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Sample records for iridium hydrides

  1. Electrochemical and chemical routes to hydride loss from an iridium dihydride.

    PubMed

    Walden, A G; Kumar, A; Lease, N; Goldman, A S; Miller, A J M

    2016-06-14

    With a view towards replacing sacrificial hydrogen acceptors in alkane dehydrogenation catalysis, electrochemical methods for oxidative activation of a pincer-ligated iridium hydride intermediate were explored. A 1H(+)/2e(-) oxidation process was observed in THF solvent, with net hydride loss leading to a reactive cationic intermediate that can be trapped by chloride. Analogous reactivity was observed with the concerted hydride transfer reagent Ph3C(+), connecting chemical and electrochemical hydride loss pathways. PMID:26979786

  2. The diastereoselective synthesis of octahedral cationic iridium hydride complexes with a stereogenic metal centre.

    PubMed

    Humbert, Nicolas; Mazet, Clément

    2016-08-23

    We report herein the highly diastereoselective synthesis of octahedral cationic Ir(iii) hydride complexes with a stereogenic metal centre following various strategies. The configurational stability of these compounds has also been investigated. PMID:27498763

  3. Hydriding process

    DOEpatents

    Raymond, J.W.; Taketani, H.

    1973-12-01

    BS>A method is described for hydriding a body of a Group IV-B metal, preferably zirconium, to produce a crack-free metal-hydride bedy of high hydrogen content by cooling the body at the beta to beta + delta boundary, without further addition of hydrogen, to precipitate a fine-grained delta-phase metal hydride in the beta + delta phase region and then resuming the hydriding, preferably preceded by a reheating step. (Official Gazette)

  4. Iridium in natural waters

    SciTech Connect

    Anbar, A.D.; Wasserburg, G.J.; Papanastassiou, D.A.

    1996-09-13

    Iridium, commonly used as a tracer of extraterrestrial material, was measured in rivers, oceans, and an estuarine environment. The concentration of iridium in the oceans ranges from 3.0 ({+-}1.3) x 10{sup 8} to 5.7 ({+-}0.8) x 10{sup 8} atoms per kilogram. Rivers contain from 17.4 ({+-}0.9) x 10{sup 8} to 92.9 ({+-}2.2) x 10{sup 8} atoms per kilogram and supply more dissolved iridium to the oceans than do extraterrestrial sources. In the Baltic Sea, {approximately}75% of riverine iridium is removed from solution. Iron-manganese oxyhydroxides scavenge iridium under oxidizing conditions, but anoxic environments are not a major sink for iridium. The ocean residence time of iridium is between 2 x 10{sup 3} and 2 x 10{sup 4} years. 32 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Iridium porphyrins in CD3OD: reduction of Ir(III), CD3-OD bond cleavage, Ir-D acid dissociation and alkene reactions.

    PubMed

    Bhagan, Salome; Imler, Gregory H; Wayland, Bradford B

    2013-04-15

    Methanol solutions of iridium(III) tetra(p-sulfonatophenyl)porphyrin [(TSPP)Ir(III)] form an equilibrium distribution of methanol and methoxide complexes ([(TSPP)Ir(III)(CD3OD)(2-n)(OCD3)n]((3+n)-)). Reaction of [(TSPP)Ir(III) with dihydrogen (D2) in methanol produces an iridium hydride [(TSPP)Ir(III)-D(CD3OD)](4-) in equilibrium with an iridium(I) complex ([(TSPP)Ir(I)(CD3OD)](5-)). The acid dissociation constant of the iridium hydride (Ir-D) in methanol at 298 K is 3.5 × 10(-12). The iridium(I) complex ([(TSPP)Ir(I)(CD3OD)](5-)) catalyzes reaction of [(TSPP)Ir(III)-D(CD3OD)](4-) with CD3-OD to produce an iridium methyl complex [(TSPP)Ir(III)-CD3(CD3OD)](4-) and D2O. Reactions of the iridium hydride with ethene and propene produce iridium alkyl complexes, but the Ir-D complex fails to give observable addition with acetaldehyde and carbon monoxide in methanol. Reaction of the iridium hydride with propene forms both the isopropyl and propyl complexes with free energy changes (ΔG° 298 K) of -1.3 and -0.4 kcal mol(-1) respectively. Equilibrium thermodynamics and reactivity studies are used in discussing relative Ir-D, Ir-OCD3 and Ir-CD2- bond energetics in methanol. PMID:23540797

  6. Processing of Iridium and Iridium Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Ohriner, Evan Keith

    2008-01-01

    Iridium and its alloys have been considered to be difficult to fabricate due to their high melting temperatures, limited ductility, sensitivity to impurity content, and chemical properties. The variety of processing methods used for iridium and its alloys are reviewed, including purification, melting, forming, joining, and powder metallurgy techniques. Also included are coating and forming by the methods of electroplating, chemical and physical vapor deposition, and melt particle deposition.

  7. Sealed aerospace metal-hydride batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coates, Dwaine

    1992-01-01

    Nickel metal hydride and silver metal hydride batteries are being developed for aerospace applications. There is a growing market for smaller, lower cost satellites which require higher energy density power sources than aerospace nickel-cadmium at a lower cost than space nickel-hydrogen. These include small LEO satellites, tactical military satellites and satellite constellation programs such as Iridium and Brilliant Pebbles. Small satellites typically do not have the spacecraft volume or the budget required for nickel-hydrogen batteries. NiCd's do not have adequate energy density as well as other problems such as overcharge capability and memory effort. Metal hydride batteries provide the ideal solution for these applications. Metal hydride batteries offer a number of advantages over other aerospace battery systems.

  8. Hydride compositions

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Myung, W.

    1994-01-01

    Disclosed are a composition for use in storing hydrogen and a method for making the composition. The composition comprises a mixture of two or more hydrides, each hydride having a different series of hydrogen sorption isotherms that contribute to the overall isotherms of the mixture. The hydrides are chosen so that the isotherms of the mixture have regions wherein the H equilibrium pressure increases with increasing hydrogen, preferably linearly. The isotherms of the mixture can be adjusted by selecting hydrides with different isotherms and by varying the amounts of the individual hydrides, or both. Preferably, the mixture is made up of hydrides that have isotherms with substantially flat plateaus and in nearly equimolar amounts. The composition is activated by degassing, exposing to H, and then heating below the softening temperature of any of the constituents. When the composition is used to store hydrogen, its hydrogen content can be found simply by measuring P{sub H}{sub 2} and determining H/M from the isothermic function of the composition.

  9. Hydride compositions

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Myung W.

    1995-01-01

    A composition for use in storing hydrogen, and a method for making the composition. The composition comprises a mixture of two or more hydrides, each hydride having a different series of hydrogen sorption isotherms that contribute to the overall isotherms of the mixture. The hydrides are chosen so that the isotherms of the mixture have regions wherein the hydrogen equilibrium pressure increases with increasing hydrogen, preferably linearly. The isotherms of the mixture can be adjusted by selecting hydrides with different isotherms and by varying the amounts of the individual hydrides, or both. Preferably, the mixture is made up of hydrides that have isotherms with substantially flat plateaus and in nearly equimolar amounts. The composition is activated by degassing, exposing to hydrogen and then heating at a temperature below the softening temperature of any of the. constituents so that their chemical and structural integrity is preserved. When the composition is used to store hydrogen, its hydrogen content can be found simply by measuring P.sub.H.sbsb.2 and determining H/M from the isothermic function of the composition.

  10. Iridium Interfacial Stack (IRIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spry, David James (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An iridium interfacial stack ("IrIS") and a method for producing the same are provided. The IrIS may include ordered layers of TaSi.sub.2, platinum, iridium, and platinum, and may be placed on top of a titanium layer and a silicon carbide layer. The IrIS may prevent, reduce, or mitigate against diffusion of elements such as oxygen, platinum, and gold through at least some of its layers.

  11. Iridium: failures & successes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, CarissaBryce; Beard, Suzette

    2001-03-01

    This paper will provide an overview of the Iridium business venture in terms of the challenges faced, the successes achieved, and the causes of the ultimate failure of the venture — bankruptcy and system de-orbit. The paper will address technical, business, and policy issues. The intent of the paper is to provide a balanced and accurate overview of the Iridium experience, to aid future decision-making by policy makers, the business community, and technical experts. Key topics will include the history of the program, the objectives and decision-making of Motorola, the market research and analysis conducted, partnering strategies and their impact, consumer equipment availability, and technical issues — target performance, performance achieved, technical accomplishments, and expected and unexpected technical challenges. The paper will use as sources trade media and business articles on the Iridium program, technical papers and conference presentations, Wall Street analyst's reports, and, where possible, interviews with participants and close observers.

  12. Asymmetric Hydrogenation of Isoxazolium Triflates with a Chiral Iridium Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Ryuhei; Kuwano, Ryoichi

    2016-06-13

    The iridium catalyst [IrCl(cod)]2 -phosphine-I2 (cod=1,5-cyclooctadiene) selectively reduced isoxazolium triflates to isoxazolines or isoxazolidines in the presence of H2 . The iridium-catalyzed hydrogenation proceeded in high-to-good enantioselectivity when an optically active phosphine-oxazoline ligand was used. The 3-substituted 5-arylisoxazolium salts were transformed into 4-isoxazolines with up to 95:5 enantiomeric ratio (e.r.). Chiral cis-isoxazolidines were obtained in up to 89:11 e.r., with no formation of their trans isomers, when the substrates had a primary alkyl substituent at the 5-position. The mechanistic studies indicate that the hydridoiridium(III) species prefers to deliver its hydride to the C5 atom of the isoxazole ring. The hydride attack leads to the formation of the chiral isoxazolidine via a 3-isoxazoline intermediate. Meanwhile, in the selective formation of 4-isoxazolines, hydride attack at the C5 atom may be obstructed by steric hindrance from the 5-aryl substituent. PMID:27105605

  13. Mononuclear iridium dinitrogen complexes bonded to zeolite HY

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Dong; Chen, Mingyang; Martinez-Macias, Claudia; Dixon, David A.; Gates, Bruce C.

    2014-11-07

    In this study, the adsorption of N2 on structurally well-defined dealuminated HY zeolite-supported iridium diethylene complexes was investigated. Iridium dinitrogen complexes formed when the sample was exposed to N2 in H2 at 298 K, as shown by infrared spectra recorded with isotopically labeled N2. Four supported species formed in various flowing gases: Ir(N2), Ir(N2)(N2), Ir(C2H5)(N2), and Ir(H)(N2). Their interconversions are summarized in a reaction network, showing, for example, that, in the presence of N2, Ir(N2) was the predominant dinitrogen species at temperatures of 273-373 K. Ir(CO)(N2) formed transiently in flowing CO, and in the presence of H2, rather stable iridium hydride complexes formed. Here, four structural models of each iridium complex bonded at the acidic sites of the zeolite were employed in a computational investigation, showing that the calculated vibrational frequencies agree well with experiment when full calculations are done at the level of density functional theory, independent of the size of the model of the zeolite.

  14. Hydride compressor

    DOEpatents

    Powell, James R.; Salzano, Francis J.

    1978-01-01

    Method of producing high energy pressurized gas working fluid power from a low energy, low temperature heat source, wherein the compression energy is gained by using the low energy heat source to desorb hydrogen gas from a metal hydride bed and the desorbed hydrogen for producing power is recycled to the bed, where it is re-adsorbed, with the recycling being powered by the low energy heat source. In one embodiment, the adsorption-desorption cycle provides a chemical compressor that is powered by the low energy heat source, and the compressor is connected to a regenerative gas turbine having a high energy, high temperature heat source with the recycling being powered by the low energy heat source.

  15. Method for refining contaminated iridium

    DOEpatents

    Heshmatpour, B.; Heestand, R.L.

    1982-08-31

    Contaminated iridium is refined by alloying it with an alloying agent selected from the group consisting of manganese and an alloy of manganese and copper, and then dissolving the alloying agent from the formed alloy to provide a purified iridium powder.

  16. Method for refining contaminated iridium

    DOEpatents

    Heshmatpour, Bahman; Heestand, Richard L.

    1983-01-01

    Contaminated iridium is refined by alloying it with an alloying agent selected from the group consisting of manganese and an alloy of manganese and copper, and then dissolving the alloying agent from the formed alloy to provide a purified iridium powder.

  17. Mononuclear iridium dinitrogen complexes bonded to zeolite HY

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yang, Dong; Chen, Mingyang; Martinez-Macias, Claudia; Dixon, David A.; Gates, Bruce C.

    2014-11-07

    In this study, the adsorption of N2 on structurally well-defined dealuminated HY zeolite-supported iridium diethylene complexes was investigated. Iridium dinitrogen complexes formed when the sample was exposed to N2 in H2 at 298 K, as shown by infrared spectra recorded with isotopically labeled N2. Four supported species formed in various flowing gases: Ir(N2), Ir(N2)(N2), Ir(C2H5)(N2), and Ir(H)(N2). Their interconversions are summarized in a reaction network, showing, for example, that, in the presence of N2, Ir(N2) was the predominant dinitrogen species at temperatures of 273-373 K. Ir(CO)(N2) formed transiently in flowing CO, and in the presence of H2, rather stable iridiummore » hydride complexes formed. Here, four structural models of each iridium complex bonded at the acidic sites of the zeolite were employed in a computational investigation, showing that the calculated vibrational frequencies agree well with experiment when full calculations are done at the level of density functional theory, independent of the size of the model of the zeolite.« less

  18. Solar abundance of iridium

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Stephen; Aller, Lawrence H.

    1976-01-01

    By a method of spectrum synthesis, which yields log gfA, where g is the statistical weight of the lower level, f is the oscillator strength, and A is the abundance, an attempt is made to deduce the solar iridium abundance from one relatively unblended, but fairly weak IrI line, λ 3220.78 Å. If the Corliss-Bozman f-value for this line is adopted, we find log A(Ir) = 0.82 on the scale log A(H) = 12.00. The discordance with the value found from carbonaceous chondrites may arise from faulty f-values or from difficulties arising from line blending in this far ultraviolet domain of the solar spectrum. PMID:16578735

  19. Silica Embedded Metal Hydrides

    SciTech Connect

    Heung, L.K.; Wicks, G.G.

    1998-08-01

    A method to produce silica embedded metal hydride was developed. The product is a composite in which metal hydride particles are embedded in a matrix of silica. The silica matrix is highly porous. Hydrogen gas can easily reach the embedded metal hydride particles. The pores are small so that the metal hydride particles cannot leave the matrix. The porous matrix also protects the metal hydride particles from larger and reactive molecules such as oxygen, since the larger gas molecules cannot pass through the small pores easily. Tests show that granules of this composite can absorb hydrogen readily and withstand many cycles without making fines.

  20. Modelling of hydride cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, X.J.; Metzger, D.R.; Glinka, G.; Dubey, R.N.

    1996-12-01

    Zirconium alloys may be susceptible to hydride formation under certain service conditions, due to hydrogen diffusion and precipitation in the presence of stress concentrations and temperature gradients. The inhomogeneous brittle hydride platelets that form are modeled as plane defects of zero thickness, with fracture toughness less than that of the matrix. A fracture criterion based on sufficient energy and stress is proposed for either delayed hydride cracking (DHC) under constant loading conditions, or hydride cracking at rising loads, such as in a fracture toughness test. The fracture criterion is validated against available experimental data concerning initiation of hydride fracture in smooth specimens, and DHC in cracked specimens under various loading and temperature conditions.

  1. Hydridomethyl iridium complex

    DOEpatents

    Bergman, Robert G.; Buchanan, J. Michael; Stryker, Jeffrey M.; Wax, Michael J.

    1989-01-01

    A process for functionalizing methane comprising: (a) reacting methane with a hydridoalkyl metal complex of the formula: CpIr[P(R.sub.1).sub.3 ]H(R.sub.2) wherein Cp represents a cyclopentadienyl or alkylcyclopentadienyl radical having from 1 to 5 carbon atoms; Ir represents an iridium atom; P represents a phosphorus atom; R.sub.1 represents an alkyl group; R.sub.2 represents an alkyl group having at least two carbon atoms; and H represents a hydrogen atom, in the presence of a liquid alkane R.sub.3 H having at least three carbon atoms to form a hydridomethyl complex of the formula: CpIr[P(R.sub.1).sub.3 ]HMe where Me represents a methyl radical. (b) reacting said hydridomethyl complex with an organic halogenating agent such as a tetrahalomethane or a haloform of the formulas: CX'X"X'"X"" or CHX'X"X'"; wherein X', X", X"', and X"" represent halogens selected from bromine, iodine and chlorine, to halomethyl complex of step (a) having the formula: CpIr[P(R.sub.1).sub.3 ]MeX: (c) reacting said halomethyl complex with a mercuric halide of the formula HgX.sub.2 to form a methyl mercuric halide of the formula HgMeX; and (d) reacting said methyl mercuric halide with a molecular halogen of the formula X.sub.2 to form methyl halide.

  2. Hydride precipitation in titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Numakura, H.; Kowia, M.

    1984-10-01

    The crystal structure and morphology of hydride (deuteride) precipitates are investigated on ..cap alpha..-titanium specimens containing 1-3 at.% H or D by transmission electron microscopy. The hydride is found to have a face-centered tetragonal structure (c/a = 1.09) with an ordered arrangement of hydrogen, being isomorphous to ..gamma..-zirconium hydride. Two types of precipitation mode are observed with the habit planes (0110) and near (0225).

  3. Hysteresis in Metal Hydrides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flanagan, Ted B., And Others

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes a reproducible process where the irreversibility can be readily evaluated and provides a thermodynamic description of the important phenomenon of hysteresis. A metal hydride is used because hysteresis is observed during the formation and decomposition of the hydride phase. (RH)

  4. Iridium-Catalyzed Allylic Substitution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartwig, John F.; Pouy, Mark J.

    Iridium-catalyzed asymmetric allylic substitution has become a valuable method to prepare products from the addition of nucleophiles at the more substituted carbon of an allyl unit. The most active and selective catalysts contain a phosphoramidite ligand possessing at least one arylethyl substituent on the nitrogen atom of the ligand. In these systems, the active catalyst is generated by a base-induced cyclometalation at the methyl group of this substituent to generate an iridium metalacycle bound by the COD ligand of the [Ir(COD)Cl]2 precursor and one additional labile dative ligand. Such complexes catalyze the reactions of linear allylic esters with alkylamines, arylamines, phenols, alcohols, imides, carbamates, ammonia, enolates and enolate equivalents, as well as typical stabilized carbon nucleophiles generated from malonates and cyanoesters. Iridium catalysts for enantioselective allylic substitution have also been generated from phosphorus ligands with substituents bound by heteroatoms, and an account of the studies of such systems, along with a description of the development of iridium catalysts is included.

  5. Metal hydride heat pump

    SciTech Connect

    Nishizaki, T.; Miyamoto, K.; Miyamoto, M.; Nakata, Y.; Yamaji, K.; Yoshida, K.

    1983-12-27

    A metal hydride heat pump is disclosed comprising a first and a second heat medium receptacle having heat media flowing therein and a plurality of closed vessels each containing a hydrogen gas atmosphere and divided into a first chamber having a first metal hydride filled therein and a second chamber having a second metal hydride filled therein. The first and second chambers of each closed vessel are made to communicate with each other so that hydrogen gas passes from one chamber to the other but the metal hydrides do not, and a group of the first chambers of the closed vessels being located within the first heat medium receptacle and a group of the second chambers of the closed vessels being located within the second heat medium receptacle, whereby heat exchange is carried out between the heat media in the first and second heat medium receptacles and the first and second metal hydrides through the external walls of the closed vessels.

  6. IRIDIUM LINER FOR NASA 5 LBF CLASS MATERIAL TEST CHAMBER IRIDIUM LINER FOR ATLANTIC RESEARCH CORPORA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    IRIDIUM LINER FOR NASA 5 LBF CLASS MATERIAL TEST CHAMBER IRIDIUM LINER FOR ATLANTIC RESEARCH CORPORATION 5 LBF CLASS ROCKET CHAMBER 25 LBF CLASS 75 HFC 25 TAC CERAMIC COMPOSITE ROCKET CHAMBER FROM REFRACTURY COMPOSITES INC. PURCHASE ORDER C-551941-

  7. Nickel Hydride Complexes.

    PubMed

    Eberhardt, Nathan A; Guan, Hairong

    2016-08-10

    Nickel hydride complexes, defined herein as any molecules bearing a nickel hydrogen bond, are crucial intermediates in numerous nickel-catalyzed reactions. Some of them are also synthetic models of nickel-containing enzymes such as [NiFe]-hydrogenase. The overall objective of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of this specific type of hydride complexes, which has been studied extensively in recent years. This review begins with the significance and a very brief history of nickel hydride complexes, followed by various methods and spectroscopic or crystallographic tools used to synthesize and characterize these complexes. Also discussed are stoichiometric reactions involving nickel hydride complexes and how some of these reactions are developed into catalytic processes. PMID:27437790

  8. Lightweight hydride storage materials

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, G.J.; Guthrie, S.E.; Bauer, W.

    1995-09-01

    The need for lightweight hydrides in vehicular applications has prompted considerable research into the use of magnesium and its alloys. Although this earlier work has provided some improved performance in operating temperature and pressure, substantial improvements are needed before these materials will significantly enhance the performance of an engineered system on a vehicle. We are extending the work of previous investigators on Mg alloys to reduce the operating temperature and hydride heat of formation in light weight materials. Two important results will be discussed in this paper: (1) a promising new alloy hydride was found which has better pressure-temperature characteristics than any previous Mg alloy and, (2) a new fabrication process for existing Mg alloys was developed and demonstrated. The new alloy hydride is composed of magnesium, aluminum and nickel. It has an equilibrium hydrogen overpressure of 1.3 atm. at 200{degrees}C and a storage capacity between 3 and 4 wt.% hydrogen. A hydrogen release rate of approximately 5 x 10{sup -4} moles-H{sub 2}/gm-min was measured at 200{degrees}C. The hydride heat of formation was found to be 13.5 - 14 kcal/mole-H{sub 2}, somewhat lower than Mg{sub 2}Ni. The new fabrication method takes advantage of the high vapor transport of magnesium. It was found that Mg{sub 2}Ni produced by our low temperature process was better than conventional materials because it was single phase (no Mg phase) and could be fabricated with very small particle sizes. Hydride measurements on this material showed faster kinetic response than conventional material. The technique could potentially be applied to in-situ hydride bed fabrication with improved packing density, release kinetics, thermal properties and mechanical stability.

  9. Electronic Structure of Iridium Clusters on Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Bradford A.; Bradley, Aaron J.; Ugeda, Miguel M.; Coh, Sinisa; Zettl, Alex; Crommie, Michael F.; Cohen, Marvin L.; Louie, Steven G.

    2015-03-01

    Graphene was predicted to exhibit non-trivial Z2 topology, but its exceedingly weak spin-orbit coupling prevented this from being observed. Previous theoretical work has proposed enhancing the spin-orbit coupling strength by depositing individual adatoms adsorbed onto the surface of graphene. We show experimental evidence that the iridium adatoms cluster, with a cluster size of at least two atoms. We investigate through theoretical calculations the orientation of the iridium dimers on graphene, contrast the electronic structure of iridium dimers with iridium monomers, and compare the theoretical iridium dimer electronic structure calculations with the experimental results determined via scanning tunneling spectroscopy. This work was supported by NSF Grant No. DMR10-1006184 and U.S. DOE under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. Computational resources have been provided by DOE at LBNL's NERSC facility.

  10. Iridium material for hydrothermal oxidation environments

    DOEpatents

    Hong, Glenn T.; Zilberstein, Vladimir A.

    1996-01-01

    A process for hydrothermal oxidation of combustible materials in which, during at least a part of the oxidation, corrosive material is present and makes contact with at least a portion of the apparatus over a contact area on the apparatus. At least a portion of the contact surface area comprises iridium, iridium oxide, an iridium alloy, or a base metal overlaid with an iridium coating. Iridium has been found to be highly resistant to environments encountered in the process of hydrothermal oxidation. Such environments typically contain greater than 50 mole percent water, together with oxygen, carbon dioxide, and a wide range of acids, bases and salts. Pressures are typically about 27.5 to about 1000 bar while temperatures range as high as 800.degree. C.

  11. Metal hydride heat pump system

    SciTech Connect

    Nishizaki, T.; Miyamoto, K.; Miyamoto, M.; Nakata, Y.; Yamaji, K.; Yoshida, K.

    1985-06-18

    A metal hydride heat pump system has a plurality of operating units, the metal hydride heat exchange medium of each operating unit be a combination of a first metal hydride having a lower equilibrium dissociation pressure at the operating temperature and a second metal hydride having a higher equilibrium dissociation pressure at the opening temperature and the metal hydrides being such that hydrogen can flow freely between the two metal hydrides, wherein the equilibrium dissociation pressure characteristics of one or both of the first and second metal hydrides in a given operating unit differ from those of one or both of the first and second metal hydrides in at least one other operating unit.

  12. TCP Performance Enhancement Over Iridium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torgerson, Leigh; Hutcherson, Joseph; McKelvey, James

    2007-01-01

    In support of iNET maturation, NASA-JPL has collaborated with NASA-Dryden to develop, test and demonstrate an over-the-horizon vehicle-to-ground networking capability, using Iridium as the vehicle-to-ground communications link for relaying critical vehicle telemetry. To ensure reliability concerns are met, the Space Communications Protocol Standards (SCPS) transport protocol was investigated for its performance characteristics in this environment. In particular, the SCPS-TP software performance was compared to that of the standard Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) over the Internet Protocol (IP). This paper will report on the results of this work.

  13. Hydrated hydride anion clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Han Myoung; Kim, Dongwook; Singh, N. Jiten; Kołaski, Maciej; Kim, Kwang S.

    2007-10-01

    On the basis of density functional theory (DFT) and high level ab initio theory, we report the structures, binding energies, thermodynamic quantities, IR spectra, and electronic properties of the hydride anion hydrated by up to six water molecules. Ground state DFT molecular dynamics simulations (based on the Born-Oppenheimer potential surface) show that as the temperature increases, the surface-bound hydride anion changes to the internally bound structure. Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations are also carried out for the spectral analysis of the monohydrated hydride. Excited-state ab initio molecular dynamics simulations show that the photoinduced charge-transfer-to-solvent phenomena are accompanied by the formation of the excess electron-water clusters and the detachment of the H radical from the clusters. The dynamics of the detachment process of a hydrogen radical upon the excitation is discussed.

  14. On the dissolution of iridium by aluminum.

    SciTech Connect

    Hewson, John C.

    2009-08-01

    The potential for liquid aluminum to dissolve an iridium solid is examined. Substantial uncertainties exist in material properties, and the available data for the iridium solubility and iridium diffusivity are discussed. The dissolution rate is expressed in terms of the regression velocity of the solid iridium when exposed to the solvent (aluminum). The temperature has the strongest influence in the dissolution rate. This dependence comes primarily from the solubility of iridium in aluminum and secondarily from the temperature dependence of the diffusion coefficient. This dissolution mass flux is geometry dependent and results are provided for simplified geometries at constant temperatures. For situations where there is negligible convective flow, simple time-dependent diffusion solutions are provided. Correlations for mass transfer are also given for natural convection and forced convection. These estimates suggest that dissolution of iridium can be significant for temperatures well below the melting temperature of iridium, but the uncertainties in actual rates are large because of uncertainties in the physical parameters and in the details of the relevant geometries.

  15. Boron hydride polymer coated substrates

    DOEpatents

    Pearson, Richard K.; Bystroff, Roman I.; Miller, Dale E.

    1987-01-01

    A method is disclosed for coating a substrate with a uniformly smooth layer of a boron hydride polymer. The method comprises providing a reaction chamber which contains the substrate and the boron hydride plasma. A boron hydride feed stock is introduced into the chamber simultaneously with the generation of a plasma discharge within the chamber. A boron hydride plasma of ions, electrons and free radicals which is generated by the plasma discharge interacts to form a uniformly smooth boron hydride polymer which is deposited on the substrate.

  16. Boron hydride polymer coated substrates

    DOEpatents

    Pearson, R.K.; Bystroff, R.I.; Miller, D.E.

    1986-08-27

    A method is disclosed for coating a substrate with a uniformly smooth layer of a boron hydride polymer. The method comprises providing a reaction chamber which contains the substrate and the boron hydride plasma. A boron hydride feed stock is introduced into the chamber simultaneously with the generation of a plasma discharge within the chamber. A boron hydride plasma of ions, electrons and free radicals which is generated by the plasma discharge interacts to form a uniformly smooth boron hydride polymer which is deposited on the substrate.

