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Sample records for iridium oxide microelectrode

  1. Microscopic measurement of pH with iridium oxide microelectrodes

    PubMed

    Wipf; Ge; Spaine; Baur

    2000-10-15

    Microscopic pH electrodes were produced by deposition of hydrous iridium oxide onto carbon fiber microelectrodes. The electrodes exhibit two linear regions of potentiometric response between pH 2-6 and pH 6-12. The electrodes respond to pH changes within 50 ms, and an equilibrium value is reached within 30 s. By using these electrodes as probes in the scanning electrochemical microscope, dynamic pH changes occurring at or near a surface can be measured and pH maps of the surface can be generated. Vertical pH profiles and images of pH were obtained at substrates where electrochemical (oxidation and reduction of H2O2, hydrogen evolution) or enzymatic (glucose oxidase) reactions involving proton transfers occur. PMID:11055710

  2. Optimization and electrochemical characterization of RF-sputtered iridium oxide microelectrodes for electrical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Xiaoyang; Liu, Jingquan; Tian, Hongchang; Yang, Bin; NuLi, Yanna; Yang, Chunsheng

    2014-02-01

    A reactively sputtered iridium oxide (IrOx) thin film has been developed as electrochemical modification material for microelectrodes to obtain high stability and charge storage capacity (CSC) in functional electrical stimulation. The effect of the oxygen flow and oxygen to argon ratio during sputtering process on the microstructure and electrochemical properties of the IrOx film is characterized. After optimization, the activated IrOx microelectrode shows the highest CSC of 36.15 mC cm-2 at oxygen flow of 25 sccm and oxygen to argon ratio of (2.5:1). Because the deposition process of the reactively sputtered iridium oxide is an exothermic reaction, it is difficult to form film patterning by the lift-off process. The lift-off process was focused on the partially carbonized photoresist (PR) and normal PR. The higher of the carbonization degree of PR reaches, the longer the immersion duration. However, the patterning process of the iridium oxide film becomes feasible when the sputtering pressure is increasing. The experimental results show that the iridium oxide films forms the pattern with the lowest duration of ultrasonic agitation when the deposition pressure is 4.2 Pa and pressure ratio between O2 and Ar pressure is 3:4.

  3. Substrate arrays of iridium oxide microelectrodes for in vitro neuronal interfacing.

    PubMed

    Gawad, Shady; Giugliano, Michele; Heuschkel, Marc; Wessling, Börge; Markram, Henry; Schnakenberg, Uwe; Renaud, Philippe; Morgan, Hywel

    2009-01-01

    The design of novel bidirectional interfaces for in vivo and in vitro nervous systems is an important step towards future functional neuroprosthetics. Small electrodes, structures and devices are necessary to achieve high-resolution and target-selectivity during stimulation and recording of neuronal networks, while significant charge transfer and large signal-to-noise ratio are required for accurate time resolution. In addition, the physical properties of the interface should remain stable across time, especially when chronic in vivo applications or in vitro long-term studies are considered, unless a procedure to actively compensate for degradation is provided. In this short report, we describe the use and fabrication of arrays of 120 planar microelectrodes (MEAs) of sputtered Iridium Oxide (IrOx). The effective surface area of individual microelectrodes is significantly increased using electrochemical activation, a procedure that may also be employed to restore the properties of the electrodes as required. The electrode activation results in a very low interface impedance, especially in the lower frequency domain, which was characterized by impedance spectroscopy. The increase in the roughness of the microelectrodes surface was imaged using digital holographic microscopy and electron microscopy. Aging of the activated electrodes was also investigated, comparing storage in saline with storage in air. Demonstration of concept was achieved by recording multiple single-unit spike activity in acute brain slice preparations of rat neocortex. Data suggests that extracellular recording of action potentials can be achieved with planar IrOx MEAs with good signal-to-noise ratios. PMID:19194527

  4. Iridium material for hydrothermal oxidation environments

    DOEpatents

    Hong, Glenn T.; Zilberstein, Vladimir A.

    1996-01-01

    A process for hydrothermal oxidation of combustible materials in which, during at least a part of the oxidation, corrosive material is present and makes contact with at least a portion of the apparatus over a contact area on the apparatus. At least a portion of the contact surface area comprises iridium, iridium oxide, an iridium alloy, or a base metal overlaid with an iridium coating. Iridium has been found to be highly resistant to environments encountered in the process of hydrothermal oxidation. Such environments typically contain greater than 50 mole percent water, together with oxygen, carbon dioxide, and a wide range of acids, bases and salts. Pressures are typically about 27.5 to about 1000 bar while temperatures range as high as 800.degree. C.

  5. Homogeneous and heterogenized iridium water oxidation catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macchioni, Alceo

    2014-10-01

    The development of an efficient catalyst for the oxidative splitting of water into molecular oxygen, protons and electrons is of key importance for producing solar fuels through artificial photosynthesis. We are facing the problem by means of a rational approach aimed at understanding how catalytic performance may be optimized by the knowledge of the reaction mechanism of water oxidation and the fate of the catalytic site under the inevitably harsh oxidative conditions. For the purposes of our study we selected iridium water oxidation catalysts, exhibiting remarkable performance (TOF > 5 s-1 and TON > 20000). In particular, we recently focused our attention on [Cp*Ir(N,O)X] (N,O = 2-pyridincarboxylate; X = Cl or NO3) and [IrCl(Hedta)]Na water oxidation catalysts. The former exhibited a remarkable TOF whereas the latter showed a very high TON. Furthermore, [IrCl(Hedta)]Na was heterogenized onto TiO2 taking advantage of the presence of a dandling -COOH functionality. The heterogenized catalyst maintained approximately the same catalytic activity of the homogeneous analogous with the advantage that could be reused many times. Mechanistic studies were performed in order to shed some light on the rate-determining step and the transformation of catalysts when exposed to "oxidative stress". It was found that the last oxidative step, preceding oxygen liberation, is the rate-determining step when a small excess of sacrificial oxidant is used. In addition, several intermediates of the oxidative transformation of the catalyst were intercepted and characterized by NMR, X-Ray diffractometry and ESI-MS.

  6. IRIDIUM OXIDE PH MICROELECTRODE. (R825549C027)

    EPA Science Inventory

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  7. Iridium-Doped Ruthenium Oxide Catalyst for Oxygen Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valdez, Thomas I.; Narayan, Sri R.; Billings, Keith J.

    2011-01-01

    NASA requires a durable and efficient catalyst for the electrolysis of water in a polymer-electrolyte-membrane (PEM) cell. Ruthenium oxide in a slightly reduced form is known to be a very efficient catalyst for the anodic oxidation of water to oxygen, but it degrades rapidly, reducing efficiency. To combat this tendency of ruthenium oxide to change oxidation states, it is combined with iridium, which has a tendency to stabilize ruthenium oxide at oxygen evolution potentials. The novel oxygen evolution catalyst was fabricated under flowing argon in order to allow the iridium to preferentially react with oxygen from the ruthenium oxide, and not oxygen from the environment. Nanoparticulate iridium black and anhydrous ruthenium oxide are weighed out and mixed to 5 18 atomic percent. They are then heat treated at 300 C under flowing argon (in order to create an inert environment) for a minimum of 14 hours. This temperature was chosen because it is approximately the creep temperature of ruthenium oxide, and is below the sintering temperature of both materials. In general, the temperature should always be below the sintering temperature of both materials. The iridium- doped ruthenium oxide catalyst is then fabricated into a PEM-based membrane- electrode assembly (MEA), and then mounted into test cells. The result is an electrolyzer system that can sustain electrolysis at twice the current density, and at the same efficiency as commercial catalysts in the range of 100-200 mA/sq cm. At 200 mA/sq cm, this new system operates at an efficiency of 85 percent, which is 2 percent greater than commercially available catalysts. Testing has shown that this material is as stable as commercially available oxygen evolution catalysts. This means that this new catalyst can be used to regenerate fuel cell systems in space, and as a hydrogen generator on Earth.

  8. Phase control of iridium and iridium oxide thin films in atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sung-Wook; Kwon, Se-Hun; Kwak, Dong-Kee; Kang, Sang-Won

    2008-01-15

    The atomic layer deposition of iridium (Ir) and iridium oxide (IrO{sub 2}) films was investigated using an alternating supply of (ethylcyclopentadienyl)(1,5-cyclooctadiene) iridium and oxygen gas at temperatures between 230 and 290 deg. C. The phase transition between Ir and IrO{sub 2} occurred at the critical oxygen partial pressure during the oxygen injection pulse. The oxygen partial pressure was controlled by the O{sub 2}/(Ar+O{sub 2}) ratio or deposition pressures. The resistivity of the deposited Ir and IrO{sub 2} films was about 9 and 120 {mu}{omega} cm, respectively. In addition, the critical oxygen partial pressure for the phase transition between Ir and IrO{sub 2} was increased with increasing the deposition temperature. Thus, the phase of the deposited film, either Ir or IrO{sub 2}, was controlled by the oxygen partial pressure and the deposition temperature. However, the formation of a thin Ir layer was detected between the IrO{sub 2} and SiO{sub 2} substrate. To remove this interfacial layer, the oxygen partial pressure is increased to a severe condition. And the impurity contents were below the detection limit of Auger electron spectroscopy in both Ir and IrO{sub 2} films.

  9. Excimer laser deinsulation of Parylene-C on iridium for use in an activated iridium oxide film-coated Utah electrode array

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Je-Min; Negi, Sandeep; Tathireddy, Prashant; Solzbacher, Florian; Song, Jong-In; Rieth, Loren W.

    2013-01-01

    Implantable microelectrodes provide a measure to electrically stimulate neurons in the brain and spinal cord and record their electrophysiological activity. A material with a high charge capacity such as activated or sputter-deposited iridium oxide film (AIROF or SIROF) is used as an interface. The Utah electrode array (UEA) uses SIROF for its interface material with neural tissue and oxygen plasma etching (OPE) with an aluminium foil mask to expose the active area, where the interface between the electrode and neural tissue is formed. However, deinsulation of Parylene-C using OPE has limitations, including the lack of uniformity in the exposed area and reproducibility. While the deinsulation of Parylene-C using an excimer laser is proven to be an alternative for overcoming the limitations, the iridium oxide (IrOx) suffers from fracture when high laser fluence (>1000 mJ/cm2) is used. Iridium (Ir), which has a much higher fracture resistance than IrOx, can be deposited before excimer laser deinsulation and then the exposed Ir film area can be activated by electrochemical treatment to acquire the AIROF. Characterisation of the laser-ablated Ir film and AIROF by surface analysis (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope, and atomic force microscope) and electrochemical analysis (electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and cyclic voltammetry) shows that the damage on the Ir film induced by laser irradiation is significantly less than that on SIROF, and the AIROF has a high charge storage capacity. The results show the potential of the laser deinsulation technique for use in high performance AIROF-coated UEA fabrication. PMID:23458659

  10. Microelectrode arrays fabricated using a novel hybrid microfabrication method.

    PubMed

    Merlo, Mark W; Snyder, Russell L; Middlebrooks, John C; Bachman, Mark

    2012-02-01

    We present novel hybrid microfabrication methods for microelectrode arrays that combine microwire assembly, microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) manufacturing techniques and precision tool-based micromachining. This combination enables hybrid microfabrication to produce complex geometries and structures, increase material selection, and improve integration. A 32-channel shank microelectrode array was fabricated to highlight the hybrid microfabrication techniques. The electrode shank was 130 μm at its narrowest, had a 127 μm thickness and had iridium oxide electrode sites that were 25 μm in diameter with 150 μm spacing. Techniques used to fabricate this electrode include microassembly of insulated gold wires into a micromold, micromolding the microelectrode shank, post molding machining, sacrificial release of the microelectrode and electrodeposition of iridium oxide onto the microelectrode sites. Electrode site position accuracy was shown to have a standard deviation of less than 4 μm. Acute in vivo recordings with the 32-channel shank microelectrode array demonstrated comparable performance to that obtained with commercial microelectrode arrays. This new approach to microelectrode array fabrication will enable new microelectrodes, such as multi-sided arrays, drug eluding electrodes and biodegradable shanks. PMID:21979567

  11. Microelectrode arrays fabricated using a novel hybrid microfabrication method

    PubMed Central

    Merlo, Mark W.; Snyder, Russell L.; Middlebrooks, John C.; Bachman, Mark

    2011-01-01

    We present novel hybrid microfabrication methods for microelectrode arrays that combine microwire assembly, microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) manufacturing techniques and precision tool-based micromachining. This combination enables hybrid microfabrication to produce complex geometries and structures, increase material selection, and improve integration. A 32-channel shank microelectrode array was fabricated to highlight the hybrid microfabrication techniques. The electrode shank was 130 μm at its narrowest, had a 127 μm thickness and had iridium oxide electrode sites that were 25 μm in diameter with 150 μm spacing. Techniques used to fabricate this electrode include microassembly of insulated gold wires into a micromold, micromolding the microelectrode shank, post molding machining, sacrificial release of the microelectrode and electrodeposition of iridium oxide onto the microelectrode sites. Electrode site position accuracy was shown to have a standard deviation of less than 4 μm. Acute in vivo recordings with the 32-channel shank microelectrode array demonstrated comparable performance to that obtained with commercial microelectrode arrays . This new approach to microelectrode array fabrication will enable new microelectrodes, such as multi-sided arrays, drug eluding electrodes and biodegradable shanks. PMID:21979567

  12. Photochemical Oxidative Growth of Iridium Oxide Nanoparticles on CdSe@CdS Nanorods.

    PubMed

    Kalisman, Philip; Nakibli, Yifat; Amirav, Lilac

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a procedure for the photochemical oxidative growth of iridium oxide catalysts on the surface of seeded cadmium selenide-cadmium sulfide (CdSe@CdS) nanorod photocatalysts. Seeded rods are grown using a colloidal hot-injection method and then moved to an aqueous medium by ligand exchange. CdSe@CdS nanorods, an iridium precursor and other salts are mixed and illuminated. The deposition process is initiated by absorption of photons by the semiconductor particle, which results with formation of charge carriers that are used to promote redox reactions. To insure photochemical oxidative growth we used an electron scavenger. The photogenerated holes oxidize the iridium precursor, apparently in a mediated oxidative pathway. This results in the growth of high quality crystalline iridium oxide particles, ranging from 0.5 nm to about 3 nm, along the surface of the rod. Iridium oxide grown on CdSe@CdS heterostructures was studied by a variety of characterization methods, in order to evaluate its characteristics and quality. We explored means for control over particle size, crystallinity, deposition location on the CdS rod, and composition. Illumination time and excitation wavelength were found to be key parameters for such control. The influence of different growth conditions and the characterization of these heterostructures are described alongside a detailed description of their synthesis. Of significance is the fact that the addition of iridium oxide afforded the rods astounding photochemical stability under prolonged illumination in pure water (alleviating the requirement for hole scavengers). PMID:26891234

