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Sample records for ir transmission diffraction

  1. Efficient IR Transmission Diffraction Grating for Circularly Polarized Light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Helen; Chambers, Diana

    1999-01-01

    Numerical methods, using rigorous coupled wave theory, are used to design rectangular relief diffraction gratings for an infrared application which requires comparable first order efficiencies in the TE and TM polarization states. The depth, period, and fill factor of the grating are varied to identify optimal two level binary lamellar grating profiles which predict efficiencies for individual TM and TE polarizations above 75 percent, while keeping the difference between the two efficiencies within 10 percent. The application at hand is a rotating, transmissive diffractive scanner for space-based coherent lidar. The operating wavelength is 2.0 microns. A collimated, circularly polarized beam is incident on the diffractive scanner at the Bragg angle; 30 and 45 degree beam deflection angles being studied. Fused silica is the substrate material of choice. Selected designs are fabricated on 3 inch fused silica substrates using lithographic methods. The performance of the test pieces is measured and compared to theoretical predictions.

  2. Electron Diffraction Using Transmission Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bendersky, Leonid A.; Gayle, Frank W.

    2001-01-01

    Electron diffraction via the transmission electron microscope is a powerful method for characterizing the structure of materials, including perfect crystals and defect structures. The advantages of electron diffraction over other methods, e.g., x-ray or neutron, arise from the extremely short wavelength (≈2 pm), the strong atomic scattering, and the ability to examine tiny volumes of matter (≈10 nm3). The NIST Materials Science and Engineering Laboratory has a history of discovery and characterization of new structures through electron diffraction, alone or in combination with other diffraction methods. This paper provides a survey of some of this work enabled through electron microscopy.

  3. Transmissive Diffractive Optical Element Solar Concentrators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baron, Richard; Moynihan, Philip; Price, Douglas

    2008-01-01

    Solar-thermal-radiation concentrators in the form of transmissive diffractive optical elements (DOEs) have been proposed as alternatives to mirror-type solar concentrators now in use. In comparison with functionally equivalent mirror-type solar concentrators, the transmissive, diffractive solar concentrators would weigh and cost less, and would be subject to relaxed mechanical tolerances. A DOE concentrator would be made from a thin, flat disk or membrane of a transmissive material having a suitable index of refraction. By virtue of its thinness, the DOE concentrator would have an areal mass density significantly less than that of a functionally equivalent conventional mirror. The DOE concentrator would have a relatively wide aperture--characterized by a focal-length/aperture-diameter ratio ('f number') on the order of 1. A kinoform (a surface-relief phase hologram) of high diffractive order would be microfabricated onto one face of the disk. The kinoform (see figure) would be designed to both diffract and refract incident solar radiation onto a desired focal region, without concern for forming an image of the Sun. The high diffractive order of this kinoform (in contradistinction to the low diffractive orders of some other kinoforms) would be necessary to obtain the desired f number of 1, which, in turn, would be necessary for obtaining a desired concentration ratio of 2,500 or greater. The design process of optimizing the concentration ratio of a proposed DOE solar concentrator includes computing convolutions of the optical bandwidth of the Sun with the optical transmission of the diffractive medium. Because, as in the cases of other non-imaging, light-concentrating optics, image quality is not a design requirement, the process also includes trading image quality against concentration ratio. A baseline design for one example calls for an aperture diameter of 1 m. This baseline design would be scalable to a diameter as large as 10 m, or to a smaller diameter for a

  4. Diffractive wave transmission in dispersive media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lescarret, Vincent

    The aim of this paper is to study the reflection-transmission of diffractive geometrical optic rays described by semi-linear symmetric hyperbolic systems such as the Maxwell-Lorentz equations with the anharmonic model of polarization. The framework is that of P. Donnat's thesis [P. Donnat, Quelques contributions mathématiques en optique non linéaire, chapters 1 and 2, thèse, 1996] and V. Lescarret [V. Lescarret, Wave transmission in dispersive media, M3AS 17 (4) (2007) 485-535]: we consider an infinite WKB expansion of the wave over long times/distances O(1/ɛ) and because of the boundary, we decompose each profile into a hyperbolic (purely oscillating) part and elliptic (evanescent) part as in M. William [M. William, Boundary layers and glancing blow-up in nonlinear geometric optics, Ann. Sci. École Norm. Sup. 33 (2000) 132-209]. Then to get the usual sublinear growth on the hyperbolic part of the profiles, for every corrector, we consider E, the space of bounded functions decomposing into a sum of pure transports and a "quasi compactly" supported part. We make a detailed analysis on the nonlinear interactions on E which leads us to make a restriction on the set of resonant phases. We finally give a convergence result which justifies the use of "quasi compactly" supported profiles.

  5. Near diffraction limited mid-IR spectromicroscopy using frequency upconversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Nicolai; Dam, Jeppe Seidelin; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter; Pedersen, Christian

    2014-02-01

    Mid-infrared microscopy and spectroscopy is interesting due to its medical, biological and chemical applications. Spectromicroscopy can be used for histopathology, sample analysis and diagnosis. The ability to do spectromicroscopy in the 2.5 to 4.5 μm wavelength range where many organic molecules have their fundamental vibrations, with the addition of sufficient spectroscopic resolution to resolve these bands, can e.g. potentially allow for diagnostics without the need for staining of the sample. On a longer timeframe, mid-IR spectromicroscopy has the potential for in-vivo diagnostics, combining morphological and spectral imaging. Recent developments in nonlinear frequency upconversion, have demonstrated the potential to perform both imaging and spectroscopy in the mid-IR range at unparalleled low levels of illumination, the low upconversion detector noise being orders of magnitude below competing technologies. With these applications in mind, we have incorporated microscopy optics into an image upconversion system, achieving near diffraction limited spatial resolution in the 3 μm range. Spectroscopic information is further acquired by appropriate control of the phase match condition of the upconversion process. Multispectral images for a region of interest can be obtained by XY-scanning this region of interest within the field of view of the mid-IR upconversion system. Thus, the whole region of interest can be imaged with all available converter wavelengths, and the spectral representation becomes equal for all points in the image. In addition, the range of converted/imaged wavelengths can be tuned continuously by changing the temperature of the crystal, or discretely by using a different poling channel in the PPLN crystal.

  6. Diffraction modelling of laser ablation using transmission masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyer, P. E.; Mackay, J.; Walton, C. D.

    2004-10-01

    We present an analysis of near-field diffraction effects in ablation with transmission masks, based on coupling a simplified form of the Fresnel-Kirchhoff diffraction integral with basic models for material removal. Modelling for square, hexagonal and circular proximity masks is described and compared with previously reported experiments on glass, silicon and polyimide using excimer, femtosecond and CO2 lasers. The model has general applicability and can provide useful insight into the effect of near-field diffraction in ablation patterning.

  7. Transmission Kikuchi diffraction and transmission electron forescatter imaging of electropolished and FIB manufactured TEM specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Zieliński, W. Płociński, T.; Kurzydłowski, K.J.

    2015-06-15

    We present a study of the efficiency of the utility of scanning electron microscope (SEM)-based transmission methods for characterizing grain structure in thinned bulk metals. Foils of type 316 stainless steel were prepared by two methods commonly used for transmission electron microscopy — double-jet electropolishing and focused ion beam milling. A customized holder allowed positioning of the foils in a configuration appropriate for both transmission electron forward scatter diffraction, and for transmission imaging by the use of a forescatter detector with two diodes. We found that both crystallographic orientation maps and dark-field transmitted images could be obtained for specimens prepared by either method. However, for both methods, preparation-induced artifacts may affect the quality or accuracy of transmission SEM data, especially those acquired by the use of transmission Kikuchi diffraction. Generally, the quality of orientation data was better for specimens prepared by electropolishing, due to the absence of ion-induced damage. - Highlights: • The transmission imaging and diffraction techniques are emerging in scanning electron microscopy (SEM) as promising new field of materials characterization. • The manuscript titled: “Transmission Kikuchi Diffraction and Transmission Electron Forescatter Imaging of Electropolished and FIB Manufactured TEM Specimens” documents how different specimen thinning procedures can effect efficiency of transmission Kikuchi diffraction and transmission electron forescatter imaging. • The abilities to make precision crystallographic orientation maps and dark-field images in transmission was studied on electropolished versus focus ion beam manufactured TEM specimens. • Depending on the need, electropolished and focused ion beam technique may produce suitable specimens for transmission imaging and diffraction in SEM.

  8. Highlighting material structure with transmission electron diffraction correlation coefficient maps.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Ákos K; Rauch, Edgar F; Lábár, János L

    2016-04-01

    Correlation coefficient maps are constructed by computing the differences between neighboring diffraction patterns collected in a transmission electron microscope in scanning mode. The maps are shown to highlight material structural features like grain boundaries, second phase particles or dislocations. The inclination of the inner crystal interfaces are directly deduced from the resulting contrast. PMID:26866276

  9. Diffraction grating transmission efficiencies for XUV and soft x rays.

    PubMed

    Schnopper, H W; Van Speybroeck, L P; Delvaille, J P; Epstein, A; Källne, E; Bachrach, R Z; Dijkstra, J; Lantward, L

    1977-04-01

    Efficiencies for diffraction of 45-275-eV x rays into orders by interferometrically formed, electrodeposited, gold transmission gratings have been measured on the 4 degrees beam line at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Project (SSRP). Anomalous dispersion affects the observed efficiency since the gold is partially transmitting to x rays. Model calculations which include anomalous dispersion are in good agreement with observations. With a suitable choice of material and thickness, a grating can be optimized for a given wavelength range by reducing the zero order transmission and enhancing the higher orders. Even orders are suppressed for a grating with equal slit and wire sizes. PMID:20168641

  10. Flexible waveguides for transmission of IR radiation and surgical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croitoru, Nathan I.; Gannot, Israel; Dror, Jacob; Imber, A.; Kaplan, Isaac; Calderon, Shlomo

    1993-05-01

    Infrared (IR) radiation emitted by lasers is a very important tool in surgery applications. This type of laser energy is used for cutting and soldering of tissues, cauterization, evaporation of growths, opening blocked passages and others. The most important lasers which give radiation in the mid-IR region are the CO2 laser ((lambda) equals 10.6 micrometers ), CO laser ((lambda) equals 5 mm) and the Er-YAG laser ((lambda) equals 2.94 micrometers ). In our laboratory a plastic, flexible, hollow waveguide suitable for mid-IR energy transmission was devised. This waveguide is used successfully in surgery. The waveguide is made of a plastic tube covered internally with a thin metal layer (Ag) and a dielectric overlayer (AgI). A theoretical ray model was also developed which has described quantitatively the propagation of radiation through the waveguide under straight and bent trajectories. The thickness and index of refraction of the dielectric layer is the essential parameter which determines the attenuation of transmitted energy through the waveguide. Powers up to 50 watts of CO2 laser can be transmitted through these waveguides for bending radii down to 2.5 cm.

  11. Diffraction pattern of self-supporting transmission gratings.

    PubMed

    Meekins, J F

    1989-03-15

    Self-supporting transmission gratings suitable for the soft x-ray and extreme ultraviolet must be reinforced by support structures which, if regularly placed, tend to produce undesirable artifacts in the diffraction plane. Because these artifacts appear in the neighborhood of the principal maxima and can be substantial in magnitude, they may confuse the spectrum. Methods are described whereby these unwanted diffraction effects are much reduced or eliminated. In one method, the members of the support structure parallel to the grating slits are placed in a random pattern so that on the average the coherence of the support structure is drastically reduced everywhere. In a second method, these support structure members are distributed pseudorandomly in such a manner that the diffraction pattern of the support structure is completely removed from the diffraction plane. A third method is investigated in which the pseudorandom placement of supports is organized into a repeated pattern, which may be easier to manufacture than the configurations of the first two methods. PMID:20548643

  12. Implementing Transmission Electron Backscatter Diffraction for Atom Probe Tomography.

    PubMed

    Rice, Katherine P; Chen, Yimeng; Prosa, Ty J; Larson, David J

    2016-06-01

    There are advantages to performing transmission electron backscattering diffraction (tEBSD) in conjunction with focused ion beam-based specimen preparation for atom probe tomography (APT). Although tEBSD allows users to identify the position and character of grain boundaries, which can then be combined with APT to provide full chemical and orientation characterization of grain boundaries, tEBSD can also provide imaging information that improves the APT specimen preparation process by insuring proper placement of the targeted grain boundary within an APT specimen. In this report we discuss sample tilt angles, ion beam milling energies, and other considerations to optimize Kikuchi diffraction pattern quality for the APT specimen geometry. Coordinated specimen preparation and analysis of a grain boundary in a Ni-based Inconel 600 alloy is used to illustrate the approach revealing a 50° misorientation and trace element segregation to the grain boundary. PMID:27329309

  13. MOIRE: ground demonstration of a large aperture diffractive transmissive telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atcheson, Paul; Domber, Jeanette; Whiteaker, Kevin; Britten, Jerald A.; Dixit, Shamasundar N.; Farmer, Brandon

    2014-08-01

    The desire to field space-based telescopes with apertures in excess of 10 meter diameter is forcing the development of extreme lightweighted large optomechanical structures. Sparse apertures, shell optics, and membrane optics are a few of the approaches that have been investigated and demonstrated. Membrane optics in particular have been investigated for many years. The MOIRE approach in which the membrane is used as a transmissive diffractive optical element (DOE) offers a significant relaxation in the control requirements on the membrane surface figure, supports extreme lightweighting of the primary collecting optic, and provides a path for rapid low cost production of the primary optical elements. Successful development of a powered meter-scale transmissive membrane DOE was reported in 2012. This paper presents initial imaging results from integrating meter-scale transmissive DOEs into the primary element of a 5- meter diameter telescope architecture. The brassboard telescope successfully demonstrates the ability to collect polychromatic high resolution imagery over a representative object using the transmissive DOE technology. The telescope includes multiple segments of a 5-meter diameter telescope primary with an overall length of 27 meters. The object scene used for the demonstration represents a 1.5 km square complex ground scene. Imaging is accomplished in a standard laboratory environment using a 40 nm spectral bandwidth centered on 650 nm. Theoretical imaging quality for the tested configuration is NIIRS 2.8, with the demonstration achieving NIIRS 2.3 under laboratory seeing conditions. Design characteristics, hardware implementation, laboratory environmental impacts on imagery, image quality metrics, and ongoing developments will be presented.

  14. Precise rotational alignment of x-ray transmission diffraction gratings

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, S.L.

    1988-03-28

    Gold transmission diffraction gratings used for x-ray spectroscopy must sometimes be rotationally aligned to the axis of a diagnostic instrument to within sub-milliradian accuracy. We have fabricated transmission diffraction gratings with high line-densities (grating period of 200 and 300 nm) using uv holographic and x-ray lithography. Since the submicron features of the gratings are not optically visible, precision alignment is time consuming and difficult to verify in situ. We have developed a technique to write an optically visible alignment pattern onto these gratings using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). At high magnification (15000 X) several submicron lines of the grating are observable in the SEM, making it possible to write an alignment pattern parallel to the grating lines in an electron-beam-sensitive coating that overlays the grating. We create an alignment pattern by following a 1-cm-long grating line using the SEM's joystick-controlled translation stage. By following the same grating line we are assured the traveled direction of the SEM electron beam is parallel to the grating to better than 10 ..mu..radian. The electron-beam-exposed line-width can be large (5 to 15 ..mu..m wide) depending on the SEM magnification, and is therefore optically visible. The exposed pattern is eventually made a permanent feature of the grating by ion beam etching or gold electroplating. The pattern can be used to accurately align the grating to the axis of a diagnostic instrument. More importantly, the alignment of the grating can be quickly verified in situ.

  15. Dynamical Low-energy Electron Diffraction Analyses of Clean and H-adsorbed Ir(111) Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Masuaki; Ogura, Syohei; Fukutani, Katsuyuki; Okano, Tatsuo; Okada, Michio

    Structures of Clean and H-adsorbed Ir(111) surfaces were studied by dynamical analyses of low-energy electron diffraction (LEED). LEED pattern for the Clean Ir(111) surface was 1×1. Dynamical analysis of LEED spot intensity vs incident electron enegy (I-V) curves for the clean Ir(111) surface revealed that the layer distance between the 1st and the 2nd layers (d12) equals to 0.2207±0.002 nm, which is almost equal to the bulk value (0.2217 nm). It appears that our result contradicts an previous report, which concluded that d12 equals to 0.216 nm which is 2.6% smaller than the bulk value. However their error bar was so large (±0.01 nm) that it is suggested that our result is the accurate atomic structure of the clean Ir(111) surface. LEED pattern was almost unchanged by H adsorption of 1 ML (1.56×1015 cm-2) at 80 K. The difference between LEED I-V curves before and after hydrogen adsorption was very small and it was impossible to determine the adsorption structure on Ir(111) but it can be conculded that no reconstruction occurs and only a very small relaxation occurs by the adsorption of hydrogen on Ir(111) surface.

  16. Theoretical models of diffraction efficiencies of arc profiled bar transmission grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Wanli; Mei, Lusheng; Yang, Jiamin

    2012-06-01

    Diffraction efficiencies of transmission grating play important roles in accurate measurement of soft X-ray and grating applications. Circular, horizontal elliptical, and vertical elliptical arc profiled bar models were established from Kirchhoff diffraction theory with the Fraunhofer diffraction approximation to calculate the diffraction efficiencies of arc profiled bar transmission grating. The calculated results were compared with the available data from X-ray Optics web site of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Center. Excellent agreements have been obtained. With these modes the diffraction efficiencies of the particular type of transmission grating having arc profiled bars can be simulated accurately and the best fit bar profiles can be obtained.

  17. Study of mid IR fiber transmission and mode patterns under laser induced stimulated Brillouin scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, C.; Chong, Yat C.; Zhou, Hongyi

    1990-01-01

    Mid IR fiber transmission and exit radiation mode patterns at various incident CO2 laser power levels appear to be effective diagnostic tools for monitoring laser induced stimulated Brillouin scattering in various mid IR fibers. Such processes are deemed to be essential mechanisms for fiber-optic amplifiers and switches as potential replacements of current repeaters and bistable devices.

  18. The magnetic and crystal structures of Sr2IrO4: A neutron diffraction study

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Feng; Chi, Songxue; Chakoumakos, Bryan C; Fernandez-Baca, Jaime A; Qi, Tongfei; Cao, Gang

    2013-01-01

    We report a single-crystal neutron diffraction study of the layered Sr2IrO4. This work unambigu- ously determines the magnetic and crystal structures, and reveals that the spin orientation rigidly tracks the staggered rotation of the IrO6 octahedra in Sr2IrO4. The long-range antiferromagnetic order has a canted spin configuration with an ordered moment of 0.208(3) B/Ir site within the basal plane; a detailed examination of the spin canting yields 0.202(3) and 0.049(2) B/site for the a-axis and the b-axis, respectively. It is intriguing that forbidden nuclear reflections of space group I41/acd are also observed in a wide temperature range from 4 K to 600 K, which suggests a reduced crystal structure symmetry. This neutron scattering work provides a direct, well-refined experimen- tal characterization of the magnetic and crystal structures that are crucial to the understanding of the unconventional magnetism existent in this unusual magnetic insulator.

  19. Elimination of higher-order diffraction using zigzag transmission grating in soft x-ray region

    SciTech Connect

    Zang, H. P.; Wang, C. K.; Gao, Y. L.; Zhou, W. M.; Kuang, L. Y.; Wei, L.; Fan, W.; Zhang, W. H.; Zhao, Z. Q.; Cao, L. F.; Gu, Y. Q.; Zhang, B. H.; Jiang, G.; Zhu, X. L.; Xie, C. Q.; Zhao, Y. D.; Cui, M. Q.

    2012-03-12

    We present a realization of the sinusoidal transmission function using a series of zigzag-profiled strips where the transmission takes on the binary values 0 and 1 in a two-dimensional distribution. A zigzag transmission grating of 1000 line/mm has been fabricated and demonstrated on the soft x-ray beam of synchrotron radiation. The axial single-order diffraction indicates that the zigzag transmission grating is adequate for spectroscopic application.

  20. Elimination of higher-order diffraction using zigzag transmission grating in soft x-ray region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zang, H. P.; Wang, C. K.; Gao, Y. L.; Zhou, W. M.; Kuang, L. Y.; Wei, L.; Fan, W.; Zhang, W. H.; Zhao, Z. Q.; Cao, L. F.; Gu, Y. Q.; Zhang, B. H.; Jiang, G.; Zhu, X. L.; Xie, C. Q.; Zhao, Y. D.; Cui, M. Q.

    2012-03-01

    We present a realization of the sinusoidal transmission function using a series of zigzag-profiled strips where the transmission takes on the binary values 0 and 1 in a two-dimensional distribution. A zigzag transmission grating of 1000 line/mm has been fabricated and demonstrated on the soft x-ray beam of synchrotron radiation. The axial single-order diffraction indicates that the zigzag transmission grating is adequate for spectroscopic application.

  1. Environmental testing and laser transmission results for ruggedized high power IR fiber cables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busse, Lynda; Kung, Frederic; Florea, Catalin; Shaw, Brandon; Aggarwal, Ishwar; Sanghera, Jas

    2013-03-01

    We present successful results of high mid-IR laser power transmission as well as MIL-SPEC environmental testing (thermal cycling and vibration testing) of ruggedized, IR-transmitting chalcogenide glass fiber cables. The cables tested included chalcogenide fiber cables with endfaces imprinted with anti-reflective "moth eye" surfaces, whereby the reflection loss is reduced from about 17% per end to less than 3%. The cables with these moth eye surfaces also show excellent laser damage resistance.

  2. Diffraction Revisited: Position of Diffraction Spots upon Rotation of a Transmission Grating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vollmer, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Diffraction gratings are often used in the laboratory to determine the wavelength of laser light. What happens to the spots on the screen if the grating is rotated in this set-up? The answer is nontrivial and instructive.

  3. A Characteristic Transmission Spectrum for WFC3 IR Water Hosting Exoplanet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swain, Mark R.

    2015-12-01

    Using the 19 published Hubble/WFC3 IR exoplanet transmission spectra, we perform a meta-analysis of the spectral modulation due to water. Because of the heterogeneous nature of these data, in which spectral resolution, calibration approach, and observational method vary, we introduce a formalism to de-bias the estimates of spectral modulation. This analysis finds a characteristic transmission spectrum and examines trends for these water-hosting exoplanets.

  4. He-atom diffraction from nanostructure transmission gratings: The role of imperfections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grisenti, R. E.; Schöllkopf, W.; Toennies, J. P.; Manson, J. R.; Savas, T. A.; Smith, Henry I.

    2000-03-01

    The relative diffraction peak intensities of He atoms with an incident beam energy of 65 meV diffracted from a microfabricated 100 nm-period transmission grating are analyzed using both Fresnel and Fraunhofer diffraction theory. The projected slit width could be varied from 50 nm down to less than 1 nm by inclining the grating at angles up to Θ0=42° with respect to the incident beam. Good agreement between calculated and measured peak intensities, up to the sixth order, is obtained by accounting for random deviations in the slit positions, and averaging over the velocity spread of the incident beam as well as the spatial extent of the nozzle beam source. It is demonstrated that He atom beam diffraction together with simple transmission measurements is an excellent means of characterizing such gratings including a detailed determination of the slit width, the bar shape, and random as well as periodic disorder.

  5. Diffraction and Transmission Synchrotron Imaging at the German Light Source ANKA--Potential Industrial Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Rack, Alexander; Weitkamp, Timm; Helfen, Lukas; Simon, Rolf; Luebbert, Daniel; Baumbach, Tilo

    2009-03-10

    Diffraction and transmission synchrotron imaging methods have proven to be highly suitable for investigations in materials research and non-destructive evaluation. The high flux and spatial coherence of X-rays from modern synchrotron light sources allows one to work using high resolution and different contrast modalities. This article gives a short overview of different transmission and diffraction imaging methods with high potential for industrial applications, now available for commercial access via the German light source ANKA (Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe) and its new department ANKA Commercial Service (ANKA COS, http://www.anka-cos.de)

  6. Quasi-sinusoidal single-order diffraction transmission grating used in x-ray spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Longyu; Cao, Leifeng; Zhu, Xiaoli; Wu, Shunchao; Wang, Zhebin; Wang, Chuanke; Liu, Shenye; Jiang, Shaoen; Yang, Jiamin; Ding, Yongkun; Xie, Changqing; Zheng, Jian

    2011-10-15

    A novel design of quasi-sinusoidal single-order diffraction transmission grating (QSTG) is proposed, which can achieve a line density up to thousands line/millimeter as that of traditional transmission gratings with the current level of nanofabrication technique. We fabricate a 1000 line/mm QSTG using the new design approach, and display the calibration results of such QSTG on the soft x-ray beam of synchrotron radiation. PMID:22002350

  7. Optimizing diffraction efficiency for transmission holographic optical elements with HARMAN holographic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Steven L.; Harvey, Karen; Richardson, Martin; Blyth, Jeff

    2011-02-01

    HARMAN technology's new holographic emulsions; red sensitive and green sensitive assisted by smaller grain sizes, novel sensitization and coating technology have been shown to achieve high diffraction efficiencies and narrow band reconstruction capabilities. Authors demonstrate processing optimizations and material behavior characteristics for Transmission image Masters as well as Holographic Optical Elements (HOE's).

  8. New IR imaging modalities for cancer detection and for intra-cell chemical mapping with a sub-diffraction mid-IR s-SNOM.

    PubMed

    Amrania, H; Drummond, L; Coombes, R C; Shousha, S; Woodley-Barker, L; Weir, K; Hart, W; Carter, I; Phillips, C C

    2016-06-23

    We present two new modalities for generating chemical maps. Both are mid-IR based and aimed at the biomedical community, but they differ substantially in their technological readiness. The first, so-called "Digistain", is a technologically mature "locked down" way of acquiring diffraction-limited chemical images of human cancer biopsy tissue. Although it is less flexible than conventional methods of acquiring IR images, this is an intentional, and key, design feature. It allows it to be used, on a routine basis, by clinical personnel themselves. It is in the process of a full clinical evaluation and the philosophy behind the approach is discussed. The second modality is a very new, probe-based "s-SNOM", which we are developing in conjunction with a new family of tunable "Quantum Cascade Laser" (QCL) diode lasers. Although in its infancy, this instrument can already deliver ultra-detailed chemical images whose spatial resolutions beat the normal diffraction limit by a factor of ∼1000. This is easily enough to generate chemical maps of the insides of single cells for the first time, and a range of new possible scientific applications are explored. PMID:27077445

  9. Site-isolated Iridium Complexes on MgO Powder: Individual Ir Atoms Imaged by Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Uzun, A.; Ortalan, V; D. Browning, N; C. Gates , B

    2009-01-01

    Iridium complexes were synthesized on MgO powder by adsorption of Ir(C{sub 2}H{sub 4}){sub 2}(acac) [acac = acetonylacetonate]; images determined by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy show individual Ir atoms, demonstrating that the supported complexes were site-isolated.

  10. Broadband transmission functions for atmospheric IR flux computations and climate studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, M.-D.

    1983-01-01

    In order to reduce the size of precomputed tables which are used in the emissivity approach to computing IR radiation in a climate model, the three-dimensional transmission function in the water vapor bands is defined in this study by a simple regression equation consisting of three two-dimensional parameters. The transmittances in the 9.6 and 15 micron bands are individually parameterized as functions of the amount of scaled absorber. This approach can thus be applied to atmospheres with a variable CO2 concentration.

  11. Single-order transmission diffraction gratings based on dispersion engineered all-dielectric metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Shulabh

    2016-08-01

    A single-order transmission diffraction grating based on dispersion engineered all-dielectric metasurfaces is proposed and its wavelength discriminating properties have been theoretically described and confirmed using numerical simulations. The metasurface is designed using a 2D array of all-dielectric resonators, which emulates a Huygens source configuration to achieve a perfect match to free-space in broad bandwidth. Using a holey dielectric nanodisk structure as the unit cell, the resonant wavelength is tapered across the metasurface to engineer the wavelength dependent spatial phase gradient, to emulate a dispersive prism. Consequently, different wavelengths are steered towards different directions and thus are discriminated on the output image plane. Due to subwavelength periodicities involved, the wavelength discrimination is achieved directly in the zeroth diffraction order of the device, unlike conventional diffraction gratings, thereby providing a high efficiency wavelength discriminating device.

  12. Investigation on Deformation Behavior of Nickel Aluminum Bronze by Neutron Diffraction and Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaoyan; Wang, Hong; Lv, Yuting; Lu, Weijie; Sun, Guangai

    2016-05-01

    The deformation behavior, deformation microstructures, and generated inter-phase stresses of nickel aluminum bronze were investigated by in situ neutron diffraction instrument and transmission electron microscopy in this paper. Lattice strains calculated by both peak shifting and broadening by Gaussian fitting of α and κ phase neutron diffraction peak profiles at both holding stress conditions and unloaded stress conditions were compared. Twining and stacking faults in α matrix were observed after deformed by different tensile stresses. Compressive internal/residual stress in α matrix and tensile internal stress in κ phase in elasto-plastic region were calculated based on neutron diffraction analysis. The piled-up dislocations around hard κ phases increase with increasing the deformation degree, which raise the stress concentration near α/ κ interface and increase the internal stresses.

  13. Determining Projections of Grain Boundaries from Diffraction Data in Transmission Electron Microscope.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Ákos K; Lábár, János L

    2016-06-01

    Grain boundaries (GB) are characterized by disorientation of the neighboring grains and the direction of the boundary plane between them. A new approach presented here determines the projection of GB that can be used to determine the latter one. The novelty is that an additional parameter of GB is quantified in addition to the ones provided by the orientation maps, namely the width of the projection of the GB is measured from the same set of diffraction patterns that were recorded for the orientation map, without the need to take any additional images. The diffraction patterns are collected in nanobeam diffraction mode in a transmission electron microscope, pixel-by-pixel, from an area containing two neighboring grains and the boundary between them. In our case, the diffraction patterns were recorded using the beam scanning function of a commercially available system (ASTAR). Our method is based on non-negative matrix factorization applied to the mentioned set of diffraction patterns. The method is encoded in a MATLAB environment, making the results easy to interpret and visualize. The measured GB-projection width is used to determine the orientation of the GB-plane, as given in the study by Kiss et al. PMID:27074103

  14. Fabrication of Efficient, Large Aperture Transmission Diffraction Gratings by Ion-Beam Etching

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, H T; Bryan, S R; Britten, J A; Perry, M D

    2000-09-14

    The utilization of high-power short pulse laser employing chirped-pulse amplification (CPA) for material processing and inertial confinement research is widely increasing. The performance of these high-power CPA laser system continues to be limited by the ability of the pulse compression gratings to hold up to the high-average-power or high-peak-power of the laser. Pulse compression gratings used in transmission and fabricated out of bulk fused silica have intrinsically the highest laser damage threshold when compared with metal or multilayer dielectric gratings that work in reflection. LLNL has developed processing capability to produce high efficiency fused silica transmission gratings at sizes useful to future Petawatt-class systems, and has demonstrated high efficiency at smaller aperture. This report shows that fused silica diffraction exhibiting >95% efficiency into the -1 diffraction order in transmission (90{sup o} deflection of the incident light, at an incidence angle of 45{sup o} to the grating face). The microstructure of this grating consisted of grooves ion-beam etched to a depth of 1.6 microns with a pitch of 0.75 microns, using a holographically produced photoresist mask that was subsequently stripped away in significance to the fabrication of the small scale high efficiency grating was the development of the processing technology and infrastructure for production of such gratings at up to 65 cm diameter. LLNL is the currently the only location in the world with the ability to coat, interferometrically expose, and ion etch diffractive optics at this aperture. Below, we describe the design, fabrication, performance and, the scaleup process for a producing a high-efficiency transmission grating on a 65 cm fused silica substrate.

  15. Using transmission Kikuchi diffraction to study intergranular stress corrosion cracking in type 316 stainless steels.

    PubMed

    Meisnar, Martina; Vilalta-Clemente, Arantxa; Gholinia, Ali; Moody, Michael; Wilkinson, Angus J; Huin, Nicolas; Lozano-Perez, Sergio

    2015-08-01

    Transmission Kikuchi diffraction (TKD), also known as transmission-electron backscatter diffraction (t-EBSD) is a novel method for orientation mapping of electron transparent transmission electron microscopy specimen in the scanning electron microscope and has been utilized for stress corrosion cracking characterization of type 316 stainless steels. The main advantage of TKD is a significantly higher spatial resolution compared to the conventional EBSD due to the smaller interaction volume of the incident beam with the specimen. Two 316 stainless steel specimen, tested for stress corrosion cracking in hydrogenated and oxygenated pressurized water reactor chemistry, were characterized via TKD. The results include inverse pole figure (IPFZ) maps, image quality maps and misorientation maps, all acquired in very short time (<60 min) and with remarkable spatial resolution (up to 5 nm step size possible). They have been used in order to determine the location of the open crack with respect to the grain boundary, deformation bands, twinning and slip. Furthermore, TKD has been used to measure the grain boundary misorientation and establish a gauge for quantifying plastic deformation at the crack tip and other regions in the surrounding matrix. Both grain boundary migration and slip transfer have been detected as well. PMID:25974882

  16. Effect of thermal treatment and ageing on IR transmission and visible photoluminescence of nanostructured aluminum oxyhydroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlash, A. Yu; Skryshevsky, V. A.; Khodan, A. N.; Kanaev, A. V.; Gayvoronsky, V. Ya

    2012-09-01

    IR transmission and visible photoluminescence (PL) were studied in raw nanoporous aluminum oxyhydroxide (NOA) and in samples after thermal treatment at different temperatures. Structural and chemical modifications of the NOA sample were related to the water content and adsorption/desorption process at the surface. The differences observed in the FTIR spectra in vacuum and after ageing of the samples can be explained by the effects of molecular water and OH- groups on the stability of the low-temperature phases of NOA. A considerable increase in PL intensity and spectrum expansion to longer wavelengths were observed in all NOA samples after water desorption. This was accompanied by strong changes in the PL decay kinetics. Quenching of the fast luminescent decay and low-energy transitions in aged samples were observed after ageing of the samples. Partial passivation of the NOA surface and defective sites under ambient conditions is discussed.

  17. Design of plastic diffractive-refractive compact zoom lenses for visible-near-IR spectrum.

    PubMed

    Greisukh, Grigoriy I; Ezhov, Evgeniy G; Sidyakina, Zoya A; Stepanov, Sergei A

    2013-08-10

    The requirements for selecting the initial scheme for a compact plastic zoom lens are formulated. The main stages of the initial scheme of the transformation, incorporating the diffractive lens and replacement of the lenses' glasses by optical plastics, are presented. The efficiency of the suggested techniques of the optical layout process are demonstrated by using the example of the design and analysis of a zoom lens intended for use in security cameras for day or night vision. PMID:23938440

  18. Predesign of diamond turned refractive/diffractive elements for IR objectives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riedl, Max J.

    1993-01-01

    Diffractive lenses have arrived. Literally hundreds of papers have been published and technology impact reports have been written about the exciting addition of a new tool for the lens designer. Sophisticated computer programs have been developed to aid in the optimization of these diffractive phase profiles for a wide variety of applications. Now, several fabrication methods are being pursued to produce these diffractive elements economically. The best known process is the etching of a multi-level relief grating, known as binary optics. This process uses sets of computer generated lithographic masks. Another, more recently developed method is Dry Photopolymer Embossing (DPE). This replication process uses master holograms. And now, diamond turning is being applied for the machining of these elements. Diamond turning is especially well suited for infrared optics. As any process has advantages and limitations, so has diamond turning. These advantages and limitations are discussed and general guidelines are presented to aid the designer and systems engineer in the project predesign stage.

  19. A Recalibration of the Diffraction Efficiency of the Transmission Grating Spectrometers on EXOSAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paerels, Frits; Kahn, Steven M.; Wolkovitch, Debra N.

    1998-03-01

    We describe a recalibration of the diffraction efficiency of the transmission gratings on EXOSAT. This recalibration is required in order to quantitatively interpret the soft X-ray spectra obtained with these instruments on Sco X-1. Because this source is extremely bright, the spectra are sensitive enough to reveal residual systematic effects in the grating efficiency. Specifically, we observe short-wavelength radiation dispersed into high (m > 5) spectral orders, which is usually too weak to be detectable. We develop a simple model for the diffraction efficiency and briefly discuss some properties of the efficiency, applicable to X-ray transmission gratings in general. We explore the effect of a new degree of freedom, the cross-sectional shape of the grating bars. We then use a set of preflight calibration spectra to constrain the free parameters of the model. The new efficiency curves are in satisfactory agreement with the calibration data and quantitatively account for the anomalies seen in the spectrum of Sco X-1. We also briefly discuss an empirical zero-order profile shape, appropriate for the analysis of spectra of very bright sources.

  20. Diffraction grating transmission efficiencies for XUV and soft X rays. [for HEAO-B extrasolar astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnopper, H. W.; Van Speybroeck, L. P.; Delvaille, J. P.; Epstein, A.; Kaellne, E.; Bachrach, R. Z.; Dijkstra, J.; Lantward, L.

    1977-01-01

    The manufacture and properties of a grating intended for extrasolar X-ray studies are described. The manufacturing process uses a split laser beam exposing an interference pattern on the photoresist-coated glass plated with a nickel parting layer. The grating, supporting structure, and mounting frame are electrodeposited on the nickel parting layer, and the final product is lifted from the glass substrate by selective etching of the nickel. A model was derived which relates the number of counts received in a given order m as a function of photon wavenumber. A 4-deg beam line was used to measure the efficiencies of gold transmission gratings for diffraction of X-rays in the range of 45 to 275 eV. The experimental results are in good agreement with model calculations.

  1. Calculation of Projected Bond-Orientational Order Parameters to Quantify Local Symmetries from Transmission Diffraction Data.

    PubMed

    Liu, A C Y; Tabor, R F; Bourgeois, L; de Jonge, M D; Mudie, S T; Petersen, T C

    2016-05-20

    The bond-orientational order parameters introduced by Steinhardt et al. [Phys. Rev. B 28, 784 (1983)] have been an invaluable measurement tool for assessing short-range order in disordered, close-packed assemblies of particles in which the particle positions are known. In many glassy systems the measurement of particle position is not possible or limited (field of view, thickness, resolution) and the bond-orientational order parameters cannot be measured, or adequately sampled. Here we calculate a set of rotationally averaged, projected bond-orientational order parameters that reflect the symmetries of close-packed particle clusters when projected onto a plane. We show by simulation that these parameters are unique fingerprints that can be directly compared to angular correlations in limited-volume, transmission geometry, diffraction patterns from close-packed glassy assemblies. PMID:27258876

  2. Conventional transmission electron microscopy imaging beyond the diffraction and information limits.

    PubMed

    Rosenauer, Andreas; Krause, Florian F; Müller, Knut; Schowalter, Marco; Mehrtens, Thorsten

    2014-08-29

    There are mainly two complementary imaging modes in transmission electron microscopy (TEM): Conventional TEM (CTEM) and scanning TEM (STEM). In the CTEM mode the specimen is illuminated with a plane electron wave, and the direct image formed by the objective lens is recorded in the image plane. STEM is based on scanning the specimen surface with a focused electron beam and collecting scattered electrons with an extended disk or ring-shaped detector. Here we show that combination of CTEM imaging with STEM illumination generally allows extending the point resolution of CTEM imaging beyond the diffraction limit. This new imaging mode improves imaging characteristics, is more robust against chromatic aberration, exhibits direct structural imaging with superior precision, visualizes light elements with excellent contrast, and even allows us to overcome the conventional information limit of a microscope. PMID:25215995

  3. High temperature x-ray diffraction in transmission under controlled environment

    SciTech Connect

    Margulies, L.; Kramer, M.J.; Williams, J.J.; Deters, E.M.; McCallum, R.W.; Goldman, A.I.; Haeffner, D.R.; Lang, J.C.; Kycia, S.

    1998-12-31

    A compact tube furnace has been developed for high temperature X-ray diffraction studies using high energy synchrotron radiation. The furnace design has a low absorption path in transmission yet allows for a high degree of control of the sample atmosphere and a minimal temperature gradient across the sample. The design allows for a maximum temperature of 1,500 C with a variety of atmospheres including inert, reducing, and oxidizing. Preliminary results obtained at the SRI-CAT 1-ID undulator line (60 keV) at the APS facility and the A2 24 pole wiggler line (45 keV) at CHESS on the Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3}Z{sub .5} (Z = C, N, O) system will be presented to demonstrate the feasibility of this approach.

  4. Calculation of Projected Bond-Orientational Order Parameters to Quantify Local Symmetries from Transmission Diffraction Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, A. C. Y.; Tabor, R. F.; Bourgeois, L.; de Jonge, M. D.; Mudie, S. T.; Petersen, T. C.

    2016-05-01

    The bond-orientational order parameters introduced by Steinhardt et al. [Phys. Rev. B 28, 784 (1983)] have been an invaluable measurement tool for assessing short-range order in disordered, close-packed assemblies of particles in which the particle positions are known. In many glassy systems the measurement of particle position is not possible or limited (field of view, thickness, resolution) and the bond-orientational order parameters cannot be measured, or adequately sampled. Here we calculate a set of rotationally averaged, projected bond-orientational order parameters that reflect the symmetries of close-packed particle clusters when projected onto a plane. We show by simulation that these parameters are unique fingerprints that can be directly compared to angular correlations in limited-volume, transmission geometry, diffraction patterns from close-packed glassy assemblies.

  5. Comprehensive Study of Hydrated IDPs: X-Ray Diffraction, IR Spectroscopy and Electron Microscopic Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, K.; Keller, L. P.; Nakamura, T.; Noguchi, T.; Nozaki, W.; Tomeoka, K.

    2003-01-01

    Chondritic hydrated interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) comprise up to 50% of all IDPs collected in the stratosphere(1). Although much is known about the mineralogy, chemistry and carbon abundance of hydrated IDPs (2-4) controversies still exist regarding their formation, history, and relationship to other primitive solar system materials. Hydrated IDPs are generally believed to be derived from asteroidal sources that have undergone some degree of aqueous alteration. However, the high C contents of hydrated IDPs (by 2 to 6X CI levels (3,4) indicate that they are probably not derived from the same parent bodies sampled by the known chondritic meteorites. We report the comprehensive study of individual hydrated IDPs. The strong depletion in Ca (I) has been used as a diagnostic feature of hydrated IDPs. The particles are embedded in elemental sulfur or low viscosity epoxy and ultramicrotomed thin sections are observed using a transmission electron microscope (TEM) equipped with an energy-dispersive X-ray detector (EDX) followed by other measurements including: 1) FTIR microspectroscopy to understand the significant constraints on the organic functionality and the nature of the C-bearing phases and 2) powder X-ray difiaction using a synchrotron X-ray source to understand the bulk mineralogy of the particles.

  6. Electron Backscatter Diffraction and Transmission Kikuchi Diffraction Analysis of an Austenitic Stainless Steel Subjected to Surface Mechanical Attrition Treatment and Plasma Nitriding.

    PubMed

    Proust, Gwénaëlle; Retraint, Delphine; Chemkhi, Mahdi; Roos, Arjen; Demangel, Clemence

    2015-08-01

    Austenitic 316L stainless steel can be used for orthopedic implants due to its biocompatibility and high corrosion resistance. Its range of applications in this field could be broadened by improving its wear and friction properties. Surface properties can be modified through surface hardening treatments. The effects of such treatments on the microstructure of the alloy were investigated here. Surface Mechanical Attrition Treatment (SMAT) is a surface treatment that enhances mechanical properties of the material surface by creating a thin nanocrystalline layer. After SMAT, some specimens underwent a plasma nitriding process to further enhance their surface properties. Using electron backscatter diffraction, transmission Kikuchi diffraction, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy, the microstructural evolution of the stainless steel after these different surface treatments was characterized. Microstructural features investigated include thickness of the nanocrystalline layer, size of the grains within the nanocrystalline layer, and depth of diffusion of nitrogen atoms within the material. PMID:26139391

  7. Nanostructure characterisation of flow-formed Cr-Mo-V steel using transmission Kikuchi diffraction technique.

    PubMed

    Birosca, S; Ding, R; Ooi, S; Buckingham, R; Coleman, C; Dicks, K

    2015-06-01

    Nowadays flow-forming has become a desired near net shape manufacturing method as it provides excellent mechanical properties with improved surface finish and significant manufacturing cost reduction. However, the material is subjected to excessive plastic deformation during flow-forming process, generating a very fine and complex microstructure. In addition, the intense dislocation density and residual stress that is generated in the component during processing makes the microstructure characterisation using conventional micro-analytical tools challenging. Thus, the microstructure/property relationship study in such a material is rather difficult. In the present study a flow-formed Cr-Mo-V steel nanostructure and crystallographic texture were characterised by means of Transmission Kikuchi Diffraction (TKD). Here, TKD is shown to be a powerful technique in revealing very fine martensite laths within an austenite matrix. Moreover, fine precipitates in the order of 20-70 nm on the martensite lath boundaries were clearly imaged and characterised. This greatly assisted in understanding the preferable site formation of the carbides in such a complex microstructure. The results showed that the actual TKD spatial resolution was in the range of 5-10 nm using 25 kV for flow-formed Cr-Mo-V steel. PMID:25697460

  8. Elimination of X-Ray Diffraction through Stimulated X-Ray Transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, B.; Wang, T.; Graves, C. E.; Zhu, D.; Schlotter, W. F.; Turner, J. J.; Hellwig, O.; Chen, Z.; Dürr, H. A.; Scherz, A.; Stöhr, J.

    2016-07-01

    X-ray diffractive imaging with laterally coherent x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) pulses is increasingly utilized to obtain ultrafast snapshots of matter. Here we report the amazing disappearance of single-shot charge and magnetic diffraction patterns recorded with resonantly tuned, narrow bandwidth XFEL pulses. Our experimental results reveal the exquisite sensitivity of single-shot charge and magnetic diffraction patterns of a magnetic film to the onset of field-induced stimulated elastic x-ray forward scattering. The loss in diffraction contrast, measured over 3 orders of magnitude in intensity, is in remarkable quantitative agreement with a recent theory that is extended to include diffraction.

  9. Blazed high-efficiency x-ray diffraction via transmission through arrays of nanometer-scale mirrors.

    PubMed

    Heilmann, Ralf K; Ahn, Minseung; Gullikson, Eric M; Schattenburg, Mark L

    2008-06-01

    Diffraction gratings are ubiquitous wavelength dispersive elements for photons as well as for subatomic particles, atoms, and large molecules. They serve as enabling devices for spectroscopy, microscopy, and interferometry in numerous applications across the physical sciences. Transmission gratings are required in applications that demand high alignment and figure error tolerances, low weight and size, or a straight-through zero-order beam. However, photons or particles are often strongly absorbed upon transmission, e.g., in the increasingly important extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft x-ray band, leading to low diffraction efficiency. We demonstrate the performance of a critical-angle transmission (CAT) grating in the EUV and soft x-ray band that for the first time combines the advantages of transmission gratings with the superior broadband efficiency of blazed reflection gratings via reflection from nanofabricated periodic arrays of atomically smooth nanometer-thin silicon mirrors at angles below the critical angle for total external reflection. The efficiency of the CAT grating design is not limited to photons, but also opens the door to new, sensitive, and compact experiments and applications in atom and neutron optics, as well as for the efficient diffraction of electrons, ions, or molecules. PMID:18545579

  10. Spectral responses of virtual Frisch-grid CdZnTe detectors and their relation to IR microscopy and x-ray diffraction topography data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolotnikov, A. E.; Babalola, S.; Camarda, G. S.; Cui, Y.; Egarievwe, S. U.; Fochuk, P. M.; Hawrami, R.; Hossain, A.; James, J. R.; Nakonechnyj, I. J.; Yang, Ge; James, R. B.

    2008-08-01

    Virtual Frisch-grid CdZnTe detectors potentially can provide energy resolution close to the statistical limit. However, in real detectors, the quality of the crystals used to fabricate the devices primarily determines energy resolution. In this paper, we report our findings on the spectral response of devices and their relation to material-characterization data obtained using IR microscopy and X-ray diffraction topography.

  11. Single order X-ray diffraction with binary sinusoidal transmission grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Leifeng

    2013-10-01

    All existing x-ray dispersive devices including crystals, multilayers and diffraction gratings generate spectra in multiple orders, whereas soft x-ray spectroscopy applications usually require only the first order spectrum. The other diffraction orders can overlap and contaminate the first order spectrum of interest. In this letter we describe how an axis-symmetrically-distributed sinusoidal-shaped aperture with binary transmittance values can be used to disperse x-rays and with a superior diffraction pattern where, along its symmetry axis, all higher-order diffractions can be effectively suppressed. Hence this sophisticated dispersive element generates pure soft x-ray spectra in the first diffraction order, free from interference from higher diffraction orders.

  12. Beyond the diffraction limit of optical/IR interferometers. I. Angular diameter and rotation parameters of Achernar from differential phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domiciano de Souza, A.; Hadjara, M.; Vakili, F.; Bendjoya, P.; Millour, F.; Abe, L.; Carciofi, A. C.; Faes, D. M.; Kervella, P.; Lagarde, S.; Marconi, A.; Monin, J.-L.; Niccolini, G.; Petrov, R. G.; Weigelt, G.

    2012-09-01

    Context. Spectrally resolved long-baseline optical/IR interferometry of rotating stars opens perspectives to investigate their fundamental parameters and the physical mechanisms that govern their interior, photosphere, and circumstellar envelope structures. Aims: Based on the signatures of stellar rotation on observed interferometric wavelength-differential phases, we aim to measure angular diameters, rotation velocities, and orientation of stellar rotation axes. Methods: We used the AMBER focal instrument at ESO-VLTI in its high-spectral resolution mode to record interferometric data on the fast rotator Achernar. Differential phases centered on the hydrogen Br γ line (K band) were obtained during four almost consecutive nights with a continuous Earth-rotation synthesis during ~5 h/night, corresponding to ~60° position angle coverage per baseline. These observations were interpreted with our numerical code dedicated to long-baseline interferometry of rotating stars. Results: By fitting our model to Achernar's differential phases from AMBER, we could measure its equatorial radius Req = 11.6 ± 0.3 R⊙, equatorial rotation velocity Veq = 298 ± 9 km s-1, rotation axis inclination angle i = 101.5 ± 5.2°, and rotation axis position angle (from North to East) PArot = 34.9 ± 1.6°. From these parameters and the stellar distance, the equatorial angular diameter ⌀eq of Achernar is found to be 2.45 ± 0.09 mas, which is compatible with previous values derived from the commonly used visibility amplitude. In particular, ⌀eq and PArot measured in this work with VLTI/AMBER are compatible with the values previously obtained with VLTI/VINCI. Conclusions: The present paper, based on real data, demonstrates the super-resolution potential of differential interferometry for measuring sizes, rotation velocities, and orientation of rotating stars in cases where visibility amplitudes are unavailable and/or when the star is partially or poorly resolved. In particular, we showed

  13. Modification of nanostructured fused silica for use as superhydrophobic, IR-transmissive, anti-reflective surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Darryl A.; Frantz, Jesse A.; Bayya, Shyam S.; Busse, Lynda E.; Kim, Woohong; Aggarwal, Ishwar; Poutous, Menelaos; Sanghera, Jasbinder S.

    2016-04-01

    In order to mimic and enhance the properties of moth eye-like materials, nanopatterned fused silica was chemically modified to produce self-cleaning substrates that have anti-reflective and infrared transmissive properties. The characteristics of these substrates were evaluated before and after chemical modification. Furthermore, their properties were compared to fused silica that was devoid of surface features. The chemical modification imparted superhydrophobic character to the substrates, as demonstrated by the average water contact angles which exceeded 170°. Finally, optical analysis of the substrates revealed that the infrared transmission capabilities of the fused silica substrates (nanopatterned to have moth eye on one side) were superior to those of the regular fused silica substrates within the visible and near-infrared region of the light spectrum, with transmission values of 95% versus 92%, respectively. The superior transmission properties of the fused silica moth eye were virtually unchanged following chemical modification.

  14. High temperature Ir segregation in Ir-B ceramics: Effect of oxygen presence on stability of IrB2 and other Ir-B phases

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xie, Zhilin; Terracciano, Anthony C.; Cullen, David A.; Blair, Richard G.; Orlovskaya, Nina

    2015-05-13

    The formation of IrB2, IrB1.35, IrB1.1 and IrB monoboride phases in the Ir–B ceramic nanopowder was confirmed during mechanochemical reaction between metallic Ir and elemental B powders. The Ir–B phases were analysed after 90 h of high energy ball milling and after annealing of the powder for 72 h at 1050°C in vacuo. The iridium monoboride (IrB) orthorhombic phase was synthesised experimentally for the first time and identified by powder X-ray diffraction. Additionally, the ReB2 type IrB2 hexagonal phase was also produced for the first time and identified by high resolution transmission electron microscope. Ir segregation along disordered domains ofmore » the boron lattice was found to occur during high temperature annealing. Furthermore, these nanodomains may have useful catalytic properties.« less

  15. Far IR Transmission Characteristics of Silicon Nitride Films using Fourier Transform Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrusca, D.; Castillo-Domínguez, E.; Velázquez, M.; Hughes, D.; Serrano, A.; Torres-Jácome, A.

    2009-12-01

    We are fabricating amorphous Silicon (a-Si) bolometers doped with boron with a measured NEP˜1.5×10-16 W/Hz1/2 suitable for use in millimeter and sub-millimeter astronomy. In this paper we present the preliminary results of the absorber optimization for the a-Si bolometers. A film of Silicon Nitride (SiN), deposited by LPCVD (Low Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition) process at INAOE, with or without metallic coating is used as a weak thermal link to the heat sink as well as an absorber. We have measured the transmission spectrum of thin films of SiN in the range of 200 to 1000 GHz using Fourier Transform Spectroscopy (FTS) and a bolometric system with a NEP˜1.26×10-13. The transmission of thin films of SiN with a thickness of 0.4 μn has been measured at temperatures of 290 K and 4 K. The uncoated SiN films have a transmission of 80% and we expect a 50% transmission for the metallic (e.g. Titanium) coated films.

  16. Complete analysis of a transmission electron diffraction pattern of a MoS2-graphite heterostructure.

    PubMed

    Adrian, Marlene; Senftleben, Arne; Morgenstern, Silvio; Baumert, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    The combination of various 2D layered materials in multilayer heterostructures arises great interest in the current science. Due to the large variety of electronic properties of the group of 2D layered materials the combination opens a new pathway towards ultrasmall electronic devices. In this contribution we present a full mathematical description of multilayer heterostructure samples and their diffraction patterns including a proposal of a consistent assignment of the superstructure diffraction spots. A 27nm thick MoS2-graphite heterostructure was produced and fully analysed with the methods presented in this paper. PMID:27107328

  17. Nonlinear absorption and transmission properties of Ge, Te and InAs using tuneable IR FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Amirmadhi, F.; Becker, K.; Brau, C.A.

    1995-12-31

    Nonlinear absorption properties of Ge, Te and InAs are being investigated using the transmission of FEL optical pulses through these semiconductors (z-scan method). Wavelength, intensity and macropulse dependence are used to differentiate between two-photon and free-carrier absorption properties of these materials. Macropulse dependence is resolved by using a Pockles Cell to chop the 4-{mu}s macropulse down to 100 ns. Results of these experiments will be presented and discussed.

  18. Analytical theory of extraordinary transmission through metallic diffraction screens perforated by small holes.

    PubMed

    Marqués, R; Mesa, F; Jelinek, L; Medina, F

    2009-03-30

    In this letter, the problem of extraordinary (ET) transmission of electromagnetic waves through opaque screens perforated with subwave-length holes is addressed from an analytical point of view. Our purpose was to find a closed-form expression for the transmission coefficient in a simple case in order to explore and clarify, as much as possible, the physical background of the phenomenon. The solution of this canonical example, apart from matching quite well with numerical simulations given by commercial solvers, has provided new insight in extraordinary transmission as well as Wood's anomaly. Thus, our analysis has revealed that one of the key factors behind ET is the continuous increase of excess electric energy around the holes as the frequency approaches the onset of some of the higher-order modes associated with the periodicity of the screen. The same analysis also helps to clarify the role of surface modes -or spoof plasmons- in the onset of ET. PMID:19333324

  19. Hubble space telescope near-ir transmission spectroscopy of the super-Earth HD 97658B

    SciTech Connect

    Knutson, Heather A.; Dragomir, Diana; Kreidberg, Laura; Bean, Jacob L.; Kempton, Eliza M.-R.; McCullough, P. R.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Gillon, Michael; Homeier, Derek; Howard, Andrew W.

    2014-10-20

    Recent results from the Kepler mission indicate that super-Earths (planets with masses between 1-10 times that of the Earth) are the most common kind of planet around nearby Sun-like stars. These planets have no direct solar system analogue, and are currently one of the least well-understood classes of extrasolar planets. Many super-Earths have average densities that are consistent with a broad range of bulk compositions, including both water-dominated worlds and rocky planets covered by a thick hydrogen and helium atmosphere. Measurements of the transmission spectra of these planets offer the opportunity to resolve this degeneracy by directly constraining the scale heights and corresponding mean molecular weights of their atmospheres. We present Hubble Space Telescope near-infrared spectroscopy of two transits of the newly discovered transiting super-Earth HD 97658b. We use the Wide Field Camera 3's (WFC3) scanning mode to measure the wavelength-dependent transit depth in 30 individual bandpasses. Our averaged differential transmission spectrum has a median 1σ uncertainty of 23 ppm in individual bins, making this the most precise observation of an exoplanetary transmission spectrum obtained with WFC3 to date. Our data are inconsistent with a cloud-free solar metallicity atmosphere at the 10σ level. They are consistent at the 0.4σ level with a flat line model, as well as effectively flat models corresponding to a metal-rich atmosphere or a solar metallicity atmosphere with a cloud or haze layer located at pressures of 10 mbar or higher.

  20. Features of the ISO-25498: method of selected area electron diffraction analysis in transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Delu

    2013-08-01

    International standard ISO-25498 specifies the method of selected area electron diffraction (SAED) analysis in TEM. It is applicable to the acquisition of SAED patterns, indexing the patterns and calibration of diffraction constant. Several features of this standard are introduced. As an example of the applications, phosphide with nanometer scale in a low-carbon steel produced by compact strip production process was analyzed by SAED and EDX. The phosphide precipitates in the steel are identified as M x P, where x is 2-3 and M is Fe, Ti, Cr, or Ni. It possesses a hexagonal lattice with lattice parameter a = 0.609 nm and c = 0.351 nm. PMID:23920207

  1. Turbine engine exhaust gas measurements using in-situ FT-IR emission/transmission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marran, David F.; Cosgrove, Joseph E.; Neira, Jorge; Markham, James R.; Rutka, Ronald; Strange, Richard R.

    2001-02-01

    12 An advanced multiple gas analyzer based on in-situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy has been used to successfully measure the exhaust plume composition and temperature of an operating gas turbine engine at a jet engine test stand. The sensor, which was optically coupled to the test cell using novel broadband hollow glass waveguides, performed well in this harsh environment (high acoustical noise and vibration, considerable temperature swings in the ambient with engine operation), providing quantitative gas phase information. Measurements were made through the diameter of the engine's one meter exhaust plume, about 0.7 meters downstream of the engine exit plane. The sensor performed near simultaneous infrared transmission and infrared emission measurements through the centerline of the plume. Automated analysis of the emission and transmission spectra provided the temperature and concentration information needed for engine tuning and control that will ensure optimal engine operation and reduced emissions. As a demonstration of the utility and accuracy of the technique, carbon monoxide, nitric oxide, water, and carbon dioxide were quantified in spite of significant variations in the exhaust gas temperature. At some conditions, unburned fuel, particulates (soot/fuel droplets), methane, ethylene and aldehydes were identified, but not yet quantified.

  2. Strain mapping at the nanoscale using precession electron diffraction in transmission electron microscope with off axis camera

    SciTech Connect

    Vigouroux, M. P.; Delaye, V.; Bernier, N.; Lafond, D.; Audoit, G.; Bertin, F.; Cipro, R.; Baron, T.; Martin, M.; Rouvière, J. L.; Chenevier, B.

    2014-11-10

    Precession electron diffraction is an efficient technique to measure strain in nanostructures by precessing the electron beam, while maintaining a few nanometre probe size. Here, we show that an advanced diffraction pattern treatment allows reproducible and precise strain measurements to be obtained using a default 512 × 512 DigiSTAR off-axis camera both in advanced or non-corrected transmission electron microscopes. This treatment consists in both projective geometry correction of diffraction pattern distortions and strain Delaunay triangulation based analysis. Precision in the strain measurement is improved and reached 2.7 × 10{sup −4} with a probe size approaching 4.2 nm in diameter. This method is applied to the study of the strain state in InGaAs quantum-well (QW) devices elaborated on Si substrate. Results show that the GaAs/Si mismatch does not induce in-plane strain fluctuations in the InGaAs QW region.

  3. High precision two-dimensional strain mapping in semiconductor devices using nanobeam electron diffraction in the transmission electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, Frieder H.

