Science.gov

Sample records for ionization cooling experiment

  1. MICE: The International Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, Daniel M.

    2006-03-20

    Ionization cooling of a muon beam is a key technique for a Neutrino Factory or Muon Collider. An international collaboration is mounting an experiment to demonstrate muon ionization cooling at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory. We aim to complete the experiment by 2010.

  2. The International Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment: MICE and Neutrino Factories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freemire, Ben

    2010-03-01

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is an accelerator and particle physics experiment aimed at demonstrating the technique of ionization cooling on a beam of muons. Ionization cooling is the process by which muons are sent through an absorbing material, thereby losing energy and decreasing their normalized emittance. The muons are then reaccelerated in the appropriate direction with radio frequency (RF) cavities. This produces an overall reduction in transverse emittance of the muon beam. Ionization cooling could be a key technique in the design of a high intensity Neutrino Factory.

  3. Status of MICE, the international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Sandstroem, R.

    2008-02-21

    An international experiment designed to demonstrate muon ionization cooling is being built at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL). The experiment consists of one cell of a Neutrino Factory cooling channel, along with upstream and downstream detectors to identify individual muons and measure their initial and final emittance to a precision of 0.1%. Magnetic design of the beamline and cooling channel are complete, and portions are under construction. This paper describes the experiment, including cooling channel hardware designs, fabrication status, and running plans.

  4. STATUS OF THE INTERNATIONAL MUON IONIZATION COOLING EXPERIMENT(MICE)

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2007-07-18

    An international experiment to demonstrate muon ionization cooling is scheduled for beam at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in 2007. The experiment comprises one cell of the Study II cooling channel [1], along with upstream and downstream detectors to identify individual muons and measure their initial and final 6D phase-space parameters to a precision of 0.1%. Magnetic design of the beam line and cooling channel are complete and portions are under construction. The experiment will be described, including cooling channel hardware designs, fabrication status, and running plans. Phase 1 of the experiment will prepare the beam line and provide detector systems, including time-of-flight, Cherenkov, scintillating-fiber trackers and their spectrometer solenoids, and an electromagnetic calorimeter. The Phase 2 system will add the cooling channel components, including liquid-hydrogen absorbers embedded in superconducting Focus Coil solenoids, 201-MHz normal-conducting RF cavities, and their surrounding Coupling Coil solenoids. The MICE Collaboration goal is to complete the experiment by 2010; progress toward this is discussed.

  5. MICE: The International Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment: Diagnostic Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bross, Alan D.; Hart, Terrence Lee; /IIT, Chicago

    2008-06-24

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment will make detailed measurements of muon ionization cooling using a new constructed low-energy muon beam at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL). The experiment is a single-particle experiment and utilizes many detector techniques from high energy physics experiments. To characterize and monitor the muon beamline, newly developed scintillating fiber profile monitors and scintillator paddle rate monitors are employed. In order to monitor the purity of the beam and tag the arrival time of individual muons, a dual aerogel Cherenkov system is used, and a plastic scintillator time-of-flight system will be used. The phase-space vectors of the muons will be measured by two identical spectrometer systems (one before and one after the cooling apparatus) which employ a fiber tracker system, and electron and muon calorimeters are used to tag outgoing muons. We will discuss the design of the MICE diagnostic systems, the operation, and give the first results from beam measurements in the MICE experimental hall.

  6. The Reconstruction Software for the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment Trackers

    SciTech Connect

    Dobbs, A.; Long, K.; Santos, E.; Adey, D.; Hanlet, P.; Heidt, C.

    2014-01-01

    The international Muon Ionisation Cooling Experiment (MICE) is designed to demonstrate the principle of muon ionization cooling, for application to a future Neutrino Factory or Muon Collider. In order to measure the change in emittance, MICE is equipped with a pair of high precision scintillating fibre trackers. The trackers are required to measure a 10% change in emittance to 1% accuracy (giving an overall precision of 0.1%). This paper describes the tracker reconstruction software, as a part of the overall MICE software framework, MAUS. Channel clustering is described, proceeding to the formation of space-points, which are then associated with particle tracks using pattern recognition algorithms. Finally a full custom Kalman track fit is performed, to account for energy loss and multiple scattering. Exemplar results are shown for Monte Carlo data.

  7. Phase space density as a measure of cooling performance for the international muon ionization cooling experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, J. S.

    2015-05-03

    The International Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is an experiment to demonstrate ionization cooling of a muon beam in a beamline that shares characteristics with one that might be used for a muon collider or neutrino factory. I describe a way to quantify cooling performance by examining the phase space density of muons, and determining how much that density increases. This contrasts with the more common methods that rely on the covariance matrix and compute emittances from that. I discuss why a direct measure of phase space density might be preferable to a covariance matrix method. I apply this technique to an early proposal for the MICE final step beamline. I discuss how matching impacts the measured performance.

  8. Status of the International Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE)

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, Michael S.; Zisman, Michael S.

    2007-02-02

    An international experiment to demonstrate muonionization cooling is scheduled for beam at RutherfordAppleton Laboratory (RAL) in 2007. The experimentcomprises one cell of the Study II cooling channel [1],along with upstream and downstream detectors to identifyindividual muons and measure their initial and final 6Dphase-space parameters to a precision of 0.1percent. Magneticdesign of the beam line and cooling channel are completeand portions are under construction. The experiment willbe described, including cooling channel hardware designs,fabrication status, and running plans. Phase 1 of theexperiment will prepare the beam line and providedetector systems, including time-of-flight, Cherenkov,scintillating-fiber trackers and their spectrometersolenoids, and an electromagnetic calorimeter. The Phase2 system will add the cooling channel components,including liquid-hydrogen absorbers embedded insuperconducting Focus Coil solenoids, 201-MHz normalconductingRF cavities, and their surrounding CouplingCoil solenoids. The MICE Collaboration goal is tocomplete the experiment by 2010; progress toward this isdiscussed.

  9. MICE: The International Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment: Phase Space Cooling Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, T. L.

    2010-03-30

    MICE is an experimental demonstration of muon ionization cooling using a section of an ionization cooling channel and a muon beam. The muons are produced by the decay of pions from a target dipping into the ISIS proton beam at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL). The channel includes liquid-hydrogen absorbers providing transverse and longitudinal momentum loss and high-gradient radiofrequency (RF) cavities for longitudinal reacceleration, all packed into a solenoidal magnetic channel. MICE will reduce the beam transverse emittance by about 10% for muon momenta between 140 and 240 MeV/c. Time-of-flight (TOF) counters, threshold Cherenkov counters, and a calorimeter will identify background electrons and pions. Spectrometers before and after the cooling section will measure the beam transmission and input and output emittances with an absolute precision of 0.1%.

  10. Fabrication of the prototype 201.25 mhz cavity for a muon ionization cooling experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Rimmer, R.A.; Manning, S.; Manus, R.; Phillips, L.; Stirbet, M.; Worland, K.; Wu, G.; Li, D.; MacGill, R.; Staples, J.; Virostek, S.; Zisman, M.S.; Taminger, K.; Hafley, R.; Martin, R.; Summers, D.; Reep, M.

    2005-05-20

    We describe the fabrication and assembly of the first prototype 201. 25 MHz copper cavity for the muon ionization cooling experiment (MICE). This cavity was developed by the US MUCOOL collaboration and will be tested in the new MUCOOL Test Area at Fermilab. We outline the component and subassembly fabrication steps and the various metal forming and joining methods used to produce the final cavity shape. These include spinning, brazing, TIG welding, electron beam welding, electron beam annealing and deep drawing. Some of the methods developed for this cavity are novel and offer significant cost savings over conventional methods.

  11. Fabrication of the Prototype 201.25 MHz Cavity for a Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    R.A. Rimmer; S. Manning; R. Manus; L. Phillips; M. Stirbet; K. Worland; G. Wu; D. Li; R. MacGill; J. Staples; S. Virostek; M. Zisman; K. Taminger; R. Hafley; R. Martin; D. Summers; M. Reep

    2005-05-01

    We describe the fabrication and assembly of the first prototype 201.25 MHz copper cavity for the muon ionization cooling experiment (MICE). This cavity was developed by the US MUCOOL collaboration and will be tested in the new MUCOOL Test Area at Fermilab. We outline the component and subassembly fabrication steps and the various metal forming and joining methods used to produce the final cavity shape. These include spinning, brazing, TIG welding, electron beam welding, electron beam annealing and deep drawing. Some of the methods developed for this cavity are novel and offer significant cost savings over conventional construction methods.

  12. The MICE Muon Beam on ISIS and the beam-line instrumentation of the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Bogomilov, M.; et al.

    2012-05-01

    The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), which is under construction at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL), will demonstrate the principle of ionization cooling as a technique for the reduction of the phase-space volume occupied by a muon beam. Ionization cooling channels are required for the Neutrino Factory and the Muon Collider. MICE will evaluate in detail the performance of a single lattice cell of the Feasibility Study 2 cooling channel. The MICE Muon Beam has been constructed at the ISIS synchrotron at RAL, and in MICE Step I, it has been characterized using the MICE beam-instrumentation system. In this paper, the MICE Muon Beam and beam-line instrumentation are described. The muon rate is presented as a function of the beam loss generated by the MICE target dipping into the ISIS proton beam. For a 1 V signal from the ISIS beam-loss monitors downstream of our target we obtain a 30 KHz instantaneous muon rate, with a neglible pion contamination in the beam.

  13. The MICE Demonstration of Ionization Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Pasternak, J.; Blackmore, V.; Hunt, C.; Lagrange, J-B.; Long, K.; Collomb, N.; Snopok, P.

    2015-05-01

    Muon beams of low emittance provide the basis for the intense, well-characterised neutrino beams necessary to elucidate the physics of flavour at the Neutrino Factory and to provide lepton-antilepton collisions at energies of up to several TeV at the Muon Collider. The International Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will demonstrate ionization cooling, the technique by which it is proposed to reduce the phase-space volume occupied by the muon beam at such facilities. In an ionization cooling channel, the muon beam passes through a material (the absorber) in which it loses energy. The energy lost is then replaced using RF cavities. The combined effect of energy loss and re-acceleration is to reduce the transverse emittance of the beam (transverse cooling). A major revision of the scope of the project was carried out over the summer of 2014. The revised project plan, which has received the formal endorsement of the international MICE Project Board and the international MICE Funding Agency Committee, will deliver a demonstration of ionization cooling by September 2017. In the revised configuration a central lithium-hydride absorber provides the cooling effect. The magnetic lattice is provided by the two superconducting focus coils and acceleration is provided by two 201 MHz single-cavity modules. The phase space of the muons entering and leaving the cooling cell will be measured by two solenoidal spectrometers. All the superconducting magnets for the ionization cooling demonstration are available at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory and the first single-cavity prototype is under test in the MuCool Test Area at Fermilab. The design of the cooling demonstration experiment will be described together with a summary of the performance of each of its components. The cooling performance of the revised configuration will also be presented.

  14. Ionization Cooling using Parametric Resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Rolland P.

    2008-06-07

    Ionization Cooling using Parametric Resonances was an SBIR project begun in July 2004 and ended in January 2008 with Muons, Inc., (Dr. Rolland Johnson, PI), and Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) (Dr. Yaroslav Derbenev, Subcontract PI). The project was to develop the theory and simulations of Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling (PIC) so that it could be used to provide the extra transverse cooling needed for muon colliders in order to relax the requirements on the proton driver, reduce the site boundary radiation, and provide a better environment for experiments. During the course of the project, the theoretical understanding of PIC was developed and a final exposition is ready for publication. Workshops were sponsored by Muons, Inc. in May and September of 2007 that were devoted to the PIC technique. One outcome of the workshops was the interesting and somewhat unexpected realization that the beam emittances using the PIC technique can get small enough that space charge forces can be important. A parallel effort to develop our G4beamline simulation program to include space charge effects was initiated to address this problem. A method of compensating for chromatic aberrations by employing synchrotron motion was developed and simulated. A method of compensating for spherical aberrations using beamline symmetry was also developed and simulated. Different optics designs have been developed using the OptiM program in preparation for applying our G4beamline simulation program, which contains all the power of the Geant4 toolkit. However, no PIC channel design that has been developed has had the desired cooling performance when subjected to the complete G4beamline simulation program. This is believed to be the consequence of the difficulties of correcting the aberrations associated with the naturally large beam angles and beam sizes of the PIC method that are exacerbated by the fringe fields of the rather complicated channel designs that have been

  15. Epicyclic Twin-Helix Ionization Cooling Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Vasiliy Morozov, Yaroslav Derbenev, A. Afanaciev, R.P. Johnson

    2011-04-01

    Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling (PIC) is proposed as the final 6D cooling stage of a highluminosity muon collider. For the implementation of PIC, we earlier developed an epicyclic twin-helix channel with correlated behavior of the horizontal and vertical betatron motions and dispersion. We now insert absorber plates with short energy-recovering units located next to them at the appropriate locations in the twin-helix channel. We first demonstrate conventional ionization cooling in such a system with the optics uncorrelated. We then adjust the correlated optics state and induce a parametric resonance to study ionization cooling under the resonant condition.

  16. On analog simulation of ionization cooling of muons

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Ming

    2001-06-18

    Analog simulation, proposed here as an alternative approach for the study of ionization cooling of muons, is a scaled cooling experiment, using protons instead of muons as simulation particles. It is intended to be an effective and flexible, quick and inexpensive experiment for the understanding and validation of unprecedentedly complicated cooling physics, for the demonstration and optimization of various elaborated techniques for beam manipulation in 6D phase space. It can be done and perhaps should be done before the costly and time-consuming development of extremely challenging, muon-specific cooling technology. In a nutshell, the idea here is to build a toy machine in a playground of ideas, before staking the Imperial Guard of Napoleon into the bloody battlefield of Waterloo.

  17. The MANX Muon Cooling Experiment Detection System

    SciTech Connect

    Kahn, S. A.; Abrams, R. J.; Ankenbrandt, C.; Cummings, M. A. C.; Johnson, R. P.; Robertsa, T. J.; Yoneharab, K.

    2010-03-30

    The MANX experiment is being proposed to demonstrate the reduction of 6D muon phase space emittance, using a continuous liquid absorber to provide ionization cooling in a helical solenoid magnetic channel. The experiment involves the construction of a two-period-long helical cooling channel (HCC) to reduce the muon invariant emittance by a factor of two. The HCC would replace the current cooling section of the MICE experiment now being set up at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory. The MANX experiment would use the existing MICE spectrometers and muon beam line. We discuss the placement of detection planes to optimize the muon track resolution.

  18. Design Issues for the Superconducting Magnet that Goes Around theLiquid Hydrogen Absorber for the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment(MICE)

    SciTech Connect

    Barr, G.; Cobb, J.H.; Green, M.A.; Lau, W.; Senanayake R.S.; Yang, S.Q.; Baynham, D.E.; Bradshaw, T.W.; Drum, P.V.; Rochford, J.H.; Chilton, Didcot

    2004-06-15

    This report describes the design issues that are associated with a superconducting focusing solenoid that goes around a liquid hydrogen absorber for the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) proposed for the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory. The solenoid consists of two superconducting coils that may operated at the same polarity or at opposite polarities. As a result, the coils and their support structure must be designed to carry a 360-ton inter-coil force that is forcing the coils apart along their axis. The basic design parameters for the focusing magnet are discussed. The magnet and its cryostat are designed so that the absorber can be assembled and tested before installation into the pre-tested focusing solenoid. Safety requirements for MICE dictate that the insulating vacuum for the superconducting magnet be separated from the insulating vacuum for the absorber and that both vacuum be separated from the experiment vacuum and the vacuum within adjacent RF cavities. The safety issues associated with the arrangement of the various vacuums in the MICE focusing modules are presented. The effect of magnet operation and magnet quench on the liquid hydrogen absorber is also discussed.

  19. Stochastic processes in muon ionization cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Errede, D.; Makino, K.; Berz, M.; Johnstone, C. J.; Van Ginneken, A.

    2004-02-01

    A muon ionization cooling channel consists of three major components: the magnet optics, an acceleration cavity, and an energy absorber. The absorber of liquid hydrogen contained by thin aluminum windows is the only component which introduces stochastic processes into the otherwise deterministic acceleration system. The scattering dynamics of the transverse coordinates is described by Gaussian distributions. The asymmetric energy loss function is represented by the Vavilov distribution characterized by the minimum number of collisions necessary for a particle undergoing loss of the energy distribution average resulting from the Bethe-Bloch formula. Examples of the interplay between stochastic processes and deterministic beam dynamics are given.

  20. Transpiration Cooling Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Kyo D.; Ries, Heidi R.; Scotti, Stephen J.; Choi, Sang H.

    1997-01-01

    The transpiration cooling method was considered for a scram-jet engine to accommodate thermally the situation where a very high heat flux (200 Btu/sq. ft sec) from hydrogen fuel combustion process is imposed to the engine walls. In a scram-jet engine, a small portion of hydrogen fuel passes through the porous walls of the engine combustor to cool the engine walls and at the same time the rest passes along combustion chamber walls and is preheated. Such a regenerative system promises simultaneously cooling of engine combustor and preheating the cryogenic fuel. In the experiment, an optical heating method was used to provide a heat flux of 200 Btu/sq. ft sec to the cylindrical surface of a porous stainless steel specimen which carried helium gas. The cooling efficiencies by transpiration were studied for specimens with various porosity. The experiments of various test specimens under high heat flux have revealed a phenomenon that chokes the medium flow when passing through a porous structure. This research includes the analysis of the system and a scaling conversion study that interprets the results from helium into the case when hydrogen medium is used.

  1. Homonuclear ionizing collisions of laser-cooled metastable helium atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Stas, R. J. W.; McNamara, J. M.; Hogervorst, W.; Vassen, W.

    2006-03-15

    We present a theoretical and experimental investigation of homonuclear ionizing collisions of laser-cooled metastable (2 {sup 3}S{sub 1}) helium atoms, considering both the fermionic {sup 3}He and bosonic {sup 4}He isotopes. The theoretical description combines quantum threshold behavior, Wigner's spin-conservation rule, and quantum-statistical symmetry requirements in a single-channel model, complementing a more complete close-coupling theory that has been reported for collisions of metastable {sup 4}He atoms. The model is supported with measurements (in the absence of light fields) of ionization rates in magneto-optically trapped samples that contain about 3x10{sup 8} atoms of a single isotope. The ionization rates are determined from measurements of trap loss due to light-assisted collisions combined with comparative measurements of the ion production rate in the absence and presence of trapping light. Theory and experiment show good agreement.

  2. Epicyclic helical channels for parametric resonance ionization cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Johson, Rolland Paul; Derbenev, Yaroslav

    2015-08-23

    Proposed next-generation muon colliders will require major technical advances to achieve rapid muon beam cooling requirements. Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling (PIC) is proposed as the final 6D cooling stage of a high-luminosity muon collider. In PIC, a half-integer parametric resonance causes strong focusing of a muon beam at appropriately placed energy absorbers while ionization cooling limits the beam’s angular spread. Combining muon ionization cooling with parametric resonant dynamics in this way should then allow much smaller final transverse muon beam sizes than conventional ionization cooling alone. One of the PIC challenges is compensation of beam aberrations over a sufficiently wide parameter range while maintaining the dynamical stability with correlated behavior of the horizontal and vertical betatron motion and dispersion. We explore use of a coupling resonance to reduce the dimensionality of the problem and to shift the dynamics away from non-linear resonances. PIC simulations are presented.

  3. The Cool Flames Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearlman, Howard; Chapek, Richard; Neville, Donna; Sheredy, William; Wu, Ming-Shin; Tornabene, Robert

    2001-01-01

    A space-based experiment is currently under development to study diffusion-controlled, gas-phase, low temperature oxidation reactions, cool flames and auto-ignition in an unstirred, static reactor. At Earth's gravity (1g), natural convection due to self-heating during the course of slow reaction dominates diffusive transport and produces spatio-temporal variations in the thermal and thus species concentration profiles via the Arrhenius temperature dependence of the reaction rates. Natural convection is important in all terrestrial cool flame and auto-ignition studies, except for select low pressure, highly dilute (small temperature excess) studies in small vessels (i.e., small Rayleigh number). On Earth, natural convection occurs when the Rayleigh number (Ra) exceeds a critical value of approximately 600. Typical values of the Ra, associated with cool flames and auto-ignitions, range from 104-105 (or larger), a regime where both natural convection and conduction heat transport are important. When natural convection occurs, it alters the temperature, hydrodynamic, and species concentration fields, thus generating a multi-dimensional field that is extremely difficult, if not impossible, to be modeled analytically. This point has been emphasized recently by Kagan and co-workers who have shown that explosion limits can shift depending on the characteristic length scale associated with the natural convection. Moreover, natural convection in unstirred reactors is never "sufficiently strong to generate a spatially uniform temperature distribution throughout the reacting gas." Thus, an unstirred, nonisothermal reaction on Earth does not reduce to that generated in a mechanically, well-stirred system. Interestingly, however, thermal ignition theories and thermokinetic models neglect natural convection and assume a heat transfer correlation of the form: q=h(S/V)(T(bar) - Tw) where q is the heat loss per unit volume, h is the heat transfer coefficient, S/V is the surface to

  4. A Study of Muon Ionization Cooling at MICE

    SciTech Connect

    Sakamoto, Hideyuki; /Osaka U.

    2010-02-01

    A Neutrino Factory based on a high-energy muon storage-ring is proposed to study neutrino oscillation with high precision. An emittance reduction of muon beam by ionization cooling, which has never been demonstrated in practice, is one of the critical issues for Neutrino Factory. The international Muon Ionisation Cooling Experiment (MICE) is the first experiment to verify an effect of the ionization cooling with muons. MICE will measure a change in transverse emittance of approximately 10% with a precision of {+-}0.1%. In order to meet the requirements, muon trackers based on 350 {micro}m diameter scintillating fibers have been proposed. The construction of such trackers is a very challenging task and some innovative techniques are needed to realize, since there have been no trackers made with such a small diameter of scintillating fibers in the world. Upstream and downstream SciFi trackers have been successfully constructed with the international collaboration of UK, US and Japan by 2008. Both of the trackers have been tested with cosmic-rays at the RAL by 2009, at which high tracking efficiencies more than 90% are measured for both trackers. It is also confirmed that by collecting the misalignments found in both of the trackers, the requirements for the emittance measurement is met.

  5. Strong-Field Ionization of Laser Cooled Li Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Sachin; Romans, Kevin; Fischer, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    Recently, our understanding of few-body effects has been substantially boosted by the development of intense femto- and attosecond laser sources. Observing the momenta of the fragments of atoms and molecules ionized in these strong fields provided new and before inconceivable insights in molecular and electronic dynamics. Here, we report on a new experiment, where the target atoms (6 Li) are laser cooled and trapped using a magneto optical trap (MOT). Momentum vectors of the target fragments will be measured using a reaction microscope (ReMi). The exclusivity of this setup is a combination of MOT and ReMi, thus dubbed as MOTReMi. Here, the advantages over standard COLTRIMS systems are multifold: Firstly, an unprecedented recoil ion momentum resolution can be achieved, as the target can be prepared at significantly lower temperatures. Second, the atoms can be optically prepared in the ground or in polarized excited states. In a first experimental campaign, studies on single ionization of laser excited and polarized Lithium atoms will be performed with circularly polarized light. This experiment can provide insight into the helicity-dependence of the ionization dynamics as the differences among co- and counter rotating electron and laser field, if any, can be investigated.

  6. Parametric-Resonance Ionization Cooling in Twin-Helix.

    SciTech Connect

    V.S. Morozov, Ya.S. Derbenev, A. Afanasev, R.P. Johnson, Erdelyi. B., J.A. Maloney

    2011-09-01

    Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling (PIC) is proposed as the final 6D cooling stage of a highluminosity muon collider. For the implementation of PIC, we developed an epicyclic twin-helix channel with correlated optics. Wedge-shaped absorbers immediately followed by short rf cavities are placed into the twin-helix channel. Parametric resonances are induced in both planes using helical quadrupole harmonics. We demonstrate resonant dynamics and cooling with stochastic effects off using GEANT4/G4beamline. We illustrate compensation of spherical aberrations and benchmark COSY Infinity, a powerful tool for aberration analysis and compensation.

  7. Helical FOFO snake for 6D ionization cooling of muons

    SciTech Connect

    Alexahin, Y.; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01

    A channel for 6D ionization cooling of muons is described which consists of periodically inclined solenoids of alternating polarity, liquid hydrogen absorbers placed inside solenoids and RF cavities between them. Important feature of such channel (called Helical FOFO snake) is that it can cool simultaneously muons of both signs. Theoretical considerations as well as results of simulations with G4Beamline are presented which show that 200MHz HFOFO snake has sufficient acceptance to be used for initial 6D cooling in muon colliders and neutrino factories.

  8. Helical FOFO Snake for 6D Ionization Cooling of Muons

    SciTech Connect

    Alexahin, Y.

    2010-03-30

    A channel for 6D ionization cooling of muons is described which consists of periodically inclined solenoids of alternating polarity, liquid hydrogen absorbers placed inside the solenoids and RF cavities between them. An important feature of such a channel (called Helical FOFO snake) is that it can cool simultaneously muons of both signs. Theoretical considerations as well as results of simulations with G4beamline are presented which show that a 200 MHz HFOFO snake has sufficient acceptance to be used for initial 6D cooling in muon colliders and neutrino factories.

  9. Simulations of Parametric Resonance Ionization Cooling of Muon Beams

    SciTech Connect

    K. Beard; S.A. Bogacz; Y.S. Derbenev; R.P. Johnson; K. Paul; T.J. Roberts; K. Yonehara

    2005-05-16

    The technique of using a parametric resonance to allow better ionization cooling is being developed to create small beams so that high collider luminosity can be achieved with fewer muons. In the linear channel that is studied in this effort, a half integer resonance is induced such that the normal elliptical motion of particles in x-x' phase space becomes hyperbolic, with particles moving to smaller x and larger x' as they pass down the channel. Thin absorbers placed at the focal points of the channel then cool the angular divergence of the beam by the usual ionization cooling mechanism where each absorber is followed by RF cavities. Thus the phase space of the beam is compressed in transverse position by the dynamics of the resonance and its angular divergence is compressed by the ionization cooling mechanism. We report the first results of simulations of this process, including comparisons to theoretical cooling rates and studies of sensitivity to variations in absorber thickness and initial beam conditions.

  10. 6D Ionization Cooling Channel with Resonant Dispersion Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.B.; Alexahin, Yuri I.; Yonehara, K.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    For muons with preferable for ionization cooling momentum <300MeV/c the longitudinal motion is naturally undamped. In order to provide the longitudinal damping a correlation between muon momentum and transverse position--described in terms of the dispersion function--should be introduced. In the present report we consider the possibility of dispersion generation in a periodic sequence of alternating solenoids (FOFO channel) by choosing the tune in the second passband (i.e. above half-integer per cell) and tilting the solenoids in adjacent cells in the opposite direction. Analytical estimates for equilibrium emittances and cooling rates are presented.

  11. Optics for Phase Ionization Cooling of Muon Beams

    SciTech Connect

    R.P. Johnson; S.A. Bogacz; Y.S. Derbenev

    2006-06-26

    The realization of a muon collider requires a reduction of the 6D normalized emittance of an initially generated muon beam by a factor of more than 106. Analytical and simulation studies of 6D muon beam ionization cooling in a helical channel filled with pressurized gas or liquid hydrogen absorber indicate that a factor of 106 is possible. Further reduction of the normalized 4D transverse emittance by an additional two orders of magnitude is envisioned using Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling (PIC). To realize the phase shrinkage effect in the parametric resonance method, one needs to design a focusing channel free of chromatic and spherical aberrations. We report results of our study of a concept of an aberration-free wiggler transport line with an alternating dispersion function. Resonant beam focusing at thin beryllium wedge absorber plates positioned near zero dispersion points then provides the predicted PIC effect.

  12. Coherent electron cooling demonstration experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, V.N.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Brutus, J.C.; Fedotov, A.; Hao, Y.; Kayran, D.; Mahler, G.; Marusic, A.; Meng, W.; McIntyre, G.; Minty, M.; Ptitsyn, V.; Pinayev, I.; Rao, T.; Roser, T.; Sheehy, B.; Tepikian, S.; Than, R.; Trbojevic, D.; Tuozzolo, J.; Wang, G.; Yakimenko, V.; Hutton, A.; Krafft, G.; Poelker, M.; Rimmer, R.; Bruhwiler, D.; Abell, D.T.; Nieter, C.; Ranjbar, V.; Schwartz, B.; Kholopov M.; Shevchenko, O.; McIntosh, P.; Wheelhouse, A.

    2011-09-04

    Coherent electron cooling (CEC) has a potential to significantly boost luminosity of high-energy, high-intensity hadron-hadron and electron-hadron colliders. In a CEC system, a hadron beam interacts with a cooling electron beam. A perturbation of the electron density caused by ions is amplified and fed back to the ions to reduce the energy spread and the emittance of the ion beam. To demonstrate the feasibility of CEC we propose a proof-of-principle experiment at RHIC using SRF linac. In this paper, we describe the setup for CeC installed into one of RHIC's interaction regions. We present results of analytical estimates and results of initial simulations of cooling a gold-ion beam at 40 GeV/u energy via CeC. We plan to complete the program in five years. During first two years we will build coherent electron cooler in IP2 of RHIC. In parallel we will develop complete package of computer simulation tools for the start-to-end simulation predicting exact performance of a CeC. The later activity will be the core of Tech X involvement into the project. We will use these tools to predict the performance of our CeC device. The experimental demonstration of the CeC will be undertaken in years three to five of the project. The goal of this experiment is to demonstrate the cooling of ion beam and to compare its measured performance with predictions made by us prior to the experiments.

  13. Ionization and Cooling of a Hot Plasma with Temperature Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholtygin, A. F.; Bratsev, V. F.; Ochkur, V. I.

    2002-01-01

    Cooling functions for a stationary plasma are calculated in a wide temperature range from 5·103 K to 108 K, both for a plasma with the solar abundances of elements and for a plasma with an anomalous chemical composition typical of Wolf—Rayet stars. The HILYS project is described, with the aim of calculating cross sections and rates of excitation by electron collision of atoms and ions with a charge Z 26 and principal electron quantum numbers n 10, needed to calculate the ionization and thermal states of a plasma and the development of methods of calculating the plasma's spectrum in the visible, UV, and x-ray ranges. The results of a calculation of cross sections and effective collision strengths obtained within the framework of the project are given. The influence of temperature fluctuations (T/T 0.16) on the relative ion abundances and the total cooling function is studied. It is shown that the presence of such fluctuations considerably increases the temperature range in which the abundances of ions of a given degree of ionization are not negligible, while the cooling function can differ considerably from that calculated for a one-temperature plasma. The contribution of dielectronic recombination to the total cooling function is investigated, and it proves to be significant only for a plasma with high abundances of heavy elements. The x-ray spectrum of the bright supergiant Pup is analyzed.

  14. Polymerization, shock cooling and ionization of liquid nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, M; Rogers, F

    2005-07-21

    The trajectory of thermodynamic states passed through by the nitrogen Hugoniot starting from the liquid and up to 10{sup 6} GPa has been studied. An earlier report of cooling in the doubly shocked liquid, near 50 to 100 GPa and 7500 K, is revisited in light of the recent discovery of solid polymeric nitrogen. It is found that cooling occurs when the doubly shocked liquid is driven into a volume near the molecular to polymer transition and raising the possibility of a liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT). By increasing the shock pressure and temperature by an order of magnitude, theoretical calculations predict thermal ionization of the L shell drives the compression maxima to 5-6 fold compression at 10 Mbar (T {approx} 3.5 10{sup 5} K) and at 400 Mbar (T {approx} 2.3 10{sup 6} K) from K shell ionization. Near a pressure of 10{sup 6} GPa the K shell ionizes completely and the Hugoniot approaches the classical ideal gas compression fourfold limit.

  15. Progress on muon parametric-resonance ionization cooling channel development

    SciTech Connect

    V.S. Morozov, Ya.S. Derbenev, A. Afanasev, K.B. Beard, R.P. Johnson, B. Erdelyi, J.A. Maloney

    2012-07-01

    Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling (PIC) is intended as the final 6D cooling stage of a high-luminosity muon collider. To implement PIC, a continuous-field twin-helix magnetic channel was developed. A 6D cooling with stochastic effects off is demonstrated in a GEANT4/G4beamline model of a system where wedge-shaped Be absorbers are placed at the appropriate dispersion points in the twin-helix channel and are followed by short rf cavities. To proceed to cooling simulations with stochastics on, compensation of the beam aberrations from one absorber to another is required. Initial results on aberration compensation using a set of various-order continuous multipole fields are presented. As another avenue to mitigate the aberration effect, we optimize the cooling channel's period length. We observe a parasitic parametric resonance naturally occurring in the channel's horizontal plane due to the periodic beam energy modulation caused by the absorbers and rf. We discuss options for compensating this resonance and/or properly combining it with the induced half-integer parametric resonance needed for PIC.

  16. ICOOL: A SIMULATION CODE FOR IONIZATION COOLING OF MUON BEAMS.

    SciTech Connect

    FERNOW,R.C.

    1999-03-25

    Current ideas [1,2] for designing a high luminosity muon collider require significant cooling of the phase space of the muon beams. The only known method that can cool the beams in a time comparable to the muon lifetime is ionization cooling [3,4]. This method requires directing the particles in the beam at a large angle through a low Z absorber material in a strong focusing magnetic channel and then restoring the longitudinal momentum with an rf cavity. We have developed a new 3-D tracking code ICOOL for examining possible configurations for muon cooling. A cooling system is described in terms of a series of longitudinal regions with associated material and field properties. The tracking takes place in a coordinate system that follows a reference orbit through the system. The code takes into account decays and interactions of {approx}50-500 MeV/c muons in matter. Material geometry regions include cylinders and wedges. A number of analytic models are provided for describing the field configurations. Simple diagnostics are built into the code, including calculation of emittances and correlations, longitudinal traces, histograms and scatter plots. A number of auxiliary files can be generated for post-processing analysis by the user.

