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Sample records for ir research glasgow

  1. Silica research in Glasgow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barr, B. W.; Cagnoli, G.; Casey, M. M.; Clubley, D.; Crooks, D. R. M.; Danzmann, K.; Elliffe, E. J.; Goßler, S.; Grant, A.; Grote, H.; Heptonstall, A.; Hough, J.; Jennrich, O.; Lück, H.; McIntosh, S. A.; Newton, G. P.; Palmer, D. A.; Plissi, M. V.; Robertson, D. I.; Robertson, N. A.; Rowan, S.; Skeldon, K. D.; Sneddon, P.; Strain, K. A.; Torrie, C. I.; Ward, H.; Willems, P. A.; Willke, B.; Winkler, W.

    2002-04-01

    The Glasgow group is involved in the construction of the GEO600 interferometer as well as in R&D activity on technology for advanced gravitational wave detectors. GEO600 will be the first GW detector using quasi-monolithic silica suspensions in order to decrease thermal noise significantly with respect to steel wire suspensions. The results concerning GEO600 suspension mounting and performance will be shown in the first section. Section 2 is devoted to the present results from the direct measurement of thermal noise in mirrors mounted in the 10 m interferometer in Glasgow which has a sensitivity limit of 4 × 10-19 m Hz-1/2 above 1 kHz. Section 3 presents results on the measurements of coating losses. R&D activity has been carried out to understand better how thermal noise in the suspensions affects the detector sensitivity, and in section 4 a discussion on the non-linear thermoelastic effect is presented.

  2. Cormack Research Project: Glasgow University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, Susan; Ryan, James M.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this project was to investigate and improve upon existing methods of analysing data from COMITEL on the Gamma Ray Observatory for neutrons emitted during solar flares. In particular, a strategy for placing confidence intervals on neutron energy distributions, due to uncertainties on the response matrix has been developed. We have also been able to demonstrate the superior performance of one of a range of possible statistical regularization strategies. A method of generating likely models of neutron energy distributions has also been developed as a tool to this end. The project involved solving an inverse problem with noise being added to the data in various ways. To achieve this pre-existing C code was used to run Fortran subroutines which performed statistical regularization on the data.

  3. Trigger Happy: The Troubling Trend of Primary School Closures in Glasgow City Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koch, Joshua F.

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the continuing trend of school closures in Glasgow, Scotland. Particular attention will be paid to Stonedyke Primary School, which Glasgow City Council was proposing to close at the time of this research. Current statistical data and research is used to better examine the current crisis Stonedyke Primary faces. Furthermore,…

  4. Territorialities in Scotland: Perceptions of Young People in Glasgow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holligan, Christopher Peter; Deuchar, Ross

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an exploratory, small-scale qualitative research enquiry into the perceptions and experiences of young people in communities afflicted by deprivation in Glasgow, Scotland's largest city. The context within which we address this focus contains a culture reputed to involve sectarianism, territoriality and gangs.…

  5. Application of IR thermography for unsteady fluid-flow research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppel, Tiit; Lahdeniemi, Matti; Ekholm, Ari

    1998-03-01

    In the recent years the IR thermography technique has been sued successfully as a new contactless instrument for gas and fluid flow research in pipes and on the surface of a flat plate. It is well known that most energy changes in the flow take place in the boundary layer. This is in turn important for the intensity of convective heat transfer in pipe flows and enables to measure processes connected with energy changes in the flow from outside the pipe. Series of measurements of suddenly accelerated and pulsating pipe flow were made at Satakunta Polytechnic, Technology Pori, Finland. The theoretical criterion describing the transition from laminar to turbulent regime is found depending on the critical thickness of the boundary layer of suddenly accelerated flow. At the moment of transition of the 'plug' type flow into turbulent flow, the velocities in the wall region diminish and this can be detected using the IR thermography from the wall temperature changes. the experimental results of the mean velocity development and transition criteria correspond to the theoretical calculations. The changes of the internal structure of the flow affect the convective heat transfer and this in turn influences the pipe wall temperature. IR thermography measures pipe wall temperature changes and consequently we can detect flow structure changes in the boundary layer in the accelerated and decelerated phase of the pulsating pipe flow.

  6. An Exploration of Smoking Behavior of African Male Immigrants Living in Glasgow

    PubMed Central

    Ezika, Ejiofor Augustine

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The aim of this research study was to explore the smoking behavior of adult African male immigrant smokers living in Glasgow to inform and contribute to primary health promotion frameworks. METHODS 25 adult African male immigrant smokers living in Glasgow were recruited via consecutive sampling by soliciting for participation through the use of flyers, posters and word of mouth. Data collection occurred via semi-structured face-to-face interviews. The interviews were audio taped, after which verbatim transcription was carried out and the data analyzed thematically. RESULTS The participants’ smoking habits were influenced by cold weather environment as well as societal norms that appear to make the smoking habit more acceptable in Glasgow than Africa. It appears the more educated the participants were, the fewer cigarettes they smoked. However, there was only a slight difference in the number of cigarettes smoked between participants with a degree and those with a postgraduate degree. CONCLUSION The participants’ smoking habits in Glasgow appear to have increased because of environmental variables associated with living in Glasgow, specifically the cold weather environment and high acceptability of smoking habits in Glasgow. PMID:25741179

  7. An EW technology research of jamming IR imaging guided missiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiu-qin; Rong, Hua; Liang, Jing-ping; Chen, Qi; Chen, Min-rong

    2009-07-01

    The IR-Imaging-Guided Weapons have been playing an important role in the modern warfare by means of select attacking the vital parts of targets with the features of highly secret attacking, high precision, and excellent anti-jamming capability ,therefore, they are viewed to be one of the promising precisely guided weapons ,receiving great concern through out the world. This paper discusses the characteristics of IR-Imaging guidance systems at the highlight of making a study of correlated technologies of jamming IR-Imaging-Guided Weapons on the basis of elaborating the operational principles of IR-Imaging-guided Weapons.

  8. 78 FR 67024 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Glasgow, MT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-08

    ... airspace at the Glasgow VOR/DME navigation aid, Glasgow, MT (78 FR 59807, September 30, 2013). The FAA... Federal Register of September 30, 2013 (78 FR 59807), Airspace Docket No. 13- ANM-17, FR Doc. 2013-23669... airspace at the Glasgow VHF Omni-Directional Radio Range/Distance Measuring Equipment (VOR/DME)...

  9. IR fiber optics development at the Naval Research Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanghera, Jasbinder S.; Busse, Lynda E.; Nguyen, Viet Q.; Mossadegh, Reza; Kung, Frederic H.; Cole, Brian J.; Shaw, L. Brandon; Pureza, Pablo C.; Miklos, Robert E.; Aggarwal, Ishwar D.; Park, Yoon-Soo

    2000-04-01

    We report the first technology demonstration of the use of an IR fiber cable in an IRCM system for missile jamming. The IR fiber cable contains sulphide glass fibers which possess low loss, high strength and high threshold to laser damage. The fiber cable was used to transmit the output from a laser operating in the 2 - 5 micrometers atmospheric window to a Jam Head located remote from the laser. The demonstration was successful and fiber cable performed remarkably well and without damage.

  10. Will IR Staff Stick? An Exploration of Institutional Researchers' Intention to Remain in or Leave Their Jobs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, William E.; Leimer, Christina L.

    2010-01-01

    The study explored the factors that relate to the likelihood of institutional researchers (IRs) to plan to leave their jobs. Learning more about the effects on IR job turnover can serve to improve the employment experience of IR practitioners, the profession of IR, and, indirectly, higher education. 1,264 IRs responded to a national survey…

  11. Research into the usage of integrated jamming of IR weakening and smoke-screen resisting the IR imaging guided missiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Long-tao; Jiang, Ning; Lv, Ming-shan

    2015-10-01

    With the emergence of the anti-ship missle with the capability of infrared imaging guidance, the traditional single jamming measures, because of the jamming mechanism and technical flaws or unsuitable use, greatly reduced the survival probability of the war-ship in the future naval battle. Intergrated jamming of IR weakening + smoke-screen Can not only make jamming to the search and tracking of IR imaging guidance system , but also has feasibility in conjunction, besides , which also make the best jamming effect. The research conclusion has important realistic meaning for raising the antimissile ability of surface ships. With the development of guidance technology, infrared guidance system has expanded by ir point-source homing guidance to infrared imaging guidance, Infrared imaging guidance has made breakthrough progress, Infrared imaging guidance system can use two-dimensional infrared image information of the target, achieve the precise tracking. Which has Higher guidance precision, better concealment, stronger anti-interference ability and could Target the key parts. The traditional single infrared smoke screen jamming or infrared decoy flare interference cannot be imposed effective interference. So, Research how to effectively fight against infrared imaging guided weapons threat measures and means, improving the surface ship antimissile ability is an urgent need to solve.

  12. Drug Issues Affecting Chinese, Indian and Pakistani People Living in Greater Glasgow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, A. J.; Heim, D.; Bakshi, N.; Davies, J. B.; Flatley, K. J.; Hunter, S. C.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes research on drug issues affecting Chinese, Indian and Pakistani people living in Greater Glasgow. There were two strands: (i) a questionnaire-based survey of young people and focus groups; (ii) interviews with young people and adults. The primary aims were to gather prevalence data and to investigate perceptions about current…

  13. The experimentation research of IR imaging system capability affected by sapphire window's pneumatic calefaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang-peng; Pan, Guo-qing; Zhang, Yun-qiang

    2009-07-01

    In the inclement pneumatic calefaction condition, the window of IR imaging system will be calefied and emit infrared radiation, so that the Signal-to-Noise and quality of target IR image are felled off that are from the imaging system. At this rate the physical characteristic of IR window direct affect capability of imaging system controlled and guided homing by IR tracker and measure precision of target IR characteristics. The properties of sapphire make it an ideal choice for the high speed missile applications compared to other existing or emerging materials. But the research has not been reported about the infrared radiation characteristic of sapphire as the IR window. In this paper, based on an IR imaging system using the sapphire window, the experimentation and conclusions of IR thermal image measurement affected by IR window's pneumatic calefaction have been accomplished. Firstly, the temperatures of sapphire window at supersonic flight extended over 1 km and 15 km from the ground have been estimated by calculating the flow and state variables and the aerodynamic heating into the window. On the base of the results calculated the window static state calefaction experimentation and electric arc wind tunnel experimentation had been designed and completed to validate the effect degree of pneumatic calefaction to the imaging system. With the temperatures of the sapphire window rising, in the image coming from the imaging system, the peak luminance of target image detected is increased, the background average luminance of the image is also increased, and the margin of above two varies in a little range. The data obtained from the different temperature experimentation have demonstrated that the IR flux due to the sapphire window becomes heated by friction with the air and heat transfer to the dome can obscure the target image created by the onboard IR sensor, depress Signal-to-Noise and resolving power of the imaging system, but can not overload the detector.

  14. Status of NASA's IR wind shear detection research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckissick, Burnell

    1991-01-01

    The status of NASA's wind shear detection research is reported in viewgraph form. Information is given on early experience, FLIR detectors, quantities measured by Airborne Warning and Avoidance System 1 (AWAS 1), the time series model for Flight 551, conclusions from NASA 737 flights, conclusions on Orlando 7-7-90, and AWAS 3 mnemonics.

  15. Road to refractory epilepsy: the Glasgow story.

    PubMed

    Brodie, Martin J

    2013-05-01

    This short article reviews 30 years of prospective observations on outcomes relevant to an expanding cohort of adolescent and adult patients with newly diagnosed epilepsy, who received their first antiepileptic drug (AED) and subsequent long-term follow-up at the Epilepsy Unit at the Western Infirmary in Glasgow, United Kingdom. Despite the fact that the overall prognosis has slowly improved over this time, >30% of the patients remain uncontrolled despite the introduction of a range of new AEDs, some with unique mechanisms of action, over the last 20 years. Most patients followed a constant course (59% controlled, 25% refractory), which could usually be predicted early. The remaining 16% fluctuated between periods of remission and relapse. The likelihood of seizure freedom declined with successive drug regimens, most markedly from the first to the third. A number of factors predicting poorer outcomes have been identified, particularly high pretreatment seizure density and concomitant psychiatric comorbidities. Novel approaches to identifying and treating the processes underpinning the generation and propagation of seizures are required if the current rather disappointing scenario is to be substantially improved. PMID:23646962

  16. Intelligent Vision Systems Independent Research and Development (IR&D) 2006

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patrick, Clinton; Chavis, Katherine

    2006-01-01

    This report summarizes results in conduct of research sponsored by the 2006 Independent Research and Development (IR&D) program at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) at Redstone Arsenal, Alabama. The focus of this IR&D is neural network (NN) technology provided by Imagination Engines, Incorporated (IEI) of St. Louis, Missouri. The technology already has many commercial, military, and governmental applications, and a rapidly growing list of other potential spin-offs. The goal for this IR&D is implementation and demonstration of the technology for autonomous robotic operations, first in software and ultimately in one or more hardware realizations. Testing is targeted specifically to the MSFC Flat Floor, but may also include other robotic platforms at MSFC, as time and funds permit. For the purpose of this report, the NN technology will be referred to by IEI's designation for a subset configuration of its patented technology suite: Self-Training Autonomous Neural Network Object (STANNO).

  17. Female streetworking prostitution and HIV infection in Glasgow.

    PubMed Central

    McKeganey, N.; Barnard, M.; Leyland, A.; Coote, I.; Follet, E.

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To identify the extent of HIV infection and injecting drug use among female streetworking prostitutes in Glasgow; to estimate the size of the female streetworking prostitute population in the city; and to estimate the number of HIV positive women working as prostitutes on the streets in Glasgow. DESIGN--Observation and interviewing of female prostitutes over seven months in red light district; analysis of saliva samples for presence of antibodies to HIV; capture-recapture approach to estimating the size of the female streetworking prostitute population. SETTING--Glasgow. SUBJECTS--206 female streetworking prostitutes. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Number of women with antibodies to HIV, self reported use of injecting drugs, history of contact with 206 women. RESULTS--Saliva samples were requested from 197 women; 159 (81%) provided samples. Four (2.5%, 95% confidence interval 0.7%-6.3%) of the samples were positive for HIV, all of which had been provided by women who injected drugs. Of the 206 streetworking women contacted 147 (71%) were injecting drug users. About 1150 women are estimated to work on the streets in Glasgow over a 12 month period. CONCLUSIONS--HIV is not as widespread among female prostitutes as many reports in the tabloid press suggest. A greater proportion of female streetworking prostitutes in Glasgow are injecting drugs than has been reported for other British cities. PMID:1422360

  18. The Physical Tourist Physics in Glasgow: A Heritage Tour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Sean F.

    2006-12-01

    I trace the history of the physical and applied sciences, and particularly physics, in Glasgow. Among the notable individuals I discuss are Joseph Black (1728 1799), James Watt (1736 1819), William John Macquorn Rankine (1820 1872), William Thomson, Lord Kelvin (1824 1907), John Kerr (1824 1907), Frederick Soddy (1877 1956), John Logie Baird (1888 1946), and Ian Donald (1910 1987), as well as physics-related businesses.The locations, centering on the city center and University of Glasgow, include sites both recognizable today and transformed from past usage, as well as museums and archives related to the history and interpretation of physics.

  19. Pure Dead Brilliant?: Evaluating the Glasgow Story Digitisation Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Ian G.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present an evaluation of The Glasgow Story (TGS) digitisation project, funded by the UK's National Lottery's New Opportunities Fund digitisation (NOF-Digi) programme, and a critique of the evaluation process itself. The paper emphasises the need for user impact evaluation and for results to be brought into…

  20. Emotional and Behavioural Development in Glasgow Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pritchett, Rachel; Nowek, Gail; Neill, Cróna; Minnis, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Studies examining the well-being of British children find that about 5-10% are at risk of developing problems. This study aimed to examine the emotional and behavioural development of six to eight year olds in an area of socio-economic deprivation in Glasgow (Scotland) and compare this with UK norms. Furthermore, it aimed to look at overlap…

  1. 78 FR 59807 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Glasgow, MT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-30

    ... proposed rulemaking (NPRM) to establish controlled airspace at Glasgow, MT (78 FR 41337). Interested...'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant... FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec. 71.1 0 2. The incorporation by reference in 14 CFR...

  2. 76 FR 45179 - Modification of Class E Airspace; Glasgow, MT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-28

    ... accommodate aircraft using Area Navigation (RNAV) Global Positioning System (GPS) standard instrument approach... proposed rulemaking to amend Class E controlled airspace at Glasgow, MT (76 FR 30300). Interested parties...) is not a ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February...

  3. Progress of the Swedish-Australian research collaboration on uncooled smart IR sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liddiard, Kevin C.; Ringh, Ulf; Jansson, Christer; Reinhold, Olaf

    1998-10-01

    Progress is reported on the development of uncooled microbolometer IR focal plane detector arrays (IRFPDA) under a research collaboration between the Swedish Defence Research Establishment (FOA), and the Defence Science and Technology Organization (DSTO), Australia. The paper describes current focal plane detector arrays designed by Electro-optic Sensor Design (EOSD) for readout circuits developed by FOA. The readouts are fabricated in 0.8 micrometer CMOS, and have a novel signal conditioning and 16 bit parallel ADC design. The arrays are post-processed at DSTO on wafers supplied by FOA. During the past year array processing has been carried out at a new microengineering facility at DSTO, Salisbury, South Australia. A number of small format 16 X 16 arrays have been delivered to FOA for evaluation, and imaging has been demonstrated with these arrays. A 320 X 240 readout with 320 parallel 16 bit ADCs has been developed and IRFPDAs for this readout have been fabricated and are currently being evaluated.

  4. The medical collections at the University of Glasgow.

    PubMed

    Reilly, Maggie; McDonald, Stuart W

    2009-01-01

    The medical and other collections in the University of Glasgow have at their core the generous bequest of Dr William Hunter (1718 - 1783), a local man who rose to become an internationally renowned anatomist and obstetrician. The University does not have a Medical Museum as such but an Anatomy Museum, a Zoology Museum, a Pathology Collection, medical displays in the main halls of the Hunterian Museum in the Gilbert Scott Building and a rich collection of antiquarian medical books and archives as well as contemporary libraries. The Hunterian Collection, since its inauguration at the University of Glasgow in 1807, has engendered a spirit of diversity and scholarship that embraces many disciplines across the campus. The Hunterian Museum was the first public museum in Scotland and service to the local, national and international communities and response to their academic needs is very much at heart of its function today. PMID:20481359

  5. Revisiting the eye opening response of the Glasgow Coma Scale.

    PubMed

    Rabiu, Taopheeq Bamidele

    2011-01-01

    The Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), introduced by Teasdale and Jenneth in 1974, has received tremendous acclaim from clinicians and has been extensively used in clinical practice for the evaluation of the level of consciousness. The author notes that some traumatic brain injury patients close eyes in response to painful stimuli as opposed to the eye opening response to pain of the GCS. A revision of the eye opening response subsection of the GCS is suggested. PMID:21633551

  6. Appointment, Retention and Promotion of Academic Staff in Higher Education Institutions. A Report to the HEFCE by the Scottish Council for Research in Education, University of Glasgow and Nottingham Trent University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higher Education Funding Council for England, Bristol.

    This study addressed the link between policies and practices related to teaching staff and sustaining and improving standards in higher education in the United Kingdom. Evidence from the literature has indicated that teaching is increasingly being given less priority in comparison with research in higher education. It is clear from the data of…

  7. A Framework for Evaluating Digital Library Services; Interdisciplinarity: The Road Ahead for Education in Digital Libraries; Federated Digital Rights Management: A Proposed DRM Solution for Research and Education; Learning Lessons Holistically in the Glasgow Digital Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choudhury, Sayeed; Hobbs, Benjamin; Lorie, Mark; Flores, Nicholas; Coleman, Anita; Martin, Mairead; Kuhlman, David L.; McNair, John H.; Rhodes, William A.; Tipton, Ron; Agnew, Grace; Nicholson, Dennis; Macgregor, George

    2002-01-01

    Includes four articles that address issues related to digital libraries. Highlights include a framework for evaluating digital library services, particularly academic research libraries; interdisciplinary approaches to education about digital libraries that includes library and information science and computing; digital rights management; and the…

  8. Unhealthy Glasgow: a case for ecological public health?

    PubMed

    Hanlon, Phil

    2015-10-01

    Ecological public health has been proposed as an approach appropriate for addressing the multiple transitions that currently affect human health and sustainability. The paper draws on the author's experience in public health in Glasgow to analyse the health challenges faced by this postindustrial Scottish city. Like other such cities, it not only faces multiple health challenges but also demonstrates a currently unexplained excess mortality that has been dubbed the 'Glasgow Effect'. To explore this troubled mixture, the paper outlines four historical waves of public health challenge and response in Glasgow over the last century, and proposes that a fifth is emerging. The challenge now is how to negotiate environmental sustainability with social, political and economic sustainability to enhance health for all. The paper suggests that gains made by past approaches still need to be protected and can be included within ecological public health, but they lack the wider vision, coherence and capacity required if cities are to address the scale and range of contemporary conditions. A number of lessons are offered for the ecological public health perspective. PMID:26376607

  9. Neutronic safety and transient analyses for potential LEU conversion of the IR-8 research reactor.

    SciTech Connect

    Deen, J. R.; Hanan, N. A.; Smith, R. S.; Matos, J. E.; Egorenkov, P. M.; Nasonov, V. A.

    1999-09-27

    Kinetic parameters, isothermal reactivity feedback coefficients and three transients for the IR-8 research reactor cores loaded with either HEU(90%), HEU(36%), or LEU (19.75%) fuel assemblies (FA) were calculated using three dimensional diffusion theory flux solutions, RELAP5/MOD3.2 and PARET. The prompt neutron generation time and effective delayed neutron fractions were calculated for fresh and beginning-of-equilibrium-cycle cores. Isothermal reactivity feedback coefficients were calculated for changes in coolant density, coolant temperature and fuel temperature in fresh and equilibrium cores. These kinetic parameters and reactivity coefficients were used in transient analysis models to predict power histories, and peak fuel, clad and coolant temperatures. The transients modeled were a rapid and slow loss-of-flow, a slow reactivity insertion, and a fast reactivity insertion.

  10. 48 CFR 931.205-18 - Independent research and development (IR&D) and bid and proposal (B&P) costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... development (IR&D) and bid and proposal (B&P) costs. 931.205-18 Section 931.205-18 Federal Acquisition... PROCEDURES Contracts With Commercial Organizations 931.205-18 Independent research and development (IR&D) and bid and proposal (B&P) costs. (c)(2) IR&D costs are recoverable under DOE contracts to the extent...

  11. 48 CFR 931.205-18 - Independent research and development (IR&D) and bid and proposal (B&P) costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... development (IR&D) and bid and proposal (B&P) costs. 931.205-18 Section 931.205-18 Federal Acquisition... PROCEDURES Contracts With Commercial Organizations 931.205-18 Independent research and development (IR&D) and bid and proposal (B&P) costs. (c)(2) IR&D costs are recoverable under DOE contracts to the extent...

  12. Learning from history: The Glasgow Airport terrorist attack.

    PubMed

    Crichton, Gillies

    Glasgow Airport was the target of a terrorist attack on 30th June, 2007. Many people within Scotland had come to believe that Scotland was immune from terrorism. This perception was in large part informed by Scotland's experience during the protracted Troubles in Northern Ireland, during which the Provisional Irish Republican Army's mainland bombing campaign focused on targets in England, sparing both Scotland and Wales. While Glasgow Airport did not expect such an attack to take place, meticulous planning, organising and testing of plans had taken place to mitigate the unlikely event of such an attack. The attack stands up as a shining example of robust business continuity management, where the airport reopened for business as usual in less than 24 hours from the time of the attack. Little is known about how the airport handled the situation in conjunction with other responding agencies as people tend to want to focus on high-profile disasters only. Yet countless such incidents are happening worldwide on a daily basis, in which there are excellent learning opportunities, and, taken in the spirit of converting hindsight into foresight, the likelihood of similar incidents could potentially be reduced in the future. PMID:25416378

  13. The Glasgow Outcome Scale - 40 years of application and refinement.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Tom; Wilson, Lindsay; Ponsford, Jennie; Levin, Harvey; Teasdale, Graham; Bond, Michael

    2016-08-01

    The Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) was first published in 1975 by Bryan Jennett and Michael Bond. With over 4,000 citations to the original paper, it is the most highly cited outcome measure in studies of brain injury and the second most-cited paper in clinical neurosurgery. The original GOS and the subsequently developed extended GOS (GOSE) are recommended by several national bodies as the outcome measure for major trauma and for head injury. The enduring appeal of the GOS is linked to its simplicity, short administration time, reliability and validity, stability, flexibility of administration (face-to-face, over the telephone and by post), cost-free availability and ease of access. These benefits apply to other derivatives of the scale, including the Glasgow Outcome at Discharge Scale (GODS) and the GOS paediatric revision. The GOS was devised to provide an overview of outcome and to focus on social recovery. Since the initial development of the GOS, there has been an increasing focus on the multidimensional nature of outcome after head injury. This Review charts the development of the GOS, its refinement and usage over the past 40 years, and considers its current and future roles in developing an understanding of brain injury. PMID:27418377

  14. Highlights from the Ninth European Breast Cancer Conference, Glasgow, 19–21 March 2014

    PubMed Central

    Munzone, Elisabetta

    2014-01-01

    The Ninth European Breast Cancer Conference (EBCC-9), one of the largest breast cancer conferences in the world, was held in Glasgow in March 2014, and brought together the voices of doctors, researchers, nurses, and patients. All the major breast cancer advocacy groups and institutions were united in one forum (Europa Donna, the EORTC Breast Cancer group, and EUSOMA). The Scientific Programme for EBCC-9 highlighted a holistic picture of breast cancer, including research, prevention, treatment, advocacy, and care. Participants were able to discover the most up-to-date developments and findings within the field for implementation into daily practice. Improvements in treatment, as well as enhanced access to care, underlie the sustained decreases in breast cancer mortality seen in 30 European countries from 1989 to 2010. PMID:24834121

  15. IRS organigram

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messerschmid, Ernst

    1991-01-01

    Charts and graphs relative to magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thruster technology are given. The research activities at the Institute of Space Transportation, University of Stuttgart, are summarized. Information is given on the Institute's Electric Propulsion and Plasma Wind Tunnel; thermal arcjet research; the nozzle-type thruster, DT-IRS; nozzle-type MPD thrusters; a hot anode thruster; the DT6 thruster; the ZT-1 thruster; the cylindrical MPD thruster; and a comparison of continuous and quasi-steady MPD.

  16. The 20 item prosopagnosia index (PI20): relationship with the Glasgow face-matching test

    PubMed Central

    Sowden, Sophie; Gaule, Anne; Bird, Geoffrey

    2015-01-01

    The 20 item prosopagnosia index (PI20) was recently developed to identify individuals with developmental prosopagnosia. While the PI20’s principal purpose is to aid researchers and clinicians, it was suggested that it may serve as a useful screening tool to identify people with face recognition difficulties in applied settings where face matching is a critical part of their occupation. Although the PI20 has been validated using behavioural measures of face recognition, it has yet to be validated against a measure of face-matching ability that is more representative of applied settings. In this study, the PI20 was therefore administered with the Glasgow face-matching test (GFMT). A strong correlation was observed between PI20 and GFMT scores, providing further validation for the PI20, indicating that it is likely to be of value in applied settings. PMID:26715995

  17. FT-IR and FT-NIR Raman spectroscopy in biomedical research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumann, D.

    1998-06-01

    FT-IR and FT-NIR Raman spectra of intact microbial, plant animal or human cells, tissues, and body fluids are highly specific, fingerprint-like signatures which can be used to discriminate between diverse microbial species and strains, characterize growth-dependent phenomena and cell-drug interactions, and differentiate between various disease states. The spectral information potentially useful for biomedical characterizations may be distributed over the entire infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum, i.e. over the near-, mid-, and far-infrared. It is therefore a key problem how the characteristic vibrational spectroscopic information can be systematically extracted from the infrared spectra of complex biological samples. In this report these questions are addressed by applying factor and cluster analysis treating the classification problem of microbial infrared spectra as a model task. Particularly interesting applications arise by means of a light microscope coupled to the FT-IR spectrometer. FT-IR spectra of single microcolonies of less than 40 μm in diameter can be obtained from colony replica applying a stamping technique that transfers the different, spatially separated microcolonies from the culture plate to a special IR-sample holder. Using a computer controlled x,y-stage together with mapping and video techniques, the fundamental tasks of microbiological analysis, namely detection, enumeration, and differentiation of micro-organisms can be integrated in one single apparatus. Since high quality, essentially fluorescence free Raman spectra may now be obtained in relatively short time intervals on previously intractable biological specimens, FT-IR and NIR-FT-Raman spectroscopy can be used in tandem to characterize biological samples. This approach seems to open up new horizons for biomedical characterizations of complex biological systems.

  18. Some new insights into the history of the Glasgow time ball and time guns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, David; Kinns, Roger

    2012-03-01

    The 1857 time ball machinery at the Glasgow Sailors' Home was supplied by Alexander McKenzie, mechanist, using a design that had much in common with the 1853 Edinburgh apparatus. It was operated using electrical connections to a mean time clock in the Home. This clock required adjustment by hand each day to compensate for its losing rate. Such manual intervention and lack of independent verification of accuracy under-mined the authority of the signal. The relative prestige of the Glasgow and Edinburgh Observatories was an important issue. There was no telegraphic link between Glasgow Observatory and the City until the end of 1863, but it had been demonstrated as early as October 1855 that a time ball could be dropped by telegraph from Edinburgh. Another Edinburgh initiative in September 1863 using time guns fired from Edinburgh caused offence in Glasgow and the trials were terminated in February 1864. Professor Grant, Director of Glasgow Observatory, argued successfully that a system of slave clocks controlled from Glasgow Observatory would be far superior to either a time ball or time guns which only provided a signal once per day. He won the debate in March 1864.

  19. Space Radar Image of Missouri River, Glasgow, Missouri

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is a false-color L-band image of an area near Glasgow, Missouri, centered at about 39.2 degrees north latitude and 92.8 degrees west longitude. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on its 50th orbit on October 3, 1994. The false-color composite was made by displaying the L-band (horizontally transmitted and received) return in red; the L-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received) return in green; and the sum of the two channels in blue. The area shown is approximately 37 kilometers by 25 kilometers (23 miles by 16 miles). The radar data, coupled with pre-flood aerial photography and satellite data and post-flood topographic and field data, are being used to evaluate changes associated with levee breaks in landforms, where deposits formed during the widespread flooding in 1993 along the Missouri and Mississippi Rivers. The distinct radar scattering properties of farmland, sand fields and scoured areas will be used to inventory floodplains along the Missouri River and determine the processes by which these areas return to preflood conditions. The image shows one such levee break near Glasgow, Missouri. In the upper center of the radar image is a region covered by several meters of sand, shown as blue regions below the bend in the river. West (left) of this dark area, a blue gap in the levee tree canopy can be seen, showing the area where the levee failed. Radar data such as these can help scientists more accurately assess the potential for future flooding in this region and how that might impact surrounding communities. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar(SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves, allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm

  20. Aspects of neurosurgical assessment using the Glasgow Coma Scale.

    PubMed

    Ellis, A; Cavanagh, S J

    1992-06-01

    The Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) has become a cornerstone of the neurological/surgical assessment of patients used by both nursing and medical staff. Since its development in the 1970s it has been used in a variety of clinical situations to monitor changes in a number of key neurological functions, including level of consciousness, pupil reaction and limb movement. During this time, however, there have been suggestions that there are problems with some of the measurement principles underlying its use, which in part has stimulated the development of other neuro-assessment tools. Irrespective of measurement device, there is always the possibility of error or incorrect assessment. In the field of neurosurgery, as with other high dependency environments, a patient's condition can change rapidly. Additionally, there is the association of certain assessment responses with nursing and medical interventions. Thus, accuracy in all aspects of assessment and recording is paramount. Despite the growing body of literature surrounding the GCS, little is known about the pattern of errors made by nursing staff using the GCS to assess neurosurgical patients. This study compared the assessment findings of Registered General Nurses (RGNs), Enrolled Nurses and Student Nurses after viewing videotaped neuro-assessments of patients in a high dependency unit. The criterion for judging the accuracy of subject's assessments was established by a panel of experts. As expected, RGNs had the highest proportion of correct assessments and students the least. Subjects were identified as having difficulty in determining the relative amounts of weakness that a patient exhibited, and in correctly distinguishing between flexion and extension. PMID:1611292

  1. Development of an XUV-IR free-electron laser user facility for scientific research and industrial applications

    SciTech Connect

    Newnam, B.E.; Warren, R.W.; Conradson, S.D.; Goldstein, J.C.; McVey, B.D.; Schmitt, M.J.; Elliott, C.J.; Burns, M.J.; Carlsten, B.E.; Chan, K.C.; Johnson, W.J.; Wang, T.S.; Sheffield, R.L.; Meier, K.L.; Olsher, R.H.; Scott, M.L.; Griggs, J.E.

    1991-01-01

    Los Alamos has designed and proposes to establish an XUV-IR free- electron laser (FEL) user facility for scientific research and industrial applications based on coherent radiation ranging from soft x-rays as short as 1 nm to far-infrared wavelengths as long as 100 {mu}m. As the next-generation light source beyond low-emittance storage rings with undulator insertion devices, this proposed national FEL user facility should make available to researchers broadly tunable, picosecond-pulse, coherent radiation with 10{sup 4} to 10{sup 7} greater spectral flux and brightness. The facility design is based on two series of FEL oscillators including one regenerative amplifier. The primary series of seven FEL oscillators, driven by a single, 1-GeV rf linac, spans the short-wavelength range from 1 to 600 nm. A second 60-MeV rf linac, synchronized with the first, drives a series of three Vis/IR FEL oscillators to cover the 0. 5 to 100-{mu}m range. This paper presents the motivation for such a facility arising from its inherently high power per unit bandwidth and its potential use for an array of scientific and industrial applications, describes the facility design, output parameters, and user laboratories, makes comparisons with synchrotron radiation sources, and summarizes recent technical progress that supports the technical feasibility. 80 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs.

  2. Institutional Researchers as Knowledge Managers in Universities: Envisioning New Roles for the IR Profession

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teodorescu, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Using concepts from Davenport and Prusak's "Working Knowledge" and other recent research on knowledge management, this article discusses the processes through which institutional knowledge is created, managed and transferred throughout the university and ways in which institutional researchers can improve these processes. A special emphasis is…

  3. Applications and development of IR techniques for building research in Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaasinen, Harri I.; Kauppi, Ari; Nykanen, Esa

    1991-03-01

    Infrared thermography has been used in building research at the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) since 1975. Traditionally this technique has been used to localize defects in thermal insulation and air tightness in the external envelope of buildings. During the past few years it has also been applied successfully to assessing the condition of facades and detecting moisture in structures. This paper briefly describes our experiences with thermography in building research. Multispectral technique has been applied to concrete facades. The principle of this method is also presented in this paper.

  4. Evidence-based improvement of the National Trauma Triage Protocol: The Glasgow Coma Scale versus Glasgow Coma Scale motor subscale

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Joshua B.; Forsythe, Raquel M.; Stassen, Nicole A.; Peitzman, Andrew B.; Billiar, Timothy R.; Sperry, Jason L.; Gestring, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Ideal triage uses simple criteria to identify severely injured patients. Glasgow Coma Scale motor (GCSm) may be easier for field use and was considered for the National Trauma Triage Protocol (NTTP). This study evaluated performance of the NTTP if GCSm is substituted for the current GCS score ≤ 13 criterion. METHODS Subjects in the National Trauma Data Bank undergoing scene transport were included. Presence of NTTP physiologic (Step 1) and anatomic (Step 2) criteria was determined. GCSm score ≤ 5 was defined as a positive criterion. Trauma center need (TCN) was defined as Injury Severity Score (ISS) > 15, intensive care unit admission, urgent operation, or emergency department death. Test characteristics were calculated to predict TCN. Area under the curve was compared between GCSm and GCS scores, individually and within the NTTP. Logistic regression was used to determine the association of GCSm score ≤ 5 and GCS score ≤ 13 with TCN after adjusting for other triage criteria. Predicted versus actual TCN was compared. RESULTS There were 811,143 subjects. Sensitivity was lower (26.7% vs. 30.3%), specificity was higher (95.1% vs. 93.1%), and accuracy was similar (66.1% vs. 66.3%) for GCSm score ≤ 5 compared with GCS score ≤ 13. Incorporated into the NTTP Steps 1 + 2, GCSm score ≤ 5 traded sensitivity (60.4% vs. 62.1%) for specificity (67.1% vs. 65.7%) with similar accuracy (64.2% vs. 64.2%) to GCS score ≤ 13. There was no difference in the area under the curve between GCSm score ≤ 5 and GCS score ≤ 13 when incorporated into the NTTP Steps 1 + 2 (p = 0.10). GCSm score ≤ 5 had a stronger association with TCN (odds ratio, 3.37; 95% confidence interval, 3.27–3.48; p < 0.01) than GCS score ≤ 13 (odds ratio, 3.03; 95% confidence interval, 2.94–3.13; p < 0.01). GCSm had a better fit of predicted versus actual TCN than GCS at the lower end of the scales. CONCLUSION GCSm score ≤ 5 increases specificity at the expense of sensitivity

  5. A tale of two cities: a review of homicide in Melbourne and Glasgow in 2005.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Matthew; Black, Marjorie

    2008-01-01

    The Departments of Forensic Medicine and Science at the University of Glasgow and the Victorian Institute of Forensic Medicine in Melbourne are academic university-based forensic medicine units providing a medico-legal death investigation service to the Strathclyde region of Scotland and the State of Victoria, Australia, respectively. We reviewed and compared homicides in the two jurisdictions for the year 2005. Whilst gross numbers were comparable, the homicide rate per capita was significantly higher in Glasgow. Death due to stabbing comprised a greater proportion of homicides in Glasgow, reflective of a well recognised social epidemic of knife-related trauma amongst young males. Blunt force trauma was the most prevalent cause of homicidal injury in the Australian cases. The cities shared a low incidence of firearm- related homicide, reflective of strict legislative initiatives. PMID:18341154

  6. A review of the predictive ability of Glasgow Coma Scale scores in head-injured patients.

    PubMed

    McNett, Molly

    2007-04-01

    According to 1999 data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, traumatic brain injuries (TBI) caused by motor vehicle accidents, firearms, and falls are recorded as a leading cause of death and lifelong disability for young adults in the United States. Researchers have investigated if correlations exist between variables in the acute stage of injury and outcome measures in TBI patients. The Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score is one variable that was extensively studied for its ability to predict outcome in TBI patients. However, the use of different designs and methodologies in these studies makes the interpretation of the cumulative findings difficult. Therefore the purpose of this review was to provide a summary of the research findings on the ability of the GCS scores to predict outcome in TBI patients. A search was done on MEDLINE and CINAHL to identify studies that investigated the predictive ability of the GCS score. Studies that used the GCS as a variable in predicting outcome with adult patients who had sustained some type of head injury were included. GCS scores are most accurate at predicting outcome in head-injured patients when they are combined with patient age and pupillary response and when broad outcome categories are used. The motor component of the GCS yields similar prediction rates as the summed GCS score, and better prediction occurs with very high or very low GCS scores. Information about the cumulative research findings on the predictive ability of GCS scores aids nurses in providing support and education to family members during the acute stage of injury, and in coordinating the services of members of the healthcare team, which could result in improved outcomes for both patient and family. PMID:17477220

  7. Twenty-five years of aerodynamic research with IR imaging: A survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gartenberg, Ehud; Roberts, A. Sidney, Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Infrared imaging used in aerodynamic research evolved during the last 25 years into a rewarding experimental technique for investigation of body-flow viscous interactions, such as heat flux determination and boundary layer transition. The technique of infrared imaging matched well its capability to produce useful results, with the expansion of testing conditions in the entire spectrum of wind tunnels, from hypersonic high-enthalpy facilities to cryogenic transonic wind tunnels. With unique achievements credited to its past, the current trend suggests a change in attitude towards this technique: from the perception as an exotic, project-oriented tool, to the status of a routine experimental procedure.

  8. New opportunities for strong-field LPI research in the mid-IR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogorelsky, Igor V.; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Skaritka, John; Babzien, Markus; Polyanskiy, Mikhail N.; Najmudin, Zulfikar; Dover, Nicholas; Lu, Wei

    2015-05-01

    Over the last two decades, BNL's ATF has pioneered the use of high-peak power CO2 lasers for research in advanced accelerators and radiation sources. Our recent developments in ion acceleration, Compton scattering, and IFELs have further underscored the benefits from expanding the landscape of strong-field laser interactions deeper into the midinfrared (MIR) range of wavelengths. This extension validates our ongoing efforts in advancing CO2 laser technology, which we report here. Our next-generation, multi-terawatt, femtosecond CO2 laser will open new opportunities for studying ultra-relativistic laser interactions with plasma in the MIR spectral domain. We will address new regimes in the particle acceleration of ions and electrons, as well as the radiations sources, ranging from THz to gamma- rays, that are enabled by the emerging ultra-fast CO2 lasers.

  9. Perspectives on differing health outcomes by city: accounting for Glasgow's excess mortality.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Simon Ds; George, Steve

    2015-01-01

    Several health outcomes (including mortality) and health-related behaviors are known to be worse in Scotland than in comparable areas of Europe and the United Kingdom. Within Scotland, Greater Glasgow (in West Central Scotland) experiences disproportionately poorer outcomes independent of measurable variation in socioeconomic status and other important determinants. Many reasons for this have been proposed, particularly related to deprivation, inequalities, and variation in health behaviors. The use of models (such as the application of Bradford Hill's viewpoints on causality to the different hypotheses) has provided useful insights on potentially causal mechanisms, with health behaviors and inequalities likely to represent the strongest individual candidates. This review describes the evolution of our understanding of Glasgow's excess mortality, summarizes some of the key work in this area, and provides some suggestions for future areas of exploration. In the context of demographic change, the experience in Glasgow is an important example of the complexity that frequently lies behind observed variations in health outcomes within and between populations. A comprehensive explanation of Glasgow's excess mortality may continue to remain elusive, but is likely to lie in a complex and difficult-to-measure interplay of health determinants acting at different levels in society throughout the life course. Lessons learned from the detailed examination of different potentially causative determinants in Scotland may provide useful methodological insights that may be applied in other settings. Ongoing efforts to unravel the causal mechanisms are needed to inform public health efforts to reduce health inequalities and improve outcomes in Scotland. PMID:26124684

  10. The Use of Electronic Information Services and Information Literacy: A Glasgow Caledonian University Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, John

    2006-01-01

    The study was undertaken as part of the LIRG/SCONUL Value and Impact study and sought to establish direct evidence of the impact of electronic information services (EIS) on Glasgow Caledonian University students, both past and present. Evidence of the spread of information literacy among students and alumni was also sought. An electronic…

  11. Contested Urban Spaces: Exploring the Analytics of Young Persons' Experiences of Living in Glasgow's Deprived Zones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holligan, Chris; Deuchar, Ross

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports findings from an exploratory study of mainly young people's verbally articulated perceptions of urban life in Glasgow, Scotland. The focus is upon areas of deprivation where territory and social capital is contested and whose meanings are possibly only partially grasped by our informants. Their personal knowledge of violence and…

  12. 78 FR 67218 - CSX Transportation, Inc.-Trackage Rights Exemption-Glasgow Railway Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board CSX Transportation, Inc.--Trackage Rights Exemption--Glasgow Railway Company..., referring to Docket No. FD 35778, must be filed with the Surface Transportation Board, 395 E Street...

  13. Phytotoxicity of fungicides, herbicides and insecticides/acaricides on ornamental conifer (division: pinophyta) species in Southeastern U.S. for interregional research program (IR-4).

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Interregional Research Project (IR-4) is a joint USDA-ARS and Land Grant Institution program that evaluates agricultural chemicals and expands sustainable pest management technologies for growers by providing efficacy and phytotoxicity data needed for registered use on specialty crops that inclu...

  14. Interregional Research (IR-4) program for the field assessment of fungicides, herbicides and insecticides/Acaricides on ornamental horticultural crops in southeastern U.S.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Interregional Research Project (IR-4) is a national public program that amplifies pest management options for specialty crop growers by providing phytotoxicity data needed for the registration of agricultural chemicals for specialty crops including floral, fruit, herb, nursery, nut and vegetable...

  15. Which score should be used in intubated patients’ Glasgow coma scale or full outline of unresponsiveness?

    PubMed Central

    Gorji, Mohammad Ali Heidari; Gorji, Ali Morad Heidari; Hosseini, Seyed Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: Today Glasgow coma scale (GCS) is the most well-known and common score for evaluation of the level of consciousness and outcome predict after traumatic brain injuries in the world. Regarding to some advantages of the full outline of unresponsiveness (FOUR) score over GCS in intubated patients, we’re going to compare the precision of these two scores in predicting the outcome predict in intubated patients. Methods: This research was a diagnostic-based study, which was conducted prospectively on 80 patients with Traumatic brain injury who were intubated and admitted to Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of Educational Hospitals of Mazandaran University of Medical Science during February 2013 to August 2013. The scores of FOUR and GCS were measured by the researcher in the first 24 h of admission in ICU. The information's recorded in the check list including the mortality rate of early and late inside of the hospital interred to excel. The findings were analyzed using SPSS software, through descriptive statistics and regression logistic. Results: The results showed of 80 patients 21 patients (20%) were female and 59 patients (80%) were male. The age average of the samples was 33.80 ± 12.60 ranging from 16 to 60 years old. 21 patients (26.2%) died during treatment. Of 21 patients, 15 patients died during first 14 days (18.7%) and 6 patients died after 14 years (7.5%). The area under curve (AUC) of FOUR score in early mortality was 0.90 (C1 = 0.95, 0.88–0.90). The amount AUC for GCS was 0.80 (C1 = 0.95, 0.78–0.84), which in delayed mortality it was ordered as 0.86 (C1 = 0.95, 0.84–0.90) and 0.89 (C1 = 0.95, 0.78–0.88). Conclusion: The research results indicated that FOUR score is more exact and more practical in intubated patients regarding lack of verbal response factor in early mortality prediction in GCS. Hence, it is recommended for health professionals to use the FOUR score to predict the early outcome of intubated patients with traumatic

  16. SWUIS-A: A Versatile, Low-Cost UV/VIS/IR Imaging System for Airborne Astronomy and Aeronomy Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durda, Daniel D.; Stern, S. Alan; Tomlinson, William; Slater, David C.; Vilas, Faith

    2001-01-01

    We have developed and successfully flight-tested on 14 different airborne missions the hardware and techniques for routinely conducting valuable astronomical and aeronomical observations from high-performance, two-seater military-type aircraft. The SWUIS-A (Southwest Universal Imaging System - Airborne) system consists of an image-intensified CCD camera with broad band response from the near-UV to the near IR, high-quality foreoptics, a miniaturized video recorder, an aircraft-to-camera power and telemetry interface with associated camera controls, and associated cables, filters, and other minor equipment. SWUIS-A's suite of high-quality foreoptics gives it selectable, variable focal length/variable field-of-view capabilities. The SWUIS-A camera frames at 60 Hz video rates, which is a key requirement for both jitter compensation and high time resolution (useful for occultation, lightning, and auroral studies). Broadband SWUIS-A image coadds can exceed a limiting magnitude of V = 10.5 in <1 sec with dark sky conditions. A valuable attribute of SWUIS-A airborne observations is the fact that the astronomer flies with the instrument, thereby providing Space Shuttle-like "payload specialist" capability to "close-the-loop" in real-time on the research done on each research mission. Key advantages of the small, high-performance aircraft on which we can fly SWUIS-A include significant cost savings over larger, more conventional airborne platforms, worldwide basing obviating the need for expensive, campaign-style movement of specialized large aircraft and their logistics support teams, and ultimately faster reaction times to transient events. Compared to ground-based instruments, airborne research platforms offer superior atmospheric transmission, the mobility to reach remote and often-times otherwise unreachable locations over the Earth, and virtually-guaranteed good weather for observing the sky. Compared to space-based instruments, airborne platforms typically offer

  17. IR fiber sources for scene projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, L. B.; Sanghera, J. S.; Aggarwal, I. D.

    2007-04-01

    Naval Research Laboratory has developed IR transmitting fiber and IR fiber sources which can be used for HWIL testing. IR transmitting fiber is capable of broad transmission from near IR to LWIR and can be formed into bundles for imaging. IR fiber sources are based on rare earth doped glass or nonlinear processes in the glass and are cable of high brightness IR emission. Recently, NRL developed a four emitter MWIR fiber source which is capable of high temperature simulation, high dynamic range, and fast response. New broadband fiber sources based upon IR supercontinuum generation in IR fibers are also being developed. In this paper, we will report on these technologies.

  18. The Association of Surgeons in Training Conference: #ASiT2015 Glasgow.

    PubMed

    Gokani, V J; Beamish, A J; Sinclair, P; Robson, A; Harries, R L

    2015-11-01

    The Association of Surgeons in Training (ASiT) is a professional body and registered charity working to promote excellence in surgical training for the benefit of junior doctors and patients alike. ASiT is in-dependent of the National Health Service (NHS), Surgical Royal Colleges, and specialty associations and represents trainees in all ten surgical specialties. ASiT was delighted to welcome a number of distinguished guests and speakers to Glasgow for #ASiT2015. The theme of 'The Future of Surgery' delved into challenges surgical training faces, exciting developments into using technology to help patients, a glance at the past with the development of the Glasgow Coma Score and whether mortality truly is the future of measured outcomes. More than £3500 of prizes was awarded by the incoming President, Miss. Rhiannon Harries to the highest scoring papers presented selected from over 1000 abstracts submitted. PMID:26525269

  19. Proceedings of a symposium on the neurobiology of the basal ganglia. Glasgow, United Kingdom, July 1999.

    PubMed

    2000-05-01

    The basal ganglia occupy a commanding place in neuroscience research, in clinical neurology and in biomedical education. The paucity of our understanding of the role of the basal ganglia in normal everyday life combined with our more extensive knowledge of their deficiencies in a variety of clinical syndromes is a potent spur to continuing investigation. That some of these neurodegenerative syndromes-such as Parkinson's disease-are already common only heightens the need for insight in the face of a population with increasing expectations of longevity. About a decade ago an explosion of information on the connectivity and immunocytochemistry of forebrain structures gave rise to concepts which have shaped the fabric of basal ganglia theory-'patch and matrix', 'disinhibition', 'parallel circuits'. Some of these ideas seemed to facilitate an understanding of the basal ganglia, others to render them more complex and impenetrable. Perhaps unsurprisingly, the work of the last decade has tended towards consolidation and refinement. However, several new developments are receiving attention, many of them related to disorders of the basal ganglia. The realisation that some forms of Parkinson's disease have a genetic determinant is gaining strength. The molecular biology of the dopaminergic synapse on the one hand and of the production of insoluble proteins on the other will clearly influence future research into therapeutic options and neuroprotection. The importance of apoptosis, neural plasticity and free radical formation remains unresolved but these are potential areas of promise. Meanwhile, scanning techniques for brain imaging are allowing real time investigation of the working striatum in normal and disordered humans and animals.We believe that the time is opportune for a broad review of current thinking on the basal ganglia in health and disease. The following articles are based on presentations given at a Symposium on the Neurobiology of the Basal Ganglia held at

  20. Kinderheilkunde and continental connections in child health: the "Glasgow school revisited"--again.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Lawrence T

    2013-10-01

    The last two hundred years or so have seen the transformation of medical practice from a clinical art to the application of science to the diagnosis and treatment of disease. There has been a historical debate about how the use of technology and discoveries of the laboratory have become integrated within medical practice. In trying to understand the evolution of "scientific medicine," this has generally focused on the tensions between the differing cultures, persons, and professions of the "laboratory" and "clinic" and sought to explain how they were resolved within specific institutions. This paper looks again at the "Glasgow School" (the subject of a number of seminal papers on this subject) and the forces that shaped it, by exploring the career of Leonard Findlay, whose training in Glasgow, and in Berlin (where he worked in a department in which science and medicine were integrated), defined a style of clinical medicine that formed the model for a new sort of university department of medicine in which clinicians and scientists worked side by side, albeit under the leadership of the former. As a clinician exposed in Berlin to the emerging new sciences of nutrition, microbiology, and immunology, which were particularly relevant to the care of sick children, Findlay created in Glasgow a department of medical pediatrics, which owed less to local factors, figures, and forces and more to his experience in Germany. PMID:22492737

  1. Good in parts: the Gay Men's Task Force in Glasgow--a response to Kelly.

    PubMed

    Hart, G J; Williamson, L M; Flowers, P

    2004-02-01

    We know that peer education, or the use of popular opinion leaders (POLs), works in terms of reducing reported risk behaviour for HIV infection amongst gay men. The work of Jeffrey Kelly and his colleagues provides some of the best scientific evidence in support of this approach. Influenced by this work, we undertook a peer education intervention amongst gay men in bars in Glasgow--the Gay Men's Task Force (GMTF)--but failed to demonstrate any reduction in sexual risk behaviour for HIV infection. In this paper we describe why we were unable to repeat in Scotland the success in small cities in the USA of the POL model. Our explanations include: failure to replicate the 'core elements' of POL; spatial and temporal differences between the original POL settings and the bars of Glasgow; and the currency of ideas such as 'peer education' beyond the protocols designed for their implementation. However, we also describe some of the successful features of the GMTF in Glasgow, and the continued value of peer education in contributing to reductions in sexual risk behaviour for HIV infection. PMID:14676022

  2. Gait and Glasgow Coma Scale scores can predict functional recovery in patients with traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Bilgin, Sevil; Guclu-Gunduz, Arzu; Oruckaptan, Hakan; Kose, Nezire; Celik, Bülent

    2012-09-01

    Fifty-one patients with mild (n = 14), moderate (n = 10) and severe traumatic brain injury (n = 27) received early rehabilitation. Level of consciousness was evaluated using the Glasgow Coma Score. Functional level was determined using the Glasgow Outcome Score, whilst mobility was evaluated using the Mobility Scale for Acute Stroke. Activities of daily living were assessed using the Barthel Index. Following Bobath neurodevelopmental therapy, the level of consciousness was significantly improved in patients with moderate and severe traumatic brain injury, but was not greatly influenced in patients with mild traumatic brain injury. Mobility and functional level were significantly improved in patients with mild, moderate and severe traumatic brain injury. Gait recovery was more obvious in patients with mild traumatic brain injury than in patients with moderate and severe traumatic brain injury. Activities of daily living showed an improvement but this was insignificant except for patients with severe traumatic brain injury. Nevertheless, complete recovery was not acquired at discharge. Multiple regression analysis showed that gait and Glasgow Coma Scale scores can be considered predictors of functional outcomes following traumatic brain injury. PMID:25624828

  3. A lead isotopic study of the human bioaccessibility of lead in urban soils from Glasgow, Scotland.

    PubMed

    Farmer, John G; Broadway, Andrew; Cave, Mark R; Wragg, Joanna; Fordyce, Fiona M; Graham, Margaret C; Ngwenya, Bryne T; Bewley, Richard J F

    2011-11-01

    The human bioaccessibility of lead (Pb) in Pb-contaminated soils from the Glasgow area was determined by the Unified Bioaccessibility Research Group of Europe (BARGE) Method (UBM), an in vitro physiologically based extraction scheme that mimics the chemical environment of the human gastrointestinal system and contains both stomach and intestine compartments. For 27 soils ranging in total Pb concentration from 126 to 2160 mg kg(-1) (median 539 mg kg(-1)), bioaccessibility as determined by the 'stomach' simulation (pH ~1.5) was 46-1580 mg kg(-1), equivalent to 23-77% (mean 52%) of soil total Pb concentration. The corresponding bioaccessibility data for the 'stomach+intestine' simulation (pH ~6.3) were 6-623 mg kg(-1) and 2-42% (mean 22%) of soil Pb concentration. The soil (206)Pb/(207)Pb ratios ranged from 1.057 to 1.175. Three-isotope plots of (208)Pb/(206)Pb against (206)Pb/(207)Pb demonstrated that (206)Pb/(207)Pb ratios were intermediate between values for source end-member extremes of imported Australian Pb ore (1.04)--used in the manufacture of alkyl Pb compounds (1.06-1.10) formerly added to petrol--and indigenous Pb ores/coal (1.17-1.19). The (206)Pb/(207)Pb ratios of the UBM 'stomach' extracts were similar (<0.01 difference) to those of the soil for 26 of the 27 samples (r=0.993, p<0.001) and lower in 24 of them. A slight preference for lower (206)Pb/(207)Pb ratio was discernible in the UBM. However, the source of Pb appeared to be less important in determining the extent of UBM-bioaccessible Pb than the overall soil total Pb concentration and the soil phases with which the Pb was associated. The significant phases identified in a subset of samples were carbonates, manganese oxides, iron-aluminium oxyhydroxides and clays. PMID:21930292

  4. The Unseen Founders Of Quaternary Science - The Men Of Glasgow, Scotland (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, J.

    2010-12-01

    Louis Agassiz (1807-1873) and Charles Lyell (1797-1875) are widely regarded as the founders of Quaternary Science, and there is no doubt that they played their part: Agassiz in 1840 presented and promoted his case for the wide-scale fluctuations of glaciers, and Lyell, through his books and contacts, did much to introduce the subject which we now know as climate change. However there are a number of individuals who contributed to the founding of Quaternary Science who are not so readily recognised and a remarkable fact is that a significant proportion were men without academic training or background who come from, or worked in Glasgow or the adjacent region of central Scotland. First amongst the Glaswegians was James Smith (1782-1867) who, in 1836 presented a paper to the Geological Society of London (where it was duly ignored) in which he suggested, on the basis of fossils dredged from the bed of the Clyde and experience of sailing around Iceland, that the climate of Scotland had been as cold as that of Iceland in the recent past. In 1841, Charles Maclaren (1782-1866) a journalist from Edinburgh, but using information based on raised shorelines near Glasgow proposed what we now know as the glacio-eustatic theory in which the variations in glacier extent control the level of the sea. Perhaps the most important of all was James Croll (1821- 1890) who worked on the theory of ice ages, based on orbital forcing, while janitor at the Andersonian Institute and Museum in Glasgow between 1859-1867. This work was the true precursor to the Milankovitch theory which provides the explanation for the major predictable elements of climate change. Robert Jack (1845-1921) from Irvine, southwest of Glasgow, while doing fieldwork for the British Geological Survey near Loch Lomond close to Glasgow, described in 1874 evidence for non-glacial conditions between tills and clearly recognised that climate could change from glacial to temperate and then glacial climate, before returning to

  5. ‘At-risk’ places: inequities in the distribution of environmental stressors and prescription rates of mental health medications in Glasgow, Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maantay, Juliana; Maroko, Andrew

    2015-11-01

    Using geospatial analytical methods, this study examines the association between one aspect of the built environment, namely, the concentration of vacant and derelict land (VDL), and the prevalence of mental health disorders (using the proxy variable of mental health medication prescription rates) in Glasgow, Scotland. This study builds on our previous research, which demonstrated the spatial correspondence between the locations of VDL in Glasgow and several physical health outcomes. Numerous studies of other locales have found similar correspondence between different elements of the built environment and various health outcomes. This is the first study of its kind to look at the spatial concentration of vacant and derelict land in relation to mental health, socio-economic indicators, environmental justice, and health inequities. The findings of this study demonstrate an inequity with respect to the distribution of vacant and derelict land, as confirmed by Pearson correlations between VDL density and deprivation (r = .521, p < .001). This suggests that many deprived communities are disproportionately burdened with environmental impacts and psycho-social stressors associated with this land use. Regression analyses show a significant positive association between the proportion of the population who were prescribed medication for anxiety, depression, or psychosis and the density of vacant and derelict land while adjusting for socio-demographic characteristics. This indicates that areas with higher VDL densities tend to exhibit higher rates of mental health issues. Based on these findings, strategies for constructive re-use of VDL are proposed.

  6. Reinforced Concrete Condition Assessment in Architectural Heritage. The Lion Chambers (Glasgow, UK) and the Theatre E. Duni (Matera, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guida, A.; Dimitrijevic, B.; Pagliuca, A.

