Science.gov

Sample records for iridium hydrides

  1. Investigations of iridium-mediated reversible C-H bond cleavage: characterization of a 16-electron iridium(III) methyl hydride complex.

    PubMed

    Bernskoetter, Wesley H; Hanson, Susan Kloek; Buzak, Sara K; Davis, Zoe; White, Peter S; Swartz, Rodney; Goldberg, Karen I; Brookhart, Maurice

    2009-06-24

    New iridium complexes of a tridentate pincer ligand, 2,6-bis(di-tert-butylphosphinito)pyridine (PONOP), have been prepared and used in the study of hydrocarbon C-H bond activation. Intermolecular oxidative addition of a benzene C-H bond was directly observed with [(PONOP)Ir(I)(cyclooctene)][PF(6)] at ambient temperature, resulting in a cationic five-coordinate iridium(III) phenyl hydride product. Protonation of the (PONOP)Ir(I) methyl complex yielded the corresponding iridium(III) methyl hydride cation, a rare five-coordinate, 16-valence electron transition metal alkyl hydride species which was characterized by X-ray diffraction. Kinetic studies of C-H bond coupling and reductive elimination reactions from the five-coordinate complexes have been carried out. Exchange NMR spectroscopy measurements established a barrier of 17.8(4) kcal/mol (22 degrees C) for H-C(aryl) bond coupling in the iridium(III) phenyl hydride cation and of 9.3(4) kcal/mol (-105 degrees C) for the analogous H-C(alkyl) coupling in the iridium(III) methyl hydride cation. The origin of the higher barrier of H-C(aryl) relative to H-C(alkyl) bond coupling is proposed to be influenced by a hindered rotation about the Ir-C(aryl) bond, a result of the sterically demanding PONOP ligand. PMID:19489584

  2. Iridium in natural waters

    SciTech Connect

    Anbar, A.D.; Wasserburg, G.J.; Papanastassiou, D.A.

    1996-09-13

    Iridium, commonly used as a tracer of extraterrestrial material, was measured in rivers, oceans, and an estuarine environment. The concentration of iridium in the oceans ranges from 3.0 ({+-}1.3) x 10{sup 8} to 5.7 ({+-}0.8) x 10{sup 8} atoms per kilogram. Rivers contain from 17.4 ({+-}0.9) x 10{sup 8} to 92.9 ({+-}2.2) x 10{sup 8} atoms per kilogram and supply more dissolved iridium to the oceans than do extraterrestrial sources. In the Baltic Sea, {approximately}75% of riverine iridium is removed from solution. Iron-manganese oxyhydroxides scavenge iridium under oxidizing conditions, but anoxic environments are not a major sink for iridium. The ocean residence time of iridium is between 2 x 10{sup 3} and 2 x 10{sup 4} years. 32 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Processing of Iridium and Iridium Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Ohriner, Evan Keith

    2008-01-01

    Iridium and its alloys have been considered to be difficult to fabricate due to their high melting temperatures, limited ductility, sensitivity to impurity content, and chemical properties. The variety of processing methods used for iridium and its alloys are reviewed, including purification, melting, forming, joining, and powder metallurgy techniques. Also included are coating and forming by the methods of electroplating, chemical and physical vapor deposition, and melt particle deposition.

  4. Hydride compositions

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Myung W. (North Augusta, SC)

    1995-01-01

    A composition for use in storing hydrogen, and a method for making the composition. The composition comprises a mixture of two or more hydrides, each hydride having a different series of hydrogen sorption isotherms that contribute to the overall isotherms of the mixture. The hydrides are chosen so that the isotherms of the mixture have regions wherein the hydrogen equilibrium pressure increases with increasing hydrogen, preferably linearly. The isotherms of the mixture can be adjusted by selecting hydrides with different isotherms and by varying the amounts of the individual hydrides, or both. Preferably, the mixture is made up of hydrides that have isotherms with substantially flat plateaus and in nearly equimolar amounts. The composition is activated by degassing, exposing to hydrogen and then heating at a temperature below the softening temperature of any of the. constituents so that their chemical and structural integrity is preserved. When the composition is used to store hydrogen, its hydrogen content can be found simply by measuring P.sub.H.sbsb.2 and determining H/M from the isothermic function of the composition.

  5. Hydride compositions

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Myung, W.

    1994-01-01

    Disclosed are a composition for use in storing hydrogen and a method for making the composition. The composition comprises a mixture of two or more hydrides, each hydride having a different series of hydrogen sorption isotherms that contribute to the overall isotherms of the mixture. The hydrides are chosen so that the isotherms of the mixture have regions wherein the H equilibrium pressure increases with increasing hydrogen, preferably linearly. The isotherms of the mixture can be adjusted by selecting hydrides with different isotherms and by varying the amounts of the individual hydrides, or both. Preferably, the mixture is made up of hydrides that have isotherms with substantially flat plateaus and in nearly equimolar amounts. The composition is activated by degassing, exposing to H, and then heating below the softening temperature of any of the constituents. When the composition is used to store hydrogen, its hydrogen content can be found simply by measuring P{sub H}{sub 2} and determining H/M from the isothermic function of the composition.

  6. Iridium Interfacial Stack (IRIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spry, David James (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An iridium interfacial stack ("IrIS") and a method for producing the same are provided. The IrIS may include ordered layers of TaSi.sub.2, platinum, iridium, and platinum, and may be placed on top of a titanium layer and a silicon carbide layer. The IrIS may prevent, reduce, or mitigate against diffusion of elements such as oxygen, platinum, and gold through at least some of its layers.

  7. Luminogenic iridium azide complexes.

    PubMed

    Ohata, Jun; Vohidov, Farrukh; Aliyan, Amirhossein; Huang, Kewei; Martí, Angel A; Ball, Zachary T

    2015-10-21

    The synthesis and characterization of luminogenic, bioorthogonal iridium probes is described. These probes exhibit long photoluminescence lifetimes amenable to time-resolved applications. A simple, modular synthesis via 5-azidophenanthroline allows structural variation and allows optimization of cell labeling. PMID:26325066

  8. Method for refining contaminated iridium

    DOEpatents

    Heshmatpour, B.; Heestand, R.L.

    1982-08-31

    Contaminated iridium is refined by alloying it with an alloying agent selected from the group consisting of manganese and an alloy of manganese and copper, and then dissolving the alloying agent from the formed alloy to provide a purified iridium powder.

  9. Method for refining contaminated iridium

    DOEpatents

    Heshmatpour, Bahman (Waltham, MA); Heestand, Richard L. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1983-01-01

    Contaminated iridium is refined by alloying it with an alloying agent selected from the group consisting of manganese and an alloy of manganese and copper, and then dissolving the alloying agent from the formed alloy to provide a purified iridium powder.

  10. Iridium at Kilauea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Peter M.

    Trace-element anomalies observed in rocks located stratigraphically at the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary are considered significant evidence that the boundary is a record of a large meteorite impact (Science, 208, 1095-1108, 1980). In particular, trace metals, including iridium and other members of the platinum metals group, are thought to be enriched in rocks alien to the earth's surface. These elements are indeed enriched in meteorites relative to earth crustal rocks, but new evidence from analyses of the January 1983 eruption of Kilauea suggest that the analogy may be invalid. W.H. Zoller, J.R. Parrington, and J.M. Phelan Kotra reported neutron activation analyses of airborne particulate matter collected at the Mauna Loa Observatory and found “strikingly” large concentrations of iridium in addition to element concentrations expected from volcanic emissions (Science, 222, 1118, 1983). The only other platinum-group trace metal analyzed was gold, which was also found to be anomalously high. They concede that they need more data of other platinum group elements and more data on other volcanos, but the implication is that the Cretacious-Tertiary boundary may well be volcanic, not due to a large meteorite impact.

  11. Iridium in marine organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, M. C.; Boothe, P. N.; Presley, B. J.

    1988-06-01

    Iridium concentrations in several types of marine organisms from the northern Gulf of Mexico averaged 20 parts per trillion (range < 4-80 pptr). Based on this value the Pt/Ir ratio for marine organisms is 10 as compared to the 100 that has been reported for both seawater and authigenic Mn nodules. This low ratio may be related to the weaker ability of Ir to form stable chloro-metal complexes in seawater. The Ir inventory in the present-day marine biosphere is five orders of magnitude less than that of Cretaceous/Tertiary (K-T) boundary sediments, making it unlikely that the Cretaceous marine biosphere was a significant source of Ir for K-T boundary sediments. This small, modern inventory also suggests that the recently reported Ir enrichment (1100 ppb) in organic kerogen from K-T boundary sediments probably occurred after deposition as a result of Ir redistribution within the sediments.

  12. Iridium in marine organisms

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, M.C.; Boothe, P.N.; Presley, B.J. )

    1988-06-01

    Iridium concentrations in several types of marine organisms from the northern Gulf of Mexico averaged 20 parts per trillion (range < 4-80 pptr). Based on this value the Pt/Ir ratio for marine organisms is 10 as compared to the 100 that has been reported for both seawater and authigenic Mn nodules. This low ratio may be related to the weaker ability of Ir to form stable chloro-metal complexes in seawater. The Ir inventory in the present-day marine biosphere is five orders of magnitude less than that of Cretaceous/Tertiary (K-T) boundary sediments. This small, modern inventory also suggest that the recently reported Ir enrichment (1100 ppb) in organic kerogen from K-T boundary sediments probably occurred after deposition as a result of Ir redistribution within the sediments.

  13. Solar abundance of iridium

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Stephen; Aller, Lawrence H.

    1976-01-01

    By a method of spectrum synthesis, which yields log gfA, where g is the statistical weight of the lower level, f is the oscillator strength, and A is the abundance, an attempt is made to deduce the solar iridium abundance from one relatively unblended, but fairly weak IrI line, ? 3220.78 Å. If the Corliss-Bozman f-value for this line is adopted, we find log A(Ir) = 0.82 on the scale log A(H) = 12.00. The discordance with the value found from carbonaceous chondrites may arise from faulty f-values or from difficulties arising from line blending in this far ultraviolet domain of the solar spectrum. PMID:16578735

  14. Hydridomethyl iridium complex

    DOEpatents

    Bergman, Robert G. (P.O. Box 7141, San Francisco, CA 94120-7141); Buchanan, J. Michael (P.O. Box 7141, San Francisco, CA 94120-7141); Stryker, Jeffrey M. (P.O. Box 7141, San Francisco, CA 94120-7141); Wax, Michael J. (P.O. Box 7141, San Francisco, CA 94120-7141)

    1989-01-01

    A process for functionalizing methane comprising: (a) reacting methane with a hydridoalkyl metal complex of the formula: CpIr[P(R.sub.1).sub.3 ]H(R.sub.2) wherein Cp represents a cyclopentadienyl or alkylcyclopentadienyl radical having from 1 to 5 carbon atoms; Ir represents an iridium atom; P represents a phosphorus atom; R.sub.1 represents an alkyl group; R.sub.2 represents an alkyl group having at least two carbon atoms; and H represents a hydrogen atom, in the presence of a liquid alkane R.sub.3 H having at least three carbon atoms to form a hydridomethyl complex of the formula: CpIr[P(R.sub.1).sub.3 ]HMe where Me represents a methyl radical. (b) reacting said hydridomethyl complex with an organic halogenating agent such as a tetrahalomethane or a haloform of the formulas: CX'X"X'"X"" or CHX'X"X'"; wherein X', X", X"', and X"" represent halogens selected from bromine, iodine and chlorine, to halomethyl complex of step (a) having the formula: CpIr[P(R.sub.1).sub.3 ]MeX: (c) reacting said halomethyl complex with a mercuric halide of the formula HgX.sub.2 to form a methyl mercuric halide of the formula HgMeX; and (d) reacting said methyl mercuric halide with a molecular halogen of the formula X.sub.2 to form methyl halide.

  15. Hysteresis in Metal Hydrides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flanagan, Ted B., And Others

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes a reproducible process where the irreversibility can be readily evaluated and provides a thermodynamic description of the important phenomenon of hysteresis. A metal hydride is used because hysteresis is observed during the formation and decomposition of the hydride phase. (RH)

  16. Chemistry of intermetallic hydrides

    SciTech Connect

    Reilly, J.J.

    1991-01-01

    Certain intermetallic hydrides are safe, convenient and inexpensive hydrogen storage compounds. A particular advantage of such compounds is the ease with which their properties can be modified by small changes in alloy composition or preparation. This quality can be exploited to optimize their storage properties for particular applications, e.g. as intermetallic hydride electrodes in batteries. We will be concerned herein with the more important aspects of the thermodynamic and structural principles which regulate the behavior of intermetallic hydrogen systems and then illustrate their application using the archetype hydrides of LaNi5, FeTi and Mg alloys. The practical utility of these classes of materials will be briefly noted.

  17. Iridium-Catalyzed Allylic Substitution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartwig, John F.; Pouy, Mark J.

    Iridium-catalyzed asymmetric allylic substitution has become a valuable method to prepare products from the addition of nucleophiles at the more substituted carbon of an allyl unit. The most active and selective catalysts contain a phosphoramidite ligand possessing at least one arylethyl substituent on the nitrogen atom of the ligand. In these systems, the active catalyst is generated by a base-induced cyclometalation at the methyl group of this substituent to generate an iridium metalacycle bound by the COD ligand of the [Ir(COD)Cl]2 precursor and one additional labile dative ligand. Such complexes catalyze the reactions of linear allylic esters with alkylamines, arylamines, phenols, alcohols, imides, carbamates, ammonia, enolates and enolate equivalents, as well as typical stabilized carbon nucleophiles generated from malonates and cyanoesters. Iridium catalysts for enantioselective allylic substitution have also been generated from phosphorus ligands with substituents bound by heteroatoms, and an account of the studies of such systems, along with a description of the development of iridium catalysts is included.

  18. IRIDIUM LINER FOR NASA 5 LBF CLASS MATERIAL TEST CHAMBER IRIDIUM LINER FOR ATLANTIC RESEARCH CORPORA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    IRIDIUM LINER FOR NASA 5 LBF CLASS MATERIAL TEST CHAMBER IRIDIUM LINER FOR ATLANTIC RESEARCH CORPORATION 5 LBF CLASS ROCKET CHAMBER 25 LBF CLASS 75 HFC 25 TAC CERAMIC COMPOSITE ROCKET CHAMBER FROM REFRACTURY COMPOSITES INC. PURCHASE ORDER C-551941-

  19. Analytical Characterization of Microlithographically Fabricated Iridium-Based Ultramicroelectrode Arrays

    E-print Network

    Kounaves, Samuel P.

    Analytical Characterization of Microlithographically Fabricated Iridium-Based Ultramicroelectrode Final version: October 31, 1997 Abstract The analytical performance of several mercury-coated iridiumUMEA surfaces. Keywords: Mercury-coated iridium ultramicroelectrode arrays, Stripping voltammetry

  20. Iridium-Catalyzed C-C Coupling of a Simple Propargyl Ether with Primary Alcohols: Enantioselective Homoaldol Addition via Redox-Triggered (Z)-Siloxyallylation.

    PubMed

    Liang, Tao; Zhang, Wandi; Krische, Michael J

    2015-12-30

    A chiral iridium complex formed in situ from [Ir(cod)Cl]2 and (R)-H8-BINAP is found to catalyze the direct enantioselective C-C coupling of a simple propargyl ether, TIPSOCH2C?CH, with primary alcohols to form ?-hydroxy (Z)-enol silanes with uniformly high enantioselectivity and complete alkene (Z)-stereoselectivity. As corroborated by deuterium labeling studies, these studies represent the first examples of 1,2-hydride shift-enabled ?-allyl formation in the context of iridium catalysis. PMID:26671223

  1. Lightweight hydride storage materials

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, G.J.; Guthrie, S.E.; Bauer, W.

    1995-09-01

    The need for lightweight hydrides in vehicular applications has prompted considerable research into the use of magnesium and its alloys. Although this earlier work has provided some improved performance in operating temperature and pressure, substantial improvements are needed before these materials will significantly enhance the performance of an engineered system on a vehicle. We are extending the work of previous investigators on Mg alloys to reduce the operating temperature and hydride heat of formation in light weight materials. Two important results will be discussed in this paper: (1) a promising new alloy hydride was found which has better pressure-temperature characteristics than any previous Mg alloy and, (2) a new fabrication process for existing Mg alloys was developed and demonstrated. The new alloy hydride is composed of magnesium, aluminum and nickel. It has an equilibrium hydrogen overpressure of 1.3 atm. at 200{degrees}C and a storage capacity between 3 and 4 wt.% hydrogen. A hydrogen release rate of approximately 5 x 10{sup -4} moles-H{sub 2}/gm-min was measured at 200{degrees}C. The hydride heat of formation was found to be 13.5 - 14 kcal/mole-H{sub 2}, somewhat lower than Mg{sub 2}Ni. The new fabrication method takes advantage of the high vapor transport of magnesium. It was found that Mg{sub 2}Ni produced by our low temperature process was better than conventional materials because it was single phase (no Mg phase) and could be fabricated with very small particle sizes. Hydride measurements on this material showed faster kinetic response than conventional material. The technique could potentially be applied to in-situ hydride bed fabrication with improved packing density, release kinetics, thermal properties and mechanical stability.

  2. Boron hydride polymer coated substrates

    DOEpatents

    Pearson, R.K.; Bystroff, R.I.; Miller, D.E.

    1986-08-27

    A method is disclosed for coating a substrate with a uniformly smooth layer of a boron hydride polymer. The method comprises providing a reaction chamber which contains the substrate and the boron hydride plasma. A boron hydride feed stock is introduced into the chamber simultaneously with the generation of a plasma discharge within the chamber. A boron hydride plasma of ions, electrons and free radicals which is generated by the plasma discharge interacts to form a uniformly smooth boron hydride polymer which is deposited on the substrate.

  3. Boron hydride polymer coated substrates

    DOEpatents

    Pearson, Richard K. (Pleasanton, CA); Bystroff, Roman I. (Livermore, CA); Miller, Dale E. (Livermore, CA)

    1987-01-01

    A method is disclosed for coating a substrate with a uniformly smooth layer of a boron hydride polymer. The method comprises providing a reaction chamber which contains the substrate and the boron hydride plasma. A boron hydride feed stock is introduced into the chamber simultaneously with the generation of a plasma discharge within the chamber. A boron hydride plasma of ions, electrons and free radicals which is generated by the plasma discharge interacts to form a uniformly smooth boron hydride polymer which is deposited on the substrate.

  4. Electronic Structure of Iridium Clusters on Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Bradford A.; Bradley, Aaron J.; Ugeda, Miguel M.; Coh, Sinisa; Zettl, Alex; Crommie, Michael F.; Cohen, Marvin L.; Louie, Steven G.

    2015-03-01

    Graphene was predicted to exhibit non-trivial Z2 topology, but its exceedingly weak spin-orbit coupling prevented this from being observed. Previous theoretical work has proposed enhancing the spin-orbit coupling strength by depositing individual adatoms adsorbed onto the surface of graphene. We show experimental evidence that the iridium adatoms cluster, with a cluster size of at least two atoms. We investigate through theoretical calculations the orientation of the iridium dimers on graphene, contrast the electronic structure of iridium dimers with iridium monomers, and compare the theoretical iridium dimer electronic structure calculations with the experimental results determined via scanning tunneling spectroscopy. This work was supported by NSF Grant No. DMR10-1006184 and U.S. DOE under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. Computational resources have been provided by DOE at LBNL's NERSC facility.

  5. Iridium material for hydrothermal oxidation environments

    DOEpatents

    Hong, Glenn T. (Tewksbury, MA); Zilberstein, Vladimir A. (Brookline, MA)

    1996-01-01

    A process for hydrothermal oxidation of combustible materials in which, during at least a part of the oxidation, corrosive material is present and makes contact with at least a portion of the apparatus over a contact area on the apparatus. At least a portion of the contact surface area comprises iridium, iridium oxide, an iridium alloy, or a base metal overlaid with an iridium coating. Iridium has been found to be highly resistant to environments encountered in the process of hydrothermal oxidation. Such environments typically contain greater than 50 mole percent water, together with oxygen, carbon dioxide, and a wide range of acids, bases and salts. Pressures are typically about 27.5 to about 1000 bar while temperatures range as high as 800.degree. C.

  6. TCP Performance Enhancement Over Iridium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torgerson, Leigh; Hutcherson, Joseph; McKelvey, James

    2007-01-01

    In support of iNET maturation, NASA-JPL has collaborated with NASA-Dryden to develop, test and demonstrate an over-the-horizon vehicle-to-ground networking capability, using Iridium as the vehicle-to-ground communications link for relaying critical vehicle telemetry. To ensure reliability concerns are met, the Space Communications Protocol Standards (SCPS) transport protocol was investigated for its performance characteristics in this environment. In particular, the SCPS-TP software performance was compared to that of the standard Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) over the Internet Protocol (IP). This paper will report on the results of this work.

  7. Neuronal cell growth on iridium oxide.

    PubMed

    Göbbels, Katrin; Kuenzel, Thomas; van Ooyen, André; Baumgartner, Werner; Schnakenberg, Uwe; Bräunig, Peter

    2010-02-01

    Iridium oxide is an attractive material for the development of novel multi electrode array (MEA) systems that provide electrodes for stimulation as well as recording single neurons. In this study the biocompatibility of pure iridium and different iridium oxides that differ characteristically in their surface roughness was investigated using two different biological test systems, insect and vertebrate neurons. Iridium oxide surfaces were coated with Concanavalin A and poly-(D)-lysine. In detailed investigations (R(a) value determination, contact angle measurement, marker enzyme assay) the surface characteristics of non-modified and coated iridium oxide films were analysed, demonstrating that the materials can be successfully coated. Furthermore, we show that locust neurons grow well on all substrates tested, while chicken neurons need coated surfaces for proper adhesion. Increasing the roughness of iridium oxide films, which in principle could improve cell adhesion, did not improve the neurocompatibility. These results show that in future applications iridium oxide films can be used with surface morphologies previously shown to be optimal for stimulation purposes (cauliflower-like surface structure). PMID:19857894

  8. On the dissolution of iridium by aluminum.

    SciTech Connect

    Hewson, John C.

    2009-08-01

    The potential for liquid aluminum to dissolve an iridium solid is examined. Substantial uncertainties exist in material properties, and the available data for the iridium solubility and iridium diffusivity are discussed. The dissolution rate is expressed in terms of the regression velocity of the solid iridium when exposed to the solvent (aluminum). The temperature has the strongest influence in the dissolution rate. This dependence comes primarily from the solubility of iridium in aluminum and secondarily from the temperature dependence of the diffusion coefficient. This dissolution mass flux is geometry dependent and results are provided for simplified geometries at constant temperatures. For situations where there is negligible convective flow, simple time-dependent diffusion solutions are provided. Correlations for mass transfer are also given for natural convection and forced convection. These estimates suggest that dissolution of iridium can be significant for temperatures well below the melting temperature of iridium, but the uncertainties in actual rates are large because of uncertainties in the physical parameters and in the details of the relevant geometries.

  9. Determining the Altitude of Iridium Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, James; Owe, Manfred

    1999-01-01

    Iridium flares have nothing to do with the element iridium. Iridium is also the name of a telecommunications company that has been launching satellites into low orbits around the Earth. These satellites are being used for a new type of wireless phone and paging service. Flares have been observed coming from these satellites. These flares have the potential, especially when the full fleet of satellites is in orbit, to disrupt astronomical observations. The paper reviews using simple trigonometry how to calculate the altitude of one of these satellites.

  10. DC Breakdown Experiments with Iridium Cathode

    E-print Network

    Profatilova, Iaroslava; Korsback, Anders; Muranaka, Tomoko; Wuensch, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Electrical breakdown occurring in rf accelerating structures is one of the major disruptions of the accelerated beam in CLIC. At CERN, as complements to rf facilities, DC-spark systems have been used to study breakdown properties of many candidate materials for making rf components. In this note, measurements of conditioning speed, breakdown field and field enhancement factor of iridium are presented comparing with previously tested materials. The average breakdown field after conditioning reached 238 MV/m, which places iridium next to copper. By comparison with results and properties of other metals, the low breakdown field of iridium could be explained by its face-centred-cubic crystal structure.

  11. Destabilization of magnesium hydride through interface engineering

    E-print Network

    Dam, Bernard

    Destabilization of magnesium hydride through interface engineering Lennard Mooij #12;Destabilization of magnesium hydride through interface engineering PROEFSCHRIFT ter verkrijging van de graad van . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 1.3 Magnesium hydride . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 1

  12. Method for preparing porous metal hydride compacts

    DOEpatents

    Ron, Moshe (Haifa, IL); Gruen, Dieter M. (Downers Grove, IL); Mendelsohn, Marshall H. (Woodridge, IL); Sheft, Irving (Oak Park, IL)

    1981-01-01

    A method for preparing porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts which can be repeatedly hydrided and dehydrided without disintegration. A mixture of a finely divided metal hydride and a finely divided matrix metal is contacted with a poison which prevents the metal hydride from dehydriding at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The mixture of matrix metal and poisoned metal hydride is then compacted under pressure at room temperature to form porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts.

  13. Method for preparing porous metal hydride compacts

    DOEpatents

    Ron, M.; Gruen, D.M.; Mendelsohn, M.H.; Sheft, I.

    1980-01-21

    A method for preparing porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts which can be repeatedly hydrided and dehydrided without disintegration. A mixture of a finely divided metal hydride and a finely divided matrix metal is contacted with a poison which prevents the metal hydride from dehydriding at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The mixture of matrix metal and poisoned metal hydride is then compacted under pressure at room temperature to form porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts.

  14. 17. VIEW OF HYDRIDING SYSTEM IN BUILDING 881. THE HYDRIDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. VIEW OF HYDRIDING SYSTEM IN BUILDING 881. THE HYDRIDING SYSTEM WAS PART OF THE FAST ENRICHED URANIUM RECOVERY PROCESS. (11/11/59) - Rocky Flats Plant, General Manufacturing, Support, Records-Central Computing, Southern portion of Plant, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  15. Hydrogenation using hydrides and acid

    DOEpatents

    Bullock, R. Morris (Wading River, NY)

    1990-10-30

    A process for the non-catalytic hydrogenation of organic compounds, which contain at least one reducible functional group, which comprises reacting the organic compound, a hydride complex, preferably a transition metal hydride complex or an organosilane, and a strong acid in a liquid phase.

  16. Dimensionally stable metallic hydride composition

    DOEpatents

    Heung, Leung K. (Aiken, SC)

    1994-01-01

    A stable, metallic hydride composition and a process for making such a composition. The composition comprises a uniformly blended mixture of a metal hydride, kieselguhr, and a ballast metal, all in the form of particles. The composition is made by subjecting a metal hydride to one or more hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles to disintegrate the hydride particles to less than approximately 100 microns in size. The particles are partly oxidized, then blended with the ballast metal and the kieselguhr to form a uniform mixture. The mixture is compressed into pellets and calcined. Preferably, the mixture includes approximately 10 vol. % or more kieselguhr and approximately 50 vol. % or more ballast. Metal hydrides that can be used in the composition include Zr, Ti, V, Nb, Pd, as well as binary, tertiary, and more complex alloys of La, Al, Cu, Ti, Co, Ni, Fe, Zr, Mg, Ca, Mn, and mixtures and other combinations thereof. Ballast metals include Al, Cu and Ni.

  17. Salt passivation during anodic iridium dissolution in chloride melts

    SciTech Connect

    Saltykova, N.A.; Pechorskaya, L.S.; Baraboshkin, A.N.; Kotovskii, S.N.; Kosikhin, L.T.

    1986-11-01

    Anodic iridium dissolution in chloride melts at 500-700/sup 0/C was studied by potentiostatic, potentiodynamic, and galvanostatic techniques. It was found that an iridium anode is passivated by hexachloroiridates, first by the iridium (III) salt and at more positive potentials by the iridium (IV) salt. Values for anode resistance during passivation by salt films were calculated. It was shown that the morphology of the dissolving anode surface is determined by the value of polarization.

  18. "Globalstar, Iridium and other Satellite-Based Mobile Phone

    E-print Network

    1 "Globalstar, Iridium and other Satellite-Based Mobile Phone Systems: How Do they Work and Where formed in the early 90's ­ Iridium [LEO, intersatellite links] ­ Globalstar [LEO, satellite diversity in their Flying Machines Iridium LEO Polar TDMA Globalstar LEO Inclined CDMA ICO MEO Inclined Custom Constellation

  19. IRIDIUM (R): A Lockheed transition to commercial space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tadano, Thomas N.

    1995-01-01

    At Lockheed Missiles & Space Company, the IRIDIUM commercial space program is dramatically revolutionizing spacecraft development and manufacturing processes to reduce cost while maintaining quality and reliability. This report includes the following sections: an overview of the IRIDIUM system, the Lockheed IRIDIUM project and challenges; cycle-time reduction through production reorganization; and design for manufacturing and quality.

  20. Erbium hydride decomposition kinetics.

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrizz, Robert Matthew

    2006-11-01

    Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) is used to study the decomposition kinetics of erbium hydride thin films. The TDS results presented in this report are analyzed quantitatively using Redhead's method to yield kinetic parameters (E{sub A} {approx} 54.2 kcal/mol), which are then utilized to predict hydrogen outgassing in vacuum for a variety of thermal treatments. Interestingly, it was found that the activation energy for desorption can vary by more than 7 kcal/mol (0.30 eV) for seemingly similar samples. In addition, small amounts of less-stable hydrogen were observed for all erbium dihydride films. A detailed explanation of several approaches for analyzing thermal desorption spectra to obtain kinetic information is included as an appendix.

  1. Europium palladium hydrides.

    PubMed

    Kohlmann, H; Fischer, H E; Yvon, K

    2001-05-21

    The first fully structurally characterized ternary europium palladium hydrides (deuterides) are reported. The most Eu rich compound is Eu(2)PdD(4). Its beta-K(2)SO(4) type structure (space group Pnma, a = 749.47(1) pm, b = 543.34(1) pm, c = 947.91(1) pm, Z = 4) contains tetrahedral 18-electron [PdD(4)](4)(-) complex anions and divalent Eu cations. The compound is presumably nonmetallic and shows paramagnetic behavior (mu(eff) = 8.0(2) mu(B)) with ferromagnetic ordering at T(C) = 15.1(4) K. A metallic compound at intermediate Eu content is EuPdD(3). It crystallizes with the cubic perovskite structure (space group Pm3m, a = 380.01(2) pm, Z = 1) in which palladium is octahedrally surrounded by fully occupied deuterium sites. Metallic hydrides at low Eu content form by reversible hydrogen absorption of intermetallic EuPd(2) (Fd3m, a = 775.91(1) pm, Z = 8). Depending on the experimental conditions at least three phases with distinctly different hydrogen contents x exist: EuPd(2)H(x) ( approximately )(0.1) (a = 777.02(2) pm, Z = 8, T = 298 K, p(H(2)) = 590 kPa), EuPd(2)H(x) ( approximately )(1.5) (a = 794.47(5) pm, Z = 8, T = 298 K, p(H(2)) = 590 kPa), and EuPd(2)H(x) ( approximately )(2.1) (a = 802.1(1) pm, Z = 8, T = 350 K, p(H(2)) = 610 kPa). All crystallize with cubic Laves phase derivative structures and have presumably disordered hydrogen distributions. PMID:11350241

  2. Complex Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Slattery, Darlene; Hampton, Michael

    2003-03-10

    This report describes research into the use of complex hydrides for hydrogen storage. The synthesis of a number of alanates, (AIH4) compounds, was investigated. Both wet chemical and mechano-chemical methods were studied.

  3. Hydride development for hydrogen storage

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, G.J.; Guthrie, S.E.; Bauer, W.; Yang, N.Y.C.; Sandrock, G.

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this project is to develop and demonstrate improved hydride materials for hydrogen storage. The work currently is organized into four tasks: hydride development, bed fabrication, materials support for engineering systems, and IEA Annex 12 activities. At the present time, hydride development is focused on Mg alloys. These materials generally have higher weight densities for storing hydrogen than rare earth or transition metal alloys, but suffer from high operating temperatures, slow kinetic behavior and material stability. The authors approach is to study bulk alloy additions which increase equilibrium overpressure, in combination with stable surface alloy modification and particle size control to improve kinetic properties. This work attempts to build on the considerable previous research in this area, but examines specific alloy systems in greater detail, with attention to known phase properties and structures. The authors have found that specific phases can be produced which have significantly improved hydride properties compared to previous studies.

  4. Annealing Increases Stability Of Iridium Thermocouples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Germain, Edward F.; Daryabeigi, Kamran; Alderfer, David W.; Wright, Robert E.; Ahmed, Shaffiq

    1989-01-01

    Metallurgical studies carried out on samples of iridium versus iridium/40-percent rhodium thermocouples in condition received from manufacturer. Metallurgical studies included x-ray, macroscopic, resistance, and metallographic studies. Revealed large amount of internal stress caused by cold-working during manufacturing, and large number of segregations and inhomogeneities. Samples annealed in furnace at temperatures from 1,000 to 2,000 degree C for intervals up to 1 h to study effects of heat treatment. Wire annealed by this procedure found to be ductile.

  5. Iridium emissions from Hawaiian volcanoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finnegan, D. L.; Zoller, W. H.; Miller, T. M.

    1988-01-01

    Particle and gas samples were collected at Mauna Loa volcano during and after its eruption in March and April, 1984 and at Kilauea volcano in 1983, 1984, and 1985 during various phases of its ongoing activity. In the last two Kilauea sampling missions, samples were collected during eruptive activity. The samples were collected using a filterpack system consisting of a Teflon particle filter followed by a series of 4 base-treated Whatman filters. The samples were analyzed by INAA for over 40 elements. As previously reported in the literature, Ir was first detected on particle filters at the Mauna Loa Observatory and later from non-erupting high temperature vents at Kilauea. Since that time Ir was found in samples collected at Kilauea and Mauna Loa during fountaining activity as well as after eruptive activity. Enrichment factors for Ir in the volcanic fumes range from 10,000 to 100,000 relative to BHVO. Charcoal impregnated filters following a particle filter were collected to see if a significant amount of the Ir was in the gas phase during sample collection. Iridium was found on charcoal filters collected close to the vent, no Ir was found on the charcoal filters. This indicates that all of the Ir is in particulate form very soon after its release. Ratios of Ir to F and Cl were calculated for the samples from Mauna Loa and Kilauea collected during fountaining activity. The implications for the KT Ir anomaly are still unclear though as Ir was not found at volcanoes other than those at Hawaii. Further investigations are needed at other volcanoes to ascertain if basaltic volcanoes other than hot spots have Ir enrichments in their fumes.

  6. Low density metal hydride foams

    DOEpatents

    Maienschein, Jon L. (Oakland, CA); Barry, Patrick E. (Pleasant Hill, CA)

    1991-01-01

    Disclosed is a low density foam having a porosity of from 0 to 98% and a density less than about 0.67 gm/cc, prepared by heating a mixture of powered lithium hydride and beryllium hydride in an inert atmosphere at a temperature ranging from about 455 to about 490 K for a period of time sufficient to cause foaming of said mixture, and cooling the foam thus produced. Also disclosed is the process of making the foam.

  7. Fundamental experiments on hydride reorientation in zircaloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colas, Kimberly B.

    In the current study, an in-situ X-ray diffraction technique using synchrotron radiation was used to follow directly the kinetics of hydride dissolution and precipitation during thermomechanical cycles. This technique was combined with conventional microscopy (optical, SEM and TEM) to gain an overall understanding of the process of hydride reorientation. Thus this part of the study emphasized the time-dependent nature of the process, studying large volume of hydrides in the material. In addition, a micro-diffraction technique was also used to study the spatial distribution of hydrides near stress concentrations. This part of the study emphasized the spatial variation of hydride characteristics such as strain and morphology. Hydrided samples in the shape of tensile dog-bones were used in the time-dependent part of the study. Compact tension specimens were used during the spatial dependence part of the study. The hydride elastic strains from peak shift and size and strain broadening were studied as a function of time for precipitating hydrides. The hydrides precipitate in a very compressed state of stress, as measured by the shift in lattice spacing. As precipitation proceeds the average shift decreases, indicating average stress is reduced, likely due to plastic deformation and morphology changes. When nucleation ends the hydrides follow the zirconium matrix thermal contraction. When stress is applied below the threshold stress for reorientation, hydrides first nucleate in a very compressed state similar to that of unstressed hydrides. After reducing the average strain similarly to unstressed hydrides, the average hydride strain reaches a constant value during cool-down to room temperature. This could be due to a greater ease of deforming the matrix due to the applied far-field strain which would compensate for the strains due to thermal contraction. Finally when hydrides reorient, the average hydride strains become tensile during the first precipitation regime and remain constant in the tensile direction during the second precipitation regime. This could be due to the fact that the face of reoriented hydride platelet is in compression once these platelets have grown to a sufficient size. The second goal of this study was to perform a spatially resolved study of the effect of a stress concentration such as a notch or a crack on hydride reorientation. Using SEM and image analysis, it was found that a sharp crack induces a different hydride microstructure than a blunt notch. In the case of sharp crack, hydrides are more localized and align more with the defect than for blunt notches. The hydride connectivity also increases close to a stress concentration which will assist in crack propagation during DHC. Using TEM, the microstructure of hydrides grown near crack tips were observed to be similar to that of circumferential hydrides grown in the bulk. The orientation relationship studied with SEM and micro-X-ray diffraction was found to be in most cases ?(111)// ?(0002) for hydrides grown both near and far from stress concentrations. Using the same micro-X-ray diffraction technique local hydride and matrix elastic strains were measured and observed to vary significantly from grain to grain. It was however observed that hydrides grown close to the stress concentration are in tension in the face of the platelet, similar to reoriented hydrides, while those grown far from the stress concentration are in tension, similar to circumferential hydrides. The orders of magnitude of the measured strains in the hydrides and the zirconium matrix compared well to those predicted by finite element models. This study shows that it is possible to study hydride dissolution and precipitation in-situ using time-dependent techniques. It was found that the precipitation temperature is lowered by hydride reorientation. The evolution of hydride strains during precipitation was found to be different for unstressed, stressed and reoriented hydrides. The reoriented hydride fraction and connectivity increase with number of cycles which could lead to mor

  8. Osmium-191/iridium-191m radionuclide

    DOEpatents

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Butler, T.A.; Brihaye, C.

    1985-08-26

    A generator system to provide iridium-191m for clinical imaging applications comprises an activated carbon adsorbent loaded with a compound containing the parent nuclide, osmium-191. The generator, which has a shelf-life in excess of two weeks and does not require a scavenger column, can be eluted with physiologically compatible saline. 4 figs. 3 tabs.

  9. Osmium-191/iridium-191m radionuclide

    DOEpatents

    Knapp, Jr., Furn F. (Oak Ridge, TN); Butler, Thomas A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Brihaye, Claude (Liege, BE)

    1987-01-01

    A generator system to provide iridium-191m for clinical imaging applications comprises an activated carbon adsorbent loaded with a compound containing the parent nuclide, osmium-191. The generator, which has a shelf-life in excess of two weeks and does not require a scavenger column, can be eluted with physiologically compatible saline.

  10. Iridium-Coated Rhenium Combustion Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Steven J.; Tuffias, Robert H.; Rosenberg, Sanders D.

    1994-01-01

    Iridium-coated rhenium combustion chamber withstands operating temperatures up to 2,200 degrees C. Chamber designed to replace older silicide-coated combustion chamber in small rocket engine. Modified versions of newer chamber could be designed for use on Earth in gas turbines, ramjets, and scramjets.

  11. Iridium-192 Production for Cancer Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Rostelato, M.E.C.M.; Silva, C.P.G.; Rela, P.R.; Zeituni, C.A.; Lepki, V.; Feher, A.

    2004-10-05

    The purpose of this work is to settle a laboratory for Iridium -192 sources production, that is, to determine a wire activation method and to build a hot cell for the wires manipulation, quality control and packaging. The paper relates, mainly, the wire activation method and its quality control. The wire activation is carried out in our nuclear reactor, IEA- R1m.

  12. Enantioselective iridium-catalyzed allylic arylation.

    PubMed

    Polet, Damien; Rathgeb, Xavier; Falciola, Caroline A; Langlois, Jean-Baptiste; El Hajjaji, Samir; Alexakis, Alexandre

    2009-01-01

    We describe herein the development of the first iridium-catalyzed allylic substitution using arylzinc nucleophiles. High enantioselectivities were obtained from the reactions, which used commercially available Grignard reagents as the starting materials. This methodology was also shown to be compatible with halogen/metal exchange reactions. Its synthetic potential is demonstrated by its application towards the formal synthesis of (+)-sertraline. PMID:19072966

  13. Iridium-catalyzed enantioselective polyene cyclization.

    PubMed

    Schafroth, Michael A; Sarlah, David; Krautwald, Simon; Carreira, Erick M

    2012-12-19

    A highly enantioselective polycyclization method has been developed using the combination of Lewis acid activation with iridium-catalyzed allylic substitution. This strategy relies on direct use of branched, racemic allylic alcohols and furnishes a diverse and unique set of carbo- and heteropolycyclic ring systems in good yields and ?99% ee. PMID:23193947

  14. Hydrogen, lithium, and lithium hydride production

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Sam W; Spencer, Larry S; Phillips, Michael R; Powell, G. Louis; Campbell, Peggy J

    2014-03-25

    A method of producing high purity lithium metal is provided, where gaseous-phase lithium metal is extracted from lithium hydride and condensed to form solid high purity lithium metal. The high purity lithium metal may be hydrided to provide high purity lithium hydride.

  15. Method of producing a chemical hydride

    DOEpatents

    Klingler, Kerry M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Zollinger, William T. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wilding, Bruce M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Bingham, Dennis N. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wendt, Kraig M. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2007-11-13

    A method of producing a chemical hydride is described and which includes selecting a composition having chemical bonds and which is capable of forming a chemical hydride; providing a source of a hydrocarbon; and reacting the composition with the source of the hydrocarbon to generate a chemical hydride.

  16. Vanadium hydride deuterium-tritium generator

    DOEpatents

    Christensen, Leslie D. (Livermore, CA)

    1982-01-01

    A pressure controlled vanadium hydride gas generator to provide deuterium-tritium gas in a series of pressure increments. A high pressure chamber filled with vanadium-deuterium-tritium hydride is surrounded by a heater which controls the hydride temperature. The heater is actuated by a power controller which responds to the difference signal between the actual pressure signal and a programmed pressure signal.

  17. Application of the Iridium Satellite System to Aeronautical Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerczewski, Robert J.; Meza, Mike; Gupta, Om

    2008-01-01

    The next generation air transportation system will require greater air-ground communications capacity to accommodate more air traffic with increased safety and efficiency. Communications will remain primarily terrestrially based, but satellite communications will have an increased role. Inmarsat s aeronautical services have been approved and are in use for aeronautical safety communications provided by geostationary satellites. More recently the approval process for the Iridium low earth orbit constellation is nearing completion. The current Iridium system will be able to provide basic air traffic services communications suitable for oceanic, remote and polar regions. The planned second generation of the Iridium system, called Iridium NEXT, will provide enhanced capabilities and enable a greater role in the future of aeronautical communications. This paper will review the potential role of satellite communications in the future of air transportation, the Iridium approval process and relevant system testing, and the potential role of Iridium NEXT.

  18. Efficient Yellow Electroluminescence from a Single Layer of a Cyclometalated Iridium Complex

    E-print Network

    Bernhard, Stefan

    Efficient Yellow Electroluminescence from a Single Layer of a Cyclometalated Iridium Complex Jason been tried in single-layer electroluminescent devices. Complexes of iridium have been used extensively

  19. Weldability of general purpose heat source iridium capsules

    SciTech Connect

    Kanne, W.R. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Two weldability tests developed by ORNL for plate material have been demonstrated on iridium (Goodwin 1987 and David 1987), but neither test is applicable to underbead cracking in a capsule configuration. As a result of underbead cracking of welded iridium capsules at SRP, a weldability test was designed and demonstrated on capsules to measure the susceptibility of different batches of iridium to underbead cracking. The capsule weldability test and its use to determine the relative weldability of the ORNL new-process iridium is presented in this paper. 6 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  20. Iridium-coated rhenium thrusters by CVD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, J. T.; Kazaroff, J. M.; Appel, M. A.

    1989-01-01

    Operation of spacecraft thrusters at increased temperature reduces propellant requirements. Inasmuch as propellant comprises the bulk of a satellite's mass, even a small percentage reduction makes possible a significant enhancement of the mission in terms of increased payload. Because of its excellent high temperature strength, rhenium is often the structural material of choice. It can be fabricated into free-standing shapes by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) onto an expendable mandrel. What rhenium lacks is oxidation resistance, but this can be provided by a coating of iridium, also by CVD. This paper describes the process used by Ultramet to fabricate 22-N (5-lbf) and, more recently, 445-N (100-lbf) Ir/Re thrusters; characterizes the CVD-deposited materials; and summarizes the materials effects of firing these thrusters. Optimal propellant mixture ratios can be employed because the materials withstand an oxidizing environment up to the melting temperature of iridium, 2400 C (4350 F).

  1. Iridium-coated rhenium thrusters by CVD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, John T.; Kazaroff, John M.; Appel, Marshall A.

    1988-01-01

    Operation of spacecraft thrusters at increased temperature reduces propellant requirements. Inasmuch as propellant comprises the bulk of a satellite's mass, even a small percentage reduction makes possible a significant enhancement of the mission in terms of increased payload. Because of its excellent high temperature strength, rhenium is often the structural material of choice. It can be fabricated into free-standing shapes by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) onto an expendable mandrel. What rhenium lacks is oxidation resistance, but this can be provided by a coating of iridium, also by CVD. This paper describes the process used by Ultramet to fabricate 22-N (5-lbf) and, more recently, 445-N (100-lbf) Ir/Re thrusters; characterizes the CVD-deposited materials; and summarizes the materials effects of firing these thrusters. Optimal propellant mixture ratios can be employed because the materials withstand an oxidizing environment up to the meltimg temperature of iridium, 2400 C (4350 F).

  2. Iridium-Catalyzed Hydrogen Transfer Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saidi, Ourida; Williams, Jonathan M. J.

    This chapter describes the application of iridium complexes to catalytic hydrogen transfer reactions. Transfer hydrogenation reactions provide an alternative to direct hydrogenation for the reduction of a range of substrates. A hydrogen donor, typically an alcohol or formic acid, can be used as the source of hydrogen for the reduction of carbonyl compounds, imines, and alkenes. Heteroaromatic compounds and even carbon dioxide have also been reduced by transfer hydrogenation reactions. In the reverse process, the oxidation of alcohols to carbonyl compounds can be achieved by iridium-catalyzed hydrogen transfer reactions, where a ketone or alkene is used as a suitable hydrogen acceptor. The reversible nature of many hydrogen transfer processes has been exploited for the racemization of alcohols, where temporary removal of hydrogen generates an achiral ketone intermediate. In addition, there is a growing body of work where temporary removal of hydrogen provides an opportunity for using alcohols as alkylating agents. In this chemistry, an iridium catalyst "borrows" hydrogen from an alcohol to give an aldehyde or ketone intermediate, which can be transformed into either an imine or alkene under the reaction conditions. Return of the hydrogen from the catalyst provides methodology for the formation of amines or C-C bonds where the only by-product is typically water.

  3. Microstructure of surface cerium hydride growth sites

    SciTech Connect

    Brierley, Martin; Knowles, John; Montgomery, Neil; Preuss, Michael

    2014-05-15

    Samples of cerium were exposed to hydrogen under controlled conditions causing cerium hydride sites to nucleate and grow on the surface. The hydriding rate was measured in situ, and the hydrides were characterised using secondary ion mass spectrometry, scanning electron microscopy, and optical microscopy. The results show that the hydriding rate proceeded more quickly than earlier studies. Characterisation confirmed that the hydrogen is confined to the sites. The morphology of the hydrides was confirmed to be oblate, and stressed material was observed surrounding the hydride, in a number of cases lathlike features were observed surrounding the hydride sites laterally with cracking in the surface oxide above them. It is proposed that during growth the increased lattice parameter of the CeH{sub 2} induces a lateral compressive stress around the hydride, which relieves by the ca. 16% volume collapse of the ?-Ce to ?-Ce pressure induced phase transition. Cracking of the surface oxide above the laths reduces the diffusion barrier to hydrogen reaching the metal/oxide interface surrounding the hydride site and contributes to the anisotropic growth of the hydrides.

  4. Variation of iridium in a differentiated tholeiitic dolerite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greenland, L.P.

    1971-01-01

    Iridium has been determined in a drill core from the Great Lake (Tasmania) dolerite sheet. Iridium decreases systematically from the mafic dolerites (0.25 ppb) to the granophyres (0.006 ppb). The trend with differentiation closely parallels that of chromium. ?? 1971.

  5. Electrolysis of Molten Iron Oxide with an Iridium Anode: The Role of Electrolyte Basicity

    E-print Network

    Sadoway, Donald Robert

    Electrolysis of Molten Iron Oxide with an Iridium Anode: The Role of Electrolyte Basicity Hojong evolution is a critical enabling component for the technol- ogy. To this end, iridium has been evaluated to have a dramatic effect on the stability of the iridium anode. The rate of iridium loss in an acidic

  6. Metal hydride composition and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Congdon, James W. (Aiken, SC)

    1995-01-01

    A dimensionally stable hydride composition and a method for making such a composition. The composition is made by forming particles of a metal hydride into porous granules, mixing the granules with a matrix material, forming the mixture into pellets, and sintering the pellets in the absence of oxygen. The ratio of matrix material to hydride is preferably between approximately 2:1 and 4:1 by volume. The porous structure of the granules accommodates the expansion that occurs when the metal hydride particles absorb hydrogen. The porous matrix allows the flow of hydrogen therethrough to contact the hydride particles, yet supports the granules and contains the hydride fines that result from repeated absorption/desorption cycles.

  7. Use of reversible hydrides for hydrogen storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darriet, B.; Pezat, M.; Hagenmuller, P.

    1980-01-01

    The addition of metals or alloys whose hydrides have a high dissociation pressure allows a considerable increase in the hydrogenation rate of magnesium. The influence of temperature and hydrogen pressure on the reaction rate were studied. Results concerning the hydriding of magnesium rich alloys such as Mg2Ca, La2Mg17 and CeMg12 are presented. The hydriding mechanism of La2Mg17 and CeMg12 alloys is given.

  8. Vanadium hydride deuterium-tritium generator

    DOEpatents

    Christensen, L.D.

    1980-03-13

    A pressure controlled vanadium hydride gas generator was designed to provide deuterium-tritium gas in a series of pressure increments. A high pressure chamber filled with vanadium-deuterium-tritium hydride is surrounded by a heater which controls the hydride temperature. The heater is actuated by a power controller which responds to the difference signal between the actual pressure signal and a programmed pressure signal.

  9. Inhibited solid propellant composition containing beryllium hydride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, W. W. (inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An object of this invention is to provide a composition of beryllium hydride and carboxy-terminated polybutadiene which is stable. Another object of this invention is to provide a method for inhibiting the reactivity of beryllium hydride toward carboxy-terminated polybutadiene. It was found that a small amount of lecithin inhibits the reaction of beryllium hydride with the acid groups in carboxy terminated polybutadiene.

  10. Hydrogen /Hydride/-air secondary battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarradin, J.; Bronoel, G.; Percheron-Guegan, A.; Achard, J. C.

    1979-01-01

    The use of metal hydrides as negative electrodes in a hydrogen-air secondary battery seems promising. However, in an unpressurized cell, more stable hydrides that LaNi5H6 must be selected. Partial substitutions of nickel by aluminium or manganese increase the stability of hydrides. Combined with an air reversible electrode, a specific energy close to 100 Wh/kg can be expected.

  11. Iridium Film For Charge-Coupled Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hecht, Michael H.

    1990-01-01

    Usability extended to different environments. Application of thin film of iridium to back surface of back-surface-illuminated charge-coupled device expected to increase and stabilize quantum efficiency at wavelengths less than 4,500 Angstrom. Enhances quantum efficiency according to principle discussed in "Metal Film Increases CCD Output" (NPO-16815). Does not react with hydrogen, so device need not be kept in oxygen: Advantage where high absorption of ultraviolet light by oxygen undesirable; for example, when device used to make astronomical observations from high altitudes.

  12. Iridium/Rhenium Parts For Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Steven J.; Harding, John T.; Wooten, John R.

    1991-01-01

    Oxidation/corrosion of metals at high temperatures primary life-limiting mechanism of parts in rocket engines. Combination of metals greatly increases operating temperature and longevity of these parts. Consists of two transition-element metals - iridium and rhenium - that melt at extremely high temperatures. Maximum operating temperature increased to 2,200 degrees C from 1,400 degrees C. Increases operating lifetimes of small rocket engines by more than factor of 10. Possible to make hotter-operating, longer-lasting components for turbines and other heat engines.

  13. Iridium Interfacial Stack - IrIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spry, David

    2012-01-01

    Iridium Interfacial Stack (IrIS) is the sputter deposition of high-purity tantalum silicide (TaSi2-400 nm)/platinum (Pt-200 nm)/iridium (Ir-200 nm)/platinum (Pt-200 nm) in an ultra-high vacuum system followed by a 600 C anneal in nitrogen for 30 minutes. IrIS simultaneously acts as both a bond metal and a diffusion barrier. This bondable metallization that also acts as a diffusion barrier can prevent oxygen from air and gold from the wire-bond from infiltrating silicon carbide (SiC) monolithically integrated circuits (ICs) operating above 500 C in air for over 1,000 hours. This TaSi2/Pt/Ir/Pt metallization is easily bonded for electrical connection to off-chip circuitry and does not require extra anneals or masking steps. There are two ways that IrIS can be used in SiC ICs for applications above 500 C: it can be put directly on a SiC ohmic contact metal, such as Ti, or be used as a bond metal residing on top of an interconnect metal. For simplicity, only the use as a bond metal is discussed. The layer thickness ratio of TaSi2 to the first Pt layer deposited thereon should be 2:1. This will allow Si from the TaSi2 to react with the Pt to form Pt2Si during the 600 C anneal carried out after all layers have been deposited. The Ir layer does not readily form a silicide at 600 C, and thereby prevents the Si from migrating into the top-most Pt layer during future anneals and high-temperature IC operation. The second (i.e., top-most) deposited Pt layer needs to be about 200 nm to enable easy wire bonding. The thickness of 200 nm for Ir was chosen for initial experiments; further optimization of the Ir layer thickness may be possible via further experimentation. Ir itself is not easily wire-bonded because of its hardness and much higher melting point than Pt. Below the iridium layer, the TaSi2 and Pt react and form desired Pt2Si during the post-deposition anneal while above the iridium layer remains pure Pt as desired to facilitate easy and strong wire-bonding to the SiC chip circuitry.

  14. Complex hydrides for hydrogen storage

    DOEpatents

    Zidan, Ragaiy

    2006-08-22

    A hydrogen storage material and process of forming the material is provided in which complex hydrides are combined under conditions of elevated temperatures and/or elevated temperature and pressure with a titanium metal such as titanium butoxide. The resulting fused product exhibits hydrogen desorption kinetics having a first hydrogen release point which occurs at normal atmospheres and at a temperature between 50.degree. C. and 90.degree. C.

  15. Determination of tin by in situ trapping of stannane on a resistively heated iridium treated tungsten coil surface and interference studies.

    PubMed

    Alp, Orkun; Erta?, Nusret

    2010-04-15

    A novel method was developed for the in situ trapping of stannane on an iridium-coated tungsten coil. Coating the tungsten coil with iridium has significantly improved the sensitivity. The tungsten coil can either be used as an on-line atomizer or as a trapping surface. The interference effect of some hydride-forming elements such as, As(III), Se(IV), Te(IV), Sb(III) was investigated. The interference effect of Sb(III) and Se(IV) could not be completely eliminated using in situ trapping mode but the magnitude of their interferences was reduced significantly when compared to quartz T-tube atomizer. The limit of detection with iridium-coated tungsten coil for a 60s trapping period (sample volume 6 ml) was found to be 0.065 ng ml(-1) and the calibration was linear over the range of 0.5-4.0 ng ml(-1). The precision of the analytical method was determined to be 2.2% RSD (n=11) for 1.0 ng ml(-1) Sn concentration. Analytical performance of the proposed method was checked by analyzing tap water, spring water and mineral water samples for Sn. The accuracy of the method was tested with two different certified reference materials; fortified water TMDA 61 (NWRI) and Dogfish Liver DOLT-3 (NRC). The results were in a good agreement with the certified values at 95% confidence level. PMID:20188956

  16. Diminiode thermionic conversion with 111-iridium electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koeger, E. W.; Bair, V. L.; Morris, J. F.

    1976-01-01

    Preliminary data indicating thermionic-conversion potentialities for a 111-iridium emitter and collector spaced 0.2 mm apart are presented. These results comprise output densities of current and of power as functions of voltage for three sets of emitter, collector, and reservoir temperatures: 1553, 944, 561 K; 1605, 898, 533 K; and 1656, 1028, 586 K. For the 1605 K evaluation, estimates produced work-function values of 2.22 eV for the emitter and 1.63 eV for the collector with a 2.0-eV barrier index (collector work function plus interelectrode voltage drop) corresponding to the maximum output of 5.5 W/sq cm at 0.24 volt. The current, voltage curve for the 1656 K 111-iridium diminiode yields a 6.2 W/sq cm maximum at 0.25 volt and is comparable with the 1700 K envelope for a diode with an etched-rhenium emitter and a 0.025-mm electrode gap made by TECO and evaluated by NASA.

  17. Erbium hydride thermal desorption : controlling kinetics.

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrizz, Robert Matthew

    2007-08-01

    Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) is used to study the decomposition kinetics of erbium hydride thin films. The TDS results presented in this report show that hydride film processing parameters directly impact thermal stability. Issues to be addressed include desorption kinetics for dihydrides and trihydrides, and the effect of film growth parameters, loading parameters, and substrate selection on desorption kinetics.

  18. Phase control of iridium and iridium oxide thin films in atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sung-Wook; Kwon, Se-Hun; Kwak, Dong-Kee; Kang, Sang-Won

    2008-01-15

    The atomic layer deposition of iridium (Ir) and iridium oxide (IrO{sub 2}) films was investigated using an alternating supply of (ethylcyclopentadienyl)(1,5-cyclooctadiene) iridium and oxygen gas at temperatures between 230 and 290 deg. C. The phase transition between Ir and IrO{sub 2} occurred at the critical oxygen partial pressure during the oxygen injection pulse. The oxygen partial pressure was controlled by the O{sub 2}/(Ar+O{sub 2}) ratio or deposition pressures. The resistivity of the deposited Ir and IrO{sub 2} films was about 9 and 120 {mu}{omega} cm, respectively. In addition, the critical oxygen partial pressure for the phase transition between Ir and IrO{sub 2} was increased with increasing the deposition temperature. Thus, the phase of the deposited film, either Ir or IrO{sub 2}, was controlled by the oxygen partial pressure and the deposition temperature. However, the formation of a thin Ir layer was detected between the IrO{sub 2} and SiO{sub 2} substrate. To remove this interfacial layer, the oxygen partial pressure is increased to a severe condition. And the impurity contents were below the detection limit of Auger electron spectroscopy in both Ir and IrO{sub 2} films.

