceous (135.1-124.4 Ma) when the Neotethyan Ocean was up to ~6900 km, it rifted from India sometime after ~130 Ma, and that the India-Asia collision should be a dual-collision process including the first Tethyan Himalaya-Lhasa terrane collision at ~54.9 Ma and the final India-Tethyan Himalaya collision at ~36.7 Ma.

  3. Early Cretaceous paleomagnetic and geochronologic results from the Tethyan Himalaya: Insights into the Neotethyan paleogeography and the India–Asia collision

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yiming; Yang, Tianshui; Bian, Weiwei; Jin, Jingjie; Zhang, Shihong; Wu, Huaichun; Li, Haiyan

    2016-01-01

    To better understand the Neotethyan paleogeography, a paleomagnetic and geochronological study has been performed on the Early Cretaceous Sangxiu Formation lava flows, which were dated from ~135.1 Ma to ~124.4 Ma, in the Tethyan Himalaya. The tilt-corrected site-mean characteristic remanent magnetization (ChRM) direction for 26 sites is Ds = 296.1°, Is = −65.7°, ks = 51.7, α95 = 4.0°, corresponding to a paleopole at 5.9°S, 308.0°E with A95 = 6.1°. Positive fold and reversal tests prove that the ChRM directions are prefolding primary magnetizations. These results, together with reliable Cretaceous-Paleocene paleomagnetic data observed from the Tethyan Himalaya and the Lhasa terrane, as well as the paleolatitude evolution indicated by the apparent polar wander paths (APWPs) of India, reveal that the Tethyan Himalaya was a part of Greater India during the Early Cretaceous (135.1–124.4 Ma) when the Neotethyan Ocean was up to ~6900 km, it rifted from India sometime after ~130 Ma, and that the India-Asia collision should be a dual-collision process including the first Tethyan Himalaya-Lhasa terrane collision at ~54.9 Ma and the final India-Tethyan Himalaya collision at ~36.7 Ma. PMID:26883692

  4. Elastic Collisions and Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Steven

    2009-04-01

    Elastic collisions are fascinating demonstrations of conservation principles. The mediating force must be conservative in an elastic collision. Truly elastic collisions take place only when the objects in collision do not touch, e.g. magnetic bumpers on low friction carts. This requires that we define a collision as a momentum transfer. Elastic collisions in 1-D can be solved in general and the implications are quite remarkable. For example, a heavy object moving initially towards a light object followed by an elastic collision results in a final velocity of the light object greater than either initial velocity. This is easily demonstrated with low friction carts. Gravitational elastic collisions involving a light spacecraft and an extremely massive body like a moon or planet can be approximated as 1-D collisions, such as the ``free return'' trajectory of Apollo 13 around the moon. The most fascinating gravitational collisions involve the gravitational slingshot effect used to boost spacecraft velocities. The maximum gravitational slingshot effect occurs when approaching a nearly 1-D collision, revealing that the spacecraft can be boosted to greater than twice the planet velocity, enabling the spacecraft to travel much further away from the Sun.

  5. Relativistic theory for radiative forward electron emission in heavy ion-atom encounters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakubaßa-Amundsen, Doris; Müller, Robert; Surzhykov, Andrey; Yerokhin, Vladimir

    2014-12-01

    The forward electron emission with simultaneous photon production during the scattering of relativistic, highly stripped projectiles from light target atoms is calculated within the Dirac theory. The method of calculation is a simplification of the impulse approximation and is based on the relation of the cross section for radiative capture to continuum of loosely bound electrons to the frame-transformed electron bremsstrahlung cross section. It is demonstrated that such an approximation is well justified in a large region of energies and photon emission angles, with the exception of the extreme forward and backward emission and the soft-photon energy limit. The cusp spectrum and the corresponding angular distribution are compared to recent experimental data for the collision system 90.38 MeV/amu U88+ + N2.

  6. Laser-Phase Dependence for Electron Capture in Laser-Assisted Proton -- Hydrogen Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niederhausen, Thomas; Thumm, Uwe

    2006-05-01

    We calculate electron capture probabilities for ion--atom collisions in a strong laser field (5x10^13 W/cm^2) by numerically solving the 3-dimensional time--dependent Schr"odinger equation. For circularly polarized laser fields and an impact energy of 1.2 keV, we find a substantial modification of the electronic dynamics in the p--H collision system as compared to field-free collisions. In particular, we observe a strong dependence on the laser phase and the impact parameter for electron capture, which can be explained using semi-classical arguments.

  7. Recent Results on High-Energy Spin Phenomena of Gluons and Sea-Quarks in Polarized Proton-Proton Collisions at Rhic at Bnl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surrow, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    The STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory is carrying out a spin physics program in high-energy polarized proton collisions at √ {s} = 200 GeV and √ {s} = 500 GeV to gain a deeper insight into the spin structure and dynamics of the proton. One of the main objectives of the spin physics program at RHIC is the precise determination of the polarized gluon distribution function. The STAR detector is well suited for the reconstruction of various final states involving jets, π0, π±, e± and γ, which allows to measure several different processes. Recent results suggest a gluon spin contribution to the proton spin at the same level as the quark spin contribution itself. The production of W bosons in polarized p+p collisions at √ {s} = 500 GeV opens a new era in the study of the spin-flavor structure of the proton. W-(+) bosons are produced in \\bar {u} + d (\\bar {d} + u) collisions and can be detected through their leptonic decays, e- + \\bar {ν }e (e++ν e), where only the respective charged lepton is measured. Results of W-(+) production suggest a large asymmetry between the polarization of anti-u and anti-d quarks.

  8. Isospin Effects in Heavy-Ion Collisions: Some Results From CHIMERA Experiments At LNS And Perspectives With Radioactive Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Cardella, G.; De Filippo, E.; Pagano, A.; Papa, M.; Pirrone, S.; Verde, G.; Amorini, F.; Cavallaro, S.; Lombardo, I.; Porto, F.; Rizzo, F.; Russotto, P.; Anzalone, A.; Maiolino, C.; Arena, N.; Geraci, E.; Grassi, L.; Lo Nigro, S.; Politi, G.; Auditore, L.

    2009-05-04

    CHIMERA is a 4{pi} multidetector for charged particles available at Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (INFN-LNS). A new method to measure the time scale of the emission of nuclear fragments is described, together with some applications in the field of the isospin dynamics of heavy-ion collisions. Competition between fusion-like and binary reactions near the energy threshold for nuclear multifragmentation is discussed. Opportunities are pointed out to use the detector at low and intermediate energies using the kinematical-coincidence method.

  9. Paleomagnetic results from the Early Cretaceous Lakang Formation lavas: Constraints on the paleolatitude of the Tethyan Himalaya and the India-Asia collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tianshui; Ma, Yiming; Bian, Weiwei; Jin, Jingjie; Zhang, Shihong; Wu, Huaichun; Li, Haiyan; Yang, Zhenyu; Ding, Jikai

    2015-10-01

    To better constrain the Early Cretaceous paleogeographic position of the Tethyan Himalaya and the India-Asia collision process, a paleomagnetic study was performed on the Lakang Formation lava flows in the Cuona area in the southeastern Tethyan Himalaya. Stepwise thermal and alternating field demagnetizations successfully isolated reliable characteristic remanent magnetization (ChRM) directions that include antipodal dual polarities and pass positive fold tests at the 99% confidence level and reversal tests at 95% confidence level, indicating prefolding primary magnetizations. The distribution patterns of ChRM directions from the Lakang Formation lava flows are consistent with young lava flows at similar latitudes, suggesting that secular variation has likely been averaged out. The tilt-corrected site-mean direction for 31 sites is D = 261.6 °, I = - 68.5 ° with α95 = 3.6 °, which provides a paleopole at 26.8°S, 315.2°E (A95 = 5.7 °), corresponding to a paleolatitude of 52.2 ° ± 5.7 °S for the study area. Comparison of the paleolatitude observed from the Lakang Formation lava flows with that expected from the apparent polar wander paths of India at 130 Ma show a paleolatitude difference of ∼2.1° (∼230 km), indicating that neither a great north-south continental crustal shortening occurred between the Indian craton and the Tethyan Himalaya after 130 Ma, nor that a wide ocean separated them at that time. Comparison with reliable Cretaceous-Paleocene paleomagnetic results observed from the Tethyan Himalaya and the Lhasa terrane indicates that the latitudinal width of the Neo-Tethyan Ocean could have been up to ∼7000 km at 134-130 Ma and an extension should have existed between the Indian craton and the Tethyan Himalaya during the Late Cretaceous and Paleocene. Furthermore, reliable paleomagnetic results suggest that the India-Asia collision was a dual-collision process, consisting of a first collision of the Tethyan Himalaya with the Lhasa terrane

  10. Crustal structure and seismicity associated with seamount subduction: Preliminary results from the Tonga-Kermadec Trench - Louisville Ridge collision zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassett, D.; Watts, A. B.; Peirce, C.; Grevemeyer, I.; Paulatto, M.; Stratford, W. R.; Hunter, J.; Kalnins, L. M.

    2011-12-01

    The Tonga-Kermadec trench, which separates the subducting Pacific plate from the overthrusting Indo-Australian plate, is intersected at ~26° S by the Louisville Ridge seamount chain. The collision zone is characterized by a 3000 m reduction in trench depth, a 15° anticlockwise rotation of the trench axis, a 20 % reduction in the width of extensional bend faulting on the Pacific plate and a rough, hummocky, forearc on the Indo-Australian plate. These morphological characteristics are accompanied by a 40 % reduction in seismicity compared to regions immediately to the north and south. The influence of subducting seamounts on megathrust processes is not limited to their immediate vicinity and there is evidence of morphological and seismological manifestations in the forearc with wavelengths similar to the wavelengths of the flexural moats and bulges that flank these features. The Louisville Ridge collision zone has been the subject of three marine geophysical surveys conducted onboard R/V Sonne in 2004, 2007 and 2011. Swath bathymetry data were collected throughout all surveys and the collated dataset reveals a pronounced forearc high reaching a depth of 2700 m, located ~80 km and at an azimuth of 305° from Osbourn, the oldest known seamount within the Louisville chain. The bathymetric high correlates with a free-air gravity and magnetic anomaly high (50 mGal and 200 nT peaks respectively) and all three datasets reveal both a flanking depression, approximately one third of the amplitude of the peak, and an outer high. Within the region of reduced seismicity, a preliminary forward velocity model derived from strike-parallel wide-angle seismic data, suggest a north-south reduction in depth to the forearc Moho and a local crustal thickening in the vicinity of the high. We present here a preliminary analysis of new and existing seismic, swath and potential field datasets from the Louisville Ridge collision zone. In addition to the anomalous forearc structure introduced

  11. Electron energy spectra of H{sup {minus}} autodetaching states resulting from collisions of H{sup {minus}} with He at 1 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, M.; Sato, H. |; Hino, K.; Matsuzawa, M.

    1995-06-01

    Electron energy spectra for H{sup {minus}} autodetaching states resulting from collisions H{sup {minus}} with He at 1 keV are rigorously calculated by including couplings between doubly excited states and continuum states and their interference with direct detachment processes. An energy sampling procedure, based on the Gauss quadratures, is used to discretize continuum states. The present theoretical result, for the first time, clarifies mechanisms of excitation to doubly excited states, quantitatively reproduces the experimental spectra first observed by Risley and Geballe in 1974, separates the contributions from each of three autodetaching states, and identifies the cause of the interference between autodetaching and direct-detaching excitation channels.

  12. State-of-the-Art Experimental Techniques and Results for Low Energy Electron Collisions with Simple Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckman, Stephen

    2012-10-01

    Electron collisions with simple molecular systems (diatomics and small polyatomics) play an important role in most discharge-based devices and environments. Even in cases where large precursor molecules are involved, say for example in a plasma processing environment, dissociation and dissociative attachment lead to the production of smaller molecules, perhaps radicals, whose interactions can then play an important part in the dynamics of the discharge. This paper will attempt to describe the current state of the art for measurements of processes such as elastic scattering, rotational, vibrational and electronic excitation, dissociative attachment, and ionization of small molecular species by electron impact. Examples of absolute cross sections that arise from such measurements will be provided and compared, where possible, with contemporary theoretical calculations. The collaboration between experiment and theory is of critical importance in the context of ``Plasma Data Exchange,'' as benchmarked theory will play an significant role in providing data for the many, perhaps majority, of processes that cannot be easily measured.

  13. Arc-arc Collision Structure in the Southernmost Part of the Kuril Trench Region -Results from Integrated Analyses of the 1998-2000 Hokkaido Transect Seismic Data-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, Takaya; Tsumura, Noriko; Ito, Tanio; Sato, Hiroshi; Kurashimo, Eiji; Hirata, Naoshi; Arita, Kazunori; Noda, Katsuya; Fujiwara, Akira; Abe, Susumu; Kikkuchi, Shunsuke; Suzuki, Kazuko

    2015-04-01

    -10 km) are interpreted to be fragments of Cretaceous subduction/arc complexes or deformation interfaces branched from the HMT. The refraction/wide-angle reflection analysis revealed a series of eastward dipping interfaces at depths of 15-30 km east of the HMT, some of which show a very large Vp contrast exceeding 0.5-1.0 km/s. The subducted NE Japan arc meets the Kuril arc 20-40 km east of the HMT at a depth of 20-30 km. The above mentioned high Vp contrasts may result from the mixture of the upper crustal (low Vp) materials of the NE Japan arc and lower crustal (high Vp) materials of the Kuril arc. Seismic reflection image in the southern HCZ reprocessed by almost the same techniques confirms a clear crustal delamination, where the upper 23-km crust is thrust up along the HMT while the lower part of the crust descends down to the subducted PAC plate. At the moment, the results in the northern HCZ do not provide positive evidence on shallow crustal delamination as found in the case of the southern HCZ, suggesting regional difference in collision style along the HMT.

  14. Puck collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauge, E. H.

    2012-09-01

    Collisions between two ice hockey pucks sliding on frictionless ice are studied, with both inelasticity and frictional contact between the colliding surfaces of the two pucks taken into account. The latter couples translational and rotational motion. The full solution depends on the sign and magnitude of the initial mismatch between the surface velocities at the point of contact. The initial state defines two physically distinct regimes for the friction coefficient. To illustrate the complexities, we discuss at length the typical situation (well known from curling) when puck number 1 is initially at rest, and is hit by puck number 2 with an arbitrary impact parameter, velocity and angular velocity. We find that the total outgoing angle between the pucks exceeds \\frac{1}{2}\\pi if and only if the collision leads to a net increase in the translational part of the kinetic energy. The conditions for this to happen are scrutinized, and the results are presented both analytically and numerically by a set of representative curves. This paper is written with an ambitious undergraduate, and her teacher, in mind.