    2012-04-01

    The research objective is to provide new qualitative information on the strength of reinforced concrete structures of two prominent examples of modern architecture by using innovative, non-invasive testing techniques. The first one is Lion Chambers in Glasgow (Scotland, United Kingdom) designed by the architects Salmon, Son and Gillespie and completed in 1907. It was the second example of the use of François Hennebique's reinforced concrete system in a building in Glasgow and one of the earliest in Britain. The second example is Duni Theatre in Matera (Southern Italy), designed by the architect Ettore Stella and completed in 1949. The tests on the internal reinforced concrete columns were undertaken by using "SonReb" (SONic + REBound) method that enables assessing the concrete resistance by combining the speed of ultrasound waves and the index of surface bounce through a scleorometric test. In fact, the sclerometer index only gives information regarding the surface layer of the building's structure. In fact, due to the effects of the natural ageing, catalysed by the presence of humidity, surface layers of concrete are affected over time by carbonatation, which increases surface rigidity, providing as a result a greatly "altered" rebound index (much greater than one would have under normal conditions). On the other hand, the ultrasound speed, on the contrary to resistance, is inversely proportional to the age of the concrete (this seems to be due to the cracks that occur and reduce the speed). The hardening process continues over time with a consequent increase in resistance, which diminishes with the passage of time. The paper provides the results of the tests run on the structure of the Lion Chambers and the Duni Theatre. The tests carried out are the basis of a diagnostic project that is possible to implement and monitor to guarantee a deeper knowledge, with the goal of attaining a level of thorough understanding aimed at the preservation of "Modern Architecture

  7. The food retail environment and area deprivation in Glasgow City, UK

    PubMed Central

    Macdonald, Laura; Ellaway, Anne; Macintyre, Sally

    2009-01-01

    It has previously been suggested that deprived neighbourhoods within modern cities have poor access to general amenities, for example, fewer food retail outlets. Here we examine the distribution of food retailers by deprivation in the City of Glasgow, UK. We obtained a list of 934 food retailers in Glasgow, UK, in 2007, and mapped these at address level. We categorised small areas (data zones) into quintiles of area deprivation using the 2006 Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation Income sub-domain score. We computed mean number of retailers per 1000 residents per data zone, and mean network distance to nearest outlet from data zone centroid, for all retailers combined and for each of seven categories of retailer separately (i.e. bakers, butchers, fruit and vegetable sellers, fishmongers, convenience stores, supermarkets and delicatessens). The most deprived quintile (of areas) had the greatest mean number of total food retailers per 1000 residents while quintile 1 (least deprived) had the least, and this difference was statistically significant (Chi-square p < 0.01). The closest mean distance to the nearest food retailer was within quintile 3 while the furthest distance was within quintile 1, and this was also statistically significant (Chi-square p < 0.01). There was variation in the distribution of the seven different types of food retailers, and access to amenities depended upon the type of food retailer studied and whether proximity or density was measured. Overall the findings suggested that deprived neighbourhoods within the City of Glasgow did not necessarily have fewer food retail outlets. PMID:19660114

  8. Prevalence and determinants of hepatitis C virus infection among female drug injecting sex workers in Glasgow

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Avril; Hutchinson, Sharon J; Gilchrist, Gail; Cameron, Sheila; Carr, Susan; Goldberg, David J

    2008-01-01

    Background Few studies of the prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection have focussed on women who work as street sex workers to finance their drug use. Methods The investigators report the survey findings of such a population in Glasgow. All women attending the health and social care drop-in centre, situated in Glasgow's "Red Light Area", during a four-week period in 1999 were invited to participate in a survey involving the provision of a saliva sample for anonymous HCV testing and the self-completion of a questionnaire seeking demographic, sexual and injecting practice data. Results Of the 223 women who attended, 51% agreed to participate. Of the 98 women who provided a sufficient saliva sample, 64% (95% CI: 54%–74%) tested HCV antibody positive; 98% of those who tested positive had ever injected drugs. Adjusting for the 85% sensitivity of the saliva test, the HCV antibody prevalence among IDU sex workers sampled was 81%; a rate which is considerably higher than those recorded, contemporaneously, among Glasgow IDUs generally. Two factors were independently associated with HCV antibody positivity in saliva: ever shared needles and syringes (adjusted OR 5.7, 95% CI 2–16) and number of times imprisoned (adjusted OR 7.3, 95% CI 1.4–39, for more than five times compared to zero times). Conclusion Women who engage in street sex work to finance their drug habit are a particularly desperate, chaotic and vulnerable population. This study demonstrates that their HCV infection risk may be greater than that for other IDUs. Those responsible for designing interventions to prevent HCV infection among IDUs should consider the special needs of this group. PMID:18355407

  9. IR Asterisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riess, Adam

    2010-09-01

    Observing asterisms for photometric calibration provides a "happy medium" between observing single stars which areobservable from the ground but lack statistics, and star clusters which have excellent statistics but are too crowded to observe from the ground.Asterisms in the IR for calibration have been less available than in the optical, e.g., Landolt's standard fields.While ad-hoc asterisms for calibration could be formed from 2MASS calibration, the photometric precision of 2MASSis relatively low, 0.02-0.05, for the fainter stars, m=9-13, that can still be observed without saturation in WFC3-IR.However, IR monitoring of variable phenomena {e.g., AGN SNe, stellar variables} from the ground has produced calibration of stars in asterisms with m=9-13 with a relative uncertainty of 0.001 to 0.01 mag due to the high frequency of monitoring. We have selected 4 such asterisms to observe. Because the stars are bright we need to use subarrays of 64x64 or 128x128 to get read out short enough to avoid saturation. The observations are obtained in pairs of 3 close stars, i.e., 2x3=6 stars per orbit in F125W and F160W as well as a F555W full frame to verify astrometry. In all we expect to measure 24 stars with m=9 to 14. The goal is to provide 2 calibrations, an independent zeropoint and its uncertainty as well as a measure of count rate non linearity. For the latter, an expected CRNL over 2 dex {5 mag} is expected tobe 0.02 mag.

  10. Representing the Glasgow Coma Scale in IT: Proper Specification is Required for Assessment Scales.

    PubMed

    Goossen, William; Oemig, Frank

    2014-01-01

    In healthcare a huge amount of assessment scales and score systems are in use to abbreviate and summarize the results of clinical observations to interpret a patient's condition in a valid and reliable manner. It is challenging to convey the information in a semantic interoperable form to other systems. A bad approach would be to invent individual models for each of them. Within this paper we would like to demonstrate that a generic model is sufficient by demonstrating the realization with the Glasgow Coma Scale. PMID:24851961

  11. Rickets and Osteomalacia in the Glasgow Pakistani Community, 1961-71

    PubMed Central

    Ford, J. A.; Colhoun, E. M.; McIntosh, W. B.; Dunnigan, M. G.

    1972-01-01

    The prevalence of vitamin D deficiency was reassessed in April and May 1971, 10 years after the discovery of widespread late rickets and osteomalacia in the Glasgow Pakistani community. Evidence of vitamin D deficiency was found in 28 out of 115 adults and children examined (24%). Children at the age of puberty were most severely affected by rickets, whereas most infants and younger children in the survey were protected by vitamin D supplements. Mild biochemical osteomalacia was common in Pakistani women. A total of 21 Pakistani and Indian children with rickets were admitted to Glasgow hospitals during 1968-70. These comprised 10 children with infantile rickets and 11 with late rickets. Four of the latter group required osteotomy for severe rachitic deformity. Late rickets and osteomalacia in Pakistani and Indian immigrants are not primarily due to nutritional deficiency of vitamin D, though the high phytate content of their diet may be of aetiological importance. A combination of environmental, social, and endogenous factors, the relative importance of which is not at present clear, may also be involved. Advice on the prophylaxis of vitamin D deficiency should be given to all Pakistani and Indian communities in the United Kingdom. PMID:5031709

  12. The importance of empathy in the enablement of patients attending the Glasgow Homoeopathic Hospital.

    PubMed Central

    Mercer, Stewart W; Reilly, David; Watt, Graham C M

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patient enablement in general practice is known to be limited by consultation length. However, the processes within the consultation that lead to enablement are not well understood. AIMS: To investigate patient enablement in a setting where time is less of a constraint than in primary care, in order to determine the importance of other factors in enablement. DESIGN OF STUDY: Exploratory questionnaire-based study. SETTING: Two hundred consecutive outpatients attending four doctors at the Glasgow Homoeopathic Hospital, an NHS-funded integrated complementary and orthodox medicine unit. METHOD: Information was collected on enablement and a range of other factors, including the patients expectations, their perception of the doctors empathy, and the doctors own confidence in the doctor-patient relationship. RESULTS: Although there were many factors that correlated with enablement, multi-regression analysis showed patients expectation, doctor's empathy (as perceived by the patient), and doctor's own confidence in the therapeutic relationship to be the three key factors. Together they accounted for 41% of the variation in enablement, with empathy being the single most important factor (66% of the explained variation in enablement). CONCLUSION: Patient enablement at the Glasgow Homoeopathic Hospital is mainly related to the patients perception of the doctor's empathy. PMID:12434958

  13. Dr. Auzoux's botanical teaching models and medical education at the universities of Glasgow and Aberdeen.

    PubMed

    Olszewski, Margaret Maria

    2011-09-01

    In the 1860s, Dr. Louis Thomas Jérôme Auzoux introduced a set of papier-mâché teaching models intended for use in the botanical classroom. These botanical models quickly made their way into the educational curricula of institutions around the world. Within these institutions, Auzoux's models were principally used to fulfil educational goals, but their incorporation into diverse curricula also suggests they were used to implement agendas beyond botanical instruction. This essay examines the various uses and meanings of Dr. Auzoux's botanical teaching models at the universities of Glasgow and Aberdeen in the nineteenth century. The two main conclusions of this analysis are: (1) investing in prestigious scientific collections was a way for these universities to attract fee-paying students so that better medical accommodation could be provided and (2) models were used to transmit different kinds of botanical knowledge at both universities. The style of botany at the University of Glasgow was offensive and the department there actively embraced and incorporated ideas of the emerging new botany. At Aberdeen, the style of botany was defensive and there was some hesitancy when confronting new botanical ideas. PMID:21802633

  14. Assessment of daytime outdoor comfort levels in and outside the urban area of Glasgow, UK.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Eduardo; Drach, Patricia; Emmanuel, Rohinton; Corbella, Oscar

    2013-07-01

    To understand thermal preferences and to define a preliminary outdoor comfort range for the local population of Glasgow, UK, an extensive series of measurements and surveys was carried out during 19 monitoring campaigns from winter through summer 2011 at six different monitoring points in pedestrian areas of downtown Glasgow. For data collection, a Davis Vantage Pro2 weather station equipped with temperature and humidity sensors, cup anemometer with wind vane, silicon pyranometer and globe thermometer was employed. Predictions of the outdoor thermal index PET (physiologically equivalent temperature) correlated closely to the actual thermal votes of respondents. Using concurrent measurements from a second Davis Vantage Pro2 weather station placed in a rural setting approximately 15 km from the urban area, comparisons were drawn with regard to daytime thermal comfort levels and urban-rural temperature differences (∆T(u-r)) for the various sites. The urban sites exhibited a consistent lower level of thermal discomfort during daytime. No discernible effect of urban form attributes in terms of the sky-view factor were observed on ∆Tu-r or on the relative difference of the adjusted predicted percentage of dissatisfied (PPD*). PMID:22886367

  15. Female streetworker--prostitutes in Glasgow: a descriptive study of their lifestyle.

    PubMed

    Green, S T; Goldberg, D J; Christie, P R; Frischer, M; Thomson, A; Carr, S V; Taylor, A

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this study is to describe the lifestyle of a group of female prostitutes. The collection of information was achieved by: (i) using a self administered questionnaire; and (ii) conducting conversational type interviews. Of 85 women attending a health care drop-in centre for female street prostitutes in Glasgow, 63 completed the questionnaire and 72 participated in conversational interviews. For 63 women the mean age of commencement of prostitution was 21 years. Fifty-one (81%) were injecting drug users, their most commonly used drugs being heroin and temazepam. They worked a mean of 5.5 evenings per week and provided sexual services to a mean of 6.4 clients per working day. Less than half of these services were estimated to be vaginal intercourse. While 59/60 women indicated that they always used condoms during vaginal intercourse, this only applied to commercial sex; only 8/47 (17%) always used condoms with their regular sexual partners. Unconventional sexual services, e.g. voyeurism and physical abuse, were commonly provided and clients were often violent. A typical female streetworking-prostitute in Glasgow was aged 25, unemployed, an injecting drug user and had commenced prostitution 4 years before. Her knowledge of HIV/AIDS was good and for vaginal intercourse she almost always used condoms with clients, though probably not with her regular partner. Her main concern was likely to be violence from clients. PMID:8218467

  16. Research on the intelligent control simulation target with IR imaging target for hardware-in-the-loop simulation test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Key-an; Gu, Ye; An, Yan; Meng, Xiang-kai; Lou, Yan; Zhang, Ya-lin; Zhan, Juntong; Song, Yan-song; Dong, Yan; Tong, Shou-feng

    2014-11-01

    The intelligent control of simulation target with infrared imaging target in the indoor and outdoor environment can effectively and quantitatively evaluated the parameters such as the minimum resolution temperature difference (MRTD) and spatial resolution of airborne forward looking infrared, infrared detection and tracking, infrared alarm, and etc. This paper focused on introducing the working principles of the intelligent control simulation target of Infrared imaging target, studying the thermal radiation characteristics of the infrared target surface material, analyzing the influences of the infrared radiation energy distribution, and developing the intelligent control simulation target with IR imaging target for hardware-in-the-loop simulation test. The intelligent control simulation target which area was 5 m2 and concluded 44 infrared targets including two kinds of infrared targets ,0.25m×0.25m;, and 0.25m×0.5m, achieved 1°~10° temperature simulation of target and the background, and temperature control precision better than 0.5°. Field test requirements were achieved by actual test.

  17. An empirical research in application of dynamic, multispectral-band IR thermal images for investigations of petrochemical furnaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pregowski, P.; Goleniewski, G.; Komosa, W.; Korytkowski, W.; Zwolenik, Sl.

    2008-09-01

    A few years ago we have developed a patent pending method that allows to increase the reliability of the heater's tube temperature measurements through flames. The applications of this method showed additional potential for investigation of heating medium, i.e. mixture of various gases and aerosols inside flames and flue gases. This paper presents the recently developed, new version of the measuring system based on PtSi IRFPA commercial thermographic type camera. Two additional optical (8 filter wheel) and digital interfaces have been applied. The main special feature of elaborated techniques is the dynamic spectrally matched IR thermography, which bases on forming single images that consist of pixels of chosen statistical value, minimum and maximum, noted during adequately long sequence of thermograms with total independence to the moment of their capture. Sets of these data can be used either directly or as inputs to other artificial images. In this way, additive or suppressed interferences of fluctuating character could be minimized or exhibited, depending on the type of investigations i.e. studying tubes' temperature or energetic features of the flames and flue gases. Some of the results emerged as very promising - in the future they may help in creating a new field of thermal cameras application for furnaces control or steering to further enhance safety and efficiency of furnaces running.

  18. IR Windstreaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Windstreaks are features caused by the interaction of wind and topographic landforms. The raised rims and bowls of impact craters causes a complex interaction such that the wind vortex in the lee of the crater can both scour away the surface dust and deposit it back in the center of the lee. If you look closely, you will see evidence of this in a darker 'rim' enclosing a brighter interior.

    This infrared image shows windstreaks in the region between Gordii Dorsum and Amazonis Mensa.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude -15.8, Longitude 215 East (145 West). 97 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  19. The JARCC Toolbox: The IR-EP: A Powerful Model for Self-Assessment and Planning in Institutional Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polinsky, Tracy L.

    2003-01-01

    Describes an institutional research office's establishment of an outcomes-oriented self-assessment model rooted in the college's mission and goals. Reports that the framework enables institutional research departments to evaluate their effectiveness, and more importantly, to use the results of self-assessment to plan future activities, thereby…

  20. Audit of the Forensic Psychiatry Liaison Service to Glasgow Sheriff Court 1994 to 1998.

    PubMed

    White, T; Ramsay, L; Morrison, R

    2002-01-01

    This study seeks to describe the demographic, offence, and diagnostic details of subjects referred by the Procurator Fiscal at Glasgow Sheriff Court to the Forensic Psychiatry Liaison between 1994 and 1997. The initial outcome of the assessment and an assessment of medical time involved is presented. This study is a retrospective review of audit forms completed between 1993 and 1994 and once more in 1997. The referral criteria, age structure and offence pattern was broadly similar to that reported in court diversion schemes in England. A primary diagnosis of alcohol and/or drug dependence was seen in one third of referrals during both years of the audit. A marked increase (250%) in referrals between 1994 and 1997 resulted in a marked reduction of those admitted to hospital, and an increase in the percentage who had 'no psychiatric diagnosis'. The need for ongoing liaison between the Procurators Fiscal and the Forensic Psychiatrists involved would appear important in modifying referral criteria. PMID:11848141

  1. Do obesity-promoting food environments cluster around socially disadvantaged schools in Glasgow, Scotland?

    PubMed Central

    Ellaway, Anne; Macdonald, Laura; Lamb, Karen; Thornton, Lukar; Day, Peter; Pearce, Jamie

    2012-01-01

    Increase in the consumption of food and drinks outside the home by adolescents and young people and associations with rising levels of obesity is a significant concern worldwide and it has been suggested that the food environment around schools may be a contributory factor. As few studies have explored this issue in a UK setting, we examined whether different types of food outlets are clustered around public secondary schools in Glasgow, and whether this pattern differed by social disadvantage. We found evidence of clustering of food outlets around schools but a more complex picture in relation to deprivation was observed. Across all schools there were numerous opportunities for pupils to purchase energy dense foods locally and the implications for policy are discussed. PMID:22819370

  2. Alternative manifestations of actor responses to urban flooding: case studies from Bradford and Glasgow.

    PubMed

    Cashman, A C

    2009-01-01

    Flooding processes are complex and can occur throughout urban areas sometimes with devastating consequences. Traditionally flood risks have been managed through a combination of structural defence measures, warnings and emergency measures. More recently they have included development controls and land zoning policies. When such measures fail, individuals, authorities and the economy have to cope with the consequences. There is a growing realization that the resilience of individuals and institutions to floods and the risks from flooding need to be addressed. In the past few years there has been what some have referred to as a paradigm shift in the way responses to flooding are being conceptualized and the way this affects actors and actions. Based on fieldwork including interviews this paper presents two examples of actor and institutional responses to flooding events from the cities of Bradford and Glasgow in the United Kingdom. PMID:19587405

  3. Diets for disease? Intraurban variation in reported food consumption in Glasgow.

    PubMed

    Forsyth, A; Macintyre, S; Anderson, A

    1994-06-01

    A recent official report on the Scottish Diet reviews evidence for poor health and poor diets among the Scots, and makes extensive and specific recommendations about dietary change. This paper examines the extent to which reported consumption of fifteen of the food groups discussed in that report vary among four neighbourhoods in Glasgow City. Some foods appear to be typical of a wider Glaswegian (or Scottish) diet and show little variation among neighbourhoods (e.g. semi-skimmed milk, white fish, confectionery, cakes and pastries, savoury snacks). Other foods however show marked differences between neighbourhoods after controlling for sex, age and social class; these include fruit, vegetables, meat (particularly processed meat products), bread, spreading fats, sugar, natural fruit juice and alcohol. This suggests that such intraurban variations in food consumption cannot be explained simply by socio-demographic or socio-economic factors in individuals and that cultural and supply factors also need to be taken into account. PMID:7979343

  4. Hegel in Glasgow: Idealists and the Emergence of Adult Education in the West of Scotland, 1866-1927

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Robert; Turner, Robert

    2006-01-01

    This paper considers how Hegel's philosophical idealism influenced the thinking and practical activities of four successive holders of the Chair of Moral Philosophy in the University of Glasgow between 1866 and 1927. It argues that their activities were shaped by Hegelian concepts of citizenship, which engendered a commitment to encouraging the…

  5. Case Study: A Distance Education Contribution to a Social Strategy To Combat Poverty: Open University Community Education Courses in Glasgow.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farnes, N. C.

    This project located in Glasgow, Scotland, is concerned with the use of distance teaching for a non-formal community education program that is a component of a social change strategy to combat poverty. The study shows that the use of distance learning courses in non-formal community education is successful in attracting, at a reasonable cost per…

  6. Out-of-home food outlets and area deprivation: case study in Glasgow, UK

    PubMed Central

    Macintyre, Sally; McKay, Laura; Cummins, Steven; Burns, Cate

    2005-01-01

    Background There is a popular belief that out-of-home eating outlets, which typically serve energy dense food, may be more commonly found in more deprived areas and that this may contribute to higher rates of obesity and related diseases in such areas. Methods We obtained a list of all 1301 out-of-home eating outlets in Glasgow, UK, in 2003 and mapped these at unit postcode level. We categorised them into quintiles of area deprivation using the 2004 Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation and computed mean density of types of outlet (restaurants, fast food restaurants, cafes and takeaways), and all types combined, per 1000 population. We also estimated odds ratios for the presence of any outlets in small areas within the quintiles. Results The density of outlets, and the likelihood of having any outlets, was highest in the second most affluent quintile (Q2) and lowest in the second most deprived quintile (Q4). Mean outlets per 1,000 were 4.02 in Q2, 1.20 in Q4 and 2.03 in Q5. With Q2 as the reference, Odds Ratios for having any outlets were 0.52 (CI 0.32–0.84) in Q1, 0.50 (CI 0.31 – 0.80) in Q4 and 0.61 (CI 0.38 – 0.98) in Q5. Outlets were located in the City Centre, West End, and along arterial roads. Conclusion In Glasgow those living in poorer areas are not more likely to be exposed to out-of-home eating outlets in their neighbourhoods. Health improvement policies need to be based on empirical evidence about the location of fast food outlets in specific national and local contexts, rather than on popular 'factoids'. PMID:16248898

  7. Asbestos and lung cancer in Glasgow and the west of Scotland.

    PubMed Central

    De Vos Irvine, H; Lamont, D W; Hole, D J; Gillis, C R

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To quantify the relation between lung cancer and exposure to asbestos in men in west Scotland and to estimate the proportion of lung cancer which may be attributed to exposure to asbestos. DESIGN--An ecological correlation study of the incidence of lung cancer in men and past asbestos exposure. The unit of analysis was the postcode sector. Correction was made for past cigarette smoking, air pollution, and deprivation. SETTING--The region covered by the west of Scotland cancer registry, containing 2.72 million people and including Glasgow and the lower reaches of the River Clyde, where shipbuilding was once a major industry. SUBJECTS--All men diagnosed with lung cancer between 1975 and 1984 whose residence at the time of registration was within the west of Scotland. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE--The population attributable risk for asbestos related lung cancer. RESULTS--An estimated 5.7% (95% confidence interval 2.3 to 9.1%) of all lung cancers in men registered in the west of Scotland during the period 1975-84 were asbestos related, amounting to 1081 cases. CONCLUSIONS--A considerable proportion of cases of lung cancer in men in Glasgow and the west of Scotland from 1975 to 1984 were asbestos related. Most of these may not have been considered for compensation by the Department of Social Security. Given the very small annual number of recorded cases of asbestosis this condition is probably not a prerequisite for the development of asbestos related lung cancer. A heightened awareness of the increasing incidence of asbestos related neoplasms and their more thorough investigation are recommended. PMID:8518676

  8. Assessment of nurse’s knowledge about Glasgow coma scale at a university hospital

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Wesley Cajaíba; Vancini-Campanharo, Cássia Regina; Lopes, Maria Carolina Barbosa Teixeira; Okuno, Meiry Fernanda Pinto; Batista, Ruth Ester Assayag

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To assess knowledge of nurses of emergency services and intensive care units about Glasgow Coma Scale. Methods This cross-sectional analytical study included 127 nurses of critical units of an university hospital. We used structured interview with 12 questions to evaluate their knowledge about the scale. Association of Knowledge with professionals’ sociodemographic variables were verified by the Fisher-test, χ2 and likelihood ratio. Results Most of participants were women mean aged 31.1 years, they had graduated more than 5 years previously, and had 1 to 3 years of work experience. In the assessment of best score possible for Glasgow scale (question 3) nurses who had graduate more than 5 years ago presented a lower percentage success rate (p=0.0476). However, in the question 7, which evaluated what interval of the scale indicated moderate severity of brain trauma injury, those with more years of experience had higher percentage of correct answers (p=0.0251). In addition, nurses from emergency service had more correct answers than nurses from intensive care unit (p=0.0143) in the same question. Nurses graduated for more than 5 years ago had a lower percentage of correct answers in question 7 (p=0.0161). Nurses with more work experience had a better score (p=0.0119) to identify how assessment of motor response should be started. Conclusion Number of year since graduation, experience, and work at critical care units interfered in nurses’ knowledge about the scale, which indicates the need of training. PMID:27462896

  9. Optical/IR from ground

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strom, Stephen; Sargent, Wallace L. W.; Wolff, Sidney; Ahearn, Michael F.; Angel, J. Roger; Beckwith, Steven V. W.; Carney, Bruce W.; Conti, Peter S.; Edwards, Suzan; Grasdalen, Gary

    1991-01-01

    Optical/infrared (O/IR) astronomy in the 1990's is reviewed. The following subject areas are included: research environment; science opportunities; technical development of the 1980's and opportunities for the 1990's; and ground-based O/IR astronomy outside the U.S. Recommendations are presented for: (1) large scale programs (Priority 1: a coordinated program for large O/IR telescopes); (2) medium scale programs (Priority 1: a coordinated program for high angular resolution; Priority 2: a new generation of 4-m class telescopes); (3) small scale programs (Priority 1: near-IR and optical all-sky surveys; Priority 2: a National Astrometric Facility); and (4) infrastructure issues (develop, purchase, and distribute optical CCDs and infrared arrays; a program to support large optics technology; a new generation of large filled aperture telescopes; a program to archive and disseminate astronomical databases; and a program for training new instrumentalists)

  10. 48 CFR 931.205-18 - Independent research and development (IR&D) and bid and proposal (B&P) costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... development (IR&D) and bid and proposal (B&P) costs. 931.205-18 Section 931.205-18 Federal Acquisition... bid and proposal (B&P) costs. (c)(2) IR&D costs are recoverable under DOE contracts to the extent they... the DOE program. The term “DOE program” encompasses the DOE total mission and its objectives....

  11. 48 CFR 931.205-18 - Independent research and development (IR&D) and bid and proposal (B&P) costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... development (IR&D) and bid and proposal (B&P) costs. 931.205-18 Section 931.205-18 Federal Acquisition... bid and proposal (B&P) costs. (c)(2) IR&D costs are recoverable under DOE contracts to the extent they... the DOE program. The term “DOE program” encompasses the DOE total mission and its objectives....

  12. 48 CFR 931.205-18 - Independent research and development (IR&D) and bid and proposal (B&P) costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... development (IR&D) and bid and proposal (B&P) costs. 931.205-18 Section 931.205-18 Federal Acquisition... bid and proposal (B&P) costs. (c)(2) IR&D costs are recoverable under DOE contracts to the extent they... the DOE program. The term “DOE program” encompasses the DOE total mission and its objectives....

  13. Estimating the variability in the risk of infection for hepatitis C in the Glasgow injecting drug user population.

    PubMed

    Sutton, A J; McDonald, S A; Palmateer, N; Taylor, A; Hutchinson, S J

    2012-12-01

    Glasgow (Scotland's largest city) has a high prevalence of injecting drug use and has one of the highest prevalences of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in injecting drug users (IDUs) in Western Europe. HCV prevalence data from surveys of Glasgow's IDUs from 1990 to 2007 were utilized and a model was applied that described the prevalence of HCV as a function of the rate (force) of infection. Force-of-infection estimates for HCV that may vary over time and injecting career length over a range of variables were investigated. New initiates to injecting were found to be at increased risk of HCV infection, with being recruited from a street location and reporting injecting in prison leading to a significant increase in the risk of infection in new initiates. These results indicate areas of importance for the planning of public health measures that target the IDU population. PMID:22459739

  14. Item-Level Psychometrics of the Glasgow Outcome Scale: Extended Structured Interviews.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ickpyo; Li, Chih-Ying; Velozo, Craig A

    2016-04-01

    The Glasgow Outcome Scale-Extended (GOSE) structured interview captures critical components of activities and participation, including home, shopping, work, leisure, and family/friend relationships. Eighty-nine community dwelling adults with mild-moderate traumatic brain injury (TBI) were recruited (average = 2.7 year post injury). Nine items of the 19 items were used for the psychometrics analysis purpose. Factor analysis and item-level psychometrics were investigated using the Rasch partial-credit model. Although the principal components analysis of residuals suggests that a single measurement factor dominates the measure, the instrument did not meet the factor analysis criteria. Five items met the rating scale criteria. Eight items fit the Rasch model. The instrument demonstrated low person reliability (0.63), low person strata (2.07), and a slight ceiling effect. The GOSE demonstrated limitations in precisely measuring activities/participation for individuals after TBI. Future studies should examine the impact of the low precision of the GOSE on effect size. PMID:27504879

  15. Clinical Significance of the Glasgow Prognostic Score for Survival after Colorectal Cancer Surgery.

    PubMed

    Eren, Tunc; Burcu, Busra; Tombalak, Ercument; Ozdemir, Tugrul; Leblebici, Metin; Ozemir, Ibrahim Ali; Ziyade, Sedat; Alimoglu, Orhan

    2016-06-01

    Glasgow prognostic score (GPS) has been found to be a useful tool in various cancer types. Our aim was to evaluate the significance of GPS in patients operated on for colorectal cancer (CRC). Patients with CRC who underwent radical resections between April 2010 and January 2015 were retrospectively evaluated. GPS was estimated based on the preoperative measurement of C-reactive protein and serum albumin levels. Data including demographics, laboratory and pathological parameters, surgical outcomes, and late-term follow-up results were analyzed. The study group of 115 patients consisted of 51 (44 %) women and 64 (56 %) men with a median age of 66 (range 32-91) years. The mean follow-up period was 20 (range 7-41) months. Tumor size and wound infection rates were significantly increased in patients with higher GPS (p = 0.019 and p = 0.003, respectively). According to multivariate analyses, CEA and GPS were found to be independent risk factors significantly effecting mortality (p = 0.001 and p = 0.009, respectively). At the end of the late-term follow-up period, it was detected that cancer-specific survival significantly decreased as the GPS increased (p = 0.016). The GPS is a significant prognostic factor in CRC and should be included in the routine preoperative assessment of all surgically treated CRC patients. PMID:26925798

  16. [Assessment of Cachexia in Head and Neck Cancer Patients Based on a Modified Glasgow Prognostic Score].

    PubMed

    Matsuzuka, Takashi; Suzuki, Masahiro; Saijoh, Satoshi; Ikeda, Masakazu; Imaizumi, Mitsumasa; Nomoto, Yukio; Matsui, Takamichi; Tada, Yasuhiro; Omori, Koichi

    2016-02-01

    We retrospectively analyzed 54 patients who died of head and neck squamous cell caricinoma regarding the process and duration of cachexia using the modified Glasgow Prognostic Score (mGPS). The patients were classified as having cachexia when the serum albumin level was less than 3.5 mg/dL and the C-reactive protein (CRP) level was more than 0.5 mg/dL. The number of patients with cachexia was eight (8%) at the first visit and 50 (93%) at the time of death. In the 50 patients, the median and average time of having cachexia was 59 and 95 days, respectively. Thirty-two of the 50 patients (64%) died within three months after the presence of cachexia was confirmed. In this study, the time of having cachexia was so short, then the policy of care should be converted from aggressive into supportive in patients classified as having cachexia. mGPS would be an accurate assessment tool for cachexia and ascertain the end stage of head and neck cancer patients. PMID:27149710

  17. A health impact assessment of the 2014 Commonwealth Games in Glasgow

    PubMed Central

    McCartney, G.; Palmer, S.; Winterbottom, J.; Jones, R.; Kendall, R.; Booker, D.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Objective To influence the planning of the 2014 Commonwealth Games such that the positive impacts are maximized and the negative impacts are mitigated. Study design Participatory health impact assessment (HIA). Methods A participatory HIA was performed using standard World Health Organization methods. A scoping event was held to involve decision makers in the process and to identify the key areas for consideration. A large community engagement exercise and a systematic review were conducted as part of the evidence-gathering phase. The results of the HIA were reported to the key decision makers involved in the Glasgow City Council legacy strategy. Results The likely net health impact of hosting the Commonwealth Games was uncertain. It was suggested that the main mechanisms through which impacts were likely to be felt were: the economy; civic pride; engagement in decision making; the provision of new infrastructure; and participation in cultural events. A series of recommendations was produced in order to maximize positive health benefits and mitigate negative impacts. Conclusions HIA is a useful tool for engaging communities and decision makers in the public health agenda. HIAs of major multi-sport events are limited by a lack of quality evidence and the inability to predict impacts reliably. PMID:20630546

  18. Meteorological conditions and incidence of Legionnaires' disease in Glasgow, Scotland: application of statistical modelling.

    PubMed

    Dunn, C E; Rowlingson, B; Bhopal, R S; Diggle, P

    2013-04-01

    This study investigated the relationships between Legionnaires' disease (LD) incidence and weather in Glasgow, UK, by using advanced statistical methods. Using daily meteorological data and 78 LD cases with known exact date of onset, we fitted a series of Poisson log-linear regression models with explanatory variables for air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and year, and sine-cosine terms for within-year seasonal variation. Our initial model showed an association between LD incidence and 2-day lagged humidity (positive, P = 0·0236) and wind speed (negative, P = 0·033). However, after adjusting for year-by-year and seasonal variation in cases there were no significant associations with weather. We also used normal linear models to assess the importance of short-term, unseasonable weather values. The most significant association was between LD incidence and air temperature residual lagged by 1 day prior to onset (P = 0·0014). The contextual role of unseasonably high air temperatures is worthy of further investigation. Our methods and results have further advanced understanding of the role which weather plays in risk of LD infection. PMID:22687530

  19. ALBERMARLE PAMLICO IR 2002

    EPA Science Inventory

    The 2002 Albermarle Pamlico Implementation Review (IR) highlights recent successes and challenges with the estuary program. Various components within the IR include: CCMP implementation, outlining priority management actions, public involvement, stakeholder contribution, and limi...

  20. Predicting Outcome in Acute Organophosphorus Poisoning with a Poison Severity Score or the Glasgow Coma Scale

    PubMed Central

    Davies, James O. J.; Eddleston, Michael; Buckley, Nick A.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Organophosphorus pesticide poisoning kills around 200,000 people each year, principally due to self poisoning in the Asia-Pacific region. Aim: We wished to assess whether patients at high risk of death could be identified accurately using clinical parameters soon after hospital admission. Design: We evaluated the usefulness of the International Program on Chemical Safety Poison Severity Score (IPCS PSS) and the Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) prospectively for predicting death in patients poisoned by organophosphorus pesticides. Methods: Data were collected as part of a multicentre cohort study in Sri Lanka. Study doctors saw all patients on admission, collecting data on pulse, blood pressure, pupil size, need for intubation, and GCS. Results: 1365 patients with a history of acute organophosphorus poisoning were included. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were calculated for the IPCS PSS and GCS on admission. The IPCS PSS and GCS had similar ROC area under the curves (AUC) and best cut points as determined by Youden's index (AUC/sensitivity/specificity 0.81/0.78/0.79 for IPCS PSS ≥ grade 2 and 0.84/0.79/0.79 for GCS ≤13). The predictive value varied with the pesticide ingested, being more accurate for dimethoate poisoning and less accurate for fenthion poisoning (GCS AUC 0.91 compared to 0.69). Conclusions: GCS and the IPCS PSS were similarly effective at predicting outcome. Patients presenting with a GCS ≤ 13 need intensive monitoring and treatment. However, the identity of the organophosphate must be taken into account since the half of all patients who died from fenthion poisoning only had mild symptoms at presentation. PMID:18319295

  1. Effects of Urban Morphology on Intra-Urban Temperature Differences: Two Squares in Glasgow City Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drach, P. R. C.; Emmanuel, R.

    2014-12-01

    The perspective of climate change increases the necessity of tackling the urban over heating effects, by developing strategies to mitigate/adapt to changes. Analysing the influence of urban form on intra-urban temperature dynamics could be a helpful way of reducing its negative consequences. Also, it would help untangle the urban effect from the effect caused by atmospheric conditions. The present paper presents the effect of atmospheric conditions as exemplified by atmospheric stability (modified Pasquill-Gifford-Turner classification system) and urban morphology as measured by the Sky View Factor (SVF) on intra-urban variations in air temperature in a cold climate city, in and around the mature urban area of Glasgow, UK (55° 51' 57.294"N, 4° 15' 0.2628"W). The aim is to highlight their combined importance and to make preliminary investigations on the local warming effect of urban morphology under specific atmospheric stability classes. The present work indicates that the maximum intra-urban temperature differences (i.e. temperature difference between the coolest and the warmest spots in a given urban region) is strongly correlated with atmospheric stability. The spatial patterns in local temperature variations consistently show that water bodies and urban parks have lower temperature variations. Thus, greenery and urban materials could play an important role in influencing the local climate in cold cities. The knowledge of urban morphology's influence on local temperature variations could be an important tool for devising appropriate planning/design strategies to face urban overheating in the coming years as the background climate continues to warm.

  2. Glasgow Coma Scale and Outcomes after Structural Traumatic Head Injury in Early Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Heather, Natasha L.; Derraik, José G. B.; Beca, John; Hofman, Paul L.; Dansey, Rangi; Hamill, James; Cutfield, Wayne S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess the association of the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) with radiological evidence of head injury (the Abbreviated Injury Scale for the head region, AIS-HR) in young children hospitalized with traumatic head injury (THI), and the predictive value of GCS and AIS-HR scores for long-term impairment. Methods Our study involved a 10-year retrospective review of a database encompassing all patients admitted to Starship Children’s Hospital (Auckland, New Zealand, 2000–2010) with THI. Results We studied 619 children aged <5 years at the time of THI, with long-term outcome data available for 161 subjects. Both GCS and AIS-HR scores were predictive of length of intensive care unit and hospital stay (all p<0.001). GCS was correlated with AIS-HR (ρ=-0.46; p<0.001), although mild GCS scores (13–15) commonly under-estimated the severity of radiological injury: 42% of children with mild GCS scores had serious–critical THI (AIS-HR 3–5). Increasingly severe GCS or AIS-HR scores were both associated with a greater likelihood of long-term impairment (neurological disability, residual problems, and educational support). However, long-term impairment was also relatively common in children with mild GCS scores paired with structural THI more severe than a simple linear skull fracture. Conclusion Severe GCS scores will identify most cases of severe radiological injury in early childhood, and are good predictors of poor long-term outcome. However, young children admitted to hospital with structural THI and mild GCS scores have an appreciable risk of long-term disability, and also warrant long-term follow-up. PMID:24312648

  3. Morphological Typology of Languages for IR.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pirkola, Ari

    2001-01-01

    Presents a morphological classification of languages from the information retrieval (IR) perspective. Discusses differences in inflection, derivation, and compounding; index of synthesis and index of fusion; cross-language retrieval research; the need for semantic and syntactic typologies; and the effects of morphology and stemming in IR.…

  4. Preoperative Glasgow prognostic score as a predictor of primary bladder cancer recurrence

    PubMed Central

    YUKSEL, OZGUR HAKI; AKAN, SERKAN; URKMEZ, AHMET; YILDIRIM, CAGLAR; SAHIN, AYTAC; VERIT, AYHAN

    2016-01-01

    The correlation between systemic inflammatory markers and malignancies has been assessed by a number of recent studies. The aim of this study was to prospectively assess preoperative inflammation markers and Glasgow prognostic scores (GPS) in patients who underwent surgery for primary bladder cancer (BC), and evaluate the predictive value of GPS for disease recurrence and progression. A total of 38 patients (mean age, 60.16±9.71 years; range, 33–76 years) who were treated in our department between May, 2014 and August, 2015 were enrolled in the present study. Preoperatively, patient information regarding gender, body mass index, serum C-reactive protein (CRP) and albumin levels, GPS and comorbidities, were collected and recorded. Transurethral resection of the bladder was performed, followed by histopathological evaluation of the resected material. The tumor size, stage and grade and the presence of necrosis were determined. According to the international TNM classification, the results of the histopathological analysis were as follows: Ta low- (n=24) and high-grade (n=4); and T1 low- (n=2) and high-grade (n=8). The median follow-up period was 10.1 months (range, 6–12 months). During this period, recurrence was observed in 10 cases and disease progression was detected in 1 patient. Hypoalbuminemia was encountered in 40% of the cases with recurrence, which was significantly higher compared with that in patients without recurrence (7.1%; P=0.031). In patients who had recurrence, a GPS of 1–2 points and tumor necrosis were more frequently detected compared with those without recurrence (60 vs. 7.1%, P=0.002; and 80 vs. 7.1%, P=0.001, respectively). Excluding a cystectomized case with a diagnosis of muscle-invasive BC, disease progression was not detected in any of the cases with recurrence during follow-up. Therefore, we consider that GPS and serum markers of systemic inflammatory response may be used as predictors of recurrence in patients with transitional

  5. Neighbourhood demolition, relocation and health. A qualitative longitudinal study of housing-led urban regeneration in Glasgow, UK

    PubMed Central

    Egan, Matt; Lawson, Louise; Kearns, Ade; Conway, Ellie; Neary, Joanne

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a qualitative longitudinal study to explore how adult residents of disadvantaged urban neighbourhoods (Glasgow, UK) experienced neighbourhood demolition and relocation. Data from 23 households was collected in 2011 and 2012. Some participants described moves to new or improved homes in different neighbourhoods as beneficial to their and their families’ wellbeing. Others suggested that longstanding illnesses and problems with the new home and/or neighbourhood led to more negative experiences. Individual-level contextual differences, home and neighbourhood-level factors and variations in intervention implementation influence the experiences of residents involved in relocation programmes. PMID:25814338

  6. Neighbourhood demolition, relocation and health. A qualitative longitudinal study of housing-led urban regeneration in Glasgow, UK.

    PubMed

    Egan, Matt; Lawson, Louise; Kearns, Ade; Conway, Ellie; Neary, Joanne

    2015-05-01

    We conducted a qualitative longitudinal study to explore how adult residents of disadvantaged urban neighbourhoods (Glasgow, UK) experienced neighbourhood demolition and relocation. Data from 23 households was collected in 2011 and 2012. Some participants described moves to new or improved homes in different neighbourhoods as beneficial to their and their families' wellbeing. Others suggested that longstanding illnesses and problems with the new home and/or neighbourhood led to more negative experiences. Individual-level contextual differences, home and neighbourhood-level factors and variations in intervention implementation influence the experiences of residents involved in relocation programmes. PMID:25814338

  7. Unravelling the Glasgow effect: The relationship between accumulative bio- psychosocial stress, stress reactivity and Scotland's health problems.

    PubMed

    Cowley, Joe; Kiely, John; Collins, Dave

    2016-12-01

    To date, multiple hypotheses have been proposed for the Scottish effect and, more specifically, Glasgow's high mortality rate and the associated Glasgow effect. Previous authors have highlighted the improbability of a single factor as responsible for this effect with seventeen possible hypotheses presented. These have ranged from socio-economic factors, lifestyle and cultural factors such as sectarianism, and political and economic factors. Although these may all be contributory factors to this paradox, the underpinning reasons for the observed effect remain relatively unexplained. In this paper, we suggest that the compounding effect of a unique blend of accumulating life stressors may predispose Scots, and particularly socially-disadvantaged Glaswegians, to a wide-range of health disorders. In short, a confluence of social, environmental, attitudinal and cultural stressors perhaps combine to negatively influence biological health. Future directions should consider the stress remediating role of physical activity, and the problems presented by barriers to participation in physical activity and exercise during key transitional stages of life. PMID:27512652

  8. IOT Overview: IR Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, E.

    In this instrument review chapter the calibration plans of ESO IR instruments are presented and briefly reviewed focusing, in particular, on the case of ISAAC, which has been the first IR instrument at VLT and whose calibration plan served as prototype for the coming instruments.

  9. IR Hot Wave

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, T. B.

    2010-04-01

    The IR Hot Wave{trademark} furnace is a breakthrough heat treatment system for manufacturing metal components. Near-infrared (IR) radiant energy combines with IR convective heating for heat treating. Heat treatment is an essential process in the manufacture of most components. The controlled heating and cooling of a metal or metal alloy alters its physical, mechanical, and sometimes chemical properties without changing the object's shape. The IR Hot Wave{trademark} furnace offers the simplest, quickest, most efficient, and cost-effective heat treatment option for metals and metal alloys. Compared with other heat treatment alternatives, the IR Hot Wave{trademark} system: (1) is 3 to 15 times faster; (2) is 2 to 3 times more energy efficient; (3) is 20% to 50% more cost-effective; (4) has a {+-}1 C thermal profile compared to a {+-}10 C thermal profile for conventional gas furnaces; and (5) has a 25% to 50% smaller footprint.

  10. Deploying a culture change programme management approach in support of information and communication technology developments in Greater Glasgow NHS Board.

    PubMed

    Frame, Joanne; Watson, Janice; Thomson, Katie

    2008-06-01

    This article reports on the project management and Culture Change Programme adopted by the NHS Greater Glasgow Health Board to deliver an electronic patient record (EPR) to support cardiology and stroke clinical services. To achieve its vision for the EPR (;to "really make a difference" to patient care by providing to the right person, the right information, under the right safeguards') the Board recognized that attending to social and organizational issues is at least of equal importance to addressing strictly technical concerns. Consequently, an ICT Culture Change Programme (ICT CCP) was devised and implemented to assist in the management of change, and in particular to facilitate a visionary clinical and cultural environment operating in conjunction with the evolving technical environment. In this article we describe the key components of this approach, outline the benefits we believe have accrued, and describe the steps being taken to build upon lessons learned. PMID:18477599

  11. Women's work in offices and the preservation of men's "breadwinning" jobs in early twentieth-century Glasgow.

    PubMed

    Wilson, R G

    2001-01-01

    As Britain's industrial economy matured and the volume of administrative work increased, different kinds of clerical jobs and clerical careers became possible. Using examples from a variety of small- to medium-sized enterprises in Glasgow, this article will describe how the main functions of administrative work - financial, secretarial and managerial - were divided both horizontally and vertically in order to preserve secure, well-paid, "breadwinning" jobs for men, leaving routine secretarial work for women. The isolation of women in all-women enclaves carrying out shorthand and typing work and the subsequent devaluation of these as kinds of work were of primary importance in the creation of office work that was explicitly women's work. PMID:19678416

  12. WHEN CONSCIENCE ISN'T CLEAR: GREATER GLASGOW HEALTH BOARD v DOOGAN AND ANOTHER [2014] UKSC 68.

    PubMed

    Neal, Mary

    2015-01-01

    The Supreme Court's judgment in Doogan is a judicial review of a decision by Greater Glasgow Health Board regarding the scope of the conscience-based exemption in section 4(1) of the Abortion Act 1967. The case progressed through the Outer and Inner Houses of the Court of Session in Edinburgh before final judgment was delivered in the Supreme Court by Baroness Hale on December 17 2014. The Supreme Court eschewed consideration of the human rights dimension of the case (which had featured in the Outer House decision) and approached its judgment as 'a pure question of statutory construction'. This commentary engages with the judgment on its own terms, assessing it as an exercise in statutory interpretation, and leaves it to others who may wish to do so to comment on the human rights aspects of the case. PMID:26324460

  13. CHARLOTTE HARBOR IR, 2002

    EPA Science Inventory

    The 2002 Charlotte Harbor Implementation Review (IR) summarizes the progress and challenges ahead for the Charlotte Harbor National Estuary Program (CHNEP). The implementation review report requires seven components: Status of CCMP implementation (programmatic progress); Environm...

  14. Seeking to Institutionally Embed Lessons from a Funded Project: Experiences from the Digital Libraries in the Classroom Spoken Word Project at Glasgow Caledonian University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donald, David; Wallace, Iain

    2007-01-01

    The Joint Information Systems Committee and the National Science Foundation programme, Digital Libraries in the Classroom (DLiC), addresses implications for the learning of the revolution in scholarly communication. What are the obstacles to undergraduates "'writing' on and for the Internet"? Glasgow Caledonian University (GCU) is a partner in one…

  15. Libraries for Life: Democracy, Diversity, Delivery. IFLA Council and General Conference: Conference Programme and Proceedings (68th, Glasgow, Scotland, August 18-24, 2002).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions, The Hague (Netherlands).

    This document presents the program and proceedings from the 68th International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA) Conference held in Glasgow, Scotland, August 18-24, 2002. Topics of presentations include: library services for parliaments; needs assessment; the effects of September 11th on information provision and privacy;…

  16. Reliability and Validity of the Dutch Version of the Glasgow Anxiety Scale for People with an Intellectual Disability (GAS-ID)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hermans, H.; Wieland, J.; Jelluma, N.; Van der Pas, F.; Evenhuis, H.

    2013-01-01

    Background: In the Netherlands, no self-report screening questionnaire for anxiety in people with intellectual disabilities (ID) was available yet. Therefore, we have translated the Glasgow Anxiety Scale for people with an Intellectual Disability (GAS-ID) into Dutch and studied its reliability and validity in adults with borderline, mild or…

  17. SPEECH PATHOLOGY, DIAGNOSIS--THEORY AND PRACTICE, REPORT OF THE NATIONAL CONFERENCE OF THE COLLEGE OF SPEECH THERAPISTS (GLASGOW, JULY 25-29, 1966).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1967

    TWENTY ARTICLES AND ABSTRACTS ON THE THEORY AND PRACTICE OF DIAGNOSIS ARE INCLUDED IN THIS REPORT OF THE NATIONAL CONFERENCE OF THE COLLEGE OF SPEECH THERAPISTS IN GLASGOW IN 1966. FOUR PAPERS ON STAMMERING CONSIDER TONGUE THRUSTING, THE NEUROSES INVOLVED, PROGNOSIS, AND DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS IN DISORDERS OF FLUENCY. OTHER ARTICLES DISCUSS AREAS…

  18. Do poorer people have poorer access to local resources and facilities? The distribution of local resources by area deprivation in Glasgow, Scotland☆

    PubMed Central

    Macintyre, Sally; Macdonald, Laura; Ellaway, Anne

    2008-01-01

    It has commonly been suggested that in modern cities individual or household deprivation (for example, low income or education) is amplified by area level deprivation (for example, lack of jobs or good schools), in ways which damage the health of the poorest and increase health inequalities. The aim of this study was to determine the location of a range of resources and exposures by deprivation in a UK city. We examined the location of 42 resources in Glasgow City, Scotland, in 2005–2006, by quintile of small area deprivation. Measures included number per 1000 population, network distance to nearest resource, and percentage of data zones containing at least one of each type of resource. Twelve resources had higher density in, and/or were closer to or more common in, more deprived neighbourhoods: public nurseries, public primary schools, police stations, pharmacies, credit unions, post offices, bus stops, bingo halls, public swimming pools, public sports centres, outdoor play areas, and vacant and derelict land/buildings. Sixteen had higher density in, and/or were closer to, or more common in, more affluent neighbourhoods: public secondary schools, private schools, banks, building societies, museums/art galleries, railway stations, subway stations, tennis courts, bowling greens, private health clubs, private swimming pools, colleges, A & E hospitals, parks, waste disposal sites, and tourist attractions. Private nurseries, Universities, fire stations, general, dental and ophthalmic practices, pawn brokers, ATMs, supermarkets, fast food chains, cafes, public libraries, golf courses, and cinemas showed no clear pattern by deprivation. Thus it appears that in the early 21st century access to resources does not always disadvantage poorer neighbourhoods in the UK. We conclude that we need to ensure that theories and policies are based on up-to-date and context-specific empirical evidence on the distribution of neighbourhood resources, and to engage in further research

  19. Do poorer people have poorer access to local resources and facilities? The distribution of local resources by area deprivation in Glasgow, Scotland.

    PubMed

    Macintyre, Sally; Macdonald, Laura; Ellaway, Anne

    2008-09-01

    It has commonly been suggested that in modern cities individual or household deprivation (for example, low income or education) is amplified by area level deprivation (for example, lack of jobs or good schools), in ways which damage the health of the poorest and increase health inequalities. The aim of this study was to determine the location of a range of resources and exposures by deprivation in a UK city. We examined the location of 42 resources in Glasgow City, Scotland, in 2005-2006, by quintile of small area deprivation. Measures included number per 1000 population, network distance to nearest resource, and percentage of data zones containing at least one of each type of resource. Twelve resources had higher density in, and/or were closer to or more common in, more deprived neighbourhoods: public nurseries, public primary schools, police stations, pharmacies, credit unions, post offices, bus stops, bingo halls, public swimming pools, public sports centres, outdoor play areas, and vacant and derelict land/buildings. Sixteen had higher density in, and/or were closer to, or more common in, more affluent neighbourhoods: public secondary schools, private schools, banks, building societies, museums/art galleries, railway stations, subway stations, tennis courts, bowling greens, private health clubs, private swimming pools, colleges, A & E hospitals, parks, waste disposal sites, and tourist attractions. Private nurseries, Universities, fire stations, general, dental and ophthalmic practices, pawn brokers, ATMs, supermarkets, fast food chains, cafes, public libraries, golf courses, and cinemas showed no clear pattern by deprivation. Thus it appears that in the early 21st century access to resources does not always disadvantage poorer neighbourhoods in the UK. We conclude that we need to ensure that theories and policies are based on up-to-date and context-specific empirical evidence on the distribution of neighbourhood resources, and to engage in further research on

  20. Visualizing Infrared (IR) Spectroscopy with Computer Animation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrams, Charles B.; Fine, Leonard W.

    1996-01-01

    IR Tutor, an interactive, animated infrared (IR) spectroscopy tutorial has been developed for Macintosh and IBM-compatible computers. Using unique color animation, complicated vibrational modes can be introduced to beginning students. Rules governing the appearance of IR absorption bands become obvious because the vibrational modes can be visualized. Each peak in the IR spectrum is highlighted, and the animation of the corresponding normal mode can be shown. Students can study each spectrum stepwise, or click on any individual peak to see its assignment. Important regions of each spectrum can be expanded and spectra can be overlaid for comparison. An introduction to the theory of IR spectroscopy is included, making the program a complete instructional package. Our own success in using this software for teaching and research in both academic and industrial environments will be described. IR Tutor consists of three sections: (1) The 'Introduction' is a review of basic principles of spectroscopy. (2) 'Theory' begins with the classical model of a simple diatomic molecule and is expanded to include larger molecules by introducing normal modes and group frequencies. (3) 'Interpretation' is the heart of the tutorial. Thirteen IR spectra are analyzed in detail, covering the most important functional groups. This section features color animation of each normal mode, full interactivity, overlay of related spectra, and expansion of important regions. This section can also be used as a reference.

  1. Jamming effectiveness analysis of IR smoke projectile based on sight optical observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Longtao; Liu, Zhenxing; Wang, Falong

    2013-09-01

    This text makes use of the similar of the principle between IR imaging guided missile detection system and the general sight optics probe. In this text, the synopsis analysis on the jamming effectiveness of the IR smoke projectile resist the IR imaging guided missile is discussed. This research of the jamming technique to IR imaging guided missile have a very realistic meaning.

  2. Modelling shallow urban geology using reservoir modelling techniques: voxel-based lithology and physical properties of the greater Glasgow area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kingdon, Andrew; Williams, John D. O.; Williamson, J. Paul; Lark, R. Murray; Dobbs, Marcus R.; Kearsey, Timothy; Finlayson, Andrew; Campbell, S. Diarmad G.

    2013-04-01

    Conventional 3D geological models of lithostratigraphy undertaken by BGS have facilitated a significant step forward in understanding of the 3D sedimentological and structural controls in the subsurface of the UK. However, when lithostratigraphic units are mapped or modelled in 3D, intra-unit variability is often not recognized and may be substantial, particularly in sedimentologically heterogeneous successions. Because of this BGS has been testing voxel grid-based approaches in urban areas with high borehole density. A city-scale lithology model of shallow, unconsolidated sediments in Glasgow, Scotland has been developed as a test of the applicability of these techniques to aid geological understanding and possible future applications. This is of particular significance in this location due to the complex fluvial and glacial history of the superficial geology which alternates between inter-fingering sedimentary packages and short-scale variability of subsurface materials. The model has been created by developing a stochastic model of clastic geology on a voxel support, based on upscaling of observed borehole lithology, independent of lithostratigraphy. Multiple realisations of lithology were generated, each honouring the borehole observations. Lithology information has therefore been used to both develop a model of the distribution of lithology throughout the grid, but also to develop an understanding of the associated uncertainty by providing estimates of the probability with which a particular lithology occurs at a given node. This lithological model compares well with 'traditional' deterministic lithostratigraphic 3D models created in the same area, and with field-based geological maps. This lithological voxel model has been used as a matrix through which physical property data can be attributed within the grid by stochastic modelling and simulation of the variability of properties within the lithological units. Several different property datasets have been

  3. BUZZARDS BAY IR, 2002

    EPA Science Inventory

    The 2002 Buzzards Bay Implementation Review (IR) summarizes the progress and challenges ahead for the Buzzards Bay Project. Major new completed actions during the past two years include: designation of Buzzards Bay as a no discharge area in August 2000; full support by the Massac...

  4. Adopting seven-day working in practice: a report by the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow.

    PubMed

    Scott, H R; Isles, C J; Fisher, B M; Long, J; Dunn, F G

    2014-11-01

    Following the UK Academy of Medical Royal Colleges Report on seven day consultant present care, the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow held a symposium to explore clinicians' views on the ways in which clinical care should best be enhanced outside 'normal' working hours. In addition, a survey of members and fellows was undertaken to identify the tests which would make the greatest impact on care out of hours. Key messages were: (a) that seven-day consultant delivered care would not achieve the desired benefit to patient care if introduced in isolation from other inter-relating factors. These include alternatives to hospital admission, enhanced nursing support, increased junior medical, pharmacy, social care and ambulance availability and greater access to selected diagnostic services; (b) that the care of hospital inpatients is a service which is one part of the totality of secondary care provision. Any significant change in the deployment of staff for inpatient care must be carefully managed so as not to result in a reduced quality of care provided by the rest of the system. PMID:25351425

  5. Case notes, case histories, and the patient's experience of insanity at Gartnavel Royal Asylum, Glasgow, in the nineteenth century.

    PubMed

    Andrews, J

    1998-08-01

    This article is concerned primarily with questions as to how and why case notes were produced and utilized, and how they may (or may not) be used by historians. More specifically, it discusses how the Glasgow Royal Asylum's case notes may be deployed to access patients' experiences of madness and confinement. The deficiencies and biases of the case record are also explored. So too is the relationship of case notes with other asylum based records, including reception order questionnaires, with a separate section on patient writings as part of the case history corpus. This leads into an analysis of how the Asylum's case notes became case histories and for what purposes. These subjects are related to changes and continuities in medical ideologies about insanity, social attitudes to the insane and the nature of medical practice in asylums. Some fundamental shifts in emphasis in the use of the case note and case history occurred in this period. These shifts were associated with an increased emphasis on organic interpretations of mental disease and on clinical approaches to insanity; with the medicalization of asylum records and the wider discourse on insanity, and with declining deference to the public at large in the presentation of cases. The survey concludes by analysing the changing place of patient testimony within the case record. PMID:11620430

  6. Constructing Patient Stories: 'Dynamic' Case Notes and Clinical Encounters at Glasgow's Gartnavel Mental Hospital, 1921-32.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Hazel

    2016-01-01

    This article contextualises the production of patient records at Glasgow's Gartnavel Mental Hospital between 1921 and 1932. Following his appointment as asylum superintendent in 1921, psychiatrist David Kennedy Henderson sought to introduce a so-called dynamic approach to mental health care. He did so, primarily, by encouraging patients to reveal their inner lives through their own language and own understanding of their illness. To this effect, Henderson implemented several techniques devised to gather as much information as possible about patients. He notably established routine 'staff meetings' in which a psychiatrist directed questions towards a patient while a stenographer recorded word-for-word the conversation that passed between the two parties. As a result, the records compiled at Gartnavel under Henderson's guidance offer a unique window into the various strategies deployed by patients, but also allow physicians and hospital staff to negotiate their place amidst these clinical encounters. In this paper, I analyse the production of patient narratives in these materials. The article begins with Henderson's articulation of his 'dynamic' psychotherapeutic method, before proceeding to an in-depth hermeneutic investigation into samples of Gartnavel's case notes and staff meeting transcripts. In the process, patient-psychiatrist relationships are revealed to be mutually dependent and interrelated subjects of historical enquiry rather than as distinct entities. This study highlights the multi-vocal nature of the construction of stories 'from below' and interrogates their subsequent appropriation by historians. PMID:26651189

  7. Possibilities for Implementing Fracture Liaison Service in Poland in the Light of a Visit to Glasgow Western Infirmary.

    PubMed

    Amarowicz, Jarosław; Czerwiński, Edward

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporosis remains one of the top challenges for health services all over the world. Osteoporotic changes in bone structure along with the aging of society result in rapid growth of osteoporotic fractures. Statistics show that approximately 25% of women and 20% of men will suffer a subsequent fracture within 5 years of an initial one. In order to deal with the problem, a novel program in secondary fracture prevention was developed in Scotland in the late 1990's. The system was based on a coordinator and focused on identifying, diagnosing and treating patients with osteoporotic fractures. After just a few years, the system, known as Fracture Liaison Services (FLS), proved to be a cost-effective success. For the last several years, FLS has been implemented in countries all over the world. The Glasgow Western Infirmary, where the program started, continues to be one of the top exemplary facilities in the United Kingdom. Each year the Bone Metabolism Unit proves its effectiveness by providing 4000 DXA scans and taking care of 2500 fractures a year. In 2015, the European Foundation of Osteoporosis and Musculoskeletal Diseases successfully implemented a coordinator-based Fracture Liaison Service in Poland. PMID:26468179

  8. Nuclear IRS-1 and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Reiss, Krzysztof; Valle, Luis Del; Lassak, Adam; Trojanek, Joanna

    2011-01-01

    The family of insulin receptor substrates (IRS) consists of four proteins (IRS-1 - IRS-4), which were initially characterized as typical cytosolic adaptor proteins involved in insulin receptor (IR) and insulin-like growth factor I receptor (IGF-IR) signaling. The first cloned and characterized member of the IRS family, IRS-1, has predicted molecular weight of 132 kDa, however, as a result of its extensive serine phosphorylation it separates on a SDS gel as a band of approximately 160–185 kDa. In addition to its metabolic and growth-promoting functions, IRS-1 is also suspected to play a role in malignant transformation. The mechanism by which IRS-1 supports tumor growth is not fully understood, and the argument that IRS-1 merely amplifies the signal from the IGF-1R and/or IR requires further investigation. Almost a decade ago, we reported the presence of nuclear IRS-1 in medulloblastoma clinical samples, which express viral oncoprotein, large T-antigen of human polyomavirus JC (JCV T-antigen). This first demonstration of nuclear IRS-1 was confirmed in several other laboratories. The nuclear IRS-1 was also detected by cells expressing the SV40 T-antigen, v-Src, in immortalized fibroblasts stimulated with IGF-I, in hepatocytes, 32D cells, and in an osteosarcoma cell line. More recently, nuclear IRS-1 was detected in breast cancer cells in association with estrogen receptor alpha (ERα), and in JC virus negative medulloblastoma cells expressing ERβ, further implicating nuclear IRS-1 in cellular transformation. Here, we discuss how nuclear IRS-1 acting on DNA repair fidelity, transcriptional activity, and cell growth can support tumor development and progression. PMID:22454254

  9. HWIL IR imaging testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinson, R. J.; Passwater, R. D.

    1981-03-01

    The Army simulator facilities are presently configured to conduct hardware-in-the-loop mission tasks on the HELLFIRE and COPPERHEAD missile systems. These systems presently use a LASER seeker. The facility is an ideal candidate to be converted to include infrared (IR) seekers used on the TGSM system. This study investigates the possibility and impact of a facility update. This report documents the feasibility of developing a hardware-in-the-loop (HWIL) hybrid simulation incorporating infrared IR seekers used for the Assault Breaker program. Other hardware to be considered are the autopilot, signal conditioning, signal processing, and actuators which may be integrated into the system simulation. Considerations are given to replacing all or elements of hardware while substituting math models in the system simulation.