  19. Growth kinetics and microstructure of MOCVD iridium coating from iridium(III) acetylacetonate with hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shirui; Yu, Xiaodong; Tan, Chengwen; Wang, Yandong; Ma, Honglei; Liu, Kexue; Cai, Hongnian

    2015-02-01

    Iridium coatings were produced by metallo-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) using iridium(III) acetylacetonate (Ir(acac)3) as precursor at 400-520 °C under atmospheric pressure in the presence of hydrogen. Three different deposition regions were obtained in the study: reaction-rate-limited regions at intermediate (460-500 °C), low (<460 °C), and high (520, and 540 °C) temperatures. The steady-state kinetics of iridium deposition was studied as functions of temperature and hydrogen pressure at intermediate temperatures, which could be described with the Rideal-Elay kinetic model. This model indicates that the hydrogen in the air is activated and reacts with the Ir(acac)3 molecules adsorbed on the surface. At high temperatures, growth velocity was changed into the relation dependent more on deposition temperature and hydrogen partial pressure, while at low temperatures stable deposition results could not be obtained in the system. The coating microstructure strongly depended on deposition temperature and hydrogen pressure. The coatings surfaces show an even topography in the reaction-limited regions and uneven ones at low or high deposition temperatures. The grain size increased with decreased temperature or decreased hydrogen pressure at 400-500 °C.

  20. Direct synthesis of catalyzed hydride compounds

    DOEpatents

    Gross, Karl J.; Majzoub, Eric

    2004-09-21

    A method is disclosed for directly preparing alkali metal aluminum hydrides such as NaAlH.sub.4 and Na.sub.3 AlH.sub.6 from either the alkali metal or its hydride, and aluminum. The hydride thus prepared is doped with a small portion of a transition metal catalyst compound, such as TiCl.sub.3, TiF.sub.3, or a mixture of these materials, in order to render them reversibly hydridable. The process provides for mechanically mixing the dry reagents under an inert atmosphere followed by charging the mixed materials with high pressure hydrogen while heating the mixture to about 125.degree. C. The method is relatively simple and inexpensive and provides reversible hydride compounds which are free of the usual contamination introduced by prior art wet chemical methods.

  1. Zirconium hydride containing explosive composition

    DOEpatents

    Walker, Franklin E. (18 Shadow Oak Rd., Danville, CA 94526); Wasley, Richard J. (4290 Colgate Way, Livermore, CA 94550)

    1981-01-01

    An improved explosive composition is disclosed and comprises a major portion of an explosive having a detonation velocity between about 1500 and 10,000 meters per second and a minor amount of a donor additive comprising a non-explosive compound or mixture of non-explosive compounds which when subjected to an energy fluence of 1000 calories/cm.sup.2 or less is capable of releasing free radicals each having a molecular weight between 1 and 120. Exemplary donor additives are dibasic acids, polyamines and metal hydrides.

  2. Iridium anomaly approximately synchronous with terminal eocene extinctions

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, W.; Asaro, F.; Michel, H.V.; Alvarez, L.W.

    1982-05-21

    An iridium anomaly has been found in coincidence with the known microtektite level in cores from Deep Sea Drilling Project site 149 in the Caribbean Sea. The iridium was probably not in the microtektites but deposited simultaneously with them; this could occur if the iridium was deposited from a dust cloud resulting from a bolide impact, as suggested for the anomaly associated with the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary. Other workers have deduced that the microtektites are part of the North American strewn tektite field, which is dated at about 34 million years before present, and that the microtektite horizon in deep-sea cores is synchronous with the extinction of five radiolarian species. Mass extinctions also occur in terrestrial mammals within 4 million years of this time. The iridium anomaly and the tektites and microtektites are supportive of a major bolide impact about 34 million years ago.

  3. Iridium anomaly approximately synchronous with terminal eocene extinctions.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, W; Asaro, F; Michel, H V; Alvarez, L W

    1982-05-21

    An iridium anomaly has been found in coincidence with the known microtektite level in cores from Deep Sea Drilling Project site 149 in the Caribbean Sea. The iridium was probably not in the microtektites but deposited simultaneously with them; this could occur if the iridium was deposited from a dust cloud resulting from a bolide impact, as suggested for the anomaly associated with the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary. Other workers have deduced that the microtektites are part of the North American strewn tektite field, which is dated at about 34 million years before present, and that the microtektite horizon in deep-sea cores is synchronous with the extinction of five radiolarian species. Mass extinctions also occur in terrestrial mammals within 4 million years of this time. The iridium anomaly and the tektites and microtektites are supportive of a major bolide impact about 34 million years ago. PMID:17819180

  4. Acute radiodermatitis from occupational exposure to iridium 192

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, J.; Rosen, T. )

    1989-12-01

    Industrial radiography using the man-made radioisotope iridium 192 is commonplace in the southern states. Despite established procedures and safeguards, accidental exposure may result in typical acute radiodermatitis. We have presented a clinical example of this phenomenon.9 references.

  5. GPS/GNSS Interference from Iridium Data Transmitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berglund, H. T.; Blume, F.; Estey, L.; White, S.

    2011-12-01

    The Iridium satellite communication system broadcasts in the 1610 to 1626.5 MHz band. The L1 frequencies broadcast by GPS, Galileo and GLONASS satellites are 1575.42 MHz, 1575.42 MHz and 1602 MHz + n × 0.5625 MHz, respectively (each GLONASS satellite uses a unique frequency). The proximity of the Iridium frequency band with the L1 frequencies of the GPS, Galileo and GLONASS systems leaves GNSS receivers susceptible to interference from Iridium data transmissions. Interference from Iridium transmissions can cause cycle slips and loss of lock on the carrier and code phases, thereby degrading the quality of GNSS observations and position estimates. In 2008, UNAVCO staff members observed that the percent of slips vs. the number of observations increased as the distance between a GPS choke ring antenna (TRM29659.00) and an Iridium antenna decreased. From those observations they suggested that Iridium antennas and GPS antennas should be separated by >30 m to minimize cycle slips caused by the interference from Iridium data transmissions. A second test conducted in 2009 using a newer Trimble GNSS choke ring antenna (TRM59800.00) showed similar results to the previous test despite the wider frequency range of the newer antenna. More recent testing conducted to investigate the response of new receiver models to iridium transmissions has shown that many GNSS enabled models, when combined with GNSS enabled antennas, have increased sensitivity to interference when compared to older GPS-only models. The broader frequency spectrum of the Low Noise Amplifiers (LNA) installed in many newer GNSS antennas can increase the impact of near-band RF interference on tracking performance. Our testing has shown that the quality of data collected at sites collocated with iridium communications is highly degraded for antenna separations exceeding 100m. Using older GPS antenna models (e.g. TRM29659.00) with newer GNSS enabled receivers can reduce this effect. To mitigate the effects that iridium data transmissions have on receiver tracking performance, we tested a custom cavity-type notch filter designed to attenuate the Iridium RF band. The filter has a >20dB rejection at 1616-1626.5 MHz. Test results when using the filter have shown excellent GPS data quality at antenna separations of ~30 m. Determining what impact the filter has on GLONASS and Galileo observations will require further testing. Future investigations will also include alternative RF mitigation methods, including RF shielding.

  6. CO adsorption on neutral iridium clusters

    E-print Network

    Kerpal, Christian; Meijer, Gerard; Fielicke, André

    2010-01-01

    The adsorption of carbon monoxide on neutral iridium clusters in the size range of n = 3 to 21 atoms is investigated with infrared multiple photon dissociation spectroscopy. For each cluster size only a single v(CO) band is present with frequencies in the range between 1962 cm-1 (n = 8) and 1985 cm-1 (n = 18) which can be attributed to an atop binding geometry. This behaviour is compared to the CO binding geometries on clusters of other group 9 and 10 transition metals as well as to that on extended surfaces. The preference of Ir for atop binding is rationalized by relativistic effects on the electronic structure of the later 5d metals.

  7. Improvements in manufacture of iridium alloy materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ohriner, E.K.

    1992-01-01

    Iridium alloys are used as fuel-cladding material in radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs). Hardware produced at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been used in Voyager 1 and 2, Galileo, and Ulysses spacecraft. This hardware was fabricated from small, 500-g drop-cast ingots. Porosity in these ingots and the resulting defects in the rolled sheets caused rejection of about 30% of the product. An improved manufacturing process was developed with the goal of substantially reducing the level of defects in the rolled sheets. The ingot size is increased to 10 kg and is produced by vacuum arc remelting. In addition, the ingot is hot extruded prior to rolling. Since implementation of the process in 1989, the average rate of rejection of the product has been reduced to below 10%.

  8. Improvements in manufacture of iridium alloy materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ohriner, E.K.

    1992-08-01

    Iridium alloys are used as fuel-cladding material in radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs). Hardware produced at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been used in Voyager 1 and 2, Galileo, and Ulysses spacecraft. This hardware was fabricated from small, 500-g drop-cast ingots. Porosity in these ingots and the resulting defects in the rolled sheets caused rejection of about 30% of the product. An improved manufacturing process was developed with the goal of substantially reducing the level of defects in the rolled sheets. The ingot size is increased to 10 kg and is produced by vacuum arc remelting. In addition, the ingot is hot extruded prior to rolling. Since implementation of the process in 1989, the average rate of rejection of the product has been reduced to below 10%.

  9. Activated aluminum hydride hydrogen storage compositions and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Sandrock, Gary (Ringwood, NJ); Reilly, James (Bellport, NY); Graetz, Jason (Mastic, NY); Wegrzyn, James E. (Brookhaven, NY)

    2010-11-23

    In one aspect, the invention relates to activated aluminum hydride hydrogen storage compositions containing aluminum hydride in the presence of, or absence of, hydrogen desorption stimulants. The invention particularly relates to such compositions having one or more hydrogen desorption stimulants selected from metal hydrides and metal aluminum hydrides. In another aspect, the invention relates to methods for generating hydrogen from such hydrogen storage compositions.

  10. Iridium{reg_sign} worldwide personal communication system

    SciTech Connect

    Helm, J.

    1997-01-01

    The IRIDIUM system is a personal worldwide communication system designed to support portable, low power subscriber units through the use of a constellation of satellites in low earth polar orbit. The satellites are networked together to form a system which provides continuous line-of-sight communications between the IRIDIUM system and any point within 30 km of the earth{close_quote}s surface. The system architecture and operation are described. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. Synthesis and characterization of nitrides of iridium and palladiums

    SciTech Connect

    Crowhurst, Jonathan C.; Goncharov, Alexander F.; Sadigh, B.; Zaug, J.M.; Aberg, D.; Meng, Yue; Prakapenka, Vitali B.

    2008-08-14

    We describe the synthesis of nitrides of iridium and palladium using the laser-heated diamond anvil cell. We have used the in situ techniques of x-ray powder diffraction and Raman scattering to characterize these compounds and have compared our experimental findings where possible to the results of first-principles theoretical calculations. We suggest that palladium nitride is isostructural with pyrite, while iridium nitride has a monoclinic symmetry and is isostructural with baddeleyite.

  12. Iridium-silicide nanowires on Si(110) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohottige, Rasika N.; Oncel, Nuri

    2015-11-01

    We studied physical and electronic properties of iridium silicide nanowires grown on the Si(110) surface with the help of scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. The nanowires grow along the [001] direction with an average length of about 100 nm. They have a band gap of ~ 0.5 eV and their electronic properties show similarities with the iridium silicide ring clusters formed on Ir modified Si(111) surface.

  13. PURIFICATION OF IRIDIUM BY ELECTRON BEAM MELTING

    SciTech Connect

    Ohriner, Evan Keith

    2008-01-01

    The purification of iridium metal by electron beam melting has been characterized for 48 impurity elements. Chemical analysis was performed by glow discharge mass spectrographic (GDMS) analysis for all elements except carbon, which was analyzed by combustion. The average levels of individual elemental impurities in the starting powder varied from 37 g/g to 0.02 g/g. The impurity elements Li, Na, Mg, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Pd, Ag, Cd, Sn, Sb, Te, Ba, Ce, Tl, Pb, and Bi were not detectable following the purification. No significant change in concentration of the elements Ti, V, Zr, Nb, Mo, and Re was found. The elements B, C, Al, Si, Cr, Fe, Ru, Rh, and Pt were partially removed by vaporization during electron beam melting. Langmuir's equation for ideal vaporization into a vacuum was used to calculate for each impurity element the expected ratio of impurity content after melting to that before melting. Equilibrium vapor pressures were calculated using Henry's law, with activity coefficients obtained from published data for the elements Fe, Ti, and Pt. Activity coefficients were estimated from enthalpy data for Al, Si, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Zr, Nb, Mo, and Hf and an ideal solution model was used for the remaining elements. The melt temperature was determined from measured iridium weight loss. Excellent agreement was found between measured and calculated impurity ratios for all impurity elements. The results are consistent with some localized heating of the melt pool due to rastering of the electron beam, with an average vaporization temperature of 3100 K as compared to a temperature of 2965 K calculated for uniform heating of the melt pool. The results are also consistent with ideal mixing in the melt pool.

  14. Hydrogen-storing hydride complexes

    DOEpatents

    Srinivasan, Sesha S. (Tampa, FL); Niemann, Michael U. (Venice, FL); Goswami, D. Yogi (Tampa, FL); Stefanakos, Elias K. (Tampa, FL)

    2012-04-10

    A ternary hydrogen storage system having a constant stoichiometric molar ratio of LiNH.sub.2:MgH.sub.2:LiBH.sub.4 of 2:1:1. It was found that the incorporation of MgH.sub.2 particles of approximately 10 nm to 20 nm exhibit a lower initial hydrogen release temperature of 150.degree. C. Furthermore, it is observed that the particle size of LiBNH quaternary hydride has a significant effect on the hydrogen sorption concentration with an optimum size of 28 nm. The as-synthesized hydrides exhibit two main hydrogen release temperatures, one around 160.degree. C. and the other around 300.degree. C., with the main hydrogen release temperature reduced from 310.degree. C. to 270.degree. C., while hydrogen is first reversibly released at temperatures as low as 150.degree. C. with a total hydrogen capacity of 6 wt. % to 8 wt. %. Detailed thermal, capacity, structural and microstructural properties have been demonstrated and correlated with the activation energies of these materials.

  15. Liquid suspensions of reversible metal hydrides

    DOEpatents

    Reilly, J.J.; Grohse, E.W.; Winsche, W.E.

    1983-12-08

    The reversibility of the process M + x/2 H/sub 2/ ..-->.. MH/sub x/, where M is a metal hydride former that forms a hydride MH/sub x/ in the presence of H/sub 2/, generally used to store and recall H/sub 2/, is found to proceed under a liquid, thereby to reduce contamination, provide better temperature control and provide in situ mobility of the reactants. Thus, a slurry of particles of a metal hydride former with an inert solvent is subjected to temperature and pressure controlled atmosphere containing H/sub 2/, to store hydrogen (at high pressures) and to release (at low pressures) previously stored hydrogen. The direction of the flow of the H/sub 2/ through the liquid is dependent upon the H/sub 2/ pressure in the gas phase at a given temperature. When the former is above the equilibrium absorption pressure of the respective hydride the reaction proceeds to the right, i.e., the metal hydride is formed and hydrogen is stored in the solid particle. When the H/sub 2/ pressure in the gas phase is below the equilibrium dissociation pressure of the respective hydride the reaction proceeds to the left, the metal hydride is decomposed and hydrogen is released into the gas phase.

  16. Improved Turn-on Times of Iridium Electroluminescent Devices by Use of Ionic Liquids

    E-print Network

    Bernhard, Stefan

    Improved Turn-on Times of Iridium Electroluminescent Devices by Use of Ionic Liquids Sara T. Parker devices based on the iridium complex [Ir(ppy)2(dtb-bpy)]+(PF6 - ), where ppy is 2-phenylpyridine and dtb

  17. Hydrodesulfurization of Thiophene and Benzothiophene to Butane and Ethylbenzene by a Homogeneous Iridium

    E-print Network

    Jones, William D.

    Iridium Complex David A. Vicic and William D. Jones* Department of Chemistry, University of Rochester such as benzothiophene. This led us to explore the reactivity of the bis(µ-hydrido)- bis[chloro(pentamethylcyclopentadienyl)]iridium

  18. DOI: 10.1002/adsc.200700546 Iridium-Catalyzed Asymmetric Hydrogenation of Vinyl Ethers

    E-print Network

    Burgess, Kevin

    DOI: 10.1002/adsc.200700546 Iridium-Catalyzed Asymmetric Hydrogenation of Vinyl Ethers Ye Zhua,P-ligated iridium complexes in asymmetric hydrogenations of the silyl and methyl enol ethers D and E, but complex

  19. Activation of Sulfur-and Nitrogen-Containing Heterocycles by a Dinuclear Iridium Complex

    E-print Network

    Jones, William D.

    Activation of Sulfur- and Nitrogen-Containing Heterocycles by a Dinuclear Iridium Complex David A Of relevance to the present work, the dinuclear iridium complex [Cp*IrH3]2 (1) was previously found to react

  20. DETERMINATION OF HETEROGENEOUS ELECTRON TRANSFER RATE CONSTANTS AT MICROFABRICATED IRIDIUM ELECTRODES. (R825511C022)

    EPA Science Inventory

    There has been an increasing use of both solid metal and microfabricated iridium electrodes as substrates for various types of electroanalysis. However, investigations to determine heterogeneous electron transfer rate constants on iridium, especially at an electron beam evapor...

  1. Heterolytic and Homolytic Activation of Dihydrogen at an Unusual Iridium (II) Sulfide

    E-print Network

    Rauchfuss, Thomas B.

    Heterolytic and Homolytic Activation of Dihydrogen at an Unusual Iridium (II) Sulfide Rachel C of reactive sulfides of iridium, a metal known to be highly active for HDS.4,9 Our starting reagent was (NBu4

  2. Method of forming metal hydride films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinberg, R.; Alger, D. L.; Cooper, D. W. (inventors)

    1977-01-01

    The substrate to be coated (which may be of metal, glass or the like) is cleaned, both chemically and by off-sputtering in a vacuum chamber. In an ultra-high vacuum system, vapor deposition by a sublimator or vaporizer coats a cooled shroud disposed around the substrate with a thin film of hydride forming metal which getters any contaminant gas molecules. A shutter is then opened to allow hydride forming metal to be deposited as a film or coating on the substrate. After the hydride forming metal coating is formed, deuterium or other hydrogen isotopes are bled into the vacuum system and diffused into the metal film or coating to form a hydride of metal film. Higher substrate temperatures and pressures may be used if various parameters are appropriately adjusted.

  3. Mixed N-Heterocyclic Carbene-Bis(oxazolinyl)borato Rhodium and Iridium Complexes in Photochemical and Thermal Oxidative Addition Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Songchen; Manna, Kuntal; Ellern, Arkady; Sadow, Aaron D

    2014-12-08

    In order to facilitate oxidative addition chemistry of fac-coordinated rhodium(I) and iridium(I) compounds, carbene–bis(oxazolinyl)phenylborate proligands have been synthesized and reacted with organometallic precursors. Two proligands, PhB(OxMe2)2(ImtBuH) (H[1]; OxMe2 = 4,4-dimethyl-2-oxazoline; ImtBuH = 1-tert-butylimidazole) and PhB(OxMe2)2(ImMesH) (H[2]; ImMesH = 1-mesitylimidazole), are deprotonated with potassium benzyl to generate K[1] and K[2], and these potassium compounds serve as reagents for the synthesis of a series of rhodium and iridium complexes. Cyclooctadiene and dicarbonyl compounds {PhB(OxMe2)2ImtBu}Rh(?4-C8H12) (3), {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}Rh(?4-C8H12) (4), {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}Rh(CO)2 (5), {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}Ir(?4-C8H12) (6), and {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}Ir(CO)2 (7) are synthesized along with ToMM(?4-C8H12) (M = Rh (8); M = Ir (9); ToM = tris(4,4-dimethyl-2-oxazolinyl)phenylborate). The spectroscopic and structural properties and reactivity of this series of compounds show electronic and steric effects of substituents on the imidazole (tert-butyl vs mesityl), effects of replacing an oxazoline in ToM with a carbene donor, and the influence of the donor ligand (CO vs C8H12). The reactions of K[2] and [M(?-Cl)(?2-C8H14)2]2 (M = Rh, Ir) provide {?4-PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes?CH2}Rh(?-H)(?-Cl)Rh(?2-C8H14)2 (10) and {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}IrH(?3-C8H13) (11). In the former compound, a spontaneous oxidative addition of a mesityl ortho-methyl to give a mixed-valent dirhodium species is observed, while the iridium compound forms a monometallic allyl hydride. Photochemical reactions of dicarbonyl compounds 5 and 7 result in C–H bond oxidative addition providing the compounds {?4-PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes?CH2}RhH(CO) (12) and {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}IrH(Ph)CO (13). In 12, oxidative addition results in cyclometalation of the mesityl ortho-methyl similar to 10, whereas the iridium compound reacts with the benzene solvent to give a rare crystallographically characterized cis-[Ir](H)(Ph) complex. Alternatively, the rhodium carbonyl 5 or iridium isocyanide {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}Ir(CO)CNtBu (15) reacts with PhSiH3 in the dark to form the silyl compound {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}RhH(SiH2Ph)CO (14) or {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}IrH(SiH2Ph)CNtBu (17). These examples demonstrate the enhanced thermal reactivity of {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}-supported iridium and rhodium carbonyl compounds in comparison to tris(oxazolinyl)borate, tris(pyrazolyl)borate, and cyclopentadienyl-supported compounds.

  4. Metastable Metal Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Graetz, Jason

    2012-01-01

    The possibility of using hydrogen as a reliable energy carrier for both stationary and mobile applications has gained renewed interest in recent years due to improvements in high temperature fuel cells and a reduction in hydrogen production costs. However, a number of challenges remain and new media are needed that are capable of safely storing hydrogen with high gravimetric and volumetric densities. Metal hydrides and complex metal hydrides offer some hope of overcoming these challenges; however, many of the high capacity “reversible” hydrides exhibit a large endothermic decomposition enthalpy making it difficult to release the hydrogen at low temperatures. Onmore »the other hand, the metastable hydrides are characterized by a low reaction enthalpy and a decomposition reaction that is thermodynamically favorable under ambient conditions. The rapid, low temperature hydrogen evolution rates that can be achieved with these materials offer much promise for mobile PEM fuel cell applications. However, a critical challenge exists to develop new methods to regenerate these hydrides directly from the reactants and hydrogen gas. This spotlight paper presents an overview of some of the metastable metal hydrides for hydrogen storage and a few new approaches being investigated to address the key challenges associated with these materials.« less

  5. Adsorptive Stripping Analysis of Trace Nickel at Iridium-Based Ultramicroelectrode Arrays

    E-print Network

    Kounaves, Samuel P.

    Adsorptive Stripping Analysis of Trace Nickel at Iridium-Based Ultramicroelectrode Arrays Joseph: July 27, 1999 Abstract Lithographically fabricated iridium-based mercury microelectrode arrays the iridium-based microelectrode array very attractive for on-site measurements of trace metals that cannot

  6. Chemical bath method to grow precipitated nanorods of iridium oxide on alumina membranes

    E-print Network

    Chiao, Jung-Chih

    Chemical bath method to grow precipitated nanorods of iridium oxide on alumina membranes C; Received on 23rd September 2012; Revised on 14th November 2012 High aspect ratio iridium (IV) oxide and densely packed iridium oxide (IrO2) nanostructures. Nanorods with an aspect ratio of 22 can be synthesised

  7. Catalytic Arene H/D Exchange with Novel Rhodium and Iridium Complexes

    E-print Network

    Jones, William D.

    Catalytic Arene H/D Exchange with Novel Rhodium and Iridium Complexes Jennifer L. Rhinehart to improve the efficiency of the system. Periana has reported using iridium26,27 with a wide variety an acetate is intricately involved in the C-H activation.30,31 Herein we report new rhodium and iridium

  8. Sensors and Actuators B 50 (1998) 117124 Failure analysis of microfabricated iridium ultramicroelectrodes in

    E-print Network

    Kounaves, Samuel P.

    1998-01-01

    Sensors and Actuators B 50 (1998) 117­124 Failure analysis of microfabricated iridium consisting of an array of microlithographically fabricated iridium ultramicroelectrodes (UME) on a silicon such as gold, platinum, iridium and carbon have been utilized as the electrode substrate. Most of these sensors

  9. 16 CFR 23.7 - Misuse of the words “platinum,” “iridium,” “palladium,” “ruthenium,” “rhodium,” and “osmium.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... § 23.7 Misuse of the words “platinum,” “iridium,” “palladium,” “ruthenium,” “rhodium,” and “osmium.” (a) It is unfair or deceptive to use the words “platinum,” “iridium,” “palladium,” “ruthenium,” “rhodium... Platinum, Iridium, Palladium, Ruthenium, Rhodium, and Osmium. (b) The following are examples of markings...

  10. Large enhancement of intersystem crossing in polyfluorenes by iridium-complex doping

    E-print Network

    Shy,Jow-Tsong

    Large enhancement of intersystem crossing in polyfluorenes by iridium-complex doping Hua-Hsien Liao the intersystem crossing ISC rate of two polyfluorenes doped with iridium III tris 2- 4-totyl pyridinato-N,C2. Iridium III tris 2- 4-totyl pyridinato-N,C2 Ir mppy 3 is doped into polyfluorene as the phosphorescent

  11. Activation and Oxidation of Mesitylene C-H Bonds by (Phebox)Iridium(III) Complexes

    E-print Network

    Goddard III, William A.

    Activation and Oxidation of Mesitylene C-H Bonds by (Phebox)Iridium(III) Complexes Meng Zhou Supporting Information ABSTRACT: A pincer iridium(III) complex, (Phebox)Ir- (OAc)2OH2 (1) (Phebox = 3 an isolable iridium mesityl complex, (Phebox)Ir(mesityl)(OAc) (3), in >90% yield. The trifluor- oacetate

  12. Synthesis and characterization of a series of rhodium, iridium, and ruthenium isocyanide complexes

    E-print Network

    Jones, William D.

    Synthesis and characterization of a series of rhodium, iridium, and ruthenium isocyanide complexes in revised form 16 July 2013 Accepted 18 July 2013 Available online 8 August 2013 Keywords: Rhodium Iridium with novel electrophilic rhodium and iridium complexes possessing a fac-chelating bis-pyrazolylacetate ligand

  13. 16 CFR 23.7 - Misuse of the words “platinum,” “iridium,” “palladium,” “ruthenium,” “rhodium,” and “osmium.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... § 23.7 Misuse of the words “platinum,” “iridium,” “palladium,” “ruthenium,” “rhodium,” and “osmium.” (a) It is unfair or deceptive to use the words “platinum,” “iridium,” “palladium,” “ruthenium,” “rhodium... Platinum, Iridium, Palladium, Ruthenium, Rhodium, and Osmium. (b) The following are examples of markings...

  14. 16 CFR 23.7 - Misuse of the words “platinum,” “iridium,” “palladium,” “ruthenium,” “rhodium,” and “osmium.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... § 23.7 Misuse of the words “platinum,” “iridium,” “palladium,” “ruthenium,” “rhodium,” and “osmium.” (a) It is unfair or deceptive to use the words “platinum,” “iridium,” “palladium,” “ruthenium,” “rhodium... Platinum, Iridium, Palladium, Ruthenium, Rhodium, and Osmium. (b) The following are examples of markings...

  15. REVIEW OF SCIENTIFIC INSTRUMENTS 82, 116105 (2011) Note: Electrochemical etching of sharp iridium tips

    E-print Network

    Grütter, Peter

    2011-01-01

    REVIEW OF SCIENTIFIC INSTRUMENTS 82, 116105 (2011) Note: Electrochemical etching of sharp iridium iridium tips with apex radii of 15­70 nm, as determined by scanning electron microscopy, field ion American Institute of Physics. [doi:10.1063/1.3662473] Iridium (Ir) has a very high Young's modulus (528

  16. DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200500523 Amorphous Diphenylaminofluorene-Functionalized Iridium

    E-print Network

    DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200500523 Amorphous Diphenylaminofluorene-Functionalized Iridium Complexes and efficient emissive cores in the syn- thesis of useful iridium complexes.[9] One advantage of fluo- rene). Two new phosphorescent iridium(III) cyclometalated complexes, [Ir(DPA-Flpy)3] (1) and [Ir(DPA-Flpy)2

  17. Copyright c 2008 IEEE. Reprinted from Ujjwal Deep Dahal, Brent R. Petersen and Julian Meng, "Iridium

    E-print Network

    Petersen, Brent

    , "Iridium communication system for data telemetry of renewable distributed generation system," in 2008 24th, you agree to all provisions of the copyright laws protecting it. #12;Iridium Communication System for the required telemetry. The Iridium satellite system is able to provide global communications at a reasonable

  18. Deposition and Stripping Properties of Mercury on Iridium S. P. Kounaves*'1 and J. Buffle

    E-print Network

    Kounaves, Samuel P.

    Deposition and Stripping Properties of Mercury on Iridium Electrodes S. P. Kounaves*'1 and J ABSTRACT The reduction of mercury on a fresh iridium surface is reversible with a half-wave potential documented in the literature, the same cannot be said for iridium. During the past 30 years, only a few

  19. 16 CFR 23.7 - Misuse of the words “platinum,” “iridium,” “palladium,” “ruthenium,” “rhodium,” and “osmium.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... § 23.7 Misuse of the words “platinum,” “iridium,” “palladium,” “ruthenium,” “rhodium,” and “osmium.” (a) It is unfair or deceptive to use the words “platinum,” “iridium,” “palladium,” “ruthenium,” “rhodium... Platinum, Iridium, Palladium, Ruthenium, Rhodium, and Osmium. (b) The following are examples of markings...

  20. Synthesis, Separation, and Circularly Polarized Luminescence Studies of Enantiomers of Iridium(III) Luminophores

    E-print Network

    Bernhard, Stefan

    Synthesis, Separation, and Circularly Polarized Luminescence Studies of Enantiomers of Iridium spectra for each of the enantio-enriched iridium complexes were obtained. The experimentally measured. Introduction Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs)1 incorporating cyclometalated iridium(III) complexes have

  1. 16 CFR 23.7 - Misuse of the words “platinum,” “iridium,” “palladium,” “ruthenium,” “rhodium,” and “osmium.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... § 23.7 Misuse of the words “platinum,” “iridium,” “palladium,” “ruthenium,” “rhodium,” and “osmium.” (a) It is unfair or deceptive to use the words “platinum,” “iridium,” “palladium,” “ruthenium,” “rhodium... Platinum, Iridium, Palladium, Ruthenium, Rhodium, and Osmium. (b) The following are examples of markings...

  2. Goals: Reduction of IridiumGoals: Reduction of Iridium--usage; ASV Collaboration under Constraints; Online Datausage; ASV Collaboration under Constraints; Online Data--streamingstreaming CoastalCoastal FreewaveFreewave network; Hierarchical Control Scheme

    E-print Network

    Roe, Paul

    Goals: Reduction of IridiumGoals: Reduction of Iridium--usage; ASV Collaboration under Constraints endurance (~4 wks) + Collaborative robotic sensing - Slow moving (Iridium is expensive (>$2500 instead of Iridium whenever in range. o Network should support multiple gliders simultaneously to enable

  3. Iridium oxide-polymer nanocomposite electrode materials for water oxidation.

    PubMed

    Lattach, Youssef; Rivera, Juan Francisco; Bamine, Tahya; Deronzier, Alain; Moutet, Jean-Claude

    2014-08-13

    Nanocomposite anode materials for water oxidation have been readily synthesized by electrodeposition of iridium oxide nanoparticles into poly(pyrrole-alkylammonium) films, previously deposited onto carbon electrodes by oxidative electropolymerization of a pyrrole-alkylammonium monomer. The nanocomposite films were characterized by electrochemistry, transmission electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. They showed an efficient electrocatalytic activity toward the oxygen evolution reaction. Data from Tafel plots have demonstrated that the catalytic activity of the iridium oxide nanoparticles is maintained following their inclusion in the polymer matrix. Bulk electrolysis of water at carbon foam modified electrodes have shown that the iridium oxide-polymer composite presents a higher catalytic activity and a better operational stability than regular oxide films. PMID:25045786

  4. Experimental determination of the solubility of iridium in silicate melts: Preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borisov, Alexander; Dingwell, Donald B.; Oneill, Hugh ST.C.; Palme, Herbert

    1992-01-01

    Little is known of the geochemical behavior of iridium. Normally this element is taken to be chalcophile and/or siderophile so that during planetary differentiation processes, e.g., core formation, iridium is extracted from silicate phases into metallic phases. Experimental determination of the metal/silicate partition coefficient of iridium is difficult simply because it is so large. Also there are no data on the solubility behavior of iridium in silicate melts. With information on the solubility of iridium in silicate melts it is possible, in combination with experimental data for Fe-Ir alloys, to calculate the partition coefficient between a metallic phase and a silicate melt.

  5. Welding iridium heat-source capsules for space missions

    SciTech Connect

    Kanne, W.R. Jr.

    1982-03-01

    A remote computer-controlled welding station was developed to encapsulate radioactive PuO/sub 2/ in iridium. Weld quench cracking caused an interruption in production of capsules for upcoming space missions. Hot crack sensitivity of the DOP-26 iridium alloy was associated with low melting constituents in the grain boundaries. The extent of cracking was reduced but could not be eliminated by changes to the welding operation. An ultrasonic test was developed to detect underbead cracks exceeding a threshold size. Production was continued using the ultrasonic test to reject capsules with detectable cracks.

  6. Field desorption of Na and Cs from graphene on iridium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernatskii, D. P.; Pavlov, V. G.

    2015-08-01

    Field electron and desorption microscopy has been used to study specific features of the field desorption of sodium and cesium ions adsorbed on the surface of iridium with graphene. It was found that adsorbed sodium atoms most strongly reduce the work function on graphene islands situated over densely packed faces of iridium. A strong electric field qualitatively similarly affects the sodium and cesium desorption processes from a field emitter to give two desorption phases and has no noticeable effect on the disintegration of the graphene layer.

  7. Thin-film metal hydrides.

    PubMed

    Remhof, Arndt; Borgschulte, Andreas

    2008-12-01

    The goal of the medieval alchemist, the chemical transformation of common metals into nobel metals, will forever be a dream. However, key characteristics of metals, such as their electronic band structure and, consequently, their electric, magnetic and optical properties, can be tailored by controlled hydrogen doping. Due to their morphology and well-defined geometry with flat, coplanar surfaces/interfaces, novel phenomena may be observed in thin films. Prominent examples are the eye-catching hydrogen switchable mirror effect, the visualization of solid-state diffusion and the formation of complex surface morphologies. Thin films do not suffer as much from embrittlement and/or decrepitation as bulk materials, allowing the study of cyclic absorption and desorption. Therefore, thin-metal hydride films are used as model systems to study metal-insulator transitions, for high throughput combinatorial research or they may be used as indicator layers to study hydrogen diffusion. They can be found in technological applications as hydrogen sensors, in electrochromic and thermochromic devices. In this review, we discuss the effect of hydrogen loading of thin niobium and yttrium films as archetypical examples of a transition metal and a rare earth metal, respectively. Our focus thereby lies on the hydrogen induced changes of the electronic structure and the morphology of the thin films, their optical properties, the visualization and the control of hydrogen diffusion and on the study of surface phenomena and catalysis. PMID:18980236

  8. Homogeneous and heterogenized iridium water oxidation catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macchioni, Alceo

    2014-10-01

    The development of an efficient catalyst for the oxidative splitting of water into molecular oxygen, protons and electrons is of key importance for producing solar fuels through artificial photosynthesis. We are facing the problem by means of a rational approach aimed at understanding how catalytic performance may be optimized by the knowledge of the reaction mechanism of water oxidation and the fate of the catalytic site under the inevitably harsh oxidative conditions. For the purposes of our study we selected iridium water oxidation catalysts, exhibiting remarkable performance (TOF > 5 s-1 and TON > 20000). In particular, we recently focused our attention on [Cp*Ir(N,O)X] (N,O = 2-pyridincarboxylate; X = Cl or NO3) and [IrCl(Hedta)]Na water oxidation catalysts. The former exhibited a remarkable TOF whereas the latter showed a very high TON. Furthermore, [IrCl(Hedta)]Na was heterogenized onto TiO2 taking advantage of the presence of a dandling -COOH functionality. The heterogenized catalyst maintained approximately the same catalytic activity of the homogeneous analogous with the advantage that could be reused many times. Mechanistic studies were performed in order to shed some light on the rate-determining step and the transformation of catalysts when exposed to "oxidative stress". It was found that the last oxidative step, preceding oxygen liberation, is the rate-determining step when a small excess of sacrificial oxidant is used. In addition, several intermediates of the oxidative transformation of the catalyst were intercepted and characterized by NMR, X-Ray diffractometry and ESI-MS.

  9. Metal Hydride Chemical Heat Pumps for Industrial Use 

    E-print Network

    Ally, M. R.; Rebello, W. J.; Rosso, M. J., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    cycle. This paper describes the state-of-the-art developments of metal hydride heat pumps (MHCHP). Details of the thermodynamic cycle, kinetics of hydriding reactions, physical construction limitations and potential areas of application are discussed....

  10. Optimization of hydride fueled pressurized water reactor cores

    E-print Network

    Shuffler, Carter Alexander

    2004-01-01

    This thesis contributes to the Hydride Fuels Project, a collaborative effort between UC Berkeley and MIT aimed at investigating the potential benefits of hydride fuel use in light water reactors (LWRs). This pursuit involves ...

  11. Thermal hydraulic analysis of hydride fuels in BWR's

    E-print Network

    Creighton, John Everett

    2005-01-01

    This thesis contributes to the hydride nuclear fuel project being completed by UC Berkeley and MIT to assess the possible benefits of using hydride fuel in light water nuclear reactors (LWR's). More specifically, this ...

  12. Corrosion-resistant iridium-platinum anode material for high polarization application in corrosive acids

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J.; Summers, L.; Lewis, P.

    1993-09-08

    The present invention relates to highly corrosion resistant components for use in an electrochemical cell. Specifically, these components are resistant to corrosion under very extreme conditions such as exposure to aqua regia in the presence of a constant current density of 100mA/m{sup 2}. The components are comprised of an iridium-platinum alloy that comprises less than 30% iridium. In a preferred embodiment of the present invention, the iridium-platinum alloy comprises 15-20% iridium. In another preferred embodiment of the present invention, the iridium-platinum alloy is deposited on the surface of an electrochemical cell component by magnetron sputtering. The present invention also relates to a method for conducting an electrochemical reaction in the presence of highly corrosive acids under a high degree of polarization wherein the electrochemical cell comprises a component, preferably the anode, containing an iridium-platinum alloy that comprises less than 30% iridium.

  13. High H? ionic conductivity in barium hydride.

    PubMed

    Verbraeken, Maarten C; Cheung, Chaksum; Suard, Emmanuelle; Irvine, John T S

    2015-01-01

    With hydrogen being seen as a key renewable energy vector, the search for materials exhibiting fast hydrogen transport becomes ever more important. Not only do hydrogen storage materials require high mobility of hydrogen in the solid state, but the efficiency of electrochemical devices is also largely determined by fast ionic transport. Although the heavy alkaline-earth hydrides are of limited interest for their hydrogen storage potential, owing to low gravimetric densities, their ionic nature may prove useful in new electrochemical applications, especially as an ionically conducting electrolyte material. Here we show that barium hydride shows fast pure ionic transport of hydride ions (H(-)) in the high-temperature, high-symmetry phase. Although some conductivity studies have been reported on related materials previously, the nature of the charge carriers has not been determined. BaH2 gives rise to hydride ion conductivity of 0.2 S cm(-1) at 630 °C. This is an order of magnitude larger than that of state-of-the-art proton-conducting perovskites or oxide ion conductors at this temperature. These results suggest that the alkaline-earth hydrides form an important new family of materials, with potential use in a number of applications, such as separation membranes, electrochemical reactors and so on. PMID:25485988

  14. High H- ionic conductivity in barium hydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbraeken, Maarten C.; Cheung, Chaksum; Suard, Emmanuelle; Irvine, John T. S.

    2015-01-01

    With hydrogen being seen as a key renewable energy vector, the search for materials exhibiting fast hydrogen transport becomes ever more important. Not only do hydrogen storage materials require high mobility of hydrogen in the solid state, but the efficiency of electrochemical devices is also largely determined by fast ionic transport. Although the heavy alkaline-earth hydrides are of limited interest for their hydrogen storage potential, owing to low gravimetric densities, their ionic nature may prove useful in new electrochemical applications, especially as an ionically conducting electrolyte material. Here we show that barium hydride shows fast pure ionic transport of hydride ions (H-) in the high-temperature, high-symmetry phase. Although some conductivity studies have been reported on related materials previously, the nature of the charge carriers has not been determined. BaH2 gives rise to hydride ion conductivity of 0.2 S cm-1 at 630 °C. This is an order of magnitude larger than that of state-of-the-art proton-conducting perovskites or oxide ion conductors at this temperature. These results suggest that the alkaline-earth hydrides form an important new family of materials, with potential use in a number of applications, such as separation membranes, electrochemical reactors and so on.

  15. Potassium Hydride in Paraffin: A Useful Base for Organic Synthesis

    E-print Network

    Taber, Douglass

    Potassium Hydride in Paraffin: A Useful Base for Organic Synthesis Douglass F. Taber taberdf@udel.edu ReceiVed July 7, 2006 The preparation of potassium hydride as a 1:1 homogenate be a generally useful base for organic synthesis. Sodium hydride (NaH), potassium tert-butoxide, and n-BuLi have

  16. 49 CFR 173.311 - Metal hydride storage systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Metal hydride storage systems. 173.311...Preparation and Packaging § 173.311 Metal hydride storage systems. The following...instruction is applicable to transportable UN Metal hydride storage systems (UN3468)...

  17. 49 CFR 173.311 - Metal hydride storage systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Metal hydride storage systems. 173.311...Preparation and Packaging § 173.311 Metal hydride storage systems. The following...instruction is applicable to transportable UN Metal hydride storage systems (UN3468)...

  18. 49 CFR 173.311 - Metal hydride storage systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Metal hydride storage systems. 173.311...Preparation and Packaging § 173.311 Metal hydride storage systems. The following...instruction is applicable to transportable UN Metal hydride storage systems (UN3468)...

  19. 49 CFR 173.311 - Metal hydride storage systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Metal hydride storage systems. 173.311...Preparation and Packaging § 173.311 Metal hydride storage systems. The following...instruction is applicable to transportable UN Metal hydride storage systems (UN3468)...

  20. Gold Hydride Complexes DOI: 10.1002/anie.200803842

    E-print Network

    Müller, Peter

    Gold Hydride Complexes DOI: 10.1002/anie.200803842 Reactions of a Stable Monomeric Gold(I) Hydride Complex** Emily Y. Tsui,* Peter Müller, and Joseph P. Sadighi Gold hydride complexes have been postulated as intermediates in a number of homogeneous gold- catalyzed reactions,[1] but relatively little is known about

  1. 49 CFR 173.311 - Metal hydride storage systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Metal hydride storage systems. 173.311 Section 173... REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging § 173.311 Metal hydride storage systems. The following packing instruction is applicable to transportable UN Metal hydride storage...

  2. 49 CFR 173.311 - Metal hydride storage systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Metal hydride storage systems. 173.311 Section 173... REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging § 173.311 Metal hydride storage systems. The following packing instruction is applicable to transportable UN Metal hydride storage...

  3. 49 CFR 173.311 - Metal hydride storage systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Metal hydride storage systems. 173.311 Section 173... REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging § 173.311 Metal hydride storage systems. The following packing instruction is applicable to transportable UN Metal hydride storage...

  4. 49 CFR 173.311 - Metal hydride storage systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Metal hydride storage systems. 173.311 Section 173... REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging § 173.311 Metal hydride storage systems. The following packing instruction is applicable to transportable UN Metal hydride storage...

  5. New electrochromism isotherm in anodic iridium oxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beni, G.; Shay, J. L.

    1980-01-01

    We show that there are two distinct electrochromic processes in anodic iridium oxide films. The measured isotherms for both processes have simple theoretical forms dominated by internal entropy changes of noninteracting particles. Such isotherms have never before been observed for amorphous films.

  6. Iridium Based Ultramicroelectrodes DEVELOPMENT AND USE IN ELECTROCHEMICAL ANALYSIS

    E-print Network

    Kounaves, Samuel P.

    Iridium Based Ultramicroelectrodes DEVELOPMENT AND USE IN ELECTROCHEMICAL ANALYSIS By Samuel P techniques, such as atomic absorp- tion spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence, neutron activation, and anodic with anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV) is unsurpassed, not to mention the low cost of the instruments

  7. Achieving Zero Stress in Iridium, Chromium, and Nickle Thin Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broadway, David M.; Weimer, Jeffrey; Gurgew, Danielle; Lis, Tomasz; Ramsey, Brian D.; O'Dell, Stephen L.; Ames, A.; Bruni, R.

    2015-01-01

    We examine a method for achieving zero intrinsic stress in thin films of iridium, chromium, and nickel deposited by magnetron sputter deposition. The examination of the stress in these materials is motivated by efforts to advance the optical performance of light-weight x-ray space telescopes into the regime of sub-arc second resolution that rely on control of the film stress to values within 10-100 MPa. A characteristic feature of the intrinsic stress behavior in chromium and nickel is their sensitivity to the magnitude and sign of the intrinsic stress with argon gas pressure, including the existence of a critical pressure that results in zero film stress. This critical pressure scales linearly with the film's density. While the effect of stress reversal with argon pressure has been previously reported by Hoffman and others for nickel and chromium, we have discovered a similar behavior for iridium. Additionally, we have identified zero stress in iridium shortly after island coalescence. This feature of film growth is used for achieving a total internal stress of -2.89 MPa for a 15.8 nm thick iridium film. The surface roughness of this low-stress film was examined using scanning probe microscopy (SPM) and x-ray reflectivity (XRR) at CuKa and these results presented and discussed.

  8. The Iridium (tm) system: Personal communications anytime, anyplace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatlelid, John E.; Casey, Larry

    The Iridium system is designed to provide handheld personal communications between diverse locations around the world at any time and without prior knowledge of the location of the personal units. This paper provides an overview of the system, the services it provides, its operation, and an overview of the commercial practices and relatively high volume satellite production techniques which will make the system cost effective. A constellation of 66 satellites will provide an orbiting, spherical-shell, infrastructure for this global calling capability. The satellites act as tall cellular towers and allow convenient operation for portable handheld telephones. The system will provide a full range of services including voice, paging, data, geolocation, and fax capabilities. Motorola is a world leader in the production of high volume, high quality, reliable telecommunications hardware. One of Iridium's goals is to apply these production techniques to high reliability space hardware. Concurrent engineering, high performance work teams, advanced manufacturing technologies, and improved assembly and test methods are some of the techniques that will keep the Iridium system cost effective. Mobile, global, flexible personal communications are coming that will allow anyone to call or receive a call from/to anyplace at anytime. The Iridium system will provide communications where none exist today. This connectivity will allow increased information transfer, open new markets for various business endeavors, and in general increase productivity and development.

  9. Achieving zero stress in iridium, chromium, and nickel thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broadway, David M.; Weimer, Jeffrey; Gurgew, Danielle; Lis, Tomasz; Ramsey, Brian D.; O'Dell, Stephen L.; Gubarev, Mikhail; Ames, A.; Bruni, R.

    2015-05-01

    We examine a method for achieving zero intrinsic stress in thin films of iridium, chromium, and nickel deposited by magnetron sputter deposition. The examination of the stress in these materials is motivated by efforts to advance the optical performance of light-weight x-ray space telescopes into the regime of sub-arc second resolution. A characteristic feature of the intrinsic stress behavior in chromium and nickel is their sensitivity to the magnitude and sign of the intrinsic stress with argon gas pressure, including the existence of a critical pressure that results in zero film stress. This critical pressure scales linearly with the film's density. While the effect of stress reversal with argon pressure has been previously reported by Hoffman and others for nickel and chromium, we have discovered a similar behavior for the intrinsic stress in iridium films. Additionally, we have identified zero stress in iridium shortly after island coalescence in the high adatom mobility growth regime. This feature of film growth is used for achieving a total internal stress of -2.89 MPa for a 15.8 nm thick iridium film with a surface roughness of 5.0 +/- 0.5Å based on x-ray reflectivity (XRR) measurement at CuK?. The surface topography was also examined using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The examination of the stress in these films has been performed with a novel in-situ measurement device. The methodology and sensitivity of the in-situ instrument is also described herein.

  10. Discovery of tantalum, rhenium, osmium, and iridium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, R.; Thoennessen, M.

    2012-09-15

    Currently, thirty-eight tantalum, thirty-eight rhenium, thirty-nine osmium, and thirty-eight iridium isotopes have been observed and the discovery of these isotopes is described here. For each isotope a brief synopsis of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  11. The Iridium (tm) system: Personal communications anytime, anyplace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatlelid, John E.; Casey, Larry

    1993-01-01

    The Iridium system is designed to provide handheld personal communications between diverse locations around the world at any time and without prior knowledge of the location of the personal units. This paper provides an overview of the system, the services it provides, its operation, and an overview of the commercial practices and relatively high volume satellite production techniques which will make the system cost effective. A constellation of 66 satellites will provide an orbiting, spherical-shell, infrastructure for this global calling capability. The satellites act as tall cellular towers and allow convenient operation for portable handheld telephones. The system will provide a full range of services including voice, paging, data, geolocation, and fax capabilities. Motorola is a world leader in the production of high volume, high quality, reliable telecommunications hardware. One of Iridium's goals is to apply these production techniques to high reliability space hardware. Concurrent engineering, high performance work teams, advanced manufacturing technologies, and improved assembly and test methods are some of the techniques that will keep the Iridium system cost effective. Mobile, global, flexible personal communications are coming that will allow anyone to call or receive a call from/to anyplace at anytime. The Iridium system will provide communications where none exist today. This connectivity will allow increased information transfer, open new markets for various business endeavors, and in general increase productivity and development.

  12. Iridium Aluminide Coats For Protection Against Ox idation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, Richard B.; Tuffias, Robert H.; La Ferla, Raffaele; Jang, Qin

    1996-01-01

    Iridium aluminide coats investigated for use in protecting some metallic substrates against oxidation at high temperatures. Investigation prompted by need for cost-effective anti-oxidation coats for walls of combustion chambers in rocket engines. Also useful in special terrestrial applications like laboratory combustion chambers and some chemical-processing chambers.

  13. Discovery of Tantalum, Rhenium, Osmium, and Iridium Isotopes

    E-print Network

    Robinson, R

    2011-01-01

    Currently, thirty-eight tantalum, thirty-eight rhenium, thirty-nine osmium, and thirty-eight iridium, isotopes have been observed and the discovery of these isotopes is discussed here. For each isotope a brief synopsis of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  14. Origins of Regioselectivity in Iridium Catalyzed Allylic Substitution.

    PubMed

    Madrahimov, Sherzod T; Li, Qian; Sharma, Ankit; Hartwig, John F

    2015-12-01

    Detailed studies on the origin of the regioselectivity for formation of branched products over linear products have been conducted with complexes containing the achiral triphenylphosphite ligand. The combination of iridium and P(OPh)3 was the first catalytic system shown to give high regioselectivity for the branched product with iridium and among the most selective for forming branched products among any combination of metal and ligand. We have shown the active catalyst to be generated from [Ir(COD)Cl]2 and P(OPh)3 by cyclometalation of the phenyl group on the ligand and have shown such species to be the resting state of the catalyst. A series of allyliridium complexes ligated by the resulting P,C ligand have been generated and shown to be competent intermediates in the catalytic system. We have assessed the potential impact of charge, metal-iridium bond length, and stability of terminal vs internal alkenes generated by attack at the branched and terminal positions of the allyl ligand, respectively. These factors do not distinguish the regioselectivity for attack on allyliridium complexes from that for attack on allylpalladium complexes. Instead, detailed computational studies suggest that a series of weak, attractive, noncovalent interactions, including interactions of H-bond acceptors with a vinyl C-H bond of the alkene ligand, favor formation of the branched product with the iridium catalyst. This conclusion underscores the importance of considering attractive interactions, as well as repulsive steric interactions, when seeking to rationalize selectivities. PMID:26498382

  15. Discovery of Tantalum, Rhenium, Osmium, and Iridium Isotopes

    E-print Network

    R. Robinson; M. Thoennessen

    2011-09-02

    Currently, thirty-eight tantalum, thirty-eight rhenium, thirty-nine osmium, and thirty-eight iridium, isotopes have been observed and the discovery of these isotopes is discussed here. For each isotope a brief synopsis of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  16. Magnetostratigraphy, Late devonian iridium anomaly, and impact hypotheses

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, N.F.; Van der Voo, R. )

    1990-04-01

    Paleomagnetism, sedimentology, and fine-scale stratigraphy have been integrated to explain the origin of an iridium anomaly in the Late Devonian of Western Australia. Thermal demagnetization experiments were carried out on 93 specimens of marginal-slope limestone form the northern Canning Basin. Samples are from a condensed sequence of deep-water (> 100 m) Frutexites microstromatolites. Frutexites is a shrublike cyanobacterial organism that probably precipitated hematite, or a metastable precursor, from sea water. When plotted within the microstratigraphic framework for the study area, the observed characteristic directions from the sampled interval (14.5 cm thick) are in five discrete, layer-parallel, normal- and reversed-polarity zones. The measured northeast-southwest declinations and shallow inclinations probably record Late Devonian magnetostratigraphy on a centimetre scale. The Frutexites bed studied there occurs close to the Frasnian/Famennian (Late Devonian) boundary, a time of mass extinction of a wide variety of marine organisms throughout the world. Anomalously high iridium concentrations observed in the Frutexites bed have suggested to some authors that the mass extinction was caused by meteorite impact. This study concludes that iridium, which is present over the span of five layer-parallel magnetic reversals, was concentrated over a long period of time by biologic processes. Thus, the Canning Basin iridium anomaly may be unrelated to meteorite impact.

  17. Iridium alloy Clad Vent Set manufacturing qualification studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulrich, George B.

    Metallurgical qualification studies to demonstrate the manufacturing readiness of the iridium alloy Clad Vent Set (CVS) for the General Purpose Heat Source program at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant are described. Microstructural data for various materials/test conditions are presented.

  18. Mechanisms of hydride abstractions by quinones.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xingwei; Zipse, Hendrik; Mayr, Herbert

    2014-10-01

    The kinetics of the hydride abstractions by 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano-p-benzoquinone (DDQ) from 13 C-H hydride donors (acyclic 1,4-dienes, cyclohexa-1,4-dienes, dihydropyridines), tributylstannane, triphenylstannane, and five borane complexes (amine-boranes, carbene-boranes) have been studied photometrically in dichloromethane solution at 20 °C. Analysis of the resulting second-order rate constants by the correlation log k2(20 °C) = sN(E + N) ( J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2001 , 123 , 9500 ) showed that the hydride abstractions from the C-H donors on one side and the Sn-H and B-H hydride donors on the other follow separate correlations, indicating different mechanisms for the two reaction series. The interpretation that the C-H donors transfer hydrogen to the carbonyl oxygen of DDQ while Sn-H and B-H hydride donors transfer hydride to a cyano-substituted carbon of DDQ is supported by quantum-chemical intrinsic reaction coordinate calculations and isotope labeling experiments of the reactions of D8-cyclohexa-1,4-diene, Bu3SnD, and pyridine·BD3 with 2,5-dichloro-p-benzoquinone. The second-order rate constants of the reactions of tributylstannane with different quinones correlate linearly with the electrophilicity parameters E of the quinones, which have previously been derived from the reactions of quinones with ?-nucleophiles. The fact that the reactions of Bu3SnH with quinones and benzhydrylium ions are on the same log k2 vs E (electrophilicity) correlation shows that both reaction series proceed by the same mechanism and illustrates the general significance of the reactivity parameters E, N, and sN for predicting rates of polar organic reactions. PMID:25196576

  19. Atomistic Potentials for Palladium-Silver Hydrides

    E-print Network

    Hale, L M; Zimmerman, J A; Zhou, X

    2013-01-01

    New EAM potentials for the ternary palladium-silver-hydrogen system are developed by extending a previously developed palladium-hydrogen potential. The ternary potentials accurately capture the heat of mixing and structural properties associated with solid solution alloys of palladium-silver. Stable hydrides are produced with properties that smoothly transition across the compositions. Additions of silver to palladium are predicted to alter the properties of the hydrides by decreasing the miscibility gap and increasing the likelihood of hydrogen atoms occupying tetrahedral interstitial sites over octahedral interstitial sites.

  20. 1. VIEW OF A PORTION OF THE HYDRIDE PROCESSING LABORATORY. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW OF A PORTION OF THE HYDRIDE PROCESSING LABORATORY. OPERATIONS IN THE GLOVE BOX IN THE BACKGROUND OF THE PHOTOGRAPH INCLUDED HYDRIDING OF PLUTONIUM AND HYDRIDE SEPARATION. IN THE FOREGROUND, THE VACUUM MONITOR CONTROL PANEL MEASURED TEMPERATURES WITHIN THE GLOVEBOX. THE CENTER CONTROL PANEL REGULATED THE FURNACE INSIDE THE GLOVE BOX USED IN THE HYDRIDING PROCESSES. THIS EQUIPMENT WAS ESSENTIAL TO THE HYDRIDING PROCESS, AS WELL AS OTHER GLOVE BOX OPERATIONS. - Rocky Flats Plant, Plutonium Laboratory, North-central section of industrial area at 79 Drive, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  1. Structure, electrochemical properties and capacitance performance of polypyrrole electrodeposited onto 1-D crystals of iridium complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wysocka-?o?opa, Monika; Winkler, Krzysztof

    2015-12-01

    Composites of polypyrrole and one-dimensional iridium complex crystals [(C2H5)4N]0.55[IrCl2(CO)2] were prepared by in situ two-step electrodeposition. Initially, iridium complex crystals were formed during [IrCl2(CO)2]- complex oxidation. Next, pyrrole was electropolymerized on the surface of the iridium needles. The morphology of the composite was investigated by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. At positive potentials, the iridium complex crystals and the polypyrrole were oxidized. In aprotic solvents, oxidation of the iridium complex crystals resulted in their dissolution. In water containing tetra(n-butyl)ammonium chlorides, the 1-D iridium complex crystals were reversibly oxidized. The product of the iridium complex oxidation remained on the electrode surface in crystalline form. The iridium complex needles significantly influenced the redox properties of the polymer. The polypyrrole involved electrode processes become more reversible in presence of crystals of iridium complex. The current of polypyrrole oxidation was higher compared to that of pure polypyrrole and the capacitance properties of the polymer were significantly enhanced. A specific capacitance as high as 590 F g-1 was obtained for a composite of polypyrrole and 1-D crystals of the iridium complex in water containing tetra(n-butyl)ammonium chloride. This value is approximately twice as high as the capacitance of the pure polymer deposited onto the electrode surface.

  2. Hydridable material for the negative electrode in a nickel-metal hydride storage battery

    DOEpatents

    Knosp, Bernard (Neuilly-sur-Seine, FR); Bouet, Jacques (Paris, FR); Jordy, Christian (Dourdan, FR); Mimoun, Michel (Neuilly-sur-Marne, FR); Gicquel, Daniel (Lanorville, FR)

    1997-01-01

    A monophase hydridable material for the negative electrode of a nickel-metal hydride storage battery with a "Lave's phase" structure of hexagonal C14 type (MgZn.sub.2) has the general formula: Zr.sub.1-x Ti.sub.x Ni.sub.a Mn.sub.b Al.sub.c Co.sub.d V.sub.e where ##EQU1##

  3. Effect of yttrium on nucleation and growth of zirconium hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Changji; Xiong, Liangyin; Wu, Erdong; Liu, Shi

    2015-02-01

    Addition of yttrium in zirconium causes precipitates of yttrium, which form two types of particles and are oxidized upon heat treatment. One type of particles with sub-micrometer scale sizes has a low population, whereas the other with nano scale sizes has a high population and cluster distribution. Owing to strong affinity of yttrium to hydrogen, the nanoparticles, mostly within the grains of the Zr-Y alloy, attract nucleation of hydrides at the clusters of the nanoparticles and cause preferential distribution of intragranular hydrides. In comparison with that of Zr, additional nanoparticles in the Zr-Y alloy impede further growth of hydride precipitates during hydriding. It is deduced that the impediment of growing hydride precipitates by the nanoparticles is developed during an auto-catalytic nucleation process, which leads to formation of thin and intragranular hydrides, favorable to mitigation of hydride embrittlement.