    2014-06-30

    A classical method used to characterize the strain in modern semiconductor devices is nanobeam diffraction (NBD) in the transmission electron microscope. One challenge for this method lies in the fact that the smaller the beam becomes, the more difficult it becomes to analyze the resulting diffraction spot pattern. We show that a carefully designed fitting algorithm enables us to reduce the sampling area for the diffraction patterns on the camera chip dramatically (∼1/16) compared to traditional settings without significant loss of precision. The resulting lower magnification of the spot pattern permits the presence of an annular dark field detector, which in turn makes the recording of images for drift correction during NBD acquisition possible. Thus, the reduced sampling size allows acquisition of drift corrected NBD 2D strain maps of up to 3000 pixels while maintaining a precision of better than 0.07%. As an example, we show NBD strain maps of a modern field effect transistor (FET) device. A special filtering feature used in the analysis makes it is possible to measure strain in silicon devices even in the presence of other crystalline materials covering the probed area, which is important for the characterization of the next generation of devices (Fin-FETs).

  4. A novel approach to tunable diffractive transmission gratings based on dielectric elastomer actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollosche, Matthias; Döring, Sebastian; Kofod, Guggi; Stumpe, Joachim

    2010-04-01

    Dielectric elastomer actuators (DEA) of poly-styrene-ethylene-butadiene-styrene (SEBS) and commonly used VHB4910 tape were studied for voltage tunable optical transmission gratings. A new geometry is proposed, in which the grating is placed in an area without electrodes, permitting for light transmission through the device. Experiments were performed to implement surface relief gratings on DEA films from pattern masters made from holographic recorded gratings. Since the actuation strain of the DEA depends strongly on the boundary conditions, the desired voltage-controllable deformation of the grating can be achieved by choosing suitable manufacturing parameters. Conditions were found permitting a shift of up to 9 % in a 1 μm grating. A model based on independently measured material parameters is shown to describe the optical behavior.

  5. Engineered second-harmonic diffraction from highly transmissive metasurfaces composed of complementary split-ring resonators.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin; Zhang, Chi; Wan, Mingjie; Chen, Zhuo; Wang, Zhenlin

    2016-07-01

    We theoretically and experimentally investigated the optical second-harmonic (SH) diffraction from metasurfaces based on gold complementary split-ring resonators (CSRRs). We have demonstrated that the generated SH currents are mostly parallel to the incident polarization and are asymmetric with respect to the base of a CSRR, thus allowing us to impose the phase change of π on the SH radiation by reversing the CSRR's orientation. We verified this concept of geometry-induced nonlinear phase by designing and fabricating a nonlinear metasurface consisting of supercells of CSRRs with opposite orientations that can function as a SH beam splitter. The ability to control the phase of the local nonlinearity coupled with the high transmittance at both fundamental and SHG wavelengths makes the CSRRs good candidates for the construction of highly efficient three-dimensional nonlinear metamaterials and suitable for applications in nonlinear beam shaping. PMID:27367070

  6. Airborne detection of natural gas leaks from transmission pipelines by using a laser system operating in visual, near-IR, and mid-IR wavelength bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ershov, Oleg V.; Klimov, Alexey G.; Vavilov, Vladimir P.

    2006-04-01

    An airborne gas detection IR system which includes a laser, infrared imager and video-recorder is described. The sensitivity of the system to leaks from ground pipelines by the laser channel is about 100 ppm*m at 100 m (by methane). The IR thermographic channel plays an auxiliary role and the video channel allows better coordinate positioning of detected gas leaks in conjunction with a built-in GPS device.

  7. Transmission X-ray Diffraction (XRD) Patterns Relevant to the MSL Chemin Amorphous Component: Sulfates And Silicates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, R. V.; Rampe, E. B.; Graff, T. G.; Archer, P. D., Jr.; Le, L.; Ming, D. W.; Sutter, B.

    2015-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) CheMin instrument on the Curiosity rover is a transmission X-ray diffractometer (Co-Kalpha radiation source and a approx.5deg to approx.52deg 2theta range) where the analyzed powder samples are constrained to have discrete particle diameters <150 microns by a sieve. To date, diffraction patterns have been obtained for one basaltic soil (Rocknest (RN)) and four drill fines of coherent rock (John Klein (JK), Cumberland (CB), Windjana (WJ), and Confidence Hills (CH)). The CheMin instrument has detected and quantified the abundance of both primary igneous (e.g., feldspar, olivine, and pyroxene) and secondary (e.g., Ca-sulfates, hematite, akaganeite, and Fe-saponite) minerals. The diffraction patterns of all CheMin samples are also characterized by a broad diffraction band centered near 30deg 2theta and by increasing diffraction intensity (scattering continuum) from approx.15deg to approx.5deg, the 2theta minimum. Both the broad band and the scattering continuum are attributed to the presence of an XRD amorphous component. Estimates of amorphous component abundance, based on the XRD data itself and on mass-balance calculations using APXS data crystalline component chemistry derived from XRD data, martian meteorites, and/or stoichiometry [e.g., 6-9], range from approx.20 wt.% to approx.50 wt.% of bulk sample. The APXSbased calculations show that the amorphous component is rich in volatile elements (esp. SO3) and is not simply primary basaltic glass, which was used as a surrogate to model the broad band in the RN CheMin pattern. For RN, the entire volatile inventory (except minor anhydrite) is assigned to the amorphous component because no volatile-bearing crystalline phases were reported within detection limits [2]. For JK and CB, Fesaponite, basanite, and akaganeite are volatile-bearing crystalline components. Here we report transmission XRD patterns for sulfate and silicate phases relevant to interpretation of MSL-CheMin XRD amorphous

  8. Guided Wave Propagation and Diffraction in Plates with Obstacles: Resonance Transmission and Trapping Mode Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glushkov, E. V.; Glushkova, N. V.; Eremin, A. A.; Lammering, R.

    The paper is based on the authors' report at ICU-2015 giving the idea of the semi-analytical integral equation approach to a physically clear simulation of wave phenomena in composite plate-like structures with local inhomogeneities. On this basis, a set of low-cost computer models for a reliable near- and far-field analysis had been developed and experimentally validated. Their abilities have been illustrated with examples of structural frequency response and radiation pattern diagrams for guided waves (GW) generated by piezoelectric wafer active sensors (PWAS); the reconstruction of effective elastic moduli of fiber-reinforced composites; the PWAS frequency tuning with accounting for the radiation directivity induced by anisotropy; and the effects of wave energy resonance transmission and trapping. Some of these examples have been already discussed in journal articles. Therefore, the present paper concentrates on the recent results of resonance GW interaction with deep surface notches and buried cavities.

  9. Coded aperture x-ray diffraction imaging with transmission computed tomography side-information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odinaka, Ikenna; Greenberg, Joel A.; Kaganovsky, Yan; Holmgren, Andrew; Hassan, Mehadi; Politte, David G.; O'Sullivan, Joseph A.; Carin, Lawrence; Brady, David J.

    2016-03-01

    Coded aperture X-ray diffraction (coherent scatter spectral) imaging provides fast and dose-efficient measurements of the molecular structure of an object. The information provided is spatially-dependent and material-specific, and can be utilized in medical applications requiring material discrimination, such as tumor imaging. However, current coded aperture coherent scatter spectral imaging system assume a uniformly or weakly attenuating object, and are plagued by image degradation due to non-uniform self-attenuation. We propose accounting for such non-uniformities in the self-attenuation by utilizing an X-ray computed tomography (CT) image (reconstructed attenuation map). In particular, we present an iterative algorithm for coherent scatter spectral image reconstruction, which incorporates the attenuation map, at different stages, resulting in more accurate coherent scatter spectral images in comparison to their uncorrected counterpart. The algorithm is based on a spectrally grouped edge-preserving regularizer, where the neighborhood edge weights are determined by spatial distances and attenuation values.

  10. Experimental Verification of Overcoming the Diffraction Limit with a Volumetric Veselago-Pendry Transmission-Line Lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jiang; Eleftheriades, George V.

    2008-07-01

    A fully printed Veselago-Pendry lens (isotropic n=-1, ɛr=-1, μr=-1) is presented which is based on transmission-line metamaterials. The lens is constructed in a parallel-plate environment at 1.569 GHz and without any embedded sources and achieves a resolution better than the diffraction limit (full width half power of 0.235λ). Because the lens is low loss (<0.3dB per unit cell), the focused fields are dominated by the evanescent components which dictates that subwavelength tightening of the beam is achieved only in the transverse and not the longitudinal direction. The demonstrated lens is quarter-wavelength thick thus allowing ample “working distance” between the subject/image and the lens.

  11. Induced magnetic anisotropy in Si-free nanocrystalline soft magnetic materials: A transmission x-ray diffraction study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, R.; Yanai, T.; Kishimoto, H.; Kato, A.; Ohnuma, M.; Suzuki, K.

    2015-05-01

    In order to better understand the origin of field-induced anisotropy (Ku) in Si-free nanocrystalline soft magnetic alloys, the lattice spacing of the bcc-Fe phase in nanocrystalline Fe94-xNb6Bx (x = 10, 12, 14) alloys annealed under an applied magnetic field has been investigated by X-ray diffraction in transmission geometry (t-XRD) with the diffraction vector parallel and perpendicular to the field direction. The saturation magnetostriction (λs) of nanocrystalline Fe94-xNb6Bx was found to increase linearly with the volume fraction of the residual amorphous phase and is well described by taking into account the volume-weighted average of two local λs values for the bcc-Fe nanocrystallites (-5 ± 2 ppm) and the residual amorphous matrix (+8 ± 2 ppm). The lattice distortion required to produce the measured Ku values (˜100 J/m3) was estimated via the inverse magnetostrictive effect using the measured λs values and was compared to the lattice spacing estimations made by t-XRD. The lattice strain required to produce Ku under the magnetoelastic model was not observed by the t-XRD experiments and so the findings of this study suggest that the origin of magnetic field induced Ku cannot be explained through the magnetoelastic effect.

  12. Molecular structure of actein: 13C CPMAS NMR, IR, X-ray diffraction studies and theoretical DFT-GIAO calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamróz, Marta K.; Bąk, Joanna; Gliński, Jan A.; Koczorowska, Agnieszka; Wawer, Iwona

    2009-09-01

    Actein is a prominent triterpene glycoside occurring in Actaea racemosa. The triterpene glycosides are believed to be responsible for the estrogenic activity of an extract prepared from this herb. We determined in the crystal structure of actein by X-ray crystallography to be monoclinic P2(1) chiral space group. Refining the disorder, we determined 70% and 30% of contributions of ( S)- and ( R)-actein, respectively. The IR and Raman spectra suggest that actein forms at least four different types of hydrogen bonds. The 13C NMR spectra of actein were recorded both in solution and solid state. The 13C CPMAS spectrum of actein displays multiplet signals, in agreement with the crystallographic data. The NMR shielding constants were calculated for actein using GIAO approach and a variety of basis sets: 6-31G**, 6-311G**, 6-31+G**, cc-pVDZ, cc-pVDZ-su1 and 6-31G**-su1, as well as IGLO approach combined with the IGLO II basis set. The best results (RMSD of 1.6 ppm and maximum error of 3.4 ppm) were obtained with the 6-31G**-su1 basis set. The calculations of the shielding constants are helpful in the interpretation of the 13C CPMAS NMR spectra of actein and actein's analogues.

  13. Mechanochemical synthesis in copper(II) halide/pyridine systems: single crystal X-ray diffraction and IR spectroscopic studies.

    PubMed

    Bowmaker, Graham A; Di Nicola, Corrado; Pettinari, Claudio; Skelton, Brian W; Somers, Neil; White, Allan H

    2011-05-14

    Whereas complexes of divalent metal halides (X = Cl, Br, I) with/from pyridine commonly crystallise as trans-[M(py)(4)X(2)]·2py, M on a site of 222 symmetry in space group Ccca, true for CuCl(2) and CuBr(2) in particular, the copper(II) iodide adduct is of the form [Cu(py)(4)I]I·2py, Cu on a site of mm2 symmetry in space group Cmcm, and five-coordinate (square-pyramidal), the same cationic species also being found in 2[Cu(py)(4)I](I(3))·[(py)(2)Cu(μ-I)(2)Cu(py)(2)] (structurally defined). Bromide or N-thiocyanate may be substituted for the unbound iodide ion in the solvated salt, resulting in complexes which crystallize in space group Ccca, but with both anions and the metal atom disordered. In [Cu(py)(4)(I(3))(2)], a pair of long Cu···I contacts approach a square-planar Cu(py)(4) array. Assignments of the ν(CuN) and ν(CuX) (X = Br, I, SCN) bands in the far-IR spectra are made, the latter with the aid of analogous assignments for [Cu(py)(2)X(2)] (X = Cl, Br), which show a dependence of ν(CuX) on the Cu-X bond length that is very similar to that determined previously for copper(i) halide complexes. The structure of the adventitious complex [(trans-)(H(2)O)(py)(4)CuClCu(py)(4)](I(3))(3)·H(2)O is also recorded, with six- and five-coordinate copper atoms; rational synthesis provides [{Cu(py)(4)}(2)(μ-Cl)](I(3))(3)·H(2)O with one water molecule less. In [{Cu(py)(4)Cl}((∞|∞))](I(3))·3py, square pyramidal [Cu(py)(4)Cl](+) cations, assisted by Cl···Cu interactions, stack to give rise to infinite polymeric strings. Several of these compounds were prepared mechanochemically, illustrating the applicability of this method to syntheses involving redox reactions as well as to complex syntheses involving up to five components. The totality of results demonstrates that the [Cu(II)(py)(4)] entity can be stabilized in an unexpectedly diverse range of mononuclear and multinuclear complexes through the presence of lattice pyridine molecules, the bulky triiodide

  14. Mesoporous silica nanoparticle supported PdIr bimetal catalyst for selective hydrogenation, and the significant promotional effect of Ir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hui; Huang, Chao; Yang, Fan; Yang, Xu; Du, Li; Liao, Shijun

    2015-12-01

    A mesoporous silica nanoparticle (MSN) supported bimetal catalyst, PdIr/MSN, was prepared by a facile impregnation and hydrogen reduction method. The strong promotional effect of Ir was observed and thoroughly investigated. At the optimal molar ratio of Ir to Pd (NIr/NPd = 0.1), the activity of PdIr0.1/MSN was up to eight times and 28 times higher than that of monometallic Pd/MSN and Ir/MSN, respectively. The catalysts were characterized comprehensively by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and hydrogen temperature programmed reduction, which revealed that the promotional effect of Ir may be due to the enhanced dispersion of active components on the MSN, and to the intensified Pd-Ir electronic interaction caused by the addition of Ir.

  15. Direct evidence of a zigzag spin-chain structure in the honeycomb lattice: A neutron and x-ray diffraction investigation of single-crystal Na2IrO3

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Feng; Chi, Songxue; Cao, Huibo; Chakoumakos, Bryan C; Fernandez-Baca, Jaime A; Custelcean, Radu; Qi, Tongfei; Korneta, O. B.; Cao, Gang

    2012-01-01

    We have combined single crystal neutron and x-ray diffractions to investigate the magnetic and crystal structures of the honeycomb lattice $\\rm Na_2IrO_3$. The system orders magnetically below $18.1(2)$~K with Ir$^{4+}$ ions forming zigzag spin chains within the layered honeycomb network with ordered moment of $\\rm 0.22(1)~\\mu_B$/Ir site. Such a configuration sharply contrasts the N{\\'{e}}el or stripe states proposed in the Kitaev-Heisenberg model. The structure refinement reveals that the Ir atoms form nearly ideal 2D honeycomb lattice while the $\\rm IrO_6$ octahedra experience a trigonal distortion that is critical to the ground state. The results of this study provide much-needed experimental insights into the magnetic and crystal structure crucial to the understanding of the exotic magnetic order and possible topological characteristics in the 5$d$-electron based honeycomb lattice.

  16. Induced magnetic anisotropy in Si-free nanocrystalline soft magnetic materials: A transmission x-ray diffraction study

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, R. Suzuki, K.; Yanai, T.; Kishimoto, H.; Kato, A.; Ohnuma, M.

    2015-05-07

    In order to better understand the origin of field-induced anisotropy (K{sub u}) in Si-free nanocrystalline soft magnetic alloys, the lattice spacing of the bcc-Fe phase in nanocrystalline Fe{sub 94−x}Nb{sub 6}B{sub x} (x = 10, 12, 14) alloys annealed under an applied magnetic field has been investigated by X-ray diffraction in transmission geometry (t-XRD) with the diffraction vector parallel and perpendicular to the field direction. The saturation magnetostriction (λ{sub s}) of nanocrystalline Fe{sub 94−x}Nb{sub 6}B{sub x} was found to increase linearly with the volume fraction of the residual amorphous phase and is well described by taking into account the volume-weighted average of two local λ{sub s} values for the bcc-Fe nanocrystallites (−5 ± 2 ppm) and the residual amorphous matrix (+8 ± 2 ppm). The lattice distortion required to produce the measured K{sub u} values (∼100 J/m{sup 3}) was estimated via the inverse magnetostrictive effect using the measured λ{sub s} values and was compared to the lattice spacing estimations made by t-XRD. The lattice strain required to produce K{sub u} under the magnetoelastic model was not observed by the t-XRD experiments and so the findings of this study suggest that the origin of magnetic field induced K{sub u} cannot be explained through the magnetoelastic effect.

  17. Beyond the diffraction limit of optical/IR interferometers. II. Stellar parameters of rotating stars from differential phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadjara, M.; Domiciano de Souza, A.; Vakili, F.; Jankov, S.; Millour, F.; Meilland, A.; Khorrami, Z.; Chelli, A.; Baffa, C.; Hofmann, K.-H.; Lagarde, S.; Robbe-Dubois, S.

    2014-09-01

    , PArot = 65.6° ± 5°, for Fomalhaut. They were found to be compatible with previously published values from differential phase and visibility measurements, while we were able to determine, for the first time, the inclination angle i of Fomalhaut (i = 90° ± 9°) and δ Aquilae (i = 81° ± 13°), and the rotation-axis position angle PArot of δ Aquilae. Conclusions: Beyond the theoretical diffraction limit of an interferometer (ratio of the wavelength to the baseline), spatial super resolution is well suited to systematically estimating the angular diameters of rotating stars and their fundamental parameters with a few sets of baselines and the Earth-rotation synthesis provided a high enough spectral resolution. Based on observations performed at the European Southern Observatory, Chile, under ESO AMBER-consortium GTO program IDs 084.D-0456 081.D-0293 and 082.C-0376.Figure 5 is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  18. Curcumin-β-cyclodextrin inclusion complex: stability, solubility, characterisation by FT-IR, FT-Raman, X-ray diffraction and photoacoustic spectroscopy, and food application.

    PubMed

    Mangolim, Camila Sampaio; Moriwaki, Cristiane; Nogueira, Ana Claudia; Sato, Francielle; Baesso, Mauro Luciano; Neto, Antônio Medina; Matioli, Graciette

    2014-06-15

    Curcumin was complexed with β-CD using co-precipitation, freeze-drying and solvent evaporation methods. Co-precipitation enabled complex formation, as indicated by the FT-IR and FT-Raman techniques via the shifts in the peaks that were assigned to the aromatic rings of curcumin. In addition, photoacoustic spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction, with the disappearance of the band related to aromatic rings, by Gaussian fitting, and modifications in the spectral lines, respectively, also suggested complex formation. The possible complexation had an efficiency of 74% and increased the solubility of the pure colourant 31-fold. Curcumin-β-CD complex exhibited a sunlight stability 18% higher than the pure colourant. This material was stable to pH variations and storage at -15 and 4°C. With an isothermal heating at 100 and 150°C for 2h, the material exhibited a colour retention of approximately 99%. The application of curcumin-β-CD complex in vanilla ice creams intensified the colour of the products and produced a great sensorial acceptance. PMID:24491741

  19. Diffraction efficiency of 200-nm-period critical-angle transmission gratings in the soft x-ray and extreme ultraviolet wavelength bands.

    PubMed

    Heilmann, Ralf K; Ahn, Minseung; Bruccoleri, Alex; Chang, Chih-Hao; Gullikson, Eric M; Mukherjee, Pran; Schattenburg, Mark L

    2011-04-01

    We report on measurements of the diffraction efficiency of 200-nm-period freestanding blazed transmission gratings for wavelengths in the 0.96 to 19.4 nm range. These critical-angle transmission (CAT) gratings achieve highly efficient blazing over a broad band via total external reflection off the sidewalls of smooth, tens of nanometer thin ultrahigh aspect-ratio silicon grating bars and thus combine the advantages of blazed x-ray reflection gratings with those of more conventional x-ray transmission gratings. Prototype gratings with maximum depths of 3.2 and 6 μm were investigated at two different blaze angles. In these initial CAT gratings the grating bars are monolithically connected to a cross support mesh that only leaves less than half of the grating area unobstructed. Because of our initial fabrication approach, the support mesh bars feature a strongly trapezoidal cross section that leads to varying CAT grating depths and partial absorption of diffracted orders. While theory predicts broadband absolute diffraction efficiencies as high as 60% for ideal CAT gratings without a support mesh, experimental results show efficiencies in the range of ∼50-100% of theoretical predictions when taking the effects of the support mesh into account. Future minimization of the support mesh therefore promises broadband CAT grating absolute diffraction efficiencies of 50% or higher. PMID:21460902

  20. Diffraction efficiency of 200-nm-period critical-angle transmission gratings in the soft x-ray and extreme ultraviolet wavelength bands

    SciTech Connect

    Heilmann, Ralf K.; Ahn, Minseung; Bruccoleri, Alex; Chang, Chih-Hao; Gullikson, Eric M.; Mukherjee, Pran; Schattenburg, Mark L.

    2011-04-01

    We report on measurements of the diffraction efficiency of 200-nm-period freestanding blazed transmission gratings for wavelengths in the 0.96 to 19.4 nm range. These critical-angle transmission (CAT) gratings achieve highly efficient blazing over a broad band via total external reflection off the sidewalls of smooth, tens of nanometer thin ultrahigh aspect-ratio silicon grating bars and thus combine the advantages of blazed x-ray reflection gratings with those of more conventional x-ray transmission gratings. Prototype gratings with maximum depths of 3.2 and 6 {mu}m were investigated at two different blaze angles. In these initial CAT gratings the grating bars are monolithically connected to a cross support mesh that only leaves less than half of the grating area unobstructed. Because of our initial fabrication approach, the support mesh bars feature a strongly trapezoidal cross section that leads to varying CAT grating depths and partial absorption of diffracted orders. While theory predicts broadband absolute diffraction efficiencies as high as 60% for ideal CAT gratings without a support mesh, experimental results show efficiencies in the range of {approx}50-100% of theoretical predictions when taking the effects of the support mesh into account. Future minimization of the support mesh therefore promises broadband CAT grating absolute diffraction efficiencies of 50% or higher.

  1. Diphosphine- and CO-Induced Fragmentation of Chloride-bridged Dinuclear Complex and Cp*Ir(mu-Cl)(3)Re(CO)(3) and Attempted Synthesis of Cp*Ir(mu-Cl)(3)Mn(CO)(3): Spectroscopic Data and X-ray Diffraction Structures of the Pentamethylcyclopentadienyl Compounds [Cp*IrCl{(Z)-Ph2PCH = CHPPh2}][Cl]center dot 2CHCl(3) and Cp*Ir(CO)Cl-2

    SciTech Connect

    Hammons, Casey; Wang, Xiaoping; Nesterov, Vladimir; Richmond, Michael G.

    2010-01-01

    The confacial bioctahedral compound Cp*Ir(mu-Cl)(3)Re(CO)(3) (1) undergoes rapid fragmentation in the presence of the unsaturated diphosphine ligand (Z)-Ph2PCH = CHPPh2 to give the mononuclear compounds [Cp*IrCl {(Z)-Ph2PCH = CHPPh2}][Cl] (2) and fac-ClRe(CO)(3)[(Z)-Ph2PCH = CHPPh2] (3). 2 has been characterized by H-1 and P-31 NMR spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. 2 center dot 2CHCl(3) crystallizes in the monoclinic space group C2/c, a = 35.023 (8) angstrom, b = 10.189 (2) angstrom, c = 24.003 (6) angstrom, b = 103.340 (3), V = 8,335 (3) angstrom 3, Z = 8, and d(calc) = 1.647 Mg/m(3); R = 0.0383, R-w = 0.1135 for 8,178 reflections with I> 2 sigma(I). The Ir(III) center in 2 exhibits a six-coordinate geometry and displays a chelating diphosphine group. Compound 1 reacts with added CO with fragmentation to yield the known compounds Cp*Ir(CO)Cl-2 (4) and ClRe(CO)(5) (5) in near quantitative yield by IR spectroscopy. Using the protocol established by our groups for the synthesis of 1, we have explored the reaction of [Cp*IrCl2](2) with ClMn(CO)(5) as a potential route to Cp*Ir(mu-Cl)(3)Mn(CO)(3); unfortunately, 4 was the only product isolated from this reaction. The solid-state structure of 4 was determined by X-ray diffraction analysis. 4 crystallizes in the triclinic space group P-1, a = 7.4059 (4) angstrom, b = 7.8940 (4) angstrom, c = 11.8488 (7) angstrom, alpha = 80.020 (1), beta = 79.758 (1), gamma = 68.631 (1), V = 630.34 (6) angstrom(3), Z = 2, and d(calc) = 2.246 Mg/m(3); R = 0.0126, R-w = 0.0329 for 2,754 reflections with I> 2 sigma(I). The expected three-legged piano-stool geometry in 4 has been crystallographically confirmed.

  2. Good performances but short lasting efficacy of Actellic 50 EC Indoor Residual Spraying (IRS) on malaria transmission in Benin, West Africa

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The National Malaria Control Program (NMCP) has been using pirimiphos methyl for the first time for indoor residual spraying (IRS) in Benin. The first round was a success with a significant decrease of entomological indicators of malaria transmission in the treated districts. We present the results of the entomological impact on malaria transmission. Entomologic parameters in the control area were compared with those in intervention sites. Methods Mosquito collections were carried out in three districts in the Atacora-Dongo region of which two were treated with pirimiphos methyl (Actellic 50EC) (Tanguiéta and Kouandé) and the untreated (Copargo) served as control. Anopheles gambiae s.l. populations were sampled monthly by human landing catch. In addition, window exit traps and pyrethrum spray catches were performed to assess exophagic behavior of Anopheles vectors. In the three districts, mosquito collections were organized to follow the impact of pirimiphos methyl IRS on malaria transmission and possible changes in the behavior of mosquitoes. The residual activity of pirimiphos methyl in the treated walls was also assessed using WHO bioassay test. Results A significant reduction (94.25%) in human biting rate was recorded in treated districts where an inhabitant received less than 1 bite of An. gambiae per night. During this same time, the entomological inoculation rate (EIR) dramatically declined in the treated area (99.24% reduction). We also noted a significant reduction in longevity of the vectors and an increase in exophily induced by pirimiphos methyl on An. gambiae. However, no significant impact was found on the blood feeding rate. Otherwise, the low residual activity of Actellic 50 EC, which is three months, is a disadvantage. Conclusion Pirimiphos methyl was found to be effective for IRS in Benin. However, because of the low persistence of Actellic 50EC used in this study on the treated walls, the recourse to another more residual formulation

  3. High temperature Ir segregation in Ir-B ceramics: Effect of oxygen presence on stability of IrB2 and other Ir-B phases

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Zhilin; Terracciano, Anthony C.; Cullen, David A.; Blair, Richard G.; Orlovskaya, Nina

    2015-05-13

    The formation of IrB2, IrB1.35, IrB1.1 and IrB monoboride phases in the Ir–B ceramic nanopowder was confirmed during mechanochemical reaction between metallic Ir and elemental B powders. The Ir–B phases were analysed after 90 h of high energy ball milling and after annealing of the powder for 72 h at 1050°C in vacuo. The iridium monoboride (IrB) orthorhombic phase was synthesised experimentally for the first time and identified by powder X-ray diffraction. Additionally, the ReB2 type IrB2 hexagonal phase was also produced for the first time and identified by high resolution transmission electron microscope. Ir segregation along disordered domains of the boron lattice was found to occur during high temperature annealing. Furthermore, these nanodomains may have useful catalytic properties.

  4. Computation of relative dose distribution and effective transmission around a shielded vaginal cylinder with {sup 192}Ir HDR source using MCNP4B

    SciTech Connect

    Sureka, Chandra Sekaran; Aruna, Prakasarao; Ganesan, Singaravelu; Sunny, Chirayath Sunil; Subbaiah, Kamatam Venkata

    2006-06-15

    The present work is primarily focused on the estimation of relative dose distribution and effective transmission around a shielded vaginal cylinder with an {sup 192}Ir source using the Monte Carlo technique. The MCNP4B code was used to evaluate the dose distribution around a tungsten shielded vaginal cylinder as a function of thickness and angular shielding. The dose distribution and effective transmission of {sup 192}Ir by 0.8 cm thickness tungsten were also compared with that for gold and lead. Dose distributions were evaluated for different distances starting from 1.35 cm to 10.15 cm from the center of the cylinder. Dose distributions were also evaluated sequentially from 0 deg.to 180 deg.for every 5 deg.interval. Studies show that all the shielding material at 0.8 cm thickness contribute tolerable doses to normal tissues and also protect the critical organs such as the rectum and bladder. However, the computed dose values are in good agreement with the reported experimental values. It was also inferred that the higher the shielding angles, the more the protection of the surrounding tissues. Among the three shielding materials, gold has been observed to have the highest attenuation and hence contribute lowest transmission in the shielded region. Depending upon the shielding angle and thickness, it is possible to predict the dose distribution using the MCNP4B code. In order to deliver the higher dose to the unshielded region, lead may be considered as the shielding material and further it is highly economic over other materials.

  5. Nanosecond Time Resolved Electron Diffraction Studies of the (Alpha) to (Beta) Transition in Pure Ti Thin Films using the Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope (DTEM)

    SciTech Connect

    LaGrange, T; Campbell, G H; Colvin, J D; Reed, B; King, W E

    2005-12-09

    The transient events of the {alpha}-{beta} martensitic transformation in nanocrystalline Ti films were explored via single shot electron diffraction patterns with 1.5 ns temporal resolution. The diffraction patterns were acquired with a newly constructed dynamic transmission electron microscope (DTEM), which combines nanosecond pulsed laser systems and pump-probe techniques with a conventional TEM. With the DTEM, the transient events of fundamental material processes, that are far too fast to be studied by conventional bulk techniques, can be captured in the form of electron diffraction patterns or images with nanosecond temporal resolution. The transient phenomena of the martensitic transformations in nanocrystalline Ti is ideally suited for study in the DTEM, with their rapid nucleation, characteristic interface velocities {approx}1 km/s, and significant irreversible microstructural changes. Free-standing 40-nm-thick Ti films were laser-heated at a rate of {approx}10{sup 10} K/s to a temperature above the 1155 K transition point, then probed at various time intervals with a 1.5-ns-long, intense electron pulse. Diffraction patterns show an almost complete transition to the {beta} phase within 500 ns. Postmortem analysis (after the sample is allowed to cool) shows a reversion to the {alpha} phase coupled with substantial grain growth, lath formation, and texture modification. The cooled material also shows a complete lack of apparent dislocations, suggesting the possible importance of a ''massive'' short-range diffusion transformation mechanism.

  6. LO-TO splittings, effective charges and interactions in electro-optic meta-nitroaniline crystal as studied by polarized IR reflection and transmission spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szostak, M. M.; Le Calvé, N.; Romain, F.; Pasquier, B.

    1994-10-01

    The polarized IR reflection spectra of the meta-nitroaniline ( m-NA) single crystal along the a, b and c crystallographic axes as well as the b and c polarized transmission spectra have been measured in the 100-400 cm -1 region. The LO-TO splitting values have been calculated from the reflection spectra by fitting them with the four parameter dielectric function. The dipole moment derivatives, relevant to dynamic effective charges, of the vibrations have also been calculated and used to check the applicability of the oriented gas model (OGM) to reflection spectra. The discrepancies from the OGM have been discussed in terms of vibronic couplings, weak hydrogen bondings (HB) and intramolecular charge transfer.

  7. Multilayer graphene stacks grown by different methods-thickness measurements by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and optical transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Tokarczyk, M. Kowalski, G.; Kępa, H.; Grodecki, K.; Drabińska, A.; Strupiński, W.

    2013-12-15

    X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and Optical absorption estimates of the thickness of graphene multi layer stacks (number of graphene layers) are presented for three different growth techniques. The objective of this work was focused on comparison and reconciliation of the two already widely used methods for thickness estimates (Raman and Absorption) with the calibration of the X-ray method as far as Scherer constant K is concerned and X-ray based Wagner-Aqua extrapolation method.

  8. Two-way multi-band optical/IR transmission measurements in the Persian Gulf coastal region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, Arie N.; Fritz, Peter J.

    2005-10-01

    The atmospheric conditions in the Persian Gulf region are significantly different from other places in the world. The particle size distribution may vary daily and during the day. The aerosols can contribute to the amount of rainfall over land, important for the nations around the Gulf. In 2004 NASNGSFC and NRL (Naval Research Laboratory) introduced a proposal to improve the modelling of aerosol transport for the Persian Gulf area. The proposal included a measurement campaign in the UAE (United Arabian Emirates), held in the summer/fall of 2004, sponsored by the DWRS (Department of Water Resources Studies) in Abu Dhabi: UAEz (Unified Aerosol Experiment in the UAE). In this campaign NASA installed a number of multi-spectral sun-photometers at various locations in the UAE (http://aeronet.gsfc.nasa.gov). NRL installed ground based and airborne particle samplers. In addition, TNO (the Netherlands) installed its multi-band opticaUIR transmissometer, in order to collect horizontal, path-integrated transmission data. This device provides additional information on the scattering behaviour of the aerosols compared to the other instruments, which either integrate scattering over the full vertical path (the NASA sun-photometers, providing the Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD)) or sample the particles in-situ (the NRL particle samplers, providing size distribution and composition). This paper deals with our transmission measurement set-up, which was located in a coastal area near Abu Dhabi. This location allowed the investigation of the local variability of the atmospheric conditions: from desert dust to pollution, such as fossil fuel and biomass burning, depending on the wind direction. For logistic reasons a set-up was chosen with a retro-reflector. This choice implies consequences for the calibration procedure and measurement accuracy, which are discussed in detail. Also the effects of path-inhomogeneity and scintillation for such a two-way set-up are considered. Results are

  9. HfO2/SiO2 multilayer based reflective and transmissive optics from the IR to the UV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jue; Hart, Gary A.; Oudard, Jean Francois; Wamboldt, Leonard; Roy, Brian P.

    2016-05-01

    HfO2/SiO2 multilayer based reflective optics enable threat detection in the short-wave/middle-wave infrared and high power laser targeting capability in the near infrared. On the other hand, HfO2/SiO2 multilayer based transmissive optics empower early missile warning by taking advantage of the extremely low noise light detection in the deep-ultraviolet region where solar irradiation is strongly absorbed by the ozone layer of the earth's atmosphere. The former requires high laser damage resistance, whereas the latter needs a solar-blind property, i.e., high transmission of the radiation below 290 nm and strong suppression of the solar background from 300 nm above. The technical challenges in both cases are revealed. The spectral limits associated with the HfO2 and SiO2 films are discussed and design concepts are schematically illustrated. Spectral performances are realized for potential A and D and commercial applications.

  10. Third-dimension information retrieval from a single convergent-beam transmission electron diffraction pattern using an artificial neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennington, Robert S.; Van den Broek, Wouter; Koch, Christoph T.

    2014-05-01

    We have reconstructed third-dimension specimen information from convergent-beam electron diffraction (CBED) patterns simulated using the stacked-Bloch-wave method. By reformulating the stacked-Bloch-wave formalism as an artificial neural network and optimizing with resilient back propagation, we demonstrate specimen orientation reconstructions with depth resolutions down to 5 nm. To show our algorithm's ability to analyze realistic data, we also discuss and demonstrate our algorithm reconstructing from noisy data and using a limited number of CBED disks. Applicability of this reconstruction algorithm to other specimen parameters is discussed.

  11. Influence of deposition conditions on Ir/IrO2 oxygen barrier effectiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinnow, C. U.; Kasko, I.; Nagel, N.; Poppa, S.; Mikolajick, T.; Dehm, C.; Hosler, W.; Bleyl, F.; Jahnel, F.; Seibt, M.; Geyer, U.

    2002-06-01

    The influence of the deposition temperature during the reactive sputtering process on the microstructure of thin Ir and IrO2 films deposited on oxidized Si substrates was investigated and related to the oxygen barrier effectiveness. For this purpose differential thermal analysis combined with residual gas analysis by mass spectrometry was used for the investigation of the microstructural and chemical behavior of the as-sputtered IrO2 films upon heating. Moreover, in situ stress relaxation analyses up to 900 degC, in and ex situ x-ray diffraction measurements were done for various annealing conditions. The investigated polycrystalline IrO2 films exhibited a large compressive stress and a distorted lattice due to the sputter deposition process. It is demonstrated that a high deposition temperature involves a delayed relaxation of the IrO2 grains which is causing an extrinsic, enhanced defect controlled oxygen mobility for the annealing temperatures below the recrystallization. The well-known low intrinsic oxygen diffusivity was only found in those samples which show--in addition to the recovery process--a recrystallization at low temperatures and thus a formation and growth of a new generation of grains with a lattice spacing as in bulk IrO2. Moreover, the oxygen diffusion in Ir films was investigated and the oxygen was found to penetrate the Ir films very quickly at elevated temperatures. The microstructure of the films was investigated by cross sectional transmission electron microscopy and it is shown that the cold-sputtered columnar IrO2 films protect the underlying layers from oxidation during a 700 degC high temperature oxygen anneal with an optimized Ir/IrO2 oxygen barrier stack.

  12. A collimated focused ultrasound beam of high acoustic transmission and minimum diffraction achieved by using a lens with subwavelength structures

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Zhou; Tu, Juan; Cheng, Jianchun; Guo, Xiasheng E-mail: dzhang@nju.edu.cn; Wu, Junru; Huang, Pingtong; Zhang, Dong E-mail: dzhang@nju.edu.cn

    2015-09-14

    An acoustic focusing lens incorporated with periodically aligned subwavelength grooves corrugated on its spherical surface has been developed. It is demonstrated theoretically and experimentally that acoustic focusing achieved by using the lens can suppress the relative side-lobe amplitudes, enhance the focal gain, and minimize the shifting of the focus. Use of the lens coupled with a planar ultrasound transducer can generate an ultrasound beam with enhanced acoustic transmission and collimation effect, which offers the capability of improving the safety, efficiency, and accuracy of targeted surgery implemented by high intensity focused ultrasound.

  13. Comparative investigation of Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and X-ray Diffraction (XRD) in the determination of cotton fiber crystallinity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Despite considerable efforts in developing the curve-fitting protocol to evaluate the crystallinity index (CI) from the X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurement, in its present state XRD procedure can only provide a qualitative or semi-quantitative assessment of the amounts of crystalline or amorphous po...

  14. Detailed structural analysis of epitaxial MBE-grown Fe/Cr superlattices by x-ray diffraction and transmission-electron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, M.E.; Santamaria, J.; Kim, S.; Schuller, Ivan K.; Krishnan, Kannan M.

    2005-03-15

    We have performed a detailed quantitative structural analysis of epitaxial [Fe(3 nm)/Cr(1.2 nm)]{sub 20} superlattices by low- and high-angle x-ray diffraction, and energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy on cross-section samples. The interface roughness was changed systematically by varying the substrate temperature (150-250 deg. C) maintaining all other growth parameters fixed. Direct imaging of the interfaces allows examining the roughness of the individual interfaces and its evolution with thickness. A statistical analysis of the local interface width for the individual layers supplies the roughness static and dynamic exponents. High-temperature samples (250 deg. C) show roughness decreasing with thickness as a result of surface-diffusion-dominated growth. Low-temperature samples (150 deg. C) show anomalous non-self-affine roughness characterized by a time-dependent local interface width.

  15. Stable Ir/SiO2 catalyst for selective hydrogenation of crotonaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Xiao; Li, Bo; Wang, Yuejuan; Lu, Jiqing; Hu, Gengshen; Luo, Mengfei

    2013-04-01

    Vapor-phase selective hydrogenation of crotonaldehyde was conducted over Ir/SiO2 catalysts to investigate the effects of Ir loading on the catalytic behaviors. The catalysts were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), CO chemisorption, temperature-programmed reduction (TPR), diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectra of CO adsorption (CO-DRIFTS), NH3 temperature-programmed desorption (NH3-TPD), and temperature-programmed oxidation (TPO). It was found that the particle size of Ir in the catalyst increased with Ir loading, being 2.1, 3.9 and 6.7 nm for the 1Ir/SiO2, 3Ir/SiO2 and 5Ir/SiO2 catalyst, respectively. The Ir species on the Ir/SiO2 catalysts consisted of Ir0 and Irδ+, but the average valence of Ir species decreased with increasing Ir loading. Also, catalytic testing results revealed that the reactivity of the catalyst increased with Ir loading. Interestingly, it was found that the reaction underwent an induction period, with the conversion of crotonaldehyede and the selectivity to crotyl alcohol gradually increasing during the reaction, and eventually reaching a steady state. The highest selectivity (77.6%) to crotyl alcohol was obtained over the 3Ir/SiO2 catalyst, and the conversion increased gradually to 15.6%. The catalytic behavior of these stable catalysts could be attributed to the proper Ir particle size, the existence of Ir0 and Irδ+ species on the surface, and high amount of surface acid sites in these catalysts.

  16. Anharmonic Computations Meet Experiments (IR, Raman, Neutron Diffraction) for Explaining the Behavior of 1,3,5-Tribromo-2,4,6-trimethylbenzene.

    PubMed

    Meinnel, Jean; Latouche, Camille; Ghanemi, Soumia; Boucekkine, Abdou; Barone, Vincenzo; Moréac, Alain; Boudjada, Ali

    2016-02-25

    In the present paper we first show the experimental Raman, infrared, and neutron INS spectra of tribromomesitylene (TBM) measured in the range 50-3200 cm(-1) using crystalline powders at 6 or 4 K. Then, the bond lengths and angles determined by neutron diffraction using a TBM single crystal at 14 K are compared to the computed ones at different levels of theory. Anharmonic computations were then performed on the relaxed structure using the VPT2 approach, and for the lowest normal modes, the HRAO model has led to a remarkable agreement for the assignment of the experimental signatures. A particularity appears for frequencies below 150 cm(-1), and in particular for those concerning the energy levels of "hindered rotation" of the three methyl groups, they must be calculated for one-dimensional symmetrical tops independent of the frame vibrations. This fact is consistent with the structure established by neutron diffraction: the protons of the methyl groups undergoing huge "libration" motions are widely spread in space. The values of the transitions between the librational levels determined by inelastic neutron scattering indicate that the hindering potentials are mainly due to intermolecular interactions different for each methyl group in the triclinic cell. PMID:26836589

  17. EC-QCL mid-IR transmission spectroscopy for monitoring dynamic changes of protein secondary structure in aqueous solution on the example of β-aggregation in alcohol-denaturated α-chymotrypsin.

    PubMed

    Alcaráz, Mirta R; Schwaighofer, Andreas; Goicoechea, Héctor; Lendl, Bernhard

    2016-06-01

    In this work, a novel EC-QCL-based setup for mid-IR transmission measurements in the amide I region is introduced for monitoring dynamic changes in secondary structure of proteins. For this purpose, α-chymotrypsin (aCT) acts as a model protein, which gradually forms intermolecular β-sheet aggregates after adopting a non-native α-helical structure induced by exposure to 50 % TFE. In order to showcase the versatility of the presented setup, the effects of varying pH values and protein concentration on the rate of β-aggregation were studied. The influence of the pH value on the initial reaction rate was studied in the range of pH 5.8-8.2. Results indicate an increased aggregation rate at elevated pH values. Furthermore, the widely accessible concentration range of the laser-based IR transmission setup was utilized to investigate β-aggregation across a concentration range of 5-60 mg mL(-1). For concentrations lower than 20 mg mL(-1), the aggregation rate appears to be independent of concentration. At higher values, the reaction rate increases linearly with protein concentration. Extended MCR-ALS was employed to obtain pure spectral and concentration profiles of the temporal transition between α-helices and intermolecular β-sheets. Comparison of the global solutions obtained by the modelled data with results acquired by the laser-based IR transmission setup at different conditions shows excellent agreement. This demonstrates the potential and versatility of the EC-QCL-based IR transmission setup to monitor dynamic changes of protein secondary structure in aqueous solution at varying conditions and across a wide concentration range. Graphical abstract EC-QCL IR spectroscopy for monitoring protein conformation change. PMID:27007739

  18. Epitaxial growth of iridate pyrochlore Nd2Ir2O7 films

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gallagher, J. C.; Esser, B. D.; Morrow, R.; Dunsiger, S. R.; Williams, R. E. A.; Woodward, P. M.; McComb, D. W.; Yang, F. Y.

    2016-02-29

    Epitaxial films of the pyrochlore Nd2Ir2O7 have been grown on (111)-oriented yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) substrates by off-axis sputtering followed by post-growth annealing. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results demonstrate phase-pure epitaxial growth of the pyrochlore films on YSZ. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) investigation of an Nd2Ir2O7 film with a short post-annealing provides insight into the mechanism for crystallization of Nd2Ir2O7 during the post-annealing process. STEM images reveal clear pyrochlore ordering of Nd and Ir in the films. As a result, the epitaxial relationship between the YSZ and Nd2Ir2O7 is observed clearly while some interfacial regions show a thin region with polycrystallinemore » Ir nanocrystals.« less

  19. Epitaxial growth of iridate pyrochlore Nd2Ir2O7 films

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, J. C.; Esser, B. D.; Morrow, R.; Dunsiger, S. R.; Williams, R. E. A.; Woodward, P. M.; McComb, D. W.; Yang, F. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Epitaxial films of the pyrochlore Nd2Ir2O7 have been grown on (111)-oriented yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) substrates by off-axis sputtering followed by post-growth annealing. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results demonstrate phase-pure epitaxial growth of the pyrochlore films on YSZ. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) investigation of an Nd2Ir2O7 film with a short post-annealing provides insight into the mechanism for crystallization of Nd2Ir2O7 during the post-annealing process. STEM images reveal clear pyrochlore ordering of Nd and Ir in the films. The epitaxial relationship between the YSZ and Nd2Ir2O7 is observed clearly while some interfacial regions show a thin region with polycrystalline Ir nanocrystals. PMID:26923862

  20. Epitaxial growth of iridate pyrochlore Nd2Ir2O7 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, J. C.; Esser, B. D.; Morrow, R.; Dunsiger, S. R.; Williams, R. E. A.; Woodward, P. M.; McComb, D. W.; Yang, F. Y.

    2016-02-01

    Epitaxial films of the pyrochlore Nd2Ir2O7 have been grown on (111)-oriented yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) substrates by off-axis sputtering followed by post-growth annealing. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results demonstrate phase-pure epitaxial growth of the pyrochlore films on YSZ. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) investigation of an Nd2Ir2O7 film with a short post-annealing provides insight into the mechanism for crystallization of Nd2Ir2O7 during the post-annealing process. STEM images reveal clear pyrochlore ordering of Nd and Ir in the films. The epitaxial relationship between the YSZ and Nd2Ir2O7 is observed clearly while some interfacial regions show a thin region with polycrystalline Ir nanocrystals.

  1. Lattice vibration spectra. Part LXXXII. Brucite-type hydroxides M(OH)2 (M = Ca, Mn, Co, Fe, Cd) — IR and Raman spectra, neutron diffraction of Fe(OH)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, H. D.; Möller, H.; Schmidt, M.

    1994-12-01

    Fe3+-free white rust Fe(O(H,D))2 has been prepared and characterized by X-ray, neutron diffraction, and IR and Raman spectroscopic methods. The crystal structure of Fe(OH)2 (space group Poverline3ml, Z = 1, a = 326.289(1) pm and c = 460.4(1)pm; V = 42.45(1) × 106 pm3) was refined to a final RI = 5.6%. The results of IR and Raman spectra of the brucite-type M(O(H,D))2 (M = Ca, Mn, Fe, Co, Cd) are presented and discussed in terms of (i) assignment of the librational and translational modes, (ii) frequency shifts with respect to MO bond lengths, unit-cell volumes and masses of the atoms involved, and (iii) the nature of the large unit-cell group splittings of the OH stretching modes. Due to different bonding, i.e. more or less covalent, the brucite-type hydroxides can be divided into two groups of M = Ca, Mg, and M = Fe, Co, Ni, and Cd, respectively.

  2. In search of the elusive IrB2: Can mechanochemistry help?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Zhilin; Blair, Richard G.; Orlovskaya, Nina; Cullen, David A.; Lapidus, Saul H.; Kata, Dariusz; Rutkowski, Paweł; Lis, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    The previously unknown hexagonal ReB2-type IrB2 diboride and orthorhombic IrB monoboride phases were produced by mechanochemical syntheses. High energy ball milling of elemental Ir and B powder for 30 h, followed by annealing of the powder at 1050 °C for 48 h, resulted in the formation of the desired phases. Both traditional laboratory and high resolution synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses were used for phase identification of the synthesized powder. In addition to XRD, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were employed to further characterize the microstructure of the phases produced.

  3. In search of the elusive IrB2: Can mechanochemistry help?

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xie, Zhilin; Blair, Richard G.; Orlovskaya, Nina; Cullen, David A.; Lapidus, Saul H.; Kata, Dariusz; Rutkowski, Paweł; Lis, Jerzy

    2015-10-20

    We produced hexagonal ReB2-type IrB2 diboride and orthorhombic IrB monoboride phases, that were previously unknown and saw them produced by mechanochemical syntheses. High energy ball milling of elemental Ir and B powder for 30 h, followed by annealing of the powder at 1050 °C for 48 h, resulted in the formation of the desired phases. Both traditional laboratory and high resolution synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses were used for phase identification of the synthesized powder. Additionally, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were employed, along with XRD, to further characterize the microstructure of the phases produced.

  4. Synthesis, crystal structure analysis, spectral IR, NMR UV-Vis investigations, NBO and NLO of 2-benzoyl-N-(4-chlorophenyl)-3-oxo-3-phenylpropanamide with use of X-ray diffractions studies along with DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demir, Sibel; Sarioğlu, Ahmet Oral; Güler, Semih; Dege, Necmi; Sönmez, Mehmet

    2016-08-01

    The title compound, 2-benzoyl-N-(4-chlorophenyl)-3-oxo-3-phenylpropanamide compound (C22H16NO3Cl) has been synthesized and characterized by X-ray diffraction, IR, 1H and 13C NMR and UV-Vis spectra. Optimized geometrical structure, harmonic vibrational frequencies and chemical shifts were computed using hybrid-DFT (B3LYP and B3PW91) methods and 6-311G(d,p) as the basis set. The results of the optimized molecular structure are presented and compared with the experimental X-ray diffraction. The calculated optimized geometries, vibrational frequencies and 1H NMR chemical shift values are in strong agreement with experimentally measured values. UV-Vis spectrum of the title compound, was also recorded and the electronic properties, such as calculated energies, excitation energies, oscillator strengths, dipole moments and frontier orbital energies and band gap energies were computed with TDDFT-B3LYP methodolgy and using 6-311G(d,p) as the basis set. Furthermore, frontier molecular orbitals (FMO), molecular electrostatic potential (MEP), natural bond orbital (NBO) and non linear optical (NLO) properties were performed by using B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) level for the title compound.

  5. Definitive support by transmission electron microscopy, electron diffraction, and electron density maps for the formation of a BCC lattice from poly[N-[3,4,5-tris(n-dodecan-1-yloxy)benzoyl]ethyleneimine].

    PubMed

    Duan, H; Hudson, S D; Ungar, G; Holerca, M N; Percec, V

    2001-10-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), electron diffraction (ED), and electron density maps (EDM) experiments were carried out on a poly[N-[3,4,5-tris(n-dodecan-1-yloxy)benzoyl]ethyleneimine] [poly[(3,4,5)12G1-Oxz

  6. Structure refinement of the δ1p phase in the Fe–Zn system by single-crystal X-ray diffraction combined with scanning transmission electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Norihiko L.; Tanaka, Katsushi; Yasuhara, Akira; Inui, Haruyuki

    2014-01-01

    The structure of the δ1p phase in the iron−zinc system has been refined by single-crystal synchrotron X-ray diffraction combined with scanning transmission electron microscopy. The large hexagonal unit cell of the δ1p phase with the space group of P63/mmc comprises more or less regular (normal) Zn12 icosahedra, disordered Zn12 icosahedra, Zn16 icosioctahedra and dangling Zn atoms that do not constitute any polyhedra. The unit cell contains 52 Fe and 504 Zn atoms so that the compound is expressed with the chemical formula of Fe13Zn126. All Fe atoms exclusively occupy the centre of normal and disordered icosahedra. Iron-centred normal icosahedra are linked to one another by face- and vertex-sharing forming two types of basal slabs, which are bridged with each other by face-sharing with icosioctahedra, whereas disordered icosahedra with positional disorder at their vertex sites are isolated from other polyhedra. The bonding features in the δ1p phase are discussed in comparison with those in the Γ and ζ phases in the iron−zinc system. PMID:24675597

  7. Transmission Mössbauer spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction studies on the structure of nanocrystalline Fe-Cu-Si-B alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X. D.; Lu, K.; Hu, Z. Q.; Ding, B. Z.; Zhu, J.; Jiang, J.

    1994-04-01

    Nanocrystalline Fe-Cu-Si-B alloys with grain sizes of 25-90 nm were synthesized by crystallization of the amorphous alloy. Two nanocrystalline phases of α-Fe(Si) and Fe2B were observed in all tested samples. Transmission Mössbauer spectroscopy investigation on the structure of nanocrystalline Fe-Cu-Si-B alloys showed that Si atoms are completely and substitutionally dissolved in Fe bcc lattice and the arrangement of the Si atoms in the α-Fe(Si) phase shows short range order (SRO), whereas 8.5-9.7 at. % of the B atoms were found as Fe2B and the remainder were located in the interfaces. When grains grow larger, the arrangement of the Si atoms in the α-Fe(Si) phase changes. Interestingly, x-ray diffraction results reveal that the lattice constant of α-Fe(Si) phase decreases rapidly with grain coarsening. Based on the thermodynamic analysis, the changes in the lattice constant of the α-Fe(Si) phase and SRO of Si atoms in bcc Fe lattices were attributed to the lattice expansion as a result of the variation of vacancy concentration in α-Fe(Si) solid solution. Meanwhile, owing to the interface contribution, the alloy with small grain size is found to exhibit large values of half linewidth (HLW) and isomer shift (IS) in the Mössbauer spectra. The results from electrical resistivity measurements agree and confirm the strong effects of the lattice distortion and interfaces.

  8. Using multiple diffractive optical elements in infrared lens design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinclair, R. Lawrence; High, Martin; Strnad, Vladimir

    1999-07-01

    Many IR lenses include Diffractive Optical Elements (DOEs) which have been incorporated to reduce the lens complexity and/or the tolerance sensitivity. In many cases the diffractive surface includes an asphere to achieve further aberration correction. For complex lens systems such as IR multi-FOV and IR zoom lenses there is a strong motivation to use multiple diffractive optical elements. This paper reviews the performance impact and productivity advantages of using multiple diffractive optical elements in an IR lens.

  9. Preparation and reactivity of the heterobimetallic ReIr face-shared bioctahedral compounds Cp*Ir(mu-Cl)(3)Re(CO)(3) and Cp*Ir(mu-SC6H4Me-4)(3)Re(CO)(3): X-ray diffraction structures and redox behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiaoping; Hammons, Casey; Richmond, Michael G.

    2009-01-01

    Thermolysis of the dinuclear compound [Cp*IrCl2](2) (1) with ClRe(CO)(5) (2) leads to the formation of the confacial bioctahedral compound Cp*Ir(mu-Cl)(3)Re(CO)(3) (3) in high yield. Whereas the substitution of the chloride ligands in 3 is observed on treatment with excess p-methylbenzenethiol to furnish the sulfido-bridged compound Cp*Ir(mu-SC6H4Me-4)(3)Re(CO)(3) (4), 3 undergoes fragmentation upon reaction with tertiary phosphines [PPh3 and P(OMe)(3)] to furnish the mononuclear compounds CP*IrCl2P and fac-ClRe-(CO3)P-2. Both 3 and 4 have been isolated and fully characterized in solution by IR and H-1 NMR spectroscopies, and their solid-state structures have been established by X-ray crystallography. The redox properties of 3 and 4 have been explored by cyclic voltammetry, and the results are discussed relative to extended Huckel MO calculations.

  10. IR fiber sources for scene projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, L. B.; Sanghera, J. S.; Aggarwal, I. D.

    2007-04-01

    Naval Research Laboratory has developed IR transmitting fiber and IR fiber sources which can be used for HWIL testing. IR transmitting fiber is capable of broad transmission from near IR to LWIR and can be formed into bundles for imaging. IR fiber sources are based on rare earth doped glass or nonlinear processes in the glass and are cable of high brightness IR emission. Recently, NRL developed a four emitter MWIR fiber source which is capable of high temperature simulation, high dynamic range, and fast response. New broadband fiber sources based upon IR supercontinuum generation in IR fibers are also being developed. In this paper, we will report on these technologies.

  11. Preparation of IrO2 nanoparticles with SBA-15 template and its supported Pt nanocomposite as bifunctional oxygen catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Fan-Dong; Liu, Jing; Ling, Ai-Xia; Xu, Zhi-Qiang; Wang, Hui-Yun; Kong, Qing-Sheng

    2015-12-01

    In the present work, we report the syntheses of IrO2 nanoparticles with SBA-15 template (s-IrO2), and s-IrO2 supported Pt nanocomposite (Pt/s-IrO2) as bifunctional oxygen catalyst. Physical characterizations including X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy demonstrate that s-IrO2 catalyst has excellent uniformity and regularity in particle shape and much ordered distribution in geometric space, and Pt/s-IrO2 catalyst shows a uniform Pt dispersion on the surface of the s-IrO2 particles. Electrochemical analyses prove that s-IrO2 catalyst possesses superior OER activity at operating potentials; and that Pt/s-IrO2 catalyst, in comparison to Pt/commercial IrO2, has higher ESA value and ORR catalytic performance with a mechanism of four-electron pathway and a high ORR efficiency. And as a bifunctional oxygen catalyst, Pt/s-IrO2 also exhibits more remarkable OER performance than the commercial one. The s-IrO2 nanoparticles will be a promising active component (for OER), and suitable for Pt support (for ORR).

  12. Calculating cellulose diffraction patterns

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although powder diffraction of cellulose is a common experiment, the patterns are not widely understood. The theory is mathematical, there are numerous different crystal forms, and the conventions are not standardized. Experience with IR spectroscopy is not directly transferable. An awful error, tha...

  13. Evolution of titania nanotubes-supported WO{sub x} species by in situ thermo-Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and high resolution transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cortes-Jacome, M.A.; Angeles-Chavez, C.; Morales, M.; Lopez-Salinas, E.; Toledo-Antonio, J.A.

    2007-10-15

    Structural evolution of WO{sub x} species on the surface of titania nanotubes was followed by in situ thermo-Raman spectroscopy. A total of 15 wt% of W atoms were loaded on the surface of a hydroxylated titania nanotubes by impregnation with ammonium metatungstate solution and then, the sample was thermally treated in a Linkam cell at different temperatures in nitrogen flow. The band characteristic of the W=O bond was observed at 962 cm{sup -1} in the dried sample, which vanished between 300 and 700 deg. C, and reappear again after annealing at 800 deg. C, along with a broad band centered at 935 cm{sup -1}, attributed to the v{sub 1} vibration of W=O in tetrahedral coordination. At 900 and 1000 deg. C, the broad band decomposed into four bands at 923, 934, 940 and 950 cm{sup -1}, corresponding to the symmetric and asymmetric vibration of W=O bonds in Na{sub 2}WO{sub 4} and Na{sub 2}W{sub 2}O{sub 7} phases as determined by X-ray diffraction and High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The structure of the nanotubular support was kept at temperatures below 450 deg. C, thereafter, it transformed into anatase being stabilized at temperatures as high as 900 deg. C. At 1000 deg. C, anatase phase partially converted into rutile. After annealing at 1000 deg. C, a core-shell model material was obtained, with a shell of ca. 5 nm thickness, composed of sodium tungstate nanoclusters, and a core composed mainly of rutile TiO{sub 2} phase. - Graphical abstract: Titania nanotubes loaded with 15 wt% W atoms were characterized from room temperature (rt) to 1000 deg. C by thermo-Raman spectroscopy in N{sub 2}. At 1000 deg. C, a core-shell model material was obtained, with a shell thickness of ca. 5 nm composed by nanoclusters of sodium tungstate, and a core composed mainly of rutile TiO{sub 2} phase.

  14. A pseudo-tetragonal tungsten bronze superstructure: a combined solution of the crystal structure of K6.4(Nb,Ta)(36.3)O94 with advanced transmission electron microscopy and neutron diffraction.

    PubMed

    Paria Sena, Robert; Babaryk, Artem A; Khainakov, Sergiy; Garcia-Granda, Santiago; Slobodyanik, Nikolay S; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Abakumov, Artem M; Hadermann, Joke

    2016-01-21

    The crystal structure of the K6.4Nb28.2Ta8.1O94 pseudo-tetragonal tungsten bronze-type oxide was determined using a combination of X-ray powder diffraction, neutron diffraction and transmission electron microscopy techniques, including electron diffraction, high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM), annular bright field STEM (ABF-STEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray compositional mapping (STEM-EDX). The compound crystallizes in the space group Pbam with unit cell parameters a = 37.468(9) Å, b = 12.493(3) Å, c = 3.95333(15) Å. The structure consists of corner sharing (Nb,Ta)O6 octahedra forming trigonal, tetragonal and pentagonal tunnels. All tetragonal tunnels are occupied by K(+) ions, while 1/3 of the pentagonal tunnels are preferentially occupied by Nb(5+)/Ta(5+) and 2/3 are occupied by K(+) in a regular pattern. A fractional substitution of K(+) in the pentagonal tunnels by Nb(5+)/Ta(5+) is suggested by the analysis of the HAADF-STEM images. In contrast to similar structures, such as K2Nb8O21, also parts of the trigonal tunnels are fractionally occupied by K(+) cations. PMID:26646168

  15. Multilayer dielectric diffraction gratings

    DOEpatents

    Perry, Michael D.; Britten, Jerald A.; Nguyen, Hoang T.; Boyd, Robert; Shore, Bruce W.

