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Sample records for ionization potentially produced

  1. HF echoes from ionization potentially produced by high-altitude discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Roussel-Dupre, R.; Fitzgerald, T.J.; Symbalisty, E.

    1997-04-01

    In this paper the authors report on recent radar measurements taken during the month of October 1994 with the LDG HF radar in the Ivory Coast, Africa as part of the International Equatorial Electrojet Year. The purpose of this experimental effort in part was to study the effects of thunderstorms on the ionosphere. At the same time, the authors decided to carry out a set of experiments of an exploratory nature to look for echoes that could potentially arise from ionization produced in the mesosphere. The two leading candidates for producing transient ionization in the mesosphere are meteors and high-altitude discharges. Each is discussed in the context of these measurements.

  2. HF echoes from ionization potentially produced by high-altitude discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Roussel-Dupre, R.A.; Blanc, E.

    1997-03-01

    The presence of ionization associated with high-altitude discharges has been detected using an HF radar operating at 2.2, 2.5, and 2.8 MHz. On several occasions, oblique echoes lasting several hundred ms at night and 1{r_arrow}10s during the day were observed. The echoes turned on in several interpulse times of 70 ms and were generally correlated with strong lightning activity prior to onset. The angles of arrival of sferics detected at three goniometer stations were used to determine the distance to thunderstorms. The data are consistent with specular reflections from columns of ionization produced at 55{endash}65 km altitude and having minimum electron densities of 6{times}10{sup 4}{endash}10{sup 5}cm{sup {minus}3}. The source of the ionization is believed to be high-altitude discharges.{copyright} 1997 American Geophysical Union

  3. Ionization potentials of seaborgium

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, E.; Pershina, V.; Fricke, B.

    1999-10-21

    Multiconfiguration relativistic Dirac-Fock values were calculated for the first six ionization potentials of seaborgium and of the other group 6 elements. No experimental ionization potentials are available for seaborgium. Accurate experimental values are not available for all of the other ionization potentials. Ionic radii for the 4+ through 6+ ions of seaborgium are also presented. The ionization potentials and ionic radii obtained will be used to predict some physiochemical properties of seaborgium and its compounds.

  4. Ionization Potentials for Isoelectronic Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agmon, Noam

    1988-01-01

    Presents a quantitative treatment of ionization potentials of isoelectronic atoms. By looking at the single-electron view of calculating the total energy of an atom, trends in the screening and effective quantum number parameters are examined. Approaches the question of determining electron affinities. (CW)

  5. On the ionization potential of molecular oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samson, J. A. R.; Gardner, J. L.

    1974-01-01

    The ionization potential of O2 was measured by the technique of high resolution photoelectron spectroscopy taking into account the influence of rotational structure on the shape of the vibrational bands. A value of 12.071 + or - .001 eV (1027.1 + or - 0.1 A) was found for the ionization potential. A lowering of the ionization potential caused by a branch-head when delta N = -2 gave an appearance potential for ionization of 12.068 + or - .001 eV (1027.4 + or - 0.1 A).

  6. Thermochromic behaviors and ionization potentials of organopolysilanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Kenji; Yokoyama, Masaaki

    1989-04-01

    Ionization potentials of organopolysilanes with different kinds of substituents were evaluated from the low energy photo-electron emission measurements in air. An aryl-substituted organopolysilane capable of σ - π mixing between Si backbone σ and side-group π electrons gave smaller ionization potential by about 0.1˜0.15 eV compared with alkyl-substituted organopolysilanes. The value of ionization potentials in some alkyl-substituted organopolysilanes which showed thermochromic behaviors was found to vary substantially with thermally induced reversible changes in polymer backbone conformation, indicating that the effective conjugation length of σ electrons decreases above the thermochromic transition temperature.

  7. Measurement of the first ionization potential of astatine by laser ionization spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothe, S.; Andreyev, A. N.; Antalic, S.; Borschevsky, A.; Capponi, L.; Cocolios, T. E.; de Witte, H.; Eliav, E.; Fedorov, D. V.; Fedosseev, V. N.; Fink, D. A.; Fritzsche, S.; Ghys, L.; Huyse, M.; Imai, N.; Kaldor, U.; Kudryavtsev, Yuri; Köster, U.; Lane, J. F. W.; Lassen, J.; Liberati, V.; Lynch, K. M.; Marsh, B. A.; Nishio, K.; Pauwels, D.; Pershina, V.; Popescu, L.; Procter, T. J.; Radulov, D.; Raeder, S.; Rajabali, M. M.; Rapisarda, E.; Rossel, R. E.; Sandhu, K.; Seliverstov, M. D.; Sjödin, A. M.; van den Bergh, P.; van Duppen, P.; Venhart, M.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Wendt, K. D. A.

    2013-05-01

    The radioactive element astatine exists only in trace amounts in nature. Its properties can therefore only be explored by study of the minute quantities of artificially produced isotopes or by performing theoretical calculations. One of the most important properties influencing the chemical behaviour is the energy required to remove one electron from the valence shell, referred to as the ionization potential. Here we use laser spectroscopy to probe the optical spectrum of astatine near the ionization threshold. The observed series of Rydberg states enabled the first determination of the ionization potential of the astatine atom, 9.31751(8) eV. New ab initio calculations are performed to support the experimental result. The measured value serves as a benchmark for quantum chemistry calculations of the properties of astatine as well as for the theoretical prediction of the ionization potential of superheavy element 117, the heaviest homologue of astatine.

  8. Measurement of the first ionization potential of astatine by laser ionization spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Rothe, S.; Andreyev, A. N.; Antalic, S.; Borschevsky, A.; Capponi, L.; Cocolios, T. E.; De Witte, H.; Eliav, E.; Fedorov, D. V.; Fedosseev, V. N.; Fink, D. A.; Fritzsche, S.; Ghys, L.; Huyse, M.; Imai, N.; Kaldor, U.; Kudryavtsev, Yuri; Köster, U.; Lane, J. F. W.; Lassen, J.; Liberati, V.; Lynch, K. M.; Marsh, B. A.; Nishio, K.; Pauwels, D.; Pershina, V.; Popescu, L.; Procter, T. J.; Radulov, D.; Raeder, S.; Rajabali, M. M.; Rapisarda, E.; Rossel, R. E.; Sandhu, K.; Seliverstov, M. D.; Sjödin, A. M.; Van den Bergh, P.; Van Duppen, P.; Venhart, M.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Wendt, K. D. A.

    2013-01-01

    The radioactive element astatine exists only in trace amounts in nature. Its properties can therefore only be explored by study of the minute quantities of artificially produced isotopes or by performing theoretical calculations. One of the most important properties influencing the chemical behaviour is the energy required to remove one electron from the valence shell, referred to as the ionization potential. Here we use laser spectroscopy to probe the optical spectrum of astatine near the ionization threshold. The observed series of Rydberg states enabled the first determination of the ionization potential of the astatine atom, 9.31751(8) eV. New ab initio calculations are performed to support the experimental result. The measured value serves as a benchmark for quantum chemistry calculations of the properties of astatine as well as for the theoretical prediction of the ionization potential of superheavy element 117, the heaviest homologue of astatine. PMID:23673620

  9. Measurement of the first ionization potential of astatine by laser ionization spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rothe, S; Andreyev, A N; Antalic, S; Borschevsky, A; Capponi, L; Cocolios, T E; De Witte, H; Eliav, E; Fedorov, D V; Fedosseev, V N; Fink, D A; Fritzsche, S; Ghys, L; Huyse, M; Imai, N; Kaldor, U; Kudryavtsev, Yuri; Köster, U; Lane, J F W; Lassen, J; Liberati, V; Lynch, K M; Marsh, B A; Nishio, K; Pauwels, D; Pershina, V; Popescu, L; Procter, T J; Radulov, D; Raeder, S; Rajabali, M M; Rapisarda, E; Rossel, R E; Sandhu, K; Seliverstov, M D; Sjödin, A M; Van den Bergh, P; Van Duppen, P; Venhart, M; Wakabayashi, Y; Wendt, K D A

    2013-01-01

    The radioactive element astatine exists only in trace amounts in nature. Its properties can therefore only be explored by study of the minute quantities of artificially produced isotopes or by performing theoretical calculations. One of the most important properties influencing the chemical behaviour is the energy required to remove one electron from the valence shell, referred to as the ionization potential. Here we use laser spectroscopy to probe the optical spectrum of astatine near the ionization threshold. The observed series of Rydberg states enabled the first determination of the ionization potential of the astatine atom, 9.31751(8) eV. New ab initio calculations are performed to support the experimental result. The measured value serves as a benchmark for quantum chemistry calculations of the properties of astatine as well as for the theoretical prediction of the ionization potential of superheavy element 117, the heaviest homologue of astatine. PMID:23673620

  10. Theoretical determinations of ionization potentials of dopamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, J. F.; Yu, Z. Y.

    2013-04-01

    Adiabatic and vertical ionization potentials (IPs) of nine conformers of dopamine in the gas phase are determined using density functional theory (DFT) B3LYP, B3P86, B3PW91 methods and high level ab initio HF method with 6-311++G** basis set, respectively. And the nine stable cationic states have been found in the ionization process of dopamine. Vertical ionization potentials of nine conformers of dopamine are calculated using the older outer-valence Green's function (OVGF) calculations at 6-311++G** basis set. Vibrational frequencies and infrared spectrum intensities of G1b and G1b+ at B3LYP/6-311++G** level are discussed.

  11. The lowest ionization potentials of Al2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Barnes, Leslie A.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1988-01-01

    Potential curves for the lowest two electronic states (X 2 sigma g + and A 2 pi u) of Al2(+) were computed using complete active space SCF/multireference CI wave functions and large Gaussian basis sets. The lowest observable vertical ionization potential (to Al2(+) X 2 sigma g +) of the Al2 X 3 pi u ground state is calculated to occur around 6.1 eV, in excellent agreement with the experimental range of 6.0 to 6.42 eV obtained in recent cluster ionization studies by Cox and co-workers. The second vertical ionization potential (to Al2(+) A 2 pi u) occurs near 6.4 eV, also within the experimental range. The adiabatic IP of 5.90 eV is in good agreement with the value of 5.8 to 6.1 eV deduced by Hanley and co-workers from the difference in thresholds between collision induced dissociation processes of Al3(+). The computed IP values are somewhat larger than those deduced from branching ratios in cluster fragmentation experiments by Jarrold and co-workers. The observation of an ionization threshold below 6.42 eV is shown to be incompatible with an Al2 ground electronic state assignment of 3 sigma g -, but the separation between the two lowest states of Al2 is so small that it is likely that both are populated in the experiments, so that this does not provide unambiguous support for the recent theoretical assignment of the ground state as 3 pi u.

  12. Femtosecond Laser Ionization of Organic Amines with Very Low Ionization Potential.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatsuhashi, Tomoyuki; Obayashi, Takashi; Tanaka, Michinori; Murakami, Masanao; Nakashima, Nobuaki

    2006-03-01

    The interaction between high intensity femtosecond laser and molecules is one of the most attractive areas in laser chemistry and ionization is the most fundamental subject. Theoretical consideration successfully reproduced the ionization behavior of rare gases. However, the understanding of ionization mechanisms of large molecules is difficult more than those of rare gases due to their complexity. Generally speaking, molecules are harder to ionize than rare gases even if they have the same ionization potential. The suppressed ionization phenomena are one of the important features of molecular ionization. Hankin et al. examined 23 organic molecules with ionization potentials between 8.25 and 11.52 eV. We have examined ionization and/ or fragmentation of many organic molecules, including aromatic compounds, halogenated compounds, methane derivatives etc. at various wavelengths below 10^16 Wcm-2. In order to investigate the nature of molecular ionization, it is interesting to examine a variety of molecule in a wide range of ionization potential. In this study, we examined several organic amines because we can explore the uninvestigated ionization potential range down to 5.95 eV. In addition to the significant suppression of the ionization rates, stepwise ionization behavior, which was not observed in rare gases, was observed.

  13. What produces the ionizing background at large redshift?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miralda-Escude, Jordi; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented from mathematical and modeling studies to make estimates of the intensity of the ionizing background more definite and quantitative. It is shown that the observed quasars fail to emit sufficient ionizing radiation to satisfy the Gunn-Peterson test. Two possible sources for the additional source of UV radiation are examined: main-sequence, high mass stars in primordial galaxies and quasars that have not been observed because of dust obscuration. Both of these models satisfy the observational constraints with reasonable parameters. It is suggested that observations of He lines from Ly-alpha clouds or an analysis of the line ratios in metal line absorption systems may be used to determine which sources produce the ionizing background.

  14. Plasma Bragg density gratings produced by optical-field ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Lule; Sheng Zhengming; Zhang Jie

    2009-11-15

    Plasma Bragg density gratings produced by optical-field ionization in underdense gas under the irradiation of two counterpropagating laser pulses at laser intensities around 10{sup 13} W/cm{sup 2} are investigated by particle-in-cell simulation. The grating is composed of interlacing layers of neutral gas and plasma (or partially ionized gas) with its density and period controlled by the initial gas density, laser wavelengths, and intersecting angles of the two laser pulses. The study shows that such gratings have a longer lifetime, about nanoseconds, as compared with those driven by the laser ponderomotive force at higher laser intensities around 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}. They may be used for phase-matched high-harmonic generation, laser self-guiding, laser pulse compression and stretching, etc.

  15. Determination of the first ionization potential of actinium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roßnagel, J.; Raeder, S.; Hakimi, A.; Ferrer, R.; Trautmann, N.; Wendt, K.

    2012-01-01

    Using resonance ionization spectroscopy the first-ionization potential of actinium has been determined by analyzing different Rydberg series in two-color resonant laser excitation. Three individual Rydberg series were investigated, converging toward the ionic ground state and toward the first- and second-excited state of the actinium ion, respectively. A combined analysis of the convergence limits leads to a consistent value for the first-ionization potential of Ac of 43394.45(19)cm-1, equivalent to 5.380226(24) eV.

  16. Ionizing potential waves and high-voltage breakdown streamers.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albright, N. W.; Tidman, D. A.

    1972-01-01

    The structure of ionizing potential waves driven by a strong electric field in a dense gas is discussed. Negative breakdown waves are found to propagate with a velocity proportional to the electric field normal to the wavefront. This causes a curved ionizing potential wavefront to focus down into a filamentary structure, and may provide the reason why breakdown in dense gases propagates in the form of a narrow leader streamer instead of a broad wavefront.

  17. Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence and the First Ionization Potential (FIP) Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laming, J. Martin

    2010-05-01

    The FIP Effect is the elemental abundance anomaly observed in the solar corona and slow speed solar wind, whereby elements with First Ionization Potential (FIP) less than about 10 eV (e.g. Mg, Si, Fe) are enhanced in Elements with FIP higher than 10 eV (e.g. C, N, O) are essentially unchanged. This fractionation is assumed to occur in the solar chromosphere, since the low FIP elements are predominantly ionized here, while the high FIP elements are neutral. The abundance enhancement is currently explained by the upward action of the ponderomotive force on chromospheric ions, but not neutrals, as Alfven waves generated in the corona reflect from the steep chromospheric density gradients at each footpoint. The fractionation so produced is almost independent of ion mass as observed, and is stronger for closed coronal loops than for open field lines, also as observed. I will describe some recent results from models of the FIP effect, including the role of slow mode waves generated by the ponderomotive force of coherent Alfven waves in saturating the abundance enhancement. Work supported by NASA Contract NNGH05HL39I, and by basic research funds of the Office of Naval Research.

  18. Determination of the first ionization potential of technetium

    SciTech Connect

    Mattolat, C.; Gottwald, T.; Raeder, S.; Rothe, S.; Schwellnus, F.; Wendt, K.; Thoerle-Pospiech, P.; Trautmann, N.

    2010-05-15

    The first ionization potential (IP) of technetium (Tc) has been determined by evaluating Rydberg convergences toward the first ionization potential as well as toward two low-lying excited states of the singly charged Tc ion. The Rydberg states were excited and detected by applying multiphoton resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) on the long-lived isotope {sup 99g}Tc using a three-color excitation scheme. The observed Rydberg convergences yield a result for the first ionization potential of Tc V{sub IP}(Tc)=7.119380(32) eV. This precise value for V{sub IP}(Tc) is somewhat lower than the so far published data of 7.23 eV or 7.28 eV, dating back to the 1950s.

  19. Photon acceleration via laser-produced ionization fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Savage, R.L. Jr.; Brogle, R.P.; Mori, W.B.; Joshi, C.

    1992-01-01

    Microwave radiation has been upshifted in frequency and compressed in duration by more than a factor of five via its interaction with a relativistically propagating, underdense ionization front. The experimental observations are in good agreement with theoretical predictions.

  20. Photon acceleration via laser-produced ionization fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Savage, R.L. Jr.; Brogle, R.P.; Mori, W.B.; Joshi, C.

    1992-12-31

    Microwave radiation has been upshifted in frequency and compressed in duration by more than a factor of five via its interaction with a relativistically propagating, underdense ionization front. The experimental observations are in good agreement with theoretical predictions.

  1. Inner-shell and double ionization potentials of aminophenol isomers.

    SciTech Connect

    Kryzhevoi, N. V.; Santra, R.; Cederbaum, L. S.

    2011-01-01

    A comprehensive study of single and double core ionization potentials of the aminophenol molecule is reported. The role of relaxation, correlation, relativistic, and basis set effects in these potentials is clarified. Special attention is paid to the isomer dependence of the single and double core ionization potentials. Some of them are also compared with the respective values of the phenol and aniline molecules. It is shown that the core level single ionization potentials of the para-, meta-, and ortho-aminophenol molecules differ only slightly from each other, rendering these structural isomers challenging to distinguish for conventional x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. In contrast, the energy needed to remove two core electrons from different atoms depends noticeably on the mutual arrangement and even on the relative orientations of the hydroxyl and amine groups. Together with the electrostatic repulsion between the two core holes, relaxation effects accompanying double core ionization play a crucial role here. The pronounced sensitivity of the double ionization potentials, therefore, enables a spectroscopic characterization of the electronic structure of aminophenol isomers by means of x-ray two-photon photoelectron spectroscopy.

  2. Determination of Ionization Potential of Calcium by High-Resolution Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyabe, Masabumi; Geppert, Christopher; Kato, Masaaki; Oba, Masaki; Wakaida, Ikuo; Watanabe, Kazuo; Wendt, Klaus D. A.

    2006-03-01

    High-resolution resonance ionization spectroscopy has been utilized to determine a precise ionization potential of Ca. Three-step resonance excitation with single-mode extended-cavity diode lasers populates long and unperturbed Rydberg series of 4snp (1P1) and 4snf (1F3) states in the range of n=20--150. Using an extended Ritz formula for quantum defects, the series convergence limit has been determined to be 49305.9240(20) cm-1 with the accuracy improved one order of magnitude higher than previously reported ones.

  3. Ionization potentials of large sodium doped ammonia clusters.

    PubMed

    Steinbach, C; Buck, U

    2005-04-01

    In a continuous neat supersonic expansion ammonia clusters are generated and doped with sodium atoms in a pickup cell. Thus clusters of the form Na(NH(3))(n) are produced that are photoionized by a tunable dye laser system. The ions are mass analyzed in a reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer, and the wavelength dependent ion signals serve for the determination of the ionization potentials (IP) of the different clusters in the size range 10< or =n< or =1500. Aside from a plateau for 10< or =n< or =17 and smaller steps at n=24, 35, and 59 on the average a continuous decrease of the IP with cluster size is observed. The IPs in this size range are linear with (n+1)(-13) and extrapolate to IP(n=infinity)=1.66+/-0.01 eV. The slope is consistent with a dielectric continuum model of the solvated electron and the dielectric constant of the solid. The extrapolated IPs are compared with results obtained for negative ammonia cluster ions and metallic solutions in liquid ammonia. Differences are explained by the presence of counterions and their various distances from the solvated electron. PMID:15847459

  4. Ionization potentials of large sodium doped ammonia clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbach, C.; Buck, U.

    2005-04-01

    In a continuous neat supersonic expansion ammonia clusters are generated and doped with sodium atoms in a pickup cell. Thus clusters of the form Na(NH3)n are produced that are photoionized by a tunable dye laser system. The ions are mass analyzed in a reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer, and the wavelength dependent ion signals serve for the determination of the ionization potentials (IP) of the different clusters in the size range 10⩽n ⩽1500. Aside from a plateau for 10⩽n⩽17 and smaller steps at n =24, 35, and 59 on the average a continuous decrease of the IP with cluster size is observed. The IPs in this size range are linear with (n+1)-1/3 and extrapolate to IP (n=∞)=1.66±0.01eV. The slope is consistent with a dielectric continuum model of the solvated electron and the dielectric constant of the solid. The extrapolated IPs are compared with results obtained for negative ammonia cluster ions and metallic solutions in liquid ammonia. Differences are explained by the presence of counterions and their various distances from the solvated electron.

  5. Radioprotective Potential of Plants and Herbs against the Effects of Ionizing Radiation

    PubMed Central

    C. Jagetia, Ganesh

    2007-01-01

    Ionizing radiations produce deleterious effects in the living organisms and the rapid technological advancement has increased human exposure to ionizing radiations enormously. There is a need to protect humans against such effects of ionizing radiation. Attempts to protect against the deleterious effects of ionizing radiations by pharmacological intervention were made as early as 1949 and efforts are continued to search radioprotectors, which may be of great help for human application. This review mainly dwells on the radioprotective potential of plant and herbal extracts. The results obtained from in vitro and in vivo studies indicate that several botanicals such as Gingko biloba, Centella asiatica, Hippophae rhamnoides, Ocimum sanctum, Panax ginseng, Podophyllum hexandrum, Amaranthus paniculatus, Emblica officinalis, Phyllanthus amarus, Piper longum, Tinospora cordifoila, Mentha arvensis, Mentha piperita, Syzygium cumini, Zingiber officinale, Ageratum conyzoides, Aegle marmelos and Aphanamixis polystachya protect against radiation-induced lethality, lipid peroxidation and DNA damage. The fractionation-guided evaluation may help to develop new radioprotectors of desired activities. PMID:18188408

  6. High Rydberg states of DABCO: Spectroscopy, ionization potential, and comparison with mass analyzed threshold ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boogaarts, Maarten G. H.; Holleman, Iwan; Jongma, Rienk T.; Parker, David H.; Meijer, Gerard; Even, Uzi

    1996-03-01

    Doubly-resonant excitation/vibrational autoionization is used to accurately determine the ionization potential (IP) of the highly symmetric caged amine 1,4 diazabicyclo[2,2,2]octane (DABCO). The IP of DABCO excited with one quantum of the ν24(e') vibration lies at (59 048.62±0.03) cm-1, based on fitting 56 components of the npxy Rydberg series (δ=0.406±0.002) to the Rydberg formula. Rydberg state transition energies and linewidths are determined using standard calibration and linefitting techniques. The IP determined from Rydberg state extrapolation is compared with that determined by mass analyzed threshold ionization (MATI). Effects of static electric fields on MATI signals measured for the high Rydberg states are discussed.

  7. Ionization potential for excited S states of the lithium atom

    SciTech Connect

    Puchalski, M.; KePdziera, D.; Pachucki, K.

    2010-12-15

    Nonrelativistic, relativistic, quantum electrodynamic, and finite nuclear mass corrections to the energy levels are obtained for the nS{sub 1/2},n=3,...,9 states of the lithium atom. Computational approach is based on the explicitly correlated Hylleraas functions with the analytic integration and recursion relations. Theoretical predictions for the ionization potential of nS{sub 1/2} states and transition energies nS{sub 1/2{yields}}2S{sub 1/2} are compared to known experimental values for {sup 6,7}Li isotopes.

  8. Ionization potential depression for non equilibrated aluminum plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calisti, A.; Ferri, S.; Talin, B.

    2015-11-01

    A classical molecular dynamics simulation model, designed to simulate neutral plasmas with various charge states of a given atom together with electrons, is used to investigate the ionization potential depression (IPD) in dense plasmas. The IPD is discussed for aluminum plasma at and out of equilibrium. The simulation results are compared with those of earlier theoretical models and with experimental data obtained in the framework of x-ray free-electron laser experiments. The model proposed in this work appears as an important tool to provide data for further discussion on IPD models.

  9. Potential of Lactic Streptococci to Produce Bacteriocin

    PubMed Central

    Geis, Arnold; Singh, Jasjit; Teuber, Michael

    1983-01-01

    A survey was made on the bacteriocin-producing potential of lactic streptococci. Bacteriocin-like activities were isolated and partially purified from about 5% of the 280 strains investigated. The frequency of production varied from about 1% in Streptococcus lactis subsp. diacetylactis to 9 and 7.5% in S. lactis and Streptococcus cremoris, respectively. Eight strains of S. cremoris produced bacteriocins which, on the basis of heat stability at different pH values and inhibitory spectrum, could be divided into four types. From 54 S. lactis strains, 5 strains produced inhibitory substances, namely, three nisin-like antibiotics and two different bacteriocins. Only 1 of 93 S. lactis subsp. diacetylactis strains produced a bacteriocin which was very similar to bacteriocins of type I in S. cremoris. All of the bacteriocins that were partially purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation showed very limited inhibitory spectra. Most of the lactic streptococci and a few members of the genera Clostridium, Leuconostoc, and Pediococcus were inhibited. None of the bacteriocins acted on gram-negative bacteria. The bacteriocinogenic strains were also characterized on the basis of plasmid content. All strains possessed between one and nine plasmids ranging from 1 to 50 megadaltons. Images PMID:16346166

  10. Bacillus subtilis as potential producer for polyhydroxyalkanoates

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Mamtesh; Patel, Sanjay KS; Kalia, Vipin C

    2009-01-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are biodegradable polymers produced by microbes to overcome environmental stress. Commercial production of PHAs is limited by the high cost of production compared to conventional plastics. Another hindrance is the brittle nature and low strength of polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB), the most widely studied PHA. The needs are to produce PHAs, which have better elastomeric properties suitable for biomedical applications, preferably from inexpensive renewable sources to reduce cost. Certain unique properties of Bacillus subtilis such as lack of the toxic lipo-polysaccharides, expression of self-lysing genes on completion of PHA biosynthetic process – for easy and timely recovery, usage of biowastes as feed enable it to compete as potential candidate for commercial production of PHA. PMID:19619289

  11. Effect of Coulomb Collisions on the Gravitational Settling of Low and High First Ionization Potential Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bø, Iselin M. Th.; Esser, Ruth; Lie-Svendsen, Øystein

    2013-05-01

    We model the effect of gravitational settling in the upper chromosphere on O, Fe, Si, and Ne, studying whether Coulomb collisions between ionized low First Ionization Potential (FIP) elements and protons is sufficient to cause abundance enhancements relative to oxygen. We find that low-FIP abundance enhancements comparable to observed values can be obtained provided the hydrogen ionization degree lies in the approximate range 10%-30%, which agrees with chromospheric models. Lower or higher hydrogen ionization causes the FIP-effect to become smaller or absent (depletion of all heavy elements). Iron must be almost fully ionized in order to become enriched relative to high-FIP elements, and this requires a high iron photoionization rate. The time scale necessary to produce the enrichment increases rapidly with increasing H ionization. For iron in a background from a semiempirical chromospheric model, with an H ion fraction of the order of 30%-40% in the upper chromosphere, 1-2 hr of settling is required to produce enhancements comparable to observations. The absolute abundance (relative to H), which monotonically decreases with time during settling, has by that time decreased by less than 50% in the same altitude region. With the same background conditions, the silicon abundance is more strongly enhanced by the settling than the iron abundance. The high-FIP element neon is depleted, relative to O and low-FIP elements, in the same background and altitude region where iron is enhanced, typically by 50% or more relative to O after 1-2 hr of settling.

  12. EFFECT OF COULOMB COLLISIONS ON THE GRAVITATIONAL SETTLING OF LOW AND HIGH FIRST IONIZATION POTENTIAL ELEMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Bo, Iselin M. Th.; Esser, Ruth; Lie-Svendsen, Oystein E-mail: ruth.esser@uit.no

    2013-05-20

    We model the effect of gravitational settling in the upper chromosphere on O, Fe, Si, and Ne, studying whether Coulomb collisions between ionized low First Ionization Potential (FIP) elements and protons is sufficient to cause abundance enhancements relative to oxygen. We find that low-FIP abundance enhancements comparable to observed values can be obtained provided the hydrogen ionization degree lies in the approximate range 10%-30%, which agrees with chromospheric models. Lower or higher hydrogen ionization causes the FIP-effect to become smaller or absent (depletion of all heavy elements). Iron must be almost fully ionized in order to become enriched relative to high-FIP elements, and this requires a high iron photoionization rate. The time scale necessary to produce the enrichment increases rapidly with increasing H ionization. For iron in a background from a semiempirical chromospheric model, with an H ion fraction of the order of 30%-40% in the upper chromosphere, 1-2 hr of settling is required to produce enhancements comparable to observations. The absolute abundance (relative to H), which monotonically decreases with time during settling, has by that time decreased by less than 50% in the same altitude region. With the same background conditions, the silicon abundance is more strongly enhanced by the settling than the iron abundance. The high-FIP element neon is depleted, relative to O and low-FIP elements, in the same background and altitude region where iron is enhanced, typically by 50% or more relative to O after 1-2 hr of settling.

  13. A plea for a reexamination of ionization potential depression measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iglesias, Carlos A.

    2014-09-01

    Experiments at the Linac Coherent Light Source determined the ionization potential depression (IPD) in dense plasmas by measuring the Kα fluorescence associated with K-shell holes created by the X-ray free-electron laser. The analysis of the experimental spectrum found a significantly larger IPD than predicted by the widely used Stewart-Pyatt model. It is shown, however, that a more accurate treatment of atomic levels than used in the analysis has additional channels reducing the threshold laser energy for creating Kα photons without invoking an increase in the IPD. Thus, it is argued that a simulation of the Kα fluorescence using improved atomic data could impact the interpretation of the experimental results.

  14. Assemblage of Superalkali Complexes with Ever Low-Ionization Potentials.

    PubMed

    Paduani, C; Rappe, Andrew M

    2016-08-18

    A simple recipe is proposed for the obtention of new molecules with even lower vertical ionization potential (VIP): to decorate an atom of an electronegative element with superalkali species in number that exceeds its formal valence by one. For instance, density functional theory calculations show that by using the superalkali Li3O cluster (VIP = 3.83 eV) as building blocks decorating the O atom one obtains VIP = 3.33 eV for the Li9O4 cluster, which is lower than the calculated VIP for Cs (3.89 eV) and Li (5.39 eV). This feature is systematic, as confirmed by calculated results on Li-F and Li-S clusters as well. The calculated binding energy per atom of the large-sized species exceeds by far that of LiF (134.7 kcal/mol). PMID:27463269

  15. Imaging cellular membrane potential through ionization of quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowland, Clare E.; Susumu, Kimihiro; Stewart, Michael H.; Oh, Eunkeu; Mäkinen, Antti J.; O'Shaughnessy, Thomas J.; Kushto, Gary; Wolak, Mason A.; Erickson, Jeffrey S.; Efros, Alexander L.; Huston, Alan L.; Delehanty, James B.

    2016-03-01

    Recent interest in quantum dots (QDs) stems from the plethora of potential applications that arises from their tunable absorption and emission profiles, high absorption cross sections, resistance to photobleaching, functionalizable surfaces, and physical robustness. The emergent use of QDs in biological imaging exploits these and other intrinsic properties. For example, quantum confined Stark effect (QCSE), which describes changes in the photoluminescence (PL) of QDs driven by the application of an electric field, provides an inherent means of detecting changes in electric fields by monitoring QD emission and thus points to a ready mean of imaging membrane potential (and action potentials) in electrically active cells. Here we examine the changing PL of various QDs subjected to electric fields comparable to those found across a cellular membrane. By pairing static and timeresolved PL measurements, we attempt to understand the mechanism driving electric-field-induced PL quenching and ultimately conclude that ionization plays a substantial role in initiating PL changes in systems where QCSE has traditionally been credited. Expanding on these findings, we explore the rapidity of response of the QD PL to applied electric fields and demonstrate changes amply able to capture the millisecond timescale of cellular action potentials.

  16. Monte Carlo simulations of ionization potential depression in dense plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stransky, M.

    2016-01-01

    A particle-particle grand canonical Monte Carlo model with Coulomb pair potential interaction was used to simulate modification of ionization potentials by electrostatic microfields. The Barnes-Hut tree algorithm [J. Barnes and P. Hut, Nature 324, 446 (1986)] was used to speed up calculations of electric potential. Atomic levels were approximated to be independent of the microfields as was assumed in the original paper by Ecker and Kröll [Phys. Fluids 6, 62 (1963)]; however, the available levels were limited by the corresponding mean inter-particle distance. The code was tested on hydrogen and dense aluminum plasmas. The amount of depression was up to 50% higher in the Debye-Hückel regime for hydrogen plasmas, in the high density limit, reasonable agreement was found with the Ecker-Kröll model for hydrogen plasmas and with the Stewart-Pyatt model [J. Stewart and K. Pyatt, Jr., Astrophys. J. 144, 1203 (1966)] for aluminum plasmas. Our 3D code is an improvement over the spherically symmetric simplifications of the Ecker-Kröll and Stewart-Pyatt models and is also not limited to high atomic numbers as is the underlying Thomas-Fermi model used in the Stewart-Pyatt model.

  17. Dust particle charge screening in the dry-air plasma produced by an external ionization source

    SciTech Connect

    Derbenev, I. N.; Filippov, A. V.

    2015-08-15

    The ionic composition of the plasma produced by an external ionization source in dry air at atmospheric pressure and room temperature and the screening of the electric field of a dust particle in such a plasma have been investigated. The point sink model based on the diffusion-drift approximation has been used to solve the screening problem. We have established that the main species of ions in the plasma under consideration are O{sub 4}{sup +}, O{sub 2}{sup -}, and O{sub 4}{sup -} and that the dust particle potential distribution is described by a superposition of four exponentials with four different constants. We show that the first constant coincides with the inverse Debye length, the second is described by the inverse ambipolar diffusion length of the positive and negative plasma components in the characteristic time of their recombination, the third is determined by the conversion of negative ions, and the fourth is determined by the attachment and recombination of electrons and diatomic ions.

  18. Accurate ionization potential of semiconductors from efficient density functional calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Lin-Hui

    2016-07-01

    Despite its huge successes in total-energy-related applications, the Kohn-Sham scheme of density functional theory cannot get reliable single-particle excitation energies for solids. In particular, it has not been able to calculate the ionization potential (IP), one of the most important material parameters, for semiconductors. We illustrate that an approximate exact-exchange optimized effective potential (EXX-OEP), the Becke-Johnson exchange, can be used to largely solve this long-standing problem. For a group of 17 semiconductors, we have obtained the IPs to an accuracy similar to that of the much more sophisticated G W approximation (GWA), with the computational cost of only local-density approximation/generalized gradient approximation. The EXX-OEP, therefore, is likely as useful for solids as for finite systems. For solid surfaces, the asymptotic behavior of the vx c has effects similar to those of finite systems which, when neglected, typically cause the semiconductor IPs to be underestimated. This may partially explain why standard GWA systematically underestimates the IPs and why using the same GWA procedures has not been able to get an accurate IP and band gap at the same time.

  19. Injection and Trapping of Tunnel-Ionized Electrons into Laser-Produced Wakes

    SciTech Connect

    Pak, A.; Marsh, K. A.; Joshi, C.; Martins, S. F.; Lu, W.; Mori, W. B.

    2010-01-15

    A method, which utilizes the large difference in ionization potentials between successive ionization states of trace atoms, for injecting electrons into a laser-driven wakefield is presented. Here a mixture of helium and trace amounts of nitrogen gas was used. Electrons from the K shell of nitrogen were tunnel ionized near the peak of the laser pulse and were injected into and trapped by the wake created by electrons from majority helium atoms and the L shell of nitrogen. The spectrum of the accelerated electrons, the threshold intensity at which trapping occurs, the forward transmitted laser spectrum, and the beam divergence are all consistent with this injection process. The experimental measurements are supported by theory and 3D OSIRIS simulations.

  20. Strong field ionization rates simulated with time-dependent configuration interaction and an absorbing potential

    SciTech Connect

    Krause, Pascal; Sonk, Jason A.; Schlegel, H. Bernhard

    2014-05-07

    Ionization rates of molecules have been modeled with time-dependent configuration interaction simulations using atom centered basis sets and a complex absorbing potential. The simulations agree with accurate grid-based calculations for the ionization of hydrogen atom as a function of field strength and for charge resonance enhanced ionization of H{sub 2}{sup +} as the bond is elongated. Unlike grid-based methods, the present approach can be applied to simulate electron dynamics and ionization in multi-electron polyatomic molecules. Calculations on HCl{sup +} and HCO{sup +} demonstrate that these systems also show charge resonance enhanced ionization as the bonds are stretched.

  1. Double-resonant photoionization efficiency spectroscopy: A precise determination of the adiabatic ionization potential of DCO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foltynowicz, Robert J.; Robinson, Jason D.; Grant, Edward R.

    2001-03-01

    We report the first high-resolution measurement of the adiabatic ionization potential of DCO and the fundamental bending frequency of DCO+. Fixing a first-laser frequency on selected ultraviolet transitions to individual rotational levels in the (000) band of the 3pπ 2Π intermediate Rydberg state of DCO, we scan a second visible laser over the range from 20 000 to 20 300 cm-1 to record double resonance photoionization efficiency (DR/PIE) spectra. Intermediate resonance with this Rydberg state facilitates transitions to the threshold for producing ground-state cations by bridging the Franck-Condon gap between the bent neutral radical and linear cation. By selecting a single rotational state for ionization, double-resonant excitation eliminates thermal congestion. Spectroscopic features for first-photon resonance are identified by reference to a complete assignment of the 3pπ 2Π(000)-X 2A'(000) band system of DCO. Calibration with HCO, for which the adiabatic ionization threshold is accurately known, establishes an experimental instrument function that accounts for collisional effects on the shape of the photoionization efficiency spectrum near threshold. Analysis of the DR/PIE threshold for DCO yields an adiabatic ionization threshold of 65 616±3 cm-1. By extrapolation of vibrationally autoionizing Rydberg series accessed from the Σ+ component of the 3pπ 2Π(010) intermediate state, we determine an accurate rotationally state-resolved threshold for producing DCO+(010). This energy, together with the threshold determined for the vibrational ground state of the cation provides a first estimate of the bending frequency for DCO+ as 666±3 cm-1. Assignment of the (010) autoionization spectrum further yields a measurement of an energy of 4.83±0.01 cm-1 for the (2-1) rotational transition in the 1Σ+(0110) state of DCO+.

  2. The computation of ionization potentials for second-row elements by ab initio and density functional theory methods

    SciTech Connect

    Jursic, B.S.

    1996-12-31

    Up to four ionization potentials of elements from the second-row of the periodic table were computed using the ab initio (HF, MP2, MP3, MP4, QCISD, GI, G2, and G2MP2) and DFT (B3LY, B3P86, B3PW91, XALPHA, HFS, HFB, BLYP, BP86, BPW91, BVWN, XAPLY, XAP86, XAPW91, XAVWN, SLYR SP86, SPW91 and SVWN) methods. In all of the calculations, the large 6-311++G(3df,3pd) gaussian type of basis set was used. The computed values were compared with the experimental results and suitability of the ab initio and DFF methods were discussed, in regard to reproducing the experimental data. From the computed ionization potentials of the second-row elements, it can be concluded that the HF ab initio computation is not capable of reproducing the experimental results. The computed ionization potentials are too low. However, by using the ab initio methods that include electron correlation, the computed IPs are becoming much closer to the experimental values. In all cases, with the exception of the first ionization potential for oxygen, the G2 computation result produces ionization potentials that are indistinguishable from the experimental results.

  3. Separation of low first ionization potential ions from high first ionization potential neutrals in the low chromosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athay, R. Grant

    1994-03-01

    Spectroscopic data from two flights of the Naval Research Laboratory's High Resolution Telescope and Spectrograph (HRTS) are analyzed for evidence of variations in relative abundances in the low chromosphere. Comparisons of sunspot, active region, and quiet-Sun data from HRTS II reveal decreases of intensities of sunspot lines from the first ionization stages of elements with low first ionization potential relative to both the active region and the quiet Sun. C I lines, however, are more intense in the sunspot than either the active region or the quiet Sun. Within a sunspot in Spacelab II data, the C I line at 156.1 nm is near its average intensity, whereas the Fe II line at 156.3 is much weaker than average. Both spots suggest a relative high value for the C I/Fe II abundance ratio. Within the zone of the same magnetic polarity as the sunspot (leading polarity) in the Spacelab II data, the brightest plages in C I show large C I/Fe II intensity ratios similar to those found in the sunspot. By contrast, the zones of following polarity on either side of the leading polarity show several well-defined areas of unusually low C I/Fe II intensity ratios associated with dark features in C I. The plages within these same zones have near normal or somewhat enhanced values for the C I/Fe II intensity ratios. It is noteworthy, also, that many of the brightest areas in C I do not coincide spatially with the brightest regions in Fe II. Neither do the darkest areas in C I align well with the darkest areas in Fe II. The association of high C I/Fe II intensity ratios with the zone of leading polarity and low-intensity ratios with zones of following polarity suggests that the iron abundance is dependent on the field polarity and is relatively low in the sunspot and the brighter plages in the zone of leading polarity and relatively high in C I dark flocculi in zones of following polarity. Failure of the brightest and darkest features in C I to align with the brightest and darkest

  4. Measurement of the first ionization potential of lawrencium, element 103

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, T. K.; Asai, M.; Borschevsky, A.; Stora, T.; Sato, N.; Kaneya, Y.; Tsukada, K.; Düllmann, Ch. E.; Eberhardt, K.; Eliav, E.; Ichikawa, S.; Kaldor, U.; Kratz, J. V.; Miyashita, S.; Nagame, Y.; Ooe, K.; Osa, A.; Renisch, D.; Runke, J.; Schädel, M.; Thörle-Pospiech, P.; Toyoshima, A.; Trautmann, N.

    2015-04-01

    The chemical properties of an element are primarily governed by the configuration of electrons in the valence shell. Relativistic effects influence the electronic structure of heavy elements in the sixth row of the periodic table, and these effects increase dramatically in the seventh row--including the actinides--even affecting ground-state configurations. Atomic s and p1/2 orbitals are stabilized by relativistic effects, whereas p3/2, d and f orbitals are destabilized, so that ground-state configurations of heavy elements may differ from those of lighter elements in the same group. The first ionization potential (IP1) is a measure of the energy required to remove one valence electron from a neutral atom, and is an atomic property that reflects the outermost electronic configuration. Precise and accurate experimental determination of IP1 gives information on the binding energy of valence electrons, and also, therefore, on the degree of relativistic stabilization. However, such measurements are hampered by the difficulty in obtaining the heaviest elements on scales of more than one atom at a time. Here we report that the experimentally obtained IP1 of the heaviest actinide, lawrencium (Lr, atomic number 103), is electronvolts. The IP1 of Lr was measured with 256Lr (half-life 27 seconds) using an efficient surface ion-source and a radioisotope detection system coupled to a mass separator. The measured IP1 is in excellent agreement with the value of 4.963(15) electronvolts predicted here by state-of-the-art relativistic calculations. The present work provides a reliable benchmark for theoretical calculations and also opens the way for IP1 measurements of superheavy elements (that is, transactinides) on an atom-at-a-time scale.

  5. Measurement of the first ionization potential of lawrencium, element 103.

    PubMed

    Sato, T K; Asai, M; Borschevsky, A; Stora, T; Sato, N; Kaneya, Y; Tsukada, K; Düllmann, Ch E; Eberhardt, K; Eliav, E; Ichikawa, S; Kaldor, U; Kratz, J V; Miyashita, S; Nagame, Y; Ooe, K; Osa, A; Renisch, D; Runke, J; Schädel, M; Thörle-Pospiech, P; Toyoshima, A; Trautmann, N

    2015-04-01

    The chemical properties of an element are primarily governed by the configuration of electrons in the valence shell. Relativistic effects influence the electronic structure of heavy elements in the sixth row of the periodic table, and these effects increase dramatically in the seventh row--including the actinides--even affecting ground-state configurations. Atomic s and p1/2 orbitals are stabilized by relativistic effects, whereas p3/2, d and f orbitals are destabilized, so that ground-state configurations of heavy elements may differ from those of lighter elements in the same group. The first ionization potential (IP1) is a measure of the energy required to remove one valence electron from a neutral atom, and is an atomic property that reflects the outermost electronic configuration. Precise and accurate experimental determination of IP1 gives information on the binding energy of valence electrons, and also, therefore, on the degree of relativistic stabilization. However, such measurements are hampered by the difficulty in obtaining the heaviest elements on scales of more than one atom at a time. Here we report that the experimentally obtained IP1 of the heaviest actinide, lawrencium (Lr, atomic number 103), is 4.96(+0.08)(-0.07) electronvolts. The IP1 of Lr was measured with (256)Lr (half-life 27 seconds) using an efficient surface ion-source and a radioisotope detection system coupled to a mass separator. The measured IP1 is in excellent agreement with the value of 4.963(15) electronvolts predicted here by state-of-the-art relativistic calculations. The present work provides a reliable benchmark for theoretical calculations and also opens the way for IP1 measurements of superheavy elements (that is, transactinides) on an atom-at-a-time scale. PMID:25855457

  6. Potentially hazardous waste produced at home

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to identify the sources of waste generation household consisting of biological material and to investigate the knowledge presented by those responsible for the generation of waste in the home environment on the potential health risk human and environmental. Method It is a quantitative survey performed in Parque Capuava, Santo André (SP). The questionnaire was administered by the community employers and nursing students during the consultation with nursing supervision through interview question/answer. The exclusion criteria were patients who were not in the area served by the Basic Health Unit which covers the area of Pq Capuava. The sample was consisted of 99 persons and the data collection a questionnaire was used. Results We observed that 63.3% of people said to use disposables, with the majority (58.7%) of these use the public collection as the final destination of these materials. It was reported that 73.7% of those surveyed reported having knowledge about the risk of disease transmission. Public awareness of the importance of proper packaging and disposal of potentially hazardous household waste may contribute significantly to the preservation of human and environmental health and this procedure can be performed and supervised by professional nurses. Conclusion We suggest implementation of workshops for community health workers and the general population in order to enhance their knowledge about the storage and disposal of potentially infectious waste generated at home, thereby reducing the potential risk of disease transmission by improper management. PMID:23806043

  7. Photo-triggering and secondary electron produced ionization in electric discharge ArF* excimer lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Zhongmin; Kushner, Mark J.

    2011-10-01

    Electric discharge excimer lasers are sustained in multi-atmosphere attaching gas mixtures that are typically preionized to enable a reproducible, uniform glow, which maximizes optical quality and gain. This preionization is often accomplished using UV light produced by a corona discharge within the plasma cavity. To quantify the relationship between corona discharge properties and those of the laser discharge, the triggering of electron avalanche by preionizing UV light in an electric discharge-pumped ArF* excimer laser was numerically investigated using a two-dimensional model. The preionizing UV fluxes were generated by a corona-bar discharge driven by the same voltage pulse as the main discharge sustained in a multi-atmospheric Ne/Ar/Xe/F2 gas mixture. The resulting peak photo-electron density in the inter-electrode spacing is around 108 cm-3, and its distribution is biased toward the UV source. The preionization density increases with increasing dielectric constant and capacitance of the corona bar. The symmetry and uniformity of the discharge are, however, improved significantly once the main avalanche develops. In addition to bulk electron impact ionization, the ionization generated by sheath accelerated secondary electrons was found to be important in sustaining the discharge current at experimentally observed values. At peak current, the magnitude of the ionization by sheath accelerated electrons is comparable to that from bulk electron impact in the vicinity of the cathode.

  8. Cellulose gels produced in room temperature ionic liquids by ionizing radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Atsushi; Nagasawa, Naotsugu; Taguchi, Mitsumasa

    2014-10-01

    Cellulose-based gels were produced in room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) by ionizing radiation. Cellulose was dissolved at the initial concentration of 20 wt% in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium (EMI)-acetate or N,N-diethyl-N-methyl-N-(2-methoxyethyl)ammonium (DEMA)-formate with a water content of 18 wt%, and irradiated with γ-rays under aerated condition to produce new cellulose gels. The gel fractions of the cellulose gels obtained in EMI-acetate and DEMA-formate at a dose of 10 kGy were 13% and 19%, respectively. The formation of gel fractions was found to depend on the initial concentration of cellulose, water content, and irradiation temperature. The obtained gel readily absorbed water, methanol, ethanol, dichloromethane, N,N-dimethylacetamide, and RTILs.

  9. The ionization potentials of atomic ions in laser-irradiated Ar, Kr and Xe clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gets, A. V.; Krainov, V. P.

    2006-04-01

    The ionization potentials of atomic ions in laser-irradiated Ar, Kr and Xe clusters are derived as functions of electron temperature. These potentials decrease significantly compared to the case of the isolated atomic ions because of the screening effect by the atomic ions and electrons inside the cluster. The results can be used for derivations of inner ionization by impact collisions of hot electrons with atomic ions and by the static Coulomb field of the ionized cluster. The broadening of atomic states by the quasistatic Holtsmark field of atomic ions is also considered.

  10. Time Profiles of Ions Produced in a Hot-Cavity Resonant Ionization Laser Ion Source

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yuan; Baktash, Cyrus; Beene, James R; Havener, Charles C; Krause, Herbert F; Schultz, David Robert; Stracener, Daniel W; Vane, C Randy; Geppert, C.; Kessler, T.; Wies, K.; Wendt, K.

    2011-01-01

    The time profiles of Cu, Sn and Ni ions extracted from a hot-cavity resonant ionization laser ion source are investigated. The ions are produced in the ion source by three-photon resonant ionization with pulsed Ti:Sapphire lasers. Measurements show that the time spread of these ions generated within laser pulses of about 30 ns could be larger than 100 s when the ions are extracted from the ion source. A one-dimensional ion-transport model using the Monte Carlo method is developed to simulate the time dependence of the ion pulses. The observed ion temporal profiles agree reasonably well with the predictions of the model, which indicates that a substantial fraction of the extracted ions are generated in the vapor-transfer tube rather than the hot cavity and that ion-wall collisions are suppressed inside the ion source by an undetermined ion confinement mechanism. Three-dimensional modeling will be necessary to understand the strong reduction in losses expected from ion-wall collisions which we interpret as evidence for confinement.

  11. Electron conic distributions produced by solar ionizing radiation in planetary atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, W. K.; Brain, D. L.; Yau, A. W.; Richards, P. G.

    2015-06-01

    Electron conic distributions have angular distributions with peak fluxes well separated from the field aligned-direction. They have previously been reported at Earth on auroral field lines and at the Moon and Mars on closed crustal magnetic field lines. Here we report observations of electron conics at Earth on closed magnetic field lines well removed from the aurora. We show how these distributions could be produced without plasma wave interactions when magnetic field lines are illuminated by solar ionizing radiation at relatively high altitudes in the ionosphere. Examination of previous reports of electron conic distributions observed in planetary atmospheres show that there are a variety of physical mechanisms that can lead to their formation, not all of which require wave-particle interactions.

  12. Ionization potentials of cobalt and nickel ions in the local-spin-density approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Dhar, S. ); Kestner, N.R. )

    1990-06-15

    In this article we report on the ionization potentials of all configurations of the Co{sup {ital n}+} and Ni{sup {ital n}+} ions obtained via transition-state calculations using local-spin-density (LSD) potentials. The calculations were performed numerically with and without modifications of the local exchange potential for fractional occupation numbers. When the exchange potential is corrected for noninteger occupation numbers, a more consistent picture of the ionization process is obtained than that given by the LSD Kohn-Sham exchange. The agreement with experimental results is also significantly improved.

  13. Ionization Potential Depression in Hot Dense Plasmas Through a Pure Classical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calisti, A.; Ferri, S.; Talin, B.

    2015-05-01

    The ionization potential of an ion embedded in a plasma, lowered due to the whole of the charged particles (ions and electrons) interacting with this ion, is the so-called plasma effect. A numerical plasma model based on classical molecular dynamics has been developed recently. It is capable to describe a neutral plasma at equilibrium involving ions of various charge states of the same atom together with electrons. This code is used here to investigate the ionization potential depression (IPD). The study of the IPD is illustrated and discussed for aluminum plasmas at mid and solid density and electron temperatures varying from 50eV to 190eV. The method relies on a sampling of the total potential energy of the electron located at an ion being ionized. The potential energy of such electron results from all of the interacting charged particles interacting with it.

  14. Exact Potential Driving the Electron Dynamics in Enhanced Ionization of H2+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosravi, Elham; Abedi, Ali; Maitra, Neepa T.

    2015-12-01

    It was recently shown that the exact factorization of the electron-nuclear wave function allows the construction of a Schrödinger equation for the electronic system, in which the potential contains exactly the effect of coupling to the nuclear degrees of freedom and any external fields. Here we study the exact potential acting on the electron in charge-resonance enhanced ionization in a model one-dimensional H2+ molecule. We show there can be significant differences between the exact potential and that used in the traditional quasistatic analyses, arising from nonadiabatic coupling to the nuclear system, and that these are crucial to include for accurate simulations of time-resolved ionization dynamics and predictions of the ionization yield.

  15. Density-functional errors in ionization potential with increasing system size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittleton, Sarah R.; Sosa Vazquez, Xochitl A.; Isborn, Christine M.; Johnson, Erin R.

    2015-05-01

    This work investigates the effects of molecular size on the accuracy of density-functional ionization potentials for a set of 28 hydrocarbons, including series of alkanes, alkenes, and oligoacenes. As the system size increases, delocalization error introduces a systematic underestimation of the ionization potential, which is rationalized by considering the fractional-charge behavior of the electronic energies. The computation of the ionization potential with many density-functional approximations is not size-extensive due to excessive delocalization of the incipient positive charge. While inclusion of exact exchange reduces the observed errors, system-specific tuning of long-range corrected functionals does not generally improve accuracy. These results emphasize that good performance of a functional for small molecules is not necessarily transferable to larger systems.

  16. Density-functional errors in ionization potential with increasing system size

    SciTech Connect

    Whittleton, Sarah R.; Sosa Vazquez, Xochitl A.; Isborn, Christine M.; Johnson, Erin R.

    2015-05-14

    This work investigates the effects of molecular size on the accuracy of density-functional ionization potentials for a set of 28 hydrocarbons, including series of alkanes, alkenes, and oligoacenes. As the system size increases, delocalization error introduces a systematic underestimation of the ionization potential, which is rationalized by considering the fractional-charge behavior of the electronic energies. The computation of the ionization potential with many density-functional approximations is not size-extensive due to excessive delocalization of the incipient positive charge. While inclusion of exact exchange reduces the observed errors, system-specific tuning of long-range corrected functionals does not generally improve accuracy. These results emphasize that good performance of a functional for small molecules is not necessarily transferable to larger systems.

  17. Non-solar UV produced ions observed optically from the 'Crit I' critical velocity ionization experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Wescott, E. M.; Rees, D.; Valenzuela, A.; Brenning, N.

    1990-01-01

    A critical velocity ionization experiment was carried out with a heavily instrumented rocket launched from Wallops Island on May 13, 1986. Two neutral barium beams were created by explosive shaped charges released from the rocket and detonated at 48 deg to B at altitudes near 400 km and below the solar UV cutoff. Critical velocity ionization was expected to form a detectable ion jet along the release field line, but, instead, an ion cloud of fairly uniform intensity was observed stretching from the release field line across to where the neutral barium jet reached sunlight. The process creating these ions must have been present from the time of the release; the efficiency is estimated to be equivalent to an ionization time constant of 1800 sec. This ionization is most likely from collisions between the neutral barium jet and the ambient atmospheric oxygen, and, if so, the cross section for collisional ionization is 9 x 10 to the -18th sq cm.

  18. Determination of the ionization potentials of security-relevant substances with single photon ionization mass spectrometry using synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Schramm, E; Mühlberger, F; Mitschke, S; Reichardt, G; Schulte-Ladbeck, R; Pütz, M; Zimmermann, R

    2008-02-01

    Several ionization potentials (IPs) of security relevant substances were determined with single photon ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (SPI-TOFMS) using monochromatized synchrotron radiation from the "Berliner Elektronenspeicherring-Gesellschaft für Synchrotronstrahlung" (BESSY). In detail, the IPs of nine explosives and related compounds, seven narcotics and narcotics precursors, and one chemical warfare agent (CWA) precursor were determined, whereas six IPs already known from the literature were verified correctly. From seven other substances, including one CWA precursor, the IP could not be determined as the molecule ion peak could not be detected. For these substances the appearance energy (AE) of a main fragment was determined. The analyzed security-relevant substances showed IPs significantly below the IPs of common matrix compounds such as nitrogen and oxygen. Therefore, it is possible to find photon energies in between, whereby the molecules of interest can be detected with SPI in very low concentrations due to the shielding of the matrix. All determined IPs except the one of the explosive EGDN were below 10.5 eV. Hence, laser-generated 118 nm photons can be applied for detecting almost all security-relevant substances by, e.g., SPI-TOFMS. PMID:18284801

  19. The Diagnostic Potential of Transition Region Lines Undergoing Transient Ionization in Dynamic Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, J. G.; Giunta, A.; Singh, A.; Madjarska, M. S.; Summers, H.; Kellett, B. J.; O'Mullane, M.

    2012-09-01

    We discuss the diagnostic potential of high cadence UV spectral data when transient ionization is considered. For this we use high cadence UV spectra taken during the impulsive phase of a solar flare (observed with instruments on-board the Solar Maximum Mission) which showed excellent correspondence with hard X-ray pulses. The ionization fraction of the transition region ion O v and, in particular, the contribution function for the O v 1371 Å line are computed within the Atomic Data and Analysis Structure, which is a collection of fundamental and derived atomic data and codes to manipulate them. Due to transient ionization, the O v 1371 Å line is enhanced in the first fraction of a second with the peak in the line contribution function occurring initially at a higher electron temperature than in ionization equilibrium. The rise time and enhancement factor depend mostly on the electron density. The fractional increase in the O v 1371 Å emissivity due to transient ionization can reach a factor of two-four and can explain the fast response in the line flux of transition regions ions during the impulsive phase of flares solely as a result of transient ionization. This technique can be used to diagnose the electron temperature and density of solar flares observed with the forthcoming Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph.

  20. Rapid Detection of OXA-48-Producing Enterobacteriaceae by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Oviaño, Marina; Barba, Maria José; Fernández, Begoña; Ortega, Adriana; Aracil, Belén; Oteo, Jesús; Campos, José; Bou, Germán

    2016-03-01

    A rapid and sensitive (100%) matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) assay was developed to detect OXA-48-type producers, using 161 previously characterized clinical isolates. Ertapenem was monitored to detect carbapenem resistance, and temocillin was included in the assay as a marker for OXA-48-producers. Structural analysis of temocillin is described. Data are obtained within 60 min. PMID:26677247

  1. Ionization potentials and radii of neutral and ionized species of elements 107 (bohrium) and 108 (hassium) from extended multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, E.; Fricke, B.; Jacob, T.; Dong, C. Z.; Fritzsche, S.; Pershina, V.

    2002-02-01

    Large multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock calculations were performed for all neutral and up to 7 and 8 times ionized species of elements 107 and 108, respectively, as well as all the homologous elements Mn, Tc, Re, Fe, Ru, and Os for a number of different total angular momenta. Comparison of the resulting ionization potentials to the known values of the homologues allow an extrapolation and thus a prediction of the chemically important seven or eight ionization potentials of elements 107 or 108 as well as a prediction of some ionic radii.

  2. Size-dependent error of the density functional theory ionization potential in vacuum and solution

    SciTech Connect

    Sosa Vazquez, Xochitl A.; Isborn, Christine M.

    2015-12-28

    Density functional theory is often the method of choice for modeling the energetics of large molecules and including explicit solvation effects. It is preferable to use a method that treats systems of different sizes and with different amounts of explicit solvent on equal footing. However, recent work suggests that approximate density functional theory has a size-dependent error in the computation of the ionization potential. We here investigate the lack of size-intensivity of the ionization potential computed with approximate density functionals in vacuum and solution. We show that local and semi-local approximations to exchange do not yield a constant ionization potential for an increasing number of identical isolated molecules in vacuum. Instead, as the number of molecules increases, the total energy required to ionize the system decreases. Rather surprisingly, we find that this is still the case in solution, whether using a polarizable continuum model or with explicit solvent that breaks the degeneracy of each solute, and we find that explicit solvent in the calculation can exacerbate the size-dependent delocalization error. We demonstrate that increasing the amount of exact exchange changes the character of the polarization of the solvent molecules; for small amounts of exact exchange the solvent molecules contribute a fraction of their electron density to the ionized electron, but for larger amounts of exact exchange they properly polarize in response to the cationic solute. In vacuum and explicit solvent, the ionization potential can be made size-intensive by optimally tuning a long-range corrected hybrid functional.

  3. Size-dependent error of the density functional theory ionization potential in vacuum and solution

    SciTech Connect

    Sosa Vazquez, Xochitl A.; Isborn, Christine M.

    2015-12-22

    Density functional theory is often the method of choice for modeling the energetics of large molecules and including explicit solvation effects. It is preferable to use a method that treats systems of different sizes and with different amounts of explicit solvent on equal footing. However, recent work suggests that approximate density functional theory has a size-dependent error in the computation of the ionization potential. We here investigate the lack of size-intensivity of the ionization potential computed with approximate density functionals in vacuum and solution. We show that local and semi-local approximations to exchange do not yield a constant ionization potential for an increasing number of identical isolated molecules in vacuum. Instead, as the number of molecules increases, the total energy required to ionize the system decreases. Rather surprisingly, we find that this is still the case in solution, whether using a polarizable continuum model or with explicit solvent that breaks the degeneracy of each solute, and we find that explicit solvent in the calculation can exacerbate the size-dependent delocalization error. We demonstrate that increasing the amount of exact exchange changes the character of the polarization of the solvent molecules; for small amounts of exact exchange the solvent molecules contribute a fraction of their electron density to the ionized electron, but for larger amounts of exact exchange they properly polarize in response to the cationic solute. As a result, in vacuum and explicit solvent, the ionization potential can be made size-intensive by optimally tuning a long-range corrected hybrid functional.

  4. Frequency Upshift and Radiation of the THz Electromagnetic Wave via an Ultrashort-Laser-Produced Ionization Front

    SciTech Connect

    Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Hasegawa, Hideyuki; Nishimai, Hirofumi; Yugami, Noboru; Muggli, Patric

    2009-01-22

    We report the generation of radiation in the terahertz (THz) spectral region from an electrostatic field converted by a laser-produced relativistic ionization front. The THz radiation is generated through spatiotemporal change in electron density induced by a relativistic ionization front propagating in a ZnSe crystal enclosed in a capacitor array. The measured central radiation frequency is 1.2 THz with a bandwidth of 0.7 THz (FWHM), which is attributed to production of an electron density of the order of 10{sup 15} cm{sup -3}. The amplitude of the linearly polarized THz radiation increased linearly with the voltage applied to the capacitors.

  5. Rydberg levels and ionization potential of francium measured by laser-resonance ionization in a hot cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, S.V.; Mishin, V.I.; Letokhov, V.S.

    1988-10-01

    A highly sensitive method of detecting atoms in samples has been used for spectral investigations of the rare radioactive element Fr. The method is based on laser-resonance photoionization of Fr atoms in a hot quasi-enclosed cavity. The investigations have been carried out with samples in which short-lived radioactive /sup 221/Fr atoms formed at a rate of approximately 10/sup 3/ atoms/sec. The data obtained, to our knowledge for the first time, on the energies of the high-lying Rydberg levels of the /sup 2/S/sub 1/2/ and /sup 2/D series have made it possible to determine the electron binding energy of the 7p /sup 2/P/sub 3/2/ state and to establish the ionization potential of Fr accurately.

  6. Use of Relativistic Effective Core Potentials in the Calculation of Electron-Impact Ionization Cross Sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Kim, Yong-Ki

    1999-01-01

    Based on the Binary-Encounter-Bethe (BEB) model, the advantage of using relativistic effective core potentials (RECP) in the calculation of total ionization cross sections of heavy atoms or molecules containing heavy atoms is discussed. Numerical examples for Ar, Kr, Xe, and WF6 are presented.

  7. Ionizing radiation post-curing of objects produced by stereolithography and other methods

    DOEpatents

    Howell, David H.; Eberle, Claude C.; Janke, Christopher J.

    2000-01-01

    An object comprised of a curable material and formed by stereolithography or another three-dimensional prototyping method, in which the object has undergone initial curing, is subjected to post-curing by ionizing radiation, such as an electron beam having a predetermined beam output energy, which is applied in a predetermined dosage and at a predetermined dose rate. The post-cured object exhibits a property profile which is superior to that which existed prior to the ionizing radiation post-curing.

  8. Size-dependent error of the density functional theory ionization potential in vacuum and solution

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sosa Vazquez, Xochitl A.; Isborn, Christine M.

    2015-12-22

    Density functional theory is often the method of choice for modeling the energetics of large molecules and including explicit solvation effects. It is preferable to use a method that treats systems of different sizes and with different amounts of explicit solvent on equal footing. However, recent work suggests that approximate density functional theory has a size-dependent error in the computation of the ionization potential. We here investigate the lack of size-intensivity of the ionization potential computed with approximate density functionals in vacuum and solution. We show that local and semi-local approximations to exchange do not yield a constant ionization potentialmore » for an increasing number of identical isolated molecules in vacuum. Instead, as the number of molecules increases, the total energy required to ionize the system decreases. Rather surprisingly, we find that this is still the case in solution, whether using a polarizable continuum model or with explicit solvent that breaks the degeneracy of each solute, and we find that explicit solvent in the calculation can exacerbate the size-dependent delocalization error. We demonstrate that increasing the amount of exact exchange changes the character of the polarization of the solvent molecules; for small amounts of exact exchange the solvent molecules contribute a fraction of their electron density to the ionized electron, but for larger amounts of exact exchange they properly polarize in response to the cationic solute. As a result, in vacuum and explicit solvent, the ionization potential can be made size-intensive by optimally tuning a long-range corrected hybrid functional.« less

  9. Immunomodulatory potential of shatavarins produced from Asparagus racemosus tissue cultures

    PubMed Central

    Pise, Mashitha Vinod; Rudra, Jaishree Amal; Upadhyay, Avinash

    2015-01-01

    Medicinal properties of Asparagus racemosus (vernacular name: Shatavari) are attributed to its steroidal saponins called shatavarins. This plant is facing the threat of being endangered due to several developmental, seasonal constrains and malpractices involved in its collection and storage. To support its conservation, a tissue culture protocol is standardized which produces 20 fold higher levels of shatavarin. Here we evaluate the bioactivity and immunomodulatory potential of in vitro produced shatavarins from cell cultures of AR using human peripheral blood lymphocytes. In vitro produced shatavarin stimulated immune cell proliferation and IgG secretion in a dose dependent manner. It stimulated interleukin (IL)-12 production and inhibited production of IL-6. It also had strong modulatory effects on Th1/Th2 cytokine profile, indicating its potential application for immunotherapies where Th1/Th2 balance is envisaged. Our study demonstrating the bioactivity of tissue cultured AR extracts supports further in vivo evaluation of its immunomodulatory efficacy. PMID:26283842

  10. Immunomodulatory potential of shatavarins produced from Asparagus racemosus tissue cultures.

    PubMed

    Pise, Mashitha Vinod; Rudra, Jaishree Amal; Upadhyay, Avinash

    2015-01-01

    Medicinal properties of Asparagus racemosus (vernacular name: Shatavari) are attributed to its steroidal saponins called shatavarins. This plant is facing the threat of being endangered due to several developmental, seasonal constrains and malpractices involved in its collection and storage. To support its conservation, a tissue culture protocol is standardized which produces 20 fold higher levels of shatavarin. Here we evaluate the bioactivity and immunomodulatory potential of in vitro produced shatavarins from cell cultures of AR using human peripheral blood lymphocytes. In vitro produced shatavarin stimulated immune cell proliferation and IgG secretion in a dose dependent manner. It stimulated interleukin (IL)-12 production and inhibited production of IL-6. It also had strong modulatory effects on Th1/Th2 cytokine profile, indicating its potential application for immunotherapies where Th1/Th2 balance is envisaged. Our study demonstrating the bioactivity of tissue cultured AR extracts supports further in vivo evaluation of its immunomodulatory efficacy. PMID:26283842

  11. Unraveling nonadiabatic ionization and Coulomb potential effect in strong-field photoelectron holography.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaohong; Lin, Cheng; Sheng, Zhihao; Liu, Peng; Chen, Zhangjin; Yang, Weifeng; Hu, Shilin; Lin, C D; Chen, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Strong field photoelectron holography has been proposed as a means for interrogating the spatial and temporal information of electrons and ions in a dynamic system. After ionization, part of the electron wave packet may directly go to the detector (the reference wave), while another part may be driven back and scatters off the ion(the signal wave). The interference hologram of the two waves may be used to extract target information embedded in the collision process. Unlike conventional optical holography, however, propagation of the electron wave packet is affected by the Coulomb potential as well as by the laser field. In addition, electrons are emitted over the whole laser pulse duration, thus multiple interferences may occur. In this work, we used a generalized quantum-trajectory Monte Carlo method to investigate the effect of Coulomb potential and the nonadiabatic subcycle ionization on the photoelectron hologram. We showed that photoelectron hologram can be well described only when the effect of nonadiabatic ionization is accounted for, and Coulomb potential can be neglected only in the tunnel ionization regime. Our results help paving the way for establishing photoelectron holography for probing spatial and dynamic properties of atoms and molecules. PMID:27329071

  12. Unraveling nonadiabatic ionization and Coulomb potential effect in strong-field photoelectron holography

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xiaohong; Lin, Cheng; Sheng, Zhihao; Liu, Peng; Chen, Zhangjin; Yang, Weifeng; Hu, Shilin; Lin, C. D.; Chen, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Strong field photoelectron holography has been proposed as a means for interrogating the spatial and temporal information of electrons and ions in a dynamic system. After ionization, part of the electron wave packet may directly go to the detector (the reference wave), while another part may be driven back and scatters off the ion(the signal wave). The interference hologram of the two waves may be used to extract target information embedded in the collision process. Unlike conventional optical holography, however, propagation of the electron wave packet is affected by the Coulomb potential as well as by the laser field. In addition, electrons are emitted over the whole laser pulse duration, thus multiple interferences may occur. In this work, we used a generalized quantum-trajectory Monte Carlo method to investigate the effect of Coulomb potential and the nonadiabatic subcycle ionization on the photoelectron hologram. We showed that photoelectron hologram can be well described only when the effect of nonadiabatic ionization is accounted for, and Coulomb potential can be neglected only in the tunnel ionization regime. Our results help paving the way for establishing photoelectron holography for probing spatial and dynamic properties of atoms and molecules. PMID:27329071

  13. Unraveling nonadiabatic ionization and Coulomb potential effect in strong-field photoelectron holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xiaohong; Lin, Cheng; Sheng, Zhihao; Liu, Peng; Chen, Zhangjin; Yang, Weifeng; Hu, Shilin; Lin, C. D.; Chen, Jing

    2016-06-01

    Strong field photoelectron holography has been proposed as a means for interrogating the spatial and temporal information of electrons and ions in a dynamic system. After ionization, part of the electron wave packet may directly go to the detector (the reference wave), while another part may be driven back and scatters off the ion(the signal wave). The interference hologram of the two waves may be used to extract target information embedded in the collision process. Unlike conventional optical holography, however, propagation of the electron wave packet is affected by the Coulomb potential as well as by the laser field. In addition, electrons are emitted over the whole laser pulse duration, thus multiple interferences may occur. In this work, we used a generalized quantum-trajectory Monte Carlo method to investigate the effect of Coulomb potential and the nonadiabatic subcycle ionization on the photoelectron hologram. We showed that photoelectron hologram can be well described only when the effect of nonadiabatic ionization is accounted for, and Coulomb potential can be neglected only in the tunnel ionization regime. Our results help paving the way for establishing photoelectron holography for probing spatial and dynamic properties of atoms and molecules.