  4. Hydride Reorientation and Delayed Hydride Cracking of Spent Fuel Rods in Dry Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young S.

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate the effect of thermal creep during vacuum drying of spent fuel rods on hydride reorientation and their delayed hydride cracking (DHC) susceptibility. To these ends, we analyzed Tsai’s thermal creep results of irradiated Zircaloy-4 cladding segments from two pressurized water reactors and Simpson and Ells’ observation where zirconium alloy cladding tube failed during long-term storage at room temperature. On cooling under 190 MPa, the spent fuel rods crept to 3.5 pct strain during vacuum drying showed large radial hydrides, while the ones crept to 0.35 pct strain had very fine radial hydrides. Thus, it is suggested that prior creep deformation promotes hydride reorientation in spent fuel rods on cooling after vacuum drying. Evidence for this suggestion is provided by a model experiment. Considering Kim’s DHC model and experimental facts showing precipitation of hydrides even at room temperature at stress raisers, we suggest that spent fuel rods would fail by DHC in dry storage if stress raisers are present inside the cladding on cooling to below 180 °C, and then axial splits of the failed spent fuel rods would occur by DHC due to fuel expansion by UO2 oxidation.

  5. Metal hydride fuel storage and method thereof

    DOEpatents

    Morse, Jeffrey D [Martinez, CA; Jankowski, Alan F [Livermore, CA; Yu, Conrad [Antioch, CA

    2009-05-05

    Disclosed herein is a metal hydride fuel storage cartridge having integrated resistive heaters that can be used in conjunction with fuel cells such as MEMS-based fuel cells. The cartridge is fabricated using micromachining methods and thin/thick film materials synthesis techniques.

  6. Metal hydride fuel storage and method thereof

    DOEpatents

    Morse, Jeffrey D. (Martinez, CA); Jankowski, Alan F. (Livermore, CA); Yu, Conrad (Antioch, CA)

    2006-10-17

    Disclosed herein is a metal hydride fuel storage cartridge having integrated resistive heaters that can be used in conjunction with fuel cells such as MEMS-based fuel cells. The cartridge is fabricated using micromachining methods and thin/thick film materials synthesis techniques.

  7. Abstract--In this work, we reported fabrication of new miniature sensors utilizing iridium oxide (IrO2) nanorods to

    E-print Network

    Chiao, Jung-Chih

    Abstract--In this work, we reported fabrication of new miniature sensors utilizing iridium oxide template, chemical bath deposition, dopamine, iridium oxide, nanorods, nanotemplate. I. INTRODUCTION nanoparticles, zinc oxide nanorods and iridium oxide nanostructures [9-13]. Among these materials

  8. Simulation of dose distribution for iridium-192 brachytherapy source type-H01 using MCNPX

    SciTech Connect

    Purwaningsih, Anik

    2014-09-30

    Dosimetric data for a brachytherapy source should be known before it used for clinical treatment. Iridium-192 source type H01 was manufactured by PRR-BATAN aimed to brachytherapy is not yet known its dosimetric data. Radial dose function and anisotropic dose distribution are some primary keys in brachytherapy source. Dose distribution for Iridium-192 source type H01 was obtained from the dose calculation formalism recommended in the AAPM TG-43U1 report using MCNPX 2.6.0 Monte Carlo simulation code. To know the effect of cavity on Iridium-192 type H01 caused by manufacturing process, also calculated on Iridium-192 type H01 if without cavity. The result of calculation of radial dose function and anisotropic dose distribution for Iridium-192 source type H01 were compared with another model of Iridium-192 source.

  9. Synthesis, characterization, and reactivity studies of iridium complexes bearing the ligand diphenylphosphidoboratabenzene

    E-print Network

    Arizpe, Luis (Luis Alfredo)

    2011-01-01

    The synthesis, structure, and reactivity properties of three iridium square planar complexes bearing the anionic phosphine ligand diphenylphosphidoboratabenzene (DPB) are described. Reactivity studies show a rate enhancement ...

  10. Anodic iridium oxide films: An UPS study of emersed electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kötz, E. R.; Neff, H.

    1985-09-01

    Formation of anodic iridium oxide films has been monitored using Ultraviolet Photoemission Spectroscopy (UPS) of the emersed electrodes. The potential dependent valence band spectra clearly show the onset of oxide formation at about 0.6 V versus SCE. The density of states at the Fermi level and the positron of the Fermi level with respect to the maximum of the t 2g band of the oxide indicates a transition from metallic to semiconducting behaviour of the oxide. Protonation of the oxide is associated with increased emission from OH species. A linear correlation between electrode potential and workfunction change is observed for the metal as well as for the oxide. Our results confirm known band theory models and provide a fundamental understanding of the electrochromism of anodic iridium oxide films.

  11. Network flexibility of the IRIDIUM (R) Global Mobile Satellite System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutcheson, Jonathan; Laurin, Mala

    1995-01-01

    The IRIDIUM system is a global personal communications system supported by a constellation of 66 low earth orbit (LEO) satellites and a collection of earth-based 'gateway' switching installations. Like traditional wireless cellular systems, coverage is achieved by a grid of cells in which bandwidth is reused for spectral efficiency. Unlike any cellular system ever built, the moving cells can be shared by multiple switching facilities. Noteworthy features of the IRIDIUM system include inter-satellite links, a GSM-based telephony architecture, and a geographically controlled system access process. These features, working in concert, permit flexible and reliable administration of the worldwide service area by gateway operators. This paper will explore this unique concept.

  12. Circularly polarised phosphorescent photoluminescence and electroluminescence of iridium complexes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tian-Yi; Jing, Yi-Ming; Liu, Xuan; Zhao, Yue; Shi, Lin; Tang, Zhiyong; Zheng, You-Xuan; Zuo, Jing-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Nearly all the neutral iridium complexes widely used as dopants in PhOLEDs are racemic mixtures; however, this study observed that these complexes can be separated into stable optically active ? and ? isomers and that their chirality is an intrinsic property. The circularly polarised phosphorescent photoluminescence (CPPPL) signals of ?/? isomers are perfect mirror images with opposite polarisation and equal intensity exhibiting a “handedness” for the polarisation. For the first time, we applied the ?/? iridium isomers as emitters in OLEDs, and the circularly polarised phosphorescent electroluminescence (CPPEL) spectra reveal completely positive or negative broad peaks consistent with the CPPPL spectra. The results demonstrate that the ?/? isomers have potential application for 3D OLEDs because they can exhibit high efficiency and luminance, and 3D display technology based on circularly polarised light is the most comfortable for the eyes. PMID:26446521

  13. Circularly polarised phosphorescent photoluminescence and electroluminescence of iridium complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tian-Yi; Jing, Yi-Ming; Liu, Xuan; Zhao, Yue; Shi, Lin; Tang, Zhiyong; Zheng, You-Xuan; Zuo, Jing-Lin

    2015-10-01

    Nearly all the neutral iridium complexes widely used as dopants in PhOLEDs are racemic mixtures; however, this study observed that these complexes can be separated into stable optically active ? and ? isomers and that their chirality is an intrinsic property. The circularly polarised phosphorescent photoluminescence (CPPPL) signals of ?/? isomers are perfect mirror images with opposite polarisation and equal intensity exhibiting a “handedness” for the polarisation. For the first time, we applied the ?/? iridium isomers as emitters in OLEDs, and the circularly polarised phosphorescent electroluminescence (CPPEL) spectra reveal completely positive or negative broad peaks consistent with the CPPPL spectra. The results demonstrate that the ?/? isomers have potential application for 3D OLEDs because they can exhibit high efficiency and luminance, and 3D display technology based on circularly polarised light is the most comfortable for the eyes.

  14. Circularly polarised phosphorescent photoluminescence and electroluminescence of iridium complexes.

    PubMed

    Li, Tian-Yi; Jing, Yi-Ming; Liu, Xuan; Zhao, Yue; Shi, Lin; Tang, Zhiyong; Zheng, You-Xuan; Zuo, Jing-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Nearly all the neutral iridium complexes widely used as dopants in PhOLEDs are racemic mixtures; however, this study observed that these complexes can be separated into stable optically active ? and ? isomers and that their chirality is an intrinsic property. The circularly polarised phosphorescent photoluminescence (CPPPL) signals of ?/? isomers are perfect mirror images with opposite polarisation and equal intensity exhibiting a "handedness" for the polarisation. For the first time, we applied the ?/? iridium isomers as emitters in OLEDs, and the circularly polarised phosphorescent electroluminescence (CPPEL) spectra reveal completely positive or negative broad peaks consistent with the CPPPL spectra. The results demonstrate that the ?/? isomers have potential application for 3D OLEDs because they can exhibit high efficiency and luminance, and 3D display technology based on circularly polarised light is the most comfortable for the eyes. PMID:26446521

  15. Processing and properties of iridium alloys for space power applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ohriner, E.K.

    1994-12-31

    Iridium alloys are used as fuel cladding in radioisotope thermoelectric generators due to their high-melting point, high- temperature strength, and oxidation and corrosion resistance. Although iridium has a face-centered cubic crystal structure, it undergoes a distinct ductile-to-brittle transition characteristic of many body-centered cubic metals. Improved ductility in the alloys is achieved through material purification and controlled alloy additions at the parts per million (ppm) level. A vacuum arc remelt operation produces a nearly defect-free casting, which is further processed to sheet products. A change in processing from drop castings of small arc-melted buttons to large arc-remelted ingots has substantially improved product yields. The effects of processing changes on alloy microstructure, sheet textures, oxidation effects, high-strain-rate ductility, and fabricability are discussed.

  16. Iridium alloy clad vent set manufacturing qualification studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulrich, George B.

    1991-01-01

    Qualification studies have been successfully conducted to demonstrate iridium alloy Clad Vent Set (CVS) manufacturing readiness for the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) program at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. These studies were joint comparison evaluations of both the Y-12 Plant and EG&G Mound G-MAT) products. Note: EG&G-MAT formerly manufactured the iridium alloy CVS. The comparison evaluations involved work in a number of areas; however, only the CVS cup metallurgical evalution will be presented here. The initial metallurgical comparisons in conjunction with follow-up metallurgical work showed the Y-12 Plant CVS product to be comparable to the fully qualified (for Galileo and Ulysses missions) EG&G-MAT product. This allowed the Y-12 Plant to commence pilot production of CVS components for potential use in the CRAF and CASSINI missions.

  17. Iridium-Doped Ruthenium Oxide Catalyst for Oxygen Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valdez, Thomas I.; Narayan, Sri R.; Billings, Keith J.

    2011-01-01

    NASA requires a durable and efficient catalyst for the electrolysis of water in a polymer-electrolyte-membrane (PEM) cell. Ruthenium oxide in a slightly reduced form is known to be a very efficient catalyst for the anodic oxidation of water to oxygen, but it degrades rapidly, reducing efficiency. To combat this tendency of ruthenium oxide to change oxidation states, it is combined with iridium, which has a tendency to stabilize ruthenium oxide at oxygen evolution potentials. The novel oxygen evolution catalyst was fabricated under flowing argon in order to allow the iridium to preferentially react with oxygen from the ruthenium oxide, and not oxygen from the environment. Nanoparticulate iridium black and anhydrous ruthenium oxide are weighed out and mixed to 5 18 atomic percent. They are then heat treated at 300 C under flowing argon (in order to create an inert environment) for a minimum of 14 hours. This temperature was chosen because it is approximately the creep temperature of ruthenium oxide, and is below the sintering temperature of both materials. In general, the temperature should always be below the sintering temperature of both materials. The iridium- doped ruthenium oxide catalyst is then fabricated into a PEM-based membrane- electrode assembly (MEA), and then mounted into test cells. The result is an electrolyzer system that can sustain electrolysis at twice the current density, and at the same efficiency as commercial catalysts in the range of 100-200 mA/sq cm. At 200 mA/sq cm, this new system operates at an efficiency of 85 percent, which is 2 percent greater than commercially available catalysts. Testing has shown that this material is as stable as commercially available oxygen evolution catalysts. This means that this new catalyst can be used to regenerate fuel cell systems in space, and as a hydrogen generator on Earth.

  18. Sputtered iridium oxide films (SIROFs) for neural stimulation electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Cogan, Stuart F.; Ehrlich, Julia; Plante, Timothy D.; Smirnov, Anton; Shire, Douglas B.; Gingerich, Marcus; Rizzo, Joseph F.

    2009-01-01

    Sputtered iridium oxide films (SIROFs) deposited by DC reactive sputtering from an iridium metal target have been characterized in vitro for their potential as neural recording and stimulation electrodes. SIROFs were deposited over gold metallization on flexible multielectrode arrays fabricated on thin (15 µm) polyimide substrates. SIROF thickness and electrode areas of 200–1300 nm and 1960–125600 µm2, respectively, were investigated. The charge-injection capacities of the SIROFs were evaluated in an inorganic interstitial fluid model in response to charge-balanced, cathodal-first current pulses. Charge injection capacities were measured as a function of cathodal pulse width (0.2 – 1 ms) and potential bias in the interpulse period (0.0 to 0.7 V vs. Ag|AgCl). Depending on the pulse parameters and electrode area, charge-injection capacities ranged from 1–9 mC/cm2, comparable with activated iridium oxide films (AIROFs) pulsed under similar conditions. Other parameters relevant to the use of SIROF on nerve electrodes, including the thickness dependence of impedance (0.05–105 Hz) and the current necessary to maintain a bias in the interpulse region were also determined. PMID:17271216

  19. Mono- and bis-tolylterpyridine iridium(III) complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkle, Lindsay M.; Young, Jr., Victor G.; Mann, Kent R.

    2012-01-20

    The first structure report of trichlorido[4'-(p-tolyl)-2,2':6',2{double_prime}-terpyridine]iridium(III) dimethyl sulfoxide solvate, [IrCl{sub 3}(C{sub 22}H{sub 17}N{sub 3})] {center_dot} C{sub 2}H{sub 6}OS, (I), is presented, along with a higher-symmetry setting of previously reported bis[4'-(p-tolyl)-2,2':6',2{double_prime}-terpyridine]iridium(III) tris(hexafluoridophosphate) acetonitrile disolvate, [Ir(C{sub 22}H{sub 17}N{sub 3})2](PF{sub 6}){sub 3} {center_dot} 2C{sub 2}H{sub 3}N, (II) [Yoshikawa, Yamabe, Kanehisa, Kai, Takashima & Tsukahara (2007). Eur. J. Inorg. Chem. pp. 1911-1919]. For (I), the data were collected with synchrotron radiation and the dimethyl sulfoxide solvent molecule is disordered over three positions, one of which is an inversion center. The previously reported structure of (II) is presented in the more appropriate C2/c space group. The iridium complex and one PF{sub 6}{sup -} anion lie on twofold axes in this structure, making half of the molecule unique.

  20. Mechanistic Investigation of Iridium-Catalyzed Hydrovinylation of Jonas Oxgaard, Gaurav Bhalla, Roy A. Periana, and William A. Goddard, III*,

    E-print Network

    Goddard III, William A.

    Mechanistic Investigation of Iridium-Catalyzed Hydrovinylation of Olefins Jonas Oxgaard, Gaurav metallacyclopentane intermediates have also been postulated.8 Only a related iridium complex, Tp*Ir(C2H4)2, has been

  1. Received 21 Jul 2013 | Accepted 7 Jan 2014 | Published 3 Feb 2014 Iridium oxide nanotube electrodes for

    E-print Network

    Cui, Yi

    ARTICLE Received 21 Jul 2013 | Accepted 7 Jan 2014 | Published 3 Feb 2014 Iridium oxide nanotube- rodes of a new geometry, namely nanotubes of iridium oxide. When cardiomyocytes are cultured upon those

  2. Green electroluminescence from an ionic iridium complex Jason D. Slinker, Cheong Y. Koh, and George G. Malliarasa

    E-print Network

    Bernhard, Stefan

    Green electroluminescence from an ionic iridium complex Jason D. Slinker, Cheong Y. Koh, and George, it was not until 2004 when an ionic iridium complex, Ir ppy 2 dtb-bpy + PF6 - , where ppy is 2-phenylpyridine

  3. Evaluation of Molybdenum as a Surrogate for Iridium in the GPHS Weld Development

    SciTech Connect

    Stine, Andrew Martin; Pierce, Stanley W.; Moniz, Paul F.

    2015-10-17

    The welding equipment used for welding iridium containers (clads) at Los Alamos National Laboratory is twenty five years old and is undergoing an upgrade. With the upgrade, there is a requirement for requalification of the welding process, and the opportunity for process improvement. Testing of the new system and requalification will require several welds on iridium test parts and clads, and any efforts to improve the process will add to the need for iridium parts. The extreme high cost of iridium imposes a severe limitation on the extent of test welding that can be done. The 2 inch diameter, 0.027 inch thick, iridium blank disc that the clad cup is formed from, is useful for initial weld trials, but it costs $5000. The development clad sets needed for final tests and requalification cost $15,000 per set. A solution to iridium cost issue would be to do the majority of the weld development on a less expensive surrogate metal with similar weld characteristics. One such metal is molybdenum. Since its melting index (melting temperature x thermal conductivity) is closest to iridium, welds on molybdenum should be similar in size for a given weld power level. Molybdenum is inexpensive; a single 2 inch molybdenum disc costs only $9. In order to evaluate molybdenum as a surrogate for iridium, GTA welds were first developed to provide full penetration on 0.030 inch thick molybdenum discs at speeds of 20, 25, and 30 inches per minute (ipm). These weld parameters were then repeated on the standard 0.027 inch thick iridium blanks. The top surface and bottom surface (root) width and grain structure of the molybdenum and iridium welds were compared, and similarities were evident between the two metals. Due to material and thickness differences, the iridium welds were approximately 35% wider than the molybdenum welds. A reduction in iridium weld current of 35% produce welds slightly smaller than the molybdenum welds yet showed that current could be scaled according to molybdenum/iridium weld width ratio to achieve similar welds. Further weld trials using various thicknesses of molybdenum determined that 0.024 inch thick molybdenum material would best match the 0.027 inch thick iridium in achieving comparable welds when using the same welding parameters. Across the range of welding speeds, the characteristic weld pool shape and solidification grain structure in the two materials was also similar. With the similarity of welding characteristics confirmed, and the appropriate thickness of molybdenum determined, it has been concluded that the use of molybdenum discs and tube sections will greatly expand the weld testing opportunities prior to iridium weld qualification

  4. HYDRIDE-RELATED DEGRADATION OF SNF CLADDING UNDER REPOSITORY CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    K. McCoy

    2000-12-12

    The purpose and scope of this analysis/model report is to analyze the degradation of commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) cladding under repository conditions by the hydride-related metallurgical processes, such as delayed hydride cracking (DHC), hydride reorientation and hydrogen embrittlement, thereby providing a better understanding of the degradation process and clarifying which aspects of the process are known and which need further evaluation and investigation. The intended use is as an input to a more general analysis of cladding degradation.

  5. Flow in a metal hydride chromatographic column

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, G.S.

    1990-01-01

    The flow of hydrogen isotopes in a metal hydride chromatographic column is calculated by a one-dimensional finite difference method. The Ergun equation is used to define the gas flow; and equilibrium pressure isotherms are used to define the column holdup. Solid phase loadings are shown to move as a wave front on absorption, but remain more uniform on desorption. 3 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Dissipative hydride precipitates in superconducting niobium cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Romanenko, A.; Cooley, L.D.; Ciovati, G.; Wu, G.; /Argonne

    2011-10-01

    We report the first direct observation of the microstructural features exhibiting RF losses at high surface magnetic fields of above 100 mT in field emission free superconducting niobium cavities. The lossy areas were identified by advanced thermometry. Surface investigations using different techniques were carried out on cutout samples from lossy areas and showed the presence of dendritic niobium hydrides. This finding has possible implications to the mechanisms of RF losses in superconducting niobium at all field levels.

  7. METAL HYDRIDE HYDROGEN COMPRESSORS: A REVIEW

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman Jr, Robert C; Yartys, Dr. Volodymyr A.; Lototskyy, Dr. Michael V; Pollet, Dr. B.G.

    2014-01-01

    Metal hydride (MH) thermal sorption compression is an efficient and reliable method allowing a conversion of energy from heat into a compressed hydrogen gas. The most important component of such a thermal engine the metal hydride material itself should possess several material features in order to achieve an efficient performance in the hydrogen compression. Apart from the hydrogen storage characteristics important for every solid H storage material (e.g. gravimetric and volumetric efficiency of H storage, hydrogen sorption kinetics and effective thermal conductivity), the thermodynamics of the metal-hydrogen systems is of primary importance resulting in a temperature dependence of the absorption/desorption pressures). Several specific features should be optimized to govern the performance of the MH-compressors including synchronisation of the pressure plateaus for multi-stage compressors, reduction of slope of the isotherms and hysteresis, increase of cycling stability and life time, together with challenges in system design associated with volume expansion of the metal matrix during the hydrogenation. The present review summarises numerous papers and patent literature dealing with MH hydrogen compression technology. The review considers (a) fundamental aspects of materials development with a focus on structure and phase equilibria in the metal-hydrogen systems suitable for the hydrogen compression; and (b) applied aspects, including their consideration from the applied thermodynamic viewpoint, system design features and performances of the metal hydride compressors and major applications.

  8. Storing hydrogen in the form of light alloy hydrides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freund, E.; Gillerm, C.

    1981-01-01

    Different hydrides are investigated to find a system with a sufficiently high storage density (at least 3%). The formation of hydrides with light alloys is examined. Reaction kinetics for hydride formation were defined and applied to the systems Mg-Al-H, Mg-Al-Cu-H, Ti-Al-H, Ti-Al-Cu-H, and Ti-Al-Ni-H. Results indicate that the addition of Al destabilizes MgH2 and TiH2 hydrides while having only a limited effect on the storage density.

  9. A Combined Ab Initio and Bond-Order Potentials Study of Cohesion in Iridium Marc J. Cawkwell1

    E-print Network

    Vitek, Vaclav

    A Combined Ab Initio and Bond-Order Potentials Study of Cohesion in Iridium Marc J. Cawkwell1 , Duc and excellent resistance to oxidation and corrosion offered by iridium suggest numerous applications since highlighted iridium as worthy of significant industrial interest and academic study. Owing to its

  10. A Cost-effective Microcontroller-based Iridium Satellite Communication Architecture for a Remote Renewable Energy Source

    E-print Network

    Petersen, Brent

    A Cost-effective Microcontroller-based Iridium Satellite Communication Architecture for a Remote, 2008 #12;ii DEDICATION This thesis is dedicated to my parents. #12;iii ABSTRACT The Iridium Satellite (SBD) transceiver for data communications. A cost-effective microcontroller-based Iridium SBD satellite

  11. Effects of Electrodeposition Conditions and Protocol on the Properties of Iridium Oxide pH Sensor Electrodes

    E-print Network

    Majda, Marcin

    Effects of Electrodeposition Conditions and Protocol on the Properties of Iridium Oxide pH Sensor of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720-1460, USA The properties of iridium oxide pH sensors substrates with iridium oxide. Increasing the film thickness beyond the full coverage did not further

  12. An experimental study of the solubility and partitioning of iridium, osmium and gold between olivine and silicate melt

    E-print Network

    Mcdonough, William F.

    = An experimental study of the solubility and partitioning of iridium, osmium and gold between­melt partitioning experiments to understand the behaviour of iridium, osmium and gold during crust; osmium; iridium; gold; partitioning; olivine 1. Introduction Owing to their refractory nature, and unique

  13. Reducing hot-short cracking in iridium GTA welding using four-pole oscillation

    SciTech Connect

    Scarbrough, J.D.; Burgan, C.E.

    1984-01-01

    Hot-short cracking, an intrinsic problem in iridium welding, has been reduced using four-pole magnetic arc oscillation. For given batches of iridium, reject rates have been reduced from 26% to 2%. The mechanics of the four-pole oscillator, the microstructural effects and the causes for improvement are discussed.

  14. Real-Time Characterization of Formation and Breakup of Iridium Clusters in Highly Dealuminated Zeolite Y

    SciTech Connect

    Uzun, Alper; Gates, Bruce C.

    2009-01-15

    The chemistry of formation of iridium clusters from mononuclear iridium diethylene complexes anchored in dealuminated Y zeolite, and their subsequent breakup -- all including changes in the metal-metal, metal-support, and metal-ligand interactions -- is demonstrated by time-resolved EXAFS, XANES, and IR spectroscopy.

  15. Development and Testing of High Surface Area Iridium Anodes for Molten Oxide Electrolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shchetkovskiy, Anatoliy; McKechnie, Timothy; Sadoway, Donald R.; Paramore, James; Melendez, Orlando; Curreri, Peter A.

    2010-01-01

    Processing of lunar regolith into oxygen for habitat and propulsion is needed to support future space missions. Direct electrochemical reduction of molten regolith is an attractive method of processing, because no additional chemical reagents are needed. The electrochemical processing of molten oxides requires high surface area, inert anodes. Such electrodes need to be structurally robust at elevated temperatures (1400-1600 C), be resistant to thermal shock, have good electrical conductivity, be resistant to attack by molten oxide (silicate), be electrochemically stable and support high current density. Iridium with its high melting point, good oxidation resistance, superior high temperature strength and ductility is the most promising candidate for anodes in high temperature electrochemical processes. Several innovative concepts for manufacturing such anodes by electrodeposition of iridium from molten salt electrolyte (EL-Form process) were evaluated. Iridium electrodeposition to form of complex shape components and coating was investigated. Iridium coated graphite, porous iridium structure and solid iridium anodes were fabricated. Testing of electroformed iridium anodes shows no visible degradation. The result of development, manufacturing and testing of high surface, inert iridium anodes will be presented.

  16. Development and Testing of High Surface Area Iridium Anodes for Molten Oxide Electrolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shchetkovskiy, Anatoliy; McKechnie, Timothy; Sadoway, Donald R.; Paramore, James; Melendez, Orlando; Curreri, Peter A.

    2010-01-01

    Processing of lunar regolith into oxygen for habitat and propulsion is needed to support future space missions. Direct electrochemical reduction of molten regolith is an attractive method of processing, because no additional chemical reagents are needed. The electrochemical processing of molten oxides requires high surface area, inert anodes. Such electrodes need to be structurally robust at elevated temperatures (1400-1600?C), be resistant to thermal shock, have good electrical conductivity, be resistant to attack by molten oxide (silicate), be electrochemically stable and support high current density. Iridium with its high melting point, good oxidation resistance, superior high temperature strength and ductility is the most promising candidate for anodes in high temperature electrochemical processes. Several innovative concepts for manufacturing such anodes by electrodeposition of iridium from molten salt electrolyte (EL-Form? process) were evaluated. Iridium electrodeposition to form of complex shape components and coating was investigated. Iridium coated graphite, porous iridium structure and solid iridium anodes were fabricated. Testing of electroformed iridium anodes shows no visible degradation. The result of development, manufacturing and testing of high surface, inert iridium anodes will be presented.

  17. Iridium Metal in Chicxulub Impact Melt: Forensic Chemistry on the K-T Smoking Gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuraytz, Benjamin C.; Lindstrom, David J.; Marin, Luis E.; Martinez, Rene R.; Mittlefehldt, David W.; Sharpton, Virgil L.; Wentworth, Susan J.

    1996-03-01

    Iridium concentrations in successively smaller subsplits of melt rock and melt breccia from the Chicxulub impact basin were tracked to isolate and identify iridium carrier phases. Iridium-rich particles were isolated from two samples, and a micrometer-scale, silicate-enclosed aggregate of subhedral iridium metal grains was identified in one, confirming earlier reports of iridium at ground zero of the impact at the Cretaceous-Tertiary (K-T) boundary. The aggregate may be either a phase formed after the collision or a relict of the Chicxulub basin-forming meteorite. In either case, its presence indicates that even among the largest impact structures on Earth, meteoritic components may be preserved within the crater.

  18. Characterization of zirconium hydrides in Zircaloy-4 cladding with respect to cooling rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung-Dae; Rhyim, Youngmok; Kim, Ju-Seong; Yoon, Jonghun

    2015-10-01

    In order to characterize the habit planes and crystallographic relation between the ?-matrix and various kinds of Zr hydrides, three different Zr hydrides including ?-hydride, ?-hydride, and surface hydride are produced by controlling the cooling rate from 0.5 to 300 °C/min. Analysis of SAED patterns and TEM images of the Zr hydrides demonstrates representative habit planes and crystallographic relation according to the hydride morphologies. The macroscopic ?-hydride has two kinds of habit planes such as { 10 1 bar 7 } ? and {0002}?, while microscopic ?-hydride has the habit plane of {0002}? at the cooling rate of 0.5-10 °C/min. The microscopic ?-hydride has the major habit plane of { 10 1 bar 7 } ? at the cooling rate of 300 °C/min in which the crystallographic relation between the ?-hydride and the ?-Zr matrix as (11 1 bar) ? ?(01 1 bar 1) ? ;(111)? ?(0001)? ;[ 1 1 bar 0 ] ? ?[ 11 2 bar 0 ] ? .

  19. Iridium: Global OTH data communications for high altitude scientific ballooning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denney, A.

    While the scientific community is no stranger to embracing commercially available technologies, the growth and availability of truly affordable cutting edge technologies is opening the door to an entirely new means of global communications. For many years high altitude ballooning has provided science an alternative to costly satellite based experimental platforms. As with any project, evolution becomes an integral part of development. Specifically in the NSBF ballooning program, where flight durations have evolved from the earlier days of hours to several weeks and plans are underway to provide missions up to 100 days. Addressing increased flight durations, the harsh operational environment, along with cumbersome and outdated systems used on existing systems, such as the balloon vehicles Support Instrumentation Package (SIP) and ground-based systems, a new Over-The-Horizon (OTH) communications medium is sought. Current OTH equipment planning to be phased-out include: HF commanding systems, ARGOS PTT telemetry downlinks and INMARSAT data terminals. Other aspects up for review in addition to the SIP to utilize this communications medium include pathfinder balloon platforms - thereby, adding commanding abilities and increased data rates, plus providing a package for ultra-small experiments to ride aloft. Existing communication systems employed by the National Scientific Balloon Facility ballooning program have been limited not only by increased cost, slow data rates and "special government use only" services such as TDRSS (Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System), but have had to make special provisions to geographical flight location. Development of the Support Instrumentation Packages whether LDB (Long Duration Balloon), ULDB (Ultra Long Duration Balloon) or conventional ballooning have been plagued by non-standard systems configurations requiring additional support equipment for different regions and missions along with a myriad of backup for redundancy. Several beneficial points provided by the Iridium platform include pure global accessibility (as well as polar), cost effectiveness because it is available as a COTS (Commercially Off The Shelf) technology, reliability in that the equipment must operate in extreme conditions (near space), integration and development time into current systems must be minimized. As a bonus Motorola and NAL Research Corporation are developing SBD (Short Burst Data) into the Iridium network. This may lead the way to a global IP (Internet Protocol) node based ballooning platform. The Iridium satellite data modems employ the Iridium Low-Earth Orbit (LEO) satellite network. The scope of this paper is to introduce an OTH communications alternative, albeit not necessarily a primary one, to existing ballooning platforms using COTS based emerging technologies. Design aspects, characteristics, actual flight testing statistics, principles of the Iridium modems and communication paths are described including payload and support instrumentation interfacing. Not limited to high altitude ballooning, the Iridium communications platform opens a new era in remote commanding and data retrieval.

  20. Metal Hydride Thermal Storage: Reversible Metal Hydride Thermal Storage for High-Temperature Power Generation Systems

    SciTech Connect

    2011-12-05

    HEATS Project: PNNL is developing a thermal energy storage system based on a Reversible Metal Hydride Thermochemical (RMHT) system, which uses metal hydride as a heat storage material. Heat storage materials are critical to the energy storage process. In solar thermal storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials during the day and released at night—when the sun is not out—to drive a turbine and produce electricity. In nuclear storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials at night and released to produce electricity during daytime peak-demand hours. PNNL’s metal hydride material can reversibly store heat as hydrogen cycles in and out of the material. In a RHMT system, metal hydrides remain stable in high temperatures (600- 800°C). A high-temperature tank in PNNL’s storage system releases heat as hydrogen is absorbed, and a low-temperature tank stores the heat until it is needed. The low-cost material and simplicity of PNNL’s thermal energy storage system is expected to keep costs down. The system has the potential to significantly increase energy density.

  1. Hydrogen storage in the form of metal hydrides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwanziger, M. G.; Santana, C. C.; Santos, S. C.

    1984-01-01

    Reversible reactions between hydrogen and such materials as iron/titanium and magnesium/ nickel alloy may provide a means for storing hydrogen fuel. A demonstration model of an iron/titanium hydride storage bed is described. Hydrogen from the hydride storage bed powers a converted gasoline electric generator.

  2. Metal Hydrides for High-Temperature Power Generation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ronnebro, Ewa; Whyatt, Greg A.; Powell, Michael R.; Westman, Matthew P.; Zheng, Feng; Fang, Zhigang Zak

    2015-08-10

    Metal hydrides can be utilized for hydrogen storage and for thermal energy storage (TES) applications. By using TES with solar technologies, heat can be stored from sun energy to be used later which enables continuous power generation. We are developing a TES technology based on a dual-bed metal hydride system, which has a high-temperature (HT) metal hydride operating reversibly at 600-800°C to generate heat as well as a low-temperature (LT) hydride near room temperature that is used for hydrogen storage during sun hours until there is a need to produce electricity, such as during night time, a cloudy day, ormore »during peak hours. We proceeded from selecting a high-energy density, low-cost HT-hydride based on performance characterization on gram size samples, to scale-up to kilogram quantities and design, fabrication and testing of a 1.5kWh, 200kWh/m3 bench-scale TES prototype based on a HT-bed of titanium hydride and a hydrogen gas storage instead of a LT-hydride. COMSOL Multiphysics was used to make performance predictions for cylindrical hydride beds with varying diameters and thermal conductivities. Based on experimental and modeling results, a bench-scale prototype was designed and fabricated and we successfully showed feasibility to meet or exceed all performance targets.« less

  3. Metal Hydrides for High-Temperature Power Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Ronnebro, Ewa; Whyatt, Greg A.; Powell, Michael R.; Westman, Matthew P.; Zheng, Feng; Fang, Zhigang Zak

    2015-08-10

    Metal hydrides can be utilized for hydrogen storage and for thermal energy storage (TES) applications. By using TES with solar technologies, heat can be stored from sun energy to be used later which enables continuous power generation. We are developing a TES technology based on a dual-bed metal hydride system, which has a high-temperature (HT) metal hydride operating reversibly at 600-800°C to generate heat as well as a low-temperature (LT) hydride near room temperature that is used for hydrogen storage during sun hours until there is a need to produce electricity, such as during night time, a cloudy day, or during peak hours. We proceeded from selecting a high-energy density, low-cost HT-hydride based on performance characterization on gram size samples, to scale-up to kilogram quantities and design, fabrication and testing of a 1.5kWh, 200kWh/m3 bench-scale TES prototype based on a HT-bed of titanium hydride and a hydrogen gas storage instead of a LT-hydride. COMSOL Multiphysics was used to make performance predictions for cylindrical hydride beds with varying diameters and thermal conductivities. Based on experimental and modeling results, a bench-scale prototype was designed and fabricated and we successfully showed feasibility to meet or exceed all performance targets.

  4. Method of making crack-free zirconium hydride

    DOEpatents

    Sullivan, Richard W. (Denver, CO)

    1980-01-01

    Crack-free hydrides of zirconium and zirconium-uranium alloys are produced by alloying the zirconium or zirconium-uranium alloy with beryllium, or nickel, or beryllium and scandium, or nickel and scandium, or beryllium and nickel, or beryllium, nickel and scandium and thereafter hydriding.

  5. Chronic radiodermatitis developing after iridium-192 exposure: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kurmu?, Gökçe I??l; Gönül, Müzeyyen

    2015-01-01

    Iridium-192 (Ir(192)) is a radioactive isotope which has high-penetration ability in humans. Due to occupational accidents, industrial radiography workers may be rarely exposed to high doses of ionizing radiation, and acute radiodermatitis may develop after the exposure. After an asymptomatic period which can last several months, poikiloderma, sclerosis, necrosis, and ulceration of the skin may be observed as typical clinical features of chronic radiodermatitis. Herein, we report the case of a 26-year-old man presented with ulceration and sclerosis on the second digit of the left hand and was diagnosed with chronic radiodermatitis induced by Ir(192). PMID:25198404

  6. The solubility of hydrogen in rhodium, ruthenium, iridium and nickel.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclellan, R. B.; Oates, W. A.

    1973-01-01

    The temperature variation of the solubility of hydrogen in rhodium, ruthenium, iridium, and nickel in equilibrium with H2 gas at 1 atm pressure has been measured by a technique involving saturating the solvent metal with hydrogen, quenching, and analyzing in resultant solid solutions. The solubilities determined are small (atom fraction of H is in the range from 0.0005 to 0.00001, and the results are consistent with the simple quasi-regular model for dilute interstitial solid solutions. The relative partial enthalpy and excess entropy of the dissolved hydrogen atoms have been calculated from the solubility data and compared with well-known correlations between these quantities.

  7. Measurements of the hard-x-ray reflectivity of iridium

    SciTech Connect

    Romaine, S.; Bruni, R.; Gorenstein, P.; Zhong, Z

    2007-01-10

    In connection with the design of a hard-x-ray telescope for the Constellation X-Ray Observatory we measured the reflectivity of an iridium-coated zerodur substrate as a function of angle at 55, 60, 70, and 80 keV at the National Synchrotron Light Source of Brookhaven National Laboratory. The optical constants were derived from the reflectivity data. The real component of the index of refraction is in excellent agreement with theoretical values at all four energies. However, the imaginary component, which is related to the mass attenuation coefficient, is 50% to 70% larger at 55, 60, and 70 keV than theoretical values.

  8. Luminescent cyclometallated iridium(III) complexes having acetylide ligands

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, Mark E.; Bossi, Alberto; Djurovich, Peter Ivan

    2014-09-02

    The present invention relates to phosphorescent (triplet-emitting) organometallic materials. The phosphorescent materials of the present invention comprise Ir(III)cyclometallated alkynyl complexes for use as triplet light-emitting materials. The Ir(III)cyclometallated alkynyl complexes comprise at least one cyclometallating ligand and at least one alkynyl ligand bonded to the iridium. Also provided is an organic light emitting device comprising an anode, a cathode and an emissive layer between the anode and the cathode, wherein the emissive layer comprises a Ir(III)cyclometallated alkynyl complex as a triplet emitting material.

  9. Intercalation of graphene on iridium with sodium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rut'kov, E. V.; Gall', N. R.

    2015-06-01

    It has been shown that sodium atoms deposited on the surface of graphene atop iridium at T ? 850 K diffuse under the graphene layer into an intercalated state and accumulate there in significant concentrations ˜(2-3) × 1014 atoms cm-2. The release of the atoms from under the graphene "carpet" takes place upon destruction of the layer at T ? 1800 K. The physical nature of the differences in the processes of release of atoms of different alkali metals from under graphene has been discussed.

  10. Determination of iridium in mafic rocks by atomic absorption

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grimaldi, F.S.; Schnepfe, M.M.

    1970-01-01

    Iridium is determined in mineralized mafic rocks by atomic absorption after fire-assay concentration into a gold bead. Interelement interferences in the atomic-absorption determination are removed and Ir sensitivity is increased by buffering the solutions with a mixture of copper and sodium sulphates. Substantial amounts of Ag, Al, Au, Bi, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Fe, Ho, Hg, K, La, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Te, Ti, V, Y, Zn and platinum metals can be tolerated in the atomic-absorption determination. The sensitivity and detection limits are 3.2 and 0.25 ppm of Ir, respectively. ?? 1970.

  11. Recent advances in metal hydrides for clean energy applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ronnebro, Ewa; Majzoub, Eric H.

    2013-06-01

    Metal hydrides are a fascinating class of materials that can be utilized for a surprising variety of clean energy applications, including smart solar collectors, smart windows, sensors, thermal energy storage, and batteries, in addition to their traditional application for hydrogen storage. Over the past decade, research on metal hydrides for hydrogen storage increased due to global governmental incentives and an increased focus on hydrogen storage research for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell operation. Tremendous progress has been made in so-called complex metal hydrides for hydrogen storage applications with the discovery of many new hydrides containing covalently bound complex anions. Many of these materials have applications beyond hydrogen storage and are being investigated for lithium-ion battery separator and anode materials. In this issue of MRS Bulletin , we present the state of the art of key evolving metal-hydride-based clean energy technologies with an outlook toward future needs.

  12. Modular hydride beds for mobile applications

    SciTech Connect

    Malinowski, M.E.; Stewart, K.D.

    1997-08-01

    Design, construction, initial testing and simple thermal modeling of modular, metal hydride beds have been completed. Originally designed for supplying hydrogen to a fuel cell on a mobile vehicle, the complete bed design consists of 8 modules and is intended for use on the Palm Desert Vehicle (PDV) under development at the Schatz Energy Center, Humbolt State University. Each module contains approximately 2 kg of a commercially available, low temperature, hydride-forming metal alloy. Waste heat from the fuel cell in the form of heated water is used to desorb hydrogen from the alloy for supplying feed hydrogen to the fuel cell. In order to help determine the performance of such a modular bed system, six modules were constructed and tested. The design and construction of the modules is described in detail. Initial testing of the modules both individually and as a group showed that each module can store {approximately} 30 g of hydrogen (at 165 PSIA fill pressure, 17 C), could be filled with hydrogen in 6 minutes at a nominal, 75 standard liters/min (slm) fueling rate, and could supply hydrogen during desorption at rates of 25 slm, the maximum anticipated hydrogen fuel cell input requirement. Tests made of 5 modules as a group indicated that the behavior of the group run in parallel both in fueling and gas delivery could be directly predicted from the corresponding, single module characteristics by using an appropriate scaling factor. Simple thermal modeling of a module as an array of cylindrical, hydride-filled tubes was performed. The predictions of the model are in good agreement with experimental data.

  13. Development of nickel-metal hydride cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuwajima, Saburo; Kamimori, Nolimits; Nakatani, Kensuke; Yano, Yoshiaki

    1993-01-01

    National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) has conducted the research and development (R&D) of battery cells for space use. A new R&D program about a Nickel-Metal Hydride (Ni-MH) cell for space use from this year, based on good results in evaluations of commercial Ni-MH cells in Tsukuba Space Center (TKSC), was started. The results of those commercial Ni-MH cell's evaluations and recent status about the development of Ni-MH cells for space use are described.

  14. Metal hydride fuel storage and method thereof

    DOEpatents

    Morse, Jeffrey D. (Martinez, CA); Jankowski, Alan F. (Livermore, CA); Yu, Conrad (Antioch, CA)

    2010-08-10

    An apparatus having a first substrate having (1) a cavity, (2) one or more resistive heaters, and (3) one or more coatings forming a diffusion barrier to hydrogen; a second substrate having (1) an outlet valve comprising a pressure relief structure and (2) one or more coatings forming a diffusion barrier to hydrogen, wherein said second substrate is coupled to said first substrate forming a sealed volume in said cavity; a metal hydride material contained within said cavity; and a gas distribution system formed by coupling a microfluidic interconnect to said pressure relief structure. Additional apparatuses and methods are also disclosed.

  15. Autodissociating Rydberg states of positronium hydride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drachman, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    Consequences of the nonrelativistic Coulomb Hamiltonian with a fixed proton are considered for positronium hydride (PsH). An optical-potential method and certain simplifying assumptions are used to compute the lowest s-wave resonance parameters on the basis of the /e(+)H(-)/ configuration. Resonance parameters corresponding to a Ps scattering energy of 4.0190 eV and a width of 0.0303 eV are obtained. These results are shown to be in very close agreement with those of previous studies.

  16. Highly Concentrated Palladium Hydrides/Deuterides; Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Papaconstantopoulos, Dimitrios

    2013-11-26

    Accomplishments are reported in these areas: tight-binding molecular dynamics study of palladium; First-principles calculations and tight-binding molecular dynamics simulations of the palladium-hydrogen system; tight-binding studies of bulk properties and hydrogen vacancies in KBH{sub 4}; tight-binding study of boron structures; development of angular dependent potentials for Pd-H; and density functional and tight-binding calculations for the light-hydrides NaAlH4 and NaBH4

  17. Results of NDE Technique Evaluation of Clad Hydrides

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis C. Kunerth

    2014-09-01

    This report fulfills the M4 milestone, M4FT-14IN0805023, Results of NDE Technique Evaluation of Clad Hydrides, under Work Package Number FT-14IN080502. During service, zirconium alloy fuel cladding will degrade via corrosion/oxidation. Hydrogen, a byproduct of the oxidation process, will be absorbed into the cladding and eventually form hydrides due to low hydrogen solubility limits. The hydride phase is detrimental to the mechanical properties of the cladding and therefore it is important to be able to detect and characterize the presence of this constituent within the cladding. Presently, hydrides are evaluated using destructive examination. If nondestructive evaluation techniques can be used to detect and characterize the hydrides, the potential exists to significantly increase test sample coverage while reducing evaluation time and cost. To demonstrate the viability this approach, an initial evaluation of eddy current and ultrasonic techniques were performed to demonstrate the basic ability to these techniques to detect hydrides or their effects on the microstructure. Conventional continuous wave eddy current techniques were applied to zirconium based cladding test samples thermally processed with hydrogen gas to promote the absorption of hydrogen and subsequent formation of hydrides. The results of the evaluation demonstrate that eddy current inspection approaches have the potential to detect both the physical damage induced by hydrides, e.g. blisters and cracking, as well as the combined effects of absorbed hydrogen and hydride precipitates on the electrical properties of the zirconium alloy. Similarly, measurements of ultrasonic wave velocities indicate changes in the elastic properties resulting from the combined effects of absorbed hydrogen and hydride precipitates as well as changes in geometry in regions of severe degradation. However, for both approaches, the signal responses intended to make the desired measurement incorporate a number of contributing parameters. These contributing factors need to be recognized and a means to control them or separate their contributions will be required to obtain the desired information.

  18. Dynamic high-temperature characterization of an iridium alloy in tension

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Bo; Nelson, Kevin; Jin, Helena; Lipinski, Ronald J.; Bignell, John; Ulrich, G. B.; George, E. P.

    2015-09-01

    Iridium alloys have been utilized as structural materials for certain high-temperature applications, due to their superior strength and ductility at elevated temperatures. The mechanical properties, including failure response at high strain rates and elevated temperatures of the iridium alloys need to be characterized to better understand high-speed impacts at elevated temperatures. A DOP-26 iridium alloy has been dynamically characterized in compression at elevated temperatures with high-temperature Kolsky compression bar techniques. However, the dynamic high-temperature compression tests were not able to provide sufficient dynamic high-temperature failure information of the iridium alloy. In this study, we modified current room-temperature Kolsky tension bar techniques for obtaining dynamic tensile stress-strain curves of the DOP-26 iridium alloy at two different strain rates (~1000 and ~3000 s-1) and temperatures (~750°C and ~1030°C). The effects of strain rate and temperature on the tensile stress-strain response of the iridium alloy were determined. The DOP-26 iridium alloy exhibited high ductility in stress-strain response that strongly depended on both strain rate and temperature.

  19. Cation insertion reactions of electrochromic tungsten and iridium oxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntyre, J. D. E.; Basu, S.; Peck, W. F., Jr.; Brown, W. L.; Augustyniak, W. M.

    1982-06-01

    Electrochemical coloration mechanisms of electrochromic (EC), amorphous tungsten and iridium oxide films have been investigated by direct elemental analysis of their compositions in oxidized and reduced states. Combined Rutherford backscattering and nuclear-reaction-analysis techniques were employed to determine the identities and concentrations of ions injected as charge compensators from the contacting electrolyte during EC redox reactions. In aqueous electrolytes, the cathodic coloration of an anodically formed, hydrous tungsten oxide film (composition ~WO3.H2O), is accompanied by injection of protons, in accordance with mechanisms determined for anhydrous WO3. The anodic coloration and coloration bleaching of an anodically formed, hydrous iridium oxide (IROX) film, which has a varying degree of hydration throughout its thickness, is accompanied by ejection and injection of H+ and H3O+ ions. In nonaqueous aprotic electrolytes, the slow but reversible insertion of Li+ (r=0.60 Å) and Na+ (r=0.95 Å) ions into IROX films has been successfully demonstrated for the first time. Li+ ions were found to exchange with H+ ions in these hydrous films. No evidence could be found for insertion of K+ (r=1.33 Å), F- (r=1.36 Å), or OH- (r=1.55 Å) ions as charge compensators. These results provide a measure of the size and concentration of vacancies and defects in amorphous IROX films.

  20. Microindentation hardness evaluation of iridium alloy clad vent set cups

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrich, G.B.; DeRoos, L.F.; Stinnette, S.E.

    1992-05-15

    An iridium alloy, DOP-26, is used as cladding for {sup 238}PuO{sup 2} fuel in radioisotope heat sources for space power systems. Presently, DOP-26 iridium alloy clad vent sets (CVS) are being manufactured at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant for potential use in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Cassini mission to Saturn. Wrought/ground/stress relieved blanks are warm formed into CVS cups. These cups are then annealed to recrystallize the material for subsequent fabrication/assembly operations as well as for final use. One of the cup manufacturing certification requirements is to test for Vickers microindentation hardness. New microindentation hardness specification limits, 210 to 310 HV, have been established for a test load of 1000 grams-force (gf). The original specification limits, 250 to 350 HV, were for 200 gf testing. The primary reason for switching to a higher test load was to reduce variability in the test data. The DOP-26 alloy exhibits microindentation hardness load dependence, therefore, new limits were needed for 1000 gf testing. The new limits were established by testing material from 15 CVS cups using 200 gf and 1000 gf loads and then statistically analyzing the data. Additional work using a Knoop indenter and a 10 gf load indicated that the DOP-26 alloy grain boundaries have higher hardnesses than the grain interiors.

  1. Microindentation hardness evaluation of iridium alloy clad vent set cups

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrich, G.B.; DeRoos, L.F.; Stinnette, S.E.

    1992-05-15

    An iridium alloy, DOP-26, is used as cladding for {sup 238}PuO{sup 2} fuel in radioisotope heat sources for space power systems. Presently, DOP-26 iridium alloy clad vent sets (CVS) are being manufactured at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant for potential use in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration`s Cassini mission to Saturn. Wrought/ground/stress relieved blanks are warm formed into CVS cups. These cups are then annealed to recrystallize the material for subsequent fabrication/assembly operations as well as for final use. One of the cup manufacturing certification requirements is to test for Vickers microindentation hardness. New microindentation hardness specification limits, 210 to 310 HV, have been established for a test load of 1000 grams-force (gf). The original specification limits, 250 to 350 HV, were for 200 gf testing. The primary reason for switching to a higher test load was to reduce variability in the test data. The DOP-26 alloy exhibits microindentation hardness load dependence, therefore, new limits were needed for 1000 gf testing. The new limits were established by testing material from 15 CVS cups using 200 gf and 1000 gf loads and then statistically analyzing the data. Additional work using a Knoop indenter and a 10 gf load indicated that the DOP-26 alloy grain boundaries have higher hardnesses than the grain interiors.

  2. Analysis and Consequences of the Iridium 33-Cosmos 2251 Collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anz-Meador, Phillip; Liou, Jer-Chyi

    The collision of Iridium 33 and Cosmos 2251, on 10 February 2009, was the first known uninten-tional hypervelocity collision in space of intact satellites. Iridium 33 was an active commercial telecommunications satellite, while Cosmos 2251 was a derelict communication satellite of the Strela-2M class. The collision occurred at a relative velocity of 11.6 km/s at an altitude of approximately 790 km over the Great Siberian Plain and near the northern apex of Cosmos 2251's orbit. This paper describes the physical and orbital characteristics of the relevant spacecraft classes and reports upon our analysis of the resulting debris clouds' size, mass, area-to-mass ratio, and relative velocity/directionality distributions. We compare these distributions to those predicted by the NASA breakup model and notable recent fragmentation events; in particular, we compare the area-to-mass ratio distribution for each spacecraft to that exhibited by the FY-1C debris cloud for the purpose of assessing the relative contribution of modern aerospace materials to debris clouds resulting from energetic collisions. In addition, we examine the long-term consequences of this event for the low Earth orbit (LEO) environment. Finally, we discuss "lessons learned", which may be incorporated into NASA's environmental models.

  3. Analysis and Consequences of the Iridium 33-Cosmos 2251 Collision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anz-Meador, P. D.; Liou, Jer-Chi

    2010-01-01

    The collision of Iridium 33 and Cosmos 2251, on 10 February 2009, was the first known unintentional hypervelocity collision in space of intact satellites. Iridium 33 was an active commercial telecommunications satellite, while Cosmos 2251 was a derelict communication satellite of the Strela-2M class. The collision occurred at a relative velocity of 11.6 km/s at an altitude of approximately 790 km over the Great Siberian Plain and near the northern apex of Cosmos 2251 s orbit. This paper describes the physical and orbital characteristics of the relevant spacecraft classes and reports upon our analysis of the resulting debris clouds size, mass, area-to-mass ratio, and relative velocity/directionality distributions. We compare these distributions to those predicted by the NASA breakup model and notable recent fragmentation events; in particular, we compare the area-to-mass ratio distribution for each spacecraft to that exhibited by the FY-1C debris cloud for the purpose of assessing the relative contribution of modern aerospace materials to debris clouds resulting from energetic collisions. In addition, we examine the long-term consequences of this event for the low Earth orbit (LEO) environment. Finally, we discuss "lessons learned", which may be incorporated into NASA s environmental models.

  4. Analysis of Abrasive Blasting of DOP-26 Iridium Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Ohriner, Evan Keith; Zhang, Wei; Ulrich, George B

    2012-01-01

    The effects of abrasive blasting on the surface geometry and microstructure of DOP-26 iridium alloy (Ir-0.3% W-0.006% Th 0.005% Al) have been investigated. Abrasive blasting has been used to control emissivity of components operating at elevated temperature. The effects of abrasive blasting conditions on surface morphology were investigated both experimentally and by numerical modeling. The simplified model, based on finite element analysis of a single angular particle impacting on Ir alloy disk, calculates the surface deformation and residual strain distribution. The experimental results and modeling results both indicate that the surface geometry is not sensitive to the abrasive blast process conditions of nozzle pressure and standoff distance considered in this study. On the other hand, the modeling results suggest that the angularity of the abrasive particle has an important role in determining surface geometry, which in turn, affects the emissivity. Abrasive blasting causes localized surface strains and localized recrystallization, but it does not affect grain size following extended exposure at elevated temperature. The dependence of emissivity of the DOP-26 alloy on mean surface slope follows a similar trend to that reported for pure iridium.

  5. Microindentation hardness evaluation of iridium alloy clad vent set cups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulrich, George B.; DeRoos, Larry F.; Stinnette, Samuel E.

    1993-01-01

    An iridium alloy, DOP-26, is used as cladding for 238PuO2 fuel in radioisotope heat sources for space power systems. Presently, DOP-26 iridium alloy clad vent sets (CVS) are being manufactured at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant for potential use in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Cassini mission to Saturn. Wrought/ground/stress relieved blanks are warm formed into CVS cups. These cups are then annealed to recrystallize the material for subsequent fabrication/assembly operations as well as for final use. One of the cup manufacturing certification requirements is to test for Vickers microindentation hardness. New microindentation hardness specification limits, 210 to 310 HV, have been established for a test load of 1000 grams-force (gf). The original specification limits, 250 to 350 HV, were for 200 gf testing. The primary reason for switching to a higher test load was to reduce variability in the test data. The DOP-26 alloy exhibits microindentation hardness load dependence, therefore, new limits were needed for 1000 gf testing. The new limits were established by testing material from 15 CVS cups using 200 gf and 1000 gf loads and then statistically analyzing the data. Additional work using a Knoop indenter and a 10 gf load indicated that the DOP-26 alloy grain boundaries have higher hardnesses than the grain interiors.

  6. Comparison of amorphous iridium water-oxidation electrocatalysts prepared from soluble precursors.

    PubMed

    Blakemore, James D; Schley, Nathan D; Kushner-Lenhoff, Maxwell N; Winter, Andrew M; D'Souza, Francis; Crabtree, Robert H; Brudvig, Gary W

    2012-07-16

    Electrodeposition of iridium oxide layers from soluble precursors provides a route to active thin-layer electrocatalysts for use on water-oxidizing anodes. Certain organometallic half-sandwich aqua complexes of iridium form stable and highly active oxide films upon electrochemical oxidation in aqueous solution. The catalyst films appear as blue layers on the anode when sufficiently thick, and most closely resemble hydrous iridium(III,IV) oxide by voltammetry. The deposition rate and cyclic voltammetric response of the electrodeposited material depend on whether the precursor complex contains a pentamethylcyclopentadieneyl (Cp*) or cyclopentadienyl ligand (Cp), and do not match, in either case, iridium oxide anodes prepared from non-organometallic precursors. Here, we survey our organometallic precursors, iridium hydroxide, and pre-formed iridium oxide nanoparticles. From electrochemical quartz crystal nanobalance (EQCN) studies, we find differences in the rate of electrodeposition of catalyst layers from the two half-sandwich precursors; however, the resulting layers operate as water-oxidizing anodes with indistinguishable overpotentials and H/D isotope effects. Furthermore, using the mass data collected by EQCN and not otherwise available, we show that the electrodeposited materials are excellent catalysts for the water-oxidation reaction, showing maximum turnover frequencies greater than 0.5 mol O(2) (mol iridium)(-1) s(-1) and quantitative conversion of current to product dioxygen. Importantly, these anodes maintain their high activity and robustness at very low iridium loadings. Our organometallic precursors contrast with pre-formed iridium oxide nanoparticles, which form an unstable electrodeposited material that is not stably adherent to the anode surface at even moderately oxidizing potentials. PMID:22725667

  7. Millimeter-Wave Spectroscopy of Ethylmercury Hydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goubet, M.; Motiyenko, R. A.; Margulès, L.; Guillemin, J.-C.

    2012-06-01

    The first millimeter-wave rotational spectrum of an organomercury compound, ethylmercury hydride (CH_3CH_2HgH), has been recorded using the Lille fast-scan spectrometer in the frequency range 120 -- 180 GHz. The spectroscopic study is complemented by quantum chemical calculations taking into account relativistic effects on the mercury atom. The very good agreement between theoretical and experimental molecular parameters validates the chosen ab initio method, in particular its capability to predict the accurate values of the quartic centrifugal distortion constants related to this type of compound. Estimations of the nuclear quadrupole coupling constants are not as predictive as the structural parameters but good enough to satisfy the spectroscopic needs. In addition, the orientation of the H--Hg--C bonds axis deduced from the experimental nuclear quadrupole coupling constants compares well with the corresponding ab initio value. From the good agreement between experimental and theoretical results, together with the observation of the six most abundant isotopes of mercury, ethylmercury hydride is unambiguously identified and its calculated equilibrium geometry is confirmed. Alekseev, E.A. et al. Radio Physics and Radio Astronomy 3 (2012) 78.