  17. INTERACTION OF MUON BEAM WITH PLASMA DEVELOPED DURING IONIZATION COOLING

    SciTech Connect

    S. Ahmed, D. Kaplan, T. Roberts, L. Spentzouris, K. Beard

    2012-07-01

    Particle-in-cell simulations involving the interaction of muon beam (peak density 10{sup 18} m{sup 3}) with Li plasma (ionized medium) of density 10{sup 16}-10{sup 22} m{sup -3} have been performed. This study aimed to understand the effects of plasma on an incoming beam in order to explore scenario developed during the process of ionization cooling. The computer code takes into account the self-consistent electromagnetic effects of beam interacting with plasma. This study shows that the beam can pass through the plasma of densities four order of magnitude higher than its peak density. The low density plasmas are wiped out by the beam, however, the resonance is observed for densities of similar order. Study reveals the signature of plasma wakefield acceleration.

  18. MANX, a 6-D Muon Beam Cooling Experiment for RAL

    SciTech Connect

    Yonehara, K.; Kashikhin, V.; Lamm, M.; Zlobin, A.; Abrams, R.; Ankenbrandt, C.; Cummings, M.A.C.; Johnson, R.P.; Kahn, S.; Maloney, J.; /Northern Illinois U.

    2009-05-01

    MANX is a six-dimensional muon ionization cooling demonstration experiment based on the concept of a helical cooling channel in which a beam of muons loses energy in a continuous helium or hydrogen absorber while passing through a special superconducting magnet called a helical solenoid. The goals of the experiment include tests of the theory of the helical cooling channel and the helical solenoid implementation of it, verification of the simulation programs, and a demonstration of effective six-dimensional cooling of a muon beam. We report the status of the experiment and in particular, the proposal to have MANX follow MICE at the Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory (RAL) as an extension of the MICE experimental program. We describe the economies of such an approach which allow the MICE beam line and much of the MICE apparatus and expertise to be reused.

  19. Experiences in solar cooling systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, D. S.

    The results of performance evaluations for nine solar cooling systems are presented, and reasons fow low or high net energy balances are discussed. Six of the nine systems are noted to have performed unfavorably compared to standard cooling systems due to thermal storage losses, excessive system electrical demands, inappropriate control strategies, poor system-to-load matching, and poor chiller performance. A reduction in heat losses in one residential unit increased the total system efficiency by 2.5%, while eliminating heat losses to the building interior increased the efficiency by 3.3%. The best system incorporated a lithium bromide absorption chiller and a Rankine cycle compression unit for a commercial application. Improvements in the cooling tower and fan configurations to increase the solar cooling system efficiency are indicated. Best performances are expected to occur in climates inducing high annual cooling loads.

  20. MANX, A 6-D Muon Cooling Demonstration Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts,Thomas; Alsharo'a, Mohammad; Hanlet, Pierrick M; Johnson, Rolland P; Kuchnir, Moyses; Paul, Kevin; Ankenbrandt, Charles; Moretti, Alfred; Popovic, Milorad; Yarba, Victor; Kaplan, Daniel; Yonehara, Katsuya

    2005-04-01

    Most ionization cooling schemes now under consideration are based on using many large flasks of liquid hydrogen energy absorber. One important example is the proposed Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), which has recently been approved to run at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL). In the work reported here, a potential muon cooling demonstration experiment based on a continuous liquid energy absorber in a helical cooling channel (HCC) is discussed. The original HCC used a gaseous energy absorber for the engineering advantage of combining the energy absorption and RF energy regeneration in hydrogen-filled RF cavities. In the Muon And Neutrino eXperiment (MANX) that is proposed here, a liquid-filled HCC is used without RF energy regeneration to achieve the largest possible cooling rate in six dimensions. In this case, the magnetic fields of the HCC must diminish as the muons lose momentum as they pass through the liquid energy absorber. The length of the MANX device is determined by the maximum momentum of the muon test beam and the maximum practical field that can be sustained at the magnet coils. We have studied a 3 meter-long HCC example that could be inserted between the MICE spectrometers at RAL.

  1. 6D Muon Ionization Cooling with an Inverse Cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, D. J.; Bracker, S. B.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Godang, R.; Palmer, R. B.

    2006-03-20

    A large admittance sector cyclotron filled with LiH wedges surrounded by helium or hydrogen gas is explored. Muons are cooled as they spiral adiabatically into a central swarm. As momentum approaches zero, the momentum spread also approaches zero. Long bunch trains coalesce. Energy loss is used to inject the muons into the outer rim of the cyclotron. The density of material in the cyclotron decreases adiabatically with radius. The sector cyclotron magnetic fields are transformed into an azimuthally symmetric magnetic bottle in the center. Helium gas is used to inhibit muonium formation by positive muons. Deuterium gas is used to allow captured negative muons to escape via the muon catalyzed fusion process. The presence of ionized gas in the center may automatically neutralize space charge. When a bunch train has coalesced into a central swarm, it is ejected axially with an electric kicker pulse.

  2. Progress on a Cavity with Beryllium Walls for Muon Ionization Cooling Channel R&D.

    SciTech Connect

    Bowring, D. L.; DeMello, A. J.; Lambert, A. R.; Li, D.; Virostek, S.; Zisman, M.; Kaplan, D.; Palmer, R. B.

    2012-05-20

    The Muon Accelerator Program (MAP) collaboration is working to develop an ionization cooling channel for muon beams. An ionization cooling channel requires the operation of high-gradient, normal-conducting RF cavities in multi-Tesla solenoidal magnetic fields. However, experiments conducted at Fermilab?s MuCool Test Area (MTA) show that increasing the solenoidal field strength reduces the maximum achievable cavity gradient. This gradient limit is characterized by an RF breakdown process that has caused significant damage to copper cavity interiors. The damage may be caused by field-emitted electrons, focused by the solenoidal magnetic field onto small areas of the inner cavity surface. Local heating may then induce material fatigue and surface damage. Fabricating a cavity with beryllium walls would mitigate this damage due to beryllium?s low density, low thermal expansion, and high electrical and thermal conductivity. We address the design and fabrication of a pillbox RF cavity with beryllium walls, in order to evaluate the performance of high-gradient cavities in strong magnetic fields.

  3. Status of the MANX muon cooling experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Yonehara, K.; Broemmelsiek, D.; Hu, M.; Jansson, A.; Kashikhin, V.S.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Lamm, M.; Lopes, M.; Shiltsev, V.; Yarba, V.; Yu, M.; /Fermilab /Muons Inc., Batavia

    2008-06-01

    A demonstration experiment of six-dimensional (6D) phase space muon beam cooling is a key milestone on the roadmap toward to a real muon collider. In order to achieve this goal, they have designed the Muon Collider and Neutrino Factory Experiment (MANX) channel, which consists of the Helical Cooling Channel (HCC). They discuss the status of the simulation study of the MANX in this document.

  4. Cooling of electronics in collider experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Richard P. Stanek et al.

    2003-11-07

    Proper cooling of detector electronics is critical to the successful operation of high-energy physics experiments. Collider experiments offer unique challenges based on their physical layouts and hermetic design. Cooling systems can be categorized by the type of detector with which they are associated, their primary mode of heat transfer, the choice of active cooling fluid, their heat removal capacity and the minimum temperature required. One of the more critical detector subsystems to require cooling is the silicon vertex detector, either pixel or strip sensors. A general design philosophy is presented along with a review of the important steps to include in the design process. Factors affecting the detector and cooling system design are categorized. A brief review of some existing and proposed cooling systems for silicon detectors is presented to help set the scale for the range of system designs. Fermilab operates two collider experiments, CDF & D0, both of which have silicon systems embedded in their detectors. A review of the existing silicon cooling system designs and operating experience is presented along with a list of lessons learned.

  5. Circularly Inclined Solenoid Channel for 6D Ionization Cooling of Muons

    SciTech Connect

    Alexahin, Y.; /Fermilab

    2009-05-01

    Ionization cooling is essential for realization of Muon Collider, muons beam based neutrino factories and other experiments involving muons. The simplest structure - absorber(s) immersed in alternating solenoidal magnetic field - provides only transverse cooling since the longitudinal motion in the most suitable momentum range (2-300MeV/c) is naturally anti-damped. To overcome this difficulty it is proposed to periodically tilt solenoids so that a rotating transverse magnetic field was created. By choosing the phase advance per period above a multiple of 2{pi} it is possible to ensure that muons with higher momentum make a longer path in the absorber (whether distributed or localized) thus providing longitudinal damping. Basic theory of such channel and results of tracking simulations are presented.

  6. RECENT PROGRESS IN SIX DIMENSIONAL IONIZATION COOLING TECHNIQUES FOR MUON BASED MACHINES.

    SciTech Connect

    KIM,K.J.; WANG,C.X.; BERG,J.S.; FERNOW,R.; KIRK,H.; PALMER,R.; BALBEKOV,V.; GARREN,A.A.

    2002-06-03

    Ionization cooling is an essential component of a neutrino factory or a muon collider. Ionization cooling in the transverse dimensions is reasonably straightforward, and has been incorporated in published neutrino factory studies. Achieving cooling in the longitudinal dimensions is more difficult, but has the potential to greatly improve the performance of neutrino factories, and is essential to muon colliders. Much progress has recently been made in describing ring cooling lattices which achieve cooling in all three phase space planes, and in the design of the required, but difficult, injection systems. Ring cooling lattices also have the potential of significantly reduced cost compared to single-pass cooling systems with comparable performance. We will present some recent lattice designs, describing their theory, features, and performance, including injection and extraction systems.

  7. G4BEAMLINE Simulations of Parametric Resonance Ionization Cooling of Muon Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Beard, Kevin; Bogacz, S. Alex; Derbenev, Yaroslav; Yonehara, Katsuya; Johnson, Rolland P.; Paul, Kevin; Roberts, Thomas J.

    2006-03-20

    The technique of using a parametric resonance to allow better ionization cooling is being developed to create small emittance beams so that high collider luminosity can be achieved with fewer muons. While parametric resonance ionization cooling (PIC) of muons has been shown to work in matrix-based simulations using OptiM when the system is properly tuned, doing the same using a much more detailed GEANT-based g4beamline simulation has been more difficult.

  8. A COMPLETE SCHEME FOR IONIZATION COOLING FOR A MUON COLLIDER.

    SciTech Connect

    PALMER,R.B.; BERG, J.S.; FERNOW, R.C.; GALLARDO, J.C.; KIRK, H.G.; ALEXAHIN, Y.; NEUFFER, D.; KAHN, S.A.; SUMMERS, D.

    2007-06-25

    A complete scheme for production and cooling a muon beam for three specified muon colliders is presented. Parameters for these muon colliders are given. The scheme starts with the front end of a proposed neutrino factory that yields bunch trains of both muon signs. Emittance exchange cooling in slow helical lattices reduces the longitudinal emittance until it becomes possible to merge the trains into single bunches, one of each sign. Further cooling in all dimensions is applied to the single bunches in further slow helical lattices. Final transverse cooling to the required parameters is achieved in 50 T solenoids using high TC superconductor at 4 K. Preliminary simulations of each element are presented.

  9. Muon Tracking Studies in a Skew Parametric Resonance Ionization Cooling Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Sy, Amy; Afanaciev, Andre; Derbenev, Yaroslav S.; Johnson, Rolland; Morozov, Vasiliy

    2015-09-01

    Skew Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling (SPIC) is an extension of the Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling (PIC) framework that has previously been explored as the final 6D cooling stage of a high-luminosity muon collider. The addition of skew quadrupoles to the PIC magnetic focusing channel induces coupled dynamic behavior of the beam that is radially periodic. The periodicity of the radial motion allows for the avoidance of unwanted resonances in the horizontal and vertical transverse planes, while still providing periodic locations at which ionization cooling components can be implemented. A first practical implementation of the magnetic field components required in the SPIC channel is modeled in MADX. Dynamic features of the coupled correlated optics with and without induced parametric resonance are presented and discussed.

  10. Epicyclic Helical Channels for Parametric Resonance Ionization Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Andrei Afanaciev, Alex Bogacz, Yaroslav Derbenev, Kevin Beard, Valentin Ivanov, Rolland Johnson, Guimei Wang, Katsuya Yonehara

    2009-05-01

    In order to achieve cooling of muons in addition to 6D helical cooling channel (HCC) [1], we develop a technique based on a parametric resonance. The use of parametric resonances requires alternating dispersion, minimized at locations of thin absorbers, but maximized in between in order to compensate for chromatic aberrations [2]. These solutions can be combined in an Epicyclic Helical Cooling Channel (EHCC) that meets requirements of alternating dispersion of beam periodic orbit with best conditions for maintenance of stable beam transport in a continuous solenoid-type field [3]. We discuss here basic features and new simulation results for EHCC.

  11. Parametric Resonance Ionization Cooling and Reverse Emittance Exchange for Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Yaroslav Derbenev

    2005-09-18

    Two methods to cool muon beams deeply below the limit conventionally established for the ionization cooling are proposed. In Phase Ionization Cooling (PIC), the beam is focused at wedge absorber plates each half of particle oscillation period by imposing a weak parametric resonance along the beam path. The resonance growth of particle amplitude is surmounted by the ionization cooling. At optimum, such arrangement results in reduction of each of two transverse emittances by an order of value in addition to the preceding 6D ionization cooling. Next, resonance focusing and transverse cooling can be continued in the regime of a fast Reverse Emittance Exchange (REMEX). Here, the sign of the absorber wedge is opposite to PIC while the dispersion increased. REMEX to be accompanied by the bunch lengthening and acceleration in order to maintain the relative energy spread at an appropriate level. The limitations due to energy straggling in absorber will be evaluated, and possibilities of beam conditioning against aberrations and muon space charge will be illustrated for specific beam transports. Estimates of Muon Collider luminosity versus muon production rate will be presented.

  12. Status of Studies of Achromat-based 6D Ionization Cooling Rings for Muons

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, X.; Kirk, H.; Cline, D.; Garren, A.A.; Berg, J.S.

    2011-09-04

    Six dimensional ionization cooling of muons is needed to achieve the necessary luminosity for a muon collider. If that cooling could occur over multiple turns in a closed ring, there would be significant cost savings over a single-pass cooling channel. We report on the status of a cooling ring with achromatic arcs. The achromatic design permits the design to easily switch between a closed ring and a snaking geometry on injection or extraction from the ring. The ring is designed with sufficient space in each superperiod for injection and extraction magnets. We describe the ring's lattice design, performance, and injection/extraction requirements.

  13. Skew-Quad Parametric-Resonance Ionization Cooling: Theory and Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Afanaciev, Andre; Derbenev, Yaroslav S.; Morozov, Vasiliy; Sy, Amy; Johnson, Rolland P.

    2015-09-01

    Muon beam ionization cooling is a key component for the next generation of high-luminosity muon colliders. To reach adequately high luminosity without excessively large muon intensities, it was proposed previously to combine ionization cooling with techniques using a parametric resonance (PIC). Practical implementation of PIC proposal is a subject of this report. We show that an addition of skew quadrupoles to a planar PIC channel gives enough flexibility in the design to avoid unwanted resonances, while meeting the requirements of radially-periodic beam focusing at ionization-cooling plates, large dynamic aperture and an oscillating dispersion needed for aberration corrections. Theoretical arguments are corroborated with models and a detailed numerical analysis, providing step-by-step guidance for the design of Skew-quad PIC (SPIC) beamline.

  14. Studies of the Twin Helix Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling Channel with COSY INFINITY

    SciTech Connect

    J.A. Maloney, K.B. Beard, R.P. Johnson, A. Afanasev, S.A. Bogacz, Y.S. Derbenev, V.S. Morozov, B. Erdelyi

    2012-07-01

    A primary technical challenge to the design of a high luminosity muon collider is an effective beam cooling system. An epicyclic twin-helix channel utilizing parametric-resonance ionization cooling has been proposed for the final 6D cooling stage. A proposed design of this twin-helix channel is presented that utilizes correlated optics between the horizontal and vertical betatron periods to simultaneously focus transverse motion of the beam in both planes. Parametric resonance is induced in both planes via a system of helical quadrupole harmonics. Ionization cooling is achieved via periodically placed wedges of absorbing material, with intermittent rf cavities restoring longitudinal momentum necessary to maintain stable orbit of the beam. COSY INFINITY is utilized to simulate the theory at first order. The motion of particles around a hyperbolic fixed point is tracked. Comparison is made between the EPIC cooling channel and standard ionization cooling effects. Cooling effects are measured, after including stochastic effects, for both a single particle and a distribution of particles.

  15. Salt water cooling tower retrofit experience

    SciTech Connect

    Rittenhouse, R.C.

    1994-06-01

    This article describes the experience of engineers at Atlantic Electric Co. with a recent cooling tower fill retrofit at the company's B.L. England Station, Unit 3. Note that this tower is unique. It is the first natural draft salt water tower to be built in the United States. Unit 3's closed-loop saltwater cooling system features a double condenser and two 50% capacity horizontal circulating water pumps. A natural draft cooling tower rejects heat to the atmosphere through evaporation and sensible heat transfer. The tower is 180 ft in diameter at the base and 208 ft high, and features a counterflow design. It was designed to cool 63,500 gpm of circulating salt water through a range of 26 F with an approach of 19.2 degrees at an ambient wet bulb temperature of 76 F and 60% relative humidity. A drift rate of 0.002% of circulating water flow was specified to avoid excessive salt water carryover.

  16. g4beamline Simulations of Parametric Resonance Ionization Cooling of Muon Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin Beard; Slawomir Bogacz; Yaroslav Derbenev; Katsuya Yonehara; Rolland P. Johnson; Kevin Paul; Thomas J. Roberts

    2005-09-19

    The technique of using a parametric resonance to allow better ionization cooling is being developed to create small beams so that high collider luminosity can be achieved with fewer muons. While parametric resonance ionization (PIC) cooling of muons has been shown to work in matrix-based simulations when the system is properly tuned, doing the same using a much more detailed GEANT-based g4beamline [1] simulation has proven more difficult. The starting point for this work is a the linear channel; a half integer resonance is induced such that the normal elliptical motion of particles in x-x' phase space becomes hyperbolic, with particles moving to smaller x and larger x' as they pass down the channel. Thin absorbers placed at the focal points of the channel then cool the angular divergence of the beam by the usual ionization cooling mechanism where each absorber is followed by RF cavities. Thus the phase space of the beam is compressed in transverse position by the dynamics of the resonance and its angular divergence is compressed by the ionization cooling mechanism. The g4beamline and OptiM [2] simulations show the importance of synchrotron motion as an averaging mechanism for chromatic detuning. Multiple scattering and energy straggling play a significant role that must be addressed via further optimizations and additional compensation solutions.

  17. Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC) Balloon Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wefel, John P.; Guzik, T. Gregory

    2001-01-01

    During grant NAG5-5064, Louisiana State University (LSU) led the ATIC team in the development, construction, testing, accelerator validation, pre-deployment integration and flight operations of the Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC) Balloon Experiment. This involved interfacing among the ATIC collaborators (UMD, NRL/MSFC, SU, MSU, WI, SNU) to develop a new balloon payload based upon a fully active calorimeter, a carbon target, a scintillator strip hodoscope and a pixilated silicon solid state detector for a detailed investigation of the very high energy cosmic rays to energies beyond 10(exp 14) eV/nucleus. It is in this very high energy region that theory predicts changes in composition and energy spectra related to the Supernova Remnant Acceleration model for cosmic rays below the "knee" in the all-particle spectrum. This report provides a documentation list, details the anticipated ATIC science return, describes the particle detection principles on which the experiment is based, summarizes the simulation results for the system, describes the validation work at the CERN SPS accelerator and details the balloon flight configuration. The ATIC experiment had a very successful LDB flight from McMurdo, Antarctica in 12/00 - 1/01. The instrument performed well for the entire 15 days. Preliminary data analysis shows acceptable charge resolution and an all-particle power law energy deposition distribution not inconsistent with previous measurements. Detailed analysis is underway and will result in new data on the cosmic ray charge and energy spectra in the GeV - TeV energy range. ATIC is currently being refurbished in anticipation of another LDB flight in the 2002-03 period.

  18. The Effect of Extending the Length of the Coupling Coils in a MuonIonization Cooling Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Michael A.

    2007-11-10

    RF cavities are used to re-accelerate muons that have beencooled by absorbers that are in low beta regions of a muon ionizationcooling channel. A superconducting coupling magnet (or magnets) arearound or among the RF cavities of a muon ionization-cooling channel. Thefield from the magnet guides the muons so that they are kept within theiris of the RF cavities that are used to accelerate the muons. Thisreport compares the use of a single short coupling magnet with anextended coupling magnet that has one or more superconducting coils aspart of a muon-cooling channel of the same design as the muon ionizationcooling experiment (MICE). Whether the superconducting magnet is shortand thick or long and this affects the magnet stored energy and the peakfield in the winding. The magnetic field distribution also affects is themuon beam optics in the cooling cell of a muon coolingchannel.

  19. Design of a Microgravity Spray Cooling Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baysinger, Kerri M.; Yerkes, Kirk L.; Michalak, Travis E.; Harris, Richard J.; McQuillen, John

    2004-01-01

    An analytical and experimental study was conducted for the application of spray cooling in a microgravity and high-g environment. Experiments were carried out aboard the NASA KC-135 reduced gravity aircraft, which provided the microgravity and high-g environments. In reduced gravity, surface tension flow was observed around the spray nozzle, due to unconstrained liquid in the test chamber and flow reversal at the heat source. A transient analytical model was developed to predict the temperature and the spray heat transfer coefficient within the heated region. Comparison of the experimental transient temperature variation with analytical results showed good agreement for low heat input values. The transient analysis also verified that thermal equilibrium within the heated region could be reached during the 20-25s reduced gravity portion of the flight profile.

  20. Non-equilibirum ionization and cooling of metal-enriched gas in the presence of a photoionization background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oppenheimer, Benjamin D.; Schaye, Joop

    2013-09-01

    Simulations of the formation of galaxies, as well as ionization models used to interpret observations of quasar absorption lines, generally either assume ionization equilibrium or ignore the presence of the extragalactic background (EGB) radiation. We introduce a method to compute the non-equilibrium ionization and cooling of diffuse gas exposed to the EGB. Our method iterates the ionization states of the 11 elements that dominate the cooling (H, He, C, N, O, Ne, Si, Mg, S, Ca and Fe) and uses tabulated ion-by-ion cooling and photo-heating efficiencies to update the temperature of the gas. Our reaction network includes radiative and di-electric recombination, collisional ionization, photoionization, Auger ionization and charge transfer. We verify that our method reproduces published results for collisional equilibrium, collisional non-equilibrium and photoionized equilibrium. Non-equilibrium effects can become very important in cooling gas, particularly below 106 K. Photoionization and non-equilibrium effects both tend to boost the degree of ionization and to reduce cooling efficiencies. The effect of the EGB is larger for lower densities (i.e. higher ionization parameters). Hence, photoionization affects (equilibrium and non-equilibrium) cooling more under isochoric than under isobaric conditions. Non-equilibrium effects are smaller in the presence of the EGB and are thus overestimated when using collisional-only processes. The inclusion of the EGB alters the observational diagnostics of diffuse, metal-enriched gas (e.g. metal absorption lines probed in quasar sight lines) even more significantly than the cooling efficiencies. We argue that the cooling efficiency should be considered if ionization models are used to infer physical conditions from observed line ratios, as the a priori probability of observing gas is lower if its cooling time is shorter. We provide online tables of ionization fractions and cooling efficiencies, as well as other data, for equilibrium

  1. Integrating the MANX 6-D Muon Cooling Experiment with the MICE Spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Kahn, S.A.; Abrams, R.J.; Ankenbrandt, C.; Cummings, M.A.C.; Johnson, R.P.; Roberts, T.; Yonehara, K.; /Fermilab

    2009-05-01

    The MANX experiment is to demonstrate the reduction of 6D muon phase space emittance using a continuous liquid absorber to provide ionization cooling in a helical solenoid magnetic channel. The experiment involves the construction of a short two-period long helical cooling channel (HCC) to reduce the muon invariant emittance by a factor of two. The HCC would replace the current cooling section of the MICE experiment now being setup at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory. The MANX experiment would use the existing MICE spectrometers and muon beam line. This paper shall consider the various approaches to integrate MANX into the RAL hall using the MICE spectrometers. This study shall discuss the matching schemes used to minimize losses and prevent emittance growth between the MICE spectrometers and the MANX HCC. Also the placement of additional detection planes in the matching region and the HCC to improve the resolution will be examined.

  2. Mysterious ionization in cooling flow filaments: a test with deep COS FUV spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, Grant

    2013-10-01

    The Cosmic Origins Spectrograph is capable of unraveling a two decade old mystery regarding the filamentary emission line nebulae found in the brightest cluster galaxies {BCGs} of cool core {CC} clusters. These kpc-scale filaments are characterized by elevated H-alpha luminosities and puzzling ionization states that cannot be accounted for by recombination or photionization alone, and are instead excited by an unknown ionization mechanism. The most hotly debated proposed solutions invoke thermal conduction, shocks, or cosmic-ray heating, but progress toward consensus awaits unambiguous spectral discriminants between these models that can only be found in the FUV. We propose deep {9 orbit}, off-nuclear observations of two strategically selected BCGs in well-studied cool core clusters with cross-spectrum archival datasets. We also propose a shorter {5 orbit} on-nuclear observation for one of our targets to assess possible AGN contributions to the spectra. These proposed observations represent critical tests that can unambiguously discriminate between the various candidate ionziation models. Constraining the mechanisms by which CC BCG filaments are excited remains one of the most important roadblocks to a better understanding of cooling from hot ambient medium to cold star forming clouds and filaments, a process important for both galaxy and black hole growth. It is therefore important that, before HST ends its mission and we lose FUV capability, we advance our understanding of this decades old mystery.

  3. The Franck-Hertz Experiment and the Nature of Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gearhart, Clayton

    2013-04-01

    In 1914, James Franck and Gustav Hertz published their famous experiment in which they bombarded mercury atoms with slow electrons---the latest in a series of papers seeking both to measure the ionization potentials of different elements, and to understand the implications of the new quantum theory. They found peaks in the transmitted current separated by 4.9 volts, a result they interpreted as the ionization potential. But they also noticed that this voltage corresponded to a prominent resonance line in the ultraviolet spectrum of mercury, and immediately performed a second experiment that confirmed the presence of this spectral line. They concluded---surprisingly---that their collisions sometimes resulted in ionization, but other times in the excitation of an atomic electron that vibrated and emitted light at this wavelength. In 1914, Franck and Hertz did not know of Niels Bohr's new theory, which presented something close to our modern view of the relation between spectral terms and ionization potentials. In this paper, I will ask how Franck and Hertz, and other physicists, thought about ionization in the early years of quantum theory, before the advent of the Bohr model.

  4. Gear Lubrication and Cooling Experiment and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, D. P.; Akin, L. S.

    1983-01-01

    A gear tooth temperature analysis was performed using a finite element method combined with a calculated heat input, a calculated oil jet impingement depth, and estimated heat transfer coefficients for the different parts of the gear tooth that are oil cooled and air cooled. Experimental measurements of gear tooth average surface temperature and gear tooth instantaneous surface temperature were made with a fast response, infrared, radiometric microscope. Increasing oil pressure has a significant effect on both average surface temperature and peak surface temperature at loads above 1895 N/cm(1083 lb/in) and speeds of 10,000 and 7500 rpm. Both increasing speed (from 5000 to 10,000 rpm) at constant speed cause a significant rise in the average surface temperature and in the instantaneous peak surface temperatures on the gear teeth. The oil jet pressure required to provide the best cooling for gears is the pressure required to obtain full gear tooth impingement. Calculated results for gear tooth temperatures were close to experimental results for various oil jet impingement depths for identical operating conditions.

  5. RF system concepts for a muon cooling experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, W.C.; Corlett, J.N.; Li, D.; Moretti, A.; Kirk, H.G.; Palmer, R.B.; Zhao, Y.

    1998-06-01

    The feasibility of muon colliders for high energy physics experiments has been under intensive study for the past few years and recent activity has focused on defining an R and D program that would answer the critical issues. An especially critical issue is developing practical means of cooling the phase space of the muons once they have been produced and captured in a solenoidal magnetic transport channel. Concepts for the rf accelerating cavities of a muon cooling experiment are discussed.

  6. Longitudinal electron cooling experiments at HIRFL-CSRe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, L. J.; Zhao, H.; Yang, X. D.; Li, J.; Yang, J. C.; Yuan, Y. J.; Parkhomchuk, V. V.; Reva, V. B.; Ma, X. M.; Yan, T. L.; Tang, M. T.; Xia, J. W.

    2016-02-01

    At the heavy ion storage ring HIRFL-CSRe an electron cooler is operated to improve the beam conditions for experiments. The properties of cooled beams have been studied. The longitudinal beam dynamics during the cooling process was measured by a resonant Schottky detector. The dependencies of the parameters electron beam density and profile on cooling times were investigated. The friction force was measured directly with the aid of the high voltage system of the cooler and with the application of the beam bunching system as well. An experiment with bunched cold beam showed a dependence of the bunch length on the beam density.

  7. Survey of reinjection experience from groundwater cooling applications

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, M.; Lee, C.H.

    1980-09-01

    The use of groundwater for cooling applications is a common practice throughout the country wherever an adequate supply of water exists. However, the reinjection of the cooling water to water-bearing strata is not as widely practiced. The literature pertaining to reinjection of heated water is not well documented. To fulfill the need for more information, a study was conducted to identify and document at least 30 sites where reinjection of grundwater from cooling applications was being (or had been) performed. The information obtained on each site was compiled and analyzed, the site described briefly and cooling and reinjection problems characterized. The end result of this study was to establish a data base of reinjection experience based on a variety of sites around the country with different hydrogeologic characteristics and cooling systems. These data are presented.

  8. Color gradients in cooling flow cluster central galaxies and the ionization of cluster emission line systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanishin, W.

    1988-01-01

    Preliminary results are given for a program to measure color gradients in the central galaxies in clusters with a variety of cooling flow rates. The objectives are to search for extended blue continuum regions indicative of star formation, to study the spatial distribution of star formation, and to make a quantitative measure of the amount of light from young stars, which can lead to a measure of the star formation rate (for an assumed initial mass function). Four clusters with large masses and large cluster H-alpha emission fluxes are found to have an excess of blue light concentrated to the centers of the cluster central galaxy. Assumption of a disk IMF leads to the conclusion that the starlight might play a major role in ionizing the emission line gas in these clusters.

  9. Experiments on statistical mechanics using resonance ionization spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Iturbe, J.; Allman, S.L.; Hurst, G.S.; Payne, M.G.

    1984-04-01

    Five different fluctuation phenomena at the atomic and molecular levels have been studied by resonance ionization spectroscopy techniques with one-atom detection sensitivity. The Poisson distribution described the observed frequency distributions suggesting random behavior. In addition, a gedanken experiment suggested by Einstein and Furth on the diffusion of atoms was performed in order to test the equality between time and ensemble averages. The obtained results confirmed the ergodicity of the studied system.

  10. Resonant two-photon ionization spectroscopy of jet-cooled NiPt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Scott; Spain, Eileen M.; Morse, Michael D.

    1990-03-01

    Resonant two-photon ionization spectroscopy of jet-cooled NiPt has been used to investigate the possibility of d-electron contributions to the bonding in this species. Based on an abrupt onset of predissociation, the bond strength of NiPt is assigned as D0(NiPt)=2.798±0.003 eV. Comparisons of scans using ArF (6.42 eV) or F2 (7.87 eV) radiation as the ionization laser yield IP(NiPt)=8.02±0.15 eV, from which we derive D0(Ni+-Pt)=2.41±0.15 eV and D0(Ni-Pt+) =3.58±0.35 eV. High resolution studies of the 6-0 and 8-0 bands of one of the three identifiable progressions demonstrate an Ω'=0←Ω`=0 transition with r'e =2.3396±0.0039Å and r″0 =2.2078±0.0023Å. The short bond length and large bond strength of NiPt, as compared to the corresponding values (re=2.330±0.003Å and D0=2.34±0.10 eV) for the coinage metal analog, CuAu, demonstrate significant d-orbital contributions to the bonding in NiPt.

  11. Parametric-Resonance Ionization Cooling and Reverse Emittance Exchange for Muon Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Derbenev, Yaroslav; Johnson, Rolland P.

    2006-03-20

    Two new ideas are being developed to reduce the transverse emittance of muon beams in order to increase the luminosity of muon colliders. The first idea involves driving a (1/2)-integer parametric resonance in a beam line or ring such that particle motion becomes hyperbolic, where xx'=constant. With the proper phase of the resonance driving term, particles move to larger and larger x' and smaller and smaller x at the position of a thin wedge absorber. The usual mechanism of ionization cooling reduces or constrains the excursion in x' while the dynamics of the resonance reduces the spread of x. The second idea takes advantage of the large reduction of relative momentum spread with increasing momentum in going from a few hundred MeV/c where the beam is cooled to a few TeV/c for an energy frontier collider. In this case we can use thin wedge absorbers to exchange the transverse and longitudinal emittances to make the transverse emittance smaller. These two ideas depend on careful control of the lattice functions and corrections for chromatic and spherical aberrations. We discuss these ideas and their potential luminosity implications considering the limitations of aberration corrections and of space charge effects.