  10. IR Activities. IR Applications, Volume 12

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambers, Stephen; Gerek, Mary Louise

    2007-01-01

    Institutional research is the sum total of all activities directed at describing the full spectrum of functions (educational, administrative, and support) occurring within a college or university. Institutional research activities examine those functions in their broadest definitions, and embrace data collection and analytical strategies in…

  11. The ABCs of the FDA: A Primer on the Role of the United States Food and Drug Administration in Medical Device Approvals and IR Research.

    PubMed

    Adamovich, Ashley; Park, Susie; Siskin, Gary P; Englander, Meridith J; Mandato, Kenneth D; Herr, Allen; Keating, Lawrence J

    2015-09-01

    The role of the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in medical device regulation is important to device-driven specialties such as interventional radiology. Whether it is through industry-sponsored trials during the approval process for new devices or investigator-initiated research prospectively evaluating the role of existing devices for new or established procedures, interaction with the FDA is an integral part of performing significant research in interventional radiology. This article reviews the potential areas of interface between the FDA and interventional radiology, as understanding these areas is necessary to continue the innovation that is the hallmark of this specialty. PMID:26189046

  12. AIR 1981-82. Forum 1981 Proceedings: Toward 2001: The IR Perspective (Minneapolis, Minnesota, May 17-20). The Association for Institutional Research Directory, 1981-82.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Institutional Research.

    Proceedings of the 1981 Association for Institutional Research (AIR) Forum and the 1981-82 AIR Directory are presented in a single volume. General session addresses and authors from the forum are as follows: "Some Possible Revolutions by 2001" (Michael Marien); "Information, the Non-Depletive Resource" (John W. Lacey); "What's Higher about Higher…

  13. Prognostic value of the Glasgow Prognostic Score in metastatic colorectal cancer in the era of anti-EGFR therapies.

    PubMed

    Dréanic, Johann; Maillet, Marianne; Dhooge, Marion; Mir, Olivier; Brezault, Catherine; Goldwasser, François; Chaussade, Stanislas; Coriat, Romain

    2013-01-01

    The Glasgow Prognostic Score (GPS), combination of C-reactive protein and albumin, has proven its prognostic value in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients receiving conventional cytotoxic therapy. More recently, anti-EGFR therapies have been validated in mCRC and roll forward the patients' overall survival (OS). We aimed to evaluate the prognostic accuracy of the GPS in patients receiving anti-EGFR therapy in addition to conventional chemotherapy. From January 2007 to February 2012, consecutive mCRC patients who received 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy plus cetuximab were included in the present analysis. Patients were eligible for the study if they met the following criteria: advanced pathologically proven MCRC, age >18 years, adequate renal function (creatinine clearance >40 ml/min), C-reactive protein and albumin and performance status evaluation before treatment initiation. A total of 49 patients received cetuximab plus 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy (colon, n = 34; rectum, n = 15) and were treated with a median follow-up of 35 months (16.5-74.7). Median age was 48 years old. In addition to cetuximab, patients received oxaliplatin- (n = 34, 60%) or irinotecan (n = 15, 30%)-based chemotherapy. At time of diagnosis, 55, 29 and 16% of patients had a GPS of 0 (n = 27), 1 (n = 14) and 2 (n = 8), respectively. Fifty-five, 29 and 14 % of patients add one, two or ≥3 metastatic sites, respectively. Considering two groups (GPS = 0 and GPS ≥1), median progression-free survivals were significantly different (p = 0.0084). Median OS in the GPS 0, 1 and 2 groups were 38.2, 14 and 12.1 months, respectively (p = 0.0093). The results of the present study confirm that the GPS is still a simple and effective prognostic factor in the era of cetuximab therapy in mCRC patients. PMID:23839775

  14. The predictive and prognostic value of the Glasgow Prognostic Score in metastatic colorectal carcinoma patients receiving bevacizumab.

    PubMed

    Maillet, Marianne; Dréanic, Johann; Dhooge, Marion; Mir, Olivier; Brezault, Catherine; Goldwasser, François; Chaussade, Stanislas; Coriat, Romain

    2014-11-01

    The Glasgow Prognostic Score (GPS), based on C-reactive protein and albumin levels, has shown its prognostic value in metastatic colorectal carcinoma (mCRC) patients receiving conventional cytotoxic therapy. Bevacizumab, a monoclonal antibody to vascular epidermal growth factor, improves the overall survival in mCRC. The aim of the present study was to assess the prognostic value of GPS in mCRC patients receiving antivascular epidermal growth factor therapy. From August 2005 to August 2012, consecutive patients with mCRC who received chemotherapy plus bevacizumab were eligible for the present analysis. The clinical stage, C-reactive protein, albumin and the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status were recorded at the time of initiation of bevacizumab. Patients received 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy plus bevacizumab in accordance with the digestive oncology multidisciplinary staff proposal and in line with the French recommendations for the treatment of mCRC. Eighty patients were eligible (colon n = 59, rectum n = 21), with a median follow-up of 14 months (range 1-58 months). Chemotherapy given with bevacizumab and 5-fluorouracil was oxaliplatin (n = 41, 51%) or irinotecan (n = 27, 34%). At baseline, 56, 31 and 13% of patients had a GPS of 0 (n = 45), 1 (n = 25) and 2 (n = 10), respectively. The median progression-free survival in these groups was 10.1, 6.5 and 5.6 months (P = 0.16), respectively. The median overall survival was 20.1, 11.4 and 6.5 months, respectively (P = 0.004). Our study confirmed the prognostic value of GPS in mCRC patients receiving chemotherapy plus bevacizumab. Given the poor survival observed in patients with an GPS of 2, studies dedicated to these patients could identify optimal treatment modalities. PMID:24858536

  15. Prognostic significance of modified Glasgow Prognostic Score in patients with non-metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cho, Dae Sung; Kim, Sun Il; Choo, Seol Ho; Jang, Seok Heun; Ahn, Hyun Soo; Kim, Se Joong

    2016-06-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of the modified Glasgow Prognostic Score (mGPS) as a prognostic factor in patients with non-metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Materials and methods Between June 1994 and July 2012, 469 patients with RCC underwent radical or partial nephrectomy at two hospitals. Among these patients, 65 with non-clear cell type histology and 16 with lymph-node or distant metastasis were excluded. The medical records of the remaining 388 patients were retrospectively reviewed. The mGPS was calculated using a selective combination of C-reactive protein (CRP) and albumin as previously described. The prognostic significance of various clinicopathological variables including mGPS was analyzed using univariate and multivariate analyses. Results Of the total 388 patients, 40 patients (10.3%) developed local recurrence or distant metastasis and 18 patients (4.6%) died of disease during the follow-up period. The univariate analysis identified CRP, mGPS, thrombocytosis, T stage, Fuhrman's nuclear grade and lymphovascular invasion as significant prognostic factors for recurrence-free survival (RFS) and cancer-specific survival (CSS). The multivariate analysis indicated that mGPS (p < 0.001), T stage (p = 0.024) and lymphovascular invasion (p = 0.046) were independent prognostic factors for RFS, whereas mGPS (p = 0.001) was the only independent prognostic factor for CSS. Conclusions The mGPS is an independent prognostic factor for RFS and CSS in patients with non-metastatic clear cell RCC treated with radical or partial nephrectomy. These findings suggest that mGPS should be used for predicting recurrence or survival in patients undergoing nephrectomy for non-metastatic clear cell RCC. PMID:26878156

  16. IR Spot Weld Inspect

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jian; Feng, Zhili

    2014-01-01

    In automotive industry, destructive inspection of spot welds is still the mandatory quality assurance method due to the lack of efficient non-destructive evaluation (NDE) tools. However, it is costly and time-consuming. Recently at ORNL, a new NDE prototype system for spot weld inspection using infrared (IR) thermography has been developed to address this problem. This software contains all the key functions that ensure the NDE system to work properly: system input/output control, image acquisition, data analysis, weld quality database generation and weld quality prediction, etc.

  17. IR Spot Weld Inspect

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2014-01-01

    In automotive industry, destructive inspection of spot welds is still the mandatory quality assurance method due to the lack of efficient non-destructive evaluation (NDE) tools. However, it is costly and time-consuming. Recently at ORNL, a new NDE prototype system for spot weld inspection using infrared (IR) thermography has been developed to address this problem. This software contains all the key functions that ensure the NDE system to work properly: system input/output control, image acquisition, datamore » analysis, weld quality database generation and weld quality prediction, etc.« less

  18. The NASA Ames PAH IR Spectroscopic Database and the far-IR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boersma, C.; Allamandola, L. J.; Bauschlicher, C. W.; Ricca, A.; Cami, J.; Peeters, E.; Sánchez de Armas, F.; Puerta Saborido, G.; Mattioda, A. L.; Hudgins, D. M.

    2011-03-01

    Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are widespread across the Universe and influence many stages of the Galactic lifecycle. The presence of PAHs has been well established and the rich mid-IR PAH spectrum is now commonly used as a probe into (inter)stellar environments. The NASA Ames PAH IR Spectroscopic Database has been key to test and refine the "PAH hypothesis". This database is a large coherent set (>600 spectra) of laboratory measured and DFT computed infrared spectra of PAHs from C10H8 to C130H28 and has been made available on the web at ( http://www.astrochem.org/pahdb). With a new spectral window opening up; the far-IR, the study of PAH far-IR spectra and the quest for identifying a unique member of the interstellar PAH family has begun. To guide this research, the far-IR (>20 μm) spectra of different sets of PAHs are investigated using the NASA Ames PAH IR Spectroscopic Database. These sets explore the influence of size, shape, charge and composition on the far-IR PAH spectrum. The far-IR is also the domain of the so-called "drumhead" modes and other molecular vibrations involving low order bending vibrations of the carbon skeleton as a whole. As with drums, these are molecule and shape specific and promise to be a key diagnostic for specific PAHs. Here, the sensitivity of these "drumhead" modes to size and shape is assessed by comparing the frequencies of the lowest drumhead modes of a family of circular shaped (the coronene "family") and rhombus shaped (the pyrene "family") PAH molecules. From this study, some consequences for an observing strategy are drawn.

  19. Integrated IR sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tom, Michael; Trujillo, Edward

    1994-06-01

    Integrated infrared (IR) sensors which exploit modular avionics concepts can provide features such as operational flexibility, enhanced stealthiness, and ease of maintenance to meet the demands of tactical, airborne sensor systems. On-board, tactical airborne sensor systems perform target acquisition, tracking, identification, threat warning, missile launch detection, and ground mapping in support of situation awareness, self-defense, navigation, target attack, weapon support, and reconnaissance activities. The use of sensor suites for future tactical aircraft such as US Air Force's multirole fighter require a blend of sensor inputs and outputs that may vary over time. It is expected that special-role units of these tactical aircraft will be formed to conduct tasks and missions such as anti-shipping, reconnaissance, or suppression of enemy air defenses.

  20. An initial assessment of spatial relationships between respiratory cases, soil metal content, air quality and deprivation indicators in Glasgow, Scotland, UK: relevance to the environmental justice agenda.

    PubMed

    Morrison, S; Fordyce, F M; Scott, E Marian

    2014-04-01

    There is growing interest in links between poor health and socio-environmental inequalities (e.g. inferior housing, crime and industrial emissions) under the environmental justice agenda. The current project assessed associations between soil metal content, air pollution (NO2/PM10) and deprivation and health (respiratory case incidence) across Glasgow. This is the first time that both chemical land quality and air pollution have been assessed citywide in the context of deprivation and health for a major UK conurbation. Based on the dataset 'averages' for intermediate geography areas, generalised linear modelling of respiratory cases showed significant associations with overall soil metal concentration (p = 0.0367) and with deprivation (p < 0.0448). Of the individual soil metals, only nickel showed a significant relationship with respiratory cases (p = 0.0056). Whilst these associations could simply represent concordant lower soil metal concentrations and fewer respiratory cases in the rural versus the urban environment, they are interesting given (1) possible contributions from soil to air particulate loading and (2) known associations between airborne metals like nickel and health. This study also demonstrated a statistically significant correlation (-0.213; p < 0.05) between soil metal concentration and deprivation across Glasgow. This highlights the fact that despite numerous regeneration programmes, the legacy of environmental pollution remains in post-industrial areas of Glasgow many decades after heavy industry has declined. Further epidemiological investigations would be required to determine whether there are any causal links between soil quality and population health/well-being. However, the results of this study suggest that poor soil quality warrants greater consideration in future health and socio-environmental inequality assessments. PMID:24203260

  1. New Ir Bis-Carbonyl Precursor for Water Oxidation Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Daria L; Beltrán-Suito, Rodrigo; Thomsen, Julianne M; Hashmi, Sara M; Materna, Kelly L; Sheehan, Stafford W; Mercado, Brandon Q; Brudvig, Gary W; Crabtree, Robert H

    2016-03-01

    This paper introduces Ir(I)(CO)2(pyalc) (pyalc = (2-pyridyl)-2-propanoate) as an atom-efficient precursor for Ir-based homogeneous oxidation catalysis. This compound was chosen to simplify analysis of the water oxidation catalyst species formed by the previously reported Cp*Ir(III)(pyalc)OH water oxidation precatalyst. Here, we present a comparative study on the chemical and catalytic properties of these two precursors. Previous studies show that oxidative activation of Cp*Ir-based precursors with NaIO4 results in formation of a blue Ir(IV) species. This activation is concomitant with the loss of the placeholder Cp* ligand which oxidatively degrades to form acetic acid, iodate, and other obligatory byproducts. The activation process requires substantial amounts of primary oxidant, and the degradation products complicate analysis of the resulting Ir(IV) species. The species formed from oxidation of the Ir(CO)2(pyalc) precursor, on the other hand, lacks these degradation products (the CO ligands are easily lost upon oxidation) which allows for more detailed examination of the resulting Ir(pyalc) active species both catalytically and spectroscopically, although complete structural analysis is still elusive. Once Ir(CO)2(pyalc) is activated, the system requires acetic acid or acetate to prevent the formation of nanoparticles. Investigation of the activated bis-carbonyl complex also suggests several Ir(pyalc) isomers may exist in solution. By (1)H NMR, activated Ir(CO)2(pyalc) has fewer isomers than activated Cp*Ir complexes, allowing for advanced characterization. Future research in this direction is expected to contribute to a better structural understanding of the active species. A diol crystallization agent was needed for the structure determination of 3. PMID:26901517

  2. Preliminary development of a GIS-tool to assess threats to shallow groundwater quality from soil pollutants in Glasgow, UK (GRASP).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dochartaigh, B. É. Ó.; Fordyce, F. M.; Ander, E. L.; Bonsor, H. C.

    2009-04-01

    The protection of groundwater and related surface water quality is a key aspect of the European Union Water Framework Directive and environmental legislation in many countries worldwide. Globally, the protection of urban groundwater resources and related ecosystem services is of growing concern as urbanisation increases. Although urban areas are often where groundwater resources are most in need of protection, there is frequently a lack of information about threats to groundwater quality. Most studies of soil and groundwater contamination, although detailed, are site-specific, and city-wide overviews are generally lacking. The British Geological Survey (BGS) is currently undertaking the Clyde Urban Super-Project (CUSP), delivering multi-disciplinary geoscience products for the Glasgow conurbation. Under this project, a GIS-based prioritisation tool known as GRASP (GRoundwater And Soil Pollutants) has been trialled to aid urban planning and sustainable development by providing a broad-scale assessment of threats to groundwater quality across the conurbation. GRASP identifies areas where shallow groundwater quality is at greatest threat from the leaching and downward movement of potentially harmful metals in the soil. Metal contamination is a known problem in many urban centres including Glasgow, which has a long industrial heritage and associated contamination legacy, notably with respect to Cr. GRASP is based primarily upon an existing British Standard - International Standards Organisation methodology to determine the leaching potential of metals from soils, which has been validated for 11 metals: Al, Fe, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Mn, Pb and Zn (BS-ISO 15175:2004). However, the GRASP tool is innovative as it combines assessments of soil leaching potential with soil metal content data to highlight threats to shallow groundwater quality. The input parameters required for GRASP (soil pH, clay, organic matter, sesquioxide and metal content) are based upon a systematic

  3. IR Stray Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petro, Larry

    2009-07-01

    Structures outside the optical path of the detector FOV and the surfaces of optical elements could scatter significant light from bright sources onto the IR FPA. Such structures are oversized by typically a few mm relative to the FOV?s beam. The beam footprint of a source outside the FOV can overlap the edges of those structures, which will cause light to be scattered onto the detector. During ground test, it was found that one per cent of the signal from a target imaged onto the edge of the detector was scattered into an approximately 10 pixel by 100 pixel flare. This on orbit test will: 1} verify that release of gravitational stress has not changed the detector mask, 2} assess the far wing stray light from a sources outside the detector FOV, 3} note any sources of stray light in the near and far field that were not noted during ground test, and 4} assess the surface brightness of the off-detector target PSF relative to the on-detector PSF

  4. Naval threat countermeasure simulator and the IR_CRUISE_missiles models for the generation of infrared (IR) videos of maritime targets and background for input into advanced imaging IR seekers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taczak, Thomas M.; Dries, John W.; Gover, Robert E.; Snapp, Mary Ann; Williams, Elmer F.; Cahill, Colin P.

    2002-07-01

    A new hardware-in-the-loop modeling technique was developed at the US Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) for the evaluation of IR countermeasures against advanced IR imaging anti-ship cruise missiles. The research efforts involved the creation of tools to generate accurate IR imagery and synthesize video to inject in to real-world threat simulators. A validation study was conducted to verify the accuracy and limitations of the techniques that were developed.

  5. The Performance of a Modified Glasgow Blatchford Score in Predicting Clinical Interventions in Patients with Acute Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding: A Vietnamese Prospective Multicenter Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Quach, Duc Trong; Dao, Ngoi Huu; Dinh, Minh Cao; Nguyen, Chung Huu; Ho, Linh Xuan; Nguyen, Nha-Doan Thi; Le, Quang Dinh; Vo, Cong Minh Hong; Le, Sang Kim; Hiyama, Toru

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims To compare the performance of a modified Glasgow Blatchford score (mGBS) to the Glasgow Blatchford score (GBS) and the pre-endoscopic Rockall score (RS) in predicting clinical interventions in Vietnamese patients with acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (AN-VUGIB). Methods A prospective multicenter cohort study was conducted in five tertiary hospitals from May 2013 to February 2014. The mGBS, GBS, and pre-endoscopic RS scores were prospectively calculated for all patients. The accuracy of mGBS was compared with that of GBS and pre-endoscopic RS using area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Clinical interventions were defined as blood transfusions, endoscopic or radiological intervention, or surgery. Results There were 395 patients including 128 (32.4%) needing endoscopic treatment, 117 (29.6%) requiring blood transfusion and two (0.5%) needing surgery. In predicting the need for clinical intervention, the mGBS (AUC, 0.707) performed as well as the GBS (AUC, 0.708; p=0.87) and outperformed the pre-endoscopic RS (AUC, 0.594; p<0.001). However, none of these scores effectively excluded the need for endoscopic intervention at a threshold of 0. Conclusions mGBS performed as well as GBS and better than pre-endoscopic RS for predicting clinical interventions in Vietnamese patients with ANVUGIB. PMID:26601829

  6. Schedule optimization for IR detection of buried targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derzko, Zenon; Eylander, John B.; Broach, J. Thomas

    2012-06-01

    Schedule optimization of air platforms for IR sensors is a priority because of 1) the time sensitive nature of the IR detection of buried targets, 2) limited air platform assets, and 3) limited bandwidth for live-feed video. Scheduling optimization for airborne IR sensors depends on transient meteorological predictions, transient soil properties, target type and depth. This work involves using predictions from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, a regional weather model, as input to the Countermine Computational Test Bed (CTB), a 3D finite element model that accounts for coupled heat and moisture transfer in soil and targets. The result is a continuous 2-day optimized schedule for airborne IR assets. In this paper, a 2-day optimized schedule for an airborne IR sensor asset is demonstrated for a single geographical location with a buried target. Transient physical surface and subsurface soil temperatures are presented as well as the phase-shifted, transient thermal response of the target.

  7. Low-cost infrared glass for IR imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Amy G.; LeBlanc, Richard A.; Hilton, Ray A., Sr.

    2003-09-01

    With the advent of the uncooled detectors, the fraction of infrared (IR) imaging system cost due to lens elements has risen to the point where work was needed in the area of cost. Since these IR imaging systems often have tight packaging requirements which drive the optical elements to have complex surfaces, typical IR optical elements are costly to manufacture. The drive of our current optical material research is to lower the cost of the materials as well as the element fabrication for IR imaging systems. A low cost, moldable amorphous material, Amtir-4, has been developed and characterized. Ray Hilton Sr., Amorphous Materials Inc., Richard A. LeBlanc, Amy Graham and Others at Lockheed Martin Missiles and Fire Control Orlando (LMMFC-O) and James Johnson, General Electric Global Research Center (GE-GRC), along with others have been doing research for the past three years characterizing and designing IR imaging systems with this material. These IR imaging systems have been conventionally fabricated via diamond turning and techniques required to mold infrared optical elements have been developed with this new material, greatly reducing manufacturing costs. This paper will outline efforts thus far in incorporating this new material into prototype IR imaging systems.

  8. Methane Line Intensities: Near and Far IR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Linda R.; Devi, V. Malathy; Wishnow, Edward H.; Sung, Keeyoon; Crawford, Timothy J.; Mantz, Arlan W.; Smith, Mary Ann H.; Predoi-Cross, Adriana; Benner, D. Chris

    2014-11-01

    Accurate knowledge of line intensities is crucial input for radiance calculations to interpret atmospheric observations of planets and moons. We have therefore undertaken extensive laboratory studies to measure the methane spectrum line-by-line in order to improve theoretical quantum mechanical modeling for molecular spectroscopy databases (e. g. HITRAN and GEISA) used by planetary astronomers. Preliminary results will be presented for selected ro-vibrational transitions in both the near-IR (1.66 and 2.2 - 2.4 microns) and the far-IR (80 - 120 microns) regions. For this, we have recorded high-resolution spectra (instrumental resolving power: 1,300,000 (NIR) and 10,000 (FIR)) with the Bruker 125HR Fourier transform spectrometer at JPL using isotopically-enriched 12CH4 and 13CH4, as well as normal methane samples. For the NIR wavelengths, three different absorption cells have been employed to achieve sample temperatures ranging from 78 K to 299 K: 1) a White cell set to a path length of 13.09 m for room temperature data, 2) a single-pass 0.2038 m cold cell and 3) a new coolable Herriott cell with a fixed 20.941 m optical path and configured for the first time to a FT-IR spectrometer. For the Far-IR, another coolable absorption chamber set to a 52 m optical path has been used. These new experiments and intensity measurements will be presented and discussed.Part of the research described in this paper was performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, the University of California, Berkeley, Connecticut College, and NASA Langley under contracts and grants with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. A. Predoi-Cross and her research group have been supported by the National Science and Engineering Research Council of Canada.

  9. UV-Enhanced IR Raman System for Identifying Biohazards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stirbl, Robert; Moynihan, Philip; Lane, Arthur

    2003-01-01

    An instrumentation system that would include an ultraviolet (UV) laser or light-emitting diode, an infrared (IR) laser, and the equivalent of an IR Raman spectrometer has been proposed to enable noncontact identification of hazardous biological agents and chemicals. In prior research, IR Raman scattering had shown promise as a means of such identification, except that the Raman-scattered light was often found to be too weak to be detected or to enable unambiguous identification in practical applications. The proposed system would utilize UV illumination as part of a two-level optical-pumping scheme to intensify the Raman signal sufficiently to enable positive identification.

  10. Novel EO/IR sensor technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Keith

    2011-10-01

    The requirements for advanced EO/IR sensor technologies are discussed in the context of evolving military operations, with significant emphasis on the development of new sensing technologies to meet the challenges posed by asymmetric threats. The Electro-Magnetic Remote Sensing (EMRS DTC) was established in 2003 to provide a centre of excellence in sensor research and development, supporting new capabilities in key military areas such as precision attack, battlespace manoeuvre and information superiority. In the area of advanced electro-optic technology, the DTC has supported work on discriminative imaging, advanced detectors, laser components/technologies, and novel optical techniques. This paper provides a summary of some of the EO/IR technologies explored by the DTC.

  11. Integrated uncooled array IR sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pevtsov, Eugeny P.; Elkin, Eugeny G.; Pospelova, Marina A.

    1997-08-01

    Technologies enabling low-dissipation designs for uncooled array IR sensors are offered. The technique involves the etching of special buffer layers from under a 1-micrometers membrane followed by deposition of an IR-sensitive film and electrode structure. The electrical and physical properties of plumbum-zirconate-titanate, barium titanate, tetraaminodiphenyl, polyvinylidene fluoride pyroelectric films are compared. A circuit for sensing pyroelectric signals in a CCD is considered.

  12. Revised trauma scoring system to predict in-hospital mortality in the emergency department: Glasgow Coma Scale, Age, and Systolic Blood Pressure score

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Our aim in this study was to assess whether the new Glasgow Coma Scale, Age, and Systolic Blood Pressure (GAP) scoring system, which is a modification of the Mechanism, Glasgow Coma Scale, Age, and Arterial Pressure (MGAP) scoring system, better predicts in-hospital mortality and can be applied more easily than previous trauma scores among trauma patients in the emergency department (ED). Methods This multicenter, prospective, observational study was conducted to analyze readily available variables in the ED, which are associated with mortality rates among trauma patients. The data used in this study were derived from the Japan Trauma Data Bank (JTDB), which consists of 114 major emergency hospitals in Japan. A total of 35,732 trauma patients in the JTDB from 2004 to 2009 who were 15 years of age or older were eligible for inclusion in the study. Of these patients, 27,154 (76%) with complete sets of important data (patient age, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score, systolic blood pressure (SBP), respiratory rate and Injury Severity Score (ISS)) were included in our analysis. We calculated weight for the predictors of the GAP scores on the basis of the records of 13,463 trauma patients in a derivation data set determined by using logistic regression. Scores derived from four existing scoring systems (Revised Trauma Score, Triage Revised Trauma Score, Trauma and Injury Severity Score and MGAP score) were calibrated using logistic regression models that fit in the derivation set. The GAP scoring system was compared to the calibrated scoring systems with data from a total of 13,691 patients in a validation data set using c-statistics and reclassification tables with three defined risk groups based on a previous publication: low risk (mortality < 5%), intermediate risk, and high risk (mortality > 50%). Results Calculated GAP scores involved GCS score (from three to fifteen points), patient age < 60 years (three points) and SBP (> 120 mmHg, six points; 60 to 120

  13. Complementarity of NGST, ALMA, and far IR Space Observatories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, John C.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) and the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) will both start operations long before a new far IR observatory in space can be launched. What will be unknown even after they are operational, and what will a far IR space observatory be able to add? I will compare the telescope design concepts and capabilities and the advertised scientific programs for the projects and attempt to forecast the research topics that will be at the forefront in 2010.

  14. [Power and everyday life in a lunatic asylum environment - a case example from Glasgow at the beginning of the 20th century].

    PubMed

    Gründler, Jens

    In this article the focus of analysis lies on power relations in everyday life in one of Glasgow's Pauper Lunatic Asylums at the turn of the twentieth century. Taking a sample of patient case files I examine the daily processes of negotiation between inmates and their relatives, physicians, attendants and nurses as well as the poor law administration. Some cases especially exemplify the complex relationships between the actors. They show which opportunities and boundaries existed for "power brokering" for the more powerless. At the same time these cases illustrate the formal and practical limits of enforcement by doctors and nursing staff. Without turning a blind eve to hierarchies and power imbalances the analysis shows that even in settings like "total institutions" power remains volatile. Even there the more powerful actors have to actualize, seize and prevail on a regular basis. PMID:27501547

  15. An ethnographic study of HIV-related risk practices among Glasgow rent boys and their clients: report of a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Bloor, M; McKeganey, N; Barnard, M

    1990-01-01

    This paper provides an early report of a continuing ethnographic study of male prostitution in Glasgow. Pilot work indicates that rent boy activity may be of considerable importance for the spread of HIV infection. Although there is little evidence of an association between rent boy activity and injecting drug use, rent boys may well be implicated in epidemic spread because many (but not all) of them report unsafe sexual practices. Some boys reported that they engaged in unprotected anal sex both actively (insertor) and passively (insertee). Although the majority of the boys' clients were covert bisexuals--married men seeking occasional, anonymous, male sexual contact--a substantial minority of clients were gay-identified. PMID:2083256

  16. Predictive power of UKCAT and other pre-admission measures for performance in a medical school in Glasgow: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The UK Clinical Aptitude Test (UKCAT) and its four subtests are currently used by 24 Medical and Dental Schools in the UK for admissions. This longitudinal study examines the predictive validity of UKCAT for final performance in the undergraduate medical degree programme at one Medical School and compares this with the predictive validity of the selection measures available pre-UKCAT. Methods This was a retrospective observational study of one cohort of students, admitted to Glasgow Medical School in 2007. We examined the associations which UKCAT scores, school science grades and pre-admissions interview scores had with performance indicators, particularly final composite scores that determine students’ postgraduate training opportunities and overall ranking (Educational Performance Measure - EPM, and Honours and Commendation – H&C). Analyses were conducted both with and without adjustment for potential socio-demographic confounders (gender, age, ethnicity and area deprivation). Results Despite its predictive value declining as students progress through the course, UKCAT was associated with the final composite scores. In mutually adjusted analyses (also adjusted for socio-demographic confounders), only UKCAT total showed independent relationships with both EPM (p = 0.005) and H&C (p = 0.004), school science achievements predicted EPM (p = 0.009), and pre-admissions interview score predicted neither. UKCAT showed less socio-demographic variation than did TSS. Conclusion UKCAT has a modest predictive power for overall course performance at the University of Glasgow Medical School over and above that of school science achievements or pre-admission interview score and we conclude that UKCAT is the most useful predictor of final ranking. PMID:24919950

  17. Better Glasgow outcome score, cerebral perfusion pressure and focal brain oxygenation in severely traumatized brain following direct regional brain hypothermia therapy: A prospective randomized study

    PubMed Central

    Idris, Zamzuri; Zenian, Mohd Sofan; Muzaimi, Mustapha; Hamid, Wan Zuraida Wan Abdul

    2014-01-01

    Background: Induced hypothermia for treatment of traumatic brain injury is controversial. Since many pathways involved in the pathophysiology of secondary brain injury are temperature dependent, regional brain hypothermia is thought capable to mitigate those processes. The objectives of this study are to assess the therapeutic effects and complications of regional brain cooling in severe head injury with Glasgow coma scale (GCS) 6-7. Materials and Methods: A prospective randomized controlled pilot study involving patients with severe traumatic brain injury with GCS 6 and 7 who required decompressive craniectomy. Patients were randomized into two groups: Cooling and no cooling. For the cooling group, analysis was made by dividing the group into mild and deep cooling. Brain was cooled by irrigating the brain continuously with cold Hartmann solution for 24-48 h. Main outcome assessments were a dichotomized Glasgow outcome score (GOS) at 6 months posttrauma. Results: A total of 32 patients were recruited. The cooling-treated patients did better than no cooling. There were 63.2% of patients in cooling group attained good GOS at 6 months compared to only 15.4% in noncooling group (P = 0.007). Interestingly, the analysis at 6 months post-trauma disclosed mild-cooling-treated patients did better than no cooling (70% vs. 15.4% attained good GOS, P = 0.013) and apparently, the deep-cooling-treated patients failed to be better than either no cooling (P = 0.074) or mild cooling group (P = 0.650). Conclusion: Data from this pilot study imply direct regional brain hypothermia appears safe, feasible and maybe beneficial in treating severely head-injured patients. PMID:25685201

  18. Status of VibroIR at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Michael W.; Miller, Wayne O.

    2004-04-01

    Current efforts at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in the area of vibrothermography (VibroIR or SonicIR) are presented. The primary goals of the efforts of the NDE group at LLNL have been to demonstrate the applicability of vibrothermography to new areas, to examine the degree to which VibroIR may replace existing NDE inspection procedures, and to conduct research on the underlying processes and optimal parameters in its implementation. We report three new applications of VibroIR, in the areas of brazed tube joint inspection, evaluationtion of thick multilayer carbon/carbon composites as used in the NASA Shuttle, and the inspection of soft composite materials. The goal of the brazed joint inspection process is ultimately the replacement of a current dye penetrant inspection procedure. Therefore a direct comparison between VibroIR and dye penetrant inspection is made. Preliminary results of the analysis of a leading edge panel from a NASA Shuttle is also reported as an example of the application of VibroIR to thick composites. Finally, a comparison betweeen the effectiveness of VibroIR versus a spectrum of other NDE techniques (ultrasonic imaging, radiographic tomography) for the imaging of known ceramic defects is briefly discussed.

  19. Advances in handheld FT-IR instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnó, Josep; Cardillo, Len; Judge, Kevin; Frayer, Maxim; Frunzi, Michael; Hetherington, Paul; Levy, Dustin; Oberndorfer, Kyle; Perec, Walter; Sauer, Terry; Stein, John; Zuidema, Eric

    2012-06-01

    FT-IR spectroscopy is the technology of choice to identify solid and liquid phase unknown samples. The challenges of ConOps (Concepts of Operation) in emergency response and military field applications require a significant redesign of the stationary FT-IR bench-top instruments typically used in laboratories. Specifically, field portable units require high levels of resistance against mechanical shock and chemical attack, ease of use in restrictive gear, quick and easy interpretation of results, and reduced size. In the last 20 years, FT-IR instruments have been re-engineered to fit in small suitcases for field portable use and recently further miniaturized for handheld operation. This article introduces the advances resulting from a project designed to overcome the challenges associated with miniaturizing FT-IR instruments. The project team developed a disturbance-corrected permanently aligned cube corner interferometer for improved robustness and optimized opto-mechanical design to maximize optical throughput and signal-to-noise ratios. Thermal management and heat flow were thoroughly modeled and studied to isolate sensitive components from heat sources and provide the widest temperature operation range. Similarly, extensive research on mechanical designs and compensation techniques to protect against shock and vibration will be discussed. A user interface was carefully created for military and emergency response applications to provide actionable information in a visual, intuitive format. Similar to the HazMatID family of products, state-of-the-art algorithms were used to quickly identify the chemical composition of complex samples based on the spectral information. This article includes an overview of the design considerations, tests results, and performance validation of the mechanical ruggedness, spectral, and thermal performance.

  20. Detection of IR target by fusing multispectral IR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Liya; Qi, Meng; Gao, Xuhui

    2011-08-01

    Detection of the small target in clutter, usually regarded as singular points in the infrared image, is an important issue in infrared searching and tracking (IRST) system. Because of the far range of the target to the sensor, the stealth technology, the effects of inherent sensor noise and the phenomena of nature, the target is more difficult to be detected. Multispectral sensor system has been proved it could greatly improve detection of the small, hard-to-find targets by multispectral processing techniques (such as sensor or image fusion). Aiming at the problem of multispectral IR Target Detection, a kind method of the multispectral IR target detection is proposed, based on the existed detection systems. In this method, the image registration is done firstly to make the different sensors have a same scene. Then, a fusion rule, named as adaptive weighted voting theory, is developed to combine the target detection results from the different spectral sensors. The adaptive weighted voting theory can give the different weights, based on the different spectral IR characteristics, and these weights decide the detected target is identified as real target or background. The experimental results show that the proposed method can reduce the detection uncertainty and improve the detection performance. Compared with the single spectral detection results and the others fusion detection methods, it can decrease the lost alarm rate and the false alarm rate effectively. The proposed method has been employed in our IR surveillance system, and it is easy to be used in the various circumstances.

  1. The IR-EP: A Powerful Model for Self-Assessment and Planning in IR. AIR 2002 Forum Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polinsky, Tracy L.

    While institutional researchers commonly evaluate the programs and services provided by their colleges, they rarely evaluate their own effectiveness with as much gusto. If Institutional Research (IR) is to serve as the bedrock of an institution's effectiveness, it must be effective in itself and continually improving. It must make certain that the…

  2. Theoretical studies of Ir5Th and Ir5Ce nanoscale precipitates in Ir

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, James R; Averill, Frank; Cooper, Valentino R

    2014-01-01

    Experimentally, it is known that very small amounts of thorium and/or cerium added to iridium metal form a precipitate, Ir5Th / Ir5Ce, which improves the high temperature mechanical properties of the resulting alloys. We demonstrate that there are low-energy configurations for nano-scale precipitates of these phases in Ir, and that these coherent arrangements may assist in producing improved mechanical properties. One precipitate/matrix orientation gives a particularly low interfacial energy, and a low lattice misfit. Nanolayer precipitates with this orientation are found to be likely to form, with little driving force to coarsen. The predicted morphology of the precipitates and their orientation with the matrix phase provide a potential experiment that could be used to test these predictions.

  3. Knowledge Management (KM): A Revolution Waiting for IR. AIR 2001 Annual Forum Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milam, John H., Jr.

    This paper shares a vision of the future of institutional research (IR) for the 21st century, in which institutional researchers learn to see themselves as the critical knowledge workers in the higher education industry. To take on this role, IR needs to: (1) understand the concepts of knowledge management (KM); (2) use new tools to meet the…

  4. IR Variability of Eta Carinae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Nathan

    2007-02-01

    Every 5.5 years, η Carinae experiences a dramatic ``spectroscopic event'' when high-excitation lines in its UV, optical, and IR spectrum disappear, and its hard X-ray and radio continuum flux crash. This periodicity has been attributed to an eccentric binary system with a shell ejection occurring at periastron. In addition, η Car shows long term changes as it is still recovering from its giant 19th century outburst. Both types of variability are directly linked to the current mass-loss rate and dust formation in its wind. Mid-IR images and spectra with T-ReCS provide a direct measure of changes in the current bolometric luminosity and trace dust formation episodes. This will provide a direct measurement of the mass ejected. Near-IR emission lines trace related changes in the post-event wind and ionization changes in the circumstellar environment needed to test specific models for the cause of η Car's variability as it recovers from its recent ``event''. High resolution near-IR spectra with GNIRS will continue the important work of HST/STIS, investigating changes in the direct and reflected spectrum of the stellar wind, and ionization changes in the nebula.

  5. IR Variability of Eta Carinae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Nathan

    2008-02-01

    Every 5.5 years, η Carinae experiences a dramatic ``spectroscopic event'' when high-excitation lines in its UV, optical, and IR spectrum disappear, and its hard X-ray and radio continuum flux crash. This periodicity has been attributed to an eccentric binary system with a shell ejection occurring at periastron, and the next periastron event will occur at the very end of 2008. In addition, η Car shows long term changes as it is still recovering from its giant 19th century outburst. Both types of variability are directly linked to the current mass-loss rate and dust formation in its wind. Mid-IR images and spectra with T-ReCS provide a direct measure of changes in the current bolometric luminosity and a direct measure of the massw in dust formation episodes that may occur at periastron in the colliding wind shock. Near-IR emission lines trace related changes in the post-event wind and ionization changes in the circumstellar environment needed to test specific models for the cause of η Car's variability as it recovers from its recent ``event''. High resolution near-IR spectra with Phoenix will continue the important work of HST/STIS, investigating changes in the direct and reflected spectrum of the stellar wind, and ionization changes in the nebula.

  6. Concealing compensation from the IRS.

    PubMed

    Burda, D; Greene, J

    1991-01-28

    Tougher reporting requirements from the Internal Revenue Service are prompting some not-for-profit hospitals to seek ways to hide compensation arrangements from the public and the media. Critics believe those tactics could get hospitals in hot water with the law, especially now that the IRS has launched a new, aggressive auditing offensive. PMID:10108763

  7. MARYLAND COASTAL BAYS IR 2002

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Maryland Coastal Bays Program Implementation Review (IR) summarizes the progress and challenges ahead for the Program through examination of its activities in relation to the CCMP. During the CCMP planning phase the stakeholders prioritized the actions and determined the impl...

  8. Passive IR polarization sensors: a new technology for mine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbour, Blair A.; Jones, Michael W.; Barnes, Howard B.; Lewis, Charles P.

    1998-09-01

    The problem of mine and minefield detection continues to provide a significant challenge to sensor systems. Although the various sensor technologies (infrared, ground penetrating radar, etc.) may excel in certain situations there does not exist a single sensor technology that can adequately detect mines in all conditions such as time of day, weather, buried or surface laid, etc. A truly robust mine detection system will likely require the fusion of data from multiple sensor technologies. The performance of these systems, however, will ultimately depend on the performance of the individual sensors. Infrared (IR) polarimetry is a new and innovative sensor technology that adds substantial capabilities to the detection of mines. IR polarimetry improves on basic IR imaging by providing improved spatial resolution of the target, an inherent ability to suppress clutter, and the capability for zero (Delta) T imaging. Nichols Research Corporation (Nichols) is currently evaluating the effectiveness of IR polarization for mine detection. This study is partially funded by the U.S. Army Night Vision & Electronic Sensors Directorate (NVESD). The goal of the study is to demonstrate, through phenomenology studies and limited field trials, that IR polarizaton outperforms conventional IR imaging in the mine detection arena.

  9. Shaped Ir-Ni bimetallic nanoparticles for minimizing Ir utilization in oxygen evolution reaction.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jinkyu; Yang, Sungeun; Kim, Chanyeon; Roh, Chi-Woo; Kwon, Yongwoo; Kim, Yong-Tae; Lee, Hyunjoo

    2016-04-12

    Shaped Ir-Ni bimetallic nanoparticles were synthesized and used for electrocatalytic oxygen evolution reaction (OER). The obtained bimetallic nanoparticles showed significantly enhanced Ir mass activity and durability compared with Ir nanoparticles. PMID:27034092

  10. The Rise of Institutional Effectiveness: IR Competitor, Customer, Collaborator, or Replacement? Professional File. Number 120, Spring 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leimer, Christina

    2011-01-01

    As Institutional Research (IR) moves beyond its fiftieth anniversary, a new profession, called Institutional Effectiveness (IE), is emerging. In some respects, IR and IE are similar. IE, though, appears to be taking the leadership role. What are the structure, purpose, and responsibilities of IE offices? What are the implications for the IR field…

  11. Discrimination of five species of Fritillaria and its extracts by FT-IR and 2D-IR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dan; Jin, Zhexiong; Zhou, Qun; Chen, Jianbo; Lei, Yu; Sun, Suqin

    2010-06-01

    Bulbus Fritillariae (in Chinese named Beimu), referred to the bulbs of several Fritillaria species ( Liliaceae), is a commonly used anti-tussive and expectorant herb in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) for more than 2000 years. The objective of this study is to discriminate five species of Beimu herbs and their total alkaloid extracts by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), second derivative infrared spectroscopy, and two-dimensional correlation infrared spectroscopy (2D-IR) under thermal perturbation. The structural information of the samples indicated that, Beimu and their extract residues contain a large amount of starch, since some characteristic absorption peaks of the starch, such as 1158, 1080, 1015 and 987 cm -1 can be observed. Further more, the characteristic absorption peaks of the sulfate which arouse at 1120 ± 5 and 618 cm -1 in the IR spectra of Beimu aqueous extracts can be find. This validated that people used the sulfur fumigation method in the processing. The macroscopical fingerprint characters of FT-IR and 2D-IR spectra can not only provide the information of main chemical constituents in medicinal materials and their different extracts, but also compare the components differences among the similar samples. In conclusion, the multi-steps IR macro-fingerprint method is rapid, effective, visual and accurate for pharmaceutical research.

  12. High temperature Ir segregation in Ir-B ceramics: Effect of oxygen presence on stability of IrB2 and other Ir-B phases

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xie, Zhilin; Terracciano, Anthony C.; Cullen, David A.; Blair, Richard G.; Orlovskaya, Nina

    2015-05-13

    The formation of IrB2, IrB1.35, IrB1.1 and IrB monoboride phases in the Ir–B ceramic nanopowder was confirmed during mechanochemical reaction between metallic Ir and elemental B powders. The Ir–B phases were analysed after 90 h of high energy ball milling and after annealing of the powder for 72 h at 1050°C in vacuo. The iridium monoboride (IrB) orthorhombic phase was synthesised experimentally for the first time and identified by powder X-ray diffraction. Additionally, the ReB2 type IrB2 hexagonal phase was also produced for the first time and identified by high resolution transmission electron microscope. Ir segregation along disordered domains ofmore » the boron lattice was found to occur during high temperature annealing. Furthermore, these nanodomains may have useful catalytic properties.« less

  13. Prehospital heart rate and blood pressure increase the positive predictive value of the Glasgow Coma Scale for high-mortality traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Reisner, Andrew; Chen, Xiaoxiao; Kumar, Kamal; Reifman, Jaques

    2014-05-15

    We hypothesized that vital signs could be used to improve the association between a trauma patient's prehospital Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score and his or her clinical condition. Previously, abnormally low and high blood pressures have both been associated with higher mortality for patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). We undertook a retrospective analysis of 1384 adult prehospital trauma patients. Vital-sign data were electronically archived and analyzed. We examined the relative risk of severe head Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) 5-6 as a function of the GCS, systolic blood pressure (SBP), heart rate (HR), and respiratory rate (RR). We created multi-variate logistic regression models and, using DeLong's test, compared their area under receiver operating characteristic curves (ROC AUCs) for three outcomes: head AIS 5-6, all-cause mortality, and either head AIS 5-6 or neurosurgical procedure. We found significant bimodal relationships between head AIS 5-6 versus SBP and HR, but not RR. When the GCS was <15, ROC AUCs were significantly higher for a multi-variate regression model (GCS, SBP, and HR) versus GCS alone. In particular, patients with abnormalities in all parameters (GCS, SBP, and HR) were significantly more likely to have high-mortality TBI versus those with abnormalities in GCS alone. This could be useful for mobilizing resources (e.g., neurosurgeons and operating rooms at the receiving hospital) and might enable new prehospital management protocols where therapies are selected based on TBI mortality risk. PMID:24372334

  14. Provision of, and patient satisfaction with, primary care services in a relatively affluent area and a relatively deprived area of Glasgow.

    PubMed Central

    Wyke, S; Campbell, G; Maciver, S

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a survey of the structure of general practice in two contrasting areas within Greater Glasgow health board: the south west area had a more deprived social profile at the 1981 census and higher than average all cause and selected major cause standardized mortality ratios than the health board as a whole while the north west area had a more affluent social profile at the 1981 census and lower than average all cause and selected major cause standardized mortality ratios. The general practice survey data gathered in 1989 were supplemented with data from a survey of residents of the localities in three age cohorts carried out in 1987-88, which provided information on use of services, as well as perceived accessibility of and satisfaction with them. Despite the more deprived social and mortality profile of the south west area, and greater use of services, few systematic differences in the structure of general practices were found in the two areas. These findings support other studies which suggest that the stereotype of poorly resourced, low quality primary care in inner city areas may apply in London, but not elsewhere. Respondents in both areas were equally satisfied with services and found them accessible. PMID:1419258

  15. Pretreatment Modified Glasgow Prognostic Score Predicts Clinical Outcomes After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kishi, Takahiro; Matsuo, Yukinori Ueki, Nami; Iizuka, Yusuke; Nakamura, Akira; Sakanaka, Katsuyuki; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to evaluate the prognostic significance of the modified Glasgow Prognostic Score (mGPS) in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who received stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Data from 165 patients who underwent SBRT for stage I NSCLC with histologic confirmation from January 1999 to September 2010 were collected retrospectively. Factors, including age, performance status, histology, Charlson comorbidity index, mGPS, and recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class based on sex and T stage, were evaluated with regard to overall survival (OS) using the Cox proportional hazards model. The impact of the mGPS on cause of death and failure patterns was also analyzed. Results: The 3-year OS was 57.9%, with a median follow-up time of 3.5 years. A higher mGPS correlated significantly with poor OS (P<.001). The 3-year OS of lower mGPS patients was 66.4%, whereas that of higher mGPS patients was 44.5%. On multivariate analysis, mGPS and RPA class were significant factors for OS. A higher mGPS correlated significantly with lung cancer death (P=.019) and distant metastasis (P=.013). Conclusions: The mGPS was a significant predictor of clinical outcomes for SBRT in NSCLC patients.

  16. The Glasgow Prognostic Score (GPS) as a novel and significant predictor of extranodal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type.

    PubMed

    Li, Ya-Jun; Jiang, Wen-Qi; Huang, Jia-Jia; Xia, Zhong-Jun; Huang, Hui-Qiang; Li, Zhi-Ming

    2013-05-01

    The Glasgow Prognostic Score (GPS), an inflammation-based prognostic score including C-reactive protein and albumin, shows significant prognostic value in several types of solid tumors. The prognostic value of GPS in lymphoma remains unclear. We performed this study to evaluate the prognostic significance of GPS in extranodal natural killer (NK)/T-cell lymphoma (ENKL). We retrospectively analyzed 164 patients with newly diagnosed ENKL. The prognostic value of GPS was evaluated and compared with that of International Prognostic Index (IPI), Prognostic Index for Peripheral T-cell lymphoma unspecified (PIT), and Korean Prognostic Index (KPI). Patients with higher GPS tended to have more adverse clinical characteristics, lower rates of complete remission (P < 0.001), inferior progression-free survival (PFS, P < 0.001), and inferior overall survival (OS, P < 0.001). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that high GPS, age > 60 years, and elevated LDH were independent adverse predictors of OS. GPS was found superior to IPI, PIT, and KPI in discriminating patients with different outcomes in low-risk groups (all P < 0.05). GPS is an independent predictor of survival outcomes in ENKL. Inflammatory response might play an important role in the progression of ENKL and survival of patients with ENKL. PMID:23423859

  17. The Community College IR Shop and Accreditation: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, George

    2011-01-01

    This article presents results of a study the author recently conducted on the role of traditional institutional research (IR) offices in support of accreditation activities and institutional effectiveness. The purpose of the study was to confirm or disconfirm the utility of a theoretical model developed by Brittingham, O'Brien, and Alig (2008) of…

  18. Heat transfer investigation in pipe by IR thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppel, Tiit; Ainola, Leo; Ekholm, Ari; Lahdeniemi, Matti

    2000-03-01

    The IR-thermography has proved to be a useful contactless instrument in fluid flow research, especially for investigation of heat transfer processes. Series of experimental measurements of suddenly accelerated and pulsating pipe flow were made at Satakunta Polytechnic, Technology in Pori, Finland, with this aim.

  19. Complementarity of NGST, ALMA, and Far IR Space Observatories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, John C.

    2004-01-01

    The Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) and the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) will both start operations long before a new far IR observatory to follow SIRTF into space can be launched. What will be unknown even after they are operational, and what will a far IR space observatory be able to add? I will compare the telescope design concepts and capabilities and the advertised scientific programs for the projects and attempt to forecast the research topics that will be at the forefront in 2010.

  20. IR susceptibility of naval ships using ShipIR/NTCS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaitekunas, David A.

    2010-04-01

    Methods of analysing the signature and susceptibility of naval platforms to infrared detection are described. An unclassified ShipIR destroyer model is used to illustrate the primary sources of infrared signature and detection: the exhaust system, solar-heating, and operating climate. The basic detection algorithm used by the Naval Threat Countermeasure Simulator (NTCS) component of ShipIR is described and used to analyse the effectiveness of various stealth technologies: stack suppression, low solar absorptive (LSA) paints, and Active Hull Cooling (AHC). Standard marine climate statistics are used to determine a minimum (5%), average (50%) and maximum (95%) signature condition for each operating region. The change in detection range of two wave-band sensors (3-5μm, 8-12 μm) operating at different altitudes (10m, 270m) in each of four climatic conditions is used to assess the effectiveness of each stealth solution, providing a more integral approach to infrared stealth design. These tools and methods form the basis on which future platform designs are being evaluated.

  1. Athermalization design in the big-aperture IR zoom telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Dayue; Chen, Ruiyi; Ye, Zhijian; Jin, Fangqing; Zhao, Xiuli; Zhang, Xingde

    1995-10-01

    How to solve effectively the athermalization of IR zoom lenses is an important problem. We have designed and described an IR zoom lens with a mechanical passive athermalization to compensate for the focus deviation caused by germanium refractive index variation with working temperature in the past research phase. After that, in the other design of an IR zoom telescope, (with aperture 160 mm, magnification 4X - 12X, five-element lenses made of germanium used in the 8 - 12 micrometer range of the wavelength and at a working temperature of -10 degree(s)C to +40 degree(s)C), we adopt a mechanical active athermalization in the front element used for focusing and the rear element for collimating. In this paper we stress the rear collimating element realizing the thermal compensation.

  2. The Use of Microscopes and Telescopes in IR Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton

    2011-01-01

    A wide selection of lenses is very useful to the thermographer working in a research environment, where applications can vary from week to week. Both wide angle and telephoto infrared lenses are widely used alternatives to the standard lenses typically supplied by IR camera manufacturers. However, in some extreme applications the need arises for additional image magnification. In these cases, the thermographer must rely on an IR microscope for close-up work with a field of view on the order of 1.3 to 15.8 mm, or a telescope for working at a distance on the order of meters or kilometers. The advantages of using an IR microscope and reflecting telescope will be discussed, as well as the challenges and characteristics of using these instruments.

  3. Carbon nanotube IR detectors (SV)

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, F. L.

    2012-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) and Lockheed Martin Corporation (LMC) collaborated to (1) evaluate the potential of carbon nanotubes as channels in infrared (IR) photodetectors; (2) assemble and characterize carbon nanotube electronic devices and measure the photocurrent generated when exposed to infrared light;(3) compare the performance of the carbon nanotube devices with that of traditional devices; and (4) develop and numerically implement models of electronic transport and opto-electronic behavior of carbon nanotube infrared detectors. This work established a new paradigm for photodetectors.

  4. Results from the Air Force Geophysics Laboratory survey catalog. [IR astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, S. D.; Walker, R. G.

    1977-01-01

    Results of an IR survey program designed to obtain the spatial and brightness distributions of a representative sample of IR-emitting objects in the 3-30 micron range are analyzed. Small cryogenically cooled telescopes carried above the atmosphere on sounding rockets were employed in the research. Minimization of sky noise and photon background, experimental equipment, and data reduction techniques are discussed.

  5. DRDC's approach to IR scene generation for IRCM simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepage, Jean-François; Labrie, Marc-André; Rouleau, Eric; Richard, Jonathan; Ross, Vincent; Dion, Denis; Harrison, Nathalie

    2011-06-01

    An object oriented simulation framework, called KARMA, was developed over the last decade at Defence Research and Development Canada - Valcartier (DRDC Valcartier) to study infrared countermeasures (IRCM) methods and tactics. It provides a range of infrared (IR) guided weapon engagement services from constructive to HWIL simulations. To support the increasing level of detail of its seeker models, DRDC Valcartier recently developed an IR scene generation (IRSG) capacity for the KARMA framework. The approach relies on Open-Source based rendering of scenes composed of 3D models, using commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) graphics processing units (GPU) of standard PCs. The objective is to produce a high frame rate and medium fidelity representation of the IR scene, allowing to properly reproduce the spectral, spatial, and temporal characteristics of the aircraft's and flare's signature. In particular, the OpenSceneGraph library is used to manage the 3D models, and to send high-level rendering commands. The atmospheric module allows for accurate, run-time computation of the radiative components using a spectrally correlated wide-band mode. Advanced effects, such as surface reflections and zoom anti-aliasing, are computed by the GPU through the use of shaders. Also, in addition to the IR scene generation module, a signature modeling and analysis tool (SMAT) was developed to assist the modeler in building and validating signature models that are independent of a particular sensor type. Details of the IR scene generation module and the associated modeling tool will be presented.

  6. Xanthe Terra Landslide in IR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    This is a daytime IR image of a chaos region within Xanthe Terra. As with earlier images, the landslide in this image is caused by the failure of steep slopes releasing material to form the landslide deposit.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude 3.1, Longitude 309.7 East (50.3 West). 100 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  7. Coprates Chasma Landslides in IR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Today's daytime IR image is of a portion of Coprates Chasma, part of Valles Marineris. As with yesterday's image, this image shows multiple large landslides.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude -8.2, Longitude 300.2 East (59.8 West). 100 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  8. Anti-epidermal or anti-vascular endothelial growth factor as first-line metastatic colorectal cancer in modified Glasgow prognostic score 2' patients

    PubMed Central

    Dréanic, Johann; Dhooge, Marion; Barret, Maximilien; Brezault, Catherine; Mir, Olivier; Chaussade, Stanislas; Coriat, Romain

    2015-01-01

    Background In metastatic colorectal cancer, the modified Glasgow prognostic score (mGPS) has been approved as an independent prognostic indicator of survival. No data existed on poor prognosis patients treated with molecular-targeted agents. Methods From January 2007 to February 2012, patients with metastatic colorectal cancer and poor predictive survival score (mGPS = 2), treated with 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy in addition to an anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) or anti-vascular epidermal growth factor (VEGF) therapy, were included to assess the interest of targeted therapy within mGPS = 2' patients. Results A total of 27 mGPS = 2' patients were included and received a 5-fluorouracil-based systemic chemotherapy in addition to an anti-EGFR treatment (cetuximab; n = 18) or an anti-VEGF treatment (bevacizumab; n = 9). Median follow-up was 12.1 months (interquartile range 4.9–22). Patients were Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) Performance Status 1, 2, and 3 in 66% (n = 18), 26% (n = 7), and 8% (n = 2), respectively. Comparing anti-EGFR and anti-VEGF groups, median progression-free survival was 3.9 and 15.4 months, respectively, and was significantly different (P = 0.046). Conversely, the median overall survival was not significantly different between the two groups (P = 0.15). Conclusion Our study confirmed the poor survival of patients with mGPS = 2 despite the use of targeted therapy and identified the superiority of an anti-VEGF treatment in progression-free survival, without a significant benefit in the overall survival compared with the anti-EGFR therapy. Our results deserved confirmation by a prospective clinical trial. PMID:26401469

  9. The relationship between an inflammation‐based prognostic score (Glasgow Prognostic Score) and changes in serum biochemical variables in patients with advanced lung and gastrointestinal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Brown, D J F; Milroy, R; Preston, T; McMillan, D C

    2007-01-01

    Background The Glasgow Prognostic Score (GPS), an inflammation‐based prognostic score formed from standard thresholds of C reactive protein (CRP) and albumin, has prognostic value in patients with advanced cancer. Little is known about the general biochemical disturbance associated with the systemic inflammatory response in cancer. Aim To examine the relationship between the GPS and blood biochemistry in patients with advanced lung and gastrointestinal cancer. Methods The GPS (albumin <35 g/l = 1 and CRP >10 mg/l = 1 combined to form a prognostic score of 0 (normal) and 1 or 2 (abnormal)) and a variety of biochemical variables were examined in patients (n = 50) with advanced lung or gastrointestinal cancer and in a healthy control group (n = 13). Results The GPS was normal in all the controls, but abnormal in 78% of the cancer group. Serum levels of sodium, chloride, creatine kinase, zinc and vitamin D were lower in the cancer group (all p<0.01), whereas levels of calcium, copper (both p<0.05), alkaline phosphatase, γ‐glutamyl transferase (both p<0.001) and lactate dehydrogenase (p<0.10) were raised. In the patient group, with increasing GPS, there was a median reduction in Karnofsky Performance Status (25%), haemoglobin (22%), sodium (3%), zinc (15%) and survival (93%, all p<0.05) and a median increase in white cell count (129%), alkaline phosphatase (217%), γ‐glutamyl transferase (371%) and lactate dehydrogenase (130%, all p<0.05). CRP levels were strongly and similarly correlated with alkaline phosphatase and γ‐glutamyl transferase, accounting for more than 25% of the variation in their activities. Conclusion Several correlations were seen between biochemical variables and increasing GPS. In particular, chronic activation of the systemic inflammatory response in cancer was associated with increase in γ‐glutamyl transferase and alkaline phosphatase activity in patients with advanced lung and gastrointestinal cancer. PMID:16644880

  10. Dust Content in Compact HII Regions (NGC 7538 -- IRS 1, IRS 2, and IRS 3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akabane, K.; Kuno, N.

    The luminosity of the central star in compact HII regions was estimated from the solid angle of the nearby IR sources subtended at the central star, to be 5 ˜ 10 times as intense as that of the IR sources. The luminosity gives the stellar UV photon rate, Nu(*)(s-1), under the assumption of a single star approximation. For gas of standard dust content, Nu(*) and the observed electron density, ne, provide the dust opacity of the ionizing photons, τSdn, along the optical path to the Strömgren sphere of radius rs. The ionizing photon opacity over the same optical path but with the actual dust content, τSdi, is also derived from Nu(*) and the observed emission measure, ne2(4 π/3)ri3, with ri of the radius of the ionized sphere. A relationship γNu(*)/(4 π ri2)1/2˜= 1.3 × 109 (s-1/2m-1) with γ= τSdi/ τSdn was obtained as an observational trend for the 4 compact HII regions of NGC7538(N). Fourteen selected compact HII regions from the data catalogued by VLA observations were examined for this trend, and a similar result was shown. A confined area within 1050 >= Nu (s-1, radio) >= 1044 and 15 >= γ >= 0.1 was proposed for the location of compact HII regions in their (ne - D) diagram.