  8. Pressure-stabilized superconductive yttrium hydrides

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yinwei; Hao, Jian; Liu, Hanyu; Tse, John S.; Wang, Yanchao; Ma, Yanming

    2015-01-01

    The search for high-temperature superconductors has been focused on compounds containing a large fraction of hydrogen, such as SiH4(H2)2, CaH6 and KH6. Through a systematic investigation of yttrium hydrides at different hydrogen contents using an structure prediction method based on the particle swarm optimization algorithm, we have predicted two new yttrium hydrides (YH4 andYH6), which are stable above 110?GPa. Three types of hydrogen species with increased H contents were found, monatomic H in YH3, monatomic H+molecular “H2” in YH4 and hexagonal “H6” unit in YH6. Interestingly, H atoms in YH6 form sodalite-like cage sublattice with centered Y atom. Electron-phonon calculations revealed the superconductive potential of YH4 and YH6 with estimated transition temperatures (Tc) of 84–95?K and 251–264?K at 120?GPa, respectively. These values are higher than the predicted maximal Tc of 40?K in YH3. PMID:25942452

  9. Regeneration of Aluminum Hydride Using Trimethylamine

    SciTech Connect

    D Lacina; J Reilly; Y Celebi; J Wegrzyn; J Johnson; J Graetz

    2011-12-31

    Aluminum hydride is an attractive reducing agent and energy storage compound possessing a low decomposition temperature and a high gravimetric and volumetric hydrogen density. However, it is thermodynamically unstable at room temperature and requires extremely high pressures to form the hydride from aluminum and hydrogen gas. Here, we describe an alternate method of synthesizing AlH{sub 3} using Ti-catalyzed Al powder, H{sub 2}, and trimethylamine (TMA) to form an alane adduct. The formation of trimethylamine alane occurs at modest hydrogen pressures ({approx}100 bar), forming the 2:1 bis complex (2 trimethylamine/AlH{sub 3}). Along with the hydrogenation product, mono (1:1) and bis (2:1) standards of TMA-AlH{sub 3} were prepared and characterized using X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of the reaction products showed that the Ti catalyst remains with the unreacted Al powder after hydrogenation and is not present in the alane adduct. We also demonstrate that TMA can be transaminated with triethylamine to form triethylamine alane, which can easily be separated to recover AlH{sub 3}.

  10. A study of hydriding kinetics of metal hydrides using a physically based model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voskuilen, Tyler G.

    The reaction of hydrogen with metals to form metal hydrides has numerous potential energy storage and management applications. The metal hydrogen system has a high volumetric energy density and is often reversible with a high cycle life. The stored hydrogen can be used to produce energy through combustion, reaction in a fuel cell, or electrochemically in metal hydride batteries. The high enthalpy of the metal-hydrogen reaction can also be used for rapid heat removal or delivery. However, improving the often poor gravimetric performance of such systems through the use of lightweight metals usually comes at the cost of reduced reaction rates or the requirement of pressure and temperature conditions far from the desired operating conditions. In this work, a 700 bar Sievert system was developed at the Purdue Hydrogen Systems Laboratory to study the kinetic and thermodynamic behavior of high pressure hydrogen absorption under near-ambient temperatures. This system was used to determine the kinetic and thermodynamic properties of TiCrMn, an intermetallic metal hydride of interest due to its ambient temperature performance for vehicular applications. A commonly studied intermetallic hydride, LaNi5, was also characterized as a base case for the phase field model. The analysis of the data obtained from such a system necessitate the use of specialized techniques to decouple the measured reaction rates from experimental conditions. These techniques were also developed as a part of this work. Finally, a phase field model of metal hydride formation in mass-transport limited interstitial solute reactions based on the regular solution model was developed and compared with measured kinetics of LaNi5 and TiCrMn. This model aided in the identification of key reaction features and was used to verify the proposed technique for the analysis of gas-solid reaction rates determined volumetrically. Additionally, the phase field model provided detailed quantitative predictions of the effects of multidimensional phase growth and transitions between rate-limiting processes on the experimentally determined reaction rates. Unlike conventional solid state reaction analysis methods, this model relies fully on rate parameters based on the physical mechanisms occurring in the hydride reaction and can be extended to reactions in any dimension.

  11. Formylated chloro-bridged iridium(III) dimers as OLED materials: opening up new possibilities.

    PubMed

    Wong, Michael Y; Xie, Guohua; Tourbillon, Clarisse; Sandroni, Martina; Cordes, David B; Slawin, Alexandra M Z; Samuel, Ifor D W; Zysman-Colman, Eli

    2015-05-14

    In this study, a series of four formyl-substituted chloro-bridged iridium(iii) dimers were prepared. Their absorption, photophysical and electrochemical properties were studied in dichloromethane solution. It was found that as the formyl content increased on the cyclometalating ligands, emission unexpectedly became brighter. Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) were fabricated using each of these iridium dimers as the emitter. The OLED fabricated using the brightest of the series, 2b, as the dopant afforded a decent external quantum efficiency (EQE) of 2.6%. This suggests that chloro-bridged iridium dimers are potential candidates as solid-state emitters. PMID:25609226

  12. Addition of Iridium to the Biopolymer Mediated Synthesis of YBa2Cu3O7 ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wimbush, Stuart C.; Marx, Werner; Barth, Andreas; Hall, Simon R.

    This work represents the first study into the addition of iridium into the solgel synthesis of the high temperature superconductor YBa2Cu3O7? (Y123). Through a biopolymermediated synthetic approach, the homogeneous nature of the precursor sol and the preferred nucleation and growth of Y123 phases allow for a high yield of superconducting nanoparticles with no suppression of the superconducting critical temperature, even at high levels (40 wt%) of iridium addition. We attribute this to iridium not substituting into the Y123 crystal lattice, instead forming an associate phase.

  13. Fracture Resistance of a Zirconium Alloy with Reoriented Hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Kwai S.; He, Xihua; Pan, Yi-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Zirconium alloy cladding materials typically contain circumferential hydrides that may be reoriented to align along the radial direction when the cladding tubes are heated above and then cooled below the solvus temperature. The objectives of this study were to investigate the critical stress levels required to cause hydride reorientation (HRT) and to characterize the fracture resistance of Zircaloy-2 after hydride reorientation. HRT heat-treatment was performed on hydrogen-charged Zircaloy-2 specimens at 593 K (320 °C) or 623 K (350 °C) for 1 to 2 hours, followed by cooling to 473 K (200 °C). Fracture testing was conducted on hydride-reoriented three-point bend specimens at 473 K (200 °C) using an in situ loading stage inside a scanning electron microscope. Direct observations indicated that the reoriented hydrides, which ranged from ?1 to 22 ?m in lengths, were more prone to fracture at larger sizes (>10 ?m) compared to smaller sizes (<0.5 ?m). The reoriented hydrides reduced fracture resistance through a void nucleation, growth, and coalescence process at the crack tip. The resulting crack-resistance curves for Zircaloy-2 with reoriented hydrides decrease from 38 to 21 MPa(m)1/2 with increasing hydrogen contents from 51 to 1265 wt ppm hydrogen.

  14. A preliminary study of factors affecting the calibration stability of the iridium versus iridium-40 percent rhodium thermocouple

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmed, Shaffiq; Germain, Edward F.; Daryabeigi, Kamran; Alderfer, David W.; Wright, Robert E.

    1987-01-01

    An iridium versus iridium-40% rhodium thermocouple was studied. Problems associated with the use of this thermocouple for high temperature applications (up to 2000 C) were investigated. The metallurgical studies included X-ray, macroscopic, resistance, and metallographic studies. The thermocouples in the as-received condition from the manufacturer revealed large amounts of internal stress caused by cold working during manufacturing. The thermocouples also contained a large amount of inhomogeneities and segregations. No phase transformations were observed in the alloy up to 1100 C. It was found that annealing the thermocouple at 1800 C for two hours, and then at 1400 C for 2 to 3 hours yielded a fine grain structure, relieving some of the strains, and making the wire more ductile. It was also found that the above annealing procedure stabilized the thermal emf behavior of the thermocouple for application below 1800 C (an improvement from + or - 1% to + or - 0.02% within the range of the test parameters used).

  15. Molecular rare-earth-metal hydrides in non-cyclopentadienyl environments.

    PubMed

    Fegler, Waldemar; Venugopal, Ajay; Kramer, Mathias; Okuda, Jun

    2015-02-01

    Molecular hydrides of the rare-earth metals play an important role as homogeneous catalysts and as counterparts of solid-state interstitial hydrides. Structurally well-characterized non-metallocene-type hydride complexes allow the study of elementary reactions that occur at rare-earth-metal centers and of catalytic reactions involving bonds between rare-earth metals and hydrides. In addition to neutral hydrides, cationic derivatives have now become available. PMID:25413985

  16. The development of metal hydrides using as concentrating solar thermal storage materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Xuanhui; Li, Yang; Li, Ping; Wan, Qi; Zhai, Fuqiang

    2015-10-01

    Metal hydrides high temperature thermal heat storage technique has great promising future prospects in solar power generation, industrial waste heat utilization and peak load regulating of power system. This article introduces basic principle of metal hydrides for thermal storage, and summarizes developments in advanced metal hydrides high-temperature thermal storage materials, numerical simulation and thermodynamic calculation in thermal storage systems, and metal hydrides thermal storage prototypes. Finally, the future metal hydrides high temperature thermal heat storage technique is been looked ahead.

  17. Sub-Chronic Oral Exposure to Iridium (III) Chloride Hydrate in Female Wistar Rats: Distribution and Excretion of the Metal

    PubMed Central

    Iavicoli, Ivo; Fontana, Luca; Bergamaschi, Antonio; Conti, Marcelo Enrique; Pino, Anna; Mattei, Daniela; Bocca, Beatrice; Alimonti, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    Iridium tissue distribution and excretion in female Wistar rats following oral exposure to iridium (III) chloride hydrate in drinking water (from 1 to 1000 ng/ml) in a sub-chronic oral study were determined. Samples of urine, feces, blood and organs (kidneys, liver, lung, spleen and brain) were collected at the end of exposure. The most prominent fractions of iridium were retained in kidney and spleen; smaller amounts were found in lungs, liver and brain. Iridium brain levels were lower than those observed in other tissues but this finding can support the hypothesis of iridium capability to cross the blood brain barrier. The iridium kidney levels rose significantly with the administered dose. At the highest dose, important amounts of the metal were found in serum, urine and feces. Iridium was predominantly excreted via feces with a significant linear correlation with the ingested dose, which is likely due to low intestinal absorption of the metal. However, at the higher doses iridium was also eliminated through urine. These findings may be useful to help in the understanding of the adverse health effects, particularly on the immune system, of iridium dispersed in the environment as well as in identifying appropriate biological indices of iridium exposure. PMID:22942873

  18. Technical and economic aspects of hydrogen storage in metal hydrides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, R.

    1981-01-01

    The recovery of hydrogen from such metal hydrides as LiH, MgH2, TiH2, CaH2 and FeTiH compounds is studied, with the aim of evaluating the viability of the technique for the storage of hydrogen fuel. The pressure-temperature dependence of the reactions, enthalpies of formation, the kinetics of the hydrogen absorption and desorption, and the mechanical and chemical stability of the metal hydrides are taken into account in the evaluation. Economic aspects are considered. Development of portable metal hydride hydrogen storage reservoirs is also mentioned.

  19. Preparation of platinum/iridium scanning probe microscopy tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sørensen, A. H.; Hvid, U.; Mortensen, M. W.; Mørch, K. A.

    1999-07-01

    We report on the development of an etching setup for use in the preparation of platinum/iridium tips for atomic force microscopy and scanning electrostatic force microscopy as well as scanning tunneling microscopy. The etching process is based on a two step electrochemical procedure. The first step is a coarse alternating current (ac) etching in which the etching is continuous and stops automatically when the lower part of the wire drops off, while the second step is a fine etching made by a number of ac pulses, each of a certain duration and separated by a certain interval of time. When the tip material being etched is platinum/iridium (10%) the influence of the stop phase of the ac current terminating each pulse in the second etching is found to be negligible, while in the case of second etching of tungsten wires it is important to break the pulse in a certain phase to avoid formation of a thick oxide layer. In order to explain the relatively high etching rates observed for the otherwise noble metal platinum we suggest that besides anodic corrosion of the platinum by the electrolyte containing chloride ions, a different etching mechanism causes a substantial increase of the etching rate. This mechanism is based on the formation of oxygen and hydrogen at the platinum/iridium electrode when the potential is above the dissociation potential of water (˜1.23 V) and storage of these products interstitially in the outer layers of the platinum wire. This leads to "microexplosions" that detach fragments of platinum from the wire surface and hereby give rise to "etching" of the wire. In the second etching blunt tips become sharp while tips which are already sharp apparently stay sharp. Therefore, the second etching scheme with pulses separated by pauses is found to be a very important factor for the production of sharp tips. After being etched the tips are ready for use in scanning tunneling microscopes, or they may be bent to form integrated tip/cantilever systems in ordinary commercial atomic force microscopes, being applicable as tapping mode tips and as electrostatic force microscopy tips.

  20. Chemical Hydride Slurry for Hydrogen Production and Storage

    SciTech Connect

    McClaine, Andrew W.

    2008-09-30

    The purpose of this project was to investigate and evaluate the attractiveness of using a magnesium chemical hydride slurry as a hydrogen storage, delivery, and production medium for automobiles. To fully evaluate the potential for magnesium hydride slurry to act as a carrier of hydrogen, potential slurry compositions, potential hydrogen release techniques, and the processes (and their costs) that will be used to recycle the byproducts back to a high hydrogen content slurry were evaluated. A 75% MgH2 slurry was demonstrated, which was just short of the 76% goal. This slurry is pumpable and storable for months at a time at room temperature and pressure conditions and it has the consistency of paint. Two techniques were demonstrated for reacting the slurry with water to release hydrogen. The first technique was a continuous mixing process that was tested for several hours at a time and demonstrated operation without external heat addition. Further work will be required to reduce this design to a reliable, robust system. The second technique was a semi-continuous process. It was demonstrated on a 2 kWh scale. This system operated continuously and reliably for hours at a time, including starts and stops. This process could be readily reduced to practice for commercial applications. The processes and costs associated with recycling the byproducts of the water/slurry reaction were also evaluated. This included recovering and recycling the oils of the slurry, reforming the magnesium hydroxide and magnesium oxide byproduct to magnesium metal, hydriding the magnesium metal with hydrogen to form magnesium hydride, and preparing the slurry. We found that the SOM process, under development by Boston University, offers the lowest cost alternative for producing and recycling the slurry. Using the H2A framework, a total cost of production, delivery, and distribution of $4.50/kg of hydrogen delivered or $4.50/gge was determined. Experiments performed at Boston University have demonstrated the technical viability of the process and have provided data for the cost analyses that have been performed. We also concluded that a carbothermic process could also produce magnesium at acceptable costs. The use of slurry as a medium to carry chemical hydrides has been shown during this project to offer significant advantages for storing, delivering, and distributing hydrogen: • Magnesium hydride slurry is stable for months and pumpable. • The oils of the slurry minimize the contact of oxygen and moisture in the air with the metal hydride in the slurry. Thus reactive chemicals, such as lithium hydride, can be handled safely in the air when encased in the oils of the slurry. • Though magnesium hydride offers an additional safety feature of not reacting readily with water at room temperatures, it does react readily with water at temperatures above the boiling point of water. Thus when hydrogen is needed, the slurry and water are heated until the reaction begins, then the reaction energy provides heat for more slurry and water to be heated. • The reaction system can be relatively small and light and the slurry can be stored in conventional liquid fuel tanks. When transported and stored, the conventional liquid fuel infrastructure can be used. • The particular metal hydride of interest in this project, magnesium hydride, forms benign byproducts, magnesium hydroxide (“Milk of Magnesia”) and magnesium oxide. • We have estimated that a magnesium hydride slurry system (including the mixer device and tanks) could meet the DOE 2010 energy density goals. ? During the investigation of hydriding techniques, we learned that magnesium hydride in a slurry can also be cycled in a rechargeable fashion. Thus, magnesium hydride slurry can act either as a chemical hydride storage medium or as a rechargeable hydride storage system. Hydrogen can be stored and delivered and then stored again thus significantly reducing the cost of storing and delivering hydrogen. Further evaluation and development of this concept will be performed as follow-on work under a

  1. The Hydriding Kinetics of Organic Hydrogen Getters

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, G. L.

    2002-02-11

    The aging of hermetically sealed systems is often accompanied by the gradual production of hydrogen gas that is a result of the decay of environmental gases and the degradation of organic materials. In particular, the oxygen, water, hydrogen ''equilibrium'' is affected by the removal of oxygen due the oxidation of metals and organic materials. This shift of the above ''equilibrium'' towards the formation of hydrogen gas, particularly in crevices, may eventually reach an explosive level of hydrogen gas or degrade metals by hydriding them. The latter process is generally delayed until the oxidizing species are significantly reduced. Organic hydrogen getters introduced by Allied Signal Aerospace Company, Kansas City Division have proven to be a very effective means of preventing hydrogen gas accumulation in sealed containers. These getters are relatively unaffected by air and environmental gases. They can be packaged in a variety of ways to fit particular needs such as porous pellets, fine or coarse [gravel] powder, or loaded into silicone rubber. The hydrogen gettering reactions are extremely irreversible since the hydrogen gas is converted into an organic hydrocarbon. These getters are based on the palladium-catalyzed hydrogenation of triple bonds to double and then single bonds in aromatic aryl compounds. DEB (1,4 bis (phenyl ethynyl) benzene) typically mixed with 25% by weight carbon with palladium (1% by weight of carbon) is one of the newest and best of these organic hydrogen getters. The reaction mechanisms are complex involving solid state reaction with a heterogeneous catalyst leading to the many intermediates, including mixed alkyl and aryl hydrocarbons with the possibilities of many isomers. The reaction kinetics mechanisms are also strongly influenced by the form in which they are packaged. For example, the hydriding rates for pellets and gravel have a strong dependence on reaction extent (i.e., DEB reduction) and a kinetic order in pressure of 0.76. Silicone rubber based DEB getters hydride at a much lower rate, have little dependence on reaction extent, have a higher kinetic order in pressure (0.87), and have a lower activation energy. The kinetics of the reaction as a function of hydrogen pressure, stoichiometry, and temperature for hydrogen and deuterium near ambient temperature (0 to 75 C) for pressures near or below 100 Pa over a wide range (in some cases, the complete) hydrogenation range are presented along with multi-dimensional rate models.

  2. ENVIRONMENTAL REACTIVITY OF SOLID STATE HYDRIDE MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, J; Donald Anton, D

    2009-04-23

    In searching for high gravimetric and volumetric density hydrogen storage systems, it is inevitable that higher energy density materials will be used. In order to make safe and commercially acceptable condensed phase hydrogen storage systems, it is important to understand quantitatively the risks involved in using and handling these materials and to develop appropriate mitigation strategies to handle potential material exposure events. A crucial aspect of the development of risk identification and mitigation strategies is the development of rigorous environmental reactivity testing standards and procedures. This will allow for the identification of potential risks and implementation of risk mitigation strategies. Modified testing procedures for shipping air and/or water sensitive materials, as codified by the United Nations, have been used to evaluate two potential hydrogen storage materials, 2LiBH{sub 4} {center_dot} MgH{sub 2} and NH{sub 3}BH{sub 3}. The modified U.N. procedures include identification of self-reactive substances, pyrophoric substances, and gas-emitting substances with water contact. The results of these tests for air and water contact sensitivity will be compared to the pure material components where appropriate (e.g. LiBH{sub 4} and MgH{sub 2}). The water contact tests are divided into two scenarios dependent on the hydride to water mole ratio and heat transport characteristics. Air contact tests were run to determine whether a substance will spontaneously react with air in a packed or dispersed form. In the case of the 2LiBH{sub 4} {center_dot} MgH{sub 2} material, the results from the hydride mixture compared to the pure materials results showed the MgH{sub 2} to be the least reactive component and LiBH{sub 4} the more reactive. The combined 2LiBH{sub 4} {center_dot} MgH{sub 2} resulted in a material having environmental reactivity between these two materials. Relative to 2LiBH{sub 4} {center_dot} MgH{sub 2}, the chemical hydride NH{sub 3}BH{sub 3} was observed to be less environmentally reactive.

  3. Asymmetric hydrogenations of aryl alkenes using imidazol-2-ylidene iridium complexes 

    E-print Network

    Cui, Xiuhua

    2005-08-29

    A library of iridium complexes featuring oxazoline and imidazol-2-ylidene ligands were synthesized by reaction of a library of imidazoles with a second library of oxazoline iodides. These complexes were active catalysts for hydrogenations of aryl...

  4. 16 CFR 23.7 - Misuse of the words “platinum,” “iridium,” “palladium,” “ruthenium,” “rhodium,” and “osmium.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...for Iridium; “Pall.” or “Pd.” for Palladium; “Ruth.” or “Ru.” for Ruthenium; “Rhod.” or “Rh.” for Rhodium; and “Osmi.” or “Os.” for Osmium. (2) An industry product consisting of at least 950 parts per...

  5. 16 CFR 23.7 - Misuse of the words “platinum,” “iridium,” “palladium,” “ruthenium,” “rhodium,” and “osmium.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...for Iridium; “Pall.” or “Pd.” for Palladium; “Ruth.” or “Ru.” for Ruthenium; “Rhod.” or “Rh.” for Rhodium; and “Osmi.” or “Os.” for Osmium. (2) An industry product consisting of at least 950 parts per...

  6. 16 CFR 23.7 - Misuse of the words “platinum,” “iridium,” “palladium,” “ruthenium,” “rhodium,” and “osmium.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...for Iridium; “Pall.” or “Pd.” for Palladium; “Ruth.” or “Ru.” for Ruthenium; “Rhod.” or “Rh.” for Rhodium; and “Osmi.” or “Os.” for Osmium. (2) An industry product consisting of at least 950 parts per...

  7. 16 CFR 23.7 - Misuse of the words “platinum,” “iridium,” “palladium,” “ruthenium,” “rhodium,” and “osmium.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...for Iridium; “Pall.” or “Pd.” for Palladium; “Ruth.” or “Ru.” for Ruthenium; “Rhod.” or “Rh.” for Rhodium; and “Osmi.” or “Os.” for Osmium. (2) An industry product consisting of at least 950 parts per...

  8. 16 CFR 23.7 - Misuse of the words “platinum,” “iridium,” “palladium,” “ruthenium,” “rhodium,” and “osmium.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...for Iridium; “Pall.” or “Pd.” for Palladium; “Ruth.” or “Ru.” for Ruthenium; “Rhod.” or “Rh.” for Rhodium; and “Osmi.” or “Os.” for Osmium. (2) An industry product consisting of at least 950 parts per...

  9. Automated apparatus for Sieverts' studies of metal hydrides. [U deuteride; La/sub 5. 25/ Ni hydride

    SciTech Connect

    Carstens, D.H.W.; David, W.R.

    1980-12-01

    An automated system, controlled by a small desktop computer, that carries out Sieverts' experiments on metal hydride systems is described. Data (equilibrium pressures versus temperatures at constant hydrogen-to-metal ratios) are recorded for later analysis and plotting. The computer also controls valve positions during the experiments. Results for two metal hydride systems, the uranium deuteride system in the plateau region and the La/sub 5/ /sub 25/Ni hydride system at low concentrations, are presented as examples. Data included on the latter system have not been reported previously. The techniques used in Sieverts' experiments and the sources of errors are discussed.

  10. Ni/metal hydride secondary element

    DOEpatents

    Bauerlein, Peter

    2005-04-19

    A Ni/metal hydride secondary element having a positive nickel hydroxide electrode, a negative electrode having a hydrogen storage alloy, and an alkaline electrolyte, the positive electrode, provided with a three-dimensional metallic conductive structure, also contains an aluminum compound which is soluble in the electrolyte, in addition to nickel hydroxide and cobalt oxide. The aluminum compound is aluminum hydroxide and/or aluminum oxide, and the mass of the aluminum compound which is present in the positive bulk material mixture is 0.1 to 2% by weight relative to the mass of the nickel hydroxide which is present. In combination with aluminum hydroxide or aluminum oxide, the positive electrode further contains lanthanoid oxidic compounds Y.sub.2 O.sub.3, La.sub.2 O.sub.3 and Ca(OH).sub.2, as well as mixtures of these compounds.

  11. Process for production of a metal hydride

    DOEpatents

    Allen, Nathan Tait; Butterick, III, Robert; Chin, Arthur Achhing; Millar, Dean Michael; Molzahn, David Craig

    2014-08-12

    A process for production of a metal hydride compound MH.sub.x, wherein x is one or two and M is an alkali metal, Be or Mg. The process comprises combining a compound of formula (R.sup.1O).sub.xM with aluminum, hydrogen and at least one metal selected from among titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, vanadium, tantalum and iron to produce a compound of formula MH.sub.x. R.sup.1 is phenyl or phenyl substituted by at least one alkyl or alkoxy group. A mole ratio of aluminum to (R.sup.1O).sub.xM is from 0.1:1 to 1:1. The catalyst is present at a level of at least 200 ppm based on weight of aluminum.

  12. Growth and control of nanoprotrusions on iridium field emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalamala, Babu R.; Reuss, Robert H.; Dean, Kenneth A.

    2001-04-01

    We report on the direct observation of the growth of nanoprotrusions on iridium field-emission tips. For clean, protrusion-free field emitters, the field emission originated from crystal planes with low-work-function values. However, with continuous operation, we observed the growth of nanoprotrusions on crystalline planes where there was initially no detectable emission. The protrusions were estimated to be approximately 2-3 nm in diameter and 5-15 nm in height. Protrusion growth led to an increase in field-emission current by several orders of magnitude. However, the tips were destroyed when operated with sustained emission current values greater than 10 ?A. We found that stable operation and control of protrusion growth can be achieved by either progressively reducing the anode voltage or by adding a series resistor.

  13. Iridium nanocrystal synthesis and surface coating-dependent catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Stowell, Cynthia A; Korgel, Brian A

    2005-07-01

    Iridium (Ir) nanocrystals were synthesized by reducing (methylcyclopentadienyl)(1,5-cyclooctadiene)lr with hexadecanediol in the presence of four different capping ligand combinations: oleic acid and oleylamine, trioctylphosphine (TOP), tetraoctylammonium bromide (TOAB), and tetraoctylphosphonium bromide (TOPB). The oleic acid/oleylamine-capped nanocrystals were of the highest quality, with the narrowest size and shape distribution. The Ir nanocrystals were tested for their ability to catalyze the hydrogenation of 1-decene as a model reaction. The oleic acid/oleylamine and TOP-capped nanocrystals were both catalytically dead. TOAB and TOPB-coated nanocrystals both catalyzed 1-decene hydrogenation, with the TOPB-coated nanocrystals exhibiting the highest turnover frequencies. Recycling through several catalytic reactions increased the catalytic activity, presumably as a result of ligand desorption and increased exposure of the metal surface, with ligand desorption eventually leading to precipitation and significantly decreased activity. PMID:16178211

  14. Comparative modelling of chemical ordering in palladium-iridium nanoalloys.

    PubMed

    Davis, Jack B A; Johnston, Roy L; Rubinovich, Leonid; Polak, Micha

    2014-12-14

    Chemical ordering in "magic-number" palladium-iridium nanoalloys has been studied by means of density functional theory (DFT) computations, and compared to those obtained by the Free Energy Concentration Expansion Method (FCEM) using derived coordination dependent bond energy variations (CBEV), and by the Birmingham Cluster Genetic Algorithm using the Gupta potential. Several compositions have been studied for 38- and 79-atom particles as well as the site preference for a single Ir dopant atom in the 201-atom truncated octahedron (TO). The 79- and 38-atom nanoalloy homotops predicted for the TO by the FCEM/CBEV are shown to be, respectively, the global minima and competitive low energy minima. Significant reordering of minima predicted by the Gupta potential is seen after reoptimisation at the DFT level. PMID:25494749

  15. Iridium-alloy processing experience in FY 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Ohriner, E.K.

    1990-11-01

    Iridium-alloy blanks and foil are produced at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory for use as fuel cladding material in radioisotope thermoelectric generators for space power sources. Until 1984, the material was produced from small 500-g drop castings. A new process has been developed in which consumable electrodes of about 10 kg are arc melted, extruded, and then rolled to produce the sheet products. The work performed during FY 1989 included the arc melting of three electrodes and the extruding and rolling to sheet of three billets. Significant improvements have been made in the extruding and arc-melting processes. Preliminary results show that these improvements have had an important effect in increasing the rate of blank acceptance in nondestructive evaluations. 4 refs., 33 figs., 11 tabs.

  16. Iridium abundance maxima in the Upper Cenomanian extinction interval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orth, C. J.; Attrep, M., Jr.; Mao, X. Y.; Kauffman, E. G.; Diner, R.

    1988-01-01

    Two iridium abundance peaks, both 0.11 ppb (whole-rock basis) over a local background of 0.017 ppb, have been found in Middle Cretaceous marine rocks near Pueblo, Colorado. They occur just below the 92-million-year-old Cenomanian-Turonian (C-T) stage boundary. No other peaks were found in 45 meters of strata (about 2.5 million years of deposition) above and below the boundary interval. The broad lower peak straddles the first in a series of extinctions of benthic and nektonic macrobiota which comprise the C-T extinction event. The sharp upper peak occurs stratigraphically about 1.2 meters above the lower peak. The excess Ir might be from meteoroid impacts.

  17. Comparative modelling of chemical ordering in palladium-iridium nanoalloys

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Jack B. A.; Johnston, Roy L.; Rubinovich, Leonid; Polak, Micha

    2014-12-14

    Chemical ordering in “magic-number” palladium-iridium nanoalloys has been studied by means of density functional theory (DFT) computations, and compared to those obtained by the Free Energy Concentration Expansion Method (FCEM) using derived coordination dependent bond energy variations (CBEV), and by the Birmingham Cluster Genetic Algorithm using the Gupta potential. Several compositions have been studied for 38- and 79-atom particles as well as the site preference for a single Ir dopant atom in the 201-atom truncated octahedron (TO). The 79- and 38-atom nanoalloy homotops predicted for the TO by the FCEM/CBEV are shown to be, respectively, the global minima and competitive low energy minima. Significant reordering of minima predicted by the Gupta potential is seen after reoptimisation at the DFT level.

  18. Inhibition of Beta-Amyloid Fibrillation by Luminescent Iridium(III) Complex Probes

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Lihua; Zhong, Hai-Jing; Wang, Modi; Ho, See-Lok; Li, Hung-Wing; Leung, Chung-Hang; Ma, Dik-Lung

    2015-01-01

    We report herein the application of kinetically inert luminescent iridium(III) complexes as dual inhibitors and probes of beta-amyloid fibrillogenesis. These iridium(III) complexes inhibited A?1–40 peptide aggregation in vitro, and protected against A?-induced cytotoxicity in neuronal cells. Furthermore, the complexes differentiated between the aggregated and unaggregated forms of A?1–40 peptide on the basis of their emission response. PMID:26419607

  19. Inhibition of Beta-Amyloid Fibrillation by Luminescent Iridium(III) Complex Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Lihua; Zhong, Hai-Jing; Wang, Modi; Ho, See-Lok; Li, Hung-Wing; Leung, Chung-Hang; Ma, Dik-Lung

    2015-09-01

    We report herein the application of kinetically inert luminescent iridium(III) complexes as dual inhibitors and probes of beta-amyloid fibrillogenesis. These iridium(III) complexes inhibited A?1-40 peptide aggregation in vitro, and protected against A?-induced cytotoxicity in neuronal cells. Furthermore, the complexes differentiated between the aggregated and unaggregated forms of A?1-40 peptide on the basis of their emission response.

  20. Inhibition of Beta-Amyloid Fibrillation by Luminescent Iridium(III) Complex Probes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lihua; Zhong, Hai-Jing; Wang, Modi; Ho, See-Lok; Li, Hung-Wing; Leung, Chung-Hang; Ma, Dik-Lung

    2015-01-01

    We report herein the application of kinetically inert luminescent iridium(III) complexes as dual inhibitors and probes of beta-amyloid fibrillogenesis. These iridium(III) complexes inhibited A?1-40 peptide aggregation in vitro, and protected against A?-induced cytotoxicity in neuronal cells. Furthermore, the complexes differentiated between the aggregated and unaggregated forms of A?1-40 peptide on the basis of their emission response. PMID:26419607

  1. Hydrogen storage in sodium aluminum hydride.

    SciTech Connect

    Ozolins, Vidvuds; Herberg, J.L.; McCarty, Kevin F.; Maxwell, Robert S.; Stumpf, Roland Rudolph; Majzoub, Eric H.

    2005-11-01

    Sodium aluminum hydride, NaAlH{sub 4}, has been studied for use as a hydrogen storage material. The effect of Ti, as a few mol. % dopant in the system to increase kinetics of hydrogen sorption, is studied with respect to changes in lattice structure of the crystal. No Ti substitution is found in the crystal lattice. Electronic structure calculations indicate that the NaAlH{sub 4} and Na{sub 3}AlH{sub 6} structures are complex-ionic hydrides with Na{sup +} cations and AlH{sub 4}{sup -} and AlH{sub 6}{sup 3-} anions, respectively. Compound formation studies indicate the primary Ti-compound formed when doping the material at 33 at. % is TiAl{sub 3} , and likely Ti-Al compounds at lower doping rates. A general study of sorption kinetics of NaAlH{sub 4}, when doped with a variety of Ti-halide compounds, indicates a uniform response with the kinetics similar for all dopants. NMR multiple quantum studies of solution-doped samples indicate solvent interaction with the doped alanate. Raman spectroscopy was used to study the lattice dynamics of NaAlH{sub 4}, and illustrated the molecular ionic nature of the lattice as a separation of vibrational modes between the AlH{sub 4}{sup -} anion-modes and lattice-modes. In-situ Raman measurements indicate a stable AlH{sub 4}{sup -} anion that is stable at the melting temperature of NaAlH{sub 4}, indicating that Ti-dopants must affect the Al-H bond strength.

  2. New yellow-emitting phosphorescent cyclometalated iridium(III) complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, P.; Tomova, R.; Petrova, P.; Stanimirov, S.; Petkov, I.

    2012-12-01

    We have synthesized a new yellow iridium complex Iridium(III) bis[2-phenylbenzothiazolato-N,C2']-(1-phenylicosane-1,3-dionate) (bt)2Ir(bsm), based on the benzothiazole derivative. The synthesized molecule was identified by 1H NMR and elemental analysis. The UV-Visible absorption and photoluminescence (PL) spectra of (bt)Ir2(bsm) in CH2Cl2 solution were found at 273 nm and 559 nm, respectively. The complex was used as a dopant into a hole-transporting layer (HTL) in a multilayered organic light emitting device (OLED) structure: ITO/doped-HTL/EL/ETL/M. ITO was a transparent anode of In2O3:SnO2, M- a metallic Al cathode, HTL- 4,4'-bis(9H-carbazol-9-yl)biphenyl (CBP) incorporated in poly(N-vinylcarbazole) (PVK) matrix, EL- electroluminescent layer of bis(8-hydroxy-2-methylquinoline)-(4-phenylphenoxy)aluminum (BAlq) and ETL- electron-transporting layer of tris(8-hydroxyquinolinato)aluminum (Alq3). The electroluminescent (EL) spectra of OLEDs were basically the sum of the emissions of BAlq at 496 nm and the emission of (bt)2Ir(bsm) at 559 nm. With increasing (bt)2Ir(bsm) concentration, the relative electroluminescent intensity of greenish-blue emission (at 496 nm) decreased, while the yellow (at 559 nm) - increased and CIE coordinates of the device shifted from (0.21, 0.33) at 0 wt % to (0.40, 0.48) at 8 wt % of the dopant. It was found that OLED with 0.5 wt % (bt)2Ir(bsm) had the best performance and stable color chromaticity at various voltages.

  3. Transient analysis of hydride fueled pressurized water reactor cores

    E-print Network

    Trant, Jarrod Michael

    2004-01-01

    This thesis contributes to the hydride nuclear fuel project led by U. C. Berkeley for which MIT is to perform the thermal hydraulic and economic analyses. A parametric study has been performed to determine the optimum ...

  4. Self-Consistent-Field Calculation on Lithium Hydride for Undergraduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rioux, Frank; Harriss, Donald K.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a self-consistent-field-linear combination of atomic orbitals-molecular orbital calculation on the valence electrons of lithium hydride using the method of Roothaan. This description is intended for undergraduate physics students.

  5. The development of lightweight hydride alloys based on magnesium

    SciTech Connect

    Guthrie, S.E.; Thomas, G.J.; Yang, N.Y.C.; Bauer, W.

    1996-02-01

    The development of a magnesium based hydride material is explored for use as a lightweight hydrogen storage medium. It is found that the vapor transport of magnesium during hydrogen uptake greatly influences the surface and hydride reactions in these alloys. This is exploited by purposely forming near-surface phases of Mg{sub 2}Ni on bulk Mg-Al-Zn alloys which result in improved hydrogen adsorption and desorption behavior. Conditions were found where these near-surface reactions yielded a complex and heterogeneous microstructure that coincided with excellent bulk hydride behavior. A Mg-Al alloy hydride is reported with near atmospheric plateau pressures at temperatures below 200{degrees}C. Additionally, a scheme is described for low temperature in-situ fabrication of Mg{sub 2}Ni single phase alloys utilizing the high vapor pressure of Mg.

  6. Iridium NEXT partnership for Earth observation: exploiting global satellite constellations for new remote sensing capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Om P.

    2008-08-01

    A unique opportunity exists to host up to 66 earth observation sensors on the Iridium NEXT LEO constellation in a manner that can revolutionize earth observation and weather predictions. A constellation approach to sensing, using the real-time communications backbone of Iridium, will enable unprecedented geospatial and temporal sampling for now-casting of weather on a global basis as well as global climate monitoring. The Iridium NEXT constellation, with 66 interconnected satellites in 6 near polar orbiting planes, provides a unique platform for hosting a variety of earth observation missions. The opportunity is proposed as a Public-Private Partnership (PPP) allowing for the sharing of infrastructure by government agencies. This has the potential to augment current and planned climate and weather observation programs in a very cost effective manner not achievable in any other way. Iridium, with the assistance of the Group on Earth Observations (GEO), NASA, NOAA, and ESA, has evaluated a number of sensing missions that would be a good fit to the Iridium NEXT constellation. These include GPS radio occultation sensors, earth radiation budget measurements, radio altimetry, tropospheric and stratospheric winds measurements including polar winds measurements, and atmospheric chemistry. Iridium NEXT launches start in 2013 and constellation operational life will extend beyond 2030. Detailed feasibility studies on specific missions are planned to begin later this year.

  7. Solution softning and strengthening of iridium in arc-melted tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, A.; Shin, K.S.; Jacobson, D.L. )

    1991-01-01

    A comprehensive investigation has been performed on the hardness, tensile properties, microstructure, and fracture behavior of arc-melted W and W-Ir alloys at room temperature and from 1600 K to 2600 K. The objectives of the present study were to examine solution softening effect of Ir in W at room-temperature, and to characterize the strength properties of dilute W-Ir alloys as the functions of iridium content at high temperatures. Tensile tests were conducted in a vacuum better than 1.3{times}10{sup {minus}5} Pa (10{sup {minus}7} torr) with a strain rate of 10{sup {minus}3}/sec. It was found that iridium was more effective insoften and ductilize tungsten than rhenium at room temperature, and the minimum hardness and maximum elongation occurred at iridium content about 0.4 wt.%. In dilute W-Ir alloys, the high-temperature strength increment was proportional to the atomic content of iridium. And the addition of iridium in arc-melted tungsten substantially increased both the strain-hardening exponent and the activation energy of plastic deformation above 1600 K. Besides, transgranular fracture was found to be the dominant fracture mode for arc-melted W-Ir alloys, but the tendency of fracturing intergranularly became stronger with increasing iridium content and temperature.

  8. Development of the Low-Pressure Hydride/Dehydride Process

    SciTech Connect

    Rueben L. Gutierrez

    2001-04-01

    The low-pressure hydride/dehydride process was developed from the need to recover thin-film coatings of plutonium metal from the inner walls of an isotope separation chamber located at Los Alamos and to improve the safety operation of a hydride recovery process using hydrogen at a pressure of 0.7 atm at Rocky Flats. This process is now the heart of the Advanced Recovery and Integrated Extraction System (ARIES) project.

  9. Method of selective reduction of polyhalosilanes with alkyltin hydrides

    DOEpatents

    Sharp, Kenneth G. (Midland, MI); D'Errico, John J. (Fenton, MI)

    1989-01-01

    The invention relates to the selective and stepwise reduction of polyhalosilanes by reacting at room temperature or below with alkyltin hydrides without the use of free radical intermediates. Alkyltin hydrides selectively and stepwise reduce the Si--Br, Si--Cl, or Si--I bonds while leaving intact any Si--F bonds. When two or more different halogens are present on the polyhalosilane, the halogen with the highest atomic weight is preferentially reduced.

  10. Solid-state gadolinium{endash}magnesium hydride optical switch

    SciTech Connect

    Armitage, R.; Rubin, M.; Richardson, T.; OBrien, N.; Chen, Y.

    1999-09-01

    The optical switching properties of gadolinium{endash}magnesium hydride have been demonstrated in a solid-state electrochromic device. With positive polarization of the hydride electrode, the visible reflectance approaches 35{percent} with virtually zero transmission, while with negative polarization, the visible transmission exceeds 25{percent} at 650 nm. The switching is reversible, with intermediate optical properties between the transparent and reflecting states. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. Hydride absorption refrigerator system for ten Kelvin and below

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, J. A.

    1985-05-01

    A very long-life, lightweight and efficient hydride absorption refrigerator system was built to operate at ten Kelvin and below. The system consists of four basic stages of refrigeration. The first stage is accomplished by an active refrigeration system. The second stage is operated by a hydride absorption system, wherein a heated hydride powder drives off high pressure hydrogen through a Joule-Thomson/heat exchanger expansion loop such that the hydrogen is partially liquefied. In the third stage, the vapor pressure over the collected liquid hydrogen is lowered by absorbing the hydrogen vapor onto a different low pressure, worn hydride. With a 1.7 torr partial pressure of hydrogen gas in the hydride, liquid hydrogen is solidified and sublimes at 10 K. Long-life adiabatic demagnetization refrigerators, helium desorption, or helium diaphragm compressors are used to cool to 4 K or below. It is shown that the hydride concepts provide an extremely efficient means of refrigeration to 10 K, and that an entire sorption refrigeration process can be accomplished solely by using low grade heat energy at about 150 C.

  12. Optimization of Hydride Rim Formation in Unirradiated Zr 4 Cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Shimskey, Rick W.; Hanson, Brady D.; MacFarlan, Paul J.

    2013-09-30

    The purpose of this work is to build on the results reported in the M2 milestone M2FT 13PN0805051, document number FCRD-USED-2013-000151 (Hanson, 2013). In that work, it was demonstrated that unirradiated samples of zircaloy-4 cladding could be pre-hydrided at temperatures below 400°C in pure hydrogen gas and that the growth of hydrides on the surface could be controlled by changing the surface condition of the samples and form a desired hydride rim on the outside diameter of the cladding. The work performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory since the issuing of the M2 milestone has focused its efforts to optimize the formation of a hydride rim on available zircaloy-4 cladding samples by controlling temperature variation and gas flow control during pre-hydriding treatments. Surface conditioning of the outside surface was also examined as a variable. The results of test indicate that much of the variability in the hydride thickness is due to temperature variation occurring in the furnaces as well as how hydrogen gas flows across the sample surface. Efforts to examine other alloys, gas concentrations, and different surface conditioning plan to be pursed in the next FY as more cladding samples become available

  13. AIR PASSIVATION OF METAL HYDRIDE BEDS FOR WASTE DISPOSAL

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, J; R. H. Hsu, R

    2007-07-02

    Metal hydride beds offer compact, safe storage of tritium. After metal hydride beds have reached the end of their useful life, the beds will replaced with new beds and the old beds prepared for disposal. One acceptance criteria for hydride bed waste disposal is that the material inside the bed not be pyrophoric. To determine the pyrophoric nature of spent metal hydride beds, controlled air ingress tests were performed. A simple gas handling manifold fitted with pressure transducers and a calibrated volume were used to introduce controlled quantities of air into a metal hydride bed and the bed temperature rise monitored for reactivity with the air. A desorbed, 4.4 kg titanium prototype hydride storage vessel (HSV) produced a 4.4 C internal temperature rise upon the first air exposure cycle and a 0.1 C temperature rise upon a second air exposure. A total of 346 scc air was consumed by the bed (0.08 scc per gram Ti). A desorbed, 9.66 kg LaNi{sub 4.25}Al{sub 0.75} prototype storage bed experienced larger temperature rises over successive cycles of air ingress and evacuation. The cycles were performed over a period of days with the bed effectively passivated after the 12th cycle. Nine to ten STP-L of air reacted with the bed producing both oxidized metal and water.

  14. The regioselective hydroformylation of vinylsilanes. A remarkable difference in the selectivity and reactivity of cobalt, rhodium, and iridium catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Crudden, C.M.; Alper, H.

    1994-06-03

    Rhodium, iridium, and cobalt complexes were evaluated as catalysts for hydroformylation of vinylsilanes. Regioselectivities, product structures, and reaction yields were widely variable for these catalysts.

  15. Influence of uranium hydride oxidation on uranium metal behaviour

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, N.; Hambley, D.; Clarke, S.A.; Simpson, K.

    2013-07-01

    This work addresses concerns that the rapid, exothermic oxidation of active uranium hydride in air could stimulate an exothermic reaction (burning) involving any adjacent uranium metal, so as to increase the potential hazard arising from a hydride reaction. The effect of the thermal reaction of active uranium hydride, especially in contact with uranium metal, does not increase in proportion with hydride mass, particularly when considering large quantities of hydride. Whether uranium metal continues to burn in the long term is a function of the uranium metal and its surroundings. The source of the initial heat input to the uranium, if sufficient to cause ignition, is not important. Sustained burning of uranium requires the rate of heat generation to be sufficient to offset the total rate of heat loss so as to maintain an elevated temperature. For dense uranium, this is very difficult to achieve in naturally occurring circumstances. Areas of the uranium surface can lose heat but not generate heat. Heat can be lost by conduction, through contact with other materials, and by convection and radiation, e.g. from areas where the uranium surface is covered with a layer of oxidised material, such as burned-out hydride or from fuel cladding. These rates of heat loss are highly significant in relation to the rate of heat generation by sustained oxidation of uranium in air. Finite volume modelling has been used to examine the behaviour of a magnesium-clad uranium metal fuel element within a bottle surrounded by other un-bottled fuel elements. In the event that the bottle is breached, suddenly, in air, it can be concluded that the bulk uranium metal oxidation reaction will not reach a self-sustaining level and the mass of uranium oxidised will likely to be small in relation to mass of uranium hydride oxidised. (authors)

  16. Kinetics of Electron Transfer and Oxygen Evolution in the Reaction of [Ru(bpy)3]3+ with Colloidal Iridium Oxide

    E-print Network

    Iridium Oxide Natalie D. Morris, Masahiro Suzuki, and Thomas E. Mallouk* Department of Chemistry the colloidal iridium oxide catalysts originally investigated by Harriman and co-workers23-25 for the water

  17. Evaluation of oxide-coated iridium-rhenium chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Brian D.

    1994-01-01

    Iridium-coated rhenium (Ir-Re) provides long life operation of radiation-cooled rockets at temperatures up to 2200 C. Ceramic oxide coatings could be used to increase Ir-Re rocket lifetimes and allow operation in highly oxidizing environments. Ceramic oxide coatings promise to serve as both thermal and diffusion barriers for the iridium layer. Seven ceramic oxide-coated Ir-Re, 22-N rocket chambers were tested with gaseous hydrogen/gaseous oxygen (GHz/G02) propellants. Five chambers had thick (over 10 mils), monolithic coatings of either hafnia (HfO2) or zirconia (ZrO2). Two chambers had coatings with thicknesses less than 5 mils. One of these chambers had a thin-walled coating of ZrO2 infiltrated with sol gel HfO2. The other chamber had a coating composed of an Ir-oxide composite. The purpose of this test program was to assess the ability of the oxide coatings to withstand the thermal shock of combustion initiation, adhere under repeated thermal cycling, and operate in aggressively oxidizing environments. All of the coatings survived the thermal shock of combustion and demonstrated operation at mixture ratios up to 11. Testing the Ir-oxide composite-coated chamber included over 29 min at mixture ratio 16. The thicker walled coatings provided the larger temperature drops across the oxide layer (up to 570 C), but were susceptible to macrocracking and eventual chipping at a stress concentrator. The cracks apparently resealed during firing, under compression of the oxide layer. The thinner walled coatings did not experience the macrocracking and chipping of the chambers that was seen with the thick, monolithic coatings. However, burn-throughs in the throat region did occur in both of the thin-walled chambers at mixture ratios well above stoichiometric. The burn-throughs were probably the result of oxygen diffusion through the oxide coating that allowed the underlying Ir and Re layers to be oxidized. The results of this test program indicated that the thin-walled oxide coatings are better suited for repeated thermal cycling than the thick-walled coating, while thicker coatings may be required for operation in aggressively oxidizing environments.

  18. Fatigue crack growth in lithium hydride

    SciTech Connect

    Healy, T.E.

    1993-09-01

    Subcritical fatigue crack growth, from cyclic tensile loading, was demonstrated in warm pressed Polycrystalline lithium hydride. Experiments were performed with cyclic tension-tension crack opening (mode I) loads applied to a pre-cracked compact type specimen in an argon environment at a temperature of 21C (70F). The fatigue crack growth was found to occur between 7.56 {times} 10{sup {minus}ll} M/cycle (2.98 {times} l0{sup {minus}9} in/cycle) and 2.35 {times} l0{sup {minus}8} m/cycle (9.24{times}10{sup {minus}7} in/cycle) for a range of stress intensity factors between 1.04 MPa{center_dot}{radical}m (0.95 ksi{center_dot}{radical}in) and 1.49 MPa{center_dot}{radical}m (1.36 ksi{center_dot}{radical}in). The rate of fatigue crack growth from cyclic tensile loading was found to be in excess of crack growth from sustained loading at an equivalent stress intensity factor. Furthermore, a fatigue threshold was not evident from the acquired data.

  19. Investigation of Cracked Lithium Hydride Reactor Vessels

    SciTech Connect

    bird, e.l.; mustaleski, t.m.

    1999-06-01

    Visual examination of lithium hydride reactor vessels revealed cracks that were adjacent to welds, most of which were circumferentially located in the bottom portion of the vessels. Sections were cut from the vessels containing these cracks and examined by use of the metallograph, scanning electron microscope, and microprobe to determine the cause of cracking. Most of the cracks originated on the outer surface just outside the weld fusion line in the base material and propagated along grain boundaries. Crack depths of those examined sections ranged from {approximately}300 to 500 {micro}m. Other cracks were reported to have reached a maximum depth of 1/8 in. The primary cause of cracking was the creation of high tensile stresses associated with the differences in the coefficients of thermal expansion between the filler metal and the base metal during operation of the vessel in a thermally cyclic environment. This failure mechanism could be described as creep-type fatigue, whereby crack propagation may have been aided by the presence of brittle chromium carbides along the grain boundaries, which indicates a slightly sensitized microstructure.

  20. Studies in Boron Hydrides Inorganic Chemistry, Vol. 12,No. 9, 1973 2091

    E-print Network

    Bodner, George M.

    Studies in Boron Hydrides Table Ia Inorganic Chemistry, Vol. 12,No. 9, 1973 2091 B , M logh, log, Illinois 61801 Studies in Boron Hydrides. X. SubstituentEffectsin the Decahydrodecaborate(2-) Ion ALLEN R

  1. Hydride Transfer in Liver Alcohol Dehydrogenase: Quantum Dynamics, Kinetic Isotope Effects, and Role of Enzyme Motion

    E-print Network

    Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    Hydride Transfer in Liver Alcohol Dehydrogenase: Quantum Dynamics, Kinetic Isotope Effects dynamics of the hydride transfer reaction catalyzed by liver alcohol dehydrogenase (LADH) are studied and the coenzyme. I. Introduction Liver alcohol dehydrogenase (LADH) catalyzes the reversible oxidation of alcohols

  2. Synthesis and small molecule chemistry of the niobaziridine-hydride functional group

    E-print Network

    Figueroa, Joshua S

    2005-01-01

    Chapter 1. Synthesis and Divergent Reactivity of the Niobaziridine-Hydride Functional Group The synthesis, characterization and reactivity of the niobaziridine-hydride complex Nb(H)([eta]²-t- ]Bu(H)C=NAr)(N[Np]Ar)? (la-H; ...

  3. Hydrogen storage as a hydride. Citations from the International Aerospace Abstracts data base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zollars, G. F.

    1980-01-01

    These citations from the international literature concern the storage of hydrogen in various metal hydrides. Binary and intermetallic hydrides are considered. Specific alloys discussed are iron titanium, lanthanium nickel, magnesium copper and magnesium nickel among others.

  4. Multidimensional simulations of hydrides during fuel rod lifecycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stafford, D. S.

    2015-11-01

    In light water reactor fuel rods, waterside corrosion of zirconium-alloy cladding introduces hydrogen into the cladding, where it is slightly soluble. When the solubility limit is reached, the hydrogen precipitates into crystals of zirconium hydride which decrease the ductility of the cladding and may lead to cladding failure during dry storage or transportation events. The distribution of the hydride phase and the orientation of the crystals depend on the history of the spatial temperature and stress profiles in the cladding. In this work, we have expanded the existing hydride modeling capability in the BISON fuel performance code with the goal of predicting both global and local effects on the radial, azimuthal and axial distribution of the hydride phase. We compare results from 1D simulations to published experimental data. We demonstrate the new capability by simulating in 2D a fuel rod throughout a lifecycle that includes irradiation, short-term storage in the spent fuel pool, drying, and interim storage in a dry cask. Using the 2D simulations, we present qualitative predictions of the effects of the inter-pellet gap and the drying conditions on the growth of a hydride rim.

  5. Design, analysis, and fabrication of oxide-coated iridium/rhenium combustion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jang, Q.; Tuffias, R. H.; Laferla, R.; Ghoniem, N. M.

    1993-01-01

    Iridium-coated rhenium (Ir/Re) combustion chambers provide high temperature, oxidation-resistant operation for radiation-cooled liquid-fueled rocket engines. A 22-N (5-lb(sub f)) chamber has been operated for 15 hours at 2200 C (4000 F) using nitrogen tetroxide/monomethyl hydrazine (NTO/MMH) propellant, with negligible internal erosion. The oxidation resistance of these chambers could be further increased by the addition of refractory oxide coatings, providing longer life and/or operation in more oxidizing and higher temperature environments. The oxide coatings would serve as a thermal and diffusion barrier for the iridium coating, lowering the temperature of the iridium layer while also preventing the ingress of oxygen and egress of iridium oxides. This would serve to slow the failure mechanisms of Ir/Re chambers, namely the diffusion of rhenium to the inner surface and the oxidation of iridium. Such protection could extend chamber lifetimes by tens or perhaps hundreds of hours, and allow chamber operation on stoichiometric or higher mixture ratio oxygen/hydrogen (O2/H2) propellant. Extensive thermomechanical, thermochemical, and mass transport modeling was performed as a key material/structure design tool. Based on the results of these analyses, several 22-N oxide-coated Ir/Re chambers were fabricated and delivered to NASA Lewis Research Center for hot-fire testing.

  6. Solution-processable phosphorescence based on iridium-cored small molecules with the trifluoromethyl group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenguan; He, Zhiqun; Wang, Yongsheng; Zhao, Shengmin

    2015-04-01

    A novel cyclometallated ligand 2-(4-(2?-ethylhexyloxy)phenyl)-5-trifluoromethyl-pyridine (EHO-5CF3-ppy) was synthesized, and two solution-processable iridium complexes bis[2-(4-(2?-ethylhexyloxy)phenyl)-5-trifluoromethylpyridinto-C3, N] iridium (acetylacetonate) (EHO-5CF3-ppy)2Ir(acac) (5) and bis[2-(4-(2?-ethylhexyl-oxy)phenyl)-5-trifluoromethylpyridinto-C3, N] iridium (2-picolinic acid) (EHO-5CF3-ppy)2Ir(pic) (6) were afforded. Trifluoromethyl and dendritic ethylhexyloxy group were incorporated into iridium ligands to tune luminescent color, to reduce luminescence quenching and to improve the solution-processable property. Photoluminescent spectra of 5 and 6 in tetrahydrofuran peaked at around 540 and 523 nm. Electrophosphorescent devices were fabricated using 5 and 6 as dopant emitters (2%), which exhibited electroluminescent (EL) peaks at 536 and 524 nm, and current efficiencies of 10.4 and 16.7 cd/A, respectively. With the concentration of iridium complexes increasing to 8%, the main EL peak showed a 4 nm of red shift and a distinct shoulder peak occurred at 583 nm for 5 or 560 nm for 6, respectively. Maximum external quantum efficiencies of the devices at the concentration of 2% and 8% were 2.8% and 4.2% for 5, 4.7% and 4.8% for 6. These indicated that 5 and 6 were efficient solution-processable emitters.