  13. Metallo Protoporphyrin Functionalized Microelectrodes for Electrocatalytic Sensing of Nitric Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chen-Zhong; Alwarappan, Subbiah; Zhang, Wenbo; Scafa, Nikki; Zhang, Xueji

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been considered as an important bio-regulatory molecule in the physiological process. All the existing methods often employed for NO measurement are mainly indirect and not suitable for in vivo conditions. In this paper, we report a systematic study of electrocatalytic NO reduction by comparing the redox properties of NO at carbon microelectrodes functionalized by Fe, Mn and Co protoporphyrins. The mechanisms of electrocatalytic reduction of NO by different metalloporphyrins have been proposed and compared. In addition, by varying the metallic cores of the metalloporphyrins, NO exhibits voltammograms in which the cathodic peak current occur at different potential. A comparative study on the electrochemical behavior of each of these metalloporphyrin (as a result of varying the metallic core) has been performed and a possible mechanism for the observed behavior is proposed. The results confirmed the potential applicability of using metalloporphyrins modified electrodes for voltammetric NO detection. PMID:20526418

  14. In situ observation of surface species on iridium oxide nanoparticles during the oxygen evolution reaction.

    PubMed

    Sanchez Casalongue, Hernan G; Ng, May Ling; Kaya, Sarp; Friebel, Daniel; Ogasawara, Hirohito; Nilsson, Anders

    2014-07-01

    An iridium oxide nanoparticle electrocatalyst under oxygen evolution reaction conditions was probed in situ by ambient-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Under OER conditions, iridium undergoes a change in oxidation state from Ir(IV) to Ir(V) that takes place predominantly at the surface of the catalyst. The chemical change in iridium is coupled to a decrease in surface hydroxide, providing experimental evidence which strongly suggests that the oxygen evolution reaction on iridium oxide occurs through an OOH-mediated deprotonation mechanism. PMID:24889896

  15. Sol-Gel Deposition of Iridium Oxide for Biomedical Micro-Devices

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Cuong M.; Rao, Smitha; Yang, Xuesong; Dubey, Souvik; Mays, Jeffrey; Cao, Hung; Chiao, Jung-Chih

    2015-01-01

    Flexible iridium oxide (IrOx)-based micro-electrodes were fabricated on flexible polyimide substrates using a sol-gel deposition process for utilization as integrated pseudo-reference electrodes for bio-electrochemical sensing applications. The fabrication method yields reliable miniature on-probe IrOx electrodes with long lifetime, high stability and repeatability. Such sensors can be used for long-term measurements. Various dimensions of sol-gel iridium oxide electrodes including 1 mm × 1 mm, 500 μm × 500 μm, and 100 μm × 100 μm were fabricated. Sensor longevity and pH dependence were investigated by immersing the electrodes in hydrochloric acid, fetal bovine serum (FBS), and sodium hydroxide solutions for 30 days. Less pH dependent responses, compared to IrOx electrodes fabricated by electrochemical deposition processes, were measured at 58.8 ± 0.4 mV/pH, 53.8 ± 1.3 mV/pH and 48 ± 0.6 mV/pH, respectively. The on-probe IrOx pseudo-reference electrodes were utilized for dopamine sensing. The baseline responses of the sensors were higher than the one using an external Ag/AgCl reference electrode. Using IrOx reference electrodes integrated on the same probe with working electrodes eliminated the use of cytotoxic Ag/AgCl reference electrode without loss in sensitivity. This enables employing such sensors in long-term recording of concentrations of neurotransmitters in central nervous systems of animals and humans. PMID:25686309

  16. Fluorinated Xerogel-Derived Microelectrodes for Amperometric Nitric Oxide Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jae Ho; Privett, Benjamin J.; Kita, Justin M.; Wightman, R. Mark; Schoenfisch, Mark H.

    2009-01-01

    An amperometric fluorinated xerogel-derived nitric oxide (NO) microelectrode is described. A range of fluorine-modified xerogel polymers were synthesized via the co-hydrolysis and condensation of alkylalkoxy- and fluoroalkoxysilanes. Such polymers were evaluated as NO sensor membranes to identify the optimum composition for maximizing NO permeability while providing sufficient selectivity for NO in the presence of common interfering species. By taking advantage of both the versatility of sol–gel chemistry and the “poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE)-like” high NO permselective properties of the xerogels, the performance of the fluorinated xerogel-derived sensors was excellent, surpassing all miniaturized NO sensors reported to date. In contrast to previous electrochemical NO sensor designs, xerogel-based NO microsensors were fabricated using a simple, reliable dip-coating procedure. An optimal permselective membrane was achieved by synthesizing xerogels of methyltrimethoxysilane (MTMOS) and 20% (heptadecafluoro-1,1,2,2-tetrahydrodecyl)trimethoxysilane (17FTMS, balance MTMOS) under acid-catalyzed conditions. The resulting NO microelectrode had a conical tip of ~20 μm in diameter and ~55 mm in length, and exhibited sensitivities of 7.91 pA·nM−1 from 0.2 to 3.0 nM (R2 = 0.9947) and 7.60 nA·mM−1 from 0.5 to 4.0 μM (R2 = 0.9999), detection limit of 83 pM (S/N = 3), response time (t95%) of <3 sec, and selectivity (logKNO,jamp) of −5.74, <−6, <−6, <−6, <−6, −5.84, and −1.33 for j = nitrite, ascorbic acid, uric acid, acetaminophen, dopamine, ammonia/ammonium, and carbon monoxide. In addition, the sensor proved functional up to 20 d, maintaining ≥90% of the sensor's initial sensitivity without serious deterioration in selectivity. PMID:18714964

  17. Fluorinated xerogel-derived microelectrodes for amperometric nitric oxide sensing.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jae Ho; Privett, Benjamin J; Kita, Justin M; Wightman, R Mark; Schoenfisch, Mark H

    2008-09-15

    An amperometric fluorinated xerogel-derived nitric oxide (NO) microelectrode is described. A range of fluorine-modified xerogel polymers were synthesized via the cohydrolysis and condensation of alkylalkoxy- and fluoroalkoxysilanes. Such polymers were evaluated as NO sensor membranes to identify the optimum composition for maximizing NO permeability while providing sufficient selectivity for NO in the presence of common interfering species. By taking advantage of both the versatility of sol-gel chemistry and the "poly(tetrafluoroethylene)-like" high NO permselective properties of the xerogels, the performance of the fluorinated xerogel-derived sensors was excellent, surpassing all miniaturized NO sensors reported to date. In contrast to previous electrochemical NO sensor designs, xerogel-based NO microsensors were fabricated using a simple, reliable dip-coating procedure. An optimal permselective membrane was achieved by synthesizing xerogels of methyltrimethoxysilane (MTMOS) and 20% (heptadecafluoro-1,1,2,2-tetrahydrodecyl)trimethoxysilane (17FTMS, balance MTMOS) under acid-catalyzed conditions. The resulting NO microelectrode had a conical tip of approximately 20 microm in diameter and approximately 55 microm in length and exhibited sensitivities of 7.91 pA x nM (-1) from 0.2 to 3.0 nM (R (2) = 0.9947) and 7.60 nA x microM (-1) from 0.5 to 4.0 microM ( R (2) = 0.9999), detection limit of 83 pM (S/ N = 3), response time ( t 95%) of <3 s, and selectivity (log K NO, j (amp)) of -5.74, <-6, <-6, <-6, <-6, -5.84, and -1.33 for j = nitrite, ascorbic acid, uric acid, acetaminophen, dopamine, ammonia/ammonium, and carbon monoxide. In addition, the sensor proved functional up to 20 d, maintaining >or=90% of the sensor's initial sensitivity without serious deterioration in selectivity. PMID:18714964

  18. Single step radiolytic synthesis of iridium nanoparticles onto graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas, J. V.; Molina Higgins, M. C.; Toro Gonzalez, M.; Castano, C. E.

    2015-12-01

    In this work a new approach to synthesize iridium nanoparticles on reduced graphene oxide is presented. The nanoparticles were directly deposited and grown on the surface of the carbon-based support using a single step reduction method through gamma irradiation. In this process, an aqueous isopropanol solution containing the iridium precursor, graphene oxide, and sodium dodecyl sulfate was initially prepared and sonicated thoroughly to obtain a homogeneous dispersion. The samples were irradiated with gamma rays with energies of 1.17 and 1.33 MeV emitted from the spontaneous decay of the 60Co irradiator. The interaction of gamma rays with water in the presence of isopropanol generates highly reducing species homogeneously distributed in the solution that can reduce the Ir precursor down to a zero valence state. An absorbed dose of 60 kGy was used, which according to the yield of reducing species is sufficient to reduce the total amount of precursor present in the solution. This novel approach leads to the formation of 2.3 ± 0.5 nm Ir nanoparticles distributed along the surface of the support. The oxygenated functionalities of graphene oxide served as nucleation sites for the formation of Ir nuclei and their subsequent growth. XPS results revealed that the interaction of Ir with the support occurs through Irsbnd O bonds.

  19. Properties of mixed molybdenum oxide iridium oxide thin films synthesized by spray pyrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, P. S.; Kawar, R. K.; Sadale, S. B.; Inamdar, A. I.; Deshmukh, H. P.

    2006-09-01

    Molybdenum-doped iridium oxide thin films have been deposited onto corning glass- and fluorine-doped tin oxide coated corning glass substrates at 350 °C by using a pneumatic spray pyrolysis technique. An aqueous solution of 0.01 M ammonium molybdate was mixed with 0.01 M iridium trichloride solution in different volume proportions and the resultant solution was used as a precursor solution for spraying. The as-deposited samples were annealed at 600 °C in air medium for 1 h. The structural, electrical and optical properties of as-deposited and annealed Mo-doped iridium oxide were studied and values of room temperature electrical resistivity, and thermoelectric power were estimated. The as-deposited samples with 2% Mo doping exhibit more pronounced electrochromism than other samples, including pristine Ir oxide.

  20. Evaluation of oxide-coated iridium-rhenium chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Brian D.

    1994-01-01

    Iridium-coated rhenium (Ir-Re) provides long life operation of radiation-cooled rockets at temperatures up to 2200 C. Ceramic oxide coatings could be used to increase Ir-Re rocket lifetimes and allow operation in highly oxidizing environments. Ceramic oxide coatings promise to serve as both thermal and diffusion barriers for the iridium layer. Seven ceramic oxide-coated Ir-Re, 22-N rocket chambers were tested with gaseous hydrogen/gaseous oxygen (GHz/G02) propellants. Five chambers had thick (over 10 mils), monolithic coatings of either hafnia (HfO2) or zirconia (ZrO2). Two chambers had coatings with thicknesses less than 5 mils. One of these chambers had a thin-walled coating of ZrO2 infiltrated with sol gel HfO2. The other chamber had a coating composed of an Ir-oxide composite. The purpose of this test program was to assess the ability of the oxide coatings to withstand the thermal shock of combustion initiation, adhere under repeated thermal cycling, and operate in aggressively oxidizing environments. All of the coatings survived the thermal shock of combustion and demonstrated operation at mixture ratios up to 11. Testing the Ir-oxide composite-coated chamber included over 29 min at mixture ratio 16. The thicker walled coatings provided the larger temperature drops across the oxide layer (up to 570 C), but were susceptible to macrocracking and eventual chipping at a stress concentrator. The cracks apparently resealed during firing, under compression of the oxide layer. The thinner walled coatings did not experience the macrocracking and chipping of the chambers that was seen with the thick, monolithic coatings. However, burn-throughs in the throat region did occur in both of the thin-walled chambers at mixture ratios well above stoichiometric. The burn-throughs were probably the result of oxygen diffusion through the oxide coating that allowed the underlying Ir and Re layers to be oxidized. The results of this test program indicated that the thin-walled oxide

  1. Evaluation of oxide-coated iridium-rhenium chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Brian D.

    1994-03-01

    Iridium-coated rhenium (Ir-Re) provides long life operation of radiation-cooled rockets at temperatures up to 2200 C. Ceramic oxide coatings could be used to increase Ir-Re rocket lifetimes and allow operation in highly oxidizing environments. Ceramic oxide coatings promise to serve as both thermal and diffusion barriers for the iridium layer. Seven ceramic oxide-coated Ir-Re, 22-N rocket chambers were tested with gaseous hydrogen/gaseous oxygen (GHz/G02) propellants. Five chambers had thick (over 10 mils), monolithic coatings of either hafnia (HfO2) or zirconia (ZrO2). Two chambers had coatings with thicknesses less than 5 mils. One of these chambers had a thin-walled coating of ZrO2 infiltrated with sol gel HfO2. The other chamber had a coating composed of an Ir-oxide composite. The purpose of this test program was to assess the ability of the oxide coatings to withstand the thermal shock of combustion initiation, adhere under repeated thermal cycling, and operate in aggressively oxidizing environments. All of the coatings survived the thermal shock of combustion and demonstrated operation at mixture ratios up to 11. Testing the Ir-oxide composite-coated chamber included over 29 min at mixture ratio 16. The thicker walled coatings provided the larger temperature drops across the oxide layer (up to 570 C), but were susceptible to macrocracking and eventual chipping at a stress concentrator. The cracks apparently resealed during firing, under compression of the oxide layer. The thinner walled coatings did not experience the macrocracking and chipping of the chambers that was seen with the thick, monolithic coatings. However, burn-throughs in the throat region did occur in both of the thin-walled chambers at mixture ratios well above stoichiometric. The burn-throughs were probably the result of oxygen diffusion through the oxide coating that allowed the underlying Ir and Re layers to be oxidized. The results of this test program indicated that the thin-walled oxide

  2. Development and Testing of High Surface Area Iridium Anodes for Molten Oxide Electrolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shchetkovskiy, Anatoliy; McKechnie, Timothy; Sadoway, Donald R.; Paramore, James; Melendez, Orlando; Curreri, Peter A.

    2010-01-01

    Processing of lunar regolith into oxygen for habitat and propulsion is needed to support future space missions. Direct electrochemical reduction of molten regolith is an attractive method of processing, because no additional chemical reagents are needed. The electrochemical processing of molten oxides requires high surface area, inert anodes. Such electrodes need to be structurally robust at elevated temperatures (1400-1600 C), be resistant to thermal shock, have good electrical conductivity, be resistant to attack by molten oxide (silicate), be electrochemically stable and support high current density. Iridium with its high melting point, good oxidation resistance, superior high temperature strength and ductility is the most promising candidate for anodes in high temperature electrochemical processes. Several innovative concepts for manufacturing such anodes by electrodeposition of iridium from molten salt electrolyte (EL-Form process) were evaluated. Iridium electrodeposition to form of complex shape components and coating was investigated. Iridium coated graphite, porous iridium structure and solid iridium anodes were fabricated. Testing of electroformed iridium anodes shows no visible degradation. The result of development, manufacturing and testing of high surface, inert iridium anodes will be presented.

  3. Development and Testing of High Surface Area Iridium Anodes for Molten Oxide Electrolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shchetkovskiy, Anatoliy; McKechnie, Timothy; Sadoway, Donald R.; Paramore, James; Melendez, Orlando; Curreri, Peter A.

