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Sample records for ionic strength saline

  1. Sr2+/Ca2+ and 44Ca/40Ca fractionation during inorganic calcite formation: III. Impact of salinity/ionic strength

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jianwu; Niedermayr, Andrea; Köhler, Stephan J.; Böhm, Florian; Kısakürek, Basak; Eisenhauer, Anton; Dietzel, Martin

    2012-01-01

    In order to apply Sr/Ca and 44Ca/40Ca fractionation during calcium carbonate (CaCO3) formation as a proxy to reconstruct paleo-environments, it is essential to evaluate the impact of various environmental factors. In this study, a CO2 diffusion technique was used to crystallize inorganic calcite from aqueous solutions at different ionic strength/salinity by the addition of NaCl at 25 °C. Results show that the discrimination of Sr2+ versus Ca2+ during calcite formation is mainly controlled by precipitation rate (R in μmol/m2/h) and is weakly influenced by ionic strength/salinity. In analogy to Sr incorporation, 44Ca/40Ca fractionation during precipitation of calcite is weakly influenced by ionic strength/salinity too. At 25 °C the calcium isotope fractionation between calcite and aqueous calcium ions (Δ44/40Cacalcite-aq = δ44/40Cacalcite − δ44/40Caaq) correlates inversely to log R values for all experiments. In addition, an inverse relationship between Δ44/40Cacalcite-aq and log DSr, which is independent of temperature, precipitation rate, and aqueous (Sr/Ca)aq ratio, is not affected by ionic strength/salinity either. Considering the log DSr and Δ44/40Cacalcite-aq relationship, Sr/Ca and δ44/40Cacalcite values of precipitated calcite can be used as an excellent multi-proxy approach to reconstruct environmental conditions (e.g., temperature, precipitation rate) of calcite growth and diagenetic alteration. PMID:22347722

  2. The effect of ionic strength on oil adhesion in sandstone – the search for the low salinity mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Hilner, E.; Andersson, M. P.; Hassenkam, T.; Matthiesen, J.; Salino, P. A.; Stipp, S. L. S.

    2015-01-01

    Core flood and field tests have demonstrated that decreasing injection water salinity increases oil recovery from sandstone reservoirs. However, the microscopic mechanism behind the effect is still under debate. One hypothesis is that as salinity decreases, expansion of the electrical double layer decreases attraction between organic molecules and pore surfaces. We have developed a method that uses atomic force microscopy (AFM) in chemical force mapping (CFM) mode to explore the relationship between wettability and salinity. We functionalised AFM tips with alkanes and used them to represent tiny nonpolar oil droplets. In repeated measurements, we brought our “oil” close to the surface of sand grains taken from core plugs and we measured the adhesion between the tip and sample. Adhesion was constant in high salinity solutions but below a threshold of 5,000 to 8,000 ppm, adhesion decreased as salinity decreased, rendering the surface less oil wet. The effect was consistent, reproducible and reversible. The threshold for the onset of low salinity response fits remarkably well with observations from core plug experiments and field tests. The results demonstrate that the electric double layer force always contributes at least in part to the low salinity effect, decreasing oil wettability when salinity is low. PMID:25899050

  3. The effect of ionic strength on oil adhesion in sandstone--the search for the low salinity mechanism.

    PubMed

    Hilner, E; Andersson, M P; Hassenkam, T; Matthiesen, J; Salino, P A; Stipp, S L S

    2015-01-01

    Core flood and field tests have demonstrated that decreasing injection water salinity increases oil recovery from sandstone reservoirs. However, the microscopic mechanism behind the effect is still under debate. One hypothesis is that as salinity decreases, expansion of the electrical double layer decreases attraction between organic molecules and pore surfaces. We have developed a method that uses atomic force microscopy (AFM) in chemical force mapping (CFM) mode to explore the relationship between wettability and salinity. We functionalised AFM tips with alkanes and used them to represent tiny nonpolar oil droplets. In repeated measurements, we brought our "oil" close to the surface of sand grains taken from core plugs and we measured the adhesion between the tip and sample. Adhesion was constant in high salinity solutions but below a threshold of 5,000 to 8,000 ppm, adhesion decreased as salinity decreased, rendering the surface less oil wet. The effect was consistent, reproducible and reversible. The threshold for the onset of low salinity response fits remarkably well with observations from core plug experiments and field tests. The results demonstrate that the electric double layer force always contributes at least in part to the low salinity effect, decreasing oil wettability when salinity is low. PMID:25899050

  4. Ionic strength and DOC determinations from various freshwater sources to the San Francisco Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunter, Y.R.; Kuwabara, J.S.

    1994-01-01

    An exact estimation of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) within the salinity gradient of zinc and copper metals is significant in understanding the limit to which DOC could influence metal speciation. A low-temperature persulfate/oxygen/ultraviolet wet oxidation procedure was utilized for analyzing DOC samples adapted for ionic strength from major freshwater sources of the northern and southern regions of San Francisco Bay. The ionic strength of samples was modified with a chemically defined seawater medium up to 0.7M. Based on the results, a minimum effect of ionic strength on oxidation proficiency for DOC sources to the Bay over an ionic strength gradient of 0.0 to 0.7 M was observed. There was no major impacts of ionic strength on two Suwanee River fulvic acids. In general, the noted effects associated with ionic strength were smaller than the variances seen in the aquatic environment between high- and low-temperature methods.

  5. TOUGHREACT Testing in High Ionic Strength Brine Sandstone Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Tianfu

    2008-09-01

    Deep saline formations and oil and gas reservoirs often contain concentrated brine solutions of ionic strength greater than 1 (I > 1 M). Geochemical modeling, involving high ionic strength brines, is a challenge. In the original TOUGHREACT code (Xu et al., 2004; Xu et al., 2006), activity coefficients of charged aqueous species are computed using an extended Debye-Huckel (DH) equation and parameters derived by Helgeson et al. (1981). The DH model can deal with ionic strengths from dilute to moderately saline water (up to 6 molal for an NaCl-dominant solution). The equations implemented for the DH model are presented in Appendix A. During the course of the Yucca Mountain project, a Pitzer ion-interaction model was implemented into TOUGHREACT. This allows the application of this simulator to problems involving much more concentrated aqueous solutions, such as those involving geochemical processes in and around high-level nuclear waste repositories where fluid evaporation and/or boiling is expected to occur (Zhang et al., 2007). The Pitzer ion-interaction model, which we refer to as the Pitzer virial approach, and associated ion-interaction parameters have been applied successfully to study non-ideal concentrated aqueous solutions. The formulation of the Pitzer model is presented in Appendix B; detailed information can be founded in Zhang et al. (2007). For CO{sub 2} geological sequestration, the Pitzer ion-interaction model for highly concentrated brines was incorporated into TOUGHREACT/ECO2N, then was tested and compared with a previously implemented extended Debye-Hueckel (DH) ion activity model. The comparison was made through a batch geochemical system using a Gulf Coast sandstone saline formation.

  6. Role of Ionic Strength in Staphylococcal Cell Aggregation.

    PubMed

    Vanzieleghem, Thomas; Couniot, Numa; Herman-Bausier, Philippe; Flandre, Denis; Dufrêne, Yves F; Mahillon, Jacques

    2016-07-26

    Cell aggregation plays a key role in biofilm formation and pathogenesis of Staphylococcus species. Although the molecular basis of aggregation in Staphylococci has already been extensively investigated, the influence of environmental factors, such as ionic strength, remains poorly understood. In this paper, we report a new type of cellular aggregation of Staphylococci that depends solely on ionic strength. Seven strains out of 14, all belonging to staphylococcal species, formed large cell clusters within minutes in buffers of ionic strength ranging from 1.5 to 50 mM, whereas isolates belonging to other Gram-positive species did not display this phenotype. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) with chemically functionalized tips provided direct evidence that ionic strength modulates cell surface adhesive properties through changes in cell surface charge. The optimal ionic strength for aggregation was found to be strain dependent, but in all cases, bacterial aggregates formed at an ionic strength of 1.5-50 mM were rapidly dispersed in a solution of higher ionic strength, indicating a reversibility of the cell aggregation process. These findings suggest that some staphylococcal isolates can respond to ionic strength as an external stimulus to trigger rapid cell aggregation in a way that has not yet been reported. PMID:27364477

  7. "Switchable water": aqueous solutions of switchable ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Mercer, Sean M; Jessop, Philip G

    2010-04-26

    "Salting out" is a standard method for separating water-soluble organic compounds from water. In this method, adding a large amount of salt to the aqueous solution forces the organic compound out of the aqueous phase. However, the method can not be considered sustainable because it creates highly salty water. A greener alternative would be a method that allows reversible salting out. Herein, we describe aqueous solutions of switchable ionic strength. Aqueous solutions of a diamine in water have essentially zero ionic strength but are converted by CO(2) into solutions of high ionic strength. The change is reversible. Application to the reversible salting out of THF from water is described. PMID:20186910

  8. Mechanistic Study of Electroosmotic Transport Across Hydrated Nail Plates: Effects of pH and Ionic Strength

    PubMed Central

    HAO, JINSONG; LI, S. KEVIN

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of pH and ionic strength on electroosmotic transport in transungual iontophoresis. Transungual iontophoretic transport of model neutral permeants mannitol (MA) and urea (UR) across fully hydrated human nail plates in phosphate-buffered saline of different pH and ionic strengths were investigated in vitro. Two protocols were involved in the transport experiments with each protocol divided into stages including passive and iontophoresis transport at 0.1 and/or 0.3 mA. Nail plate electrical resistance and water uptake of nail clippings were measured at various pH and ionic strengths. In the pH study, electroosmosis enhanced the anodal transport of MA at pH 9 and cathodal transport at pH 3. The Peclet numbers of MA were more than two times higher than those of UR under these conditions. No significant electroosmosis enhancement was observed for MA and UR at pH 5. In the ionic strength study, a decrease in solution ionic strength from 0.7 to 0.04 M enhanced electroosmotic transport. Nail electrical resistance increased with decreasing the ionic strength of the equilibrating solution, but reached a plateau when the ionic strength was less than approximately 0.07 M. Solution pH and ionic strength had no significant effect on nail hydration. Under the studied pH and ionic strength conditions, the effects of electroosmosis were small compared to the direct-field effects in transungual iontophoretic transport of small to moderate size permeants. PMID:18386836

  9. Evaluation of cation-anion interaction strength in ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Ana M; Rocha, Marisa A A; Freire, Mara G; Marrucho, Isabel M; Coutinho, João A P; Santos, Luís M N B F

    2011-04-14

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry with variable collision induced dissociation of the isolated [(cation)(2)anion](+) and/or [(anion)(2)cation](-) ions of imidazolium-, pyridinium-, pyrrolidinium-, and piperidinium-based ionic liquids (ILs) combined with a large set of anions, such as chloride, tetrafluoroborate, hexafluorophosphate, trifluoromethanesulfonate, and bis[(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl]imide, was used to carry out a systematic and comprehensive study on the ionic liquids relative interaction energies. The results are interpreted in terms of main influences derived from the structural characteristics of both anion and cation. On the basis of quantum chemical calculations, the effect of the anion upon the dissociation energies of the ionic liquid pair, and isolated [(cation)(2)anion](+) and/or [(anion)(2)cation](-) aggregates, were estimated and are in good agreement with the experimental data. Both experimental and computational results indicate an energetic differentiation between the cation and the anion to the ionic pair. Moreover, it was found that the quantum chemical calculations can describe the trend obtained for the electrostatic cation-anion attraction potential. The impact of the cation-anion interaction strengths in the surface tension of ionic liquids is further discussed. The surface tensions dependence on the cation alkyl chain length, and on the anion nature, follows an analogous pattern to that of the relative cation-anion interaction energies determined by mass spectrometry. PMID:21425809

  10. Media ionic strength impacts embryonic responses to engineered nanoparticle exposure

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Lisa; Zaikova, Tatiana; Richman, Erik K.; Hutchison, James E.; Tanguay, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    Embryonic zebrafish were used to assess the impact of solution ion concentrations on agglomeration and resulting in vivo biological responses of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). The minimum ion concentration necessary to support embryonic development was determined. Surprisingly, zebrafish exhibit no adverse outcomes when raised in nearly ion-free media. During a rapid throughput screening of AuNPs, 1.2-nm 3-mercaptopropionic acid-functionalized AuNPs (1.2-nm 3-MPA-AuNPs) rapidly agglomerate in exposure solutions. When embryos were exposed to 1.2-nm 3-MPA-AuNPs dispersed in low ionic media, both morbidity and mortality were induced, but when suspended in high ionic media, there was little to no biological response. We demonstrated that the media ionic strength greatly affects agglomeration rates and biological responses. Most importantly, the insensitivity of the zebrafish embryo to external ions indicates that it is possible, and necessary, to adjust the exposure media conditions to optimize NP dispersion prior to assessment. PMID:21809903

  11. SORPTION OF CU AND ZN TO KAOLINITE AND IRON OXIDE: EFFECTS OF HUMIC ACID AND IONIC STRENGTH AND IMPLICATIONS FOR STORMWATER RUNOFF

    EPA Science Inventory

    Heavy metals are common pollutants in wet weather flows and urban waterways. Changes in ionic strength, whether from mixing with saline waters, road salt, or from the large osmotic adjustment needed for the Microtox toxicity assay, affect the aqueous chemistry of stormwater runof...

  12. The Concept of Ionic Strength Eighty Years after Its Introduction in Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sastre de Vicente, Manuel E.

    2004-05-01

    Even today, eighty years after its empirical introduction in chemistry, the ionic strength of a solution continues to be regarded as a major variable in examining salt effects in many fields of science. In fact, many studies have examined the effect of, or dependence on, not only T , P , or pH, but also ionic strength. This paper reviews the meaning of ionic strength, including the relationship of ionic strength to macroscopic concepts such as thermodynamic quantities and microscopic ones such as molecule size. See Letter re: this article.

  13. Evaluating contribution of ionic, osmotic and oxidative stress components towards salinity tolerance in barley

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Salinity tolerance is a physiologically multi-faceted trait attributed to multiple mechanisms. Three barley (Hordeum vulgare) varieties contrasting in their salinity tolerance were used to assess the relative contribution of ionic, osmotic and oxidative stress components towards overall salinity stress tolerance in this species, both at the whole-plant and cellular levels. In addition, transcriptional changes in the gene expression profile were studied for key genes mediating plant ionic and oxidative homeostasis (NHX; RBOH; SOD; AHA and GORK), to compare a contribution of transcriptional and post-translational factors towards the specific components of salinity tolerance. Results Our major findings are two-fold. First, plant tissue tolerance was a dominating component that has determined the overall plant responses to salinity, with root K+ retention ability and reduced sensitivity to stress-induced hydroxyl radical production being the main contributing tolerance mechanisms. Second, it was not possible to infer which cultivars were salinity tolerant based solely on expression profiling of candidate genes at one specific time point. For the genes studied and the time point selected that transcriptional changes in the expression of these specific genes had a small role for barley’s adaptive responses to salinity. Conclusions For better tissue tolerance, sodium sequestration, K+ retention and resistance to oxidative stress all appeared to be crucial. Because these traits are highly interrelated, it is suggested that a major progress in crop breeding for salinity tolerance can be achieved only if these complementary traits are targeted at the same time. This study also highlights the essentiality of post translational modifications in plant adaptive responses to salinity. PMID:24774965

  14. Effect of Ionic Strength and Surface Charge on Convective Deposition.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Kedar; Muangnapoh, Tanyakorn; Stever, Michael D; Gilchrist, James F

    2015-11-17

    Particle-particle and particle-substrate interactions play a crucial role in capillary driven convective self-assembly for continuous deposition of particles. This systematic study demonstrates the nontrivial effects of varying surface charge and ionic strength of monosized silica microspheres in water on the quality of the deposited monolayer. Increase in particle surface charge results a broader range of parameters that result in monolayer deposition which can be explained considering the particle-substrate electrostatic repulsion in solution. Resulting changes in the coating morphology and microstructure at different solution conditions were observed using confocal microscopy enabling correlation of order to disorder transitions with relative particle stability. These results, in part, may explain similar results seen by Muangnapoh et al., 2013 in vibration-assisted convective deposition. PMID:26501996

  15. Dynamic light scattering by polyelectrolytes in low ionic strength buffers

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz, K.S.

    1993-12-31

    Dynamic light scattering is a generic term which refers to all techniques that monitor fluctuation in the intensity of scattered light. Quasielastic light scattering (QELS) is that configuration in which no external field is applied in the course of data collection. In the case of charged macroions, QELS studies indicate a bifurcation in the relaxation modes as the ionic strength is lowered. This phenomenon is discussed in terms of an extended couple mode theory in which the dynamics of the macroions are coupled with those of the electrolyte ions. The QELS results are correlated with studies in which external electric fields of wave forms that are constant (ELS, electrophoretic light scattering) or pure sinusoidal (QELS-SEF).

  16. Transient streaming potentials under varying pore-water ionic strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malama, B.

    2014-12-01

    Streaming potentials (SP) are generated when polar fluids such as groundwater flow through porous media that have charged mineral surfaces. This is due to the flow-shearing of the diffuse layer of the electric double layer (EDL), which is known to form in the fluid phase at the fluid-rock interface. Previous works have suggested that the EDL vanishes at high pore-fluid ionic strengths resulting in vanishing SP signals. However, recent observations in sea-water intrusion applications by Jackson and coworkers indicate that measurable SP signals are obtainable in flows of fluids with high ionic strengths through silica sand. We demonstrate the repeatability of these observations through a series of laboratory flow experiments performed on 98% silica sand in a falling-head permeameter with brines of concentrations ranging from 0.001M to about 5 M NaCl. The results of the experiments, which clearly show measurable SP signals even at the highest concentration of 5 M NaCl, are reported. They are also used to estimate the hydraulic conductivity and electrokinetic coupling coefficient. The linearity assumption for the relation between pressure and SP differentials is evaluated for high pore-water NaCl concentrations. Additionally, displacement of one brine by another of different NaCl concentration yields dramatic transient SP responses that may be harnessed in the development of early-detection/warning technologies for sea-water intrusion applications. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. This research is funded by WIPP programs administered by the Office of Environmental Management (EM) of the U.S Department of Energy.

  17. Ionic Strength-Induced Formation of Smectite Quasicrystals Enhances Nitroaromatic Compound Sorption

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The influence of ionic strength on nitroaromatic compound sorption from water by K+- and Ca2+-saturated smectite (SWy-2) was examined. The results indicated that sorption of 1,3-dinitrobenzene by K-SWy-2 increased up to 2.2 times as KCl ionic strength increased from 0.01 to 0.30 M. In contrast, sorp...

  18. The Effect of Ionic Strength on the Solubility of an Electrolyte

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willey, Joan D.

    2004-01-01

    A simple experiment was conducted for studying and demonstrating visually and dramatically the effect of ionic strength on the solubility of an electrolyte is described. It is seen that the experiment visually illustrates the effect of ionic strength on electrolyte solubility by the appearance of the two solutions and by the difference in the…

  19. Prokaryotic Community Structure Driven by Salinity and Ionic Concentrations in Plateau Lakes of the Tibetan Plateau

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Zhi-Ping; Liu, Ying; Miao, Li-Li; Wang, Fang; Chu, Li-Min; Wang, Jia-Li

    2016-01-01

    communities along gradients of salinity and ionic concentrations. PMID:26746713

  20. Prokaryotic Community Structure Driven by Salinity and Ionic Concentrations in Plateau Lakes of the Tibetan Plateau.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Zhi-Ping; Liu, Ying; Miao, Li-Li; Wang, Fang; Chu, Li-Min; Wang, Jia-Li; Liu, Zhi-Pei

    2016-03-01

    well as whole communities along gradients of salinity and ionic concentrations. PMID:26746713

  1. Influence of ionic strength on poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) macromolecule conformations in electrolyte solutions.

    PubMed

    Adamczyk, Zbigniew; Jamroży, Krzysztof; Batys, Piotr; Michna, Aneta

    2014-12-01

    Conformations of poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride), PDADMAC, molecules in electrolyte solutions were experimentally evaluated by dynamic light scattering (DLS), micro-electrophoretic and viscosity measurements. The role of ionic strength varied within 10(-4) and 2M was systematically studied. The diffusion coefficient of the polymer molecules was equal to 1.3×10(-7)cm(2)s(-1) for the ionic strength range 5×10(-4) to 10(-2)M decreasing slightly for higher ionic strength. This corresponds to the hydrodynamic diameter of 38.5nm. Using the diffusion coefficient and the electrophoretic mobility data, the electrokinetic charge on PDADMAC molecules was calculated as a function of ionic strength. It was positive and varied between 84 and 51 elementary charges. This gives the effective ionization degree of the macromolecule equal to 13% and 8% for ionic strength of 5×10(-4) and 0.15M, respectively. Additional information about macromolecule conformation was derived from the viscosity measurements of dilute PDADMAC solutions. The intrinsic viscosity derived from these measurements decreased abruptly with ionic strength from 3400 for 10(-4)M to 100 for 2M, NaCl solutions. By extrapolating the hydrodynamic diameter and intrinsic viscosity data to zero ionic strength the polyelectrolyte molecule contour length of 240nm and the backbone diameter of 0.85nm were predicted. On the other hand, the decrease in the intrinsic viscosity for higher ionic strength was attributed to changes in macromolecule conformations to more collapsed ones. The experimental results were interpreted by molecular dynamics modeling of PDADMAC chain conformations in electrolyte solutions where the ionic strength effect and the effective ionization degree were considered. A quantitative agreement was attained for lower ionic strength range proving that the combined DLS and viscosity measurements furnish reliable information about macromolecule conformations in electrolyte solution. PMID:25265546

  2. Ionic strength independence of charge distributions in solvation of biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Virtanen, J J; Sosnick, T R; Freed, K F

    2014-12-14

    Electrostatic forces enormously impact the structure, interactions, and function of biomolecules. We perform all-atom molecular dynamics simulations for 5 proteins and 5 RNAs to determine the dependence on ionic strength of the ion and water charge distributions surrounding the biomolecules, as well as the contributions of ions to the electrostatic free energy of interaction between the biomolecule and the surrounding salt solution (for a total of 40 different biomolecule/solvent combinations). Although water provides the dominant contribution to the charge density distribution and to the electrostatic potential even in 1M NaCl solutions, the contributions of water molecules and of ions to the total electrostatic interaction free energy with the solvated biomolecule are comparable. The electrostatic biomolecule/solvent interaction energies and the total charge distribution exhibit a remarkable insensitivity to salt concentrations over a huge range of salt concentrations (20 mM to 1M NaCl). The electrostatic potentials near the biomolecule's surface obtained from the MD simulations differ markedly, as expected, from the potentials predicted by continuum dielectric models, even though the total electrostatic interaction free energies are within 11% of each other. PMID:25494774

  3. Ionic strength independence of charge distributions in solvation of biomolecules

    SciTech Connect

    Virtanen, J. J.; Sosnick, T. R.; Freed, K. F.

    2014-12-14

    Electrostatic forces enormously impact the structure, interactions, and function of biomolecules. We perform all-atom molecular dynamics simulations for 5 proteins and 5 RNAs to determine the dependence on ionic strength of the ion and water charge distributions surrounding the biomolecules, as well as the contributions of ions to the electrostatic free energy of interaction between the biomolecule and the surrounding salt solution (for a total of 40 different biomolecule/solvent combinations). Although water provides the dominant contribution to the charge density distribution and to the electrostatic potential even in 1M NaCl solutions, the contributions of water molecules and of ions to the total electrostatic interaction free energy with the solvated biomolecule are comparable. The electrostatic biomolecule/solvent interaction energies and the total charge distribution exhibit a remarkable insensitivity to salt concentrations over a huge range of salt concentrations (20 mM to 1M NaCl). The electrostatic potentials near the biomolecule's surface obtained from the MD simulations differ markedly, as expected, from the potentials predicted by continuum dielectric models, even though the total electrostatic interaction free energies are within 11% of each other.

  4. Ionic strength assay via polyacrylate-ferriferrous oxide magnetic photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan-Ran; Sun, Ye; Wang, He-Fang

    2015-05-21

    Convenient reading out and/or determination of ionic strength (IS) is of great significance for both scientific research and real life applications. We presented here a novel method for the rapid and sensitive IS assay based on the electrolyte-induced sensitive wavelength blueshifts of the reflection spectra of polyacrylate capped Fe3O4 magnetic photonic crystals (PA-Fe3O4-MPCs). For HCl, MgSO4 and the common electrolytes corresponding to the salinity of seawater (including NaCl, KCl, MgCl2, CaCl2, Na2SO4 and their mixtures), the PA-Fe3O4-MPCs displayed wavelength blueshifts identical to the total IS of the aqueous solutions, regardless of the kind of above-mentioned electrolytes in the solutions. Besides, the PA-Fe3O4-MPCs exhibited relatively high sensitivity (an average of 294 nm L mmol(-1) in the range of 0.05-0.30 mmol L(-1), and an even higher value of 386 nm L mmol(-1) at 0.05-0.15 mmol L(-1)) and fast response (within 8 s) to the IS of aqueous solutions. The relative standard deviation (RSD) for IS (NaCl, 0.1 mmol L(-1)) was 4.4% (n = 5). The developed method was applied to determine the salinity of seawater samples, and the determined results were validated by the traditional standard chlorinity titration and electric conductimetry method. The recoveries were in the range of 92-104%. The proposed PA-Fe3O4-MPCs based reflectometry method would have great potential for IS and salinity assays. PMID:25827462

  5. Modeling colloid and microorganism transport and release with transients in solution ionic strength

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The transport and fate of colloids, microorganisms, and nanoparticles in subsurface environments is strongly influenced by transients in solution ionic strength (IS). A sophisticated dual-permeability transport model that is capable of simulating exponential, hyperexponential, uniform, and nonmonot...

  6. High-performance ionic diode membrane for salinity gradient power generation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jun; Guo, Wei; Feng, Dan; Wang, Huanting; Zhao, Dongyuan; Jiang, Lei

    2014-09-01

    Salinity difference between seawater and river water is a sustainable energy resource that catches eyes of the public and the investors in the background of energy crisis. To capture this energy, interdisciplinary efforts from chemistry, materials science, environmental science, and nanotechnology have been made to create efficient and economically viable energy conversion methods and materials. Beyond conventional membrane-based processes, technological breakthroughs in harvesting salinity gradient power from natural waters are expected to emerge from the novel fluidic transport phenomena on the nanoscale. A major challenge toward real-world applications is to extrapolate existing single-channel devices to macroscopic materials. Here, we report a membrane-scale nanofluidic device with asymmetric structure, chemical composition, and surface charge polarity, termed ionic diode membrane (IDM), for harvesting electric power from salinity gradient. The IDM comprises heterojunctions between mesoporous carbon (pore size ∼7 nm, negatively charged) and macroporous alumina (pore size ∼80 nm, positively charged). The meso-/macroporous membrane rectifies the ionic current with distinctly high ratio of ca. 450 and keeps on rectifying in high-concentration electrolytes, even in saturated solution. The selective and rectified ion transport furthermore sheds light on salinity-gradient power generation. By mixing artificial seawater and river water through the IDM, substantially high power density of up to 3.46 W/m(2) is discovered, which largely outperforms some commercial ion-exchange membranes. A theoretical model based on coupled Poisson and Nernst-Planck equations is established to quantitatively explain the experimental observations and get insights into the underlying mechanism. The macroscopic and asymmetric nanofluidic structure anticipates wide potentials for sustainable power generation, water purification, and desalination. PMID:25137214

  7. Effects of Ionic Strength on Passive and Iontophoretic Transport of Cationic Permeant Across Human Nail

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Kelly A.; Hao, Jinsong; Li, S. Kevin

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Transport across the human nail under hydration can be modeled as hindered transport across aqueous pore pathways. As such, nail permselectivity to charged species can be manipulated by changing the ionic strength of the system in transungual delivery to treat nail diseases. The present study investigated the effects of ionic strength upon transungual passive and iontophoretic transport. Methods Transungual passive and anodal iontophoretic transport experiments of tetraethylammonium ion (TEA) were conducted under symmetric conditions in which the donor and receiver had the same ionic strength in vitro. Experiments under asymmetric conditions were performed to mimic the in vivo conditions. Prior to the transport studies, TEA uptake studies were performed to assess the partitioning of TEA into the nail. Results Permselectivity towards TEA was inversely related to ionic strength in both passive and iontophoretic transport. The permeability and transference number of TEA were higher at lower ionic strengths under the symmetric conditions due to increased partitioning of TEA into the nail. Transference numbers were smaller under the asymmetric conditions compared with their symmetric counterparts. Conclusions The results demonstrate significant ionic strength effects upon the partitioning and transport of a cationic permeant in transungual transport, which may be instrumental in the development of transungual delivery systems. PMID:19267187

  8. Ionic strength-dependent changes in tentacular ion exchangers with variable ligand density. I. Structural properties.

    PubMed

    Bhambure, Rahul; Gillespie, Christopher M; Phillips, Michael; Graalfs, Heiner; Lenhoff, Abraham M

    2016-09-01

    The ligand density critically affects the performance of ion-exchange resins in such measures as the adsorption capacity and transport characteristics. However, for tentacular and other polymer-modified exchangers, the mechanistic basis of the effect of ligand density on performance is not yet fully understood. In this study we map the ionic strength-dependent structural changes in tentacular cation exchangers with variable ligand densities as the basis for subsequent investigation of effects on functional properties. Inverse size-exclusion chromatography (ISEC), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) were used to assess the effect of ionic strength on the pore size and intraparticle architecture of resin variants with different ligand densities. Comparison of ISEC and cryo-SEM results shows a considerable reduction in average pore size with increasing ligand density; these methods also confirm an increase of average pore size at higher ionic strengths. SAXS analysis of ionic strength-dependent conformational changes in the grafted polyelectrolyte layer shows a characteristic ionomer peak at values of the scattering vector q (0.1-0.2Å(-1)) that depend on the ligand density and the ionic strength of the solution. This peak attribution reflects nanoscale changes in the structure of the grafted polyelectrolyte chains that can in turn be responsible for observed pore-size changes in the resins. Finally, salt breakthrough experiments confirm a stronger Donnan exclusion effect on pore accessibility for small ions in the high ligand density variant. PMID:27544749

  9. Influence of ionic strength on the surface charge and interaction of layered silicate particles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Miller, Jan D; Yin, Xihui; Gupta, Vishal; Wang, Xuming

    2014-10-15

    The surface charge densities and surface potentials of selected phyllosilicate surfaces were calculated from AFM surface force measurements and reported as a function of ionic strength at pH 5.6. The results show that the silica faces of clay minerals follow the constant surface charge model because of isomorphous substitution in the silica tetrahedral layer. A decreasing surface charge density sequence was observed as follows: muscovite silica face>kaolinite silica face>talc silica face, which is expected to be due to the extent of isomorphous substitution. In contrast, at pH 5.6, the alumina face and the edge surface of kaolinite follow the constant surface potential model with increasing ionic strength, and the surface charge density increased with increasing ionic strength. The cluster size of suspended kaolinite particles at pH 5.6 was found to increase with increasing ionic strength due to an increase in the surface charge density for the alumina face and the edge surface. However, the cluster size decreased at 100mM KCl as a result of an unexpected decrease in the surface charge of the alumina face. When the ionic strength continued to increase above 100mM KCl, the van der Waals attraction dominated and larger clusters of micron size were stabilized. PMID:25086721

  10. Neptunium (V) Adsorption to a Halophilic Bacterium Under High Ionic Strength Conditions: A Surface Complexation Modeling Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Ams, David A

    2012-06-11

    Rationale for experimental design: Np(V) -- important as analog for Pu(V) and for HLW scenarios; High ionic strength -- relevant to salt-based repositories such as the WIPP; Halophilic microorganisms -- representative of high ionic strength environments. For the first time showed: Significant adsorbant to halophilic microorganisms over entire pH range under high ionic strength conditions; Strong influence of ionic strength with increasing adsorption with increasing ionic strength (in contrast to trends of previous low ionic strength studies); Effect of aqueous Np(V) and bacterial surface site speciation on adsorption; and Developed thermodynamic models that can be incorporated into geochemical speciation models to aid in the prediction of the fate and transport of Np(V) in more complex systems.

  11. Plutonium (IV) complexation by nitrate in acid solutions of ionic strengths from 2 to 19 molal

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, J.M.; Veirs, D.K.; Vaughn, R.B.; Cisneros, M.A.; Smith, C.A.

    1997-09-01

    Titrations of Pu(IV) with HNO{sub 3} in a series of aqueous HClO{sub 4} solutions ranging in ionic strength from 2 to 19 molal were followed using absorption spectrophotometry. The Pu 5f-5f spectra in the visible and near IR range change with complex formation. At each ionic strength, a series of spectra were obtained by varying nitrate concentration. Each series was deconvoluted into spectra f Pu{sup 4+}(aq), Pu(NO{sub 3}){sup 3+} and Pu(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}{sup 2+} complexes, and simultaneously their formation constants were determined. When corrected for the incomplete dissociation of nitric acid, the ionic strength dependence of each formation constant can be described by two parameters, {beta}{sup 0} and {Delta}{var_epsilon} using the formulae of specific ion interaction theory. The difficulties with extending this analysis to higher nitrate coordination numbers are discussed.

  12. Role of Heavy Meromyosin in Heat-Induced Gelation in Low Ionic Strength Solution Containing L-Histidine.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Toru; Yoshida, Yuri; Yasui, Masanori; Ito, Toshiaki; Wakamatsu, Jun-ichi; Hattori, Akihito; Nishimura, Takanori

    2015-08-01

    The gelation of myosin has a very important role in meat products. We have already shown that myosin in low ionic strength solution containing L-histidine forms a transparent gel after heating. To clarify the mechanism of this unique gelation, we investigated the changes in the nature of myosin subfragments during heating in solutions with low and high ionic strengths with and without L-histidine. The hydrophobicity of myosin and heavy meromyosin (HMM) in low ionic strength solution containing L-histidine was lower than in high ionic strength solution. The SH contents of myosin and HMM in low ionic strength solution containing l-histidine did not change during the heating process, whereas in high ionic strength solution they decreased slightly. The heat-induced globular masses of HMM in low ionic strength solution containing L-histidine were smaller than those in high ionic strength solution. These findings suggested that the polymerization of HMM molecules by heating was suppressed in low ionic strength solution containing L-histidine, resulting in formation of the unique gel. PMID:26148000

  13. Delineating Effects of Ionic Strength and Suspended Solids on Ammonia Volatilization from Dairy Manure Slurry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koirala, K.

    2014-12-01

    Ammonia emission is a major concern due to its adverse effects on animal and human health. Ionic strength and suspended solids play key roles in the ammonia volatilization process. These two parameters, however, are usually lumped together in form of total solids. The objective of this study was to separate the contribution of suspended solids (SS) from that of ionic strength (IS) on ammonia volatilization in liquid dairy manure. A two-way factorial experiment was conducted to simultaneously test the effects of IS and SS on ammonium dissociation: a key element of the ammonia volatilization process. The fraction of ammonia (β) in total ammoniacal nitrogen (TAN) was experimentally determined in a convective emission chamber, for each level of SS and IS, at a constant wind speed of 1.5 m s-1, and air and liquid temperature of 25°C. The two way analysis of variance showed a significant effect of SS concentration (p = 0.04) on fraction of ammonia in the liquid dairy manure, while the effect of ionic strength was marginal (p = 0.05). The highest dissociation of ammonium was observed in manure with the lowest SS concentration (0%) and the lowest ionic strength (0.10 mol L-1). Significant increases in suspended solids concentration and ionic strength were necessary to influence the ammonium dissociation in dairy manure. Results revealed that substantially high content of suspended solids (> 3.0%) or relatively high dilution of manure with water (30%) were necessary for these two parameters to play significant roles in the ammonia volatilization mechanism in liquid dairy manure. Results also showed that the β was more sensitive to the changes in suspended solids concentration than in the changes in ionic strength within the ranges of SS and IS examined in this study. Overall, the SS and IS effects on ammonium dissociation (and by extension on ammonia volatilization process) were thus found negligible within the normal ranges of liquid dairy manure characteristics.

  14. Effects of ionic strength and fulvic acid on adsorption of Tb(III) and Eu(III) onto clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poetsch, Maria; Lippold, Holger

    2016-09-01

    High salinity and natural organic matter are both known to facilitate migration of toxic or radioactive metals in geochemical systems, but little is known on their combined effect. We investigated complexation of Tb(III) and Eu(III) (as analogues for trivalent actinides) with fulvic acid and their adsorption onto a natural clay in the presence of NaCl, MgCl2 and CaCl2 up to very high ionic strengths. 160Tb, 152Eu and 14C-labelled fulvic acid were employed as radiotracers, allowing investigations at very low concentrations according to probable conditions in far-field scenarios of nuclear waste repositories. A combined Kd approach (Linear Additive Model) was tested for suitability in predicting solid-liquid distribution of metals in the presence of organic matter based on the interactions in the constituent subsystems. In this analysis, it could be shown that high ionic strength does not further enhance the mobilizing potential of humic matter. A quantitative reproduction of the influence of fulvic acid failed for most systems under study. Assumptions and limitations of the model are discussed.

  15. Effects of ionic strength and fulvic acid on adsorption of Tb(III) and Eu(III) onto clay.

    PubMed

    Poetsch, Maria; Lippold, Holger

    2016-09-01

    High salinity and natural organic matter are both known to facilitate migration of toxic or radioactive metals in geochemical systems, but little is known on their combined effect. We investigated complexation of Tb(III) and Eu(III) (as analogues for trivalent actinides) with fulvic acid and their adsorption onto a natural clay in the presence of NaCl, MgCl2 and CaCl2 up to very high ionic strengths. (160)Tb, (152)Eu and (14)C-labelled fulvic acid were employed as radiotracers, allowing investigations at very low concentrations according to probable conditions in far-field scenarios of nuclear waste repositories. A combined Kd approach (Linear Additive Model) was tested for suitability in predicting solid-liquid distribution of metals in the presence of organic matter based on the interactions in the constituent subsystems. In this analysis, it could be shown that high ionic strength does not further enhance the mobilizing potential of humic matter. A quantitative reproduction of the influence of fulvic acid failed for most systems under study. Assumptions and limitations of the model are discussed. PMID:27454893

  16. Neptunium(V) adsorption to bacteria at low and high ionic strength

    SciTech Connect

    Ams, David A; Swanson, Juliet S; Reed, Donald T; Fein, Jeremy B

    2010-12-08

    Np(V) is expected to be the predominant oxidation state of neptunium in aerobic natural waters. Np(V), as the NpO{sub 2}{sup +} aquo and associated complexed species, is readily soluble, weakly interacting with geologic media, and has a high redox stability under a relatively wide range of subsurface conditions. These chemical properties, along with a long half-life make it a primary element of concern regarding long-term nuclear waste storage and subsurface contaminant. The fate and transport of neptunium in the environment may be influenced by adsorption onto bacterial surfaces. The adsorption of neptunium to bacterial surfaces ties the mobility of the contaminant to the mobility of the bacterium. In this study, the adsorption of the neptunyl (NpO{sub 2}{sup +}) ion was evaluated at low ionic strength on a common soil bacterium and at high ionic strength on a halophilic bacterium isolated from a briny groundwater near the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeast New Mexico. Adsorption experiments were performed in batch reactors as a function of pH, ionic strength, and bacterialNp mass ratio. Np(V) adsorption was modeled using a surface complexation approach with the mathematical program FITEQL to determine functional group specific binding constants. The data from acid and base titrations of the bacteria were also modeled to estimate the concentrations and deprotonation constants of discrete bacterial surface functional groups. Bacterial functional group characteristics and Np(V) adsorption behavior between the soil bacterium and the halophilic bacterium were compared. These results highlight the key similarities and differences in actinide adsorption behavior in environments of significantly different ionic strength. Similarities in adsorption behavior may be linked to similarities in the characteristics of the moieties between all bacterial cell walls. Differences in adsorption behavior may reflect differences in ionic strength effects, rather than

  17. Gelatinization kinetic of waxy starches under pressure according to ionic strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonin, Hélène; Guyon, Claire; de Lamballerie, Marie; Lebail, Alain

    2010-12-01

    High pressure is a potential technology for the texturization of food products at ambient temperature. In this area, waxy starches are particularly interesting because they gelatinize quickly under sufficient pressure. However, gelatinization may be influenced by other components in the food matrix. Here, we investigate the influence of increasing ionic strength on gelatinization rate and kinetics at 500 MPa for waxy corn and waxy rice starches. We show that increasing ionic strength strongly retards and inhibits starch gelatinization under pressure and leads to heterogeneous gels with remnant granules.

  18. Neptunium(V) Adsorption to Bacteria at Low and High Ionic Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ams, D.; Swanson, J. S.; Reed, D. T.