  17. The kinetics and mechanism of the organo-iridium catalysed racemisation of amines.

    PubMed

    Stirling, Matthew J; Mwansa, Joseph M; Sweeney, Gemma; Blacker, A John; Page, Michael I

    2016-08-01

    The dimeric iodo-iridium complex [IrCp*I2]2 (Cp* = pentamethylcyclopentadiene) is an efficient catalyst for the racemisation of secondary and tertiary amines at ambient and higher temperatures with a low catalyst loading. The racemisation occurs with pseudo-first-order kinetics and the corresponding four rate constants were obtained by monitoring the time dependence of the concentrations of the (R) and (S) enantiomers starting with either pure (R) or (S) and show a first-order dependence on catalyst concentration. Low temperature (1)H NMR data is consistent with the formation of a 1 : 1 complex with the amine coordinated to the iridium and with both iodide anions still bound to the metal-ion, but at the higher temperatures used for kinetic studies binding is weak and so no saturation zero-order kinetics are observed. A cross-over experiment with isotopically labelled amines demonstrates the intermediate formation of an imine which can dissociate from the iridium complex. Replacing the iodides in the catalyst by other ligands or having an amide substituent in Cp* results in a much less effective catalysts for the racemisation of amines. The rate constants for a deuterated amine yield a significant primary kinetic isotope effect kH/kD = 3.24 indicating that hydride transfer is involved in the rate-limiting step. PMID:27377259

  18. Determining the Altitude of Iridium Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, James; Owe, Manfred

    1999-01-01

    Iridium flares have nothing to do with the element iridium. Iridium is also the name of a telecommunications company that has been launching satellites into low orbits around the Earth. These satellites are being used for a new type of wireless phone and paging service. Flares have been observed coming from these satellites. These flares have the potential, especially when the full fleet of satellites is in orbit, to disrupt astronomical observations. The paper reviews using simple trigonometry how to calculate the altitude of one of these satellites.

  19. Superstoichiometric hydride of zirconium

    SciTech Connect

    Kupryazhkin, A.Ya.; Shchepetkin, A.A.; Zabolotskaya, E.V.; Pletnev, R.N.; Alyamovskii, S.I.; Kitaev, G.A.

    1987-12-01

    Superstoichiometric hydrides of zirconium have been obtained all the way up to the composition ZrH/sub 2.4/ by additional hydrogenation of ZrH/sub 2/ as a result of redistribution of hydrogen atoms between t- and o-positions. In the preparation of the hydrides the authors used zirconium iodide with an impurity content no greater than 10/sup -2/ to 10/sup -2/ mole %; the hydrogen and helium used in this work had a minimum purity of 99.95%. The content of hydrogen in the specimens was determined by a volumetric method. The x-ray diffraction analysis was performed in a DRON-2.0 unit (CuK/sub ..cap alpha../ radiation). PMR spectra were recorded in a broad-line spectrometer in the temperature interval 150-450 K.

  20. C-H activation and C=C double bond formation reactions in iridium ortho-methyl arylphosphane complexes.

    PubMed

    Baratta, Walter; Ballico, Maurizio; Del Zotto, Alessandro; Zangrando, Ennio; Rigo, Pierluigi

    2007-01-01

    The Vaska-type iridium(I) complex [IrCl(CO){PPh(2)(2-MeC(6)H(4))}(2)] (1), characterized by an X-ray diffraction study, was obtained from iridium(III) chloride hydrate and PPh(2)(2,6-MeRC(6)H(3)) with R=H in DMF, whereas for R=Me, activation of two ortho-methyl groups resulted in the biscyclometalated iridium(III) compound [IrCl(CO){PPh(2)(2,6-CH(2)MeC(6)H(3))}(2)] (2). Conversely, for R=Me the iridium(I) compound [IrCl(CO){PPh(2)(2,6-Me(2)C(6)H(3))}(2)] (3) can be obtained by treatment of [IrCl(COE)(2)](2) (COE=cyclooctene) with carbon monoxide and the phosphane in acetonitrile. Compound 3 in CH(2)Cl(2) undergoes intramolecular C-H oxidative addition, affording the cyclometalated hydride iridium(III) species [IrHCl(CO){PPh(2)(2,6-CH(2)MeC(6)H(3))}{PPh(2)(2,6-Me(2)C(6)H(3))}] (4). Treatment of 2 with Na[BAr(f) (4)] (Ar(f)=3,5-C(6)H(3)(CF(3))(2)) gives the fluxional cationic 16-electron complex [Ir(CO){PPh(2)(2,6-CH(2)MeC(6)H(3))}(2)][BAr(f) (4)] (5), which reversibly reacts with dihydrogen to afford the delta-agostic complex [IrH(CO){PPh(2)(2,6-CH(2)MeC(6)H(3))}{PPh(2)(2,6-Me(2)C(6)H(3))}][BAr(f)(4)] (6), through cleavage of an Ir-C bond. This species can also be formed by treatment of 4 with Na[BAr(f)(4)] or of 2 with Na[BAr(f)(4)] through C-H oxidative addition of one ortho-methyl group, via a transient 14-electron iridium(I) complex. Heating of the coordinatively unsaturated biscyclometalated species 5 in toluene gives the trans-dihydride iridium(III) complex [IrH(2)(CO){PPh(2)(2,6-MeC(6)H(3)CH=CHC(6)H(3)Me-2,6)PPh(2)}][BAr(f) (4)] (7), containing a trans-stilbene-type terdentate ligand, as result of a dehydrogenative carbon-carbon double bond coupling reaction, possibly through an iridium carbene species. PMID:17535000

  1. Hydrogen Outgassing from Lithium Hydride

    SciTech Connect

    Dinh, L N; Schildbach, M A; Smith, R A; Balazs1, B; McLean II, W

    2006-04-20

    Lithium hydride is a nuclear material with a great affinity for moisture. As a result of exposure to water vapor during machining, transportation, storage and assembly, a corrosion layer (oxide and/or hydroxide) always forms on the surface of lithium hydride resulting in the release of hydrogen gas. Thermodynamically, lithium hydride, lithium oxide and lithium hydroxide are all stable. However, lithium hydroxides formed near the lithium hydride substrate (interface hydroxide) and near the sample/vacuum interface (surface hydroxide) are much less thermally stable than their bulk counterpart. In a dry environment, the interface/surface hydroxides slowly degenerate over many years/decades at room temperature into lithium oxide, releasing water vapor and ultimately hydrogen gas through reaction of the water vapor with the lithium hydride substrate. This outgassing can potentially cause metal hydriding and/or compatibility issues elsewhere in the device. In this chapter, the morphology and the chemistry of the corrosion layer grown on lithium hydride (and in some cases, its isotopic cousin, lithium deuteride) as a result of exposure to moisture are investigated. The hydrogen outgassing processes associated with the formation and subsequent degeneration of this corrosion layer are described. Experimental techniques to measure the hydrogen outgassing kinetics from lithium hydride and methods employing the measured kinetics to predict hydrogen outgassing as a function of time and temperature are presented. Finally, practical procedures to mitigate the problem of hydrogen outgassing from lithium hydride are discussed.

  2. Method for preparing porous metal hydride compacts

    DOEpatents

    Ron, M.; Gruen, D.M.; Mendelsohn, M.H.; Sheft, I.

    1980-01-21

    A method for preparing porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts which can be repeatedly hydrided and dehydrided without disintegration. A mixture of a finely divided metal hydride and a finely divided matrix metal is contacted with a poison which prevents the metal hydride from dehydriding at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The mixture of matrix metal and poisoned metal hydride is then compacted under pressure at room temperature to form porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts.

  3. Method for preparing porous metal hydride compacts

    DOEpatents

    Ron, Moshe; Gruen, Dieter M.; Mendelsohn, Marshall H.; Sheft, Irving

    1981-01-01

    A method for preparing porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts which can be repeatedly hydrided and dehydrided without disintegration. A mixture of a finely divided metal hydride and a finely divided matrix metal is contacted with a poison which prevents the metal hydride from dehydriding at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The mixture of matrix metal and poisoned metal hydride is then compacted under pressure at room temperature to form porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts.

  4. 17. VIEW OF HYDRIDING SYSTEM IN BUILDING 881. THE HYDRIDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. VIEW OF HYDRIDING SYSTEM IN BUILDING 881. THE HYDRIDING SYSTEM WAS PART OF THE FAST ENRICHED URANIUM RECOVERY PROCESS. (11/11/59) - Rocky Flats Plant, General Manufacturing, Support, Records-Central Computing, Southern portion of Plant, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  5. Effect of ultrasound sonication on electroplating of iridium.

    PubMed

    Ohsaka, Takashi; Isaka, Motohiro; Hirano, Katsuhiko; Ohishi, Tomoji

    2008-04-01

    Effect of ultrasound sonication was examined on the electroplating of iridium in aqueous hexabromoiridate(III) solution. The electrodeposits were evaluated by observing the defects of the iridium deposits by means of voltammetry, in which the current-potential curves of the iridium deposits on copper were measured. Applying ultrasound sonication to the electroplating of iridium decreased the defects including the cracks in the deposit whenever the glycerol as the additives was contained or not in the electrolyte. PMID:18164231

  6. IRIDIUM (R): A Lockheed transition to commercial space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tadano, Thomas N.

    1995-01-01

    At Lockheed Missiles & Space Company, the IRIDIUM commercial space program is dramatically revolutionizing spacecraft development and manufacturing processes to reduce cost while maintaining quality and reliability. This report includes the following sections: an overview of the IRIDIUM system, the Lockheed IRIDIUM project and challenges; cycle-time reduction through production reorganization; and design for manufacturing and quality.

  7. Uranium thorium hydride nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Simnad, M.T.

    1985-01-15

    A nuclear fuel includes uranium dispersed within a thorium hydride matrix. The uranium may be in the form of particles including fissile and non-fissile isotopes. Various hydrogen to thorium ratios may be included in the matrix. The matrix with the fissile dispersion may be used as a complete fuel for a metal hydride reactor or may be combined with other fuels.

  8. Dimensionally stable metallic hydride composition

    DOEpatents

    Heung, Leung K.

    1994-01-01

    A stable, metallic hydride composition and a process for making such a composition. The composition comprises a uniformly blended mixture of a metal hydride, kieselguhr, and a ballast metal, all in the form of particles. The composition is made by subjecting a metal hydride to one or more hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles to disintegrate the hydride particles to less than approximately 100 microns in size. The particles are partly oxidized, then blended with the ballast metal and the kieselguhr to form a uniform mixture. The mixture is compressed into pellets and calcined. Preferably, the mixture includes approximately 10 vol. % or more kieselguhr and approximately 50 vol. % or more ballast. Metal hydrides that can be used in the composition include Zr, Ti, V, Nb, Pd, as well as binary, tertiary, and more complex alloys of La, Al, Cu, Ti, Co, Ni, Fe, Zr, Mg, Ca, Mn, and mixtures and other combinations thereof. Ballast metals include Al, Cu and Ni.

  9. Origin of brittle cleavage in iridium.

    PubMed

    Cawkwell, Marc J; Nguyen-Manh, Duc; Woodward, Christopher; Pettifor, David G; Vitek, Vaclav

    2005-08-12

    Iridium is unique among the face-centered cubic metals in that it undergoes brittle cleavage after a period of plastic deformation under tensile stress. Atomistic simulation using a quantum-mechanically derived bond-order potential shows that in iridium, two core structures for the screw dislocation are possible: a glissile planar core and a metastable nonplanar core. Transformation between the two core structures is athermal and leads to exceptionally high rates of cross slip during plastic deformation. Associated with this athermal cross slip is an exponential increase in the dislocation density and strong work hardening from which brittle cleavage is a natural consequence. PMID:16099981

  10. Annealing Increases Stability Of Iridium Thermocouples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Germain, Edward F.; Daryabeigi, Kamran; Alderfer, David W.; Wright, Robert E.; Ahmed, Shaffiq

    1989-01-01

    Metallurgical studies carried out on samples of iridium versus iridium/40-percent rhodium thermocouples in condition received from manufacturer. Metallurgical studies included x-ray, macroscopic, resistance, and metallographic studies. Revealed large amount of internal stress caused by cold-working during manufacturing, and large number of segregations and inhomogeneities. Samples annealed in furnace at temperatures from 1,000 to 2,000 degree C for intervals up to 1 h to study effects of heat treatment. Wire annealed by this procedure found to be ductile.

  11. Iridium satellites light up the sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, N. D.

    1998-08-01

    Motorola's Iridium satellite system is the largest and most ambitious of a set of competing satellite-based mobile phone systems. Motorola's objective is to allow handheld mobiles to be used from anywhere on the planet, with the call being routed directly from handset to handset via one or several of the satellites. After a bad start when the first Delta launch failed, Iridium spacecraft have been launched up to five at a time and the system is due to go operational late this year.

  12. Iridium emissions from Hawaiian volcanoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finnegan, D. L.; Zoller, W. H.; Miller, T. M.

    1988-01-01

    Particle and gas samples were collected at Mauna Loa volcano during and after its eruption in March and April, 1984 and at Kilauea volcano in 1983, 1984, and 1985 during various phases of its ongoing activity. In the last two Kilauea sampling missions, samples were collected during eruptive activity. The samples were collected using a filterpack system consisting of a Teflon particle filter followed by a series of 4 base-treated Whatman filters. The samples were analyzed by INAA for over 40 elements. As previously reported in the literature, Ir was first detected on particle filters at the Mauna Loa Observatory and later from non-erupting high temperature vents at Kilauea. Since that time Ir was found in samples collected at Kilauea and Mauna Loa during fountaining activity as well as after eruptive activity. Enrichment factors for Ir in the volcanic fumes range from 10,000 to 100,000 relative to BHVO. Charcoal impregnated filters following a particle filter were collected to see if a significant amount of the Ir was in the gas phase during sample collection. Iridium was found on charcoal filters collected close to the vent, no Ir was found on the charcoal filters. This indicates that all of the Ir is in particulate form very soon after its release. Ratios of Ir to F and Cl were calculated for the samples from Mauna Loa and Kilauea collected during fountaining activity. The implications for the KT Ir anomaly are still unclear though as Ir was not found at volcanoes other than those at Hawaii. Further investigations are needed at other volcanoes to ascertain if basaltic volcanoes other than hot spots have Ir enrichments in their fumes.

  13. Development of metal hydride composites

    SciTech Connect

    Congdon, J.W.

    1992-12-01

    Most of current hydride technology at Savannah River Site is based on beds of metal hydride powders; the expansion upon hydridation and the cycling results in continued breakdown into finer particles. Goal is to develop a composite which will contain the fines in a dimensionally stable matrix, for use in processes which require a stable gas flow through a hydride bed. Metal hydride composites would benefit the advanced Thermal Cycling Absorption process (hydrogen isotope separation), and the Replacement Tritium Facility (storage, pumping, compression, purification of hydrogen isotopes). These composites were fabricated by cold compaction of a mixture of metal hydride granules and coarse copper powder; the porosity in the granules was introduced by means of ammonium carbonate. The composite pellets were cycled 138 times in hydrogen with the loss of LANA0.75 (LaNi{sub 4.25}Al{sub 0.75}) limited to the surface. Vacuum sintering can provide additional strength at the edges. Without a coating, the metal hydride particles exposed at the pellet surface can be removed by cycling several times in hydrogen.

  14. Iridium-192 Production for Cancer Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Rostelato, M.E.C.M.; Silva, C.P.G.; Rela, P.R.; Zeituni, C.A.; Lepki, V.; Feher, A.

    2004-10-05

    The purpose of this work is to settle a laboratory for Iridium -192 sources production, that is, to determine a wire activation method and to build a hot cell for the wires manipulation, quality control and packaging. The paper relates, mainly, the wire activation method and its quality control. The wire activation is carried out in our nuclear reactor, IEA- R1m.

  15. Iridium-Coated Rhenium Combustion Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Steven J.; Tuffias, Robert H.; Rosenberg, Sanders D.

    1994-01-01

    Iridium-coated rhenium combustion chamber withstands operating temperatures up to 2,200 degrees C. Chamber designed to replace older silicide-coated combustion chamber in small rocket engine. Modified versions of newer chamber could be designed for use on Earth in gas turbines, ramjets, and scramjets.

  16. Osmium-191/iridium-191m radionuclide

    DOEpatents

    Knapp, Jr., Furn F.; Butler, Thomas A.; Brihaye, Claude

    1987-01-01

    A generator system to provide iridium-191m for clinical imaging applications comprises an activated carbon adsorbent loaded with a compound containing the parent nuclide, osmium-191. The generator, which has a shelf-life in excess of two weeks and does not require a scavenger column, can be eluted with physiologically compatible saline.

  17. Osmium-191/iridium-191m radionuclide

    DOEpatents

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Butler, T.A.; Brihaye, C.

    1985-08-26

    A generator system to provide iridium-191m for clinical imaging applications comprises an activated carbon adsorbent loaded with a compound containing the parent nuclide, osmium-191. The generator, which has a shelf-life in excess of two weeks and does not require a scavenger column, can be eluted with physiologically compatible saline. 4 figs. 3 tabs.

  18. Parahydrogen induced polarization and the oxidative addition of hydrogen to iridium tribromostannyl carbonylate anions.

    PubMed

    Permin, Alexei; Eisenberg, Richard

    2002-05-01

    Activation of dihydrogen by a system composed of (Bu(4)N)[IrBr(2)(CO)(2)] (1) and tin dibromide in varying ratios was studied using parahydrogen induced polarization (PHIP) which allows the detection of transient dihydrides not observable in conventional (1)H NMR spectra. While the oxidative addition of dihydrogen to neutral and cationic Ir(I) species is common, there are only a few examples of H(2) addition to anionic complexes. Tin dibromide reacts with iridium(I) complex 1 in acetone forming equilibrium mixtures of cis- and trans-tribromostannyl derivatives [IrBr(n)()(SnBr(3))(2)(-)(n)()(CO)(2)](-), n = 0,1, the existence of which is inferred from the stereochemistries of the dihydrogen addition products determined using PHIP. The sigma-donating effect of the SnBr(3)(-) ligand facilitates the oxidative addition to the iridium center. The structures of the dihydrides formed upon addition of dihydrogen are assigned on the basis of hydride chemical shifts and values of (2)J((1)H-(117,119)Sn). The only dihydride observed in conventional (1)H NMR spectra is cis-trans-cis-[IrH(2)(SnBr(3))(2)(CO)(2)](-), the identity of which was confirmed using the (13)C labeled Ir(I) precursor. Both [IrBr(2)(CO)(2)](-) and its tribromostannyl derivatives catalyze cis-pairwise addition of dihydrogen to phenylacetylene. PMID:11978112

  19. Erbium hydride decomposition kinetics.

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrizz, Robert Matthew

    2006-11-01

    Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) is used to study the decomposition kinetics of erbium hydride thin films. The TDS results presented in this report are analyzed quantitatively using Redhead's method to yield kinetic parameters (E{sub A} {approx} 54.2 kcal/mol), which are then utilized to predict hydrogen outgassing in vacuum for a variety of thermal treatments. Interestingly, it was found that the activation energy for desorption can vary by more than 7 kcal/mol (0.30 eV) for seemingly similar samples. In addition, small amounts of less-stable hydrogen were observed for all erbium dihydride films. A detailed explanation of several approaches for analyzing thermal desorption spectra to obtain kinetic information is included as an appendix.

  20. Metallurgy of rechargeable hydrides

    SciTech Connect

    Rudman, P.S.; Sandrock, G.D.

    1982-01-01

    Thermodynamic principles of metal-hydrogen (M-H) systems are reviewed, and the theory and practice of M-H alloys are detailed. Pseudobinary systems, phase transformations, and metastability are briefly discussed. The LaNi5-H system is used to examine plateau slope and hysteresis in M-H alloy formation, and the rules of simple averaging and reversed stability are assessed with respect to their usefulness in predicting the behavior of such systems. The crystal structure of metal hydrides is addressed, including AB, AB2, and AB5 structure. Finally, the use of ternary substitutional alloying in controlling the thermodynamic properties of M-H systems is discussed, illustrating the substitution of copper for nickel in LaN5 and the dependence of the equilibrium pressure on the unit cell volume of various CaCu5 type compounds.

  1. Hydride development for hydrogen storage

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, G.J.; Guthrie, S.E.; Bauer, W.; Yang, N.Y.C.; Sandrock, G.

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this project is to develop and demonstrate improved hydride materials for hydrogen storage. The work currently is organized into four tasks: hydride development, bed fabrication, materials support for engineering systems, and IEA Annex 12 activities. At the present time, hydride development is focused on Mg alloys. These materials generally have higher weight densities for storing hydrogen than rare earth or transition metal alloys, but suffer from high operating temperatures, slow kinetic behavior and material stability. The authors approach is to study bulk alloy additions which increase equilibrium overpressure, in combination with stable surface alloy modification and particle size control to improve kinetic properties. This work attempts to build on the considerable previous research in this area, but examines specific alloy systems in greater detail, with attention to known phase properties and structures. The authors have found that specific phases can be produced which have significantly improved hydride properties compared to previous studies.

  2. Complex Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Slattery, Darlene; Hampton, Michael

    2003-03-10

    This report describes research into the use of complex hydrides for hydrogen storage. The synthesis of a number of alanates, (AIH4) compounds, was investigated. Both wet chemical and mechano-chemical methods were studied.

  3. Low density metal hydride foams

    DOEpatents

    Maienschein, Jon L.; Barry, Patrick E.

    1991-01-01

    Disclosed is a low density foam having a porosity of from 0 to 98% and a density less than about 0.67 gm/cc, prepared by heating a mixture of powered lithium hydride and beryllium hydride in an inert atmosphere at a temperature ranging from about 455 to about 490 K for a period of time sufficient to cause foaming of said mixture, and cooling the foam thus produced. Also disclosed is the process of making the foam.

  4. Application of the Iridium Satellite System to Aeronautical Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerczewski, Robert J.; Meza, Mike; Gupta, Om

    2008-01-01

    The next generation air transportation system will require greater air-ground communications capacity to accommodate more air traffic with increased safety and efficiency. Communications will remain primarily terrestrially based, but satellite communications will have an increased role. Inmarsat s aeronautical services have been approved and are in use for aeronautical safety communications provided by geostationary satellites. More recently the approval process for the Iridium low earth orbit constellation is nearing completion. The current Iridium system will be able to provide basic air traffic services communications suitable for oceanic, remote and polar regions. The planned second generation of the Iridium system, called Iridium NEXT, will provide enhanced capabilities and enable a greater role in the future of aeronautical communications. This paper will review the potential role of satellite communications in the future of air transportation, the Iridium approval process and relevant system testing, and the potential role of Iridium NEXT.

  5. Bulk Hydrides and Delayed Hydride Cracking in Zirconium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulk, Eric F.

    Zirconium alloys are susceptible to engineering problems associated with the uptake of hydrogen throughout their design lifetime in nuclear reactors. Understanding of hydrogen embrittlement associated with the precipitation of brittle hydride phases and a sub-critical crack growth mechanism known as Delayed Hydride Cracking (DHC) is required to provide the engineering justifications for safe reactor operation. The nature of bulk zirconium hydrides at low concentrations (< 100 wt. ppm) is subject to several contradictory descriptions in the literature associated with the stability and metastability of gamma-phase zirconium hydride. Due to the differing volume expansions (12-17%) and crystallography between gamma and delta hydride phases, it is suggested that the matrix yield strength may have an effect on the phase stability. The present work indicated that although yield strength can shift the phase stability, other factors such as microstructure and phase distribution can be as or more important. This suggests that small material differences are the reason for the literature discrepancies. DHC is characterised by the repeated precipitation, growth, fracture of brittle hydride phases and subsequent crack arrest in the ductile metal. DHC growth is associated primarily the ability of hydrogen to diffuse under a stress induced chemical potential towards a stress raiser. Knowledge of the factors controlling DHC are paramount in being able to appropriately describe DHC for engineering purposes. Most studies characterise DHC upon cooling to the test temperature. DHC upon heating has not been extensively studied and the mechanism by which it occurs is somewhat controversial in the literature. This work shows that previous thermo-mechanical processing of hydrided zirconium can have a significant effect on the dissolution behaviour of the bulk hydride upon heating. DHC tests with gamma-quenched, furnace cooled-delta and reoriented bulk hydrides upon heating and DHC upon

  6. Iridium-coated rhenium thrusters by CVD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, J. T.; Kazaroff, J. M.; Appel, M. A.

    1989-01-01

    Operation of spacecraft thrusters at increased temperature reduces propellant requirements. Inasmuch as propellant comprises the bulk of a satellite's mass, even a small percentage reduction makes possible a significant enhancement of the mission in terms of increased payload. Because of its excellent high temperature strength, rhenium is often the structural material of choice. It can be fabricated into free-standing shapes by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) onto an expendable mandrel. What rhenium lacks is oxidation resistance, but this can be provided by a coating of iridium, also by CVD. This paper describes the process used by Ultramet to fabricate 22-N (5-lbf) and, more recently, 445-N (100-lbf) Ir/Re thrusters; characterizes the CVD-deposited materials; and summarizes the materials effects of firing these thrusters. Optimal propellant mixture ratios can be employed because the materials withstand an oxidizing environment up to the melting temperature of iridium, 2400 C (4350 F).

  7. Iridium-coated rhenium thrusters by CVD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, John T.; Kazaroff, John M.; Appel, Marshall A.

    1988-01-01

    Operation of spacecraft thrusters at increased temperature reduces propellant requirements. Inasmuch as propellant comprises the bulk of a satellite's mass, even a small percentage reduction makes possible a significant enhancement of the mission in terms of increased payload. Because of its excellent high temperature strength, rhenium is often the structural material of choice. It can be fabricated into free-standing shapes by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) onto an expendable mandrel. What rhenium lacks is oxidation resistance, but this can be provided by a coating of iridium, also by CVD. This paper describes the process used by Ultramet to fabricate 22-N (5-lbf) and, more recently, 445-N (100-lbf) Ir/Re thrusters; characterizes the CVD-deposited materials; and summarizes the materials effects of firing these thrusters. Optimal propellant mixture ratios can be employed because the materials withstand an oxidizing environment up to the meltimg temperature of iridium, 2400 C (4350 F).

  8. Handling System for Iridium-192 Seeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, W.; Wodicka, D.

    1973-01-01

    A complete system is proposed for safe handling of iridium-192 seeds used to internally irradiate malignant growths. A vibratory hopper feeds the seeds onto a transport system for deposit in a magazine or storage area. A circular magazine consisting of segmented plastic tubing with holes in the walls to accommodate the seeds seems feasible. The magazine is indexed to stop and release a seed for calibration and deposition.

  9. Complex and liquid hydrides for energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callini, Elsa; Atakli, Zuleyha Özlem Kocabas; Hauback, Bjørn C.; Orimo, Shin-ichi; Jensen, Craig; Dornheim, Martin; Grant, David; Cho, Young Whan; Chen, Ping; Hjörvarsson, Bjørgvin; de Jongh, Petra; Weidenthaler, Claudia; Baricco, Marcello; Paskevicius, Mark; Jensen, Torben R.; Bowden, Mark E.; Autrey, Thomas S.; Züttel, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    The research on complex hydrides for hydrogen storage was initiated by the discovery of Ti as a hydrogen sorption catalyst in NaAlH4 by Boris Bogdanovic in 1996. A large number of new complex hydride materials in various forms and combinations have been synthesized and characterized, and the knowledge regarding the properties of complex hydrides and the synthesis methods has grown enormously since then. A significant portion of the research groups active in the field of complex hydrides is collaborators in the International Energy Agreement Task 32. This paper reports about the important issues in the field of complex hydride research, i.e. the synthesis of borohydrides, the thermodynamics of complex hydrides, the effects of size and confinement, the hydrogen sorption mechanism and the complex hydride composites as well as the properties of liquid complex hydrides. This paper is the result of the collaboration of several groups and is an excellent summary of the recent achievements.

  10. Advances in iridium alloy processing in 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Heestand, R.L.; Ohriner, E.K.; Roche, T.K.

    1988-08-01

    A new process for the production of DOP-26 iridium alloy blanks is being evaluated and optimized. The alloy is prepared by electron-beam (EB) melting of Ir-0.3% W powder compacts followed by doping with aluminum and thorium by arc melting. Drop-cast alloy rod segments are EB welded to produce an electrode that is consumable arc melted to produce an ingot for extrusion and subsequent rolling. Initial results showed rejections for ultrasonic indications of alloy blanks produced by this process to be very low. Subsequently, some ingots have exhibited delaminations in the sheet, leading to rejection rates similar to that obtained in the standard process. The increase in delaminations is related to near-surface porosity in the consumable arc-melted ingot. A number of modifications to the arc-melting process and plans for further experimental work are described. In addition, the tensile properties of the DOP-26 iridium alloys have been measured over a range of test temperatures and strain rates. A laboratory evaluation of alternative cleaning procedures indicates that electrolytic dissolution of DOP-26 iridium alloy in an HCl solution is a potential substitute to the KCN process now in use. 7 refs., 13 figs., 6 tabs.