  11. IR Thermography NDE of ISS Radiator Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshti, Ajay; Winfree, William; Morton, Richard; Wilson, Walter; Reynolds, Gary

    2010-01-01

    The presentation covers an active and a passive infrared (IR) thermography for detection of delaminations in the radiator panels used for the International Space Station (ISS) program. The passive radiator IR data was taken by a NASA astronaut in an extravehicular activity (EVA) using a modified FLIR EVA hand-held camera. The IR data could be successfully analyzed to detect gross facesheet disbonds. The technique used the internal hot fluid tube as the heat source in analyzing the IR data. Some non-flight ISS radiators were inspected using an active technique of IR flash thermography to detect disbond of face sheet with honeycomb core, and debonds in facesheet overlap areas. The surface temperature and radiated heat emission from flight radiators is stable during acquisition of the IR video data. This data was analyzed to detect locations of unexpected surface temperature gradients. The flash thermography data was analyzed using derivative analysis and contrast evolutions. Results of the inspection are provided.

  12. Integrating IR detector imaging systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, G. C. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    An integrating IR detector array for imaging is provided in a hybrid circuit with InSb mesa diodes in a linear array, a single J-FET preamplifier for readout, and a silicon integrated circuit multiplexer. Thin film conductors in a fan out pattern deposited on an Al2O3 substrate connect the diodes to the multiplexer, and thick film conductors also connect the reset switch and preamplifier to the multiplexer. Two phase clock pulses are applied with a logic return signal to the multiplexer through triax comprised of three thin film conductors deposited between layers. A lens focuses a scanned image onto the diode array for horizontal read out while a scanning mirror provides vertical scan.

  13. The Ionotropic Receptors IR21a and IR25a mediate cool sensing in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Ni, Lina; Klein, Mason; Svec, Kathryn V; Budelli, Gonzalo; Chang, Elaine C; Ferrer, Anggie J; Benton, Richard; Samuel, Aravinthan Dt; Garrity, Paul A

    2016-01-01

    Animals rely on highly sensitive thermoreceptors to seek out optimal temperatures, but the molecular mechanisms of thermosensing are not well understood. The Dorsal Organ Cool Cells (DOCCs) of the Drosophila larva are a set of exceptionally thermosensitive neurons critical for larval cool avoidance. Here, we show that DOCC cool-sensing is mediated by Ionotropic Receptors (IRs), a family of sensory receptors widely studied in invertebrate chemical sensing. We find that two IRs, IR21a and IR25a, are required to mediate DOCC responses to cooling and are required for cool avoidance behavior. Furthermore, we find that ectopic expression of IR21a can confer cool-responsiveness in an Ir25a-dependent manner, suggesting an instructive role for IR21a in thermosensing. Together, these data show that IR family receptors can function together to mediate thermosensation of exquisite sensitivity. PMID:27126188

  14. The Ionotropic Receptors IR21a and IR25a mediate cool sensing in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Lina; Klein, Mason; Svec, Kathryn V; Budelli, Gonzalo; Chang, Elaine C; Ferrer, Anggie J; Benton, Richard; Samuel, Aravinthan DT; Garrity, Paul A

    2016-01-01

    Animals rely on highly sensitive thermoreceptors to seek out optimal temperatures, but the molecular mechanisms of thermosensing are not well understood. The Dorsal Organ Cool Cells (DOCCs) of the Drosophila larva are a set of exceptionally thermosensitive neurons critical for larval cool avoidance. Here, we show that DOCC cool-sensing is mediated by Ionotropic Receptors (IRs), a family of sensory receptors widely studied in invertebrate chemical sensing. We find that two IRs, IR21a and IR25a, are required to mediate DOCC responses to cooling and are required for cool avoidance behavior. Furthermore, we find that ectopic expression of IR21a can confer cool-responsiveness in an Ir25a-dependent manner, suggesting an instructive role for IR21a in thermosensing. Together, these data show that IR family receptors can function together to mediate thermosensation of exquisite sensitivity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13254.001 PMID:27126188

  15. Atmospheric Entry Experiments at IRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auweter-Kurtz, M.; Endlich, P.; Herdrich, G.; Kurtz, H.; Laux, T.; Löhle, S.; Nazina, N.; Pidan, S.

    2002-01-01

    Entering the atmosphere of celestial bodies, spacecrafts encounter gases at velocities of several km/s, thereby being subjected to great heat loads. The thermal protection systems and the environment (plasma) have to be investigated by means of computational and ground facility based simulations. For more than a decade, plasma wind tunnels at IRS have been used for the investigation of TPS materials. Nevertheless, ground tests and computer simulations cannot re- place space flights completely. Particularly, entry mission phases encounter challenging problems, such as hypersonic aerothermodynamics. Concerning the TPS, radiation-cooled materials used for reuseable spacecrafts and ablator tech- nologies are of importance. Besides the mentioned technologies, there is the goal to manage guidance navigation, con- trol, landing technology and inflatable technologies such as ballutes that aim to keep vehicles in the atmosphere without landing. The requirement to save mass and energy for planned interplanetary missions such as Mars Society Balloon Mission, Mars Sample Return Mission, Mars Express or Venus Sample Return mission led to the need for manoeuvres like aerocapture, aero-breaking and hyperbolic entries. All three are characterized by very high kinetic vehicle energies to be dissipated by the manoeuvre. In this field flight data are rare. The importance of these manoeuvres and the need to increase the knowledge of required TPS designs and behavior during such mission phases point out the need of flight experiments. As result of the experience within the plasma diagnostic tool development and the plasma wind tunnel data base, flight experiments like the PYrometric RE-entry EXperiment PYREX were developed, fully qualified and successfully flown. Flight experiments such as the entry spectrometer RESPECT and PYREX on HOPE-X are in the conceptual phase. To increase knowledge in the scope of atmospheric manoeuvres and entries, data bases have to be created combining both

  16. A controlled trial of the effectiveness of a diabetes education programme in a multi-ethnic community in Glasgow [ISRCT28317455

    PubMed Central

    Baradaran, Hamid R; Knill-Jones, Robin P; Wallia, Sunita; Rodgers, Alison

    2006-01-01

    Background Epidemiologic data have shown that the prevalence of Type 2 diabetes varies with ethnic origin. Type 2 diabetes is up to four times more common in British South Asians than in the indigenous white population. The aim of this study was to develop a culturally appropriate educational intervention programme for South Asians with Type 2 diabetes. We then investigated whether this intervention could produce an improvement, and finally whether any improvement was greater than background changes in knowledge in comparison groups. Methods A multi-site prospective, randomised controlled study was conducted in all day care centres and three general practice registers with high proportion patients from different ethnic minority groups in Glasgow, Scotland. The intervention consisted of 18 educational sessions in 6 separate programmes. A modified questionnaire was used to measure the knowledge, attitudes, and practice of diabetes before and after intervention. Results Baseline assessment showed that Indian and Pakistani subjects had less knowledge about diabetes, regarded the disease less seriously, and had a lesser understanding of the relationship between control and complications than the white population. No differences in initial responses were found between those who completed the second assessment and those who did not. The intervention group showed significant improvements in scores for Knowledge (+12.5%); Attitudes toward seriousness (+13.5%), complications (+8.1%), Practice (+20.0%). However there were also changes in the ethnic control group scores; respectively +5.0%, +16.3% (significant P < 0.001), +1.5%, +1.7%. The single white control group also showed some improvements; respectively +12.2%, +12.4% (P = 0.04), +6.0%, +25.0% (P = 0.007), but the differences in improvement between these two control groups were not significant. Overall, the improvement seen was similar in both intervention and ethnic control groups and there was no significant difference

  17. Status Of Sofradir IR-CCD Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tribolet, Philippe; Radisson, Patrick

    1988-05-01

    The topics of this paper deal with the IR-CCD detectors manufactured by SOFRADIR the new French joint venture. Description of the IRCCD technology and the advantages of this approach are given. In conclusion, some IR-CCD typical results are given.

  18. Hydrogen intercalation under graphene on Ir(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grånäs, Elin; Gerber, Timm; Schröder, Ulrike A.; Schulte, Karina; Andersen, Jesper N.; Michely, Thomas; Knudsen, Jan

    2016-09-01

    Using high resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy we study the intercalation of hydrogen under graphene/Ir(111). The hydrogen intercalated graphene is characterized by a component in C 1s that is shifted -0.10 to -0.18 eV with respect to pristine graphene and a component in Ir 4f at 60.54 eV. The position of this Ir 4f component is identical to that of the Ir(111) surface layer with hydrogen atoms adsorbed, indicating that the atomic hydrogen adsorption site on bare Ir(111) and beneath graphene is the same. Based on co-existence of fully- and non-intercalated graphene, and the inability to intercalate a closed graphene film covering the entire Ir(111) surface, we conclude that hydrogen dissociatively adsorbs at bare Ir(111) patches, and subsequently diffuses rapidly under graphene. A likely entry point for the intercalating hydrogen atoms is identified to be where graphene crosses an underlying Ir(111) step.

  19. CHIP: Caltech High-res IRS Pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pontoppidan, Klaus M.

    2016-02-01

    CHIP (Caltech High-res IRS Pipeline) reduces high signal-to-noise short-high and long-high Spitzer-IRS spectra, especially that taken with dedicated background exposures. Written in IDL, it is independent of other Spitzer reduction tools except IRSFRINGE (ascl:1602.016).

  20. High temperature Ir segregation in Ir-B ceramics: Effect of oxygen presence on stability of IrB2 and other Ir-B phases

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Zhilin; Terracciano, Anthony C.; Cullen, David A.; Blair, Richard G.; Orlovskaya, Nina

    2015-05-13

    The formation of IrB2, IrB1.35, IrB1.1 and IrB monoboride phases in the Ir–B ceramic nanopowder was confirmed during mechanochemical reaction between metallic Ir and elemental B powders. The Ir–B phases were analysed after 90 h of high energy ball milling and after annealing of the powder for 72 h at 1050°C in vacuo. The iridium monoboride (IrB) orthorhombic phase was synthesised experimentally for the first time and identified by powder X-ray diffraction. Additionally, the ReB2 type IrB2 hexagonal phase was also produced for the first time and identified by high resolution transmission electron microscope. Ir segregation along disordered domains of the boron lattice was found to occur during high temperature annealing. Furthermore, these nanodomains may have useful catalytic properties.

  1. Using The Cornell Atlas of Spitzer/IRS Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samsonyan, A. L.

    2016-06-01

    I summarize my research studying details of the emission line profiles of the mid infrared [NeII] 12.8 microns and [NeIII] 15.6 microns emission lines. Observations are from the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) (Houck et al. 2004), so I illustrate use of the archive of these spectra. The IRS team developed the Cornell Atlas of Spitzer IRS Sources (CASSIS) found at cassis.sirtf.com. At present, all low resolution (Lebouteiller et al. 2011) and high resolution (Lebouteiller et al. 2015) staring observations with the IRS are available (more than 20,000 spectra of about 15,000 distinct sources). Spectra are provided in various formats to enable easy viewing or measurements. Spectra cover 5 microns to 37 microns in low resolution (R ˜ 60 to 125) and 10 microns to 37 microns in high resolution (R ˜ 600) modes. CASSIS is intended as a long term resource for the astronomical community so that this fundamental data base of mid-infrared spectra will be easily usable perpetually, and I demonstrate some examples of its use.

  2. IR detection with uncooled sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tissot, J. L.

    2004-12-01

    The emergence of uncooled detectors has opened new opportunities for IR detection for both military and commercial applications. Development of such devices involves a lot of trade-offs between the different parameters that define the technological stack. These trade-offs explain the number of different architectures that are under worldwide development. The Laboratoire d'Electronique, de Technologies et d'Information (LETI) and ULIS have chosen to develop uncooled infrared sensor using a silicon technology. This silicon approach has the greatest potential for reducing infrared detector manufacturing cost. LETI and ULIS are now working to facilitate the infrared focal plane array (IRFPA) integration into equipment in order to address a very large market. Achievement of this goal needs the development of smart sensors with on-chip advanced functions and the decrease of manufacturing cost of IRFPA by decreasing the pixel pitch and simplifying the vacuum package. We present in this paper the new designs for readout circuit and packages that will be used for 384 × 288 and 160 × 120 arrays with a pitch of 35 μm and advanced results on 35 μm pixel pitch arrays. Thermographic application needs high stability infrared detector with a precise determination of the amount of absorbed infrared flux. Hence, infrared detector with internal temperature stabilized shield has been developed and characterized. The results will be presented.

  3. IR line scanner on UAV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shi-chao; Qin, Jie-xin; Qi, Hong-xing; Xiao, Gong-hai

    2011-08-01

    This paper introduces the designing principle and method of the IR line scanner on UAV in three aspects of optical-mechanical system, electronics system and processing software. It makes the system achieve good results in practical application that there are many features in the system such as light weight, small size, low power assumption, wide field of view, high instantaneous field of view, high noise equivalent temperature difference, wirelessly controlled and so on. The entire system is designed as follows: Multi-element scanner is put into use for reducing the electrical noise bandwidth, and then improving SNR; Square split aperture scanner is put into use for solving the image ratation distortion, besides fit for large velocity to height ratio; DSP is put into use for non-uniformity correction and background nosie subtraction, and then improving the imagery quality; SD card is put into use as image data storage media instead of the hard disk; The image data is stored in SD card in FAT32 file system, easily playbacked by processing software on Windows and Linux operating system; wireless transceiver module is put into use for wirelessly controlled.

  4. Recent catalysis measurements at IRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massuti-Ballester, B.; Pidan, S.; Herdrich, G.; Fertig, M.

    2015-08-01

    At the Institute of Space Systems (IRS), experiments have been performed using the high enthalpy, inductively heated plasma generator (IPG) in plasma wind tunnel 3 (PWK3), in order to assess the catalytic behaviour of different materials. Utilising the Upwind Relaxation Algorithm for Non-equilibrium Flows of the University of Stuttgart (URANUS), a methodology for determining catalytic efficiencies by obtaining atomic recombination probabilities γ for high temperature materials, has been developed. This method eliminates the inherent uncertainties produced when using catalytic properties of previously tested materials to infer those of new materials. In this work, eight different candidates for the Thermal Protection System (TPS) of an entry vehicle have been studied, of which six are ceramic materials and the other two are metallic alloys. Thermochemical properties of these specimens are given for surface temperatures between 1000 and 2000 K in pure oxygen and pure nitrogen plasmas. The high enthalpies and relatively low pressure conditions in which these material samples have been tested in PWK3 are relevant for entry applications from Low Earth Orbit (LEO).

  5. Demonstration of KHILS two-color IR projection capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Lawrence E.; Coker, Jason S.; Garbo, Dennis L.; Olson, Eric M.; Murrer, Robert Lee, Jr.; Bergin, Thomas P.; Goldsmith, George C., II; Crow, Dennis R.; Guertin, Andrew W.; Dougherty, Michael; Marler, Thomas M.; Timms, Virgil G.

    1998-07-01

    For more than a decade, there has been considerable discussion about using different IR bands for the detection of low contrast military targets. Theory predicts that a target can have little to no contrast against the background in one IR band while having a discernible signature in another IR band. A significant amount of effort has been invested towards establishing hardware that is capable of simultaneously imaging in two IR bands to take advantage of this phenomenon. Focal plane arrays (FPA) are starting to materialize with this simultaneous two-color imaging capability. The Kinetic Kill Vehicle Hardware-in-the-loop Simulator (KHILS) team of the Air Force Research Laboratory and the Guided Weapons Evaluation Facility (GWEF), both at Eglin AFB, FL, have spent the last 10 years developing the ability to project dynamic IR scenes to imaging IR seekers. Through the Wideband Infrared Scene Projector (WISP) program, the capability to project two simultaneous IR scenes to a dual color seeker has been established at KHILS. WISP utilizes resistor arrays to produce the IR energy. Resistor arrays are not ideal blackbodies. The projection of two IR colors with resistor arrays, therefore, requires two optically coupled arrays. This paper documents the first demonstration of two-color simultaneous projection at KHILS. Agema cameras were used for the measurements. The Agema's HgCdTe detector has responsivity from 4 to 14 microns. A blackbody and two IR filters (MWIR equals 4.2 t 7.4 microns, LWIR equals 7.7 to 13 microns) were used to calibrate the Agema in two bands. Each filter was placed in front of the blackbody one at a time, and the temperature of the blackbody was stepped up in incremental amounts. The output counts from the Agema were recorded at each temperature. This calibration process established the radiance to Agema output count curves for the two bands. The WISP optical system utilizes a dichroic beam combiner to optically couple the two resistor arrays. The

  6. The Functions of Institutional Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saupe, Joe L.

    The nature and purpose of institutional research (IR), forms of research, and the function of IR in the organizational structures of colleges and universities are examined. Institutional research is defined as research conducted within a higher education institution to provide information that supports institutional planning, policy formulation,…

  7. NaIrO{sub 3}-A pentavalent post-perovskite

    SciTech Connect

    Bremholm, M.; Dutton, S.E.; Stephens, P.W.; Cava, R.J.

    2011-03-15

    Sodium iridium (V) oxide, NaIrO{sub 3,} was synthesized by a high pressure solid state method and recovered to ambient conditions. It is found to be isostructural with CaIrO{sub 3}, the much-studied structural analog of the high-pressure post-perovskite phase of MgSiO{sub 3}. Among the oxide post-perovskites, NaIrO{sub 3} is the first example with a pentavalent cation. The structure consists of layers of corner- and edge-sharing IrO{sub 6} octahedra separated by layers of NaO{sub 8} bicapped trigonal prisms. NaIrO{sub 3} shows no magnetic ordering and resistivity measurements show non-metallic behavior. The crystal structure, electrical and magnetic properties are discussed and compared to known post-perovskites and pentavalent perovskite metal oxides. -- Graphical abstract: Sodium iridium(V) oxide, NaIrO{sub 3}, synthesized by a high pressure solid state method and recovered to ambient conditions is found to crystallize as the post-perovskite structure and is the first example of a pentavalent ABO{sub 3} post-perovskite. Research highlights: {yields} NaIrO{sub 3} post-perovskite stabilized by pressure. {yields} First example of a pentavalent oxide post-perovskite. {yields} Non-metallic and non-magnetic behavior of NaIrO{sub 3}.

  8. The recent and prospective developments of cooled IR FPAs for double application at Electron NRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arutunov, V. A.; Vasilyev, I. S.; Ivanov, V. G.; Prokofyev, A. E.

    2003-09-01

    The recent and prospective developments of monolithic silicon IR-Schottky-barrier staring focal plane arrays (IR SB FPAs), photodetector assembly, and digital thermal imaging cameras (TICs) at Electron National Research Institute (Electron NRI) are considered. Basic parameters for IR SB FPAs with 256x256 and 512x512 pixels, and TICs based on these arrays are presented. The problems emerged while proceeding from the developments of IR SB FPAs for the wavelength range from 3 μm to 5 μm to the developments of those ones for xLWIR range are indicated (an abrupt increase in the level of background architecture). Possibility for further improvement in basic parameters of IR SB FPAs are discussed (a decrease in threshold signal power down to 0.5-1.0"1013 W/element with an increase in quantum efficiency, a decrease in output noise and proceeding to Schottky barriers of degenerated semiconductor/silicon heterojunction, and implementation of these array parameters in photodetector assembly with improved thermal background shielding taking into consideration an optical structure of TIC for concrete application). It is concluded that relative simplicity of the technology and expected low cost of monolithic silicon IR SB FPAs with basic parameters compared with hybrid IR FPAs for the wavelength ranges from 3 μm to 5 μm and from 8 μm to 12 μm maintain large monolithic IR SB FPAs as a basis for developments of double application digital TICs in the Russian Federation.

  9. PREMIER's imaging IR limb sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraft, Stefan; Caron, Jerome; Bézy, Jean-Loup; Meynart, Roland; Langen, Jörg; Carnicero Dominguez, Bernardo; Bensi, Paolo; Silvestrin, Pierluigi

    2011-11-01

    The Imaging IR Limb Sounder (IRLS) is one of the two instruments planned on board of the candidate Earth Explorer Core Mission PREMIER. PREMIER stands for PRocess Exploration through Measurements of Infrared and Millimetrewave Emitted Radiation and is presently under feasibility study by ESA. Emerging from recent enhanced detector and processing technologies IRLS shall, next to a millimetre-wave limb sounder, explore the benefits of three-dimensional limb sounding with embedded cloud imaging capability. Such 3d imaging technology is expected to open a new era of limb sounding that will allow detailed studies of the link between atmospheric composition and climate, since it will map simultaneously fields of temperature and many trace gases in the mid/upper troposphere and stratosphere across a large vertical and horizontal field of view and with relatively high vertical and horizontal resolution. PREMIER shall fly in tandem formation looking backwards to METOP's swath and thereby explore the benefit of 3-dimensional information for meteorological/environmental analyses and climate forcing investigations. As currently planned and if implemented, IRLS will cover a total horizontal field of about 360 km and observe the limb at altitudes between 4 and 52 km. The vertical spatial sampling distance (SSD) will be well below 1 km. It will be run in two different exclusive modes to address scientific questions about atmospheric dynamics and chemistry at spectral samplings of ~1.2 cm-1 and ~0.2 cm-1, respectively. In such configuration IRLS will be composed of an imaging array with about 1800 macro pixels or sub-samples, thereby allowing cloud imaging and rejection at sufficient spatial resolution. We will present an overview of the instrument requirements as derived from the scientific requirements, the present status of the mission, and we will give an overview of the currently identified technology needs and instrument predevelopments.

  10. Corrosion detection on pipelines by IR thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bison, P.; Marinetti, S.; Cuogo, G.; Molinas, B.; Zonta, P.; Grinzato, E.

    2011-05-01

    IR thermography is applied to detect hidden corrosion on carbon steel pipelines for oil transportation. The research is oriented to set up a robust technique to carry out in situ the early detection of corroded zones that may evolve either towards leakage or failure. The use of thermography associated with a transient thermal technique is investigated on 12.2 mm thick samples, machined to artificially create a reduction of wall thickness that simulates the effect of real corrosion in pipes. The extension and depth of the artificial defects is controlled by ultrasounds which represents the reference for the results obtained by thermography. Two approaches are proposed: the first is based on the processing of a single thermogram taken at the optimum time after a finite pulse heating of a large area of the external surface; the second technique is carried out by scanning the pipeline by means of a device composed of a linear lamp and a thermographic camera which move jointly over the surface to test. A suitable reconstruction provides a map of the tested surface with possible hot spots in correspondence with the corroded areas. The analysis of the thermal problem by Finite Element Method is used to optimize the experimental parameters. The experimental results demonstrate a detection capability starting from 15 % of wall thickness reduction.

  11. Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bracey, Gerald W.

    1984-01-01

    This potpourri surveys research on various topics: neurologically based curricula, midafternoon slumps in student attention, accounting for contexts in research, feelings of powerlessness among students and teachers, further equity implications of computers in schools, misreporting of research findings, and accounting for media transfer in…

  12. Irs2 and Irs4 synergize in non-LepRb neurons to control energy balance and glucose homeostasis★

    PubMed Central

    Sadagurski, Marianna; Dong, X. Charlie; Myers, Martin G.; White, Morris F.

    2013-01-01

    Insulin receptor substrates (Irs1, 2, 3 and Irs4) mediate the actions of insulin/IGF1 signaling. They have similar structure, but distinctly regulate development, growth, and metabolic homeostasis. Irs2 contributes to central metabolic sensing, partially by acting in leptin receptor (LepRb)-expressing neurons. Although Irs4 is largely restricted to the hypothalamus, its contribution to metabolic regulation is unclear because Irs4-null mice barely distinguishable from controls. We postulated that Irs2 and Irs4 synergize and complement each other in the brain. To examine this possibility, we investigated the metabolism of whole body Irs4−/y mice that lacked Irs2 in the CNS (bIrs2−/−·Irs4−/y) or only in LepRb-neurons (Lepr∆IrsIrs4−/y). bIrs2−/−·Irs4−/y mice developed severe obesity and decreased energy expenditure, along with hyperglycemia and insulin resistance. Unexpectedly, the body weight and fed blood glucose levels of Lepr∆IrsIrs4−/y mice were not different from Lepr∆Irs2 mice, suggesting that the functions of Irs2 and Irs4 converge upon neurons that are distinct from those expressing LepRb. PMID:24567904

  13. Ice Clouds in Color IR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released August 9, 2004 This image shows two representations of the same infra-red image in the Elysium region of Mars. On the left is a grayscale image showing surface temperature, and on the right is a false-color composite made from 3 individual THEMIS bands. The false-color image is colorized using a technique called decorrelation stretch (DCS), which emphasizes the spectral differences between the bands to highlight compositional variations.

    The light blue area in the center of this image is a very nice example of a water ice cloud. Water ice is frequently present in the Martian atmosphere as a thin haze. Clouds such as this one can be difficult to identify in a temperature image, but are easy to spot in the DCS images. In this case, the water ice is relatively confined and concentrated which may be due to the topography of the Elysium volcanic construct.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude 23.2, Longitude 150.1 East (209.9 West). 100 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed

  14. Melas Chasma in IR Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released August 11, 2004 This image shows two representations of the same infra-red image over Melas Chasma. On the left is a grayscale image showing surface temperature, and on the right is a false-color composite made from 3 individual THEMIS bands. The false-color image is colorized using a technique called decorrelation stretch (DCS), which emphasizes the spectral differences between the bands to highlight compositional variations.

    There is a distinct purple/blue layer present in the northern wall of the Chasma. Although this layer likely has a composition different than the surrounding areas, it is difficult to interpret its specific composition due to the high variability of sunlit and shaded surfaces in this area, which cause a wide range of temperatures to be present within each pixel of the image. It is possible that this layer has a unique composition due to differences in the volcanic or sedimentary environment at the time that the rock formed, or it could be a layer of magma injected between two previously existing rock layers. Another possibility is that the wall is mostly covered by dust and debris, and this portion contains the only exposed bedrock. The light blue colors present in many other areas of the Chasma are due to water ice clouds.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude -8.9, Longitude 282 East (78 West). 100 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey

  15. Atmospheric Effects in IR Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released August 3, 2004 This image shows two representations of the same infra-red image covering parts of Ius Chasma and Oudemans Crater. On the left is a grayscale image showing surface temperature, and on the right is a false-color composite made from 3 individual THEMIS bands. The false-color image is colorized using a technique called decorrelation stretch (DCS), which emphasizes the spectral differences between the bands to highlight compositional variations.

    This image is dominated by atmospheric effects. The pink/magenta colors inside the canyon show areas with a large amount of atmospheric dust. In the bottom half of the image, the patchy blue/cyan colors indicate the presence of water ice clouds out on the plains. Water ice clouds and high amounts of dust do not generally occur at the same place and time on Mars because the dust absorbs sunlight and heats the atmosphere. The more dust that is present, the warmer the atmosphere becomes, sublimating the water ice into water vapor and dissipating any clouds.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude -8.2, Longitude 267.9 East (92.1.West). 100 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is

  16. Gale Crater in IR Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released August 4, 2004 This image shows two representations of the same infra-red image of Gale Crater. On the left is a grayscale image showing surface temperature, and on the right is a false-color composite made from 3 individual THEMIS bands. The false-color image is colorized using a technique called decorrelation stretch (DCS), which emphasizes the spectral differences between the bands to highlight compositional variations.

    In the bottom of the crater, surrounding the central mound, there are extensive basaltic sand deposits. The basaltic sand spectral signature combined with the warm surface (due to the low albedo of basaltic sand) produces a very strong pink/magenta color. This color signature contrasts with the green/yellow color of soil and dust in the top of the image, and the cyan color due to the presence of water ice clouds at the bottom of the image. This migrating sand may be producing the erosional features seen on the central mound.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude -4.4, Longitude 137.4 East (222.6 West). 100 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University

  17. Basaltic Crater in Color IR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released August 6, 2004 This image shows two representations of the same infra-red image near Nili Fosse in the the Isidis region of Mars. On the left is a grayscale image showing surface temperature, and on the right is a false-color composite made from 3 individual THEMIS bands. The false-color image is colorized using a technique called decorrelation stretch (DCS), which emphasizes the spectral differences between the bands to highlight compositional variations. In many cases craters trap sand in their topographic depressions, interrupting the sand's migration across the Martian surface. This image is particularly interesting because there appears to be more than 1 type of sand in the bottom of this crater and in the hummocky terrain near the bottom of the image. The pink/magenta areas are characteristic of a basaltic composition, but there are also orange areas that are likely caused by the presence of andesite. These two compositions, basalt and andesite, are some of the most common found on Mars.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude 24, Longitude 80.7 East (297.3 West). 100 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip

  18. Lava Flows in IR Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released August 5, 2004 This image shows two representations of the same infra-red image covering a portion of the Solis Planum region, southeast of the Tharsis volcanoes. On the left is a grayscale image showing surface temperature, and on the right is a false-color composite made from 3 individual THEMIS bands. The false-color image is colorized using a technique called decorrelation stretch (DCS), which emphasizes the spectral differences between the bands to highlight compositional variations.

    Multiple layers of lava flows in this region show temperature differences, as well as some potential compositional differences. The temperature variations between these flows are likely caused by differences in their surface texture. The compositional variation could be due to differences in the make-up of the lava when it erupted onto the surface or might only reflect differences in the amount of dust covering these flows.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude -30.1, Longitude 275.9 East (84.1 West). 100 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is

  19. PKC{delta}-mediated IRS-1 Ser24 phosphorylation negatively regulates IRS-1 function

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, Michael W. . E-mail: michael.greene@bassett.org; Ruhoff, Mary S.; Roth, Richard A.; Kim, Jeong-a; Quon, Michael J.; Krause, Jean A.

    2006-10-27

    The IRS-1 PH and PTB domains are essential for insulin-stimulated IRS-1 Tyr phosphorylation and insulin signaling, while Ser/Thr phosphorylation of IRS-1 disrupts these signaling events. To investigate consensus PKC phosphorylation sites in the PH-PTB domains of human IRS-1, we changed Ser24, Ser58, and Thr191 to Ala (3A) or Glu (3E), to block or mimic phosphorylation, respectively. The 3A mutant abrogated the inhibitory effect of PKC{delta} on insulin-stimulated IRS-1 Tyr phosphorylation, while reductions in insulin-stimulated IRS-1 Tyr phosphorylation, cellular proliferation, and Akt activation were observed with the 3E mutant. When single Glu mutants were tested, the Ser24 to Glu mutant had the greatest inhibitory effect on insulin-stimulated IRS-1 Tyr phosphorylation. PKC{delta}-mediated IRS-1 Ser24 phosphorylation was confirmed in cells with PKC{delta} catalytic domain mutants and by an RNAi method. Mechanistic studies revealed that IRS-1 with Ala and Glu point mutations at Ser24 impaired phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate binding. In summary, our data are consistent with the hypothesis that Ser24 is a negative regulatory phosphorylation site in IRS-1.

  20. Measuring the IR solar corona during the 2017 eclipse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryans, Paul; Hannigan, James; Philip, Judge; Larson, Brandon; Sewell, Scott; McIntire, Lauren

    2016-05-01

    On 21 August 2017 a total solar eclipse will pass across the continental United States, offering a unique opportunity to conduct scientific research of the solar atmosphere. With the light from the Sun eclipsed, the solar corona becomes visible in a way not possible when swamped by the light from the photosphere. The infrared (IR) spectrum of the corona, in particular, is predicted to contain some of the most magnetically sensitive spectral lines. However, no comprehensive survey of this spectral range has been carried out to date. Here, we describe a Fourier Transform Spectrometer, currently under construction at NCAR, to measure the IR spectrum from 2 to 12 microns. We will discuss the operation of the experiment, which will be deployed along the path of totality in Wyoming, and the scientific results we hope to obtain.

  1. Far-IR selected star formation regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, D. T.; Hildebrand, R. H.; Keene, J.; Harper, D. A.; Loewenstein, R. F.; Moran, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    Detailed far-IR observations and complemenary submillimeter, 5 GHz continuum and c(18)0 observations of a sample of far-IR selected luminous regions of star formation. The clouds and that the exciting stars lie deep within these condensations. The far-IR sources have diversely shaped 40 micron to 180 micron spectra even through their 60 micron to 100 micron color temperatures are similar. The radio and far-IR results together show that the exciting stars are in clusters containing either zero-age main sequence and pre-main sequence stars or consisting entirely of premain sequence objects. C(18)0 and submillimeter observations imply gas densities approximately .00005 - high enough to make t(sub dust) approximately t(sub gas).

  2. IR Optimization, DID and anti-DID

    SciTech Connect

    Seryi, Andrei; Maruyama, Takashi; Parker, Brett; /Brookhaven

    2006-02-03

    In this paper, we discuss optimization of the larger crossing angle Interaction Region of the Linear Collider, where specially shaped transverse field of the Detector Integrated Dipole can be reversed and adjusted to optimize trajectories of the low energy pairs, so that their majority would be directed into the extraction exit hole. This decreases the backscattering and makes background in 14mrad IR to be similar to background in 2mrad IR.

  3. IR diver vision for turbidity mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milam, Jerry A.

    2010-04-01

    Commercial, forensic, and military divers often encounter turbid conditions which reduce visibility to zero. Under such conditions, work must be performed completely blind. The darkness resulting from high levels of turbidity is complete, and can be dangerous as well as disorienting. Such darkness can even occur near the surface on a bright and sunny day. Artificial underwater lighting is of no use in such situations, as it only makes matters worse (similar to the use of high beam headlights in dense fog). Certain wavelengths of infrared (IR) light have the ability to penetrate this underwater "fog," and thus form the basis of the current development. Turbidity results from clay, silt, finely divided organic and inorganic matter, soluble colored organic compounds, plankton and microscopic organisms suspended in water. The IR Diver Vision system described herein consists of a standard commercial diving mask of any of several configurations whereby an IR light source, IR video camera, video display, and power source may be integrated within or attached to the mask. The IR light source wavelength is compatible with the spectral bandwidth of the video camera. The camera field-of-view (FOV) is matched to the video display in order to provide a unity magnification and hence prevent diver ocular fatigue. The IR video camera, video display, power source and controls are compatible with extended use in a submarine environment. Some such masks will incorporate tilt/heading sensors and video indicators. 3-D Imaging, Inc. has developed prototypes and has patents pending on such devices.

  4. Development of an IR stimulator concept for testing IR missile warning systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, William G.; Farrier, David A.

    1999-07-01

    Missile warning systems (MWS) present unique problems for hardware-in-the-loop testing compared to other sensors found on modern day military aircraft and ground vehicles. End-to- end testing of an IR MWS like the AN/AAR-44 and other IR MWS requires a scene projector or stimulator capable of large intensity dynamic range, moderate temporal response, and a very large field of regard. These requirements dictate a different type of stimulator than is normally used with more conventional IR imaging systems using IR focal plane arrays and relatively narrow fields of view on the order of 10 - 30 degrees. This paper describes an initial design approach for development of an IR stimulator that satisfies the requirements for hardware and software testing of the AN/AAR-44 and other IR MWS equipment.

  5. Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raudenbush, Stephen

    In May of 1999, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences hosted a conference on ways to improve the scientific quality of educational research. In medicine, thanks to work 40 years ago by 2 researchers, Howard Hyatt and Frederick Mosteller, the commitment of medical professionals to base their diagnoses and prescriptions on clinical trials in…

  6. Research

    SciTech Connect

    1999-10-01

    Subjects covered in this section are: (1) PCAST panel promotes energy research cooperation; (2) Letter issued by ANS urges funding balance in FFTF restart consideration and (3) FESAC panel releases report on priorities and balance.

  7. Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathematics Teaching, 1973

    1973-01-01

    Implications for teachers from Piagetian-oriented piagetian-oriented research on problem solving reported in an article by Eleanor Duckworth are presented. Edward de Bono's Children Solve Problems,'' a collection of examples, is also discussed. (MS)

  8. Influence of deposition conditions on Ir/IrO2 oxygen barrier effectiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinnow, C. U.; Kasko, I.; Nagel, N.; Poppa, S.; Mikolajick, T.; Dehm, C.; Hosler, W.; Bleyl, F.; Jahnel, F.; Seibt, M.; Geyer, U.

    2002-06-01

    The influence of the deposition temperature during the reactive sputtering process on the microstructure of thin Ir and IrO2 films deposited on oxidized Si substrates was investigated and related to the oxygen barrier effectiveness. For this purpose differential thermal analysis combined with residual gas analysis by mass spectrometry was used for the investigation of the microstructural and chemical behavior of the as-sputtered IrO2 films upon heating. Moreover, in situ stress relaxation analyses up to 900 degC, in and ex situ x-ray diffraction measurements were done for various annealing conditions. The investigated polycrystalline IrO2 films exhibited a large compressive stress and a distorted lattice due to the sputter deposition process. It is demonstrated that a high deposition temperature involves a delayed relaxation of the IrO2 grains which is causing an extrinsic, enhanced defect controlled oxygen mobility for the annealing temperatures below the recrystallization. The well-known low intrinsic oxygen diffusivity was only found in those samples which show--in addition to the recovery process--a recrystallization at low temperatures and thus a formation and growth of a new generation of grains with a lattice spacing as in bulk IrO2. Moreover, the oxygen diffusion in Ir films was investigated and the oxygen was found to penetrate the Ir films very quickly at elevated temperatures. The microstructure of the films was investigated by cross sectional transmission electron microscopy and it is shown that the cold-sputtered columnar IrO2 films protect the underlying layers from oxidation during a 700 degC high temperature oxygen anneal with an optimized Ir/IrO2 oxygen barrier stack.

  9. Clusterin: an IR-inducible protein determining life and death

    SciTech Connect

    DAVID A. BOOTHMAN, Ph.D.

    2006-07-11

    The roles of ionizing radiation (IR)-inducible genes/proteins are now being elucidated and the research team will focus on the functions of the clusterin (CLU) proteins after low dose IR exposures. With funding from the DOE, we discovered that x-ray-inducible transcript/protein #8 (xip8) bound to the Ku70 DNA double strand break repair protein using various molecular biology techniques. We showed that translation of the CLU/xip8 transcript was complicated, leading to two classes of proteins separated by their intracellular processing. One set of CLU proteins (a secreted and precursor protein, sCLU and psCLU, respectively) were induced by very low doses of IR (>2.0 cGy) and subsequently secreted from the cell. The functions of sCLU, particularly in bystander effects, are not known; sCLU does not bind Ku70, but can interact with the TGF-ß II receptor. Another intracellular class of CLU proteins was targeted to the cytoplasm and existed in a dormant precursor nuclear form (pnCLU). After higher IR doses (>1.0 Gy), pnCLU was activated via post-translational modification, and translocated to the nucleus, where nuclear CLU (nCLU) interacted with Ku70/Ku80, and signaled cell death. The mechanism(s) of how cells die following nCLU accumulation are unknown. Recent data from our lab indicate that CLU gene transcription is also complicated. Thus far, the data suggest that: (a) p53 is a negative regulator of CLU transcription, however, the mechanisms by which it exerts this negative pressure are not known; and (b) IR induces transcription of the CLU promoter, independent of p53, at regulatory elements that lie between -1403 and -325 bps 5'-from the TATAA box. In this renewal, the research team will investigate three separate, but interrelated hypotheses: (1) p53 negatively regulates the CLU promoter via distinct head to tail p53 half sites, and induction is mediated by the combination of retinoblatoma control elements (RCEs) and NF-∫B sites; (2) sCLU is cytoprotective and

  10. Observations of Typhoon Eye Using SAR and IR Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Anthony K.; He, Shuangyan; Pan, Yufang; Yang, Jingsong

    2014-11-01

    In this review, recent studies on the observations of typhoon eyes by images acquired by multiple sensors, including synthetic aperture radar (SAR), and infrared (IR) radiometer, are first summarized. Large horizontal distances between typhoon eyes on the ocean surface by SAR and those on the cloud top by IR sensors have been demonstrated; these have previously been ignored but should not be ignored in typhoon forecasts and numerical simulations. Then, based on nine published typhoon cases, the horizontal shifts and vertical tilt angles from the cloud-top typhoon eye locations by IR sensors on board the Feng-Yun 2 (FY-2) and Multi Functional Transport Satellite (MTSAT) to those at sea surface by SAR are further estimated. This shift difference between different sensors raises an issue on project distortion and navigation system errors for FY-2 and MTSAT satellites, which are of concern to both space agencies and data users. Finally, issues for current ongoing study and future research related to typhoon eyes are discussed, including rainband tracking between sensors for local wind speeds.

  11. ALLFlight: detection of moving objects in IR and ladar images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doehler, H.-U.; Peinecke, Niklas; Lueken, Thomas; Schmerwitz, Sven

    2013-05-01

    Supporting a helicopter pilot during landing and takeoff in degraded visual environment (DVE) is one of the challenges within DLR's project ALLFlight (Assisted Low Level Flight and Landing on Unprepared Landing Sites). Different types of sensors (TV, Infrared, mmW radar and laser radar) are mounted onto DLR's research helicopter FHS (flying helicopter simulator) for gathering different sensor data of the surrounding world. A high performance computer cluster architecture acquires and fuses all the information to get one single comprehensive description of the outside situation. While both TV and IR cameras deliver images with frame rates of 25 Hz or 30 Hz, Ladar and mmW radar provide georeferenced sensor data with only 2 Hz or even less. Therefore, it takes several seconds to detect or even track potential moving obstacle candidates in mmW or Ladar sequences. Especially if the helicopter is flying with higher speed, it is very important to minimize the detection time of obstacles in order to initiate a re-planning of the helicopter's mission timely. Applying feature extraction algorithms on IR images in combination with data fusion algorithms of extracted features and Ladar data can decrease the detection time appreciably. Based on real data from flight tests, the paper describes applied feature extraction methods for moving object detection, as well as data fusion techniques for combining features from TV/IR and Ladar data.

  12. Iridium Interfacial Stack - IrIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spry, David

    2012-01-01

    Iridium Interfacial Stack (IrIS) is the sputter deposition of high-purity tantalum silicide (TaSi2-400 nm)/platinum (Pt-200 nm)/iridium (Ir-200 nm)/platinum (Pt-200 nm) in an ultra-high vacuum system followed by a 600 C anneal in nitrogen for 30 minutes. IrIS simultaneously acts as both a bond metal and a diffusion barrier. This bondable metallization that also acts as a diffusion barrier can prevent oxygen from air and gold from the wire-bond from infiltrating silicon carbide (SiC) monolithically integrated circuits (ICs) operating above 500 C in air for over 1,000 hours. This TaSi2/Pt/Ir/Pt metallization is easily bonded for electrical connection to off-chip circuitry and does not require extra anneals or masking steps. There are two ways that IrIS can be used in SiC ICs for applications above 500 C: it can be put directly on a SiC ohmic contact metal, such as Ti, or be used as a bond metal residing on top of an interconnect metal. For simplicity, only the use as a bond metal is discussed. The layer thickness ratio of TaSi2 to the first Pt layer deposited thereon should be 2:1. This will allow Si from the TaSi2 to react with the Pt to form Pt2Si during the 600 C anneal carried out after all layers have been deposited. The Ir layer does not readily form a silicide at 600 C, and thereby prevents the Si from migrating into the top-most Pt layer during future anneals and high-temperature IC operation. The second (i.e., top-most) deposited Pt layer needs to be about 200 nm to enable easy wire bonding. The thickness of 200 nm for Ir was chosen for initial experiments; further optimization of the Ir layer thickness may be possible via further experimentation. Ir itself is not easily wire-bonded because of its hardness and much higher melting point than Pt. Below the iridium layer, the TaSi2 and Pt react and form desired Pt2Si during the post-deposition anneal while above the iridium layer remains pure Pt as desired to facilitate easy and strong wire-bonding to the Si

  13. Narcissus analysis for cooled staring IR system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Feng-Yun; Cui, Ji-Cheng; Feng, Shu-Long; Zhang, Xin

    2007-12-01

    Narcissus can have a deleterious effect on image quality for cooled infrared imaging systems. Therefore, analysis of narcissus is important for designing both scanning and staring optics. Narcissus is generally assumed to be negligible in staring IR optical designs because the shading effects can be removed by calibration of the detector array data. However, the calibration usually decreases sensitiveness of the system and Narcissus variation may be noticeable for sensors when the conditions changes as follows: 1. warming and cooling the optical housing, 2. zooming optical elements, 3. movement of lenses for focus. In that case, it will result in shading and other image defects even after calibration. To minimize these effects, narcissus should be assessed and controlled during the design of staring array IR system. We provided a direct and fast method for analyzing the narcissus variation in the presence of software such as LightTools, TracePro and ASAP, and proposed the principles in optical design of staring IR systems to reduce narcissus. A cooled staring IR system with serious narcissus was estimated and reoptimized. Narcissus analysis of this IR system confirmed the efficiency of the analysis method.

  14. 2D IR Spectroscopy using Four-Wave Mixing, Pulse Shaping, and IR Upconversion: A Quantitative Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Rock, William; Li, Yun-Liang; Pagano, Philip; Cheatum, Christopher M.

    2013-01-01

    Recent technological advances have led to major changes in the apparatuses used to collect 2D IR spectra. Pulse shaping offers several advantages including rapid data collection, inherent phase stability, and phase cycling capabilities. Visible array detection via upconversion allows the use of visible detectors that are cheaper, faster, more sensitive, and less noisy than IR detectors. However, despite these advantages, many researchers are reluctant to implement these technologies. Here we present a quantitative study of the S/N of 2D IR spectra collected with a traditional four-wave mixing (FWM) apparatus, with a pulse shaping apparatus, and with visible detection via upconversion to address the question of whether or not weak chromophores at low concentrations are still accessible with such an apparatus. We find that the enhanced averaging capability of the pulse shaping apparatus enables the detection of small signals that would be challenging to measure even with the traditional FWM apparatus, and we demonstrate this ability on a sample of cyanylated dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). PMID:23687988

  15. The mid-IR and near-IR interferometry of AGNs: key results and their implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishimoto, M.

    2015-09-01

    Infrared interferometry has been very productive in directly probing the structure of AGNs at sub-pc scales. With tens of objects already probed in the mid-IR and near-IR, I will summarize the key results and im- plications from this direct exploration. The Keck interferometry in the near-IR and VLTI in the mid-IR shaped the luminosity dependence of the torus size and structure, while the latter also revealed an equatorial structure at several Rsub (dust sublimation radius), and a polar-elongated region at a few tens of Rsub. Notably, this polar component seems to dominate the compact mid-IR flux. This component can persuasively be attributed to a polar outflow. However, interferometry, through emissivity estimations, also indicates that it is not a UV-optically-thin cloud but participating in the obscuration of the nucleus. I will discuss how to accommodate all these facts to build a consistent picture.

  16. Superconducting squid amplifiers for IR detectors and other applications: Phase 2. Final report. [IR (Infrared)

    SciTech Connect

    Osterman, D.

    1993-05-01

    The subject of this report is a completed Phase II SBIR project to develop a superconducting analog multiplexer circuit. The intended application of the multiplexer is as a component of processing circuitry for a superconducting infrared focal plane array (IR FPA). Development of the IR FPA is in progress under a separate contract. Among the accomplishments that are described below is the fabrication and testing of a functioning, superconducting, 20-input multiplexer, appropriate for use with an IR FPA. The motivation for developing a superconducting multiplexer circuit derives primarily from the significant potential advantages of an all-superconducting IR FPA system, i.e. a system in which the detectors, as well as the associated processing circuitry, are superconducting. Section III of this report reviews the subject of superconducting IR FPAs. Chief among the advantages of such systems is the potential for larger arrays with greater numbers of detectors than is now possible.

  17. Ir-induced activation of Au towards CO adsorption: Ir films deposited on Au{111}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tianfu; Driver, Stephen M.; Pratt, Stephanie J.; Jenkins, Stephen J.; King, David A.

    2016-06-01

    We have investigated the interaction of CO with Ir/Au{111} bimetallic surfaces, and the influence of morphology changes as Ir moves sub-surface into the Au bulk, using reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS). The presence of Ir stabilises CO on exposed regions of the Au surface at temperatures up to around 200 K: we attribute this to low-coordinated Au sites, probably associated with lifting of the clean-surface 'herringbone' reconstruction by Ir deposition. The highest density of active Au sites is obtained after annealing the bimetallic surface to 500-600 K: we attribute this to morphology changes associated with the movement of Ir into bulk Au.

  18. IR signature management for the modern navy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaitekunas, David A.; Kim, Yoonsik

    2013-06-01

    A methodology for analysing the infrared (IR) signature and susceptibility of naval platforms using ShipIR/NTCS was presented by Vaitekunas (2010). This paper provides three key improvements: use of a larger climatic data set (N=100), a new target sub-image algorithm eliminating false detections from pixel-aliasing at the horizon, and a new seeker model interfacing with a line-by-line background clutter model. Existing commercial stealth technologies (exhaust stack suppression, low solar absorptive paints, extended hull film-cooling) are re-analysed using the new models and methods to produce a more rigorous and comprehensive analysis of their effectiveness based on the statistics of reduction in IR susceptibility. These methods and results combined with the cost of each stealth option should allow platform managers to select an appropriate level of infrared suppression and establish the design criteria for a new ship.

  19. Fiber Delivery of mid-IR lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Kriesel, J.M.; Gat, N.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Myers, Tanya L.; Bledt, Carlos M.; Harrington, James P.

    2011-08-24

    Fiber optics for the visible to near infrared (NIR) wavelength regimes (i.e. = 0.42 {mu}m) have proven to be extremely useful for a myriad of applications such as telecommunications, illumination, and sensors because they enable convenient, compact, and remote delivery of laser beams. Similarly, there is a need for fiber optics operating at longer wavelengths. For example, systems operating in the mid-IR regime (i.e., = 314 {mu}m) are being developed to detect trace molecular species with far-reaching applications, such as detecting explosives on surfaces, pollutants in the environment, and biomarkers in the breath of a patient. Furthermore, with the increasing availability of quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) which are semiconductor lasers that operate in the mid-IR regime additional uses are rapidly being developed. Here, we describe the development of hollow-core fibers for delivery of high-quality mid-IR laser beams across a broad spectral range.

  20. Coherent mid-IR laser radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, Frank E.; Poirier, Peter M.; Schimitschek, Erhard J.; Arbore, Mark A.

    2001-09-01

    We report the first demonstration of mid-IR coherent laser radar operation near 3.6 micrometers . In many low altitude environments, the wavelength region from 3.5 - 4 micrometers has advantages for laser beam propagation because the detrimental effects of scattering and turbulence are less severe than at shorter wavelengths. In addition, under conditions of high humidity, water vapor absorption in the mid-IR is also significantly lower compared to the long-IR region at 9-11 micrometers . The source in this work is a 100 mW, frequency stable cw-optical parametric oscillator (OPO) based on periodically poled lithium niobate. The frequency stability of the source is discussed and laboratory heterodyne experiments measuring small Doppler shifts from vibrating targets are described.

  1. Comparison of Ranson, Glasgow, MOSS, SIRS, BISAP, APACHE-II, CTSI Scores, IL-6, CRP, and Procalcitonin in Predicting Severity, Organ Failure, Pancreatic Necrosis, and Mortality in Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, Ajay K.; Meher, Susanta; Prakash, Shashi; Tiwary, Satyendra Kumar; Singh, Usha; Srivastava, Arvind; Dixit, V. K.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Multifactorial scorings, radiological scores, and biochemical markers may help in early prediction of severity, pancreatic necrosis, and mortality in patients with acute pancreatitis (AP). Methods. BISAP, APACHE-II, MOSS, and SIRS scores were calculated using data within 24 hrs of admission, whereas Ranson and Glasgow scores after 48 hrs of admission; CTSI was calculated on day 4 whereas IL-6 and CRP values at end of study. Predictive accuracy of scoring systems, sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of various markers in prediction of severe acute pancreatitis, organ failure, pancreatic necrosis, admission to intensive care units and mortality were calculated. Results. Of 72 patients, 31 patients had organ failure and local complication classified as severe acute pancreatitis, 17 had pancreatic necrosis, and 9 died (12.5%). Area under curves for Ranson, Glasgow, MOSS, SIRS, APACHE-II, BISAP, CTSI, IL-6, and CRP in predicting SAP were 0.85, 0.75, 0.73, 0.73, 0.88, 0.80, 0.90, and 0.91, respectively, for pancreatic necrosis 0.70, 0.64, 0.61, 0.61, 0.68, 0.61, 0.75, 0.86, and 0.90, respectively, and for mortality 0.84, 0.83, 0.77, 0.76, 0.86, 0.83, 0.57, 0.80, and 0.75, respectively. Conclusion. CRP and IL-6 have shown a promising result in early detection of severity and pancreatic necrosis whereas APACHE-II and Ranson score in predicting AP related mortality in this study. PMID:24204087

  2. Advanced ROICs design for cooled IR detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zécri, Michel; Maillart, Patrick; Sanson, Eric; Decaens, Gilbert; Lefoul, Xavier; Baud, Laurent

    2008-04-01

    The CMOS silicon focal plan array technologies hybridized with infrared detectors materials allow to cover a wide range of applications in the field of space, airborne and grounded-based imaging. Regarding other industries which are also using embedded systems, the requirements of such sensor assembly can be seen as very similar; high reliability, low weight, low power, radiation hardness for space applications and cost reduction. Comparing to CCDs technology, excepted the fact that CMOS fabrication uses standard commercial semiconductor foundry, the interest of this technology used in cooled IR sensors is its capability to operate in a wide range of temperature from 300K to cryogenic with a high density of integration and keeping at the same time good performances in term of frequency, noise and power consumption. The CMOS technology roadmap predict aggressive scaling down of device size, transistor threshold voltage, oxide and metal thicknesses to meet the growing demands for higher levels of integration and performance. At the same time infrared detectors manufacturing process is developing IR materials with a tunable cut-off wavelength capable to cover bandwidths from visible to 20μm. The requirements of third generation IR detectors are driving to scaling down the pixel pitch, to develop IR materials with high uniformity on larger formats, to develop Avalanche Photo Diodes (APD) and dual band technologies. These needs in IR detectors technologies developments associated to CMOS technology, used as a readout element, are offering new capabilities and new opportunities for cooled infrared FPAs. The exponential increase of new functionalities on chip, like the active 2D and 3D imaging, the on chip analog to digital conversion, the signal processing on chip, the bicolor, the dual band and DTI (Double Time Integration) mode ...is aiming to enlarge the field of application for cooled IR FPAs challenging by the way the design activity.

  3. Early fire sensing using near-IR diode laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bomse, David S.; Hovde, D. Christian; Chen, Shin-Juh; Silver, Joel A.

    2002-09-01

    We describe research leading to a trace gas detection system based on optical absorption using near-IR diode lasers that is intended to provide early warning of incipient fires. Applications include "high loss" structures such as office buildings, hospitals, hotels and shopping malls as well as airplanes and manned spacecraft where convention smoke detectors generate unacceptably high false alarm rates. Simultaneous or near-simultaneous detection of several gases (typically carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, acetylene and hydrogen cyanide) provides high sensitivity while reducing the chance of false alarms. Continuous measurement of carbon dioxide concentrations also provides an internal check of instrument performance because ambient levels will not drop below ~350 ppm.

  4. Interpretation of IR Spectra of Indolinospirobenzothiopyran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladkov, L. L.; Khamchukov, Yu. D.; Sychev, I. Yu.; Lyubimov, A. V.; Gladkova, G. A.

    2015-09-01

    The structures of four stereomers (enantiomers) of photochromic indolinospirobenzothiopyran (ISTP) in the closed form were studied by the DFT method. The most stable structure was found. IR spectra of ISTP in KBr pellets and as a film on single-crystalline KBr plates (in the region 400-4000 cm -1 ) and as a powder between polyethylene plates (100-400 cm -1 ) were measured. An interpretation of the obtained IR spectra was proposed. Specific features of normal modes of ISTP caused by the presence of the spiro center were revealed.

  5. Independent contractor arrangements and IRS audits.

    PubMed

    Pelfrey, S; Theisen, B A

    1995-01-01

    As government auditors begin their challenges, nurse executives need to review their operations to remove any potential audit risks. Although a common practice for many institutions, the use of independent contractor arrangements may be ruled inappropriate. As a result, many individuals may be reclassified as employees, leading to Internal Revenue Service (IRS) assessments of penalties and back payroll taxes. It always is prudent to anticipate IRS actions and shore up any areas that may lead to tax assessments before they are imposed on the institution. PMID:7636578

  6. Compressive sensing in the EO/IR.

    PubMed

    Gehm, M E; Brady, D J

    2015-03-10

    We investigate the utility of compressive sensing (CS) to electro-optic and infrared (EO/IR) applications. We introduce the field through a discussion of historical antecedents and the development of the modern CS framework. Basic economic arguments (in the broadest sense) are presented regarding the applicability of CS to the EO/IR and used to draw conclusions regarding application areas where CS would be most viable. A number of experimental success stories are presented to demonstrate the overall feasibility of the approaches, and we conclude with a discussion of open challenges to practical adoption of CS methods. PMID:25968399

  7. IR LASER BASED CHEMICAL SENSOR FOR THE COOPERATIVE MONITORING PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Edward A Whitaker

    2005-08-08

    The purpose of this project was to investigate the device properties of the quantum cascade laser (QCL), a type of laser invented at Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies in the device physics research lab of Dr. Federico Capasso and more specifically to determine the remote sensing capability of this device. The PI and Stevens Institute of Technology collaborated with Dr. Capasso and Bell Laboratories to carry out this research project. The QCL is a unique laser source capable of generating laser radiation in the middle-infrared spectral region that overlaps the most important molecular absorption bands. With appropriate modulation techniques it is possible to use the laser to measure the concentration of many molecules of interest to the remote sensing community. In addition, the mid-IR emission wavelength is well suited to atmospheric transmission as mid-IR experiences much less scattering due to dust and fog. At the onset of this project little was known about several key device performance parameters of this family of lasers and the NNSA supported research enabled them to determine values of several of these characteristics.

  8. Target location for IR image based on IR/visual image registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhao-ying; Zhou, Fu-gen; Bai, Xiang-zhi

    2009-07-01

    We propose an effective algorithm of IR target location based on image registration. This approach includes four steps--pre-processing, typical region and feature points extraction, point pattern matching, target location. Firstly, by analying the characters of the visual and IR images, a pre-processing procedure is introduced to improve the IR image quality and to make the gray distribution in IR and visual images more consistent. Secondly, mathematical morphology is used to extract typical regions around the target, and we mark the feature points based on the extracted typical regions. Thirdly, point pattern matching algorithm is applied to realize the preliminary registration of IR/visual images, triangle geometry similarity is utilized as the similarity measure to establish two points set correspondance. Finally, we take twostage location strategy to accurately locate the IR targets, least square method and mutual information theory are applied in the location strategy. Experiment results demonstrate a high rate (above 93%) of success for predicting target location, the results showed that this method can effectively meet the requirement of target detection in low resolution and low contrast IR images.

  9. Model for simulation of IR countermeasure effect on IR-seeker/missile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berggren, Jan; Kihlen, Ralf G.

    2004-12-01

    TACSI (TACtical SImulation) is an existing simulator used as a tactical environment for manned simulators at Saab Aerosystems. TACSI can also be used as a stand-alone desktop development and simulation tool. TACSI simulates a large number of entities and functions such as platforms, sensors, weapons, signatures, communication, multisensor fusion, decision support etc. TACSI has a rule based pilot model and uses High Level Architecture (HLA) for interfacing with other simulation models. This model, a development of TACSI, simulates the flight dynamics, IR-signature and IR-seeker operation. The dynamic behaviour of the aircraft, the IRCM, the missile and the IR-seeker are modelled. The IR-contrast seen by the seeker through the atmosphere in front of the aircraft and the IRCM are spectrally and dynamically modelled. The seeker operation behaviour and function are also modelled. To implement this in a real-time simulation system simplifications are necessary. This paper describes the simplifications to model the IR-contrast and the seeker function. This model is used to analyse the effect of IR countermeasures (IRCM) on a missile IR-seeker.

  10. 75 FR 56657 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Cognitive and Psychological Research Coordinated by...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-16

    ... Internal Revenue Service Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Cognitive and Psychological Research...)). Currently, the IRS is soliciting comments concerning Cognitive and Psychological Research Coordinated by....Durbala@irs.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Cognitive and Psychological Research Coordinated...

  11. IR laser-induced protein crystal transformation

    PubMed Central

    Kiefersauer, Reiner; Grandl, Brigitte; Krapp, Stephan; Huber, Robert

    2014-01-01

    A method and the design of instrumentation, and its preliminary practical realisation, including test experiments, with the object of inducing phase changes of biomolecular crystals by controlled dehydration through heating with infrared (IR) light are described. The aim is to generate and select crystalline phases through transformation in the solid state which have improved order (higher resolution in X-ray diffraction experiments) and reduced mosaic spread (more uniformly aligned mosaic blocks) for diffraction data collection and analysis. The crystal is heated by pulsed and/or constant IR laser irradiation. Loss of crystal water following heating and its reabsorption through equilibration with the environment is measured optically by a video system. Heating proved superior to traditional controlled dehydration by humidity change for the test cases CODH (carbon monoxide dehydrogenase) and CLK2 (a protein kinase). Heating with IR light is experimentally simple and offers an exploration of a much broader parameter space than the traditional method, as it allows the option of varying the rate of phase changes through modification of the IR pulse strength, width and repeat frequency. It impacts the crystal instantaneously, isotropically and homogeneously, and is therefore expected to cause less mechanical stress. PMID:24816092

  12. Airborne pipeline leak detection: UV or IR?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babin, François; Gravel, Jean-François; Allard, Martin

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a study of different approaches to the measurement of the above ground vapor plume created by the spill caused by a small 0.1 l/min (or less) leak in an underground liquid petroleum pipeline. The scenarios are those for the measurement from an airborne platform. The usual approach is that of IR absorption, but in the case of liquid petroleum products, there are drawbacks that will be discussed, especially when using alkanes to detect a leak. The optical measurements studied include UV enhanced Raman lidar, UV fluorescence lidar and IR absorption path integrated lidars. The breadboards used for testing the different approaches will be described along with the set-ups for leak simulation. Although IR absorption would intuitively be the most sensitive, it is shown that UV-Raman could be an alternative. When using the very broad alkane signature in the IR, the varying ground spectral reflectance are a problem. It is also determined that integrated path measurements are preferred, the UV enhanced Raman measurements showing that the vapor plume stays very close to the ground.