  14. Unraveling nonadiabatic ionization and Coulomb potential effect in strong-field photoelectron holography

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Song, Xiaohong; Lin, Cheng; Sheng, Zhihao; Liu, Peng; Chen, Zhangjin; Yang, Weifeng; Hu, Shilin; Lin, C. D.; Chen, Jing

    2016-06-22

    Strong field photoelectron holography has been proposed as a means for interrogating the spatial and temporal information of electrons and ions in a dynamic system. After ionization, part of the electron wave packet may directly go to the detector (the reference wave), while another part may be driven back and scatters off the ion(the signal wave). The interference hologram of the two waves may be used to extract target information embedded in the collision process. Unlike conventional optical holography, however, propagation of the electron wave packet is affected by the Coulomb potential as well as by the laser field. Inmore » addition, electrons are emitted over the whole laser pulse duration, thus multiple interferences may occur. In this work, we used a generalized quantum-trajectory Monte Carlo method to investigate the effect of Coulomb potential and the nonadiabatic subcycle ionization on the photoelectron hologram. Here, we showed that photoelectron hologram can be well described only when the effect of nonadiabatic ionization is accounted for, and Coulomb potential can be neglected only in the tunnel ionization regime. Our results help paving the way for establishing photoelectron holography for probing spatial and dynamic properties of atoms and molecules.« less

  15. Behavioral and physiological changes produced by a supralethal dose of ionizing radiation: evidence for hormone-influenced sex differences in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Mickley, G.A.

    1980-01-01

    A sufficiently large and rapid dose of ionizing radiation produces an immediate but transient behavioral incapacitation. Acute hypotension often accompanies the disorder. Although the etiology of this syndrome is unclear, it has been suggested that an increase in histamine excretion contributes to it. Since histamine is known to interact with the endocrine system and since estrogens have been shown to prolong the life of animals exposed to potentially lethal doses of radiation, it was also hypothesized that females might be relatively less affected by an acute, large dose of ionizing radiation. Male and female rats were trained on an avoidance task, irradiated, and then retested. Females showed a less severe decrement after radiation exposure than males. Likewise, females did not suffer the severe hypotension normally associated with male radiogenic early transient incapacitation (ETI); rather, an acute hypertension was produced in females. A second series of experiments revealed that differences in male and female radiation response were eliminated by gonadectomy. Systemic estradiol injection produced strikingly feminine (i.e., superior) postirradiation avoidance responses as well as hypertension in neutered rats. Testosterone injections had no effect on either measure. Central nervous system alterations have been correlated with the ETI. Therefore, final experiments sought a possible central locus of the action of estradiol. It was found that exposure of the nucleus peopticus medialis to estrogens produces postirradiation benefits in avoidance performance and blood pressure similar to those seen after systemic estradiol treatments. Nucleus amygdaloideus medialis implants produced no such benefits.

  16. Supersonic propagation of ionization waves in an under-dense, laser-produced plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Constantin, C; Back, C A; Fournier, K B; Gregori, G; Landen, O L; Glenzer, S H; Dewald, E L; Miller, M C

    2004-10-22

    We observe a laser-driven supersonic ionization wave heating a mm-scale plasma of sub-critical density up to 2-3 keV electron temperatures. Propagation velocities initially 10 times the sound speed were measured by means of time-resolved x-ray imaging diagnostics. The measured ionization wave trajectory is modeled analytically and by a 2D radiation-hydrodynamics code. The comparison to the modeling suggests that nonlocal heat transport effects may contribute to the attenuation of the heat wave propagation.

  17. Improving the potential to produce oil from naturally fractured reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, J.M.; Nighswander, J.; Berg, R.R.; Friedman, M.; Gangi, A.F.; Poston, S.W.

    1994-12-31

    A multi-phase effort that involved geological, geophysical, and petroleum engineering studies yielded an improved understanding of naturally fractured reservoirs and potential manners to improve the incidence of oil production from such reservoirs. Maps of fracture traces on bedding planes in the Austin Chalk outcrops showed organized trends of the fracture development and a hierarchical nature within the complete fracture system. Vertical Seismic Profile, VSP data has been used to estimate fracture orientation from shear-wave splitting. Well log responses in Austin Chalk wells have shown to be a reliable indicator of organic maturity. Well logs have also been used to calculate average resistivity of producing zones and to correlate resistivity with oil saturation and therefore with producing potential. Additionally, the use of carbonates water imbibition displacement processes has shown encouraging results of accelerating and increasing oil recovery of oil which do not have appreciable asphaltene contents.

  18. Investigation of Ionization and Dissociation Processes Produced by Electron Impact on Molecules.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ce.

    1990-01-01

    Absolute electron impact partial ionization cross sections for Ar and CF_4 were measured by use of a newly built pulsed electron beam time-of-flight apparatus for incident electron energies from thresholds to 500 eV. The apparatus employed consisted of a low energy electron gun, 40 mm diameter ion extraction gold screens, time-of-flight drift tubes, micro-channel plate detectors and fast time to digital electronics. A pulsed electron beam was obtained by pulsing the control grid of the electron gun. Both beam - beam experiments and beam - constant gas target pressure experiments were carried out to determine the absolute partial ionization cross sections for Ar ^{+}, Ar^{2+ }, Ar^{3+} from an argon gas target, and for CF_sp {3}{+}, CF_sp {2}{+}, CF_sp {3}{2+}, CF^ {+}, CF_sp{2} {2+}, F^{+}, C^{+} from a CF _4 gas target. By charge weighted summing of the partial ionization cross sections, the total ionization cross sections of Ar and CF_4 were obtained. The total neutral dissociation cross section for CF_4 was inferred from the total ionization cross section and the total dissociation cross section. Also, a new method for determining absolute total electron scattering cross sections with corrections for forward scattering was developed. The electron beam current was measured as function of gas target pressure and the scattering path length. The total electron scattering cross section obtained from the new model is as much as 6% larger than the cross section derived from the traditional Beer's law for Ar at an incident electron energy of 300 eV. This method is capable of yielding reliable total cross section up to 10 keV. Finally, a study of the secondary electron emission as a function of ejection angle and ejection energy for CO, the doubly differential cross section (DDCS), is presented.

  19. Equation of motion coupled cluster methods for electron attachment and ionization potential in polyacenes

    SciTech Connect

    Bhaskaran-Nair, Kiran; Kowalski, Karol; Jarrell, Mark; Moreno, Juana; Shelton, William A.

    2015-11-05

    Polyacenes have attracted considerable attention due to their use in organic based optoelectronic materials. Polyacenes are polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons composed of fused benzene rings. Key to understanding and design of new functional materials is an understanding of their excited state properties starting with their electron affinity (EA) and ionization potential (IP). We have developed a highly accurate and com- putationally e*fficient EA/IP equation of motion coupled cluster singles and doubles (EA/IP-EOMCCSD) method that is capable of treating large systems and large basis set. In this study we employ the EA/IP-EOMCCSD method to calculate the electron affinity and ionization potential of naphthalene, anthracene, tetracene, pentacene, hex- acene and heptacene. We have compared our results with other previous theoretical studies and experimental data. Our EA/IP results are in very good agreement with experiment and when compared with the other theoretical investigations our results represent the most accurate calculations as compared to experiment.

  20. Accurate Ionization Potentials and Electron Affinities of Acceptor Molecules IV: Electron-Propagator Methods.

    PubMed

    Dolgounitcheva, O; Díaz-Tinoco, Manuel; Zakrzewski, V G; Richard, Ryan M; Marom, Noa; Sherrill, C David; Ortiz, J V

    2016-02-01

    Comparison of ab initio electron-propagator predictions of vertical ionization potentials and electron affinities of organic, acceptor molecules with benchmark calculations based on the basis set-extrapolated, coupled cluster single, double, and perturbative triple substitution method has enabled identification of self-energy approximations with mean, unsigned errors between 0.1 and 0.2 eV. Among the self-energy approximations that neglect off-diagonal elements in the canonical, Hartree-Fock orbital basis, the P3 method for electron affinities, and the P3+ method for ionization potentials provide the best combination of accuracy and computational efficiency. For approximations that consider the full self-energy matrix, the NR2 methods offer the best performance. The P3+ and NR2 methods successfully identify the correct symmetry label of the lowest cationic state in two cases, naphthalenedione and benzoquinone, where some other methods fail. PMID:26730459

  1. The ionization potential of aqueous hydroxide computed using many-body perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Opalka, Daniel Sprik, Michiel; Pham, Tuan Anh; Galli, Giulia

    2014-07-21

    The ionization potentials of electrolyte solutions provide important information about the electronic structure of liquids and solute-solvent interactions. We analyzed the positions of solute and solvent bands of aqueous hydroxide and the influence of the solvent environment on the ionization potential of hydroxide ions. We used the concept of a computational hydrogen electrode to define absolute band positions with respect to vacuum. We found that many-body perturbation theory in the G{sub 0} W{sub 0} approximation substantially improves the relative and absolute positions of the band edges of solute and solvent with respect to those obtained within Density Functional Theory, using semi-local functionals, yielding results in satisfactory agreement with recent experiments.

  2. Multireference configuration interaction calculations of the first six ionization potentials of the uranium atom

    SciTech Connect

    Bross, David H.; Parmar, Payal; Peterson, Kirk A.

    2015-11-14

    The first 6 ionization potentials (IPs) of the uranium atom have been calculated using multireference configuration interaction (MRCI+Q) with extrapolations to the complete basis set limit using new all-electron correlation consistent basis sets. The latter was carried out with the third-order Douglas-Kroll-Hess Hamiltonian. Correlation down through the 5s5p5d electrons has been taken into account, as well as contributions to the IPs due to the Lamb shift. Spin-orbit coupling contributions calculated at the 4-component Kramers restricted configuration interaction level, as well as the Gaunt term computed at the Dirac-Hartree-Fock level, were added to the best scalar relativistic results. The final ionization potentials are expected to be accurate to at least 5 kcal/mol (0.2 eV) and thus more reliable than the current experimental values of IP{sub 3} through IP{sub 6}.

  3. Botryosphaeriales fungi produce extracellular enzymes with biotechnological potential.

    PubMed

    Esteves, Ana Cristina; Saraiva, Márcia; Correia, António; Alves, Artur

    2014-05-01

    Phytopathogenic fungi are known for producing an arsenal of extracellular enzymes whose involvement in the infection mechanism has been suggested. However, these enzymes are largely unknown and their biotechnological potential also remains poorly understood. In this study, the production and thermostability of extracellular enzymes produced by phytopathogenic Botryosphaeriaceae was investigated. Hydrolytic and oxidative activities were detected and quantified at different temperatures. Most strains (70%; 37/53) were able to produce simultaneously cellulases, laccases, xylanases, pectinases, pectin lyases, amylases, lipases, and proteases. Surprisingly for mesophilic filamentous fungi, several enzymes proved to be thermostable: cellulases from Neofusicoccum mediterraneum CAA 001 and from Dothiorella prunicola CBS 124723, lipases from Diplodia pinea (CAA 015 and CBS 109726), and proteases from Melanops tulasnei CBS 116806 were more active at 70 °C than at any of the other temperatures tested. In addition, lipases produced by Diplodia pinea were found to be significantly more active than any other known lipase from Botryosphaeriales. The thermal activity profile and the wide array of activities secreted by these fungi make them optimal producers of biotechnologically relevant enzymes that may be applied in the food and the health industries (proteases), the pulp-and-paper and biofuel industries (cellulases), or even in the detergent industry (lipases, proteases, amylases, and cellulases). PMID:24802941

  4. Increasing the applicability of density functional theory. IV. Consequences of ionization-potential improved exchange-correlation potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, Prakash; Bartlett, Rodney J.

    2014-05-14

    This paper's objective is to create a “consistent” mean-field based Kohn-Sham (KS) density functional theory (DFT) meaning the functional should not only provide good total energy properties, but also the corresponding KS eigenvalues should be accurate approximations to the vertical ionization potentials (VIPs) of the molecule, as the latter condition attests to the viability of the exchange-correlation potential (V{sub XC}). None of the prominently used DFT approaches show these properties: the optimized effective potential V{sub XC} based ab initio dft does. A local, range-separated hybrid potential cam-QTP-00 is introduced as the basis for a “consistent” KS DFT approach. The computed VIPs as the negative of KS eigenvalue have a mean absolute error of 0.8 eV for an extensive set of molecule's electron ionizations, including the core. Barrier heights, equilibrium geometries, and magnetic properties obtained from the potential are in good agreement with experiment. A similar accuracy with less computational efforts can be achieved by using a non-variational global hybrid variant of the QTP-00 approach.

  5. Virulence Potential of Activatable Shiga Toxin 2d–Producing Escherichia coli Isolates from Fresh Produce

    PubMed Central

    Melton-Celsa, Angela R.; O'Brien, Alison D.; Feng, Peter C. H.

    2016-01-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx)–producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains are food- and waterborne pathogens that are often transmitted via beef products or fresh produce. STEC strains cause both sporadic infections and outbreaks, which may result in hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome. STEC strains may elaborate Stx1, Stx2, and/or subtypes of those toxins. Epidemiological evidence indicates that STEC that produce subtypes Stx2a, Stx2c, and/or Stx2d are more often associated with serious illness. The Stx2d subtype becomes more toxic to Vero cells after incubation with intestinal mucus or elastase, a process named “activation.” Stx2d is not generally found in the E. coli serotypes most commonly connected to STEC outbreaks. However, STEC strains that are stx2d positive can be isolated from foods, an occurrence that gives rise to the question of whether those food isolates are potential human pathogens. In this study, we examined 14 STEC strains from fresh produce that were stx2d positive and found that they all produced the mucus-activatable Stx2d and that a subset of the strains tested were virulent in streptomycin-treated mice. PMID:26555533

  6. Virulence Potential of Activatable Shiga Toxin 2d-Producing Escherichia coli Isolates from Fresh Produce.

    PubMed

    Melton-Celsa, Angela R; O'Brien, Alison D; Feng, Peter C H

    2015-11-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains are food- and waterborne pathogens that are often transmitted via beef products or fresh produce. STEC strains cause both sporadic infections and outbreaks, which may result in hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome. STEC strains may elaborate Stx1, Stx2, and/or subtypes of those toxins. Epidemiological evidence indicates that STEC that produce subtypes Stx2a, Stx2c, and/or Stx2d are more often associated with serious illness. The Stx2d subtype becomes more toxic to Vero cells after incubation with intestinal mucus or elastase, a process named "activation." Stx2d is not generally found in the E. coli serotypes most commonly connected to STEC outbreaks. However, STEC strains that are stx2d positive can be isolated from foods, an occurrence that gives rise to the question of whether those food isolates are potential human pathogens. In this study, we examined 14 STEC strains from fresh produce that were stx2d positive and found that they all produced the mucus-activatable Stx2d and that a subset of the strains tested were virulent in streptomycin-treated mice. PMID:26555533

  7. Potential Energy Curves and Collisions Integrals of Air Components. 2; Interactions Involving Ionized Atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallcop, James R.; Partridge, Harry; Levin, Eugene; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Collision integrals are fundamental quantities required to determine the transport properties of the environment surrounding aerospace vehicles in the upper atmosphere. These collision integrals can be determined as a function of temperature from the potential energy curves describing the atomic and molecular collisions. Ab initio calculations provide a practical method of computing the required interaction potentials. In this work we will discuss recent advances in scattering calculations with an emphasis on the accuracy that is obtainable. Results for interactions of the atoms and ionized atoms of nitrogen and oxygen will be reviewed and their application to the determination of transport properties, such as diffusion and viscosity coefficients, will be examined.

  8. Communication: Physical origins of ionization potential shifts in mixed carboxylic acids and water complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Quanli; Tang, Zhen; Su, Peifeng; Wu, Wei; Yang, Zhijun; Trindle, Carl O.; Knee, Joseph L.

    2016-08-01

    The ionization potential (IP) of the aromatic alpha hydroxy carboxylic acid, 9-hydroxy-9-fluorene carboxylic acid (9HFCA), is shifted by complexation with hydrogen bonding ligands such as water and formic acid. Generalized Kohn-Sham energy decomposition analysis decomposes the intermolecular binding energies into a frozen energy term, polarization, correlation, and/or dispersion energy terms, as well as terms of geometric relaxation and zero point energy. We observe that in each dimer the attractive polarization always increases upon ionization, enhancing binding in the cation and shifting the IP toward the red. For 9HFCA—H2O, a substantial decrease of the repulsive frozen energy in cation further shifts the IP toward red. For 9HFCA—HCOOH, the increase of the frozen energy actually occurs in the cation and shifts the IP toward blue. Consistent with the experimental measurements, our analysis provides new, non-intuitive perspectives on multiple hydrogen bonds interactions in carboxylic acids and water complexes.

  9. Sprites as Luminous Columns of Ionization Produced by Quasi-Electrostatic Thundercloud Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pasko, V. P.; Inan, U. S.; Bell, T. F.

    1996-01-01

    Quasi-electrostatic (QE) fields which exist above thunderclouds after lightning discharges can lead to the formation of columnar channels of breakdown ionization and carrot-like vertical luminous structures with typical transverse dimension approximately 5-10 km spaning an altitude range from approximately 80 km to well below approximately 50 km. The carrot-like forms closely resemble those observed in sprites. Results indicate that the appearance of optical emissions can be significantly delayed in time (approx. 1-20 ms) with respect to the causative lightning discharge.

  10. The Potential for Microalgae as Bioreactors to Produce Pharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Na; Fan, Chengming; Chen, Yuhong; Hu, Zanmin

    2016-01-01

    As photosynthetic organisms, microalgae can efficiently convert solar energy into biomass. Microalgae are currently used as an important source of valuable natural biologically active molecules, such as carotenoids, chlorophyll, long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, phycobiliproteins, carotenoids and enzymes. Significant advances have been achieved in microalgae biotechnology over the last decade, and the use of microalgae as bioreactors for expressing recombinant proteins is receiving increased interest. Compared with the bioreactor systems that are currently in use, microalgae may be an attractive alternative for the production of pharmaceuticals, recombinant proteins and other valuable products. Products synthesized via the genetic engineering of microalgae include vaccines, antibodies, enzymes, blood-clotting factors, immune regulators, growth factors, hormones, and other valuable products, such as the anticancer agent Taxol. In this paper, we briefly compare the currently used bioreactor systems, summarize the progress in genetic engineering of microalgae, and discuss the potential for microalgae as bioreactors to produce pharmaceuticals. PMID:27322258

  11. The Potential for Microalgae as Bioreactors to Produce Pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Yan, Na; Fan, Chengming; Chen, Yuhong; Hu, Zanmin

    2016-01-01

    As photosynthetic organisms, microalgae can efficiently convert solar energy into biomass. Microalgae are currently used as an important source of valuable natural biologically active molecules, such as carotenoids, chlorophyll, long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, phycobiliproteins, carotenoids and enzymes. Significant advances have been achieved in microalgae biotechnology over the last decade, and the use of microalgae as bioreactors for expressing recombinant proteins is receiving increased interest. Compared with the bioreactor systems that are currently in use, microalgae may be an attractive alternative for the production of pharmaceuticals, recombinant proteins and other valuable products. Products synthesized via the genetic engineering of microalgae include vaccines, antibodies, enzymes, blood-clotting factors, immune regulators, growth factors, hormones, and other valuable products, such as the anticancer agent Taxol. In this paper, we briefly compare the currently used bioreactor systems, summarize the progress in genetic engineering of microalgae, and discuss the potential for microalgae as bioreactors to produce pharmaceuticals. PMID:27322258

  12. Equation of motion coupled cluster methods for electron attachment and ionization potential in polyacenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhaskaran-Nair, Kiran; Kowalski, Karol; Jarrell, Mark; Moreno, Juana; Shelton, William A.

    2015-11-01

    Polyacenes have attracted considerable attention due to their various applications in organic optoelectronic materials. This study focuses on linear polyacenes and their electron affinity (EA) and ionization potential (IP) properties. We have employed our recent implementation of EA/IP equation of motion coupled cluster singles and doubles (EA/IP-EOMCCSD) methods which are accurate, computationally efficient and are capable of treating large systems employing reasonable basis sets size. The EA/IP results obtained for naphthalene, anthracene, tetracene, pentacene, hexacene and heptacene are in a good agreement with experiment. Comparison between quality of excitation energies obtained from IP-EOMCCSD and EE-EOMCCSD formalisms were also studied.

  13. Accurate Ionization Potentials and Electron Affinities of Acceptor Molecules II: Non-Empirically Tuned Long-Range Corrected Hybrid Functionals.

    PubMed

    Gallandi, Lukas; Marom, Noa; Rinke, Patrick; Körzdörfer, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    The performance of non-empirically tuned long-range corrected hybrid functionals for the prediction of vertical ionization potentials (IPs) and electron affinities (EAs) is assessed for a set of 24 organic acceptor molecules. Basis set-extrapolated coupled cluster singles, doubles, and perturbative triples [CCSD(T)] calculations serve as a reference for this study. Compared to standard exchange-correlation functionals, tuned long-range corrected hybrid functionals produce highly reliable results for vertical IPs and EAs, yielding mean absolute errors on par with computationally more demanding GW calculations. In particular, it is demonstrated that long-range corrected hybrid functionals serve as ideal starting points for non-self-consistent GW calculations. PMID:26731340

  14. Direct computation of general chemical energy differences: Application to ionization potentials, excitation, and bond energies

    SciTech Connect

    Beste, Ariana; Harrison, Robert J; Yanai, Takeshi

    2006-01-01

    Chemists are mainly interested in energy differences. In contrast, most quantum chemical methods yield the total energy which is a large number compared to the difference and has therefore to be computed to a higher relative precision than would be necessary for the difference alone. Hence, it is desirable to compute energy differences directly, thereby avoiding the precision problem. Whenever it is possible to find a parameter which transforms smoothly from an initial to a final state, the energy difference can be obtained by integrating the energy derivative with respect to that parameter (c.f., thermodynamic integration or adiabatic connection methods). If the dependence on the parameter is predominantly linear, accurate results can be obtained by single-point integration. In density functional theory (DFT) and Hartree-Fock, we applied the formalism to ionization potentials, excitation energies, and chemical bond breaking. Example calculations for ionization potentials and excitation energies showed that accurate results could be obtained with a linear estimate. For breaking bonds, we introduce a non-geometrical parameter which gradually turns the interaction between two fragments of a molecule on. The interaction changes the potentials used to determine the orbitals as well as constraining the orbitals to be orthogonal.

  15. Optical potential approach to the electron-atom impact ionization threshold problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Temkin, A.; Hahn, Y.

    1973-01-01

    The problem of the threshold law for electron-atom impact ionization is reconsidered as an extrapolation of inelastic cross sections through the ionization threshold. The cross sections are evaluated from a distorted wave matrix element, the final state of which describes the scattering from the Nth excited state of the target atom. The actual calculation is carried for the e-H system, and a model is introduced which is shown to preserve the essential properties of the problem while at the same time reducing the dimensionability of the Schrodinger equation. Nevertheless, the scattering equation is still very complex. It is dominated by the optical potential which is expanded in terms of eigen-spectrum of QHQ. It is shown by actual calculation that the lower eigenvalues of this spectrum descend below the relevant inelastic thresholds; it follows rigorously that the optical potential contains repulsive terms. Analytical solutions of the final state wave function are obtained with several approximations of the optical potential.

  16. Direct computation of general chemical energy differences: Application to ionization potentials, excitation, and bond energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beste, A.; Harrison, R. J.; Yanai, T.

    2006-08-01

    Chemists are mainly interested in energy differences. In contrast, most quantum chemical methods yield the total energy which is a large number compared to the difference and has therefore to be computed to a higher relative precision than would be necessary for the difference alone. Hence, it is desirable to compute energy differences directly, thereby avoiding the precision problem. Whenever it is possible to find a parameter which transforms smoothly from an initial to a final state, the energy difference can be obtained by integrating the energy derivative with respect to that parameter (cf. thermodynamic integration or adiabatic connection methods). If the dependence on the parameter is predominantly linear, accurate results can be obtained by single-point integration. In density functional theory and Hartree-Fock, we applied the formalism to ionization potentials, excitation energies, and chemical bond breaking. Example calculations for ionization potentials and excitation energies showed that accurate results could be obtained with a linear estimate. For breaking bonds, we introduce a nongeometrical parameter which gradually turns the interaction between two fragments of a molecule on. The interaction changes the potentials used to determine the orbitals as well as the constraint on the orbitals to be orthogonal.

  17. Potential human study populations for non-ionizing (radio frequency) radiation health effects

    SciTech Connect

    Novotney, L.C.; Gravitis, I.

    1982-12-01

    This research project was initiated to identify potential human populations for future epidemiological studies of the health effects of radio frequency radiation. Through a literature search and contacts with various groups and organizations, numerous occupations and applications of radio frequency radiation (RFR) were identified and evaluated for their suitability for further study. Many populations were eliminated early because their potential exposure to RFR was too limited or data necessary for epidemiological research were unavailable. Eight populations were evaluated in detail and appear to satisfy many of the criteria for epidemiological research and could be useful study groups in an investigation of the health effects of non-ionizing radiation. The eight potential study populations are: RF heat sealer operators, HF (high frequency) tube welder operators, medical diathermy operators in Veterans Administration hospitals, medical diathermy operators in rehabilitation facilities, school children located near broadcasting towers, state policemen, security guards, and radar technicians.

  18. Accurate Kohn-Sham ionization potentials from scaled-opposite-spin second-order optimized effective potential methods.

    PubMed

    Śmiga, Szymon; Della Sala, Fabio; Buksztel, Adam; Grabowski, Ireneusz; Fabiano, Eduardo

    2016-08-15

    One important property of Kohn-Sham (KS) density functional theory is the exact equality of the energy of the highest occupied KS orbital (HOMO) with the negative ionization potential of the system. This exact feature is out of reach for standard density-dependent semilocal functionals. Conversely, accurate results can be obtained using orbital-dependent functionals in the optimized effective potential (OEP) approach. In this article, we investigate the performance, in this context, of some advanced OEP methods, with special emphasis on the recently proposed scaled-opposite-spin OEP functional. Moreover, we analyze the impact of the so-called HOMO condition on the final quality of the HOMO energy. Results are compared to reference data obtained at the CCSD(T) level of theory. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27357413

  19. Signature of superradiance from a nitrogen-gas plasma channel produced by strong-field ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guihua; Jing, Chenrui; Zeng, Bin; Xie, Hongqiang; Yao, Jinping; Chu, Wei; Ni, Jielei; Zhang, Haisu; Xu, Huailiang; Cheng, Ya; Xu, Zhizhan

    2014-03-01

    Recently, Yao et al. demonstrated the creation of coherent emissions in nitrogen gas with two-color (800 nm + 400 nm) ultrafast laser pulses [J. Yao, G. Li, C. Jing, B. Zeng, W. Chu, J. Ni, H. Zhang, H. Xie, C. Zhang, H. Li, H. Xu, S. L. Chin, Y. Cheng, and Z. Xu, New J. Phys. 15, 023046 (2013), 10.1088/1367-2630/15/2/023046]. Based on this two-color scheme, here we report on systematic investigation of temporal characteristics of the radiation emitted at 391 nm [N2+: B2Σu+(ν =0) -X2Σg+(ν =0)] by experimentally examining its temporal profiles with the increase of the plasma channel induced by the intense 800-nm femtosecond laser pulses at a nitrogen-gas pressure of ˜25 mbar. We reveal unexpected temporal profiles of the coherent emissions, which show significant superradiance signatures owing to the cooperation of an ensemble of excited N2+ molecules that are coherently radiating in phase. Our findings shed more light on the mechanisms behind the coherent laserlike emissions induced by strong-field ionization of molecules.

  20. Antioxidative potential of folate producing probiotic Lactobacillus helveticus CD6.

    PubMed

    Ahire, Jayesh Jagannath; Mokashe, Narendra Uttamrao; Patil, Hemant Jagatrao; Chaudhari, Bhushan Liladhar

    2013-02-01

    Folate producing Lactobacillus sp. CD6 isolated from fermented milk showed 98% similarity with Lactobacillus helveticus based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. It was found to produce a folic acid derivative 5-methyl tetrahydrofolate (5-MeTHF). The intracellular cell-free extract of strain demonstrated antioxidative activity with the inhibition rate of ascorbate autoxidation in the range of 27.5% ± 3.7%. It showed highest metal ion chelation ability for Fe(2+) (0.26 ± 0.06 ppm) as compared to Cu(2+). The DPPH (α,α-Diphenyl-β-Picrylhydrazyl) radical scavenging activity for intact cells were found to be 24.7% ± 10.9% proved its antioxidative potential. Furthermore, it demonstrated 14.89% inhibition of epinephrine autoxidation, 20.9 ± 1.8 μg cysteine equivalent reducing activity and 20.8% ± 0.9% hydroxyl radical scavenging effect. The strain was evaluated for probiotic properties as per WHO and FAO guidelines. It showed 90.61% survival at highly acidic condition (pH 2.0), 90.66% viability in presence of synthetic gastric juice and 68% survivability at 0.5% bile concentration for 24 h. It was susceptible to many antibiotics which reduces the prospect to offer resistance determinants to other organisms if administered in the form of probiotic preparations. It showed in vitro mucus binding and antimicrobial activity against enteric pathogens like Salmonella typhimurium (NCIM 2501), Streptococcus pyogenes (NCIM 2608), and Staphylococcus aureus (NCIM 5021) and moreover it showed non- hemolytic activity on sheep blood agar. PMID:24425884

  1. A hierarchy of local coupled cluster singles and doubles response methods for ionization potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wälz, Gero; Usvyat, Denis; Korona, Tatiana; Schütz, Martin

    2016-02-01

    We present a hierarchy of local coupled cluster (CC) linear response (LR) methods to calculate ionization potentials (IPs), i.e., excited states with one electron annihilated relative to a ground state reference. The time-dependent perturbation operator V(t), as well as the operators related to the first-order (with respect to V(t)) amplitudes and multipliers, thus are not number conserving and have half-integer particle rank m. Apart from calculating IPs of neutral molecules, the method offers also the possibility to study ground and excited states of neutral radicals as ionized states of closed-shell anions. It turns out that for comparable accuracy IPs require a higher-order treatment than excitation energies; an IP-CC LR method corresponding to CC2 LR or the algebraic diagrammatic construction scheme through second order performs rather poorly. We therefore systematically extended the order with respect to the fluctuation potential of the IP-CC2 LR Jacobian up to IP-CCSD LR, keeping the excitation space of the first-order (with respect to V(t)) cluster operator restricted to the m = /1 2 ⊕ /3 2 subspace and the accuracy of the zero-order (ground-state) amplitudes at the level of CC2 or MP2. For the more expensive diagrams beyond the IP-CC2 LR Jacobian, we employ local approximations. The implemented methods are capable of treating large molecular systems with hundred atoms or more.

  2. Multireference configuration interaction calculations of the first six ionization potentials of the uranium atom

    SciTech Connect

    Bross, David H.; Parmar, Payal; Peterson, Kirk A.

    2015-11-12

    The first 6 ionization potentials (IPs) of the uranium atom have been calculated using multireference configuration interaction (MRCI+Q) with extrapolations to the complete basis set (CBS) limit using new all-electron correlation consistent basis sets. The latter were carried out with the third-order Douglas-Kroll-Hess Hamiltonian. Correlation down through the 5s5p5d electrons have been taken into account, as well as contributions to the IPs due to the Lamb shift. Spin-orbit coupling contributions calculated at the 4-component Kramers restricted configuration interaction level, as well as the Gaunt term computed at the Dirac-Hartree-Fock level, were added to the best scalar relativistic results. As a result, the final ionization potentials are expected to be accurate to at least 5 kcal/mol (0.2 eV), and thus more reliable than the current experimental values of IP3 through IP6.

  3. Multireference configuration interaction calculations of the first six ionization potentials of the uranium atom

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bross, David H.; Parmar, Payal; Peterson, Kirk A.

    2015-11-12

    The first 6 ionization potentials (IPs) of the uranium atom have been calculated using multireference configuration interaction (MRCI+Q) with extrapolations to the complete basis set (CBS) limit using new all-electron correlation consistent basis sets. The latter were carried out with the third-order Douglas-Kroll-Hess Hamiltonian. Correlation down through the 5s5p5d electrons have been taken into account, as well as contributions to the IPs due to the Lamb shift. Spin-orbit coupling contributions calculated at the 4-component Kramers restricted configuration interaction level, as well as the Gaunt term computed at the Dirac-Hartree-Fock level, were added to the best scalar relativistic results. As amore » result, the final ionization potentials are expected to be accurate to at least 5 kcal/mol (0.2 eV), and thus more reliable than the current experimental values of IP3 through IP6.« less

  4. Sprites produced by quasi-electrostatic heating and ionization in the lower ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasko, V. P.; Inan, U. S.; Bell, T. F.; Taranenko, Y. N.

    1997-03-01

    Quasi-electrostatic (QE) fields that temporarily exist at high altitudes following the sudden removal (e.g., by a lightning discharge) of thundercloud charge at low altitudes lead to ambient electron heating (up to ~5eV average energy), ionization of neutrals, and excitation of optical emissions in the mesosphere/lower ionosphere. Model calculations predict the possibility of significant (several orders of magnitude) modification of the lower ionospheric conductivity in the form of depletions of electron density due to dissociative attachment to O2 molecules and/or in the form of enhancements of electron density due to breakdown ionization. Results indicate that the optical emission intensities of the 1st positive band of N2 corresponding to fast (~1ms) removal of 100-300 C of thundercloud charge from 10 km altitude are in good agreement with observations of the upper part (``head'' and ``hair'' [Sentman et al., 1995]) of the sprites. The typical region of brightest optical emission has horizontal and vertical dimensions ~10km, centered at altitudes 70 km and is interpreted as the head of the sprite. The model also shows the formation of low intensity glow (``hair'') above this region due to the excitation of optical emissions at altitudes ~85km during ~500μs at the initial stage of the lightning discharge. Comparison of the optical emission intensities of the 1st and 2nd positive bands of N2, Meinel and 1st negative bands of N2+, and 1st negative band of O2+ demonstrates that the 1st positive band of N2 is the dominating optical emission in the altitude range around ~70km, which accounts for the observed red color of sprites, in excellent agreement with recent spectroscopic observations of sprites. Results indicate that the optical emission levels are predominantly defined by the lightning discharge duration and the conductivity properties of the atmosphere/lower ionosphere (i.e., relaxation time of electric field in the conducting medium). The model demonstrates

  5. Radiative properties of molecular nitrogen ions produced by helium Penning ionization and argon effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, George, III; Song, Kyo-Dong

    1994-01-01

    The development of hypersonic aerospace vehicles requires a better understanding on the thermal and chemical nonequilibrium kinetics of participating species in shock layers. The computational fluid dynamic (CFD) codes developed for such flowfields overestimate the radiation in the spectral region of 300 - 600 nm. A speculation for this overestimation is that inclusion of Ar, CO2, and H2O at the upper atmosphere flight region makes a significant impact on radiative kinetics of molecular nitrogen ions. To define the effects of minority species on the radiative kinetics of N2(+), an experimental setup was made by using the helium Penning ionization. The vibrational and rotational temperature were measured by mapping the vibrational and rotational distributions of N2(+) emission with high spectroscopic resolution and absolute intensity measurements. Measured vibrational temperatures were in the range from 18,000 to 36,000 K, and rotational temperatures were in the range from 300 to 370 K. The irradiance of 391.44 nm line and rotational and vibrational temperatures were analyzed to define argon and CO2 effects on the N2(+) emission. When Ar or CO2 is injected with N2, the rotational temperature did not change. The irradiances were reduced by 34 percent and 78 percent for the 50 percent of mixture of Ar and CO2, respectively. The vibrational temperatures were increased by 24.1 percent and 82.9 percent for the 50 percent of mixture of Ar and CO2, respectively. It appears that there are no significant effects from small concentrations of Ar and CO2 at the upper atmosphere flight region.

  6. Preventive or Potential Therapeutic Value of Nutraceuticals against Ionizing Radiation-Induced Oxidative Stress in Exposed Subjects and Frequent Fliers

    PubMed Central

    Giardi, Maria Teresa; Touloupakis, Eleftherios; Bertolotto, Delfina; Mascetti, Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    Humans are constantly exposed to ionizing radiation deriving from outer space sources or activities related to medical care. Absorption of ionizing radiation doses over a prolonged period of time can result in oxidative damage and cellular dysfunction inducing several diseases, especially in ageing subjects. In this report, we analyze the effects of ionizing radiation, particularly at low doses, in relation to a variety of human pathologies, including cancer, and cardiovascular and retinal diseases. We discuss scientific data in support of protection strategies by safe antioxidant formulations that can provide preventive or potential therapeutic value in response to long-term diseases that may develop following exposure. PMID:23965979

  7. Peculiarities of extracellular potentials produced by deep muscles. Part 1: single fibre potential fields.

    PubMed

    Arabadzhiev, T I

    2013-06-01

    The similarity among surface electromyography (EMG) signals recorded by the poles of electrode arrays above deep muscles like erector spinae is a substantial obstacle in determining major muscle characteristics. What makes EMG signals so different when detected at various distances from the fibres? To answer this question, we simulated and analyzed extracellular potential fields produced by a single muscle fibre. We considered the fields at a few specific time instants. They corresponded to the origination of two depolarized zones at the end-plate, their propagation along both semi-fibres, and extinction at the fibre-ends. We used intracellular action potentials and muscle fibre propagation velocities typical for non-fatigued or fatigued muscle fibres. We have shown that at relatively small distances from the fibre, the strong potential fields are concentrated mainly near the sources. The interaction between potential fields is weak and the propagation of the fields and EMG signals in relatively long fibres is clearly apparent. At large distances, the potential fields are wide and the interaction between the fields produced by the two depolarized zones is strong. The total potential field could remain non-propagating during the entire main phase. As a result, the propagation will be obscured also in EMG signals. PMID:23361341

  8. Perceptions of Sustainable Agriculture: A Longitudinal Study of Young and Potential Producers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamon, Julia A.; Scofield, Gaylan G.

    1998-01-01

    Comparison of an older group of agricultural producers (n=45), young producers (n=102) , and potential producers (n=77) showed the following: potential producers were more positive about sustainable agriculture, younger and potential groups were more likely than older to use dealers as information sources, and potentials were more likely to be…

  9. High-field plasma acceleration in a high-ionization-potential gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corde, S.; Adli, E.; Allen, J. M.; An, W.; Clarke, C. I.; Clausse, B.; Clayton, C. E.; Delahaye, J. P.; Frederico, J.; Gessner, S.; Green, S. Z.; Hogan, M. J.; Joshi, C.; Litos, M.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K. A.; Mori, W. B.; Vafaei-Najafabadi, N.; Walz, D.; Yakimenko, V.

    2016-06-01

    Plasma accelerators driven by particle beams are a very promising future accelerator technology as they can sustain high accelerating fields over long distances with high energy efficiency. They rely on the excitation of a plasma wave in the wake of a drive beam. To generate the plasma, a neutral gas can be field-ionized by the head of the drive beam, in which case the distance of acceleration and energy gain can be strongly limited by head erosion. Here we overcome this limit and demonstrate that electrons in the tail of a drive beam can be accelerated by up to 27 GeV in a high-ionization-potential gas (argon), boosting their initial 20.35 GeV energy by 130%. Particle-in-cell simulations show that the argon plasma is sustaining very high electric fields, of ~150 GV m-1, over ~20 cm. The results open new possibilities for the design of particle beam drivers and plasma sources.

  10. High-field plasma acceleration in a high-ionization-potential gas

    PubMed Central

    Corde, S.; Adli, E.; Allen, J. M.; An, W.; Clarke, C. I.; Clausse, B.; Clayton, C. E.; Delahaye, J. P.; Frederico, J.; Gessner, S.; Green, S. Z.; Hogan, M. J.; Joshi, C.; Litos, M.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K. A.; Mori, W. B.; Vafaei-Najafabadi, N.; Walz, D.; Yakimenko, V.

    2016-01-01

    Plasma accelerators driven by particle beams are a very promising future accelerator technology as they can sustain high accelerating fields over long distances with high energy efficiency. They rely on the excitation of a plasma wave in the wake of a drive beam. To generate the plasma, a neutral gas can be field-ionized by the head of the drive beam, in which case the distance of acceleration and energy gain can be strongly limited by head erosion. Here we overcome this limit and demonstrate that electrons in the tail of a drive beam can be accelerated by up to 27 GeV in a high-ionization-potential gas (argon), boosting their initial 20.35 GeV energy by 130%. Particle-in-cell simulations show that the argon plasma is sustaining very high electric fields, of ∼150 GV m−1, over ∼20 cm. The results open new possibilities for the design of particle beam drivers and plasma sources. PMID:27312720

  11. High-field plasma acceleration in a high-ionization-potential gas.

    PubMed

    Corde, S; Adli, E; Allen, J M; An, W; Clarke, C I; Clausse, B; Clayton, C E; Delahaye, J P; Frederico, J; Gessner, S; Green, S Z; Hogan, M J; Joshi, C; Litos, M; Lu, W; Marsh, K A; Mori, W B; Vafaei-Najafabadi, N; Walz, D; Yakimenko, V

    2016-01-01

    Plasma accelerators driven by particle beams are a very promising future accelerator technology as they can sustain high accelerating fields over long distances with high energy efficiency. They rely on the excitation of a plasma wave in the wake of a drive beam. To generate the plasma, a neutral gas can be field-ionized by the head of the drive beam, in which case the distance of acceleration and energy gain can be strongly limited by head erosion. Here we overcome this limit and demonstrate that electrons in the tail of a drive beam can be accelerated by up to 27 GeV in a high-ionization-potential gas (argon), boosting their initial 20.35 GeV energy by 130%. Particle-in-cell simulations show that the argon plasma is sustaining very high electric fields, of ∼150 GV m(-1), over ∼20 cm. The results open new possibilities for the design of particle beam drivers and plasma sources. PMID:27312720

  12. High-field plasma acceleration in a high-ionization-potential gas

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Corde, S.; Adli, E.; Allen, J. M.; An, W.; Clarke, C. I.; Clausse, B.; Clayton, C. E.; Delahaye, J. P.; Frederico, J.; Gessner, S.; et al

    2016-06-17

    Plasma accelerators driven by particle beams are a very promising future accelerator technology as they can sustain high accelerating fields over long distances with high energy efficiency. They rely on the excitation of a plasma wave in the wake of a drive beam. To generate the plasma, a neutral gas can be field-ionized by the head of the drive beam, in which case the distance of acceleration and energy gain can be strongly limited by head erosion. In our research, we overcome this limit and demonstrate that electrons in the tail of a drive beam can be accelerated by upmore » to 27 GeV in a high-ionization-potential gas (argon), boosting their initial 20.35 GeV energy by 130%. Particle-in-cell simulations show that the argon plasma is sustaining very high electric fields, of ~150 GV m-1, over ~20 cm. Lastly, the results open new possibilities for the design of particle beam drivers and plasma sources.« less

  13. Stellar coronal abundances. 3: The solar first ionization potential effect determined from full-disk observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laming, J. Martin; Drake, J. J.; Widing, Kenneth G.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper we reanalayze the full-disk quiet-sun spectrum of Mallinovsky & Heroux (1973) with modern atomic data. The purposes of this are to check our atomic data and methods in other investigations using data from nearby stars obtained with the NASA Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) satellite, and to confirm that the solar first ionization potential (FIP) effect investigated by previous authors studying discrete solar regions is the same as that found in full-disk spectra. We recover the usual solar FIP effect of a coronal abundance enhancement of elements with a low FIP of a factor approximately 3-4 for lines formed at temperatures greater than approximately 10(exp 6) K. For lower temperatures, the FIP effect seems to be substantially smaller, in qualitative agreement with other data. Comparing our full-disk result with those from discrete solar structures suggest that the FIP effect is a function of altitude, with the lower temperature full-disk emission being dominated by the super-granulation network. We also compare the recent ionization balance of Arnaud & Raymond (1992) with that of Arnaud & Rothenflug (1985).

  14. Communication: Physical origins of ionization potential shifts in mixed carboxylic acids and water complexes.

    PubMed

    Gu, Quanli; Tang, Zhen; Su, Peifeng; Wu, Wei; Yang, Zhijun; Trindle, Carl O; Knee, Joseph L

    2016-08-01

    The ionization potential (IP) of the aromatic alpha hydroxy carboxylic acid, 9-hydroxy-9-fluorene carboxylic acid (9HFCA), is shifted by complexation with hydrogen bonding ligands such as water and formic acid. Generalized Kohn-Sham energy decomposition analysis decomposes the intermolecular binding energies into a frozen energy term, polarization, correlation, and/or dispersion energy terms, as well as terms of geometric relaxation and zero point energy. We observe that in each dimer the attractive polarization always increases upon ionization, enhancing binding in the cation and shifting the IP toward the red. For 9HFCA-H2O, a substantial decrease of the repulsive frozen energy in cation further shifts the IP toward red. For 9HFCA-HCOOH, the increase of the frozen energy actually occurs in the cation and shifts the IP toward blue. Consistent with the experimental measurements, our analysis provides new, non-intuitive perspectives on multiple hydrogen bonds interactions in carboxylic acids and water complexes. PMID:27497532

  15. NON-WKB MODELS OF THE FIRST IONIZATION POTENTIAL EFFECT: THE ROLE OF SLOW MODE WAVES

    SciTech Connect

    Laming, J. Martin

    2012-01-10

    A model for element abundance fractionation between the solar chromosphere and corona is further developed. The ponderomotive force due to Alfven waves propagating through or reflecting from the chromosphere in solar conditions generally accelerates chromospheric ions, but not neutrals, into the corona. This gives rise to what has become known as the first ionization potential effect. We incorporate new physical processes into the model. The chromospheric ionization balance is improved and the effect of different approximations is discussed. We also treat the parametric generation of slow mode waves by the parallel propagating Alfven waves. This is also an effect of the ponderomotive force, arising from the periodic variation of the magnetic pressure driving an acoustic mode, which adds to the background longitudinal pressure. This can have subtle effects on the fractionation, rendering it quasi-mass independent in the lower regions of the chromosphere. We also briefly discuss the change in the fractionation with Alfven wave frequency, relative to the frequency of the overlying coronal loop resonance.

  16. A Microstructured Fiber with Defined Borosilicate Regions to Produce a Radial Micronozzle Array for Nanoelectrospray Ionization.

    PubMed

    Fu, Y; Morency, S; Bachus, K; Simon, D; Hutama, T; Gibson, G T T; Messaddeq, Y; Oleschuk, R D

    2016-01-01

    This work highlights the possibility of using microstructured fibres with predefined doped regions to produce functional microstructures at a fibre facet with differential chemical etching. A specially designed silica microstructured fibre (MSF) that possesses specific boron-doped silica regions was fabricated for the purpose of generating a radial micronozzle array. The MSF was drawn from a preform comprising pure silica capillaries surrounded by boron-doped silica rods. Different etching rates of the boron-doped and silica regions at the fiber facet produces raised nozzles where the silica capillaries were placed. Fabrication parameters were explored in relation to the fidelity and protrusion length of the nozzle. Using etching alone, the nozzle protrusion length was limited, and the inner diameter of the channels in the array is expanded. However with the addition of a protective water counter flow, nozzle protrusion is increased to 60 μm with a limited increase in hole diameter. The radial micronozzle array generated nine individual electrosprays which were characterized using spray current measurements and related to theoretical prediction. Signal enhancement for the higher charge state ions for two peptides showed a substantial signal enhancement compared to conventional emitter technology. PMID:26891920

  17. A Microstructured Fiber with Defined Borosilicate Regions to Produce a Radial Micronozzle Array for Nanoelectrospray Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Y.; Morency, S.; Bachus, K.; Simon, D.; Hutama, T.; Gibson, G. T. T.; Messaddeq, Y.; Oleschuk, R. D.

    2016-02-01

    This work highlights the possibility of using microstructured fibres with predefined doped regions to produce functional microstructures at a fibre facet with differential chemical etching. A specially designed silica microstructured fibre (MSF) that possesses specific boron-doped silica regions was fabricated for the purpose of generating a radial micronozzle array. The MSF was drawn from a preform comprising pure silica capillaries surrounded by boron-doped silica rods. Different etching rates of the boron-doped and silica regions at the fiber facet produces raised nozzles where the silica capillaries were placed. Fabrication parameters were explored in relation to the fidelity and protrusion length of the nozzle. Using etching alone, the nozzle protrusion length was limited, and the inner diameter of the channels in the array is expanded. However with the addition of a protective water counter flow, nozzle protrusion is increased to 60 μm with a limited increase in hole diameter. The radial micronozzle array generated nine individual electrosprays which were characterized using spray current measurements and related to theoretical prediction. Signal enhancement for the higher charge state ions for two peptides showed a substantial signal enhancement compared to conventional emitter technology.

  18. A Microstructured Fiber with Defined Borosilicate Regions to Produce a Radial Micronozzle Array for Nanoelectrospray Ionization

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Y.; Morency, S.; Bachus, K.; Simon, D.; Hutama, T.; Gibson, G. T. T.; Messaddeq, Y.; Oleschuk, R. D.

    2016-01-01

    This work highlights the possibility of using microstructured fibres with predefined doped regions to produce functional microstructures at a fibre facet with differential chemical etching. A specially designed silica microstructured fibre (MSF) that possesses specific boron-doped silica regions was fabricated for the purpose of generating a radial micronozzle array. The MSF was drawn from a preform comprising pure silica capillaries surrounded by boron-doped silica rods. Different etching rates of the boron-doped and silica regions at the fiber facet produces raised nozzles where the silica capillaries were placed. Fabrication parameters were explored in relation to the fidelity and protrusion length of the nozzle. Using etching alone, the nozzle protrusion length was limited, and the inner diameter of the channels in the array is expanded. However with the addition of a protective water counter flow, nozzle protrusion is increased to 60 μm with a limited increase in hole diameter. The radial micronozzle array generated nine individual electrosprays which were characterized using spray current measurements and related to theoretical prediction. Signal enhancement for the higher charge state ions for two peptides showed a substantial signal enhancement compared to conventional emitter technology. PMID:26891920

  19. Ionization potential of {sup 9}Be calculated including nuclear motion and relativistic corrections

    SciTech Connect

    Stanke, Monika; Kedziera, Dariusz; Bubin, Sergiy; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2007-05-15

    Variational calculations employing explicitly correlated Gaussian functions have been performed for the ground states of {sup 9}Be and {sup 9}Be{sup +} including the nuclear motion [i.e., without assuming the Born-Oppenheimer (BO) approximation]. An approach based on the analytical energy gradient calculated with respect to the Gaussian exponential parameters was employed, leading to energies of the two systems noticeably improved over those found in the recent paper of Pachucki and Komasa [Phys. Rev. A 73, 052502 (2006)]. The non-BO wave functions were used to calculate the {alpha}{sup 2} relativistic corrections ({alpha}=e{sup 2}/({Dirac_h}/2{pi})c). With those corrections and the {alpha}{sup 3} and {alpha}{sup 4} corrections taken from Pachucki and Komasa, a new value of the ionization potential (IP) of {sup 9}Be was determined. It agrees very well with the most recent experimental IP.

  20. Ab initio calculation of ionization potential and electron affinity in solid-state organic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Youngho; Jeon, Sang Ho; Cho, Youngmi; Han, Seungwu

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the vertical ionization potential (IP) and electron affinity (EA) of organic semiconductors in the solid state that govern the optoelectrical property of organic devices using a fully ab initio way. The present method combines the density functional theory and many-body perturbation theory based on G W approximations. To demonstrate the accuracy of this approach, we carry out calculations on several prototypical organic molecules. Since IP and EA depend on the molecular orientation at the surface, the molecular geometry of the surface is explicitly considered through the slab model. The computed IP and EA are in reasonable and consistent agreements with spectroscopic data on organic surfaces with various molecular arrangements. However, the transport gaps are slightly underestimated in calculations, which can be explained by different screening effects between surface and bulk regions.

  1. Role of the ionization potential in nonequilibrium metals driven to absorption saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mincigrucci, R.; Bencivenga, F.; Capotondi, F.; Principi, E.; Giangrisostomi, E.; Battistoni, A.; Caputo, M.; Casolari, F.; Gessini, A.; Manfredda, M.; Pedersoli, E.; Masciovecchio, C.

    2015-07-01

    A composite metallic foil (Al/Mg/Al) has been exposed to intense sub-100 fs free electron laser (FEL) pulses and driven to ultrafast massive photoionization. The resulting nonequilibrium state of matter has been monitored through absorption spectroscopy across the L2 ,3 edge of Mg as a function of the FEL fluence. The raw spectroscopic data indicate that at about 100 J /cm2 the main absorption channels of the sample, i.e., Mg (2 p →free ) and oxidized Al (valence→free ), are almost saturated. The spectral behavior of the induced transparency has been interpreted with an analytical approach based on an effective ionization potential of the generated solid-density plasma.

  2. Solar radiation pressure as a mechanism of acceleration of atoms and first ions with low ionization potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shestakova, L. I.

    2015-04-01

    Calculated results are presented for solar radiation pressure acting on atoms and first ions. For some of these particles, radiation pressure exceeds the gravitational attraction and can accelerate them to large velocities. A comparison of the results with ionization potentials shows that the maxima of radiation pressure on neutral atoms coincide with the minima of the first ionization potentials (FIPs). This relationship is even more apparent for first ions. The minima of the second ionization potentials (SIPs) coincide with the radiation pressure maxima for a number of ions such as Be II, Mg II, Ca II, and the neighboring elements. Thus, radiation pressure may serve as a possible mechanism of acceleration of pickup ions and energetic neutral atoms (ENA) coming from an inner source (zodiacal dust and sungrazing comets). These atoms and ions, which are not typical of the solar wind, are formed as a result of the disintegration of comets or meteor showers near the Sun and can accelerate and reach the Earth's orbit as part of the solar wind. Doubly ionized atoms have resonance lines in the UV range, where solar radiation pressure has no apparent impact on the particle dynamics; thus, the proposed acceleration mechanism can only be applied to neutral atoms and first ions with low potentials of the subsequent ionization.

  3. Anomalous abundances of solar energetic particles and coronal gas: Coulomb effects and First Ionization Potential (FIP) ordering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullan, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    The first ionization potential (FIP) ordering of elemental abundances in solar energetic particles and in the corona which can both be explained Coulomb effects is discussed. Solar energetic particles (SEP) and coronal gas have anomalous abundances relative to the photosphere. The anomalies are similar in both cases: which led to the conclusion that SEP acceleration is not selective, but merely preserves the source abundances. It is argued that SEP acceleration can be selective, because identical selectivity operates to determine the coronal abundances. The abundance anomalies are ordered by first ionization potential (FIP).

  4. Drifting potential humps in ionization zones: The “propeller blades” of high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, André; Ni, Pavel; Panjan, Matjaž; Franz, Robert; Andersson, Joakim

    2013-09-30

    Ion energy distribution functions measured for high power impulse magnetron sputtering show features, such as a broad peak at several 10 eV with an extended tail, as well as asymmetry with respect to E×B, where E and B are the local electric and magnetic field vectors, respectively. Here it is proposed that those features are due to the formation of a potential hump of several 10 V in each of the traveling ionization zones. Potential hump formation is associated with a negative-positive-negative space charge that naturally forms in ionization zones driven by energetic drifting electrons.

  5. New implicitly solvable potential produced by second order shape invariance

    SciTech Connect

    Cannata, F.; Ioffe, M.V.; Kolevatova, E.V.; Nishnianidze, D.N.

    2015-05-15

    The procedure proposed recently by Bougie et al. (2010) to study the general form of shape invariant potentials in one-dimensional Supersymmetric Quantum Mechanics (SUSY QM) is generalized to the case of Higher Order SUSY QM with supercharges of second order in momentum. A new shape invariant potential is constructed by this method. It is singular at the origin, it grows at infinity, and its spectrum depends on the choice of connection conditions in the singular point. The corresponding Schrödinger equation is solved explicitly: the wave functions are constructed analytically, and the energy spectrum is defined implicitly via the transcendental equation which involves Confluent Hypergeometric functions. - Highlights: • New potential with 2nd order irreducible shape invariance was constructed. • The connection conditions at the singularity of potential were obtained. • The explicit expressions for all wave functions were derived. • The implicit equation for the energy spectrum was obtained.

  6. POTENTIAL HYDROCARBON PRODUCING SPECIES OF WESTERN GHATS, TAMIL, NADU, INDIA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The decline in the world supplies of hydrocarbons has lead to the search for alternate sources of fuel and chemicals. Plant species are potential sources of hydrocarbons. Large-scale screening of plants growing in the Western Ghats, Tamil Nadu, India was conducted to assess the hydrocarbon productio...

  7. Three-step resonant photoionization spectroscopy of Ni and Ge: ionization potential and odd-parity Rydberg levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, T.; Brück, K.; Baktash, C.; Beene, J. R.; Geppert, Ch; Havener, C. C.; Krause, H. F.; Liu, Y.; Schultz, D. R.; Stracener, D. W.; Vane, C. R.; Wendt, K.

    2007-12-01

    In preparation of a laser ion source, we have investigated multi-step laser ionization via Rydberg and autoionizing states for atomic Ni and Ge using a mass separator with an ion beam energy of 20 keV. For both elements resonant three-step excitation schemes suitable for modern Ti:sapphire laser systems were developed. Rydberg series in the range of principal quantum numbers 20 <= n <= 80 were localized, assigned and quantum numbers were allocated to the individual resonances. Ionization potentials (IP) were extracted from fits of the individual series and quantum defects of individual levels were analysed for confirmation of series assignment. For Ni the ionization potential could be extracted with significantly increased precision compared to literature with a value of EIP (Ni) = 61 619.77(14) cm-1. Also, at least one notable autoionizing state above the first IP was discovered for both elements, and the different ionization schemes via Rydberg or autoionizing states were compared with respect to line shape, ionization efficiency and selectivity.

  8. Vertical Ionization Potentials of Nucleobases in a Fully Solvated DNA Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Cauet, Emilie L.; Valiev, Marat; Weare, John H.

    2010-05-06

    Calculations of the direct ionization potentials (DIP) of DNA nucleobases in the fully solvated DNA helix are reported. The results show an unexpected large shift of roughly 3.2-3.3 eV compared to the corresponding gas-phase IP values. The DIP shift is nearly the same for all the four DNA bases and appears to vary slowly with the stacking and H-bonding interactions of the nucleobases. We demonstrate that the large shift in the DIP of bases is due to the electric potential around the DNA resulting from the long range solvent structure created by the negative phosphate groups and positive counterions of the DNA helical structure. Thermal fluctuations in the fluid can result in DIP changes of roughly 1ev on a picosecond time scale. The model used in this work is based on a QM/MM approach in which the base (or clusters of bases) are chosen as the QM system and calculated using a high-level quantum chemistry method. The remaining DNA fragment and the species in solution are included in an exact molecular mechanics (MM) model. The expected high accuracy of the QM/MM model is defended in terms of the essentially Columbic nature of the interactions of the solvent (the MM region) with isolated base in the quantum region. For the test anion, Cl-, the QM/MM approach yields the 3.4 eV (gas-phase) to 9.3 eV (aqueous solution) shift of the ionization energy in agreement with experimental values (3.6 and 9.6 eV). The localization of the electronic excitation inside the QM region is supported by current experimental and theoretical evidence indicating that the HOMO of the nucleotide is localized on the base rather than the sugar or the phosphate backbone. Our calculations performed in the native DNA environment support this localization. The QM/MM model presented in this work provides an important simplification to the difficult problem of incorporating a detailed structural model of the physiological conditions into investigations of the electronic processes in DNA.

  9. Ecophysiology of Aspergillus section nigri species potential ochratoxin a producers.

    PubMed

    Astoreca, Andrea L; Magnoli, Carina E; Dalcero, Ana M

    2010-11-01

    After aflatoxins, ochratoxin A (OTA) is the most studied mycotoxin due to the toxicological significance in human and animal diets. OTA presence has been extensively reported worldwide in the last decade in several agricultural products. The main OTA producer in tropical and temperate climates is Aspergillus carbonarius followed by species belonging to A. niger aggregate. Currently, many scientists worldwide have studied the influence of water activity and temperature for growth and biosynthesis of OTA by these species on synthetic media. This article reviews ecophysiological studies of Aspergillus section Nigri strains on synthetic media and natural substrates. The results of these investigations suggest that significant amounts of OTA can be produced in only five days and that the use of different storage practices, such as a(W) and temperature levels below 0.930 and 15 °C, respectively, allow controlling fungal contamination and minimizing the OTA production in several products as peanuts, corn, dried grapes and derived products for human consumption. PMID:22069566

  10. Ecophysiology of Aspergillus Section Nigri Species Potential Ochratoxin A Producers

    PubMed Central

    Astoreca, Andrea L.; Magnoli, Carina E.; Dalcero, Ana M.

    2010-01-01

    After aflatoxins, ochratoxin A (OTA) is the most studied mycotoxin due to the toxicological significance in human and animal diets. OTA presence has been extensively reported worldwide in the last decade in several agricultural products. The main OTA producer in tropical and temperate climates is Aspergillus carbonarius followed by species belonging to A. niger aggregate. Currently, many scientists worldwide have studied the influence of water activity and temperature for growth and biosynthesis of OTA by these species on synthetic media. This article reviews ecophysiological studies of Aspergillus section Nigri strains on synthetic media and natural substrates. The results of these investigations suggest that significant amounts of OTA can be produced in only five days and that the use of different storage practices, such as aW and temperature levels below 0.930 and 15 °C, respectively, allow controlling fungal contamination and minimizing the OTA production in several products as peanuts, corn, dried grapes and derived products for human consumption. PMID:22069566

  11. Methemoglobinemia hemotoxicity of some antimalarial 8-aminoquinoline analogues and their hydroxylated derivatives: density functional theory computation of ionization potentials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The administration of primaquine (PQ), an essential drug for treatment and radical cure of malaria, can lead to methemoglobin formation and life-threatening hemolysis for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficient patients. The ionization potential (IP, a quantitative measure of the ability to lose...

  12. Characterization of Ce SUP 3+-tributyl phosphate coordination complexes produced by fused droplet electrospray ionization with a target capillary

    SciTech Connect

    Gary S. Groenewold; Jean-Jacques Gaumet

    2011-12-01

    Coordination complexes containing Ce(III) and tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) in the 1+, 2+ and 3+ charge states were generated using desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) mass spectrometry, in which the analyte solutions were supplied via a target capillary orthogonally situated with respect to the electrospray. Comparison with direct electrospray (ESI) showed that the same coordination complexes were produced in each experiment, and could be described by the general formula [Ce(NO3)m=0-2(TBP)n](3-m)+. This result indicates that DESI has utility for measuring metal speciation for metal ligand solutions where the gas-phase complexes generated by ESI have been correlated with solution speciation. Such an application would be useful for analyses where it is desirable to limit the total amount of metal being handled, or that have solvent systems that are not readily amenable to ESI. Both the direct ESI and DESI mass spectra showed similar trends with respect to the TBP:Ce ratio, viz. high values tend to favor formation of a larger fraction of the 1+ species, and the 2+ and 3+ species become relatively more important as the ratio is decreased. Within individual charge state ion envelopes, lower TBP:Ce ratios produce coordination complexes with fewer ligands, a trend also seen using both approaches. These trends again point toward strong similarity between the direct ESI and DESI analyses of the metal-ligand solutions. The DESI experiments were less sensitive for measuring the coordination complexes compared to the direct ESI experiments, by a factor of 10 - 100 depending on whether minimum detectable concentration or absolute ion abundances were considered. Nevertheless, mid-picomolar quantities of coordination complexes were measured using the target capillary, indicating that sensitivity would be sufficient for measuring species in many industrial separations processes.

  13. Aureocins 4185, bacteriocins produced by Staphylococcus aureus 4185: potential application in food preservation.

    PubMed

    Ceotto, Hilana; Brede, Dag; Salehian, Zhian; Nascimento, Janaína dos Santos; Fagundes, Patricia Carlin; Nes, Ingolf F; Bastos, Maria do Carmo de Freire

    2010-10-01

    In the present study, the bacteriocins produced by Staphylococcus aureus 4185, a strain isolated from bovine mastitis, were purified and partially characterized. After purification by ammonium sulfate precipitation, cation-exchange chromatography, and five runs of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), antimicrobial activity was recovered with 40% and 80% isopropanol, suggesting that more than one antimicrobial peptide, named aureocins 4185, is produced by S. aureus 4185. Mass spectrometry analyses revealed three peptides eluted with 40% isopropanol: peptide A (2,305.3 +/-1.5 Da), peptide B (2,327.3 +/-1.5 Da), and peptide C (3,005.5 +/-1.5 Da), and two peptides eluted with 80% isopropanol: peptide D (6,413.5 +/-1.5 Da) and peptide E (12,834.5 +/-1.5 Da). Although five peptides have been detected, only four small peptide sequences were obtained by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight (MALDI-TOF)/TOF mass spectrometry analyses: SLLEQFTGK (eluted with 40% isopropanol), ALLYDER, NNTSHNLPLGWFNVK, and NNLAQGTFNATK (eluted with 80% isopropanol). The sequences SLLEQFTGK and ALLYDER revealed identity with hypothetical peptides with unknown function. The sequences NNTSHNLPLGWFNVK and NNLAQGTFNATK showed similarity to a segment of a precursor of staphylococcal autolysins. The antimicrobial activity detected in the supernatant of strain 4185 proved to be resistant to heat treatment at 65°C; however, treatment at 80°C abolished completely its antimicrobial properties. The concentrated supernatant containing aureocins 4185 exhibited a strong bacteriolytic activity toward Micrococcus luteus ATCC 4698. Additionally, aureocins 4185 exhibited antagonistic activity against important foodborne pathogens, including Listeria monocytogenes, thus showing a potential application in food preservation. PMID:20618078

  14. The potential of algae blooms to produce renewable gaseous fuel.

    PubMed

    Allen, E; Browne, J; Hynes, S; Murphy, J D

    2013-11-01

    Ulva lactuca (commonly known as sea letuce) is a green sea weed which dominates Green Tides or algae blooms. Green Tides are caused by excess nitrogen from agriculture and sewage outfalls resulting in eutrophication in shallow estuaries. Samples of U. lactuca were taken from the Argideen estuary in West Cork on two consecutive years. In year 1 a combination of three different processes/pretreatments were carried out on the Ulva. These include washing, wilting and drying. Biomethane potential (BMP) assays were carried out on the samples. Fresh Ulva has a biomethane yield of 183LCH4/kgVS. For dried, washed and macerated Ulva a BMP of 250LCH4/kgVS was achieved. The resource from the estuary in West Cork was shown to be sufficient to provide fuel to 264 cars on a year round basis. Mono-digestion of Ulva may be problematic; the C:N ratio is low and the sulphur content is high. In year 2 co-digestion trials with dairy slurry were carried out. These indicate a potential increase in biomethane output by 17% as compared to mono-digestion of Ulva and slurry. PMID:23850117

  15. Effects of dust-charge fluctuations on the potential of an array of projectiles in a partially ionized dusty plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, S.; Nasim, M. H.; Murtaza, G.

    2003-11-01

    The expressions for the Debye and the wake potential are derived by incorporating dust-charge fluctuations of a single projectile, as well as of an array of dust grain projectiles, propagating through a partially ionized dusty plasma with a constant velocity. Numerically, the effects of the dust-charge fluctuations and the dust-neutral collisions on the electrostatic potential for a single, three, six and ten projectiles are examined. The dust-charge relaxation rate modifies the shape of the Debye as well as the wake potential. For smaller values of the relaxation rates a potential well is formed instead of Debye potential.

  16. Accurate Ionization Potentials and Electron Affinities of Acceptor Molecules III: A Benchmark of GW Methods.

    PubMed

    Knight, Joseph W; Wang, Xiaopeng; Gallandi, Lukas; Dolgounitcheva, Olga; Ren, Xinguo; Ortiz, J Vincent; Rinke, Patrick; Körzdörfer, Thomas; Marom, Noa

    2016-02-01

    The performance of different GW methods is assessed for a set of 24 organic acceptors. Errors are evaluated with respect to coupled cluster singles, doubles, and perturbative triples [CCSD(T)] reference data for the vertical ionization potentials (IPs) and electron affinities (EAs), extrapolated to the complete basis set limit. Additional comparisons are made to experimental data, where available. We consider fully self-consistent GW (scGW), partial self-consistency in the Green's function (scGW0), non-self-consistent G0W0 based on several mean-field starting points, and a "beyond GW" second-order screened exchange (SOSEX) correction to G0W0. We also describe the implementation of the self-consistent Coulomb hole with screened exchange method (COHSEX), which serves as one of the mean-field starting points. The best performers overall are G0W0+SOSEX and G0W0 based on an IP-tuned long-range corrected hybrid functional with the former being more accurate for EAs and the latter for IPs. Both provide a balanced treatment of localized vs delocalized states and valence spectra in good agreement with photoemission spectroscopy (PES) experiments. PMID:26731609

  17. Quantum-Mechanical Calculation of Ionization-Potential Lowering in Dense Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Sang-Kil; Thiele, Robert; Jurek, Zoltan; Ziaja, Beata; Santra, Robin

    2014-07-01

    The charged environment within a dense plasma leads to the phenomenon of ionization-potential depression (IPD) for ions embedded in the plasma. Accurate predictions of the IPD effect are of crucial importance for modeling atomic processes occurring within dense plasmas. Several theoretical models have been developed to describe the IPD effect, with frequently discrepant predictions. Only recently, first experiments on IPD in Al plasma have been performed with an x-ray free-electron laser, where their results were found to be in disagreement with the widely used IPD model by Stewart and Pyatt. Another experiment on Al, at the Orion laser, showed disagreement with the model by Ecker and Kröll. This controversy shows a strong need for a rigorous and consistent theoretical approach to calculate the IPD effect. Here, we propose such an approach: a two-step Hartree-Fock-Slater model. With this parameter-free model, we can accurately and efficiently describe the experimental Al data and validate the accuracy of standard IPD models. Our model can be a useful tool for calculating atomic properties within dense plasmas with wide-ranging applications to studies on warm dense matter, shock experiments, planetary science, inertial confinement fusion, and nonequilibrium plasmas created with x-ray free-electron lasers.

  18. Density functional theory study on the ionization potentials and electron affinities of thymine-formamide complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Haitao; Tang, Ke; Li, Yanmin; Su, Chunfang; Zhou, Zhengyu; Wang, Zhizhong

    The effect of hydrogen bond interactions on ionization potentials (IPs) and electron affinities (EAs) of thymine-formamide complexes (T-F) have been investigated employing the density functional theory B3LYP at 6-311++G(d, p) basis set level. All complexes experience a geometrical change on either electron detachment or attachment, and the change might be facilitated or hindered according to the strength of the hydrogen-bonding interaction involved. The strength of hydrogen bonds presents an opposite changing trend on the two processes. A more important role that H-bonding interaction plays in the process of electron attachment than in the process of electron detachment can be seen by a comparison of the IPs and EAs of complexes with that of isolated thymine. Futhermore, the EAs of isolated thymine are in good agreement with the experimental values (AEA is 0.79 eV, VEA is -0.29 eV [Wetmore et al., Chem Phys Lett 2000, 322, 129]). The calculated total NPA charge distributions reveal that nearly all the negative charges locate on thymine monomer in the anions and even in the cationic states, there are a few negative charges on thymine monomer. An analysis of dissociation energies predicts the processes T-F+→ T++ F and T-F- → T- + F to be the most energetically favorable for T-F+ and T-F-, respectively. Content:text/plain; charset="UTF-8"

  19. Lift producing device exhibiting low drag and reduced ventilation potential and method for producing the same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldwell, Richard A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A lift producing device is disclosed which is adapted to be connected to a vehicle to provide lift to the vehicle when the vehicle is moved relative to a first fluid medium having a first density and viscosity and being in contact with a second fluid medium adjacent the vehicle. The second fluid medium has a second fluid density which is different from the first fluid density. The lift producing device comprises opposed first and second major surfaces joined at a longitudinally extending leading edge and at a longitudinally extending trailing edge, with at least a portion of the longitudinally extending leading edge being spaced from the longitudinally extending trailing edge by a predetermined mean chord length. When the vehicle is moved relative to the first fluid medium at a velocity within a range of predetermined velocities, with each of the velocities having a direction inclined from a plane extending through the leading edge and the trailing edge within a predetermined angular range, a region of high pressure is generated in the first fluid medium adjacent the first major surface and a region of low pressure is generated in the first fluid medium adjacent the second major surface. The lift producing device has a cross-sectional shape which will generate a pressure distribution around the device when the vehicle is moved relative to the first fluid medium at a velocity within the range of predetermined velocities such that the first fluid medium exhibits attached laminar flow along the device for a portion of the predetermined mean chord length from the leading edge to the trailing edge and will neither form a laminar separation bubble adjacent the second major surface of the device, nor exhibit turbulent separation adjacent the second major surface for substantially all of the predetermined mean chord length from the leading edge to the trailing edge. The portion along which attached laminar flow is maintained is the longest portion which will still fulfill

  20. Invasive plant species as potential bioenergy producers and carbon contributors.

    SciTech Connect

    Young, S.; Gopalakrishnan, G.; Keshwani, D.