  11. Iridium-Catalyzed Hydrogen Transfer Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saidi, Ourida; Williams, Jonathan M. J.

    This chapter describes the application of iridium complexes to catalytic hydrogen transfer reactions. Transfer hydrogenation reactions provide an alternative to direct hydrogenation for the reduction of a range of substrates. A hydrogen donor, typically an alcohol or formic acid, can be used as the source of hydrogen for the reduction of carbonyl compounds, imines, and alkenes. Heteroaromatic compounds and even carbon dioxide have also been reduced by transfer hydrogenation reactions. In the reverse process, the oxidation of alcohols to carbonyl compounds can be achieved by iridium-catalyzed hydrogen transfer reactions, where a ketone or alkene is used as a suitable hydrogen acceptor. The reversible nature of many hydrogen transfer processes has been exploited for the racemization of alcohols, where temporary removal of hydrogen generates an achiral ketone intermediate. In addition, there is a growing body of work where temporary removal of hydrogen provides an opportunity for using alcohols as alkylating agents. In this chemistry, an iridium catalyst "borrows" hydrogen from an alcohol to give an aldehyde or ketone intermediate, which can be transformed into either an imine or alkene under the reaction conditions. Return of the hydrogen from the catalyst provides methodology for the formation of amines or C-C bonds where the only by-product is typically water.

  12. Hydrogen, lithium, and lithium hydride production

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Sam W; Spencer, Larry S; Phillips, Michael R; Powell, G. Louis; Campbell, Peggy J

    2014-03-25

    A method of producing high purity lithium metal is provided, where gaseous-phase lithium metal is extracted from lithium hydride and condensed to form solid high purity lithium metal. The high purity lithium metal may be hydrided to provide high purity lithium hydride.

  13. Method of producing a chemical hydride

    DOEpatents

    Klingler, Kerry M.; Zollinger, William T.; Wilding, Bruce M.; Bingham, Dennis N.; Wendt, Kraig M.

    2007-11-13

    A method of producing a chemical hydride is described and which includes selecting a composition having chemical bonds and which is capable of forming a chemical hydride; providing a source of a hydrocarbon; and reacting the composition with the source of the hydrocarbon to generate a chemical hydride.

  14. Vanadium hydride deuterium-tritium generator

    DOEpatents

    Christensen, Leslie D.

    1982-01-01

    A pressure controlled vanadium hydride gas generator to provide deuterium-tritium gas in a series of pressure increments. A high pressure chamber filled with vanadium-deuterium-tritium hydride is surrounded by a heater which controls the hydride temperature. The heater is actuated by a power controller which responds to the difference signal between the actual pressure signal and a programmed pressure signal.

  15. Variation of iridium in a differentiated tholeiitic dolerite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greenland, L.P.

    1971-01-01

    Iridium has been determined in a drill core from the Great Lake (Tasmania) dolerite sheet. Iridium decreases systematically from the mafic dolerites (0.25 ppb) to the granophyres (0.006 ppb). The trend with differentiation closely parallels that of chromium. ?? 1971.

  16. Characteristics and Applications of Metal Hydrides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egan, G. J.; Lynch, F. E.

    1987-01-01

    Report discusses engineering principles of uses of metal hydrides in spacecraft. Metal hydrides absorb, store, pump, compress, and expand hydrogen gas. Additionally, they release or absorb sizeable amounts of heat as they form and decompose - property adapted for thermal-energy management or for propulsion. Describes efforts to: Identify heat sources and sinks suitable for driving metal hydride thermal cycles in spacecraft; develop concepts for hydride subsystems employing available heating and cooling methods; and produce data base on estimated sizes, masses, and performances of hydride devices for spacecraft.

  17. Iridium enrichment in airborne particles from kilauea volcano: january 1983.

    PubMed

    Zoller, W H; Parrington, J R; Kotra, J M

    1983-12-01

    Airborne particulate matter from the January 1983 eruption of Kilauea volcano was inadvertently collected on air filters at Mauna Loa Observatory at a sampling station used to observe particles in global circulation. Analyses of affected samples revealed unusually large concentrations of selenium, arsenic, indium, gold, and sulfur, as expected for volcanic emissions. Strikingly large concentrations of iridium were also observed, the ratio of iridium to aluminum being 17,000 times its value in Hawaiian basalt. Since iridium enrichments have not previously been observed in volcanic emissions, the results for Kilauea suggest that it is part of an unusual volcanic system which may be fed by magma from the mantle. The iridium enrichment appears to be linked with the high fluorine content of the volcanic gases, which suggests that the iridium is released as a volatile IrF(6). PMID:17747384

  18. Properties of nanoscale metal hydrides.

    PubMed

    Fichtner, Maximilian

    2009-05-20

    Nanoscale hydride particles may exhibit chemical stabilities which differ from those of a macroscopic system. The stabilities are mainly influenced by a surface energy term which contains size-dependent values of the surface tension, the molar volume and an additional term which takes into account a potential reduction of the excess surface energy. Thus, the equilibrium of a nanoparticular hydride system may be shifted to the hydrogenated or to the dehydrogenated side, depending on the size and on the prefix of the surface energy term of the hydrogenated and dehydrogenated material. Additional complexity appears when solid-state reactions of complex hydrides are considered and phase segregation has to be taken into account. In such a case the reversibility of complex hydrides may be reduced if the nanoparticles are free standing on a surface. However, it may be enhanced if the system is enclosed by a nanoscale void which prevents the reaction partners on the dehydrogenated side from diffusing away from each other. Moreover, the generally enhanced diffusivity in nanocrystalline systems may lower the kinetic barriers for the material's transformation and, thus, facilitate hydrogen absorption and desorption. PMID:19420657

  19. Cheaper Hydride-Forming Cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A.; Blue, Gary

    1990-01-01

    Hydride-forming cathodes for electrochemical experiments made of materials or combinations of materials cheaper and more abundant than pure palladium, according to proposal. Concept prompted by needs of experimenters in now-discredited concept of electrochemical nuclear fusion, cathodes useful in other electrochemical applications involving generation or storage of hydrogen, deuterium, or tritium.

  20. Iridium Interfacial Stack - IrIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spry, David

    2012-01-01

    Iridium Interfacial Stack (IrIS) is the sputter deposition of high-purity tantalum silicide (TaSi2-400 nm)/platinum (Pt-200 nm)/iridium (Ir-200 nm)/platinum (Pt-200 nm) in an ultra-high vacuum system followed by a 600 C anneal in nitrogen for 30 minutes. IrIS simultaneously acts as both a bond metal and a diffusion barrier. This bondable metallization that also acts as a diffusion barrier can prevent oxygen from air and gold from the wire-bond from infiltrating silicon carbide (SiC) monolithically integrated circuits (ICs) operating above 500 C in air for over 1,000 hours. This TaSi2/Pt/Ir/Pt metallization is easily bonded for electrical connection to off-chip circuitry and does not require extra anneals or masking steps. There are two ways that IrIS can be used in SiC ICs for applications above 500 C: it can be put directly on a SiC ohmic contact metal, such as Ti, or be used as a bond metal residing on top of an interconnect metal. For simplicity, only the use as a bond metal is discussed. The layer thickness ratio of TaSi2 to the first Pt layer deposited thereon should be 2:1. This will allow Si from the TaSi2 to react with the Pt to form Pt2Si during the 600 C anneal carried out after all layers have been deposited. The Ir layer does not readily form a silicide at 600 C, and thereby prevents the Si from migrating into the top-most Pt layer during future anneals and high-temperature IC operation. The second (i.e., top-most) deposited Pt layer needs to be about 200 nm to enable easy wire bonding. The thickness of 200 nm for Ir was chosen for initial experiments; further optimization of the Ir layer thickness may be possible via further experimentation. Ir itself is not easily wire-bonded because of its hardness and much higher melting point than Pt. Below the iridium layer, the TaSi2 and Pt react and form desired Pt2Si during the post-deposition anneal while above the iridium layer remains pure Pt as desired to facilitate easy and strong wire-bonding to the Si

  1. Iridium Film For Charge-Coupled Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hecht, Michael H.

    1990-01-01

    Usability extended to different environments. Application of thin film of iridium to back surface of back-surface-illuminated charge-coupled device expected to increase and stabilize quantum efficiency at wavelengths less than 4,500 Angstrom. Enhances quantum efficiency according to principle discussed in "Metal Film Increases CCD Output" (NPO-16815). Does not react with hydrogen, so device need not be kept in oxygen: Advantage where high absorption of ultraviolet light by oxygen undesirable; for example, when device used to make astronomical observations from high altitudes.

  2. Validation of EXAFS Analysis of Iridium Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feiters, M. C.; Longo, A.; Banerjee, D.; van der Ham, C. J. M.; Hetterscheid, D. G. H.

    2016-05-01

    Results of iridium L3 edge EXAFS measurements of compounds relevant for water oxidation catalysis are compared to those of other structural techniques. The structural results from EXAFS for the Ir compounds investigated here compare well to those of other structural techniques. Multiple scattering contributions are important in the coordinated Cp* and NHC ligands as well as in the IrCl6 unit and the IrO2 rutile structure. NHC is relatively weak compared to Ir, Cl, and even Cp* and O, and often out of phase with the other contributions.

  3. Iridium/Rhenium Parts For Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Steven J.; Harding, John T.; Wooten, John R.

    1991-01-01

    Oxidation/corrosion of metals at high temperatures primary life-limiting mechanism of parts in rocket engines. Combination of metals greatly increases operating temperature and longevity of these parts. Consists of two transition-element metals - iridium and rhenium - that melt at extremely high temperatures. Maximum operating temperature increased to 2,200 degrees C from 1,400 degrees C. Increases operating lifetimes of small rocket engines by more than factor of 10. Possible to make hotter-operating, longer-lasting components for turbines and other heat engines.

  4. Microstructure of surface cerium hydride growth sites

    SciTech Connect

    Brierley, Martin; Knowles, John; Montgomery, Neil; Preuss, Michael

    2014-05-15

    Samples of cerium were exposed to hydrogen under controlled conditions causing cerium hydride sites to nucleate and grow on the surface. The hydriding rate was measured in situ, and the hydrides were characterised using secondary ion mass spectrometry, scanning electron microscopy, and optical microscopy. The results show that the hydriding rate proceeded more quickly than earlier studies. Characterisation confirmed that the hydrogen is confined to the sites. The morphology of the hydrides was confirmed to be oblate, and stressed material was observed surrounding the hydride, in a number of cases lathlike features were observed surrounding the hydride sites laterally with cracking in the surface oxide above them. It is proposed that during growth the increased lattice parameter of the CeH{sub 2} induces a lateral compressive stress around the hydride, which relieves by the ca. 16% volume collapse of the γ-Ce to α-Ce pressure induced phase transition. Cracking of the surface oxide above the laths reduces the diffusion barrier to hydrogen reaching the metal/oxide interface surrounding the hydride site and contributes to the anisotropic growth of the hydrides.

  5. Diminiode thermionic conversion with 111-iridium electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koeger, E. W.; Bair, V. L.; Morris, J. F.

    1976-01-01

    Preliminary data indicating thermionic-conversion potentialities for a 111-iridium emitter and collector spaced 0.2 mm apart are presented. These results comprise output densities of current and of power as functions of voltage for three sets of emitter, collector, and reservoir temperatures: 1553, 944, 561 K; 1605, 898, 533 K; and 1656, 1028, 586 K. For the 1605 K evaluation, estimates produced work-function values of 2.22 eV for the emitter and 1.63 eV for the collector with a 2.0-eV barrier index (collector work function plus interelectrode voltage drop) corresponding to the maximum output of 5.5 W/sq cm at 0.24 volt. The current, voltage curve for the 1656 K 111-iridium diminiode yields a 6.2 W/sq cm maximum at 0.25 volt and is comparable with the 1700 K envelope for a diode with an etched-rhenium emitter and a 0.025-mm electrode gap made by TECO and evaluated by NASA.

  6. Rechargeable metal hydrides for spacecraft application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, J. L.

    1988-01-01

    Storing hydrogen on board the Space Station presents both safety and logistics problems. Conventional storage using pressurized bottles requires large masses, pressures, and volumes to handle the hydrogen to be used in experiments in the U.S. Laboratory Module and residual hydrogen generated by the ECLSS. Rechargeable metal hydrides may be competitive with conventional storage techniques. The basic theory of hydride behavior is presented and the engineering properties of LaNi5 are discussed to gain a clear understanding of the potential of metal hydrides for handling spacecraft hydrogen resources. Applications to Space Station and the safety of metal hydrides are presented and compared to conventional hydride storage. This comparison indicates that metal hydrides may be safer and require lower pressures, less volume, and less mass to store an equivalent mass of hydrogen.

  7. Metal hydride composition and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Congdon, James W.

    1995-01-01

    A dimensionally stable hydride composition and a method for making such a composition. The composition is made by forming particles of a metal hydride into porous granules, mixing the granules with a matrix material, forming the mixture into pellets, and sintering the pellets in the absence of oxygen. The ratio of matrix material to hydride is preferably between approximately 2:1 and 4:1 by volume. The porous structure of the granules accommodates the expansion that occurs when the metal hydride particles absorb hydrogen. The porous matrix allows the flow of hydrogen therethrough to contact the hydride particles, yet supports the granules and contains the hydride fines that result from repeated absorption/desorption cycles.

  8. Ten degree Kelvin hydride refrigerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A compact hydride absorption refrigeration system with few moving parts for 10 Kelvin operation is disclosed and comprises liquid hydrogen producing means in combination with means for solidifying and subliming the liquid hydrogen produced. The liquid hydrogen is sublimed at about 10 Kelvin. By using a symmetrical all hydrogen redundant loop system, a 10 Kelvin refrigeration system can be operated for many years with only a fraction of the power required for prior art systems.

  9. Complex hydrides for hydrogen storage

    DOEpatents

    Zidan, Ragaiy

    2006-08-22

    A hydrogen storage material and process of forming the material is provided in which complex hydrides are combined under conditions of elevated temperatures and/or elevated temperature and pressure with a titanium metal such as titanium butoxide. The resulting fused product exhibits hydrogen desorption kinetics having a first hydrogen release point which occurs at normal atmospheres and at a temperature between 50.degree. C. and 90.degree. C.

  10. Hydrogen /Hydride/-air secondary battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarradin, J.; Bronoel, G.; Percheron-Guegan, A.; Achard, J. C.

    1979-01-01

    The use of metal hydrides as negative electrodes in a hydrogen-air secondary battery seems promising. However, in an unpressurized cell, more stable hydrides that LaNi5H6 must be selected. Partial substitutions of nickel by aluminium or manganese increase the stability of hydrides. Combined with an air reversible electrode, a specific energy close to 100 Wh/kg can be expected.

  11. Use of reversible hydrides for hydrogen storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darriet, B.; Pezat, M.; Hagenmuller, P.

    1980-01-01

    The addition of metals or alloys whose hydrides have a high dissociation pressure allows a considerable increase in the hydrogenation rate of magnesium. The influence of temperature and hydrogen pressure on the reaction rate were studied. Results concerning the hydriding of magnesium rich alloys such as Mg2Ca, La2Mg17 and CeMg12 are presented. The hydriding mechanism of La2Mg17 and CeMg12 alloys is given.

  12. Inhibited solid propellant composition containing beryllium hydride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, W. W. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An object of this invention is to provide a composition of beryllium hydride and carboxy-terminated polybutadiene which is stable. Another object of this invention is to provide a method for inhibiting the reactivity of beryllium hydride toward carboxy-terminated polybutadiene. It was found that a small amount of lecithin inhibits the reaction of beryllium hydride with the acid groups in carboxy terminated polybutadiene.

  13. Vanadium hydride deuterium-tritium generator

    DOEpatents

    Christensen, L.D.

    1980-03-13

    A pressure controlled vanadium hydride gas generator was designed to provide deuterium-tritium gas in a series of pressure increments. A high pressure chamber filled with vanadium-deuterium-tritium hydride is surrounded by a heater which controls the hydride temperature. The heater is actuated by a power controller which responds to the difference signal between the actual pressure signal and a programmed pressure signal.

  14. Highly efficient D2 generation by dehydrogenation of formic acid in D2O through H+/D+ exchange on an iridium catalyst: application to the synthesis of deuterated compounds by transfer deuterogenation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wan-Hui; Hull, Jonathan F; Muckerman, James T; Fujita, Etsuko; Hirose, Takuji; Himeda, Yuichiro

    2012-07-23

    Deuterated compounds have received increasing attention in both academia and industrial fields. However, preparations of these compounds are limited for both economic and practical reasons. Herein, convenient generation of deuterium gas (D(2)) and the preparation of deuterated compounds on a laboratory scale are demonstrated by using a half-sandwich iridium complex with 4,4'-dihydroxy-2,2'-bipyridine. The "umpolung" (i.e., reversal of polarity) of a hydrogen atom of water was achieved in consecutive reactions, that is, a cationic H(+)/D(+) exchange reaction and anionic hydride or deuteride transfer, under mild conditions. Selective D(2) evolution (purity up to 89 %) was achieved by using HCO(2)H as an electron source and D(2)O as a deuterium source; a rhodium analogue provided HD gas (98 %) under similar conditions. Furthermore, pressurized D(2) (98 %) without CO gas was generated by using DCO(2)D in D(2)O in a glass autoclave. Transfer deuterogenation of ketones gave α-deuterated alcohols with almost quantitative yields and high deuterium content by using HCO(2)H in D(2)O. Mechanistic studies show that the H(+)/D(+) exchange reaction in the iridium hydride complex was much faster than β-elimination and hydride (deuteride) transfer. PMID:22718518

  15. Phase control of iridium and iridium oxide thin films in atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sung-Wook; Kwon, Se-Hun; Kwak, Dong-Kee; Kang, Sang-Won

    2008-01-15

    The atomic layer deposition of iridium (Ir) and iridium oxide (IrO{sub 2}) films was investigated using an alternating supply of (ethylcyclopentadienyl)(1,5-cyclooctadiene) iridium and oxygen gas at temperatures between 230 and 290 deg. C. The phase transition between Ir and IrO{sub 2} occurred at the critical oxygen partial pressure during the oxygen injection pulse. The oxygen partial pressure was controlled by the O{sub 2}/(Ar+O{sub 2}) ratio or deposition pressures. The resistivity of the deposited Ir and IrO{sub 2} films was about 9 and 120 {mu}{omega} cm, respectively. In addition, the critical oxygen partial pressure for the phase transition between Ir and IrO{sub 2} was increased with increasing the deposition temperature. Thus, the phase of the deposited film, either Ir or IrO{sub 2}, was controlled by the oxygen partial pressure and the deposition temperature. However, the formation of a thin Ir layer was detected between the IrO{sub 2} and SiO{sub 2} substrate. To remove this interfacial layer, the oxygen partial pressure is increased to a severe condition. And the impurity contents were below the detection limit of Auger electron spectroscopy in both Ir and IrO{sub 2} films.

  16. Thermodynamic Hydricity of Transition Metal Hydrides.

    PubMed

    Wiedner, Eric S; Chambers, Matthew B; Pitman, Catherine L; Bullock, R Morris; Miller, Alexander J M; Appel, Aaron M

    2016-08-10

    Transition metal hydrides play a critical role in stoichiometric and catalytic transformations. Knowledge of free energies for cleaving metal hydride bonds enables the prediction of chemical reactivity, such as for the bond-forming and bond-breaking events that occur in a catalytic reaction. Thermodynamic hydricity is the free energy required to cleave an M-H bond to generate a hydride ion (H(-)). Three primary methods have been developed for hydricity determination: the hydride transfer method establishes hydride transfer equilibrium with a hydride donor/acceptor pair of known hydricity, the H2 heterolysis method involves measuring the equilibrium of heterolytic cleavage of H2 in the presence of a base, and the potential-pKa method considers stepwise transfer of a proton and two electrons to give a net hydride transfer. Using these methods, over 100 thermodynamic hydricity values for transition metal hydrides have been determined in acetonitrile or water. In acetonitrile, the hydricity of metal hydrides spans a range of more than 50 kcal/mol. Methods for using hydricity values to predict chemical reactivity are also discussed, including organic transformations, the reduction of CO2, and the production and oxidation of hydrogen. PMID:27483171

  17. Fundamental experiments on hydride reorientation in zircaloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colas, Kimberly B.

    In the current study, an in-situ X-ray diffraction technique using synchrotron radiation was used to follow directly the kinetics of hydride dissolution and precipitation during thermomechanical cycles. This technique was combined with conventional microscopy (optical, SEM and TEM) to gain an overall understanding of the process of hydride reorientation. Thus this part of the study emphasized the time-dependent nature of the process, studying large volume of hydrides in the material. In addition, a micro-diffraction technique was also used to study the spatial distribution of hydrides near stress concentrations. This part of the study emphasized the spatial variation of hydride characteristics such as strain and morphology. Hydrided samples in the shape of tensile dog-bones were used in the time-dependent part of the study. Compact tension specimens were used during the spatial dependence part of the study. The hydride elastic strains from peak shift and size and strain broadening were studied as a function of time for precipitating hydrides. The hydrides precipitate in a very compressed state of stress, as measured by the shift in lattice spacing. As precipitation proceeds the average shift decreases, indicating average stress is reduced, likely due to plastic deformation and morphology changes. When nucleation ends the hydrides follow the zirconium matrix thermal contraction. When stress is applied below the threshold stress for reorientation, hydrides first nucleate in a very compressed state similar to that of unstressed hydrides. After reducing the average strain similarly to unstressed hydrides, the average hydride strain reaches a constant value during cool-down to room temperature. This could be due to a greater ease of deforming the matrix due to the applied far-field strain which would compensate for the strains due to thermal contraction. Finally when hydrides reorient, the average hydride strains become tensile during the first precipitation regime and

  18. Iridium anomaly approximately synchronous with terminal eocene extinctions

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, W.; Asaro, F.; Michel, H.V.; Alvarez, L.W.

    1982-05-21

    An iridium anomaly has been found in coincidence with the known microtektite level in cores from Deep Sea Drilling Project site 149 in the Caribbean Sea. The iridium was probably not in the microtektites but deposited simultaneously with them; this could occur if the iridium was deposited from a dust cloud resulting from a bolide impact, as suggested for the anomaly associated with the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary. Other workers have deduced that the microtektites are part of the North American strewn tektite field, which is dated at about 34 million years before present, and that the microtektite horizon in deep-sea cores is synchronous with the extinction of five radiolarian species. Mass extinctions also occur in terrestrial mammals within 4 million years of this time. The iridium anomaly and the tektites and microtektites are supportive of a major bolide impact about 34 million years ago.

  19. Iridium anomaly approximately synchronous with terminal eocene extinctions.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, W; Asaro, F; Michel, H V; Alvarez, L W

    1982-05-21

    An iridium anomaly has been found in coincidence with the known microtektite level in cores from Deep Sea Drilling Project site 149 in the Caribbean Sea. The iridium was probably not in the microtektites but deposited simultaneously with them; this could occur if the iridium was deposited from a dust cloud resulting from a bolide impact, as suggested for the anomaly associated with the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary. Other workers have deduced that the microtektites are part of the North American strewn tektite field, which is dated at about 34 million years before present, and that the microtektite horizon in deep-sea cores is synchronous with the extinction of five radiolarian species. Mass extinctions also occur in terrestrial mammals within 4 million years of this time. The iridium anomaly and the tektites and microtektites are supportive of a major bolide impact about 34 million years ago. PMID:17819180

  20. Acute radiodermatitis from occupational exposure to iridium 192

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, J.; Rosen, T. )

    1989-12-01

    Industrial radiography using the man-made radioisotope iridium 192 is commonplace in the southern states. Despite established procedures and safeguards, accidental exposure may result in typical acute radiodermatitis. We have presented a clinical example of this phenomenon.9 references.

  1. Low energy cyclotron production and cyclometalation chemistry of iridium-192.

    PubMed

    Langille, G; Yang, H; Zeisler, S K; Hoehr, C; Storr, T; Andreoiu, C; Schaffer, P

    2016-09-01

    This work demonstrates the labelling of a novel class of iridium lumophore with radioiridium, as proof-of-feasibility for producing and using the medically useful isotope iridium-192. Natural osmium was electroplated onto silver target backings in basic media and irradiated for up to two hours with ≤20μA of 12.8MeV protons. A range of iridium isotopes were generated, characterized and quantified using γ-spectroscopy methods. The target material was removed from the backings via oxidative dissolution with hydrogen peroxide, and the iridium radioisotopes isolated using an anion exchange resin. Both no-carrier-added as well as carrier-added formulations were then used in subsequent cyclometalation reactions. PMID:27344003

  2. GPS/GNSS Interference from Iridium Data Transmitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berglund, H. T.; Blume, F.; Estey, L.; White, S.

    2011-12-01

    The Iridium satellite communication system broadcasts in the 1610 to 1626.5 MHz band. The L1 frequencies broadcast by GPS, Galileo and GLONASS satellites are 1575.42 MHz, 1575.42 MHz and 1602 MHz + n × 0.5625 MHz, respectively (each GLONASS satellite uses a unique frequency). The proximity of the Iridium frequency band with the L1 frequencies of the GPS, Galileo and GLONASS systems leaves GNSS receivers susceptible to interference from Iridium data transmissions. Interference from Iridium transmissions can cause cycle slips and loss of lock on the carrier and code phases, thereby degrading the quality of GNSS observations and position estimates. In 2008, UNAVCO staff members observed that the percent of slips vs. the number of observations increased as the distance between a GPS choke ring antenna (TRM29659.00) and an Iridium antenna decreased. From those observations they suggested that Iridium antennas and GPS antennas should be separated by >30 m to minimize cycle slips caused by the interference from Iridium data transmissions. A second test conducted in 2009 using a newer Trimble GNSS choke ring antenna (TRM59800.00) showed similar results to the previous test despite the wider frequency range of the newer antenna. More recent testing conducted to investigate the response of new receiver models to iridium transmissions has shown that many GNSS enabled models, when combined with GNSS enabled antennas, have increased sensitivity to interference when compared to older GPS-only models. The broader frequency spectrum of the Low Noise Amplifiers (LNA) installed in many newer GNSS antennas can increase the impact of near-band RF interference on tracking performance. Our testing has shown that the quality of data collected at sites collocated with iridium communications is highly degraded for antenna separations exceeding 100m. Using older GPS antenna models (e.g. TRM29659.00) with newer GNSS enabled receivers can reduce this effect. To mitigate the effects that

  3. The fourth spectrum of iridium (Ir IV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azarov, Vladimir I.; Gayasov, Robert R.

    2016-03-01

    The spectrum of three times ionized iridium, Ir IV, was investigated in the 650-2045 Å wavelength region. The analysis has led to the determination of the 5d6, 5d5 6 s and 5d5 6 p configurations. Twenty-nine of 34 theoretically possible 5d6 levels, 44 of 74 possible 5d5 6 s levels and 150 of 214 possible 5d5 6 p levels have been established. The levels are based on 1348 classified spectral lines. The level structure and transition probabilities were calculated using the orthogonal operators technique. The energy parameters have been determined by the least squares fit to the observed levels. Calculated energy values and LS-compositions obtained from the fitted parameter values are given. The level optimization procedure and the determination of uncertainties of the obtained energy level values are discussed.

  4. Synthesis and characterization of nitrides of iridium and palladiums

    SciTech Connect

    Crowhurst, Jonathan C.; Goncharov, Alexander F.; Sadigh, B.; Zaug, J.M.; Aberg, D.; Meng, Yue; Prakapenka, Vitali B.

    2008-08-14

    We describe the synthesis of nitrides of iridium and palladium using the laser-heated diamond anvil cell. We have used the in situ techniques of x-ray powder diffraction and Raman scattering to characterize these compounds and have compared our experimental findings where possible to the results of first-principles theoretical calculations. We suggest that palladium nitride is isostructural with pyrite, while iridium nitride has a monoclinic symmetry and is isostructural with baddeleyite.

  5. Iridium Complexes as a Roadblock for DNA Polymerase during Amplification.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Falguni; Kumar, Prashant; Tripathi, Suman Kumar; Patra, Srikanta; Koner, Apurba L

    2016-07-01

    Iridium-based metal complexes containing polypyridyl-pyrazine ligands show properties of DNA intercalation. They serve as roadblocks to DNA polymerase activity, thereby inhibiting the polymerization process. Upon the addition of increasing concentrations of these iridium complexes, a rapid polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based assay reveals the selective inhibition of the DNA polymerization process. This label-free approach to study the inhibition of fundamental cellular processes via physical roadblock can offer an alternative route toward cancer therapy. PMID:27240728

  6. Iridium{reg_sign} worldwide personal communication system

    SciTech Connect

    Helm, J.