    2010-12-01

    Np(V) is expected to be the predominant oxidation state of neptunium in aerobic natural waters. Np(V), as the NpO2+ aquo and associated complexed species, is readily soluble, interacts weakly with geologic media, and has a high redox stability under a relatively wide range of subsurface conditions. These chemical properties, along with a long half-life make it a primary element of concern regarding long-term nuclear waste storage and subsurface containment. The fate and transport of neptunium in the environment may be influenced by adsorption onto bacterial surfaces. The adsorption of neptunium to bacterial surfaces ties the mobility of the contaminant to the mobility of the bacterium. In this study, the adsorption of the neptunyl (NpO2+) ion was evaluated at low ionic strength on a common soil bacterium and at high ionic strength on a halophilic bacterium isolated from a briny groundwater near the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeast New Mexico. Adsorption experiments were performed in batch reactors as a function of pH, ionic strength, and bacteria/Np mass ratio. Np(V) adsorption was modeled using a surface complexation approach with the mathematical program FITEQL to determine functional group specific binding constants. The data from acid and base titrations of the bacteria used were also modeled to estimate the concentrations and deprotonation constants of discrete bacterial surface functional groups. Bacterial functional group characteristics and Np(V) adsorption behavior between the soil bacterium and the halophilic bacterium were compared. These results highlight key similarities and differences in actinide adsorption behavior in environments of significantly different ionic strength. The observed adsorption behavior may be linked to similarities and differences in the characteristics of the moieties between the cell walls of common gram-negative soil and halophilic bacteria. Moreover, differences in adsorption behavior may also reflect ionic

  19. Effect of Ions and Ionic Strength on Surface Plasmon Absorption of Single Gold Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Baral, Susil; Green, Andrew J; Richardson, Hugh H

    2016-06-28

    The local temperature change from a single optically excited gold nanowire, lithographically prepared on Al0.94Ga0.06N embedded with Er(3+) ions, is measured in air, pure water, and various concentrations of aqueous solutions of ionic solutes of NaCl, Na2SO4, and MgSO4. The absorption cross section of the nanowire under pure water (2.25 × 10(-14) m(2)) and different solution ionic strength is measured from the slopes of temperature change versus laser intensity plots. Addition of charges into the solution decreases the amount of heat generated during optical excitation of the gold nanostructures because the absorption cross section of the gold nanowire is attenuated. A Langmuir-type behavior of the absorption cross section with ionic strength is observed that is identified with an increase in the occupancy of screened interfacial charges. The absorption cross section of the nanowire decreases with ionic strength until a saturation value of 9 × 10(-15) m(2), where saturation in the occupancy of screened interfacial charge occurs. Dynamic measurements of temperature for a single gold nanowire immersed in a microchannel flow cell show a sharp and fast temperature drop for the flow of ionic solution compared to the pure (deionized) water, suggesting that the technique can be developed as a sensor probe to detect the presence of ions in solution. PMID:27215955

  20. Effect of Pore Fluid Salinity on Compressibility and Shear Strength Development of Clayey Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Paassen, Leon A.; Gareau, Laurent F.

    Investigations of shear strength, compressibility and moisture content of a recent marine clay in the Caspian Sea showed soil profiles with a lower shear strength and higher moisture content, than expected for a normally consolidated soil. Further, measured preconsolidation pressures were lower than the calculated in-situ effective stress, suggesting that the deposit was underconsolidated. The pore fluid salinity was also measured and showed an increase with depth up to saturation concentration. A research project was carried out to study the effect of pore fluid salinity on shear strength and compressibility of remoulded clays. Results of this study showed that increasing pore fluid salinity caused a decrease of the moisture content for a normally consolidated clayey soil of high plasticity. The remoulded shear strength corresponded with the measured moisture contents. The observed compressive behaviour of these clays is explained using the modified effective stress concept, which considers not only (excess) pore pressure and effective pressure, but also the electrochemical repulsive and attractive forces between the clay particles. The laboratory tests on remoulded clays show opposite results to the measurements on the natural soils. The effects of soil structure are used to explain the differences for the measurements of moisture content, undrained shear strength and preconsolidation pressure. The oedometer test procedure was reviewed and additional tests were performed on natural clay samples from this site. Results showed that the measured pre-consolidation pressure depends largely on the salinity of the permeating fluid used in the oedometer apparatus and suggest that when testing marine clays with very high pore fluid salinity, using a brine solution that closely resembles the pore fluid chemistry yields a measured preconsolidation pressure closer to the known geological stress history.

  1. Ionic strength effects on the photodegradation reactions of riboflavin in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Iqbal; Anwar, Zubair; Ali, Syed Abid; Hasan, Khwaja Ali; Sheraz, Muhammad Ali; Ahmed, Sofia

    2016-04-01

    A study of the effect of ionic strength on the photodegradation reactions (photoreduction and photoaddition) of riboflavin (RF) in phosphate buffer (pH7.0) has been carried out using a specific multicomponent spectrometric method. It has been found that the rates of photodegradation reactions of RF are dependent upon the ionic strength of the solutions at different buffer concentrations. The apparent first-order rate constants (kobs) for the photodegradation of riboflavin at ionic strengths of 0.1-0.5 (0.5M phosphate) lie in the range of 7.35-30.32×10(-3)min(-1). Under these conditions, the rate constants for the formation of the major products, lumichrome (LC) by photoreduction pathway, and cyclodehydroriboflavin (CDRF) by photoaddition pathway, are in the range of 3.80-16.03 and 1.70-6.07×10(-3)min(-1), respectively. A linear relationship has been observed between log kobs and √μ/1+√μ. A similar plot of log k/ko against √μ yields a straight line with a value of ~+1 for ZAZB showing the involvement of a charged species in the rate determining step. NaCl appears to promote the photodegradation reactions of RF probably by an excited state interaction. The implications of ionic strength on RF photodegradation by different pathways and flavin-protein interactions have been discussed. PMID:26910851

  2. Effects of molecular model, ionic strength, divalent ions, and hydrophobic interaction on human neurofilament conformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Joonseong; Kim, Seonghoon; Chang, Rakwoo; Jayanthi, Lakshmi; Gebremichael, Yeshitila

    2013-01-01

    The present study examines the effects of the model dependence, ionic strength, divalent ions, and hydrophobic interaction on the structural organization of the human neurofilament (NF) brush, using canonical ensemble Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of a coarse-grained model with the amino-acid resolution. The model simplifies the interactions between the NF core and the sidearm or between the sidearms by the sum of excluded volume, electrostatic, and hydrophobic interactions, where both monovalent salt ions and solvents are implicitly incorporated into the electrostatic interaction potential. Several important observations are made from the MC simulations of the coarse-grained model NF systems. First, the mean-field type description of monovalent salt ions works reasonably well in the NF system. Second, the manner by which the NF sidearms are arranged on the surface of the NF backbone core has little influence on the lateral extension of NF sidearms. Third, the lateral extension of the NF sidearms is highly affected by the ionic strength of the system: at low ionic strength, NF-M is most extended but at high ionic strength, NF-H is more stretched out because of the effective screening of the electrostatic interaction. Fourth, the presence of Ca2 + ions induces the attraction between negatively charged residues, which leads to the contraction of the overall NF extension. Finally, the introduction of hydrophobic interaction does not change the general structural organization of the NF sidearms except that the overall extension is contracted.

  3. The ionic strength effect on the DNA complexation by DOPC - gemini surfactants liposomes.

    PubMed

    Pullmannová, Petra; Bastos, Margarida; Bai, Guangyue; Funari, Sergio S; Lacko, Ivan; Devínsky, Ferdinand; Teixeira, José; Uhríková, Daniela

    2012-01-01

    Liposome dispersions obtained from the mixture of gemini surfactants of the type alkane-α,ω-diyl-bis(alkyldimethylammonium bromide) and helper lipid DOPC create complexes with DNA showing a regular inner microstructure, identified by small angle X-ray diffraction as condensed lamellar phase (L(α)(c)). In addition to the L(α)(c) phase, a coexisting lamellar phase L(B) was also identified in the complexes formed, with periodicities in the range ~8.8-5.7nm, at ionic strengths corresponding to 50-200mM NaCl. The periodicities of L(B) phase did not correspond to those identified in liposome dispersion without DNA using small angle neutron scattering. The observed phase separation is shown to depend on the interplay between the surface charge density of cationic liposomes, ionic strength and method of complex preparation. The effect of ionic strength on complex formation was studied by isothermal titration calorimetry and zeta potential measurements. High ionic strength reduces the fraction of bound DNA in the complexes, and the isoelectric point is attained at a ratio of DNA/gemini surfactant which is lower than the one that can be estimated by calculation based on nominal charges of CLs and DNA. PMID:21996510

  4. Measuring DNA Confinement and Excluded Volume Parameters: Scaling with confinement and ionic strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klotz, Alexander; Duong, Lyndon; Coursol, Laurence; Reisner, Walter

    2014-03-01

    Using nanofluidic devices for genomic mapping requires an understanding of the underlying polymer physics of confined DNA. Despite many years of study, there are still aspects that are poorly understood, including the role that excluded volume and semiflexibility play under confinement. Here, a hybrid nanofluidic device consisting of a narrow slit embedded with a lattice of square pits was used to study confined DNA. At equilibrium, molecules tend to occupy one or more pits. The partitioning of molecular contour between the pits and the slit is dependent on maximizing entropy by removing contour from the highly confining slit while reducing excess free energy due to excluded volume interactions from increased concentration in the pit. Measurements of the average number of occupied pits as a function of pit dimension, slit height, and ionic strength serves as a probe of the underlying polymer physics. In particular, the free energy of slit-like confinement and the effective molecular width were measured across a range of slit heights and ionic strengths. It was found that effective width scales with ionic strength according to Stigter's charged rod theory, and that the Chen-Sullivan interpolation formula for the slit-like energy of confinement describes the data well for narrow slits. Unexpected scaling of the confinement free energy with ionic strength indicates that excluded volume effects are relevant for confined DNA.

  5. Polarographic determination of lead hydroxide formation constants at low ionic strength

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lind, Carol J.

    1978-01-01

    Values of formation constants for lead hydroxide at 25 ??C were calculated from normal pulse polarographic measurements of 10-6 M lead in 0.01 M sodium perchlorate. The low concentrations simulate those found in many freshwaters, permitting direct application of the values when considering distributions of lead species. The precise evaluation of species distribution in waters at other ionic strengths requires activity coefficient corrections. As opposed to much of the previously published work done at high ionic strength, the values reported here were obtained at low ionic strength, permitting use of smaller and better defined activity coefficient corrections. These values were further confirmed by differential-pulse polarography and differential-pulse anodic stripping voltammetry data. The logs of the values for ??1??? ??2???, and ??3??? were calculated to be 6.59, 10.80, and 13.63, respectively. When corrected to zero ionic strength these values were calculated to be 6.77, 11.07, and 13.89, respectively.

  6. Synthesis of pH- and ionic strength-responsive microgels and their interactions with lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bao; Sun, Binghua; Li, Xiaoxiao; Yu, Yun; Tian, Yaoqi; Xu, Xueming; Jin, Zhengyu

    2015-08-01

    Microgels composed of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) polymers via chemical crosslinking with sodium trimetaphosphate were synthesized and characterized using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), swelling, and rheological analysis. The effects of pH, ionic strength, and crosslinking density on lysozyme loading in microgels were also studied. The microgel particle size ranged primarily from 10 to 20 μm. TGA revealed that the crosslinking increased the thermal stability of CMC. The swelling degree increased as pH increased from 3 to 5, and remained almost constant from pH 5 to 8. However, the swelling degree decreased with increasing ionic strength. The rheological analysis was in good agreement with the results of swelling degree. The protein uptake decreased with increasing ionic strength and crosslinking density. The pH 6 was the optimal pH for lysozyme absorption at ionic strength 0.05 M. The lysozyme-microgel complex was identified by confocal laser scanning microscopy, and the lysozyme distribution in the microgel was observed to be rather homogeneous. PMID:26001494

  7. Phosphorylation and Ionic Strength Alter the LRAP-HAP Interface in the N-terminus

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Junxia; Xu, Yimin; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2013-04-02

    The conditions present during enamel crystallite development change dramatically as a function of time, including the pH, protein concentration, surface type and ionic strength. In this work, we investigate the role that two of these changing conditions, pH and ionic strength, have in modulating the interaction of amelogenin, LRAP, with hydroxyapatite (HAP). Using solid state NMR dipolar recoupling and chemical shift data, we investigate the structure, orientation and dynamics of three regions in the N-terminus of the protein, L15 to V19, V19 to L23 and K24 to S28. These regions are also near the only phosphorylated residue in the protein, pS16, therefore, changes in the LRAP-HAP interaction as a function of phosphorylation (LRAP(-P) vs. LRAP(+P)) were also investigated. All of the regions and conditions studies for the surface immobilized proteins showed restricted motion, with more mobility under all conditions for L15(+P) and K24(-P). The structure and orientation of the LRAP-HAP interaction in the N-terminus of the phosphorylated protein is very stable to changing solution conditions. From REDOR dipolar recoupling data, the structure and orientation in the region L15V19(+P) did not change significantly as a function of pH or ionic strength. The structure and orientation of the region V19L23(+P) were also stable to changes in pH, with the only significant change observed at high ionic strength, where the region becomes extended, suggesting this may be an important region in regulating mineral development. Chemical shift studies also suggest minimal changes in all three regions studied for both LRAP(-P) and LRAP(+P) as a function of pH or ionic strength. Phosphorylation also alters the LRAP-HAP interface. All of the three residues investigated (L15, V19, and K24) are closer to the surface in LRAP(+P), but K24S28 also changes structure as a result of phosphorylation, from a random coil to a largely helical structure, and V19L23 becomes more extended at high ionic

  8. Enhanced purification of plasmid DNA isoforms by exploiting ionic strength effects during ultrafiltration.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Currie, David; Zydney, Andrew L

    2016-04-01

    The solution structure of plasmid DNA is known to be a strong function of solution conditions due to intramolecular electrostatic interactions between the charged phosphate groups along the DNA backbone. The objective of this work was to determine whether it was possible to enhance the use of ultrafiltration for separation of different plasmid isoforms by proper selection of the solution ionic strength and ion type. Experiments were performed with a 3.0 kbp plasmid using composite regenerated cellulose ultrafiltration membranes. The transmission of the linear isoform was nearly independent of solution ionic strength, but increased significantly with increasing filtrate flux due to the elongation of the highly flexible plasmid in the converging flow field into the membrane pores. In contrast, the transmission of the open-circular and supercoiled plasmids both increased with increasing NaCl or MgCl2 concentration due to the change in plasmid size and conformational flexibility. The effect of ionic strength was greatest for the supercoiled plasmid, providing opportunities for enhanced purification of this therapeutically active isoform. This behavior was confirmed using experiments performed with binary mixtures of the different isoforms. These results clearly demonstrate the potential for enhancing the performance of membrane systems for plasmid DNA separations by proper selection of the ionic conditions. PMID:26370270

  9. Constitutive expression of a salinity-induced wheat WRKY transcription factor enhances salinity and ionic stress tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Yuxiang; Tian, Yanchen; Han, Lu; Yang, Xinchao

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: •A class II WRKY transcription factor, TaWRKY79 was isolated and characterized. •TaWRKY79 was induced by NaCl or abscisic acid. •843 bp regulatory segment was sufficient to respond to ABA or NaCl treatment. •TaWRKY79 enhanced salinity and ionic tolerance while reduced sensitivity to ABA. •TaWRKY79 increased salinity and ionic tolerance in an ABA-dependent pathway. -- Abstract: The isolation and characterization of TaWRKY79, a wheat class II WRKY transcription factor, is described. Its 1297 bp coding region includes a 987 bp long open reading frame. TaWRKY79 was induced by stressing seedlings with either NaCl or abscisic acid (ABA). When a fusion between an 843 bp segment upstream of the TaWRKY79 coding sequence and GUS was introduced into Arabidopsis thaliana, GUS staining indicated that this upstream segment captured the sequence(s) required to respond to ABA or NaCl treatment. When TaWRKY79 was constitutively expressed as a transgene in A. thaliana, the transgenic plants showed an improved capacity to extend their primary root in the presence of either 100 mM NaCl, 10 mM LiCl or 2 μM ABA. The inference was that TaWRKY79 enhanced the level of tolerance to both salinity and ionic stress, while reducing the level of sensitivity to ABA. The ABA-related genes ABA1, ABA2 ABI1 and ABI5 were all up-regulated in the TaWRKY79 transgenic plants, suggesting that the transcription factor operates in an ABA-dependent pathway.

  10. The influence of ionic strength on DNA diffusion in gel networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yuanxi; Jee, Ah-Young; Kim, Hyeong-Ju; Granick, Steve

    Cations are known to reduce the rigidity of the DNA molecules by screening the negative charge along the sugar phosphate backbone. This was established by optical tweezer pulling experiment of immobilized DNA strands. However, little is known regarding the influence of ions on the motion of DNA molecules as they thread through network meshes. We imaged in real time the Brownian diffusion of fluorescent labeled lambda-DNA in an agarose gel network in the presence of salt with monovalent or multivalent cations. Each movie was analyzed using home-written program to yield a trajectory of center of the mass and the accompanying history of the shape fluctuations. One preliminary finding is that ionic strength has a profound influence on the slope of the trace of mean square displacement (MSD) versus time. The influence of ionic strength on DNA diffusion in gel networks.

  11. Variation of stability constants of thorium citrate complexes and of thorium hydrolysis constants with ionic strength

    SciTech Connect

    Choppin, G.R.; Erten, H.N.; Xia, Y.X.

    1995-09-01

    Citrate is among the organic anions that are expected to be present in the wastes planned for deposition in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant repository. In this study, a solvent extraction method has been used to measure the stability constants of Thorium(IV)[Th(IV)] with citrate anions in aqueous solutions with (a) NaClO{sub 4} and (b) NaCl as the background electrolytes. The ionic strengths were varied up to 5 m (NaCl) and 14 m (NaClO{sub 4}). The data from the NaClO{sub 4} solutions at varying pH values were used to calculate the hydrolysis constants for formation of Th(OH){sup 3+} at the different ionic strengths.

  12. An Aqueous Thermodynamic Model for Polymerized Silica Species to High Ionic Strength

    SciTech Connect

    Felmy, Andrew R.; Cho, Herman M.; Rustad, James R.; Mason, Marvin J.

    2001-06-01

    The development of an aqueous thermodynamic model for polymerized silica species is presented which is valid to high ionic strengths and high dissolved silica concentration ({approx}0.1m) at low temperature (22-25 C). The model is based upon the equations of Pitzer and has been parameterized from solubility, electromotive force (emf), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data. The description of the silica speciation reactions at high dissolved silica and basic conditions (pH > 10) required the inclusion of monomeric, dimeric, trimeric (linear, cyclic and substituted), tetrameric (linear and cyclic) and hexameric (prismatic) species. The standard state equilibrium constants for the formation of these species, as well as the necessary Pitzer ion-interaction parameters to describe the ionic strength dependence of the formation reactions were determined.

  13. Intracellular Temperature Sensing: An Ultra-bright Luminescent Nanothermometer with Non-sensitivity to pH and Ionic Strength

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Helin; Fan, Yanyan; Wang, Jianhai; Song, Zhongsen; Shi, Hao; Han, Rongcheng; Sha, Yinlin; Jiang, Yuqiang

    2015-01-01

    Luminescence thermometry usually suffer from cellular complexity of the biochemical environment (such as pH and ionic strength), and thus the accuracy and reliability of the determined intracellular temperature are directly affected. Herein, a photoluminescent nanothermometer composed of polymer encapsulated quantum dots (P-QD) has been developed. And the prepared nanothermometer exhibits some advantages: such as non-sensitivity to pH and ionic strength, as well as high detection sensitivity and ultrahigh reversibility. The intracellular temperature was accurately determined under physiological conditions with different pH and ionic strength, and direct measurement of thermogenesis in individual cells has been achieved. PMID:26445905

  14. Effect of ionic strength on ruthenium CMP in H2O2-based slurries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Liang; He, Yongyong; Li, Yuzhuo; Luo, Jianbin

    2014-10-01

    With the development of ultra-large scale integrated circuits, ruthenium has been selected as one of the most promising barrier metals for copper interconnects to replace traditional Ta/TaN bilayer. This paper mainly investigated the effect of ionic strength on the chemical mechanical polishing performance of ruthenium in H2O2-based slurries. The results show that, the ruthenium removal rate (RR) increases with the increasing concentration of H2O2 due to the formation of ruthenium oxides like Ru(OH)3, RuO2·2H2O and even RuO42-; additionally, the ruthenium RR can be further enhanced with the increase of K+ ionic strength. It is revealed that the added K+ can intensify the electrochemical reactions between H2O2 and the ruthenium surface by increasing the conductivity, meanwhile can also result in the neutralization of the zeta potentials of both silica particles and the ruthenium surface, and thus can lead to the decrease of the electrostatic repulsive force and the increase of the mechanical abrasion intensity between silica particles and the ruthenium surface. Therefore, the ruthenium RR increases with the increase of K+ ionic strength. Furthermore, the effects of K+ ionic strength on the material removal rate (MRR) selectivity of Ru vs. Cu and the galvanic corrosion of Cu/Ru couple are studied. It is found that, in order to achieve higher MRR selectivity than 1.0, KNO3 is preferred for the K+ source; and with H2O2 as the oxidizer, copper galvanic corrosion problem can be effectively suppressed.

  15. Tuning Cationic Block Copolymer Micelle Size by pH and Ionic Strength.

    PubMed

    Sprouse, Dustin; Jiang, Yaming; Laaser, Jennifer E; Lodge, Timothy P; Reineke, Theresa M

    2016-09-12

    The formation, morphology, and pH and ionic strength responses of cationic block copolymer micelles in aqueous solutions have been examined in detail to provide insight into the future development of cationic micelles for complexation with polyanions such as DNA. Diblock polymers composed of a hydrophilic/cationic block of N,N-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA) and a hydrophobic/nonionic block of n-butyl methacrylate (BMA) were synthesized [denoted as DMAEMA-b-BMA (X-Y), where X = DMAEMA molecular weight and Y = molecular weight of BMA in kDa]. Four variants were created with block molecular weights of 14-13, 14-23, 27-14, 27-29 kDa and low dispersities less than 1.10. The amphiphilic polymers self-assembled in aqueous conditions into core-shell micelles that ranged in size from 25-80 nm. These cationic micelles were extensively characterized in terms of size and net charge in different buffers over a wide range of ionic strength (0.02-1 M) and pH (5-10) conditions. The micelle core is kinetically trapped, and the corona contracts with increasing pH and ionic strength, consistent with previous work on micelles with glassy polystyrene cores, indicating that the corona properties are independent of the dynamics of the micelle core. The contraction and extension of the corona scales with solution ionic strength and charge fraction of the amine groups. The aggregation numbers of the micelles were obtained by static light scattering, and the Rg/Rh ratios are close to that of a hard sphere. The zeta potentials of the micelles were positive up to two pH units above the corona pKa, suggesting that applications relying on micelle charge for stability should be viable over a wide range of solution conditions. PMID:27487088

  16. Influence of droplet size, pH and ionic strength on endotoxin-triggered ordering transitions in liquid crystalline droplets

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Daniel S.; Abbott, Nicholas L.

    2012-01-01

    We report an investigation of ordering transitions that are induced in water-dispersed, micrometer-sized droplets of a thermotropic liquid crystal (LC) by the bacterial lipopolysaccharide endotoxin. We reveal that the ordering transitions induced by endotoxin – from a bipolar state of the droplets to a radial state – are strongly dependent on the size of the LC droplets. Specifically, as the diameters of the LC droplets increase from 2 μm to above 10 μm (in phosphate buffered saline with an ionic strength of 90 mM and a pH of 7.2), we measured the percentage of droplets exhibiting a radial configuration in the presence of 100 pg/mL endotoxin to decrease from 98 ± 1 % to 3 ± 2 %. In addition, we measured a decrease in either the ionic strength or pH of the aqueous phase to reduce the percentage of droplets exhibiting a radial configuration in the presence of endotoxin. These results, when interpreted within the context of a simple thermodynamic model that incorporates the contributions of elasticity and surface anchoring to the free energies of the LC droplets, lead us to conclude that (i) the elastic constant K24 plays a central role in determining the size-dependent response of the LC droplets to endotoxin, and (ii) endotoxin-triggered ordering transitions occur only under solution conditions (pH, ionic strength) where the combined contributions of elasticity and surface anchoring to the free energies of the bipolar and radial configurations of the LC droplets are similar in magnitude. Our analysis also suggests that the presence of endotoxin perturbs the free energies of the LC droplets by ~10−17 J/droplet, which is comparable to the standard free energy of self-association of ~103 endotoxin molecules. These results, when combined with prior reports of localization of endotoxin at the center of LC droplets, are consistent with the hypothesis that self-assembly of endotoxin within micrometer-sized LC droplets provides the driving force for the ordering

  17. Signal Amplification in Field Effect-Based Sandwich Enzyme-Linked Immunosensing by Tuned Buffer Concentration with Ionic Strength Adjuster.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Satyendra; Kumar, Narendra; Panda, Siddhartha

    2016-04-01

    Miniaturization of the sandwich enzyme-based immunosensor has several advantages but could result in lower signal strength due to lower enzyme loading. Hence, technologies for amplification of the signal are needed. Signal amplification in a field effect-based electrochemical immunosensor utilizing chip-based ELISA is presented in this work. First, the molarities of phosphate buffer saline (PBS) and concentrations of KCl as ionic strength adjuster were optimized to maximize the GOx glucose-based enzymatic reactions in a beaker for signal amplification measured by change in the voltage shift with an EIS device (using 20 μl of solution) and validated with a commercial pH meter (using 3 ml of solution). The PBS molarity of 100 μM with 25 mM KCl provided the maximum voltage shift. These optimized buffer conditions were further verified for GOx immobilized on silicon chips, and similar trends with decreased PBS molarity were obtained; however, the voltage shift values obtained on chip reaction were lower as compared to the reactions occurring in the beaker. The decreased voltage shift with immobilized enzyme on chip could be attributed to the increased Km (Michaelis-Menten constant) values in the immobilized GOx. Finally, a more than sixfold signal enhancement (from 8 to 47 mV) for the chip-based sandwich immunoassay was obtained by altering the PBS molarity from 10 to 100 μM with 25 mM KCl. PMID:26801818

  18. Effects of ionic strength on the production of short chain volatile hydrocarbons by Dunaliella salina (Teodoresco).

    PubMed

    Muñoz, J; Mudge, S M; Sandoval, A

    2004-02-01

    The effect of ionic strength on the production of short chain volatile hydrocarbons was studied in cultures of Dunaliella salina. Axenic cultures of D. salina were grown at three different ionic strengths 0.5, 2 and 3 M of NaCl in Johnson (J/1) culture medium [Journal of Bacteriology 95 (1968) 1461] under the following laboratory growth conditions: a 12:12 h photoperiod, 300 micromolm(-2)s(-1) of photosynthetic active radiation (PAR) provided by a fluorescent lamp of 40 W combined with a 100 W incandescent lamp at 20 +/- 1 degrees C at pH 7.5. C1 to C5 hydrocarbons were detected using a head space technique and GC-FID. Cell numbers and growth rate was greatest at 2 M NaCl 4.3 x 10(6) cellml(-1) after a 15 days period of culture. Maximum hydrocarbon production was measured in the concentration of 0.5 NaCl with lower production rates in the more concentrated solutions. The principal hydrocarbon was pentane at 0.5 M but was ethane in 2 and 3 M solutions. Production rates for individual compounds ranged between 0.13 and 22 x 10(-15) microgCcell(-1)h(-1). It is suggested that the ability to produce and release volatile organic compounds of D. salina is related to osmotic conditions established by the ionic strength of growth solution. PMID:14664856

  19. Colloid transport and deposition in water-saturated Yucca Mountain tuff as determined by ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Gamerdinger, A P; Kaplan, D I

    2001-08-15

    Colloid mobility and deposition were determined in model systems consisting of quartz sand or crushed Yucca Mountain tuff, latex microspheres (colloidal particles), and simulated groundwater. Ionic strength (I) was manipulated as a first step in defining limiting conditions for colloid transport in a system modeled after geochemical conditions at the Yucca Mountain site. Solutions of deionized water (DI), 0.1x, 1x, and 10x (the ionic strength of simulated groundwater) (I = 0.0116 M) were used in saturated columns under steady-state flow conditions. Separate experiments with conservative tracers indicated stable hydrodynamic conditions that were independent of I. Colloids were completely mobile (no deposition) in the DI and 0.1x solutions; deposition increased to 11-13% for 1x and to 89-97% for 10x treatments with similar results for sand and tuff. Deposition was described as a pseudo-first-order process; however, a decreasing rate of deposition was apparent for colloid transport at the 10x condition through the tuff. A linear dependence of colloid removal (extent and deposition rate coefficient) on I is illustrated for the model Yucca Mountain system and for a glass-KCl system reported in the literature. This simple relationship for saturated systems may be useful for predicting deposition efficiencies under conditions of varying ionic strength. PMID:11529572

  20. The binding of glucose to yeast hexokinase monomers is independent of ionic strength.

    PubMed Central

    Mayes, E L; Hoggett, J G; Kellett, G L

    1982-01-01

    Hoggett & Kellett [Eur. J. Biochem. 66, 65-77 (1976)] have reported that the binding of glucose to the monomer of hexokinase PII isoenzyme is independent of ionic strength, in contrast to the subsequent claim of Feldman & Kramp [Biochemistry 17, 1541-1547 (1978)] that the binding is strongly dependent on ionic strength. Since measurements with native hexokinase P forms are complicated by the fact that the enzyme exists in a monomer-dimer association-dissociation equilibrium, we have now studied the binding of glucose to the proteolytically-modified S forms which are monomeric. At pH 8.5, the affinity of glucose for both SI and SII monomers is independent of salt concentration over the range of KCl concentrations 0-1.0 mol . dm-3 and is in good agreement with that of the corresponding P forms in both low and high salt. These observations confirm that the binding of glucose to hexokinase P monomers is independent of ionic strength and that the affinity of glucose for the hexokinase PII monomer is about an order of magnitude greater than that for the dimer. PMID:7052060

  1. The binding of glucose to yeast hexokinase monomers is independent of ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Mayes, E L; Hoggett, J G; Kellett, G L

    1982-05-01

    Hoggett & Kellett [Eur. J. Biochem. 66, 65-77 (1976)] have reported that the binding of glucose to the monomer of hexokinase PII isoenzyme is independent of ionic strength, in contrast to the subsequent claim of Feldman & Kramp [Biochemistry 17, 1541-1547 (1978)] that the binding is strongly dependent on ionic strength. Since measurements with native hexokinase P forms are complicated by the fact that the enzyme exists in a monomer-dimer association-dissociation equilibrium, we have now studied the binding of glucose to the proteolytically-modified S forms which are monomeric. At pH 8.5, the affinity of glucose for both SI and SII monomers is independent of salt concentration over the range of KCl concentrations 0-1.0 mol . dm-3 and is in good agreement with that of the corresponding P forms in both low and high salt. These observations confirm that the binding of glucose to hexokinase P monomers is independent of ionic strength and that the affinity of glucose for the hexokinase PII monomer is about an order of magnitude greater than that for the dimer. PMID:7052060

  2. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles: Impact of increasing ionic strength during synthesis, reflux, and hydrothermal aging

    SciTech Connect

    Isley, Sara L.; Jordan, David S.; Penn, R. Lee

    2009-01-08

    This work investigates the role of ionic strength during synthesis, reflux, and hydrothermal aging of sol-gel synthesized titanium dioxide. Research presented here uses X-ray diffraction data and Rietveld refinements to quantify anatase, brookite, and rutile phases as functions of synthetic and aging variables. In addition, the Scherrer equation is used to obtain average crystallite sizes for each phase quantified. Results presented in this work demonstrate that the most control over the sol-gel products can be obtained by modifying the pH during hydrolysis. In addition, while varying the ionic strength during reflux and hydrothermal aging can result in enhanced control over the crystalline phase and crystallite size, the most control can be achieved by varying the ionic strength during synthesis. Finally, sol-gel synthesis at low pH (-0.6) and high-chloride concentration (3 M NaCl) produced a heterogeneous sample composed of nanocrystalline anatase (3.8 nm) and rutile (2.9 nm)

  3. General strategy for biodetection in high ionic strength solutions using transistor-based nanoelectronic sensors

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ning; Zhou, Wei; Jiang, Xiaocheng; Hong, Guosong; Fu, Tian-Ming; Lieber, Charles M.

    2015-01-01

    Transistor-based nanoelectronic sensors are capable of label-free real-time chemical and biological detection with high sensitivity and spatial resolution, although the short Debye screening length in high ionic strength solutions has made difficult applications relevant to physiological conditions. Here, we describe a new and general strategy to overcome this challenge for field-effect transistor (FET) sensors that involves incorporating a porous and biomolecule permeable polymer layer on the FET sensor. This polymer layer increases the effective screening length in the region immediately adjacent to the device surface, and thereby enables detection of biomolecules in high ionic strength solutions in real-time. Studies of silicon nanowire (SiNW) field-effect transistors (FETs) with additional polyethylene glycol (PEG) modification show that prostate specific antigen (PSA) can be readily detected in solutions with phosphate buffer (PB) concentrations as high as 150 mM, while similar devices without PEG modification only exhibit detectable signals for concentrations ≤ 10 mM. Concentration-dependent measurements exhibited real-time detection of PSA with a sensitivity of at least 10 nM in ~130 mM ionic strength PB with linear response up to the highest (1000 nM) PSA concentrations tested. The current work represents an important step toward general application of nanoelectronic detectors for biochemical sensing in physiological environments, and is expected to open up exciting opportunities for in-vitro and in-vivo biological sensing relevant to basic biology research through medicine. PMID:25664395

  4. The effect of high ionic strength on neptunium (V) adsorption to a halophilic bacterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ams, David A.; Swanson, Juliet S.; Szymanowski, Jennifer E. S.; Fein, Jeremy B.; Richmann, Michael; Reed, Donald T.

    2013-06-01

    The mobility of neptunium (V) in subsurface high ionic strength aqueous systems may be strongly influenced by adsorption to the cell wall of the halophilic bacteria Chromohalobacter sp. This study is the first to evaluate the adsorption of neptunium (V) to the surface of a halophilic bacterium as a function of pH from approximately 2 to 10 and at ionic strengths of 2 and 4 M. This is also the first study to evaluate the effects of carbonate complexation with neptunium (V) on adsorption to whole bacterial cells under high pH conditions. A thermodynamically-based surface complexation model was adapted to describe experimental adsorption data under high ionic strength conditions where traditional corrections for aqueous ion activity are invalid. Adsorption of neptunium (V) was rapid and reversible under the conditions of the study. Adsorption was significant over the entire pH range evaluated for both ionic strength conditions and was shown to be dependent on the speciation of the sites on the bacterial surface and neptunium (V) in solution. Adsorption behavior was controlled by the relatively strong electrostatic attraction of the positively charged neptunyl ion to the negatively charged bacterial surface at pH below circum-neutral. At pH above circum-neutral, the adsorption behavior was controlled by the presence of negatively charged neptunium (V) carbonate complexes resulting in decreased adsorption, although adsorption was still significant due to the adsorption of negatively charged neptunyl-carbonate species. Adsorption in 4 M NaClO4 was enhanced relative to adsorption in 2 M NaClO4 over the majority of the pH range evaluated, likely due to the effect of increasing aqueous ion activity at high ionic strength. The protonation/deprotonation characteristics of the cell wall of Chromohalobacter sp. were evaluated by potentiometric titrations in 2 and 4 M NaClO4. Bacterial titration results indicated that Chromohalobacter sp. exhibits similar proton buffering

  5. Removal of natural organic matter by titanium tetrachloride: The effect of total hardness and ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Y X; Shon, H K; Phuntsho, S; Gao, B Y

    2014-02-15

    This study is the first attempt to investigate the effect of total hardness and ionic strength on coagulation performance and the floc characteristics of titanium tetrachloride (TiCl4). Membrane fouling under different total hardness and ionic strength conditions was also evaluated during a coagulation-ultrafiltration (C-UF) hybrid process. Coagulation experiments were performed with two simulated waters, using humic acid (HA, high molecular weight) and fulvic acid (FA, relatively low molecular weight), respectively, as model natural organic matter (NOM). Results show that both particle and organic matter removal can be enhanced by increasing total hardness and ionic strength. Floc characteristics were significantly influenced by total hardness and ionic strength and were improved in terms of floc size, growth rate, strength, recoverability and compactness. The results of the UF tests show that the pre-coagulation with TiCl4 significantly improves the membrane permeate fluxes. Under different total hardness and ionic strength conditions, the membrane permeate flux varied according to both NOM and floc characteristics. The increase in total hardness and ionic strength improved the membrane permeate flux in the case of HA simulated water treatment. PMID:24463732

  6. EFFECTS OF PH, SOLID/SOLUTION RATIO, IONIC STRENGTH, AND ORGANIC ACIDS ON PB AND CD ON KAOLINITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Potentiometric and ion-selective electrode titrations together with batch sorption/desorption experiments, were performed to explain the aqueous and surface complexation reactions between kaolinite, Pb, Cd and organic acids. Variables included pH, ionic strength, metal concentrat...

  7. β-Lactoglobulin (BLG) binding to highly charged cationic polymer-grafted magnetic nanoparticles: effect of ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Qin, Li; Xu, Yisheng; Han, Haoya; Liu, Miaomiao; Chen, Kaimin; Wang, Siyi; Wang, Jie; Xu, Jun; Li, Li; Guo, Xuhong

    2015-12-15

    Poly(2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyltrimethyl ammonium chloride) (PMATAC) modified magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) with a high zeta potential of ca. 50mV were synthesized by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). The prepared NPs consist of a magnetic core around 13nm and a PMATAC shell around 20nm attached on the surface of magnetic nanoparticles. Thermodynamic binding parameters between β-lactoglobulin and these polycationic NPs were investigated at different ionic strengths by high-resolution turbidimetry, dynamic light scattering (DLS), and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Both turbidity and ITC show that binding affinities for BLG display a non-monotonic ionic strength dependence trend and a maximum appears at ionic strength of 50mM. Such observation should arise from the coeffects of protein charge anisotropy visualized by DelPhi electrostatic modeling and the strong electrostatic repulsion among highly charged NPs at a variety of ionic strengths. PMID:26322494

  8. High-Strength Composite Fibers from Cellulose-Lignin Blends Regenerated from Ionic Liquid Solution.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yibo; Asaadi, Shirin; Johansson, Leena-Sisko; Ahvenainen, Patrik; Reza, Mehedi; Alekhina, Marina; Rautkari, Lauri; Michud, Anne; Hauru, Lauri; Hummel, Michael; Sixta, Herbert

    2015-12-01

    Composite fibres that contain cellulose and lignin were produced from ionic liquid solutions by dry-jet wet spinning. Eucalyptus dissolving pulp and organosolv/kraft lignin blends in different ratios were dissolved in the ionic liquid 1,5-diazabicyclo[4.3.0]non-5-enium acetate to prepare a spinning dope from which composite fibres were spun successfully. The composite fibres had a high strength with slightly decreasing values for fibres with an increasing share of lignin, which is because of the reduction in crystallinity. The total orientation of composite fibres and SEM images show morphological changes caused by the presence of lignin. The hydrophobic contribution of lignin reduced the vapour adsorption in the fibre. Thermogravimetric analysis curves of the composite fibres reveal the positive effect of the lignin on the carbonisation yield. Finally, the composite fibre was found to be a potential raw material for textile manufacturing and as a precursor for carbon fibre production. PMID:26542190

  9. Exogenous trehalose largely alleviates ionic unbalance, ROS burst, and PCD occurrence induced by high salinity in Arabidopsis seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lei; Zhao, Xiaoju; Zhu, Hong; Paul, Matthew; Zu, Yuangang; Tang, Zhonghua

    2014-01-01

    Trehalose (Tre) has been reported to play a critical role in plant response to salinity and the involved mechanisms remain to be investigated in detail. Here, the putative roles of Tre in regulation of ionic balance, cellular redox state, cell death were studied in Arabidopsis under high salt condition. Our results found that the salt-induced restrictions on both vegetative and reproductive growth in salt-stressed plants were largely alleviated by exogenous supply with Tre. The microprobe analysis of ionic dynamics in the leaf and stem of florescence highlighted the Tre ability to retain K and K/Na ratio in plant tissues to improve salt tolerance. The flow cytometry assay of cellular levels of reactive oxygen species and programmed cell death displayed that Tre was able to antagonized salt-induced damages in redox state and cell death and sucrose did not play the same role with Tre. By comparing ionic distribution in leaf and inflorescence stem (IS), we found that Tre was able to restrict Na transportation to IS from leaves since that the ratio of Na accumulation in leaves relative to IS was largely improved due to Tre. The marked decrease of Na ion and improved sucrose level in IS might account for the promoted floral growth when Tre was included in the saline solution. At the same time, endogenous soluble sugars and antioxidant enzyme activities in the salt-stressed plants were also elevated by Tre to counteract high salt stress. We concluded that Tre could improve Arabidopsis salt resistance with respect to biomass accumulation and floral transition in the means of regulating plant redox state, cell death, and ionic distribution. PMID:25400644

  10. Fabrication of Carbon Nanotube High-Frequency Nanoelectronic Biosensor for Sensing in High Ionic Strength Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Girish S.; Zhong, Zhaohui

    2013-01-01

    The unique electronic properties and high surface-to-volume ratios of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) and semiconductor nanowires (NW) 1-4 make them good candidates for high sensitivity biosensors. When a charged molecule binds to such a sensor surface, it alters the carrier density5 in the sensor, resulting in changes in its DC conductance. However, in an ionic solution a charged surface also attracts counter-ions from the solution, forming an electrical double layer (EDL). This EDL effectively screens off the charge, and in physiologically relevant conditions ~100 millimolar (mM), the characteristic charge screening length (Debye length) is less than a nanometer (nm). Thus, in high ionic strength solutions, charge based (DC) detection is fundamentally impeded6-8. We overcome charge screening effects by detecting molecular dipoles rather than charges at high frequency, by operating carbon nanotube field effect transistors as high frequency mixers9-11. At high frequencies, the AC drive force can no longer overcome the solution drag and the ions in solution do not have sufficient time to form the EDL. Further, frequency mixing technique allows us to operate at frequencies high enough to overcome ionic screening, and yet detect the sensing signals at lower frequencies11-12. Also, the high transconductance of SWNT transistors provides an internal gain for the sensing signal, which obviates the need for external signal amplifier. Here, we describe the protocol to (a) fabricate SWNT transistors, (b) functionalize biomolecules to the nanotube13, (c) design and stamp a poly-dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) micro-fluidic chamber14 onto the device, and (d) carry out high frequency sensing in different ionic strength solutions11. PMID:23912795

  11. Fabrication of carbon nanotube high-frequency nanoelectronic biosensor for sensing in high ionic strength solutions.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Girish S; Zhong, Zhaohui

    2013-01-01

    The unique electronic properties and high surface-to-volume ratios of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) and semiconductor nanowires (NW) make them good candidates for high sensitivity biosensors. When a charged molecule binds to such a sensor surface, it alters the carrier density in the sensor, resulting in changes in its DC conductance. However, in an ionic solution a charged surface also attracts counter-ions from the solution, forming an electrical double layer (EDL). This EDL effectively screens off the charge, and in physiologically relevant conditions ~100 millimolar (mM), the characteristic charge screening length (Debye length) is less than a nanometer (nm). Thus, in high ionic strength solutions, charge based (DC) detection is fundamentally impeded. We overcome charge screening effects by detecting molecular dipoles rather than charges at high frequency, by operating carbon nanotube field effect transistors as high frequency mixers. At high frequencies, the AC drive force can no longer overcome the solution drag and the ions in solution do not have sufficient time to form the EDL. Further, frequency mixing technique allows us to operate at frequencies high enough to overcome ionic screening, and yet detect the sensing signals at lower frequencies. Also, the high transconductance of SWNT transistors provides an internal gain for the sensing signal, which obviates the need for external signal amplifier. Here, we describe the protocol to (a) fabricate SWNT transistors, (b) functionalize biomolecules to the nanotube, (c) design and stamp a poly-dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) micro-fluidic chamber onto the device, and (d) carry out high frequency sensing in different ionic strength solutions. PMID:23912795

  12. The improved resistance to high salinity induced by trehalose is associated with ionic regulation and osmotic adjustment in Catharanthus roseus.