  13. IR laser-induced protein crystal transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Kiefersauer, Reiner Grandl, Brigitte; Krapp, Stephan; Huber, Robert

    2014-05-01

    A novel method and the associated instrumentation for improving crystalline order (higher resolution of X-ray diffraction and reduced mosaicity) of protein crystals by precisely controlled heating is demonstrated. Crystal transformation is optically controlled by a video system. A method and the design of instrumentation, and its preliminary practical realisation, including test experiments, with the object of inducing phase changes of biomolecular crystals by controlled dehydration through heating with infrared (IR) light are described. The aim is to generate and select crystalline phases through transformation in the solid state which have improved order (higher resolution in X-ray diffraction experiments) and reduced mosaic spread (more uniformly aligned mosaic blocks) for diffraction data collection and analysis. The crystal is heated by pulsed and/or constant IR laser irradiation. Loss of crystal water following heating and its reabsorption through equilibration with the environment is measured optically by a video system. Heating proved superior to traditional controlled dehydration by humidity change for the test cases CODH (carbon monoxide dehydrogenase) and CLK2 (a protein kinase). Heating with IR light is experimentally simple and offers an exploration of a much broader parameter space than the traditional method, as it allows the option of varying the rate of phase changes through modification of the IR pulse strength, width and repeat frequency. It impacts the crystal instantaneously, isotropically and homogeneously, and is therefore expected to cause less mechanical stress.

  14. The Concept of Relevance in IR.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borlund, Pia

    2003-01-01

    Introduces the concept of relevance as viewed and applied in the context of IR (information retrieval) evaluation by presenting an overview of the multidimensionality and dynamic nature of the concept. Topics include classes and types of relevance; relevance criteria; degrees of relevance; levels of relevance; situational relevance; and…

  15. IR fiber optic sensing on biological tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bindig, Uwe; Gersonde, I.; Meinke, M.; Becker, Y.; Mueller, Gerhard

    2003-10-01

    A diagnostic method is described to detect differences between diseased and normal tissue from bladder carcinoma by FTIR-microspectroscopy and fiber-optics methods. Regions of interest on 10 μm thin tissue sections were mapped using an IR-microscope in transmission mode. Afterwards the specimens were analyzed using standard pathological techniques. Quadratic discriminant as well as correlation analysis was applied for data analysis. IR optical fibers, not only allowed measurements to be made in the attenuated total reflectance (ATR)-mode but also absorption measurements to be carried out at a remote location. The IR-sensor is in contact with the sample which shows characteristic absorption lines. This method can be used to determine the absorption of a sample in a non-destructive manner. In this paper we report our efforts to develop a fiber-optic infrared sensor to differentiate between malignant and healthy tissue in vivo. Silver halide fibers and a special sensor tip were used for the ATR measurements on human tissue specimens. The results indicate that IR-spectrometry will be a useful tool for bio-diagnostics.

  16. Limitations To Optical/IR Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colavita, M. M.

    1993-01-01

    The primary limitation to ground-based optical/IR interferometry is the turbulent atmosphere, which limits sensitivity by restricting the coherence volume, limits imaging accuracy by corrupting the fringe phase, and limits astrometric acuracy by corrupting the angel of arrival.

  17. LONG ISLAND SOUND STUDY 2002 CCMP IR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Long Island Sound Study Implementation Review (IR) summarizes the progress and challenges ahead for the for the Long Island Sound Study (LISS) through examination of it activities in relation to the CCMP. The LISS CCMP identified six major areas requiring management action: 1...

  18. IR sensors and imagers in networked operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breiter, Rainer; Cabanski, Wolfgang

    2005-05-01

    "Network-centric Warfare" is a common slogan describing an overall concept of networked operation of sensors, information and weapons to gain command and control superiority. Referring to IR sensors, integration and fusion of different channels like day/night or SAR images or the ability to spread image data among various users are typical requirements. Looking for concrete implementations the German Army future infantryman IdZ is an example where a group of ten soldiers build a unit with every soldier equipped with a personal digital assistant (PDA) for information display, day photo camera and a high performance thermal imager for every unit. The challenge to allow networked operation among such a unit is bringing information together and distribution over a capable network. So also AIM's thermal reconnaissance and targeting sight HuntIR which was selected for the IdZ program provides this capabilities by an optional wireless interface. Besides the global approach of Network-centric Warfare network technology can also be an interesting solution for digital image data distribution and signal processing behind the FPA replacing analog video networks or specific point to point interfaces. The resulting architecture can provide capabilities of data fusion from e.g. IR dual-band or IR multicolor sensors. AIM has participated in a German/UK collaboration program to produce a demonstrator for day/IR video distribution via Gigabit Ethernet for vehicle applications. In this study Ethernet technology was chosen for network implementation and a set of electronics was developed for capturing video data of IR and day imagers and Gigabit Ethernet video distribution. The demonstrator setup follows the requirements of current and future vehicles having a set of day and night imager cameras and a crew station with several members. Replacing the analog video path by a digital video network also makes it easy to implement embedded training by simply feeding the network with

  19. Growth and termination of a rutile IrO2(100) layer on Ir(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Rahul; Li, Tao; Liang, Zhu; Kim, Minkyu; Asthagiri, Aravind; Weaver, Jason F.

    2016-10-01

    We investigated the oxidation of Ir(111) by gas-phase oxygen atoms at temperatures between 500 and 625 K using temperature programmed desorption (TPD), low energy electron diffraction (LEED), low energy ion scattering spectroscopy (LEISS) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. We find that a well-ordered surface oxide with (√ 3 × √ 3)R30° periodicity relative to Ir(111) develops prior to the formation of a rutile IrO2(100) layer. The IrO2(100) layer reaches a saturation thickness of about four oxide layers under the oxidation conditions employed, and decomposes during TPD to produce a single, sharp O2 desorption peak at ~ 770 K. Favorable lattice matching at the oxide-metal interface is likely responsible for the preferential growth of the IrO2(100) facet during the initial oxidation of Ir(111), with the resulting coincidence lattice generating a clear (6 × 1) moiré pattern in LEED. Temperature programmed reaction spectroscopy (TPRS) experiments reveal that CO and H2O molecules bind only weakly on the IrO2(100) surface and LEISS measurements show that the oxide surface is highly enriched in O-atoms. These characteristics provide strong evidence that the rutile IrO2(100) layer is oxygen-terminated, and thus lacks reactive Ir atoms that can strongly bind molecular adsorbates. Oxygen binding energies predicted by DFT suggest that on-top O-atoms will remain adsorbed on IrO2(100) at temperatures up to ~ 625 K, thus supporting the conclusion that the rutile IrO2 layer grown in our experiments is oxygen-terminated. As such, the appearance of only a single O2 TPD peak indicates that the singly coordinate, on-top O-atoms remain stable on the IrO2(100) surface up to temperatures at which the oxide layer begins to thermally decompose.

  20. The Foundations and Evolution of Institutional Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volkwein, J. Fredericks

    2008-01-01

    What is institutional research (IR)? One of the most widely definition of the institutional research is by Joe Saupe, who emphasized institutional research as a set of activities that support institutional planning, policy formation, and decision making. Institutional researchers and IR functions are embedded in the offices of strategic planning,…

  1. Epitaxial Growth of Ca2IrO4 Single-Crystal Thin-Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souri, Maryam; Gruenewald, John H.; Terzic, Jasminka; Cao, Gang; Brill, Joseph W.; Seo, Sung S. Ambrose

    2015-03-01

    Complex oxides containing 5 d transition metals including iridates have attracted substantial attention due to their potential to create novel electronic and magnetic states that originate from strong spin-orbit coupling and the electron-correlation of 5 d electrons. However, the progress of experimental research on the 5 d transition-metal oxides is hindered by the limited number of available materials. To further understand the layered iridates (A2IrO4, A: alkaline-earth elements) featuring the Jeff = 1/2 Mott state, we have synthesized epitaxial thin-films of Ca2IrO4. The single crystal Ruddlesden-Popper (R-P) phase of Can+1IrnO3n+1 (n =1) is thermodynamically unstable; hence, we have used epitaxial-stabilization strategies to grow metastable thin-films of Ca2IrO4. The R-P phase of Ca2IrO4 is synthesized on yttrium aluminum oxide and lanthanum aluminum oxide substrates by pulsed laser deposition. We have studied the electronic structure of these films by transport and optical spectroscopic measurements. The dc-resistivity shows that these Ca2IrO4 thin-films are insulating with activation energy of about 100 meV. The optical spectroscopy shows that the optical gap energy is about 0.5 eV. We will discuss the electronic structure of Ca2IrO4 by comparing with Sr2IrO4andBa2IrO4.

  2. Magnetic ordering in Gd5Ir2Bi and Gd5Ir2Sb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, D. H.; Mas, Nadejda; Rejali, Rasa; Miller, T.; Gerke, Birgit; Heying, Birgit; Pöttgen, Rainer; Flacau, Roxana

    2016-05-01

    155Gd Mössbauer spectroscopy and neutron powder diffraction have been used to study magnetic ordering in Gd5Ir2Bi and Gd5Ir2Sb. Despite the hyperfine fields (Bhf) at the two Gd sites differing by more than a factor of two for both compounds, the moments derived from neutron diffraction are essentially equal in Gd5Ir2Bi. This implies an unusual departure from the commonly assumed scaling between B hf G d and μGd. Neutron powder diffraction shows that Gd5Ir2Bi is a c-axis ferromagnet at 3.6 K. We find no evidence for a FM → AF transition.

  3. Tax-deferred annuity plans: meeting the IRS audit challenge.

    PubMed

    Schussler, M

    1997-01-01

    A growing number of nonprofit organizations are being fined for violations of IRS regulations following IRS audits of their tax-deferred annuity (TDA) plans. To ensure that their organizations can withstand the scrutiny of an IRS audit, TDA plan administrators must ensure that plans meet IRS regulations and be prepared for IRS audits. Documentation--particularly of the TDA plan itself, and procedures related to salary reduction programs, compensation limits, excess deferrals and other excess contributions, loans, and distributions--must be comprehensive and in compliance with IRS regulations. PMID:10163893

  4. Discrimination of Chinese Sauce liquor using FT-IR and two-dimensional correlation IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Su-Qin; Li, Chang-Wen; Wei, Ji-Ping; Zhou, Qun; Noda, Isao

    2006-11-01

    We applied the three-step IR macro-fingerprint identification method to obtain the IR characteristic fingerprints of so-called Chinese Sauce liquor (Moutai liquor and Kinsly liquor) and a counterfeit Moutai. These fingerprints can be used for the identification and discrimination of similar liquor products. The comparison of their conventional IR spectra, as the first step of identification, shows that the primary difference in Sauce liquor is the intensity of characteristic peaks at 1592 and 1225 cm -1. The comparison of the second derivative IR spectra, as the second step of identification, shows that the characteristic absorption in 1400-1800 cm -1 is substantially different. The comparison of 2D-IR correlation spectra, as the third and final step of identification, can discriminate the liquors from another direction. Furthermore, the method was successfully applied to the discrimination of a counterfeit Moutai from the genuine Sauce liquor. The success of the three-step IR macro-fingerprint identification to provide a rapid and effective method for the identification of Chinese liquor suggests the potential extension of this technique to the identification and discrimination of other wine and spirits, as well.

  5. Development of IR Contrast Data Analysis Application for Characterizing Delaminations in Graphite-Epoxy Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Havican, Marie

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Develop infrared (IR) flash thermography application based on use of a calibration standard for inspecting graphite-epoxy laminated/honeycomb structures. Background: Graphite/Epoxy composites (laminated and honeycomb) are widely used on NASA programs. Composite materials are susceptible for impact damage that is not readily detected by visual inspection. IR inspection can provide required sensitivity to detect surface damage in composites during manufacturing and during service. IR contrast analysis can provide characterization of depth, size and gap thickness of impact damage. Benefits/Payoffs: The research provides an empirical method of calibrating the flash thermography response in nondestructive evaluation. A physical calibration standard with artificial flaws such as flat bottom holes with desired diameter and depth values in a desired material is used in calibration. The research devises several probability of detection (POD) analysis approaches to enable cost effective POD study to meet program requirements.

  6. Highly stable bimetallic AuIr/TiO2 catalyst: physical origin of the intrinsic stability against sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinero, Ernesto; Han, Chan Wan; Majundar, Paulami; Aguilar-Tapia, Antonio; Zanella, Rodolfo; Greeley, Jeffrey; Otarlan, Volkan

    It has been a long-lived research topic in the field of heterogeneous catalysis to find a way to stabilizing supported Au catalysts against sintering. Herein, we report highly stable AuIr bimetallic nanoparticles on TiO2 synthesized by sequential deposition-precipitation. To understand the physical origin of the high stability AuIr/TiO2 system, we have used scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), STEM-tomography and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. 3D structures of AuIr/TiO2 obtained by STEM-tomography indicate that AuIr nanoparticles on TiO2 have intrinsically lower free energy and less driving force for sintering than Au nanoparticles. DFT calculations on segregation behavior of AuIr slabs on TiO2 showed that the presence of Ir near the TiO2 surface increases the adhesion energy of the bimetallic slabs to the TiO2 and the attractive interactions between Ir and TiO2 lead to higher stability of the AuIr nanoparticles compared to Au nanoparticles.

  7. Looking at Art in the IR and UV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falco, Charles

    2013-03-01

    Starting with the very earliest cave paintings art has been created to be viewed by the unaided eye and, until very recently, it wasn't even possible to see it at wavelengths outside the visible spectrum. However, it is now possible to view paintings, sculptures, manuscripts, and other cultural artifacts at wavelengths from the x-ray, through the ultraviolet (UV), to well into the infrared (IR). Further, thanks to recent advances in technology, this is becoming possible with hand-held instruments that can be used in locations that were previously inaccessible to anything but laboratory-scale image capture equipment. But, what can be learned from such ``non-visible'' images? In this talk I will briefly describe the characteristics of high resolution UV and IR imaging systems I developed for this purpose by modifying high resolution digital cameras. The sensitivity of the IR camera makes it possible to obtain images of art ``in situ'' with standard museum lighting, resolving features finer than 0.35 mm on a 1.0x0.67 m painting. I also have used both it and the UV camera in remote locations with battery-powered illumination sources. I will illustrate their capabilities with images of various examples of Western, Asian, and Islamic art in museums on three continents, describing how these images have revealed important new information about the working practices of artists as famous as Jan van Eyck. I also will describe what will be possible for this type of work with new capabilities that could be developed within the next few years. This work is based on a collaboration with David Hockney, and benefitted from image analys research supported by ARO grant W911NF-06-1-0359-P00001.

  8. Infrared Measurements of Possible IR Filter Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Koller,D.; Ediss, G.; Mihaly, L.; Carr, G.

    2006-01-01

    A Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (FTS) was used to obtain the transmission spectra of candidate materials for use as infrared (IR) filters in cryogenic receivers. The data cover the range from 50 cm-1 ({approx}1.5 THz), well below the peak of the 300 K black body spectrum, to 5000 cm-1 ({approx}150 THz), Z-cut quartz, Gore-Tex, Zitex G and Zitex A, High Density Polyethylene (HDPE), Teflon (PTFE), Fluorogold and Black Polyethylene were measured. The relative effectiveness of each material as a filter is determined by integrating the transmission spectrum multiplied by the Planck distribution to obtain a normalized attenuation for the mid-IR band. Measurements at both room temperature and 8 K are compared.

  9. Theoretical IR spectra of ionized naphthalene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pauzat, F.; Talbi, D.; Miller, M. D.; DeFrees, D. J.; Ellinger, Y.

    1992-01-01

    We report the results of a theoretical study of the effect of ionization on the IR spectrum of naphthalene, using ab initio molecular orbital theory. For that purpose we determined the structures, band frequencies, and intensities of neutral and positively ionized naphthalene. The calculated frequencies and intensities allowed an assignment of the most important bands appearing in the newly reported experimental spectrum of the positive ion. Agreement with the experimental spectrum is satisfactory enough to take into consideration the unexpected and important result that ionization significantly affects the intensities of most vibrations. A possible consequence on the interpretation of the IR interstellar emission, generally supposed to originate from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), is briefly presented.

  10. Mineralogy of an OH/IR superwind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombaert, R.; de Vries, B. L.; Hillen, M.

    2016-07-01

    The mineralogy of the dense, dusty superwind of OH/IR stars can provide important constraints for understanding the dust formation process as well as the acceleration of the wind. We aim to model the ISO-SWS spectrum of the OH/IR star OH 30.1-0.7 in detail by reproducing the slope of the spectral energy distribution in the continuum regions between 3 and 8 μm and 12 and 15 μm. In addition to metallic Fe, we find that larger amorphous olivine grains of size on the order of 1 μm may also contribute to the continuum emission. We report here on the preliminary model results and discuss their validity given the important assumption of a 1D spherically symmetric stellar wind.

  11. FT-IR : Today And Tomorrow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasselli, J. G.; Mehicic, M.; Mooney, J. R.

    1985-12-01

    The last decade has been a period of astonishing growth and vigor for FT-IR spectroscopy. The first International Conference on Fourier Transform Spectroscopy held in Aspen, Colorado, in 1970, described new instrumentation using Michelson interferometers that had been developed in response to problems in astro-physics, where faster acquisition of data and better ways of handling the large quantity of data generated were needed. The problems had driven the development of new instrumentation. With this impetus, instrument manufacturers introduced reliable, computerized FT-IR instruments for use by industry. These new instru-ments, with their speed and advanced data processing capabilities, led to an explosion of new examples of practical problem solving, as well as new sophistication in analyzing structures of materials or composition mixtures. Today the field of industrial infrared spectroscopy which was literally "transformed" just 15 years ago is vigorous, healthy, and still expanding. Perhaps we have now come full circle, for today industry is again articulating ever more challenging problems that need solving via novel instrumentation and/or accessories. This will lead to a tomorrow in areas that have been elegantly described in the invited lectures and poster contributions of this conference. In this paper, we will describe some typical uses of FT-IR today and from them predict where FT-IR will "walk tomorrow". We will concentrate on industrial applications because that is the community we represent. It is also relevant to point out that the growth and success of new analytical tools or techniques are dependent on the extent of use by industry. Industrial practical problem solving - and just because it's practical or solving a problem does not preclude good science and basic work - drives the development of newer and better ways to get answers to problems or to understand properties of materials.

  12. WFC3 TV3 Testing: IR Channel Blue Leaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Thomas R.

    2008-03-01

    A new IR detector (IR4; FPA165) is housed in WFC3 during the current campaign of thermal vacuum (TV) ground testing at GSFC. As part of these tests, we measured the IR channel throughput. Compared to the previous IR detectors, IR4 has much higher quantum efficiency at all wavelengths, particularly in the optical. The total throughput for the IR channel is still low in the optical, due to the opacity of the IR filters at these wavelengths, but there is a small wavelength region (~710-830 nm) where these filters do not offer as much blocking as needed to meet Contract End Item specifications. For this reason, the throughput measurements were extended into the blue to quantify the amount of blue leak in the narrow and medium IR bandpasses where a few percent of the measured flux could come from optical photons when observing hot sources. The results are tabulated here.

  13. STATUS OF FAST IR ORBIT FEEDBACK AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    MONTAG, C.; CUPOLO, J.; GLENN, J.; LITVINENKO, V.; MARUSIC, A.; MENG, W.; MICHNOFF, R.; ROSER, T.; SCHULTHEISS, C.; TUOZZOLO, J.

    2006-06-26

    To compensate modulated beam-beam offsets caused by mechanical vibrations of IR triplet quadrupoles at frequencies around 10 Hz, a fast IR orbit feedback system has been developed. We report design considerations and recent status of the system.

  14. Choices for Tissue Visualization with IR Microspectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gough,K.; Rak, M.; Bookatz, A.; Del Bigio, M.; Mai, S.; Westaway, D.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we address some of the issues associated with infrared (IR) imaging, with reference to our work on brain tissue from the TgCRND8 mouse, a transgenic model of Alzheimer's disease (AD). AD is the most common cause of dementia in the aging population. One of the characteristic hallmarks of this chronic neurodegenerative disorder is the accumulation of plaques in the brain, usually visualized with histochemistry and immunostaining. Although these methods are extremely useful, they illustrate only certain aspects of the sample, require a great amount of tissue processing, and are highly dependent on experimental protocols and reagent quality. IR imaging provides information on multiple components, with a minimal amount of sample processing. However, in order to interpret the data successfully, the issues of spectral acquisition parameters, pre-processing, and spectral artifacts need to be considered. The methods commonly used to process the data, such as uni- and bi-variate spectral analysis, and multivariate methods, such as hierarchical cluster analysis, and some issues concerning the use of second derivatives of IR spectra are discussed.

  15. Structure and elementary properties of the new Ir hollandite Rb{sub 0.17}IrO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Schoop, Leslie M.; Krizan, Jason W.; Gibson, Quinn D.; Cava, R.J.

    2014-01-15

    We report the synthesis and structural characterization of the new Ir holladite, Rb{sub 0.17}IrO{sub 2}. Rb{sub 0.17}IrO{sub 2} crystallizes in the tetragonal hollandite structure. In contrast to the previously reported monoclinic Ir hollandite K{sub 0.25}IrO{sub 2}, we do not observe a difference in Ir–O bond lengths in Rb{sub 0.17}IrO{sub 2} and thus find Ir in an average oxidation state of + 3.83. We also report and compare the electronic and magnetic properties of Rb{sub 0.17}IrO{sub 2} and K{sub 0.25}IrO{sub 2}, finding that they are both metallic and Pauli paramagnets further supporting that the electrons are delocalized in the Ir 5d states. - Graphical abstract: Crystal structure of Rb{sub 0.17}IrO{sub 2} (right), and the SEM image of Rb{sub 0.17}IrO{sub 2}, showing the growth of thin needles (left). Display Omitted - Highlights: • New iridium hollandite. • Naturally grows in very thin wires. • Elementary physical properties of Ir holladites reported for the first time metallic conductor and paramagnetic.

  16. Arbitrage Rebate Compliance: Recent IRS Scrutiny of School Districts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Given, Lynda K.; Gurrola, George E.; Richardson, James R.

    2002-01-01

    Describes rules and procedures school districts must follow to comply with IRS arbitrage and rebate rules and exceptions on profits derived from investing yields of tax-exempt bonds in a higher yielding account. Describes consequences of noncompliance and seven ways to be prepared for an IRS audit--for example, answering the IRS promptly. (PKP)

  17. IR Cards: Inquiry-Based Introduction to Infrared Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Jacqueline; Forster, Tabetha

    2010-01-01

    As infrared spectroscopy (IR) is frequently used in undergraduate organic chemistry courses, an inductive introduction to IR spectroscopy that uses index cards printed with spectra, structures, and chemical names is described. Groups of students are given an alphabetized deck of these "IR cards" to sort into functional groups. The students then…

  18. Mesoporous silica nanoparticle supported PdIr bimetal catalyst for selective hydrogenation, and the significant promotional effect of Ir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hui; Huang, Chao; Yang, Fan; Yang, Xu; Du, Li; Liao, Shijun

    2015-12-01

    A mesoporous silica nanoparticle (MSN) supported bimetal catalyst, PdIr/MSN, was prepared by a facile impregnation and hydrogen reduction method. The strong promotional effect of Ir was observed and thoroughly investigated. At the optimal molar ratio of Ir to Pd (NIr/NPd = 0.1), the activity of PdIr0.1/MSN was up to eight times and 28 times higher than that of monometallic Pd/MSN and Ir/MSN, respectively. The catalysts were characterized comprehensively by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and hydrogen temperature programmed reduction, which revealed that the promotional effect of Ir may be due to the enhanced dispersion of active components on the MSN, and to the intensified Pd-Ir electronic interaction caused by the addition of Ir.

  19. High-performance MCT and QWIP IR detectors at Sofradir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reibel, Yann; Rubaldo, Laurent; Manissadjian, Alain; Billon-Lanfrey, David; Rothman, Johan; de Borniol, Eric; Destéfanis, Gérard; Costard, E.

    2012-11-01

    Cooled IR technologies are challenged for answering new system needs like compactness and reduction of cryo-power which is key feature for the SWaP (Size, Weight and Power) requirements. This paper describes the status of MCT IR technology in France at Leti and Sofradir. A focus will be made on hot detector technology for SWAP applications. Sofradir has improved its HgCdTe technology to open the way for High Operating Temperature systems that release the Stirling cooler engine power consumption. Solutions for high performance detectors such as dual bands, much smaller pixel pitch or megapixels will also be discussed. In the meantime, the development of avalanche photodiodes or TV format with digital interface is key to bringing customers cutting-edge functionalities. Since 1997, Sofradir has been working with Thales and Research Technologies (TRT) to develop and produce Quantum Well Infrared Photodetectors (QWIP) as a complementary offer with MCT, to provide large LW staring arrays. A dualband MW-LW QWIP detector (25μm pitch 384×288 IDDCA) is currently under development. We will present in this paper its latest results.

  20. Application of multiple IR projector technologies for AMCOM HWIL simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beasley, D. Brett; Saylor, Daniel A.

    1999-07-01

    This paper describes the application of multiple IR projector technologies to hardware-in-the-loop (HWIL) simulations at the US Army Aviation and Missile Command's (AMCOM) Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center (MRDEC). Several projectors utilizing a variety of emerging technologies are currently being successfully applied within the HWIL facilities of AMCOM's MRDEC. Projector technologies utilized at AMCOM include laser diode array projectors, Honeywell's bright resistive infrared thermal emitter arrays, an IR zoom projector with thermoscenes, and steerable point source projectors. Future plans include a new resistor array projector called the Multispectral Infrared Animation Generation Equipment, which is being manufactured by Santa Barbara Infrared. These projector technologies have been used to support multiple HWIL test entries of various seeker configurations. Seeker configurations tested include: two InSb 256 X 256 FPAs, an InSb 512 X 512 FPA, a PtSi 640 X 480 FPA, a PtSi 256 X 256 FPA, a HgCdTe 256 X 256 FPA, a scanning linear array, and an uncooled 320 X 240 microbolometer FPA. The application, capabilities, and performance of each technology are reviewed in the paper. Example imagery collected from each operational system is also presented.

  1. Limewashed mural paintings as seen by VIS-IR reflectography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontana, R.; Striova, J.; Barucci, M.; Pampaloni, E.; Raffaelli, M.; Pezzati, L.; Mariotti, P.

    2015-06-01

    Near-Infrared (NIR) reflectography is a well-established technique for painting diagnostics, offering a fundamental contribution to the conservation of paintings. Since the '80s it has been routinely applied to study the execution technique of the author, as well as the presence of pentimenti, retouches, integrations or underdrawing. In the last decades IR reflectography has been extended to the visible (VIS) spectral range, providing information about the pigment composition. Up to now the multispectral analysis is still applied at an experimental level, as the processing of the image set is not straightforward. Rarely multispectral VIS-IR application has been applied to frescos, probably due to the lack, in most cases, of a scattering background. In this work we present the results provided by a multispectral scanning device based on single sensor acquisition, working in the 380-2500 nm spectral range, that is a laboratory prototype specifically built for research-grade imaging. The technique have been applied on a mock up simulating a mural painting substrate where an underdrawing, made of either carbon or iron-gall ink, was covered by different surface layers of limewash, the so-called scialbo.

  2. Fast rise time IR detectors for lepton colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drago, A.; Bini, S.; Cestelli Guidi, M.; Marcelli, A.; Pace, E.

    2016-07-01

    Diagnostics is a fundamental issue for accelerators whose demands are continuously increasing. In particular bunch-by-bunch diagnostics is a key challenge for the latest generation of lepton colliders and storage rings. The Frascati Φ-factory, DAΦNE, colliding at 1.02 GeV in the centre of mass, hosts in the main rings few synchrotron radiation beamlines and two of them collect the synchrotron radiation infrared emission: SINBAD from the electron ring and 3+L from the positron ring. At DAΦNE each bucket is 2.7 ns long and particles are gathered in bunches emitting pulsed IR radiation, whose intensity in the long wavelength regime is directly proportional to the accumulated particles. Compact uncooled photoconductive HgCdTe detectors have been tested in both beamlines using dedicated optical layouts. Actually, the fast rise time of HgCdTe semiconductors give us the chance to test bunch-by-bunch devices for both longitudinal and transverse diagnostics. For the longitudinal case, single pixel detectors have been used, while for the transverse diagnostics, multi-pixel array detectors, with special custom design, are under test. This contribution will briefly describe the status of the research on fast IR detectors at DAΦNE, the results obtained and possible foreseen developments.

  3. Best Visual Presentation--Observations from the Award Committee. IR Applications. Volume 4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bers, Trudy

    2005-01-01

    In 2003, the Association for Institutional Research (AIR) initiated the Best Visual Presentation (BVP) award to acknowledge the contributions made through new ways of professional communication, in addition to those made through more traditional scholarly formats. The purpose of this "IR Applications" is to provide observations from the BVP Award…

  4. IR: A Look towards the 1980's and Institutional Research and Student Aid. Proceedings, Sixth Annual Meeting of the North Carolina Association for Institutional Research and the Drive-In Conference, Charlotte, November 1-2, 1978, and Southern Pines, August 10-11, 1978.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Charles I., Ed.; Sanford, Timothy R., Ed.

    Highlights of the Sixth Annual Meeting of the North Carolina Association for Institutional Research (NCAIR) and of the Drive-In Conference held prior to the annual meeting are presented. The major emphasis of the annual meeting was to look toward the 1980's and project the role that institutional research might play in higher education. The…

  5. Making a Significant Difference with Institutional Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clagett, Craig A.; Huntington, Robin B.

    Focusing on the changing roles of institutional researchers (IRs) due to the widespread distribution of computer technology, this monograph explores the effective application of IR skills to maximize the impact of research on campus policy making. The discussion is centered around three major principles guiding institutional research: know the…

  6. IR Spectroscopic signs of malignant neoplasms in the thyroid gland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolstorozhev, G. B.; Skornyakov, I. V.; Butra, V. A.

    2012-03-01

    We use Fourier transform IR spectroscopy to study thyroid tumor tissues which were removed during surgery. The IR spectra of the tissues with pathological foci are compared with data from histologic examination. In the region of N-H, C-H, and C = O stretching vibrations, the IR spectra of the tissues for thyroid cancer are different from the IR spectra of tissues without malignant formations. We identify the spectral signs of thyroid cancer. We show that IR analysis is promising for identification of thyroid pathology at the molecular level.

  7. Comparison of outcome predictions by the Glasgow coma scale and the Full Outline of UnResponsiveness score in the neurological and neurosurgical patients in the Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Khanal, Kishor; Bhandari, Sanjeeb Sudarshan; Shrestha, Ninadini; Acharya, Subhash Prasad; Marhatta, Moda Nath

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of level of consciousness is very important in predicting patient's outcome from neurological illness. Glasgow coma scale (GCS) is the most commonly used scale, and Full Outline of UnResponsiveness (FOUR) score is also recently validated as an alternative to GCS in the evaluation of the level of consciousness. We carried out a prospective study in 97 patients aged above 16 years. We measured GCS and FOUR score within 24 h of Intensive Care Unit admission. The mean GCS and the FOUR scores were lower among nonsurvivors than among the survivors and were statistically significant (P < 0.001). Discrimination for GCS and FOUR score was fair with the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.79 and 0.82, respectively. The cutoff point with best Youden index for GCS and FOUR score was 6.5 each. Below the cutoff point, mortality was higher in both models (P < 0.001). The Hosmer-Lemeshow Chi-square coefficient test showed better calibration with FOUR score than GCS. A positive correlation was seen between the models with Spearman's correlation coefficient of 0.91 (P < 0.001).

  8. Optical alignment and testing of the Diffuse IR Background Experiment IR cryogenic telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, H. John

    1989-01-01

    Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE) optical alignment and testing methods are discussed. Using strobe videography, vibration and performance testing of a 32 hz tuning-fork chopper was carried out. The Cosmic Background explorer satellite provides improved microwave and IR all-sky maps of the cosmic background radiation from a polar orbit. A liquid helium cryostat houses the DIRBE and the Far IR Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS) instruments at a temperature of 2 K. Differential MicRowave Radiometers (DMRs) provide large scale maps of anisotropy of the 3 K background at wavelengths of 3.3, 5.7, and 9.6 mm. The DIRBE telescope is an IR photometric instrument with 10 wavelength bands between 1 and 300 microns, designed to measure radiation from the epoch of galaxy formation. Stringent stray light requirements mean that the DIRBE flight instrument has to be built and tested in a class 100 environment.

  9. Development of a Measure to Assess the Impact of Epilepsy on People with an Intellectual Disability: The Glasgow Epilepsy Outcome Scale-Client Version (GEOS-C)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, J.; Espie, C. A.; Curtice, L.; Mantala, K.; Corp, A.; Foley, J.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Epilepsy is common in people with intellectual disability, yet clinicians and researchers seldom obtain information directly from the client. The development and preliminary validation of a novel measure for use with people with mild to moderate intellectual disabilities is described. Methods: Focus group methods (6 groups; 24…

  10. ToO IRS Observations of Novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodward, Charles; Black, John; Bode, Michael; Evans, Aneuryn; Geballe, Thomas; Gehrz, Robert; Greenhouse, Matthew; Hauschildt, Peter; Helton, Andrew; Krautter, Joachim; Liller, William; Lyke, James; Lynch, David; Rudy, Richard; Salama, Alberto; Schwarz, Greg; Shore, Steve; Starrfield, Sumner; Truran, Jim; Vanlandingham, Karen; Wagner, R. Mark

    2006-05-01

    Stars are the engines of energy production and chemical evolution in our Universe. They deposit radiative and mechanical energy into their environments and enrich the ambient interstellar medium with elements synthesized in their interiors and dust grains condensed in their atmospheres. Classical novae (CN) contribute to this cycle of chemical enrichment through explosive nucleosynthesis and the violent ejection of material dredged from the white dwarf progenitor and mixed with the accreted surface layers. Using Spitzer (+IRS), we propose a 25.8 hrs no-impact ToO program to study (in temporal detail) the evolutionary stages of CN by targeting 4 Galactic and 2 Magellanic Cloud (MC) novae. Spitzer is a unique facility that enables us to investigate aspects of the CN phenomenon including the in situ formation and astromineralogy of nova dust, the elemental abundances resulting from thermonuclear runaway, the correlation of ejecta masses with progenitor type, the bolometric luminosities of the outburst, and the kinematics and structure of the ejected envelopes. Synoptic, high signal-to-noise IRS spectra permit: 1) determination of the grain size distribution and mineral composition of nova dust; 2) estimation of chemical abundances of nova ejecta from coronal and other emission line spectroscopy; 3) measurement of the density and masses of the ejecta; 4) characterization of the geometry and structure of ejected shells at early stages during which the initial mixing of the chemical abundances can be studied in detail; and 5) exploration of the characteristics of CN in low metallicity systems (MC) at mid- to far-IR wavelengths. Observations of CN with Spitzer will be complemented by extensive ground-based, as well as space-based (e.g., Chandra, Swift, XMM-Newton), DDT and ToO programs led by team CoIs.

  11. Near-IR fluorescence and reflectance confocal microscopy for imaging of quantum dots in mammalian skin

    PubMed Central

    Mortensen, Luke J.; Glazowski, Christopher E.; Zavislan, James M.; DeLouise, Lisa A.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the skin penetration of nanoparticles (NPs) is an important concern due to the increasing presence of NPs in consumer products, including cosmetics. Technical challenges have slowed progress in evaluating skin barrier and NP factors that contribute to skin penetration risk. To limit sampling error and other problems associated with histological processing, many researchers are implementing whole tissue confocal or multiphoton microscopies. This work introduces a fluorescence and reflectance confocal microscopy system that utilizes near-IR excitation and emission to detect near-IR lead sulfide quantum dots (QDs) through ex vivo human epidermis. We provide a detailed prediction and experimental analysis of QD detection sensitivity and demonstrate detection of QD skin penetration in a barrier disrupted model. The unique properties of near-IR lead-based QDs will enable future studies that examine the impact of further barrier-disrupting agents on skin penetration of QDs and elucidate mechanistic insight into QD tissue interactions at the cellular level. PMID:21698023

  12. Photon-electron-ion momentum transfer in high intensityIR laser pulse ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandrauk, Andre D.; Chelkowski, Szczefan; Corkum, Paul

    2016-05-01

    Photon momentum sharing between electrons and parent ions in high intensityIR multiphoton ionization requires going beyond the traditional perturbative dipole approximation. Using numerical solutions of the 2-D TDSE(Time dependent Schroedinger equation) for one electron atom models, we show that the radiation pressure on photoelectrons is sensitive to the ionization mechanism, either direct or by recollision. A complex electron-ion response is obtained due to the interplay between the Lorentz force and Coulomb attraction of the ion.The influence of the photon momentum sharing is shown to be discernible in IR high intensity atomic and/or molecular holographic patterns thus suggesting a new research subject in IR strong field physics.

  13. IR beamline at the Swiss Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ph, Lerch; L, Quaroni; J, Wambach; J, Schneider; B, Armstrong D.; D, Rossetti; L, Mueller F.; P, Peier; V, Schlott; L, Carroll; P, Friedli; H, Sigg; S, Stutz; M, Tran

    2012-05-01

    The infrared beamline at the Swiss light source uses dipole radiation and is designed to transport light to four experimental stations, A, B, C, D. Branch A is dedicated to far IR work in vacuum; branch B is a micro-spectrometer; branch C is dedicated to high resolution spectroscopy in the gas phase; branch D is a pump and probe set-up. This contribution describes the optical layout and provides a brief survey of currently available experimental stations. The beamline is in regular user operation since 2009.

  14. Standoff imaging of chemicals using IR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Senesac, Larry R; Thundat, Thomas George; Morales Rodriguez, Marissa E

    2011-01-01

    Here we report on a standoff spectroscopic technique for identifying chemical residues on surfaces. A hand-held infrared camera was used in conjunction with a wavelength tunable mid-IR quantum cascade laser (QCL) to create hyperspectral image arrays of a target with an explosive residue on its surface. Spectral signatures of the explosive residue (RDX) were extracted from the hyperspectral image arrays and compared with a reference spectrum. Identification of RDX was achieved for residue concentrations of 20 g per cm2 at a distance of 1.5 m, and for 5 g per cm2 at a distance of 15 cm.

  15. Low Power Polysilicon Sources for IR Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Das, N. C.; Jhabvala, M.; Shu, P.

    1998-01-01

    We have designed and fabricated polysilicon thin film infrared (IR) sources by micromachining technology. These sources are made with a lightly doped middle region for light emission and heavy doping of the supporting legs. The sources are fabricated on a 10 mm thick, low temperature process parameters in the fabrication of these silicon dioxide layer. Different doping levels were used to achieve various source resistances. From the power requirement to reach the required light emission versus source resistance curve it is seen that there exists a resistance value which minimizes the necessary input power.

  16. Superconductivity in Pd, Ir, and Pt chalcogenide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Yoon Seok; Yang, Junjie; Choi, Y. J.; Hogan, A.; Horibe, Y.; Cheong, S.-W.

    2012-02-01

    Large spin-orbit coupling in materials with heavy chalcogens can result in unique quantum states or functional properties such as topological insulator, giant thermoelectric power, and superconductivity. When materials contain heavy cations in addition to heavy chalcogens, spin-orbit coupling can be further enhanced. For these reasons, we have studied the superconductivity of Pd, Ir, and Pt tellurides and selenides. In the exploration of these chalcogenides, we have focused on the competition between superconductivity and charge density wave that is associated with superlattice reflections.

  17. Gated IR Images of Shocked Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    S. S. Lutz; W. D. Turley; P. M. Rightley; L. E. Primas

    2001-06-01

    Gated infrared (IR) images have been taken of a series of shocked surface geometries in tin. Metal coupons machined with steps and flats were mounted directly to the high explosive. The explosive was point-initiated and 500-ns to 1-microsecond-wide gated images of the target were taken immediately following shock breakout using a Santa Barbara Focalplane InSb camera (SBF-134). Spatial distributions of surface radiance were extracted from the images of the shocked samples and found to be non-single-valued. Several geometries were modeled using CTH, a two-dimensional Eulerian hydrocode.

  18. Gated IR Images of Shocked Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, Stephen S.; Turley, W. Dale; Rightley, Paul M.; Primas, Lori E.

    2002-07-01

    Gated infrared (IR) images have been taken of a series of shocked surface geometries in tin. Metal coupons machined with steps and flats were mounted directly to the high explosive. The explosive was point-initiated and 500-ns to 1-microsecond-wide gated images of the target were taken immediately following shock breakout using a Santa Barbara Focalplane InSb camera (SBF-134). Spatial distributions of surface radiance were extracted from the images of the shocked samples and found to be non-single-valued. Several surfaces were modeled using CTH, a 2- or 3-dimensional Eulerian hydrocode.

  19. Gated IR images of shocked surfaces.

    SciTech Connect

    Lutz, S. S.; Turley, W. D.; Rightley, P. M.; Primas, L. E.

    2001-01-01

    Gated infrared (IR) images have been taken of a series of shocked surface geometries in tin. Metal coupons machined with steps and flats were mounted directly to the high explosive. The explosive was point-initiated and 500-ns to 1-microsecond-wide gated images of the target were taken immediately following shock breakout using a Santa Barbara Focalplane InSb camera (SBF-134). Spatial distributions of surface radiance were extracted from the images of the shocked samples and found to be non-single-valued. Several geometries were modeled using CTH, a two-dimensional Eulerian hydrocode.

  20. Temperature and bias dependence of anisotropic magnetoresistance in antiferromagnetic Sr2IrO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seinige, Heidi; Wang, Cheng; Cao, Gang; Zhou, Jian-Shi; Goodenough, John B.; Tsoi, Maxim

    2015-03-01

    We study anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) in antiferromagnetic (AFM) Mott insulator Sr2IrO4. Such AMR is a promising candidate for monitoring the magnetic order parameter in AFM spintronics. Here we present temperature- and electrical bias-dependent measurements of the point-contact AMR in single crystals of Sr2IrO4. The point-contact technique allows to probe very small volumes and, therefore, look for electronic transport in Sr2IrO4 on a microscopic scale. Point-contact measurements at liquid nitrogen temperature revealed a large negative magnetoresistance (MR) for magnetic fields applied within IrO2 a-b plane and electric currents flowing perpendicular to the plane. The observed MR decreases with increasing temperature and falls to zero at TNéel ~ 240 K. Interestingly, the temperature dependence of MR ratios differs qualitatively from that of the resistivity. The point-contact measurements also show a strong dependence of MR on the dc bias applied to the contact. The latter can be associated with correlations between electronic transport and magnetic order in Sr2IrO4. This work was supported in part by C-SPIN, one of six centers of STARnet, a Semiconductor Research Corporation program, sponsored by MARCO and DARPA, and by NSF Grants DMR-1207577, DMR-1265162 and DMR-1122603.

  1. A novel algorithm to attack the problem of pattern recognition with near-IR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, Yi.

    1993-01-01

    Near-infrared (near-IR) spectroscopy is a rapid, nondestructive analytical technique that has wide application in industry as well as in academic research. In general, near-IR analysis uses reflectance or absorbance signals to determine chemical information from samples. Near-IR is also a very good technique for differentiating samples from different sources using pattern recognition analysis. In this dissertation, a novel algorithm of the quantile BEST (Boot-strap Error-adjusted Sample Technique) for pattern recognition analysis has been extensively tested with hypothetical data and real samples. A modified model is proposed to improve the system performance in higher dimensional space. The applications to real samples include: (1) the identification of the points of origin of soil samples; (2) near-IR spectrophotometric monitoring of stroke-related changes in the protein and lipid composition of whole gerbil brains; and (3) determination of cholesterol concentration in aqueous and serum samples with principal component analysis. In addition, a new laser spectroscopic system is designed and tested. This system uses Nd-YAG and dye lasers are primary sources. Powerful near-IR radiation is obtained from stimulated Raman scattering. The stability, accuracy, and precision of the system is investigated and an application to known samples is shown.

  2. Spin orientations of the spin-half Ir4+ ions in Sr3NiIrO6, Sr2IrO4, and Na2IrO3: Density functional, perturbation theory, and Madelung potential analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Elijah E.; Xiang, Hongjun; Köhler, Jürgen; Whangbo, Myung-Hwan

    2016-03-01

    The spins of the low-spin Ir4+ (S = 1/2, d5) ions at the octahedral sites of the oxides Sr3NiIrO6, Sr2IrO4, and Na2IrO3 exhibit preferred orientations with respect to their IrO6 octahedra. We evaluated the magnetic anisotropies of these S = 1/2 ions on the basis of density functional theory (DFT) calculations including spin-orbit coupling (SOC), and probed their origin by performing perturbation theory analyses with SOC as perturbation within the LS coupling scheme. The observed spin orientations of Sr3NiIrO6 and Sr2IrO4 are correctly predicted by DFT calculations, and are accounted for by the perturbation theory analysis. As for the spin orientation of Na2IrO3, both experimental studies and DFT calculations have not been unequivocal. Our analysis reveals that the Ir4+ spin orientation of Na2IrO3 should have nonzero components along the c- and a-axis directions. The spin orientations determined by DFT calculations are sensitive to the accuracy of the crystal structures employed, which is explained by perturbation theory analyses when interactions between adjacent Ir4+ ions are taken into consideration. There are indications implying that the 5d electrons of Na2IrO3 are less strongly localized compared with those of Sr3NiIrO6 and Sr2IrO4. This implication was confirmed by showing that the Madelung potentials of the Ir4+ ions are less negative in Na2IrO3 than in Sr3NiIrO6 and Sr2IrO4. Most transition-metal S = 1/2 ions do have magnetic anisotropies because the SOC induces interactions among their crystal-field split d-states, and the associated mixing of the states modifies only the orbital parts of the states. This finding cannot be mimicked by a spin Hamiltonian because this model Hamiltonian lacks the orbital degree of freedom, thereby leading to the spin-half syndrome. The spin-orbital entanglement for the 5d spin-half ions Ir4+ is not as strong as has been assumed.

  3. Spin orientations of the spin-half Ir(4+) ions in Sr3NiIrO6, Sr2IrO4, and Na2IrO3: Density functional, perturbation theory, and Madelung potential analyses.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Elijah E; Xiang, Hongjun; Köhler, Jürgen; Whangbo, Myung-Hwan

    2016-03-21

    The spins of the low-spin Ir(4+) (S = 1/2, d(5)) ions at the octahedral sites of the oxides Sr3NiIrO6, Sr2IrO4, and Na2IrO3 exhibit preferred orientations with respect to their IrO6 octahedra. We evaluated the magnetic anisotropies of these S = 1/2 ions on the basis of density functional theory (DFT) calculations including spin-orbit coupling (SOC), and probed their origin by performing perturbation theory analyses with SOC as perturbation within the LS coupling scheme. The observed spin orientations of Sr3NiIrO6 and Sr2IrO4 are correctly predicted by DFT calculations, and are accounted for by the perturbation theory analysis. As for the spin orientation of Na2IrO3, both experimental studies and DFT calculations have not been unequivocal. Our analysis reveals that the Ir(4+) spin orientation of Na2IrO3 should have nonzero components along the c- and a-axis directions. The spin orientations determined by DFT calculations are sensitive to the accuracy of the crystal structures employed, which is explained by perturbation theory analyses when interactions between adjacent Ir(4+) ions are taken into consideration. There are indications implying that the 5d electrons of Na2IrO3 are less strongly localized compared with those of Sr3NiIrO6 and Sr2IrO4. This implication was confirmed by showing that the Madelung potentials of the Ir(4+) ions are less negative in Na2IrO3 than in Sr3NiIrO6 and Sr2IrO4. Most transition-metal S = 1/2 ions do have magnetic anisotropies because the SOC induces interactions among their crystal-field split d-states, and the associated mixing of the states modifies only the orbital parts of the states. This finding cannot be mimicked by a spin Hamiltonian because this model Hamiltonian lacks the orbital degree of freedom, thereby leading to the spin-half syndrome. The spin-orbital entanglement for the 5d spin-half ions Ir(4+) is not as strong as has been assumed. PMID:27004892

  4. Spin orientations of the spin-half Ir4+ ions in Sr3NiIrO6, Sr2IrO4 and Na2IrO3: Density functional, perturbation theory and Madelung potential analyses

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gordon, Elijah E.; Xiang, Hongjun; Koehler, Jurgen; Whangbo, Myung -Hwan

    2016-03-01

    The spins of the low-spin Ir4+ (S = 1/2, d5) ions at the octahedral sites of the oxides Sr3NiIrO6, Sr2IrO4 and Na2IrO3 exhibit preferred orientations with respect to their IrO6 octahedra. We evaluated the magnetic anisotropies of these S = 1/2 ions on the basis of DFT calculations including spin-orbit coupling (SOC), and probed their origin by performing perturbation theory analyses with SOC as perturbation within the LS coupling scheme. The observed spin orientations of Sr3NiIrO6 and Sr2IrO4 are correctly predicted by DFT calculations, and are accounted for by the perturbation theory analysis. As for the spin orientation of Na2IrO3,more » both experimental studies and DFT calculations have not been unequivocal. Our analysis reveals that the Ir4+ spin orientation of Na2IrO3 should have nonzero components along the c- and a-axes directions. The spin orientations determined by DFT calculations are sensitive to the accuracy of the crystal structures employed, which is explained by perturbation theory analyses when interactions between adjacent Ir4+ ions are taken into consideration. There are indications implying that the 5d electrons of Na2IrO3 are less strongly localized compared with those of Sr3NiIrO6 and Sr2IrO4. This implication was confirmed by showing that the Madelung potentials of the Ir4+ ions are less negative in Na2IrO3 than in Sr3NiIrO6, Sr2IrO4. Most transition-metal S = 1/2 ions do have magnetic anisotropies because the SOC induces interactions among their crystal-field split d-states, and the associated mixing of the states modifies only the orbital parts of the states. This finding cannot be mimicked by a spin Hamiltonian because this model Hamiltonian lacks the orbital degree of freedom, thereby leading to the spin-half syndrome. As a result, the spin-orbital entanglement for the 5d spin-half ions Ir4+ is not as strong as has been assumed lately.« less

  5. Electron beam transport for the LBL IR-FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Staples, J.; Edighoffer, J.; Kim, Kwang-Je

    1992-07-01

    The infrared flee-electron laser (IR-FEL) proposed by LBL as part of the Combustion Dynamics Research Laboratory (CDRL) consists of a multiple-pass accelerator with superconducting cavities supplying a 55 MeV 12 mA beam to an undulator within a 24-meter optical cavity. Future options include deceleration through the same cavities for energy recovery and reducing the power in the beam dump. The electron transport system from the injector through the cavities and undulator must satisfy conditions of high order achromaticity, isochronicity, unity first-order transport matrix around the recirculation loop, variable betatron match into the undulator, ease of operation and economical implementation. This paper presents a workable solution that satisfies these requirements.

  6. Precision FT-IR laboratory measurements of atmospheric molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, K.; Brown, L. R.; Crawford, T. J.

    2014-12-01

    Spectroscopic information is crucial a priori input to interpret atmospheric spectroscopic observations through radiative transfer modeling. The spectroscopic observations lead us to determine the physical and chemical conditions (e.g., atmospheric pressure, temperatures, composition, abundances …). In order to avoid false interpretations of the observed spectra, the molecular spectroscopic information (either line parameters or cross sections) must be sufficiently accurate and complete. To achieve this goal, we employ a broad-band Fourier transform spectrometer, Bruker IFS-125HR equipped with multiple detectors (He-cooled bolometers, N2-cooled MCT and InSb, warm InGaAs, Boron-doped silicates, photodiode) and beamsplitters (Mylars, KBr, CaF2, Quartz) sufficient to cover entire infrared spectra region from 20 to 15000 cm-1. We vacuum-couple up to 15 different absorption cells to the FT-IR, including five coolable cells with optical path lengths ranging from 0.02 m to 52 m; three of them are capable of reaching temperatures down to 50 K. We also have one heatable cell reaching 400 K. Finally, an extra vacuum chamber newly implemented to the Bruker 125HR enables both emission and absorption spectroscopy utilizing the emission port of the FT-IR. Recently, several studies of atmospheric molecules have been completed using the FT-IR at JPL in support of the Earth, terrestrial and planetary atmospheric remote sensing. These include analyses of C3H8 (propane) and 16O12C17O mid- and near-infrared regions, 13C12CH6 and 12C2H6 at longer wavelengths. In addition, we are studying the O2(A) line mixing and collision-induced absorption in the O2 A-band at 0.76 μm, as well as temperature-dependent cross sections of C6H6 (benzene) and C3H6 (propene) in the mid-infrared region. We will present an overview of results and work in progress. [Research described in this paper was performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Connecticut College, and

  7. Infrared Passbands for Accurate IR Photometry : the IRWG set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milone, E. F.; Young, A. T.

    2002-12-01

    The well-known past limitations in accuracy and precision of infrared photometry has been shown to be due primarily to atmospheric features within passbands and the use of the edges of the atmospheric windows to define those passbands. The saturation of portions of the passbands high in the atmosphere means, especially for the longer wavelength passbands, a large difference between a linearly extrapolated zero-air mass magnitude and the actual value. The rapid curvature of the extinction curve between 1 and 0 air mass is known as the Forbes effect. Since the strengths of atmospheric features vary with altitude and the circumstances of each site, different observatories have responded to the problem by redefining the Johnson system from J to Q to suit the needs of the site. The result has been a proliferation of systems, with filters having been selected for maximum throughput and so not necessarily placed, shaped, and narrowed to minimize optimally the effects of the absorption bands of the terrestrial atmosphere. Given this situation and in light of the tremendous promise of high precision presented by infrared photometry, and with the support of an important segment of the IR community, the Infrared Astronomy Working Group (IRWG) was created inside IAU Com. 25 to solve the problem. A subgroup of the IRWG consisting of Young, Milone, and Stagg set about examining the properties of existing passbands and in optimizing the placement and width of passbands within the atmospheric windows. Here we review the transformation properties of the recommended Z to Q passbands and of the IR filters produced by Custom Scientific Co. to approximate the near IR passbands of this set, their signal to noise ratios, and results of the standardization testing project at the Rothney Astrophysical Observatory over the past few years. The extinction coefficients determined with the manufactured filters demonstrate the usefulness of these passbands for transformation to the standard

  8. Active IR-applications in civil engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiggenhauser, H.

    2002-06-01

    Applications of IR-thermography in civil engineering are not limited to the identification of heat losses in building envelopes. As it is well known from other areas of non-destructive testing, active IR-thermographic methods such as cooling down or lock-in thermography improves the results in many investigations. In civil engineering these techniques have not been used widely. Mostly thermography is used in a quasi-static manner. The interpretation of moisture measurements with thermography on surfaces can be very difficult due to several overlapping effects: emissivity changes due to composition, heat transfer through wet sections of the specimen, cooling through air flow or reflected spurious radiation sources. These effects can be reduced by selectively measuring the reflection in two wavelength windows, one on an absorption band of water and another in a reference band and then combining the results in a moisture index image. Cooling down thermography can be used to identify subsurface structural deficiencies. For building materials like concrete these measurements are performed on a much longer time scale than in flash lamp experiments. A quantitative analysis of the full cooling down process over several minutes can reliably identify defects at different depths. Experiments at BAM have shown, that active thermography is capabale of identifying structural deficiencies or moist areas in building materials much more reliable than quasi-static thermography.

  9. The Spitzer IRS Debris Disk Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C.

    2014-04-01

    During the Spitzer Space Telescope cryogenic mission, Guaranteed Time Observers, Legacy Teams, and General Observers obtained Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) observations of hundreds of debris disk candidates. We calibrated the spectra of 571 candidates, including 64 new IRAS and MIPS debris disks candidates, modeled their stellar photospheres, and produced a catalog of excess spectra for unresolved debris disks. We carried out two separate SED analyses. (1) For all targets, we modeled the IRS and MIPS 70 micron data (where available) assuming that the SEDs were well-described using, zero, one or two temperature black bodies. We calculated the probability for each model and computed the average probability to select among models. (2) For a subset of 120 targets with 10 and/or 20 micron silicate features, we modeled the data using spherical silicate (olivine, pyroxene, forsterite, and enstatite) grains located either in a continuous disk with power-law size and surface density distributions or two thin rings that are well-characterized using two separate dust grain temperatures. We present a demographic analysis of the disk properties. For example, we find that the majority of debris disks are better fit using two dust components, suggesting that planetary systems are common in debris disks and that the size distribution of dust grains is consistent with a collisional cascade.

  10. Space mid-IR detectors from DRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogue, Henry H.; Guptill, Matthew L.; Reynolds, David; Atkins, Ernest W.; Stapelbroek, Maryn G.

    2003-03-01

    The Blocked Impurity Band (BIB) detector was invented in the early 1980's and subsequently developed by our team. The original arsenic-doped silicon (Si:As) detectors addressed the need for low-noise, radiation-tolerant, mid-IR detectors for defense surveillance from space. We have since developed large-format BIB focal plane arrays to address high-background requirements of ground-based telescopes and missile interceptors, low-background requirements of the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF), and very low background requirements of the mid-IR instruments for the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) and Terrestrial Planet Finder. Most of these applications employ Si:As BIB detectors, but antimony-doped silicon (Si:Sb) BIB detectors are used for some SIRTF bands. Other demonstrated types including phosphorus (Si:P) and gallium-doped (Si:Ga) BIB detectors may have application niches. We have proposed development of a BIB detector type utilizing both Si:As and Si:P layers to optimize dark current vs. wavelength performance. Wavelength response for silicon BIB detectors extend to a maximum of ~40 microns (Si:Sb), but we have also demonstrated germanium BIB detectors for wavelengths extending to several hundred microns. We are currently developing germanium BIB detector arrays for astrophysics applications, including space telescopes beyond NGST.

  11. Qualification tests for 192Ir sealed sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iancso, Georgeta; Iliescu, Elena; Iancu, Rodica

    2013-12-01

    This paper describes the results of qualification tests for 192Ir sealed sources, available in Testing and Nuclear Expertise Laboratory of National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering "Horia Hulubei" (I.F.I.N.-HH), Romania. These sources had to be produced in I.F.I.N.-HH and were tested in order to obtain the authorization from The National Commission for Nuclear Activities Control (CNCAN). The sources are used for gammagraphy procedures or in gammadefectoscopy equipments. Tests, measurement methods and equipments used, comply with CNCAN, AIEA and International Quality Standards and regulations. The qualification tests are: 1. Radiological tests and measurements: dose equivalent rate at 1 m; tightness; dose equivalent rate at the surface of the transport and storage container; external unfixed contamination of the container surface. 2. Mechanical and climatic tests: thermal shock; external pressure; mechanic shock; vibrations; boring; thermal conditions for storage and transportation. Passing all tests, it was obtained the Radiological Security Authorization for producing the 192Ir sealed sources. Now IFIN-HH can meet many demands for this sealed sources, as the only manufacturer in Romania.

  12. An IR Navigation System for Pleural PDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Timothy; Liang, Xing; Kim, Michele; Finlay, Jarod; Dimofte, Andreea; Rodriguez, Carmen; Simone, Charles; Friedberg, Joseph; Cengel, Keith

    2015-03-01

    Pleural photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been used as an adjuvant treatment with lung-sparing surgical treatment for malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). In the current pleural PDT protocol, a moving fiber-based point source is used to deliver the light. The light fluences at multiple locations are monitored by several isotropic detectors placed in the pleural cavity. To improve the delivery of light fluence uniformity, an infrared (IR) navigation system is used to track the motion of the light source in real-time at a rate of 20 - 60 Hz. A treatment planning system uses the laser source positions obtained from the IR camera to calculate light fluence distribution to monitor the light dose uniformity on the surface of the pleural cavity. A novel reconstruction algorithm is used to determine the pleural cavity surface contour. A dual-correction method is used to match the calculated fluences at detector locations to the detector readings. Preliminary data from a phantom shows superior light uniformity using this method. Light fluence uniformity from patient treatments is also shown with and without the correction method.

  13. MEMS-based IR-sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weise, Sebastian; Steinbach, Bastian; Biermann, Steffen

    2016-03-01

    The series JSIR350 sources are MEMS based infrared emitters. These IR sources are characterized by a high radiation output. Thus, they are excellent for NDIR gas analysis and are ideally suited for using with our pyro-electric or thermopile detectors. The MEMS chips used in Micro-Hybrid's infrared emitters consist of nano-amorphous carbon (NAC). The MEMS chips are produced in the USA. All Micro-Hybrid Emitter are designed and specified to operate up to 850°C. The improvements we have made in the source's packaging enable us to provide IR sources with the best performance on the market. This new technology enables us to seal the housings of infrared radiation sources with soldered infrared filters or windows and thus cause the parts to be impenetrable to gases. Micro-Hybrid provide various ways of adapting our MEMS based infrared emitter JSIR350 to customer specifications, like specific burn-in parameters/characteristic, different industrial standard housings, producible with customized cap, reflector or pin-out.