  15. Sedimentation in forearc basins, trenches, and collision zones of the western Pacific: A summary of results from the Ocean Drilling Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Underwood, Michael B.; Ballance, Peter F.; Clift, Peter D.; Hiscott, Richard N.; Marsaglia, Kathleen M.; Pickering, Kevin T.; Reid, R. Pamela

    The comprehensive strategy pursued by the Ocean Drilling Program in the western Pacific Ocean resulted in significant improvements in our understanding of arc-related geologic processes and products. Many types of depositional environments were examined, including intraoceanic forearc basins, backarc basins, trenches, and ridge-trench collision zones. Most of the ODP sites were chosen to address tectonic, geochemical, or hydrologic objectives, but a wealth of new sedimentologic information was generated at the same time. We now have a better appreciation of how intraoceanic forearcs are affected by diverse depositional processes (e.g., debris flows, turbidity currents, and vertical settling of tephra, hemipelagic mud, and pelagic ooze). Detailed turbidite stratigraphy deduced from FMS borehole imagery shows that the Izu-Bonin forearc basin is characterized by a noncyclic basin-plain style of sedimentation, rather than a channelized submarine fan or a channelized slope apron. Detrital modes for volcaniclastic sands in the Izu-Bonin forearc are consistent with an undissected-arc provenance; subdivisions of volcanic texture and glass type provide additional details and support the idea of extensive subaerial production and mixing of epiclastic detritus. Evolution of the Tonga forearc has been affected by a complicated interplay of tectonic subsidence, eustacy, and arc volcanism. Stratigraphic evolution of the Nankai accretionary prism produced a classic upward-coarsening and upward-thickening mega-cycle representative of transition from abyssal hemipelagites to trench turbidites. Turbidite sands within the outer trench-wedge facies display indicators of northwest-directed paleoflow; those flows probably experienced a phase of upslope movement onto the outer wall and deflection back toward the Nankai trench axis. Sand petrography and clay mineralogy collectively support a mixed detrital provenance for the Nankai trench wedge; the main source area is located in the Izu

  16. Finite size corrections to Madelung number. [for ion atoms in ionic crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Heinbockel, J. H.; Outlaw, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    It is customary in the study of ionic crystals to assume that the ions are point charges at their respective lattice sites; the corresponding electrostatic energy of one such ion is reducible to Madelung's form, where the Madelung number has a value of 1.7467. This paper considers the modifications in the electrostatic energy when the atomic finite size is treated in more detail. The results are tabulated as a direct correction to Madelung's number for alkali halide cubic crystals.

  17. Ultra-precise single-ion atomic mass measurements on deuterium and helium-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zafonte, S. L.; Van Dyck, R. S., Jr.

    2015-04-01

    The former University of Washington Penning Trap Mass Spectrometer (UW-PTMS), now located at the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, Germany, was used in the decade before the move to determine new values for the deuteron atomic mass, M (2H+) = 2.013 553 212 745(40) u, and the deuterium atomic mass, M (2H) = 2.014 101 778 052(40) u, both of which are now more than an order-of-magnitude more accurate than the previous best 1994-MIT measurements of these quantities. The new value for the deuteron’s mass can then be used with the accepted 2010-CODATA proton mass and the most recent 1999-measurement of the 2.2 MeV gamma-ray binding energy of the deuteron to refine the neutron’s mass to mn = 1.008 664 916 018(435) u which has about half the uncertainty relative to the value computed using that previous 1994-MIT deuterium measurement. As a result, further improvements of mn must now come from a more accurate determination of the wavelength of this gamma ray. In this same period of time, this spectrometer has also been used to determine new values for the helion atomic mass, M (3He2+) = 3.014 932 246 668(43) u, and the neutral helium-3 atomic mass, M (3He) = 3.016 029 321 675(43) u, which are both about 60 times more accurate than the 2006-SMILETRAP measurements, but disagree with the 4.4-times less-accurate 2015-Florida-State measurements by 0.76 nu. It is expected that these helium-3 results will be used in the future 3H/3He mass ratio (to be determined by the Heidelberg, Germany version of the old UW-PTMS) in order to generate a more accurate value for the tritium atomic mass.

  18. Finite strain calculations of continental deformation. I - Method and general results for convergent zones. II - Comparison with the India-Asia collision zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houseman, G.; England, P.

    1986-01-01

    The present investigation has the objective to perform numerical experiments on a rheologically simple continuum model for the continental lithosphere. It is attempted to obtain a better understanding of the dynamics of continental deformation. Calculations are presented of crustal thickness distributions, stress, strain, strain rate fields, latitudinal displacements, and finite rotations, taking into account as basis a model for continental collision which treats the litoshphere as a thin viscous layer subject to indenting boundary conditions. The results of this paper support the conclusions of England and McKenzie (1982) regarding the role of gravity in governing the deformation of a thin viscous layer subject to indenting boundary conditions. The results of the experiments are compared with observations of topography, stress and strain rate fields, and palaeomagnetic latitudinal displacements in Asia.

  19. Linear Collisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walkiewicz, T. A.; Newby, N. D., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A discussion of linear collisions between two or three objects is related to a junior-level course in analytical mechanics. The theoretical discussion uses a geometrical approach that treats elastic and inelastic collisions from a unified point of view. Experiments with a linear air track are described. (Author/TS)

  20. Photon-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, D.L.

    1982-10-01

    Studies of photon-photon collisions are reviewed with particular emphasis on new results reported to this conference. These include results on light meson spectroscopy and deep inelastic e..gamma.. scattering. Considerable work has now been accumulated on resonance production by ..gamma gamma.. collisions. Preliminary high statistics studies of the photon structure function F/sub 2//sup ..gamma../(x,Q/sup 2/) are given and comments are made on the problems that remain to be solved.

  1. Recent STAR Results from Neutral Pion Production in Polarized pp Collisions at {radical}(s) = 200 GeV at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, Alan

    2009-08-04

    A primary goal of the STAR spin physics program is measuring the polarized gluon distribution function, {delta}g(x), accessible through the double longitudinal spin asymmetry, A{sub LL}. The STAR detector is uniquely suited for measuring A{sub LL} in a number of different final-state channels, such as inclusive jet and pion production, in polarized pp collisions. We present preliminary A{sub LL} results from RHIC run 6 for neutral pion production at mid-rapidity. These A{sub LL} measurements allow for discrimination among a number of different next-to-leading order (NLO) perturbative Quantum Chromodynamics (pQCD) predictions and provide meaningful constraints on {delta}g(x)

  2. Planck Constant Deduced from Metrical Results of Doppler Effect of Moving Particle— Uncertainty Principle Caused byCollision of a Particle with CMB Photons and Virtual Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shao-Guang

    Put two counters at origin O and particle P respectively, the wave-number difference counted by two counters at same moment is the length x between P and O (as a rod). The metrical result of known Doppler effect is: x(θ) = x0 (1+ β cos θ) (1). β= v/c, v is the velocity of counter to light-source, c = c+ = c -is the metrical one-way velocity of light, v • n = v cos θ, θ is the angle between v and unit-vector n of light-beam pointing to counter from light-source, x0 is the metrical length when v = 0. The result counted by a counter in one second is the light-wave frequency: f(θ) = f0 (1 -β cos θ) (2). f0 is the metrical frequency when v = 0. From Eq.(1) and Eq (2): x 2 (θ) = x0 2 (1+2 β cos θ + β 2 cos2 θ); f 2 (θ) = f 0 2 (1-2 β cos θ + β 2 cos2 θ). Define the square-difference root of the metrical results in two contrary directions: ∆x = (x 2 (0) -x 2 (π)) 1/2 = 2 x0 β 1/2 (3); ∆f = (f 2 (0) -f 2 (π))1/2 = i 2 f0 β 1/2 (4); ∆x • ∆f = i 4 x0 f0 β (5). From p = m v and the variance in absolute average value of Eq.(2) ∆f= 2 f0 ∆v/π c, Eq.(5) changes into: ∆x•∆p= 2 π x0 p (6). Once a particle collides with CMB photon, its velocity will change as in a quasi-Brownian motion. Let S be the average space-distance between CMB photons, the time-interval between two collisions is S / v, v is the velocity of particle. Because x0 is the length of an imaginary resting rod, i.e., after every collision the origin O must be reset jumpily at a new position and the jumpy distance (S/v) • ∆v is just the displacement of particle x0 , ∆v is the variance in velocity caused by each collision. The variance in momentum of particle ∆p in each collision is the average momentum p0 of CMB photon, then we obtain: x0 = S ∆v / v = S ∆p /p = S p0 /p and Eq.(6) changes into: ∆x•∆p= 2 π p0 S (7). The average energy and average momentum of CMB photon in 2.7K are: e0 = k T= 3.72•10-16 erg; p0 = e0 /c =1.24•10 -26 g cm s -1 . The

  3. Preheating in bubble collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Jun; Piao Yunsong

    2010-08-15

    In a landscape with metastable minima, the bubbles will inevitably nucleate. We show that when the bubbles collide, due to the dramatic oscillation of the field at the collision region, the energy deposited in the bubble walls can be efficiently released by the explosive production of the particles. In this sense, the collision of bubbles is actually highly inelastic. The cosmological implications of this result are discussed.

  4. The Loyalty—New Hebrides Arc collision: Effects on the Loyalty Ridge and basin system, Southwest Pacific (first results of the ZoNéCo programme)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafoy, Yves; Missegue, Francois; Cluzel, Dominique; Le Suave, Raymond

    1996-06-01

    The ZoNéCo 1 and 2 cruises of Ifremer's Research Vessel L'Atalante, collected new swath bathymetry and geophysical data over the southern and northern segments of the basins and ridges forming the Loyalty system. Between the two surveyed areas, previous studies found evidence for the resistance of the Loyalty Ridge to subduction beneath the New Hebrides trench near 22°S 169°E. On the subducted plate, except for seismicity related to the downbending of the Australian plate, recorded shallow seismicity is sparse within the Loyalty system (Ridge and Basin) where reliable focal mechanism solutions are almost absent. Swath bathymetry, seismic reflection and magnetic data acquired during the ZoNéCo 1 and 2 cruises revealed a transverse asymmetric morphology in the Loyalty system, and an along-strike horst and graben structure on the discontinuous Loyalty Ridge. South of 23°50'S and at 20°S, the two WSW-ENE-trending fault systems, respectively, sinistral and dextral, that crosscut the southern and northern segments of the Loyalty system, are interpreted as due to the early effects of collision with the New Hebrides Arc. A NNW-SSE trend, evident along the whole Loyalty system and on the island of New Caledonia, is interpreted as an inherited structural trend that may have been reactivated through flexure of the Australian lithospheric plate at the subduction zone. Overall then, the morphology, structure and evolution of the southern and northern segments of the Loyalty system probably result from the combined effects of the Australian plate lithospheric bulge, the active Loyalty-New Hebrides collision and the overthrust of the New Caledonian ophiolite.

  5. Infrared absorption by molecular gases as a probe of nanoporous silica xerogel and molecule-surface collisions: Low-pressure results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vander Auwera, J.; Ngo, N. H.; El Hamzaoui, H.; Capoen, B.; Bouazaoui, M.; Ausset, P.; Boulet, C.; Hartmann, J.-M.

    2013-10-01

    Transmission spectra of gases confined (but not adsorbed) within the pores of a 1.4-cm-thick silica xerogel sample have been recorded between 2.5 and 5 μm using a high-resolution Fourier transform spectrometer. This was done for pure CO, CO2, N2O, H2O, and CH4 at room temperature and pressures of a few hectopascals. Least-squares fits of measured absorption lines provide the optical-path lengths within the confined (LC) and free (LF) gas inside the absorption cell and the half width at half maximum ΓC of the lines of the confined gases. The values of LC and LF retrieved using numerous transitions of all studied species are very consistent. Furthermore, LC is in satisfactory agreement with values obtained from independent measurements, thus showing that reliable information on the open porosity volume can be retrieved from an optical experiment. The values of ΓC, here resulting from collisions of the molecules with the inner surfaces of the xerogel pores, are practically independent of the line for each gas and inversely proportional to the square root of the probed-molecule molar mass. This is a strong indication that, for the studied transitions, a single collision of a molecule with a pore surface is sufficient to change its rotational state. A previously proposed simple model, used for the prediction of the line shape, leads to satisfactory agreement with the observations. It also enables a determination of the average pore size, bringing information complementary to that obtained from nitrogen adsorption porosimetry.

  6. Auto Body and Collision Damage Repairer (Branch 1). Apprenticeship Training Standards = Reparateur de carrossiers et de dommages resultant d'une collision (categorie 1). Normes de formation en apprentissage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ontario Ministry of Skills Development, Toronto.

    This manual presents training standards for auto body and collision damage repairers (branch 1) and is intended to be used by apprentice/trainees, instructors, and companies in Ontario, Canada as a blueprint for training or as a prerequisite for accreditation/certification. The training standards identify skills required for this occupation and…

  7. Launch Collision Probability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bollenbacher, Gary; Guptill, James D.

    1999-01-01

    This report analyzes the probability of a launch vehicle colliding with one of the nearly 10,000 tracked objects orbiting the Earth, given that an object on a near-collision course with the launch vehicle has been identified. Knowledge of the probability of collision throughout the launch window can be used to avoid launching at times when the probability of collision is unacceptably high. The analysis in this report assumes that the positions of the orbiting objects and the launch vehicle can be predicted as a function of time and therefore that any tracked object which comes close to the launch vehicle can be identified. The analysis further assumes that the position uncertainty of the launch vehicle and the approaching space object can be described with position covariance matrices. With these and some additional simplifying assumptions, a closed-form solution is developed using two approaches. The solution shows that the probability of collision is a function of position uncertainties, the size of the two potentially colliding objects, and the nominal separation distance at the point of closest approach. ne impact of the simplifying assumptions on the accuracy of the final result is assessed and the application of the results to the Cassini mission, launched in October 1997, is described. Other factors that affect the probability of collision are also discussed. Finally, the report offers alternative approaches that can be used to evaluate the probability of collision.

  8. Intraplate shearing and basin deformation in the Pacific Plate as a result of the Yakutat Block collision with North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reece, R.; Gulick, S. P.; Christeson, G. L.; Worthington, L. L.

    2009-12-01

    The Yakutat Block (YAK), an allochthonous terrane coupled to the Pacific Plate (PAC), collided with the North American plate ~10Ma and began subducting at the Aleutian Trench. Due to its thickness, the YAK is resistant to subduction compared to the PAC. As a result, the YAK is undergoing flat-slab subduction and now has developed its own vector relative to the PAC. High-resolution bathymetry data shows a 30km N-S trending ridge within the Surveyor Fan between the mouths of the Yakutat Sea Valley and Bering Trough. The ridge originates in the north at the base of the continental slope, which is coincident with the Transition Fault, the strike-slip boundary between the YAK and the PAC. The ridge exhibits greatest relief adjacent to the Transition Fault, and becomes less distinct farther from the shelf edge. As the highest relief feature in this part of the basin, the ridge has completely redefined sediment distribution patterns within the Surveyor Fan. Seismic reflection data reveal a sharp basement high beneath the ridge (1.1 sec of relief above “normal” basement in two-way travel time) as well as multiple strike-slip fault systems that are also N-S oriented. The ridge, basement high, and faults are aligned and co-located with an intraplate earthquake swarm on the PAC, which includes four events > 6.5 Mw that occurred from 1987-1992. This earthquake swarm is defined by mostly right-lateral strike-slip events, and is known as the Gulf of Alaska Shear Zone (GASZ). Based on the extent of seismicity, the GASZ extends 230km into the PAC. Tearing of oceanic crust on this scale is rare. A recent wide-angle seismic study shows the YAK to be a 20-25km thick mafic body while the 30 Myr old Pacific crust in the northern Gulf of Alaska is of normal thickness. Intraplate deformation occurring within the PAC could be the result of PAC-YAK coupling whereby YAK resistance to subduction is expressed as deformation in the thinner (weaker) PAC crust. Although a large tear in

  9. Crustal structure and seismicity associated with seamount subduction: A synthesis of results from the Tonga-Kermadec Trench - Louisville Ridge collision zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassett, D.; Watts, A. B.; Paulatto, M.; Stratford, W. R.; Peirce, C.; Grevemeyer, I.