  12. SR90, strontium shaped-charge critical ionization velocity experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wescott, Eugene M.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, Hans; Swift, Daniel W.; Valenzuela, Arnoldo; Rees, David

    1990-01-01

    In May 1986 an experiment was performed to test Alfven's critical ionization velocity (CIV) effect in free space, using the first high explosive shaped charge with a conical liner of strontium metal. The release, made at 540 km altitude at dawn twilight, was aimed at 48 deg to B. The background electron density was 1.5 x 10(exp 4) cu cm. A faint field-aligned Sr(+) ion streak with tip velocity of 2.6 km/s was observed from two optical sites. Using two calibration methods, it was calculated that between 4.5 x 10(exp 20) and 2 x 10(exp 21) ions were visible. An ionization time constant of 1920 s was calculated for Sr from the solar UV spectrum and ionization cross section which combined with a computer simulation of the injection predicts 1.7 x 10(exp 21) solar UV ions in the low-velocity part of the ion streak. Thus all the observed ions are from solar UV ionization of the slow (less than critical) velocity portion of the neutral jet. The observed neutral Sr velocity distribution and computer simulations indicate that 2 x 10(exp 21) solar UV ions would have been created from the fast (greater than critical) part of the jet. They would have been more diffuse, and were not observed. Using this fact it was estimated that any CIV ions created were less than 10(exp 21). It was concluded that future Sr CIV free space experiments should be conducted below the UV shadow height and in much larger background plasma density.

  13. Experimental assessment of on-chip liquid cooling through microchannels with de-ionized water and diluted ethylene glycol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Won, Yonghyun; Kim, Sungdong; Eunkyung Kim, Sarah

    2016-06-01

    Recent progress in Si IC devices, which results in an increase in power density and decrease in device size, poses various thermal challenges owing to high heat dissipation. Therefore, conventional cooling techniques become ineffective and produce a thermal bottleneck. In this study, an on-chip liquid cooling module with microchannels and through Si via (TSV) was fabricated, and cooling characteristics were evaluated by IR measurements. Both the microchannels and TSVs were fabricated in a Si wafer by deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) and the wafer was bonded with a glass wafer by a anodic bonding. The fabricated liquid cooling sample was evaluated using two different coolants (de-ionized water and 70 wt % diluted ethylene glycol), and the effect of coolants on cooling characteristics was investigated.

  14. Wedge Absorber Design for the Muon Ionisation Cooling Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, C.; Snopok, P.; Coney, L.; Jansson, A.; /Fermilab

    2010-05-01

    In the Muon Ionisation Cooling Experiment (MICE), muons are cooled by ionisation cooling. Muons are passed through material, reducing the total momentum of the beam. This results in a decrease in transverse emittance and a slight increase in longitudinal emittance, but overall reduction of 6d beam emittance. In emittance exchange, a dispersive beam is passed through wedge-shaped absorbers. Muons with higher energy pass through more material, resulting in a reduction in longitudinal emittance as well as transverse emittance. We consider the cooling performance of different wedge materials and geometries and propose a set of measurements that would be made in MICE.We outline the resources these measurements would require and detail some constraints that guide the choice of wedge parameters.

  15. Spectroscopy of Jet-Cooled Neutral and Ionized PAHs: Implications for Interstellar Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, F.; Tan, X.; Biennier, L.; Cami, J.

    2005-01-01

    We present the gas-phase spectroscopy of neutral and ionized polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) measured in the W-Visible-NIR range in an astrophysically relevant environment. These measurements provide data on PAHs and nanometer sized particles that can now be directly compared to astronomical observations. The harsh physical conditions of the IS medium - characterized by a low temperature, an absence of collisions and strong VUV radiation fields - are simulated in the laborat'ory by associating a molecular beam with an ionizing discharge to generate a cold plasma expansion. PAH ions are formed from the neutral precursors in an isolated environment at low temperature ($\\sim lOO$-K). The spectra of neutral and ionized PAHs are measured using the high sensitivity methods of cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS) and multiplex integrated cavity output spectroscopy (MICOS). These experiments provide unique information on the spectra of free, cold large carbon molecules and ions in the gas phase. The electronic bands measured for ionized PAH are found to be intrinsically broad ($\\geq$20 cm$^{-l}$) while the bands associated with the neutral precursors are narrower (of the order of 2 - 10 cm$^{-l}$). The laboratory data are discussed and compared with recent astronomical spectra of large and narrow DIBs and with the spectra of circumstellar environments of selected carbon stars (see contribution of Cami et al.) and the implications for the interstellar PAH population are derived. Preliminary results also show that carbon nanoparticles are formed during the short residence time of the precursors in the plasma. This finding holds great potential for understanding the formation process of interstellar grains.

  16. Fast Quasi-Adiabatic Gas Cooling: An Experiment Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oss, S.; Gratton, L. M.; Calza, G.; Lopez-Arias, T.

    2012-01-01

    The well-known experiment of the rapid expansion and cooling of the air contained in a bottle is performed with a rapidly responsive, yet very cheap thermometer. The adiabatic, low temperature limit is approached quite closely and measured with our apparatus. A straightforward theoretical model for this process is also presented and discussed.…

  17. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search low ionization-threshold experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Basu Thakur, Ritoban

    2014-01-01

    Over 80 years ago we discovered the presence of Dark Matter in our universe. Endeavors in astronomy and cosmology are in consensus with ever improving precision that Dark Matter constitutes an essential 27% of our universe. The Standard Model of Particle Physics does not provide any answers to the Dark Matter problem. It is imperative that we understand Dark Matter and discover its fundamental nature. This is because, alongside other important factors, Dark Matter is responsible for formation of structure in our universe. The very construct in which we sit is defined by its abundance. The Milky Way galaxy, hence life, wouldn't have formed if small over densities of Dark Matter had not caused sufficient accretion of stellar material. Marvelous experiments have been designed based on basic notions to directly and in-directly study Dark Matter, and the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment has been a pioneer and forerunner in the direct detection field. Generations of the CDMS experiment were designed with advanced scientific upgrades to detect Dark Matter particles of mass O(100) GeV/c2. This mass-scale was set primarily by predictions from Super Symmetry. Around 2013 the canonical SUSY predictions were losing some ground and several observations (rather hints of signals) from various experiments indicated to the possibility of lighter Dark Matter of mass O(10) GeV/c2. While the SuperCDMS experiment was probing the regular parameter space, the CDMSlite experiment was conceived to dedicatedly search for light Dark Matter using a novel technology. "CDMSlite" stands for CDMS - low ionization threshold experiment. Here we utilize a unique electron phonon coupling mechanism to measure ionization generated by scattering of light particles. Typically signals from such low energy recoils would be washed under instrumental noise. In CDMSlite via generation of Luke-Neganov phonons we can detect the small ionization energies, amplified in phonon

  18. The cryogenic dark matter search low ionization-threshold experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu Thakur, Ritoban

    Over 80 years ago we discovered the presence of Dark Matter in our universe. Endeavors in astronomy and cosmology are in consensus with ever improving precision that Dark Matter constitutes an essential 27% of our universe. The Standard Model of Particle Physics does not provide any answers to the Dark Matter problem. It is imperative that we understand Dark Matter and discover its fundamental nature. This is because, alongside other important factors, Dark Matter is responsible for formation of structure in our universe. The very construct in which we sit is defined by its abundance. The Milky Way galaxy, hence life, wouldn't have formed if small over densities of Dark Matter had not caused sufficient accretion of stellar material. Marvelous experiments have been designed based on basic notions to directly and indirectly study Dark Matter, and the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment has been a pioneer and forerunner in the direct detection field. Generations of the CDMS experiment were designed with advanced scientific upgrades to detect Dark Matter particles of mass O(100) GeV/c2. This mass-scale was set primarily by predictions from Super Symmetry. Around 2013 the canonical SUSY predictions were losing some ground and several observations (rather hints of signals) from various experiments indicated to the possibility of lighter Dark Matter of mass O(10) GeV/c2. While the SuperCDMS experiment was probing the regular parameter space, the CDMSlite experiment was conceived to dedicatedly search for light Dark Matter using a novel technology. "CDMSlite" stands for CDMS - low ionization threshold experiment. Here we utilize a unique electron phonon coupling mechanism to measure ionization generated by scattering of light particles. Typically signals from such low energy recoils would be washed under instrumental noise.In CDMSlite via generation of Luke-Neganov phonons we can detect the small ionization energies, amplified in phonon modes during charge

  19. Summary report on four foot septifoil cooling experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Randolph, H.W.; Collins, S.L.; Verebelyi, D.T.; Foti, D.J.

    1991-10-01

    Cooling parameters for some of the SRS reactor internal components are computed using the Transient Reactor Analysis Code, ``TRAC.`` In order to benchmark the code, the Safety Analysis Group of SRL requested an experiment to provide measurements of cooling parameters in a well defined physical system utilizing SRS reactor component(s). The experiment selected included a short length of septifoil with both top and bottom fittings containing five simulated control rods in an ``unseated`` configuration. Power level to be supplied to the rods was targeted at 2.5 kilowatts per foot. The septifoil segment was to be operated with no forced flow in order to evaluate thermal-hydraulic cooling. Parameters to be measured for comparison with code predictions were basic cooling phenomena, incidence of film boiling, thermal-hydraulic flow rate, pressure rise, and ratio of heat transfer through the wall of the assembly vs heat transfer to axial water flow through the assembly. Experimental apparatus was designed and assembled incorporating five simulated control rods four feet long, joule heated inside a five foot length of type ``Q`` septifoil. Water at 70 C was fed independently to the bottom inlet and along the outside of the septifoil. Water flowing along the outside of the septifoil was in confined flow and provided calorimetry to measure power flow through the septifoil housing. A shadowgraph technique was developed and used to monitor unforced flow of water pumped thermal-hydraulically through the septifoil. Electrical power of 10,000 to 70,000 watts was fed to the simulated rods from a dc power supply. Computer data acquisition was accomplished using ``LabView`` software programmed to match the configuration of the experiment along with scanning digital voltmeters and requisite signal sensors. Video camcorders were used to provide video records of six areas of the experiment.

  20. Summary report on four foot septifoil cooling experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Randolph, H.W.; Collins, S.L.; Verebelyi, D.T.; Foti, D.J.

    1991-10-01

    Cooling parameters for some of the SRS reactor internal components are computed using the Transient Reactor Analysis Code, TRAC.'' In order to benchmark the code, the Safety Analysis Group of SRL requested an experiment to provide measurements of cooling parameters in a well defined physical system utilizing SRS reactor component(s). The experiment selected included a short length of septifoil with both top and bottom fittings containing five simulated control rods in an unseated'' configuration. Power level to be supplied to the rods was targeted at 2.5 kilowatts per foot. The septifoil segment was to be operated with no forced flow in order to evaluate thermal-hydraulic cooling. Parameters to be measured for comparison with code predictions were basic cooling phenomena, incidence of film boiling, thermal-hydraulic flow rate, pressure rise, and ratio of heat transfer through the wall of the assembly vs heat transfer to axial water flow through the assembly. Experimental apparatus was designed and assembled incorporating five simulated control rods four feet long, joule heated inside a five foot length of type Q'' septifoil. Water at 70 C was fed independently to the bottom inlet and along the outside of the septifoil. Water flowing along the outside of the septifoil was in confined flow and provided calorimetry to measure power flow through the septifoil housing. A shadowgraph technique was developed and used to monitor unforced flow of water pumped thermal-hydraulically through the septifoil. Electrical power of 10,000 to 70,000 watts was fed to the simulated rods from a dc power supply. Computer data acquisition was accomplished using LabView'' software programmed to match the configuration of the experiment along with scanning digital voltmeters and requisite signal sensors. Video camcorders were used to provide video records of six areas of the experiment.

  1. A Modified Cooling Method and Its Application in "Drosophila" Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qu, Wen-hui; Zhu, Tong-bo; Yang, Da-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Chilling is a cost-effective and safe method of immobilising flies in "Drosophila" experiments. However, should condensation form on the plate, it would be fatal to the flies. Here we describe a modified cooling method using reusable commercial ice pack(s) (ca. 400 ml, 2-3 cm tall) rather than crushed ice. The ice pack is covered with a…

  2. Impact ionization experiments with porous cosmic dust particle analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterken, Veerle; Moragas-Klostermeyer, Georg; Hillier, Jon; Fielding, Lee; Lovett, Joseph; Armes, Steven; Fechler, Nina; Srama, Ralf; Bugiel, Sebastian; Hornung, Klaus

    2016-04-01

    Impact ionization experiments have been performed since more than 40 years for calibration of cosmic dust instruments using a linear Van de Graaff dust accelerator. Such an accelerator can accelerate conductive dust particles of sizes between ca. a few tens of microns, and a micron in size to speeds up to 80 km/s depending on particle size. Many different materials have been used for instrument calibration, from iron in the earlier days to carbon, metal-coated minerals and most recently, minerals coated with conductive polymers. While different materials with different densities have been used for instrument calibration, no comparative analysis has been made yet of compact particles versus porous or fluffy particles of the same material. Porous or fluffy particles are increasingly found to be present in the solar system, e.g. dust from comet 67P Churyumov-Gerasimenko or aggregate grains from the plumes of Enceladus and recently also indications were found for low-density interstellar dust (ISD) from ISD data and trajectory simulations. These recalibrations are thus relevant for estimations of the size distributions of interplanetary and interstellar dust. In this talk we report about the calibrations being performed at the Heidelberg dust accelerator facility for investigating the influence of particle density on the impact ionization charge after impact. We use the Cassini Cosmic Dust Analyser as an impact target. We then explain the experiment set-up, the preparation of the materials and the materials used. We elaborate on the technical challenges, and finally about the current status of the research at this stage. We conclude the talk with the relevance of the study, being the potential influence of such calibrations on the estimates of the mass distributions of interstellar and interplanetary dust.

  3. OPTICAL SPECTROSCOPY OF H{alpha} FILAMENTS IN COOL CORE CLUSTERS: KINEMATICS, REDDENING, AND SOURCES OF IONIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Michael; Veilleux, Sylvain; Rupke, David S. N. E-mail: veilleux@astro.umd.edu

    2012-02-20

    We have obtained deep, high spatial and spectral resolution, long-slit spectra of the H{alpha} nebulae in the cool cores of nine galaxy clusters. This sample provides a wealth of information on the ionization state, kinematics, and reddening of the warm gas in the cool cores of galaxy clusters. We find evidence for only small amounts of reddening in the extended, line-emitting filaments, with the majority of filaments having E(B - V) < 0.2. We find, in agreement with previous works, that the optical emission in cool core clusters has elevated low-ionization line ratios. The combination of [O III]/H{beta}, [N II]/H{alpha}, [S II]/H{alpha}, and [O I]/H{alpha} allow us to rule out collisional ionization by cosmic rays, thermal conduction, and photoionization by intracluster medium (ICM) X-rays and active galactic nuclei as strong contributors to the ionization in the bulk of the optical line-emitting gas in both the nuclei and filaments. The data are adequately described by a composite model of slow shocks and star formation. This model is further supported by an observed correlation between the line widths and low-ionization line ratios which becomes stronger in systems with more modest star formation activity based on far-ultraviolet observations. We find that the more extended, narrow filaments tend to have shallower velocity gradients and narrower line widths than the compact filamentary complexes. We confirm that the widths of the emission lines decrease with radius, from FWHM {approx}600 km s{sup -1} in the nuclei to FWHM {approx}100 km s{sup -1} in the most extended filaments. The variation of line width with radius is vastly different than what is measured from stellar absorption lines in a typical giant elliptical galaxy, suggesting that the velocity width of the warm gas may in fact be linked to ICM turbulence and, thus, may provide a glimpse into the amount of turbulence in cool cores. In the central regions (r < 10 kpc) of several systems the warm gas

  4. RF ACCELERATING STRUCTURE FOR THE MUON COOLING EXPERIMENT.

    SciTech Connect

    CORLETT,J.; GREEN,M.; LI,D.; HOLTKAMP,N.; MORETTI,A.; KIRK,H.G.; PALMER,R.B.; ZHAO,Y.; SUMMERS,D.

    1999-03-29

    The ionization cooling of muons requires longitudinal acceleration of the muons after scattering in a hydrogen target. In order to maximize the accelerating voltage, we propose using linear accelerating structures with cells bounded by thin beryllium metal foils. This produces an on-axis field equivalent to the maximum surface field, whereas with beam-pipes the accelerating field is approximately half that of the peak surface field in the cavity. The muons interact only weakly with the thin foils. A {pi}/2 interleaved cavity structure has been chosen, with alternate cells coupled together externally, and the two groups of cells fed in quadrature. At present they are considering an operating temperature of 77K to gain a factor of at least two in Q-value over room temperature. The authors describe the design of the {pi}/2 interleaved cavity structure, design of an alternative {pi}-mode open structure, preliminary experimental results from a low-power test cavity, and plans for high-power testing.

  5. Cooling of 3D Granular Gases: Experiments in Microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harth, Kirsten; Wegner, Sandra; Trittel, Torsten; Stannarius, Ralf

    Granular gases are ensembles of macroscopic grains, which move randomly and interact through inelastic collisions. This non-equilibrium statistical system is easy to picture, but still insufficiently understood. Numerous theoretical treatments have been performed, favorably with spherical grains and periodic boundaries, starting from a homogeneous state. Experimentally, such a gas in 3D can only be realized with strong external forcing or in microgravity. We have recently demonstrated that the use of elongated grains facilitates the realization of 3D experiments beyond the Knudsen regime (1). Main findings in a sounding rocket experiment were non-Gaussian velocity distributions and a violation of the equipartition of kinetic energy in the steady state. Rotational degrees of freedom are under-excited. When the excitation is stopped, energy is dissipated, the granular gas is ''cooling''. We present the first quantitative study of the cooling of a granular gas, based on a 3D data evaluation, from drop tower experiments. The evolution of the kinetic energy in translational and rotational degrees of freedom is compared to Haff's law and recent numerical studies. Additionally, we analyze velocity and density distributions.(1) K. Harth et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110 144102 (2013) This research was funded by German Aerospace Center DLR Grants 50WM1241 and 50WB1344 and by DFG Grant STA-425/34-1.

  6. The Lack of Influence of Metallicity on Cooling and Collapse of Ionized Gas in Small Protogalactic Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jappsen, A.-K.; Glover, S. C. O.; Klessen, R. S.; Mac Low, M.-M.

    2005-12-01

    We study the influence of low levels of metal enrichment on the cooling and collapse of ionized gas in small protogalactic halos. We use three-dimensional, smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations, run with the publicly available parallel code GADGET (Springel et al. 2001). We implement a sink particle algorithm. This allows us to safely represent gas that has collapsed beyond the resolution limit without causing numerical errors within the resolved regions of the simulation. We also include the necessary framework for following the non-equilibrium chemistry of H2 in the protogalactic gas, and a treatment of radiative heating and cooling. Our initial conditions represent protogalaxies forming within a fossil H ii region---a previously ionized H ii region that has not yet had time to cool and recombine. Prior to cosmological reionization, such regions should be relatively common, since the characteristic lifetimes of the likely ionizing sources are significantly shorter than a Hubble time. We show that in these regions, H2 is the dominant and most effective coolant, even in the presence of small amounts of metals. It is the amount of H2 which forms that controls whether or not the gas can collapse and form stars. For metallicities Z ≤ 10-3 Z⊙, we find that metal line cooling alters the density and temperature evolution of the gas by less than 1% compared to the metal-free case at densities below 1 cm-3 and temperatures above 2000 K. However, at higher densities and lower temperatures, metal line cooling does become rather more important, and will affect the ability of the gas to fragment. We also show that an external ultraviolet background delays or suppresses the cooling and collapse of the gas regardless of whether or not it is metal-enriched. RSK and A-KJ acknowledge support from the Emmy Noether Program of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (grant no. KL1358/1). M-MML acknowledges support from NSF grants AST99-85392 and AST03-07854, and NASA grant NAG5

  7. Heat Transfer Experiments in the Internal Cooling Passages of a Cooled Radial Turbine Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, B. V.; Wagner, J. H.

    1996-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted (1) to experimentally measure, assess and analyze the heat transfer within the internal cooling configuration of a radial turbine rotor blade and (2) to obtain heat transfer data to evaluate and improve computational fluid dynamics (CFD) procedures and turbulent transport models of internal coolant flows. A 1.15 times scale model of the coolant passages within the NASA LERC High Temperature Radial Turbine was designed, fabricated of Lucite and instrumented for transient beat transfer tests using thin film surface thermocouples and liquid crystals to indicate temperatures. Transient heat transfer tests were conducted for Reynolds numbers of one-fourth, one-half, and equal to the operating Reynolds number for the NASA Turbine. Tests were conducted for stationary and rotating conditions with rotation numbers in the range occurring in the NASA Turbine. Results from the experiments showed the heat transfer characteristics within the coolant passage were affected by rotation. In general, the heat transfer increased and decreased on the sides of the straight radial passages with rotation as previously reported from NASA-HOST-sponsored experiments. The heat transfer in the tri-passage axial flow region adjacent to the blade exit was relatively unaffected by rotation. However, the heat transfer on one surface, in the transitional region between the radial inflow passage and axial, constant radius passages, decreased to approximately 20 percent of the values without rotation. Comparisons with previous 3-D numerical studies indicated regions where the heat transfer characteristics agreed and disagreed with the present experiment.

  8. Threshold ionization spectroscopic investigation of supersonic jet-cooled, laser-desorbed Tryptophan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taherkhani, Mehran; Armentano, Antonio; Černý, Jiří; Müller-Dethlefs, Klaus

    2016-07-01

    Tryptophan (Trp) was studied by two-colour Photoionization Efficiency (PIE) and Mass Analysed Threshold Ionization (MATI) spectroscopy using a laser desorption apparatus. Conformer A of Trp was excited into the S1 state (34,878 cm-1) and the second laser was scanned around the D0 cation ground and the D1 excited state. No ionization signal into the D0 state could be found, but a clear threshold was observed for the D1 state with an ionization energy of 66,704 ± 3 cm-1 (8.27 eV). This observation is explained in terms of the electronic configurations of the S1 and cationic states.

  9. Cooling System for the Merit High-Power Target Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haug, F.; Pereira, H.; Silva, P.; Pezzetti, M.; Pavlov, O.; Pirotte, O.; Metselaar, J.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fabich, A.; Lettry, J.; Kirk, H. G.; McDonald, K. T.; Titus, P.; Bennett, J. R. J.

    2010-04-01

    MERIT is a proof-of-principle experiment of a target station suitable as source for future muon colliders or neutrino factories. When installed at the CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research) PS (Proton Synchrotron) complex fast-extracted high-intensity proton beams intercepted a free mercury jet inside a normal-conducting, pulsed 15-T capture solenoid magnet cooled with liquid nitrogen. Up to 25 MJ of Joule heat was dissipated in the magnet during a pulse. The fully automated, remotely controlled cryogenic system of novel design permitted the transfer of nitrogen by the sole means of differential pressures inside the vessels. This fast cycling system permitted several hundred tests in less than three weeks during the 2007 data taking campaign.

  10. Cooling water for SSC experiments: Supplemental Conceptual Design Report (SCDR)

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, R.E.

    1989-10-20

    This paper discusses the following topics on cooling water design on the superconducting super collider; low conductivity water; industrial cooling water; chilled water systems; and radioactive water systems. (LSP)

  11. Ionization and excitation in cool giant stars. I - Hydrogen and helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luttermoser, Donald G.; Johnson, Hollis R.

    1992-01-01

    The influence that non-LTE radiative transfer has on the electron density, ionization equilibrium, and excitation equilibrium in model atmospheres representative of both oxygen-rich and carbon-rich red giant stars is demonstrated. The radiative transfer and statistical equilibrium equations are solved self-consistently for H, H(-), H2, He I, C I, C II, Na I, Mg I, Mg II, Ca I, and Ca II in a plane-parallel static medium. Calculations are made for both radiative-equilibrium model photospheres alone and model photospheres with attached chromospheric models as determined semiempirically with IUE spectra of g Her (M6 III) and TX Psc (C6, 2). The excitation and ionization results for hydrogen and helium are reported.

  12. The integrated radio continuum spectrum of M33 - Evidence for free-free absorption by cool ionized gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Israel, F. P.; Mahoney, M. J.; Howarth, N.

    1992-01-01

    We present measurements of the integrated radio continuum flux density of M33 at frequencies between 22 and 610 MHz and discuss the radio continuum spectrum of M33 between 22 MHz and 10 GHz. This spectrum has a turnover between 500 and 900 MHz, depending on the steepness of the high frequency radio spectrum of M33. Below 500 MHz the spectrum is relatively flat. We discuss possible mechanisms to explain this spectral shape and consider efficient free-free absorption of nonthermal emission by a cool (not greater than 1000 K) ionized gas to be a very likely possibility. The surface filling factor of both the nonthermal and the thermal material appears to be small (of order 0.001), which could be explained by magnetic field/density fluctuations in the M 33 interstellar medium. We briefly speculate on the possible presence of a nuclear radio source with a steep spectrum.

  13. Bent Superconducting Solenoids for the Muon Cooling Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.A.; Eyssa, Y.; Kenney, S.; Miller, J. R.; Prestemon, S.; Wang, S.T.

    1999-03-18

    This report describes some solenoid design work done for the cooling experiment for the muon collider collaboration. This report describes an analysis section of superconducting solenoids that have a center line induction of 3.0 T. The section is bent in the shape of an S. Each bend in the S bends the muon beam one radian (57.3 degrees). The warm bore diameter of the solenoid bent solenoid is 300 to 320 mm. The radius of the bend at the solenoid center line is 1000 mm. This report shows the results of three dimensional field calculations and presents a solenoid design that will include four TPC detectors that are 240 mm in diameter and 550 mm long as well as a 1300 mm long section of 1300 MHz RF cavities. The TPC sections need a solenoid wann bore diameter of about 300 320 mm while RF cavities require a warm bore diameter of 440 mm. The superconducting solenoid design must take into account the varying warm bore diameter requirements for the magnet string yet meet the stringent solenoidal field uniformity requirements within the active volume of the four TPCs.

  14. First-Principles Investigation to Ionization of Argon Under Conditions Close to Typical Sonoluminescence Experiments.

    PubMed

    Kang, Wei; Zhao, Shijun; Zhang, Shen; Zhang, Ping; Chen, Q F; He, Xian-Tu

    2016-01-01

    Mott effect, featured by a sharp increase of ionization, is one of the unique properties of partially ionized plasmas, and thus of great interest to astrophysics and inertial confinement fusion. Recent experiments of single bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) revealed that strong ionization took place at a density two orders lower than usual theoretical expectation. We show from the perspective of electronic structures that the strong ionization is unlikely the result of Mott effect in a pure argon plasma. Instead, first-principles calculations suggest that other ion species from aqueous environments can energetically fit in the gap between the continuum and the top of occupied states of argon, making the Mott effect possible. These results would help to clarify the relationship between SBSL and Mott effect, and further to gain an better understanding of partially ionized plasmas. PMID:26853107

  15. Simulations of laser propagation and ionization in l'OASIS experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Dimitrov, D.A.; Bruhwiler, D.L.; Leemans, W.; Esarey, E.; Catravas, P.; Toth, C.; Shadwick, B.; Cary, J.R.; Giacone, R.

    2002-06-30

    We have conducted particle-in-cell simulations of laser pulse propagation through neutral He, including the effects of tunneling ionization, within the parameter regime of the l'OASIS experiments [1,2] at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The simulations show the theoretically predicted [3] blue shifting of the laser frequency at the leading edge of the pulse. The observed blue shifting is in good agreement with the experimental data. These results indicate that such computations can be used to accurately simulate a number of important effects related to tunneling ionization for laser-plasma accelerator concepts, such as steepening due to ionization-induced pump depletion, which can seed and enhance instabilities. Our simulations show self-modulation occurring earlier when tunneling ionization is included then for a pre-ionized plasma.

  16. First-Principles Investigation to Ionization of Argon Under Conditions Close to Typical Sonoluminescence Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Wei; Zhao, Shijun; Zhang, Shen; Zhang, Ping; Chen, Q. F.; He, Xian-Tu

    2016-01-01

    Mott effect, featured by a sharp increase of ionization, is one of the unique properties of partially ionized plasmas, and thus of great interest to astrophysics and inertial confinement fusion. Recent experiments of single bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) revealed that strong ionization took place at a density two orders lower than usual theoretical expectation. We show from the perspective of electronic structures that the strong ionization is unlikely the result of Mott effect in a pure argon plasma. Instead, first-principles calculations suggest that other ion species from aqueous environments can energetically fit in the gap between the continuum and the top of occupied states of argon, making the Mott effect possible. These results would help to clarify the relationship between SBSL and Mott effect, and further to gain an better understanding of partially ionized plasmas. PMID:26853107

  17. First-Principles Investigation to Ionization of Argon Under Conditions Close to Typical Sonoluminescence Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Wei; Zhao, Shijun; Zhang, Shen; Zhang, Ping; Chen, Q. F.; He, Xian-Tu

    2016-02-01

    Mott effect, featured by a sharp increase of ionization, is one of the unique properties of partially ionized plasmas, and thus of great interest to astrophysics and inertial confinement fusion. Recent experiments of single bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) revealed that strong ionization took place at a density two orders lower than usual theoretical expectation. We show from the perspective of electronic structures that the strong ionization is unlikely the result of Mott effect in a pure argon plasma. Instead, first-principles calculations suggest that other ion species from aqueous environments can energetically fit in the gap between the continuum and the top of occupied states of argon, making the Mott effect possible. These results would help to clarify the relationship between SBSL and Mott effect, and further to gain an better understanding of partially ionized plasmas.

  18. Non-solar UV produced ions observed optically from the 'Crit I' critical velocity ionization experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Wescott, E. M.; Rees, D.; Valenzuela, A.; Brenning, N.

    1990-01-01

    A critical velocity ionization experiment was carried out with a heavily instrumented rocket launched from Wallops Island on May 13, 1986. Two neutral barium beams were created by explosive shaped charges released from the rocket and detonated at 48 deg to B at altitudes near 400 km and below the solar UV cutoff. Critical velocity ionization was expected to form a detectable ion jet along the release field line, but, instead, an ion cloud of fairly uniform intensity was observed stretching from the release field line across to where the neutral barium jet reached sunlight. The process creating these ions must have been present from the time of the release; the efficiency is estimated to be equivalent to an ionization time constant of 1800 sec. This ionization is most likely from collisions between the neutral barium jet and the ambient atmospheric oxygen, and, if so, the cross section for collisional ionization is 9 x 10 to the -18th sq cm.

  19. Cavity Cooling of Nanoparticles: Towards Matter-Wave experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millen, James; Kuhn, Stefan; Arndt, Markus

    2016-05-01

    Levitated systems are a fascinating addition to the world of optically-controlled mechanical resonators. It is predicted that nanoparticles can be cooled to their c.o.m. ground state via the interaction with an optical cavity. By freeing the oscillator from clamping forces dissipation and decoherence is greatly reduced, leading to the potential to produce long-lived, macroscopically spread, mechanical quantum states, allowing tests of collapse models and any mass limit of quantum physics. Reaching the low pressures required to cavity-cool to the ground state has proved challenging. Our approach is to cavity cool a beam of nanoparticles in high vacuum. We can cool the c.o.m. motion of nanospheres a few hundred nanometers in size. Looking forward, we will utilize novel microcavities to enhance optomechanical cooling, preparing particles in a coherent beam ideally suited to ultra-high mass interferometry at 107 a.m.u.

  20. Epicyclic Twin-helix Magnetic Structure for Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    A. Afanasev, R.P. Johnson, Y.S. Derbenev, V.S. Morozov

    2010-05-01

    Para­met­ric-res­o­nance Ion­iza­tion Cool­ing (PIC) is en­vi­sioned as the final 6D cool­ing stage of a high-lu­mi­nos­i­ty muon col­lid­er. Im­ple­ment­ing PIC im­pos­es strin­gent con­straints on the cool­ing chan­nel's mag­net­ic op­tics de­sign. This paper pre­sents a lin­ear op­tics so­lu­tion com­pat­i­ble with PIC. Our so­lu­tion con­sists of a su­per­po­si­tion of two op­po­site-he­lic­i­ty equal-pe­ri­od and equal-strength he­li­cal dipole har­mon­ics and a straight nor­mal quadrupole. We demon­strate that such a sys­tem can be ad­just­ed to meet all of the PIC lin­ear op­tics re­quire­ments while re­tain­ing large ac­cep­tance.

  1. Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC) balloon experiment: instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzik, T. Gregory; Adams, James H.; Bashindzhagyan, G. L.; Dudnik, Alexey V.; Ellison, Steven B.; Fazely, Ali R.; Garcia, L.; Grigorov, Naum L.; Inderhees, Susan E.; Isbert, Joachim; Jung, H. C.; Khein, L.; Kim, Sun-Kee; Kroeger, Richard A.; Lockwood, R.; McDonald, Frank B.; Panasyuk, Mikhail I.; Park, Choong-Soo; Price, B.; Schmidt, Wolfgang K.; Dion-Schwartz, C.; Senchishin, V. G.; Seo, Eun-Suk; Wefel, John P.; Wang, J. Z.; Zatsepin, Viktor I.; Zinn, S. Y.

    1996-10-01

    A new balloon instrument, the advanced thin ionization calorimeter (ATIC), is currently under development by an international collaboration involving researchers in the U.S., Germany, Korea, Russia and the Ukraine. The instrument will be used, in a series of long duration balloon flights, to investigate the charge composition and energy spectra of primary cosmic rays over the energy range from about 1010 to 1014 eV. The ATIC instrument is designed around a new technology, fully active Bismuth Germanate (BGO) ionization calorimeter that is used to measure the energy deposited by the cascades formed by particles interacting in an approximately 1 proton interaction length thick carbon target. The charge module comprises a highly segmented, triply redundant set of detectors (scintillator, silicon matrix and Cherenkov) that together give good incident charge resolution plus rejection of the 'backscattered' particles from the interaction. Trajectory information is obtained both from scintillator layers and from the cascade profile throughout the BGO calorimeter. This instrument is specifically designed to take advantage of the existing NASA long duration balloon flight capability in Antarctica and/or the Northern Hemisphere. The ATIC instrumentation is presented here, while a companion paper at this conference discusses the expected performance.

  2. Miniature metastable ionization detectors for exobiology flight experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woeller, F. H.