  7. Meteoric smoke fallout over the Holocene epoch revealed by iridium and platinum in Greenland ice.

    PubMed

    Gabrielli, Paolo; Barbante, Carlo; Plane, John M C; Varga, Anita; Hong, Sungmin; Cozzi, Giulio; Gaspari, Vania; Planchon, Frédéric A M; Cairns, Warren; Ferrari, Christophe; Crutzen, Paul; Cescon, Paolo; Boutron, Claude F

    2004-12-23

    An iridium anomaly at the Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary layer has been attributed to an extraterrestrial body that struck the Earth some 65 million years ago. It has been suggested that, during this event, the carrier of iridium was probably a micrometre-sized silicate-enclosed aggregate or the nanophase material of the vaporized impactor. But the fate of platinum-group elements (such as iridium) that regularly enter the atmosphere via ablating meteoroids remains largely unknown. Here we report a record of iridium and platinum fluxes on a climatic-cycle timescale, back to 128,000 years ago, from a Greenland ice core. We find that unexpectedly constant fallout of extraterrestrial matter to Greenland occurred during the Holocene, whereas a greatly enhanced input of terrestrial iridium and platinum masked the cosmic flux in the dust-laden atmosphere of the last glacial age. We suggest that nanometre-sized meteoric smoke particles, formed from the recondensation of ablated meteoroids in the atmosphere at altitudes >70 kilometres, are transported into the winter polar vortices by the mesospheric meridional circulation and are preferentially deposited in the polar ice caps. This implies an average global fallout of 14 +/- 5 kilotons per year of meteoric smoke during the Holocene. PMID:15616558

  8. Metal-Organic Framework Nodes as Nearly Ideal Supports for Molecular Catalysts: NU-1000-and UiO-66-Supported Iridium

    E-print Network

    -Supported Iridium Complexes Dong Yang, Samuel O. Odoh, Timothy C. Wang,§ Omar K. Farha,§, Joseph T. Hupp for the iridium is identified on the nodes of NU-1000, whereas two sites are identified on UiO- 66, although at low iridium loadings only one site is occupied. Density functional theory calculations provide

  9. Understanding the Effect of Monomeric Iridium(III/IV) Aquo Complexes on the Photoelectrochemistry of IrOxnH2OCatalyzed

    E-print Network

    Understanding the Effect of Monomeric Iridium(III/IV) Aquo Complexes on the Photoelectrochemistry-21 Iridium oxide is a highly active OER catalyst and has been recently benchmarked by McCrory et al The overpotential for water oxidation at iridium oxide is low over a broad range of pH,1 although it is less active

  10. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NANOTECHNOLOGY, VOL. 13, NO. 5, SEPTEMBER 2014 945 Micro pH Sensors Based on Iridium Oxide Nanotubes

    E-print Network

    Chiao, Jung-Chih

    on Iridium Oxide Nanotubes Cuong M. Nguyen, Member, IEEE, Smitha Rao, Young-Sik Seo, Kyle Schadt, Yaowu Hao, and J.-C. Chiao, Senior Member, IEEE Abstract--Iridium oxide (IrOx ) nanotubes have been grown also conducted. Index Terms--Aluminum oxide (AAO) templates, electrodeposi- tion, iridium oxide (Ir

  11. Abstrac In this work, we introduced pH-sensing iridium oxide (IrOx) nanotubes grown on metal electrodes which were

    E-print Network

    Chiao, Jung-Chih

    Abstrac In this work, we introduced pH-sensing iridium oxide (IrOx) nanotubes grown on metal with a measured sensitivity of 74.3 mV/pH. Keywords: Iridium oxide, pH sensor, nanotubes, nanotemplate, aluminum oxide template, microfabrication. I. INTRODUCTION Iridium oxide nanostructures have recently attracted

  12. IEEE SENSORS JOURNAL, VOL. 13, NO. 10, OCTOBER 2013 3857 Sol-Gel Iridium Oxide-Based pH Sensor Array on

    E-print Network

    Chiao, Jung-Chih

    IEEE SENSORS JOURNAL, VOL. 13, NO. 10, OCTOBER 2013 3857 Sol-Gel Iridium Oxide-Based pH Sensor, Mu Chiao, and Jung-Chih Chiao Abstract--Iridium oxide pH sensing film is demonstrated with wide p and less labor-intensive method, to deposit iridium oxide thin films for pH sensing is reported previously

  13. Influence of Specific Surface Area of Powder on Hydrogen Desorption Kinetics for Metal Hydrides

    E-print Network

    Drozdov, I V

    2014-01-01

    The observable results for desorption kinetics by powder of metal hydride on the example of mangesium hydride are reproduced with the model formulated in terms of specific surface of powder. A volumetric measurement of hydrogen desorption process is evaluated on an example of wet ball milled magnesium hydride, and can be applied generally for any metal hydride. The exact solution of the model reproduces the shape of experimental curves for desorption process providing a satisfying agreement with experimental data.

  14. High Strain Rate Tensile Testing of DOP-26 Iridium

    SciTech Connect

    Schneibel, Joachim H; Carmichael Jr, Cecil Albert; George, Easo P

    2007-11-01

    The iridium alloy DOP-26 was developed through the Radioisotope Power Systems Program in the Office of Nuclear Energy of the Department of Energy. It is used for clad vent set cups containing radioactive fuel in radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) heat sources which provide electric power for spacecraft. This report describes mechanical testing results for DOP-26. Specimens were given a vacuum recrystallization anneal of 1 hour at 1375 C and tested in tension in orientations parallel and perpendicular to the rolling direction of the sheet from which they were fabricated. The tests were performed at temperatures ranging from room temperature to 1090 C and strain rates ranging from 1 x 10{sup -3} to 50 s{sup -1}. Room temperature testing was performed in air, while testing at elevated temperatures was performed in a vacuum better than 1 x 10{sup -4} Torr. The yield stress (YS) and the ultimate tensile stress (UTS) decreased with increasing temperature and increased with increasing strain rate. Between 600 and 1090 C, the ductility showed a slight increase with increasing temperature. Within the scatter of the data, the ductility did not depend on the strain rate. The reduction in area (RA), on the other hand, decreased with increasing strain rate. The YS and UTS values did not differ significantly for the longitudinal and transverse specimens. The ductility and RA values of the transverse specimens were marginally lower than those of the longitudinal specimens.

  15. High-Temperature Oxidation Behavior of Iridium-Rhenium Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Brian D.

    1995-01-01

    The life-limiting mechanism for radiation-cooled rockets made from iridium-coated rhenium (Ir/Re) is the diffusion of Re into the Ir layer and the subsequent oxidation of the resulting Ir-Re alloy from the inner surface. In a previous study, a life model for Ir/Re rockets was developed. It incorporated Ir-Re diffusion and oxidation data to predict chamber lifetimes as a function of temperature and oxygen partial pressure. Oxidation testing at 1540 deg C suggested that a 20-wt percent Re concentration at the inner wall surface should be established as the failure criterion. The present study was performed to better define Ir-oxidation behavior as a function of Re concentration and to supplement the data base for the life model. Samples ranging from pure Ir to Ir-40 wt percent Re (Ir-40Re) were tested at 1500 deg C, in two different oxygen environments. There were indications that the oxidation rate of the Ir-Re alloy increased significantly when it went from a single-phase solid solution to a two-phase mixture, as was suggested in previous work. However, because of testing anomalies in this study, there were not enough dependable oxidation data to definitively raise the Ir/Re rocket failure criterion from 20-wt percent Re to a Re concentration corresponding to entry into the two-phase region.

  16. Author's personal copy Unusual lithium coordinated platinum and rhodium hydride dimers

    E-print Network

    Jones, William D.

    Author's personal copy Unusual lithium coordinated platinum and rhodium hydride dimers Brett D complexes Rhodium complexes Hydride complexes X-ray crystal structures a b s t r a c t Two unusual lithium coordinated binuclear platinum- and rhodium-hydride complexes [M(dip- pe)(H)]2ÁLiHBEt3 were synthesized

  17. Investigation of metal hydride materials as hydrogen reservoirs for metal-hydrogen batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    ONISCHAK

    1976-01-01

    The performance and suitability of various metal hydride materials were examined for use as possible hydrogen storage reservoirs for secondary metal-hydrogen batteries. Lanthanum pentanickel hydride appears as a probable candidate in terms of stable hydrogen supply under feasible thermal conditions. A kinetic model describing the decomposition rate data of the hydride has been developed.

  18. Models for Metal Hydride Particle Shape, Packing, and Heat Transfer

    E-print Network

    Kyle C. Smith; Timothy S. Fisher

    2012-05-04

    A multiphysics modeling approach for heat conduction in metal hydride powders is presented, including particle shape distribution, size distribution, granular packing structure, and effective thermal conductivity. A statistical geometric model is presented that replicates features of particle size and shape distributions observed experimentally that result from cyclic hydride decreptitation. The quasi-static dense packing of a sample set of these particles is simulated via energy-based structural optimization methods. These particles jam (i.e., solidify) at a density (solid volume fraction) of 0.665+/-0.015 - higher than prior experimental estimates. Effective thermal conductivity of the jammed system is simulated and found to follow the behavior predicted by granular effective medium theory. Finally, a theory is presented that links the properties of bi-porous cohesive powders to the present systems based on recent experimental observations of jammed packings of fine powder. This theory produces quantitative experimental agreement with metal hydride powders of various compositions.

  19. H2 fuel prototype hydride bed performance tests

    SciTech Connect

    Dyer, E.F.

    1996-10-01

    H2Fuel is a project to design, build, and demonstrate a hydrogen-electric hybrid city bus for Augusta, GA. The H2Fuel bus uses metal hydride technology for on-board hydrogen fuel storage. This document reports on tests by the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) to measure the performance of the H2Fuel prototype hydride bed. Bed diameter measurements were made before and after hydrogen testing. Seven hydrogen absorption-desorption cycles were completed. Significant results include: - maximum hydrogen capacity of approximately 3500 STP liters (0.315 kg) - practical hydrogen capacity of approximately 3000 STP liters (0.270 kg) - absorption tests at four hydrogen supply pressures (75, 100, 140, and 300 psia) - desorption tests at three hydrogen rates (20, 30, and 50 slpm) - no measurable swelling of the hydride bed

  20. Composite Materials for Hazard Mitigation of Reactive Metal Hydrides.

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, Joseph William; Cordaro, Joseph Gabriel; Sartor, George B.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Reeder, Craig L.

    2012-02-01

    In an attempt to mitigate the hazards associated with storing large quantities of reactive metal hydrides, polymer composite materials were synthesized and tested under simulated usage and accident conditions. The composites were made by polymerizing vinyl monomers using free-radical polymerization chemistry, in the presence of the metal hydride. Composites with vinyl-containing siloxane oligomers were also polymerized with and without added styrene and divinyl benzene. Hydrogen capacity measurements revealed that addition of the polymer to the metal hydride reduced the inherent hydrogen storage capacity of the material. The composites were found to be initially effective at reducing the amount of heat released during oxidation. However, upon cycling the composites, the mitigating behavior was lost. While the polymer composites we investigated have mitigating potential and are physically robust, they undergo a chemical change upon cycling that makes them subsequently ineffective at mitigating heat release upon oxidation of the metal hydride. Acknowledgements The authors would like to thank the following people who participated in this project: Ned Stetson (U.S. Department of Energy) for sponsorship and support of the project. Ken Stewart (Sandia) for building the flow-through calorimeter and cycling test stations. Isidro Ruvalcaba, Jr. (Sandia) for qualitative experiments on the interaction of sodium alanate with water. Terry Johnson (Sandia) for sharing his expertise and knowledge of metal hydrides, and sodium alanate in particular. Marcina Moreno (Sandia) for programmatic assistance. John Khalil (United Technologies Research Corp) for insight into the hazards of reactive metal hydrides and real-world accident scenario experiments. Summary In an attempt to mitigate and/or manage hazards associated with storing bulk quantities of reactive metal hydrides, polymer composite materials (a mixture of a mitigating polymer and a metal hydride) were synthesized and tested under simulated usage and accident conditions. Mitigating the hazards associated with reactive metal hydrides during an accident while finding a way to keep the original capability of the active material intact during normal use has been the focus of this work. These composites were made by polymerizing vinyl monomers using free-radical polymerization chemistry, in the presence of the metal hydride, in this case a prepared sodium alanate (chosen as a representative reactive metal hydride). It was found that the polymerization of styrene and divinyl benzene could be initiated using AIBN in toluene at 70 degC. The resulting composite materials can be either hard or brittle solids depending on the cross-linking density. Thermal decomposition of these styrene-based composite materials is lower than neat polystyrene indicating that the chemical nature of the polymer is affected by the formation of the composite. The char-forming nature of cross-linked polystyrene is low and therefore, not an ideal polymer for hazard mitigation. To obtain composite materials containing a polymer with higher char-forming potential, siloxane-based monomers were investigated. Four vinyl-containing siloxane oligomers were polymerized with and without added styrene and divinyl benzene. Like the styrene materials, these composite materials exhibited thermal decomposition behavior significantly different than the neat polymers. Specifically, the thermal decomposition temperature was shifted approximately 100 degC lower than the neat polymer signifying a major chemical change to the polymer network. Thermal analysis of the cycled samples was performed on the siloxane-based composite materials. It was found that after 30 cycles the siloxane-containing polymer composite material has similar TGA/DSC-MS traces as the virgin composite material indicating that the polymer is physically intact upon cycling. Hydrogen capacity measurements revealed that addition of the polymer to the metal hydride in the form of a composite material reduced the inherent hydrogen storage capacity of the material. This

  1. A review on hydride precipitation in zirconium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bair, Jacob; Asle Zaeem, Mohsen; Tonks, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Nucleation and formation of hydride precipitates in zirconium alloys have been an important factor in limiting the lifetime of nuclear fuel cladding for over 50 years. This review provides a concise summary of experimental and computational studies performed on hydride precipitation in zirconium alloys since the 1960's. Different computational models, including density functional theory, molecular dynamics, phase field, and finite element models applied to study hydride precipitation are reviewed, with specific consideration given to the phase field model, which has become a popular and powerful computational tool for modeling microstructure evolution. The strengths and weaknesses of these models are discussed in detail. An outline of potential future work in this area is discussed as well.

  2. High-Spin Cobalt Hydrides for Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, Patrick L.

    2013-08-29

    Organometallic chemists have traditionally used catalysts with strong-field ligands that give low-spin complexes. However, complexes with a weak ligand field have weaker bonds and lower barriers to geometric changes, suggesting that they may lead to more rapid catalytic reactions. Developing our understanding of high-spin complexes requires the use of a broader range of spectroscopic techniques, but has the promise of changing the mechanism and/or selectivity of known catalytic reactions. These changes may enable the more efficient utilization of chemical resources. A special advantage of cobalt and iron catalysts is that the metals are more abundant and cheaper than those currently used for major industrial processes that convert unsaturated organic molecules and biofeedstocks into useful chemicals. This project specifically evaluated the potential of high-spin cobalt complexes for small-molecule reactions for bond rearrangement and cleavage reactions relevant to hydrocarbon transformations. We have learned that many of these reactions proceed through crossing to different spin states: for example, high-spin complexes can flip one electron spin to access a lower-energy reaction pathway for beta-hydride elimination. This reaction enables new, selective olefin isomerization catalysis. The high-spin cobalt complexes also cleave the C-O bond of CO2 and the C-F bonds of fluoroarenes. In each case, the detailed mechanism of the reaction has been determined. Importantly, we have discovered that the cobalt catalysts described here give distinctive selectivities that are better than known catalysts. These selectivities come from a synergy between supporting ligand design and electronic control of the spin-state crossing in the reactions.

  3. Improved electrochromic performance of iridium-oxide films prepared by thermal oxidation of iridium-carbon composite films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Yoshiyuki

    1989-08-01

    Thermally oxidized iridium-oxide films have exhibited a residual coloration in the as-prepared state. This residual coloration has been found to be much improved by potential cycling in a range from -0.25 to 1.25 V versus a saturated calomel electrode (SCE) in a 0.5M H2 SO4 electrolyte. In order to optimize the conditions for improving the electrochromic performance of the films, the anodic oxidation growth on sputtered-Ir films and changes of the electrochemical properties of the oxidized films have been investigated by applying various waveform voltages (triangular, sine, and square waves) at a frequency range from 0.033 to 0.5 Hz. Appreciable film dissolution has been observed for the Ir/SnO2 electrodes. On the other hand, the dissolution of the films during the electrochemical treatment has been less than 2% of the total Ir in the oxidized films at the optimum conditions: triangular wave at 0.067 Hz. 5×105 cycles have been obtained with less than 5% decrease in the charge for the film, when applying a square-wave voltage from -0.2 to 1.0 V vs SCE at 1 Hz in a 0.5M H2 SO4 electrolyte.

  4. Identification of an iridium(III) complex with anti-bacterial and anti-cancer activity

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Lihua; Liu, Li-Juan; Chao, Wei-chieh; Zhong, Hai-Jing; Wang, Modi; Chen, Xiu-Ping; Lu, Jin-Jian; Li, Ruei-nian; Ma, Dik-Lung; Leung, Chung-Hang

    2015-01-01

    Group 9 transition metal complexes have been widely explored as therapeutic agents due to their unique geometry, their propensity to undergo ligand exchanges with biomolecules and their diverse steric and electronic properties. These metal complexes can offer distinct modes of action in living organisms compared to carbon-based molecules. In this study, we investigated the antimicrobial and anti-proliferative abilities of a series of cyclometallated iridium(III) complexes. The iridium(III) complex 1 inhibited the growth of S. aureus with MIC and MBC values of 3.60 and 7.19 ?M, respectively, indicating its potent bactericidal activity. Moreover, complex 1 also exhibited cytotoxicity against a number of cancer cell lines, with particular potency against ovarian, cervical and melanoma cells. This cyclometallated iridium(III) complex is the first example of a substitutionally-inert, Group 9 organometallic compound utilized as a direct and selective inhibitor of S. aureus. PMID:26416333

  5. Identification of an iridium(III) complex with anti-bacterial and anti-cancer activity.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lihua; Liu, Li-Juan; Chao, Wei-Chieh; Zhong, Hai-Jing; Wang, Modi; Chen, Xiu-Ping; Lu, Jin-Jian; Li, Ruei-Nian; Ma, Dik-Lung; Leung, Chung-Hang

    2015-01-01

    Group 9 transition metal complexes have been widely explored as therapeutic agents due to their unique geometry, their propensity to undergo ligand exchanges with biomolecules and their diverse steric and electronic properties. These metal complexes can offer distinct modes of action in living organisms compared to carbon-based molecules. In this study, we investigated the antimicrobial and anti-proliferative abilities of a series of cyclometallated iridium(III) complexes. The iridium(III) complex 1 inhibited the growth of S. aureus with MIC and MBC values of 3.60 and 7.19 ?M, respectively, indicating its potent bactericidal activity. Moreover, complex 1 also exhibited cytotoxicity against a number of cancer cell lines, with particular potency against ovarian, cervical and melanoma cells. This cyclometallated iridium(III) complex is the first example of a substitutionally-inert, Group 9 organometallic compound utilized as a direct and selective inhibitor of S. aureus. PMID:26416333

  6. Grain-boundary cavitation and weld-underbead cracking in DOP-26 iridium alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Mosley, W.C. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Plutonium-238 oxide fuel pellets for the General Purpose Heat Source Radioisotopic thermoelectric generators to be used on the NASA Galileo Mission to Jupiter and the International Solar Polar Mission are produced and encapsulated in DOP-26 iridium alloy at the Savannah River Plant. DOP-26 iridium alloy was developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and contains nominally 0.3 weight-percent tungsten, 60-ppM thorium and 50-ppM aluminum. Underbead cracks occasionally occur in the girth weld on the iridium alloy cladding in the area where the gas tungsten arc is quenched. A variety of electron beam techniques have been used to determine the cause of cracking. Results are discussed. (WHK)

  7. Photoelectron spectroscopy of boron aluminum hydride cluster anions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Haopeng; Zhang, Xinxing; Ko, Yeon Jae; Gantefoer, Gerd; Bowen, Kit H. E-mail: kiran@mcneese.edu; Li, Xiang; Kiran, Boggavarapu E-mail: kiran@mcneese.edu; Kandalam, Anil K.

    2014-04-28

    Boron aluminum hydride clusters are studied through a synergetic combination of anion photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory based calculations. Boron aluminum hydride cluster anions, B{sub x}Al{sub y}H{sub z}{sup ?}, were generated in a pulsed arc cluster ionization source and identified by time-of-flight mass spectrometry. After mass selection, their photoelectron spectra were measured by a magnetic bottle-type electron energy analyzer. The resultant photoelectron spectra as well as calculations on a selected series of stoichiometries reveal significant geometrical changes upon substitution of aluminum atoms by boron atoms.

  8. Ab-initio study of transition metal hydrides

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Ramesh; Shukla, Seema Dwivedi, Shalini Sharma, Yamini

    2014-04-24

    We have performed ab initio self consistent calculations based on Full potential linearized augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) method to investigate the optical and thermal properties of yttrium hydrides. From the band structure and density of states, the optical absorption spectra and specific heats have been calculated. The band structure of Yttrium metal changes dramatically due to hybridization of Y sp orbitals with H s orbitals and there is a net charge transfer from metal to hydrogen site. The electrical resistivity and specific heats of yttrium hydrides are lowered but the thermal conductivity is slightly enhanced due to increase in scattering from hydrogen sites.

  9. Phase I. Lanthanum-based Start Materials for Hydride Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Gschneidner, K. A.; Schmidt, F. A.; Frerichs, A. E.; Ament, K. A.

    2013-08-20

    The purpose of Phase I of this work is to focus on developing a La-based start material for making nickel-metal (lanthanum)-hydride batteries based on our carbothermic-silicon process. The goal is to develop a protocol for the manufacture of (La1-xRx)(Ni1-yMy)(Siz), where R is a rare earth metal and M is a non-rare earth metal, to be utilized as the negative electrode in nickel-metal hydride (NiMH) rechargeable batteries.

  10. Highly efficient red electrophosphorescence from a solution-processed zwitterionic cyclometalated iridium(III) complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, Younghun; Lyu, Yi-Yeol; Das, Rupasree Ragini; Kwon, Ohyun; Lee, Tae-Woo; Park, Young Ja

    2007-11-01

    A mononuclear red-emitting zwitterionic iridium(III) complex, bis(1-(phenyl)isoquinolinato) iridium(III) (2,2'-bipyridine-3-ol-3'-olate), was synthesized and used as a triplet emitter doped in a polymeric host in solution-processed electrophosphorescent light-emitting diodes. We achieved a high luminous effieciency (LE) of 12.62cd/A with fast response time in the device using the dopant unlike in the device using cationic irridium(III) phosphorescent materials. A hole transporting polymeric interlayer between the anode and the emitting layer improved the LE and decreased the exciton quenching at high electric fields.

  11. A search for iridium abundance anomalies at two late cambrian biomere boundaries in Western utah.

    PubMed

    Orth, C J; Knight, J D; Quintana, L R; Gilmore, J S; Palmer, A R

    1984-01-13

    Iridium concentrations have been measured in samples taken across two Late Cambrian biomere boundaries (crisis zones) in search of evidence for possible elemental abundance anomalies similar to the one observed at the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary. Sampling was performed in uplifted marine limestone deposits in the House Range of western Utah. Although the two trilobite-brachiopod extinction boundaries could be assigned to +/-4 millimeters of vertical section by laboratory examination of the rocks, only background amounts of iridium (2 x 10(-12) to 17 x 10(-12) gram per gram of whole rock) were observed. PMID:17733805

  12. High-strain-rate, high-temperature biaxial testing of DOP-26 iridium

    SciTech Connect

    George, T.G.

    1988-05-01

    High-strain-rate biaxial punch tests were performed on DOP-26 (Ir-0.3 wt.% tungsten) iridium-alloy disc given annealing and aging heat treatments. Test temperatures ranged between 600 and 1440/degree/C, and punch velocity was held constant at 45 m/s. Three types of samples were evaluated: Z-batch old-process discs, B-batch old-process discs, and B-batch new-process discs. The results indicate that batch-to-batch variations in ductility are significant and that new-process iridium is slightly more ductile than old-process material. 12 refs., 43 figs., 26 tabs.

  13. Thermocouples of molybdenum and iridium alloys for more stable vacuum-high temperature performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, J. F. (inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Thermocouples providing stability and performance reliability in systems involving high temperatures and vacuums by employing a bimetallic thermocouple sensor are described. Each metal of the sensor is selected from a group of metals comprising molybdenum and iridium and alloys containing only those two metals. The molybdenum, iridium thermocouple sensor alloys provide bare metal thermocouple sensors having advantageous vapor pressure compatibility and performance characteristics. The compatibility and physical characteristics of the thermocouple sensor alloys result in improved emf, temperature properties and thermocouple hot junction performance.

  14. Synthesis of Fluoroalkoxy Substituted Arylboronic Esters by Iridium-Catalyzed Aromatic C-H Borylation.

    PubMed

    Batool, Farhat; Parveen, Shehla; Emwas, Abdul-Hamid; Sioud, Salim; Gao, Xin; Munawar, Munawar A; Chotana, Ghayoor A

    2015-09-01

    The preparation of fluoroalkoxy arylboronic esters by iridium-catalyzed aromatic C-H borylation is described. The fluoroalkoxy groups employed include trifluoromethoxy, difluoromethoxy, 1,1,2,2-tetrafluoroethoxy, and 2,2-difluoro-1,3-benzodioxole. The borylation reactions were carried out neat without the use of a glovebox or Schlenk line. The regioselectivities available through the iridium-catalyzed C-H borylation are complementary to those obtained by the electrophilic aromatic substitution reactions of fluoroalkoxy arenes. Fluoroalkoxy arylboronic esters can serve as versatile building blocks. PMID:26278016

  15. Comparison of the interactions in the rare gas hydride and Group 2 metal hydride anions

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Joe P.; Manship, Daniel R.; Wright, Timothy G.; Breckenridge, W. H.

    2014-02-28

    We study both the rare gas hydride anions, RG–H{sup ?} (RG = He–Rn) and Group 2 (Group IIa) metal hydride anions, M{sub IIa}H{sup ?} (M{sub IIa} = Be–Ra), calculating potential energy curves at the CCSD(T) level with augmented quadruple and quintuple basis sets, and extrapolating the results to the basis set limit. We report spectroscopic parameters obtained from these curves; additionally, we study the Be–He complex. While the RG–H{sup ?} and Be–He species are weakly bound, we show that, as with the previously studied BeH{sup ?} and MgH{sup ?} species, the other M{sub IIa}H{sup ?} species are strongly bound, despite the interactions nominally also being between two closed shell species: M(ns{sup 2}) and H{sup ?}(1s{sup 2}). We gain insight into the interactions using contour plots of the electron density changes and population analyses. For both series, the calculated dissociation energy is significantly less than the ion/induced-dipole attraction term, confirming that electron repulsion is important in these species; this effect is more dramatic for the M{sub IIa}H{sup ?} species than for RG–H{sup ?}. Our analyses lead us to conclude that the stronger interaction in the case of the M{sub IIa}H{sup ?} species arises from sp and spd hybridization, which allows electron density on the M{sub IIa} atom to move away from the incoming H{sup ?}.

  16. Hyperfine structure and Stark effect in the [18.0] 4 - X3?4 transition of iridium hydride, IrH and [18.2] 4 - X3?4 transition of iridium deuteride, IrD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linton, C.; Granger, A. D.; Adam, A. G.; Steimle, T. C.

    2014-10-01

    High resolution spectra of IrH and IrD, with full width at half maximum (FWHM) of ?0.001 cm-1, have shown well resolved hyperfine structure due to the nuclear spin, I = 3/2, of 193Ir and 191Ir. Analysis of the hyperfine structure in the [18.2] 4 - X3?4 transition of 193IrD and 191IrD yielded well defined magnetic and quadrupole Ir hyperfine parameters which showed that the ground X3?4 state originates predominantly from the two open-shell Ir(5d?35d?3) configuration with a significant contribution from the four open-shell Ir(5d?5d?35d?36s?) configuration. Examination of the Stark effect in the [18.0] 4 - X3?4 transition of 193IrH yielded electric dipole moments of 1.23(1) D and 0.76(1) D for the ground and excited states, respectively. The hyperfine constants and the dipole moment of the ground state are seen to follow the trend shown by the isovalent molecules, CoF, CoH and IrF.

  17. Fracture strength of hydride precipitates in Zr-2.5Nb alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, S.-Q.; Puls, M. P.

    1999-11-01

    The hydride precipitate fracture strength as a function of precipitate size and temperature (23-250°C) in smooth tensile specimens of Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube material (nominal hydrogen content 100 ppm by weight) was studied using the acoustic emission technique. At room temperature, this strength is sensitive to hydride length when the average hydride length is short, and is insensitive to the hydride length when the average hydride length is longer than 25 ?m. The hydride fracture strength decreases slightly with temperature, but a more rapid decrease in the yield strength offsets this decrease, resulting in a brittle-to-ductile transition at 120°C to 140°C in smooth tensile tests. The presence of hydrides causes a decrease in the ultimate tensile strength of the material at low temperatures, and has no effect at high temperatures for these smooth tensile specimens.

  18. Process of forming a sol-gel/metal hydride composite

    DOEpatents

    Congdon, James W. (Aiken, SC)

    2009-03-17

    An external gelation process is described which produces granules of metal hydride particles contained within a sol-gel matrix. The resulting granules are dimensionally stable and are useful for applications such as hydrogen separation and hydrogen purification. An additional coating technique for strengthening the granules is also provided.

  19. THE EFFECT OF STRESS BIAXIALITY ON HYDRIDE REORIENTATION THRESHOLD STRESS

    E-print Network

    Motta, Arthur T.

    THE EFFECT OF STRESS BIAXIALITY ON HYDRIDE REORIENTATION THRESHOLD STRESS Department of Mechanical with their stress axis oriented in the long- transverse direction of the sheet, which corresponds to the hoop direction of the cladding tube. The taper within the gauge section caused the tensile stress to vary

  20. 5-year review of Metal Hydride Center of Excellence.

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Jay O.; Klebanoff, Leonard E.

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of the DOE Metal Hydride Center of Excellence (MHCoE) is to develop hydrogen storage materials with engineering properties that allow the use of these materials in a way that satisfies the DOE/FreedomCAR Program system requirements for automotive hydrogen storage. The Center is a multidisciplinary and collaborative effort with technical interactions divided into two broad areas: (1) mechanisms and modeling (which provide a theoretically driven basis for pursuing new materials) and (2) materials development (in which new materials are synthesized and characterized). Driving all of this work are the hydrogen storage system specifications outlined by the FreedomCAR Program for 2010 and 2015. The organization of the MHCoE during the past year is show in Figure 1. During the past year, the technical work was divided into four project areas. The purpose of the project areas is to organize the MHCoE technical work along appropriate and flexible technical lines. The four areas summarized are: (1) Project A - Destabilized Hydrides, The objective of this project is to controllably modify the thermodynamics of hydrogen sorption reactions in light metal hydrides using hydride destabilization strategies; (2) Project B - Complex Anionic Materials, The objective is to predict and synthesize highly promising new anionic hydride materials; (3) Project C - Amides/Imides Storage Materials, The objective of Project C is to assess the viability of amides and imides (inorganic materials containing NH{sub 2} and NH moieties, respectively) for onboard hydrogen storage; and (4) Project D - Alane, AlH{sub 3}, The objective of Project D is to understand the sorption and regeneration properties of AlH{sub 3} for hydrogen storage.

  1. Optimization and electrochemical characterization of RF-sputtered iridium oxide microelectrodes for electrical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Xiaoyang; Liu, Jingquan; Tian, Hongchang; Yang, Bin; NuLi, Yanna; Yang, Chunsheng

    2014-02-01

    A reactively sputtered iridium oxide (IrOx) thin film has been developed as electrochemical modification material for microelectrodes to obtain high stability and charge storage capacity (CSC) in functional electrical stimulation. The effect of the oxygen flow and oxygen to argon ratio during sputtering process on the microstructure and electrochemical properties of the IrOx film is characterized. After optimization, the activated IrOx microelectrode shows the highest CSC of 36.15 mC cm-2 at oxygen flow of 25 sccm and oxygen to argon ratio of (2.5:1). Because the deposition process of the reactively sputtered iridium oxide is an exothermic reaction, it is difficult to form film patterning by the lift-off process. The lift-off process was focused on the partially carbonized photoresist (PR) and normal PR. The higher of the carbonization degree of PR reaches, the longer the immersion duration. However, the patterning process of the iridium oxide film becomes feasible when the sputtering pressure is increasing. The experimental results show that the iridium oxide films forms the pattern with the lowest duration of ultrasonic agitation when the deposition pressure is 4.2 Pa and pressure ratio between O2 and Ar pressure is 3:4.

  2. Electrochromic Properties of Iridium Oxide Films Prepared by Pulsed Anodic Electrodeposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Youngwoo; Tak, Yongsug; Lee, Jaeyoung

    2002-12-01

    Thin films of iridium oxide to be used as an electrochromic material were prepared by pulsed anodic current electrodeposition onto indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass substrates. Before the pulsed electrodeposition, iridium oxide films formed by cyclic voltammetry (CV) played an important role in good adhesion as a seed layer. Iridium oxide films with light-blue color (100 mC/cm2) were deposited when anodic current of 0.07 mA/cm2 for 0.5 sec was superimposed on off-time of 0.5 sec (i.e., zero current) in each cycle. During CV experiment in phosphate buffered saline solution, electrodeposited iridium oxide films exhibited anodic electrochromism of blue and black color at two oxidation potentials (i.e., the ejection of H+) of +0.5 V and +0.9 V (vs. SCE), respectively, while on the cathodic scan, black thin film became colorless due to the injection of H+. When +0.9 V and -0.7 V were applied for coloring and bleaching observation in different pulse voltammetry, minimal times needed for each process are 9 sec and 5 sec, respectively.

  3. Comparative assessment of iridium oxide and platinum alloy wires using an in vitro glial scar assay.

    PubMed

    Ereifej, Evon S; Khan, Saida; Newaz, Golam; Zhang, Jinsheng; Auner, Gregory W; VandeVord, Pamela J

    2013-12-01

    The long-term effect of chronically implanted electrodes is the formation of a glial scar. Therefore, it is imperative to assess the biocompatibility of materials before employing them in neural electrode fabrication. Platinum alloy and iridium oxide have been identified as good candidates as neural electrode biomaterials due to their mechanical and electrical properties, however, effect of glial scar formation for these two materials is lacking. In this study, we applied a glial scarring assay to observe the cellular reactivity to platinum alloy and iridium oxide wires in order to assess the biocompatibility based on previously defined characteristics. Through real-time PCR, immunostaining and imaging techniques, we will advance the understanding of the biocompatibility of these materials. Results of this study demonstrate iridium oxide wires exhibited a more significant reactive response as compared to platinum alloy wires. Cells cultured with platinum alloy wires had less GFAP gene expression, lower average GFAP intensity, and smaller glial scar thickness. Collectively, these results indicated that platinum alloy wires were more biocompatible than the iridium oxide wires. PMID:23764951

  4. Report of Iridium/{sup 238}PuO{sub 2} Compatibility Test

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, D.H.

    2001-08-09

    This study indicates that the chemical purity of the fuel used presently to fabricate fueled clad vent sets will not present any special problems to the performance of the fueled clad vent sets as intended. However, cation impurities in the fuel can have a deleterious effect on the iridium cladding and vents and should be minimized as much as practical.

  5. X-ray excitable luminescent polymer dots doped with an iridium(III) complex.

    PubMed

    Osakada, Yasuko; Pratx, Guillem; Hanson, Lindsey; Solomon, Paige Elana; Xing, Lei; Cui, Bianxiao

    2013-05-14

    In this study, cyclometalated iridium(III) complex-doped polymer dots were synthesized and shown to emit luminescence upon X-ray irradiation, potentially serving as a new probe for molecular imaging during X-ray computed tomography. PMID:23320256

  6. High-temperature compatibility study of iridium (DOP-26 alloy) with graphite and plutonia

    SciTech Connect

    Axler, K.M.; Eash, D.T.

    1987-12-01

    This report outlines the materials compatibility tests conducted on DOP-26 iridium alloy and carbon. The carbon used was in the form of woven graphite as present in the impact shell used to encase plutonia in nuclear heat sources. In addition, compatibility tests of the DOP-26 alloy with plutonia are described. The reactivity observed in both systems is discussed. 4 refs., 6 figs.

  7. A pH Sensor Based on a Stainless Steel Electrode Electrodeposited with Iridium Oxide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, C. C. M.; Madrid, R. E.; Felice, C. J.

    2009-01-01

    A simple procedure to make an iridium oxide (IrO[subscript 2]) electrodeposited pH sensor, that can be used in a chemical, biomedical, or materials laboratory, is presented here. Some exercises, based on this sensor, that can be used to teach important concepts in the field of biomedical, biochemical, tissue, or materials engineering, are also…

  8. Anal. Chem. 1993, 65, 375-379 Analytical Utility of the Iridium-Based Mercury

    E-print Network

    Kounaves, Samuel P.

    Anal. Chem. 1993, 65, 375-379 Analytical Utility of the Iridium-Based Mercury over several days use. The applicationof SWASV theory for mercury film electrodes is shown The mercury electrode in ita many forms has been the overwhelmingsubstrate-of-choicefor electrochemistrysince

  9. Testing and evaluation of oxide-coated iridium/rhenium chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Brian D.

    1993-01-01

    Iridium-coated rhenium provides long life operation of radiation-cooled rockets at temperatures up to 2200 C. Ceramic oxide coatings could be used to increase iridium/rhenium rocket lifetimes and allow operation in highly oxidizing environments. Ceramic oxide coatings promise to serve as both thermal and diffusion barriers for the iridium layer. Seven ceramic oxide-coated iridium/rhenium, 22 N rocket chambers were tested on gaseous hydrogen/gaseous oxygen propellants. Five chambers had thick (over 10 mils), monolithic coatings of either hafnia or zirconia. Two chambers had coatings with thicknesses less than 5 mils. One of these chambers had a thin-walled coating of zirconia infiltrated with sol gel hafnia. The other chamber had a coating composed of an iridium/oxide composite. The purpose of this test program was to assess the ability of the oxide coatings to withstand the thermal shock of combustion initiation, adhere under repeated thermal cycling, and operate in aggressively oxidizing environments. All of the coatings survived the thermal shock of combustion and demonstrated operation at mixture ratios up to 11. The iridium/oxide composite coated chamber included testing for over 29 minutes at mixture ratio 16. The thicker-walled coatings provided the larger temperature drops across the oxide layer (up to 570 C), but were susceptible to macrocracking and eventual chipping at a stress concentrator. The cracks apparently resealed during firing, under compression of the oxide layer. The thinner-walled coatings did not experience the macrocracking and chipping of the chambers seen with the thick, monolithic coatings. However, burnthroughs in the throat region did occur in both of the thin-walled chambers at mixture ratios well above stochiometric. The burn-throughs were probably the result of oxygen-diffusion through the oxide coating that allowed the underlying iridium and rhenium layers to be oxidized. The results of this test program indicated that the thin-walled oxide coatings are better suited for repeated thermal cycling than the thick-walled coating, while thicker coatings may be required for operation in aggressively oxidizing environments.

  10. Nanoscale properties of planar and faceted iridium(210)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermanoski, Ivan

    2005-07-01

    In the presence of a thin layer of adsorbed oxygen, the Ir(210) surface exhibits morphological instability and, upon annealing, becomes covered with nanometer-sized pyramids with facets of {311} and (110) crystallographic orientation. Electron diffraction and temperature programmed desorption experiments show that complete faceting requires 0.5 monolayers of oxygen coverage and annealing temperature of 600 K. For lower temperatures and coverages, faceted and planar surfaces coexist. Oxygen desorption above 950 K causes irreversible facet destruction. In previous adsorbate-induced faceting studies, it has not been possible to remove the adsorbate while preserving the faceted structure. We have accomplished this for O/Ir(210) via two low-temperature chemical methods: catalytic carbon monoxide oxidation and water formation. The clean faceted surface is an excellent substrate for model catalytic studies; it is stable for temperatures below 600 K and irreversibly reverts to planar above 600 K. Real-time low energy electron microscopy shows uniform facet nucleation and growth on the oxygen-covered Ir(210) surface and facet relaxation of the clean faceted surface. Planar and faceted structures coexist between 850 K and 1150 K in the presence of gaseous oxygen. Atomic-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy shows that {311} facets are atomically smooth. The (110) facets consist of unreconstructed terraces separated by steps and of a complicated superstructure formed on the same facet. The facet atomic structure is consistent with models based bulk iridium properties and with first-principle simulations. Facets grow with annealing temperature increase, their average size ranging from 5 nm to 14 nm. Acetylene and ammonia decomposition exhibit structure sensitivity over the planar and faceted surface. Ammonia decomposition additionally exhibits size effects in experiments on faceted surfaces with different average facet size. Subtle differences in core-level high resolution soft x-ray spectra suggest that surface morphology, rather than electronic structure changes, is responsible for the structure and size effects. This work is the first adsorbate-induced faceting study where the preparation of a clean elemental faceted substrate has been accomplished. It paves the way for revealing the mechanisms of substantial mass transport in surface transformations, and is an excellent substrate for the study of structure sensitivity and size effects in catalytic reactions.

  11. Testing of electroformed deposited iridium/powder metallurgy rhenium rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Brian D.; Dickerson, Robert

    1996-01-01

    High-temperature, oxidation-resistant chamber materials offer the thermal margin for high performance and extended lifetimes for radiation-cooled rockets. Rhenium (Re) coated with iridium (Ir) allow hours of operation at 2200 C on Earth-storable propellants. One process for manufacturing Ir/Re rocket chambers is the fabrication of Re substrates by powder metallurgy (PM) and the application of Ir coatings by using electroformed deposition (ED). ED Ir coatings, however, have been found to be porous and poorly adherent. The integrity of ED Ir coatings could be improved by densification after the electroforming process. This report summarizes the testing of two 22-N, ED Ir/PM Re rocket chambers that were subjected to post-deposition treatments in an effort to densify the Ir coating. One chamber was vacuum annealed, while the other chamber was subjected to hot isostatic pressure (HIP). The chambers were tested on gaseous oxygen/gaseous hydrogen propellants, at mixture ratios that simulated the oxidizing environments of Earth-storable propellants. ne annealed ED Ir/PM Re chamber was tested for a total of 24 firings and 4.58 hr at a mixture ratio of 4.2. After only 9 firings, the annealed ED Ir coating began to blister and spall upstream of the throat. The blistering and spalling were similar to what had been experienced with unannealed, as-deposited ED Ir coatings. The HIP ED Ir/PM Re chamber was tested for a total of 91 firings and 11.45 hr at mixture ratios of 3.2 and 4.2. The HIP ED Ir coating remained adherent to the Re substrate throughout testing; there were no visible signs of coating degradation. Metallography revealed, however, thinning of the HIP Ir coating and occasional pores in the Re layer upstream of the throat. Pinholes in the Ir coating may have provided a path for oxidation of the Re substrate at these locations. The HIP ED Ir coating proved to be more effective than vacuum annealed and as-deposited ED Ir. Further densification is still required to match the integrity of chemically vapor deposited Ir coatings. Despite this, the successful long duration testing of the HIP ED Ir chamber, in an oxidizing environment comparable to Earth-storable propellants, demonstrated the viability of this Ir/Re rocket fabrication process.

  12. Iridium and Spherules in Late Eocene Impact Deposits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kyte, F. T.; Liu, S.

    2002-01-01

    We have been independently examining the Ir (FTK) and spherule (SL) contents of recently discovered late Eocene impact deposits from the south Atlantic and western Indian oceans. These include ODP Sites 1090 [14,15], 709 [lo], and 699 [Liu in prep.]. Iridium abundances at these sites are within the typical range reported for late Eocene deposits, with peak concentrations between 100 and 1000 pg/g. In Table 1 we present estimated net Ir fluences (in ng Ir/cm ) for these and nine other sites. Although there are fewer sites than the K/T boundary, the average of 9 ng Ir/cm2 is probably a good estimate of the late Eocene global flux. This is enough Ir for a 6 km comet (assuming 250 ng/g Ir, p=1.5), is sufficient to produce the Popigai or Chesapeake Bay structures, and is 16% of the flux estimated for the K/T boundary (55 ng/cm2 [ 161). Figure 1 shows the relative abundances of Ir, glassy microtektites and cpx-bearing spherules in sediments from Sites 699 and 1090, which are separated by only 3100 km. Although these two sites have similar Ir anomalies, the abundances of spherules are quite different. Site 1090 has well-defined peaks for both types of spherules, with a peak of 562 cpx spheruledg, while Site 699 contains only a few glassy microtektites and no cpx spherules. While the different abundances of spherules may reflect a heterogeneous distribution of spherules on the Earth s surface, an equally likely cause of this difference may be differential preservation of spherules in the sediment. recovered are only a trace residue of the initial impact deposit. Earlier work found 0.22 ng/g Ir in glassy microtektites from Site 689 [17], an insufficient concentration to support 0.16 ng/g in the bulk sediment at this site. We measured 15 ng/g Ir in a group of 95 cpx spherules from Site 1090 with sizes from 63 to -200 pm, a set typical of the size distribution at this site. Although this is a significant concentration it also cannot support the Ir peak. We presently lack quantitative data on the mass concentration of cpx spherules in Site 1090 sediments, but it is certainly <1 mg/g in The impact record in the late Eocene is very different from that at the Cretaceous-Tertiary In contrast, the late Eocene probably experienced multiple impact events.

  13. Luminescent Iridium(III) Complexes Supported by N-Heterocyclic Carbene-based C^C^C-Pincer Ligands and Aromatic Diimines

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Lai-Hon; Lo, Hoi-Shing; Ng, Sze-Wing; Ma, Dik-Lung; Leung, Chung-Hang; Wong, Chun-Yuen

    2015-01-01

    Iridium(III) hydrido complexes containing N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC)-based pincer ligand 1,3-bis(1-butylimidazolin-2-ylidene)phenyl anion (C1^C^C1) or 1,3-bis(3-butylbenzimidazolin-2-ylidene)phenyl anion (C2^C^C2) and aromatic diimine (2,2?-bipyridine (bpy), 1,10-phenanthroline (phen), 4,4?-dimethyl-2,2?-bipyridine (Me2bpy), or dipyrido-[3,2-f:2?,3?-h]-quinoxaline (dpq)) in the form of [Ir(C^C^C)(N^N)(H)]+ have been prepared. Crystal structures for these complexes show that the Ir–CNHC distances are 2.043(5)–2.056(5) Å. The hydride chemical shifts for complexes bearing C1^C^C1 (?20.6 to ?20.3?ppm) are more upfield than those with C2^C^C2 (?19.5 and ?19.2?ppm), revealing that C1^C^C1 is a better electron donor than C2^C^C2. Spectroscopic comparisons and time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations suggest that the lowest-energy electronic transition associated with these complexes (??=?340–530?nm (????103?dm3 mol?1 cm?1)) originate from a d?(IrIII)????*(N^N) metal-to-ligand charge transfer transition, where the d?(IrIII) level contain significant contribution from the C^C^C ligands. All these complexes are emissive in the yellow-spectral region (553–604?nm in CH3CN and CH2Cl2) upon photo-excitation with quantum yields of 10?3–10?1. PMID:26487542

  14. Luminescent Iridium(III) Complexes Supported by N-Heterocyclic Carbene-based C^C^C-Pincer Ligands and Aromatic Diimines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Lai-Hon; Lo, Hoi-Shing; Ng, Sze-Wing; Ma, Dik-Lung; Leung, Chung-Hang; Wong, Chun-Yuen

    2015-10-01

    Iridium(III) hydrido complexes containing N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC)-based pincer ligand 1,3-bis(1-butylimidazolin-2-ylidene)phenyl anion (C1^C^C1) or 1,3-bis(3-butylbenzimidazolin-2-ylidene)phenyl anion (C2^C^C2) and aromatic diimine (2,2?-bipyridine (bpy), 1,10-phenanthroline (phen), 4,4?-dimethyl-2,2?-bipyridine (Me2bpy), or dipyrido-[3,2-f:2?,3?-h]-quinoxaline (dpq)) in the form of [Ir(C^C^C)(N^N)(H)]+ have been prepared. Crystal structures for these complexes show that the Ir–CNHC distances are 2.043(5)–2.056(5) Å. The hydride chemical shifts for complexes bearing C1^C^C1 (?20.6 to ?20.3?ppm) are more upfield than those with C2^C^C2 (?19.5 and ?19.2?ppm), revealing that C1^C^C1 is a better electron donor than C2^C^C2. Spectroscopic comparisons and time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations suggest that the lowest-energy electronic transition associated with these complexes (??=?340–530?nm (????103?dm3 mol?1 cm?1)) originate from a d?(IrIII)????*(N^N) metal-to-ligand charge transfer transition, where the d?(IrIII) level contain significant contribution from the C^C^C ligands. All these complexes are emissive in the yellow-spectral region (553–604?nm in CH3CN and CH2Cl2) upon photo-excitation with quantum yields of 10?3–10?1.

  15. Luminescent Iridium(III) Complexes Supported by N-Heterocyclic Carbene-based C^C^C-Pincer Ligands and Aromatic Diimines.

    PubMed

    Chung, Lai-Hon; Lo, Hoi-Shing; Ng, Sze-Wing; Ma, Dik-Lung; Leung, Chung-Hang; Wong, Chun-Yuen

    2015-01-01

    Iridium(III) hydrido complexes containing N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC)-based pincer ligand 1,3-bis(1-butylimidazolin-2-ylidene)phenyl anion (C(1)^C^C(1)) or 1,3-bis(3-butylbenzimidazolin-2-ylidene)phenyl anion (C(2)^C^C(2)) and aromatic diimine (2,2'-bipyridine (bpy), 1,10-phenanthroline (phen), 4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine (Me2bpy), or dipyrido-[3,2-f:2',3'-h]-quinoxaline (dpq)) in the form of [Ir(C^C^C)(N^N)(H)](+) have been prepared. Crystal structures for these complexes show that the Ir-CNHC distances are 2.043(5)-2.056(5) Å. The hydride chemical shifts for complexes bearing C(1)^C^C(1) (-20.6 to -20.3?ppm) are more upfield than those with C(2)^C^C(2) (-19.5 and -19.2?ppm), revealing that C(1)^C^C(1) is a better electron donor than C(2)^C^C(2). Spectroscopic comparisons and time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations suggest that the lowest-energy electronic transition associated with these complexes (??=?340-530?nm (????10(3)?dm(3) mol(-1) cm(-1))) originate from a d?(Ir(III))????*(N^N) metal-to-ligand charge transfer transition, where the d?(Ir(III)) level contain significant contribution from the C^C^C ligands. All these complexes are emissive in the yellow-spectral region (553-604?nm in CH3CN and CH2Cl2) upon photo-excitation with quantum yields of 10(-3)-10(-1). PMID:26487542

  16. Identification of an iridium-containing compound with a formal oxidation state of IX.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guanjun; Zhou, Mingfei; Goettel, James T; Schrobilgen, Gary J; Su, Jing; Li, Jun; Schlöder, Tobias; Riedel, Sebastian

    2014-10-23

    One of the most important classifications in chemistry and within the periodic table is the concept of formal oxidation states. The preparation and characterization of compounds containing elements with unusual oxidation states is of great interest to chemists. The highest experimentally known formal oxidation state of any chemical element is at present VIII, although higher oxidation states have been postulated. Compounds with oxidation state VIII include several xenon compounds (for example XeO4 and XeO3F2) and the well-characterized species RuO4 and OsO4 (refs 2-4). Iridium, which has nine valence electrons, is predicted to have the greatest chance of being oxidized beyond the VIII oxidation state. In recent matrix-isolation experiments, the IrO4 molecule was characterized as an isolated molecule in rare-gas matrices. The valence electron configuration of iridium in IrO4 is 5d(1), with a formal oxidation state of VIII. Removal of the remaining d electron from IrO4 would lead to the iridium tetroxide cation ([IrO4](+)), which was recently predicted to be stable and in which iridium is in a formal oxidation state of IX. There has been some speculation about the formation of [IrO4](+) species, but these experimental observations have not been structurally confirmed. Here we report the formation of [IrO4](+) and its identification by infrared photodissociation spectroscopy. Quantum-chemical calculations were carried out at the highest level of theory that is available today, and predict that the iridium tetroxide cation, with a Td-symmetrical structure and a d(0) electron configuration, is the most stable of all possible [IrO4](+) isomers. PMID:25341786

  17. Hydride structures in Ti-aluminides subjected to high temperature and hydrogen pressure charging conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Legzdina, D.; Robertson, I. M.; Birnbaum, H. K.

    1991-01-01

    The distribution and chemistry of hydrides produced in single and dual phase alloys with a composition near TiAl have been investigated by using a combination of TEM and X-ray diffraction techniques. The alloys were exposed at 650 C to 13.8 MPa of gaseous H2 for 100 h. In the single-phase gamma alloy, large hydrides preferentially nucleated on the grain boundaries and matrix dislocations and a population of small hydrides was distributed throughout the matrix. X-ray and electron diffraction patterns from these hydrides indicated that they have an fcc structure with a lattice parameter of 0.45 nm. EDAX analysis of the hydrides showed that they were enriched in Ti. The hydrides were mostly removed by vacuum annealing at 800 C for 24 h. On dissolution of the hydrides, the chemistry of hydride-free regions of the grain boundary returned to the matrix composition, suggesting that Ti segregation accompanied the hydride formation rather than Ti enrichment causing the formation of the hydride.

  18. Exploring metal hydrides using autoclave and multi-anvil hydrogenations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puhakainen, Kati

    Metal hydride materials have been intensively studied for hydrogen storage applications. In addition to potential hydrogen economy applications, metal hydrides offer a wide variety of other interesting properties. For example, hydrogen-dominant materials, which are hydrides with the highest hydrogen content for a particular metal/semimetal composition, are predicted to display high-temperature superconductivity. On the other side of the spectrum are hydrides with small amounts of hydrogen (0.1 - 1 at.%) that are investigated as viable magnetic, thermoelectric or semiconducting materials. Research of metal hydride materials is generally important to gain fundamental understanding of metal-hydrogen interactions in materials. Hydrogenation of Zintl phases, which are defined as compounds between an active metal (alkali, alkaline earth, rare earth) and a p-block metal/semimetal, were attempted by a hot sintering method utilizing an autoclave loaded with gaseous hydrogen (< 9 MPa). Hydride formation competes with oxidative decomposition of a Zintl phase. The oxidative decomposition, which leads to a mixture of binary active metal hydride and p-block element, was observed for investigated aluminum (Al) and gallium (Ga) containing Zintl phases. However, a new phase Li2Al was discovered when Zintl phase precursors were synthesized. Using the single crystal x-ray diffraction (SCXRD), the Li2Al was found to crystallize in an orthorhombic unit cell (Cmcm) with the lattice parameters a = 4.6404(8) Å, b = 9.719(2) Å, and c = 4.4764(8) Å. Increased demand for materials with improved properties necessitates the exploration of alternative synthesis methods. Conventional metal hydride synthesis methods, like ball-milling and autoclave technique, are not responding to the demands of finding new materials. A viable alternative synthesis method is the application of high pressure for the preparation of hydrogen-dominant materials. Extreme pressures in the gigapascal ranges can open access to new metal hydrides with novel structures and properties, because of the drastically increased chemical potential of hydrogen. Pressures up to 10 GPa can be easily achieved using the multi-anvil (MA) hydrogenations while maintaining sufficient sample volume for structure and property characterization. Gigapascal MA hydrogenations using ammonia borane (BH3

  19. Highly active iridium/iridium-tin/tin oxide heterogeneous nanoparticles as alternative electrocatalysts for the ethanol oxidation reaction.

    PubMed

    Du, Wenxin; Wang, Qi; Saxner, David; Deskins, N Aaron; Su, Dong; Krzanowski, James E; Frenkel, Anatoly I; Teng, Xiaowei

    2011-09-28

    Ethanol is a promising fuel for low-temperature direct fuel cell reactions due to its low toxicity, ease of storage and transportation, high-energy density, and availability from biomass. However, the implementation of ethanol fuel cell technology has been hindered by the lack of low-cost, highly active anode catalysts. In this paper, we have studied Iridium (Ir)-based binary catalysts as low-cost alternative electrocatalysts replacing platinum (Pt)-based catalysts for the direct ethanol fuel cell (DEFC) reaction. We report the synthesis of carbon supported Ir(71)Sn(29) catalysts with an average diameter of 2.7 ± 0.6 nm through a "surfactant-free" wet chemistry approach. The complementary characterization techniques, including aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy equipped with electron energy loss spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy, are used to identify the "real" heterogeneous structure of Ir(71)Sn(29)/C particles as Ir/Ir-Sn/SnO(2), which consists of an Ir-rich core and an Ir-Sn alloy shell with SnO(2) present on the surface. The Ir(71)Sn(29)/C heterogeneous catalyst exhibited high electrochemical activity toward the ethanol oxidation reaction compared to the commercial Pt/C (ETEK), PtRu/C (Johnson Matthey) as well as PtSn/C catalysts. Electrochemical measurements and density functional theory calculations demonstrate that the superior electro-activity is directly related to the high degree of Ir-Sn alloy formation as well as the existence of nonalloyed SnO(2) on surface. Our cross-disciplinary work, from novel "surfactant-free" synthesis of Ir-Sn catalysts, theoretical simulations, and catalytic measurements to the characterizations of "real" heterogeneous nanostructures, will not only highlight the intriguing structure-property correlations in nanosized catalysts but also have a transformative impact on the commercialization of DEFC technology by replacing Pt with low-cost, highly active Ir-based catalysts. PMID:21812458

  20. Highly Active Iridium/Iridium Tin/Tin Oxide Heterogeneous Nanoparticles as Alternative Electrocatalysts for the Ethanol Oxidation Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Du W.; Su D.; Wang Q.; Saxner D.; Deskins N.A.; Krzanowski J.E.; Frenkel A.I.; Teng X.

    2011-08-03

    Ethanol is a promising fuel for low-temperature direct fuel cell reactions due to its low toxicity, ease of storage and transportation, high-energy density, and availability from biomass. However, the implementation of ethanol fuel cell technology has been hindered by the lack of low-cost, highly active anode catalysts. In this paper, we have studied Iridium (Ir)-based binary catalysts as low-cost alternative electrocatalysts replacing platinum (Pt)-based catalysts for the direct ethanol fuel cell (DEFC) reaction. We report the synthesis of carbon supported Ir{sub 71}Sn{sub 29} catalysts with an average diameter of 2.7 {+-} 0.6 nm through a 'surfactant-free' wet chemistry approach. The complementary characterization techniques, including aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy equipped with electron energy loss spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy, are used to identify the 'real' heterogeneous structure of Ir{sub 71}Sn{sub 29}/C particles as Ir/Ir-Sn/SnO{sub 2}, which consists of an Ir-rich core and an Ir-Sn alloy shell with SnO{sub 2} present on the surface. The Ir{sub 71}Sn{sub 29}/C heterogeneous catalyst exhibited high electrochemical activity toward the ethanol oxidation reaction compared to the commercial Pt/C (ETEK), PtRu/C (Johnson Matthey) as well as PtSn/C catalysts. Electrochemical measurements and density functional theory calculations demonstrate that the superior electro-activity is directly related to the high degree of Ir-Sn alloy formation as well as the existence of nonalloyed SnO{sub 2} on surface. Our cross-disciplinary work, from novel 'surfactant-free' synthesis of Ir-Sn catalysts, theoretical simulations, and catalytic measurements to the characterizations of 'real' heterogeneous nanostructures, will not only highlight the intriguing structure-property correlations in nanosized catalysts but also have a transformative impact on the commercialization of DEFC technology by replacing Pt with low-cost, highly active Ir-based catalysts.

  1. Experimental realization of catalytic CH4 hydroxylation predicted for an iridium NNC pincer complex, demonstrating thermal, protic,

    E-print Network

    Goddard III, William A.

    Experimental realization of catalytic CH4 hydroxylation predicted for an iridium NNC pincer complex; functionalization using NaIO4 and KIO3 gives the oxy-ester. The most efficient methane hydroxylation catalysts

  2. Determination of surface coverage of catalysts: Temperature programmed experiments on platinum and iridium sponge catalysts after low temperature ammonia oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Broek, A.C.M. van den; Grondelle, J. van; Santen, R.A. van

    1999-07-25

    The activity of iridium and platinum sponge catalysts was studied in the low temperature gas phase oxidation of ammonia with oxygen. Under the reaction conditions used, iridium was found to be more active and more selective to nitrogen than platinum. Furthermore it was established from activity measurements that both catalysts lose activity as a function of time on stream due to inhibition of the surface by reaction intermediates. The used catalysts were studied by XPS and temperature programmed techniques. It was found that the surface of the catalysts had a high coverage of NH and OH and some additional NH{sub 2}. It seems most likely that the reaction mechanism proceeds through a stepwise dehydrogenation of the ammonia molecule. It appears that the last dehydrogenation step (NH by OH to N and water) is the rate determining step. The high selectivity of iridium to nitrogen can be explained by the higher activity of iridium in dissociating NO.

  3. Development of a gamma-ray detector with iridium transition edge sensor coupled to a Pb absorber

    E-print Network

    Leman, Steven W.

    We have recently started to develop a high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometer for material defect analysis. Our gamma-ray detector is a microcalorimeter consisting of an iridium/gold bilayer transition edge sensor (TES) ...