    2013-12-01

    The Tonga-Kermadec plate boundary is the most linear, fastest converging and most seismically active subduction zone on Earth. The margin is intersected at ~26° S by the Louisville Ridge seamount chain. Crustal structure of both the overthrusting Indo-Australian and subducting Pacific plate are sufficiently uniform north and south of the contemporary collision zone to make this an ideal location to study the mechanics and seismological consequences of seamount subduction. We present here a synthesis and interpretation of structural observations from the Louisville collision zone made during three marine geophysical surveys onboard R/V Sonne in 2004, 2007-2008 and 2011. The Louisville collision zone is characterized by a 3000 m reduction in trench depth and a 15° anticlockwise rotation of the trench axis. Swath bathymetry data reveal a pronounced forearc high (~ 2000 m relative to adjacent regions), which is correlated with a free-air gravity and magnetic anomaly high (50 mGal and 200 nT peaks respectively). Morphological characteristics are accompanied by a 40 % reduction in seismicity compared to regions immediately to the north and south. Forward modeling of active source seismic travel-times constrain the subducting Pacific plate to ~30 km depth and suggests that it is ~6 km thick and has Vp 6.2-6.8 km/sec. The overthrusting Indo-Australian plate has Vp 4.5-6.8 km/sec and a Moho depth of 15 km. The mantle wedge has Vp ~8.0 km/sec. Beneath the forearc high, seismic wave-speeds within the upper-plate are 0.3-0.5 km/sec slower than regions to the north and south and a up to 3 km thick volume of anomalously low Vp (<4.5 km/sec at > 10 km depth) is inferred to overlie the subduction interface. This latter observation is interpreted as subducting and underplated volcaniclastic sediments, which reach up to 1-2 km in thickness within the flanking flexural moats of the Louisville Ridge. The projected width of the ridge and flanking moats are well correlated with the

  10. Preliminary result of teleseismic double-difference relocation of earthquakes in the Molucca collision zone with a 3D velocity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiddiqi, Hasbi Ash; Widiyantoro, Sri; Nugraha, Andri Dian; Ramdhan, Mohamad; Wandono, Sutiyono, Handayani, Titi; Nugroho, Hendro

    2015-04-01

    We have relocated hypocenters of earthquakes occurring in the Molucca collision zone and surrounding region taken from the BMKG catalog using teleseismic double-difference relocation algorithm (teletomoDD). We used P-wave arrival times of local, regional, and teleseismic events recorded at 304 recording stations. Over 7,000 earthquakes were recorded by the BMKG seismographicnetworkin the study region from April, 2009 toJune, 2014. We used a 3D regional-global nested velocity modelresulting fromprevious global tomographystudy. In this study, the3D seismic velocity model was appliedto theIndonesian region, whilethe1D seismicvelocity model (ak135)wasused for regions outside of Indonesia. Our relocation results show a better improvement in travel-time RMS residuals comparedto those of the BMKG catalog.Ourresultsalso show that relocation shifts were dominated intheeast-west direction, whichmaybeinfluenced by theexistingvelocity anomaly related to the reversed V-shaped slabbeneaththestudy region. Our eventrelocation results refine the geometry of slabs beneath the Halmahera and Sangihe arcs.

  11. Combined results of searches for the standard model Higgs boson in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

    2012-03-01

    Combined results are reported from searches for the standard model Higgs boson in proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s)=7 TeV in five Higgs boson decay modes: gamma pair, b-quark pair, tau lepton pair, W pair, and Z pair. The explored Higgs boson mass range is 110-600 GeV. The analysed data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 4.6-4.8 inverse femtobarns. The expected excluded mass range in the absence of the standard model Higgs boson is 118-543 GeV at 95% CL. The observed results exclude the standard model Higgs boson in the mass range 127-600 GeV at 95% CL, and in the mass range 129-525 GeV at 99% CL. An excess of events above the expected standard model background is observed at the low end of the explored mass range making the observed limits weaker than expected in the absence of a signal. The largest excess, with a local significance of 3.1 sigma, is observed for a Higgs boson mass hypothesis of 124 GeV. The global significance of observing an excess with a local significance greater than 3.1 sigma anywhere in the search range 110-600 (110-145) GeV is estimated to be 1.5 sigma (2.1 sigma). More data are required to ascertain the origin of this excess.

  12. Preliminary result of teleseismic double-difference relocation of earthquakes in the Molucca collision zone with a 3D velocity model

    SciTech Connect

    Shiddiqi, Hasbi Ash E-mail: h.a.shiddiqi@gmail.com; Widiyantoro, Sri; Nugraha, Andri Dian; Ramdhan, Mohamad; Wandono,; Sutiyono,; Handayani, Titi; Nugroho, Hendro

    2015-04-24

    We have relocated hypocenters of earthquakes occurring in the Molucca collision zone and surrounding region taken from the BMKG catalog using teleseismic double-difference relocation algorithm (teletomoDD). We used P-wave arrival times of local, regional, and teleseismic events recorded at 304 recording stations. Over 7,000 earthquakes were recorded by the BMKG seismographicnetworkin the study region from April, 2009 toJune, 2014. We used a 3D regional-global nested velocity modelresulting fromprevious global tomographystudy. In this study, the3D seismic velocity model was appliedto theIndonesian region, whilethe1D seismicvelocity model (ak135)wasused for regions outside of Indonesia. Our relocation results show a better improvement in travel-time RMS residuals comparedto those of the BMKG catalog.Ourresultsalso show that relocation shifts were dominated intheeast-west direction, whichmaybeinfluenced by theexistingvelocity anomaly related to the reversed V-shaped slabbeneaththestudy region. Our eventrelocation results refine the geometry of slabs beneath the Halmahera and Sangihe arcs.

  13. [The specific features of a lethal injury to the driver and the passenger of a scooter resulting from the collision with a car moving in the same direction].

    PubMed

    Fetisov, V A; Smirenin, S A; Khabova, Z S

    2014-01-01

    Forensic medical diagnostics of the injuries inflicted to the drivers and the passengers of bicycles (scooters, mopeds, quadrocycles, etc.) remains a serious challenge for the specialists involved in forensic medical and combined medico-autotechnical expertises. The present article is an overview of materials pertinent to the analysis of this form of traffic injuries. The approach to the analysis is exemplified by the case of repeated panel expertise with the purpose of elucidation of the mechanisms and the sequence of events leading to a combined blunt injury in the driver and the passenger of a scooter resulting from the collision with a car moving at a high speed in the same direction. Both victims presented with a whiplash injury to the brain stem region responsible for their immediate death at the scene of the accident. The results of the expertise allowed to differentiate between the driver and the passenger in terms of the extent of the injury. The authors emphasize the necessity of and good prospects for further traffic injury research bearing in mind a great variety of the aforementioned means of transportation. PMID:25764875

  14. [ital M]-shell ionization resulting from near-central collisions of mid-[ital Z] atoms with 5. 5-MeV/amu oxygen ions

    SciTech Connect

    Carlen, M.W.; Boschung, B.; Dousse, J.; Halabuka, Z.; Hoszowska, J.; Kern, J.; Rheme, C. ); Polasik, M. ); Rymuza, P.; Sujkowski, Z. )

    1994-04-01

    The [ital K][alpha] and [ital K][beta] x-ray spectra of palladium and lanthanum bombarded by 5.5-MeV/amu [sup 16]O ions were measured with a high-resolution transmission crystal spectrometer. The observed complex structure of the [ital K][alpha][ital L][sup 0] and [ital K][beta][sub 1,3][ital L][sup 0] lines consisting of many [ital M] satellites was analyzed by means of theoretical line profiles based on multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock calculations. The average [ital M]-shell and [ital M]-subshell ionization probabilities in near-central collisions are determined. The experimental results are compared to the predictions of the semiclassical-approximation theory. The agreement is much improved by using Dirac-Hartree-Fock (DHF) wave functions instead of screened relativistic hydrogenic wave functions. The importance of DHF wave functions in the calculation of the [ital M]-shell ionization probabilities is illustrated with other examples.

  15. Photonic, Electronic and Atomic Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fainstein, Pablo D.; Lima, Marco Aurelio P.; Miraglia, Jorge E.; Montenegro, Eduardo C.; Rivarola, Roberto D.

    2006-11-01

    -coincidence technique / T. Kaneyasu, T. Azuma and K. Okuno. Recent developments in proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry / A. Wisthaler ... [et al.]. Interferences in electron emission from H[symbol] induced by fast ions / N. Stolterfoht. Atomic realization of the young single electron interference process in individual autoionization collisions / R. O. Barrachina and M. Šitnik. Multiple ionization processes related to irradiation of biological tissue / M. E. Galassi ... [et al.]. Atom-diatom collisions at cold and ultra-cold temperatures / F. D. Colavecchia, G. A. Parker and R. T. Pack. Interactions of ions with hydrogen atoms / A. Luca, G. Borodi and D. Gerlich. Analysis of all structures in the elastic and charge transfer cross sections for proton-hydrogen collisions in the range of 10[symbol]-10øeV / P. S. Krstić ... [et al.]. Ab-initio ion-atom collision calculations for many-electron systems / J. Anton and B. Fricke. Fully differential studies on single ionization of helium by slow proton impact / A. Hasan ... [et al.]. Dipole polarization effects on highly-charged-ion-atom electron capture / C. C. Havener ... [et al.]. Proton-, antiproton-, and photon-he collisions in the context of ultra fast processes / T. Morishita ... [et al.]. Impact parameter dependent charge exchange studies with channeled heavy ions / D. Dauvergne ... [et al.]. Crystal assisted atomic physics experiments using heavy ions / K. Komaki -- Collisions involving clusters and surfaces. Structure and dynamics of Van der Waal complexes: from triatomic to medium size clusters / G. Delgado Barrio ... [et al.]. Evaporation, fission and multifragmentation processes of multicharged C[symbol] ions versus excitation energies / S. Martin ... [et al.]. Fragmentation of collisionally excited fullerenes / M. Alcami, S. Diaz-Tendero and F. Martín. Lifetimes of C[symbol] and C[symbol] dianions in a storage ring / S. Tomita ... [et al.]. Clusters and clusters of clusters in collisions / B. Manil ... [et al

  16. An ultra-low energy (30-200 eV) ion-atomic beam source for ion-beam-assisted deposition in ultrahigh vacuum.

    PubMed

    Mach, Jindrich; Samoril, Tomás; Voborný, Stanislav; Kolíbal, Miroslav; Zlámal, Jakub; Spousta, Jirí; Dittrichová, Libuse; Sikola, Tomás

    2011-08-01

    The paper describes the design and construction of an ion-atomic beam source with an optimized generation of ions for ion-beam-assisted deposition under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions. The source combines an effusion cell and an electron impact ion source and produces ion beams with ultra-low energies in the range from 30 eV to 200 eV. Decreasing ion beam energy to hyperthermal values (≈10(1) eV) without loosing optimum ionization conditions has been mainly achieved by the incorporation of an ionization chamber with a grid transparent enough for electron and ion beams. In this way the energy and current density of nitrogen ion beams in the order of 10(1) eV and 10(1) nA/cm(2), respectively, have been achieved. The source is capable of growing ultrathin layers or nanostructures at ultra-low energies with a growth rate of several MLs/h. The ion-atomic beam source will be preferentially applied for the synthesis of GaN under UHV conditions. PMID:21895238

  17. The role of different magnetotelluric tensor relationships in detecting partial melt in continental collision zones: Results from synthetic models and real data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campanya i Llovet, J.; Ledo, J.; Jones, A. G.; Queralt, P.; Marcuello, A.; Liesa, M.; Muñoz, J.

    2013-12-01

    Three magnetotelluric (MT) tensor relationships - the single-station MT impedance tensor, the single-station vertical geomagnetic transfer function (GTF) and the multiple-station horizontal geomagnetic transfer function (HGTF) - were investigated for their role in detecting the presence of partial melting in continental collision zones. Synthetic models based on previous studies were used to characterize the sensitivity of each tensor relationship constraining the presence of partial melt at lower-crustal and upper-mantle depths. From the MT response of the synthetic models, each type of data has been inverted separately and jointly with the others, thus determining the properties and advantages of each when modeling the subsurface. Non-linear sensitivity tests have been carried out to determine the resolution that can be expected when constraining electrical resistivity anomalies associated with the presence of partial melt. The electrical resistivity anomalies associated with different amounts of partial melt were calculated using the two phases of Archie's law and Hashin Shtrikman extremal bounds. The results have been compared with the sensitivity of the MT tensor relationships, thus determining the resolution that can be expected in the detection of partial melt at lower-crustal and upper-mantle depths. Equivalent analyses have been performed using real MT data from a survey carried out in the Pyrenees. The data comprise a total of 82 broadband MT sites and 29 long period MT sites distributed along four profiles across the Pyrenean mountain range between the Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea. The results show the presence of a low-electrical-resistivity structure that has been associated with partial melting of the Iberian subducted lower crust. This anomaly has been constrained below three of the MT profiles but seems to be absent below the Eastern Pyrenees MT profile. A non-linear sensitivity tests was undertaken to ensure that the absence of this

  18. Composite particle production in relativistic Au+Au collisions at AGS: First results from the E866 forward spectrometer @ 2, 4, and 10.8 A{center_dot}GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Ashktorab, K.

    1996-12-31

    Particle spectra were measured for Au + Au collisions at 2, 4, and 10. 8 A{center_dot}GeV using the E866 spectrometers. Recent results on proton emission and composite particle production form the E866 forward spectrometer data taken in 1994 together with the first results from the 1995/6 AGS running period are presented. Preliminary results indicate a decrease in the coalescence scaling coefficient with increasing projectile energy and centrality.

  19. Photon-photon collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1988-07-01

    Highlights of the VIIIth International Workshop on Photon-Photon Collisions are reviewed. New experimental and theoretical results were reported in virtually every area of ..gamma gamma.. physics, particularly in exotic resonance production and tests of quantum chromodynamics where asymptotic freedom and factorization theorems provide predictions for both inclusive and exclusive ..gamma gamma.. reactions at high momentum transfer. 73 refs., 12 figs.

  20. Collisions of O+ with He at low energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, Dwayne C.; Saha, B. C.; Zhao, L. B.

    2009-05-01

    We have investigated the following charge transfer processO^+( ^4S^0, ^2D^0, ^2P^0)+He->O( ^3P)+He^+-δE using the full quantum [1] and semi-classical molecular [2]orbital close-coupling (MOCC) approximations. The quantum MOCC equations are solved numerically in the adiabatic representation [3]. Using MRD-CI package [4] the ab initio configuration interaction calculation is carried out for potential energies. Details of our findings will be reported in the conference. [1] B. H. Bransden and M. R. C. McDowell, ``Charge Exchange and the Theory of Ion-Atom Collisions'', Clarendon Press, Oxford, 1992. [2] M. Kimura and N. F. Lane, At. Mol. Opt. Phys 26, 79 (1990). [3] J. P. Braga and J. C. Belchoir, J. Comput. Chem 17, 1559 (1996). [4] R. J. Buenker, ``Current Aspects of Quantum Chemistry 1981, Vol 21, edited by R. Carbo (Elsevier, Amsterdam), p 17.

  1. Long-range, collision-induced hyperpolarizabilities of atoms or centrosymmetric linear molecules: Theory and numerical results for pairs containing H or He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaoping; Hunt, Katharine L. C.; Pipin, Janusz; Bishop, David M.