    1986-01-01

    The Metastable Ionization Detector (MID) is three orders of magnitude more sensitive than the thermal conductivity detectors used on previous flight instruments. The miniature MID provides scientists with a much smaller and highly sensitive detector for flight gas chromatographs. A miniature MID featuring an unconventional triaxial electrode configuration was developed and used routinely in the laboratory. Although much smaller and lighter than the commercial MID, its performance characteristics parallel those of the traditional design. The detector is compatible with the modulated voltage circuitry, also developed here, and thus can perform over an expanded response range of more than 7 orders magnitude. A micro volume version of a miniature MID, with an internal volume of less than 8 microliter, was recently designed is now being tested. The micro volume MID uses carrier gas flow rates of approx. 2cc/min thus eliminating the need for makeup gas when capillary columns are used.

  3. Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC) balloon experiment: expected performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Eun-Suk; Adams, James H.; Bashindzhagyan, G. L.; Dudnik, Alexey V.; Fazely, Ali R.; Garcia, L.; Grigorov, Naum L.; Guzik, T. Gregory; Inderhees, Susan E.; Isbert, Joachim; Jung, H. C.; Khein, L.; Kim, Sun-Kee; Kroeger, Richard A.; McDonald, Frank B.; Panasyuk, Mikhail I.; Park, Choong-Soo; Schmidt, Wolfgang K.; Dion-Schwartz, C.; Senchishin, V. G.; Wang, J. Z.; Wefel, John P.; Zatsepin, Viktor I.; Zinn, S. Y.

    1996-10-01

    An advanced thin ionization calorimeter (ATIC) will be used to investigate the charge composition and energy spectra of ultrahigh energy primary cosmic rays in a series of long- duration balloon flights. While obtaining new high priority scientific results, this balloon payload can also serve as a proof of concept for a BGO calorimeter-based instrument on the International Space Station. The ATIC technical details are presented in a companion paper at this conference. Here we discuss the expected performance of the instrument based on a GEANT code developed for simulating nuclear- electromagnetic cascades initiated by protons. For simulations of helium and heavy nuclei, a nucleus-nucleus interaction event generator LUCIAE was linked to the GEANT based program. Using these models, the design of the ATIC detector system has been optimized by simulating the instrument response to particles of different charges over the energy range to be covered. Results of these simulations are presented and discussed.

  4. IONIZED ABSORBERS AS EVIDENCE FOR SUPERNOVA-DRIVEN COOLING OF THE LOWER GALACTIC CORONA

    SciTech Connect

    Fraternali, Filippo; Marasco, Antonino; Binney, James

    2013-02-20

    We show that the ultraviolet absorption features, newly discovered in Hubble Space Telescope spectra, are consistent with being formed in a layer that extends a few kpc above the disk of the Milky Way. In this interface between the disk and the Galactic corona, high-metallicity gas ejected from the disk by supernova feedback can mix efficiently with the virial-temperature coronal material. The mixing process triggers the cooling of the lower corona down to temperatures encompassing the characteristic range of the observed absorption features, producing a net supernova-driven gas accretion onto the disk at a rate of a few M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. We speculate that this mechanism explains how the hot mode of cosmological accretion feeds star formation in galactic disks.

  5. A fitting formula for radiative cooling based on non-local thermodynamic equilibrium population from weakly-ionized air plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogino, Yousuke; Nagano, Atsushi; Ishihara, Tomoaki; Ohnishi, Naofumi

    2013-08-01

    A fitting formula for radiative cooling with collisional-radiative population for air plasma flowfield has been developed. Population number densities are calculated from rate equations in order to evaluate the effects of nonequilibrium atomic and molecular processes. Many elementary processes are integrated to be applied to optically-thin plasmas in the number density range of 1012/cm3 <= N <= 1019/cm3 and the temperature range of 300 K <= T <= 40,000 K. Our results of the total radiative emissivity calculated from the collisional-radiative population are fitted in terms of temperature and total number density. To validate the analytic fitting formula, numerical simulation of a laser-induced blast wave propagation with the nonequilibrium radiative cooling is conducted and successfully reproduces the shock and plasma wave front time history observed by experiments. In addition, from the comparison between numerical simulations with the radiation cooling effect based on the fitting formula and those with a gray gas radiation model that assumes local thermodynamic equilibrium, we find that the displacement of the plasma front is slightly different due to the deviation of population probabilities. By using the fitting formula, we can easily and more accurately evaluate the radiative cooling effect without solving detailed collisional-radiative rate equations.

  6. Ghost peaks observed after AP-MALDI experiment may disclose new ionization mechanism of matrix assisted hypersonic velocity impact ionization

    PubMed Central

    Moskovets, Eugene

    2015-01-01

    RATIONALE Understanding the mechanisms of MALDI promises improvements in the sensitivity and specificity of many established applications in the field of mass spectrometry. This paper reports a serendipitous observation of a significant ion yield in a post-ionization experiment conducted after the sample has been removed from a standard atmospheric pressure (AP)-MALDI source. This post-ionization is interpreted in terms of collisions of microparticles moving with a hypersonic velocity into a solid surface. Calculations show that the thermal energy released during such collisions is close to that absorbed by the top matrix layer in traditional MALDI. The microparticles, containing both the matrix and analytes, could be detached from a film produced inside the inlet capillary during the sample ablation and accelerated by the flow rushing through the capillary. These observations contribute some new perspective to ion formation in both laser and laserless matrix-assisted ionization. METHODS An AP-MALDI ion source hyphenated with a three-stage high-pressure ion funnel system was utilized for peptide mass analysis. After the laser was turned off and MALDI sample was removed, ions were detected during a gradual reduction of the background pressure in the first funnel. The constant-rate pressure reduction led to the reproducible appearance of different singly- and doubly-charged peptide peaks in mass spectra taken a few seconds after the end of the MALDI analysis of a dried-droplet spot. RESULTS The ion yield as well as the mass range of ions observed with a significant delay after a completion of the primary MALDI analysis depended primarily on the background pressure inside the first funnel. The production of ions in this post-ionization step was exclusively observed during the pressure drop. A lower matrix background and significant increase in relative yield of double-protonated ions are reported. CONCLUSIONS The observations were partially consistent with a model of

  7. Ionization states of low-energy cosmic rays - Results from Spacelab 3 cosmic-ray experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutta, A.; Goswami, J. N.; Biswas, S.; Durgaprasad, N.; Mitra, B.; Singh, R. K.

    1993-01-01

    The Indian cosmic ray experiment Anuradha, conducted onboard Spacelab 3 during April 29-May 6, 1985 was designed to obtain information on the ionization states of low-energy cosmic rays, using the geomagnetic field as a rigidity filter to place an upper limit on the ionization state of individual cosmic ray particles. This paper presents data confirming the presence of three distinct groups of energetic particles in the near-earth space: (1) low-energy (15-25 MeV/nucleon) anomalous cosmic rays that are either singly ionized or consistent with their being in singly ionized state, (2) fully ionized galactic cosmic ray ions, and (3) partially ionized iron and sub-iron group ions (which account for about 20 percent of all the iron and sub-iron group ions detected at the Spacelab 3 orbit within the magnetosphere in the energy interval 25-125 MeV/nucleon). It is argued that these partially ionized heavy ions are indeed a part of the low-energy galactic cosmic rays present in the interplanetary space.

  8. Simulation of ionization effects for high-density positron drivers in future plasma wakefield experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Bruhwiler, D.L.; Dimitrov, D.A.; Cary, J.R.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W.P.

    2003-05-12

    The plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA) concept has been proposed as a potential energy doubler for present or future electron-positron colliders. Recent particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations have shown that the self-fields of the required electron beam driver can tunnel ionize neutral Li, leading to plasma wake dynamics differing significantly from that of a preionized plasma. It has also been shown, for the case of a preionized plasma, that the plasma wake of a positron driver differs strongly from that of an electron driver. We will present new PIC simulations, using the OOPIC code, showing the effects of tunneling ionization on the plasma wake generated by high-density positron drivers. The results will be compared to previous work on electron drivers with tunneling ionization and positron drivers without ionization. Parameters relevant to the energy doubler and the upcoming E-164x experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center will be considered.

  9. Precision Experiments With Stored And Cooled Highly Charged Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluge, H.-Jürgen

    2006-11-01

    Accumulation, storing and cooling techniques play an increasingly important role in many areas of science. These procedures can be applied in Penning traps and storage rings to ions. In this way, quantum electrodynamics can be tested in extreme electromagnetic fields by measuring hyperfine structure splittings. Lamb shifts, or g-factors in hydrogen-like heavy systems such as U91+ or Pb81+. In addition, fundamental constants or nuclear properties like the atomic mass can be determined. In the case of a radioactive ion, the fate of an individual ion, undergoing a nuclear decay, can be studied in detail by observing the disappearance of the signal of the mother and the appearance of that of the daughter isotope. Presently, the Highly-charged Ion TRAP (HITRAP) facility is being built up at GSI. Stable or radioactive highly charged ions are produced by colliding relativistic ions with a target. After electron cooling and deceleration in the storage ring ESR at GSI, these ions are ejected, decelerated further, and injected into a Penning trap where cooling to 4 K takes place. From there, the cooled highly charged ions such as hydrogen-like uranium are transferred at low energy to different experimental set-ups which are being built up by the international HITRAP Collaboration.

  10. Interpretation of the electric fields measured in an ionospheric critical ionization velocity experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brenning, N.; Faelthammar, C.-G.; Marklund, G.; Haerendel, G.; Kelley, M. C.; Pfaff, R.

    1991-01-01

    The quasi-dc electric fields measured in the CRIT I ionospheric release experiment are studied. In the experiment, two identical barium shaped charges were fired toward a main payload, and three-dimensional measurements of the electric field inside the streams were made. The relevance of proposed mechanisms for electron heating in the critical ionization velocity (CIV) mechanism is addressed. It is concluded that both the 'homogeneous' and the 'ionizing front' models probably are valid, but in different parts of the streams. It is also possible that electrons are directly accelerated by a magnetic field-aligned component of the electric field. The coupling between the ambient ionosphere and the ionized barium stream is more complicated that is usually assumed in CIV theories, with strong magnetic-field-aligned electric fields and probably current limitation as important processes.

  11. Methods of beam cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, A.M.

    1996-02-01

    Diverse methods which are available for particle beam cooling are reviewed. They consist of some highly developed techniques such as radiation damping, electron cooling, stochastic cooling and the more recently developed, laser cooling. Methods which have been theoretically developed, but not yet achieved experimentally, are also reviewed. They consist of ionization cooling, laser cooling in three dimensions and stimulated radiation cooling.

  12. SRF photoinjector for proof-of-principle experiment of coherent electron cooling at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Kayran D.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Brutus, J.C.; et al

    2012-05-20

    Coherent Electron Cooling (CEC) based on Free Electron Laser (FEL) amplifier promises to be a very good way to cool protons and ions at high energies. A proof of principle experiment to demonstrate cooling at 40 GeV/u is under construction at BNL. One of possible sources to provide sufficient quality electron beam for this experiment is a SRF photoinjector. In this paper we discuss design and simulated performance of the photoinjector based on existing 112 MHz SRF gun and newly designed single-cavity SRF linac operating at 704 MHz.

  13. Charge exchange contamination of CRIT-II barium CIV experiment. [critical ionization velocity in ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swenson, G. R.; Mende, S. B.; Meyerott, R. E.; Rairden, R. L.

    1991-01-01

    Experiments have been recently performed which attempted to confirm critical ionization velocity (CIV) ionization by deploying chemicals at high velocity in the ionosphere. Specifically, the CRIT-II rocket performed a barium release in the ionosphere, where observations of Ba(+) resonant emissions following the release are believed to have resulted from the CIV process. Calculations are presented which suggest a significant fraction (if not all) of the Ba(+) observed likely resulted from charge exchange with the thermosphere ions and not through CIV processes. The results presented here are pertinent to other CIV experiments performed in the ionosphere. It is recommended that laboratory measurements should be made of the charge exchange cross section between O(+) and Ba as well as other metal vapors used in CIV experiments.

  14. Vertical sampling flights in support of the 1981 ASCOT cooling tower experiments: field effort and data

    SciTech Connect

    Gay, G.T.

    1982-03-01

    During the month of August 1981, three nights of experimental sampling of tracers released into the cooling tower plume of a geothermal power plant were conducted. In these experiments a tethered balloon was used to lift a payload so as to obtain vertical profiles of the cooling tower plume and the entrained tracers. A description of the equipment used, the field effort and the data acquired are presented here.

  15. Spatial ionization effects of a shock layer in the RAM-C-II flight experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surzhikov, S. T.

    2015-02-01

    A three-dimensional computer model of the nonequilibrium ionization aerophysics of descent moduli entering dense atmospheric layers with orbital velocity in the height range of 60-90 km is developed. A three-dimensional numerical analysis of the experimental data on the ionization of the shock layer near the surface of a hypersonic flying module having the form of a blunt-sphere cone with the flight velocity higher than 7.5 km/s at heights of 61-81 km is fulfilled. The data of the flight experiment are obtained in the framework of the RAM-C-II investigatory program. The use of a three-dimensional computer model made it possible to find the calculated data in good agreement with the flight experiment data, as well as to explain some spatial effects not considered before.

  16. The Tomographic Ionized-Carbon Mapping Experiment (TIME) CII Imaging Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staniszewski, Z.; Bock, J. J.; Bradford, C. M.; Brevik, J.; Cooray, A.; Gong, Y.; Hailey-Dunsheath, S.; O'Brient, R.; Santos, M.; Shirokoff, E.; Silva, M.; Zemcov, M.

    2014-09-01

    The Tomographic Ionized-Carbon Mapping Experiment (TIME) and TIME-Pilot are proposed imaging spectrometers to measure reionization and large scale structure at redshifts 5-9. We seek to exploit the 158 restframe emission of [CII], which becomes measurable at 200-300 GHz at reionization redshifts. Here we describe the scientific motivation, give an overview of the proposed instrument, and highlight key technological developments underway to enable these measurements.

  17. Electron Acceleration and Ionization Production in High-Power Heating Experiments at HAARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishin, E. V.; Pedersen, T.

    2012-12-01

    Recent ionospheric modification experiments with the 3.6 MW transmitter at the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility in Alaska led to discovery of artificial ionization descending from the nominal interaction altitude in the background F-region ionosphere by ~60-80 km. Artificial ionization production is indicated by significant 427.8 nm emissions from the 1st negative band of N2+ and the appearance of transmitter-induced bottomside traces in ionosonde data during the periods of most intense optical emissions. However, the exact mechanisms producing the artificial plasmas remain to be determined. Yet the only existing theoretical models explain the development of artificial plasma as an ionizing wavefront moving downward due to ionization by electrons accelerated by HF-excited strong Langmuir turbulence (SLT) generated near the plasma resonance, where the pump frequency matches the plasma frequency. However, the observations suggest also the significance of interactions with upper hybrid and electron Bernstein waves near multiples of the electron gyrofrequency. We describe recent observations and discuss suitable acceleration mechanisms.

  18. Optical observations on the CRIT-II Critical Ionization Velocity Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Wescott, E. M.; Haerendel, G.; Valenzuela, A.

    1990-01-01

    A rocket borne Critical Ionization Velocity (CIV0 experiment was carried out from Wallops Island at dusk on May 4, 1989. Two barium shaped charges were released below the solar terminator (to prevent photoionization) at altitudes near 400 km. The ambient ionospheric electron density was 50,000/cu cm. The neutral barium jet was directed upward and at an angle of nominally 45 degrees to B which gives approximately 3 x 10 to the 23rd neutrals with super critical velocity. Ions created by a CIV process in the region of the neutral jet would travel up along B into sunlight where they can be detected optically. Well defined ion clouds (max. brightness 750 R) were observed in both releases. An ionization rate of 0.8 percent/sec (125 sec ionization time constant) can account for the observed ion cloud near the release field line, but the ionization rate falls off with increasing distance from the release. It is concluded that a CIV process was present in the neutral jet out to about 50 km from the release, which is significantly further than allowed by current theories.

  19. Zirconium carbide coating for corium experiments related to water-cooled and sodium-cooled reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plevacova, K.; Journeau, C.; Piluso, P.; Zhdanov, V.; Baklanov, V.; Poirier, J.

    2011-07-01

    Since the TMI and Chernobyl accidents the risk of nuclear severe accident is intensively studied for existing and future reactors. In case of a core melt-down accident in a nuclear reactor, a complex melt, called corium, forms. To be able to perform experiments with prototypic corium materials at high temperature, a coating which resists to different corium melts related to Generation I and II Water Reactors and Generation IV sodium fast reactor was researched in our experimental platforms both in IAE NNC in Kazakhstan and in CEA in France. Zirconium carbide was selected as protective coating for graphite crucibles used in our induction furnaces: VCG-135 and VITI. The method of coating application, called reactive wetting, was developed. Zirconium carbide revealed to resist well to the (U x, Zr y)O 2-z water reactor corium. It has also the advantage not to bring new elements to this chemical system. The coating was then tested with sodium fast reactor corium melts containing steel or absorbers. Undesirable interactions were observed between the coating and these materials, leading to the carburization of the corium ingots. Concerning the resistance of the coating to oxide melts without ZrO 2, the zirconium carbide coating keeps its role of protective barrier with UO 2-Al 2O 3 below 2000 °C but does not resist to a UO 2-Eu 2O 3 mixture.

  20. Cool in the kitchen: Radiation, conduction, and the Newton ``hot block'' experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverman, Mark P.; Silverman, Christopher R.

    2000-02-01

    Despite frequent reference to Newton's law of cooling in physics and math books, the paper in which Newton reported this law is quite obscure and rarely cited. We have managed to acquire a copy of this paper and discuss the interesting experiment that Newton did in his kitchen. Surprisingly, the paper contains no procedural details or data of any experiments measuring the rate at which a hot object cools. We have performed our own kitchen experiments to investigate the cooling of (a) the burner of an electric range and (b) a block of Styrofoam. Newton's law provides a poor model for both systems, whose th! ! ermal energy loss we can much better understand by examining closely the effects of radiation and conduction.

  1. Recent experiments with liquid gallium cooling of crystal diffraction optics (abstract)

    SciTech Connect

    Smither, R.K.; Lee, W.; Macrander, A.; Mills, D.; Rogers, S. )

    1992-01-01

    The x-ray beams for the next generation of synchrotrons will contain much more power (1--10 kW) than is available at present day facilities. Cooling the first optical components in these beam lines will require the best cooling technology that one can bring to bear. Argonne continues to pioneer the use of liquid metals as the cooling fluid and has adopted liquid gallium as the liquid metal of choice. Its low melting point, 29.7 {degree}C and its very low vapor pressure make it an easy fluid to handle and its high thermal conductivity and heat capacity make it an excellent cooling fluid. A series of experiments were performed during April 1991 with the wiggler beam at the F2 station of the CHESS facility at Cornell to investigate the cooling of large areas of high power. Two types of cooling crystal geometries were tested, one where the cooling channels were core-drilled just below the surface of the crystal and a second where slots were cut into the crystal just below the surface with a diamond saw. Both crystals performed well with beam powers up to 1050 W and power densities of up to 14.5 W/mm{sup 2} at normal incidence.

  2. Resonance Enhanced Multi-Photon Ionization and Uv-Uv Hole-Burning Spectroscopic Studies of Jet-Cooled Acetanilide Derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Ceol Joo; Min, Ahreum; Ahn, Ahreum; Lee, Seung Jun; Choi, Myong Yong; Kim, Seong Keun

    2013-06-01

    Conformational investigations and photochemistry of jet-cooled methacetine (MA) and phenacetine (PA) using one color resonant two-photon ionization (REMPI), UV-UV hole-burning and IR-dip spectroscopy are presented. MA and PA are derivatives of acetanilide, substituted by methoxyl, ethoxyl group in the para position of acetanilide, respectively. Moreover, we have investigated conformational information of the acetanilide derivatives (AAP, MA and PA)-water. In this work, we will present and discuss the solvent effects of the hydroxyl group of acetanilide derivatives in the excited state.

  3. The Cool Surge Following Flux Emergence in a Radiation-MHD Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nóbrega-Siverio, D.; Moreno-Insertis, F.; Martínez-Sykora, J.

    2016-05-01

    Cool and dense ejections, typically Hα surges, often appear alongside EUV or X-ray coronal jets as a result of the emergence of magnetized plasma from the solar interior. Idealized numerical experiments explain those ejections as being indirectly associated with the magnetic reconnection taking place between the emerging and preexisting systems. However, those experiments miss basic elements that can importantly affect the surge phenomenon. In this paper we study the cool surges using a realistic treatment of the radiation transfer and material plasma properties. To that end, the Bifrost code is used, which has advanced modules for the equation of state of the plasma, photospheric and chromospheric radiation transfer, heat conduction, and optically thin radiative cooling. We carry out a 2.5D experiment of the emergence of magnetized plasma through (meso) granular convection cells and the low atmosphere to the corona. Through detailed Lagrange tracing we study the formation and evolution of the cool ejection and, in particular, the role of the entropy sources; this allows us to discern families of evolutionary patterns for the plasma elements. In the launch phase, many elements suffer accelerations well in excess of gravity; when nearing the apex of their individual trajectories, instead, the plasma elements follow quasi-parabolic trajectories with accelerations close to {g}ȯ . We show how the formation of the cool ejection is mediated by a wedge-like structure composed of two shocks, one of which leads to the detachment of the surge from the original emerged plasma dome.

  4. Development of an experiment for measuring film cooling performance in supersonic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maqbool, Daanish

    This thesis describes the development of an experiment for acquiring supersonic film cooling performance data in canonical configurations suitable for code validation. A methodology for selecting appropriate experimental conditions is developed and used to select test conditions in the UMD atmospheric pressure wind tunnel that are relevant to film cooling conditions encountered in the J-2X rocket engine. A new technique for inferring wall heat flux with 10% uncertainty from temperature-time histories of embedded sensors is developed and implemented. Preliminary heat flux measurements on the uncooled upper wall and on the lower wall with the film cooling flow turned off suggest that RANS solvers using Menter's SST model are able to predict heat flux within 15% in the far-field (> 10 injection slot heights) but are very inaccurate in the near-field. However, more experiments are needed to confirm this finding. Preliminary Schlieren images showing the shear layer growth rate are also presented.

  5. Timonium Elementary School Solar Energy Heating and Cooling Augmentation Experiment. Final Engineering Report. Executive Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    AAI Corp., Baltimore, MD.

    This report covers a two-year and seven-month solar space heating and cooling experiment conducted at the Timonium Elementary School, Timonium, Maryland. The system was designed to provide a minimum of 50 percent of the energy required during the heating season and to determine the feasibility of using solar energy to power absorption-type…

  6. A position-sensitive twin ionization chamber for fission fragment and prompt neutron correlation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Göök, A.; Geerts, W.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Oberstedt, S.; Vidali, M.; Zeynalov, Sh.

    2016-09-01

    A twin position-sensitive Frisch grid ionization chamber, intended as a fission fragment detector in experiments to study prompt fission neutron correlations with fission fragment properties, is presented. Fission fragment mass and energies are determined by means of the double kinetic energy technique, based on conservation of mass and linear momentum. The position sensitivity is achieved by replacing each anode plate in the standard twin ionization chamber by a wire plane and a strip anode, both readout by means of resistive charge division. This provides information about the fission axis orientation, which is necessary to reconstruct the neutron emission process in the fully accelerated fragment rest-frame. The energy resolution compared to the standard twin ionization chamber is found not to be affected by the modification. The angular resolution of the detector relative to an arbitrarily oriented axis is better than 7° FWHM. Results on prompt fission neutron angular distributions in 235U(n,f) obtained with the detector in combination with an array of neutron scintillation detectors is presented as a proof of principle.

  7. Electron-impact ionization of helium: A comprehensive experiment benchmarks theory

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, X.; Pflueger, T.; Senftleben, A.; Xu, S.; Dorn, A.; Ullrich, J.; Bray, I.; Fursa, D.V.; Colgan, J.; Pindzola, M.S.

    2011-05-15

    Single ionization of helium by 70.6-eV electron impact is studied in a comprehensive experiment covering a major part of the entire collision kinematics and the full 4{pi} solid angle for the emitted electron. The absolutely normalized triple-differential experimental cross sections are compared with results from the convergent close-coupling (CCC) and the time-dependent close-coupling (TDCC) theories. Whereas excellent agreement with the TDCC prediction is only found for equal energy sharing, the CCC calculations are in excellent agreement with essentially all experimentally observed dynamical features, including the absolute magnitude of the cross sections.

  8. Radsensor: Optical Dielectric-Modulation Sensing of Ionizing Radiation for Diagnostics for Weapons Physics Ignition Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Lowry, M; Lee, H; Larson, M; Delgado, G; Thielen, P

    2000-08-24

    The objective of this program is to investigate and develop a novel class of high speed single transient ionizing radiation detector technologies that will enable critical diagnostics for the Stockpile Stewardship Management Program (such as ignition and other experiments) that is currently lacking. The goal is to achieve temporal resolution in the {approx}100 fs to 1 ps range, provide adequate fidelity to accurately measure DT burn histories, and extrapolate these to probable impact on nuclear weapon phenomena. This detector concept will be capable of femtosecond temporal response, good sensitivity (single x-ray photons), and can be fabricated into imaging arrays.

  9. Mass model of the LDEF satellite spacecraft and experiments for ionizing radiation analyses.

    PubMed

    Colborn, B L; Armstrong, T W

    1996-11-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) mass model of the LDEF spacecraft and selected experiments has been developed to allow the influence of material shielding on ionizing radiation measurements and analyses to be determined accurately. This computer model has been applied in a stand-alone mode to provide 3D shielding distributions around radiation dosimeters to aid data interpretation, and has been interfaced with radiation transport codes for a variety of different types of radiation predictions. This paper summarizes the methodology used, the level of detail incorporated, and some example model applications. PMID:11540514

  10. Experiments with highly ionized low-energy tandem accel-decel beams

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K.W.; Johnson, B.M.; Meron, M.; Da-Hai, W.; Thieberger, P.; Barrette, J.; Schuch, R.; Schmidt-Boecking, H.; Tserruya, I.; Kruse, T.H.

    1982-01-01

    The present status of the production of low-energy highly ionized beams by the 4-stage tandem accel-decel method is surveyed, and their use in three atomic physics experiments is summarized. The experiments are: the measurement of the charge state dependence of K-x-ray production in S/sup +q/-Ar collisions at 10 MeV, the impact-parameter dependence of quasimolecular x rays in S/sup +15/-Ar collisions again at 10 MeV, and the determination of charge transfer cross sections in S/sup +q/ + Ar, He collisions. The results of the three experiments give evidence that the 4-stage accel-decel ion production technique is extremely powerful and useful.

  11. Proof-of-Principle Experiment for FEL-based Coherent Electron Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, V; Bengtsson, J; Fedotov, A V; Hao, Y; Kayran, D; Mahler, G J; Meng, W; Roser, T; Sheehy, B; Than, R; Tuozzolo, J E; Wang, G; Webb, S D; Yakimenko, V; Bell, G I; Bruhwiler, D L; Schwartz, B T; Hutton, A; Krafft, G A; Poelker, M

    2011-03-01

    Coherent electron cooling (CEC) has a potential to significantly boost luminosity of high-energy, high-intensity hadron-hadron and electron-hadron colliders*. In a CEC system, a hadron beam interacts with a cooling electron beam. A perturbation of the electron density caused by ions is amplified and fed back to the ions to reduce the energy spread and the emittance of the ion beam. To demonstrate the feasibility of CEC we propose a proof-of-principle experiment at RHIC using one of JLab’s SRF cryo-modules. In this paper, we describe the experimental setup for CeC installed into one of RHIC's interaction regions. We present results of analytical estimates and results of initial simulations of cooling a gold-ion beam at 40 GeV/u energy via CeC.

  12. Igneous cooling history of olivine-phyric shergottite Yamato 980459 constrained by dynamic crystallization experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    First, Emily; Hammer, Julia

    2016-07-01

    Dynamic crystallization experiments were performed on a liquid having the bulk composition of olivine-phyric shergottite Yamato 980459, to constrain the igneous thermal history of this meteorite. Key characteristics of the meteorite's mineralogy and texture, including several morphologically distinct olivine and pyroxene crystal populations and a glassy mesostasis devoid of plagioclase, were replicated upon cooling from 1435 to 909 °C at 1 atmosphere under reducing conditions. Three sequential cooling ramps are required to produce synthetic samples with textures and compositions matching Yamato 980459. Olivine phenocrysts formed at <1 °C h-1, presumably at depth in the Martian crust. Pyroxene phenocrysts formed mainly at ~10 °C h-1, consistent with crystallization within a lava flow at depths of 25-45 cm. Increased cooling rate (~100 °C h-1) in a third stage suppressed the formation of plagioclase and produced groundmass crystals, consistent with crystallization at lava flow depths of 5-7 cm. Although Y 980459 is unique among Martian meteorites (i.e., preserving a primary glassy mesostasis), its emplacement did not require unique physical conditions. Rather, the second and third cooling stages may reflect cooling within the core of a pāhoehoe-like flow and subsequent breakout on the surface of Mars.

  13. Igneous cooling history of olivine-phyric shergottite Yamato 980459 constrained by dynamic crystallization experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    First, Emily; Hammer, Julia

    2016-05-01

    Dynamic crystallization experiments were performed on a liquid having the bulk composition of olivine-phyric shergottite Yamato 980459, to constrain the igneous thermal history of this meteorite. Key characteristics of the meteorite's mineralogy and texture, including several morphologically distinct olivine and pyroxene crystal populations and a glassy mesostasis devoid of plagioclase, were replicated upon cooling from 1435 to 909 °C at 1 atmosphere under reducing conditions. Three sequential cooling ramps are required to produce synthetic samples with textures and compositions matching Yamato 980459. Olivine phenocrysts formed at <1 °C h-1, presumably at depth in the Martian crust. Pyroxene phenocrysts formed mainly at ~10 °C h-1, consistent with crystallization within a lava flow at depths of 25-45 cm. Increased cooling rate (~100 °C h-1) in a third stage suppressed the formation of plagioclase and produced groundmass crystals, consistent with crystallization at lava flow depths of 5-7 cm. Although Y 980459 is unique among Martian meteorites (i.e., preserving a primary glassy mesostasis), its emplacement did not require unique physical conditions. Rather, the second and third cooling stages may reflect cooling within the core of a pāhoehoe-like flow and subsequent breakout on the surface of Mars.

  14. Experiment attributes to establish tube with twisted tape insert performance cooling plasma facing components

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Clark, Emily; Ramirez, Emilio; Ruggles, Art E.; Griffard, Cory

    2015-08-18

    The modeling capability for tubes with twisted tape inserts is reviewed with reference to the application of cooling plasma facing components in magnetic confinement fusion devices. The history of experiments examining the cooling performance of tubes with twisted tape inserts is reviewed with emphasis on the manner of heating, flow stability limits and the details of the test section and fluid delivery system. Models for heat transfer, burnout, and onset of net vapor generation in straight tube flows and tube with twisted tape are compared. As a result, the gaps in knowledge required to establish performance limits of the plasmamore » facing components are identified and attributes of an experiment to close those gaps are presented.« less

  15. Scale selection in columnar jointing: Insights from experiments on cooling stearic acid and numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Amalie; Raufaste, Christophe; Misztal, Marek; Celestini, Franck; Guidi, Maria; Ellegaard, Clive; Mathiesen, Joachim

    2016-03-01

    Many natural fracture systems are characterized by a single length scale, which is the distance between neighboring fractures. Examples are mud cracks and columnar jointing. In columnar jointing the origin of this scale has been a long-standing issue. Here we present a comprehensive study of columnar jointing based on experiments on cooling stearic acids, numerical simulations using both discrete and finite element methods and basic analytical calculations. We show that the diameter of columnar joints is a nontrivial function of the material properties and the cooling conditions of the system. We determine the shape of this function analytically and show that it is in agreement with the experiments and the numerical simulations.

  16. Experiment attributes to establish tube with twisted tape insert performance cooling plasma facing components

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Emily; Ramirez, Emilio; Ruggles, Art E.; Griffard, Cory

    2015-08-18

    The modeling capability for tubes with twisted tape inserts is reviewed with reference to the application of cooling plasma facing components in magnetic confinement fusion devices. The history of experiments examining the cooling performance of tubes with twisted tape inserts is reviewed with emphasis on the manner of heating, flow stability limits and the details of the test section and fluid delivery system. Models for heat transfer, burnout, and onset of net vapor generation in straight tube flows and tube with twisted tape are compared. As a result, the gaps in knowledge required to establish performance limits of the plasma facing components are identified and attributes of an experiment to close those gaps are presented.

  17. Experiments on aerosol-induced cooling in the nocturnal boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreenivas, K.; Singh, D. K.; Vk, P.; Mukund, V.; Subramanian, G.

    2012-12-01

    In the nocturnal boundary layer (NBL), under calm & clear-sky conditions, radiation is the principal mode of heat transfer & it determines the temperature distribution close to the ground. Radiative processes thus influence the surface energy budget, & play a decisive role in many micro-meteorological processes including the formation of radiation-fog & inversion layer. Here, we report hyper-cooling of air layers close to the ground that has a radiative origin. Resulting vertical temperature distribution has an anomalous profile with an elevated minimum few decimetres above the ground (known as Lifted Temperature Minimum; LTM). Even though the first observation of this type of profile dates back to 1930s, its origin has not been explained till recently. We report field experiments to elucidate effects of emissivity and other physical properties of the ground on the LTM profile. Field observations clearly indicate that LTM-profiles are observed as a rule in the lowest meter of the NBL. We also demonstrate that the air-layer near the ground, rather than the ground itself, leads the post sunset cooling. This fact changes the very nature of the sensible heat-flux boundary condition. A laboratory experimental setup has been developed that can reproduce LTM. Lab-experiments demonstrate that the high cooling rates observed in the field experiments arise from the presence of aerosols & the intensity of cooling is proportional to aerosol concentration (Fig-1). We have also captured penetrative convection cells in the field experiments (Fig-2). Results presented here thus help in parameterizing transport processes in the NBL.