    1999-01-01

    The design and fabrication of dielectric grating structures with high diffraction efficiency used in reflection or transmission is described. By forming a multilayer structure of alternating index dielectric materials and placing a grating structure on top of the multilayer, a diffraction grating of adjustable efficiency, and variable optical bandwidth can be obtained. Diffraction efficiency into the first order in reflection varying between 1 and 98 percent has been achieved by controlling the design of the multilayer and the depth, shape, and material comprising the grooves of the grating structure. Methods for fabricating these gratings without the use of ion etching techniques are described.

  16. Multilayer dielectric diffraction gratings

    DOEpatents

    Perry, M.D.; Britten, J.A.; Nguyen, H.T.; Boyd, R.; Shore, B.W.

    1999-05-25

    The design and fabrication of dielectric grating structures with high diffraction efficiency used in reflection or transmission is described. By forming a multilayer structure of alternating index dielectric materials and placing a grating structure on top of the multilayer, a diffraction grating of adjustable efficiency, and variable optical bandwidth can be obtained. Diffraction efficiency into the first order in reflection varying between 1 and 98 percent has been achieved by controlling the design of the multilayer and the depth, shape, and material comprising the grooves of the grating structure. Methods for fabricating these gratings without the use of ion etching techniques are described. 7 figs.

  17. Preparation of Pt/Irx(IrO2)10 - x bifunctional oxygen catalyst for unitized regenerative fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Fan-Dong; Zhang, Sheng; Yin, Ge-Ping; Zhang, Na; Wang, Zhen-Bo; Du, Chun-Yu

    2012-07-01

    Bifunctional Pt/Irx(IrO2)10 - x (x < 10) catalyst for unitized regenerative fuel cell (URFC) has been prepared by depositing Pt on Irx(IrO2)10 - x support which is obtained initially from Adams fusion method. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy show that ultrafine and narrow distributed Pt/Ir3(IrO2)7 nanocomposites are formed. Electrochemical measurements demonstrate that among the series of catalysts studied, Pt/Ir3(IrO2)7 catalyst possesses the highest electrochemical surface area (24.74 m2 g-1) and the highest activity towards oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) (21.71 mA mg-1 at 0.85 V). Meanwhile, considerably high activity towards oxygen evolution reaction (OER) (42.35 mA mg-1 at 1.55 V) is also observed for Pt/Ir3(IrO2)7 catalyst. Kinetic analyses indicate that ORR on Pt/Ir3(IrO2)7 catalyst follows four-electron mechanism. This work opens a new way to fabricate efficient bifunctional oxygen catalyst for URFC.

  18. Phononic crystal diffraction gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moiseyenko, Rayisa P.; Herbison, Sarah; Declercq, Nico F.; Laude, Vincent

    2012-02-01

    When a phononic crystal is interrogated by an external source of acoustic waves, there is necessarily a phenomenon of diffraction occurring on the external enclosing surfaces. Indeed, these external surfaces are periodic and the resulting acoustic diffraction grating has a periodicity that depends on the orientation of the phononic crystal. This work presents a combined experimental and theoretical study on the diffraction of bulk ultrasonic waves on the external surfaces of a 2D phononic crystal that consists of a triangular lattice of steel rods in a water matrix. The results of transmission experiments are compared with theoretical band structures obtained with the finite-element method. Angular spectrograms (showing frequency as a function of angle) determined from diffraction experiments are then compared with finite-element simulations of diffraction occurring on the surfaces of the crystal. The experimental results show that the diffraction that occurs on its external surfaces is highly frequency-dependent and has a definite relation with the Bloch modes of the phononic crystal. In particular, a strong influence of the presence of bandgaps and deaf bands on the diffraction efficiency is found. This observation opens perspectives for the design of efficient phononic crystal diffraction gratings.

  19. Diffraction efficiencies of holographic laminar and blazed types gratings for use in a flat-field spectrograph in the 50-200 eV range for transmission electron microscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imazono, T.; Koike, M.; Kawachi, T.; Koeda, M.; Nagano, T.; Sasai, H.; Oue, Y.; Yonezawa, Z.; Kuramoto, S.; Sano, K.

    2011-09-01

    A versatile soft x-ray flat-field grating spectrograph to be installed to a conventional transmission electron microscope has been developed. A holographic spherical grating of a 1200-lines/mm effective groove density which places emphasis on the low energy region of 50-200 eV is designed by an aspheric wavefront recording system. Laminar and blazed types master (LM and BM) gratings and their respective replica (LR and BR) gratings are fabricated by holographic exposure and ion-beam etching methods. Absolute diffraction efficiencies in the 50-300 eV range at the angle of incidence of 86.0 degrees were measured using a synchrotron radiation. The first order diffraction efficiencies are 6.1-7.5% (or 12%) for LM (or BM) and 7.4-9.6% (or 13%) for LR (or BR) gratings at near 55 eV, and over 5% (or 8%) in the 50-200 eV range for LM and LR (or BM and BR) gratings. The replica gratings show the comparable first-order diffraction efficiencies with their respective laminar and blazed types of master gratings.

  20. Preparation and characterization of Ir/TiC catalyst for oxygen evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Lirong; Sui, Sheng; Zhai, Yuchun

    Nano-sized titanium carbide (TiC) was employed as the support material for an iridium (Ir) electrocatalyst in a proton exchange membrane water electrolyser (PEMWE). The Ir/TiC electrocatalyst for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) was prepared by chemical reduction and deposition with ultrasonic dispersion. The diameter of the Ir particles deposited on the TiC support is 10-40 nm. The Ir/TiC catalyst has a pore volume of 0.1425 cm 3 g -1, which is about two times as high as that of the corresponding unsupported Ir. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis indicate that the Ir particles are nearly uniformly deposited on the surface of the TiC and exhibit remarkably fine variable crystallites and crystal lattice defects, which enhance the density of active sites and greatly improves the catalytic activity of the Ir/TiC catalyst. Cyclic voltammograms (CVs) reveal that the peak current density at 1.5 V versus SCE on the Ir/TiC is about nine times of that for the unsupported Ir black catalyst and potentiostatic analysis shows that the charge passed by the Ir/TiC after 600 s at 1.3 V versus SCE is about 15 times of that for the unsupported Ir catalyst. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) shows that the electrochemical polarization impedance of the Ir/TiC catalyst is about 50 Ω cm 2 per 0.02 mg as compared to 150 Ω cm 2 of the Ir black in the range of high frequency. The diffusion polarization impedances of the Ir/TiC form a semicircle and those of the Ir black are close to a straight line with a phase angle of 45° in the range of low frequency. Thus, the catalytic activity of the Ir/TiC for the OER is significantly higher than that of the unsupported Ir catalyst. The TiC support is chemically and electrochemically stable in the whole range of experimental potentials.

  1. Ionic strength and composition govern the elasticity of biological membranes. A study of model DMPC bilayers by force- and transmission IR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Šegota, Suzana; Vojta, Danijela; Pletikapić, Galja; Baranović, Goran

    2015-02-01

    Infrared (IR) spectroscopy was used to quantify the ion mixture effect of seawater (SW), particularly the contribution of Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) as dominant divalent cations, on the thermotropic phase behaviour of 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-posphocholine (DMPC) bilayers. The changed character of the main transition at 24 °C from sharp to gradual in films and the 1 °C shift of the main transition temperature in dispersions reflect the interactions of lipid headgroups with the ions in SW. Force spectroscopy was used to quantify the nanomechanical hardness of a DMPC supported lipid bilayer (SLB). Considering the electrostatic and ion binding equilibrium contributions while systematically probing the SLB in various salt solutions, we showed that ionic strength had a decisive influence on its nanomechanics. The mechanical hardness of DMPC SLBs in the liquid crystalline phase linearly increases with the increasing fraction of all ion-bound lipids in a series of monovalent salt solutions. It also linearly increases in the gel phase but almost three times faster (the corresponding slopes are 4.9 nN/100 mM and 13.32 nN/100 mM, respectively). We also showed that in the presence of divalent ions (Ca(2+) and Mg(2+)) the bilayer mechanical hardness was unproportionally increased, and that was accompanied with the decrease of Na(+) ion and increase of Cl(-) ion bound lipids. The underlying process is a cooperative and competitive ion binding in both the gel and the liquid crystalline phase. Bilayer hardness thus turned out to be very sensitive to ionic strength as well as to ionic composition of the surrounding medium. In particular, the indicated correlation helped us to emphasize the colligative properties of SW as a naturally occurring complex ion mixture. PMID:25447291

  2. Stoichiometry of alloy nanoparticles from laser ablation of PtIr in acetone and their electrophoretic deposition on PtIr electrodes.

    PubMed

    Jakobi, Jurij; Menéndez-Manjón, Ana; Chakravadhanula, Venkata Sai Kiran; Kienle, Lorenz; Wagener, Philipp; Barcikowski, Stephan

    2011-04-01

    Charged Pt-Ir alloy nanoparticles are generated through femtosecond laser ablation of a Pt₉Ir target in acetone without using chemical precursors or stabilizing agents. Preservation of the target's stoichiometry in the colloidal nanoparticles is confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM)-energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX), high angle annular dark field (HAADF) scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM)-EDX elemental maps, high resolution TEM and selected area electron diffraction (SAED) measurements. Results are discussed with reference to thermophysical properties and the phase diagram. The nanoparticles show a lognormal size distribution with a mean Feret particle size of 26 nm. The zeta potential of -45 mV indicates high stability of the colloid with a hydrodynamic diameter of 63 nm. The charge of the particles enables electrophoretic deposition of nanoparticles, creating nanoscale roughness on three-dimensional PtIr neural electrodes within a minute. In contrast to coating with Pt or Ir oxides, this method allows modification of the surface roughness without changing the chemical composition of PtIr. PMID:21346297

  3. Effect of temperature on electrical and microstructural changes of coevaporated Ir-Si alloy films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, B. Z.; Tu, K. N.; Smith, D. A.

    1986-01-01

    Electrical and microstructural changes of coevaporated Ir(50)Si(50) have been studied as a function of temperature, from room temperature to 970 C. In situ resistivity measurements, in situ annealing and transmission electron microscopy, Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, and Seeman-Bohlin glancing angle incidence X-ray diffraction were applied. In the as-deposited state, the alloy film is amorphous and exhibits semiconducting behavior. A two-stage phase transformation occurs in the process of heating. The first transition from amorphous to crystalline IrSi is nucleation-controlled. It is accompanied by an abrupt decrease in resistivity and was found to be dependent on the heating rate and chemical composition. The second crystalline-to-crystalline transformation is controlled by nonstoichiometry of the alloy film. An excess of Ir atoms leads to formation of Ir2Si at about 640 C, while an excess of Si atoms leads to formation of IrSi3 at about 710 C. The second transition is independent of the heating rate. The formation of both Ir2Si and IrSi3 decreases the electrical resistivity. The isothermal transformation from amorphous to crystalline structure follows a sigmoidal function. The apparent activation energy of this process is about 1.32 eV. The kinetic behavior implies random nucleation and interface-controlled two-dimensional growth of the crystalline phase.

  4. IRS organigram

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messerschmid, Ernst

    1991-01-01

    Charts and graphs relative to magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thruster technology are given. The research activities at the Institute of Space Transportation, University of Stuttgart, are summarized. Information is given on the Institute's Electric Propulsion and Plasma Wind Tunnel; thermal arcjet research; the nozzle-type thruster, DT-IRS; nozzle-type MPD thrusters; a hot anode thruster; the DT6 thruster; the ZT-1 thruster; the cylindrical MPD thruster; and a comparison of continuous and quasi-steady MPD.

  5. Diffractive centrosymmetric 3D-transmission phase gratings positioned at the image plane of optical systems transform lightlike 4D-WORLD as tunable resonators into spectral metrics...

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauinger, Norbert

    1999-08-01

    Diffractive 3D phase gratings of spherical scatterers dense in hexagonal packing geometry represent adaptively tunable 4D-spatiotemporal filters with trichromatic resonance in visible spectrum. They are described in the (lambda) - chromatic and the reciprocal (nu) -aspects by reciprocal geometric translations of the lightlike Pythagoras theorem, and by the direction cosine for double cones. The most elementary resonance condition in the lightlike Pythagoras theorem is given by the transformation of the grating constants gx, gy, gz of the hexagonal 3D grating to (lambda) h1h2h3 equals (lambda) 111 with cos (alpha) equals 0.5. Through normalization of the chromaticity in the von Laue-interferences to (lambda) 111, the (nu) (lambda) equals (lambda) h1h2h3/(lambda) 111-factor of phase velocity becomes the crucial resonance factor, the 'regulating device' of the spatiotemporal interaction between 3D grating and light, space and time. In the reciprocal space equal/unequal weights and times in spectral metrics result at positions of interference maxima defined by hyperbolas and circles. A database becomes built up by optical interference for trichromatic image preprocessing, motion detection in vector space, multiple range data analysis, patchwide multiple correlations in the spatial frequency spectrum, etc.

  6. In search of the elusive IrB2: Can mechanochemistry help?

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Zhilin; Blair, Richard G.; Orlovskaya, Nina; Cullen, David A.; Lapidus, Saul H.; Kata, Dariusz; Rutkowski, Paweł; Lis, Jerzy

    2015-10-20

    We produced hexagonal ReB2-type IrB2 diboride and orthorhombic IrB monoboride phases, that were previously unknown and saw them produced by mechanochemical syntheses. High energy ball milling of elemental Ir and B powder for 30 h, followed by annealing of the powder at 1050 °C for 48 h, resulted in the formation of the desired phases. Both traditional laboratory and high resolution synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses were used for phase identification of the synthesized powder. Additionally, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were employed, along with XRD, to further characterize the microstructure of the phases produced.

  7. IR Asterisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riess, Adam

    2010-09-01

    Observing asterisms for photometric calibration provides a "happy medium" between observing single stars which areobservable from the ground but lack statistics, and star clusters which have excellent statistics but are too crowded to observe from the ground.Asterisms in the IR for calibration have been less available than in the optical, e.g., Landolt's standard fields.While ad-hoc asterisms for calibration could be formed from 2MASS calibration, the photometric precision of 2MASSis relatively low, 0.02-0.05, for the fainter stars, m=9-13, that can still be observed without saturation in WFC3-IR.However, IR monitoring of variable phenomena {e.g., AGN SNe, stellar variables} from the ground has produced calibration of stars in asterisms with m=9-13 with a relative uncertainty of 0.001 to 0.01 mag due to the high frequency of monitoring. We have selected 4 such asterisms to observe. Because the stars are bright we need to use subarrays of 64x64 or 128x128 to get read out short enough to avoid saturation. The observations are obtained in pairs of 3 close stars, i.e., 2x3=6 stars per orbit in F125W and F160W as well as a F555W full frame to verify astrometry. In all we expect to measure 24 stars with m=9 to 14. The goal is to provide 2 calibrations, an independent zeropoint and its uncertainty as well as a measure of count rate non linearity. For the latter, an expected CRNL over 2 dex {5 mag} is expected tobe 0.02 mag.

  8. Metastable honeycomb SrTiO3/SrIrO3 heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, T. J.; Ryu, S.; Zhou, H.; Xie, L.; Podkaminer, J. P.; Ma, Y.; Irwin, J.; Pan, X. Q.; Rzchowski, M. S.; Eom, C. B.

    2016-04-01

    Recent theory predictions of exotic band topologies in (111) honeycomb perovskite SrIrO3 layers sandwiched between SrTiO3 have garnered much attention in the condensed matter physics and materials communities. However, perovskite SrIrO3 film growth in the (111) direction remains unreported, as efforts to synthesize pure SrIrO3 on (111) perovskite substrates have yielded films with monoclinic symmetry rather than the perovskite structure required by theory predictions. In this study, we report the synthesis of ultra-thin metastable perovskite SrIrO3 films capped with SrTiO3 grown on (111) SrTiO3 substrates by pulsed laser deposition. The atomic structure of the ultra-thin films was examined with scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), which suggests a perovskite layering distinct from the bulk SrIrO3 monoclinic phase. In-plane 3-fold symmetry for the entire heterostructure was confirmed using synchrotron surface X-ray diffraction to measure symmetry equivalent crystal truncation rods. Our findings demonstrate the ability to stabilize (111) honeycomb perovskite SrIrO3, which provides an experimental avenue to probe the phenomena predicted for this material system.

  9. Growth and characterization of V-shaped IrO(2) nanowedges via metal-organic vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Chen, C A; Chen, Y M; Huang, Y S; Tsai, D S; Tiong, K K; Du, C H

    2008-11-19

    We report in detail the synthesis and characterization of V-shaped IrO(2) nanowedges (NWs) with an angle of 110° between the two arms. The NWs were grown on top of rutile (R) phase TiO(2) nanorods (NRs) sitting on a sapphire (SA)(100) substrate via metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) by using (C(6)H(7))(C(8)H(12))Ir and titanium-tetraisopropoxide (TTIP, Ti[OCH(CH(3))(2)](4)) as the source reagents. The surface morphology, structural, and spectroscopic properties of the as-deposited nanocrystals (NCs) were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD), micro-Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and selected-area electron diffractometry (SAED). The FESEM images and XRD patterns indicated growth of V-shaped IrO(2)(101) NWs on top of R-TiO(2) NRs. The Raman spectrum showed the nanosize induced redshift and peak broadening of the IrO(2) and rutile phase of TiO(2) signatures with respect to that of the bulk counterparts. TEM and SAED characterizations of IrO(2) NCs showed that the nanowedges were crystalline IrO(2) with a twin plane of (101) and twin direction of [Formula: see text] at the V-junction. The probable mechanisms for the formation of well-aligned IrO(2) NWs are discussed. PMID:21836254

  10. Growth and characterization of V-shaped IrO2 nanowedges via metal-organic vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. A.; Chen, Y. M.; Huang, Y. S.; Tsai, D. S.; Tiong, K. K.; Du, C. H.

    2008-11-01

    We report in detail the synthesis and characterization of V-shaped IrO2 nanowedges (NWs) with an angle of 110° between the two arms. The NWs were grown on top of rutile (R) phase TiO2 nanorods (NRs) sitting on a sapphire (SA)(100) substrate via metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) by using (C6H7)(C8H12)Ir and titanium-tetraisopropoxide (TTIP, Ti[OCH(CH3)2]4) as the source reagents. The surface morphology, structural, and spectroscopic properties of the as-deposited nanocrystals (NCs) were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD), micro-Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and selected-area electron diffractometry (SAED). The FESEM images and XRD patterns indicated growth of V-shaped IrO2(101) NWs on top of R-TiO2 NRs. The Raman spectrum showed the nanosize induced redshift and peak broadening of the IrO2 and rutile phase of TiO2 signatures with respect to that of the bulk counterparts. TEM and SAED characterizations of IrO2 NCs showed that the nanowedges were crystalline IrO2 with a twin plane of (101) and twin direction of [\\bar {1} 01] at the V-junction. The probable mechanisms for the formation of well-aligned IrO2 NWs are discussed.

  11. Detonation diffraction through different geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorin, Rémy; Zitoun, Ratiba; Khasainov, Boris; Desbordes, Daniel

    2009-04-01

    We performed the study of the diffraction of a self-sustained detonation from a cylindrical tube (of inner diameter d) through different geometric configurations in order to characterise the transmission processes and to quantify the transmission criteria to the reception chamber. For the diffraction from a tube to the open space the transmission criteria is expressed by d c = k c · λ (with λ the detonation cell size and k c depending on the mixture and on the operture configuration, classically 13 for alkane mixtures with oxygen). The studied geometries are: (a) a sharp increase of diameter ( D/ d > 1) with and without a central obstacle in the diffracting section, (b) a conical divergent with a central obstacle in the diffracting section and (c) an inversed intermediate one end closed tube insuring a double reflection before a final diffraction between the initiator tube and the reception chamber. The results for case A show that the reinitiation process depends on the ratio d/ λ. For ratios below k c the re-ignition takes place at the receptor tube wall and at a fixed distance from the step, i.e. closely after the diffracted shock reflection shows a Mach stem configuration. For ratios below a limit ratio k lim (which depends on D/ d) the re-ignition distance increases with the decrease of d/λ. For both case A and B the introduction of a central obstacle (of blockage ratio BR = 0.5) at the exit of the initiator tube decreases the critical transmission ratio k c by 50%. The results in configuration C show that the re-ignition process depends both on d/ λ and the geometric conditions. Optimal configuration is found that provides the transmission through the two successive reflections (from d = 26 mm to D ch = 200 mm) at as small d/ λ as 2.2 whatever the intermediate diameter D is. This configuration provides a significant improvement in the detonation transmission conditions.

  12. Magnetic ordering in Gd5Ir2Bi and Gd5Ir2Sb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, D. H.; Mas, Nadejda; Rejali, Rasa; Miller, T.; Gerke, Birgit; Heying, Birgit; Pöttgen, Rainer; Flacau, Roxana

    2016-05-01

    155Gd Mössbauer spectroscopy and neutron powder diffraction have been used to study magnetic ordering in Gd5Ir2Bi and Gd5Ir2Sb. Despite the hyperfine fields (Bhf) at the two Gd sites differing by more than a factor of two for both compounds, the moments derived from neutron diffraction are essentially equal in Gd5Ir2Bi. This implies an unusual departure from the commonly assumed scaling between B hf G d and μGd. Neutron powder diffraction shows that Gd5Ir2Bi is a c-axis ferromagnet at 3.6 K. We find no evidence for a FM → AF transition.

  13. IR Windstreaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Windstreaks are features caused by the interaction of wind and topographic landforms. The raised rims and bowls of impact craters causes a complex interaction such that the wind vortex in the lee of the crater can both scour away the surface dust and deposit it back in the center of the lee. If you look closely, you will see evidence of this in a darker 'rim' enclosing a brighter interior.

    This infrared image shows windstreaks in the region between Gordii Dorsum and Amazonis Mensa.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude -15.8, Longitude 215 East (145 West). 97 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  14. Electron diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy of the high temperature crystal structures of GexSb2Te3+x (x=1,2,3) phase change material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kooi, B. J.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.

    2002-10-01

    The crystal structures of GeSb2Te4, Ge2Sb2Te5, and Ge3Sb2Te6 were determined using electron diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The structure determined for the former two crystals deviates from the ones proposed in the literature. These crystal structures were developed jointly upon cooling of liquid Ge2Sb2Te5. A stacking disorder parallel to the basal plane was observed that increases with increasing cooling rates. For the GexSb2Te3+x (x=1,2,3) crystals it is shown that an a,b,c stacking holds with an alternating stacking of x GeTe double layers identically present in binary GeTe and one Te-Sb-Te-Te-Sb- repeat unit also present in binary Sb2Te3. A stacking disorder is a logical consequence of building crystals with these two principal units. On the other hand, it is likely that all stable crystals of the Ge-Sb-Te systems are an ordered sequence of these two units. Some of the implications of these findings of the stable and metastable crystal structures that develop from amorphous Ge2Sb2Te5 are presented so as to understand the crucial crystallization process in Ge2Sb2Te5 phase change material.

  15. Two-dimensional X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy study on the effect of magnetron sputtering atmosphere on GaN/SiC interface and gallium nitride thin film crystal structure

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Huaxiang; Zhu, Guo-Zhen; Botton, Gianluigi A.; Kitai, Adrian

    2015-03-21

    The growth mechanisms of high quality GaN thin films on 6H-SiC by sputtering were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). The XRD θ-2θ scans show that high quality (0002) oriented GaN was deposited on 6H-SiC by reactive magnetron sputtering. Pole figures obtained by 2D-XRD clarify that GaN thin films are dominated by (0002) oriented wurtzite GaN and (111) oriented zinc-blende GaN. A thin amorphous silicon oxide layer on SiC surfaces observed by STEM plays a critical role in terms of the orientation information transfer from the substrate to the GaN epilayer. The addition of H{sub 2} into Ar and/or N{sub 2} during sputtering can reduce the thickness of the amorphous layer. Moreover, adding 5% H{sub 2} into Ar can facilitate a phase transformation from amorphous to crystalline in the silicon oxide layer and eliminate the unwanted (33{sup ¯}02) orientation in the GaN thin film. Fiber texture GaN thin films can be grown by adding 10% H{sub 2} into N{sub 2} due to the complex reaction between H{sub 2} and N{sub 2}.

  16. Mid-IR laser source using hollow waveguide beam combining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elder, Ian F.; Thorne, Daniel H.; Lamb, Robert A.; Jenkins, R. M.

    2016-03-01

    Hollow waveguide technology is a route to efficient beam combining of multiple laser sources in a compact footprint. It is a technology appropriate for combining free-space or fibre-coupled beams generated by semiconductor, fibre or solidstate laser sources. This paper will present results of a breadboard mid-IR system comprising four laser sources combined using a hollow waveguide optical circuit. In this approach the individual dichroic beam combiner components are held in precision alignment slots in the hollow waveguide circuit and the different input wavelengths are guided between the components to a common output port. The hollow waveguide circuit is formed in the surface of a Macor (machinable glass-ceramic) substrate using precision CNC machining techniques. The hollow waveguides have fundamentally different propagation characteristics to solid core waveguides leading to transmission characteristics close to those of the atmosphere while still providing useful light guidance properties. The transmission efficiency and power handling of the hollow waveguide circuit can be designed to be very high across a broad waveband range. Three of the sources are quantum cascade lasers (QCLs), a semiconductor laser technology providing direct generation of midwave IR output. The combined beams provide 4.2 W of near diffraction-limited output co-boresighted to better than 20 µrad. High coupling efficiency into the waveguides is demonstrated, with negligible waveguide transmission losses. The overall transmission of the hollow waveguide beam combining optical circuit, weighted by the laser power at each wavelength, is 93%. This loss is dominated by the performance of the dichroic optics used to combine the beams.

  17. Structure and catalytic properties of Pt Ir catalysts as a function of different substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zecua-Fernández, A.; Gómez-Cortés, A.; Cordero-Borboa, A. E.; Vázquez-Zavala, A.

    2001-10-01

    A series of Pt-Ir catalysts prepared by the impregnation method in three different supports and different atomic concentrations were characterized by conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution electron microscopy (HREM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and n-hexane contact reaction as a catalytic probe. The reaction products were grouped in linear (hydrogenolysis products), isomers (2- and 3-methilpentane), cyclic (cyclohexane) and aromatic (benzene) hydrocarbons. An increment in hydrogenolysis products was observed as the amount of Ir was increased. This observation was extreme when Al 2O 3 and SiO 2 were used as supports, but it was not so for the case of TiO 2. From TEM results, it was concluded that the metallic particle size is a function of Ir content. From X-ray diffraction analysis, it was found that a unique crystalline phase containing atoms of Pt and Ir precipitates into the specimens under study. This phase was found to have a face-centered cubic structure and a lattice parameter whose value changes as long as the relative amounts of Pt and Ir does. A linear relationship was observed to hold between the lattice parameter of the precipitated phase and the relative concentration of Pt for specimens with metallic weights of 4 and 8% in a SiO 2 support. This result may be taken as a direct experimental evidence of the fact that the crystalline structure of the phase-centered cubic phase found to precipitate in amorphous silica obeys the Vegard's law and therefore, the character of a solid solution Pt( x) Ir(1- x), where x is the Pt molar fraction, can be assigned to the structural nature of this phase. This new phase and the changes recorded in particle size could explain the changes in selectivity and catalytic activity observed in the n-hexane contact reaction.

  18. Exchange enhancement and thermal anneal in Mn76Ir24 bottom-pinned spin valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Haohua; Freitas, P. P.; Wang, Zhenjun; Sousa, J. B.; Gogol, P.; Chapman, J.

    2001-06-01

    Exchange enhancement through thermal anneal in bottom-pinned Mn76Ir24 spin valves is investigated. Samples were fabricated by ion beam deposition (IBD), post-annealed in vacuum (10-6 Torr) at 270 °C for 10 min, then cooled in a 3 kOe applied field. For a bilayer structure, glass/Ta 40 Å/NiFe 30 Å/MnIr 60 Å/CoFe 25 Å/Ta 40 Å, the exchange field (Hex) reaches 1148 Oe (Jex=0.4 erg/cm2) after anneal. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis shows strong enhancement of <111> texture upon anneal, while grain size obtained from XRD and transmission electron microscopy for as-deposited and annealed states shows no major change. With increasing MnIr thickness, the exchange field decreases, and blocking temperature (Tb) increases, reaching 295 °C for tMnIr=180 Å. Spin valves built with the same exchange bilayer (Ta 20 Å/NiFe 30 Å/MnIr 60 Å/CoFe 25 Å/Cu 22 Å/CoFe 20 Å/NiFe 40 Å/Ta 40 Å) show Hex=855 Oe (Jex=0.3 erg/cm2) and magnetoresistance (MR)=7.1%. The incorporation of nano-oxide layers in spin valves increases the MR signal to 11%. No signal degradation is found in these specular structures for anneals up to 310 °C.

  19. Keyhole electron diffractive imaging (KEDI).

    PubMed

    De Caro, Liberato; Carlino, Elvio; Vittoria, Fabio Alessio; Siliqi, Dritan; Giannini, Cinzia

    2012-11-01

    Electron diffractive imaging (EDI) relies on combining information from the high-resolution transmission electron microscopy image of an isolated kinematically diffracting nano-particle with the corresponding nano-electron diffraction pattern. Phase-retrieval algorithms allow one to derive the phase, lost in the acquisition of the diffraction pattern, to visualize the actual atomic projected potential within the specimen at sub-ångström resolution, overcoming limitations due to the electron lens aberrations. Here the approach is generalized to study extended crystalline specimens. The new technique has been called keyhole electron diffractive imaging (KEDI) because it aims to investigate nano-regions of extended specimens at sub-ångström resolution by properly confining the illuminated area. Some basic issues of retrieving phase information from the EDI/KEDI measured diffracted amplitudes are discussed. By using the generalized Shannon sampling theorem it is shown that whenever suitable oversampling conditions are satisfied, EDI/KEDI diffraction patterns can contain enough information to lead to reliable phase retrieval of the unknown specimen electrostatic potential. Hence, the KEDI method has been demonstrated by simulations and experiments performed on an Si crystal cross section in the [112] zone-axis orientation, achieving a resolution of 71 pm. PMID:23075611

  20. Individual speckle diffraction based 1D and 2D Random Grating Fabrication for detector and solar energy harvesting applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bingi, Jayachandra; Murukeshan, Vadakke Matham

    2016-02-01

    Laser speckles and speckle patterns, which are formed by the random interference of scattered waves from optically rough surfaces, have found tremendous applications in a wide range of metrological and biomedical fields. Here, we demonstrate a novel edge diffraction phenomenon of individual speckle for the fabrication of 1D and 2D micron and sub-micron size random gratings. These random gratings exhibit broadband response with interesting diffusive diffraction patterns. As an immediate application for solar energy harvesting, significant reduction in transmission and enhanced absorption in thin “Si-random grating-Si” sandwich structure is demonstrated. This work has multifaceted significance where we exploited the individual speckle diffraction properties for the first time. Besides the solar harvesting applications, random gratings are suitable structures for fabrication of theoretically proposed random quantum well IR detectors and hence expected that this work will augur well for such studies in the near future.

  1. Individual speckle diffraction based 1D and 2D Random Grating Fabrication for detector and solar energy harvesting applications

    PubMed Central

    Bingi, Jayachandra; Murukeshan, Vadakke Matham

    2016-01-01

    Laser speckles and speckle patterns, which are formed by the random interference of scattered waves from optically rough surfaces, have found tremendous applications in a wide range of metrological and biomedical fields. Here, we demonstrate a novel edge diffraction phenomenon of individual speckle for the fabrication of 1D and 2D micron and sub-micron size random gratings. These random gratings exhibit broadband response with interesting diffusive diffraction patterns. As an immediate application for solar energy harvesting, significant reduction in transmission and enhanced absorption in thin “Si-random grating-Si” sandwich structure is demonstrated. This work has multifaceted significance where we exploited the individual speckle diffraction properties for the first time. Besides the solar harvesting applications, random gratings are suitable structures for fabrication of theoretically proposed random quantum well IR detectors and hence expected that this work will augur well for such studies in the near future. PMID:26842242

  2. Individual speckle diffraction based 1D and 2D Random Grating Fabrication for detector and solar energy harvesting applications.

    PubMed

    Bingi, Jayachandra; Murukeshan, Vadakke Matham

    2016-01-01

    Laser speckles and speckle patterns, which are formed by the random interference of scattered waves from optically rough surfaces, have found tremendous applications in a wide range of metrological and biomedical fields. Here, we demonstrate a novel edge diffraction phenomenon of individual speckle for the fabrication of 1D and 2D micron and sub-micron size random gratings. These random gratings exhibit broadband response with interesting diffusive diffraction patterns. As an immediate application for solar energy harvesting, significant reduction in transmission and enhanced absorption in thin "Si-random grating-Si" sandwich structure is demonstrated. This work has multifaceted significance where we exploited the individual speckle diffraction properties for the first time. Besides the solar harvesting applications, random gratings are suitable structures for fabrication of theoretically proposed random quantum well IR detectors and hence expected that this work will augur well for such studies in the near future. PMID:26842242

  3. Enhanced monolithic diffraction gratings with high efficiency and reduced polarization sensitivity for remote sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triebel, Peter; Diehl, Torsten; Moeller, Tobias; Gatto, Alexandre; Pesch, Alexander; Erdmann, Lars H.; Burkhardt, Matthias; Kalies, Alexander

    2015-10-01

    Spectral imaging systems lead to enhanced sensing properties when the sensing system provides sufficient spectral resolution to identify materials from its spectral reflectance signature. The performance of diffraction gratings provides an initial way to improve instrumental resolution. Thus, subsequent manufacturing techniques of high quality gratings are essential to significantly improve the spectral performance. The ZEISS unique technology of manufacturing real-blazed profiles and as well as lamellar profiles comprising transparent substrates is well suited for the production of transmission gratings. In order to reduce high order aberrations, aspherical and free-form surfaces can be alternatively processed to allow more degrees of freedom in the optical design of spectroscopic instruments with less optical elements and therefore size and weight advantages. Prism substrates were used to manufacture monolithic GRISM elements for UV to IR spectral range. Many years of expertise in the research and development of optical coatings enable high transmission anti-reflection coatings from the DUV to the NIR. ZEISS has developed specially adapted coating processes (Ion beam sputtering, ion-assisted deposition and so on) for maintaining the micro-structure of blazed gratings in particular. Besides of transmission gratings, numerous spectrometer setups (e.g. Offner, Rowland circle, Czerny-Turner system layout) working on the optical design principles of reflection gratings. This technology steps can be applied to manufacture high quality reflection gratings from the EUV to the IR applications with an outstanding level of low stray light and ghost diffraction order by employing a combination of holography and reactive ion beam etching together with the in-house coating capabilities. We report on results of transmission gratings on plane and curved substrates and GRISM elements with enhanced efficiency of the grating itself combined with low scattered light in the angular

  4. The Origin of Capacity Fade in the Li2MnO3·LiMO2 (M = Li, Ni, Co, Mn) Microsphere Positive Electrode: An Operando Neutron Diffraction and Transmission X-ray Microscopy Study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Jung; Pang, Wei Kong; Mori, Tatsuhiro; Peterson, Vanessa K; Sharma, Neeraj; Lee, Po-Han; Wu, She-Huang; Wang, Chun-Chieh; Song, Yen-Fang; Liu, Ru-Shi

    2016-07-20

    The mechanism of capacity fade of the Li2MnO3·LiMO2 (M = Li, Ni, Co, Mn) composite positive electrode within a full cell was investigated using a combination of operando neutron powder diffraction and transmission X-ray microscopy methods, enabling the phase, crystallographic, and morphological evolution of the material during electrochemical cycling to be understood. The electrode was shown to initially consist of 73(1) wt % R3̅m LiMO2 with the remaining 27(1) wt % C2/m Li2MnO3 likely existing as an intergrowth. Cracking in the Li2MnO3·LiMO2 electrode particle under operando microscopy observation was revealed to be initiated by the solid-solution reaction of the LiMO2 phase on charge to 4.55 V vs Li(+)/Li and intensified during further charge to 4.7 V vs Li(+)/Li during the concurrent two-phase reaction of the LiMO2 phase, involving the largest lattice change of any phase, and oxygen evolution from the Li2MnO3 phase. Notably, significant healing of the generated cracks in the Li2MnO3·LiMO2 electrode particle occurred during subsequent lithiation on discharge, with this rehealing being principally associated with the solid-solution reaction of the LiMO2 phase. This work reveals that while it is the reduction of lattice size of electrode phases during charge that results in cracking of the Li2MnO3·LiMO2 electrode particle, with the extent of cracking correlated to the magnitude of the size change, crack healing is possible in the reverse solid-solution reaction occurring during discharge. Importantly, it is the phase separation during the two-phase reaction of the LiMO2 phase that prevents the complete healing of the electrode particle, leading to pulverization over extended cycling. This work points to the minimization of behavior leading to phase separation, such as two-phase and oxygen evolution, as a key strategy in preventing capacity fade of the electrode. PMID:27314640

  5. Diffraction encoded position measuring apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Tansey, Richard J.

    1991-01-01

    When a lightwave passes through a transmission grating, diffracted beams appear at the output or opposite side of the grating that are effectively Doppler shifted in frequency (phase) whereby a detector system can compare the phase of the zero order and higher order beams to obtain an indication of position. Multiple passes through the grating increase resolution for a given wavelength of a laser signal. The resolution can be improved further by using a smaller wavelength laser to generate the grating itself. Since the grating must only have a pitch sufficient to produce diffracted orders, inexpensive, ultraviolet wavelength lasers can be utilized and still obtain high resolution detection.

  6. Diffraction encoded position measuring apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Tansey, R.J.

    1991-09-24

    When a lightwave passes through a transmission grating, diffracted beams appear at the output or opposite side of the grating that are effectively Doppler shifted in frequency (phase) whereby a detector system can compare the phase of the zero order and higher order beams to obtain an indication of position. Multiple passes through the grating increase resolution for a given wavelength of a laser signal. The resolution can be improved further by using a smaller wavelength laser to generate the grating itself. Since the grating must only have a pitch sufficient to produce diffracted orders, inexpensive, ultraviolet wavelength lasers can be utilized and still obtain high resolution detection. 3 figures.

  7. ALBERMARLE PAMLICO IR 2002

    EPA Science Inventory

    The 2002 Albermarle Pamlico Implementation Review (IR) highlights recent successes and challenges with the estuary program. Various components within the IR include: CCMP implementation, outlining priority management actions, public involvement, stakeholder contribution, and limi...

  8. IR laser-induced protein crystal transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Kiefersauer, Reiner Grandl, Brigitte; Krapp, Stephan; Huber, Robert

    2014-05-01

    A novel method and the associated instrumentation for improving crystalline order (higher resolution of X-ray diffraction and reduced mosaicity) of protein crystals by precisely controlled heating is demonstrated. Crystal transformation is optically controlled by a video system. A method and the design of instrumentation, and its preliminary practical realisation, including test experiments, with the object of inducing phase changes of biomolecular crystals by controlled dehydration through heating with infrared (IR) light are described. The aim is to generate and select crystalline phases through transformation in the solid state which have improved order (higher resolution in X-ray diffraction experiments) and reduced mosaic spread (more uniformly aligned mosaic blocks) for diffraction data collection and analysis. The crystal is heated by pulsed and/or constant IR laser irradiation. Loss of crystal water following heating and its reabsorption through equilibration with the environment is measured optically by a video system. Heating proved superior to traditional controlled dehydration by humidity change for the test cases CODH (carbon monoxide dehydrogenase) and CLK2 (a protein kinase). Heating with IR light is experimentally simple and offers an exploration of a much broader parameter space than the traditional method, as it allows the option of varying the rate of phase changes through modification of the IR pulse strength, width and repeat frequency. It impacts the crystal instantaneously, isotropically and homogeneously, and is therefore expected to cause less mechanical stress.

  9. Investigation of PdIr/C electrocatalysts as anode on the performance of direct ammonia fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assumpção, M. H. M. T.; da Silva, S. G.; De Souza, R. F. B.; Buzzo, G. S.; Spinacé, E. V.; Santos, M. C.; Neto, A. O.; Silva, J. C. M.

    2014-12-01

    This work investigates the ammonia electro-oxidation considering electrochemical and direct ammonia fuel cell (DAFC) experiments. The working electrodes/anodes are composed of Pd/C, PdIr/C (90:10, 70:30, 50:50, 30:70 and 10:90 atomic ratios) and Ir/C. Solutions of 1 mol L-1 NH4OH and 1 mol L-1 KOH were used for electrochemical experiments while 1.0, 3.0 and 5.0 mol L-1 NH4OH in 1.0 mol L-1 KOH were used in DAFC. X-ray diffraction analysis of PdIr/C electrocatalysts suggests the formation of PdIr alloy, while transmission electron micrographs show the average particle diameters between 4.6 and 6.2 nm. Electrochemical experiments indicate PdIr/C 30:70 as the best electrocatalyst in accordance with DAFC. The maximum power densities obtained with PdIr/C 30:70 as anode using 5 mol L-1 NH4OH and 1 mol L-1 KOH at 40 °C are 60% and 30% higher than the ones obtained with Pd/C and Ir/C electrocatalysts, respectively. The enhanced synergic effect in this specific composition may be assigned to an optimal ratio of palladium sites that dehydrogenates ammonia at lower overpotential with the lower surface coverage of Nads on iridium. Furthermore, electronic effect between palladium and iridium might also contribute to the decrease of poisoning on catalyst surface by Nads.

  10. IR laser-induced protein crystal transformation

    PubMed Central

    Kiefersauer, Reiner; Grandl, Brigitte; Krapp, Stephan; Huber, Robert

    2014-01-01

    A method and the design of instrumentation, and its preliminary practical realisation, including test experiments, with the object of inducing phase changes of biomolecular crystals by controlled dehydration through heating with infrared (IR) light are described. The aim is to generate and select crystalline phases through transformation in the solid state which have improved order (higher resolution in X-ray diffraction experiments) and reduced mosaic spread (more uniformly aligned mosaic blocks) for diffraction data collection and analysis. The crystal is heated by pulsed and/or constant IR laser irradiation. Loss of crystal water following heating and its reabsorption through equilibration with the environment is measured optically by a video system. Heating proved superior to traditional controlled dehydration by humidity change for the test cases CODH (carbon monoxide dehydrogenase) and CLK2 (a protein kinase). Heating with IR light is experimentally simple and offers an exploration of a much broader parameter space than the traditional method, as it allows the option of varying the rate of phase changes through modification of the IR pulse strength, width and repeat frequency. It impacts the crystal instantaneously, isotropically and homogeneously, and is therefore expected to cause less mechanical stress. PMID:24816092

  11. IOT Overview: IR Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, E.

    In this instrument review chapter the calibration plans of ESO IR instruments are presented and briefly reviewed focusing, in particular, on the case of ISAAC, which has been the first IR instrument at VLT and whose calibration plan served as prototype for the coming instruments.

  12. Diffraction by dual-period gratings.

    PubMed

    Skigin, Diana C; Depine, Ricardo A

    2007-03-20

    The dynamical characteristics of dual-period perfectly conducting gratings are explored. Gratings with several grooves (reflection) or slits (transmission) within each period are considered. A scalar approach is proposed to derive the general characteristics of the diffracted response. It was found that compound gratings can be designed to cancel as well as to intensify a given diffraction order. These preliminary estimations for finite gratings are validated by numerical examples for infinitely periodic reflection and transmission gratings with finite thickness, performed using an extension of the rigorous modal method to compound gratings, for both polarization cases. PMID:17334426

  13. IR Hot Wave

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, T. B.

    2010-04-01

    The IR Hot Wave{trademark} furnace is a breakthrough heat treatment system for manufacturing metal components. Near-infrared (IR) radiant energy combines with IR convective heating for heat treating. Heat treatment is an essential process in the manufacture of most components. The controlled heating and cooling of a metal or metal alloy alters its physical, mechanical, and sometimes chemical properties without changing the object's shape. The IR Hot Wave{trademark} furnace offers the simplest, quickest, most efficient, and cost-effective heat treatment option for metals and metal alloys. Compared with other heat treatment alternatives, the IR Hot Wave{trademark} system: (1) is 3 to 15 times faster; (2) is 2 to 3 times more energy efficient; (3) is 20% to 50% more cost-effective; (4) has a {+-}1 C thermal profile compared to a {+-}10 C thermal profile for conventional gas furnaces; and (5) has a 25% to 50% smaller footprint.

  14. Metagratings for Diffraction Based, Compact, Holographic Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inampudi, Sandeep; Podolskiy, Viktor; Multiscale Electromagnetics Group Team

    2013-03-01

    Recent developments in semiconductor technology brought to life a new generation of highly-compact visible-frequency cameras. Unfortunately, straight forward extension of this progress to low-frequency domains (such as mid-IR imaging) is impossible since the pixel size at these frequencies is limited by free-space diffraction limit. Here we present an approach to realize highly-compact imaging systems at lower frequencies. Our approach takes advantage of high refractive index of materials commonly utilized in semiconductor detectors of mid-IR radiation, accompanied by metagratings, structures with engineered diffraction properties, to achieve a 10-fold reduction in the pixel size. In contrast to conventional refraction-based imaging, the approach essentially produces a digital hologram - a 2D projection of the 3D optical field, enabling a post-imaging ``refocusing'' of the picture. The perspectives of numerical recovery of the optical field and the stability of such recovery are discussed.

  15. Atomic structure of Zr-Cu glassy alloys and detection of deviations from ideal solution behavior with Al addition by x-ray diffraction using synchrotron light in transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgarakis, K.; Yavari, A. R.; Louzguine-Luzgin, D. V.; Antonowicz, J.; Stoica, M.; Li, Y.; Satta, M.; LeMoulec, A.; Vaughan, G.; Inoue, A.

    2009-05-01

    The atomic structure of Zr-Cu binary amorphous alloys was studied using real space pair distribution functions derived from x-ray diffraction. The structure can be modeled by an ideal solution approximation because of relatively weak Cu-Zr atomic interactions. Addition of Al to Zr-Cu metallic glasses modifies the atomic structure in the short and medium range order because of the strongly attractive interaction between Al and Zr atoms. These interactions generate strong deviations from the ideal solution behavior.

  16. X-Ray Diffraction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, D. K.; Smith, K. L.

    1980-01-01

    Reviews applications in research and analytical characterization of compounds and materials in the field of X-ray diffraction, emphasizing new developments in applications and instrumentation in both single crystal and powder diffraction. Cites 414 references. (CS)

  17. Fabrication of (111)-oriented Ca0.5Sr0.5IrO3/SrTiO3 superlattices—A designed playground for honeycomb physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirai, Daigorou; Matsuno, Jobu; Takagi, Hidenori

    2015-04-01

    We report the fabrication of (111)-oriented superlattice structures with alternating 2m-layers (m = 1, 2, and 3) of Ca0.5Sr0.5IrO3 perovskite and two layers of SrTiO3 perovskite on SrTiO3(111) substrates. In the case of m = 1 bilayer films, the Ir sub-lattice is a buckled honeycomb, where a topological state may be anticipated. The successful growth of superlattice structures on an atomic level along the [111] direction was clearly demonstrated by superlattice reflections in x-ray diffraction patterns and by atomically resolved transmission electron microscope images. The ground states of the superlattice films were found to be magnetic insulators, which may suggest the importance of electron correlations in Ir perovskites in addition to the much discussed topological effects.

  18. Fabrication of (111)-oriented Ca{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}IrO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3} superlattices—A designed playground for honeycomb physics

    SciTech Connect

    Hirai, Daigorou; Matsuno, Jobu; Takagi, Hidenori

    2015-04-01

    We report the fabrication of (111)-oriented superlattice structures with alternating 2m-layers (m = 1, 2, and 3) of Ca{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}IrO{sub 3} perovskite and two layers of SrTiO{sub 3} perovskite on SrTiO{sub 3}(111) substrates. In the case of m = 1 bilayer films, the Ir sub-lattice is a buckled honeycomb, where a topological state may be anticipated. The successful growth of superlattice structures on an atomic level along the [111] direction was clearly demonstrated by superlattice reflections in x-ray diffraction patterns and by atomically resolved transmission electron microscope images. The ground states of the superlattice films were found to be magnetic insulators, which may suggest the importance of electron correlations in Ir perovskites in addition to the much discussed topological effects.

  19. Infrared Measurements of Possible IR Filter Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Koller,D.; Ediss, G.; Mihaly, L.; Carr, G.

    2006-01-01

    A Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (FTS) was used to obtain the transmission spectra of candidate materials for use as infrared (IR) filters in cryogenic receivers. The data cover the range from 50 cm-1 ({approx}1.5 THz), well below the peak of the 300 K black body spectrum, to 5000 cm-1 ({approx}150 THz), Z-cut quartz, Gore-Tex, Zitex G and Zitex A, High Density Polyethylene (HDPE), Teflon (PTFE), Fluorogold and Black Polyethylene were measured. The relative effectiveness of each material as a filter is determined by integrating the transmission spectrum multiplied by the Planck distribution to obtain a normalized attenuation for the mid-IR band. Measurements at both room temperature and 8 K are compared.

  20. CHARLOTTE HARBOR IR, 2002

    EPA Science Inventory

    The 2002 Charlotte Harbor Implementation Review (IR) summarizes the progress and challenges ahead for the Charlotte Harbor National Estuary Program (CHNEP). The implementation review report requires seven components: Status of CCMP implementation (programmatic progress); Environm...

  1. Far-field infrared super-resolution microscopy using picosecond time-resolved transient fluorescence detected IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Makoto; Kawashima, Yasutake; Takeda, Akihiro; Ohmori, Tsutomu; Fujii, Masaaki

    2007-05-01

    A new far-field infrared super-resolution microscopy combining laser fluorescence microscope and picosecond time-resolved transient fluorescence detected IR (TFD-IR) spectroscopy is proposed. TFD-IR spectroscopy is a kind of IR-visible/UV double resonance spectroscopy, and detects IR transitions by the transient fluorescence due to electronic transition originating from vibrationally excited level populated by IR light. IR images of rhodamine-6G solution and of fluorescent beads were clearly observed by monitoring the transient fluorescence. Super-resolution twice higher than the diffraction limit for IR light was achieved. The IR spectrum due to the transient fluorescence was also measured from spatial domains smaller than the diffraction limit.

  2. Magnetic symmetries in neutron and resonant x-ray Bragg diffraction patterns of four iridium oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovesey, S. W.; Khalyavin, D. D.; Manuel, P.; Chapon, L. C.; Cao, G.; Qi, T. F.

    2012-12-01

    The magnetic properties of Sr2IrO4, Na2IrO3, Sr3Ir2O7 and CaIrO3 are discussed, principally in the light of experimental data in recent literature for Bragg intensities measured in x-ray diffraction with enhancement at iridium L-absorption edges. The electronic structure factors we report, which incorporate parity-even and acentric entities, serve the immediate purpose of making full use of crystal and magnetic symmetry to refine our knowledge of the magnetic properties of the four iridates from resonant x-ray diffraction data. They also offer a platform on which to interpret future investigations, using dichroic signals, resonant x-ray diffraction and neutron diffraction, for example, as well as ab initio calculations of electronic structure. Unit-cell structure factors, suitable for x-ray Bragg diffraction enhanced by an electric dipole-electric dipole (E1-E1) event, reveal exactly which iridium multipoles are visible, e.g., a magnetic dipole parallel to the crystal c-axis (z-axis) and an electric quadrupole with yz-like symmetry in the specific case of CaIrO3. Magnetic space-groups are assigned to Sr2IrO4, Sr3Ir2O7 and CaIrO3, namely, PIcca, PAban and Cm‧cm‧, respectively, in the Belov-Neronova-Smirnova notation. The assignment for Sr2IrO4 is possible because of our new high-resolution neutron diffraction data, gathered on a powder sample. In addition, the new data are used to show that the ordered magnetic moment of an Ir4+ ion in Sr2IrO4 does not exceed 0.29(4) μB. Na2IrO3 has two candidate magnetic space-groups that are not resolved with currently available resonant x-ray data.

  3. Growth and termination of a rutile IrO2(100) layer on Ir(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Rahul; Li, Tao; Liang, Zhu; Kim, Minkyu; Asthagiri, Aravind; Weaver, Jason F.

    2016-10-01

    We investigated the oxidation of Ir(111) by gas-phase oxygen atoms at temperatures between 500 and 625 K using temperature programmed desorption (TPD), low energy electron diffraction (LEED), low energy ion scattering spectroscopy (LEISS) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. We find that a well-ordered surface oxide with (√ 3 × √ 3)R30° periodicity relative to Ir(111) develops prior to the formation of a rutile IrO2(100) layer. The IrO2(100) layer reaches a saturation thickness of about four oxide layers under the oxidation conditions employed, and decomposes during TPD to produce a single, sharp O2 desorption peak at ~ 770 K. Favorable lattice matching at the oxide-metal interface is likely responsible for the preferential growth of the IrO2(100) facet during the initial oxidation of Ir(111), with the resulting coincidence lattice generating a clear (6 × 1) moiré pattern in LEED. Temperature programmed reaction spectroscopy (TPRS) experiments reveal that CO and H2O molecules bind only weakly on the IrO2(100) surface and LEISS measurements show that the oxide surface is highly enriched in O-atoms. These characteristics provide strong evidence that the rutile IrO2(100) layer is oxygen-terminated, and thus lacks reactive Ir atoms that can strongly bind molecular adsorbates. Oxygen binding energies predicted by DFT suggest that on-top O-atoms will remain adsorbed on IrO2(100) at temperatures up to ~ 625 K, thus supporting the conclusion that the rutile IrO2 layer grown in our experiments is oxygen-terminated. As such, the appearance of only a single O2 TPD peak indicates that the singly coordinate, on-top O-atoms remain stable on the IrO2(100) surface up to temperatures at which the oxide layer begins to thermally decompose.

  4. Eyeglass. 1. Very large aperture diffractive telescopes.

    PubMed

    Hyde, R A

    1999-07-01

    The Eyeglass is a very large aperture (25-100-m) space telescope consisting of two distinct spacecraft, separated in space by several kilometers. A diffractive lens provides the telescope s large aperture, and a separate, much smaller, space telescope serves as its mobile eyepiece. Use of a transmissive diffractive lens solves two basic problems associated with very large aperture space telescopes; it is inherently launchable (lightweight, packagable, and deployable) it and virtually eliminates the traditional, very tight surface shape tolerances faced by reflecting apertures. The potential drawback to use of a diffractive primary (very narrow spectral bandwidth) is eliminated by corrective optics in the telescope s eyepiece; the Eyeglass can provide diffraction-limited imaging with either single-band (Deltalambda/lambda approximately 0.1), multiband, or continuous spectral coverage. PMID:18323902

  5. Harmonic diffractive lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, D.W.; Sommargren, G.E.

    1995-05-10

    The harmonic diffractive lens is a diffractive imaging lens for which the optical path-length transition between adjacent facets is an integer multiple {ital m} of the design wavelength {lambda}{sub 0}. The total lens thickness in air is {ital m}{lambda}{sub 0}/({ital n} {minus} 1), which is {ital m} times thicker than the so-called modulo 2{pi} diffractive lens. Lenses constructed in this way have hybrid properties of both refractive and diffractive lenses. Such a lens will have a diffraction-limited, common focus for a number of discrete wavelengths across the visible spectrum. A 34.75-diopter, 6-mm-diameter lens is diamond turned in aluminum and replicated in optical materials. The sag of the lens is 23 {mu}m. Modulation transfer function measurements in both monochromatic and white light verify the performance of the lens. The lens approaches the diffraction limit for 10 discrete wavelengths across the visible spectrum.

  6. Shingles Transmission

    MedlinePlus

    ... on Shingles Immunization Action Coalition Chickenpox Q&As Transmission Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... Prevention & Treatment Related Pages Preventing Varicella Zoster Virus Transmission in Healthcare Settings Related Links Medline Plus NIH ...

  7. BUZZARDS BAY IR, 2002

    EPA Science Inventory

    The 2002 Buzzards Bay Implementation Review (IR) summarizes the progress and challenges ahead for the Buzzards Bay Project. Major new completed actions during the past two years include: designation of Buzzards Bay as a no discharge area in August 2000; full support by the Massac...

  8. Concomitant charge-density-wave and unit-cell-doubling structural transitions in Dy5Ir4Si10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, M. H.; Chen, C. H.; Tseng, C. M.; Lue, C. S.; Kuo, Y. K.; Yang, H. D.; Chu, M.-W.

    2014-05-01

    The tetragonal rare-earth transition-metal silicide system with three-dimensional crystallographic structure R5T4Si10, where R is Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, and Lu, and T=Ir and Rh, has been shown to exhibit fascinating charge-density-wave (CDW) phase transitions, a phenomenon largely found in otherwise low-dimensional systems. In this study, we report the investigations of CDW in Dy5Ir4Si10 at different temperatures using transmission electron microscopy techniques including electron diffraction and dark-field imaging. Incommensurate superlattice spots along the c axis were observed in the electron-diffraction patterns when the sample was cooled below the CDW transition temperature at ˜208 K. CDW becomes commensurate with further cooling and configurations of CDW dislocations convincingly show that the CDW phase transition is accompanied by a concomitant cell-doubling crystallographic structural phase transition. Intriguingly, the cell-doubling transition is featured by a broken inversion symmetry along the c axis and a disparity in the CDW-modulation vectors with opposite signs, which gives rise to two sets of CDW domains with reversed contrasts. The profound physics underlining this notable domain-contrast behavior is discussed.

  9. Diffraction by cold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauch, F.; Gomer, V.; Schadwinkel, H.; Ueberholz, B.; Haubrich, D.; Meschede, D.

    1998-01-01

    We have observed diffraction of a laser probe beam by a trapped sample of cold atoms. The effect is only visible in the vicinity of a resonance line. The observed diffraction pattern arises from interference of the incident and scattered light wave, allowing reconstruction of geometric properties of the trapped sample from the holographic record.

  10. Diffraction Results from CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Goulianos, Konstantin

    2012-04-01

    We present final results by the CDF II collaboration on diffractive W and Z production, report on the status of ongoing analyses on diffractive dijet production and on rapidity gaps between jets, and briefly summarize results obtained on exclusive production pointing to their relevance to calibrating theoretical models used to predict exclusive Higgs-boson production at the LHC.

  11. FT-IR microscopical analysis with synchrotron radiation: The microscope optics and system performance

    SciTech Connect

    Reffner, J.A.; Martoglio, P.A.; Williams, G.P.

    1995-01-01

    When a Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) microspectrometer was first interfaced with the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) in September 1993, there was an instant realization that the performance at the diffraction limit had increased 40-100 times. The synchrotron source transformed the IR microspectrometer into a true IR microprobe, providing high-quality IR spectra for probe diameters at the diffraction limit. The combination of IR microspectroscopy and synchrotron radiation provides a powerful new tool for molecular spectroscopy. The ability to perform IR microspectroscopy with synchrotron radiation is still under development at Brookhaven National Laboratory, but several initial studies have been completed that demonstrate the broad-ranging applications of this technology and its potential for materials characterization.

  12. Exchange enhancement and thermal anneal in Mn{sub 76}Ir{sub 24} bottom-pinned spin valves

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Haohua; Freitas, P. P.; Wang, Zhenjun; Sousa, J. B.; Gogol, P.; Chapman, J.

    2001-06-01

    Exchange enhancement through thermal anneal in bottom-pinned Mn{sub 76}Ir{sub 24} spin valves is investigated. Samples were fabricated by ion beam deposition (IBD), post-annealed in vacuum (10{sup {minus}6}Torr) at 270{degree}C for 10 min, then cooled in a 3 kOe applied field. For a bilayer structure, glass/Ta 40 Aa/NiFe 30 Aa/MnIr 60 Aa/CoFe 25 Aa/Ta 40 Aa, the exchange field (H{sub ex}) reaches 1148 Oe (J{sub ex}=0.4erg/cm{sup 2}) after anneal. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis shows strong enhancement of {l_angle}111{r_angle} texture upon anneal, while grain size obtained from XRD and transmission electron microscopy for as-deposited and annealed states shows no major change. With increasing MnIr thickness, the exchange field decreases, and blocking temperature (T{sub b}) increases, reaching 295{degree}C for t{sub MnIr}=180Aa. Spin valves built with the same exchange bilayer (Ta 20 Aa/NiFe 30 Aa/MnIr 60 Aa/CoFe 25 Aa/Cu 22 Aa/CoFe 20 Aa/NiFe 40 Aa/Ta 40 Aa) show H{sub ex}=855Oe (J{sub ex}=0.3erg/cm{sup 2}) and magnetoresistance (MR)=7.1%. The incorporation of nano-oxide layers in spin valves increases the MR signal to 11%. No signal degradation is found in these specular structures for anneals up to 310{degree}C. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  13. Linear-dichroic infrared spectral (IR-LD) analysis of codeine and its derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koleva, Bojidarka; Kolev, Tsonko; Bakalska, Rumyana

    2007-05-01

    By means of IR-LD spectroscopy of oriented as suspension in nematic liquid crystal solids, a detailed IR-bands assignment and a stereo-structural prediction of codeine, codeinone and N-norcodeine have been carried out. The data are compared with known crystallographic ones of codeine and codeinone obtained by single crystal X-ray diffraction.