    1996-12-01

    For atoms or molecules of D∞h or higher symmetry, this work gives equations for the long-range, collision-induced changes in the first (Δβ) and second (Δγ) hyperpolarizabilities, complete to order R-7 in the intermolecular separation R for Δβ, and order R-6 for Δγ. The results include nonlinear dipole-induced-dipole (DID) interactions, higher multipole induction, induction due to the nonuniformity of the local fields, back induction, and dispersion. For pairs containing H or He, we have used ab initio values of the static (hyper)polarizabilities to obtain numerical results for the induction terms in Δβ and Δγ. For dispersion effects, we have derived analytic results in the form of integrals of the dynamic (hyper)polarizabilities over imaginary frequencies, and we have evaluated these numerically for the pairs H...H, H...He, and He...He using the values of the fourth dipole hyperpolarizability ɛ(-iω; iω, 0, 0, 0, 0) obtained in this work, along with other hyperpolarizabilities calculated previously by Bishop and Pipin. For later numerical applications to molecular pairs, we have developed constant ratio approximations (CRA1 and CRA2) to estimate the dispersion effects in terms of static (hyper)polarizabilities and van der Waals energy or polarizability coefficients. Tests of the approximations against accurate results for the pairs H...H, H...He, and He...He show that the root mean square (rms) error in CRA1 is ˜20%-25% for Δβ and Δγ; for CRA2 the error in Δβ is similar, but the rms error in Δγ is less than 4%. At separations ˜1.0 a.u. outside the van der Waals minima of the pair potentials for H...H, H...He, and He...He, the nonlinear DID interactions make the dominant contributions to Δγzzzz (where z is the interatomic axis) and to Δγxxxx, accounting for ˜80%-123% of the total value. Contributions due to higher-multipole induction and the nonuniformity of the local field (Qα terms) may exceed 15%, while dispersion effects

  2. Atomic collisions, inelastic indeed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bercegol, Herve; Ferrando, Gwenael; Lehoucq, Roland

    At the turn of the twentieth century, a hot controversy raged about the ability of Boltzmann's framework to take care of irreversibility. The so-called Loschmidt's paradox progressively faded with time during the last hundred years, due to the predictive efficiency of statistical mechanics. However, one detail at the origin of the controversy - the elasticity of atomic collisions - was not completely challenged. A semi-classical treatment of two atoms interacting with the vacuum zero-point field permits to predict a friction force acting against the rotation of the pair of atoms. By its form and its level, the calculated torque is a candidate as a physical cause for diffusion of energy and angular momentum, and consequently for entropy growth. It opens the way to a revision of the standard vision of irreversibility. This presentation will focus on two points. First we will discuss the recent result in a broader context of electromagnetic interactions during microscopic collisions. The predicted friction phenomenon can be compared to and distinguished from Collision-Induced Emission and other types of inelastic collisions. Second we will investigate the consequences of the friction torque on calculated trajectories of colliding atoms, quantifying the generation of dimers linked by dispersion forces.

  3. Collision geometry and flow in uranium + uranium collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldschmidt, Andy; Qiu, Zhi; Shen, Chun; Heinz, Ulrich

    2015-10-01

    Using event-by-event viscous fluid dynamics to evolve fluctuating initial density profiles from the Monte Carlo-Glauber model for U+U collisions, we study the predicted "knee"-like structure in the elliptic flow as a function of collision centrality. The knee arises in the two-component Monte Carlo-Glauber model when the initial source ellipticity is plotted as a function of centrality. It results from the preferential selection of tip-on-tip collision geometries by a high-multiplicity trigger. We find that the knee survives hydrodynamic evolution, and that it is located around the 0.5% most central collisions as measured by the final charged multiplicity. Such a knee structure is not seen in the STAR data. This rules out the two-component MC-Glauber model for initial energy and entropy production. Hence an enrichment of tip-tip configurations by triggering solely on high-multiplicity in the U+U collisions does not work. On the other hand, by using zero degree calorimeters (ZDCs) coupled with event-shape engineering such a selection is possible. We identify the selection purity of body-body and tip-tip events in full-overlap U+U collisions. By additionally constraining the asymmetry of the ZDC signals we can further increase the probability of selecting tip-tip events in U+U collisions.

  4. Two-center effect on low-energy electron emission in collisions of 1-MeV/u bare ions with atomic hydrogen, molecular hydrogen, and helium. I. Atomic hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tribedi, Lokesh C.; Richard, P.; Gulyás, L.; Rudd, M. E.; Moshammer, R.

    2001-06-01

    We have investigated ionization mechanisms in fast ion-atom collisions by measuring the low-energy electron emission cross sections in a pure three-body collision involving bare carbon ions (v=6.35 a.u.) colliding with atomic hydrogen targets. The measurements have also been extended to molecular hydrogen and helium targets. In this paper we provide the energy and angular distributions of double differential cross sections of low-energy electron emission for atomic hydrogen targets. The Slevin rf source with a high degree of dissociation was used to produce the atomic H target. It is found that the two-center effect has a major influence on the observed large forward-backward angular asymmetry. A detailed comparison is presented with calculations based on the continuum distorted-wave (CDW) and CDW-EIS (eikonal initial-state) approximations. Both the continuum distorted-wave calculations provide a very good understanding of the data, whereas the first Born calculation predicts almost symmetric forward-backward distributions that do not agree with the data. The two-center effect is slightly better represented by the CDW calculations compared to the CDW-EIS calculation. The total cross sections are, however, in good agreement with the theories used. The results for molecular hydrogen and helium will be discussed in the following paper.

  5. Electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in atomic collisions. Progress report, June 15, 1992--June 14, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, T.G.; Alston, S.G.

    1995-08-01

    The research program of Winter and Alston addresses the fundamental processes of electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in ion-atom, ion-ion, and ion-molecule collisions. Attention is focussed on one- and two-electron systems and, more recently, quasi-one-electron systems whose electron-target-core interaction can be accurately modeled by one-electron potentials. The basic computational approaches can then be taken with few, if any, approximations, and the underlying collisional mechanisms can be more clearly revealed. Winter has focussed on intermediate collision energies (e.g., proton energies for p-He{sup +} collisions on the order of 100 kilo-electron volts), in which many electron states are strongly coupled during the collision and a coupled-state approach, such as a coupled-Sturmian-pseudostate approach, is appropriate. Alston has concentrated on higher collision energies (million electron-volt energies), or asymmetric collision systems, for which the coupling of the projectile is weaker with, however, many more target states being coupled together so that high-order perturbation theory is essential. Several calculations by Winter and Alston are described, as set forth in the original proposal.

  6. Dynamic screening and wake effects on electronic excitation in ion-solid and ion-surface collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Burgdoerfer, J. . Dept. of Physics Oak Ridge National Lab., TN )

    1991-01-01

    The collective electronic response in a solid effectively alters ionic and atomic potentials giving rise to dynamic screening and to a wake'' of density fluctuations trailing ions as they propagate through the solid. The presence of dynamic screening modifies electronic excitation processes of projectiles in ion-solid collisions as compared to binary ion-atom collisions. We review recent theoretical and experimental studies directed at the search for and identification of signatures of dynamic screening and wake effects. Examples include the formation of excited projectile bound states under channeling conditions, radiative electron capture, the search for wake riding'' electrons in antiproton-solid collisions, and the neutralization of highly charged ions near surfaces. 42 refs., 7 figs.

  7. Recent STAR Results from Charged Pion Production in Polarized pp Collisions at {radical}(s) = 200 GeV at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Kocoloski, Adam

    2009-08-04

    The STAR experiment at RHIC measures the longitudinal double-spin asymmetry A{sub LL} for a variety of final states in collisions of longitudinally polarized protons to constrain the polarized gluon distribution in the proton. Asymmetries for mid-rapidity charged pion production benefit from large cross-sections and the excellent tracking and particle identification capabilities of the STAR Time Projection Chamber. This contribution presents a measurement of the ratio of cross sections for inclusive {pi}{sup -} and {pi}{sup +} production using data collected in 2005, as well as a new measurement of A{sub LL} for charged pions opposite a jet obtained from the 2006 RHIC run.

  8. Recent CDF results on heavy and exotic baryons in p-pbar collisions at s**(1/2)=1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Curbis, F.; /Rome U. /INFN, Rome

    2005-01-01

    Since March 2001 a new period of CDF data taking (called Run II) began at the p{bar p} Tevatron collider. The upgrade of Collider Detector at Fermilab improved the tracking system: the vertexing, triggering and particle identification capabilities. This has allowed a further development of B physics, because the B{sub s} and {Lambda}{sub b} are produced in hadronic collisions. Here measurements of the mass and lifetime of {Lambda}{sub b} in two decay channels are presented. Using particle identification (PID) information from the time of flight and the dE/dx, CDF performed pentaquark searches for {Theta}{sup +}, {Xi}{sub 3/2}{sup --,0} and {Theta}{sub c}{sup 0}, following the recent interest in exotic baryon spectroscopy.

  9. Collision-Induced Absorption by H2 Pairs in the Second Overtone Band at 298 and 77.5 K: Comparison between Experimental and Theoretical Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brodbeck, C.; Bouanich, J.-P.; van-Thanh, Nguyen; Fu, Y.; Borysow, A.

    1999-01-01

    The collision-induced spectra of hydrogen in the region of the second overtone at 0.8 microns have been recorded at temperatures of 298 and 77.5 K and for gas densities ranging from 100 to 800 amagats. The spectral profile defined by the absorption coefficient per squared density varies significantly with the density, so that the binary absorption coefficient has been determined by extrapolations to zero density of the measured profiles. Our extrapolated measurements and our recent ab initio quantum calculation are in relatively good agreement with one another. Taking into account the very weak absorption of the second overtone band, the agreement is, however, not as good as it has become (our) standard for strong bands.

  10. Interstellar Cloud Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lattanzio, J. C.; Monaghan, J. J.; Pongracic, H.; Schwarz, M. P.

    1985-07-01

    We describe the results of a three-dimensional numerical simulation of isothermal interstellar clouds in the absence of magnetic fields. A wide variety of high and low Mach number, head-on and off-centre collisions of clouds with mass ratios 1, 2.5, 5.0 and 10.1 have been studied. The results show that a necessary, but not sufficient, condition for the gravitational instability of a substantial fraction of the matter is that the initial clouds should be either marginally stable or unstable according to the usual Jeans criterion. The collisions, in general, do not result in one or more clouds. Instead we find, in most cases, that the matter disperses in an irregular way. The calculations therefore suggest that if the initial state of the interstellar medium is one of cool dense clouds in a hotter more tenuous background, collisions will rapidly mix the medium rather than produce a steady-state spectrum of cool clouds.

  11. Ternary drop collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinterbichler, Hannes; Planchette, Carole; Brenn, Günter

    2015-10-01

    It has been recently proposed to use drop collisions for producing advanced particles or well-defined capsules, or to perform chemical reactions where the merged drops constitute a micro-reactor. For all these promising applications, it is essential to determine whether the merged drops remain stable after the collision, forming a single entity, or if they break up. This topic, widely investigated for binary drop collisions of miscible and immiscible liquid, is quite unexplored for ternary drop collisions. The current study aims to close this gap by experimentally investigating collisions between three equal-sized drops of the same liquid arranged centri-symmetrically. Three drop generators are simultaneously operated to obtain controlled ternary drop collisions. The collision outcomes are observed via photographs and compared to those of binary collisions. Similar to binary collisions, a regime map is built, showing coalescence and bouncing as well as reflexive and stretching separation. Significant differences are observed in the transitions between these regimes.

  12. Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zemsky, Robert; Shaman, Susan; Shapiro, Daniel B.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the Collegiate Results Instrument (CRI), which measures a range of collegiate outcomes for alumni 6 years after graduation. The CRI was designed to target alumni from institutions across market segments and assess their values, abilities, work skills, occupations, and pursuit of lifelong learning. (EV)

  13. High energy hadron-hadron collisions. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of Georgia, Athens, Georgia

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, T.T.

    1992-01-01

    Results of a study on high energy collisions with the geometrical model are summarized in three parts: (1) the elastic hadron-hadron collision, (2) the inelastic hadron-hadron collision, and (3) e[sup +]e[sup [minus

  14. Simulating immersed particle collisions: the Devil's in the details

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biegert, Edward; Vowinckel, Bernhard; Meiburg, Eckart

    2015-11-01

    Simulating densely-packed particle-laden flows with any degree of confidence requires accurate modeling of particle-particle collisions. To this end, we investigate a few collision models from the fluids and granular flow communities using sphere-wall collisions, which have been studied by a number of experimental groups. These collisions involve enough complexities--gravity, particle-wall lubrication forces, particle-wall contact stresses, particle-wake interactions--to challenge any collision model. Evaluating the successes and shortcomings of the collision models, we seek improvements in order to obtain more consistent results. We will highlight several implementation details that are crucial for obtaining accurate results.

  15. Measurement of energy and charged particle emission in the central rapidity region from O + A and p + A collisions at 14. 5 GeV/c per nucleon and preliminary results from Si + A collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, T.; Akiba, Y.; Alburger, D.; Beavis, D.; Betts, R.R.; Bloomer, M.A.; Bond, P.D.; Chasman, C.; Chu, Y.Y.; Cole, B.A.

    1987-01-01

    The first data from a 160 beam of total energy 232 GeV at the BNL Tandem-AGS are discussed. Preliminary results from a /sup 28/Si beam of total energy 406 GeV are also shown. The full complement of E-802, including a magnetic spectrometer, was used for the /sup 28/Si measurement. A different experimental arrangement was used for 160. Comparison measurements with proton beams are presented for both configurations. 12 refs., 12 figs.

  16. Comparison of cross sections from the quasi-classical trajectory method and the j(z)-conserving centrifugal sudden approximation with accurate quantum results for an atom-rigid nonlinear polyatomic collision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwenke, David W.

    1993-01-01

    We report the results of a series of calculations of state-to-state integral cross sections for collisions between O and nonvibrating H2O in the gas phase on a model nonreactive potential energy surface. The dynamical methods used include converged quantum mechanical scattering calculations, the j(z) conserving centrifugal sudden (j(z)-CCS) approximation, and quasi-classical trajectory (QCT) calculations. We consider three total energies 0.001, 0.002, and 0.005 E(h) and the nine initial states with rotational angular momentum less than or equal to 2 (h/2 pi). The j(z)-CCS approximation gives good results, while the QCT method can be quite unreliable for transitions to specific rotational sublevels. However, the QCT cross sections summed over final sublevels and averaged over initial sublevels are in better agreement with the quantum results.

  17. Collision experiments with fullerenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, E. E. B.; Ehlich, R.; Westerburg, M.; Hertel, I. V.

    1993-12-01

    Relative fragmentation cross sections for fullerene ion collisions with rare gas atoms and SF6 are presented over a range of collision energies. Structure in the cross sections and threshold energy determinations can shed some light on the fragmentation dynamics. Cluster cluster collisions with fullerenes are also described which show evidence of fusion reactions.

  18. A problem of collision avoidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, T. L.; Cliff, E. M.; Grantham, W. J.; Peng, W. Y.

    1972-01-01

    Collision avoidance between two vehicles of constant speed with limited turning radii, moving in a horizontal plane is investigated. Collision avoidance is viewed as a game by assuming that the operator of one vehicle has perfect knowledge of the state of the other, whereas the operator of the second vehicle is unaware of any impending danger. The situation envisioned is that of an encounter between a commercial aircraft and a small light aircraft. This worse case situation is examined to determine the conditions under which the commercial aircraft should execute a collision avoidance maneuver. Three different zones of vulnerability are defined and the boundaries, or barriers, between these zones are determined for a typical aircraft encounter. A discussion of the methods used to obtain the results as well as some of the salient features associated with the resultant barriers is included.