    1997-01-01

    The IRIDIUM system is a personal worldwide communication system designed to support portable, low power subscriber units through the use of a constellation of satellites in low earth polar orbit. The satellites are networked together to form a system which provides continuous line-of-sight communications between the IRIDIUM system and any point within 30 km of the earth{close_quote}s surface. The system architecture and operation are described. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. PURIFICATION OF IRIDIUM BY ELECTRON BEAM MELTING

    SciTech Connect

    Ohriner, Evan Keith

    2008-01-01

    The purification of iridium metal by electron beam melting has been characterized for 48 impurity elements. Chemical analysis was performed by glow discharge mass spectrographic (GDMS) analysis for all elements except carbon, which was analyzed by combustion. The average levels of individual elemental impurities in the starting powder varied from 37 g/g to 0.02 g/g. The impurity elements Li, Na, Mg, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Pd, Ag, Cd, Sn, Sb, Te, Ba, Ce, Tl, Pb, and Bi were not detectable following the purification. No significant change in concentration of the elements Ti, V, Zr, Nb, Mo, and Re was found. The elements B, C, Al, Si, Cr, Fe, Ru, Rh, and Pt were partially removed by vaporization during electron beam melting. Langmuir's equation for ideal vaporization into a vacuum was used to calculate for each impurity element the expected ratio of impurity content after melting to that before melting. Equilibrium vapor pressures were calculated using Henry's law, with activity coefficients obtained from published data for the elements Fe, Ti, and Pt. Activity coefficients were estimated from enthalpy data for Al, Si, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Zr, Nb, Mo, and Hf and an ideal solution model was used for the remaining elements. The melt temperature was determined from measured iridium weight loss. Excellent agreement was found between measured and calculated impurity ratios for all impurity elements. The results are consistent with some localized heating of the melt pool due to rastering of the electron beam, with an average vaporization temperature of 3100 K as compared to a temperature of 2965 K calculated for uniform heating of the melt pool. The results are also consistent with ideal mixing in the melt pool.

  8. Erbium hydride thermal desorption : controlling kinetics.

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrizz, Robert Matthew

    2007-08-01

    Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) is used to study the decomposition kinetics of erbium hydride thin films. The TDS results presented in this report show that hydride film processing parameters directly impact thermal stability. Issues to be addressed include desorption kinetics for dihydrides and trihydrides, and the effect of film growth parameters, loading parameters, and substrate selection on desorption kinetics.

  9. Submillimeter Spectroscopy of Hydride Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, T. G.

    1998-05-01

    Simple hydride molecules are of great importance in astrophysics and astrochemistry. Physically they dominate the cooling of dense, warm phases of the ISM, such as the cores and disks of YSOs. Chemically they are often stable end points of chemical reactions, or may represent important intermediate stages of the reaction chains, which can be used to test the validity of the process. Through the efforts of astronomers, physicists, chemists, and laboratory spectroscopists we have an approximate knowledge of the abundance of some of the important species, but a great deal of new effort will be required to achieve the comprehensive and accurate data set needed to determine the energy balance and firmly establish the chemical pathways. Due to the low moment of inertia, the hydrides rotate rapidly and so have their fundamental spectral lines in the submillimeter. Depending on the cloud geometry and temperature profile they may be observed in emission or absorption. Species such as HCl, HF, OH, CH, CH(+) , NH_2, NH_3, H_2O, H_2S, H_3O(+) and even H_3(+) have been detected, but this is just a fraction of the available set. Also, most deduced abundances are not nearly sufficiently well known to draw definitive conclusions about the chemical processes. For example, the most important coolant for many regions, H_2O, has a possible range of deduced abundance of a factor of 1000. The very low submillimeter opacity at the South Pole site will be a significant factor in providing a new capabilty for interstellar hydride spectroscopy. The new species and lines made available in this way will be discussed.

  10. Iridium NEXT: A Global access for your sensor needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, O. P.; Fish, C. S.

    2010-12-01

    The operational Iridium constellation is comprised of 66 satellites, used to primarily provide worldwide voice and data coverage to satellite phones, pagers and integrated transceivers. The satellites are in low Earth orbit at 781 km and inclination of 86.4 deg, resulting in unprecedented 24/7 coverage and real-time visibility of the entire globe. Recently, through funding from the National Science Foundation (NSF), Iridium has been utilized by the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL), with help from The Boeing Company, as an infrastructure for a comprehensive network for space environment measurements. Known as the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE), the Iridium-based system provides real-time magnetic field measurements using the satellites as part of a new observation network to forecast weather in space. In February 2007, Iridium announced Iridium NEXT, a novel design for a second-generation satellite constellation. Anticipated to begin launching in 2015, Iridium NEXT will maintain the existing Iridium constellation architecture of 66 cross-linked satellite LEO covering 100 percent of the globe. In the spirit of AMPERE, for commercial, government, and scientific organizations Iridium NEXT also plans to offer new earth and space observation opportunities through hosted hosted payloads on the 66 Iridium NEXT satellite network. To provide seamless support and access to this latest innovation in payload transportation, Iridium NEXT has teamed with Space Dynamics Laboratory - Utah State University which has delivered thousands of successful sensors and subsystems for over 400 space borne and aircraf based payloads. One such innovation called SensorPOD will offer unique benefits such as unprecedented spatial and temporal coverage, real-time relay of data to and from up to 5 Kg payloads in space, and access to space at a fraction of the cost of a dedicated missions such as 3U or larger Cubesats. In this

  11. Direct synthesis of catalyzed hydride compounds

    DOEpatents

    Gross, Karl J.; Majzoub, Eric

    2004-09-21

    A method is disclosed for directly preparing alkali metal aluminum hydrides such as NaAlH.sub.4 and Na.sub.3 AlH.sub.6 from either the alkali metal or its hydride, and aluminum. The hydride thus prepared is doped with a small portion of a transition metal catalyst compound, such as TiCl.sub.3, TiF.sub.3, or a mixture of these materials, in order to render them reversibly hydridable. The process provides for mechanically mixing the dry reagents under an inert atmosphere followed by charging the mixed materials with high pressure hydrogen while heating the mixture to about 125.degree. C. The method is relatively simple and inexpensive and provides reversible hydride compounds which are free of the usual contamination introduced by prior art wet chemical methods.

  12. Zirconium hydride containing explosive composition

    DOEpatents

    Walker, Franklin E.; Wasley, Richard J.

    1981-01-01

    An improved explosive composition is disclosed and comprises a major portion of an explosive having a detonation velocity between about 1500 and 10,000 meters per second and a minor amount of a donor additive comprising a non-explosive compound or mixture of non-explosive compounds which when subjected to an energy fluence of 1000 calories/cm.sup.2 or less is capable of releasing free radicals each having a molecular weight between 1 and 120. Exemplary donor additives are dibasic acids, polyamines and metal hydrides.

  13. DETERMINATION OF HETEROGENEOUS ELECTRON TRANSFER RATE CONSTANTS AT MICROFABRICATED IRIDIUM ELECTRODES. (R825511C022)

    EPA Science Inventory

    There has been an increasing use of both solid metal and microfabricated iridium electrodes as substrates for various types of electroanalysis. However, investigations to determine heterogeneous electron transfer rate constants on iridium, especially at an electron beam evapor...

  14. Iridium complexes demonstrating broadband emission through controlled geometric distortion and applications thereof

    DOEpatents

    Li, Jian; Turner, Eric

    2016-04-12

    Iridium compounds and their uses are disclosed herein. For example, carbazole containing iridium compounds are disclosed. The compounds are useful in many devices, including, but not limited to, electroluminescent devices.

  15. Activated aluminum hydride hydrogen storage compositions and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Sandrock, Gary; Reilly, James; Graetz, Jason; Wegrzyn, James E.

    2010-11-23

    In one aspect, the invention relates to activated aluminum hydride hydrogen storage compositions containing aluminum hydride in the presence of, or absence of, hydrogen desorption stimulants. The invention particularly relates to such compositions having one or more hydrogen desorption stimulants selected from metal hydrides and metal aluminum hydrides. In another aspect, the invention relates to methods for generating hydrogen from such hydrogen storage compositions.

  16. Cyclopentadiene-mediated hydride transfer from rhodium complexes.

    PubMed

    Pitman, C L; Finster, O N L; Miller, A J M

    2016-07-12

    Attempts to generate a proposed rhodium hydride catalytic intermediate instead resulted in isolation of (Cp*H)Rh(bpy)Cl (1), a pentamethylcyclopentadiene complex, formed by C-H bond-forming reductive elimination from the fleeting rhodium hydride. The hydride transfer ability of diene 1 was explored through thermochemistry and hydride transfer reactions, including the reduction of NAD(+). PMID:26949917

  17. Hydrogen-storing hydride complexes

    DOEpatents

    Srinivasan, Sesha S.; Niemann, Michael U.; Goswami, D. Yogi; Stefanakos, Elias K.

    2012-04-10

    A ternary hydrogen storage system having a constant stoichiometric molar ratio of LiNH.sub.2:MgH.sub.2:LiBH.sub.4 of 2:1:1. It was found that the incorporation of MgH.sub.2 particles of approximately 10 nm to 20 nm exhibit a lower initial hydrogen release temperature of 150.degree. C. Furthermore, it is observed that the particle size of LiBNH quaternary hydride has a significant effect on the hydrogen sorption concentration with an optimum size of 28 nm. The as-synthesized hydrides exhibit two main hydrogen release temperatures, one around 160.degree. C. and the other around 300.degree. C., with the main hydrogen release temperature reduced from 310.degree. C. to 270.degree. C., while hydrogen is first reversibly released at temperatures as low as 150.degree. C. with a total hydrogen capacity of 6 wt. % to 8 wt. %. Detailed thermal, capacity, structural and microstructural properties have been demonstrated and correlated with the activation energies of these materials.

  18. Liquid suspensions of reversible metal hydrides

    DOEpatents

    Reilly, J.J.; Grohse, E.W.; Winsche, W.E.

    1983-12-08

    The reversibility of the process M + x/2 H/sub 2/ ..-->.. MH/sub x/, where M is a metal hydride former that forms a hydride MH/sub x/ in the presence of H/sub 2/, generally used to store and recall H/sub 2/, is found to proceed under a liquid, thereby to reduce contamination, provide better temperature control and provide in situ mobility of the reactants. Thus, a slurry of particles of a metal hydride former with an inert solvent is subjected to temperature and pressure controlled atmosphere containing H/sub 2/, to store hydrogen (at high pressures) and to release (at low pressures) previously stored hydrogen. The direction of the flow of the H/sub 2/ through the liquid is dependent upon the H/sub 2/ pressure in the gas phase at a given temperature. When the former is above the equilibrium absorption pressure of the respective hydride the reaction proceeds to the right, i.e., the metal hydride is formed and hydrogen is stored in the solid particle. When the H/sub 2/ pressure in the gas phase is below the equilibrium dissociation pressure of the respective hydride the reaction proceeds to the left, the metal hydride is decomposed and hydrogen is released into the gas phase.

  19. Mixed N-Heterocyclic Carbene-Bis(oxazolinyl)borato Rhodium and Iridium Complexes in Photochemical and Thermal Oxidative Addition Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Songchen; Manna, Kuntal; Ellern, Arkady; Sadow, Aaron D

    2014-12-08

    In order to facilitate oxidative addition chemistry of fac-coordinated rhodium(I) and iridium(I) compounds, carbene–bis(oxazolinyl)phenylborate proligands have been synthesized and reacted with organometallic precursors. Two proligands, PhB(OxMe2)2(ImtBuH) (H[1]; OxMe2 = 4,4-dimethyl-2-oxazoline; ImtBuH = 1-tert-butylimidazole) and PhB(OxMe2)2(ImMesH) (H[2]; ImMesH = 1-mesitylimidazole), are deprotonated with potassium benzyl to generate K[1] and K[2], and these potassium compounds serve as reagents for the synthesis of a series of rhodium and iridium complexes. Cyclooctadiene and dicarbonyl compounds {PhB(OxMe2)2ImtBu}Rh(η4-C8H12) (3), {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}Rh(η4-C8H12) (4), {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}Rh(CO)2 (5), {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}Ir(η4-C8H12) (6), and {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}Ir(CO)2 (7) are synthesized along with ToMM(η4-C8H12) (M = Rh (8); M = Ir (9); ToM = tris(4,4-dimethyl-2-oxazolinyl)phenylborate). The spectroscopic and structural properties and reactivity of this series of compounds show electronic and steric effects of substituents on the imidazole (tert-butyl vs mesityl), effects of replacing an oxazoline in ToM with a carbene donor, and the influence of the donor ligand (CO vs C8H12). The reactions of K[2] and [M(μ-Cl)(η2-C8H14)2]2 (M = Rh, Ir) provide {κ4-PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes'CH2}Rh(μ-H)(μ-Cl)Rh(η2-C8H14)2 (10) and {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}IrH(η3-C8H13) (11). In the former compound, a spontaneous oxidative addition of a mesityl ortho-methyl to give a mixed-valent dirhodium species is observed, while the iridium compound forms a monometallic allyl hydride. Photochemical reactions of dicarbonyl compounds 5 and 7 result in C–H bond oxidative addition providing the compounds {κ4-PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes'CH2}RhH(CO) (12) and {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}IrH(Ph)CO (13). In 12, oxidative addition results in cyclometalation of the mesityl ortho-methyl similar to 10, whereas the iridium compound reacts with the benzene solvent to give a rare crystallographically characterized cis

  20. Characterization of Platinum and Iridium Oxyhydrate Surface Layers from Platinum and Iridium Foils.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Benjamin; Ranjan, Chinmoy; Greiner, Mark; Arrigo, Rosa; Schuster, Manfred Erwin; Höpfner, Britta; Gorgoi, Mihaela; Lauermann, Iver; Willinger, Marc; Knop-Gericke, Axel; Schlögl, Robert

    2016-07-01

    Platinum and iridium polycrystalline foils were oxidized electrochemically through anodization to create thin platinum and iridium hydrous oxide layers, which were analyzed through laboratory photoelectron spectroscopy during heating and time series (temperature-programmed spectroscopy). The films contain oxygen in the form of bound oxides, water, and hydroxides and were investigated by depth profiling with high-energy photoelectron spectroscopy. The Pt films are unstable and begin to degrade immediately after removal from the electrolyte to form core-shell structures with a metallic inner core and a hydrous oxide outer shell almost devoid of Pt. However, evidence was found for metastable intermediate states of degradation; therefore, it may be possible to manufacture PtOx phases with increased stability. Heating the film to even 100 °C causes accelerated degradation, which shows that stoichiometric oxides such as PtO2 or PtO are not the active species in the electrolyte. The Ir films exhibit increased stability and higher surface Ir content, and gentle heating at low temperatures leads to a decrease in defect density. Although both layers are based on noble metals, their surface structures are markedly different. The complexity of such hydrous oxide systems is discussed in detail with the goal of identifying the film composition more precisely. PMID:27226255

  1. Hydride heat pump with heat regenerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A regenerative hydride heat pump process and system is provided which can regenerate a high percentage of the sensible heat of the system. A series of at least four canisters containing a lower temperature performing hydride and a series of at least four canisters containing a higher temperature performing hydride is provided. Each canister contains a heat conductive passageway through which a heat transfer fluid is circulated so that sensible heat is regenerated. The process and system are useful for air conditioning rooms, providing room heat in the winter or for hot water heating throughout the year, and, in general, for pumping heat from a lower temperature to a higher temperature.

  2. The high-temperature impact properties of DOP-26 iridium

    SciTech Connect

    George, T.G.; Stevens, M.F. )

    1988-10-01

    A study of the impact properties of DOP-26 iridium (which contains 0.3% tungsten and --40 pm thorium) at temperatures of 600 to 1,440/sup 0/C revealed that the predominant mode of failure for the material is intergranular separation with occasional transgranular cleavage. DOP-26 iridium also appears to have a high notch sensitivity, in contrast to most other face-centered-cubic (fcc) metals; at elevated deformation temperatures, the dislocation substructure is similar to that of other fcc metals. In addition, regular arrays of pure edge character dislocations have been found. In the test specimens used in this study, the presence of Ir Th particles was observed within iridium grains. The existence of these particles indicates that the role of thorium is not well understood, particularly in light of the fact that previous studies, which depended on grain boundary segregation, have shown thorium to improve grain boundary cohesion.

  3. Method of forming metal hydride films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinberg, R.; Alger, D. L.; Cooper, D. W. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    The substrate to be coated (which may be of metal, glass or the like) is cleaned, both chemically and by off-sputtering in a vacuum chamber. In an ultra-high vacuum system, vapor deposition by a sublimator or vaporizer coats a cooled shroud disposed around the substrate with a thin film of hydride forming metal which getters any contaminant gas molecules. A shutter is then opened to allow hydride forming metal to be deposited as a film or coating on the substrate. After the hydride forming metal coating is formed, deuterium or other hydrogen isotopes are bled into the vacuum system and diffused into the metal film or coating to form a hydride of metal film. Higher substrate temperatures and pressures may be used if various parameters are appropriately adjusted.

  4. Experimental determination of the solubility of iridium in silicate melts: Preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borisov, Alexander; Dingwell, Donald B.; Oneill, Hugh ST.C.; Palme, Herbert

    1992-01-01

    Little is known of the geochemical behavior of iridium. Normally this element is taken to be chalcophile and/or siderophile so that during planetary differentiation processes, e.g., core formation, iridium is extracted from silicate phases into metallic phases. Experimental determination of the metal/silicate partition coefficient of iridium is difficult simply because it is so large. Also there are no data on the solubility behavior of iridium in silicate melts. With information on the solubility of iridium in silicate melts it is possible, in combination with experimental data for Fe-Ir alloys, to calculate the partition coefficient between a metallic phase and a silicate melt.

  5. Iridium(iii)-catalyzed regioselective C7-sulfonamidation of indoles.

    PubMed

    Song, Zengqiang; Antonchick, Andrey P

    2016-06-01

    Iridium(iii)-catalyzed direct C7-sulfonamidation of indoles with sulfonyl azides is described. The developed method has good compatibility with diverse functional groups, providing various 7-amino-substituted indoles with good to excellent yields in a short time under mild reaction conditions. The key feature of the developed method is the regioselective functionalization at the C7-position of 2,3-unsubstituted indoles. Biologically active compounds can be obtained using this protocol. The application of the iridium(iii) catalyst and directing group plays a crucial role in the regioselectivity of the developed reaction. PMID:27173668

  6. Field desorption of Na and Cs from graphene on iridium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernatskii, D. P.; Pavlov, V. G.

    2015-08-01

    Field electron and desorption microscopy has been used to study specific features of the field desorption of sodium and cesium ions adsorbed on the surface of iridium with graphene. It was found that adsorbed sodium atoms most strongly reduce the work function on graphene islands situated over densely packed faces of iridium. A strong electric field qualitatively similarly affects the sodium and cesium desorption processes from a field emitter to give two desorption phases and has no noticeable effect on the disintegration of the graphene layer.

  7. Synthesis of new heteroscorpionate iridium(I) and iridium(III) complexes.

    PubMed

    Roa, A E; Campos, J; Paneque, M; Salazar, V; Otero, A; Lara-Sánchez, A; Rodríguez, A M; López-Solera, I; Gómez, M V

    2015-04-21

    The reactivity of different heteroscorpionate ligands based on bis(pyrazol-1-yl)methane, with different iridium-(i) and -(iii) precursors is reported. The reaction of the heteroscorpionate lithium salts "Li(bdmpza)", [bdmpza = bis(3,5-dimethylpyrazol-1-yl)acetate], "Li(bdmpzdta)" [bdmpzdta = bis(3,5-dimethylpyrazol-1-yl)dithioacetate] and "Li(S)-mbpam" [(S)-mbpam = (S)-(-)-N-α-methylbenzyl-2,2-bis(3,5-dimethylpyrazol-1-yl)acetamidate] with 1 equivalent of [IrCl3(THF)3] in THF for 18 h affords high yields of neutral and anionic heteroscorpionate chloride iridium complexes [IrCl2(bdmpza)(THF)] (), [Li(THF)4][IrCl3(bdmpzdta)] () and [IrCl2{(S)-mbpam})(THF)] (). Solution of complex in acetonitrile at room temperature leads to complex [IrCl2{(S)-mbpam})(NCCH3)] (). Complexes and were isolated as enantiopure compounds. The reaction of the lithium salt "Li(bdmpza)" with [IrCl(η(4)-CH2[double bond, length as m-dash]C(Me)C(Me)[double bond, length as m-dash]CH2)]2 in THF for 18 h gave the Ir(i) complex [Ir(bdmpza)(η(4)-CH2[double bond, length as m-dash]C(Me)C(Me)[double bond, length as m-dash]CH2)] (). The reaction of complex with CO (2 atm) at room temperature leads to a new complex of Ir(iii), [Ir(bdmpza)(k(2)-CH2C(Me)[double bond, length as m-dash]C(Me)CH2)(CO)] (). Treatment of heteroscorpionate ligand precursors "Li(bdmpza)" and "Li(bdmpzdta)" with [IrCp*Cl2]2 in THF yielded the iridium(iii) complexes [Ir2Cp*2Cl2(bdmpzx)] (x = a , x = dta ). These complexes have helical chirality due to the demands of the fixed pyrazole rings. The stereoisomerism and the self-assembly processes of these helicates have been studied in some detail in solution by NMR spectroscopy and in the solid state by X-ray diffraction. Mixtures of M- and P-handed enantiomers were obtained. Complex undergoes a decarboxylation process initiated by the HCl generated in the previous step leading to the known ionic complex [IrClCp*(bdmpm)][IrCl3Cp*] [bdmpm = bis(3,5-dimethylpyrazol-1-yl)methane] (). The

  8. Homogeneous and heterogenized iridium water oxidation catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macchioni, Alceo

    2014-10-01

    The development of an efficient catalyst for the oxidative splitting of water into molecular oxygen, protons and electrons is of key importance for producing solar fuels through artificial photosynthesis. We are facing the problem by means of a rational approach aimed at understanding how catalytic performance may be optimized by the knowledge of the reaction mechanism of water oxidation and the fate of the catalytic site under the inevitably harsh oxidative conditions. For the purposes of our study we selected iridium water oxidation catalysts, exhibiting remarkable performance (TOF > 5 s-1 and TON > 20000). In particular, we recently focused our attention on [Cp*Ir(N,O)X] (N,O = 2-pyridincarboxylate; X = Cl or NO3) and [IrCl(Hedta)]Na water oxidation catalysts. The former exhibited a remarkable TOF whereas the latter showed a very high TON. Furthermore, [IrCl(Hedta)]Na was heterogenized onto TiO2 taking advantage of the presence of a dandling -COOH functionality. The heterogenized catalyst maintained approximately the same catalytic activity of the homogeneous analogous with the advantage that could be reused many times. Mechanistic studies were performed in order to shed some light on the rate-determining step and the transformation of catalysts when exposed to "oxidative stress". It was found that the last oxidative step, preceding oxygen liberation, is the rate-determining step when a small excess of sacrificial oxidant is used. In addition, several intermediates of the oxidative transformation of the catalyst were intercepted and characterized by NMR, X-Ray diffractometry and ESI-MS.

  9. Metastable Metal Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Graetz, Jason

    2012-01-01

    The possibility of using hydrogen as a reliable energy carrier for both stationary and mobile applications has gained renewed interest in recent years due to improvements in high temperature fuel cells and a reduction in hydrogen production costs. However, a number of challenges remain and new media are needed that are capable of safely storing hydrogen with high gravimetric and volumetric densities. Metal hydrides and complex metal hydrides offer some hope of overcoming these challenges; however, many of the high capacity “reversible” hydrides exhibit a large endothermic decomposition enthalpy making it difficult to release the hydrogen at low temperatures. Onmore » the other hand, the metastable hydrides are characterized by a low reaction enthalpy and a decomposition reaction that is thermodynamically favorable under ambient conditions. The rapid, low temperature hydrogen evolution rates that can be achieved with these materials offer much promise for mobile PEM fuel cell applications. However, a critical challenge exists to develop new methods to regenerate these hydrides directly from the reactants and hydrogen gas. This spotlight paper presents an overview of some of the metastable metal hydrides for hydrogen storage and a few new approaches being investigated to address the key challenges associated with these materials.« less

  10. Red and blue shifted hydridic bonds.

    PubMed

    Jabłoński, Mirosław

    2014-09-15

    By performing MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ ab initio calculations for a large set of dimer systems possessing a R-H hydridic bond involved in diverse types of intermolecular interactions (dihydrogen bonds, hydride halogen bonds, hydride hydrogen bonds, and charge-assisted hydride hydrogen bonds), we show that this is rather an elongation than a shortening that a hydride bond undergoes on interaction. Contrary to what might have been expected on the basis of studies in uniform electric field, this elongation is accompanied by a blue instead of red shift of the R-H stretching vibration frequency. We propose that the "additional" elongation of the R-H hydridic bond results from the significant charge outflow from the sigma bonding orbital of R-H that weakens this bond. The more standard red shift obtained for stronger complexes is explained by means of the Hermansson's formula and the particularly strong electric field produced by the H-acceptor molecule. PMID:25043253

  11. Corrosion-resistant iridium-platinum anode material for high polarization application in corrosive acids

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J.; Summers, L.; Lewis, P.

    1993-09-08

    The present invention relates to highly corrosion resistant components for use in an electrochemical cell. Specifically, these components are resistant to corrosion under very extreme conditions such as exposure to aqua regia in the presence of a constant current density of 100mA/m{sup 2}. The components are comprised of an iridium-platinum alloy that comprises less than 30% iridium. In a preferred embodiment of the present invention, the iridium-platinum alloy comprises 15-20% iridium. In another preferred embodiment of the present invention, the iridium-platinum alloy is deposited on the surface of an electrochemical cell component by magnetron sputtering. The present invention also relates to a method for conducting an electrochemical reaction in the presence of highly corrosive acids under a high degree of polarization wherein the electrochemical cell comprises a component, preferably the anode, containing an iridium-platinum alloy that comprises less than 30% iridium.

  12. Iridium Aluminide Coats For Protection Against Ox idation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, Richard B.; Tuffias, Robert H.; La Ferla, Raffaele; Jang, Qin

    1996-01-01

    Iridium aluminide coats investigated for use in protecting some metallic substrates against oxidation at high temperatures. Investigation prompted by need for cost-effective anti-oxidation coats for walls of combustion chambers in rocket engines. Also useful in special terrestrial applications like laboratory combustion chambers and some chemical-processing chambers.

  13. Magnetostratigraphy, Late devonian iridium anomaly, and impact hypotheses

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, N.F.; Van der Voo, R. )

    1990-04-01

    Paleomagnetism, sedimentology, and fine-scale stratigraphy have been integrated to explain the origin of an iridium anomaly in the Late Devonian of Western Australia. Thermal demagnetization experiments were carried out on 93 specimens of marginal-slope limestone form the northern Canning Basin. Samples are from a condensed sequence of deep-water (> 100 m) Frutexites microstromatolites. Frutexites is a shrublike cyanobacterial organism that probably precipitated hematite, or a metastable precursor, from sea water. When plotted within the microstratigraphic framework for the study area, the observed characteristic directions from the sampled interval (14.5 cm thick) are in five discrete, layer-parallel, normal- and reversed-polarity zones. The measured northeast-southwest declinations and shallow inclinations probably record Late Devonian magnetostratigraphy on a centimetre scale. The Frutexites bed studied there occurs close to the Frasnian/Famennian (Late Devonian) boundary, a time of mass extinction of a wide variety of marine organisms throughout the world. Anomalously high iridium concentrations observed in the Frutexites bed have suggested to some authors that the mass extinction was caused by meteorite impact. This study concludes that iridium, which is present over the span of five layer-parallel magnetic reversals, was concentrated over a long period of time by biologic processes. Thus, the Canning Basin iridium anomaly may be unrelated to meteorite impact.

  14. The Iridium (tm) system: Personal communications anytime, anyplace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatlelid, John E.; Casey, Larry

    The Iridium system is designed to provide handheld personal communications between diverse locations around the world at any time and without prior knowledge of the location of the personal units. This paper provides an overview of the system, the services it provides, its operation, and an overview of the commercial practices and relatively high volume satellite production techniques which will make the system cost effective. A constellation of 66 satellites will provide an orbiting, spherical-shell, infrastructure for this global calling capability. The satellites act as tall cellular towers and allow convenient operation for portable handheld telephones. The system will provide a full range of services including voice, paging, data, geolocation, and fax capabilities. Motorola is a world leader in the production of high volume, high quality, reliable telecommunications hardware. One of Iridium's goals is to apply these production techniques to high reliability space hardware. Concurrent engineering, high performance work teams, advanced manufacturing technologies, and improved assembly and test methods are some of the techniques that will keep the Iridium system cost effective. Mobile, global, flexible personal communications are coming that will allow anyone to call or receive a call from/to anyplace at anytime. The Iridium system will provide communications where none exist today. This connectivity will allow increased information transfer, open new markets for various business endeavors, and in general increase productivity and development.