  14. IR spectroscopic investigations of amoxicillin trihydrate, included in the technological models sirup granules in ethylcellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasheva, L. M.; Kalinkova, G.; Minkov, E.; Krestev, V.

    1984-03-01

    Employing IR spectroscopy some technological models of amoxicillin trihydrate, included in ethyl-, methyl-, carboxymethyl- and methylhydroxyethyl-cellulose have been studied. Interactions were established only between amoxicillin trihydrate and ethylcellulose. The IR absorption spectra suggest a H-bonded antibiotic with hydroxyl groups in the ethylcellulose molecule. The IR spectral differences observed are not due to polymorphic transformation; this was proved by X-ray powder diffraction.

  15. Glass formation and optical properties of Ge-Te-Ga-CuI far-IR transmitting chalcogenide glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yuju; Wang, Xunsi; Nie, Qiuhua; Xu, Yinsheng; Xu, Tiefeng; Dai, Sixun

    2013-09-01

    To discover the signs of life on terrestrial planets, we must accurately detect the existence of CO2, which has two vibrational absorption bands at 4 μm and 16 μm. Therefore optical materials be able to transmit light far beyond 20 μm are essential for manufacturing these detectors. In this paper, a series of Ge-Te-Ga-CuI far-IR transmitting chalcogenide glasses were synthesized by conventional melt-quenching method and their glass-forming region was determined. Properties measurements including X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), Vis-NIR and IR transmitting spectra were performed on glasses. The results of XRD measurements confirmed the amorphous state of studied glasses. With the help of Ga and CuI, these glasses have high glass transition temperature Tg (>175 °C), indicating their good thermal stability. The allowed indirect transition of samples was also calculated according to the Tauc equation. The infrared transmission spectra measured by Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) show that these glasses all have wide optical transmitting window from 1.68 to 25 μm revealing that it may have great potential for application in far-IR material fields.

  16. IR fiber optic sensing on biological tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bindig, Uwe; Gersonde, I.; Meinke, M.; Becker, Y.; Mueller, Gerhard

    2003-10-01

    A diagnostic method is described to detect differences between diseased and normal tissue from bladder carcinoma by FTIR-microspectroscopy and fiber-optics methods. Regions of interest on 10 μm thin tissue sections were mapped using an IR-microscope in transmission mode. Afterwards the specimens were analyzed using standard pathological techniques. Quadratic discriminant as well as correlation analysis was applied for data analysis. IR optical fibers, not only allowed measurements to be made in the attenuated total reflectance (ATR)-mode but also absorption measurements to be carried out at a remote location. The IR-sensor is in contact with the sample which shows characteristic absorption lines. This method can be used to determine the absorption of a sample in a non-destructive manner. In this paper we report our efforts to develop a fiber-optic infrared sensor to differentiate between malignant and healthy tissue in vivo. Silver halide fibers and a special sensor tip were used for the ATR measurements on human tissue specimens. The results indicate that IR-spectrometry will be a useful tool for bio-diagnostics.

  17. Calculating incoherent diffraction MTF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Melvin; Vizgaitis, Jay

    2008-04-01

    The incoherent diffraction MTF plays an increasingly important role in the range performance of imaging systems as the wavelength increases and the optical aperture decreases. Accordingly, all NVESD imager models have equations that describe the incoherent diffraction MTF of a circular entrance pupil. NVThermIP, a program which models thermal imager range performance, has built in equations which analytically model the incoherent diffraction MTF of a circular entrance pupil and has a capability to input a table that describes the MTF of other apertures. These can be calculated using CODE V, which can numerically calculate the incoherent diffraction MTF in the vertical or horizontal direction for an arbitrary aperture. However, we are not aware of any program that takes as input a description of the entrance pupil and analytically outputs equations that describe the incoherent diffraction MTF. This work explores the effectiveness of Mathematica to analytically and numerically calculate the incoherent diffraction MTF for an arbitrary aperture. In this work, Mathematica is used to analytically and numerically calculate the incoherent diffraction MTF for a variety of apertures and the results are compared with CODE V calculations.

  18. Nuclear IRS-1 and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Reiss, Krzysztof; Valle, Luis Del; Lassak, Adam; Trojanek, Joanna

    2011-01-01

    The family of insulin receptor substrates (IRS) consists of four proteins (IRS-1 - IRS-4), which were initially characterized as typical cytosolic adaptor proteins involved in insulin receptor (IR) and insulin-like growth factor I receptor (IGF-IR) signaling. The first cloned and characterized member of the IRS family, IRS-1, has predicted molecular weight of 132 kDa, however, as a result of its extensive serine phosphorylation it separates on a SDS gel as a band of approximately 160–185 kDa. In addition to its metabolic and growth-promoting functions, IRS-1 is also suspected to play a role in malignant transformation. The mechanism by which IRS-1 supports tumor growth is not fully understood, and the argument that IRS-1 merely amplifies the signal from the IGF-1R and/or IR requires further investigation. Almost a decade ago, we reported the presence of nuclear IRS-1 in medulloblastoma clinical samples, which express viral oncoprotein, large T-antigen of human polyomavirus JC (JCV T-antigen). This first demonstration of nuclear IRS-1 was confirmed in several other laboratories. The nuclear IRS-1 was also detected by cells expressing the SV40 T-antigen, v-Src, in immortalized fibroblasts stimulated with IGF-I, in hepatocytes, 32D cells, and in an osteosarcoma cell line. More recently, nuclear IRS-1 was detected in breast cancer cells in association with estrogen receptor alpha (ERα), and in JC virus negative medulloblastoma cells expressing ERβ, further implicating nuclear IRS-1 in cellular transformation. Here, we discuss how nuclear IRS-1 acting on DNA repair fidelity, transcriptional activity, and cell growth can support tumor development and progression. PMID:22454254

  19. HWIL IR imaging testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinson, R. J.; Passwater, R. D.

    1981-03-01

    The Army simulator facilities are presently configured to conduct hardware-in-the-loop mission tasks on the HELLFIRE and COPPERHEAD missile systems. These systems presently use a LASER seeker. The facility is an ideal candidate to be converted to include infrared (IR) seekers used on the TGSM system. This study investigates the possibility and impact of a facility update. This report documents the feasibility of developing a hardware-in-the-loop (HWIL) hybrid simulation incorporating infrared IR seekers used for the Assault Breaker program. Other hardware to be considered are the autopilot, signal conditioning, signal processing, and actuators which may be integrated into the system simulation. Considerations are given to replacing all or elements of hardware while substituting math models in the system simulation.

  20. Synthesis, growth, spectral, X-ray diffraction, magnetic and thermal studies of metal-organic complex: Diiodobis(2-aminopyridine)Cadmium(II) single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatesan, G.; Anandha Babu, G.; Ramasamy, P.; Rajnikant

    2013-06-01

    The metal-organic hybrid complex, [Cd(2ap)2I2] (DIAC), (2ap = 2-aminopyridine) was synthesized, DIAC single crystal has been grown and characterized by FT-IR, FT-Raman, FT-1H NMR, single crystal X-ray diffraction, high resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD), UV-Vis-NIR transmission, magnetic and thermal studies. The metal-ligand formation of the title complex was analyzed by FT-IR, FT-Raman and 1H NMR spectroscopic studies. The DIAC crystallizes in monoclinic crystal system, space group P21/n. The coordination geometry around the Cd(II) center is a distorted tetrahedral. The single-crystal structure analysis showed that DIAC displayed three-dimensional structures containing inorganic-organic motifs with two-dimensional layers pillar-connected through hydrogen bonding framework. The high resolution X-ray diffraction studies (HRXRD) reveals that the crystalline perfection of as grown single crystal is fairly good. Thermal stability of title compound was studied by TG/DTA analysis.

  1. Hard diffraction at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Melese, P.L.; CDF Collaboration

    1996-07-01

    We present new evidence for events with a rapidity gap between jets in {bar p}-p collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV based on data collected by triggering the Collider Detector at Fermilab on two high transverse momentum forward jets and results of a search for diffractive W{+-} and dijet production where diffraction is tagged by the rapidity gap technique. We also present the results of a search for diffractive dijets using data collected by triggering on a very forward particle in the recently installed roman-pot detectors. The dijet events exhibit additional diffractive characteristics such as rapidity gaps and boosted center of mass system, however the recoil antiproton measured in the roman-pots is in a regime in which the non- pomeron contribution is significant.

  2. Reflective diffraction grating

    DOEpatents

    Lamartine, Bruce C.

    2003-06-24

    Reflective diffraction grating. A focused ion beam (FIB) micromilling apparatus is used to store color images in a durable medium by milling away portions of the surface of the medium to produce a reflective diffraction grating with blazed pits. The images are retrieved by exposing the surface of the grating to polychromatic light from a particular incident bearing and observing the light reflected by the surface from specified reception bearing.

  3. Status of the Neutron Imaging and Diffraction Instrument IMAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kockelmann, Winfried; Burca, Genoveva; Kelleher, Joe F.; Kabra, Saurabh; Zhang, Shu-Yan; Rhodes, Nigel J.; Schooneveld, Erik M.; Sykora, Jeff; Pooley, Daniel E.; Nightingale, Jim B.; Aliotta, Francesco; Ponterio, Rosa C.; Salvato, Gabriele; Tresoldi, Dario; Vasi, Cirino; McPhate, Jason B.; Tremsin, Anton S.

    A cold neutron imaging and diffraction instrument, IMAT, is currently being constructed at the ISIS second target station. IMAT will capitalize on time-of-flight transmission and diffraction techniques available at a pulsed neutron source. Analytical techniques will include neutron radiography, neutron tomography, energy-selective neutron imaging, and spatially resolved diffraction scans for residual strain and texture determination. Commissioning of the instrument will start in 2015, with time-resolving imaging detectors and two diffraction detector prototype modules. IMAT will be operated as a user facility for material science applications and will be open for developments of time-of-flight imaging methods.

  4. Transmission eigenvalues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cakoni, Fioralba; Haddar, Houssem

    2013-10-01

    In inverse scattering theory, transmission eigenvalues can be seen as the extension of the notion of resonant frequencies for impenetrable objects to the case of penetrable dielectrics. The transmission eigenvalue problem is a relatively late arrival to the spectral theory of partial differential equations. Its first appearance was in 1986 in a paper by Kirsch who was investigating the denseness of far-field patterns for scattering solutions of the Helmholtz equation or, in more modern terminology, the injectivity of the far-field operator [1]. The paper of Kirsch was soon followed by a more systematic study by Colton and Monk in the context of developing the dual space method for solving the inverse scattering problem for acoustic waves in an inhomogeneous medium [2]. In this paper they showed that for a spherically stratified media transmission eigenvalues existed and formed a discrete set. Numerical examples were also given showing that in principle transmission eigenvalues could be determined from the far-field data. This first period of interest in transmission eigenvalues was concluded with papers by Colton et al in 1989 [3] and Rynne and Sleeman in 1991 [4] showing that for an inhomogeneous medium (not necessarily spherically stratified) transmission eigenvalues, if they existed, formed a discrete set. For the next seventeen years transmission eigenvalues were ignored. This was mainly due to the fact that, with the introduction of various sampling methods to determine the shape of an inhomogeneous medium from far-field data, transmission eigenvalues were something to be avoided and hence the fact that transmission eigenvalues formed at most a discrete set was deemed to be sufficient. In addition, questions related to the existence of transmission eigenvalues or the structure of associated eigenvectors were recognized as being particularly difficult due to the nonlinearity of the eigenvalue problem and the special structure of the associated transmission

  5. Powder Diffraction: By Decades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, William I. F.

    This introductory chapter reviews the first 100 years of powder diffraction, decade by decade, from the earliest X-ray powder diffraction measurements of the crystal structure of graphite through to the diversity and complexity of twenty-first century powder diffraction. Carbon features as an illustrative example throughout the discussion of these ten decades from graphite and the disorder of carbon black through to lonsdaleite, the elusive hexagonal polymorph of diamond, and C60, the most symmetrical of molecules. Electronics and computing have played a leading role in the development of powder diffraction, particularly over the past 60 years, and the Moore's Law decade-by-decade rise in computing power is clear in the increasing complexity of powder diffraction experiments and material systems that can be studied. The chapter concludes with a final discussion of decades - the four decades of length-scale from the ångstrom to the micron that not only represent the domain of powder diffraction but are also the distances that will dominate twenty-first century science and technology.

  6. Transmission eigenvalues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cakoni, Fioralba; Haddar, Houssem

    2013-10-01

    In inverse scattering theory, transmission eigenvalues can be seen as the extension of the notion of resonant frequencies for impenetrable objects to the case of penetrable dielectrics. The transmission eigenvalue problem is a relatively late arrival to the spectral theory of partial differential equations. Its first appearance was in 1986 in a paper by Kirsch who was investigating the denseness of far-field patterns for scattering solutions of the Helmholtz equation or, in more modern terminology, the injectivity of the far-field operator [1]. The paper of Kirsch was soon followed by a more systematic study by Colton and Monk in the context of developing the dual space method for solving the inverse scattering problem for acoustic waves in an inhomogeneous medium [2]. In this paper they showed that for a spherically stratified media transmission eigenvalues existed and formed a discrete set. Numerical examples were also given showing that in principle transmission eigenvalues could be determined from the far-field data. This first period of interest in transmission eigenvalues was concluded with papers by Colton et al in 1989 [3] and Rynne and Sleeman in 1991 [4] showing that for an inhomogeneous medium (not necessarily spherically stratified) transmission eigenvalues, if they existed, formed a discrete set. For the next seventeen years transmission eigenvalues were ignored. This was mainly due to the fact that, with the introduction of various sampling methods to determine the shape of an inhomogeneous medium from far-field data, transmission eigenvalues were something to be avoided and hence the fact that transmission eigenvalues formed at most a discrete set was deemed to be sufficient. In addition, questions related to the existence of transmission eigenvalues or the structure of associated eigenvectors were recognized as being particularly difficult due to the nonlinearity of the eigenvalue problem and the special structure of the associated transmission

  7. AQUIFER TRANSMISSIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaluation of groundwater resources requires the knowledge of the capacity of aquifers to store and transmit ground water. This requires estimates of key hydraulic parameters, such as the transmissivity, among others. The transmissivity T (m2/sec) is a hydrauli...

  8. Data on atmospheric transmission in the IR spectral region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paramonova, N. N.; Kazakova, K. V.; Brounshteyn, A. M.

    1979-01-01

    The weakening of radiation by the atmosphere in the infrared region of the spectrum was studied. The instrument used for the measurements was the IKAU-1 infrared atmospheric unit, and measurements were carried out both on an inclined path and a near-earth horizontal path.

  9. A novel CO 2 gas analyzer based on IR absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guangjun; Wu, Xiaoli

    2004-08-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO 2) gas analyzer can be widely used in many fields. A novel CO 2 gas analyzer based on infrared ray (IR) absorption is presented sufficiently in this paper. Applying Lambert-Beer Law, a novel space-double-beam optical structure is established successfully. The optical structure includes an IR source, a gas cell, a bandpass filter with a transmission wavelength at 4.26 μm, another bandpass filter with a transmission wavelength at 3.9 μm, and two IR detectors. Based on Redial Basic Function (RBF) artificial neural network, the measuring model of IR CO 2 analyzer is established with a high accuracy. A dynamic compensation filter is effectively designed to improve the dynamic characteristic of the IR CO 2 analyzer without gas pump. The IR CO 2 analyzer possesses the advantages of high accuracy and mechanical reliability with small volume, lightweight, and low-power consumption. Therefore, it can be used in such relevant fields as environmental protection, processing control, chemical analysis, medical diagnosis, and space environmental and control systems.

  10. Instrument measures many optical properties in visible and IR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batten, C. E.

    1979-01-01

    Electro-optical system measures reflectance, reflectance ratio, transmission, absorption, refractive index, and absorption coefficient in both visible and infrared (IR) spectral regions. System effectively combining capabilities of ellisometer, reflectometer, and spectrophotometer is expected to find application in environmental and material composition testing fields.

  11. Study on antibacterial alginate-stabilized copper nanoparticles by FT-IR and 2D-IR correlation spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Visurraga, Judith; Daza, Carla; Pozo, Claudio; Becerra, Abraham; von Plessing, Carlos; García, Apolinaria

    2012-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to clarify the intermolecular interaction between antibacterial copper nanoparticles (Cu NPs) and sodium alginate (NaAlg) by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and to process the spectra applying two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) correlation analysis. To our knowledge, the addition of NaAlg as a stabilizer of copper nanoparticles has not been previously reported. It is expected that the obtained results will provide valuable additional information on: (1) the influence of reducing agent ratio on the formation of copper nanoparticles in order to design functional nanomaterials with increased antibacterial activity, and (2) structural changes related to the incorporation of Cu NPs into the polymer matrix. Methods Cu NPs were prepared by microwave heating using ascorbic acid as reducing agent and NaAlg as stabilizing agent. The characterization of synthesized Cu NPs by ultraviolet visible spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), electron diffraction analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and semiquantitative analysis of the weight percentage composition indicated that the average particle sizes of Cu NPs are about 3–10 nm, they are spherical in shape, and consist of zerovalent Cu and Cu2O. Also, crystallite size and relative particle size of stabilized Cu NPs were calculated by XRD using Scherrer’s formula and FT from the X-ray diffraction data. Thermogravimetric analysis, differential thermal analysis, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), FT-IR, second-derivative spectra, and 2D-IR correlation analysis were applied to studying the stabilization mechanism of Cu NPs by NaAlg molecules. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of stabilized Cu NPs against five bacterial strains (Staphylococccus aureus ATCC 6538P, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and O157: H7, and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium ATCC 13311 and 14028) were evaluated with macrodilution

  12. IR Spot Weld Inspect

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jian; Feng, Zhili

    2014-01-01

    In automotive industry, destructive inspection of spot welds is still the mandatory quality assurance method due to the lack of efficient non-destructive evaluation (NDE) tools. However, it is costly and time-consuming. Recently at ORNL, a new NDE prototype system for spot weld inspection using infrared (IR) thermography has been developed to address this problem. This software contains all the key functions that ensure the NDE system to work properly: system input/output control, image acquisition, data analysis, weld quality database generation and weld quality prediction, etc.

  13. IR Spot Weld Inspect

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2014-01-01

    In automotive industry, destructive inspection of spot welds is still the mandatory quality assurance method due to the lack of efficient non-destructive evaluation (NDE) tools. However, it is costly and time-consuming. Recently at ORNL, a new NDE prototype system for spot weld inspection using infrared (IR) thermography has been developed to address this problem. This software contains all the key functions that ensure the NDE system to work properly: system input/output control, image acquisition, datamore » analysis, weld quality database generation and weld quality prediction, etc.« less

  14. Multipath analysis diffraction calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Statham, Richard B.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes extensions of the Kirchhoff diffraction equation to higher edge terms and discusses their suitability to model diffraction multipath effects of a small satellite structure. When receiving signals, at a satellite, from the Global Positioning System (GPS), reflected signals from the satellite structure result in multipath errors in the determination of the satellite position. Multipath error can be caused by diffraction of the reflected signals and a method of calculating this diffraction is required when using a facet model of the satellite. Several aspects of the Kirchhoff equation are discussed and numerical examples, in the near and far fields, are shown. The vector form of the extended Kirchhoff equation, by adding the Larmor-Tedone and Kottler edge terms, is given as a mathematical model in an appendix. The Kirchhoff equation was investigated as being easily implemented and of good accuracy in the basic form, especially in phase determination. The basic Kirchhoff can be extended for higher accuracy if desired. A brief discussion of the method of moments and the geometric theory of diffraction is included, but seems to offer no clear advantage in implementation over the Kirchhoff for facet models.

  15. Resonant diffraction gratings for spatial differentiation of optical beams

    SciTech Connect

    Golovastikov, N V; Bykov, D A; Doskolovich, L L

    2014-10-31

    Diffraction of a two-dimensional optical beam from a resonant diffraction grating is considered. It is shown that at certain resonance parameters the diffraction grating allows for spatial differentiation and integration of the incident beam. The parameters of the diffraction grating for spatial differentiation of optical beams in the transmission geometry are calculated. It is shown that the differentiating diffraction grating allows the conversion of the two-dimensional beam into the two-dimensional Hermite – Gaussian mode. The presented results of numerical modelling are in good agreement with the proposed theoretical description. The use of the considered resonant diffraction gratings is promising for solving the problems of all-optical data processing. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  16. Diffraction radiation generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shestopalov, Viktor P.; Vertii, Aleksei A.; Ermak, Gennadii P.; Skrynnik, Boris K.; Khlopov, Grigorii I.; Tsvyk, Aleksei I.

    Research in the field of diffraction radiation generators (DRG) conducted at the Radio Physics and electronics Institute of the Ukranian Academy of Sciences over the past 25 years is reviewed. The effect of diffraction radiation is analyzed in detail, and various operating regimes of DRGs are discussed. The discussion then focuses on the principal requirements for the design of packaged DRGs and their principal parameters. Finally, applications of DRGs in various fields of science and technology are reviewed, including such applications as DRG spectroscopy, diagnostics of plasma, biological specimens, and vibration, and DRG radar systems.

  17. Reflection and Transmission Coefficient of Yttrium Iron Garnet Filled Polyvinylidene Fluoride Composite Using Rectangular Waveguide at Microwave Frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Soleimani, Hassan; Abbas, Zulkifly; Yahya, Noorhana; Shameli, Kamyar; Soleimani, Hojjatollah; Shabanzadeh, Parvaneh

    2012-01-01

    The sol-gel method was carried out to synthesize nanosized Yttrium Iron Garnet (YIG). The nanomaterials with ferrite structure were heat-treated at different temperatures from 500 to 1000 °C. The phase identification, morphology and functional groups of the prepared samples were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), respectively. The YIG ferrite nanopowder was composited with polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) by a solution casting method. The magnitudes of reflection and transmission coefficients of PVDF/YIG containing 6, 10 and 13% YIG, respectively, were measured using rectangular waveguide in conjunction with a microwave vector network analyzer (VNA) in X-band frequencies. The results indicate that the presence of YIG in polymer composites causes an increase in reflection coefficient and decrease in transmission coefficient of the polymer. PMID:22942718

  18. Structure and Properties of Ir-Containing Oxides with Large Spin-Orbit Coupling: Ba2In(2-x)Ir(x)O(5+δ).

    PubMed

    Flynn, Joshua; Li, Jun; Sleight, Arthur W; Ramirez, Arthur P; Subramanian, M A

    2016-03-21

    In this work, the solid solution series Ba2In(2-x)Ir(x)O5+δ (x = 0-1.4, 2) was synthesized, and its structural, magnetic, and charge-transport properties were measured. With increasing Ir content, three transitions in the room-temperature structure were observed: orthorhombic to tetragonal to cubic to a monoclinic distortion of a hexagonal BaTiO3 structure. Neutron diffraction shows Ba2In(1.6)Ir(0.4)O5.4 to be cubic and Ba2InIrO6 to be monoclinic, the latter contrary to previously published X-ray diffraction refinements. Magnetization measurements show Curie-Weiss behavior for x = 0.2-0.6, which arises from nearly 50:50 ratio of Ir(V) and Ir(VI). To our knowledge, this is the first time Ir(VI) has been stabilized with standard solid-state methods under ambient conditions. The electrical resistivity measurements show all the compounds studied are semiconducting and that resistivity decreases with increasing Ir content, suggesting the proximity to a metal-insulator transition. A sign reversal in the high-temperature Seebeck coefficient is observed indicating both electron and hole charge transport. PMID:26937777

  19. Multiplexed off-axis holography using a transmission diffraction grating.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yujie; Liu, Yunhui; Li, Peng; Fu, Yili; Zhao, Jie

    2016-02-01

    This Letter presents a novel multiplexed off-axis holographic microscope that makes use of a 1D holographic grating. The grating creates multiple object waves and projects four of them to the imaging sensor. The object waves then interfere with the reference wave at the imaging sensor, so that a multiplexed hologram is created. This approach retrieves the amplitude and phase profiles of four imaging areas with a single-exposure hologram, which greatly increases the field of view of an off-axis holographic microscope. The experimental results with the resolution target USAF 1951 T-22 and a slide of paramecia are shown to demonstrate the system's ability without sacrificing the resolution of the microscope objective. PMID:26907411

  20. DIFFRACTION FROM MODEL CRYSTALS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although calculating X-ray diffraction patterns from atomic coordinates of a crystal structure is a widely available capability, calculation from non-periodic arrays of atoms has not been widely applied to cellulose. Non-periodic arrays result from modeling studies that, even though started with at...

  1. Diffractive hard scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, E.L.; Collins, J.C.; Soper, D.E.; Sterman, G.

    1986-03-01

    I discuss events in high energy hadron collisions that contain a hard scattering, in the sense that very heavy quarks or high P/sub T/ jets are produced, yet are diffractive, in the sense that one of the incident hadrons is scattered with only a small energy loss. 8 refs.

  2. Integrated IR sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tom, Michael; Trujillo, Edward

    1994-06-01

    Integrated infrared (IR) sensors which exploit modular avionics concepts can provide features such as operational flexibility, enhanced stealthiness, and ease of maintenance to meet the demands of tactical, airborne sensor systems. On-board, tactical airborne sensor systems perform target acquisition, tracking, identification, threat warning, missile launch detection, and ground mapping in support of situation awareness, self-defense, navigation, target attack, weapon support, and reconnaissance activities. The use of sensor suites for future tactical aircraft such as US Air Force's multirole fighter require a blend of sensor inputs and outputs that may vary over time. It is expected that special-role units of these tactical aircraft will be formed to conduct tasks and missions such as anti-shipping, reconnaissance, or suppression of enemy air defenses.

  3. Streaking images that appear only in the plane of diffraction in undoped GaAs single crystals: Diffraction imaging (topography) by monochromatic synchrotron radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuriyama, Masao; Steiner, Bruce; Dobbyn, Ronald C.; Laor, Uri; Larson, David; Brown, Margaret

    1988-01-01

    Streaking images restricted to the direction of the diffraction (scattering) vector have been observed on transmission through undoped GaAs. These disruption images (caused by the reduction of diffraction in the direction of observation) appear both in the forward and in Bragg diffracted directions in monochromatic synchrontron radiation diffraction imaging. This previously unobserved phenomenon can be explained in terms of planar defects (interfaces) or platelets which affects the absorption coefficient in anomalous transmission. Such regions of the crystal look perfect despite the presence of imperfections when the scattering vector is not perpendicular to the normal of the platelets. The observed crystallographic orientation of these interfaces strongly indicates that they are antiphase boundaries.

  4. Diffractive interference optical analyzer (DiOPTER)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasikumar, Harish; Prasad, Vishnu; Pal, Parama; Varma, Manoj M.

    2016-03-01

    This report demonstrates a method for high-resolution refractometric measurements using, what we have termed as, a Diffractive Interference Optical Analyzer (DiOpter). The setup consists of a laser, polarizer, a transparent diffraction grating and Si-photodetectors. The sensor is based on the differential response of diffracted orders to bulk refractive index changes. In these setups, the differential read-out of the diffracted orders suppresses signal drifts and enables time-resolved determination of refractive index changes in the sample cell. A remarkable feature of this device is that under appropriate conditions, the measurement sensitivity of the sensor can be enhanced by more than two orders of magnitude due to interference between multiply reflected diffracted orders. A noise-equivalent limit of detection (LoD) of 6x10-7 RIU was achieved in glass. This work focuses on devices with integrated sample well, made on low-cost PDMS. As the detection methodology is experimentally straightforward, it can be used across a wide array of applications, ranging from detecting changes in surface adsorbates via binding reactions to estimating refractive index (and hence concentration) variations in bulk samples. An exciting prospect of this technique is the potential integration of this device to smartphones using a simple interface based on transmission mode configuration. In a transmission configuration, we were able to achieve an LoD of 4x10-4 RIU which is sufficient to explore several applications in food quality testing and related fields. We are envisioning the future of this platform as a personal handheld optical analyzer for applications ranging from environmental sensing to healthcare and quality testing of food products.

  5. Transmissible amyloid.

    PubMed

    Tjernberg, L O; Rising, A; Johansson, J; Jaudzems, K; Westermark, P

    2016-08-01

    There are around 30 human diseases associated with protein misfolding and amyloid formation, each one caused by a certain protein or peptide. Many of these diseases are lethal and together they pose an enormous burden to society. The prion protein has attracted particular interest as being shown to be the pathogenic agent in transmissible diseases such as kuru, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and bovine spongiform encephalopathy. Whether similar transmission could occur also in other amyloidoses such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and serum amyloid A amyloidosis is a matter of intense research and debate. Furthermore, it has been suggested that novel biomaterials such as artificial spider silk are potentially amyloidogenic. Here, we provide a brief introduction to amyloid, prions and other proteins involved in amyloid disease and review recent evidence for their potential transmission. We discuss the similarities and differences between amyloid and silk, as well as the potential hazards associated with protein-based biomaterials. PMID:27002185

  6. Development of a spin polarized low energy electron diffraction system.

    PubMed

    Pradeep, A V; Roy, Arnab; Kumar, P S Anil; Kirschner, J

    2016-02-01

    We have designed and constructed a spin polarized low energy electron diffraction system working in the reflected electron pulse counting mode. This system is capable of measuring asymmetries due to spin-orbit and exchange interactions. Photoemission from a strained GaAs/GaAsP super lattice is used as the source of spin polarized electrons. Spin-orbit asymmetry is evaluated for Ir(100) single crystal at various energies. Subsequently, exchange asymmetry has been evaluated on 40 monolayer Fe deposited on Ir(100). This instrument proves to be useful in understanding structure and magnetism at surfaces. PMID:26931865

  7. Development of a spin polarized low energy electron diffraction system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradeep, A. V.; Roy, Arnab; Kumar, P. S. Anil; Kirschner, J.

    2016-02-01

    We have designed and constructed a spin polarized low energy electron diffraction system working in the reflected electron pulse counting mode. This system is capable of measuring asymmetries due to spin-orbit and exchange interactions. Photoemission from a strained GaAs/GaAsP super lattice is used as the source of spin polarized electrons. Spin-orbit asymmetry is evaluated for Ir(100) single crystal at various energies. Subsequently, exchange asymmetry has been evaluated on 40 monolayer Fe deposited on Ir(100). This instrument proves to be useful in understanding structure and magnetism at surfaces.

  8. Magnetic polarization of Ir in underdoped nonsuperconducting Eu(Fe 0.94Ir0.06)2As2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, W. T.; Xiao, Y.; Su, Y.; Nandi, S.; Jiao, W. H.; Nisbet, G.; Demirdis, S.; Cao, G. H.; Brückel, Th.

    2016-01-01

    Using polarized neutron diffraction and x-ray resonant magnetic scattering (XRMS) techniques, multiple phase transitions were revealed in an underdoped, nonsuperconducting Eu (Fe1 -xIrx )2As2 (x =0.06 ) single crystal. Compared with the parent compound EuFe2As2 , the tetragonal-to-orthorhombic structural phase transition and the antiferromagnetic order of the Fe+2 moments are significantly suppressed to TS=111 (2 ) K and TN,Fe=85 (2 ) K by 6% Ir doping, respectively. In addition, the Eu+2 spins order within the a b plane in the A-type antiferromagnetic structure similar to the parent compound. However, the order temperature is evidently suppressed to TN,Eu=16.0 (5 ) K by Ir doping. Most strikingly, the XRMS measurements at the Ir L3 edge demonstrates that the Ir 5 d states are also magnetically polarized, with the same propagation vector as the magnetic order of Fe. With TN,Ir=12.0 (5 ) K, they feature a much lower onset temperature compared with TN,Fe. Our observation suggests that the magnetism of the Eu sublattice has a considerable effect on the magnetic nature of the 5 d Ir dopant atoms and there exists a possible interplay between the localized Eu+2 moments and the conduction d electrons on the FeAs layers.

  9. Rotorcraft transmissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coy, John J.

    1990-01-01

    Highlighted here is that portion of the Lewis Research Center's helicopter propulsion systems program that deals with drive train technology and the related mechanical components. The major goals of the program are to increase life, reliability, and maintainability, to reduce weight, noise, and vibration, and to maintain the relatively high mechanical efficiency of the gear train. The current activity emphasizes noise reduction technology and analytical code development, followed by experimental verification. Selected significant advances in technology for transmissions are reviewed, including advanced configurations and new analytical tools. Finally, the plan for transmission research in the future is presented.

  10. Electronic signatures of dimerization in IrTe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Jixia; Wu, Weida; Oh, Yoon Seok; Cheong, S.-W.; Yang, J. J.

    2014-03-01

    Recently, the mysterious phase transition around Tc ~ 260 K in IrTe2 has been intensively studied. A structural supermodulation with q =1/5 was identified below Tc. A variety of microscopic mechanisms have been proposed to account for this transition, including charge-density wave due to Fermi surface nesting, Te p-orbital driven structure instability, anionic depolymerization, ionic dimerization, and so on. However, there has not been an unified picture on the nature of this transition. To address this issue, we have performed low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM/STS) experiments on IrTe2 and IrTe2-xSex. Our STM data clearly shows a strong bias dependence in both topography and local density of states (STS) maps. High resolution spectroscopic data further confirms the stripe-like electronic states modulation, which provides insight to the ionic dimerization revealed by X-ray diffraction.

  11. Colored Diffraction Catastrophes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, M. V.; Klein, S.

    1996-03-01

    On fine scales, caustics produced with white light show vividly colored diffraction fringes. For caustics described by the elementary catastrophes of singularity theory, the colors are characteristic of the type of singularity. We study the diffraction colors of the fold and cusp catastrophes. The colors can be simulated computationally as the superposition of monochromatic patterns for different wavelengths. Far from the caustic, where the luminosity contrast is negligible, the fringe colors persist; an asymptotic theory explains why. Experiments with caustics produced by refraction through irregular bathroom-window glass show good agreement with theory. Colored fringes near the cusp reveal fine lines that are not present in any of the monochromatic components; these lines are explained in terms of partial decoherence between rays with widely differing path differences.

  12. Central diffraction at ALICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lämsä, J. W.; Orava, R.

    2011-02-01

    The ALICE experiment is shown to be well suited for studies of exclusive final states from central diffractive reactions. The gluon-rich environment of the central system allows detailed QCD studies and searches for exotic meson states, such as glueballs, hybrids and new charmonium-like states. It would also provide a good testing ground for detailed studies of heavy quarkonia. Due to its central barrel performance, ALICE can accurately measure the low-mass central systems with good purity. The efficiency of the Forward Multiplicity Detector (FMD) and the Forward Shower Counter (FSC) system for detecting rapidity gaps is shown to be adequate for the proposed studies. With this detector arrangement, valuable new data can be obtained by tagging central diffractive processes.

  13. Colored diffraction catastrophes.

    PubMed Central

    Berry, M V; Klein, S

    1996-01-01

    On fine scales, caustics produced with white light show vividly colored diffraction fringes. For caustics described by the elementary catastrophes of singularity theory, the colors are characteristic of the type of singularity. We study the diffraction colors of the fold and cusp catastrophes. The colors can be simulated computationally as the superposition of monochromatic patterns for different wavelengths. Far from the caustic, where the luminosity contrast is negligible, the fringe colors persist; an asymptotic theory explains why. Experiments with caustics produced by refraction through irregular bathroom-window glass show good agreement with theory. Colored fringes near the cusp reveal fine lines that are not present in any of the monochromatic components; these lines are explained in terms of partial decoherence between rays with widely differing path differences. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 6 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 PMID:11607642

  14. Nonreciprocal optical diffraction by a single layer of gyromagnetic cylinders.

    PubMed

    Guo, Tian-Jing; Li, Teng-Fei; Yang, Mu; Cui, Hai-Xu; Guo, Qing-Hua; Cao, Xue-Wei; Chen, Jing

    2014-01-13

    We study the diffraction of optical waves by a single layer of gyromagnetic cylinders. We show that a nonvanishing rotating dipole momentum is excited in a single gyromagnetic cylinder because of the classic analog of the Zeeman effect on photonic angular momentum states (PAMSs). Consequently, different collective dipole modes are excited in a gyromagnetic cylinder array at opposite incident angles. Nonreciprocal optical diffraction effects can be observed, where the transmission and reflection coefficients depend on the sign of the incident angle. A novel phenomenon of nonreciprocal negative directional transmission is demonstrated and numerically analyzed. This work highlights the potential of PAMSs in manipulating the propagation of optical waves for various applications. PMID:24515014

  15. Diffraction before destruction

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Henry N.; Caleman, Carl; Timneanu, Nicusor

    2014-01-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers have opened up the possibility of structure determination of protein crystals at room temperature, free of radiation damage. The femtosecond-duration pulses of these sources enable diffraction signals to be collected from samples at doses of 1000 MGy or higher. The sample is vaporized by the intense pulse, but not before the scattering that gives rise to the diffraction pattern takes place. Consequently, only a single flash diffraction pattern can be recorded from a crystal, giving rise to the method of serial crystallography where tens of thousands of patterns are collected from individual crystals that flow across the beam and the patterns are indexed and aggregated into a set of structure factors. The high-dose tolerance and the many-crystal averaging approach allow data to be collected from much smaller crystals than have been examined at synchrotron radiation facilities, even from radiation-sensitive samples. Here, we review the interaction of intense femtosecond X-ray pulses with materials and discuss the implications for structure determination. We identify various dose regimes and conclude that the strongest achievable signals for a given sample are attained at the highest possible dose rates, from highest possible pulse intensities. PMID:24914146

  16. Polychromatic diffraction contrast tomography

    SciTech Connect

    King, A.; Reischig, P.; Adrien, J.; Peetermans, S.; Ludwig, W.

    2014-11-15

    This tutorial review introduces the use of polychromatic radiation for 3D grain mapping using X-ray diffraction contrast tomography. The objective is to produce a 3D map of the grain shapes and orientations within a bulk, millimeter-sized polycrystalline sample. The use of polychromatic radiation enables the standard synchrotron X-ray technique to be applied in a wider range of contexts: 1) Using laboratory X-ray sources allows a much wider application of the diffraction contrast tomography technique. 2) Neutron sources allow large samples, or samples containing high Z elements to be studied. 3) Applied to synchrotron sources, smaller samples may be treated, or faster measurements may be possible. Challenges and particularities in the data acquisition and processing, and the limitations of the different variants, are discussed. - Highlights: • We present a tutorial review of polychromatic diffraction contrast tomography techniques. • The use of polychromatic radiation allows the standard synchrotron DCT technique to be extended to a range of other sources. • The characteristics and limitations of all variants of the techniques are derived, discussed and compared. • Examples using laboratory X-ray and cold neutron radiation are presented. • Suggestions for the future development of these techniques are presented.

  17. IR Stray Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petro, Larry

    2009-07-01

    Structures outside the optical path of the detector FOV and the surfaces of optical elements could scatter significant light from bright sources onto the IR FPA. Such structures are oversized by typically a few mm relative to the FOV?s beam. The beam footprint of a source outside the FOV can overlap the edges of those structures, which will cause light to be scattered onto the detector. During ground test, it was found that one per cent of the signal from a target imaged onto the edge of the detector was scattered into an approximately 10 pixel by 100 pixel flare. This on orbit test will: 1} verify that release of gravitational stress has not changed the detector mask, 2} assess the far wing stray light from a sources outside the detector FOV, 3} note any sources of stray light in the near and far field that were not noted during ground test, and 4} assess the surface brightness of the off-detector target PSF relative to the on-detector PSF

  18. Perpendicular exchange bias behaviors of CoPt/IrMn and CoPt/FeMn bilayers: A comparative study

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, C. Y.; Lin, K. F.; Hsu, Jen-Hwa

    2015-05-07

    In this study, FeMn was introduced as an antiferromagnetic (AFM) layer to couple with a single-layered Co{sub 49}Pt{sub 51} alloy thin film, and it was compared with a Co{sub 49}Pt{sub 51}/IrMn bilayer system in exchange bias (EB) effect, to explore the mechanism of spontaneous perpendicular exchange bias (PEB), which has been recently observed in CoPt/IrMn bilayers. Bilayers of CoPt/IrMn and CoPt/FeMn were prepared under the same conditions by sputtering at room temperature without any inducing field. Although PEB was observed in as-grown CoPt/FeMn bilayers, the loop shape and PEB behavior were found to exhibit different characteristics from those of CoPt/IrMn bilayers. The CoPt (5 nm)/FeMn (10 nm) bilayer has a sheared loop that is similar to a double-shifted loop and a much lower squareness ratio (SQR = 0.52) and exchange bias field (H{sub e} = 180 Oe) than the CoPt (5 nm)/IrMn (10 nm) system, which has a rectangular loop shape and a high SQR of 0.97 and large H{sub e} of 290 Oe. The two systems present entirely different dependences of PEB on the thickness of the AFM layer. CoPt/IrMn exhibits behavior that is typical of most EB systems, but for CoPt/FeMn, this dependence is more complicated with an unusual peak at an AFM layer thickness of 10 nm. Based on the dissimilar loop shapes and dependences of PEB on AFM thickness, the mechanisms of the spontaneously established PEB in these two systems are considered to differ. Investigations of cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy revealed no apparent difference between the interfacial microstructures of the two systems. X-ray diffraction studies demonstrated the 〈111〉 texture of both systems. Therefore, different interfacial spin configurations may be responsible for the dissimilar PEB behaviors in these two FM/AFM bilayer systems.

  19. Fabrication of high-efficiency diffraction gratings in glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeshima, Nobuhito; Narita, Yoshihiro; Tanaka, Shuhei; Kuroiwa, Yutaka; Hirao, Kazuyuki

    2005-02-01

    We investigated a microfabrication process for optical gratings with periods of micrometer order that use ultrafast laser pulses in semiconductor-doped glass. ZnS- or PbS-doped SiO2 - Al2O3 - B2O3 - CaO - ZnO - Na2O - K2O glass was prepared by a melting method. Glass transmission diffraction gratings with a high refractive-index difference were fabricated with femtosecond laser pulses. The first-order diffraction efficiencies of these gratings were approximately 80%, and the first-order diffraction angles of these gratings were 8° at telecommunication wavelengths.

  20. Magnetism and electronic structure of La2ZnIrO6 and La2MgIrO6: Candidate Jeff=(1)/(2) Mott insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Guixin; Subedi, Alaska; Calder, S.; Yan, J.-Q.; Yi, Jieyu; Gai, Zheng; Poudel, Lekhanath; Singh, David J.; Lumsden, Mark D.; Christianson, A. D.; Sales, Brian C.; Mandrus, David

    2013-04-01

    We study experimentally and theoretically the electronic and magnetic properties of two insulating double perovskites that show similar atomic and electronic structure but different magnetic properties. In magnetization measurements, La2ZnIrO6 displays weak ferromagnetic behavior below 7.5 K, whereas La2MgIrO6 shows antiferromagnetic behavior below TN = 12 K. Electronic structure calculations find that the weak ferromagnetic behavior observed in La2ZnIrO6 is in fact due to canted antiferromagnetism. The calculations also predict canted antiferromagnetic behavior in La2MgIrO6, but intriguingly, this was not observed. Neutron diffraction measurements confirm the essentially antiferromagnetic behavior of both systems but lack the sensitivity to resolve the small (0.22μB/Ir) ferromagnetic component in La2ZnIrO6. Overall, the results presented here indicate the crucial role of spin-orbit coupling (SOC) and the on-site Coulomb repulsion on the magnetic, transport, and thermodynamic properties of both compounds. The electronic structure calculations show that both compounds, like Sr2IrO4, are Jeff = 1/2 Mott insulators. Our present findings suggest that La2ZnIrO6 and La2MgIrO6 provide a new playground to study the interplay between SOC and on-site Coulomb repulsion in a 5d transition-metal oxide.

  1. Investigation of Acrylic Acid at High Pressure Using Neutron Diffraction

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This article details the exploration of perdeuterated acrylic acid at high pressure using neutron diffraction. The structural changes that occur in acrylic acid-d4 are followed via diffraction and rationalized using the Pixel method. Acrylic acid undergoes a reconstructive phase transition to a new phase at ∼0.8 GPa and remains molecular to 7.2 GPa before polymerizing on decompression to ambient pressure. The resulting product is analyzed via Raman and FT-IR spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry and found to possess a different molecular structure compared with polymers produced via traditional routes. PMID:24650085

  2. Structural study by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy of the misfit compound (SbS{sub 1-x}Se{sub x}){sub 1.16}(Nb{sub 1.036}S{sub 2}){sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Kars, Mohammed; Fredrickson, Daniel C.; Gomez-Herrero, A.; Lidin, Sven; Rebbah, Allaoua; Otero-Diaz, L.C.; Dpto. Inorganica, Fac. C.C. Quimicas, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid

    2010-08-15

    In the Sb-Nb-S-Se system, a new misfit layer compound (MSL) has been synthesized and its structure was determined by combining single crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques. It presents a composite crystal structure formed by (SbS{sub 1-x}Se{sub x}) slabs stacking alternately with double NbS{sub 2} layers and both can be treated as separate monoclinic subsystems. The (SbS{sub 1-x}Se{sub x}) slabs comprise a distorted, two-atom-thick layer with NaCl-type structure formed by an array of {l_brace}SbX{sub 5}{r_brace} square pyramids joined by edges (X: S, Se); the NbS{sub 2} layers consist of {l_brace}NbS{sub 6}{r_brace} trigonal prisms linked through edge-sharing to form sheets, just as in the 2H-NbS{sub 2} structure type. Both sublattices have the same lattice parameters a = 5.7672(19) A, c = 17.618(6) A and {beta} = 96.18(3){sup o}, with incommensurability occurring along the b direction: b{sub 1} = 3.3442(13) A for the NbS{sub 2} subsystem and b{sub 2} = 2.8755(13) A for the (SbS{sub 1-x}Se{sub x}) subsystem. The occurrence of diffuse scattering intensity streaked along c{sup *} indicates that the (SbS{sub 1-x}Se{sub x}) subsystem is subjected to extended defects along the stacking direction.

  3. Eyeglass: A Very Large Aperture Diffractive Space Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Hyde, R; Dixit, S; Weisberg, A; Rushford, M

    2002-07-29

    Eyeglass is a very large aperture (25-100 meter) space telescope consisting of two distinct spacecraft, separated in space by several kilometers. A diffractive lens provides the telescope's large aperture, and a separate, much smaller, space telescope serves as its mobile eyepiece. Use of a transmissive diffractive lens solves two basic problems associated with very large aperture space telescopes; it is inherently fieldable (lightweight and flat, hence packagable and deployable) and virtually eliminates the traditional, very tight, surface shape tolerances faced by reflecting apertures. The potential drawback to use of a diffractive primary (very narrow spectral bandwidth) is eliminated by corrective optics in the telescope's eyepiece. The Eyeglass can provide diffraction-limited imaging with either single-band, multiband, or continuous spectral coverage. Broadband diffractive telescopes have been built at LLNL and have demonstrated diffraction-limited performance over a 40% spectral bandwidth (0.48-0.72 {micro}m). As one approach to package a large aperture for launch, a foldable lens has been built and demonstrated. A 75 cm aperture diffractive lens was constructed from 6 panels of 1 m thick silica; it achieved diffraction-limited performance both before and after folding. This multiple panel, folding lens, approach is currently being scaled-up at LLNL. We are building a 5 meter aperture foldable lens, involving 72 panels of 700 {micro}m thick glass sheets, diffractively patterned to operate as coherent f/50 lens.

  4. Visible/near-IR-light-driven TNFePc/BiOCl organic-inorganic heterostructures with enhanced photocatalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Li, Lu; Zhang, Mingyi; Zhao, Zhenyu; Sun, Baodong; Zhang, Xitian

    2016-06-21

    Although semiconductor photocatalysis has been reported for more than 40 years, the spectral response is still focused on the region of UV-Visible and it is seldom extended to more than 600 nm. In this work, visible/near-IR-light-driven 2,9,16,23-tetranitrophthalocyanine iron (FeTNPc)/bismuth oxychloride (BiOCl) organic-inorganic heterostructures have been synthesized by a two-step solvothermal method. The obtained products were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectra, scanning electron and transmission microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer, UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, nitrogen adsorption-desorption, and electrochemical measurements. The photocatalytic activity for the decomposition of methyl orange and bisphenol A solution can be significantly improved under visible/near-IR-light irradiation. Through detecting the main oxidative species by trapping experiments, the results show holes and ˙O2(-) radicals are majorly and minorly responsible for photodegradation respectively. What's more, the FeTNPc/BiOCl composite photocatalyst still retained the photocatalytic activity after three cycle measurements. PMID:27192122

  5. Rotorcraft transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coy, John J.

    1987-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center and the U.S. Army Aviation Systems Command share an interest in advancing the technology for helicopter propulsion systems. In particular, this presentation outlines that portion of the program that applies to the drive train and its various mechanical components. The major goals of the program are to increase the life, reliability, and maintainability; reduce the weight, noise, and vibration; and maintain the relatively high mechanical efficiency of the gear train. The current activity emphasizes noise reduction technology and analytical code development followed by experimental verification. Selected significant advances in technology for transmissions are reviewed, including advanced configurations and new analytical tools. Finally, the plan for transmission research in the future is presented.

  6. Synthesis, characterization of (3E)-1-(6-chloro-2-methyl-4-phenyl quinolin-3-Yl)-3-aryl prop-2-en-1-ones through IR, NMR, single crystal X-ray diffraction and insights into their electronic structure using DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarveswari, S.; Srikanth, A.; Arul Murugan, N.; Vijayakumar, V.; Jasinski, Jerry P.; Beauchesne, Hanna C.; Jarvis, Ethan E.

    2015-02-01

    3E-1-(6-Chloro-2-methyl-4-phenylquinolin-3-yl)-3-arylprop-2-en-1-ones were synthesized and characterized by FTIR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, HSQC, DEPT-135. In addition the compound 3E-1-(6-chloro-2-methyl-4-phenylquinolin-3-yl)-3-(2,5-dimethoxyphenyl)prop-2-en-1-one was subjected to the single crystal X-ray diffraction studies. Density functional theory calculations were carried out for this chalcone and its derivatives to investigate into their electronic structure, chemical reactivity, linear and non-linear optical properties. The structure predicted from DFT for chalcone is in good agreement with the structure from XRD measurement.

  7. Diffraction of a Laser Beam.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jodoin, Ronald E.

    1979-01-01

    Investigates the effect of the nonuniform irradiance across a laser beam on diffraction of the beam, specifically the Fraunhofer diffraction of a laser beam with a Gaussian irradiance profile as it passes through a circular aperture. (GA)

  8. Aberrations of diffracted wave fields. II. Diffraction gratings.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, V N

    2000-12-01

    The Rayleigh-Sommerfeld theory is applied to diffraction of a spherical wave by a grating. The grating equation is obtained from the aberration-free diffraction pattern, and its aberrations are shown to be the same as the conventional aberrations obtained by using Fermat's principle. These aberrations are shown to be not associated with the diffraction process. Moreover, it is shown that the irradiance distribution of a certain diffraction order is the Fraunhofer diffraction pattern of the grating aperture as a whole aberrated by the aberration of that order. PMID:11140481

  9. Recent diffractive results from HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valkárová, Alice

    2016-07-01

    The diffractive dijet cross sections for photoproduction and deep inelastic scattering were studied and compared with theoretical NLO QCD predictions. The results of exclusive dijet production were compared to predictions from models which are based on different assumptions about the nature of diffractive exchange. Isolated prompt photons in diffractive photoproduction produced inclusively or together with a jet were studied for the first time.

  10. Spectral diffraction efficiency characterization of broadband diffractive optical elements.

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Junoh; Cruz-Cabrera, Alvaro Augusto; Tanbakuchi, Anthony

    2013-03-01

    Diffractive optical elements, with their thin profile and unique dispersion properties, have been studied and utilized in a number of optical systems, often yielding smaller and lighter systems. Despite the interest in and study of diffractive elements, the application has been limited to narrow spectral bands. This is due to the etch depths, which are optimized for optical path differences of only a single wavelength, consequently leading to rapid decline in efficiency as the working wavelength shifts away from the design wavelength. Various broadband diffractive design methodologies have recently been developed that improve spectral diffraction efficiency and expand the working bandwidth of diffractive elements. We have developed diffraction efficiency models and utilized the models to design, fabricate, and test two such extended bandwidth diffractive designs.

  11. Variation in MidIR and LWIR polarimetric imagery due to diurnal and meteorological impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurton, Kristan P.; Felton, Melvin

    2008-04-01

    We present radiometric and polarimetric calibrated imagery recorded in both the mid-wave IR (MidIR) and long wave IR (LWIR) as a function diurnal variation over several multiday periods. We compare differences in polarimetric and conventional thermal imagry for both IR atmospheric transmission windows, i.e., 3-5μm and 8-12 μm regions. Meteorological parameters measured during the study include temperature, relative-humidity, wind-speed/direction, precipitation, and ambient atmospheric IR loading. The two camera systems used in the study differed significantly in design. The LWIR polarimetric sensor utilizes a spinning achromatic retarder and is best suited for static scenes, while the MidIR system is based on a division-of-aperture design and is capable of recording polarimetric imagery of targets that are rapidly moving. Examples of both S0 (conventional thermal) and degree-of-linear polarization (DOLP) imagery are presented and compared.

  12. Transmission electron microscope studies of extraterrestrial materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Lindsay P.

    1995-01-01

    Transmission Electron Microscopy, X-Ray spectrometry and electron-energy-loss spectroscopy are used to analyse carbon in interplanetary dust particles. Optical micrographs are shown depicting cross sections of the dust particles embedded in sulphur. Selected-area electron diffraction patterns are shown. Transmission Electron Microscope specimens of lunar soil were prepared using two methods: ion-milling and ultramicrotomy. A combination of high resolution TEM imaging and electron diffraction is used to characterize the opaque assemblages. The opaque assemblages analyzed in this study are dominated by ilmenite with lesser rutile and spinel exsolutions, and traces of Fe metal.

  13. Electronic excitations and structure of Li{sub 2}IrO{sub 3} thin films grown on ZrO{sub 2}:Y (001) substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Jenderka, Marcus Schmidt-Grund, Rüdiger; Grundmann, Marius; Lorenz, Michael

    2015-01-14

    Thin films are a prerequisite for application of the emergent exotic ground states in iridates that result from the interplay of strong spin-orbit coupling and electronic correlations. We report on pulsed laser deposition of Li{sub 2}IrO{sub 3} films on ZrO{sub 2}:Y (001) single crystalline substrates. X-ray diffraction confirms preferential (001) and (10-1) out-of-plane crystalline orientations with well defined in-plane orientation. Resistivity between 35 and 300 K is dominated by a three-dimensional variable range hopping mechanism. The dielectric function is determined by means of spectroscopic ellipsometry and, complemented by Fourier transform infrared transmission spectroscopy, reveals a small optical gap of ≈300 meV, a splitting of the 5d-t{sub 2g} manifold, and several in-gap excitations attributed to phonons and possibly magnons.

  14. Optical/IR from ground

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strom, Stephen; Sargent, Wallace L. W.; Wolff, Sidney; Ahearn, Michael F.; Angel, J. Roger; Beckwith, Steven V. W.; Carney, Bruce W.; Conti, Peter S.; Edwards, Suzan; Grasdalen, Gary

    1991-01-01

    Optical/infrared (O/IR) astronomy in the 1990's is reviewed. The following subject areas are included: research environment; science opportunities; technical development of the 1980's and opportunities for the 1990's; and ground-based O/IR astronomy outside the U.S. Recommendations are presented for: (1) large scale programs (Priority 1: a coordinated program for large O/IR telescopes); (2) medium scale programs (Priority 1: a coordinated program for high angular resolution; Priority 2: a new generation of 4-m class telescopes); (3) small scale programs (Priority 1: near-IR and optical all-sky surveys; Priority 2: a National Astrometric Facility); and (4) infrastructure issues (develop, purchase, and distribute optical CCDs and infrared arrays; a program to support large optics technology; a new generation of large filled aperture telescopes; a program to archive and disseminate astronomical databases; and a program for training new instrumentalists)

  15. Hard diffraction in Pythia 8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overgaard Rasmussen, Christine

    2016-07-01

    We present an overview of the options for diffraction implemented in the general-purpose event generator Pythia 8 [1]. We review the existing model for soft diffraction and present a new model for hard diffraction. Both models use the Pomeron approach pioneered by Ingelman and Schlein, factorising the diffractive cross section into a Pomeron flux and a Pomeron PDF, with several choices for both implemented in Pythia 8. The model of hard diffraction is implemented as a part of the multiparton interactions (MPI) framework, thus introducing a dynamical gap survival probability that explicitly breaks factorisation.

  16. Integrated uncooled array IR sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pevtsov, Eugeny P.; Elkin, Eugeny G.; Pospelova, Marina A.

    1997-08-01

    Technologies enabling low-dissipation designs for uncooled array IR sensors are offered. The technique involves the etching of special buffer layers from under a 1-micrometers membrane followed by deposition of an IR-sensitive film and electrode structure. The electrical and physical properties of plumbum-zirconate-titanate, barium titanate, tetraaminodiphenyl, polyvinylidene fluoride pyroelectric films are compared. A circuit for sensing pyroelectric signals in a CCD is considered.

  17. Controlled tuning of thin film deposition of IrO2 on Si using pulsed laser ablation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshy, Abraham M.; Bhat, Shwetha G.; Kumar, P. S. Anil

    2016-05-01

    We have successfully grown a stable phase of polycrystalline IrO2 on Si (100) substrate. We have found that the phase of IrO2 can be controllably tuned to obtain either Ir or IrO2 using pulsed laser ablation technique. O2 conditions during the deposition influences the phase directly and drastically whereas annealing conditions do not show any variation in the phase of thin film. X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoemission experiments confirm both Ir and IrO2 can be successively grown on Si using IrO2 target. Also, the morphology is found to be influenced by the O2 conditions.

  18. Thulium fiber laser-pumped mid-IR OPO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creeden, Daniel; Jiang, Min; Budni, Peter A.; Ketteridge, Peter A.; Setzler, Scott D.; Young, York E.; McCarthy, John C.; Schunemann, Peter G.; Pollak, Thomas M.; Tayebati, Parviz; Chicklis, Evan P.

    2008-04-01

    Fiber lasers are advancing rapidly due to their ability to generate stable, efficient, and diffraction-limited beams with significant peak and average powers. This is of particular interest as fibers provide an ideal pump source for driving parametric processes. Most nonlinear optical crystals which provide phase-matching to the mid-IR at commercially available fiber pump wavelengths suffer from high absorption above 4μm, resulting in low conversion efficiencies in the 4-5μm spectral region. The nonlinear optical crystals which combine low absorption in this same spectral region with high nonlinear gain require pumping at longer wavelengths (typically >1.9μm). In this paper, we report a novel mid-IR OPO pumped by a pulsed thulium-doped fiber laser operating at 2-microns. The eyesafe thulium-fiber pump laser generates >3W of average power at >30kHz repetition rate with 15-30ns pulses in a near diffraction-limited beam. The ZnGeP II (ZGP) OPO produces tunable mid-IR output power in the 3.4-3.99μm (signal) and the 4.0-4.7μm (idler) spectral regions in both singly resonant (SRO) and doubly resonant (DRO) formats. The highest mid-IR output power achieved from this system was 800mW with 20% conversion efficiency at 40kHz. In a separate experiment, the 3W of 2-micron light was further amplified to the 20W level. This amplified output was also used to pump a ZGP OPO, resulting in 2W of output power in the mid-IR. To our knowledge, these are the first demonstrations of a fiber-pumped ZGP OPO.

  19. Structured beam diffraction.

    PubMed

    Castagna, R; Di Donato, A; Nucara, L; Xu, J H; Lucchetta, D E; Simoni, F

    2016-04-01

    We report on the observation of a modulated pattern induced by a single laser beam in a polymeric film. In spite of the simple geometrical configuration, the analysis of the far field diffraction pattern allows a sensitive retrieving of the wavelength of the recording beam and of its incidence angle, pointing out the high information content of the recorded spot. A theoretical model is presented which satisfactorily explains the observed behavior. It takes into account the interaction of structured light with structured matter with the same symmetries and spatial modulation frequencies close to each other. This result shows a feature of the interaction between structured light and structured matter which has not been explored yet. PMID:27192262

  20. Phase shifting diffraction interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, Gary E.

    1996-01-01

    An interferometer which has the capability of measuring optical elements and systems with an accuracy of .lambda./1000 where .lambda. is the wavelength of visible light. Whereas current interferometers employ a reference surface, which inherently limits the accuracy of the measurement to about .lambda./50, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical reference wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. This interferometer is adjustable to give unity fringe visibility, which maximizes the signal-to-noise, and has the means to introduce a controlled prescribed relative phase shift between the reference wavefront and the wavefront from the optics under test, which permits analysis of the interference fringe pattern using standard phase extraction algorithms.

  1. Phase shifting diffraction interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, G.E.

    1996-08-29

    An interferometer which has the capability of measuring optical elements and systems with an accuracy of {lambda}/1000 where {lambda} is the wavelength of visible light. Whereas current interferometers employ a reference surface, which inherently limits the accuracy of the measurement to about {lambda}/50, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical reference wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. This interferometer is adjustable to give unity fringe visibility, which maximizes the signal-to-noise, and has the means to introduce a controlled prescribed relative phase shift between the reference wavefront and the wavefront from the optics under test, which permits analysis of the interference fringe pattern using standard phase extraction algorithms. 8 figs.