    PubMed

    Chang, Bowen; Yang, Lei; Cong, Weiwei; Zu, Yuangang; Tang, Zhonghua

    2014-04-01

    The effects of exogenous trehalose (Tre) on salt tolerance of pharmaceutical plant Catharanthus roseus and the physiological mechanisms were both investigated in this study. The results showed that the supplement of Tre in saline condition (250 mM NaCl) largely alleviated the inhibitory effects of salinity on plant growth, namely biomass accumulation and total leaf area per plant. In this saline condition, the decreased level of relative water content (RWC) and photosynthetic rate were also greatly rescued by exogenous Tre. This improved performance of plants under high salinity induced by Tre could be partly ascribed to its ability to decrease accumulation of sodium, and increase potassium in leaves. The exogenous Tre led to high levels of fructose, glucose, sucrose and Tre inside the salt-stressed plants during whole the three-week treatment. The major free amino acids such as proline, arginine, threonine and glutamate were also largely elevated in the first two-week course of treatment with Tre in saline solution. It was proposed here that Tre might act as signal to make the salt-stressed plants actively increase internal compatible solutes, including soluble sugars and free amino acids, to control water loss, leaf gas exchange and ionic flow at the onset of salt stress. The application of Tre in saline condition also promoted the accumulation of alkaloids. The regulatory role of Tre in improving salt tolerance was optimal with an exogenous concentration of 10 mM Tre. Larger concentrations of Tre were supra-optimum and adversely affected plant growth. PMID:24589477

  13. Variation of stability constants of thorium and uranium oxalate complexes with ionic strength

    SciTech Connect

    Erten, H.N; Mohammed, A.K.; Choppin, G.R.

    1993-12-31

    Extraction of Th(IV) and UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} by a solution of TTA and HDEHP, respectively, in toluene was used to obtain stability constants of their oxalate complexes in 1, 3, 5, 7 and 9 M ionic strength (NaClO{sub 2}) solutions. The complexes formed were the MOx, MHOx, MOx{sub 2} and M(HOx){sub 2} (M = Th, UO{sub 2}) species. The values were analyzed by the Specific Interaction Theory and agreed to I {le} 3 M but required an additional term for fitting at I > 3 M.

  14. Zinc isotope fractionation during adsorption onto Mn oxyhydroxide at low and high ionic strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryan, Allison L.; Dong, Shuofei; Wilkes, Elise B.; Wasylenki, Laura E.

    2015-05-01

    Marine ferromanganese sediments represent one of the largest sinks from global seawater for Zn, a critical trace metal nutrient. These sediments are variably enriched in heavier isotopes of Zn relative to deep seawater, and some are among the heaviest natural samples analyzed to date. New experimental results demonstrate that adsorption of Zn to poorly crystalline Mn oxyhydroxide results in preferential association of heavier isotopes with the sorbent phase. At low ionic strength our experimental system displayed a short-lived kinetic isotope effect, with light isotopes adsorbed to birnessite (Δ66/64Znadsorbed-dissolved ∼ -0.2‰). After 100 h the sense of fractionation was opposite, such that heavier isotopes were preferentially adsorbed at steady state, but the magnitude of Δ66/64Znadsorbed-dissolved was indistinguishable from zero (+0.05 ± 0.08‰). At high ionic strength, we observed preferential sorption of heavy isotopes, with a strong negative correlation between Δ66/64Znadsorbed-dissolved and the percentage of Zn on the birnessite. Values of Δ66/64Znadsorbed-dissolved ranged from nearly +3‰ at low surface loading to +0.16‰ at high surface loading. Based on previous EXAFS work we infer that Zn adsorbs first as tetrahedral, inner-sphere complexes at low surface loading, with preferential incorporation of heavier isotopes relative to the octahedral Zn species predominating in solution. As surface loading increases, so does the proportion of Zn adsorbing as octahedral complexes, thus diminishing the magnitude of fractionation between the dissolved and adsorbed pools of Zn. The magnitude of fractionation at high ionic strength is also governed by aqueous speciation of Zn in synthetic seawater; a substantial fraction of Zn ions reside in chloro complexes, which preferentially incorporate light Zn isotopes, and this drives the adsorbed pool to be heavier relative to the bulk solution than it was at low ionic strength. Our results explain the observation

  15. Effects of starvation on the transport of Escherichia coli K12 in saturated porous media are dependent on pH and ionic strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, S.; Walczak, J. J.; Wang, L.; Bardy, S. L.; Li, J.

    2010-12-01

    In this research, we investigate the effects of starvation on the transport of E. coli K12 in saturated porous media. Particularly, we examine the relationship between such effects and the pH and ionic strength of the electrolyte solutions that were used to suspend bacterial cells. E. coli K12 (ATCC 10798) cells were cultured using either Luria-Bertani Miller (LB-Miller) broth (10 g trypton, 5 g yeast extract and 10 g NaCl in 1 L of deionized water) or LB-Luria broth (10 g tryptone, 5 g yeast extract and 0.5 g NaCl in 1 L of deionized water). Both broths had similar pH (~7.1) but differed in ionic strength (LB-Miller: ~170 mM, LB-Luria: ~ 8 mM). The bacterial cells were then harvested and suspended using one of the following electrolyte solutions: phosphate buffered saline (PBS) (pH ~7.2; ionic strength ~170 mM), 168 mM NaCl (pH ~5.7), 5% of PBS (pH ~ 7.2; ionic strength ~ 8 mM) and 8 mM NaCl (pH ~ 5.7). Column transport experiments were performed at 0, 21 and 48 hours following cell harvesting to evaluate the change in cell mobility over time under “starvation” conditions. Our results showed that 1) starvation increased the mobility of E. coli K12 cells; 2) the most significant change in mobility occurred when bacterial cells were suspended in an electrolyte solution that had different pH and ionic strength (i.e., LB-Miller culture suspended in 8 mM NaCl and LB-Luria culture suspended in 168 mM Nacl); and 3) the change in cell mobility primarily occurred within the first 21 hours. The size of the bacterial cells was measured and the surface properties (e.g., zeta potential, hydrophobicity, cell-bound protein, LPS sugar content, outer membrane protein profiles) of the bacterial cells were characterized. We found that the measured cell surface properties could not fully explain the observed changes in cell mobility caused by starvation.

  16. Modulating the Arrangement of Charged Nanotubes by Ionic Strength in Salty Water.

    PubMed

    Tao, Jiaojiao; Huang, Ningdong; Li, Junjun; Chen, Mingming; Wei, Chengsha; Li, Liangbin; Wu, Ziyu

    2014-04-01

    Despite the important role and potential application of charged cylindrical polyelectrolytes, biomacromolecules, and self-assembles, salt-modulated organization of those 1D charged nanostructures remains a topic relatively unexplored with an obscure underlying mechanism. In this Letter, the aggregation of oriented nanotubes self-assembled by ionic aromatic oligoamide in aqueous solution of NaCl over a wide concentration range is probed via small-angle X-ray scattering and a transmission electron microscope. The arrangement of nanotubes undergoes order-disorder transition sequences from an ordered rectangular phase to hexagonal packing and then to a lamellar gel. The observed transitions are understood by ionic effects on the electrostatic interaction between charged nanotubes and osmotic pressure due to ion partitioning. Above the physiological condition, electrostatic interactions are largely screened by the salts, while osmotic effects start to regulate the aggregation behavior and concomitantly deform the nanotubes. The study demonstrates rich phase behaviors of ordered, charged 1D nanostructures by tuning the ionic strength and underlying key physical principles. PMID:26274469

  17. Ionic and Amino Acid Regulation in Hard Clam (Meretrix lusoria) in Response to Salinity Challenges.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chia-Hao; Yeh, Po-Ling; Lee, Tsung-Han

    2016-01-01

    Most marine mollusks are osmoconformers, in that, their body fluid osmolality changes in the direction of the change in environmental salinity. Marine mollusks exhibit a number of osmoregulatory mechanisms to cope with either hypo- or hyperosmotic stress. The effects of changes in salinity on the osmoregulatory mechanisms of the hard clam (Meretrix lusoria, an economically important species of marine bivalve for Taiwan) have not been determined. In this study, we examined the effect of exposure to hypo (10‰)- and hyper (35‰)-osmotic salinity on hard clams raised at their natural salinity (20‰). The osmolality, [Na(+)], and [Cl(-)] of the hard clam hemolymph were changed in the same direction as the surrounding salinity. Further, the contents of total free amino acids including taurine in the gills and mantles were significantly upregulated in hard clam with increasing salinity. The gill Na(+), K(+)-ATPase (NKA) activity, the important enzyme regulating cellular inorganic ions, was not affected by the changed salinity. Mantle NKA activity, however, was stimulated in the 35‰ SW treatment. The taurine transporter (TAUT) is related to the regulation of intracellular contents of taurine, the dominant osmolyte. Herein, a TAUT gene of hard clam was cloned and a TAUT antibody was derived for the immunoblotting. The TAUT mRNA expression of the mantle in hard clam was significantly stimulated in 35‰ SW, but protein expression was not modulated by the changed salinity. In gills of the hard clam with 10‰ SW, both TAUT mRNA and protein expressions were significantly stimulated, and it may reflect a feedback regulation from the decreased gills taurine content under long-term hypoosmotic acclimation. These findings suggest that TAUT expression is regulated differently in gills and mantles following exposure to alterations in environmental salinity. Taken together, this study used the physiological, biochemical and molecular approaches to simultaneously explore the

  18. Ionic and Amino Acid Regulation in Hard Clam (Meretrix lusoria) in Response to Salinity Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chia-Hao; Yeh, Po-Ling; Lee, Tsung-Han

    2016-01-01

    Most marine mollusks are osmoconformers, in that, their body fluid osmolality changes in the direction of the change in environmental salinity. Marine mollusks exhibit a number of osmoregulatory mechanisms to cope with either hypo- or hyperosmotic stress. The effects of changes in salinity on the osmoregulatory mechanisms of the hard clam (Meretrix lusoria, an economically important species of marine bivalve for Taiwan) have not been determined. In this study, we examined the effect of exposure to hypo (10‰)- and hyper (35‰)-osmotic salinity on hard clams raised at their natural salinity (20‰). The osmolality, [Na+], and [Cl−] of the hard clam hemolymph were changed in the same direction as the surrounding salinity. Further, the contents of total free amino acids including taurine in the gills and mantles were significantly upregulated in hard clam with increasing salinity. The gill Na+, K+-ATPase (NKA) activity, the important enzyme regulating cellular inorganic ions, was not affected by the changed salinity. Mantle NKA activity, however, was stimulated in the 35‰ SW treatment. The taurine transporter (TAUT) is related to the regulation of intracellular contents of taurine, the dominant osmolyte. Herein, a TAUT gene of hard clam was cloned and a TAUT antibody was derived for the immunoblotting. The TAUT mRNA expression of the mantle in hard clam was significantly stimulated in 35‰ SW, but protein expression was not modulated by the changed salinity. In gills of the hard clam with 10‰ SW, both TAUT mRNA and protein expressions were significantly stimulated, and it may reflect a feedback regulation from the decreased gills taurine content under long-term hypoosmotic acclimation. These findings suggest that TAUT expression is regulated differently in gills and mantles following exposure to alterations in environmental salinity. Taken together, this study used the physiological, biochemical and molecular approaches to simultaneously explore the

  19. pH and ion strength modulated ionic species loading in mesoporous silica nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Liu, Jianbo; Yang, Xiaohai; Wang, Kemin; Wang, Qing; Yang, Meng; Li, Li; Xu, Jianguo

    2013-10-01

    Mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN) have emerged as appealing host materials to accommodate guest molecules for biomedical applications, and recently various methods have been developed to modulate the loading of guest molecules in the silica matrix. Herein, it was demonstrated that pH and ion strength showed great influence on the loading of charged species into the nanoparticles, taking MCM-41 as a host MSN model and methylviologen (MV2+) and 1,5-naphthalene disulfonate (NDS2-) as typical charged ionic guest molecules. As the pH increased from 3.0 to 8.0, the loading amount of MV2+ increased gradually, while on the contrary, it decreased gradually for NDS2-, for the solution pH changed the electrostatic interaction between the silica matrix and the ionic guest molecules. Additionally, the adding of NaCl reduced the electrostatic interaction, which resulted in a decreasing of the electrostatic rejection and electrostatic accumulation for the molecules carrying the same and the opposite charge to the particle respectively. Thus, pH and ion strength can be employed as simple approaches to modulate the loading of charged molecules and permselectivity in MSN. This work has a definite guidance function for molecule loading, transport modulation, controlled release as well as sensors based on MSN.

  20. Ionic Strength Modulation of the Free Energy Landscape of Aβ40 Peptide Fibril Formation.

    PubMed

    Abelein, Axel; Jarvet, Jüri; Barth, Andreas; Gräslund, Astrid; Danielsson, Jens

    2016-06-01

    Protein misfolding and formation of cross-β structured amyloid fibrils are linked to many neurodegenerative disorders. Although recently developed quantitative approaches have started to reveal the molecular nature of self-assembly and fibril formation of proteins and peptides, it is yet unclear how these self-organization events are precisely modulated by microenvironmental factors, which are known to strongly affect the macroscopic aggregation properties. Here, we characterize the explicit effect of ionic strength on the microscopic aggregation rates of amyloid β peptide (Aβ40) self-association, implicated in Alzheimer's disease. We found that physiological ionic strength accelerates Aβ40 aggregation kinetics by promoting surface-catalyzed secondary nucleation reactions. This promoted catalytic effect can be assigned to shielding of electrostatic repulsion between monomers on the fibril surface or between the fibril surface itself and monomeric peptides. Furthermore, we observe the formation of two different β-structured states with similar but distinct spectroscopic features, which can be assigned to an off-pathway immature state (Fβ*) and a mature stable state (Fβ), where salt favors formation of the Fβ fibril morphology. Addition of salt to preformed Fβ* accelerates transition to Fβ, underlining the dynamic nature of Aβ40 fibrils in solution. On the basis of these results we suggest a model where salt decreases the free-energy barrier for Aβ40 folding to the Fβ state, favoring the buildup of the mature fibril morphology while omitting competing, energetically less favorable structural states. PMID:27171340

  1. The effect of macromolecular crowding, ionic strength and calcium binding on calmodulin dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qian; Liang, Kao-Chen; Waxham, Neal; Cheung, Margaret

    2011-03-01

    The flexibility in the structure of calmodulin (CaM) allows its binding to over 300 target proteins in the cell. To investigate the structure-function relationship of CaM in response to the changing intracellular environment, we use a combined method of computer simulation and experiments based on circular dichroism (CD). The conformation, helicity and EF hand orientation of CaM are analyzed computationally to address the effect of macromolecular crowding, ionic strength and calcium binding in the experiments. We applied a unique solution of charges computed from QM/MM to accurately represent the charge distribution in the transition from apo-CaM to holo-CaM. Computationally, we found that a high level of macromolecular crowding, in addition to calcium binding and ionic strength, can impact the conformation, helicity and the EF hand orientation of CaM. Our result may provide unique insight into understanding the promiscuous behavior of calmodulin in target selection inside cells. This work is supported by National Science Foundation, Molecular & Cellular Biosciences (MCB0919974).

  2. Biotite dissolution and Cr(VI) reduction at elevated pH and ionic strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Y. Thomas; Bigham, Jerry M.; Traina, Samuel J.

    2005-08-01

    The effects of elevated pH, ionic strength, and temperature on sediments in the vadose zone are of primary importance in modeling contaminant transport and understanding the environmental impact of tank leakage at nuclear waste storage facilities like those of the Hanford site. This study was designed to investigate biotite dissolution under simulated high level waste (HLW) conditions and its impact on Cr(VI) reduction and immobilization. Biotite dissolution increased with NaOH concentrations in the range of 0.1 to 2 mol L -1. There was a corresponding release of K, Fe, Si, and Al to solution, with Si and Al showing a complex pattern due to the formation of secondary zeolite minerals. Dissolved Fe concentrations were an order of magnitude lower than the other elements, possibly due to the formation of green rust and Fe(OH) 2. The reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) also increased with increased NaOH concentration. A homogeneous reduction of chromate by Fe(II) aq released through biotite dissolution was probably the primary pathway responsible for this reaction. Greater ionic strengths increased biotite dissolution and consequently increased Fe(II) aq release and Cr(VI) removal. The results indicated that HLW would cause phyllosilicate dissolution and the formation of secondary precipitates that would have a major impact on radionuclide and contaminant transport in the vadose zone at the Hanford site.

  3. Experimental determination of lead carbonate solubility at high ionic strengths: A Pitzer model description

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xiong, Yongliang

    2015-05-06

    In this article, solubility measurements of lead carbonate, PbCO3(cr), cerussite, as a function of total ionic strengths are conducted in the mixtures of NaCl and NaHCO3 up to I = 1.2 mol•kg–1 and in the mixtures of NaHCO3 and Na2CO3 up to I = 5.2 mol•kg–1, at room temperature (22.5 ± 0.5 °C). The solubility constant (log Ksp) for cerussite, PbCO3(cr) = Pb2+ + CO32- was determined as –13.76 ± 0.15 (2σ) with a set of Pitzer parameters describing the specific interactions of PbCO3(aq), Pb(CO3)22-, and Pb(CO3)Cl– with the bulk-supporting electrolytes, based on the Pitzer model. The model developed inmore » this work can reproduce the experimental results including model-independent solubility values from the literature over a wide range of ionic strengths with satisfactory accuracy. The model is expected to find applications in numerous fields, including the accurate description of chemical behavior of lead in geological repositories, the modeling of formation of oxidized Pb–Zn ore deposits, and the environmental remediation of lead contamination.« less

  4. Effect of added salt and increase in ionic strength on skim milk electroacidification performances.

    PubMed

    Bazinet, L; Ippersiel, D; Gendron, C; Mahdavi, B; Amiot, J; Lamarche, F

    2001-05-01

    Bipolar-memibrane electroacidification (BMEA) technology which uses the property of bipolar membranes to split water and the demineralization action of cation-exchange membranes (CEM), was tested for the production of acid casein. BMEA has numerous advantages in comparison with conventional isoelectric precipitation processes of proteins used in the dairy industry. BMEA uses electricity to generate the desired ionic species to acidify the treated solutions. The process can be precisely controlled, as electro-acidification rate is regulated by the effective current density in the cell. Water dissociation at the bipolar membrane interface is continuous and avoids local excess of acid. In-situ generation of dangerous chemicals (acids and bases) reduces the risks associated with the handling, transportation, use and elimination of these products. The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of BMEA in different conditions of added ionic strength (p(added) = 0, 0.25, 0.5 and 1.0 M) and added salt (CaCl2, NaCl and KCl). The combination of KCl and p(added) = 0.5 M gave the best results with a 45% decrease in energy consumption. The increased energy efficiency was the result of a decrease in the anode/cathode voltage difference. This was due to an increase of conductivity, produced by addition of salt, necessary to compensate for the lack of sufficiently mobile ions in the skim milk. However, the addition of salts, irrespective of type or ionic strength, increased the required operation time. The protein profile of isolates were similar under all experimental conditions, except at 1.0 M-CaCl2. PMID:11504388

  5. Effects of ionic strength on the binding of phenanthrene and pyrene to humic substances: three-stage variation model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chon-Lin; Kuo, Li-Jung; Wang, Huei-Ling; Hsieh, Ping-Chieh

    2003-10-01

    This study compared the effects of ionic strength on the binding constants (K(doc)) of selected polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) (phenanthrene and pyrene) and a terrestrial humic acid (Leonardite Humic Acid) in different electrolyte solutions (KCl, KBr, MgCl(2) and MgSO(4)). Distinct trends were found in K(doc) variation depending upon the range of ionic strength resulting from added electrolytes. These trends demonstrated similar shapes for all the systems studied, while degree of variation increased with hydrophobicity of the PAHs. Furthermore, different types of electrolytes had different effects on the interactions between humic acid (HA) and the PAHs. These differences were primarily caused by types of cation, not anion. To describe the complicated effects of ionic strength on K(doc), we developed a three-stage variation model that encompasses increasing and decreasing trends and plateaus in K(doc) associated with ionic strength, as well as the mechanisms behind these trends, including the variation of HA structure configuration, HA aggregation and the salting-out effect. This model illustrated the importance of sufficient experimental data when interpreting the influence of ionic strength on the trends in K(doc) variation. PMID:12946908

  6. Neutron scattering and phase separation of Gamma-B crystallin vs. pH, ionic strength and protein concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurston, George; Martini, K. Michael; Desmond, Kenneth; Putzig, Elias; Dell, Zachary; Carter, Dawn; Hollenbeck, Dawn; Dexter, Nicholas; Langner, Andreas; Ross, David; Harkin, Anthony; Nelson, Edward; Zackrisson-Oskolkova, Malin; Stradner, Anna; Dorsaz, Nicolas; Foffi, Giuseppe; Schurtenberger, Peter

    2010-03-01

    We study the pH, ionic strength and concentration dependence of liquid-liquid phase separation and neutron scattering of the eye lens protein Gamma-B crystallin. At pH 7, lowering ionic strength raises the cloud points. Neutron scattering indicates anisotropic protein interactions, in agreement with prior information. At lower pH phase separation disappears, and protein repulsions increase at low ionic strength. We seek to evaluate the roles of (i) patterned charge regulation, (ii) biasing of relative protein orientation due to local charge patches, and (iii) screened net protein charge for these phenomena. We apply a grand-canonical partition function model for charge regulation and other interactions, as input to Monte Carlo and neutron scattering computations.

  7. Ionic Strength Effect on the Rate of Reduction of Hexacyanoferrate(III) by Ascorbic Acid: A Flow Injection Kinetic Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobrega, Joanquim A.; Rocha, Fabio R. P.

    1997-05-01

    Flow injection analysis (FIA) is a well recognized tool for solutions management. In spite of the use of this technique mainly for quantitative determination of analytes in solution, FIA systems can also be used for obtaining physical chemistry data. This work describes the use of a flow diagram to perform a kinetic experiment: the effect of ionic strength on the rate of reduction of hexacyanoferrate(III) by ascorbic acid. The rate determining step of this reaction involves the collision between two anionic species. The increase of the ionic strength of the medium alters the ionic atmosphere and changes the charge densities around the anions. Consequently, there is an increment of the rate constants for higher ionic strengths. In the proposed system, the flow is stopped by commutation when the center of the sample zone attained the flow cell and a gradual decrease in signal, related to the redox reaction, is registered as function of time. This allowed the determination of the rate constants as a function of the ionic strength. The product of the charges of the ions involved in the rate determining step was estimated in 3.2 that is close to the expected value considering the proposed mechanism.

  8. The ionic strength dependence of lead (II) carbonate complexation in perchlorate media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Easley, Regina A.; Byrne, Robert H.

    2011-10-01

    Lead speciation in many aqueous geochemical systems is dominated by carbonate complexation. However, direct observations of Pb complexation by carbonate ions are few in number. This work represents the first investigation of the equilibrium Pb+CO32-⇌PbCO30 over a range of ionic strength. Through spectrophotometric observations of PbCO30 formation at 25 °C in NaHCO 3-NaClO 4 solutions, PbCO30 formation constants of the form COβ1=[PbCO30]/[Pb][CO32-] were determined between 0.001 and 5.0 molal ionic strength. Formation constant results were well represented by the equation: logCO3β1=(6.789±0.022)-{4.088·I0.5}/{1+1.5I0.5}+(0.244±0.012)I . This result, combined with previous critical assessments of formation constants for the equilibrium PbCO30+CO32-⇌Pb(CO)22-, was used to estimate the ionic strength dependence for the equilibrium Pb+2CO32-⇌Pb(CO)22-: logCO3β2=(10.41±0.18)-{4.088·I0.5}/{1+1.5I0.5}-(0.31±0.33)I where COβ2=[Pb(CO)22-]/[Pb][CO32-]2. The carbonate complexation constants produced in this study, combined with previous complexation constants for formation of Pb chloride and hydroxide species, were used to predict formation constants for mixed-ligand species Pb(CO)Cl, Pb(OH)Cl, and Pb(CO)OH. Formation constant estimates for the system Pb-HCO3-Cl-H were then used to assess Pb speciation in seawater. In the absence of complexation by organics, approximately 1.9% of the total lead in surface seawater ( S = 35, t = 25 °C, pH ˜8.2 (free H concentration scale)) is present as free hydrated Pb. Carbonate complexes, PbCO30 and Pb(CO)Cl, are predominant forms of Pb in seawater at high pH, and lead chloride complexes are predominant species at low pH. For pH >7.7 the sum concentration of PbCO30, Pb(CO)Cl, PbOH, and Pb(OH)Cl in seawater exceeds the sum concentration of Pb, PbCl, PbCl20, and PbCl3-.

  9. Cadmium isotope fractionation during adsorption to Mn oxyhydroxide at low and high ionic strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasylenki, Laura E.; Swihart, Jared W.; Romaniello, Stephen J.

    2014-09-01

    We report results of experiments conducted to quantify the sense and magnitude of cadmium stable isotope fractionation during sorption to synthetic birnessite (Mn oxyhydroxide) and to constrain the molecular mechanism responsible for fractionation in this system. Ferromanganese crusts have recently been proposed as a possible archive of the cadmium isotopic composition of seawater over the last few tens of millions of years (Horner et al., 2010), and this archive can potentially yield information about biological use of Cd by diatoms over the Cenozoic Era. Cd isotopes may also be useful for determining the extent to which sorption to mineral substrates attenuates Cd transport in contaminated aquifers. At low ionic strength, we found a small fractionation effect (Δ114/112Cdfluid-solid = +0.12 ± 0.06‰, 1 sd; equivalent to +2.4 in terms of ε114/110Cd) that was constant as a function of the fraction of total Cd sorbed, indicating a reversible equilibrium isotope effect. At high ionic strength we observed a fractionation averaging (Δ114/112Cdfluid-solid = +0.27 ± 0.07‰ (1 sd; equivalent to +5.4 in terms of ε114/110Cd). A time series conducted at high ionic strength revealed that the magnitude of isotopic fractionation decreases gradually over time, from Δ114/112Cdfluid-solid of nearly +0.4‰ after 1 h to +0.2‰ after 24 h and +0.1‰ after 912 h. Furthermore, the percentage of Cd sorbed to birnessite increases over this interval from 27% to 58%. We hypothesize that this shift results from either changes over time in the structure and crystallinity of birnessite and/or a change in the molecular mechanism of sorption of cadmium on birnessite. Our result is encouraging for application of Cd isotopes in ferromanganese crusts to reconstruction of the Cd isotopic composition of coexisting seawater, given the very slow accumulation rates of such sediments.

  10. Determination of Surface Charge of Titanium Dioxide (Anatase) at High Ionic Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoonen, M. A.; Strongin, D. R.

    2014-12-01

    Charge development on mineral surfaces is an important control on the fate of minor and trace elements in a wide range of environments, including in possible radioactive waste repositories. Formation waters have often a high ionic strength. In this study, we determined the zeta potential (ζ) of anatase in potassium chloride solutions with concentrations up to 3M (25°C). The zeta potential is the potential at the hydrodynamic shear plane. In this study, we made use of the electro-acoustic effect. This effect is based on the development of a measureable potential/current when the electrical double layer outside the shearplane is separated from a charged particle through rapid oscillation induced by a sound wave. The advantage of this type of measurement is that the particles are not subjected to a high electric field (common to typical zeta potential measurements), which leads to electrode reactions and a shift of solution pH. Measurements were collected by subtracting the ion vibration current (IVI) due to the presence of potassium and chloride ions from the CVI. The correction is necessary for measurements in solutions with I > 0.25 M. This subtraction was done at each of the measurement conditions by centrifuging the slurrly, measuring the IVI of the supernatant, reconstituting the slurry, and then measuring CVI of the slurry. Subtraction of IVI at each condition is critical because IVI changes with pH and accounts for most of raw signal. The results show that the anatase isoelectric point shifts from a pH ~6.5 to a value of ~4.5 at 1M KCl. At ionic strength in excess of 1 M KCl, the surface appears to be slightly negatively charged accross the pH range accessible by this technique (pH 2.5-10). The loss of an isoelectric point suggests that KCl is no longer an indifferent electrolyte at 1 M KCl and higher. The results are in disagreement with earlier measurements in which anatase was shown to have a positive charge at high ionic strength across the pH scale. The

  11. Surface Physicochemistry and Ionic Strength Affects eDNA’s Role in Bacterial Adhesion to Abiotic Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Regina, Viduthalai R.; Lokanathan, Arcot R.; Modrzyński, Jakub J.; Sutherland, Duncan S.; Meyer, Rikke L.

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular DNA (eDNA) is an important structural component of biofilms formed by many bacteria, but few reports have focused on its role in initial cell adhesion. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of eDNA in bacterial adhesion to abiotic surfaces, and determine to which extent eDNA-mediated adhesion depends on the physicochemical properties of the surface and surrounding liquid. We investigated eDNA alteration of cell surface hydrophobicity and zeta potential, and subsequently quantified the effect of eDNA on the adhesion of Staphylococcus xylosus to glass surfaces functionalised with different chemistries resulting in variable hydrophobicity and charge. Cell adhesion experiments were carried out at three different ionic strengths. Removal of eDNA from S. xylosus cells by DNase treatment did not alter the zeta potential, but rendered the cells more hydrophilic. DNase treatment impaired adhesion of cells to glass surfaces, but the adhesive properties of S. xylosus were regained within 30 minutes if DNase was not continuously present, implying a continuous release of eDNA in the culture. Removal of eDNA lowered the adhesion of S. xylosus to all surfaces chemistries tested, but not at all ionic strengths. No effect was seen on glass surfaces and carboxyl-functionalised surfaces at high ionic strength, and a reverse effect occurred on amine-functionalised surfaces at low ionic strength. However, eDNA promoted adhesion of cells to hydrophobic surfaces irrespective of the ionic strength. The adhesive properties of eDNA in mediating initial adhesion of S. xylosus is thus highly versatile, but also dependent on the physicochemical properties of the surface and ionic strength of the surrounding medium. PMID:25122477

  12. Ionic strength effect on molecular structure of hyaluronic acid investigated by flow field-flow fractionation and multiangle light scattering.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bitnara; Woo, Sohee; Park, Young-Soo; Hwang, Euijin; Moon, Myeong Hee

    2015-02-01

    This study describes the effect of ionic strength on the molecular structure of hyaluronic acid (HA) in an aqueous solution using flow field-flow fractionation and multiangle light scattering (FlFFF-MALS). Sodium salts of HA (NaHA) raw materials (∼2 × 10(6) Da) dispersed in different concentrations of NaCl prepared by repeated dilution/ultrafiltration procedures were examined in order to study conformational changes in terms of the relationship between the radius of gyration and molecular weight (MW) and molecular weight distribution (MWD) of NaHA in solution. This was achieved by varying the ionic strength of the carrier solution used in a frit-inlet asymmetrical FlFFF (FIAF4) channel. Experiments showed that the average MW of NaHA increased as the ionic strength of the NaHA solution decreased due to enhanced entanglement or aggregation of HA molecules. Relatively large molecules (greater than ∼5 MDa) did not show a large increase in RMS radius value as the NaCl concentration decreased. Conversely, smaller species showed larger changes, suggesting molecular expansion at lower ionic strengths. When the ionic strength of the FlFFF carrier solution was decreased, the HA species in a salt-rich solution (0.2 M NaCl) underwent rapid molecular aggregation during FlFFF separation. However, when salt-depleted HA samples (I = 4.66∼0.38 mM) were analyzed with FFF carrier solutions of a high ionic strength, the changes in both molecular structure and size were somewhat reversible, although there was a delay in correction of the molecular structure. PMID:25542570

  13. Leaching of metal(loid)s from a construction material: influence of the particle size, specific surface area and ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Schmukat, A; Duester, L; Ecker, D; Schmid, H; Heil, C; Heininger, P; Ternes, T A

    2012-08-15

    Construction materials are tested worldwide for a potential release of dangerous substances to prevent adverse effects on humans and biota. It is crucial to identify and understand the processes which are decisive for the release of hazardous substances. The current study compares the results of different test methods. Taking copper slag as model material, the influence of material particle size, eluant composition and ionic strength was tested. Ionic strength and salinity significantly influenced the release of metal(loid)s in the water phase. Furthermore, it was elucidated that colloids can cause methodological artefacts. The available specific surface area exhibited a positive correlation with the release of hazardous substances. The specific surface areas of materials were determined by the Brunauer, Emmett and Teller model (BET) and four other methods. The aluminium foil method showed the best results with regard to the statistical uncertainty, compared to a 3D laser scanning method. With help of the roughness factor λ it is possible to compare the results from surface area measurements with different material particle sizes (0-250 mm). This comparability offers the potential to match the release of metal(loid)s from laboratory studies with field applications and catchment area calculations/modelling, based on the release per m(2). PMID:22683212

  14. Hydrolysis, formation and ionization constants at 25/sup 0/C, and at high temperature-high ionic strength

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, S.L.; Phillips, C.A.; Skeen, J.

    1985-02-01

    Thermochemical data for nuclear waste disposal are compiled. The resulting computerized database consists of critically evaluated data on Gibbs energy of formation, enthalpy of formation, entropy and heat capacity of selected substances for about 16 elements at 25/sup 0/C and zero ionic strength. Elements covered are Am, As, Br, C, Cl, F, I, Mo, Np, N, O, P, Pu, Si, Sr, S, and U. Values of these thermodynamic properties were used to calculate equilibrium quotients for hydrolysis, complexation and ionization reactions up to 300/sup 0/C and 3 ionic strength, for selected chemical reactions.

  15. Application of the effects of ionic strength reducing agents in the purification and crystallization of chitinase A.

    PubMed

    Papanikolau, Yannis; Petratos, Kyriacos

    2002-10-01

    The effects of ionic strength reducing agents may find a large number of applications. Based on these effects, we have redesigned the purification scheme of Chitinase A (ChiA) from Serratia marcescen. This scheme led to reproducibly crystallizable enzyme in both salting-in and salting-out conditions, which are presented here. Herein, we demonstrate some experimental applications of the ionic strength reducing agents theory and, in parallel, provide further evidence of the theory's correctness. Finally, we report a new crystal form produced recently in salting-in crystallization experiments. This form may allow the co-crystallization of ChiA mutants with longer substrates. PMID:12351868

  16. Some rootstocks improve pepper tolerance to mild salinity through ionic regulation.

    PubMed

    Penella, Consuelo; Nebauer, Sergio G; Quiñones, Ana; San Bautista, Alberto; López-Galarza, Salvador; Calatayud, Angeles

    2015-01-01

    Grafting has been proposed as an interesting strategy that improves the responses of crops under salinity. In pepper, we reported increased fruit yield of the commercial 'Adige' cultivar under salinity when grafted onto accessions Capsicum chinense Jacq. 'ECU-973' (12) and Capsicum baccatum L. var. pendulum 'BOL-58' (14), whereas no effect was observed when grafted onto accession Capsicum annuum L var. 'Serrano' (5). We also analysed the physiological and biochemical mechanisms related to the tolerance conferred by these rootstocks. Responses to salinity (40 mM NaCl) were studied in the different plant combinations for 30 days by determining water relations, mineral content, proline accumulation, photosynthetic parameters, nitrate reductase activity and antioxidant capacity. Higher salt tolerance was achieved when the 'Adige' cultivar was grafted onto the 12 genotype, which allowed not only lower Na(+) and Cl(-) accumulation in the scion, but also ion selectivity maintenance, particularly Na(+)/K(+) discrimination. These traits led to a minor negative impact on photosynthesis, nitrate reductase activity and lipid peroxidation in grafted scion leaves. This work suggests that using tolerant pepper rootstocks that maintain the scion's ion homeostasis is a promising strategy to provide salinity tolerance and can consequently improve crop yield. PMID:25480004

  17. Using UCST Ionic Liquid as a Draw Solute in Forward Osmosis to Treat High-Salinity Water.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yujiang; Feng, Xiaoshuang; Chen, Wei; Wang, Xinbo; Huang, Kuo-Wei; Gnanou, Yves; Lai, Zhiping

    2016-01-19

    The concept of using a thermoresponsive ionic liquid (IL) with an upper critical solution temperature (UCST) as a draw solute in forward osmosis (FO) was successfully demonstrated here experimentally. A 3.2 M solution of protonated betaine bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([Hbet][Tf2N]) was obtained by heating and maintaining the temperature above 56 °C. This solution successfully drew water from high-salinity water up to 3.0 M through FO. When the IL solution cooled to room temperature, it spontaneously separated into a water-rich phase and an IL-rich phase: the water-rich phase was the produced water that contained a low IL concentration, and the IL-rich phase could be used directly as the draw solution in the next cycle of the FO process. The thermal stability, thermal-responsive solubility, and UV-vis absorption spectra of the IL were also studied in detail. PMID:26649525

  18. Motion of Molecular Probes and Viscosity Scaling in Polyelectrolyte Solutions at Physiological Ionic Strength

    PubMed Central

    Sozanski, Krzysztof; Wisniewska, Agnieszka; Kalwarczyk, Tomasz; Sznajder, Anna; Holyst, Robert

    2016-01-01

    We investigate transport properties of model polyelectrolyte systems at physiological ionic strength (0.154 M). Covering a broad range of flow length scales—from diffusion of molecular probes to macroscopic viscous flow—we establish a single, continuous function describing the scale dependent viscosity of high-salt polyelectrolyte solutions. The data are consistent with the model developed previously for electrically neutral polymers in a good solvent. The presented approach merges the power-law scaling concepts of de Gennes with the idea of exponential length scale dependence of effective viscosity in complex liquids. The result is a simple and applicable description of transport properties of high-salt polyelectrolyte solutions at all length scales, valid for motion of single molecules as well as macroscopic flow of the complex liquid. PMID:27536866

  19. Role of charge suppression and ionic strength in free zone electrophoresis of proteins.

    PubMed

    Compton, B J; O'Grady, E A

    1991-11-15

    The free zone electrophoretic mobility of proteins can be predicted from the protein's amino acid content by applying a model based on the Debye-Hückle-Henry theory and Henderson-Hasselbalch equation. Calculated mobilities are always greater than actual mobility but a pH-independent proportionality (described by the constant FZ) is found between the two. Thus, determination of a protein's mobility at one pH allows, with the use of the model and FZ, calculation of its mobility at other pH conditions. This leads directly to optimum conditions for the electrophoretic resolution of proteins in capillary zone electrophoresis. The fundamental nature of FZ is examined and found to be a function of a proteins molecular weight, charge, and solution ionic strength. This work aids in explaining the form of previously proposed empirically based equations for peptide and protein mobility. PMID:1776698

  20. Effects of pH and ionic strength on precipitation of phytopathogenic viruses by polyethylene glycol.

    PubMed

    Pastorek, J; Marcinka, K

    1989-01-01

    The effects of ionic strength of the solution (changed by varying NaCl concentrations or buffer molarity) on the precipitation with polyethylene glycol (PEG) 6000 were studied on phytopathogenic viruses of different morphology: the isometric red clover mottle virus (RCMV), rod-shaped tobacco mosaic virus, flexuous potato virus X (PVX) and bacilliform alfalfa mosaic virus. With increasing NaCl concentration or buffer molarity up to a certain level (0.1 mol/l), the efficiency of PEG precipitation increased. This relationship did not apply to PVX. The effects of pH on PEG precipitation were studied on RCMV. The efficiency of precipitation increased with decreasing difference between pH of the solution and pI of the virus. PMID:2565676

  1. Motion of Molecular Probes and Viscosity Scaling in Polyelectrolyte Solutions at Physiological Ionic Strength.

    PubMed

    Sozanski, Krzysztof; Wisniewska, Agnieszka; Kalwarczyk, Tomasz; Sznajder, Anna; Holyst, Robert

    2016-01-01

    We investigate transport properties of model polyelectrolyte systems at physiological ionic strength (0.154 M). Covering a broad range of flow length scales-from diffusion of molecular probes to macroscopic viscous flow-we establish a single, continuous function describing the scale dependent viscosity of high-salt polyelectrolyte solutions. The data are consistent with the model developed previously for electrically neutral polymers in a good solvent. The presented approach merges the power-law scaling concepts of de Gennes with the idea of exponential length scale dependence of effective viscosity in complex liquids. The result is a simple and applicable description of transport properties of high-salt polyelectrolyte solutions at all length scales, valid for motion of single molecules as well as macroscopic flow of the complex liquid. PMID:27536866

  2. Experimental determination of lead carbonate solubility at high ionic strengths: A Pitzer model description

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Yongliang

    2015-05-06

    In this article, solubility measurements of lead carbonate, PbCO3(cr), cerussite, as a function of total ionic strengths are conducted in the mixtures of NaCl and NaHCO3 up to I = 1.2 mol•kg–1 and in the mixtures of NaHCO3 and Na2CO3 up to I = 5.2 mol•kg–1, at room temperature (22.5 ± 0.5 °C). The solubility constant (log Ksp) for cerussite, PbCO3(cr) = Pb2+ + CO32- was determined as –13.76 ± 0.15 (2σ) with a set of Pitzer parameters describing the specific interactions of PbCO3(aq), Pb(CO3)22-, and Pb(CO3)Cl with the bulk-supporting electrolytes, based on the Pitzer model. The model developed in this work can reproduce the experimental results including model-independent solubility values from the literature over a wide range of ionic strengths with satisfactory accuracy. The model is expected to find applications in numerous fields, including the accurate description of chemical behavior of lead in geological repositories, the modeling of formation of oxidized Pb–Zn ore deposits, and the environmental remediation of lead contamination.