  15. The Iridium (tm) system: Personal communications anytime, anyplace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatlelid, John E.; Casey, Larry

    1993-01-01

    The Iridium system is designed to provide handheld personal communications between diverse locations around the world at any time and without prior knowledge of the location of the personal units. This paper provides an overview of the system, the services it provides, its operation, and an overview of the commercial practices and relatively high volume satellite production techniques which will make the system cost effective. A constellation of 66 satellites will provide an orbiting, spherical-shell, infrastructure for this global calling capability. The satellites act as tall cellular towers and allow convenient operation for portable handheld telephones. The system will provide a full range of services including voice, paging, data, geolocation, and fax capabilities. Motorola is a world leader in the production of high volume, high quality, reliable telecommunications hardware. One of Iridium's goals is to apply these production techniques to high reliability space hardware. Concurrent engineering, high performance work teams, advanced manufacturing technologies, and improved assembly and test methods are some of the techniques that will keep the Iridium system cost effective. Mobile, global, flexible personal communications are coming that will allow anyone to call or receive a call from/to anyplace at anytime. The Iridium system will provide communications where none exist today. This connectivity will allow increased information transfer, open new markets for various business endeavors, and in general increase productivity and development.

  16. Iridium alloy Clad Vent Set manufacturing qualification studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulrich, George B.

    Metallurgical qualification studies to demonstrate the manufacturing readiness of the iridium alloy Clad Vent Set (CVS) for the General Purpose Heat Source program at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant are described. Microstructural data for various materials/test conditions are presented.

  17. Discovery of tantalum, rhenium, osmium, and iridium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, R.; Thoennessen, M.

    2012-09-15

    Currently, thirty-eight tantalum, thirty-eight rhenium, thirty-nine osmium, and thirty-eight iridium isotopes have been observed and the discovery of these isotopes is described here. For each isotope a brief synopsis of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  18. Iridium-catalyzed enantioselective hydrogenation of unsaturated heterocyclic acids.

    PubMed

    Song, Song; Zhu, Shou-Fei; Pu, Liu-Yang; Zhou, Qi-Lin

    2013-06-01

    Spiral binding: A highly enantioselective hydrogenation of unsaturated heterocyclic acids has been developed by using chiral iridium/spirophosphino oxazoline catalysts (see scheme; BArF(-) =tetrakis[3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]borate, Boc=tert-butoxycarbonyl). This reaction provided an efficient method for the preparation of optically active heterocyclic acids with excellent enantioselectivities. PMID:23610004

  19. Achieving zero stress in iridium, chromium, and nickel thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broadway, David M.; Weimer, Jeffrey; Gurgew, Danielle; Lis, Tomasz; Ramsey, Brian D.; O'Dell, Stephen L.; Gubarev, Mikhail; Ames, A.; Bruni, R.

    2015-05-01

    We examine a method for achieving zero intrinsic stress in thin films of iridium, chromium, and nickel deposited by magnetron sputter deposition. The examination of the stress in these materials is motivated by efforts to advance the optical performance of light-weight x-ray space telescopes into the regime of sub-arc second resolution. A characteristic feature of the intrinsic stress behavior in chromium and nickel is their sensitivity to the magnitude and sign of the intrinsic stress with argon gas pressure, including the existence of a critical pressure that results in zero film stress. This critical pressure scales linearly with the film's density. While the effect of stress reversal with argon pressure has been previously reported by Hoffman and others for nickel and chromium, we have discovered a similar behavior for the intrinsic stress in iridium films. Additionally, we have identified zero stress in iridium shortly after island coalescence in the high adatom mobility growth regime. This feature of film growth is used for achieving a total internal stress of -2.89 MPa for a 15.8 nm thick iridium film with a surface roughness of 5.0 +/- 0.5Å based on x-ray reflectivity (XRR) measurement at CuKα. The surface topography was also examined using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The examination of the stress in these films has been performed with a novel in-situ measurement device. The methodology and sensitivity of the in-situ instrument is also described herein.

  20. Achieving Zero Stress in Iridium, Chromium, and Nickle Thin Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broadway, David M.; Weimer, Jeffrey; Gurgew, Danielle; Lis, Tomasz; Ramsey, Brian D.; O'Dell, Stephen L.; Ames, A.; Bruni, R.

    2015-01-01

    We examine a method for achieving zero intrinsic stress in thin films of iridium, chromium, and nickel deposited by magnetron sputter deposition. The examination of the stress in these materials is motivated by efforts to advance the optical performance of light-weight x-ray space telescopes into the regime of sub-arc second resolution that rely on control of the film stress to values within 10-100 MPa. A characteristic feature of the intrinsic stress behavior in chromium and nickel is their sensitivity to the magnitude and sign of the intrinsic stress with argon gas pressure, including the existence of a critical pressure that results in zero film stress. This critical pressure scales linearly with the film's density. While the effect of stress reversal with argon pressure has been previously reported by Hoffman and others for nickel and chromium, we have discovered a similar behavior for iridium. Additionally, we have identified zero stress in iridium shortly after island coalescence. This feature of film growth is used for achieving a total internal stress of -2.89 MPa for a 15.8 nm thick iridium film. The surface roughness of this low-stress film was examined using scanning probe microscopy (SPM) and x-ray reflectivity (XRR) at CuKa and these results presented and discussed.

  1. Thin-film metal hydrides.

    PubMed

    Remhof, Arndt; Borgschulte, Andreas

    2008-12-01

    The goal of the medieval alchemist, the chemical transformation of common metals into nobel metals, will forever be a dream. However, key characteristics of metals, such as their electronic band structure and, consequently, their electric, magnetic and optical properties, can be tailored by controlled hydrogen doping. Due to their morphology and well-defined geometry with flat, coplanar surfaces/interfaces, novel phenomena may be observed in thin films. Prominent examples are the eye-catching hydrogen switchable mirror effect, the visualization of solid-state diffusion and the formation of complex surface morphologies. Thin films do not suffer as much from embrittlement and/or decrepitation as bulk materials, allowing the study of cyclic absorption and desorption. Therefore, thin-metal hydride films are used as model systems to study metal-insulator transitions, for high throughput combinatorial research or they may be used as indicator layers to study hydrogen diffusion. They can be found in technological applications as hydrogen sensors, in electrochromic and thermochromic devices. In this review, we discuss the effect of hydrogen loading of thin niobium and yttrium films as archetypical examples of a transition metal and a rare earth metal, respectively. Our focus thereby lies on the hydrogen induced changes of the electronic structure and the morphology of the thin films, their optical properties, the visualization and the control of hydrogen diffusion and on the study of surface phenomena and catalysis. PMID:18980236

  2. Structure, electrochemical properties and capacitance performance of polypyrrole electrodeposited onto 1-D crystals of iridium complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wysocka-Żołopa, Monika; Winkler, Krzysztof

    2015-12-01

    Composites of polypyrrole and one-dimensional iridium complex crystals [(C2H5)4N]0.55[IrCl2(CO)2] were prepared by in situ two-step electrodeposition. Initially, iridium complex crystals were formed during [IrCl2(CO)2]- complex oxidation. Next, pyrrole was electropolymerized on the surface of the iridium needles. The morphology of the composite was investigated by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. At positive potentials, the iridium complex crystals and the polypyrrole were oxidized. In aprotic solvents, oxidation of the iridium complex crystals resulted in their dissolution. In water containing tetra(n-butyl)ammonium chlorides, the 1-D iridium complex crystals were reversibly oxidized. The product of the iridium complex oxidation remained on the electrode surface in crystalline form. The iridium complex needles significantly influenced the redox properties of the polymer. The polypyrrole involved electrode processes become more reversible in presence of crystals of iridium complex. The current of polypyrrole oxidation was higher compared to that of pure polypyrrole and the capacitance properties of the polymer were significantly enhanced. A specific capacitance as high as 590 F g-1 was obtained for a composite of polypyrrole and 1-D crystals of the iridium complex in water containing tetra(n-butyl)ammonium chloride. This value is approximately twice as high as the capacitance of the pure polymer deposited onto the electrode surface.

  3. High H- ionic conductivity in barium hydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbraeken, Maarten C.; Cheung, Chaksum; Suard, Emmanuelle; Irvine, John T. S.

    2015-01-01

    With hydrogen being seen as a key renewable energy vector, the search for materials exhibiting fast hydrogen transport becomes ever more important. Not only do hydrogen storage materials require high mobility of hydrogen in the solid state, but the efficiency of electrochemical devices is also largely determined by fast ionic transport. Although the heavy alkaline-earth hydrides are of limited interest for their hydrogen storage potential, owing to low gravimetric densities, their ionic nature may prove useful in new electrochemical applications, especially as an ionically conducting electrolyte material. Here we show that barium hydride shows fast pure ionic transport of hydride ions (H-) in the high-temperature, high-symmetry phase. Although some conductivity studies have been reported on related materials previously, the nature of the charge carriers has not been determined. BaH2 gives rise to hydride ion conductivity of 0.2 S cm-1 at 630 °C. This is an order of magnitude larger than that of state-of-the-art proton-conducting perovskites or oxide ion conductors at this temperature. These results suggest that the alkaline-earth hydrides form an important new family of materials, with potential use in a number of applications, such as separation membranes, electrochemical reactors and so on.

  4. Computational Study of Metal Hydride Destabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Karl

    2006-03-01

    The safe and efficient on-board storage of hydrogen in fuel cell vehicles is one of the major road-blocks for utilization of hydrogen in transportation. This talk will illustrate the use quantum molecular modeling techniques for investigating atomic- level details of hydrogen storage in new materials. Metal hydrides of period 2 and 3 materials have high volumetric and gravimetric hydrogen storage capacities. However, these materials typically have very high heats of reaction, meaning that high temperatures are required to dissociate the hydrides. Likewise, hydrogenation reactions evolve very large quantities of energy, making thermal management during refueling a impractical. Recent experimental work has focused on chemical destabilization of metal hydrides as a means of decreasing the heats of reaction. We have carried out quantum mechanical calculations, using the electronic density functional theory (DFT) formalism, for various metal hydride systems. The heats of reaction for over 300 different reactions have been computed. We have compared our calculations with experimental and tabulated data where available and find reasonable agreement. Our calculations demonstrate the utility of DFT for screening reactions and for identifying promising materials for further computational and experimental studies. We have also studied the hydration of Mg2Si, a destabilized hydride of MgH2. Experiments have failed to hydrogenate this material in the laboratory under high pressures of H2. We examine adsorption of H2 and dissociation on the Mg2Si(110) surface to see if kinetic limitations are responsible for the failure to observe hydrogenation of this material.

  5. 49 CFR 173.311 - Metal hydride storage systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Metal hydride storage systems. 173.311 Section 173... REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging § 173.311 Metal hydride storage systems. The following packing instruction is applicable to transportable UN Metal hydride storage...

  6. Simulation of dose distribution for iridium-192 brachytherapy source type-H01 using MCNPX

    SciTech Connect

    Purwaningsih, Anik

    2014-09-30

    Dosimetric data for a brachytherapy source should be known before it used for clinical treatment. Iridium-192 source type H01 was manufactured by PRR-BATAN aimed to brachytherapy is not yet known its dosimetric data. Radial dose function and anisotropic dose distribution are some primary keys in brachytherapy source. Dose distribution for Iridium-192 source type H01 was obtained from the dose calculation formalism recommended in the AAPM TG-43U1 report using MCNPX 2.6.0 Monte Carlo simulation code. To know the effect of cavity on Iridium-192 type H01 caused by manufacturing process, also calculated on Iridium-192 type H01 if without cavity. The result of calculation of radial dose function and anisotropic dose distribution for Iridium-192 source type H01 were compared with another model of Iridium-192 source.

  7. Simulation of dose distribution for iridium-192 brachytherapy source type-H01 using MCNPX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purwaningsih, Anik

    2014-09-01

    Dosimetric data for a brachytherapy source should be known before it used for clinical treatment. Iridium-192 source type H01 was manufactured by PRR-BATAN aimed to brachytherapy is not yet known its dosimetric data. Radial dose function and anisotropic dose distribution are some primary keys in brachytherapy source. Dose distribution for Iridium-192 source type H01 was obtained from the dose calculation formalism recommended in the AAPM TG-43U1 report using MCNPX 2.6.0 Monte Carlo simulation code. To know the effect of cavity on Iridium-192 type H01 caused by manufacturing process, also calculated on Iridium-192 type H01 if without cavity. The result of calculation of radial dose function and anisotropic dose distribution for Iridium-192 source type H01 were compared with another model of Iridium-192 source.

  8. 1. VIEW OF A PORTION OF THE HYDRIDE PROCESSING LABORATORY. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW OF A PORTION OF THE HYDRIDE PROCESSING LABORATORY. OPERATIONS IN THE GLOVE BOX IN THE BACKGROUND OF THE PHOTOGRAPH INCLUDED HYDRIDING OF PLUTONIUM AND HYDRIDE SEPARATION. IN THE FOREGROUND, THE VACUUM MONITOR CONTROL PANEL MEASURED TEMPERATURES WITHIN THE GLOVEBOX. THE CENTER CONTROL PANEL REGULATED THE FURNACE INSIDE THE GLOVE BOX USED IN THE HYDRIDING PROCESSES. THIS EQUIPMENT WAS ESSENTIAL TO THE HYDRIDING PROCESS, AS WELL AS OTHER GLOVE BOX OPERATIONS. - Rocky Flats Plant, Plutonium Laboratory, North-central section of industrial area at 79 Drive, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  9. In situ observation of surface species on iridium oxide nanoparticles during the oxygen evolution reaction.

    PubMed

    Sanchez Casalongue, Hernan G; Ng, May Ling; Kaya, Sarp; Friebel, Daniel; Ogasawara, Hirohito; Nilsson, Anders

    2014-07-01

    An iridium oxide nanoparticle electrocatalyst under oxygen evolution reaction conditions was probed in situ by ambient-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Under OER conditions, iridium undergoes a change in oxidation state from Ir(IV) to Ir(V) that takes place predominantly at the surface of the catalyst. The chemical change in iridium is coupled to a decrease in surface hydroxide, providing experimental evidence which strongly suggests that the oxygen evolution reaction on iridium oxide occurs through an OOH-mediated deprotonation mechanism. PMID:24889896

  10. Network flexibility of the IRIDIUM (R) Global Mobile Satellite System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutcheson, Jonathan; Laurin, Mala

    1995-01-01

    The IRIDIUM system is a global personal communications system supported by a constellation of 66 low earth orbit (LEO) satellites and a collection of earth-based 'gateway' switching installations. Like traditional wireless cellular systems, coverage is achieved by a grid of cells in which bandwidth is reused for spectral efficiency. Unlike any cellular system ever built, the moving cells can be shared by multiple switching facilities. Noteworthy features of the IRIDIUM system include inter-satellite links, a GSM-based telephony architecture, and a geographically controlled system access process. These features, working in concert, permit flexible and reliable administration of the worldwide service area by gateway operators. This paper will explore this unique concept.

  11. Photoswitchable azobenzene-appended iridium(iii) complexes.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Miqueo, J; Altube, A; García-Lecina, E; Tron, A; McClenaghan, N D; Freixa, Z

    2016-09-21

    Iridium(iii) cyclometalated complexes have been used as models to study the effect that extended conjugation and substitution pattern has on the photochromic behavior of azobenzene-appended 2-phenylpyridyl (ppy) ligands. For this purpose four azobenzene-containing ppy ligands were synthesized. With these ligands, nine iridium(iii) complexes containing up to three appended azobenzenes were synthesized. Analysis of their photochromic behaviour by means of UV-vis and (1)H-NMR spectroscopy permitted us to conclude that the light-induced trans-to-cis isomerization of the azobenzene was strongly inhibited upon coordination to the Ir(iii) cation when the electronic conjugation was extended along the whole ligand. The use of an aliphatic spacer unit (either -CH2- or -OCH2-) between the azobenzene and the ppy fragment of the ligand sufficed to disrupt the electronic communication, and obtain photochromic organometallic complexes. PMID:27460186

  12. Water-soluble iridium phosphorescent complexes for OLED applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eum, Min-Sik; Yoon, Heekoo; Kim, Tae Hyung

    2012-09-01

    Newly prepared water-soluble iridium phosphorescent complexes, trans-[Ir(ppy)(PAr3)2(H)L]0,+ (ppy = bidentate 2-phenylpyridinato anionic ligand; L= Cl (1), CO (2), CN- (3); H being trans to the nitrogen of ppy ligand; PAr3 (TPPTS) = P(m-C6H4SO3Na)3), have been synthesized and characterized. Those complexes containing water-soluble phosphine ligands can emit any color region as altering cyclometalated ligands in aqueous media with high quantum efficiencies. Even though these water-soluble phosphorescent iridium complexes can be the sensing probe for toxic CO gas and CN anion, they will be capable of promising materials in the solution processible OLED applications.

  13. Olefin hydroaryloxylation catalyzed by pincer-iridium complexes.

    PubMed

    Haibach, Michael C; Guan, Changjian; Wang, David Y; Li, Bo; Lease, Nicholas; Steffens, Andrew M; Krogh-Jespersen, Karsten; Goldman, Alan S

    2013-10-01

    Aryl alkyl ethers, which are widely used throughout the chemical industry, are typically produced via the Williamson ether synthesis. Olefin hydroaryloxylation potentially offers a much more atom-economical alternative. Known acidic catalysts for hydroaryloxylation, however, afford very poor selectivity. We report the organometallic-catalyzed intermolecular hydroaryloxylation of unactivated olefins by iridium "pincer" complexes. These catalysts do not operate via the hidden Brønsted acid pathway common to previously developed transition-metal-based catalysts. The reaction is proposed to proceed via olefin insertion into an iridium-alkoxide bond, followed by rate-determining C-H reductive elimination to yield the ether product. The reaction is highly chemo- and regioselective and offers a new approach to the atom-economical synthesis of industrially important ethers and, potentially, a wide range of other oxygenates. PMID:24028199

  14. Circularly polarised phosphorescent photoluminescence and electroluminescence of iridium complexes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tian-Yi; Jing, Yi-Ming; Liu, Xuan; Zhao, Yue; Shi, Lin; Tang, Zhiyong; Zheng, You-Xuan; Zuo, Jing-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Nearly all the neutral iridium complexes widely used as dopants in PhOLEDs are racemic mixtures; however, this study observed that these complexes can be separated into stable optically active Λ and ∆ isomers and that their chirality is an intrinsic property. The circularly polarised phosphorescent photoluminescence (CPPPL) signals of Λ/Δ isomers are perfect mirror images with opposite polarisation and equal intensity exhibiting a “handedness” for the polarisation. For the first time, we applied the Λ/Δ iridium isomers as emitters in OLEDs, and the circularly polarised phosphorescent electroluminescence (CPPEL) spectra reveal completely positive or negative broad peaks consistent with the CPPPL spectra. The results demonstrate that the Λ/Δ isomers have potential application for 3D OLEDs because they can exhibit high efficiency and luminance, and 3D display technology based on circularly polarised light is the most comfortable for the eyes. PMID:26446521

  15. Iridium alloy clad vent set manufacturing qualification studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulrich, George B.

    1991-01-01

    Qualification studies have been successfully conducted to demonstrate iridium alloy Clad Vent Set (CVS) manufacturing readiness for the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) program at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. These studies were joint comparison evaluations of both the Y-12 Plant and EG&G Mound G-MAT) products. Note: EG&G-MAT formerly manufactured the iridium alloy CVS. The comparison evaluations involved work in a number of areas; however, only the CVS cup metallurgical evalution will be presented here. The initial metallurgical comparisons in conjunction with follow-up metallurgical work showed the Y-12 Plant CVS product to be comparable to the fully qualified (for Galileo and Ulysses missions) EG&G-MAT product. This allowed the Y-12 Plant to commence pilot production of CVS components for potential use in the CRAF and CASSINI missions.

  16. Processing and properties of iridium alloys for space power applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ohriner, E.K.

    1994-12-31

    Iridium alloys are used as fuel cladding in radioisotope thermoelectric generators due to their high-melting point, high- temperature strength, and oxidation and corrosion resistance. Although iridium has a face-centered cubic crystal structure, it undergoes a distinct ductile-to-brittle transition characteristic of many body-centered cubic metals. Improved ductility in the alloys is achieved through material purification and controlled alloy additions at the parts per million (ppm) level. A vacuum arc remelt operation produces a nearly defect-free casting, which is further processed to sheet products. A change in processing from drop castings of small arc-melted buttons to large arc-remelted ingots has substantially improved product yields. The effects of processing changes on alloy microstructure, sheet textures, oxidation effects, high-strain-rate ductility, and fabricability are discussed.

  17. Hydridable material for the negative electrode in a nickel-metal hydride storage battery

    DOEpatents

    Knosp, Bernard; Bouet, Jacques; Jordy, Christian; Mimoun, Michel; Gicquel, Daniel

    1997-01-01

    A monophase hydridable material for the negative electrode of a nickel-metal hydride storage battery with a "Lave's phase" structure of hexagonal C14 type (MgZn.sub.2) has the general formula: Zr.sub.1-x Ti.sub.x Ni.sub.a Mn.sub.b Al.sub.c Co.sub.d V.sub.e where ##EQU1##

  18. Iridium-Doped Ruthenium Oxide Catalyst for Oxygen Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valdez, Thomas I.; Narayan, Sri R.; Billings, Keith J.

    2011-01-01

    NASA requires a durable and efficient catalyst for the electrolysis of water in a polymer-electrolyte-membrane (PEM) cell. Ruthenium oxide in a slightly reduced form is known to be a very efficient catalyst for the anodic oxidation of water to oxygen, but it degrades rapidly, reducing efficiency. To combat this tendency of ruthenium oxide to change oxidation states, it is combined with iridium, which has a tendency to stabilize ruthenium oxide at oxygen evolution potentials. The novel oxygen evolution catalyst was fabricated under flowing argon in order to allow the iridium to preferentially react with oxygen from the ruthenium oxide, and not oxygen from the environment. Nanoparticulate iridium black and anhydrous ruthenium oxide are weighed out and mixed to 5 18 atomic percent. They are then heat treated at 300 C under flowing argon (in order to create an inert environment) for a minimum of 14 hours. This temperature was chosen because it is approximately the creep temperature of ruthenium oxide, and is below the sintering temperature of both materials. In general, the temperature should always be below the sintering temperature of both materials. The iridium- doped ruthenium oxide catalyst is then fabricated into a PEM-based membrane- electrode assembly (MEA), and then mounted into test cells. The result is an electrolyzer system that can sustain electrolysis at twice the current density, and at the same efficiency as commercial catalysts in the range of 100-200 mA/sq cm. At 200 mA/sq cm, this new system operates at an efficiency of 85 percent, which is 2 percent greater than commercially available catalysts. Testing has shown that this material is as stable as commercially available oxygen evolution catalysts. This means that this new catalyst can be used to regenerate fuel cell systems in space, and as a hydrogen generator on Earth.

  19. Ionic hydrogenations of hindered olefins at low temperature. Hydride transfer reactions of transition metal hydrides

    SciTech Connect

    Bullock, R.M.; Song, J.S. )

    1994-09-21

    Sterically hindered olefins can be hydrogenated at -50[degree]C in dichloromethane using triflic acid (CF[sub 3]SO[sub 3]H) and a hydride donor. Mechanistic studies indicate that these reactions proceed by hydride transfer to the carbenium ion that is formed by protonation of the olefin. Olefins that form tertiary carbenium ions upon protonation are hydrogenated in high yields (90-100%). Styrenes generally produce lower yields of hydrogenated products (50-60%). Suitable hydride donors include HSiE[sub 3] and several transition metal carbonyl hydrides HW(CO)[sub 3]Cp, HW(CO)[sub 3]Cp[sup +], HMo-(CO)[sub 3]Cp, HMn(CO)[sub 5], HRe(CO)[sub 3], and HO[sub 3](CO)[sub 1]Cp*; Cp = [eta][sup 5]-C[sub 3]H[sub 5+], Cp* = [eta][sup 5]-C[sub 5]Me[sub 5]. A characteristic that is required for transition metal hydrides to be effective is that the cationic dihydrides (or dihydrogen complexes) that result from their protonation must have sufficient acidity to transfer a proton to the olefin, as well as sufficient thermal stability to avoid significant decomposition on the time scale of the hydrogenation reaction. Metal hydrides that fall due to insufficient stability of their protonated forms include HMo(CO)[sub 2](PPH[sub 3])Cp, HMo(CO)[sub 3]Cp*, and HFe(CO)[sub 2]Cp*. 62 refs., 2 tabs.

  20. Understanding the Origins of Nucleophilic Hydride Reactivity of a Sodium Hydride-Iodide Composite.

    PubMed

    Hong, Zonghan; Ong, Derek Yiren; Muduli, Subas Kumar; Too, Pei Chui; Chan, Guo Hao; Tnay, Ya Lin; Chiba, Shunsuke; Nishiyama, Yusuke; Hirao, Hajime; Soo, Han Sen

    2016-05-17

    Sodium hydride (NaH) has been commonly used as a Brønsted base in chemical syntheses, while it has rarely been employed to add hydride (H(-) ) to unsaturated electrophiles. We previously developed a procedure to activate NaH through the addition of a soluble iodide source and found that the new NaH-NaI composite can effect even stereoselective nucleophilic hydride reductions of nitriles, imines, and carbonyl compounds. In this work, we report that mixing NaH with NaI or LiI in tetrahydrofuran (THF) as a solvent provides a new inorganic composite, which consists of NaI interspersed with activated NaH, as revealed by powder X-ray diffraction, and both solid-state NMR and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies. DFT calculations imply that this remarkably simple inorganic composite, which is comprised of NaH and NaI, gains nucleophilic hydridic character similar to covalent hydrides, resulting in unprecedented and unique hydride donor chemical reactivity. PMID:27038135

  1. Thermodynamic characterization of hydrogen interaction with iridium polyhydride complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Zidan, R.A.; Rocheleau, R.E.

    1999-01-01

    Hydrogen interaction with solid iridium complexes IrXH{sub 2}(PPr3{sup i}){sub 2} (X=Cl, I) was investigated. Gaseous hydrogen was found to react reversibly with solid chloro-iridium complex IrClH{sub 2}(PPr3{sup i}){sub 2} forming IrClH{sub 2}(PPr3{sup i}){sub 2}H{sub 2}. The relative partial molal enthalpy and entropy were obtained from equilibrium isotherms at different hydrogen concentrations. The decrease in entropy with increasing hydrogen concentration and the absence of plateaus in the equilibrium isotherms were consistent with a single phase solid solution with two chemical components. Hydrogen release from solid iodo-iridium complex IrIH{sub 2}(PPr3{sup i}){sub 2}H{sub 2} was not observed at temperatures up to 350 K, indicating stronger hydrogen bonding. {copyright} {ital 1999 Materials Research Society.}

  2. Advances in iridium alloy processing in FY 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Ohriner, E.K.; Heestand, R.L.

    1989-12-01

    A new process for the production of DOP-26 iridium alloy blanks is being evaluated and optimized. The alloy is prepared by electron-beam (EB) melting of Ir-0.3% W powder compacts followed by doping with aluminum and thorium by arc melting. Drop-cast alloy rod segments are EB welded together into an electrode that is arc melted to produce an ingot for extrusion and subsequent sheet rolling and blanking. Initial results showed rejections for ultrasonic indications for alloy blanks fabricated by this process to be very low. Subsequently, some ingots have exhibited delaminations in the sheet, leading to blank rejection rates similar to that obtained in the standard process. The occurrence of ultrasonic indications in the blanks are now shown to be associated with the presence of subsurface flaws in the arc-melted ingot that are not healed during extrusion or the subsequent rolling of the sheet. There is substantial evidence indicating that the occurrence of surface and subsurface flaws in the ingots are exacerbated by the relatively small clearances between the electrode and the side wall of the 51-mm-diam mold. These results obtained from experimental melts, with both stainless steel and scrap iridium alloy materials, have led to a recommendation for arc melting in a large 63-mm-diam mold. The fabrication of blanks from this larger diameter ingot is under way. The efficiency of iridium material utilization in the new process is also discussed. 2 refs., 23 figs., 12 tabs.

  3. Luminescence of carbazolyl-containing polymers doped with iridium chelates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skryshevskii, Yu. A.