  4. FEASIBILITY OF RECYCLING PLUTONIUM AND MINOR ACTINIDES IN LIGHT WATER REACTORS USING HYDRIDE FUEL

    SciTech Connect

    Greenspan, Ehud; Todreas, Neil; Taiwo, Temitope

    2009-03-10

    The objective of this DOE NERI program sponsored project was to assess the feasibility of improving the plutonium (Pu) and minor actinide (MA) recycling capabilities of pressurized water reactors (PWRs) by using hydride instead of oxide fuels. There are four general parts to this assessment: 1) Identifying promising hydride fuel assembly designs for recycling Pu and MAs in PWRs 2) Performing a comprehensive systems analysis that compares the fuel cycle characteristics of Pu and MA recycling in PWRs using the promising hydride fuel assembly designs identified in Part 1 versus using oxide fuel assembly designs 3) Conducting a safety analysis to assess the likelihood of licensing hydride fuel assembly designs 4) Assessing the compatibility of hydride fuel with cladding materials and water under typical PWR operating conditions Hydride fuel was found to offer promising transmutation characteristics and is recommended for further examination as a possible preferred option for recycling plutonium in PWRs.

  5. The free-energy barrier to hydride transfer across a dipalladium complex.

    PubMed

    Vanston, C R; Kearley, G J; Edwards, A J; Darwish, T A; de Souza, N R; Ramirez-Cuesta, A J; Gardiner, M G

    2015-01-01

    We use density-functional theory molecular dynamics (DFT-MD) simulations to determine the hydride transfer coordinate between palladium centres of the crystallographically observed terminal hydride locations, Pd-Pd-H, originally postulated for the solution dynamics of the complex bis-NHC dipalladium hydride [{(MesIm)2CH2}2Pd2H][PF6], and then calculate the free-energy along this coordinate. We estimate the transfer barrier-height to be about 20 kcal mol(-1) with a hydride transfer rate in the order of seconds at room temperature. We validate our DFT-MD modelling using inelastic neutron scattering which reveals anharmonicity of the hydride environment that is so pronounced that there is complete failure of the harmonic model for the hydride ligand. The simulations are extended to high temperature to bring the H-transfer to a rate that is accessible to the simulation technique. PMID:25652724

  6. SPECIATION OF ARSENIC COMPOUNDS IN DRINKING WATER BY CAPILLARY ELECTROPHORESIS WITH HYDRODYNAMICALLY MODIFIED ELECTROOSMOTIC FLOW DETECTED THROUGH HYDRIDE GENERATION INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA MASS..

    EPA Science Inventory

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) was used to speciate four environmentally significant, toxic forms of arsenic: arsenite, arsenate, monomethylarsonic acid and dimethylarsinic acid. Hydride generation (HG) was used to convert the species into their respective hydrides. The hydride ...

  7. SPECIATION OF ARSENIC COMPOUNDS IN DRINKING WATER BY CAPILLARY ELECTROPHORESIS WITH HYDRODYNAMICALLY MODIFIED ELECTROOSMOTIC FLOW DETECTED THROUGH HYDRIDE GENERATION INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA MASS...

    EPA Science Inventory

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) was used to speciate four environmentally significant, toxic forms of arsenic: arsenite, arsenate, monomethylarsonic acid and dimethylarsinic acid. Hydride generation (HG) was used to convert the species into their respective hydrides. The hydride s...

  8. Composition and structure of sputter deposited erbium hydride thin films

    SciTech Connect

    ADAMS,DAVID P.; ROMERO,JUAN A.; RODRIGUEZ,MARK A.; FLORO,JERROLD A.; BANKS,JAMES C.

    2000-05-10

    Erbium hydride thin films are grown onto polished, a-axis {alpha} Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (sapphire) substrates by reactive ion beam sputtering and analyzed to determine composition, phase and microstructure. Erbium is sputtered while maintaining a H{sub 2} partial pressure of 1.4 x 10{sup {minus}4} Torr. Growth is conducted at several substrate temperatures between 30 and 500 C. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and elastic recoil detection analyses after deposition show that the H/Er areal density ratio is approximately 3:1 for growth temperatures of 30, 150 and 275 C, while for growth above {approximately}430 C, the ratio of hydrogen to metal is closer to 2:1. However, x-ray diffraction shows that all films have a cubic metal sublattice structure corresponding to that of ErH{sub 2}. RBS and Auger electron that sputtered erbium hydride thin films are relatively free of impurities.

  9. Characteristics of Interconnected Delta-Hydride Precipitates in Zr

    SciTech Connect

    L.J. Carroll; M.R. Tonks; T.M. Lillo; B.S. Fromm; DC Haggard; T.C. Morris; W.D. Swank; T.L. Trowbridge; M.C. Carroll

    2014-09-01

    Characterization of extended delta-ZrH1.66 structures in unalloyed zirconium by electron backscatter diffraction analysis confirms that they consist of many interconnected precipitates of multiple, but distinctly related, orientations. The expected orientation relationship of (0001)a-Zr//(111)delta-ZrH1.66 is confirmed between the hydride and one of the surrounding a-Zr matrix grains. The delta-ZrH1.66 precipitates do not extend in a discrete crystalline orientation, but are regularly divided by 60° type {111} twins in which adjacent delta-ZrH1.66 grains share a {111} plane. The observed matching of the close-packed FCC planes of impinging or twinned hydrides within an interconnected structure enables the minimization of the overall interfacial energy through successive nucleation and growth events and twinning.

  10. ALUMINUM HYDRIDE: A REVERSIBLE STORAGE MATERIAL FOR HYDROGEN STORAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Zidan, R; Christopher Fewox, C; Brenda Garcia-Diaz, B; Joshua Gray, J

    2009-01-09

    One of the challenges of implementing the hydrogen economy is finding a suitable solid H{sub 2} storage material. Aluminium (alane, AlH{sub 3}) hydride has been examined as a potential hydrogen storage material because of its high weight capacity, low discharge temperature, and volumetric density. Recycling the dehydride material has however precluded AlH{sub 3} from being implemented due to the large pressures required (>10{sup 5} bar H{sub 2} at 25 C) and the thermodynamic expense of chemical synthesis. A reversible cycle to form alane electrochemically using NaAlH{sub 4} in THF been successfully demonstrated. Alane is isolated as the triethylamine (TEA) adduct and converted to unsolvated alane by heating under vacuum. To complete the cycle, the starting alanate can be regenerated by direct hydrogenation of the dehydrided alane and the alkali hydride (NaH) This novel reversible cycle opens the door for alane to fuel the hydrogen economy.

  11. Synthesis of Stable Shape-Controlled Catalytically Active ?-Palladium Hydride.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zipeng; Huang, Xiaoqing; Li, Mufan; Wang, Gongming; Lee, Chain; Zhu, Enbo; Duan, Xiangfeng; Huang, Yu

    2015-12-23

    We have developed an efficient strategy for the production of stable ?-palladium hydride (PdH0.43) nanocrystals with controllable shapes and remarkable stability. The as-synthesized PdH0.43 nanocrystals showed impressive stability in air at room temperature for over 10 months, which has enabled the investigation of their catalytic property for the first time. The prepared PdH0.43 nanocrystals served as highly efficient catalysts in the oxidation of methanol, showing higher activity than their Pd counterparts. These studies opened a door for further exploration of ?-palladium hydride-based nanomaterials as a new class of promising catalytic materials and beyond. PMID:26636882

  12. High Temperature Metal Hydrides as Heat Storage Materials for Solar and Related Applications

    PubMed Central

    Felderhoff, Michael; Bogdanovi?, Borislav

    2009-01-01

    For the continuous production of electricity with solar heat power plants the storage of heat at a temperature level around 400 °C is essential. High temperature metal hydrides offer high heat storage capacities around this temperature. Based on Mg-compounds, these hydrides are in principle low-cost materials with excellent cycling stability. Relevant properties of these hydrides and their possible applications as heat storage materials are described. PMID:19333448

  13. Design and Characterization of a Hydride-based Hydrogen Storage Container for Neutron Imaging Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baruj, A.; Ardito, M.; Marín, J.; Sánchez, F.; Borzone, E. M.; Meyer, G.

    We have designed, constructed and tested a prototype hydride-based container to in-situ observe the hydride decomposition process using a neutron imaging facility. This work describes the container design parameters and the experimental setup used for the studies. The results open new possibilities for the application of the neutron imaging technique to visualize the internal state of massive hydride-based hydrogen containers, thus aiding in the design of efficient hydrogen storage tanks.

  14. Ground-state energy and relativistic corrections for positronium hydride

    SciTech Connect

    Bubin, Sergiy; Varga, Kalman

    2011-07-15

    Variational calculations of the ground state of positronium hydride (HPs) are reported, including various expectation values, electron-positron annihilation rates, and leading relativistic corrections to the total and dissociation energies. The calculations have been performed using a basis set of 4000 thoroughly optimized explicitly correlated Gaussian basis functions. The relative accuracy of the variational energy upper bound is estimated to be of the order of 2x10{sup -10}, which is a significant improvement over previous nonrelativistic results.

  15. An Analysis of the FY-1C, Iridium 33, and Cosmos 2251 Fragments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, J.-C.

    2014-01-01

    The beginning of the year 2013 marks the sixth anniversary of the destruction of the Fengyun-1C (FY-1C) weather satellite as the result of an anti-satellite test conducted by China in January 2007 and the fourth anniversary of the accidental collision between Cosmos 2251 and the operational Iridium 33 in February 2009. These two events represent the worst satellite breakups in history. A total of 5579 fragments have been cataloged by the U.S. Space Surveillance Network (SSN), and almost 5000 of them were still in orbit in January 2013. In addition to these cataloged objects, hundreds of thousands (or more) of fragments down to the millimeter size regime were also generated during the breakups. These fragments are too small to be tracked by the SSN, but are large enough to be a safety concern for human space activities and robotic missions in low Earth orbit (LEO, the region below 2000 km altitude). Like their cataloged siblings, many of them remain in orbit today. These two breakup events dramatically changed the landscape of the orbital debris environment in LEO. The spatial density of the cataloged population in January 2013 is shown as the top blue curve. The combined FY-1C, Iridium 33, and Cosmos 2251 fragments (black curve) account for about 50 percent of the cataloged population below an altitude of 1000 km. They are also responsible for the concentrations at 770 km and 850 km, altitudes at which the collisions occurred. The effects of the FY-1C, Iridium 33, and Cosmos 2251 fragments will continue to be felt for decades to come. For example, approximately half of the generated FY-1C fragments will remain in orbit 20 years from now. In general, the Iridium 33 and Cosmos 2251 fragments will decay faster than the FY-1C fragments because of their lower altitudes. Of the Iridium 33 and Cosmos 2251 fragments, the former have much shorter orbital lifetimes than the latter, because lightweight composite materials were heavily used in the construction of the Iridium vehicle, leading to the higher area-to-mass ratios of the fragments.

  16. Air passivation of metal hydride beds for waste disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, J. E.; Hsu, R. H.

    2008-07-15

    One waste acceptance criteria for hydride bed waste disposal is that the bed be non-pyrophoric. Batch-wise air ingress tests were performed which determined the amount of air consumed by a metal hydride bed. A desorbed, 4.4 kg titanium prototype hydride storage vessel (HSV) produced a 4.4 deg.C internal temperature rise upon the first air exposure cycle and a 0.1 deg.C temperature rise upon a second air exposure. A total of 346 sec air was consumed by the bed (0.08 sec per gram Ti). A desorbed, 9.66 kg LaNi{sub 4.25}Al{sub 0.75} prototype storage bed experienced larger temperature rises over successive cycles of air ingress and evacuation. The cycles were performed over a period of days with the bed effectively passivated after the 12. cycle. Nine to ten STP-L of air reacted with the bed producing both oxidized metal and water. (authors)

  17. Structure and properties of complex hydride perovskite materials.

    PubMed

    Schouwink, Pascal; Ley, Morten B; Tissot, Antoine; Hagemann, Hans; Jensen, Torben R; Smr?ok, Lubomír; ?erný, Radovan

    2014-01-01

    Perovskite materials host an incredible variety of functionalities. Although the lightest element, hydrogen, is rarely encountered in oxide perovskite lattices, it was recently observed as the hydride anion H(-), substituting for the oxide anion in BaTiO3. Here we present a series of 30 new complex hydride perovskite-type materials, based on the non-spherical tetrahydroborate anion BH4(-) and new synthesis protocols involving rare-earth elements. Photophysical, electronic and hydrogen storage properties are discussed, along with counterintuitive trends in structural behaviour. The electronic structure is investigated theoretically with density functional theory solid-state calculations. BH4-specific anion dynamics are introduced to perovskites, mediating mechanisms that freeze lattice instabilities and generate supercells of up to 16 × the unit cell volume in AB(BH4)3. In this view, homopolar hydridic di-hydrogen contacts arise as a potential tool with which to tailor crystal symmetries, thus merging concepts of molecular chemistry with ceramic-like host lattices. Furthermore, anion mixing BH4(-)?X(-) (X(-)=Cl(-), Br(-), I(-)) provides a link to the known ABX3 halides. PMID:25490884

  18. Investigation of long term stability in metal hydrides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marmaro, Roger W.; Lynch, Franklin E.; Chandra, Dhanesh; Lambert, Steve; Sharma, Archana

    1991-01-01

    It is apparent from the literature and the results of this study that cyclic degradation of AB(5) type metal hydrides varies widely according to the details of how the specimens are cycled. The Rapid Cycle Apparatus (RCA) used produced less degradation in 5000 to 10000 cycles than earlier work with a Slow Cycle Apparatus (SCA) produced in 1500 cycles. Evidence is presented that the 453 K (356 F) Thermal Aging (TA) time spent in the saturated condition causes hydride degradation. But increasing the cooling (saturation) period in the RCA did not greatly increase the rate of degradation. It appears that TA type degradation is secondary at low temperatures to another degradation mechanism. If rapid cycles are less damaging than slow cycles when the saturation time is equal, the rate of hydriding/dehydriding may be an important factor. The peak temperatures in the RCA were about 30 C lower than the SCA. The difference in peak cycle temperatures (125 C in the SCA, 95 C in RCA) cannot explain the differences in degradation. TA type degradation is similar to cyclic degradation in that nickel peaks and line broadening are observed in X ray diffraction patterns after either form of degradation.

  19. Diffusional exchange of isotopes in a metal hydride sphere.

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfer, Wilhelm G.; Hamilton, John C.; James, Scott Carlton

    2011-04-01

    This report describes the Spherical Particle Exchange Model (SPEM), which simulates exchange of one hydrogen isotope by another hydrogen isotope in a spherical metal hydride particle. This is one of the fundamental physical processes during isotope exchange in a bed of spherical metal particles and is thus one of the key components in any comprehensive physics-based model of exchange. There are two important physical processes in the model. One is the entropy of mixing between the two isotopes; the entropy of mixing is increased by having both isotopes randomly placed at interstitial sites on the lattice and thus impedes the exchange process. The other physical process is the elastic interaction between isotope atoms on the lattice. The elastic interaction is the cause for {beta}-phase formation and is independent of the isotope species. In this report the coupled diffusion equations for two isotopes in the {beta}-phase hydride are solved. A key concept is that the diffusion of one isotope depends not only on its concentration gradient, but also on the concentration gradient of the other isotope. Diffusion rate constants and the chemical potentials for deuterium and hydrogen in the {beta}-phase hydride are reviewed because these quantities are essential for an accurate model of the diffusion process. Finally, a summary of some of the predictions from the SPEM model are provided.

  20. Pressure-driven formation and stabilization of superconductive chromium hydrides.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shuyin; Jia, Xiaojing; Frapper, Gilles; Li, Duan; Oganov, Artem R; Zeng, Qingfeng; Zhang, Litong

    2015-01-01

    Chromium hydride is a prototype stoichiometric transition metal hydride. The phase diagram of Cr-H system at high pressures remains largely unexplored due to the challenges in dealing with the high activation barriers and complications in handing hydrogen under pressure. We have performed an extensive structural study on Cr-H system at pressure range 0???300?GPa using an unbiased structure prediction method based on evolutionary algorithm. Upon compression, a number of hydrides are predicted to become stable in the excess hydrogen environment and these have compositions of Cr2Hn (n?=?2-4, 6, 8, 16). Cr2H3, CrH2 and Cr2H5 structures are versions of the perfect anti-NiAs-type CrH with ordered tetrahedral interstitial sites filled by H atoms. CrH3 and CrH4 exhibit host-guest structural characteristics. In CrH8, H2 units are also identified. Our study unravels that CrH is a superconductor at atmospheric pressure with an estimated transition temperature (T c) of 10.6?K, and superconductivity in CrH3 is enhanced by the metallic hydrogen sublattice with T c of 37.1?K at 81?GPa, very similar to the extensively studied MgB2. PMID:26626579

  1. The Reactivity Patterns of Low-Coordinate Iron Hydride Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ying; Sadique, Azwana R.; Smith, Jeremy M.; Dugan, Thomas R.; Cowley, Ryan E.; Brennessel, William W.; Flaschenriem, Christine J.; Bill, Eckhard; Cundari, Thomas R.; Holland, Patrick L.

    2008-01-01

    We report a survey of the reactivity of the first isolable iron-hydride complexes with a coordination number less than five. The high-spin iron(II) complexes [(?-diketiminate)Fe(?-H)]2 react rapidly with representative cyanide, isocyanide, alkyne, N2, alkene, diazene, azide, CO2, carbodiimide and Brønsted acid containing substrates. The reaction outcomes fall into three categories: (1) addition of Fe-H across a multiple bond of the substrate, (2) reductive elimination of H2 to form iron(I) products, and (3) protonation of the hydride to form iron(II) products. The products include imide, isocyanide, vinyl, alkyl, azide, triazenido, benzo[c]cinnoline, amidinate, formate, and hydroxo complexes. These results expand the range of known bond transformations at iron complexes. Additionally, they give insight into the elementary transformations that may be possible at the iron-molybdenum cofactor of nitrogenases, which may have hydride ligands on high-spin, low coordinate metal atoms. PMID:18444648

  2. Pressure-driven formation and stabilization of superconductive chromium hydrides

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shuyin; Jia, Xiaojing; Frapper, Gilles; Li, Duan; Oganov, Artem R.; Zeng, Qingfeng; Zhang, Litong

    2015-01-01

    Chromium hydride is a prototype stoichiometric transition metal hydride. The phase diagram of Cr-H system at high pressures remains largely unexplored due to the challenges in dealing with the high activation barriers and complications in handing hydrogen under pressure. We have performed an extensive structural study on Cr-H system at pressure range 0???300?GPa using an unbiased structure prediction method based on evolutionary algorithm. Upon compression, a number of hydrides are predicted to become stable in the excess hydrogen environment and these have compositions of Cr2Hn (n?=?2–4, 6, 8, 16). Cr2H3, CrH2 and Cr2H5 structures are versions of the perfect anti-NiAs-type CrH with ordered tetrahedral interstitial sites filled by H atoms. CrH3 and CrH4 exhibit host-guest structural characteristics. In CrH8, H2 units are also identified. Our study unravels that CrH is a superconductor at atmospheric pressure with an estimated transition temperature (T c) of 10.6?K, and superconductivity in CrH3 is enhanced by the metallic hydrogen sublattice with T c of 37.1?K at 81?GPa, very similar to the extensively studied MgB2. PMID:26626579

  3. Measurement and modeling of strain fields in zirconium hydrides precipitated at a stress concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Gregory B.; Kerr, Matthew; Daymond, Mark R.

    2012-10-23

    Hydrogen adsorption into zirconium, as a result of corrosion in aqueous environments, leads to the precipitation of a secondary brittle hydride phase. These hydrides tend to first form at stress concentrations such as fretting flaws or cracks in engineering components, potentially degrading the structural integrity of the component. One mechanism for component failure is a slow crack growth mechanism known as Delayed Hydride Cracking (DHC), where hydride fracture occurs followed by crack arrest in the ductile zirconium matrix. The current work employs both an experimental and a modeling approach to better characterize the effects and behavior of hydride precipitation at such stress concentrations. Strains around stress concentrations containing hydrides were mapped using High Energy X-ray Diffraction (HEXRD). These studies highlighted important differences in the behavior of the hydride phase and the surrounding zirconium matrix, as well as the strain associated with the precipitation of the hydride. A finite element model was also developed and compared to the X-ray strain mapping results. This model provided greater insight into details that could not be obtained directly from the experimental approaches, as well as providing a framework for future modeling to predict the effects of hydride precipitation under varied conditions.

  4. Uranium metal reactions with hydrogen and water vapour and the reactivity of the uranium hydride produced

    SciTech Connect

    Godfrey, H.; Broan, C.; Goddard, D.; Hodge, N.; Woodhouse, G.; Diggle, A.; Orr, R.

    2013-07-01

    Within the nuclear industry, metallic uranium has been used as a fuel. If this metal is stored in a hydrogen rich environment then the uranium metal can react with the hydrogen to form uranium hydride which can be pyrophoric when exposed to air. The UK National Nuclear Laboratory has been carrying out a programme of research for Sellafield Limited to investigate the conditions required for the formation and persistence of uranium hydride and the reactivity of the material formed. The experimental results presented here have described new results characterising uranium hydride formed from bulk uranium at 50 and 160 C. degrees and measurements of the hydrolysis kinetics of these materials in liquid water. It has been shown that there is an increase in the proportion of alpha-uranium hydride in material formed at lower temperatures and that there is an increase in the rate of reaction with water of uranium hydride formed at lower temperatures. This may at least in part be attributable to a difference in the reaction rate between alpha and beta-uranium hydride. A striking observation is the strong dependence of the hydrolysis reaction rate on the temperature of preparation of the uranium hydride. For example, the reaction rate of uranium hydride prepared at 50 C. degrees was over ten times higher than that prepared at 160 C. degrees at 20% extent of reaction. The decrease in reaction rate with the extent of reaction also depended on the temperature of uranium hydride preparation.

  5. Excimer laser deinsulation of Parylene-C on iridium for use in an activated iridium oxide film-coated Utah electrode array

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Je-Min; Negi, Sandeep; Tathireddy, Prashant; Solzbacher, Florian; Song, Jong-In; Rieth, Loren W.

    2013-01-01

    Implantable microelectrodes provide a measure to electrically stimulate neurons in the brain and spinal cord and record their electrophysiological activity. A material with a high charge capacity such as activated or sputter-deposited iridium oxide film (AIROF or SIROF) is used as an interface. The Utah electrode array (UEA) uses SIROF for its interface material with neural tissue and oxygen plasma etching (OPE) with an aluminium foil mask to expose the active area, where the interface between the electrode and neural tissue is formed. However, deinsulation of Parylene-C using OPE has limitations, including the lack of uniformity in the exposed area and reproducibility. While the deinsulation of Parylene-C using an excimer laser is proven to be an alternative for overcoming the limitations, the iridium oxide (IrOx) suffers from fracture when high laser fluence (>1000 mJ/cm2) is used. Iridium (Ir), which has a much higher fracture resistance than IrOx, can be deposited before excimer laser deinsulation and then the exposed Ir film area can be activated by electrochemical treatment to acquire the AIROF. Characterisation of the laser-ablated Ir film and AIROF by surface analysis (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope, and atomic force microscope) and electrochemical analysis (electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and cyclic voltammetry) shows that the damage on the Ir film induced by laser irradiation is significantly less than that on SIROF, and the AIROF has a high charge storage capacity. The results show the potential of the laser deinsulation technique for use in high performance AIROF-coated UEA fabrication. PMID:23458659

  6. Excimer laser deinsulation of Parylene-C on iridium for use in an activated iridium oxide film-coated Utah electrode array.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Je-Min; Negi, Sandeep; Tathireddy, Prashant; Solzbacher, Florian; Song, Jong-In; Rieth, Loren W

    2013-04-30

    Implantable microelectrodes provide a measure to electrically stimulate neurons in the brain and spinal cord and record their electrophysiological activity. A material with a high charge capacity such as activated or sputter-deposited iridium oxide film (AIROF or SIROF) is used as an interface. The Utah electrode array (UEA) uses SIROF for its interface material with neural tissue and oxygen plasma etching (OPE) with an aluminium foil mask to expose the active area, where the interface between the electrode and neural tissue is formed. However, deinsulation of Parylene-C using OPE has limitations, including the lack of uniformity in the exposed area and reproducibility. While the deinsulation of Parylene-C using an excimer laser is proven to be an alternative for overcoming the limitations, the iridium oxide (IrOx) suffers from fracture when high laser fluence (>1000 mJ/cm2) is used. Iridium (Ir), which has a much higher fracture resistance than IrOx, can be deposited before excimer laser deinsulation and then the exposed Ir film area can be activated by electrochemical treatment to acquire the AIROF. Characterisation of the laser-ablated Ir film and AIROF by surface analysis (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope, and atomic force microscope) and electrochemical analysis (electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and cyclic voltammetry) shows that the damage on the Ir film induced by laser irradiation is significantly less than that on SIROF, and the AIROF has a high charge storage capacity. The results show the potential of the laser deinsulation technique for use in high performance AIROF-coated UEA fabrication. PMID:23458659

  7. Anodically Electrodeposited Iridium Oxide Films (AEIROF) from Alkaline Solutions for Electrochromic Display Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, Kazusuke

    1989-04-01

    Anodically electrodeposited iridium oxide films from alkaline solutions were investigated for application to electrochromic devices. Micro-crystalline (diameter: 15Å) films obtained by the electrolysis of aqueous alkaline solutions containing iridium chloride, oxalic acid and potassium carbonate showed good electrochromic reaction reversibility. The coloration efficiency of the films was about one third that of typical evaporated tungsten oxide films, and the response rate measured by the amount of injected charge was about double. The cycle lives of the cells, composed of electrodeposited films, 1M H3PO4-NaOH (pH{=}3˜ 5), and an activated carbon cloth, were more than 8× 106 with a 0.6 V, 1 Hz continuous square wave.

  8. Oxidation of iridium coating on rhenium coated graphite at elevated temperature in stagnated air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yongle; Bai, Shuxin; Zhang, Hong; Ye, Yicong

    2015-02-01

    Continuous and dense iridium coatings were prepared on the rhenium coated graphite specimens by electrodeposition. The iridium/rhenium coated graphite (Ir/Re/C) specimens were oxidized at elevated temperatures in stagnated air for 3600 s. The purification of the as-prepared Ir coating was higher than about 99.98% with the main impurity elements Si, Al, Fe and Ru. After oxidation, the Ir/Re/C specimens kept integrity without significant failures and the average oxidation rate was about 0.219 mg/(cm2 min). Pores were found at the grain boundaries and concentrated to penetrating holes with the growth of Ir grains, which resulted in disastrous failures of the Ir coating.

  9. Strongly improved electrochemical cycling durability by adding iridium to electrochromic nickel oxide films.

    PubMed

    Wen, Rui-Tao; Niklasson, Gunnar A; Granqvist, Claes G

    2015-05-13

    Anodically colored nickel oxide (NiO) thin films are of much interest as counter electrodes in tungsten oxide based electrochromic devices such as "smart windows" for energy-efficient buildings. However, NiO films are prone to suffering severe charge density degradation upon prolonged electrochemical cycling, which can lead to insufficient device lifetime. Therefore, a means to improve the durability of NiO-based films is an important challenge at present. Here we report that the incorporation of a modest amount of iridium into NiO films [Ir/(Ir + Ni) = 7.6 atom %] leads to remarkable durability, exceeding 10000 cycles in a lithium-conducting electrolyte, along with significantly improved optical modulation during extended cycling. Structure characterization showed that the face-centered-cubic-type NiO structure remained after iridium addition. Moreover, the crystallinity of these films was enhanced upon electrochemical cycling. PMID:25919917

  10. The treatment of malignant diseases in Romania using stainless steel encapsulated iridium-192 sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanef, I.; Matache, G.; Cioc?ltei, V.; Gheorghiev, G.

    1994-01-01

    Iridium-192 sources supplied by the Institute for Nuclear Physics and Engineering have been used in Romanian radiotherapy clinics since 1980. The source assembly is sealed in a protective stainless steel sheath which satisfies the requirements of international standards. Since this sheath acts as a filter to change the characteristic spectrum it has been necessary to determine experimentally an accurate value of the specific gamma-ray constant. Some clinical aspects of the complex treatment of carcinomas with iridium-192 are reviewed. Results of the calculation of the dose distribution around single and multiple sources are given for different applications in the treatment of carcinomas of the vaginal and uterine cervix, oral cavity, rectum and vagina.

  11. First Applications of DoD Iridium RUDICS in the NSF Polar Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentic, T.; Stehle, R.

    2008-12-01

    We will present the first deployment and application of the new Iridium RUDICS service to remote instrumentation projects within the National Science Foundation's polar programs. The rise of automated observing networks has increased the demand for real-time connectivity to remote instruments, not only for immediate access to data, but to also interrogate health and status. Communicating with field sites in the polar regions is complicated by the remoteness from existing infrastructure, low temperatures and limited connection options. Sites located above 78° latitude are not able to see geostationary satellites, leaving the Iridium constellation as the only one that provide a direct connection. Some others, such as Orbcomm, only provide a store-and-forward service. Iridium is often used as a dial up modem to establish a PPP connection to the Internet with data files transferred via FTP. On low-bandwidth, high-latency networks like Iridium (2400bps with ping times of seconds), this approach is time consuming and inefficient. The dial up time alone takes upwards of a minute, and standard TCP/IP and FTP protocols are hampered by the long latencies. Minimizing transmission time is important for reducing battery usage and connection costs. The new Iridium RUDICS service can be used for more efficient transfers. RUDICS is an acronym for "Router-based Unstructured Digital Inter-working Connectivity Solution" and provides a direct connection between an instrument in the field and a server on the Internet. After dialing into the Iridium gateway, a socket connection is opened to a registered port on a user's server. Bytes sent to or from the modem appear at the server's socket. The connection time is reduced to about 10 seconds because the modem training and PPP negotiation stages are eliminated. The remote device does not need to have a full TCP/IP stack, allowing smaller instruments such as data loggers to directly handle the data transmission. Alternative protocols can be deployed that better exploit the characteristics of the Iridium channel. In addition, the setup naturally scales to handle hundreds of remote devices, an important aspect for larger sensor networks. As part of the NSF's Arctic Research Support and Logistics Services, we have deployed RUDICS systems with three different research projects. These are the first NSF RUDICS deployments for projects using the Department of Defense Iridium gateway, which allows for unlimited connection time at a flat monthly rate for US government users. The first project is O-Buoy, an IPY-OASIS project for self-contained, autonomous observations of atmospheric chemical species in the polar marine boundary layer. The second project is collection of low-power instrument towers on Alaska's North Slope at Imnavait Creek, part of the Arctic Observation Network (AON). Lastly, the autonomous instrument platform at Ivotuk, Alaska, uses RUDICS to provide telemetry about the renewable energy systems. A set of real-time web displays allow researchers for each project to monitor their remote sites and access real-time data.

  12. Surface studies of iridium-alloy grain boundaries associated with weld cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Mosley, W.C.

    1982-01-01

    Plutonium-238 oxide fuel pellets for the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) Radioisotopic Thermoelectric Generators to be used on the NASA Galileo Mission to Jupiter and the International Solar Polar Mission are produced and encapsulated in iridium alloy at the Savannah River Plant (SRP). Underbead cracks occasionally occur in the girth weld on the iridium-alloy-clad vent sets in the region where the gas tungsten arc is quenched. Grain-boundary structures and compositions were characterized by scanning electron microscopy/x-ray energy spectroscopy, electron microprobe analysis and scanning Auger microprobe analysis to determine the cause of weld quench area cracking. Results suggest that weld quench area cracking may be caused by gas porosity or liquation in the grain boundaries.

  13. Merger of visible light induced oxidation and enantioselective alkylation with a chiral iridium catalyst.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chuanyong; Zheng, Yu; Huo, Haohua; Röse, Philipp; Zhang, Lilu; Harms, Klaus; Hilt, Gerhard; Meggers, Eric

    2015-05-11

    A single chiral octahedral iridium(III) complex is used for visible light activated asymmetric photoredox catalysis. In the presence of a conventional household lamp and under an atmosphere of air, the oxidative coupling of 2-acyl-1-phenylimidazoles with N,N-diaryl-N-(trimethylsilyl)methylamines provides aminoalkylated products in 61-93?% yields with high enantiomeric excess (90-98?% ee). Notably, the iridium center simultaneously serves three distinct functions: as the exclusive source of chirality, as the catalytically active Lewis acid, and as a central part of the photoredox sensitizer. This conceptionally simple reaction Scheme may provide new avenues for the green synthesis of non-racemic chiral molecules. PMID:25832794

  14. Determination of the amount of physical adsorption of water vapour on platinum-iridium surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizushima, S.; Ueda, K.; Ooiwa, A.; Fujii, K.

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents the measurement of the physical adsorption of water vapour on platinum-iridium surfaces using a vacuum mass comparator. This value is of importance for redefining the kilogram, which will be realized under vacuum in the near future. Mirror-polished artefacts, consisting of a reference artefact and a test artefact, were manufactured for this experiment. The surface area difference between the reference and test artefacts was 226.2?cm2. This surface area difference was approximately 3.2 times the geometric surface area of the prototype of the kilogram made of platinum-iridium (71.7?cm2). The measurement results indicate that the amount of physical adsorption at a relative humidity of 50% is 0.0129??g?cm{{-}2} , with a standard uncertainty of 0.0016??g?cm{{-}2} . This value is 0.03 to 0.16 times that observed in other studies.

  15. DEFORMATION MODELING OF IRIDIUM DOP-26 ALLOY TO DETERMINE POTENTIAL FOR SECONDARY RECRYSTALLIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Ohriner, Evan Keith; Sabau, Adrian S; Ulrich, George B; George, Easo P

    2008-01-01

    The DOP-26 iridium alloy (Ir-0.3%W-0.006%Th-0.005% Al) contains a distribution of thorium-containing intermetallic particles, typically less than 1 micrometer in size, which serve to pin grain boundaries. The alloy is thus subject to secondary recrystallization during long-term exposure at elevated temperature if prior plastic strains are within a critical range. A finite element method was used to model the deformation and resulting local plastic strains introduced by sizing operations on recrystallized iridium alloy cups. The results of the analysis show that local strains introduced by the deformation of cups are in all cases maintained below 0.025, the lower critical level for secondary recrystallization at 1600 K. The effects of die clearance and applied load on local plastic strain values were also treated.

  16. Iridium-bearing sublimates at a hot-spot volcano (Piton de la Fournaise, Indian Ocean)

    SciTech Connect

    Toutain, J.P. ); Meyer, G.

    1989-12-01

    Sublimates and incrustations derived upon the cooling of volcanic gases have been collected on various sites (Piton de la Fournaise, Poas, Momotombo, Etna, Ardoukoba and Erta-Ale). They have been analyzed for Ir and other volatile elements (Se, As, Cu, Au, Ag, Pb, Tl) by means of instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and proton induced X-Ray emission (PIXE). Among the investigated volcanoes, only Piton de la Fournaise is found to release detectable amounts of iridium. Ir in Piton de la Fournaise sublimates is associated with F-minerals. This confirms its gaseous transport as a volatile fluoride compound. Iridium seems to be preferentialy released by hot-spot type volcanoes, and its detection in Piton de la Fournaise sublimates provides a positive argument in favor of a volcanic hypothesis to explain the KTB events.

  17. Observation of electrochromism in solid-state anodic iridium oxide film cells using fluoride electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, C. E.; Bridenbaugh, P. M.

    1981-01-01

    Thin film cells of composition SnO2/AIROF/fluoride/Au have been constructed, where AIROF is anodic iridium oxide film and fluoride is PbF2 on PbSnF4. These devices exhibit reversible electrocoloration and bleaching, with response times as low as 0.1 sec. The behavior of these cells is consistent with the anion insertion mechanism for AIROF electrochromism.

  18. Transformation of a Cp*-iridium(III) precatalyst for water oxidation when exposed to oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Zuccaccia, Cristiano; Bellachioma, Gianfranco; Bortolini, Olga; Bucci, Alberto; Savini, Arianna; Macchioni, Alceo

    2014-03-17

    The reaction of [Cp*Ir(bzpy)NO3 ] (1; bzpy=2-benzoylpyridine, Cp*=pentamethylcyclopentadienyl anion), a competent water-oxidation catalyst, with several oxidants (H2 O2 , NaIO4 , cerium ammonium nitrate (CAN)) was studied to intercept and characterize possible intermediates of the oxidative transformation. NMR spectroscopy and ESI-MS techniques provided evidence for the formation of many species that all had the intact Ir-bzpy moiety and a gradually more oxidized Cp* ligand. Initially, an oxygen atom is trapped in between two carbon atoms of Cp* and iridium, which gives an oxygen-Ir coordinated epoxide, whereas the remaining three carbon atoms of Cp* are involved in a ?(3) interaction with iridium (2?a). Formal addition of H2 O to 2?a or H2 O2 to 1 leads to 2?b, in which a double MeCOH functionalization of Cp* is present with one MeCOH engaged in an interaction with iridium. The structure of 2?b was unambiguously determined in the solid state and in solution by X-ray single-crystal diffractometry and advanced NMR spectroscopic techniques, respectively. Further oxidation led to the opening of Cp* and transformation of the diol into a diketone with one carbonyl coordinated at the metal (2?c). A ?(3) interaction between the three non-oxygenated carbons of "ex-Cp*" and iridium is also present in both 2?b and 2?c. Isolated 2?b and mixtures of 2?a-c species were tested in water-oxidation catalysis by using CAN as sacrificial oxidant. They showed substantially the same activity than 1 (turnover frequency values ranged from 9 to 14?min(-1) ). PMID:24523138

  19. Highly efficient deep-blue phosphorescence from heptafluoropropyl-substituted iridium complexes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-Bum; Han, Seung-Hoon; Yang, Kiyull; Kwon, Soon-Ki; Kim, Jang-Joo; Kim, Yun-Hi

    2015-01-01

    New deep-blue iridium complexes, consisting of a heptafluoropropyl (HFP) substituent at the 3' position of 2',4''-difluorophenyl, have a deep HOMO level and decreased shoulder electronic transition and inhibit self-quenching due to the sterically hindered group without conjugation. An OLED using (HFP)2Ir(mpic) exhibited a maximum EQE of 21.4% with a CIE of (0.146, 0.165). PMID:25407660

  20. A Site-Isolated Iridium Diethylene Complex Supported on Highly Dealuminated Y Zeolite: Synthesis and Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Uzun,A.; Bhirud, V.; Kletnieks, P.; Haw, J.; Gates, B.

    2007-01-01

    Highly dealuminated Y zeolite-supported mononuclear iridium complexes with reactive ethylene ligands were synthesized by chemisorption of Ir(C2H4)2(C5H7O2). The resultant structure and its treatment in He, CO, ethylene, and H2 were investigated with infrared (IR) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopies. The IR spectra show that Ir(C2H4)2(C5H7O2) reacted readily with surface OH groups of the zeolite, leading to the removal of C5H7O2 ligands and the formation of supported mononuclear iridium complexes, confirmed by the lack of Ir-Ir contributions in the EXAFS spectra. The EXAFS data show that each Ir atom was bonded to four carbon atoms at an average distance of 2.10 Angstroms, consistent with the presence of two ethylene ligands per Ir atom and in agreement with the IR spectra indicating p-bonded ethylene ligands. The EXAFS data also indicate that each Ir atom was bonded to two oxygen atoms of the zeolite at a distance of 2.15 Angstroms . The supported iridium-ethylene complex reacted with H2 to give ethane, and it also catalyzed ethylene hydrogenation at atmospheric pressure and 294 K. Treatment of the sample in CO led to the formation of Ir(CO)2 complexes bonded to the zeolite. The sharpness of the ?CO bands indicates a high degree of uniformity of these complexes on the support. The iridium-ethylene complex on the crystalline zeolite support is inferred to be one of the most nearly uniform supported metal complex catalysts. The results indicate that it is isostructural with a previously reported rhodium complex on the same zeolite; thus, the results are a start to a family of analogous, structurally well-defined supported metal complex catalysts.

  1. Branch-Selective Alkene Hydroarylation by Cooperative Destabilization: Iridium-Catalyzed ortho-Alkylation of Acetanilides

    PubMed Central

    Crisenza, Giacomo E M; Sokolova, Olga O; Bower, John F

    2015-01-01

    An iridium(I) catalyst system, modified with the wide-bite-angle and electron-deficient bisphosphine dFppb (1,4-bis(di(pentafluorophenyl)phosphino)butane) promotes highly branch-selective hydroarylation reactions between diverse acetanilides and aryl- or alkyl-substituted alkenes. This provides direct and ortho-selective access to synthetically challenging anilines, and addresses long-standing issues associated with related Friedel–Crafts alkylations. PMID:26490739

  2. An iridium abundance anomaly at the palynological Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary in northern New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Orth, C.J.; Gilmore, J.S.; Knight, J.D.; Pillmore, C.L.; Tschudy, R.H.; Fassett, J.E.

    1981-01-01

    An iridium abundance anomaly, with concentrations up to 5000 parts per trillion over a background level of 4 to 20 parts per trillion, has been located in sedimentary rocks laid down under freshwater swamp conditions in the Raton Basin of northeastern New Mexico. The anomaly occurs at the base of a coal bed, at the same stratigraphic position at which several well-known species of Cretaceous-age pollen became extinct. Copyright ?? 1981 AAAS.

  3. NIR-emissive iridium(iii) corrole complexes as efficient singlet oxygen sensitizers.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Woormileela; Ravotto, Luca; Ceroni, Paola; Kar, Sanjib

    2015-10-28

    Three new iridium(iii) corrole complexes, having symmetrically and asymmetrically substituted corrole frameworks and judiciously varied axial ligands are prepared and characterized by various spectroscopic techniques including the X-ray structures of two of them. The observed phosphorescence at ambient temperature appears at much longer wavelengths than the previously reported Ir(iii) porphyrin/corrole derivatives. Efficiencies of these compounds in the generation of singlet oxygen are also studied for the first time. PMID:26400747

  4. Combining Electronic Structure Methods with the Calculation of Hydrogen Vibrational Wavefunctions: Application to Hydride Transfer in Liver Alcohol Dehydrogenase

    E-print Network

    Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    : Application to Hydride Transfer in Liver Alcohol Dehydrogenase Simon P. Webb, Pratul K. Agarwal, and Sharon of benzyl alcohol catalyzed by liver alcohol dehydrogenase (LADH). The hydride transfer from the benzyl

  5. Electron transfer dynamics of iridium oxide nanoparticles attached to electrodes by self-assembled monolayers.

    PubMed

    Gambardella, Alessa A; Feldberg, Stephen W; Murray, Royce W

    2012-04-01

    Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of carboxylated alkanethiolates (-S(CH(2))(n-1)CO(2)(-)) on flat gold electrode surfaces are used to tether small (ca. 2 nm d.) iridium(IV) oxide nanoparticles (Ir(IV)O(X) NPs) to the electrode. Peak potential separations in cyclic voltammetry (CV) of the nanoparticle Ir(IV/III) wave, in pH 13 aqueous base, increase with n, showing that the Ir(IV/III) apparent electron transfer kinetics of metal oxide sites in the nanoparticles respond to the imposed SAM electron transfer tunneling barrier. Estimated apparent electron transfer rate constants (k(app)(0)) for n = 12 and 16 are 9.8 and 0.12 s(-1). Owing to uncompensated solution resistance, k(app)(0) for n = 8 was too large to measure in the potential sweep experiment. For the cathodic scans, coulometric charges under the Ir(IV/III) voltammetric waves were independent of potential scan rate, suggesting participation of all of the iridium oxide redox sites (ca. 130 per NP) in the NPs. These experiments show that it is possible to control and study electron transfer dynamics of electroactive nanoparticles including, as shown by preliminary experiments, that of the electrocatalysis of water oxidation by iridium oxide nanoparticles. PMID:22435773

  6. Ultrasonic detection of laminar-type defects in iridium alloy blanks

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, K.V.; Cunningham, R.A. Jr.; Simpson, W.A. Jr.; McClung, R.W.

    1986-07-01

    Encapsulated isotopic heat sources for use in generating electrical power for space applications require flight-quality hardware material. Iridium is the chosen material for such applications, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been the prime supplier of iridium alloy forming blanks 52 mm in diameter by 0.66 mm thick (1.0 by 0.026 in.). Prior to the work reported here, these blanks were ultrasonically examined by using 0.9-mm-diam (0.035-in.) simulated flaw standards. However, as a result of this effort, the sensitivity of our ultrasonic pulse-echo test system has been increased. The improved ultrasonic test system permits blank inspection at the 0.5-mm-diam (0.020-in.) simulated flaw detection level. This test system was successfully demonstrated on the initial blanks provided via an improved processing route (consumable arc-melting, extruding, and rolling). The equipment modification and/or selection and the specific focused search unit immersion technique developed to provide this capability are described. The improved flaw detection capability also provides data maps of a common type of defect in iridium (delaminations).

  7. IRIDIUM—a program to model reaction of silicate liquid infiltrating a porous solid assemblage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudreau, Alan E.

    2003-05-01

    The migration of silicate liquid through porous rock can give rise to compositional changes in both the liquid and the host solid assemblage that are important in a number of fields of igneous petrology. Ongoing studies in numerical models of crystallization and compaction behavior in layered intrusions by our group have lead to a need to incorporate more realistic silicate crystallization behavior. The computer program IRIDIUM incorporates liquid-mineral equilibria with one-dimensional transport equations for modeling magmatic infiltration-reaction (IR) phenomenon. The program allows calculation of mineral precipitation/dissolution and chromatographic fronts as silicate liquid percolates through a porous solid matrix. The liquid-mineral equilibria part of the IRIDIUM program is based on the free energy minimization algorithm used in the MELTS software algorithm of Ghiorso and coworkers and includes trace element modeling. The IRIDIUM program incorporates both general and compaction-driven thermal and mass transport equations. A simple example involving infiltration metasomatism in olivine cumulates in the Muskox intrusion shows some of the capabilities of the program.

  8. Neutron activation determination of iridium, gold, platinum, and silver in geologic samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Millard, H.T., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Low-level methods for the determination of iridium and other noble metals have become increasingly important in recent years due to interest in locating abundance anomalies associated with the Cretaceous and Tertiary (K-T) boundary. Typical iridium anomalies are in the range of 1 to 100 ??g/kg (ppb). Thus methods with detection limits near 0.1 ??g/kg should be adequate to detect K-T boundary anomalies. Radiochemical neutron activation analysis methods continue to be required although instrumental neutron activation analysis techniques employing elaborate gamma-counters are under development. In the procedure developed in this study samples irradiated in the epithermal neutron facility of the U. S. Geological Survey TRIGA Reactor (Denver, Colorado) are treated with a mini-fire assay technique. The iridium, gold, and silver are collected in a 1-gram metallic lead button. Primary contaminants at this stage are arsenic and antimony. These can be removed by heating the button with a mixture of sodium perioxide and sodium hydroxide. The resulting 0.2-gram lead bead is counted in a Compton suppression spectrometer. Carrier yields are determined by reirradiation of the lead beads. This procedure has been applied to the U.S.G.S. Standard Rock PCC-1 and samples from K-T boundary sites in the Western Interior of North America. ?? 1987 Akade??miai Kiado??.

  9. Supported Molecular Iridium Catalysts: Resolving Effects of Metal Nuclearity and Supports as Ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Jing; Serna, Pedro; Aydin, Cerem; Browning, Nigel D.; Gates, Bruce C.

    2012-02-07

    The performance of a supported catalyst is influenced by the size and structure of the metal species, the ligands bonded to the metal, and the support. Resolution of these effects has been lacking because of the lack of investigations of catalysts with uniform and systematically varied catalytic sites. We now demonstrate that the performance for ethene hydrogenation of isostructural iridium species on supports with contrasting properties as ligands (electron-donating MgO and electron-withdrawing HY zeolite) can be elucidated on the basis of molecular concepts. Spectra of the working catalysts show that the catalytic reaction rate is determined by the dissociation of H{sub 2} when the iridium, either as mono- or tetra-nuclear species, is supported on MgO and is not when the support is the zeolite. The neighboring iridium sites in clusters are crucial for activation of both H{sub 2} and C{sub 2}H{sub 4} when the support is MgO but not when it is the zeolite, because the electron-withdrawing properties of the zeolite support enable even single site-isolated Ir atoms to bond to both C{sub 2}H{sub 4} and H{sub 2} and facilitate the catalysis.

  10. Half-Sandwich Iridium Complexes for Homogeneous Water-Oxidation Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Blakemore, James D.; Schley, Nathan D.; Balcells, D.; Hull, Jonathan F.; Olack, G.; Incarvito, Christopher D.; Eisenstein, O.; Brudvig, Gary W.; Crabtree, Robert H.

    2010-10-21

    Iridium half-sandwich complexes of the types Cp*Ir(N-C)X, [Cp*Ir(N-N)X]X, and [CpIr(N-N)X]X are catalyst precursors for the homogeneous oxidation of water to dioxygen. Kinetic studies with cerium(IV) ammonium nitrate as primary oxidant show that oxygen evolution is rapid and continues over many hours. In addition, [Cp*Ir(H2O)3]SO4 and [(Cp*Ir)2(?-OH)3]OH can show even higher turnover frequencies (up to 20 min-1 at pH 0.89). Aqueous electrochemical studies on the cationic complexes having chelate ligands show catalytic oxidation at pH > 7; conversely, at low pH, there are no oxidation waves up to 1.5 V vs NHE for the complexes. H218O isotope incorporation studies demonstrate that water is the source of oxygen atoms during cerium(IV)-driven catalysis. DFT calculations and kinetic experiments, including kinetic-isotope-effect studies, suggest a mechanism for homogeneous iridium-catalyzed water oxidation and contribute to the determination of the rate-determining step. The kinetic experiments also help distinguish the active homogeneous catalyst from heterogeneous nanoparticulate iridium dioxide.

  11. Consumable arc-melting, extruding, and rolling process for iridium sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Heestand, R.L.; Copeland, G.L.; Martin, M.M.

    1986-06-01

    An iridium alloy has been used as cladding for the /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ fuel in radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) for recent interplanetary spacecraft such as Voyagers 1 and 2 and will be used for the Galileo and Ulysses spacecraft. The iridium alloy sheet for the fuel cladding used on these missions was fabricated by hot and cold rolling of arc-melted and drop-cast 0.5-kg ingots. Upon completion of production for these spacecraft, an opportunity was taken to conduct process improvement studies that would increase processing batch sizes, develop a more uniform product, decrease rejections due to internal delaminations and surface defects, and reduce costs. The studies to scale up and improve the fabrication process are described. In the new process, iridium is electron beam melted, alloyed by arc melting, and then consumable arc melted to form a cylindrical ingot of approximately 7 kg for extrusion. The ingot is extruded to sheet bar and hot and cold rooled into sheet. Sheet evaluated from the first two ingots showed 100% acceptance with no defects on inspection. An improved uniformity of microstructure was obtained, and chemistry was controlled within specification limits.

  12. Combined on-board hydride slurry storage and reactor system and process for hydrogen-powered vehicles and devices

    DOEpatents

    Brooks, Kriston P; Holladay, Jamelyn D; Simmons, Kevin L; Herling, Darrell R

    2014-11-18

    An on-board hydride storage system and process are described. The system includes a slurry storage system that includes a slurry reactor and a variable concentration slurry. In one preferred configuration, the storage system stores a slurry containing a hydride storage material in a carrier fluid at a first concentration of hydride solids. The slurry reactor receives the slurry containing a second concentration of the hydride storage material and releases hydrogen as a fuel to hydrogen-power devices and vehicles.

  13. Grain Growth Behavior, Tensile Impact Ductility, and Weldability of Cerium-Doped Iridium Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    McKamey, C.G.

    2002-05-28

    An iridium alloy doped with small amounts of cerium and thorium is being developed as a potential replacement for the iridium-based DOP-26 alloy (doped with thorium only) that is currently used by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for cladding and post-impact containment of the radioactive fuel in radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) heat sources which provide electric power for interplanetary spacecraft. This report summarizes results of studies conducted to date under the Iridium Alloy Characterization and Development subtask of the Radioisotope Power System Materials Production and Technology Program to characterize the properties of the iridium-based alloy (designated as DOP-40) containing both cerium and thorium. Included within this report are data on grain growth of sheet material in vacuum and low-pressure oxygen environments, grain growth in vacuum of the clad vent set cup material, weldability, and the effect of grain size and test temperature on tensile properties. Where applicable, data for the DOP-26 alloy are included for comparison. Both grain size and grain-boundary cohesion affect the ductility of iridium alloys. In this study it was found that cerium and thorium, when added together, refine grain size more effectively than when thorium is added by itself (especially at high temperatures). In addition, the effect of cerium additions on grain-boundary cohesion is similar to that of thorium. Mechanical testing at both low ({approx} 10{sup -3}s{sup -1}) and high ({approx} 10{sup -3}s{sup -1}) strain rates showed that the Ce/Th-doped alloys have tensile ductilities that are as good or better than the DOP-26 alloy. The general conclusion from these studies is that cerium can be used to replace some of the radioactive thorium currently used in DOP-26 while maintaining or improving its metallurgical properties. The current DOP-26 alloy meets all requirements for cladding the radioactive fuel in the RTG heat source, but the new DOP-40 alloy could serve as a back-up alloy to be used if the costs of refining, handling, and transporting DOP-26 become prohibitively high.

  14. Inverse Sodium Hydride: A Theoretical Study Agnieszka Sawicka,, Piotr Skurski,, and Jack Simons*,

    E-print Network

    Simons, Jack

    Inverse Sodium Hydride: A Theoretical Study Agnieszka Sawicka,, Piotr Skurski,, and Jack Simons is the analogue of what the earlier workers termed "inverse sodium hydride", might be stable with respect and characterization of an interesting crystalline salt in which sodium appears as the Na- alkalide anion

  15. Hydrogen storage material and process using graphite additive with metal-doped complex hydrides

    DOEpatents

    Zidan, Ragaiy (Aiken, SC); Ritter, James A. (Lexington, SC); Ebner, Armin D. (Lexington, SC); Wang, Jun (Columbia, SC); Holland, Charles E. (Cayce, SC)

    2008-06-10

    A hydrogen storage material having improved hydrogen absorbtion and desorption kinetics is provided by adding graphite to a complex hydride such as a metal-doped alanate, i.e., NaAlH.sub.4. The incorporation of graphite into the complex hydride significantly enhances the rate of hydrogen absorbtion and desorption and lowers the desorption temperature needed to release stored hydrogen.

  16. First-row hydrides: Dissociation and ground state energies using quantum Monte Carlo

    E-print Network

    Anderson, James B.

    First-row hydrides: Dissociation and ground state energies using quantum Monte Carlo Arne Lu. The dissociation energies De have been calculated with accuracies of 0.5 kcal mol 1 or better. For all hydrides, the dissociation energies are consistent with experimental values. The fixed-node quantum Monte Carlo method can

  17. Analytical assessment of the thermal behavior of nickel-metal hydride batteries

    E-print Network

    Bahrami, Majid

    Analytical assessment of the thermal behavior of nickel-metal hydride batteries Peyman Taheri-metal hydride (NiMH) batteries to heat generation during their operation. The model is based on integral in batteries with orthotropic thermal conductivities, where the heat generation is due to irreversible

  18. Computational Studies of the Mechanism for Proton and Hydride Transfer in Liver Alcohol Dehydrogenase

    E-print Network

    Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    studies directed at elucidating the mechanism of the oxidation of benzyl alcohol by liver alcoholComputational Studies of the Mechanism for Proton and Hydride Transfer in Liver Alcohol dehydrogenase (LADH). This enzyme reaction involves a hydride transfer from the alcohol substrate

  19. Chemo- and regioselective reductive transposition of allylic alcohol derivatives via iridium or rhodium catalysis.

    PubMed

    Lundgren, Rylan J; Thomas, Bryce N

    2016-01-01

    We report highly chemo- and regioselective reductive transpositions of methyl carbonates to furnish olefin products with complementary regioselectivity to that of established Pd-catalysis. These Rh- and Ir-catalysed transformations proceed under mild conditions and enable selective deoxygenation in the presence of functional groups that are susceptible to reduction by metal hydrides. PMID:26587569

  20. Getting metal-hydrides to do what you want them to

    SciTech Connect

    Gruen, D.M.

    1981-01-01

    With the discovery of AB/sub 5/ compounds, intermetallic hydrides with unusual properties began to be developed (H dissociation pressures of one to several atmospheres, extremely rapid and reversible adsorption/desorption very large amounts of H adsorbed). This paper reviews the factors that must be controlled in order to modify these hydrides to make them useful. The system LaNi/sub 5/ + H/sub 2/ is used as example. Use of AB/sub 5/ hydrides to construct a chemical heat pumps is discussed. Results of a systematic study substituting Al for Ni are reported; the HYCSOS pump is described briefly. Use of hydrides as hydrogen getters (substituted ZrV/sub 2/) is also discussed. Finally, possible developments in intermetallic hydride research in the 1980's and the hydrogen economy are discussed. 10 figures. (DLC)

  1. Synthesis, Characterization, and Nitrogenase-Relevant Reactions of an Iron Sulfide Complex with a Bridging Hydride.

    PubMed

    Arnet, Nicholas A; Dugan, Thomas R; Menges, Fabian S; Mercado, Brandon Q; Brennessel, William W; Bill, Eckhard; Johnson, Mark A; Holland, Patrick L

    2015-10-21

    The FeMoco of nitrogenase is an iron-sulfur cluster with exceptional bond-reducing abilities. ENDOR studies have suggested that E4, the state that binds and reduces N2, contains bridging hydrides as part of the active-site iron-sulfide cluster. However, there are no examples of any isolable iron-sulfide cluster with a hydride, which would test the feasibility of such a species. Here, we describe a diiron sulfide hydride complex that is prepared using a mild method involving C-S cleavage of added thiolate. Its reactions with nitrogenase substrates show that the hydride can act as a base or nucleophile and that reduction can cause the iron atoms to bind N2. These results add experimental support to hydride-based pathways for nitrogenase. PMID:26457740

  2. A new method to study hydriding processes from the inner surfaces of fuel claddings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacedón, J. L.; Díaz, M.; Moya, J. S.; Remartínez, B.; Izquierdo, J.

    2004-04-01

    In this paper, a new method that allows the study of the hydriding process of fuel claddings from the inner surfaces is presented. The hydriding is performed by heating the cladding in an ultra-high vacuum chamber while hydrogen flows inside the tube. The external H 2 partial pressure, the tube electrical resistance and the power dissipated by the reaction are measured throughout the process. These measurements at different hydriding stages are complemented with an optical microscopy analysis of the claddings give insight into the main physical processes. As a consequence a description of the hydriding first stages is provided. The method allows the measurement of the incubation and failure times and the total energy dissipated by the hydriding reaction.

  3. Hydride-phase formation and its influence on fatigue crack propagationbehavior in a Zircaloy-4 alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Garlea, Elena; Choo, H.; Wang, G Y; Liaw, Peter K; Clausen, B; Brown, D. W.; Park, Jae-Sung; Rack, P. D.; Kenik, Edward A

    2010-01-01

    The hydride-phase formation and its influence on the fatigue behavior of a Zircaloy-4 alloy charged with hydrogen gas are investigated. First, the microstructure and fatigue crack propagation rate of the alloy in the as-received condition are studied. Second, the formation and homogeneous distribution of delta zirconium hydride ( -ZrH2) in the bulk, and its effect on the fatigue crack propagation rate are presented. The results show that in the presence of hydrides the zirconium alloy exhibits reduced toughness and enhanced crack growth rates. Finally, the influence of a pre-existing fatigue crack in the specimen and the subsequent hydride formation were investigated. The residual lattice strain profile around the fatigue crack tip was measured using neutron diffraction. The combined effects of residual strains and hydride precipitation on the fatigue behavior are discussed.