    2010-01-01

    Processing of lunar regolith into oxygen for habitat and propulsion is needed to support future space missions. Direct electrochemical reduction of molten regolith is an attractive method of processing, because no additional chemical reagents are needed. The electrochemical processing of molten oxides requires high surface area, inert anodes. Such electrodes need to be structurally robust at elevated temperatures (1400-1600?C), be resistant to thermal shock, have good electrical conductivity, be resistant to attack by molten oxide (silicate), be electrochemically stable and support high current density. Iridium with its high melting point, good oxidation resistance, superior high temperature strength and ductility is the most promising candidate for anodes in high temperature electrochemical processes. Several innovative concepts for manufacturing such anodes by electrodeposition of iridium from molten salt electrolyte (EL-Form? process) were evaluated. Iridium electrodeposition to form of complex shape components and coating was investigated. Iridium coated graphite, porous iridium structure and solid iridium anodes were fabricated. Testing of electroformed iridium anodes shows no visible degradation. The result of development, manufacturing and testing of high surface, inert iridium anodes will be presented.

  4. High-Temperature Oxidation Behavior of Iridium-Rhenium Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Brian D.

    1995-01-01

    The life-limiting mechanism for radiation-cooled rockets made from iridium-coated rhenium (Ir/Re) is the diffusion of Re into the Ir layer and the subsequent oxidation of the resulting Ir-Re alloy from the inner surface. In a previous study, a life model for Ir/Re rockets was developed. It incorporated Ir-Re diffusion and oxidation data to predict chamber lifetimes as a function of temperature and oxygen partial pressure. Oxidation testing at 1540 deg C suggested that a 20-wt percent Re concentration at the inner wall surface should be established as the failure criterion. The present study was performed to better define Ir-oxidation behavior as a function of Re concentration and to supplement the data base for the life model. Samples ranging from pure Ir to Ir-40 wt percent Re (Ir-40Re) were tested at 1500 deg C, in two different oxygen environments. There were indications that the oxidation rate of the Ir-Re alloy increased significantly when it went from a single-phase solid solution to a two-phase mixture, as was suggested in previous work. However, because of testing anomalies in this study, there were not enough dependable oxidation data to definitively raise the Ir/Re rocket failure criterion from 20-wt percent Re to a Re concentration corresponding to entry into the two-phase region.

  5. Iridium-based double perovskites for efficient water oxidation in acid media

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Morales, Oscar; Raaijman, Stefan; Kortlever, Ruud; Kooyman, Patricia J.; Wezendonk, Tim; Gascon, Jorge; Fu, W. T.; Koper, Marc T. M.

    2016-01-01

    The development of active, cost-effective and stable oxygen-evolving catalysts is one of the major challenges for solar-to-fuel conversion towards sustainable energy generation. Iridium oxide exhibits the best available compromise between catalytic activity and stability in acid media, but it is prohibitively expensive for large-scale applications. Therefore, preparing oxygen-evolving catalysts with lower amounts of the scarce but active and stable iridium is an attractive avenue to overcome this economical constraint. Here we report on a class of oxygen-evolving catalysts based on iridium double perovskites which contain 32 wt% less iridium than IrO2 and yet exhibit a more than threefold higher activity in acid media. According to recently suggested benchmarking criteria, the iridium double perovskites are the most active catalysts for oxygen evolution in acid media reported until now, to the best of our knowledge, and exhibit similar stability to IrO2. PMID:27498694

  6. Iridium-based double perovskites for efficient water oxidation in acid media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz-Morales, Oscar; Raaijman, Stefan; Kortlever, Ruud; Kooyman, Patricia J.; Wezendonk, Tim; Gascon, Jorge; Fu, W. T.; Koper, Marc T. M.

    2016-08-01

    The development of active, cost-effective and stable oxygen-evolving catalysts is one of the major challenges for solar-to-fuel conversion towards sustainable energy generation. Iridium oxide exhibits the best available compromise between catalytic activity and stability in acid media, but it is prohibitively expensive for large-scale applications. Therefore, preparing oxygen-evolving catalysts with lower amounts of the scarce but active and stable iridium is an attractive avenue to overcome this economical constraint. Here we report on a class of oxygen-evolving catalysts based on iridium double perovskites which contain 32 wt% less iridium than IrO2 and yet exhibit a more than threefold higher activity in acid media. According to recently suggested benchmarking criteria, the iridium double perovskites are the most active catalysts for oxygen evolution in acid media reported until now, to the best of our knowledge, and exhibit similar stability to IrO2.

  7. Iridium-based double perovskites for efficient water oxidation in acid media.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Morales, Oscar; Raaijman, Stefan; Kortlever, Ruud; Kooyman, Patricia J; Wezendonk, Tim; Gascon, Jorge; Fu, W T; Koper, Marc T M

    2016-01-01

    The development of active, cost-effective and stable oxygen-evolving catalysts is one of the major challenges for solar-to-fuel conversion towards sustainable energy generation. Iridium oxide exhibits the best available compromise between catalytic activity and stability in acid media, but it is prohibitively expensive for large-scale applications. Therefore, preparing oxygen-evolving catalysts with lower amounts of the scarce but active and stable iridium is an attractive avenue to overcome this economical constraint. Here we report on a class of oxygen-evolving catalysts based on iridium double perovskites which contain 32 wt% less iridium than IrO2 and yet exhibit a more than threefold higher activity in acid media. According to recently suggested benchmarking criteria, the iridium double perovskites are the most active catalysts for oxygen evolution in acid media reported until now, to the best of our knowledge, and exhibit similar stability to IrO2. PMID:27498694

  8. Transformation of a Cp*-iridium(III) precatalyst for water oxidation when exposed to oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Zuccaccia, Cristiano; Bellachioma, Gianfranco; Bortolini, Olga; Bucci, Alberto; Savini, Arianna; Macchioni, Alceo

    2014-03-17

    The reaction of [Cp*Ir(bzpy)NO3 ] (1; bzpy=2-benzoylpyridine, Cp*=pentamethylcyclopentadienyl anion), a competent water-oxidation catalyst, with several oxidants (H2 O2 , NaIO4 , cerium ammonium nitrate (CAN)) was studied to intercept and characterize possible intermediates of the oxidative transformation. NMR spectroscopy and ESI-MS techniques provided evidence for the formation of many species that all had the intact Ir-bzpy moiety and a gradually more oxidized Cp* ligand. Initially, an oxygen atom is trapped in between two carbon atoms of Cp* and iridium, which gives an oxygen-Ir coordinated epoxide, whereas the remaining three carbon atoms of Cp* are involved in a η(3) interaction with iridium (2 a). Formal addition of H2 O to 2 a or H2 O2 to 1 leads to 2 b, in which a double MeCOH functionalization of Cp* is present with one MeCOH engaged in an interaction with iridium. The structure of 2 b was unambiguously determined in the solid state and in solution by X-ray single-crystal diffractometry and advanced NMR spectroscopic techniques, respectively. Further oxidation led to the opening of Cp* and transformation of the diol into a diketone with one carbonyl coordinated at the metal (2 c). A η(3) interaction between the three non-oxygenated carbons of "ex-Cp*" and iridium is also present in both 2 b and 2 c. Isolated 2 b and mixtures of 2 a-c species were tested in water-oxidation catalysis by using CAN as sacrificial oxidant. They showed substantially the same activity than 1 (turnover frequency values ranged from 9 to 14 min(-1) ). PMID:24523138

  9. Design, analysis, and fabrication of oxide-coated iridium/rhenium combustion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jang, Q.; Tuffias, R. H.; Laferla, R.; Ghoniem, N. M.

    1993-01-01

    Iridium-coated rhenium (Ir/Re) combustion chambers provide high temperature, oxidation-resistant operation for radiation-cooled liquid-fueled rocket engines. A 22-N (5-lb(sub f)) chamber has been operated for 15 hours at 2200 C (4000 F) using nitrogen tetroxide/monomethyl hydrazine (NTO/MMH) propellant, with negligible internal erosion. The oxidation resistance of these chambers could be further increased by the addition of refractory oxide coatings, providing longer life and/or operation in more oxidizing and higher temperature environments. The oxide coatings would serve as a thermal and diffusion barrier for the iridium coating, lowering the temperature of the iridium layer while also preventing the ingress of oxygen and egress of iridium oxides. This would serve to slow the failure mechanisms of Ir/Re chambers, namely the diffusion of rhenium to the inner surface and the oxidation of iridium. Such protection could extend chamber lifetimes by tens or perhaps hundreds of hours, and allow chamber operation on stoichiometric or higher mixture ratio oxygen/hydrogen (O2/H2) propellant. Extensive thermomechanical, thermochemical, and mass transport modeling was performed as a key material/structure design tool. Based on the results of these analyses, several 22-N oxide-coated Ir/Re chambers were fabricated and delivered to NASA Lewis Research Center for hot-fire testing.

  10. Design, analysis, and fabrication of oxide-coated iridium/rhenium combustion chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Q.; Tuffias, R. H.; Laferla, R.; Ghoniem, N. M.

    1993-11-01

    Iridium-coated rhenium (Ir/Re) combustion chambers provide high temperature, oxidation-resistant operation for radiation-cooled liquid-fueled rocket engines. A 22-N (5-lb(sub f)) chamber has been operated for 15 hours at 2200 C (4000 F) using nitrogen tetroxide/monomethyl hydrazine (NTO/MMH) propellant, with negligible internal erosion. The oxidation resistance of these chambers could be further increased by the addition of refractory oxide coatings, providing longer life and/or operation in more oxidizing and higher temperature environments. The oxide coatings would serve as a thermal and diffusion barrier for the iridium coating, lowering the temperature of the iridium layer while also preventing the ingress of oxygen and egress of iridium oxides. This would serve to slow the failure mechanisms of Ir/Re chambers, namely the diffusion of rhenium to the inner surface and the oxidation of iridium. Such protection could extend chamber lifetimes by tens or perhaps hundreds of hours, and allow chamber operation on stoichiometric or higher mixture ratio oxygen/hydrogen (O2/H2) propellant. Extensive thermomechanical, thermochemical, and mass transport modeling was performed as a key material/structure design tool. Based on the results of these analyses, several 22-N oxide-coated Ir/Re chambers were fabricated and delivered to NASA Lewis Research Center for hot-fire testing.

  11. Implications of Chronic Daily Anti-Oxidant Administration on the Inflammatory Response to Intracortical Microelectrodes

    PubMed Central

    Potter-Baker, Kelsey A.; Stewart, Wade G.; Tomaszewski, William H.; Wong, Chun T.; Meador, William D.; Ziats, Nicholas P.; Capadona, Jeffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Oxidative stress events have been implicated to occur and facilitate multiple failure modes of intracortical microelectrodes. The goal of the present study was to evaluate the ability of a sustained concentration of an anti-oxidant and to reduce oxidative stress-mediated neurodegeneration for the application of intracortical microelectrodes. Approach Non-functional microelectrodes were implanted into the cortex of male Sprague Dawley rats for up to sixteen weeks. Half of the animals received a daily intraperitoneal injection of the natural anti-oxidant resveratrol, at 30 mg/kg. The study was designed to investigate the biodistribution of the resveratrol, and the effects on neuroinflammation/neuroprotection following device implantation. Main Results Daily maintenance of a sustained range of resveratrol throughout the implantation period resulted in fewer degenerating neurons in comparison to control animals at both two and sixteen weeks post implantation. Initial and chronic improvements in neuronal viability in resveratrol-dosed animals were correlated with significant reductions in local superoxide anion accumulation around the implanted device at two weeks after implantation. Controls, receiving only saline injections, were also found to have reduced amounts of accumulated superoxide anion locally and less neurodegeneration than controls at sixteen weeks post-implantation. Despite observed benefits, thread-like adhesions were found between the liver and diaphragm in resveratrol-dosed animals. Significance Overall, our chronic daily anti-oxidant dosing scheme resulted in improvements in neuronal viability surrounding implanted microelectrodes, which could result in improved device performance. However, due to the discovery of thread-like adhesions, further work is still required to optimize a chronic anti-oxidant dosing regime for the application of intracortical microelectrodes. PMID:26015427

  12. Implications of chronic daily anti-oxidant administration on the inflammatory response to intracortical microelectrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter-Baker, Kelsey A.; Stewart, Wade G.; Tomaszewski, William H.; Wong, Chun T.; Meador, William D.; Ziats, Nicholas P.; Capadona, Jeffrey R.

    2015-08-01

    Objective. Oxidative stress events have been implicated to occur and facilitate multiple failure modes of intracortical microelectrodes. The goal of the present study was to evaluate the ability of a sustained concentration of an anti-oxidant and to reduce oxidative stress-mediated neurodegeneration for the application of intracortical microelectrodes. Approach. Non-functional microelectrodes were implanted into the cortex of male Sprague Dawley rats for up to sixteen weeks. Half of the animals received a daily intraperitoneal injection of the natural anti-oxidant resveratrol, at 30 mg kg-1. The study was designed to investigate the biodistribution of the resveratrol, and the effects on neuroinflammation/neuroprotection following device implantation. Main results. Daily maintenance of a sustained range of resveratrol throughout the implantation period resulted in fewer degenerating neurons in comparison to control animals at both two and sixteen weeks post implantation. Initial and chronic improvements in neuronal viability in resveratrol-dosed animals were correlated with significant reductions in local superoxide anion accumulation around the implanted device at two weeks after implantation. Controls, receiving only saline injections, were also found to have reduced amounts of accumulated superoxide anion locally and less neurodegeneration than controls at sixteen weeks post-implantation. Despite observed benefits, thread-like adhesions were found between the liver and diaphragm in resveratrol-dosed animals. Significance. Overall, our chronic daily anti-oxidant dosing scheme resulted in improvements in neuronal viability surrounding implanted microelectrodes, which could result in improved device performance. However, due to the discovery of thread-like adhesions, further work is still required to optimize a chronic anti-oxidant dosing regime for the application of intracortical microelectrodes.