    2008-05-01

    White light emission is shown to be obtainable at room temperature through the mixing of poly-N-vinylcarbazole (PVC) host fluorescence with fac-tris(2-phenylpyridyl)Ir(III) [Ir(ppy)3] and bis[2-(2'-benzothienyl)pyridinato-N,C3'](acetylacetonate)iridium (III) [Btp2Ir(acac)] dopant phosphorescence whereas at very low temperature through the superposition of poly-N-epoxypropyl-3,6-dibromocarbazole (3,6-DBrPEPC) host and Btp2Ir(acac) dopant phosphorescence emissions. The balance between basic colors is adjusted by the variation of triplet-emitter dopant concentrations. Spin-allowed singlet-singlet energy transfer from the host to iridium chelate dopants by the Forster mechanism is the dominant process in PVC. Spin-forbidden triplet-singlet transfer by the Forster mechanism from the host to the dopant occurs at low temperatures in 3,6-DBrPEPC due to strong spin-orbit coupling induced by the heavy bromine atoms. Spin-allowed transfer from the same host’s triplet excited state to the iridium chelate occurs via electron exchange at high temperatures.

  4. Mono- and bis-tolylterpyridine iridium(III) complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkle, Lindsay M.; Young, Jr., Victor G.; Mann, Kent R.

    2012-01-20

    The first structure report of trichlorido[4'-(p-tolyl)-2,2':6',2{double_prime}-terpyridine]iridium(III) dimethyl sulfoxide solvate, [IrCl{sub 3}(C{sub 22}H{sub 17}N{sub 3})] {center_dot} C{sub 2}H{sub 6}OS, (I), is presented, along with a higher-symmetry setting of previously reported bis[4'-(p-tolyl)-2,2':6',2{double_prime}-terpyridine]iridium(III) tris(hexafluoridophosphate) acetonitrile disolvate, [Ir(C{sub 22}H{sub 17}N{sub 3})2](PF{sub 6}){sub 3} {center_dot} 2C{sub 2}H{sub 3}N, (II) [Yoshikawa, Yamabe, Kanehisa, Kai, Takashima & Tsukahara (2007). Eur. J. Inorg. Chem. pp. 1911-1919]. For (I), the data were collected with synchrotron radiation and the dimethyl sulfoxide solvent molecule is disordered over three positions, one of which is an inversion center. The previously reported structure of (II) is presented in the more appropriate C2/c space group. The iridium complex and one PF{sub 6}{sup -} anion lie on twofold axes in this structure, making half of the molecule unique.

  5. Metal hydride fuel storage and method thereof

    DOEpatents

    Morse, Jeffrey D [Martinez, CA; Jankowski, Alan F [Livermore, CA; Yu, Conrad [Antioch, CA

    2009-05-05

    Disclosed herein is a metal hydride fuel storage cartridge having integrated resistive heaters that can be used in conjunction with fuel cells such as MEMS-based fuel cells. The cartridge is fabricated using micromachining methods and thin/thick film materials synthesis techniques.

  6. Metal hydride fuel storage and method thereof

    DOEpatents

    Morse, Jeffrey D.; Jankowski, Alan F.; Yu, Conrad

    2006-10-17

    Disclosed herein is a metal hydride fuel storage cartridge having integrated resistive heaters that can be used in conjunction with fuel cells such as MEMS-based fuel cells. The cartridge is fabricated using micromachining methods and thin/thick film materials synthesis techniques.

  7. Ductility Evaluation of As-Hydrided and Hydride Reoriented Zircaloy-4 Cladding under Simulated Dry-Storage Condition

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Yong; Plummer, Lee K; Ray, Holly B; Cook, Tyler S; Bilheux, Hassina Z

    2014-01-01

    Pre-storage drying-transfer operations and early stage storage expose cladding to higher temperatures and much higher pressure-induced tensile hoop stresses relative to normal operation in-reactor and pool storage under these conditions. Radial hydrides could precipitate during slow cooling and provide an additional embrittlement mechanism as the cladding temperature decreases below the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature. As a means of simulating this behavior, unirradiated hydrided Zircaloy-4 samples were fabricated by a gas charging method to levels that encompass the range of hydrogen concentrations observed in current used fuel. Mechanical testing was carried out by the ring compression test (RCT) method at various temperatures to evaluate the sample s ductility for both as-hydrided and post-hydride reorientation treated specimens. As-hydrided samples with higher hydrogen concentration (>800 ppm) resulted in lower strain before fracture and reduced maximum load. Increasing RCT temperatures resulted in increased ductility of the as-hydrided cladding. A systematic radial hydride treatment was conducted at various pressures and temperatures for the hydrided samples with H content around 200 ppm. Following the radial hydride treatment, RCTs on the hydride reoriented samples were conducted and exhibited lower ductility compared to as-hydrided samples.

  8. Thermal cycle limits for tritium hydride beds

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, J.E.

    1992-12-31

    During revision of the Tritium Facility Technical Standards, a thermal cycle limit was added to the {open_quotes}Hydride Vessels{close_quotes} Technical Standard. A limit of 1,000 cycles was added since the metallurgical effect of repeated thermal cycling of the stainless steel hydride beds was not known. Procedures would require modifications to record the number of thermal cycles a bed has experienced during its life-time. The calculations in this report show that the operations of the hydride beds in the Tritium Facilities can experience at least 10,000 thermal cycles. Maximum temperature differences across the walls of the hydride beds were calculated to determine the cycle limits. The calculated temperature differentials were less than 50% of the temperature differentials which would require a 10,000 cycle limit. 10,000 cycles is equivalent to cycling the bed over nine times per day for the next three years or five times per day for the next five years. If the expected number of bed cycles for the beds are to be less than 10,000 cycles, the number of thermal cycles for the beds do not need to be recorded or logged. Not logging or tracking the number of thermal cycles for the beds will greatly reduce the administrative burden of operating these vessels. These results are based ultimately on the pressure drop of nitrogen through the hydride bed cooling coils which is controlled by the liquid nitrogen dewer`s 22 psig relief valve. This 22 psi differential for flow and the conservative assumptions made in the calculations gave maximum temperature differentials less than 50 percent of the values allowed for the 10,000 cycle limit. Changes which would increase the liquid nitrogen supply pressure for the beds would need to be reviewed to verify that the conclusions of this report were to remain valid.

  9. Thermal cycle limits for tritium hydride beds

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    During revision of the Tritium Facility Technical Standards, a thermal cycle limit was added to the [open quotes]Hydride Vessels[close quotes] Technical Standard. A limit of 1,000 cycles was added since the metallurgical effect of repeated thermal cycling of the stainless steel hydride beds was not known. Procedures would require modifications to record the number of thermal cycles a bed has experienced during its life-time. The calculations in this report show that the operations of the hydride beds in the Tritium Facilities can experience at least 10,000 thermal cycles. Maximum temperature differences across the walls of the hydride beds were calculated to determine the cycle limits. The calculated temperature differentials were less than 50% of the temperature differentials which would require a 10,000 cycle limit. 10,000 cycles is equivalent to cycling the bed over nine times per day for the next three years or five times per day for the next five years. If the expected number of bed cycles for the beds are to be less than 10,000 cycles, the number of thermal cycles for the beds do not need to be recorded or logged. Not logging or tracking the number of thermal cycles for the beds will greatly reduce the administrative burden of operating these vessels. These results are based ultimately on the pressure drop of nitrogen through the hydride bed cooling coils which is controlled by the liquid nitrogen dewer's 22 psig relief valve. This 22 psi differential for flow and the conservative assumptions made in the calculations gave maximum temperature differentials less than 50 percent of the values allowed for the 10,000 cycle limit. Changes which would increase the liquid nitrogen supply pressure for the beds would need to be reviewed to verify that the conclusions of this report were to remain valid.

  10. Evaluation of Molybdenum as a Surrogate for Iridium in the GPHS Weld Development

    SciTech Connect

    Stine, Andrew Martin; Pierce, Stanley W.; Moniz, Paul F.

    2015-10-17

    The welding equipment used for welding iridium containers (clads) at Los Alamos National Laboratory is twenty five years old and is undergoing an upgrade. With the upgrade, there is a requirement for requalification of the welding process, and the opportunity for process improvement. Testing of the new system and requalification will require several welds on iridium test parts and clads, and any efforts to improve the process will add to the need for iridium parts. The extreme high cost of iridium imposes a severe limitation on the extent of test welding that can be done. The 2 inch diameter, 0.027 inch thick, iridium blank disc that the clad cup is formed from, is useful for initial weld trials, but it costs $5000. The development clad sets needed for final tests and requalification cost $15,000 per set. A solution to iridium cost issue would be to do the majority of the weld development on a less expensive surrogate metal with similar weld characteristics. One such metal is molybdenum. Since its melting index (melting temperature x thermal conductivity) is closest to iridium, welds on molybdenum should be similar in size for a given weld power level. Molybdenum is inexpensive; a single 2 inch molybdenum disc costs only $9. In order to evaluate molybdenum as a surrogate for iridium, GTA welds were first developed to provide full penetration on 0.030 inch thick molybdenum discs at speeds of 20, 25, and 30 inches per minute (ipm). These weld parameters were then repeated on the standard 0.027 inch thick iridium blanks. The top surface and bottom surface (root) width and grain structure of the molybdenum and iridium welds were compared, and similarities were evident between the two metals. Due to material and thickness differences, the iridium welds were approximately 35% wider than the molybdenum welds. A reduction in iridium weld current of 35% produce welds slightly smaller than the molybdenum welds yet showed that current could be scaled according to molybdenum/iridium

  11. Rockot Launch Vehicle Commercial Operations for Grace and Iridium Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viertel, Y.; Kinnersley, M.; Schumacher, I.

    2002-01-01

    The GRACE mission and the IRIDIUM mission on ROCKOT launch vehicle are presented. Two identical GRACE satellites to measure in tandem the gravitational field of the earth with previously unattainable accuracy - it's called the Gravity Research and Climate Experiment, or and is a joint project of the U.S. space agency, NASA and the German Centre for Aeronautics and Space Flight, DLR. In order to send the GRACE twins into a 500x500 km , 89deg. orbit, the Rockot launch vehicle was selected. A dual launch of two Iridium satellites was scheduled for June 2002 using the ROCKOT launch vehicle from Plesetsk Cosmodrome in Northern Russia. This launch will inject two replacement satellites into a low earth orbit (LEO) to support the maintenance of the Iridium constellation. In September 2001, Eurockot successfully carried out a "Pathfinder Campaign" to simulate the entire Iridium mission cycle at Plesetsk. The campaign comprised the transport of simulators and related equipment to the Russian port-of-entry and launch site and also included the integration and encapsulation of the simulators with the actual Rockot launch vehicle at Eurockot's dedicated launch facilities at Plesetsk Cosmodrome. The pathfinder campaign lasted four weeks and was carried out by a joint team that also included Khrunichev, Russian Space Forces and Eurockot personnel on the contractors' side. The pathfinder mission confirmed the capability of Eurockot Launch Services to perform the Iridium launch on cost and on schedule at Plesetsk following Eurockot's major investment in international standard preparation, integration and launch facilities including customer facilities and a new hotel. In 2003, Eurockot will also launch the Japanese SERVI'S-1 satellite for USEF. The ROCKOT launch vehicle is a 3 stage liquid fuel rocket whose first 2 stages have been adapted from the Russian SS-19. A third stage, called "Breeze", can be repeatedly ignited and is extraordinarily capable of manoeuvre. Rockot can place

  12. Microstructural study of hydride formation in Zr-1Nb alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neogy, S.; Srivastava, D.; Tewari, R.; Singh, R. N.; Dey, G. K.; Banerjee, S.

    2003-11-01

    Hydriding of Zr-1Nb alloy having a microstructure comprising equiaxed α grains and a uniform distribution of spherical particles of the β-phase has been carried out in this study. The specimens were hydrided by gaseous charging method to different hydrogen levels. The microstructures of hydrided samples were examined as a function of hydrogen content. The formation of δ-hydride in slow cooled specimens and formation of γ-hydride in rapidly cooled specimens has been studied with their morphology, habit plane and orientation relationship with the α matrix in view. The habit planes of either type of hydride phase has been determined and compared with those observed in other Zr-Nb alloys. The orientation relationship between the α matrix and the δ-hydride was found to be the following: (0 0 0 1) α∥( 1¯ 1 1¯) δ and [1 1 2¯ 0] α∥[1 1 0] δ. The orientation relationship between the α matrix and the γ-hydride was of the following type: (0 0 0 1) α∥(0 0 1) γ and [1 2¯ 1 0] α∥[1 1¯ 0] γ. The internal structure of both types of hydride has been examined. The effect of the presence of the spherical β-phase particles in the α matrix on the growth of the hydride plates has been investigated.

  13. Real-Time Characterization of Formation and Breakup of Iridium Clusters in Highly Dealuminated Zeolite Y

    SciTech Connect

    Uzun, Alper; Gates, Bruce C.

    2009-01-15

    The chemistry of formation of iridium clusters from mononuclear iridium diethylene complexes anchored in dealuminated Y zeolite, and their subsequent breakup -- all including changes in the metal-metal, metal-support, and metal-ligand interactions -- is demonstrated by time-resolved EXAFS, XANES, and IR spectroscopy.

  14. Development and Testing of High Surface Area Iridium Anodes for Molten Oxide Electrolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shchetkovskiy, Anatoliy; McKechnie, Timothy; Sadoway, Donald R.; Paramore, James; Melendez, Orlando; Curreri, Peter A.

    2010-01-01

    Processing of lunar regolith into oxygen for habitat and propulsion is needed to support future space missions. Direct electrochemical reduction of molten regolith is an attractive method of processing, because no additional chemical reagents are needed. The electrochemical processing of molten oxides requires high surface area, inert anodes. Such electrodes need to be structurally robust at elevated temperatures (1400-1600 C), be resistant to thermal shock, have good electrical conductivity, be resistant to attack by molten oxide (silicate), be electrochemically stable and support high current density. Iridium with its high melting point, good oxidation resistance, superior high temperature strength and ductility is the most promising candidate for anodes in high temperature electrochemical processes. Several innovative concepts for manufacturing such anodes by electrodeposition of iridium from molten salt electrolyte (EL-Form process) were evaluated. Iridium electrodeposition to form of complex shape components and coating was investigated. Iridium coated graphite, porous iridium structure and solid iridium anodes were fabricated. Testing of electroformed iridium anodes shows no visible degradation. The result of development, manufacturing and testing of high surface, inert iridium anodes will be presented.

  15. Development and Testing of High Surface Area Iridium Anodes for Molten Oxide Electrolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shchetkovskiy, Anatoliy; McKechnie, Timothy; Sadoway, Donald R.; Paramore, James; Melendez, Orlando; Curreri, Peter A.

    2010-01-01

    Processing of lunar regolith into oxygen for habitat and propulsion is needed to support future space missions. Direct electrochemical reduction of molten regolith is an attractive method of processing, because no additional chemical reagents are needed. The electrochemical processing of molten oxides requires high surface area, inert anodes. Such electrodes need to be structurally robust at elevated temperatures (1400-1600?C), be resistant to thermal shock, have good electrical conductivity, be resistant to attack by molten oxide (silicate), be electrochemically stable and support high current density. Iridium with its high melting point, good oxidation resistance, superior high temperature strength and ductility is the most promising candidate for anodes in high temperature electrochemical processes. Several innovative concepts for manufacturing such anodes by electrodeposition of iridium from molten salt electrolyte (EL-Form? process) were evaluated. Iridium electrodeposition to form of complex shape components and coating was investigated. Iridium coated graphite, porous iridium structure and solid iridium anodes were fabricated. Testing of electroformed iridium anodes shows no visible degradation. The result of development, manufacturing and testing of high surface, inert iridium anodes will be presented.

  16. Phosphorescent Imaging of Living Cells Using a Cyclometalated Iridium(III) Complex

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Dik-Lung; Zhong, Hai-Jing; Fu, Wai-Chung; Chan, Daniel Shiu-Hin; Kwan, Hiu-Yee; Fong, Wang-Fun; Chung, Lai-Hon; Wong, Chun-Yuen; Leung, Chung-Hang

    2013-01-01

    A cell permeable cyclometalated iridium(III) complex has been developed as a phosphorescent probe for cell imaging. The iridium(III) solvato complex [Ir(phq)2(H2O]2)] preferentially stains the cytoplasm of both live and dead cells with a bright luminescence. PMID:23457478

  17. Iridium-based double perovskites for efficient water oxidation in acid media

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Morales, Oscar; Raaijman, Stefan; Kortlever, Ruud; Kooyman, Patricia J.; Wezendonk, Tim; Gascon, Jorge; Fu, W. T.; Koper, Marc T. M.

    2016-01-01

    The development of active, cost-effective and stable oxygen-evolving catalysts is one of the major challenges for solar-to-fuel conversion towards sustainable energy generation. Iridium oxide exhibits the best available compromise between catalytic activity and stability in acid media, but it is prohibitively expensive for large-scale applications. Therefore, preparing oxygen-evolving catalysts with lower amounts of the scarce but active and stable iridium is an attractive avenue to overcome this economical constraint. Here we report on a class of oxygen-evolving catalysts based on iridium double perovskites which contain 32 wt% less iridium than IrO2 and yet exhibit a more than threefold higher activity in acid media. According to recently suggested benchmarking criteria, the iridium double perovskites are the most active catalysts for oxygen evolution in acid media reported until now, to the best of our knowledge, and exhibit similar stability to IrO2. PMID:27498694

  18. Iridium-based double perovskites for efficient water oxidation in acid media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz-Morales, Oscar; Raaijman, Stefan; Kortlever, Ruud; Kooyman, Patricia J.; Wezendonk, Tim; Gascon, Jorge; Fu, W. T.; Koper, Marc T. M.

    2016-08-01

    The development of active, cost-effective and stable oxygen-evolving catalysts is one of the major challenges for solar-to-fuel conversion towards sustainable energy generation. Iridium oxide exhibits the best available compromise between catalytic activity and stability in acid media, but it is prohibitively expensive for large-scale applications. Therefore, preparing oxygen-evolving catalysts with lower amounts of the scarce but active and stable iridium is an attractive avenue to overcome this economical constraint. Here we report on a class of oxygen-evolving catalysts based on iridium double perovskites which contain 32 wt% less iridium than IrO2 and yet exhibit a more than threefold higher activity in acid media. According to recently suggested benchmarking criteria, the iridium double perovskites are the most active catalysts for oxygen evolution in acid media reported until now, to the best of our knowledge, and exhibit similar stability to IrO2.

  19. Iridium-based double perovskites for efficient water oxidation in acid media.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Morales, Oscar; Raaijman, Stefan; Kortlever, Ruud; Kooyman, Patricia J; Wezendonk, Tim; Gascon, Jorge; Fu, W T; Koper, Marc T M

    2016-01-01

    The development of active, cost-effective and stable oxygen-evolving catalysts is one of the major challenges for solar-to-fuel conversion towards sustainable energy generation. Iridium oxide exhibits the best available compromise between catalytic activity and stability in acid media, but it is prohibitively expensive for large-scale applications. Therefore, preparing oxygen-evolving catalysts with lower amounts of the scarce but active and stable iridium is an attractive avenue to overcome this economical constraint. Here we report on a class of oxygen-evolving catalysts based on iridium double perovskites which contain 32 wt% less iridium than IrO2 and yet exhibit a more than threefold higher activity in acid media. According to recently suggested benchmarking criteria, the iridium double perovskites are the most active catalysts for oxygen evolution in acid media reported until now, to the best of our knowledge, and exhibit similar stability to IrO2. PMID:27498694

  20. METHOD OF FABRICATING A URANIUM-ZIRCONIUM HYDRIDE REACTOR CORE

    DOEpatents

    Weeks, I.F.; Goeddel, W.V.

    1960-03-22

    A method is described of evenly dispersing uranlum metal in a zirconium hydride moderator to produce a fuel element for nuclear reactors. According to the invention enriched uranium hydride and zirconium hydride powders of 200 mesh particle size are thoroughly admixed to form a mixture containing 0.1 to 3% by weight of U/sup 235/ hydride. The mixed powders are placed in a die and pressed at 100 tons per square inch at room temperature. The resultant compacts are heated in a vacuum to 300 deg C, whereby the uranium hydride deoomposes into uranium metal and hydrogen gas. The escaping hydrogen gas forms a porous matrix of zirconium hydride, with uramum metal evenly dispersed therethrough. The advantage of the invention is that the porosity and uranium distribution of the final fuel element can be more closely determined and controlled than was possible using prior methods of producing such fuel ele- ments.

  1. The influence of prior deformation on hydride precipitation in zircolay

    SciTech Connect

    Perovic, V.; Leger, M. . Metallurgical Research Dept.); Weatherly, G.C. ); MacEwen, S.R. )

    1992-02-01

    This paper reports on precipitation of hydrides that has been studied in samples of Zircaloy subjected to prior tensile or compressive deformation before charging with hydrogen. The mean residual stress pattern in the alloys prior to charging was assessed by neutron diffraction techniques and provided a rough guide as to the preferred site of hydride nucleation. Heterogeneous hydride nucleation at grain boundaries or twin boundaries was commonly found in samples subjected to 4% prior deformation, while transgranular hydrides were most frequently observed after a prior 1/2% compressive deformation or an annealing. The local stress state at grain boundary facets or twins is thought to be the deciding factor in determining where hydrides nucleate and how hydride stacks form.

  2. Numerical study of a magnesium hydride tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delhomme, Baptiste; de Rango, Patricia; Marty, Philippe

    2012-11-01

    Hydrogen storage in metal hydride tanks (MHT) is a very promising solution. Several experimental tanks, studied by different teams, have already proved the feasibility and the interesting performances of this solution. However, in much cases, an optimization of tank geometry is still needed in order to perform fast hydrogen loading. The development of efficient numerical tools is a key issue for MHT design and optimization. We propose a simple model representing a metal hydride tank exchanging its heat of reaction with a thermal fluid flow. In this model, the radial and axial discretisations have been decoupled by using Matlab® one-dimensional tools. Calculations are compared to experimental results obtained in a previous study. A good agreement is found for the loading case. The discharging case shows some discrepancies, which are discussed in this paper.

  3. Arsenic in marine tissues — The challenging problems to electrothermal and hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karadjova, Irina B.; Petrov, Panayot K.; Serafimovski, Ivan; Stafilov, Trajče; Tsalev, Dimiter L.

    2007-03-01

    Analytical problems in determination of arsenic in marine tissues are addressed. Procedures for the determination of total As in solubilized or extracted tissues with tetramethylammonium hydroxide and methanol have been elaborated. Several typical lyophilized tissues were used: NIST SRM 1566a 'Oyster Tissue', BCR-60 CRM 'Trace Elements in an Aquatic Plant ( Lagarosiphon major)', BCR-627 'Forms of As in Tuna Fish Tissue', IAEA-140/TM 'Sea Plant Homogenate', NRCC DOLT-1 'Dogfish Liver' and two representatives of the Black Sea biota, Mediterranean mussel ( Mytilus galloprovincialis) and Brown algae ( Cystoseira barbata). Tissues (nominal 0.3 g) were extracted in tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) 1 ml of 25% m/v TMAH and 2 ml of water) or 5 ml of aqueous 80% v/v methanol (MeOH) in closed vessels in a microwave oven at 50 °C for 30 min. Arsenic in solubilized or extracted tissues was determined by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) after appropriate dilution (nominally to 25 ml, with further dilution as required) under optimal instrumental parameters (pyrolysis temperature 900 °C and atomization temperature 2100 °C) with 1.5 μg Pd as modifier on Zr-Ir treated platform. Platforms have been pre-treated with 2.7 μmol of zirconium and then with 0.10 μmol of iridium which served as a permanent chemical modifier in direct ETAAS measurements and as an efficient hydride sequestration medium in flow injection hydride generation (FI-HG)-ETAAS. TMAH and methanol extract 96-108% and 51-100% of As from CRMs. Various calibration approaches have been considered and critically evaluated. The effect of species-dependent slope of calibration graph or standard additions plot for total As determination in a sample comprising of several individual As species with different ETAAS behavior has been considered as a kind of 'intrinsic element speciation interference' that cannot be completely overcome by standard additions technique. Calibration by means of CRMs has

  4. Iridium: Global OTH data communications for high altitude scientific ballooning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denney, A.

    beneficial points provided by the Iridium platform include pure global accessibility (as well as polar), cost effectiveness because it is available as a COTS (Commercially Off The Shelf) technology, reliability in that the equipment must operate in extreme conditions (near space), integration and development time into current systems must be minimized. As a bonus Motorola and NAL Research Corporation are developing SBD (Short Burst Data) into the Iridium network. This may lead the way to a global IP (Internet Protocol) node based ballooning platform. The Iridium satellite data modems employ the Iridium Low-Earth Orbit (LEO) satellite network. The scope of this paper is to introduce an OTH communications alternative, albeit not necessarily a primary one, to existing ballooning platforms using COTS based emerging technologies. Design aspects, characteristics, actual flight testing statistics, principles of the Iridium modems and communication paths are described including payload and support instrumentation interfacing. Not limited to high altitude ballooning, the Iridium communications platform opens a new era in remote commanding and data retrieval.

  5. Mechanistically Driven Development of Iridium Catalysts for Asymmetric Allylic Substitution

    PubMed Central

    Hartwig, John F.; Stanley, Levi M.

    2010-01-01

    Conspectus Enantioselective allylic substitution reactions comprise some of the most versatile methods for preparing enantiomerically enriched materials. These reactions form products that contain multiple functionalities by creating carbon–nitrogen, carbon–oxygen, carbon–carbon, and carbon–sulfur bonds. For many years, the development of catalysts for allylic substitution focused on palladium complexes. However, studies of complexes of other metals have revealed selectivities that often complement those of palladium systems. Most striking is the observation that reactions with unsymmetrical allylic electrophiles that typically occur with palladium catalysts at the less hindered site of an allylic electrophile occur at the more hindered site with catalysts based on other metals. In this Account, we describe an iridium precursor and a phosphoramidite ligand that catalyze reactions with a particularly broad scope of nucleophiles. The active form of this iridium catalyst is not generated by the simple binding of the phosphoramidite ligand to the metal precursor. Instead, the initial phosphoramidite and iridium precursor react in the presence of base to form a metallacyclic species that is the active catalyst. This species is generated either in situ or separately in isolated form by reactions with added base. The identification of the structure of the active catalyst led to the development of simplified catalysts as well as the most active form of the catalyst now available, which is stabilized by a loosely bound ethylene. Most recently, this structure was used to prepare intermediates containing allyl ligands, the structures of which provide a model for the enantioselectivities discussed here. Initial studies from our laboratory on the scope of iridium-catalyzed allylic substitution showed that reactions of primary and secondary amines, including alkylamines, benzylamines, and allylamines, and reactions of phenoxides and alkoxides occurred in high yields

  6. Flow in a metal hydride chromatographic column

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, G.S.

    1990-01-01

    The flow of hydrogen isotopes in a metal hydride chromatographic column is calculated by a one-dimensional finite difference method. The Ergun equation is used to define the gas flow; and equilibrium pressure isotherms are used to define the column holdup. Solid phase loadings are shown to move as a wave front on absorption, but remain more uniform on desorption. 3 refs., 4 figs.

  7. Dissipative hydride precipitates in superconducting niobium cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Romanenko, A.; Cooley, L.D.; Ciovati, G.; Wu, G.; /Argonne

    2011-10-01

    We report the first direct observation of the microstructural features exhibiting RF losses at high surface magnetic fields of above 100 mT in field emission free superconducting niobium cavities. The lossy areas were identified by advanced thermometry. Surface investigations using different techniques were carried out on cutout samples from lossy areas and showed the presence of dendritic niobium hydrides. This finding has possible implications to the mechanisms of RF losses in superconducting niobium at all field levels.

  8. Nickel metal hydride LEO cycle testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowery, Eric

    1995-01-01

    The George C. Marshall Space Flight Center is working to characterize aerospace AB5 Nickel Metal Hydride (NiMH) cells. The cells are being evaluated in terms of storage, low earth orbit (LEO) cycling, and response to parametric testing (high rate charge and discharge, charge retention, pulse current ability, etc.). Cells manufactured by Eagle Picher are the subjects of the evaluation. There is speculation that NiMH cells may become direct replacements for current Nickel Cadmium cells in the near future.

  9. HYDRIDE-RELATED DEGRADATION OF SNF CLADDING UNDER REPOSITORY CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    K. McCoy

    2000-12-12

    The purpose and scope of this analysis/model report is to analyze the degradation of commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) cladding under repository conditions by the hydride-related metallurgical processes, such as delayed hydride cracking (DHC), hydride reorientation and hydrogen embrittlement, thereby providing a better understanding of the degradation process and clarifying which aspects of the process are known and which need further evaluation and investigation. The intended use is as an input to a more general analysis of cladding degradation.