    2011-03-01

    Current cellulosic bioenergy sources in the United States are being investigated in an effort to reduce dependence on foreign oil and the associated risks to national security and climate change (Koh and Ghazoul 2008; Demirbas 2007; Berndes et al. 2003). Multiple sources of renewable plant-based material have been identified and include agricultural and forestry residues, municipal solid waste, industrial waste, and specifically grown bioenergy crops (Demirbas et al. 2009; Gronowska et al. 2009). These sources are most commonly converted to energy through direct burning, conversion to gas, or conversion to ethanol. Annual crops, such as corn (Zea Mays L.) and sorghum grain, can be converted to ethanol through fermentation, while soybean and canola are transformed into fatty acid methyl esters (biodiesel) by reaction with an alcohol (Demirbas 2007). Perennial grasses are one of the more viable sources for bioenergy due to their continuous growth habit, noncrop status, and multiple use products (Lewandowski el al. 2003). In addition, a few perennial grass species have very high water and nutrient use efficiencies producing large quantities of biomass on an annual basis (Dohleman et al. 2009; Grantz and Vu 2009).

  1. Degradation potential and growth of anaerobic bacteria in produced water.

    PubMed

    Vieira, D S; Sérvulo, E F C; Cammarota, M C

    2005-08-01

    The efficiency of an anaerobic biological treatment for the reduction of essential contaminants of produced water from an offshore oilfield was investigated using a microbial consortium enriched with sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB). Experiments were conducted in a bench bioreactor at 35 degrees C, 250 rpm, with intermittent purges of N2 gas in order to establish anaerobic conditions and to remove the H2S generated. The results showed that pH control effectively influenced the activity of the anaerobic bacteria leading to COD removal of 57%. Meanwhile, pH control was found to have no influence on the removal efficiencies of oil and grease and total phenols. In all experiments, removals of oil and grease and total phenols of 60% and 58-67%, respectively, were obtained after a 15-day process. In studies carried out with biomass reuse the reductions obtained were 61% for oil and grease and 78% for total phenols over the same period. Such results point to the technical feasibility of anaerobic biodegradation for oilfield wastewater treatment. PMID:16128390

  2. Ionization potentials of small lithium clusters (Lin) and hydrogenated lithium clusters (LinH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Steven E.; Schaefer, Henry F.

    2005-05-01

    We present accurate ionization potentials (IPs) for small lithium clusters and hydrogenated lithium clusters (n=1-4), computed using coupled-cluster singles and doubles theory augmented with a perturbative correction for connected triple excitations [CCSD(T)] with the correlation-consistent weighted core-valence quadruple-ζ basis set (cc-pwCVQZ). In some cases the full CCSDT method has been used. Comparison of computed binding energies with experiment for the pure cationic lithium clusters reveals excellent agreement, demonstrating that previous discrepancies between computed and experimentally derived atomization energies for the corresponding neutral clusters are due to the use of an inaccurate experimental IP for Li4. The experimental IP for Li4 falls 0.43eV below our theoretical adiabatic value of 4.74eV, which should be a lower bound to the measured IP. Our recommended zero-point corrected adiabatic IPs for Li, Li2, Li3, Li4, LiH, Li2H, Li3H, and Li4H are 5.39, 5.14, 4.11, 4.74, 7.69, 3.98, 4.69, and 4.05eV, respectively. Zero-point vibrationally corrected CCSD(T) atomization energies per atom for Li2+, Li3+, Li4+, LiH+, Li2H+, Li3H+, and Li4H+ are 0.64, 0.96, 0.90, 0.056, 1.62, 1.40, and 1.40eV, respectively.

  3. The effects of ionization potential depression on the spectra emitted by hot dense aluminium plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preston, Thomas R.; Vinko, Sam M.; Ciricosta, Orlando; Chung, Hyun-Kyung; Lee, Richard W.; Wark, Justin S.

    2013-06-01

    Recent experiments at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) X-ray Free-Electron-Laser (FEL) have demonstrated that the standard model used for simulating ionization potential depression (IPD) in a plasma (the Stewart-Pyatt (SP) model, J.C. Stewart and K.D. Pyatt Jr., Astrophysical Journal 144 (1966) 1203) considerably underestimates the degree of IPD in a solid density aluminium plasma at temperatures up to 200 eV. In contrast, good agreement with the experimental data was found by use of a modified Ecker-Kröll (mEK) model (G. Ecker and W. Kröll, Physics of Fluids 6 (1963) 62-69). We present here detailed simulations, using the FLYCHK code, of the predicted spectra from hot dense, hydrogenic and helium-like aluminium plasmas ranging in densities from 0.1 to 4 times solid density, and at temperatures up to 1000 eV. Importantly, we find that the greater IPDs predicted by the mEK model result in the loss of the n = 3 states for the hydrogenic ions for all densities above ≈0.8 times solid density, and for the helium-like ions above ≈0.65 solid density. Therefore, we posit that if the mEK model holds at these higher temperatures, the temperature of solid density highly-charged aluminium plasmas cannot be determined by using spectral features associated with the n = 3 principal quantum number, and propose a re-evaluation of previous experimental data where high densities have been inferred from the spectra, and the SP model has been used.

  4. No first ionization potential fractionation in the active stars AR Piscium and AY Ceti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanz-Forcada, J.; Affer, L.; Micela, G.

    2009-10-01

    Context: The comparison of coronal and photospheric abundances in cool stars is an essential question to resolve. In the Sun an enhancement of the elements with low first ionization potential (FIP) is observed in the corona with respect to the photosphere. Stars with high levels of activity seem to show a depletion of elements with low FIP when compared to solar standard values; however, the few cases of active stars in which photospheric values are available for comparison lead to confusing results, and an enlargement of the sample is mandatory for solving this longstanding problem. Aims: We calculate in this paper the photospheric and coronal abundances of two well known active binary systems, AR Psc and AY Cet, to get further insight into the complications of coronal abundances. Methods: Coronal abundances of 9 elements were calculated by means of the reconstruction of a detailed emission measure distribution, using a line-based method that considers the lines from different elements separately. Photospheric abundances of 8 elements were calculated using high-resolution optical spectra of the stars. Results: The results once again show a lack of any FIP-related effect in the coronal abundances of the stars. The presence of metal abundance depletion (MAD) or inverse FIP effects in some stars could stem from a mistaken comparison to solar photospheric values or from a deficient calculation of photospheric abundances in fast-rotating stars. Conclusions: The lack of FIP fractionation seems to confirm that Alfvén waves combined with pondermotive forces are dominant in the corona of active stars. Tables 2 and 3 are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  5. Influence of magnetic field strength on potential well in the ionization stage of a double stage Hall thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Daren; Song Maojiang; Liu Hui; Zhang Xu; Li Hong

    2012-07-15

    Similar to a single stage Hall thruster, the magnetic field, which controls electron trajectory and electric field distribution, is the most important factor determining the performance of a double stage Hall thruster. Especially, a potential well, which is helpful to reduce the ion loss on the thruster walls, is shaped in the ionization stage due to the existence of an annular magnetic field topology there. In this paper, the influence of magnetic field strength in the ionization stage on the potential well is researched with both experiments and particle-in-cell simulations. It is found that the depth of potential well increases with the magnetic field strength as a result of enhanced magnetic confinement and lowered electron conductivity. Consequently, the plasma density as well as the ion current entering the acceleration stage increases. However, an excessive magnetic field strength leads to an excess of ion loss on the walls of the acceleration stage. Therefore, there is an appropriate magnetic field strength in the ionization stage that results in a proper potential well and consequently an optimal performance of a double stage Hall thruster.

  6. Theoretical elucidation of conflicting experimental data on vertical ionization potentials of microhydrated thymine.

    PubMed

    Close, David M; Crespo-Hernández, Carlos E; Gorb, Leonid; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2008-05-15

    In a recent article we reported calculations of the ionization energy thresholds (IET) of microhydrated thymine (Close; et al. J. Phys. Chem. A, 2006, 110, 7485). Calculations showed a distinct effect of microhydration on the IET's of thymine. The first water molecule was seen to decrease the IET by about 0.1 eV, and the second and third water molecules caused a further decrease of less than 0.1 eV each. These changes in IET calculated for the canonical form of thymine with 1-3 waters of hydration are smaller than the experimental values determined by Kim et al. (J. Phys. Chem. C 1996, 100, 7933). In the present study it has been shown that there is considerable reorientation of the water molecules in microhydrated thymine upon ionization. This leads to the expectation that the experimental ionization energies may therefore represent an adiabatic process. The results presented here show that the changes in experimental ionization energies determined by Kim et al. for microhydrated thymine are in good agreement with the calculated adiabatic ionization energies. PMID:18402430

  7. Increasing the applicability of density functional theory. V. X-ray absorption spectra with ionization potential corrected exchange and correlation potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Prakash; Bartlett, Rodney J.

    2016-07-01

    Core excitation energies are computed with time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) using the ionization energy corrected exchange and correlation potential QTP(0,0). QTP(0,0) provides C, N, and O K-edge spectra to about an electron volt. A mean absolute error (MAE) of 0.77 and a maximum error of 2.6 eV is observed for QTP(0,0) for many small molecules. TD-DFT based on QTP (0,0) is then used to describe the core-excitation spectra of the 22 amino acids. TD-DFT with conventional functionals greatly underestimates core excitation energies, largely due to the significant error in the Kohn-Sham occupied eigenvalues. To the contrary, the ionization energy corrected potential, QTP(0,0), provides excellent approximations (MAE of 0.53 eV) for core ionization energies as eigenvalues of the Kohn-Sham equations. As a consequence, core excitation energies are accurately described with QTP(0,0), as are the core ionization energies important in X-ray photoionization spectra or electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis.

  8. Increasing the applicability of density functional theory. V. X-ray absorption spectra with ionization potential corrected exchange and correlation potentials.

    PubMed

    Verma, Prakash; Bartlett, Rodney J

    2016-07-21

    Core excitation energies are computed with time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) using the ionization energy corrected exchange and correlation potential QTP(0,0). QTP(0,0) provides C, N, and O K-edge spectra to about an electron volt. A mean absolute error (MAE) of 0.77 and a maximum error of 2.6 eV is observed for QTP(0,0) for many small molecules. TD-DFT based on QTP (0,0) is then used to describe the core-excitation spectra of the 22 amino acids. TD-DFT with conventional functionals greatly underestimates core excitation energies, largely due to the significant error in the Kohn-Sham occupied eigenvalues. To the contrary, the ionization energy corrected potential, QTP(0,0), provides excellent approximations (MAE of 0.53 eV) for core ionization energies as eigenvalues of the Kohn-Sham equations. As a consequence, core excitation energies are accurately described with QTP(0,0), as are the core ionization energies important in X-ray photoionization spectra or electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis. PMID:27448875

  9. Measurements of Ionization Cross Sections by Molecular Beam Experiments: Information Content on the Imaginary Part of the Optical Potential.

    PubMed

    Falcinelli, Stefano; Rosi, Marzio; Pirani, Fernando; Stranges, Domenico; Vecchiocattivi, Franco

    2016-07-14

    In this work, we present and analyze in detail new and recent ionization cross section and mass spectrum determinations, collected in the case of He*, Ne*-H2O, -H2S, and -NH3 ionizing collisions. These sets of data, obtained under the same experimental conditions, are relevant to identify differences in the autoionization stereodynamics of the three hydrogenated molecules and on the selective role of the imaginary part of the optical potential. We demonstrate that in these autoionization processes hydrogen and halogen bonds are competing because they are controlling both real and imaginary components of the optical potential that drives the complete reaction dynamics. In particular, we found that both components critically depend on the angular and radial approach between the reagent partners in determining the collision dynamics. PMID:26938026

  10. Strong-field ionization rates of linear polyenes simulated with time-dependent configuration interaction with an absorbing potential

    SciTech Connect

    Krause, Pascal; Schlegel, H. Bernhard

    2014-11-07

    The strong field ionization rates for ethylene, trans 1,3-butadiene, and trans,trans 1,3,5-hexatriene have been calculated using time-dependent configuration interaction with single excitations and a complex absorbing potential (TDCIS-CAP). The calculations used the aug-cc-pVTZ basis set with a large set of diffuse functions (3 s, 2 p, 3 d, and 1 f) on each atom. The absorbing boundary was placed 3.5 times the van der Waals radius from each atom. The simulations employed a seven-cycle cosine squared pulse with a wavelength of 800 nm. Ionization rates were calculated for intensities ranging from 0.3 × 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2} to 3.5 × 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}. Ionization rates along the molecular axis increased markedly with increasing conjugation length. By contrast, ionization rates perpendicular to the molecular axis were almost independent of the conjugation length.

  11. Strong-field ionization rates of linear polyenes simulated with time-dependent configuration interaction with an absorbing potential.

    PubMed

    Krause, Pascal; Schlegel, H Bernhard

    2014-11-01

    The strong field ionization rates for ethylene, trans 1,3-butadiene, and trans,trans 1,3,5-hexatriene have been calculated using time-dependent configuration interaction with single excitations and a complex absorbing potential (TDCIS-CAP). The calculations used the aug-cc-pVTZ basis set with a large set of diffuse functions (3 s, 2 p, 3 d, and 1 f) on each atom. The absorbing boundary was placed 3.5 times the van der Waals radius from each atom. The simulations employed a seven-cycle cosine squared pulse with a wavelength of 800 nm. Ionization rates were calculated for intensities ranging from 0.3 × 10(14) W/cm(2) to 3.5 × 10(14) W/cm(2). Ionization rates along the molecular axis increased markedly with increasing conjugation length. By contrast, ionization rates perpendicular to the molecular axis were almost independent of the conjugation length. PMID:25381499

  12. The Effect of the Residual Ion Potential on the Fully Differential Cross Section of Helium for Ionization by Electron Impact

    SciTech Connect

    Toth, A.; Nagy, L.

    2011-10-03

    We have carried out calculations for the fully differential cross section of the ionization of helium by electron projectiles. In order to study the effect of the residual ion potential, we employed three models, and tested them for the coplanar and perpendicular plane geometry. In spite of the simplicity of our models, the results for the coplanar case are in fair agreement with the available experimental data. The results for the perpendicular geometry need more improvement.

  13. Development and diagnostics of revised ion beam analyzer, ion or laser produced plasmas and X-ray pre-ionizer for gas lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Kasuya, K.; Watanabe, M.; Kamiya, T.; Nishigori, K.; Funatsu, M.; Ido, D.; Ebine, T.; Okayama, H.; Sunami, H.; Wu, C.; Adachi, T.; Hotta, E.; Hattori, T.; Yasuike, K.; Nakai, S.; Miyamoto, S.

    1997-04-15

    A CCD element was tested as an end plate of a Thomson parabola analyzer. This element was directly irradiated by ion beams to produce electric signals associated with the beams. With a pin-hole camera, we also tried to measure the divergence angle of ion beams. Coated thin layers of ion source materials on a quartz plate were back-lighted by an e-beam pumped KrF laser, and the produced plasmas were observed to supply advanced source plasmas for pulsed ion diodes. We built a cryogenic target which was cooled by liquid nitrogen, and the ice-covered target was irradiated by proton beams to measure the concerned ablation processes. Fundamental characteristics of an X-ray source with wire-initiated discharge plasmas for pre-ionization of gas mixtures of our former discharge-pumped KrF laser in place of UV pre-ionization were also investigated.

  14. Ultrafast ionization and fragmentation of molecular silane

    SciTech Connect

    Sayres, Scott G.; Ross, Matt W.; Castleman, A. W. Jr.

    2010-09-15

    The ionization and fragmentation of molecular silane is examined here with laser intensities ranging between 7x10{sup 12} and 1x10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2} at 624 nm. The ionization potential of silane determined using both multiphoton ionization (MPI) and tunneling ionization (TI) models agrees with the vertical ionization potential of the molecule. In addition, the application of the tunneling ionization model is extended here to the fragments of silane to determine their appearance potentials. MPI values for SiH{sub 3}{sup +}, SiH{sub 2}{sup +}, SiH{sup +}, Si{sup +}, as well as H{sub 2}{sup +} and H{sup +} are consistent with vertical potentials, whereas the TI measurements are found to be in accord with adiabatic potentials. The tunneling appearance potentials observed for the fragments H{sub 2}{sup +} and H{sup +} are lower than reported for other techniques. In fact, the appearance potential measurements for these species resulting from silane are lower than their ionization potentials. The fragmentation rate of silane is determined to be nearly 20 times larger than the ionization rate. The main precursor for producing amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin films, SiH{sub 3}{sup +} is the dominant fragmentation product making up roughly a third of the total ion yield, a substantial increase from other techniques.

  15. Field ionization of high-Rydberg fragments produced after inner-shell photoexcitation and photoionization of the methane molecule.

    PubMed

    Kivimäki, A; Sankari, A; Kettunen, J A; Stråhlman, C; Álvarez Ruiz, J; Richter, R

    2015-09-21

    We have studied the production of neutral high-Rydberg (HR) fragments from the CH4 molecule at the C 1s → 3p excitation and at the C 1s ionization threshold. Neutral fragments in HR states were ionized using a pulsed electric field and the resulting ions were mass-analyzed using an ion time-of-flight spectrometer. The atomic fragments C(HR) and H(HR) dominated the spectra, but molecular fragments CH(x)(HR), x = 1-3, and H2(HR) were also observed. The production of HR fragments is attributed to dissociation of CH4(+) and CH4(2+) ions in HR states. Just above the C 1s ionization threshold, such molecular ionic states are created when the C 1s photoelectron is recaptured after single or double Auger decay. Similar HR states may be reached directly following resonant Auger decay at the C 1s → 3p resonance. The energies and geometries of the parent and fragment ions have been calculated in order to gain insight into relevant dissociation pathways. PMID:26395703

  16. Field ionization of high-Rydberg fragments produced after inner-shell photoexcitation and photoionization of the methane molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Kivimäki, A.; Sankari, A.; Kettunen, J. A.; Stråhlman, C.; Álvarez Ruiz, J.; Richter, R.

    2015-09-21

    We have studied the production of neutral high-Rydberg (HR) fragments from the CH{sub 4} molecule at the C 1s → 3p excitation and at the C 1s ionization threshold. Neutral fragments in HR states were ionized using a pulsed electric field and the resulting ions were mass-analyzed using an ion time-of-flight spectrometer. The atomic fragments C(HR) and H(HR) dominated the spectra, but molecular fragments CH{sub x}(HR), x = 1-3, and H{sub 2}(HR) were also observed. The production of HR fragments is attributed to dissociation of CH{sub 4}{sup +} and CH{sub 4}{sup 2+} ions in HR states. Just above the C 1s ionization threshold, such molecular ionic states are created when the C 1s photoelectron is recaptured after single or double Auger decay. Similar HR states may be reached directly following resonant Auger decay at the C 1s → 3p resonance. The energies and geometries of the parent and fragment ions have been calculated in order to gain insight into relevant dissociation pathways.

  17. Field ionization of high-Rydberg fragments produced after inner-shell photoexcitation and photoionization of the methane molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kivimäki, A.; Sankari, A.; Kettunen, J. A.; Strâhlman, C.; Álvarez Ruiz, J.; Richter, R.

    2015-09-01

    We have studied the production of neutral high-Rydberg (HR) fragments from the CH4 molecule at the C 1s → 3p excitation and at the C 1s ionization threshold. Neutral fragments in HR states were ionized using a pulsed electric field and the resulting ions were mass-analyzed using an ion time-of-flight spectrometer. The atomic fragments C(HR) and H(HR) dominated the spectra, but molecular fragments CHx(HR), x = 1-3, and H2(HR) were also observed. The production of HR fragments is attributed to dissociation of CH4+ and CH42+ ions in HR states. Just above the C 1s ionization threshold, such molecular ionic states are created when the C 1s photoelectron is recaptured after single or double Auger decay. Similar HR states may be reached directly following resonant Auger decay at the C 1s → 3p resonance. The energies and geometries of the parent and fragment ions have been calculated in order to gain insight into relevant dissociation pathways.

  18. Polynucleotide kinase as a potential target for enhancing cytotoxicity by ionizing radiation and topoisomerase I inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, N. K.; Karimi-Busheri, F.; Rasouli-Nia, A.; Mani, R.; Dianov, G.; Glover, J. N. M.; Weinfeld, M.

    2010-01-01

    The cytotoxicity of many antineoplastic agents is due to their capacity to damage DNA and there is evidence indicating that DNA repair contributes to the cellular resistance to such agents. DNA strand breaks constitute a significant proportion of the lesions generated by a broad range of genotoxic agents, either directly, or during the course of DNA repair. Strand breaks that are caused by many agents including ionizing radiation, topoisomerase I inhibitors, and DNA repair glycosylases such as NEIL1 and NEIL2, often contain 5’-hydroxyl and/or 3’-phosphate termini. These ends must be converted to 5’-phosphate and 3’-hydroxyl termini in order to allow DNA polymerases and ligases to catalyze repair synthesis and strand rejoining. A key enzyme involved in this end-processing is polynucleotide kinase (PNK), which possesses two enzyme activities, a DNA 5’-kinase activity and a 3’-phosphatase activity. PNK participates in the single-strand break repair pathway and the non-homologous end joining pathway for double-strand break repair. RNAi-mediated down-regulation of PNK renders cells more sensitive to ionizing radiation and camptothecin, a topoisomerase I inhibitor. Structural analysis of PNK revealed the protein is composed of three domains, the kinase domain at the C-terminus, the phosphatase domain in the centre and a forkhead associated (FHA) domain at the N-terminus. The FHA domain plays a critical role in the binding of PNK to other DNA repair proteins. Thus each PNK domain may be a suitable target for small molecule inhibition to effectively reduce resistance to ionizing radiation and topoisomerase I inhibitors. PMID:18473721

  19. Neutral resonant ionization in a H- plasma source: Potential of doubly excited **H-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, J. S.

    2016-02-01

    Hydrogen plasmas are optically dense to Lyman-α radiation, maintaining *H(n = 2) neutral atoms that may undergo neutral resonant ionization to **H-. One state, **H-(2p2 3Pe), is thought bound at 9.7 meV with a several nanosecond lifetime while all others are unbound resonances. Collision dynamics of two *H(2s) shows that an ionic pair of (p, **H-) resolves at least three long-standing collision experiments. The doubly excited anion also has a path to the unexcited ion pair whose only physical distinction is that both (p, H-) have energy of 3.7 eV.

  20. Electric Potential Near The Extraction Region In Negative Ion Sources With Surface Produced Negative Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Fukano, A.; Hatayama, A.

    2011-09-26

    The potential distribution near the extraction region in negative ion sources for the plasma with the surface produced negative ions is studied analytically. The potential is derived analytically by using a plasma-sheath equation, where negative ions produced on the Plasma Grid (PG) surface are considered in addition to positive ions and electrons. A negative potential peak is formed in the sheath region near the PG surface for the case of strong surface production of negative ions or for low energy negative ions. Negative ions are reflected by the negative potential peak near the PG and returned to the PG surface. This reflection mechanism by the negative potential peak possibly becomes a factor in negative ion extraction. It is also indicated that the potential difference between the plasma region and the wall decreases by the surface produced negative ions. This also has the possibility to contribute to the negative ion extraction.

  1. Calculations of the ionization potentials of the halogens by the relativistic Hartree-Rock-Dirac method taking account of superposition of configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Tupitsyn, I.I.

    1988-03-01

    The ionization potentials of the halogen group have been calculated. The calculations were carried out using the relativistic Hartree-Fock method taking into account correlation effects. Comparison of theoretical results with experimental data for the elements F, Cl, Br, and I allows an estimation of the accuracy and reliability of the method. The theoretical values of the ionization potential of astatine obtained here may be of definite interest for the chemistry of astatine.

  2. Equation of motion coupled cluster methods for electron attachment and ionization potential in fullerenes C60 and C70

    SciTech Connect

    Bhaskaran-Nair, Kiran; Kowalski, Karol; Moreno, Juana; Jarrell, Mark; Shelton, William A.

    2014-08-21

    Discovery of fullerenes has opened a entirely new chapter in chemistry due to their wide range of properties which holds exciting applications in numerous disciplines of science. The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 1996 was awarded jointly to Robert F. Curl Jr., Sir Harold W. Kroto and Richard E. Smalley in recoginition for their discovery of this new carbon allotrope. In this letter we are reporting ionization potential and electron attachment studies on fullerenes (C60 and C70) obtained with novel parallel implementation of the EA-EOM-CCSD and IP-EOM-CCSD methods in NWChem program package.

  3. Ionization potentials, electron affinities, resonance excitation energies, oscillator strengths, and ionic radii of element Uus (Z = 117) and astatine.

    PubMed

    Chang, Zhiwei; Li, Jiguang; Dong, Chenzhong

    2010-12-30

    Multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock (MCDF) method was employed to calculate the first five ionization potentials, electron affinities, resonance excitation energies, oscillator strengths, and radii for the element Uus and its homologue At. Main valence correlation effects were taken into account. The Breit interaction and QED effects were also estimated. The uncertainties of calculated IPs, EAs, and IR for Uus and At were reduced through an extrapolation procedure. The good consistency with available experimental and other theoretical values demonstrates the validity of the present results. These theoretical data therefore can be used to predict some unknown physicochemical properties of element Uus, Astatine, and their compounds. PMID:21141866

  4. Using the charge-stabilization technique in the double ionization potential equation-of-motion calculations with dianion references.

    PubMed

    Kuś, Tomasz; Krylov, Anna I

    2011-08-28

    The charge-stabilization method is applied to double ionization potential equation-of-motion (EOM-DIP) calculations to stabilize unstable dianion reference functions. The auto-ionizing character of the dianionic reference states spoils the numeric performance of EOM-DIP limiting applications of this method. We demonstrate that reliable excitation energies can be computed by EOM-DIP using a stabilized resonance wave function instead of the lowest energy solution corresponding to the neutral + free electron(s) state of the system. The details of charge-stabilization procedure are discussed and illustrated by examples. The choice of optimal stabilizing Coulomb potential, which is strong enough to stabilize the dianion reference, yet, minimally perturbs the target states of the neutral, is the crux of the approach. Two algorithms of choosing optimal parameters of the stabilization potential are presented. One is based on the orbital energies, and another--on the basis set dependence of the total Hartree-Fock energy of the reference. Our benchmark calculations of the singlet-triplet energy gaps in several diradicals show a remarkable improvement of the EOM-DIP accuracy in problematic cases. Overall, the excitation energies in diradicals computed using the stabilized EOM-DIP are within 0.2 eV from the reference EOM spin-flip values. PMID:21895161

  5. Phyllostictines A-D, Oxazatricycloalkenones Produced by Phyllosticta cirsii, A Potential Mycoherbicide for Cirsium arvense Biocontrol

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phyllosticta cirsii, a fungal pathogen isolated from Cirsium arvense and proposed as biocontrol agent of this noxious perennial weed, produces in liquid cultures different phytotoxic metabolites with potential herbicidal activity. Four new oxazatricycloalkenones, named phyllostictines A-D, were isol...

  6. Grain in weakly ionized plasma in the presence of an external magnetic field: Charging by plasma currents and effective potential

    SciTech Connect

    Momot, A. I.; M.M. Bogolubov Institute for Theoretical Physics, Nat. Acad. Sci. of Ukraine, 14b, Metrologichna Str., Kyiv, 03680

    2013-07-15

    The problem of grain screening is solved numerically for the case of weakly ionized plasma in the presence of an external magnetic field. The plasma dynamics is described within the drift-diffusion approximation under the assumption that the grain absorbs all encountered electrons and ions. We also assume that the plasma current through the grain surface is equal to zero in the stationary state. This condition is used to perform self-consistent calculations of the grain charge. The spatial distribution of the screened grain potential is studied and compared with the analytical estimates. It is shown that at the distances larger than the Debye length such potential has the Coulomb-like asymptotics with the effective charge dependent on the angle between the radius vector and the external magnetic field direction. The numerical solutions show that in the direction parallel to the external magnetic field the effective potential can have nonmonotonic behavior.

  7. Effect of Chromatin Structure on the Extent and Distribution of DNA Double Strand Breaks Produced by Ionizing Radiation; Comparative Study of hESC and Differentiated Cells Lines

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesh, Priyanka; Panyutin, Irina V.; Remeeva, Evgenia; Neumann, Ronald D.; Panyutin, Igor G.

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin structure affects the extent of DNA damage and repair. Thus, it has been shown that heterochromatin is more protective against DNA double strand breaks (DSB) formation by ionizing radiation (IR); and that DNA DSB repair may proceed differently in hetero- and euchromatin regions. Human embryonic stem cells (hESC) have a more open chromatin structure than differentiated cells. Here, we study the effect of chromatin structure in hESC on initial DSB formation and subsequent DSB repair. DSB were scored by comet assay; and DSB repair was assessed by repair foci formation via 53BP1 antibody staining. We found that in hESC, heterochromatin is confined to distinct regions, while in differentiated cells it is distributed more evenly within the nuclei. The same dose of ionizing radiation produced considerably more DSB in hESC than in differentiated derivatives, normal human fibroblasts; and one cancer cell line. At the same time, the number of DNA repair foci were not statistically different among these cells. We showed that in hESC, DNA repair foci localized almost exclusively outside the heterochromatin regions. We also noticed that exposure to ionizing radiation resulted in an increase in heterochromatin marker H3K9me3 in cancer HT1080 cells, and to a lesser extent in IMR90 normal fibroblasts, but not in hESCs. These results demonstrate the importance of chromatin conformation for DNA protection and DNA damage repair; and indicate the difference of these processes in hESC. PMID:26729112

  8. Peculiarities of extracellular potentials produced by deep muscles. Part 2: motor unit potentials.

    PubMed

    Arabadzhiev, T I

    2013-07-01

    The potential fields generated by single fibres far from the sources are non-propagating. This suggests that there should be differences in the features of surface motor unit (MU) potentials (MUPs) detected from deep and superficial muscles. We explored the features using a simulation approach. We have shown that the non-propagating character and similar shapes among surface MUPs recorded over a wide area above deep muscles with monopolar or longitudinal single differential (LSD) electrodes are natural. Contrary to close distances, at large radial distances single differentiation did not emphasize MUP main phase relative weight. The position of the end plate area could be estimated with LSD detections only for MUs with long (123 mm) almost symmetric fibres. With short fibres, the LSD main phase was masked by the outlined terminal phases. This could be misleading in MUP analysis since the terminal phases reflect standing sources. The highly asymmetric fibres could yield peculiar MUP shapes resembling MUPs of two distinct MUs. We have shown that the relative weight of terminal phases at large fibre-electrode distance decreases under abnormal peripheral conditions. However, the changes in membrane depolarization due to fatigue or pathology could be assessed non-invasively also from deep muscles. PMID:23393049

  9. Revisiting The Brightest RV Tauri Star: First Ionization Potential (FIP) Effect in R Sct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yolalan, Gizay; Sahin, Timur

    2016-07-01

    We have derived elemental abundances of the brightest RV Tauri star, R Sct. The abundance analysis of the star is based on high resolution and high quality (S/N>300) echelle spectra, mainly obtained for radial velocity study of a large sample of IRAS like RV Tau sample stars, from the McDonald Observatory (R~48,000). Our analysis is based on optical spectra obtained at only one phase of the variation. The standard 1D LTE analysis provided a fresh determination of the atmospheric parameters: Teff=5000 K, logg=1.05 cgs, and a microturbulence velocity ξ=3.4 km/s and [Fe/H] = -0.33. We report on chemical abundances of 10 neutral and ionized species identified over 4800 - 5600 A wavelength region. In an effort to explain observed deficiency in abundances, possible scenarios including FIP is investigated.

  10. ACUTE SULFOLANE EXPOSURE PRODUCES TEMPERATURE-INDEPENDENT AND DEPENDENT CHANGES IN VISUAL EVOKED POTENTIALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes the consequences of acute exposure to sulfolane upon the visual system, as measured using flash evoked potential (FEPs) and pattern reversal evoked potentials (PREPs). A single injection of either 1/2 or 1/4, but not 1/8 the i.p. LD50 (1600 mg/kg) produced si...

  11. Calculations of the ionization potentials and electron affinities of bacteriochlorophyll and bacteriopheophytin via ab initio quantum chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Crystal, J.; Friesner, R.A.

    2000-03-23

    Ionization potentials (IP) and electron affinities (EA) are calculated for bacteriopheophytin (BPh) and bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) in the photosynthetic reaction center utilizing density functional methods implemented in a parallel version of the JAGUAR electronic structure code. These quantities are studied as a function of basis set size and molecular geometry. The results indicate the necessity of using large basis sets with diffuse functions in order to obtain reliable IP and EA in the gas phase. The relative reduction potentials of BChl and BPh in dimethylformamide solution are also calculated and compared with experimental results. Excellent agreement between theory and experiment is obtained when ligand binding of solvent molecules to the central Mg atom of BNhl is incorporated in the calculations.

  12. IONIZATION CHAMBER

    DOEpatents

    Redman, W.C.; Shonka, F.R.

    1958-02-18

    This patent describes a novel ionization chamber which is well suited to measuring the radioactivity of the various portions of a wire as the wire is moved at a uniform speed, in order to produce the neutron flux traverse pattern of a reactor in which the wire was previously exposed to neutron radiation. The ionization chamber of the present invention is characterized by the construction wherein the wire is passed through a tubular, straight electrode and radiation shielding material is disposed along the wire except at an intermediate, narrow area where the second electrode of the chamber is located.

  13. Oxidation-reduction potentials and ionization states of extracellular peroxidases from the lignin-degrading fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium.

    PubMed

    Millis, C D; Cai, D Y; Stankovich, M T; Tien, M

    1989-10-17

    The oxidation-reduction potentials of lignin peroxidase isozymes H1, H2, H8, and H10 as well as the Mn-dependent peroxidase isozymes H3 and H4 are reported. The potentiometric titrations involving the ferrous and ferric states of the enzyme had Nernst plots indicating single-electron transfer. The Em7 values of lignin peroxidase isozymes H1, H2, H8, and H10 are -142, -135, -137, and -127 mV versus standard hydrogen electrode, respectively. The Em7 values for the Mn-dependent peroxidase isozymes H3 and H4 are -88 and -93 mV versus standard hydrogen electrode, respectively. The midpoint potential of H1, H8, and H4 remained unchanged in the presence of their respective substrates, veratryl alcohol and Mn(II). The midpoint potential between the ferric and ferrous forms of isozymes H1 and H4 exhibited a pH-dependent change between pH 3.5 and pH 6.5. These results indicate that the reductive half-reaction of the enzymes is the following: ferric peroxidase + le- + H+----ferrous peroxidase. Above pH 6.5, the effect of pH on the midpoint potential is diminished and indicates that an ionization with an apparent pKa equal to approximately 6.6-6.7 occurs in the reduced form of the enzymes. A heme-linked ionization group in the ferrous form of the enzymes was confirmed by studying the effect of pH on the absorption spectra of isozymes H1 and H4. These spectrophotometric pH titration experiments confirmed the electrochemical results indicating pKa values of 6.59 and 6.69 for reduced isozymes H1 and H4, respectively. These results indicate the presence of a heme-linked ionization of an amino acid in the reduced form of the lignin peroxidase isozymes similar to that of other plant peroxidases. PMID:2605198

  14. Potential treatment of inflammatory and proliferative diseases by ultra-low doses of ionizing radiations.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Charles L

    2012-12-01

    Ultra-low doses and dose- rates of ionizing radiation are effective in preventing disease which suggests that they also may be effective in treating disease. Limited experimental and anecdotal evidence indicates that low radiation doses from radon in mines and spas, thorium-bearing monazite sands and enhanced radioactive uranium ore obtained from a natural geological reactor may be useful in treating many inflammatory conditions and proliferative disorders, including cancer. Optimal therapeutic applications were identified via a literature survey as dose-rates ranging from 7 to 11μGy/hr or 28 to 44 times world average background rates. Rocks from an abandoned uranium mine in Utah were considered for therapeutic application and were examined by γ-ray and laser-induced breakdown fluorescence spectroscopy. The rocks showed the presence of transuranics and fission products with a γ-ray energy profile similar to aged spent uranium nuclear fuel (93% dose due to β particles and 7% due to γ rays). Mud packs of pulverized uranium ore rock dust in sealed plastic bags delivering bag surface β,γ dose-rates of 10-450 μGy/h were used with apparent success to treat several inflammatory and proliferative conditions in humans. PMID:23304108

  15. Potential Treatment of Inflammatory and Proliferative Diseases by Ultra-Low Doses of Ionizing Radiations

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Charles L.

    2012-01-01

    Ultra-low doses and dose- rates of ionizing radiation are effective in preventing disease which suggests that they also may be effective in treating disease. Limited experimental and anecdotal evidence indicates that low radiation doses from radon in mines and spas, thorium-bearing monazite sands and enhanced radioactive uranium ore obtained from a natural geological reactor may be useful in treating many inflammatory conditions and proliferative disorders, including cancer. Optimal therapeutic applications were identified via a literature survey as dose-rates ranging from 7 to 11μGy/hr or 28 to 44 times world average background rates. Rocks from an abandoned uranium mine in Utah were considered for therapeutic application and were examined by γ-ray and laser-induced breakdown fluorescence spectroscopy. The rocks showed the presence of transuranics and fission products with a γ-ray energy profile similar to aged spent uranium nuclear fuel (93% dose due to β particles and 7% due to γ rays). Mud packs of pulverized uranium ore rock dust in sealed plastic bags delivering bag surface β,γ dose-rates of 10–450 μGy/h were used with apparent success to treat several inflammatory and proliferative conditions in humans. PMID:23304108

  16. Boosting the Detection Potential of Liquid Chromatography-Electron Ionization Mass Spectrometry Using a Ceramic Coated Ion Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magrini, Laura; Famiglini, Giorgio; Palma, Pierangela; Termopoli, Veronica; Cappiello, Achille

    2016-01-01

    Detection of target and non-target substances and their characterization in complex samples is a challenging task. Here we demonstrate that coating the electron ionization (EI) ion source of an LC-MS system with a sol-gel ceramic film can drastically improve the detection of high-molecular weight and high-boiling analytes. A new ion source coated with a ceramic material was developed and tested with a mixture of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) with an increasing number of rings. Comparison of the results obtained with those for an uncoated stainless steel (SS) ion source shows a dramatic improvement in the MS signals, with a nearly 40-fold increase of the signal-to-noise ratio. We also demonstrate the ability of the new system to produce excellent chromatographic profiles for hard-to-detect hormones.

  17. Boosting the Detection Potential of Liquid Chromatography-Electron Ionization Mass Spectrometry Using a Ceramic Coated Ion Source.

    PubMed

    Magrini, Laura; Famiglini, Giorgio; Palma, Pierangela; Termopoli, Veronica; Cappiello, Achille

    2016-01-01

    Detection of target and non-target substances and their characterization in complex samples is a challenging task. Here we demonstrate that coating the electron ionization (EI) ion source of an LC-MS system with a sol-gel ceramic film can drastically improve the detection of high-molecular weight and high-boiling analytes. A new ion source coated with a ceramic material was developed and tested with a mixture of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) with an increasing number of rings. Comparison of the results obtained with those for an uncoated stainless steel (SS) ion source shows a dramatic improvement in the MS signals, with a nearly 40-fold increase of the signal-to-noise ratio. We also demonstrate the ability of the new system to produce excellent chromatographic profiles for hard-to-detect hormones. PMID:26350384

  18. POTENTIAL HUMAN STUDY POPULATIONS FOR NON-IONIZING (RADIO FREQUENCY) RADIATION HEALTH EFFECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research project was initiated to identify potential human populations for future epidemiological studies of the health effects of radio frequency radiation. Through a literature search and contacts with various groups and organizations, numerous occupations and applications...

  19. Increasing the efficiency of CO/sub 2/ transverse electric atmospheric lasers by use of low ionization potential additives

    SciTech Connect

    Cruz, C.H.B.; Fragnito, H.L.

    1981-02-01

    A method for increasing the efficiency of conventional CO/sub 2/ transverse electric atmospheric lasers is presented. We take advantage of the fact that by strongly doping the usual CO/sub 2/:N/sub 2/:He gas mixture with a low ionization potential additive, the plasma sustaining field can be suitably reduced to attain a value optimum for the excitation of the upper laser level of CO/sub 2/. We observed field reductions to as little as 20% of the reported value for the nondoped mixture. This permitted us to increase the CO/sub 2/ excitation efficiency by a factor of 2. We also observed that the laser operating efficiency was increased by reducing the helium concentration in the gas mixture.

  20. Non-Targeted Effects Induced by Ionizing Radiation: Mechanisms and Potential Impact on Radiation Induced Health Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, William F.; Sowa, Marianne B.

    2015-01-01

    Not-targeted effects represent a paradigm shift from the "DNA centric" view that ionizing radiation only elicits biological effects and subsequent health consequences as a result of an energy deposition event in the cell nucleus. While this is likely true at higher radiation doses (> 1Gy), at low doses (< 100mGy) non-targeted effects associated with radiation exposure might play a significant role. Here definitions of non-targeted effects are presented, the potential mechanisms for the communication of signals and signaling networks from irradiated cells/tissues are proposed, and the various effects of this intra- and intercellular signaling are described. We conclude with speculation on how these observations might lead to and impact long-term human health outcomes.

  1. Second-Order Perturbation Theory for Fractional Occupation Systems: Applications to Ionization Potential and Electron Affinity Calculations.

    PubMed

    Su, Neil Qiang; Xu, Xin

    2016-05-10

    Recently, we have developed an integration approach for the calculations of ionization potentials (IPs) and electron affinities (EAs) of molecular systems at the level of second-order Møller-Plesset (MP2) (Su, N. Q.; Xu, X. J. Chem. Theory Comput. 11, 4677, 2015), where the full MP2 energy gradient with respect to the orbital occupation numbers was derived but only at integer occupations. The theory is completed here to cover the fractional occupation systems, such that Slater's transition state concept can be used to have accurate predictions of IPs and EAs. Antisymmetrized Goldstone diagrams have been employed for interpretations and better understanding of the derived equations, where two additional rules were introduced in the present work specifically for hole or particle lines with fractional occupation numbers. PMID:27010405

  2. An ab initio study of the ionization potentials and f-f spectroscopy of europium atoms and ions.

    SciTech Connect

    Naleway, C.; Seth, M.; Shepard, R.; Wagner, A. F.; Tilson, J. L.; Ermler, W. C.; Brozell, S. R.; Stevens Inst. of Tech.; Ohio State Univ.

    2002-04-01

    The first three ionization potentials of europium and the f-f spectroscopy of the two lowest multiplets of Eu+3 have been calculated using ab initio spin-orbit configuration interaction techniques. To accomplish this, a new averaged relativistic effective core potential has been developed which leaves only the 5s, 5p, and 4f in the valence space. A series of configuration interaction calculations were carried out up through single and partial double excitations with a double-zeta quality basis set. The computed ionization values have an absolute error of about 0.1 eV from the experimental values. The computed f-f spectroscopy for the lowest {sup 7}F multiplet of Eu{sup +3} has a RMS error with experiment of about 100 cm-1. The computed f-f spectroscopy for the first excited {sup 5}D multiplet has a higher RMS error of about 350 cm{sup -1}. The computed center of gravity separation between the {sup 5}D-{sup 7}F multiplet is underestimated by 750 cm{sup -1}. Comparisons between non-spin-orbit and spin-orbit configuration interaction calculations for the separations of the centers of gravity of multiplets are very favorable up through single and double excitations with differences of a tenth of an eV or less. The spin-orbit configuration interaction calculations are among the largest ever performed for lanthanides, with expansion lengths in excess of 1.9 million double-group-adapted functions. The calculations were achieved by application of a new parallel spin-orbit configuration interaction component in the COLUMBUS Program System.

  3. Direct Delta-MBPT(2) method for ionization potentials, electron affinities, and excitation energies using fractional occupation numbers

    SciTech Connect

    Beste, Ariana; Vazquez-Mayagoitia, Alvaro; Ortiz, J. Vincent

    2013-01-01

    A direct method (D-Delta-MBPT(2)) to calculate second-order ionization potentials (IPs), electron affinities (EAs), and excitation energies is developed. The Delta-MBPT(2) method is defined as the correlated extension of the Delta-HF method. Energy differences are obtained by integrating the energy derivative with respect to occupation numbers over the appropriate parameter range. This is made possible by writing the second-order energy as a function of the occupation numbers. Relaxation effects are fully included at the SCF level. This is in contrast to linear response theory, which makes the D-Delta-MBPT(2) applicable not only to single excited but also higher excited states. We show the relationship of the D-Delta-MBPT(2) method for IPs and EAs to a second-order approximation of the effective Fock-space coupled-cluster Hamiltonian and a second-order electron propagator method. We also discuss the connection between the D-Delta-MBPT(2) method for excitation energies and the CIS-MP2 method. Finally, as a proof of principle, we apply our method to calculate ionization potentials and excitation energies of some small molecules. For IPs, the Delta-MBPT(2) results compare well to the second-order solution of the Dyson equation. For excitation energies, the deviation from EOM-CCSD increases when correlation becomes more important. When using the numerical integration technique, we encounter difficulties that prevented us from reaching the Delta-MBPT(2) values. Most importantly, relaxation beyond the Hartree Fock level is significant and needs to be included in future research.

  4. Methemoglobinemia Hemotoxicity of Some Antimalarial 8-Aminoquinoline Analogues and Their Hydroxylated Derivatives: Density Functional Theory Computation of Ionization Potentials.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yuanqing; Liu, Haining; Tekwani, Babu L; Nanayakkara, N P Dhammika; Khan, Ikhlas A; Walker, Larry A; Doerksen, Robert J

    2016-07-18

    The administration of primaquine (PQ), an essential drug for the treatment and radical cure of malaria, can lead to methemoglobin formation and life-threatening hemolysis for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficient patients. The ionization potential (IP, a quantitative measure of the ability to lose an electron) of the metabolites generated by antimalarial 8-aminoquinoline (8-AQ) drugs like PQ has been believed to be correlated in part to this methemoglobinemia hemotoxicity: the lower the IP of an 8-AQ derivative, the higher the concentration of methemoglobin generated. In this work, demethoxylated primaquine (AQ02) was employed as a model, by intensive computation at the B3LYP-SCRF(PCM)/6-311++G**//B3LYP/6-31G** level in water, to study the effects of hydroxylation at various positions on the ionization potential. Compared to the parent AQ02, the IPs of AQ02's metabolites hydroxylated at N1', C5, and C7 were lower by 61, 30, and 19 kJ/mol, respectively, while differences in the IP relative to PQ were small for hydroxylation at all other positions. The C6 position, at which the IP of the hydroxylated metabolite was greater than that of AQ02, by 2 kJ/mol, was found to be unique. Several literature and proposed 8-AQ analogues were studied to evaluate substituent effects on their potential to generate methemoglobin, with the finding that hydroxylations at N1' and C5 contribute the most to the potential hemotoxicity of PQ-based antimalarials, whereas hydroxylation at C7 has little effect. Phenoxylation at C5 in PQ-based 8-AQs can block the hydroxylation at C5 and reduce the potential for methemoglobin generation, while -CF3 and chlorines attached to the phenolic ring can further reduce the risk. The H-shift at N1' during the cationization of hydroxylated metabolites of 8-AQs sharply decreased their IPs, but this effect can be significantly reduced by the introduction of an electron-withdrawing group to the quinoline core. The results and this approach may be

  5. Ionization potentials of transparent conductive indium tin oxide films covered with a single layer of fluorine-doped tin oxide nanoparticles grown by spray pyrolysis deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Fukano, Tatsuo; Motohiro, Tomoyoshi; Ida, Takashi; Hashizume, Hiroo

    2005-04-15

    Indium tin oxide (ITO) films deposited with single layers of monodispersive fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) nanoparticles of several nanometers in size were grown on glass substrates by intermittent spray pyrolysis deposition using conventional atomizers. These films have significantly higher ionization potentials than the bare ITO and FTO films grown using the same technique. The ITO films covered with FTO particles of 7 nm in average size show an ionization potential of 5.01 eV, as compared with {approx}4.76 and {approx}4.64 eV in ITO and FTO films, respectively, which decreases as the FTO particle size increases. The ionization potentials are practically invariant against oxidation and reduction treatments, promising a wide application of the films to transparent conducting oxide electrodes in organic electroluminescent devices and light-emitting devices of high efficiencies.

  6. Ionization potentials of transparent conductive indium tin oxide films covered with a single layer of fluorine-doped tin oxide nanoparticles grown by spray pyrolysis deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukano, Tatsuo; Motohiro, Tomoyoshi; Ida, Takashi; Hashizume, Hiroo

    2005-04-01

    Indium tin oxide (ITO) films deposited with single layers of monodispersive fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) nanoparticles of several nanometers in size were grown on glass substrates by intermittent spray pyrolysis deposition using conventional atomizers. These films have significantly higher ionization potentials than the bare ITO and FTO films grown using the same technique. The ITO films covered with FTO particles of 7nm in average size show an ionization potential of 5.01eV, as compared with ˜4.76 and ˜4.64eV in ITO and FTO films, respectively, which decreases as the FTO particle size increases. The ionization potentials are practically invariant against oxidation and reduction treatments, promising a wide application of the films to transparent conducting oxide electrodes in organic electroluminescent devices and light-emitting devices of high efficiencies.

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of Acetobacterium bakii DSM 8239, a Potential Psychrophilic Chemical Producer through Syngas Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Soonkyu; Song, Yoseb

    2015-01-01

    Acetobacterium bakii DSM 8239 is an anaerobic, psychrophilic, and chemolithoautotrophic bacterium that is a potential platform for producing commodity chemicals from syngas fermentation. We report here the draft genome sequence of A. bakii DSM 8239 (4.14 Mb) to elucidate its physiological and metabolic properties related to syngas fermentation. PMID:26404601

  8. Draft genome sequences of clostridium strains native to Colombia with the potential to produce solvents.

    PubMed

    Rosas-Morales, Juan Pablo; Perez-Mancilla, Ximena; López-Kleine, Liliana; Montoya Castaño, Dolly; Riaño-Pachón, Diego Mauricio

    2015-01-01

    Genomes from four Clostridium sp. strains considered to be mesophilic anaerobic bacteria, isolated from crop soil in Colombia, with a strong potential to produce alcohols like 1,3-propanediol, were analyzed. We present the draft genome of these strains, which will be useful for developing genetic engineering strategies. PMID:25999575

  9. Draft Genome Sequences of Clostridium Strains Native to Colombia with the Potential To Produce Solvents

    PubMed Central

    Rosas-Morales, Juan Pablo; Perez-Mancilla, Ximena; López-Kleine, Liliana

    2015-01-01

    Genomes from four Clostridium sp. strains considered to be mesophilic anaerobic bacteria, isolated from crop soil in Colombia, with a strong potential to produce alcohols like 1,3-propanediol, were analyzed. We present the draft genome of these strains, which will be useful for developing genetic engineering strategies. PMID:25999575

  10. Genome Sequence of Pichia kudriavzevii M12, a Potential Producer of Bioethanol and Phytase

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Han Ming; Ling, How Lie; Rashid, Noor Aini Abdul

    2012-01-01

    A draft genome sequence of Pichia kudriavzevii M12 is presented here. The genome reveals the presence of genes encoding enzymes involved in xylose utilization and the pentose phosphate pathway for bioethanol production. Strain M12 is also a potential producer of phytases, enzymes useful in food processing and agriculture. PMID:23027839

  11. A proposed technique for creation and detection of hot electron ionization and gain effects in a laser-produced tin plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apruzese, J. P.; Davis, J.

    1984-07-01

    It has recently been demonstrated that suprathermal electrons, while deleterious to laser fusion, may have significant and beneficial effects in plasma ionization and promoting population inversions in neon-like ions. This report considers experimental demonstration of these effects. Using linearly focused and aligned beams, a series of shots with planar in tin targets (Z=50) is proposed. At irradiances of approx. = 1-4 X 10 to the 14th power W 1/cm, both the energies and numbers of hot electrons produced by a 1.05 micron laser beam should be appropriate for substantial enhancement of gain in the 3s-3p transition of neon-like tin at 118.2A. If possible a quiescent plasma should be prepared with a 0.35 micron beam, which would be followed by a 1.05 micron pulse to create a burst of hot electrons at 4-5 keV to pump the upper leasing state.

  12. Density and x-ray emission profile relationships in highly ionized high-Z laser-produced plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Kensuke; Fujioka, Shinsuke Ugomori, Teruyuki; Tanaka, Nozomi; Azechi, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Higashiguchi, Takeshi Kawasaki, Masato; Suzuki, Yuhei; Suzuki, Chihiro; Tomita, Kentaro; Hirose, Ryoichi; Ejima, Takeo; Ohashi, Hayato; Nishikino, Masaharu; Sunahara, Atsushi; Li, Bowen; Dunne, Padraig; O'Sullivan, Gerry; Yanagida, Tatsuya

    2015-03-23

    We present a benchmark measurement of the electron density profile in the region where the electron density is 10{sup 19 }cm{sup –3} and where the bulk of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) emission occurs from isotropically expanding spherical high-Z gadolinium plasmas. It was found that, due to opacity effects, the observed EUV emission is mostly produced from an underdense region. We have analyzed time-resolved emission spectra with the aid of atomic structure calculations and find the multiple ion charge states around 18+ during the laser pulse irradiation.

  13. Spatially Resolved Plant Metabolomics: Some Potentials and Limitations of Laser-Ablation Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Metabolite Imaging1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Etalo, Desalegn W.; De Vos, Ric C.H.; Joosten, Matthieu H.A.J.; Hall, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    Laser-ablation electrospray ionization (LAESI)-mass spectrometry imaging has been applied to contrasting plant organs to assess its potential as a procedure for performing in vivo metabolomics in plants. In a proof-of-concept experiment, purple/white segmented Phalaenopsis spp. petals were first analyzed using standard liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses of separate extracts made specifically from the purple and white regions. Discriminatory compounds were defined and putatively annotated. LAESI analyses were then performed on living tissues, and these metabolites were then relocalized within the LAESI-generated data sets of similar tissues. Maps were made to illustrate their locations across the petals. Results revealed that, as expected, anthocyanins always mapped to the purple regions. Certain other (nonvisible) polyphenols were observed to colocalize with the anthocyanins, whereas others were found specifically within the white tissues. In a contrasting example, control and Cladosporium fulvum-infected tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) leaves were subjected to the same procedures, and it could be observed that the alkaloid tomatine has clear heterogeneous distribution across the tomato leaf lamina. Furthermore, LAESI analyses revealed perturbations in alkaloid content following pathogen infection. These results show the clear potential of LAESI-based imaging approaches as a convenient and rapid way to perform metabolomics analyses on living tissues. However, a range of limitations and factors have also been identified that must be taken into consideration when interpreting LAESI-derived data. Such aspects deserve further evaluation before this approach can be applied in a routine manner. PMID:26392264

  14. Low dose ionizing radiation produces too few reactive oxygen species to directly affect antioxidant concentrations in cells.

    PubMed

    Smith, J T; Willey, N J; Hancock, J T

    2012-08-23

    It has been hypothesized that radiation-induced oxidative stress is the mechanism for a wide range of negative impacts on biota living in radioactively contaminated areas around Chernobyl. The present study tests this hypothesis mechanistically, for the first time, by modelling the impacts of radiolysis products within the cell resulting from radiations (low linear energy transfer β and γ), and dose rates appropriate to current contamination types and densities in the Chernobyl exclusion zone and at Fukushima. At 417 µGy h(-1) (illustrative of the most contaminated areas at Chernobyl), generation of radiolysis products did not significantly impact cellular concentrations of reactive oxygen species, or cellular redox potential. This study does not support the hypothesis that direct oxidizing stress is a mechanism for damage to organisms exposed to chronic radiation at dose rates typical of contaminated environments. PMID:22496076

  15. Oil and gas technology transfer activities and potential in eight major producing states. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    In 1990, the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (the Compact) performed a study that identified the structure and deficiencies of the system by which oil and gas producers receive information about the potential of new technologies and communicate their problems and technology needs back to the research community. The conclusions of that work were that major integrated companies have significantly more and better sources of technology information than independent producers. The majors also have significantly better mechanisms for communicating problems to the research and development (R&D) community. As a consequence, the Compact recommended analyzing potential mechanisms to improve technology transfer channels for independents and to accelerate independents acceptance and use of existing and emerging technologies. Building on this work, the Compact, with a grant from the US Department Energy, has reviewed specific technology transfer organizations in each of eight major oil producing states to identify specific R&D and technology transfer organizations, characterize their existing activities, and identify potential future activities that could be performed to enhance technology transfer to oil and gas producers. The profiles were developed based on information received from organizations,follow-up interviews, site visit and conversations, and participation in their sponsored technology transfer activities. The results of this effort are reported in this volume. In addition, the Compact has also developed a framework for the development of evaluation methodologies to determine the effectiveness of technology transfer programs in performing their intended functions and in achieving desired impacts impacts in the producing community. The results of that work are provided in a separate volume.

  16. Biologic Potential of Calcium Phosphate Biopowders Produced via Decomposition Combustion Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Vollmer, N.; King, K.B.; Ayers, R.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research was to evaluate the biologic potential of calcium phosphate (CaP) biopowders produced with a novel reaction synthesis system. Decomposition combustion synthesis (DCS) is a modified combustion synthesis method capable of producing CaP powders for use in bone tissue engineering applications. During DCS, the stoichiometric ratio of reactant salt to fuel was adjusted to alter product chemistry and morphology. In vitro testing methods were utilized to determine the effects of controlling product composition on cytotoxicity, proliferation, biocompatibility and biomineralization. In vitro, human fetal osteoblasts (ATCC, CRL-11372) cultured with CaP powder displayed a flattened morphology, and uniformly encompassed the CaP particulates. Matrix vesicles containing calcium and phosphorous budded from the osteoblast cells. CaP powders produced via DCS are a source of biologically active, synthetic, bone graft substitute materials PMID:26034341

  17. Evaluation of humic fractions potential to produce bio-oil through catalytic hydroliquefaction.

    PubMed

    Lemée, L; Pinard, L; Beauchet, R; Kpogbemabou, D

    2013-12-01

    Humic substances were extracted from biodegraded lignocellulosic biomass (LCBb) and submitted to catalytic hydroliquefaction. The resulting bio-oils were compared with those of the initial biomass. Compared to fulvic and humic acids, humin presented a high conversion rate (74 wt.%) and the highest amount of liquid fraction (66 wt.%). Moreover it represented 78% of LCBb. Humin produced 43 wt.% of crude oil and 33 wt.% of hexane soluble fraction containing hydrocarbons which is a higher yield than those from other humic substances as well as from the initial biomass. Hydrocarbons were mainly aromatics, but humin produces the highest amount of aliphatics. Considering the quantity, the quality and the molecular composition of the humic fractions, a classification of the potential of the latter to produce fuel using hydroliquefaction process can be assess: Hu>AF>AH. The higher heating value (HHV) and oxygen content of HSF from humin were fully compatible with biofuel characteristics. PMID:24140851

  18. Role of H2O2 in RET/PTC1 chromosomal rearrangement produced by ionizing radiation in human thyroid cells.

    PubMed

    Ameziane-El-Hassani, Rabii; Boufraqech, Myriem; Lagente-Chevallier, Odile; Weyemi, Urbain; Talbot, Monique; Métivier, Didier; Courtin, Françoise; Bidart, Jean-Michel; El Mzibri, Mohammed; Schlumberger, Martin; Dupuy, Corinne

    2010-05-15

    During childhood, the thyroid gland is one of the most sensitive organs to the carcinogenetic effects of ionizing radiation that may lead to papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) associated with RET/PTC oncogene rearrangement. Exposure to ionizing radiation induces a transient "oxidative burst" through radiolysis of water, which can cause DNA damage and mediates part of the radiation effects. H(2)O(2) is a potent DNA-damaging agent that induces DNA double-strand breaks, and consequently, chromosomal aberrations. Irradiation by 5 Gy X-ray increased extracellular H(2)O(2). Therefore, we investigated the implication of H(2)O(2) in the generation of RET/PTC1 rearrangement after X-ray exposure. We developed a highly specific and sensitive nested reverse transcription-PCR method. By using the human thyroid cell line HTori-3, previously found to produce RET/PTC1 after gamma-irradiation, we showed that H(2)O(2), generated during a 5 Gy X-ray irradiation, causes DNA double-strand breaks and contributes to RET/PTC1 formation. Pretreatment of cells with catalase, a scavenger of H(2)O(2), significantly decreased RET/PTC1 rearrangement formation. Finally, RET/PTC chromosomal rearrangement was detected in HTori-3.1 cells after exposure of cells to H(2)O(2) (25 micromol/L), at a dose that did not affect the cell viability. This study shows for the first time that H(2)O(2) is able to cause RET/PTC1 rearrangement in thyroid cells and consequently highlights that oxidative stress could be responsible for the occurrence of RET/PTC1 rearrangement found in thyroid lesions even in the absence of radiation exposure. PMID:20424115

  19. Evaluation of Acid Producing Potential of Road-cut Rock Slopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, K.; Han, D.

    2006-12-01

    Acid rock drainage (ARD) developed as a result of road construction represents a number of technical, environmental, and social problems. Engineering impacts from ARD, the product of atmospheric oxidation of rock-forming sulfide minerals, including degradation of surface water quality, disintegration of construction materials, and structural damage of buildings, have been documented widely around the world. To characterize the ARD and to evaluate acid producing potential of road-cut rocks, samples of rocks and water were collected from two road-cut sites of shale to phyllite showing such visual indicators of ARD as orange iron precipitates along streambed and rocks. Acid Base Accounting (ABA) test, the most commonly applied static test to evaluate the potential acidity, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis were performed for fifteen rock samples. In terms of NAPP (Net Acid Producing Potential) and NAGpH (pH of Net Acid Generation), seven, four, and four rock samples were classified into a PAF (potentially acid forming) group, a NAF (non-acid forming) group, and an uncertain group, respectively. Water samples with low pH of 4.4, low DO (dissolved oxygen), and high contents of heavy metals and sulfate ion showed the generation of ARD in the studied area, which confirmed the applicability of ABA test to prediction of ARD in road-cut rock slopes. Evaluation of acid producing potential of earth materials should be an essential step in the pre-design stage of construction works especially in the vicinity of mining areas.

  20. Relativistic equation-of-motion coupled-cluster method using open-shell reference wavefunction: Application to ionization potential.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Himadri; Sasmal, Sudip; Nayak, Malaya K; Vaval, Nayana; Pal, Sourav

    2016-08-21

    The open-shell reference relativistic equation-of-motion coupled-cluster method within its four-component description is successfully implemented with the consideration of single- and double- excitation approximations using the Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian. At the first attempt, the implemented method is employed to calculate ionization potential value of heavy atomic (Ag, Cs, Au, Fr, and Lr) and molecular (HgH and PbF) systems, where the effect of relativity does really matter to obtain highly accurate results. Not only the relativistic effect but also the effect of electron correlation is crucial in these heavy atomic and molecular systems. To justify the fact, we have taken two further approximations in the four-component relativistic equation-of-motion framework to quantify how the effect of electron correlation plays a role in the calculated values at different levels of theory. All these calculated results are compared with the available experimental data as well as with other theoretically calculated values to judge the extent of accuracy obtained in our calculations. PMID:27544090

  1. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon reaction rates with peroxy-acid treatment: prediction of reactivity using local ionization potential.

    PubMed

    Shoulder, J M; Alderman, N S; Breneman, C M; Nyman, M C

    2013-08-01

    Property-Encoded Surface Translator (PEST) descriptors were found to be correlated with the degradation rates of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) by the peroxy-acid process. Reaction rate constants (k) in hr(-1) for nine PAHs (acenaphthene, anthracene, benzo[a]pyrene, benzo[k]fluoranthene, fluoranthene, fluorene, naphthalene, phenanthrene, and pyrene) were determined by a peroxy-acid treatment method that utilized acetic acid, hydrogen peroxide, and a sulphuric acid catalyst to degrade the polyaromatic structures. Molecular properties of the selected nine PAHs were derived from structures optimized at B3LYP/6-31G(d) and HF/6-31G(d) levels of theory. Properties of adiabatic and vertical ionization potential (IP), highest occupied molecular orbitals (HOMO), HOMO/lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) gap energies and HOMO/singly occupied molecular orbital (SOMO) gap energies were not correlated with rates of peroxy-acid reaction. PEST descriptors were calculated from B3LYP/6-31G(d) optimized structures and found to have significant levels of correlation with k. PIP Min described the minimum local IP on the surface of the molecule and was found to be related to k. PEST technology appears to be an accurate method in predicting reactivity and could prove to be a valuable asset in building treatment models and in remediation design for PAHs and other organic contaminants in the environment. PMID:23734862

  2. Sequence and conformation effects on ionization potential and charge distribution of homo-nucleobase stacks using M06-2X hybrid density functional theory calculations.

    PubMed

    Rooman, Marianne; Wintjens, René

    2014-04-01

    DNA is subject to oxidative damage due to radiation or by-products of cellular metabolism, thereby creating electron holes that migrate along the DNA stacks. A systematic computational analysis of the dependence of the electronic properties of nucleobase stacks on sequence and conformation was performed here, on the basis of single- and double-stranded homo-nucleobase stacks of 1-10 bases or 1-8 base pairs in standard A-, B-, and Z-conformation. First, several levels of theory were tested for calculating the vertical ionization potentials of individual nucleobases; the M06-2X/6-31G* hybrid density functional theory method was selected by comparison with experimental data. Next, the vertical ionization potential, and the Mulliken charge and spin density distributions were calculated and considered on all nucleobase stacks. We found that (1) the ionization potential decreases with the number of bases, the lowest being reached by Gua≡Cyt tracts; (2) the association of two single strands into a double-stranded tract lowers the ionization potential significantly (3) differences in ionization potential due to sequence variation are roughly three times larger than those due to conformational modifications. The charge and spin density distributions were found (1) to be located toward the 5'-end for single-stranded Gua-stacks and toward the 3'-end for Cyt-stacks and basically delocalized over all bases for Ade- and Thy-stacks; (2) the association into double-stranded tracts empties the Cyt- and Thy-strands of most of the charge and all the spin density and concentrates them on the Gua- and Ade-strands. The possible biological implications of these results for transcription are discussed. PMID:23582046

  3. Sequence and conformation effects on ionization potential and charge distribution of homo-nucleobase stacks using M06-2X hybrid density functional theory calculations

    PubMed Central

    Rooman, Marianne; Wintjens, René

    2013-01-01

    DNA is subject to oxidative damage due to radiation or by-products of cellular metabolism, thereby creating electron holes that migrate along the DNA stacks. A systematic computational analysis of the dependence of the electronic properties of nucleobase stacks on sequence and conformation was performed here, on the basis of single- and double-stranded homo-nucleobase stacks of 1–10 bases or 1–8 base pairs in standard A-, B-, and Z-conformation. First, several levels of theory were tested for calculating the vertical ionization potentials of individual nucleobases; the M06-2X/6-31G* hybrid density functional theory method was selected by comparison with experimental data. Next, the vertical ionization potential, and the Mulliken charge and spin density distributions were calculated and considered on all nucleobase stacks. We found that (1) the ionization potential decreases with the number of bases, the lowest being reached by Gua≡Cyt tracts; (2) the association of two single strands into a double-stranded tract lowers the ionization potential significantly (3) differences in ionization potential due to sequence variation are roughly three times larger than those due to conformational modifications. The charge and spin density distributions were found (1) to be located toward the 5′-end for single-stranded Gua-stacks and toward the 3′-end for Cyt-stacks and basically delocalized over all bases for Ade- and Thy-stacks; (2) the association into double-stranded tracts empties the Cyt- and Thy-strands of most of the charge and all the spin density and concentrates them on the Gua- and Ade-strands. The possible biological implications of these results for transcription are discussed. PMID:23582046

  4. Chlorella zofingiensis as an Alternative Microalgal Producer of Astaxanthin: Biology and Industrial Potential

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jin; Sun, Zheng; Gerken, Henri; Liu, Zheng; Jiang, Yue; Chen, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Astaxanthin (3,3′-dihydroxy-β,β-carotene-4,4′-dione), a high-value ketocarotenoid with a broad range of applications in food, feed, nutraceutical, and pharmaceutical industries, has been gaining great attention from science and the public in recent years. The green microalgae Haematococcus pluvialis and Chlorella zofingiensis represent the most promising producers of natural astaxanthin. Although H. pluvialis possesses the highest intracellular astaxanthin content and is now believed to be a good producer of astaxanthin, it has intrinsic shortcomings such as slow growth rate, low biomass yield, and a high light requirement. In contrast, C. zofingiensis grows fast phototrophically, heterotrophically and mixtrophically, is easy to be cultured and scaled up both indoors and outdoors, and can achieve ultrahigh cell densities. These robust biotechnological traits provide C. zofingiensis with high potential to be a better organism than H. pluvialis for mass astaxanthin production. This review aims to provide an overview of the biology and industrial potential of C. zofingiensis as an alternative astaxanthin producer. The path forward for further expansion of the astaxanthin production from C. zofingiensis with respect to both challenges and opportunities is also discussed. PMID:24918452

  5. Chlorella zofingiensis as an alternative microalgal producer of astaxanthin: biology and industrial potential.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin; Sun, Zheng; Gerken, Henri; Liu, Zheng; Jiang, Yue; Chen, Feng

    2014-06-01

    Astaxanthin (3,3'-dihydroxy-β,β-carotene-4,4'-dione), a high-value ketocarotenoid with a broad range of applications in food, feed, nutraceutical, and pharmaceutical industries, has been gaining great attention from science and the public in recent years. The green microalgae Haematococcus pluvialis and Chlorella zofingiensis represent the most promising producers of natural astaxanthin. Although H. pluvialis possesses the highest intracellular astaxanthin content and is now believed to be a good producer of astaxanthin, it has intrinsic shortcomings such as slow growth rate, low biomass yield, and a high light requirement. In contrast, C. zofingiensis grows fast phototrophically, heterotrophically and mixtrophically, is easy to be cultured and scaled up both indoors and outdoors, and can achieve ultrahigh cell densities. These robust biotechnological traits provide C. zofingiensis with high potential to be a better organism than H. pluvialis for mass astaxanthin production. This review aims to provide an overview of the biology and industrial potential of C. zofingiensis as an alternative astaxanthin producer. The path forward for further expansion of the astaxanthin production from C. zofingiensis with respect to both challenges and opportunities is also discussed. PMID:24918452

  6. Field Validation of Toxicity Tests to Evaluate the Potential for Beneficial Use of Produced Water

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph Bidwell; Jonathan Fisher; Naomi Cooper

    2008-03-31

    This study investigated potential biological effects of produced water contamination derived from occasional surface overflow and possible subsurface intrusion at an oil production site along the shore of Skiatook Lake, Oklahoma. We monitored basic chemistry and acute toxicity to a suite of standard aquatic test species (fathead minnow-Pimephales promelas, Daphnia pulex, Daphnia magna, and Ceriodaphnia dubia) in produced water and in samples taken from shallow groundwater wells on the site. Toxicity identification evaluations and ion toxicity modeling were used to identify toxic constituents in the samples. Lake sediment at the oil production site and at a reference site were also analyzed for brine intrusion chemically and by testing sediment toxicity using the benthic invertebrates, Chironomus dilutus, and Hyallela azteca. Sediment quality was also assessed with in situ survival and growth studies with H. azteca and the Asian clam, Corbicula fluminea, and by benthic macroinvertebrate community sampling. The produced water was acutely toxic to the aquatic test organisms at concentrations ranging from 1% to 10% of the whole produced water sample. Toxicity identification evaluation and ion toxicity modeling indicated major ion salts and hydrocarbons were the primary mixture toxicants. The standardized test species used in the laboratory bioassays exhibited differences in sensitivity to these two general classes of contaminants, which underscores the importance of using multiple species when evaluating produced water toxicity. Toxicity of groundwater was greater in samples from wells near a produced water injection well and an evaporation pond. Principle component analyses (PCA) of chemical data derived from the groundwater wells indicated dilution by lake water and possible biogeochemical reactions as factors that ameliorated groundwater toxicity. Elevated concentrations of major ions were found in pore water from lake sediments, but toxicity from these ions was

  7. Probiotic characterization of potential hydrolases producing Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis isolated from pickled yam.