  19. Initial conditions in heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venugopalan, Raju

    2001-10-01

    At very high energies, partons in nuclei form a color glass condensate (CGC). In a nuclear collision, the color glass shatters, producing a high multiplicity of gluons. We discuss the results of numerical simulations which describe the real time evolution of the CGC in a heavy ion collision.

  20. Radiative double electron capture in collisions of fully-stripped fluorine ions with thin carbon foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elkafrawy, Tamer Mohammad Samy

    Radiative double electron capture (RDEC) is a one-step process in ion-atom collisions occurring when two target electrons are captured to a bound state of the projectile simultaneously with the emission of a single photon. The emitted photon has approximately double the energy of the photon emitted due to radiative electron capture (REC), which occurs when a target electron is captured to a projectile bound state with simultaneous emission of a photon. REC and RDEC can be treated as time-reversed photoionization (PI) and double photoionization (DPI), respectively, if loosely-bound target electrons are captured. This concept can be formulated with the principle of detailed balance, in which the processes of our interest can be described in terms of their time-reversed ones. Fully-stripped ions were used as projectiles in the performed RDEC experiments, providing a recipient system free of electron-related Coulomb fields. This allows the target electrons to be transferred without interaction with any of the projectile electrons, enabling accurate investigation of the electron-electron interaction in the vicinity of electromagnetic field. In this dissertation, RDEC was investigated during the collision of fully-stripped fluorine ions with a thin carbon foil and the results are compared with the recent experimental and theoretical studies. In the current work, x rays associated with projectile charge-changing by single and double electron capture and no charge change by F9+ ions were observed and compared with recent work for O8+ ions and with theory. Both the F 9+ and O8+ ions had energies in the ˜MeV/u range. REC, in turn, was investigated as a means to compare with the theoretical predictions of the RDEC/REC cross section ratio. The most significant background processes including various mechanisms of x-ray emission that may interfere with the energy region of interest are addressed in detail. This enables isolation of the contributions of REC and RDEC from the

  1. Vortex-Surface Collisions^

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conlisk, A. T.

    1998-11-01

    The interaction of vortices with solid surfaces occurs in many different situations including, but not limited to tornadoes, propeller wakes, flows over swept wings and missile forebodies, turbomachinery flows, blade-vortex interactions and tip vortex-surface interactions on helicopters. Often, parts of a system must operate within such flows and thus encounter these vortices. In the present paper we discuss the nature of a particular subset of interactions called ``collisions''. A ``collision'' is characterized by the fact that the core of the vortex is permanently altered; usually the core is locally destroyed. The focus is on fully three-dimensional collisions although two-dimensional collisions are discussed as well. Examples of collisions in helicopter aerodynamics and turbomachinery flows are discussed and the dynamics of the vortex core during a collision process are illustrated for a 90^o collision. ^Supported by the US Army Research Office

  2. Restricted Collision List method for faster Direct Simulation Monte-Carlo (DSMC) collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macrossan, Michael N.

    2016-08-01

    The 'Restricted Collision List' (RCL) method for speeding up the calculation of DSMC Variable Soft Sphere collisions, with Borgnakke-Larsen (BL) energy exchange, is presented. The method cuts down considerably on the number of random collision parameters which must be calculated (deflection and azimuthal angles, and the BL energy exchange factors). A relatively short list of these parameters is generated and the parameters required in any cell are selected from this list. The list is regenerated at intervals approximately equal to the smallest mean collision time in the flow, and the chance of any particle re-using the same collision parameters in two successive collisions is negligible. The results using this method are indistinguishable from those obtained with standard DSMC. The CPU time saving depends on how much of a DSMC calculation is devoted to collisions and how much is devoted to other tasks, such as moving particles and calculating particle interactions with flow boundaries. For 1-dimensional calculations of flow in a tube, the new method saves 20% of the CPU time per collision for VSS scattering with no energy exchange. With RCL applied to rotational energy exchange, the CPU saving can be greater; for small values of the rotational collision number, for which most collisions involve some rotational energy exchange, the CPU may be reduced by 50% or more.

  3. Calculation of the Trubnikov and Nanbu Collision Kernels: Implications for Numerical Modeling of Coulomb Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Dimits, A M; Wang, C; Caflisch, R; Cohen, B I; Huang, Y

    2008-08-06

    We investigate the accuracy of and assumptions underlying the numerical binary Monte-Carlo collision operator due to Nanbu [K. Nanbu, Phys. Rev. E 55 (1997)]. The numerical experiments that resulted in the parameterization of the collision kernel used in Nanbu's operator are argued to be an approximate realization of the Coulomb-Lorentz pitch-angle scattering process, for which an analytical solution for the collision kernel is available. It is demonstrated empirically that Nanbu's collision operator quite accurately recovers the effects of Coulomb-Lorentz pitch-angle collisions, or processes that approximate these (such interspecies Coulomb collisions with very small mass ratio) even for very large values of the collisional time step. An investigation of the analytical solution shows that Nanbu's parameterized kernel is highly accurate for small values of the normalized collision time step, but loses some of its accuracy for larger values of the time step. Careful numerical and analytical investigations are presented, which show that the time dependence of the relaxation of a temperature anisotropy by Coulomb-Lorentz collisions has a richer structure than previously thought, and is not accurately represented by an exponential decay with a single decay rate. Finally, a practical collision algorithm is proposed that for small-mass-ratio interspecies Coulomb collisions improves on the accuracy of Nanbu's algorithm.

  4. A framework of boundary collision data aggregation into neighbourhoods.

    PubMed

    Cui, Ge; Wang, Xin; Kwon, Dae-Won

    2015-10-01

    A large portion of the total number of motor collisions can be boundary collisions; therefore, exaggerated or underestimated numbers for boundary collisions aggregated into neighbourhoods may hamper road safety analyses and management. In this paper, we propose a systematic framework for boundary collision aggregation. First, an entropy-based histogram thresholding method is utilized to determine the boundary zone size and identify boundary collisions. Next, the collision density probability distribution is then established, based on the collisions in each neighbourhood. Last, an effective boundary collision aggregation method, called the collision density ratio (CDR), is used to aggregate boundary collisions into neighbourhoods. The proposed framework is applied to collision data in the City of Edmonton for a case study. The experimental results show that the proposed entropy-based histogram thresholding method can identify boundary collision with the high precision and recall, and the proposed CDR method is more effective than the existing methods, the half-to-half ratio method and the one-to-one ratio method, to aggregate boundary collisions into neighbourhoods. PMID:26143631

  5. K-shell processes in heavy-ion collisions in solids and the local plasma approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadhane, Umesh; Montanari, C. C.; Tribedi, Lokesh C.

    2003-03-01

    We have investigated K-shell vacancy production due to ionization and electron transfer processes, in collisions of highly charged oxygen ions with various solid targets such as Cl, K, Ti, Fe, and Cu at energies between 1.5 and 6.0 MeV/u. The K-shell ionization cross sections were derived from the measured K x-ray cross sections. An ab initio theoretical model based on the local plasma approximation (LPA), which is an extension of the dielectric formalism to consider core electrons, provides an explanation of the measured data only qualitatively. In case of asymmetric collisions (Zp/Zt<0.35, Zp, Zt being the atomic numbers of the projectile and target, respectively) and at higher energies, the LPA model explains the data to some extent but deviates for more symmetric collision systems. On the other hand, a perturbed-stationary-state (PSS) calculation (ECPSSR), including the corrective terms due to energy (E) loss, Coulomb (C) deflection, and relativistic (R) wave functions designed for ion-atom collisions agree quite well with the data for different combinations of target and projectile elements. In addition, we have also measured the K(target)-K(projectile) electron transfer cross sections and compared them with a model based on perturbed-stationary-state approximation.

  6. Disequilibration by Planetary Collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asphaug, E. I.; Jutzi, M.

    2010-12-01

    Molten planets equilibrate gravitationally, chemically, and thermally. Large scale collisions (a.k.a. giant impacts, similar-sized collisions) can upset the apple cart by bringing core material, late in the game, into mixture with mantle products, and by shredding stratified planets into strands of mantle and clumps of core (c.g. Asphaug et al. Nature 2006). Atmophiles and volatiles come along for the ride, and can find themselves in disequilibrium mixtures not anticipated by one-dimensional models of planetary evolution, or by planet growth models in which planets stick, merge, and mix perfectly in the aftermath of a collision. We present very high resolution case studies of such collisions.

  7. Photodetachment collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Pegg, D.J.

    1989-01-01

    A crossed-beams apparatus has been used to measure the cross sections (angular differential and integral) for photodetaching electrons from metastable He/sup/minus// and stable B/sup/minus// ions at /lambda/ = 696.2 nm. Kinematic effects were exploited, in a novel way, to enhance the precision of the measurements. The partial (angular integral) cross sections for He/sup /minus// photodetachment are /sigma/(2/sup 3/S) = 22.9 /plus minus/ 1.0 Mb and /sigma/(2/sup 3/P) = 10.0 /plus minus/ 0.6 Mb. The corresponding cross section for B/sup/minus// is /sigma/(2 /sup 2/) = 16.5 /plus minus/ 2.1 Mb. The calculated cross section for the photodetachment of D/sup /minus// was used to establish an absolute scale for the relative measurements. Radiative attachment cross sections are derived from the photodetachment results using the principle of detailed balance. 16 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. A summary of recent experimental results from Mark J: High energy e/sup +/e/sup /minus// collisions at PETRA: Report Number 131

    SciTech Connect

    Adeva, B.; Barber, D.P.; Becker, U.; Berdugo, J.; Bohm, A.; Branson, J.G.; Burger, J.D.; Capell, M.; Cerrada, M.; Chang, C.C.

    1983-12-01

    The PETRA electron-positron collider at DESY in Hamburg, Federal Republic of Germany, began operating in 1978, with four intersection regions devoted to experiments. In the intervening five years, five detector devices, CELLO, JADE, MARK-J, PLUTO and TASSO have accumulated and published a substantial variety of experimental results. The limits of validity of Quantum Electro-Dynamics (QED) have been extended; the pointlike nature of leptons and quarks have been probed at exceedingly small distances; the Glashow, Weinberg and Salam (GWS) '' standard electroweak model'' has been tested and found to describe interactions remarkably well; the predicted interference between electromagnetic and weak forces has been conclusively demonstrated; events with three jets have been discovered and interpreted as resulting from gluons, as predicted by Quantum Chromo-Dynamics (QCD); the sixth, ''top,'' quark has not been found yet, although an energy search for ''toponium'' (top + antitop) has been carried out up to 43.1 GeV center of mass energy. An integrated luminosity of about 100 pb/sup /minus/1/ mostly at energies above 30 GeV, has produced a very large sample of events. The present paper is a complete review and up-dating of all MARK-J physics results either published or unpublished. Since the amount of interesting information is so large, we realized that a coherent summation could be of substantial usefulness to the community. In order that this review can serve many needs, we include, a brief description of the apparatus and the data acquisition and analysis.

  9. Basins in ARC-continental collisions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Draut, Amy E.; Clift, Peter D.

    2012-01-01

    Arc-continent collisions occur commonly in the plate-tectonic cycle and result in rapidly formed and rapidly collapsing orogens, often spanning just 5-15 My. Growth of continental masses through arc-continent collision is widely thought to be a major process governing the structural and geochemical evolution of the continental crust over geologic time. Collisions of intra-oceanic arcs with passive continental margins (a situation in which the arc, on the upper plate, faces the continent) involve a substantially different geometry than collisions of intra-oceanic arcs with active continental margins (a situation requiring more than one convergence zone and in which the arc, on the lower plate, backs into the continent), with variable preservation potential for basins in each case. Substantial differences also occur between trench and forearc evolution in tectonically erosive versus tectonically accreting margins, both before and after collision. We examine the evolution of trenches, trench-slope basins, forearc basins, intra-arc basins, and backarc basins during arc-continent collision. The preservation potential of trench-slope basins is low; in collision they are rapidly uplifted and eroded, and at erosive margins they are progressively destroyed by subduction erosion. Post-collisional preservation of trench sediment and trench-slope basins is biased toward margins that were tectonically accreting for a substantial length of time before collision. Forearc basins in erosive margins are usually floored by strong lithosphere and may survive collision with a passive margin, sometimes continuing sedimentation throughout collision and orogeny. The low flexural rigidity of intra-arc basins makes them deep and, if preserved, potentially long records of arc and collisional tectonism. Backarc basins, in contrast, are typically subducted and their sediment either lost or preserved only as fragments in melange sequences. A substantial proportion of the sediment derived from

  10. Electron Collisions with Large Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKoy, Vincent

    2006-10-01

    In recent years, interest in electron-molecule collisions has increasingly shifted to large molecules. Applications within the semiconductor industry, for example, require electron collision data for molecules such as perfluorocyclobutane, while almost all biological applications involve macromolecules such as DNA. A significant development in recent years has been the realization that slow electrons can directly damage DNA. This discovery has spurred studies of low-energy collisions with the constituents of DNA, including the bases, deoxyribose, the phosphate, and larger moieties assembled from them. In semiconductor applications, a key goal is development of electron cross section sets for plasma chemistry modeling, while biological studies are largely focused on understanding the role of localized resonances in inducing DNA strand breaks. Accurate calculations of low-energy electron collisions with polyatomic molecules are computationally demanding because of the low symmetry and inherent many-electron nature of the problem; moreover, the computational requirements scale rapidly with the size of the molecule. To pursue such studies, we have adapted our computational procedure, known as the Schwinger multichannel method, to run efficiently on highly parallel computers. In this talk, we will present some of our recent results for fluorocarbon etchants used in the semiconductor industry and for constituents of DNA and RNA. In collaboration with Carl Winstead, California Institute of Technology.

  11. Elastic and Inelastic Collisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gluck, Paul

    2010-01-01

    There have been two articles in this journal that described a pair of collision carts used to demonstrate vividly the difference between elastic and inelastic collisions. One cart had a series of washers that were mounted rigidly on a rigid wooden framework, the other had washers mounted on rubber bands stretched across a framework. The rigidly…

  12. Ball Collision Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, R.

    2015-01-01

    Experiments are described on collisions between two billiard balls and between a bat and a ball. The experiments are designed to extend a student's understanding of collision events and could be used either as a classroom demonstration or for a student project.

  13. Spatial Kerr soliton collisions at arbitrary angles.

    PubMed

    Chamorro-Posada, P; McDonald, G S

    2006-09-01

    The theory of spatial Kerr solitons is extended to colliding beams that are neither almost-exactly copropagating nor almost-exactly counterpropagating. Our new Helmholtz formalism yields results that are consistent with the inherent symmetry of the collision process and that are not predicted by existing paraxial descriptions. Full numerical and approximate analytical results are presented. These show excellent agreement. In particular, Kerr solitons are found to be remarkably robust under nonparaxial collisions. PMID:17025766

  14. Polarization effects in heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Barros, C. C. Jr.

    2010-11-12

    Recent experiments at RHIC have shown that in 200 GeV Au-Au collisions, the {Lambda} and {Lambda}-bar hyperons are produced with very small polarizations, almost consistent with zero. These results can be understood in terms of a model that we recently proposed. In this work, we show how this model may be applied in such collisions, and also will discuss the relation of our results with other models, in order to explain the experimental data.