  13. Potentiometric responses of ion-selective microelectrode with bovine serum albumin adsorption.

    PubMed

    Goda, Tatsuro; Yamada, Eriko; Katayama, Yurika; Tabata, Miyuki; Matsumoto, Akira; Miyahara, Yuji

    2016-03-15

    There is a growing demand for an in situ measurement of local pH and ion concentrations in biological milieu to monitor ongoing process of bioreaction and bioresponse in real time. An ion-selective microelectrode can meet the requirements. However, the contact of the electrode with biological fluids induces biofouling by protein adsorption to result in a noise signal. Therefore, we investigated the relationship between the amount of nonspecific protein adsorption and the electrical signals in potentiometry by using ion-selective microelectrodes, namely silver/silver chloride (Ag/AgCl), iridium/iridium oxides (Ir/IrOx), and platinum/iridium oxides (Pt/IrOx). The microelectrodes reduced a potential change following the adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) by comparison with the original metal microelectrodes without oxide layers. Suppression in the noise signal was attributed to the increased capacitance at the electrode/solution interface due to the formation of granulated metal oxide layer rather than a decrease in the amount of protein adsorbed. Ion sensitivity was maintained for Ir/IrOx against proton, but it was not for Ag/AgCl against chloride ion (Cl(-)), because of the interference of the equilibrium reaction by adsorbed BSA molecules on the electrode surface at<10(-2)M [Cl(-)] in the solution. The results open up the application of the Ir/IrOx microelectrode for measuring local pH in realistic dirty samples with a limited influence of electrode pollution by protein adsorption. PMID:26409020

  14. Heterogeneous Catalysis for Water Oxidation by an Iridium Complex Immobilized on Bipyridine-Periodic Mesoporous Organosilica.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao; Maegawa, Yoshifumi; Goto, Yasutomo; Hara, Kenji; Inagaki, Shinji

    2016-07-01

    Heterogenization of metal-complex catalysts for water oxidation without loss of their catalytic activity is important for the development of devices simulating photosynthesis. In this study, efficient heterogeneous iridium complexes for water oxidation were prepared using bipyridine-bridged periodic mesoporous organosilica (BPy-PMO) as a solid chelating ligand. The BPy-PMO-based iridium catalysts (Ir-BPy-PMO) were prepared by postsynthetic metalation of BPy-PMO and characterized through physicochemical analyses. The Ir-BPy-PMOs showed high catalytic activity for water oxidation. The turnover frequency (TOF) values for Ir-BPy-PMOs were one order of magnitude higher than those of conventional heterogeneous iridium catalysts. The reusability and stability of Ir-BPy-PMO were also examined, and detailed characterization was conducted using powder X-ray diffraction, nitrogen adsorption, (13) C DD MAS NMR spectroscopy, TEM, and XAFS methods. PMID:27168492

  15. Testing and evaluation of oxide-coated iridium/rhenium chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Brian D.

    1993-01-01

    Iridium-coated rhenium provides long life operation of radiation-cooled rockets at temperatures up to 2200 C. Ceramic oxide coatings could be used to increase iridium/rhenium rocket lifetimes and allow operation in highly oxidizing environments. Ceramic oxide coatings promise to serve as both thermal and diffusion barriers for the iridium layer. Seven ceramic oxide-coated iridium/rhenium, 22 N rocket chambers were tested on gaseous hydrogen/gaseous oxygen propellants. Five chambers had thick (over 10 mils), monolithic coatings of either hafnia or zirconia. Two chambers had coatings with thicknesses less than 5 mils. One of these chambers had a thin-walled coating of zirconia infiltrated with sol gel hafnia. The other chamber had a coating composed of an iridium/oxide composite. The purpose of this test program was to assess the ability of the oxide coatings to withstand the thermal shock of combustion initiation, adhere under repeated thermal cycling, and operate in aggressively oxidizing environments. All of the coatings survived the thermal shock of combustion and demonstrated operation at mixture ratios up to 11. The iridium/oxide composite coated chamber included testing for over 29 minutes at mixture ratio 16. The thicker-walled coatings provided the larger temperature drops across the oxide layer (up to 570 C), but were susceptible to macrocracking and eventual chipping at a stress concentrator. The cracks apparently resealed during firing, under compression of the oxide layer. The thinner-walled coatings did not experience the macrocracking and chipping of the chambers seen with the thick, monolithic coatings. However, burnthroughs in the throat region did occur in both of the thin-walled chambers at mixture ratios well above stochiometric. The burn-throughs were probably the result of oxygen-diffusion through the oxide coating that allowed the underlying iridium and rhenium layers to be oxidized. The results of this test program indicated that the thin

  16. Donor-Flexible Nitrogen Ligands for Efficient Iridium-Catalyzed Water Oxidation Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Miquel; Li, Mo; Müller-Bunz, Helge; Bernhard, Stefan; Albrecht, Martin

    2016-05-10

    A pyridylideneamide ligand with variable donor properties owing to a pronounced zwitterionic and a neutral diene-type resonance structure was used as a dynamic ligand at a Cp* iridium center to facilitate water oxidation catalysis, a reaction that requires the stabilization of a variety of different iridium oxidation states and that is key for developing an efficient solar fuel device. The ligand imparts high activity (nearly three-fold increase of turnover frequency compared to benchmark systems), and exceptionally high turnover numbers, which indicate a robust catalytic cycle and little catalyst degradation. PMID:26919306

  17. Electrochromic Properties of Iridium Oxide Films Prepared by Pulsed Anodic Electrodeposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Youngwoo; Tak, Yongsug; Lee, Jaeyoung

    2002-12-01

    Thin films of iridium oxide to be used as an electrochromic material were prepared by pulsed anodic current electrodeposition onto indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass substrates. Before the pulsed electrodeposition, iridium oxide films formed by cyclic voltammetry (CV) played an important role in good adhesion as a seed layer. Iridium oxide films with light-blue color (100 mC/cm2) were deposited when anodic current of 0.07 mA/cm2 for 0.5 sec was superimposed on off-time of 0.5 sec (i.e., zero current) in each cycle. During CV experiment in phosphate buffered saline solution, electrodeposited iridium oxide films exhibited anodic electrochromism of blue and black color at two oxidation potentials (i.e., the ejection of H+) of +0.5 V and +0.9 V (vs. SCE), respectively, while on the cathodic scan, black thin film became colorless due to the injection of H+. When +0.9 V and -0.7 V were applied for coloring and bleaching observation in different pulse voltammetry, minimal times needed for each process are 9 sec and 5 sec, respectively.

  18. Identification of an iridium-containing compound with a formal oxidation state of IX.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guanjun; Zhou, Mingfei; Goettel, James T; Schrobilgen, Gary J; Su, Jing; Li, Jun; Schlöder, Tobias; Riedel, Sebastian

    2014-10-23

    One of the most important classifications in chemistry and within the periodic table is the concept of formal oxidation states. The preparation and characterization of compounds containing elements with unusual oxidation states is of great interest to chemists. The highest experimentally known formal oxidation state of any chemical element is at present VIII, although higher oxidation states have been postulated. Compounds with oxidation state VIII include several xenon compounds (for example XeO4 and XeO3F2) and the well-characterized species RuO4 and OsO4 (refs 2-4). Iridium, which has nine valence electrons, is predicted to have the greatest chance of being oxidized beyond the VIII oxidation state. In recent matrix-isolation experiments, the IrO4 molecule was characterized as an isolated molecule in rare-gas matrices. The valence electron configuration of iridium in IrO4 is 5d(1), with a formal oxidation state of VIII. Removal of the remaining d electron from IrO4 would lead to the iridium tetroxide cation ([IrO4](+)), which was recently predicted to be stable and in which iridium is in a formal oxidation state of IX. There has been some speculation about the formation of [IrO4](+) species, but these experimental observations have not been structurally confirmed. Here we report the formation of [IrO4](+) and its identification by infrared photodissociation spectroscopy. Quantum-chemical calculations were carried out at the highest level of theory that is available today, and predict that the iridium tetroxide cation, with a Td-symmetrical structure and a d(0) electron configuration, is the most stable of all possible [IrO4](+) isomers. PMID:25341786

  19. Identification of an iridium-containing compound with a formal oxidation state of IX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guanjun; Zhou, Mingfei; Goettel, James T.; Schrobilgen, Gary J.; Su, Jing; Li, Jun; Schlöder, Tobias; Riedel, Sebastian

    2014-10-01

    One of the most important classifications in chemistry and within the periodic table is the concept of formal oxidation states. The preparation and characterization of compounds containing elements with unusual oxidation states is of great interest to chemists. The highest experimentally known formal oxidation state of any chemical element is at present VIII, although higher oxidation states have been postulated. Compounds with oxidation state VIII include several xenon compounds (for example XeO4 and XeO3F2) and the well-characterized species RuO4 and OsO4 (refs 2, 3, 4). Iridium, which has nine valence electrons, is predicted to have the greatest chance of being oxidized beyond the VIII oxidation state. In recent matrix-isolation experiments, the IrO4 molecule was characterized as an isolated molecule in rare-gas matrices. The valence electron configuration of iridium in IrO4 is 5d1, with a formal oxidation state of VIII. Removal of the remaining d electron from IrO4 would lead to the iridium tetroxide cation ([IrO4]+), which was recently predicted to be stable and in which iridium is in a formal oxidation state of IX. There has been some speculation about the formation of [IrO4]+ species, but these experimental observations have not been structurally confirmed. Here we report the formation of [IrO4]+ and its identification by infrared photodissociation spectroscopy. Quantum-chemical calculations were carried out at the highest level of theory that is available today, and predict that the iridium tetroxide cation, with a Td-symmetrical structure and a d0 electron configuration, is the most stable of all possible [IrO4]+ isomers.

  20. A pH Sensor Based on a Stainless Steel Electrode Electrodeposited with Iridium Oxide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, C. C. M.; Madrid, R. E.; Felice, C. J.

    2009-01-01

    A simple procedure to make an iridium oxide (IrO[subscript 2]) electrodeposited pH sensor, that can be used in a chemical, biomedical, or materials laboratory, is presented here. Some exercises, based on this sensor, that can be used to teach important concepts in the field of biomedical, biochemical, tissue, or materials engineering, are also…

  1. Luminescent Iridium(III) Complex Labeled DNA for Graphene Oxide-Based Biosensors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qingcheng; Zhou, Yuyang; Li, Yingying; Gu, Wei; Zhang, Qi; Liu, Jian

    2016-02-01

    There has been growing interest in utilizing highly photostable iridium(III) complexes as new luminescent probes for biotechnology and life science. Herein, iridium(III) complex with carboxyl group was synthesized and activated with N-hydroxysuccinimide, followed by tagging to the amino terminate of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). The Ir-ssDNA probe was further combined with graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets to develop a GO-based biosensor for target ssDNA detection. The quenching efficiency of GO, and the photostability of iridium(III) complex and GO-Ir-ssDNA biosensor, were also investigated. On the basis of the high luminescence quenching efficiency of GO toward iridium(III) complex, the GO-Ir-ssDNA biosensor exhibited minimal background signals, while strong emission was observed when Ir-ssDNA desorbed from GO nanosheets and formed a double helix with the specific target, leading to a high signal-to-background ratio. Moreover, it was found that luminescent intensities of iridium(III) complex and GO-Ir-ssDNA biosensor were around 15 and 3 times higher than those of the traditional carboxyl fluorescein (FAM) dye and the GO-FAM-ssDNA biosensor after UV irradiation, respectively. Our study suggested the sensitive and selective Ir-ssDNA probe was suitable for the development of highly photostable GO-based detection platforms, showing promise for application beyond the OLED (organic light emitting diode) area. PMID:26753824

  2. Highly Active Iridium/Iridium Tin/Tin Oxide Heterogeneous Nanoparticles as Alternative Electrocatalysts for the Ethanol Oxidation Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Du W.; Su D.; Wang Q.; Saxner D.; Deskins N.A.; Krzanowski J.E.; Frenkel A.I.; Teng X.

    2011-08-03

    Ethanol is a promising fuel for low-temperature direct fuel cell reactions due to its low toxicity, ease of storage and transportation, high-energy density, and availability from biomass. However, the implementation of ethanol fuel cell technology has been hindered by the lack of low-cost, highly active anode catalysts. In this paper, we have studied Iridium (Ir)-based binary catalysts as low-cost alternative electrocatalysts replacing platinum (Pt)-based catalysts for the direct ethanol fuel cell (DEFC) reaction. We report the synthesis of carbon supported Ir{sub 71}Sn{sub 29} catalysts with an average diameter of 2.7 {+-} 0.6 nm through a 'surfactant-free' wet chemistry approach. The complementary characterization techniques, including aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy equipped with electron energy loss spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy, are used to identify the 'real' heterogeneous structure of Ir{sub 71}Sn{sub 29}/C particles as Ir/Ir-Sn/SnO{sub 2}, which consists of an Ir-rich core and an Ir-Sn alloy shell with SnO{sub 2} present on the surface. The Ir{sub 71}Sn{sub 29}/C heterogeneous catalyst exhibited high electrochemical activity toward the ethanol oxidation reaction compared to the commercial Pt/C (ETEK), PtRu/C (Johnson Matthey) as well as PtSn/C catalysts. Electrochemical measurements and density functional theory calculations demonstrate that the superior electro-activity is directly related to the high degree of Ir-Sn alloy formation as well as the existence of nonalloyed SnO{sub 2} on surface. Our cross-disciplinary work, from novel 'surfactant-free' synthesis of Ir-Sn catalysts, theoretical simulations, and catalytic measurements to the characterizations of 'real' heterogeneous nanostructures, will not only highlight the intriguing structure-property correlations in nanosized catalysts but also have a transformative impact on the commercialization of DEFC

  3. Flexible complementary metal oxide semiconductor microelectrode arrays with applications in single cell characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pajouhi, H.; Jou, A. Y.; Jain, R.; Ziabari, A.; Shakouri, A.; Savran, C. A.; Mohammadi, S.

    2015-11-01

    A highly flexible microelectrode array with an embedded complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) instrumentation amplifier suitable for sensing surfaces of biological entities is developed. The array is based on ultrathin CMOS islands that are thermally isolated from each other and are interconnected by meandered nano-scale wires that can adapt to cellular surfaces with micro-scale curvatures. CMOS temperature sensors are placed in the islands and are optimally biased to have high temperature sensitivity. While no live cell thermometry is conducted, a measured temperature sensitivity of 0.15 °C in the temperature range of 35 to 40 °C is achieved by utilizing a low noise CMOS lock-in amplifier implemented in the same technology. The monolithic nature of CMOS sensors and amplifier circuits and their versatile flexible interconnecting wires overcome the sensitivity and yield limitations of microelectrode arrays fabricated in competing technologies.

  4. Iridium/Iridium Silicide as an Oxidation Resistant Capping Layer for Soft X-ray Mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Prisbrey, S; Vernon, S

    2004-04-05

    Rust on a sword, tarnish on the silverware, and a loss in reflectivity for soft x-ray mirrors are all caused by oxidation that changes the desired characteristics of a material. Methods to prevent the oxidation have varied over the centuries with the default method of a protective coating being the most common. The protective coating for x-ray mirrors is usually a self-limiting oxidized layer on the surface of the material that stops further oxidation of the material by limiting the diffusion of oxygen to the material underneath.

  5. The influence of electrolyte composition on the in vitro charge-injection limits of activated iridium oxide (AIROF) stimulation electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cogan, Stuart F.; Troyk, Philip R.; Ehrlich, Julia; Gasbarro, Christina M.; Plante, Timothy D.