  3. Soluble hydrocarbons uptake by porous carbonaceous adsorbents at different water ionic strength and temperature: something to consider in oil spills.

    PubMed

    Flores-Chaparro, Carlos E; Ruiz, Luis Felipe Chazaro; Alfaro-De la Torre, Ma Catalina; Rangel-Mendez, Jose Rene

    2016-06-01

    Nowadays, petrochemical operations involve risks to the environment and one of the biggest is oil spills. Low molecular aromatics like benzene, toluene, and naphthalene dissolve in water, and because of their toxicological characteristics, these produce severe consequences to the environment. The oil spill cleanup strategies are mainly designed to deal with the heavy fractions accumulated on the water surface. Unfortunately, very limited information is available regarding the treatment of dissolved fractions.A commercial (Filtrasorb 400) and modified activated carbons were evaluated to remove benzene, toluene, and naphthalene from water, which are the most soluble aromatic hydrocarbons, at different ionic strengths (I) and temperatures (0-0.76 M and 4-25 °C, respectively). This allowed simulating the conditions of fresh and saline waters when assessing the performance of these adsorbents. It was found that the hydrocarbons adsorption affinity increased 12 % at a I of 0.5 M, due to the less negative charge of the adsorbent, while at a high I (≃0.76 M) in a synthetic seawater, the adsorption capacity decreased 21 % that was attributed to the adsorbent's pores occlusion by water clusters. Approximately, 40 h were needed to reach equilibrium; however, the maximum adsorption rate occurred within the first hour in all the cases. Moreover, the hydrocarbons adsorption and desorption capacities increased when the temperature augmented from 4 to 25 °C. On the other hand, thermally and chemically modified materials showed that the interactions between adsorbent-contaminant increased with the basification degree of the adsorbent surface. PMID:26903130

  4. TiO₂ nanoparticle transport and retention through saturated limestone porous media under various ionic strength conditions.

    PubMed

    Esfandyari Bayat, Ali; Junin, Radzuan; Derahman, Mohd Nawi; Samad, Adlina Abdul

    2015-09-01

    The impact of ionic strength (from 0.003 to 500mM) and salt type (NaCl vs MgCl2) on transport and retention of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles (NPs) in saturated limestone porous media was systematically studied. Vertical columns were packed with limestone grains. The NPs were introduced as a pulse suspended in aqueous solutions and breakthrough curves in the column outlet were generated using an ultraviolent-visible spectrometry. Presence of NaCl and MgCl2 in the suspensions were found to have a significant influence on the electrokinetic properties of the NP aggregates and limestone grains. In NaCl and MgCl2 solutions, the deposition rates of the TiO2-NP aggregates were enhanced with the increase in ionic strength, a trend consistent with traditional Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory. Furthermore, the NP aggregates retention increased in the porous media with ionic strength. The presence of salts also caused a considerable delay in the NPs breakthrough time. MgCl2 as compared to NaCl was found to be more effective agent for the deposition and retention of TiO2-NPs. The experimental results followed closely the general trends predicted by the filtration and DLVO calculations. Overall, it was found that TiO2-NP mobility in the limestone porous media depends on ionic strength and salt type. PMID:25889359

  5. Ionic Strength Effect on the Rate of Reduction of Hexacyanoferrate (III) by Ascorbic Acid: A Physical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Kenneth W.; Olson, June A.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a physical chemistry experiment that allows students to test the effect of ionic strength on the rates of a reaction between ions. The reduction of hexacyanoferrate III by ascorbic acid is detailed. Comparisons with the iodine clock reaction are made. (CS)

  6. Ionic strength dependence of the oxidation of SO2 by H2O2 in sodium chloride particles

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, Hashim M.; Iedema, Martin J.; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Cowin, James P.

    2014-06-20

    The reaction of sulfur dioxide and hydrogen peroxide in the presence of deliquesced (>75% RH) sodium particles was studied by utilizing a crossflow-mini reactor. The reaction kinetics was followed by observing chloride depletion in particles by computer-controlled scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive X-ray analysis, namely SEM/EDX. The reactions take place in concentrated mixed salt brine aerosols, for which no complete kinetic equilibrium data previously existed. We measured the Henry’s law solubility of H2O2 to close that gap. We also calculated the reaction rate as the particle transforms continuously from concentrated NaCl brine to eventually a mixed NaHSO4 plus H2SO4 brine solution. The reaction rate of the SO2 oxidation by H2O2 was found to be influenced by the change in ionic strength as the particle undergoes compositional transformation, following closely the dependence of the third order rate constant on ionic strength as predicted rates using previously established rate equations. This is the first study that has measured the ionic strength dependence of sulfate formation (in non-aqueous media) from oxidation of mixed salt brine aerosols in the presence of H2O2. It also gives the first report of the Henry’s law constant of H2O2 dependence on ionic strength.

  7. Ionic strength dependence of the oxidation of SO2 by H2O2 in sodium chloride particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, H. M.; Iedema, M.; Yu, X.-Y.; Cowin, J. P.

    2014-06-01

    The reaction of sulfur dioxide and hydrogen peroxide in the presence of deliquesced (>75% RH) sodium chloride (brine) particles was studied by utilizing a cross flow mini-reactor. The reaction kinetics were followed by observing chloride depletion in particles by computer-controlled scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive X-ray analysis, namely CCSEM/EDX. The reactions take place in concentrated mixed salt brine aerosols, for which no complete kinetic equilibrium data previously existed. We measured the Henry's law solubility of H2O2 in brine solutions to close that gap. We also calculated the reaction rate as the particle transforms continuously from concentrated NaCl brine to, eventually, a mixed NaHSO4 plus H2SO4 brine solution. The reaction rate of the SO2 oxidation by H2O2 was found to be influenced by the change in ionic strength as the particle undergoes compositional transformation, following closely the dependence of the third order rate constant on ionic strength as predicted using established rate equations. This is the first study that has measured the ionic strength dependence of sulfate formation (in non-aqueous media) from oxidation of mixed salt brine aerosols in the presence of H2O2. It also gives the first report of the dependence of the Henry's law constant of H2O2 on ionic strength.

  8. CHLORIDEDETERMINATION IN HIGH IONIC STRENGTH SOLUTION OF AMMONIUM ACETATE USING NEGATIVE ION ELECTRON SPRAY IONIZATION (HPLC/MS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A precise ion chromatography method has been developed for the determination of chloride in high ionic strength ammonium acetate solutions (10-5 M-5 M) using sodium carbonate/sodium bicarbonate as eluent. Negative ion electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry was used for q...

  9. State-of-the-Art pH Electrode Quality Control for Measurements of Acidic, Low Ionic Strength Waters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stapanian, Martin A.; Metcalf, Richard C.

    1990-01-01

    Described is the derivation of the relationship between the pH measurement error and the resulting percentage error in hydrogen ion concentration including the use of variable activity coefficients. The relative influence of the ionic strength of the solution on the percentage error is shown. (CW)

  10. A novel conductance glucose biosensor in ultra-low ionic strength solution triggered by the oxidation of Ag nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Song, Yonghai; Chen, Jingyi; Liu, Hongyu; Li, Ping; Li, Hongbo; Wang, Li

    2015-09-01

    A simple, sensitive and effective method to detect glucose in ultra-low ionic strength solution containing citrate-capped silver nanoparticles (CCAgNPs) was developed by monitoring the change of solution conductance. Glucose was catalyzed into gluconic acid firstly by glucose oxidase in an O2-saturated solution accompanied by the reduction of O2 into hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Then, CCAgNPs was oxidized by H2O2 into Ag(+) and the capping regent of citrate was released at the same time. All these resulted Ag(+), gluconic acid and the released citrate would contribute to the increase of solution ionic strength together, leading to a detectable increase of solution conductance. And a novel conductance glucose biosensor was developed with a routine linear range of 0.06-4.0 mM and a suitable detection limit of 18.0 μM. The novel glucose biosensor was further applied in energy drink sample and proven to be suitable for practical system with low ionic strength. The proposed conductance biosensor achieved a significant breakthrough of glucose detection in ultra-low ionic strength media. PMID:26388373

  11. The role of ionic strength and grain size on the transport of colloids in unsaturated sand columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitropoulou, Polyxeni N.; Syngouna, Vasiliki I.; Chrysikopoulos, Constantinos V.

    2013-04-01

    The main objective of this study was to better understand the combined effects of ionic strength, and sand grain size on colloid fate and transport in unsaturated porous media. Spherical fluorescent polymer microspheres with three different sizes (0.075, 0.30 and 2.1 μm), and laboratory columns packed with two size fractions of clean quartz sand (0.513 and 0.181 mm) were used. The saturation level of the packed columns was set to 83-95% with solutions having a wide range of ionic strength (0.1-1000 mM). The electrophoretic mobility of colloids and sand grains were evaluated for all the experimental conditions employed. The various experimental collision efficiencies were quantified using the classical colloid filtration theory. The theoretical collision efficiencies were estimated with appropriate DLVO energies using a Maxwell model. The experimental results suggested that the retention of the bigger colloids (2.1 μm) was slightly higher compared to the conservative tracer and smaller colloids (0.3 and 0.075 μm) in deionized-distilled-water, indicating sorption at air-water interfaces or straining. Moreover, relatively smaller attachment was observed onto fine than medium quartz sand. The mass recovery of the 0.3 μm microspheres in NaCl solution was shown to significantly decrease with increasing ionic strength. Both the experimental and theoretical collision efficiencies based on colloid interactions with solid-water interfaces, were increased with increasing ionic strength.

  12. COLLOID TRANSPORT IN UNSATURATED POROUS MEDIA: THE ROLE OF WATER CONTENT AND IONIC STRENGTH ON PARTICLE STRAINING

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Packed column and mathematical modeling studies were conducted to explore the influence of water content, pore-water ionic strength, and grain size on the transport of latex microsphere colloids (1 ƒÝm) in unsaturated conditions. Experiments were conducted under unfavorable conditions in terms of co...

  13. Systematic Approach for Calculating the Concentrations of Chemical Species in Multiequilibrium Problems: Inclusion of the Ionic Strength Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baeza-Baeza, Juan J.; Garcia-Alvarez-Coque, M. Celia

    2012-01-01

    A general systematic approach including ionic strength effects is proposed for the numerical calculation of concentrations of chemical species in multiequilibrium problems. This approach extends the versatility of the approach presented in a previous article and is applied using the Solver option of the Excel spreadsheet to solve real problems…

  14. Colloid Transport in Unsaturated Porous Media: The Role of Water Content and Ionic Strength on Particle Straining

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Packed column and mathematical modeling studies were conducted to explore the influence of water saturation, pore-water ionic strength, and grain size on the transport of latex microsphere colloids (1.1 micron) in porous media. Experiments were carried out under unfavorable conditions in terms of c...

  15. EFFECTS OF PH, SOLID/SOLUTION RATIO, IONIC STRENGTH, AND ORGANIC ACIDS ON PB AND CD SOPRTION ON KAOLINITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Potentiometric and ion-selective electrode titrations together with batch sorption/desorption experiments, were performed to explain the aqueous and surface complexation reactions between kaolinite, Pb, Cd and three organic acids. Variables included pH, ionic strength, metal conc...

  16. The effect of ionic strength and hardness of trichloroethylene contaminated groundwater in remediation using granular activated carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, J.; Chang, H.

    2005-12-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the trichloroethylene (TCE) removal by granular activated carbon (GAC) based on influential factors (ionic strength, hardness) of various groundwaters. The experimental method used in this study was batch experiments. Synthetic groundwater for test was made according to ionic strength, hardness and then it was artificially contaminated by TCE 5ppm. The variation of ions in synthetic groundwater was measured by I.C. and I.C.P. Surface area of GAC was determined by the Brunauer, Emmett and Teller (BET) adsorption data. The results of tests showed that TCE removal using GAC is affected by the hardness of synthetic groundwaters. It was founded that surface area of GAC was decreased by increasing of ions. Due to pore blocking of ions by functional group, the surface area of GAC decreased and the difference of the remediation appeared. This result was affected by the ionic strength and hardness of water. Therefore, the ionic strength and hardness of contaminated groundwater must be considered in remediation using GAC.

  17. Low absorption state of phycocyanin from Acaryochloris marina antenna system: On the interplay between ionic strength and excitonic coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nganou, Collins

    2013-07-01

    This paper studies the excitonic factor in the excited state energy transfer of phycobilisome (PBS) by using a polarized time-resolved pump-probe and by changing the ionic strength of the cofactors' medium in the PBS of Acaryochloris marina (A. marina). As a result, the interplay between the surrounding medium and the closely excited adjacent cofactors is shown to be a negligible factor of the excitonic decay kinetics at 618 nm of the phycocyanin (PC), while it appears as a driving factor of an increase in excitonic delocalization at 630 nm. The obtained anisotropy values are consistent with the contribution of ionic strength in the excitonic mechanism in PBS. These values were 0.38 in high ionic strength and 0.4 in low ionic strength at 618 nm, and 0.52 in high ionic strength and 0.4 in low ionic strength at 630-635 nm. The anisotropy value of 0.52 in high phosphate is similar at 630 nm and 635 nm, which is consistent with an excitonic delocalization band at 635 nm. The 635 nm band is suggested to show the true low energy level of PC in A. marina PBS. The anisotropy decay kinetic at 630 nm suggests that the excited state population of PC is not all equilibrated in 3 ps because of the existence of the 10 ps decay kinetic component. The presence of the slow kinetic decay component in high, and low ionic strength, is consistent with a 10 and 14 ps energy transfer pathway, while the 450 fs kinetic decay component is consistent with the presence of an additional excitation energy transfer pathway between adjacent α84 and β84. Furthermore, the 450 fs decay kinetic is suggested to be trapped in the trimer, while the 400 fs decay kinetic rules out an excitonic flow from low energy level PC to allophycoyanin. This excitonic flow may occur between β84 in adjacent trimers, towards the low energy state of the PBS rod.

  18. The Role of Biomacromolecular Crowding, Ionic Strength, and Physicochemical Gradients in the Complexities of Life's Emergence

    PubMed Central

    Spitzer, Jan; Poolman, Bert

    2009-01-01

    Summary: We have developed a general scenario of prebiotic physicochemical evolution during the Earth's Hadean eon and reviewed the relevant literature. We suggest that prebiotic chemical evolution started in microspaces with membranous walls, where external temperature and osmotic gradients were coupled to free-energy gradients of potential chemical reactions. The key feature of this scenario is the onset of an emergent evolutionary transition within the microspaces that is described by the model of complex vectorial chemistry. This transition occurs at average macromolecular crowding of 20 to 30% of the cell volume, when the ranges of action of stabilizing colloidal forces (screened electrostatic forces, hydration, and excluded volume forces) become commensurate. Under these conditions, the macromolecules divide the interior of microspaces into dynamically crowded macromolecular regions and topologically complementary electrolyte pools. Small ions and ionic metabolites are transported vectorially between the electrolyte pools and through the (semiconducting) electrolyte pathways of the crowded macromolecular regions from their high electrochemical potential (where they are biochemically produced) to their lower electrochemical potential (where they are consumed). We suggest a sequence of tentative transitions between major evolutionary periods during the Hadean eon as follows: (i) the early water world, (ii) the appearance of land masses, (iii) the pre-RNA world, (iv) the onset of complex vectorial chemistry, and (v) the RNA world and evolution toward Darwinian thresholds. We stress the importance of high ionic strength of the Hadean ocean (short Debye's lengths) and screened electrostatic interactions that enabled the onset of the vectorial structure of the cytoplasm and the possibility of life's emergence. PMID:19487732

  19. Effects of ionic strength, temperature, and pH on degradation of selected antibiotics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Loftin, K.A.; Adams, C.D.; Meyer, M.T.; Surampalli, R.

    2008-01-01

    Aqueous degradation rates, which include hydrolysis and epimerization, for chlorretracycline (CTC), oxytetracycline (OTC), tetracycline (TET), lincomycin (LNC), sulfachlorpyridazine (SCP), sulfadimethoxine (SDM), sulfathiazole (STZ), trimethoprim (TRM), and tylosin A (TYL) were studied as a function of ionic strength (0.0015, 0.050, or 0.084 mg/L as Na2HPO4), temperature (7, 22, and 35??C), and pH (2, 5, 7, 9, and 11). Multiple linear regression revealed that ionic strength did not significantly affect (?? = 0.05) degradation rates for all compounds, but temperature and pH affected rates for CTC, OTC, and TET significandy (?? = 0.05). Degradation also was observed for TYL at pH 2 and 11. No significant degradation was observed for LNC, SCR SDM, STZ, TRM, and TYL (pH 5, 7, and 9) under study conditions. Pseudo first-order rate constants, half-lives, and Arrhenius coefficients were calculated where appropriate. In general, hydrolysis rates for CTC, OTC, and TET increased as pH and temperature increased following Arrhenius relationships. Known degradation products were used to confirm that degradation had occurred, but these products were not quantified. Half-lives ranged from less than 6 h up to 9.7 wk for the tetracyclines and for TYL (pH 2 and 11), but no degradation of LIN, the sulfonamides, or TRM was observed during the study period. These results indicate that tetracyclines and TYL at pH 2 and 11 are prone to pH-mediated transformation and hydrolysis in some cases, but not the sulfonamides, LIN nor TRM are inclined to degrade under study conditions. This indicates that with the exception of CTC OTC, and TET, pH-mediated reactions such as hydrolysis and epimerization are not likely removal mechanisms in surface water, anaerobic swine lagoons, wastewater, and ground water. Copyright ?? 2008 by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved.

  20. Novel double-confined polymeric ionic liquids as sorbents for solid-phase microextraction with enhanced stability and durability in high-ionic-strength solution.

    PubMed

    Feng, Juanjuan; Sun, Min; Xu, Lili; Wang, Shuai; Liu, Xia; Jiang, Shengxiang

    2012-12-14

    Because of the occurrence of ion exchange between high-ionic-strength solution and anions of polymeric ionic liquids (PILs), PILs based solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fibers were rarely used in direct immersion mode to high-salt-added samples. In this work, a novel double-confined PIL sorbent was prepared by co-polymerization of cation and anion of 1-vinyl-3-octylimidzaolium p-styrenesulfonate (VOIm(+)SS(-)). The poly(VOIm(+)-SS(-)) was chemically bonded onto functionalized stainless steel wire via surface radical chain-transfer reaction. Stability of poly(VOIm(+)-SS(-)) in high-ionic-strength solution was investigated and compared with that of poly(1-vinyl-3-octylimidzaolium benzenesulfonate) (poly(VOIm(+)BS(-))) by elemental analysis of sulfur element, and results turned out that the poly(VOIm(+)-SS(-)) was more stable. Coupled to gas chromatography (GC), the poly(VOIm(+)-SS(-)) fiber was used to extract three sorts of compounds including anilines, phenols and phthalate esters in aqueous solution. The as-established method showed good linearity, low detection limits, and acceptable repeatability. The direct immersion SPME-GC method was applied to determine the model phthalate esters in bottled mineral water. The determination results were satisfactory. PMID:23127811

  1. Influence of ionic conductivity in bioelectricity production from saline domestic sewage sludge in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyan, Rengasamy; Selvam, Ammayaippan; Cheng, Ka Yu; Wong, Jonathan Woon-Chung

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at manipulating ionic conductivity (EC) to harvest the maximum electrical energy from seawater-based domestic wastewater sewage sludge (SWS), unique to only a few cities, through microbial fuel cell (MFC). SWS has never been investigated as a MFC substrate before, and thus the influence of high in-situ EC on the energy recovery was unknown. In this study, the EC of the SWS was reduced through mixing it with fresh water-based domestic wastewater sewage sludge (FWS) or diluted 50% using deionized water while FWS and SWS were individually served as reference treatments. SWS:FWS mix (1:1) exhibited a maximum Coulombic efficiency of 28.6±0.5% at a COD removal of 59±3% while the peak power density was 20-fold higher than FWS. The improved performance was due to the lower ohmic internal resistance (36.8±4.2Ω) and optimal conductivity (12.8±0.2mScm(-1)). Therefore, dilution with FWS could enhance energy recovery from SWS. PMID:26590759

  2. Stability of the Cadmium Complex with the Bacterial Trihydroxamate Siderophore Desferrioxamine B at Seawater Ionic Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christenson, E. A.; Schijf, J.

    2010-12-01

    strength. Whereas this is orders of magnitude smaller than values for DFOB complexes of other divalent transition metals (e.g., β(Cu2+) ~ 1014), it nevertheless makes DFOB one of the strongest known biogenic Cd ligands, rivaling synthetic ligands such as NTA. We present measurements of the stability constant of the Cd(II)-DFOB complex that were obtained by potentiometric titration of DFOB in the presence of Cd in a non-complexing background electrolyte (NaClO4) at seawater ionic strength (0.7 M). The titrations were corrected for hydrolysis and also performed at different Cd:DFOB ratios to detect any polynuclear species. Stability constants were derived from non-linear regressions of the data using FITEQL4.0. The results may provide new insights into the marine biogeochemistry of cadmium and its potential effects on primary productivity.

  3. Liquid-Gated Epitaxial Graphene: How Leakage Currents Affect Ionic Strength Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedoya, Mauricio D.; Metaxas, Peter J.; Scrimgeour, Jan; Hu, Yike; Dong, Rui; Berger, Claire; de Heer, Walt A.; Curtis, Jennifer E.

    2013-03-01

    Graphene is a promising material for the fabrication of miniaturized biological and chemical sensors. Epitaxial graphene is an exciting candidate due to its compatibility with standard processing techniques and its intrinsic robustness. We have fabricated liquid-gated FET-like devices based upon sub-millimeter wide epitaxial graphene strips defined using optical lithography methods. The devices exhibit a bipolar conductance versus gate voltage behavior with the minimum conductance point being dependent upon the ionic strength of a KCl solution. Measurements of the graphene conductance and gate-leakage currents during the stepping of the gate voltage demonstrate the presence of time dependent nA-scale leakage currents which limit signal stability at short times. Notably, these currents depend upon the gate voltage and the composition of the gate electrode. These and other electrode dependent effects have ramifications for graphene sensor design and implementation such as the need to limit gate voltage operating windows as and carefully design electrodes. With high transconductance and controlled doping, such devices should be able to function at low gate voltages if a full understanding of charge and charge transport at the graphene interface is obtained. NSF Grant No. DMR-0820382. PJM thanks the ANN and DIISR.

  4. Effects of temperature, pH, and ionic strength on the Henry's law constant of triethylamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, Chun-Bo; Roberts, Jason E.; Zeng, Guang; Zhang, Yun-Hong; Liu, Yong

    2015-05-01

    The Henry's law constants (KH) of triethylamine (TEA) in pure water and in 1-octanol were measured for the temperatures pertinent to the lower troposphere (278-298 K) using a bubble column system coupled to a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. The KH values of TEA in water and 1-octanol at 298 K are 5.75 ± 0.86 mol L-1 atm-1 and 115.62 ± 5.78 mol L-1 atm-1. The KH values display strong dependence on temperature, pH, and ionic strength. The characteristic times for TEA to establish an equilibrium between gas and droplet with a size of 5.6 µm are ~33 s (298 K, pH = 5.6); ~8.9 × 102 s (278 K, pH = 5.6); ~1.3 × 103 s (298 K, pH = 4.0); and 3.6 × 104 s (278 K, pH = 4.0). The evaluation of TEA partitioning between gas phase and condensed phase implies that TEA predominantly resides in rainwater, and TEA loss to organic aerosol is negligible.

  5. Evidence for an increase of DNA contour length at low ionic strength.

    PubMed Central

    Geller, K; Reinert, K E

    1980-01-01

    The polyion chain expansion of DNA was studied by viscometry within the Na+ concentration range c5 = 0.002 M to 0.4 M. The DNA molecular weights M were between 0.5 x 10(6) and 13 x 10(6). The relative change of intrinsic viscosity [eta] is linearly correlated to c5(-1/2) with a slope that increases with increasing M. This behaviour reflects the predominance of helix stiffening in chain expansion. At c5(112) > 0.01(-1/2 M-1/2 (Debye-Hückel screening radius 1/chi > (1/chi)*=3nm) the relative change of [eta] rises with a steeper slope. This effect increases with decreasing M suggesting that helix lengthening contributes to the chain expansion. Our model enables us to interpret other ionic-strength dependent effects known from literature. The start of the significant duplex elongation at (1/chi)* can be correlated to the polyion-charge arrangement. In accordance with our interpretation (1/chi)* is found to be greater for DNA-intercalator complexes. PMID:7433095

  6. LRRC8 Proteins Form Volume-Regulated Anion Channels that Sense Ionic Strength.

    PubMed

    Syeda, Ruhma; Qiu, Zhaozhu; Dubin, Adrienne E; Murthy, Swetha E; Florendo, Maria N; Mason, Daniel E; Mathur, Jayanti; Cahalan, Stuart M; Peters, Eric C; Montal, Mauricio; Patapoutian, Ardem

    2016-01-28

    The volume-regulated anion channel (VRAC) is activated when a cell swells, and it plays a central role in maintaining cell volume in response to osmotic challenges. SWELL1 (LRRC8A) was recently identified as an essential component of VRAC. However, the identity of the pore-forming subunits of VRAC and how the channel is gated by cell swelling are unknown. Here, we show that SWELL1 and up to four other LRRC8 subunits assemble into heterogeneous complexes of ∼800 kDa. When reconstituted into bilayers, LRRC8 complexes are sufficient to form anion channels activated by osmolality gradients. In bilayers, as well as in cells, the single-channel conductance of the complexes depends on the LRRC8 composition. Finally, low ionic strength (Γ) in the absence of an osmotic gradient activates the complexes in bilayers. These data demonstrate that LRRC8 proteins together constitute the VRAC pore and that hypotonic stress can activate VRAC through a decrease in cytoplasmic Γ. PMID:26824658

  7. Effect of solution temperature, pH and ionic strength on dye adsorption onto Magellanic peat.

    PubMed

    Sepulveda, Luisa Antonia; Santana, Cesar Costapinto

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this research was to study the effect of the solution temperature, pH and ionic strength on the adsorption of the Basic Blue 3 (BB3) and Acid Black 1 (AB1) dyes in Magellanic peat. The peat used was physically characterized as fibrous, of low decomposition level, without the presence of crystalline material and with a highly porous morphology. The functional groups with major concentration in the surface adsorbent were the carboxylics and phenolics, with values of 0.91 and 0.47 mmol/g, respectively. The results of the batch assays showed that the adsorption of the AB1 dye was strongly dependent of electrical charge density on the surface, contrary to what occurred to the BB3 dye, because the interactions between the dyes and carboxylic groups of the peat could be either electrostatic or non-electrostatic. The Langmuir, Freundlich and Sips isotherm models were fitted to the experimental data; among them, the Sips model presented the best adjustment quality. The maximum adsorption capacities for BB3 and AB1 dyes were 33.1 and 33.7 mg/g, respectively. The adsorption of BB3 dye onto Magellan peat has an exothermic behaviour, obtaining an adsorption enthalpy of -3.44 kJ/mol. Contrarily the adsorption of AB1 has an adsorption enthalpy of 56.76 kJ/mol. PMID:23837348

  8. Experimental results of the influence of ionic strength in liquid environment on fiber life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overgaard, Jette V.

    1996-01-01

    Stress free corrosion such as chemical dissolution of silica optical fibers is normally assumed to be a pure pH dependent reaction. In our investigation we have found that it is not only the pH values that influence the lifetime of the fiber in water, but also the ionic strength of the water in contact with the fiber. We have seen that the lifetime of the normal dual coated fibers is severely reduced in seawater compared to the lifetime in deionized water. Carbon coated fibers show better results in these harsh conditions; but the experiments also demonstrate that the carbon coated fibers begin to fail before they have had a sufficient lifetime. A chemical explanation of the results, based on dissolution of glass in water and influence from the ions in question, is given. In this paper, experimental results from long term static fatigue tests on fibers in different liquid environments is shown. In the laboratory we have samples still living after almost four years in different environments. We have buffered water at pH values from 3 to 11, artificial seawater and deionized water. The fibers in the tests are both commercially available dual coated and carbon coated fibers and carbon coated test fibers.

  9. High ionic strength and low pH detain activated skinned rabbit skeletal muscle crossbridges in a low force state.

    PubMed

    Seow, C Y; Ford, L E

    1993-04-01

    The effects of varying pH and ionic strength on the force-velocity relations and tension transients of skinned rabbit skeletal muscle were studied at 1-2 degrees C. Both decreasing pH from 7.35 to 6.35 and raising ionic strength from 125 to 360 mM reduced isometric force by about half and decreased sarcomere stiffness by about one-fourth, so that the stiffness/force ratio was increased by half. Lowering pH also decreased maximum shortening velocity by approximately 29%, while increasing ionic strength had little effect on velocity. These effects on velocity were correlated with asymmetrical effects on stiffness. The increase in the stiffness/force ratio with both interventions was manifest as a greater relative force change associated with a sarcomere length step. This force difference persisted for a variable time after the step. At the high ionic strength the force difference was long-lasting after stretches but relaxed quickly after releases, suggesting that the structures responsible would not impose much resistance to steady-state shortening. The opposite was found in the low pH experiments. The force difference relaxed quickly after stretches but persisted for a long time after releases. Furthermore, this force difference reached a constant value of approximately 8% of isometric force with intermediate sizes of release, and was not increased with larger releases. This value was almost identical to the value of an internal load that would be sufficient to account for the reduction in maximum velocity seen at the low pH. The results are interpreted as showing that both low pH and high ionic strength inhibit the movement of crossbridges into the force-generating parts of their cycle after they have attached to the actin filaments, with very few other effects on the cycle. The two interventions are different, however, in that detained bridges can be detached readily by shortening when the detention is caused by high ionic strength but not when it is caused by low

  10. Influence of ionic strength, pH, and cation valence on aggregation kinetics of titanium dioxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    French, Rebecca A; Jacobson, Astrid R; Kim, Bojeong; Isley, Sara L; Penn, R Lee; Baveye, Philippe C

    2009-03-01

    The extensive use of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO2) in many consumer products has raised concerns about possible risks to the environment The magnitude of the threat may depend on whether nano-TiO2 remains dispersed in the environment, or forms much larger-sized aggregates or clusters. Currently, limited information is available on the issue. In this context, the purpose of the present article is to report initial measurements of the morphology and rate of formation of nano-TiO2 aggregates in aqueous suspensions as a function of ionic strength and of the nature of the electrolyte in a moderately acid to circumneutral pH range typical of soil and surface water conditions. Dynamic light scattering results show that 4-5 nm titanium dioxide particles readily form stable aggregates with an average diameter of 50-60 nm at pH approximately 4.5 in a NaCl suspension adjusted to an ionic strength of 0.0045 M. Holding the pH constant but increasing the ionic strength to 0.0165 M, leads to the formation of micron-sized aggregates within 15 min. At all other pH values tested (5.8-8.2), micron-sized aggregates form in less than 5 min (minimum detection time), even at low ionic strength (0.0084-0.0099 M with NaCl). In contrast, micron-sized aggregates form within 5 min in an aqueous suspension of CaCl2 at an ionic strength of 0.0128 M and pH of 4.8, which is significantly faster than observed for NaCI suspensions with similar ionic strength and pH. This result indicates that divalent cations may enhance aggregation of nano-TiO2 in soils and surface waters. Optical micrographs show branching aggregates of sizes ranging from the 1 microm optical limit of the microscope to tens of micrometers in diameter. PMID:19350903

  11. A computer program for geochemical analysis of acid-rain and other low-ionic-strength, acidic waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnsson, P.A.; Lord, D.G.

    1987-01-01

    ARCHEM, a computer program written in FORTRAN 77, is designed primarily for use in the routine geochemical interpretation of low-ionic-strength, acidic waters. On the basis of chemical analyses of the water, and either laboratory or field determinations of pH, temperature, and dissolved oxygen, the program calculates the equilibrium distribution of major inorganic aqueous species and of inorganic aluminum complexes. The concentration of the organic anion is estimated from the dissolved organic concentration. Ionic ferrous iron is calculated from the dissolved oxygen concentration. Ionic balances and comparisons of computed with measured specific conductances are performed as checks on the analytical accuracy of chemical analyses. ARCHEM may be tailored easily to fit different sampling protocols, and may be run on multiple sample analyses. (Author 's abstract)

  12. Improved thermodynamic model for interaction of EDTA with trivalent actinides and lanthanide to ionic strength of 6.60 m

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakur, Punam; Xiong, Yongliang; Borkowski, Marian; Choppin, Gregory R.

    2014-05-01

    The dissociation constants of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (H4EDTA), and the stability constants of Am3+, Cm3+and Eu3+ with EDTA4- have been determined at 25 °C, over a range of concentration varying from 0.1 to 6.60 m NaClO4 using potentiometric titration and an extraction technique, respectively. The formation of only 1:1 complex, M(EDTA)-, where (M = Am3+, Cm3+ and Eu3+), was observed under the experimental conditions. The observed ionic strength dependencies of the dissociation constants and the stability constants have been described successfully over the entire ionic strength range using the Pitzer model. The thermodynamic stability constant: logβ1010=20.55±0.18 for Am3+, logβ1010=20.43±0.20 for Cm3+ and logβ1010=20.65±0.19 for Eu3+ were calculated by extrapolation of data to zero ionic strength in an NaClO4 medium. In addition, logβ1010 of 20.05 ± 0.40 for Am3+ was obtained by simultaneously modeling data both in NaCl and NaClO4 media. For all stability constants, the Pitzer model gives an excellent representation of the data using interaction parameters β(0), β(1), and Cϕ determined in this work. The improved model presented in this work would enable researchers to model accurately the potential mobility of actinides (III) and light rare earth elements to ionic strength of 6.60 m in low temperature environments in the presence of EDTA.

  13. Stability constants for the formation of lead chloride complexes as a function of temperature and ionic strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yanxin; Millero, Frank J.

    2007-01-01

    The stability constants for the formation of lead (Pb 2+) with chloride Pb+nCl↔PbCln2-nβn(n=1,2,3) have been determined using a spectrophotometric method in NaClO 4 solutions as a function of ionic strength (0-6 m) and temperature (15-45 °C). The results have been fitted to the equations:

  14. Carbonate adsorption onto goethite as a function of pH and ionic strength. [Yucca Mountain Project:a1

    SciTech Connect

    Rundberg, R.S. ); Albinsson, Y. . Dept. of Nuclear Chemistry)

    1991-01-01

    The adsorption of carbonate onto geothite was studied as a function of both pH and ionic strength (NaClO{sub 4} electrolyte) using {sup 14}C tracer. The pH ranged from 2.5 to 11.6. The ionic strength was controlled by varying the NaClO{sub 4} concentration and ranged from 0.01 to 0.1 molar. The results indicate that carbonate is adsorbed on goethite as primarily an inner-sphere complex at pH values above the point of zero charge. This is inferred from the lack of dependence on ionic strength in the adsorption of carbonate. Below the point of zero charge carbonate is adsorbed by an additional outer-sphere mechanism. An adsorption isotherm was measured at pH 7.0 with an electrolyte concentration of 0.01M. Deconvolution of the isotherm proved that at least two sorption mechanisms exist. These mechanisms lead to large distribution coefficients at low pH. Thereby making the complete removal and exclusion of carbonate from an aqueous goethite system difficult, for the purpose of characterizing a clean'' goethite surface.

  15. Equilibrium distribution of permeants in polyelectrolyte microcapsules filled with negatively charged polyelectrolyte: the influence of ionic strength and solvent polarity.

    PubMed

    Tong, Weijun; Song, Haiqing; Gao, Changyou; Möhwald, Helmuth

    2006-07-01

    The effects of ionic strength and solvent polarity on the equilibrium distribution of fluorescein (FL) and FITC-dextran between the interior of polyelectrolyte multilayer microcapsules filled with negatively charged strong polyelectrolyte and the bulk solution were systematically investigated. A negatively charged strong polyelectrolyte, poly(styrene sulfonate) (PSS), used for CaCO3 core fabrication, was entrapped inside the capsules. Due to the semipermeability of the capsule wall, a Donnan equilibrium between the inner solution within the capsules and the bulk solution was created. The equilibrium distribution of the negatively charged permeants was investigated by means of confocal laser scanning microscopy as a function of ionic strength and solvent polarity. The equilibrium distribution of the negatively charged permeants could be tuned by increasing the bulk ionic strength to decrease the Donnan potential. Decreasing the solvent polarity also could enhance the permeation of FL, which induces a sudden increase of permeation when the ethanol volume fraction was higher than 0.7. This is mainly attributed to the precipitation of PSS. A theoretical model combining the Donnan equilibrium and Manning counterion condensation was employed to discuss the results. PMID:16805590

  16. Dioctahedral smectite reactions at elevated temperatures: Effects of K-availability, Na/K ratio and ionic strength

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whitney, G.

    1992-01-01

    Hydrothermal experiments were conducted to measure the effects of K availability, Na/K ratio and ionic strength in chloride solutions on the rate and extent of the reaction of smectite to interstratified illite/smectite. The < 2 ??m fraction of a bentonite was treated hydrothermally at temperatures of 200, 250, 300, 350, 400 and 450??C for run times of up to 30 days in the presence of 0.33, 0.66 and 1.00 equivalents of K per O10(OH)2. The effect of K-content on reaction progress is dramatic at low (0.33 eq.) K concentrations, but diminishes above a concentration of 0.66 equivalents. The effect of K-content is also more important at lower temperatures than at higher temperatures. Addition of K above that required to satisfy the cation exchange capacity of the smectite reduced the amount of chlorite byproduct and produced authigenic K-feldspar at the highest K-concentration. Similar experiments were run using Na/K equivalent ratios of 0 to 25 and total solution molalities of 0 to 3.75 molal. Because these experiments were small fixed-volume experiments, it was necessary to vary two of the three key variables (K-content, Na/K ratio, ionic strength simultaneously. The data suggest, however, that K-content has a much stronger effect than either Na/K ratio or ionic strength on illitization reaction progress. ?? 1992.