  15. Collision lifetimes of polyatomic molecules at low temperatures: Benzene–benzene vs benzene–rare gas atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Jie; Krems, Roman V.; Li, Zhiying

    2014-10-28

    We use classical trajectory calculations to study the effects of the interaction strength and the geometry of rigid polyatomic molecules on the formation of long-lived collision complexes at low collision energies. We first compare the results of the calculations for collisions of benzene molecules with rare gas atoms He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe. The comparison illustrates that the mean lifetimes of the collision complexes increase monotonically with the strength of the atom–molecule interaction. We then compare the results of the atom–benzene calculations with those for benzene–benzene collisions. The comparison illustrates that the mean lifetimes of the benzene–benzene collision complexes are significantly reduced due to non-ergodic effects prohibiting the molecules from sampling the entire configuration space. We find that the thermally averaged lifetimes of the benzene–benzene collisions are much shorter than those for Xe with benzene and similar to those for Ne with benzene.

  16. Annihilation of nematic point defects: Pre-collision and post-collision evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svetec, M.; Kralj, S.; Bradač, Z.; Žumer, S.

    2006-05-01

    The annihilation of the nematic hedgehog and anti-hedgehog within an infinite cylinder of radius R is studied. The semi-microscopic lattice-type model and Brownian molecular dynamics are used. We distinguish among the i) early pre-collision, ii) late pre-collision, iii) early post-collision, and iv) late post-collision stages. In the pre-collision stage our results agree qualitatively with the existing experimental observations and also continuum-type simulations. The core of each defect exhibits a ring-like structure, where the ring axis is set perpendicular to the cylinder symmetry axis. For ξ(0)d/(2R) > 1 the interaction between defects is negligible, where ξ(0)d describes the initial separation of defects. Consequently, the defects annihilate within the simulation time window for ξ(0)d/(2R) < 1. For close enough defects their separation scales as ξd \\varpropto (tc - t)0.4±0.1, where tc stands for the collision time. In elastically anisotropic medium the hedgehog is faster than the anti-hedgehog. In the early pre-collision stage the defects can be treated as point-like particles, possessing inherent core structure, that interact via the nematic director field. In the late pre-collision stage the cores reflect the interaction between defects. After the collision a charge-less ring structure is first formed. In the early post-collision stage the ring adopts an essentially untwisted circular structure of the radius ξr. In the late post-collision stage we observe two qualitatively different scenarios. For μ = ξr/R < μc ˜ 0.25 the ring collapses leading to the escaped radial equilibrium structure. For μ > μc the chargeless ring triggers the nucleation growth into the planar polar structure with line defects.

  17. Comparison of collision operators for the geodesic acoustic mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yang; Gao, Zhe

    2015-04-01

    The collisional damping rate and real frequency of the geodesic acoustic mode (GAM) are solved from a drift kinetic model with different collision operators. As the ion collision rate increases, the damping rate increases at low collision rate but decays at high ion collision rate. Different collision operators do not change the overall trend but influence the magnitude of the damping rate. The collision damping is much overestimated with the number-conserving-only Krook operator; on the other hand, using the Lorentz operator with a constant collision rate, the damping is overestimated at low collision rate but underestimated at high collision rate. The results from the Krook operator with both number and energy conservation terms, the Lorentz operator with an energy-dependent collision rate and the full Hirshman-Sigmar-Clarke collision operator are very close. Meanwhile, as the ion collision rate increases, the GAM frequency decreases from the collisionless value, \\sqrt {7/4+τ} {vti}/R , to \\sqrt {1+τ} {vti}/R for the number-conserving-only Krook operator, but to \\sqrt {5/3+τ} {vti}/R for the other four operators, which conserve both number and energy, where τ, vti and R are the ratio of electron temperature to ion temperature, the ion thermal velocity and the major radius, respectively. The results imply that the property of energy conservation of the collision operator is important to the dynamics of the GAM as well as that of number conservation, which may provide guidance in choosing collision operators in further study of the zonal flow (ZF) dynamics, such as the nonlinear simulation of the ZF-turbulence system.

  18. Late Triassic paleomagnetic result from the Baoshan Terrane, West Yunnan of China: Implication for orientation of the East Paleotethys suture zone and timing of the Sibumasu-Indochina collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jie; Huang, Baochun; Yan, Yonggang; Zhang, Donghai

    2015-11-01

    In order to better understand the paleogeographic position of the Baoshan Terrane in the northernmost part of the Sibumasu Block during formation of the Pangea supercontinent, a paleomagnetic study has been conducted on Late Triassic basaltic lavas from the southern part of the Baoshan Terrane in the West Yunnan region of Southwest China. Following detailed rock magnetic investigations and progressive thermal demagnetization, stable characteristic remanent magnetizations (ChRMs) were successfully isolated from Late Triassic Niuhetang lava flows. The ChRMs are of dual polarity and pass fold and reversal tests with magnetic carriers dominated by magnetite and subordinate oxidation-induced hematite; we thus interpret them as a primary remanence. This new paleomagnetic result indicates that the Baoshan Terrane was located at low paleolatitudes of ∼15°N in the Northern Hemisphere during Late Triassic times. Together with available paleomagnetic data from the Baoshan Terrane and surrounding areas, a wider paleomagnetic comparison supports the view that the East Paleotethys Ocean separated the Sibumasu and Indochina blocks and closed no later than Late Triassic times. We argue that the currently approximately north-to-south directed Changning-Menglian suture zone is very likely to have been oriented nearly east-to-west at the time of the Sibumasu-Indochina collision.

  19. COLLIDE: Collisions into Dust Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colwell, Joshua E.

    1999-01-01

    The Collisions Into Dust Experiment (COLLIDE) was completed and flew on STS-90 in April and May of 1998. After the experiment was returned to Earth, the data and experiment were analyzed. Some anomalies occurred during the flight which prevented a complete set of data from being obtained. However, the experiment did meet its criteria for scientific success and returned surprising results on the outcomes of very low energy collisions into powder. The attached publication, "Low Velocity Microgravity Impact Experiments into Simulated Regolith," describes in detail the scientific background, engineering, and scientific results of COLLIDE. Our scientific conclusions, along with a summary of the anomalies which occurred during flight, are contained in that publication. We offer it as our final report on this grant.

  20. Molecular vibrational states during a collision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Recamier, Jose A.; Jauregui, Rocio

    1995-01-01

    Alternative algebraic techniques to approximate a given Hamiltonian by a harmonic oscillator are described both for time-independent and time-dependent systems. We apply them to the description of a one dimensional atom-diatom collision. From the resulting evolution operator, we evaluate vibrational transition probabilities as well as other time-dependent properties. As expected, the ground vibrational state becomes a squeezed state during the collision.

  1. Kink Collisions in Curved Field Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahlqvist, Pontus; Eckerle, Kate; Greene, Brian

    2015-04-01

    We study bubble universe collisions in the ultrarelativistic limit with the new feature of allowing for nontrivial curvature in field space. We establish a simple geometrical interpretation of such collisions in terms of a double family of field profiles whose tangent vector fields stand in mutual parallel transport. This provides a generalization of the well-known flat field space limit of the free passage approximation. We investigate the limits of this approximation and illustrate our analytical results with numerical simulations.

  2. Modelling Coulomb Collisions in Anisotropic Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellinger, P.; Travnicek, P. M.

    2009-12-01

    Collisional transport in anisotropic plasmas is investigated comparing the theoretical transport coefficients (Hellinger and Travnicek, 2009) for anisotropic particles with the results of the corresponding Langevin equation, obtained as a generalization of Manheimer et al. (1997). References: Hellinger, P., and P. M. Travnicek (2009), On Coulomb collisions in bi-Maxwellian plasmas, Phys. Plasmas, 16, 054501. Manheimer, W. M., M. Lampe and G. Joyce (1997), Langevin representation of Coulomb collisions in PIC simulations, J. Comput. Phys., 138, 563-584.

  3. Icy Collisions - Planet Building beyond the snowline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaertner, Sabrina; Hill, Catherine; Heisselmann, Daniel; Blum, Juergen; Fraser, Helen

    2015-11-01

    Collisions of small icy and dust particles beyond the “snow-line” are a key step in planet formation. Whilst the physical forces that underpin the aggregation of the smallest grains (van der Waals) and the largest planetessimals (gravity) are well understood, the processes involving mm - cm sized particles remain a mystery.In a unique set of experiments, we investigated low velocity collisions of dust and icy particles in this size range under microgravity conditions - utilizing parabolic flight (e.g. Salter 2009, Hill 2015 (a) & (b)). Experiments were performed at cryogenic temperatures (below 140 K) for icy aggregates and ambient as well as cryogenic temperatures (80 - 220 K) for dust aggregates.The kinetic analysis of the observed collisions of different aggregate types in different shapes and sizes revealed astonishing results - as the collisional properties of all investigated particles differ strongly from the usual assumptions in models of planet formation.Here, we present a summary of the results on the collisions of icy particles as well as first results on the collisions of dust aggregates. Focus will be on the coefficient of restitution, which measures the loss of translational energy in bouncing collisions and is a key parameter in models of planet formation.

  4. Electron impact collision strengths in Ne VII

    SciTech Connect

    Di, L.; Shi, J.R.; Zhao, G.

    2012-07-15

    The lines of Ne VII have been observed in many astronomical objects, and some transitions from high energy levels were observed both in Seyfert galaxies and stellar coronae. Thus, the atomic data for these transitions are important for modeling. Using the code FAC we calculated the collision strengths based on the distorted-wave method with large configuration interactions included. The Maxwellian averaged effective collision strengths covering the typical temperature range of astronomical and laboratory hot plasmas are presented. We extend the calculation of the energy levels to n=4 and 5. The energy levels, wavelengths, spontaneous transition rates, weighted oscillator strengths, and effective collision strengths were reported. Compared with the results from experiment or previous theoretical calculations a general agreement is found. It is found that the resonance effects are important in calculating the effective collision strengths.

  5. Polar molecule reactive collisions in quasi-1D systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simoni, A.; Srinivasan, S.; Launay, J.-M.; Jachymski, K.; Idziaszek, Z.; Julienne, P. S.

    2015-01-01

    We study polar molecule scattering in quasi-one-dimensional geometries. Elastic and reactive collision rates are computed as a function of collision energy and electric dipole moment for different confinement strengths. The numerical results are interpreted in terms of first order scattering and of adiabatic models. Universal dipolar scattering is also discussed. Our results are relevant to experiments where control of the collision dynamics through one-dimensional confinement and an applied electric field is envisioned.

  6. Newton's Strange Collisions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erlichson, Herman

    1995-01-01

    Discusses Newton's apparent oversight of the role of energy considerations in collisions between two spherical bodies related to the third corollary of his "Laws of Motion." Investigates several theories that provide solutions to the mysterious oversight. (LZ)

  7. Time rate collision matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Stoenescu, M.L.; Smith, T.M.

    1980-02-01

    The collision integral terms in Boltzmann equation are reformulated numerically leading to the substitution of the multiple integrals with a multiplicative matrix of the two colliding species velocity distribution functions which varies with the differential collision cross section. A matrix of lower rank may be constructed when one of the distribution functions is specified, in which case the matrix elements represent kinetic transition probabilities in the velocity space and the multiplication of the time rate collision matrix with the unknown velocity distribution function expresses the time rate of change of the distribution. The collision matrix may be used to describe the time evolution of systems in nonequilibrium conditions, to evaluate the rate of momentum and energy transfer between given species, or to generate validity criteria for linearized kinetic equations.

  8. Collision prediction software for radiotherapy treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Padilla, Laura; Pearson, Erik A.; Pelizzari, Charles A.

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: This work presents a method of collision predictions for external beam radiotherapy using surface imaging. The present methodology focuses on collision prediction during treatment simulation to evaluate the clearance of a patient’s treatment position and allow for its modification if necessary. Methods: A Kinect camera (Microsoft, Redmond, WA) is used to scan the patient and immobilization devices in the treatment position at the simulator. The surface is reconstructed using the SKANECT software (Occipital, Inc., San Francisco, CA). The treatment isocenter is marked using simulated orthogonal lasers projected on the surface scan. The point cloud of this surface is then shifted to isocenter and converted from Cartesian to cylindrical coordinates. A slab models the treatment couch. A cylinder with a radius equal to the normal distance from isocenter to the collimator plate, and a height defined by the collimator diameter is used to estimate collisions. Points within the cylinder clear through a full gantry rotation with the treatment couch at 0° , while points outside of it collide. The angles of collision are reported. This methodology was experimentally verified using a mannequin positioned in an alpha cradle with both arms up. A planning CT scan of the mannequin was performed, two isocenters were marked in PINNACLE, and this information was exported to AlignRT (VisionRT, London, UK)—a surface imaging system for patient positioning. This was used to ensure accurate positioning of the mannequin in the treatment room, when available. Collision calculations were performed for the two treatment isocenters and the results compared to the collisions detected the room. The accuracy of the Kinect-Skanect surface was evaluated by comparing it to the external surface of the planning CT scan. Results: Experimental verification results showed that the predicted angles of collision matched those recorded in the room within 0.5°, in most cases (largest deviation

  9. Electron capture in very low energy collisions of multicharged ions with H and D in merged beams

    SciTech Connect

    Havener, C.C.; Meyer, F.W.; Phaneuf, R.A.

    1991-01-01

    An ion-atom merged-beams technique is being used to measure total absolute electron-capture cross sections for multicharged ions in collisions with H (or D) in the energy range between 0.1 and 1000 eV/amu. Comparison between experiment and theory over such a large energy range constitutes a critical test for both experiment and theory. Total capture cross-section measurements for O{sup 3+} H(D) and O{sup 5+} + H(D) are presented and compared to state selective and differential cross section calculations. Landau-Zener calculations show that for O{sup 5+} the sharp increase in the measured cross section below 1 eV/amu is partly due to trajectory effects arising from the ion-induced dipole interaction between the reactants. 20 refs., 8 figs.

  10. Search for collective expansion in pp collisions at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floris, Michele; ALICE Collaboration

    2011-01-01

    Proton-proton collisions at LHC energies reach a multiplicity density comparable to nuclear collisions at lower energy. It is therefore natural to ask whether the collective bulk behavior observed in heavy-ion collisions develops already in p-p collisions. In previous experiments, the study of pt distributions of identified particles in the framework of blast wave models provided considerable insight on the collective behavior and on the freeze-out parameters of the fireball created in heavy-ion collisions. These ideas have recently been applied also to p-p collisions at RHIC. The ALICE experiment, thanks to its excellent PID capabilities and pt coverage, offers an ideal test-bench for these studies at the LHC. In this work, we discuss the performance and analysis strategy of ALICE for blast wave studies and present some preliminary results on identified particle spectra, based on the data collected in the late 2009.

  11. Ion Collision, Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, Anil K.

    2013-09-11

    The outcome of a collision between an ion and neutral species depends on the chemical and physical properties of the two reactants, their relative velocities, and the impact parameter of their trajectories. These include elastic and inelastic scattering of the colliding particles, charge transfer (including dissociative charge transfer), atom abstraction, complex formation and dissociation of the colliding ion. Each of these reactions may be characterized in terms of their energy-dependent rate coefficients, cross sections and reaction kinetics. A theoretical framework that emphasizes simple models and classical mechanics is presented for these processes. Collision processes are addressed in two categories of low-energy and high-energy collisions. Experiments under thermal or quasi-thermal conditions–swarms, drift tubes, chemical ionization and ion cyclotron resonance are strongly influenced by long-range forces and often involve collisions in which atom exchange and extensive energy exchange are common characteristics. High-energy collisions are typically impulsive, involve short-range intermolecular forces and are direct, fast processes.