    PubMed

    Bhanwar, Seema; Singh, Arashdeep; Ganguli, Abhijit

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize potential probiotic strain co-producing α-amylase and β-galactosidase. Sixty-three strains, isolated from pickle samples were screened for their hydrolase producing capacity by utilizing different starches as carbon source. One out of 63 strains, isolated from traditionally fermented pickled yam showing maximum hydrolase activity (α-amylase (36.9 U/ml) and β-galactosidase (42.6 U/ml)) within a period of 48 hours was identified as Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis. Further, it was assessed for the probiotic characteristics under gastrointestinal conditions like acidic, alkaline, proteolytic enzymes, bile stress and found to exhibit tolerance to these stresses. The therapeutic potential of the isolate is implicated because of its antagonistic effect against enteric foodborne pathogens (Salmonella typhimurium, Escherichia coli 0157:H7, Staphylococcus aureus, Yersinia enterocolitica and Aeromonas hydrophila). The results of this study entail a potential applicability of the isolate in developing future probiotic foods besides the production of industrially significant hydrolases. PMID:24020495

  8. Hyicin 3682, a bioactive peptide produced by Staphylococcus hyicus 3682 with potential applications for food preservation.

    PubMed

    Fagundes, Patrícia Carlin; Ceotto, Hilana; Potter, Amina; Vasconcelos de Paiva Brito, Maria Aparecida; Brede, Dag; Nes, Ingolf F; Bastos, Maria do Carmo de Freire

    2011-12-01

    Bacteriocins are peptides produced by bacteria and having inhibitory activity against other bacteria. Many of these substances may be useful as antibacterial agents for practical applications. In this study, 21 Staphylococcus spp. isolated from pigs, dogs and bovine milk in different states of Brazil were investigated for staphylococcin production. Hyicin 3682, a bacteriocin produced by one such strain, inhibited almost all strains tested, including Bacillus cereus, Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus. PCR experiments showed that hyicin 3682 is lantibiotic-related, but not identical, to both epidermin and Bsa. The maximum production of hyicin 3682 (6,400 AU/ml) was observed after 24 h of growth in BHI medium at 37 °C. Hyicin 3682 proved to be a cationic, small antimicrobial peptide with a molecular mass of 2,139 Da. It exhibited resistance to low pH and to heating at 65 °C, and partial sensitivity to proteolytic enzymes. Taken together, these results suggest that hyicin 3682, the first bacteriocin characterized in Staphylococcus hyicus, has potential biotechnological applications as a food preservative. Moreover, hyicin 3682 was able to inhibit its producer strain, suggesting that an effective immune system for specific protection against hyicin 3682 is not found in its producer strain, a characteristic not described thus far for other staphylococcins. PMID:22019494

  9. Investigations of the potential functions of weakly bound diatomic molecules and laser-assisted excitive Penning ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Goble, J.H. Jr.

    1982-05-01

    Three variations on the Dunham series expansion function of the potential of a diatomic molecule are compared. The differences among these expansions lie in the choice of the expansion variable, lambda. The functional form of these variables are lambda/sub s/ = l-r/sub e//r for the Simon-Parr-Finlan version, lambda/sub T/ - 1-(r/sub e//r)/sup p/ for that of Thakkar, and lambda/sub H/ = 1-exp(-rho(r/r/sub e/-1) for that of Huffaker. A wide selection of molecular systems are examined. It is found that, for potentials in excess of thirty kcal/mole, the Huffaker expansion provides the best description of the three, extrapolating at large internuclear separation to a value within 10% of the true dissociation energy. For potentials that result from the interaction of excited states, all series expansions show poor behavior away from the equilibrium internuclear separation of the molecule. The series representation of the potentials of weakly bound molecules are examined in more detail. The ground states of BeAr/sup +/, HeNe/sup +/, NaAr, and Ar/sub 2/ and the excited states of HeNe+, NaNe, and NaAr are best described by the Thakkar expansion. Finally, the observation of laser-assisted excitive Penning ionization in a flowing afterglow is reported. The reaction Ar(/sup 3/P/sub 2/) + Ca + h nu ..-->.. Ar + Ca/sup +/(5p /sup 2/P/sub J/) + e/sup -/ occurs when the photon energy, h nu, is approximately equal to the energy difference between the metastable argon and one of the fine structure levels of the ion's doublet. By monitoring the cascade fluorescence of the above reaction and comparing it to the flourescence from the field-free process Ar(/sup 3/P/sub 2/) + Ca ..-->.. Ar + Ca/sup +/(4p /sup 2/P/sub J/) + e/sup -/ a surprisingly large cross section of 6.7 x 10/sup 3/ A/sup 2/ is estimated.

  10. Potential of selected lactic acid bacteria to produce food compatible antifungal metabolites.

    PubMed

    De Muynck, Cassandra; Leroy, Annelies I J; De Maeseneire, Sofie; Arnaut, Filip; Soetaert, Wim; Vandamme, Erick J

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the potential of lactic acid bacteria to inhibit the outgrowth of some common food-spoiling fungi. Culture supernatants of 17 Lactic acid bacterial strains as well as of three commercial probiotic cultures were evaluated for antifungal activity using an agar-diffusion method. The method parameters were chosen in order to reveal compounds for potential use in food (bio)preservation. Thirteen strains showed antifungal activity of which five strains were very promising: Lactobacillus acidophilus LMG 9433, L. amylovorus DSM 20532, L. brevis LMG 6906, L. coryniformis subsp. coryniformis LMG 9196 and L. plantarum LMG 6907. Four of these five strains were further examined; it was found that the produced antifungal metabolites were pH-dependent. The exact chemical nature of these substances has not been revealed yet. PMID:15646380

  11. Bio-electro catalytic treatment of petroleum produced water: Influence of cathode potential upliftment.

    PubMed

    Jain, Pratiksha; Srikanth, Sandipam; Kumar, Manoj; Sarma, Priyangshu M; Singh, M P; Lal, Banwari

    2016-11-01

    Treatment of petroleum produced water (PPW) was studied using bioelectrochemical system (BES) under uplifted cathode potential. The treatment efficiency in terms of COD and hydrocarbon removal was observed at 91.25% and 76.60% respectively, along with the reduction in TDS during BES operation under 400mV of cathode potential. There was also a reduction in concentration of sulfates, however, it was not significant at, since oxidative conditions are being maintained at anode. Improved oxidation of PPW at anode also resulted in good power output (-20.47mA) and also depicted improved fuel cell behaviour. The electrochemical analysis in terms of cyclic/linear sweep voltammetry also showed well correlation with the observed treatment efficiencies. The microbial dynamics of the BES after loading real field wastewater showed the dominance of species that are reported to be effective for petroleum crude oil degradation. PMID:27544915

  12. Resonance Ionization of Heavy Noble Gases: The Potential of KR and Xe Measurements from Single Pre-Solar Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thonnard, N.

    1995-09-01

    measure noble gases from fourteen individual "X" SiC grains, previously identified by ion microprobe analysis, was unsuccessful with the 2,000 132Xe atom detection limit of the mass spectrometer [12,13]. From the Kr concentration measurements of SiC particles KJF by Lewis et al. [6], a 2 micrometer diameter particle will on average contain 134 Kr atoms. If only 4% of the SiC grains contain the majority of the noble gas atoms, then a single gas rich grain will contain 3,350 Kr atoms, or 12, 75, 385, 398, 1910, and 580 atoms for 78Kr through 86Kr, respectively. The Xe single-grain abundances would be similar. Resonance ionization, an emerging laser-based element analysis technique, is being harnessed to a wide variety of problems in which minute quantities of a particular element need to be measured efficiently in the presence of an overwhelmingly larger background of other materials [14]. By utilizing lasers tuned to specific atomic energy levels of the analyte element, ions are produced selectively in a mass spectrometer with much higher efficiency than possible using conventional methods, such as electron bombardment, thermal ionization, or ion sputtering. In a static resonance ionization system for noble gases, the combination of high ionization efficiency and sample concentrator results in an extremely fast (~3 min. detection half-life vs. ~60 min. for conventional systems) analyzer with a detection limit of ~100 85Kr atoms [15]. In addition to the almost complete absence of interferences, the short analysis time significantly reduces the background contribution of outgassing in the mass spectrometer. Although using a less efficient laser scheme resulting in slightly slower analyses, a similar system has recently been completed and dedicated to extraterrestrial Xe measurements [16]. At the newly formed Institute for Rare Isotope Measurements [17], the noble gas equipment that had previously been at Atom Sciences [14,15] is being re-installed and upgraded to provide

  13. Scintillation-producing Fresnel-scale irregularities associated with the regions of steepest TEC gradients adjacent to the equatorial ionization anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muella, M. T. A. H.; Kherani, E. A.; de Paula, E. R.; Cerruti, A. P.; Kintner, P. M.; Kantor, I. J.; Mitchell, C. N.; Batista, I. S.; Abdu, M. A.

    2010-03-01

    Using ground-based GPS and digital ionosonde instruments, we have built up at latitudes of the equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA), in the Brazilian sector, a time-evolving picture of total electron content (TEC), L-band amplitude scintillations, and F region heights, and we have investigated likely reasons for the occurrence or suppression of equatorial scintillations during the disturbed period of 18-23 November 2003. During the prestorm quiet nights, scintillations are occurring postsunset, as expected; however, during the storm time period, their spatial-temporal characteristics and intensity modify significantly owing to the dramatic changes in the ionospheric plasma density distribution and in the temporal evolution of TEC. The two-dimensional maps showing both TEC and amplitude scintillations revealed strong evidence of turbulences at the Fresnel length (causing scintillations) concurrent with those regions of steepest TEC gradients adjacent to the crests of the EIA. The largest density gradients have been found to occur in an environment of increased background electron density, and their spatial distribution and location during the disturbed period may differ significantly from the magnetic quiet night pattern. However, in terms of magnitude the gradients at equatorial and low latitudes appear to not change during both magnetic quiet and disturbed conditions. The scenarios for the formation or suppression of scintillation-producing Fresnel-scale irregularities during the prestorm quiet nights and disturbed nights are discussed in view of different competing effects computed from numerical simulation techniques.

  14. Identification of phosphorylated peptides from complex mixtures using negative-ion orifice-potential stepping and capillary liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ding, J; Burkhart, W; Kassel, D B

    1994-01-01

    A rapid method for identifying and characterizing sites of phosphorylation of peptides and proteins is described. High-performance capillary liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) is used to distinguish non-phosphorylated and phosphorylated peptides originating from mixtures as complex as enzyme digests. The method relies on the ability to produce a fragment ion characteristic and unique to phosphopeptides (m/z 79, PO3) by stepping the orifice potential of the mass spectrometer as a function of mass. At low m/z values, a high orifice potential is applied to induce extensive fragmentation of the peptide, leading to the formation of the m/z 79 phosphate-derived ion. This method is analogous to that described by Carr et al. for the identification of glycopeptides from enzymatic digestion of glycoproteins (S.A. Carr, M.J. Huddleston, M.F. Bean, Protein Science 2, 183 (1993)). The method was first evaluated and validated for a mixture of non-, mono- and di-phosphorylated synthetic peptides. Both mono- and di-phosphorylated peptides were found to generate fragment ions characteristic of PO3 whereas the non-phosphorylated peptide did not. Application of the method was extended to identifying phosphopeptides generated from an endoprotease Lys-C digestion of beta-casein. Both the expected mono- and tetra-phosphorylated Lys-C peptides were observed and identified rapidly in the LC/SEI-MS analysis. The procedure was used additionally to identify the site(s) of phosphorylation of the cytosolic non-receptor tyrosine kinase, pp60(c-src). PMID:8118063

  15. Accumulation and perchlorate exposure potential of lettuce produced in the Lower Colorado River region.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, C A; Krieger, R I; Khandaker, N; Moore, R C; Holts, K C; Neidel, L L

    2005-06-29

    The Colorado River is contaminated with perchlorate concentrations of 1.5-8 microg/L, an anion linked to thyroid dysfunction. Over 90% of the lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) consumed during the winter months in the United States is produced in the Lower Colorado River region. Studies were conducted in this region to survey the potential for lettuce perchlorate accumulation and estimate potential human exposure to perchlorate from lettuce. Total uptake of perchlorate in the above-ground plant of iceberg lettuce was approximately 5 g/ha. Exposure estimates ranged from 0.45 to 1.8 microg/day depending on lettuce types and trimming. For all lettuce types, hypothetical exposures were less than 4% of the reference dose recommended by the National Academy of Sciences. Results show the relative iodide uptake inhibition potential because of lettuce nitrate was 2 orders of magnitude greater than that associated with the corresponding trace levels of perchlorate. These data support the conclusion that potential perchlorate exposures from lettuce irrigated with Colorado River water are negligible relative to acute or long-term harmful amounts. PMID:15969537

  16. Simple and accurate modelling of the gravitational potential produced by thick and thin exponential discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, R.; Flynn, C.; Candlish, G. N.; Fellhauer, M.; Gibson, B. K.

    2015-04-01

    We present accurate models of the gravitational potential produced by a radially exponential disc mass distribution. The models are produced by combining three separate Miyamoto-Nagai discs. Such models have been used previously to model the disc of the Milky Way, but here we extend this framework to allow its application to discs of any mass, scalelength, and a wide range of thickness from infinitely thin to near spherical (ellipticities from 0 to 0.9). The models have the advantage of simplicity of implementation, and we expect faster run speeds over a double exponential disc treatment. The potentials are fully analytical, and differentiable at all points. The mass distribution of our models deviates from the radial mass distribution of a pure exponential disc by <0.4 per cent out to 4 disc scalelengths, and <1.9 per cent out to 10 disc scalelengths. We tabulate fitting parameters which facilitate construction of exponential discs for any scalelength, and a wide range of disc thickness (a user-friendly, web-based interface is also available). Our recipe is well suited for numerical modelling of the tidal effects of a giant disc galaxy on star clusters or dwarf galaxies. We consider three worked examples; the Milky Way thin and thick disc, and a discy dwarf galaxy.

  17. Metronomic Small Molecule Inhibitor of Bcl-2 (TW-37) Is Antiangiogenic and Potentiates the Antitumor Effect of Ionizing Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Zeitlin, Benjamin D.; Spalding, Aaron C.; Campos, Marcia S.; Ashimori, Naoki; Dong Zhihong; Wang Shaomeng; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Noer, Jacques E.

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of a metronomic (low-dose, high-frequency) small-molecule inhibitor of Bcl-2 (TW-37) in combination with radiotherapy on microvascular endothelial cells in vitro and in tumor angiogenesis in vivo. Methods and Materials: Primary human dermal microvascular endothelial cells were exposed to ionizing radiation and/or TW-37 and colony formation, as well as capillary sprouting in three-dimensional collagen matrices, was evaluated. Xenografts vascularized with human blood vessels were engineered by cotransplantation of human squamous cell carcinoma cells (OSCC3) and human dermal microvascular endothelial cells seeded in highly porous biodegradable scaffolds into the subcutaneous space of immunodeficient mice. Mice were treated with metronomic TW-37 and/or radiation, and tumor growth was evaluated. Results: Low-dose TW-37 sensitized primary endothelial cells to radiation-induced inhibition of colony formation. Low-dose TW-37 or radiation partially inhibited endothelial cell sprout formation, and in combination, these therapies abrogated new sprouting. Combination of metronomic TW-37 and low-dose radiation inhibited tumor growth and resulted in significant increase in time to failure compared with controls, whereas single agents did not. Notably, histopathologic analysis revealed that tumors treated with TW-37 (with or without radiation) are more differentiated and showed more cohesive invasive fronts, which is consistent with less aggressive phenotype. Conclusions: These results demonstrate that metronomic TW-37 potentiates the antitumor effects of radiotherapy and suggest that patients with head and neck cancer might benefit from the combination of small molecule inhibitor of Bcl-2 and radiation therapy.

  18. Bacteriophage cell lysis of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli for top-down proteomic identification of Shiga toxin 1 & 2 using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization tandem time-of-light mass spectrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    RATIONALE: Analysis of bacteria by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) often relies upon sample preparation methods that result in cell lysis, e.g. bead-beating. However, Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) can undergo bacteriophage...

  19. Top-down proteomic identification of Shiga toxin 2 subtypes from Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Tandem Time of Flight mass spectrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have analyzed 26 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains for Shiga toxin 2 (Stx2) production using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight-time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-TOF-MS/MS) and top-down proteomic analysis. STEC strains were induced to ...

  20. Halotolerant, biosurfactant-producing Bacillus species potentially useful for enhanced oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Jenneman, G.E.; McInerney, M.J.; Knapp, R.M.; Clark, J.B.; Feero, J.M.; Revus, D.E.; Menzie, D.E.

    1983-01-01

    A biosurfactant-producing Bacillus licheniformis was isolated from oil-field injection water with properties potentially useful for in situ enhanced oil recovery. Conventional miscible flooding procedures use expensive synthetic detergents such as petroleum sulfonates that precipitate in high NaCl brines and adsorb to rock surfaces. The Bacillus sp. produced a biosurfactant when grown at 40 C in a sucrose mineral salts medium containing 5% NaCl. The biosurfactant was produced during the log phase of growth in the presence or absence of either crude oil or hexadecane. The surface tension of a 5% NaCl solution decreased from 74.0 mN/m to 27 mN/m when the surfactant was added. Interfacial tension of a 5% NaCl brine/octane mixture was as low as 0.43 mN/m when measured by a spinning drop tensiometer. The surfactant was extracted by acid precipitation at a pH of 2.0. The extracted surfactant exhibited optimal surface tension-lowering ability in 4-5% NaCl solutions between pH's of 6.0 to 10.0. The addition of calcium up to 340 mg/liter and incubation temperatures up to 100 C did not alter appreciably the surfactant activity. Mobilization of crude oil and oil bank formation occurred in a sandpack column after addition of the biosurfactant. 16 references, 1 figure, 2 tables.

  1. Understanding Potential Air Emissions from a Cellulosic Biorefinery Producing Renewable Diesel Blendstock.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yimin; Heath, Garvin A.; Renzaglia, Jason; Thomas, Mae

    2015-06-22

    The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007, through the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS), mandates increased use of biofuels, including cellulosic biofuels. The RFS is expected to spur the development of advanced biofuel technologies (e.g., new and innovative biofuel conversion pathways) as well as the construction of biorefineries (refineries that produce biofuels) using these technologies. To develop sustainable cellulosic biofuels, one of the goals of the Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) at the Department of Energy is to minimize air pollutants from the entire biofuel supply chain, as stated in their 2014 Multi-Year Program Plan (2014). Although biofuels in general have been found to have lower life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions compared to petroleum fuels on an energy basis, biomass feedstock production, harvesting, transportation, processing and conversion are expected to emit a wide range of other air pollutants (e.g., criteria air pollutants, hazardous air pollutants), which could affect the environmental benefits of biofuels when displacing petroleum fuels. While it is important for policy makers, air quality planners and regulators, biofuel developers, and investors to understand the potential implications on air quality from a growing biofuel industry, there is a general lack of information and knowledge about the type, fate and magnitude of potential air pollutant emissions from the production of cellulosic biofuels due to the nascent stage of this emerging industry. This analysis assesses potential air pollutant emissions from a hypothetical biorefinery, selected by BETO for further research and development, which uses a biological conversion process of sugars to hydrocarbons to produce infrastructural-compatible renewable diesel blendstock from cellulosic biomass.

  2. A corona discharge initiated electrochemical electrospray ionization technique.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, John R; Hess, Sonja

    2009-11-01

    We report here the development of a corona discharge (CD) initiated electrochemical (EC) electrospray ionization (ESI) technique using a standard electrospray ion source. This is a new ionization technique distinct from ESI, electrochemistry inherent to ESI, APCI, and techniques using hydroxyl radicals produced under atmospheric pressure conditions. By maximizing the observable CD at the tip of a stainless steel ESI capillary, efficient electrochemical oxidation of electrochemically active compounds is observed. For electrochemical oxidation to be observed, the ionization potential of the analyte must be lower than Fe. Ferrocene labeled compounds were chosen as the electrochemically active moiety. The electrochemical cell in the ESI source was robust, and generated ions with selectivity according to the ionization potential of the analytes and up to zeptomolar sensitivity. Our results indicate that CD initiated electrochemical ionization has the potential to become a powerful technique to increase the dynamic range, sensitivity, and selectivity of ESI experiments. PMID:19747843

  3. Potential application of a bioemulsifier-producing actinobacterium for treatment of vinasse.

    PubMed

    Colin, Verónica L; Cortes, Álvaro A Juárez; Aparicio, Juan D; Amoroso, María J

    2016-02-01

    Vinasse is a complex effluent created during production of ethyl alcohol, which can present serious pollution hazard in areas where it is discharged. A variety of technologies, many based upon recovery of the effluent via microbial pathways, are continually being evaluated in order to mitigate the pollution potential of vinasse. The present work reports on initial advances related to the effectiveness of the actinobacterium Streptomyces sp. MC1 for vinasse treatment. Alternative use of raw vinasse as a substrate for producing metabolites of biotechnological interest such as bioemulsifiers, was also evaluated. The strain was able to grow at very high vinasse concentrations (until 50% v/v) and remove over 50% of the biodegradable organic matter in a time period as short as 4 d. Potentially toxic metals such as Mn, Fe, Zn, As, and Pb were also effectively removed during bacterial growth. Decrease in the pollution potential of treated vinasse compared to raw effluent, was reflected in a significant increase in the vigour index of Lactuca sativa (letucce) used as bioremediation indicator. Finally, significant bioemulsifier production was detected when this strain was incubated in a vinasse-based culture medium. These results represent the first advances on the recovery and re-valuation of an actual effluent, by using an actinobacterium from our collection of cultures. PMID:26421623

  4. Microcystin-producing and non-producing cyanobacterial blooms collected from the Central India harbor potentially pathogenic Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Prashant; Kumar Agrawal, Manish; Nath Bagchi, Suvendra

    2015-05-01

    On the basis of relative abundance, frequency and biovolume, the important value index ranks were assigned to individual cyanobacteria in phytoplankton samples collected from fourteen water resources of Central India. The mcyABDE genes were detected in all the blooms with Microcystis (-aeruginosa, -viridis, -panniformis, -botrys) as being the major constituent morphospecies. On the other hand, blooms composed of primarily Oscillatoria (-limosa,-agardhii, -laetevirens) along with Anabaena, Nostoc, Phormidium and Spirulina as sub-dominant forms exhibited quite a patchy distribution of one or the other mcy genes. Fifty percent of Microcystis- but none of the Oscillatoria dominant blooms produced microcystins-RR and desmethyl-RR at 0.03-0.41mgg(-1) bloom dry mass. Traces of dissolved microcystin was detected in lake water, which is well below the WHO guideline. Irrespective of cyanobacterial composition and microcystin production ability, during the study period 43-64% of the cyanobacterial bloom samples exhibited association of viable but nonculturable forms of Vibrio cholerae O1 and O139, as evident from amplification of the antigen genes. We believe that spread of endemic cholera is the major threat associated with harmful algal blooms. PMID:25682583

  5. Equation of motion coupled cluster methods for electron attachment and ionization potential in fullerenes C{sub 60} and C{sub 70}

    SciTech Connect

    Bhaskaran-Nair, Kiran; Kowalski, Karol; Moreno, Juana; Jarrell, Mark; Shelton, William A.

    2014-08-21

    In both molecular and periodic solid-state systems there is a need for the accurate determination of the ionization potential and the electron affinity for systems ranging from light harvesting polymers and photocatalytic compounds to semiconductors. The development of a Green's function approach based on the coupled cluster (CC) formalism would be a valuable tool for addressing many properties involving many-body interactions along with their associated correlation functions. As a first step in this direction, we have developed an accurate and parallel efficient approach based on the equation of motion-CC technique. To demonstrate the high degree of accuracy and numerical efficiency of our approach we calculate the ionization potential and electron affinity for C{sub 60} and C{sub 70}. Accurate predictions for these molecules are well beyond traditional molecular scale studies. We compare our results with experiments and both quantum Monte Carlo and GW calculations.

  6. Accurate mass fragment library for rapid analysis of pesticides on produce using ambient pressure desorption ionization with high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kern, Sara E; Lin, Lora A; Fricke, Frederick L

    2014-08-01

    U.S. food imports have been increasing steadily for decades, intensifying the need for a rapid and sensitive screening technique. A method has been developed that uses foam disks to sample the surface of incoming produce. This work provides complimentary information to the extensive amount of published pesticide fragmentation data collected using LCMS systems (Sack et al. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 59, 6383-6411, 2011; Mol et al. Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, 403, 2891-2908, 2012). The disks are directly analyzed using transmission-mode direct analysis in real time (DART) ambient pressure desorption ionization coupled to a high resolution accurate mass-mass spectrometer (HRAM-MS). In order to provide more certainty in the identification of the pesticides detected, a library of accurate mass fragments and isotopes of the protonated parent molecular ion (the [M+H]⁺) has been developed. The HRAM-MS is equipped with a quadrupole mass filter, providing the capability of "data-dependent" fragmentation, as opposed to "all -ion" fragmentation (where all of the ions enter a collision chamber and are fragmented at once). A temperature gradient for the DART helium stream and multiple collision energies were employed to detect and fragment 164 pesticides of varying chemical classes, sizes, and polarities. The accurate mass information of precursor ([M+H]⁺ ion) and fragment ions is essential in correctly identifying chemical contaminants on the surface of imported produce. Additionally, the inclusion of isotopes of the [M+H]⁺ in the database adds another metric to the confirmation process. The fragmentation data were collected using a Q-Exactive mass spectrometer and were added to a database used to process data collected with an Exactive mass spectrometer, an instrument that is more readily available for this screening application. The commodities investigated range from smooth-skinned produce such as apples to rougher surfaces like broccoli

  7. Accurate Mass Fragment Library for Rapid Analysis of Pesticides on Produce Using Ambient Pressure Desorption Ionization with High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kern, Sara E.; Lin, Lora A.; Fricke, Frederick L.

    2014-08-01

    U.S. food imports have been increasing steadily for decades, intensifying the need for a rapid and sensitive screening technique. A method has been developed that uses foam disks to sample the surface of incoming produce. This work provides complimentary information to the extensive amount of published pesticide fragmentation data collected using LCMS systems (Sack et al. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 59, 6383-6411, 2011; Mol et al. Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, 403, 2891-2908, 2012). The disks are directly analyzed using transmission-mode direct analysis in real time (DART) ambient pressure desorption ionization coupled to a high resolution accurate mass-mass spectrometer (HRAM-MS). In order to provide more certainty in the identification of the pesticides detected, a library of accurate mass fragments and isotopes of the protonated parent molecular ion (the [M+H]+) has been developed. The HRAM-MS is equipped with a quadrupole mass filter, providing the capability of "data-dependent" fragmentation, as opposed to "all -ion" fragmentation (where all of the ions enter a collision chamber and are fragmented at once). A temperature gradient for the DART helium stream and multiple collision energies were employed to detect and fragment 164 pesticides of varying chemical classes, sizes, and polarities. The accurate mass information of precursor ([M+H]+ ion) and fragment ions is essential in correctly identifying chemical contaminants on the surface of imported produce. Additionally, the inclusion of isotopes of the [M+H]+ in the database adds another metric to the confirmation process. The fragmentation data were collected using a Q-Exactive mass spectrometer and were added to a database used to process data collected with an Exactive mass spectrometer, an instrument that is more readily available for this screening application. The commodities investigated range from smooth-skinned produce such as apples to rougher surfaces like broccoli. The

  8. Ionization Energies and Aqueous Redox Potentials of Organic Molecules: Comparison of DFT, Correlated ab Initio Theory and Pair Natural Orbital Approaches.

    PubMed

    Isegawa, Miho; Neese, Frank; Pantazis, Dimitrios A

    2016-05-10

    The calculation of redox potentials involves large energetic terms arising from gas phase ionization energies, thermodynamic contributions, and solvation energies of the reduced and oxidized species. In this work we study the performance of a wide range of wave function and density functional theory methods for the prediction of ionization energies and aqueous one-electron oxidation potentials of a set of 19 organic molecules. Emphasis is placed on evaluating methods that employ the computationally efficient local pair natural orbital (LPNO) approach, as well as several implementations of coupled cluster theory and explicitly correlated F12 methods. The electronic energies are combined with implicit solvation models for the solvation energies. With the exception of MP2 and its variants, which suffer from enormous errors arising at least partially from the poor Hartree-Fock reference, ionization energies can be systematically predicted with average errors below 0.1 eV for most of the correlated wave function based methods studies here, provided basis set extrapolation is performed. LPNO methods are the most efficient way to achieve this type of accuracy. DFT methods show in general larger errors and suffer from inconsistent behavior. The only exception is the M06-2X functional which is found to be competitive with the best LPNO-based approaches for ionization energies. Importantly, the limiting factor for the calculation of accurate redox potentials is the solvation energy. The errors in the predicted solvation energies by all continuum solvation models tested in this work dominate the final computed reduction potential, resulting in average errors typically in excess of 0.3 V and hence obscuring the gains that arise from choosing a more accurate electronic structure method. PMID:27065224

  9. Mycotoxin-producing potential of fungi isolated from amaranth seeds in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Bresler, G; Brizzio, S B; Vaamonde, G

    1995-03-01

    To evaluate the potential for mycotoxin production by molds in amaranth grains, the mycoflora was determined both before and after surface disinfection on dichloran-chloramphenicol-peptone agar (DCPA) and dichloran-18% glycerol agar (DG18). On both media Aspergillus, Penicillium, Fusarium and Alternaria were the predominant genera. A flaus and A. parasiticus were the Aspergillus species most frequently isolated. P. chrysogenum was the species most common among the penicillia. F. equiseti was the predominant Fusarium species. Isolates of Aspergillus, Penicillium and Fusarium were screened for mycotoxin production on sterile rice substrate and also using a simple screening method. Toxinogenic strains of A. flavus and A. parasiticus (aflatoxins), A. versicolor (sterigmatocystin), P. citrinum (citrinin), P. viridicatum (penicillic acid), F. moniliforme, F. equiseti and F. semitectum (zearalenone), were encountered. The simple screening method for toxinogenic molds showed good performance for the detection of molds producing aflatoxins and zearalenone compared with mycotoxins production on the natural substrate. PMID:7599026

  10. Surface-Induced Dissociation of Ions Produced by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization in a Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Laskin, Julia; Beck, Kenneth M.; Hache, John J.; Futrell, Jean H.

    2004-01-15

    Intermediate pressure matrix assisted laser ionization (MALDI) source was constructed and interfaced with a 6T Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR MS) specially configured for surface-induced dissociation (SID) studies.

  11. Isolation and characterization of potential antibiotic producing actinomycetes from water and sediments of Lake Tana, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Gebreyohannes, Gebreselema; Moges, Feleke; Sahile, Samuel; Raja, Nagappan

    2013-01-01

    Objective To isolate, evaluate and characterize potential antibiotic producing actinomycetes from water and sediments of Lake Tana, Ethiopia. Methods A total of 31 strains of actinomycetes were isolated and tested against Gram positive and Gram negative bacterial strains by primary screening. In the primary screening, 11 promising isolates were identified and subjected to solid state and submerged state fermentation methods to produce crude extracts. The fermented biomass was extracted by organic solvent extraction method and tested against bacterial strains by disc and agar well diffusion methods. The isolates were characterized by using morphological, physiological and biochemical methods. Results The result obtained from agar well diffusion method was better than disc diffusion method. The crude extract showed higher inhibition zone against Gram positive bacteria than Gram negative bacteria. One-way analysis of variance confirmed most of the crude extracts were statistically significant at 95% confidence interval. The minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration of crude extracts were 1.65 mg/mL and 3.30 mg/mL against Staphylococcus aureus, and 1.84 mg/mL and 3.80 mg/mL against Escherichia coli respectively. The growth of aerial and substrate mycelium varied in different culture media used. Most of the isolates were able to hydrolysis starch and urea; able to survive at 5% concentration of sodium chloride; optimum temperature for their growth was 30 °C. Conclusions The results of the present study revealed that freshwater actinomycetes of Lake Tana appear to have immense potential as a source of antibacterial compounds. PMID:23730554

  12. Determination of ionization fraction and plasma potential in a dc magnetron sputtering system using a quartz crystal microbalance and a gridded energy analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Green, K.M.

    1997-01-01

    A diagnostic which combines a quartz crystal microbalance and a gridded energy analyzer has been developed to measure the ion-to- neutral ratio and the plasma potential in a commercial dc magnetron sputtering device. Additional features of this sensor include an externally controlled shutter which protects the diagnostic when it is in the chamber, but it is not in use. The diagnostic is mounted on a linear motion feedthrough and embedded in a slot in the wafer chuck to allow for measuring uniformity in deposition and ionization throughout the plane of the wafer. RF power is introduced to ionize the Al particles. Using the quartz crystal microbalance and the gridded energy analyzer, the ion-to-neutral ratio and other parameters are determined. Comparing the total deposition rate with and without a bias that screens out the ions, but leaves the plasma undisturbed, allows for the determination of the ion-to-neutral ratio. By varying the voltage applied to the grids, the plasma potential is measured. For example, a magnetron configuration having a pressure of 35 mtorr, a dc power of 2 kW, and a net rf power of 310{+-}5 W yielded 78{+-}5% ionization and a plasma potential of 35{+-}1 V.

  13. Modulated voltage metastable ionization detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carle, G. C.; Kojiro, D. R.; Humphrey, D. E. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    The output current from a metastable ionization detector (MID) is applied to a modulation voltage circuit. An adjustment is made to balance out the background current, and an output current, above background, is applied to an input of a strip chart recorder. For low level concentrations, i.e., low detected output current, the ionization potential will be at a maximum and the metastable ionization detector will operate at its most sensitive level. When the detected current from the metastable ionization detector increases above a predetermined threshold level, a voltage control circuit is activated which turns on a high voltage transistor which acts to reduce the ionization potential. The ionization potential applied to the metastable ionization detector is then varied so as to maintain the detected signal level constant. The variation in ionization potential is now related to the concentration of the constituent and a representative amplitude is applied to another input of said strip chart recorder.

  14. Lactic acid bacteria producing B-group vitamins: a great potential for functional cereals products.

    PubMed

    Capozzi, Vittorio; Russo, Pasquale; Dueñas, María Teresa; López, Paloma; Spano, Giuseppe

    2012-12-01

    Wheat contains various essential nutrients including the B group of vitamins. However, B group vitamins, normally present in cereals-derived products, are easily removed or destroyed during milling, food processing or cooking. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are widely used as starter cultures for the fermentation of a large variety of foods and can improve the safety, shelf life, nutritional value, flavor and overall quality of the fermented products. In this regard, the identification and application of strains delivering health-promoting compounds is a fascinating field. Besides their key role in food fermentations, several LAB found in the gastrointestinal tract of humans and animals are commercially used as probiotics and possess generally recognized as safe status. LAB are usually auxotrophic for several vitamins although certain strains of LAB have the capability to synthesize water-soluble vitamins such as those included in the B group. In recent years, a number of biotechnological processes have been explored to perform a more economical and sustainable vitamin production than that obtained via chemical synthesis. This review article will briefly report the current knowledge on lactic acid bacteria synthesis of vitamins B2, B11 and B12 and the potential strategies to increase B-group vitamin content in cereals-based products, where vitamins-producing LAB have been leading to the elaboration of novel fermented functional foods. In addition, the use of genetic strategies to increase vitamin production or to create novel vitamin-producing strains will be also discussed. PMID:23093174

  15. Potential usefulness of a video printer for producing secondary images from digitized chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, Robert M.; MacMahon, Heber; Doi, Kunio; Bosworth, Eric

    1991-05-01

    Communication between radiologists and clinicians could be improved if a secondary image (copy of the original image) accompanied the radiologic report. In addition, the number of lost original radiographs could be decreased, since clinicians would have less need to borrow films. The secondary image should be simple and inexpensive to produce, while providing sufficient image quality for verification of the diagnosis. We are investigating the potential usefulness of a video printer for producing copies of radiographs, i.e. images printed on thermal paper. The video printer we examined (Seikosha model VP-3500) can provide 64 shades of gray. It is capable of recording images up to 1,280 pixels by 1,240 lines and can accept any raster-type video signal. The video printer was characterized in terms of its linearity, contrast, latitude, resolution, and noise properties. The quality of video-printer images was also evaluated in an observer study using portable chest radiographs. We found that observers could confirm up to 90 of the reported findings in the thorax using video- printer images, when the original radiographs were of high quality. The number of verified findings was diminished when high spatial resolution was required (e.g. detection of a subtle pneumothorax) or when a low-contrast finding was located in the mediastinal area or below the diaphragm (e.g. nasogastric tubes).

  16. Trichoderma harzianum Produces a New Thermally Stable Acid Phosphatase, with Potential for Biotechnological Application

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Amanda Araújo; Leitão, Vanessa Oliveira; Ramada, Marcelo Henrique; Mehdad, Azadeh; Georg, Raphaela de Castro; Ulhôa, Cirano José; de Freitas, Sonia Maria

    2016-01-01

    Acid phosphatases (ACPases) are produced by a variety of fungi and have gained attention due their biotechnological potential in industrial, diagnosis and bioremediation processes. These enzymes play a specific role in scavenging, mobilization and acquisition of phosphate, enhancing soil fertility and plant growth. In this study, a new ACPase from Trichoderma harzianum, named ACPase II, was purified and characterized as a glycoprotein belonging to the acid phosphatase family. ACPase II presents an optimum pH and temperature of 3.8 and 65°C, respectively, and is stable at 55°C for 120 min, retaining 60% of its activity. The enzyme did not require metal divalent ions, but was inhibited by inorganic phosphate and tungstate. Affinity for several phosphate substrates was observed, including phytate, which is the major component of phosphorus in plant foods. The inhibition of ACPase II by tungstate and phosphate at different pH values is consistent with the inability of the substrate to occupy its active site due to electrostatic contacts that promote conformational changes, as indicated by fluorescence spectroscopy. A higher affinity for tungstate rather than phosphate at pH 4.0was observed, in accordance with its highest inhibitory effect. Results indicate considerable biotechnological potential of the ACPase II in soil environments. PMID:26938873

  17. Screening of Diatom Strains and Characterization of Cyclotella cryptica as A Potential Fucoxanthin Producer

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Bingbing; Liu, Bin; Yang, Bo; Sun, Peipei; Lu, Xue; Liu, Jin; Chen, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Fucoxanthin has been receiving ever-increasing interest due to its broad health beneficial effects. Currently, seaweeds are the predominant source of natural fucoxanthin. However, the disappointingly low fucoxanthin content has impeded their use, driving the exploration of alternative fucoxanthin producers. In the present study, thirteen diatom strains were evaluated with respect to growth and fucoxanthin production potential. Cyclotella cryptica (CCMP 333), which grew well for fucoxanthin production under both photoautotrophic and heterotrophic growth conditions, was selected for further investigation. The supply of nitrate and light individually or in combination were all found to promote growth and fucoxanthin accumulation. When transferring heterotrophic cultures to light, fucoxanthin responded differentially to light intensities and was impaired by higher light intensity with a concomitant increase in diadinoxanthin and diatoxanthin, indicative of the modulation of Diadinoxanthin Cycle to cope with the light stress. Taken together, we, for the first time, performed the screening of diatom strains for fucoxanthin production potential and investigated in detail the effect of nutritional and environmental factors on C. cryptica growth and fucoxanthin accumulation. These results provide valuable implications into future engineering of C. cryptica culture parameters for improved fucoxanthin production and C. cryptica may emerge as a promising microalgal source of fucoxanthin. PMID:27399729

  18. Screening of Diatom Strains and Characterization of Cyclotella cryptica as A Potential Fucoxanthin Producer.

    PubMed

    Guo, Bingbing; Liu, Bin; Yang, Bo; Sun, Peipei; Lu, Xue; Liu, Jin; Chen, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Fucoxanthin has been receiving ever-increasing interest due to its broad health beneficial effects. Currently, seaweeds are the predominant source of natural fucoxanthin. However, the disappointingly low fucoxanthin content has impeded their use, driving the exploration of alternative fucoxanthin producers. In the present study, thirteen diatom strains were evaluated with respect to growth and fucoxanthin production potential. Cyclotella cryptica (CCMP 333), which grew well for fucoxanthin production under both photoautotrophic and heterotrophic growth conditions, was selected for further investigation. The supply of nitrate and light individually or in combination were all found to promote growth and fucoxanthin accumulation. When transferring heterotrophic cultures to light, fucoxanthin responded differentially to light intensities and was impaired by higher light intensity with a concomitant increase in diadinoxanthin and diatoxanthin, indicative of the modulation of Diadinoxanthin Cycle to cope with the light stress. Taken together, we, for the first time, performed the screening of diatom strains for fucoxanthin production potential and investigated in detail the effect of nutritional and environmental factors on C. cryptica growth and fucoxanthin accumulation. These results provide valuable implications into future engineering of C. cryptica culture parameters for improved fucoxanthin production and C. cryptica may emerge as a promising microalgal source of fucoxanthin. PMID:27399729

  19. Trichoderma harzianum Produces a New Thermally Stable Acid Phosphatase, with Potential for Biotechnological Application.

    PubMed

    Souza, Amanda Araújo; Leitão, Vanessa Oliveira; Ramada, Marcelo Henrique; Mehdad, Azadeh; Georg, Raphaela de Castro; Ulhôa, Cirano José; de Freitas, Sonia Maria

    2016-01-01

    Acid phosphatases (ACPases) are produced by a variety of fungi and have gained attention due their biotechnological potential in industrial, diagnosis and bioremediation processes. These enzymes play a specific role in scavenging, mobilization and acquisition of phosphate, enhancing soil fertility and plant growth. In this study, a new ACPase from Trichoderma harzianum, named ACPase II, was purified and characterized as a glycoprotein belonging to the acid phosphatase family. ACPase II presents an optimum pH and temperature of 3.8 and 65 °C, respectively, and is stable at 55 °C for 120 min, retaining 60% of its activity. The enzyme did not require metal divalent ions, but was inhibited by inorganic phosphate and tungstate. Affinity for several phosphate substrates was observed, including phytate, which is the major component of phosphorus in plant foods. The inhibition of ACPase II by tungstate and phosphate at different pH values is consistent with the inability of the substrate to occupy its active site due to electrostatic contacts that promote conformational changes, as indicated by fluorescence spectroscopy. A higher affinity for tungstate rather than phosphate at pH 4.0 was observed, in accordance with its highest inhibitory effect. Results indicate considerable biotechnological potential of the ACPase II in soil environments. PMID:26938873

  20. A tank experiment with self-potential signals produced by a subsurface bioelectrochemical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fachin, S. D.; Vasconcelos, S.; Mendonça, C.

    2010-12-01

    Self-potential (SP) anomalies are observed in contaminated sites. Geobattery models valid for conductive mineral orebodies cannot be applied to contaminated sites where massive concentrations of conductive minerals are not expected. The possibility of active bioelectrical processes working as large-scale “biogeobatteries” was recently proposed to explain SP signals observed in field and in laboratory conditions. In many aspects the biogeobattery model share properties with has been termed as bioelectrochemical system (BES), well studied in environmental technology. In a BES microbial communities assume active roles either in catalyzing redox reactions leading to biodegradation and pollutant removal as well as structure makers (or substance producers) in charge transfer reactions. Polarization curves describing current yielding for a variable external load usually are used to characterize a BES. In our experiment it was used as a criterion to recognize a system working as a BES. We present preliminary results from a tank experiment in which a BES was established in a tank and self-potential anomalies were simultaneously observed at the top surface. To do this, a narrow (4 cm wide) rectangular (80 x 35 cm) plexiglass tank was partially filled with organic waste matter from a treatment plant. To simulate a capped landfill the organic material was covered by a 12 cm thick layer of bentonite mud. A graphite plug (area of 19 cm2) was inserted in the middle depth of the organic layer and a similar one buried 2 cm below the top surface. The system was left to rest for 80 days when polarization curves for the graphite electrodes revealed a response compatible with a BES. Variations in the BES external load produced a consistent response in the self-potential anomaly measured by a set of 19 non-polarizable (Pb/PbCl2) electrodes at the top surface. Our results suggest that natural BES’s are able to generate measurable SP signals at the ground surface, which makes

  1. NON-WKB MODELS OF THE FIRST IONIZATION POTENTIAL EFFECT: IMPLICATIONS FOR SOLAR CORONAL HEATING AND THE CORONAL HELIUM AND NEON ABUNDANCES

    SciTech Connect

    Laming, J. Martin

    2009-04-20

    We revisit in more detail a model for element abundance fractionation in the solar chromosphere that gives rise to the 'first ionization potential (FIP) effect' in the solar corona and wind. Elements with first ionization potential below about 10 eV, i.e., those that are predominantly ionized in the chromosphere, are enriched in the corona by a factor of 3-4. We model the propagation of Alfven waves through the chromosphere using a non-WKB treatment, and evaluate the ponderomotive force associated with these waves. Under solar conditions, this is generally pointed upward in the chromosphere, and enhances the abundance of chromospheric ions in the corona. Our new approach captures the essentials of the solar coronal abundance anomalies, including the depletion of He relative to H, and also the putative depletion of Ne, recently discussed in the literature. We also argue that the FIP effect provides the strongest evidence to date for energy fluxes of Alfven waves sufficient to heat the corona. However, it appears that these waves must also be generated in the corona, in order to preserve the rather regular fractionation pattern without strong variations from loop to loop observed in the solar corona and slow-speed solar wind.

  2. Cellulolytic and xylanolytic potential of high β-glucosidase-producing Trichoderma from decaying biomass.

    PubMed

    Okeke, Benedict C

    2014-10-01

    Availability, cost, and efficiency of microbial enzymes for lignocellulose bioconversion are central to sustainable biomass ethanol technology. Fungi enriched from decaying biomass and surface soil mixture displayed an array of strong cellulolytic and xylanolytic activities. Strains SG2 and SG4 produced a promising array of cellulolytic and xylanolytic enzymes including β-glucosidase, usually low in cultures of Trichoderma species. Nucleotide sequence analysis of internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) region of rRNA gene revealed that strains SG2 and SG4 are closely related to Trichoderma inhamatum, Trichoderma piluliferum, and Trichoderma aureoviride. Trichoderma sp. SG2 crude culture supernatant correspondingly displayed as much as 9.84 ± 1.12, 48.02 ± 2.53, and 30.10 ± 1.11 units mL(-1) of cellulase, xylanase, and β-glucosidase in 30 min assay. Ten times dilution of culture supernatant of strain SG2 revealed that total activities were about 5.34, 8.45, and 2.05 orders of magnitude higher than observed in crude culture filtrate for cellulase, xylanase, and β-glucosidase, respectively, indicating that more enzymes are present to contact with substrates in biomass saccharification. In parallel experiments, Trichoderma species SG2 and SG4 produced more β-glucosidase than the industrial strain Trichoderma reesei RUT-C30. Results indicate that strains SG2 and SG4 have potential for low cost in-house production of primary lignocellulose-hydrolyzing enzymes for production of biomass saccharides and biofuel in the field. PMID:25129039

  3. Photoelectron circular dichroism in the multiphoton ionization by short laser pulses. I. Propagation of single-active-electron wave packets in chiral pseudo-potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Artemyev, Anton N.; Müller, Anne D.; Demekhin, Philipp V.; Hochstuhl, David

    2015-06-28

    A theoretical method to study the angle-resolved multiphoton ionization of polyatomic molecules is developed. It is based on the time-dependent formulation of the Single Center (TDSC) method and consists in the propagation of single-active-electron wave packets in the effective molecular potentials in the presence of intense laser pulses. For this purpose, the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for one electron, moving in a molecular field and interacting with an arbitrary laser pulse, is solved in spherical coordinates by an efficient numerical approach. As a test, the method is applied to the one- and two-photon ionizations of a model methane-like chiral system by circularly polarized short intense high-frequency laser pulses. Thereby, we analyze the photoelectron circular dichroism (PECD) in the momentum distribution. The considered model application illustrates the capability of the TDSC method to study multiphoton PECD in fixed-in-space and randomly oriented chiral molecules.

  4. Potential of gas chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometry for screening and quantification of hexabromocyclododecane.

    PubMed

    Sales, Carlos; Portolés, Tania; Sancho, Juan Vicente; Abad, Esteban; Ábalos, Manuela; Sauló, Jordi; Fiedler, Heidelore; Gómara, Belén; Beltrán, Joaquim

    2016-01-01

    A fast method for the screening and quantification of hexabromocyclododecane (sum of all isomers) by gas chromatography using a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (GC-APCI-QqQ) is proposed. This novel procedure makes use of the soft atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source, which results in less fragmentation of the analyte than by conventional electron impact (EI) and chemical ionization (CI) sources, favoring the formation of the [M - Br](+) ion and, thus, enhancing sensitivity and selectivity. Detection was based on the consecutive loses of HBr from the [M - Br](+) ion to form the specific [M - H5Br6](+) and [M - H4Br5](+) ions, which were selected as quantitation (Q) and qualification (q) transitions, respectively. Parameters affecting ionization and MS/MS detection were studied. Method performance was also evaluated; calibration curves were found linear from 1 pg/μL to 100 pg/μL for the total HBCD concentration; instrumental detection limit was estimated to be 0.10 pg/μL; repeatability and reproducibility, expressed as relative standard deviation, were better than 7% in both cases. The application to different real samples [polyurethane foam disks (PUFs), food, and marine samples] pointed out a rapid way to identify and allow quantification of this compound together with a number of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (BDE congeners 28, 47, 66, 85, 99, 100, 153, 154, 183, 184, 191, 196, 197, and 209) and two other novel brominated flame retardants [i.e., decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE) and 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE)] because of their presence in the same fraction when performing the usual sample treatment. PMID:26554601

  5. Surface ionization of terpene hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Zandberg, E.Y.; Nezdyurov, A.L.; Paleev, V.I.; Ponomarev, D.A.

    1986-09-01

    By means of a surface ionization indicator for traces of materials in the atmosphere it has been established that many natural materials containing terpenes and their derivatives are ionized on the surface of heated molybdenum oxide at atmospheric air pressure. A mass-spectrometer method has been used to explain the mechanism of ionization of individual terpene hydrocarbons and to establish its principles. The ionization of ..cap alpha..-pinene, alloocimene, camphene, and also adamantane on oxidized tungsten under vacuum conditions has been investigated. The ..cap alpha..-pinene and alloocimene are ionized by surface ionization but camphene and adamantane are not ionized under vacuum conditions. The surface ionization mass spectra of ..cap alpha..-pinene and alloocimene are of low line brightness in comparison with electron ionization mass spectra and differ between themselves. The temperature relations for currents of the same compositions of ions during ionization of ..cap alpha..-pinene and alloocimene are also different, which leads to the possibility of surface ionization analysis of mixtures of terpenes being ionized. The ionization coefficients of alloocimene and ..cap alpha..-pinene on oxidized tungsten under temperatures optimum for ionization and the ionization potentials of alloocimene molecules and of radicals (M-H) of both compounds have been evaluated.

  6. Produce from Africa’s Gardens: Potential for Leafy Vegetable and Fruit Fermentations

    PubMed Central

    Oguntoyinbo, Folarin A.; Fusco, Vincenzina; Cho, Gyu-Sung; Kabisch, Jan; Neve, Horst; Bockelmann, Wilhelm; Huch, Melanie; Frommherz, Lara; Trierweiler, Bernhard; Becker, Biserka; Benomar, Nabil; Gálvez, Antonio; Abriouel, Hikmate; Holzapfel, Wilhelm H.; Franz, Charles M. A. P.

    2016-01-01

    A rich variety of indigenous fruits and vegetables grow in Africa, which contribute to the nutrition and health of Africa’s populations. Fruits and vegetables have high moisture and are thus inherently prone to accelerated spoilage. Food fermentation still plays a major role in combating food spoilage and foodborne diseases that are prevalent in many of Africa’s resource disadvantaged regions. Lactic acid fermentation is probably the oldest and best-accepted food processing method among the African people, and is largely a home-based process. Fermentation of leafy vegetables and fruits is, however, underutilized in Africa, although such fermented products could contribute toward improving nutrition and food security in this continent, where many are still malnourished and suffer from hidden hunger. Fermentation of leafy vegetables and fruits may not only improve safety and prolong shelf life, but may also enhance the availability of some trace minerals, vitamins and anti-oxidants. Cassava, cow-peas, amaranth, African nightshade, and spider plant leaves have a potential for fermentation, as do various fruits for the production of vinegars or fruit beers and wines. What is needed to accelerate efforts for production of fermented leaves and vegetables is the development of fermentation protocols, training of personnel and scale-up of production methods. Furthermore, suitable starter cultures need to be developed and produced to guarantee the success of the fermentations. PMID:27458430

  7. Potential of various archae- and eubacterial strains as industrial polyhydroxyalkanoate producers from whey.

    PubMed

    Koller, Martin; Hesse, Paula; Bona, Rodolfo; Kutschera, Christoph; Atlić, Aid; Braunegg, Gerhart

    2007-02-12

    Three different microbial wild-type strains are compared with respect to their potential as industrial scale polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) producers from the feed stock whey lactose. The halophilic archaeon Haloferax mediterranei as well as two eubacterial strains (Pseudomonas hydrogenovora and Hydrogenophaga pseudoflava) are investigated. H. mediterranei accumulated 50 wt.-% of poly-3-(hydroxybutyrate-co-8%-hydroxyvalerate) from hydrolyzed whey without addition of 3-hydroxyvalerate (3HV) precursors (specific productivity q(p): 9.1 mg x g(-1) x h(-1)). Using P. hydrogenovora, the final percentage of poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) amounted to 12 wt.-% (q(p): 2.9 mg x g(-1) x h(-1)). With H. pseudoflava, it was possible to reach 40 wt.-% P-3(HB-co-5%-HV) on non-hydrolyzed whey lactose plus addition of valeric acid as 3HV precursor (q(p): 12.5 mg x g(-1) x h(-1)). A detailed characterization of the isolated biopolyesters and an evaluation with regard to the economic feasibility completes the study. PMID:17295410

  8. Biocide effects of volatile organic compounds produced by potential biocontrol rhizobacteria on Sclerotinia sclerotiorum

    PubMed Central

    Giorgio, Annalisa; De Stradis, Angelo; Lo Cantore, Pietro; Iacobellis, Nicola S.

    2015-01-01

    Six rhizobacteria isolated from common bean and able to protect bean plants from the common bacterial blight (CBB) causal agent, were in vitro evaluated for their potential antifungal effects toward different plant pathogenic fungi, mostly soil-borne. By dual culture assays, the above bacteria resulted producing diffusible and volatile metabolites which inhibited the growth of the majority of the pathogens under study. In particular, the latter substances highly affected the mycelium growth of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum strains, one of which was selected for further studies either on mycelium or sclerotia. Gas chromatographic analysis of the bacterial volatiles led to the identification of an array of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Time course studies showed the modification of the VOCs profile along a period of 5 days. In order to evaluate the single detected VOC effects on fungal growth, some of the pure compounds were tested on S. sclerotiorum mycelium and their minimal inhibitory quantities were determined. Similarly, the minimal inhibitory quantities on sclerotia germination were also defined. Moreover, observations by light and transmission electron microscopes highlighted hyphae cytoplasm granulation and ultrastructural alterations at cell organelles, mostly membranes, mitochondria, and endoplasmic reticulum. The membranes appeared one of the primary targets of bacterial volatiles, as confirmed by hemolytic activity observed for the majority of pure VOCs. However, of interest is the alteration observed on mitochondria as well. PMID:26500617

  9. Produce from Africa's Gardens: Potential for Leafy Vegetable and Fruit Fermentations.

    PubMed

    Oguntoyinbo, Folarin A; Fusco, Vincenzina; Cho, Gyu-Sung; Kabisch, Jan; Neve, Horst; Bockelmann, Wilhelm; Huch, Melanie; Frommherz, Lara; Trierweiler, Bernhard; Becker, Biserka; Benomar, Nabil; Gálvez, Antonio; Abriouel, Hikmate; Holzapfel, Wilhelm H; Franz, Charles M A P

    2016-01-01

    A rich variety of indigenous fruits and vegetables grow in Africa, which contribute to the nutrition and health of Africa's populations. Fruits and vegetables have high moisture and are thus inherently prone to accelerated spoilage. Food fermentation still plays a major role in combating food spoilage and foodborne diseases that are prevalent in many of Africa's resource disadvantaged regions. Lactic acid fermentation is probably the oldest and best-accepted food processing method among the African people, and is largely a home-based process. Fermentation of leafy vegetables and fruits is, however, underutilized in Africa, although such fermented products could contribute toward improving nutrition and food security in this continent, where many are still malnourished and suffer from hidden hunger. Fermentation of leafy vegetables and fruits may not only improve safety and prolong shelf life, but may also enhance the availability of some trace minerals, vitamins and anti-oxidants. Cassava, cow-peas, amaranth, African nightshade, and spider plant leaves have a potential for fermentation, as do various fruits for the production of vinegars or fruit beers and wines. What is needed to accelerate efforts for production of fermented leaves and vegetables is the development of fermentation protocols, training of personnel and scale-up of production methods. Furthermore, suitable starter cultures need to be developed and produced to guarantee the success of the fermentations. PMID:27458430

  10. Biocide effects of volatile organic compounds produced by potential biocontrol rhizobacteria on Sclerotinia sclerotiorum.

    PubMed

    Giorgio, Annalisa; De Stradis, Angelo; Lo Cantore, Pietro; Iacobellis, Nicola S

    2015-01-01

    Six rhizobacteria isolated from common bean and able to protect bean plants from the common bacterial blight (CBB) causal agent, were in vitro evaluated for their potential antifungal effects toward different plant pathogenic fungi, mostly soil-borne. By dual culture assays, the above bacteria resulted producing diffusible and volatile metabolites which inhibited the growth of the majority of the pathogens under study. In particular, the latter substances highly affected the mycelium growth of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum strains, one of which was selected for further studies either on mycelium or sclerotia. Gas chromatographic analysis of the bacterial volatiles led to the identification of an array of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Time course studies showed the modification of the VOCs profile along a period of 5 days. In order to evaluate the single detected VOC effects on fungal growth, some of the pure compounds were tested on S. sclerotiorum mycelium and their minimal inhibitory quantities were determined. Similarly, the minimal inhibitory quantities on sclerotia germination were also defined. Moreover, observations by light and transmission electron microscopes highlighted hyphae cytoplasm granulation and ultrastructural alterations at cell organelles, mostly membranes, mitochondria, and endoplasmic reticulum. The membranes appeared one of the primary targets of bacterial volatiles, as confirmed by hemolytic activity observed for the majority of pure VOCs. However, of interest is the alteration observed on mitochondria as well. PMID:26500617

  11. Calcium - ionized

    MedlinePlus

    ... at both ionized calcium and calcium attached to proteins. You may need to have a separate ionized calcium test if you have factors that increase or decrease total calcium levels. These may include abnormal blood levels ...

  12. Analytical instruments, ionization sources, and ionization methods

    DOEpatents

    Atkinson, David A.; Mottishaw, Paul

    2006-04-11

    Methods and apparatus for simultaneous vaporization and ionization of a sample in a spectrometer prior to introducing the sample into the drift tube of the analyzer are disclosed. The apparatus includes a vaporization/ionization source having an electrically conductive conduit configured to receive sample particulate which is conveyed to a discharge end of the conduit. Positioned proximate to the discharge end of the conduit is an electrically conductive reference device. The conduit and the reference device act as electrodes and have an electrical potential maintained between them sufficient to cause a corona effect, which will cause at least partial simultaneous ionization and vaporization of the sample particulate. The electrical potential can be maintained to establish a continuous corona, or can be held slightly below the breakdown potential such that arrival of particulate at the point of proximity of the electrodes disrupts the potential, causing arcing and the corona effect. The electrical potential can also be varied to cause periodic arcing between the electrodes such that particulate passing through the arc is simultaneously vaporized and ionized. The invention further includes a spectrometer containing the source. The invention is particularly useful for ion mobility spectrometers and atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometers.

  13. A first-principle protocol for calculating ionization energies and redox potentials of solvated molecules and ions: Theory and application to aqueous phenol and phenolate

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Debashree; Roy, Anirban; Seidel, Robert; Winter, Bernd; Bradforth, Stephen; Krylov, Anna I.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of hydration on the lowest vertical ionization energy (VIE) of phenol and phenolate solvated in bulk water was characterized using the equation-of-motion ionization potential coupled-cluster (EOM-IP-CCSD) and effective fragment potential (EFP) methods (referred to as EOM/EFP), and determined experimentally by valence photo-emission measurements using microjets and synchrotron radiation. The computed solvent-induced shifts in VIEs (ΔVIE) are −0.66 eV and +5.72 eV for phenol and phenolate, respectively. Our best estimates of the absolute values of VIEs (7.9 and 7.7 eV for phenol and phenolate) agree reasonably well with the respective experimental values (7.8±0.1 eV and 7.1±0.1 eV). The EOM/EFP scheme was benchmarked against full EOM-IP-CCSD using micro-solvated phenol and phenolate clusters. A protocol for calculating redox potentials with EOM/EFP was developed based on linear response approximation (LRA) of free energy determination. The oxidation potentials of phenol and phenolate calculated using LRA and EOM/EFP are 1.32 V and 0.89 V, respectively; they agree well with experimental values. PMID:22497288

  14. Quantity, composition and water contamination potential of ash produced under different wildfire severities.

    PubMed

    Santín, Cristina; Doerr, Stefan H; Otero, Xosé L; Chafer, Chris J

    2015-10-01

    Wildfires frequently threaten water quality through the transfer of eroded ash and soil into rivers and reservoirs. The ability to anticipate risks for water resources from wildfires is fundamental for implementing effective fire preparedness plans and post-fire mitigation measures. Here we present a new approach that allows quantifying the amount and characteristics of ash generated under different wildfire severities and its respective water contamination potential. This approach is applied to a wildfire in an Australian dry sclerophyll eucalypt forest, but can be adapted for use in other environments. The Balmoral fire of October 2013 affected 12,694 ha of Sydney's forested water supply catchment. It produced substantial ash loads that increased with fire severity, with 6, 16 and 34 Mg ha(-1) found in areas affected by low, high and extreme fire severity, respectively. Ash bulk density was also positively related to fire severity. The increase with fire severity in the total load and bulk density of the ash generated is mainly attributed to a combination of associated increases in (i) total amount of fuel affected by fire and (ii) contribution of charred mineral soil to the ash layer. Total concentrations of pollutants and nutrients in ash were mostly unrelated to fire severity and relatively low compared to values reported for wildfire ash in other environments (e.g. 4.0-7.3mg As kg(-1); 2.3-4.1 B mg kg(-1); 136-154 P mg kg(-1)). Solubility of the elements analysed was also low, less than 10% of the total concentration for all elements except for B (6-14%) and Na (30-50%). This could be related to a partial loss of soluble components by leaching and/or wind erosion before the ash sampling (10 weeks after the fire and before major ash mobilisation by water erosion). Even with their relatively low concentrations of potential pollutants, the substantial total ash loads found here represent a water contamination risk if transported into the hydrological network

  15. First successful ionization of Lr (Z = 103) by a surface-ionization technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Tetsuya K.; Sato, Nozomi; Asai, Masato; Tsukada, Kazuaki; Toyoshima, Atsushi; Ooe, Kazuhiro; Miyashita, Sunao; Schädel, Matthias; Kaneya, Yusuke; Nagame, Yuichiro; Osa, Akihiko; Ichikawa, Shin-ichi; Stora, Thierry; Kratz, Jens Volker

    2013-02-01

    We have developed a surface ionization ion-source as part of the JAEA-ISOL (Isotope Separator On-Line) setup, which is coupled to a He/CdI2 gas-jet transport system to determine the first ionization potential of the heaviest actinide lawrencium (Lr, Z = 103). The new ion-source is an improved version of the previous source that provided good ionization efficiencies for lanthanides. An additional filament was newly installed to give better control over its operation. We report, here, on the development of the new gas-jet coupled surface ion-source and on the first successful ionization and mass separation of 27-s 256Lr produced in the 249Cf + 11B reaction.

  16. Liver metabolomics reveals increased oxidative stress and fibrogenic potential in gfrp transgenic mice in response to ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Cheema, Amrita K; Pathak, Rupak; Zandkarimi, Fereshteh; Kaur, Prabhjit; Alkhalil, Lynn; Singh, Rajbir; Zhong, Xiaogang; Ghosh, Sanchita; Aykin-Burns, Nukhet; Hauer-Jensen, Martin

    2014-06-01

    Although radiation-induced tissue-specific injury is well documented, the underlying molecular changes resulting in organ dysfunction and the consequences thereof on overall metabolism and physiology have not been elucidated. We previously reported the generation and characterization of a transgenic mouse strain that ubiquitously overexpresses Gfrp (GTPH-1 feedback regulatory protein) and exhibits higher oxidative stress, which is a possible result of decreased tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) bioavailability. In this study, we report genotype-dependent changes in the metabolic profiles of liver tissue after exposure to nonlethal doses of ionizing radiation. Using a combination of untargeted and targeted quantitative mass spectrometry, we report significant accumulation of metabolites associated with oxidative stress, as well as the dysregulation of lipid metabolism in transgenic mice after radiation exposure. The radiation stress seems to exacerbate lipid peroxidation and also results in higher expression of genes that facilitate liver fibrosis, in a manner that is dependent on the genetic background and post-irradiation time interval. These findings suggest the significance of Gfrp in regulating redox homeostasis in response to stress induced by ionizing radiation affecting overall physiology. PMID:24824572

  17. Liver Metabolomics Reveals Increased Oxidative Stress and Fibrogenic Potential in Gfrp Transgenic Mice in Response to Ionizing Radiation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Although radiation-induced tissue-specific injury is well documented, the underlying molecular changes resulting in organ dysfunction and the consequences thereof on overall metabolism and physiology have not been elucidated. We previously reported the generation and characterization of a transgenic mouse strain that ubiquitously overexpresses Gfrp (GTPH-1 feedback regulatory protein) and exhibits higher oxidative stress, which is a possible result of decreased tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) bioavailability. In this study, we report genotype-dependent changes in the metabolic profiles of liver tissue after exposure to nonlethal doses of ionizing radiation. Using a combination of untargeted and targeted quantitative mass spectrometry, we report significant accumulation of metabolites associated with oxidative stress, as well as the dysregulation of lipid metabolism in transgenic mice after radiation exposure. The radiation stress seems to exacerbate lipid peroxidation and also results in higher expression of genes that facilitate liver fibrosis, in a manner that is dependent on the genetic background and post-irradiation time interval. These findings suggest the significance of Gfrp in regulating redox homeostasis in response to stress induced by ionizing radiation affecting overall physiology. PMID:24824572

  18. Evaluation of Potential Ionizing Irradiation Protectors and Mitigators Using Clonogenic Survival of Human Umbilical Cord Blood Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Goff, Julie P.; Shields, Donna S.; Wang, Hong; Skoda, Erin M.; Sprachman, Melissa M.; Wipf, Peter; Garapati, Venkata Krishna; Atkinson, Jeffrey; London, Barry; Lazo, John S.; Kagan, Valerian; Epperly, Michael W.; Greenberger, Joel S.

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the use of colony formation (CFU-GM, BFU-E, and CFU-GEMM) by human umbilical cord blood (CB) hematopoietic progenitor cells for testing novel small molecule ionizing irradiation protectors and mitigators. Each of 11 compounds was added before (protection) or after (mitigation) ionizing irradiation including: GS-nitroxides (JP4-039 and XJB-5-131), the bifunctional sulfoxide MMS-350, the phosphoinositol-3-kinase inhibitor (LY294002), TPP-imidazole fatty acid, (TPP-IOA), the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor (MCF-201-89), the p53/mdm2/mdm4 inhibitor (BEB55), methoxamine, isoproterenol, propanolol, and the ATP sensitive potassium channel blocker (glyburide). The drugs XJB-5-131, JP4-039, and MMS-350 were radiation protectors for CFU-GM. JP4-039 was also a radiation protector for CFU-GEMM. The drugs, XJB-5-131, JP4-039, and MMS-350 were radiation mitigators for BFU-E, MMS-350 and JP4-039 were mitigators for CFU-GM, and MMS350 was a mitigator for CFU-GEMM. In contrast, other drugs that were effective in murine assays: TTP-IOA, LY294002, MCF201-89, BEB55, propranolol, isoproterenol, methoxamine, and glyburide showed no significant protection or mitigation in human CB assays. These data support testing of new candidate clinical radiation protectors and mitigators using human CB clonogenic assays early in the drug discovery process, reducing the need for animal experiments. PMID:23933481

  19. Microwave ionization of Rydberg atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, T.F.

    1996-12-31

    An atom can be ionized by a static field if the field depresses the potential below the binding energy W, leading to the requirement E = W{sup 2}/4 in atomic units. The atomic units of field and energy are 5.14 {times} 10{sup 9} V/cm and 27.2 eV. The ionization field is often expressed in terms of the principal quantum number n of the state in question as E = 1/16n{sup 4}. In a microwave field with frequency far less than the separation {Delta}W = 1/n{sup 3} between adjacent n states, atoms other than H ionize at the much lower microwave field amplitude of E = 1/3n{sup 5}. This field corresponds to the Inglis-Teller limit, where it is impossible to resolve spectrally adjacent n states due to Stark broadening in a plasma. In H ionization occurs as it does in a static field. The difference exists because the finite sized ionic core of a non hydrogenic atom breaks one of the symmetries found in H. In non hydrogenic atoms the microwave field drives a series of transitions through successively higher n states culminating in ionization. These transitions can be understood in terms of a Landau-Zener picture based on the variation of the energies of the atoms produced by the time varying field or as the resonant multiphoton absorption of the microwave photons. In either case, the atoms make transitions through real intermediate states en route to ionization. With short, four cycle, microwave pulses complete ionization does not occur with fields of E = 1/3n{sup 5}, and population is left in intermediate states. The transition from ionization at fields near E = 1/3n{sup 5} to fields of E = 1/16n{sup 4} occurs when the frequency becomes low enough that the energies of the states vary adiabatically in the temporally varying field.

  20. Astrophysical Ionizing Radiation Sources and Life on Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Brian

    2013-04-01

    Astrophysical sources of ionizing radiation have been recognized as a potential threat to life on Earth, primarily through long-term depletion of stratospheric ozone, leading to greatly increased solar ultraviolet (UV) irradiance at the surface. It has been suggested that a gamma-ray burst, in particular, may have initiated the late Ordovician mass extinction - one of the ``big five'' known extinctions. I will describe the atmospheric impacts of ionizing radiation events and discuss estimates of biological damage under a severely depleted ozone layer. In particular, I will describe new and on-going work to quantify the impact of ionizing radiation events on primary producers in Earth's oceans.

  1. Band gaps, ionization potentials, and electron affinities of periodic electron systems via the adiabatic-connection fluctuation-dissipation theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trushin, Egor; Betzinger, Markus; Blügel, Stefan; Görling, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    An approach to calculate fundamental band gaps, ionization energies, and electron affinities of periodic electron systems is explored. Starting from total energies obtained with the help of the adiabatic-connection fluctuation-dissipation (ACFD) theorem, these physical observables are calculated according to their basic definition by differences of the total energies of the N -, (N -1 ) -, and (N +1 ) -electron system. The response functions entering the ACFD theorem are approximated here by the direct random phase approximation (dRPA). For a set of prototypical semiconductors and insulators it is shown that even with this quite drastic approximation the resulting band gaps are very close to experiment and of a similar quality to those from the computationally more involved G W approximation. By going beyond the dRPA in the future the accuracy of the calculated band gaps may be significantly improved further.

  2. Evaluation of potential ionizing irradiation protectors and mitigators using clonogenic survival of human umbilical cord blood hematopoietic progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Goff, Julie P; Shields, Donna S; Wang, Hong; Skoda, Erin M; Sprachman, Melissa M; Wipf, Peter; Garapati, Venkata Krishna; Atkinson, Jeffrey; London, Barry; Lazo, John S; Kagan, Valerian; Epperly, Michael W; Greenberger, Joel S

    2013-11-01

    We evaluated the use of colony formation (colony-forming unit-granulocyte macrophage [CFU-GM], burst-forming unit erythroid [BFU-E], and colony-forming unit-granulocyte-erythroid-megakaryocyte-monocytes [CFU-GEMM]) by human umbilical cord blood (CB) hematopoietic progenitor cells for testing novel small molecule ionizing irradiation protectors and mitigators. The following compounds were added before (protection) or after (mitigation) ionizing irradiation: GS-nitroxides (JP4-039 and XJB-5-131), the bifunctional sulfoxide MMS-350, the phosphoinositol-3-kinase inhibitor LY29400, triphenylphosphonium-imidazole fatty acid, the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor (MCF-201-89), the p53/mdm2/mdm4 inhibitor (BEB55), methoxamine, isoproterenol, propranolol, and the adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channel blocker (glyburide). The drugs XJB-5-131, JP4-039, and MMS-350 were radiation protectors for CFU-GM. JP4-039 was also a radiation protector for CFU-GEMM. The drugs XJB-5-131, JP4-039, and MMS-350 were radiation mitigators for BFU-E, MMS-350 and JP4-039 were mitigators for CFU-GM, and MMS350 was a mitigator for CFU-GEMM. In contrast, other drugs were effective in murine assays; TTP-IOA, LY294002, MCF201-89, BEB55, propranolol, isoproterenol, methoxamine, and glyburide but showed no significant protection or mitigation in human CB assays. These data support the testing of new candidate clinical radiation protectors and mitigators using human CB clonogenic assays early in the drug discovery process, thus reducing the need for animal experiments. PMID:23933481

  3. Contributions of ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials and the electrooculogram to periocular potentials produced by whole-body vibration.