  4. A mechanical-force-driven physical vapour deposition approach to fabricating complex hydride nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Pang, Yuepeng; Liu, Yongfeng; Gao, Mingxia; Ouyang, Liuzhang; Liu, Jiangwen; Wang, Hui; Zhu, Min; Pan, Hongge

    2014-01-01

    Nanoscale hydrides desorb and absorb hydrogen at faster rates and lower temperatures than bulk hydrides because of their high surface areas, abundant grain boundaries and short diffusion distances. No current methods exist for the direct fabrication of nanoscale complex hydrides (for example, alanates, borohydrides) with unique morphologies because of their extremely high reducibility, relatively low thermodynamic stability and complicated elemental composition. Here, we demonstrate a mechanical-force-driven physical vapour deposition procedure for preparing nanoscale complex hydrides without scaffolds or supports. Magnesium alanate nanorods measuring 20-40?nm in diameter and lithium borohydride nanobelts measuring 10-40?nm in width are successfully synthesised on the basis of the one-dimensional structure of the corresponding organic coordination polymers. The dehydrogenation kinetics of the magnesium alanate nanorods are improved, and the nanorod morphology persists through the dehydrogenation-hydrogenation process. Our findings may facilitate the fabrication of such hydrides with improved hydrogen storage properties for practical applications. PMID:24663074

  5. Improvement in thallium hydride generation using iodide and Rhodamine B.

    PubMed

    Picón, David; Carrero, Pablo; Valero, Maribel; de Peña, Yaneira Petit; Gutiérrez, Luís

    2015-05-01

    A continuous flow hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry (CF-HG-AAS) system was used to study the enhancement effect of different substances for conventional chemical HG of thallium. At room temperature, the acidified sample solution containing the respective enhancement reagent merged with the aqueous NaBH4 solution. The generated thallium hydride was stripped from the eluent solution by the addition of a nitrogen flow and thereafter the bulk phases were separated in a gas-liquid separator. The main factors under study were concentration and type of enhancement reagent (Te, iodide added as KI, Rhodamine B, malachite green and crystal violet) and acid (HCl, H2SO4 or HNO3). Other parameters affecting the thallium hydride generation, such as: NaBH4 concentration, carrier gas flow rate, length of reaction-mixing coil and reagents flow rates, were studied and optimized. Among the enhancement reagents tested, the combination of Rhodamine B and iodide produced the best results. A linear response was obtained between the detection limit (LOD (3?)) of 1.5?g L(-1) and 1000?g L(-1). The RSD% (n=10) for a solution containing 15?g L(-1) of Tl was 2.9%. The recoveries of thallium in environmental water samples by spiking the samples with 10 and 20µg L(-1) of Tl were in the 97.0-102.5% range. The accuracy for Tl determination was further confirmed by the analysis of a water standard reference material (1643e form NIST, USA). Finally, it was demonstrated that malachite green and crystal violet showed similar enhancement effect like Rhodamine B for thallium HG. PMID:25702995

  6. Mathematical modeling of the nickel/metal hydride battery system

    SciTech Connect

    Paxton, B K

    1995-09-01

    A group of compounds referred to as metal hydrides, when used as electrode materials, is a less toxic alternative to the cadmium hydroxide electrode found in nickel/cadmium secondary battery systems. For this and other reasons, the nickel/metal hydride battery system is becoming a popular rechargeable battery for electric vehicle and consumer electronics applications. A model of this battery system is presented. Specifically the metal hydride material, LaNi{sub 5}H{sub 6}, is chosen for investigation due to the wealth of information available in the literature on this compound. The model results are compared to experiments found in the literature. Fundamental analyses as well as engineering optimizations are performed from the results of the battery model. In order to examine diffusion limitations in the nickel oxide electrode, a ``pseudo 2-D model`` is developed. This model allows for the theoretical examination of the effects of a diffusion coefficient that is a function of the state of charge of the active material. It is found using present data from the literature that diffusion in the solid phase is usually not an important limitation in the nickel oxide electrode. This finding is contrary to the conclusions reached by other authors. Although diffusion in the nickel oxide active material is treated rigorously with the pseudo 2-D model, a general methodology is presented for determining the best constant diffusion coefficient to use in a standard one-dimensional battery model. The diffusion coefficients determined by this method are shown to be able to partially capture the behavior that results from a diffusion coefficient that varies with the state of charge of the active material.

  7. ALUMINUM HYDRIDE: A REVERSIBLE MATERIAL FOR HYDROGEN STORAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Zidan, R; Christopher Fewox, C; Brenda Garcia-Diaz, B; Joshua Gray, J

    2009-01-09

    Hydrogen storage is one of the challenges to be overcome for implementing the ever sought hydrogen economy. Here we report a novel cycle to reversibly form high density hydrogen storage materials such as aluminium hydride. Aluminium hydride (AlH{sub 3}, alane) has a hydrogen storage capacity of 10.1 wt% H{sub 2}, 149 kg H{sub 2}/m{sup 3} volumetric density and can be discharged at low temperatures (< 100 C). However, alane has been precluded from use in hydrogen storage systems because of the lack of practical regeneration methods. The direct hydrogenation of aluminium to form AlH{sub 3} requires over 10{sup 5} bars of hydrogen pressure at room temperature and there are no cost effective synthetic means. Here we show an unprecedented reversible cycle to form alane electrochemically, using alkali metal alanates (e.g. NaAlH{sub 4}, LiAlH{sub 4}) in aprotic solvents. To complete the cycle, the starting alanates can be regenerated by direct hydrogenation of the dehydrided alane and the alkali hydride being the other compound formed in the electrochemical cell. The process of forming NaAlH{sub 4} from NaH and Al is well established in both solid state and solution reactions. The use of adducting Lewis bases is an essential part of this cycle, in the isolation of alane from the mixtures of the electrochemical cell. Alane is isolated as the triethylamine (TEA) adduct and converted to pure, unsolvated alane by heating under vacuum.

  8. ALUMINUM HYDRIDE: A REVERSIBLE MATERIAL FOR HYDROGEN STORAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Fewox, C; Ragaiy Zidan, R; Brenda Garcia-Diaz, B

    2008-12-31

    Hydrogen storage is one of the greatest challenges for implementing the ever sought hydrogen economy. Here we report a novel cycle to reversibly form high density hydrogen storage materials such as aluminium hydride. Aluminium hydride (AlH{sub 3}, alane) has a hydrogen storage capacity of 10.1 wt% H{sub 2}, 149 kg H{sub 2}/m{sup 3} volumetric density and can be discharged at low temperatures (< 100 C). However, alane has been precluded from use in hydrogen storage systems because of the lack of practical regeneration methods; the direct hydrogenation of aluminium to form AlH{sub 3} requires over 10{sup 5} bars of hydrogen pressure at room temperature and there are no cost effective synthetic means. Here we show an unprecedented reversible cycle to form alane electrochemically, using alkali alanates (e.g. NaAlH{sub 4}, LiAlH{sub 4}) in aprotic solvents. To complete the cycle, the starting alanates can be regenerated by direct hydrogenation of the dehydrided alane and the alkali hydride being the other compound formed in the electrochemical cell. The process of forming NaAlH{sub 4} from NaH and Al is well established in both solid state and solution reactions. The use of adducting Lewis bases is an essential part of this cycle, in the isolation of alane from the mixtures of the electrochemical cell. Alane is isolated as the triethylamine (TEA) adduct and converted to pure, unsolvated alane by heating under vacuum.

  9. Electrochemical process and production of novel complex hydrides

    DOEpatents

    Zidan, Ragaiy

    2013-06-25

    A process of using an electrochemical cell to generate aluminum hydride (AlH.sub.3) is provided. The electrolytic cell uses a polar solvent to solubilize NaAlH.sub.4. The resulting electrochemical process results in the formation of AlH.sub.3. The AlH.sub.3 can be recovered and used as a source of hydrogen for the automotive industry. The resulting spent aluminum can be regenerated into NaAlH.sub.4 as part of a closed loop process of AlH.sub.3 generation.

  10. Modeling of Gallium Nitride Hydride Vapor Phase Epitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyyappan, Meyya; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    A reactor model for the hydride vapor phase epitaxy of GaN is presented. The governing flow, energy, and species conservation equations are solved in two dimensions to examine the growth characteristics as a function of process variables and reactor geometry. The growth rate varies with GaCl composition but independent of NH3 and H2 flow rates. A change in carrier gas for Ga source from H2 to N2 affects the growth rate and uniformity for a fixed reactor configuration. The model predictions are in general agreement with observed experimental behavior.

  11. The calculated rovibronic spectrum of scandium hydride, ScH

    E-print Network

    Lodi, Lorenzo; Tennyson\\, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    The electronic structure of six low-lying electronic states of scandium hydride, $X\\,{}^{1}\\Sigma^+$, $a\\,{}^{3}\\Delta$, $b\\,{}^{3}\\Pi$, $A\\,{}^{1}\\Delta$ $c\\,{}^{3}\\Sigma^+$, and $B\\,{}^{1}\\Pi$, is studied using multi-reference configuration interaction as a function of bond length. Diagonal and off-diagonal dipole moment, spin-orbit coupling and electronic angular momentum curves are also computed. The results are benchmarked against experimental measurements and calculations on atomic scandium. The resulting curves are used to compute a line list of molecular ro-vibronic transitions for $^{45}$ScH.

  12. Modification of the hydriding of uranium using ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Musket, R.G.; Robinson-Weis, G.; Patterson, R.G.

    1983-11-04

    The hydriding of depleted uranium at 76 Torr hydrogen and 130/sup 0/C has been significantly reduced by implantation of oxygen ions. The high-dose implanted specimens had incubation times for the initiation of the reaction after exposure to hydrogen that exceeded those of the nonimplanted specimens by more than a factor of eight. Furthermore, the nonimplanted specimens consumed enough hydrogen to cause macroscopic flaking of essentially the entire surface in times much less than the incubation time for the high-dose implanted specimens. In contrast, the ion-implanted specimens reacted only at isolated spots with the major fraction of the surface area unaffected by the hydrogen exposure.

  13. Sintering of sponge and hydride-dehydride titanium powders

    SciTech Connect

    Alman, David E.; Gerdemann, Stephen J.

    2004-04-01

    The sintering behavior of compacts produced from sponge and hydride-dehydride (HDH) Ti powders was examined. Compacts were vacuum sintered at 1200 or 1300 deg C for 30, 60, 120, 240, 480 or 960 minutes. The porosity decreased with sintering time and/or temperature in compacts produced from the HDH powders. Compacts produced from these powders could be sintered to essentially full density. However, the sintering condition did not influence the amount of porosity present in compacts produced from the sponge powders. These samples could only be sintered to a density of 97% theoretical. The sintering behavior was attributed to the chemical impurities in the powders.

  14. Geoneutrinos and Hydridic Earth (or primordially hydrogen-rich planet)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezrukov, L.; Sinev, V.

    2015-03-01

    Geoneutrino is a new channel of information about geochemical composition of the Earth. We analyzed here the following problem. What statistics do we need to distinguish between predictions of Bulk Silicate Earth model and Hydridic Earth model for Th/U signal ratio? We obtained the simple formula for estimation of error of Th/U signal ratio. Our calculations show that we need more than 22 kt · year exposition for Gran-Sasso underground laboratory and Sudbury Neutrino Observatory. We need more than 27 kt · year exposition for Kamioka site in the case of stopping of all Japanese nuclear power plants.

  15. Chemical Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage in Fuel Cell Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Devarakonda, Maruthi N.; Brooks, Kriston P.; Ronnebro, Ewa; Rassat, Scot D.; Holladay, Jamelyn D.

    2012-04-16

    Due to its high hydrogen storage capacity (up to 19.6% by weight for the release of 2.5 molar equivalents of hydrogen gas) and its stability under typical ambient conditions, ammonia borane (AB) is a promising material for chemical hydrogen storage for fuel cell applications in transportation sector. Several systems models for chemical hydride materials such as solid AB, liquid AB and alane were developed and evaluated at PNNL to determine an optimal configuration that would meet the 2010 and future DOE targets for hydrogen storage. This paper presents an overview of those systems models and discusses the simulation results for various transient drive cycle scenarios.

  16. Synthesis, photophysical and electroluminescent properties of novel iridium (III) complexes based on 5-methyl-2-phenylbenzo[d]oxazole derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao; Chi, Hai-Jun; Dong, Yan; Xiao, Guo-Yong; Lei, Peng; Zhang, Dong-Yu; Cui, Zheng

    2013-12-01

    A new series of phosphorescent iridium (III) complexes based on 5-methyl-2-phenylbenzo[d]oxazole derivatives as main ligands, i.e. bis(5-methyl-2- phenylbenzo[d]oxazole-N,C2?)iridium(acetylacetonate) [(mpbo)2Ir(acac)], bis(2-(4-fluorophenyl)-5-methylbenzo[d]oxazole-N,C2?)iridium(acetylacetonate) [(fmbo)2Ir(acac)] and bis(5-methyl-2-p-tolylbenzo[d]oxazole-N,C2?) iridium(acetylacetonate) [(mtbo)2Ir(acac)], were synthesized for organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), and their photophysical, electroluminescent properties were investigated. All complexes have high thermal stability and emit intense phosphorescence from green to yellow at room temperature with high quantum efficiencies and relatively short lifetimes. The OLED based on (fmbo)2Ir(acac) as dopant emitter showed very high luminance of 26,004 cd m-2 and luminance efficiency of 18.5 cd A-1. The evidences indicated that this series of iridium (III) complexes were potential candidates for applications in organic electroluminescent devices.

  17. Thermodynamic properties of the cubic plutonium hydride solid solution

    SciTech Connect

    Haschke, J M

    1981-12-01

    Pressure, temperature, and composition data for the cubic solid solution plutonium hydride phase, PuH/sub x/, have been measured by microbalance methods. Integral enthalpies and entropies of formation have been evaluated for the composition range 1.90 less than or equal to X less than or equal to 3.00. At 550/sup 0/K, ..delta..H/sup 0/ /sub f/(PuH/sub x/(s)) varies linearly from approximately (-38 +- 1) kcal mol/sup -1/ at PuH/sub 190/ to (-50 +- 1 kcal mol/sup -1/) at PuH/sub 3/ /sub 00/. Thermochemical values obtained by reevaluating tensimetric data from the literature are in excellent agreement with these results. Isotopic effects have been quantified by comparing the results for hydride and deuteride, and equations are presented for predicting ..delta..H/sup 0/ /sub f/ and ..delta..S/sup 0/ /sub f/ values for PuH/sub x/(s) and PuD/sub x/(s).

  18. Superconductivity above the lowest Earth temperature in pressurized sulfur hydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianconi, Antonio; Jarlborg, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    A recent experiment has shown a macroscopic quantum coherent condensate at 203 K, about 19 degrees above the coldest temperature recorded on the Earth surface, 184 K (-89.2 ^\\circ \\text{C}, -128.6 ^\\circ \\text{F}) in pressurized sulfur hydride. This discovery is relevant not only in material science and condensed matter but also in other fields ranging from quantum computing to quantum physics of living matter. It has given the start to a gold rush looking for other macroscopic quantum coherent condensates in hydrides at the temperature range of living matter 200c <400 \\text{K} . We present here a review of the experimental results and the theoretical works and we discuss the Fermiology of \\text{H}3\\text{S} focusing on Lifshitz transitions as a function of pressure. We discuss the possible role of the shape resonance near a neck disrupting Lifshitz transition, in the Bianconi-Perali-Valletta (BPV) theory, for rising the critical temperature in a multigap superconductor, as the Feshbach resonance rises the critical temperature in Fermionic ultracold gases.

  19. Method of generating hydrogen-storing hydride complexes

    DOEpatents

    Srinivasan, Sesha S; Niemann, Michael U; Goswami, D. Yogi; Stefanakos, Elias K

    2013-05-14

    A ternary hydrogen storage system having a constant stoichiometric molar ratio of LiNH.sub.2:MgH.sub.2:LiBH.sub.4 of 2:1:1. It was found that the incorporation of MgH.sub.2 particles of approximately 10 nm to 20 nm exhibit a lower initial hydrogen release temperature of 150.degree. C. Furthermore, it is observed that the particle size of LiBNH quaternary hydride has a significant effect on the hydrogen sorption concentration with an optimum size of 28 nm. The as-synthesized hydrides exhibit two main hydrogen release temperatures, one around 160.degree. C. and the other around 300.degree. C., with the main hydrogen release temperature reduced from 310.degree. C. to 270.degree. C., while hydrogen is first reversibly released at temperatures as low as 150.degree. C. with a total hydrogen capacity of 6 wt. % to 8 wt. %. Detailed thermal, capacity, structural and microstructural properties have been demonstrated and correlated with the activation energies of these materials.

  20. ACCEPTABILITY ENVELOPE FOR METAL HYDRIDE-BASED HYDROGEN STORAGE SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, B.; Corgnale, C.; Tamburello, D.; Garrison, S.; Anton, D.

    2011-07-18

    The design and evaluation of media based hydrogen storage systems requires the use of detailed numerical models and experimental studies, with significant amount of time and monetary investment. Thus a scoping tool, referred to as the Acceptability Envelope, was developed to screen preliminary candidate media and storage vessel designs, identifying the range of chemical, physical and geometrical parameters for the coupled media and storage vessel system that allow it to meet performance targets. The model which underpins the analysis allows simplifying the storage system, thus resulting in one input-one output scheme, by grouping of selected quantities. Two cases have been analyzed and results are presented here. In the first application the DOE technical targets (Year 2010, Year 2015 and Ultimate) are used to determine the range of parameters required for the metal hydride media and storage vessel. In the second case the most promising metal hydrides available are compared, highlighting the potential of storage systems, utilizing them, to achieve 40% of the 2010 DOE technical target. Results show that systems based on Li-Mg media have the best potential to attain these performance targets.

  1. Comparison of pressurized sulfur hydride with conventional superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicol, E. J.; Carbotte, J. P.

    2015-06-01

    A recent report that sulfur hydride under pressure is an electron-phonon superconductor with a Tc of 190 K has been met with much excitement although it is yet to be confirmed. Based on several electron-phonon spectral density functions already available from density functional theory, we find that the electron-phonon spectrum is near optimum for Tc with a particularly large value of its characteristic phonon energy ?ln which is due to the small hydrogen mass. We find that the thermodynamic universal BCS ratios are near those for Pb and Nb3Sn . We suggest that optical measurements could be a useful tool to establish the existence and nature of the superconductivity in this system. Conventional superconductors are in the impurity-dominated dirty limit. By contrast sulfur hydride will be in the clean limit because of its large energy gap scale. The ac optical conductivity will display distinct and separate signatures of the superconducting gap in the low-energy impurity-dominated range of the optical spectrum and additional phonon structures at higher energies where the clean limit applies.

  2. Development of U.S. Government General Technical Requirements for UAS Flight Safety Systems Utilizing the Iridium Satellite Constellation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, Jennifer; Birr, Richard

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the development of technical requirements for Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) utilization of the Iridium Satellite Constellation to provide flight safety. The Federal Aviation Authority (FAA) required an over-the-horizon communication standard to guarantee flight safety before permitting widespread UAS flights in the National Air Space (NAS). This is important to ensure reliable control of UASs during loss-link and over-the-horizon scenarios. The core requirement was to utilize a satellite system to send GPS tracking data and other telemetry from a flight vehicle down to the ground. Iridium was chosen as the system because it is one of the only true satellite systems that has world wide coverage, and the service has a highly reliable link margin. The Iridium system, the flight modems, and the test flight are described.

  3. Ir/PuO/sub 2/ compatibility: transfer of impurities from plutonium dioxide to iridium metal during high temperature aging

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, D.H.; Christie, W.H.; Pavone, D.

    1984-01-01

    Plutonium oxide fuel pellets for powering radioisotopic thermoelectric generators for NASA space vehicles are encapsulated in iridium which has been grain-boundary-stabilized with thorium and aluminum. After aging for 6 months at 1310/sup 0/C under vacuum, enhanced grain growth is observed in the near-surface grains of the iridium next to the PuO/sub 2/. Examination of the grain boundaries by AES and SIMS shows a depletion of thorium and aluminum. Iron, chromium, and nickel from the fuel were found to diffuse into the iridium along the grain boundaries. Enhanced grain growth appears to result from thorium depletion in the grain boundaries of the near-surface grains next to the fuel. However, in one instance grain growth was slowed by the formation of thorium oxide by oxygen diffusing up the grain boundaries.

  4. Migration of Single Iridium Atoms and Tri-iridium Clusters on MgO Surfaces: Aberration-Corrected STEM Imaging and Ab Initio Calculations.

    PubMed

    Han, Chang Wan; Iddir, Hakim; Uzun, Alper; Curtiss, Larry A; Browning, Nigel D; Gates, Bruce C; Ortalan, Volkan

    2015-12-01

    To address the challenge of fast, direct atomic-scale visualization of the migration of atoms and clusters on surfaces, we used aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) with high scan speeds (as little as ?0.1 s per frame) to visualize the migration of (1) a heavy atom (Ir) on the surface of a support consisting of light atoms, MgO(100), and (2) an Ir3 cluster on MgO(110). Sequential Z-contrast images elucidate the surface transport mechanisms. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations provided estimates of the migration energy barriers and binding energies of the iridium species to the surfaces. The results show how the combination of fast-scan STEM and DFT calculations allow visualization and fundamental understanding of surface migration phenomena pertaining to supported catalysts and other materials. PMID:26544015

  5. Effect of heat treatment on delayed hydride cracking in Zr-2.5 Wt Pct Nb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amouzouvi, K. F.; Clegg, L. J.

    1987-10-01

    The effect of heat treatments on delayed hydride cracking (DHC) in Zr-2.5 wt pct Nb has been studied. Crack velocities were measured in hydrided specimens, which were cooled from solution-treatment temperatures at different rates by water-quenching, oil-quenching, liquid-nitrogen quenching, and furnace cooling. The resulting hydride size, morphology, and distributions were examined by optical metallography. It was found that fast cooling rates, which produce very finely dispersed hydrides, result in higher crack growth rates and a stronger dependence of the crack velocity on the applied-stress intensity factor. Also, the incubation period before cracking commences was found to be relatively short for specimens with fine hydrides, whereas specimens with coarse hydrides required considerably longer incubation periods. These results can be explained by rapid growth of preexisting hydrides within the crack-tip plastic zone. In addition, different solution temperatures were used to investigate the effect of the continuity of the grain-boundary phase (?-phase) on the crack velocity. Transmission electron microscopy was used to examine the structure of this grain-boundary phase. It was found that for heat treatments, which destroyed the ?-phase continuity, the crack velocity was significantly reduced, as would be expected from the theory of enhanced diffusion through grain boundaries.

  6. The recording of monophasic action potentials with fractal-coated iridium electrodes in humans.

    PubMed

    Zrenner, B; Ndrepepa, G; Müssig, D; Stöbe, C; Schneider, M A; Karch, M R; Plewan, A; Schömig, A; Schmitt, C

    2000-01-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the feasibility of the recording of monophasic action potentials (MAP) with fractal-coated iridium electrodes in a clinical setting. In 18 patients who underwent an electrophysiological study for various arrhythmias, we performed MAP recordings with both 1.3-mm2 and 6-mm2 tip surface area fractal-coated iridium and standard silver--silver chloride (Ag/AgCl) electrodes in the high right atrium and two ventricular positions. Amplitude and MAP duration at 90%, 50%, and 25% of repolarization were calculated during steady-state pacing at 600, 500, and 400 ms cycle lengths with extrastimuli application. Morphology comparisons of MAP signals recorded with both types of electrodes were performed by regression analysis using 5% of the repolarization segments of the MAP trajectory. Differences between MAP duration at 90%, 50%, and 25% of repolarization recorded with fractal-coated and Ag/AgCl electrodes were statistically insignificant. Amplitude values recorded with 6-mm2 tip electrodes were significantly smaller than those recorded with Ag/AgCl electrodes for all comparisons. During steady-state pacing, the correlation coefficients between Ag/AgCl and fractal-coated 1.3-mm2 and 6-mm2 tip electrodes were within the range of 0.93-0.999 and 0.87-0.999, respectively. The correlation of MAP amplitude and duration at 90%, 50%, and 25% of repolarization following the extrastimulus S2, recorded with both types of electrodes, was significantly weaker for right atrial recordings (r value range 0.78-0.92) as compared to ventricular recordings (r value range 0.92-0.99). The MAP sensing features of fractal-coated iridium and Ag/AgCl electrodes are comparable. The best results for recording of MAPs with fractal-coated electrodes can be achieved with small surface area tip electrodes. PMID:10666754

  7. The next step in chemical propulsion: Oxide-iridium/rhenium combustion chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Fortini, Arthur J.; Tuffias, Robert H.

    1999-01-22

    Chemical propulsion systems are currently limited by materials issues. Until recently, the state-of-the-art material for liquid propellant combustion chambers was silicide-coated niobium. However, combustion chamber performance demands have exceeded the capabilities of this material system, requiring development of better materials. The iridium/rhenium combustion chamber, comprising a rhenium structural shell with an iridium inner liner for oxidation protection, represents the current state of the art in high-performance, high temperature, long-life propulsion systems using nitrogen tetroxide/monomethyl hydrazine propellant. However, oxygen/hydrogen (O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}) and new 'green' monopropellants under development to replace hydrazine will be significantly more oxidizing at operating temperature. For these more highly aggressive combustion environments, Ultramet has shown that substantial additional life can be obtained by lining the interior of the combustion chamber with a refractory metal oxide, which functions as a thermal and gas diffusion barrier and provides dramatically increased oxidation resistance. Ultramet has fabricated numerous 22-N (5-lb{sub f}) thrust chambers with this oxide-iridium/rhenium architecture that have been hot-fire tested at NASA Lewis Research Center in O{sub 2}/H{sub 2} propellant at mixture ratios of 6 and 16, with steady-state exterior wall temperatures ranging from 2433 to 2899 K, comprising the most severe temperature and oxidizing conditions ever utilized. Of the seven chambers tested to date, three failed due to facility problems, and two never failed. The best-performing chamber was hot-fired for 13,595 seconds (227 minutes; 3.8 hours) and showed no visible signs of degradation. Additional chambers are being fabricated for future testing.

  8. The role of stress-state on the deformation and fracture mechanism of hydrided and non-hydrided Zircaloy-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cockeram, B. V.; Hollenbeck, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    Zircaloy-4 was tested at room-temperature over a range of hydrogen content between 10 and 200 ppm, and stress-states between a triaxiality of -0.23 and 0.9. Triaxiality (?) is defined as the ratio of hydrostatic stress to von Mises stress and was controlled through use of select mechanical test specimen designs. Testing of smooth and notched tensile specimens (? = 0.33 to 0.9) results in an increase in the stress to initiate plastic deformation and a decrease in strain to failure at higher values of ?. Increases in triaxiality are shown to have a more significant effect on reducing the strain to failure when the material is hydrided. Increases in strain to failure are observed at lower values of triaxiality for dual keyhole specimens (? = 0.1) and compression specimens (? = -0.17 to -0.23), with hydrided material showing much less decrement in strain to failure at these lower triaxialities. Examinations of microstructure are used to show that a change in mechanism for deformation and fracture with triaxiality can explain these differences in mechanical behavior and a model is developed to describe the observed changes in strain to failure with stress-state.

  9. Studies of hydride formation and superconductivity in hydrides of alloys Th-M /M = La, Y, Ce, Zr and Bi/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oesterreicher, H.; Clinton, J.; Misroch, M.

    1977-01-01

    In order to gain a better insight into both the unusual composition of ThH15 and its superconductivity, an experimental study was conducted to assess the influence of partial replacement of Th in Th4H15 by elements which allow for a systematic alteration of spatial and electronic effects. For this purpose, substituent elements with the same number of valence electrons (4) but of smaller size (Zr) as well as elements with a smaller number of valence electrons (3) and either larger (La) or smaller size (Y) were selected. A few data with Ce and Bi as substituent atoms are also included. The matrix alloys for hydriding were obtained by induction melting under Ar in water-cooled Cu boats. Superconducting transition temperatures are found to decrease on substitution for Th in Th4H15. Hydrides derived from LaH3 by substitution for La by Th do not become superconducting. It is suggested that superconductivity in Th4H15 is connected with a deviation from the exact stoichiometry of Th4H15. A model of unsatisfied valencies may be of more general validity in predicting superconductivity.

  10. New iridium complexes with cyclometalated 2-arylimidazole ligands as highly efficient saturated green emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayabharathi, Jayaraman; Thanikachalam, Venugopal; Saravanan, Kanagarathinam; Venkatesh Perumal, Marimuthu

    2012-06-01

    Phosphorescence studies of a series of heteroleptic cyclometalated iridium(III) complexes have been carried out. From the photoluminescent properties, it was found that these complexes possess dominantly 3MLCT and 3?-?* excited states. The solvent shifts are interpreted in terms of Reichardt-Dimroth solvent ET parameters and Marcus theory. The results are consistent with prior assignments on the absorption band to a metal-to-ligand charge transfer excited state associated with chelating ligand. Emission kinetic studies reveal that kr increases with increasing ?em and linear correlation between ln(knr) and energy gap. The effect of Eg and ?Qe on knr is discussed in detail.

  11. Relationship between mass extinction and iridium across the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary in New Jersey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, K.G.; Sherrell, R.M.; Browning, J.V.; Field, M.P.; Gallagher, W.; Olsson, R.K.; Sugarman, P.J.; Tuorto, S.; Wahyudi, H.

    2010-01-01

    We directly link iridium (Ir) anomalies in New Jersey to the mass extinction of marine plankton marking the Cretaceous-Paleogene (K-Pg) boundary. We confirm previous reports of an Ir anomaly 20 cm below the extinction of Cretaceous macrofauna (the "Pinna" bed) with new results from a muddy sand section from Tighe Park, Freehold, New Jersey (United States), but we also show that Ir anomalies correlate with marine mass extinctions at three other clay-rich New Jersey sections. Thus, we attribute the anomaly at Freehold to the downward movement of Ir and reaffirm the link between impact and mass extinction. ?? 2010 Geological Society of America.

  12. Electrogenerated chemiluminescence from heteroleptic iridium(III) complexes with multicolor emission.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuyang; Gao, Hongfang; Wang, Xiaomei; Qi, Honglan

    2015-02-16

    Electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL) with different emission colors is important in the development of multichannel analytical techniques. In this report, five new heteroleptic iridium(III) complexes were synthesized, and their photophysical, electrochemical, and ECL properties were studied. Here, 2-(2,4-difluorophenyl)pyridine (dfppy, complex 1), 2-phenylbenzo[d]thiazole (bt, complex 2), and 2-phenylpyridine (ppy, complex 3) were used as the main ligands to tune the emission color, while avobenzone (avo) was used as the ancillary ligand. For comparison, complexes 4 and 5 with 2-phenylpyridine and 2-phenylbenzo[d]thiazole as the main ligand, respectively, and acetyl acetone (acac) as the ancillary ligand were also synthesized. All five iridium(III) complexes had strong intraligand absorption bands (?–?*) in the UV region (below 350 nm) and a featureless MLCT (d??*) transition in the visible 400–500 nm range. Multicolored emissions were observed for these five iridium(III) complexes, including green, orange, and red for complexes 4, 5, 2, 1, 3, respectively. Density functional theory calculations indicate that the electronic density of the highest occupied molecular orbital is entirely located on the C^N ligands and the iridium atom, while the formation of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) is complicated. The LUMO is mainly assigned to the ancillary ligand for complexes 1 and 3 but to the C^N ligand for complexes 2, 4, and 5. Cyclic voltammetry studies showed that all these complexes have a reversible oxidation wave, but no reduction waves were found in the electrochemical windows of CH2Cl2. The E1/2(ox) values of these complexes ranged from 0.642 to 0.978 V for complexes 3, 4, 2, 5, 1, (in increasing order) and are all lower than that of Ru(bpy)3(2+). Most importantly, when using tripropylamine as a coreactant, complexes 1–5 exhibited intense ECL signals with an emission wavelength centered at 616, 580, 663, 536, and 569 nm, respectively. In addition, complexes 1, 2, and 5 displayed approximately 2, 11, and 214 times higher ECL efficiencies than Ru(bpy)3(2+) under identical conditions. PMID:25584991

  13. Palynological and iridium anomalies at Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary, south-central Saskatchewan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, D.J.; Jarzen, D.M.; Orth, C.J.; Oliver, P.Q.

    1986-01-01

    The Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary in south-central Saskatchewan is marked by coincident anomalies in abundance of iridium and fern spores at the extinction level of a suite of Cretaceous pollen taxa. Evidence of disruption of the terrestrial flora includes the fern-spore abundance anomaly and local extinction of as much as 30 percent of angiosperm species. The reorganized earliest Tertiary flora is made up largely of surviving species that assumed new roles of dominance. Persistence of climatically sensitive taxa across the boundary indicates that if paleoclimate was altered by the terminal Cretaceous event, it returned quickly to the pre-event condition.

  14. Evolution of odd A transitional iridium nuclei at the strong deformation limit levels of $\\^{185}$Ir

    E-print Network

    Sébille-Schück, C; Genevey-Rivier, J; Höglund, A; Huck, A; Knipper, A; Richard-Serre, Claude; Walter, G

    1976-01-01

    A level scheme is proposed for neutron deficient /sup 185/Ir obtained by the decay of /sup 185/Pt produced with the ISOLDE on-line separator (CERN). This level scheme is compared to those of heavier mass iridium nuclei where the negative parity levels had been interpreted in the asymmetric-rotor-plus-particle model. In /sup 185/Ir similar systems of levels appear with a stronger prolate deformation of the nucleus. They seem correctly described by coupling an odd-particle (or a hole) to a symmetric rotor.

  15. A Site-Isolated Iridium Diethylene Complex Supported on Highly Dealuminated Y Zeolite: Synthesis And Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Uzun, A.; Bhirud, V.A.; Kletnieks, P.W.; Haw, J.F.; Gates, B.C.

    2009-06-04

    Highly dealuminated Y zeolite-supported mononuclear iridium complexes with reactive ethylene ligands were synthesized by chemisorption of Ir(C{sub 2}H{sub 4}){sub 2}(C{sub 5}H{sub 7}O{sub 2}). The resultant structure and its treatment in He, CO, ethylene, and H2 were investigated with infrared (IR) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopies. The IR spectra show that Ir(C{sub 2}H{sub 4}){sub 2}(C{sub 5}H{sub 7}O{sub 2}) reacted readily with surface OH groups of the zeolite, leading to the removal of C{sub 5}H{sub 7}O{sub 2} ligands and the formation of supported mononuclear iridium complexes, confirmed by the lack of Ir-Ir contributions in the EXAFS spectra. The EXAFS data show that each Ir atom was bonded to four carbon atoms at an average distance of 2.10 {angstrom}, consistent with the presence of two ethylene ligands per Ir atom and in agreement with the IR spectra indicating {pi}-bonded ethylene ligands. The EXAFS data also indicate that each Ir atom was bonded to two oxygen atoms of the zeolite at a distance of 2.15 {angstrom}. The supported iridium-ethylene complex reacted with H{sub 2} to give ethane, and it also catalyzed ethylene hydrogenation at atmospheric pressure and 294 K. Treatment of the sample in CO led to the formation of Ir(CO){sub 2} complexes bonded to the zeolite. The sharpness of the V{sub CO} bands indicates a high degree of uniformity of these complexes on the support. The iridium-ethylene complex on the crystalline zeolite support is inferred to be one of the most nearly uniform supported metal complex catalysts. The results indicate that it is isostructural with a previously reported rhodium complex on the same zeolite; thus, the results are a start to a family of analogous, structurally well-defined supported metal complex catalysts.

  16. The Collision of Iridium 33 and Cosmos 2251: The Shape of Things to Come

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicholas, Johnson

    2009-01-01

    The collision of Iridium 33 and Cosmos 2251 was the most severe accidental fragmentation on record. More than 1800 debris approx. 10 cm and larger were produced. If solar activity returns to normal, half of the tracked debris will reenter within five years. Less than 60 cataloged debris had reentered by 1 October 2009. Some debris from both satellites will remain in orbit through the end of the century. The collision rate of one every five years will increase without future removal of large derelict spacecraft and launch vehicle orbital stages.

  17. RF Sputtered Iridium (Ir) Film as a Counter Electrode for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokurala, Krishnaiah; Kamble, Anvita; Bhargava, Parag; Mallick, Sudhanshu

    2015-11-01

    Iridium (Ir) films were deposited on fluorine-doped tin oxide substrate by radio-frequency sputtering at room temperature and the as-deposited films were used as counter electrodes (CE) for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSC). The photo conversion efficiency (PCE) of DSSC fabricated with Ir-based CE was 7.2%. Electrocatalytic activity and electrochemical data for Ir-based CE were compared with those for conventional Pt-based CE. The results were indicative of potential use of Ir as an alternative CE material for DSSC.

  18. Lewis Base Activation of Silyl Acetals: Iridium-Catalyzed Reductive Horner-Wadsworth-Emmons Olefination.

    PubMed

    Dakarapu, Udaya Sree; Bokka, Apparao; Asgari, Parham; Trog, Gabriela; Hua, Yuanda; Nguyen, Hiep H; Rahman, Nawal; Jeon, Junha

    2015-12-01

    A Lewis base promoted deprotonative pronucleophile addition to silyl acetals has been developed and applied to the iridium-catalyzed reductive Horner-Wadsworth-Emmons (HWE) olefination of esters and the chemoselective reduction of the resulting enoates. Lewis base activation of silyl acetals generates putative pentacoordinate silicate acetals, which fragment into aldehydes, silanes, and alkoxides in situ. Subsequent deprotonative metalation of phosphonate esters followed by HWE with aldehydes furnishes enoates. This operationally convenient, mechanistically unique protocol converts the traditionally challenging aryl, alkenyl, and alkynyl esters to homologated enoates at room temperature within a single vessel. PMID:26566189

  19. Iridium Complexes and Clusters in Dealuminated Zeolite HY: Distribution between Crystalline and Impurity Amorphous Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Macias, Claudia; Xu, Pinghong; Hwang, Son-Jong; Lu, Jing; Chen, Cong-Yan; Browning, Nigel D.; Gates, Bruce C.

    2014-07-08

    Dealuminated zeolite HY was used to support Ir(CO)2 complexes formed from Ir(CO)2(C5H7O2). Infrared and X-ray absorption spectra and atomic-resolution electron microscopy images identify these complexes, and the images and 27Al NMR spectra identify impurity amorphous regions in the zeolite where the iridium is more susceptible to aggregation than in the crystalline regions. The results indicate a significant stability limitation of metal in amorphous impurity regions of zeolites.

  20. Iridium-Catalyzed Asymmetric Ring-Opening of Oxabenzonorbornadienes with N-Substituted Piperazine Nucleophiles.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wen; Luo, Renshi; Yang, Dingqiao

    2015-01-01

    Iridium-catalyzed asymmetric ring-opening of oxabenzonorbornadienes with N-substituted piperazines was described. The reaction afforded the corresponding ring-opening products in high yields and moderate enantioselectivities in the presence of 2.5 mol % [Ir(COD)Cl]? and 5.0 mol % (S)-p-Tol-BINAP. The effects of various chiral bidentate ligands, catalyst loading, solvent, and temperature on the yield and enantioselectivity were also investigated. A plausible mechanism was proposed to account for the formation of the corresponding trans-ring opened products based on the X-ray structure of product 2i. PMID:26633315

  1. Stereodivergent ?-allylation of linear aldehydes with dual iridium and amine catalysis.

    PubMed

    Krautwald, Simon; Schafroth, Michael A; Sarlah, David; Carreira, Erick M

    2014-02-26

    We describe the fully stereodivergent, dual catalytic ?-allylation of linear aldehydes. The reaction proceeds via direct iridium-catalyzed substitution of racemic allylic alcohols with enamines generated in situ. The use of an Ir(P,olefin) complex and a diarylsilyl prolinol ether as catalysts in the presence of dimethylhydrogen phosphate as the promoter proved to be crucial for achieving high enantio- and diastereoselectivity (>99% ee, up to >20:1 dr). The utility of the method is demonstrated in a concise enantioselective synthesis of the antidepressant (-)-paroxetine. PMID:24506196

  2. Non-dispersive atomic fluorimeter for metals that form volatile hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, K.; Slavin, W.; Walsh, A.

    A non-dispersive atomic fluorescence spectrophotometer was built and tested for the determination of those elements that form volatile hydrides. The instrument design is compatible with simultaneous multiple element analysis for those elements that can be determined as their hydride. As little as 0.1 to 0.2 ng of Se, As, Bi and Sb was detected and this is typically 10-fold better than the reported hydride detection limits by atomic absorption. The precision was better than 2% at the 50 ng level of the elements.

  3. The storage of hydrogen in the form of metal hydrides: An application to thermal engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gales, C.; Perroud, P.

    1981-01-01

    The possibility of using LaNi56, FeTiH2, or MgH2 as metal hydride storage sytems for hydrogen fueled automobile engines is discussed. Magnesium copper and magnesium nickel hydrides studies indicate that they provide more stable storage systems than pure magnesium hydrides. Several test engines employing hydrogen fuel have been developed: a single cylinder motor originally designed for use with air gasoline mixture; a four-cylinder engine modified to run on an air hydrogen mixture; and a gas turbine.

  4. The Zr20Nb-H phase diagram and the characterisation of hydrides in ?-Zr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrow, L.; Barrow, A. T. W.; Almer, J.; Daymond, M. R.

    2013-11-01

    In this work a combination of synchrotron X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and differential scanning calorimetry have been used to characterise the Zr20Nb-H phase diagram and hydrides in ?-Zr. A single hydride phase, termed ?' was found to be present in ?-Zr over a wide range of H concentrations up to 1559 wppm. ?'-hydride had an orthorhombic crystal structure with the composition ZrH0.4 ± 0.2, and was found to be stable during heating to 450 °C; it can therefore be considered the equilibrium hydride in ?-Zr. Accompanying hydride nucleation is a volumetric strain of 10.4% that is accommodated elastically and plastically by the ?-Zr. The body-centre cubic to orthorhombic martensitic transformation is analogous to the Au-Cd system where the basal plane in the hydride is constructed from the (0 1 1)? to give the Bain correspondence. There are strong similarities between the Zr20Nb-H and Nb-H phase diagrams with the former having a lower solubility for H at room temperature, ˜130 wppm and ˜290 wppm respectively. The room temperature solubility difference between body-centre cubic Nb and ?-Zr can be attributed to their electron configurations and the reduction in energy associated with the metallic Zr/Nb-H bonding. The hydrides were found to have a plate morphology and consisted of sub-platelets analogous to ?-hydride in ?-Zr. The hydride had an orthorhombic crystal structure and the (0?(0,[0?[0 and [1?[ orientation relationship with the ?-Zr matrix, consistent with the Au-Cd system. gamma;'-hydride formation was accompanied by a volumetric strain of 10.4% that is accommodated elastically and plastically in the matrix. Sympathetic hydride nucleation occurs in the elastic strain field of the parent hydride. In all instances the long axis of the hydride was consistent with the <0 1 1>?. beta;-Zr has a H solubility of 128 ± 5 wppm at room temperature and considerably higher than ?-Zr. The solubility difference between the BCC and HCP structures can be attributed to the size and number of tetrahedral sites within the respective lattices. In the absence of Nb, the H solubility in ?-Zr would be considerably lower. The Zr-20Nb-H and Nb-H phase diagrams are similar. However, BCC-Nb has a higher H solubility than ?-Zr as a result of their different electron configurations. The ?/? + ?' solvus reaches a plateau at a H concentration of ˜1400 wppm; this is consistent with the concentration at which the enthalpy of formation of BCC ZrH becomes negative. Only one hydride phase, ?' was found in the Zr-20Nb-H system. This phase had the composition ZrH0.4±0.2 and was stable at all the temperatures evaluated. It is analogous to the ?-NbH in the Nb-H system. There was a small hysteresis in the TSSd and TSSp temperatures. This can be attributed to the narrow temperature range over which the hydride forms (˜80 °C) and the smaller volumetric strain for the nucleation of ?'-hydride in ?-Zr than ?-hydride in ?-Zr.

  5. DEVELOPMENT OF A FABRICATION PROCESS FOR SOL-GEL/METAL HYDRIDE COMPOSITE GRANULES

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, E; Eric Frickey, E; Leung Heung, L

    2004-02-23

    An external gelation process was developed to produce spherical granules that contain metal hydride particles in a sol-gel matrix. Dimensionally stable granules containing metal hydrides are needed for applications such as hydrogen separation and hydrogen purification that require columns containing metal hydrides. Gases must readily flow through the metal hydride beds in the columns. Metal hydrides reversibly absorb and desorb hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes. This is accompanied by significant volume changes that cause the metal hydride to break apart or decrepitate. Repeated cycling results in very fine metal hydride particles that are difficult to handle and contain. Fine particles tend to settle and pack making it more difficult to flow gases through a metal hydride bed. Furthermore, the metal hydrides can exert a significant force on the containment vessel as they expand. These problems associated with metal hydrides can be eliminated with the granulation process described in this report. Small agglomerates of metal hydride particles and abietic acid (a pore former) were produced and dispersed in a colloidal silica/water suspension to form the feed slurry. Fumed silica was added to increase the viscosity of the feed slurry which helped to keep the agglomerates in suspension. Drops of the feed slurry were injected into a 27-foot tall column of hot ({approx}70 C), medium viscosity ({approx}3000 centistokes) silicone oil. Water was slowly evaporated from the drops as they settled. The drops gelled and eventually solidified to form spherical granules. This process is referred to as external gelation. Testing was completed to optimize the design of the column, the feed system, the feed slurry composition, and the operating parameters of the column. The critical process parameters can be controlled resulting in a reproducible fabrication technique. The residual silicone oil on the surface of the granules was removed by washing in mineral spirits. The granules were dried in air at 40 C. The granules were heated to 230 C for 30 minutes in argon to remove the remaining water and organic materials. The resulting product was spherical composite granules (100 to 2000 micron diameter) with a porous silica matrix containing small agglomerates of metal hydride particles. Open porosity in the silica matrix allows hydrogen to permeate rapidly through the matrix but the pores are small enough to contain the metal hydride particles. Additional porosity around the metal hydride particles, induced using abietic acid as a pore former, allows the particles to freely expand and contract without fracturing the brittle sol-gel matrix. It was demonstrated that the granules readily absorb and desorb hydrogen while remaining integral and dimensionally stable. Microcracking was observed after the granules were cycled in hydrogen five times. The strength of the granules was improved by coating them with a thin layer of a micro-porous polymer sol-gel that would allow hydrogen to freely pass through the coating but would filter out metal hydride poisons such as water and carbon monoxide. It was demonstrated that if a thin sol-gel coating was applied after the granules were cycled, the coating not only improved the strength of the granules but the coated granules retained their strength after additional hydrogen cycling tests. This additional strength is needed to extend the lifetime of the granules and to survive the compressive load in a large column of granules. Additional hydrogen adsorption tests are planned to evaluate the performance of coated granules after one hundred cycles. Tests will also be performed to determine the effects of metal hydride poisons on the granules. The results of these tests will be documented in a separate report. The process that was developed to form these granules could be scaled to a production process. The process to form granules from a mixture of metal hydride particles and pore former such as abietic acid can be scaled up using commercial granulators. The current laboratory-scale external gelation column produc

  6. Hydride-induced embrittlement of Zircaloy-4 cladding under plane-strain tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daum, Robert S.

    The mechanical response of high-burnup Zircaloy-4 fuel cladding subjected to a postulated reactivity initiated accident (referred to as a rod ejection accident (REA) in a pressurized water reactor) can be affected by hydrogen embrittlement. This study addresses the hydrogen embrittlement of non-irradiated, stress-relieved Zircaloy-4 cladding under conditions (state of stress and temperature) relevant to those of a reactivity initiated accident. Specifically, the study has investigated the effects of a concentrated density of hydride particles (in the form of a rim at the outer surface of the cladding tube introduced by gas-charging) on the cladding ductility when tested under a near-plane-strain tension at 25, 300, and 375°C. The influence of the hydride-rim thickness and local hydrogen contents on cladding ductility is studied as a function of temperature and correlated with the hydride microstructure. Using synchrotron x-ray diffraction, this study has found that the delta-hydride phase (i.e., ZrHx, where x ? 1.66) is the predominant hydride phase to precipitate in stress-relieved Zircaloy-4 cladding for hydrogen contents up to 1250 wt ppm. At hydrogen contents above 2700 wt ppm, although delta-hydride is still the majority phase, both gamma- and epsilon-hydride phases are also observed. The volume fraction of hydrides was estimated as a function of hydrogen content, using the diffracted x-ray intensities. These estimated values agree well with calculated values assuming hydride precipitates are delta-hydride. Under near-plane-strain hoop tension, the ductility and fracture of the cladding is highly dependent on both the hydride-rim thickness and the testing temperature. At room temperature, due to a high density of hydride particles within the rim, a Mode I crack is injected shortly after yielding. This limits cladding ductility, such that it decreases with increasing thickness of the hydride rim. Cladding containing hydride rims with a thickness of ?100 mum was thus macroscopically brittle (the macroscopic failure strain was small) as the result of the initiation and propagation of a Mode I (i.e., tensile) crack through the thickness of the cladding. Crack growth occurred due to void initiation at fractured hydride particles and subsequent strain-induced coalescence. Mode I cracks were also observed at 300°C within the hydride rim, but the substrate failed by a mixed Mode I/II crack with no signs of void nucleation, as the hydride particles in the substrate resisted fracture. Macroscopically brittle behavior occurred for cladding with hydride rims thicker than ?170-mum. In contrast, at 375°C, materials with rim thicknesses up to 260 mum were ductile and failed due to localized necking. As a result, the effect of hydrogen on ductility at this temperature is small. Also, at this highest temperature, small Mode I cracks were occasionally observed within the hydride rim; these cracks were associated with high local hydrogen contents (>4000 wt ppm) and the presence of the tetragonal epsilon-hydride phase near the outer surface, suggesting that this hydride phase is highly brittle at all temperatures of this study. This study also tested specimens with a uniform distribution of hydrides (containing ?2200-wt-ppm hydrogen) in order to compare their behavior to that of hydride-rim specimens. Uniformly-hydrided specimens containing ?2200-wt-ppm hydrogen tested at 300°C showed the initiation of Mode I cracks and macroscopically brittle behavior, similar to that of the hydride-rim cladding. However, when tested at 375°C, cladding with ?2200-wt-ppm hydrogen showed comparable macroscopic ductility (>4% uniform hoop strain) and fracture (i.e., plastic instability) to that of non-hydrided cladding, suggesting that this cladding is macroscopically ductile. The difference between material behavior at 300 and 375°C indicates that the survivability of cladding during a reactivity initiated accident may depend critically on the exact cladding temperature at maximum load.

  7. Capture of liquid hydrogen boiloff with metal hydride absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosso, M. J.; Golben, P. M.

    1984-01-01

    A procedure which uses metal hydrides to capture some of this low pressure (,1 psig) hydrogen for subsequent reliquefaction is described. Of the five normally occurring sources of boil-off vapor the stream associated with the off-loading of liquid tankers during dewar refill was identified as the most cost effective and readily recoverable. The design, fabrication and testing of a proof-of-concept capture device, operating at a rate that is commensurate with the evolution of vapor by the target stream, is described. Liberation of the captured hydrogen gas at pressure .15 psig at normal temperatures (typical liquefier compressor suction pressure) are also demonstrated. A payback time of less than three years is projected.

  8. Ovonic nickel metal hydride batteries for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatesan, S.; Corrigan, D. A.; Fetcenko, M. A.; Gifford, P. R.; Dhar, S. K.; Ovshinsky, S. R.

    1993-01-01

    Ovonic nickel-metal hydride (NiMH) rechargeable batteries are easily adaptable to a variety of applications. Small consumer NiMH cells were developed and are now being manufactured by licensees throughout the world. This technology was successfully scaled up in larger prismatic cells aimed at electric vehicle applications. Sealed cells aimed at satellite power applications were also built and cycle tested by OBC and other outside agencies. Prototype batteries with high specific energy (over 80 Wh/kg), high energy density (245 Wh/L), and excellent power capability (400 W/kg) were produced. Ovonic NiMH batteries demonstrated an excellent cycle life of over 10,000 cycles at 30 percent DOD. Presently, Ovonic Battery Company is working on an advanced version of this battery for space applications as part of an SBIR contract from NASA.

  9. Carbon microspheres grown by using hydride vapor phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Hunsoo; Lee, Chanmi; Park, Minah; Lee, Chanbin; Yi, Sam Nyung; Yang, Min; Ahn, Hyung Soo; Kim, Suck-Whan; Yu, Young Moon; Shin, Kee Sam; Bae, Jong Seong; Sawaki, Nobuhiko

    2015-10-01

    A carbon microsphere of a core-shell type was grown by using a new method of mixed-source hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE). The surface and the cross section of the carbon microsphere grown by using the new method were observed by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The characteristics of the carbon microsphere were investigated by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM). From these measurements, the diameters of the carbon spheres were about a few hundred micrometers. Furthermore, we showed that carbon microspheres of the core-shell type could be grown successfully by using a mixed-source HVPE method and that they had larger sizes than those grown by using existing methods. This mixed-source HVPE method is proposed as a new method for making carbon microspheres.

  10. Final report for the DOE Metal Hydride Center of Excellence.

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Jay O.; Klebanoff, Leonard E.

    2012-01-01

    This report summarizes the R&D activities within the U.S. Department of Energy Metal Hydride Center of Excellence (MHCoE) from March 2005 to June 2010. The purpose of the MHCoE has been to conduct highly collaborative and multi-disciplinary applied R&D to develop new reversible hydrogen storage materials that meet or exceed DOE 2010 and 2015 system goals for hydrogen storage materials. The MHCoE combines three broad areas: mechanisms and modeling (which provide a theoretically driven basis for pursuing new materials), materials development (in which new materials are synthesized and characterized) and system design and engineering (which allow these new materials to be realized as practical automotive hydrogen storage systems). This Final Report summarizes the organization and execution of the 5-year research program to develop practical hydrogen storage materials for light duty vehicles. Major results from the MHCoE are summarized, along with suggestions for future research areas.

  11. Pressure-Induced Structures and Properties in Indium Hydrides.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yunxian; Duan, Defang; Tian, Fubo; Liu, Hanyu; Wang, Chao; Huang, Xiaoli; Li, Da; Ma, Yanbin; Liu, Bingbing; Cui, Tian

    2015-10-19

    The structures, electron properties, and potential superconductivity of indium hydrides are systematically studied under high pressure by first-principles density functional calculations. Upon compression, two stable stoichiometries (InH3 and InH5) are predicted to be thermodynamically stable. Particularly, in the two compounds, all hydrogen atoms exist in the form of H2 or H3 units. The stable phases present metallic features with the overlap between the conduction and the valence bands. The Bader analysis indicates that charges transfer from In atoms to H atoms. Electron-phonon calculations show that the estimated transition temperatures (Tc) of InH3 and InH5 are 34.1-40.5 and 22.4-27.1 K at 200 and 150 GPa, respectively. PMID:26431267

  12. Hydrogen generation from magnesium hydride by using organic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Yen-Hsi

    In this paper, the hydrolysis of solid magnesium hydride has been studied with the high concentration of catalyst at the varying temperature. An organic acid (acetic acid, CH3COOH) has been chosen as the catalyst. The study has three objectives: first, using three different weights of MgH 2 react with aqueous solution of acid for the hydrogen generation experiments. Secondly, utilizing acetic acid as the catalyst accelerates hydrogen generation. Third, emphasizing the combination of the three operating conditions (the weight of MgH2, the concentration of acetic acid, and the varying temperature) influence the amount of hydrogen generation. The experiments results show acetic acid truly can increase the rate of hydrogen generation and the weight of MgH2 can affect the amount of hydrogen generation more than the varying temperature.

  13. Recycling of nickel-metal hydride battery scrap

    SciTech Connect

    Lyman, J.W.; Palmer, G.R.

    1994-12-31

    Nickel-metal hydride (Ni-MH) battery technology is being developed as a NiCd replacement for applications in consumer cells and electric vehicle batteries. The U.S. Bureau of Mines is investigating hydrometallurgical recycling technology that separates and recovers individual components from Ni-MH battery scrap. Acid dissolution and metal recovery techniques such as precipitation and solvent extraction produced purified products of rare-earths, nickel, and other metals associated with AB{sub 2} and AB{sub 5} Ni-MH scrap. Tests were conducted on scrap cells of a single chemistry that had been de-canned to reduce iron content. Although recovery techniques have been identified in principal, their applicability to mixed battery waste stream and economic attractiveness remain to be demonstrated. 14 refs.

  14. Comparison of delayed hydride cracking behavior of two zirconium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponzoni, L. M. E.; Mieza, J. I.; De Las Heras, E.; Domizzi, G.

    2013-08-01

    Delayed hydride cracking (DHC) is an important failure mechanism that may occur in Zr alloys during service in water-cooled reactors. Two conditions must be attained to initiate DHC from a crack: the stress intensity factor must be higher than a threshold value called KIH and, hydrogen concentration must exceed a critical value. Currently the pressure tubes for CANDU reactor are fabricated from Zr-2.5Nb. In this paper the critical hydrogen concentration for DHC and the crack velocity of a developmental pressure tube, Excel, was evaluated and compared with that of Zr-2.5Nb. The DHC velocity values measured in Excel were higher than usually reported in Zr-2.5Nb. Due to the higher hydrogen solubility limits in Excel, its critical hydrogen concentration for DHC initiation is 10-50 wppm over that of Zr-2.5Nb in the range of 150-300 °C.

  15. Nickel metal hydride batteries for high power applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soria, M. Luisa; Chacón, Joaquín.; Hernández, J. Carlos; Moreno, Daniel; Ojeda, Araceli

    Nickel metal hydride (Ni/MH) is presently the most promising battery system for electric and hybrid vehicle propulsion in the short and mid-term. This paper presents the results obtained in the development of prismatic Ni/MH batteries for high power, mainly hybrid vehicle, applications. Valve regulated Ni/MH cells rated at 25 and 60 Ah have been designed and assembled using improved positive and negative electrodes. Both types of cells showed excellent high rate discharge capability and fast rechargeability and a satisfactory charge retention when stored and cycle life under deep cycling and hybrid vehicle working conditions. On the other hand, energy and power efficiency ratios were improved in the 60 Ah cells.

  16. A resonant state and the ground state of positronium hydride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Y. K.

    1978-01-01

    The lowest-lying resonance occurring in S-wave positronium-hydrogen scattering is reinvestigated, using the complex-rotation method. By employing a generalized Hylleraas-type wave function that includes all six interparticle coordinates, a very accurate value of the resonance position is obtained, along with a good value of the width. The present result for the resonance position (-1.205 plus or minus 0.001 Ry) is lower than the previous result of Drachman and Houston, who omitted the interelectronic coordinate in their trial function. In addition, the lowest ground-state energy of positronium hydride is obtained by using 210 terms in the trial wave function. The effect of the interelectronic coordinate and others on both the resonant energy and the binding energy of PsH is discussed.