  12. Rapidity dependence in holographic heavy ion collisions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wilke van der Schee; Schenke, Bjorn

    2015-12-11

    We present an attempt to closely mimic the initial stage of heavy ion collisions within holography, assuming a decoupling of longitudinal and transverse dynamics in the very early stage. We subsequently evolve the obtained initial state using state-of-the-art hydrodynamic simulations and compare results with experimental data. We present results for charged hadron pseudorapidity spectra and directed and elliptic flow as functions of pseudorapidity for √sNN = 200GeV Au-Au and 2.76TeV Pb-Pb collisions. As a result, the directed flow interestingly turns out to be quite sensitive to the viscosity. The results can explain qualitative features of the collisions, but the rapiditymore » spectra in our current model is narrower than the experimental data.« less

  13. Rapidity dependence in holographic heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Wilke van der Schee; Schenke, Bjorn

    2015-12-11

    We present an attempt to closely mimic the initial stage of heavy ion collisions within holography, assuming a decoupling of longitudinal and transverse dynamics in the very early stage. We subsequently evolve the obtained initial state using state-of-the-art hydrodynamic simulations and compare results with experimental data. We present results for charged hadron pseudorapidity spectra and directed and elliptic flow as functions of pseudorapidity for √sNN = 200GeV Au-Au and 2.76TeV Pb-Pb collisions. As a result, the directed flow interestingly turns out to be quite sensitive to the viscosity. The results can explain qualitative features of the collisions, but the rapidity spectra in our current model is narrower than the experimental data.

  14. Electron Impact Collision Strength in Si IX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noman, Hala; Gokce, Y.; Nahar, Sultana; Pradhan, Anil

    2016-05-01

    Results from work in progress under Iron Project on the electron impact excitation collision strengths and rate coefficients for transitions between the fine-structure levels of the 2s2 2p2 , 2 s 2p3 , 2p4 , 2s2 2 p 3 s , 2s2 2 p 3 p , and 2s2 2 p 3 d configurations in Si IX will be presented. The fine structure collision strength has been calculated at very fine energy mesh using relativistic effects in Breit-Pauli R-matrix method. Maxwellian averaged collision strengths have been tabulated for all possible transitions among all 46 enrgy levels. We made comparisions of our results with the previously reported results in the literature and found significant differences in low the temperature range (Te < 106 K) for few of the transitions. The correction to the previous reported values results due to more extensive expansion for Si IX target states.

  15. Landau quantization effects in ultracold atom-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simoni, Andrea; Launay, Jean-Michel

    2011-12-01

    We study ultracold atom-ion collisions in the presence of an external magnetic field. At low collision energy the field can drastically modify the translational motion of the ion, which follows quantized cyclotron orbits. We present a rigorous theoretical approach for the calculation of quantum scattering amplitudes in these conditions. Collisions in different magnetic field regimes, identified by the size of the cyclotron radius with respect to the range of the interaction potential, are investigated. Our results are important in cases where use of a magnetic field to control the atom-ion collision dynamics is envisioned.

  16. Jets and Vector Bosons in Heavy Ion Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Cruz, Begoña

    2013-11-01

    This paper reviews experimental results on jets and electroweak boson (photon,Wand Z) production in heavy-ion collisions, from the CMS and ATLAS detectors, using data collected during 2011 PbPb run and pp data collected at an equivalent energy. By comparing the two collision systems, the energy loss of the partons propagating through the medium produced in PbPb collisions can be studied. Its characterization is done using dijet events and isolated photon-jet pairs. Since the electroweak gauge bosons do not participate in the strong interaction, and are thus unmodified by the nuclear medium, they serve as clean probes of the initial state in the collision.

  17. Hydrodynamic evolution and jet energy loss in Cu + Cu collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Schenke, Bjoern; Jeon, Sangyong; Gale, Charles

    2011-04-15

    We present results from a hybrid description of Cu + Cu collisions using (3 + 1)-dimensional hydrodynamics (music) for the bulk evolution and a Monte Carlo simulation (martini) for the evolution of high-momentum partons in the hydrodynamical background. We explore the limits of this description by going to small system sizes and determine the dependence on different fractions of wounded nucleon and binary collisions scaling of the initial energy density. We find that Cu + Cu collisions are well described by the hybrid description at least up to 20% central collisions.

  18. Microscope collision protection apparatus

    DOEpatents

    DeNure, Charles R.

    2001-10-23

    A microscope collision protection apparatus for a remote control microscope which protects the optical and associated components from damage in the event of an uncontrolled collision with a specimen, regardless of the specimen size or shape. In a preferred embodiment, the apparatus includes a counterbalanced slide for mounting the microscope's optical components. This slide replaces the rigid mounts on conventional upright microscopes with a precision ball bearing slide. As the specimen contacts an optical component, the contacting force will move the slide and the optical components mounted thereon. This movement will protect the optical and associated components from damage as the movement causes a limit switch to be actuated, thereby stopping all motors responsible for the collision.

  19. Collision of cosmic superstrings

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, E. J.; Firouzjahi, H.; Kibble, T. W. B.; Steer, D. A.

    2008-03-15

    We study the formation of three-string junctions between (p,q)-cosmic superstrings, and collisions between such strings and show that kinematic constraints analogous to those found previously for collisions of Nambu-Goto strings apply here too, with suitable modifications to take account of the additional requirements of flux conservation. We examine in detail several examples involving collisions between strings with low values of p and q, and also examine the rates of growth or shrinkage of strings at a junction. Finally, we briefly discuss the formation of junctions for strings in a warped space, specifically with a Klebanov-Strassler throat, and show that similar constraints still apply with changes to the parameters taking account of the warping and the background flux.

  20. A numerical investigation of continental collision styles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazian, Reza Khabbaz; Buiter, Susanne J. H.

    2013-06-01

    Continental collision after closure of an ocean can lead to different deformation styles: subduction of continental crust and lithosphere, lithospheric thickening, folding of the unsubducted continents, Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instabilities and/or slab break-off. We use 2-D thermomechanical models of oceanic subduction followed by continental collision to investigate the sensitivity of these collision styles to driving velocity, crustal and lithospheric temperature, continental rheology and the initial density difference between the oceanic lithosphere and the asthenosphere. We find that these parameters influence the collision system, but that driving velocity, rheology and lithospheric (rather than Moho and mantle) temperature can be classified as important controls, whereas reasonable variations in the initial density contrast between oceanic lithosphere and asthenosphere are not necessarily important. Stable continental subduction occurs over a relatively large range of values of driving velocity and lithospheric temperature. Fast and cold systems are more likely to show folding, whereas slow and warm systems can experience RT-type dripping. Our results show that a continent with a strong upper crust can experience subduction of the entire crust and is more likely to fold. Accretion of the upper crust at the trench is feasible when the upper crust has a moderate to weak strength, whereas the entire crust can be scraped-off in the case of a weak lower crust. We also illustrate that weakening of the lithospheric mantle promotes RT-type of dripping in a collision system. We use a dynamic collision model, in which collision is driven by slab pull only, to illustrate that adjacent plates can play an important role in continental collision systems. In dynamic collision models, exhumation of subducted continental material and sediments is triggered by slab retreat and opening of a subduction channel, which allows upward flow of buoyant materials. Exhumation continues

  1. Dynamical resonant electron capture in atom surface collisions: H- formation in H-Al(111) collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, A. G.; Teillet-Billy, D.; Gauyacq, J. P.

    1992-05-01

    The formation of H- ion by grazing-angle collisions of hydrogen on an Al(111) surface is investigated with the newly developed coupled angular mode method. The capture process involves a dynamical resonant process induced by the collision velocity. All the resonance properties of the H- level in front of an Al(111) surface are determined: position, width, and angular distribution of ejected electrons. The results are shown to account for the recent observations on H- formation by Wyputta, Zimny, and Winter.

  2. High energy hadron-hadron collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, T.T.

    1990-11-01

    Results of a study on high energy collision with the geometrical model are summarized in three parts: (i) the elastic hadron-hadron collision, (ii) the inelastic hadron-hadron collision, and (iii) the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} annihilation. For elastic collisions, a simple expression for the proton matter distribution is proposed which fits well the elastic {bar p}p scattering from ISR to S{bar p}pS energies within the geometrical model. The proton form factor is of the dipole form with an energy-dependent range parameter. The {bar p}p elastic differential cross section at Tevatron energies obtained by extrapolation is in good agreement with experiments. For multiparticle emission processes a unified physical picture for hadron-hadron and e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collisions was proposed. A number of predictions were made, including the one that KNO-scaling does not obtain for e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} two-jet events. An extension of the considerations within the geometrical model led to a theory of the momentum distributions of the outgoing particles which are found in good agreement with current experimental data. Extrapolations of results to higher energies have been made. The cluster size of hadrons produced in e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} annihilation is found to increase slowly with energy.

  3. Automobile Collisions, Kinematics and Related Injury Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, A. W.

    1972-01-01

    It has been determined clinically that fatalities and injury severity resulting from automobile collisions have decreased during the last five years for low impact speeds. This reduction is a direct result of the application of biomechanics and occupant kinematics, as well as changes in automobile design. The paper defines terminology used in the field of mechanics and develops examples and illustrations of the physical concepts of acceleration, force strength, magnitude duration, rate of onset and others, as they apply to collision phenomena and injury. The mechanism of injury pattern reduction through the use of restraint systems is illustrated. PMID:5059661

  4. Fully dynamical simulation of central nuclear collisions.

    PubMed

    van der Schee, Wilke; Romatschke, Paul; Pratt, Scott

    2013-11-27

    We present a fully dynamical simulation of central nuclear collisions around midrapidity at LHC energies. Unlike previous treatments, we simulate all phases of the collision, including the equilibration of the system. For the simulation, we use numerical relativity solutions to anti-de Sitter space/conformal field theory for the preequilibrium stage, viscous hydrodynamics for the plasma equilibrium stage, and kinetic theory for the low-density hadronic stage. Our preequilibrium stage provides initial conditions for hydrodynamics, resulting in sizable radial flow. The resulting light particle spectra reproduce the measurements from the ALICE experiment at all transverse momenta. PMID:24329444

  5. Exotics from Heavy Ion Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Ohnishi, Akira; Jido, Daisuke; Cho, Sungtae; Furumoto, Takenori; Yazaki, Koichi; Hyodo, Tetsuo; Ko, Che Ming; Lee, Su Houng; Nielsen, Marina; Sekihara, Takayasu; Yasui, Shigehiro

    2011-10-21

    Discriminating hadronic molecular and multi-quark states is a long standing problem in hadronic physics. We propose here to utilize relativistic heavy ion collisions to resolve this problem, as exotic hadron yields are expected to be strongly affected by their structures. Using the coalescence model, we find that the exotic hadron yield relative to the statistical model result is typically an order of magnitude smaller for a compact multi-quark state, and larger by a factor of two or more for a loosely bound hadronic molecule. We further find that some of the newly proposed heavy exotic states could be produced and realistically measured at RHIC and LHC.

  6. Real barchan dune collisions and ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugenholtz, Chris H.; Barchyn, Thomas E.

    2012-01-01

    From high-resolution satellite imagery of barchan sand dunes, we provide geomorphological evidence of collisions that result in the ejection of a barchan from the wake of another barchan dune. Previous interpretations suggest this outcome is evidence of soliton or solitary wave behaviour; however, the physical mechanisms for mass exchange are not fully understood, resulting in debate. Our evidence and interpretation indicates that mass is transferred to the upwind barchan by shadowing a portion of downwind barchan's stoss slope. Turbulent, unsaturated airflow erodes the surface between the dunes, creating a smaller dune that ejects from the wake region. Previous observations lacked the spatial resolution required to document this process; therefore, our observations clarify the collision dynamics of barchans. A broader implication of our observations is the role of collisions in maintaining an “equilibrium” size distribution in barchan swarms.

  7. Computations of Drop Collision and Coalescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tryggvason, Gretar; Juric, Damir; Nas, Selman; Mortazavi, Saeed

    1996-01-01

    Computations of drops collisions, coalescence, and other problems involving drops are presented. The computations are made possible by a finite difference/front tracking technique that allows direct solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations for a multi-fluid system with complex, unsteady internal boundaries. This method has been used to examine the various collision modes for binary collisions of drops of equal size, mixing of two drops of unequal size, behavior of a suspension of drops in linear and parabolic shear flows, and the thermal migration of several drops. The key results from these simulations are reviewed. Extensions of the method to phase change problems and preliminary results for boiling are also shown.

  8. Neutrino-atom collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouzakov, Konstantin A.; Studenikin, Alexander I.

    2016-05-01

    Neutrino-atom scattering provides a sensitive tool for probing nonstandard interactions of massive neutrinos in laboratory measurements. The ionization channel of this collision process plays an important role in experiments searching for neutrino magnetic moments. We discuss some theoretical aspects of atomic ionization by massive neutrinos. We also outline possible manifestations of neutrino electromagnetic properties in coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering.

  9. Rotation as an origin of high energy particle collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaslavskii, O. B.

    2016-01-01

    We consider collision of two particles in rotating spacetimes without horizons. If the metric coefficient responsible for rotation of spacetime is big enough, the energy of collisions in the center of mass frame can be as large as one likes. This can happen in the ergoregion only. The results are model-independent and apply both to relativistic stars and wormholes.

  10. Crabbed Waist Collisions in DAFNE and Super-B Design

    SciTech Connect

    Raimondi, P.; Alesini, D.; Biagini, M.E.; Biscari, C.; Boni, R.; Boscolo, M.; Bossi, F.; Buonomo, B.; Clozza, A.; Delle Monache, G.O.; Demma, T.; Di Pasquale, E.; Di Pirro, G.; Drago, A.; Gallo, A.; Ghigo, A.; Guiducci, S.; Ligi, C.; Marcellini, F.; Mazzitelli, Giovanni; Milardi, C.; /Frascati /Orsay, LAL /CERN /Rome III U. /Rome U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /KEK, Tsukuba /INFN, Pisa /INFN, Cosenza /SLAC /Frascati

    2011-11-02

    The new idea of increasing the luminosity of a collider with crab waist collisions and first experimental results from the DA{Phi}NE {Phi}-Factory at LNF, Frascati, using this concept are presented. Consequences for the design of future factories will be discussed. An outlook to the performance reach with crab waist collisions is given, with emphasis on future B Factories.

  11. Particle collision in Newtonian and viscoelastic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardekani, Arezoo

    2009-11-01

    Particle-particle and particle-wall collision occurs in many natural and industrial applications such as sedimentation, crystal growth, suspension rheology, and microfluidic devices such as those used in mechanical cell lysis. To accurately predict the behavior of particulate flows, fundamental knowledge of the mechanisms of single collision is required. In this work, particle-wall collision in Newtonian and viscoelastic fluids is numerically and experimentally studied. The effect of Stokes number, surface roughness, and Deborah number on the rebound velocity of a colliding spherical particle on a wall is considered. The experimental study of particle-wall collision in poly(ethylene-oxide) mixed with water shows that the results for the coefficient of restitution in polymeric liquids can be collapsed together with the Newtonian fluid behavior if one defines the Stokes number based on the local strain rate. In addition, the effects of particle interaction and collision on the droplet breakup in a particulate shear flow are studied. The presence of particles leads to larger droplet deformation and a perforation in the center of the droplet. It is found that the critical Stokes number above which a perforation occurs increases linearly with the inverse of the capillary number and viscosity ratio.