    PubMed

    Todd, Neil P M; Bell, Steven L; Paillard, Aurore C; Griffin, Michael J

    2012-11-01

    In this paper we report the results of an experiment to investigate the emergence of ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (OVEMPs) during the linear vestibular ocular reflex (LVOR) evoked by whole-body vibration (WBV). OVEMP and electrooculogram (EOG) montages were employed to record periocular potentials (POPs) from six subjects during WBV in the nasooccipital (NO) axis over a range of frequencies from 0.5 to 64 Hz with approximately constant peak head acceleration of 1.0 ms(-2) (i.e., 0.1 g). Measurements were made in two context conditions: a fixation context to examine the effect of gaze eccentricity (0 vs. 20°), and a visual context, where a target was either head-fixed or earth-fixed. The principal results are that from 0.5 to 2 Hz POP magnitude in the earth-fixed condition is related to head displacement, so with constant acceleration at all frequencies it reduces with increasing frequency, but at frequencies greater than 2 Hz both POP magnitude and POP gain, defined as the ratio of POP magnitude at 20 and 0°, increase with increasing frequency. By exhibiting this high-pass characteristic, a property shared with the LVOR, the results are consistent with the hypothesis that the OVEMP, as commonly employed in the clinical setting, is a high-frequency manifestation of the LVOR. However, we also observed low-frequency acceleration following POPs in head-fixed conditions, consistent with a low-frequency OVEMP, and found evidence of a high-frequency visual context effect, which is also consistent with the OVEMP being a manifestation of the LVOR. PMID:22984251

  4. Contributions of ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials and the electrooculogram to periocular potentials produced by whole-body vibration

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Steven L.; Paillard, Aurore C.; Griffin, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we report the results of an experiment to investigate the emergence of ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (OVEMPs) during the linear vestibular ocular reflex (LVOR) evoked by whole-body vibration (WBV). OVEMP and electrooculogram (EOG) montages were employed to record periocular potentials (POPs) from six subjects during WBV in the nasooccipital (NO) axis over a range of frequencies from 0.5 to 64 Hz with approximately constant peak head acceleration of 1.0 ms−2 (i.e., 0.1 g). Measurements were made in two context conditions: a fixation context to examine the effect of gaze eccentricity (0 vs. 20°), and a visual context, where a target was either head-fixed or earth-fixed. The principal results are that from 0.5 to 2 Hz POP magnitude in the earth-fixed condition is related to head displacement, so with constant acceleration at all frequencies it reduces with increasing frequency, but at frequencies greater than 2 Hz both POP magnitude and POP gain, defined as the ratio of POP magnitude at 20 and 0°, increase with increasing frequency. By exhibiting this high-pass characteristic, a property shared with the LVOR, the results are consistent with the hypothesis that the OVEMP, as commonly employed in the clinical setting, is a high-frequency manifestation of the LVOR. However, we also observed low-frequency acceleration following POPs in head-fixed conditions, consistent with a low-frequency OVEMP, and found evidence of a high-frequency visual context effect, which is also consistent with the OVEMP being a manifestation of the LVOR. PMID:22984251

  5. Potential for Producing Hydrogen from Key Renewable Resources in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Milbrandt, A.; Mann, M.

    2006-02-01

    This study estimates the potential for hydrogen production from key renewable resources (onshore wind, solar photovoltaic, and biomass) by county in the United States. It includes maps that allow the reader to easily visualize the results.

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of Clostridium aceticum DSM 1496, a Potential Butanol Producer through Syngas Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yoseb; Hwang, Soonkyu

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium aceticum DSM 1496 is a Gram-negative anaerobic chemolithoautotrophic acetogenic bacterium that is capable of producing commodity chemicals from syngas fermentation. In this study, we report the draft genome sequence of the C. aceticum DSM 1496 strain (4.16 Mb) to elucidate the syngas fermentation metabolic pathway. PMID:25931594

  7. UVB Radiation as a Potential Selective Factor Favoring Microcystin Producing Bloom Forming Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yi; Song, Lirong; Sedmak, Bojan

    2013-01-01

    Due to the stratospheric ozone depletion, several organisms will become exposed to increased biologically active UVB (280–320 nm) radiation, not only at polar but also at temperate and tropical latitudes. Bloom forming cyanobacteria are exposed to UVB radiation on a mass scale, particularly during the surface bloom and scum formation that can persist for long periods of time. All buoyant species of cyanobacteria are at least periodically exposed to higher irradiation during their vertical migration to the surface that usually occurs several times a day. The aim of this study is to assess the influence on cyanobacteria of UVB radiation at realistic environmental intensities. The effects of two UVB intensities of 0.5 and 0.99 W/m2 in up to 0.5 cm water depth were studied in vitro on Microcystis aeruginosa strains, two microcystin producing and one non-producing. After UVB exposure their ability to proliferate was estimated by cell counting, while cell fitness and integrity were evaluated using light microscopy, autofluorescence and immunofluorescence. Gene damage was assessed by TUNEL assay and SYBR Green staining of the nucleoide area. We conclude that UVB exposure causes damage to the genetic material, cytoskeletal elements, higher sedimentation rates and consequent cell death. In contrast to microcystin producers (PCC7806 and FACHB905), the microcystin non-producing strain PCC7005 is more susceptible to the deleterious effects of radiation, with weak recovery ability. The ecological relevance of the results is discussed using data from eleven years’ continuous UVB radiation measurements within the area of Ljubljana city (Slovenia, Central Europe). Our results suggest that increased solar radiation in temperate latitudes can have its strongest effect during cyanobacterial bloom formation in spring and early summer. UVB radiation in this period may significantly influence strain composition of cyanobacterial blooms in favor of microcystin producers. PMID

  8. Improved method for producing catalytic carbon and the potential for increasing its use in commercial applications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kruse, C.W.; Lizzio, A.A.; DeBarr, J.A.; Feizoulof, C.A.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes an improved method for producing a catalytic carbon, which was first produced in the late 1960s. The new activated carbon (AC) removes and destroys organic pollutants in aqueous solutions. To determine the effects of altering the pore structure and surface chemistry of activated carbons, carbons differing in the amount of functional groups on their surfaces were prepared in three steps: (1) oxidizing AC with boiling nitric acid, (2) washing oxidized AC with water to remove the acid, and (3) heating oxidized AC to temperatures beteween 100 and 925 ??C. The surfaces of the products were characterized by determining the amount of CO2 and CO evolved during temperature-programmed desorption. Depending on the desorption temperature, these modified carbons showed enhanced adsorptive and/or catalytic properties that included (1) carbon molecular sieves for separating oxygen from nitrogen, (2) increased capacity for adsorbing sulfur dioxide, (3) stronger adsorption of p-nitrophenol from water, and (4) catalysis of dehydrochlorination reactions. A dehydrohalogenation catalyst produced by the oxidation/ desorption steps was found to be similar to one prepared in the 1960s by oxidizing AC with air at 500-700 ??C. The dehydrohalogenation catalyst produced by either the old method or the new method involves an oxidized surface that has been exposed to a 500-700 ??C temperature range. This carbon catalyst retains modified adsorptive properties of the AC from which it is produced. It can be used both to adsorb pollutants from liquid or gaseous streams and to convert them to recyclable products.

  9. The Organellar Genome and Metabolic Potential of the Hydrogen-Producing Mitochondrion of Nyctotherus ovalis

    PubMed Central

    de Graaf, Rob M.; Ricard, Guenola; van Alen, Theo A.; Duarte, Isabel; Dutilh, Bas E.; Burgtorf, Carola; Kuiper, Jan W. P.; van der Staay, Georg W. M.; Tielens, Aloysius G. M.; Huynen, Martijn A.; Hackstein, Johannes H. P.

    2011-01-01

    It is generally accepted that hydrogenosomes (hydrogen-producing organelles) evolved from a mitochondrial ancestor. However, until recently, only indirect evidence for this hypothesis was available. Here, we present the almost complete genome of the hydrogen-producing mitochondrion of the anaerobic ciliate Nyctotherus ovalis and show that, except for the notable absence of genes encoding electron transport chain components of Complexes III, IV, and V, it has a gene content similar to the mitochondrial genomes of aerobic ciliates. Analysis of the genome of the hydrogen-producing mitochondrion, in combination with that of more than 9,000 genomic DNA and cDNA sequences, allows a preliminary reconstruction of the organellar metabolism. The sequence data indicate that N. ovalis possesses hydrogen-producing mitochondria that have a truncated, two step (Complex I and II) electron transport chain that uses fumarate as electron acceptor. In addition, components of an extensive protein network for the metabolism of amino acids, defense against oxidative stress, mitochondrial protein synthesis, mitochondrial protein import and processing, and transport of metabolites across the mitochondrial membrane were identified. Genes for MPV17 and ACN9, two hypothetical proteins linked to mitochondrial disease in humans, were also found. The inferred metabolism is remarkably similar to the organellar metabolism of the phylogenetically distant anaerobic Stramenopile Blastocystis. Notably, the Blastocystis organelle and that of the related flagellate Proteromonas lacertae also lack genes encoding components of Complexes III, IV, and V. Thus, our data show that the hydrogenosomes of N. ovalis are highly specialized hydrogen-producing mitochondria. PMID:21378103

  10. Assessment of the "6-31+G** + LANL2DZ" Mixed Basis Set Coupled with Density Functional Theory Methods and the Effective Core Potential: Prediction of Heats of Formation and Ionization Potentials for First-Row-Transition-Metal Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yue; Weaver, Michael N.; Merz, Kenneth M.

    2009-08-01

    Computational chemists have long demonstrated great interest in finding ways to reliably and accurately predict the molecular properties for transition-metal-containing complexes. This study is a continuation of our validation efforts of density functional theory (DFT) methods when applied to transition-metal-containing systems (Riley, K.E.; Merz, K. M., Jr. J. Phys. Chem. 2007, 111, 6044-6053). In our previous work we examined DFT using all-electron basis sets, but approaches incorporating effective core potentials (ECPs) are effective in reducing computational expense. With this in mind, our efforts were expanded to include evaluation of the performance of the basis set derived to approximate such an approach as well on the same set of density functionals. Indeed, employing an ECP basis such as LANL2DZ (Los Alamos National Laboratory 2 double ζ) for transition metals, while using all-electron basis sets for all other non-transition-metal atoms, has become more and more popular in computations on transition-metal-containing systems. In this study, we assess the performance of 12 different DFT functionals, from the GGA (generalized gradient approximation), hybrid-GGA, meta-GGA, and hybrid-meta-GGA classes, respectively, along with the 6-31+G** + LANL2DZ (on the transition metal) mixed basis set in predicting two important molecular properties, heats of formation and ionization potentials, for 94 and 58 systems containing first-row transition metals from Ti to Zn, which are all in the third row of the periodic table. An interesting note is that the inclusion of the exact exchange term in density functional methods generally increases the accuracy of ionization potential prediction for the hybrid-GGA methods but decreases the reliability of determining the heats of formation for transition-metal-containing complexes for all hybrid density functional methods. The hybrid-GGA functional B3LYP gives the best performance in predicting the ionization potentials, while the

  11. Ionizing radiation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter gives a comprehensive review on ionizing irradiation of fresh fruits and vegetables. Topics include principles of ionizing radiation, its effects on pathogenic and spoilage microorganisms, shelf-life, sensory quality, nutritional and phytochemical composition, as well as physiologic and...

  12. Liquid State Forging: Novel Potentiality to Produce High Performance Components, Process, Plant and Tooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosso, M.; Zago, A.; Claus, P.; Motoiu, P.

    2007-04-01

    The paper deals about a new patented process able to the production of high resistance and high toughness parts, taking into consideration also the tooling need. The molten alloy is introduced into the die cavity at low pressure, then the alloy is forged. The forging action takes place during the alloy solidification process, favouring the reduction of the duration of the process and the production of parts characterised by very high mechanical and ductility properties. The very high mechanical characteristics of the produced parts are obtained thank to their very low porosity content, as well as to their unique microstructure features. Moreover, the process allow the optimisation of the yield of the alloy, in fact the feeding system and the risers are practically absent, this means minimum production of scraps to be recycled. After a short description of the main features of the equipment and of the process, the work take into consideration the aluminium based produced parts, in their as cast state and after T6 heat treatment, comparing their characteristics with those obtainable by the most traditional low pressure and gravity casting processes. In particular, samples for the evaluation of the mechanical properties have been machined from the produced parts to obtain their tensile strength, together with their ductility characteristics. The maximum attained hardness values have also been evaluated. Tensile strength higher than 440 MPa, with elongation up to 18% with hardness higher than 125 HB are easily attainable on Al alloys type A356. Light microscopy observations performed on the transverse section of polished samples and the analysis of the fracture surfaces after mechanical tests allowed to focus the attention on the microstructure details and to highlight the ductile aspects of the fracture to confirm the high quality and high performance of the produced parts.

  13. Identification of innovative potential quality markers in rocket and melon fresh-cut produce.

    PubMed

    Cavaiuolo, Marina; Cocetta, Giacomo; Bulgari, Roberta; Spinardi, Anna; Ferrante, Antonio

    2015-12-01

    Ready-to-eat fresh cut produce are exposed to pre- and postharvest abiotic stresses during the production chain. Our work aimed to identify stress responsive genes as new molecular markers of quality that can be widely applied to leaves and fruits and easily determined at any stage of the production chain. Stress responsive genes associated with quality losses were isolated in rocket and melon fresh-cut produce and their expression levels analyzed by quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) at different time points after harvest at 20 °C and 4 °C. qRT-PCR results were supported by correlation analysis with physiological and biochemical determinations evaluated at the same conditions such as chlorophyll a fluorescence indices, total, reducing sugars, sucrose, ethylene, ascorbic acid, lipid peroxidation and reactive oxygen species. In both species the putative molecular markers increased their expression soon after harvest suggesting a possible use as novel and objective quality markers of fresh-cut produces. PMID:26041186

  14. The isolation and identification of new microalgal strains producing oil and carotenoid simultaneously with biofuel potential.

    PubMed

    Minhas, Amritpreet Kaur; Hodgson, Peter; Barrow, Colin J; Sashidhar, Burla; Adholeya, Alok

    2016-07-01

    Taxonomy and phylogeny of twenty two microalgal isolates were examined using both universal and newly designed molecular primers. Among the isolates, Scenedesmus bijugus, Coelastrella sp., Auxenochlorella protothecoides, and Chlorella sp. were particularly promising in terms of producing lipids as measured by fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) analysis and significant concentration of carotenoids. A comparative experiment showed that S. bijugus and Chlorella sp. were the most promising candidates (L(-)(1)d(-)(1), with biomass) 174.77±6.75, 169.81±5.22mg, lipids 40.14±3.31, 39.72±3.89mg, lutein 0.47, 0.36mg, and astaxanthin 0.27, 0.18mg respectively. The fatty acids produced by these microalgal isolates were mainly palmitic, stearic, oleic, linoleic, and linolenic acid. The freshwater microalgal isolate S. bijugus be the most suitable isolate for producing biodiesel and carotenoids, due to high productivity of biomass, lipids, metabolites, and its suitable fatty acid profile. PMID:27043053

  15. Tapping the Molecular Potential of Microalgae to Produce Biomass (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)

    ScienceCinema

    Sayre, Richard [LANL

    2013-01-22

    Richard Sayre, from Los Alamos National Laboratory, presents a talk titled "Tapping the Molecular Potential of Microalgae to Produce Biomass" at the JGI 7th Annual Users Meeting: Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 22, 2012 in Walnut Creek, California.

  16. Tapping the Molecular Potential of Microalgae to Produce Biomass (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)

    SciTech Connect

    Sayre, Richard

    2012-03-22

    Richard Sayre, from Los Alamos National Laboratory, presents a talk titled "Tapping the Molecular Potential of Microalgae to Produce Biomass" at the JGI 7th Annual Users Meeting: Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 22, 2012 in Walnut Creek, California.

  17. Density functional theory calculations on rhodamine B and pinacyanol chloride. Optimized ground state, dipole moment, vertical ionization potential, adiabatic electron affinity and lowest excited triplet state.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Juan C; Selsby, Ronald G

    2013-01-01

    The ground state configuration of the gas phase cationic dyes pinacyanol chloride and rhodamine B are optimized with HF/6-311 + G(2d,2p) method and basis set. B3PW91/6-311 + G(2df,2p) functional and basis set is used to calculate the Mulliken atom charge distribution, total molecular energy, the dipole moment, the vertical ionization potential, the adiabatic electron affinity and the lowest excited triplet state, the last three as an energy difference between separately calculated open shell and ground states. The triplet and extra electron states are optimized to find the relaxation energy. In the ground state optimization of both dyes the chloride anion migrates to a position near the center of the chromophore. For rhodamine B the benzoidal group turns perpendicular to the chromophore plane. For both dyes, the LUMO is mostly of π character associated with the aromatic part of the molecule containing the chromophore. The highest occupied MOs consist of three almost degenerate eigenvectors involving the chloride anion coordinated with σ electrons in the molecular framework. The fourth highest MO is of π character. For both molecules in the gas phase ionization process the chloride anion loses the significant fraction of electric charge. In electron capture, the excess charge goes mainly on the dye cation. PMID:22891949

  18. Photoelectron circular dichroism in the multiphoton ionization by short laser pulses. I. Propagation of single-active-electron wave packets in chiral pseudo-potentials.

    PubMed

    Artemyev, Anton N; Müller, Anne D; Hochstuhl, David; Demekhin, Philipp V

    2015-06-28

    A theoretical method to study the angle-resolved multiphoton ionization of polyatomic molecules is developed. It is based on the time-dependent formulation of the Single Center (TDSC) method and consists in the propagation of single-active-electron wave packets in the effective molecular potentials in the presence of intense laser pulses. For this purpose, the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for one electron, moving in a molecular field and interacting with an arbitrary laser pulse, is solved in spherical coordinates by an efficient numerical approach. As a test, the method is applied to the one- and two-photon ionizations of a model methane-like chiral system by circularly polarized short intense high-frequency laser pulses. Thereby, we analyze the photoelectron circular dichroism (PECD) in the momentum distribution. The considered model application illustrates the capability of the TDSC method to study multiphoton PECD in fixed-in-space and randomly oriented chiral molecules. PMID:26133408

  19. Genomic analysis reveals the biotechnological and industrial potential of levan producing halophilic extremophile, Halomonas smyrnensis AAD6T.

    PubMed

    Diken, Elif; Ozer, Tugba; Arikan, Muzaffer; Emrence, Zeliha; Oner, Ebru Toksoy; Ustek, Duran; Arga, Kazim Yalcin

    2015-01-01

    Halomonas smyrnensis AAD6T is a gram negative, aerobic, and moderately halophilic bacterium, and is known to produce high levels of levan with many potential uses in foods, feeds, cosmetics, pharmaceutical and chemical industries due to its outstanding properties. Here, the whole-genome analysis was performed to gain more insight about the biological mechanisms, and the whole-genome organization of the bacterium. Industrially crucial genes, including the levansucrase, were detected and the genome-scale metabolic model of H. smyrnensis AAD6T was reconstructed. The bacterium was found to have many potential applications in biotechnology not only being a levan producer, but also because of its capacity to produce Pel exopolysaccharide, polyhydroxyalkanoates, and osmoprotectants. The genomic information presented here will not only provide additional information to enhance our understanding of the genetic and metabolic network of halophilic bacteria, but also accelerate the research on systematical design of engineering strategies for biotechnology applications. PMID:26251777

  20. Insect pests and yield potential of vegetable soybean (Endamame) produced in Georgia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A series of replicated field experiments was conducted with vegetable soybean (edamame), Glycine max (L.) Merrill, to assess the impacts of cultivars, planting dates, and insecticidal controls on insect pest abundance, crop damage and yield potential. The velvetbean caterpillar, Anticarsia gemmatali...

  1. A short latency vestibular evoked potential (VsEP) produced by bone-conducted acoustic stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAngus Todd, Neil P.; Rosengren, Sally M.; Colebatch, James G.

    2003-12-01

    In this paper data are presented from an experiment which provides evidence for the existence of a short latency, acoustically evoked potential of probable vestibular origin. The experiment was conducted in two phases using bone-conducted acoustic stimulation. In the first phase subjects were stimulated with 6-ms, 500-Hz tone bursts in order to obtain the threshold VT for vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP). It was confirmed that the difference between bone-conducted auditory and acoustic vestibular thresholds was slightly over 30 dB. The estimated threshold was then used as a reference value in the second part of the experiment to stimulate subjects over a range of intensities from -6 to +18 dB (re:VT). Averaged EEG recordings were made with eight Ag/AgCl electrodes placed on the scalp at Fpz, F3, F4, F7, F8, Cz, T3, and T4 according to the 10-20 system. Below VT auditory midlatency responses (MLRs) were observed. Above VT two additional potentials appeared: a positivity at about 10 ms (P10) which was maximal at Cz, and a negativity at about 15 ms (N15) which was maximal at Fpz. Extrapolation of the growth functions for the P10 and N15 indicated a threshold close to VT, consistent with a vestibular origin of these potentials. Given the low threshold of vestibular acoustic sensitivity it is possible that this mode may make a contribution to the detection of and affective responses to loud low frequency sounds. The evoked potentials may also have application as a noninvasive and nontraumatic test of vestibular projections to the cortex.

  2. The Potential of Pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan) for Producing Important Components of Renewable Energy and Agricultural Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwata, E.

    2012-04-01

    In agricultural systems, sustainable crop production is critical in meeting both environmental requirements and the limitations of drought imposed by the effects of global warming. The inputs for crop production and end use of the products should determine the choice of a crop particularly in environments prone to droughts. The objective of this paper is to highlight why a multi-purpose grain legume such as pigeonpea is an ideal crop that can be utilized for producing renewable energy. Firstly, it is highly tolerant to drought and does not require additional soil moisture after the seedling growth stage. The deep tape root extracts moisture and nutrients from deep layers of the soil concomitantly allowing for efficient nutrient recycling. The piscidic acid which is exuded from the roots enhances the solubilization of phosphorus in order to make it available for plant uptake. Secondly, the grain of pigeonpea is suitable for both human food and feedstocks. The grain is rich in oil, vitamins, minerals and protein. The grain can also be used for producing biofuel. In many countries particularly in the developing world, the stover is used as fuel wood or building (roofing) material, thus alleviating pressure on forest products. The crop is grown without the application of inorganic fertilizers as it can fix atmospheric nitrogen symbiotically in its root nodules. Pigeonpea is also ratoonable, producing two or more harvests per season. In addition, it is grown in mixed cropping systems thus optimizing land use. In these regards, pigeonpea is sustainable and environmentally friendly choice for agricultural production of food and energy balance.

  3. Potential Factors for the Differentiation of ESCs/iPSCs Into Insulin-Producing Cells.

    PubMed

    Tsugata, Takako; Nikoh, Naruo; Kin, Tatsuya; Saitoh, Issei; Noguchi, Yasufumi; Ueki, Hideo; Watanabe, Masami; James Shapiro, Andrew M; Noguchi, Hirofumi

    2015-02-01

    The low efficiency of in vitro differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) or human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) into insulin-producing cells thus creates a crucial hurdle for the clinical implementation of human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs). In this study, we investigated the key factors for the differentiation of PSCs into insulin-producing cells. We obtained microarray data of HUES8 and HUES6 from two GeneChips (GPL3921: Affymetrix HT Human Genome U133A Array, GPL570: Affymetrix Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 Array) in a database of GEO (NCBI), since HUES8 can differentiate into pancreatic cells, while HUES6 hardly demonstrates any differentiation at all. The genes with more than fourfold higher expressions in HUES8 compared to HUES6 included RPS4Y1, DDX3Y, EIF1AY, GREM1, GATA6, and NLGN4Y. Since there were four genes, RPS4Y1, DDX3Y, EIF1AY, and NLGN4Y, on the Y chromosome and HUES8 was a male cell line and HUES6 was a female cell line, we excluded these genes in this study. On the other hand, genes with more than fourfold higher expressions in HUES6 compared to HUES8 included NLRP2, EGR1, and SMC3. We next compared iPSCs derived from pancreatic cells (PiPSCs) and iPSCs derived from fibroblasts (FiPSCs). PiPSCs differentiated into insulin-producing cells more easily than FiPSCs because of their epigenetic memory. The gene expressions of GREM1, GATA6, NLRP2, EGR1, and SMC3 in PiPSCs and FiPSCs were also investigated. The expression level of GREM1 and GATA6 in PiPSCs were higher than in FiPSCs. On the other hand, EGR1, which was lower in HUES8 than in HUES6, was predictably lower in PiPSCs than FiPSCs, while NLRP2 and SMC3 were higher in PiPSCs than FiPSCs. These data suggest that the expression of GATA6 and GREM1 and the inhibition of EGR1 may be important factors for the differentiation of PSCs into insulin-producing cells. PMID:26858897

  4. Siderophore as a potential plant growth-promoting agent produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa JAS-25.

    PubMed

    Sulochana, M B; Jayachandra, S Y; Kumar, S Anil; Parameshwar, A B; Reddy, K Mohan; Dayanand, A

    2014-09-01

    Siderophores scavenges Fe(+3) from the vicinity of the roots of plants, and thus limit the amount of iron required for the growth of pathogens such as Fusarium oxysporum, Pythium ultimum, and Fusarium udum, which cause wilt and root rot disease in crops. The ability of Pseudomonas to grow and to produce siderophore depends upon the iron content, pH, and temperature. Maximum yield of siderophore of 130 μM was observed at pH 7.0 ± 0.2 and temperature of 30 °C at 30 h. The threshold level of iron was 50 μM, which increases up to 150 μM, favoring growth but drastically affecting the production of siderophore by Pseudomonas aeruginosa JAS-25. The seeds of agricultural crops like Cicer arietinum (chick pea), Cajanus cajan (pigeon pea), and Arachis hypogaea (ground nut) were treated with P. aeruginosa JAS-25, which enhanced the seed germination, root length, shoot length, and dry weight of chick pea, pigeon pea, and ground nut plants under pot studies. The efficient growth of the plants was not only due to the biocontrol activity of the siderophore produced by P. aeruginosa JAS-25 but also may be by the production of indole acetic acid (IAA), which influences the growth of the plants as phytohormones. PMID:25062779

  5. Complete genome sequence of probiotic Bacillus coagulans HM-08: A potential lactic acid producer.

    PubMed

    Yao, Guoqiang; Gao, Pengfei; Zhang, Wenyi

    2016-06-20

    Bacillus coagulans HM-08 is a commercialized probiotic strain in China. Its genome contains a 3.62Mb circular chromosome with an average GC content of 46.3%. In silico analysis revealed the presence of one xyl operon as well as several other genes that are correlated to xylose utilization. The genetic information provided here may help to expand its future biotechnology potential in lactic acid production. PMID:27130497

  6. Cleavage pattern predicts developmental potential of day 3 human embryos produced by IVF.

    PubMed

    Yang, S T; Shi, J X; Gong, F; Zhang, S P; Lu, C F; Tan, K; Leng, L Z; Hao, M; He, H; Gu, Y F; Lu, G X; Lin, G

    2015-06-01

    Time-lapse technique provides opportunities to observe the dynamic process of human early development. Previous studies have suggested several abnormal division patterns were associated with decreased developmental potential, but no systematic results are currently available. In this study, seven abnormal division patterns were observed during early cleavage, and these had different effects on the further development potential of daughter blastomeres. According to the severity and occurrence of abnormal division patterns during the initial three cleavages, an embryo hierarchical classification model was developed and day 3 embryos were classified into six grades (from A to F). The good-quality blastocyst formation rate for these grades decreased from 70.8-3.8% (P < 0.001). In a prospective observational study, 139 IVF cycles were recruited to assess the efficiency of this classification model. In the embryos that had confirmed implantation results, the implantation rate decreased from 67.0% (Grade A) to 0% (Grade D;P < 0.001). These results indicated that cleavage patterns can predict the developmental potential of day 3 human embryos. PMID:25892500

  7. Steady Potential Changes and Spreading Depression in Rat Brains Produced by Focused Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vykhodtseva, Natalia I.; Koroleva, Valeria I.

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that focused ultrasound (FUS) can locally induce direct current (DC) potential changes and elicit spreading depression (SD) in the cerebral cortex and deep brain structures. Methods: Focused ultrasound transducer (4.6 MHz; D/R=16/27 mm) was used to induced DC potential changes in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, thalamus and caudate nucleus of brains of rats. Pulsed sonications (burst length=10-100 ms, PRF=5-10 Hz, total exposure=10-40 s, peak pressure amplitude=0.9-3.5 MPa) were delivered through the skull window or in several cases, through the intact skull. Results: FUS exposure evoked DC potential changes and elicited SD in each structure separately or simultaneously depending on the focal point targeting and exposure parameters. The effects were reversible: up to thirty SD waves could be evoked with FUS exposure repeated at 7-10 min intervals after the end of previous SD wave. Conclusion: A practical method for induction of SD in the targeted structures of the brain by FUS might offer a new therapeutic method to induce infarct tolerance in patients at high risk of ischemic stroke as well as for increased blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability to deliver therapeutic agents.

  8. Vibrational analysis and ionization potentials of XCH 3 (X=Be,Mg,Ca) calculated by hybrid density functional theory and high order ab initio methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalbout, Abraham F.

    2001-06-01

    The amount of attention dedicated to the theoretical and experimental investigation of small cationic organometallic systems in the literature is very limited. In this Letter we use the B3LYP method with a variety of basis sets as well as the very advanced CBS-Q, CBS-QB3, G1, G2MP2, G2, G3, and G3B3 ab initio methods in order to analyze the vibrational spectra as well as ionization potentials of BeCH 3,MgCH 3 and CaCH 3. The need for further addition of experimental data to the archives for these systems is discussed, as well as recommendations for which theoretical methods are optimum for a particular result.

  9. Acanthocephalan fish parasites (Rhadinorhynchidae Lühe, 1912) as potential biomarkers: Molecular-chemical screening by pyrolysis-field ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinertz, S.; Eckhardt, K.-U.; Theisen, S.; Palm, H. W.; Leinweber, P.

    2016-07-01

    The present study represents the first molecular-chemical screening by pyrolysis-field ionization mass spectrometry applied on fish parasites. A total of 71 fishes from Balinese fish markets, 36 Auxis rochei (Risso, 1810) and 35 A. thazard (Lacepède, 1800), were studied for their acanthocephalan parasites. This is the first record of Rhadinorhynchus zhukovi in Balinese waters, Indonesia, and we describe for the first time A. rochei and A. thazard as R. zhukovi hosts. Using this method, small scale variations within the chemical compounds of acanthocephalans could be detected. Using this methodology it will be possible to generate additional, pollutant specific information from aquatic habitats in future with the potential of a new bioindicator application for parasite/host origin and/or environmental pollution.

  10. Effect of Ionization Potential of Hole Transport Layer on Device Characteristics of Organic Light Emitting Diode with Oxygen Plasma Treated Indium Tin Oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Yuichi; Hamagaki, Manabu; Sakakibara, Takeshi

    2001-07-01

    We have investigated the contribution of the oxygen ions and electrons, and of the kinetic energy of these species on oxygen plasma treatment of indium tin oxide (ITO) electrode. In the case of the treatment by positive oxygen ions with kinetic energy of 50 eV, the luminance increased markedly with a lowering of the operating voltage in the organic light emitting diode (OLED). The change in the device characteristics was attributed to an effective removal of organic contaminants from the ITO surface, leading to enhanced hole injection from ITO to a hole transport layer (HTL) due to an increase in work function of the ITO@. Moreover, the highest luminance and luminous efficiency were obtained in the OLED having HTL with ionization potential of 5.4 eV@. These results have suggested that OLEDs fabricated using the oxygen plasma treated ITO can give the best device performance by the selection of an optimum HTL.

  11. Evaluation of the Synthetic Potential of an AHBA Knockout Mutant of the Rifamycin Producer Amycolatopsis mediterranei.

    PubMed

    Bułyszko, Ilona; Dräger, Gerald; Klenge, Anja; Kirschning, Andreas

    2015-12-21

    Supplementing an AHBA(-) mutant strain of Amycolatopsis mediterranei, the rifamycin producer, with a series of benzoic acid derivatives yielded new tetraketides containing different phenyl groups. These mutasynthetic studies revealed unique reductive properties of A. mediterranei towards nitro- and azidoarenes, leading to the corresponding anilines. In selected cases, the yields of mutaproducts (fermentation products isolated after feeding bacteria with chemically prepared analogs of natural building blocks) obtained are in a range (up to 118 mg L(-1)) that renders them useful as chiral building blocks for further synthetic endeavors. The configuration of the stereogenic centers at C6 and C7 was determined to be 6R,7S for one representative tetraketide. Importantly, processing beyond the tetraketide stage is not always blocked when the formation of the bicyclic naphthalene precursor cannot occur. This was proven by formation of a bromo undecaketide, an observation that has implications regarding the evolutionary development of rifamycin biosynthesis. PMID:26559164

  12. Potential effects of Plasma on the Development of Laser Produced Craters

    SciTech Connect

    Batani, Dimitri; Desai, Tara; Rossetti, Stefano; Lucchini, Gianni

    2006-04-07

    Laser ablation and crater formation have been studied on a copper target using a 10 Hz, Nd:YAG laser system delivering pulses up to 100 mJ in 40 ps with a flux on target F{<=} 5000 J/cm2. Crater dimensions were measured using optical microscope or SEM (Scanning Electron Microscope). In order to understand the process of crater formation, we considered various theoretical models present in the literature and revised them taking into account the occurrence of plasma phenomena, which are important at the intensities used in this experiment. We also compared our experimental results with other results obtained at the PALS laboratory, using a 0.44 {mu}m wavelength laser and much higher laser intensities. Finally we explore the possibility of extending the information derived from laser produced craters to other types of craters.

  13. Composite ECM-alginate microfibers produced by microfluidics as scaffolds with biomineralization potential.

    PubMed

    Angelozzi, Marco; Miotto, Martina; Penolazzi, Letizia; Mazzitelli, Stefania; Keane, Timothy; Badylak, Stephen F; Piva, Roberta; Nastruzzi, Claudio

    2015-11-01

    A novel approach to produce artificial bone composites (microfibers) with distinctive features mimicking natural tissue was investigated. Currently proposed inorganic materials (e.g. apatite matrixes) lack self-assembly and thereby limit interactions between cells and the material. The present work investigates the feasibility of creating "bio-inspired materials" specifically designed to overcome certain limitations inherent to current biomaterials. We examined the dimensions, morphology, and constitutive features of a composite hydrogel which combined an alginate based microfiber with a gelatin solution or a particulate form of urinary bladder matrix (UBM). The effectiveness of the composite microfibers to induce and modulate osteoblastic differentiation in three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds without altering the viability and morphological characteristics of the cells was investigated. The present study describes a novel alginate microfiber production method with the use of microfluidics. The microfluidic procedure allowed for precise tuning of microfibers which resulted in enhanced viability and function of embedded cells. PMID:26249575

  14. Ab initio molecular orbital calculations of DNA radical ions. 5. Scaling of calculated electron affinities and ionization potentials to experimental values

    SciTech Connect

    Sevilla, M.D.; Colson, A.O. ); Besler, B. )

    1995-01-19

    Ab initio molecular orbital calculations of the electron affinities (EAs) and ionization potentials (IPs) of the DNA bases are presented in this work. Comparisons of calculated and experimental values are made for a series of compounds of size and/or structure similar to the DNA bases. Excellent correlations between calculated and experimental values are found for both Koopmans EAs at the 6-31G[sup *] and D95v levels and calculated vertical EAs of the model compounds. Several basis sets are considered: 6-31G[sup *], 6-31+G(d), and D95v. Calculations at 6-31G[sup *] and 6-31+G(d) using both ROHF and ROMP2 theories show a consistent difference between calculated vertical and adiabatic EAs. This allows for a good estimate of DNA base adiabatic EAs. i.e., -0.7, -0.3, 0.2, 0.3, and 0.4 eV; from the vertical EAs -1.23, -0.74, -0.40, -0.32, and -0.19 eV for G, A, C, T, and U respectively. While EAs must be scaled, we find that Koopmans IPs calculated at the simple 3-21G level predict vertical IPs of the DNA bases with only a 0.15 eV average absolute deviation from the experimentally reported values and calculations at MP2/6-31+G(d)//6-31G[sup *] for the adiabatic ionization potentials of the DNA bases are all within 0.1 eV of experiment. 41 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  15. Novel Bacterial Isolate from Permian Groundwater, Capable of Aggregating Potential Biofuel-Producing Microalga Nannochloropsis oceanica IMET1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Laughinghouse, Haywood D.; Anderson, Matthew A.; Chen, Feng; Willliams, Ernest; Place, Allen R.; Zmora, Odi; Zohar, Yonathan

    2012-01-01

    Increasing petroleum costs and climate change have resulted in microalgae receiving attention as potential biofuel producers. Little information is available on the diversity and functions of bacterial communities associated with biofuel-producing algae. A potential biofuel-producing microalgal strain, Nannochloropsis oceanica IMET1, was grown in Permian groundwater. Changes in the bacterial community structure at three temperatures were monitored by two culture-independent methods, and culturable bacteria were characterized. After 9 days of incubation, N. oceanica IMET1 began to aggregate and precipitate in cultures grown at 30°C, whereas cells remained uniformly distributed at 15°C and 25°C. The bacterial communities in cultures at 30°C changed markedly. Some bacteria isolated only at 30°C were tested for their potential for aggregating microalgae. A novel bacterium designated HW001 showed a remarkable ability to aggregate N. oceanica IMET1, causing microalgal cells to aggregate after 3 days of incubation, while the total lipid content of the microalgal cells was not affected. Direct interaction of HW001 and N. oceanica is necessary for aggregation. HW001 can also aggregate the microalgae N. oceanica CT-1, Tetraselmis suecica, and T. chuii as well as the cyanobacterium Synechococcus WH8007. 16S rRNA gene sequence comparisons indicated the great novelty of this strain, which exhibited only 89% sequence similarity with any previously cultured bacteria. Specific primers targeted to HW001 revealed that the strain originated from the Permian groundwater. This study of the bacterial communities associated with potential biofuel-producing microalgae addresses a little-investigated area of microalgal biofuel research and provides a novel approach to harvest biofuel-producing microalgae by using the novel bacterium strain HW001. PMID:22194289

  16. Characterization of Fluorescent and Nonfluorescent Peptide Siderophores Produced by Pseudomonas syringae Strains and Their Potential Use in Strain Identification

    PubMed Central

    Bultreys, Alain; Gheysen, Isabelle; Maraite, Henri; de Hoffmann, Edmond

    2001-01-01

    Nonfluorescent highly virulent strains of Pseudomonas syringae pv. aptata isolated in different European countries and in Uruguay produce a nonfluorescent peptide siderophore, the production of which is iron repressed and specific to these strains. The amino acid composition of this siderophore is identical to that of the dominant fluorescent peptide siderophore produced by fluorescent P. syringae strains, and the molecular masses of the respective Fe(III) chelates are 1,177 and 1,175 atomic mass units. The unchelated nonfluorescent siderophore is converted into the fluorescent siderophore at pH 10, and colors and spectral characteristics of the unchelated siderophores and of the Fe(III)-chelates in acidic conditions are similar to those of dihydropyoverdins and pyoverdins, respectively. The nonfluorescent siderophore is used by fluorescent and nonfluorescent P. syringae strains. These results and additional mass spectrometry data strongly suggest the presence of a pyoverdin chromophore in the fluorescent siderophore and a dihydropyoverdin chromophore in the nonfluorescent siderophore, which are both ligated to a succinamide residue. When chelated, the siderophores behave differently from typical pyoverdins and dihydropyoverdins in neutral and alkaline conditions, apparently because of the ionization occurring around pH 4.5 of carboxylic acids present in β-hydroxyaspartic acid residues of the peptide chains. These differences can be detected visually by pH-dependent changes of the chelate colors and spectrophotochemically. These characteristics and the electrophoretic behavior of the unchelated and chelated siderophores offer new tools to discriminate between saprophytic fluorescent Pseudomonas species and fluorescent P. syringae and P. viridiflava strains and to distinguish between the two siderovars in P. syringae pv. aptata. PMID:11282626

  17. NMDA receptor hypofunction produces concomitant firing rate potentiation and burst activity reduction in the prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Mark E.; Homayoun, Houman; Moghaddam, Bita

    2004-01-01

    Cognitive deficits associated with frontal lobe dysfunction are a determinant of long-term disability in schizophrenia and are not effectively treated with available medications. Clinical studies show that many aspects of these deficits are transiently induced in healthy individuals treated with N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) antagonists. These findings and recent genetic linkage studies strongly implicate NMDA receptor deficiency in schizophrenia and suggest that reversing this deficiency is pertinent to treating the cognitive symptoms of schizophrenia. Despite the wealth of behavioral data on the effects of NMDA antagonist treatment in humans and laboratory animals, there is a fundamental lack of understanding about the mechanisms by which a general state of NMDA deficiency influences the function of cortical neurons. Using ensemble recording in freely moving rats, we found that NMDA antagonist treatment, at doses that impaired working memory, potentiated the firing rate of most prefrontal cortex neurons. This potentiation, which correlated with expression of behavioral stereotypy, resulted from an increased number of irregularly discharged single spikes. Concurrent with the increase in spike activity, there was a significant reduction in organized bursting activity. These results identify two distinct mechanisms by which NMDA receptor deficiency may disrupt frontal lobe function: an increase in disorganized spike activity, which may enhance cortical noise and transmission of disinformation; and a decrease in burst activity, which reduces transmission efficacy of cortical neurons. These findings provide a physiological basis for the NMDA receptor deficiency model of schizophrenia and may clarify the nature of cortical dysfunction in this disease. PMID:15159546

  18. Heavy Metal Contamination in Rice-Producing Soils of Hunan Province, China and Potential Health Risks

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Fanfu; Wei, Wei; Li, Mansha; Huang, Ruixue; Yang, Fei; Duan, Yanying

    2015-01-01

    We studied Cd, Cr, As, Ni, Mn, Pb, and Hg in three agricultural areas of Hunan province and determined the potential non-carcinogenic and carcinogenic risks for residents. Soil and brown rice samples from Shimen, Fenghuang, and Xiangtan counties were analyzed by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Soil levels of Cd and Hg were greatest, followed by As and Ni. The mean concentrations of heavy metals in brown rice were Cd 0.325, Cr 0.109, As 0.344, Ni 0.610, Mn 9.03, Pb 0.023, and Hg 0.071 mg/kg, respectively. Cd and Hg had greater transfer ability from soil to rice than the other elements. Daily intake of heavy metals through brown rice consumption were estimated to be Cd 2.30, Cr 0.775, As 2.45, Ni 4.32, Pb 0.162, Mn 64.6 and Hg 0.503 µg/(kg·day), respectively. Cd, Hg and As Hazard Quotient values were greater than 1 and Cd, Cr, As and Ni Cancer Risk values were all greater than 10−4. The total non-carcinogenic risk factor was 14.6 and the total carcinogenic risk factor was 0.0423. Long-term exposure to heavy metals through brown rice consumption poses both potential non-carcinogenic and carcinogenic health risks to the local residents. PMID:26670240

  19. Contamination of common spices in Saudi Arabia markets with potential mycotoxin-producing fungi

    PubMed Central

    Hashem, Mohamed; Alamri, Saad

    2010-01-01

    Fifteen spices obtained from common markets were examined for their mould profile. A total of 520 fungal isolates, representing 57 species, were recovered and identified from dried and ground spice samples on three different media using standard dilution plate method. The most heavily contaminated spice samples examined were observed in ginger in order of magnitude of 5325–6800 cfu/g. The most predominant fungal genera encountered were Aspergillus, Penicillium, and Rhizopus. Relative occurrence values of taxa disclosed ranged between 80% for Aspergillusflavus, Aspergillusniger and Penicilliumarenicola, and 10% for some species. Samples obtained from sumac encountered very rare colony counts indicating its antifungal prosperities. The present magnitude of contamination and spectra of mycobiota approximate those reported for similar spice samples. Several potentially mycotoxigenic fungi were isolated from the majority of samples. The present study attracts the attention to potential risk for mycotoxins contamination may be caused as a result of using these spices, especially in great quantities. The study strongly recommends reduction in application of heavily contaminated spices like ginger in food processing and using some others like clove and sumac due to their antimicrobial properties. PMID:23961074

  20. Interferometric measurement of ionization in a grassfire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mphale, Kgakgamatso Marvel; Heron, M.; Ketlhwaafetse, R.; Letsholathebe, D.; Casey, R.

    2010-03-01

    Grassfire plumes are weakly ionized gas. The ionization in the fire plume is due to thermal and chemi-ionization of incumbent species, which may include graphitic carbon, alkalis and thermally excited radicals, e.g., methyl. The presence of alkalis (e.g., potassium and sodium) in the fires makes thermal ionization a predominant electron producing mechanism in the combustion zone. Alkalis have low dissociation and ionization potentials and therefore require little energy to thermally decompose and give electrons. Assuming a Maxwellian velocity distribution of flame particles and electron-neutral collision frequency much higher than plasma frequency, the propagation of radio waves through a grassfire is predicted to have attenuation and phase shift. Radio wave propagation measurements were performed in a moderate intensity (554 kW m-1) controlled grassfire at 30- and 151-MHz frequencies on a 44 m path using a radio wave interferometer. The maximum temperature measured in the controlled burn was 1071 K and the observed fire depth was 0.9 m. The radio wave interferometer measured attenuation coefficients of 0.033 and 0.054 dB m-1 for 30- and 151-MHz, respectively. At collision frequency of 1.0 × 1011 s-1, maximum electron density was determined to be 5.061 × 1015 m-3.

  1. Burkholderia: an update on taxonomy and biotechnological potential as antibiotic producers.

    PubMed

    Depoorter, Eliza; Bull, Matt J; Peeters, Charlotte; Coenye, Tom; Vandamme, Peter; Mahenthiralingam, Eshwar

    2016-06-01

    Burkholderia is an incredibly diverse and versatile Gram-negative genus, within which over 80 species have been formally named and multiple other genotypic groups likely represent new species. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence and core genome ribosomal multilocus sequence typing analysis indicates the presence of at least three major clades within the genus. Biotechnologically, Burkholderia are well-known for their bioremediation and biopesticidal properties. Within this review, we explore the ability of Burkholderia to synthesise a wide range of antimicrobial compounds ranging from historically characterised antifungals to recently described antibacterial antibiotics with activity against multiresistant clinical pathogens. The production of multiple Burkholderia antibiotics is controlled by quorum sensing and examples of quorum sensing pathways found across the genus are discussed. The capacity for antibiotic biosynthesis and secondary metabolism encoded within Burkholderia genomes is also evaluated. Overall, Burkholderia demonstrate significant biotechnological potential as a source of novel antibiotics and bioactive secondary metabolites. PMID:27115756

  2. Purification and characterization of enterocin MC13 produced by a potential aquaculture probiont Enterococcus faecium MC13 isolated from the gut of Mugil cephalus.

    PubMed

    Satish Kumar, R; Kanmani, P; Yuvaraj, N; Paari, K A; Pattukumar, V; Arul, V

    2011-12-01

    A bacteriocin producer strain MC13 was isolated from the gut of Mugil cephalus (grey mullet) and identified as Enterococcus faecium. The bacteriocin of E. faecium MC13 was purified to homogeneity, as confirmed by Tricine sodium dodecyl sulphate - polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis showed a single active fraction eluted at 26 min, and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry analysis showed the molecular mass to be 2.148 kDa. The clear zone in native PAGE corresponding to enterocin MC13 band further substantiated its molecular mass. A dialyzed sample (semicrude preparation) of enterocin MC13 was broad spectrum in its action and inhibited important seafood-borne pathogens: Listeria monocytogenes , Vibrio parahaemolyticus, and Vibrio vulnificus. This antibacterial substance was sensitive to proteolytic enzymes: trypsin, protease, and chymotrypsin but insensitive to catalase and lipase, confirming that inhibition was due to the proteinaceous molecule, i.e., bacteriocin, and not due to hydrogen peroxide. Enterocin MC13 tolerated heat treatment (up to 90 °C for 20 min). Enterococcus faecium MC13 was effective in bile salt tolerance, acid tolerance, and adhesion to the HT-29 cell line. These properties reveal the potential of E. faecium MC13 to be a probiotic bacterium. Enterococcus faecium MC13 could be used as potential fish probiotic against pathogens such as V. parahaemolyticus, Vibrio harveyi, and Aeromonas hydrophila in fisheries. Also, this could be a valuable seafood biopreservative against L. monocytogenes. PMID:22112158

  3. The potential of transgenic green microalgae; a robust photobioreactor to produce recombinant therapeutic proteins.

    PubMed

    Akbari, Fariba; Eskandani, Morteza; Khosroushahi, Ahmad Yari

    2014-11-01

    Microalgae have been used in food, cosmetic, and biofuel industries as a natural source of lipids, vitamins, pigments and antioxidants for a long time. Green microalgae, as potent photobioreactors, can be considered as an economical expression system to produce recombinant therapeutical proteins at large-scale due to low cost of production and scaling-up capitalization owning to the inexpensive medium requirement, fast growth rate, and the ease of manipulation. These microalgae possess all benefit eukaryotic expression systems including the ability of post-translational modifications required for proper folding and stability of active proteins. Among the many items regarded as recombinant protein production, this review compares the different expression systems with green microalgae like Dunaliella by viewing the nuclear/chloroplast transformation challenges/benefits, related selection markers/reporter genes, and crucial factors/strategies affecting the increase of foreign protein expression in microalgae transformants. Some important factors were discussed regarding the increase of protein yielding in microalgae transformants including: transformation-associated genotypic modifications, endogenous regulatory factors, promoters, codon optimization, enhancer elements, and milking of recombinant protein. PMID:25115849

  4. Effects of Nitrogen Sources and C/N Ratios on the Lipid-Producing Potential of Chlorella sp. HQ.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Jingjing; Hong, Yu; Hu, Hongying

    2016-07-28

    Microalgae are being researched for their potential as attractive biofuel feedstock, particularly for their lipid production. For maximizing biofuel production, it is necessary to explore the effects of environmental factors on algal lipid-producing potential. In this study, the effects of nitrogen (N) sources (NO2-N, NO3-N, urea-N, NH4-N, and N-deficiency) and carbon-to-nitrogen ratios (C/N= 0, 1.0, 3.0, and 5.0) on algal lipid-producing potential of Chlorella sp. HQ were investigated. The results showed that for Chlorella growth and lipid accumulation potential, NO2-N was the best amongst the nitrogen sources, and NO3-N and urea-N also contributed to algal growth and lipid accumulation potential, but NH4-N and N-deficiency instead caused inhibitory effects. Moreover, the results indicated that algal lipid-producing potential was related to C/N ratios. With NO2-N treatment and carbon addition (C/N = 1.0, 3.0, and 5.0), total lipid yield was enhanced by 12.96-20.37%, but triacylglycerol (TAG) yields decreased by 25.52-94.31%. As for NO3-N treatment, carbon addition led to a 17.82-57.43%/ 25.86-82.67% reduction of total lipid/TAG yields. When NH4-N was used as the nitrogen source, total lipid/TAG yields were increased by 46.67-113.33%/28.99-74.76% with carbon addition. The total lipid/TAG yields of urea-N treatment varied with C/N ratios. Overall, the highest TAG yield (TAG yield: 38.75 ± 5.21 mg/l; TAG content: 44.16 ± 4.35%) was achieved under NO2-N treatment without carbon addition (C/N = 0), the condition that had merit for biofuel production. PMID:27090186

  5. Complete genome sequence of Lactobacillus plantarum LZ95, a potential probiotic strain producing bacteriocins and B-group vitamin riboflavin.

    PubMed

    Li, Ping; Gu, Qing

    2016-07-10

    Lactobacillus plantarum LZ95 is a potential probiotic isolated from newborn infant fecal and it is identified to produce riboflavin with great antimicrobial activity. The complete genome sequence of this strain was reported in the present study. The genome contains a 3,261,418-bp chromosome and two plasmids. Genes, related to the biosynthesis of bacteriocins and riboflavin, were identified. This work will facilitate to reveal the biosynthetic mechanism of bacteriocins and B-group vitamins in lactic acid bacteria and provide evidence for its potential application in food industry. PMID:27140869

  6. Monthly and seasonal occurrences of potential flash flood-producing rains determined from Manually Digitized Radar data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, G. S.

    1980-01-01

    An analysis is conducted of a small 4-year climatological data base of Manually Digitized Radar (MDR) data to infer the monthly and seasonal distributions of the relative frequency of occurrence of potential flash flood-producing rains over the Central and Eastern U.S. Some possible meteorological mechanisms for producing potential flash flooding rains are discussed in terms of the relative maxima and minima in the monthly and seasonal frequency distributions over the MDR network. Frequencies were found to be generally higher in more southern locations and lower farther north in all months and seasons. However, most locations experienced an annual cycle in the frequency of occurrence with maxima in summer and minima in winter. In given seasons and months, local areas of maximum and minimum occurrences may be related to quasi-stationary meteorological processes that trigger and organize intense convection over a common area.

  7. Characterizing Properties of Biochar Produced from Simulated Human Feces and Its Potential Applications.

    PubMed

    Ilango, Ajaykannan; Lefebvre, Olivier

    2016-03-01

    This study presents a comprehensive characterization of biochar obtained from simulated human feces (SHF) with a view to improve human waste sanitization and stabilization before usage as a resource. The possible applications of SHF are as a fuel, as a soil amendment, or for emerging applications (e.g., activated carbon precursor and odor control), depending on the charring conditions. Simulated human feces were charred under different conditions of peak temperature (200-800°C), heating rate (2-50°C min), and holding time (0.5-6.0 h); these parameters have been shown to have the largest influence on the thermal and physicochemical characteristics of the final product. The peak temperature was shown to have a higher impact than the heating rate or the holding time. At 200°C, the very mild structural changes of the product were characteristic of dry torrefaction, a process useful to remove moisture and sterilize the product. At 400°C the carbon content (76.2 ± 0.4) and the calorific heat value (30.6 ± 0.4 MJ kg) of the product increased by 60%. From 600°C onward, the improved degree of aromatization verified by Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (alkene [C=C] stretching around 1680-1450 cm) and C nuclear magnetic resonance (C=C stretching at 140-110 ppm) made the biochar increasingly suitable for carbon sequestration or commercial fabrication of briquettes of charcoal. In conclusion, SHF proved to be a suitable feedstock to produce a biochar whose characteristics depended mostly on the peak charring temperature. Ultimately, the selection of a suitable application may depend on local and sociological considerations. PMID:27065422

  8. Potential of essential oils for protection of grains contaminated by aflatoxin produced by Aspergillus flavus

    PubMed Central

    Esper, Renata H.; Gonçalez, Edlayne; Marques, Marcia O. M.; Felicio, Roberto C.; Felicio, Joana D.

    2014-01-01

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) is a highly toxic and carcinogenic metabolite produced by Aspergillus species on food and agricultural commodities. Inhibitory effects of essential oils of Ageratum conyzoides (mentrasto) and Origanum vulgare (oregano) on the mycelial growth and aflatoxin B1 production by Aspergillus flavus have been studied previously in culture medium. The aim of this study was to evaluate aflatoxin B1 production by Aspergillus flavus in real food systems (corn and soybean) treated with Ageratum conyzoides (mentrasto) and Origanum vulgare (oregano) essential oils. Samples with 60 g of the grains were treated with different volumes of essential oils, 200, 100, 50, and 10 μL for oregano and 50, 30, 15, and 10 μL for mentrasto. Fungal growth was evaluated by disk diffusion method. Aflatoxin B1 production was evaluated inoculating suspensions of A. flavus containing 1.3 × 105 spores/mL in 60 g of grains (corn and soybeans) after adjusting the water activity at 0.94. Aflatoxin was quantified by photodensitometry. Fungal growth and aflatoxin production were inhibited by essential oils, but the mentrasto oil was more effective in soybeans than that of oregano. On the other hand, in corn samples, the oregano essential oil was more effective than that of mentrasto. Chemical compositions of the essential oils were also investigated. The GC/MS oils analysis showed that the main component of mentrasto essential oil is precocene I and of the main component of oregano essential oil is 4-terpineol. The results indicate that both essential oils can become an alternative for the control of aflatoxins in corn and soybeans. PMID:24926289

  9. The human potential of a recombinant pandemic influenza vaccine produced in tobacco plants

    PubMed Central

    Jul-Larsen, Åsne; Madhun, Abdullah S.; Brokstad, Karl A.; Montomoli, Emanuele; Yusibov, Vidadi; Cox, Rebecca J.

    2012-01-01

    Rapid production of influenza vaccine antigen is an important challenge when a new pandemic occurs. Production of recombinant antigens in plants is a quick, cost effective and up scalable new strategy for influenza vaccine production. In this study, we have characterized a recombinant influenza haemagglutinin antigen (HAC1) that was derived from the 2009 pandemic H1N1 (pdmH1N1) virus and expressed in tobacco plants. Volunteers vaccinated with the 2009 pdmH1N1 oil-in-water adjuvanted vaccine provided serum and lymphocyte samples that were used to study the immunogenic properties of the HAC1 antigen in vitro. By 7 d post vaccination, the vaccine fulfilled the licensing criteria for antibody responses to the HA detected by haemagglutination inhibition and single radial hemolysis. By ELISA and ELISPOT analysis we showed that HAC1 was recognized by specific serum antibodies and antibody secreting cells, respectively. We conducted a kinetic analysis and found a peak of serum HAC1 specific antibody response between day 14 and 21 post vaccination by ELISA. We also detected elevated production of IL-2 and IFNγ and low frequencies of CD4+ T cells producing single or multiple Th1 cytokines after stimulating PBMCs (peripheral blood mononuclear cells) with the HAC1 antigen in vitro. This indicates that the antigen can interact with T cells, although confirming that an effective adjuvant would be required to improve the T-cell stimulation of plant based vaccines. We conclude that the tobacco derived recombinant HAC1 antigen is a promising vaccine candidate recognized by both B and T cells. PMID:22634440

  10. Potential for improvement of a neutron producing target for time-of-flight measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flaska, M.; Lathouwers, D.; Plompen, A. J. M.; Mondelaers, W.; van der Hagen, T. H. J. J.; van Dam, H.

    2005-12-01

    The Geel electron linear accelerator (GELINA) white neutron source is designed for time-of-flight (TOF) measurements with a high neutron energy resolution. A project has been launched in order to improve the accuracy of the high-resolution neutron cross-section measurements. The experimental accuracy is highly dependent on the neutron intensity and the time spread of the neutrons leaving the target. The main project objective is not only to design a new neutron producing target that reduces the time spread of the neutrons of a given energy, but also to maintain or possibly enhance the neutron production. The present GELINA target has been simulated recently with coupled electron-photon-neutron MCNP4C3 calculations and, subsequently, compared with experimental results. Based on the very good benchmarking results, this code is now used to design and optimise the new target and to assess all relevant parameters influencing the neutron flux and resolution functions. In this paper, the reader will find an explanation of the methodology on which the research of a new target is based. We compared the neutron fluxes of the compact geometries of various materials for different angles with the fluxes of the existing target. Further, we also made a comparison of the resolution functions for the present design versus a compact design. Finally, a dedicated figure of merit was used to make a qualitative comparison of various designs. The results presented in this paper reveal that there is a possibility to design a new target with superior characteristics so that all project objectives will be fulfilled.

  11. Potential of hot water extraction of birch wood to produce high-purity dissolving pulp after alkaline pulping.

    PubMed

    Borrega, Marc; Tolonen, Lasse K; Bardot, Fanny; Testova, Lidia; Sixta, Herbert

    2013-05-01

    The potential of hot water extraction of birch wood to produce highly purified dissolving pulp in a subsequent soda-anthraquinone pulping process was evaluated. After intermediate extraction intensities, pulps with low xylan content (3-5%) and high cellulose yield were successfully produced. Increasing extraction intensity further decreased the xylan content in pulp. However, below a xylan content of 3%, the cellulose yield dramatically decreased. This is believed to be due to cleavage of glycosidic bonds in cellulose during severe hot water extractions, followed by peeling reactions during alkaline pulping. Addition of sodium borohydride as well as increased anthraquinone concentration in the pulping liquor increased the cellulose yield, but had no clear effects on pulp purity and viscosity. The low intrinsic viscosity of pulps produced after severe extraction intensities and soda-anthraquinone pulping corresponded to the viscosity at the leveling-off degree of polymerization, suggesting that nearly all amorphous cellulose had been degraded. PMID:23260272

  12. Potential damage of GM crops to the country image of the producing country.

    PubMed

    Knight, John G; Clark, Allyson; Mather, Damien W

    2013-01-01

    Frequently heard within New Zealand are arguments that release of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) into the environment will harm the "clean green" image of the country, and therefore do irreparable harm to export markets for food products and also to the New Zealand tourism industry. But where is the evidence? To investigate the likelihood of harmful effects on New Zealand's clean green image in relation to food exports, we have previously used face-to-face interviews with gatekeepers in the food distribution channel in five countries in Europe, in China, and in India. To investigate potential impacts on the New Zealand tourism sector, we have surveyed first-time visitors to New Zealand at Auckland International Airport soon after arrival. We conclude that it is highly unlikely that introduction of GM plants into New Zealand would have any long-term deleterious effect on perceptions in overseas markets of food products sourced from New Zealand. Furthermore it is highly unlikely that New Zealand's image as a tourist destination would suffer if GM plants were introduced. PMID:24002524

  13. Sediment from Hurricane Katrina: Potential to Produce Pulmonary Dysfunction in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kai; You, Dahui; Balakrishna, Shrilatha; Ripple, Michael; Ahlert, Terry; Fahmy, Baher; Becnel, David; Daly, Melissa; Subra, Wilma; McElduff, James S.; Lomax, Larry G.; Troxclair, Dana; Cormier, Stephania A.

    2008-01-01

    On August 29, 2005, Hurricane Katrina made landfall along the Gulf Coast as a Category 3 hurricane. The associated storm surge and heavy rainfall resulted in major flooding throughout the New Orleans area. As the flood waters receded, thick sediment was left covering the ground and coating the interior of homes. This sediment was dispersed into the air and inhaled as dust by returning residents and workers. Our objective in this study was to evaluate the potential pulmonary effects associated with the respirable particulate matter (PM) derived from Hurricane Katrina (HK-PM) in mice. Samples of PM were collected from several locations along the Gulf Coast on September 30 and October 2, 2005 and had a mean aerodynamic diameter ranging from 3-5 μm). Chemical analysis and cytotoxicity assays were performed for all HK-PM samples. A few samples with varying levels of cytotoxicity were chosen for an acute inhalation exposure study. Airborne PM10 levels recorded in the New Orleans area post-Katrina were variable, ranging from 70 μg/m3 in Gentilly to 688 μg/m3 in Lakeview (residential areas). Mice exposed to one of these samples developed significant pulmonary inflammation and airways resistance and hyperresponsiveness to methacholine challenge. These studies demonstrate that dispersion of certain Katrina sediment samples through either natural (e.g., wind) or mechanical (e.g., vehicles) processes promotes airflow obstruction in mice. PMID:19079667

  14. Flapping tail membrane in bats produces potentially important thrust during horizontal takeoffs and very slow flight.

    PubMed

    Adams, Rick A; Snode, Emily R; Shaw, Jason B

    2012-01-01

    Historically, studies concerning bat flight have focused primarily on the wings. By analyzing high-speed video taken on 48 individuals of five species of vespertilionid bats, we show that the capacity to flap the tail-membrane (uropatagium) in order to generate thrust and lift during takeoffs and minimal-speed flight (<1 m (s-1)) was largely underestimated. Indeed, bats flapped the tail-membrane by extensive dorso-ventral fanning motions covering as much as 135 degrees of arc consistent with thrust generation by air displacement. The degree of dorsal extension of the tail-membrane, and thus the potential amount of thrust generated during platform launches, was significantly correlated with body mass (P = 0.02). Adduction of the hind limbs during upstrokes collapsed the tail-membrane thereby reducing its surface area and minimizing negative lift forces. Abduction of the hind limbs during the downstroke fully expanded the tail-membrane as it was swept ventrally. The flapping kinematics of the tail-membrane is thus consistent with expectations for an airfoil. Timing offsets between the wings and tail-membrane during downstrokes was as much as 50%, suggesting that the tail-membrane was providing thrust and perhaps lift when the wings were retracting through the upstoke phase of the wing-beat cycle. The extent to which the tail-membrane was used during takeoffs differed significantly among four vespertilionid species (P = 0.01) and aligned with predictions derived from bat ecomorphology. The extensive fanning motion of the tail membrane by vespertilionid bats has not been reported for other flying vertebrates. PMID:22393378

  15. Flapping Tail Membrane in Bats Produces Potentially Important Thrust during Horizontal Takeoffs and Very Slow Flight

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Rick A.; Snode, Emily R.; Shaw, Jason B.

    2012-01-01

    Historically, studies concerning bat flight have focused primarily on the wings. By analyzing high-speed video taken on 48 individuals of five species of vespertilionid bats, we show that the capacity to flap the tail-membrane (uropatagium) in order to generate thrust and lift during takeoffs and minimal-speed flight (<1 m s−1) was largely underestimated. Indeed, bats flapped the tail-membrane by extensive dorso-ventral fanning motions covering as much as 135 degrees of arc consistent with thrust generation by air displacement. The degree of dorsal extension of the tail-membrane, and thus the potential amount of thrust generated during platform launches, was significantly correlated with body mass (P = 0.02). Adduction of the hind limbs during upstrokes collapsed the tail-membrane thereby reducing its surface area and minimizing negative lift forces. Abduction of the hind limbs during the downstroke fully expanded the tail-membrane as it was swept ventrally. The flapping kinematics of the tail-membrane is thus consistent with expectations for an airfoil. Timing offsets between the wings and tail-membrane during downstrokes was as much as 50%, suggesting that the tail-membrane was providing thrust and perhaps lift when the wings were retracting through the upstoke phase of the wing-beat cycle. The extent to which the tail-membrane was used during takeoffs differed significantly among four vespertilionid species (P = 0.01) and aligned with predictions derived from bat ecomorphology. The extensive fanning motion of the tail membrane by vespertilionid bats has not been reported for other flying vertebrates. PMID:22393378

  16. Alkali metal ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Bauerle, James E.; Reed, William H.; Berkey, Edgar

    1978-01-01

    Variations in the conventional filament and collector electrodes of an alkali metal ionization detector, including the substitution of helical electrode configurations for either the conventional wire filament or flat plate collector; or, the substitution of a plurality of discrete filament electrodes providing an in situ capability for transferring from an operationally defective filament electrode to a previously unused filament electrode without removing the alkali metal ionization detector from the monitored environment. In particular, the helical collector arrangement which is coaxially disposed about the filament electrode, i.e. the thermal ionizer, provides an improved collection of positive ions developed by the filament electrode. The helical filament design, on the other hand, provides the advantage of an increased surface area for ionization of alkali metal-bearing species in a monitored gas environment as well as providing a relatively strong electric field for collecting the ions at the collector electrode about which the helical filament electrode is coaxially positioned. Alternatively, both the filament and collector electrodes can be helical. Furthermore, the operation of the conventional alkali metal ionization detector as a leak detector can be simplified as to cost and complexity, by operating the detector at a reduced collector potential while maintaining the sensitivity of the alkali metal ionization detector adequate for the relatively low concentration of alkali vapor and aerosol typically encountered in leak detection applications.

  17. Ionization of polarized hydrogen atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Alessi, J.G.

    1983-01-01

    Methods are discussed for the production of polarized H/sup -/ ions from polarized atoms produced in ground state atomic beam sources. Present day sources use ionizers of two basic types - electron ionizers for H/sup +/ Vector production followed by double charge exchange in a vapor, or direct H/sup -/ Vector production by charge exchange of H/sup 0/ with Cs/sup 0/. Both methods have ionization efficiencies of less than 0.5%. Ionization efficiencies in excess of 10% may be obtained in the future by the use of a plasma ionizer plus charge exchange in Cs or Sr vapor, or ionization by resonant charge exchange with a self-extracted D/sup -/ beam from a ring magnetron or HCD source. 36 references, 4 figures.

  18. A Corona Discharge Initiated Electrochemical Electrospray Ionization Technique

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, John R.; Hess, Sonja

    2009-01-01

    We report here the development of a corona discharge (CD) initiated electrochemical (EC) electrospray ionization (ESI) technique using a standard electrospray ion source. This is a new ionization technique distinct from ESI, electrochemistry inherent to ESI, APCI, and techniques using hydroxyl radicals produced under atmospheric pressure conditions. By maximizing the observable CD at the tip of a stainless steel ESI capillary, efficient electrochemical oxidation of electrochemically active compounds is observed. For electrochemical oxidation to be observed, the ionization potential of the analyte must be lower than Fe. Ferrocene labeled compounds were chosen as the electrochemically active moiety. The electrochemical cell in the ESI source was robust and generated ions with selectivity according to the ionization potential of the analytes and up to zeptomolar sensitivity. Our results indicate that CD initiated electrochemical ionization has the potential to become a powerful technique to increase the dynamic range, sensitivity and selectivity of ESI experiments. Synopsis Using a standard ESI source a corona discharge initiated electrochemical ionization technique was established resulting from the electrochemistry occurring at the CD electrode surface. PMID:19747843

  19. Positron impact ionization of atomic hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Acacia, P.; Campeanu, R.I.; Horbatsch, M.

    1993-05-01

    We will present integrated cross sections for ionization of atomic hydrogen by positrons. These have been calculated in a distorted-wave approximation using energy-dependent effective charges in the final channel as well as static and polarization potentials in the initial channel. We present two models for calculating the energy-dependent effective charges both of which produce results in good agreement with the recent experimental measurements of Spicher et al. This is in contrast to previous distorted-wave calculations which used fixed effective charges as well as classical trajectory calculations. Both of these latter methods produced results which were substantially below ours and the experimental data.

  20. Nonsequential double ionization of molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Prauzner-Bechcicki, Jakub S.; Sacha, Krzysztof; Zakrzewski, Jakub; Eckhardt, Bruno

    2005-03-01

    Double ionization of diatomic molecules by short linearly polarized laser pulses is analyzed. We consider the final stage of the ionization process, that is the decay of a highly excited two electron molecule, which is formed after rescattering. The saddles of the effective adiabatic potential energy close to which simultaneous escape of electrons takes place are identified. Numerical simulations of the ionization of molecules show that the process can be dominated by either sequential or nonsequential events. In order to increase the ratio of nonsequential to sequential ionizations very short laser pulses should be applied.

  1. Ionization chamber

    DOEpatents

    Walenta, Albert H.

    1981-01-01

    An ionization chamber has separate drift and detection regions electrically isolated from each other by a fine wire grid. A relatively weak electric field can be maintained in the drift region when the grid and another electrode in the chamber are connected to a high voltage source. A much stronger electric field can be provided in the detection region by connecting wire electrodes therein to another high voltage source. The detection region can thus be operated in a proportional mode when a suitable gas is contained in the chamber. High resolution output pulse waveforms are provided across a resistor connected to the detection region anode, after ionizing radiation enters the drift region and ionize the gas.

  2. Ionization chamber

    DOEpatents

    Walenta, A.H.

    An ionization chamber is described which has separate drift and detection regions electrically isolated from each other by a fine wire grid. A relatively weak electric field can be maintained in the drift region when the grid and another electrode in the chamber are connected to a high voltage source. A much stronger electric field can be provided in the detection region by connecting wire electrodes therein to another high voltage source. The detection region can thus be operated in a proportional mode when a suitable gas is contained in the chamber. High resolution output pulse waveforms are provided across a resistor connected to the detection region anode, after ionizing radiation enters the drift region and ionizes the gas.