  18. Status of Proof-of-principle Experiment for Coherent Electron Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Pinayev, I; Ben-Zvi, I; Bengtsson, J; Elizarov, A; Fedotov, A V; Gassner, D M; Hao, Y; Kayran, D; Litvinenko, V; Mahler, G J; Meng, W; Roser, T; Sheehy, B; Than, R; Tuozzolo, J E; Wang, G; Webb, S D; Yakimenko, V; Bell, G I; Bruhwiler, D L; Ranjbar, V H; Schwartz, B T; Hutton, A; Krafft, G A; Poelker, M; Rimmer, R A; Kholopov, M A; Vobly, P

    2012-07-01

    Coherent electron cooling (CEC) has a potential to significantly boost luminosity of high-energy, high-intensity hadron colliders. To verify the concept we conduct proof-of-the-principle experiment at RHIC. In this paper, we describe the current experimental setup to be installed into 2 o'clock RHIC interaction regions. We present current design, status of equipment acquisition and estimates for the expected beam parameters.

  19. Investigation of nonthermal particle effects on ionization dynamics in high current density ion beam transport experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, H. K.; MacFarlane, J. J.; Wang, P.; Moses, G. A.; Bailey, J. E.; Olson, C. L.; Welch, D. R.

    1997-01-01

    Light ion inertial fusion experiments require the presence of a moderate density background gas in the transport region to provide charge and current neutralization for a high current density ion beam. In this article, we investigate the effects of nonthermal particles such as beam ions or non-Maxwellian electron distributions on the ionization dynamics of the background gas. In particular, we focus on the case of Li beams being transported in an argon gas. Nonthermal particles as well as thermal electrons are included in time-dependent collisional-radiative calculations to determine time-dependent atomic level populations and charge state distributions in a beam-produced plasma. We also briefly discuss the effects of beam ions and energetic electrons on the visible and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) spectral regions. It is found that the mean charge state of the gas, and hence the electron density, is significantly increased by collisions with energetic particles. This higher ionization significantly impacts the VUV spectral region, where numerous resonance lines occur. On the other hand, the visible spectrum tends to be less affected because the closely spaced excited states are populated by lower energy thermal electrons.

  20. Geometry and mass model of ionizing radiation experiments on the LDEF satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colborn, B. L.; Armstrong, T. W.

    1992-01-01

    Extensive measurements related to ionizing radiation environments and effects were made on the LDEF satellite during its mission lifetime of almost 6 years. These data, together with the opportunity they provide for evaluating predictive models and analysis methods, should allow more accurate assessments of the space radiation environment and related effects for future missions in low Earth orbit. The LDEF radiation dosimetry data is influenced to varying degrees by material shielding effects due to the dosimeter itself, nearby components and experiments, and the spacecraft structure. A geometry and mass model is generated of LDEF, incorporating sufficient detail that it can be applied in determining the influence of material shielding on ionizing radiation measurements and predictions. This model can be used as an aid in data interpretation by unfolding shielding effects from the LDEF radiation dosimeter responses. Use of the LDEF geometry/mass model, in conjunction with predictions and comparisons with LDEF dosimetry data currently underway, will also allow more definitive evaluations of current radiation models for future mission applications.

  1. Geometry and mass model of ionizing radiation experiments on the LDEF satellite. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Colborn, B.L.; Armstrong, T.W.

    1992-04-01

    Extensive measurements related to ionizing radiation environments and effects were made on the LDEF satellite during its mission lifetime of almost 6 years. These data, together with the opportunity they provide for evaluating predictive models and analysis methods, should allow more accurate assessments of the space radiation environment and related effects for future missions in low Earth orbit. The LDEF radiation dosimetry data is influenced to varying degrees by material shielding effects due to the dosimeter itself, nearby components and experiments, and the spacecraft structure. A geometry and mass model is generated of LDEF, incorporating sufficient detail that it can be applied in determining the influence of material shielding on ionizing radiation measurements and predictions. This model can be used as an aid in data interpretation by unfolding shielding effects from the LDEF radiation dosimeter responses. Use of the LDEF geometry/mass model, in conjunction with predictions and comparisons with LDEF dosimetry data currently underway, will also allow more definitive evaluations of current radiation models for future mission applications.

  2. Study of thermosiphon cooling scheme for the production solenoid of the Mu2e experiment at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Dhanaraj, N.; Kashikhin, V.; Peterson, T.; Pronskikh, V.; Nicol, T.

    2014-01-29

    A thermosiphon cooling scheme is envisioned for the Production Solenoid of the Mu2e experiment at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The thermosiphon cooling is achieved by indirect cooling with helium at 4.7 K. The siphon tubes are welded to the solenoid outer structure. The anticipated heat loads in the solenoid is presented as well as the cooling scheme design. A thermal model using ANSYS to simulate the temperature gradient is presented. The thermal analysis also makes provisions for including the heat load generated in the coils and structures by the secondary radiation simulated using the MARS 15 code. The impact of the heat loads from supports on the solenoid cooling is studied. The thermosiphon cooling scheme is also validated using pertinent correlations to study flow reversals and the cooling regime.

  3. Study of thermosiphon cooling scheme for the production solenoid of the Mu2e experiment at Fermilab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhanaraj, N.; Kashikhin, V.; Peterson, T.; Pronskikh, V.; Nicol, T.

    2014-01-01

    A thermosiphon cooling scheme is envisioned for the Production Solenoid of the Mu2e experiment at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The thermosiphon cooling is achieved by indirect cooling with helium at 4.7 K. The siphon tubes are welded to the solenoid outer structure. The anticipated heat loads in the solenoid is presented as well as the cooling scheme design. A thermal model using ANSYS to simulate the temperature gradient is presented. The thermal analysis also makes provisions for including the heat load generated in the coils and structures by the secondary radiation simulated using the MARS 15 code. The impact of the heat loads from supports on the solenoid cooling is studied. The thermosiphon cooling scheme is also validated using pertinent correlations to study flow reversals and the cooling regime.

  4. Cryogenic systems for proof of the principle experiment of coherent electron cooling at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Yuenian; Belomestnykh, Sergey; Brutus, Jean Clifford; Lederle, Dewey; Orfin, Paul; Skaritka, John; Soria, Victor; Tallerico, Thomas; Than, Roberto

    2014-01-29

    The Coherent electron Cooling (CeC) Proof of Principle (PoP) experiment is proposed to be installed in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) to demonstrate proton and ion beam cooling with this new technique that may increase the beam luminosity in certain cases, by as much as tenfold. Within the scope of this project, a 112 MHz, 2MeV Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) electron gun and a 704 MHz 20MeV 5-cell SRF cavity will be installed at IP2 in the RHIC ring. The superconducting RF electron gun will be cooled in a liquid helium bath at 4.4 K. The 704 MHz 5-cell SRF cavity will be cooled in a super-fluid helium bath at 2.0 K. This paper discusses the cryogenic systems designed for both cavities. For the 112 MHz cavity cryogenic system, a condenser/boiler heat exchanger is used to isolate the cavity helium bath from pressure pulses and microphonics noise sources. For the 704 MHz 5-cell SRF cavity, a heat exchanger is also used to isolate the SRF cavity helium bath from noise sources in the sub-atmospheric pumping system operating at room temperature. Detailed designs, thermal analyses and discussions for both systems will be presented in this paper.

  5. A Technology Demonstration Experiment for Laser Cooled Atomic Clocks in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klipstein, W. M.; Kohel, J.; Seidel, D. J.; Thompson, R. J.; Maleki, L.; Gibble, K.

    2000-01-01

    We have been developing a laser-cooling apparatus for flight on the International Space Station (ISS), with the intention of demonstrating linewidths on the cesium clock transition narrower than can be realized on the ground. GLACE (the Glovebox Laser- cooled Atomic Clock Experiment) is scheduled for launch on Utilization Flight 3 (UF3) in 2002, and will be mounted in one of the ISS Glovebox platforms for an anticipated 2-3 week run. Separate flight definition projects funded at NIST and Yale by the Micro- gravity Research Division of NASA as a part of its Laser Cooling and Atomic Physics (LCAP) program will follow GLACE. Core technologies for these and other LCAP missions are being developed at JPL, with the current emphasis on developing components such as the laser and optics subsystem, and non-magnetic vacuum-compatible mechanical shutters. Significant technical challenges in developing a space qualifiable laser cooling apparatus include reducing the volume, mass, and power requirements, while increasing the ruggedness and reliability in order to both withstand typical launch conditions and achieve several months of unattended operation. This work was performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  6. Proof-of-principle experiment for FEL-based coherent electron cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, V.N.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Brutus, J.C.; Fedotov, A.; Hao, Y.; Kayran, D.; Mahler, G.; Marusic, A.; Meng, W.; McIntyre, G.; Minty, M.; Ptitsyn, V.; Pinayev, I.; Rao, T.; Roser, T.; Sheehy, B.; Tepikian, S.; Than, Y.; Trbojevic, D.; Tuozzolo, J.; Wang, G.; Yakimenko, V.; Poelker, M.; Hutton, A.; Kraft, G.; Rimmer, R.; Bruhwiler, D.L.; Abell, D.T.; Nieter, C.; Ranjbar, V.; Schwartz, B.T.; Vobly, P.; Kholopov, M.; Shevchenko, O.; Mcintosh, P.; Wheelhouse, A.

    2011-08-21

    Coherent electron cooling (CEC) has a potential to significantly boost luminosity of high-energy, high-intensity hadron-hadron and electron-hadron colliders. In a CEC system, a hadron beam interacts with a cooling electron beam. A perturbation of the electron density caused by ions is amplified and fed back to the ions to reduce the energy spread and the emittance of the ion beam. To demonstrate the feasibility of CEC we propose a proof-of-principle experiment at RHIC using SRF linac. In this paper, we describe the setup for CeC installed into one of RHIC's interaction regions. We present results of analytical estimates and results of initial simulations of cooling a gold-ion beam at 40 GeV/u energy via CeC. We plan to complete the program in five years. During first two years we will build coherent electron cooler in IP2 of RHIC. In parallel we will develop complete package of computer simulation tools for the start-to-end simulation predicting exact performance of a CeC. The later activity will be the core of Tech X involvement into the project. We will use these tools to predict the performance of our CeC device. The experimental demonstration of the CeC will be undertaken in years three to five of the project. The goal of this experiment is to demonstrate the cooling of ion beam and to compare its measured performance with predictions made by us prior to the experiments.

  7. The CNO Concentration in Cosmic Ray Spectrum as Measured From The Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fazely, A. R.; Gunasingha, R. M.; Adams, James H., Jr.; Ahn, H.; Ampe, J.; Bashindzhagyan, G.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We present preliminary results on the spectra of CNO nuclei in the cosmic radiation as measured in the first flight of the Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter Balloon Experiment (ATIC) which lasted for 16 days, starting in December, 2000 with a launch from McMurdo, Antarctica. ATIC is a multiple, long duration balloon flight, investigation for the study of cosmic ray spectra from below 50 GeV to near 100 TeV total energy, using a fully active Bismuth Germanate (BGO) calorimeter. It is equipped with the first large area mosaic of small fully depleted silicon detector pads capable of charge identification in cosmic rays from H to Fe. As a redundancy check for the charge identification and a coarse particle tracking system, three projective layers of x-y scintillator hodoscopes were employed, above, in the center and below a Carbon interaction "target".

  8. Ionization, Charging and Electric Field Effects on Cloud Particles in the CLOUD Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichman, L.; Järvinen, E.; Wagner, R.; Dorsey, J.; Dias, A. M.; Ehrhart, S.; Kirkby, J.; Gallagher, M. W.; Saunders, C. P.

    2015-12-01

    Ice crystals and frozen droplets play an important role in atmospheric charging and electrification processes, particularly by collision and aggregation. The dynamics of charged particles in the atmosphere can be modulated by Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR). High electric fields also affect the alignment of charged particles, allowing more time for interactions. The CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) experiment at CERN has the ability to conduct ionization, charging and high electric field experiments on liquid or ice clouds created in the chamber by adiabatic pressure reductions. A pion secondary beam from the CERN Proton Synchrotron is used to ionize the molecules in the chamber, and Ar+ Corona Ion Generator for Atmospheric Research (CIGAR) is used to inject unipolar charged ions directly into the chamber. A pressurized airgun provides rapid pressure shocks inside the chamber and induces charged ice nucleation. The cloud chamber is accompanied by a variety of analysing instruments e.g. a 3View Cloud Particle Imager (3V-CPI) coupled with an induction ring, a Scattering Intensity Measurements for the Optical detection of icE (SIMONE) and a Nano-aerosol and Air Ion Spectrometer (NAIS). Using adiabatic expansion and high electric fields we can replicate the ideal conditions for adhesion, sintering and interlocking between ice crystals. Charged cloud particles produced measurable variations in the total induced current pulse on the induction ring. The most influential factors comprised initial temperature, lapse rate and charging mechanism. The ions produced in the chamber may deposit onto larger particles and form dipoles during ice nucleation and growth. The small ion concentration was monitored by the NAIS during these runs. Possible short-term aggregates or alignment of particles were observed in-situ with the SIMONE. These and future chamber measurements of charging and aggregation could shed more light on the ambient conditions and dynamics for electrification

  9. Cooling Properties of the Shuttle Advanced Crew Escape Spacesuit: Results of an Environmental Chamber Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Douglas; Gillis, David; Bue, Grant; Son, Chan; Norcross, Jason; Kuznetz, Larry; Chapman, Kirt; Chhipwadia, Ketan; McBride, Tim

    2008-01-01

    The shuttle crew wears the Advanced Crew Escape Spacesuit (ACES) to protect themselves from cabin decompression and to support bail out during landing. ACES is cooled by a liquid-cooled garment (LCG) that interfaces to a heat exchanger that dumps heat into the cabin. The ACES outer layer is made of Gore-Tex(Registered TradeMark), permitting water vapor to escape while containing oxygen. The crew can only lose heat via insensible water losses and the LCG. Under nominal landing operations, the average cabin temperature rarely exceeds 75 F, which is adequate for the ACES to function. Problem A rescue shuttle will need to return 11 crew members if the previous mission suffers a thermal protection system failure, preventing it from returning safely to Earth. Initial analysis revealed that 11 crew members in the shuttle will increase cabin temperature at wheel stop above 80 F, which decreases the ACES ability to keep crew members cool. Air flow in the middeck of the shuttle is inhomogeneous and some ACES may experience much higher temperatures that could cause excessive thermal stress to crew members. Methods A ground study was conducted to measure the cooling efficiency of the ACES at 75 F, 85 F, and 95 F at 50% relative humidity. Test subjects representing 5, 50, and 95 percentile body habitus of the astronaut corps performed hand ergometry keeping their metabolic rate at 400, 600, and 800 BTU/hr for one hour. Core temperature was measured by rectal probe and skin, while inside and outside the suit. Environmental chamber wall and cooling unit inlet and outlet temperatures were measured using high-resolution thermistors ( 0.2 C). Conclusions Under these test conditions, the ACES was able to protect the core temperature of all test subjects, however thermal stress due to high insensible losses and skin temperature and skin heat flow may impact crew performance. Further research should be performed to understand the impact on cognitive performance.

  10. Radiation and ionization energy loss simulation for the GDH sum rule experiment in Hall-A at Jefferson Lab

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yan, Xin -Hu; Ye, Yun -Xiu; Chen, Jian -Ping; Lu, Hai -Jiang; Zhu, Peng -Jia; Jiang, Feng -Jian

    2015-07-17

    The radiation and ionization energy loss are presented for single arm Monte Carlo simulation for the GDH sum rule experiment in Hall-A at Jefferson Lab. Radiation and ionization energy loss are discussed formore » $$^{12}C$$ elastic scattering simulation. The relative momentum ratio $$\\frac{\\Delta p}{p}$$ and $$^{12}C$$ elastic cross section are compared without and with radiation energy loss and a reasonable shape is obtained by the simulation. The total energy loss distribution is obtained, showing a Landau shape for $$^{12}C$$ elastic scattering. This simulation work will give good support for radiation correction analysis of the GDH sum rule experiment.« less

  11. Radiation and ionization energy loss simulation for the GDH sum rule experiment in Hall-A at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Xin -Hu; Ye, Yun -Xiu; Chen, Jian -Ping; Lu, Hai -Jiang; Zhu, Peng -Jia; Jiang, Feng -Jian

    2015-07-17

    The radiation and ionization energy loss are presented for single arm Monte Carlo simulation for the GDH sum rule experiment in Hall-A at Jefferson Lab. Radiation and ionization energy loss are discussed for $^{12}C$ elastic scattering simulation. The relative momentum ratio $\\frac{\\Delta p}{p}$ and $^{12}C$ elastic cross section are compared without and with radiation energy loss and a reasonable shape is obtained by the simulation. The total energy loss distribution is obtained, showing a Landau shape for $^{12}C$ elastic scattering. This simulation work will give good support for radiation correction analysis of the GDH sum rule experiment.

  12. Superconducting magnet system for muon beam cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, N.; Johnson, R.P.; Kashikhin, V.S.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Novitski, I.; Yonehara, K.; Zlobin, A.; /Fermilab

    2006-08-01

    A helical cooling channel has been proposed to quickly reduce the six-dimensional phase space of muon beams for muon colliders, neutrino factories, and intense muon sources. A novel superconducting magnet system for a muon beam cooling experiment is being designed at Fermilab. The inner volume of the cooling channel is filled with liquid helium where passing muon beam can be decelerated and cooled in a process of ionization energy loss. The magnet parameters are optimized to match the momentum of the beam as it slows down. The results of 3D magnetic analysis for two designs of magnet system, mechanical and quench protection considerations are discussed.

  13. Stochastic Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Blaskiewicz, M.

    2011-01-01

    Stochastic Cooling was invented by Simon van der Meer and was demonstrated at the CERN ISR and ICE (Initial Cooling Experiment). Operational systems were developed at Fermilab and CERN. A complete theory of cooling of unbunched beams was developed, and was applied at CERN and Fermilab. Several new and existing rings employ coasting beam cooling. Bunched beam cooling was demonstrated in ICE and has been observed in several rings designed for coasting beam cooling. High energy bunched beams have proven more difficult. Signal suppression was achieved in the Tevatron, though operational cooling was not pursued at Fermilab. Longitudinal cooling was achieved in the RHIC collider. More recently a vertical cooling system in RHIC cooled both transverse dimensions via betatron coupling.

  14. HuDo 1 and HuBi 1: two planetary nebulae ionized by cool [WC] central stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peña, M.

    2005-10-01

    As part of our spectroscopic survey of planetary nebulae with [WC] nuclei (Peña et al. 2001), low- and high-resolution spectra of the planetary nebulae HuDo 1 (PNG 060.4+01.5, PM1-310) and HuBi 1 (PNG 012.2+04.9, PM1-188) were secured and analyzed. Both objects are ionized by very late [WC] central stars. We found that the objects belong to the galactic disk, with heliocentric radial velocities of -12 km s-1 (HuDo 1) and 57 km s-1 (HuBi1). Both objects are heavily extinguished showing a logarithmic reddening, c(Hβ), of 2.04 for HuDo 1 and 1.22 for HuBi 1. Our data cover a wide wavelength range; therefore we obtained several plasma line ratios to estimate physical conditions and abundances. The derived electron temperature and density for HuBi 1 are 9,400±1,500 K and 800 cm-3. This density is very low for a nebula around a [WC]-late star. HuDo 1 has Ne = 3300 cm-3. We find log(O/H)+12 = 8.43 and 8.57, and N/O = 0.2 and 0.1 for HuDo 1 and HuBi 1 respectively, typical of disk PNe. Intense nebular He I recombination lines are detected for HuBi 1, this being the only PN excited by a very late [WC] star showing such an emission. The He+ abundance derived for HuBi 1 is 0.11, which is indicating a large He enhancement in HuBi 1. >From the analysis of the stellar emission lines a [WC 10] spectral type is derived for both stars. This is consistent with a stellar temperature of about 30,000 K, although the HuBi 1 central star should be slightly hotter for providing the large amount of He0 ionizing photons required to explain the nebular He I lines. Nebular and stellar parameters of HuDo 1 and HuBi 1 can be compared with those of other [WC 10] objects, such as M 4-18, He 2-113 and CPD-5608031. >From this, we can conclude that, in spite of the fact that all the objects have the same spectral type, the central stars of HuDo 1 and HuBi 1 should be intrinsically fainter, and consequently of lower mass. This is an additional evidence showing that stars of different masses can go

  15. Veno-venous extracorporeal blood shunt cooling to induce mild hypothermia in dog experiments and review of cooling methods.

    PubMed

    Behringer, Wilhelm; Safar, Peter; Wu, Xianren; Nozari, Ala; Abdullah, Ali; Stezoski, S William; Tisherman, Samuel A

    2002-07-01

    Mild hypothermia (33-36 degrees C) might be beneficial when induced during or after insults to the brain (cardiac arrest, brain trauma, stroke), spinal cord (trauma), heart (acute myocardial infarction), or viscera (hemorrhagic shock). Reaching the target temperature rapidly in patients inside and outside hospitals remains a challenge. This study was to test the feasibility of veno-venous extracorporeal blood cooling for the rapid induction of mild hypothermia in dogs, using a simple pumping-cooling device. Ten custom-bred hunting dogs (21-28 kg) were lightly anesthetized and mechanically ventilated. In five dogs, two catheters were inserted through femoral veins, one peripheral and the other into the inferior vena cava. The catheters were connected via a coiled plastic tube as heat exchanger (15 m long, 3 mm inside diameter, 120 ml priming volume), which was immersed in an ice-water bath. A small roller-pump produced a veno-venous flow of 200 ml/min (about 10% of cardiac output). In five additional dogs (control group), a clinically practiced external cooling method was employed, using alcohol over the skin of the trunk and fanning plus ice-bags. During spontaneous normotension, veno-venous cooling delivered blood into the vena cava at 6.2 degrees C standard deviation (SD 1.4) and decreased tympanic membrane (Tty) temperature from 37.5 to 34.0 degrees C at 5.2 min (SD 0.7), and to 32.0 degrees C at 7.9 min (SD 1.3). Skin surface cooling decreased tympanic temperature from 37.5 to 34.0 degrees C at 19.9 min (SD 3.7), and to 32.0 degrees C at 29.9 (SD 5.1) (P=0.001). Heart rates at Tty 34 and 32 degrees C were significantly lower than at baseline in both groups, but within physiological range, without difference between groups. There were no arrhythmias. We conclude that in large dogs the induction of mild systemic hypothermia with extracorporeal veno-venous blood shunt cooling is simple and four times more rapid than skin surface cooling. PMID:12104113

  16. Simulations of MANX, A Practical Six Dimensional Muon Beam Cooling Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Yonehara, Katsuya; Beard, Kevin; Bogacz, Alex; Derbenev, Yaroslav; Johnson, Rolland P.; Paul, Kevin; Roberts, Thomas; Kaplan, Daniel

    2006-03-20

    A helical cooling channel (HCC) has been proposed to quickly reduce the six-dimensional phase space of muon beams for muon colliders, neutrino factories, and intense muon sources. Simulation studies of the HCC have already verified the use of a channel with solenoidal, and helical magnetic fields of constant amplitude where, by moving to a rotating frame, a z or time-independent Hamiltonian can be obtained for detailed analytic treatment. In the discussion below, the HCC concept has been extended to have momentum-dependent magnetic field strengths for a six-dimensional M lowbar muon collider A lowbar nd N lowbar neutrino factory muon beam cooling demonstration eX lowbar experiment (MANX). The simulation studies reported here for this experiment have shown that liquid helium can be used as an energy absorber and coolant for superconducting magnetic coils and that the HCC parameters can be varied to reduce the maximum required field magnitudes. These developments make the experiment more practical in that safety requirements are relaxed and the required fields can be achieved with existing technology.

  17. Simulations of MANX, A Practical Six Dimensional Muon Beam Cooling Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Katsuya Yonehara; Kevin Beard; Alex Bogacz; Yaroslav Derbenev; Rolland P. Johnson; Daniel Kaplan; Kevin Paul; Thomas Roberts

    2006-06-01

    A helical cooling channel (HCC) has been proposed to quickly reduce the six-dimensional phase space of muon beams for muon colliders, neutrino factories, and intense muon sources. Simulation studies of the HCC have already verified the use of a channel with solenoidal, and helical magnetic fields of constant amplitude where, by moving to a rotating frame, a z or time-independent Hamiltonian can be obtained for detailed analytic treatment. In the discussion below, the HCC concept has been extended to have momentum-dependent magnetic field strengths for a six-dimensional Muon collider And Neutrino factory muon beam cooling demonstration eXperiment (MANX). The simulation studies reported here for this experiment have shown that liquid helium can be used as an energy absorber and coolant for superconducting magnetic coils and that the HCC parameters can be varied to reduce the maximum required field magnitudes. These developments make the experiment more practical in that safety requirements are relaxed and the required fields can be achieved with existing technology.

  18. Arduino-based laboratory instruments for an undergraduate laser cooling experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireland, Timothy; Tiber, Gage; Brooke, Robert W. A.; Gillis, Julie M.; Zaccagnini, Christopher A.; Corcovilos, Theodore A.

    2015-05-01

    Arduino is an inexpensive open-source microcontroller platform designed for quick development turn-around and easy interfacing, making it ideal for novice programmers and instrument designers. Based on Atmel ATMEGA microcontroller chips, the Arduino boards are programmed with standard C/C++ code and contain sufficient inputs and outputs (both digital and analog) for basic data acquisition and device control. Here we present home-built Arduino-based instruments commonly used in laser-cooling experiments, such as a wavelength meter and temperature controller. We describe the design and performance of these instruments.

  19. Characterisation of the muon beams for the Muon Ionisation Cooling Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, D.; et al.,

    2013-10-01

    A novel single-particle technique to measure emittance has been developed and used to characterise seventeen different muon beams for the Muon Ionisation Cooling Experiment (MICE). The muon beams, whose mean momenta vary from 171 to 281 MeV/c, have emittances of approximately 1.5--2.3 \\pi mm-rad horizontally and 0.6--1.0 \\pi mm-rad vertically, a horizontal dispersion of 90--190 mm and momentum spreads of about 25 MeV/c. There is reasonable agreement between the measured parameters of the beams and the results of simulations. The beams are found to meet the requirements of MICE.

  20. Investigating two-photon double ionization of D{sub 2} by XUV-pump-XUV-probe experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Y. H.; Kurka, M.; Kuehnel, K. U.; Toppin, M.; Schroeter, C. D.; Moshammer, R.; Rudenko, A.; Foucar, L.; Perez-Torres, J. F.; Plesiat, E.; Morales, F.; Martin, F.; Herrwerth, O.; Lezius, M.; Kling, M. F.; Jahnke, T.; Doerner, R.; Sanz-Vicario, J. L.; Tilborg, J. van; Belkacem, A.

    2010-05-15

    We used a split-mirror setup attached to a reaction microscope at the free-electron laser in Hamburg (FLASH) to perform an XUV-pump-XUV-probe experiment by tracing the ultrafast nuclear wave-packet motion in the D{sub 2}{sup +}(1s{sigma}{sub g}) with <10 fs time resolution. Comparison with time-dependent calculations shows excellent agreement with the measured vibrational period of 22{+-}4 fs in D{sub 2}{sup +}, points to the importance of accurately knowing the internuclear distance-dependent ionization probability, and paves the way to control sequential and nonsequential two-photon double-ionization contributions.

  1. Ideas for GLOBE's Future Drawn from the 7-Year Experience of the CERES S'COOL Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, L. H.; Detweiler, P. T.; Fischer, J. D.; Sepulveda, R.; Arabini, E.

    2003-12-01

    As the outreach portion of the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) project, the Students' Cloud Observations On-Line (S'COOL) project is of smaller scale and scope than GLOBE; but its aims and methods are quite similar. As a result, lessons learned from S'COOL since its beginnings in 1997 may provide useful ideas for the future of GLOBE. This is particularly true as the director of S'COOL has also been a GLOBE science principal investigator for the last year (leading the contrail investigation within GLOBE). This paper will discuss a number of lessons learned from the experience with the S'COOL Project, and will make some suggestions for the future of GLOBE based on that experience. It will include discussion of most of the important elements of GLOBE, including 1) teacher training: S'COOL recently conducted its 5th annual Summer S'COOL Teacher Workshop; 2) data collection: S'COOL is nearing 26,000 complete student cloud observations; 3) integration of scientific research with classroom teaching and learning: S'COOL promotes use of real, student-reported, scientific observations for use in the classroom and in student projects. S'COOL also makes scientific satellite data available and accessible to students and teachers; 4) use of data by scientists: S'COOL pursues a statistical analysis of student data which was requested and obtained for a specific purpose. The paper will also present some observations and ideas for GLOBE based on the author's year of experience as a GLOBE principal investigator.

  2. Review of ORNL-TSF shielding experiments for the gas-cooled Fast Breeder Reactor Program

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, L.S.; Ingersoll, D.T.; Muckenthaler, F.J.; Slater, C.O.

    1982-01-01

    During the period between 1975 and 1980 a series of experiments was performed at the ORNL Tower Shielding Facility in support of the shield design for a 300-MW(e) Gas Cooled Fast Breeder Demonstration Plant. This report reviews the experiments and calculations, which included studies of: (1) neutron streaming in the helium coolant passageways in the GCFR core; (2) the effectiveness of the shield designed to protect the reactor grid plate from radiation damage; (3) the adequacy of the radial shield in protecting the PCRV (prestressed concrete reactor vessel) from radiation damage; (4) neutron streaming between abutting sections of the radial shield; and (5) the effectiveness of the exit shield in reducing the neutron fluxes in the upper plenum region of the reactor.

  3. In-situ surface contamination removal and cool-down process of the DEAP-3600 experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giampa, Pietro; DEAP Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    The DEAP-3600 experiment is a single-phase detector that uses 3600 Kg of liquid argon to search for Dark Matter at SNOLAB, Sudbury, Canada, 6800 ft. underground. The projected sensitivity to the spin-independent WIMP-nucleon cross-section is 10-46 cm2 for a WIMP mass of 100 GeV. A key experimental requirement is the reduction of any possible source of background that would mimic a Dark Matter signal This document will review how radiogenic surface backgrounds were reduced in-situ by removing 500 microns of acrylic from the innermost part of the detector with a resurfacing robot. Furthermore it will review the transient cool-down process of the experiment, necessary to reach cryogenic operating temperature.

  4. Molecular-weight distributions of coal and petroleum asphaltenes from laser desorption/ionization experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ana R. Hortal; Paola Hurtado; Bruno Martinez-Haya; Oliver C. Mullins

    2007-09-15

    Molecular-weight distributions (MWDs) of asphaltenes extracted from coal and petroleum have been measured in laser desorption/ionization (LDI) mass spectrometric experiments. The dried-droplet and solvent-free sample preparation methods are compared. The coal asphaltenes have a relatively narrow MWD (full width 150 amu) with an average molecular weight of 340 amu. The petroleum asphaltenes display a broader MWD (full width 300 amu) and are heavier on average (680 amu). The LDI spectra also provide evidence for the formation of noncovalent clusters of the two types of asphaltenes during the desorption process. Petroleum and coal asphaltenes exhibit aggregation as do large model polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) with five or more fused rings also included in the study. Smaller PAHs (pyrene) exhibit less aggregation, especially when alkane-chain substituents are incorporated to the molecular structure. This indicates that asphaltenes possess large PAHs and, according to the relatively small molecular weights observed, that there is a preponderance of asphaltene molecules with only a single fused ring system. The coal asphaltenes present a significantly smaller propensity toward aggregation than their crude oil counterparts. This finding, coupled with the fact that (1) alkanes inhibit aggregation in LDI and (2) petroleum asphaltenes possess much more alkane carbon, indicates that coal asphaltenes have smaller PAHs on average than petroleum asphaltenes. This is further corroborated by the stronger ultraviolet absorbance of the coal asphaltenes at wavelengths shorter than 400 nm. 32 refs., 8 figs.

  5. Rb atomic magnetometer toward EDM experiment with laser cooled francium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Takeshi; Ando, Shun; Aoki, Takahiro; Arikawa, Hiroshi; Harada, Ken-Ichi; Hayamizu, Tomohiro; Ishikawa, Taisuke; Itoh, Masatoshi; Kato, Ko; Kawamura, Hirokazu; Sakamoto, Kosuke; Uchiyama, Aiko; Asahi, Koichiro; Yoshimi, Akihiro; Sakemi, Yasuhiro

    2014-09-01

    A permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) of a particle or an atom is a suited observable to test the physics beyond the standard model. We plan to search for the electron EDM by using the laser cooled francium (Fr) atom, since the Fr atom has a large enhancement factor of the electron EDM and the laser cooling techniques can suppress both statistical and systematic errors. In the EDM experiment, a fluctuation of the magnetic field is a main source of the errors. In order to achieve the high precision magnetometry, a magnetometer based on the nonlinear magneto-optical rotation effect of the Rb atom is under development. A long coherence time of Rb atom is the key issue for the highly sensitive detection of the field fluctuations. The coherence time is limited due both to collisions with an inner surface of a cell contained the Rb atom and to residual field in a magnetic shield. We prepared the cell coated with an anti-relaxation material and measured the relaxation time. A degauss of the shield was performed to eliminate the residual field. We will report the present status of the magnetometer. A permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) of a particle or an atom is a suited observable to test the physics beyond the standard model. We plan to search for the electron EDM by using the laser cooled francium (Fr) atom, since the Fr atom has a large enhancement factor of the electron EDM and the laser cooling techniques can suppress both statistical and systematic errors. In the EDM experiment, a fluctuation of the magnetic field is a main source of the errors. In order to achieve the high precision magnetometry, a magnetometer based on the nonlinear magneto-optical rotation effect of the Rb atom is under development. A long coherence time of Rb atom is the key issue for the highly sensitive detection of the field fluctuations. The coherence time is limited due both to collisions with an inner surface of a cell contained the Rb atom and to residual field in a magnetic shield

  6. Lattice design of the integrable optics test accelerator and optical stochastic cooling experiment at Fermilab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafka, Gene

    The Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA) storage ring at Fermilab will serve as the backbone for a broad spectrum of Advanced Accelerator R&D (AARD) experiments, and as such, must be designed with significant flexibility in mind, but without compromising cost efficiency. The nonlinear experiments at IOTA will include: achievement of a large nonlinear tune shift/spread without degradation of dynamic aperture; suppression of strong lattice resonances; study of stability of nonlinear systems to perturbations; and studies of different variants of nonlinear magnet design. The ring optics control has challenging requirements that reach or exceed the present state of the art. The development of a complete self-consistent design of the IOTA ring optics, meeting the demands of all planned AARD experiments, is presented. Of particular interest are the precise control for nonlinear integrable optics experiments and the transverse-to-longitudinal coupling and phase stability for the Optical Stochastic Cooling Experiment (OSC). Since the beam time-of-flight must be tightly controlled in the OSC section, studies of second order corrections in this section are presented.