    2007-06-01

    The effects of ionic conductivity and buffer concentration of electrolytes used for in vitro measurement of the charge-injection limits of activated iridium oxide (AIROF) neural stimulation electrodes have been investigated. Charge-injection limits of AIROF microelectrodes were measured in saline with a range of phosphate buffer concentrations from [PO43-] = 0 to [PO43-] = 103 mM and ionic conductivities from 2-28 mS cm-1. The charge-injection limits were insensitive to the buffer concentration, but varied significantly with ionic conductivity. Using 0.4 ms cathodal current pulses at 50 Hz, the charge-injection limit increased from 0.5 mC cm-2 to 2.1 mC cm-2 as the conductivity was increased from 2 mS cm-1 to 28 mS cm-1. An explanation is proposed in which the observed dependence on ionic conductivity arises from non-uniform reduction and oxidation within the porous AIROF and from uncorrected iR-drops that result in an overestimation of the redox potential during pulsing. Conversely, slow-sweep-rate cyclic voltammograms (CVs) were sensitive to buffer concentration with the potentials of the primary Ir3+/Ir4+ reduction and oxidation reactions shifting ~300 mV as the buffer concentration decreased from [PO43-] = 103 mM to [PO43-] = 0 mM. The CV response was insensitive to ionic conductivity. A comparison of in vitro AIROF charge-injection limits in commonly employed electrolyte models of extracellular fluid revealed a significant dependence on the electrolyte, with more than a factor of 4 difference under some pulsing conditions, emphasizing the need to select an electrolyte model that closely matches the conductivity and ionic composition of the in vivo environment.

  6. A 96-channel neural stimulation system for driving AIROF microelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Z; Troyk, P; Cogan, S

    2004-01-01

    We present the design and testing of a 96-channel stimulation system to drive activated iridium oxide (AIROF) microelectrodes within safe charge-injection limits. Our system improves upon the traditional capacitively coupled, symmetric charge-balanced biphasic stimulation waveform so as to maximize charge-injection capacity without endangering the microelectrodes. It can deliver computer-controlled cathodic current pulse for to up to 96 AIROF microelectrodes and positively bias them during the inter-pulse interval. The stimulation system is comprised of (1) 12 custom-designed PCB boards each hosting an 8-channel ASIC chip, (2) a motherboard to communicate between these 12 boards and the PC, (3) the PC interface equipped with a DIO card and the corresponding software. We plan to use this system in animal experiments for intracortical neural stimulation of implanted electrodes within our visual prosthesis project. PMID:17271241

  7. Toward a comparison of microelectrodes for acute and chronic recordings.

    PubMed

    Ward, Matthew P; Rajdev, Pooja; Ellison, Casey; Irazoqui, Pedro P

    2009-07-28

    Several variations of microelectrode arrays are used to record and stimulate intracortical neuronal activity. Bypassing the immune response to maintain a stable recording interface remains a challenge. Companies and researchers are continuously altering the material compositions and geometries of the arrays in order to discover a combination that allows for a chronic and stable electrode-tissue interface. From this interface, they wish to obtain consistent quality recordings and a stable, low impedance pathway for charge injection over extended periods of time. Despite numerous efforts, no microelectrode array design has managed to evade the host immune response and remain fully functional. This study is an initial effort comparing several microelectrode arrays with fundamentally different configurations for use in an implantable epilepsy prosthesis. Specifically, NeuroNexus (Michigan) probes, Cyberkinetics (Utah) Silicon and Iridium Oxide arrays, ceramic-based thin-film microelectrode arrays (Drexel), and Tucker-Davis Technologies (TDT) microwire arrays are evaluated over a 31-day period in an animal model. Microelectrodes are compared in implanted rats through impedance, charge capacity, signal-to-noise ratio, recording stability, and elicited immune response. Results suggest significant variability within and between microelectrode types with no clear superior array. Some applications for the microelectrode arrays are suggested based on data collected throughout the longitudinal study. Additionally, specific limitations of assaying biological phenomena and comparing fundamentally different microelectrode arrays in a highly variable system are discussed with suggestions on how to improve the reliability of observed results and steps needed to develop a more standardized microelectrode design. PMID:19486899

  8. Nanoporous gold supported cobalt oxide microelectrodes as high-performance electrochemical biosensors.

    PubMed

    Lang, Xing-You; Fu, Hong-Ying; Hou, Chao; Han, Gao-Feng; Yang, Ping; Liu, Yong-Bing; Jiang, Qing

    2013-01-01

    Tremendous demands for electrochemical biosensors with high sensitivity and reliability, fast response and excellent selectivity have stimulated intensive research on developing versatile materials with ultrahigh electrocatalytic activity. Here we report flexible and self-supported microelectrodes with a seamless solid/nanoporous gold/cobalt oxide hybrid structure for electrochemical nonenzymatic glucose biosensors. As a result of synergistic electrocatalytic activity of the gold skeleton and cobalt oxide nanoparticles towards glucose oxidation, amperometric glucose biosensors based on the hybrid microelectrodes exhibit multi-linear detection ranges with ultrahigh sensitivities at a low potential of 0.26 V (versus Ag/AgCl). The sensitivity up to 12.5 mA mM⁻¹ cm⁻² with a short response time of less than 1 s gives rise to ultralow detection limit of 5 nM. The outstanding performance originates from a novel nanoarchitecture in which the cobalt oxide nanoparticles are incorporated into pore channels of the seamless solid/nanoporous Au microwires, providing excellent electronic/ionic conductivity and mass transport for the enhanced electrocatalysis. PMID:23851924

  9. Insights into the oxidative dehydrogenation of amines with nanoparticulate iridium oxide.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Ceri; Schümperli, Martin T; Hermans, Ive

    2013-09-23

    The aerobic oxidation of amines offers a promising route towards many versatile chemical compounds. Within this contribution, we extend our previous investigations of iridium oxide-catalyzed alcohol oxidation to amine substrates. In addition to demonstrating the versatility of this catalyst, particular attention is focused on the mechanisms of the reaction. Herein, we demonstrate that although amines are oxidized slower than the corresponding alcohols, the catalyst has a preference for amine substrates, and oxidizes various amines at turnover frequencies greater than other systems found in the open literature. Furthermore, the competition between double amine dehydrogenation, to yield the corresponding nitrile, and amine-imine coupling, to yield the corresponding coupled imine, has been found to arise from a competitive reaction pathway, and stems from an effect of substrate-to-metal ratio. Finally, the mechanism responsible for the formation of N-benzylidene-1-phenylmethanamine was examined, and attributed to the coupling of free benzyl amine substrate and benzaldehyde, formed in situ through hydrolysis of the primary reaction product, benzyl imine. PMID:23939827

  10. Strongly improved electrochemical cycling durability by adding iridium to electrochromic nickel oxide films.

    PubMed

    Wen, Rui-Tao; Niklasson, Gunnar A; Granqvist, Claes G

    2015-05-13

    Anodically colored nickel oxide (NiO) thin films are of much interest as counter electrodes in tungsten oxide based electrochromic devices such as "smart windows" for energy-efficient buildings. However, NiO films are prone to suffering severe charge density degradation upon prolonged electrochemical cycling, which can lead to insufficient device lifetime. Therefore, a means to improve the durability of NiO-based films is an important challenge at present. Here we report that the incorporation of a modest amount of iridium into NiO films [Ir/(Ir + Ni) = 7.6 atom %] leads to remarkable durability, exceeding 10000 cycles in a lithium-conducting electrolyte, along with significantly improved optical modulation during extended cycling. Structure characterization showed that the face-centered-cubic-type NiO structure remained after iridium addition. Moreover, the crystallinity of these films was enhanced upon electrochemical cycling. PMID:25919917

  11. Continuous monitoring of ascorbate transport through neuroblastoma cells with a ruthenium oxide hexacyanoferrate modified microelectrode.

    PubMed

    Paixão, Thiago R L C; Barbosa, Lívea F; Carrì, Maria T; Medeiros, Marisa H G; Bertotti, Mauro

    2008-11-01

    The uptake of ascorbate by neuroblastoma cells using a ruthenium oxide hexacyanoferrate (RuOHCF)-modified carbon fiber disc (CFD) microelectrode (r = 14.5 microm) was investigated. By use of the proposed electrochemical sensor the amperometric determination of ascorbate was performed at 0.0 V in minimum essential medium (MEM, pH = 7.2) with a limit of detection of 25 micromol L(-1). Under the optimum experimental conditions, no interference from MEM constituents and reduced glutathione (used to prevent the oxidation of ascorbate during the experiments) was noticed. The stability of the RuOHCF-modified electrode response was studied by measuring the sensitivity over an extended period of time (120 h), a decrease of around 10% being noticed at the end of the experiment. The rate of ascorbate uptake by control human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells, and cells transfected with wild-type Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD WT) or with a mutant typical of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (SOD G93A), was in agreement with the level of oxidative stress in these cells. The usefulness of the RuOHCF-modified microelectrode for in vivo monitoring of ascorbate inside neuroblastoma cells was also demonstrated. PMID:18936840

  12. Flexible Nerve Stimulation Electrode with Iridium Oxide Sputtered on Liquid Crystal Polymer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kevin; Liu, Chung-Chiun; Durand, Dominique M.

    2009-01-01

    Current electrode designs require flexible substrates that absorb little moisture and provide large charge injection capability. Sputtered iridium oxide films have superior charge injection capabilities versus noble metals and can adhere to various substrates. Liquid crystal polymers (LCP) have very little water absorption compared to other flexible substrates. Therefore, the combination of sputtered iridium oxide film on liquid crystal polymer substrate was studied using 50Hz, 100μs duration, 10mA biphasic current waveforms for 700 hours at 67°C in bicarbonate buffer saline. Scanning electron micrograph (SEM) analysis showed no delamination and approximately 1% of electrode material was lost to the bicarbonate buffer. The charge injection limit and the cathodic charge storage capacity within the water window were 4.6 +/− 1.0mC/cm2 and 31.5 +/− 6.6mC/cm2 respectively. Additional electrochemical analysis revealed significant charge imbalance attributed to oxygen reduction within the water window. These results, along with the flexible, chemically inert, biocompatible substrate, indicate that sputtered iridium oxide films on liquid crystal polymer could become the method of choice for flexible substrate nerve electrodes. PMID:19224713

  13. Merger of visible light induced oxidation and enantioselective alkylation with a chiral iridium catalyst.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chuanyong; Zheng, Yu; Huo, Haohua; Röse, Philipp; Zhang, Lilu; Harms, Klaus; Hilt, Gerhard; Meggers, Eric

    2015-05-11

    A single chiral octahedral iridium(III) complex is used for visible light activated asymmetric photoredox catalysis. In the presence of a conventional household lamp and under an atmosphere of air, the oxidative coupling of 2-acyl-1-phenylimidazoles with N,N-diaryl-N-(trimethylsilyl)methylamines provides aminoalkylated products in 61-93 % yields with high enantiomeric excess (90-98 % ee). Notably, the iridium center simultaneously serves three distinct functions: as the exclusive source of chirality, as the catalytically active Lewis acid, and as a central part of the photoredox sensitizer. This conceptionally simple reaction Scheme may provide new avenues for the green synthesis of non-racemic chiral molecules. PMID:25832794

  14. The next step in chemical propulsion: Oxide-iridium/rhenium combustion chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortini, Arthur J.; Tuffias, Robert H.

    1999-01-01

    Chemical propulsion systems are currently limited by materials issues. Until recently, the state-of-the-art material for liquid propellant combustion chambers was silicide-coated niobium. However, combustion chamber performance demands have exceeded the capabilities of this material system, requiring development of better materials. The iridium/rhenium combustion chamber, comprising a rhenium structural shell with an iridium inner liner for oxidation protection, represents the current state of the art in high-performance, high temperature, long-life propulsion systems using nitrogen tetroxide/monomethyl hydrazine propellant. However, oxygen/hydrogen (O2/H2) and new ``green'' monopropellants under development to replace hydrazine will be significantly more oxidizing at operating temperature. For these more highly aggressive combustion environments, Ultramet has shown that substantial additional life can be obtained by lining the interior of the combustion chamber with a refractory metal oxide, which functions as a thermal and gas diffusion barrier and provides dramatically increased oxidation resistance. Ultramet has fabricated numerous 22-N (5-lbf) thrust chambers with this oxide-iridium/rhenium architecture that have been hot-fire tested at NASA Lewis Research Center in O2/H2 propellant at mixture ratios of 6 and 16, with steady-state exterior wall temperatures ranging from 2433 to 2899 K, comprising the most severe temperature and oxidizing conditions ever utilized. Of the seven chambers tested to date, three failed due to facility problems, and two never failed. The best-performing chamber was hot-fired for 13,595 seconds (227 minutes; 3.8 hours) and showed no visible signs of degradation. Additional chambers are being fabricated for future testing.

  15. The next step in chemical propulsion: Oxide-iridium/rhenium combustion chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Fortini, Arthur J.; Tuffias, Robert H.

    1999-01-22

    Chemical propulsion systems are currently limited by materials issues. Until recently, the state-of-the-art material for liquid propellant combustion chambers was silicide-coated niobium. However, combustion chamber performance demands have exceeded the capabilities of this material system, requiring development of better materials. The iridium/rhenium combustion chamber, comprising a rhenium structural shell with an iridium inner liner for oxidation protection, represents the current state of the art in high-performance, high temperature, long-life propulsion systems using nitrogen tetroxide/monomethyl hydrazine propellant. However, oxygen/hydrogen (O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}) and new 'green' monopropellants under development to replace hydrazine will be significantly more oxidizing at operating temperature. For these more highly aggressive combustion environments, Ultramet has shown that substantial additional life can be obtained by lining the interior of the combustion chamber with a refractory metal oxide, which functions as a thermal and gas diffusion barrier and provides dramatically increased oxidation resistance. Ultramet has fabricated numerous 22-N (5-lb{sub f}) thrust chambers with this oxide-iridium/rhenium architecture that have been hot-fire tested at NASA Lewis Research Center in O{sub 2}/H{sub 2} propellant at mixture ratios of 6 and 16, with steady-state exterior wall temperatures ranging from 2433 to 2899 K, comprising the most severe temperature and oxidizing conditions ever utilized. Of the seven chambers tested to date, three failed due to facility problems, and two never failed. The best-performing chamber was hot-fired for 13,595 seconds (227 minutes; 3.8 hours) and showed no visible signs of degradation. Additional chambers are being fabricated for future testing.

  16. Iridium in natural waters

    SciTech Connect

    Anbar, A.D.; Wasserburg, G.J.; Papanastassiou, D.A.

    1996-09-13

    Iridium, commonly used as a tracer of extraterrestrial material, was measured in rivers, oceans, and an estuarine environment. The concentration of iridium in the oceans ranges from 3.0 ({+-}1.3) x 10{sup 8} to 5.7 ({+-}0.8) x 10{sup 8} atoms per kilogram. Rivers contain from 17.4 ({+-}0.9) x 10{sup 8} to 92.9 ({+-}2.2) x 10{sup 8} atoms per kilogram and supply more dissolved iridium to the oceans than do extraterrestrial sources. In the Baltic Sea, {approximately}75% of riverine iridium is removed from solution. Iron-manganese oxyhydroxides scavenge iridium under oxidizing conditions, but anoxic environments are not a major sink for iridium. The ocean residence time of iridium is between 2 x 10{sup 3} and 2 x 10{sup 4} years. 32 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Evaluation of microelectrode materials for direct-current electrocorticography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunyan; Narayan, Raj K.; Wu, Pei-Ming; Rajan, Neena; Wu, Zhizhen; Mehan, Neal; Golanov, Eugene V.; Ahn, Chong H.; Hartings, Jed A.