  3. An analytical model for the calculation of the change in transmembrane potential produced by an ultrawideband electromagnetic pulse.

    PubMed

    Hart, Francis X; Easterly, Clay E

    2004-05-01

    The electric field pulse shape and change in transmembrane potential produced at various points within a sphere by an intense, ultrawideband pulse are calculated in a four stage, analytical procedure. Spheres of two sizes are used to represent the head of a human and the head of a rat. In the first stage, the pulse is decomposed into its Fourier components. In the second stage, Mie scattering analysis (MSA) is performed for a particular point in the sphere on each of the Fourier components, and the resulting electric field pulse shape is obtained for that point. In the third stage, the long wavelength approximation (LWA) is used to obtain the change in transmembrane potential in a cell at that point. In the final stage, an energy analysis is performed. These calculations are performed at 45 points within each sphere. Large electric fields and transmembrane potential changes on the order of a millivolt are produced within the brain, but on a time scale on the order of nanoseconds. The pulse shape within the brain differs considerably from that of the incident pulse. Comparison of the results for spheres of different sizes indicates that scaling of such pulses across species is complicated. PMID:15114634

  4. Physicochemical properties of biochar produced from aerobically composted swine manure and its potential use as an environmental amendment.

    PubMed

    Meng, Jun; Wang, Lili; Liu, Xingmei; Wu, Jianjun; Brookes, Philip C; Xu, Jianming

    2013-08-01

    Biochars derived from the pyrolysis, at 400 and 700°C, respectively, of fresh (T0), 21d (T1) and 84d (T2) aerobically composted swine manure, were characterized and investigated for their potential use as environmental amendments. The biochar yield significantly increased following composting, but decreased with increased temperature. The ash content, surface area (SA), pH, electrical conductivity (EC), mineral nutrients, total heavy metals (except Cd) and available As, Cu, Mn and Zn concentrations of biochar produced at 700°C were higher than in biochar produced at 400°C, whereas the volatile matter, higher heating value (HHV) and elemental composition were decreased. The maximum Cu(II) adsorption capacity was 20.11 mg g(-1) by biochar produced from T2 at 400°C. The pyrolysis of 84d aerobically composted swine manure to produce biochar at 400°C could be used as a soil amendment, or as an adsorbent for the removal heavy metal ions from wastewater. PMID:23774223

  5. Studies in transgenic mice reveal potential relationships between secretin-producing cells and other endocrine cell types.

    PubMed

    Lopez, M J; Upchurch, B H; Rindi, G; Leiter, A B

    1995-01-13

    We have produced transgenic mice expressing fusion genes consisting of 1.6 kilobase pairs of the secretin gene 5' flanking region to direct the expression of human growth hormone (hGH) or simian virus 40 large T antigen to secretin-producing cells. Analysis of different mouse tissues for hGH transcripts revealed expression in each of the major secretin-producing tissues, namely the intestine and endocrine pancrease. Multiple label immunohistochemistry demonstrated that the transgene was correctly directed to secretin cells in the intestinal tract, including a previously unrecognized population of secretin cells in the colon of adult and developing mice. In the small intestine, subpopulations of hGH-containing cells frequently coexpressed substance P, serotonin, and cholecystokinin, whereas in the colon, cells expressing hGH frequently coexpressed glucagon, peptide YY, or neurotensin. Transgenic mice expressing large T antigen in secretin cells developed poorly differentiated neuroendocrine tumors of the small intestine, well differentiated colonic tumors containing glucagon-expressing cells, and insulin-producing tumors in pancreas. These studies indicate that the major cis-regulatory sequences necessary for secretin expression in enteroendocrine cells and fetal islets are localized with 1.6 kilobase pairs of the transcriptional start site. Coexpression of reporter transgenes with several gastrointestinal hormones suggests a potential relationships between secretin cells and other enteroendocrine cell types, as well as pancreatic beta cells. PMID:7822327

  6. Determination of the energy potential of gases produced in the pyrolysis processes of the vegetal carbon manufacture industry.

    PubMed

    Gañan, J; González, J F; González-García, C M; Cuerda-Correa, E M; Macías-García, A

    2006-03-01

    In this work, a pyrolysis plant located in Valverde de Leganes, Badajoz (SW Spain) was studied. At present, only the solid phase obtained by pyrolysis finds an application as domestic fuel. In order to analyze the feasibility of a further energetic exploitation of the plant under study, the gases flowing through the chimneys were collected at different times throughout the pyrolysis process. Next, they were characterized and quantified by gas chromatography, the energy potential of each of the gases being determined. According to the results obtained in this study, a total energy potential of 5.6 x 10(7) MJ (i.e., 1.78 MW(t)) might be generated yearly. Hence, considering an overall process yield equal to 20%, up to 358 KW(e) would be produced. This power would supply enough electric energy to the industry, the remaining being added to the common electric network. PMID:15953721

  7. Transition energy and potential energy curves for ionized inner-shell states of CO, O2 and N 2 calculated by several inner-shell multiconfigurational approaches.

    PubMed

    Moura, Carlos E V de; Oliveira, Ricardo R; Rocha, Alexandre B

    2013-05-01

    Potential energy curves and inner-shell ionization energies of carbon monoxide, oxygen and nitrogen molecules were calculated using several forms of the inner-shell multiconfigurational self-consistent field (IS-MCSCF) method-a recently proposed protocol to obtain specifically converged inner-shell states at this level. The particular forms of the IS-MCSCF method designated IS-GVB-PP, IS-FVBL and IS-CASSCF stand for perfect pairing generalized valence bond, full valence bond-like MCSCF and complete active space self consistent field, respectively. A comparison of these different versions of the IS-MCSCF method was carried out for the first time. The results indicate that inner-shell states are described accurately even for the simplest version of the method (IS-GVB-PP). Dynamic correlation was recovered by multireference configuration interaction or multireference perturbation theory. For molecules not having equivalent atoms, all methods led to comparable and accurate transition energies. For molecules with equivalent atoms, the most accurate results were obtained by multireference perturbation theory. Scalar relativistic effects were accounted for using the Douglas-Kroll-Hess Hamiltonian. PMID:23070335

  8. Is near-``spectroscopic accuracy'' possible for heavy atoms and coupled cluster theory? An investigation of the first ionization potentials of the atoms Ga-Kr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeYonker, Nathan J.; Peterson, Kirk A.

    2013-04-01

    Recent developments in ab initio coupled cluster (CC) theory and correlation consistent basis sets have ushered in an era of unprecedented accuracy when studying the spectroscopy and thermodynamics of molecules containing main group elements. These same developments have recently seen application to heavier inorganic or transition metal-containing species. The present work benchmarks conventional single reference coupled cluster theory (up to full configuration interaction for valence electron correlation and coupled cluster with up to full pentuple excitations (CCSDTQP) for core-valence correlation) and explicitly correlated coupled cluster methods [CC with single, double, and perturbative triple substitutions (CCSD(T)-F12)] for the atomic ionization potentials of the six 4p elements (Ga-Kr), a property with experimental error bars no greater than a few cm-1. When second-order spin orbit coupling effects are included, a composite methodology based on CCSD(T) calculations yielded a mean signed error of just -0.039 kcal mol-1 and a mean unsigned error of 0.043 kcal mol-1. Inclusion of post-CCSD(T) correlation corrections reduced both of these values to -0.008 kcal mol-1 and 0.025 kcal mol-1, respectively, with the latter corresponding to an average error of just 9 cm-1. The maximum signed error in the latter scheme was just -0.043 kcal mol-1 (15 cm-1).

  9. Accurate Ionization Potentials and Electron Affinities of Acceptor Molecules I. Reference Data at the CCSD(T) Complete Basis Set Limit.

    PubMed

    Richard, Ryan M; Marshall, Michael S; Dolgounitcheva, O; Ortiz, J V; Brédas, Jean-Luc; Marom, Noa; Sherrill, C David

    2016-02-01

    In designing organic materials for electronics applications, particularly for organic photovoltaics (OPV), the ionization potential (IP) of the donor and the electron affinity (EA) of the acceptor play key roles. This makes OPV design an appealing application for computational chemistry since IPs and EAs are readily calculable from most electronic structure methods. Unfortunately reliable, high-accuracy wave function methods, such as coupled cluster theory with single, double, and perturbative triples [CCSD(T)] in the complete basis set (CBS) limit are too expensive for routine applications to this problem for any but the smallest of systems. One solution is to calibrate approximate, less computationally expensive methods against a database of high-accuracy IP/EA values; however, to our knowledge, no such database exists for systems related to OPV design. The present work is the first of a multipart study whose overarching goal is to determine which computational methods can be used to reliably compute IPs and EAs of electron acceptors. This part introduces a database of 24 known organic electron acceptors and provides high-accuracy vertical IP and EA values expected to be within ±0.03 eV of the true non-relativistic, vertical CCSD(T)/CBS limit. Convergence of IP and EA values toward the CBS limit is studied systematically for the Hartree-Fock, MP2 correlation, and beyond-MP2 coupled cluster contributions to the focal point estimates. PMID:26731487

  10. Study of gas-phase O-H bond dissociation enthalpies and ionization potentials of substituted phenols - Applicability of ab initio and DFT/B3LYP methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Erik; Lukeš, Vladimír

    2006-11-01

    In this paper, the study of phenol and 37 compounds representing various ortho-, para-, and meta-substituted phenols is presented. Molecules and their radical structures were studied using ab initio methods with inclusion of correlation energy and DFT in order to calculate the O-H bond dissociation enthalpies (BDEs) and vertical ionization potentials (IPs). Calculated BDEs and IPs were compared with available experimental values to ascertain the suitability of used methods, especially for the description of the substituent induced changes in BDE and IP. MP2, MP3, and MP4 methods do not give reliable results, since they significantly underestimate substituent induced changes in BDE and do not reflect distinct effect of substituents related to para and meta position correctly. DFT/B3LYP method reflects the effect of substituents on BDE satisfactorily, though ΔBDEs are in narrower range than experimental values. BDE of phenol was calculated also using CCSD(T) method in various basis sets. Both, DFT and HF methods describe the effect of substituents on IP identically. However, DFT considerably underestimates individual values. HF method gives IPs in very good agreement with experimental data. Obtained results show that dependences of BDEs and IPs on Hammett constants of the substituents are linear. Linearity of DFT BDE vs. IP dependence is even better than the dependences on Hammett constants and obtained equations allow estimating of O-H BDEs of meta- and para-substituted phenols from calculated IPs.

  11. Photoreduction of benzophenone by acetonitrile: correlation of rates of hydrogen abstraction from RH with the ionization potentials of the radicals R

    SciTech Connect

    Naguib, Y.M.A.; Steel, C.; Cohen, S.G.; Young, M.A.

    1987-05-21

    Triplet benzophenone (/sup 4/K) abstracts a hydrogen from acetonitrile with a rate constant of 130 +/- 30 M/sup -1/ s/sup -1/. Despite this low rate constant acetonitrile is not really an inert solvent and at low light fluxes, where T-T annihilation is not a major fate of the triplet, a major decay path for /sup 4/K is hydrogen abstraction with resulting pinacol (K/sub 2/H/sub 2/) formation (phi/sub K/sub 2/H/sub 2/ approx. = 0.1 at t = 0). Both K/sub 2/H/sub 2/ formation and /sup 3/K lifetime rapidly decrease with irradiation due to the light absorbing transients (LAT's) which are formed along with K/sub 7/H/sub 2/ from ketyl radicals (KH). The rate constants per hydrogen (k/sub H/) for abstraction from R-H by the electrophilic /sup 3/K correlate well with the ionization potentials (IP) of the corresponding radicals (R).

  12. Basis set limit electronic excitation energies, ionization potentials, and electron affinities for the 3d transition metal atoms: Coupled cluster and multireference methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balabanov, Nikolai B.; Peterson, Kirk A.

    2006-08-01

    Recently developed correlation consistent basis sets for the first row transition metal elements Sc-Zn have been utilized to determine complete basis set (CBS) scalar relativistic electron affinities, ionization potentials, and 4s23dn -2-4s1dn -1 electronic excitation energies with single reference coupled cluster methods [CCSD(T), CCSDT, and CCSDTQ] and multireference configuration interaction with three reference spaces: 3d4s, 3d4s4p, and 3d4s4p3d'. The theoretical values calculated with the highest order coupled cluster techniques at the CBS limit, including extrapolations to full configuration interaction, are well within 1kcal/mol of the corresponding experimental data. For the early transition metal elements (Sc-Mn) the internally contracted multireference averaged coupled pair functional method yielded excellent agreement with experiment; however, the atomic properties for the late transition metals (Mn-Zn) proved to be much more difficult to describe with this level of theory, even with the largest reference function of the present work.

  13. Atmospheric Ionization Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slack, Thomas; Mayes, Riley

    2015-04-01

    The measurement of atmospheric ionization is a largely unexplored science that potentially holds the key to better understanding many different geophysical phenomena through this new and valuable source of data. Through the LaACES program, which is funded by NASA through the Louisiana Space Consortium, students at Loyola University New Orleans have pursued the goal of measuring high altitude ionization for nearly three years, and were the first to successfully collect ionization data at altitudes over 30,000 feet using a scientific weather balloon flown from the NASA Columbia Scientific Ballooning Facility in Palestine, TX. In order to measure atmospheric ionization, the science team uses a lightweight and highly customized sensor known as a Gerdien condenser. Among other branches of science the data is already being used for, such as the study of aerosol pollution levels in the atmosphere, the data may also be useful in meteorology and seismology. Ionization data might provide another variable with which to predict weather or seismic activity more accurately and further in advance. Thomas Slack and Riley Mayes have served as project managers for the experiment, and have extensive knowledge of the experiment from the ground up. LaSPACE Louisiana Space Consortium.

  14. Bacillus amyloliquefaciens TSBSO 3.8, a biosurfactant-producing strain with biotechnological potential for microbial enhanced oil recovery.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Vanessa Marques; Jurelevicius, Diogo; Marques, Joana Montezano; de Souza, Pamella Macedo; de Araújo, Livia Vieira; Barros, Thalita Gonçalves; de Souza, Rodrigo Octavio Mendonça Alves; Freire, Denise Maria Guimarães; Seldin, Lucy

    2015-12-01

    A screening for biosurfactant-producing bacteria was conducted with 217 strains that were isolated from environmental samples contaminated with crude oil and/or petroleum derivatives. Although 19 promising biosurfactant producers were detected, strain TSBSO 3.8, which was identified by molecular methods as Bacillus amyloliquefaciens, drew attention for its production of a high-activity compound that presented an emulsification activity of 63% and considerably decreased surface (28.5 mN/m) and interfacial (11.4 mN/m) tensions in Trypticase Soy Broth culture medium. TSBSO 3.8 growth and biosurfactant production were tested under different physical and chemical conditions to evaluate its biotechnological potential. Biosurfactant production occurred between 0.5% and 7% NaCl, at pH values varying from 6 to 9 and temperatures ranging from 28 to 50 °C. Moreover, biosurfactant properties remained the same after autoclaving at 121 °C for 15 min. The biosurfactant was also successful in a test to simulate microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR). Mass spectrometry analysis showed that the surface active compound was a surfactin, known as a powerful biosurfactant that is commonly produced by Bacillus species. The production of a high-efficiency biosurfactant, under some physical and chemical conditions that resemble those experienced in an oil production reservoir, such as high salinities and temperatures, makes TSBSO 3.8 an excellent candidate and creates good expectations for its application in MEOR. PMID:26350801

  15. Potential of bacteriocin-producing lactic acid bacteria for safety improvements of traditional Thai fermented meat and human health.

    PubMed

    Swetwiwathana, Adisorn; Visessanguan, Wonnop

    2015-11-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are very important in converting of agricultural products into safe, delicious and shelf stable foods for human consumption. The preservative activity of LAB in foods is mainly attributed to the production of anti-microbial metabolites such as organic acids and bacteriocins which enables them to grow and control the growth of pathogens and spoilage microorganisms. Besides ensuring safety, bacteriocin-producing LAB with their probiotic potentials could also be emerging as a means to develop functional meat products with desirable health benefits. Nevertheless, to be qualified as a candidate probiotic culture, other prerequisite probiotic properties of bacteriocin-producing LAB have to be assessed according to regulatory guidelines for probiotics. Nham is an indigenous fermented sausage of Thailand that has gained popularity and acceptance among Thais. Since Nham is made from raw meat and is usually consumed without cooking, risks due to undesirable microorganisms such as Salmonella spp., Staphylococcus aureus, and Listeria monocytogenes, are frequently observed. With an ultimate goal to produce safer and healthier product, our research attempts on the development of a variety of new Nham products are discussed. PMID:26100576

  16. Ionization of cluster atoms in a strong laser field

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, M.B.; Krainov, V.P.

    2004-04-01

    Inner and outer multiple ionization of clusters by a superintense ultrashort laser pulse is studied. The barrier-suppression mechanism governs inner field ionization in this case, while impact ionization can be neglected. Outer ionization produces a static Coulomb field inside the ionized cluster. This field increases the charge multiplicity of the atomic ions produced inside the cluster approximately by a factor of 1.5. Various models are suggested for the charge distribution inside the cluster.

  17. Oxidative potential of secondary organic aerosols produced from photooxidation of different hydrocarbons using outdoor chamber under ambient sunlight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Huanhuan; Jang, Myoseon; Sabo-Attwood, Tara; Robinson, Sarah E.

    2016-04-01

    The oxidative potential of various secondary organic aerosols (SOA) was measured using dithiothreitol (DTT) assay to understand how organic aerosols react with cellular materials. SOA was produced via the photooxidation of four different hydrocarbons (toluene, 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene, isoprene and α-pinene) in the presence of NOx using a large outdoor photochemical smog chamber. The DTT consumption rate was normalized by the aerosol mass, which is expressed as DTTmass. Toluene SOA and isoprene SOA yielded higher DTTmass than 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene SOA or α-pinene SOA. In order to discover the correlation between the molecular structure and oxidative potential, the DTT responses of selected model compounds were also measured. Among them, conjugated aldehydes, quinones, and H2O2 showed considerable DTT response. To investigate the correlation between DTT response and cell responses in vitro, the expression of biological markers, i.e. IL-6, IL-8, and HMOX-1 were studied using small airway epithelial cells. Higher cellular expression of IL-8 was observed with toluene SOA exposure compared to 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene SOA exposure, which aligned with the results from DTT assay. Our study also suggests that within the urban atmosphere, the contribution of toluene SOA and isoprene SOA to the oxidative potential of ambient SOA will be more significant than that of α-pinene SOA.

  18. Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Ryan T.; Marginean, Ioan; Tang, Keqi

    2014-06-13

    Electrospray Ionization (ESI) is a process whereby gas phase ions are created from molecules in solution. As a solution exits a narrow tube in the presence of a strong electric field, an aerosol of charged droplets are is formed that produces gas phase ions as they it desolvates. ESI-MS comprises the creation of ions by ESI and the determination of their mass to charge ratio (m/z) by MS.

  19. ION PRODUCING MECHANISM

    DOEpatents

    Backus, J.G.

    1958-09-01

    This patent relates to improvements in calutron devices and particularly describes a novel ion source. The unique feature of this source lies in the shaping of the ionizing electron stream to conform to the arc plasma boundary at the exit slit of the ionization chamber, thereby increasing the ion density produced at the plasma boundary. The particular structure consists of an electron source disposed at onc end of an elongated ionization chambcr and a coilimating electrode positioned to trim the electron stream to a crescent shape before entering the ionization chamber.

  20. Environmental Factors and Seasonal Occurrence of the Dinoflagellate Alexandrium minutum, a PSP Potential Producer, in a Mediterranean Lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacobbe, M. G.; Oliva, F. D.; Maimone, G.

    1996-05-01

    Seasonal fluctuations of hydrobiological parameters were studied, throughout 1992, in a shallow Mediterranean area (Ganzirri lagoon), affected by the dinoflagellate Alexandrium minutum, a potential producer of saxitoxins. Concentrations of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) and N:P ratios were high in autumn and winter, when the waters were well mixed and free from A. minutumcells. The spring appearance of this species coincided with enhanced rainfall and freshwater runoff and with stabilization of the water column, whereas cell dispersion was observed in summer. Although A. minutumnever dominated the algal community, cell densities were maximal in May, when values of salinity did not exceed 30; during this month, there were reduced amounts of DIN, N:P atomic ratios close to 16:1 and a minor competitive pressure by other phytoplankters. Subsequent increases in values of the above parameters—in particular, of the ammonium nitrogen—were associated with a decline in cell numbers, and final disappearance of A. minutumcells.

  1. Potentiation of the Cytotoxic Activity of Copper by Polyphosphate on Biofilm-Producing Bacteria: A Bioinspired Approach

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Werner E. G.; Wang, Xiaohong; Guo, Yue-Wei; Schröder, Heinz C.

    2012-01-01

    Adhesion and accumulation of organic molecules represent an ecologically and economically massive problem. Adhesion of organic molecules is followed by microorganisms, unicellular organisms and plants together with their secreted soluble and structure-associated byproducts, which damage unprotected surfaces of submerged marine structures, including ship hulls and heat exchangers of power plants. This is termed biofouling. The search for less toxic anti-biofilm strategies has intensified since the ban of efficient and cost-effective anti-fouling paints, enriched with the organotin compound tributyltin, not least because of our finding of the ubiquitous toxic/pro-apoptotic effects displayed by this compound [1]. Our proposed bio-inspired approach for controlling, suppressing and interfluencing the dynamic biofouling complex uses copper as one component in an alternative anti-fouling system. In order to avoid and overcome the potential resistance against copper acquired by microorganisms we are using the biopolymer polyphosphate (polyP) as a further component. Prior to being functionally active, polyP has to be hydrolyzed to ortho-phosphate which in turn can bind to copper and export the toxic compound out of the cell. It is shown here that inhibition of the hydrolysis of polyP by the bisphosphonate DMDP strongly increases the toxic effect of copper towards the biofilm-producing Streptococcus mutans in a synergistic manner. This bisphosphonate not only increases the copper-caused inhibition of cell growth but also of biofilm production by the bacteria. The defensin-related ASABF, a marine toxin produced by the sponge Suberites domuncula, caused only an additive inhibitory effect in combination with copper. We conclude that the new strategy, described here, has a superior anti-biofilm potential and can be considered as a novel principle for developing bio-inspired antifouling compounds, or cocktails of different compounds, in the future. PMID:23203265

  2. Stress produces aversion and potentiates cocaine reward by releasing endogenous dynorphins in the ventral striatum to locally stimulate serotonin reuptake

    PubMed Central

    Schindler, Abigail G.; Messinger, Daniel I.; Smith, Jeffrey S.; Shankar, Haripriya; Gustin, Richard M.; Schattauer, Selena S.; Lemos, Julia C.; Chavkin, Nicholas W.; Hagan, Catherine E.; Neumaier, John F.; Chavkin, Charles

    2012-01-01

    Activation of the dynorphin/kappa opioid receptor (KOR) system by repeated stress exposure or agonist treatment produces place aversion, social avoidance, and reinstatement of extinguished cocaine place preference behaviors by stimulation of p38α MAPK, which subsequently causes the translocation of the serotonin transporter (SERT, Slc6a4) to the synaptic terminals of serotonergic neurons. In the present study we extend those findings by showing that stress-induced potentiation of cocaine conditioned place preference occurred by a similar mechanism. In addition, SERT knockout mice did not show KOR-mediated aversion, and selective re-expression of SERT by lenti-viral injection into the dorsal raphe restored the prodepressive effects of KOR activation. Kinetic analysis of several neurotransporters demonstrated that repeated swim stress exposure selectively increased the Vmax but not Km of SERT without affecting dopamine transport or the high capacity, low affinity transporters. Although the serotonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe project throughout the forebrain, a significant stress-induced increase in cell-surface SERT expression was only evident in the ventral striatum, and not in the dorsal striatum, hippocampus, prefrontal cortex, amygdala, or dorsal raphe. Stereotaxic microinjections of the long-lasting KOR antagonist norBNI demonstrated that local KOR activation in the nucleus accumbens, but not dorsal raphe, mediated this stress-induced increase in ventral striatal surface SERT expression. Together, these results support the hypothesis that stress-induced activation of the dynorphin/KOR system produces a transient increase in serotonin transport locally in the ventral striatum that may underlie some of the adverse consequences of stress exposure, including the potentiation of the rewarding effects of cocaine. PMID:23223282

  3. 2-n-Pentyl-4-Quinolinol Produced by a Marine Alteromonas sp. and Its Potential Ecological and Biogeochemical Roles†

    PubMed Central

    Long, Richard A.; Qureshi, Asfia; Faulkner, D. John; Azam, Farooq

    2003-01-01

    Bacterium-bacterium interactions occur at intimate spatial scales on the order of micrometers, but our knowledge of interactions at this level is rudimentary. Antagonism is a potential interaction in such microenvironments. To study the ecological role of antibiosis, we developed a model system involving an antibiotic-producing isolate (SWAT5) derived from a marine particle and its dominant antibiotic product, 2-n-pentyl-4-quinolinol (PQ). This system was used to address questions about the significance of this antibiotic for microbial ecology and carbon cycling on particles. We characterized the chemical and inhibitory properties of PQ in relation to the mechanisms used by particle-associated bacteria in interacting with particles and with other attached bacteria. PQ was produced by SWAT5 only on surfaces. When SWAT5 was grown in polysaccharide matrices, PQ diffused within the matrices but not into the surrounding seawater. SWAT5 might thus be able to generate a localized zone of high antibiotic concentration on particles suspended or sinking through seawater. Target bacterial respiration was most sensitive to PQ (75 nM), while inhibition of DNA synthesis, protein synthesis, and bacterial motility required higher (micromolar) PQ levels. The presence of PQ altered the composition of the bacterial community that colonized and developed in a model particle system. PQ also inhibited Synechococcus and phytoplankton growth. Our results suggest that antibiosis may significantly influence community composition and activities of attached bacterial and thus regulate the biogeochemical fate of particulate organic matter in the ocean. PMID:12514043

  4. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor–dependent enrichment of a megakaryocytic precursor with a high potential to produce proplatelets

    PubMed Central

    Brouard, Nathalie; Mallo, Lea; Receveur, Nicolas; Mangin, Pierre; Eckly, Anita; Bieche, Ivan; Tarte, Karin; Gachet, Christian; Lanza, François

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms regulating megakaryopoiesis and platelet production (thrombopoiesis) are still incompletely understood. Identification of a progenitor with enhanced thrombopoietic capacity would be useful to decipher these mechanisms and to improve our capacity to produce platelets in vitro. Differentiation of peripheral blood CD34+ cells in the presence of bone marrow–human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) enhanced the production of proplatelet-bearing megakaryocytes (MKs) and platelet-like elements. This was accompanied by enrichment in a MK precursor population exhibiting an intermediate level of CD41 positivity while maintaining its expression of CD34. Following sorting and subculture with MSCs, this CD34+CD41low population was able to efficiently generate proplatelet-bearing MKs and platelet-like particles. Similarly, StemRegenin 1 (SR1), an antagonist of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) transcription factor known to maintain CD34 expression of progenitor cells, led to an enriched CD34+CD41low fraction and to an increased capacity to generate proplatelet-producing MKs and platelet-like elements ultrastructurally and functionally similar to circulating platelets. The effect of MSCs, like that of SR1, appeared to be mediated by an AhR-dependent mechanism because both culture conditions resulted in repression of its downstream effector CYP1B1. This newly described isolation of a precursor exhibiting strong MK potential could be exploited to study normal and abnormal thrombopoiesis and for in vitro platelet production. PMID:26966088

  5. Chemical Structure, Property and Potential Applications of Biosurfactants Produced by Bacillus subtilis in Petroleum Recovery and Spill Mitigation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jin-Feng; Mbadinga, Serge Maurice; Yang, Shi-Zhong; Gu, Ji-Dong; Mu, Bo-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Lipopeptides produced by microorganisms are one of the five major classes of biosurfactants known and they have received much attention from scientific and industrial communities due to their powerful interfacial and biological activities as well as environmentally friendly characteristics. Microbially produced lipopeptides are a series of chemical structural analogues of different families and, among them, 26 families covering about 90 lipopeptide compounds have been reported in the last two decades. This paper reviews the chemical structural characteristics and molecular behaviors of surfactin, one of the representative lipopeptides of the 26 families. In particular, two novel surfactin molecules isolated from cell-free cultures of Bacillus subtilis HSO121 are presented. Surfactins exhibit strong self-assembly ability to form sphere-like micelles and larger aggregates at very low concentrations. The amphipathic and surface properties of surfactins are related to the existence of the minor polar and major hydrophobic domains in the three 3-D conformations. In addition, the application potential of surfactin in bioremediation of oil spills and oil contaminants, and microbial enhanced oil recovery are discussed. PMID:25741767

  6. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor-dependent enrichment of a megakaryocytic precursor with a high potential to produce proplatelets.

    PubMed

    Strassel, Catherine; Brouard, Nathalie; Mallo, Lea; Receveur, Nicolas; Mangin, Pierre; Eckly, Anita; Bieche, Ivan; Tarte, Karin; Gachet, Christian; Lanza, François

    2016-05-01

    The mechanisms regulating megakaryopoiesis and platelet production (thrombopoiesis) are still incompletely understood. Identification of a progenitor with enhanced thrombopoietic capacity would be useful to decipher these mechanisms and to improve our capacity to produce platelets in vitro. Differentiation of peripheral blood CD34(+) cells in the presence of bone marrow-human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) enhanced the production of proplatelet-bearing megakaryocytes (MKs) and platelet-like elements. This was accompanied by enrichment in a MK precursor population exhibiting an intermediate level of CD41 positivity while maintaining its expression of CD34. Following sorting and subculture with MSCs, this CD34(+)CD41(low) population was able to efficiently generate proplatelet-bearing MKs and platelet-like particles. Similarly, StemRegenin 1 (SR1), an antagonist of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) transcription factor known to maintain CD34 expression of progenitor cells, led to an enriched CD34(+)CD41(low) fraction and to an increased capacity to generate proplatelet-producing MKs and platelet-like elements ultrastructurally and functionally similar to circulating platelets. The effect of MSCs, like that of SR1, appeared to be mediated by an AhR-dependent mechanism because both culture conditions resulted in repression of its downstream effector CYP1B1. This newly described isolation of a precursor exhibiting strong MK potential could be exploited to study normal and abnormal thrombopoiesis and for in vitro platelet production. PMID:26966088

  7. Chemical structure, property and potential applications of biosurfactants produced by Bacillus subtilis in petroleum recovery and spill mitigation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin-Feng; Mbadinga, Serge Maurice; Yang, Shi-Zhong; Gu, Ji-Dong; Mu, Bo-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Lipopeptides produced by microorganisms are one of the five major classes of biosurfactants known and they have received much attention from scientific and industrial communities due to their powerful interfacial and biological activities as well as environmentally friendly characteristics. Microbially produced lipopeptides are a series of chemical structural analogues of different families and, among them, 26 families covering about 90 lipopeptide compounds have been reported in the last two decades. This paper reviews the chemical structural characteristics and molecular behaviors of surfactin, one of the representative lipopeptides of the 26 families. In particular, two novel surfactin molecules isolated from cell-free cultures of Bacillus subtilis HSO121 are presented. Surfactins exhibit strong self-assembly ability to form sphere-like micelles and larger aggregates at very low concentrations. The amphipathic and surface properties of surfactins are related to the existence of the minor polar and major hydrophobic domains in the three 3-D conformations. In addition, the application potential of surfactin in bioremediation of oil spills and oil contaminants, and microbial enhanced oil recovery are discussed. PMID:25741767

  8. Phytase-Producing Potential and Other Functional Attributes of Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolates for Prospective Probiotic Applications.

    PubMed

    Andrabi, Syed Tabia; Bhat, Bilqeesa; Gupta, Mahak; Bajaj, Bijender Kumar

    2016-09-01

    Wide variations among multifaceted-health benefitting attributes of probiotics fueled investigations on targeting efficacious probiotics. In the current study, lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from poultry gut, feces of rat, chicken, human infants, and fermented foods were characterized for desired probiotic functional properties including the phytase-producing ability which is one of the wanted characteristics for probiotics for potential applications for upgrading animal nutrition, enhancing feed conversion, and minimizing anti-nutritional properties. Among 62 LAB isolates Weissella kimchii R-3 an isolate from poultry gut exhibited substantial phytase-producing ability (1.77 U/ml) in addition to other functional probiotic characteristics viz. hydrophobicity, autoaggregation, coaggregation with bacterial pathogens, and antimicrobial activity against pathogens. Survival of W. kimchii R-3 cells (in free and calcium alginate encapsulated state) was examined sequentially in simulated gastric and intestinal juices. Encapsulated cells exhibited better survival under simulated gut conditions indicating that encapsulation conferred considerable protection against adverse gut conditions. Furthermore, simulated gastric and intestinal juices with pepsin and pancreatin showed higher survival of cells than the juices without pepsin and pancreatin. W. kimchii R-3 due to its significant functional probiotic attributes may have prospective for commercial applications in human/animal nutrition. PMID:27349529

  9. Pseudomonas strains naturally associated with potato plants produce volatiles with high potential for inhibition of Phytophthora infestans.

    PubMed

    Hunziker, Lukas; Bönisch, Denise; Groenhagen, Ulrike; Bailly, Aurélien; Schulz, Stefan; Weisskopf, Laure

    2015-02-01

    Bacteria emit volatile organic compounds with a wide range of effects on bacteria, fungi, plants, and animals. The antifungal potential of bacterial volatiles has been investigated with a broad span of phytopathogenic organisms, yet the reaction of oomycetes to these volatile signals is largely unknown. For instance, the response of the late blight-causing agent and most devastating oomycete pathogen worldwide, Phytophthora infestans, to bacterial volatiles has not been assessed so far. In this work, we analyzed this response and compared it to that of selected fungal and bacterial potato pathogens, using newly isolated, potato-associated bacterial strains as volatile emitters. P. infestans was highly susceptible to bacterial volatiles, while fungal and bacterial pathogens were less sensitive. Cyanogenic Pseudomonas strains were the most active, leading to complete growth inhibition, yet noncyanogenic ones also produced antioomycete volatiles. Headspace analysis of the emitted volatiles revealed 1-undecene as a compound produced by strains inducing volatile-mediated P. infestans growth inhibition. Supplying pure 1-undecene to P. infestans significantly reduced mycelial growth, sporangium formation, germination, and zoospore release in a dose-dependent manner. This work demonstrates the high sensitivity of P. infestans to bacterial volatiles and opens new perspectives for sustainable control of this devastating pathogen. PMID:25398872

  10. Pseudomonas Strains Naturally Associated with Potato Plants Produce Volatiles with High Potential for Inhibition of Phytophthora infestans

    PubMed Central

    Hunziker, Lukas; Bönisch, Denise; Groenhagen, Ulrike; Bailly, Aurélien; Schulz, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria emit volatile organic compounds with a wide range of effects on bacteria, fungi, plants, and animals. The antifungal potential of bacterial volatiles has been investigated with a broad span of phytopathogenic organisms, yet the reaction of oomycetes to these volatile signals is largely unknown. For instance, the response of the late blight-causing agent and most devastating oomycete pathogen worldwide, Phytophthora infestans, to bacterial volatiles has not been assessed so far. In this work, we analyzed this response and compared it to that of selected fungal and bacterial potato pathogens, using newly isolated, potato-associated bacterial strains as volatile emitters. P. infestans was highly susceptible to bacterial volatiles, while fungal and bacterial pathogens were less sensitive. Cyanogenic Pseudomonas strains were the most active, leading to complete growth inhibition, yet noncyanogenic ones also produced antioomycete volatiles. Headspace analysis of the emitted volatiles revealed 1-undecene as a compound produced by strains inducing volatile-mediated P. infestans growth inhibition. Supplying pure 1-undecene to P. infestans significantly reduced mycelial growth, sporangium formation, germination, and zoospore release in a dose-dependent manner. This work demonstrates the high sensitivity of P. infestans to bacterial volatiles and opens new perspectives for sustainable control of this devastating pathogen. PMID:25398872

  11. Measurement of Organic Acids Produced By The Gas-Phase Ozonolysis of Simple Olefins Using Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CIMS) as a Function of Temperature And Humidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Percival, C. J.; Bacak, A.; Leather, K. E.; McGillen, M. R.

    2009-12-01

    Non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) form an important trace component of the atmosphere and are of particular environmental interest because of their deleterious effects on air quality, their numerous (and potentially counteractive) effects on Earth’s climate system and their sophisticated semiochemical roles in the world’s ecosystems. NMHCs are also important precursors to the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) (e.g. Pandis et al., 1991; Kavouras et al., 1999). The ozonolysis reactions of olefins result in complex menageries of products, of which the acids are ubiquitous. Although the gas phase acid concentrations are small, they are thought to be key species in SOA formation as a result of their low volatility (e.g., Ma et al., 2009). Despite this, the factors that control acid formation are not well understood, especially with regards to humidity and temperature. Acid yields will be measured using the newly commissioned EXTreme RAnge (EXTRA) chamber (Leather et al., 2009). EXTRA is a 125 L stainless steel chamber, which can be temperature controlled using a commercial chest freezer unit (for T ≤ -20 °C) or a purpose built oven for T > 25 °C. The EXTRA chamber can be operated at pressures from 10-3800 Torr and at temperatures from 180-473 K. The stainless steel chamber walls have been coated with PFA to minimize wall loss of radicals. Fans, located at both ends of the cylinder, promote rapid mixing of reactants. Six sample ports are located at either end of the chamber for connection to ADS-GC-ECD, CIMS and commercial sensors such as a Thermo Electron Corporation 49i Ozone Analyzer, an Edinburgh Instruments Gascard CO2 sensor and a Trace Analytical inc. RGA3 CO analyzer. Experiments will be performed as a function of atmospherically relevant temperatures (T= 180-300 K). The field CIMS has sub ppt(v) L.O.D.s with a sub 1 Hz time response so will enable products to be quantified at very low concentrations in real time. Acid products will be detected

  12. An empirical dependence of frequency in the oscillatory sorption of H2 and D2 in Pd on the first ionization potential of noble gases.

    PubMed

    Lalik, Erwin

    2011-08-14

    Oscillatory heat evolution in sorption of H(2) and D(2) in Pd can be induced by an admixture of ~10 vol.% of an inert gas (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, or N(2)) to either isotope prior to its contact with palladium powder. The oscillations are represented in the form of a calorimetric time series, recorded using a gas flow-through microcalorimeter at the temperatures of 75 °C for D(2) and 106 °C for H(2). For both D(2) and H(2), the oscillation parameters change as a function of the kind of inert gas used: the amplitude increases and the frequency decreases in passing from He to Kr. An empirical dependence of the oscillation frequencies observed for various admixtures and normalized with respect to Kr has been found. Accordingly, the frequency is a function of a product of the first ionization potential and the square root of atomic mass of the inert gas (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, or N(2)). On the other hand, invariance of the thermal effects of sorption is evident from the integrated areas under the calorimetric time series yielding the molar heats of sorption conserved, irrespective of the inert gas admixture. A novel calibration procedure has been devised in order to deal with an instability of calibration factor arising in desorption of H(2) and D(2) from Pd. A method of dynamic calibration factor made it possible to obtain a good agreement between the heats of sorption and desorption of both H(2) and D(2) within individual sorption-desorption cycles for all inert gas admixtures. PMID:21842944

  13. Ionizing Irradiation Not Only Inactivates Clonogenic Potential in Primary Normal Human Diploid Lens Epithelial Cells but Also Stimulates Cell Proliferation in a Subset of This Population

    PubMed Central

    Fujimichi, Yuki; Hamada, Nobuyuki

    2014-01-01

    Over the past century, ionizing radiation has been known to induce cataracts in the crystalline lens of the eye, but its mechanistic underpinnings remain incompletely understood. This study is the first to report the clonogenic survival of irradiated primary normal human lens epithelial cells and stimulation of its proliferation. Here we used two primary normal human cell strains: HLEC1 lens epithelial cells and WI-38 lung fibroblasts. Both strains were diploid, and a replicative lifespan was shorter in HLEC1 cells. The colony formation assay demonstrated that the clonogenic survival of both strains decreases similarly with increasing doses of X-rays. A difference in the survival between two strains was actually insignificant, although HLEC1 cells had the lower plating efficiency. This indicates that the same dose inactivates the same fraction of clonogenic cells in both strains. Intriguingly, irradiation enlarged the size of clonogenic colonies arising from HLEC1 cells in marked contrast to those from WI-38 cells. Such enhanced proliferation of clonogenic HLEC1 cells was significant at ≥2 Gy, and manifested as increments of ≤2.6 population doublings besides sham-irradiated controls. These results suggest that irradiation of HLEC1 cells not only inactivates clonogenic potential but also stimulates proliferation of surviving uniactivated clonogenic cells. Given that the lens is a closed system, the stimulated proliferation of lens epithelial cells may not be a homeostatic mechanism to compensate for their cell loss, but rather should be regarded as abnormal. This is because these findings are consistent with the early in vivo evidence documenting that irradiation induces excessive proliferation of rabbit lens epithelial cells and that suppression of lens epithelial cell divisions inhibits radiation cataractogenesis in frogs and rats. Thus, our in vitro model will be useful to evaluate the excessive proliferation of primary normal human lens epithelial cells that

  14. Immune potentiation after fractionated exposure to very low doses of ionizing radiation and/or caloric restriction in autoimmune-prone and normal C57Bl/6 mice

    SciTech Connect

    James, S.J.; Enger, S.M.; Peterson, W.J.; Makinodan, T. )

    1990-06-01

    Very low doses of ionizing radiation can enhance immune responsiveness and extend life span in normal mice. Total lymphoid irradiation at relatively high doses of radiation can retard autoimmune disease in genetically susceptible mice, but may impair immune function. In order to determine whether fractionated low dose exposure would enhance immune response and retard lymphadenopathy in autoimmune-prone mice, groups of C57B1/6 lpr/lpr mice were sham irradiated, exposed 5 days/week for 4 weeks to 0.04 Gy/day, or to 0.1 Gy/day. After the radiation protocol, the mice were evaluated for splenic T cell proliferative capacity, T cell subset distribution, and total spleen cell numbers. The independent and additive effect of caloric restriction was additionally assessed since this intervention has been shown to increase immune responsiveness and retard disease progression in autoimmune-prone mice. The congenic C57B1/6 +/+ immunologically normal strain was evaluated in parallel as congenic control. The results indicated that mitogen-stimulated proliferation was up-regulated in both strains of mice after exposure to 0.04 Gy/day. The proliferative capacity was additively enhanced when radiation at this dose level was combined with caloric restriction. Exposure to 0.1 Gy/day resulted in further augmentation of proliferative response in the lpr/lpr mice, but was depressive in the +/+ mice. Although the proportions of the various T cell subpopulations were altered in both strains after exposure to LDR, the specific subset alterations were different within each strain. Additional experiments were subsequently performed to assess whether the thymus is required for LDR-induced immune potentiation. Thymectomy completely abrogated the LDR effect in the +/+ mice, suggesting that thymic processing and/or trafficking is adaptively altered with LDR in this strain.

  15. Phospholipidomic identification of potential serum biomarkers in dengue fever, hepatitis B and hepatitis C using liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Khedr, Alaa; Hegazy, Maha A; Kammoun, Ahmed K; Shehata, Mostafa A

    2016-01-15

    The serum phospholipid (PL) profiles of healthy volunteers (HE) and patients with recently diagnosed dengue fever (DF), hepatitis B (HBV), and hepatitis C (HCV) were investigated using liquid chromatography-ion trap-mass spectrometry (LC-IT-MS) and liquid chromatography-triple quad-mass spectrometry (LC-TQ-MS). Major PLs, including lyso-phosphatidylcholins (LPCs), phosphatidylcholins (PCs), phosphatidylinositols (PIs), phosphatidylethanolamines (PEs) and phosphatidylserines (PSs), were characterized in human serum using LC-IT-MS. Thirty-five PLs were quantified using seven non-endogenous odd-carbon PL standards. An MS search protocol for the identification of PLs is described. The analytical method was optimized to achieve maximum recovery and detection. PLs were detected with minimal ionization suppression. The PLs species were characterized on the basis of (i) MS(2) peaks due to polar head, (ii) precursor ion or neutral loss scans, (iii) identification of fatty acid, (iv) identification of sn-1 and sn-2 fatty acid. The quantitation data were subjected to principal component analysis (PCA), and a significant difference was observed between the PL profiles of the investigated diseases and those of HE subjects. The significance of the changes in each lipid among the four groups was statistically assessed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Bonferroni post hoc multiple comparison. The serum profiles of 28 PLs were determined to be significantly different and enabled the discrimination between HE individuals and the studied patients. Potentially dysregulated PLs were considered as differentiating biomarkers to diagnose DF, HBV, and HCV. PMID:26708624

  16. Comparative anti-inflammatory activities of curcumin and tetrahydrocurcumin based on the phenolic O-H bond dissociation enthalpy, ionization potential and quantum chemical descriptor.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Yukio; Ishii, Hiroaki; Takada, Naoki; Tanaka, Shoji; Machino, Mamoru; Ito, Shigeru; Fujisawa, Seiichiro

    2008-01-01

    Curcumin and its reduced derivative tetrahydrocurcumin have been shown to exhibit chemopreventive activity. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibition in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)- or Porphyromonas gingivalis fimbria-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells was investigated using Northern blot analysis. The fimbria-stimulated expression of the COX-2 gene was inhibited by curcumin but not by tetrahydrocurcumin. LPS-stimulated COX-2 gene expression was completely inhibited by curcumin, but an increase in the concentration of tetrahydrocurcumin did not cause complete inhibition of COX-2 expression. The inhibitory effect of curcumin on nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB) activation in the cells was clearly observed, but that of tetrahydrocurcumin was incomplete even at a concentration of 20 microM. To explain the difference in effect between the two compounds, analysis of the frontier orbital was performed using ab initio 6-31G* wave function. The calculated chemical hardness (eta) for curcumin was clearly smaller, whereas its electronegativity (chi) and electrophilicity (omega) were clearly greater than the corresponding values for the curcumin-related compounds tetrahydrocurcumin, isoeugenol and eugenol. This suggested that the anti-inflammatory activities of curcumin may be related to eta-, chi- and/or omega-controlled enzymes. In addition, the bond dissociation enthalpy (BDE) of the phenolic OH was calculated using the density function theory (DFT)/B3LY. The total BDE values of curcumin and tetrahydrocurcumin were almost identical, but the BDE of one-electron oxidation and ionization potential (IP) for curcumin were lower than those for tetrahydrocurcumin, suggesting the highly pro-oxidative activity of curcumin. Curcumin has both oxidant and antioxidant properties. A causal link between the anti-inflammatory activities and molecular properties of phenolic antioxidants is suggested. PMID:18507010

  17. Pulsed helium ionization detection system

    DOEpatents

    Ramsey, Roswitha S.; Todd, Richard A.

    1987-01-01

    A helium ionization detection system is provided which produces stable operation of a conventional helium ionization detector while providing improved sensitivity and linearity. Stability is improved by applying pulsed dc supply voltage across the ionization detector, thereby modifying the sampling of the detectors output current. A unique pulse generator is used to supply pulsed dc to the detector which has variable width and interval adjust features that allows up to 500 V to be applied in pulse widths ranging from about 150 nsec to about dc conditions.

  18. Pulsed helium ionization detection system

    DOEpatents

    Ramsey, R.S.; Todd, R.A.

    1985-04-09

    A helium ionization detection system is provided which produces stable operation of a conventional helium ionization detector while providing improved sensitivity and linearity. Stability is improved by applying pulsed dc supply voltage across the ionization detector, thereby modifying the sampling of the detectors output current. A unique pulse generator is used to supply pulsed dc to the detector which has variable width and interval adjust features that allows up to 500 V to be applied in pulse widths ranging from about 150 nsec to about dc conditions.

  19. Potential nephrotoxic effects produced by steroidal saponins from hydro alcoholic extract of Tribulus terrestris in STZ-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Sonia; Srinivasan, B P; Akarte, Atul S

    2013-09-01

    Chronic hyperglycemia leads to the development of microvascular complications like diabetic nephropathy. The present study investigated the potential effects of the hydroalcoholic extract of Tribulus terrestris, a plant of Zygophyllaceae family, on the renal complications in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Diabetes was induced by administering STZ (90 mg/kg) to the 2-days old neonates. After 6 weeks of induction, diabetic rats were treated with 50 mg/kg hydroalcoholic extract of T. terrestris for 8 weeks. The anti-hyperglycaemic nature was confirmed by reduction in blood glucose and improvement in insulin levels. Diabetic renal injury associated with decrease in total proteins and albumin levels was observed to be improved by T. terrestris extract. Glomerular filtration rate along with inflammatory and growth factors, adiponectin and erythropoietin were also improved by the treatment, though the findings were not significant. However, the beneficial antidiabetic effects of T. terrestris extract in plasma were not observed in kidney histopathology. This was confirmed by the quantitative estimation of unhydrolyzed fraction of saponins (major component: protodioscin) in plasma and kidney samples of normal and diabetic rats. Hence, it can be concluded that 8 weeks treatment with T. terrestris extract produces potential toxic effects in kidney, which are independent of its anti-diabetic action. PMID:23594260

  20. Complete genome sequence of Lactobacillus plantarum LZ227, a potential probiotic strain producing B-group vitamins.

    PubMed

    Li, Ping; Zhou, Qingqing; Gu, Qing

    2016-09-20

    B-group vitamins play an important role in human metabolism, whose deficiencies are associated with a variety of disorders and diseases. Certain microorganisms such as Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have been shown to have capacities for B-group vitamin production and thus could potentially replace chemically synthesized vitamins for food fortification. A potential probiotic strain named Lactobacillus plantarum LZ227, which was isolated from raw cow milk in this study, exhibits the ability to produce B-group vitamins. Complete genome sequencing of LZ227 was performed to gain insights into the genetic elements involved in B-group vitamin production. The genome of LZ227 contains a circular 3,131,750-bp chromosome, three circular plasmids and two predicted linear plasmids. LZ227 also contains gene clusters for biosynthesis of both riboflavin and folate. This genome sequence provides a basis for further elucidation of its molecular genetics and probiotic functions, and will facilitate its applications as starter cultures in food industry. PMID:27480344

  1. Ionization Thresholds of Small Carbon Clusters: Tunable VUVExperiments and Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Belau, Leonid; Wheeler, Steven E.; Ticknor, Brian W.; Ahmed,Musahid; Leone, Stephen R.; Allen, Wesley D.; Schaefer III, Henry F.; Duncan, Michael A.

    2007-07-31

    Small carbon clusters (Cn, n = 2-15) are produced in amolecular beam by pulsed laser vaporization and studied with vacuumultraviolet (VUV) photoionization mass spectrometry. The required VUVradiation in the 8-12 eV range is provided by the Advanced Light Source(ALS) at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Mass spectra atvarious ionization energies reveal the qualitative relative abundances ofthe neutral carbon clusters produced. By far the most abundant species isC3. Using the tunability of the ALS, ionization threshold spectra arerecorded for the clusters up to 15 atoms in size. The ionizationthresholds are compared to those measured previously with charge-transferbracketing methods. To interpret the ionization thresholds for differentcluster sizes, new ab initio calculations are carried out on the clustersfor n = 4-10. Geometric structures are optimized at the CCSD(T) levelwith cc-pVTZ (or cc-pVDZ) basis sets, and focal point extrapolations areapplied to both neutral and cation species to determine adiabatic andvertical ionization potentials. The comparison of computed and measuredionization potentials makes it possible to investigate the isomericstructures of the neutral clusters produced in this experiment. Themeasurements are inconclusive for the n = 4-6 species because ofunquenched excited electronic states. However, the data provide evidencefor the prominence of linear structures for the n = 7, 9, 11, 13 speciesand the presence of cyclic C10.

  2. Design and Prototyping of an Ionization Profile Monitor for the SNS Accumulator Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Bartkoski, Dirk A; Deibele, Craig E; Polsky, Yarom

    2014-12-01

    An ionization profile monitor (IPM) has been designed for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accumulator ring. Utilizing ionized electrons produced by beam-gas ionization, the SNS IPM uses a 120 kV bias potential to overcome beam space charge and accelerate electrons towards a movable particle detector. A 300 G magnetic field is used to confine the transverse electron motion, resulting in profile errors at the estimated 7% level. With a system bandwidth of 17.5 MHz. The SNS IPM is capable of measuring turn-by-turn beam profiles for a fully accumulated beam. This paper presents a description of the system and design.

  3. Equilibrium and highly nonequilibrium states of condensed matter (Scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 21 April 2008): Radiation-dynamic effects. Potential for producing condensed media with unique properties and structural states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovchinnikov, V. V.; Murtazaev, A. K.; Khazanov, E. A.; Sergeev, A. M.

    2008-09-01

    On 21 April 2008, a scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences was held at the conference room of the Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS. The following talks were presented: (1) Ovchinnikov V V (Institute of Electrophysics, RAS (UB), Ekaterinburg) "Radiation-dynamic effects. Potential for producing condensed media with unique properties and structural states"; (2) Garnov S V (Prokhorov General Physics Institute, RAS, Moscow) "Femtosecond laser plasma of multiply ionized gases"; (3) Murtazaev A K (Institute of Physics, Dagestan Scientific Center, RAS, Dagestan State University, Makhachkala) "Critical properties of frustrated spin systems on a stacked triangular lattice"; (4) Khazanov E A and Sergeev A M (Institute of Applied Physics, RAS, Nizhnii Novgorod) "Petawatt lasers based on optical parametric amplifiers: their state and prospects". Summaries of talks 1, 3, and 4 are given below. • Radiation-dynamic effects. Potential for producing condensed media with unique properties and structural states, V V Ovchinnikov Physics-Uspekhi, 2008, Volume 51, Number 9, Pages 955-964 • Critical properties of frustrated spin systems on a stacked triangular lattice, A K Murtazaev Physics-Uspekhi, 2008, Volume 51, Number 9, Pages 965-969 • Petawatt lasers based on optical parametric amplifiers: their state and prospects, E A Khazanov and A M Sergeev Physics-Uspekhi, 2008, Volume 51, Number 9, Pages 969-974

  4. Hybrid hydrogels produced by ionizing radiation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, M. J. A.; Amato, V. S.; Lugão, A. B.; Parra, D. F.

    2012-09-01

    The interest in biocompatible hydrogels with particular properties has increased considerably in recent years due to their versatile applications in biomedicine, biotechnology, pharmacy, agriculture and controlled release of drugs. The use of hydrogels matrices for particular drug-release applications has been investigated with the synthesis of modified polymeric hydrogel of PVAl and 0.5, 1.0, 1.5% nano-clay. They were processed using gamma radiation from Cobalt-60 source at 25 kGy dose. The characterization of the hydrogels was conducted and toxicity was evaluated. The dried hydrogel was analyzed for thermogravimetry analysis (TGA), infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and swelling in solutions of different pH. The membranes have no toxicity. The nano-clay influences directly the equilibrium swelling.

  5. Trophic transfer potential of aluminium oxide nanoparticles using representative primary producer (Chlorella ellipsoides) and a primary consumer (Ceriodaphnia dubia).

    PubMed

    Pakrashi, Sunandan; Dalai, Swayamprava; Chandrasekaran, Natarajan; Mukherjee, Amitava

    2014-07-01

    The transfer of nanoparticles through the food chain can lead to bioaccumulation and biomagnification resulting in a long term negative impact on the ecosystem functions. The primary objective of this study was evaluation of aluminium oxide nanoparticles transfer from primary producers to primary consumers. A simple set up consisting of a primary producer (Chlorella ellipsoides) and a primary consumer (Ceriodaphnia dubia) was used. Here, C. ellipsoides were exposed to the varying concentrations of the nanoparticles ranging from 20 to 120μg/mL (196 to 1176μM) for 48h and the infested algal cells were used as the feed to C. dubia. The bioaccumulation of the nanoparticles into the daphnids was noted and the biomagnification factors were computed. The exposure was noted to cause subtle alterations in the feeding behaviour of the daphnids. This might have long term consequences in the energy flow through the food chain. The reproductive behaviour of the daphnids remained unaffected upon exposure to nanoparticle infested algal feed. Distinct observations at ultra-structural scale using transmission electron microscopy provided visual evidences for the disrupted feeding behaviour upon exposure to nanoparticle treated algae. Internalization of nanoparticle like inclusion bodies in the intracellular space of algae was also detected. The findings were further substantiated by a detailed analysis of hydrodynamic stability, bioavailability and dissolution of ions from the nanoparticles over the exposure period. Altogether, the study brings out the first of its kind of observation of trophic transfer potential/behaviour of aluminium oxide nanoparticles and its probable impacts on the energy flow in the fresh water aquatic ecosystem. PMID:24736130

  6. Establishment of quantitative PCR methods for the quantification of geosmin-producing potential and Anabaena sp. in freshwater systems.

    PubMed

    Su, Ming; Gaget, Virginie; Giglio, Steven; Burch, Michael; An, Wei; Yang, Min

    2013-06-15

    Geosmin has often been associated with off-flavor problems in drinking water with Anabaena sp. as the major producer. Rapid on-site detection of geosmin-producers as well as geosmin is important for a timely management response to potential off-flavor events. In this study, quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) methods were developed to detect the levels of Anabaena sp. and geosmin, respectively, by designing two PCR primer sets to quantify the rpoC1 gene (ARG) and geosmin synthase one (GSG) in Anabaena sp. in freshwater systems. The ARG density determined by qPCR assay is highly related to microscopic cell count (r(2) = 0.726, p < 0.001), and the limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) of the qPCR method were 0.02 pg and 0.2 pg of DNA, respectively. At the same time, the relationship between geosmin concentrations measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and GSG copies was also established (r(2) = 0.742, p < 0.001) with similar LOD and LOQ values. Using the two qPCR protocols, we succeeded in measuring different levels of ARG and GSG copies in different freshwater systems with high incidence environmental substrata and diverse ecological conditions, showing that the methods developed could be applied for environmental monitoring. Moreover, comparing to the microscopic count and GC-MS analytical methods, the qPCR methods can reduce the time-to-results from several days to a few hours and require considerably less traditional algal identification and taxonomic expertise. PMID:23622984

  7. Antibacterial activity and genotypic-phenotypic characteristics of bacteriocin-producing Bacillus subtilis KKU213: potential as a probiotic strain.

    PubMed

    Khochamit, Nalisa; Siripornadulsil, Surasak; Sukon, Peerapol; Siripornadulsil, Wilailak

    2015-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity and probiotic properties of Bacillus subtilis strain KKU213, isolated from local soil, were investigated. The cell-free supernatant (CFS) of a KKU213 culture containing crude bacteriocins exhibited inhibitory effects on Gram-positive bacteria, including Bacillus cereus, Listeria monocytogenes, Micrococcus luteus, and Staphylococcus aureus. The antibacterial activity of the CFS precipitated with 40% ammonium sulfate (AS) remained even after treatment at 60 and 100 °C, at pH 4 and 10 and with proteolytic enzymes, detergents and heavy metals. When analyzed by SDS-PAGE and overlaid with the indicator strains B. cereus and S. aureus, the 40% AS precipitate exhibited inhibitory activity on proteins smaller than 10 kDa. However, proteins larger than 25 kDa and smaller than 10 kDa were still observed on a native protein gel. Purified subtilosin A was prepared by Amberlite XAD-16 bead extraction and HPLC and analyzed by Nano-LC-QTOF-MS. Its molecular mass was found to be 3.4 kDa, and it retained its antibacterial activity. These results are consistent with the detection of the anti-listerial subtilosin A gene of the sbo/alb cluster in the KKU213 strain, which is 100% identical to that of B. subtilis subsp. subtilis 168. In addition to stable and cyclic subtilosin A, a mixture of many extracellular antibacterial peptides was also detected in the KKU213 culture. The KKU213 strain produced extracellular amylase, cellulase, lipase and protease, is highly acid-resistant (pH 2) when cultured in inulin and promotes health and reduces infection of intestinally colonized broiler chickens. Therefore, we propose that bacteriocin-producing B. subtilis KKU213 could be used as a potential probiotic strain or protective culture. PMID:25440998

  8. Phylogenomic approaches to determine the zoonotic potential of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) isolated from Zambian dairy cattle

    PubMed Central

    Mainda, Geoffrey; Lupolova, Nadejda; Sikakwa, Linda; Bessell, Paul R.; Muma, John B.; Hoyle, Deborah V.; McAteer, Sean P.; Gibbs, Kirsty; Williams, Nicola J.; Sheppard, Samuel K.; La Ragione, Roberto M.; Cordoni, Guido; Argyle, Sally A.; Wagner, Sam; Chase-Topping, Margo E.; Dallman, Timothy J.; Stevens, Mark P.; Bronsvoort, Barend M. deC.; Gally, David L.

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed the prevalence and zoonotic potential of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) sampled from 104 dairy units in the central region of Zambia and compared these with isolates from patients presenting with diarrhoea in the same region. A subset of 297 E. coli strains were sequenced allowing in silico analyses of phylo- and sero-groups. The majority of the bovine strains clustered in the B1 ‘commensal’ phylogroup (67%) and included a diverse array of serogroups. 11% (41/371) of the isolates from Zambian dairy cattle contained Shiga toxin genes (stx) while none (0/73) of the human isolates were positive. While the toxicity of a subset of these isolates was demonstrated, none of the randomly selected STEC belonged to key serogroups associated with human disease and none encoded a type 3 secretion system synonymous with typical enterohaemorrhagic strains. Positive selection for E. coli O157:H7 across the farms identified only one positive isolate again indicating this serotype is rare in these animals. In summary, while Stx-encoding E. coli strains are common in this dairy population, the majority of these strains are unlikely to cause disease in humans. However, the threat remains of the emergence of strains virulent to humans from this reservoir. PMID:27220895

  9. Potential for producing oil and gas from Woodford Shale (Devonian-Mississippian) in the southern Mid-Continent, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Comer, J.B. )

    1991-03-01

    Woodford Shale is a prolific oil source rock throughout the southern Mid-Continent of the US. Extrapolation of thickness and organic geochemical data based on the analysis of 614 samples from the region indicate that on the order of 100 {times} 10{sup 9} bbl of oil (300 {times} 10{sup 12} ft {sup 3} of natural gas equivalent). Tapping this resource is most feasible in areas where the Woodford subcrop contains competent lithofacies (e.g., chert, sandstone, siltstone, dolostone) and is high fractured. Horizontal drilling may provide the optimum exploitation technique. Areas with the greatest potential and the most prospective lithologies include (1) the Nemaha uplift (chert, sandstone, dolostone), (2) Marietta-Ardmore basin (chert), (3) southern flank of the Anadarko basin along the Wichita Mountain uplift (chert), (4) frontal zone of the Ouachita tectonic belt in Oklahoma (chert), and (5) the Central Basin platform in west Texas and New Mexico (chert and siltstone). In virtually all of these areas the Woodford is in the oil or gas window. Thus, fracture porosity would be continuously fed by hydrocarbons generated in the enclosing source rocks. Reservoir systems such as these have typically produced at low to moderate flow rates for many decades.

  10. Potential for producing oil and gas from the Woodford Shale (Devonian-Mississippian) in the southern mid-continent, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Comer, J.B. )

    1992-04-01

    The Woodford Shale is a prolific oil source rock throughout the southern mid-continent of the United States. Extrapolation of thickness and organic geochemical data based on the analysis of 614 samples from the region indicate that on the order of 100 {times} 10{sup 9} bbl of oil (300 {times} 10{sup 12} ft{sup 3} of natural gas equivalent) reside in the Woodford in Oklahoma and northwestern Arkansas. The Woodford in west Texas and southeastern New Mexico contains on the order of 80 {times} 10{sup 9} bbl of oil (240 {times} 10{sup 12} ft{sup 3} of natural gas equivalent). Tapping this resource is most feasible in areas where the Woodford subcrop contains competent lithofacies (e.g., chert, sandstone, siltstone, dolostone) and is highly fractured. Horizontal drilling may provide the optimum exploitation technique. Areas with the greatest potential and the most prospective lithologies include (1) the Nemaha uplift (chert, sandstone, dolostone), (2) Marietta-Ardmore basin (chert), (3) southern flank of the Anadarko basin along the Wichita Mountain uplift (chert), (4) frontal zone of the Ouachita tectonic belt in Oklahoma (chert), and (5) the Central Basin platform in west Texas and New Mexico (chert and siltstone). In virtually all of these areas, the Woodford is in the oil or gas window. Thus, fracture porosity would be continuously fed by hydrocarbons generated in the enclosing source rocks. Reservoir systems such as these typically have produced at low to moderate flow rates for many decades.

  11. An assessment of the potential of drylands in eight sub-Saharan African countries to produce bioenergy feedstocks.

    PubMed

    Watson, H K; Diaz-Chavez, R A

    2011-04-01

    This paper synthesizes lessons learnt from research that aimed to identify land in the dryland regions of eight sub-Saharan African study countries where bioenergy feedstocks production has a low risk of detrimental environmental and socio-economic effects. The methodology involved using geographical information systems (GISs) to interrogate a wide range of datasets, aerial photograph and field verification, an extensive literature review, and obtaining information from a wide range of stakeholders. The GIS work revealed that Africa's drylands potentially have substantial areas available and agriculturally suitable for bioenergy feedstocks production. The other work showed that land-use and biomass dynamics in Africa's drylands are greatly influenced by the inherent 'disequilibrium' behaviour of these environments. This behaviour challenges the sustainability concept and perceptions regarding the drivers, nature and consequences of deforestation, land degradation and other factors. An assessment of the implications of this behaviour formed the basis for the practical guidance suggested for bioenergy feedstock producers and bioenergy policy makers. PMID:22482033

  12. Isolation of potential probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains from traditional fermented mare milk produced in Sumbawa Island of Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Shi, Tala; Nishiyama, Keita; Nakamata, Koichi; Aryantini, Ni Putu Desy; Mikumo, Dai; Oda, Yuji; Yamamoto, Yuji; Mukai, Takao; Sujaya, I Nengah; Urashima, Tadasu; Fukuda, Kenji

    2012-01-01

    To explore potential probiotics in the traditional foods of Indonesia, fermented mare milk produced in Sumbawa Island was investigated in this study. Gram stain, catalase activity, gas production, cell morphology, carbohydrate utilization pattern, and 16S rDNA sequencing were performed to identify isolated lactic acid bacteria. To assess their probiotic ability, tolerance of low pH, bile salts, artificial gastrointestinal fluids, and adhesion properties to extracellular matrices, were examined. In total 27 strains, 25 Lactobacillus rhamnosus and two Lactobacillus fermentum, were obtained. Among the isolated lactobacilli, three Lb. rhamnosus strains, FSMM15, FSMM22, and FSMM26, were selected as candidates for probiotics, using Lb. rhamnosus GG as index. In vitro binding assay of the three strains against several extracellular matrix proteins revealed that FSMM15 and FSMM26 gave greater binding ratios of mucin/bovine serum albumin (BSA) and significantly higher adhesive abilities to fibronectin than Lb. rhamnosus GG. FSMM22 showed significantly higher adhesion to laminin than Lb. rhamnosus GG. PMID:23047104

  13. High Protein- and High Lipid-Producing Microalgae from Northern Australia as Potential Feedstock for Animal Feed and Biodiesel

    PubMed Central

    Duong, Van Thang; Ahmed, Faruq; Thomas-Hall, Skye R.; Quigley, Simon; Nowak, Ekaterina; Schenk, Peer M.

    2015-01-01

    Microalgal biomass can be used for biodiesel, feed, and food production. Collection and identification of local microalgal strains in the Northern Territory, Australia was conducted to identify strains with high protein and lipid contents as potential feedstock for animal feed and biodiesel production, respectively. A total of 36 strains were isolated from 13 samples collected from a variety of freshwater locations, such as dams, ponds, and streams and subsequently classified by 18S rDNA sequencing. All of the strains were green microalgae and predominantly belong to Chlorella sp., Scenedesmus sp., Desmodesmus sp., Chlamydomonas sp., Pseudomuriella sp., Tetraedron caudatum, Graesiella emersonii, and Mychonastes timauensis. Among the fastest growing strains, Scenedesmus sp. NT1d possessed the highest content of protein; reaching up to 33% of its dry weight. In terms of lipid production, Chlorella sp. NT8a and Scenedesmus dimorphus NT8e produced the highest triglyceride contents of 116.9 and 99.13 μg mL−1 culture, respectively, as measured by gas chromatography–mass spectroscopy of fatty acid methyl esters. These strains may present suitable candidates for biodiesel production after further optimization of culturing conditions, while their protein-rich biomass could be used for animal feed. PMID:26042215

  14. Phylogenomic approaches to determine the zoonotic potential of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) isolated from Zambian dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Mainda, Geoffrey; Lupolova, Nadejda; Sikakwa, Linda; Bessell, Paul R; Muma, John B; Hoyle, Deborah V; McAteer, Sean P; Gibbs, Kirsty; Williams, Nicola J; Sheppard, Samuel K; La Ragione, Roberto M; Cordoni, Guido; Argyle, Sally A; Wagner, Sam; Chase-Topping, Margo E; Dallman, Timothy J; Stevens, Mark P; Bronsvoort, Barend M deC; Gally, David L

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed the prevalence and zoonotic potential of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) sampled from 104 dairy units in the central region of Zambia and compared these with isolates from patients presenting with diarrhoea in the same region. A subset of 297 E. coli strains were sequenced allowing in silico analyses of phylo- and sero-groups. The majority of the bovine strains clustered in the B1 'commensal' phylogroup (67%) and included a diverse array of serogroups. 11% (41/371) of the isolates from Zambian dairy cattle contained Shiga toxin genes (stx) while none (0/73) of the human isolates were positive. While the toxicity of a subset of these isolates was demonstrated, none of the randomly selected STEC belonged to key serogroups associated with human disease and none encoded a type 3 secretion system synonymous with typical enterohaemorrhagic strains. Positive selection for E. coli O157:H7 across the farms identified only one positive isolate again indicating this serotype is rare in these animals. In summary, while Stx-encoding E. coli strains are common in this dairy population, the majority of these strains are unlikely to cause disease in humans. However, the threat remains of the emergence of strains virulent to humans from this reservoir. PMID:27220895

  15. Microbial lipid produced by Yarrowia lipolytica QU21 using industrial waste: a potential feedstock for biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Poli, Jandora Severo; da Silva, Mirra Angelina Neres; Siqueira, Ezequias P; Pasa, Vânya M D; Rosa, Carlos Augusto; Valente, Patricia

    2014-06-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of medium composition and culture conditions on lipid content, fatty acid profile and biomass production by the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica QU21. Lipid production by the yeast growing on glycerol/(NH4)2SO4 (10%/0.1%) reached 1.48g/L (30.1% according to total cell dry weight). When glycerol was replaced by crude glycerol (industrial waste), the lipid yield was 1.27g/L, with no significant difference. Some particular fatty acids were found when crude glycerol was combined with fresh yeast extract (FYE, brewery waste), as linolenic acid (C18:3n3), eicosadienoic acid (C20:2), eicosatrienoic acid (C20:3n3) and eicosapentaenoic acid (C20:5n3). In addition, the FYE promoted an increase of more than 300% on polyunsaturated fatty acid content (PUFA), which is an undesirable feature for biodiesel production. The fatty acid composition of the oil produced by Y. lipolytica QU21 growing on crude glycerol/(NH4)2SO4 presented a potential use as biodiesel feedstock, with low PUFA content. PMID:24727354

  16. An assessment of the potential of drylands in eight sub-Saharan African countries to produce bioenergy feedstocks

    PubMed Central

    Watson, H. K.; Diaz-Chavez, R. A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper synthesizes lessons learnt from research that aimed to identify land in the dryland regions of eight sub-Saharan African study countries where bioenergy feedstocks production has a low risk of detrimental environmental and socio-economic effects. The methodology involved using geographical information systems (GISs) to interrogate a wide range of datasets, aerial photograph and field verification, an extensive literature review, and obtaining information from a wide range of stakeholders. The GIS work revealed that Africa's drylands potentially have substantial areas available and agriculturally suitable for bioenergy feedstocks production. The other work showed that land-use and biomass dynamics in Africa's drylands are greatly influenced by the inherent ‘disequilibrium’ behaviour of these environments. This behaviour challenges the sustainability concept and perceptions regarding the drivers, nature and consequences of deforestation, land degradation and other factors. An assessment of the implications of this behaviour formed the basis for the practical guidance suggested for bioenergy feedstock producers and bioenergy policy makers. PMID:22482033

  17. Microwave remote sensing of ionized air.

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, S.; Gopalsami, N.; Heifetz, A.; Elmer, T.; Fiflis, P.; Koehl, E. R.; Chien, H. T.; Raptis, A. C.