  12. Modelling of a collision between two smartphones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jesus, V. L. B.; Sasaki, D. G. G.

    2016-09-01

    In the predominant approach in physics textbooks, the collision between particles is treated as a black box, where no physical quantity can be measured. This approach becomes even more evident in experimental classes where collisions are the simplest and most common way of applying the theorem of conservation of linear momentum in the asymptotic behavior. In this paper we develop and analyse an experiment on collisions using only two smartphones. The experimental setup is amazingly simple; the two devices are aligned on a horizontal table of lacquered wood, in order to slide more easily. At the edge of one of them a piece of common sponge is glued using double-sided tape. By using a free smartphone application, the values generated by the accelerometer of the two devices in full motion are measured and tabulated. Through numerical iteration, the speed graphs of the smartphones before, during, and after the collision are obtained. The main conclusions were: (i) the demonstration of the feasibility of using smartphones as an alternative to air tracks and electronic sensors employed in a teaching lab, (ii) the possibility of investigating the collision itself, its characteristics and effects; this is the great advantage of the use of smartphones over traditional experiments, (iii) the compatibility of the results with the impulse-momentum theorem, within the margin of uncertainty.

  13. Classical chromodynamics and heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lappi, T.

    2005-05-01

    This paper is a slightly modified version of the introductory part of a doctoral dissertation also containing the articles hep-ph/0303076, hep-ph/0409328 and hep-ph/0409058. The paper focuses on the calculation of particle production in a relativistic heavy ion collision using the McLerran-Venugopalan model. The main part of the paper summarizes the background of these numerical calculations. First we relate this calculation of the initial stage af a heavy ion collision to our understanding of the whole collision process. Then we discuss the saturation physics of the small x wavefunction of a hadron or a nucleus. The classical field model of Kovner, McLerran and Weigert is then introduced before moving to discuss the numerical algorithms used to compute gluon and quark pair production in this model. Finally we shortly review the results on gluon and quark-antiquark production obtained in the three articles mentioned above.

  14. Neutrino quantum kinetic equations: The collision term

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Blaschke, Daniel N.; Cirigliano, Vincenzo

    2016-08-25

    We derive the collision term relevant for neutrino quantum kinetic equations in the early universe and compact astrophysical objects, displaying its full matrix structure in both flavor and spin degrees of freedom. We include in our analysis neutrino-neutrino processes, scattering and annihilation with electrons and positrons, and neutrino scattering off nucleons (the latter in the low-density limit). After presenting the general structure of the collision terms, we take two instructive limiting cases. The one-flavor limit highlights the structure in helicity space and allows for a straightforward interpretation of the off-diagonal entries in terms of the product of scattering amplitudes ofmore » the two helicity states. As a result, the isotropic limit is relevant for studies of the early universe: in this case the terms involving spin coherence vanish and the collision term can be expressed in terms of two-dimensional integrals, suitable for computational implementation.« less

  15. Electromagnetically induced absorption via incoherent collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Xihua; Sheng Jiteng; Xiao Min

    2011-10-15

    We conduct theoretical studies on electromagnetically induced absorption via incoherent collisions in an inhomogeneously broadened ladder-type three-level system with the density-matrix approach. The effects of the collision-induced coherence decay rates as well as the probe laser field intensity on the probe field absorption are examined. It is shown that with the increase of the collisional decay rates in a moderate range, a narrow dip due to electromagnetically induced transparency superimposed on the Doppler-broadened absorption background can be turned into a narrow peak under the conditions that the probe field intensity is not very weak as compared to the pump field, which results from the enhancement of constructive interference and suppression of destructive interference between one-photon and multiphoton transition pathways. The physical origin of the collision-assisted electromagnetically induced absorption is analyzed with a power-series solution of the density-matrix equations.

  16. Active Collision Avoidance for Planetary Landers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rickman, Doug; Hannan, Mike; Srinivasan, Karthik

    2014-01-01

    Present day robotic missions to other planets require precise, a priori knowledge of the terrain to pre-determine a landing spot that is safe. Landing sites can be miles from the mission objective, or, mission objectives may be tailored to suit landing sites. Future robotic exploration missions should be capable of autonomously identifying a safe landing target within a specified target area selected by mission requirements. Such autonomous landing sites must (1) 'see' the surface, (2) identify a target, and (3) land the vehicle. Recent advances in radar technology have resulted in small, lightweight, low power radars that are used for collision avoidance and cruise control systems in automobiles. Such radar systems can be adapted for use as active hazard avoidance systems for planetary landers. The focus of this CIF proposal is to leverage earlier work on collision avoidance systems for MSFC's Mighty Eagle lander and evaluate the use of automotive radar systems for collision avoidance in planetary landers.

  17. A study of the collisional dynamics for collisions of UF with atoms and molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doverspike, L. D.; Champion, R. D.

    1980-08-01

    Absolute total cross sections for the collisional decomposition of the negative ion of uranium hexafluoride into its three lowest asymptotic channels in collisions with the rare gases were measured for collision energies ranging from below thresholds for decomposition up to a laboratory collision energy of 500 eV. The experimental results were found to be consistent with the predictions of a two step collision model where the unimolecular decomposition of the excited molecular negative ions is described with a statistical theory.

  18. Systematics of Charged Particle Production in Heavy-Ion Collisions with the PHOBOS Detector at Rhic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinberg, Peter A.; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Corbo, J.; Decowski, M. P.; Garcia, E.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Henderson, C.; Hicks, D.; Hofman, D.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołyński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Michałowski, J.; Mignerey, A.; Mülmenstädt, J.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Rafelski, M.; Rbeiz, M.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Skulski, W.; Steadman, S. G.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stodulski, M.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J.-L.; Teng, R.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Wadsworth, B.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wysłouch, B.

    2002-03-01

    The multiplicity of charged particles produced in Au+Au collisions as a function of energy, centrality, rapidity and azimuthal angle has been measured with the PHOBOS detector at RHIC. These results contribute to our understanding of the initial state of heavy ion collisions and provide a means to compare basic features of particle production in nuclear collisions with more elementary systems.

  19. Space-time dimensionality from brane collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, William; Sakellariadou, Mairi

    2009-04-01

    Collisions and subsequent decays of higher dimensional branes leave behind three-dimensional branes and anti-branes, one of which could play the rôle of our universe. This process also leads to the production of one-dimensional branes and anti-branes, however their number is expected to be suppressed. Brane collisions may also lead to the formation of bound states of branes. Their existence does not alter this result, it just allows for the existence of one-dimensional branes captured within the three-dimensional ones.

  20. Reactive Collision Avoidance Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharf, Daniel; Acikmese, Behcet; Ploen, Scott; Hadaegh, Fred

    2010-01-01

    The reactive collision avoidance (RCA) algorithm allows a spacecraft to find a fuel-optimal trajectory for avoiding an arbitrary number of colliding spacecraft in real time while accounting for acceleration limits. In addition to spacecraft, the technology can be used for vehicles that can accelerate in any direction, such as helicopters and submersibles. In contrast to existing, passive algorithms that simultaneously design trajectories for a cluster of vehicles working to achieve a common goal, RCA is implemented onboard spacecraft only when an imminent collision is detected, and then plans a collision avoidance maneuver for only that host vehicle, thus preventing a collision in an off-nominal situation for which passive algorithms cannot. An example scenario for such a situation might be when a spacecraft in the cluster is approaching another one, but enters safe mode and begins to drift. Functionally, the RCA detects colliding spacecraft, plans an evasion trajectory by solving the Evasion Trajectory Problem (ETP), and then recovers after the collision is avoided. A direct optimization approach was used to develop the algorithm so it can run in real time. In this innovation, a parameterized class of avoidance trajectories is specified, and then the optimal trajectory is found by searching over the parameters. The class of trajectories is selected as bang-off-bang as motivated by optimal control theory. That is, an avoiding spacecraft first applies full acceleration in a constant direction, then coasts, and finally applies full acceleration to stop. The parameter optimization problem can be solved offline and stored as a look-up table of values. Using a look-up table allows the algorithm to run in real time. Given a colliding spacecraft, the properties of the collision geometry serve as indices of the look-up table that gives the optimal trajectory. For multiple colliding spacecraft, the set of trajectories that avoid all spacecraft is rapidly searched on

  1. Off-Center Collisions Between Clusters of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricker, P. M.; Lamb, D. Q.

    1996-05-01

    Hybrid N-body/hydrodynamical simulations of head-on collisions between clusters of galaxies (eg. Evrard 1990, Roettiger et al. 1993, Pearce et al. 1994) have demonstrated that the effects of such a collision can be observable for several Gyr after the event. These effects include shock heating of the intracluster gas, distortion of X-ray isophotes along the collision axis, and destruction of hydrostatic equilibrium (as shown by the displacement of the gas centroid from that of the galaxy distribution). In the presence of other nearby clusters, however, it is reasonable to expect that collisions with non-negligible impact parameters could take place. As the clusters in such off-center collisions would develop significant large-scale angular momentum, it is interesting to determine how this angular momentum affects the general progress of the collision and how it is distributed with scale in the final merger remnant. We report on simulations of off-axis collisions made using several different impact parameters, impact velocities, and relative cluster masses. We use a hybrid N-body/hydro code based on the piecewise-parabolic method (PPM) and a particle-mesh method (PM). Using a multigrid-based Poisson solver we are able to handle the isolated boundary conditions required for these calculations. Preliminary results for the gas-only problem suggest that the primary shock wave resulting from the collision dissipates most of the clusters' angular momentum in this case.

  2. High energy nuclear collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Plasil, F.

    1998-01-01

    This presentation covers three broad topics: a brief introduction to the field of nucleus-nucleus collisions at relativistic energies; a discussion of several topics illustrating what`s been learned after more than a decade of fixed target experiments; and an indication of what the future may bring at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) under construction at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) planned at CERN.

  3. Operational Collision Avoidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guit, Bill

    2015-01-01

    This presentation will describe the early days of the EOS Aqua and Aura operational collision avoidance process. It will highlight EOS debris avoidance maneuvers, EOS high interest event statistic and A-Train systematic conjunctions and conclude with future challenges. This is related to earlier e-DAA (tracking number 21692) that an abstract was submitted to a different conference. Eric Moyer, ESMO Deputy Project Manager has reviewed and approved this presentation on May 6, 2015

  4. Head-on collisions of boson stars

    SciTech Connect

    Palenzuela, C.; Lehner, L.; Olabarrieta, I.; Liebling, S. L.

    2007-03-15

    We study head-on collisions of boson stars in three dimensions. We consider evolutions of two boson stars which may differ in their phase or have opposite frequencies but are otherwise identical. Our studies show that these phase differences result in different late time behavior and gravitational wave output.

  5. Collision of Bose Condensate Dark Matter structures

    SciTech Connect

    Guzman, F. S.

    2008-12-04

    The status of the scalar field or Bose condensate dark matter model is presented. Results about the solitonic behavior in collision of structures is presented as a possible explanation to the recent-possibly-solitonic behavior in the bullet cluster merger. Some estimates about the possibility to simulate the bullet cluster under the Bose Condensate dark matter model are indicated.

  6. Fan Affinity Laws from a Collision Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhattacharjee, Shayak

    2012-01-01

    The performance of a fan is usually estimated using hydrodynamical considerations. The calculations are long and involved and the results are expressed in terms of three affinity laws. In this paper we use kinetic theory to attack this problem. A hard sphere collision model is used, and subsequently a correction to account for the flow behaviour…

  7. High energy nucleus-nucleus collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wosiek, B.

    1986-01-01

    Experimental results on high energy nucleus-nucleus interactions are presented. The data are discussed within the framework of standard super-position models and from the point-of-view of the possible formation of new states of matter in heavy ion collisions.

  8. Collision and mountain building

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trifonov, V. G.

    2016-01-01

    The spatial, chronological, and genetic relationships of recent (Late Alpine) collisions to mountain building are considered at three levels of scale: (i) in separate zones of the Arabian-Caucasus segment of the Alpine-Himalayan Orogenic Belt, (ii) throughout the central segment of this belt from the Alps to the Himalalayas, and (iii) in Central Asia and other mountain belts of continents. Three stages of mountain building are distinguished at all three levels. The first stage starts with widespread collision and similar plate interactions from the end of the Eocene to the middle Miocene and is expressed in the formation of uplifts, commonly no higher than the moderately elevated level in regions that concentrate deformations of transverse shortening induced by compression. The second short stage, which embraces the Pliocene-Quaternary and occasionally the end of the Miocene, differs in general, though differentiated in the value and intensification of vertical movements, when the height of mountains increases by 2-3 times. Elevations are spread over certain platform territories and even frameworks of rift zones. This is related not so much to the intensity of compression and shortening as to the compositional transformation of the upper mantle and the lower crust, leading to their decompaction. Comparison with the Hercynian and Caledonian orogenic stages shows that the second phase, predetermined by widespread collision, reflects a more important geodynamic event expressed in a change of the global plate interaction system and its deep-seated sources.

  9. Affordable MMW aircraft collision avoidance system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almsted, Larry D.; Becker, Robert C.; Zelenka, Richard E.

    1997-06-01

    Collision avoidance is of concern to all aircraft, requiring the detection and identification of hazardous terrain or obstacles in sufficient time for clearance maneuvers. The collision avoidance requirement is even more demanding for helicopters, as their unique capabilities result in extensive operations at low-altitude, near to terrain and other hazardous obstacles. TO augment the pilot's visual collision avoidance abilities, some aircraft are equipped with 'enhanced-vision' systems or terrain collision warning systems. Enhanced-vision systems are typically very large and costly systems that are not very covert and are also difficult to install in a helicopter. The display is typically raw images from infrared or radar sensors, and can require a high degree of pilot interpretation and attention. Terrain collision warning system that rely on stored terrain maps are often of low resolution and accuracy and do not represent hazards to the aircraft placed after map sampling. Such hazards could include aircraft parked on runway, man- made towers or buildings and hills. In this paper, a low cost dual-function scanning pencil-beam, millimeter-wave radar forward sensor is used to determine whether an aircraft's flight path is clear of obstructions. Due to the limited space and weight budget in helicopters, the system is a dual function system that is substituted in place of the existing radar altimeter. The system combines a 35 GHz forward looking obstacle avoidance radar and a 4.3 GHz radar altimeter. The forward looking 35 GHz 3D radar's returns are used to construct a terrain and obstruction database surrounding an aircraft, which is presented to the pilot as a synthetic perspective display. The 35 GHz forward looking radar and the associated display was evaluated in a joint NASA Honeywell flight test program in 1996. The tests were conducted on a NASA/Army test helicopter. The test program clearly demonstrated the systems potential usefulness for collision avoidance.

  10. Collision model for non-Markovian quantum dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kretschmer, Silvan; Luoma, Kimmo; Strunz, Walter T.

    2016-07-01

    We study the applicability of collisional models for non-Markovian dynamics of open quantum systems. By allowing interactions between the separate environmental degrees of freedom in between collisions we are able to construct a collision model that allows us to study quantum memory effects in open system dynamics. We also discuss the possibility to embed non-Markovian collision model dynamics into Markovian collision model dynamics in an extended state space. As a concrete example we show how, using the proposed class of collision models, we can discretely model non-Markovian amplitude damping of a qubit. In the time-continuous limit, we obtain the well-known results for spontaneous decay of a two-level system into a structured zero-temperature reservoir.