  2. Multilayer diffraction grating

    DOEpatents

    Barbee, Jr., Troy W.

    1990-01-01

    This invention is for a reflection diffraction grating that functions at X-ray to VUV wavelengths and at normal angles of incidence. The novel grating is comprised of a laminar grating of period D with flat-topped grating bars. A multiplicity of layered synthetic microstructures, of period d and comprised of alternating flat layers of two different materials, are disposed on the tops of the grating bars of the laminar grating. In another embodiment of the grating, a second multiplicity of layered synthetic microstructures are also disposed on the flat faces, of the base of the grating, between the bars. D is in the approximate range from 3,000 to 50,000 Angstroms, but d is in the approximate range from 10 to 400 Angstroms. The laminar grating and the layered microstructures cooperatively interact to provide many novel and beneficial instrumentational advantages.

  3. Multilayer diffraction grating

    DOEpatents

    Barbee, T.W. Jr.

    1990-04-10

    This invention is for a reflection diffraction grating that functions at X-ray to VUV wavelengths and at normal angles of incidence. The novel grating is comprised of a laminar grating of period D with flat-topped grating bars. A multiplicity of layered synthetic microstructures, of period d and comprised of alternating flat layers of two different materials, are disposed on the tops of the grating bars of the laminar grating. In another embodiment of the grating, a second multiplicity of layered synthetic microstructures are also disposed on the flat faces, of the base of the grating, between the bars. D is in the approximate range from 3,000 to 50,000 Angstroms, but d is in the approximate range from 10 to 400 Angstroms. The laminar grating and the layered microstructures cooperatively interact to provide many novel and beneficial instrumentational advantages. 2 figs.

  4. Dichroic Coherent Diffractive Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Ashish

    Understanding electronic structure at nanometer resolution is crucial to understanding physics such as phase separation and emergent behavior in correlated electron materials. Nondestructive probes which have the ability to see beyond surfaces on nanometer length and sub-picosecond time scales can greatly enhance our understanding of these systems and will impact development of future technologies, such as magnetic storage. Polarized x-rays are an appealing choice of probe due to their penetrating power, elemental and magnetic specificity, and high spatial resolution. The resolution of traditional x-ray microscopy is limited by the nanometer precision required to fabricate x-ray optics. In this thesis, a novel approach to lensless imaging of an extended magnetic nanostructure is presented. We demonstrate this approach by imaging ferrimagnetic "maze" domains in a Gd/Fe multilayer with perpendicular anisotropy. A series of dichroic coherent diffraction patterns, ptychographically recorded, are numerically inverted using non-convex and non-linear optimization theory, and we follow the magnetic domain configuration evolution through part of its magnetization hysteresis loop by applying an external magnetic field. Unlike holographic methods, it does not require a reference wave or precision optics, and so is a far simpler experiment. In addition, it enables the imaging of samples with arbitrarily large spatial dimensions, at a spatial resolution limited solely by the coherent x-ray flux and wavelength. It can readily be extended to other non-magnetic systems that exhibit circular or linear dichroism. This approach is scalable to imaging with diffraction-limited resolution, a prospect rapidly becoming a reality in view of the new generation of phenomenally brilliant x-ray sources.

  5. Vented transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, T.H.

    1990-01-29

    This patent describes a vented transmission. It comprises: a housing; a rotary input to the housing; a rotary output from the housing; transmission means within the housing interconnecting the input and the output and including a hollow, rotary shaft journaled within the housing; a vent tube having a first end extending into one end of the hollow shaft and a second end in fluid communication with the exterior of the housing; a shoulder within the hollow shaft and intermediate the ends of the vent tube and defining of relatively smaller diameter section near the first end of the vent tube that is within the hollow shaft and a relatively large diameter section nearer the second end of the vent tube; at least one aperture extending through the hollow shaft from the large diameter section immediately adjacent the shoulder; and a labyrinth seal at the interface of the vent tube and the large diameter section at a location between the aperture (s) and the second end of the vent tube.

  6. Characterization and identification of microorganisms by FT-IR microspectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngo-Thi, N. A.; Kirschner, C.; Naumann, D.

    2003-12-01

    We report on a novel FT-IR approach for microbial characterization/identification based on a light microscope coupled to an infrared spectrometer which offers the possibility to acquire IR-spectra of microcolonies containing only few hundred cells. Microcolony samples suitable for FT-IR microspectroscopic measurements were obtained by a replica technique with a stamping device that transfers spatially accurate cells of microcolonies growing on solid culture plates to a special, IR-transparent or reflecting stamping plate. High quality spectra could be recorded either by applying the transmission/absorbance or the reflectance/absorbance mode of the infrared microscope. Signal to noise ratios higher than 1000 were obtained for microcolonies as small as 40 μm in diameter. Reproducibility levels were established that allowed species and strain identification. The differentiation and classification capacity of the FT-IR microscopic technique was tested for different selected microorganisms. Cluster and factor analysis methods were used to evaluate the complex spectral data. Excellent discrimination between bacteria and yeasts, and at the same time Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial strains was obtained. Twenty-two selected strains of different species within the genus Staphylococcus were repetitively measured and could be grouped into correct species cluster. Moreover, the results indicated that the method allows also identifications at the subspecies level. Additionally, the new approach allowed spectral mapping analysis of single colonies which provided spatially resolved characterization of growth heterogeneity within complex microbial populations such as colonies.

  7. Epitaxial growth and electrochemical transfer of graphene on Ir(111)/α-Al2O3(0001) substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Shinji; Saito, Yuta; Kodama, Hideyuki; Sawabe, Atsuhito

    2016-07-01

    Low-pressure chemical vapor deposition growth of graphene on Iridium (Ir) layers epitaxially deposited on α-Al2O3 (0001) substrates was investigated. The X-ray diffraction, Raman and reflection high energy electron diffraction characterizations revealed that graphene films were epitaxially grown on Ir(111) layers, and the in-plane epitaxial relationship between graphene, Ir(111), and α-Al2O3(0001) was graphene ⟨ 1 1 ¯ 00 ⟩//Ir⟨ 11 2 ¯ ⟩//α-Al2O3⟨ 11 2 ¯ 0 ⟩. The graphene on Ir(111) was electrochemically transferred onto SiO2/Si substrates. We also demonstrated the reuse of the Ir(111)/α-Al2O3(0001) substrates in multiple growth and transfer cycles.

  8. Magnetic properties of RE5Ir2X (RE = Y, Gd-Ho, X = Sn, Sb, Pb, Bi) and magnetocaloric characterization of Gd5Ir2X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, Konrad; Schwickert, Christian; Niehaus, Oliver; Winter, Florian; Pöttgen, Rainer

    2014-09-01

    Systematic phase analytical studies of the systems RE-Ir-X (X = Sn, Pb, Sb, Bi) led to 15 new stannides, plumbides, antimonides and bismuthides with the composition RE5Ir2X. The compounds have been synthesized and characterized by X-ray powder diffraction. The structures of Gd5Ir2Sb and Dy5Ir2Bi have been refined from single crystal X-ray diffractometer data: Mo5SiB2 type, I4/mcm, a = 775.2(2), c = 1361.3(5) pm, wR2 = 0.0933, 404 F2 values, 16 variables for Gd5Ir2Sb and a = 767.5(1), c = 1368.9(3) pm, wR2 = 0.0694, 571 F2 values, 16 variables for Dy5Ir2Bi. Magnetic measurements of Gd5Ir2X (X = Sn, Pb, Sb, Bi), Tb5Ir2X (X = Sn, Pb, Sb, Bi), Dy5Ir2Pb, Dy5Ir2Bi and Ho5Ir2Pb indicate ferromagnetic transitions at TC = 154.3, 159.3, 124.4, 119.3, 99.2, 98.2, 65.5, 68.6, 45.1, 35.6 and 23.5 K, respectively. Gd5Ir2Bi and Gd5Ir2Sb show an additional antiferromagnetic transition at TN = 118.5 and 91.0 K. The magnetocaloric effect of Gd5Ir2X (X = Sn, Pb, Sb, Bi) in terms of the isothermal entropy change ΔSm is -7.3(3), -6.5(3), -8.7(3) and -9.0(3) J kg-1 K-1 at temperatures of 153, 157, 120 and 126 K for a 5 T field change. 119Sn Mössbauer spectra of Gd5Ir2Sn at 78 K show a huge transferred hyperfine field of 21.9(1) T and an isomer shift of 1.94(1) mm s-1, typical for stannides. 121Sb Mössbauer spectra of Gd5Ir2Sb at 78 K show a transferred hyperfine field of 14.2(3) T and an isomer shift of -7.45(8) mm s-1 reflecting the antimonide character.

  9. IR super-resolution microspectroscopy and its application to single cells.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Makoto; Inoue, Keiichi; Fujii, Masaaki

    2013-01-01

    For many years, spatial resolution is the most critical problem in IR microspectroscopy. This is because the spatial resolution of a conventional infrared microscope is restricted by the diffraction limit, which is almost the same as the wavelength of IR light, ranging from 2.5 to 25 μm. In the recent years, we have developed two novel types of far-field IR super-resolution microscopes using 2-color laser spectroscopies, those are transient fluorescence detected IR (TFD-IR) spectroscopy and vibrational sum-frequency generation (VSFG) spectroscopy. In these ways, because both transient fluorescence and VSFG signal have a wavelength in the visible region, the image is observed at the resolution of visible light, which is about 10 times smaller than that of IR light (that is, IR super-resolution). By using these techniques, we can map the specific IR absorption band with sub-micrometer spatial resolution, visualization of the molecular structure and reaction dynamics in a non-uniform environment such as a cell becomes a possibility. In the present reviews, we introduce our novel IR super-resolution microspectroscopy and its application to single cells in detail. PMID:22356113

  10. Diffraction-based optical correlator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spremo, Stevan M. (Inventor); Fuhr, Peter L. (Inventor); Schipper, John F. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Method and system for wavelength-based processing of a light beam. A light beam, produced at a chemical or physical reaction site and having at least first and second wavelengths, ?1 and ?2, is received and diffracted at a first diffraction grating to provide first and second diffracted beams, which are received and analyzed in terms of wavelength and/or time at two spaced apart light detectors. In a second embodiment, light from first and second sources is diffracted and compared in terms of wavelength and/or time to determine if the two beams arise from the same source. In a third embodiment, a light beam is split and diffracted and passed through first and second environments to study differential effects. In a fourth embodiment, diffracted light beam components, having first and second wavelengths, are received sequentially at a reaction site to determine whether a specified reaction is promoted, based on order of receipt of the beams. In a fifth embodiment, a cylindrically shaped diffraction grating (uniform or chirped) is rotated and translated to provide a sequence of diffracted beams with different wavelengths. In a sixth embodiment, incident light, representing one or more symbols, is successively diffracted from first and second diffraction gratings and is received at different light detectors, depending upon the wavelengths present in the incident light.

  11. Insulin receptor substrates 1 and 2 but not Shc can activate the insulin receptor independent of insulin and induce proliferation in CHO-IR cells

    SciTech Connect

    Niessen, Markus . E-mail: markus.niessen@usz.ch; Jaschinski, Frank; Item, Flurin; McNamara, Morgan P.; Spinas, Giatgen A.; Trueb, Thomas

    2007-02-15

    Ligand-activated insulin receptor (IR) attracts and phosphorylates various substrates such as insulin receptor substrates 1-4 (IRS) and Shc. To investigate how binding affinity for substrate affects signalling we generated chimeric receptors with the {beta}-chain of the insulin receptor containing NPXY motives with different affinities for receptor substrates. We found that the extent of receptor tyrosine phosphorylation positively correlates with binding affinity towards IRS1/2 but not towards Shc. Moreover, overexpression of IRS1 or IRS2 but not of Shc increased IR tyrosine phosphorylation in a dose-dependent manner, also independent of insulin. Molecular truncations of IRS1 revealed that neither the isolated PH and PTB domains nor the C-terminus with the tyrosine phosphorylation sites alone are sufficient for substrate-dependent receptor activation. Overexpression of IRS1 and IRS2 impaired insulin-induced internalization of the IR in a dose-dependent manner suggesting that IRS proteins prevent endosome-associated receptor dephosphorylation/inactivation. IRS1 and IRS2 could therefore target the activated IR to different cellular compartments. Overexpression of IRS1 and IRS2 inhibited insulin-stimulated activation of the MAP kinases Erk1/2 while it increased/induced activation of Akt/PKB. Finally, overexpression of IRS1 and IRS2 but not of Shc induced DNA synthesis in starved CHO-IR cells independent of exogenous growth factors. Our results demonstrate that variations in cellular IRS1 and IRS2 concentration affect insulin signalling both upstream and downstream and that IRS proteins could play instructive rather than just permissive roles in signal transmission.

  12. Detonation diffraction in gases

    SciTech Connect

    Pintgen, F.; Shepherd, J.E.

    2009-03-15

    We have experimentally investigated detonation diffraction out of a round tube into an unconfined half-space. The focus of our study is examining how the extent of detonation cellular instability influences the quantitative and qualitative features of diffraction. Detailed quantitative and qualitative measurements were obtained through simultaneous schlieren imaging, multiple-exposure chemiluminescence imaging, and planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging of OH molecules. Two types of stoichiometric mixtures, highly diluted H{sub 2}-O{sub 2}-Ar and H{sub 2}-N{sub 2}O, were studied in the sub-critical, critical and super-critical regime. These mixture types represent extreme cases in the classification of cellular instability with highly diluted H{sub 2}-O{sub 2}-Ar mixtures having very regular instability structures and H{sub 2}-N{sub 2}O having very irregular instability structures. The most striking differences between the mixtures occur in the sub-critical and critical regimes, for which the detonation fails to transition into the unconfined half-space. For the H{sub 2}-O{sub 2}-Ar mixture, the velocity on the center line was found to decay significantly slower than for the H{sub 2}-N{sub 2}O mixture. In case of the H{sub 2}-O{sub 2}-Ar mixture, it was evident from simultaneous schlieren-fluorescence images that the reaction front was coupled to the lead shock front up to 2.3 tube diameters from the exit plane. For the H{sub 2}-N{sub 2}O mixture, the reaction front velocity decreased to 60% of the corresponding Chapman-Jouguet value at 1.1 tube diameters from the tube exit plane. A geometric acoustic model showed that the observed differences in failure patterns are not caused by the differences in thermodynamic properties of the two mixtures but is linked to the larger effective activation energy and critical decay time in the H{sub 2}-N{sub 2}O mixture as compared to the H{sub 2}-O{sub 2}-Ar mixture. The re-initiation events appear similar for the two

  13. Dedicated software for diffractive optics design and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firsov, A.; Brzhezinskaya, M.; Firsov, A.; Svintsov, A.; Erko, A.

    2013-03-01

    An efficient software package for the structure design and simulation of imaging properties of diffraction optical elements has been developed. It operates with point source and consists of: the ZON software, to calculate the structure of an optical element in transmission and reflection; the KRGF software, to simulate the diffraction properties of an ideal optical element with point source; the DS software, to calculate the diffraction properties by taking into consideration material and shadowing effects. Optional software allows simulation with a real non-point source. Zone plate thickness profile, source shape as well as substrate curvature are considered in this calculation. This is especially important for the diffractive focusing elements and gratings at a total external reflection, given that the lateral size of the structure can be up to 1 m. The program package can be used in combination with the Nanomaker software to prepare data for ion and e-beam surface modifications and corrections.

  14. Study of optical Laue diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Chakravarthy, Giridhar E-mail: aloksharan@email.com; Allam, Srinivasa Rao E-mail: aloksharan@email.com; Satyanarayana, S. V. M. E-mail: aloksharan@email.com; Sharan, Alok E-mail: aloksharan@email.com

    2014-10-15

    We present the study of the optical diffraction pattern of one and two-dimensional gratings with defects, designed using desktop pc and printed on OHP sheet using laser printer. Gratings so prepared, using novel low cost technique provides good visual aid in teaching. Diffraction pattern of the monochromatic light (632.8nm) from the grating so designed is similar to that of x-ray diffraction pattern of crystal lattice with point defects in one and two-dimensions. Here both optical and x-ray diffractions are Fraunhofer. The information about the crystalline lattice structure and the defect size can be known.

  15. Electrically-programmable diffraction grating

    DOEpatents

    Ricco, Antonio J.; Butler, Michael A.; Sinclair, Michael B.; Senturia, Stephen D.

    1998-01-01

    An electrically-programmable diffraction grating. The programmable grating includes a substrate having a plurality of electrodes formed thereon and a moveable grating element above each of the electrodes. The grating elements are electrostatically programmable to form a diffraction grating for diffracting an incident beam of light as it is reflected from the upper surfaces of the grating elements. The programmable diffraction grating, formed by a micromachining process, has applications for optical information processing (e.g. optical correlators and computers), for multiplexing and demultiplexing a plurality of light beams of different wavelengths (e.g. for optical fiber communications), and for forming spectrometers (e.g. correlation and scanning spectrometers).

  16. Recent CMS results on diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benoît, Roland

    2015-03-01

    Recent CMS results on diffraction are presented. These include the measurements of the soft diffractive cross sections, of the forward rapidity gap cross section, of the diffractive dijet cross section, the measurement of a large rapidity gap in W and Z boson events and the measurement of the pseudorapidity distribution of charged particles in a single diffractive enhanced sample. This last measurement is the first common result of the CMS and TOTEM collaborations. Some prospects of common CMS-TOTEM data taking are also discussed.

  17. Photoinduced phase transitions in vanadium dioxide revealed by ultrafast electron diffraction and mid-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Kunal; Morrison, Vance; Chatelain, Robert; Hendaoui, Ali; Bruhacs, Andrew; Chaker, Mohamed; Siwick, Bradley

    2015-03-01

    The complex interplay between strong electron-electron correlations and structural distortions is thought to determine the electronic properties of many oxides, but the respective role of these two contributions is often difficult to determine. We report combined radio-frequency compressed ultrafast electron diffraction (RF-UED) and infrared transmissivity experiments in which we directly monitor and separate the lattice and charge density reorganizations associated with the optically induced semiconductor-to-metal phase transition in vanadium dioxide. These studies have uncovered a previously unreported photoinduced transition to a metastable phase retaining the periodic lattice distortion characteristic of the insulating phase, but differing by a reorganization of charge density along the vanadium dimer chains and a transition to metal-like mid IR optical properties. These results demonstrate that UED is able to follow details of both lattice and electronic structural dynamics on the ultrafast timescale. Supported by Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, the Canada Foundation for Innovation, the Canada Research Chairs program, NSERC PGS-D and CGS-D fellowships, and Fonds de Récherche du Québec-Nature et Technologies.

  18. Detection of IR target by fusing multispectral IR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Liya; Qi, Meng; Gao, Xuhui

    2011-08-01

    Detection of the small target in clutter, usually regarded as singular points in the infrared image, is an important issue in infrared searching and tracking (IRST) system. Because of the far range of the target to the sensor, the stealth technology, the effects of inherent sensor noise and the phenomena of nature, the target is more difficult to be detected. Multispectral sensor system has been proved it could greatly improve detection of the small, hard-to-find targets by multispectral processing techniques (such as sensor or image fusion). Aiming at the problem of multispectral IR Target Detection, a kind method of the multispectral IR target detection is proposed, based on the existed detection systems. In this method, the image registration is done firstly to make the different sensors have a same scene. Then, a fusion rule, named as adaptive weighted voting theory, is developed to combine the target detection results from the different spectral sensors. The adaptive weighted voting theory can give the different weights, based on the different spectral IR characteristics, and these weights decide the detected target is identified as real target or background. The experimental results show that the proposed method can reduce the detection uncertainty and improve the detection performance. Compared with the single spectral detection results and the others fusion detection methods, it can decrease the lost alarm rate and the false alarm rate effectively. The proposed method has been employed in our IR surveillance system, and it is easy to be used in the various circumstances.

  19. Image contrast of diffraction-limited telescopes for circular incoherent sources of uniform radiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shackleford, W. L.

    1980-01-01

    A simple approximate formula is derived for the background intensity beyond the edge of the image of uniform incoherent circular light source relative to the irradiance near the center of the image. The analysis applies to diffraction-limited telescopes with or without central beam obscuration due to a secondary mirror. Scattering off optical surfaces is neglected. The analysis is expected to be most applicable to spaceborne IR telescopes, for which diffraction can be the major source of off-axis response.

  20. The atomic structural dynamics of γ-Al2O3 supported Ir-Pt nanocluster catalysts prepared from a bimetallic molecular precursor: a study using aberration-corrected electron microscopy and X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Small, Matthew W; Sanchez, Sergio I; Menard, Laurent D; Kang, Joo H; Frenkel, Anatoly I; Nuzzo, Ralph G

    2011-03-16

    This study describes a prototypical, bimetallic heterogeneous catalyst: compositionally well-defined Ir-Pt nanoclusters with sizes in the range of 1-2 nm supported on γ-Al(2)O(3). Deposition of the molecular bimetallic cluster [Ir(3)Pt(3)(μ-CO)(3)(CO)(3)(η-C(5)Me(5))(3)] on γ-Al(2)O(3), and its subsequent reduction with hydrogen, provides highly dispersed supported bimetallic Ir-Pt nanoparticles. Using spherical aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (C(s)-STEM) and theoretical modeling of synchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements, our studies provide unambiguous structural assignments for this model catalytic system. The atomic resolution C(s)-STEM images reveal strong and specific lattice-directed strains in the clusters that follow local bonding configurations of the γ-Al(2)O(3) support. Combined nanobeam diffraction (NBD) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) data suggest the polycrystalline γ-Al(2)O(3) support material predominantly exposes (001) and (011) surface planes (ones commensurate with the zone axis orientations frequently exhibited by the bimetallic clusters). The data reveal that the supported bimetallic clusters exhibit complex patterns of structural dynamics, ones evidencing perturbations of an underlying oblate/hemispherical cuboctahedral cluster-core geometry with cores that are enriched in Ir (a result consistent with models based on surface energetics, which favor an ambient cluster termination by Pt) due to the dynamical responses of the M-M bonding to the specifics of the adsorbate and metal-support interactions. Taken together, the data demonstrate that strong temperature-dependent charge-transfer effects occur that are likely mediated variably by the cluster-support, cluster-adsorbate, and intermetallic bonding interactions. PMID:21341654

  1. An accurate dynamical electron diffraction algorithm for reflection high-energy electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, J.; Cai, C. Y.; Lv, C. L.; Zhou, G. W.; Wang, Y. G.

    2015-12-01

    The conventional multislice method (CMS) method, one of the most popular dynamical electron diffraction calculation procedures in transmission electron microscopy, was introduced to calculate reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) as it is well adapted to deal with the deviations from the periodicity in the direction parallel to the surface. However, in the present work, we show that the CMS method is no longer sufficiently accurate for simulating RHEED with the accelerating voltage 3-100 kV because of the high-energy approximation. An accurate multislice (AMS) method can be an alternative for more accurate RHEED calculations with reasonable computing time. A detailed comparison of the numerical calculation of the AMS method and the CMS method is carried out with respect to different accelerating voltages, surface structure models, Debye-Waller factors and glancing angles.

  2. Hydromechanical transmission

    DOEpatents

    Orshansky, Jr. deceased, Elias; Weseloh, William E.

    1978-01-01

    A power transmission having three planetary assemblies, each having its own carrier and its own planet, sun, and ring gears. A speed-varying module is connected in driving relation to the input shaft and in driving relationship to the three sun gears, all of which are connected together. The speed-varying means may comprise a pair of hydraulic units hydraulically interconnected so that one serves as a pump while the other serves as a motor and vice versa, one of the units having a variable stroke and being connected in driving relation to the input shaft, the other unit, which may have a fixed stroke, being connected in driving relation to the sun gears. The input shaft also drives the carrier of the third planetary assembly. A brake grounds the first carrier in the first range and in reverse and causes drive to be delivered to the output through the first ring gear in a hydrostatic mode. The carrier of the third planetary assembly drives the ring gear of the second planetary assembly, and a first clutching means connects the second carrier with the output in a second range, the brake for grounding the first carrier then being released. A second clutching means enables the third ring gear to drive the output shaft in a third range.

  3. Devices useful for vacuum ultraviolet beam characterization including a movable stage with a transmission grating and image detector

    DOEpatents

    Gessner, Oliver; Kornilov, Oleg A; Wilcox, Russell B

    2013-10-29

    The invention provides for a device comprising an apparatus comprising (a) a transmission grating capable of diffracting a photon beam into a diffracted photon output, and (b) an image detector capable of detecting the diffracted photon output. The device is useful for measuring the spatial profile and diffraction pattern of a photon beam, such as a vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) beam.

  4. Platinum Monolayer on IrFe Core-Shell Nanoparticle Electrocatalysts for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    K Sasaki; K Kuttiyiel; D Su; R Adzic

    2011-12-31

    We synthesized high activity and stability platinum monolayer on IrFe core-shell nanoparticle electrocatalysts. Carbon-supported IrFe core-shell nanoparticles were synthesized by chemical reduction and subsequent thermal annealing. The formation of Ir shells on IrFe solid-solution alloy cores has been verified by scanning transmission electron microscopy coupled with energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) and in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The Pt monolayers were deposited on IrFe core-shell nanoparticles by galvanic replacement of underpotentially deposited Cu adatoms on the Ir shell surfaces. The specific and Pt mass activities for the ORR on the Pt monolayer on IrFe core-shell nanoparticle electrocatalyst are 0.46 mA/cm{sup 2} and 1.1 A/mg{sub Pt}, which are much higher than those on a commercial Pt/C electrocatalyst. High durability of Pt{sub ML}/IrFe/C has also been demonstrated by potential cycling tests. These high activity and durability observed can be ascribed to the structural and electronic interaction between the Pt monolayer and the IrFe core-shell nanoparticles.

  5. Platinum Monolayer on IrFe Core–Shell Nanoparticle Electrocatalysts for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki K.; Kuttiyiel, K.A.; Su, D.; Adzic, R.R.

    2012-04-19

    We synthesized high activity and stability platinum monolayer on IrFe core-shell nanoparticle electrocatalysts. Carbon-supported IrFe core-shell nanoparticles were synthesized by chemical reduction and subsequent thermal annealing. The formation of Ir shells on IrFe solid-solution alloy cores has been verified by scanning transmission electron microscopy coupled with energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) and in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The Pt monolayers were deposited on IrFe core-shell nanoparticles by galvanic replacement of underpotentially deposited Cu adatoms on the Ir shell surfaces. The specific and Pt mass activities for the ORR on the Pt monolayer on IrFe core-shell nanoparticle electrocatalyst are 0.46 mA/cm{sup 2} and 1.1 A/mg{sub Pt}, which are much higher than those on a commercial Pt/C electrocatalyst. High durability of Pt{sub ML}/IrFe/C has also been demonstrated by potential cycling tests. These high activity and durability observed can be ascribed to the structural and electronic interaction between the Pt monolayer and the IrFe core-shell nanoparticles.

  6. Theoretical studies of Ir5Th and Ir5Ce nanoscale precipitates in Ir

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, James R; Averill, Frank; Cooper, Valentino R

    2014-01-01

    Experimentally, it is known that very small amounts of thorium and/or cerium added to iridium metal form a precipitate, Ir5Th / Ir5Ce, which improves the high temperature mechanical properties of the resulting alloys. We demonstrate that there are low-energy configurations for nano-scale precipitates of these phases in Ir, and that these coherent arrangements may assist in producing improved mechanical properties. One precipitate/matrix orientation gives a particularly low interfacial energy, and a low lattice misfit. Nanolayer precipitates with this orientation are found to be likely to form, with little driving force to coarsen. The predicted morphology of the precipitates and their orientation with the matrix phase provide a potential experiment that could be used to test these predictions.

  7. Results on diffraction at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Wyatt, A.

    2003-10-27

    In run I CDF made an extensive range of measurements studying diffractive processes. In run II these measurements can be extended using improved triggering, new detectors and larger data samples. In these proceedings run II measurements of single diffractive dijet production and double pomeron exchange production of dijets are presented.

  8. Computer Simulation of Diffraction Patterns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodd, N. A.

    1983-01-01

    Describes an Apple computer program (listing available from author) which simulates Fraunhofer and Fresnel diffraction using vector addition techniques (vector chaining) and allows user to experiment with different shaped multiple apertures. Graphics output include vector resultants, phase difference, diffraction patterns, and the Cornu spiral…

  9. IR Variability of Eta Carinae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Nathan

    2007-02-01

    Every 5.5 years, η Carinae experiences a dramatic ``spectroscopic event'' when high-excitation lines in its UV, optical, and IR spectrum disappear, and its hard X-ray and radio continuum flux crash. This periodicity has been attributed to an eccentric binary system with a shell ejection occurring at periastron. In addition, η Car shows long term changes as it is still recovering from its giant 19th century outburst. Both types of variability are directly linked to the current mass-loss rate and dust formation in its wind. Mid-IR images and spectra with T-ReCS provide a direct measure of changes in the current bolometric luminosity and trace dust formation episodes. This will provide a direct measurement of the mass ejected. Near-IR emission lines trace related changes in the post-event wind and ionization changes in the circumstellar environment needed to test specific models for the cause of η Car's variability as it recovers from its recent ``event''. High resolution near-IR spectra with GNIRS will continue the important work of HST/STIS, investigating changes in the direct and reflected spectrum of the stellar wind, and ionization changes in the nebula.

  10. IR Variability of Eta Carinae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Nathan

    2008-02-01

    Every 5.5 years, η Carinae experiences a dramatic ``spectroscopic event'' when high-excitation lines in its UV, optical, and IR spectrum disappear, and its hard X-ray and radio continuum flux crash. This periodicity has been attributed to an eccentric binary system with a shell ejection occurring at periastron, and the next periastron event will occur at the very end of 2008. In addition, η Car shows long term changes as it is still recovering from its giant 19th century outburst. Both types of variability are directly linked to the current mass-loss rate and dust formation in its wind. Mid-IR images and spectra with T-ReCS provide a direct measure of changes in the current bolometric luminosity and a direct measure of the massw in dust formation episodes that may occur at periastron in the colliding wind shock. Near-IR emission lines trace related changes in the post-event wind and ionization changes in the circumstellar environment needed to test specific models for the cause of η Car's variability as it recovers from its recent ``event''. High resolution near-IR spectra with Phoenix will continue the important work of HST/STIS, investigating changes in the direct and reflected spectrum of the stellar wind, and ionization changes in the nebula.

  11. Concealing compensation from the IRS.

    PubMed

    Burda, D; Greene, J

    1991-01-28

    Tougher reporting requirements from the Internal Revenue Service are prompting some not-for-profit hospitals to seek ways to hide compensation arrangements from the public and the media. Critics believe those tactics could get hospitals in hot water with the law, especially now that the IRS has launched a new, aggressive auditing offensive. PMID:10108763

  12. MARYLAND COASTAL BAYS IR 2002

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Maryland Coastal Bays Program Implementation Review (IR) summarizes the progress and challenges ahead for the Program through examination of its activities in relation to the CCMP. During the CCMP planning phase the stakeholders prioritized the actions and determined the impl...

  13. Automatic transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Miura, M.; Inuzuka, T.

    1986-08-26

    1. An automatic transmission with four forward speeds and one reverse position, is described which consists of: an input shaft; an output member; first and second planetary gear sets each having a sun gear, a ring gear and a carrier supporting a pinion in mesh with the sun gear and ring gear; the carrier of the first gear set, the ring gear of the second gear set and the output member all being connected; the ring gear of the first gear set connected to the carrier of the second gear set; a first clutch means for selectively connecting the input shaft to the sun gear of the first gear set, including friction elements, a piston selectively engaging the friction elements and a fluid servo in which hydraulic fluid is selectively supplied to the piston; a second clutch means for selectively connecting the input shaft to the sun gear of the second gear set a third clutch means for selectively connecting the input shaft to the carrier of the second gear set including friction elements, a piston selectively engaging the friction elements and a fluid servo in which hydraulic fluid is selectively supplied to the piston; a first drive-establishing means for selectively preventing rotation of the ring gear of the first gear set and the carrier of the second gear set in only one direction and, alternatively, in any direction; a second drive-establishing means for selectively preventing rotation of the sun gear of the second gear set; and a drum being open to the first planetary gear set, with a cylindrical intermediate wall, an inner peripheral wall and outer peripheral wall and forming the hydraulic servos of the first and third clutch means between the intermediate wall and the inner peripheral wall and between the intermediate wall and the outer peripheral wall respectively.

  14. Metal-carbon nanocomposites based on activated IR pyrolized polyacrylonitrile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efimov, Mikhail N.; Zhilyaeva, Natalya A.; Vasilyev, Andrey A.; Muratov, Dmitriy G.; Zemtsov, Lev M.; Karpacheva, Galina P.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we report about new approach to preparation of metal-carbon nanocomposites based on activated carbon. Polyacrylonitrile is suggested as a precursor for Co, Pd and Ru nanoparticles carbon support which is prepared under IR pyrolysis conditions of a precursor. The first part of the paper is devoted to study activated carbon structural characteristics dependence on activation conditions. In the second part the effect of type of metal introduced in precursor on metal-carbon nanocomposite structural characteristics is shown. Prepared AC and nanocomposite samples are characterized by BET, TEM, SEM and X-ray diffraction.

  15. Structure symmetry determination and magnetic evolution in Sr2Ir1–xRhxO4

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ye, Feng; Wang, Xiaoping; Hoffmann, Christina; Wang, Jinchen; Chi, Songxue; Matsuda, Masaaki; Chakoumakos, Bryan C.; Fernandez-Baca, Jaime A.; Cao, Gang

    2015-11-23

    We use single-crystal neutron diffraction to determine the crystal structure symmetry and to study the magnetic evolution in the rhodium doped iridates Sr2Ir1–xRhxO4 (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.16). Throughout this doping range, the crystal structure retains a tetragonal symmetry (space group I41/a) with two distinct magnetic Ir sites in the unit cell forming staggered IrO6 rotation. Upon Rh doping, the magnetic order is suppressed and the magnetic moment of Ir4+ is reduced from 0.21 μB/Ir for x = 0 to 0.18 μB/Ir for x = 0.12. As a result, the magnetic structure at x = 0.12 is different from thatmore » of the parent compound while the moments remain in the basal plane.« less

  16. Coherent Diffractive Imaging Using Curved-Beam Illumination

    SciTech Connect

    Peele, A G; Nugent, K A; Quiney, H M; Mancuso, A P; Chapman, H N

    2005-06-22

    The potential of coherent diffractive imaging has in recent years become well recognized. In this technique an essentially parallel beam of coherent x-rays illuminates a support region containing an unknown sample. Outside that region the wavefield is known--typically the sample is isolated so that outside the support there is no scattering. When the diffraction pattern is measured with sufficient signal to noise ratio an iterative technique can be used to solve for the transmission function of the sample. The technique offers extremely high resolution reconstructions of a sample.

  17. High-speed autofocusing of a cell using diffraction pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oku, Hiromasa; Ishikawa, Masatoshi; Theodorus; Hashimoto, Koichi

    2006-05-01

    This paper proposes a new autofocusing method for observing cells under a transmission illumination. The focusing method uses a quick and simple focus estimation technique termed “depth from diffraction,” which is based on a diffraction pattern in a defocused image of a biological specimen. Since this method can estimate the focal position of the specimen from only a single defocused image, it can easily realize high-speed autofocusing. To demonstrate the method, it was applied to continuous focus tracking of a swimming paramecium, in combination with two-dimensional position tracking. Three-dimensional tracking of the paramecium for 70 s was successfully demonstrated.

  18. Nanofabrication of diffractive optics for soft X-ray and atom beam focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehbein, S.

    2003-03-01

    Nanostructuring processes are described for manufacturing diffractive optics for the condensermonochromator set-up of the transmission X-ray microscope (TXM) and for the scanning transmission X-ray microscope (STXM) at the BESSY II electron storage ring in Berlin. Furthermore, a process for manufacturing freestanding nickel zone plates for helium atom beam focusing experiments is presented.

  19. Characterization of pinhole transmission gratings.

    PubMed

    Eidmann, K; Kühne, M; Müller, P; Tsakiris, G D

    1990-01-01

    Gold pinhole transmission gratings fabricated by Heidenhain GmbH primarily for the purpose of studying the radiation of intense soft x-ray sources have been tested with the synchrotron radiation of BESSY. Typical results for the spectral dependence of the grating efficiency into the various diffraction orders are presented in a wavelength region ranging from 4 to 20 nm. Also the influence of grating irregularities has been studied. With appropriate grating parameters quite good agreement between the experimental results and theoretical Calculations is Obtained. PMID:21307429

  20. Nanocrystalline diamond films: new material for IR optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konov, Vitali I.; Obraztsova, E. D.; Pimenov, Sergej M.; Ralchenko, Victor G.; Smolin, Andrey A.; Khomich, A. V.; Polyakov, Vladimir I.; Rukovishnikov, A. I.; Perov, Polievet I.; Loubnin, E. N.

    1995-07-01

    Thin nanocrystalline diamond films promising for IR optical applications were grown on Si substrates from methane-hydrogen gas mixture in a DC arc plasma CVD reactor. Three stages for the synthesis of the highly smooth noncrystalline diamond films are important: (i) substrate pretreatment with ultrafine diamond powder, (ii) excimer laser irradiation of seeded substrates, and (iii) two-step deposition process. A correlation between optical properties of the films and growth conditions has been established by means of Raman spectroscopy, spectroscopic ellipsometry and optical transmission spectroscopy techniques. Surface roughness, which was Ra equals 8 - 40 nm for the 1 micrometers thick films, significantly decreased the transmission in the visible because of light scattering, but it had a negligible effect in the IR range. The films are transparent in the IR and have optical constants n equals 2.34-2.36 and k equals 0.005- 0.03. The hydrogen incorporation in the films in amounts up to 1.5% have been deduced from intensity of C-H absorption band around 2900 cm(superscript -1.

  1. Small pixel oversampled IR focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caulfield, John; Curzan, Jon; Lewis, Jay; Dhar, Nibir

    2015-06-01

    We report on a new high definition high charge capacity 2.1 Mpixel MWIR Infrared Focal Plane Array. This high definition (HD) FPA utilizes a small 5 um pitch pixel size which is below the Nyquist limit imposed by the optical systems Point Spread Function (PSF). These smaller sub diffraction limited pixels allow spatial oversampling of the image. We show that oversampling IRFPAs enables improved fidelity in imaging including resolution improvements, advanced pixel correlation processing to reduce false alarm rates, improved detection ranges, and an improved ability to track closely spaced objects. Small pixel HD arrays are viewed as the key component enabling lower size, power and weight of the IR Sensor System. Small pixels enables a reduction in the size of the systems components from the smaller detector and ROIC array, the reduced optics focal length and overall lens size, resulting in an overall compactness in the sensor package, cooling and associated electronics. The highly sensitive MWIR small pixel HD FPA has the capability to detect dimmer signals at longer ranges than previously demonstrated.

  2. Encapsulated thermopile detector array for IR microspectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Huaiwen; Emadi, Arvin; de Graaf, Ger; Wolffenbuttel, Reinoud F.

    2010-04-01

    The miniaturized IR spectrometer discussed in this paper is comprised of: slit, planar imaging diffraction grating and Thermo-Electric (TE) detector array, which is fabricated using CMOS compatible MEMS technology. The resolving power is maximized by spacing the TE elements at an as narrow as possible pitch, which is limited by processing constraints. The large aspect ratio of the TE elements implies a large cross-sectional area between adjacent elements within the array and results in a relatively large lateral heat exchange between micromachined elements by thermal diffusion. This thermal cross-talk is about 10% in case of a gap spacing of 10 μm between elements. Therefore, the detector array should be packaged (and operated) in vacuum in order to reduce the cross-talk due to the air conduction through the gap. Thin film packaging is a solution to achieve an operating air pressure at1.3 mBar, which reduces the cross-talk to 0.4%. An absorber based on an optical interference filter design is also designed and fabricated as an IC compatible post-process on top the detector array. The combination of the use of CMOS compatible materials and processing with high absorbance in 1.5 - 5 μm wavelength range makes a complete on-chip microspectrometer possible.

  3. Shaped Ir-Ni bimetallic nanoparticles for minimizing Ir utilization in oxygen evolution reaction.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jinkyu; Yang, Sungeun; Kim, Chanyeon; Roh, Chi-Woo; Kwon, Yongwoo; Kim, Yong-Tae; Lee, Hyunjoo

    2016-04-12

    Shaped Ir-Ni bimetallic nanoparticles were synthesized and used for electrocatalytic oxygen evolution reaction (OER). The obtained bimetallic nanoparticles showed significantly enhanced Ir mass activity and durability compared with Ir nanoparticles. PMID:27034092

  4. Metal-mesh optical filter technology for mid-IR, far-IR, and submillimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGovern, William R.; Swinehart, Philip R.; Hogue, Eric L.; Daughton, David R.; DeLombard, Jay V.

    2012-06-01

    The innovative, high transmission band-pass filter technology presented here for the mid infrared (IR), terahertz (THz) and submillimeter ranges can tolerate cryogenic temperatures (down to 4K and below), are radiation-hard, vacuum-compatible and vibration-tolerant making them launch-capable and durable for potential space applications. In addition, Lake Shore band-pass filters (BPF) are light weight, as they employ no heavy substrates, nor have any vibronic bands due to polymer support layers. The filters are less than 2 mm thick (mostly the mounting frame) which allows insertion into tight spaces and standard filter wheels. The thin, light weight, vacuum compatible design can be incorporated into almost any detector setup. Filters are available for quick delivery in 29 standard center wavelengths (CWL) with 4 standard diameter sizes, up to 40mm inner diameter (ID).

  5. Electromagnetic diffraction efficiencies for plane reflection diffraction gratings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marathay, A. S.; Shrode, T. E.

    1973-01-01

    Results are presented of research activities on holographic grating research. A large portion of this work was performed using rigorous vector diffraction theory, therefore, the necessary theory has been included in this report. The diffraction efficiency studies were continued using programs based on a rigorous theory. The simultaneous occurrence of high diffraction efficiencies and the phenomenon of double Wood's anomalies is demonstrated along with a graphic method for determining the necessary grating parameters. Also, an analytical solution for a grating profile that is perfectly blazed is obtained. The performance of the perfectly blazed grating profile is shown to be significantly better than grating profiles previously studied. Finally, a proposed method is described for the analysis of coarse echelle gratings using rigorous vector diffraction that is currently being developed.

  6. Electromagnetic analysis of the IR sensor focal plane arrays of micro-optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikorski, Zbigniew

    2000-04-01

    Matrices of binary micro-lenses monolithically integrated with the focal-place-arrays (FPA) of longwave IR uncooled detectors can significantly improve sensor's parameters. Surface relief of the binary micro-lenses is built of annular stair step structures of heights and widths smaller than the radiation length. Scalar diffraction theory cannot correctly describe diffraction on these micro-structures and therefore the rigorous electromagnetic theory should be applied. In this aper, we have applied the electromagnetic eignemode method to study binary micro-optics for the longwave IR FPA of 50 micrometers pixel width. We have shown that binary refractive micro-lenses outperform their diffractive counterparts allowing for detectors of 10 micrometers width. The effective refractive micro-lenses require the 8-level surface relief. Geometrical optics predictions of the focal position agree quite well width electromagnetic calculations.

  7. Interlaced X-ray diffraction computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Vamvakeros, Antonios; Jacques, Simon D. M.; Di Michiel, Marco; Senecal, Pierre; Middelkoop, Vesna; Cernik, Robert J.; Beale, Andrew M.

    2016-01-01

    An X-ray diffraction computed tomography data-collection strategy that allows, post experiment, a choice between temporal and spatial resolution is reported. This strategy enables time-resolved studies on comparatively short timescales, or alternatively allows for improved spatial resolution if the system under study, or components within it, appear to be unchanging. The application of the method for studying an Mn–Na–W/SiO2 fixed-bed reactor in situ is demonstrated. Additionally, the opportunities to improve the data-collection strategy further, enabling post-collection tuning between statistical, temporal and spatial resolutions, are discussed. In principle, the interlaced scanning approach can also be applied to other pencil-beam tomographic techniques, like X-ray fluorescence computed tomography, X-ray absorption fine structure computed tomography, pair distribution function computed tomography and tomographic scanning transmission X-ray microscopy. PMID:27047305

  8. Diffraction analysis of frequency selective reflector antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahmat-Samii, Yahya; Tulintseff, Ann N.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper, a unified computational technique is presented which allows the incorporation of the curved frequency-selective surface (FSS) geometry in the computation of the reflector antenna radiation pattern. The scattered fields from an illuminated FSS reflector are formalized using Huygens' principle in such a way that the 'reflecting' and the 'transparent' FSS subreflector cases are treated identically and the thickness of the FSS subreflector remains arbitrary. The analysis utilizes local surface coordinates to describe the reflection/transmission matrices of the FSS subreflector where it is assumed that these matrices are available. In most cases one may use the local tangent plane for approximating the plane of the FSS in the local coordinate surface of the reflector. The paper demonstrates how the local curved coordinate system can be introduced in the diffraction modeling of FSS reflectors and its importance in accurately predicting the side-lobe and crosspolarization levels. Results of numerical simulations are presented for several FSS subreflector configurations.

  9. Diffraction dissociation at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkovszky, László; Orava, Risto; Salii, Andrii

    2013-04-01

    We report on recent calculations of low missing mass single (SD) and double (DD) diffractive dissociation at LHC energies. The calculations are based on a dual-Regge model, dominated by a single Pomeron exchange. The diffractively excited states lie on the nucleon trajectory N*, appended by the isolated Roper resonance. Detailed predictions for the squared momentum transfer and missing mass dependence of the differential and integrated single-and double diffraction dissociation in the kinematical range of present and future LHC measurements are given.

  10. Diffraction dissociation at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkovszky, Laszlo; Orava, Risto; Salii, Andrii

    2013-04-15

    We report on recent calculations of low missing mass single (SD) and double (DD) diffractive dissociation at LHC energies. The calculations are based on a dual-Regge model, dominated by a single Pomeron exchange. The diffractively excited states lie on the nucleon trajectory N*, appended by the isolated Roper resonance. Detailed predictions for the squared momentum transfer and missing mass dependence of the differential and integrated single-and double diffraction dissociation in the kinematical range of present and future LHC measurements are given.

  11. Diffraction techniques in engineering applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kozarczek, K.J.; Hubbard, C.R.; Watkins, T.R.; Wang, X.L.; Spooner, S.

    1995-12-31

    Diffraction techniques applied to crystalline materials provide quantitative information about the crystallographic structure and mechanical condition of the material. Those two characteristics influence the chemical, physical, and mechanical properties of a Component. A concerted application of x-ray and neutron diffraction allows one to comprehensively study the bulk and subsurface variations of such material characteristics as crystallographic texture, residual stress, and cold work. The Residual Stress User Center at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory offers academic and industrial researchers both neutron and x-ray diffraction capabilities. Recent examples of the application of work related to thin film, metal, ceramic and composite material technologies are presented.

  12. Strong-Field Physics with Mid-IR Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolter, Benjamin; Pullen, Michael G.; Baudisch, Matthias; Sclafani, Michele; Hemmer, Michaël; Senftleben, Arne; Schröter, Claus Dieter; Ullrich, Joachim; Moshammer, Robert; Biegert, Jens

    2015-04-01

    Strong-field physics is currently experiencing a shift towards the use of mid-IR driving wavelengths. This is because they permit conducting experiments unambiguously in the quasistatic regime and enable exploiting the effects related to ponderomotive scaling of electron recollisions. Initial measurements taken in the mid-IR immediately led to a deeper understanding of photoionization and allowed a discrimination among different theoretical models. Ponderomotive scaling of rescattering has enabled new avenues towards time-resolved probing of molecular structure. Essential for this paradigm shift was the convergence of two experimental tools: (1) intense mid-IR sources that can create high-energy photons and electrons while operating within the quasistatic regime and (2) detection systems that can detect the generated high-energy particles and image the entire momentum space of the interaction in full coincidence. Here, we present a unique combination of these two essential ingredients, namely, a 160-kHz mid-IR source and a reaction microscope detection system, to present an experimental methodology that provides an unprecedented three-dimensional view of strong-field interactions. The system is capable of generating and detecting electron energies that span a 6 order of magnitude dynamic range. We demonstrate the versatility of the system by investigating electron recollisions, the core process that drives strong-field phenomena, at both low (meV) and high (hundreds of eV) energies. The low-energy region is used to investigate recently discovered low-energy structures, while the high-energy electrons are used to probe atomic structure via laser-induced electron diffraction. Moreover, we present, for the first time, the correlated momentum distribution of electrons from nonsequential double ionization driven by mid-IR pulses.

  13. Efficient infrared luminescence of Er2S3/ZnS core/shell quantum dots and IR QDs-lED.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo; Zhang, Xiaosong; Ji, Ting; Zhang, Gaofeng; Li, Lan

    2014-06-01

    We have synthesized Er2S3/ZnS core/shell QDs by employing ErSt3, ZnSt2, and sulfur as precursors via a hot solution phase chemistry using a nucleation-doping strategy. X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and photoluminescence (PL) spectra were used to characterize the structure, morphology and luminescence properties of Er2S3/ZnS core/shell QDs. Moreover, the influence of overcoating temperatures on the infrared luminescence properties of QDs was investigated. PL spectra show that the emission intensity from the 4I13/2 --> 4I15/2 transition of Er3+ strongly increases with increasing overcoating temperatures, which was interpreted by the enhancing diffusion of Er3+ ions. IR-LEDs were fabricated combining commercial red GaAs LEDs with Er2S3/ZnS QDs, and luminescence properties of the IR-LED have been investigated. PMID:24738369

  14. Numerical investigation of diffraction of acoustic waves by phononic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moiseyenko, Rayisa P.; Declercq, Nico F.; Laude, Vincent

    2012-05-01

    Diffraction as well as transmission of acoustic waves by two-dimensional phononic crystals (PCs) composed of steel rods in water are investigated in this paper. The finite element simulations were performed in order to compute pressure fields generated by a line source that are incident on a finite size PC. Such field maps are analyzed based on the complex band structure for the infinite periodic PC. Finite size computations indicate that the exponential decrease of the transmission at deaf frequencies is much stronger than that in Bragg band gaps.

  15. Diffraction by DNA, carbon nanotubes and other helical nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, Amand A.; Lambin, Philippe

    2005-05-01

    This review discusses the diffraction patterns of x-rays or electrons scattered by fibres of helical biological molecules and by carbon nanotubes (CNTs) from the unified point of view of the Fourier-Bessel transform of an atomic helix. This paper is intended for scientists who are not professional crystallographers. X-ray fibre diffraction patterns of Pauling's protein α-helix and of Crick and Pauling's protein coiled-coil are revisited. This is followed by a non-technical comparison between the historic x-ray diffraction patterns of the A and B conformations of DNA, which were crucial for the discovery of the double helix. The qualitative analysis of the diffraction images is supported by novel optical simulation experiments designed to pinpoint the gross structural informational content of the patterns. The spectacular helical structure of the tobacco mosaic virus determined by Rosalind Franklin and co-workers will then be described as an early example of the great power of x-ray crystallography in determining the structure of a large biomolecular edifice. After these mostly historical and didactic case studies, this paper will consider electron diffraction and transmission electron microscopy of CNTs of great current interest, focusing particularly on recent data obtained for single-wall, double-wall and scrolled nanotubes. Several points of convergence between the interpretations of the diffraction patterns of biological helices and CNTs will be emphasized.

  16. Mid-IR high-index dielectric Huygens metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Jun; Zhang, Li; Ren, Han; Zhou, Mi; Lin, Yuankun; Hu, Juejun; Zhang, Hualiang

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we proposed highly efficient all-dielectric Huygens' metasurfaces working at mid-IR frequencies. The meta-atom of the designed Huygens' metasurface is a cubic dielectric resonator or its variety, which is made from PbTe that possesses a high refractive index of around 5 at mid-IR frequencies. By overlapping spectrally both the magnetic and electric dipole modes of the high-index dielectric resonators, a full phase coverage of 2π and an equal-magnitude transmission could be achieved, which are essential conditions for realizing a metasurface. Two Huygens' metasurfaces for beam bending are designed with a phase change between two consecutive meta-atoms of π/4 and π/3, respectively. The simulation results agree well with the design theory.

  17. Low Temperature Structural Phase Transition of Ba3NaIr2O9

    SciTech Connect

    Conrad, H.; Loye, Z; Kim, S; Macquart, R; Smith, M; Lee, Y; Vogt, T

    2009-01-01

    Single crystal X-ray and synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction have been used to probe the structure of Ba3NaIr2O9 from 300 K down to 20 K. Ba3NaIr2O9 is found to undergo a structural transition from hexagonal symmetry, P63/mmc, at ambient temperature to monoclinic symmetry, C2/c, at low temperature. The evolution of the unit cell volume upon cooling is indicative of a higher order structural transition, and the symmetry breaking becomes apparent as the temperature is decreased. The low temperature monoclinic structure of Ba3NaIr2O9 contains strongly distorted [NaO6] and [IrO6] octahedra in comparison to the room temperature hexagonal structure.

  18. Detonation diffraction from an annular channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meredith, James; Ng, Hoi Dick; Lee, John H. S.

    2010-12-01

    In this study, gaseous detonation diffraction from an annular channel was investigated with a streak camera and the critical pressure for transmission of the detonation wave was obtained. The annular channel was used to approximate an infinite slot resulting in cylindrically expanding detonation waves. Two mixtures, stoichiometric acetylene-oxygen and stoichiometric acetylene-oxygen with 70% Ar dilution, were tested in a 4.3 and 14.3 mm channel width ( W). The undiluted and diluted mixtures were found to have values of the critical channel width over the cell size around 3 and 12 respectively. Comparing these results to values of the critical diameter ( d c ), in which a spherical detonation occurs, a value of critical d c / W c near 2 is observed for the highly diluted mixture. This value corresponds to the geometrical factor of the curvature term between a spherical and cylindrical diverging wave. Hence, the result is in support of Lee's proposed mechanism [Lee in Dynamics of Exothermicity, pp. 321, Gordon and Breach, Amsterdam, 1996] for failure due to diffraction based on curvature in stable mixtures such as those highly argon diluted with very regular detonation cellular patterns.

  19. Advanced X-ray diffractive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vila-Comamala, J.; Jefimovs, K.; Pilvi, T.; Ritala, M.; Sarkar, S. S.; Solak, H. H.; Guzenko, V. A.; Stampanoni, M.; Marone, F.; Raabe, J.; Tzvetkov, G.; Fink, R. H.; Grolimund, D.; Borca, C. N.; Kaulich, B.; David, C.

    2009-09-01

    X-ray microscopy greatly benefits from the advances in x-ray optics. At the Paul Scherrer Institut, developments in x-ray diffractive optics include the manufacture and optimization of Fresnel zone plates (FZPs) and diffractive optical elements for both soft and hard x-ray regimes. In particular, we demonstrate here a novel method for the production of ultra-high resolution FZPs. This technique is based on the deposition of a zone plate material (iridium) onto the sidewalls of a prepatterned template structure (silicon) by atomic layer deposition. This approach overcomes the limitations due to electron-beam writing of dense patterns in FZP fabrication and provides a clear route to push the resolution into sub-10 nm regime. A FZP fabricated by this method was used to resolve test structures with 12 nm lines and spaces at the scanning transmission x-ray microscope of the PolLux beamline of the Swiss Light Source at 1.2 keV photon energy.

  20. X-Ray Diffraction Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, David F. (Inventor); Bryson, Charles (Inventor); Freund, Friedmann (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An x-ray diffraction apparatus for use in analyzing the x-ray diffraction pattern of a sample is introduced. The apparatus includes a beam source for generating a collimated x-ray beam having one or more discrete x-ray energies, a holder for holding the sample to be analyzed in the path of the beam, and a charge-coupled device having an array of pixels for detecting, in one or more selected photon energy ranges, x-ray diffraction photons produced by irradiating such a sample with said beam. The CCD is coupled to an output unit which receives input information relating to the energies of photons striking each pixel in the CCD, and constructs the diffraction pattern of photons within a selected energy range striking the CCD.

  1. Femtosecond single-electron diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Lahme, S.; Kealhofer, C.; Krausz, F.; Baum, P.

    2014-01-01

    Ultrafast electron diffraction allows the tracking of atomic motion in real time, but space charge effects within dense electron packets are a problem for temporal resolution. Here, we report on time-resolved pump-probe diffraction using femtosecond single-electron pulses that are free from intra-pulse Coulomb interactions over the entire trajectory from the source to the detector. Sufficient average electron current is achieved at repetition rates of hundreds of kHz. Thermal load on the sample is avoided by minimizing the pump-probe area and by maximizing heat diffusion. Time-resolved diffraction from fibrous graphite polycrystals reveals coherent acoustic phonons in a nanometer-thick grain ensemble with a signal-to-noise level comparable to conventional multi-electron experiments. These results demonstrate the feasibility of pump-probe diffraction in the single-electron regime, where simulations indicate compressibility of the pulses down to few-femtosecond and attosecond duration. PMID:26798778

  2. Electrically-programmable diffraction grating

    DOEpatents

    Ricco, A.J.; Butler, M.A.; Sinclair, M.B.; Senturia, S.D.

    1998-05-26

    An electrically-programmable diffraction grating is disclosed. The programmable grating includes a substrate having a plurality of electrodes formed thereon and a moveable grating element above each of the electrodes. The grating elements are electrostatically programmable to form a diffraction grating for diffracting an incident beam of light as it is reflected from the upper surfaces of the grating elements. The programmable diffraction grating, formed by a micromachining process, has applications for optical information processing (e.g. optical correlators and computers), for multiplexing and demultiplexing a plurality of light beams of different wavelengths (e.g. for optical fiber communications), and for forming spectrometers (e.g. correlation and scanning spectrometers). 14 figs.

  3. Diffraction by random Ronchi gratings.

    PubMed

    Torcal-Milla, Francisco Jose; Sanchez-Brea, Luis Miguel

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we obtain analytical expressions for the near-and far-field diffraction of random Ronchi diffraction gratings where the slits of the grating are randomly displaced around their periodical positions. We theoretically show that the effect of randomness in the position of the slits of the grating produces a decrease of the contrast and even disappearance of the self-images for high randomness level at the near field. On the other hand, it cancels high-order harmonics in far field, resulting in only a few central diffraction orders. Numerical simulations by means of the Rayleigh-Sommerfeld diffraction formula are performed in order to corroborate the analytical results. These results are of interest for industrial and technological applications where manufacture errors need to be considered. PMID:27505363

  4. Electron beam coherence measurements using diffracted beam interferometry/holography.

    PubMed

    Herring, Rodney A

    2009-06-01

    The intensity and coherence of elastically and inelastically scattered electrons have been studied by the interference of electron-diffracted beams using a method of diffracted beam interferometry/holography (DBI/H). In the interferograms produced, fringes were found to exist from low to high scattering angles. The intensity and coherence of the fringes are useful for understanding the contrast mismatch between experimental and simulated images found in atomic resolution images of crystals produced by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and annular dark-field (ADF) scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). The fringes disappear when the interfering beams are separated from an exact overlay position, which produces a measurement of the beam's lateral coherence and holds promise for measuring the coherence of the respective quasi-particles associated with the energy loss electrons. PMID:19141592

  5. Zika and Sexual Transmission

    MedlinePlus

    ... Address What's this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Zika and Sexual Transmission Language: English Español Português ... Healthcare Providers: Sexual Transmission of Zika Basics of Zika Virus and Sex Transmission Zika can be passed ...

  6. Fresnel diffraction by spherical obstacles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hovenac, Edward A.

    1989-01-01

    Lommel functions were used to solve the Fresnel-Kirchhoff diffraction integral for the case of a spherical obstacle. Comparisons were made between Fresnel diffraction theory and Mie scattering theory. Fresnel theory is then compared to experimental data. Experiment and theory typically deviated from one another by less than 10 percent. A unique experimental setup using mercury spheres suspended in a viscous fluid significantly reduced optical noise. The major source of error was due to the Gaussian-shaped laser beam.

  7. Diffractive dijet production in CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Albrow, M.G.; CDF Collaboration

    1998-04-17

    We have studied events with a high-x{sub F} antiproton and two central jets in CDF, with p{anti p} collisions at {radical}s = 630 and 1800 GeV. These events are expected to be dominated by diffraction (pomeron exchange). The jet E{sub T} spectra are very similar to those of non-diffractively produced jets but slightly steeper; their azimuthal difference {Delta}{phi} is more peaked at 180{degree}.

  8. New CDF results on diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Mesropian, Christina; /Rockefeller U.

    2006-12-01

    We report new diffraction results obtained by the CDF collaboration in proton-antiproton collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron collider at {radical}s=1.96 TeV. The first experimental evidence of exclusive dijet and diphoton production is presented. The exclusive results are discussed in context of the exclusive Higgs production at LHC. We also present the measurement of the Q{sup 2} and t dependence of the diffractive structure function.