    2011-07-01

    We present observations of microwave scattering from ambient room air ionized with a negative ion generator. The frequency dependence of the radar cross section of ionized air was measured from 26.5 to 40 GHz (Ka-band) in a bistatic mode with an Agilent PNA-X series (model N5245A) vector network analyzer. A detailed calibration scheme is provided to minimize the effect of the stray background field and system frequency response on the target reflection. The feasibility of detecting the microwave reflection from ionized air portends many potential applications such as remote sensing of atmospheric ionization and remote detection of radioactive ionization of air.

  18. Ultraviolet femtosecond laser ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Imasaka, Totaro

    2008-01-01

    For this study, multiphoton ionization/mass spectrometry using an ultraviolet (UV) femtosecond laser was employed for the trace analysis of organic compounds. Some of the molecules, such as dioxins, contain several chlorine atoms and have short excited-state lifetimes due to a "heavy atom" effect. A UV femtosecond laser is, then, useful for efficient resonance excitation and subsequent ionization. A technique of multiphoton ionization using an extremely short laser pulse (e.g., <10 fs), referred to as "impulsive ionization," may have a potential for use in fragmentation-free ionization, thus providing information on molecular weight in mass spectrometry. PMID:18302290

  19. Anion formation in sputter ion sources by neutral resonant ionization.

    PubMed

    Vogel, J S

    2016-02-01

    Focused Cs(+) beams in sputter ion sources create mm-diameter pits supporting small plasmas that control anionization efficiencies. Sputtering produces overwhelmingly neutral products that the plasma can ionize as in a charge-change vapor. Electron capture between neutral atoms rises as the inverse square of the difference between the ionization potential of the Cs state and the electron affinity of the sputtered atom, allowing resonant ionization at very low energies. A plasma collision-radiation model followed electronic excitation up to Cs(7d). High modeled Cs(7d) in a 0.5 mm recess explains the 80 μA/mm(2) C(-) current density compared to the 20 μA/mm(2) from a 1 mm recess. PMID:26931912

  20. Anion formation in sputter ion sources by neutral resonant ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, J. S.

    2016-02-01

    Focused Cs+ beams in sputter ion sources create mm-diameter pits supporting small plasmas that control anionization efficiencies. Sputtering produces overwhelmingly neutral products that the plasma can ionize as in a charge-change vapor. Electron capture between neutral atoms rises as the inverse square of the difference between the ionization potential of the Cs state and the electron affinity of the sputtered atom, allowing resonant ionization at very low energies. A plasma collision-radiation model followed electronic excitation up to Cs(7d). High modeled Cs(7d) in a 0.5 mm recess explains the 80 μA/mm2 C- current density compared to the 20 μA/mm2 from a 1 mm recess.

  1. Note: Discharging fused silica test masses with ionized nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugolini, D.; Funk, Q.; Amen, T.

    2011-04-01

    We have developed a technique for discharging fused silica test masses in a gravitational-wave interferometer with nitrogen ionized by an electron beam. The electrons are produced from a heated filament by thermionic emission in a low-pressure region to avoid contamination and burnout. Some electrons then pass through a small aperture and ionize nitrogen in a higher-pressure region, and this ionized gas is pumped across the test mass surface, neutralizing both polarities of charge. The discharge rate varies exponentially with charge density and filament current, quadratically with filament potential, and has an optimal working pressure of ˜8 mT. Adapting the technique to larger test mass chambers is also discussed.

  2. Polarization phenomena in multiphoton ionization of atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, V. L.

    1973-01-01

    The theory of multiphoton ionization for an atomic system of arbitrary complexity is developed using a density matrix formalism. An expression is obtained which determines the differential N-photon ionization cross section as a function of the polarization states of the target atom and the incident radiation. The parameters which characterize the photoelectron angular distribution are related to the general reduced matrix elements for the N-photon transition. Two-photon ionization of unpolarized atoms is treated as an illustration of the use of the theory. The dependence of the multiphoton ionization cross section on the polarization state of the incident radiation, which has been observed in two- and three-photon ionization of Cs, is accounted for by the theory. Finally, the photoelectron spin polarization produced by the multiphoton ionization of unpolarized atoms, like the analogous polarization resulting from single-photon ionization, is found to depend on the circular polarization of the incident radiation.

  3. Measuring Ionization at Extreme Densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, Dominik; Doeppner, Tilo; Kritcher, Andrea; Bachmann, Benjamin; Fletcher, Luke; Falcone, Roger; Gericke, Dirk; Glenzer, Siegfried; Masters, Nathan; Nora, Ryan; Boehm, Kurt; Divol, Laurent; Landen, Otto; Yi, Austin; Kline, John; Redmer, Ronald; Neumayer, Paul

    2015-11-01

    A precise knowledge of ionization at given temperature and density is crucial in order to properly model compressibility and heat capacity of ICF ablator materials for efficient implosions producing energy gain. Here, we present a new experimental platform to perform spectrally resolved x-ray scattering measurements of ionization, density and temperature in imploding CH or beryllium capsules on the National Ignition Facility. Recording scattered x-rays at 9 keV from a zinc He-alpha plasma source at a scattering angle of 120 degrees, first experiments show strong sensitivity to k-shell ionization, while at the same time constraining density and temperature. This platform will allow for x-ray Thomson scattering studies of dense plasmas with free electron densities up to 1025 cm-3, giving the possibility to investigate effects of continuum lowering and Pauli blocking on the ablator ionization state right before stagnation of the implosion.

  4. An assessment of potential environmental impacts of cement kiln dust produced in kilns co-fired with hazardous waste fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Goad, P.T.; Millner, G.C.; Nye, A.C.

    1998-12-31

    The Keystone Cement Company (Keystone), located in Bath, Pennsylvania, produces cement in two kilns that are co-fired with hazardous waste-derived fuels. Beginning in the late 1970`s Keystone began storing cement kiln dust (CKD) in an aboveground storage pile located on company property adjacent to the cement kilns. Storm water runoff from the CKD pile is channeled into a storm water settling pond which in turn discharges into Monocacy Creek, a stream running along the eastern property boundary. Monocacy Creek sustains a thriving trout fishery and is routinely fished during the open recreational fishing season in pennsylvania. The CKD pile has a surface area of approximately 12 acres, with an average height of approximately 35 feet. The southern edge of the pile is contiguous with an adjacent company-owned field in which field corn is grown for cattle feed. Some of the corn on the edges of the field is actually grown in direct contact with CKD that comprises the edge of the storage pile. The CKD pile is located approximately 150 yards to the west of Monocacy Creek. In 1995--1996 water, sediment and fish (trout) samples were obtained from Monocacy Creek sampling stations upstream and downstream of the point of discharge of storm water runoff from the CKD pile. In addition, corn samples were obtained from the field contiguous with the CKD pile and from a control field located distant to the site. The sediment, water, fish, and corn samples were analyzed for various chemicals previously identified as chemicals of potential concern in CKD. These data indicate that chemical constituents of CKD are not contaminating surface water or sediment in the stream, and that bioaccumulation of organic chemicals and/or metals has not occurred in field corn grown in direct contact with undiluted CKD, or in fish living in the waters that receive CKD pile runoff.

  5. A comparative study on the potential of epiphytic yeasts isolated from tropical fruits to produce flavoring compounds.

    PubMed

    Grondin, Eric; Shum Cheong Sing, Alain; Caro, Yanis; Raherimandimby, Marson; Randrianierenana, Ando Lalaniaina; James, Steve; Nueno-Palop, Carmen; François, Jean Marie; Petit, Thomas

    2015-06-16

    In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in identifying and characterizing the yeast flora associated with diverse types of habitat because of the many potential desirable technological properties of these microorganisms, especially in food applications. In this study, a total of 101 yeast strains were isolated from the skins of tropical fruits collected in several locations in the South West Indian Ocean. Sequence analysis of the D1/D2 domains of the large subunit (LSU) ribosomal RNA gene identified 26 different species. Among them, two species isolated from the skins of Cape gooseberry and cocoa beans appeared to represent putative new yeast species, as their LSU D1/D2 sequence was only 97.1% and 97.4% identical to that of the yeasts Rhodotorula mucilaginosa and Candida pararugosa, respectively. A total of 52 Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) were detected by Head Space Solid Phase Micro Extraction coupled to Gas Chromatography and Mass Spectroscopy (HS-SPME-GC/MS) from the 26 yeast species cultivated on a glucose rich medium. Among these VOCs, 6 uncommon compounds were identified, namely ethyl but-2-enoate, ethyl 2-methylbut-2-enoate (ethyl tiglate), ethyl 3-methylbut-2-enoate, 2-methylpropyl 2-methylbut-2-enoate, butyl 2-methylbut-2-enoate and 3-methylbutyl 2-methylbut-2-enoate, making them possible yeast species-specific markers. In addition, statistical methods such as Principal Component Analysis allowed to associate each yeast species with a specific flavor profile. Among them, Saprochaete suaveolens (syn: Geotrichum fragrans) turned to be the best producer of flavor compounds, with a total of 32 out of the 52 identified VOCs in its flavor profile. PMID:25802220

  6. Stx-Producing Shigella Species From Patients in Haiti: An Emerging Pathogen With the Potential for Global Spread

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Miranda D.; Leonard, Susan R.; Lacher, David W.; Lampel, Keith A.; Alam, Meer T.; Morris, J. Glenn; Ali, Afsar; LaBreck, Patrick T.; Maurelli, Anthony T.

    2015-01-01

    Shiga toxins (Stx) are commonly produced by Shigella dysenteriae serotype 1 and Stx-producing Escherichia coli. However, the toxin genes have been detected in additional Shigella species. We recently reported the emergence of Stx-producing Shigella in travelers in the United States and France who had recently visited Hispaniola (Haiti and the Dominican Republic). In this study, we confirm this epidemiological link by identifying Stx-producing Shigella from Haitian patients attending clinics near Port-au-Prince. We also demonstrate that the bacteriophage encoding Stx is capable of dissemination to stx-negative Shigella species found in Haiti, suggesting that Stx-producing Shigella may become more widespread within that region. PMID:26484357

  7. Assessment of Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli Isolates from Wildlife Meat as Potential Pathogens for Humans▿

    PubMed Central

    Miko, Angelika; Pries, Karin; Haby, Sabine; Steege, Katja; Albrecht, Nadine; Krause, Gladys; Beutin, Lothar

    2009-01-01

    A total of 140 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains from wildlife meat (deer, wild boar, and hare) isolated in Germany between 1998 and 2006 were characterized with respect to their serotypes and virulence markers associated with human pathogenicity. The strains grouped into 38 serotypes, but eight O groups (21, 146, 128, 113, 22, 88, 6, and 91) and four H types (21, 28, 2, and 8) accounted for 71.4% and 75.7% of all STEC strains from game, respectively. Eighteen of the serotypes, including enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) O26:[H11] and O103:H2, were previously found to be associated with human illness. Genes linked to high-level virulence for humans (stx2, stx2d, and eae) were present in 46 (32.8%) STEC strains from game. Fifty-four STEC isolates from game belonged to serotypes which are frequently found in human patients (O103:H2, O26:H11, O113:H21, O91:H21, O128:H2, O146:H21, and O146:H28). These 54 STEC isolates were compared with 101 STEC isolates belonging to the same serotypes isolated from farm animals, from their food products, and from human patients. Within a given serotype, most STEC strains were similar with respect to their stx genotypes and other virulence attributes, regardless of origin. The 155 STEC strains were analyzed for genetic similarity by XbaI pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. O103:H2, O26:H11, O113:H21, O128:H2, and O146:H28 STEC isolates from game were 85 to 100% similar to STEC isolates of the same strains from human patients. By multilocus sequence typing, game EHEC O103:H2 strains were attributed to a clonal lineage associated with hemorrhagic diseases in humans. The results from our study indicate that game animals represent a reservoir for and a potential source of human pathogenic STEC and EHEC strains. PMID:19700552

  8. Weakly ionized cosmic gas: Ionization and characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberg, M.; Mendis, D. A.; Chow, V. W.

    1994-01-01

    Since collective plasma behavior may determine important transport processes (e.g., plasma diffusion across a magnetic field) in certain cosmic environments, it is important to delineate the parameter space in which weakly ionized cosmic gases may be characterized as plasmas. In this short note, we do so. First, we use values for the ionization fraction given in the literature, wherein the ionization is generally assumed to be due primarily to ionization by cosmic rays. We also discuss an additional mechanism for ionization in such environments, namely, the photoelectric emission of electrons from cosmic dust grains in an interstellar Far Ultra Violet (FUV) radiation field. Simple estimates suggest that under certain conditions this mechanism may dominate cosmic ray ionization, and possibly also the photoionization of metal atoms by the interstellar FUV field, and thereby lead to an enhanced ionization level.

  9. Multiple ionization of xenon by proton impact

    SciTech Connect

    Manson, S.T.; DuBois, R.D.

    1987-12-01

    An experimental and theoretical study of multiple ionization of xenon for 0.2- to 2.0-MeV proton impact was made. Absolute cross sections for producing xenon ions with charges from +1 to +3 were measured, and calculations of subshell cross sections were performed. Experiment and theory are consistent and indicate that multiple ionization of xenon by fast protons occurs via inner-shell ionization. This is in contrast to the lighter noble gases where direct multiple outer shell ionization can be predominant.

  10. Potential of atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source in gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry for the screening of urinary exogenous androgenic anabolic steroids.

    PubMed

    Raro, M; Portolés, T; Pitarch, E; Sancho, J V; Hernández, F; Garrostas, L; Marcos, J; Ventura, R; Segura, J; Pozo, O J

    2016-02-01

    The atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) source for gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis has been evaluated for the screening of 16 exogenous androgenic anabolic steroids (AAS) in urine. The sample treatment is based on the strategy currently applied in doping control laboratories i.e. enzymatic hydrolysis, liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) and derivatization to form the trimethylsilyl ether-trimethylsilyl enol ether (TMS) derivatives. These TMS derivatives are then analyzed by gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry using a triple quadrupole instrument (GC-QqQ MS/MS) under selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode. The APCI promotes soft ionization with very little fragmentation resulting, in most cases, in abundant [M + H](+) or [M + H-2TMSOH](+) ions, which can be chosen as precursor ions for the SRM transitions, improving in this way the selectivity and sensitivity of the method. Specificity of the transitions is also of great relevance, as the presence of endogenous compounds can affect the measurements when using the most abundant ions. The method has been qualitatively validated by spiking six different urine samples at two concentration levels each. Precision was generally satisfactory with RSD values below 25 and 15% at the low and high concentration level, respectively. Most the limits of detection (LOD) were below 0.5 ng mL(-1). Validation results were compared with the commonly used method based on the electron ionization (EI) source. EI analysis was found to be slightly more repeatable whereas lower LODs were found for APCI. In addition, the applicability of the developed method has been tested in samples collected after the administration of 4-chloromethandienone. The highest sensitivity of the APCI method for this compound, allowed to increase the period in which its administration can be detected. PMID:26772132

  11. High-temperature Ionization in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desch, Steven J.; Turner, Neal J.

    2015-10-01

    We calculate the abundances of electrons and ions in the hot (≳500 K), dusty parts of protoplanetary disks, treating for the first time the effects of thermionic and ion emission from the dust grains. High-temperature ionization modeling has involved simply assuming that alkali elements such as potassium occur as gas-phase atoms and are collisionally ionized following the Saha equation. We show that the Saha equation often does not hold, because free charges are produced by thermionic and ion emission and destroyed when they stick to grain surfaces. This means the ionization state depends not on the first ionization potential of the alkali atoms, but rather on the grains’ work functions. The charged species’ abundances typically rise abruptly above about 800 K, with little qualitative dependence on the work function, gas density, or dust-to-gas mass ratio. Applying our results, we find that protoplanetary disks’ dead zone, where high diffusivities stifle magnetorotational turbulence, has its inner edge located where the temperature exceeds a threshold value ≈1000 K. The threshold is set by ambipolar diffusion except at the highest densities, where it is set by Ohmic resistivity. We find that the disk gas can be diffusively loaded onto the stellar magnetosphere at temperatures below a similar threshold. We investigate whether the “short-circuit” instability of current sheets can operate in disks and find that it cannot, or works only in a narrow range of conditions; it appears not to be the chondrule formation mechanism. We also suggest that thermionic emission is important for determining the rate of Ohmic heating in hot Jupiters.

  12. Evaluation of the potential of the phytocannabinoids, cannabidivarin (CBDV) and Δ9-tetrahydrocannabivarin (THCV), to produce CB1 receptor inverse agonism symptoms of nausea in rats

    PubMed Central

    Rock, Erin M; Sticht, Martin A; Duncan, Marnie; Stott, Colin; Parker, Linda A

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The cannabinoid 1 (CB1) receptor inverse agonists/antagonists, rimonabant (SR141716, SR) and AM251, produce nausea and potentiate toxin-induced nausea by inverse agonism (rather than antagonism) of the CB1 receptor. Here, we evaluated two phytocannabinoids, cannabidivarin (CBDV) and Δ9-tetrahydrocannabivarin (THCV), for their ability to produce these behavioural effect characteristics of CB1 receptor inverse agonism in rats. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH In experiment 1, we investigated the potential of THCV and CBDV to produce conditioned gaping (measure of nausea-induced behaviour) in the same manner as SR and AM251. In experiment 2, we investigated the potential of THCV and CBDV to enhance conditioned gaping produced by a toxin in the same manner as CB1 receptor inverse agonists. KEY RESULTS SR (10 and 20 mg·kg−1) and AM251 (10 mg·kg−1) produced conditioned gaping; however, THCV (10 or 20 mg·kg−1) and CBDV (10 or 200 mg·kg−1) did not. At a subthreshold dose for producing nausea, SR (2.5 mg·kg−1) enhanced lithium chloride (LiCl)-induced conditioned gaping, whereas Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC, 2.5 and 10 mg·kg−1), THCV (2.5 or 10 mg·kg−1) and CBDV (2.5 or 200 mg·kg−1) did not; in fact, THC (2.5 and 10 mg·kg−1), THCV (10 mg·kg−1) and CBDV (200 mg·kg−1) suppressed LiCl-induced conditioned gaping, suggesting anti-nausea potential. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS The pattern of findings indicates that neither THCV nor CBDV produced a behavioural profile characteristic of CB1 receptor inverse agonists. As well, these compounds may have therapeutic potential in reducing nausea. PMID:23902479

  13. Exploring the in vitro thrombolytic potential of streptokinase-producing β-hemolytic Streptococci isolated from bovine milk.

    PubMed

    Babu, Vaishnavi; Subathra Devi, C

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to isolate and characterize streptokinase-producing β-hemolytic Streptococcus sp. from bovine milk. A total of 50 milk samples were collected randomly from different breeds of cow and goat (Vellore, Tamil Nadu, India). The samples were characterized and screened for streptokinase-producing isolates using microbial and biochemical analysis. About 97 colonies were isolated from milk samples showing hemolytic patterns of α (19.6%), β (24.7%) and γ (55.6 %). Out of 20β-hemolytic isolates, only 6 colonies (VB2, VB3, VB8, VB14, VB16, and VB17) were identified as β-hemolytic Streptococci as potent producers of streptokinase. VB2 and VB14 showed the greatest streptokinase activities of 265 U mL(-1) and 225 U mL(-1), respectively. Based on biochemical and molecular characterization, the potent isolates VB2 and VB14 were identified and confirmed as S. equinus and S. agalactiae, respectively. The identified strains were named Streptococcus equinus VIT_VB2 (GenBank accession no. JX406835) and Streptococcus agalactiae VITVS5 (GenBank accession No. KF186620) The strains isolated from bovine milk provide a variance in the fibrinolytic activity on blood clots. The current study has demonstrated that the isolation of streptokinase producers from bovine milk, and the production of streptokinase from novel strain, enhanced the fibrinolytic activity. This study is the first to report that Streptococcus equinus produces streptokinase. PMID:26377134

  14. Geohydrologic feasibility study of the Piceance Basin of Colorado for the potential applicability of Jack W. McIntyre`s patented gas/produced water separation process

    SciTech Connect

    Kieffer, F.

    1994-02-01

    Geraghty & Miller, Inc. of Midland, Texas conducted geologic and hydrologic feasibility studies of the potential applicability of Jack McIntyre`s patented process for the recovery of natural gas from coalbed/sand formations in the Piceance Basin through literature surveys. Jack McIntyre`s tool separates produced water from gas and disposes of the water downhole into aquifers unused because of poor water quality, uneconomic lifting costs or poor aquifer deliverability. The beneficial aspects of this technology are two fold. The process increases the potential for recovering previously uneconomic gas resources by reducing produced water lifting, treatment and disposal costs. Of greater importance is the advantage of lessening the environmental impact of produced water by downhole disposal. Results from the survey indicate that research in the Piceance Basin includes studies of the geologic, hydrogeologic, conventional and unconventional recovery oil and gas technologies. Available information is mostly found centered upon the geology and hydrology for the Paleozoic and Mesozoic sediments. Lesser information is available on production technology because of the limited number of wells currently producing in the basin. Limited information is available on the baseline geochemistry of the coal/sand formation waters and that of the potential disposal zones. No determination was made of the compatibility of these waters. The study also indicates that water is often produced in variable quantities with gas from several gas productive formations which would indicate that there are potential applications for Jack McIntyre`s patented tool in the Piceance Basin.

  15. Potential for green microalgae to produce hydrogen, pharmaceuticals and other high value products in a combined process.

    PubMed

    Skjånes, Kari; Rebours, Céline; Lindblad, Peter

    2013-06-01

    Green microalgae for several decades have been produced for commercial exploitation, with applications ranging from health food for human consumption, aquaculture and animal feed, to coloring agents, cosmetics and others. Several products from green algae which are used today consist of secondary metabolites that can be extracted from the algal biomass. The best known examples are the carotenoids astaxanthin and β-carotene, which are used as coloring agents and for health-promoting purposes. Many species of green algae are able to produce valuable metabolites for different uses; examples are antioxidants, several different carotenoids, polyunsaturated fatty acids, vitamins, anticancer and antiviral drugs. In many cases, these substances are secondary metabolites that are produced when the algae are exposed to stress conditions linked to nutrient deprivation, light intensity, temperature, salinity and pH. In other cases, the metabolites have been detected in algae grown under optimal conditions, and little is known about optimization of the production of each product, or the effects of stress conditions on their production. Some green algae have shown the ability to produce significant amounts of hydrogen gas during sulfur deprivation, a process which is currently studied extensively worldwide. At the moment, the majority of research in this field has focused on the model organism, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, but other species of green algae also have this ability. Currently there is little information available regarding the possibility for producing hydrogen and other valuable metabolites in the same process. This study aims to explore which stress conditions are known to induce the production of different valuable products in comparison to stress reactions leading to hydrogen production. Wild type species of green microalgae with known ability to produce high amounts of certain valuable metabolites are listed and linked to species with ability to produce hydrogen

  16. Potential for green microalgae to produce hydrogen, pharmaceuticals and other high value products in a combined process

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Green microalgae for several decades have been produced for commercial exploitation, with applications ranging from health food for human consumption, aquaculture and animal feed, to coloring agents, cosmetics and others. Several products from green algae which are used today consist of secondary metabolites that can be extracted from the algal biomass. The best known examples are the carotenoids astaxanthin and β-carotene, which are used as coloring agents and for health-promoting purposes. Many species of green algae are able to produce valuable metabolites for different uses; examples are antioxidants, several different carotenoids, polyunsaturated fatty acids, vitamins, anticancer and antiviral drugs. In many cases, these substances are secondary metabolites that are produced when the algae are exposed to stress conditions linked to nutrient deprivation, light intensity, temperature, salinity and pH. In other cases, the metabolites have been detected in algae grown under optimal conditions, and little is known about optimization of the production of each product, or the effects of stress conditions on their production. Some green algae have shown the ability to produce significant amounts of hydrogen gas during sulfur deprivation, a process which is currently studied extensively worldwide. At the moment, the majority of research in this field has focused on the model organism, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, but other species of green algae also have this ability. Currently there is little information available regarding the possibility for producing hydrogen and other valuable metabolites in the same process. This study aims to explore which stress conditions are known to induce the production of different valuable products in comparison to stress reactions leading to hydrogen production. Wild type species of green microalgae with known ability to produce high amounts of certain valuable metabolites are listed and linked to species with ability to produce hydrogen

  17. Ionization Cross Sections and Dissociation Channels of DNA Bases by Electron Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Dateo, Christopher E.; Fletcher, Graham D.

    2004-01-01

    Free secondary electrons are the most abundant secondary species in ionizing radiation. Their role in DNA damage, both direct and indirect, is an active area of research. While indirect damage by free radicals, particularly by the hydroxyl radical generated by electron collision with water. is relatively well studied, damage by direct electron collision with DNA is less well understood. Only recently Boudaiffa et al. demonstrated that electrons at energies well below ionization thresholds can induce substantial yields of single- and double-strand breaks in DNA by a resonant, dissociative attachment process. This study attracted renewed interest in electron collisions with DNA, especially in the low energy region. At higher energies ionization becomes important. While Monte Carlo track simulations of radiation damage always include ionization, the probability of dissociative ionization, i.e., simultaneous ionization and dissociation, is ignored. Just like dissociative attachment, dissociative ionization may be an important contributor to double-strand breaks since the radicals and ions produced by dissociative ionization, located in the vicinity of the DNA coil, can readily interact with other parts of the DNA. Using the improved binary-encounter dipole (iBED) formulation, we calculated the ionization cross sections of the four DNA bases, adenine, cytosine, guanine, and thymine, by electrons at energies from threshold to 1 KeV. The present calculation gives cross sections approximately 20% lower than the results by Bemhardt and Paretzke using the Deutsch-Mark and Binary-Encounter-Bethe (BEB) formalisms. The difference is most likely due to the lack of a shielding term in the dipole potential used in the Deutsch-Mark and BEB formalisms. The dissociation channels of ionization for the bases are currently being studied.

  18. Ionization probes of molecular structure and chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, P.M.

    1993-12-01

    Various photoionization processes provide very sensitive probes for the detection and understanding of the spectra of molecules relevant to combustion processes. The detection of ionization can be selective by using resonant multiphoton ionization or by exploiting the fact that different molecules have different sets of ionization potentials. Therefore, the structure and dynamics of individual molecules can be studied even in a mixed sample. The authors are continuing to develop methods for the selective spectroscopic detection of molecules by ionization, and to use these methods for the study of some molecules of combustion interest.

  19. New plasma source based on contact ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Schrittwieser, R.; Koslover, R.; Karim, R.; Rynn, N.

    1985-07-01

    A new type of plasma source is presented: A collisionless plasma is formed by producing ions on one end and electrons on the other of a cylindrical vacuum chamber in a solenoidal magnetic field. The ions are produced by contact ionization of potassium on tungsten. The source of electrons is a LaB/sub 6/ plate. In the usual single-ended Q machine the elements rhenium, iridium, and platinum are tested as ionizing metals for potassium and barium.

  20. The Diffuse Ionized Gas in the large telescopes era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo-Gámez, A. M.

    2005-12-01

    In this workshop we summarize the ``state of the art'' of the Diffuse Ionized Gas. We present all the possible situations which can produce ionization outside an H II region, as well as some of the observations that can be performed with the GTC instrumentation and how relevant they can be in the undestanding of the ionization mechanisms of the DIG.

  1. Direct Infusion Electrospray Ionization - Ion Mobility - High Resolution Mass Spectrometry (DIESI-IM-HRMS) for Rapid Characterization of Potential Bioprocess Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munisamy, Sharon M.; Chambliss, C. Kevin; Becker, Christopher

    2012-07-01

    Direct infusion electrospray ionization - ion mobility - high resolution mass spectrometry (DIESI-IM-HRMS) has been utilized as a rapid technique for the characterization of total molecular composition in "whole-sample" biomass hydrolysates and extracts. IM-HRMS data reveal a broad molecular weight distribution of sample components (up to 1100 m/z) and provide trendline isolation of feedstock components from those introduced "in process." Chemical formulas were obtained from HRMS exact mass measurements (with typical mass error less than 5 ppm) and were consistent with structural carbohydrates and other lignocellulosic degradation products. Analyte assignments are supported via IM-MS collision-cross-section measurements and trendline analysis (e.g., all carbohydrate oligomers identified in a corn stover hydrolysate were found to fall within 6 % of an average trendline). These data represent the first report of collision cross sections for several negatively charged carbohydrates and other acidic species occurring natively in biomass hydrolysates.

  2. Potential aquaculture probiont Lactococcus lactis TW34 produces nisin Z and inhibits the fish pathogen Lactococcus garvieae.

    PubMed

    Sequeiros, Cynthia; Garcés, Marisa E; Vallejo, Marisol; Marguet, Emilio R; Olivera, Nelda L

    2015-04-01

    Bacteriocin-producing Lactococcus lactis TW34 was isolated from marine fish. TW34 bacteriocin inhibited the growth of the fish pathogen Lactococcus garvieae at 5 AU/ml (minimum inhibitory concentration), whereas the minimum bactericidal concentration was 10 AU/ml. Addition of TW34 bacteriocin to L. garvieae cultures resulted in a decrease of six orders of magnitude of viable cells counts demonstrating a bactericidal mode of action. The direct detection of the bacteriocin activity by Tricine-SDS-PAGE showed an active peptide with a molecular mass ca. 4.5 kDa. The analysis by MALDI-TOF-MS detected a strong signal at m/z 2,351.2 that corresponded to the nisin leader peptide mass without the initiating methionine, whose sequence STKDFNLDLVSVSKKDSGASPR was confirmed by MS/MS. Sequence analysis of nisin structural gene confirmed that L. lactis TW34 was a nisin Z producer. This nisin Z-producing strain with probiotic properties might be considered as an alternative in the prevention of lactococcosis, a global disease in aquaculture systems. PMID:25549984

  3. The selective Aurora-A kinase inhibitor MLN8237 (alisertib) potently inhibits proliferation of glioblastoma neurosphere tumor stem-like cells and potentiates the effects of temozolomide and ionizing radiation

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Xin; O’Donnell, James P.; Salazar, Clarence R.; Van Brocklyn, James R.; Barnett, Kahlil D.; Pearl, Dennis K.; deCarvalho, Ana C.; Ecsedy, Jeffrey A.; Brown, Stephen L.; Mikkelsen, Tom; Lehman, Norman L.

    2016-01-01

    The selective Aurora-A kinase inhibitor MLN8237 is in clinical trials for hematologic malignancies, ovarian cancer and other solid tumors. We previously showed that MLN8237 is potently antiproliferative toward standard monolayer cultured glioblastoma cells. We have now investigated the effect of MLN8237 with and without temozolomide or ionizing radiation on the proliferation of glioblastoma tumor stem-like cells (neurospheres) using soft agar colony formation assays and normal human astrocytes by MTT assay. Western blotting was utilized to compare MLN8237 IC50s to cellular Aurora-A and phospho-Thr288-Aurora-A levels. MLN8237 was more potently antiproliferative to neurosphere cells than to standard monolayer glioma cells, and was non-toxic to normal human astrocytes. Western blot analysis revealed that MLN8237 treatment inhibits phospho-Thr288-Aurora–A levels providing proof of drug target-hit in glioblastoma cells. Furthermore, phospho-Thr288-Aurora-A levels partially predicted the antiproliferative efficacy of MLN8237. We also found that Aurora-A inhibition by MLN8237 was synergistic with temozolomide and potentiated the effects of ionizing radiation on colony formation in neurosphere glioblastoma tumor stem-like cells. These results further support the potential of Aurora-A inhibitors as primary chemotherapy agents or biological response modifiers in glioblastoma patients. PMID:24627220

  4. INHIBITION OF BRAIN CHOLINESTERASE AND THE PHOTIC AFTER DISCHARGE OF FLASH EVOKED POTENTIALS PRODUCED BY CARBARYL IN LONG EVANS RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Carbaryl is a widely used N-methyl carbamate pesticide that acts by inhibiting cholinesterases (ChE), which may lead to cholinergic toxicity. Flash evoked potentials (FEPs) are a neurophysiological response often used to detect central nervous system (CNS) changes following expos...

  5. Electronic structures of TiO2-TCNE, -TCNQ, and -2,6-TCNAQ surface complexes studied by ionization potential measurements and DFT calculations: Mechanism of the shift of interfacial charge-transfer bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujisawa, Jun-ichi; Hanaya, Minoru

    2016-06-01

    Interfacial charge-transfer (ICT) transitions between inorganic semiconductors and π-conjugated molecules allow direct charge separation without loss of energy. This feature is potentially useful for efficient photovoltaic conversions. Charge-transferred complexes of TiO2 nanoparticles with 7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) and its analogues (TCNX) show strong ICT absorption in the visible region. The ICT band was reported to be significantly red-shifted with extension of the π-conjugated system of TCNX. In order to clarify the mechanism of the red-shift, in this work, we systematically study electronic structures of the TiO2-TCNX surface complexes (TCNX; TCNE, TCNQ, 2,6-TCNAQ) by ionization potential measurements and density functional theory (DFT) calculations.

  6. Butyrate produced by commensal bacteria potentiates phorbol esters induced AP-1 response in human intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Nepelska, Malgorzata; Cultrone, Antonietta; Béguet-Crespel, Fabienne; Le Roux, Karine; Doré, Joël; Arulampalam, Vermulugesan; Blottière, Hervé M

    2012-01-01

    The human intestine is a balanced ecosystem well suited for bacterial survival, colonization and growth, which has evolved to be beneficial both for the host and the commensal bacteria. Here, we investigated the effect of bacterial metabolites produced by commensal bacteria on AP-1 signaling pathway, which has a plethora of effects on host physiology. Using intestinal epithelial cell lines, HT-29 and Caco-2, stably transfected with AP-1-dependent luciferase reporter gene, we tested the effect of culture supernatant from 49 commensal strains. We observed that several bacteria were able to activate the AP-1 pathway and this was correlated to the amount of short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) produced. Besides being a major source of energy for epithelial cells, SCFAs have been shown to regulate several signaling pathways in these cells. We show that propionate and butyrate are potent activators of the AP-1 pathway, butyrate being the more efficient of the two. We also observed a strong synergistic activation of AP-1 pathway when using butyrate with PMA, a PKC activator. Moreover, butyrate enhanced the PMA-induced expression of c-fos and ERK1/2 phosphorylation, but not p38 and JNK. In conclusion, we showed that SCFAs especially butyrate regulate the AP-1 signaling pathway, a feature that may contribute to the physiological impact of the gut microbiota on the host. Our results provide support for the involvement of butyrate in modulating the action of PKC in colon cancer cells. PMID:23300800

  7. Pharmacodynamic Evaluation of the Potential Clinical Utility of Fosfomycin and Meropenem in Combination Therapy against KPC-2-Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Albiero, James; Sy, Sherwin K B; Mazucheli, Josmar; Caparroz-Assef, Silvana Martins; Costa, Bruno Buranello; Alves, Janio Leal Borges; Gales, Ana Cristina; Tognim, Maria Cristina Bronharo

    2016-07-01

    KPC-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae causes serious infections associated with high death rates worldwide. Combination therapy consisting of fosfomycin and a carbapenem is better than monotherapy to combat multidrug-resistant microorganisms, but no dosages for the combination have been defined. The MICs of meropenem and fosfomycin were evaluated against 18 clinical isolates of KPC-2-producing K. pneumoniae The activities of combination antimicrobials were also determined by the checkerboard method. The MIC50 and MIC90 of each agent alone and in combination were challenged against short (1.5-h) or prolonged (3-h) infusion regimens of meropenem (1 g every 8 h [q8h], 1.5 g q6h, 2 g q8h) and fosfomycin (4 g q8h, 6 g q6h, 8 g q8h) by Monte Carlo simulation to evaluate the time above the MIC of the free drug concentration as a percentage of the dosing interval (fT>MIC). The monotherapy MIC50s and MIC90s were 32 and 256 mg/liter for meropenem and 64 and 512 mg/liter for fosfomycin, respectively. Antimicrobial combination increased bacterial susceptibility to 1/4 the MIC50s and to 1/8 to 1/16 the MIC90s of monotherapy. The antimicrobial combination demonstrated a synergistic effect for at least two-thirds of the isolates. In combination therapy, fosfomycin regimens of 6 g q6h and 8 g q8h as a 3-h infusion against the MIC50 and MIC90 had better chances of achieving ≥90% probability of target attainment (PTA) of 70% fT>MIC. Meropenem regimens of 1.5 g q6h and 2 g q8h in prolonged infusion can achieve close to 90% PTA of 40% fT>MIC for MIC50 but not MIC90 The significant reduction in the MIC values and the achievement of appropriate PTA demonstrated that regimens containing fosfomycin with meropenem can be effective against KPC-2-producing K. pneumoniae. PMID:27139468

  8. In vitro potentiation of carbapenems with ME1071, a novel metallo-beta-lactamase inhibitor, against metallo-beta-lactamase- producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Yoshikazu; Eto, Maki; Mano, Yoko; Tateda, Kazuhiro; Yamaguchi, Keizo

    2010-09-01

    ME1071, a maleic acid derivative, is a novel specific inhibitor for metallo-beta-lactamases (MBL). In this study, the potentiation of ME1071 in combination with several beta-lactams was evaluated using MBL-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates. The rates of susceptibility of MBL producers to carbapenems (imipenem, biapenem, and doripenem) and ceftazidime were increased by 8 to 27% in the presence of 32 microg/ml of ME1071. The corresponding resistance rates were decreased by 13 to 46%, respectively. On the other hand, ME1071 showed weaker or no potentiation with non-MBL producers. The K(i) value of ME1071 for IMP-1 was 0.4 microM, significantly lower than the K(m) values of carbapenems for the IMP-1 enzyme. On the other hand, the K(i) value of ME1071 for VIM-2 was 120 microM, higher than the K(m) values of carbapenems for the VIM-2 enzyme. Results of this study indicate that ME1071 can potentiate the activity of ceftazidime and carbapenems against MBL-producing strains of P. aeruginosa. PMID:20606062

  9. pH-Dependent Reduction Potentials and Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer Mechanisms in Hydrogen-Producing Nickel Molecular Electrocatalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Horvath, Samantha; Fernandez, Laura; Appel, Aaron M.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2013-04-01

    The nickel-based Ph Bz 2 2 P N electrocatalysts, which are comprised of a nickel atom and two 1,5-dibenzyl-3,7-diphenyl-1,5-diaza-3,7-diphosphacyclooctane ligands, have been shown to effectively catalyze H2 production in acetonitrile. Recent electrochemical experiments revealed a linear dependence of the NiII/I reduction potential on pH, suggesting a proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reaction. In the proposed mechanism, the catalytic cycle begins with a PCET process involving electrochemical electron transfer to the nickel center and intermolecular proton transfer from an acid to the pendant amine ligand. This paper presents quantum mechanical calculations of this PCET process to examine the thermodynamics of the sequential mechanisms, in which either the electron or the proton transfers first (ET–PT and PT–ET, respectively), and the concerted mechanism (EPT). The favored mechanism depends on a balance among many factors, including the acid strength, association free energy for the acid–catalyst complex, PT free energy barrier, and ET reduction potential. The ET reduction potential is less negative after PT, favoring the PT–ET mechanism, and the association free energy is less positive after reduction, favoring the ET–PT mechanism. The calculations, along with analysis of the experimental data, indicate that the sequential ET–PT mechanism is favored for weak acids because of the substantial decrease in the association free energy after reduction. For strong acids, however, the PT–ET mechanism may be favored because the association free energy is somewhat smaller and PT is more thermodynamically favorable. The concerted mechanism could also occur, particularly for intermediate acid strengths. In the context of the entire catalytic cycle for H2 production, the initial PCET process involving intermolecular PT has a more negative reduction potential than the subsequent PCET process involving intramolecular PT. As a result, the second PCET should

  10. Differentiation of Lactobacillus brevis strains using Matrix-Assisted-Laser-Desorption-Ionization-Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry with respect to their beer spoilage potential.

    PubMed

    Kern, Carola C; Vogel, Rudi F; Behr, Jürgen

    2014-06-01

    Lactobacillus (L.) brevis is one of the most frequently encountered bacteria in beer-spoilage incidents. As the species Lactobacillus brevis comprises strains showing varying ability to grow in beer, ranging from growth in low hopped wheat to highly hopped pilsner beer, differentiation and classification of L. brevis with regard to their beer-spoiling ability is of vital interest for the brewing industry. Matrix-Assisted-Laser-Desorption-Ionization-Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has been shown as a powerful tool for species and sub-species differentiation of bacterial isolates and is increasingly used for strain-level differentiation. Seventeen L. brevis strains, representative of different spoilage types, were characterized according to their tolerance to iso-alpha-acids and their growth in wheat-, lager- and pilsner beer. MALDI-TOF MS spectra were acquired to perform strain-level identification, cluster analysis and biomarker detection. Strain-level identification was achieved in 90% out of 204 spectra. Misidentification occurred nearly exclusively among strains belonging to the same spoilage type. Though spectra of strongly beer-spoiling strains showed remarkable similarity, no decisive single markers were detected to be present in all strains of one group. However, MALDI-TOF MS spectra can be reliably assigned to the corresponding strain and thus allow to track single strains and connect them to their physiological properties. PMID:24549193

  11. Trace determination of 1-aminopropanone, a potential marker for wastewater contamination by liquid chromatography and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Singh, Simrat P; Gardinali, Piero R

    2006-02-01

    1-Aminopropanone (APR) is a volatile aminoketone of human origin that has been identified in raw sewage and surface waters. However, the traditional methodology for the determination of APR is extremely complicated and requires a skilled chemist to achieve consistent results. This investigation presents a novel and simple method for the analysis of APR by direct derivatization in aqueous media. APR is synthesized as its hydrochloride and derivatized using mercaptoethanol and o-phthalaldehyde. The product of reaction is separated on a 15 cm x 4.6 mm Luna C-18 column (1 mL/min, 45:55 acetonitrile: Water) and detected using a single quadrupole mass spectrometer detector operated in atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) mode. Method detection limits as low as 100 nM were routinely obtained with a precision of 1.7%. Recoveries of APR were always found to be greater then 88% in surface and wastewater samples fortified at three different levels. However, despite the robustness of the method and the fact that APR was consistently detected in urine it was not present in a variety surface or wastewaters analyzed during the course of the study. These results pose a critical question on the use of APR as a tracer for human derived wastewaters. PMID:16443254

  12. Zinc Chelation by a Small-Molecule Adjuvant Potentiates Meropenem Activity in Vivo against NDM-1-Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Falconer, Shannon B; Reid-Yu, Sarah A; King, Andrew M; Gehrke, Sebastian S; Wang, Wenliang; Britten, James F; Coombes, Brian K; Wright, Gerard D; Brown, Eric D

    2015-11-13

    The widespread emergence of antibiotic drug resistance has resulted in a worldwide healthcare crisis. In particular, the extensive use of β-lactams, a highly effective class of antibiotics, has been a driver for pervasive β-lactam resistance. Among the most important resistance determinants are the metallo-β-lactamases (MBL), which are zinc-requiring enzymes that inactivate nearly all classes of β-lactams, including the last-resort carbapenem antibiotics. The urgent need for new compounds targeting MBL resistance mechanisms has been widely acknowledged; however, the development of certain types of compounds-namely metal chelators-is actively avoided due to host toxicity concerns. The work herein reports the identification of a series of zinc-selective spiro-indoline-thiadiazole analogues that, in vitro, potentiate β-lactam antibiotics against an MBL-carrying pathogen by withholding zinc availability. This study demonstrates the ability of one such analogue to inhibit NDM-1 in vitro and, using a mouse model of infection, shows that combination treatment of the respective analogue with meropenem results in a significant decrease in bacterial burden in contrast to animals that received antibiotic treatment alone. These results support the therapeutic potential of these chelators in overcoming antibiotic resistance. PMID:27623408

  13. Ionization Energies of Lanthanides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Peter F.; Smith, Barry C.

    2010-01-01

    This article describes how data are used to analyze the pattern of ionization energies of the lanthanide elements. Different observed pathways of ionization between different ground states are discussed, and the effects of pairing, exchange, and orbital interactions on ionization energies of the lanthanides are evaluated. When all the above…

  14. The gas-sensing potential of nanocrystalline SnO2 produced by a mechanochemical milling via centrifugal action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kersen, Ü.

    In this work, the synthesis of undoped nanocrystalline tin dioxide powders and the subsequent preparation of SnO2 thick-films were studied. An initial mixture of SnCl2 and Ca(OH)2 was sealed in a vial for milling in an air atmosphere. Heat treatment of the milled powder resulted in the formation of tetragonal and orthorhombic SnO2 phases, which was confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. It was found that crystallite size could be controlled by varying the milling time, the rotation speed and the temperature used for the heat treatment. Crystallite sizes in the range 20 to 30 nm (determined by XRD measurements) were obtained. The total pore volume was 0.22 ml/g for a measured particle size of 37 m2/g. No contamination of the powder during milling was found. The response of the prepared thick-films to H2S gas in the concentration range 0.5 to 10 ppm in air was investigated as a function of the preparation conditions. The advantage of mechanochemical synthesis of powder is its relative simplicity, low cost and possibility of obtaining isolated, unagglomerated nanosized grains. It is shown that chemical reactions, which usually occur in the vibratory mill to produce the SnO phase, can also be initiated during a short processing time in the centrifugal mill.

  15. Assessing potential risk of heavy metal exposure from consumption of home-produced vegetables by urban populations.

    PubMed Central

    Hough, Rupert L; Breward, Neil; Young, Scott D; Crout, Neil M J; Tye, Andrew M; Moir, Ann M; Thornton, Iain

    2004-01-01

    We performed a risk assessment of metal exposure to population subgroups living on, and growing food on, urban sites. We modeled uptake of cadmium, copper, nickel, lead, and zinc for a selection of commonly grown allotment and garden vegetables. Generalized linear cross-validation showed that final predictions of Cd, Cu, Ni, and Zn content of food crops were satisfactory, whereas the Pb uptake models were less robust. We used predicted concentrations of metals in the vegetables to assess the risk of exposure to human populations from homegrown food sources. Risks from other exposure pathways (consumption of commercially produced foodstuffs, dust inhalation, and soil ingestion) were also estimated. These models were applied to a geochemical database of an urban conurbation in the West Midlands, United Kingdom. Risk, defined as a "hazard index," was mapped for three population subgroups: average person, highly exposed person, and the highly exposed infant (assumed to be a 2-year-old child). The results showed that food grown on 92% of the urban area presented minimal risk to the average person subgroup. However, more vulnerable population subgroups (highly exposed person and the highly exposed infant) were subject to hazard index values greater than unity. This study highlights the importance of site-specific risk assessment and the "suitable for use" approach to urban redevelopment. PMID:14754576

  16. The ``gunshot'' sound produced by male North Atlantic right whales and its potential function in reproductive advertisement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parks, Susan E.; Hamilton, Philip; Kraus, Scott D.; Tyack, Peter L.

    2001-05-01

    North Atlantic right whales (Eubalaena glacialis) commonly use sound to mediate social interactions between individuals. Surface active groups (SAGs) are the most commonly observed social interaction on the summer feeding grounds. These groups are typically composed of an adult female with two or more males engaged in social behavior at the surface. Several distinct types of sounds have been recorded from these groups. One sound commonly recorded from these groups is a brief broadband sound, referred to as a gunshot sound because it sounds like a rifle being fired. This sound has been recorded in the Bay of Fundy, Canada from both lone whales (N=9) and social SAGs (N=49). Those lone whales producing gunshot sounds whose sex could be determined (N=9) were all mature males. In surface active groups, the rate of production of gunshot sounds was weakly correlated with the total number of males present in the group. Given the behavioral contexts of gunshot sound production by male whales, gunshots probably function in a reproductive context as an agonistic signal directed toward other males, an advertisement signal to attract females, or a combination of the two functions.

  17. Assessment of fertilizer potential of the struvite produced from the treatment of methanogenic landfill leachate using low-cost reagents.

    PubMed

    Siciliano, Alessio

    2016-03-01

    Leachates generated in methanogenic landfills contain high strength of ammonium nitrogen which removal is hard to be accomplished by means of conventional techniques. The chemical precipitation of struvite, which is a mineral that could be reused as a slow-release fertilizer, is an effective process in the removal and recovery of NH4 amount of high-concentrated wastewaters. In this paper, a struvite precipitation process using unconventional reagents is proposed for a sustainable recovery of nitrogen content. In particular, seawater bittern, a by-product of marine salt manufacturing, and bone meal, a by-product of the thermal treatment of meat waste, have been used as low-cost sources of magnesium and phosphorus, respectively. The process enables the removal of more than 98 % ammonia load, the recovery about 99 and 95 % of phosphorus and magnesium, respectively, and the production of a precipitate containing struvite crystals. Heavy metals concentrations of produced precipitate were below the threshold values specified by the EC Directive for use of sewage sludges as fertilizers. Specific agronomic tests were conducted to investigate the fertilizing value of precipitate recovered from landfill leachate. The fertilizing effect of struvite deposit in cultivating Spinacia oleracea was compared with that of vegetable soil and commercial fertilizer. The growth of selected vegetable in the pots with struvite precipitate resulted significantly greater in both than those in the control pots and in the pots with the complex fertilizer. Furthermore, the struvite application as fertilizer did not result in more heavy metals in the vegetables respect those from soil and model fertilizer. PMID:26604197

  18. Chemistry of α-pinene and naphthalene oxidation products generated in a Potential Aerosol Mass (PAM) chamber as measured by acetate chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chhabra, P. S.; Lambe, A. T.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Stark, H.; Jayne, J. T.; Onasch, T. B.; Davidovits, P.; Kimmel, J. R.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2014-07-01

    Recent developments in high resolution, time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometry (HR-ToF-CIMS) have made possible the direct detection of atmospheric organic compounds in real-time with high sensitivity and with little or no fragmentation, including low volatility, highly oxygenated organic vapors that are precursors to secondary organic aerosol formation. Here, for the first time, we examine gas-phase O3 and OH oxidation products of α-pinene and naphthalene formed in the PAM flow reactor with an HR-ToF-CIMS using acetate reagent ion chemistry. Integrated OH exposures ranged from 1.2 × 1011 to 9.7 × 1011 molec cm−3 s, corresponding to approximately 1.0 to 7.5 daysmore » of equivalent atmospheric oxidation. Measured gas-phase organic acids are similar to those previously observed in environmental chamber studies. For both precursors, we find that acetate-CIMS spectra capture both functionalization (oxygen addition) and fragmentation (carbon loss) as a function of OH exposure. The level of fragmentation is observed to increase with increased oxidation. We present a method that estimates vapor pressures of organic molecules using the measured O/C ratio, H/C ratio, and carbon number for each compound detected by the CIMS. The predicted condensed-phase SOA average acid yields and O/C and H/C ratios agree within uncertainties with previous AMS measurements and ambient CIMS results. While acetate reagent ion chemistry is used to selectively measure organic acids, in principle this method can be applied to additional reagent ion chemistries depending on the application.« less

  19. First Report of Pseudobodo sp, a New Pathogen for a Potential Energy-Producing Algae: Chlorella vulgaris Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bangzhou; Yang, Luxi; Zhang, Huajun; Zhang, Jingyan; Li, Yi; Zheng, Wei; Tian, Yun; Liu, Jingwen; Zheng, Tianling

    2014-01-01

    Chlorella vulgaris, is a kind of single-celled green algae, which could serve as a potential source of food and energy because of its photosynthetic efficiency. In our study, a pathogenic organism targeting C. vulgaris was discovered. The algae-lytic activity relates to a fraction from lysates of infected C. vulgaris that was blocked upon filtration through a 3 µm filter. 18S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that it shared 99.0% homology with the protist Pseudobodo tremulans. Scanning electron microscope analysis showed that Pseudobodo sp. KD51 cells were approximately 4–5 µm long, biflagellate with an anterior collar around the anterior part of the cell in unstressed feeding cells. Besides the initial host, Pseudobodo sp. KD51 could also kill other algae, indicating its relatively wide predatory spectrum. Heat stability, pH and salinity tolerance experiments were conducted to understand their effects on its predatory activities, and the results showed that Pseudobodo sp. KD51 was heat-sensitive, and pH and salinity tolerant. PMID:24599263

  20. Transgenic Plant-Produced Hydrolytic Enzymes and the Potential of Insect Gut-Derived Hydrolases for Biofuels.

    PubMed

    Willis, Jonathan D; Mazarei, Mitra; Stewart, C Neal

    2016-01-01

    Various perennial C4 grass species have tremendous potential for use as lignocellulosic biofuel feedstocks. Currently available grasses require costly pre-treatment and exogenous hydrolytic enzyme application to break down complex cell wall polymers into sugars that can then be fermented into ethanol. It has long been hypothesized that engineered feedstock production of cell wall degrading (CWD) enzymes would be an efficient production platform for of exogenous hydrolytic enzymes. Most research has focused on plant overexpression of CWD enzyme-coding genes from free-living bacteria and fungi that naturally break down plant cell walls. Recently, it has been found that insect digestive tracts harbor novel sources of lignocellulolytic biocatalysts that might be exploited for biofuel production. These CWD enzyme genes can be located in the insect genomes or in symbiotic microbes. When CWD genes are transformed into plants, negative pleiotropic effects are possible such as unintended cell wall digestion. The use of codon optimization along with organelle and tissue specific targeting improves CWD enzyme yields. The literature teaches several important lessons on strategic deployment of CWD genes in transgenic plants, which is the focus of this review. PMID:27303411

  1. Steady-State Motion Visual Evoked Potentials Produced by Oscillating Newton's Rings: Implications for Brain-Computer Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jun; Xu, Guanghua; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Feng; Zhang, Yizhuo

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we utilize a special visual stimulation protocol, called motion reversal, to present a novel steady-state motion visual evoked potential (SSMVEP)-based BCI paradigm that relied on human perception of motions oscillated in two opposite directions. Four Newton's rings with the oscillating expansion and contraction motions served as visual stimulators to elicit subjects' SSMVEPs. And four motion reversal frequencies of 8.1, 9.8, 12.25 and 14 Hz were tested. According to Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA), the offline accuracy and ITR (mean ± standard deviation) over six healthy subjects were 86.56±9.63% and 15.93±3.83 bits/min, respectively. All subjects except one exceeded the level of 80% mean accuracy. Circular Hotelling's T-Squared test () also demonstrated that most subjects exhibited significantly strong stimulus-locked SSMVEP responses. The results of declining exponential fittings exhibited low-adaptation characteristics over the 100-s stimulation sequences in most experimental conditions. Taken together, these results suggest that the proposed paradigm can provide comparable performance with low-adaptation characteristic and less visual discomfort for BCI applications. PMID:22724028

  2. First report of Pseudobodo sp, a new pathogen for a potential energy-producing algae: Chlorella vulgaris cultures.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhangran; Lei, Xueqian; Zhang, Bangzhou; Yang, Luxi; Zhang, Huajun; Zhang, Jingyan; Li, Yi; Zheng, Wei; Tian, Yun; Liu, Jingwen; Zheng, Tianling

    2014-01-01

    Chlorella vulgaris, is a kind of single-celled green algae, which could serve as a potential source of food and energy because of its photosynthetic efficiency. In our study, a pathogenic organism targeting C. vulgaris was discovered. The algae-lytic activity relates to a fraction from lysates of infected C. vulgaris that was blocked upon filtration through a 3 µm filter. 18S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that it shared 99.0% homology with the protist Pseudobodo tremulans. Scanning electron microscope analysis showed that Pseudobodo sp. KD51 cells were approximately 4-5 µm long, biflagellate with an anterior collar around the anterior part of the cell in unstressed feeding cells. Besides the initial host, Pseudobodo sp. KD51 could also kill other algae, indicating its relatively wide predatory spectrum. Heat stability, pH and salinity tolerance experiments were conducted to understand their effects on its predatory activities, and the results showed that Pseudobodo sp. KD51 was heat-sensitive, and pH and salinity tolerant. PMID:24599263

  3. Transgenic Plant-Produced Hydrolytic Enzymes and the Potential of Insect Gut-Derived Hydrolases for Biofuels

    PubMed Central

    Willis, Jonathan D.; Mazarei, Mitra; Stewart, C. Neal

    2016-01-01

    Various perennial C4 grass species have tremendous potential for use as lignocellulosic biofuel feedstocks. Currently available grasses require costly pre-treatment and exogenous hydrolytic enzyme application to break down complex cell wall polymers into sugars that can then be fermented into ethanol. It has long been hypothesized that engineered feedstock production of cell wall degrading (CWD) enzymes would be an efficient production platform for of exogenous hydrolytic enzymes. Most research has focused on plant overexpression of CWD enzyme-coding genes from free-living bacteria and fungi that naturally break down plant cell walls. Recently, it has been found that insect digestive tracts harbor novel sources of lignocellulolytic biocatalysts that might be exploited for biofuel production. These CWD enzyme genes can be located in the insect genomes or in symbiotic microbes. When CWD genes are transformed into plants, negative pleiotropic effects are possible such as unintended cell wall digestion. The use of codon optimization along with organelle and tissue specific targeting improves CWD enzyme yields. The literature teaches several important lessons on strategic deployment of CWD genes in transgenic plants, which is the focus of this review. PMID:27303411

  4. Dissociative Ionization of Aromatic and Heterocyclic Molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.

    2003-01-01

    Space radiation poses a major health hazard to humans in space flight. The high-energy charged particles in space radiation ranging from protons to high atomic number, high-energy (HZE) particles, and the secondary species they produce, attack DNA, cells, and tissues. Of the potential hazards, long-term health effects such as carcinogenesis are likely linked to the DNA lesions caused by secondary electrons in the 1 - 30 eV range. Dissociative ionization (DI) is one of the electron collision processes that can damage the DNA, either directly by causing a DNA lesion, or indirectly by producing radicals and cations that attack the DNA. To understand this process, we have developed a theoretical model for DI. Our model makes use of the fact that electron motion is much faster than nuclear motion and assumes DI proceeds through a two-step process. The first step is electron-impact ionization resulting in a particular state of the molecular ion in the geometry of the neutral molecule. In the second step the ion undergoes unimolecular dissociation. Thus the DI cross section sigma(sup DI)(sub a) for channel a is given by sigma(sup DI)(sub a) = sigma(sup I)(sub a) P(sub D) with sigma(sup I)(sub a) the ionization cross section of channel a and P(sub D) the dissociation probability. This model has been applied to study the DI of H2O, NH3, and CH4, with results in good agreement with experiment. The ionization cross section sigma(sup I)(sub a) was calculated using the improved binary encounter-dipole model and the unimolecular dissociation probability P(sub D) obtained by following the minimum energy path determined by the gradients and Hessians of the electronic energy with respect to the nuclear coordinates of the ion. This model is used to study the DI from the low-lying channels of benzene and pyridine to understand the different product formation in aromatic and heterocyclic molecules. DI study of the DNA base thymine is underway. Solvent effects will also be discussed.

  5. Potential application of sludge produced from coal mine drainage treatment for removing Zn(II) in an aqueous phase.

    PubMed

    Cui, Mingcan; Jang, Min; Cho, Sang-Hyun; Khim, Jeehyeong

    2011-01-01

    Various analyses of physico-chemical characteristics and batch tests were conducted with the sludge obtained from a full-scale electrolysis facility for treating coal mine drainage in order to find the applicability of sludge as a material for removing Zn(II) in an aqueous phase. The physico-chemical analysis results indicated that coal mine drainage sludge (CMDS) had a high specific surface area and also satisfied the standard of toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) because the extracted concentrations of certain toxic elements such as Pb, Cu, As, Hg, Zn, and Ni were much less than their regulatory limits. The results of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) showed that the CMDS mainly consists of goethite (70%) and calcite (30%) as a weight basis. However, the zeta potential analysis represented that the CMDS had a lower isoelectric point of pH (pH(IEP)) than that of goethite or calcite. This might have been caused by the complexation of negatively charged anions, especially sulfate, which usually exists with a high concentration in coal mine drainage. The results of Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometry analysis revealed that Zn(II) was dominantly removed as a form of precipitation by calcite, such as smithsonite [ZnCO₃] or hydrozincite [Zn₅(CO₃)₂(OH)₆]. Recycling sludge, originally a waste material, for the removal process of Zn(II), as well as other heavy metals, could be beneficial due to its high and speedy removal capability and low economic costs. PMID:21063752

  6. Symbiotic Fungi Produce Laccases Potentially Involved in Phenol Degradation in Fungus Combs of Fungus-Growing Termites in Thailand†

    PubMed Central

    Taprab, Yaovapa; Johjima, Toru; Maeda, Yoshimasa; Moriya, Shigeharu; Trakulnaleamsai, Savitr; Noparatnaraporn, Napavarn; Ohkuma, Moriya; Kudo, Toshiaki

    2005-01-01

    Fungus-growing termites efficiently decompose plant litter through their symbiotic relationship with basidiomycete fungi of the genus Termitomyces. Here, we investigated phenol-oxidizing enzymes in symbiotic fungi and fungus combs (a substrate used to cultivate symbiotic fungi) from termites belonging to the genera Macrotermes, Odontotermes, and Microtermes in Thailand, because these enzymes are potentially involved in the degradation of phenolic compounds during fungus comb aging. Laccase activity was detected in all the fungus combs examined as well as in the culture supernatants of isolated symbiotic fungi. Conversely, no peroxidase activity was detected in any of the fungus combs or the symbiotic fungal cultures. The laccase cDNA fragments were amplified directly from RNA extracted from fungus combs of five termite species and a fungal isolate using degenerate primers targeting conserved copper binding domains of basidiomycete laccases, resulting in a total of 13 putative laccase cDNA sequences being identified. The full-length sequences of the laccase cDNA and the corresponding gene, lcc1-2, were identified from the fungus comb of Macrotermes gilvus and a Termitomyces strain isolated from the same fungus comb, respectively. Partial purification of laccase from the fungus comb showed that the lcc1-2 gene product was a dominant laccase in the fungus comb. These findings indicate that the symbiotic fungus secretes laccase to the fungus comb. In addition to laccase, we report novel genes that showed a significant similarity with fungal laccases, but the gene product lacked laccase activity. Interestingly, these genes were highly expressed in symbiotic fungi of all the termite hosts examined. PMID:16332742

  7. Fermentation characteristics of exopolysaccharide-producing lactic acid bacteria from sourdough and assessment of the isolates for industrial potential.

    PubMed

    Jung, Seung Won; Kim, Wang June; Lee, Kwang Geun; Kim, Cheol Woo; Noh, Wan Seob

    2008-07-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) with antimicrobial activity and high exopolysaccharide (EPS) production ability isolated from sourdough were studied for their fermentation characteristics as potential new starter cultures. The values of pH, titratable acidity, and viable cell counts were 4.06+/-0.009-4.50+/- 0.015, 0.787+/-0.020%-1.172+/-0.018%, and 8.78+/-0.08-8.98+/- 0.06 log CFU/ml, respectively. In order to select probiotics with a high survival rate in the gut, isolates were tested to assess resistance against the artificial gastric acid and bile juice. Viable LAB counts were significantly (p<0.05) affected by the acidity. At pH 2.0, the total declines in the initial bacterial counts were 4.52+/-0.07 log for S. thermophilus St-Body-1, >7.98+/-0.03 log for E. flavescens DU-10, >7.95+/-0.05 log for E. faecium DU-12, and 3.15+/- 0.06 log for L. amylovorus DU-21. Among the strains, L. amylovorus DU-21 was the only strain that had bile tolerance under simulated gastrointestinal conditions. In order to improve EPS production by L. amylovorus DU- 21, the influence of carbon source was studied. When glucose was used as a carbon source, EPS production dramatically increased to 17.19+/-0.28 g/l (p<0.05). The maximum cell growth (10.012+/-0.012 log CFU/ml) and EPS production (18.71+/-0.19 g/l) were achieved when 15 g/ l of glucose was employed as the carbon source. PMID:18667855

  8. An evaluation of ionizing radiation emitted by high power microwave generators

    SciTech Connect

    Lovell, C.D. ); Bolch, W.E. . Dept. of Environmental Engineering Sciences)

    1992-02-01

    Ionizing radiation emitted by electron-beam driven high power microwave (HPM) generators were measured in the near and far-field using lithium fluoride (LiF) thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). Simplified photon energy spectra were determined by measuring radiation transmission, at electron beam energies of 300 to 650 keV, through various thicknesses of steel and lead attenuators. These data were used to calculate the effective energy of the x-rays produced by interactions between the electrons and the walls or other structures of the HPM generators. Operators were polled to determine locations of burn marks or other visible damage to locate potential ionizing radiation source regions. 27 refs.

  9. Ambient Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Min-Zong; Yuan, Cheng-Hui; Cheng, Sy-Chyi; Cho, Yi-Tzu; Shiea, Jentaie

    2010-07-01

    Mass spectrometric ionization methods that operate under ambient conditions and require minimal or no sample pretreatment have attracted much attention in such fields as biomedicine, food safety, antiterrorism, pharmaceuticals, and environmental pollution. These technologies usually involve separate ionization and sample-introduction events, allowing independent control over each set of conditions. Ionization is typically performed under ambient conditions through use of existing electrospray ionization (ESI) or atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) techniques. Rapid analyses of gas, liquid, and solid samples are possible with the adoption of various sample-introduction methods. This review sorts different ambient ionization techniques into two main subcategories, primarily on the basis of the ionization processes, that are further differentiated in terms of the approach used for sampling.

  10. Physics of Partially Ionized Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishan, Vinod

    2016-05-01

    Figures; Preface; 1. Partially ionized plasmas here and everywhere; 2. Multifluid description of partially ionized plasmas; 3. Equilibrium of partially ionized plasmas; 4. Waves in partially ionized plasmas; 5. Advanced topics in partially ionized plasmas; 6. Research problems in partially ionized plasmas; Supplementary matter; Index.

  11. Method and an apparatus for detecting ionizable substance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McElroy, James F. (Inventor); Smith, William (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    The amount of ionizable substance within a stream can be continuously monitored through the use of an ionizable substance detector. The substance is ionized at an electrode producing ions and free electrons. The ions are transported across an ion exchange membrane, while the free electrons flow through a power source. The current, produced by the electrons, is proportional to the amount of substance in the stream. Continuous monitoring can be useful in early detection of problems, or system fluctuations.

  12. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic study of trifluoromethyl isocyanide. Back-bonding, fluorine lone-pair ionization potentials, and the CF/sub 3/NC. -->. CF/sub 3/CN isomerization energy

    SciTech Connect

    Beach, D.B.; Jolly, W.L.; Lentz, D.

    1985-06-05

    Core binding energy data for CF/sub 3/NC, Cr(CO)/sub 5/CNCF/sub 3/, and W(CO)/sub 5/CNCF/sub 3/ indicate that CF/sub 3/NC is a very strong ..pi..-acceptor ligand, practically as strong as CO. The core and fluorine lone-pair valence ionization potentials of CF/sub 3/NC and CF/sub 3/CN show that the net interaction of the fluorine lone-pair orbitals with other orbitals in these molecules is zero. The core data for CF/sub 3/NC and CF/sub 3/CN, when interpreted with the equivalent cores approximation, lead to a CF/sub 3/NC ..-->.. CF/sub 3/CN isomerization energy of -23 kcal mol/sup -1/.

  13. Fe/O ratio variations during the disturbed stage in the development of the solar cosmic ray fluxes: Manifestations of the first ionization potential effect in the solar cosmic ray composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minasyants, G. S.; Minasyants, T. M.; Tomozov, V. M.

    2016-03-01

    The accelerated particle energy spectra in different energy intervals (from 0.06 to 75.69 MeV n-1) have been constructed for various powerful flare events (1997-2006) with the appearance of solar cosmic rays (SCRs) based on the processing of data from the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) and WIND spacecraft. Flares were as a rule accompanied by coronal mass ejections. Different specific features in the particle spectra behavior, possibly those related to different acceleration processes, were revealed when the events developed. The Fe/O abundance ratio in different energy intervals during the disturbed development of flareinduced fluxes has been qualitatively estimated. It has been established that ground level event (GLE) fluxes represent an individual subclass of gradual events according to the character of Fe/O variations. The manifestations of the first ionization potential (FIP) effect in the composition of SCRs during their propagation have been qualitatively described.

  14. Ionizing photon budget: constraints from galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Östlin, Göran

    2015-08-01

    I will discuss the the production and propagation of ionizing photons in galaxies. Multi wavelength HST imaging and spectroscopy of local starbursts, including candidate Lyman continuum leakers, from the UV to the i-band plus Halpha and Hbeta are used to investigate where ionizing protons are produced and absorbed. We add IFU data, e.g. from MUSE, to further constrain the optical depth to Lyman continuum photons. I will further discuss rest frame UV observations of galaxies at higher redshifts, and their implications for the ionizing photon budget.

  15. Re-ionization and decaying dark matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodelson, Scott; Jubas, Jay M.

    1991-01-01

    Gunn-Peterson tests suggest that the Universe was reionized after the standard recombination epoch. A systematic treatment is presented of the ionization process by deriving the Boltzmann equations appropriate to this regime. A compact solution for the photon spectrum is found in terms of the ionization ratio. These equations are then solved numerically for the Decaying Dark Matter scenario, wherein neutrinos with mass of order 30 eV radiatively decay producing photons which ionize the intergalactic medium. It was found that the neutrino mass and lifetime are severely constrained by Gunn-Peterson tests, observations of the diffuse photon spectrum in the ultraviolet regime, and the Hubble parameter.

  16. Influence of the set anode potential on the performance and internal energy losses of a methane-producing microbial electrolysis cell.

    PubMed

    Villano, Marianna; Ralo, Cláudia; Zeppilli, Marco; Aulenta, Federico; Majone, Mauro

    2016-02-01

    The effect of the set anode potential (between + 200 mV and - 200 mV vs. SHE, standard hydrogen electrode) on the performance and distribution of internal potential losses has been analyzed in a continuous-flow methane-producing microbial electrolysis cell (MEC).Both acetate removal rate (at the anode) and methane generation rate (at the cathode) were higher (1 gCOD/L day and 0.30 m(3)/m(3) day, respectively) when the anode potential was controlled at + 200 mV. However, both the yields of acetate conversion into current and current conversion into methane were very high (72-90%) under all the tested conditions. Moreover, the sum of internal potential losses decreased from 1.46 V to 0.69 V as the anode potential was decreased from + 200 mV to - 200 mV, with cathode overpotentials always representing the main potential losses. This was likely to be due to the high energy barrier which has to be overcome in order to activate the cathode reaction. Finally, the energy efficiency correspondingly increased reaching 120% when the anode was controlled at - 200 mV. PMID:26342333

  17. Secreted or nonsecreted forms of acidic fibroblast growth factor produced by transfected epithelial cells influence cell morphology, motility, and invasive potential.

    PubMed Central

    Jouanneau, J; Gavrilovic, J; Caruelle, D; Jaye, M; Moens, G; Caruelle, J P; Thiery, J P

    1991-01-01

    Addition of exogenous acidic fibroblast growth factor (aFGF) to NBT-II epithelial carcinoma cells results in fibroblastic transformation and cell motility. We have generated aFGF-producing NBT-II cells by transfection with recombinant expression vectors containing human aFGF cDNA, or the human aFGF cDNA coupled to a signal peptide (SP) sequence. The effects of the nonsecreted and the secreted 16-kDa growth factor on the morphology, motility, and cell invasive potential (gelatinase activity) were compared. aFGF coupled to a SP was actively secreted out of the producing cells. The secretion of aFGF was not necessary for induction of gelatinase activity, as this was observed in NBT-II cells producing aFGF with or without SP. Production of aFGF, whether secreted or not secreted, resulted in increased in vitro motility of most isolated clones; however, there was no correlation between aFGF level and motility rate. The data suggest that expression of aFGF in NBT-II cells induces metastatic potential through an autocrine or intracrine mechanism. Images PMID:1707175

  18. Ionizing radiation potentiates the induction of nitric oxide synthase by interferon-gamma and/or lipopolysaccharide in murine macrophage cell lines. Role of tumor necrosis factor-alpha.