  7. Lattice design of the integrable optics test accelerator and optical stochastic cooling experiment at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Kafka, Gene

    2015-05-01

    The Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA) storage ring at Fermilab will serve as the backbone for a broad spectrum of Advanced Accelerator R&D (AARD) experiments, and as such, must be designed with signi cant exibility in mind, but without compromising cost e ciency. The nonlinear experiments at IOTA will include: achievement of a large nonlinear tune shift/spread without degradation of dynamic aperture; suppression of strong lattice resonances; study of stability of nonlinear systems to perturbations; and studies of di erent variants of nonlinear magnet design. The ring optics control has challenging requirements that reach or exceed the present state of the art. The development of a complete self-consistent design of the IOTA ring optics, meeting the demands of all planned AARD experiments, is presented. Of particular interest are the precise control for nonlinear integrable optics experiments and the transverse-to-longitudinal coupling and phase stability for the Optical Stochastic Cooling Experiment (OSC). Since the beam time-of- ight must be tightly controlled in the OSC section, studies of second order corrections in this section are presented.

  8. Fundamental experiments of steady-state high heat fluxes using spray cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Jorge E.; Ortiz, Lester

    1996-11-01

    Spray cooling has been considered as one of the most efficient alternatives for the removal of high heat fluxes and is currently used in several modern industrial and technological applications to dissipate high amounts of heat from their components such as in electronics, lasers, metallurgical, and nuclear. In many of these applications steady-state high heat fluxes (SSHHF) removal is required. In this research, experiments were conducted to determine parameters that affect the steady-state behavior of high heat fluxes when using spray cooling. The parameters taken in consideration included the mass flow rate, the heated surface roughness, the liquid subcooling temperature, and the spray angle. Water was used as the working fluid in the experiments. An experimental apparatus was built to carry- out the experiments, consisting of a copper heater with a disc shaped surface, an atomizer system that used commercial nozzles, and a data acquisition systems to accurately measure temperatures, heat fluxes, flow rates, and room conditions. The commercial nozzles generated mean droplet diameters ranging from 85 to 100 micrometers and flow rates between 1.48 and 1.9L/hr. Two surface conditions were sued; one polished with 0.25 micrometers liquid solution and the other polished with 600 grit silicon carbide grinding paper. The SSHHF was determined by observing the transient response of the surface temperature and the surface heat flux. Steady- state heat fluxes in the order of 100W/cm2 were obtained in most cases. Results indicated that higher SSHHF can be obtained with increasing mass flow rates and it was easier to achieve them with smooth surfaces. Results also showed that subcooling may not be significant when high mass flow rates. Curves indicating maximum SSHHF were generated as function of the parameters investigated.

  9. Analytical model for calibrating laser intensity in strong-field-ionization experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Song-Feng; Le, Anh-Thu; Jin, Cheng; Wang, Xu; Lin, C. D.

    2016-02-01

    The interaction of an intense laser pulse with atoms and molecules depends extremely nonlinearly on the laser intensity. Yet experimentally there still exists no simple reliable methods for determining the peak laser intensity within the focused volume. Here we present a simple method, based on an improved Perelomov-Popov-Terent'ev model, that would allow the calibration of laser intensities from the measured ionization signals of atoms or molecules. The model is first examined by comparing ionization probabilities (or signals) of atoms and several simple diatomic molecules with those from solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. We then show the possibility of using this method to calibrate laser intensities for atoms, diatomic molecules as well as large polyatomic molecules, for laser intensities from the multiphoton ionization to tunneling ionization regimes.

  10. Experiments on FTU with an actively water cooled liquid lithium limiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzitelli, G.; Apicella, M. L.; Apruzzese, G.; Crescenzi, F.; Iannone, F.; Maddaluno, G.; Pericoli-Ridolfini, V.; Roccella, S.; Reale, M.; Viola, B.; Lyublinski, I.; Vertkov, A.

    2015-08-01

    In order to prevent the overheating of the liquid Li surface and the consequent Li evaporation for T > 500 °C, an advanced version of the liquid lithium limiter has been realized and installed on FTU. This new system, named Cooled Lithium Limiter (CLL), has been optimized to demonstrate the lithium limiter capability to sustain thermal loads as high as 10 MW/m2 with up to 5 s of plasma pulse duration. The CLL operates with an actively cooled system with water circulation at the temperature of about 200 °C, for heating lithium up to the melting point and for the heat removal during the plasma discharges. To characterize CLL during discharges, a fast infrared camera and the spectroscopic signals from Li and D atom emission have been used. The experiments analyzed so far and simulated by ANSYS code, point out that heat loads as high as 2 MW/m2 for 1.5 s have been withstood without problems.

  11. Advances in Beam Cooling for Muon Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    R.P. Johnson, Y.S. Derbenev

    2006-09-01

    A six-dimensional (6D) ionization cooling channel based on helical magnets surrounding RF cavities filled with dense hydrogen gas is the basis for the latest plans for muon colliders. This helical cooling channel (HCC) has solenoidal, helical dipole, and helical quadrupole magnetic fields, where emittance exchange is achieved by using a continuous homogeneous absorber. Momentum-dependent path length differences in the dense hydrogen energy absorber provide the required correlation between momentum and ionization loss to accomplish longitudinal cooling. Recent studies of an 800 MHz RF cavity pressurized with hydrogen, as would be used in this application, show that the maximum gradient is not limited by a large external magnetic field, unlike vacuum cavities. Two new cooling ideas, Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling and Reverse Emittance Exchange, will be employed to further reduce transverse emittances to a few mm-mr, which allows high luminosity with fewer muons than previously imagined. We describe these new ideas as well as a new precooling idea based on a HCC with z dependent fields that is being developed for an exceptional 6D cooling demonstration experiment. The status of the designs, simulations, and tests of the cooling components for a high luminosity, low emittance muon collider will be reviewed.

  12. TASK 2.5.7 FIELD EXPERIMENTS TO EVALUATE COOL-COLORED ROOFING

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, William A; Cherry, Nigel J; Allen, Richard Lowell; Childs, Phillip W; Atchley, Jerald Allen; Ronnen, Levinson; Akbari, Hashem; Berhahl, Paul

    2010-03-01

    counter battens, providing a nailing surface for the concrete tile. This double batten construction forms an inclined air channel running from the soffit to the ridge. The bottom surface of the channel is formed by the roof decking and is relatively flat and smooth. The top surface is created by the underside of the roofing tiles, and is designed to be an air permeable covering to alleviate the underside air pressure and minimize wind uplift on the tiles. The resulting air flows also have a cooling influence which further complicates prediction of the heat penetrating through the deck because an accurate measure of the airflow is required to predict the heat transfer. Measured temperatures and heat flows at the roof surface, within the attic and at the ceiling of the houses are discussed as well as the power usage to help gauge the benefit of cool-pigmented reflective roof products fitted with and without ventilation above the roof deck. Ventilation occurring above the deck is an inherent feature for tile roof assemblies, and is formed by an air space between the exterior face of the roof sheathing and the underside of the tile. The greater the tile s profile the greater is the effect of the ventilation which herein is termed above-sheathing ventilation (ASV). However, because of the complexity of the thermally induced flow, little credit is allowed by state and federal building codes. ASHRAE (2005) provides empirical data for the effective thermal resistance of plane air spaces. A -in. (0.0191-m) plane air space inclined at 45 with the horizontal has an RUS-0.85 (RSI-0.15) . Our intent is to help further deploy cool color pigments in roofs by conducting field experiments to evaluate the new cool-colored roofing materials in the hot climate of Southern California. The collected data will be used to showcase and market the performance of new cool-roof products and also to help formulate and validate computer codes capable of calculating the heat transfer occurring within

  13. Single-photon single ionization of W+ ions: experiment and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, A.; Schippers, S.; Hellhund, J.; Holste, K.; Kilcoyne, A. L. D.; Phaneuf, R. A.; Ballance, C. P.; McLaughlin, B. M.

    2015-12-01

    Experimental and theoretical results are reported for photoionization of Ta-like (W+) tungsten ions. Absolute cross sections were measured in the energy range 16-245 eV employing the photon-ion merged-beam setup at the advanced light source in Berkeley. Detailed photon-energy scans at 100 meV bandwidth were performed in the 16-108 eV range. In addition, the cross section was scanned at 50 meV resolution in regions where fine resonance structures could be observed. Theoretical results were obtained from a Dirac-Coulomb R-matrix approach. Photoionization cross section calculations were performed for singly ionized atomic tungsten ions in their 5{{{s}}}25{{{p}}}65{{{d}}}4{(}5{{D}})6{{s}}{ }6{{{D}}}J, J = 1/2, ground level and the associated excited metastable levels with J = 3/2, 5/2, 7/2 and 9/2. Since the ion beams used in the experiments must be expected to contain long-lived excited states also from excited configurations, additional cross-section calculations were performed for the second-lowest term, 5{{{d}}}5{ }6{{{S}}}J, J = 5/2, and for the 4F term, 5{{{d}}}36{{{s}}}2{ }4{{{F}}}J, with J = 3/2, 5/2, 7/2 and 9/2. Given the complexity of the electronic structure of W+ the calculations reproduce the main features of the experimental cross section quite well.

  14. The trigger system for the external target experiment in the HIRFL cooling storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Min; Zhao, Lei; Liu, Jin-Xin; Lu, Yi-Ming; Liu, Shu-Bin; An, Qi

    2016-08-01

    A trigger system was designed for the external target experiment in the Cooling Storage Ring (CSR) of the Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL). Considering that different detectors are scattered over a large area, the trigger system is designed based on a master-slave structure and fiber-based serial data transmission technique. The trigger logic is organized in hierarchies, and flexible reconfiguration of the trigger function is achieved based on command register access or overall field-programmable gate array (FPGA) logic on-line reconfiguration controlled by remote computers. We also conducted tests to confirm the function of the trigger electronics, and the results indicate that this trigger system works well. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (11079003), the Knowledge Innovation Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (KJCX2-YW-N27), and the CAS Center for Excellence in Particle Physics (CCEPP).

  15. Low-noise wide-band amplifiers for stochastic beam cooling experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Leskovar, B.; Lo, C.C.

    1982-09-05

    Noise characteristics of the continuous-wave wide-band amplifier systems for stochastic beam cooling experiments are presented. Also, the noise performance, bandwidth capability and gain stability of components used in these amplifiers are summarized and compared in the 100 MHz to 40 GHz frequency range. This includes bipolar and field-effect transistors, parametric amplifier, Schottky diode mixer and maser. Measurements of the noise characteristics and scattering parameters of variety GaAs FETs as a function of ambient temperature are also given. Performance data and design information are presented on a broadband 150-500 MHz preamplifier having noise temperature of approximately 35/sup 0/K at ambient temperature of 20/sup 0/K. An analysis of preamplifier stability based on scattering parameters concept is included.

  16. Cryo-Cooled Sapphire Oscillator for the Cassini Ka-Band Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Rabi T.; Dick, G. John

    1997-01-01

    We present features for an ultra-stable sapphire cryogenic oscillator which has been designed to support the Cassini Ka-band Radio Science experiment. The design of this standard is new in several respects. It is cooled by a commercial cryocooler instead of liquid cryogens to increase operating time, and it uses a technology to adjust the temperature turn-over point to extend the upper operating temperature limit and to enable construction of multiple units with uniform operating characteristics. Objectives are 3 x 10(exp -15) stability for measuring times 1 second less than or equal to (tau) less than or equal to 100 seconds, phase noise of -85 dBc/Hz from offset frequencies of 1 Hz to 1000 Hz at 10 GHz carrier frequency, and a one year continuous operating period.

  17. RCCS Experiments and Validation for High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Oh; Cliff Davis; Goon C. Park

    2007-09-01

    A reactor cavity cooling system (RCCS), an air-cooled helical coil RCCS unit immersed in the water pool, was proposed to overcome the disadvantages of the weak cooling ability of air-cooled RCCS and the complex structure of water-cooled RCCS for the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR). An experimental apparatus was constructed to investigate the various heat transfer phenomena in the water pool type RCCS, such as the natural convection of air inside the cavity, radiation in the cavity, the natural convection of water in the water pool and the forced convection of air in the cooling pipe. The RCCS experimental results were compared with published correlations. The CFX code was validated using data from the air-cooled portion of the RCCS. The RELAP5 code was validated using measured temperatures from the reactor vessel and cavity walls.

  18. Radiation and ionization energy loss simulation for the GDH sum rule experiment in Hall-A at Jefferson Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Xin-Hu; Ye, Yun-Xiu; Chen, Jian-Ping; Lu, Hai-Jiang; Zhu, Peng-Jia; Jiang, Feng-Jian

    2015-07-01

    The radiation and ionization energy loss are presented for single arm Monte Carlo simulation for the GDH sum rule experiment in Hall-A at the Jefferson Lab. Radiation and ionization energy loss are discussed for 12C elastic scattering simulation. The relative momentum ratio \\frac{{Δ p}}{p} and 12C elastic cross section are compared without and with radiative energy loss and a reasonable shape is obtained by the simulation. The total energy loss distribution is obtained, showing a Landau shape for 12C elastic scattering. This simulation work will give good support for radiation correction analysis of the GDH sum rule experiment. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11135002, 11275083), US Department of Energy contract DE-AC05-84ER-40150 under which Jefferson Science Associates operates the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility and Natural Science Foundation of An'hui Educational Committee (KJ2012B179)

  19. Three-Dimensional Electromagnetic Monte Carlo Particle-in-Cell Simulations of Critical Ionization Velocity Experiments in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J.; Biasca, R.; Liewer, P. C.

    1996-01-01

    Although the existence of the critical ionization velocity (CIV) is known from laboratory experiments, no agreement has been reached as to whether CIV exists in the natural space environment. In this paper we move towards more realistic models of CIV and present the first fully three-dimensional, electromagnetic particle-in-cell Monte-Carlo collision (PIC-MCC) simulations of typical space-based CIV experiments. In our model, the released neutral gas is taken to be a spherical cloud traveling across a magnetized ambient plasma. Simulations are performed for neutral clouds with various sizes and densities. The effects of the cloud parameters on ionization yield, wave energy growth, electron heating, momentum coupling, and the three-dimensional structure of the newly ionized plasma are discussed. The simulations suggest that the quantitative characteristics of momentum transfers among the ion beam, neutral cloud, and plasma waves is the key indicator of whether CIV can occur in space. The missing factors in space-based CIV experiments may be the conditions necessary for a continuous enhancement of the beam ion momentum. For a typical shaped charge release experiment, favorable CIV conditions may exist only in a very narrow, intermediate spatial region some distance from the release point due to the effects of the cloud density and size. When CIV does occur, the newly ionized plasma from the cloud forms a very complex structure due to the combined forces from the geomagnetic field, the motion induced emf, and the polarization. Hence the detection of CIV also critically depends on the sensor location.

  20. Crystallization kinetics of alkali feldspars in cooling and decompression-induced crystallization experiments in trachytic melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzilli, Fabio; Carroll, Michael R.

    2013-10-01

    Cooling and decompression experiments have been carried out on trachytic melts in order to investigate crystallization kinetics of alkali feldspar, the effect of the degree of undercooling ( ΔT = T liquidus - T experimental) and time on nucleation and crystal growth process. This experimental work gives us new data about crystallization kinetics of trachytic melts, and it that will be useful to better understand the natural system of Campi Flegrei volcanoes. Experiments have been conducted using cold seal pressure vessel apparatus, at pressure between 30 and 200 MPa, temperature between 750 and 855 °C, time between 7,200 and 57,600 s and redox condition close to the NNO +0.8 buffer. These conditions are ideal to reproducing pre- and syn-eruptive conditions of the Campi Flegrei volcanoes, where the "conditions" pertain to the complete range of pressures, temperatures and time at which the experiments were performed. Alkali feldspar is the main phase present in this trachyte, and its abundance can strongly vary with small changes in pressure, temperature and water content in the melt, implying appreciable variations in the textures and in the crystallization kinetics. The obtained results show that crystallization kinetics are strictly related to ΔT, time, final pressure, superheating (- ΔT) and water content in the melt. ΔT is the driving force of the crystallization, and it has a strong influence on nucleation and growth processes. In fact, the growth process dominates crystallization at small ΔT, whereas the nucleation dominates crystallization at large ΔT. Time also is an important variable during crystallization process, because long experiment durations involve more nucleation events of alkali feldspar than short experiment durations. This is an important aspect to understand magma evolution in the magma chamber and in the conduit, which in turn has strong effects on magma rheology.

  1. Status of proof-of-principle experiment for coherent electron cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Pinayev I.; Belomestnykh, S.; Bengtsson, J.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Elizarov, A. et al

    2012-05-20

    Coherent electron cooling (CEC) has a potential to significantly boost luminosity of high-energy, high-intensity hadron colliders. To verify the concept we conduct proof-of-the-principle experiment at RHIC. In this paper, we describe the current experimental setup to be installed into 2 o'clock RHIC interaction regions. We present current design, status of equipment acquisition and estimates for the expected beam parameters. We use a dogleg to merge the electron and ion beams. The ions 'imprint' their distribution into the electron beam via a space charge density modulation. The modulation is amplified in an FEL comprised of a 7-m long helical wiggler. The ions are co-propagating with electron beam through the FEL. The ion's average velocity is matched to the group velocity of the wave-packet of e-beam density modulation in the FEL. A three-pole wiggler at the exit of the FEL tune the phase of the wave-packet so the ion with the central energy experience the maximum of the e-beam density modulation, where electric field is zero. The time-of-flight dependence on ion's provides for the electrical field caused by the density modulation to reduce energy spread of the ion beam. The used electron beam is bent off the ion path and damped.

  2. Emergency cooling experiments with aqueous boric acid solution in the REWET-II facility

    SciTech Connect

    Kervinen, T.; Tuunanen, J.

    1987-01-01

    Although boron is widely used as soluble neutron poison in nuclear reactors (boric acid in pressurized water reactors, sodium pentaborate in boiling water reactors), there is a lack of experimental data about aqueous boron solution behavior during loss-of-coolant accidents. The main aims of the REWET boric acid experiments were to study the behavior of aqueous boric acid solution during long-term cooling of a nuclear reactor and to find out the circumstances in which boric acid crystallization takes place. In the experiments, carried out in the facility of a 19-fuel-rod simulator bundle, boric acid crystallization caused the uncovering of the bundle, which always occurred on the water surface. However, crossflows and backflows in a reactor presumably make the concentrations uniform and thus retard crystallization. Therefore, experimental investigations of aqueous boric acid solution behavior will be carried out for the next 2 yr in a larger scale experimental facility. The new facility will be a simulator of the Loviisa VVER-440 reactor with a scaling factor of 1:349 for power and volumes and 1:1 for elevations. The facility will contain a full-scale rod bundle.

  3. Investigating two-photon double ionization of D2 by XUV-Pump -- XUV-Probe experiments at FLASH

    SciTech Connect

    FLASH Collaboration; Jiang, Y.; Rudenko, A.; Perez-Torres, J.; Foucar, L.; Kurka, M.; Kuhnel, K.; Toppin, M.; Plesiat, E.; Morales, F.; Martin, F.; Herrwerth, O.; Lezius, M.; Kling, M.; Jahnke, T.; Dorner, R.; Sanz-Vicario, J.; van Tilborg, J.; Belkacem, A.; Schulz, M.; Ueda, K.; Zouros, T.; Dusterer, S.; Treusch, R.; Schroter, C.; Moshammer, R.; Ullrich, J.

    2010-08-02

    Using a novel split-mirror set-up attached to a Reaction Microscope at the Free electron LASer in Hamburg (FLASH) we demonstrate an XUV-pump -- XUV-probe ((hbar omega = 38 eV) experiment by tracing the ultra-fast nuclear wave-packet motion in the D2+ (1s sigma g-state) with<10 fs time resolution. Comparison with time-dependent calculations yields excellent agreement with the measured vibrational period of 22+-4 fs in D2+, points to the importance of the inter-nuclear distance dependent ionization probability and paves the way to control sequential and non-sequential two-photon double ionization contributions.

  4. Decay of C60 by delayed ionization and C2 emission: Experiment and statistical modeling of kinetic energy release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebeault, M.-A.; Baguenard, B.; Concina, B.; Calvo, F.; Climen, B.; Lépine, F.; Bordas, C.

    2012-08-01

    C60 molecules highly excited in the nanosecond regime decay following ionization and dissociation by emitting a series of carbon dimers, as well as other small fragments if excitation is strong enough. The fragmentation mass spectrum and kinetic energy release of all charged fragments obtained in these experiments are interpreted within the framework of the Weisskopf theory, using a realistic Monte Carlo procedure in which the rates of all relevant decay channels are modeled using Arrhenius expressions. Comparison between the measurements and the simulated spectra allows the distribution of deposited energy to be accurately estimated. The dependence of the fragment kinetic energies on the laser fluence, found in the simulation but not observed in the experimental results, indicates that the small fragments are not necessarily emitted from small fullerenes resulting from C60 by sequential decay. Rather, direct multifragmentation of C60 is invoked to interpret the observed patterns. The possible role of post-ionization of neutral emitted fragments is discussed.

  5. Capillary-Driven Heat Transfer Experiment: Keeping It Cool in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lekan, Jack F.; Allen, Jeffrey S.

    1998-01-01

    Capillary-pumped loops (CPL's) are devices that are used to transport heat from one location to another--specifically to transfer heat away from something. In low-gravity applications, such as satellites (and possibly the International Space Station), CPL's are used to transfer heat from electrical devices to space radiators. This is accomplished by evaporating one liquid surface on the hot side of the CPL and condensing the vapor produced onto another liquid surface on the cold side. Capillary action, the phenomenon that causes paper towels to absorb spilled liquids, is used to "pump" the liquid back to the evaporating liquid surface (hot side) to complete the "loop." CPL's require no power to operate and can transfer heat over distances as large as 30 ft or more. Their reliance upon evaporation and condensation to transfer heat makes them much more economical in terms of weight than conventional heat transfer systems. Unfortunately, they have proven to be unreliable in space operations, and the explanation for this unreliability has been elusive. The Capillary-Driven Heat Transfer (CHT) experiment is investigating the fundamental fluid physics phenomena thought to be responsible for the failure of CPL's in low-gravity operations. If the failure mechanism can be identified, then appropriate design modifications can be developed to make capillary phase-change heat-transport devices a more viable option in space applications. CHT was conducted onboard the Space Shuttle Columbia during the first Microgravity Science Laboratory (MSL-1) mission, STS-94, which flew from July 1 to 17, 1997. The CHT glovebox investigation, which was conceived by Dr. Kevin Hallinan and Jeffrey Allen of the University of Dayton, focused on studying the dynamics associated with the heating and cooling at the evaporating meniscus within a capillary phase-change device in a low-gravity environment. The CHT experimental hardware was designed by a small team of engineers from Aerospace Design

  6. Implementation of natural down-draft evaporative cooling devices in commercial buildings: The international experience

    SciTech Connect

    Chalfoun, N.V.

    1998-07-01

    Conventional evaporative coolers are high-pressure high-volume devices that deliver cool air by water evaporation wetted pads. Natural down-draft evaporative coolers, or Cool Towers, are devices developed at The University of Arizona's Environmental Research Laboratory. Similar to conventional coolers, these devices are equipped with wetted pads and sprays at the top which provide cool air by evaporation but the air is moved by gravity flow saving the energy required by the blower. In arid regions, cool towers are useful for cooling buildings and outdoor private and public areas. This paper focuses on recent implementation of cool towers in two international projects in arid regions. It also demonstrates CoolT{copyright}, a software developed by the author, which was used for sizing and designing the cool towers used in these projects. The two demonstrated projects are: (1) The Botswana Technology Center (BTC), a Headquarters office building in Bostswana, South Africa. The building energy loads were first optimized through energy conservation measures where the heating load, as predicted by computer simulation, was reduced by 89.9% and the cooling load by 24%. The cooling load was further addressed by the use of a series of integrated cool towers. (2) The Ministry of Municipal and Rural Affairs (MOMRA) Environmental Rowdah project in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia is the second, recently built, project which demonstrates the use of cool towers in outdoor spaces. The Rowdah is equipped with a 76 feet high cool tower, the biggest in the world, which provides cool air to the surrounding outdoor space. The tower performance, as predicted by the CoolT program, demonstrated that on a typical June day in Riyadh, at 3:00 p.m. the ambient air temperature of 107.1 F (41.7 C) will be cooled down to 73.9 F (23.2 C) i.e., 33.2 F (18.4 C) lower, but the 13% relative humidity of air is increased to 75% at the tower discharge.

  7. On the Lower Limit of Chondrule Cooling Rates: The Significance of Iron Loss in Dynamic Crystallization Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paque, Julie M.; Connolly, Harold C., Jr.; Lofgren, Gary E.

    1999-01-01

    Lofgren (1989) and the further analysis of Lofgren's 1989 experiments by Jones and Lofgren (1993) established that cooling rates as slow as 5 C/hour produced analog textures and major and minor element zoning profiles in minerals, implying that a lower limit on chondrule cooling rate may be approximately 5 C/hour These results, however, are in conflict with those reported by Radomsky and Hewins (1990). In their paper, Radomsky and Hewins (1990) established a lower limit on chondrule cooling rates of I 100 C/hour a factor of 20 higher than that suggested by Jones and Lofgren (1993). The higher cooling rates suggested by Radomsky and Hewins (1990) have gained considerable favor within the meteoritic community largely because it appears more consistent with the preservation of Na in chondrules, which tends to volatilize at the slower cooling rates. In their study, however, Radomsky and Hewins (1990) did not use Pt hang wires that were coated or saturated with Fe. The lack of such techniques likely facilitated Fe loss from their experimental chondrules to the hang wire during formation (Jones and Lofgren, 1993). The effect of Fe loss could produce an inaccurate determination of cooling rates since these rates are largely determined by the Mg-Fe distributions in individual crystals.

  8. Cold weather operating guidelines and experience for natural draft cooling towers on the American Electric Power system

    SciTech Connect

    Michell, F.L.; Drew, D.H.

    1996-10-01

    American Electric Power`s more than 30 years of experience in operating natural draft cooling towers during freezing winter weather conditions is discussed in the paper. Design features incorporated into the specifications for major rebuild/repack projects for crossflow and counterflow towers to facilitate cold weather operation are also reviewed.

  9. Electric breakdown and ionization detection in normal liquid and superfluid 4He for the SNA nEDM experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karcz, Maciej

    Helium throughout the pressure-temperature phase space, between 1 bar and the saturation curve and between 4.2 K and 1.7 K. A new breakdown hysteresis in liquid helium was discovered and is attributed to the suppression of heterogeneous nucleation sites inside the liquid. A phenomenological model involving the Townsend breakdown mechanism and Paschen's Law in liquid helium is proposed. In addition, the many challenges faced by efficient scintillation detection in the cryogenic environment of the nEDM experiment motivated additional studies at CEEM. To test the effect of an electric field on scintillation in superfluid, a SF test cell was constructed inside a dilution refrigerator and it was found that the scintil- lation intensity from a 241Am source in the cell, is reduced at high electric fields. Alternatives to scintillation detection for the nEDM experiment were also explored and the test cell was reconfigured to operate as a superfluid ionization chamber. The superfluid ionization chamber was tested with 241Am in pulse mode and current mode configurations. While the pulse mode in superfluid, which relies on the drift velocity of charges, is hindered by quasi-particle excitations in superfluid, results of current mode measurements appear promising. To further explore the prospect of cryogenic ionization detection, a detector cryo-stat capable of detecting neutrons using a 10B converter was also constructed at CEEM and tested at the Indiana University Low Energy Neutron Source (LENS). The neutron detector cryostat has the benefit of being able to modulate the ioniza- tion source which was not possible with the superfluid ionization chamber. Tests with argon gas led to the development of more efficient boron targets. The cryogenic test of ionization detection in current mode will be discussed.

  10. Operating experience feedback report: Assessment of spent fuel cooling. Volume 12

    SciTech Connect

    Ibarra, J.G.; Jones, W.R.; Lanik, G.F.; Ornstein, H.L.; Pullani, S.V.

    1997-02-01

    This report documents the results of an independent assessment by a team from the Office of Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data of spent-fuel-pool (SFP) cooling in operating nuclear power plants. The team assessed the likelihood and consequences of an extended loss of SFP cooling and suggested corrective actions, based on their findings.

  11. RF-bunching of relativistic 12C3+ ion beam for laser cooling experiment at the CSRe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H. B.; Wen, W. Q.; Ma, X.; Huang, Z. K.; Zhang, D. C.; Bussmann, M.; Winters, D. F. A.; Yuan, Y. J.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhao, D. M.; Mao, R. S.; Li, J.; Mao, L. J.; Yang, J. C.; Zhao, H. W.; Xu, H. S.; Xiao, G. Q.; Xia, J. W.

    2015-01-01

    To prepare the upcoming experiment of laser cooling of relativistic 12C3+ ion beams at the experimental cooler storage ring (CSRe), a test experiment was performed with 12C3+ ion beams at an energy of 122 MeV/u on the CSRe, at the Institute of Modern Physics, Lanzhou, China. In this experiment, the main storage ring of CSRm was employed to accumulate and accelerate the ion beam which was injected into the CSRe for the experiments. The number of 12C3+ ions at the CSRe reached 5×108 for every injection, which satisfied the experimental requirement. To fulfil the laser cooling experiment, the 12C3+ ion beams were bunched by sinusoidal waveforms with fixed and sweeping frequencies, respectively. A resonant Schottky pick-up was employed to record the Schottky spectra of these ion beams. The test experimental results demonstrated that the RF-buncher and diagnostic systems at the CSRe worked well and the CSRe was very stable with 12C3+ ion beams, hereby the CSRe is suitable for laser cooling experiment.

  12. New Results from the Search for Low-Mass Weakly Interacting Massive Particles with the CDMS Low Ionization Threshold Experiment.

    PubMed

    Agnese, R; Anderson, A J; Aramaki, T; Asai, M; Baker, W; Balakishiyeva, D; Barker, D; Basu Thakur, R; Bauer, D A; Billard, J; Borgland, A; Bowles, M A; Brink, P L; Bunker, R; Cabrera, B; Caldwell, D O; Calkins, R; Cerdeno, D G; Chagani, H; Chen, Y; Cooley, J; Cornell, B; Cushman, P; Daal, M; Di Stefano, P C F; Doughty, T; Esteban, L; Fallows, S; Figueroa-Feliciano, E; Ghaith, M; Godfrey, G L; Golwala, S R; Hall, J; Harris, H R; Hofer, T; Holmgren, D; Hsu, L; Huber, M E; Jardin, D; Jastram, A; Kamaev, O; Kara, B; Kelsey, M H; Kennedy, A; Leder, A; Loer, B; Lopez Asamar, E; Lukens, P; Mahapatra, R; Mandic, V; Mast, N; Mirabolfathi, N; Moffatt, R A; Morales Mendoza, J D; Oser, S M; Page, K; Page, W A; Partridge, R; Pepin, M; Phipps, A; Prasad, K; Pyle, M; Qiu, H; Rau, W; Redl, P; Reisetter, A; Ricci, Y; Roberts, A; Rogers, H E; Saab, T; Sadoulet, B; Sander, J; Schneck, K; Schnee, R W; Scorza, S; Serfass, B; Shank, B; Speller, D; Toback, D; Underwood, R; Upadhyayula, S; Villano, A N; Welliver, B; Wilson, J S; Wright, D H; Yellin, S; Yen, J J; Young, B A; Zhang, J

    2016-02-19

    The CDMS low ionization threshold experiment (CDMSlite) uses cryogenic germanium detectors operated at a relatively high bias voltage to amplify the phonon signal in the search for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). Results are presented from the second CDMSlite run with an exposure of 70 kg day, which reached an energy threshold for electron recoils as low as 56 eV. A fiducialization cut reduces backgrounds below those previously reported by CDMSlite. New parameter space for the WIMP-nucleon spin-independent cross section is excluded for WIMP masses between 1.6 and 5.5  GeV/c^{2}. PMID:26943526

  13. New Results from the Search for Low-Mass Weakly Interacting Massive Particles with the CDMS Low Ionization Threshold Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnese, R.; Anderson, A. J.; Aramaki, T.; Asai, M.; Baker, W.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Barker, D.; Basu Thakur, R.; Bauer, D. A.; Billard, J.; Borgland, A.; Bowles, M. A.; Brink, P. L.; Bunker, R.; Cabrera, B.; Caldwell, D. O.; Calkins, R.; Cerdeno, D. G.; Chagani, H.; Chen, Y.; Cooley, J.; Cornell, B.; Cushman, P.; Daal, M.; Di Stefano, P. C. F.; Doughty, T.; Esteban, L.; Fallows, S.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Ghaith, M.; Godfrey, G. L.; Golwala, S. R.; Hall, J.; Harris, H. R.; Hofer, T.; Holmgren, D.; Hsu, L.; Huber, M. E.; Jardin, D.; Jastram, A.; Kamaev, O.; Kara, B.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kennedy, A.; Leder, A.; Loer, B.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Lukens, P.; Mahapatra, R.; Mandic, V.; Mast, N.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Moffatt, R. A.; Morales Mendoza, J. D.; Oser, S. M.; Page, K.; Page, W. A.; Partridge, R.; Pepin, M.; Phipps, A.; Prasad, K.; Pyle, M.; Qiu, H.; Rau, W.; Redl, P.; Reisetter, A.; Ricci, Y.; Roberts, A.; Rogers, H. E.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Sander, J.; Schneck, K.; Schnee, R. W.; Scorza, S.; Serfass, B.; Shank, B.; Speller, D.; Toback, D.; Underwood, R.; Upadhyayula, S.; Villano, A. N.; Welliver, B.; Wilson, J. S.; Wright, D. H.; Yellin, S.; Yen, J. J.; Young, B. A.; Zhang, J.; SuperCDMS Collaboration

    2016-02-01

    The CDMS low ionization threshold experiment (CDMSlite) uses cryogenic germanium detectors operated at a relatively high bias voltage to amplify the phonon signal in the search for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). Results are presented from the second CDMSlite run with an exposure of 70 kg day, which reached an energy threshold for electron recoils as low as 56 eV. A fiducialization cut reduces backgrounds below those previously reported by CDMSlite. New parameter space for the WIMP-nucleon spin-independent cross section is excluded for WIMP masses between 1.6 and 5.5 GeV /c2 .