  17. Solubilisation of myosin in a solution of low ionic strength L-histidine: Significance of the imidazole ring.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xing; Zou, Yufeng; Han, Minyi; Pan, Lihua; Xing, Tong; Xu, Xinglian; Zhou, Guanghong

    2016-04-01

    Myosin, a major muscle protein, can be solubilised in a low ionic strength solution containing L-histidine (His). To elucidate which chemical constituents in His are responsible for this solubilisation, we investigated the effects of 5mM His, imidazole (Imi), L-α-alanine (Ala), 1-methyl-L-histidine (M-his) and L-carnosine (Car) on particle properties of myosin suspensions and conformational characteristics of soluble myosin at low ionic strength (1 mM KCl, pH 7.5). His, Imi and Car, each containing an imidazole ring, were able to induce a myosin suspension, which had small particle size species and high absolute zeta potential, thus increasing the solubility of myosin. His, Imi and Car affected the tertiary structure and decreased the α-helix content of soluble myosin. Therefore, the imidazole ring of His appeared to be the significant chemical constituent in solubilising myosin at low ionic strength solution, presumably by affecting its secondary structure. PMID:26593463

  18. Colloid release and clogging in porous media: Effects of solution ionic strength and flow velocity.

    PubMed

    Torkzaban, Saeed; Bradford, Scott A; Vanderzalm, Joanne L; Patterson, Bradley M; Harris, Brett; Prommer, Henning

    2015-10-01

    The release and retention of in-situ colloids in aquifers play an important role in the sustainable operation of managed aquifer recharge (MAR) schemes. The processes of colloid release, retention, and associated permeability changes in consolidated aquifer sediments were studied by displacing native groundwater with reverse osmosis-treated (RO) water at various flow velocities. Significant amounts of colloid release occurred when: (i) the native groundwater was displaced by RO-water with a low ionic strength (IS), and (ii) the flow velocity was increased in a stepwise manner. The amount of colloid release and associated permeability reduction upon RO-water injection depended on the initial clay content of the core. The concentration of released colloids was relatively low and the permeability reduction was negligible for the core sample with a low clay content of about 1.3%. In contrast, core samples with about 6 and 7.5% clay content exhibited: (i) close to two orders of magnitude increase in effluent colloid concentration and (ii) more than 65% permeability reduction. Incremental improvement in the core permeability was achieved when the flow velocity increased, whereas a short flow interruption provided a considerable increase in the core permeability. This dependence of colloid release and permeability changes on flow velocity and colloid concentration was consistent with colloid retention and release at pore constrictions due to the mechanism of hydrodynamic bridging. A mathematical model was formulated to describe the processes of colloid release, transport, retention at pore constrictions, and subsequent permeability changes. Our experimental and modeling results indicated that only a small fraction of the in-situ colloids was released for any given change in the IS or flow velocity. Comparison of the fitted and experimentally measured effluent colloid concentrations and associated changes in the core permeability showed good agreement, indicating that the

  19. Impact of ionic strength on chitin nanocrystal-xyloglucan multilayer film growth.

    PubMed

    Villares, Ana; Moreau, Céline; Capron, Isabelle; Cathala, Bernard

    2014-09-01

    The impact of the ionic strength on the film growth has been studied for the architectures composed of chitin nanocrystals (ChiNC) and xyloglucan (XG) to better understand the fabrication process of multilayer films. The formation of ChiNC-XG assemblies was monitored by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) and multilayer films were fabricated by the spin-coating assisted layer-by-layer (LbL) procedure. Films were prepared from 1 g L(-1) ChiNC dispersions at pH 4 without and with the addition of NaCl (0 and 5 mM, respectively) and 0.5 g L(-1) XG solutions in water. Distinct growth pattern and structural characteristics were found for the films prepared from ChiNC at 0 and 5 mM NaCl. Specifically, films assembled without salt exhibited lower mass deposition and film growth failed after 5 (ChiNC-XG) bilayers. Differently, at 5 mM NaCl higher amounts of both polymers (ChiNC and XG) were adsorbed; therefore, the films were thicker, and the deposition succeeded up to 10 bilayers. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) revealed an almost completely covered surface after the adsorption of ChiNC at 5 mM NaCl whereas salt-free ChiNC dispersions resulted in lower surface coverage. These results reliably concluded that the fabrication of (ChiNC-XG) films requires the screening of the charges to promote the layers stability. PMID:24719043

  20. Temperature and Ionic Strength Effects on the Chlorosome Light-Harvesting Antenna Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Kuo-Hsiang; Zhu, Liying; Urban, Volker S; Collins, Aaron M.; Biswas, Pratim; Blankenship, R. E.

    2011-03-15

    Chlorosomes, the peripheral light-harvesting antenna complex from green photosynthetic bacteria, are the largest and one of the most efficient light-harvesting antenna complexes found in nature. In contrast to other light-harvesting antennas, chlorosomes are constructed from more than 150,000 self-assembled bacteriochlorophylls (BChls) and contain relatively few proteins that play secondary roles. These unique properties have led to chlorosomes as an attractive candidate for developing biohybrid solar cell devices. In this article, we investigate the temperature and ionic strength effects on the viability of chlorosomes from the photosynthetic green bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus using small-angle neutron scattering and dynamic light scattering. Our studies indicate that chlorosomes remain intact up to 75 °C and that salt induces the formation of large aggregates of chlorosomes. No internal structural changes are observed for the aggregates. The salt-induced aggregation, which is a reversible process, is more efficient with divalent metal ions than with monovalent metal ions. Moreover, with treatment at 98 °C for 2 min, the bulk of the chlorosome pigments are undamaged, while the baseplate is destroyed. Chlorosomes without the baseplate remain rodlike in shape and are 30-40% smaller than with the baseplate attached. Further, chlorosomes are stable from pH 5.5 to 11.0. Together, this is the first time such a range of characterization tools have been used for chlorosomes, and this has enabled elucidation of properties that are not only important to understanding their functionality but also may be useful in biohybrid devices for effective light harvesting.

  1. Effect of high salinity on anaerobic treatment of low strength effluents.

    PubMed

    Ozalp, G; Gomec, C Y; Ozturk, I; Gonuldinc, S; Altinbas, M

    2003-01-01

    In anaerobic treatment, it is obligatory to know the effect of potentially inhibitory compounds due to the fact that methane formation may retard severely and may proceed slower than organic acid production. One of the most important inhibitory substances in anaerobic treatment is high salinity. In many cases, the main collectors of a municipal sewer system should have been built in the coastal zone and below the ground water level due to the available topography of wastewater catchments area, which is carrying the risk of seawater infiltration. Besides, one of the most convenient methods for leachate control is to treat landfill leachates with domestic wastewaters in the central municipal wastewater treatment plants such as in Istanbul. Thus, the nitrogen load of the treatment plants increase significantly. In this study, the effects of high salinity and ammonium nitrogen levels on mesophilic anaerobic tretament processes were investigated. In the first part of the study, high salinity effect on anaerobic treatment was investigated by feeding synthetic wastewater containing high salinity between 0.15%-1.5% ratios. In the second part of the study, the simultaneous effect of high salinity and ammonia (1.5% salinity+1,000 mg NH3/l) was examined by a lab-scale Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Bed Reactor (UASBR). Results indicated no significant inhibition in both cases and effective COD removals (89%) and total biogas productions having methane content of 84% could be achieved. PMID:14753538

  2. The influence of ionic strength and organic compounds on nanoparticle TiO2 (n-TiO2) aggregation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaewoong; Bartelt-Hunt, Shannon L; Li, Yusong; Gilrein, Erica Jeanne

    2016-07-01

    This study investigated the aggregation of n-TiO2 in the presence of humic acid (HA) and/or 17β-estradiol (E2) under high ionic strength conditions simulating levels detected in landfill leachate. Aggregation of n-TiO2 was strongly influenced by ionic strength as well as ionic valence in that divalent cations (Ca(2+)) were more effective than monovalent (Na(+)) at the surface modification. HA or E2 enhanced aggregation of n-TiO2 in 20 mM CaCl2, however little aggregation was observed in 100 mM NaCl. Similarly, we observed only the increased aggregation of n-TiO2 in the presence of HA/E2. These results showed the critical role of particles' surface charges on the aggregation behaviors of n-TiO2 that HA plays more significantly than E2. However, the slightly increased zeta potential and aggregation of n-TiO2 in the combination of HA and E2 at both 20 mM CaCl2 and 100 mM NaCl means that E2 has influenced on the surface modification of n-TiO2 by adsorption. Based on the aggregation of n-TiO2 under high ionic strength with HA and/or E2, we simulated the mobility of aggregated n-TiO2 in porous media. As a result, we observed that the mobility distance of aggregated n-TiO2 was dramatically influenced by the surface modification with both HA and/or E2 between particles and media. Furthermore, larger mobility distance was observed with larger aggregation of n-TiO2 particles that can be explained by clean bed filtration (CFT) theory. PMID:27045636

  3. Directionality of individual kinesin-5 Cin8 motors is modulated by loop 8, ionic strength and microtubule geometry.

    PubMed

    Gerson-Gurwitz, Adina; Thiede, Christina; Movshovich, Natalia; Fridman, Vladimir; Podolskaya, Maria; Danieli, Tsafi; Lakämper, Stefan; Klopfenstein, Dieter R; Schmidt, Christoph F; Gheber, Larisa

    2011-12-14

    Kinesin-5 motors fulfil essential roles in mitotic spindle morphogenesis and dynamics as slow, processive microtubule (MT) plus-end directed motors. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae kinesin-5 Cin8 was found, surprisingly, to switch directionality. Here, we have examined directionality using single-molecule fluorescence motility assays and live-cell microscopy. On spindles, Cin8 motors mostly moved slowly (∼25 nm/s) towards the midzone, but occasionally also faster (∼55 nm/s) towards the spindle poles. In vitro, individual Cin8 motors could be switched by ionic conditions from rapid (380 nm/s) and processive minus-end to slow plus-end motion on single MTs. At high ionic strength, Cin8 motors rapidly alternated directionalities between antiparallel MTs, while driving steady plus-end relative sliding. Between parallel MTs, plus-end motion was only occasionally observed. Deletion of the uniquely large insert in loop 8 of Cin8 induced bias towards minus-end motility and affected the ionic strength-dependent directional switching of Cin8 in vitro. The deletion mutant cells exhibited reduced midzone-directed motility and efficiency to support spindle elongation, indicating the importance of directionality control for the anaphase function of Cin8. PMID:22101328

  4. Directionality of individual kinesin-5 Cin8 motors is modulated by loop 8, ionic strength and microtubule geometry

    PubMed Central

    Gerson-Gurwitz, Adina; Thiede, Christina; Movshovich, Natalia; Fridman, Vladimir; Podolskaya, Maria; Danieli, Tsafi; Lakämper, Stefan; Klopfenstein, Dieter R; Schmidt, Christoph F; Gheber, Larisa

    2011-01-01

    Kinesin-5 motors fulfil essential roles in mitotic spindle morphogenesis and dynamics as slow, processive microtubule (MT) plus-end directed motors. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae kinesin-5 Cin8 was found, surprisingly, to switch directionality. Here, we have examined directionality using single-molecule fluorescence motility assays and live-cell microscopy. On spindles, Cin8 motors mostly moved slowly (∼25 nm/s) towards the midzone, but occasionally also faster (∼55 nm/s) towards the spindle poles. In vitro, individual Cin8 motors could be switched by ionic conditions from rapid (380 nm/s) and processive minus-end to slow plus-end motion on single MTs. At high ionic strength, Cin8 motors rapidly alternated directionalities between antiparallel MTs, while driving steady plus-end relative sliding. Between parallel MTs, plus-end motion was only occasionally observed. Deletion of the uniquely large insert in loop 8 of Cin8 induced bias towards minus-end motility and affected the ionic strength-dependent directional switching of Cin8 in vitro. The deletion mutant cells exhibited reduced midzone-directed motility and efficiency to support spindle elongation, indicating the importance of directionality control for the anaphase function of Cin8. PMID:22101328

  5. Quantitative and qualitative optimization of allergen extraction from peanut and selected tree nuts. Part 2. Optimization of buffer and ionic strength using a full factorial experimental design.

    PubMed

    L'Hocine, Lamia; Pitre, Mélanie

    2016-03-01

    A full factorial design was used to assess the single and interactive effects of three non-denaturing aqueous (phosphate, borate, and carbonate) buffers at various ionic strengths (I) on allergen extractability from and immunoglobulin E (IgE) immunoreactivity of peanut, almond, hazelnut, and pistachio. The results indicated that the type and ionic strength of the buffer had different effects on protein recovery from the nuts under study. Substantial differences in protein profiles, abundance, and IgE-binding intensity with different combinations of pH and ionic strength were found. A significant interaction between pH and ionic strength was observed for pistachio and almond. The optimal buffer system conditions, which maximized the IgE-binding efficiency of allergens and provided satisfactory to superior protein recovery yield and profiles, were carbonate buffer at an ionic strength of I=0.075 for peanut, carbonate buffer at I=0.15 for almond, phosphate buffer at I=0.5 for hazelnut, and borate at I=0.15 for pistachio. The buffer type and its ionic strength could be manipulated to achieve the selective solubility of desired allergens. PMID:26471623

  6. Stability of YREE complexes with the trihydroxamate siderophore desferrioxamine B at seawater ionic strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christenson, Emily A.; Schijf, Johan

    2011-11-01

    Organic complexation of yttrium and the rare earth elements (YREEs), although generally believed to be important, is an understudied aspect of YREE solution speciation in the open ocean. We report the first series of stability constants for complexes of YREEs (except Ce and Pm) with the trihydroxamate siderophore desferrioxamine B (DFOB), representing a class of small organic ligands that have an extraordinary selectivity for Fe(III) and are found in surface seawater at low-picomolar concentrations. Constants were measured by potentiometric titration of DFOB (pH 3-10) in the presence of single YREEs, in simple media at seawater ionic strength (NaClO 4 or NaCl, I = 0.7 M). Under these circumstances, the terminal amine of DFOB does not deprotonate. The four acid dissociation constants of the siderophore were determined separately by potentiometric titration of DFOB alone. Values for the bidentate (log β1), tetradentate (log β2), and hexadentate (log β3) complexes of La-Lu range from 4.88 to 6.53, 7.70 to 11.27, and 10.09 to 15.19, respectively, while Y falls between Gd and Tb in each case. Linear free-energy relations of the three stability constants with the first YREE hydrolysis constant, log β1∗, yield regression coefficients of >0.97. On the other hand, plots of the constants vs. the radius of the inner hydration sphere display an increasing deviation from linearity for the lightest REEs (La > Pr > Nd). This may signify steric constraints in DFOB folding around bulkier cations, a larger mismatch in coordination number, or a substantial degree of covalence in the YREE-hydroxamate bond. Complexes of the YREEs with DFOB are many orders of magnitude more stable than those with carbonate, the dominant inorganic YREE ligand in seawater. Speciation modeling with MINEQL indicates that, for an average seawater composition, the hexadentate complex could constitute as much as 28% of dissolved Lu at free DFOB concentrations as low as 10 -13 M. Such conditions might

  7. Hysteresis in the amount of colloids mobilized from intact cores of a fractured soil as a result of changes in the ionic strength of simulated rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanty, S.; Ryan, J. N.; Saiers, J. E.

    2010-12-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of colloid mobilization is essential to predicting the importance of colloid-facilitated transport of contaminants in subsurface environment. The mobilization of colloids increases with a decrease in the ionic strength of the pore water. Colloid mobilization is hysteretic in response to changes in ionic strength - the amount of colloids mobilized at a given ionic strength is not matched when the experiment is repeated following exposure to pore water of higher or lower ionic strengths. An exchange of pore water between the soil matrix and macropores is proposed to be the primary reason for the hysteresis of colloid mobilization during changes in ionic strength. The mobilization of colloids by pore water of a given ionic strength is either enhanced or inhibited by the slow release of matrix pore water of a lower or higher ionic strengths, respectively. This hypothesis was tested by conducting simulated rainfall experiments on undisturbed, intact cores of fractured soil (25.4 cm diameter, 15.2 cm depth) sampled from Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee. Rainfall of increasing, and then decreasing, ionic strength was applied to soil cores in successive events of 6 h of rainfall and an 18 h pause for each ionic strength. The ionic strength ranged from 0.01 to 10 mM as sodium chloride. Sodium bromide was included to provide a conservative tracer (Br-). Samples were collected from 19 ports in a hexagonal grid at the base of the soil core to identify regions of fast and slow flow attributed to macropore and matrix pathways. The samples were analyzed for concentrations of colloids (turbidity) and bromide (ion-selective electrode), conductivity, and pH. A flow-interruption method during bromide injection was employed to estimate the mass transfer rate of bromide between the soil macropores and matrix. Colloid concentrations, flow rates, and breakthrough times for bromide were found to be different for each port in the experiments at

  8. Effects of kaolinite colloids on Cd2 + transport through saturated sand under varying ionic strength conditions: Column experiments and modeling approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wikiniyadhanee, Rakkreat; Chotpantarat, Srilert; Ong, Say Kee

    2015-11-01

    Column experiments were performed under various ionic strengths (0.0-0.9 mM) using 10 mg L- 1 of Cd2 + without kaolinite colloids and 10 mg L- 1 Cd2 + mixed with 100 mg L- 1 kaolinite colloids. The nonequilibrium two-site model (TSM) described the behavior of both Cd2 + transport and Cd2 + co-transported with kaolinite colloids better than the equilibrium model (CDeq) (R2 = 0.978-0.996). The results showed that an increase in ionic strength negatively impacted the retardation factors (R) of both Cd2 + and Cd2 + mixed with kaolinite colloids. The presence of kaolinite colloids increased the retardation factors of Cd2 + from 7.23 to 7.89, 6.76 to 6.61 and 3.79 to 6.99 for ionic strengths of 0.225, 0.45 and 0.9 mM, respectively. On the other hand, the presence of kaolinite colloids decreased the retardation factor of Cd2 + from 8.13 to 7.83 for ionic strength of 0.0 mM. The fraction of instantaneous sorption sites (f) parameters, kinetic constant for sorption sites (α) and Freundlich constant (Kf) were estimated from HYDRUS-1D of TSM for Cd2 + transport. The fraction of instantaneous sorption sites was found to increase for an increase in ionic strength. Kf values of Cd2 + transport without kaolinite colloids for 0.0, 0.225 and 0.45 mM were found to be higher than those of Cd2 + transport with kaolinite colloids, except for ionic strength of 0.9 mM. Hence, the presence of kaolinite colloids probably retarded the mobility of Cd2 + in porous media for higher ionic strengths. Furthermore, retardation factors and Kf values of both Cd2 + transport and Cd2 + co-transport were shown to decrease when ionic strength increased. Interestingly, according to TSM, the fraction of instantaneous sorption sites tends to increase for an increase in ionic strength, which imply that the mechanism of Cd2 + sorption onto quartz sand can be better described using equilibrium sorption rather than nonequilibrium sorption for an increase in ionic strength.

  9. Effects of kaolinite colloids on Cd²⁺ transport through saturated sand under varying ionic strength conditions: Column experiments and modeling approaches.

    PubMed

    Wikiniyadhanee, Rakkreat; Chotpantarat, Srilert; Ong, Say Kee

    2015-11-01

    Column experiments were performed under various ionic strengths (0.0-0.9 mM) using 10 mg L(-1) of Cd(2+) without kaolinite colloids and 10 mg L(-1) Cd(2+) mixed with 100 mg L(-1) kaolinite colloids. The nonequilibrium two-site model (TSM) described the behavior of both Cd(2+) transport and Cd(2+) co-transported with kaolinite colloids better than the equilibrium model (CD(eq)) (R(2)=0.978-0.996). The results showed that an increase in ionic strength negatively impacted the retardation factors (R) of both Cd(2+) and Cd(2+) mixed with kaolinite colloids. The presence of kaolinite colloids increased the retardation factors of Cd(2+) from 7.23 to 7.89, 6.76 to 6.61 and 3.79 to 6.99 for ionic strengths of 0.225, 0.45 and 0.9 mM, respectively. On the other hand, the presence of kaolinite colloids decreased the retardation factor of Cd(2+) from 8.13 to 7.83 for ionic strength of 0.0 mM. The fraction of instantaneous sorption sites (f) parameters, kinetic constant for sorption sites (α) and Freundlich constant (K(f)) were estimated from HYDRUS-1D of TSM for Cd(2+) transport. The fraction of instantaneous sorption sites was found to increase for an increase in ionic strength. K(f) values of Cd(2+) transport without kaolinite colloids for 0.0, 0.225 and 0.45 mM were found to be higher than those of Cd(2+) transport with kaolinite colloids, except for ionic strength of 0.9 mM. Hence, the presence of kaolinite colloids probably retarded the mobility of Cd(2+) in porous media for higher ionic strengths. Furthermore, retardation factors and K(f) values of both Cd(2+) transport and Cd(2+) co-transport were shown to decrease when ionic strength increased. Interestingly, according to TSM, the fraction of instantaneous sorption sites tends to increase for an increase in ionic strength, which imply that the mechanism of Cd(2+) sorption onto quartz sand can be better described using equilibrium sorption rather than nonequilibrium sorption for an increase in ionic strength. PMID

  10. Influence of porewater velocity and ionic strength on DOC concentrations in and losses from peat-sand mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfaffner, Nora; Tiemeyer, Bärbel; Fiedler, Sabine

    2015-04-01

    Organic soils play an important role in the global carbon cycle as they can act as a source or a sink for greenhouse gas emissions. The new IPCC Wetlands Supplement accounts for the first time for CO2 emissions from the decomposition of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). While there is a wealth of studies on "true" peat soils, knowledge on DOC losses from organic soils heavily disturbed by e.g. mixing with sand is fragmentary. Moreover, there are only a few studies on the influence of soil hydrological properties on DOC transport. This study investigates physico-chemical controls on the concentration and losses of DOC from a peat-sand mixture in a saturated column experiment with undisturbed columns. The soil originates from the study site "Grosses Moor" (Northern Germany) which is a former bog where peat layers remaining after peat mining were mixed with the underlying mineral soil. We studied the influence of the flow regime and the ionic strength of the irrigation solution on DOC concentrations and losses. Three different pumping rates and two different ionic strengths determined by different concentrations of a sodium chloride-calcium chloride mixture in the irrigation solution were applied. Transport properties of the soil were obtained by analyzing breakthrough curves (BTCs) of a conservative tracer (potassium bromide). For interpretation of the BTCs, the transport model STANMOD which is based on the two-region (mobile/immobile) non-equilibrium concept was fitted to the data. The shape of the BTCs and the STANMOD results showed that three of the four columns had a dual porosity structure, which affects the porewater velocity and the contact area. After a large initial peak, DOC concentrations equilibrated to nearly constant values. Increased porewater velocities decreased the concentration of DOC, but increased the losses. A new equilibrium concentration was reached after nearly all changes of the porewater velocity. At maximum pumping rates as determined from

  11. Assessment of the Effects of Flow Rate and Ionic Strength on Microbial Fuel Cell Performance Using Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Aaron, D; Tsouris, Costas; Hamilton, Choo Yieng; Borole, Abhijeet P

    2010-01-01

    Impedance changes of the anode, cathode and solution were examined for a microbial fuel cell (MFC) under varying conditions in order to improve its performance. An MFC inoculated with a pre-enriched microbial culture resulted in a startup time of ten days. Over this period, the anode impedance decreased below the cathode impedance, suggesting a cathode limited power output. Decreasing the anode flow rate did not impact the anode impedance significantly, while it increased the cathode impedance by 65% . Reducing the anode-medium ionic strength from 100% to 10% increased the cathode impedance by 48%.

  12. Effect of oxidation state and ionic strength on sorption of actinides (Th, U, Np, Am) to geologic media

    SciTech Connect

    Dittrich, Timothy M.; Richmann, Michael K.; Reed, Donald T.

    2015-10-30

    The degree of conservatism in the estimated sorption partition coefficients (Kds) used in a performance assessment model is being evaluated based on a complementary batch and column method. The main focus of this work is to investigate the role of ionic strength, solution chemistry, and oxidation state (III-VI) in actinide sorption to dolomite rock. Based on redox conditions and solution chemistry expected at the WIPP, possible actinide species include Pu(III), Pu(IV), U(IV), U(VI), Np(IV), Np(V), Am(III), and Th(IV).

  13. Effect of ionic strength on perfusive flow in capillary electrochromatography columns packed with wide-pore stationary phases.

    PubMed

    Dearie, H S; Smith, N W; Moffatt, F; Wren, S A C; Evans, K P

    2002-02-01

    The use of wide-pore stationary phases in capillary electrochromatography has shown exceptional increases in separation efficiency in conjunction with high electroosmotic flow. These effects are due to the perfusive flow mechanism which is primarily controlled by the ionic strength of the mobile phase. Good correlation between calculated values of electrochemical double-layer thickness and efficiency data have also been obtained. Reduced plate height values of <0.5 have been observed with pore sizes of 4000 A. In addition, electroosmotic flow mobility twice that of 3 microm Spherisorb ODS-1 has been obtained. PMID:11862987

  14. Divalent cation and ionic strength effects on Vinca alkaloid-induced tubulin self-association.

    PubMed Central

    Lobert, S; Boyd, C A; Correia, J J

    1997-01-01

    We present here a systematic study of ionic strength and divalent cation effects on Vinca alkaloid-induced tubulin spiral formation. We used sedimentation velocity experiments and quantitative fitting of weight-average sedimentation coefficients versus free drug concentrations to obtain thermodynamic parameters under various solution conditions. The addition of 50-150 mM NaCl to our standard buffer (10 mM piperazine-N,N'-bis(2-ethanesulfonic acid), 1 mM Mg, 50 microM GDP or GTP, pH 6.9) enhances overall vinblastine- or vincristine-induced tubulin self-association. As demonstrated in previous studies, GDP enhances overall self-association more than GTP, although in the presence of salt, GDP enhancement is reduced. For example, in 150 mM NaCl, GDP enhancement is 0.24 kcal/mol for vinblastine and 0.36 kcal/mol for vincristine versus an average enhancement of 0.87 (+/- 0.34) kcal/mol for the same drugs in the absence of salt. Wyman linkage analysis of experiments with vinblastine or vincristine over a range of NaCl concentrations showed a twofold increase in the change in NaCl bound to drug-induced spirals in the presence of GTP compared to GDP. These data indicate that GDP enhancement of Vinca alkaloid-induced tubulin self-association is due in part to electrostatic inhibition in the GTP state. In the absence of NaCl, we found that vinblastine and 1 mM Mn2+ or Ca2+ causes immediate condensation of tubulin. The predominant aggregates observed by electron microscopy are large sheets. This effect was not found with 1 mM Mg2+. At 100 microM cation concentrations (Mn2+, Mg2+, or Ca2+), GDP enhances vinblastine-induced spiral formation by 0.55 (+/- 0.26) kcal/mol. This effect is found only in K2, the association of liganded heterodimers at the ends of growing spirals. There is no GDP enhancement of K1, the binding of drug to heterodimer, although K1 is dependent upon the divalent cation concentration. NaCl diminishes tubulin condensation, probably by inhibiting lateral

  15. Estimation of distribution coefficient of natural radionuclides in soil around uranium mines and its effect with ionic strength of water.

    PubMed

    Mishra, S; Maity, S; Pandit, G G

    2012-11-01

    The distribution coefficient, K(d) in soil is an important parameter to predict the migration of contaminants. In this study, uranium (U) and its decay products thorium (Th), radium (Ra), bismuth (Bi), lead (Pb) and polonium (Po), which may contaminate the soil and ground water around uranium mining areas, have been considered. Soil and ground water samples were collected from a proposed uranium mining site in India. The soil samples were characterised for different parameters affecting the K(d) values. The batch sorption method was employed to measure the K(d) of different radionuclides. The important factors affecting the batch method for K(d) estimation were identified and optimised. The variation of K(d) was observed with different ionic strength water samples. Results showed high K(d) values for Th(IV), Po(IV) and Pb(II) (log K(d) ∼4) and low K(d) (log K(d) ∼2-3) for U(VI), Ra(II) and Bi(III) in all three types of water with different ionic strength. PMID:22927651

  16. Transport of aluminum oxide nanoparticles in saturated sand: effects of ionic strength, flow rate, and nanoparticle concentration.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Tanzina; George, Jessica; Shipley, Heather J

    2013-10-01

    The effect of ionic strength (IS), flow rate, and nanoparticle concentration on the transport and deposition of aluminum oxide nanoparticles (Al2O3 NPs) in saturated sand was investigated. Mobility of Al2O3 NPs was influenced by IS, the highest mobility was observed in DI water (97% elution of the influent) and decreased with increasing ionic strength. Decreased mobility of the NPs was due to aggregation as the IS increased. Varying flow conditions did not have a significant effect on mobility. However, increased and faster elution was observed when the influent concentration was increased from 50 mg/L to 400 mg/L. The influent and effluent nanoparticle sizes were also measured using dynamic light scattering. For most conditions, the size was observed to be below 100 nm and there was no significant change to the influent and effluent particle sizes. Significant elution was observed although conditions were electrostatically favorable, which was attributed to the small, stable size (~82 nm) of the particles and blocking. DLVO theory was also applied to the data to better understand the mechanisms of mobility. It is necessary to consider these mechanisms for a reliable prediction of transport through the subsurface and potential removal methods such as filtration. PMID:23835066

  17. Investigation of the Sedimentation Behavior of Aluminum Phosphate: Influence of pH, Ionic Strength, and Model Antigens.

    PubMed

    Muthurania, Kevin; Ignatius, Arun Alphonse; Jin, Zhaowei; Williams, Jennifer; Ohtake, Satoshi

    2015-11-01

    Evaluation of the physical characteristics of vaccines formulated in the presence of adjuvants, such as aluminum salts (Alum), is an important step in the development of vaccines. Depending on the formulation conditions and the associated electrostatic interactions of the adjuvant particles, the vaccine suspension may transition between flocculated and deflocculated states. The impact of practical formulation parameters, including pH, ionic strength, and the presence of model antigens, has been correlated to the sedimentation behavior of aluminum phosphate suspensions. A novel approach for the characterization of suspension properties of Alum has been developed to predict the flocculated state of the system using a sedimentation analysis-based tool (Turbiscan®). Two sedimentation parameters, the settling onset time (Sonset) and the sedimentation volume ratio (SVR) can be determined simultaneously in a single measurement. The results demonstrate the suspension characteristics to be significantly altered by solution conditions (pH and ionic strength) and the charge state of bound antigens. Formulation conditions that promote the flocculated state of the suspension are characterized by faster Sonset and higher SVR, and are generally easy to resuspend. The Turbiscan® method described herein is a useful tool for the characterization of aluminum-containing suspensions and may be adapted for screening and optimization of suspension-based vaccine formulations in general. PMID:26205044

  18. Influence of ionic strength and soil characteristics on the behavior of Cryptosporidium oocysts in saturated porous media.

    PubMed

    Balthazard-Accou, Ketty; Fifi, Urbain; Agnamey, Patrice; Casimir, Justin André; Brasseur, Philippe; Emmanuel, Evens

    2014-05-01

    The physico-chemical behavior of Cryptosporidium oocysts was investigated during their transfer through an alluvial formation from Les Cayes (Haiti) via batch tests. Five approximately 3 kg soil samples were collected and combined prior to batch tests from the alluvial formations. The experiments were carried out at soil pH by equilibrating different ranges of pure oocysts concentrations and soil samples with 3mM CaCl2 and 1mM NaBr as electrolyte. We used the Debye-Hückel equation describing ion activity in a solution for a given ionic strength. The equilibrium adsorption mechanism is used to enumerate the oocysts in the soil. The results suggest that the oocysts behavior in porous media depends on soil characteristics such as soil pH, the nature of the mineral and organic constituents of the soil and the ionic strength and activities in solution. These results show that a total transfer in batch containing NaBr solutions against a partial one in batch containing CaCl2 solutions depends on the oocysts media concentration. To confirm the oocysts number retained in soil, confocal microscopy was successfully used and the images demonstrate that the majority of oocysts were retained at the range of concentrations tested. The findings from this study demonstrated that the retention of C. Parvum in soils may be influenced by chemical conditions and soils characteristics, which are important for groundwater risk assessment. PMID:24359923

  19. Influence of cellulose nanocrystals concentration and ionic strength on the elaboration of cellulose nanocrystals-xyloglucan multilayered thin films.

    PubMed

    Dammak, Abir; Moreau, Céline; Azzam, Firas; Jean, Bruno; Cousin, Fabrice; Cathala, Bernard

    2015-12-15

    The effect of the variation of CNC concentration on the growth pattern of CNC-XG films is investigated. We found that a transition in the growth slope occurs at a CNC concentration of roughly 3-4gL(-1). A close effect can be obtained by the increase of the ionic strength of the CNC suspensions, suggesting that electrostatic interactions are involved. Static light scattering investigation of CNC dispersions at increasing concentrations demonstrated that the particle-particle interactions change as the CNC concentration increases. Neutron Reflectivity (NR) was used to probe the internal structure of the films. The increase of the CNC concentration as well as the increase of the ionic strength in the CNC suspension were found to induce a densification of the adsorbed CNC layers, even though the mechanisms are not strictly identical in both cases. Small changes in these parameters provide a straightforward way of controlling the architecture of CNC-based multilayered thin films and, as a result, their functional properties. PMID:26322493

  20. Dispersion and stability of bare hematite nanoparticles: effect of dispersion tools, nanoparticle concentration, humic acid and ionic strength

    PubMed Central

    Dickson, Dionne; Liu, Guangliang; Li, Chenzhong; Tachiev, Georgio; Cai, Yong

    2012-01-01

    The aggregation and sedimentation of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) can significantly affect the mobility and reactivity of IONPs and subsequently influence the interaction between IONPs and environmental contaminants. Dispersing bare IONPs into a stable suspension within nanoscale range is an important step for studying the interaction of IONPs with contaminants (e.g., toxic metals). In this study, different techniques to disperse bare IONPs (vortex, bath sonication and probe ultrasonication) and the effects of important environmental factors such as dissolved organic matter and ionic strength on the stability of IONPs dispersions were investigated. Vortex minimally dispersed IONPs with hydrodynamic diameter outside the “nanosize range” (698–2400nm). Similar to vortex, bath sonication could not disperse IONPs efficiently. Probe ultrasonication was more effective at dispersing IONPs (50% or more) with hydrodynamic diameters ranging from 120–140 nm with minimal changes in size and sedimentation of IONPs for a prolonged period of time. Over the course of 168 hours, considerable amounts of IONPs remained dispersed in the presence and absence of low ionic strength (0.1 mM of NaCl) and 100 mg/L of humic acid (HA). These results indicate that IONPs can be broken down efficiently into “nanosize range” by probe ultrasonication and a degree of stability can be achieved without the use of synthetic modifiers to enhance colloidal stability. This dispersion tool could be used to develop a laboratory method to study the adsorption mechanism between dispersed bare IONPs and toxic contaminants. PMID:22289174

  1. Stability constants for the formation of rare earth-inorganic complexes as a function of ionic strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millero, Frank J.

    1992-08-01

    Recent studies have been made on the distribution of the rare earths (La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Pm, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu) in natural waters relative to their concentration in shales. These metals have also been used as models for the behavior of the trivalent actinides. The speciation of the rare earths in natural waters is modelled by using ionic interaction models which require reliable stability constants. In this paper the stability constants for the formation of lanthanide complexes ( k mx∗) with Cl -, NO 3-, SO 42-, OH -, HCO 3-, H 2PO 4-, HPO 42-, and CO 32- determined in NaClO 44 at various ionic strengths have been extrapolated to infinite dilution using the Pitzer interaction model. The activity coefficients for free ions ( γM, γx) needed for this extrapolation have been estimated from the Pitzer equations. The thermodynamic stability constants ( KMX) and activity coefficients of the various ion pairs ( γMX) were determined from In ( solK MX∗/γ Mγ x) = In K mx+ In (γ MX). The activity coefficients of the ion pairs have been used to determine Pitzer parameters ( BMX) for the rare earth complexes. The values of BMX were found to be the same for complexes of the same charge. These results make it possible to estimate the stability constants for the formation of rare earth complexes over a wide range of ionic strengths. The stability constants have been used to determine the speciation of the lanthanides in seawater and in brines. The carbonate complexes dominate for all natural waters where the carbonate alkalinity is greater than 0.001 eq/L at a pH near 8.

  2. Deciphering the energetic barriers to calcium carbonate nucleation as a continuum of competing interfacial forces between polysaccharide chemistry and ionic strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuffre, A. J.; De Yoreo, J. J.; Dove, P. M.

    2013-12-01

    Calcified skeletons are produced within complex assemblages of proteins and polysaccharides whose roles in mineralization are not well understood. Researchers have long-postulated that living organisms utilize organic matrices to actively guide the formation and growth of crystalline structures. The timing and placement of these features are most easily controlled during the nucleation stage. Our recent kinetic study of heterogeneous calcite nucleation found the energy barrier to formation is regulated by a systematic relationship to the competing interfacial energies between the substrate, crystal, and liquid (Giuffre et al., 2013). Chitosan presents a low energy barrier to nucleation because its near-neutral charge favors formation of a substrate-crystal interface, thus reducing substrate interactions with water. Progressively higher barriers are measured for negatively charged alginates and heparin that favor contact with the solution over the formation of new substrate-crystal interfaces. These results showed calcite nucleation is regulated by substrate-crystal interactions but could not quantify the larger continuum of competing forces that must regulate calcite nucleation. To determine these relationships, we estimate the energy barriers to nucleation and crystal-liquid interfacial energies by measuring the kinetics of homogeneous calcite nucleation in NaCl solutions at ionic strengths that extend to seawater salinity (0.6 M). The data show that solutions of greater ionic strength produce faster nucleation rates, smaller crystal-liquid interfacial energies, and lower barriers to nucleation, which concurs with recent theoretical and experimental findings that background electrolytes promote ion desolvation during nucleation. By applying this relationship to heterogeneous nucleation on chitosan and heparin in future work, we will quantify the relative contributions of substrate-crystal-liquid interfacial energies. The findings reiterate a directing role for PS

  3. London-van der Waals and EDL effects in the coalescence of oil drops. 2: Ionic strength and pH effects

    SciTech Connect

    Deshiikan, S.R.; Papadopoulous, K.D.

    1995-09-15

    Coalescence of n-hexadecane oil drops (70--100 {micro}m in diameter) suspended inside an aqueous medium of varying pH and ionic strength is reported. The drops were produced in situ by micropipettes inside aqueous-phase-filled fine capillaries (100--160 {micro}m, i.d.) At constant pH values of 5.7 and 10.9 the ionic strength of the aqueous medium was changed with KCl so that the Debye length ({kappa}{sup {minus}1}) varied between 1.6 to 362 nm and 0.36 to 14 nm, respectively. Visual observations showed coalescence when {kappa}{sup {minus}1} was less than {approximately} 5.0 nm. The DLVO theory together with previously reported measurements of critical thickness of rupture of aqueous thin films also predicts coalescence under these conditions.The effect of change in pH at constant ionic strength ({kappa}{sup {minus}1} = 5.0 nm) was also studied. While theory predicts coalescence at all pH values with constant {kappa}{sup {minus}1}, coalescence time increases with pH. At similar conditions of high ionic strength, the coalescence times at very low pH are lower than at intermediate pH by two orders of magnitude, suggesting that pH is more important than ionic strength in controlling the coalescence of the oil drops.

  4. Mechanisms of Pathogen and Surrogate Transport in Porous Media: Concurrent Effects of Grain Characteristics, NOM and Ionic Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emelko, M. B.; Stimson, J.; McLellan, N.; Tufenkji, N.