  9. VLT near- to mid-IR imaging and spectroscopy of the M 17 UC1 - IRS5 region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhiwei; Nürnberger, Dieter E. A.; Chini, Rolf; Jiang, Zhibo; Fang, Min

    2015-06-01

    Aims: We investigate the surroundings of the hypercompact H ii region M 17 UC1 to probe the physical properties of the associated young stellar objects and the environment of massive star formation. Methods: We use diffraction-limited near-IR (VLT/NACO) and mid-IR (VLT/VISIR) images to reveal the different morphologies at various wavelengths. Likewise, we investigate the stellar and nebular content of the region with VLT/SINFONI integral field spectroscopy with a resolution R ˜ 1500 at H + K bands. Results: Five of the seven point sources in this region show L-band excess emission. A geometric match is found between the H2 emission and near-IR polarized light in the vicinity of IRS5A, and between the diffuse mid-IR emission and near-IR polarization north of UC1. The H2 emission is typical for dense photodissociation regions (PDRs), which are initially far-ultraviolet pumped and repopulated by collisional de-excitation. The spectral types of IRS5A and B273A are B3-B7 V/III and G4-G5 III, respectively. The observed infrared luminosity LIR in the range 1-20 μm is derived for three objects; we obtain 2.0 × 103 L⊙ for IRS5A, 13 L⊙ for IRS5C, and 10 L⊙ for B273A. Conclusions: IRS5 might be a young quadruple system. Its primary star IRS5A is confirmed to be a high-mass protostellar object (˜9 M⊙, ˜1 × 105 yrs); it might have terminated accretion due to the feedback from stellar activities (radiation pressure, outflow) and the expanding H ii region of M 17. The object UC1 might also have terminated accretion because of the expanding hypercompact H ii region, which it ionizes. The disk clearing process of the low-mass young stellar objects in this region might be accelerated by the expanding H ii region. The outflows driven by UC1 are running south-north with its northeastern side suppressed by the expanding ionization front of M 17; the blue-shifted outflow lobe of IRS5A is seen in two types of tracers along the same line of sight in the form of H2 emission

  10. Dynamical x-ray diffraction from an icosahedral Al-Pd-Mn quasicrystal

    SciTech Connect

    Kycia, S.

    1996-04-23

    Primary extinction effects in diffraction from single grains of Al-Pd- Mn, and presumably many other FCI alloys, may be significant and should be corrected for prior to use of diffraction data in structural determinations. Probes based on dynamical diffraction effects, such as x-ray standing wave fluorescence, multiple beam interference, and x-ray transmission topographs, may now be used to study the bulk and surface structure of some quasicrystals. The observation of dynamical diffraction from icosahedral Al-Pd-Mn is a striking confirmation of the fact that quasicrystals can present a degree of structural perfection comparable to that found in the best periodic intermetallic crystals.

  11. 100-watt fiber-based green laser with near diffraction-limited beam quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Dan; Eisenberg, Eric; Brar, Khush; Yilmaz, Tolga; Honea, Eric

    2010-02-01

    An air-cooled, light-weight, fiber-based, high power green laser has been prototyped. The system consists of an all-fibercoupled IR pump laser at 1064 nm and a frequency-conversion module in a compact and flexible configuration. The IR laser operates in QCW mode, with 10 MHz pulse repetition frequency and 3-5 ns pulse width, to generate sufficient peak power for frequency doubling in the converter module. The IR laser can produce more than 200 W in a linearlypolarized diffraction-limited output beam with high spectral brightness for frequency conversion. The converter module has an input telescope and an oven with a nonlinear crystal to efficiently convert the 1064-nm IR fiber laser output to 532-nm green output. The IR laser and conversion module are connected via a stainless-steel protected delivery fiber for optical beam delivery and an electrical cable harness for electrical power delivery and system control. The beam quality of the 532 nm output remains near diffraction-limited, with M2<1.4. Up to 101 W of 532 nm output was demonstrated and multi-hour runs were characterized at 75 W output. The weights of the IR laser package and doubler are 69 lbs and 14 lbs respectively. An overview of the system and full characterization results will be presented. Such compact, highbrightness green laser sources are expected to enable various scientific, defense and industrial applications.

  12. Diffractive paths for weak localization in quantum billiards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Březinová, Iva; Stampfer, Christoph; Wirtz, Ludger; Rotter, Stefan; Burgdörfer, Joachim

    2008-04-01

    We study the weak-localization effect in quantum transport through a clean ballistic cavity with regular classical dynamics. We address the question which paths account for the suppression of conductance through a system where disorder and chaos are absent. By exploiting both quantum and semiclassical methods, we unambiguously identify paths that are diffractively backscattered into the cavity (when approaching the lead mouths from the cavity interior) to play a key role. Diffractive scattering couples transmitted and reflected paths and is thus essential to reproduce the weak-localization peak in reflection and the corresponding antipeak in transmission. A comparison of semiclassical calculations featuring these diffractive paths yields good agreement with full quantum calculations and experimental data. Our theory provides system-specific predictions for the quantum regime of few open lead modes and can be expected to be relevant also for mixed as well as chaotic systems.

  13. X-ray diffraction as a local probe tool.

    PubMed

    Stangl, J; Mocuta, C; Diaz, A; Metzger, T H; Bauer, G

    2009-12-01

    For the structural characterization of nanoscale objects, X-ray diffraction is widely used as a technique complementing local probe analysis methods such as scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Details on strain distributions, chemical composition, or size and shape of nanostructures are addressed. X-ray diffraction traditionally obtains very good statistically averaged properties over large ensembles-provided this averaging is meaningful for ensembles with sufficiently small dispersion of properties. In many cases, however, it is desirable to combine different analysis techniques on exactly the same nano-object, for example, to gain a more detailed insight into the interdependence of properties. X-ray beams focused to diameters in the sub-micron range, which are available at third-generation synchrotron sources, allow for such X-ray diffraction studies of individual nano-objects. PMID:19856372

  14. Cryo diffraction microscopy: Ice conditions and finite supports

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, H.; Downing, K.; Huang, X.; Kirz, J.; Marchesini, S.; Nelson, J.; Shapiro, D.; Steinbrener, J.; Stewart, A.; Jacobsen, C.

    2009-09-01

    Using a signal-to-noise ratio estimation based on correlations between multiple simulated images, we compare the dose efficiency of two soft x-ray imaging systems: incoherent brightfield imaging using zone plate optics in a transmission x-ray microscope (TXM), and x-ray diffraction microscopy (XDM) where an image is reconstructed from the far-field coherent diffraction pattern. In XDM one must computationally phase weak diffraction signals; in TXM one suffers signal losses due to the finite numerical aperture and efficiency of the optics. In simulations with objects representing isolated cells such as yeast, we find that XDM has the potential for delivering equivalent resolution images using fewer photons. This can be an important advantage for studying radiation-sensitive biological and soft matter specimens.

  15. Optical properties and diffraction effects in opal photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Balestreri, Alessandra; Andreani, Lucio Claudio; Agio, Mario

    2006-09-01

    Optical properties of fcc opals oriented along the [111] direction are calculated by means of a scattering-matrix approach based on approximating each sphere with cylindrical slices. The use of a plane-wave basis in each layer allows distinguishing zero-order reflection and transmission from higher-order (diffraction) spectra. Optical spectra at large values of the angle of incidence indicate the presence of diffraction effects and of polarization mixing along the LW orientation. Reflectance and transmittance in the high-energy region show a rich spectral dependence and compare reasonably well with recent experimental observations on polystyrene opals. Diffraction spectra as a function of the number of layers display an oscillatory behavior, pointing to the existence of a Pendellösung phenomenon, related to the exchange of energy between two propagating modes in the investigated three-dimensional photonic crystal. This phenomenon could be observed in transmittance experiments on high-quality opals with controlled thickness. PMID:17025760

  16. Cryo diffraction microscopy: Ice conditions and finite supports

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Miao, H.; Downing, K.; Huang, X.; Kirz, J.; Marchesini, S.; Nelson, J.; Shapiro, D.; Steinbrener, J.; Stewart, A.; Jacobsen, C.

    2009-09-01

    Using a signal-to-noise ratio estimation based on correlations between multiple simulated images, we compare the dose efficiency of two soft x-ray imaging systems: incoherent brightfield imaging using zone plate optics in a transmission x-ray microscope (TXM), and x-ray diffraction microscopy (XDM) where an image is reconstructed from the far-field coherent diffraction pattern. In XDM one must computationally phase weak diffraction signals; in TXM one suffers signal losses due to the finite numerical aperture and efficiency of the optics. In simulations with objects representing isolated cells such as yeast, we find that XDM has the potential for delivering equivalent resolution imagesmore » using fewer photons. This can be an important advantage for studying radiation-sensitive biological and soft matter specimens.« less

  17. Survey of Transmission Cost Allocation Methodologies for Regional Transmission Organizations

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, S.; Porter, K.; Mudd, C.; Rogers, J.

    2011-02-01

    The report presents transmission cost allocation methodologies for reliability transmission projects, generation interconnection, and economic transmission projects for all Regional Transmission Organizations.

  18. Diffraction efficiency analysis for multi-level diffractive optical elements

    SciTech Connect

    Erteza, I.A.

    1995-11-01

    Passive optical components can be broken down into two main groups: Refractive elements and diffractive elements. With recent advances in manufacturing technologies, diffractive optical elements are becoming increasingly more prevalent in optical systems. It is therefore important to be able to understand and model the behavior of these elements. In this report, we present a thorough analysis of a completely general diffractive optical element (DOE). The main goal of the analysis is to understand the diffraction efficiency and power distribution of the various modes affected by the DOE. This is critical to understanding cross talk and power issues when these elements are used in actual systems. As mentioned, the model is based on a completely general scenario for a DOE. This allows the user to specify the details to model a wide variety of diffractive elements. The analysis is implemented straightforwardly in Mathematica. This report includes the development of the analysis, the Mathematica implementation of the model and several examples using the Mathematical analysis tool. It is intended that this tool be a building block for more specialized analyses.

  19. New approach to imaging spectroscopy using diffractive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinnrichs, Michele; Massie, Mark A.

    1997-10-01

    Over the past several years, Pacific Advanced Technology (PAT) has developed several hyperspectral imagers using diffractive optics as the dispersive media. This new approach has been patented and demonstrated in numerous field tests. PAT has developed hyperspectral cameras in the visible, mid-wave IR and is currently under contrast to the Air Force to develop a dual band hyperspectral lens for simultaneous spectral imaging in both the mid-wave and long- wave IR. The development of these cameras over the years have been sponsored by internal research and development, contracts from the Air Force Phillips Lab., Air Force Wright Labs Armament Division, BMDO and by the Office of Naval Research. Numerous papers have been presented in the past describing the performance of these various hyperspectral cameras. The purpose of this paper is to describe the theory behind the image multi-spectral sensing (IMSS) used in these hyperspectral cameras. IMSS utilizes a very simple optical design that enables a robust and low cost hyper-spectral imaging instrument. The IMSS is a dispersive spectrometer using a single diffractive optical element for both imaging and dispersion. The lens is tuned for a single wavelength giving maximum diffraction efficiency at that wavelength and high efficiency throughout the spectral band-pass of the camera. The diffractive optics disperse the light along the optical axis as opposed to perpendicular to the axis in conventional dispersive spectrometers. A detector array is used as the sensing medium and the spectral images are rad out electronically. POst processing is used to reduce spectral cross talk and to spatially sharpen the spectral images.

  20. Electrochromism with colloidal WO3 and IrO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalak, Franck; Rault, L.; Aldebert, Pierre

    1992-11-01

    Colloidal particles of WO3 and IrO2 are synthesized and dispersed within a gelatinous perfluorinated ionomer matrix. Experimental procedures are established in order to obtain percolation between the electrochromic particles. Colloidal particle sizes are measured by quasi elastic light scattering. Electrochemical properties of the mixed colloid electrodes are determined by cyclic voltammetry and impedance spectroscopy. Preliminary optical tests are performed in order to measure transmission and contrast of electrochromic half cells with a mixed colloid electrode, and also a sputtered oxide electrode.

  1. Expanded IR glass map for multispectral optics designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayya, Shyam; Gibson, Daniel; Nguyen, Vinh; Beadie, Guy; Sanghera, Jasbinder; Kotov, Mikhail

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents new multispectral IR glasses with transmission from 0.9 to > 14 μm in wavelength and refractive index from 2.38 to 2.17. These new glasses are designed to have comparable glass softening temperatures and compatible coefficients of thermal expansion to allow bonding and co-molding of multilayer optics. With large variation in their Abbe numbers and negative to near-zero dn/dT, optics made from these new glasses can significantly reduce the size/weight or complexity of the multispectral imaging systems for weight sensitive platforms.

  2. Localized waveguide formation in germanosilicate fiber transmitting femtosecond IR pulses

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Haohua; Koh, Yee Lin; Marks, Daniel L.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2010-01-01

    Transmission of intense femtosecond 825 nm pulses progressively produces a waveguide at the entrance of a heavily Ge-doped silicate fiber. The waveguide behaves as a multimillimeter long-fiber bandpass filter that scatters away light with wavelengths shorter or longer than 850 nm. This phenomenon has been correlated with the ~800 nm photosensitivity producing type I-IR fiber Bragg gratings in side-written lightly Ge-doped silicate fibers and low-loss waveguides in pure silica bulk glass. A model incorporating color center formation is proposed to understand the underlying mechanism. PMID:20548798

  3. Diffraction described by virtual particle momentum exchange: the "diffraction force"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobley, Michael J.

    2011-09-01

    Particle diffraction can be described by an ensemble of particle paths determined through a Fourier analysis of a scattering lattice where the momentum exchange probabilities are defined at the location of scattering, not the point of detection. This description is compatible with optical wave theories and quantum particle models and provides deeper insights to the nature of quantum uncertainty. In this paper the Rayleigh-Sommerfeld and Fresnel-Kirchoff theories are analyzed for diffraction by a narrow slit and a straight edge to demonstrate the dependence of particle scattering on the distance of virtual particle exchange. The quantized momentum exchange is defined by the Heisenberg uncertainty principle and is consistent with the formalism of QED. This exchange of momentum manifests the "diffraction force" that appears to be a universal construct as it applies to neutral and charged particles. This analysis indicates virtual particles might form an exchange channel that bridges the space of momentum exchange.

  4. Secondary diffraction of diffracted Gaussian beam of laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasil'Ev, Yu. V.; Kozar', A. V.; Matyunin, A. V.

    2011-10-01

    The diffraction of a narrow Gaussian beam of laser radiation on mutually perpendicular edges of crossed, superimposed sharp wedge-shaped blades (safety razors) has been studied. The diffraction pattern observed on a flat screen behind the blades comprises a very bright central spot, which exhibits the structure of a "light network" with rectangular cells, and four groups of narrow bright bands that expand from the central spot toward the periphery and form a rectangular cross. The spatial frequency of light-field modulation on the screen can be controlled by varying the distance from the blades to screen.

  5. Electromagnetic diffraction efficiencies for plane reflection diffraction gratings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marathay, A. S.; Shrode, T. E.

    1974-01-01

    The theory and computer programs, based on electromagnetic theory, for the analysis and design of echelle gratings were developed. The gratings are designed for instruments that operate in the ultraviolet portion of the spectrum. The theory was developed so that the resulting computer programs will be able to analyze deep (up to 30 wavelengths) gratings by including as many as 100 real or homogeneous diffraction orders. The program calculates the complex amplitude coefficient for each of the diffracted orders. A check on the numerical method used to solve the integral equations is provided by a conservation of energy calculation.

  6. IR susceptibility of naval ships using ShipIR/NTCS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaitekunas, David A.

    2010-04-01

    Methods of analysing the signature and susceptibility of naval platforms to infrared detection are described. An unclassified ShipIR destroyer model is used to illustrate the primary sources of infrared signature and detection: the exhaust system, solar-heating, and operating climate. The basic detection algorithm used by the Naval Threat Countermeasure Simulator (NTCS) component of ShipIR is described and used to analyse the effectiveness of various stealth technologies: stack suppression, low solar absorptive (LSA) paints, and Active Hull Cooling (AHC). Standard marine climate statistics are used to determine a minimum (5%), average (50%) and maximum (95%) signature condition for each operating region. The change in detection range of two wave-band sensors (3-5μm, 8-12 μm) operating at different altitudes (10m, 270m) in each of four climatic conditions is used to assess the effectiveness of each stealth solution, providing a more integral approach to infrared stealth design. These tools and methods form the basis on which future platform designs are being evaluated.

  7. Quantum-dot-array diffraction grating with single order diffraction property for soft x-ray region

    SciTech Connect

    Kuang Longyu; Wang Chuanke; Wang Zhebin; Cao Leifeng; Liu Shenye; Ding Yongkun; Zhu Xiaoli; Xie Changqing

    2010-07-15

    A gold transmission grating is used routinely to disperse the x-ray spectrum at the Z soft x-ray facility to measure the spectrum and temporal history of the absolute soft x-ray power emitted from z-pinch and hohlraum radiation sources. A quantum-dot-array diffraction grating (QDADG) of 250 lines/mm for soft x-ray is designed and fabricated for the first time according to the principle of binary sinusoidal transmission grating. The diffraction efficiencies of the grating are measured in the 150-300 eV photon energy range on the Beamline 3W1B of Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility. This article describes the basic concept and calibration techniques and presents calibration results. It is shown that the 250 lines/mm QDADG can be used to disperse light without higher-order diffractions in soft x-ray range, and the diffraction efficiencies of this grating are nearly constant (about 25%), which is beneficial in the spectrum analysis.

  8. Quantum-dot-array diffraction grating with single order diffraction property for soft x-ray region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, Longyu; Wang, Chuanke; Wang, Zhebin; Cao, Leifeng; Zhu, Xiaoli; Xie, Changqing; Liu, Shenye; Ding, Yongkun

    2010-07-01

    A gold transmission grating is used routinely to disperse the x-ray spectrum at the Z soft x-ray facility to measure the spectrum and temporal history of the absolute soft x-ray power emitted from z-pinch and hohlraum radiation sources. A quantum-dot-array diffraction grating (QDADG) of 250 lines/mm for soft x-ray is designed and fabricated for the first time according to the principle of binary sinusoidal transmission grating. The diffraction efficiencies of the grating are measured in the 150-300 eV photon energy range on the Beamline 3W1B of Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility. This article describes the basic concept and calibration techniques and presents calibration results. It is shown that the 250 lines/mm QDADG can be used to disperse light without higher-order diffractions in soft x-ray range, and the diffraction efficiencies of this grating are nearly constant (about 25%), which is beneficial in the spectrum analysis.

  9. Quantum-dot-array diffraction grating with single order diffraction property for soft x-ray region.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Longyu; Wang, Chuanke; Wang, Zhebin; Cao, Leifeng; Zhu, Xiaoli; Xie, Changqing; Liu, Shenye; Ding, Yongkun

    2010-07-01

    A gold transmission grating is used routinely to disperse the x-ray spectrum at the Z soft x-ray facility to measure the spectrum and temporal history of the absolute soft x-ray power emitted from z-pinch and hohlraum radiation sources. A quantum-dot-array diffraction grating (QDADG) of 250 lines/mm for soft x-ray is designed and fabricated for the first time according to the principle of binary sinusoidal transmission grating. The diffraction efficiencies of the grating are measured in the 150-300 eV photon energy range on the Beamline 3W1B of Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility. This article describes the basic concept and calibration techniques and presents calibration results. It is shown that the 250 lines/mm QDADG can be used to disperse light without higher-order diffractions in soft x-ray range, and the diffraction efficiencies of this grating are nearly constant (about 25%), which is beneficial in the spectrum analysis. PMID:20687723

  10. Carbon nanotube IR detectors (SV)

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, F. L.

    2012-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) and Lockheed Martin Corporation (LMC) collaborated to (1) evaluate the potential of carbon nanotubes as channels in infrared (IR) photodetectors; (2) assemble and characterize carbon nanotube electronic devices and measure the photocurrent generated when exposed to infrared light;(3) compare the performance of the carbon nanotube devices with that of traditional devices; and (4) develop and numerically implement models of electronic transport and opto-electronic behavior of carbon nanotube infrared detectors. This work established a new paradigm for photodetectors.

  11. Li adsorption versus graphene intercalation on Ir(111): From quenching to restoration of the Ir surface state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pervan, P.; Lazić, P.; Petrović, M.; Šrut Rakić, I.; Pletikosić, I.; Kralj, M.; Milun, M.; Valla, T.

    2015-12-01

    It is common knowledge that even a trace amount of a chemisorbed species can strongly perturb the surface electronic structure, in particular the surface states, to the point of their complete eradication. We have confirmed this behavior by adsorbing Li on the Ir(111), but surprisingly, we have discovered that in the presence of graphene Li does not suppress the Ir surface state. By combining the results of the low-energy electron diffraction and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with the density functional theory for modeling of the studied systems we can provide a detailed explanation for the observed phenomena. The quenching of the surface state by the electronic states of disordered Li layer on a bare Ir surface is efficiently deactivated by the presence of graphene which shifts the Li states to lower energies thereby leading to the unexpected reappearance of the surface state. Such protection of the surface state coherence from disorder upon intercalation could be used as a benchmark in the toolbox of surface science.

  12. Structure, magnetic and electrical properties of CeIrSb and its hydride CeIrSbH{sub 0.8}

    SciTech Connect

    Gaudin, Etienne; Chevalier, Bernard; Hermes, Wilfried; Rodewald, Ute Ch.; Poettgen, Rainer

    2009-07-15

    The ternary antimonide CeIrSb absorbs hydrogen under moderate temperature and pressure conditions (4 MPa and 573 K), leading to the hydride CeIrSbH{sub 0.8}. The crystal structures of both compounds have been investigated by X-ray diffraction on powders and single crystals: TiNiSi type, space group Pnma, a=735.07(7), b=456.93(4), c=792.8(1) pm, R1/wR2=0.0206/0.0395, 601 F{sup 2} values for CeIrSb and a=728.16(14), b=460.35(6), c=825.87(2) pm, R1/wR2=0.0322/0.0735, 528 F{sup 2} values for CeIrSbH{sub 0.8} with 20 variables per refinement. Hydrogenation induces both an increase of the cell volume V (+4%) and a strongly anisotropic expansion of the unit cell with a maximum of 4.3% in the c direction, leading to a significant increase of the Ce-Ir and Ce-Ce distances in this direction. The H-insertion into CeIrSb leads to a magnetic transition from intermediate valence to antiferromagnetic behavior (T{sub N}=7.0 K) evidenced by magnetization, electrical resistivity and specific heat measurements. This transition can be explained on the basis of the Doniach diagram considering the J{sub cf} interaction between the 4f(Ce) and conduction electrons. - Graphical Abstract: Cerium coordination in CeIrSb and CeIrSbH{sub 0.8}.

  13. Diffraction inspired unidirectional and bidirectional beam splitting in defect-containing photonic structures without interface corrugations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colak, Evrim; Serebryannikov, Andriy E.; Usik, P. V.; Ozbay, Ekmel

    2016-05-01

    It is shown that strong diffractions and related dual-beam splitting can be obtained at transmission through the nonsymmetric structures that represent two slabs of photonic crystal (PhC) separated by a single coupled-cavity type defect layer, while there are no grating-like corrugations at the interfaces. The basic operation regimes include unidirectional and bidirectional splitting that occur due to the dominant contribution of the first positive and first negative diffraction orders to the transmission, which is typically connected with different manifestations of the asymmetric transmission phenomenon. Being the main component of the resulting transmission mechanism, diffractions appear owing to the effect exerted by the defect layer that works like an embedded diffractive element. Two mechanisms can co-exist in one structure, which differ, among others, in that whether dispersion allows coupling of zero order to a wave propagating in the regular, i.e., defect-free PhC segments or not. The possibility of strong diffractions and efficient splitting related to it strongly depend on the dispersion properties of the Floquet-Bloch modes of the PhC. Existence of one of the studied transmission scenarios is not affected by location of the defect layer.

  14. Structural, Magnetic, and Electrical Properties in the Metallic Pyrochlore Pr2+xIr2-xO7+δ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, K.; Ohta, Y.; Nakatsuji, S.

    2012-12-01

    Pr2Ir2O7 is the metallic pyrochlore magnet which has been revealed to form a spin liquid phase by recent studies. Here we report results of structural, magnetic, and electrical transport properties of a newly synthesized polycrystalline sample of Pr2Ir2O7. Our powder x-ray diffraction indicates the sample to be a single pyrochlore phase with a “Pr-stuffing” into the Ir site. The resistivity measurement suggests a phase transition into some sort of ordered phase, in contrast to the previous report. We discuss the possible origin of the phase transition.

  15. Demonstration of KHILS two-color IR projection capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Lawrence E.; Coker, Jason S.; Garbo, Dennis L.; Olson, Eric M.; Murrer, Robert Lee, Jr.; Bergin, Thomas P.; Goldsmith, George C., II; Crow, Dennis R.; Guertin, Andrew W.; Dougherty, Michael; Marler, Thomas M.; Timms, Virgil G.

    1998-07-01

    transmission path of the beam combiner provided the LWIR (6.75 to 12 microns), while the reflective path produced the MWIR (3 to 6.5 microns). Each resistor array was individually projected into the Agema through the beam combiner at incremental output levels. Once again the Agema's output counts were recorded at each resistor array output level. These projections established the resistor array output to Agema count curves for the MWIR and LWIR resistor arrays. Using the radiance to Agema counts curves, the MWIR and LWIR resistor array output to radiance curves were established. With the calibration curves established, a two-color movie was projected and compared to the generated movie radiance values. By taking care to correctly account for the spectral qualities of the Agema camera, the calibration filters, and the diachroic beam combiner, the projections matched the theoretical calculations. In the near future, a Lockheed- Martin Multiple Quantum Well camera with true two-color IR capability will be tested.

  16. Lensless reflective point diffraction interferometer.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wenhua; Chen, Lei; Zheng, Donghui; Yang, Ying; Han, Zhigang; Li, Jinpeng

    2016-07-01

    A lensless reflective point diffraction interferometer (LRPDI) is proposed for dynamic wavefront measurement. The point diffraction interferometer is integrated on a small substrate with properly designed thin film, which is used for generating the interferogram with high carrier frequency at a CCD target. By lensless imaging, the complex amplitude at the CCD target can be propagated to the conjugated plane of the exit pupil of an incident wavefront, which not only avoids the edge diffraction in the interferogram, but also eliminates systematic error. The accuracy of LRPDI is demonstrated by simulation and experiment, and a precision better than 1/150 wavelength is achieved. The new design with lensless imaging processing is suitable for dynamic wavefront measurement. PMID:27409204

  17. Electron diffraction by plasmon waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García de Abajo, F. J.; Barwick, B.; Carbone, F.

    2016-07-01

    An electron beam traversing a structured plasmonic field is shown to undergo diffraction with characteristic angular patterns of both elastic and inelastic outgoing electron components. In particular, a plasmonic grating (e.g., a standing wave formed by two counterpropagating plasmons in a thin film) produces diffraction orders of the same parity as the net number of exchanged plasmons. Large diffracted beam fractions are predicted to occur for realistic plasmon intensities in attainable geometries due to a combination of phase and amplitude changes locally imprinted on the passing electron wave. Our study opens vistas in the study of multiphoton exchanges between electron beams and evanescent optical fields with unexplored effects related to the transversal component of the electron wave function.

  18. Asymmetric acoustic transmission in multiple frequency bands

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Hong-xiang; Yuan, Shou-qi; Zhang, Shu-yi

    2015-11-23

    We report both experimentally and numerically that the multi-band device of the asymmetric acoustic transmission is realized by placing two periodic gratings with different periods on both sides of two brass plates immersed in water. The asymmetric acoustic transmission can exist in four frequency bands below 1500 kHz, which arises from the interaction between various diffractions from the two gratings and Lamb modes in the brass plates immersed in water. The results indicate that the device has the advantages of multiple band, broader bandwidth, and simpler structure. Our finding should have great potential applications in ultrasonic devices.

  19. Boundary diffraction wave integrals for diffraction modeling of external occulters.

    PubMed

    Cady, Eric

    2012-07-01

    An occulter is a large diffracting screen which may be flown in conjunction with a telescope to image extrasolar planets. The edge is shaped to minimize the diffracted light in a region beyond the occulter, and a telescope may be placed in this dark shadow to view an extrasolar system with the starlight removed. Errors in position, orientation, and shape of the occulter will diffract additional light into this region, and a challenge of modeling an occulter system is to accurately and quickly model these effects. We present a fast method for the calculation of electric fields following an occulter, based on the concept of the boundary diffraction wave: the 2D structure of the occulter is reduced to a 1D edge integral which directly incorporates the occulter shape, and which can be easily adjusted to include changes in occulter position and shape, as well as the effects of sources-such as exoplanets-which arrive off-axis to the occulter. The structure of a typical implementation of the algorithm is included. PMID:22772218

  20. Distributed etched diffraction grating demultiplexer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafari, Amir

    This doctoral thesis studies the concept of a distributed etched diffraction grating (DEDG) and presents a methodology to engineer the spectral response of the device. The design which incorporates a distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) at the facets of a conventional etched diffraction grating demultiplexer promises for a superior performance in multiple aspects. Where in a conventional etched diffraction grating, smooth vertical deep etched walls are required in order to realize a low insertion loss device; in the DEDG such requirement is significantly mitigated. Deep etched walls are replaced with shallowly etched diffraction grating facets followed by a DBR structure and as a result devices with significantly lower insertion loss are achievable. The feasibility of the application of DEDG as a wavelength demultiplexer was demonstrated through fabrication and characterization of a prototype device. The proof of concept device was fabricated using the state of the art deep UV optical lithography and reactive ion etching in a nano-photonic silicon-on-insulator (SOI) material platform. The fabricated device was then characterized in the lab. Furthermore, incorporation of the DBR structure at the facets of the conventional etched diffraction grating decouples the reflection and diffraction functionalities, rendering the DEDG suitable for spectral response engineering. According to the application, the output spectral response of the device can be tailored through careful design and optimization of the incorporated DBR. In this thesis, through numerical simulations we have shown that functionalities such as polarization independent performance and at top insertion loss envelop are viable. A methodology to engineer the spectral response of the DEDG is discussed in details.

  1. Study of nonlinear optical sBs phenomena in mid IR fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Chung; Fong, C. K.

    1988-01-01

    This is the first reported attempt at investigation of the sBs phenomena in mid IR fibers using externally fed or laser self generated low frequency and microwave frequency phonon waves as diagnostic probes of such processes. The observation of laser excited phonon emissions in the mid IR fiber and direct modulation of CO2 laser pulse transmission by externally imposed low frequency radiation is the first indication of the predicted low sBs threshold in these fibers in the phonon rich mid IR spectral region. The prospect of wide applications of the sBs process in optical switching, phase conjugation and ultimately optical computing and possible deleterious effects in mid IR laser heterodyne spectroscopy, sideband modulation and transmitted power limitation is discussed.

  2. Development of nanostructured antireflection coatings for EO/IR sensor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pethuraja, Gopal G.; Welser, Roger E.; Sood, Ashok K.; Efstathiadis, Harry; Haldar, Pradeep; Wijewarnasuriya, Priyalal S.; Dhar, Nibir K.

    2016-05-01

    Electro-optical/infrared (EO/IR) nanosensors are being developed for a variety of defense and commercial systems applications. One of the critical technologies that will enhance EO/IR sensor performance is the development of advanced antireflection coatings. In this paper, we review our latest work on high quality nanostructure-based antireflection structures, including recent efforts to deposit nanostructured antireflection coatings on IR substrates. Nanostructured antireflection coatings fabricated via oblique angle deposition are shown to enhance the optical transmission through transparent windows by minimizing reflection losses at the spectral band of interest to less than one percent, a substantial improvement over conventional thin-film antireflection coating technologies. Step-graded antireflection structures also exhibit excellent omnidirectional performance, and have recently been demonstrated with good performance in medium wavelength and long wavelength IR spectral bands.

  3. Neutron diffraction on pulsed sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksenov, V. L.; Balagurov, A. M.

    2016-03-01

    The current capabilities of and major scientific problems solved by time-of-flight neutron diffraction are reviewed. The reasons for the rapid development of the method over the last two decades have been mainly the emergence of third-generation pulsed sources with a megawatt time-averaged power and advances in neutron optical devices and detector systems. The paper discusses some historical aspects of time-of-flight neutron diffraction and examines the contribution to this method from F L Shapiro, the centennial of whose birth was celebrated in 2015. The state of the art with respect to neutron sources for studies on extracted beams is reviewed in a special section.

  4. High-pressure neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Hongwu

    2011-01-10

    This lecture will cover progress and prospect of applications of high-pressure neutron diffraction techniques to Earth and materials sciences. I will first introduce general high-pressure research topics and available in-situ high-pressure techniques. Then I'll talk about high-pressure neutron diffraction techniques using two types of pressure cells: fluid-driven and anvil-type cells. Lastly, I will give several case studies using these techniques, particularly, those on hydrogen-bearing materials and magnetic transitions.

  5. Ellipsometry of diffractive insect reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brink, D. J.; Lee, M. E.

    1996-04-01

    Scales on the wings of certain insects, such as Trichoplusia orichalcea, exhibit a surface microstructure resembling a fine diffraction grating. Diffraction of incident light by this structure is responsible for many of the optical properties of the wings of this moth, such as the metallic yellow color and the almost-specular reflection and polarization properties of the scattered radiation. It is shown that by the use of null ellipsometry the polarization characteristics can be used to obtain the optical constants of the scale material. Theoretical considerations and suitable experimental conditions are discussed and evaluated.

  6. Subwavelength diffractive color beam combiner.

    PubMed

    Petrov, Nikolai I; Nikitin, Vladislav G; Danilov, Viktor A; Popov, Vladimir V; Usievich, Boris A

    2014-09-01

    A high-efficiency subwavelength diffractive beam combiner operating in a visible spectral range is designed, fabricated, and demonstrated. Such a device combines red, green, and blue color beams into one output light beam. Diffraction efficiencies of different types of gratings are calculated for various materials, incidence angles, and polarizations of light. It is shown that the plasmon resonance via a grating coupling occurs at the determined conditions. Subwavelength gratings with a period of 400 nm are fabricated and tested using laser and laser diode sources. PMID:25321371

  7. Optical diffraction for measurements of nano-mechanical bending

    PubMed Central

    Hermans, Rodolfo I.; Dueck, Benjamin; Ndieyira, Joseph Wafula; McKendry, Rachel A.; Aeppli, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    We explore and exploit diffraction effects that have been previously neglected when modelling optical measurement techniques for the bending of micro-mechanical transducers such as cantilevers for atomic force microscopy. The illumination of a cantilever edge causes an asymmetric diffraction pattern at the photo-detector affecting the calibration of the measured signal in the popular optical beam deflection technique (OBDT). The conditions that avoid such detection artefacts conflict with the use of smaller cantilevers. Embracing diffraction patterns as data yields a potent detection technique that decouples tilt and curvature and simultaneously relaxes the requirements on the illumination alignment and detector position through a measurable which is invariant to translation and rotation. We show analytical results, numerical simulations and physiologically relevant experimental data demonstrating the utility of the diffraction patterns. We offer experimental design guidelines and quantify possible sources of systematic error in OBDT. We demonstrate a new nanometre resolution detection method that can replace OBDT, where diffraction effects from finite sized or patterned cantilevers are exploited. Such effects are readily generalized to cantilever arrays, and allow transmission detection of mechanical curvature, enabling instrumentation with simpler geometry. We highlight the comparative advantages over OBDT by detecting molecular activity of antibiotic Vancomycin. PMID:27255427

  8. Optical diffraction for measurements of nano-mechanical bending.

    PubMed

    Hermans, Rodolfo I; Dueck, Benjamin; Ndieyira, Joseph Wafula; McKendry, Rachel A; Aeppli, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    We explore and exploit diffraction effects that have been previously neglected when modelling optical measurement techniques for the bending of micro-mechanical transducers such as cantilevers for atomic force microscopy. The illumination of a cantilever edge causes an asymmetric diffraction pattern at the photo-detector affecting the calibration of the measured signal in the popular optical beam deflection technique (OBDT). The conditions that avoid such detection artefacts conflict with the use of smaller cantilevers. Embracing diffraction patterns as data yields a potent detection technique that decouples tilt and curvature and simultaneously relaxes the requirements on the illumination alignment and detector position through a measurable which is invariant to translation and rotation. We show analytical results, numerical simulations and physiologically relevant experimental data demonstrating the utility of the diffraction patterns. We offer experimental design guidelines and quantify possible sources of systematic error in OBDT. We demonstrate a new nanometre resolution detection method that can replace OBDT, where diffraction effects from finite sized or patterned cantilevers are exploited. Such effects are readily generalized to cantilever arrays, and allow transmission detection of mechanical curvature, enabling instrumentation with simpler geometry. We highlight the comparative advantages over OBDT by detecting molecular activity of antibiotic Vancomycin. PMID:27255427

  9. Optical diffraction for measurements of nano-mechanical bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermans, Rodolfo I.; Dueck, Benjamin; Ndieyira, Joseph Wafula; McKendry, Rachel A.; Aeppli, Gabriel

    2016-06-01

    We explore and exploit diffraction effects that have been previously neglected when modelling optical measurement techniques for the bending of micro-mechanical transducers such as cantilevers for atomic force microscopy. The illumination of a cantilever edge causes an asymmetric diffraction pattern at the photo-detector affecting the calibration of the measured signal in the popular optical beam deflection technique (OBDT). The conditions that avoid such detection artefacts conflict with the use of smaller cantilevers. Embracing diffraction patterns as data yields a potent detection technique that decouples tilt and curvature and simultaneously relaxes the requirements on the illumination alignment and detector position through a measurable which is invariant to translation and rotation. We show analytical results, numerical simulations and physiologically relevant experimental data demonstrating the utility of the diffraction patterns. We offer experimental design guidelines and quantify possible sources of systematic error in OBDT. We demonstrate a new nanometre resolution detection method that can replace OBDT, where diffraction effects from finite sized or patterned cantilevers are exploited. Such effects are readily generalized to cantilever arrays, and allow transmission detection of mechanical curvature, enabling instrumentation with simpler geometry. We highlight the comparative advantages over OBDT by detecting molecular activity of antibiotic Vancomycin.

  10. Xanthe Terra Landslide in IR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    This is a daytime IR image of a chaos region within Xanthe Terra. As with earlier images, the landslide in this image is caused by the failure of steep slopes releasing material to form the landslide deposit.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude 3.1, Longitude 309.7 East (50.3 West). 100 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  11. Coprates Chasma Landslides in IR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Today's daytime IR image is of a portion of Coprates Chasma, part of Valles Marineris. As with yesterday's image, this image shows multiple large landslides.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude -8.2, Longitude 300.2 East (59.8 West). 100 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  12. GaSb substrates with extended IR wavelength for advanced space based applications

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Lisa P.; Flint, Patrick; Dallas, Gordon; Bakken, Daniel; Blanchat, Kevin; Brown, Gail J.; Vangala, Shivashankar R.; Goodhue, William D.; Krishnaswami, Kannan

    2009-05-01

    GaSb substrates have advantages that make them attractive for implementation of a wide range of infrared (IR) detectors with higher operating temperatures for stealth and space based applications. A significant aspect that would enable widespread commercial application of GaSb wafers for very long wavelength IR (VLWIR) applications is the capability for transmissivity beyond 15 m. Due largely to the GaSb (antisite) defect and other point defects in undoped GaSb substrates, intrinsic GaSb is still slightly p-type and strongly absorbs in the VLWIR. This requires backside thinning of the GaSb substrate for IR transmissivity. An extremely low n-type GaSb substrate is preferred to eliminate thinning and provide a substrate solution for backside illuminated VLWIR devices. By providing a more homogeneous radial distribution of the melt solute to suppress GaSb formation and controlling the cooling rate, ultra low doped n:GaSb has been achieved. This study examines the surface properties and IR transmission spectra of ultra low doped GaSb substrates at both room and low temperatures. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), homoepitaxy by MBE, and infrared Fourier transform (FTIR) analysis was implemented to examine material quality. As compared with standard low doped GaSb, the ultra low doped substrates show over 50% transmission and consistent wavelength transparency past 23 m with improved %T at low temperature. Homoepitaxy and AFM results indicate the ultra low doped GaSb has a low thermal desorbtion character and qualified morphology. In summary, improvements in room temperature IR transmission and extended wavelength characteristics have been shown consistently for ultra low doped n:GaSb substrates.

  13. Preparation of Soybean Seed Samples for FT-IR Microspectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Miller,S.; Pietrzak, L.

    2005-01-01

    Typical preparation of seed samples for infrared (IR) microspectroscopy involves imbibition of the seed for varying time periods followed by cryosectioning. Imbibition, however, may initiate germination even at 4 C with associated changes in the chemistry of the sample. We have found that it is possible to section seeds that are sufficiently hard, such as soybeans, on a standard laboratory microtome without imbibition. The use of dry sectioning of unimbibed seeds is reported here, as well as a comparison of different mounting media and modes of analysis. Glycerol, Tissue-Tek, and ethanol were used as mounting media, and the quality of the resulting spectra was assessed. Ethanol was the preferred mountant, because it dried quickly with no residue and thus did not interfere with the spectrum of interest. Analysis in transmission mode using barium fluoride windows to hold the samples was compared with transmission-reflection analysis with sections mounted on special infrared-reflecting slides. The two modes of analysis performed well in different regions of the spectrum. The mode of analysis (transmission vs. transmission-reflection) should be based on the components of greatest interest in the sample.

  14. Fresnel Diffraction for CTR Microbunching

    SciTech Connect

    Tikhoplav, R.; Knyazik, A.; Rosenzweig, J. B.; Andonian, G.

    2009-01-22

    Laser beams of high intensities are routinely used for IFEL experiments. Such beams can potentially destroy microbunching diagnostic tools such as coherent transition radiation foils due to their low damage thresholds. Near-field Fresnel diffraction scheme for termination of CO{sub 2} laser beam has been experimentally studied and is presented in this paper. Novel THz camera was utilized for such study.

  15. Dust Content in Compact HII Regions (NGC 7538 -- IRS 1, IRS 2, and IRS 3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akabane, K.; Kuno, N.

    The luminosity of the central star in compact HII regions was estimated from the solid angle of the nearby IR sources subtended at the central star, to be 5 ˜ 10 times as intense as that of the IR sources. The luminosity gives the stellar UV photon rate, Nu(*)(s-1), under the assumption of a single star approximation. For gas of standard dust content, Nu(*) and the observed electron density, ne, provide the dust opacity of the ionizing photons, τSdn, along the optical path to the Strömgren sphere of radius rs. The ionizing photon opacity over the same optical path but with the actual dust content, τSdi, is also derived from Nu(*) and the observed emission measure, ne2(4 π/3)ri3, with ri of the radius of the ionized sphere. A relationship γNu(*)/(4 π ri2)1/2˜= 1.3 × 109 (s-1/2m-1) with γ= τSdi/ τSdn was obtained as an observational trend for the 4 compact HII regions of NGC7538(N). Fourteen selected compact HII regions from the data catalogued by VLA observations were examined for this trend, and a similar result was shown. A confined area within 1050 >= Nu (s-1, radio) >= 1044 and 15 >= γ >= 0.1 was proposed for the location of compact HII regions in their (ne - D) diagram.

  16. 70-Watt green laser with near diffraction-limited beam quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Dan; Eisenberg, Eric; Madasamy, Pratheepan; Mead, Roy; Honea, Eric

    2009-02-01

    A 70-Watt green laser with M2<1.4 has been demonstrated. This green laser consists of an all-fiber-based IR pump laser at 1064 nm and a frequency-conversion module in a compact and flexible configuration. The IR laser produces up to 150 Watts in a polarized diffraction-limited output beam with high spectral brightness for frequency conversion. The IR laser is operating under QCW mode, e.g. 10 MHz with 3~5 ns pulse width or 700 MHz with 50 ps pulse width, to generate sufficient peak power for frequency doubling in the converter module. The IR laser and conversion module are connected via a 5-mm stainless-steel protected delivery fiber for optical beam delivery and an electrical cable harness for electrical power delivery and system control. Both the IR laser and converter module are run through embedded software that controls laser operations such as warm up and shut down. System overview and full characterization results will be presented. Such a high power green laser with near diffraction-limited output in a compact configuration will enable various scientific as well as industrial applications.

  17. IR Thermography NDE of ISS Radiator Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshti, Ajay; Winfree, William; Morton, Richard; Wilson, Walter; Reynolds, Gary

    2010-01-01

    The presentation covers an active and a passive infrared (IR) thermography for detection of delaminations in the radiator panels used for the International Space Station (ISS) program. The passive radiator IR data was taken by a NASA astronaut in an extravehicular activity (EVA) using a modified FLIR EVA hand-held camera. The IR data could be successfully analyzed to detect gross facesheet disbonds. The technique used the internal hot fluid tube as the heat source in analyzing the IR data. Some non-flight ISS radiators were inspected using an active technique of IR flash thermography to detect disbond of face sheet with honeycomb core, and debonds in facesheet overlap areas. The surface temperature and radiated heat emission from flight radiators is stable during acquisition of the IR video data. This data was analyzed to detect locations of unexpected surface temperature gradients. The flash thermography data was analyzed using derivative analysis and contrast evolutions. Results of the inspection are provided.

  18. Integrating IR detector imaging systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, G. C. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    An integrating IR detector array for imaging is provided in a hybrid circuit with InSb mesa diodes in a linear array, a single J-FET preamplifier for readout, and a silicon integrated circuit multiplexer. Thin film conductors in a fan out pattern deposited on an Al2O3 substrate connect the diodes to the multiplexer, and thick film conductors also connect the reset switch and preamplifier to the multiplexer. Two phase clock pulses are applied with a logic return signal to the multiplexer through triax comprised of three thin film conductors deposited between layers. A lens focuses a scanned image onto the diode array for horizontal read out while a scanning mirror provides vertical scan.

  19. Digital diffractive optics: Have diffractive optics entered mainstream industry yet?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kress, Bernard; Hejmadi, Vic

    2010-05-01

    When a new technology is integrated into industry commodity products and consumer electronic devices, and sold worldwide in retail stores, it is usually understood that this technology has then entered the realm of mainstream technology and therefore mainstream industry. Such a leap however does not come cheap, as it has a double edge sword effect: first it becomes democratized and thus massively developed by numerous companies for various applications, but also it becomes a commodity, and thus gets under tremendous pressure to cut down its production and integration costs while not sacrificing to performance. We will show, based on numerous examples extracted from recent industry history, that the field of Diffractive Optics is about to undergo such a major transformation. Such a move has many impacts on all facets of digital diffractive optics technology, from the optical design houses to the micro-optics foundries (for both mastering and volume replication), to the final product integrators or contract manufacturers. The main causes of such a transformation are, as they have been for many other technologies in industry, successive technological bubbles which have carried and lifted up diffractive optics technology within the last decades. These various technological bubbles have been triggered either by real industry needs or by virtual investment hype. Both of these causes will be discussed in the paper. The adjective ""digital"" in "digital diffractive optics" does not refer only, as it is done in digital electronics, to the digital functionality of the element (digital signal processing), but rather to the digital way they are designed (by a digital computer) and fabricated (as wafer level optics using digital masking techniques). However, we can still trace a very strong similarity between the emergence of micro-electronics from analog electronics half a century ago, and the emergence of digital optics from conventional optics today.

  20. Comparing ultrafast surface and bulk heating using time-resolved electron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Streubühr, C.; Kalus, A.; Zhou, P. Kammler, M.; Linde, D. von der; Ligges, M.; Hanisch-Blicharski, A.; Bovensiepen, U.; Horn-von Hoegen, M.

    2014-04-21

    From measurements of the transient Debye-Waller effect in Bismuth, we determine the buildup time of the random atomic motion resulting from the electronic relaxation after short pulse laser excitation. The surface sensitive reflection high energy electron diffraction and transmission electron diffraction yield a time constant of about 12 ps and 3 ps, respectively. The different energy transfer rates indicate relatively weak coupling between bulk and surface vibrational modes.

  1. Ion irradiation of graphene on Ir(111): From trapping to blistering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbig, Charlotte; Åhlgren, E. Harriet; Valerius, Philipp; Schröder, Ulrike A.; Martínez-Galera, Antonio J.; Arman, Mohammad A.; Kotakoski, Jani; Knudsen, Jan; Krasheninnikov, Arkady V.; Michely, Thomas

    Graphene grown epitaxially on Ir(111) is irradiated with low energy noble gas ions and the processes induced by atomic collision and subsequent annealing are analyzed using scanning tunneling microscopy, low energy electron diffraction, X-ray photoelectron diffraction and thermal desorption spectroscopy. Upon room temperature ion irradiation graphene amorphizes and recovers its crystalline structure during annealing. The energetic noble gas projectiles are trapped with surprisingly high efficiency under the graphene cover up to extremely high temperatures beyond 1300K. The energy, angle, and ion species dependence of trapping are quantified. At elevated temperatures the trapped gas forms well developed and highly pressurized blisters under the graphene cover. We use molecular dynamics simulations and ab initio calculations to elucidate the trapping mechanism and its thermal robustness. Similar trapping and blistering are observed after ion irradiation of a single layer of hexagonal boron nitride on Ir(111) and we speculate on the generality of the observed phenomena.

  2. Nanostructured diffractive optical devices for soft X-ray microscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hambach, D.; Peuker, M.; Schneider, G.

    2001-07-01

    The new transmission X-ray microscope (TXM) installed at the BESSY II electron storage ring uses an off-axis transmission zone plate (OTZ) as diffractive and focusing element of the condenser-monochromator setup. A high resolution micro-zone plate (MZP) forms a magnified image on a CCD-detector. Both, the OTZ with an active area of up to 24 mm2 and the MZP with zone widths as small as 25 nm are generated by a process including electron beam lithography (EBL), dry etching and subsequent electroplating of nickel on top of silicon membrane substrates with about 100- 150 nm thickness. The combination of a larger zone width and the usage of nickel zone structures allows to increase the diffraction efficiency of the condenser element at least by a factor of 3 compared to the earlier used KZP7 condenser zone plate in the TXM at BESSY I. Groove diffraction efficiencies of 21.6% and 14.7% were measured for MZP objectives with 40 and 25 nm outermost zone width, respectively.

  3. Transmission of Mumps

    MedlinePlus

    ... Articles Related Links World Health Organization Medline Plus Transmission of Mumps Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on ... Answers for Patients . Top of Page Related Pages Transmission for Healthcare Providers Cover Your Cough Clean Hands ...

  4. Chickenpox (Varicella): Transmission

    MedlinePlus

    ... Multimedia Related Links Medline Plus Healthfinder.gov Shingles Transmission Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... not shingles. For more information about shingles, see Transmission . When Is a Person Contagious? A person with ...

  5. The Ionotropic Receptors IR21a and IR25a mediate cool sensing in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Ni, Lina; Klein, Mason; Svec, Kathryn V; Budelli, Gonzalo; Chang, Elaine C; Ferrer, Anggie J; Benton, Richard; Samuel, Aravinthan Dt; Garrity, Paul A

    2016-01-01

    Animals rely on highly sensitive thermoreceptors to seek out optimal temperatures, but the molecular mechanisms of thermosensing are not well understood. The Dorsal Organ Cool Cells (DOCCs) of the Drosophila larva are a set of exceptionally thermosensitive neurons critical for larval cool avoidance. Here, we show that DOCC cool-sensing is mediated by Ionotropic Receptors (IRs), a family of sensory receptors widely studied in invertebrate chemical sensing. We find that two IRs, IR21a and IR25a, are required to mediate DOCC responses to cooling and are required for cool avoidance behavior. Furthermore, we find that ectopic expression of IR21a can confer cool-responsiveness in an Ir25a-dependent manner, suggesting an instructive role for IR21a in thermosensing. Together, these data show that IR family receptors can function together to mediate thermosensation of exquisite sensitivity. PMID:27126188

  6. The Ionotropic Receptors IR21a and IR25a mediate cool sensing in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Lina; Klein, Mason; Svec, Kathryn V; Budelli, Gonzalo; Chang, Elaine C; Ferrer, Anggie J; Benton, Richard; Samuel, Aravinthan DT; Garrity, Paul A

    2016-01-01

    Animals rely on highly sensitive thermoreceptors to seek out optimal temperatures, but the molecular mechanisms of thermosensing are not well understood. The Dorsal Organ Cool Cells (DOCCs) of the Drosophila larva are a set of exceptionally thermosensitive neurons critical for larval cool avoidance. Here, we show that DOCC cool-sensing is mediated by Ionotropic Receptors (IRs), a family of sensory receptors widely studied in invertebrate chemical sensing. We find that two IRs, IR21a and IR25a, are required to mediate DOCC responses to cooling and are required for cool avoidance behavior. Furthermore, we find that ectopic expression of IR21a can confer cool-responsiveness in an Ir25a-dependent manner, suggesting an instructive role for IR21a in thermosensing. Together, these data show that IR family receptors can function together to mediate thermosensation of exquisite sensitivity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13254.001 PMID:27126188

  7. Atmospheric Entry Experiments at IRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auweter-Kurtz, M.; Endlich, P.; Herdrich, G.; Kurtz, H.; Laux, T.; Löhle, S.; Nazina, N.; Pidan, S.

    2002-01-01

    Entering the atmosphere of celestial bodies, spacecrafts encounter gases at velocities of several km/s, thereby being subjected to great heat loads. The thermal protection systems and the environment (plasma) have to be investigated by means of computational and ground facility based simulations. For more than a decade, plasma wind tunnels at IRS have been used for the investigation of TPS materials. Nevertheless, ground tests and computer simulations cannot re- place space flights completely. Particularly, entry mission phases encounter challenging problems, such as hypersonic aerothermodynamics. Concerning the TPS, radiation-cooled materials used for reuseable spacecrafts and ablator tech- nologies are of importance. Besides the mentioned technologies, there is the goal to manage guidance navigation, con- trol, landing technology and inflatable technologies such as ballutes that aim to keep vehicles in the atmosphere without landing. The requirement to save mass and energy for planned interplanetary missions such as Mars Society Balloon Mission, Mars Sample Return Mission, Mars Express or Venus Sample Return mission led to the need for manoeuvres like aerocapture, aero-breaking and hyperbolic entries. All three are characterized by very high kinetic vehicle energies to be dissipated by the manoeuvre. In this field flight data are rare. The importance of these manoeuvres and the need to increase the knowledge of required TPS designs and behavior during such mission phases point out the need of flight experiments. As result of the experience within the plasma diagnostic tool development and the plasma wind tunnel data base, flight experiments like the PYrometric RE-entry EXperiment PYREX were developed, fully qualified and successfully flown. Flight experiments such as the entry spectrometer RESPECT and PYREX on HOPE-X are in the conceptual phase. To increase knowledge in the scope of atmospheric manoeuvres and entries, data bases have to be created combining both

  8. dxtbx: the diffraction experiment toolbox.

    PubMed

    Parkhurst, James M; Brewster, Aaron S; Fuentes-Montero, Luis; Waterman, David G; Hattne, Johan; Ashton, Alun W; Echols, Nathaniel; Evans, Gwyndaf; Sauter, Nicholas K; Winter, Graeme

    2014-08-01

    Data formats for recording X-ray diffraction data continue to evolve rapidly to accommodate new detector technologies developed in response to more intense light sources. Processing the data from single-crystal X-ray diffraction experiments therefore requires the ability to read, and correctly interpret, image data and metadata from a variety of instruments employing different experimental representations. Tools that have previously been developed to address this problem have been limited either by a lack of extensibility or by inconsistent treatment of image metadata. The dxtbx software package provides a consistent interface to both image data and experimental models, while supporting a completely generic user-extensible approach to reading the data files. The library is written in a mixture of C++ and Python and is distributed as part of the cctbx under an open-source licence at http://cctbx.sourceforge.net. PMID:25242914

  9. Diffraction Analysis of Solar Coronagraphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabin, Douglas M.; gong, qian

    2016-05-01

    The design of a solar coronagraph is predicated on controlling diffracted and scattered light using principles dating back to Bernard Lyot in the 1930’s. The existence of many successful ground- and space-based coronagraphs testifies to our ability to apply these principles in specific cases, but it is difficult to explore a significant range of design parameters because the calculations are tricky and time-consuming. Indeed, scattered light is so design-specific that ad hoc analysis is unavoidable once guidelines from experience are used to create a first-guess system of baffles and low-scatter surfaces. Here we describe a combination of analytic and computational approaches that has the potential to explore coronagraph design space somewhat more systematically with respect to diffracted light.

  10. Diffraction operators in paraxial approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasso, William; Navas, Marianela; Añez, Liz; Urdaneta, Romer; Díaz, Leonardo; Torres, César O.

    2014-07-01

    Nowadays, research in the field of science education points to the creation of alternative ways of teaching contents encouraging the development of more elaborate reasoning, where a high degree of abstraction and generalization of scientific knowledge prevails. On that subject, this research shows a didactic alternative proposal for the construction of Fresnel and Fraunhoffer diffraction concepts applying the Fourier transform technique in the study of electromagnetic waves propagation in free space. Curvature transparency and Fourier sphere operators in paraxial approximation are used in order to make the usual laborious mathematical approach easier. The main result shows that the composition of optic metaxial operators results in the discovery of a simpler way out of the standard electromagnetic wave propagation in free space between a transmitter and a receptor separated from a given distance. This allows to state that the didactic proposal shown encourages the construction of Fresnel and Fraunhoffer diffraction concepts in a more effective and easier way than the traditional teaching.

  11. Infrared Applications In Transmission System Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Guy; Fernandez, Joe

    1988-01-01

    Five California Utilities participated in an electric power transmission and distribution system survey in the late fall of 1987. The survey consisted of visual and Infrared (IR) inspection of 12.5-kV to 230-kV AC transmission lines and equipment. This paper summarizes the results of the survey, including a cost/benefit analysis. The participating utilities, under Western Area Power Administration's sponsorship, were the City of Lodi, City of Roseville, Plumas-Sierra Rural Electric Cooperative, Sacramento Municipal Utility District, and Sierra Pacific Power Company. Three hundred miles of line and thirty substations were inspected using a helicopter and a high resolution infrared camera with visual recording capabilities. The transmission and distribution system covered a broad range of terrain; valleys, foothills, and mountains. All five utilities recognized the value of the IR inspection. The procedure gave the maintenance staff advanced notice of problem areas such as (1) loose connections on switches, (2) unbalanced lines, (3) poor splices, and (4) capacitor and transformer bank malfunction. In addition, the staff saw its potential in environmental and safety applications. The initial data shows an increased capacity carrying and reliability providing capability of about 50 KW per 100 transmission line miles. This capability increase results in a B/C ratio of about three. Other applications in transmission system surveys are worthy of study. These applications include power theft and vandalism. Also, the Utility can use technology as an effective public relations tool with customers by providing services such as roof and building envelope inspections.

  12. Diffraction gratings for lighting applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornelissen, Hugo J.; de Boer, Dick K. G.; Tukker, Teus

    2013-09-01

    Sub-micron diffraction gratings have been used for two LED illumination applications. One is to create a transparent see through luminaire which can be used to illuminate and read a paper document or e-book. A second is a light sensor that can be used in a feedback loop to control a multicolor LED lamp. Optical design and experimental proof-of-principle are presented.

  13. Industrial applications of neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Felcher, G.P.

    1989-01-01

    Neutron diffraction (or, to be more general, neutron scattering) is a most versatile and universal tool, which has been widely employed to probe the structure, the dynamics and the magnetism of condensed matter. Traditionally used for fundamental research in solid state physics, this technique more recently has been applied to problems of immediate industrial interest, as illustrated in examples covering the main fields of endeavour. 14 refs., 14 figs.

  14. RF switching network: a novel technique for IR sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mechtel, Deborah M.; Jenkins, R. Brian; Joyce, Peter J.; Nelson, Charles L.

    2016-05-01

    Rapid sensing of near infrared (IR) energy on a composite structure would provide information that could mitigate damage to composite structures. This paper describes a novel technique that implements photoconductive sensors in a radio frequency (RF) switching network designed to locate in real time the position and intensity of IR radiation incident on a composite structure. In the implementation described here, photoconductive sensors act as rapid response switches in a two layer RF network embedded in an FR-4 laminate. To detect radiation, phosphorous doped silicon photoconductive sensors are inserted in GHz range RF transmission lines. Photoconductive sensors use semiconductor materials that are optically sensitive at material dependent wavelengths. Incident radiation at the appropriate wavelength produces hole-electron pairs, so that the semiconductor becomes a conductor. By permitting signal propagation only when a sensor is illuminated, the RF signals are selectively routed from the lower layer transmission lines to the upper layer lines, thereby pinpointing the location and strength of incident radiation on a structure. Simulations based on a high frequency 3D planar electromagnetics model are presented and compared to experimental results. Experimental results are described for GHz range RF signal control for 300 mW and 180 mW incident energy from 975 nm and 1060 nm wavelength lasers respectively, where upon illumination, RF transmission line signal output power doubled when compared to non-illuminated results. Experimental results are reported for 100 W incident energy from a 1060 nm laser. Test results illustrate that real-time signal processing would permit a structure or vehicle to be controlled in response to incident radiation

  15. Dedicated spectrometers based on diffractive optics: design, modelling and evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Løvhaugen, O.; Johansen, I.-R.; Bakke, K. A. H.; Fismen, B. G.; Nicolas, S.