    2016-02-01

    Objective. Direct-current electrocorticography (DC-ECoG) allows a more complete characterization of brain states and pathologies than traditional alternating-current recordings (AC-ECoG). However, reliable recording of DC signals is challenging because of electrode polarization-induced potential drift, particularly at low frequencies and for more conducting materials. Further challenges arise as electrode size decreases, since impedance is increased and the potential drift is augmented. While microelectrodes have been investigated for AC-ECoG recordings, little work has addressed microelectrode properties for DC-signal recording. In this paper, we investigated several common microelectrode materials used in biomedical application for DC-ECoG. Approach. Five of the most common materials including gold (Au), silver/silver chloride (Ag/AgCl), platinum (Pt), Iridium oxide (IrOx), and platinum-iridium oxide (Pt/IrOx) were investigated for electrode diameters of 300 μm. The critical characteristics such as polarization impedance, AC current-induced polarization, long-term stability and low-frequency noise were studied in vitro (0.9% saline). The two most promising materials, Pt and Pt/lrOx were further investigated in vivo by recording waves of spreading depolarization, one of the most important applications for DC-ECoG in clinical and basic science research. Main results. Our experimental results indicate that IrOx-based microelectrodes, particularly with composite layers of nanostructures, are excellent in all of the common evaluation characteristics both in vitro and in vivo and are most suitable for multimodal monitoring applications. Pt electrodes suffer high current-induced polarization, but have acceptable long-term stability suitable for DC-ECoG. Major significance. The results of this study provide quantitative data on the electrical properties of microelectrodes with commonly-used materials and will be valuable for development of neural recordings inclusive of

  18. Synthesis of nanoporous activated iridium oxide films by anodized aluminum oxide templated atomic layer deposition.

    SciTech Connect

    Comstock, D. J.; Christensen, S. T.; Elam, J. W.; Pellin, M. J.; Hersam, M. C.

    2010-08-01

    Iridium oxide (IrOx) has been widely studied due to its applications in electrochromic devices, pH sensing, and neural stimulation. Previous work has demonstrated that both Ir and IrOx films with porous morphologies prepared by sputtering exhibit significantly enhanced charge storage capacities. However, sputtering provides only limited control over film porosity. In this work, we demonstrate an alternative scheme for synthesizing nanoporous Ir and activated IrOx films (AIROFs). This scheme utilizes atomic layer deposition to deposit a thin conformal Ir film within a nanoporous anodized aluminum oxide template. The Ir film is then activated by potential cycling in 0.1 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} to form a nanoporous AIROF. The morphologies and electrochemical properties of the films are characterized by scanning electron microscopy and cyclic voltammetry, respectively. The resulting nanoporous AIROFs exhibit a nanoporous morphology and enhanced cathodal charge storage capacities as large as 311 mC/cm{sup 2}.

  19. Determination of surface coverage of catalysts: Temperature programmed experiments on platinum and iridium sponge catalysts after low temperature ammonia oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Broek, A.C.M. van den; Grondelle, J. van; Santen, R.A. van

    1999-07-25

    The activity of iridium and platinum sponge catalysts was studied in the low temperature gas phase oxidation of ammonia with oxygen. Under the reaction conditions used, iridium was found to be more active and more selective to nitrogen than platinum. Furthermore it was established from activity measurements that both catalysts lose activity as a function of time on stream due to inhibition of the surface by reaction intermediates. The used catalysts were studied by XPS and temperature programmed techniques. It was found that the surface of the catalysts had a high coverage of NH and OH and some additional NH{sub 2}. It seems most likely that the reaction mechanism proceeds through a stepwise dehydrogenation of the ammonia molecule. It appears that the last dehydrogenation step (NH by OH to N and water) is the rate determining step. The high selectivity of iridium to nitrogen can be explained by the higher activity of iridium in dissociating NO.

  20. State and catalytic activity of iridium compounds in the reaction of mercury(I) oxidation by cerium(IV)

    SciTech Connect

    Khomutova, E.G.; Rysev, A.P.; Romanovskaya, L.E.; Malysheva, N.M.

    1995-12-01

    Kinetic methods of determining Ir are insufficiently selective and sensitive as compared to the methods of determining Os and Ru. These characteristics may be improved by increasing the catalytic activity of iridium. All other factors being equal, catalytic activity depends on the state and form of iridium that enters the catalytic process. This is why one of the ways of improving the performance characteristics of a method of determining iridium involves searching for forms of the catalyst with higher catalytic activity. The aim of this work was to study the state and catalytic activity of iridium compounds. The method based on the iridium-catalyzed reaction of mercury(I) oxidation by cerium(IV) was chosen for the investigation. This method is most commonly used for analyzing complex samples. It was found previously that both the catalytic activity and selectivity of iridium determination increase when the reaction is conducted in the medium of perchloric acid or the sample is pretreated with nitric acid.

  1. Flexible, high-density microphotodiode array with integrated sputtered iridium oxide electrodes for retinal stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Frank; Chang, Mao-Yen; Yang, Chung-Hua; Teng, Chih-Ciao; Fan, Long-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    To assess the charge-injection capacity of the sputtered iridium oxide film (SIROF) electrode on the retinal CMOS image sensor (CIS) chip, a polyimide-based flex device was designed and fabricated to package the retinal CIS chip. The polyimide-flex-based packaging process keeps the surface of photosensors clean, and the measured connection resistance meets the packaging requirement of the low-power retinal CIS chip. The in vitro experimental results show that the small SIROF electrodes can provide a biphasic charge injection per phase of 3.9 nC/ph to achieve the stimulation threshold at a polarization potential of -0.44 V.

  2. Partially oxidized iridium clusters within dendrimers: size-controlled synthesis and selective hydrogenation of 2-nitrobenzaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Higaki, Tatsuya; Kitazawa, Hirokazu; Yamazoe, Seiji; Tsukuda, Tatsuya

    2016-06-01

    Iridium clusters nominally composed of 15, 30 or 60 atoms were size-selectively synthesized within OH-terminated poly(amidoamine) dendrimers of generation 6. Spectroscopic characterization revealed that the Ir clusters were partially oxidized. All the Ir clusters efficiently converted 2-nitrobenzaldehyde to anthranil and 2-aminobenzaldehyde under atmospheric hydrogen at room temperature in toluene via selective hydrogenation of the NO2 group. The selectivity toward 2-aminobenzaldehyde over anthranil was improved with the reduction of the cluster size. The improved selectivity is ascribed to more efficient reduction than intramolecular heterocyclization of a hydroxylamine intermediate on smaller clusters that have a higher Ir(0)-phase population on the surface. PMID:27193739

  3. Microelectrodes in microbial ecology

    SciTech Connect

    Boots, S.

    1989-03-15

    Understanding the microenvironment of bacteria has presented many challenges for the microbial ecologist. Simple intracellular capillary electrodes have been used in neurophysiology since the 1950s to measure action potentials in ion transport over biological membranes, and ion-selective electrodes were developed soon thereafter for the determination of H{sup +}, Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, and Ca{sup 2+}. However, these analytical techniques did not receive much attention until 1978, when Niels Peter Revsbech and Bo Barker Joergensen at the Institute of Ecology and Genetics, University of Aarhus, Denmark, began using oxygen microelectrodes in their studies of the ecology and biogeochemistry of marine sediments and other microbial environments. Today, Revsbech and Joergensen use five types of microelectrodes, two types of oxygen microelectrodes, a combined microelectrode for nitrous oxide and oxygen, a sulfide microelectrode, and a pH microelectrode. The first three microelectrodes have diameters of about 10 {mu}m and the last two of about 50 {mu}m. Some of the electrodes actually contain two or three cathodes plus a reference electrode, all situated behind a polymer membrane. In situ experiments have been done for several years at a water depth of several meters, where the micromanipulator is operated by a diver. Recently measurements were obtained in the deep sea with the microelectrodes mounted on a free-falling vehicle or operated from a submersible vessel.

  4. Anodic Deposition of a Robust Iridium-Based Water-Oxidation Catalyst from Organometallic Precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Blakemore, James D; Schley, Nathan D; Olack, G.; Incarvito, Christopher D; Brudvig, Gary W; Crabtree, Robert H

    2011-01-01

    Artificial photosynthesis, modeled on natural light-driven oxidation of water in Photosystem II, holds promise as a sustainable source of reducing equivalents for producing fuels. Few robust water-oxidation catalysts capable of mediating this difficult four-electron, four-proton reaction have yet been described. We report a new method for generating an amorphous electrodeposited material, principally consisting of iridium and oxygen, which is a robust and long-lived catalyst for water oxidation, when driven electrochemically. The catalyst material is generated by a simple anodic deposition from Cp*Ir aqua or hydroxo complexes in aqueous solution. This work suggests that organometallic precursors may be useful in electrodeposition of inorganic heterogeneous catalysts.

  5. Partially oxidized iridium clusters within dendrimers: size-controlled synthesis and selective hydrogenation of 2-nitrobenzaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higaki, Tatsuya; Kitazawa, Hirokazu; Yamazoe, Seiji; Tsukuda, Tatsuya

    2016-06-01

    Iridium clusters nominally composed of 15, 30 or 60 atoms were size-selectively synthesized within OH-terminated poly(amidoamine) dendrimers of generation 6. Spectroscopic characterization revealed that the Ir clusters were partially oxidized. All the Ir clusters efficiently converted 2-nitrobenzaldehyde to anthranil and 2-aminobenzaldehyde under atmospheric hydrogen at room temperature in toluene via selective hydrogenation of the NO2 group. The selectivity toward 2-aminobenzaldehyde over anthranil was improved with the reduction of the cluster size. The improved selectivity is ascribed to more efficient reduction than intramolecular heterocyclization of a hydroxylamine intermediate on smaller clusters that have a higher Ir(0)-phase population on the surface.Iridium clusters nominally composed of 15, 30 or 60 atoms were size-selectively synthesized within OH-terminated poly(amidoamine) dendrimers of generation 6. Spectroscopic characterization revealed that the Ir clusters were partially oxidized. All the Ir clusters efficiently converted 2-nitrobenzaldehyde to anthranil and 2-aminobenzaldehyde under atmospheric hydrogen at room temperature in toluene via selective hydrogenation of the NO2 group. The selectivity toward 2-aminobenzaldehyde over anthranil was improved with the reduction of the cluster size. The improved selectivity is ascribed to more efficient reduction than intramolecular heterocyclization of a hydroxylamine intermediate on smaller clusters that have a higher Ir(0)-phase population on the surface. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr01460g

  6. Parahydrogen induced polarization and the oxidative addition of hydrogen to iridium tribromostannyl carbonylate anions.

    PubMed

    Permin, Alexei; Eisenberg, Richard

    2002-05-01

    Activation of dihydrogen by a system composed of (Bu(4)N)[IrBr(2)(CO)(2)] (1) and tin dibromide in varying ratios was studied using parahydrogen induced polarization (PHIP) which allows the detection of transient dihydrides not observable in conventional (1)H NMR spectra. While the oxidative addition of dihydrogen to neutral and cationic Ir(I) species is common, there are only a few examples of H(2) addition to anionic complexes. Tin dibromide reacts with iridium(I) complex 1 in acetone forming equilibrium mixtures of cis- and trans-tribromostannyl derivatives [IrBr(n)()(SnBr(3))(2)(-)(n)()(CO)(2)](-), n = 0,1, the existence of which is inferred from the stereochemistries of the dihydrogen addition products determined using PHIP. The sigma-donating effect of the SnBr(3)(-) ligand facilitates the oxidative addition to the iridium center. The structures of the dihydrides formed upon addition of dihydrogen are assigned on the basis of hydride chemical shifts and values of (2)J((1)H-(117,119)Sn). The only dihydride observed in conventional (1)H NMR spectra is cis-trans-cis-[IrH(2)(SnBr(3))(2)(CO)(2)](-), the identity of which was confirmed using the (13)C labeled Ir(I) precursor. Both [IrBr(2)(CO)(2)](-) and its tribromostannyl derivatives catalyze cis-pairwise addition of dihydrogen to phenylacetylene. PMID:11978112

  7. Electrodeposition of PANi films on platinum needle type microelectrodes. Application to the oxidation of ascorbate in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Bonastre, A M; Bartlett, P N

    2010-08-31

    Needle type (165 microm(2)) and small Pt disc (3-11 microm(2)) microelectrodes were used for the electrodeposition of composite poly(aniline), PANi, films by cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry for the oxidation of ascorbate. PANi electroactivity at neutral pH was retained through polymer alkylation or by using large poly-anions, such as poly(vinylsulfonate), PVS, and poly(styrenesulfonate), PSS. Hence the growth of the composite films was studied in the presence of different counter ions such as SO(4)(2-), Cl(-), NaPVS and NaPSS. The morphology of the resulting films was examined by scanning electron microscopy. Results showed that flat PANi films with thicknesses much lower than the microelectrode radius were obtained by potentiodynamic electrodeposition. On the other hand films with mushroom shapes, with significant spill over, were obtained under constant potential. The resulting polymer modified microelectrodes films were shown to be suitable for the oxidation of ascorbate at 0.1 V vs. SCE and pH 7 with a detection limit of 1 microM for PANi/PSS composites. The current was independent of film thickness, mass transport controlled at low ascorbate concentrations and not affected by the presence of common interferences such as uric acid, glutathione or vitamin E. Due to their excellent properties the PANi-PSS film coated microelectrodes were used for the amperometric detection of ascorbate in human plasma. The results are encouraging for the use of small polymer modified Pt needle type microelectrodes for the detection of ascorbate in biological systems. PMID:20800735

  8. Te/Pt nanonetwork modified carbon fiber microelectrodes for methanol oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Hsiang-Yu; Shih, Zih-Yu; Lin, Zong-Hong; Chang, Huan-Tsung

    2013-05-01

    Te/Pt nanonetwork-decorated carbon fiber microelectrodes (CFMEs) have been fabricated and employed as anodic catalysts in a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). Te nanowires were prepared from tellurite ions (TeO32-) through a seed-mediated growth process and were deposited onto CFMEs to form three-dimensional Te nanonetworks. The Te nanonetworks then acted as a framework and reducing agent to reduce PtCl62- ions to form Te/Pt through a galvanic replacement reaction, leading to the formation of Te/PtCFMEs. By controlling the reaction time, the amount of Pt and morphology of Te/Pt nanonetworks were controlled, leading to various degrees of electrocatalytic activity. The Te/PtCFMEs provide a high electrochemical active surface area (129.2 m2 g-1), good catalytic activity (1.2 A mg-1), high current density (20.0 mA cm-2), long durability, and tolerance toward the poisoning species for methanol oxidation in 0.5 M sulfuric acid containing 1 M methanol. We have further demonstrated an enhanced current density by separately using 3 and 5 Te/PtCFMEs. Our results show that the low-cost, stable, and effective Te/PtCFMEs have great potential in the fabrication of cost-effective fuel cells.