  14. Wafer level test solutions for IR sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giessmann, Sebastian; Werner, Frank-Michael

    2014-05-01

    Wafer probers provide an established platform for performing electrical measurements at wafer level for CMOS and similar process technologies. For testing IR sensors, the requirements are beyond the standard prober capabilities. This presentation will give an overview about state of the art IR sensor probing systems reaching from flexible engineering solutions to automated production needs. Cooled sensors typically need to be tested at a target temperature below 80 K. Not only is the device temperature important but also the surrounding environment is required to prevent background radiation from reaching the device under test. To achieve that, a cryogenic shield is protecting the movable chuck. By operating that shield to attract residual gases inside the chamber, a completely contamination-free test environment can be guaranteed. The use of special black coatings are furthermore supporting the removal of stray light. Typically, probe card needles are operating at ambient (room) temperature when connecting to the wafer. To avoid the entrance of heat, which can result in distorted measurements, the probe card is fully embedded into the cryogenic shield. A shutter system, located above the probe field, is designed to switch between the microscope view to align the sensor under the needles and the test relevant setup. This includes a completely closed position to take dark current measurements. Another position holds a possible filter glass with the required aperture opening. The necessary infrared sources to stimulate the device are located above.

  15. Passive ranging using a single IR sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey, W.; Gobel, R.W.; Draper, J.S.

    1994-12-31

    As current defense system architectures change and downsize there is a need to accomplish more with each sensors capability. Desert Storm`s missile to aircraft and missile to missile engagements elevated the need to better cope with early and stealthy assessment of the adversaries location while providing minimal compromise to the operator. The use of stealth vehicles introduces a requirement to deploy sensors that silently assess tactical and theater issues [battle damage assessment (BDA) and theater missile defense (TMD)] without preengagement detection. IR sensor system development and high speed, parallel, distributed processing make practical the implementation of compact passive ranging packages aboard satellites and aircraft. Here, single IR Sensor Passive Ranging from an observer to a target embedded in the atmosphere exploits the effect of atmospheric attenuation of the signal. By judicious choice of wavebands the range and altitude to a target can be determined passively with a single observer. This result will be shown to be relatively insensitive to assumed atmospheric models or precise source spectral content. A detailed closed-form solution relating range (and altitude) to observed target intensities will be presented. Previous studies of this type have required either detailed knowledge of the source spectra or spectral resolution of individual rotational lines. The single sensor passive ranging methodology requires no such detailed information.

  16. IR camera temperature resolution enhancing using computer processing of IR image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trofimov, Vyacheslav A.; Trofimov, Vladislav V.

    2016-05-01

    As it is well-known, application of the IR camera for the security problems is very promising way. In previous papers, we demonstrate new possibility of the passive THz camera using for a temperature difference observing on the human skin if this difference is caused by different temperatures inside the body. For proof of validity of our statement we make the similar physical experiment using the IR camera. We show a possility of viewing the temperature trace on a human body skin, caused by temperature changing inside the human body due to water drinking. We use new approach, based on usung a correlation function, for computer processing of IR images. Its application results in a temperature resolution enhancing of cameras. We analyze IR images of a person, which drinks water. We follow a temperature trace on human body skin, caused by changing of temperature inside the human body. Some experiments were made with measurements of a body temperature covered by shirt. We try to see a human body temperature changing in physical experiments under consideration. Shown phenomena are very important for the detection of forbidden objects, cancelled under clothes or inside the human body, by using non-destructive control without using X-rays.

  17. MMW, IR, and SAM signature collection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichstetter, Fred; Ward, Mary E.

    2002-08-01

    During the development of smart weapon's seeker/sensors, it is imperative to collect high quality signatures of the targets the system is intended to engage. These signatures are used to support algorithm development so the system can find and engage the targets of interest in the specific kill area on the target. Englin AFB FL is the AF development center for munitions; and in support of the development effort, the 46th Test Wing (46 TW) has initiated significant improvements in collection capabilities for signatures in the MMW, Infrared and Seismic, Acoustic and Magnetic (SAM) spectrum. Additionally, the Joint Munitions Test and Evaluation program office maintains a fleet of foreign ground vehicle targets used for such signature collection including items such as tanks, SCUD missile launchers, air defense units such as SA-06, SA-8, SA-13, and associated ground support trucks and general purpose vehicles. The major test facility includes a 300 ft tower used for mounting the instrumentation suite that currently includes, 10, 35 and 94 GHz MMW and 2-5(mu) and 8-12(mu) IR instrumentation systems. This facility has undergone major improvements in terms of background signature reduction, construction of a high bay building to house the turntable on which the targets are mounted, and an additional in- ground stationary turntable primarily for IR signature collection. Our experience using this facility to collect signatures for the smart weapons development community has confirmed a significant improvement in quality and efficiency. The need for the stationary turntable signature collection capability was driven by the requirements of the IR community who are interested in collecting signatures in clutter. This tends to be contrary to the MMW community that desires minimum background clutter. The resulting location, adjacent to the MMW tower, allows variations in the type and amount of clutter background that could be incorporated and also provides maximum utilization of

  18. The infra-red (IR) landscape of Triatoma infestans. An hypothesis about the role of IR radiation as a cue for Triatominae dispersal.

    PubMed

    Catalá, Silvia S

    2011-12-01

    This paper presents the infrared (IR) emission spectrum of hosts and habitats of Triatoma infestans in the chaco region of NW Argentina, representing the first attempt to correlate the natural infrared stimulus with the known behaviour of these blood-sucking insect, vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi--causative agent of Chagas disease. The study was carried out in two rural villages of La Rioja Province (Argentina). A FLYR i40 camera was used to obtain IR pictures which were analyzed to determine the thermal range for humans, domestic animals, building materials, and general background emissions. From sunset to the first hours of night, the thermal contrast between hosts and their landscape rises, increasing the likelihood that hosts could be differentiated by the vector. However, some building materials, can retain high temperatures during the night, which might add attractiveness to the presence of hosts. The results suggest that the most attractive habitats for dispersing bugs would be those at short distance, with high CO2 emission and strong IR radiation indicative of host presence. Goats corrals may be the most attractive habitat to disperse, within the domestic habitat. Dispersal would be favoured in periods of low atmospheric water saturation when IR perception is highest. In the IR band, the potential host and habitat discrimination available for the insects fits well with their known sensory capacities and observed dispersive behavior. Research in this area could be of considerable interest in relation to vector surveillance, epidemiology of Chagas disease transmission, and to develop new methods to minimise triatomine colonisation of new habitats. PMID:21856443

  19. IGF-IR and its inhibitors in gastrointestinal carcinomas (Review)

    PubMed Central

    BAO, XIAO HONG; NAOMOTO, YOSHIO; HAO, HUI FANG; WATANABE, NOBUYUKI; SAKURAMA, KAZUFUMI; NOMA, KAZUHIRO; MOTOKI, TAKAYUKI; TOMONO, YASUKO; FUKAZAWA, TAKUYA; SHIRAKAWA, YASUHIRO; YAMATSUJI, TOMOKI; MATSUOKA, JUNJI; TAKAOKA, MUNENORI

    2010-01-01

    The type I insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-IR) and its associated signaling system play a significant role in tumorigenesis, tumor survival and progression, and cancer therapeutic resistance, and thus has provoked great interest as a promising target for cancer treatment. In this report we present the role of IGF-IR in gastrointestinal carcinomas whose pathology has been identified as tightly correlated with an abnormal expression and activation of IGF-IR. Reported data from experimental studies suggest the feasibility of targeted IGF-IR therapy in gastrointestinal carcinomas. Many types of inhibitors against IGF-IR have been developed. Inhibitors with anti-IGF-IR monoclonal antibodies and tyrosine kinase inhibitors currently undergoing preclinical and clinical evolution are also reviewed. PMID:22966282

  20. Future development of IR thermovision weather satellite equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Listratov, A. V.

    1974-01-01

    The self radiation of the surface being viewed is used for image synthesis in IR thermovision equipment. The installation of such equipment aboard weather satellites makes it possible to obtain cloud cover pictures of the earth's surface in a complete orbit, regardless of the illumination conditions, and also provides quantitative information on the underlying surface temperature and cloud top height. Such equipment is used successfully aboard the Soviet satellites of the Meteor system, and experimentally on the American satellites of the Nimbus series. With regard to surface resolution, the present-day IR weather satellite equipment is inferior to the television equipment. This is due primarily to the comparatively low detectivity of the IR detectors used. While IR equipment has several fundamental advantages in comparison with the conventional television equipment, the problem arises of determining the possibility for future development of weather satellite IR thermovision equipment. Criteria are examined for evaluating the quality of IR.

  1. Structural and electronic properties of AuIr nanoalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Díaz, Laura M.; Pérez, Luis A.

    2013-01-01

    The lowest-energy structures of binary (AuIr) n , (AuIr3) s , and (Au3Ir) s clusters, with n = 2-20, and s = 5, modeled by the many-body Gupta potential, were obtained by using a genetic-symbiotic algorithm. These structures were further relaxed within the density functional theory to obtain the most stable structures for each composition. Segregation is observed in all the AuIr clusters, where the Ir atoms occupy the cluster core and the Au atoms are situated on the cluster surface. On the other hand, there is experimental evidence that the (AuIr) n nanoalloys could have an enhanced catalytic activity for CO oxidation. In order to study this phenomenon, we also performed first-principles density functional calculations of the CO and O2 adsorption on these bimetallic nanoclusters, considering three different compositions and a fixed cluster size of 20 atoms.

  2. Ice contamination on satellite IR sensors: the MIPAS case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niro, F.; Fehr, T.; Kleinert, A.; Laur, H.; Lecomte, P.; Perron, G.

    2009-04-01

    MIPAS on board the ENVISAT platform is a Michelson Interferometer measuring the atmospheric limb emission in the mid-infrared (IR), from 4.15 µm to 14.5 µm [1]. The calibrated MIPAS measurements are radiance spectra as a function of wavenumber. The radiometric and spectral calibrations of the raw data are part of the Level 1 processing in the Ground Segment [2]. The accuracy of the radiometric calibration is essential in order to ensure precise temperature and trace gas retrieval in the Level 2 processing. This calibration process requires a set of cold space measurements and a series of measurements of a black body source to determine the radiometric gain function and to correct for instrument self-emission. The deep space measurements are repeated every four limb scanning sequences with the purpose of compensating the variation of instrument's temperature along the orbit. The radiometric gain function is updated every week to correct for a degraded transmission at the detector due to ice contamination. The ice contamination leads to a decrease of the signal, mainly due to ice absorption of the incoming IR radiation. This paper presents an analysis of the effect of ice contamination during the MIPAS mission; in particular we will study its impact on the radiometric accuracy and on the Level 2 retrieval precision. We will highlight the importance of the ice monitoring for the MIPAS mission and we will show that this type of monitoring allows improving the stability and the overall performances of the MIPAS instrument. The effect of ice in other ENVISAT instruments will be also mentioned (e.g., AATSR). The lessons learned during the mission about ice contamination are very important, especially for IR sensors that are the most affected by this type of problem. These lessons will be useful in order to improve the in-flight operations of present and future satellite missions. [1] H. Fischer, M. Birk, C. Blom, B. Carli, M. Carlotti, T. von Clarmann, L. Delbouille, A

  3. Raman scattering of IrTe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Alexander; Thorsmolle, Verner; Artyukhin, Sergey; Yang, Jun; Cheong, Sang-Wook; Blumberg, Girsh

    2014-03-01

    IrTe2 presents a layered compound with a triangular lattice. It is known to exhibit a first order structural phase transition at approximately 260 K which is of a first order, corresponding to a formation of a superstructure with a period of five unit cells. Using polarized Raman spectroscopy we have studied the temperature dependence of 14 observed Raman allowed phononic modes. These phonons couple strongly to this transition and one additional first order transition at approximately 170 K. In the high-temperature phase only 3 modes are observed, while below approximately 280 K all 14 modes become visible. Below approximately 170 K only 11 modes are observed. Our results shed light on the possible mechanism driving the transitions. ACL, VKT and GB acknowledge support by NSF DMR-1104884.

  4. Dynamic projecting IR zoom-based systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturlesi, Benjamin E.; Mangoubi, Samuel; Ben-David, Emanuel

    1995-09-01

    An IR target simulating projector system may sometimes require zooming lenses to simulate continuously the target's increasing size as a missile closes the range. In addition, special opto-mechanical layouts may sometimes be needed to allow cascaded action of two or more zooms to increase the zooming range, or to present the missile simultaneously two or more spectral regions. The zooms in these systems may differ in some important characteristics from the more conventional types: (1) The maximum speed and acceleration of their moving parts, as required by the dynamics of the missile-target approach scenario, are to be limited by the performance of commercially available stages carrying those parts, and (2) the motion control system must assure strict adherence to the 'zoom function' (relative position of the zoom's moving parts) to avoid defocusing during the zooming phase. In this paper we describe the implications of complying with these requirements on implementations actually designed and executed.

  5. Design of compact IR zoom telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ruiyi; Zhou, Xiuli; Zhang, Xingde

    1991-12-01

    A compact IR zoom telescope with diameter/length = 94/159 mm and magnification from 2 to 6 times at 8-12 microns is designed. Mechanically compensated zoom is adopted. Zooming lens and compensating lens groups possessing three roller followers for each are controlled by the stationary control cylinder on which there are three pairs of cam slots to which six followers are attached. When the outer cylinder having six linear slots is rotated, it will force the followers (i.e., the two lens mountings) to turn, resulting in smoothly turning and moving the two. The effect of air gap between the follower and the slot on backlash in the cam track is eliminated by special design of elastic construction of the roller follower. The image quality examed by MTF testing is satisfactory.

  6. The fourth spectrum of iridium (Ir IV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azarov, Vladimir I.; Gayasov, Robert R.

    2016-03-01

    The spectrum of three times ionized iridium, Ir IV, was investigated in the 650-2045 Å wavelength region. The analysis has led to the determination of the 5d6, 5d5 6 s and 5d5 6 p configurations. Twenty-nine of 34 theoretically possible 5d6 levels, 44 of 74 possible 5d5 6 s levels and 150 of 214 possible 5d5 6 p levels have been established. The levels are based on 1348 classified spectral lines. The level structure and transition probabilities were calculated using the orthogonal operators technique. The energy parameters have been determined by the least squares fit to the observed levels. Calculated energy values and LS-compositions obtained from the fitted parameter values are given. The level optimization procedure and the determination of uncertainties of the obtained energy level values are discussed.

  7. Cyclotene diaphragm for MEMS based IR detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shuwen

    2003-01-01

    A novel structure employing Dow Chemical (Midland, MI) benzocyclobutene (BCB) Cyclotene as a diaphragm material is presented in this report. The main advantages of this BCB diaphragm are its low thermal conductivity, robustness, chemical inertness, low curing temperature and high structure yield. Moreover, a BCB film can be either photo-defined or plasma etched and is a suitable micromachining material for post IC processing. Micromachined IR thermopile single detectors and lineal detector arrays (1×16), using BiSeTeSb/BiSbTe sensing elements on BCB diaphragms, have been constructed and tested. Up to 100% structure yield has been obtained. The process used to realize this detector structure is compatible with the eventual inclusion of on-chip circuitry for signal amplification and conditioning.

  8. Spitzer IRS Pipelines for General Users

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narron, B.; Fajardo-Acosta, S.; Ardila, D.; Laher, R. R.

    2008-08-01

    An effort is underway to make the Spitzer InfraRed Spectrograph (IRS) data-processing pipelines available for use by astronomers worldwide. This will allow users to reprocess raw data downloaded from the Spitzer archive with customized calibration files, updated operational parameters, and/or a modified list of processing steps. The pipelines will create all standard BCD (basic calibrated data) and post-BCD products, plus additional intermediate products. The pipelines will be made up of newly developed Perl and C-shell ``executive'' scripts, plus the binary-executable modules currently used in operations (the modules' source code will not be distributed, however). The scripts are being designed for ease of use and will facilitate user-customization. The operating systems targeted for support are Mac OS X, Linux, Solaris, and possibly Windows.

  9. Gated IR Imaging of Shocked Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, Stephen; Turley, Dale; Rightley, Paul; Primas, Lori

    2001-06-01

    Gated IR images have been taken of a series of shocked surface geometries in tin and copper. Metal coupons machined with grooves, steps, and flats with various surface finishes, were mounted directly to high explosive. The HE was point initiated and 500 ns to 1 microsecond wide gated images of the target were taken immediately following shock breakout using a Santa Barbara Focalplane InSb CID camera (SB-134). Raw camera radiance data was temperature calibrated assuming plausible material emissivity. The spatial distribution of temperature was estimated from the images of the shocked flats and found not to be single valued. Several of the geometries were modeled using CTH, a two dimensional Eulerian hydrocode, and comparisons were made to observed results.

  10. Air tightness monitoring by IR thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinzato, Ermanno G.; Marinetti, Sergio; Bison, Paolo G.

    2004-04-01

    The standard air tightness test of containers is based on measurement of global parameters as the outlet of a specific gas, detected by specialised mass spectrometers. The identification and location of air leakages is extremely important especially for the container manufacturer. At the same time, the measure of the mass flux is of importance. IR Thermography has been successfully applied for leakages detection on buildings, but unfortunately, the noise due to The standard air tightness test of containers is based on measurement of global parameters as the outlet of a specific gas, detected by specialised mass spectrometers. The identification and location of air leakages is extremely important especially for the container manufacturer. At the same time, the measure of the mass flux is of importance. IR Thermography has been successfully applied for leakage detection on buildings, but unfortunately, the noise due to environment limits its applicability, particularly in case of a small flux. A new thermal procedure has been developed for the leakage detection. The technique is based on the stimulation of the envelope with a low oscillating heat flux and lock-in analysis. An airflow is injected, with a harmonically varying flowrate and a slightly higher temperature than the ambient. Then, the thermograms sequence is analyzed in the frequency domain. A review of quantitative techniques for the convective heat exchange measurement is reported. The procedure has been utilized for special containers used for both transport and exhibition of pictures inside museums. Tests performed before and after gaskets improvements show the capability of the technique to estimate qualitatively the airflow.

  11. ATR-IR spectroscopy as applied to nucleic acid films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanyugin, Andriy V.; Samijlenko, Svitlana P.; Martynenko, Olena I.; Hovorun, Dmytro M.

    2005-07-01

    For the first time the ATR technique was applied to obtain IR absorption spectra of DNA and RNA dry films. There was worked out procedure of the nucleic acid removal from germanium plate, which obviously was a main obstacle to application of ATR-IR spectroscopy to nucleic acids. This technique of IR spectroscopy was applied to confirmation of RNA tropism of aurin tricarboxylic acid observed by molecular biological methods.

  12. Efficient radiometrically accurate synthetic representation of IR scenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Patrick C.; Gover, Robert E.

    2003-08-01

    A technique is developed for synthesizing a high spectral resolution IR ship signature image, for use in an imaging IR Anti-Ship Cruise Missile (ASCM) model, from an IR scene database provided by the ship signature model NTCS/ShipIR. This synthesized IR ship image is generated for use over ranges representative of an ASCM engagement. The technique presented focuses on the application of in-band averaged transmittance to the source ship signature as a means of reducing the spectral calculations required by the cruise missile model. In order to achieve this reduction in computation, while preserving the fidelity of the apparent ship signature, the idea of sub-banding is introduced. Sub-banding describes the manner in which the IR band is partitioned into smaller bandwidths, such that the error produced in the ship's average contrast radiance due to the use of in-band averaged transmittance is minimized over range. The difference between the average contrast radiance of an IR ship image generated using in-band averaging and the average contrast radiance of a spectrally generated IR ship image is the metric for this minimization. This choice is based on measured data collected from the recent NATO SIMVEX trial, which used high quality IR measurements of the CFAV Quest in an effort to refine the NTCS/ShipIR model. The technique is general and applicable to any band(s) of interest. Results are presented which verify that the use of in-band averaged transmittance over an IR band (3.5-5.0 μm), partitioned using three optimal sub-bands, produces an IR ship image with an average contrast radiance within the desired error bar of a spectrally generated ship image's average contrast radiance.

  13. [Study on the IR and UV dual-spectrum radiation].

    PubMed

    Chen, Z; Zhu, Q; Xu, S; Wan, S

    2000-06-01

    The article gives a method to produce dual spectrum radiation in IR and UV. Relying on theoretical analysis, the relative data are computed, some atomic materials are selected and added to a double-base propellants. When the UV pyrotechnics is ignited together with traditional IR pyrotechnics, the spectrum of IR and UV is emitted at the same time. The final measuring curves show that all results are satisfying. PMID:12958935

  14. Subarcsecond observations of NGC 7538 IRS 1: Continuum distribution and dynamics of molecular gas

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Lei; Shi, Hui; Zhao, Jun-Hui; Wright, M. C. H.; Sandell, Göran; Wu, Yue-Fang; Brogan, Crystal; Corder, Stuartt

    2013-12-10

    We report new results based on the analysis of the Submillimeter Array (SMA) and Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA) observations of NGC 7538 IRS 1 at 1.3 and 3.4 mm with subarcsecond resolutions. With angular resolutions ∼0.''7, the SMA and CARMA observations show that the continuum emission at 1.3 and 3.4 mm from the hyper-compact H II region IRS 1 is dominated by a compact source with a tail-like extended structure to the southwest of IRS 1. With a CARMA B-array image at 1.3 mm convolved to 0.''1, we resolve the hyper-compact H II region into two components: an unresolved hyper-compact core, and a north-south extension with linear sizes of <270 AU and ∼2000 AU, respectively. The fine structure observed with CARMA is in good agreement with the previous Very Large Array results at centimeter wavelengths, suggesting that the hyper-compact H II region at the center of IRS 1 is associated with an ionized bipolar outflow. We image the molecular lines OCS(19-18) and CH{sub 3}CN(12-11) as well as {sup 13}CO(2-1) surrounding IRS 1, showing a velocity gradient along the southwest-northeast direction. The spectral line profiles in {sup 13}CO(2-1), CO(2-1), and HCN(1-0) observed toward IRS 1 show broad redshifted absorption, providing evidence for gas infall with rates in the range of 3-10 × 10{sup –3} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} inferred from our observations.

  15. The scope of the conscience-based exemption in Section 4(1) of the Abortion Act 1967: Doogan and Wood v NHS Greater Glasgow Health Board [2013] CSIH 36.

    PubMed

    Neal, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Doogan is a judgment of the Inner House of the Scottish Court of Session in an action brought by two midwives ('petitioners' at first instance and 'reclaimers' on appeal) for judicial review of a decision by Greater Glasgow and Clyde Health Board ('respondents'). At issue in the litigation was the scope of the conscience-based exemption contained in section 4(1) of the Abortion Act 1967, which included consideration of where the burden of managing the exemption should fall. The court of first instance (Outer House) had held that section 4(1), which exempts people with a conscientious objection from having to 'participate in any treatment authorised by this Act', ought to be read in light of section 1, which was the authorising provision. On the analysis adopted by the Outer House, any activity which was not unlawful before the 1967 Act came into force, and which therefore did not require to be authorised by section 1, was not covered by section 4(1). Roles which consisted of 'supervision, delegation, and support' were held not to fall within the scope of section 4(1) for this reason. The Inner House rejected the argument that the scope of the exemption in section 4(1) must be coextensive with the scope of the authorisation in section 1, and held that section 4(1) covered the 'whole process of treatment' given for the purpose of terminating a pregnancy. For the Inner House, therefore, 'supervision, delegation, and support' of staff directly involved in the abortion process did constitute the kind of 'participation' that a person could be exempted from under section 4(1). Moreover, the court took the view that the reclaimers' interpretation of section 4(1) was also to be preferred in terms of its likely management consequences. The appeal succeeded, and the Health Board has begun the process of appealing to the UK Supreme Court. PMID:24448479

  16. Fusion: ultra-high-speed and IR image sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etoh, T. Goji; Dao, V. T. S.; Nguyen, Quang A.; Kimata, M.

    2015-08-01

    Most targets of ultra-high-speed video cameras operating at more than 1 Mfps, such as combustion, crack propagation, collision, plasma, spark discharge, an air bag at a car accident and a tire under a sudden brake, generate sudden heat. Researchers in these fields require tools to measure the high-speed motion and heat simultaneously. Ultra-high frame rate imaging is achieved by an in-situ storage image sensor. Each pixel of the sensor is equipped with multiple memory elements to record a series of image signals simultaneously at all pixels. Image signals stored in each pixel are read out after an image capturing operation. In 2002, we developed an in-situ storage image sensor operating at 1 Mfps 1). However, the fill factor of the sensor was only 15% due to a light shield covering the wide in-situ storage area. Therefore, in 2011, we developed a backside illuminated (BSI) in-situ storage image sensor to increase the sensitivity with 100% fill factor and a very high quantum efficiency 2). The sensor also achieved a much higher frame rate,16.7 Mfps, thanks to the wiring on the front side with more freedom 3). The BSI structure has another advantage that it has less difficulties in attaching an additional layer on the backside, such as scintillators. This paper proposes development of an ultra-high-speed IR image sensor in combination of advanced nano-technologies for IR imaging and the in-situ storage technology for ultra-highspeed imaging with discussion on issues in the integration.

  17. Near-IR Spectral Variability of Young Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zajac, Stephanie; Eisner, J. A.; Rudolph, A.

    2011-01-01

    Young stars (such as T Tauri and Herbig Ae/Be sources) exhibit photometric variability across the electromagnetic spectrum, including in the visible and infrared regions. Time-variable mass accretion rates may cause some of the observed variability, although other mechanisms such as starspots or structural changes in the circumstellar disks, provide alternative explanations. Spectroscopic observations provide a means to probe accretion via diagnostic emission lines, and to probe the ratio of stellar-to-circumstellar flux via veiling of stellar absorption lines. While spectroscopic variability in the optical range has been previously investigated, variability in the near-IR has not been explored as thoroughly. We have undertaken a project to track the spectral variability of young stars in the near-IR. Using the 90-inch Bok telescope on Kitt Peak, we observed about 40 young stars with FSPEC during two five-night runs separated by one month. As this project continues, in order to extend the timescales covered by our data, we will survey the same targets under similar circumstances in the summer of 2011. Ultimately, we hope to follow a sample of about 100 young stars with five-night observing runs every month of the year. Here we present initial results showing Brackett gamma Hydrogen line emission for several sources. We show that the emission line luminosity varies, and we use this variability to constrain the mass accretion rate with time for the observed objects. We acknowledge the NSF for funding under Award No. AST-0847170, a PAARE Grant for the Calfornia-Arizona Minority Partnership for Astronomy Research and Education (CAMPARE).

  18. A combined IR/IR and IR/UV spectroscopy study on the proton transfer coordinate of isolated 3-hydroxychromone in the electronic ground and excited state.

    PubMed

    Stamm, A; Weiler, M; Brächer, A; Schwing, K; Gerhards, M

    2014-10-21

    In this paper the excited state proton transfer (ESPT) of isolated 3-hydroxychromone (3-HC), the prototype of the flavonols, is investigated for the first time by combined IR/UV spectroscopy in molecular beam experiments. The IR/UV investigations are performed both for the electronically excited and electronic ground state indicating a spectral overlap of transitions of the 3-HC monomer and clusters with water in the electronic ground state, whereas in the excited state only the IR frequencies of the proton-transferred monomer structure are observed. Due to the loss of isomer and species selectivity with respect to the UV excitations IR/IR techniques are applied in order to figure out the assignment of the vibrational transitions in the S0 state. In this context the quadruple resonance IR/UV/IR/UV technique (originally developed to distinguish different isomers in the electronically excited state) could be applied to identify the OH stretching vibration of the monomer in the electronic ground state. In agreement with calculations the OH stretching frequency differs significantly from the corresponding values of substituted hydroxychromones. PMID:25200683

  19. All-fiber mid-IR supercontinuum: a powerful new tool for IR-spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moselund, Peter M.; Huot, Laurent; Brooks, Chris D.

    2016-03-01

    spectroscopy has until now been greatly limited by the availability of lightsources. The choice has generally stood between a laser whose narrow spectrum limits flexibility or a globar, whose low brightness limits signal to noise ratio. Mid-IR supercontinuum sources, which can deliver an ultra-broad spectrum with a million times higher brightness than a globar, are now appearing to fill the performance gap between the traditional lightsources. The generation of a supercontinuum is a highly nonlinear process produced by high peak power pulses propagating through a nonlinear medium. Since the underlying processes are fundamentally random there will normally be some pulse to pulse fluctuation in the output light which can cause problems in spectroscopy. Most of the mid-IR supercontinuum sources shown to date have also been limited to pulse repetition rates of only a few tens of kilohertz which makes it difficult to apply them to the popular FTIR spectroscopy techniques. Here we will demonstrate a fully packaged, all-fiber, turn-key, low noise, 4.8W, 1.8-4.2 μm supercontinuum source, which can operate with variable repetition rates of up to 30 MHz. In addition we will discuss ways to reduce and counter the effects of pulse fluctuations and we demonstrate optimization of the output spectrum of the source for various applications. Such a source can give any mid-IR optics lab access to a performance which has previously only been available from dedicated beamlines at huge synchrotron facilities.

  20. The HOMA-Adiponectin (HOMA-AD) Closely Mirrors the HOMA-IR Index in the Screening of Insulin Resistance in the Brazilian Metabolic Syndrome Study (BRAMS)

    PubMed Central

    Cassani, Roberta Soares Lara; Forti, Adriana Costa e; Pareja, José Carlos; Tambascia, Marcos Antonio; Geloneze, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Background The major adverse consequences of obesity are associated with the development of insulin resistance (IR) and adiposopathy. The Homeostasis Model Assessment-Adiponectin (HOMA-AD) was proposed as a modified version of the HOMA1-IR, which incorporates adiponectin in the denominator of the index. Objectives To evaluate the performance of the HOMA-AD index compared with the HOMA1-IR index as a surrogate marker of IR in women, and to establish the cutoff value of the HOMA-AD. Subjects/Methods The Brazilian Metabolic Syndrome Study (BRAMS) is a cross-sectional multicenter survey. The data from 1,061 subjects met the desired criteria: 18–65 years old, BMI: 18.5–49.9 Kg/m² and without diabetes. The IR was assessed by the indexes HOMA1-IR and HOMA-AD (total sample) and by the hyperglycemic clamp (n = 49). Metabolic syndrome was defined using the IDF criteria. Results For the IR assessed by the clamp, the HOMA-AD demonstrated a stronger coefficient of correlation (r = -0.64) compared with the HOMA1-IR (r = -0.56); p < 0.0001. In the ROC analysis, compared with the HOMA1-IR, the HOMA-AD showed higher values of the AUC for the identification of IR based on the clamp test (AUC: 0.844 vs. AUC: 0.804) and on the metabolic syndrome (AUC: 0.703 vs. AUC: 0.689), respectively; p < 0.001 for all. However, the pairwise comparison did not show evidence of superiority for the HOMA-AD in comparison with the HOMA1-IR in the diagnosis of IR and metabolic syndrome (p > 0.05). The optimal cutoff identified for the HOMA-AD for the diagnosis of IR was 0.95. Conclusions The HOMA-AD index was demonstrated to be a useful surrogate marker for detecting IR among adult women and presented a similar performance compared with the HOMA1-IR index. These results may assist physicians and researchers in determining which method to use to evaluate IR in light of the available facilities. PMID:27490249

  1. WFC3 TV3 Testing: IR Channel Throughput

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Thomas M.

    2008-05-01

    A new IR detector (IR4; FPA165) was housed in WFC3 in the recent campaign of thermal vaccum (TV) testing at GSFC. We performed measurements of the IR channel throughput and found that it exceeds by ~2-8% expectations from component measurements over the entire wavelength range of the channel. This is in contrast to the results of the first WFC3 TV test in 2004 and the second WFC3 TV test in 2007. In 2004, the first IR detector (IR2; FPA064) was in the instrument, and we found a grey deficiency of 15% in the measured throughput. In 2007, the second IR detector (IR1; FPA129) was in the instrument, and we found a deficiency that smoothly varied from about 2% on the blue end of its range to 20% on the red end of its range. At the component level, IR4 was already expected to be far superior to the previous two detectors (in QE and other parameters), so this finding amplifies that superiority. The throughput measurements in the current campaign were repeated several times with outstanding consistency (~1%).

  2. IR keeps coal miners safe and reduces downtime

    SciTech Connect

    Massey, L.G.

    2009-01-15

    Infrared (IR) cameras can inspect the direct current trolley system that powers mantrips and locomotives that transport men and supplies to an underground mine. If trolley insulators become shorted or electrically leaky they can heat the roof and cause a fire or cave-in. The article explains how IR inspection works and describes typical problems that can be identified by thermograms. 8 figs.

  3. New Directions for IR, the DQP, and Tuning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jankowski, Natasha A.; Marshall, David W.

    2015-01-01

    This concluding essay provides a glimpse to the future and alerts IR professionals to related initiatives as well as provides an update to ongoing work with DQP and Tuning. Pulling from the prior chapters it provides some implications for IR offices to consider, not only in their work with the DQP and Tuning, but in terms of general decision…

  4. IRS views on physician control of integrated networks.

    PubMed

    Griffith, G M

    1995-11-01

    Integrated delivery systems and their components are evolving rapidly, as are Internal Revenue Service (IRS) tax-exemption rulings and standards affecting these entities. A common concern addressed by two recent IRS tax-exemption rulings centered on the impact of physician involvement on a hospital's tax-exempt status. PMID:10151865

  5. Testing a Model of IR Radiative Losses: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Vignola, F.; Long, C. N.; Reda, I.

    2009-08-01

    Thermopile pyranometers exhibit IR radiative losses that affect global and diffuse shortwave measurements made with first class thermopile based instruments. Pyrgeometers can be used to measure the sky temperature and are used to calculate the pyranometer?s IR radiative losses.

  6. Mirror Technology Roadmap for Optical/IR/FIR Space Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Phil

    2006-01-01

    The Optics sub-committee of the Advanced Telescope and Observatory {ATO) Capability Roadmap developed an optics capability roadmap to enable planned future space telescopes. The roadmap details 4 basic technologies: cryogenic optics for IR and Far-IR missions; precision optics for optical, UV and EUV missions; grazing incidence optics for x-ray missions; and novel optics with revolutionary capabilities.

  7. A Simulation Program for Dynamic Infrared (IR) Spectra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zoerb, Matthew C.; Harris, Charles B.

    2013-01-01

    A free program for the simulation of dynamic infrared (IR) spectra is presented. The program simulates the spectrum of two exchanging IR peaks based on simple input parameters. Larger systems can be simulated with minor modifications. The program is available as an executable program for PCs or can be run in MATLAB on any operating system. Source…

  8. Towards universal enrichment nanocoating for IR-ATR waveguides.

    PubMed

    Giammarco, James; Zdyrko, Bogdan; Petit, Laeticia; Musgraves, J David; Hu, Juejun; Agarwal, Anu; Kimerling, Lionel; Richardson, Kathleen; Luzinov, Igor

    2011-08-28

    Polymer multilayered nanocoating capable of concentrating various chemical substances at IR-ATR waveguide surfaces is described. The coating affinity to an analyte played a pivotal role in sensitivity enhancement of the IR-ATR measurements, since the unmodified waveguide did not show any analyte detection. PMID:21734984

  9. Electromagnetic and thermal effects of IR-UWB wireless implant systems on the human head.

    PubMed

    Thotahewa, Kasun M S; Redouté, Jean-Michel; Yuce, Mehmet R

    2013-01-01

    The usage of implanted wireless transmitting devices inside the human body has become widely popular in recent years. Applications such as multi-channel neural recording systems require high data rates in the wireless transmission link. Because of the inherent advantages provided by Impulse-Radio Ultra Wide Band (IR-UWB) such as high data rate capability, low power consumption and small form factor, there has been an increased research interest in using IR-UWB for bio-medical implant applications. Hence it has become imperative to analyze the electromagnetic effects caused by the use of IR-UWB when it is operated in or near the human body. This paper reports the electromagnetic effects of head implantable transmitting devices operating based on Impulse Radio Ultra Wide Band (IR-UWB) wireless technology. Simulations illustrate the performance of an implantable UWB antenna tuned to operate at 4 GHz with an -10 dB bandwidth of approximately 1 GHz when it is implanted in a human head model. Specific Absorption Rate (SAR), Specific Absorption (SA) and temperature increase are analyzed to compare the compliance of the transmitting device with international safety regulations. PMID:24110902

  10. Electrically tunable transport in antiferromagnetic Sr3Ir2O7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seinige, Heidi; Wang, Cheng; Cao, Gang; Zhou, Jianshi-S.; Goodenough, John B.; Tsoi, Maxim

    Recently we demonstrated experimentally the existence of interconnections between magnetic state and transport currents in antiferromagnetic (AFM) Mott insulator Sr2IrO4. We found a very large anisotropic magnetoresistance and demonstrated a reversible resistive switching driven by high-density currents/high electric fields. These results support the feasibility of AFM spintronics, where antiferromagnets are used in place of ferromagnets, however a low Néel temperature of this material (240 K) questions any practical applications. Here we present a comparative electrical transport study of its sister compound Sr2IrO4 which has a higher transition temperature (285 K). Similar to the case of Sr2IrO4, we find a continuous reduction in the resistivity of Sr3Ir2O7 as a function of increasing electrical bias and abrupt reversible changes above a threshold bias current. We explain these results by a reduction of activation energy associated with a field-driven lattice distortion. This work was supported in part by C-SPIN, one of six centers of STARnet, a Semiconductor Research Corporation program, sponsored by MARCO and DARPA, and by NSF Grants DMR-1207577, DMR-1265162, and DMR-1122603.

  11. ASIC Implementation of Highly Reliable IR-UWB Transceiver for Industrial Automation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olonbayar, Sonom; Fischer, Gunter; Kreiser, Dan; Martynenko, Denys; Klymenko, Oleksiy; Kraemer, Rolf; Grass, Eckhard

    2016-07-01

    An in-depth treatment of impulse an radio ultra-wideband (IR-UWB) wireless system is provided reviewing theoretical background, proceeding with detailed implementation procedure, and finally giving simulation and test results. This is the first research and prototyping work to be published in the field of IR-UWB that operates in the 6-8 GHz band. The aim of this work is to implement an IR-UWB wireless system for industrial automation that is robust and reliable. To achieve this, an analogue bandwidth of 250 MHz and digital baseband processing at the clock frequency 499.2 MHz were realized in a 250 nm BiCMOS process, integrating the complete system into a single chip. Simulation and measurement results confirm that the implemented IR-UWB transceiver is operational across four frequency channels in the band 6-8 GHz each supporting three data rates 850 kb/s, 6.81 Mb/s and 27.24 Mb/s.

  12. The vibrational resonance Raman spectra and the valence force field of iridium dichalcogenides, IrS sub 2 and IrSe sub 2

    SciTech Connect

    Sourisseau, C.; Cavagnat, R.; Fouassier, M. ); Jobic, S.; Deniard, P.; Brec, R.; Rouxel, J. )

    1991-03-01

    The electronic (900-300 nm), infrared, and Raman (500-10 cm{sup {minus}1}) spectra of polycrystalline samples of IrS{sub 2} and IrSe{sup 2} were investigated. A complete vibrational assignment is proposed in terms of stretching and bending motions of IrX{sub 3} or IrX{sub 6} distorted units and based upon frequency shifts when substituting sulfur by selenium. All the assignments were checked by a complete valence force field calculation of the IrS{sub 2} phase, including short-range and long-range interactions where most of the force constants were transferred from the FeS{sub 2} pyrite and marcasite compounds. Values of the force constants, of the principal potential energy distributions and mean square vibrational amplitudes definitely confirm the existence of anomalously long (S{sub 2}) pairs, whose Raman stretching modes appear at 334 and 316 cm{sup {minus}1}, and of large constraints between the various IrS{sub 6} units.

  13. Intermediate/Advanced Research Design and Statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ploutz-Snyder, Robert

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this module is To provide Institutional Researchers (IRs) with an understanding of the principles of advanced research design and the intermediate/advanced statistical procedures consistent with such designs

  14. Status of uncooled focal plane detector arrays for smart IR sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liddiard, Kevin C.; Ringh, Ulf; Jansson, Christer

    1996-06-01

    A cooperative research project between the Defense Science and Technology Organization, Australia, and the National Defense Research Establishment, Sweden, seeks to investigate concepts for smart IR focal plane detector arrays, whereby a monolithic Semiconductor Film Bolometer detector array is integrated with a CMOS signal conditioning circuit, analog- to-digital conversion and signal processing functions on the same silicon chip. Novel signal conditioning and on-chip digital readout techniques have been successfully demonstrated, and the supporting signal processing electronic design is being developed. This paper discusses the status of detector materials research and staring focal plane array development. The first experimental array has been delivered and is undergoing evaluation.

  15. Superconductive digital readout for IR FPA sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durand, D. J.; Abelson, L. A.; Dalrymple, B. J.; Eaton, L.; Heflinger, L. O.; Leung, M.; Pham, T.; Sandell, R. D.; Silver, A. H.; Spargo, J. W.

    1992-07-01

    We have built and demonstrated an all superconductive digital readout for use in an IR focal plane array sensor. High performance, ultralow power superconductive circuits perform the functions of low noise preamplification and analog to digital conversion. The superconductive readout was tested with a variety of detectors, including InSb, Si:As, and a thin film NbN superconducting detector. Light sources included a HeNe laser (0.6 micron), a CO2 laser (10 microns), and a blackbody (400 to 900 K). In each case, the detector and readout circuitry was assembled into a 2 inch diameter, 6 inch long test package cooled in a single dewar. We demonstrated the functionality of the detector/readout channel from input photons to output digital signal. The superconductive readout reported here used Nb-based circuits operating at 4 K. An NbN squid amplifier and detector have subsequently been demonstrated above 10 K. We discuss the extension of the entire digital readout to operating temperatures above 10 K.

  16. Evaluating uniformity of IR reference sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrat, Catherine; Violleau, Sébastien

    2015-10-01

    Infrared reference sources such as blackbodies are used to calibrate and test IR sensors and cameras.. Applications requiring a high thermal uniformity over the emissive surface become more and more frequent compared to the past applications. Among these applications are non uniformity correction of infrared cameras focused at short distance and simultaneous calibration of a set of sensor facing a large area blackbody. Facing these demanding applications requires to accurately measuring thee thermal radiation of each point of the emissive surface of the reference source. The use of an infrared camera for this purpose turns out to be absolutely inefficient since the uniformity off response of this camera is usually worse than the uniformity of thee source to bee measured. Consequently, HGH has developed a testing bench for accurate measurement of uniformity of infrared sources based on a low noise radiometer mounted of translating stages and using an exclusive drift correction method. This bench delivers a reliable thermal map of any kind of infrared reference source.

  17. Spitzer IRS Observations of FU Orionis Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, J. D.; Hartmann, L.; Calvet, N.; Watson, D. M.; Ibrahimov, M.; Furlan, E.; Sargent, B.; Forrest, W. J.

    2006-09-01

    We present 5-35 μm spectra, taken with the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) on the Spitzer Space Telescope, of five FU Orionis objects: FU Ori, V1515 Cyg, V1057 Cyg, BBW 76, and V346 Nor. All but V346 Nor reveal amorphous silicate grains in emission at 10 and 20 μm, and show water-vapor absorption bands at 5.8 and 6.8 μm and SiO or possibly methane absorption at 8 μm. These absorption features closely match these bands in model stellar photospheres-signs of the gaseous photospheres of the inner regions of these objects' accretion disks. The continuum emission at 5-8 μm is also consistent with such disks, and, for FU Orionis and BBW 76, longer wavelength emission may be fit by a model that includes moderate disk flaring. V1057 Cyg and V1515 Cyg have much more emission at longer wavelengths than the others, perhaps evidence of a substantial remnant of their natal, infalling envelopes.

  18. Small pixel oversampled IR focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caulfield, John; Curzan, Jon; Lewis, Jay; Dhar, Nibir

    2015-06-01

    We report on a new high definition high charge capacity 2.1 Mpixel MWIR Infrared Focal Plane Array. This high definition (HD) FPA utilizes a small 5 um pitch pixel size which is below the Nyquist limit imposed by the optical systems Point Spread Function (PSF). These smaller sub diffraction limited pixels allow spatial oversampling of the image. We show that oversampling IRFPAs enables improved fidelity in imaging including resolution improvements, advanced pixel correlation processing to reduce false alarm rates, improved detection ranges, and an improved ability to track closely spaced objects. Small pixel HD arrays are viewed as the key component enabling lower size, power and weight of the IR Sensor System. Small pixels enables a reduction in the size of the systems components from the smaller detector and ROIC array, the reduced optics focal length and overall lens size, resulting in an overall compactness in the sensor package, cooling and associated electronics. The highly sensitive MWIR small pixel HD FPA has the capability to detect dimmer signals at longer ranges than previously demonstrated.

  19. Encapsulated thermopile detector array for IR microspectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Huaiwen; Emadi, Arvin; de Graaf, Ger; Wolffenbuttel, Reinoud F.

    2010-04-01

    The miniaturized IR spectrometer discussed in this paper is comprised of: slit, planar imaging diffraction grating and Thermo-Electric (TE) detector array, which is fabricated using CMOS compatible MEMS technology. The resolving power is maximized by spacing the TE elements at an as narrow as possible pitch, which is limited by processing constraints. The large aspect ratio of the TE elements implies a large cross-sectional area between adjacent elements within the array and results in a relatively large lateral heat exchange between micromachined elements by thermal diffusion. This thermal cross-talk is about 10% in case of a gap spacing of 10 μm between elements. Therefore, the detector array should be packaged (and operated) in vacuum in order to reduce the cross-talk due to the air conduction through the gap. Thin film packaging is a solution to achieve an operating air pressure at1.3 mBar, which reduces the cross-talk to 0.4%. An absorber based on an optical interference filter design is also designed and fabricated as an IC compatible post-process on top the detector array. The combination of the use of CMOS compatible materials and processing with high absorbance in 1.5 - 5 μm wavelength range makes a complete on-chip microspectrometer possible.

  20. Simulation of Wakefield Effect in ILC IR Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Pei, S; Seryi, A.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; /SLAC

    2008-06-26

    To achieve super high luminosity, high current beams with very short bunch length are needed, which carry high intensity EM fields. For ILC, two bunch trains with bunch length of 300 {micro}m and bunch charge of 3.2nC are needed to collide at the IR to achieve the ILC luminosity goals. When the 300 {micro}m bunches pass through the IR chamber, wakefields will be excited, which will cause HOM power flowing through the IR chamber beam pipe to the final doublets due to the high frequency characteristic of the induced wakefields. Since superconducting technology is adopted for the final doublets of ILC BDS, whose operation stability might be affected by the HOM power produced at the IR chamber, quench might happen. In this paper, we did some analytical estimation and numerical simulation on the wakefield effects in ILC IR chamber.

  1. Simultaneous multi-beam planar array IR (pair) spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Elmore, Douglas L.; Rabolt, John F.; Tsao, Mei-Wei

    2005-09-13

    An apparatus and method capable of providing spatially multiplexed IR spectral information simultaneously in real-time for multiple samples or multiple spatial areas of one sample using IR absorption phenomena requires no moving parts or Fourier Transform during operation, and self-compensates for background spectra and degradation of component performance over time. IR spectral information and chemical analysis of the samples is determined by using one or more IR sources, sampling accessories for positioning the samples, optically dispersive elements, a focal plane array (FPA) arranged to detect the dispersed light beams, and a processor and display to control the FPA, and display an IR spectrograph. Fiber-optic coupling can be used to allow remote sensing. Portability, reliability, and ruggedness is enhanced due to the no-moving part construction. Applications include determining time-resolved orientation and characteristics of materials, including polymer monolayers. Orthogonal polarizers may be used to determine certain material characteristics.

  2. Spin mixing conductance in Cu–Ir dilute alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takizawa, Sei; Kimata, Motoi; Omori, Yasutomo; Niimi, Yasuhiro; Otani, YoshiChika

    2016-06-01

    We have investigated the spin mixing conductance at the interface of Py and Cu–Ir dilute alloys by means of spin pumping and inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE) measurements for Cu–Ir. From systematic studies of the effective spin mixing conductance as a function of Ir concentration, we found that the interfacial spin mixing conductance g \\uparrow \\downarrow was proportional to the Ir concentration. This result is consistent with a scenario based on the impurity-dependent density of states at the Fermi energy. From the ISHE measurements as a function of Ir concentration, we show that the mechanism of the spin Hall effect is skew scattering and that the spin Hall angle is comparable to the previously determined value by using the lateral spin valve structures.

  3. What Is the Glasgow Coma Scale?

    MedlinePlus

    ... 3:22pm Well done you. Look after yourself Mar 24th, 2016 6:48am Thank you for sharing!!! Mar 2nd, 2016 2:09am I am an RN ... surgery and that since he was already on life support that the likely ability of our son ...

  4. The use of an In House Scoring System Scale versus Glasgow Coma Scale in non-traumatic altered states of consciousness patients: can it be used for triaging patients in Southeast Asian developing countries?

    PubMed

    Maheswaran, M; Adnan, W A W; Ahmad, R; Ab Rahman, N H N; Naing, N N; Abdullah, J

    2007-11-01

    Non-traumatic Altered States of Consciousness (ASC) are a non-specific consequence of various etiologies, and are normally monitored by Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS). The GCS gives varriable results among untrained emergency medicine personel in developing countries where English is not the first language. An In House Scoring System (IHSS) scale was made by the first author for the purpose of triaging so as to quickly asses patients when seen by medical personel. This IHSS scale was compared to the GCS to determine it's specificity and sensitivity in the accident and emergency department (ED) of Hospital University Sains Malaysia (HUSM). All patients with non-traumatic ASC were selected by purposive sampling according to pre-determined criteria. Patients were evaluated by the two systems, IHSS and GCS, by emergency physicians who were on call. Patient demographics, clinical features, investigations, treatment given and outcomes were collected and followed for a period of 14 days. A total of 221 patients with non-traumatic ASC were studied, 54.3% were males. The mean age of the patients was 56 years old. The mean overall GCS score on presentation to the ED was 10.3. The mean duration of ASC was 11.6 hours. One hundred thirty patients (58.8%) experienced ASC secondary to general or focal cerebral disorders. The mortality rate was 40.3% 2 weeks after the ED visit. Fifty-four point three percent of the patients were awake and considered to have good outcomes while 45.7% of the patients had poor outcomes (comatose or dead) 2 weeks after the ED visit. The mean overall GCS score, verbal and motor subscores as well as the IHSS had significantly decreased (worsened) after treatment in the ED. A poor IHSS scale, hypertension, current smoking, abnormal pupillary reflexes and acidosis were associated with a worse 2-week outcome. The mean age and WBC count was lower and the mean overall GCS score and eye, verbal and motor subscores were higher as well as those having a lower IHSS

  5. Jamming efficiency evaluation of the IR smoke screen against high-orbit IR detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Gui-qing; Li, Yong-xiang

    2011-08-01

    In order to lower the orientating capability of the DSP satellite, at first the paper analyzes early warning missile satellite detective system, introduces the jamming mechanism of infrared smoke screen, and a model of jamming efficiency evaluation of the IR smoke screen against early warning satellite was built from three sides of absorbency of smoke screen to infrared radiation, dispersion ability and infrared radiation from smoke screen self. At last the correlative conclusion was got based on the brief depiction of Early-warning Satellite.

  6. Image registration of naval IR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodland, Arne J.

    1996-06-01

    In a real world application an image from a stabilized sensor on a moving platform will not be 100 percent stabilized. There will always be a small unknown error in the stabilization due to factors such as dynamic deformations in the structure between sensor and reference Inertial Navigation Unit, servo inaccuracies, etc. For a high resolution imaging sensor this stabilization error causes the image to move several pixels in unknown direction between frames. TO be able to detect and track small moving objects from such a sensor, this unknown movement of the sensor image must be estimated. An algorithm that searches for land contours in the image has been evaluated. The algorithm searches for high contrast points distributed over the whole image. As long as moving objects in the scene only cover a small area of the scene, most of the points are located on solid ground. By matching the list of points from frame to frame, the movement of the image due to stabilization errors can be estimated and compensated. The point list is searched for points with diverging movement from the estimated stabilization error. These points are then assumed to be located on moving objects. Points assumed to be located on moving objects are gradually exchanged with new points located in the same area. Most of the processing is performed on the list of points and not on the complete image. The algorithm is therefore very fast and well suited for real time implementation. The algorithm has been tested on images from an experimental IR scanner. Stabilization errors were added artificially to the image such that the output from the algorithm could be compared with the artificially added stabilization errors.

  7. Improved signature prediction through coupling of ShipIR and CFD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaitekunas, David A.; Sideroff, Chris; Moussa, Christine

    2011-05-01

    Most existing platform signature models use semi-empirical correlations to predict flow convection on internal and external surfaces, a key element in the prediction of accurate skin signature. Although these convection algorithms are capable of predicting bulk heat transfer coefficients between each surface and the designated flow region, they are not capable of capturing local effects such as flow stagnation, flow separation, and flow history. Most computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes lack the ability to predict changes in background solar and thermal irradiation with the environment and sun location, nor do they include multi-bounce radiative surface exchanges by default in their solvers. Existing interfaces between CFD and signature prediction typically involve a one-directional mapping of CFD predicted temperatures to the signature model. This paper describes a new functional interface between the NATO-standard ship signature model (ShipIR) and the ANSYS Fluent model, where a bi-directional mapping is used to transfer the thermal radiation predictions from ShipIR to Fluent, and after re-iteration of the CFD solution, transfer the wall and fluid temperatures back to ShipIR for further refinement of local-area heat transfer coefficients, and re-iteration of the ShipIR thermal solution. Both models converge to an RMS difference of 0.3 °C within a few successive iterations (5-6). This new functional interface is described through a detailed thermal/IR simulation of an unclassified research vessel, the Canadian Forces Auxiliary Vessel (CFAV) Quest. Future efforts to validate this new modelling approach using shipboard measurements are also discussed.

  8. Constraining Globular Cluster Age Uncertainties using the IR Color–Magnitude Diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correnti, Matteo; Gennaro, Mario; Kalirai, Jason S.; Brown, Thomas M.; Calamida, Annalisa

    2016-05-01

    Globular Clusters (GCs) in the Milky Way are the primary laboratories for establishing the ages of the oldest stellar populations and for measuring the color–magnitude relation of stars. In infrared (IR) color–magnitude diagrams (CMDs), the stellar main sequence (MS) exhibits a “kink” due to opacity effects in M dwarfs such that lower mass and cooler dwarfs become bluer in the IR color baseline. This diagnostic offers a new opportunity to model GC CMDs and to reduce uncertainties on cluster properties (e.g., their derived ages). In this context, we analyzed Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 IR archival observations of four GCs—47 Tuc, M4, NGC 2808, and NGC 6752—for which the data are deep enough to fully sample the low-mass MS, reaching at least ≃2 mag below the “kink.” We derived the fiducial lines for each cluster and compared them with a grid of isochrones over a large range of parameter space, allowing age, metallicity, distance, and reddening to vary within reasonable selected ranges. The derived ages for the four clusters are, respectively, 11.6, 11.5, 11.2, and 12.1 Gyr and their random uncertainties are σ ˜ 0.7–1.1 Gyr. Our results suggest that the near-IR MS “kink,” combined with the MS turn-off, provides a valuable tool to measure GC ages and offers a promising opportunity to push the absolute age of GCs to sub-Gyr accuracy with the next generation IR telescopes such as the James Webb Space Telescope and the Wide-field Infrared Survey Telescope. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  9. Constraining Globular Cluster Age Uncertainties using the IR Color–Magnitude Diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correnti, Matteo; Gennaro, Mario; Kalirai, Jason S.; Brown, Thomas M.; Calamida, Annalisa

    2016-05-01

    Globular Clusters (GCs) in the Milky Way are the primary laboratories for establishing the ages of the oldest stellar populations and for measuring the color–magnitude relation of stars. In infrared (IR) color–magnitude diagrams (CMDs), the stellar main sequence (MS) exhibits a “kink” due to opacity effects in M dwarfs such that lower mass and cooler dwarfs become bluer in the IR color baseline. This diagnostic offers a new opportunity to model GC CMDs and to reduce uncertainties on cluster properties (e.g., their derived ages). In this context, we analyzed Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 IR archival observations of four GCs—47 Tuc, M4, NGC 2808, and NGC 6752—for which the data are deep enough to fully sample the low-mass MS, reaching at least ≃2 mag below the “kink.” We derived the fiducial lines for each cluster and compared them with a grid of isochrones over a large range of parameter space, allowing age, metallicity, distance, and reddening to vary within reasonable selected ranges. The derived ages for the four clusters are, respectively, 11.6, 11.5, 11.2, and 12.1 Gyr and their random uncertainties are σ ∼ 0.7–1.1 Gyr. Our results suggest that the near-IR MS “kink,” combined with the MS turn-off, provides a valuable tool to measure GC ages and offers a promising opportunity to push the absolute age of GCs to sub-Gyr accuracy with the next generation IR telescopes such as the James Webb Space Telescope and the Wide-field Infrared Survey Telescope. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  10. WFC3 TV2 Testing: IR Channel Throughput

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Thomas M.

    2007-10-01

    A new IR detector (IR1; FPA129) was housed in WFC3 during the most recent campaign of thermal vaccum (TV) ground testing at GSFC. We performed measurements of the IR channel throughput over the course of ground testing, and found that the throughput is near expectations on the blue end of the IR channel wavelength range, but approximately 20% lower than expectations on the red end. This is in contrast to the results of the first WFC3 TV tests in 2004, when the previous IR detector (IR2; FPA064) was in the instrument; there, we found a grey deficiency of 15% in the measured throughput. The throughput measurements in the current campaign were repeated many times, with many variations on the test procedure, to understand the strong variations in the calculated throughput. In the end, these variations were traced to an instability in the optical stimulus used for these tests, not the WFC3 optics or detector. Unfortunately, this problem means that all of the IR1 images in the archive record an erroneous value for the optical stimulus flux. Most of these records cannot be corrected, due to the unknown state of the optical stimulus at the time the data were obtained, but the final two throughput tests were performed in tandem with a calibration of the optical stimulus that accounted for these systematic errors; the correction from this contemporaneous calibration has been applied here. Background

  11. Near-IR imaging of demineralization under sealants

    PubMed Central

    Tom, Henry; Chan, Kenneth H.; Darling, Cynthia L.; Fried, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that near-IR reflectance and transillumination imaging can be used to acquire high contrast images of early caries lesions and composite restorative materials. The aim of the study was to determine the optimum near-IR wavelengths for imaging demineralized areas under dental sealants. Fifteen natural human premolars and molars with occlusal lesions were used in this in vitro study. Images before and after application of sealants were acquired using near-IR reflectance and near-IR transillumination at wavelengths of 1300 nm, 1460 nm, and 1500 – 1700 nm. Images were also acquired using polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography for comparison. The highest contrast for near-IR reflectance was at 1460 nm and 1500 – 1700 nm. These near-IR wavelengths are coincident with higher water absorption. The clear Delton sealant investigated was not visible in either co-polarization or cross-polarization OCT images. The wavelength region between 1500-1700-nm yielded the highest contrast of lesions under sealants for near-IR reflectance measurements. PMID:24817807

  12. Near-IR imaging of occlusal dental decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buehler, Christopher M.; Fried, Daniel

    2005-03-01

    Dental enamel manifests high transparency in the near-IR. Previous work demonstrated that near-IR light at 1310-nm is ideally suited for the transillumination of interproximal dental caries (dental decay in between teeth) [1]. However, most new dental decay occurs in the pits and fissures of the occlusal (biting) surfaces of posterior teeth. These caries lesions cannot be detected by x-rays during the early stages of decay due to the overlapping topography of the crown of the tooth. In this study, a near-IR imaging system operating at 1310-nm was used to acquire occlusal images by launching the near-IR light into the buccal surface of the tooth just above the gingival margin (gum-line). The near-IR light diffuses through the highly scattering dentin providing uniform back illumination of the enamel of the crowns allowing imaging of the occlusal surfaces. The near-IR images show high contrast between sound and demineralized areas. Demineralization (decay) can be easily differentiated from stains and pigmentation. Moreover, the high transparency of the enamel enables imaging at greater depth for the detection of subsurface decay hidden under the enamel. These early images suggest that the near-IR offers significant advantages over conventional visual, tactile and radiographic caries detection methods.

  13. Near-IR imaging of demineralization under sealants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tom, Henry; Chan, Kenneth H.; Darling, Cynthia L.; Fried, Daniel

    2014-02-01

    Previous studies have shown that near-IR reflectance and transillumination imaging can be used to acquire high contrast images of early caries lesions and composite restorative materials. The aim of the study was to determine the optimum near-IR wavelengths for imaging demineralized areas under dental sealants. Fifteen natural human premolars and molars with occlusal lesions were used in this in vitro study. Images before and after application of sealants were acquired using near-IR reflectance and near-IR transillumination at wavelengths of 1300 nm, 1460 nm, and 1500 - 1700 nm. Images were also acquired using polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography for comparison. The highest contrast for near- IR reflectance was at 1460 nm and 1500 - 1700 nm. These near-IR wavelengths are coincident with higher water absorption. The clear Delton sealant investigated was not visible in either co-polarization or crosspolarization OCT images. The wavelength region between 1500-1700-nm yielded the highest contrast of lesions under sealants for near-IR reflectance measurements.