  14. New results from the search for low-mass weakly interacting massive particles with the CDMS low ionization threshold experiment

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Agnese, R.

    2016-02-17

    The CDMS low ionization threshold experiment (CDMSlite) uses cryogenic germanium detectors operated at a relatively high bias voltage to amplify the phonon signal in the search for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). Our results are presented from the second CDMSlite run with an exposure of 70 kg days, which reached an energy threshold for electron recoils as low as 56 eV. Furthermore, a fiducialization cut reduces backgrounds below those previously reported by CDMSlite. Lastly, new parameter space for the WIMP-nucleon spin-independent cross section is excluded forWIMP masses between 1.6 and 5.5 GeV/c2.

  15. Battery-powered pulsed high density inductively coupled plasma source for pre-ionization in laboratory astrophysics experiments.

    PubMed

    Chaplin, Vernon H; Bellan, Paul M

    2015-07-01

    An electrically floating radiofrequency (RF) pre-ionization plasma source has been developed to enable neutral gas breakdown at lower pressures and to access new experimental regimes in the Caltech laboratory astrophysics experiments. The source uses a customized 13.56 MHz class D RF power amplifier that is powered by AA batteries, allowing it to safely float at 3-6 kV with the electrodes of the high voltage pulsed power experiments. The amplifier, which is capable of 3 kW output power in pulsed (<1 ms) operation, couples electrical energy to the plasma through an antenna external to the 1.1 cm radius discharge tube. By comparing the predictions of a global equilibrium discharge model with the measured scalings of plasma density with RF power input and axial magnetic field strength, we demonstrate that inductive coupling (rather than capacitive coupling or wave damping) is the dominant energy transfer mechanism. Peak ion densities exceeding 5 × 10(19) m(-3) in argon gas at 30 mTorr have been achieved with and without a background field. Installation of the pre-ionization source on a magnetohydrodynamically driven jet experiment reduced the breakdown time and jitter and allowed for the creation of hotter, faster argon plasma jets than was previously possible. PMID:26233382

  16. On the Lower Limit of Chondrule Cooling Rates: The Significance of Iron Loss in Dynamic Crystallization Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paque, Julie M.; Connolly, Harold C., Jr.; Lofgren, Gary E.

    1998-01-01

    It is unlikely that the presence of chondrules, and thus their formation, within the protoplanetary nebula would be predicted if it were not for their ubiquitous presence in most chondritic meteorites. The study of these enigmatic, igneous objects has a direct influence on how meteoritic and solar system researchers model the processes operating and the materials present within our protoplanetary nebula. Key to understanding chondrule formation is a determination of constraints on their thermal histories. The three important variables in this history are their peak melting temperatures, the duration of their melting at peak temperatures, and the rate at which these object cool. Although these three variables are interdependent, it is cooling rate that provides the most powerful constraint. Cooling rate has a direct affect on the development of both crystal morphology and the elemental distributions within these grains. To date, experiments have indicated that chondrule cooling rates are in the range of 10's to 100's of degrees per hour for porphyritic chondrules (the most abundant type). The cooling rate for radial and barred chondrules is thought to be more rapid. To generate these cooling rates (rapid relative to the cooling of the nebula as a whole, but slow compared to simple black body radiation) the environment of chondrule formation must have been localized, and the abundance of solid materials must have been greatly enhanced above a gas of solar composition. Thus accurate determinations of chondrule cooling rates is critical in understanding both their formation and the nebular environment in which they formed. In a quest to more accurately determine the lower limit on cooling rates and to determine in more detail the effects of Fe loss from a molten sample to Pt wire loops, Weinbruch et al. have explored this issue experimentally and reevaluated the findings of Radomsky and Hewins in light of their new results. The basic conclusions of their paper are an

  17. Muon Cooling R&D Progress in the US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Derun

    2008-02-01

    Muon ionization cooling R&D is important for a neutrino factory and future muon collider. In addition to theoretical studies, much progress has been made in muon cooling channel hardware R&D since NuFact-2006. This paper reports the progress on hardware R&D that includes experimental RF test programs using 805-MHz RF cavity, superconducting (SC) solenoids (coupling coils), 201-MHz RF cavity, liquid hydrogen absorber and MUCOOL Test Area (MTA) experiment preparation for beam tests.

  18. Picosecond transient absorption rise time for ultrafast tagging of the interaction of ionizing radiation with scintillating crystals in high energy physics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auffray, E.; Buganov, O.; Fedorov, A.; Korjik, M.; Mechinsky, V.; Tikhomirov, A.; Vasil'ev, A.; Lecoq, P.

    2014-07-01

    Here we report the first results of a search of a signature for picosecond time stamps of the interaction between ionizing particles and transparent crystalline media. The induced absorption with sub-picosecond rise time observed in a cerium fluoride scintillation single crystal under UV excitation is directly associated with the ionization of Ce3+ atoms in CeF3 crystals, and the very fast occurrence thereof can be used to generate picosecond-precise time stamps corresponding to the interaction of ionizing particles with the crystal in high energy physics experiments.

  19. Simulation of the above-threshold-ionization experiment using the molecular strong-field approximation: The choice of gauge

    SciTech Connect

    Busuladzic, M.; Milosevic, D. B.

    2010-07-15

    We investigate how various versions of the molecular strong-field approximation (MSFA) agree with the experiment by Grasbon et al. [Phys. Rev. A 63, 041402(R) (2001)], in which the suppression of the ionization yield in the low-energy spectrum of the O{sub 2} molecule, compared to the spectrum of its companion atom Xe, was observed. In this experiment, it was also found that the spectrum of the N{sub 2} molecule is comparable to the corresponding spectrum of its companion atom Ar. We show that the length-gauge version of the MSFA with the initial state dressed by the laser field gives the best agreement with the experimental data for both O{sub 2} and N{sub 2} molecules.

  20. CO2 laser experiments using nuclear reactions as the ionization source.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhoads, H. S.; Schneider, R. T.; Allario, F.

    1971-01-01

    Experimental studies show that the output of a CO2 laser is significantly increased by products of the nuclear reaction He-3 (n,p)T. Helium-3 was used in lieu of the natural helium normally present in the 1:1:8 CO2:N2:He laser gas mixture (pressure = 6 torr). The laser assembly was then exposed to a reactor thermal neutron flux of about 100 million neutrons/sq cm/sec. Power output of the laser doubled while the electrical power input decreased; electrical efficiency was thus more than doubled. Results indicate that additional ionization by the energetic charged particles may be responsible for the improved laser performance.

  1. Extending the applicability of an open-ring trap to perform experiments with a single laser-cooled ion

    SciTech Connect

    Cornejo, J. M.; Colombano, M.; Doménech, J.; Rodríguez, D.; Block, M.; Delahaye, P.

    2015-10-15

    A special ion trap was initially built up to perform β-ν correlation experiments with radioactive ions. The trap geometry is also well suited to perform experiments with laser-cooled ions, serving for the development of a new type of Penning trap, in the framework of the project TRAPSENSOR at the University of Granada. The goal of this project is to use a single {sup 40}Ca{sup +} ion as detector for single-ion mass spectrometry. Within this project and without any modification to the initial electrode configuration, it was possible to perform Doppler cooling on {sup 40}Ca{sup +} ions, starting from large clouds and reaching single ion sensitivity. This new feature of the trap might be important also for other experiments with ions produced at radioactive ion beam facilities. In this publication, the trap and the laser system will be described, together with their performance with respect to laser cooling applied to large ion clouds down to a single ion.

  2. Loss-of-coolant accident experiment at the AVR (Arbeitsgemeinschaft Versuchsreaktor) gas-cooled reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Krueger, K. ); Cleveland, J. )

    1989-11-01

    Loss of coolant is one of the most severe accidents for a nuclear power plant. To demonstrate inherent safety characteristics incorporated into modular gas-cooled reactor designs, loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) simulation tests were conducted with the 15-MW(electric), 46-MW(thermal), pebble-bed, high-temperature Arbeitsgemeinschaft Versuchsreaktor (AVR) in the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG). This is the only nuclear power plant ever to have been intentionally subjected to LOCa conditions. Oak Ridge National Laboratory participation in the preparation and conduct of the tests was carried out within the U.S./FRG Agreement for Cooperation in Gas-Cooled Reactor Development.

  3. Experiments on the Recovery of Waste Heat in Cooling Ducts, Special Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverstein, Abe

    1939-01-01

    Tests have been conducted in the N.A.C.A. full-scale wind tunnel to investigate the partial recovery of the heat energy which is apparently wasted in the cooling of aircraft engines. The results indicate that if the radiator is located in an expanded duct, a part of the energy lost in cooling is recovered; however, the energy recovery is not of practical importance up to airplane speeds of 400 miles per hour. Throttling of the duct flow occurs with heated radiators and must be considered in designing the duct outlets from data obtained with cold radiators in the ducts.

  4. Mm-Wave Spectroscopy and Determination of the Radiative Branching Ratios of 11BH for Laser Cooling Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truppe, Stefan; Holland, Darren; Hendricks, Richard James; Hinds, Ed; Tarbutt, Michael

    2014-06-01

    We aim to slow a supersonic, molecular beam of 11BH using a Zeeman slower and subsequently cool the molecules to sub-millikelvin temperatures in a magneto-optical trap. Most molecules are not suitable for direct laser cooling because the presence of rotational and vibrational degrees of freedom means there is no closed-cycle transition which is necessary to scatter a large number of photons. As was pointed out by Di Rosa, there exists a class of molecules for which the excitation of vibrational modes is suppressed due to highly diagonal Franck-Condon factors. Furthermore, Stuhl et al. showed that angular momentum selection rules can be used to suppress leakage to undesired rotational states. Here we present a measurement of the radiative branching ratios of the A^1Π→ X^1Σ transition in 11BH - a necessary step towards subsequent laser cooling experiments. We also perform high-resolution mm-wave spectroscopy of the J'=1← J=0 rotational transition in the X^1Σ (v=0) state near 708 GHz. From this measurement we derive new, accurate hyper fine constants and compare these to theoretical descriptions. The measured branching ratios suggest that it is possible to laser cool 11BH molecules close to the recoil temperature of 4 μK using three laser frequencies only. M. D. Di Rosa, The European Physical Journal D, 31, 395, 2004 B. K. Stuhl et al., Physical Review Letters, 101, 243002, 2008

  5. Optimization of Electrospray Ionization by Statistical Design of Experiments and Response Surface Methodology: Protein-Ligand Equilibrium Dissociation Constant Determinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedro, Liliana; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Quinn, Ronald J.

    2016-09-01

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) binding studies between proteins and ligands under native conditions require that instrumental ESI source conditions are optimized if relative solution-phase equilibrium concentrations between the protein-ligand complex and free protein are to be retained. Instrumental ESI source conditions that simultaneously maximize the relative ionization efficiency of the protein-ligand complex over free protein and minimize the protein-ligand complex dissociation during the ESI process and the transfer from atmospheric pressure to vacuum are generally specific for each protein-ligand system and should be established when an accurate equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) is to be determined via titration. In this paper, a straightforward and systematic approach for ESI source optimization is presented. The method uses statistical design of experiments (DOE) in conjunction with response surface methodology (RSM) and is demonstrated for the complexes between Plasmodium vivax guanylate kinase ( PvGK) and two ligands: 5'-guanosine monophosphate (GMP) and 5'-guanosine diphosphate (GDP). It was verified that even though the ligands are structurally similar, the most appropriate ESI conditions for KD determination by titration are different for each.

  6. Optimization of Electrospray Ionization by Statistical Design of Experiments and Response Surface Methodology: Protein-Ligand Equilibrium Dissociation Constant Determinations.

    PubMed

    Pedro, Liliana; Van Voorhis, Wesley C; Quinn, Ronald J

    2016-09-01

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) binding studies between proteins and ligands under native conditions require that instrumental ESI source conditions are optimized if relative solution-phase equilibrium concentrations between the protein-ligand complex and free protein are to be retained. Instrumental ESI source conditions that simultaneously maximize the relative ionization efficiency of the protein-ligand complex over free protein and minimize the protein-ligand complex dissociation during the ESI process and the transfer from atmospheric pressure to vacuum are generally specific for each protein-ligand system and should be established when an accurate equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) is to be determined via titration. In this paper, a straightforward and systematic approach for ESI source optimization is presented. The method uses statistical design of experiments (DOE) in conjunction with response surface methodology (RSM) and is demonstrated for the complexes between Plasmodium vivax guanylate kinase (PvGK) and two ligands: 5'-guanosine monophosphate (GMP) and 5'-guanosine diphosphate (GDP). It was verified that even though the ligands are structurally similar, the most appropriate ESI conditions for KD determination by titration are different for each. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27225419

  7. Optimization of Electrospray Ionization by Statistical Design of Experiments and Response Surface Methodology: Protein-Ligand Equilibrium Dissociation Constant Determinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedro, Liliana; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Quinn, Ronald J.

    2016-05-01

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) binding studies between proteins and ligands under native conditions require that instrumental ESI source conditions are optimized if relative solution-phase equilibrium concentrations between the protein-ligand complex and free protein are to be retained. Instrumental ESI source conditions that simultaneously maximize the relative ionization efficiency of the protein-ligand complex over free protein and minimize the protein-ligand complex dissociation during the ESI process and the transfer from atmospheric pressure to vacuum are generally specific for each protein-ligand system and should be established when an accurate equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) is to be determined via titration. In this paper, a straightforward and systematic approach for ESI source optimization is presented. The method uses statistical design of experiments (DOE) in conjunction with response surface methodology (RSM) and is demonstrated for the complexes between Plasmodium vivax guanylate kinase (PvGK) and two ligands: 5'-guanosine monophosphate (GMP) and 5'-guanosine diphosphate (GDP). It was verified that even though the ligands are structurally similar, the most appropriate ESI conditions for KD determination by titration are different for each.

  8. Solar Heating and Cooling Experiment for a School in Atlanta. Performance Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westinghouse Electric Corp., Falls Church, VA.

    This report documents the performance and conclusions of a 13-month period of monitoring the performance of the experimental solar heating and cooling system installed in the George A. Towns Elementary School, Atlanta, Georgia. The objectives of the project were to (1) make a significant contribution to solar design, technology, and acceptability;…

  9. Electron-impact ionization of neon at low projectile energy: an internormalized experiment and theory for a complex target.

    PubMed

    Pflüger, Thomas; Zatsarinny, Oleg; Bartschat, Klaus; Senftleben, Arne; Ren, Xueguang; Ullrich, Joachim; Dorn, Alexander

    2013-04-12

    As a fundamental test for state-of-the-art theoretical approaches, we have studied the single ionization (2p) of neon at a projectile energy of 100 eV. The experimental data were acquired using an advanced reaction microscope that benefits from high efficiency and a large solid-angle acceptance of almost 4π. We put special emphasis on the ability to measure internormalized triple-differential cross sections over a large part of the phase space. The data are compared to predictions from a second-order hybrid distorted-wave plus R-matrix model and a fully nonperturbative B-spline R-matrix (BSR) with pseudostates approach. For a target of this complexity and the low-energy regime, unprecedented agreement between experiment and the BSR model is found. This represents a significant step forward in the investigation of complex targets. PMID:25167263

  10. Relative Abundances and Energy Spectra of C, N, and 0 as Measured by the Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter Balloon Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fazely, A. R.; Gunasingha, R. M.; Adams, J. H.; Ahn, E. J.; Ahn, H. S.; Bashindzhagyan, G.; Case, G.; Chang, J.; Christl, M.; Ellison, S.

    2003-01-01

    We present results on the spectra and the relative abundances of C, N, and 0 nuclei in the cosmic radiation as measured from the Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter Balloon Experiment (ATIC) . The ATIC detector has completed two successful balloon flights from McMurdo, Antarctica lasting a total of more than 35 days. ATIC is designed as a multiple, long duration balloon flight, investigation of the cosmic ray spectra from below 50 GeV to near 100 TeV total energy, using a fully active Bismuth Germanate calorimeter. It is equipped with a large area mosaic of silicon detector pixels capable of charge identification from H to Fe. As a redundancy check for the charge identification and a particle tracking system, three projective layers of x-y scintillator hodoscopes were employed, above, in the middle and below a 0.75 nuclear interaction length graphite target.

  11. Anisotropic stress accumulation in cooling lava flows and resulting fracture patterns: Insights from starch-water desiccation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lodge, Robert W. D.; Lescinsky, David T.

    2009-09-01

    Desiccation of starch-water slurries is a useful analog for the production of polygonal fractures/columnar joints in cooling lava flows. When left to dry completely, a simple mixture of 1:1 starch and water will produce columns that appear remarkably similar to natural columnar joints formed in cooled lava flows. Columns form when the accumulation of isotropic stress exceeds the tensile strength of a material, at which point a fracture forms and advances through the material perpendicular to the desiccating surface. Individual fractures will initially form orthogonal to the desiccation surface but will quickly evolve into a hexagonal fracture network that advances incrementally through the material. However, some fracture patterns found within natural lava flows are not hexagonal ( Lodge and Lescinsky, 2009-this issue), but rather have fracture lengths that are much longer than the distance to adjacent fractures. These fractures are commonly found at lava flows that have interacted with glacial ice during emplacement. The purpose of this study is to utilize starch analog experiments to better understand the formation of these fractures and the stress regimes responsible for their non-hexagonal patterns. To simulate anisotropic conditions during cooling, the starch slurry was poured into a container with a movable wall that was attached to a screw-type jack. The jack was then set to slowly extend or retract while the slurry desiccated. This resulted in either a decrease or increase in the chamber cross-sectional area thus creating compressional or extensional regimes. Decreasing chamber area (DCA) experiments resulted in fractures with larger lengths parallel to the direction of wall movement (also direction of compression). It also caused localized thrust faulting and curved column development. Increasing chamber area (ICA) experiments produced a zone of horizontal column development along the expanding margin (produced when the wall detached from the sample

  12. Experiments on the Scaling of Ionization Balance vs. Electron and Radiation Temperature in Non-LTE Gold Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Heeter, R F; Hansen, S B; Beiersdorfer, P; Foord, M E; Fournier, K B; Froula, D H; Mackinnon, A J; May, M J; Schneider, M B; Young, B F

    2004-06-25

    Understanding and predicting the behavior of high-Z non-LTE plasmas is important for developing indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion. Extending earlier work from the Nova laser, we present results from experiments using the Omega laser to study the ionization balance of gold as a function of electron and radiation temperature. In these experiments, gold samples embedded in Be disks expand under direct laser heating to n{sub e} {approx} 10{sup 21} cm{sup -3}, with T{sub e} varying from 0.8 to 2.5 keV. An additional finite radiation field with effective temperature T{sub r} up to 150 eV is provided by placing the gold-Be disks inside truncated 1.2 mm diameter tungsten-coated cylindrical hohlraums with full laser entrance holes. Densities are measured by imaging of plasma expansion. Electron temperatures are diagnosed with either 2 {omega} or 4 {omega} Thomson scattering, and also K-shell spectroscopy of KCl tracers co-mixed with the gold. Hohlraum flux and effective radiation temperature are measured using an absolutely-calibrated multichannel filtered diode array. Spectroscopic measurements of the M-shell gold emission in the 2.9-4 keV spectral range provide ionization balance and charge state distribution information. The spectra show strong variation with T{sub e}, strong variation with the applied T{sub r} at T{sub e} below 1.6 keV, and relatively little variation with T{sub r} at higher T{sub e} (upwards of 2 keV). We summarize our most recent spectral analyses and discuss emerging and outstanding issues.

  13. First atomic physics experiments with cooled stored ion beams at the Heidelberg heavy-ion ring TSR

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, A.; Balykin, V.; Baumann, W.; Berger, J.; Bisoffi, G.; Blatt, P.; Blum, M.; Faulstich, A.; Friedrich, A.; Gerhard, M.; Geyer, C.; Grieser, M.; Grieser, R.; Habs, D.; Heyng, H.W.; Hochadel, B.; Holzer, B.; Huber, G.; Jaeschke, E.; Jung, M.; Karafillidis, A.; Kilgus, G.; Klein, R.; Kraemer, D.; Krause, P.; Krieg, M.; Kuehl, T.; Matl, K.; Mueller, A.; Music, M.; Neumann, R.; Neureither, G.; Ott, W.; Petrich, W.; Povh, B.; Repnow, R.; Schroeder, S.; Schuch, R.; Schwalm, D.; Sigray, P.; Steck, M.; Stokstad, R.; Szmola, E.; Wagner, M.; Wanner, B.; Welti, K.; Zwickler, S. Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg Manne Siegbahn Institute , Stockholm Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet Giessen, Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Mainz Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung , Darmstadt (Fed

    1990-06-01

    An overview of atomic physics experiments at the heavy ion Test Storage Ring (TSR) is given. Highly charged ions up to fully stripped silicon have been stored at energies between 4 and 12 MeV/u. The enhancement of the beam intensity by stacking, the beam lifetime, and electron cooling of these ion beams are discussed. Radiative and state-selective dielectronic recombination rates of hydrogen-like oxygen ions with free electrons from the electron cooler were measured. Beam noise spectra are being investigated with regard to collective effects caused by the Coulomb interaction in the cold ion beams. Resonance fluorescence from stored single-charged ions was observed using tunable narrow-band lasers. First indications of laser cooling in a storage ring were seen.

  14. Loss-of-coolant accident experiment at the AVR gas-cooled reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Krueger, K. ); Cleveland, J. )

    1990-01-01

    A landmark safety test has been conducted at the AVR-reactor, a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) in the Federal Republic of Germany owned by the Arbeitsgemeinschaft Versuchsreaktor, AVR in Juelich. The 46-MW(t), 15-MW(e) AVR reactor was subjected to a simulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA), a very severe occurrence in which the coolant escapes from the reactor core and no emergency system provides coolant flow to the core. The test, which demonstrated the inherently safe response of this reactor to a LOCA, marked the first time ever that a reactor has been intentionally subjected to loss-of-coolant conditions without emergency cooling. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and General Atomics participated in the test by working with AVR staff by jointly performing the analyses needed to obtain the license to conduct the test and by performing post test analyses. This participation was carried out under the cooperative AVR Subprogram which is conducted within the US/FRG Agreement for Cooperation in Gas-Cooled Reactor Development. 7 figs.

  15. Recent Innovations in Muon Beam Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Rolland P. Johnson; Mohammad Alsharo'a; Charles Ankenbrandt; Emanuela Barzi; Kevin Beard; S. Alex Bogacz; Yaroslav Derbenev; Licia Del Frate; Ivan Gonin; Pierrick M. Hanlet; Robert Hartline; Daniel M. Kaplan; Moyses Kuchnir; Alfred Moretti; David Neuffer; Kevin Paul; Milorad Popovic; Thomas J. Roberts; Gennady Romanov; Daniele Turrioni; Victor Yarba; and Katsuya Yonehara

    2006-03-01

    Eight new ideas are being developed under SBIR/STTR grants to cool muon beams for colliders, neutrino factories, and muon experiments. Analytical and simulation studies have confirmed that a six-dimensional (6D) cooling channel based on helical magnets surrounding RF cavities filled with dense hydrogen gas can provide effective beam cooling. This helical cooling channel (HCC) has solenoidal, helical dipole, helical quadrupole, and helical sextupole magnetic fields to generate emittance exchange and achieve 6D emittance reduction of over 3 orders of magnitude in a 100 m segment. Four such sequential HCC segments, where the RF frequencies are increased and transverse physical dimensions reduced as the beams become cooler, implies a 6D emittance reduction of almost five orders of magnitude. Two new cooling ideas, Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling and Reverse Emittance Exchange, then can be employed to reduce transverse emittances to a few mm-mr, which allows high luminosity with fewer muons than previously imagined. We describe these new ideas as well as a new precooling idea based on a HCC with z dependent fields that can be used as MANX, an exceptional 6D cooling demonstration experiment.

  16. Recent Innovations in Muon Beam Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Rolland P.; Alsharo'a, Mohammad; Hanlet, Pierrick M.; Hartline, Robert; Kuchnir, Moyses; Paul, Kevin; Roberts, Thomas J.; Ankenbrandt, Charles; Barzi, Emanuela; Del Frate, Licia; Gonin, Ivan; Moretti, Alfred; Neuffer, David; Popovic, Milorad; Romanov, Gennady; Turrioni, Daniele; Yarba, Victor; Beard, Kevin; Bogacz, S. Alex; Derbenev, Yaroslav

    2006-03-20

    Eight new ideas are being developed under SBIR/STTR grants to cool muon beams for colliders, neutrino factories, and muon experiments. Analytical and simulation studies have confirmed that a six-dimensional (6D) cooling channel based on helical magnets surrounding RF cavities filled with dense hydrogen gas can provide effective beam cooling. This helical cooling channel (HCC) has solenoidal, helical dipole, helical quadrupole, and helical sextupole magnetic fields to generate emittance exchange and achieve 6D emittance reduction of over 3 orders of magnitude in a 100 m segment. Four such sequential HCC segments, where the RF frequencies are increased and transverse physical dimensions reduced as the beams become cooler, implies a 6D emittance reduction of almost five orders of magnitude. Two new cooling ideas, Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling and Reverse Emittance Exchange, then can be employed to reduce transverse emittances to a few mm-mr, which allows high luminosity with fewer muons than previously imagined. We describe these new ideas as well as a new precooling idea based on a HCC with z dependent fields that can be used as MANX, an exceptional 6D cooling demonstration experiment.

  17. The Cooling of a Liquid Absorber using a Small Cooler

    SciTech Connect

    Baynham, D.E.; Bradshaw, T.W.; Green, M.A.; Ishimoto, S.; Liggins, N.

    2005-08-24

    This report discusses the use of small cryogenic coolers for cooling the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) liquid cryogen absorbers. Since the absorber must be able contain liquid helium as well liquid hydrogen, the characteristics of the available 4.2 K coolers are used here. The issues associated with connecting two-stage coolers to liquid absorbers are discussed. The projected heat flows into an absorber and the cool-down of the absorbers using the cooler are presented. The warm-up of the absorber is discussed. Special hydrogen safety issues that may result from the use of a cooler on the absorbers are also discussed.

  18. Argon retentivity of hornblendes: A field experiment in a slowly cooled metamorphic terrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onstott, T. C.; Peacock, M. W.

    1987-11-01

    Hornblende from samples of amphibolite and granitic gneiss, collected within a single outcrop in the central Adirondacks, yield significantly different 40Ar ∗/39Ar k dates of 948 ± 5 and 907 ± 5 Ma. Assuming that this terrane cooled slowly following high-grade metamorphism and that the samples have experienced the same thermal history, the difference in dates apparently reflects a corresponding difference in blocking temperature for diffusion of radiogenic argon in these hornblende samples. The Fe/(Fe + Mg + Mn) of the hornblende samples are 0.8 and 0.6, the higher ratio corresponding to the younger 40Ar ∗/39Ar k date. Transmission electron microscopy observations indicate that both hornblende samples are homogeneous and devoid of any exsolution, but contain zones of fibrous phyllosilicates ~0.1 to 2 μm wide parallelling (100) and (110). These alteration zones probably formed during post-metamorphic cooling as a result of the migration of fluids through the hornblendes, and are obvious pathways for argon escape from hornblende. As these features are more abundant in the hornblende sample with the younger 40Ar /39Ar date and higher Fe/(Fe + Mg + Mn), they may influence the argon blocking temperature by effectively partitioning the hornblende grains into diffusion domains of varying size. Biotite from the granitic gneiss yields an 40Ar ∗/39Ar k date of 853 ± 2 Ma, with a mildly discordant stepheating spectrum that in part reflects the degassing of submicroscopic inclusions precipitated during alteration of the host biotite. Plagioclase from the amphibolite yields a 40Ar ∗/39Ar k integrated date of 734 ± 3 Ma. All the 40Ar /39Ar data are consistent with postmetamorphic cooling rates of 1° to 5°C/Ma.

  19. Final Technical Report on STTR Project DE-FG02-02ER86145 Pressurized RF Cavities for Muon Ionization Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Rolland Johnson

    2006-07-13

    This project was to design and build an RF test cell (TC), which could be operated at 800 MHz, filled with high pressure gases including hydrogen, at temperatures down to that of liquid nitrogen, in strong magnetic fields, in a strong radiation environment, and with interchangeable electrodes, in order to examine the use of high-pressure RF cavities for muon beam cooling.

  20. Handbook of experiences in the design and installation of solar heating and cooling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, D.S.; Oberoi, H.S.

    1980-07-01

    A large array of problems encountered are detailed, including design errors, installation mistakes, cases of inadequate durability of materials and unacceptable reliability of components, and wide variations in the performance and operation of different solar systems. Durability, reliability, and design problems are reviewed for solar collector subsystems, heat transfer fluids, thermal storage, passive solar components, piping/ducting, and reliability/operational problems. The following performance topics are covered: criteria for design and performance analysis, domestic hot water systems, passive space heating systems, active space heating systems, space cooling systems, analysis of systems performance, and performance evaluations. (MHR)

  1. The eye (and brain) as ionizing particle detector? First results from the ALTEA - space experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narici, Livio

    The first part of ALTEA-Space experiments have been performed on the ISS (USLab) between August 2006 and July 2007. The ALTEA hardware features 6 particle telescopes each with 6 striped 8 x 16 cm2 silicon planes arranged alternately in the x and y direction. These detectors are hold by helmet shaped holder. ALTEA features also a light tight visual stimulation unit, a 32 channel EEG cap and electronics, a 3-buttons pushbutton. Two different experiment modalities were run: DOSI and CNSM. The former is the study of the radiation environment of the USLab, and results from these measurements are mostly covered by other papers in this conference; the latter is the study of the electrophysiological activity in coincidence with particle traveling through the eye/brain of the astronaut, with specific reference to the observed light flashes. In this paper we will present first results from these measurements and discuss, within this panorama, the amount of the measured radiation in the brain/eye. Seven CNSM sessions have been performed (on three astronauts), with a total of 20 light flashes perceived. Comparisons with previous measurements in Low Earth Orbit and during the flights to the Moon will be also shown

  2. Progress on Superconducting Magnets for the MICE Cooling Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Michael A; Virostek, Steve P.; Li, Derun; Zisman, Michael S.; Wang, Li; Pan, Heng; Wu, Hong; Guo, XingLong; Xu, FengYu; Liu, X. K.; Zheng, S. X.; Bradshaw, Thomas; Baynham, Elwyn; Cobb, John; Lau, Wing; Lau, Peter; Yang, Stephanie Q.

    2009-09-09

    The muon ionization cooling experiment (MICE) consists of a target, a beam line, a pion decay channel, the MICE cooling channel. Superconducting magnets are used in the pion decay channel and the MICE cooling channel. This report describes the MICE cooling channel magnets and the progress in the design and fabrication of these magnets. The MICE cooling channel consists of three types of superconducting solenoids; the spectrometer solenoids, the coupling solenoids and the focusing solenoids. The three types of magnets are being fabricated in he United States, China, and the United Kingdom respectively. The spectrometer magnets are used to analyze the muon beam before and after muon cooling. The coupling magnets couple the focusing sections and keep the muon beam contained within the iris of the RF cavities that re used to recover the muon momentum lost during ionization cooling. The focusing magnets focus the muon beam in the center of a liquid hydrogen absorber. The first of the cooling channel magnets will be operational in MICE in the spring of 2010.

  3. Muon Beam Helical Cooling Channel Design

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Rolland; Ankenbrandt, Charles; Flanagan, G; Kazakevich, G M; Marhauser, Frank; Neubauer, Michael; Roberts, T; Yoshikawa, C; Derbenev, Yaroslav; Morozov, Vasiliy; Kashikhin, V S; Lopes, Mattlock; Tollestrup, A; Yonehara, Katsuya; Zloblin, A

    2013-06-01

    The Helical Cooling Channel (HCC) achieves effective ionization cooling of the six-dimensional (6d) phase space of a muon beam by means of a series of 21st century inventions. In the HCC, hydrogen-pressurized RF cavities enable high RF gradients in strong external magnetic fields. The theory of the HCC, which requires a magnetic field with solenoid, helical dipole, and helical quadrupole components, demonstrates that dispersion in the gaseous hydrogen energy absorber provides effective emittance exchange to enable longitudinal ionization cooling. The 10-year development of a practical implementation of a muon-beam cooling device has involved a series of technical innovations and experiments that imply that an HCC of less than 300 m length can cool the 6d emittance of a muon beam by six orders of magnitude. We describe the design and construction plans for a prototype HCC module based on oxygen-doped hydrogen-pressurized RF cavities that are loaded with dielectric, fed by magnetrons, and operate in a superconducting helical solenoid magnet.