    2009-05-01

    It is widely accepted that riverbank filtration (RBF) can provide substantial reductions in the concentrations of both microbial and chemical contaminants while providing more consistent water quality to subsequent treatment processes. Factors such as experimental scale, subsurface heterogeneity, and variable flow paths and fluxes have made it difficult to relate laboratory outcomes to field performance. Field studies have been plagued with inadequate consideration of ground water flow, reliance on unproven "surrogate" parameters, non-detects at the extraction well, and limited sampling. As a result, a treatment-technique type of approach has been utilized to describe subsurface and operational conditions that result in effective RBF. While it is generally understood that parameters such as ionic strength, the presence of natural organic matter (NOM), and media size and shape characteristics affect pathogen transport in porous media, one major limiting factor in the development of regulatory credits and predictive models is the lack of understanding of the concurrent effects of such parameters. To provide guidance for assessing the efficacy of RBF processes, the present investigation is focused on evaluating the concurrent effects of these parameters on pathogen transport in RBF environments. This work details the complete outcomes of a factorial experimental investigation of the concurrent impacts of the four parameters: ionic strength, NOM concentration, grain size, and uniformity coefficient on pathogen and surrogate transport in porous media. Duplicate column studies have been conducted to evaluate the transport of Cryptosporidium oocysts and Salmonella typhimurium bacteria in saturated sandy environments; PR772 bacteriophage, and 4.5 μm and 1.5 μm microspheres are also being used as surrogates for pathogen transport. The strain of Salmonella was selected due to the direct link to human illness in the Grand River watershed. Preliminary results indicate that

  5. Kinetics of gypsum crystal growth from high ionic strength solutions: A case study of Dead Sea - seawater mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reznik, Itay J.; Gavrieli, Ittai; Antler, Gilad; Ganor, Jiwchar

    2011-04-01

    Gypsum precipitation kinetics were examined from a wide range of chemical compositions (11ionic strengths (4.75-10 m) and saturation state with respect to gypsum (1.16-1.74) in seeded batch experiments of mixtures of Ca 2+-rich Dead Sea brine and SO42--rich seawater. Despite the variability in the experimental solutions, a single general rate law was formulated to describe the heterogeneous precipitation rate of gypsum from these mixtures: Ratehet=k1·(Ω0.5-1)10+k2·(Ω0.5-1)2mol ms, where k1 and k2 are heterogeneous rate coefficients (mol s -1 m -2) that vary as a function of the solution compositions, and is the saturation state with respect to gypsum. It is suggested that two parallel mechanisms control the heterogeneous precipitation rate. Under closer-to-equilibrium conditions, the reaction is dominated by a mechanism best described as a 2nd order reaction with respect to Ω0.5 - 1, which fits to the predictions of both the Burton Cabrera and Frank (BCF) crystal growth theory ( Burton et al., 1951) and other layer-by-layer growth mechanisms ( Goto and Ridge, 1967; Van Rosmalen et al., 1981; Bosbach and Rammensee, 1994). Under further-away-from-equilibrium conditions, the reaction is dominated by an apparent 10th order reaction. A conceptual model for gypsum growth kinetics is presented. The model is based on the 2nd order kinetic coefficients determined in the present study and data from the literature and is valid under a wide range of ionic strengths and Ca/SO42- ratios. According to this model, the integration of SO42- to kinks on the surface of the growing crystals is the rate-limiting step in the precipitation reaction. At ionic strengths above 8.5 m the precipitation rate of gypsum is enhanced, possibly due to the formation of CaSO4° ion pairs and/or a decrease in hydration frequencies.

  6. The Effect of Ionic Strength and Specific Anions on Substrate Binding and Hydrolytic Activities of Na,K-ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Nørby, Jens G.; Esmann, Mikael

    1997-01-01

    The physiological ligands for Na,K-ATPase (the Na,K-pump) are ions, and electrostatic forces, that could be revealed by their ionic strength dependence, are therefore expected to be important for their reaction with the enzyme. We found that the affinities for ADP3−, eosin2−, p-nitrophenylphosphate, and Vmax for Na,K-ATPase and K+-activated p-nitrophenylphosphatase activity, were all decreased by increasing salt concentration and by specific anions. Equilibrium binding of ADP was measured at 0–0.5 M of NaCl, Na2SO4, and NaNO3 and in 0.1 M Na-acetate, NaSCN, and NaClO4. The apparent affinity for ADP decreased up to 30 times. At equal ionic strength, I, the ranking of the salt effect was NaCl ≈ Na2SO4 ≈ Na-acetate < NaNO3 < NaSCN < NaClO4. We treated the influence of NaCl and Na2SO4 on Kdiss for E·ADP as a “pure” ionic strength effect. It is quantitatively simulated by a model where the binding site and ADP are point charges, and where their activity coefficients are related to I by the limiting law of Debye and Hückel. The estimated net charge at the binding site of the enzyme was about +1. Eosin binding followed the same model. The NO3− effect was compatible with competitive binding of NO3− and ADP in addition to the general I-effect. Kdiss for E·NO3 was ∼32 mM. Analysis of Vmax/Km for Na,K-ATPase and K+-p-nitrophenylphosphatase activity shows that electrostatic forces are important for the binding of p-nitrophenylphosphate but not for the catalytic effect of ATP on the low affinity site. The net charge at the p-nitrophenylphosphate-binding site was also about +1. The results reported here indicate that the reversible interactions between ions and Na,K-ATPase can be grouped according to either simple Debye-Hückel behavior or to specific anion or cation interactions with the enzyme. PMID:9154904

  7. Refinement of current monitoring methodology for electroosmotic flow assessment under low ionic strength conditions.

    PubMed

    Saucedo-Espinosa, Mario A; Lapizco-Encinas, Blanca H

    2016-05-01

    Current monitoring is a well-established technique for the characterization of electroosmotic (EO) flow in microfluidic devices. This method relies on monitoring the time response of the electric current when a test buffer solution is displaced by an auxiliary solution using EO flow. In this scheme, each solution has a different ionic concentration (and electric conductivity). The difference in the ionic concentration of the two solutions defines the dynamic time response of the electric current and, hence, the current signal to be measured: larger concentration differences result in larger measurable signals. A small concentration difference is needed, however, to avoid dispersion at the interface between the two solutions, which can result in undesired pressure-driven flow that conflicts with the EO flow. Additional challenges arise as the conductivity of the test solution decreases, leading to a reduced electric current signal that may be masked by noise during the measuring process, making for a difficult estimation of an accurate EO mobility. This contribution presents a new scheme for current monitoring that employs multiple channels arranged in parallel, producing an increase in the signal-to-noise ratio of the electric current to be measured and increasing the estimation accuracy. The use of this parallel approach is particularly useful in the estimation of the EO mobility in systems where low conductivity mediums are required, such as insulator based dielectrophoresis devices. PMID:27375813

  8. Sorption mechanisms of Sr and Pb on zeolitized tuffs from the Nevada test site as a function of pH and ionic strength

    SciTech Connect

    Um, Wooyong; Papelis, Charalambos

    2003-11-01

    The sorption of divalent strontium, Sr{sup 2+}, and divalent lead, Pb{sup 2+}, on zeolitized tuffs from the Nevada Test Site (NTS) was investigated using macroscopic batch sorption experiments and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) as a function of geochemical parameters, including pH, ionic strength, and type of background electrolyte. The sorption of Sr{sup 2+} is dependent on the ionic strength of the medium and independent of pH, suggesting that Sr{sup 2+} sorption is controlled by ion exchange at permanent charge sites. At higher ionic strengths, background electrolyte cations compete effectively with Sr{sup 2+} for cation exchange sites and Sr{sup 2+} sorption is suppressed. At the two lower ionic strengths (0.01 and 0.1 M), Pb{sup 2+} sorption is also consistent with adsorption by cation exchange. At the highest ionic strength (1.0 M), however, exclusion of Pb{sup 2+} from cation exchange sites resulted in pH dependent adsorption, consistent with sorption on amphoteric surface hydroxyl sites or formation of surface precipitates. XAS was used to test these hypotheses. Based on XAS data, Sr{sup 2+} formed hydrated surface complexes coordinated with approximately eight oxygen atoms at an average distance of 2.60 ({+-}0.02) {angstrom}, regardless of conditions, consistent with the formation of mononuclear, outer-sphere surface complexes at the Ca2 site in the B channel of clinoptilolite. The coordination environment of sorbed Pb{sup 2+} was more complex and a function of pH and ionic strength. The first shell consisted of two to three oxygen atoms at an average distance of 2.20 ({+-}0.02) {angstrom}. At low pH and ionic strength, XAS data were consistent with Pb{sup 2+} adsorption at the Na1 and Ca2 cation exchange sites in channels A and B of clinoptilolite, respectively. At the highest ionic strength (1.0 M) and low pH, XAS provides evidence for formation of Pb{sup 2+} monodentate, corner-sharing inner-sphere complexes, while at higher pH, XAS analysis is

  9. Influence of ionic strength on the time course of force development and phosphate release by dogfish muscle fibres.

    PubMed

    West, Timothy G; Ferenczi, Michael A; Woledge, Roger C; Curtin, N A

    2005-09-15

    We measured the effects of ionic strength (IS), 200 (standard) and 400 mmol l(-1) (high), on force and ATP hydrolysis during isometric contractions of permeabilized white fibres from dogfish myotomal muscle at their physiological temperature, 12 degrees C. One goal was to test the validity of our kinetic scheme that accounts for energy release, work production and ATP hydrolysis. Fibres were activated by flash photolysis of the P(3)-1-(2 nitrophenyl) ethyl ester of ATP (NPE-caged ATP), and time-resolved phosphate (P(i)) release was detected with the fluorescent protein MDCC-PBP, N-(2[1-maleimidyl]ethyl)-7-diethylamino-coumarin-3-carboxamide phosphate binding protein. High IS slowed the transition from rest to contraction, but as the fibres approached the isometric force plateau they showed little IS sensitivity. By 0.5 s of contraction, the force and the rate of P(i) release at standard and high IS values were not significantly different. A five-step reaction mechanism was used to account for the observed time courses of force and P(i) release in all conditions explored here. Only the rate constants for reactions of ATP, ADP and P(i) with the contractile proteins varied with IS, thus suggesting that the actin-myosin interactions are largely non-ionic. Our reaction scheme also fits previous results for intact fibres. PMID:16037082

  10. A cytochrome c peroxidase from Pseudomonas nautica 617 active at high ionic strength: expression, purification and characterization.

    PubMed

    Alves, T; Besson, S; Duarte, L C; Pettigrew, G W; Girio, F M; Devreese, B; Vandenberghe, I; Van Beeumen, J; Fauque, G; Moura, I

    1999-10-12

    Cytochrome c peroxidase was expressed in cells of Pseudomonas nautica strain 617 grown under microaerophilic conditions. The 36.5 kDa dihaemic enzyme was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity in three chromatographic steps. N-terminal sequence comparison showed that the Ps. nautica enzyme exhibits a high similarity with the corresponding proteins from Paracoccus denitrificans and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. UV-visible spectra confirm calcium activation of the enzyme through spin state transition of the peroxidatic haem. Monohaemic cytochrome c(552) from Ps. nautica was identified as the physiological electron donor, with a half-saturating concentration of 122 microM and allowing a maximal catalytic centre activity of 116,000 min(-1). Using this cytochrome the enzyme retained the same activity even at high ionic strength. There are indications that the interactions between the two redox partners are mainly hydrophobic in nature. PMID:10525144

  11. Respiratory complexes III and IV can each bind two molecules of cytochrome c at low ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Beltrán, Blas; Díaz-Moreno, Irene; González-Arzola, Katiuska; Guerra-Castellano, Alejandra; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; De la Rosa, Miguel A; Díaz-Quintana, Antonio

    2015-02-13

    The transient interactions of respiratory cytochrome c with complexes III and IV is herein investigated by using heterologous proteins, namely human cytochrome c, the soluble domain of plant cytochrome c1 and bovine cytochrome c oxidase. The binding molecular mechanisms of the resulting cross-complexes have been analyzed by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Isothermal Titration Calorimetry. Our data reveal that the two cytochrome c-involving adducts possess a 2:1 stoichiometry - that is, two cytochrome c molecules per adduct - at low ionic strength. We conclude that such extra binding sites at the surfaces of complexes III and IV can facilitate the turnover and sliding of cytochrome c molecules and, therefore, the electron transfer within respiratory supercomplexes. PMID:25595453

  12. Effect of carboxymethyl cellulose and ionic strength on stability of mineral suspensions in potash ore flotation systems.

    PubMed

    Pawlik, M; Laskowski, J S; Ansari, A

    2003-04-15

    The adsorption of sodium carboxymethyl cellulose from aqueous solutions varying in ionic strength from that of distilled water to 50% NaCl/KCl brine (about 3.5 mol/dm(3)) onto illite and dolomite has been studied. The purpose of this work was to investigate the solvency effects in the phenomena underlying the potash flotation process that is carried out in saturated brine. Based on viscosity measurements, the adsorption results were analyzed in terms of a simple model of polymer macromolecules in solution. Suspension stability measurements carried out concomitantly with adsorption tests showed the ranges of carboxymethyl cellulose concentration over which the tested suspensions either were aggregated or were restabilized. PMID:12686172

  13. A study of the corrosion products of mild steel in high ionic strength brines.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z; Moore, R C; Felmy, A R; Mason, M J; Kukkadapu, R K

    2001-01-01

    The corrosion layer on steel surfaces that formed after exposure to waste isolation pilot plant (WIPP) brines under anoxic conditions was characterized for chemical composition, thickness and phase composition. The chemical composition of the corrosion layer was determined both by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and by chemical analysis of acid solutions used to remove the corrosion layer. Atomic force microscopic (AFM) images indicated that the brine-corroded surface layer shows extensive granulation along the contours of the steel surface that is characteristic of sharp polishing marks. The corrosion layer seemed to be porous and could be dissolved and detached in dilute hydrochloric acid. The corrosion layer appears to be composed of iron oxides with some ionic substitutions from the brines. The 77 K Mössbauer spectrum recorded for iron powder leached under similar conditions indicated the corrosion layer was comprised principally of green rust. PMID:11300533

  14. Synaptotagmin-1 binds to PIP2-containing membrane but not to SNAREs at physiological ionic strength

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yongsoo; Seo, Jong Bae; Fraind, Alicia; Pérez-Lara, Angel; Yavuz, Halenur; Han, Kyungreem; Jung, Seung-Ryoung; Kattan, Iman; Walla, Peter Jomo; Choi, MooYoung; Cafiso, David S.; Koh, Duk-Su; Jahn, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Ca2+-sensor synaptotagmin-1 is thought to trigger membrane fusion by binding to acidic membrane lipids and SNARE proteins. Previous work has shown that binding is mediated by electrostatic interactions that are sensitive to the ionic environment. However, the influence of divalent or polyvalent ions, at physiological concentrations, on synaptotagmin binding to membranes or SNAREs has not been explored. Here we show that binding of rat synaptotagmin-1 to membranes containing PIP2 is regulated by charge shielding caused by the presence of divalent cations. Surprisingly, polyvalent ions such as ATP and Mg2+ completely abrogate synaptotagmin-1 binding to SNAREs regardless of whether Ca2+ is present or not. Altogether, our data suggest that at physiological ion concentrations Ca2+-dependent synaptotagmin-1 binding is confined to PIP2-containing membrane patches in the plasma membrane, suggesting that membrane interaction of synaptotagmin-1 rather than SNARE binding triggers exocytosis of vesicles. PMID:26389740

  15. A cation exchange model to describe Cs+ sorption at high ionic strength in subsurface sediments at Hanford site, USA.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chongxuan; Zachara, John M; Smith, Steve C

    2004-02-01

    A theoretical and experimental study of cation exchange in high ionic strength electrolytes was performed using pristine subsurface sediments from the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford site. These sediments are representative of the site contaminated sediments impacted by release of high level waste (HLW) solutions containing 137Cs+ in NaNO3 brine. The binary exchange behavior of Cs+-Na+, Cs+-K+, and Na+-K+ was measured over a range in electrolyte concentration. Vanselow selectivity coefficients (Kv) that were calculated from the experimental data using Pitzer model ion activity corrections for aqueous species showed monotonic increases with increasing electrolyte concentrations. The influence of electrolyte concentration was greater on the exchange of Na+-Cs+ than K+-Cs+, an observation consistent with the differences in ion hydration energy of the exchanging cations. A previously developed two-site ion exchange model [Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta 66 (2002) 193] was modified to include solvent (water) activity changes in the exchanger phase through application of the Gibbs-Duhem equation. This water activity-corrected model well described the ionic strength effect on binary Cs+ exchange, and was extended to the ternary exchange system of Cs+-Na+-K+ on the pristine sediment. The model was also used to predict 137Cs+ distribution between sediment and aqueous phase (Kd) beneath a leaked HLW tank in Hanfordd's S-SX tank using the analytical aqueous data from the field and the binary ion exchange coefficients for the pristine sediment. The Kd predictions closely followed the trend in the field data and were improved by consideration of water activity effects that were considerable in certain regions of the vadose zone plume. PMID:14734247

  16. A cation exchange model to describe Cs + sorption at high ionic strength in subsurface sediments at Hanford site, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chongxuan; Zachara, John M.; Smith, Steve C.

    2004-02-01

    A theoretical and experimental study of cation exchange in high ionic strength electrolytes was performed using pristine subsurface sediments from the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford site. These sediments are representative of the site contaminated sediments impacted by release of high level waste (HLW) solutions containing 137Cs + in NaNO 3 brine. The binary exchange behavior of Cs +-Na +, Cs +-K +, and Na +-K + was measured over a range in electrolyte concentration. Vanselow selectivity coefficients ( Kv) that were calculated from the experimental data using Pitzer model ion activity corrections for aqueous species showed monotonic increases with increasing electrolyte concentrations. The influence of electrolyte concentration was greater on the exchange of Na +-Cs + than K +-Cs +, an observation consistent with the differences in ion hydration energy of the exchanging cations. A previously developed two-site ion exchange model [Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta 66 (2002) 193] was modified to include solvent (water) activity changes in the exchanger phase through application of the Gibbs-Duhem equation. This water activity-corrected model well described the ionic strength effect on binary Cs + exchange, and was extended to the ternary exchange system of Cs +-Na +-K + on the pristine sediment. The model was also used to predict 137Cs + distribution between sediment and aqueous phase ( Kd) beneath a leaked HLW tank in Hanfordd's S-SX tank using the analytical aqueous data from the field and the binary ion exchange coefficients for the pristine sediment. The Kd predictions closely followed the trend in the field data and were improved by consideration of water activity effects that were considerable in certain regions of the vadose zone plume.

  17. Evaluating the Effect of Ionic Strength on Duplex Stability for PNA Having Negatively or Positively Charged Side Chains

    PubMed Central

    De Costa, N. Tilani S.; Heemstra, Jennifer M.

    2013-01-01

    The enhanced thermodynamic stability of PNA:DNA and PNA:RNA duplexes compared with DNA:DNA and DNA:RNA duplexes has been attributed in part to the lack of electrostatic repulsion between the uncharged PNA backbone and negatively charged DNA or RNA backbone. However, there are no previously reported studies that systematically evaluate the effect of ionic strength on duplex stability for PNA having a charged backbone. Here we investigate the role of charge repulsion in PNA binding by synthesizing PNA strands having negatively or positively charged side chains, then measuring their duplex stability with DNA or RNA at varying salt concentrations. At low salt concentrations, positively charged PNA binds more strongly to DNA and RNA than does negatively charged PNA. However, at medium to high salt concentrations, this trend is reversed, and negatively charged PNA shows higher affinity for DNA and RNA than does positively charged PNA. These results show that charge screening by counterions in solution enables negatively charged side chains to be incorporated into the PNA backbone without reducing duplex stability with DNA and RNA. This research provides new insight into the role of electrostatics in PNA binding, and demonstrates that introduction of negatively charged side chains is not significantly detrimental to PNA binding affinity at physiological ionic strength. The ability to incorporate negative charge without sacrificing binding affinity is anticipated to enable the development of PNA therapeutics that take advantage of both the inherent benefits of PNA and the multitude of charge-based delivery technologies currently being developed for DNA and RNA. PMID:23484047

  18. Evaluating the effect of ionic strength on duplex stability for PNA having negatively or positively charged side chains.

    PubMed

    De Costa, N Tilani S; Heemstra, Jennifer M

    2013-01-01

    The enhanced thermodynamic stability of PNA:DNA and PNA:RNA duplexes compared with DNA:DNA and DNA:RNA duplexes has been attributed in part to the lack of electrostatic repulsion between the uncharged PNA backbone and negatively charged DNA or RNA backbone. However, there are no previously reported studies that systematically evaluate the effect of ionic strength on duplex stability for PNA having a charged backbone. Here we investigate the role of charge repulsion in PNA binding by synthesizing PNA strands having negatively or positively charged side chains, then measuring their duplex stability with DNA or RNA at varying salt concentrations. At low salt concentrations, positively charged PNA binds more strongly to DNA and RNA than does negatively charged PNA. However, at medium to high salt concentrations, this trend is reversed, and negatively charged PNA shows higher affinity for DNA and RNA than does positively charged PNA. These results show that charge screening by counterions in solution enables negatively charged side chains to be incorporated into the PNA backbone without reducing duplex stability with DNA and RNA. This research provides new insight into the role of electrostatics in PNA binding, and demonstrates that introduction of negatively charged side chains is not significantly detrimental to PNA binding affinity at physiological ionic strength. The ability to incorporate negative charge without sacrificing binding affinity is anticipated to enable the development of PNA therapeutics that take advantage of both the inherent benefits of PNA and the multitude of charge-based delivery technologies currently being developed for DNA and RNA. PMID:23484047

  19. Stability and mobility of cerium oxide nanoparticles in soils: effects of humic substances, pH and ionic strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yirui; Mu, Linlin; Li, Chunyan; Bai, Lingyun; Jacobson, Astrid; Darnault, Christophe

    2015-04-01

    Among the large number of types of nanomaterials used in the field of nanotechnology, cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO2 NPs) are among the top five most commonly utilized by industry, agriculture and nanomedicine for their unique physico-chemical properties. They are used, for example, in the production of catalysts, as fuel additives, and as polishing agents. Therefore, the release and encounter of CeO2 NPs in the environment following their application, waste disposal, life-cycle and accidents is inevitable. It is critical to examine the behavior of CeO2 NPs released in the environment to assess the risk they pose to the environmental and public health. In particular, little is known about the fate and transport of CeO2 NPs in soils and groundwater. To assess the behavior of CeO2 NPs, it is important to investigate the factors that affect their stability and mobility. Humic substances are a major component of soils and have been shown to have the potential to impact the transport and retention of nanoparticles in soils. Consequently, our study characterizes the impacts of humic and fulvic acids on the stability and mobility of cerium oxides in model porous media under various pH and ionic strength conditions. Batch experiments conducted at various concentrations of humic and fulvic acids coupled with a wide range of pHs and ionic strengths were investigated. Selected parameters from these batch studies were then used as experimental conditions representative of environmental systems to perform column transport experiments to assess of the mobility of CeO2 NPs in saturated porous media, which is the first step in simulating their behavior in soil and groundwater systems.

  20. Modeling of the impact of ionic strength on the electroosmotic flow in capillary electrophoresis with uniform and discontinuous buffer systems.

    PubMed

    Thormann, W; Zhang, C X; Caslavska, J; Gebauer, P; Mosher, R A

    1998-02-01

    A new dynamic computer model permitting the combined simulation of the temporal behavior of electroosmosis and electrophoresis under constant voltage or current conditions and in a capillary which exhibits a pH-dependent surface charge has been constructed and applied to the description of capillary zone electrophoresis, isotachophoresis, and isoelectric focusing with electroosmotic zone displacement. Electroosmosis is calculated via use of a normalized wall titration curve (mobility vs pH). Two approaches employed for normalization of the experimentally determined wall titration data are discussed, one that considers the electroosmotic mobility to be inversely proportional to the square root of the ionic strength (method based on the Gouy-Chapman theory with the counterion layer thickness being equal to the Debye-Hückel length) and one that assumes the double-layer thickness to be the sum of a compact layer of fixed charges and the Debye-Hückel thickness and the existence of a wall adsorption equilibrium of the buffer cation other than the proton (method described by Salomon, K.; et al. J. Chromatogr. 1991, 559, 69). The first approach is shown to overestimate the magnitude of electroosmosis, whereas, with the more complex dependence between the electroosmotic mobility and ionic strength, qualitative agreement between experimental and simulation data is obtained. Using one set of electroosmosis input data, the new model is shown to provide detailed insight into the dynamics of electroosmosis in typical discontinuous buffer systems employed in capillary zone electrophoresis (in which the sample matrix provides the discontinuity), in capillary isotachophoresis, and in capillary isoelectric focusing. PMID:21644753

  1. MRS thermometry calibration at 3 T: effects of protein, ionic concentration and magnetic field strength.

    PubMed

    Babourina-Brooks, Ben; Simpson, Robert; Arvanitis, Theodoros N; Machin, Graham; Peet, Andrew C; Davies, Nigel P

    2015-07-01

    MRS thermometry has been utilized to measure temperature changes in the brain, which may aid in the diagnosis of brain trauma and tumours. However, the temperature calibration of the technique has been shown to be sensitive to non-temperature-based factors, which may provide unique information on the tissue microenvironment if the mechanisms can be further understood. The focus of this study was to investigate the effects of varied protein content on the calibration of MRS thermometry at 3 T, which has not been thoroughly explored in the literature. The effects of ionic concentration and magnetic field strength were also considered. Temperature reference materials were controlled by water circulation and freezing organic fixed-point compounds (diphenyl ether and ethylene carbonate) stable to within 0.2 °C. The temperature was measured throughout the scan time with a fluoro-optic probe, with an uncertainty of 0.16 °C. The probe was calibrated at the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) with traceability to the International Temperature Scale 1990 (ITS-90). MRS thermometry measures were based on single-voxel spectroscopy chemical shift differences between water and N-acetylaspartate (NAA), Δ(H20-NAA), using a Philips Achieva 3 T scanner. Six different phantom solutions with varying protein or ionic concentration, simulating potential tissue differences, were investigated within a temperature range of 21-42 °C. Results were compared with a similar study performed at 1.5 T to observe the effect of field strengths. Temperature calibration curves were plotted to convert Δ(H20-NAA) to apparent temperature. The apparent temperature changed by -0.2 °C/% of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and a trend of 0.5 °C/50 mM ionic concentration was observed. Differences in the calibration coefficients for the 10% BSA solution were seen in this study at 3 T compared with a study at 1.5 T. MRS thermometry may be utilized to measure temperature and the tissue

  2. Ultrafiltration by a compacted clay membrane-II. Sodium ion exclusion at various ionic strengths

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanshaw, B.B.; Coplen, T.B.

    1973-01-01

    Several recent laboratory studies and field investigations have indicated that shales and compacted clay minerals behave as semipermeable membranes. One of the properties of semipermeable membranes is to retard or prevent the passage of charged ionic species through the membrane pores while allowing relatively free movement of uncharged species. This phenomenon is termed salt filtering, reverse osmosis, or ultrafiltration. This paper shows how one can proceed from the ion exchange capacity of clay minerals and, by means of Donnan membrane equilibrium concept and the Teorell-Meyer-Siever theory, develop a theory to explain why and to what extent ultrafiltration occurs when solutions of known concentration are forced to flow through a clay membrane. Reasonable agreement between theory and laboratory results were found. The concentration of the ultrafiltrate was always greater than predicted because of uncertainty in values of some parameters in the equations. Ultrafiltration phenomena may be responsible for the formation of some subsurface brines and mineral deposits. The effect should also be taken into consideration in any proposal for subsurface waste emplacement in an environment containing large quantities of clay minerals. ?? 1973.

  3. A Simplified Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment to Evaluate the Effect of the Ionic Strength on the Equilibrium Concentration Quotient of the Bromcresol Green Dye

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Hernan B.; Mirenda, Martin

    2012-01-01

    A modified laboratory experiment for undergraduate students is presented to evaluate the effects of the ionic strength, "I", on the equilibrium concentration quotient, K[subscript c], of the acid-base indicator bromcresol green (BCG). The two-step deprotonation of the acidic form of the dye (sultone form), as it is dissolved in water, yields…

  4. Transport and Retention of TiO2 Rutile Nanoparticles in Saturated Porous Media: Influence of Solution pH, Ionic Strength, and the Presence of Humic Acid

    EPA Science Inventory

    The influence of solution pH, ionic strength, and varying concentrations of the Suwannee River Humic Acid (SRHA) on the transport of titanium dioxide (TiO2, rutile) nanoparticle aggregates (nTiO2) in saturated porous media was investigated through systematically examining the tra...

  5. Impact of Environmental Conditions (pH, Ionic Strength, And Electrolyte Type) On The Surface Charge And Aggregation Of Silver Nanoparticles Suspensions

    EPA Science Inventory

    The impact of capping agents and environmental conditions (pH, ionic strength, and background electrolytes) on surface charge and aggregation potential of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) suspensions were investigated. Capping agents are chemicals used in the synthesis of nanopartic...

  6. Adsorption of a Textile Dye on Commercial Activated Carbon: A Simple Experiment to Explore the Role of Surface Chemistry and Ionic Strength

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martins, Angela; Nunes, Nelson

    2015-01-01

    In this study, an adsorption experiment is proposed using commercial activated carbon as adsorbent and a textile azo dye, Mordant Blue-9, as adsorbate. The surface chemistry of the activated carbon is changed through a simple oxidation treatment and the ionic strength of the dye solution is also modified, simulating distinct conditions of water…

  7. Sorption/desorption behavior of triclosan in sediment-water-rhamnolipid systems: Effects of pH, ionic strength, and DOM.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wenjin; Hu, Yongyou; Guo, Qian; Yan, Jia; Chen, Yuancai; Cheng, Jianhua

    2015-10-30

    Effects of pH, ionic strength and DOM on the sorption and desorption of triclosan (TCS) in sediment-water-rhamnolipid systems were systematically investigated through controlled batch experiments. Results showed that solubilization enhancement of TCS by rhamnolipid was higher in acid pH range than in alkaline pH range and was the highest at the ionic strength of 5×10(-2) M. Sorption of rhamnolipid onto sediment decreased with the increase of pH while the result was contrary to ionic strength. Moreover, the apparent distribution coefficients of TCS (Kd(*)) decreased from 73.35 to 32.30 L/kg with an increase of solution pH, as varying pH had significant influence on sorption of RL onto sediment and degree of ionization of TCS. Rhamnolipid presented the largest distribution capacity of TCS into the aqueous phase at moderate ionic strength (5×10(-2) M) with the Kd(*) of 17.26 L/kg. Further results also indicated that the presence of humic acid in aqueous phase could increase the desorption of TCS from contaminated sediment. The desorption enhancement was much higher in the system containing both rhamnolipid and DOM than in the single system. These findings provide meaningful information for enhanced migration of TCS from sediment to water by rhamnolipid. PMID:25938643

  8. Effects of High-pH and High-Ionic-Strength Groundwater on Iodide, Pertechnetate, and Selenate Sorption to Hanford Sediments: Final Report for Subtask 3a

    SciTech Connect

    DI Kaplan; KE Parker; RD Orr

    1998-10-14

    As part of the Immobilized Low-Activity Waste-Performance Assessment three experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of the expected near-field chemistry on the sorption of iodide, selenate, and pertechnetate onto a sediment obtained from the Hanford Site. These experiments were performed in fiscal year 1998 at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.' During these experiments, attention was directed at the identification of the chemical mechanisms controlling the sorption processes to provide technical defensibility for the selection of the distribution coefficients (IQ to be used in the remainder of the performance assessment. It was found, during the conduct of the experiments, that selenium and technetium I&s increased as ionic strength increased. The cause for this is most likely to be that the higher ionic strength caused the double layer around the particles to decrease, thereby permitting greater interaction with the mineral surfaces. Further, the pH level had an effect on the sorption of these anions. These are the first-ever experiments conducted with Hanford Site sediment in which the IQ were measured as a function of ionic strength and pH. Overall, the observed trends were consistent with more generalized geochemical principles. One of the most important contributions of these experiments was that they quantified the & changes induced by variations in ionic strength and pH that are expected to exist in the near field.

  9. Transport and Retention of TiO2 Rutile Nanoparticles in Saturated Porous Media at Low-Ionic-Strength Conditions: Measurements and Mechanisms

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mechanisms governing the transport and retention kinetics of titanium dioxide (TiO2, rutile) nanoparticle (NP) aggregates were investigated in saturated porous media. Experiments were carried out under a range of well-controlled ionic strength (from DI water up to 1 mM) and...

  10. Dialysis buffer with different ionic strength affects the antigenicity of cultured nervous necrosis virus (NNV) suspensions.

    PubMed

    Gye, Hyun Jung; Nishizawa, Toyohiko

    2016-09-01

    Nervous necrosis virus (NNV) belongs to the genus Betanodavirus (Nodaviridae). It is highly pathogenic to various marine fishes. Here, we investigated the antigenicity changes of cultured NNV suspensions during 14days of dialyses using a dialysis tube at 1.4×10(4) molecular weight cut off (MWCO) in three different buffers (Dulbecco's phosphate buffered saline (D-PBS), 15mM Tris-HCl (pH 8.0), and deionized water (DIW)). Total NNV antigen titers of cultured NNV suspension varied depending on different dialysis buffers. For example, total NNV antigen titer during D-PBS dialysis was increased once but then decreased. During Tris-HCl dialysis, it was relatively stable. During dialysis in DIW, total NNV antigen titer was increased gradually. These antigenicity changes in NNV suspension might be due to changes in the aggregation state of NNV particles and/or coat proteins (CPs). ELISA values of NNV suspension changed due to changing aggregates state of NNV antigens. NNV particles in suspension were aggregated at a certain level. These aggregates were progressive after D-PBS dialysis, but regressive after Tris-HCl dialysis. The purified NNV particles self-aggregated after dialysis in D-PBS or in Tris-HCl containing 600mM NaCl, but not after dialysis in Tris-HCl or DIW. Quantitative analysis is merited to determine NNV antigens in the highly purified NNV particles suspended in buffer at low salt condition. PMID:27381060

  11. Membrane interactions in nerve myelin. I. Determination of surface charge from effects of pH and ionic strength on period.

    PubMed Central

    Inouye, H.; Kirschner, D. A.

    1988-01-01

    We have used x-ray diffraction to study the interactions between myelin membranes in the sciatic nerve (PNS) and optic nerve (CNS) as a function of pH (2-10) and ionic strength (0-0.18). The period of myelin was found to change in a systematic manner with pH and ionic strength. PNS periods ranged from 165 to 250 A or more, while CNS periods ranged from 150 to 230 A. The native periods were observed only near physiological ionic strength at neutral or alkaline pH. The smallest periods were observed in the pH range 2.5-4 for PNS myelin and pH 2.5-5 for CNS myelin. The minimum period was also observed for PNS myelin after prolonged incubation in distilled water. At pH 4, within these acidic pH ranges, myelin period increased slightly with ionic strength; however, above these ranges, the period increased with pH and decreased with ionic strength. Electron density profiles calculated at different pH and ionic strength showed that the major structural alteration underlying the changes in period was in the width of the aqueous space at the extracellular apposition of membranes; the width of the cytoplasmic space was virtually constant. Assuming that the equilibrium myelin periods are determined by a balance of nonspecific forces/i.e., the electrostatic repulsion force and the van der Walls attractive force, as well as the short-range repulsion force (hydration force, or steric stabilization), then values in the period-dependency curve can be used to define the isoelectric pH and exclusion length of the membrane. The exclusion length, which is related to the minimum period at isoelectric pH, was used to calculate the electrostatic repulsion force given the other forces. The electrostatic repulsion was then used to calculate the surface potential, which in turn was used to calculate the surface charge density (at different pH and ionic strength). We found the negative surface charge increases with pH at constant ionic strength and with ionic strength at constant pH. We

  12. Determination of electrophoretic mobilities and hydrodynamic radii of three humic substances as a function of pH and ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Hosse, M; Wilkinson, K J

    2001-11-01

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) were employed to determine electrophoretic mobilities and hydrodynamic sizes of three humic substances (IHSS aquatic fulvic acid (FA), IHSS aquatic humic acid (HA), and IHSS peat humic acid (PHA)) as a function of pH and ionic strength. A slight aggregation corresponding to the formation of dimers and trimers was observed at low pH using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). For example, for the peat humic acid, diffusion coefficients decreased from 2.1 x 10(-10) m2 s(-1) at pH 4 to 2.4 x 10(-10) m2 s(-1) at pH 11. For all three humic substances, electrophoretic mobilities were also shown to decrease significantly below pH 6. Calculated zeta potentials observed at high pH of -69 mV (FA), -62 mV (HA), and -63 mV (PHA) decreased to -39, -50, and -47 mV, respectively, under slightly acidic pH (4.5-4.8) conditions. No evidence of ionic strength induced aggregation was found using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS); diffusion coefficients increased slightly (<25%) with increasing ionic strength (up to 1 M). Negative electrophoretic mobilities decreased to a maximum measured ionic strength of 0.18 M. Above this ionic strength, no peaks were observed due to an increased HS adsorption to the capillary wall and an important decrease in electroosmotic flow. Interpretation of electrophoretic mobilities determined by CE is complicated by the fact that under certain conditions, HS appeared to be complexed by CE buffer systems, including MES, BES, and AMPSO. PMID:11718346

  13. Effects of Ionic Strength on Bacteriophage MS2 Behavior and Their Implications for the Assessment of Virus Retention by Ultrafiltration Membranes ▿

    PubMed Central

    Furiga, Aurelie; Pierre, Gwenaelle; Glories, Marie; Aimar, Pierre; Roques, Christine; Causserand, Christel; Berge, Mathieu

    2011-01-01

    Bacteriophage MS2 is widely used as a surrogate to estimate pathogenic virus elimination by membrane filtration processes used in water treatment. Given that this water technology may be conducted with different types of waters, we focused on investigating the effects of ionic strength on MS2 behavior. For this, MS2 was analyzed while suspended in solutions of various ionic strengths, first in a batch experiment and second during membrane ultrafiltration, and quantified using (i) quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR), which detects the total number of viral genomes, (ii) qRT-PCR without the RNA extraction step, which reflects only particles with a broken capsid (free RNA), and (iii) the PFU method, which detects only infectious viruses. At the beginning of the batch experiments using solutions containing small amounts of salts, losses of MS2 infectivity (90%) and broken particles (20%) were observed; these proportions did not change during filtration. In contrast, in high-ionic-strength solutions, bacteriophage kept its biological activity under static conditions, but it quickly lost its infectivity during the filtration process. Increasing the ionic strength decreased both the inactivation and the capsid breakup in the feed suspension and increased the loss of infectivity in the filtration retentate, while the numbers of MS2 genomes were identical in both experiments. In conclusion, the effects of ionic strength on MS2 behavior may significantly distort the results of membrane filtration processes, and therefore, the combination of classical and molecular methods used here is useful for an effective validation of the retention efficiency of ultrafiltration membranes. PMID:21075898

  14. An improved thermodynamic model for the complexation of trivalent actinides and lanthanide with oxalic acid valid to high ionic strength.

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xiong, Yongliang; Thakur, Punam; Borkowski, Marian

    2015-07-30

    The dissociation constants of oxalic acid (Ox), and the stability constants of Am3+, Cm3+ and Eu3+ with Ox2– have been determined at 25 °C, over a range of concentration varying from 0.1 to 6.60 m NaClO4 using potentiometric titration and extraction techniques, respectively. The experimental data support the formation of complexes, M(Ox)n3 – 2n, where (M = Am3+, Cm3+ and Eu3+ and n = 1 and 2). The dissociation constant and the stability constant values measured as a function of NaClO4 concentration were used to estimate the Pitzer parameters for the respective interactions of Am3+, Cm3+ and Eu3+ with Ox.more » Furthermore, the stability constants data of Am3+ –Ox measured in NaClO4 and in NaCl solutions from the literature were simultaneously fitted in order to refine the existing actinide–oxalate complexation model that can be used universally in the safety assessment of radioactive waste disposal. The thermodynamic stability constant: log β0101 = 6.30 ± 0.06 and log β0102 = 10.84 ± 0.06 for Am3+ was obtained by simultaneously fitting data in NaCl and NaClO4 media. Additionally, log β0101 = 6.72 ± 0.08 and log β0102 = 11.05 ± 0.09 for the Cm3+ and log β0101 = 6.67 ± 0.08 and log β0102 = 11.15 ± 0.09 for the Eu3+ were calculated by extrapolation of data to zero ionic strength in NaClO4 medium only. For all stability constants, the Pitzer model gives an excellent representation of the data using interaction parameters β(0), β(1), and CΦ determined in this work. The thermodynamic model developed in this work will be useful in accurately modeling the potential solubility of trivalent actinides and early lanthanides to ionic strength of 6.60 m in low temperature environments in the presence of Ox. Furthermore, the work is also applicable to the accurate modeling transport of rare earth elements in various environments under the surface conditions.« less

  15. Analysis of responsive characteristics of ionic-strength-sensitive hydrogel with consideration of effect of equilibrium constant by a chemo-electro-mechanical model.