  14. Two Jets from the Protostellar System L1551 IRS 5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fridlund, C. V. Malcolm; Liseau, René

    1998-05-01

    Hubble Space Telescope and ground-based observations of the jet emanating from the young stellar object L1551 IRS 5 clearly show a structure with two components, one of which terminates in a working surface only 1500 AU from the originating sources. This particular jet is found to be less dense than the ambient medium. Its Mach disk is found to be very small, only ~45 AU. We show that this jet cannot be the driver of the large-scale molecular outflow in L1551 for two reasons: (1) the jet fails to provide the necessary momentum by at least a factor of 100, and, (2) having a dynamic age ~3 orders of magnitude less than that of the outflow, this jet has no causal relationship with the molecular flow. The morphology and velocity field of the two components are consistent with them being separate entities, and we suggest that there are in fact two jets, each possibly originating from a different young stellar object. Based on observations made with the Nordic Optical Telescope, operated jointly on the island of La Palma by Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden, in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, and based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  15. Developments in uncooled IR technology at BAE SYSTEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurnee, Mark N.; Kohin, Margaret; Blackwell, Richard J.; Butler, Neal R.; Whitwam, Jason T.; Backer, Brian S.; Leary, Arthur R.; Nielson, Thomas

    2001-10-01

    Uncooled microbolometer thermal imaging sensor technology has begun to successfully address military, government and commercial applications in the real world. BAE SYSTEMS, located in Lexington MA, has been involved in the design and development of uncooled IR technology since the early 1980s. Our current MicroIRTM products are based on vanadium oxide (VOx) microbolometers. Thousands of uncooled microbolometer thermal imaging sensors are now being produced and sold annually. A the same time, applied research and development on the technology continues to improve the basic products and make them suitable for new applications. In this paper we report on the status and improvements achieved in the MicroIRTM product line, based on 320 X 240 element and 160 X 120 element FPA's with 46 μm pixel pitch. Other near term MicroIRTM products include 320 X 240 and 640 X 480 FPA's with 28 micrometers pixel pitch and measured sensitivities below 50 mK. In the systems area we discuss development and testing of a Light Thermal Weapon Sight (LTWS) for the U.S. Army, being developed by BAE SYSTEMS in partnership with Thales, based upon our uncooled MicroIRTM focal plane arrays (FPA) and systems. The LTWS prototypes were based upon our Standard Imaging Module SIM200, which employs our LAM2C, 320 X 240 element, microbolometer FPA. Finally we discuss the 480 X 640 element FPA and its application to the Heavy Thermal Weapon Sight application.

  16. Saturn's Atmospheric Structure from Visible and Near-IR Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanover, N.

    1999-09-01

    The vertical structure of Saturn's atmosphere is determined using an adding-doubling code to model observed center-to-limb brightness variations. The imaging data sets consist of a) Hubble Space Telescope WF/PC and WFPC2 images taken in continuum and narrow-band methane absorption filters, and b) near-IR (1--2.5 mu m) ground-based images taken in narrow-band methane and continuum filters with the Apache Point Observatory 3.5 meter telescope. A standard two-cloud model is employed, in which layers of clear gas interleave a stratospheric haze layer, an ammonia cloud deck, and a lower, semi-infinite cloud deck. Our code, which has heretofore been used to characterize the Jovian atmosphere, has been modified to incorporate physical conditions more appropriate for Saturn. The global, longitudinally-averaged atmospheric structure as a function of latitude is discussed; vertical structure in anomalous convective regions will be presented elsewhere. This work was funded by NASA Grant NAG5-7904. Additional support was provided by NASA through grant number AR-08363.01-97A from the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  17. Patient Safety in Interventional Radiology: A CIRSE IR Checklist

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, M. J.; Fanelli, F.; Haage, P.; Hausegger, K.; Lienden, K. P. Van

    2012-04-15

    Interventional radiology (IR) is an invasive speciality with the potential for complications as with other invasive specialities. The World Health Organization (WHO) produced a surgical safety checklist to decrease the morbidity and mortality associated with surgery. The Cardiovascular and Interventional Society of Europe (CIRSE) set up a task force to produce a checklist for IR. Use of the checklist will, we hope, reduce the incidence of complications after IR procedures. It has been modified from the WHO surgical safety checklist and the RAD PASS from Holland.

  18. Arsia Mons Collapse Pits in IR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    We will be looking at collapse pits for the next two weeks. Collapse pits on Mars are formed in several ways. In volcanic areas, channelized lava flows can form roofs which insulate the flowing lava. These features are termed lava tubes on Earth and are common features in basaltic flows. After the lava has drained, parts of the roof of the tube will collapse under its own weight. These collapse pits will only be as deep as the bottom of the original lava tube. Another type of collapse feature associated with volcanic areas arises when very large eruptions completely evacuate the magma chamber beneath the volcano. The weight of the volcano will cause the entire edifice to subside into the void space below it. Structural features including fractures and graben will form during the subsidence. Many times collapse pits will form within the graben. In addition to volcanic collapse pits, Mars has many collapse pits formed when volatiles (such as subsurface ice) are released from the surface layers. As the volatiles leave, the weight of the surrounding rock causes collapse pits to form.

    These collapse pits are found on the flank of Arsia Mons and are related to lava tube collapse.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude -8.8, Longitude 240.4 East (119.6 West). 100 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal

  19. Small pixel pitch MCT IR-modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, H.; Breiter, R.; Eich, D.; Figgemeier, H.; Fries, P.; Rutzinger, S.; Wendler, J.

    2016-05-01

    It is only some years ago, since VGA format detectors in 15μm pitch, manufactured with AIM's MCT n-on-p LPE standard technology, have been introduced to replace TV/4 format detector arrays as a system upgrade. In recent years a rapid increase in the demand for higher resolution, while preserving high thermal resolution, compactness and low power budget is observed. To satisfy these needs AIM has realized first prototypes of MWIR XGA format (1024x768) detector arrays in 10μm pitch. They fit in the same compact dewar as 640x512, 15μm pitch detector arrays. Therefore, they are best suited for system upgrade purposes to benefit from higher spatial resolution and keep cost on system level low. By combining pitch size reduction with recent development progress in the fields of miniature cryocoolers, short dewars and high operating temperatures the way ahead to ultra-compact high performance MWIR-modules is prepared. For cost reduction MBE grown MCT on commercially available GaAs substrates is introduced at AIM. Recently, 640x512, 15μm pitch FPAs, grown with MBE have successfully passed long-term high temperature storage tests as a crucial step towards serial production readiness level for use in future products. Pitch size reduction is not limited to arrays sensitive in the MWIR, but is of great interest for high performance LWIR or 3rd Gen solutions. Some applications such as rotorcraft pilotage require superior spatial resolution in a compact design to master severe weather conditions or degraded visual environment such as brown-out. For these applications AIM is developing both LWIR as well as dual band detector arrays in HD-format (1280x720) with 12μm pitch. This paper will present latest results in the development of detector arrays with small pitch sizes of 10μm and 12μm at AIM, together with their usage to realize compact cooled IR-modules.

  20. Comparative Investigation of Benzene Steam Reforming over Spinel Supported Rh and Ir Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, Donghai; Lebarbier, Vanessa M.; Rousseau, Roger; Glezakou, Vassiliki-Alexandra; Albrecht, Karl O.; Kovarik, Libor; Flake, Matt; Dagle, Robert A.

    2013-06-07

    activity on the supported highly dispersed Rh catalyst can be rationalized by the thermodynamic limitation for the very first C-C bond scission of benzene on the small Ir50 catalyst. The C-C bond scission of benzene on the small Ir50 catalyst is highly endothermic although the barrier is competitive with the barriers of both the C-C and the C-H bond-breakings on the small Rh50 catalyst. The calculations also imply that, for the supported Rh catalysts the C-C and C-H bond scissions are competitive, independently of the Rh cluster sizes. After the initial dissociation step via either the C-C or the C-H bond scission, the C-H bond breaking seems to be more favorable rather than the C-C bond breaking on the larger Rh terrace surface. This work was financially supported by the United States Department of Energy’s Office of Biomass Program’s. Computing time was granted by a user project at the Molecular Science Computing Facility in the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

  1. The Role of Consultants in Institutional Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milam, John

    2008-01-01

    Institutional research (IR) is a multifaceted function, occurring at many levels and in many types of settings, addressing numerous audiences, and embracing an almost infinite array of topics. The IR community is well served by understanding the role that consultants play in the panoply of postsecondary education. With the growing complexity and…

  2. Development Of A New Family Of Improved Infrared (IR) Dome Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musikant, Solomon

    1982-02-01

    A comprehensive search was made to identify ceramic materials which could be employed as IR sensor windows or IRdomes in environments conducive to severe mechanical stresses. This program, started in late 1977 under the joint sponsorship of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and the office of Naval Research (ONR), has been reported in detail in Ref. 1 - 4 through the period ending in mid 1980. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the current status of the processing technologies being developed to realize the potentials of certain advanced materials selected for development.

  3. Photopyroelectric Monitoring of Olive's Ripening Conditions and Olive Oil Quality Using Pulsed Wideband IR Thermal Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-Taha, M. I.; Sarahneh, Y.; Saleh, A. M.

    The present study is based on band absorption of radiation from pulsed wideband infrared (IR) thermal source (PWBS) in conjunction with polyvinylidene fluoride film (PVDF). It is the first time to be employed to monitor the ripening state of olive fruit. Olive's characteristics vary at different stages of ripening, and hence, cultivation of olives at the right time is important in ensuring the best oil quality and maximizes the harvest yield. The photopyroelectric (PPE) signal resulting from absorption of wideband infrared (IR) radiation by fresh olive juice indicates the ripening stage of olives, i.e., allows an estimate of the suitable harvest time. The technique was found to be very useful in discriminating between olive oil samples according to geographical region, shelf life, some storage conditions, and deliberate adulteration. Our results for monitoring oil accumulation in olives during the ripening season agree well with the complicated analytical studies carried out by other researchers.

  4. Real time plume and laser spot recognition in IR camera images

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, K.R.; Caffrey, M.P.; Nemzek, R.J.; Salazar, A.A.; Jeffs, J.; Andes, D.K.; Witham, J.C.

    1997-08-01

    It is desirable to automatically guide the laser spot onto the effluent plume for maximum IR DIAL system sensitivity. This requires the use of a 2D focal plane array. The authors have demonstrated that a wavelength-filtered IR camera is capable of 2D imaging of both the plume and the laser spot. In order to identify the centers of the plume and the laser spot, it is first necessary to segment these features from the background. They report a demonstration of real time plume segmentation based on velocity estimation. They also present results of laser spot segmentation using simple thresholding. Finally, they describe current research on both advanced segmentation and recognition algorithms and on reconfigurable real time image processing hardware based on field programmable gate array technology.

  5. Infrared spectroscopy of radio-luminous OH/IR stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Terry Jay; Hyland, A. R.; Fix, John D.; Cobb, Michael L.

    1988-01-01

    Low-resolution 1.5-2.5-micron spectra for 21 radio-luminous OH/IR stars are presented. These spectra divide into two broad classes. Those with very strong water-vapor absorption closely resemble the spectra of classical Mira variables and are classified Type VM. Those with weaker water-vapor absorption, but still showing strong CO absorption, resemble the spectra of true core-burning supergiants and are classified Type SG. Comparison of the classification of 30 radio-luminous OH/IR stars with their Delta(V)s and luminosities suggests this classification is a good indicator of the intrinsic nature of the underlying star. There is some evidence, however, that some true supergiants (massive main-sequence progenitors) develop the pulsation properties and photospheric characteristics of the Mira-like OH/IR stars when they become optically obscured OH/IR stars.

  6. IR wireless cluster synapses of HYDRA very large neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jannson, Tomasz; Forrester, Thomas

    2008-04-01

    RF/IR wireless (virtual) synapses are critical components of HYDRA (Hyper-Distributed Robotic Autonomy) neural networks, already discussed in two earlier papers. The HYDRA network has the potential to be very large, up to 10 11-neurons and 10 18-synapses, based on already established technologies (cellular RF telephony and IR-wireless LANs). It is organized into almost fully connected IR-wireless clusters. The HYDRA neurons and synapses are very flexible, simple, and low-cost. They can be modified into a broad variety of biologically-inspired brain-like computing capabilities. In this third paper, we focus on neural hardware in general, and on IR-wireless synapses in particular. Such synapses, based on LED/LD-connections, dominate the HYDRA neural cluster.

  7. Applied methods of testing and evaluation for IR imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Xiao-yue; Lu, Jin

    2009-07-01

    Different methods of testing and evaluation for IR imaging system are used with the application of the 2nd and the 3rd generation infrared detectors. The performance of IR imaging system can be reflected by many specifications, such as Noise Equivalent Temperature Difference (NETD), Nonuniformity, system Modulation Transfer Function (MTF), Minimum Resolvable Temperature Difference (MRTD), and Minimum Detectable Temperature Difference (MRTD) etc. The sensitivity of IR sensors is estimated by NETD. The sensitivity of thermal imaging sensors and space resolution are evaluated by MRTD, which is the chief specification of system. In this paper, the theoretical analysis of different testing methods is introduced. The characteristics of them are analyzed and compared. Based on discussing the factors that affect measurement results, an applied method of testing NETD and MRTD for IR system is proposed.

  8. Mid-IR semiconductor lasers for chemical sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, C. J.; Yang, R. Q.

    2003-01-01

    The development of mid-IR semiconductor diode lasers based on type-II interband cascade structures is presented. How these diode lasers can be developed to meet the requirements in chemical sensing applications is discussed.

  9. IRS increases emphasis on not-for-profit health care.

    PubMed

    Peregrine, Michael W

    2007-08-01

    In light of the increased attention the IRS is paying to not-for-profit organizations, healthcare financial managers should stay alert to developments regarding: community benefit standard, executive compensation, corporate governance, transparency and form 990, political activity. PMID:17708171

  10. Transitions between the 4 f -core-excited states in Ir16+, Ir17+, and Ir18+ ions for clock applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safronova, U. I.; Flambaum, V. V.; Safronova, M. S.

    2016-05-01

    Iridium ions near 4 f - 5 s level crossings are the leading candidates for a new type of atomic clocks with a high projected accuracy and a very high sensitivity to the temporal variation of the fine structure constant α. To identify spectra of these ions in experiment accurate calculations of the spectra and electromagnetic transition probabilities should be performed. Properties of the 4 f -core-excited states in Ir16+, Ir17+, and Ir18+ ions are evaluated using relativistic many-body perturbation theory and Hartree-Fock-Relativistic method (COWAN code). We evaluate excitation energies, wavelengths, oscillator strengths, and transition rates. Our large-scale calculations included the following set of configurations: 4f14 5 s , 4f14 5 p , 4f13 5s2 , 4f13 5p2 , 4f13 5 s 5 p , 4f12 5s2 5 p , and 4f12 5 s 5p2 in Pm-like Ir16+ ; 4f14 , 4f13 5 s , 4f13 5 p , 4f12 5s2 , 4f12 5 s 5 p , and 4f12 5p2 in Nd-like Ir17+; and 4f13 , 4f12 5 s , 4f12 5 p , 4f11 5s2 , and 4f11 5 s 5 p in Pr-like Ir18+. The 5 s - 5 p transitions are illustrated by the synthetic spectra in the 180 - 200 Å range. Large contributions of magnetic-dipole transitions to lifetimes of low-lying states in the region 2.5 Ry.

  11. Evaluation of IR technology applied to cooling tower performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacNamara, Neal A.; Zayicek, Paul A.

    1999-03-01

    Infrared thermography (IR) is widely used by electric utilities as an integral part of their predictive maintenance program. IR is utilized for inspection of a variety of plant mechanical and electrical components. Additionally, IR can be used to provide thermal performance information for other key plant systems, including assessment of cooling towers. Cooling tower performance directly affects availability and heat rate in fossil and nuclear power plants. Optimal tower performance contributes to efficient turbine operation and maximum power output. It is estimated that up to half of the cooling towers installed have failed to meet their design performance specifications. As a result, any additional degradation of tower performance resulting from fouling, valve degradation, unbalanced flow, or a poor maintenance practice has a direct effect on generation output. We have collected infrared thermography images of mechanical draft cooling towers, as part of Evaluation of IR Technology Applied to Cooling Tower Performance. IR images have been analyzed to provide information regarding general performance conditions and identification of operational deficiencies related to thermal performance. Similarly, IR can be implemented for monitoring of tower flow balance activities and for post-maintenance surveillance. To date, IR images have been used to identify areas of general flow imbalance, flooding or limited flow in individual cells, missing or broken tower fill material, fan performance and other problems related to maintenance or operational issues. Additionally, an attempt is being made to use quantitative thermal data, provided by the IR image analysis software, in conjunction with condenser input/output site ambient information, to evaluate and compare individual tower cell performance.

  12. An innovative getter coating for IR dewars and cold shields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsir, Dina; Feinman, Daniel

    2008-04-01

    A new getter type produced as a vacuum deposited thin-film is under development (patent pending). The film serves as an efficient pumping substance and also as an efficient absorber of IR stray light. The getter film is activated in place by heating to 130 °C. The film is very thin and has excellent vibration resistance and temperature stability and is expected to serve as an advantageous new solution for IR detector dewars and cold shields.

  13. Fourier transform Raman and IR spectra of snake skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, B. W.; Williams, A. C.; Edwards, H. G. M.

    1993-06-01

    The Fourier transform (FT) Raman and IR spectra of the shed dorsal skin of the snake Elaphe obsoleta (American black rat snake) are reported. Vibrational spectroscopic assignments are proposed for the first time. Although good quality Raman spectra were obtained from the hinge regions using an FT Raman microscope, the dorsal scale regions fluoresced even with 1064 nm IR excitation. This was ascribed to pigmentation markings on the scales.

  14. Introduction to Cost Analysis in IR: Challenges and Opportunities.

    PubMed

    Roudsari, Bahman; McWilliams, Justin; Bresnahan, Brian; Padia, Siddharth A

    2016-04-01

    Demonstration of value has become increasingly important in the current health care system. This review summarizes four of the most commonly used cost analysis methods relevant to IR that could be adopted to demonstrate the value of IR interventions: the cost minimization study, cost-effectiveness assessment, cost-utility analysis, and cost-benefit analysis. In addition, the issues of true cost versus hospital charges, modeling in cost studies, and sensitivity analysis are discussed. PMID:26922978

  15. Dirac Cones and Minigaps for Graphene on Ir(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pletikosić, I.; Kralj, M.; Pervan, P.; Brako, R.; Coraux, J.; N'Diaye, A. T.; Busse, C.; Michely, T.

    2009-02-01

    Epitaxial graphene on Ir(111) prepared in excellent structural quality is investigated by angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. It clearly displays a Dirac cone with the Dirac point shifted only slightly above the Fermi level. The moiré resulting from the overlaid graphene and Ir(111) surface lattices imposes a superperiodic potential giving rise to Dirac cone replicas and the opening of minigaps in the band structure.

  16. Searching for IR Excesses around Li-Rich and Rapidly Rotating K Giants Using WISE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbs, John; Rebull, Luisa M.; Black, David V.; Deeb, Elin; Larsen, Estefania; Cashen, Sarah; Datta, Ashwin; Hodgson, Emily; Lince, Megan; Buhrley, Rosie; Herring, Julie; Jacoby, Kendall; Mitchell, Elena; Altepeter, Shailyn; Bucksbee, Ethan; Clarke, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    As stars evolve from the main-sequence (MS) to the red giant branch (RGB) they exhibit several characteristic changes. Specifically, as the outer layers expand and cool, the star's rotation rate slows, the convection zone deepens and a series of shell-burning and core-burning phases begin to take place. A number of RGB K-type stars, however, exhibit uncharacteristically rapid rotation rates that also seem to be correlated with high lithium abundances (A(Li)) (Carlberg et al. 2012). These higher rotation rates and A(Li) are inconsistent with those predicted by standard stellar evolutionary models. It has also been suggested that many of these high Li RGB stars have IRAS excesses suggestive of a circumstellar shell or disk (de la Reza et al. 1997, Drake et al. 2002). Various hypotheses have been proposed to explain the Li, rapid rotation rates and IR excesses, including the accretion of nearby giant planets equivalent to a few Jupiter masses or a newly triggered nuclear fusion stage that could eject a dusty shell. Using higher spatial resolution data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), we have reevaluated these IRAS-selected targets and added a much larger sample of RGB K-type giants from Carlberg et al. (2012) that were selected without regard to IR brightness. Our findings indicate that many of the IRAS sources that exhibited an IR excess were non-stellar objects, clusters of stars or galaxies, or otherwise not RGB stars, casting doubt on the correlations found previously. Very few of the Carlberg et al. sample have IR excesses making it difficult to assess if there is a correlation in this sample. Our companion poster, Deeb et al. presents the educational aspects of this project. This research was made possible through the NASA/IPAC Teacher Archive Research Program (NITARP) and was funded by NASA Astrophysics Data Program.

  17. A novel CO 2 gas analyzer based on IR absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guangjun; Wu, Xiaoli

    2004-08-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO 2) gas analyzer can be widely used in many fields. A novel CO 2 gas analyzer based on infrared ray (IR) absorption is presented sufficiently in this paper. Applying Lambert-Beer Law, a novel space-double-beam optical structure is established successfully. The optical structure includes an IR source, a gas cell, a bandpass filter with a transmission wavelength at 4.26 μm, another bandpass filter with a transmission wavelength at 3.9 μm, and two IR detectors. Based on Redial Basic Function (RBF) artificial neural network, the measuring model of IR CO 2 analyzer is established with a high accuracy. A dynamic compensation filter is effectively designed to improve the dynamic characteristic of the IR CO 2 analyzer without gas pump. The IR CO 2 analyzer possesses the advantages of high accuracy and mechanical reliability with small volume, lightweight, and low-power consumption. Therefore, it can be used in such relevant fields as environmental protection, processing control, chemical analysis, medical diagnosis, and space environmental and control systems.

  18. Liquid chromatography/Fourier transform IR spectrometry interface flow cell

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Charles C.; Taylor, Larry T.

    1986-01-01

    A zero dead volume (ZDV) microbore high performance liquid chromatography (.mu.HPLC)/Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) interface flow cell includes an IR transparent crystal having a small diameter bore therein through which a sample liquid is passed. The interface flow cell further includes a metal holder in combination with a pair of inner, compressible seals for directly coupling the thus configured spectrometric flow cell to the outlet of a .mu.HPLC column end fitting to minimize the transfer volume of the effluents exiting the .mu.HPLC column which exhibit excellent flow characteristics due to the essentially unencumbered, open-flow design. The IR beam passes transverse to the sample flow through the circular bore within the IR transparent crystal, which is preferably comprised of potassium bromide (KBr) or calcium fluoride (CaF.sub.2), so as to minimize interference patterns and vignetting encountered in conventional parallel-plate IR cells. The long IR beam pathlength and lensing effect of the circular cross-section of the sample volume in combination with the refractive index differences between the solvent and the transparent crystal serve to focus the IR beam in enhancing sample detection sensitivity by an order of magnitude.

  19. Application of sonic IR imaging in civil structure health assurance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Qi; Han, Xiaoyan

    2012-05-01

    Sonic Infrared (Sonic IR) Imaging is a novel NDE technology. It employs an ultrasonic transducer to excite samples with a short pulse of 15 - 40 kHz sound. This short pulse of high power sound will excite the crack and cause the crack surfaces to rub and generate heat. An Infrared camera is used to detect the temperature change caused by the friction heating and therefore 'sees' the crack. We have seen promising results with Sonic IR imaging on both metal and composite structures including turbine discs, turbine blades and airplane fuselage panels. We have also explored new applications with Sonic IR technology. In this paper, the authors present the results of Sonic IR imaging technology applied on large size civil engineering structures. Results from multiple experiments have also shown the potential of Sonic IR technology as a future tool of structure health monitoring (SHM). With further development, Sonic IR could play an important role as a SHM tool for civil infrastructure health assurance [1].

  20. Liquid chromatography/Fourier transform IR spectrometry interface flow cell

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, C.C.; Taylor, L.T.

    1985-01-04

    A zero dead volume (ZDV) microbore high performance liquid chromatography (..mu.. HPLC)/Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) interface flow cell includes an IR transparent crystal having a small diameter bore therein through which a sample liquid is passed. The interface flow cell further includes a metal holder in combination with a pair of inner, compressible seals for directly coupling the thus configured spectrometric flow cell to the outlet of a ..mu.. HPLC column end fitting to minimize the transfer volume of the effluents exiting the ..mu.. HPLC column which exhibit excellent flow characteristics due to the essentially unencumbered, open-flow design. The IR beam passes transverse to the sample flow through the circular bore within the IR transparent crystal, which is preferably comprised of potassium bromide (KBr) or calcium fluoride (CaF/sub 2/), so as to minimize interference patterns and vignetting encountered in conventional parallel-plate IR cells. The long IR beam pathlength and lensing effect of the circular cross-section of the sample volume in combination with the refractive index differences between the solvent and the transparent crystal serve to focus the IR beam in enhancing sample detection sensitivity by an order of magnitude.

  1. Interpretation of the IR spectra of alkali borate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Chekhovskii, V.G.

    1985-11-01

    This paper describes methods of interpretation of the IR spectra of alkali borate glasses. In view of the difficulties which are encountered in a strict interpretation of the IR spectra of crystalline oxygen-containing compounds with complex anions, semiempirical methods of interpretation are commonly used. The existence of glasses of groups with an atomic (ionic) arrangement close to that in the crystalline compounds makes it possible to a certain extent to use the spectra of crystalline compounds in the interpretation of the IR spectra of glasses. The alkali borate glass systems were chosen for this study because the information on their structure is the most detailed by comparison with other borate glasses. IR spectrospcopy showed that the spectral regions in which fundamental asymmetrical stretching vibrations in BO/sub 3/ and BO/sub 4/ polyhedra occur, in most cases, are fairly clearly defined independently of the combined or separate presence of these polyhedra. It is proposed that the bands in the IR spectra of sodium and lithium borate glasses be assigned to vibrations mostly localized on specific fragments of polyborate groups present in the glasses. The data from IR spectroscopy confirms that tetraborate groups are present in lithium borate glasses.

  2. Metal-mesh optical filter technology for mid-IR, far-IR, and submillimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGovern, William R.; Swinehart, Philip R.; Hogue, Eric L.; Daughton, David R.; DeLombard, Jay V.

    2012-06-01

    The innovative, high transmission band-pass filter technology presented here for the mid infrared (IR), terahertz (THz) and submillimeter ranges can tolerate cryogenic temperatures (down to 4K and below), are radiation-hard, vacuum-compatible and vibration-tolerant making them launch-capable and durable for potential space applications. In addition, Lake Shore band-pass filters (BPF) are light weight, as they employ no heavy substrates, nor have any vibronic bands due to polymer support layers. The filters are less than 2 mm thick (mostly the mounting frame) which allows insertion into tight spaces and standard filter wheels. The thin, light weight, vacuum compatible design can be incorporated into almost any detector setup. Filters are available for quick delivery in 29 standard center wavelengths (CWL) with 4 standard diameter sizes, up to 40mm inner diameter (ID).

  3. Serial removal of caries lesions from tooth occlusal surfaces using near-IR image-guided IR laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Kenneth H.; Tom, Henry; Darling, Cynthia L.; Fried, Daniel

    2015-02-01

    Previous studies have established that caries lesions can be imaged with high contrast without the interference of stains at near-IR wavelengths greater than 1300-nm. It has been demonstrated that computer controlled laser scanning systems utilizing IR lasers operating at high pulse repetition rates can be used for serial imaging and selective removal of caries lesions. In this study, we report our progress towards the development of algorithms for generating rasterized ablation maps from near-IR reflectance images for the removal of natural lesions from tooth occlusal surfaces. An InGaAs camera and a filtered tungsten-halogen lamp producing near-IR light in the range of 1500-1700-nm were used to collect crosspolarization reflectance images of tooth occlusal surfaces. A CO2 laser operating at a wavelength of 9.3- μm with a pulse duration of 10-15-μs was used for image-guided ablation.

  4. Dosimetry of indigenously developed (192)Ir high-dose rate brachytherapy source: An EGSnrc Monte Carlo study.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Sridhar; Selvam, T Palani; Sharma, S D; Das, Trupti; Dey, A C; Patil, B N; Sastri, K V S

    2016-01-01

    Clinical application using high-dose rate (HDR) (192)Ir sources in remote afterloading technique is a well-established treatment method. In this direction, Board of Radiation and Isotope Technology (BRIT) and Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, India, jointly indigenously developed a remote afterloading machine and (192)Ir HDR source. The two-dimensional (2D) dose distribution and dosimetric parameters of the BRIT (192)Ir HDR source are generated using EGSnrc Monte Carlo code system in a 40 cm dia × 40 cm height cylindrical water phantom. The values of air-kerma strength and dose rate constant for BRIT (192)Ir HDR source are 9.894 × 10(-8) ± 0.06% UBq(-1) and 1.112 ± 0.11% cGyh(-1)U(-1), respectively. The values of radial dose function (gL(r)) of this source compare well with the corresponding values of BEBIG, Flexisource, and GammaMed 12i source models. This is because of identical active lengths of the sources (3.5 mm) and the comparable phantom dimensions. A comparison of gL(r) values of BRIT source with microSelectron-v1 show differences about 2% at r = 6 cm and up to 13% at r = 12 cm, which is due to differences in phantom dimensions involved in the calculations. The anisotropy function of BRIT (192)Ir HDR source is comparable with the corresponding values of microSelectron-v1 (classic) HDR source. PMID:27217623

  5. Dosimetry of indigenously developed 192Ir high-dose rate brachytherapy source: An EGSnrc Monte Carlo study

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Sridhar; Selvam, T. Palani; Sharma, S. D.; Das, Trupti; Dey, A. C.; Patil, B. N.; Sastri, K.V.S.

    2016-01-01

    Clinical application using high-dose rate (HDR) 192Ir sources in remote afterloading technique is a well-established treatment method. In this direction, Board of Radiation and Isotope Technology (BRIT) and Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, India, jointly indigenously developed a remote afterloading machine and 192Ir HDR source. The two-dimensional (2D) dose distribution and dosimetric parameters of the BRIT 192Ir HDR source are generated using EGSnrc Monte Carlo code system in a 40 cm dia × 40 cm height cylindrical water phantom. The values of air-kerma strength and dose rate constant for BRIT 192Ir HDR source are 9.894 × 10−8 ± 0.06% UBq−1 and 1.112 ± 0.11% cGyh−1U−1, respectively. The values of radial dose function (gL(r)) of this source compare well with the corresponding values of BEBIG, Flexisource, and GammaMed 12i source models. This is because of identical active lengths of the sources (3.5 mm) and the comparable phantom dimensions. A comparison of gL(r) values of BRIT source with microSelectron-v1 show differences about 2% at r = 6 cm and up to 13% at r = 12 cm, which is due to differences in phantom dimensions involved in the calculations. The anisotropy function of BRIT 192Ir HDR source is comparable with the corresponding values of microSelectron-v1 (classic) HDR source. PMID:27217623

  6. Study on Angelica and its different extracts by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and two-dimensional correlation IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hong-xia; Sun, Su-qin; Lv, Guang-hua; Chan, Kelvin K. C.

    2006-05-01

    In order to develop a rapid and effective analysis method for studying integrally the main constituents in the medicinal materials and their extracts, discriminating the extracts from different extraction process, comparing the categories of chemical constituents in the different extracts and monitoring the qualities of medicinal materials, we applied Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) associated with second derivative infrared spectroscopy and two-dimensional correlation infrared spectroscopy (2D-IR) to study the main constituents in traditional Chinese medicine Angelica and its different extracts (extracted by petroleum ether, ethanol and water in turn). The findings indicated that FT-IR spectrum can provide many holistic variation rules of chemical constituents. Use of the macroscopical fingerprint characters of FT-IR and 2D-IR spectrum can not only identify the main chemical constituents in medicinal materials and their different extracts, but also compare the components differences among the similar samples. This analytical method is highly rapid, effective, visual and accurate for pharmaceutical research.

  7. Wide-band IR imaging in the NIR-MIR-FIR regions for in situ analysis of frescoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daffara, C.; Pezzati, L.; Ambrosini, D.; Paoletti, D.; Di Biase, R.; Mariotti, P. I.; Frosinini, C.

    2011-06-01

    Imaging methods offer several advantages in the field of conservation allowing to perform non-invasive inspection of works of art. In particular, non-invasive techniques based on imaging in different infrared (IR) regions are widely used for the investigation of paintings. Using radiation beyond the visible range, different characteristics of the inspected artwork may be revealed according to the bandwidth acquired. In this paper we present the recent results of a joint project among the two research institutes DIMEG and CNR-INO, and the restoration facility Opificio delle Pietre Dure, concerning the wide-band integration of IR imaging techniques, in the spectral ranges NIR 0.8-2.5 μm, MIR 3-5 μm, and FIR 8-12 μm, for in situ analysis of artworks. A joint, multi-mode use of reflection and thermal bands is proposed for the diagnostics of mural paintings, and it is demonstrated to be an effective tool in inspecting the layered structure. High resolution IR reflectography and, to a greater extent, IR imaging in the 3-5 μm band, are effectively used to characterize the superficial layer of the fresco and to analyze the stratigraphy of different pictorial layers. IR thermography in the 8-12 μm band is used to characterize the support deep structure. The integration of all the data provides a multi- layered and multi-spectral representation of the fresco that yields a comprehensive analysis.

  8. Myocardial Loss of IRS1 and IRS2 Causes Heart Failure and Is Controlled by p38α MAPK During Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Yajuan; Xu, Zihui; Zhu, Qinglei; Thomas, Candice; Kumar, Rajesh; Feng, Hao; Dostal, David E.; White, Morris F.; Baker, Kenneth M.; Guo, Shaodong

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac failure is a major cause of death in patients with type 2 diabetes, but the molecular mechanism that links diabetes to heart failure remains unclear. Insulin resistance is a hallmark of type 2 diabetes, and insulin receptor substrates 1 and 2 (IRS1 and IRS2) are the major insulin-signaling components regulating cellular metabolism and survival. To determine the role of IRS1 and IRS2 in the heart and examine whether hyperinsulinemia causes myocardial insulin resistance and cellular dysfunction via IRS1 and IRS2, we generated heart-specific IRS1 and IRS2 gene double-knockout (H-DKO) mice and liver-specific IRS1 and IRS2 double-knockout (L-DKO) mice. H-DKO mice had reduced ventricular mass; developed cardiac apoptosis, fibrosis, and failure; and showed diminished Akt→forkhead box class O-1 signaling that was accompanied by impaired cardiac metabolic gene expression and reduced ATP content. L-DKO mice had decreased cardiac IRS1 and IRS2 proteins and exhibited features of heart failure, with impaired cardiac energy metabolism gene expression and activation of p38α mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38). Using neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes, we further found that chronic insulin exposure reduced IRS1 and IRS2 proteins and prevented insulin action through activation of p38, revealing a fundamental mechanism of cardiac dysfunction during insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. PMID:24159000

  9. Magnetic polarization of Ir in underdoped nonsuperconducting Eu(Fe 0.94Ir0.06)2As2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, W. T.; Xiao, Y.; Su, Y.; Nandi, S.; Jiao, W. H.; Nisbet, G.; Demirdis, S.; Cao, G. H.; Brückel, Th.

    2016-01-01

    Using polarized neutron diffraction and x-ray resonant magnetic scattering (XRMS) techniques, multiple phase transitions were revealed in an underdoped, nonsuperconducting Eu (Fe1 -xIrx )2As2 (x =0.06 ) single crystal. Compared with the parent compound EuFe2As2 , the tetragonal-to-orthorhombic structural phase transition and the antiferromagnetic order of the Fe+2 moments are significantly suppressed to TS=111 (2 ) K and TN,Fe=85 (2 ) K by 6% Ir doping, respectively. In addition, the Eu+2 spins order within the a b plane in the A-type antiferromagnetic structure similar to the parent compound. However, the order temperature is evidently suppressed to TN,Eu=16.0 (5 ) K by Ir doping. Most strikingly, the XRMS measurements at the Ir L3 edge demonstrates that the Ir 5 d states are also magnetically polarized, with the same propagation vector as the magnetic order of Fe. With TN,Ir=12.0 (5 ) K, they feature a much lower onset temperature compared with TN,Fe. Our observation suggests that the magnetism of the Eu sublattice has a considerable effect on the magnetic nature of the 5 d Ir dopant atoms and there exists a possible interplay between the localized Eu+2 moments and the conduction d electrons on the FeAs layers.

  10. Macro-fingerprint analysis-through-separation of licorice based on FT-IR and 2DCOS-IR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yang; Wang, Ping; Xu, Changhua; Yang, Yan; Li, Jin; Chen, Tao; Li, Zheng; Cui, Weili; Zhou, Qun; Sun, Suqin; Li, Huifen

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, a step-by-step analysis-through-separation method under the navigation of multi-step IR macro-fingerprint (FT-IR integrated with second derivative IR (SD-IR) and 2DCOS-IR) was developed for comprehensively characterizing the hierarchical chemical fingerprints of licorice from entirety to single active components. Subsequently, the chemical profile variation rules of three parts (flavonoids, saponins and saccharides) in the separation process were holistically revealed and the number of matching peaks and correlation coefficients with standards of pure compounds was increasing along the extracting directions. The findings were supported by UPLC results and a verification experiment of aqueous separation process. It has been demonstrated that the developed multi-step IR macro-fingerprint analysis-through-separation approach could be a rapid, effective and integrated method not only for objectively providing comprehensive chemical characterization of licorice and all its separated parts, but also for rapidly revealing the global enrichment trend of the active components in licorice separation process.

  11. Accurate Transmittance Measurements of Thick, High-Index, High- Dispersion, IR Windows, Using a Fourier Transform IR Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupferberg, Lenn C.

    1996-03-01

    Fourier transform IR [FT-IR] spectrometers have virtually replaced scanned grating IR spectrometers in the commercial market. While FTIR spectrometers have been a boon for the chemist, they present problems for the measurement of transmittance of thick, high-index, high-dispersion, IR windows. Reflection and refraction of light by the windows introduce measurement errors. The principles of the FT-IR spectrometer will be briefly reviewed. The origins of the measurement errors will be discussed. Simple modifications to the operation of commercially available instruments will be presented. These include using strategically placed apertures and the use of collimated vs. focused beams at the sample position. They are essential for removing the effects of reflected light entering the interferometer and limiting the divergence angle of light in the interferometer. The latter minimizes refractive effects and insures consistent underfilling of the detector. Data will be shown from FT-IR spectrometers made by four manufactures and compared to measurements from a dispersive spectrometer.

  12. Multispectral IR detection modules and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Münzberg, M.; Breiter, R.; Cabanski, W.; Lutz, H.; Wendler, J.; Ziegler, J.; Rehm, R.; Walther, M.

    2006-05-01

    typically 1ms. AIM and IAF selected antimonide based type II superlattices (SL) for such kind of applications. The type II SL technology provides - similar to QWIPs - an accurate engineering of sensitive layers by MBE with very good homogeneity and potentially good yield and resistivity against high temperature application i.e. under processing or storage. While promising results on single SL pixels have been reported since many years, so far no SL based detection module could be realized with reasonable performances. IAF and AIM last year managed to realize first most promising SL based detectors. Fully integrated IDCAs with a MWIR SL single color device with 256x256 pixels in 40 μm pitch have been integrated and tested. In the next step the pitch was reduced to 24μm in a 384x288 pixel configuration. With this design and further improved technology a very good pixel operabilities with very low cluster sizes (<= 4 pixel) and performances with quantum efficiencies as high as known from MCT is reached in the meantime. A dual color device based on SL technology on the existing 384x288 read-out circuit (ROIC) as used in the dual band QWIP device is available. It combines spectral selective detection in the 3-4.1 μm wavelength range and 4.1-5 μm wavelength range in each pixel with coincident integration in a 384x288x2 format and 40 μm pitch. Excellent thermal resolution with NETD < 17 mK @ F/2, 2.8 ms for the longer wavelength range (red band) and NETD < 30 mK @ F/2, 2.8 ms for the shorter wavelength range (blue band) has been achieved. The pixel outage rates remains below 1% in both colors. The spectral cross talk of the red band to the blue band is estimated below 1%o which is important to reduce significantly the false alarm rate in missile approach warning systems as the primarily intended use of the dual color detector is. Real time analysis of gases, i.e. the detection of toxic or agent gases, by multi spectral detection in the IR used the characteristic infrared

  13. Synchrotron IR microspectroscopy for protein structure analysis: Potential and questions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yu, Peiqiang

    2006-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (S-FTIR) has been developed as a rapid, direct, non-destructive, bioanalytical technique. This technique takes advantage of synchrotron light brightness and small effective source size and is capable of exploring the molecular chemical make-up within microstructures of a biological tissue without destruction of inherent structures at ultra-spatial resolutions within cellular dimension. To date there has been very little application of this advanced technique to the study of pure protein inherent structure at a cellular level in biological tissues. In this review, a novel approach was introduced to show the potential of the newly developed, advancedmore » synchrotron-based analytical technology, which can be used to localize relatively “pure“ protein in the plant tissues and relatively reveal protein inherent structure and protein molecular chemical make-up within intact tissue at cellular and subcellular levels. Several complex protein IR spectra data analytical techniques (Gaussian and Lorentzian multi-component peak modeling, univariate and multivariate analysis, principal component analysis (PCA), and hierarchical cluster analysis (CLA) are employed to relatively reveal features of protein inherent structure and distinguish protein inherent structure differences between varieties/species and treatments in plant tissues. By using a multi-peak modeling procedure, RELATIVE estimates (but not EXACT determinations) for protein secondary structure analysis can be made for comparison purpose. The issues of pro- and anti-multi-peaking modeling/fitting procedure for relative estimation of protein structure were discussed. By using the PCA and CLA analyses, the plant molecular structure can be qualitatively separate one group from another, statistically, even though the spectral assignments are not known. The synchrotron-based technology provides a new approach for protein structure research in

  14. Automatic inspection system of surface defects on optical IR-CUT filter based on machine vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yan; Yu, Feihong

    2014-04-01

    The paper presents an automatic surface defects inspection system for optical Infrared Cut-off (IR-CUT) filter, which is applied in all kinds of color cameras and video devices. The system involves illumination and imaging module, moving module, flipping module and machine vision algorithm. To highlight all the defected regions, the improved dark-field illumination technique is utilized in the imaging module. In order to accurately localize the region of optical IR-CUT filter in the captured image, stationary wavelet transform (SWT) is introduced to template matching algorithm. The introduction of SWT provides a more accurate estimate of the variances in the image and further facilitates the identification of the defected regions. The defects extraction method in this paper avoids the use of complicated learning process from a set of samples. Convexity theory is implemented on the algorithm of defects classification of edge crack. Experimental results on a variety of optical IR-CUT filter samples, including non-defective samples, samples with defects of stain, scratch and edge crack, have shown the efficiency (1.05 s per sample) and accuracy (96.44%) of the proposed system. Moreover, defects extraction performances of different filters are compared in this paper. The research and application of the system will greatly liberate the human workforce and inspire ideas to detect the defects of some other small optical elements.

  15. Mobile CARS - IRS Instrument for Simultaneous Spectroscopic Measurement of Multiple Properties in Gaseous Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bivolaru, Daniel; Lee, Joseph W.; Jones, Stephen B.; Tedder, Sarah A.; Danehy, Paul M.; Weikl, M. C.; Magnotti, G.; Cutler, Andrew D.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes a measurement system based on the dual-pump coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) and interferometric Rayleigh scattering (IRS) methods. The IRS measurement is performed simultaneously with the CARS measurement using a common green laser beam as a narrow-band light source. The mobile CARS-IRS instrument is designed for the use both in laboratories as well as in ground-based combustion test facilities. Furthermore, it is designed to be easily transported between laboratory and test facility. It performs single-point spatially and temporally resolved simultaneous measurements of temperature, species mole fraction of N2, O2, and H2, and two-components of velocity. A mobile laser system can be placed inside or outside the test facility, while a beam receiving and monitoring system is placed near the measurement location. Measurements in a laboratory small-scale Mach 1.6 H2-air combustion-heated supersonic jet were performed to test the capability of the system. Final setup and pretests of a larger scale reacting jet are ongoing at NASA Langley Research Center s Direct Connect Supersonic Combustor Test Facility (DCSCTF).

  16. NGC 7538 IRS. 1. Interaction of a polarized dust spiral and a molecular outflow

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, M. C. H.; Hull, Charles L. H.; Pillai, Thushara; Zhao, Jun-Hui; Sandell, Göran

    2014-12-01

    We present dust polarization and CO molecular line images of NGC 7538 IRS 1. We combined data from the Submillimeter Array, the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy, and the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope to make images with ∼2.''5 resolution at 230 and 345 GHz. The images show a remarkable spiral pattern in both the dust polarization and molecular outflow. These data dramatically illustrate the interplay between a high infall rate onto IRS 1 and a powerful outflow disrupting the dense, clumpy medium surrounding the star. The images of the dust polarization and the CO outflow presented here provide observational evidence for the exchange of energy and angular momentum between the infall and the outflow. The spiral dust pattern, which rotates through over 180° from IRS 1, may be a clumpy filament wound up by conservation of angular momentum in the infalling material. The redshifted CO emission ridge traces the dust spiral closely through the MM dust cores, several of which may contain protostars. We propose that the CO maps the boundary layer where the outflow is ablating gas from the dense gas in the spiral.

  17. Adaptive multispectral stimulator providing registered IR and RF data in a closed-loop environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Stephen C.; Hall, Robert L.

    2004-08-01

    The Multi-Spectral Stimulator described in this paper has been designed to answer the future testing and evaluation needs for emerging multi-spectral technology. This system is portable, low cost, and scalable, and can produce synchronous IR and RF images and signals, respectively, for both injection and projection to multi-mode sensors. The scenes generated are temporally and spatially registered and generated from a three-dimensional database. Its present development provides closed-loop capabilities to a missile simulation. Two adaptive technologies are merged into a flexible system that can stimulate multiple sensors simultaneously in real time. It merges Scientific Research Corporation's Adaptable Radar Environment Simulator (ARES) and Quantum3D/CG2 Inc.'s real-time, multi-spectral Scene Generation system. The stimulator can run in either real-time or stepped mode, providing signals on demand. The resulting stimulator test bed is integrated to a non-real-time high fidelity missile simulation that consists of an IR seeker, IR imaging tracker, and a 6-DOF/Autopilot model. The stimulator design can be modified to stimulate multiple passive sensors, active laser systems, multi-mode systems, multiple radar systems, or almost any combination of sensors. The next planned development stage integrates the system to real-time closed-loop system and associated interface electronics. This will provide a bridge to full hardware-in-the-loop (HWIL) integration for the simulation of a dual mode missile system.

  18. Hyperspectral IR polarimetry with applications in demining and unexploded ordnance detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Herman E.; Jones, Stephen H.; Iannarilli, Frank J., Jr.; Annen, Kurt D.

    1999-02-01

    Several years of effort in IR polarimetry have brought us convincing evidence of its effectiveness in differentiating man made objects from natural backgrounds. Adding modern focal plane array (FPA) technology (either cooled or uncooled) makes it possible to combine the benefits of polarimetry with the power of hyperspectral imaging. Aerodyne Research is embarked on a stepwise, controlled-risk development program with the objective of fielding an innovative and affordable hyperspectral imaging IR polarimeter. Proof-of-concept demonstrations are conducted for each significant technology increment as part of the prototype development effort. These steps, two demonstrated and two yet to be demonstrated, are: (1) LWIR (non-imaging) Spectral Polarimeter to demonstrate the effectiveness of combined polarimetric and hyperspectral discriminating capabilities in observations on static scenes; (2) LWIR Uncooled FPA Imaging (broadband) Polarimeter to test the sensitivity of an affordable Uncooled FPA in a broadband configuration against static scenes; (3) Multispectral Imaging Polarimeter to quantify clutter rejection performance improvements to be realized in multispectral polarimetry; and (4) Hyperspectral Imaging IR Polarimeter designed with optimal spatial and spectral resolution and sufficient throughput to achieve the reliable performance required in surface mine and UXO detection applications. Results from the ongoing proof-of- concept demonstrations in simulated surface mine detection will be presented.

  19. Motorcycle detection and counting using stereo camera, IR camera, and microphone array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Bo; Gibson, David R. P.; Middleton, Dan

    2013-03-01

    Detection, classification, and characterization are the key to enhancing motorcycle safety, motorcycle operations and motorcycle travel estimation. Average motorcycle fatalities per Vehicle Mile Traveled (VMT) are currently estimated at 30 times those of auto fatalities. Although it has been an active research area for many years, motorcycle detection still remains a challenging task. Working with FHWA, we have developed a hybrid motorcycle detection and counting system using a suite of sensors including stereo camera, thermal IR camera and unidirectional microphone array. The IR thermal camera can capture the unique thermal signatures associated with the motorcycle's exhaust pipes that often show bright elongated blobs in IR images. The stereo camera in the system is used to detect the motorcyclist who can be easily windowed out in the stereo disparity map. If the motorcyclist is detected through his or her 3D body recognition, motorcycle is detected. Microphones are used to detect motorcycles that often produce low frequency acoustic signals. All three microphones in the microphone array are placed in strategic locations on the sensor platform to minimize the interferences of background noises from sources such as rain and wind. Field test results show that this hybrid motorcycle detection and counting system has an excellent performance.

  20. ShipIR model validation using spectral measurement results from the NATO SIMVEX trial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brendhagen, Erik; Heen, Lars T.

    2003-09-01

    The ship signature model ShipIR/NTCS has been selected as a NATO standard. In 2001 Norway participated in the SIMVEX field trial arranged by NATO in Canada for validation of this model. The measurements were performed on a research vessel under different meteorological conditions, when the ship was sun illuminated and shaded, and also at night. This paper presents spectral results from our high resolution FTIR spectroradiometer, Bomem DA5. Using in-house software that enables correction of non-ideal properties of the spectroradiometer, we obtained improved absolute precision of calibrated spectra. The FTIR results are most interesting for sources with signatures deviating significantly from blackbody functions, like the ship plume, sun illuminated surfaces and sea and sky backgrounds. Ship surface and sea and sky background results have been compared with ShipIR/NTCS predictions. Results from plume measurements have been compared with simulated spectra, using the FASCODE atmospheric model, and we have estimated the plume temperature and the concentration of the most important IR contributing molecules.

  1. NGC 7538 IRS. 1. Interaction of a Polarized Dust Spiral and a Molecular Outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, M. C. H.; Hull, Charles L. H.; Pillai, Thushara; Zhao, Jun-Hui; Sandell, Göran

    2014-12-01

    We present dust polarization and CO molecular line images of NGC 7538 IRS 1. We combined data from the Submillimeter Array, the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy, and the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope to make images with ~2.''5 resolution at 230 and 345 GHz. The images show a remarkable spiral pattern in both the dust polarization and molecular outflow. These data dramatically illustrate the interplay between a high infall rate onto IRS 1 and a powerful outflow disrupting the dense, clumpy medium surrounding the star. The images of the dust polarization and the CO outflow presented here provide observational evidence for the exchange of energy and angular momentum between the infall and the outflow. The spiral dust pattern, which rotates through over 180° from IRS 1, may be a clumpy filament wound up by conservation of angular momentum in the infalling material. The redshifted CO emission ridge traces the dust spiral closely through the MM dust cores, several of which may contain protostars. We propose that the CO maps the boundary layer where the outflow is ablating gas from the dense gas in the spiral.

  2. Estimates of heat flux to material surfaces in Proto-MPEX with IR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showers, M.; Biewer, T. M.; Bigelow, T. S.; Caughman, J. B. O.; Donovan, D.; Goulding, R. H.; Gray, T. K.; Rapp, J.; Youchison, D. L.; Nygren, R. E.

    2015-11-01

    The Prototype Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment (Proto-MPEX) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is a linear plasma device with the primary purpose of developing the plasma source concept for the Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment (MPEX), which will address the plasma material interactions (PMI) science for future fusion reactors. New diagnostics for Proto-MPEX include an infrared (IR) camera, in-vessel thermocouples and ex-vessel fluoroptic probes. The IR camera and other diagnostics provide surface temperature measurements of Proto-MPEX's dump and target plates, located on either end of the machine, which are being exposed to plasma. The change in surface temperature is measured over the duration of the plasma shot to determine the heat flux hitting the plates. The IR camera additionally provides 2-D thermal load distribution images of these plates, highlighting Proto-MPEX plasma behaviors, such as hot spots. The plasma diameter on the dump plate is on the order of 15 cm. The combination of measured heat flux and the thermal load distribution gives information on the efficiency of Proto-MPEX as a plasma generating device. Machine operating parameters that will improve Proto-MPEX's performance may be identified, increasing its PMI research capabilities.

  3. Simulation of signal and data processing for a pair of GEO IR sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keil, Karl-Heinz; Hupfer, Werner

    2007-09-01

    This paper describes experiences and results from developing a basic signal and data processing simulation for a pair of GEO IR sensors observing the boost phase of Theater Ballistic Missiles (TBM). The goal of such a system is the detection of launched TBM, also against a cloud background, and the tracking from cloud break ideally up to boost-end. Two GEO satellites are used for stereo view of one and the same non-global limited Field-of-Regard (FOR). They are positioned in such a way that both cover the FOR and provide a sufficient triangulation baseline. Signal Processing is applied for each of both passive IR sensors in order to detect and track the TBM on the focal plane. The applied approach can be summarized under the term 'velocity filtering'. Data Processing operates on the 2-D signal processing input from both IR sensors, i.e. azimuth and elevation line-of-sight (LOS) angles as well as their rates. The goal is to provide 3-D tracks of the targets, which can be used to cue early warning or fire control radars. The underlying simulation model constitutes a prototype and vehicle for further research. Nevertheless, even in its current stage it provides a first tool for the analysis and evaluation of corresponding sensor design concepts.

  4. Ethical Issues Affecting Human Participants in Community College Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wurtz, Keith

    2011-01-01

    The increasing demand of constituents to conduct analyses in order to help inform the decision-making process has led to the need for Institutional Research (IR) guidelines for community college educators. One method of maintaining the quality of research conducted by IR staff is to include professional development about ethics. This article…

  5. [Luminescence characteristics of PVK doped with Ir(ppy)3].

    PubMed

    Yang, Shao-Peng; Zhang, Xue-Feng; Zhao, Su-Ling; Xu, Zheng; Zhang, Fu-Jun; Yang, Ya-Ru; Li, Qing; Pang, Xue-Xia

    2008-03-01

    With the increasing development of organic light emitting devices (OLED), interest in the mechanisms of charge carrier photogeneration, separation, transport and recombination continues to grow. Electromodulation of photoluminescence has been used as an efficient probe to investigate the evolution of primary excitation in all electric field. This method can provide useful information on carrier photogeneration, the formation and dissociation of excitons, energy transfer, and exciton recombination in the presence of electric field. The operation of OLED brings electrons and holes from opposite electrodes and generates singlet and triplet excitons. However, triplet excitons are wasted because a radiative transition from triplets is spin-forbidden. Spin statistics predicts that singlet-to-triplet ratio is 1 : 3 in organic semiconductors. One way to harvest light from triplet excitons is to use phosphorescent materials. These materials incorporate a heavy metal atom to mix singlet and triplet states by the strong spin-orbit coupling. As a result, a spin forbidden transition may occur allowing an enhanced triplet emission. Among phosphorescent materials, Ir(ppy)3 has attracted much attention because of its short triplet lifetime to minimize the triplet-triplet annihilation. High quantum efficiencies have been obtained by doping organic molecules and in polymers with Ir(ppy)3. In the present paper, the photoluminescence and electroluminescence spectra of Ir(ppy)3 doped PVK film are measured at room temperature. The device structure is ITO/PEDOT : PSS/PVK Ir(ppy)3/BCP/Alq3/Al. The results show that the luminescence capabilities of devices are different when the concentration of Ir(ppy)3 is different. When the concentration of Ir(ppy)3 is suitable, the luminescence of PVK is lower but that of Ir(ppy)3 is stronger relatively, indicating that the energy transfer from the host materials to the guest materials is sufficient. It is concluded that the device with 5% of Ir(ppy)3

  6. The Role of Institutional Research in a High Profile Study of Undergraduate Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webber, Karen L.

    2012-01-01

    Armed with a strong toolkit of knowledge and skills, institutional research (IR) professionals often serve as collaborators with campus colleagues who may need assistance with survey design, statistical analysis, program review, and assessment of individual programs or the institution. This paper discusses the role that an IR professional played…

  7. 48 CFR 45.303 - Use of Government property on independent research and development programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... research and development (IR&D) program, if— (a) Such use will not conflict with the primary use of the...; and (c) A rental charge for the portion of the contractor's IR&D program cost allocated to commercial...'s IR&D costs....

  8. 48 CFR 45.303 - Use of Government property on independent research and development programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... research and development (IR&D) program, if— (a) Such use will not conflict with the primary use of the...; and (c) A rental charge for the portion of the contractor's IR&D program cost allocated to commercial...'s IR&D costs....

  9. 48 CFR 45.303 - Use of Government property on independent research and development programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... research and development (IR&D) program, if— (a) Such use will not conflict with the primary use of the...; and (c) A rental charge for the portion of the contractor's IR&D program cost allocated to commercial...'s IR&D costs....

  10. 48 CFR 45.303 - Use of Government property on independent research and development programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... research and development (IR&D) program, if— (a) Such use will not conflict with the primary use of the...; and (c) A rental charge for the portion of the contractor's IR&D program cost allocated to commercial...'s IR&D costs....

  11. In Their Own Words: Effectiveness in Institutional Research. Professional File. Number 115, Spring 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, William E.

    2010-01-01

    This study sought to understand and improve effectiveness in institutional research (IR) by interviewing, observing, and analyzing resumes of IR practitioners who have been identified by their colleagues as particularly effective in having an impact on decision-making, planning, and policy formation. Ten themes for effectiveness in IR were…

  12. Multilevel Modeling: Applications to Research on the Assessment of Student Learning, Engagement, and Developmental Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Pu-Shih Daniel; Cragg, Kristina

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the suitability of multilevel modeling in the context of institutional research (IR) may ease the doubts of some IR professionals. However, the need for training on how to conduct and report multilevel modeling analysis remains. A major roadblock hindering the proliferation of multilevel modeling in IR is the perception that…

  13. Iridium porphyrins in CD3OD: reduction of Ir(III), CD3-OD bond cleavage, Ir-D acid dissociation and alkene reactions.

    PubMed

    Bhagan, Salome; Imler, Gregory H; Wayland, Bradford B

    2013-04-15

    Methanol solutions of iridium(III) tetra(p-sulfonatophenyl)porphyrin [(TSPP)Ir(III)] form an equilibrium distribution of methanol and methoxide complexes ([(TSPP)Ir(III)(CD3OD)(2-n)(OCD3)n]((3+n)-)). Reaction of [(TSPP)Ir(III) with dihydrogen (D2) in methanol produces an iridium hydride [(TSPP)Ir(III)-D(CD3OD)](4-) in equilibrium with an iridium(I) complex ([(TSPP)Ir(I)(CD3OD)](5-)). The acid dissociation constant of the iridium hydride (Ir-D) in methanol at 298 K is 3.5 × 10(-12). The iridium(I) complex ([(TSPP)Ir(I)(CD3OD)](5-)) catalyzes reaction of [(TSPP)Ir(III)-D(CD3OD)](4-) with CD3-OD to produce an iridium methyl complex [(TSPP)Ir(III)-CD3(CD3OD)](4-) and D2O. Reactions of the iridium hydride with ethene and propene produce iridium alkyl complexes, but the Ir-D complex fails to give observable addition with acetaldehyde and carbon monoxide in methanol. Reaction of the iridium hydride with propene forms both the isopropyl and propyl complexes with free energy changes (ΔG° 298 K) of -1.3 and -0.4 kcal mol(-1) respectively. Equilibrium thermodynamics and reactivity studies are used in discussing relative Ir-D, Ir-OCD3 and Ir-CD2- bond energetics in methanol. PMID:23540797

  14. Structurally Integrated Coatings for Wear and Corrosion (SICWC): Arc Lamp, InfraRed (IR) Thermal Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Mackiewicz-Ludtka, G.; Sebright, J.

    2007-12-15

    The primary goal of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) betwe1311 UT-Battelle (Contractor) and Caterpillar Inc. (Participant) was to develop the plasma arc lamp (PAL), infrared (IR) thermal processing technology 1.) to enhance surface coating performance by improving the interfacial bond strength between selected coatings and substrates; and 2.) to extend this technology base for transitioning of the arc lamp processing to the industrial Participant. Completion of the following three key technical tasks (described below) was necessary in order to accomplish this goal. First, thermophysical property data sets were successfully determined for composite coatings applied to 1010 steel substrates, with a more limited data set successfully measured for free-standing coatings. These data are necessary for the computer modeling simulations and parametric studies to; A.) simulate PAL IR processing, facilitating the development of the initial processing parameters; and B.) help develop a better understanding of the basic PAL IR fusing process fundamentals, including predicting the influence of melt pool stirring and heat tnmsfar characteristics introduced during plasma arc lamp infrared (IR) processing; Second, a methodology and a set of procedures were successfully developed and the plasma arc lamp (PAL) power profiles were successfully mapped as a function of PAL power level for the ORNL PAL. The latter data also are necessary input for the computer model to accurately simulate PAL processing during process modeling simulations, and to facilitate a better understand of the fusing process fundamentals. Third, several computer modeling codes have been evaluated as to their capabilities and accuracy in being able to capture and simulate convective mixing that may occur during PAL thermal processing. The results from these evaluation efforts are summarized in this report. The intention of this project was to extend the technology base and provide for

  15. Potential of mid IR spectroscopy in the rapid label free identification of skin malignancies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastl, Lena; Kemper, Björn; Lloyd, Gavin R.; Nallala, Jayakrupakar; Stone, Nick; Naranjo, Valery; Penaranda, Francisco; Schnekenburger, Jürgen

    2016-03-01

    The rapid inspection of suspicious skin lesions for pathological cell types is the objective of optical point of care diagnostics technologies. A marker free fast diagnosis of skin malignancies would overcome the limitations of the current gold standard surgical biopsy. The time consuming and costly biopsy procedure requires the inspection of each sample by a trained pathologist, which limits the analysis of potentially malignant lesions. Optical technologies like RAMAN or infrared spectroscopy, which provide both, localization and chemical information, can be used to differentiate malignant from healthy tissue by the analysis of multi cell structures and cell type specific spectra. We here report the application of midIR spectroscopy towards fast and reliable skin diagnostics. Within the European research project MINERVA we developed standardized in vitro skin systems with increasing complexity, from single skin cell types as fibroblasts, keratinocytes and melanoma cells, to mixtures of these and finally three dimensional human skin equivalents. The standards were characterized in the established midIR range and also with newly developed systems for fast imaging up to 12 μm. The analysis of the spectra by novel data processing algorithms demonstrated the clear separation of all cell types, especially the tumor cells. The signals from single cell layers were sufficient for cell type differentiation. We have compared different midIR systems and found all of them suitable for specific cell type identification. Our data demonstrate the potential of midIR spectroscopy for fast image acquisition and an improved data processing as sensitive and specific optical biopsy technology.