  9. Te/Pt nanonetwork modified carbon fiber microelectrodes for methanol oxidation.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Hsiang-Yu; Shih, Zih-Yu; Lin, Zong-Hong; Chang, Huan-Tsung

    2013-05-17

    Te/Pt nanonetwork-decorated carbon fiber microelectrodes (CFMEs) have been fabricated and employed as anodic catalysts in a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). Te nanowires were prepared from tellurite ions (TeO3(2-)) through a seed-mediated growth process and were deposited onto CFMEs to form three-dimensional Te nanonetworks. The Te nanonetworks then acted as a framework and reducing agent to reduce PtCl6(2-) ions to form Te/Pt through a galvanic replacement reaction, leading to the formation of Te/PtCFMEs. By controlling the reaction time, the amount of Pt and morphology of Te/Pt nanonetworks were controlled, leading to various degrees of electrocatalytic activity. The Te/PtCFMEs provide a high electrochemical active surface area (129.2 m(2) g(-1)), good catalytic activity (1.2 A mg(-1)), high current density (20.0 mA cm(-2)), long durability, and tolerance toward the poisoning species for methanol oxidation in 0.5 M sulfuric acid containing 1 M methanol. We have further demonstrated an enhanced current density by separately using 3 and 5 Te/PtCFMEs. Our results show that the low-cost, stable, and effective Te/PtCFMEs have great potential in the fabrication of cost-effective fuel cells. PMID:23579734

  10. Characterization of sputtered iridium oxide thin films on planar and laser micro-structured platinum thin film surfaces for neural stimulation applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thanawala, Sachin

    Electrical stimulation of neurons provides promising results for treatment of a number of diseases and for restoration of lost function. Clinical examples include retinal stimulation for treatment of blindness and cochlear implants for deafness and deep brain stimulation for treatment of Parkinsons disease. A wide variety of materials have been tested for fabrication of electrodes for neural stimulation applications, some of which are platinum and its alloys, titanium nitride, and iridium oxide. In this study iridium oxide thin films were sputtered onto laser micro-structured platinum thin films by pulsed-DC reactive sputtering of iridium metal in oxygen-containing atmosphere, to obtain high charge capacity coatings for neural stimulation applications. The micro-structuring of platinum films was achieved by a pulsed-laser-based technique (KrF excimer laser emitting at lambda=248nm). The surface morphology of the micro-structured films was studied using different surface characterization techniques. In-vitro biocompatibility of these laser micro-structured films coated with iridium oxide thin films was evaluated using cortical neurons isolated from rat embryo brain. Characterization of these laser micro-structured films coated with iridium oxide, by cyclic voltammetry and impedance spectroscopy has revealed a considerable decrease in impedance and increase in charge capacity. A comparison between amorphous and crystalline iridium oxide thin films as electrode materials indicated that amorphous iridium oxide has significantly higher charge capacity and lower impedance making it preferable material for neural stimulation application. Our biocompatibility studies show that neural cells can grow and differentiate successfully on our laser micro-structured films coated with iridium oxide. This indicates that reactively sputtered iridium oxide (SIROF) is biocompatible.

  11. Long Life Testing of Oxide-Coated Iridium/Rhenium Rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Brian D.

    1995-01-01

    22-N class rockets, composed of a rhenium (Re) substrate, an iridium (Ir) coating, and an additional composite coating consisting of Ir and a ceramic oxide, were tested on gaseous oxygen/gaseous hydrogen (GO2/GH2) propellants. Two rockets were tested, one for nearly 39 hours at a nominal mixture ratio (MR) of 4.6 and chamber pressure (Pc) of 469 kPa, and the other for over 13 hours at a nominal MR of 5.8 and 621 kPa Pc. Four additional Ir/Re rockets, with a composite Ir-oxide coating fabricated using a modified process, were also tested, including one for 1.3 hours at a nominal MR of 16.7 and Pc of 503 kPa. The long lifetimes demonstrated on low MR GO2/GH2 suggest greatly extended chamber lifetimes (tens of hours) in the relatively low oxidizing combustion environments of Earth storable propellants. The oxide coatings could also serve as a protective coating in the near injector region, where a still-mixing flowfield may cause degradation of the Ir layer. Operation at MR close to 17 suggests that oxide-coated Ir/Re rockets could be used in severely oxidizing combustion environments, such as high MR GO2/GH2, oxygen/hydrocarbon, and liquid gun propellants.

  12. Nd2K2IrO7 and Sm2K2IrO7: Iridium(VI) Oxides Prepared under Ambient Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Mugavero, III, S.; Smith, M; Yoon, W; zur Loye, H

    2009-01-01

    The most-oxidized iridium oxides known to date are prepared in a hydroxide flux under normal pressure. They contain iridium centers exclusively in the +VI oxidation state and are characterized crystallographically. The picture shows the structure of the Ln2K2IrO7 (Ln=Nd, Sm) and its structural components: IrO6 octahedra (black), KO10 polyhedra (beige), LnO10 polyhedra (blue).

  13. Iridium Oxide Nanotube Electrodes for Highly Sensitive and Prolonged Intracellular Measurement of Action Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ziliang Carter; Xie, Chong; Osakada, Yasuko; Cui, Yi; Cui, Bianxiao

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular recording of action potentials is important to understand electrically-excitable cells. Recently, vertical nanoelectrodes have been developed to achieve highly sensitive, minimally invasive, and large scale intracellular recording. It has been demonstrated that the vertical geometry is crucial for the enhanced signal detection. Here we develop nanoelectrodes made up of nanotubes of iridium oxide. When cardiomyocytes are cultured upon those nanotubes, the cell membrane not only wraps around the vertical tubes but also protrudes deep into the hollow center. We show that this geometry enhances cell-electrode coupling and results in measuring much larger intracellular action potentials. The nanotube electrodes afford much longer intracellular access and are minimally invasive, making it possible to achieve stable recording up to an hour in a single session and more than 8 days of consecutive daily recording. This study suggests that the electrode performance can be significantly improved by optimizing the electrode geometry. PMID:24487777

  14. Modulated helical metals at magnetic domain walls of pyrochlore iridium oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaji, Youhei; Imada, Masatoshi

    2016-05-01

    Spontaneous symmetry breakings, metal-insulator transitions, and transport properties of magnetic-domain-wall states in pyrochlore iridium oxides are studied by employing a symmetry-adapted effective Hamiltonian with a slab perpendicular to the (111) direction of the pyrochlore structure. Emergent metallic domain wall, which has an unconventional topological nature with a controllable and mobile metallic layer, is shown to host Fermi surfaces with modulated helical spin textures resembling Rashba metals. The helical nature of the domain-wall Fermi surfaces is experimentally detectable by anomalous Hall conductivity, circular dichroism, and optical Hall conductivity under external magnetic fields. Possible applications of the domain-wall metals to spin-current generation and "half-metallic" conduction are also discussed.

  15. Performance of laboratory polymer electrolyte membrane hydrogen generator with sputtered iridium oxide anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labou, D.; Slavcheva, E.; Schnakenberg, U.; Neophytides, S.

    The continuous improvement of the anode materials constitutes a major challenge for the future commercial use of polymer electrolyte membranes (PEM) electrolyzers for hydrogen production. In accordance to this direction, iridium/titanium films deposited directly on carbon substrates via magnetron sputtering are operated as electrodes for the oxygen evolution reaction interfaced with Nafion 115 electrolyte in a laboratory single cell PEM hydrogen generator. The anode with 0.2 mg cm -2 Ir catalyst loading was electrochemically activated by cycling its potential value between 0 and 1.2 V (vs. RHE). The water electrolysis cell was operated at 90 °C with current density 1 A cm -2 at 1.51 V without the ohmic contribution. The corresponding current density per mgr of Ir catalyst is 5 A mg -1. The achieved high efficiency is combined with sufficient electrode stability since the oxidation of the carbon substrate during the anodic polarization is almost negligible.

  16. Noisy CO oxidation on Iridium(111) surfaces. Experiments explained by theory under realistic assumptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehner, S.; Cisternas, J.; Descalzi, O.; Küppers, J.

    2014-01-01

    Noise is an everywhere phenomenon. Its influence could be described theoretically quite easily, but is hard to measure in an experiment. Catalytic reactions on surfaces can be described by nonlinear reaction-diffusion equations. For one of such surface reactions - CO oxidation on Iridium(111) surfaces - the probability distribution of CO2 rates around the mean value - showing the influence of noise - could be measured directly in a ultra high vacuum (UHV) experiment. This opens the way to address such a fundamental phenomenon like noise by all three modern methods of physics - experimental, computational and analytical. We show the measured effect of colored noise on a bistable surface reaction and explain all observations directly with the underlying theoretical description - the Langmuir-Hinshelwood reaction scheme - by solving the equations under realistic assumptions. It is a great pleasure to dedicate this work to Prof. Dr. Helmut R. Brand on the occasion of his 60th birthday.

  17. Effect of the iridium oxide thin film on the electrochemical activity of platinum nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Aicheng; La Russa, Daniel J; Miller, Brad

    2004-10-26

    The influence of the iridium oxide thin film on the electrocatalytic properties of platinum nanoparticles was investigated using the electro-oxidation of methanol and CO as a probe. The presence of the IrO(2) thin film leads to the homogeneous dispersion of Pt nanoparticles. For comparison, polycrystalline platinum and Pt nanoparticles dispersed on a Ti substrate in the absence of an IrO(2) layer (Ti/Pt) were also investigated in this study. Inverted and enhanced CO bipolar peaks were observed using an in situ electrochemical Fourier transform infrared technique during the methanol oxidation on the Pt nanoparticles dispersed on a Ti substrate. Electrochemical impedance studies showed that the charge transfer resistance was significantly lower for the Ti/IrO(2)/Pt electrode compared with that of the massive Pt and Ti/Pt nanoparticles. The presence of the IrO(2) thin film not only greatly increases the active surface area but also promotes CO oxidation at a much lower electrode potential, thus, significantly enhancing the electrocatalytic activity of Pt nanoparticles toward methanol electro-oxidation. PMID:15491204

  18. Legitimate intermediates of oxygen evolution on iridium oxide revealed by in situ electrochemical evanescent wave spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ooka, Hideshi; Wang, Yuanqing; Yamaguchi, Akira; Hatakeyama, Makoto; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Hashimoto, Kazuhito; Nakamura, Ryuhei

    2016-06-01

    Understanding how the four-electron oxidation of water to dioxygen proceeds in different materials is critical to the rational design of efficient catalysts towards artificial photosynthetic systems. Here, using in situ electrochemical evanescent wave spectroscopy under oxygen-evolving conditions, we report two intermediates of iridium oxide (IrOx), which is the most active and stable catalyst characterized to date in acidic medium. The observed potential dependence of the two intermediates indicated that they were associated with different surface sites, and intermediate scavenging experiments using H2O2 provided insight into their role during catalysis. Notably, an Ir(V) species with an absorption maximum at 450 nm was found to mediate the initial two-electron oxidation of water. Inhibition of the Ir(V) species by H2O2, combined with computational modeling, indicates that the accumulation and concurrent spin-state change of the Ir(V) species is a prerequisite for efficient water oxidation by IrOx electrodes. PMID:27197557

  19. Nanocomposites of iridium oxide and conducting polymers as electroactive phases in biological media.

    PubMed

    Moral-Vico, J; Sánchez-Redondo, S; Lichtenstein, M P; Suñol, C; Casañ-Pastor, N

    2014-05-01

    Much effort is currently devoted to implementing new materials in electrodes that will be used in the central nervous system, either for functional electrostimulation or for tests on nerve regeneration. Their main aim is to improve the charge capacity of the electrodes, while preventing damaging secondary reactions, such as peroxide formation, occurring while applying the electric field. Thus, hybrids may represent a new generation of materials. Two novel hybrid materials are synthesized using three known biocompatible materials tested in the neural system: polypyrrole (PPy), poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) and iridium oxide (IrO2). In particular, PPy-IrO2 and PEDOT-IrO2 hybrid nanocomposite materials are prepared by chemical polymerization in hydrothermal conditions, using IrO2 as oxidizing agent. The reaction yields a significant ordered new hybrid where the conducting polymer is formed around the IrO2 nanoparticles, encapsulating them. Scanning electron microscopy and backscattering techniques show the extent of the encapsulation. Both X-ray photoelectron and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopies identify the components of the phases, as well as the absence of impurities. Electrochemical properties of the final phases in powder and pellet form are evaluated by cyclic voltammetry. Biocompatibility is tested with MTT toxicity tests using primary cultures of cortical neurons grown in vitro for 6 and 9days. PMID:24394636

  20. Determination of glutathione in single HepG2 cells by capillary electrophoresis with reduced graphene oxide modified microelectrode.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaolei; Wang, Jun; Fu, Hongyan; Liu, Dongju; Chen, Zhenzhen

    2014-12-01

    Determination of intracellular bioactive species will afford beneficial information related to cell metabolism, signal transduction, cell function, and disease treatment. In this study, the electrochemically reduced graphene oxide modified carbon fiber microdisk electrode (ER-GOME) was used as a detector of CZE-electrochemical detection and developed to detect glutathione (GSH). The electrocatalytic activity of the modified microelectrode was characterized by cyclic voltammetry. Under optimized experimental conditions, the concentration linear range of GSH was from 1 to 60 μM. When the S/N ratio was 3, the concentration detection limit was 1 μM. Compared with the unmodified carbon fiber microdisk electrode, the sensitivity was enhanced more than five times. With the use of this method, the average contents of GSH in single HepG2 cells were found to be 7.13 ± 1.11 fmol (n = 10). Compared with gold/mercury amalgam microelectrode, which was usually used in determining GSH, the electrochemically reduced graphene oxide modified carbon fiber microdisk electrode was friendly to environment for free mercury. Furthermore, there were several merits of the novel electrochemical detector coupled with CE, such as comparative repeatability, easy fabrication, and high sensitivity, hold great potential for the single-cell assay. PMID:25220105

  1. Label-free impedimetric aptasensor for ochratoxin-A detection using iridium oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Rivas, Lourdes; Mayorga-Martinez, Carmen C; Quesada-González, Daniel; Zamora-Gálvez, Alejandro; de la Escosura-Muñiz, Alfredo; Merkoçi, Arben

    2015-01-01

    In this article, a novel aptasensor for ochratoxin A (OTA) detection based on a screen-printed carbon electrode (SPCE) modified with polythionine (PTH) and iridium oxide nanoparticles (IrO2 NPs) is presented. The electrotransducer surface is modified with an electropolymerized film of PTH followed by the assembly of IrO2 NPs on which the aminated aptamer selective to OTA is exchanged with the citrate ions surrounding IrO2 NPs via electrostatic interactions with the same surface. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in the presence of the [Fe(CN)6](-3/-4) redox probe is employed to characterize each step in the aptasensor assay and also for label-free detection of OTA in a range between 0.01 and 100 nM, obtaining one of the lowest limits of detection reported so far for label-free impedimetric detection of OTA (14 pM; 5.65 ng/kg). The reported system also exhibits a high reproducibility, a good performance with a white wine sample, and an excellent specificity against another toxin present in such sample. PMID:25901535