    PubMed

    McKinney, L C; Aquilla, E M; Coffin, D; Wink, D A; Vodovotz, Y

    2000-01-01

    Macrophages respond to infection or injury by changing from a "resting" cellular phenotype to an "activated" state defined by the expression of various cytotoxic effector functions. Regulation of the transition from a resting to an activated state is effected by cytokine and/or pathogenic signals. Some signals do not directly induce activation, but instead "prime" the macrophage to respond more vigorously to a second signal. One example of this priming phenomenon involves induction of nitric oxide (NO) synthesis by the enzyme nitric oxide synthase (NOS2). Our experiments indicate that low doses (1-5 Gy) of ionizing radiation can enhance the induction of enzymatically active NOS2 by IFN-gamma or LPS in J774.1 and RAW264.7 murine macrophage cell lines. Radiation alone did not produce this induction, rather, it was effective as a priming signal; cells exposed to radiation produced more NO when a second signal, either IFN-gamma or LPS, was applied 24 h later. PMID:10863529

  19. Bone ingrowth potential of electron beam and selective laser melting produced trabecular-like implant surfaces with and without a biomimetic coating.

    PubMed

    Biemond, J E; Hannink, G; Verdonschot, N; Buma, P

    2013-03-01

    The bone ingrowth potential of trabecular-like implant surfaces produced by either selective laser melting (SLM) or electron beam melting (EBM), with or without a biomimetic calciumphosphate coating, was examined in goats. For histological analysis and histomorphometry of bone ingrowth depth and bone implant contact specimens were implanted in the femoral condyle of goats. For mechanical push out tests to analyse mechanical implant fixation specimens were implanted in the iliac crest. The follow up periods were 4 (7 goats) and 15 weeks (7 goats). Both the SLM and EBM produced trabecular-like structures showed a variable bone ingrowth after 4 weeks. After 15 weeks good bone ingrowth was found in both implant types. Irrespective to the follow up period, and the presence of a coating, no histological differences in tissue reaction around SLM and EBM produced specimens was found. Histological no coating was detected at 4 and 15 weeks follow up. At both follow up periods the mechanical push out strength at the bone implant interface was significantly lower for the coated SLM specimens compared to the uncoated SLM specimens. The expected better ingrowth characteristics and mechanical fixation strength induced by the coating were not found. The lower mechanical strength of the coated specimens produced by SLM is a remarkable result, which might be influenced by the gross morphology of the specimens or the coating characteristics, indicating that further research is necessary. PMID:23254345

  20. IONIZATION IN ATMOSPHERES OF BROWN DWARFS AND EXTRASOLAR PLANETS. V. ALFVÉN IONIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Stark, C. R.; Helling, Ch.; Rimmer, P. B.; Diver, D. A.

    2013-10-10

    Observations of continuous radio and sporadic X-ray emission from low-mass objects suggest they harbor localized plasmas in their atmospheric environments. For low-mass objects, the degree of thermal ionization is insufficient to qualify the ionized component as a plasma, posing the question: what ionization processes can efficiently produce the required plasma that is the source of the radiation? We propose Alfvén ionization as a mechanism for producing localized pockets of ionized gas in the atmosphere, having sufficient degrees of ionization (≥10{sup –7}) that they constitute plasmas. We outline the criteria required for Alfvén ionization and demonstrate its applicability in the atmospheres of low-mass objects such as giant gas planets, brown dwarfs, and M dwarfs with both solar and sub-solar metallicities. We find that Alfvén ionization is most efficient at mid to low atmospheric pressures where a seed plasma is easier to magnetize and the pressure gradients needed to drive the required neutral flows are the smallest. For the model atmospheres considered, our results show that degrees of ionization of 10{sup –6}-1 can be obtained as a result of Alfvén ionization. Observable consequences include continuum bremsstrahlung emission, superimposed with spectral lines from the plasma ion species (e.g., He, Mg, H{sub 2}, or CO lines). Forbidden lines are also expected from the metastable population. The presence of an atmospheric plasma opens the door to a multitude of plasma and chemical processes not yet considered in current atmospheric models. The occurrence of Alfvén ionization may also be applicable to other astrophysical environments such as protoplanetary disks.

  1. Ionization in Atmospheres of Brown Dwarfs and Extrasolar Planets. V. Alfvén Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stark, C. R.; Helling, Ch.; Diver, D. A.; Rimmer, P. B.

    2013-10-01

    Observations of continuous radio and sporadic X-ray emission from low-mass objects suggest they harbor localized plasmas in their atmospheric environments. For low-mass objects, the degree of thermal ionization is insufficient to qualify the ionized component as a plasma, posing the question: what ionization processes can efficiently produce the required plasma that is the source of the radiation? We propose Alfvén ionization as a mechanism for producing localized pockets of ionized gas in the atmosphere, having sufficient degrees of ionization (>=10-7) that they constitute plasmas. We outline the criteria required for Alfvén ionization and demonstrate its applicability in the atmospheres of low-mass objects such as giant gas planets, brown dwarfs, and M dwarfs with both solar and sub-solar metallicities. We find that Alfvén ionization is most efficient at mid to low atmospheric pressures where a seed plasma is easier to magnetize and the pressure gradients needed to drive the required neutral flows are the smallest. For the model atmospheres considered, our results show that degrees of ionization of 10-6-1 can be obtained as a result of Alfvén ionization. Observable consequences include continuum bremsstrahlung emission, superimposed with spectral lines from the plasma ion species (e.g., He, Mg, H2, or CO lines). Forbidden lines are also expected from the metastable population. The presence of an atmospheric plasma opens the door to a multitude of plasma and chemical processes not yet considered in current atmospheric models. The occurrence of Alfvén ionization may also be applicable to other astrophysical environments such as protoplanetary disks.

  2. Optimizing production of asperolide A, a potential anti-tumor tetranorditerpenoid originally produced by the algal-derived endophytic fungus Aspergillus wentii EN-48

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Rui; Li, Xiaoming; Xu, Gangming; Wang, Bingui

    2016-07-01

    The marine algal-derived endophytic fungus Aspergillus wentii EN-48 produces the potential anti-tumor agent asperolide A, a tetranorlabdane diterpenoid active against lung cancer. However, the fermentation yield of asperolide A was very low and only produced in static cultures. Static fermentation conditions of A. wentii EN-48 were optimized employing response surface methodology to enhance the production of asperolide A. The optimized conditions resulted in a 13.9-fold yield enhancement, which matched the predicted value, and the optimized conditions were successfully used in scale-up fermentation for the production of asperolide A. Exogenous addition of plant hormones (especially 10 μmol/L methyl jasmonate) stimulated asperolide A production. To our knowledge, this is first optimized production of an asperolide by a marine-derived fungus. The optimization is Effective and valuable to supply material for further anti-tumor mechanism studies and preclinical evaluation of asperolide A and other norditerpenoids.

  3. Genetic Diversity and Virulence Potential of Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli O113:H21 Strains Isolated from Clinical, Environmental, and Food Sources

    PubMed Central

    Delannoy, Sabine; Lacher, David W.; dos Santos, Luis Fernando; Beutin, Lothar; Fach, Patrick; Rivas, Marta; Hartland, Elizabeth L.; Paton, Adrienne W.; Guth, Beatriz E. C.

    2014-01-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli strains of serotype O113:H21 have caused severe human diseases, but they are unusual in that they do not produce adherence factors coded by the locus of enterocyte effacement. Here, a PCR microarray was used to characterize 65 O113:H21 strains isolated from the environment, food, and clinical infections from various countries. In comparison to the pathogenic strains that were implicated in hemolytic-uremic syndrome in Australia, there were no clear differences between the pathogens and the environmental strains with respect to the 41 genetic markers tested. Furthermore, all of the strains carried only Shiga toxin subtypes associated with human infections, suggesting that the environmental strains have the potential to cause disease. Most of the O113:H21 strains were closely related and belonged in the same clonal group (ST-223), but CRISPR analysis showed a great degree of genetic diversity among the O113:H21 strains. PMID:24858089

  4. Complete genome of the potential thermozyme producer Anoxybacillus gonensis G2(T) isolated from the Gönen hot springs in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Lim, Yan Lue; Chan, Kok-Gan; Ee, Robson; Belduz, Ali Osman; Canakci, Sabriye; Kahar, Ummirul Mukminin; Yaakop, Amira Suriaty; Goh, Kian Mau

    2015-10-20

    Anoxybacillus gonensis type strain G2(T) (=NCIMB 13,933(T) =NCCB 100040(T)) has been isolated from the Gönen hot springs in Turkey. This strain produces a number of well-studied, biotechnologically important enzymes, including xylose isomerase, carboxylesterase, and fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase. In addition, this strain is an excellent candidate for the bioremediation of areas with heavy metal pollution. Here, we present a high-quality, annotated, complete genome of A. gonensis G2(T). Furthermore, this report provides insights into several novel enzymes of strain G2(T) and their potential industrial applications. PMID:26297905

  5. Modeling ionization and recombination from low energy nuclear recoils in liquid argon

    SciTech Connect

    Foxe, Michael P.; Hagmann, Chris; Jovanovic, Igor; Bernstein, A.; Joshi, T.; Kazkaz, K.; Mozin, Vladimir V.; Pereverzev, S. V.; Sangiorgio, Samuele; Sorensen, Peter F.

    2015-09-01

    Coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering (CNNS) is an as-yet undetected, flavor-independent neutrino interaction predicted by the Standard Model. CNNS is a flavor-blind interaction, which offers potential benefits for its use in nonproliferation (nuclear reactor monitoring) and astrophysics (supernova and solar neutrinos) applications. One challenge with detecting CNNS is the low energy deposition associated with a typical CNNS nuclear recoil. In addition, nuclear recoils are predicted to result in lower ionization yields than those produced by electron recoils of the same energy. This ratio of nuclear- and electron-induced ionization, known as the nuclear quenching factor, is unknown at energies typical for CNNS interactions in liquid xenon (LXe) and liquid argon (LAr), detector media being considered for CNNS detection. While there have been recent measurements [1] of the ionization yield from nuclear recoils in LAr, there is no universal model for nuclear quenching and ionization yield. For this reason, a Monte Carlo simulation has been developed to predict the ionization yield at sub-10 keV energies. The local ionization yield of a recoiling atom in the medium is calculated first. The ejected electrons are subsequently tracked in the electric field resulting from both the local electric charges and the externally applied drift field. The dependence of the ionization yield on the drift electric field is obtained by combining the calculated ionization yield for the initial collision cascade with the electron escape probability. An updated estimate of the CNNS signal expected in a LAr detector operated near a nuclear power reactor is presented.

  6. Characterisation of crude palm oil O/W emulsion produced with Tween 80 and potential in residual oil recovery of palm pressed mesocarp fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramly, N. H.; Zakaria, R.; Naim, M. N.

    2016-06-01

    Surfactant-assisted aqueous extraction has been proposed as a “green” alternative to hexane extraction for the recovery of oil from plant matters. An efficient aqueous surfactant extraction system usually use an extended type of ionic surfactant with the ability to produce Winsor type III microemulsion, reducing the interfacial tension (IFT) between plant oil and surfactant solution to an ultralow level (10-3 mN/m). However, the safe used of this surfactant in food processing is uncertain leading to non-food application of the recovered oil. In the present study, the potential of Tween 80, a commercial food-grade non-ionic surfactant, was evaluated in the recovery of residual oil from palm-pressed mesocarp. The emulsion produced between Tween 80 and crude palm oil (CPO) was characterised in terms of IFT, droplet size, viscosity and phase inversion temperature (PIT). The effect of surfactant concentration, electrolyte (NaCl) and temperature were studied to determine whether a Winsor Type III microemulsion can be produced. Results shows that although these parameters were able to reduce the IFT to very low values, Winsor type III microemulsion was not produced with this single surfactant. Emulsion of CPO and Tween 80 solution did not produce a PIT even after heating to 100°C indicating that middle phase emulsion was not able to be formed with increasing temperature. The highest percentage of oil extraction (38.84%) was obtained at the concentration above the critical micelle concentration (CMC) of Tween 80 and CPO, which was at 0.5 wt% Tween 80 with 6% NaCl, and temperature of 60°C. At this concentration, the IFT value is 0.253 mN/m with a droplet size of 4183.8 nm, and a viscosity of 7.38 cp.

  7. Ab initio characterization of the HCO{sup x} (x = {minus}1, 0, +1) species: Structures, vibrational frequencies, CH bond dissociation energies, and HCO ionization potential and electron affinity

    SciTech Connect

    Mourik, T. van; Dunning, T.H. Jr.; Peterson, K.A.

    2000-03-23

    The potential energy surfaces of the HCO{sup x} (x = +1, 0, -1) species near their equilibrium geometries have been calculated employing coupled cluster methods with augmented correlation consistent basis sets. The equilibrium structures, vibrational frequencies, zero point energies, and dissociation energies were computed for all three species. Valence-electron CCSD(T) calculations with the aug-cc-pV5Z basis set predict CH bond dissociation energies, D{sub 0}, of 140.3 kcal/mol for HCO{sup +}, 14.0 kcal/mol for HCO, and 4.5 kcal/mol for HCO{sup {minus}}, in good agreement with experiment (140.1 {+-} 1, 13.9--14.3, and 5.2 {+-} 0.2 kcal/mol, respectively). The same calculations predict the electron affinity, EA{sub 0}, and ionization potential, IP{sub 0}, of HCO to be 7.7 and 187.3 kcal/mol; these values are within 0.5 kcal/mol of the measured values. Inclusion of core-valence correlation corrections has only a minor effect on the calculated energetics.

  8. Notch and Delta mRNAs in early-stage and mid-stage Drosophila embryos exhibit complementary patterns of protein producing potentials

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Andrew; Wesley, Uma; Wesley, Cedric

    2010-01-01

    Notch and Delta proteins generate Notch signaling that specifies cell fates during animal development. There is an intriguing phenomenon in Drosophila embryogenesis that has not received much attention and whose significance to embryogenesis is unknown. Notch and Delta mRNAs expressed in early-stage embryos are shorter than their counterparts in mid-stage embryos. We show here that the difference in sizes is due to mRNA 3′ processing at alternate polyadenylation sites. While the early-stage Notch mRNA has a lower protein-producing potential than the mid-stage Notch mRNA, the early-stage Delta mRNA has a higher protein-producing potential than the mid-stage Delta mRNA. Our data can explain the complementary patterns of Notch and Delta protein levels in early-stage and mid-stage embryos. Our data also raise the possibility that the manner and regulation of Notch signaling change in the course of embryogenesis and that this change is effected by 3′ UTR and mRNA 3′ processing factors. PMID:20201103

  9. Partial Purification and Characterization of a Bacteriocin DT24 Produced by Probiotic Vaginal Lactobacillus brevis DT24 and Determination of its Anti-Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Potential.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Disha; Jena, Prasant Kumar; Patel, Jignesh Kumar; Seshadri, Sriram

    2013-06-01

    The emergence of antibiotic resistance has increased the interest for finding new antimicrobials in the past decade. Probiotic Lactic acid bacteria producing antimicrobial proteins like bacteriocin can be excellent agents for development as novel therapeutic agents and complement to conventional antibiotic therapy. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli, most causative agent of Urinary tract infection, has developed resistance to various antibiotics. In the present investigation, antibacterial substance like bacteriocin (Bacteriocin DT24) produced by probiotic Lactobacillus brevis DT24 from vaginal sample of healthy Indian woman was partially purified and characterized. It was efficiently working against various pathogens, that is, Uropathogenic E. coli, Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus aureus. The antimicrobial peptide was relatively heat resistant and also active over a broad range of pH 2-10. It has been partially purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation and gel filtration chromatography and checked on reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of bacteriocin DT24 was approximately 7-kDa protein. The peptide is inactivated by proteolytic enzymes, trypsin and lipase but not when treated with catalase, α-amylase and pepsin. It showed bacteriostatic mode of action against uropathogenic E. coli. Such characteristics indicate that this bacteriocin-producing probiotic may be a potential candidate for alternative agents to control urinary tract infections and other pathogens. PMID:26782739

  10. Martian Meteor Ionization Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grebowsky, J. M.; Pesnell, W. D.

    1999-01-01

    Small interplanetary grains bombard Mars, like all the solar system planets, and, like all the planets with atmospheres, meteoric ion and atom layers form in the upper atmosphere. We have developed a comprehensive one-dimensional model of the Martian meteoric ionization layer including a full chemical scheme. A persistent layer of magnesium ions should exist around an altitude of 70 km. Unlike the terrestrial case, where the metallic ions are formed via charge-exchange with the ambient ions, Mg(+) in the Martian atmosphere is produced by photoionization. Nevertheless, the predicted metal layer peak densities for Earth and Mars are similar. Diffusion solutions, such as those presented here, should be a good approximation of the metallic ions in regions where the magnetic field is negligible and may provide a significant contribution to the nightside ionosphere. The low ultraviolet absorption of the Martian atmosphere may make Mars an excellent laboratory in which to study meteoric ablation. Resonance lines not seen in the spectra of terrestrial meteors may be visible to a surface observatory in the Martian highlands.

  11. Three component plasma electron distribution in the intermediate ionized coma of Comet Giacobini-Zinner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwickl, R. D.; Baker, D. N.; Bame, S. J.; Feldman, W. C.; Fuselier, S. A.; Huebner, W. F.; McComas, D. J.; Young, D. T.

    1986-04-01

    The observation of three distinct components of the electron distribution function measured in the intermediate ionized coma (IIC) and plasma tail of Comet Giacobini-Zinner is reported. It is believed that the cold component represents electrons produced close to the comet nucleus by ionization of cometary matter and subsequent cooling by Coulomb collisions. The second component also appears to be composed of electrons produced by photoionization of cometary neutrals, but sufficiently far from the nucleus that the distributions are largely unaffected by Coulomb interactions. The hot component is probably a population of electrons originating in the solar wind. Throughout the IIC, the electrostatic potential of the spacecraft was very low (less than 0.8 eV), implying that ICE generated very little impact-produced plasma during its passage.

  12. Isolation, identification and toxigenic potential of ochratoxin A-producing Aspergillus species from coffee beans grown in two regions of Thailand.

    PubMed

    Noonim, Paramee; Mahakarnchanakul, Warapa; Nielsen, Kristian F; Frisvad, Jens C; Samson, Robert A

    2008-12-10

    In 2006 and 2007, 32 Thai dried coffee bean samples (Coffea arabica) from two growing sites of Chiang Mai Province, and 32 Thai dried coffee bean samples (Coffea canephora var. robusta) from two growing sites of Chumphon Province, Thailand, were collected and assessed for the distribution of fungi with the potential to produce ochratoxin A (OTA). The overall percentage of fungal contamination in coffee was 98% and reduced to 60% after surface disinfection. There were remarkable ecological differences in the composition of ochratoxigenic species present in these two regions. Arabica coffee bean samples from the North had an average of 78% incidence of colonization with Aspergillus of section Circumdati with Aspergillus westerdijkiae and A. melleus as the predominant species. Aspergillus spp. of section Nigri were found in 75% of the samples whereas A. ochraceus was not detected. Robusta coffee beans from the South were 98-100% contaminated with predominantly A. carbonarius and A. niger. A. westerdijkiae was only found in one sample. The diversity of the fungal population was probably correlated with the geographical origin of the coffee, coffee cultivar, and processing method. Representative isolates of section Circumdati (52) and Nigri (82) were examined for their OTA production using HPLC with fluorescence detection. Aspergillus westerdijkiae (42 isolates out of 42), A. steynii (13/13), and A. carbonarius (35/35) in general produced large amounts of OTA, while one isolate of A. sclerotiorum produced intermediate amounts of OTA. 13% of the A. niger isolates produced OTA in intermediate amounts. OTA levels in coffee bean samples were analyzed using the Ridascreen OTA ELISA kits. Of the 64 coffee bean samples analyzed, 98% were contaminated with OTA in levels of <0.6-5.5 microg/kg (Arabica) and 1-27 microg/kg (Robusta). Presence of OTA in representative coffee samples was also confirmed by LC-MS/MS after ion-exchange purification. PMID:18819720

  13. Novel pre-treatment of zeolite materials for the removal of sodium ions: potential materials for coal seam gas co-produced wastewater.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Oscar; Walsh, Kerry; Kele, Ben; Gardner, Edward; Chapman, James

    2016-01-01

    Coal seam gas (CSG) is the extraction of methane gas that is desorbed from the coal seam and brought to the surface using a dewatering and depressurisation process within the saturated coalbed. The extracted water is often referred to as co-produced CSG water. In this study, co-produced water from the coal seam of the Bowen Basin (QLD, Australia) was characterised by high concentration levels of Na(+) (1156 mg/L), low concentrations of Ca(2+) (28.3 mg/L) and Mg(2+) (5.6 mg/L), high levels of salinity, which are expected to cause various environmental problems if released to land or waters. The potential treatment of co-produced water using locally sourced natural ion exchange (zeolite) material was assessed. The zeolite material was characterized for elemental composition and crystal structure. Natural, untreated zeolite demonstrated a capacity to adsorb Na(+) ions of 16.16 mEq/100 g, while a treated zeolite using NH4 (+) using a 1.0 M ammonium acetate (NH4C2H3O2) solution demonstrated an improved 136 % Na(+) capacity value of 38.28 mEq/100 g after 720 min of adsorption time. The theoretical exchange capacity of the natural zeolite was found to be 154 mEq/100 g. Reaction kinetics and diffusion models were used to determine the kinetic and diffusion parameters. Treated zeolite using a NH4 (+) pre-treatment represents an effective treatment to reduce Na(+) concentration in coal seam gas co-produced waters, supported by the measured and modelled kinetic rates and capacity. PMID:27247868

  14. APPARATUS FOR PRODUCING IONS OF VAPORIZABLE MATERIALS

    DOEpatents

    Wright, B.T.

    1958-01-28

    a uniform and copious supply of ions. The source comprises a hollow arc- block and means for establishing a magnetic field through the arc-block. Vaporization of the material to be ionized is produced by an electric heated filament. The arc producing structure within the arc-block consists of a cathode disposed between a pair of collimating electrodes along with an anode adjacent each collimating electrode on the side opposite the cathode. A positive potential applied to the anodes and collimating electrodes, with respect to the cathode, and the magnetic field act to accelerate the electrons from the cathode through a slit in each collimating clectrode towards the respective anode. In this manner a pair of collinear arc discharges are produced in the gas region which can be tapped for an abundant supply of ions of the material being analyzed.

  15. Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Ingram, M.; Mason, W. B.; Whipple, G. H.; Howland, J. W.

    1952-04-07

    This report presents a review of present knowledge and concepts of the biological effects of ionizing radiations. Among the topics discussed are the physical and chemical effects of ionizing radiation on biological systems, morphological and physiological changes observed in biological systems subjected to ionizing radiations, physiological changes in the intact animal, latent changes following exposure of biological systems to ionizing radiations, factors influencing the biological response to ionizing radiation, relative effects of various ionizing radiations, and biological dosimetry.

  16. Electron-Impact Ionization and Dissociative Ionization of Biomolecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Chaban, Galina M.; Dateo, Christopher E.

    2006-01-01

    It is well recognized that secondary electrons play an important role in radiation damage to humans. Particularly important is the damage of DNA by electrons, potentially leading to mutagenesis. Molecular-level study of electron interaction with DNA provides information on the damage pathways and dominant mechanisms. Our study of electron-impact ionization of DNA fragments uses the improved binary-encounter dipole model and covers DNA bases, sugar phosphate backbone, and nucleotides. An additivity principle is observed. For example, the sum of the ionization cross sections of the separate deoxyribose and phosphate fragments is in close agreement with the C3(sup prime)- and C5 (sup prime)-deoxyribose-phospate cross sections, differing by less than 5%. Investigation of tandem double lesion initiated by electron-impact dissociative ionization of guanine, followed by proton reaction with the cytosine in the Watson-Crick pair, is currently being studied to see if tandem double lesion can be initiated by electron impact. Up to now only OH-induced tandem double lesion has been studied.

  17. Immuno-based detection of Shiga toxin-producing pathogenic Escherichia coli in food - A review on current approaches and potential strategies for optimization.

    PubMed

    Baker, Christopher A; Rubinelli, Peter M; Park, Si Hong; Ricke, Steven C

    2016-08-01

    Certain pathogenic Escherichia coli known as Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing E. coli (STEC) are a public health threat to the consumer, and are problematic for the food industry. Food products containing STEC are deemed unfit for human consumption, and STEC illnesses can cause hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), a disease affecting the kidneys in susceptible individuals. Optimizing detection methods in foods have been focused on more prompt and accurate analysis. This review addresses the role and applications of immuno-based assays for STEC detection in food systems. Immunoassay antibody capture systems and flow cytometry platforms have been implemented into several food-based detection systems. By applying antibodies that will interact with target microorganisms, immunoassays can be used to directly detect and quantify pathogens. Immuno-based protocols could potentially be further implemented into the food industry, limit the duration of the detection process and increase accuracy. PMID:26016737

  18. Presence of potential toxin-producing cyanobacteria in an oligo-mesotrophic lake in Baltic Lake District, Germany: an ecological, genetic and toxicological survey.

    PubMed

    Dadheech, Pawan K; Selmeczy, Géza B; Vasas, Gábor; Padisák, Judit; Arp, Wolfgang; Tapolczai, Kálmán; Casper, Peter; Krienitz, Lothar

    2014-10-01

    Massive developments of potentially toxic cyanobacteria in Lake Stechlin, an oligo-mesotrophic lake in the Baltic Lake District of Germany raised concerns about toxic contamination of these important ecosystems. Field samples in the phase of mass developments of cyanobacteria were used for genetic and toxicological analyses. Microcystins and microcystin genes were detected in field samples of the lake for the first time. However, the toxins were not produced by the dominant taxa (Dolichospermum circinale and Aphanizomenon flos-aquae) but by taxa, which were present only in low biomass in the samples (Microcystis cf. aeruginosa and Planktothrix rubescens). The phytoplankton successions during the study period revealed an increase of cyanobacterial populations. The findings contribute to the changes that have been investigated in Lake Stechlin since the mid-1990s. The possible reasons behind these developments may be climate change, special weather conditions and an increased nutrient pool. PMID:25268981

  19. Two-photon double ionization of helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Hart, Hugo W.; Feng, Liang; McKenna, Claire

    2003-12-01

    The combination of B-spline basis sets with R-matrix theory has provided a powerful tool for the description of double ionization processes. We demonstrate this first by investigating electron-impact ionization of Li2+. By applying the Floquet Ansatz, the same techniques can be employed to describe multiphoton double ionization processes through the R-matrix Floquet approach. Results for two-photon double ionization of He confirm the lower values of time-dependent close-coupling calculations compared to perturbation theory. The approach can be extended to quasi-two-electron systems through the use of model potentials. This is demonstrated by calculating photoionization cross sections near threshold for the m = 0 level of the 4s4p 1Po state of calcium.

  20. Attaching an alkali metal atom to an alkaline earth metal oxide (BeO, MgO, or CaO) yields a triatomic metal oxide with reduced ionization potential and redirected polarity.

    PubMed

    Nowiak, Grzegorz; Skurski, Piotr; Anusiewicz, Iwona

    2016-04-01

    The existence of a series of neutral triatomic metal oxides MON and their corresponding cations MON (+) (M = Be, Mg, Ca; N = Li, Na, K) was postulated and verified theoretically using ab initio methods at the CCSD(T)/6-311+G(3df)//MP2/6-311+G(3df) level of theory. The calculations revealed that the vertical ionization potentials (IPs) of the MON radicals (calculated using the outer-valence Green's function technique (OVGF) with the 6-311+G(3df) basis set) were ca. 2-3 eV smaller than the IPs of the corresponding MO and NO systems or that of the isolated M atom. Population analysis of the neutral triatomic MON molecules and their corresponding MO counterparts indicated that the attachment of an alkali metal atom to any oxide MO (BeO, MgO, CaO) reverses its polarity, which manifests itself as the redirection of the dipole moment vector. PMID:26994021

  1. Strategies for mitigating the ionization-induced beam head erosion problem in an electron-beam-driven plasma wakefield accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, W.; Zhou, M.; Vafaei-Najafabadi, N.; Marsh, K. A.; Clayton, C. E.; Joshi, C.; Mori, W. B.; Lu, W.; Adli, E.; Corde, S.; Litos, M.; Li, S.; Gessner, S.; Frederico, J.; Hogan, M. J.; Walz, D.; England, J.; Delahaye, J. P.; Muggli, P.

    2013-10-01

    Strategies for mitigating ionization-induced beam head erosion in an electron-beam-driven plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA) are explored when the plasma and the wake are both formed by the transverse electric field of the beam itself. Beam head erosion can occur in a preformed plasma because of a lack of focusing force from the wake at the rising edge (head) of the beam due to the finite inertia of the electrons. When the plasma is produced by field ionization from the space charge field of the beam, the head erosion is significantly exacerbated due to the gradual recession (in the beam frame) of the 100% ionization contour. Beam particles in front of the ionization front cannot be focused (guided) causing them to expand as in vacuum. When they expand, the location of the ionization front recedes such that even more beam particles are completely unguided. Eventually this process terminates the wake formation prematurely, i.e., well before the beam is depleted of its energy. Ionization-induced head erosion can be mitigated by controlling the beam parameters (emittance, charge, and energy) and/or the plasma conditions. In this paper we explore how the latter can be optimized so as to extend the beam propagation distance and thereby increase the energy gain. In particular we show that, by using a combination of the alkali atoms of the lowest practical ionization potential (Cs) for plasma formation and a precursor laser pulse to generate a narrow plasma filament in front of the beam, the head erosion rate can be dramatically reduced. Simulation results show that in the upcoming “two-bunch PWFA experiments” on the FACET facility at SLAC national accelerator laboratory the energy gain of the trailing beam can be up to 10 times larger for the given parameters when employing these techniques. Comparison of the effect of beam head erosion in preformed and ionization produced plasmas is also presented.

  2. Antimicrobial activity and biologic potential of silver-substituted calcium phosphate constructs produced with self-propagating high-temperature synthesis.

    PubMed

    Vollmer, N L; Spear, J R; Ayers, R A

    2016-06-01

    There is significant demand for synthetic bone substitute materials that can decrease the incidence of implant-based bacterial infections. The intent of this research was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity and biologic potential of calcium phosphate (CaP) constructs substituted with silver (Ag) that were produced via self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS). SHS is a combustion synthesis technique that has successfully generated porous CaP bioceramics intended for use in bone repair. SHS reactions are highly versatile; dopants can be added to the reactant powders to alter product chemistry and morphology. In this research, Ag powder was added to the reactants generating porous CaP constructs containing 0.5, 1, or 2 wt% Ag. Antibacterial performance of the constructs was assessed against Escherichia coli, a representative model for Gram-negative bacteria. Liquid solutions (1 μg/mL) of CaP-Ag particles to phosphate buffered saline were incubated with 10(5) cells/mL. After 24 h, 10 μL of solution were spread on an LB agar plate and cultured for 24 h at 37 °C. Samples cultured with CaP-Ag showed complete bacterial inhibition while the controls (E. coli only and CaP without Ag) exhibited significant colony formation. The effects of Ag concentration on cytotoxicity and biocompatibility were tested in vitro. At 7 days, osteoblasts uniformly enveloped the CaP-Ag particles and displayed a healthy flattened morphology suggesting the concentrations of Ag incorporated into constructs were not cytotoxic. CaP-Ag constructs produced via SHS represent a source of synthetic bone substitute materials that could potentially inhibit, or reduce the incidence of post-operative bacterial infections. PMID:27094319

  3. Potential of the salt-tolerant laccase-producing strain Trichoderma viride Pers. NFCCI-2745 from an estuary in the bioremediation of phenol-polluted environments.

    PubMed

    Divya, L M; Prasanth, G K; Sadasivan, C

    2014-06-01

    Industrialization causes the generation of phenolic pollutants in the environment. The ability of laccases to oxidize phenolic compounds and reduce molecular oxygen to water has led to intensive studies on these enzymes. Although salt-tolerant fungi are potential sources of enzymes for industrial applications, they have been inadequately explored for laccase production. This study describes the isolation of a salt- and phenol-tolerant strain of Trichoderma sp. with the ability to produce laccase, and thus with the potential for industrial applications. The coconut husk retting ground in the estuaries of Kerala, India, a saline environment highly polluted with phenolic compounds, was selected for isolating the fungus. Enhanced laccase production was observed at 5-10 ppt salinity. The organism could grow even at 30 ppt salinity with reduced biomass production and laccase secretion. The optimum concentration of different phenolic compounds for enhanced laccase secretion ranged between 20 and 80 mg L(-1) . As the concentration of phenolic compounds increased beyond 200 mg L(-1) , the enzyme activity decreased and was completely inhibited at 800 mg L(-1) . The tolerance of Trichoderma viride Pers. NFCCI-2745 to salinity and various phenolic compounds can be utilized in the bioremediation of highly saline and phenolic compound-rich industrial effluents. PMID:23712577

  4. Ab initio investigation of the autoionization process Ar*(4s {sup 3}P{sub 2}, {sup 3}P{sub 0})+Hg{yields}(Ar-Hg){sup +}+e{sup -}: Potential energy curves and autoionization widths, ionization cross sections, and electron energy spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Thiel, Linda; Hotop, Hartmut; Meyer, Wilfried

    2005-05-08

    Multireference configuration interaction (MRCI) calculations have been performed for the Ar*(4s {sup 3}P{sub 2,0})+Hg collision complex. Feshbach projection based on orbital occupancy defines the entrance channel resonance states and provides their potential energy curves as well as resonance-continuum coupling matrix elements, which are turned into an autoionization width function by Stieltjes imaging. Coupled cluster calculations with singles, doubles, and pertubative triples [CCSD(T)] give the exit channel potential of ArHg{sup +}. The Hg{sup 20+} core is treated by a scalar-relativistic effective core potential, reparametrized to reproduce experimental excitation and ionization energies. Spin-orbit interaction is included for the Ar* open 3p shell. The nuclear motion is treated within the local complex potential approximation. Ionization occurs for 85% ({sup 3}P{sub 0}) and 98% ({sup 3}P{sub 2}) of the symmetry allowed close collisions. Calculated ionization cross sections show good agreement with experimental data. The difference potential of the collision complex is remarkably flat down to internuclear separations of 8a{sub 0} and leads to very sharp peaks in theoretical electron energy spectra for single collision energies. After accounting for the experimental energy distribution and the resolution function of the spectrometer, a very satisfying agreement with experimental electron energy spectra is found, including subtle differences due to spin-orbit coupling. Theoretical input appears indispensable for an analysis of the measured data in terms of potential energy curves and autoionization width functions.

  5. New quantitative structure-fragmentation relationship strategy for chemical structure identification using the calculated enthalpy of formation as a descriptor for the fragments produced in electron ionization mass spectrometry: a case study with tetrachlorinated biphenyls.

    PubMed

    Dinca, Nicolae; Dragan, Simona; Dinca, Mihael; Sisu, Eugen; Covaci, Adrian

    2014-05-20

    Differential mass spectrometry correlated with quantum chemical calculations (QCC-ΔMS) has been shown to be an efficient tool for the chemical structure identification (CSI) of isomers with similar mass spectra. For this type of analysis, we report here a new strategy based on ordering (ORD), linear correlation (LCOR) algorithms, and their coupling, to filter the most probable structures corresponding to similar mass spectra belonging to a group with dozens of isomers (e.g., tetrachlorinated biphenyls, TeCBs). This strategy quantifies and compares the values of enthalpies of formation (Δ(f)H) obtained by QCC for some isobaric ions from the electron ionization (EI)-MS mass spectra, to the corresponding relative intensities. The result of CSI is provided in the form of lists of decreasing probabilities calculated for all the position-isomeric structures using the specialized software package CSI-Diff-MS Analysis 3.1.1. The simulation of CSI with ORD, LCOR, and their coupling of six TeCBs (IUPAC no. 44, 46, 52, 66, 74, and 77) has allowed us to find the best semiempirical molecular-orbital methods for several of their common isobaric fragments. The study of algorithms and strategy for the entire group of TeCBs (42 isomers) was made with one of the optimal variants for the computation of Δ(f)H using semiempirical molecular orbital methods of HyperChem: AM1 for M(+•) and [M - 4Cl](+•) ions and RM1 for [M - Cl](+) and [M - 2Cl](+•). The analytical performance of ORD, LCOR, and their coupling resulted from the CSI simulation of an analyte of known structure, using a decreasing number of isomeric standards, s = 5, 4, 3, and 2. Compared with the results obtained by a classical library search for TeCB isomers, the novel strategies of assigning structures of isomers with very similar mass spectra based on ORD, LCOR, and their coupling were much more efficient, because they provide the correct structure at the top of the probability list. Databases used in these CSI

  6. "Magic" Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimpin, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The systematic study of the temperature and pressure dependence of matrix-assisted ionization (MAI) led us to the discovery of the seemingly impossible, initially explained by some reviewers as either sleight of hand or the misinterpretation by an overzealous young scientist of results reported many years before and having little utility. The "magic" that we were attempting to report was that with matrix assistance, molecules, at least as large as bovine serum albumin (66 kDa), are lifted into the gas phase as multiply charged ions simply by exposure of the matrix:analyte sample to the vacuum of a mass spectrometer. Applied heat, a laser, or voltages are not necessary to achieve charge states and ion abundances only previously observed with electrospray ionization (ESI). The fundamentals of how solid phase volatile or nonvolatile compounds are converted to gas-phase ions without added energy currently involves speculation providing a great opportunity to rethink mechanistic understanding of ionization processes used in mass spectrometry. Improved understanding of the mechanism(s) of these processes and their connection to ESI and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization may provide opportunities to further develop new ionization strategies for traditional and yet unforeseen applications of mass spectrometry. This Critical Insights article covers developments leading to the discovery of a seemingly magic ionization process that is simple to use, fast, sensitive, robust, and can be directly applied to surface characterization using portable or high performance mass spectrometers.

  7. "Magic" Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Trimpin, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The systematic study of the temperature and pressure dependence of matrix-assisted ionization (MAI) led us to the discovery of the seemingly impossible, initially explained by some reviewers as either sleight of hand or the misinterpretation by an overzealous young scientist of results reported many years before and having little utility. The “magic” that we were attempting to report was that with matrix assistance, molecules, at least as large as bovine serum albumin (66 kDa), are lifted into the gas phase as multiply charged ions simply by exposure of the matrix:analyte sample to the vacuum of a mass spectrometer. Applied heat, a laser, or voltages are not necessary to achieve charge states and ion abundances only previously observed with electrospray ionization (ESI). The fundamentals of how solid phase volatile or nonvolatile compounds are converted to gas-phase ions without added energy currently involves speculation providing a great opportunity to rethink mechanistic understanding of ionization processes used in mass spectrometry. Improved understanding of the mechanism(s) of these processes and their connection to ESI and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization may provide opportunities to further develop new ionization strategies for traditional and yet unforeseen applications of mass spectrometry. This Critical Insights article covers developments leading to the discovery of a seemingly magic ionization process that is simple to use, fast, sensitive, robust, and can be directly applied to surface characterization using portable or high performance mass spectrometers. PMID:26486514

  8. The International Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment: MICE and Neutrino Factories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freemire, Ben

    2010-03-01

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is an accelerator and particle physics experiment aimed at demonstrating the technique of ionization cooling on a beam of muons. Ionization cooling is the process by which muons are sent through an absorbing material, thereby losing energy and decreasing their normalized emittance. The muons are then reaccelerated in the appropriate direction with radio frequency (RF) cavities. This produces an overall reduction in transverse emittance of the muon beam. Ionization cooling could be a key technique in the design of a high intensity Neutrino Factory.

  9. Ionization equilibrium in a cluster plasma with strong interparticle interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Likal'ter, A.A.

    1987-07-01

    An expansion, accurate up to the Madelung term, is derived for the drop in the ionization potential (and pressure) due to the strong Coulomb interaction. The ionization limit, separating the free and bound electron states, is determined with the help of the percolation theory. The principle of no explicit dependence of the total thermodynamic functions of the plasma on the ionization limit is employed. This has the consequence that the region of thermodynamic stability is greatly expanded compared with other models.

  10. Antibiotic Resistance and Virulence Potentials of Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli Isolates from Raw Meats of Slaughterhouses and Retail Markets in Korea.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun-Jung; Yoon, Jang Won; Heo, Eun-Jeong; Ko, Eun-Kyoung; Kim, Ki-Yeon; Kim, Young-Jo; Yoon, Hyang-Jin; Wee, Sung-Hwan; Park, Yong Ho; Moon, Jin San

    2015-09-01

    In this study, the prevalence of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) was investigated among raw meat or meat products from slaughterhouses and retail markets in South Korea, and their potential for antibiotic resistance and virulence was further analyzed. A total of 912 raw meats, including beef, pork, and chicken, were collected from 2008 to 2009. E. coli strains were frequently isolated in chicken meats (176/233, 75.9%), beef (102/217, 42.3%), and pork (109/235, 39.2%). Putative STEC isolates were further categorized, based on the presence or absence of the Shiga toxin (stx) genes, followed by standard O-serotyping. Polymerase chain reaction assays were used to detect the previously defined virulence genes in STEC, including Shiga toxins 1 and Shiga toxin 2 (stx1 and 2), enterohemolysin (ehxA), intimin (eaeA), STEC autoagglutination adhesion (saa), and subtilase cytotoxin (subAB). All carried both stx1 and eae genes, but none of them had the stx2, saa, or subAB genes. Six (50.0%) STEC isolates possessed the ehxA gene, which is known to be encoded by the 60-megadalton virulence plasmid. Our antibiogram profiling demonstrated that some STEC strains, particularly pork and chicken isolates, displayed a multiple drug-resistance phenotype. RPLA analysis revealed that all the stx1-positive STEC isolates produced Stx1 only at the undetectable level. Altogether, these results imply that the locus of enterocyte and effacement (LEE)-positive strains STEC are predominant among raw meats or meat products from slaughterhouses or retail markets in Korea. PMID:26095383

  11. Evaluation of a potential generator-produced PET tracer for cerebral perfusion imaging: Single-pass cerebral extraction measurements and imaging with radiolabeled Cu-PTSM

    SciTech Connect

    Mathias, C.J.; Welch, M.J.; Raichle, M.E.; Mintun, M.A.; Lich, L.L.; McGuire, A.H.; Zinn, K.R.; John, E.K.; Green, M.A. )

    1990-03-01

    Copper(II) pyruvaldehyde bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazone) (Cu-PTSM), copper(II) pyruvaldehyde bis(N4-dimethylthiosemicarbazone) (Cu-PTSM2), and copper(II) ethylglyoxal bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazone) (Cu-ETSM), have been proposed as PET tracers for cerebral blood flow (CBF) when labeled with generator-produced 62Cu (t1/2 = 9.7 min). To evaluate the potential of Cu-PTSM for CBF PET studies, baboon single-pass cerebral extraction measurements and PET imaging were carried out with the use of 67Cu (t1/2 = 2.6 days) and 64Cu (t1/2 = 12.7 hr), respectively. All three chelates were extracted into the brain with high efficiency. There was some clearance of all chelates in the 10-50-sec time frame and Cu-PTSM2 continued to clear. Cu-PTSM and Cu-ETSM have high residual brain activity. PET imaging of baboon brain was carried out with the use of (64Cu)-Cu-PTSM. For comparison with the 64Cu brain image, a CBF (15O-labeled water) image (40 sec) was first obtained. Qualitatively, the H2(15)O and (64Cu)-Cu-PTSM images were very similar; for example, a comparison of gray to white matter uptake resulted in ratios of 2.42 for H2(15)O and 2.67 for Cu-PTSM. No redistribution of 64Cu was observed in 2 hr of imaging, as was predicted from the single-pass study results. Quantitative determination of blood flow using Cu-PTSM showed good agreement with blood flow determined with H2(15)O. This data suggests that (62Cu)-Cu-PTSM may be a useful generator-produced radiopharmaceutical for blood flow studies with PET.

  12. Reversal electron attachment ionizer for detection of trace species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernius, Mark T. (Inventor); Chutjian, Ara (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    An in-line reversal electron, high-current ionizer capable of focusing a beam of electrons to a reversal region and executing a reversal of said electrons, such that the electrons possess zero kinetic energy at the point of reversal, may be used to produce both negative and positive ions. A sample gas is introduced at the point of electron reversal for low energy electron-(sample gas) molecule attachment with high efficiency. The attachment process produces negative ions from the sample gas, which includes species present in trace (minute) amounts. These ions are extracted efficiently and directed to a mass analyzer where they may be detected and identified. The generation and detection of positive ions is accomplished in a similar fashion with minimal adjustment to potentials applied to the apparatus.

  13. Fuel cell with ionization membrane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Frank T. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A fuel cell is disclosed comprising an ionization membrane having at least one area through which gas is passed, and which ionizes the gas passing therethrough, and a cathode for receiving the ions generated by the ionization membrane. The ionization membrane may include one or more openings in the membrane with electrodes that are located closer than a mean free path of molecules within the gas to be ionized. Methods of manufacture are also provided.

  14. Nuclear Fission Investigation with Twin Ionization Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Zeynalova, O.; Zeynalov, Sh.; Nazarenko, M.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Oberstedt, S.

    2011-11-29

    The purpose of the present paper was to report the recent results, obtained in development of digital pulse processing mathematics for prompt fission neutron (PFN) investigation using twin ionization chamber (TIC) along with fast neutron time-of-flight detector (ND). Due to well known ambiguities in literature (see refs. [4, 6, 9 and 11]), concerning a pulse induction on TIC electrodes by FF ionization, we first presented detailed mathematical analysis of fission fragment (FF) signal formation on TIC anode. The analysis was done using Ramo-Shockley theorem, which gives relation between charged particle motion between TIC electrodes and so called weighting potential. Weighting potential was calculated by direct numerical solution of Laplace equation (neglecting space charge) for the TIC geometry and ionization, caused by FF. Formulae for grid inefficiency (GI) correction and digital pulse processing algorithms for PFN time-of-flight measurements and pulse shape analysis are presented and discussed.

  15. Ground-Level Ozone Following Astrophysical Ionizing Radiation Events: An Additional Biological Hazard?

    PubMed

    Thomas, Brian C; Goracke, Byron D

    2016-01-01

    Astrophysical ionizing radiation events such as supernovae, gamma-ray bursts, and solar proton events have been recognized as a potential threat to life on Earth, primarily through depletion of stratospheric ozone and subsequent increase in solar UV radiation at Earth's surface and in the upper levels of the ocean. Other work has also considered the potential impact of nitric acid rainout, concluding that no significant threat is likely. Not yet studied to date is the potential impact of ozone produced in the lower atmosphere following an ionizing radiation event. Ozone is a known irritant to organisms on land and in water and therefore may be a significant additional hazard. Using previously completed atmospheric chemistry modeling, we examined the amount of ozone produced in the lower atmosphere for the case of a gamma-ray burst and found that the values are too small to pose a significant additional threat to the biosphere. These results may be extended to other ionizing radiation events, including supernovae and extreme solar proton events. PMID:26745353

  16. Naturally occurring 2-substituted (1,3)-beta-D-glucan producing Lactobacillus suebicus and Pediococcus parvulus strains with potential utility in the production of functional foods.

    PubMed

    Garai-Ibabe, Gaizka; Dueñas, María Teresa; Irastorza, Ana; Sierra-Filardi, Elena; Werning, María Laura; López, Paloma; Corbí, Angel Luis; Fernández de Palencia, Pilar

    2010-12-01

    We have isolated three lactic acid bacteria (Lactobacillus suebicus CUPV221, Pediococcus parvulus CUPV1 and P. parvulus CUPV22) that produced high levels of 2-substituted (1,3)-beta-D-glucans which increased the viscosity of the growth media. The (1,3)-beta-D-glucan consisted of two main molecular species, with masses of approximately 10(7) and 10(4) Da, whose proportions varied among the strains. The three strains survived exposure to saliva and simulated gastric conditions at pH 5, with P. parvulus CUPV22 surviving at pH 3.1, and L. suebicus CUPV221 surviving at pH 1.8. All strains were resistant to pancreatin and bile salts. P. parvulus CUPV22 exhibited the highest adhesion (10.5%) to Caco-2 cells, which decreased to 1.2% after washing the cells. Finally, P. parvulus CUPV22 and L. suebicus CUPV221 induced the production of inflammation-related cytokines by polarized macrophages, and interestingly, L. suebicus stimulated the production of cytokine IL-10. These results indicate that the three strains have potential utility for the production of functional foods. PMID:20691585

  17. Gold Nanoparticle-Photosensitizer Conjugate Based Photodynamic Inactivation of Biofilm Producing Cells: Potential for Treatment of C. albicans Infection in BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sherwani, Mohd. Asif; Tufail, Saba; Khan, Aijaz Ahmed; Owais, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been found to be effective in inhibiting biofilm producing organisms. We investigated the photodynamic effect of gold nanoparticle (GNP) conjugated photosensitizers against Candida albicans biofilm. We also examined the photodynamic efficacy of photosensitizer (PS) conjugated GNPs (GNP-PS) to treat skin and oral C. albicans infection in BALB/c mice. Methods The biomimetically synthesized GNPs were conjugated to photosensitizers viz. methylene blue (MB) or toluidine blue O (TB). The conjugation of PSs with GNPs was characterized by spectroscopic and microscopic techniques. The efficacy of gold nanoparticle conjugates against C. albicans biofilm was demonstrated by XTT assay and microscopic studies. The therapeutic efficacy of the combination of the GNP conjugates against cutaneous C. albicans infection was examined in mouse model by enumerating residual fungal burden and histopathological studies. Results The GNP-PS conjugate based PDT was found to effectively kill both C. albicans planktonic cells and biofilm populating hyphal forms. The mixture of GNPs conjugated to two different PSs significantly depleted the hyphal C. albicans burden against superficial skin and oral C. albicans infection in mice. Conclusion The GNP-PS conjugate combination exhibits synergism in photodynamic inactivation of C. albicans. The GNP conjugate based PDT can be employed effectively in treatment of cutaneous C. albicans infections in model animals. The antibiofilm potential of PDT therapy can also be exploited in depletion of C. albicans on medical appliances such as implants and catheters etc. PMID:26148012

  18. A new plasma source based on contact ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrittwieser, R.; Koslover, R.; Karim, R.; Rynn, N.

    1985-07-01

    A new type of plasma source is presented: A collisionless plasma is formed by producing ions on one end and electrons on the other of a cylindrical vacuum chamber in a solenoidal magnetic field. The ions are produced by contact ionization of potassium on tungsten. The source of electrons is a LaB6 plate. In the usual single-ended Q machine the elements rhenium, iridium, and platinum are tested as ionizing metals for potassium and barium.

  19. Ab initio molecular orbital study of substituent effects in vaska type complexes (trans-IrL{sub 2}(CO)X): Electron affinities, ionization potentials, carbonyl stretch frequencies, and the thermodynamics of H{sub 2} dissociative addition

    SciTech Connect

    Abu-Hasanayn, F.; Goldman, A.S.; Krogh-Jespersen, K.

    1994-10-26

    Ab initio electronic structure calculations are used to study substituent effects in Vaska-type complexes, trans-IrL{sub 2}(CO)X (1-X) (X = F, Cl, Br, I, CN, H, CH{sub 3}, SiH{sub 3}, OH, and SH; L = PH{sub 3}). Both the electron affinity and the ionization potential of 1-X are computed to increase upon descending the halogen series of complexes, which indicates, surprisingly, that the complexes with more electronegative halogens are more difficult to reduce and easier to oxidize. The computed electron affinity trend is consistent with the half-wave reduction potential trend known for 1-X (L = PPh{sub 3}; X = F, Cl, Br, and I). Computed carbonyl stretch frequencies for 1-X are greater than experimental values (L = PPh{sub 3}), but observed trends are well reproduced. The redox and spectroscopic trends are discussed in terms of the substituent effects on the electronic structure of 1-X, particularly as revealed in the molecular orbital energy level diagrams of these complexes. The reaction energy for H{sub 2} addition to 1-X, leading to the cis,trans-(H){sub 2}IrL{sub 2}(CO)X (2-X) product, has been computed. After electron correlation effects are included (MP4(SDTQ)), the reaction enthalpy computed for 1-CI is {minus}18.4 kcal/mol (L = PH{sub 3}) as compared to a reported experimental value of {minus}14 kcal/mol (L = PPh{sub 3}). Compared with available experimental data, the electronic effects of L(L = PH{sub 3}, NH{sub 3}, or AsH{sub 3}) and X on the thermodynamics of the H{sub 2} addition reaction are accurately reproduced by the model calculations at all levels of theory (HF and MPn). Formation of the hypothetical products cis,trans- and trans,trans-(H){sub 2}IrL{sub 2}(CO)X(2-X and 3-X) (X = BH{sub 2}, NH{sub 2}, and PH{sub 2}) is used to demonstrate that {pi}-acceptor substituents promote the H{sub 2} addition reaction to 1-X while {pi}-donor substituents disfavor addition.

  20. Ionized interstellar froth in irregular galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Deidre A.; Gallagher, John S., III

    1990-01-01

    The warm interstellar medium of galaxies is a complicated place. It is often full of holes, neutral and ionized loops and shells, and diffuse ionized gas. Deep H alpha images of Magellanic-type irregular galaxies also reveal complex spatial structures consisting of loops and filaments in the interstellar gas outside of the boundaries of traditional HII regions. Researchers refer to these ionized structures as froth. Such structures could mark paths over which newly produced heavy elements are dispersed in irregular galaxies, and they could be the signatures of a feedback process related to star formation. In order to investigate the physical nature of the froth, researchers obtained narrow-band images and high and low dispersion spectra from Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO) and deep blue-passband plates from the Canada-France-Hawaii Observatory (CFHO).

  1. Ionizing Radiation and Its Risks

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Marvin

    1982-01-01

    Penetrating ionizing radiation fairly uniformly puts all exposed molecules and cells at approximately equal risk for deleterious consequences. Thus, the original deposition of radiation energy (that is, the dose) is unaltered by metabolic characteristics of cells and tissue, unlike the situation for chemical agents. Intensely ionizing radiations, such as neutrons and alpha particles, are up to ten times more damaging than sparsely ionizing sources such as x-rays or gamma rays for equivalent doses. Furthermore, repair in cells and tissues can ameliorate the consequences of radiation doses delivered at lower rates by up to a factor of ten compared with comparable doses acutely delivered, especially for somatic (carcinogenic) and genetic effects from x- and gamma-irradiation exposure. Studies on irradiated laboratory animals or on people following occupational, medical or accidental exposures point to an average lifetime fatal cancer risk of about 1 × 10-4 per rem of dose (100 per 106 person-rem). Leukemia and lung, breast and thyroid cancer seem more likely than other types of cancer to be produced by radiation. Radiation exposures from natural sources (cosmic rays and terrestrial radioactivity) of about 0.1 rem per year yield a lifetime cancer risk about 0.1 percent of the normally occurring 20 percent risk of cancer death. An increase of about 1 percent per rem in fatal cancer risk, or 200 rem to double the “background” risk rate, is compared with an estimate of about 100 rem to double the genetic risk. Newer data suggest that the risks for low-level radiation are lower than risks estimated from data from high exposures and that the present 5 rem per year limit for workers is adequate. PMID:6761969

  2. Ambient ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, A. T.

    2015-07-01

    Ambient ionization mass spectrometry emerged as a new scientific discipline only about ten years ago. A considerable body of information has been reported since that time. Keeping the sensitivity, performance and informativity of classical mass spectrometry methods, the new approach made it possible to eliminate laborious sample preparation procedures and triggered the development of miniaturized instruments to work directly in the field. The review concerns the theoretical foundations and design of ambient ionization methods. Their advantages and drawbacks, as well as prospects for application in chemistry, biology, medicine, environmetal analysis, etc., are discussed. The bibliography includes 194 references.

  3. Multiphoton ionization of large water clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Apicella, B.; Li, X.; Passaro, M.; Spinelli, N.; Wang, X.

    2014-05-28

    Water clusters are multimers of water molecules held together by hydrogen bonds. In the present work, multiphoton ionization in the UV range coupled with time of flight mass spectrometry has been applied to water clusters with up to 160 molecules in order to obtain information on the electronic states of clusters of different sizes up to dimensions that can approximate the bulk phase. The dependence of ion intensities of water clusters and their metastable fragments produced by laser ionization at 355 nm on laser power density indicates a (3+1)-photon resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization process. It also explains the large increase of ionization efficiency at 355 nm compared to that at 266 nm. Indeed, it was found, by applying both nanosecond and picosecond laser ionization with the two different UV wavelengths, that no water cluster sequences after n = 9 could be observed at 266 nm, whereas water clusters up to m/z 2000 Th in reflectron mode and m/z 3000 Th in linear mode were detected at 355 nm. The agreement between our findings on clusters of water, especially true in the range with n > 10, and reported data for liquid water supports the hypothesis that clusters above a critical dimension can approximate the liquid phase. It should thus be possible to study clusters just above 10 water molecules, for getting information on the bulk phase structure.

  4. Understanding the role of agricultural practices in the potential colonization and contamination by Escherichia coli in the rhizospheres of fresh produce.

    PubMed

    Habteselassie, Mussie Y; Bischoff, Marianne; Applegate, Bruce; Reuhs, Bradley; Turco, Ronald F

    2010-11-01

    To better protect consumers from exposure to produce contaminated with Escherichia coli, the potential transfer of E. coli from manure or irrigation water to plants must be better understood. We used E. coli strains expressing bioluminescence (E. coli O157:H7 lux) or multiantibiotic resistance (E. coli²(+)) in this study. These marked strains enabled us to visualize in situ rhizosphere colonization and metabolic activity and to track the occurrence and survival of E. coli in soil, rhizosphere, and phyllosphere. When radish and lettuce seeds were treated with E. coli O157:H7 lux and grown in an agar-based growth system, rapid bacterial colonization of the germinating seedlings and high levels of microbial activity were seen. Introduction of E. coli²(+) to soil via manure or via manure in irrigation water showed that E. coli could establish itself in the lettuce rhizosphere. Regardless of introduction method, 15 days subsequent to its establishment in the rhizosphere, E. coli²(+) was detected on the phyllosphere of lettuce at an average number of 2.5 log CFU/g. When E. coli²(+) was introduced 17 and 32 days postseeding to untreated soil (rather than the plant surface) via irrigation, it was detected at low levels (1.4 log CFU/g) on the lettuce phyllosphere 10 days later. While E. coli²(+) persisted in the bulk and rhizosphere soil throughout the study period (day 41), it was not detected on the external portions of the phyllosphere after 27 days. Overall, we find that E. coli is mobile in the plant system and responds to the rhizosphere like other bacteria. PMID:21219711

  5. Comparison of wild-type and UV-mutant beta-glucanase-producing strains of Talaromyces emersonii with potential in brewing applications.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Tracey C; Lalor, Eoin; Hanniffy, Orla; Savage, Angela V; Tuohy, Maria G

    2005-04-01

    A screen of 46 UV-mutant strains of the moderately thermophilic fungus Talaromyces emersonii yielded two mutants (TC2, TC5) that displayed gross morphological differences to the parent strain and enhanced activity against mixed linkage cereal beta-glucans. Activity against beta-(1, 3)(1, 4)-D: -glucan from barley (BBGase) was measured during growth of the mutant and wild-type strains on a variety of carbon sources, ranging from solka floc to crude cereal fractions. In liquid culture, TC2 and TC5 secreted 1.2- to 8.6-fold more BBGase than the parent strain and markedly less beta-glucosidase (exo-activity); enzyme levels were dependent on the carbon source. Cellulose induced high BBGase. However, beet pulp, wheat bran, carob and tea-leaves were cheap and effective inducers. T. emersonii wild-type, TC2 and TC5 crude enzyme preparations achieved similar end-points during the hydrolysis of commercial barley beta-glucan (13.0-16.9%), but were more active against crude beta-glucan from barley (16.0-24.2% hydrolysis). The products of hydrolysis were quantified by high-performance anion-exchange chromatography. Mash trials indicated that enzyme preparations from all three organisms effected a significant reduction in wort viscosity and residual mash beta-glucan. Finally, TC2 and TC5 produce more efficient beta-glucan-depolymerizing enzymes; and wheat bran and solka floc can be used to provide inexpensive and potent enzyme cocktails with potential in brewing applications. PMID:15856354

  6. INSTRUMENTS AND METHODS OF INVESTIGATION: Surface-ionization field mass-spectrometry studies of nonequilibrium surface ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blashenkov, Nikolai M.; Lavrent'ev, Gennadii Ya

    2007-01-01

    The ionization of polyatomic molecules on tungsten and tungsten oxide surfaces is considered for quasiequilibrium or essentially nonequilibrium conditions (in the latter case, the term nonequilibrium surface ionization is used for adsorbate ionization). Heterogeneous reactions are supposed to proceed through monomolecular decay of polyatomic molecules or fragments of multimolecular complexes. The nonequilibrium nature of these reactions is established. The dependences of the current density of disordered ions on the surface temperature, electric field strength, and ionized particle energy distribution are obtained in analytical form. Heterogeneous dissociation energies, the ionization potentials of radicals, and the magnitude of reaction departure from equilibrium are determined from experimental data, as are energy exchange times between reaction products and surfaces, the number of molecules in molecular complexes, and the number of effective degrees of freedom in molecules and complexes. In collecting the data a new technique relying on surface-ionization field mass-spectrometry was applied.

  7. An experimental investigation of the dissociative ionization process of argon cluster ions induced by electron impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, P.; Ma, X.; Yan, S.; Xu, S.; Zhang, S.; Zhu, X.; Li, B.; Feng, W.; Qian, D.; Zhang, R.; Guo, D.; Wen, W.; Zhang, D.; Yang, J.; Zhao, D.; Liu, H.

    2014-04-01

    Utilizing the Cold Target Recoil Ions Momentum Spectrometer (COLTRIMS), dissociative ionization of argon cluster was experimentally investigated by electron impact. The recoil ions produced both in the pure ionization process and the dissociative ionization channels are measured with collision energies from 100 and 1000 eV. The ratios of the dimer ions from pure ionization (Ar2P+) and the dimer ions from small cluster dissociation (Ar+2D) to the atomic argon ion (Ar+) in different stagnation pressures were obtained.

  8. Accreditation of ionizing radiation protection programs

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, J.C.; Swinth, K.L.; Selby, J.M.

    1991-10-01

    There are over one million workers in the United States who have the potential to be exposed to ionizing radiation. Therefore, it is necessary to determine accurately the quantity of radiation to which they may have been exposed. This quantity if measured by personnel dosimeters that are carried by individuals requiring radiation monitoring. Accreditation of the organizations which evaluate this quantity provides official recognition of the competence of these organizations. Accreditation programs in the field of ionizing radiation protection have been in operation for a number of years, and their experience has demonstrated that such programs can help to improve performance.

  9. Hazards to space workers from ionizing radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyman, J. T.

    1980-01-01

    A compilation of background information and a preliminary assessment of the potential risks to workers from the ionizing radiation encountered in space is provided. The report: (1) summarizes the current knowledge of the space radiation environment to which space workers will be exposed; (2) reviews the biological effects of ionizing radiation considered of major importance to a SPS project; and (3) discusses the health implications of exposure of populations of space workers to the radiations likely to penetrate through the shielding provided by the SPS work stations and habitat shelters of the SPS Reference System.

  10. The functional potential of microbial communities in hydraulic fracturing source water and produced water from natural gas extraction characterized by metagenomic sequencing

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mohan, Arvind Murali; Bibby, Kyle J.; Lipus, Daniel; Hammack, Richard W.; Gregory, Kelvin B.; Forster, Robert J.

    2014-10-22

    Microbial activity in produced water from hydraulic fracturing operations can lead to undesired environmental impacts and increase gas production costs. However, the metabolic profile of these microbial communities is not well understood. Here, for the first time, we present results from a shotgun metagenome of microbial communities in both hydraulic fracturing source water and wastewater produced by hydraulic fracturing. Taxonomic analyses showed an increase in anaerobic/facultative anaerobic classes related to Clostridia, Gammaproteobacteria, Bacteroidia and Epsilonproteobacteria in produced water as compared to predominantly aerobic Alphaproteobacteria in the fracturing source water. Thus, the metabolic profile revealed a relative increase in genes responsiblemore » for carbohydrate metabolism, respiration, sporulation and dormancy, iron acquisition and metabolism, stress response and sulfur metabolism in the produced water samples. These results suggest that microbial communities in produced water have an increased genetic ability to handle stress, which has significant implications for produced water management, such as disinfection.« less

  11. The Functional Potential of Microbial Communities in Hydraulic Fracturing Source Water and Produced Water from Natural Gas Extraction Characterized by Metagenomic Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Arvind Murali; Bibby, Kyle J.; Lipus, Daniel; Hammack, Richard W.; Gregory, Kelvin B.

    2014-01-01

    Microbial activity in produced water from hydraulic fracturing operations can lead to undesired environmental impacts and increase gas production costs. However, the metabolic profile of these microbial communities is not well understood. Here, for the first time, we present results from a shotgun metagenome of microbial communities in both hydraulic fracturing source water and wastewater produced by hydraulic fracturing. Taxonomic analyses showed an increase in anaerobic/facultative anaerobic classes related to Clostridia, Gammaproteobacteria, Bacteroidia and Epsilonproteobacteria in produced water as compared to predominantly aerobic Alphaproteobacteria in the fracturing source water. The metabolic profile revealed a relative increase in genes responsible for carbohydrate metabolism, respiration, sporulation and dormancy, iron acquisition and metabolism, stress response and sulfur metabolism in the produced water samples. These results suggest that microbial communities in produced water have an increased genetic ability to handle stress, which has significant implications for produced water management, such as disinfection. PMID:25338024

  12. The functional potential of microbial communities in hydraulic fracturing source water and produced water from natural gas extraction characterized by metagenomic sequencing.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Arvind Murali; Bibby, Kyle J; Lipus, Daniel; Hammack, Richard W; Gregory, Kelvin B

    2014-01-01

    Microbial activity in produced water from hydraulic fracturing operations can lead to undesired environmental impacts and increase gas production costs. However, the metabolic profile of these microbial communities is not well understood. Here, for the first time, we present results from a shotgun metagenome of microbial communities in both hydraulic fracturing source water and wastewater produced by hydraulic fracturing. Taxonomic analyses showed an increase in anaerobic/facultative anaerobic classes related to Clostridia, Gammaproteobacteria, Bacteroidia and Epsilonproteobacteria in produced water as compared to predominantly aerobic Alphaproteobacteria in the fracturing source water. The metabolic profile revealed a relative increase in genes responsible for carbohydrate metabolism, respiration, sporulation and dormancy, iron acquisition and metabolism, stress response and sulfur metabolism in the produced water samples. These results suggest that microbial communities in produced water have an increased genetic ability to handle stress, which has significant implications for produced water management, such as disinfection. PMID:25338024

  13. Alkali ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Hrizo, John; Bauerle, James E.; Witkowski, Robert E.

    1982-01-01

    A calibration filament containing a sodium-bearing compound is included in combination with the sensing filament and ion collector plate of a sodium ionization detector to permit periodic generation of sodium atoms for the in-situ calibration of the detector.

  14. Ion energies in high power impulse magnetron sputtering with and without localized ionization zones

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yuchen; Tanaka, Koichi; Liu, Jason; Anders, André

    2015-03-23

    High speed imaging of high power impulse magnetron sputtering discharges has revealed that ionization is localized in moving ionization zones but localization disappears at high currents for high yield targets. This offers an opportunity to study the effect ionization zones have on ion energies. We measure that ions have generally higher energies when ionization zones are present, supporting the concept that these zones are associated with moving potential humps. We propose that the disappearance of ionization zones is caused by an increased supply of atoms from the target which cools electrons and reduces depletion of atoms to be ionized.

  15. IONIZATION IN ATMOSPHERES OF BROWN DWARFS AND EXTRASOLAR PLANETS. II. DUST-INDUCED COLLISIONAL IONIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Helling, Ch.; Jardine, M.; Mokler, F.

    2011-08-10

    Observations have shown that continuous radio emission and also sporadic H{alpha} and X-ray emission are prominent in singular, low-mass objects later than spectral class M. These activity signatures are interpreted as being caused by coupling of an ionized atmosphere to the stellar magnetic field. What remains a puzzle, however, is the mechanism by which such a cool atmosphere can produce the necessary level of ionization. At these low temperatures, thermal gas processes are insufficient, but the formation of clouds sets in. Cloud particles can act as seeds for electron avalanches in streamers that ionize the ambient gas, and can lead to lightning and indirectly to magnetic field coupling, a combination of processes also expected for protoplanetary disks. However, the precondition is that the cloud particles are charged. We use results from DRIFT-PHOENIX model atmospheres to investigate collisional processes that can lead to the ionization of dust grains inside clouds. We show that ionization by turbulence-induced dust-dust collisions is the most efficient kinetic process. The efficiency is highest in the inner cloud where particles grow quickly and, hence, the dust-to-gas ratio is high. Dust-dust collisions alone are not sufficient to improve the magnetic coupling of the atmosphere inside the cloud layers, but the charges supplied either on grains or within the gas phase as separated electrons can trigger secondary nonlinear processes. Cosmic rays are likely to increase the global level of ionization, but their influence decreases if a strong, large-scale magnetic field is present as on brown dwarfs. We suggest that although thermal gas ionization declines in objects across the fully convective boundary, dust charging by collisional processes can play an important role in the lowest mass objects. The onset of atmospheric dust may therefore correlate with the anomalous X-ray and radio emission in atmospheres that are cool, but charged more than expected by pure

  16. Ionizing radiation and orthopaedic prostheses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimnac, Clare M.; Kurtz, Steven M.

    2005-07-01

    Ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) materials have been used successfully as one half of the bearing couple (against metallic alloys or ceramics) in total hip and total knee joint replacements for four decades. This review describes the impact of ionizing radiation (used for sterilization and for microstructural modification via crosslinking) on the performance of UHMWPE total joint replacement components. Gamma radiation sterilization in air leads to oxidative degradation of UHMWPE joint components that occurs during shelf-aging and also during in vivo use. Efforts to mitigate oxidative degradation of UHMWPE joint components include gamma radiation sterilization in inert barrier-packaging and processing treatments to reduce free radicals. Ionizing radiation (both gamma and electron-beam) has recently been used to form highly crosslinked UHMWPEs that have better adhesive and abrasive wear resistance than non-crosslinked UHMWPE, thereby potentially improving the long-term performance of total joint replacements. Along with increased wear resistance, however, there are deleterious changes to ductility and fracture resistance of UHMWPE, and an increased risk of fracture of these components remains a clinical concern.

  17. Ionization of a P-doped Si(111) nanofilm using two-dimensional periodic boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Tzu-Liang; Lee, Alex J.; Chelikowsky, James R.

    2015-06-01

    We examine the ionization of a P dopant in a Si(111) nanofilm using first-principles electronic structure calculations with 2D periodic boundary conditions. The electrostatic divergence of a charged periodic system is resolved by defining an electrostatic reference potential along the confined direction. After ionization, there is an overall electrostatic potential drop of the system. A nanofilm with larger periodicity can reduce the potential drop by screening the P ion, and leads to a smaller ionization energy. We compare the ionization energy calculated for the P-doped Si nanofilm with a P-doped Si nanocrystal and a P-doped Si(110) nanowire. As dimensionality decreases, quantum confinement tends to lower the ionization energy by raising the defect level. However, lower dimensionality also reduces screening after P ionization. This leads to a larger electrostatic potential drop and offsets the effect of quantum confinement on the ionization energy.

  18. Ultrahigh vacuum measuring ionization gauge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brock, F. J. (Inventor)

    1968-01-01

    The ionization gage described consists of separate ionization and collector regions connected at an exit area with a modulator electrode. In addition to the standard modulation function, the modulator in this location yields a suprising increase in collector current, apparently due to improved focussing and extraction of ions from the ionization region.

  19. Novel fibre-optic-based ionization radiation probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, David A.

    2004-06-01

    CsI ionization radiation probes interrogated via a fiber optic transceiver link for monitoring medical procedures such as Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy, Brachytherapy and Nuclear Medicine are presented together with potential industrial, environmental and military applications.

  20. Field-free molecular alignment for measuring ionization probability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loriot, V.; Hertz, E.; Lavorel, B.; Faucher, O.

    2008-01-01

    We have shown in a recent letter (Loriot et al 2006 Opt. Lett. 31 2897) the possibility of determining the ionization probability of linear molecules by using an all-optical technique that takes advantage of post-pulse molecular alignment. To that end, we have implemented a 'cross-defocusing' technique producing a signal sensitive to both alignment and ionization. The analysis of the signal provides a quantitative measurement of the ionization probability calibrated with molecular alignment. In the present work, the method is discussed in more detail and applied to the measurement of the ionization probability of N2 as well as to the determination of the ionization ratio between (i) N2 and Ar and (ii) O2 and Xe. We demonstrate in addition a progress in the scheme in order to improve the accuracy at low intensity.