    PubMed

    Li, Hua; Lai, Fukun; Luo, Rongmo

    2009-11-17

    A multiphysics model is presented in this paper for analysis of the influence of various equilibrium constants on the smart hydrogel responsive to the ionic strength of environmental solution, and termed the multieffect-coupling ionic-strength stimulus (MECis) model. The model is characterized by a set of partial differential governing equations by consideration of the mass and momentum conservations of the system and coupled chemical, electrical, and mechanical multienergy domains. The Nernst-Planck equations are derived by the mass conservation of the ionic species in both the interstitial fluid of the hydrogel and the surrounding solution. The binding reaction between the fixed charge groups of the hydrogel and the mobile ions in the solution is described by the fixed charge equation, which is based on the Langmuir monolayer theory. As an important effect for the binding reaction, the equilibrium constant is incorporated into the fixed charge equation. The kinetics of the hydrogel swelling/deswelling is illustrated by the mechanical equation, based on the law of momentum conservation for the solid polymeric networks matrix within the hydrogel. The MECis model is examined by comparison of the numerical simulations and experiments from open literature. The analysis of the influence of different equilibrium constants on the responsive characteristics of the ionic-strength-sensitive hydrogel is carried out with detailed discussion. PMID:19678621

  16. Ionic Strength-Controlled Mn (Hydr)oxide Nanoparticle Nucleation on Quartz: Effect of Aqueous Mn(OH)2.

    PubMed

    Jung, Haesung; Jun, Young-Shin

    2016-01-01

    The early formation of manganese (hydr)oxide nanoparticles at mineral-water interfaces is crucial in understanding how Mn oxides control the fate and transport of heavy metals and the cycling of nutrients. Using atomic force microscopy, we investigated the heterogeneous nucleation and growth of Mn (hydr)oxide under varied ionic strengths (IS; 1-100 mM NaNO3). Experimental conditions (i.e., 0.1 mM Mn(2+) (aq) concentration and pH 10.1) were chosen to be relevant to Mn remediation sites. We found that IS controls Mn(OH)2 (aq) formation, and that the controlled Mn(OH)2 (aq) formation can affect the system's saturation and subsequent Mn(OH)2 (s) and further Mn3O4 (s) nanoparticle formation. In 100 mM IS system, nucleated Mn (hydr)oxide particles had more coverage on the quartz substrate than those in 1 mM and 10 mM IS systems. This high IS also resulted in low supersaturation ratio and thus favor heterogeneous nucleation, having better structural matching between nucleating Mn (hydr)oxides and quartz. The unique information obtained in this work improves our understanding of Mn (hydr)oxide formation in natural as well as engineered aqueous environments, such as groundwater contaminated by natural leachate and acid mine drainage remediation. PMID:26588858

  17. Sorption of chlorimuron-ethyl on montmorillonite clays: effects of exchangeable cations, pH, and ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Ren, Wenjie; Teng, Ying; Zhou, Qixing; Paschke, Albrecht; Schüürmann, Gerrit

    2014-10-01

    Sorption interaction of chlorimuron-ethyl with montmorillonite clays was investigated under varied types of exchangeable cation, pH, and ionic strength conditions. Chlorimuron-ethyl sorption on bentonites exhibited pronounced cation dependency, and the sorption ability increased as the sequence Ca(2+)- < Na(+)- < Al(3+)- < Fe(3+)-bentonite, due to different sorption mechanisms, whereas the cation dependency was influenced by the clay type and much weaker for montmorillonites. The decrease of pH at the range of 4.0-6.0 prominently increased sorption of chlorimuron-ethyl on all cation-exchanged montmorillonite clays, and nearly a neglected sorption (about 2 %) can be observed at pH over 7.0. In the presence of CaCl2, sorption of chlorimuron-ethyl on Fe(3+)-bentonite was promoted because of complexion of Ca(2+) and the surface of Fe(3+)-bentonite. However, as the concentration of CaCl2 increased, chlorimuron-ethyl sorption on Ca(2+)- and Fe(3+)-exchanged bentonite decreased, suggesting that Ca bridging was not the prevailing mechanism for sorption of chlorimuron-ethyl on these clays. Furthermore, chlorimuron-ethyl sorption was relatively sensitive to pH, and the change of pH may obscure effect of other factors on the sorption, so it was quite necessary to control pH at a constant value when the effect of other factor was being studied. PMID:25028319

  18. The influence of ionic strength and mixing ratio on the colloidal stability of PDAC/PSS polyelectrolyte complexes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanpu; Yildirim, Erol; Antila, Hanne S; Valenzuela, Luis D; Sammalkorpi, Maria; Lutkenhaus, Jodie L

    2015-10-01

    Polyelectrolyte complexes (PECs) form by mixing polycation and polyanion solutions together, and have been explored for a variety of applications. One challenge for PEC processing and application is that under certain conditions the as-formed PECs aggregate and precipitate out of suspension over the course of minutes to days. This aggregation is governed by several factors such as electrostatic repulsion, van der Waals attractions, and hydrophobic interactions. In this work, we explore the boundary between colloidally stable and unstable complexes as it is influenced by polycation/polyanion mixing ratio and ionic strength. The polymers examined are poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDAC) and poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate) (PSS). Physical properties such as turbidity, hydrodynamic size, and zeta potential are investigated upon complex formation. We also perform detailed molecular dynamics simulations to examine the structure and effective charge distribution of the PECs at varying mixing ratios and salt concentrations to support the experimental findings. The results suggest that the colloidally stable/unstable boundary possibly marks the screening effects from added salt, resulting in weakly charged complexes that aggregate. At higher salt concentrations, the complexes initially form and then gradually dissolve into solution. PMID:26268471

  19. The effect of human microtubule-associated-protein tau on the assembly structure of microtubules and its ionic strength dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, M. C.; Raviv, U.; Miller, H. P.; Gaylord, M. R.; Kiris, E.; Ventimiglia, D.; Needleman, D. J.; Chung, P. J.; Deek, J.; Lapointe, N.; Kim, M. W.; Wilson, L.; Feinstein, S. C.; Safinya, C. R.

    2010-03-01

    Microtubules (MTs), 25 nm protein nanotubes, are among the major filamentous elements of the eukaryotic cytoskeleton involved in intracellular trafficking, cell division and the establishment and maintenance of cell shape. Microtubule-associated-protein tau regulates tubulin assembly, MT dynamics and stability. Aberrant tau action has long been correlated with numerous neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's, and fronto-temporal dementia with Parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17) Using synchrotron small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) and binding assay, we examine the effects of tau on the assembly structure of taxol-stabilized MTs. We find that tau regulates the distribution of protofilament numbers in MTs as reflected in the observed increase in the average radius of MTs with increasing the tau/tubulin molar ratio. Additionally, tau-MT interactions are mediated to a large extent via electrostatic interactions: the binding affinity of tau to MTs is ionic strength dependent. Supported by DOE-BES DE-FG02-06ER46314, NSF DMR-0803103, NIH NS35010, NIH NS13560. (Ref) M.C. Choi, S.C. Feinstein, and C.R. Safinya et al. Biophys. J. 97; 519 (2009).

  20. Roles of ionic strength and biofilm roughness on adhesion kinetics of Escherichia coli onto groundwater biofilm grown on PVC surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Janjaroen, Dao; Ling, Fangqiong; Monroy, Guillermo; Derlon, Nicolas; Mogenroth, Eberhard; Boppart, Stephen A.; Liu, Wen-Tso; Nguyen, Thanh H.

    2013-01-01

    Mechanisms of Escherichia coli attachment on biofilms grown on PVC coupons were investigated. Biofilms were grown in CDC reactors using groundwater as feed solution over a period up to 27 weeks. Biofilm physical structure was characterized at the micro- and meso-scales using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), respectively. Microbial community diversity was analyzed with Terminal Restricted Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP). Both physical structure and microbial community diversity of the biofilms were shown to be changing from 2 weeks to 14 weeks, and became relatively stable after 16 weeks. A parallel plate flow chamber coupled with an inverted fluorescent microscope was also used to monitor the attachment of fluorescent microspheres and E. coli on clean PVC surfaces and biofilms grown on PVC surfaces for different ages. Two mechanisms of E. coli attachment were identified. The adhesion rate coefficients (kd) of E. coli on nascent PVC surfaces and 2-week biofilms increased with ionic strength. However, after biofilms grew for 8 weeks, the adhesion was found to be independent of solution chemistry. Instead, a positive correlation between kd and biofilm roughness as determined by OCT was obtained, indicating that the physical structure of biofilms could play an important role in facilitating the adhesion of E. coli cells. PMID:23497979

  1. Effect of pH, ionic strength and univalent inorganic ions on the reconstitution of aspartate aminotransferase.

    PubMed

    Gianfreda, L; Marino, G; Palescandolo, R; Scardi, V

    1974-02-01

    1. The effect of pH change on the reconstitution of aspartate aminotransferase (EC 2.6.1.1), i.e. the reactivation of the apoenzyme with coenzyme (pyridoxal phosphate and pyridoxamine phosphate), was studied in the pH range 4.2-8.9 by using three buffer systems at concentrations ranging from 0.025 to 0.1m. 2. Although the profile of the reconstitution rate-pH curve in the range pH5.2-6.8 (covered by sodium cacodylate-HCl buffer) reflects the influence of the H(+) concentration on the reconstitution process, the profile of the curve in the pH ranges 4.2-5.6 and 7.2-8.25 (covered respectively by sodium acetate-acetic acid and Tris-HCl buffers) appears to be influenced by the ionic strength of the buffer. 3. The reconstitution is also influenced by univalent inorganic ions such as halide ions and, to a lesser extent, alkali metal ions, which are known to alter the water structure. PMID:4856793

  2. Effect of pH, ionic strength and univalent inorganic ions on the reconstitution of aspartate aminotransferase

    PubMed Central

    Gianfreda, Liliana; Marino, Gennaro; Palescandolo, Rosaria; Scardi, Vincenzo

    1974-01-01

    1. The effect of pH change on the reconstitution of aspartate aminotransferase (EC 2.6.1.1), i.e. the reactivation of the apoenzyme with coenzyme (pyridoxal phosphate and pyridoxamine phosphate), was studied in the pH range 4.2–8.9 by using three buffer systems at concentrations ranging from 0.025 to 0.1m. 2. Although the profile of the reconstitution rate–pH curve in the range pH5.2–6.8 (covered by sodium cacodylate–HCl buffer) reflects the influence of the H+ concentration on the reconstitution process, the profile of the curve in the pH ranges 4.2–5.6 and 7.2–8.25 (covered respectively by sodium acetate–acetic acid and Tris–HCl buffers) appears to be influenced by the ionic strength of the buffer. 3. The reconstitution is also influenced by univalent inorganic ions such as halide ions and, to a lesser extent, alkali metal ions, which are known to alter the water structure. PMID:4856793

  3. Resolution of 16 to 20 chlorophyll-protein complexes using a low ionic strength native green gel system.

    PubMed

    Allen, K D; Staehelin, L A

    1991-04-01

    Conventional native "green gel" systems resolve at most 10 chlorophyll-protein complexes from thylakoid membranes of higher plants and green algae. Such analyses suggest a simplicity of the thylakoid membrane that is not supported by a growing body of evidence on the heterogeneity of photosystems I and II (PSI and PSII) and their associated antennae (LHCI and LHCII). We report here the development and characterization of a low ionic strength native "green gel" system that resolves from 16 to 20, mostly large chlorophyll-protein complexes from a variety of higher plant and green algal species with very little release of free pigment. In Chlamydomonas, this system resolves multiple PSI-LHCI complexes, multiple PSII-LHCII complexes, four oligomeric LHCII complexes, as well as several low electrophoretic mobility reaction center complexes, and a number of small complexes. We have obtained similar resolution with a large number of higher plant and green algal species. We also demonstrate how this system can be used as a sort of "fingerprinting" technique to distinguish thylakoids of different species, and for the analysis of photosynthetic mutants, using the chlorophyll b-less chlorina f2 mutant of barley as an example. PMID:1867380

  4. Effect of ionic strength on the thermodynamic characteristics of complexation between Fe(III) ion and nicotinamide in water-ethanol and water-dimethyl sulfoxide mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamov, G. A.; Grazhdan, K. V.; Gavrilova, M. A.; Dushina, S. V.; Sharnin, V. A.; Baranski, A.

    2013-06-01

    Solutions of iron(III) perchlorate in water, water-ethanol, and water-dimethyl sulfoxide solvents (x_{H_2 O} = 0.7 and 0.25 mole fractions) at ionic strength values I = 0.1, 0.25, and 0.5 are studied by IR spectroscopy. Analysis of the absorption bands of perchlorate ion shows that it does not participate in association processes. It is demonstrated that in the range of ionic strength values between 0 and 0.5 (NaClO4), it affects neither the results from potentiometric titration to determine the stability constants of the iron(III)-nicotinamide complex nor the thermal effects of complexation determined via direct calorimetry in a binary solvent containing 0.3 mole fractions (m.f.) of a non-aqueous component.

  5. Effect of ionic strength and pH on the size and dynamic aggregation of TiO2 nanoparticle dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, Hesham; Al-Turki, Ali; Al-Farraj, Abdullah

    2016-04-01

    The widespread use of TiO2 nanoparticles in many products has led to increased concern over their fate in the environment. The stability of TiO2 nanoparticles in aqueous dispersions plays a key role in the aggregation process and subsequently affect the retention and transport of nanoparticles in aquatic systems. We investigated the effect of ionic strength (0.0001-1 M NaCl), and pH (3-11) on the hydrodynamic size and zeta potential of 50 mg L‑1 TiO2dispersions. Dynamic aggregation of the TiO2 nanoparticles was monitored via time-resolved optical absorbance at a wavelength of 300 nm. Results showed that the hydrodynamic size of the TiO2 nanoparticles increased by increasing the ionic strength at all pH values. The average hydrodynamic size of the TiO2 nanoparticle dispersions with ionic strength of 1-0.1M reached 1522 nm. At lower ionic strength (0.01-0.0001M), the hydrodynamic size varied considerably by variation in pH values. Smaller hydrodynamic size was observed at both lower (3-5) and highest (11) pH values, and the hydrodynamic size reached 292 and 255 nm, respectively. For TiO2 dispersions with pH values 7 to 9, the hydrodynamic size reached 1595 nm because of the lower surface charge as the pH of the dispersion approaches the point of zero charge of the TiO2 nanoparticles. Zeta potential of the TiO2 nanoparticles were found to be positive for pH ≤ 5 and reached an average of 9.2 and 30.9 mV for TiO2 dispersions with 1-0.1M and 0.01-0.0001M, respectively. For pH ≥ 7, zeta potential was negative and showed the largest value of -42.6 mV at lower ionic strength and pH values above 9. Increasing the ionic strength caused the relative concentration (C/Co) of the TiO2 nanoparticles to decline indicating lower TiO2 nanoparticles stability. The average relative concentration of the TiO2 nanoparticles reached 0.14, 0.17, and 0.23 for the 1, 0.1, and < 0.01M, respectively. The maximum TiO2 nanoparticles stability reached an average of 0.79, and was observed at

  6. Persistence length for a model semirigid polyelectrolyte as seen by small angle neutron scattering: a relevant variation of the lower bound with ionic strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buhler, E.; Boué, F.

    2003-02-01

    In a SANS experiment, we have directly determined for the first time the conformation of hyaluronan, a model semirigid polyelectrolyte. At high ionic strength, this is completely possible, where the scattered intensity crosses over (when decreasing q) from a q^{-1} rod variation to a q^{-2} and, where fitting to the “wormlike” chain model gives the backbone, intrinsic, persistence length: L_0=86.5 Å. At low ionic strength, we can safely check that the measured persistence length appears increased by at least the amount predicted by Odijk for the electrostatic contribution, L_e ( kappa^{-2}, square of the Debye screening length). However, the intensity at the lowest q is not only due to the single chain, since it crosses over from a q^{-1} to a q^{-4} variation, characteristic of polymer associations.

  7. Stability of Secondary and Tertiary Structures of Virus-Like Particles Representing Noroviruses: Effects of pH, Ionic Strength, and Temperature and Implications for Adhesion to Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Samandoulgou, Idrissa; Hammami, Riadh; Morales Rayas, Rocio; Fliss, Ismail

    2015-01-01

    Loss of ordered molecular structure in proteins is known to increase their adhesion to surfaces. The aim of this work was to study the stability of norovirus secondary and tertiary structures and its implications for viral adhesion to fresh foods and agrifood surfaces. The pH, ionic strength, and temperature conditions studied correspond to those prevalent in the principal vehicles of viral transmission (vomit and feces) and in the food processing and handling environment (pasteurization and refrigeration). The structures of virus-like particles representing GI.1, GII.4, and feline calicivirus (FCV) were studied using circular dichroism and intrinsic UV fluorescence. The particles were remarkably stable under most of the conditions. However, heating to 65°C caused losses of β-strand structure, notably in GI.1 and FCV, while at 75°C the α-helix content of GII.4 and FCV decreased and tertiary structures unfolded in all three cases. Combining temperature with pH or ionic strength caused variable losses of structure depending on the particle type. Regardless of pH, heating to pasteurization temperatures or higher would be required to increase GII.4 and FCV adhesion, while either low or high temperatures would favor GI.1 adhesion. Regardless of temperature, increased ionic strength would increase GII.4 adhesion but would decrease GI.1 adhesion. FCV adsorption would be greater at refrigeration, pasteurization, or high temperature combined with a low salt concentration or at a higher NaCl concentration regardless of temperature. Norovirus adhesion mediated by hydrophobic interaction may depend on hydrophobic residues normally exposed on the capsid surface at pH 3, pH 8, physiological ionic strength, and low temperature, while at pasteurization temperatures it may rely more on buried hydrophobic residues exposed upon structural rearrangement. PMID:26296729

  8. Preparation of non-aggregating aqueous fullerenes in highly saline solutions with a biocompatible non-ionic polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aich, Nirupam; Boateng, Linkel K.; Flora, Joseph R. V.; Saleh, Navid B.

    2013-10-01

    Size-tunable stable aqueous fullerenes were prepared with different concentrations of biocompatible block-copolymer pluronic (PA) F-127, ranging from 0.001% to 1% (w/v). Size uniformity increased with the increase in PA concentration, yielding optimum 58.8 ± 5.6 and 61.8 ± 5.6 nm nC60s and nC70s, respectively (0.10%w/v PA), as observed using a dynamic light scattering technique. Fullerene aqueous suspensions also manifested enhanced stability in saline solution, Dulbecco’s modified Eagle medium (DMEM), and Roswell Park Memorial Institute (RPMI) culture medium. Transmission electron microscopy was performed to elaborate on the morphology and size specificity of fullerene clusters. Physicochemical characterizations of the suspended fullerenes were performed through UV-vis spectroscopy and electrophoretic mobility measurements. PA molecules showed size restriction by encasement, as observed via molecular dynamics simulations. Such solubilization with controllable size and non-aggregating behavior can facilitate application enhancement and mechanistic environmental and toxicological studies of size-specific fullerenes.

  9. Early osmotic, antioxidant, ionic, and redox responses to salinity in leaves and roots of Indian mustard (Brassica juncea L.).

    PubMed

    Ranjit, Singh Laxmi; Manish, Pandey; Penna, Suprasanna

    2016-01-01

    Salt-stress-induced alterations in osmotic, ionic, and redox responses were studied in the early period of treatment (30 min to 5 days) in seedlings of Brassica juncea L. Roots and shoots under mild (50 mM) and severe (250 mM) NaCl stress were analyzed for growth, oxidative stress, osmolyte accumulation, antioxidant defense, and redox state. Growth reduction was less pronounced in the early time period of salt stress while oxidative damage increased linearly and in a sustained manner under severe stress up to 6 h. An early and transient reactive oxygen species (ROS) burst, as evidenced by superoxide and hydrogen peroxide level was observed, followed by activation of enzymatic antioxidant system (GPX, SOD, CAT, and GR) in both root and shoot. The enzymatic activity was not affected much under mild stress particularly at early phase; however, severe stress induced a significant increase in the activity of antioxidant enzymes. Root ascorbate was progressively accumulated, and its redox state maintained in the early time phase of treatment under mild stress while increase in root and shoot glutathione content was recorded under mild stress at 5 days when the active ascorbate pool decreased. While early period of salt stress showed significant Na(+) accumulation over control, plants subjected to mild stress measured less Na(+) accumulation up to 5 days compared to severely stressed plants. The results showed an early induction of differential responses to salt stress in roots and shoots of Brassica which include growth limitations, reduced relative water content, increased osmolytes, redox state, and antioxidant system, and a significant Na(+) increase. The results also indicate that roots and shoots may have distinct mechanisms of responses to salt stress. PMID:25786350

  10. Transport and deposition of Suwannee River Humic Acid/Natural Organic Matter formed silver nanoparticles on silica matrices: the influence of solution pH and ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Akaighe, Nelson; Depner, Sean W; Banerjee, Sarbajit; Sohn, Mary

    2013-07-01

    The transport and deposition of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) formed from Ag(+) reduction by Suwannee River Humic Acid (SRHA) and Suwannee River Natural Organic Matter (SRNOM) utilizing a silica matrix is reported. The morphology and stability of the AgNPs was analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and zeta potential measurements. The percentage conversion of the initial [Ag(+)] to [AgNPs] was determined from a combination of atomic absorption (AAS) and UV-Vis spectroscopy, and centrifugation techniques. The results indicate higher AgNP transport and consequently low deposition in the porous media at basic pH conditions and low ionic strength. However, at low acidic pH and high ionic strength, especially with the divalent metallic cations, the mobility of the AgNPs in the porous media was very low, most likely due to NP aggregation. Overall, the results suggest the potential for AgNP contamination of subsurface soils and groundwater aquifers is mostly dependent on their aggregation state, controlled by the soil water and sediment ionic strength and pH. PMID:23422173

  11. Effect of pH, ionic strength, and background electrolytes on Cr(VI) and total chromium removal by acorn shell of Quercus crassipes Humb. & Bonpl.

    PubMed

    Aranda-García, Erick; Morales-Barrera, Liliana; Pineda-Camacho, Gabriela; Cristiani-Urbina, Eliseo

    2014-10-01

    The ability of Quercus crassipes acorn shells (QCS) to remove Cr(VI) and total chromium from aqueous solutions was investigated as a function of the solution pH, ionic strength, and background electrolytes. It was found that Cr(VI) and total chromium removal by QCS depended strongly on the pH of the solution. Cr(VI) removal rate increased as the solution pH decreased. The optimum pH for total chromium removal varied depending on contact time. NaCl ionic strengths lower than 200 mM did not affect chromium removal. The presence of 20 mM monovalent cations and anions, and of divalent cations, slightly decreased the removal of Cr(VI) and total chromium by QCS; in contrast, divalent anions (SO₄(2-), PO₄(2-), CO₃(2-)) significantly affected the removal of Cr(VI) and total chromium. The biosorption kinetics of chromium ions followed the pseudo-second-order model at all solution pH levels, NaCl ionic strengths and background electrolytes tested. Results suggest that QCS may be a potential low-cost biosorbent for the removal of Cr(VI) and total chromium from aqueous solutions containing various impurities. PMID:24880725

  12. The Influence of High Drug Loading in Xanthan Tablets and Media with Different Physiological pH and Ionic Strength on Swelling and Release.

    PubMed

    Mikac, Urša; Sepe, Ana; Baumgartner, Saša; Kristl, Julijana

    2016-03-01

    The formation of a gel coat around xanthan (Xan) tablets, empty or loaded with pentoxifylline (PF), and its release in media differing in pH and ionic strength by NMR, MR imaging, and two release methods were studied. The T1 and T2 NMR relaxation times in gels depend predominantly on Xan concentration; the presence of PF has negligible influence on them. It is interesting that the matrix swelling is primarily regulated by Xan despite high drug loading (25%, 50%). The gastric pH and high ionic strength of the media do not influence the position of the penetration and swelling fronts but do affect the erosion front and gel thickness. The different release profiles obtained in mixing and nonmixing in vitro methods are the consequence of matrix hydration level and erosion at the surface. In water and in diluted acid medium with low ionic strength, the main release mechanism is erosion, whereas in other media (pH 1.2, μ ≥ 0.20 M), anomalous transport dominates as was found out by fitting of measured data with theoretical model. Besides the in vitro investigation that mimics gastric conditions, mathematical modeling makes the product development more successful. PMID:26866780

  13. Deposition of polyelectrolyte multilayer films made from chitosan and xanthan on biodegradable substrate: Effect of pH and ionic strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viraneva, A.; Marudova, M.; Sotirov, S.; Bodurov, I.; Pilicheva, B.; Uzunova, Y.; Exner, G.; Grancharova, Ts.; Vlaeva, I.; Yovcheva, T.

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the present work is to investigate the effect of pH and ionic strength on the deposition of chitosan/xanthan multilayers on preliminary corona charged substrates from polylactic acid. The multilayer films were formed by alternative dipping the substrate into chitosan and xanthan polyelectrolyte solutions. For this purpose 0.1% chitosan solution and 0.05% xanthan solution in acetate buffers with pH 4; 4.5 and 5 and ionic strengths 0; 0.01; 0.1 and 1 mol/l were used. The film properties were investigated by FTIR, laser refractometry, XPS and AFM methods. It was found that the binding of the polyelectrolytes to the substrate was irreversible over the time of deposition. The investigated parameters were found to depend on both pH and ionic strength of the polyelectrolyte solutions. This behaviour was attributed to the changes in charge density of the polyelectrolytes and screening effect of the counterions.

  14. An improved thermodynamic model for the complexation of trivalent actinides and lanthanide with oxalic acid valid to high ionic strength.

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Yongliang; Thakur, Punam; Borkowski, Marian

    2015-07-30

    The dissociation constants of oxalic acid (Ox), and the stability constants of Am3+, Cm3+ and Eu3+ with Ox2– have been determined at 25 °C, over a range of concentration varying from 0.1 to 6.60 m NaClO4 using potentiometric titration and extraction techniques, respectively. The experimental data support the formation of complexes, M(Ox)n3 – 2n, where (M = Am3+, Cm3+ and Eu3+ and n = 1 and 2). The dissociation constant and the stability constant values measured as a function of NaClO4 concentration were used to estimate the Pitzer parameters for the respective interactions of Am3+, Cm3+ and Eu3+ with Ox. Furthermore, the stability constants data of Am3+ –Ox measured in NaClO4 and in NaCl solutions from the literature were simultaneously fitted in order to refine the existing actinide–oxalate complexation model that can be used universally in the safety assessment of radioactive waste disposal. The thermodynamic stability constant: log β0101 = 6.30 ± 0.06 and log β0102 = 10.84 ± 0.06 for Am3+ was obtained by simultaneously fitting data in NaCl and NaClO4 media. Additionally, log β0101 = 6.72 ± 0.08 and log β0102 = 11.05 ± 0.09 for the Cm3+ and log β0101 = 6.67 ± 0.08 and log β0102 = 11.15 ± 0.09 for the Eu3+ were calculated by extrapolation of data to zero ionic strength in NaClO4 medium only. For all stability constants, the Pitzer model gives an excellent representation of the data using interaction parameters β(0), β(1), and CΦ determined in this work. The thermodynamic model developed in this work will be useful in accurately modeling the potential solubility of trivalent

  15. Effects of pH and ionic strength on sulfamethoxazole and ciprofloxacin transport in saturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hao; Gao, Bin; Li, Hui; Ma, Lena Q.

    2011-09-01

    Many antibiotics regarded as emerging contaminants have been frequently detected in soils and groundwater; however, their transport behaviors in soils remain largely unknown. This study examined the transport of two antibiotics, sulfamethoxazole (SMZ) and ciprofloxacin (CIP), in saturated porous media. Laboratory columns packed with quartz sand was used to test the effects of solution pH and ionic strength (IS) on their retention and transport. The results showed that these two antibiotics behaved differently in the saturated sand columns. In general, SMZ manifested a much higher mobility than CIP for all experimental conditions tested. Almost all SMZ transported through the columns within one pore volume in deionized water (i.e., pH = 5.6, IS = 0), but no CIP was detected in the effluents under the same condition after extended column flushing. Perturbations in solution pH (5.6 and 9.5) and IS (0 and 0.1 M) showed no effect on SMZ transport in the saturated columns. When pH increased to 9.5, however, ~ 93% of CIP was eluted from the sand columns. Increase of IS from 0 to 0.1 M also slightly changed the distribution of adsorbed CIP within the sand column at pH 5.6, but still no CIP was detected in the effluents. A mathematical model based on advection-dispersion equation coupled with equilibrium and kinetic reactions successfully simulated the transport of the antibiotics in water-saturated porous media with R2 = 0.99.

  16. Effect of pH and ionic strength on exposure and toxicity of encapsulated lambda-cyhalothrin to Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Son, Jino; Hooven, Louisa A; Harper, Bryan; Harper, Stacey L

    2015-12-15

    Encapsulation of pesticide active ingredients in polymers has been widely employed to control the release of poorly water-soluble active ingredients. Given the high dispersibility of these encapsulated pesticides in water, they are expected to behave differently compared to their active ingredients; however, our current understanding of the fate and effects of encapsulated pesticides is still limited. In this study, we employed a central composite design (CCD) to investigate how pH and ionic strength (IS) affect the hydrodynamic diameter (HDD) and zeta potential of encapsulated λ-cyhalothrin and how those changes affect the exposure and toxicity to Daphnia magna. R(2) values greater than 0.82 and 0.84 for HDD and zeta potential, respectively, irrespective of incubation time suggest those changes could be predicted as a function of pH and IS. For HDD, the linear factor of pH and quadratic factor of pH×pH were found to be the most significant factors affecting the change of HDD at the beginning of incubation, whereas the effects of IS and IS×IS became significant as incubation time increased. For zeta potential, the linear factor of IS and quadratic factor of IS×IS were found to be the most dominant factors affecting the change of zeta potential of encapsulated λ-cyhalothrin, irrespective of incubation time. The toxicity tests with D. magna under exposure conditions in which HDD or zeta potential of encapsulated λ-cyhalothrin was maximized or minimized in the overlying water also clearly showed the worst-case exposure condition to D. magna was when the encapsulated λ-cyhalothrin is either stable or small in the overlying water. Our results show that water quality could modify the fate and toxicity of encapsulated λ-cyhalothrin in aquatic environments, suggesting understanding their aquatic interactions are critical in environmental risk assessment. Herein, we discuss the implications of our findings for risk assessment. PMID:26327636

  17. Systematic study of effects of pH and ionic strength on attachment of phage PRD1.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Gholamreza; Schijven, Jack F; Behrends, Thilo; Hassanizadeh, S Majid; Gerritse, Jan; Kleingeld, Pieter J

    2011-01-01

    Objectives of this work are to investigate effects of pH and ionic strength (IS) on virus transport in saturated soil and to develop a quantitative relationship for these effects. A series of 50-cm column experiments with clean quartz sand under saturated conditions and with pH values of 5, 6, 7, 8, and IS values of 1, 10, and 20 mM were conducted. Bacteriophage PRD1 was used as a model virus. Applying a one-site kinetic model, attachment, detachment, and inactivation rate coefficients were determined from fitting breakthrough curves using the software package Hydrus-1D. Attachment rate coefficients increased with decreasing pH and increasing IS, in agreement with DLVO theory. Sticking efficiencies were calculated from the attachment rate coefficients and used to develop an empirical formula for sticking efficiency as a function of pH and IS. This relationship is applicable under unfavorable conditions for virus attachment. We compared sticking efficiencies predicted by the empirical formula with those from field and column experiments. Within the calibrated range of pH and IS, the predicted and observed sticking efficiencies are in reasonable agreement for bacteriophages PRD1 and MS2. However, the formula significantly overestimates sticking efficiencies for IS higher than 100 mM. In addition, it performs less well for viruses with different surface reactivity than PRD1 and MS2. Effects of pH and IS on detachment and inactivation rate coefficients were also investigated but the experimental results do not allow constraining these parameters with sufficient certainty. PMID:21039452

  18. Use of TOUGHREACT to Simulate Effects of Fluid Chemistry onInjectivity in Fractured Geothermal Reservoirs with High Ionic StrengthFluids

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Tianfu; Zhang, Guoxiang; Pruess, Karsten

    2005-02-09

    Recent studies suggest that mineral dissolution/precipitation and clay swelling effects could have a major impact on the performance of hot dry rock (HDR) and hot fractured rock (HFR) reservoirs. A major concern is achieving and maintaining adequate injectivity, while avoiding the development of preferential short-circuiting flow paths. A Pitzer ionic interaction model has been introduced into the publicly available TOUGHREACT code for solving non-isothermal multi-phase reactive geochemical transport problems under conditions of high ionic strength, expected in typical HDR and HFR systems. To explore chemically-induced effects of fluid circulation in these systems, we examine ways in which the chemical composition of reinjected waters can be modified to improve reservoir performance. We performed a number of coupled thermo-hydrologic-chemical simulations in which the fractured medium was represented by a one-dimensional MINC model (multiple interacting continua). Results obtained with the Pitzer activity coefficient model were compared with those using an extended Debye-Hueckel equation. Our simulations show that non-ideal activity effects can be significant even at modest ionic strength, and can have major impacts on permeability evolution in injection-production systems. Alteration of injection water chemistry, for example by dilution with fresh water, can greatly alter precipitation and dissolution effects, and can offer a powerful tool for operating hot dry rock and hot fractured rock reservoirs in a sustainable manner.

  19. Deposition and release kinetics of nano-TiO2 in saturated porous media: effects of solution ionic strength and surfactants.

    PubMed

    Godinez, Itzel G; Darnault, Christophe J G; Khodadoust, Amid P; Bogdan, Dorin

    2013-03-01

    The aggregation, transport and deposition kinetics (i.e. attachment and release) of TiO(2) nanoparticles (nano-TiO(2)) were investigated as a function of ionic strength and the presence of anionic (sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate, SDBS) and non-ionic (Triton X-100) surfactants in 100% critical micelle concentration (CMC). The electrolyte concentration of the suspensions dictated the kinetic stability of nano-TiO(2) thus influencing the transport and retention of the nanoaggregates in the saturated porous medium. With increasing ionic strength, the interaction between approaching nano-TiO(2) and nano-TiO(2) already deposited onto collectors surfaces seemed to be more favorable than the interaction between approaching nano-TiO(2) and bare collectors surfaces. The abrupt and gradual reduction in electrolyte concentration during the flushing cycles of the column experiments induced the release of previously deposited nano-TiO(2) suggesting attachment of nano-TiO(2) through secondary energy minimum. PMID:23246754

  20. Proton inventory of the water-catalyzed hydrolysis of 1-acetyl-1,2,4-triazole. Examination of ionic strength effects

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, J.F.; Huskey, W.P.; Hogg, J.L.

    1980-11-07

    Proton inventories of the water-catalyzed hydrolysis of 1-acetyl-1,2-4-triazole have been completed under a variety of conditions. The solvent deuterium isotope effect, k/sub H/sub 2/O/k/sub D/sub 2/O/, determined at pH 4.7 or the equivalent point on the pD rate profile at 25/sup 0/C by using acetic acid-acetate buffers at 1 M ionic strength was 3.18. The solvent deuterium isotope effects determined at ionic strenghs of 1 and 0.5 M by using 10/sup -3/ M HCl (DCl) to control the pH(D) were 3.13 and 3.07, respectively. In all cases the proton inventories exhibit significant downward curvature and are, within experimental error, consistent with a cyclic transition state structure involving four water molecules. The equation k/sub n/ = k/sub 0/(1 - n + 0.75n) describes the proton inventories where the value of the isotope fractionation factor for the four in-flight protons is 0.75. These inventories are compared to an earlier study done with no ionic strength control, and several alternative transition states are considered in detail.

  1. Change of electrostatic potential of mean force between two curved surfaces due to different salt composition, ion valence and size under certain ionic strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shiqi

    2016-02-01

    Change of an electrostatic potential of mean force (EPMF) between two cylindrical rod surfaces with salt composition, ion valence, and ion size at a constant ionic strength of 0.3 M is studied by a classical density functional theory (CDFT) in a primitive model electrolyte solution. Several novel observations are made: (i) strength of a so-called like charge attraction (LCA) reduces in an invariable manner with the salt solution changing from single 2:1 electrolyte to mixture of 2:1 and 1:1 type electrolytes of varying concentration ratios; the change is even over entire range of the composition variation under low surface charge strength, and tends to be insensitive to the composition variation in the presence of the divalent counter-ion, and more and more drastic at a critical point the divalent counter-ion disappears, respectively, as the surface charge strength becomes big enough. (ii) Both monovalent counter-ion and co-ion diameters have only a marginal effect on both the LCA strength and equilibrium distance, and the former "abnormally" affects less than the latter. (iii) Depending on the surface charge strength considered, the divalent counter-ion diameter influences the LCA strength in solution comprised of 2:1 type and 1:1 type electrolytes, monotonously or non-monotonously. All of these findings provide forceful support for a recently proposed hydrogen-bonding style mechanism explaining the LCA.

  2. Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study of Parallel Telomeric DNA Quadruplexes at Different Ionic Strengths: Evaluation of Water and Ion Models.

    PubMed

    Rebič, Matúš; Laaksonen, Aatto; Šponer, Jiří; Uličný, Jozef; Mocci, Francesca

    2016-08-01

    Most molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of DNA quadruplexes have been performed under minimal salt conditions using the Åqvist potential parameters for the cation with the TIP3P water model. Recently, this combination of parameters has been reported to be problematic for the stability of quadruplex DNA, especially caused by the ion interactions inside or near the quadruplex channel. Here, we verify how the choice of ion parameters and water model can affect the quadruplex structural stability and the interactions with the ions outside the channel. We have performed a series of MD simulations of the human full-parallel telomeric quadruplex by neutralizing its negative charge with K(+) ions. Three combinations of different cation potential parameters and water models have been used: (a) Åqvist ion parameters, TIP3P water model; (b) Joung and Cheatham ion parameters, TIP3P water model; and (c) Joung and Cheatham ion parameters, TIP4Pew water model. For the combinations (b) and (c), the effect of the ionic strength has been evaluated by adding increasing amounts of KCl salt (50, 100, and 200 mM). Two independent simulations using the Åqvist parameters with the TIP3P model show that this combination is clearly less suited for the studied quadruplex with K(+) as counterions. In both simulations, one ion escapes from the channel, followed by significant deformation of the structure, leading to deviating conformation compared to that in the reference crystallographic data. For the other combinations of ion and water potentials, no tendency is observed for the channel ions to escape from the quadruplex channel. In addition, the internal mobility of the three loops, torsion angles, and counterion affinity have been investigated at varied salt concentrations. In summary, the selection of ion and water models is crucial as it can affect both the structure and dynamics as well as the interactions of the quadruplex with its counterions. The results obtained with the TIP4Pew

  3. The effect of humic acid on the aggregation of titanium dioxide nanoparticles under different pH and ionic strengths.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Miao; Wang, Hongtao; Keller, Arturo A; Wang, Tao; Li, Fengting

    2014-07-15

    With the increasingly widespread use of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs), the particles' environmental impacts have attracted concern, making it necessary to understand the fate and transport of TiO2 NPs in aqueous media. In this study, we investigated TiO2 NP aggregation caused by the effects of humic acid (HA), ionic strength (IS) and different pH using dynamic light scattering (DLS) to monitor the size distribution of the TiO2 NPs continuously. It was determined that HA can influence the stability of TiO2 NPs through charge neutralization, steric hindrance and bridging effects. In the absence of IS, aggregation was promoted by adding HA only when the pH (pH=4) is less than the point of zero charge for the TiO2 NPs (pHPZC≈6) because HA reduces the zeta potential of the TiO2 NPs via charge neutralization. At pH=4 and when the concentration of HA is 94.5 μg/L, the zeta potential of TiO2 NPs is close to zero, and they reach an aggregation maximum. A higher concentration of HA results in more negatively charged TiO2 NP surfaces, which hinder their aggregation. When the pH is 5.8, HA enhances the negative zeta potential of the TiO2 NPs and increases their stability via electrostatic repulsion and steric hindrance. When the pH (pH=8) is greater than pHpzc, the zeta potential of the TiO2 NPs is high (~40 mV), and it barely changes with increasing HA concentration. Thus, the TiO2 NPs are notably stable, and their size does not grow at pH8. The increase in the critical coagulation concentration (CCC) of TiO2 NPs indicated that there is steric hindrance after the addition of HA. HA can enhance the coagulation of TiO2 NPs, primarily due to bridging effect. These findings are useful in understanding the size change of TiO2 NPs, as well as the removal of TiO2 NPs and HA from aqueous media. PMID:24793841

  4. Stability constants for the formation of lead chloride complexes as a function of temperature and ionic strength

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yanxin; Millero, Frank J.