  10. Plasmonic hydrogen sensing with nanostructured metal hydrides.

    PubMed

    Wadell, Carl; Syrenova, Svetlana; Langhammer, Christoph

    2014-12-23

    In this review, we discuss the evolution of localized surface plasmon resonance and surface plasmon resonance hydrogen sensors based on nanostructured metal hydrides, which has accelerated significantly during the past 5 years. We put particular focus on how, conceptually, plasmonic resonances can be used to study metal-hydrogen interactions at the nanoscale, both at the ensemble and at the single-nanoparticle level. Such efforts are motivated by a fundamental interest in understanding the role of nanosizing on metal hydride formation processes in the quest to develop efficient solid-state hydrogen storage materials with fast response times, reasonable thermodynamics, and acceptable long-term stability. Therefore, a brief introduction to the thermodynamics of metal hydride formation is also given. However, plasmonic hydrogen sensors not only are of academic interest as research tool in materials science but also are predicted to find more practical use as all-optical gas detectors in industrial and medical applications, as well as in a future hydrogen economy, where hydrogen is used as a carbon free energy carrier. Therefore, the wide range of different plasmonic hydrogen sensor designs already available is reviewed together with theoretical efforts to understand their fundamentals and optimize their performance in terms of sensitivity. In this context, we also highlight important challenges to be addressed in the future to take plasmonic hydrogen sensors from the laboratory to real applications in devices, including poisoning/deactivation of the active materials, sensor lifetime, and cross-sensitivity toward other gas species. PMID:25427244

  11. METAL HYDRIDE HYDROGEN COMPRESSORS: A REVIEW

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman Jr, Robert C; Yartys, Dr. Volodymyr A.; Lototskyy, Dr. Michael V; Pollet, Dr. B.G.

    2014-01-01

    Metal hydride (MH) thermal sorption compression is an efficient and reliable method allowing a conversion of energy from heat into a compressed hydrogen gas. The most important component of such a thermal engine the metal hydride material itself should possess several material features in order to achieve an efficient performance in the hydrogen compression. Apart from the hydrogen storage characteristics important for every solid H storage material (e.g. gravimetric and volumetric efficiency of H storage, hydrogen sorption kinetics and effective thermal conductivity), the thermodynamics of the metal-hydrogen systems is of primary importance resulting in a temperature dependence of the absorption/desorption pressures). Several specific features should be optimized to govern the performance of the MH-compressors including synchronisation of the pressure plateaus for multi-stage compressors, reduction of slope of the isotherms and hysteresis, increase of cycling stability and life time, together with challenges in system design associated with volume expansion of the metal matrix during the hydrogenation. The present review summarises numerous papers and patent literature dealing with MH hydrogen compression technology. The review considers (a) fundamental aspects of materials development with a focus on structure and phase equilibria in the metal-hydrogen systems suitable for the hydrogen compression; and (b) applied aspects, including their consideration from the applied thermodynamic viewpoint, system design features and performances of the metal hydride compressors and major applications.

  12. Levitation of Iridium and Liquid Mercury by Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, W. J.; Cao, C. D.; Lü, Y. J.; Wei, B.

    2002-08-01

    Single-axis acoustic levitation of the heaviest solid (iridium, ρ=22.6 g cm-3) and liquid (mercury, ρ=13.6 g cm-3 on the Earth is achieved by greatly enhancing both the levitation force and stability through optimizing the geometric parameters of the levitator. The acoustically levitated Pb-Sn eutectic alloy melt (ρ=8.5 g cm-3) is highly undercooled by up to 38K, which results in a microstructural transition of ``lamellae-broken lamellae-dendrites.'' The drastic enhancement of levitation capability indicates a broader application range of single-axis acoustic levitation.

  13. Luminescent cyclometallated iridium(III) complexes having acetylide ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Mark E.; Bossi, Alberto; Djurovich, Peter Ivan

    2014-09-02

    The present invention relates to phosphorescent (triplet-emitting) organometallic materials. The phosphorescent materials of the present invention comprise Ir(III)cyclometallated alkynyl complexes for use as triplet light-emitting materials. The Ir(III)cyclometallated alkynyl complexes comprise at least one cyclometallating ligand and at least one alkynyl ligand bonded to the iridium. Also provided is an organic light emitting device comprising an anode, a cathode and an emissive layer between the anode and the cathode, wherein the emissive layer comprises a Ir(III)cyclometallated alkynyl complex as a triplet emitting material.

  14. Iridium-Catalyzed Reductive Nitro-Mannich Cyclization

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Alex W; Chambers, Alan; Hawkins, Alison; Jakubec, Pavol; Dixon, Darren J

    2015-01-01

    A new chemoselective reductive nitro-Mannich cyclization reaction sequence of nitroalkyl-tethered lactams has been developed. Relying on the rapid and chemoselective iridium(I)-catalyzed reduction of lactams to the corresponding enamine, subsequent nitro-Mannich cyclization of tethered nitroalkyl functionality provides direct access to important alkaloid natural-product-like structures in yields up to 81 % and in diastereoselectivities that are typically good to excellent. An in-depth understanding of the reaction mechanism has been gained through NMR studies and characterization of reaction intermediates. The new methodology has been applied to the total synthesis of (±)-epi-epiquinamide in four steps. PMID:25399919

  15. Methanol dehydrogenation by iridium N-heterocyclic carbene complexes.

    PubMed

    Campos, Jesús; Sharninghausen, Liam S; Manas, Michael G; Crabtree, Robert H

    2015-06-01

    A series of homogeneous iridium bis(N-heterocyclic carbene) catalysts are active for three transformations involving dehydrogenative methanol activation: acceptorless dehydrogenation, transfer hydrogenation, and amine monoalkylation. The acceptorless dehydrogenation reaction requires base, yielding formate and carbonate, as well as 2-3 equivalents of H2. Of the few homogeneous systems known for this reaction, our catalysts tolerate air and employ simple ligands. Transfer hydrogenation of ketones and imines from methanol is also possible. Finally, N-monomethylation of anilines occurs through a "borrowing hydrogen" reaction. Notably, this reaction is highly selective for the monomethylated product. PMID:25615426

  16. Highly Enantioselective Iridium-Catalyzed Hydrogenation of Cyclic Enamides.

    PubMed

    Salomó, Ernest; Orgué, Sílvia; Riera, Antoni; Verdaguer, Xavier

    2016-07-01

    The MaxPHOX-Ir catalyst system provided the highest selectivity ever reported for the reduction of cyclic enamides derived from α- and β-tetralones. This result indicates that iridium catalysts are also proficient in reducing alkenes bearing metal-coordinating groups. In the present system, selectivity was pressure-dependent: In most cases, a decrease in the H2 pressure to 3 bar resulted in an increase in enantioselectivity. Moreover, the process can be carried out in environmentally friendly solvents, such as methanol and ethyl acetate, with no loss of selectivity. PMID:27186653

  17. The solubility of hydrogen in rhodium, ruthenium, iridium and nickel.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclellan, R. B.; Oates, W. A.

    1973-01-01

    The temperature variation of the solubility of hydrogen in rhodium, ruthenium, iridium, and nickel in equilibrium with H2 gas at 1 atm pressure has been measured by a technique involving saturating the solvent metal with hydrogen, quenching, and analyzing in resultant solid solutions. The solubilities determined are small (atom fraction of H is in the range from 0.0005 to 0.00001, and the results are consistent with the simple quasi-regular model for dilute interstitial solid solutions. The relative partial enthalpy and excess entropy of the dissolved hydrogen atoms have been calculated from the solubility data and compared with well-known correlations between these quantities.

  18. Measurements of the hard-x-ray reflectivity of iridium

    SciTech Connect

    Romaine, S.; Bruni, R.; Gorenstein, P.; Zhong, Z

    2007-01-10

    In connection with the design of a hard-x-ray telescope for the Constellation X-Ray Observatory we measured the reflectivity of an iridium-coated zerodur substrate as a function of angle at 55, 60, 70, and 80 keV at the National Synchrotron Light Source of Brookhaven National Laboratory. The optical constants were derived from the reflectivity data. The real component of the index of refraction is in excellent agreement with theoretical values at all four energies. However, the imaginary component, which is related to the mass attenuation coefficient, is 50% to 70% larger at 55, 60, and 70 keV than theoretical values.

  19. Determination of iridium in mafic rocks by atomic absorption

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grimaldi, F.S.; Schnepfe, M.M.

    1970-01-01

    Iridium is determined in mineralized mafic rocks by atomic absorption after fire-assay concentration into a gold bead. Interelement interferences in the atomic-absorption determination are removed and Ir sensitivity is increased by buffering the solutions with a mixture of copper and sodium sulphates. Substantial amounts of Ag, Al, Au, Bi, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Fe, Ho, Hg, K, La, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Te, Ti, V, Y, Zn and platinum metals can be tolerated in the atomic-absorption determination. The sensitivity and detection limits are 3.2 and 0.25 ppm of Ir, respectively. ?? 1970.

  20. Levitation of iridium and liquid mercury by ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Xie, W J; Cao, C D; Lü, Y J; Wei, B

    2002-09-01

    Single-axis acoustic levitation of the heaviest solid (iridium, rho=22.6 g cm(-3)) and liquid (mercury, rho=13.6 g cm(-3) on the Earth is achieved by greatly enhancing both the levitation force and stability through optimizing the geometric parameters of the levitator. The acoustically levitated Pb-Sn eutectic alloy melt (rho=8.5 g cm(-3)) is highly undercooled by up to 38 K, which results in a microstructural transition of "lamellae-broken lamellae-dendrites." The drastic enhancement of levitation capability indicates a broader application range of single-axis acoustic levitation. PMID:12225198

  1. Materials compatibility and wall stresses in hydride storage beds

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, E.A.; Dunn, K.A.; McKillip, S.T.; Bannister, C.E.

    1991-01-01

    Hydrogen isotope handling and storage will be accomplished using solid-state hydride compounds at the Savannah River Site in the new Replacement Tritium Facility (RTF). The hydride powder is contained in a horizontal cylindrical vessel, and the combination of hydride powder, vessel, and associated heating and cooling facilities are termed in a hydride storage bed. The materials compatibility of the storage powder with the stainless steel vessel has been examined, and the stresses developed in the vessel due to expansion of the powder by absorbing hydrogen have been measured.

  2. Materials compatibility and wall stresses in hydride storage beds

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, E.A.; Dunn, K.A.; McKillip, S.T.; Bannister, C.E.

    1991-12-31

    Hydrogen isotope handling and storage will be accomplished using solid-state hydride compounds at the Savannah River Site in the new Replacement Tritium Facility (RTF). The hydride powder is contained in a horizontal cylindrical vessel, and the combination of hydride powder, vessel, and associated heating and cooling facilities are termed in a hydride storage bed. The materials compatibility of the storage powder with the stainless steel vessel has been examined, and the stresses developed in the vessel due to expansion of the powder by absorbing hydrogen have been measured.

  3. Storing hydrogen in the form of light alloy hydrides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freund, E.; Gillerm, C.

    1981-01-01

    Different hydrides are investigated to find a system with a sufficiently high storage density (at least 3%). The formation of hydrides with light alloys is examined. Reaction kinetics for hydride formation were defined and applied to the systems Mg-Al-H, Mg-Al-Cu-H, Ti-Al-H, Ti-Al-Cu-H, and Ti-Al-Ni-H. Results indicate that the addition of Al destabilizes MgH2 and TiH2 hydrides while having only a limited effect on the storage density.

  4. Materials compatibility of hydride storage materials with austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, E.A.

    1992-09-21

    This task evaluated the materials compatibility of LaNi[sub 5-x]Al[sub x] (x= 0.3, 0.75) hydrides and palladium coated kieselguhr with austenitic stainless steel in hydrogen and tritium process environments. Based on observations of retired prototype hydride storage beds and materials exposure testing samples designed for this study, no materials compatibility problem was indicated. Scanning electron microscopy observations of features on stainless steel surfaces after exposure to hydrides are also commonly found on as-received materials before hydriding. These features are caused by either normal heat treating and acid cleaning of stainless steel or reflect the final machining operation.

  5. Materials compatibility of hydride storage materials with austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, E.A.

    1992-09-21

    This task evaluated the materials compatibility of LaNi{sub 5-x}Al{sub x} (x= 0.3, 0.75) hydrides and palladium coated kieselguhr with austenitic stainless steel in hydrogen and tritium process environments. Based on observations of retired prototype hydride storage beds and materials exposure testing samples designed for this study, no materials compatibility problem was indicated. Scanning electron microscopy observations of features on stainless steel surfaces after exposure to hydrides are also commonly found on as-received materials before hydriding. These features are caused by either normal heat treating and acid cleaning of stainless steel or reflect the final machining operation.

  6. METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR MAKING URANIUM-HYDRIDE COMPACTS

    DOEpatents

    Wellborn, W.; Armstrong, J.R.

    1959-03-10

    A method and apparatus are presented for making compacts of pyrophoric hydrides in a continuous operation out of contact with air. It is particularly useful for the preparation of a canned compact of uranium hydride possessing high density and purity. The metallic uranium is enclosed in a container, positioned in a die body evacuated and nvert the uranium to the hydride is admitted and the container sealed. Heat is applied to bring about the formation of the hydride, following which compression is used to form the compact sealed in a container ready for use.

  7. Materials compatibility of hydride storage materials with austenitic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, E. A.

    1992-09-01

    This task evaluated the materials compatibility of LaNi(5-x)Al(x) (x= 0.3, 0.75) hydrides and palladium coated kieselguhr with austenitic stainless steel in hydrogen and tritium process environments. Based on observations of retired prototype hydride storage beds and materials exposure testing samples designed for this study, no materials compatibility problem was indicated. Scanning electron microscopy observations of features on stainless steel surfaces after exposure to hydrides are also commonly found on as-received materials before hydriding. These features are caused by either normal heat treating and acid cleaning of stainless steel or reflect the final machining operation.

  8. Hydride phase formation in carbon supported palladium hydride nanoparticles by in situ EXAFS and XRD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugaev, A. L.; Guda, A. A.; Lomachenko, K. A.; Lazzarini, A.; Srabionyan, V. V.; Vitillo, J. G.; Piovano, A.; Groppo, E.; Bugaev, L. A.; Soldatov, A. V.; Dmitriev, V. P.; Pellegrini, R.; van Bokhoven, J. A.; Lamberti, C.

    2016-05-01

    In the current work we present a detailed analysis of the hydride phase formation in industrial Pd/C nanocatalysts by means of combined in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy (EXAFS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and volumetric measurements for the temperatures from - 10 to 50 °C in the hydrogen pressure range from 0 to 1000 mbar. α- and β- hydride phases are clearly distinguished in XRD. For the first time, H/Pd atomic ratio were obtained by theoretical fitting of the near-edge region of the absorption spectra (XANES) and compared with volumetric measurements.

  9. Dynamic high-temperature characterization of an iridium alloy in tension

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Bo; Nelson, Kevin; Jin, Helena; Lipinski, Ronald J.; Bignell, John; Ulrich, G. B.; George, E. P.

    2015-09-01

    Iridium alloys have been utilized as structural materials for certain high-temperature applications, due to their superior strength and ductility at elevated temperatures. The mechanical properties, including failure response at high strain rates and elevated temperatures of the iridium alloys need to be characterized to better understand high-speed impacts at elevated temperatures. A DOP-26 iridium alloy has been dynamically characterized in compression at elevated temperatures with high-temperature Kolsky compression bar techniques. However, the dynamic high-temperature compression tests were not able to provide sufficient dynamic high-temperature failure information of the iridium alloy. In this study, we modified current room-temperature Kolsky tension bar techniques for obtaining dynamic tensile stress-strain curves of the DOP-26 iridium alloy at two different strain rates (~1000 and ~3000 s-1) and temperatures (~750°C and ~1030°C). The effects of strain rate and temperature on the tensile stress-strain response of the iridium alloy were determined. The DOP-26 iridium alloy exhibited high ductility in stress-strain response that strongly depended on both strain rate and temperature.

  10. Synthesis and Photophysical Studies of Iridium Complexes Having Different Ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rho, Hyeon Hee; Park, Gui Youn; Ha, Yunkyoung; Kim, Young Sik

    2006-01-01

    The synthesis and photophysical study of efficient phosphorescent iridium(III) complexes having two different (C∧N) ligands are reported. In order to improve the luminescence efficiency by avoiding triplet-triplet (T-T) annihilation, the iridium complexes, Ir(ppy)2(piq) and Ir(ppy)2(piq-F), are designed and prepared where ppy, piq and piq-F represent 2-phenylpyridine, 1-(phenyl)isoquinoline and 2-(4'-fluorophenyl)isoquinoline, respectively. Two ppy ligands and a piq derivative act as a source of energy supply and a piq derivative acts as a chromophore. Since Ir(ppy)3, Ir(piq)3 and Ir(piq-F)3 can be placed in the metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) excited state, they absorb light effectively. When Ir(ppy)2(piq-F) is placed in excited state, the excitation energy is neither quenched nor deactivated but quickly intramolecular transferred from two ppy ligands to one luminescent piq-F ligand. This can occure because the triplet energy level of ppy is higher than that of piq-F and light is emitted from piq-F ligand in the end. Thus, Ir(ppy)2(piq-F) shows strong photoluminescence originated from piq-F ligand because piq-F ligand is known to have a shorter lifetime than that of ppy ligand. To analyze luminescent mechanism, we calculated these complexes having two different ligand sets theoretically by using computational method.

  11. Single step radiolytic synthesis of iridium nanoparticles onto graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas, J. V.; Molina Higgins, M. C.; Toro Gonzalez, M.; Castano, C. E.

    2015-12-01

    In this work a new approach to synthesize iridium nanoparticles on reduced graphene oxide is presented. The nanoparticles were directly deposited and grown on the surface of the carbon-based support using a single step reduction method through gamma irradiation. In this process, an aqueous isopropanol solution containing the iridium precursor, graphene oxide, and sodium dodecyl sulfate was initially prepared and sonicated thoroughly to obtain a homogeneous dispersion. The samples were irradiated with gamma rays with energies of 1.17 and 1.33 MeV emitted from the spontaneous decay of the 60Co irradiator. The interaction of gamma rays with water in the presence of isopropanol generates highly reducing species homogeneously distributed in the solution that can reduce the Ir precursor down to a zero valence state. An absorbed dose of 60 kGy was used, which according to the yield of reducing species is sufficient to reduce the total amount of precursor present in the solution. This novel approach leads to the formation of 2.3 ± 0.5 nm Ir nanoparticles distributed along the surface of the support. The oxygenated functionalities of graphene oxide served as nucleation sites for the formation of Ir nuclei and their subsequent growth. XPS results revealed that the interaction of Ir with the support occurs through Irsbnd O bonds.

  12. Microindentation hardness evaluation of iridium alloy clad vent set cups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulrich, George B.; DeRoos, Larry F.; Stinnette, Samuel E.

    1993-01-01

    An iridium alloy, DOP-26, is used as cladding for 238PuO2 fuel in radioisotope heat sources for space power systems. Presently, DOP-26 iridium alloy clad vent sets (CVS) are being manufactured at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant for potential use in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Cassini mission to Saturn. Wrought/ground/stress relieved blanks are warm formed into CVS cups. These cups are then annealed to recrystallize the material for subsequent fabrication/assembly operations as well as for final use. One of the cup manufacturing certification requirements is to test for Vickers microindentation hardness. New microindentation hardness specification limits, 210 to 310 HV, have been established for a test load of 1000 grams-force (gf). The original specification limits, 250 to 350 HV, were for 200 gf testing. The primary reason for switching to a higher test load was to reduce variability in the test data. The DOP-26 alloy exhibits microindentation hardness load dependence, therefore, new limits were needed for 1000 gf testing. The new limits were established by testing material from 15 CVS cups using 200 gf and 1000 gf loads and then statistically analyzing the data. Additional work using a Knoop indenter and a 10 gf load indicated that the DOP-26 alloy grain boundaries have higher hardnesses than the grain interiors.

  13. Microindentation hardness evaluation of iridium alloy clad vent set cups

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrich, G.B.; DeRoos, L.F.; Stinnette, S.E.

    1992-05-15

    An iridium alloy, DOP-26, is used as cladding for {sup 238}PuO{sup 2} fuel in radioisotope heat sources for space power systems. Presently, DOP-26 iridium alloy clad vent sets (CVS) are being manufactured at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant for potential use in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration`s Cassini mission to Saturn. Wrought/ground/stress relieved blanks are warm formed into CVS cups. These cups are then annealed to recrystallize the material for subsequent fabrication/assembly operations as well as for final use. One of the cup manufacturing certification requirements is to test for Vickers microindentation hardness. New microindentation hardness specification limits, 210 to 310 HV, have been established for a test load of 1000 grams-force (gf). The original specification limits, 250 to 350 HV, were for 200 gf testing. The primary reason for switching to a higher test load was to reduce variability in the test data. The DOP-26 alloy exhibits microindentation hardness load dependence, therefore, new limits were needed for 1000 gf testing. The new limits were established by testing material from 15 CVS cups using 200 gf and 1000 gf loads and then statistically analyzing the data. Additional work using a Knoop indenter and a 10 gf load indicated that the DOP-26 alloy grain boundaries have higher hardnesses than the grain interiors.

  14. Microindentation hardness evaluation of iridium alloy clad vent set cups

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrich, G.B.; DeRoos, L.F.; Stinnette, S.E.

    1992-05-15

    An iridium alloy, DOP-26, is used as cladding for {sup 238}PuO{sup 2} fuel in radioisotope heat sources for space power systems. Presently, DOP-26 iridium alloy clad vent sets (CVS) are being manufactured at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant for potential use in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Cassini mission to Saturn. Wrought/ground/stress relieved blanks are warm formed into CVS cups. These cups are then annealed to recrystallize the material for subsequent fabrication/assembly operations as well as for final use. One of the cup manufacturing certification requirements is to test for Vickers microindentation hardness. New microindentation hardness specification limits, 210 to 310 HV, have been established for a test load of 1000 grams-force (gf). The original specification limits, 250 to 350 HV, were for 200 gf testing. The primary reason for switching to a higher test load was to reduce variability in the test data. The DOP-26 alloy exhibits microindentation hardness load dependence, therefore, new limits were needed for 1000 gf testing. The new limits were established by testing material from 15 CVS cups using 200 gf and 1000 gf loads and then statistically analyzing the data. Additional work using a Knoop indenter and a 10 gf load indicated that the DOP-26 alloy grain boundaries have higher hardnesses than the grain interiors.

  15. Microindentation hardness evaluation of iridium alloy clad vent set cups

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrich, G.B.; DeRoos, L.F.; Stinnette, S.E. )

    1993-01-15

    An iridium alloy, DOP-26, is used as cladding for [sup 238]PuO[sub 2] fuel in radioisotope heat sources for space power systems. Presently, DOP-26 iridium alloy clad vent sets (CVS) are being manufactured at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant for potential use in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Cassini mission to Saturn. Wrought/ground/stress relieved blanks are warm formed into CVS cups. These cups are then annealed to recrystallize the material for subsequent fabrication/assembly operations as well as for final use. One of the cup manufacturing certification requirements is to test for Vickers microindentation hardness. New microindentation hardness specification limits, 210 to 310 HV, have been established for a test load of 1000 grams-force (gf). The original specification limits, 250 to 350 HV, were for 200 gf testing. The primary reason for switching to a higher test load was to reduce variability in the test data. The DOP-26 alloy exhibits microindentation hardness load dependence, therefore, new limits were needed for 1000 gf testing. The new limits were established by testing material from 15 CVS cups using 200 gf and 1000 gf loads and then statistically analyzing the data. Additional work using a Knoop indenter and a 10 gf load indicated that the DOP-26 alloy grain boundaries have higher hardnesses than the grain interiors.

  16. Iridium and tantalum foils for spaceflight neutron dosimetry.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    English, R. A.; Liles, E. D.

    1972-01-01

    Description of a two-foil system of iridium and tantalum which can measure thermal and intermediate energy neutrons at flux densities of 1 neutron/sq cm-sec over a ten-day lunar mission (1,000,000 neutrons/sq cm). The foils are chemically inert and nontoxic, weigh less than 1 g each, and require only routine gamma pulse height analysis for activation measurement. Detection of fluences below 1,000,000 neutrons/sq cm are achieved for counts of foil activity made as late as two months following neutron exposure. Tantalum foils flown in Apollo 11 indicated a mean dose equivalent to the astronauts of less than 16 mrem from thermal plus intermediate energy neutrons, while nuclear emulsion track analysis indicated approximately 17 mrem from neutrons of energy greater than 0.6 MeV. Iridium foils flown on Apollo 12 indicated dose equivalents of 1.8 to 2.8 mrem from thermal neutrons, excluding tissue thermalized SNAP-27 neutrons.

  17. Analysis and Consequences of the Iridium 33-Cosmos 2251 Collision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anz-Meador, P. D.; Liou, Jer-Chi

    2010-01-01

    The collision of Iridium 33 and Cosmos 2251, on 10 February 2009, was the first known unintentional hypervelocity collision in space of intact satellites. Iridium 33 was an active commercial telecommunications satellite, while Cosmos 2251 was a derelict communication satellite of the Strela-2M class. The collision occurred at a relative velocity of 11.6 km/s at an altitude of approximately 790 km over the Great Siberian Plain and near the northern apex of Cosmos 2251 s orbit. This paper describes the physical and orbital characteristics of the relevant spacecraft classes and reports upon our analysis of the resulting debris clouds size, mass, area-to-mass ratio, and relative velocity/directionality distributions. We compare these distributions to those predicted by the NASA breakup model and notable recent fragmentation events; in particular, we compare the area-to-mass ratio distribution for each spacecraft to that exhibited by the FY-1C debris cloud for the purpose of assessing the relative contribution of modern aerospace materials to debris clouds resulting from energetic collisions. In addition, we examine the long-term consequences of this event for the low Earth orbit (LEO) environment. Finally, we discuss "lessons learned", which may be incorporated into NASA s environmental models.

  18. Analysis of Abrasive Blasting of DOP-26 Iridium Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Ohriner, Evan Keith; Zhang, Wei; Ulrich, George B

    2012-01-01

    The effects of abrasive blasting on the surface geometry and microstructure of DOP-26 iridium alloy (Ir-0.3% W-0.006% Th 0.005% Al) have been investigated. Abrasive blasting has been used to control emissivity of components operating at elevated temperature. The effects of abrasive blasting conditions on surface morphology were investigated both experimentally and by numerical modeling. The simplified model, based on finite element analysis of a single angular particle impacting on Ir alloy disk, calculates the surface deformation and residual strain distribution. The experimental results and modeling results both indicate that the surface geometry is not sensitive to the abrasive blast process conditions of nozzle pressure and standoff distance considered in this study. On the other hand, the modeling results suggest that the angularity of the abrasive particle has an important role in determining surface geometry, which in turn, affects the emissivity. Abrasive blasting causes localized surface strains and localized recrystallization, but it does not affect grain size following extended exposure at elevated temperature. The dependence of emissivity of the DOP-26 alloy on mean surface slope follows a similar trend to that reported for pure iridium.

  19. Metal Hydride Thermal Storage: Reversible Metal Hydride Thermal Storage for High-Temperature Power Generation Systems

    SciTech Connect

    2011-12-05

    HEATS Project: PNNL is developing a thermal energy storage system based on a Reversible Metal Hydride Thermochemical (RMHT) system, which uses metal hydride as a heat storage material. Heat storage materials are critical to the energy storage process. In solar thermal storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials during the day and released at night—when the sun is not out—to drive a turbine and produce electricity. In nuclear storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials at night and released to produce electricity during daytime peak-demand hours. PNNL’s metal hydride material can reversibly store heat as hydrogen cycles in and out of the material. In a RHMT system, metal hydrides remain stable in high temperatures (600- 800°C). A high-temperature tank in PNNL’s storage system releases heat as hydrogen is absorbed, and a low-temperature tank stores the heat until it is needed. The low-cost material and simplicity of PNNL’s thermal energy storage system is expected to keep costs down. The system has the potential to significantly increase energy density.

  20. Addition of Iridium to the Biopolymer Mediated Synthesis of YBa2Cu3O7 δ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wimbush, Stuart C.; Marx, Werner; Barth, Andreas; Hall, Simon R.

    This work represents the first study into the addition of iridium into the solgel synthesis of the high temperature superconductor YBa2Cu3O7δ (Y123). Through a biopolymermediated synthetic approach, the homogeneous nature of the precursor sol and the preferred nucleation and growth of Y123 phases allow for a high yield of superconducting nanoparticles with no suppression of the superconducting critical temperature, even at high levels (40 wt%) of iridium addition. We attribute this to iridium not substituting into the Y123 crystal lattice, instead forming an associate phase.