    The described design of diffractive optical elements for low cost IR-spectrometers gives a built-in wavelength reference and allows 'spectral arithmetic' to be implemented in the optical performance of the DOE. The diffractive element combines the function of the lenses and the grating and eliminates the need for alignment of those components in the standard scanned grating spectrometer design. The element gives out a set of foci, each with one spectral component, which are scanned across a detector, thus relaxing the demands for scan angle control. It can thus be regarded as an alternative solution to a beam splitter and band pass filter instrument. Software tools have been designed to ease the adaptation of the design to different applications. To model the performance of the spectrometers we have implemented a scalar Rayleigh-Sommerfeldt diffraction model. The gold-coated elements are produced by injection moulding using a compact disc (CD) moulding technique and mould inlays mastered by e-beam lithography. The optimized selection of wavelength bands and the classification of the measured signal use a combination of principal component analysis and robust statistical methods. Typical applications will be material characterization of recycled plastics and gas monitoring. Spectrometers for two different applications have been built and tested. Comparisons between the design goals and the measured performance have been made and show good agreements.

  16. Eshelby twist and correlation effects in diffraction from nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Leonardi, A.; Scardi, P.; Ryu, S.; Pugno, N. M.

    2015-04-28

    Molecular dynamics simulations were used to model the Eshelby dislocation inside Pd and Ir nanowires and to predict the powder diffraction pattern using the Debye scattering equation. We find that the ideal dislocation solution by Eshelby is in good agreement with the observed twist angle and deviatoric strain, even though it ignores both the splitting of the Eshelby dislocation into two partials and surface stress. Surface stress plays a significant role only for nanorods with small aspect ratio (∼1:1). We also find that Wilson's prediction on the diffraction peak broadening for the Eshelby dislocation is overestimated because it ignores the fact that the Eshelby twist relaxes the deviatoric strain. Moreover, the twist loosens the correlation along the nanorod, causing additional line profile broadening, which is read by diffraction as a decrease of coherent domain size when the total twist angle is bigger than 1.5°. Overall, our findings suggest a novel way to predict and analyze the dislocations as well as the resulting strain fields in the twisted nanocrystalline rods.

  17. Development of a transmission positron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuya, M.; Jinno, S.; Ootsuka, T.; Inoue, M.; Kurihara, T.; Doyama, M.; Inoue, M.; Fujinami, M.

    2011-07-01

    A practical transmission positron microscope (TPM) JEM-1011B has been developed to survey differences in the interaction of positron and electron beams with materials, and is installed in the Slow Positron Facility of High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK). The TPM can share positron and electron beams, and can also be used as a transmission electron microscope (TEM). Positron transmission images up to magnification 10,000× (resolution: 50 nm) and positron diffraction patterns up to 044 family were successfully obtained by the TPM comparing them with those of electrons. The differences in material transmittances for both beams have been measured, and can be explained by the calculated results of the Monte Carlo simulation code PENELOPE-2008.

  18. Diffraction techniques in structural biology.

    PubMed

    Egli, Martin

    2010-06-01

    A detailed understanding of chemical and biological function and the mechanisms underlying the molecular activities ultimately requires atomic-resolution structural data. Diffraction-based techniques such as single-crystal X-ray crystallography, electron microscopy, and neutron diffraction are well established and they have paved the road to the stunning successes of modern-day structural biology. The major advances achieved in the last 20 years in all aspects of structural research, including sample preparation, crystallization, the construction of synchrotron and spallation sources, phasing approaches, and high-speed computing and visualization, now provide specialists and nonspecialists alike with a steady flow of molecular images of unprecedented detail. The present unit combines a general overview of diffraction methods with a detailed description of the process of a single-crystal X-ray structure determination experiment, from chemical synthesis or expression to phasing and refinement, analysis, and quality control. For novices it may serve as a stepping-stone to more in-depth treatises of the individual topics. Readers relying on structural information for interpreting functional data may find it a useful consumer guide. PMID:20517991

  19. Diffraction Techniques in Structural Biology.

    PubMed

    Egli, Martin

    2016-01-01

    A detailed understanding of chemical and biological function and the mechanisms underlying the molecular activities ultimately requires atomic-resolution structural data. Diffraction-based techniques such as single-crystal X-ray crystallography, electron microscopy, and neutron diffraction are well established and they have paved the road to the stunning successes of modern-day structural biology. The major advances achieved in the last twenty years in all aspects of structural research, including sample preparation, crystallization, the construction of synchrotron and spallation sources, phasing approaches, and high-speed computing and visualization, now provide specialists and nonspecialists alike with a steady flow of molecular images of unprecedented detail. The present unit combines a general overview of diffraction methods with a detailed description of the process of a single-crystal X-ray structure determination experiment, from chemical synthesis or expression to phasing and refinement, analysis, and quality control. For novices it may serve as a stepping-stone to more in-depth treatises of the individual topics. Readers relying on structural information for interpreting functional data may find it a useful consumer guide. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27248784

  20. Vorticity production in shock diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, M.; Takayama, K.

    2003-03-01

    The production of vorticity or circulation production in shock wave diffraction over sharp convex corners has been numerically simulated and quantified. The corner angle is varied from 5° to 180°. Total vorticity is represented by the circulation, which is evaluated by integrating the velocity along a path enclosing the perturbed region behind a diffracting shock wave. The increase of circulation in unit time, or the rate of circulation production, depends on the shock strength and wall angle if the effects of viscosity and heat conductivity are neglected. The rate of vorticity production is determined by using a solution-adaptive code, which solves the Euler equations. It is shown that the rate of vorticity production is independent of the computational mesh and numerical scheme by comparing solutions from two different codes. It is found that larger wall angles always enhance the vorticity production. The vorticity production increases sharply when the corner angle is varied from 15° to 45°. However, for corner angles over 90°, the rate of vorticity production hardly increases and reaches to a constant value. Strong shock waves produce vorticity faster in general, except when the slipstream originating from the shallow corner attaches to the downstream wall. It is found that the vorticity produced by the slipstream represents a large proportion of the total vorticity. The slipstream is therefore a more important source of vorticity than baroclinic effects in shock diffraction.

  1. Liquid crystal filled diffraction gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jepsen, Mary Lou

    1997-12-01

    Liquid crystal technology is becoming increasingly important for flat displays in electronics, computers and TV. Most liquid crystal displays currently made have as their basic unit, two flat surfaces each coated with a transparent, conductive layer, between which a thin layer of liquid crystals is sandwiched. The work detailed in this dissertation is based on a modification of the basic liquid crystal unit and studies the properties of structures which consist of certain anisotropic liquid crystals confined between a flat substrate and a corrugated one, each substrate being transparent and having a thin trans-parent conductive coating. Without an applied electric field, the refractive indices of the liquid crystal and corrugated substrate do not match, and thus strong diffraction occurs. When an electric field is applied to the device, the liquid crystals are re-oriented so that the refractive indices now match, and the device behaves as a uniform slab of homogeneous material producing no diffraction. Rigorous coupled wave analysis was developed to design the ideal devices and analyze the performance of our experimental ones. 99% diffraction efficiencies in single wavelength polarized illumination are shown to be possible with this class of devices. The best device we fabricated showed a 62% distraction efficiency, as our fabrication process roughened the top surface of the device so that (≃30%) of the incident light was lost to scatter. Several new fabrication processes are proposed to eliminate this scatter problem, and that details of fabrication processes thus far attempted are outlined.

  2. Stretchable diffraction gratings for spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonov, Aleksey N.; Grabarnik, Semen; Vdovin, Gleb

    2007-07-01

    We have investigated the possibility of using transparent stretchable diffraction gratings for spectrometric applications. The gratings were fabricated by replication of a triangular-groove master into a transparent viscoelastic. The sample length, and hence the spatial period, can be reversibly changed by mechanical stretching. When used in a monochromator with two slits, the stretchable grating permits scanning the spectral components over the output slit, converting the monochromator into a scanning spectrometer. The spectral resolution of such a spectrometer was found to be limited mainly by the wave-front aberrations due to the grating deformation. A model relating the deformation-induced aberrations in different diffraction orders is presented. In the experiments, a 12-mm long viscoelastic grating with a spatial frequency of 600 line pairs/mm provided a full-width at half-maximum resolution of up to ~1.2 nm in the 580-680 nm spectral range when slowly stretched by a micrometer screw and ~3 nm when repeatedly stretched by a voice coil at 15 Hz. Comparison of aberrations in transmitted and diffracted beams measured by a Shack- Hartmann wave-front sensor showed that astigmatisms caused by stretch-dependent wedge deformation are the main factors limiting the resolution of the viscoelastic-grating-based spectrometer.

  3. Submicron X-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    MacDowell, Alastair; Celestre, Richard; Tamura, Nobumichi; Spolenak, Ralph; Valek, Bryan; Brown, Walter; Bravman, John; Padmore, Howard; Batterman, Boris; Patel, Jamshed

    2000-08-17

    At the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley the authors have instrumented a beam line that is devoted exclusively to x-ray micro diffraction problems. By micro diffraction they mean those classes of problems in Physics and Materials Science that require x-ray beam sizes in the sub-micron range. The instrument is for instance, capable of probing a sub-micron size volume inside micron sized aluminum metal grains buried under a silicon dioxide insulating layer. The resulting Laue pattern is collected on a large area CCD detector and automatically indexed to yield the grain orientation and deviatoric (distortional) strain tensor of this sub-micron volume. A four-crystal monochromator is then inserted into the beam, which allows monochromatic light to illuminate the same part of the sample. Measurement of diffracted photon energy allows for the determination of d spacings. The combination of white and monochromatic beam measurements allow for the determination of the total strain/stress tensor (6 components) inside each sub-micron sized illuminated volume of the sample.

  4. Diffraction Techniques in Structural Biology

    PubMed Central

    Egli, Martin

    2010-01-01

    A detailed understanding of chemical and biological function and the mechanisms underlying the activities ultimately requires atomic-resolution structural data. Diffraction-based techniques such as single-crystal X-ray crystallography, electron microscopy and neutron diffraction are well established and have paved the road to the stunning successes of modern-day structural biology. The major advances achieved in the last 20 years in all aspects of structural research, including sample preparation, crystallization, the construction of synchrotron and spallation sources, phasing approaches and high-speed computing and visualization, now provide specialists and non-specialists alike with a steady flow of molecular images of unprecedented detail. The present chapter combines a general overview of diffraction methods with a step-by-step description of the process of a single-crystal X-ray structure determination experiment, from chemical synthesis or expression to phasing and refinement, analysis and quality control. For novices it may serve as a stepping-stone to more in-depth treatises of the individual topics. Readers relying on structural information for interpreting functional data may find it a useful consumer guide. PMID:20517991

  5. Structural investigation of the bilayer iridate Sr3Ir2O7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, Tom; Bjaalie, Lars; Zhao, Liuyan; Belvin, Carina; Wang, Xiaoping; Van de Walle, Chris G.; Hsieh, David; Wilson, Stephen D.

    2016-04-01

    A complete structural solution of the bilayer iridate compound Sr3Ir2O7 presently remains outstanding. Previously reported structures for this compound vary and all fail to explain weak structural violations observed in neutron scattering measurements as well as the presence of a net ferromagnetic moment in the basal plane. In this paper, we present single crystal neutron diffraction and rotational anisotropy second harmonic generation measurements unveiling a lower, monoclinic symmetry inherent to Sr3Ir2O7 . Combined with density functional theory, our measurements identify the correct structural space group as No. 15 (C2/c) and provide clarity regarding the local symmetry of Ir4 + cations within this spin-orbit Mott material.

  6. Tunable semimetallic state in compressive-strained SrIr O3 films revealed by transport behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lunyong; Liang, Qifeng; Xiong, Ye; Zhang, Binbin; Gao, Lei; Li, Handong; Chen, Y. B.; Zhou, Jian; Zhang, Shan-Tao; Gu, Zheng-Bin; Yao, Shu-hua; Wang, Zhiming; Lin, Yuan; Chen, Yan-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Orthorhombic SrIr O3 is a typical spin-orbit-coupled correlated metal that shows diversified physical properties under external stimuli. Here the nonlinear Hall effect and weakly temperature-dependent resistance are observed in a SrIr O3 film epitaxially grown on a SrTi O3 substrate. It infers that orthorhombic SrIr O3 is a semimetal oxide. However, a linear Hall effect and insensitive-temperature-dependent resistance are observed in SrIr O3 films grown on (La ,Sr ) (Al ,Ta ) O3 (LSAT) substrates, suggesting a tunable semimetallic state due to a band structure change in SrIr O3 films under different compressive strains. The mechanism of this evolution is explored in detail through a strain-state analysis by reciprocal space mapping and electron diffraction, carrier density and mobility calculations, as well as electronic band structure evolution under compressive strain (predicted by a tight-binding approximation). It might suggest that the strain-induced band shift leads to semimetallic tuning in the SrIr O3 film grown on SrTi O3 to LSAT substrates. Our findings illustrate the tunability of SrIr O3 properties and pave the way to induce different physical states in SrIr O3 , such as the proposed topological insulator state in heterostructures.

  7. Structure symmetry determination and magnetic evolution in Sr2Ir1–xRhxO4

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Feng; Wang, Xiaoping; Hoffmann, Christina; Wang, Jinchen; Chi, Songxue; Matsuda, Masaaki; Chakoumakos, Bryan C.; Fernandez-Baca, Jaime A.; Cao, Gang

    2015-11-23

    We use single-crystal neutron diffraction to determine the crystal structure symmetry and to study the magnetic evolution in the rhodium doped iridates Sr2Ir1–xRhxO4 (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.16). Throughout this doping range, the crystal structure retains a tetragonal symmetry (space group I41/a) with two distinct magnetic Ir sites in the unit cell forming staggered IrO6 rotation. Upon Rh doping, the magnetic order is suppressed and the magnetic moment of Ir4+ is reduced from 0.21 μB/Ir for x = 0 to 0.18 μB/Ir for x = 0.12. As a result, the magnetic structure at x = 0.12 is different from that of the parent compound while the moments remain in the basal plane.

  8. High pressure structure studies of 6H-SrIrO3 and the octahedral tilting in 3C-SrIrO3 towards a post-perovskite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kronbo, Camilla H.; Nielsen, Morten B.; Kevy, Simone M.; Parisiades, Paraskevas; Bremholm, Martin

    2016-06-01

    The high pressure behaviors of the two perovskite structures (hexagonal 6H-SrIrO3 and orthorhombic 3C-SrIrO3) have been studied in diamond anvil cells to 43 and 60 GPa, respectively, using synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction. 6H-SrIrO3 was first synthesized at ambient pressure and subsequently transformed into 3C-SrIrO3 in a large volume press at 8.8 GPa and 1000 °C. Both polymorphs were found to retain the initial symmetry up to the highest pressures measured, but in the case of 6H-SrIrO3, two anomalies were identified: a change in the axial compressibilities at 24 GPa and a change in both the axial and volume compressibilities at 32 GPa. Fitting a 3rd order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state to the obtained P-V data yielded bulk moduli of K0=151.5(12) GPa (fitted range 0IrO3 and K0=187.1(9) GPa for 3C-SrIrO3. Analysis of the structural parameters for 6H-SrIrO3 aided by F-f plots suggests the anomalies are caused by changes in the compression mechanism. Comparison of the two polymorphs reveals that 6H-SrIrO3 becomes less compressible than 3C-SrIrO3 above 32 GPa as a result of the mechanistic change, and a crossing of their P-V curves is avoided. For 3C-SrIrO3, analysis of the octahedral tilt angles shows that these increase monotonically from the ambient value of 7.23(6) to 23.0(2)° at 60 GPa suggesting that a transition to a post-perovskite is approached.

  9. Stratified Diffractive Optic Approach for Creating High Efficiency Gratings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambers, Diana M.; Nordin, Gregory P.

    1998-01-01

    Gratings with high efficiency in a single diffracted order can be realized with both volume holographic and diffractive optical elements. However, each method has limitations that restrict the applications in which they can be used. For example, high efficiency volume holographic gratings require an appropriate combination of thickness and permittivity modulation throughout the bulk of the material. Possible combinations of those two characteristics are limited by properties of currently available materials, thus restricting the range of applications for volume holographic gratings. Efficiency of a diffractive optic grating is dependent on its approximation of an ideal analog profile using discrete features. The size of constituent features and, consequently, the number that can be used within a required grating period restricts the applications in which diffractive optic gratings can be used. These limitations imply that there are applications which cannot be addressed by either technology. In this paper we propose to address a number of applications in this category with a new method of creating high efficiency gratings which we call stratified diffractive optic gratings. In this approach diffractive optic techniques are used to create an optical structure that emulates volume grating behavior. To illustrate the stratified diffractive optic grating concept we consider a specific application, a scanner for a space-based coherent wind lidar, with requirements that would be difficult to meet by either volume holographic or diffractive optic methods. The lidar instrument design specifies a transmissive scanner element with the input beam normally incident and the exiting beam deflected at a fixed angle from the optical axis. The element will be rotated about the optical axis to produce a conical scan pattern. The wavelength of the incident beam is 2.06 microns and the required deflection angle is 30 degrees, implying a grating period of approximately 4 microns

  10. Zr{sub 2}Ir{sub 6}B with an eightfold superstructure of the cubic perovskite-like boride ZrIr{sub 3}B{sub 0.5}: Synthesis, crystal structure and bonding analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hermus, Martin; Fokwa, Boniface P.T.

    2010-04-15

    Single phase powder samples and single crystals of Zr{sub 2}Ir{sub 6}B were successfully synthesized by arc-melting the elements in a water-cooled copper crucible under an argon atmosphere. Superstructure reflections were observed both on powder and on single crystal diffraction data, leading to an eightfold superstructure of ZrIr{sub 3}B{sub x} phase. The new phase, which has a metallic luster, crystallizes in space group Fm3-barm (no. 225) with the lattice parameters a=7.9903(4) A, V=510.14(4) A{sup 3}. Its crystal structure was refined on the basis of powder as well as single crystal data. The single crystal refinement converged to R{sub 1}=0.0239 and wR{sub 2}=0.0624 for all 88 unique reflections and 6 parameters. Zr{sub 2}Ir{sub 6}B is isotypic to Ti{sub 2}Rh{sub 6}B and its structure can be described as a defect double perovskite, A{sub 2}BB'O{sub 6}, where the A site is occupied by zirconium, the B site by boron, the O site by iridium but the B' site is vacant, leading to the formation of empty and boron-filled octahedral Ir{sub 6} clusters. According to the result of tight-binding electronic structure calculations, Ir-B and Ir-Zr interactions are mainly responsible for the structural stability of the phase. According to COHP bonding analysis, the strongest bonding occurs for the Ir-B contacts, and the Ir-Ir bonding within the empty clusters is two times stronger than that in the BIr{sub 6} octahedra. - Graphical abstract: Zr{sub 2}Ir{sub 6}B crystallizes with an eightfold superstructure of the already reported simple cubic perovskite ZrIr{sub 3}B{sub x}. According to the result of tight-binding electronic structure calculations, Ir-B and Ir-Zr interactions are mainly responsible for its structural stability, and the Ir-Ir bonding within the empty Ir{sub 6} clusters is two times stronger than that in the BIr{sub 6} octahedra.

  11. IR spectra of ICPCVD SiNx thin films for MEMS structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudakov, G.; Reshetnikov, I.

    2015-11-01

    Optical properties of non-stoichiometric silicon nitride (SiNx) films for thermo sensitive membranes of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and microoptomechanical systems (MOMS) has been studied applying infrared (IR) spectroscopy. For the structures SiNx/Si and (thin metal layer)/SiNx/Si transmission and reflection spectra in the region of wave numbers of 500-7000 cm-1 has been investigated. For the investigated structures analysis of optical properties observed in the IR spectra both in the form of selective absorption bands and interference modulation of a baseline was conducted.

  12. The chemical instability of Na{sub 2}IrO{sub 3} in air

    SciTech Connect

    Krizan, J.W. Roudebush, J.H.; Fox, G.M.; Cava, R.J.

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • Na{sub 2}IrO{sub 3} decomposes rapidly in laboratory air. • The decomposition requires the simultaneous presence of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. • Decomposition results in a dramatic change in the magnetic properties. • Second 5 K feature in magnetic susceptibility not previously reported. - Abstract: We report that Na{sub 2}IrO{sub 3}, which has a layered honeycomb iridium oxide sublattice interleaved by Na planes, decomposes in laboratory air while maintaining the same basic crystal structure. The decomposition reaction was monitored by time-dependent powder X-ray diffraction under different ambient atmospheres, through which it was determined that it occurs only in the simultaneous presence of both CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. A hydrated sodium carbonate is the primary decomposition product along with altered Na{sub 2}IrO{sub 3}. The diffraction signature of the altered Na{sub 2}IrO{sub 3} is quite similar to that of the pristine material, which makes the detection of decomposition difficult in a sample handled under ordinary laboratory conditions. The decomposed samples show a significantly decreased magnetic susceptibility and the disappearance of the low temperature antiferromagnetic transition considered to be characteristic of the phase. Samples that have never been exposed to air after synthesis display a previously unreported magnetic transition at 5 K.

  13. Incommensurate counterrotating magnetic order stabilized by Kitaev interactions in the layered honeycomb α -Li2IrO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, S. Â. C.; Johnson, R. Â. D.; Freund, F.; Choi, Sungkyun; Jesche, A.; Kimchi, I.; Manni, S.; Bombardi, A.; Manuel, P.; Gegenwart, P.; Coldea, R.

    2016-05-01

    The layered honeycomb magnet α -Li2IrO3 has been theoretically proposed as a candidate to display unconventional magnetic behaviour associated with Kitaev interactions between spin-orbit entangled jeff=1 /2 magnetic moments on a honeycomb lattice. Here we report single crystal magnetic resonant x-ray diffraction combined with powder magnetic neutron diffraction to reveal an incommensurate magnetic order in the honeycomb layers with Ir magnetic moments counterrotating on nearest-neighbor sites. This unexpected type of magnetic structure for a honeycomb magnet cannot be explained by a spin Hamiltonian with dominant isotropic (Heisenberg) couplings. The magnetic structure shares many key features with the magnetic order in the structural polytypes β - and γ -Li2IrO3 , understood theoretically to be stabilized by dominant Kitaev interactions between Ir moments located on the vertices of three-dimensional hyperhoneycomb and stripyhoneycomb lattices, respectively. Based on this analogy and a theoretical soft-spin analysis of magnetic ground states for candidate spin Hamiltonians, we propose that Kitaev interactions also dominate in α -Li2IrO3 , indicative of universal Kitaev physics across all three members of the harmonic honeycomb family of Li2IrO3 polytypes.

  14. Crystallographic and magnetic properties of Pb2-xBixIr2O7-δ (0 ≤ x ≤ 2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Retuerto, M.; Sarkar, T.; Li, M.-R.; Ignatov, A.; Croft, M.; Hodges, J. P.; Thao Tran, T.; Shiv Halasyamani, P.; Greenblatt, M.

    2014-12-01

    The title series of compounds have been synthesized by solid state reaction and characterized by x-ray diffraction (PXD), neutron powder diffraction (PND), second harmonic generation (SHG), x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and magnetization measurements. The crystal structures have been refined from PND data in the centrosymmetric space group Fd\\bar{3}m with pyrochlore structure. No sign of a break of the centrosymmetry has been observed by SHG and no change of the structure to a polar space group in any component of the series, as it was previously reported for Pb2Ir2O7-δ with non-centrosymmetric F\\bar{4}3m space group. We have determined by PND that the oxidation state of Ir is slightly decreasing from 5+-to-4+ in the Pb-rich to almost 4+ in the Bi-rich samples. This evolution is confirmed by XAS and also it explains the progression of the crystallographic parameters. All the samples are paramagnetic in the temperature range measured and the magnitude of the effective magnetic moment is enhanced with Bi content, correlated with the enhancement of Ir4+ compared to Ir5+; suggesting Ir5+ to be present in a trigonal antiprism crystal field splitting and therefore Ir4+ as the only magnetic cation.

  15. Status Of Sofradir IR-CCD Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tribolet, Philippe; Radisson, Patrick

    1988-05-01

    The topics of this paper deal with the IR-CCD detectors manufactured by SOFRADIR the new French joint venture. Description of the IRCCD technology and the advantages of this approach are given. In conclusion, some IR-CCD typical results are given.

  16. Morphological Typology of Languages for IR.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pirkola, Ari

    2001-01-01

    Presents a morphological classification of languages from the information retrieval (IR) perspective. Discusses differences in inflection, derivation, and compounding; index of synthesis and index of fusion; cross-language retrieval research; the need for semantic and syntactic typologies; and the effects of morphology and stemming in IR.…

  17. Hydrogen intercalation under graphene on Ir(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grånäs, Elin; Gerber, Timm; Schröder, Ulrike A.; Schulte, Karina; Andersen, Jesper N.; Michely, Thomas; Knudsen, Jan

    2016-09-01

    Using high resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy we study the intercalation of hydrogen under graphene/Ir(111). The hydrogen intercalated graphene is characterized by a component in C 1s that is shifted -0.10 to -0.18 eV with respect to pristine graphene and a component in Ir 4f at 60.54 eV. The position of this Ir 4f component is identical to that of the Ir(111) surface layer with hydrogen atoms adsorbed, indicating that the atomic hydrogen adsorption site on bare Ir(111) and beneath graphene is the same. Based on co-existence of fully- and non-intercalated graphene, and the inability to intercalate a closed graphene film covering the entire Ir(111) surface, we conclude that hydrogen dissociatively adsorbs at bare Ir(111) patches, and subsequently diffuses rapidly under graphene. A likely entry point for the intercalating hydrogen atoms is identified to be where graphene crosses an underlying Ir(111) step.

  18. CHIP: Caltech High-res IRS Pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pontoppidan, Klaus M.

    2016-02-01

    CHIP (Caltech High-res IRS Pipeline) reduces high signal-to-noise short-high and long-high Spitzer-IRS spectra, especially that taken with dedicated background exposures. Written in IDL, it is independent of other Spitzer reduction tools except IRSFRINGE (ascl:1602.016).

  19. Free-field characterization via directional transmission through a nanoaperture

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We propose a scheme based on extraordinary transmission of light through a single nanoaperture, surrounded by periodic corrugations, for direct characterization of focal-region optical fields with subwavelength-scale structure. We describe the design of the device on the basis of rigorous diffraction theory and fabricate a prototype using a process that involves electron beam lithography, dry etching, and template stripping. First experimental results performed with a transmission-type confocal optical microscope demonstrate the potential of the method. PMID:23866923

  20. IR detection with uncooled sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tissot, J. L.

    2004-12-01

    The emergence of uncooled detectors has opened new opportunities for IR detection for both military and commercial applications. Development of such devices involves a lot of trade-offs between the different parameters that define the technological stack. These trade-offs explain the number of different architectures that are under worldwide development. The Laboratoire d'Electronique, de Technologies et d'Information (LETI) and ULIS have chosen to develop uncooled infrared sensor using a silicon technology. This silicon approach has the greatest potential for reducing infrared detector manufacturing cost. LETI and ULIS are now working to facilitate the infrared focal plane array (IRFPA) integration into equipment in order to address a very large market. Achievement of this goal needs the development of smart sensors with on-chip advanced functions and the decrease of manufacturing cost of IRFPA by decreasing the pixel pitch and simplifying the vacuum package. We present in this paper the new designs for readout circuit and packages that will be used for 384 × 288 and 160 × 120 arrays with a pitch of 35 μm and advanced results on 35 μm pixel pitch arrays. Thermographic application needs high stability infrared detector with a precise determination of the amount of absorbed infrared flux. Hence, infrared detector with internal temperature stabilized shield has been developed and characterized. The results will be presented.

  1. IR line scanner on UAV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shi-chao; Qin, Jie-xin; Qi, Hong-xing; Xiao, Gong-hai

    2011-08-01

    This paper introduces the designing principle and method of the IR line scanner on UAV in three aspects of optical-mechanical system, electronics system and processing software. It makes the system achieve good results in practical application that there are many features in the system such as light weight, small size, low power assumption, wide field of view, high instantaneous field of view, high noise equivalent temperature difference, wirelessly controlled and so on. The entire system is designed as follows: Multi-element scanner is put into use for reducing the electrical noise bandwidth, and then improving SNR; Square split aperture scanner is put into use for solving the image ratation distortion, besides fit for large velocity to height ratio; DSP is put into use for non-uniformity correction and background nosie subtraction, and then improving the imagery quality; SD card is put into use as image data storage media instead of the hard disk; The image data is stored in SD card in FAT32 file system, easily playbacked by processing software on Windows and Linux operating system; wireless transceiver module is put into use for wirelessly controlled.

  2. Recent catalysis measurements at IRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massuti-Ballester, B.; Pidan, S.; Herdrich, G.; Fertig, M.

    2015-08-01

    At the Institute of Space Systems (IRS), experiments have been performed using the high enthalpy, inductively heated plasma generator (IPG) in plasma wind tunnel 3 (PWK3), in order to assess the catalytic behaviour of different materials. Utilising the Upwind Relaxation Algorithm for Non-equilibrium Flows of the University of Stuttgart (URANUS), a methodology for determining catalytic efficiencies by obtaining atomic recombination probabilities γ for high temperature materials, has been developed. This method eliminates the inherent uncertainties produced when using catalytic properties of previously tested materials to infer those of new materials. In this work, eight different candidates for the Thermal Protection System (TPS) of an entry vehicle have been studied, of which six are ceramic materials and the other two are metallic alloys. Thermochemical properties of these specimens are given for surface temperatures between 1000 and 2000 K in pure oxygen and pure nitrogen plasmas. The high enthalpies and relatively low pressure conditions in which these material samples have been tested in PWK3 are relevant for entry applications from Low Earth Orbit (LEO).

  3. Automated manual transmission controller

    DOEpatents

    Lawrie, Robert E.; Reed, Jr., Richard G.; Bernier, David R.

    1999-12-28

    A powertrain system for a hybrid vehicle. The hybrid vehicle includes a heat engine, such as a diesel engine, and an electric machine, which operates as both an electric motor and an alternator, to power the vehicle. The hybrid vehicle also includes a manual-style transmission configured to operate as an automatic transmission from the perspective of the driver. The engine and the electric machine drive an input shaft which in turn drives an output shaft of the transmission. In addition to driving the transmission, the electric machine regulates the speed of the input shaft in order to synchronize the input shaft during either an upshift or downshift of the transmission by either decreasing or increasing the speed of the input shaft. When decreasing the speed of the input shaft, the electric motor functions as an alternator to produce electrical energy which may be stored by a storage device. Operation of the transmission is controlled by a transmission controller which receives input signals and generates output signals to control shift and clutch motors to effect smooth launch, upshift shifts, and downshifts of the transmission, so that the transmission functions substantially as an automatic transmission from the perspective of the driver, while internally substantially functioning as a manual transmission.

  4. Coherent Diffractive Imaging: From Nanometric Down to Picometric Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Caro, Liberato; Carlino, Elvio; Siliqi, Dritan; Giannini, Cinzia

    Coherent diffractive imaging (CDI) is a novel technique for inspecting (crystalline and non-crystalline) matter from nanometric down to picometric resolution. It was used originally with X-rays and, more recently, with electrons (so-called electron diffractive imaging, or EDI). This chapter introduces basic concepts concerning CDI and addresses the different types of X-ray CDI experiments that have been conducted, namely plane wave CDI from isolated objects in forward scattering, focused-beam Fresnel CDI from isolated objects in forward scattering, Bragg CDI from nanocrystals, and keyhole CDI and ptychography from extended objects. A CDI experiment with a transmission electron microscope, alternatively named an EDI experiment, is also introduced.

  5. Incorporating mask topography edge diffraction in photolithography simulations.

    PubMed

    Tirapu-Azpiroz, Jaione; Yablonovitch, Eli

    2006-04-01

    In deep ultraviolet lithography simulations, conventional application of Kirchhoff's boundary conditions on the mask surface provides the so-called "thin-mask" approximation of the object field. Current subwavelength lithographic operation, however, places a serious limitation on this approximation, which fails to account for the topographical, or "thick-mask," effects. In this paper, a new simulation model is proposed that is theoretically founded on the well-established physical theory of diffraction. This model relies on the key result that diffraction effects can be interpreted as an intrinsic edge property, and modeled with just two fixed parameters: width and transmission coefficient of a locally determined boundary layer applied to each chrome edge. The proposed model accurately accounts for thick-mask effects of the fields on the mask, greatly improving the accuracy of aerial image simulations in photolithography, while maintaining a reasonable computational cost. PMID:16604762

  6. Estimating the Size of Onion Epidermal Cells from Diffraction Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groff, Jeffrey R.

    2012-10-01

    Bioscience and premedical profession students are a major demographic served by introductory physics courses at many colleges and universities. Exposing these students to biological applications of physical principles will help them to appreciate physics as a useful tool for their future professions. Here I describe an experiment suitable for introductory physics where principles of wave optics are applied to probe the size of onion epidermal cells. The epidermis tissue is composed of cells of relatively uniform size and shape (Fig. 1) so the tissue acts like a one-dimensional transmission diffraction grating. The diffraction patterns generated when a laser beam passes through the tissue (Fig. 2) are analyzed and an estimate of the average width of individual onion epidermal cells is calculated. The results are compared to direct measurements taken using a light microscope. The use of microscopes and plant-cell tissue slides creates opportunities for cross-discipline collaboration between physics and biology instructors.

  7. Guided transmission for 10 micron tunable lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, C.; Sabzali, A.; Yekrangian, A.

    1986-01-01

    Performance characteristics are reported for two types of IR tunable laser guided transmission, one of which incorporates a CO2 laser, metallic piping or fiber-optics, and a detector system, while the other employs a tunable diode laser, fiber-optics, and a detector system. While existing technology furnishes low loss, rugged, near-single mode piping, fiber-optics exhibits appreciably higher loss, and its multimode fibers are fragile and chemically unstable. Studies have accordingly concentrated on such relevant fiber parameters as loss, toxicity, hygroscopicity, refractive index, flexibility, and thermal behavior at low temperature.

  8. Gamma radiation transmission along the multibend mazes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sangrok

    2016-08-01

    Installing a maze on the corridor reduces much shielding materials in shielding door at the end of the pathway. In this study, gamma transmission was measured along single-, double-, and triple-bend mazes, which were applied to nondestructive test workplace by Monte Carlo method. In the facility using (192)Ir 1.85TBq, the lengths of corridors to reduce the effective dose under the limitation without shielding door were 10 and 6m in double- and triple-bend mazes, respectively. PMID:27180220

  9. Identification of primary tumors of brain metastases by SIMCA classification of IR spectroscopic images.

    PubMed

    Krafft, Christoph; Shapoval, Larysa; Sobottka, Stephan B; Geiger, Kathrin D; Schackert, Gabriele; Salzer, Reiner

    2006-07-01

    Brain metastases are secondary intracranial lesions which occur more frequently than primary brain tumors. The four most abundant types of brain metastasis originate from primary tumors of lung cancer, colorectal cancer, breast cancer and renal cell carcinoma. As metastatic cells contain the molecular information of the primary tissue cells and IR spectroscopy probes the molecular fingerprint of cells, IR spectroscopy based methods constitute a new approach to determine the origin of brain metastases. IR spectroscopic images of 4 by 4 mm2 tissue areas were recorded in transmission mode by a FTIR imaging spectrometer coupled to a focal plane array detector. Unsupervised cluster analysis revealed variances within each cryosection. Selected clusters of five IR images with known diagnoses trained a supervised classification model based on the algorithm soft independent modeling of class analogies (SIMCA). This model was applied to distinguish normal brain tissue from brain metastases and to identify the primary tumor of brain metastases in 15 independent IR images. All specimens were assigned to the correct tissue class. This proof-of-concept study demonstrates that IR spectroscopy can complement established methods such as histopathology or immunohistochemistry for diagnosis. PMID:16787638

  10. Investigation of the coal fly ashes using IR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mozgawa, W; Król, M; Dyczek, J; Deja, J

    2014-11-11

    The results of FT-IR spectroscopic studies of coal fly ashes, originated from various polish power plants are reported. The results of MIR investigations were compared to the X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements and chemical analyses. They are mainly composed of silica, alumina and lime. The infrared spectrum in the middle range can be used to describe both the structure of phases present in the fly ash and to identify the characteristic elements of the individual components of ash. The results indicate that the amount of aluminosilicate and its Si/Al ratio induce a shift in the T-O stretching band appearing at 950-1100 cm(-1). Moreover, FWHM of these bands indicates the participation of the crystalline phase relative to amorphous. The presence of carbonate phases generates substantial changes in the 1450-1400 cm(-1) area of the spectra. The presence of such phases as anhydrite, mullite or illite has also been established on the basis of IR spectra. PMID:24935825

  11. 50 years of fiber diffraction.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Kenneth C

    2010-05-01

    In 1955 Ken Holmes started working on tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) as a research student with Rosalind Franklin at Birkbeck College, London. Afterward he spent 18months as a post doc with Don Caspar and Carolyn Cohen at the Children's Hospital, Boston where he continued the work on TMV and also showed that the core of the thick filament of byssus retractor muscle from mussels is made of two-stranded alpha-helical coiled-coils. Returning to England he joined Aaron Klug's group at the newly founded Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge. Besides continuing the TMV studies, which were aimed at calculating the three-dimensional density map of the virus, he collaborated with Pringle's group in Oxford to show that two conformation of the myosin cross-bridge could be identified in insect flight muscle. In 1968 he opened the biophysics department at the Max Planck Institute for Medical Research in Heidelberg, Germany. With Gerd Rosenbaum he initiated the use of synchrotron radiation as a source for X-ray diffraction. In his lab the TMV structure was pushed to 4A resolution and showed how the RNA binds to the protein. With his co-workers he solved the structure of g-actin as a crystalline complex and then solved the structure of the f-actin filament by orientating the g-actin structure so as to give the f-actin fiber diffraction pattern. He was also able to solve the structure of the complex of actin with tropomyosin from fiber diffraction. PMID:20079849

  12. Coherent Diffractive Imaging at LCLS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Joachim

    2010-03-01

    Soft x-ray FEL light sources produce ultrafast x-ray pulses with outstanding high peak brilliance. This might enable the structure determination of proteins that cannot be crystallized. The deposited energy would destroy the molecules completely, but owing to the short pulses the destruction will ideally only happen after the termination of the pulse. In order to address the many challenges that we face in attempting molecular diffraction, we have carried out experiments in coherent diffraction from protein nanocrystals at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC. The periodicity of these objects gives us much higher scattering signals than uncrystallized proteins would. The crystals are filtered to sizes less than 2 micron, and delivered to the pulsed X-ray beam in a liquid jet. The effects of pulse duration and fluence on the high-resolution structure of the crystals have been studied. Diffraction patterns are recorded at a repetition rate of 30 Hz with pnCCD detectors. This allows us to take 108,000 images per hour. With 2-mega-pixel-detectors this gives a data-rate of more than 400 GB per hour. The automated sorting and evaluation of hundreds of thousands images is another challenge of this kind of experiments. Preliminary results will be presented on our first LCLS experiments. This work was carried out as part of a collaboration, for which Henry Chapman is the spokesperson. The collaboration consists of CFEL DESY, Arizona State University, SLAC, Uppsala University, LLNL, The University of Melbourne, LBNL, the Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, and the Max Planck Advanced Study Group (ASG) at the CFEL. The experiments were carried out using the CAMP apparatus, which was designed and built by the Max Planck ASG at CFEL. The LCLS is operated by Stanford University on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  13. Crystallography: Resolution beyond the diffraction limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jian-Ren

    2016-02-01

    A method has been devised that extends the resolution of X-ray crystal structures beyond the diffraction limit. This might help to improve the visualization of structures of proteins that form 'poorly diffracting' crystals. See Letter p.202

  14. A diffractive mechanism of focusing.

    PubMed

    Case, W B; Sadurni, E; Schleich, W P

    2012-12-01

    We examine the free time evolution of a rectangular one dimensional Schrödinger wave packet of constant phase during the early stage which in the paraxial wave approximation is identical to the diffraction of a scalar field from a single slit. Our analysis, based on numerics and the Cornu spiral reveals considerable intricate detail behavior in the density and phase of the wave. We also point out a concentration of the intensity that occurs on axis and propose a new measure of width that expresses this concentration. PMID:23262675

  15. Fiber optic diffraction grating maker

    DOEpatents

    Deason, Vance A.; Ward, Michael B.

    1991-01-01

    A compact and portable diffraction grating maker comprised of a laser beam, optical and fiber optics devices coupling the beam to one or more evanescent beam splitters, and collimating lenses or mirrors directing the split beam at an appropriate photosensitive material. The collimating optics, the output ends of the fiber optic coupler and the photosensitive plate holder are all mounted on an articulated framework so that the angle of intersection of the beams can be altered at will without disturbing the spatial filter, collimation or beam quality, and assuring that the beams will always intersect at the position of the plate.

  16. Fiber optic diffraction grating maker

    DOEpatents

    Deason, V.A.; Ward, M.B.

    1991-05-21

    A compact and portable diffraction grating maker is comprised of a laser beam, optical and fiber optics devices coupling the beam to one or more evanescent beam splitters, and collimating lenses or mirrors directing the split beam at an appropriate photosensitive material. The collimating optics, the output ends of the fiber optic coupler and the photosensitive plate holder are all mounted on an articulated framework so that the angle of intersection of the beams can be altered at will without disturbing the spatial filter, collimation or beam quality, and assuring that the beams will always intersect at the position of the plate. 4 figures.

  17. Nonlinear ptychographic coherent diffractive imaging.

    PubMed

    Odstrcil, M; Baksh, P; Gawith, C; Vrcelj, R; Frey, J G; Brocklesby, W S

    2016-09-01

    Ptychographic Coherent diffractive imaging (PCDI) is a significant advance in imaging allowing the measurement of the full electric field at a sample without use of any imaging optics. So far it has been confined solely to imaging of linear optical responses. In this paper we show that because of the coherence-preserving nature of nonlinear optical interactions, PCDI can be generalised to nonlinear optical imaging. We demonstrate second harmonic generation PCDI, directly revealing phase information about the nonlinear coefficients, and showing the general applicability of PCDI to nonlinear interactions. PMID:27607631

  18. Issues in Optical Diffraction Theory

    PubMed Central

    Mielenz, Klaus D.

    2009-01-01

    This paper focuses on unresolved or poorly documented issues pertaining to Fresnel’s scalar diffraction theory and its modifications. In Sec. 2 it is pointed out that all thermal sources used in practice are finite in size and errors can result from insufficient coherence of the optical field. A quarter-wave criterion is applied to show how such errors can be avoided by placing the source at a large distance from the aperture plane, and it is found that in many cases it may be necessary to use collimated light as on the source side of a Fraunhofer experiment. If these precautions are not taken the theory of partial coherence may have to be used for the computations. In Sec. 3 it is recalled that for near-zone computations the Kirchhoff or Rayleigh-Sommerfeld integrals are applicable, but fail to correctly describe the energy flux across the aperture plane because they are not continuously differentiable with respect to the assumed geometrical field on the source side. This is remedied by formulating an improved theory in which the field on either side of a semi-reflecting screen is expressed as the superposition of mutually incoherent components which propagate in the opposite directions of the incident and reflected light. These components are defined as linear combinations of the Rayleigh-Sommerfeld integrals, so that they are rigorous solutions of the wave equation as well as continuously differentiable in the aperture plane. Algorithms for using the new theory for computing the diffraction patterns of circular apertures and slits at arbitrary distances z from either side of the aperture (down to z = ± 0.0003 λ) are presented, and numerical examples of the results are given. These results show that the incident geometrical field is modulated by diffraction before it reaches the aperture plane while the reflected field is spilled into the dark space. At distances from the aperture which are large compared to the wavelength λ these field expressions are

  19. PREMIER's imaging IR limb sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraft, Stefan; Caron, Jerome; Bézy, Jean-Loup; Meynart, Roland; Langen, Jörg; Carnicero Dominguez, Bernardo; Bensi, Paolo; Silvestrin, Pierluigi

    2011-11-01

    The Imaging IR Limb Sounder (IRLS) is one of the two instruments planned on board of the candidate Earth Explorer Core Mission PREMIER. PREMIER stands for PRocess Exploration through Measurements of Infrared and Millimetrewave Emitted Radiation and is presently under feasibility study by ESA. Emerging from recent enhanced detector and processing technologies IRLS shall, next to a millimetre-wave limb sounder, explore the benefits of three-dimensional limb sounding with embedded cloud imaging capability. Such 3d imaging technology is expected to open a new era of limb sounding that will allow detailed studies of the link between atmospheric composition and climate, since it will map simultaneously fields of temperature and many trace gases in the mid/upper troposphere and stratosphere across a large vertical and horizontal field of view and with relatively high vertical and horizontal resolution. PREMIER shall fly in tandem formation looking backwards to METOP's swath and thereby explore the benefit of 3-dimensional information for meteorological/environmental analyses and climate forcing investigations. As currently planned and if implemented, IRLS will cover a total horizontal field of about 360 km and observe the limb at altitudes between 4 and 52 km. The vertical spatial sampling distance (SSD) will be well below 1 km. It will be run in two different exclusive modes to address scientific questions about atmospheric dynamics and chemistry at spectral samplings of ~1.2 cm-1 and ~0.2 cm-1, respectively. In such configuration IRLS will be composed of an imaging array with about 1800 macro pixels or sub-samples, thereby allowing cloud imaging and rejection at sufficient spatial resolution. We will present an overview of the instrument requirements as derived from the scientific requirements, the present status of the mission, and we will give an overview of the currently identified technology needs and instrument predevelopments.

  20. Infrared PINEM developed by diffraction in 4D UEM

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haihua; Baskin, John Spencer; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2016-01-01

    The development of four-dimensional ultrafast electron microscopy (4D UEM) has enabled not only observations of the ultrafast dynamics of photon–matter interactions at the atomic scale with ultrafast resolution in image, diffraction, and energy space, but photon–electron interactions in the field of nanoplasmonics and nanophotonics also have been captured by the related technique of photon-induced near-field electron microscopy (PINEM) in image and energy space. Here we report a further extension in the ongoing development of PINEM using a focused, nanometer-scale, electron beam in diffraction space for measurements of infrared-light-induced PINEM. The energy resolution in diffraction mode is unprecedented, reaching 0.63 eV under the 200-keV electron beam illumination, and separated peaks of the PINEM electron-energy spectrum induced by infrared light of wavelength 1,038 nm (photon energy 1.2 eV) have been well resolved for the first time, to our knowledge. In a comparison with excitation by green (519-nm) pulses, similar first-order PINEM peak amplitudes were obtained for optical fluence differing by a factor of more than 60 at the interface of copper metal and vacuum. Under high fluence, the nonlinear regime of IR PINEM was observed, and its spatial dependence was studied. In combination with PINEM temporal gating and low-fluence infrared excitation, the PINEM diffraction method paves the way for studies of structural dynamics in reciprocal space and energy space with high temporal resolution. PMID:26848135

  1. Broadly tunable picosecond ir source

    DOEpatents

    Campillo, A.J.; Hyer, R.C.; Shapiro, S.L.

    1980-04-23

    A picosecond traveling-wave parametric device capable of controlled spectral bandwidth and wavelength in the infrared is reported. Intense 1.064 ..mu..m picosecond pulses (1) pass through a 4.5 cm long LiNbO/sub 3/ optical parametric oscillator crystal (2) set at its degeneracy angle. A broad band emerges, and a simple grating (3) and mirror (4) arrangement is used to inject a selected narrow-band into a 2 cm long LiNbO/sub 3/ optical parametric amplifier crystal (5) along a second pump line. Typical input energies at 1.064 ..mu..m along both pump lines are 6 to 8 mJ for the oscillator and 10 mJ for the amplifier. This yields 1 mJ of tunable output in the range 1.98 to 2.38 ..mu..m which when down-converted in a 1 cm long CdSe crystal mixer (6) gives 2 ..mu..J of tunable radiation over the 14.8 to 18.5 ..mu..m region. The bandwidth and wavelength of both the 2 and 16 ..mu..m radiation output are controlled solely by the diffraction grating.

  2. Broadly tunable picosecond IR source

    DOEpatents

    Campillo, Anthony J.; Hyer, Ronald C.; Shapiro, Stanley J.

    1982-01-01

    A picosecond traveling-wave parametric device capable of controlled spectral bandwidth and wavelength in the infrared is reported. Intense 1.064 .mu.m picosecond pulses (1) pass through a 4.5 cm long LiNbO.sub.3 optical parametric oscillator crystal (2) set at its degeneracy angle. A broad band emerges, and a simple grating (3) and mirror (4) arrangement is used to inject a selected narrow-band into a 2 cm long LiNbO.sub.3 optical parametric amplifier crystal (5) along a second pump line. Typical input energies at 1.064 .mu.m along both pump lines are 6-8 mJ for the oscillator and 10 mJ for the amplifier. This yields 1 mJ of tunable output in the range 1.98 to 2.38 .mu.m which when down-converted in a 1 cm long CdSe crystal mixer (6) gives 2 .mu.J of tunable radiation over the 14.8 to 18.5 .mu.m region. The bandwidth and wavelength of both the 2 and 16 .mu.m radiation output are controlled solely by the diffraction grating.

  3. Applications of Fresnel-Kirchhoff diffraction integral in linear and nonlinear optics: a didactic introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilla, V.; Costa, G. G. G.; Catunda, Tomaz

    2001-08-01

    In nonlinear optics, the Gaussian beam intensity profile, I(r) exp(-2r2/w2) generates a refractive index profile (Delta) n(r), and consequently a phase profile. Depending on the magnitude of the phase profile, rings structures can be observed in the beam far field intensity profile, the so-called Transverse Self Phase Modulation effect. In this work, we calculated these rings formation due to thermal and Kerr non linearities, using the Fresnel- Kirchhoff diffraction integral. In the case of Kerr nonlinearity, the refractive index profile is also Gaussian since n(r) equals n0 + n2I(r). However, due to the effect of heat diffusion, in the case of thermal nonlinearity the refractive index profile is broader than I(r).

  4. Visualizing Infrared (IR) Spectroscopy with Computer Animation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrams, Charles B.; Fine, Leonard W.

    1996-01-01

    IR Tutor, an interactive, animated infrared (IR) spectroscopy tutorial has been developed for Macintosh and IBM-compatible computers. Using unique color animation, complicated vibrational modes can be introduced to beginning students. Rules governing the appearance of IR absorption bands become obvious because the vibrational modes can be visualized. Each peak in the IR spectrum is highlighted, and the animation of the corresponding normal mode can be shown. Students can study each spectrum stepwise, or click on any individual peak to see its assignment. Important regions of each spectrum can be expanded and spectra can be overlaid for comparison. An introduction to the theory of IR spectroscopy is included, making the program a complete instructional package. Our own success in using this software for teaching and research in both academic and industrial environments will be described. IR Tutor consists of three sections: (1) The 'Introduction' is a review of basic principles of spectroscopy. (2) 'Theory' begins with the classical model of a simple diatomic molecule and is expanded to include larger molecules by introducing normal modes and group frequencies. (3) 'Interpretation' is the heart of the tutorial. Thirteen IR spectra are analyzed in detail, covering the most important functional groups. This section features color animation of each normal mode, full interactivity, overlay of related spectra, and expansion of important regions. This section can also be used as a reference.

  5. 1D Josephson quantum interference grids: diffraction patterns and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucci, M.; Badoni, D.; Corato, V.; Merlo, V.; Ottaviani, I.; Salina, G.; Cirillo, M.; Ustinov, A. V.; Winkler, D.

    2016-02-01

    We investigate the magnetic response of transmission lines with embedded Josephson junctions and thus generating a 1D underdamped array. The measured multi-junction interference patterns are compared with the theoretical predictions for Josephson supercurrent modulations when an external magnetic field couples both to the inter-junction loops and to the junctions themselves. The results provide a striking example of the analogy between Josephson phase modulation and 1D optical diffraction grid. The Fiske resonances in the current-voltage characteristics with voltage spacing {Φ0}≤ft(\\frac{{\\bar{c}}}{2L}\\right) , where L is the total physical length of the array, {Φ0} the magnetic flux quantum and \\bar{c} the speed of light in the transmission line, demonstrate that the discrete line supports stable dynamic patterns generated by the ac Josephson effect interacting with the cavity modes of the line.

  6. Selective imaging of nano-particle contrast agents by a single-shot x-ray diffraction technique.

    PubMed

    Stein, Ashley F; Ilavsky, Jan; Kopace, Rael; Bennett, Eric E; Wen, Han

    2010-06-01

    Iron oxide nano-particles have very different x-ray diffraction properties from tissue. They can be clearly visualized against suppressed tissue background in a single-shot x-ray diffraction imaging technique. This technique is able to acquire both diffraction and absorption images from a single grating-modulated projection image through analysis in the spatial frequency domain. We describe the use of two orthogonal transmission gratings to selectively retain diffraction signal from iron oxide particles that are larger than a threshold size, while eliminating the background signal from soft tissue and bone. This approach should help the tracking of functionalized particles in cell labeling and targeted therapy. PMID:20588456

  7. Future of Electron Scattering and Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, Ernest; Stemmer, Susanne; Zheng, Haimei; Zhu, Yimei; Maracas, George

    2014-02-25

    spectroscopy with high spatial resolution without damaging their structure. The strong interaction of electrons with matter allows high-energy electron pulses to gather structural information before a sample is damaged. Electron ScatteringImaging, diffraction, and spectroscopy are the fundamental capabilities of electron-scattering instruments. The DOE BES-funded TEAM (Transmission Electron Aberration-corrected Microscope) project achieved unprecedented sub-atomic spatial resolution in imaging through aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy. To further advance electron scattering techniques that directly enable groundbreaking science, instrumentation must advance beyond traditional two-dimensional imaging. Advances in temporal resolution, recording the full phase and energy spaces, and improved spatial resolution constitute a new frontier in electron microscopy, and will directly address the BES Grand Challenges, such as to “control the emergent properties that arise from the complex correlations of atomic and electronic constituents” and the “hidden states” “very far away from equilibrium”. Ultrafast methods, such as the pump-probe approach, enable pathways toward understanding, and ultimately controlling, the chemical dynamics of molecular systems and the evolution of complexity in mesoscale and nanoscale systems. Central to understanding how to synthesize and exploit functional materials is having the ability to apply external stimuli (such as heat, light, a reactive flux, and an electrical bias) and to observe the resulting dynamic process in situ and in operando, and under the appropriate environment (e.g., not limited to UHV conditions). To enable revolutionary advances in electron scattering and science, the participants of the workshop recommended three major new instrumental developments: A. Atomic-Resolution Multi-Dimensional Transmission Electron Microscope: This instrument would provide quantitative information over the entire real space

  8. Ultrafast electron diffraction from aligned molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Centurion, Martin

    2015-08-17

    The aim of this project was to record time-resolved electron diffraction patterns of aligned molecules and to reconstruct the 3D molecular structure. The molecules are aligned non-adiabatically using a femtosecond laser pulse. A femtosecond electron pulse then records a diffraction pattern while the molecules are aligned. The diffraction patterns are then be processed to obtain the molecular structure.

  9. Undergraduate Experiment with Fractal Diffraction Gratings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monsoriu, Juan A.; Furlan, Walter D.; Pons, Amparo; Barreiro, Juan C.; Gimenez, Marcos H.

    2011-01-01

    We present a simple diffraction experiment with fractal gratings based on the triadic Cantor set. Diffraction by fractals is proposed as a motivating strategy for students of optics in the potential applications of optical processing. Fraunhofer diffraction patterns are obtained using standard equipment present in most undergraduate physics…

  10. Highly stable bimetallic AuIr/TiO2 catalyst: physical origin of the intrinsic stability against sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinero, Ernesto; Han, Chan Wan; Majundar, Paulami; Aguilar-Tapia, Antonio; Zanella, Rodolfo; Greeley, Jeffrey; Otarlan, Volkan

    It has been a long-lived research topic in the field of heterogeneous catalysis to find a way to stabilizing supported Au catalysts against sintering. Herein, we report highly stable AuIr bimetallic nanoparticles on TiO2 synthesized by sequential deposition-precipitation. To understand the physical origin of the high stability AuIr/TiO2 system, we have used scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), STEM-tomography and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. 3D structures of AuIr/TiO2 obtained by STEM-tomography indicate that AuIr nanoparticles on TiO2 have intrinsically lower free energy and less driving force for sintering than Au nanoparticles. DFT calculations on segregation behavior of AuIr slabs on TiO2 showed that the presence of Ir near the TiO2 surface increases the adhesion energy of the bimetallic slabs to the TiO2 and the attractive interactions between Ir and TiO2 lead to higher stability of the AuIr nanoparticles compared to Au nanoparticles.

  11. Diffraction optics for terahertz waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiltse, James C.

    2004-09-01

    Conventional lenses are important components for many terahertz applications, but ordinary lenses are very difficult to fabricate for short-focal lengths. Multi-level phase-corrected zoned lens antennas have been investigated with particular application at terahertz wavelengths. These zoned lenses (or diffractive optics) give better performance than ordinary lenses, and because of their planar construction are easier and cheaper to fabricate. The depths of cut needed for a grooved zone plate are quite small, even when materials with low dielectric constants are used. Zoned lenses have been built and tested at various frequencies from 100 GHz to 1.5 THz, with phase correction levels of half-wave, quarter-wave, or eighth-wavelength. The inherent losses in transparent materials increase monotonically over this frequency range. Typical low-loss materials include polystyrene, polyethylene, Teflon, polycarbonate, polystyrene foam, foamed polyethylene, low density polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), TPX, quartz, sapphire, and silicon. Low dielectric-constant materials are normally preferred to reduce reflection and attenuation losses. Techniques for cutting or milling the materials to small dimensions are important, because at 1.0 THz an eighth-wavelength correction for silicon is only 15 μm. Another characteristic of zoned diffraction optics is their frequency behavior. Previous investigations have considered their bandwidth dependence and quasi-periodic extended frequency response for a specified focal length. As frequency changes, the focal point moves along the axis of the zoned lens. An analysis is given to explain this effect.

  12. Transmission Planning Analysis Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2015-06-23

    Developed to solve specific problem: Assist transmission planning for regional transfers in interconnected power systems. This work was originated in a study for the U.S. Department of State, to recommend transmission reinforcements for the Central American regional system that interconnects 6 countries. Transmission planning analysis is currently performed by engineers with domainspecific and systemspecific knowledge without a unique methodology. The software codes of this disclosure assists engineers by defining systematic analysis procedures to help identifymore » weak points and make decisions on transmission planning of regional interconnected power systems. Transmission Planning Analysis Tool groups PSS/E results of multiple AC contingency analysis and voltage stability analysis and QV analysis of many scenarios of study and arrange them in a systematic way to aid power system planning engineers or transmission operators in effective decision]making process or in the off]line study environment.« less

  13. Transmission Planning Analysis Tool

    SciTech Connect

    2015-06-23

    Developed to solve specific problem: Assist transmission planning for regional transfers in interconnected power systems. This work was originated in a study for the U.S. Department of State, to recommend transmission reinforcements for the Central American regional system that interconnects 6 countries. Transmission planning analysis is currently performed by engineers with domainspecific and systemspecific knowledge without a unique methodology. The software codes of this disclosure assists engineers by defining systematic analysis procedures to help identify weak points and make decisions on transmission planning of regional interconnected power systems. Transmission Planning Analysis Tool groups PSS/E results of multiple AC contingency analysis and voltage stability analysis and QV analysis of many scenarios of study and arrange them in a systematic way to aid power system planning engineers or transmission operators in effective decision]making process or in the off]line study environment.

  14. Elastic, magnetic and electronic properties of iridium phosphide Ir2P

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Pei; Wang, Yonggang; Wang, Liping; Zhang, Xinyu; Yu, Xiaohui; Zhu, Jinlong; Wang, Shanmin; Qin, Jiaqian; Leinenweber, Kurt; Chen, Haihua; et al

    2016-02-24

    Cubic (space group: Fm3¯m) iridium phosphide, Ir2P, has been synthesized at high pressure and high temperature. Angle-dispersive synchrotron X-ray diffraction measurements on Ir2P powder using a diamond-anvil cell at room temperature and high pressures (up to 40.6 GPa) yielded a bulk modulus of B0 = 306(6) GPa and its pressure derivative B0'= 6.4(5). Such a high bulk modulus attributed to the short and strongly covalent Ir-P bonds as revealed by first – principles calculations and three-dimensionally distributed [IrP4] tetrahedron network. Indentation testing on a well–sintered polycrystalline sample yielded the hardness of 11.8(4) GPa. Relatively low shear modulus of ~64 GPamore » from theoretical calculations suggests a complicated overall bonding in Ir2P with metallic, ionic, and covalent characteristics. Additionally, a spin glass behavior is indicated by magnetic susceptibility measurements.« less

  15. Copper intercalation at the interface of graphene and Ir(111) studied by scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sicot, M. Fagot-Revurat, Y.; Kierren, B.; Vasseur, G.; Malterre, D.

    2014-11-10

    We report on the intercalation of a submonolayer of copper at 775 K underneath graphene epitaxially grown on Ir(111) studied by means of low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) at 77 K. Nucleation and growth dynamics of Cu below graphene have been investigated, and, most importantly, the intercalation mechanism has been identified. First, LEED patterns reveal the pseudomorphic growth of Cu on Ir under the topmost graphene layer resulting in a large Cu in-plane lattice parameter expansion of about 6% compared to Cu(111). Second, large-scale STM topographs as a function of Cu coverage show that Cu diffusion on Ir below graphene exhibits a low energy barrier resulting in Cu accumulation at Ir step edges. As a result, the graphene sheet undergoes a strong edges reshaping. Finally, atomically-resolved STM images reveal a damaged graphene sheet at the atomic scale after metal intercalation. Point defects in graphene were shown to be carbon vacancies. According to these results, a Cu penetration path beneath graphene is proposed to occur via metal aided defect formation with no or poor self healing of the graphene sheet. This work illustrates the fact that Cu intercalation is harmful for graphene grown on Ir(111) at the atomic scale.