  16. IR emission and UV extinction in two open clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hackwell, James A.; Hecht, James H.

    1989-01-01

    Recent models of interstellar extinction have shown the importance of understanding both the UV and IR properties of interstellar dust grains. IRAS data have shown variations in 60 and 100 micron emissions presumably due to the presence of IR cirrus, while recent observations in the UV by Fitzpatrick and Massa have identified components in the UV extinction curve which vary in different star regions. A Draine and Anderson model connects these results by proposing that different size variations in interstellar grains would cause distinct changes in both the IR emission and the UV extinction. In order to test this model it is necessary to make observations in well defined locations away from peculiar extinction regions. In the infrared this means looking away from the galactic plane so as to limit non-local sources of IR radiation. Two open clusters that are out of the galactic plane and which contain a number of late B and early A stars suitable for UV extinction studies, and whose IRAS data show variations in the 60/100 micron ratio were studied. Based on the Drain and Anderson model, variations were expected in their UV extinction curves that correlate with the IR cirrus emission.

  17. Characterization and identification of microorganisms by FT-IR microspectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngo-Thi, N. A.; Kirschner, C.; Naumann, D.

    2003-12-01

    We report on a novel FT-IR approach for microbial characterization/identification based on a light microscope coupled to an infrared spectrometer which offers the possibility to acquire IR-spectra of microcolonies containing only few hundred cells. Microcolony samples suitable for FT-IR microspectroscopic measurements were obtained by a replica technique with a stamping device that transfers spatially accurate cells of microcolonies growing on solid culture plates to a special, IR-transparent or reflecting stamping plate. High quality spectra could be recorded either by applying the transmission/absorbance or the reflectance/absorbance mode of the infrared microscope. Signal to noise ratios higher than 1000 were obtained for microcolonies as small as 40 μm in diameter. Reproducibility levels were established that allowed species and strain identification. The differentiation and classification capacity of the FT-IR microscopic technique was tested for different selected microorganisms. Cluster and factor analysis methods were used to evaluate the complex spectral data. Excellent discrimination between bacteria and yeasts, and at the same time Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial strains was obtained. Twenty-two selected strains of different species within the genus Staphylococcus were repetitively measured and could be grouped into correct species cluster. Moreover, the results indicated that the method allows also identifications at the subspecies level. Additionally, the new approach allowed spectral mapping analysis of single colonies which provided spatially resolved characterization of growth heterogeneity within complex microbial populations such as colonies.

  18. Comparison of TLD calibration methods for 192Ir dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Haworth, Annette; Butler, Duncan J; Wilfert, Lisa; Ebert, Martin A; Todd, Stephen P; Hayton, Anna J M; Kron, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    For the purpose of dose measurement using a high-dose rate (192)Ir source, four methods of thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) calibration were investigated. Three of the four calibration methods used the (192)Ir source. Dwell times were calculated to deliver 1 Gy to the TLDs irradiated either in air or water. Dwell time calculations were confirmed by direct measurement using an ionization chamber. The fourth method of calibration used 6 MV photons from a medical linear accelerator, and an energy correction factor was applied to account for the difference in sensitivity of the TLDs in (192)Ir and 6 MV. The results of the four TLD calibration methods are presented in terms of the results of a brachytherapy audit where seven Australian centers irradiated three sets of TLDs in a water phantom. The results were in agreement within estimated uncertainties when the TLDs were calibrated with the (192)Ir source. Calibrating TLDs in a phantom similar to that used for the audit proved to be the most practical method and provided the greatest confidence in measured dose. When calibrated using 6 MV photons, the TLD results were consistently higher than the (192)Ir-calibrated TLDs, suggesting this method does not fully correct for the response of the TLDs when irradiated in the audit phantom. PMID:23318392

  19. Dual IR laser shattering of a water microdroplet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiyama, Akinori; Nakajima, Atsushi

    2012-10-01

    Ion desorption from the infrared (IR) laser shattering of water microdroplets (∅90 μm in diameter) was experimentally examined by ion current measurements coupled with time-resolved imaging by a charge-coupled-device camera. When a microdroplet was shattered by simultaneous illumination by two IR lasers ( λ=2.9 μm) from both the left- and right-hand sides, the time-resolved imaging shows that a lot of small fragments of splash spread around the droplet. The spatial distributions of the small fragments were symmetrically compressed. The resulting fragment swarm was effectively introduced into a vacuum chamber through an inlet skimmer ∅0.3-0.4 mm in diameter. The ion current measured from a 10-6 mol/m3 NaCl water solution microdroplet using two lasers was considerably enhanced compared to that by single IR laser shattering. When one of the two IR lasers was delayed by 0-1000 μs, the ion current gradually decreased with the delay time, and dropped substantially at delays longer than 100 ns. The results are ascribed to dynamical processes following the multi-photon excitation. The dual IR laser ablation of a liquid droplet can enhance the efficiency of ion formation with a lower dispersion velocity, which can be conveniently combined with time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

  20. Filling the gap --near UV, optical and near IR extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massa, Derck

    2014-10-01

    We propose a SNAP program to obtain STIS low resolution near-UV, optical and near-IR (G430L and G750L) spectra for a set of O7-B7 class III-V stars in the Galaxy and Magellanic Clouds with available IUE or HST/STIS UV spectropotometry, optical photometry and 2MASS IR photometry. Together with the existing data, the new observations will provide complete photometric and spectrophotometric coverage from 1150 to 10000 A and enable us to produce complete extinction curves from the far-UV to the near-IR, with well-determined values of R(V). The proposed set of 150 program sight lines includes the full range of interstellar extinction curve types from both the Galaxy and the Magellanic Clouds. The new data will allow us to examine variability in the near-UV through near-IR spectral regions, including the UV-optical "knee", and the "Very Broad Structure" and to verify the applicability of the near IR extinction law recently derived by Fitzpatrick and Massa (2009). We will examine the response of these features to different interstellar environments and their relationship to other curve features. These are largely unexplored aspects of the extinction curves which will provide additional constraints on the properties of interstellar grains. The curves will be derived using model atmospheres for the program stars, eliminating the need for standard stars.

  1. Mid-Infrared Spectral Properties of IR QSOs

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, X. Y.; Cao, C.; Mao, S.; Deng, Z. G.

    2008-10-10

    We analyse mid-infrared (MIR) spectroscopic properties for 19 ultra-luminous infrared quasars (IR QSOs) in the local universe based on the spectra from the Infrared Spectrograph on board the Spitzer Space Telescope. The MIR properties of IR QSOs are compared with those of optically-selected Palomar-Green QSOs (PG QSOs) and ultra-luminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs). The average MIR spectral features from {approx}5 to 30 {mu}m, including the spectral slopes, 6.2 {mu}m PAH emission strengths and [NeII] 12.81 {mu}m luminosities of IR QSOs, differ from those of PG QSOs. In contrast, IR QSOs and ULIRGs have comparable PAH and [NeII] luminosities. These results are consistent with IR QSOs being at a transitional stage from ULIRGs to classical QSOs. We also find the correlation between the EW (PAH 6.2 {mu}m) and outflow velocities suggests that star formation activities are suppressed by feedback from AGNs and/or supernovae.

  2. FT-IR spectroscopy characterization of schwannoma: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Isabelle; Neto, Lazaro P. M.; das Chagas, Maurilio José; Carvalho, Luís. Felipe C. S.; dos Santos, Laurita; Ribas, Marcelo; Loddi, Vinicius; Martin, Airton A.

    2016-03-01

    Schwannoma are rare benign neural neoplasia. The clinical diagnosis could be improved if novel optical techniques are performed. Among these techniques, FT-IR is one of the currently techniques which has been applied for samples discrimination using biochemical information with minimum sample preparation. In this work, we report a case of a schwannoma in the cervical region. A histological examination described a benign process. An immunohistochemically examination demonstrated positivity to anti-S100 protein antibody, indicating a diagnosis of schwannoma. The aim of this analysis was to characterize FT-IR spectrum of the neoplastic and normal tissue in the fingerprint (1000-1800 cm-1) and high wavenumber region (2800-3600 cm-1). The IR spectra were collect from tumor tissue and normal nerve samples by a FT-IR spectrophotometer (Spotlight Perkin Elmer 400, USA) with 64 scans, and resolution of 4 cm-1. A total of twenty spectra were recorded (10 from schwannoma and 10 from nerve). Multivariate Analysis was used to classify the data. Through average and standard deviation analysis we observed that the main spectral change occurs at ≍1600 cm-1 (amide I) and ≍1400 cm-1 (amide III) in the fingerprint region, and in CH2/CH3 protein-lipids and OH-water vibrations for the high wavenumber region. In conclusion, FT-IR could be used as a technique for schwannoma analysis helping to establish specific diagnostic.

  3. Multiple-frame IR photo-recorder KIT-3M

    SciTech Connect

    Roos, E; Wilkins, P; Nebeker, N; Murugov, V; Kravchenko, A; Lasarchuk, V; Litvin, D; Mis'ko, V; Petrov, S; Senik, A; Sheremetiev, Y

    2006-05-15

    This paper reports the experimental results of a high-speed multi-frame infrared camera which has been developed in Sarov at VNIIEF. Earlier [1] we discussed the possibility of creation of the multi-frame infrared radiation photo-recorder with framing frequency about 1 MHz. The basis of the photo-recorder is a semiconductor ionization camera [2, 3], which converts IR radiation of spectral range 1-10 micrometers into a visible image. Several sequential thermal images are registered by using the IR converter in conjunction with a multi-frame electron-optical camera. In the present report we discuss the performance characteristics of a prototype commercial 9-frame high-speed IR photo-recorder. The image converter records infrared images of thermal fields corresponding to temperatures ranging from 300 C to 2000 C with an exposure time of 1-20 {micro}s at a frame frequency up to 500 KHz. The IR-photo-recorder camera is useful for recording the time evolution of thermal fields in fast processes such as gas dynamics, ballistics, pulsed welding, thermal processing, automotive industry, aircraft construction, in pulsed-power electric experiments, and for the measurement of spatial mode characteristics of IR-laser radiation.

  4. Superconductivity in the Hexagonal Ternary Phosphide ScIrP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Yoshihiko; Inohara, Takumi; Yamakawa, Youichi; Yamakage, Ai; Takenaka, Koshi

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery of a bulk superconducting transition at 3.4 K in the ternary phosphide, ScIrP, which crystallizes in a hexagonal ZrNiAl-type structure without spatial inversion symmetry. On the basis of heat capacity data in a zero magnetic field, ScIrP is suggested to be a weakly-coupled Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer superconductor. Alternatively, experimental results under magnetic fields indicate that this material is a type-II superconductor with an upper critical field Hc2 at magnetic fields above 5 T at zero temperature. This moderately high Hc2 does not violate the Pauli limit, but it does imply that there is a significant effect from the strong spin-orbit interaction of Ir 5d electrons in the noncentrosymmetric crystal structure. Electronic structure calculations show an interesting feature of ScIrP, where both the Sc 3d and Ir 5d orbitals contribute to the electronic density of states at the Fermi level.

  5. Short infrared (IR) laser pulses can induce nanoporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Caleb C.; Barnes, Ronald A.; Ibey, Bennett L.; Glickman, Randolph D.; Beier, Hope T.

    2016-03-01

    Short infrared (IR) laser pulses on the order of hundreds of microseconds to single milliseconds with typical wavelengths of 1800-2100 nm, have shown the capability to reversibly stimulate action potentials (AP) in neuronal cells. While the IR stimulation technique has proven successful for several applications, the exact mechanism(s) underlying the AP generation has remained elusive. To better understand how IR pulses cause AP stimulation, we determined the threshold for the formation of nanopores in the plasma membrane. Using a surrogate calcium ion, thallium, which is roughly the same shape and charge, but lacks the biological functionality of calcium, we recorded the flow of thallium ions into an exposed cell in the presence of a battery of channel antagonists. The entry of thallium into the cell indicated that the ions entered via nanopores. The data presented here demonstrate a basic understanding of the fundamental effects of IR stimulation and speculates that nanopores, formed in response to the IR exposure, play an upstream role in the generation of AP.

  6. Rapid discrimination of cultivated Codonopsis lanceolata in different ages by FT-IR and 2DCOS-IR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yun; Xu, Chang-hua; Huang, Jian; Li, Guo-yu; Liu, Xin-Hu; Sun, Su-qin; Wang, Jin-hui

    2014-07-01

    Deodeok (Codonopsis lanceolata) root, a traditional Chinese herbal medicine, has been used to treat lung ailments, rheumatism, menstrual disturbance and bruises with a long history in China and some other Asian countries. In this study, four types of Deodeok with different growth years were discriminated and identified by a Tri-step infrared spectroscopy method (Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (conventional FT-IR) coupled with second derivative infrared spectroscopy (SD-IR) and two dimensional correlation infrared spectroscopy(2DCOS-IR) under thermal perturbation. Although only small differences were found in the FT-IR spectra of the samples, the positions and intensities of peaks around 1736, 1634, 1246, 1055, 1033, 818, 779 cm-1 could be considered as the key factors for discriminating them. The differences among them were amplified by their SD-IR spectra. The 2DCOS-IR spectra provided obvious dynamic chemical structure information of Deodeok samples, which present different particular auto peak clusters in the range of 875-1130 cm-1 and 1170-1630 cm-1, respectively. It was demonstrated that the content of triterpene were decreasing when C. lanceolata were growing older, but the relative content of saccharides initially increased and decreased significantly afterwards. It indicated a general trend that the content of polysaccharides accumulated with increasing years. Specifically, the content of polysaccharides accumulated in the root of 2-year-old plant was the lowest, 4-years-old was the highest, and then the content decreased gradually. Furthermore, according to the differences of locations and intensities of auto-peaks in 2D-IR spectra, the integral changes of components were revealed. This study offers a promising method inherent with cost-effective and time-saving to characterize and discriminate the complicated system like Deodeok.

  7. Determination of effective resonance energy for the 193Ir(n,γ)194Ir reaction by the cadmium ratio method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budak, Mustafa Guray; Karadag, Mustafa; Yücel, Haluk

    2016-04-01

    In this work, the effective resonance energy, Ebarr -value for the 193Ir(n,γ)194Ir reaction was measured using cadmium ratio method. A dual monitor (197Au-98Mo), which has convenient resonance properties, was employed for characterization of the irradiation sites. Then analytical grade iridium oxide samples diluted with CaCO3 to lower neutron self-shielding effect stacked in small cylindrical Teflon boxes were irradiated once with a 1 mm thick Cd cylindrical box placed in a thermalized neutron field of an 241Am-Be neutron source then without it. The activities produced in samples during 193Ir(n,γ)194Ir reaction were measured using a p-type HPGe detector γ-ray spectrometer with a 44.8% relative efficiency. The correction factors for thermal, epithermal neutron self-shielding (Gth, Gepi), true coincidence summing (Fcoi) and gamma-ray self-absorption (Fs) effects were determined with appropriate approaches and programs. Thus, the experimental Ebarr -value was determined to be 2.65 ± 0.61 eV for 193Ir target nuclide. The recent data for Q0 and FCd values for Ebarr determination were based on k0-NAA online database. The present experimental Ebarr value was calculated and compared with more recent values for Q0 and FCd for 193Ir. Additionally, the Ebarr -values was theoretically calculated from the up-to-date resonance data obtained from ENDF/B VII library using two different approaches. Since there is no experimentally determined Ebarr -value for the 193Ir isotope, the results are compared with the calculated ones given in the literature.

  8. Study of a V-shape flame based on IR spectroscopy and IR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pouplin, J.; Collin, A.; Acem, Z.; Parent, G.; Boulet, P.; Vena, P.; Galizzi, C.; Kühni, M.; André, F.; Escudié, D.

    2016-01-01

    Applicability of an IR imaging/spectroscopy diagnostic was tested on a laboratory- scale flame. For this purpose, measurements were carried out on a V-shape flame developed along a wall, with the aim of evaluating the wall temperature and of identifying the flame properties (temperature and species concentrations). Infrared measurements with a multiband camera and a spectrometer were post-processed and compared, in particular, with thermocouple measurements carried out for the wall temperature. Simple evaluation involving a correction for the emissivity showed a quite good agreement when assessed against experimental data. An attempt to reconstruct a flame emission spectrum was also carried out, expecting a possible inverse identification of the flame properties. The method showed a promising behaviour on synthetic data built with a radiative transfer model for gas and wall radiation. However, the spectrum reconstruction method is not yet accurate enough to allow an identification of the flame properties in full confidence when applied to actual experimental data. First tests showed a correct qualitative behaviour, but model refinements are required at least for the flame radiation, before getting accurate flame properties.

  9. [Advance of Development and Application of GC-IR Technology].

    PubMed

    Huang, Yi-fei; Cai, Zan; Hu, Jing; Lin, Li-qiong; Xiao, Xiao-hua; Li, Gong-ke

    2015-08-01

    The gas chromatograph (GC)-infrared spectroscopy (IR) technique combines the particular separating capacity of GC and the faultlessly with distinguishing capacity of molecular structure of IR, its detective sensitivity is very high and itis used to separate and identify many kinds of complicated compounds from element speciation analysis, natural products, and gasoline. This paper introduces the principle of GC-IR. Three types of interface techniques, light pipe technique, matrix isolation technique and direct deposition technique are compared. Connection type with other detections and factors influencing sensitivity in interface are also introduced. The improvement and achievement in coupling GC system, interface, data processing techniques and its application is reviewed in the present paper. PMID:26672280

  10. HST/WFC3: IR Channel Photometric Performance and Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajaj, Varun; Deustua, Susana E.; Gosmeyer, Catherine; McCullough, Peter R.; WFC3 Team

    2016-06-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) contains two channels: UVIS and IR. The IR channel makes use of a HgCdTe detector produced by Teledyne. By periodically observing a set of bright white dwarf stars we are able to monitor the photometric performance of the IR detector over the last seven years. We present the results of the photometric measurements over time. In addition we discuss the effects of detector behavior not accounted for by the typical calibration (performed by CALWF3) such as the high order nonlinear response of detector pixels, persistence of previous exposures, and contamination of the channel. The findings of this investigation will have a direct impact on the flux calibration of the channel (and the resulting zeropoints).

  11. Electronic signatures of dimerization in IrTe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Jixia; Wu, Weida; Oh, Yoon Seok; Cheong, S.-W.; Yang, J. J.

    2014-03-01

    Recently, the mysterious phase transition around Tc ~ 260 K in IrTe2 has been intensively studied. A structural supermodulation with q =1/5 was identified below Tc. A variety of microscopic mechanisms have been proposed to account for this transition, including charge-density wave due to Fermi surface nesting, Te p-orbital driven structure instability, anionic depolymerization, ionic dimerization, and so on. However, there has not been an unified picture on the nature of this transition. To address this issue, we have performed low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM/STS) experiments on IrTe2 and IrTe2-xSex. Our STM data clearly shows a strong bias dependence in both topography and local density of states (STS) maps. High resolution spectroscopic data further confirms the stripe-like electronic states modulation, which provides insight to the ionic dimerization revealed by X-ray diffraction.

  12. IR Spectroscopy and Photo-Chemistry of Extraterrestrial Ices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, Max P.; Mastrapa, Rachel; Elsila, Jamie; Sandford, Scott

    2005-01-01

    Dense molecular clouds from which planetary systems form and the outer Solar System are both cold environments dominated by ices. Infrared (IR) spectroscopy is used to probe these ices, but the IR absorptions of molecules depend on the conditions. As a result appropriate lab data is needed to correctly fit spectra of extraterrestrial ices. Such fits have shown that most of these ices are composed primarily of H2O, but also contain 1-10 percent of other simple molecules such as CO2, CO, CH4, & NH3;. We shall present near IR spectra of ice mixtures of relevance to icy outer Solar System bodies and show that they still hold surprises, such as the Cheshire cat-like CO2 (2v3) overtone near 2.134 micrometers (4685 cm-1) that is absent from spectra of pure CO2 but present in H2O-CO2 mixtures.

  13. Enhanced Landmine Detection from Low Resolution IR Image Sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tiesheng; Gu, Irene Yu-Hua; Tjahjadi, Tardi

    We deal with the problem of landmine field detection using low-resolution infrared (IR) image sequences measured from airborne or vehicle-borne passive IR cameras. The proposed scheme contains two parts: a) employ a multi-scale detector, i.e., a special type of isotropic bandpass filters, to detect landmine candidates in each frame; b) enhance landmine detection through seeking maximum consensus of corresponding landmine candidates over image frames. Experiments were conducted on several IR image sequences measured from airborne and vehicle-borne cameras, where some results are included. As shown in our experiments, the landmine signatures have been significantly enhanced using the proposed scheme, and automatic detection results are reasonably good. These methods can therefore be applied to assisting humanitarian demining work for landmine field detection.

  14. Electronic transport properties of Ir-decorated graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yilin; Xiao, Shudong; Cai, Xinghan; Bao, Wenzhong; Reutt-Robey, Janice; Fuhrer, Michael S.

    2015-10-01

    Graphene decorated with 5d transitional metal atoms is predicted to exhibit many intriguing properties; for example iridium adatoms are proposed to induce a substantial topological gap in graphene. We extensively investigated the conductivity of single-layer graphene decorated with iridium deposited in ultra-high vacuum at low temperature (7 K) as a function of Ir concentration, carrier density, temperature, and annealing conditions. Our results are consistent with the formation of Ir clusters of ~100 atoms at low temperature, with each cluster donating a single electronic charge to graphene. Annealing graphene increases the cluster size, reducing the doping and increasing the mobility. We do not observe any sign of an energy gap induced by spin-orbit coupling, possibly due to the clustering of Ir.

  15. Analysis of integrating sphere performance for IR enhanced DT layering

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, R.B.,; Collins, G.W.

    1997-06-01

    Absorbed IR energy can supplement the beta decay energy from DT ice to improve the driving force toward uniform layers. A significant problem with this approach has been to deliver the added IR energy with sufficient uniformity to enhance rather than destroy the uniformity of the ice layers. Computer modeling has indicated that one can achieve {approximately}1% uniformity in the angular variation of the absorbed power using an integrating sphere containing holes large enough to allow external inspection of the ice layer uniformity. The power required depends on the integrating sphere size, a 25 mm diameter sphere requires {approximately}35 mW of IR to deposit as much energy in the ice as the 50 mW/cm{sup 3}(35 pW total) received from tritium decay in DT. Power absorbed in the plastic can cause unacceptable ice-layer non-uniformities for the integrating sphere design considered here.

  16. Use of Natural Bodies of Water for IR Calibration Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Kurzeja, R.J.

    2001-04-17

    Natural bodies of water have several advantages as IR calibration targets in remote sensing. Among these are availability, homogeneity, and accurate knowledge of emissivity. A portable, low-cost, floating apparatus is described for calibration of remote IR sensors to within 0.15 C. The apparatus measures the surface and bulk water temperature as well as the wind speed, direction, temperature, and relative humidity. The apparatus collects data automatically and can be deployed for up to 24 hours. The sources of uncertainty, including the effects of skin temperature and waves are discussed. Data from several field campaigns to calibrate IR bands of DOE's Multi-Spectral Thermal Imager are described along with estimates of error.

  17. Image reconstruction of FT-IR microspectrometric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasch, Peter; Lewis, E. Neil; Kidder, Linda H.; Naumann, Dieter

    2000-03-01

    FT-IR microspectrometry, particularly in combination with digital imaging techniques shows great promise for in-vivo and ex-vivo medical diagnosis. The statement is based on the knowledge that this method delivers information of the chemical structure and composition of a sample and the fact that any disease is linked to changes in the molecular and structural composition of cells and tissues. Typically, these changes are highly specific for a given tissue structure and are therefore potentially detectable by FT-IR microspectrometry. In this paper we present several approaches for the representation of mid-infrared microspectroscopic data acquired with high spatial resolution by the use of a MCT focal plane array detector. The applicability of image reassembling methodologies like functional group analysis, image reconstruction based on factor analysis and artificial neural network analysis to the IR data is discussed.

  18. Reaction of Phthalocyanines with Graphene on Ir(111).

    PubMed

    Altenburg, Simon J; Lattelais, Marie; Wang, Bin; Bocquet, Marie-Laure; Berndt, Richard

    2015-07-29

    Iron phthalocyanine (FePc) is adsorbed to graphene on Ir(111) at cryogenic temperature. In addition to mobile FePc with four lobes, imaging and spectroscopy with a scanning tunneling microscope reveal immobile molecules that exhibit fewer lobes. A reversible transformation between four- and three-lobed molecules has been induced by current injection. The data are consistent with chemical bonding of lobes to graphene on Ir, pinning down the graphene area toward Ir. Similar observations are made from NiPc, CoPc, CuPc, and H2Pc. The experimental findings can be explained by ab initio calculations, which suggest that a Diels-Alder-type reaction may be involved with an allyl unit of graphene in the top-fcc moiré registry. PMID:26147789

  19. SubMIR - a submillimeter and IR observations database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayet, E.; Rabasse, J. F.; Gerin, M.

    2005-12-01

    We have built the first submillimeter and IR observations database of the Laboratoire de Radioastronomie-Ecole Normale Superieure de Paris-LERMA (Observatoire de Paris) which contains already more than 1000 submm/mm spectra and several IR maps of nearby galaxies (D<10Mpc) from Bayet et al. 2004, 2005a, 2005b, 2006; Gerin & Phillips 1998, 2000. It has been developed to gather, classify and make available all the submm, mm, IR observations collected these last years and obtained not only for the nearby galaxies but also for more distant objects. SubMIR interacts and completes the already existing databases such as NED, ADS, SIMBAD, etc... Presently, the test periods are almost finished and we hope to open SubMIR very soon to the large astrophysical community. In this poster, we present the way the database works.

  20. Electronic transport properties of Ir-decorated graphene

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yilin; Xiao, Shudong; Cai, Xinghan; Bao, Wenzhong; Reutt-Robey, Janice; Fuhrer, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Graphene decorated with 5d transitional metal atoms is predicted to exhibit many intriguing properties; for example iridium adatoms are proposed to induce a substantial topological gap in graphene. We extensively investigated the conductivity of single-layer graphene decorated with iridium deposited in ultra-high vacuum at low temperature (7 K) as a function of Ir concentration, carrier density, temperature, and annealing conditions. Our results are consistent with the formation of Ir clusters of ~100 atoms at low temperature, with each cluster donating a single electronic charge to graphene. Annealing graphene increases the cluster size, reducing the doping and increasing the mobility. We do not observe any sign of an energy gap induced by spin-orbit coupling, possibly due to the clustering of Ir. PMID:26508279

  1. Silk protein aggregation kinetics revealed by Rheo-IR.

    PubMed

    Boulet-Audet, Maxime; Terry, Ann E; Vollrath, Fritz; Holland, Chris

    2014-02-01

    The remarkable mechanical properties of silk fibres stem from a multi-scale hierarchical structure created when an aqueous protein "melt" is converted to an insoluble solid via flow. To directly relate a silk protein's structure and function in response to flow, we present the first application of a Rheo-IR platform, which couples cone and plate rheology with attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy. This technique provides a new window into silk processing by linking shear thinning to an increase in molecular alignment, with shear thickening affecting changes in the silk protein's secondary structure. Additionally, compared to other static characterization methods for silk, Rheo-IR proved particularly useful at revealing the intrinsic difference between natural (native) and reconstituted silk feedstocks. Hence Rheo-IR offers important novel insights into natural silk processing. This has intrinsic academic merit, but it might also be useful when designing reconstituted silk analogues alongside other polymeric systems, whether natural or synthetic. PMID:24200713

  2. SiC IR emitter design for thermophotovoltaic generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraas, Lewis M.; Ferguson, Luke; McCoy, Larry G.; Pernisz, Udo C.

    1996-02-01

    An improved ceramic spine disc burner/emitter for use in a thermophotovoltaic (TPV) generator is described. A columnar infrared (IR) emitter consisting of a stack of silicon carbide (SiC) spine discs provides for both high conductance for the combustion gases and efficient heat transfer from the hot combustion gases to the emitter. Herein, we describe the design, fabrication, and testing of this SiC burner as well as the characterization of the IR spectrum it emits. We note that when the SiC column is surrounded with fused silica heat shields, these heat shields suppress the emitted power beyond 4 microns. Thus, a TPV generator using GaSb photovoltaic cells covered by simple dielectric filters can convert over 30% of the emitted IR radiation to DC electric power.

  3. Compound simulator IR radiation characteristics test and calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yanhong; Zhang, Li; Li, Fan; Tian, Yi; Yang, Yang; Li, Zhuo; Shi, Rui

    2015-10-01

    The Hardware-in-the-loop simulation can establish the target/interference physical radiation and interception of product flight process in the testing room. In particular, the simulation of environment is more difficult for high radiation energy and complicated interference model. Here the development in IR scene generation produced by a fiber array imaging transducer with circumferential lamp spot sources is introduced. The IR simulation capability includes effective simulation of aircraft signatures and point-source IR countermeasures. Two point-sources as interference can move in two-dimension random directions. For simulation the process of interference release, the radiation and motion characteristic is tested. Through the zero calibration for optical axis of simulator, the radiation can be well projected to the product detector. The test and calibration results show the new type compound simulator can be used in the hardware-in-the-loop simulation trial.

  4. IR thermography for dynamic detection of laminar-turbulent transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Bernhard; Filius, Adrian; Tropea, Cameron; Grundmann, Sven

    2016-05-01

    This work investigates the potential of infrared (IR) thermography for the dynamic detection of laminar-turbulent transition. The experiments are conducted on a flat plate at velocities of 8-14 m/s, and the transition of the laminar boundary layer to turbulence is forced by a disturbance source which is turned on and off with frequencies up to 10 Hz. Three different heating techniques are used to apply the required difference between fluid and structure temperature: a heated aluminum structure is used as an internal structure heating technique, a conductive paint acts as a surface bounded heater, while an IR heater serves as an example for an external heating technique. For comparison of all heating techniques, a normalization is introduced and the frequency response of the measured IR camera signal is analyzed. Finally, the different heating techniques are compared and consequences for the design of experiments on laminar-turbulent transition are discussed.

  5. Rapid discrimination of extracts of Chinese propolis and poplar buds by FT-IR and 2D IR correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yan-Wen; Sun, Su-Qin; Zhao, Jing; Li, Yi; Zhou, Qun

    2008-07-01

    The extract of Chinese propolis (ECP) has recently been adulterated with that of poplar buds (EPB), because most of ECP is derived from the poplar plant, and ECP and EPB have almost identical chemical compositions. It is very difficult to differentiate them by using the chromatographic methods such as high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and gas chromatography (GC). Therefore, how to effectively discriminate these two mixtures is a problem to be solved urgently. In this paper, a rapid method for discriminating ECP and EPB was established by the Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra combined with the two-dimensional infrared correlation (2D IR) analysis. Forty-three ECP and five EPB samples collected from different areas of China were analyzed by the FT-IR spectroscopy. All the ECP and EPB samples tested show similar IR spectral profiles. The significant differences between ECP and EPB appear in the region of 3000-2800 cm -1 of the spectra. Based on such differences, the two species were successfully classified with the soft independent modeling of class analogy (SIMCA) pattern recognition technique. Furthermore, these differences were well validated by a series of temperature-dependent dynamic FT-IR spectra and the corresponding 2D IR plots. The results indicate that the differences in these two natural products are caused by the amounts of long-chain alkyl compounds (including long-chain alkanes, long-chain alkyl esters and long chain alkyl alcohols) in them, rather than the flavonoid compounds, generally recognized as the bioactive substances of propolis. There are much more long-chain alkyl compounds in ECP than those in EPB, and the carbon atoms of the compounds in ECP remain in an order Z-shaped array, but those in EPB are disorder. It suggests that FT-IR and 2D IR spectroscopy can provide a valuable method for the rapid differentiation of similar natural products, ECP and EPB. The IR spectra could directly reflect the integrated chemical

  6. Radio Monitoring of the Periodically Variable IR Source LRLL 54361: No Direct Correlation between the Radio and IR Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbrich, Jan; Rodríguez, Luis F.; Palau, Aina; Zapata, Luis A.; Muzerolle, James; Gutermuth, Robert A.

    2015-11-01

    LRLL 54361 is an infrared source located in the star-forming region IC 348 SW. Remarkably, its infrared luminosity increases by a factor of 10 over roughly one week every 25.34 days. To understand the origin of these remarkable periodic variations, we obtained sensitive 3.3 cm JVLA radio continuum observations of LRLL 54361 and its surroundings in six different epochs: three of them during the IR-on state and three during the IR-off state. The radio source associated with LRLL 54361 remained steady and did not show a correlation with the IR variations. We suggest that the IR is tracing the results of fast (with a timescale of days) pulsed accretion from an unseen binary companion, while the radio traces an ionized outflow with an extent of ∼100 AU that smooths out the variability over a period of the order of a year. The average flux density measured in these 2014 observations, 27 ± 5 μJy, is about a factor of two less than that measured about 1.5 years before, 53 ± 11 μJy, suggesting that variability in the radio is present, but over larger timescales than in the IR. We discuss other sources in the field, in particular two infrared/X-ray stars that show rapidly varying gyrosynchrotron emission.

  7. Formation of cluster systems in condensed matters and IR spectra of liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnikov, G.; Ignatenko, N.; Krasnych, P.; Melnikov, V.; Cherkasov, E.

    2016-02-01

    Modern approaches to the interpretation of IR spectra of polyatomic liquids are based on cluster models of the structure of matter. First of all it concerns the far infrared region of the spectrum (20-300 cm-1) where rotationally libration motions in the structure of clusters are found. This work is a continuation of research conducted by the authors earlier [G. Melnikov at al. 2015 IOP Conf. Ser Mater. Sci. Eng. 81 p 012032]. The authors have adopted a model in which the appearance of spectral bands is explained by to libration oscillations vibrations of dimers with different configurations in the structure of clusters.

  8. Retrieval of Atmospheric CO2 Column from Ground-based Near IR Spectra of the Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wennberg, Paul

    2005-01-01

    This grant has supported a graduate research assistant stipend for Zhonghua Yang, a geochemistry Ph.D. student at Caltech. In this project, we have significantly improved the retrieval of atmospheric column CO2 (and molecular oxygen) from ground-based, high resolution near-IR solar transmission spectra. This work has greatly benefited from interactions with Dr. Geoffrey Toon and Stan Sander of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and with James T. Randerson, University of California - Irvine. The results from this study are summarized in three publications, reprints of which are enclosed in with this report.

  9. Nonlinear optical processes for the mid-IR region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schepler, K. L.; Barnes, N. P.

    1989-01-01

    The 2 - 5 micron (mid-IR) region is of interest for a number of applications. Efficient up-conversion and down-conversion techniques are being developed to obtain optical sources at mid-IR wavelengths. These techniques are reviewed and recent results using AgGaSe2 are reported. Gain in AgGaSe2 as high as 13 has been observed with a pump wavelength of 1.73 microns and a signal wavelength of 3.39 microns. Optical parametric oscillation in the 2.9 - 6.8 micron region has also been demonstrated.

  10. Evanescent wave sensors for mid-IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korsakova, S. V.; Romanova, E. A.

    2016-04-01

    An important problem of investigation of the air and water contamination by the mid-IR spectroscopy is discussed. A model of evanescent wave sensor made of a multimode waveguide transparent in the mid-IR spectral range is developed. Transmittance and sensitivity of a sensing element consisting of an input chalcogenide waveguide and a sensing waveguide depend on distribution of the guided modes amplitudes in the sensing waveguide. We have demonstrated that excitation of higher-order modes is important for optimal performance of such a sensor.

  11. H2O Isotopologues in Extreme OH/IR Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Justtanont, K.; Barlow, M. J.; Blommaert, J. A. D. L.; Decin, L.; Kerschbaum, F.; Matsuura, M.; Olofsson, H.; Swinyard, B.; Teyssier, D.; Waters, L. B. F. M.; Yates, J.

    2015-08-01

    Using Herschel Space Observatory, we observed isotopologues of H2O in extreme OH/IR stars. We detected strong H216O and H217O while the H218O lines are missing, contrary to the overall galactic oxygen abundance in the interstellar medium and the Sun, where 18O is more abundant than 17O. Theoretical stellar evolution suggests that 18O is being destroyed during the hot-bottom burning. This implies that these OH/IR stars come from a population of intermediate-mass stars which have an initial mass ≥ 5 M⊙.

  12. The Mark III IR FEL: Improvements in performance and operation

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, G.A.; Madey, J.M.J.; Straub, K.D.

    1995-12-31

    The Mark III IR FEL has been upgraded by the installation of a new thermionic microwave gun. The new gun yields a reduced emittance and allows operation at a higher repetition rate and an increased electron macropulse length. The RF system of the Mark III has also been phase-locked to the RF systemof the adjacent storage ring driver for the laboratory`s short-wavelength FEL sources, making possible two-color UV-IR pump probe experiments. In this paper, the design and performance of the new gun are presented and the implications of the improvements investigated.

  13. CEBAF UV/IR FEL subsystem testing and validation program

    SciTech Connect

    G.R. Neil; S.V. Benson; H.F. Dylla; H. Liu

    1995-01-01

    A design has been established for IR and UV FELs within the Laser Processing Consortium's (LPC) program for development and application of high-average-power FELs for materials processing. Hardware prototyping and testing for the IR portion of the system are underway. The driver portion has been designed based on the superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) technology now seeing large-scale application in the commissioning of CEBAF, the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, where LPC activities are centered. As of July 1994, measurements of beam performance confirm SRF's benefits in beam quality and stability, which are applicable to high-average-power FELs.

  14. Low Dose IR Creates an Oncogenic Microenvironment by Inducing Premature

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Zhi-Min

    2013-04-28

    Introduction Much of the work addressing ionizing radiation-induced cellular response has been carried out mainly with the traditional cell culture technique involving only one cell type, how cellular response to IR is influenced by the tissue microenvironment remains elusive. By use of a three-dimensional (3D) co-culture system to model critical interactions of different cell types with their neighbors and with their environment, we recently showed that low-dose IR-induced extracellular signaling via the tissue environment affects profoundly cellular responses. This proposal aims at determining the response of mammary epithelial cells in a tissue-like setting.

  15. Photoablation of polyimide with IR and UV laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, R.; Nowak, R.; Hess, P.; Oetzmann, H.; Schmidt, C.

    1989-12-01

    IR and UV ablation experiments were performed for freestanding polyimide foils (75 μm) and spincoated films of polyimide (6-7 μm). Compared to results reported in the literature a considerably improved etch quality was obtained with a pulsed TEA CO2 laser. Distinct interference effects were found for KrF laser radiation and CO2 laser radiation. The fluence dependence of the etch rates was studied for excimer laser light at 248 nm and IR laser light at 1082.3, 1057.3 and 970.5 cm-1. The optical absorption coefficient was determined by reflectivity and transmittance measurements.

  16. SAPhIR: a fission-fragment detector

    SciTech Connect

    Theisen, Ch.; Gautherin, C.; Houry, M.; Korten, W.; Le Coz, Y.; Lucas, R.

    1998-10-26

    SAPhIR is the acronym for S{sub a}clay A{sub q}uitaine P{sub ho}tovoltaic cells for I{sub s}omer R{sub e}search. It consists of solar cells, used for fission-fragment detection. It is a collaboration between 3 laboratories: CEA Saclay, CENBG Bordeaux and CEA Bruyeres le Chatel. The coupling of a highly efficient fission-fragment detector like SAPhIR with EUROBALL will provide new insights in the study of very deformed nuclear matter and in the spectroscopy of neutron-rich nuclei.

  17. 31 CFR 256.51 - Does FMS report Judgment Fund payments to the IRS as income to the payee on IRS Form 1099?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Does FMS report Judgment Fund payments... Provisions § 256.51 Does FMS report Judgment Fund payments to the IRS as income to the payee on IRS Form 1099? No, FMS does not report Judgment Fund payments as potential taxable income to the IRS. FMS does...

  18. 31 CFR 256.51 - Does FMS report Judgment Fund payments to the IRS as income to the payee on IRS Form 1099?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Does FMS report Judgment Fund payments... Provisions § 256.51 Does FMS report Judgment Fund payments to the IRS as income to the payee on IRS Form 1099? No, FMS does not report Judgment Fund payments as potential taxable income to the IRS. FMS does...

  19. 31 CFR 256.51 - Does FMS report Judgment Fund payments to the IRS as income to the payee on IRS Form 1099?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Does FMS report Judgment Fund payments... Provisions § 256.51 Does FMS report Judgment Fund payments to the IRS as income to the payee on IRS Form 1099? No, FMS does not report Judgment Fund payments as potential taxable income to the IRS. FMS does...

  20. Structure Determination and Excited State Proton Transfer Reaction of 1-NAPHTHOL-AMMONIA Clusters in the S_{1} State Studied by Uv-Ir Mid-Ir Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, Shunpei; Miyazaki, Mitsuhiko; Martin, Weiler; Ishikawa, Haruki; Fujii, Masaaki

    2013-06-01

    1-naphthol ammonia clusters have been studied long time as a benchmark system of the excited state proton transfer (ESPT) reactions. Understanding the ESPT reaction in this system has still not been fully established. To detect the cluster size dependence of the S_{1} state properties, many researcher extensively investigated such as emission spectra, lifetime, solvents (ammonia) evaporation pattern. Curiously, cluster structure that is fundamental to discuss the reaction has not been determined for the system. Thus we applied an IR spectroscopy to the S_{1} states of the system to determine the cluster structure and to discuss the minimum size inducing the ionic dissociation of the O-H bond in the S_{1} state. IR spectra were recorded not only the O-H and N-H stretching region (3 {μ}m) but also the skeletal vibrational region (5.5-10 {μ}m). Though O-H and N-H stretching vibrations do not provide useful structural information due to the broadness, the skeletal vibrations hold the sharpness even in the S_{1} states. Changes in the skeletal vibrations due to the ammonia solvation, e.g. C-O stretching and C-O-H bending, will be discussed based on a comparison with theoretical calculations. O. Cheshnovsky and S. Leutwylar, J. Chem. Phys. 1, 4127 (1988). S. K. Kim et al., Chem. Phys. lett. 228, 369 (1994). C. Dedonder-Lardeux et al., Phys. Chem, Chem, Phys. 3, 4316 (2001).

  1. 2D IR spectroscopy at 100 kHz utilizing a Mid-IR OPCPA laser source.

    PubMed

    Luther, Bradley M; Tracy, Kathryn M; Gerrity, Michael; Brown, Susannah; Krummel, Amber T

    2016-02-22

    We present a 100 kHz 2D IR spectrometer. The system utilizes a ytterbium all normal dispersion fiber oscillator as a common source for the pump and seed beams of a MgO:PPLN OPCPA. The 1030 nm OPCPA pump is generated by amplification of the oscillator in cryocooled Yb:YAG amplifiers, while the 1.68 μm seed is generated in a OPO pumped by the oscillator. The OPCPA outputs are used in a ZGP DFG stage to generate 4.65 μm pulses. A mid-IR pulse shaper delivers pulse pairs to a 2D IR spectrometer allowing for data collection at 100 kHz. PMID:26907062

  2. VLT near- to mid-IR imaging and spectroscopy of the M 17 UC1 - IRS5 region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhiwei; Nürnberger, Dieter E. A.; Chini, Rolf; Jiang, Zhibo; Fang, Min

    2015-06-01

    Aims: We investigate the surroundings of the hypercompact H ii region M 17 UC1 to probe the physical properties of the associated young stellar objects and the environment of massive star formation. Methods: We use diffraction-limited near-IR (VLT/NACO) and mid-IR (VLT/VISIR) images to reveal the different morphologies at various wavelengths. Likewise, we investigate the stellar and nebular content of the region with VLT/SINFONI integral field spectroscopy with a resolution R ˜ 1500 at H + K bands. Results: Five of the seven point sources in this region show L-band excess emission. A geometric match is found between the H2 emission and near-IR polarized light in the vicinity of IRS5A, and between the diffuse mid-IR emission and near-IR polarization north of UC1. The H2 emission is typical for dense photodissociation regions (PDRs), which are initially far-ultraviolet pumped and repopulated by collisional de-excitation. The spectral types of IRS5A and B273A are B3-B7 V/III and G4-G5 III, respectively. The observed infrared luminosity LIR in the range 1-20 μm is derived for three objects; we obtain 2.0 × 103 L⊙ for IRS5A, 13 L⊙ for IRS5C, and 10 L⊙ for B273A. Conclusions: IRS5 might be a young quadruple system. Its primary star IRS5A is confirmed to be a high-mass protostellar object (˜9 M⊙, ˜1 × 105 yrs); it might have terminated accretion due to the feedback from stellar activities (radiation pressure, outflow) and the expanding H ii region of M 17. The object UC1 might also have terminated accretion because of the expanding hypercompact H ii region, which it ionizes. The disk clearing process of the low-mass young stellar objects in this region might be accelerated by the expanding H ii region. The outflows driven by UC1 are running south-north with its northeastern side suppressed by the expanding ionization front of M 17; the blue-shifted outflow lobe of IRS5A is seen in two types of tracers along the same line of sight in the form of H2 emission

  3. Broadband IR Measurements for Modis Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jessup, Andrew T.

    2003-01-01

    The primary objective of this research was the development and deployment of autonomous shipboard systems for infrared measurement of ocean surface skin temperature (SST). The focus was on demonstrating long-term, all-weather capability and supplying calibrated skin SST to the MODIS Ocean Science Team (MOCEAN). A secondary objective was to investigate and account for environmental factors that affect in situ measurements of SST for validation of satellite products. We developed and extensively deployed the Calibrated, InfraRed, In situ Measurement System, or CIRIMS, for at-sea validation of satellite-derived SST. The design goals included autonomous operation at sea for up to 6 months and an accuracy of +/- 0.1 C. We used commercially available infrared pyrometers and a precision blackbody housed in a temperature-controlled enclosure. The sensors are calibrated at regular interval using a cylindro-cone target immersed in a temperature-controlled water bath, which allows the calibration points to follow the ocean surface temperature. An upward-looking pyrometer measures sky radiance in order to correct for the non-unity emissivity of water, which can introduce an error of up to 0.5 C. One of the most challenging aspects of the design was protection against the marine environment. A wide range of design strategies to provide accurate, all-weather measurements were investigated. The CIRIMS uses an infrared transparent window to completely protect the sensor and calibration blackbody from the marine environment. In order to evaluate the performance of this approach, the design incorporates the ability to make measurements with and without the window in the optical path.

  4. Press conference bring excitement of geophysical research to the public

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leifert, Harvey

    “A Flare to Remember.” “Starbucks for Starfish.” “Earth's Rotation Slows for El Niño.” What do these catchy headlines have in common? They all resulted from presentations at AGU's Spring Meeting in Boston, Mass. Yes, geophysical science can be big news when presented in a way that is interesting to general audiences.Proof? Well, the “Flare to Remember” headline (in the Dallas Morning News) reported the discovery, via the SOHO spacecraft, that a solar flare had produced, deep inside the Sun, seismic disturbances of a magnitude never experienced on Earth. Researchers Valentina Zharkova of Glasgow University and Alexander Kosovichev of Stanford gave media representatives a preview of their session, supported by visual aids, in the AGU press briefing room.

  5. Rapid discrimination of three Uighur medicine of Eremurus by FT-IR combined with 2DCOS-IR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yun; Xu, Chang-hua; Huang, Jian; Li, Guo-yu; Zhou, Qun; Liu, Xin-Hu; Sun, Su-qin; Wang, Jin-hui

    2014-07-01

    As complicated mixture systems, traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs) are difficult to be identified and discriminated, especially for the drug samples originated from the same source. In this study, a tri-step infrared spectroscopy method, i.e., conventional infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) combined with second derivatives spectra and two-dimensional correlation infrared spectroscopy (2DCOS-IR), was employed to study and identify three Uighur drugs of Eremurus in Xinjiang, i.e. Eremurus altaicus (Pall.) Stev (AET), E. inderiensis (M.Bieb.)Regel(CB), E. anisopterus (Kar.et Kir.) Regel(YC). It was founded that the conventional IR spectra of the three species Eremurus were very similar based on the peak positions and shapes, indicating that the three had similar chemical profiles. On the basis of the different IR spectra of reference compounds and microscopic identification, the roots of YC, CB and AET all have comparable amount of calcium oxalate. The second derivative spectra of Eremurus enhanced the spectral resolution and amplified the small differences, especially at about 1468 cm-1, 1454 cm-1, and 1164 cm-1, and subsequently provided some dissimilarity in their calcium oxalate content. AET has relatively higher content of calcium oxalate but the lower content of anthraquinones. Moreover, the 2D-IR spectra revealed tiny differences among the three species by providing dynamic structural information of their chemical components in a more direct and visual way. The differences embodied mainly on the intensity of the auto-peaks at 971 cm-1, 1008 cm-1, 1468 cm-1 and 1578 cm-1. As a result, it was demonstrated that the macroscopic IR fingerprint method could discriminate the three similar Uighur drugs, YC, CB and AET.

  6. The Phosphotyrosine Interactome of the Insulin Receptor Family and Its Substrates IRS-1 and IRS-2*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Hanke, Stefan; Mann, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    The insulin signaling pathway is critical in regulating glucose levels and is associated with diabetes, obesity, and longevity. A tyrosine phosphorylation cascade creates docking sites for protein interactions, initiating subsequent propagation of the signal throughout the cell. The phosphotyrosine interactome of this medically important pathway has not yet been studied comprehensively. We therefore applied quantitative interaction proteomics to exhaustively profile all potential phosphotyrosine-dependent interaction sites in its key players. We targeted and compared insulin receptor substrates 1 and 2 (IRS-1 and IRS-2) as central distributors of the insulin signal, the insulin receptor, the insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor, and the insulin receptor-related receptor. Using the stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) approach with phosphorylated versus non-phosphorylated bait peptides, we found phosphorylation-specific interaction partners for 52 out of 109 investigated sites. In addition, doubly and triply phosphorylated motifs provided insight into the combinatorial effects of phosphorylation events in close proximity to each other. Our results retrieve known interactions and substantially broaden the spectrum of potential interaction partners of IRS-1 and IRS-2. A large number of common interactors rationalize their extensive functional redundancy. However, several proteins involved in signaling and metabolism interact differentially with IRS-1 and IRS-2 and thus provide leads into their different physiological roles. Differences in interactions at the receptor level are reflected in multisite recruitment of SHP2 by the insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor and limited but exclusive interactions with the IRR. In common with other recent reports, our data furthermore hint at non-SH2 or phosphotyrosine-binding domain-mediated phosphotyrosine binding. PMID:19001411

  7. Tunnelling into the twisted Mott insulator Sr2IrO4 with atomic resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansary, Armin; Nichols, John; Bray-Ali, Noah; Cao, Gang; Ng, Kwok-Wai

    2014-03-01

    We studied the single-layered iridate Sr2IrO4 with a scanning tunneling microscope. The finite low temperature conductance enables the electronic structure of this antiferromagnetic Mott insulator to be measured by tunneling spectroscopy. We imaged the topography of freshly cleaved surfaces and measured differential tunneling conductance at cryogenic temperatures. We found the Mott gap in the tunneling density of states to be 2 Δ = 615 meV. Within the Mott gap, additional shoulders are observed which are interpreted as inelastic loss features due to magnons. This research was supported by NSF grants DMR- 0800367, DMR-0856234 and EPS-0814194. Noah Bray- Ali acknowledges support from the National Research Council Postdoctoral Research Associateship Program.

  8. Mid-IR Photometry and Near-IR Spectroscopy of the FU Ori Protostar V2775 Ori (HOPS 223)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, William J.; Safron, Emily J.; Megeath, S. Thomas; Terebey, Susan; Soto, Edith; Wilson, Thomas L.; Adams, Joseph D.

    2016-02-01

    On 2015 November 20.39, we obtained mid-IR photometry of V2775 Ori (HOPS 223) with the FORCAST instrument aboard SOFIA. This is a low-mass embedded young stellar object that was reported to have undergone a luminosity outburst by Caratti o Garatti et al. (2011, A & A, 526, L1). Fischer et al. (2012, ApJ, 756, 99) dated the beginning of the outburst to between 2005 April and 2007 March and discussed the similarity of its near-IR spectrum to that of FU Orionis.

  9. Thermal Vacuum 2: measures of the IR background and on-orbit predictions (SMS IR01S18)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robberto, M.

    2008-07-01

    The total background flux seen by the WFC3-IR detector has been measured during the June-August 2007 Thermal Vacuum 2 (TV2) Campaign. The measured values agree within ~10% with our model. We predict the thermal background that will be seen on orbit with both the current (FPA129) and next (FPA165) IR FPAs, showing that it will fall well within the 0.4e/s limit stated by the CEI specification document, including detector the dark current (peak value). We also verify the general compliance of WFC3 estimated background with all relevant CEI specifications.

  10. IRS-1 Functions as a Molecular Scaffold to Coordinate IGF-I/IGFBP-2 Signaling During Osteoblast Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Xi, Gang; Shen, Xinchun; Rosen, Clifford J; Clemmons, David R

    2016-06-01

    interaction between RPTPβ and the IGF-I receptor leading to a coordinated series of signaling events that are required for osteoblast differentiation. Our findings emphasize the important role IRS-1 plays in modulating these signaling events and confirm its essential role in facilitating osteoblast differentiation. © 2016 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. PMID:26773517

  11. Sr2IrO4: Gateway to cuprate superconductivity?

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mitchell, J. F.

    2015-06-05

    High temperature superconductivity in cuprates remains a defining challenge in condensed matter physics. Recently, a new set of related compounds based on Ir rather than Cu has been discovered that may be on the verge of superconductivity themselves or be able to shed new light on the underlying interactions responsible for superconductivity in the cuprates.

  12. Biometrics via IR spectroscopy of the epidermis: potential and difficulties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackie, David M.

    2012-06-01

    We discuss the potential and difficulties of using infrared (IR) spectroscopy of the human epidermis as a biometric. We present preliminary data on the fingerpads of 9 individuals demonstrating the potential for uniqueness and stability. We also present data on the challenges presented by complications such as sebum changes, intra-individual location variability, and skin care products.

  13. IR Variability During a Shell Ejection of Eta Carinae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Nathan

    2006-02-01

    Every 5.5 years, η Carinae experiences a dramatic ``spectroscopic event'' when high-excitation lines in its UV, optical, and IR spectrum disappear, and its hard X-ray and radio continuum flux crash. This periodicity has been attributed to a very eccentric binary system with a shell ejection occurring at periastron. Mid-IR images and spectra with T-ReCS are needed to measure changes in the current bolometric luminosity and to trace dust formation episodes. This will provide a direct estimate of the mass ejected. Near-IR emission lines trace related changes in the post-event wind and ionization changes in the circumstellar environment needed to test specific models for the cause of η Car's variability as it recovers from its recent ``event''. High resolution near-IR spectra with GNIRS will continue the important work of HST/STIS, investigating changes in the direct and reflected spectrum of the stellar wind, and ionization changes in the nebula. The complex kinematic structure of η Car's ejecta also holds important clues to its mass ejection history, and is essential for interpreting other data. Phoenix can provide a unique kinematic map of the complex density and time-variable ionization structure of η Car's nebula, which is our best example of the pre-explosion environment of very massive stars.

  14. IRS Releases Tax Questionnaire that Asks Colleges to Disclose More

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelderman, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Nearly 400 colleges across the United States are about to be asked to disclose intimate financial details of their operations to the Internal Revenue Service. This article reports on a highly detailed financial questionnaire designed by the IRS for the first phase of its Colleges and Universities Compliance Project, which is part of a continuing…

  15. Attributes and drawbacks of submicron CMOS for IR FPA readouts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlowski, L. J.

    1998-09-01

    The availability of submicron CMOS has enabled the development of shingle-chip IR cameras having performance capabilities and on-chip functions which were previously impossible. Sensor designers are, however, encoutering and overcoming several challanges including steadily decreasing operating voltage.

  16. Analysis of optics designs for the LHC IR upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Tanaji; Johnstone, John; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    We consider the different options proposed for the LHC IR upgrade. The two main categories: quadrupoles first (as in the baseline design) and dipoles-first have complementary strengths. We analyze the potential of the proposed designs by calculating important performance parameters. We also propose a local scheme for correcting the quadratic chromaticity.

  17. IRS View of a Planetary Collision in the Pleiades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Inseok; Lisse, Carey; Rhee, Joseph; Zuckerman, Ben

    2008-03-01

    Recently, we identified a sun-like Pleiades member, HD 23514, hosting a huge quantity of warm dust grains. Next to BD+20 307 (a field sun-like star), HD 23514 is currently the second dustiest, adolescent-age, star known with warm excess IR emission. Very short removal timescales of warm dust grains and adolescent ages of these two stars (>~100 Myr) indicate that the very dusty, warm excess, phenomenon is a transient event. A catastrophic collision between planetary embryos or planets is the most plausible origin of so much warm dust and such a collision mimics the postulated Moon-creation event in our terrestrial system. But the N-band spectra of BD+20 307 and HD 23514 appear very different, with peculiar emission at HD 23514 peaking at ~9 microns, a peak wavelength hardly seen among young stars and other main sequence excess stars. The strange N-band spectrum may point to an extra-ordinary condition around HD 23514 such as a very thick crust of a planet, a freakish chemical composition, or shocked silicates from a planetary collision. An IRS spectrum covering the 5-35um spectral range, rather than the highly restricted ground-based N-band spectrum will provide much stronger and clearer constraints on the dusty environment of HD 23514. We propose IRS observations with all four low resolution modules to obtain a diagnostic mid-IR spectrum of this rare, fascinating star.

  18. Restructuring of an Ir(210) electrode surface by potential cycling

    PubMed Central

    Soliman, Khaled A; Kolb, Dieter M; Jacob, Timo

    2014-01-01

    Summary This study addresses the electrochemical surface faceting and restructuring of Ir(210) single crystal electrodes. Cyclic voltammetry measurements and in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy are used to probe structural changes and variations in the electrochemical behaviour after potential cycling of Ir(210) in 0.1 M H2SO4. Faceted structures are obtained electrochemically as a function of time by cycling at a scanrate of 1 V·s−1 between −0.28 and 0.70 V vs SCE, i.e., between the onset of hydrogen evolution and the surface oxidation regime. The electrochemical behaviour in sulfuric acid solution is compared with that of thermally faceted Ir(210), which shows a sharp characteristic voltammetric peak for (311) facets. Structures similar to thermally-induced faceted Ir(210) are obtained electrochemically, which typically correspond to polyoriented facets at nano-pyramids. These structures grow anisotropically in a preferred direction and reach a height of about 5 nm after 4 h of cycling. The structural changes are reflected in variations of the electrocatalytic activity towards carbon monoxide adlayer oxidation. PMID:25247118

  19. Health and Taxes: Hospitals, Community Health and the IRS.

    PubMed

    Crossley, Mary

    2016-01-01

    The Affordable Care Act created new conditions of federal tax exemption for nonprofit hospitals, including a requirement that hospitals conduct a community health needs assessment (CHNA) every three years to identify significant health needs in their communities and then develop and implement a strategy responding to those needs. As a result, hospitals must now do more than provide charity care to their patients in exchange for the benefits of tax exemption. The CHNA requirement has the potential both to prompt a radical change in hospitals' relationship to their communities and to enlist hospitals as meaningful contributors to community health improvement initiatives. Final regulations issued in December 2014 clarify hospitals' obligations under the CHNA requirement, but could do more to facilitate hospitals' engagement in collaborative community health projects. The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) has a rich opportunity, while hospitals are still learning to conduct CHNAs, to develop guidance establishing clear but flexible expectations for how providers should assess and address community needs. This Article urges the IRS to seize that opportunity by refining its regulatory framework for the CHNA requirement. Specifically, the IRS should more robustly promote transparency, accountability, community engagement, and collaboration while simultaneously leaving hospitals a good degree of flexibility. By promoting alignment between hospitals' regulatory compliance activities and broader community health improvement initiatives, the IRS could play a meaningful role in efforts to reorient our system towards promoting health and not simply treating illness. PMID:27363258

  20. Polaronic absorption in Sr2IrO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Chang Hee; Qi, Tong-Fei; Noh, Kyung Joo; Park, Hyun-Ju; Yoo, Hyang Keun; Cao, Gang; Kim, Kyung Wan; Cho, Deok-Yong; Moon, Soon Jae; Noh, Tae Won

    2014-03-01

    Sr2IrO4 has received much attention as a novel Jeff = 1/2 Mott insulator. Many theorists have supposed that exotic novel ground state such as superconductivity, topological insulator, and quantum spin liquid could emerge in Jeff = 1/2 state. However, despite of great interests on Sr2IrO4, the ground state of this material is elusive up to now. Unlike previous Mott scenario, recent reports support that Sr2IrO4 can be described as Slater insulator rather than Mott insulator. The origin of temperature evolutions of electronic structure shown in many experiments also remains vague until now. Here, we investigated the detail temperature evolution of electronic structure of Sr2IrO4 using infrared spectroscopy. We couldn't observe any anomaly in optical conductivity near the TN, which is not consistent with recent reports. Instead, we observed the continuous changes in our optical data which can be explained in terms of polaronic behavior, closely related to La2CuO4.