  4. Caries Experience among Adults Exposed to Low to Moderate Doses of Ionizing Radiation in Childhood – The Tinea Capitis Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Vered, Yuval; Chetrit, Angela; Sgan-Cohen, Harold D.; Amitai, Tova; Mann, Jonathan; Even-Nir, Hadas; Sadetzki, Siegal

    2016-01-01

    While the impact of therapeutic levels of ionizing radiation during childhood on dental defects has been documented, the possible effect of low doses on dental health is unknown. The study aim was to assess the association between childhood exposure to low–moderate doses of therapeutic radiation and caries experience among a cohort of adults 50 years following the exposure. The analysis was based on a sample of 253 irradiated (in the treatment of tinea capitis) and 162 non-irradiated subjects. The decayed, missing, and filled teeth (DMFT) index was assessed during a clinical dental examination and questions regarding dental care services utilization, oral hygiene behavior, current self-perceived mouth dryness, socio-demographic parameters, and health behavior variables were obtained through a face-to-face interview. An ordered multivariate logistic regression model was used to assess the association of the main independent variable (irradiation status) and other relevant independent variables on the increase in DMFT. Mean caries experience levels (DMFT) were 18.6 ± 7.5 for irradiated subjects compared to 16.4 ± 7.2 for the non-irradiated (p = 0.002). Controlling for gender, age, education, income, smoking, dental visit in the last year, and brushing teeth behavior, irradiation was associated with a 72% increased risk for higher DMFT level (95% CI: 1.19–2.50). A quantification of the risk by dose absorbed in the salivary gland and in the thyroid gland showed adjusted ORs of 2.21 per 1 Gy (95% CI: 1.40–3.50) and 1.05 per 1 cGy (95% CI: 1.01–1.09), respectively. Childhood exposure to ionizing radiation (0.2–0.4 Gy) might be associated with late outcomes of dental health. In line with the guidelines of the American Dental Association, these results call for caution when using dental radiographs. PMID:26942172

  5. Caries Experience among Adults Exposed to Low to Moderate Doses of Ionizing Radiation in Childhood - The Tinea Capitis Cohort.

    PubMed

    Vered, Yuval; Chetrit, Angela; Sgan-Cohen, Harold D; Amitai, Tova; Mann, Jonathan; Even-Nir, Hadas; Sadetzki, Siegal

    2016-01-01

    While the impact of therapeutic levels of ionizing radiation during childhood on dental defects has been documented, the possible effect of low doses on dental health is unknown. The study aim was to assess the association between childhood exposure to low-moderate doses of therapeutic radiation and caries experience among a cohort of adults 50 years following the exposure. The analysis was based on a sample of 253 irradiated (in the treatment of tinea capitis) and 162 non-irradiated subjects. The decayed, missing, and filled teeth (DMFT) index was assessed during a clinical dental examination and questions regarding dental care services utilization, oral hygiene behavior, current self-perceived mouth dryness, socio-demographic parameters, and health behavior variables were obtained through a face-to-face interview. An ordered multivariate logistic regression model was used to assess the association of the main independent variable (irradiation status) and other relevant independent variables on the increase in DMFT. Mean caries experience levels (DMFT) were 18.6 ± 7.5 for irradiated subjects compared to 16.4 ± 7.2 for the non-irradiated (p = 0.002). Controlling for gender, age, education, income, smoking, dental visit in the last year, and brushing teeth behavior, irradiation was associated with a 72% increased risk for higher DMFT level (95% CI: 1.19-2.50). A quantification of the risk by dose absorbed in the salivary gland and in the thyroid gland showed adjusted ORs of 2.21 per 1 Gy (95% CI: 1.40-3.50) and 1.05 per 1 cGy (95% CI: 1.01-1.09), respectively. Childhood exposure to ionizing radiation (0.2-0.4 Gy) might be associated with late outcomes of dental health. In line with the guidelines of the American Dental Association, these results call for caution when using dental radiographs. PMID:26942172

  6. Visualization and experiment of tip vortex phenomenon in cooling fan using digital particle image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Junlong; Wang, Xuejun; Wu, Guanghui; Wu, Keqi

    2004-11-01

    The Digital Particle Image Velocimetry (DPIV) is an efficient method for measuring the internal flow field of a low-speed cooling fan. This paper studied the velocity field by means of PIV technology for a leading edge swept axial-flow fan without casing, and the tip vortex phenomenon was observed. Time-averaged velocity measurements were taken near the pressure surface, the suction surface and the tip of blade, etc. Moreover, the flow characteristics were visualized using numerical techniques. Experimental results showed that this tip vortex existed at the leading edge of the blade. The generating, developing and dissipating evolvement process of the tip vortex from the blade leading edge to downstream were discussed in detail. In addition, by comparing DPIV results and numerical results, a good agreement between them indicated a possibility to predict flow field using CFD tools. The experimental data provided in this paper are reliable for improving the aerodynamic characteristics of the open axial fan.

  7. Argon retentivity of hornblendes: A field experiment in a slowly cooled metamorphic terrane

    SciTech Connect

    Onstott, T.C.; Peacock, M.W. )

    1987-11-01

    Hornblende from samples of amphibolite and granitic gneiss, collected within a single outcrop in the central Adirondacks, yield significantly different {sup 40}Ar*/{sup 39}Ark{sub K} dates of 948 {plus minus} 5 and 907 {plus minus} 5 Ma. Assuming that this terrane cooled slowly following high-grade metamorphism and that the samples have experienced the same thermal history, the difference in dates apparently reflects a corresponding difference in blocking temperature for diffusion of radiogenic argon in these hornblende samples. The Fe/(Fe + Mg + Mn) of the hornblende samples are 0.8 and 0.6, the higher ratio corresponding to the younger {sup 40}Ar*/{sup 39}Ar{sub k} date. Transmission electron microscopy observations indicate that both hornblende samples are homogeneous and devoid of any exsolution, but contain zones of fibrous phyllosilicates {approximately} 0.1 to 2 {mu}m wide parallelling (100) and (110). These alteration zones probably formed during post-metamorphic cooling as a result of the migration of fluids through the hornblendes, and are obvious pathways for argon escape from hornblende. As these features are more abundant in the hornblende sample with the younger {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar date and higher Fe/(Fe + Mg + Mn), they may influence the argon blocking temperature by effectively partitioning the hornblende grains into diffusion domains of varying size. Biotite from the granitic gneiss yields an {sup 40}Ar*/{sup 39}Ar{sub k} date of 853 {plus minus} 2 Ma, with a mildly discordant step-heating spectrum that in part reflects the degassing of submicroscopic inclusions precipitated during alteration of the host biotite. Plagioclase from the amphibolite yields a {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar{sub k} integrated date of 734 {plus minus} 3 Ma.

  8. First Flight of the Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC) Balloon Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Case, G.; Ellison, S.; Gould, R.; Granger, D.; Guzik, T. G.; Isbert, J.; Price, B.; Stewart, M.; Wefel, J. P.; Mock, L.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The ATILT instrument is designed to measure the composition and energy spectra of Z = 1 to 28 cosmic rays over the energy range -10 GeV - 100 TeV. ATIC was launched as a long duration test balloon flight on 12/28/00 local time from McMurdo, Antarctica. The operations preceding and during launch went very smoothly. During the first -20 hr while the instrument remained within line of sight (LOS), a full system check out was conducted, the experiment was operated in several test configurations, and all major tuning was completed. Preliminary analysis of the science data indicates that the overall detector system is functioning as expected. With our fully functioning analysis software we were able to monitor the data in nearly real time. Each event was reconstructed event-by-event to confirm the detector performance. The shower profiles indicate that the shower maximum location is deeper in the calorimeter for higher energy events, as expected. The energy spectra of protons, Helium nuclei, and "all particles" appear to follow power laws. Both the Si matrix and top scintillator layer of the charge module show clear charge separation for p and He. As the statistics increase, heavy nuclei charge separation will be evaluated. We will present preliminary results of the LOS data, as well as other data that will be available from the flight-data hard disk,

  9. Ionization of small molecules induced by H+, H e+ , and N+ projectiles: Comparison of experiment with quantum and classical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovács, S. T. S.; Herczku, P.; Juhász, Z.; Sarkadi, L.; Gulyás, L.; Sulik, B.

    2016-07-01

    We report the energy and angular distribution of ejected electrons from C H4 and H2O molecules impacted by 1 MeV H+, H e+ , and 650 keV N+ ions. Spectra were measured at different observation angles, from 2 to 2000 eV. The obtained absolute double-differential electron-emission cross sections (DDCSs) were compared with the results of classical trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) and continuum distorted wave, eikonal initial state (CDW-EIS) calculations. For the bare H+ projectile both theories show remarkable agreement with the experiment at all observed angles and energies. The CTMC results are in similarly good agreement with the DDCS spectra obtained for impact by dressed H e+ and N+ ions, where screening effects and electron loss from the projectile gain importance. The CDW-EIS calculations slightly overestimate the electron loss for 1 MeV H e+ impact, and overestimate both the target and projectile ionization at low emitted electron energies for 650 keV N+ impact. The contribution of multiple electron scattering by the projectile and target centers (Fermi shuttle) dominates the N+-impact spectra at higher electron energies, and it is well reproduced by the nonperturbative CTMC calculations. The contributions of different processes in medium-velocity collisions of dressed ions with molecules are determined.

  10. A combined experiment/computational study of flow in turbine blade cooling passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tse, D. G. N.; Kreskovsky, J. P.; Shamroth, S. J.; McGrath, D. B.

    1994-05-01

    Laser velocimetry was utilized to map the velocity field in a serpentine turbine blade cooling passage at Reynolds and Rotation numbers of up to 25.000 and 0.48. These results were used to assess the combined influence of passage curvature and Coriolis force on the secondary velocity field generated. A Navier-Stokes code (NASTAR) was validated against incompressible test data and then used to simulate the effect of buoyancy. The measurements show a net convection from the low pressure surface to high pressure surface. The interaction of the secondary flows induced by the turns and rotation produces swirl at the turns, which persisted beyond 2 hydraulic diameters downstream of the turns. The incompressible flow field predictions agree well with the measured velocities. With radially outward flow, the buoyancy force causes a further increase in velocity on the high pressure surface and a reduction on the low pressure surface. The results were analyzed in relation to the heat transfer measurements of Wagner et al. (1991). Predicted heat transfer is enhanced on the high pressure surfaces and in turns. The incompressible flow simulation underpredicts heat transfer in these locations. Improvements observed in compressible flow simulation indicate that the buoyancy force may be important.

  11. Loss-of-coolant accident experiment at the AVR gas-cooled reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Cleveland, J.; Krueger, K.; Kernforschungsanlage Juelich G.m.b.H. . Arbeitsgemeinschaft Versuchsreaktor)

    1989-01-01

    Loss-of-coolant is one of the most severe accidents for a nuclear power plant. To demonstrate inherent safety characteristics incorporated into small High-Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGR) designs, loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) simulation tests have been conducted with the German pebble-bed High-Temperature Reactor AVR. The AVR is the only nuclear power plant ever to have been intentionally subjected to LOCA conditions. The LOCA test was planned to create conditions that would exist if a rapid LOCA occurred with the reactor operating at full power. The tests demonstrated this reactor's safe response to an accident in which the coolant escapes from the reactor core and no emergency system is available to provide coolant flow to the core. The test is of special interest because it demonstrates the inherent safety features incorporated into modular HTGR designs. The main LOCA test lasted for 5 d. After the test began, core temperatures increased for {approximately}13 h and then gradually and continually decreased as the rate of heat dissipation from the core exceeded accident levels of decay power. Throughout the test, temperatures remained below limiting values for the core and other reactor components. 3 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Development of a Single-Pass Amplifier for an Optical Stochastic Cooling Proof-of-Principle Experiment at Fermilab's IOTA Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Andorf, M. B.; Lebedev, V. A.; Piot, P.

    2015-06-01

    Optical stochastic cooling (OSC) is a method of beam cooling which is expected to provide cooling rates orders of magnitude larger than ordinary stochastic cooling. Light from an undulator (the pickup) is amplified and fed back onto the particle beam via another undulator (the kicker). Fermilab is currently exploring a possible proof-of-principle experiment of the OSC at the integrable-optics test accelerator (IOTA) ring. To implement effective OSC a good correction of phase distortions in the entire band of the optical amplifier is required. In this contribution we present progress in experimental characterization of phase distortions associated to a Titanium Sapphire crystal laser-gain medium (a possible candidate gain medium for the OSC experiment to be performed at IOTA). We also discuss a possible option for a mid-IR amplifier

  13. Battery-Powered RF Pre-Ionization System for the Caltech Magnetohydrodynamically-Driven Jet Experiment: RF Discharge Properties and MHD-Driven Jet Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaplin, Vernon H.

    This thesis describes investigations of two classes of laboratory plasmas with rather different properties: partially ionized low pressure radiofrequency (RF) discharges, and fully ionized high density magnetohydrodynamically (MHD)-driven jets. An RF pre-ionization system was developed to enable neutral gas breakdown at lower pressures and create hotter, faster jets in the Caltech MHD-Driven Jet Experiment. The RF plasma source used a custom pulsed 3 kW 13.56 MHz RF power amplifier that was powered by AA batteries, allowing it to safely float at 4-6 kV with the cathode of the jet experiment. The argon RF discharge equilibrium and transport properties were analyzed, and novel jet dynamics were observed. Although the RF plasma source was conceived as a wave-heated helicon source, scaling measurements and numerical modeling showed that inductive coupling was the dominant energy input mechanism. A one-dimensional time-dependent fluid model was developed to quantitatively explain the expansion of the pre-ionized plasma into the jet experiment chamber. The plasma transitioned from an ionizing phase with depressed neutral emission to a recombining phase with enhanced emission during the course of the experiment, causing fast camera images to be a poor indicator of the density distribution. Under certain conditions, the total visible and infrared brightness and the downstream ion density both increased after the RF power was turned off. The time-dependent emission patterns were used for an indirect measurement of the neutral gas pressure. The low-mass jets formed with the aid of the pre-ionization system were extremely narrow and collimated near the electrodes, with peak density exceeding that of jets created without pre-ionization. The initial neutral gas distribution prior to plasma breakdown was found to be critical in determining the ultimate jet structure. The visible radius of the dense central jet column was several times narrower than the axial current channel

  14. Reanalysis of the gas-cooled fast reactor experiments at the zero power facility proteus - Spectral indices

    SciTech Connect

    Perret, G.; Pattupara, R. M.; Girardin, G.; Chawla, R.

    2012-07-01

    The gas-cooled fast reactor (GCFR) concept was investigated experimentally in the PROTEUS zero power facility at the Paul Scherrer Inst. during the 1970's. The experimental program was aimed at neutronics studies specific to the GCFR and at the validation of nuclear data in fast spectra. A significant part of the program used thorium oxide and thorium metal fuel either distributed quasi-homogeneously in the reference PuO{sub 2}/UO{sub 2} lattice or introduced in the form of radial and axial blanket zones. Experimental results obtained at the time are still of high relevance in view of the current consideration of the Gas-cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) as a Generation-IV nuclear system, as also of the renewed interest in the thorium cycle. In this context, some of the experiments have been modeled with modern Monte Carlo codes to better account for the complex PROTEUS whole-reactor geometry and to allow validating recent continuous neutron cross-section libraries. As a first step, the MCNPX model was used to test the JEFF-3.1, JEFF-3.1.1, ENDF/B-VII.0 and JENDL-3.3 libraries against spectral indices, notably involving fission and capture of {sup 232}Th and {sup 237}Np, measured in GFR-like lattices. (authors)

  15. Bilogical effects of ionizing radiation: epidemiological surveys and laboratory animal experiments. Implications for risk evaluation and decision processes

    SciTech Connect

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1981-04-01

    General background is given for an understanding of the potential health effects in populations exposed to low-level ionizing radiations. The discussion is within the framework of the scientific deliberations and controversies that arose during preparation of the current report of the committee on the biological effects of ionizing radiation of the National Academy of Science - National Research Council (1980 Beir-III Report). (ACR)

  16. Cooling overall spin temperature: Protein NMR experiments optimized for longitudinal relaxation effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deschamps, Michaël; Campbell, Iain D.

    2006-02-01

    In experiments performed on protonated proteins at high fields, 80% of the NMR spectrometer time is spent waiting for the 1H atoms to recover their polarization after recording the free induction decay. Selective excitation of a fraction of the protons in a large molecule has previously been shown to lead to faster longitudinal relaxation for the selected protons [K. Pervushin, B. Vögeli, A. Eletsky, Longitudinal 1H relaxation optimization in TROSY NMR spectroscopy, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 124 (2002) 12898-12902; P. Schanda, B. Brutscher, Very fast two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy for real-time investigation of dynamic events in proteins on the time scale of seconds, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 127 (2005) 8014-8015; H.S. Attreya, T. Szyperski, G-matrix Fourier transform NMR spectroscopy for complete protein resonance assignment, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 101 (2004) 9642-9647]. The pool of non-selected protons acts as a "thermal bath" and spin-diffusion processes ("flip-flop" transitions) channel the excess energy from the excited pool to the non-selected protons in regions of the molecule where other relaxation processes can dissipate the excess energy. We present here a sensitivity enhanced HSQC sequence (COST-HSQC), based on one selective E-BURP pulse, which can be used on protonated 15N enriched proteins (with or without 13C isotopic enrichment). This experiment is compared to a gradient sensitivity enhanced HSQC with a water flip-back pulse (the water flip-back pulse quenches the spin diffusion between 1H N and 1H α spins). This experiment is shown to have significant advantages in some circumstances. Some observed limitations, namely sample overheating with short recovery delays and complex longitudinal relaxation behaviour are discussed and analysed.

  17. Cooling overall spin temperature: protein NMR experiments optimized for longitudinal relaxation effects.

    PubMed

    Deschamps, Michaël; Campbell, Iain D

    2006-02-01

    In experiments performed on protonated proteins at high fields, 80% of the NMR spectrometer time is spent waiting for the (1)H atoms to recover their polarization after recording the free induction decay. Selective excitation of a fraction of the protons in a large molecule has previously been shown to lead to faster longitudinal relaxation for the selected protons [K. Pervushin, B. Vögeli, A. Eletsky, Longitudinal (1)H relaxation optimization in TROSY NMR spectroscopy, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 124 (2002) 12898-12902; P. Schanda, B. Brutscher, Very fast two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy for real-time investigation of dynamic events in proteins on the time scale of seconds, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 127 (2005) 8014-8015; H.S. Attreya, T. Szyperski, G-matrix Fourier transform NMR spectroscopy for complete protein resonance assignment, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 101 (2004) 9642-9647]. The pool of non-selected protons acts as a "thermal bath" and spin-diffusion processes ("flip-flop" transitions) channel the excess energy from the excited pool to the non-selected protons in regions of the molecule where other relaxation processes can dissipate the excess energy. We present here a sensitivity enhanced HSQC sequence (COST-HSQC), based on one selective E-BURP pulse, which can be used on protonated (15)N enriched proteins (with or without (13)C isotopic enrichment). This experiment is compared to a gradient sensitivity enhanced HSQC with a water flip-back pulse (the water flip-back pulse quenches the spin diffusion between (1)H(N) and (1)H(alpha) spins). This experiment is shown to have significant advantages in some circumstances. Some observed limitations, namely sample overheating with short recovery delays and complex longitudinal relaxation behaviour are discussed and analysed. PMID:16249110

  18. Design and construction of cost-effective tapered amplifier systems for laser cooling and trapping experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kangara, Jayampathi C. B.; Hachtel, Andrew J.; Gillette, Matthew C.; Barkeloo, Jason T.; Clements, Ethan R.; Bali, Samir; Unks, Brett E.; Proite, Nicholas A.; Yavuz, Deniz D.; Martin, Paul J.; Thorn, Jeremy J.; Steck, Daniel A.

    2014-08-01

    We present plans for the construction and operation of a tapered optical amplifier (TA) system seeded by a single-mode, frequency-tunable, near-IR external-cavity diode laser. Our plans include machine drawings for the parts, electronic circuit diagrams, and information on prices and vendors. Instructions are provided on how to safely couple light into and out of the TA chip. Practical aspects of handling the chip are discussed as well. Because many cold atom experiments require light beams with Gaussian spatial profiles, measurements of the tapered amplifier light output through a single-mode optical fiber are presented as a function of seed intensity, polarization, and driving current.

  19. Investigation Into the Utilization of 3D Printing in Laser Cooling Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazlett, Eric; Nelson, Brandon; de Leon, Sam Diaz; Shaw, Jonah

    2016-05-01

    With the advancement of 3D printing new opportunities are abound in many different fields, but with the balance between the precisions of atomic physics experiments and the material properties of current 3D printers the benefit of 3D printing technology needs to be investigated. We report on the progress of two investigations of 3D printing of benefit to atomic physics experiments: laser feedback module and the other being an optical chopper. The first investigation looks into creation of a 3D printed laser diode feedback module. This 3D printed module would allow for the quick realization of an external cavity diode laser that would have an adjustable cavity distance. We will report on the first tests of this system, by looking at Rb spectroscopy and mode-hop free tuning range as well as possibilities of using these lasers for MOT generation. We will also discuss our investigation into a 3D-printed optical chopper that utilizes an Arduino and a computer hard drive motor. By implementing an additional Arduino we create a low cost way to quickly measure laser beam waists.

  20. Investigation Into the Utilization of 3D Printing in Laser Cooling Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazlett, Eric

    With the advancement of 3D printing new opportunities are abound in many different fields, but with the balance between the precisions of atomic physics experiments and the material properties of current 3D printers the benefit of 3D printing technology needs to be investigated. We report on the progress of two investigations of 3D printing of benefit to atomic physics experiments: laser feedback module and the other being an optical chopper. The first investigation looks into creation of a 3D printed laser diode feedback module. This 3D printed module would allow for the quick realization of an external cavity diode laser that would have an adjustable cavity distance. We will report on the first tests of this system, by looking at Rb spectroscopy and mode-hop free tuning range as well as possibilities of using these lasers for MOT generation. We will also discuss our investigation into a 3D-printed optical chopper that utilizes an Arduino and a computer hard drive motor. By implementing an additional Arduino we create a low cost way to quickly measure laser beam waists

  1. Small helium-cooled infrared telescope experiment for Spacelab-2 (IRT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fazio, Giovanni G.

    1990-01-01

    The Infrared Telescope (IRT) experiment, flown on Spacelab-2, was used to make infrared measurements between 2 and 120 microns. The objectives were multidisciplinary in nature with astrophysical goals of mapping the diffuse cosmic emission and extended infrared sources and technical goals of measuring the induced Shuttle environment, studying properties of superfluid helium in space, and testing various infrared telescope system designs. Astrophysically, new data were obtained on the structure of the Galaxy at near-infrared wavelengths. A summary of the large scale diffuse near-infrared observations of the Galaxy by the IRT is presented, as well as a summary of the preliminary results obtained from this data on the structure of the galactic disk and bulge. The importance of combining CO and near-infrared maps of similar resolution to determine a 3-D model of galactic extinction is demonstrated. The IRT data are used, in conjunction with a proposed galactic model, to make preliminary measurements of the global scale parameters of the Galaxy. During the mission substantial amounts of data were obtained concerning the induced Shuttle environment. An experiment was also performed to measure spacecraft glow in the IR.

  2. Ultraviolet laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry of single-core and multi-core polyaromatic hydrocarbons under variable conditions of collisional cooling: insights into the generation of molecular ions, fragments and oligomers.

    PubMed

    Gámez, Francisco; Hortal, Ana R; Martínez-Haya, Bruno; Soltwisch, Jens; Dreisewerd, Klaus

    2014-11-01

    The ultraviolet laser desorption/ionization of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) has been investigated under different background pressures of an inert gas (up to 1.2 mbar of N2) in the ion source of a hybrid, orthogonal-extracting time-of-flight mass spectrometer (oTOF-MS). The study includes an ensemble of six model PAHs with isolated single polyaromatic cores and four ones with multiple cross-linked aromatic and polyaromatic cores. In combination with a weak ion extraction field, the variation of the buffer gas pressure allowed to control the degree of collisional cooling of the desorbed PAHs and, thus, to modulate their decomposition into fragments. The dominant fragmentation channels observed are related to dehydrogenation of the PAHs, in most cases through the cleavage of even numbers of C-H bonds. Breakage of C-C bonds leading to the fragmentation of rings, side chains and core linkages is also observed, in particular, at low buffer gas pressures. The precise patterns of the combined fragmentation processes vary significantly between the PAHs. The highest abundances of molecular PAH ions and cleanest mass spectra were consistently obtained at the highest buffer gas pressure of 1.2 mbar. The effective quenching of the fragmentation pathways at this elevated pressure improves the sensitivity and data interpretation for analytical applications, although the fragmentation of side chains and of bonds between (poly)aromatic cores is not completely suppressed in all cases. Moreover, these results suggest that the detected fragments are generated through thermal equilibrium processes rather than as a result of rapid photolysis. This assumption is further corroborated by a laser desorption/ionization post-source decay analysis using an axial time-of-flight MS. In line with these findings, covalent oligomers of the PAHs, which are presumably formed by association of two or more dehydrogenated fragments, are detected with higher abundances at the lower buffer gas

  3. Calcium - ionized

    MedlinePlus

    ... at both ionized calcium and calcium attached to proteins. You may need to have a separate ionized calcium test if you have factors that increase or decrease total calcium levels. These may include abnormal blood levels ...

  4. Self-Pressurization and Spray Cooling Simulations of the Multipurpose Hydrogen Test Bed (MHTB) Ground-Based Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kartuzova, O.; Kassemi, M.; Agui, J.; Moder, J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a CFD (computational fluid dynamics) model for simulating the self-pressurization of a large scale liquid hydrogen storage tank. In this model, the kinetics-based Schrage equation is used to account for the evaporative and condensing interfacial mass flows. Laminar and turbulent approaches to modeling natural convection in the tank and heat and mass transfer at the interface are compared. The flow, temperature, and interfacial mass fluxes predicted by these two approaches during tank self-pressurization are compared against each other. The ullage pressure and vapor temperature evolutions are also compared against experimental data obtained from the MHTB (Multipuprpose Hydrogen Test Bed) self-pressurization experiment. A CFD model for cooling cryogenic storage tanks by spraying cold liquid in the ullage is also presented. The Euler- Lagrange approach is utilized for tracking the spray droplets and for modeling interaction between the droplets and the continuous phase (ullage). The spray model is coupled with the VOF (volume of fluid) model by performing particle tracking in the ullage, removing particles from the ullage when they reach the interface, and then adding their contributions to the liquid. Droplet ullage heat and mass transfer are modeled. The flow, temperature, and interfacial mass flux predicted by the model are presented. The ullage pressure is compared with experimental data obtained from the MHTB spray bar mixing experiment. The results of the models with only droplet/ullage heat transfer and with heat and mass transfer between the droplets and ullage are compared.

  5. Stochastic cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Bisognano, J.; Leemann, C.

    1982-03-01

    Stochastic cooling is the damping of betatron oscillations and momentum spread of a particle beam by a feedback system. In its simplest form, a pickup electrode detects the transverse positions or momenta of particles in a storage ring, and the signal produced is amplified and applied downstream to a kicker. The time delay of the cable and electronics is designed to match the transit time of particles along the arc of the storage ring between the pickup and kicker so that an individual particle receives the amplified version of the signal it produced at the pick-up. If there were only a single particle in the ring, it is obvious that betatron oscillations and momentum offset could be damped. However, in addition to its own signal, a particle receives signals from other beam particles. In the limit of an infinite number of particles, no damping could be achieved; we have Liouville's theorem with constant density of the phase space fluid. For a finite, albeit large number of particles, there remains a residue of the single particle damping which is of practical use in accumulating low phase space density beams of particles such as antiprotons. It was the realization of this fact that led to the invention of stochastic cooling by S. van der Meer in 1968. Since its conception, stochastic cooling has been the subject of much theoretical and experimental work. The earliest experiments were performed at the ISR in 1974, with the subsequent ICE studies firmly establishing the stochastic cooling technique. This work directly led to the design and construction of the Antiproton Accumulator at CERN and the beginnings of p anti p colliding beam physics at the SPS. Experiments in stochastic cooling have been performed at Fermilab in collaboration with LBL, and a design is currently under development for a anti p accumulator for the Tevatron.

  6. Developing Young Researchers: 15 Years of Authentic Science Experiences for K-12 with NASA's S'COOL Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, L. H.; Crecelius, S.; Rogerson, T.; Lewis, P. M.; Moore, S.; Madigan, J. J.; Deller, C.; Taylor, J.

    2012-12-01

    In late 1996, members of the Atmospheric Science Directorate at NASA's Langley Research Center decided that there had to be a better way to share the excitement of our research than black and white, text-heavy Fact Sheets. We invited a group of local teachers to a half-day session on Center to help guide an improved approach. We suggested a variety of approaches to them, and asked for feedback. They were eager for anything other than black and white Fact Sheets! Fortunately, one local middle school science teacher took us up on the offer to stick around and talk over lunch. In that conversation, she said that anything that would connect the science her kids studied in the classroom to the outside world - especially to NASA! - would be very motivating to her students. From that conversation was born the Students' Cloud Observations On-Line (S'COOL Project), now a nearly 16-year experiment in K-12 science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) engagement. S'COOL is the Education and Public Outreach (EPO) arm of the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) project, and involves K-12 students as a source of ground truth for satellite cloud retrievals. It was designed from the beginning as a 2-way project, with communication of information from the students to NASA, but also from NASA back to the students. With technology evolution since the project began, we have continued to enhance this focus on 2-way interaction. S'COOL involves students with observation skills, math skills (to compute cloud cover from multiple observers or convert units), geography skills (locating their school on a map and comparing to satellite imagery), and exposes them to cutting edge engineering in the form of a series of NASA satellites. As a priority Earth Observing Instrument, CERES currently flies on Terra, Aqua and NPP, with an additional instrument in development for JPSS. Students are involved in occasional Intensive Observing Periods (as with the launch of NPP), and are

  7. Evaluation of combined matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry experiments for peptide mass fingerprinting analysis.

    PubMed

    da Silva, David; Wasselin, Thierry; Carré, Vincent; Chaimbault, Patrick; Bezdetnaya, Lina; Maunit, Benoît; Muller, Jean-François

    2011-07-15

    Peptide Mass Fingerprinting (PMF) is still of significant interest in proteomics because it allows a large number of complex samples to be rapidly screened and characterized. The main part of post-translational modifications is generally preserved. In some specific cases, PMF suffers from ambiguous or unsuccessful identification. In order to improve its reliability, a combined approach using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOFMS) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (MALDI-FTICRMS) was evaluated. The study was carried out on bovine serum albumin (BSA) digest. The influence of several important parameters (the matrix, the sample preparation method, the amount of the analyte) on the MOWSE score and the protein sequence coverage were evaluated to allow the identification of specific effects. A careful investigation of the sequence coverage obtained by each kind of experiment ensured the detection of specific peptides for each experimental condition. Results highlighted that DHB-FTICRMS and DHB- or CHCA-TOFMS are the most suited combinations of experimental conditions to achieve PMF analysis. The association (convolution) of the data obtained by each of these techniques ensured a significant increase in the MOWSE score and the protein sequence coverage. PMID:21638364

  8. Towards Laser Cooling Trapped Ions with Telecom Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dungan, Kristina; Becker, Patrick; Donoghue, Liz; Liu, Jackie; Olmschenk, Steven

    2015-05-01

    Quantum information has many potential applications in communication, atomic clocks, and the precision measurement of fundamental constants. Trapped ions are excellent candidates for applications in quantum information because of their isolation from external perturbations, and the precise control afforded by laser cooling and manipulation of the quantum state. For many applications in quantum communication, it would be advantageous to interface ions with telecom light. We present progress towards laser cooling and trapping of doubly-ionized lanthanum, which should require only infrared, telecom-compatible light. Additionally, we present progress on optimization of a second-harmonic generation cavity for laser cooling and trapping barium ions, for future sympathetic cooling experiments. This research is supported by the Army Research Office, Research Corporation for Science Advancement, and Denison University.

  9. ION-BY-ION COOLING EFFICIENCIES

    SciTech Connect

    Gnat, Orly; Ferland, Gary J.

    2012-03-01

    We present ion-by-ion cooling efficiencies for low-density gas. We use Cloudy (version 10.00) to estimate the cooling efficiencies for each ion of the first 30 elements (H-Zn) individually. We present results for gas temperatures between 10{sup 4} and 10{sup 8} K, assuming low densities and optically thin conditions. When nonequilibrium ionization plays a significant role the ionization states deviate from those that obtain in collisional ionization equilibrium (CIE), and the local cooling efficiency at any given temperature depends on specific nonequilibrium ion fractions. The results presented here allow for an efficient estimate of the total cooling efficiency for any ionic composition. We also list the elemental cooling efficiencies assuming CIE conditions. These can be used to construct CIE cooling efficiencies for non-solar abundance ratios or to estimate the cooling due to elements not included in any nonequilibrium computation. All the computational results are listed in convenient online tables.

  10. Measurements of Ionization Cross Sections by Molecular Beam Experiments: Information Content on the Imaginary Part of the Optical Potential.

    PubMed

    Falcinelli, Stefano; Rosi, Marzio; Pirani, Fernando; Stranges, Domenico; Vecchiocattivi, Franco

    2016-07-14

    In this work, we present and analyze in detail new and recent ionization cross section and mass spectrum determinations, collected in the case of He*, Ne*-H2O, -H2S, and -NH3 ionizing collisions. These sets of data, obtained under the same experimental conditions, are relevant to identify differences in the autoionization stereodynamics of the three hydrogenated molecules and on the selective role of the imaginary part of the optical potential. We demonstrate that in these autoionization processes hydrogen and halogen bonds are competing because they are controlling both real and imaginary components of the optical potential that drives the complete reaction dynamics. In particular, we found that both components critically depend on the angular and radial approach between the reagent partners in determining the collision dynamics. PMID:26938026