  16. Copper intercalation at the interface of graphene and Ir(111) studied by scanning tunneling microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sicot, M.; Fagot-Revurat, Y.; Kierren, B.; Vasseur, G.; Malterre, D.

    2014-11-01

    We report on the intercalation of a submonolayer of copper at 775 K underneath graphene epitaxially grown on Ir(111) studied by means of low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) at 77 K. Nucleation and growth dynamics of Cu below graphene have been investigated, and, most importantly, the intercalation mechanism has been identified. First, LEED patterns reveal the pseudomorphic growth of Cu on Ir under the topmost graphene layer resulting in a large Cu in-plane lattice parameter expansion of about 6% compared to Cu(111). Second, large-scale STM topographs as a function of Cu coverage show that Cu diffusion on Ir below graphene exhibits a low energy barrier resulting in Cu accumulation at Ir step edges. As a result, the graphene sheet undergoes a strong edges reshaping. Finally, atomically-resolved STM images reveal a damaged graphene sheet at the atomic scale after metal intercalation. Point defects in graphene were shown to be carbon vacancies. According to these results, a Cu penetration path beneath graphene is proposed to occur via metal aided defect formation with no or poor self healing of the graphene sheet. This work illustrates the fact that Cu intercalation is harmful for graphene grown on Ir(111) at the atomic scale.

  17. Elastic, magnetic and electronic properties of iridium phosphide Ir2P

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Pei; Wang, Yonggang; Wang, Liping; Zhang, Xinyu; Yu, Xiaohui; Zhu, Jinlong; Wang, Shanmin; Qin, Jiaqian; Leinenweber, Kurt; Chen, Haihua; et al

    2016-02-24

    Cubic (space group: Fm3¯m) iridium phosphide, Ir2P, has been synthesized at high pressure and high temperature. Angle-dispersive synchrotron X-ray diffraction measurements on Ir2P powder using a diamond-anvil cell at room temperature and high pressures (up to 40.6 GPa) yielded a bulk modulus of B0 = 306(6) GPa and its pressure derivative B0' = 6.4(5). Such a high bulk modulus attributed to the short and strongly covalent Ir-P bonds as revealed by first – principles calculations and three-dimensionally distributed [IrP4] tetrahedron network. Indentation testing on a well–sintered polycrystalline sample yielded the hardness of 11.8(4) GPa. Relatively low shear modulus of ~64more » GPa from theoretical calculations suggests a complicated overall bonding in Ir2P with metallic, ionic, and covalent characteristics. Additionally, a spin glass behavior is indicated by magnetic susceptibility measurements.« less

  18. Elastic, magnetic and electronic properties of iridium phosphide Ir2P

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Pei; Wang, Yonggang; Wang, Liping; Zhang, Xinyu; Yu, Xiaohui; Zhu, Jinlong; Wang, Shanmin; Qin, Jiaqian; Leinenweber, Kurt; Chen, Haihua; He, Duanwei; Zhao, Yusheng

    2016-02-01

    Cubic (space group: Fmm) iridium phosphide, Ir2P, has been synthesized at high pressure and high temperature. Angle-dispersive synchrotron X-ray diffraction measurements on Ir2P powder using a diamond-anvil cell at room temperature and high pressures (up to 40.6 GPa) yielded a bulk modulus of B0 = 306(6) GPa and its pressure derivative B0‧ = 6.4(5). Such a high bulk modulus attributed to the short and strongly covalent Ir-P bonds as revealed by first - principles calculations and three-dimensionally distributed [IrP4] tetrahedron network. Indentation testing on a well-sintered polycrystalline sample yielded the hardness of 11.8(4) GPa. Relatively low shear modulus of ~64 GPa from theoretical calculations suggests a complicated overall bonding in Ir2P with metallic, ionic, and covalent characteristics. In addition, a spin glass behavior is indicated by magnetic susceptibility measurements.

  19. Elastic, magnetic and electronic properties of iridium phosphide Ir2P

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pei; Wang, Yonggang; Wang, Liping; Zhang, Xinyu; Yu, Xiaohui; Zhu, Jinlong; Wang, Shanmin; Qin, Jiaqian; Leinenweber, Kurt; Chen, Haihua; He, Duanwei; Zhao, Yusheng

    2016-01-01

    Cubic (space group: Fmm) iridium phosphide, Ir2P, has been synthesized at high pressure and high temperature. Angle-dispersive synchrotron X-ray diffraction measurements on Ir2P powder using a diamond-anvil cell at room temperature and high pressures (up to 40.6 GPa) yielded a bulk modulus of B0 = 306(6) GPa and its pressure derivative B0′ = 6.4(5). Such a high bulk modulus attributed to the short and strongly covalent Ir-P bonds as revealed by first – principles calculations and three-dimensionally distributed [IrP4] tetrahedron network. Indentation testing on a well–sintered polycrystalline sample yielded the hardness of 11.8(4) GPa. Relatively low shear modulus of ~64 GPa from theoretical calculations suggests a complicated overall bonding in Ir2P with metallic, ionic, and covalent characteristics. In addition, a spin glass behavior is indicated by magnetic susceptibility measurements. PMID:26905444

  20. Preparation and Characterization of Ir Coating on WC Ceramic by Double Glow Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhongwei; Xu, Zhenghui; Wang, Jinming; Wu, Wangping; Chen, Zhaofeng

    2012-10-01

    Dense and adherent Ir coating was deposited on porous WC ceramic by double glow plasma (DGP). There were two cathodes in the vacuum deposition chamber. The bias voltage of Ir target and WC substrate were -900 and -350 V, respectively. The Ir coating was characterized using scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, nanoindentation instrument, and scratch tester to examine the microstructure and the mechanical properties. The results indicated that the deposition rate by DGP was up to 5-6 μm/h which was faster than that by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition and magnetron sputtering. The Ir coating had a preferential growth orientation of (220) crystal face. The hardness was 800 HV. The elastic modulus was 644 GPa. The excellent mechanical properties were attributed to the preferential growth, the large compressive stress, and the shrinkage of the lattice parameters. The adhesive force was up to 51 N. The strong adhesion was attributed to the mechanical locking and chemical reaction between the Ir coating and the porous WC substrate.

  1. Elastic, magnetic and electronic properties of iridium phosphide Ir2P.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pei; Wang, Yonggang; Wang, Liping; Zhang, Xinyu; Yu, Xiaohui; Zhu, Jinlong; Wang, Shanmin; Qin, Jiaqian; Leinenweber, Kurt; Chen, Haihua; He, Duanwei; Zhao, Yusheng

    2016-01-01

    Cubic (space group: Fmm) iridium phosphide, Ir2P, has been synthesized at high pressure and high temperature. Angle-dispersive synchrotron X-ray diffraction measurements on Ir2P powder using a diamond-anvil cell at room temperature and high pressures (up to 40.6 GPa) yielded a bulk modulus of B0 = 306(6) GPa and its pressure derivative B0' = 6.4(5). Such a high bulk modulus attributed to the short and strongly covalent Ir-P bonds as revealed by first - principles calculations and three-dimensionally distributed [IrP4] tetrahedron network. Indentation testing on a well-sintered polycrystalline sample yielded the hardness of 11.8(4) GPa. Relatively low shear modulus of ~64 GPa from theoretical calculations suggests a complicated overall bonding in Ir2P with metallic, ionic, and covalent characteristics. In addition, a spin glass behavior is indicated by magnetic susceptibility measurements. PMID:26905444

  2. Irs2 and Irs4 synergize in non-LepRb neurons to control energy balance and glucose homeostasis★

    PubMed Central

    Sadagurski, Marianna; Dong, X. Charlie; Myers, Martin G.; White, Morris F.

    2013-01-01

    Insulin receptor substrates (Irs1, 2, 3 and Irs4) mediate the actions of insulin/IGF1 signaling. They have similar structure, but distinctly regulate development, growth, and metabolic homeostasis. Irs2 contributes to central metabolic sensing, partially by acting in leptin receptor (LepRb)-expressing neurons. Although Irs4 is largely restricted to the hypothalamus, its contribution to metabolic regulation is unclear because Irs4-null mice barely distinguishable from controls. We postulated that Irs2 and Irs4 synergize and complement each other in the brain. To examine this possibility, we investigated the metabolism of whole body Irs4−/y mice that lacked Irs2 in the CNS (bIrs2−/−·Irs4−/y) or only in LepRb-neurons (Lepr∆IrsIrs4−/y). bIrs2−/−·Irs4−/y mice developed severe obesity and decreased energy expenditure, along with hyperglycemia and insulin resistance. Unexpectedly, the body weight and fed blood glucose levels of Lepr∆IrsIrs4−/y mice were not different from Lepr∆Irs2 mice, suggesting that the functions of Irs2 and Irs4 converge upon neurons that are distinct from those expressing LepRb. PMID:24567904

  3. Semi-automatic transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Morscheck, T.J.; Davis, A.R.; Huggins, M.J.

    1987-06-30

    This patent describes a semi-automatic mechanical change gear transmission system of the type comprising: a mechanical change gear transmission of the type comprising a transmission housing, an input shaft rotatably supported in the housing and driven by an engine through a nonpositive coupling, an output shaft rotatably supported in the housing and a plurality of selectable ratio gears selectively engageable one at a time to a first transmission element by means of positive, nonsynchronized jaw clutch assemblies for providing a plurality of manually selectable drive ratios between the input and output shafts, each of the jaw clutch assemblies comprising a first jaw clutch member rotatably associated with the first transmission element and a second jaw clutch member rotatably associated with a second transmission element, each of the first jaw clutch members axially moveable relative to the first transmission element; manually operated means for engaging and disengaging the nonpositive coupling; manually operated shifting means for engaging selected ratio gears to and disengaging selected ratio gears from the first transmission element; selection for sensing the identity of the particular ratio gear selected for manual engagement or disengagement from the first transmission element and for providing a signal; first and second rotational speed sensors for sensing the rotational speed of the first and second transmission elements and providing signals; a power synchronizer assembly selectively actuable for selectively varying the rotational speed of the second transmission element and the second jaw clutch members rotatably associated therewith; and a central processing unit semi-automatic mechanical change gear transmission system.

  4. Series Transmission Line Transformer

    DOEpatents

    Buckles, Robert A.; Booth, Rex; Yen, Boris T.

    2004-06-29

    A series transmission line transformer is set forth which includes two or more of impedance matched sets of at least two transmissions lines such as shielded cables, connected in parallel at one end ans series at the other in a cascading fashion. The cables are wound about a magnetic core. The series transmission line transformer (STLT) which can provide for higher impedance ratios and bandwidths, which is scalable, and which is of simpler design and construction.

  5. Diffraction-limited 10 microns imaging with 3 meter telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloemhof, E. E.; Townes, C. H.; Vanderwyck, A. H. B.

    1986-01-01

    An IR imaging system that achieves diffraction-limited spatial resolution (about 0.8 arcsec) at 10 microns on 3-meter ground-based telescopes. The system uses a linear array of sensitive HgCdTe photodiodes, scanned in the direction perpendicular to the array axis, to form two-dimensional images. Scans are completed rapidly enough to freeze atmospheric fluctuations. Individual detectors are small compared to the diameter of the Airy disk, and images are oversampled heavily in the scan direction. This method has a number of advantages for studying small fields with very high spatial resolution, and has been applied successfully to the problem of directly imaging faint circumstellar dust shells.

  6. High-performance, wide-magnification-range IR zoom telescope with automatic compensation for temperature effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shechterman, Mark S.

    1991-04-01

    A high performance IR zoom telescope with a 15:1 magnification ratio arid fully automatic compensation for changes in optical properties caused by changes in temperature has been developed. This novel IR zoom telescope is characterized by using of three moveable optical element groups, instead of two usually used. Magnification change in it is performed by moving these three optical groups in a predetermined manner with respect to two stationary lens elements. The positioning of the three movable lens groups is controlled by means of a computerized program. The required magnification and the measured system temperature comprise the inputs to the program. The main advantages of this new telescope design relative to existing IR zoom telescopes are: better MTF performance, reduced sensitivity of optical performance to temperature changes, small number of lenses, wider magnification range and high optical transmission.

  7. Angularly-selective transmission imaging in a scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Holm, Jason; Keller, Robert R

    2016-08-01

    This work presents recent advances in transmission scanning electron microscopy (t-SEM) imaging control capabilities. A modular aperture system and a cantilever-style sample holder that enable comprehensive angular selectivity of forward-scattered electrons are described. When combined with a commercially available solid-state transmission detector having only basic bright-field and dark-field imaging capabilities, the advances described here enable numerous transmission imaging modes. Several examples are provided that demonstrate how contrast arising from diffraction to mass-thickness can be obtained. Unanticipated image contrast at some imaging conditions is also observed and addressed. PMID:27179301

  8. Lens transmission measurement for an absolute radiation thermometer

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, X.; Yuan, Z.; Lu, X.

    2013-09-11

    The lens transmission for the National Institute of Metrology of China absolute radiation thermometer is measured by a hybrid method. The results of the lens transmission measurements are 99.002% and 86.792% for filter radiometers with center wavelengths 633 nm and 900 nm, respectively. These results, after correcting for diffraction factors and the size-of-source effect when the lens is incorporated within the radiometer, can be used for measurement of thermodynamic temperature. The expanded uncertainty of the lens transmission measurement system has been evaluated. It is 1.3×10{sup −3} at 633 nm and 900 nm, respectively.

  9. Ice Clouds in Color IR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released August 9, 2004 This image shows two representations of the same infra-red image in the Elysium region of Mars. On the left is a grayscale image showing surface temperature, and on the right is a false-color composite made from 3 individual THEMIS bands. The false-color image is colorized using a technique called decorrelation stretch (DCS), which emphasizes the spectral differences between the bands to highlight compositional variations.

    The light blue area in the center of this image is a very nice example of a water ice cloud. Water ice is frequently present in the Martian atmosphere as a thin haze. Clouds such as this one can be difficult to identify in a temperature image, but are easy to spot in the DCS images. In this case, the water ice is relatively confined and concentrated which may be due to the topography of the Elysium volcanic construct.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude 23.2, Longitude 150.1 East (209.9 West). 100 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed

  10. Melas Chasma in IR Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released August 11, 2004 This image shows two representations of the same infra-red image over Melas Chasma. On the left is a grayscale image showing surface temperature, and on the right is a false-color composite made from 3 individual THEMIS bands. The false-color image is colorized using a technique called decorrelation stretch (DCS), which emphasizes the spectral differences between the bands to highlight compositional variations.

    There is a distinct purple/blue layer present in the northern wall of the Chasma. Although this layer likely has a composition different than the surrounding areas, it is difficult to interpret its specific composition due to the high variability of sunlit and shaded surfaces in this area, which cause a wide range of temperatures to be present within each pixel of the image. It is possible that this layer has a unique composition due to differences in the volcanic or sedimentary environment at the time that the rock formed, or it could be a layer of magma injected between two previously existing rock layers. Another possibility is that the wall is mostly covered by dust and debris, and this portion contains the only exposed bedrock. The light blue colors present in many other areas of the Chasma are due to water ice clouds.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude -8.9, Longitude 282 East (78 West). 100 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey

  11. Atmospheric Effects in IR Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released August 3, 2004 This image shows two representations of the same infra-red image covering parts of Ius Chasma and Oudemans Crater. On the left is a grayscale image showing surface temperature, and on the right is a false-color composite made from 3 individual THEMIS bands. The false-color image is colorized using a technique called decorrelation stretch (DCS), which emphasizes the spectral differences between the bands to highlight compositional variations.

    This image is dominated by atmospheric effects. The pink/magenta colors inside the canyon show areas with a large amount of atmospheric dust. In the bottom half of the image, the patchy blue/cyan colors indicate the presence of water ice clouds out on the plains. Water ice clouds and high amounts of dust do not generally occur at the same place and time on Mars because the dust absorbs sunlight and heats the atmosphere. The more dust that is present, the warmer the atmosphere becomes, sublimating the water ice into water vapor and dissipating any clouds.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude -8.2, Longitude 267.9 East (92.1.West). 100 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is

  12. Gale Crater in IR Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released August 4, 2004 This image shows two representations of the same infra-red image of Gale Crater. On the left is a grayscale image showing surface temperature, and on the right is a false-color composite made from 3 individual THEMIS bands. The false-color image is colorized using a technique called decorrelation stretch (DCS), which emphasizes the spectral differences between the bands to highlight compositional variations.

    In the bottom of the crater, surrounding the central mound, there are extensive basaltic sand deposits. The basaltic sand spectral signature combined with the warm surface (due to the low albedo of basaltic sand) produces a very strong pink/magenta color. This color signature contrasts with the green/yellow color of soil and dust in the top of the image, and the cyan color due to the presence of water ice clouds at the bottom of the image. This migrating sand may be producing the erosional features seen on the central mound.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude -4.4, Longitude 137.4 East (222.6 West). 100 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University

  13. Basaltic Crater in Color IR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released August 6, 2004 This image shows two representations of the same infra-red image near Nili Fosse in the the Isidis region of Mars. On the left is a grayscale image showing surface temperature, and on the right is a false-color composite made from 3 individual THEMIS bands. The false-color image is colorized using a technique called decorrelation stretch (DCS), which emphasizes the spectral differences between the bands to highlight compositional variations. In many cases craters trap sand in their topographic depressions, interrupting the sand's migration across the Martian surface. This image is particularly interesting because there appears to be more than 1 type of sand in the bottom of this crater and in the hummocky terrain near the bottom of the image. The pink/magenta areas are characteristic of a basaltic composition, but there are also orange areas that are likely caused by the presence of andesite. These two compositions, basalt and andesite, are some of the most common found on Mars.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude 24, Longitude 80.7 East (297.3 West). 100 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip

  14. Lava Flows in IR Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released August 5, 2004 This image shows two representations of the same infra-red image covering a portion of the Solis Planum region, southeast of the Tharsis volcanoes. On the left is a grayscale image showing surface temperature, and on the right is a false-color composite made from 3 individual THEMIS bands. The false-color image is colorized using a technique called decorrelation stretch (DCS), which emphasizes the spectral differences between the bands to highlight compositional variations.

    Multiple layers of lava flows in this region show temperature differences, as well as some potential compositional differences. The temperature variations between these flows are likely caused by differences in their surface texture. The compositional variation could be due to differences in the make-up of the lava when it erupted onto the surface or might only reflect differences in the amount of dust covering these flows.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude -30.1, Longitude 275.9 East (84.1 West). 100 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is

  15. PKC{delta}-mediated IRS-1 Ser24 phosphorylation negatively regulates IRS-1 function

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, Michael W. . E-mail: michael.greene@bassett.org; Ruhoff, Mary S.; Roth, Richard A.; Kim, Jeong-a; Quon, Michael J.; Krause, Jean A.

    2006-10-27

    The IRS-1 PH and PTB domains are essential for insulin-stimulated IRS-1 Tyr phosphorylation and insulin signaling, while Ser/Thr phosphorylation of IRS-1 disrupts these signaling events. To investigate consensus PKC phosphorylation sites in the PH-PTB domains of human IRS-1, we changed Ser24, Ser58, and Thr191 to Ala (3A) or Glu (3E), to block or mimic phosphorylation, respectively. The 3A mutant abrogated the inhibitory effect of PKC{delta} on insulin-stimulated IRS-1 Tyr phosphorylation, while reductions in insulin-stimulated IRS-1 Tyr phosphorylation, cellular proliferation, and Akt activation were observed with the 3E mutant. When single Glu mutants were tested, the Ser24 to Glu mutant had the greatest inhibitory effect on insulin-stimulated IRS-1 Tyr phosphorylation. PKC{delta}-mediated IRS-1 Ser24 phosphorylation was confirmed in cells with PKC{delta} catalytic domain mutants and by an RNAi method. Mechanistic studies revealed that IRS-1 with Ala and Glu point mutations at Ser24 impaired phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate binding. In summary, our data are consistent with the hypothesis that Ser24 is a negative regulatory phosphorylation site in IRS-1.

  16. Method and apparatus for reducing diffraction-induced damage in high power laser amplifier systems

    DOEpatents

    Campillo, Anthony J.; Newnam, Brian E.; Shapiro, Stanley L.; Terrell, Jr., N. James

    1976-01-01

    Self-focusing damage caused by diffraction in laser amplifier systems may be minimized by appropriately tailoring the input optical beam profile by passing the beam through an aperture having a uniform high optical transmission within a particular radius r.sub.o and a transmission which drops gradually to a low value at greater radii. Apertures having the desired transmission characteristics may readily be manufactured by exposing high resolution photographic films and plates to a diffuse, disk-shaped light source and mask arrangement.

  17. Polarized point diffraction interferometer for fringe stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kihm, Hagyong; Lee, Yun-Woo

    2010-08-01

    We propose a new point diffraction interferometer using a polarizer with a pinholed for qualitative optical analysis. Diffraction from a polarizer with a pinholed makes reference and measurement waves. Interference fringe between diffracted-undiffracted measurement wave and undiffracted-diffracted reference wave is stabilized by common-path configuration. We examined the pinhole size and divergence angle of the diffracted wave for test optics with various numerical aperture. Optical parts comprising the interferometer can be assembled into a small monolithic component and embedded into an imaging target for easy alignment. Optical systems evaluating imaging performances such as modulation transfer function would benefit in aligning target objects.

  18. Neuron absorption study and mid-IR optical excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Dingkai; Chen, Xing; Vadala, Shilpa; Leach, Jennie; Kostov, Yordan; Bewley, William W.; Kim, Chul-Soo; Kim, Mijin; Canedy, Chadwick L.; Merritt, Charles D.; Vurgaftman, Igor; Meyer, Jerry R.; Choa, Fow-Sen

    2012-02-01

    Neuronal optical excitation can provide non-contacting tools to explore brain circuitry and a durable stimulation interface for cardiac pacing and visual as well as auditory sensory neuronal stimulation. To obtain accurate absorption spectra, we scan the transmission of neurons in cell culture medium, and normalize it by subtracting out the absorption spectrum of the medium alone. The resulting spectra show that the main neuronal absorption peaks are in the 3000- 6000nm band, although there is a smaller peak near 1450nm. By coupling the output of a 3μm interband cascade laser (ICL) into a mid-IR fluorozirconate fiber, we can effectively deliver more than 1J/cm2 photon intensity to the excitation site for neuronal stimulation.

  19. Characterization of calcium crystals in Abelia using x-ray diffraction and electron microscopes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Localization, chemical composition, and morphology of calcium crystals in leaves and stems of Abelia mosanensis and A. ×grandiflora were analyzed with a variable pressure scanning electron microscope (VP-SEM) equipped with an X-ray diffraction system, low temperature SEM (LT-SEM) and a transmission ...

  20. Application of a complex constraint for biological samples in coherent diffractive imaging.

    PubMed

    Jones, M W M; Peele, A G; van Riessen, G A

    2013-12-16

    We demonstrate the application of a complex constraint in the reconstruction of images from phase-diverse Fresnel coherent diffraction data for heterogeneous biological objects. The application of this constraint is shown to improve the quality of the reconstruction of both the phase and the magnitude of the complex object transmission function. PMID:24514606

  1. Method for studying the phase function in tunable diffraction optical elements

    SciTech Connect

    Paranin, V D; Tukmakov, K N

    2014-04-28

    A method for studying the phase function in tunable diffraction optical elements is proposed, based on measurement of the transmission of interelectrode gaps. The mathematical description of the method, which is approved experimentally, is developed. The instrumental error effects are analysed. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  2. Diffraction gratings for optical sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Patrick P.

    The following document summarizes a journey through the world of diffraction gratings, covering topics such as their history, fabrication, metrology, and uses in some of the most precise scientific experiments ever proposed. Though diffraction gratings have long been used for spectroscopy and pulse compression, it was not until recently that researchers have explored their ability to split and recombine single-frequency CW laser sources for high-precision interferometry. Gravitational-wave detection, one of the most challenging sensing applications to date, is being investigated by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) and Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) projects. Future generations of LIGO and LISA detectors may incorporate gratings as key optical components. This thesis describes the ways gratings can improve interferometer performance by simplifying thermal management and discusses the essential challenges that must be overcome before they can be adopted. The use of gratings requires new interferometer geometries. We show cases where these can be implemented simply and compactly. Gravitational-wave interferometry imposes many requirements on grating components. Using improved metrology methods, we demonstrate that large dielectric gratings with uniformly high efficiency can be fabricated and validated. In particular, we measure the diffraction efficiency of two 20-cm-scale gratings over their entire apertures. The values taken from across their surfaces collectively had means and standard deviations of mu = 99.293% and sigma = 0.164%, and mu =99.084% and sigma =0.079%. We also present simplified models of thermal distortions in gratings, and show them to be in good agreement with measurements conducted by a wavefront sensor. Special focus is given to experimental demonstrations that have achieved highly precise measurements of translational and rotational motion, also known as displacement and angular sensing. For the former

  3. Far-IR selected star formation regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, D. T.; Hildebrand, R. H.; Keene, J.; Harper, D. A.; Loewenstein, R. F.; Moran, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    Detailed far-IR observations and complemenary submillimeter, 5 GHz continuum and c(18)0 observations of a sample of far-IR selected luminous regions of star formation. The clouds and that the exciting stars lie deep within these condensations. The far-IR sources have diversely shaped 40 micron to 180 micron spectra even through their 60 micron to 100 micron color temperatures are similar. The radio and far-IR results together show that the exciting stars are in clusters containing either zero-age main sequence and pre-main sequence stars or consisting entirely of premain sequence objects. C(18)0 and submillimeter observations imply gas densities approximately .00005 - high enough to make t(sub dust) approximately t(sub gas).

  4. Fresnel diffraction of aperture with rough edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Yuwei; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Junhong; Zhang, Meina; Teng, Shuyun

    2015-06-01

    The Fresnel diffraction of an aperture with a rough edge is studied in this paper. Circular and elliptical apertures with sinusoidal and random edges are chosen as examples to investigate the influence of the aperture edge on the diffraction. The numerical calculation results indicate intuitively the variations of the transverse and longitude diffraction intensity distributions with the edge parameters of the aperture. The data files of aperture models are obtained through the numerical calculations, and the aperture samples are obtained with the help of a liquid crystal light modulator (LCLM). Thus, the practical experiments of the diffractions of apertures with rough edges are carried out. The measured results are consistent with the calculated ones. The approximate analytic expressions of the diffraction by the modified aperture are deduced on the basis of the Fresnel diffraction theory and the statistic optics, and the reasonable explanations for the influence of edge parameters on the diffraction are given through the theoretical analysis.

  5. IR LASER BASED CHEMICAL SENSOR FOR THE COOPERATIVE MONITORING PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Edward A Whitaker

    2005-08-08

    The purpose of this project was to investigate the device properties of the quantum cascade laser (QCL), a type of laser invented at Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies in the device physics research lab of Dr. Federico Capasso and more specifically to determine the remote sensing capability of this device. The PI and Stevens Institute of Technology collaborated with Dr. Capasso and Bell Laboratories to carry out this research project. The QCL is a unique laser source capable of generating laser radiation in the middle-infrared spectral region that overlaps the most important molecular absorption bands. With appropriate modulation techniques it is possible to use the laser to measure the concentration of many molecules of interest to the remote sensing community. In addition, the mid-IR emission wavelength is well suited to atmospheric transmission as mid-IR experiences much less scattering due to dust and fog. At the onset of this project little was known about several key device performance parameters of this family of lasers and the NNSA supported research enabled them to determine values of several of these characteristics.

  6. Study of titanate nanotubes by X-ray and electron diffraction and electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Brunatova, Tereza; Popelkova, Daniela; Wan, Wei; Oleynikov, Peter; Danis, Stanislav; Zou, Xiaodong; Kuzel, Radomir

    2014-01-15

    The structure of titanate nanotubes (Ti-NTs) was studied by a combination of powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), electron diffraction and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). Ti-NTs are prepared by hydrothermal treatment of TiO{sub 2} powder. The structure is identified by powder X-ray diffraction as the one based on the structure of H{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 5}·H{sub 2}O phase. The same structure is obtained by projected potential from HRTEM through-focus image series. The structure is verified by simulated PXRD pattern with the aid of the Debye formula. The validity of the model is tested by computing Fourier transformation of a single nanotube which is proportional to measured electron diffraction intensities. A good agreement of this calculation with measured precession electron diffraction data is achieved. - Highlights: • Titanate nanotubes were prepared by hydrothermal method. • X-ray powder diffraction indicated their structure based on that of H{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 5}·H{sub 2}O. • Structural model was created with the aid of high-resolution electron microscopy. • The model was verified with electron diffraction data. • X-ray powder diffraction pattern was calculated with the aid of the Debye formula.

  7. PMo or PW heteropoly acids supported on MCM-41 silica nanoparticles: Characterisation and FT-IR study of the adsorption of 2-butanol

    SciTech Connect

    Carriazo, Daniel; Domingo, Concepcion; Martin, Cristina; Rives, Vicente

    2008-08-15

    Mesoporous silica, prepared in basic conditions, has been loaded (20% weight) with 12-molybdophosphoric (PMo) or 12-tungstophosphoric (PW) acid and calcined at different temperatures ranging between 250 and 550 deg. C. The samples have been characterised by N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption at -196 deg. C, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), UV-visible diffuse reflectance, Raman spectroscopy and temperature programmed reduction (TPR). The acidity and catalytic activity have been, respectively, examined by monitoring the adsorption of pyridine and 2-butanol by FT-IR spectroscopy. The results indicate that PW and PMo acids are highly dispersed on mesoporous silica MCM-41 spherical nanoparticles. While PMo retains its Keggin structure up to 550 deg. C, PW decomposes at this temperature into crystalline WO{sub 3} and phosphorous oxides. In both cases, the morphology, hexagonal symmetry and long-range order observed for the support are preserved with calcination up to 450 deg. C. The Broensted-type acid sites found in all samples, whose surface concentration decreases as the calcination temperature increases, are responsible for the selective formation of cis-butene detected upon adsorption of 2-butanol. The sample containing PW calcined at 450 deg. C also shows selectivity to methyl ethyl ketone. - Graphical abstract: Samples based in MCM-41 nanoparticles loaded with tungstophosphoric and molybdophosphoric acids have been synthesised. The uncalcined solids and that derived upon their calcination in the temperature range 250-550 deg. C have been characterised and evaluated in the decomposition of 2-butanol monitored by FT-IR spectroscopy.

  8. Correction of spectral deformation by second-order diffraction overlap in a mid-infrared range grating spectrometer using a PbSe array detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wondong; Lee, Hyungwoo; Hahn, Jae W.

    2014-11-01

    Conventional diffraction gratings suffer from order overlap problems, especially for a mid-infrared optical emission spectrometer (mid-IR OES) using a detector array. Because of diffraction order overlap, ambiguous spectroscopic data are inevitably acquired. This shortcoming motivated us to devise an order-sorting method. We predicted a second-order diffraction overlap and corrected the deformation of signal measured with a mid-IR OES using an array detector. It is found that the first-order signal separated from the overlapped spectrum fit well with the intrinsic signal of incident light. We determined the system response function of a mid-IR OES and confirmed the validity of the compensation method by comparing the measured spectrum with Planck's curve of blackbody radiation at two different temperatures. In addition, for accuracy verification, the uncertainty factors that could affect the compensation procedures were carefully considered.

  9. IR Optimization, DID and anti-DID

    SciTech Connect

    Seryi, Andrei; Maruyama, Takashi; Parker, Brett; /Brookhaven

    2006-02-03

    In this paper, we discuss optimization of the larger crossing angle Interaction Region of the Linear Collider, where specially shaped transverse field of the Detector Integrated Dipole can be reversed and adjusted to optimize trajectories of the low energy pairs, so that their majority would be directed into the extraction exit hole. This decreases the backscattering and makes background in 14mrad IR to be similar to background in 2mrad IR.

  10. Total-scattering pair-distribution function of organic material from powder electron diffraction data.

    PubMed

    Gorelik, Tatiana E; Schmidt, Martin U; Kolb, Ute; Billinge, Simon J L

    2015-04-01

    This paper shows that pair-distribution function (PDF) analyses can be carried out on organic and organometallic compounds from powder electron diffraction data. Different experimental setups are demonstrated, including selected area electron diffraction and nanodiffraction in transmission electron microscopy or nanodiffraction in scanning transmission electron microscopy modes. The methods were demonstrated on organometallic complexes (chlorinated and unchlorinated copper phthalocyanine) and on purely organic compounds (quinacridone). The PDF curves from powder electron diffraction data, called ePDF, are in good agreement with PDF curves determined from X-ray powder data demonstrating that the problems of obtaining kinematical scattering data and avoiding beam damage of the sample are possible to resolve. PMID:25510245

  11. Total-scattering pair-distribution function of organic material from powder electron diffraction data

    SciTech Connect

    Gorelik, Tatiana E.; Billinge, Simon J. L.; Schmidt, Martin U.; Kolb, Ute

    2015-04-01

    This paper shows for the first time that pair-distribution function analyses can be carried out on organic and organo-metallic compounds from powder electron diffraction data. Different experimental setups are demonstrated, including selected area electron diffraction (SAED) and nanodiffraction in transmission electron microscopy (TEM) or nanodiffraction in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) modes. The methods were demonstrated on organo-metallic complexes (chlorinated and unchlorinated copper-phthalocyanine) and on purely organic compounds (quinacridone). The PDF curves from powder electron diffraction data, called ePDF, are in good agreement with PDF curves determined from X-ray powder data demonstrating that the problems of obtaining kinematical scattering data and avoiding beam-damage of the sample are possible to resolve.

  12. Total-scattering pair-distribution function of organic material from powder electron diffraction data

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gorelik, Tatiana E.; Billinge, Simon J. L.; Schmidt, Martin U.; Kolb, Ute

    2015-04-01

    This paper shows for the first time that pair-distribution function analyses can be carried out on organic and organo-metallic compounds from powder electron diffraction data. Different experimental setups are demonstrated, including selected area electron diffraction (SAED) and nanodiffraction in transmission electron microscopy (TEM) or nanodiffraction in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) modes. The methods were demonstrated on organo-metallic complexes (chlorinated and unchlorinated copper-phthalocyanine) and on purely organic compounds (quinacridone). The PDF curves from powder electron diffraction data, called ePDF, are in good agreement with PDF curves determined from X-ray powder data demonstrating that the problems of obtaining kinematical scattering datamore » and avoiding beam-damage of the sample are possible to resolve.« less

  13. Diffractive X-Ray Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, Gerald K.

    2010-01-01

    Diffractive X-ray telescopes, using zone plates, phase Fresnel lenses, or related optical elements have the potential to provide astronomers with true imaging capability with resolution many orders of magnitude better than available in any other waveband. Lenses that would be relatively easy to fabricate could have an angular resolution of the order of micro-arc-seconds or even better, that would allow, for example, imaging of the distorted spacetime in the immediate vicinity of the super-massive black holes in the center of active galaxies. What then is precluding their immediate adoption? Extremely long focal lengths, very limited bandwidth, and difficulty stabilizing the image are the main problems. The history, and status of the development of such lenses is reviewed here and the prospects for managing the challenges that they present are discussed.

  14. Variable focus crystal diffraction lens

    SciTech Connect

    Smither, R.K.

    1988-11-01

    A new method has been developed to control the shape of the surface of a diffracting crystal that will allow it to function as a variable focus crystal diffraction lens, for focusing photon beams from a synchrotron source. The new method uses thermal gradients in the crystal to control the shape of the surface of the crystal in two dimensions and allows one to generate both spherical and ellipsoidal surface shapes. In this work the thermal gradient was generated by core drilling two sets of cooling channels in a silicon crystal so that cooling or heating fluids could be circulated through the crystal at two different levels. The first set of channels is close to the surface of the crystal where the photon beam strikes it. The second set of channels is equal distant from the back surface. If a concave surface is desired, the fluid in the channels just below the surface exposed to the beam is cooler than the fluid circulating through the channels near the back surface. If a convex surface is desired, then the cooling fluid in the upper channels near the surface exposed to the incident photon beam, is warmer than the fluid in the lower channels. The focal length of the crystal lens is varied by varying the thermal gradient in the crystal. This approach can also be applied to the first crystal in a high power synchrotron beam line to eliminate the bowing and other thermal distortions of the crystal caused by the high heat load. 6 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Optical characteristics of aerosol trioxide dialuminum at the IR wavelength range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voitsekhovskaya, O. K.; Shefer, O. V.; Kashirskii, D. E.

    2015-11-01

    In this work, a numerical study of the transmission function, extinction coefficient, scattering coefficient, and absorption coefficient of the aerosol generated by the jet engine emissions was performed. Analyzing the calculation results of the IR optical characteristics of anthropogenic emissions containing the dialuminum trioxide was carried out. The spectral features of the optical characteristics of the medium caused by the average size, concentration and complex refractive index of the particles were illustrated.

  16. IR diver vision for turbidity mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milam, Jerry A.

    2010-04-01

    Commercial, forensic, and military divers often encounter turbid conditions which reduce visibility to zero. Under such conditions, work must be performed completely blind. The darkness resulting from high levels of turbidity is complete, and can be dangerous as well as disorienting. Such darkness can even occur near the surface on a bright and sunny day. Artificial underwater lighting is of no use in such situations, as it only makes matters worse (similar to the use of high beam headlights in dense fog). Certain wavelengths of infrared (IR) light have the ability to penetrate this underwater "fog," and thus form the basis of the current development. Turbidity results from clay, silt, finely divided organic and inorganic matter, soluble colored organic compounds, plankton and microscopic organisms suspended in water. The IR Diver Vision system described herein consists of a standard commercial diving mask of any of several configurations whereby an IR light source, IR video camera, video display, and power source may be integrated within or attached to the mask. The IR light source wavelength is compatible with the spectral bandwidth of the video camera. The camera field-of-view (FOV) is matched to the video display in order to provide a unity magnification and hence prevent diver ocular fatigue. The IR video camera, video display, power source and controls are compatible with extended use in a submarine environment. Some such masks will incorporate tilt/heading sensors and video indicators. 3-D Imaging, Inc. has developed prototypes and has patents pending on such devices.

  17. Development of an IR stimulator concept for testing IR missile warning systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, William G.; Farrier, David A.

    1999-07-01

    Missile warning systems (MWS) present unique problems for hardware-in-the-loop testing compared to other sensors found on modern day military aircraft and ground vehicles. End-to- end testing of an IR MWS like the AN/AAR-44 and other IR MWS requires a scene projector or stimulator capable of large intensity dynamic range, moderate temporal response, and a very large field of regard. These requirements dictate a different type of stimulator than is normally used with more conventional IR imaging systems using IR focal plane arrays and relatively narrow fields of view on the order of 10 - 30 degrees. This paper describes an initial design approach for development of an IR stimulator that satisfies the requirements for hardware and software testing of the AN/AAR-44 and other IR MWS equipment.

  18. Multiple Bragg diffraction in opal-based photonic crystals: Spectral and spatial dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shishkin, I. I.; Rybin, M. V.; Samusev, K. B.; Golubev, V. G.; Limonov, M. F.

    2014-01-01

    We present an experimental and theoretical study of multiple Bragg diffraction from synthetic opals. An original setup permits us to overcome the problem of the total internal light reflection in an opal film and to investigate the diffraction from both the (111) and (1¯11) systems of planes responsible for the effect. As a result, angle- and frequency-resolved diffraction and transmission measurements create a picture of multiple Bragg diffraction that includes general agreement between dips in the transmission spectra and diffraction peaks for each incident white light angle and a twin-peak structure at frequencies of the photonic stop band edges. Two opposite cases of the interference are discussed: an interference of two narrow Bragg bands that leads to multiple Bragg diffraction with anticrossing regime for dispersion photonic branches and an interference of a narrow Bragg band and broad disorder-induced Mie background that results in a Fano resonance. A good quantitative agreement between the experimental data and calculated photonic band structure has been obtained.

  19. Characterization of a high resolution transmission grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desauté, P.; Merdji, H.; Greiner, V.; Missalla, T.; Chenais-Popovics, C.; Troussel, P.

    2000-01-01

    Three 5000 lines/mm gold transmission gratings have been tested with the radiation from the Super-ACO synchrotron in the range 250 eV< E<850 eV. Typical results for the spectral dependence of the grating efficiency at different diffraction orders are presented. This grating theoretically built to have no second order exhibits second order as high as 15-20% of first order. The very thin 5000 L/mm gratings are supported by a larger grid which perturbs the recorded data by separating each order in three peaks. Fraunhofer diffraction of the support grid has been modelled and can explain this effect. The high resolution gratings were used to measure the harmonics of the beamline monochromator grating (550 L/mm) and to measure the emission and absorption of laser-produced plasmas in the XUV range.

  20. Passenger car transmissions

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This book is organized under the following headings. The Mercedes-Benz 5-speed automatic transmission targets and comparison of concepts. 1991 model year Chrysler mini-van all wheel drive vehicle. Mesh stiffness and transmission error of spur and helical gears. High precision cutting tool system for the manufacture of world class powertrain components.

  1. Data Transmission Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christenson, Chris

    1995-01-01

    Introduces some basic concepts related to the transmission of data from a computer to its peripherals to help distance educators make decisions regarding computer equipment purchases for their institutions. The following data transmission concepts are described: cables, serial and parallel, synchronous and asynchronous, bandwidth, and analog and…

  2. Transmission Line Security Monitor

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    The Transmission Line Security Monitor is a multi-sensor monitor that mounts directly on high-voltage transmission lines to detect, characterize and communicate terrorist activity, human tampering and threatening conditions around support towers. For more information about INL's critical infrastructure protection research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  3. Transmission Line Security Monitor

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2013-05-28

    The Transmission Line Security Monitor is a multi-sensor monitor that mounts directly on high-voltage transmission lines to detect, characterize and communicate terrorist activity, human tampering and threatening conditions around support towers. For more information about INL's critical infrastructure protection research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  4. Free space optical communications systems using Mid-IR quantum cascade and low-power femtosecond laser source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corrigan, Paul

    Free Space Optical (FSO) communication is a line of sight telecom technology delivering low-cost, high-volume bandwidth through the air (˜$20,000/1 day/Gbps). It is an appealing solution to the "Last-Mile" bottleneck in metropolitan areas where fiber optic deployment can be prohibitive. Over the past decade commercial design has incorporated traditional telecom components without reviewing the optimal physical layer. We therefore present a systematic investigation of physical light propagation for different laser wavelengths, investigating loss processes, margins and inherent security features. FSO's "Achilles Heel" is adverse weather which attenuates currently promoted continuous wave Near-IR systems (CW-1.55-mum). In certain conditions link range may be reduced to 50m. Absorption and Mie-scattering of light are the major obstacles for clear transmission. As scattering efficiency is coupled to the particle size to wavelength ratio, micron sized fog particles are the worst attenuators. Moving off the commercial basis we present two transmission and scattering studies demonstrating and explaining enhanced link performance for a longer wavelength Mid-IR (8.1-mum) vs. CW system and for low-power femtosecond pulse vs. CW system. We present data from the world's longest outdoor, collinear, multi-wavelength, FSO link and demonstrate that at its peak Mid-IR light attenuates 300% less power or equivalently has 3x deployable range potential. Our real-world result shows the empirical benchmark "Kruse-Mie Relation" which to date has discouraged Mid-IR industrial advancement incorrectly predicts a decrease in transmission for Mid-IR by up to 220%. We also present results for an indoor fog chamber experiment with artificial fog recording even stronger Mid-IR gains (+2000% power delivery). An indoor scattering measurement demonstrates Mid-IR light scatters 10x less power, accounting for the tremendous transmission gains and also demonstrating Mid-IR's inherent security

  5. Evaluation and comparison of three IR detectors and three amplifier designs for a new, high-speed IR pyrometer

    SciTech Connect

    J.A. Young, S. Borrora, A.W. Obst, J.R. Payton, A. Seifter

    2005-01-01

    At Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), a high-speed, four-wavelength, infrared (IR) pyrometer has been used for surface temperature measurements in shock-physics experiments for several years. The pyrometer uses solid state detectors and a single fiber-optic cable for transmission of light from the target surface to the detectors. This instrument has recently been redesigned for an upcoming experiment at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Three different IR detectors (two HgCdTe variants as well as the existing InSb chip) were compared for sensitivity, signal-to-noise ratio, and bandwidth. Of major concern was detector amplifier recovery time from overload saturation. In shock physics experiments, a short but very bright precursor frequently accompanies shock breakout (often from trapped air). This precursor can saturate the amplifier and may ''swamp-out'' the signal of interest before the amplifier recovers. With this in mind, we evaluated two new amplifier designs by the Perry Amplifier Company for linearity, signal-to-noise characteristics, gain, and saturation recovery time. This paper describes experimental setup for detector comparison and results obtained. Furthermore, we discuss new amplifier design and suitability for highspeed infrared pyrometry in shock physics experiments.

  6. Evaluation and comparison of three IR detectors and three amplifier designs for a new high-speed IR pyrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, J. A.; Borror, S.; Obst, A. W.; Payton, J. R.; Seifter, A.

    2005-08-01

    At Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), a high-speed, four-wavelength, infrared (IR) pyrometer has been used for surface temperature measurements in shock-physics experiments for several years. The pyrometer uses solid-state detectors and a single fiber-optic cable for transmission of light from the target surface to the detectors. This instrument has recently been redesigned for an upcoming experiment at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Three different IR detectors (two HgCdTe variants as well as the existing InSb chip) were compared for sensitivity, signal-to-noise ratio, and bandwidth. Of major concern was detector amplifier recovery time from overload saturation. In shock-physics experiments, a short but very bright precursor frequently accompanies shock breakout (often from trapped air). This precursor can saturate the amplifier and may "swamp-out" the signal of interest before the amplifier recovers. With this in mind, we evaluated two new amplifier designs by the Perry Amplifier Company for linearity, signal-to-noise characteristics, gain, and saturation recovery time. This paper describes experimental setup for detector comparison and results obtained. Furthermore, we discuss new amplifier design and suitability for high-speed infrared pyrometry in shock physics experiments.

  7. Bragg's Law diffraction simulations for electron backscatter diffraction analysis.

    PubMed

    Kacher, Josh; Landon, Colin; Adams, Brent L; Fullwood, David

    2009-08-01

    In 2006, Angus Wilkinson introduced a cross-correlation-based electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) texture analysis system capable of measuring lattice rotations and elastic strains to high resolution. A variation of the cross-correlation method is introduced using Bragg's Law-based simulated EBSD patterns as strain free reference patterns that facilitates the use of the cross-correlation method with polycrystalline materials. The lattice state is found by comparing simulated patterns to collected patterns at a number of regions on the pattern using the cross-correlation function and calculating the deformation from the measured shifts of each region. A new pattern can be simulated at the deformed state, and the process can be iterated a number of times to converge on the absolute lattice state. By analyzing an iteratively rotated single crystal silicon sample and recovering the rotation, this method is shown to have an angular resolution of approximately 0.04 degrees and an elastic strain resolution of approximately 7e-4. As an example of applications, elastic strain and curvature measurements are used to estimate the dislocation density in a single grain of a compressed polycrystalline Mg-based AZ91 alloy. PMID:19520512

  8. Analytical description of 3D optical pulse diffraction by a phase-shifted Bragg grating.

    PubMed

    Golovastikov, Nikita V; Bykov, Dmitry A; Doskolovich, Leonid L; Soifer, Victor A

    2016-08-22

    Diffraction of a three-dimensional (3D) spatiotemporal optical pulse by a phase-shifted Bragg grating (PSBG) is considered. The pulse diffraction is described in terms of signal transmission through a linear system with a transfer function determined by the reflection or transmission coefficient of the PSBG. Resonant approximations of the reflection and transmission coefficients of the PSBG as functions of the angular frequency and the in-plane component of the wave vector are obtained. Using these approximations, a hyperbolic partial differential equation (Klein-Gordon equation) describing a general class of transformations of the incident 3D pulse envelope is derived. A solution to this equation is found in the form of a convolution integral. The presented rigorous simulation results fully confirm the proposed theoretical description. The obtained results may find application in the design of new devices for spatiotemporal pulse shaping and for optical information processing and analog optical computing. PMID:27557167

  9. Ostwald ripening and interparticle-diffraction effects for illite crystals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eberl, D.D.; Srodon, J.

    1988-01-01

    The Warren-Averbach method, an X-ray diffraction (XRD) method used to measure mean particle thickness and particle-thickness distribution, is used to restudy sericite from the Silverton caldera. Apparent particle-thickness distributions indicate that the clays may have undergone Ostwald ripening and that this process has modified the K-Ar ages of the samples. The mechanism of Ostwald ripening can account for many of the features found for the hydrothermal alteration of illite. Expandabilities measured by the XRD peak-position method for illite/smectites (I/S) from various locations are smaller than expandabilities measured by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and by the Warren-Averbach (W-A) method. This disparity is interpreted as being related to the presence of nonswelling basal surfaces that form the ends of stacks of illite particles (short-stack effect), stacks that, according to the theory of interparticle diffraction, diffract as coherent X-ray scattering domains. -from Authors

  10. Array of reconfigurable diffractive lens on flexible substrate (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghimi, Mohammad J.; Jiang, Hongrui

    2016-03-01

    We designed and fabricated microscale lens arrays on a flexible substrate. The flexibility of the substrate allows for wide field of view imaging as well as optical focus scanning. Fresnel zone plates (FZPs), which are compact and lightweight, are used as microlenses for focusing. The arrangement of FZPs on flexible substrate can be reconfigured to maximize FOV. Tunable focus can also be achieved by stretching the FZPs laterally. In addition, the lightweight microlenses can be actuated to scan the focus axially. The lenses have a wide range of applications including displays, contact lenses, microscopy, surveillance and optical communications. The diameter of the microlenses ranges from 100 to 500 µm. The thickness of the lenses is 100 µm. Unlike refractive and reflective lenses, the focusing capability of FZPs is achieved via diffraction. FZPs consist of alternating black and white zones to modulate the phase of the incident light. The light diffracted from edge of the regions to achieve multiple focus. Most of the energy is diffracted into the first focus. The dark regions are made of silicon nanowires which are highly absorbent for visible spectrum. Standard processes, including wet and dry etching, are used to etch silicon substrate and form nanowires. The white zones are designed for both reflective and transmissive lenses. The lenses are implemented on PDMS as flexible substrate. The silicon nanowires are embedded into PDMS so that the shape of individual lens as well as the arrangement of the array can be reconfigured. In this article, we report our design, fabrication process and experiments.

  11. The impact of novel 3D diffraction optics development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firsov, Alexander; Brzhezinskaya, Maria; Loechel, Heike; Siewert, Frank; Erko, Alexei

    2013-05-01

    Dedicated diffractive VUV- and X-ray optical elements are essential for future developments in synchrotron instrumentation and methods like e.g. time-resolved spectroscopy. The quality of optical components like gratings or diffractive focusing elements matters directly to the results achievable. On the other hand the availability of such optical components is very limited at present. In this contribution we report on the development of new methods of time-resolved x-ray spectroscopy based on novel 3D diffractive optical elements (DOE) with a unique combination of properties. Such optical elements are of highest interest for application in modern synchrotron facilities like Free Electron Lasers (FELs) as well as for laboratory facilities with high harmonic generators (HHG). The project includes theoretical work as well as the development of a dedicated technology, including metrology, to manufacture such type of optics for applications in atomic, molecular and condensed matter physics. The here discussed type of optics was successfully implemented for soft-X-ray-application at the femto-second-slicing beamline at BESSY II storage ring of the Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin. DOE are expected to be important components in beamlines at upcoming new high brilliance X-ray sources such as FELs. The application of DOE`s allows to reduce the number of optical elements in a beamline. Thus allow to provide the highest possible transmission and flux as well as preserving the unique properties of FEĹs, like wave-front and coherence.

  12. Transmission media effects on precise Doppler tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callahan, P. S.

    1978-01-01

    The effects of the transmission media - the earth's troposphere and ionosphere, and the solar wind - on precise Doppler tracking are discussed. The charged particle effects can be largely removed by dual frequency observations; however there are limitations to these corrections (besides system noise and/or finite integration times) including the effects of magnetic fields, diffraction, and differential refraction, all of which must be carefully evaluated. The earth's troposphere can contribute an error of delta f/f approximately 10 to the minus 14th power.

  13. Attenuation of near-IR light through dentin at wavelengths from 1300-1650-nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Andrew C.; Darling, Cynthia L.; Chan, Kenneth H.; Fried, Daniel

    2014-02-01

    Light scattering in dental enamel decreases markedly from the UV to the near-IR and recent studies employing near-IR transillumination and reflectance imaging including optical coherence tomography indicate that this wavelength region is ideally suited for imaging dental caries due to the high transparency of enamel. The opacity of dentin is an important factor in optimizing the contrast of demineralization in reflectance measurements. It also influences the contrast of occlusal lesions in transillumination. Light scattering in dentin is an order of magnitude larger than in enamel, it is highly anisotropic and has a different spectral light scattering dependence than enamel. The objective of this study was to measure the optical attenuation of near-IR light through dentin at near-IR wavelengths from 1300-1650-nm. In this study the collimated transmission of near-IR light through polished thin sections of dentin of 0.05 to 0.6 mm thickness was measured. Beer-Lambert plots show that the attenuation coefficients range in magnitude from 20 to 40 cm-1. Attenuation increased significantly with increasing wavelength and the increases were not entirely consistent with increased water absorption.

  14. Infrared/microwave (IR/MW) micromirror array beam combiner design and analysis.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yi; Lv, Lijun; Jiang, Liwei; Wang, Xin; Li, Yanhong; Yu, Haiming; Feng, Xiaochen; Li, Qi; Zhang, Li; Li, Zhuo

    2013-08-01

    We investigated the design method of an infrared (IR)/microwave (MW) micromirror array type of beam combiner. The size of micromirror is in microscopic levels and comparable to MW wavelengths, so that the MW will not react in these dimensions, whereas the much shorter optical wavelengths will be reflected by them. Hence, the MW multilayered substrate was simplified and designed using transmission line theory. The beam combiner used an IR wavefront-division imaging technique to reflect the IR radiation image to the unit under test (UUT)'s pupil in a parallel light path. In addition, the boresight error detected by phase monopulse radar was analyzed using a moment-of method (MoM) and multilevel fast multipole method (MLFMM) acceleration technique. The boresight error introduced by the finite size of the beam combiner was less than 1°. Finally, in order to verify the wavefront-division imaging technique, a prototype of a micromirror array was fabricated, and IR images were tested. The IR images obtained by the thermal imager verified the correctness of the wavefront-division imaging technique. PMID:23913059

  15. Attenuation of near-IR light through dentin at wavelengths from 1300-1650-nm.

    PubMed

    Chan, Andrew C; Darling, Cynthia L; Chan, Kenneth H; Fried, Daniel

    2014-02-18

    Light scattering in dental enamel decreases markedly from the UV to the near-IR and recent studies employing near-IR transillumination and reflectance imaging including optical coherence tomography indicate that this wavelength region is ideally suited for imaging dental caries due to the high transparency of enamel. The opacity of dentin is an important factor in optimizing the contrast of demineralization in reflectance measurements. It also influences the contrast of occlusal lesions in transillumination. Light scattering in dentin is an order of magnitude larger than in enamel, it is highly anisotropic and has a different spectral light scattering dependence than enamel. The objective of this study was to measure the optical attenuation of near-IR light through dentin at near-IR wavelengths from 1300-1650-nm. In this study the collimated transmission of near-IR light through polished thin sections of dentin of 0.05 to 0.6 mm thickness was measured. Beer-Lambert plots show that the attenuation coefficients range in magnitude from 20 to 40 cm(-1). Attenuation increased significantly with increasing wavelength and the increases were not entirely consistent with increased water absorption. PMID:24839373

  16. Development of the IR laser pyrolysis for the synthesis of iron-doped TiO 2 nanoparticles: Structural properties and photoactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrescu, R.; Morjan, I.; Scarisoreanu, M.; Birjega, R.; Fleaca, C.; Soare, I.; Gavrila, L.; Ciupina, V.; Kylberg, W.; Figgemeier, E.

    2010-03-01

    The preparation of TiO 2-based nanoparticles of closely controlled sizes and purity gives rise to considerable interest in the frame of environmental applications, e.g. in photocatalysis. When nanoparticles instead of their bulk counterpart are used the synthesis method plays a fundamental role in defining specific structural properties. Between the different gas-phase synthesis techniques, the CO 2 laser pyrolysis is a versatile method allowing for the preparation of nanostructures of various chemical compositions. Here we demonstrate that pure and Fe-doped TiO 2 nanoparticles with rather low Fe concentration may be prepared by applying the sensitized IR laser pyrolysis to a gas mixtures containing titanium tetrachloride, air and iron pentacarbonyl (vapors). The structures of TiO 2-based particles were systematically investigated by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, high-resolution electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy. Depending on the synthesis parameters, the nanoparticle system contains mixtures of anatase and rutile, with a preponderance of the anatase phase. Higher rutile proportion was found in the iron-doped samples. Mean particle diameters of around 14 nm and 12 nm were estimated for undoped and doped anatase titania, respectively. From UV-Vis diffuse reflectance spectra, higher absorbance and red shifted absorption were evidenced at higher amount of doped iron. Preliminary evaluation tests of the UV photoactivity of samples were performed by using the scanning electrochemical microscopy for determining the evolution of the oxygen consumption in the presence of IV-chlorophenol. They show that the undoped nano titania samples perform better than the reference P25 Degussa sample. A drop of the nano-titania photoactivity as a consequence of Fe doping was observed. Possible reasons of this effect are tentatively discussed.

  17. Coatings of nanostructured pristine graphene-IrOx hybrids for neural electrodes: Layered stacking and the role of non-oxygenated graphene.

    PubMed

    Pérez, E; Lichtenstein, M P; Suñol, C; Casañ-Pastor, N

    2015-10-01

    The need to enhance charge capacity in neural stimulation-electrodes is promoting the formation of new materials and coatings. Among all the possible types of graphene, pristine graphene prepared by graphite electrochemical exfoliation, is used in this work to form a new nanostructured IrOx-graphene hybrid (IrOx-eG). Graphene is stabilized in suspension by IrOx nanoparticles without surfactants. Anodic electrodeposition results in coatings with much smaller roughness than IrOx-graphene oxide. Exfoliated pristine graphene (eG), does not electrodeposit in absence of iridium, but IrOx-nanoparticle adhesion on graphene flakes drives the process. IrOx-eG has a significantly different electronic state than graphene oxide, and different coordination for carbon. Electron diffraction shows the reflection features expected for graphene. IrOx 1-2 nm cluster/nanoparticles are oxohydroxo-species and adhere to 10nm graphene platelets. eG induces charge storage capacity values five times larger than in pure IrOx, and if calculated per carbon atom, this enhancement is one order magnitude larger than the induced by graphene oxide. IrOx-eG coatings show optimal in vitro neural cell viability and function as cell culture substrates. The fully straightforward electrochemical exfoliation and electrodeposition constitutes a step towards the application of graphene in biomedical systems, expanding the knowledge of pristine graphene vs. graphene oxide, in bioelectrodes. PMID:26117758

  18. High sensitivity refractive index sensor based on simple diffraction from phase grating.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Pankaj K; Joseph, Joby; Yukino, Ryoji; Sandhu, Adarsh

    2016-05-01

    We present a technique for refractive index sensing using a phase grating structure. A grating under normal incidence can be designed such that the first-order diffracted light travels at a diffraction angle of 90° with respect to the zeroth order. The diffracted light, which is along the direction of periodicity, can further be diffracted from the grating and interfere with the zeroth-order light. Under this condition, the π phase difference that arises between the two interfering beams results in a transmission dip. We can tune this dip wavelength for senor applications, based on the grating equation. This Letter presents both simulation and experimental data that show good agreement with each other. PMID:27128084

  19. Materials identification using a small-scale pixellated x-ray diffraction system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O’Flynn, D.; Crews, C.; Drakos, I.; Christodoulou, C.; Wilson, M. D.; Veale, M. C.; Seller, P.; Speller, R. D.

    2016-05-01

    A transmission x-ray diffraction system has been developed using a pixellated, energy-resolving detector (HEXITEC) and a small-scale, mains operated x-ray source (Amptek Mini-X). HEXITEC enables diffraction to be measured without the requirement of incident spectrum filtration, or collimation of the scatter from the sample, preserving a large proportion of the useful signal compared with other diffraction techniques. Due to this efficiency, sufficient molecular information for material identification can be obtained within 5 s despite the relatively low x-ray source power. Diffraction data are presented from caffeine, hexamine, paracetamol, plastic explosives and narcotics. The capability to determine molecular information from aspirin tablets inside their packaging is demonstrated. Material selectivity and the potential for a sample classification model is shown with principal component analysis, through which each different material can be clearly resolved.

  20. Anomalous Diffraction in Crystallographic Phase Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Hendrickson, Wayne A.

    2014-01-01

    X-ray diffraction patterns from crystals of biological macromolecules contain sufficient information to define atomic structures, but atomic positions are inextricable without having electron-density images. Diffraction measurements provide amplitudes, but the computation of electron density also requires phases for the diffracted waves. The resonance phenomenon known as anomalous scattering offers a powerful solution to this phase problem. Exploiting scattering resonances from diverse elements, the methods of multiwavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) and single-wavelength anomalous diffraction (SAD) now predominate for de novo determinations of atomic-level biological structures. This review describes the physical underpinnings of anomalous diffraction methods, the evolution of these methods to their current maturity, the elements, procedures and instrumentation used for effective implementation, and the realm of applications. PMID:24726017