    2015-01-01

    The stability constants for the formation of lead (Pb2+) with chloride Pb2+=nCl−↔PbCln2−nβn(n=1,2,3) have been determined using a spectrophotometric method in NaClO4 solutions as a function of ionic strength (0–6 m) and temperature (15–45 °C). The results have been fitted to the equations: logβ1∗=logβ1+0.21I−8.61I0.5∕(1+1.2I0.5)+1927.40[I0.5∕(1+1.2I0.5)]∕Tlogβ2∗=logβ2+0.32I−4.67I0.5(1+1.2I0.5)+594.54[I0.5∕(1+1.2I0.5)]∕Tlogβ3∗=logβ3+0.40I−2.68I0.5(1+1.2I0.5)−43.98[I0.5∕(1+1.2I0.5)]∕T with standard errors of 0.05, 0.04 and 0.06, respectively. The thermodynamic values of log β1, logβ2 and logβ3 at 25.0 °C and the enthalpies of formation of PbCl+, PbCl20 and PbCl3− are in good agreement with literature values. We have combined our results with the earlier work of Seward (1984) to yield thermodynamic constants that are valid from 15 to 300 °C: logβ1=44.82+0.031T−21.21logTlogβ2=61.42+0.046T−29.51logTlogβ3=107.97+0.071T−51.46logT with standard errors of 0.05, 0.08 and 0.10, respectively. PMID:26937043

  5. Accelerated Transport of 90Sr Following a Release of High Ionic Strength Solution in Vadose Zone Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Laurence Hull; Annette Schafer

    2008-05-01

    Numerical simulation of cation exchange and mineral precipitation / dissolution reactions using the multiphase reactive geochemical transport code TOUGHREACT has provided important insight into the distribution of 90Sr between layers of geologic strata in a complex vadose zone at the U. S. Department of Energy’s Idaho National Laboratory. During a transfer operation in November 1972, 70.4 m3 of acidic, high ionic strength liquid containing 15,900 Ci of 90Sr was released over five days into alluvial gravels 137 m above the Snake River Plain Aquifer. Sampling data from perched water zones 33 m below the release contain very high levels of 90Sr as do soil samples obtained nearer the point of release. Use of traditional simulation approaches using laboratory measured constant partitioning coefficients (Kd) cannot simultaneously explain perched water and soil concentrations. To address the discrepancy, a reactive transport approach was adopted to include competitive cation exchange, dissolution / precipitation of calcite, carbon dioxide gas production and transport, and gibbsite precipitation. Simulation results using this model suggest that some of the 90Sr could have been transported very rapidly immediately after the release with the acceleration facilitated by competition with high sodium concentrations in the released liquid, by calcium dissolved from calcite, and to a lesser extent by formation of aqueous complexes with nitrate. It is known that once the leading edge of the liquid assemblage was flushed from the alluvium, the mobility of the remaining 90Sr decreased significantly in the absence of the competing cations. Calculations indicate that there should be a net increase in calcite, suggesting that 90Sr could be entrained in the mineral lattice, but insufficient field data exists for confirmation. Sensitivity studies show that the ion exchange capacity and the Na/Sr ion exchange selectivity coefficients were the most sensitive parameters. Because of the

  6. Accelerated transport of 90Sr following a release of high ionic strength solution in vadose zone sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, Laurence C.; Schafer, Annette L.

    2008-04-01

    Numerical simulation of cation exchange and mineral precipitation/dissolution reactions using the multiphase reactive geochemical transport code TOUGHREACT has provided important insight into the distribution of 90Sr among layers of geologic strata in a complex vadose zone at the U. S. Department of Energy's Idaho National Laboratory. During a transfer operation in November 1972, 70.4 m 3 of acidic, high ionic strength liquid containing 15,900 Ci of 90Sr was released over five days into alluvial gravels 137 m above the Snake River Plain Aquifer. Sampling data from perched water zones 33 m below the release contain very high levels of 90Sr as do soil samples obtained nearer the point of release. Use of traditional simulation approaches using laboratory-measured constant partitioning coefficients ( Kd) cannot simultaneously explain perched water and soil concentrations. To address the discrepancy, a reactive transport approach was adopted to include competitive cation exchange, dissolution/precipitation of calcite, carbon dioxide gas production and transport, and gibbsite precipitation. Simulation results using this model suggest that some of the 90Sr could have been transported very rapidly immediately after the release with the acceleration facilitated by competition for cation exchange sites with high sodium concentrations in the released liquid and calcium dissolved from calcite, and to a lesser extent by formation of aqueous complexes with nitrate. Once the leading edge of the liquid assemblage was flushed from the alluvium, the mobility of the remaining 90Sr decreased significantly in the absence of the competing cations. Calculations indicate that there should be a net increase in calcite, suggesting that 90Sr could be entrained in the mineral lattice, but insufficient field data exist for confirmation. Sensitivity studies show that the cation exchange selectivity coefficients were the most sensitive individual parameters determining the 90Sr distribution

  7. Accelerated transport of (90)Sr following a release of high ionic strength solution in vadose zone sediments.

    PubMed

    Hull, Laurence C; Schafer, Annette L

    2008-04-28

    Numerical simulation of cation exchange and mineral precipitation/dissolution reactions using the multiphase reactive geochemical transport code TOUGHREACT has provided important insight into the distribution of (90)Sr among layers of geologic strata in a complex vadose zone at the U. S. Department of Energy's Idaho National Laboratory. During a transfer operation in November 1972, 70.4 m(3) of acidic, high ionic strength liquid containing 15,900 Ci of (90)Sr was released over five days into alluvial gravels 137 m above the Snake River Plain Aquifer. Sampling data from perched water zones 33 m below the release contain very high levels of (90)Sr as do soil samples obtained nearer the point of release. Use of traditional simulation approaches using laboratory-measured constant partitioning coefficients (K(d)) cannot simultaneously explain perched water and soil concentrations. To address the discrepancy, a reactive transport approach was adopted to include competitive cation exchange, dissolution/precipitation of calcite, carbon dioxide gas production and transport, and gibbsite precipitation. Simulation results using this model suggest that some of the (90)Sr could have been transported very rapidly immediately after the release with the acceleration facilitated by competition for cation exchange sites with high sodium concentrations in the released liquid and calcium dissolved from calcite, and to a lesser extent by formation of aqueous complexes with nitrate. Once the leading edge of the liquid assemblage was flushed from the alluvium, the mobility of the remaining (90)Sr decreased significantly in the absence of the competing cations. Calculations indicate that there should be a net increase in calcite, suggesting that (90)Sr could be entrained in the mineral lattice, but insufficient field data exist for confirmation. Sensitivity studies show that the cation exchange selectivity coefficients were the most sensitive individual parameters determining the (90)Sr

  8. Effects of ionic strength on the surface tension and nonequilibrium interfacial characteristics of poly(sodium styrenesulfonate)/dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide mixtures.

    PubMed

    Ábrahám, Ágnes; Kardos, Attila; Mezei, Amália; Campbell, Richard A; Varga, Imre

    2014-05-01

    We rationalize the surface tension behavior and nonequilibrium interfacial characteristics of high molecular weight poly(sodium styrenesulfonate)/dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (NaPSS/DTAB) mixtures with respect to the ionic strength. Excellent agreement is achieved between experimental data and our recent empirical model [Langmuir 2013, 29, 11554], which is based on the lack of colloidal stability of bulk aggregates in the phase separation region and has no free fitting parameters. We show that the size of a surface tension peak positioned at the edge of the phase separation region can be suppressed by the addition of inert electrolyte, which lowers the critical micelle concentration in relation to the phase separation region. Such manipulation of the peak is possible for the 100 ppm NaPSS/DTAB system because there is a high free surfactant concentration in the phase separation region. The close agreement of our model with the experimental data of samples in the phase separation region with respect to the ionic strength indicates that the surface tension behavior can be rationalized in terms of comprehensive precipitation regardless of whether there is a peak or not. The time scale of precipitation for the investigated system is on the order of one month, which emphasizes the need to understand the dynamic changes in the state of bulk aggregation in order to rationalize the surface properties of strongly interacting mixtures; steady state surface properties measured in the interim period will represent samples far from equilibrium. We show also that the surface properties of samples of low ionic strength outside the equilibrium phase separation region can be extreme opposites depending on the sample history, which is attributed to the generation of trapped nonequilibrium states. This work highlights the need to validate the underlying nature of oppositely charged polyelectrolyte/surfactant systems prior to the interpretation of experimental data within an

  9. Effects of background electrolytes and ionic strength on enrichment of Cd(II) ions with magnetic graphene oxide-supported sulfanilic acid.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xin-jiang; Liu, Yun-guo; Zeng, Guang-ming; You, Shao-hong; Wang, Hui; Hu, Xi; Guo, Yi-ming; Tan, Xiao-fei; Guo, Fang-ying

    2014-12-01

    To elucidate the influence mechanisms of background electrolytes and ionic strength on Cd(II) removal, the adsorption of Cd(II) onto magnetic graphene oxide-supported sulfanilic acid (MGO-SA) in aqueous solutions containing different types and concentrations of background electrolytes was studied. The results indicate that Cd(II) adsorption was strongly dependent on pH and could be strongly affected by background electrolytes and ionic strength. The Cd(II) removal was decreased with the presence of background electrolyte cations (Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Mn(2+), Zn(2+), and Ni(2+)), and the divalent cations exerted more obvious influences on the Cd(II) uptake than the monovalent cations at pH 6. Both Cl(-) and NO3(-) had negative effects on Cd(II) adsorption because they can form water-soluble metal-anion complexes with Cd(II) ions. The presence of 0.01molL(-1) Na3PO4 reduced the removal percentage of Cd(II) at pH<5 but extremely enhanced the Cd(II) removal when the pH>5. The Cd(II) adsorption was sensitive to changes in the concentration of NaCl, NaNO3, NaClO4, and Na3PO4. Besides, the adsorption isotherm of Cd(II) onto MGO-SA could be well described by the Freundlich model and was also influenced by the type of background electrolyte ions and the ionic strength. PMID:25238326

  10. Immunological detection of left-handed Z DNA in isolated polytene chromosomes. Effects of ionic strength, pH, temperature and topological stress.

    PubMed Central

    Robert-Nicoud, M; Arndt-Jovin, D J; Zarling, D A; Jovin, T M

    1984-01-01

    We have searched for the presence of left-handed Z DNA in unfixed polytene chromosomes isolated from the salivary glands of Chironomus thummi larvae. Physiological as well as fixation conditions were explored to assess the effects of a variety of factors known to influence the B-Z equilibrium. At neutral pH and physiological ionic strength, a weak immunofluorescence staining confined to the periphery of chromosomal bands is elicited but only by using high concentrations of anti-Z DNA immunoglobulin (IgG). The accessibility of internal highly condensed structures, as monitored with antibodies against core histones, is very limited under these conditions. Increasing the ionic strength exposes core histone determinants but results in a decondensation of the bands. The staining for Z DNA is still weak and primarily restricted to regions resisting decondensation or undergoing collapse. Dramatic changes in anti-Z DNA immunofluorescence intensities occur upon short exposure to low pH. Adjustment of the pH between 2.5 and 2.0 leads to an abrupt large increase in antibody binding, at first confined to a few specific bands and then generalized to bands throughout the chromosomes in a pattern very similar to that elicited in classical acid-fixed squash preparations. The acid-mediated effects are influenced by ionic strength, temperature and prior removal of histones; they can be mimicked by exposure to high temperature at neutral pH. The 'transition pH' assessed with a monoclonal IgG specific for left-handed d(G-C)n sequences is slightly lower than in the case of polyclonal antibodies which also recognize d(A-C)n X d(G-T)n.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 7. PMID:6373247

  11. Effect of Calcium Ion Removal, Ionic Strength, and Temperature on the Conformation Change in Calmodulin Protein at Physiological pH

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The response of the calmodulin (CaM) protein as a function of calcium ion removal, ionic strength, and temperature at physiological pH condition was investigated using classical molecular dynamics simulations. Changing the ionic strength and temperature came out to be two of the possible routes for observing a conformation change in the protein. This behavior is similar to the conformation change observed in our previous study where a change in the pH was observed to trigger a conformation change in this protein. In the present study, as the calcium ions are removed from the protein, the protein is observed to acquire more flexibility. This flexibility is observed to be more prominent at a higher ionic strength. At a lower ionic strength of 150 mM with all the four calcium ions intact, the N- and C-lobes are observed to come close to a distance of 30 Å starting from an initial separation distance of 48 Å. This conformation change is observed to take place around 50 ns in a simulation of 100 ns. As a second parameter, temperature is observed to play a key role in the conformation change of the protein. With an increase in the temperature, the protein is observed to acquire a more compact form with the formation of different salt bridges between the residues of the N- and the C-lobes. The salt bridge formation leads to an overall lowering of the energy of the protein thus favoring the bending of the two lobes towards each other. The improper and dihedral terms show a significant shift thus leading to a more compact form on increasing the temperature. Another set of simulations is also performed at an increased temperature of 500 K to verify the reproducibility of the results. Thus a set of three possible alterations in the environmental conditions of the protein CaM are studied, with two of them giving rise to a conformation change and one adding flexibility to the protein. PMID:25548559

  12. Effect of Calcium Ion Removal, Ionic Strength, and Temperature on the Conformation Change in Calmodulin Protein at Physiological pH.

    PubMed

    Negi, Sunita

    2014-01-01

    The response of the calmodulin (CaM) protein as a function of calcium ion removal, ionic strength, and temperature at physiological pH condition was investigated using classical molecular dynamics simulations. Changing the ionic strength and temperature came out to be two of the possible routes for observing a conformation change in the protein. This behavior is similar to the conformation change observed in our previous study where a change in the pH was observed to trigger a conformation change in this protein. In the present study, as the calcium ions are removed from the protein, the protein is observed to acquire more flexibility. This flexibility is observed to be more prominent at a higher ionic strength. At a lower ionic strength of 150 mM with all the four calcium ions intact, the N- and C-lobes are observed to come close to a distance of 30 Å starting from an initial separation distance of 48 Å. This conformation change is observed to take place around 50 ns in a simulation of 100 ns. As a second parameter, temperature is observed to play a key role in the conformation change of the protein. With an increase in the temperature, the protein is observed to acquire a more compact form with the formation of different salt bridges between the residues of the N- and the C-lobes. The salt bridge formation leads to an overall lowering of the energy of the protein thus favoring the bending of the two lobes towards each other. The improper and dihedral terms show a significant shift thus leading to a more compact form on increasing the temperature. Another set of simulations is also performed at an increased temperature of 500 K to verify the reproducibility of the results. Thus a set of three possible alterations in the environmental conditions of the protein CaM are studied, with two of them giving rise to a conformation change and one adding flexibility to the protein. PMID:25548559

  13. Improved antibody detection by the use of range expansion and longer filter wavelength in a low ionic strength-protamine sulphate Auto-Analyzer system.

    PubMed Central

    Downie, D M; Voak, D

    1976-01-01

    Range expansion, achieved by insertion of a variable resistance between the colorimeter and the recorder together with the use of 550 nm colorimeter filters, has resulted in markedly improved sensitivity for antibody detection, and improved sample identification, in a low ionic strength-protamine sulphate (LISPS) system. Range expansion also permits a lower concentration of red cells to be used, thus economizing on fully typed cells. Glycerol stored frozen cells were found to be only slightly less sensitive than fresh cells in this system. PMID:1002844

  14. Smart Macroporous IPN Hydrogels Responsive to pH, Temperature, and Ionic Strength: Synthesis, Characterization, and Evaluation of Controlled Release of Drugs.

    PubMed

    Dragan, Ecaterina Stela; Cocarta, Ana Irina

    2016-05-18

    Fast responsive macroporous interpenetrating polymer network (IPN) hydrogels were fabricated in this work by a sequential strategy, as follows: the first network, consisting of poly(N,N-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEM) cross-linked with N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide (BAAm), was prepared at -18 °C, the second network consisting of poly(acrylamide) (PAAm) cross-linked with BAAm, being also generated by cryogelation technique. Both single network cryogels (SNC) and IPN cryogels were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and water uptake. The presence of weak polycation PDMAEM endows the SNCs and the IPNs cryogels with sensitivity at numerous external stimuli such as pH, temperature, ionic strength, electric field, among which the first three were investigated in this work. It was found that the initial concentration of monomers in both networks was the key factor in tailoring the properties of IPN cryogels such as swelling kinetics, equilibrium water content (EWC), phase transition temperature and the response at ionic strength. The pore size increased after the formation of the second network, the swelling kinetics in pure water being comparable with that of the SNC, phase transition temperature being situated in the range 35-36 °C for IPN cryogels. The water uptake at equilibrium (WUeq) abruptly increased at pH < 3.0 in the case of SNCs, whereas the response of IPN cryogels at the decrease of pH from 6.0 to 1.0 was strongly dependent on the gel structure, the values of WUeq being lower at a higher concentration of DMAEM in the first network, the monomer concentration in the second network being about 10 wt %. The pH response was very much diminished when the monomer concentration was high in both networks (15 wt % in the first network, and 21 wt % in the second network). The increase of the ionic strength from 0 up to 0.3 M NaCl led to the decrease of the WUeq, for all cryogels, the level of dehydration

  15. The effect of Ca2+ ions and ionic strength on Mn(II) oxidation by spores of the marine Bacillus sp. SG-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyoda, Kazuhiro; Tebo, Bradley M.

    2013-01-01

    Manganese(IV) oxides, believed to form primarily through microbial activities, are extremely important mineral phases in marine environments where they scavenge a variety of trace elements and thereby control their distributions. The presence of various ions common in seawater are known to influence Mn oxide mineralogy yet little is known about the effect of these ions on the kinetics of bacterial Mn(II) oxidation and Mn oxide formation. We examined factors affecting bacterial Mn(II) oxidation by spores of the marine Bacillus sp. strain SG-1 in natural and artificial seawater of varying ionic conditions. Ca2+ concentration dramatically affected Mn(II) oxidation, while Mg2+, Sr2+, K+, Na+ and NO3- ions had no effect. The rate of Mn(II) oxidation at 10 mM Ca2+ (seawater composition) was four or five times that without Ca2+. The relationship between Ca2+ content and oxidation rate demonstrates that the equilibrium constant is small (on the order of 0.1) and the binding coefficient is 0.5. The pH optimum for Mn(II) oxidation changed depending on the amount of Ca2+ present, suggesting that Ca2+ exerts a direct effect on the enzyme perhaps as a stabilizing bridge between polypeptide components. We also examined the effect of varying concentrations of NaCl or KNO3 (0-2000 mM) on the kinetics of Mn(II) oxidation in solutions containing 10 mM Ca2+. Mn(II) oxidation was unaffected by changes in ionic strength (I) below 0.2, but it was inhibited by increasing salt concentrations above this value. Our results suggest that the critical coagulation concentration is around 200 mM of salt (I = ca. 0.2), and that the ionic strength of seawater (I > 0.2) accelerates the precipitation of Mn oxides around the spores. Under these conditions, the aggregation of Mn oxides reduces the supply of dissolved O2 and/or Mn2+ and inhibits the Mn(II) → Mn(III) step controlling the enzymatic oxidation of Mn(II). Our results suggest that the hardness and ionic strength of the aquatic environment

  16. Salt-tolerant rootstock increases yield of pepper under salinity through maintenance of photosynthetic performance and sinks strength.

    PubMed

    Penella, Consuelo; Landi, Marco; Guidi, Lucia; Nebauer, Sergio G; Pellegrini, Elisa; San Bautista, Alberto; Remorini, Damiano; Nali, Cristina; López-Galarza, Salvador; Calatayud, Angeles

    2016-04-01

    The performance of a salt-tolerant pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) accession (A25) utilized as a rootstock was assessed in two experiments. In a first field experiment under natural salinity conditions, we observed a larger amount of marketable fruit (+75%) and lower Blossom-end Root incidence (-31%) in commercial pepper cultivar Adige (A) grafted onto A25 (A/A25) when compared with ungrafted plants. In order to understand this behavior a second greenhouse experiment was conducted to determine growth, mineral partitioning, gas exchange and chlorophyll a fluorescence parameters, antioxidant systems and proline content in A and A/A25 plants under salinity conditions (80 mM NaCl for 14 days). Salt stress induced significantly stunted growth of A plants (-40.6% of leaf dry weight) compared to the control conditions, while no alterations were observed in A/A25 at the end of the experiment. Accumulation of Na(+) and Cl(-) in leaves and roots was similar in either grafted or ungrafted plants. Despite the activation of protective mechanisms (increment of superoxide dismutase, catalase, ascorbate peroxidase activity and non-photochemical quenching), A plants showed severely reduced photosynthetic CO2 assimilation (-45.6% of AN390) and substantial buildup of malondialdehyde (MDA) by-product, suggesting the inability to counteract salt-triggered damage. In contrast, A/A25 plants, which had a constitutive enhanced root apparatus, were able to maintain the shoot and root growth under salinity conditions by supporting the maintained photosynthetic performance. No increases in catalase and ascorbate peroxidase activities were observed in response to salinity, and MDA levels increased only slightly; indicating that alleviation of oxidative stress did not occur in A/A25 plants. In these plants the increased proline levels could protect enzymatic stability from salt-triggered damage, preserving the photosynthetic performance. The results could indicate that salt stress was vanished by

  17. Solubility and modeling acid-base properties of adrenaline in NaCl aqueous solutions at different ionic strengths and temperatures.

    PubMed

    Bretti, Clemente; Cigala, Rosalia Maria; Crea, Francesco; De Stefano, Concetta; Vianelli, Giuseppina

    2015-10-12

    Solubility and acid-base properties of adrenaline were studied in NaCl aqueous solutions at different ionic strengths (0ionic strength was modeled by means of the Debye-Hückel type equation and of the SIT (Specific ion Interaction Theory) approach. The specific interaction parameters of the ion pairs were also reported. For the protonation constants, the following thermodynamic values at infinite dilution were obtained: T=298.15 K, logK1(H0)=10.674±0.018 and logK2(H0)=8.954±0.022; T=310.15K, logK1(H0)=10.355±0.018 and logK2(H0)=8.749±0.030. PMID:26122929

  18. An Aqueous Thermodynamic Model for the Complexation of Sodium and Strontium with Organic Chelates valid to High Ionic Strength. I. Ethylenedinitrilotetraacetic acid (EDTA)

    SciTech Connect

    Felmy, Andrew R.; Mason, Marvin J.

    2003-04-01

    An aqueous thermodynamic model is developed, which accurately describes the effects of Na+ complexation, ionic strength, carbonate concentration, and temperature on the complexation of Sr2+ by ethylenedinitrilotetraacetic acid (EDTA) under basic conditions. The model is developed from the analysis of literature data on apparent equilibrium constants, enthalpies, and heat capacities; as well as on an extensive set of solubility data on SrCO3(c) in the presence of EDTA obtained as part of this study. The solubility data for SrCO3(c) were obtained in solutions ranging in Na2CO3 concentration from 0.01m to 1.8m, in NaNO3 concentration from 0 to 5m, and at temperatures extending to 75?C. The final aqueous thermodynamic model is based upon the equations of Pitzer and requires the inclusion of a NaEDTA3- species. An accurate model for the ionic strength dependence of the ion-interaction coefficients for the SrEDTA2- and NaEDTA3- aqueous species allows the extrapolation of standard state equilibrium constants for these species which are significantly different from the 0.1m reference state values available in the literature. The final model is tested by application to chemical systems containing competing metal ions (i.e., Ca2+) to further verify the proposed model and indicate the applicability of the model parameters to chemical systems containing other divalent metal-EDTA complexes.

  19. Studies of a weak polyampholyte at the air-buffer interface: The effect of varying pH and ionic strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicuta, Pietro; Hopkinson, Ian

    2001-05-01

    We have carried out experiments to probe the static and dynamic interfacial properties of β-casein monolayers spread at the air-buffer interface, and analyzed these results in the context of models of weak polyampholytes. Measurements have been made systematically over a wide range of ionic strength and pH. In the semidilute regime of surface concentration a scaling exponent, which can be linked to the degree of chain swelling, is found. This shows that at pH close to the isoelectric point, the protein is compact. At pH away from the isoelectric pH the protein is extended. The transition between compact and extended states is continuous. As a function of increasing ionic strength, we observe swelling of the protein at the isoelectric pH but contraction of the protein at pH values away from it. These behaviors are typical of a those predicted theoretically for a weak polyampholyte. Dilational moduli measurements, made as a function of surface concentration exhibit maxima that are linked to the collapse of hydrophilic regions of the protein into the subphase. Based on this data we present a configuration map of the protein configuration in the monolayer. These findings are supported by strain (surface pressure) relaxation measurements and surface quasielastic light scattering measurements which suggest the existence of loops and tails in the subphase at higher surface concentrations.

  20. Myosin assembly critical for the enzyme activity of smooth muscle myosin phosphatase: effects of MgATP, ionic strength, and Mg(2+).

    PubMed

    Sato, O; Ogawa, Y

    2001-06-01

    We suggested that an assembled form of phosphorylated myosin (P-myosin) might exhibit higher affinity for smooth muscle myosin phosphatase (SMMP) than dissociated P-myosin on the basis of the effect of MgATP [Sato and Ogawa (1999) J. Biochem. 126, 787-797]. To further deepen our understanding, we examined the SMMP activity and P-myosin assembly with various ionic strengths and Mg(2+) concentrations, with and without MgATP, all of which are well known to be critical for myosin assembly. The structure of myosin molecules was directly observed by electron microscopy using a rotary shadowing procedure, which was found to be consistent with the sedimentation assay. We found that the SMMP activity was always high when P-myosin was assembled. MgATP, which disassembled P-myosin mostly into a folded conformation, in contrast, decreased the enzyme activity. We also found that glycerol had a dissociating action on P-myosin, primarily dissociating it into an extended conformation, resulting in reduced SMMP activity, and that increases in the ionic strength and Mg(2+) (>5 mM) inhibited SMMP. These results indicate that myosin assembly is essential for SMMP activity. PMID:11388902

  1. A study of the mechanism of ferritin formation. The effect of pH, ionic strength and temperature, inhibition by imidazole and kinetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Pâgues, E; Pâques, A; Crichton, R R

    1980-06-01

    The rate of ferritin formation in the buffers 4-morpholinepropanesulphonic acid (Mops), 4-morpholineethanesulphonic acid (Mes) and imidazole at pH values from 5.0 to 6.5 is quite similar. However, the rate of iron deposition is much greater in Mops and Mes at pH values above 6.5 than in imidazole. Increasing the concentration of imidazole inhibits ferritin formation and also leads to a transformation in the shape of the kinetic curves observed. This inhibiton is also observed at constant ionic strength but is not found for non-complexing buffers such as Mops. An inhibition of ferritin formation in imidazole and in Mops buffers is also observed with increasing ionic strength. We conclude that the unprotonated form of imidazole inhibits iron deposition, possibly by binding to the active site of the apoferritin molecule. The temperature dependence of iron deposition was examined. An optimum temperature of 50 degrees C was found but the Arrhenius plots were non-linear. On the basis of these and previous results, a kinetic model is developed which accounts well for ferritin formation at pH values below 6.5 and above 7.0 in non-complexing buffers. The model does not account for the kinetics observed at pH values close to neutrality. PMID:6249590

  2. Forces of interactions between bare and polymer-coated iron and silica: effect of pH, ionic strength, and humic acids.

    PubMed

    Pensini, Erica; Sleep, Brent E; Yip, Christopher M; O'Carroll, Denis

    2012-12-18

    The interactions between a silica substrate and iron particles were investigated using atomic force microscopy-based force spectroscopy (AFM). The micrometer- and nanosized iron particles employed were either bare or coated with carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC), a polymer utilized to stabilize iron particle suspensions. The effect of water chemistry on the forces of interaction was probed by varying ionic strength (with 100 mM NaCl and 100 mM CaCl₂) or pH (4, 5.5, and 8) or by introducing 10 mg/L of humic acids (HA). When particles were uncoated, the forces upon approach between silica and iron were attractive at pH 4 and 5.5 and in 100 mM CaCl₂ at pH 8, but they were negligible in 100 mM NaCl buffered to pH 8 and repulsive in water buffered to pH 8 and in HA solutions. HA produced electrosteric repulsion between iron particles and silica, likely due to its sorption to iron particles. HA sorption to silica was excluded on the basis of experiments conducted with a quartz-crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring. Repulsion with CMC-coated iron was attributed to electrosteric forces, which were damped at high ionic strength. An extended DLVO model and a modified version of Ohshima's theory were successfully utilized to model AFM data. PMID:23163600

  3. Ionic strength and composition govern the elasticity of biological membranes. A study of model DMPC bilayers by force- and transmission IR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Šegota, Suzana; Vojta, Danijela; Pletikapić, Galja; Baranović, Goran

    2015-02-01

    Infrared (IR) spectroscopy was used to quantify the ion mixture effect of seawater (SW), particularly the contribution of Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) as dominant divalent cations, on the thermotropic phase behaviour of 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-posphocholine (DMPC) bilayers. The changed character of the main transition at 24 °C from sharp to gradual in films and the 1 °C shift of the main transition temperature in dispersions reflect the interactions of lipid headgroups with the ions in SW. Force spectroscopy was used to quantify the nanomechanical hardness of a DMPC supported lipid bilayer (SLB). Considering the electrostatic and ion binding equilibrium contributions while systematically probing the SLB in various salt solutions, we showed that ionic strength had a decisive influence on its nanomechanics. The mechanical hardness of DMPC SLBs in the liquid crystalline phase linearly increases with the increasing fraction of all ion-bound lipids in a series of monovalent salt solutions. It also linearly increases in the gel phase but almost three times faster (the corresponding slopes are 4.9 nN/100 mM and 13.32 nN/100 mM, respectively). We also showed that in the presence of divalent ions (Ca(2+) and Mg(2+)) the bilayer mechanical hardness was unproportionally increased, and that was accompanied with the decrease of Na(+) ion and increase of Cl(-) ion bound lipids. The underlying process is a cooperative and competitive ion binding in both the gel and the liquid crystalline phase. Bilayer hardness thus turned out to be very sensitive to ionic strength as well as to ionic composition of the surrounding medium. In particular, the indicated correlation helped us to emphasize the colligative properties of SW as a naturally occurring complex ion mixture. PMID:25447291

  4. Effects of ionic strength and sulfate upon thermal aggregation of grape chitinases and thaumatin-like proteins in a model system.

    PubMed

    Marangon, Matteo; Sauvage, Francois-Xavier; Waters, Elizabeth J; Vernhet, Aude

    2011-03-23

    Consumers expect white wines to be clear. During the storage of wines, grape proteins can aggregate to form haze. These proteins, particularly chitinases and thaumatin-like proteins (TL-proteins), need to be removed, and this is done through adsorption by bentonite, an effective but inefficient wine-processing step. Alternative processes are sought, but, for them to be successful, an in-depth understanding of the causes of protein hazing is required. This study investigated the role played by ionic strength (I) and sulfate toward the aggregation of TL-proteins and chitinases upon heating. Purified proteins were dissolved in model wine and analyzed by dynamic light scattering (DLS). The effect of I on protein aggregation was investigated within the range from 2 to 500 mM/L. For chitinases, aggregation occurred during heating with I values of 100 and 500 mM/L, depending on the isoform. This aggregation immediately led to the formation of large particles (3 μm, visible haze after cooling). TL-protein aggregation was observed only with I of 500 mM/L; it mainly developed during cooling and led to the formation of finite aggregates (400 nm) that remained invisible. With sulfate in the medium chitinases formed visible haze immediately when heat was applied, whereas TL-proteins aggregated during cooling but not into particles large enough to be visible to the naked eye. The data show that the aggregation mechanisms of TL-proteins and chitinases are different and are influenced by the ionic strength and ionic content of the model wine. Under the conditions used in this study, chitinases were more prone to precipitate and form haze than TL-proteins. PMID:21361294

  5. High Conductivity, High Strength Solid Electrolytes Formed by in Situ Encapsulation of Ionic Liquids in Nanofibrillar Methyl Cellulose Networks.

    PubMed

    Mantravadi, Ramya; Chinnam, Parameswara Rao; Dikin, Dmitriy A; Wunder, Stephanie L

    2016-06-01

    Strong, solid polymer electrolyte ion gels, with moduli in the MPa range, a capacitance of 2 μF/cm(2), and high ambient ionic conductivities (>1 × 10(-3) S/cm), all at room temperature, have been prepared from butyl-N-methyl pyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl) imide (PYR14TFSI) and methyl cellulose (MC). These properties are particularly attractive for supercapacitor applications. The ion gels are prepared by codissolution of PYR14TFSI and MC in N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF), which after heating and subsequent cooling form a gel. Evaporation of DMF leave thin, flexible, self-standing ion gels with up to 97 wt % PYR14TFSI, which have the highest combined moduli and ionic conductivity of ion gels to date, with an excellent electrochemical stability window (5.6 V). These favorable properties are attributed to the immiscibility of PYR14TFSI in MC, which permits the ionic conductivity to be independent of the MC at low MC content, and the in situ formation of a volume spanning network of semicrystalline MC nanofibers, which have a high glass transition temperature (Tg = 190 °C) and remain crystalline until they degrade at 300 °C. PMID:27153318

  6. Drug release from E chemistry hypromellose tablets using the Bio-Dis USP type III apparatus: An evaluation of the effect of systematic agitation and ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Asare-Addo, Kofi; Supuk, Enes; Mahdi, Mohammed H; Adebisi, Adeola O; Nep, Elijah; Conway, Barbara R; Kaialy, Waseem; Al-Hamidi, Hiba; Nokhodchi, Ali

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of systematic agitation, increasing ionic strength and gel strength on drug release from a gel-forming matrix (HPMC E10M, E4M and E50LV) using USP type III Bio-Dis apparatus with theophylline as a model drug. The triboelectric charging; particle sizing, water content, true density and SEM of all the hypromellose grades, theophylline and formulated blends were characterised. The results showed that balanced inter-particulate forces exist between drug particles and the excipient surface and this enabled optimum charge to mass ratio to be measured. Agitation and ionic strength affected drug release from E50LV and E4M tablet matrices in comparison to the E10M tablet matrices. Drug release increased substantially when water was used as the dissolution media relative to media at pH 1.2 (containing 0.4M NaCl). The results showed all f2 values for the E10M tablet matrices were above 50 suggesting the drug release from these tablet matrices to be similar. Rheological data also explained the different drug release behaviour with the stress required to yield/erode being 1Pa, 150Pa, and 320Pa, for the E50LV, E4M and E10M respectively. The stiffness of the gel was also found to be varied from 2.5Pa, 176.2Pa and 408.3Pa for the E50LV, E4M and E10M respectively. The lower G' value can be explained by a softer gel being formed after tablet introduction into the dissolution media thereby indicating faster drug release. PMID:27038913

  7. Deposition and Release Behaviour of ZnO Nanoparticles in Saturated Quartz Sand: Role of Biofilm, Ionic Strength, and pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Gukhwa; Han, Yosep; Kim, Donghyun; Bradford, Scott A.; Lee, Byoungcheun; Eom, Igchun; Kim, Pil Je; Choi, Siyoung Q.; Lee, Youngsoo; Kim, Hyunjung

    2015-04-01

    The influence of biofilm, ionic strength, and pH on the deposition and release behavior of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO-NPs) was systematically investigated in well-controlled saturated sand column. The results for the initial transport of the ZnO-NPs at pH 9 showed significant retention at the inlet of the column with hyper-exponential retention profiles regardless of solution ionic strength investigated (0.1 and 10 mM) and Pseudomonas putida biofilm coating; however, the increase in solution ionic strength and the presence of biofilm onto quartz sand tended to increase the retention of ZnO-NPs. The trend was likely attributed to more favorable NPs-NPs interaction and greater surface roughness, respectively. The results were well supported by the DLVO interaction energy profiles and Electron Microscopic observations. For the release tests, particle free solution at pH 6 was continuously injected into the column with the ZnO-NPs retained during the initial transport tests. The results for breakthrough curves and time-lapsed retention profiles showed that reducing solution pH led to the release of large amount of the initially retained ZnO-NPs, and the release rate was observed to be greater for bare silica than biofilm-coated sand. The release of ZnO-NPs was likely attributed to the dissolution of Zn2+ due to the change of pH. The proposed mechanism was further verified by conducting additional column tests at higher pHs (pH 9 and 10), which showed significantly reduced release of ZnO-NPs, and even nearly no release at pH 10. The findings from this study suggests that there exists high potential of complete transport of ZnO-NPs into groundwater in that the pH of various soil environments typically ranges from 5 to 9. This work was supported by the National Institute of Environmental Research, Ministry of Environment and the Energy Efficiency & Resources Core Technology Program of the Korea Institute of Energy Technology Evaluation and Planning (KETEP), granted

  8. Modeling cesium retention onto Na-, K- and Ca-smectite: Effects of ionic strength, exchange and competing cations on the determination of selectivity coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Missana, Tiziana; Benedicto, Ana; García-Gutiérrez, Miguel; Alonso, Ursula

    2014-03-01

    Cesium (137Cs) retention onto three homoionic smectites (Na-, K- and Ca-smectite), obtained from natural Spanish FEBEX bentonite, was studied. Special emphasis was given to the analysis of non-linear sorption behaviour and the dependence of selectivity on the ionic strength. A very large set of experimental sorption data was generated from sorption tests under a wide range of pHs (2-11), ionic strengths (10-3 to 100 M), and radionuclide concentrations (10-10 to 10-3 M). The aqueous phase, in contact with the clay, was analysed to quantify the effects of the presence of trace aqueous ions on Cs retention. For all the exchanged clays, Cs sorption was non-linear and a two-site exchange model approach was adopted to interpret and model sorption data. Highly selective sites for Cs sorption (Type 1 sites, T1), resembling those present in micaceous materials, with very low capacity but controlling uptake of Cs at low concentration, were observed. The logarithm value of selectivity coefficients determined for Cs+ in respect to Na+, K+ and Ca2+ in these sites is: LogNaCsK(T1)=7.59±0.15,LogKCsK(T1)=5.15±0.15 and LogCaCsK(T1)=14.41±0.17, respectively. The exchange sites at the surface of smectite sheets (planar sites), with a capacity approximately equivalent to the cation exchange capacity (CEC) of the clay, constitute the second type of sorption sites (Type 2 sites, T2). The logarithm of the selectivity coefficients determined for Cs+ with respect to Na+, K+ and Ca2+ is: LogNaCsK(T2)=1.68±0.15,LogKCsK(T2)=1.16±0.15LogCaCsK(T2)=3.02± 0.15, respectively. The analysis of the dependence of sorption values on the ionic strength clearly indicated that for a correct interpretation of data, competition effects of trace ions in solution must be always accounted for. Data obtained in this work and performed analyses are basic to explain the behaviour of raw FEBEX bentonite, and other smectite-based clay materials, under more complex experimental conditions.

  9. High ionic strength depresses muscle contractility by decreasing both force per cross-bridge and the number of strongly attached cross-bridges.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Bahadir, Anzel; Kawai, Masataka

    2015-06-01

    An increase in ionic strength (IS) lowers Ca(2+) activated tension in muscle fibres, however, its molecular mechanism is not well understood. In this study, we used single rabbit psoas fibres to perform sinusoidal analyses. During Ca(2+) activation, the effects of ligands (ATP, Pi, and ADP) at IS ranging 150-300 mM were studied on three rate constants to characterize elementary steps of the cross-bridge cycle. The IS effects were studied because a change in IS modifies the inter- and intra-molecular interactions, hence they may shed light on the molecular mechanisms of force generation. Both the ATP binding affinity (K1) and the ADP binding affinity (K 0) increased to 2-3x, and the Pi binding affinity (K5) decreased to 1/2, when IS was raised from 150 to 300 mM. The effect on ATP/ADP can be explained by stereospecific and hydrophobic interaction, and the effect on Pi can be explained by the electrostatic interaction with myosin. The increase in IS increased cross-bridge detachment steps (k2 and k-4), indicating that electrostatic repulsion promotes these steps. However, IS did not affect attachment steps (k-2 and k4). Consequently, the equilibrium constant of the detachment step (K2) increased by ~100%, and the force generation step (K4) decreased by ~30%. These effects together diminished the number of force-generating cross-bridges by 11%. Force/cross-bridge (T56) decreased by 26%, which correlates well with a decrease in the Debye length that limits the ionic atmosphere where ionic interactions take place. We conclude that the major effect of IS is a decrease in force/cross-bridge, but a decrease in the number of force generating cross-bridge also takes place. The stiffness during rigor induction did not change with IS, demonstrating that in-series compliance is not much affected by IS. PMID:25836331

  10. Effect of ionic strength on intra-protein electron transfer reactions: The case study of charge recombination within the bacterial reaction center.

    PubMed

    Giustini, Mauro; Parente, Matteo; Mallardi, Antonia; Palazzo, Gerardo

    2016-09-01

    It is a common believe that intra-protein electron transfer (ET) involving reactants and products that are overall electroneutral are not influenced by the ions of the surrounding solution. The results presented here show an electrostatic coupling between the ionic atmosphere surrounding a membrane protein (the reaction center (RC) from the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides) and two very different intra-protein ET processes taking place within it. Specifically we have studied the effect of salt concentration on: i) the kinetics of the charge recombination between the reduced primary quinone acceptor QA(-) and the primary photoxidized donor P(+); ii) the thermodynamic equilibrium (QA(-)↔QB(-)) for the ET between QA(-) and the secondary quinone acceptor QB. A distinctive point of this investigation is that reactants and products are overall electroneutral. The protein electrostatics has been described adopting the lowest level of complexity sufficient to grasp the experimental phenomenology and the impact of salt on the relative free energy level of reactants and products has been evaluated according to suitable thermodynamic cycles. The ionic strength effect was found to be independent on the ion nature for P(+)QA(-) charge recombination where the leading electrostatic term was the dipole moment. In the case of the QA(-)↔QB(-) equilibrium, the relative stability of QA(-) and QB(-) was found to depend on the salt concentration in a fashion that is different for chaotropic and kosmotropic ions. In such a case both dipole moment and quadrupole moments of the RC must be considered. PMID:27297026