  1. Grain boundary cavitation and weld underbead cracking in DOP-26 iridium alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Mosley, W.C. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Plutonium-238 oxide fuel pellets for the General Purpose Heat Source Radioisotopic Thermoelectric Generators to be used on the NASA Galileo Mission to Jupiter and the International Solar Polar Mission are produced and encapsulated in DOP-26 iridium alloy at the Savannah River Plant. DOP-26 iridium alloy was developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and contains nominally 0.3 wt.% tungsten, 60 ppm thorium, and 50 ppm aluminum. Underbead cracks occasionally occur in the girth weld on the iridium alloy cladding in the area where the gas tungsten arc is quenched. Various electron-beam techniques have been used to determine the cause of cracking.

  2. Identification of an Iridium(III)-Based Inhibitor of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α.

    PubMed

    Kang, Tian-Shu; Mao, Zhifeng; Ng, Chan-Tat; Wang, Modi; Wang, Wanhe; Wang, Chunming; Lee, Simon Ming-Yuen; Wang, Yitao; Leung, Chung-Hang; Ma, Dik-Lung

    2016-04-28

    The novel iridium(III) complex 1 was verified as a potent inhibitor of the TNF-α-TNFR protein-protein interaction in vitro and in cellulo. The iridium(III) center plays a critical role in organizing the structure of the bioactive metal complex, as the isolated ligands were found to be completely inactive. Both iridium enantiomers inhibited TNF-α-induced NF-κB activity and TNF-α-TNFR binding. 1 represents a promising scaffold for the further development of more potent organometallic TNF-α inhibitors. PMID:27054262

  3. Hydrogen storage in the form of metal hydrides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwanziger, M. G.; Santana, C. C.; Santos, S. C.

    1984-01-01

    Reversible reactions between hydrogen and such materials as iron/titanium and magnesium/ nickel alloy may provide a means for storing hydrogen fuel. A demonstration model of an iron/titanium hydride storage bed is described. Hydrogen from the hydride storage bed powers a converted gasoline electric generator.

  4. Metal Hydrides for High-Temperature Power Generation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ronnebro, Ewa; Whyatt, Greg A.; Powell, Michael R.; Westman, Matthew P.; Zheng, Feng; Fang, Zhigang Zak

    2015-08-10

    Metal hydrides can be utilized for hydrogen storage and for thermal energy storage (TES) applications. By using TES with solar technologies, heat can be stored from sun energy to be used later which enables continuous power generation. We are developing a TES technology based on a dual-bed metal hydride system, which has a high-temperature (HT) metal hydride operating reversibly at 600-800°C to generate heat as well as a low-temperature (LT) hydride near room temperature that is used for hydrogen storage during sun hours until there is a need to produce electricity, such as during night time, a cloudy day, ormore » during peak hours. We proceeded from selecting a high-energy density, low-cost HT-hydride based on performance characterization on gram size samples, to scale-up to kilogram quantities and design, fabrication and testing of a 1.5kWh, 200kWh/m3 bench-scale TES prototype based on a HT-bed of titanium hydride and a hydrogen gas storage instead of a LT-hydride. COMSOL Multiphysics was used to make performance predictions for cylindrical hydride beds with varying diameters and thermal conductivities. Based on experimental and modeling results, a bench-scale prototype was designed and fabricated and we successfully showed feasibility to meet or exceed all performance targets.« less

  5. Method of making crack-free zirconium hydride

    DOEpatents

    Sullivan, Richard W.

    1980-01-01

    Crack-free hydrides of zirconium and zirconium-uranium alloys are produced by alloying the zirconium or zirconium-uranium alloy with beryllium, or nickel, or beryllium and scandium, or nickel and scandium, or beryllium and nickel, or beryllium, nickel and scandium and thereafter hydriding.

  6. Metal Hydrides for High-Temperature Power Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Ronnebro, Ewa; Whyatt, Greg A.; Powell, Michael R.; Westman, Matthew P.; Zheng, Feng; Fang, Zhigang Zak

    2015-08-10

    Metal hydrides can be utilized for hydrogen storage and for thermal energy storage (TES) applications. By using TES with solar technologies, heat can be stored from sun energy to be used later which enables continuous power generation. We are developing a TES technology based on a dual-bed metal hydride system, which has a high-temperature (HT) metal hydride operating reversibly at 600-800°C to generate heat as well as a low-temperature (LT) hydride near room temperature that is used for hydrogen storage during sun hours until there is a need to produce electricity, such as during night time, a cloudy day, or during peak hours. We proceeded from selecting a high-energy density, low-cost HT-hydride based on performance characterization on gram size samples, to scale-up to kilogram quantities and design, fabrication and testing of a 1.5kWh, 200kWh/m3 bench-scale TES prototype based on a HT-bed of titanium hydride and a hydrogen gas storage instead of a LT-hydride. COMSOL Multiphysics was used to make performance predictions for cylindrical hydride beds with varying diameters and thermal conductivities. Based on experimental and modeling results, a bench-scale prototype was designed and fabricated and we successfully showed feasibility to meet or exceed all performance targets.

  7. High energy density battery based on complex hydrides

    DOEpatents

    Zidan, Ragaiy

    2016-04-26

    A battery and process of operating a battery system is provided using high hydrogen capacity complex hydrides in an organic non-aqueous solvent that allows the transport of hydride ions such as AlH.sub.4.sup.- and metal ions during respective discharging and charging steps.

  8. A preliminary study of factors affecting the calibration stability of the iridium versus iridium-40 percent rhodium thermocouple

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmed, Shaffiq; Germain, Edward F.; Daryabeigi, Kamran; Alderfer, David W.; Wright, Robert E.

    1987-01-01

    An iridium versus iridium-40% rhodium thermocouple was studied. Problems associated with the use of this thermocouple for high temperature applications (up to 2000 C) were investigated. The metallurgical studies included X-ray, macroscopic, resistance, and metallographic studies. The thermocouples in the as-received condition from the manufacturer revealed large amounts of internal stress caused by cold working during manufacturing. The thermocouples also contained a large amount of inhomogeneities and segregations. No phase transformations were observed in the alloy up to 1100 C. It was found that annealing the thermocouple at 1800 C for two hours, and then at 1400 C for 2 to 3 hours yielded a fine grain structure, relieving some of the strains, and making the wire more ductile. It was also found that the above annealing procedure stabilized the thermal emf behavior of the thermocouple for application below 1800 C (an improvement from + or - 1% to + or - 0.02% within the range of the test parameters used).

  9. Modular hydride beds for mobile applications

    SciTech Connect

    Malinowski, M.E.; Stewart, K.D.

    1997-08-01

    Design, construction, initial testing and simple thermal modeling of modular, metal hydride beds have been completed. Originally designed for supplying hydrogen to a fuel cell on a mobile vehicle, the complete bed design consists of 8 modules and is intended for use on the Palm Desert Vehicle (PDV) under development at the Schatz Energy Center, Humbolt State University. Each module contains approximately 2 kg of a commercially available, low temperature, hydride-forming metal alloy. Waste heat from the fuel cell in the form of heated water is used to desorb hydrogen from the alloy for supplying feed hydrogen to the fuel cell. In order to help determine the performance of such a modular bed system, six modules were constructed and tested. The design and construction of the modules is described in detail. Initial testing of the modules both individually and as a group showed that each module can store {approximately} 30 g of hydrogen (at 165 PSIA fill pressure, 17 C), could be filled with hydrogen in 6 minutes at a nominal, 75 standard liters/min (slm) fueling rate, and could supply hydrogen during desorption at rates of 25 slm, the maximum anticipated hydrogen fuel cell input requirement. Tests made of 5 modules as a group indicated that the behavior of the group run in parallel both in fueling and gas delivery could be directly predicted from the corresponding, single module characteristics by using an appropriate scaling factor. Simple thermal modeling of a module as an array of cylindrical, hydride-filled tubes was performed. The predictions of the model are in good agreement with experimental data.

  10. A novel plating process for microencapsulating metal hydrides

    SciTech Connect

    Law, H.H.; Vyas, B.; Zahurak, S.M.; Kammlott, G.W.

    1996-08-01

    One approach to increasing the lifetime of the metal hydride electrode has been the use of conventional electroless plating to produce a coating of copper or nickel on the surface of the metal hydride powders. In this paper, a novel method for microencapsulating the active electrode powders is presented. This new plating technique takes advantage of the reducing power of hydrogen already stored inside the metal hydride to plate a variety of metals onto metal hydride materials. This method greatly simplifies electroless plating for these powders, eliminating the need for stabilizers and additives typically required for conventional electroless plating solutions. Metals that can be electrolessly plated with stored hydrogen have been identified based on thermodynamic considerations. Experimentally, micrometers thick coatings of copper, silver, and nickel have been plated on several metal hydrides.

  11. Electrochemical characteristics of encapsulated metal-hydride-alloy electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, W.H.; Zhang, D.J.; Ke, J.J.

    1996-06-01

    Metal hydride electrodes with copper-encapsulated alloys and non-coated alloys were fabricated using suitable conductive and binding agents. The charge-discharge characteristics of three kinds of hydride electrodes were comparatively investigated. The encapsulated alloy electrode is remarkably superior to the non-coated LaNi{sub 5}-based one, discharging at a high rate and exhibiting a smaller capacity decay at the stage of cycle tests. The hydride alloy quality of hydride electrodes can be effectively determined by measuring rate capability. The results of vented cell experiments confirm that the capacity decay of non-coated alloy electrodes in sealed cells is not due to the oxidation of oxygen from the nickel hydroxide positive electrodes. The relationship between the equilibrium potential of hydride electrode and the equilibrium hydrogen pressure has been deduced by a succinct thermodynamic method, without consideration of the unknown activity of water and fugacity coefficient of hydrogen.

  12. Porous metal hydride composite and preparation and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Steyert, W.A.; Olsen, C.E.

    1980-03-12

    A composite formed from large pieces of aggregate formed from (1) metal hydride (or hydride-former) powder and (2) either metal powder or plastic powder or both is prepared. The composite has large macroscopic interconnected pores (much larger than the sizes of the powders which are used) and will have a very fast heat transfer rate and low windage loss. It will be useful, for example, in heat engines, hydrogen storage devices, and refrigerator components which depend for their utility upon both a fast rate of hydriding and dehydriding. Additionally, a method of preparing the composite and a method of increasing the rates of hydriding and dehydriding of metal hydrides are also given.

  13. Porous metal hydride composite and preparation and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Steyert, William A.; Olsen, Clayton E.

    1982-01-01

    A composite formed from large pieces of aggregate formed from (1) metal hydride (or hydride-former) powder and (2) either metal powder or plastic powder or both is prepared. The composite has large macroscopic interconnected pores (much larger than the sizes of the powders which are used) and will have a very fast heat transfer rate and low windage loss. It will be useful, for example, in heat engines, hydrogen storage devices, and refrigerator components which depend for their utility upon both a fast rate of hydriding and dehydriding. Additionally, a method of preparing the composite and a method of increasing the rates of hydriding and dehydriding of metal hydrides are also given.

  14. Metal hydrides for concentrating solar thermal power energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheppard, D. A.; Paskevicius, M.; Humphries, T. D.; Felderhoff, M.; Capurso, G.; Bellosta von Colbe, J.; Dornheim, M.; Klassen, T.; Ward, P. A.; Teprovich, J. A.; Corgnale, C.; Zidan, R.; Grant, D. M.; Buckley, C. E.

    2016-04-01

    The development of alternative methods for thermal energy storage is important for improving the efficiency and decreasing the cost of concentrating solar thermal power. We focus on the underlying technology that allows metal hydrides to function as thermal energy storage (TES) systems and highlight the current state-of-the-art materials that can operate at temperatures as low as room temperature and as high as 1100 °C. The potential of metal hydrides for thermal storage is explored, while current knowledge gaps about hydride properties, such as hydride thermodynamics, intrinsic kinetics and cyclic stability, are identified. The engineering challenges associated with utilising metal hydrides for high-temperature TES are also addressed.

  15. Recent advances in metal hydrides for clean energy applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ronnebro, Ewa; Majzoub, Eric H.

    2013-06-01

    Metal hydrides are a fascinating class of materials that can be utilized for a surprising variety of clean energy applications, including smart solar collectors, smart windows, sensors, thermal energy storage, and batteries, in addition to their traditional application for hydrogen storage. Over the past decade, research on metal hydrides for hydrogen storage increased due to global governmental incentives and an increased focus on hydrogen storage research for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell operation. Tremendous progress has been made in so-called complex metal hydrides for hydrogen storage applications with the discovery of many new hydrides containing covalently bound complex anions. Many of these materials have applications beyond hydrogen storage and are being investigated for lithium-ion battery separator and anode materials. In this issue of MRS Bulletin , we present the state of the art of key evolving metal-hydride-based clean energy technologies with an outlook toward future needs.

  16. Nanostructured Magnesium Hydride for Reversible Hydrogen Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Rango, P.; Chaise, A.; Fruchart, D.; Miraglia, S.; Marty, Ph.

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this work was to develop suitable materials to store hydrogen in a solid state. A systematic investigation of the co-milling process of magnesium hydride with a transition metal was undertaken in order to produce nanostructured and highly reactive powders. The initiating role of the transition metal was evidenced by in situ neutron diffraction experiments. High performances in terms of thermal and mechanical behavior were achieved introducing expanded graphite and compacting the mixture to form composite materials. Absorption and desorption kinetics have been measured versus temperature and H2 pressure.

  17. Development of nickel-metal hydride cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuwajima, Saburo; Kamimori, Nolimits; Nakatani, Kensuke; Yano, Yoshiaki

    1993-01-01

    National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) has conducted the research and development (R&D) of battery cells for space use. A new R&D program about a Nickel-Metal Hydride (Ni-MH) cell for space use from this year, based on good results in evaluations of commercial Ni-MH cells in Tsukuba Space Center (TKSC), was started. The results of those commercial Ni-MH cell's evaluations and recent status about the development of Ni-MH cells for space use are described.

  18. Highly Concentrated Palladium Hydrides/Deuterides; Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Papaconstantopoulos, Dimitrios

    2013-11-26

    Accomplishments are reported in these areas: tight-binding molecular dynamics study of palladium; First-principles calculations and tight-binding molecular dynamics simulations of the palladium-hydrogen system; tight-binding studies of bulk properties and hydrogen vacancies in KBH{sub 4}; tight-binding study of boron structures; development of angular dependent potentials for Pd-H; and density functional and tight-binding calculations for the light-hydrides NaAlH4 and NaBH4

  19. Metal hydride fuel storage and method thereof

    DOEpatents

    Morse, Jeffrey D.; Jankowski, Alan F.; Yu, Conrad

    2010-08-10

    An apparatus having a first substrate having (1) a cavity, (2) one or more resistive heaters, and (3) one or more coatings forming a diffusion barrier to hydrogen; a second substrate having (1) an outlet valve comprising a pressure relief structure and (2) one or more coatings forming a diffusion barrier to hydrogen, wherein said second substrate is coupled to said first substrate forming a sealed volume in said cavity; a metal hydride material contained within said cavity; and a gas distribution system formed by coupling a microfluidic interconnect to said pressure relief structure. Additional apparatuses and methods are also disclosed.

  20. Sub-Chronic Oral Exposure to Iridium (III) Chloride Hydrate in Female Wistar Rats: Distribution and Excretion of the Metal

    PubMed Central

    Iavicoli, Ivo; Fontana, Luca; Bergamaschi, Antonio; Conti, Marcelo Enrique; Pino, Anna; Mattei, Daniela; Bocca, Beatrice; Alimonti, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    Iridium tissue distribution and excretion in female Wistar rats following oral exposure to iridium (III) chloride hydrate in drinking water (from 1 to 1000 ng/ml) in a sub-chronic oral study were determined. Samples of urine, feces, blood and organs (kidneys, liver, lung, spleen and brain) were collected at the end of exposure. The most prominent fractions of iridium were retained in kidney and spleen; smaller amounts were found in lungs, liver and brain. Iridium brain levels were lower than those observed in other tissues but this finding can support the hypothesis of iridium capability to cross the blood brain barrier. The iridium kidney levels rose significantly with the administered dose. At the highest dose, important amounts of the metal were found in serum, urine and feces. Iridium was predominantly excreted via feces with a significant linear correlation with the ingested dose, which is likely due to low intestinal absorption of the metal. However, at the higher doses iridium was also eliminated through urine. These findings may be useful to help in the understanding of the adverse health effects, particularly on the immune system, of iridium dispersed in the environment as well as in identifying appropriate biological indices of iridium exposure. PMID:22942873

  1. Results of NDE Technique Evaluation of Clad Hydrides

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis C. Kunerth

    2014-09-01

    This report fulfills the M4 milestone, M4FT-14IN0805023, Results of NDE Technique Evaluation of Clad Hydrides, under Work Package Number FT-14IN080502. During service, zirconium alloy fuel cladding will degrade via corrosion/oxidation. Hydrogen, a byproduct of the oxidation process, will be absorbed into the cladding and eventually form hydrides due to low hydrogen solubility limits. The hydride phase is detrimental to the mechanical properties of the cladding and therefore it is important to be able to detect and characterize the presence of this constituent within the cladding. Presently, hydrides are evaluated using destructive examination. If nondestructive evaluation techniques can be used to detect and characterize the hydrides, the potential exists to significantly increase test sample coverage while reducing evaluation time and cost. To demonstrate the viability this approach, an initial evaluation of eddy current and ultrasonic techniques were performed to demonstrate the basic ability to these techniques to detect hydrides or their effects on the microstructure. Conventional continuous wave eddy current techniques were applied to zirconium based cladding test samples thermally processed with hydrogen gas to promote the absorption of hydrogen and subsequent formation of hydrides. The results of the evaluation demonstrate that eddy current inspection approaches have the potential to detect both the physical damage induced by hydrides, e.g. blisters and cracking, as well as the combined effects of absorbed hydrogen and hydride precipitates on the electrical properties of the zirconium alloy. Similarly, measurements of ultrasonic wave velocities indicate changes in the elastic properties resulting from the combined effects of absorbed hydrogen and hydride precipitates as well as changes in geometry in regions of severe degradation. However, for both approaches, the signal responses intended to make the desired measurement incorporate a number of contributing

  2. Analysis and Implications of the Iridium 33-Cosmos 2251 Collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelso, T. S.

    On 2009 February 10, Iridium 33--an operational US communications satellite in low-Earth orbit--was struck and destroyed by Cosmos 2251--a long-defunct Russian communications satellite. This is the first time since the dawn of the Space Age that two satellites have collided in orbit. To better understand the circumstances of this event and the ramifications for avoiding similar events in the future, this paper provides a detailed analysis of the predictions leading up to the collision, using various data sources, and looks in detail at the collision, the evolution of the debris clouds, and the long-term implications for satellite operations. The only publicly available system available to satellite operators for screening for close approaches, SOCRATES, did predict this close approach, but it certainly wasn't the closest approach predicted for the week of February 10. In fact, at the time of the collision, SOCRATES ranked this close approach 152 of the 11,428 within 5 km of any payload. A detailed breakdown is provided to help understand the limitations of screening for close approaches using the two-line orbital element sets. Information is also provided specifically for the Iridium constellation to provide an understanding of how these limitations affect decision making for satellite operators. Post-event analysis using high-accuracy orbital data sources will be presented to show how that information might have been used to prevent this collision, had it been available and used. Analysis of the collision event, along with the distribution of the debris relative to the original orbits, will be presented to help develop an understanding of the geometry of the collision and the near-term evolution of the resulting debris clouds. Additional analysis will be presented to show the long-term evolution of the debris clouds, including orbital lifetimes, and estimate the increased risk for operations conducted by Iridium and other satellite operators in the low-Earth orbit

  3. Iridium-Catalyzed Selective Isomerization of Primary Allylic Alcohols.

    PubMed

    Li, Houhua; Mazet, Clément

    2016-06-21

    This Account presents the development of the iridium-catalyzed isomerization of primary allylic alcohols in our laboratory over the past 8 years. Our initial interest was driven by the long-standing challenge associated with the development of a general catalyst even for the nonasymmetric version of this seemingly simple chemical transformation. The added value of the aldehyde products and the possibility to rapidly generate molecular complexity from readily accessible allylic alcohols upon a redox-economical isomerization reaction were additional sources of motivation. Certainly influenced by the success story of the related isomerization of allylic amines, most catalysts developed for the selective isomerization of allylic alcohols were focused on rhodium as a transition metal of choice. Our approach has been based on the commonly accepted precept that hydrogenation and isomerization are often competing processes, with the latter being usually suppressed in favor of the former. The cationic iridium complexes [(Cy3P)(pyridine)Ir(cod)]X developed by Crabtree (X = PF6) and Pfaltz (X = BArF) are usually considered as the most versatile catalysts for the hydrogenation of allylic alcohols. Using molecular hydrogen to generate controlled amounts of the active form of these complexes but performing the reaction in the absence of molecular hydrogen enabled deviation from the typical hydrogenation manifold and favored exclusively the isomerization of allylic alcohols into aldehydes. Isotopic labeling and crossover experiments revealed the intermolecular nature of the process. Systematic variation of the ligand on the iridium center allowed us to identify the structural features beneficial for catalytic activity. Subsequently, three generations of chiral catalysts have been investigated and enabled us to reach excellent levels of enantioselectivity for a wide range of 3,3-disubstituted aryl/alkyl and alkyl/alkyl primary allylic alcohols leading to β-chiral aldehydes. The

  4. Iridium-Catalyzed Branch-Selective Hydroarylation of Vinyl Ethers via C-H Bond Activation.

    PubMed

    Ebe, Yusuke; Nishimura, Takahiro

    2015-05-13

    Iridium-catalyzed hydroarylation of vinyl ethers via a directed C-H bond activation of aromatic compounds gave high yields of the corresponding addition products with high branch selectivity. PMID:25928127

  5. Iridium-catalyst-based autonomous bubble-propelled graphene micromotors with ultralow catalyst loading.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Sofer, Zdeněk; Eng, Alex Yong Sheng; Pumera, Martin

    2014-11-10

    A novel concept of an iridium-based bubble-propelled Janus-particle-type graphene micromotor with very high surface area and with very low catalyst loading is described. The low loading of Ir catalyst (0.54 at %) allows for fast motion of graphene microparticles with high surface area of 316.2 m(2)  g(-1). The micromotor was prepared with a simple and scalable method by thermal exfoliation of iridium-doped graphite oxide precursor composite in hydrogen atmosphere. Oxygen bubbles generated from the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide at the iridium catalytic sites provide robust propulsion thrust for the graphene micromotor. The high surface area and low iridium catalyst loading of the bubble-propelled graphene motors offer great possibilities for dramatically enhanced cargo delivery. PMID:25293511

  6. Regeneration of Aluminum Hydride Using Trimethylamine

    SciTech Connect

    D Lacina; J Reilly; Y Celebi; J Wegrzyn; J Johnson; J Graetz

    2011-12-31

    Aluminum hydride is an attractive reducing agent and energy storage compound possessing a low decomposition temperature and a high gravimetric and volumetric hydrogen density. However, it is thermodynamically unstable at room temperature and requires extremely high pressures to form the hydride from aluminum and hydrogen gas. Here, we describe an alternate method of synthesizing AlH{sub 3} using Ti-catalyzed Al powder, H{sub 2}, and trimethylamine (TMA) to form an alane adduct. The formation of trimethylamine alane occurs at modest hydrogen pressures ({approx}100 bar), forming the 2:1 bis complex (2 trimethylamine/AlH{sub 3}). Along with the hydrogenation product, mono (1:1) and bis (2:1) standards of TMA-AlH{sub 3} were prepared and characterized using X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of the reaction products showed that the Ti catalyst remains with the unreacted Al powder after hydrogenation and is not present in the alane adduct. We also demonstrate that TMA can be transaminated with triethylamine to form triethylamine alane, which can easily be separated to recover AlH{sub 3}.

  7. Metal hydrides for lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Oumellal, Y; Rougier, A; Nazri, G A; Tarascon, J-M; Aymard, L

    2008-11-01

    Classical electrodes for Li-ion technology operate via an insertion/de-insertion process. Recently, conversion electrodes have shown the capability of greater capacity, but have so far suffered from a marked hysteresis in voltage between charge and discharge, leading to poor energy efficiency and voltages. Here, we present the electrochemical reactivity of MgH(2) with Li that constitutes the first use of a metal-hydride electrode for Li-ion batteries. The MgH(2) electrode shows a large, reversible capacity of 1,480 mAh g(-1) at an average voltage of 0.5 V versus Li(+)/Li(o) which is suitable for the negative electrode. In addition, it shows the lowest polarization for conversion electrodes. The electrochemical reaction results in formation of a composite containing Mg embedded in a LiH matrix, which on charging converts back to MgH(2). Furthermore, the reaction is not specific to MgH(2), as other metal or intermetallic hydrides show similar reactivity towards Li. Equally promising, the reaction produces nanosized Mg and MgH(2), which show enhanced hydrogen sorption/desorption kinetics. We hope that such findings can pave the way for designing nanoscale active metal elements with applications in hydrogen storage and lithium-ion batteries. PMID:18849978

  8. Pressure-stabilized superconductive yttrium hydrides

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yinwei; Hao, Jian; Liu, Hanyu; Tse, John S.; Wang, Yanchao; Ma, Yanming

    2015-01-01

    The search for high-temperature superconductors has been focused on compounds containing a large fraction of hydrogen, such as SiH4(H2)2, CaH6 and KH6. Through a systematic investigation of yttrium hydrides at different hydrogen contents using an structure prediction method based on the particle swarm optimization algorithm, we have predicted two new yttrium hydrides (YH4 andYH6), which are stable above 110 GPa. Three types of hydrogen species with increased H contents were found, monatomic H in YH3, monatomic H+molecular “H2” in YH4 and hexagonal “H6” unit in YH6. Interestingly, H atoms in YH6 form sodalite-like cage sublattice with centered Y atom. Electron-phonon calculations revealed the superconductive potential of YH4 and YH6 with estimated transition temperatures (Tc) of 84–95 K and 251–264 K at 120 GPa, respectively. These values are higher than the predicted maximal Tc of 40 K in YH3. PMID:25942452

  9. Surface passivation of metal hydrides for applications

    SciTech Connect

    Suda, S.; Li, Z.P.; Sun, Y.M.; Liu, B.H.; Gao, X.P.

    1998-12-31

    Properties and characteristics of hydriding alloys are strongly dependent on surface compositions and morphologies. For instance, oxides such as La{sub 2}O{sub 3} on AB{sub 5} alloys and ZrO{sub 2} on AB{sub 2}, AB, and body-centered-cubic (BCC) alloys act as the barriers for the conversion of molecular and ionic hydrogen to atomic hydrogen at the surface, thus reducing the kinetics in both the gas-solid and electrochemical reactions. Alloy surfaces chemically treated by an aqueous F-ion containing solution have been developed to solve such problems. F-treated surfaces exhibit significantly improved characteristics in regard to the hydrogen uptakes and the protection against impurities and electrolyte solution. In addition, highly conductive metallic Ni layers can be formed on the surface of the alloy particles by the fluorination. The authors report the properties and characteristics of fluorinated hydriding alloys, mainly of a typical AB{sub 2} Laves phase material which represents the difficult activation characteristics and poor long-term durability during electrochemical charge/discharge cycles.

  10. Millimeter-Wave Spectroscopy of Ethylmercury Hydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goubet, M.; Motiyenko, R. A.; Margulès, L.; Guillemin, J.-C.

    2012-06-01

    The first millimeter-wave rotational spectrum of an organomercury compound, ethylmercury hydride (CH_3CH_2HgH), has been recorded using the Lille fast-scan spectrometer in the frequency range 120 -- 180 GHz. The spectroscopic study is complemented by quantum chemical calculations taking into account relativistic effects on the mercury atom. The very good agreement between theoretical and experimental molecular parameters validates the chosen ab initio method, in particular its capability to predict the accurate values of the quartic centrifugal distortion constants related to this type of compound. Estimations of the nuclear quadrupole coupling constants are not as predictive as the structural parameters but good enough to satisfy the spectroscopic needs. In addition, the orientation of the H--Hg--C bonds axis deduced from the experimental nuclear quadrupole coupling constants compares well with the corresponding ab initio value. From the good agreement between experimental and theoretical results, together with the observation of the six most abundant isotopes of mercury, ethylmercury hydride is unambiguously identified and its calculated equilibrium geometry is confirmed. Alekseev, E.A. et al. Radio Physics and Radio Astronomy 3 (2012) 78.