  17. Modelling zirconium hydrides using the special quasirandom structure approach.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Chroneos, A; Jiang, C; Schwingenschlögl, U

    2013-05-28

    The study of the structure and properties of zirconium hydrides is important for understanding the embrittlement of zirconium alloys used as cladding in light water nuclear reactors. Simulation of the defect processes is complicated due to the random distribution of the hydrogen atoms. We propose the use of the special quasirandom structure approach as a computationally efficient way to describe this random distribution. We have generated six special quasirandom structure cells based on face centered cubic and face centered tetragonal unit cells to describe ZrH(2-x) (x = 0.25-0.5). Using density functional theory calculations we investigate the mechanical properties, stability, and electronic structure of the alloys. PMID:23588997

  18. Iridium- and Osmium-decorated Reduced Graphenes as Promising Catalysts for Hydrogen Evolution.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chee Shan; Sofer, Zden?k; Toh, Rou Jun; Eng, Alex Yong Sheng; Luxa, Jan; Pumera, Martin

    2015-06-22

    Renewable energy sources are highly sought after as a result of numerous worldwide problems concerning the environment and the shortage of energy. Currently, the focus in the field is on the development of catalysts that are able to provide water splitting catalysis and energy storage for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). While platinum is an excellent material for HER catalysis, it is costly and rare. In this work, we investigated the electrocatalytic abilities of various graphene-metal hybrids to replace platinum for the HER. The graphene materials were doped with 4f metals, namely, iridium, osmium, platinum and rhenium, as well as 3d metals, namely, cobalt, iron and manganese. We discovered that a few hybrids, in particular iridium- and osmium-doped graphenes, have the potential to become competent electrocatalysts owing to their low costs and-more importantly-to their promising electrochemical performances towards the HER. One of the more noteworthy observations of this work is the superiority of these two hybrids over MoS2 , a well-known electrocatalyst for the HER. PMID:25908556

  19. Synthesis gas transformations with heterogeneous iridium and homogeneous rhodium metal complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Getty, C.S.

    1988-01-01

    The emphasis of this work has been on the development of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalytic systems capable of the indirect transformation of H{sub 2} and CO into chemicals under mild reaction conditions. Supported iridium carbonyl and aluminum chloride were investigated in an attempt to heterogenize an analogous homogeneous catalyst. The presence of aluminum chloride was found to lead to cluster interactions resulting in a system capable of selective reduction of carbon monoxide under mild reaction conditions. When a gaseous mixture of H{sub 2}, CO, and HCl was passed over the supported cluster at 125 C, methyl chloride, methane, carbon dioxide and water were observed as major products. Unlike the homogeneous analog, only trace C{sub 2} products were detected. Infrared spectroscopy was used to investigate the preparation of the deposited clusters as well as the iridium species formed on the support during reaction. The second study involved the investigation of a rhodium carboxylate triphenylphosphine complex which was found to be an active, homogeneous hydroformylation catalyst. The system selectively produced more of the linear aldehyde than the branched. The product selectivity was found to depend upon the amount of phosphine present. Spectroscopic studies supported that a bis(triphenylphosphine)rhodium(I) trifluoroacetate carbonyl species was the active catalyst. Comparative studies with other rhodium carboxylate complexes and hydroformylation catalysts showed that the perfluorocarboxylate complexes exhibited greater activity.

  20. In vitro comparison of sputtered iridium oxide and platinum-coated neural implantable microelectrode arrays.

    PubMed

    Negi, S; Bhandari, R; Rieth, L; Solzbacher, F

    2010-02-01

    Neural interfaces connect signal processing electronics to the nervous system via implanted microelectrode arrays such as the Utah electrode array (UEA). The active sites of the UEA are coated with thin films of either platinum (Pt) or iridium oxide (IrOx). Pt and IrOx have attracted attention as a stimulating or recording material due to their ability to transfer between ionic and electronic current and to resist corrosion. The physical, mechanical, chemical, electrical and optical properties of thin films depend on the method and deposition parameters used to deposit the films. In this work, surface morphology, impedance and charge capacity of Pt and sputtered iridium oxide film (SIROF) were investigated and compared with each other. UEAs with similar electrode area and shape were employed in this study. DC sputtering was used to deposit Pt films and pulsed-dc reactive sputtering was used to deposit SIROF. The electrodes coated with SIROF and Pt were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and potential transient measurements to measure charge injection capacity (CIC). SIROF and Pt selectively deposited on the electrode tip had dendrite and granular microstructure, respectively. The CIC of unbiased SIROF and Pt was 2 and 0.3 mC cm(-2), respectively. The average impedance at 1 kHz, of SIROF and Pt electrodes, was 6 kOmega and 125 kOmega, respectively. Low impedance and high CIC make SIROF promising stimulation/recording material for neural prosthetic applications. PMID:20124668

  1. High-Performance Computer Modeling of the Cosmos-Iridium Collision

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, S; Cook, K; Fasenfest, B; Jefferson, D; Jiang, M; Leek, J; Levatin, J; Nikolaev, S; Pertica, A; Phillion, D; Springer, K; De Vries, W

    2009-08-28

    This paper describes the application of a new, integrated modeling and simulation framework, encompassing the space situational awareness (SSA) enterprise, to the recent Cosmos-Iridium collision. This framework is based on a flexible, scalable architecture to enable efficient simulation of the current SSA enterprise, and to accommodate future advancements in SSA systems. In particular, the code is designed to take advantage of massively parallel, high-performance computer systems available, for example, at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. We will describe the application of this framework to the recent collision of the Cosmos and Iridium satellites, including (1) detailed hydrodynamic modeling of the satellite collision and resulting debris generation, (2) orbital propagation of the simulated debris and analysis of the increased risk to other satellites (3) calculation of the radar and optical signatures of the simulated debris and modeling of debris detection with space surveillance radar and optical systems (4) determination of simulated debris orbits from modeled space surveillance observations and analysis of the resulting orbital accuracy, (5) comparison of these modeling and simulation results with Space Surveillance Network observations. We will also discuss the use of this integrated modeling and simulation framework to analyze the risks and consequences of future satellite collisions and to assess strategies for mitigating or avoiding future incidents, including the addition of new sensor systems, used in conjunction with the Space Surveillance Network, for improving space situational awareness.

  2. Earth Radiation Imbalance from a Constellation of 66 Iridium Satellites: Technological Aspects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiscombe, W.; Chiu, C. J-Y.

    2012-01-01

    Iridium Communications Inc. is launching a new generation of polar orbiting communication satellites in 2015-2017. Iridium will provide a hosted payload bay on each of the 66 satellites (plus 6 in-space spares). This offers the potential for a paradigm shift in the way we measure Earth radiation imbalance from space, as well as massive cost savings. Because the constellation provides 24/7 global coverage, there is no need to account for diurnal cycle via extrapolations from uncalibrated narrowband geostationary imagers. And the spares can be rolled over to view the Sun and deep space, then transfer their calibration to the other members of the constellation during the frequent cross-overs. In part using simulations of the constellation viewing realistic Earth scenes, this presentation will address the technological aspects of such a constellation: (1) the calibration strategy; (2) the highly-accurate and stable radiometers for measuring outgoing flux; and (3) the GRACE-inspired algorithms for representing the outgoing flux field in spherical harmonics and thus achieving rv500-km spatial resolution and two-hour temporal resolution.

  3. Electron-beam processing of kilogram quantities of iridium for radioisotope thermoelectric generator applications

    SciTech Connect

    Huxford, T.J.; Ohriner, E.K.

    1992-12-31

    Iridium alloys are used as fuel-cladding materials in radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs). Hardware produced at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been used in Voyagers I and 2, Galilee, and Ulysses spacecraft. An integral part of the production of iridium-sheet metal involves electron-beam (EB) processing. These processes include the degassing of powder-pressed compacts followed by multiple meltings in order to purify 500-g buttons of Ir-0.3% W alloy. Starting in 1972 and continuing into 1992, our laboratory EB processing was Performed (ca. 1970) in a 60-kW (20 kV at 3 A), two-gun system. In 1991, a new 150-kW EB gun facility was installed to complement the older unit. This paper describes how the newly installed system was qualified for production of RTG developmental work is discussed that will potentially improve the existing process by utilizing the capabilities of the new EB system.

  4. Electron-beam processing of kilogram quantities of iridium for radioisotope thermoelectric generator applications

    SciTech Connect

    Huxford, T.J.; Ohriner, E.K.

    1992-01-01

    Iridium alloys are used as fuel-cladding materials in radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs). Hardware produced at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been used in Voyagers I and 2, Galilee, and Ulysses spacecraft. An integral part of the production of iridium-sheet metal involves electron-beam (EB) processing. These processes include the degassing of powder-pressed compacts followed by multiple meltings in order to purify 500-g buttons of Ir-0.3% W alloy. Starting in 1972 and continuing into 1992, our laboratory EB processing was Performed (ca. 1970) in a 60-kW (20 kV at 3 A), two-gun system. In 1991, a new 150-kW EB gun facility was installed to complement the older unit. This paper describes how the newly installed system was qualified for production of RTG developmental work is discussed that will potentially improve the existing process by utilizing the capabilities of the new EB system.

  5. Self-calibrating microfabricated iridium oxide pH electrode array for remote monitoring.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Susan; Baldwin, Richard P

    2010-02-01

    The goal of this work is the development of microfabricated electrochemical sensing systems for environmental, industrial, and security applications requiring long-term unattended operation. The specific advantages of the microfabrication approach include the capability not only to miniaturize the size of the sensor platform but also to create an intelligent design including features such as redundant sensing electrodes, on-chip reference and auxiliary electrodes, and in situ electrode regeneration/calibration. The model system targeted here involves continuous pH monitoring in drinking water at solid-state iridium oxide electrodes. The microchips utilized consist of a flow-through silicon platform (1 cm x 1.2 cm) containing patterned gold electrodes onto which iridium oxide has been deposited electrochemically. To simulate drinking water detection scenarios, sensors are integrated into a flow system. Microfabricated designs include as many as 11 equivalent pH electrodes whose performance was evaluated for factors such as electrode-to-electrode reproducibility, long-term drift, and response to expected interfering agents. With on-chip voltage treatment, absolute potentials measured for an electrode array are within +/-4 mV, with identical (+/-1 mV/pH unit) calibration slopes. This performance level is sustainable over weeks of usage. PMID:20067252

  6. Phase diagram and electrical behavior of silicon-rich iridium silicide compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allevato, C. E.; Vining, Cronin B.

    1992-01-01

    The iridium-silicon phase diagram on the silicon-rich side was investigated by means of X-ray powder diffraction, density, differential thermal analysis, metalography, microprobe analysis, and electrical resistivity. Attempts were made to prepare eight previously reported silicon-rich iridium silicide compounds by arc melting and Bridgman-like growth. However, microprobe analysis identified only four distinct compositions: IrSi, Ir3Si4, Ir3Si5 and IrSi sub about 3. The existence of Ir4Si5 could not be confirmed in this study, even though the crystal structure has been previously reported. Differential thermal analysis (DTA) in conjunction with X-ray powder diffraction confirm polymorphism in IrSi sub about 3, determined to have orthorhombic and monoclinic unit cells in the high and low temperature forms. A eutectic composition alloy of 83 +/- 1 atomic percent silicon was observed between IrSi sub about 3 and silicon. Ir3Si4 exhibits distinct metallic behavior while Ir3Si5 is semiconducting. Both and IrSi and IrSi sub about 3 exhibit nearly temperature independent electrical resistivities on the order of 5-10 x 10 exp -6 ohms-m.

  7. Catalytic Activity of Platinum Monolayer on Iridium and Rhenium Alloy Nanoparticles for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Karan, Hiroko I.; Sasaki, Kotaro; Kuttiyiel, Kurian; Farberow, Carrie A.; Mavrikakis, Manos; Adzic, Radoslav R.

    2012-05-04

    A new type of electrocatalyst with a core?shell structure that consists of a platinum monolayer shell placed on an iridium? rhenium nanoparticle core or platinum and palladium bilayer shell deposited on that core has been prepared and tested for electrocatalytic activity for the oxygen reduction reaction. Carbon-supported iridium? rhenium alloy nanoparticles with several different molar ratios of Ir to Re were prepared by reducing metal chlorides dispersed on Vulcan carbon with hydrogen gas at 400 °C for 1 h. These catalysts showed specific electrocatalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction comparable to that of platinum. The activities of PtML/PdML/Ir2Re1, PtML/Pd2layers/Ir2Re1, and PtML/Pd2layers/Ir7Re3 catalysts were, in fact, better than that of conventional platinum electrocatalysts, and their mass activities exceeded the 2015 DOE target. Our density functional theory calculations revealed that the molar ratio of Ir to Re affects the binding strength of adsorbed OH and, thereby, the O2 reduction activity of the catalysts. The maximum specific activity was found for an intermediate OH binding energy with the corresponding catalyst on the top of the volcano plot. The monolayer concept facilitates the use of much less platinum than in other approaches. The results with the PtML/PdML/Ir2Re electrocatalyst indicate that it is a promising alternative to conventional Pt electrocatalysts in low-temperature fuel cells.

  8. Dynamic Structural Changes in a Molecular Zeolite-Supported Iridium Catalyst for Ethene Hydrogenation

    SciTech Connect

    Uzun, Alper; Gates, Bruce C.

    2009-11-16

    The structure of a catalyst often changes as a result of changes in the reactive environment during operation. Examples include changes in bulk phases, extended surface structures, and nanoparticle morphologies; now we report real-time characterization of changes in the structure of a working supported catalyst at the molecular level. Time-resolved extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) data demonstrate the reversible interconversion of mononuclear iridium complexes and tetrairidium clusters inside zeolite Y cages, with the structure controlled by the C{sub 2}H{sub 4}/H{sub 2} ratio during ethene hydrogenation at 353 K. The data demonstrate break-up of tetrairidium clusters into mononuclear complexes indicated by a decrease in the Ir-Ir coordination number in ethene-rich feed. When the feed composition was switched to first equimolar and then to a H{sub 2}-rich (C{sub 2}H{sub 4}/H{sub 2} = 0.3) feed, the EXAFS spectra show the reformation of tetrairidium clusters as the Ir-Ir coordination number increased again. When the feed composition was cycled from ethene-rich to H{sub 2}-rich, the predominant species in the catalyst cycled accordingly. Evidence confirming the structural change is provided by IR spectra of iridium carbonyls formed by probing of the catalyst with CO. The data are the first showing how to tune the structure of a solid catalyst at the molecular scale by choice of the reactant composition.

  9. Treatment of carcinoma of the penis by iridium 192 wire implant

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, N.J.; Douchez, J.; Combes, P.F.

    1982-07-01

    Since 1971, a group of 22 adult patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the penis have been treated by iridium 192 wire implants. There were 6 T1 tumors, 14 T2 tumors and 2 T3; only one patient (T3) presented with local failure after implant. Local necrosis occurred in 2 patients without local tumoral recurrence, but was sufficient enough to warrant amputation. Thus 19/22 (86%) patients were locally cured with penile conservation. In these patients the most frequent posttherapeutic complication is chronic urethral stenosis (9/19 patients, 47%) requiring repeated instrumental dilations. Four patients presented with initial inguinal mestastatic nodes; only one was cured by radiosurgical treatment. Among patients without metastatic nodes at the time of diagnosis, none had delayed metastatic nodes. Three patients died of nodal evolution, 5 patients died of intercurrent disease without evidence of disease and 14 are now alive and NED. It appears that iridium 192 wire implant is the most effective conservative treatment of invasive squamous cell carcinoma of the penis; however, these results confirm that no particular treatment is required for inguinal nodal areas for patients who initially present with no disease.

  10. [Brachytherapy in France: current situation and economic outlook due to the unavailability of iridium wires].

    PubMed

    Le Vu, B; Boucher, S

    2014-10-01

    In 2013, about 6000 patients were treated with brachytherapy, the number diminishing by 2.6% per year since 2008. Prostate, breast and gynecological cancers are the most common types of cancers. Since 2008, the number of brachytherapy facilities has decreased by 18%. In medicoeconomic terms, brachytherapy faces many problems: the coding system is outdated; brachytherapy treatments cost as much as internal radiation; fees do not cover costs; since iridium wire has disappeared from the market, the technique will be transferred to more expensive high-speed or pulse dose rates. The French financing grid based on the national study of costs lags behind changes in such treatments and in the best of cases, hospitals resorting to alternatives such as in-hospital brachytherapy are funded at 46% of their additional costs. Brachytherapy is a reference technique. With intense pressure on hospital pricing, financing brachytherapy facilities will become even more problematic as a consequence of the disappearance of iridium 192 wires. The case of brachytherapy illustrates the limits of the French financing system and raises serious doubts as to its responsiveness. PMID:25195115

  11. Hydride production in zircaloy-4 as a function of time and temperature 

    E-print Network

    Parkison, Adam Joseph

    2009-05-15

    under flowing argon-5% hydrogen for various times and temperatures. The result of these experiments is a correlation which relates the rate of zirconium hydride formation to the process temperature. This correlation may now be used to design a method...

  12. Hydride formation in zirconium and titanium as a result of low energy ion bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackman, J. A.; Carpenter, G. J. C.; McCaffrey, J.

    1993-06-01

    Parallel energy loss spectroscopy (PEELS), convergent beam microdiffraction and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) have revealed that extensive hydride formation can occur in Zr and Ti6A14V as a direct consequence of low energy (a few keV) Ar ion bombardment in a typical ion thinning unit. Pure hydride films several microns thick could be formed on bulk samples in a few hours of sputtering under conditions which are frequently used to prepare samples for transmission electron microscopy. This effect was largely independent of the presence of contaminating hydrogen introduced in the form of water vapour in the sputter chamber, or hydrogen contamination in the incident Ar beam. However, hydride formation could be strongly influenced by controlling the presence of hydrocarbons arising from the evaporation of pump oil. Details of the degree of hydride formation as a result of experimental conditions are presented.

  13. Hydride precipitation kinetics in Zircaloy-4 studied using synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courty, Olivier F.; Motta, Arthur T.; Piotrowski, Christopher J.; Almer, Jonathan D.

    2015-06-01

    As a result of in-reactor corrosion during operation in nuclear reactors, hydrogen can enter the zirconium fuel cladding and precipitate as brittle hydride particles, which may reduce cladding ductility. Dissolved hydrogen responds to temperature gradients, resulting in transport and precipitation into cold spots so that the distribution of hydrides in the cladding is inhomogeneous. The hydrogen precipitation kinetics plays a strong role in the spatial distribution of the hydrides in the cladding. The precipitation rate is normally described as proportional to the supersaturation of hydrogen in solid solution. The proportionality constant, ?2, for hydride precipitation in Zircaloy-4 is measured directly using in situ synchrotron X-Ray diffraction, at different temperatures and with three different initial hydrogen concentrations. The results validate the linear approximation of the phenomenological model and a near constant value of ?2 = 4.5 × 10-4 s-1 was determined for the temperature range studied.

  14. Characterization of sputtered iridium oxide thin films on planar and laser micro-structured platinum thin film surfaces for neural stimulation applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thanawala, Sachin

    Electrical stimulation of neurons provides promising results for treatment of a number of diseases and for restoration of lost function. Clinical examples include retinal stimulation for treatment of blindness and cochlear implants for deafness and deep brain stimulation for treatment of Parkinsons disease. A wide variety of materials have been tested for fabrication of electrodes for neural stimulation applications, some of which are platinum and its alloys, titanium nitride, and iridium oxide. In this study iridium oxide thin films were sputtered onto laser micro-structured platinum thin films by pulsed-DC reactive sputtering of iridium metal in oxygen-containing atmosphere, to obtain high charge capacity coatings for neural stimulation applications. The micro-structuring of platinum films was achieved by a pulsed-laser-based technique (KrF excimer laser emitting at lambda=248nm). The surface morphology of the micro-structured films was studied using different surface characterization techniques. In-vitro biocompatibility of these laser micro-structured films coated with iridium oxide thin films was evaluated using cortical neurons isolated from rat embryo brain. Characterization of these laser micro-structured films coated with iridium oxide, by cyclic voltammetry and impedance spectroscopy has revealed a considerable decrease in impedance and increase in charge capacity. A comparison between amorphous and crystalline iridium oxide thin films as electrode materials indicated that amorphous iridium oxide has significantly higher charge capacity and lower impedance making it preferable material for neural stimulation application. Our biocompatibility studies show that neural cells can grow and differentiate successfully on our laser micro-structured films coated with iridium oxide. This indicates that reactively sputtered iridium oxide (SIROF) is biocompatible.

  15. Solvation dynamics and energetics of intramolecular hydride transfer reactions in biomass conversion.

    PubMed

    Mushrif, Samir H; Varghese, Jithin J; Krishnamurthy, Chethana B

    2015-02-21

    Hydride transfer changes the charge structure of the reactant and thus, may induce reorientation/reorganization of solvent molecules. This solvent reorganization may in turn alter the energetics of the reaction. In the present work, we investigate the intramolecular hydride transfer by taking Lewis acid catalyzed glucose to fructose isomerization as an example. The C2-C1 hydride transfer is the rate limiting step in this reaction. Water and methanol are used as solvents and hydride transfer is simulated in the presence of explicit solvent molecules, treated quantum mechanically and at a finite temperature, using Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics (CPMD) and metadynamics. Activation free energy barrier for hydride transfer in methanol is found to be 50 kJ mol(-1) higher than that in water. In contrast, in density functional theory calculations, using an implicit solvent environment, the barriers are almost identical. Analysis of solvent dynamics and electronic polarization along the molecular dynamics trajectory and the results of CPMD-metadynamics simulation of the hydride transfer process in the absence of any solvent suggest that higher barrier in methanol is a result of non-equilibrium solvation. Methanol undergoes electronic polarization during the hydride transfer step. However, its molecular orientational relaxation is a much slower process that takes place after the hydride transfer, over an extended timescale. This results in non-equilibrium solvation. Water, on the other hand, does not undergo significant electronic polarization and thus, has to undergo minimal molecular reorientation to provide near equilibrium solvation to the transition state and an improved equilibrium solvation to the post hydride shift product state. Hence, the hydride transfer step is also observed to be exergonic in water and endergonic in methanol. The aforementioned explanation is juxtaposed to enzyme catalyzed charge transfer reactions, where the enhanced solvation of the transition and product states by enzymes, due to electrostatic interactions, reduces the activation free energy barrier and the free energy change of the reaction. Similarly, we suggest that, in the intramolecular hydride shift, improved solvation of the transition state and of the product state by water is achieved due to minimal polarization and reorientation, and (near) equilibrium solvation. PMID:25591500

  16. High-Efficiency White Organic Light-Emitting Devices Based on a Highly Amorphous Iridium(III) Orange Phosphor

    E-print Network

    (III) Orange Phosphor Xiao-Ming Yu, Hoi-Sing Kwok,*, Wai-Yeung Wong,*, and Gui-Jiang Zhou Department on a new orange phosphorescent iridium complex [Ir(L)3] (HL ) (9,9-diethyl-7-pyridinylfluoren-2-yl of the electroluminescence spectrum is observed, with the blue color intensity increasing relative to the orange component

  17. Site-isolated Iridium Complexes on MgO Powder: Individual Ir Atoms Imaged by Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Uzun, A.; Ortalan, V; D. Browning, N; C. Gates , B

    2009-01-01

    Iridium complexes were synthesized on MgO powder by adsorption of Ir(C{sub 2}H{sub 4}){sub 2}(acac) [acac = acetonylacetonate]; images determined by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy show individual Ir atoms, demonstrating that the supported complexes were site-isolated.

  18. One-Pot Catalysis Using a Chiral Iridium Complex/Brønsted Base: Catalytic Asymmetric Synthesis of Catalponol.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takeyuki; Ismiyarto; Ishizaka, Yuka; Zhou, Da-Yang; Asano, Kaori; Sasai, Hiroaki

    2015-11-01

    Tandem asymmetric hydrogen transfer oxidation/aldol condensation under relay catalysis of a chiral iridium complex/achiral Brønsted base binary system is described for the synthesis of ?-benzylidene-?-hydroxytetralones with high ee's. A two-step synthesis of catalponol was achieved using this sequential methodology together with regio- and stereoselective hydroboration. PMID:26496409

  19. Precise measurement of K-shell fluorescence yield in iridium: An improved test of internal-conversion theory 

    E-print Network

    Nica, N.; Hardy, John C.; Iacob, VE; Montague, JR; Trzhaskovskaya, MB.

    2005-01-01

    -conversion coefficients alpha(K). Since the alpha(K) value calculated for the Ir-191 transition is virtually independent of the hole treatment, our result also yields a model-independent value for the iridium fluorescence yield, omega(K)=0.954(9)....

  20. Application of AirCell Cellular AMPS Network and Iridium Satellite System Dual Mode Service to Air Traffic Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shamma, Mohammed A.

    2004-01-01

    The AirCell/Iridium dual mode service is evaluated for potential applications to Air Traffic Management (ATM) communication needs. The AirCell system which is largely based on the Advanced Mobile Phone System (AMPS) technology, and the Iridium FDMA/TDMA system largely based on the Global System for Mobile Communications(GSM) technology, can both provide communication relief for existing or future aeronautical communication links. Both have a potential to serve as experimental platforms for future technologies via a cost effective approach. The two systems are well established in the entire CONUS and globally hence making it feasible to utilize in all regions, for all altitudes, and all classes of aircraft. Both systems have been certified for air usage. The paper summarizes the specifications of the AirCell/Iridium system, as well as the ATM current and future links, and application specifications. the paper highlights the scenarios, applications, and conditions under which the AirCell/Iridium technology can be suited for ATM Communication.

  1. C-N Coupling of Amides with Alcohols Catalyzed by N-Heterocyclic Carbene-Phosphine Iridium Complexes.

    PubMed

    Kerdphon, Sutthichat; Quan, Xu; Parihar, Vijay Singh; Andersson, Pher G

    2015-11-20

    N-Heterocyclic carbene-phosphine iridium complexes (NHC-Ir) were developed/found to be a highly reactive catalyst for N-monoalkylation of amides with alcohols via hydrogen transfer. The reaction produced the desired product in high isolated yields using a wide range of substrates with low catalyst loading and short reaction times. PMID:26489041

  2. A review of catalyst-enhanced magnesium hydride as a hydrogen storage material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, C. J.

    2015-09-01

    Magnesium hydride remains an attractive hydrogen storage material due to the high hydrogen capacity and low cost of production. A high activation energy and poor kinetics at practical temperatures for the pure material have driven research into different additives to improve the sorption properties. This review details the development of catalytic additives and their effect on the activation energy, kinetics and thermodynamic properties of magnesium hydride.

  3. Photogeneration of Hydride Donors and Their Use Toward CO2 Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita,E.; Muckerman, J.T.; Polyansky, D.E.

    2009-06-07

    Despite substantial effort, no one has succeeded in efficiently producing methanol from CO2 using homogeneous photocatalytic systems. We are pursuing reaction schemes based on a sequence of hydride-ion transfers to carry out stepwise reduction of CO2 to methanol. We are using hydride-ion transfer from photoproduced C-H bonds in metal complexes with bio-inspired ligands (i.e., NADH-like ligands) that are known to store one proton and two electrons.

  4. Influence of hydrides on ductile fracture in the Zr-2. 5 Nb alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Nikulin, S.A.; Shtremel, M.A.; Khanzhin, V.G.; Fateev, B.M. ); Markelov, V.A. )

    1993-11-01

    The influence of hydrides on the mechanism and kinetics of ductile fracture in the Zr-2.5 Nb alloy has been analyzed as a function of static tension of specimens containing 200 ppm hydrogen. The smooth cylindrical specimens used were of two orientations with the maximum hydride platelet dimensions from 5 to 200 [mu]m preferentially oriented parallel to the tensile axis. Nucleation of cracks in hydrides and internal cracks in a specimen at different deformation stages have been studied by recording the peak amplitudes of acoustic emission with a nonresonant damped sensor. The joint analysis of the stress-strain diagrams and acoustic emission results of metallographic and fractographic examinations has revealed the role of hydrides in the loss of stability by flow, neck formation and ductile fracturing under tension. Depending on the length of hydrides, two types of the ductile fracture kinetics are realized. Fine hydrides whose average size is 10 to 20 [mu]m do not influence the stability of the plastic flow under tension, but they merely accelerate the generation of voids at the stage of ductile fracture formation. In contrast, crack nucleation is large hydrides whose average size is [gt]60 to 100 [mu]m is the cause of premature localization of deformation in the neck and axial decohesion in the fracture, which reduces the overall ductility of the alloy. The record of acoustic emission provided by a damped sensor shows that the signal peak amplitude and the axial crack area are proportional; this allows one to use an amplitude analysis of signals for the quantitative estimation of the dimensions of hydride-induced cracks.

  5. Long-term pressure and thermal cycling studies on lithium imide-lithium amide complex hydrides and vanadium-carbon hydrides, and electrochemical hydrogen permeation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, Joshua H.

    Solid-state hydrogen storage is becoming increasingly important for future development of non-polluting vehicular fuels and nuclear technology. Understanding the nature of classical and complex hydrides is of great importance in developing new high gravimetric or volumetric capacity hydrides. Towards the nuclear technology, we have studied vanadium hydrides with lattice impurities for high volumetric capacities and very low pressures. For the vehicular technology, we have studied complex hydrides with emphasis on gaseous impurity effects upon pressure cycling. Another aspect of this work is to understand fundamental hydrogen permeation in materials, for example permeations in steel. In nuclear applications, vanadium hydride has been generally studied at high pressures, but very little work has been done on low pressure hydriding and the effect of impurities. Thermodynamic pressure composition-isotherms and structural studies were performed on V-0.5 at.%C. The addition of carbon did not change the thermodynamics significantly but it had an impact on the decrepitation effects usually observed in metal hydrides. In vehicular applications, high gravimetric capacities are desirable. This study was focused on modern complex hydrides especially Li based imide-amide and binary amide-alanate systems. In this case, the emphasis was on effect of gaseous impurities upon pressure cycling, and other related. These contamination studies are important as candidate materials must have long-term stability under repeated loading of the hydride beds with fresh hydrogen charges. The starting material was Li3N and during hydriding Li2NH (imide) and subsequently, LiNH 2 (amide) phases were formed with a full capacity of ˜10 wt.% hydrogen. The pressure cycling occurred between the imide and amide phases, yielding ˜5.6 wt.% reversible hydrogen. The gaseous contamination effects on the amide-imide system were studied using 100 ppm levels of impurity gases such as O 2, H2O, CH4, CO and NH3 mixed with UHP hydrogen. In addition, commercial-grade industrial hydrogen was also used to simulate the hydrogen purchased from a commercial "Hydrogen gas" station. In the case of industrial hydrogen we found a ˜50% loss (˜2.6 wt% out of ˜5.6 wt% H2) after 1100 pressure cycles. Using the more oxygenated 100ppm O2-UHP H2 mixtures we found a capacity loss of ˜75% (1.4 wt% out of 5.6 wt%) after 560 pressure cycles. Ex-situ x-ray diffraction studies after cycling revealed formation of predominant new Li2O phase along with Li2NH-LiH phases. The addition of H2O, CH4, NH3, and CO showed varying degrees capacity loss. The alanate-imide binary mixed hydridese were also tested for resistance to impurity gases in hydrogen. These samples were obtained from DoE's Metal Hydride Center of Excellence (MHCoE) partner from University of Utah. Thermodynamic measurements were performed by pressure cycling with O2, and thermal aging with CO on the alanate-imide binary mixtures The initial desorption of the material showed ˜7 wt% hydrogen storage, and subsequent hydriding/dehydriding showed 3 wt.% capacity when using a maximum rehydriding pressure of ˜10 bar. The final portion of this work focuses on electrochemical hydrogen permeation experiments performed on steels for nuclear repository service at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Hydrogen embrittlement and hydrogen induced cracking are common modes of failure when steel is exposed to hydrogen. In this, we studied the diffusion properties of hydrogen in both low and medium carbon steel using the electrochemical Devanathan-Stachurski method. The diffusivities and total hydrogen flux created by galvanostatic charging were measured in both standard 0.1 N NaOH electrolyte and in electrolyte simulating well water taken near Yucca Mountain. Potentiodynamic, potentiostatic permeation electrochemical tests, along with structural and elemental characterization was performed.

  6. Advanced Metal-Hydrides-Based Thermal Battery: A New Generation of High Density Thermal Battery Based on Advanced Metal Hydrides

    SciTech Connect

    2011-12-01

    HEATS Project: The University of Utah is developing a compact hot-and-cold thermal battery using advanced metal hydrides that could offer efficient climate control system for EVs. The team’s innovative designs of heating and cooling systems for EVs with high energy density, low-cost thermal batteries could significantly reduce the weight and eliminate the space constraint in automobiles. The thermal battery can be charged by plugging it into an electrical outlet while charging the electric battery and it produces heat and cold through a heat exchanger when discharging. The ultimate goal of the project is a climate-controlling thermal battery that can last up to 5,000 charge and discharge cycles while substantially increasing the driving range of EVs, thus reducing the drain on electric batteries.

  7. First-principles calculations of niobium hydride formation in superconducting radio-frequency cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Denise C.; Cooley, Lance D.; Seidman, David N.

    2013-09-01

    Niobium hydride is suspected to be a major contributor to degradation of the quality factor of niobium superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities. In this study, we connect the fundamental properties of hydrogen in niobium to SRF cavity performance and processing. We modeled several of the niobium hydride phases relevant to SRF cavities and present their thermodynamic, electronic, and geometric properties determined from calculations based on density-functional theory. We find that the absorption of hydrogen from the gas phase into niobium is exothermic and hydrogen becomes somewhat anionic. The absorption of hydrogen by niobium lattice vacancies is strongly preferred over absorption into interstitial sites. A single vacancy can accommodate six hydrogen atoms in the symmetrically equivalent lowest-energy sites and additional hydrogen in the nearby interstitial sites affected by the strain field: this indicates that a vacancy can serve as a nucleation center for hydride phase formation. Small hydride precipitates may then occur near lattice vacancies upon cooling. Vacancy clusters and extended defects should also be enriched in hydrogen, potentially resulting in extended hydride phase regions upon cooling. We also assess the phase changes in the niobium-hydrogen system based on charge transfer between niobium and hydrogen, the strain field associated with interstitial hydrogen, and the geometry of the hydride phases. The results of this study stress the importance of not only the hydrogen content in niobium, but also the recovery state of niobium for the performance of SRF cavities.

  8. Synthesis and Electrocatalytic Property of Diiron Hydride Complexes Derived from a Thiolate-Bridged Diiron Complex.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dawei; Li, Yang; Wang, Baomin; Zhao, Xiangyu; Su, Linan; Chen, Si; Tong, Peng; Luo, Yi; Qu, Jingping

    2015-11-01

    Interaction of a diiron thiolate-bridged complex, [Cp*Fe(?-?(2):?(4)-bdt)FeCp*] (1) (Cp* = ?(5)-C5Me5; bdt = benzene-1,2-dithiolate) with a proton gives an Fe(III)Fe(III) hydride bridged complex, [Cp*Fe(?-bdt)(?-H)FeCp*][BF4] (3[BF4]). According to in situ variable temperature (1)H NMR studies, the formation of 3[BF4] was evidenced to occur through a stepwise pathway: protonation occurring at an iron center to produce terminal hydride [Cp*Fe(?-bdt)(t-H)FeCp*][BF4] (2) and subsequent intramolecular isomerization to bridging hydride 3[BF4]. A one-electron reduction of 3[BF4] by CoCp2 affords a paramagnetic mixed-valent Fe(II)Fe(III) hydride complex, [Cp*Fe(?-?(2):?(2)-bdt)(?-H)FeCp*] (4). Further, studies on protonation processes of diruthenium and iron-ruthenium analogues of 1, [Cp*M1(?-bdt)M2Cp*] (M1 = M2 = Ru, 5; M1 = Fe, M2 = Ru, 8), provide experimental evidence for terminal hydride species at these bdt systems. Importantly, diiron or diruthenium hydride bridged complexes 3[BF4], 7[BF4] and iron-ruthenium heterodinuclear complex 8[PF6] can realize electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution. PMID:26479581

  9. Effects of hydride morphology on the embrittlement of Zircaloy-4 cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ju-Seong; Kim, Tae-Hoon; Kook, Dong-Hak; Kim, Yong-Soo

    2015-01-01

    Spent nuclear fuel claddings discharged from water reactors contain hydrogen up to 800 wppm depending on the burn-up and power history. During long-term dry storage, the cladding temperature slowly decreases with diminishing decay heat and absorbed hydrogen atoms are precipitated in Zr-matrix according to the terminal solid solubility of hydrogen. Under these conditions, hydrides can significantly reduce cladding ductility and impact resistance, especially when the radial hydrides are massively present in the material. In this study, the effects of hydride morphology on the embrittlement of Zircaloy-4 cladding were investigated using a ring compression test. The results show that circumferentially hydrided Zircaloy-4 cladding is brittle at room temperature but its ductility is regained substantially as the temperature goes above 150 °C. On the other hand, radially hydrided cladding remains brittle at 150 °C and micro-cracks developed in the radial hydrides can act as crack propagation paths. Fracture energy analysis shows that ductile to brittle transition temperature is low in between 25 °C and 100 °C in the former case, whereas it lies in between 200 °C and 250 °C in the latter case.

  10. IRIDIUM exposure increases c-fos expression in the mouse brain only at levels which likely result in tissue heating.

    PubMed

    Morrissey, J J; Raney, S; Heasley, E; Rathinavelu, P; Dauphinee, M; Fallon, J H

    1999-01-01

    With the rapid development of wireless communication technology over the last 20 years, there has been some public concern over possible health effects of long-term, low-level radiofrequency exposure from cellular telephones. As an initial step in compiling a database for risk analysis by government agencies, the effects of 1-h exposure of mice to a 1.6-GHz radiofrequency signal, given as either a continuous wave or pulse modulated at 11 Hz with a duty cycle of 4:1 and a pulse duration of 9.2 ms IRIDIUM), on c-fos gene expression in the brain was investigated. The IRIDIUM signal is the operating frequency for a ground-to-satellite-to-ground cellular communications web which has recently become fully operational, and was named as such due to the original designed employment of the same number of low orbiting satellites as there are electrons orbiting the nucleus of an iridium atom. The expression of c-fos was not significantly elevated in the brains of mice until exposure levels exceeded six times the peak dose and 30 times the whole body average dose as maximal cellular telephone exposure limits in humans. Higher level exposure using either continuous wave (analog) or IRIDIUM signals elevated c-fos to a similar extent, suggesting no obvious pulsed modulation-specific effects. The pattern of c-fos elevation in limbic cortex and subcortex areas at higher exposure levels is most consistent with a stress response due to thermal perception coupled with restraint and/or neuron activity near thermoregulatory regions, and not consistent with any direct interaction of IRIDIUM energy with brain tissue. PMID:10426505

  11. Understanding electrogenerated chemiluminescence efficiency in blue-shifted iridium(III)-complexes: an experimental and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Barbante, Gregory J; Doeven, Egan H; Kerr, Emily; Connell, Timothy U; Donnelly, Paul S; White, Jonathan M; Lópes, Thais; Laird, Sarah; Wilson, David J D; Barnard, Peter J; Hogan, Conor F; Francis, Paul S

    2014-03-17

    Compared to tris(2-phenylpyridine)iridium(III) ([Ir(ppy)3 ]), iridium(III) complexes containing difluorophenylpyridine (df-ppy) and/or an ancillary triazolylpyridine ligand [3-phenyl-1,2,4-triazol-5-ylpyridinato (ptp) or 1-benzyl-1,2,3-triazol-4-ylpyridine (ptb)] exhibit considerable hypsochromic shifts (ca. 25-60?nm), due to the significant stabilising effect of these ligands on the HOMO energy, whilst having relatively little effect on the LUMO. Despite their lower photoluminescence quantum yields compared with [Ir(ppy)3 ] and [Ir(df-ppy)3 ], the iridium(III) complexes containing triazolylpyridine ligands gave greater electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL) intensities (using tri-n-propylamine (TPA) as a co-reactant), which can in part be ascribed to the more energetically favourable reactions of the oxidised complex (M(+) ) with both TPA and its neutral radical oxidation product. The calculated iridium(III) complex LUMO energies were shown to be a good predictor of the corresponding M(+) LUMO energies, and both HOMO and LUMO levels are related to ECL efficiency. The theoretical and experimental data together show that the best strategy for the design of efficient new blue-shifted electrochemiluminophores is to aim to stabilise the HOMO, while only moderately stabilising the LUMO, thereby increasing the energy gap but ensuring favourable thermodynamics and kinetics for the ECL reaction. Of the iridium(III) complexes examined, [Ir(df-ppy)2 (ptb)](+) was most attractive as a blue-emitter for ECL detection, featuring a large hypsochromic shift (?max =454 and 484?nm), superior co-reactant ECL intensity than the archetypal homoleptic green and blue emitters: [Ir(ppy)3 ] and [Ir(df-ppy)3 ] (by over 16-fold and threefold, respectively), and greater solubility in polar solvents. PMID:24591091

  12. Effects of outgassing of loader chamber walls on hydriding of thin films for commercial applications

    SciTech Connect

    Provo, James L.

    2014-07-01

    An important aspect of understanding industrial processing is to know the characteristics of the materials used in such processes. A study was performed to determine the effects of hydriding chamber material on the degree of hydriding for the commercial production of thin film hydride targets for various research universities, commercial companies, and government national laboratories. The goal was to increase the degree of hydriding of various thin film hydrides and to study the vacuum environment during air-exposure hydriding. For this purpose, dynamic residual gas analysis during deuterium gas hydride processing was utilized with erbium thin films, employing a special set-up for direct dynamic hydride gas sampling during processing at elevated temperature and full loading gas pressure. Complete process data for (1) a copper–(1.83?wt.?%)beryllium wet hydrogen fired passivated (600?°C–1?h) externally heated pipe hydriding chamber are reported. Dynamic residual gas analysis comparisons during hydriding are presented for hydriding chambers made from (2) alumina (99.8 wt.?%), (3) copper (with an interior aluminum coating ?10 k Å thick, and (4) for a stainless-steel air-fired passivated (900?°C–1?h) chamber. Dynamic data with deuterium gas in the chamber at the hydriding temperature (450?°C) showed the presence and growth of water vapor (D{sub 2}O) and related mixed ion species(H{sub 2}O{sup +}, HDO{sup +}, D{sub 2}O{sup +}, and OD{sup +}) from hydrogen isotope exchange reactions during the 1?h process time. Peaks at mass-to-charge ratios (i.e., m/e) of 12(C{sup +}), 16(CD{sub 2}{sup +}), 17(CHD{sub 2}{sup +}), and 18(CD{sub 3}{sup +}, OD{sup +}) increased for approximately the first half hour of a 1?h hydriding process and then approach steady state. Mass-to-charge peaks at 19(HDO{sup +}) and 20(D{sub 2}O{sup +}) continue to increase throughout the process cycle. Using the m/e?=?20 (D{sub 2}O{sup +}) peak intensity from chamber (1)–Cu(1.83 wt.?%)Be as a standard, the peak intensity from chamber (4)—stainless-steel (air-fired) was 7.1× higher, indicating that the surface of stainless-steel had a larger concentration of reactive oxygen and/or water than hydrogen. The (D{sub 2}O{sup +}) peak intensity from chamber (3)—Cu (interior Al coating) was 1.55× larger and chamber (2)—alumina(99.8%) was 1.33× higher than Cu(1.83 wt.?%)Be. Thus copper–(1.83 wt.?%)beryllium was the best hydriding chamber material studied followed closely by the alumina (99.8 wt.?%) chamber. Gas take-up by Er occluder targets processed in Cu(1.83?wt.?%)Be hydriding chambers (i.e., gas/metal atomic ratios) correlate with the dynamic RGA data.

  13. Hydrogen generation using silicon nanoparticles and their mixtures with alkali metal hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patki, Gauri Dilip

    Hydrogen is a promising energy carrier, for use in fuel cells, engines, and turbines for transportation or mobile applications. Hydrogen is desirable as an energy carrier, because its oxidation by air releases substantial energy (thermally or electrochemically) and produces only water as a product. In contrast, hydrocarbon energy carriers inevitably produce CO2, contributing to global warming. While CO2 capture may prove feasible in large stationary applications, implementing it in transportation and mobile applications is a daunting challenge. Thus a zero-emission energy carrier like hydrogen is especially needed in these cases. Use of H2 as an energy carrier also brings new challenges such as safe handling of compressed hydrogen and implementation of new transport, storage, and delivery processes and infrastructure. With current storage technologies, hydrogen's energy per volume is very low compared to other automobile fuels. High density storage of compressed hydrogen requires combinations of high pressure and/or low temperature that are not very practical. An alternative for storage is use of solid light weight hydrogenous material systems which have long durability, good adsorption properties and high activity. Substantial research has been conducted on carbon materials like activated carbon, carbon nanofibers, and carbon nanotubes due to their high theoretical hydrogen capacities. However, the theoretical values have not been achieved, and hydrogen uptake capacities in these materials are below 10 wt. %. In this thesis we investigated the use of silicon for hydrogen generation. Hydrogen generation via water oxidation of silicon had been ignored due to slow reaction kinetics. We hypothesized that the hydrogen generation rate could be improved by using high surface area silicon nanoparticles. Our laser-pyrolysis-produced nanoparticles showed surprisingly rapid hydrogen generation and high hydrogen yield, exceeding the theoretical maximum of two moles of H2 per mole of Si. We compare our silicon nanoparticles (˜10nm diameter) with commercial silicon nanopowder (<100nm diameter) and ball-milled silicon powder (325 mesh). The increase in rate upon decreasing the particle size to 10 nm was even greater than would be expected based upon the increase in surface area. While specific surface area increased by a factor of 6 in going from <100 nm to ˜10 nm particles, the hydrogen production rate increased by a factor of 150. However, in all cases, silicon requires a base (e.g. NaOH, KOH, hydrazine) to catalyze its reaction with water. Metal hydrides are also promising hydrogen storage materials. The optimum metal hydride would possess high hydrogen storage density at moderate temperature and pressure, release hydrogen safely and controllably, and be stable in air. Alkali metal hydrides have high hydrogen storage density, but exhibit high uncontrollable reactivity with water. In an attempt to control this explosive nature while maintaining high storage capacity, we mixed our silicon nanoparticles with the hydrides. This has dual benefits: (1) the hydride- water reaction produces the alkali hydroxide needed for base-catalyzed silicon oxidation, and (2) dilution with 10nm coating by, the silicon may temper the reactivity of the hydride, making the process more controllable. Initially, we analyzed hydrolysis of pure alkali metal hydrides and alkaline earth metal hydrides. Lithium hydride has particularly high hydrogen gravimetric density, along with faster reaction kinetics than sodium hydride or magnesium hydride. On analysis of hydrogen production we found higher hydrogen yield from the silicon nanoparticle—metal hydride mixture than from pure hydride hydrolysis. The silicon-hydride mixtures using our 10nm silicon nanoparticles produced high hydrogen yield, exceeding the theoretical yield. Some evidence of slowing of the hydride reaction rate upon addition of silicon nanoparticles was observed.

  14. Complex Hydride Compounds with Enhanced Hydrogen Storage Capacity

    SciTech Connect

    Mosher, Daniel A.; Opalka, Susanne M.; Tang, Xia; Laube, Bruce L.; Brown, Ronald J.; Vanderspurt, Thomas H.; Arsenault, Sarah; Wu, Robert; Strickler, Jamie; Anton, Donald L.; Zidan, Ragaiy; Berseth, Polly

    2008-02-18

    The United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), in collaboration with major partners Albemarle Corporation (Albemarle) and the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), conducted research to discover new hydride materials for the storage of hydrogen having on-board reversibility and a target gravimetric capacity of ? 7.5 weight percent (wt %). When integrated into a system with a reasonable efficiency of 60% (mass of hydride / total mass), this target material would produce a system gravimetric capacity of ? 4.5 wt %, consistent with the DOE 2007 target. The approach established for the project combined first principles modeling (FPM - UTRC) with multiple synthesis methods: Solid State Processing (SSP - UTRC), Solution Based Processing (SBP - Albemarle) and Molten State Processing (MSP - SRNL). In the search for novel compounds, each of these methods has advantages and disadvantages; by combining them, the potential for success was increased. During the project, UTRC refined its FPM framework which includes ground state (0 Kelvin) structural determinations, elevated temperature thermodynamic predictions and thermodynamic / phase diagram calculations. This modeling was used both to precede synthesis in a virtual search for new compounds and after initial synthesis to examine reaction details and options for modifications including co-reactant additions. The SSP synthesis method involved high energy ball milling which was simple, efficient for small batches and has proven effective for other storage material compositions. The SBP method produced very homogeneous chemical reactions, some of which cannot be performed via solid state routes, and would be the preferred approach for large scale production. The MSP technique is similar to the SSP method, but involves higher temperature and hydrogen pressure conditions to achieve greater species mobility. During the initial phases of the project, the focus was on higher order alanate complexes in the phase space between alkaline metal hydrides (AmH), Alkaline earth metal hydrides (AeH2), alane (AlH3), transition metal (Tm) hydrides (TmHz, where z=1-3) and molecular hydrogen (H2). The effort started first with variations of known alanates and subsequently extended the search to unknown compounds. In this stage, the FPM techniques were developed and validated on known alanate materials such as NaAlH4 and Na2LiAlH6. The coupled predictive methodologies were used to survey over 200 proposed phases in six quaternary spaces, formed from various combinations of Na, Li Mg and/or Ti with Al and H. A wide range of alanate compounds was examined using SSP having additions of Ti, Cr, Co, Ni and Fe. A number of compositions and reaction paths were identified having H weight fractions up to 5.6 wt %, but none meeting the 7.5 wt%H reversible goal. Similarly, MSP of alanates produced a number of interesting compounds and general conclusions regarding reaction behavior of mixtures during processing, but no alanate based candidates meeting the 7.5 wt% goal. A novel alanate, LiMg(AlH4)3, was synthesized using SBP that demonstrated a 7.0 wt% capacity with a desorption temperature of 150°C. The deuteride form was synthesized and characterized by the Institute for Energy (IFE) in Norway to determine its crystalline structure for related FPM studies. However, the reaction exhibited exothermicity and therefore was not reversible under acceptable hydrogen gas pressures for on-board recharging. After the extensive studies of alanates, the material class of emphasis was shifted to borohydrides. Through SBP, several ligand-stabilized Mg(BH4)2 complexes were synthesized. The Mg(BH4)2*2NH3 complex was found to change behavior with slightly different synthesis conditions and/or aging. One of the two mechanisms was an amine-borane (NH3BH3) like dissociation reaction which released up to 16 wt %H and more conservatively 9 wt%H when not including H2 released from the NH3. From FPM, the stability of the Mg(BH4)2*2NH3 compound was found to increase with the inclusion of NH3 groups in the inner-Mg coordination

  15. Migration of Single Iridium Atoms and Tri-iridium Clusters on MgO Surfaces. Aberration-Corrected STEM Imaging and ab-initio Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Chang W.; Iddir, Hakim; Uzun, Alper; Curtiss, Larry A.; Browning, Nigel D.; Gates, Bruce C.; Ortalan, Volkan

    2015-11-06

    To address the challenge of fast, direct atomic-scale visualization of the diffusion of atoms and clusters on surfaces, we used aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) with high scan speeds (as little as ~0.1 s per frame) to visualize the diffusion of (1) a heavy atom (Ir) on the surface of a support consisting of light atoms, MgO(100), and (2) an Ir3 cluster on MgO(110). Sequential Z-contrast images elucidate the diffusion mechanisms, including the hopping of Ir1 and the rotational migration of Ir3 as two Ir atoms remain anchored to the surface. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations provided estimates of the diffusion energy barriers and binding energies of the iridium species to the surfaces. The results show how the combination of fast-scan STEM and DFT calculations allow real-time visualization and fundamental understanding of surface diffusion phenomena pertaining to supported catalysts and other materials.

  16. Metal hydrides: an innovative and challenging conversion reaction anode for lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Aymard, Luc; Oumellal, Yassine; Bonnet, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The state of the art of conversion reactions of metal hydrides (MH) with lithium is presented and discussed in this review with regard to the use of these hydrides as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries. A focus on the gravimetric and volumetric storage capacities for different examples from binary, ternary and complex hydrides is presented, with a comparison between thermodynamic prediction and experimental results. MgH2 constitutes one of the most attractive metal hydrides with a reversible capacity of 1480 mA·h·g(-1) at a suitable potential (0.5 V vs Li(+)/Li(0)) and the lowest electrode polarization (<0.2 V) for conversion materials. Conversion process reaction mechanisms with lithium are subsequently detailed for MgH2, TiH2, complex hydrides Mg2MH x and other Mg-based hydrides. The reversible conversion reaction mechanism of MgH2, which is lithium-controlled, can be extended to others hydrides as: MH x + xLi(+) + xe(-) in equilibrium with M + xLiH. Other reaction paths-involving solid solutions, metastable distorted phases, and phases with low hydrogen content-were recently reported for TiH2 and Mg2FeH6, Mg2CoH5 and Mg2NiH4. The importance of fundamental aspects to overcome technological difficulties is discussed with a focus on conversion reaction limitations in the case of MgH2. The influence of MgH2 particle size, mechanical grinding, hydrogen sorption cycles, grinding with carbon, reactive milling under hydrogen, and metal and catalyst addition to the MgH2/carbon composite on kinetics improvement and reversibility is presented. Drastic technological improvement in order to the enhance conversion process efficiencies is needed for practical applications. The main goals are minimizing the impact of electrode volume variation during lithium extraction and overcoming the poor electronic conductivity of LiH. To use polymer binders to improve the cycle life of the hydride-based electrode and to synthesize nanoscale composite hydride can be helpful to address these drawbacks. The development of high-capacity hydride anodes should be inspired by the emergent nano-research prospects which share the knowledge of both hydrogen-storage and lithium-anode communities. PMID:26425434

  17. Metal hydrides: an innovative and challenging conversion reaction anode for lithium-ion batteries

    PubMed Central

    Oumellal, Yassine; Bonnet, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Summary The state of the art of conversion reactions of metal hydrides (MH) with lithium is presented and discussed in this review with regard to the use of these hydrides as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries. A focus on the gravimetric and volumetric storage capacities for different examples from binary, ternary and complex hydrides is presented, with a comparison between thermodynamic prediction and experimental results. MgH2 constitutes one of the most attractive metal hydrides with a reversible capacity of 1480 mA·h·g?1 at a suitable potential (0.5 V vs Li+/Li0) and the lowest electrode polarization (<0.2 V) for conversion materials. Conversion process reaction mechanisms with lithium are subsequently detailed for MgH2, TiH2, complex hydrides Mg2MHx and other Mg-based hydrides. The reversible conversion reaction mechanism of MgH2, which is lithium-controlled, can be extended to others hydrides as: MHx + xLi+ + xe? in equilibrium with M + xLiH. Other reaction paths—involving solid solutions, metastable distorted phases, and phases with low hydrogen content—were recently reported for TiH2 and Mg2FeH6, Mg2CoH5 and Mg2NiH4. The importance of fundamental aspects to overcome technological difficulties is discussed with a focus on conversion reaction limitations in the case of MgH2. The influence of MgH2 particle size, mechanical grinding, hydrogen sorption cycles, grinding with carbon, reactive milling under hydrogen, and metal and catalyst addition to the MgH2/carbon composite on kinetics improvement and reversibility is presented. Drastic technological improvement in order to the enhance conversion process efficiencies is needed for practical applications. The main goals are minimizing the impact of electrode volume variation during lithium extraction and overcoming the poor electronic conductivity of LiH. To use polymer binders to improve the cycle life of the hydride-based electrode and to synthesize nanoscale composite hydride can be helpful to address these drawbacks. The development of high-capacity hydride anodes should be inspired by the emergent nano-research prospects which share the knowledge of both hydrogen-storage and lithium-anode communities. PMID:26425434

  18. Documentation of Hybrid Hydride Model for Incorporation into Moose-Bison and Validation Strategy.

    SciTech Connect

    Weck, Philippe F; Tikare, Veena; Schultz, Peter Andrew; Clark, B; Mitchell, J; Glazoff, Michael V.; Homer, Eric R.

    2014-10-01

    This report documents the development, demonstration and validation of a mesoscale, microstructural evolution model for simulation of zirconium hydride ?-ZrH{sub 1.5} precipitation in the cladding of used nuclear fuels that may occur during long-term dry storage. While the Zr-based claddings are manufactured free of any hydrogen, they absorb hydrogen during service, in the reactor by a process commonly termed ‘hydrogen pick-up’. The precipitation and growth of zirconium hydrides during dry storage is one of the most likely fuel rod integrity failure mechanisms either by embrittlement or delayed hydride cracking of the cladding (Hanson et al., 2011). While the phenomenon is well documented and identified as a potential key failure mechanism during long-term dry storage (Birk et al., 2012 and NUREG/CR-7116), the ability to actually predict the formation of hydrides is poor. The model being documented in this work is a computational capability for the prediction of hydride formation in different claddings of used nuclear fuels. This work supports the Used Fuel Disposition Research and Development Campaign in assessing the structural engineering performance of the cladding during and after long-term dry storage. In this work, a model to numerically simulate hydride precipitation at the microstructural scale, in a wide variety of Zr-based claddings, under dry-storage conditions is being developed. It will be used to aid in the evaluation of the mechanical integrity of used fuel rods during dry storage and transportation by providing the structural conditions from the microstructural scale to the continuum scale to engineering component scale models to predict if the used fuel rods will perform without failure under normal and off-normal conditions. The microstructure, especially, the hydride structure is thought to be a primary determinant of cladding failure, thus this component of UFD’s storage and transportation analysis program is critical. The model development, application and validation of the model are documented and the limitations of the current model are discussed. The model has been shown to simulate hydride precipitation in Zircaloy-4 cladding with correct morphology, thermodynamics and kinetics. An unexpected insight obtained from simulations hydride formation in Zircaloy-4 is that small (sub-micron) precipitates need to order themselves to form the larger hydrides typically described as radially-reoriented precipitates. A limitation of this model is that it does not currently solve the stress state that forms dynamically in the precipitate or matrix surrounding the precipitate. A method to overcome the limitations is suggested and described in detail. The necessary experiments to provide key materials physics and to validate the model are also recommended.

  19. Vibration and shock test report for the H1616-1 container and the Savannah River Hydride Transport Vessel

    SciTech Connect

    York, A.R. II; Joseph, B.J.

    1992-11-01

    Sandia National Laboratories performed random vibration and shock tests on a tritium hydride transport vessel that was packaged in an H1616-1 container. The objective of the tests was to determine if the hydride transport vessel remains leaktight under vibration and shock normally incident to transport, which is a requirement that the hydride transport vessel must meet to be shipped in the H1616-1. Helium leak tests before and after the vibration and shock tests showed that the hydride transport vessel remained leaktight under the specified conditions. There were no detrimental effects on the containment vessel of the H1616-1.

  20. Epitaxially stabilized iridium spinel oxide without cations in the tetrahedral site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuriyama, Hiromichi; Matsuno, Jobu; Niitaka, Seiji; Uchida, Masaya; Hashizume, Daisuke; Nakao, Aiko; Sugimoto, Kunihisa; Ohsumi, Hiroyuki; Takata, Masaki; Takagi, Hidenori

    2010-05-01

    Single-crystalline thin film of an iridium dioxide polymorph Ir2O4 has been fabricated by the pulsed laser deposition of LixIr2O4 precursor and the subsequent Li-deintercalation using soft chemistry. Ir2O4 crystallizes in a spinel (AB2O4) without A cations in the tetrahedral site, which is isostructural to ?-MnO2. Ir ions form a pyrochlore sublattice, which is known to give rise to a strong geometrical frustration. This Ir spinel was found to be a narrow gap insulator, in remarkable contrast to the metallic ground state of rutile-type IrO2. We argue that an interplay of a strong spin-orbit coupling and a Coulomb repulsion gives rise to an insulating ground state as in a layered perovskite Sr2IrO4.