  2. A comparative study of carbon fiber-based microelectrodes for the measurement of nitric oxide in brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Santos, Ricardo M; Lourenço, Cátia F; Piedade, Ana P; Andrews, Rodney; Pomerleau, François; Huettl, Peter; Gerhardt, Greg A; Laranjinha, João; Barbosa, Rui M

    2008-12-01

    The measurement of Nitric oxide (NO) in real-time has been a major concern due to the involvement of this ubiquitous free radical modulator in several physiological and pathological pathways in tissues. Here we performed a study aiming at evaluating different types of carbon fibers, namely Textron, Amoco, Courtaulds and carbon nanotubes (University of Kentucky) covered with Nafion/o-phenylenediamine (o-PD) for NO measurement in terms of sensitivity, LOD, response time and selectivity against major potential interferents in the brain (ascorbate, nitrite and dopamine). The results indicate that, as compared with the other carbon fibers and nanotubes, Textron carbon fiber microelectrodes coated with two layers of Nafion and o-PD exhibited better characteristics for NO measurement as they are highly selective against ascorbate (>30,000:1), nitrite (>2000:1) and dopamine (>80:1). These coated Textron microelectrodes showed an average sensitivity of 341+/-120pA/microM and a detection limit of 16+/-11nM. The better performance of the Textron fibers is likely related to a stronger adhesion or more uniform coating of the Nafion and o-PD polymers to the fiber surface. In addition, the background current of the Textron carbon fibers is low, contributing to the excellent signal-to-noise for detection of NO. PMID:18657966

  3. Mixed N-Heterocyclic Carbene-Bis(oxazolinyl)borato Rhodium and Iridium Complexes in Photochemical and Thermal Oxidative Addition Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Songchen; Manna, Kuntal; Ellern, Arkady; Sadow, Aaron D

    2014-12-08

    In order to facilitate oxidative addition chemistry of fac-coordinated rhodium(I) and iridium(I) compounds, carbene–bis(oxazolinyl)phenylborate proligands have been synthesized and reacted with organometallic precursors. Two proligands, PhB(OxMe2)2(ImtBuH) (H[1]; OxMe2 = 4,4-dimethyl-2-oxazoline; ImtBuH = 1-tert-butylimidazole) and PhB(OxMe2)2(ImMesH) (H[2]; ImMesH = 1-mesitylimidazole), are deprotonated with potassium benzyl to generate K[1] and K[2], and these potassium compounds serve as reagents for the synthesis of a series of rhodium and iridium complexes. Cyclooctadiene and dicarbonyl compounds {PhB(OxMe2)2ImtBu}Rh(η4-C8H12) (3), {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}Rh(η4-C8H12) (4), {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}Rh(CO)2 (5), {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}Ir(η4-C8H12) (6), and {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}Ir(CO)2 (7) are synthesized along with ToMM(η4-C8H12) (M = Rh (8); M = Ir (9); ToM = tris(4,4-dimethyl-2-oxazolinyl)phenylborate). The spectroscopic and structural properties and reactivity of this series of compounds show electronic and steric effects of substituents on the imidazole (tert-butyl vs mesityl), effects of replacing an oxazoline in ToM with a carbene donor, and the influence of the donor ligand (CO vs C8H12). The reactions of K[2] and [M(μ-Cl)(η2-C8H14)2]2 (M = Rh, Ir) provide {κ4-PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes'CH2}Rh(μ-H)(μ-Cl)Rh(η2-C8H14)2 (10) and {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}IrH(η3-C8H13) (11). In the former compound, a spontaneous oxidative addition of a mesityl ortho-methyl to give a mixed-valent dirhodium species is observed, while the iridium compound forms a monometallic allyl hydride. Photochemical reactions of dicarbonyl compounds 5 and 7 result in C–H bond oxidative addition providing the compounds {κ4-PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes'CH2}RhH(CO) (12) and {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}IrH(Ph)CO (13). In 12, oxidative addition results in cyclometalation of the mesityl ortho-methyl similar to 10, whereas the iridium compound reacts with the benzene solvent to give a rare crystallographically characterized cis

  4. Physicochemical properties of peptide-coated microelectrode arrays and their in vitro effects on neuroblast cells.

    PubMed

    Ghane-Motlagh, Bahareh; Javanbakht, Taraneh; Shoghi, Fatemeh; Wilkinson, Kevin J; Martel, Richard; Sawan, Mohamad

    2016-11-01

    Silicon micromachined neural electrode arrays, which act as an interface between bioelectronic devices and neural tissues, play an important role in chronic implants, in vivo. The biological compatibility of chronic microelectrode arrays (MEA) is an essential factor that must be taken into account in their design and fabrication. In order to improve biocompatibility of the MEAs, the surface of the electrodes was coated with polyethylene glycol (PEG) and parylene-C, which are biocompatible polymers. An in vitro study was performed to test the capacity of poly-d-lysine (PDL) to improve neural-cell adhesion and proliferation. Increased proliferation of the neuroblast cells on the microelectrodes was observed in the presence of the PDL. The presence of the peptide on the electrode surface was confirmed using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The impedance of the electrodes was not changed significantly before and after PDL deposition. Mouse neuroblast cells were seeded and cultured on the PDL coated and uncoated neural MEAs with different tip-coatings such as platinum, molybdenum, gold, sputtered iridium oxide, and carbon nanotubes. The neuroblast cells grew preferentially on and around peptide coated-microelectrode tips, as compared to the uncoated microelectrodes. PMID:27524064

  5. Dual microelectrodes for distance control and detection of nitric oxide from endothelial cells by means of scanning electrochemical microscope.

    PubMed

    Isik, Sonnur; Etienne, Mathieu; Oni, Joshua; Blöchl, Andrea; Reiter, Sabine; Schuhmann, Wolfgang

    2004-11-01

    Dual Pt disk microelectrodes consisting of a 10-microm distance sensor and a 50-microm nitric oxide sensor were prepared. The 50-microm electrode was modified with Ni(4-N-tetramethyl)pyridyl porphyrin enclosed in the polymer network of a negatively charged electrodeposition paint. This paint prevented the dissolution of the otherwise soluble porphyrin in the aqueous test medium due to charge interactions. It also denied negatively charged ions in the analyte solution access to the electrode surface by electrostatic repulsion, thereby preventing interference from anions such as nitrite, nitrate, and ascorbate. With the aid of a scanning electrochemical microscope, it was possible to use the distance sensor by recording the negative feedback effect on the reduction of molecular oxygen to "guide" the nitric oxide sensor to various known distances from a layer of adherently growing human umbilical vein endothelial cells for the detection of nitric oxide released from the cells upon stimulation with bradykinin. The use of the distance sensor made it possible to preserve the integrity of the adherently growing cells concomitantly with the modified electrode by preventing the deterioration of the modifying layer during the distance adjustment step. PMID:15516132

  6. Oxidation and β-Alkylation of Alcohols Catalysed by Iridium(I) Complexes with Functionalised N-Heterocyclic Carbene Ligands.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, M Victoria; Fernández-Tornos, Javier; Modrego, F Javier; Pérez-Torrente, Jesús J; Oro, Luis A

    2015-12-01

    The borrowing hydrogen methodology allows for the use of alcohols as alkylating agents for CC bond forming processes offering significant environmental benefits over traditional approaches. Iridium(I)-cyclooctadiene complexes having a NHC ligand with a O- or N-functionalised wingtip efficiently catalysed the oxidation and β-alkylation of secondary alcohols with primary alcohols in the presence of a base. The cationic complex [Ir(NCCH3 )(cod)(MeIm(2- methoxybenzyl))][BF4 ] (cod=1,5-cyclooctadiene, MeIm=1-methylimidazolyl) having a rigid O-functionalised wingtip, shows the best catalyst performance in the dehydrogenation of benzyl alcohol in acetone, with an initial turnover frequency (TOF0 ) of 1283 h(-1) , and also in the β-alkylation of 2-propanol with butan-1-ol, which gives a conversion of 94 % in 10 h with a selectivity of 99 % for heptan-2-ol. We have investigated the full reaction mechanism including the dehydrogenation, the cross-aldol condensation and the hydrogenation step by DFT calculations. Interestingly, these studies revealed the participation of the iridium catalyst in the key step leading to the formation of the new CC bond that involves the reaction of an O-bound enolate generated in the basic medium with the electrophilic aldehyde. PMID:26493780

  7. Impact of metal nano layer thickness on tunneling oxide and memory performance of core-shell iridium-oxide nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, W.; Maikap, S.; Tien, T.-C.; Li, W.-C.; Yang, J.-R.

    2011-10-01

    The impact of iridium-oxide (IrO{sub x}) nano layer thickness on the tunneling oxide and memory performance of IrO{sub x} metal nanocrystals in an n-Si/SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/IrO{sub x}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/IrO{sub x} structure has been investigated. A thinner (1.5 nm) IrO{sub x} nano layer has shown better memory performance than that of a thicker one (2.5 nm). Core-shell IrO{sub x} nanocrystals with a small average diameter of 2.4 nm and a high density of {approx}2 x 10{sup 12}/cm{sup 2} have been observed by scanning transmission electron microscopy. The IrO{sub x} nanocrystals are confirmed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A large memory window of 3.0 V at a sweeping gate voltage of {+-}5 V and 7.2 V at a sweeping gate voltage of {+-} 8 V has been observed for the 1.5 nm-thick IrO{sub x} nano layer memory capacitors with a small equivalent oxide thickness of 8 nm. The electrons and holes are trapped in the core and annular regions of the IrO{sub x} nanocrystals, respectively, which is explained by Gibbs free energy. High electron and hole-trapping densities are found to be 1.5 x 10{sup 13}/cm{sup 2} and 2 x 10{sup 13}/cm{sup 2}, respectively, due to the small size and high-density of IrO{sub x} nanocrystals. Excellent program/erase endurance of >10{sup 6} cycles and good retention of 10{sup 4} s with a good memory window of >1.2 V under a small operation voltage of {+-} 5 V are obtained. A large memory size of >10 Tbit/sq. in. can be designed by using the IrO{sub x} nanocrystals. This study is not only important for the IrO{sub x} nanocrystal charge-trapping memory investigation but it will also help to design future metal nanocrystal flash memory.

  8. Control of the iridium oxidation state in the hollandite iridate solid solution K(1-x)Ir4O8.

    PubMed

    Talanov, Artem; Phelan, W Adam; Kelly, Zachary A; Siegler, Maxime A; McQueen, Tyrel M

    2014-05-01

    The synthesis and physical properties of the K(1-x)Ir4O8 (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.7) solid solution are reported. The structure of KIr4O8, solved with single-crystal X-ray diffraction at T = 110 K, is found to be tetragonal, space group I4/m, with a = 10.0492(3) Å and c = 3.14959(13) Å. A highly anisotropic displacement parameter is found for the potassium cation. Density functional theory calculations suggest that this anisotropy is due to a competition between atomic size and bond valence. KIr4O8 has a significant electronic contribution to the specific heat, γ = 13.9 mJ mol-Ir(-1) K(-2), indicating an effective carrier mass of m*/me ≈ 10. Further, there is a magnetic-field-dependent upturn in the specific heat at T < 3 K, suggestive of a magnetically sensitive phase transition below T < 1.8 K. Resistivity and magnetization measurements show that both end-members of the solid solution, KIr4O8 and K(1-x)Ir4O8 (x ≈ 0.7), are metallic, with no significant trends in the temperature-independent contributions to the magnetization. These results are interpreted and discussed in the context of the importance of the variability of the oxidation state of iridium. The differences in physical properties between members of the K(1-x)Ir4O8 (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.7) series are small and appear to be insensitive to the iridium oxidation state. PMID:24739024

  9. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of PEDOT microelectrodes for neural stimulation and recording.

    PubMed

    Venkatraman, Subramaniam; Hendricks, Jeffrey; King, Zachary A; Sereno, Andrew J; Richardson-Burns, Sarah; Martin, David; Carmena, Jose M

    2011-06-01

    Cortical neural prostheses require chronically implanted small-area microelectrode arrays that simultaneously record and stimulate neural activity. It is necessary to develop new materials with low interface impedance and large charge transfer capacity for this application and we explore the use of conducting polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) for the same. We subjected PEDOT coated electrodes to voltage cycling between -0.6 and 0.8 V, 24 h continuous biphasic stimulation at 3 mC/cm² and accelerated aging for four weeks. Characterization was performed using cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and voltage transient measurements. We found that PEDOT coated electrodes showed a charge injection limit 15 times higher than Platinum Iridium (PtIr) electrodes and electroplated Iridium Oxide (IrOx) electrodes when using constant current stimulation at zero voltage bias. In vivo chronic testing of microelectrode arrays implanted in rat cortex revealed that PEDOT coated electrodes show higher signal-to-noise recordings and superior charge injection compared to PtIr electrodes. PMID:21292598

  10. Facilitated extracellular electron transfer of Shewanella loihica PV-4 by antimony-doped tin oxide nanoparticles as active microelectrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaojian; Liu, Huan; Wang, Jinrong; Ren, Guangyuan; Xie, Beizhen; Liu, Hong; Zhu, Ying; Jiang, Lei

    2015-11-01

    Dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria are capable of extracellular electron transfer (EET) to insoluble metal oxides as external electron acceptors for their anaerobic respiration, which is recognized as an important energy-conversion process in natural and engineered environments, such as in mineral cycling, bioremediation, and microbial fuel/electrolysis cells. However, the low EET efficiency remains one of the major bottlenecks for its practical application. We report firstly that the microbial current generated by Shewanella loihica PV-4 (S. loihica PV-4) could be greatly improved that is up to ca. 115 fold, by adding antimony-doped tin oxide (ATO) nanoparticles in the electrochemical reactor. The results demonstrate that the biocompatible, electrically conductive ATO nanoparticles acted as active microelectrodes could facilitate the formation of a cells/ATO composite biofilm and the reduction of the outer membrane c-type cytochromes (OM c-Cyts) that are beneficial for the electron transfer from cells to electrode. Meanwhile, a synergistic effect between the participation of OM c-Cyts and the accelerated EET mediated by cell-secreted flavins may play an important role for the enhanced current generation in the presence of ATO nanoparticles. Moreover, it is worth noting that the TCA cycle in S. loihica PV-4 cells is activated by adding ATO nanoparticles, even if the potential is poised at +0.2 V, thereby also improving the EET process. The results presented here may provide a simple and effective strategy to boost the EET of S. loihica PV-4 cells, which is conducive to providing potential applications in bioelectrochemical systems.Dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria are capable of extracellular electron transfer (EET) to insoluble metal oxides as external electron acceptors for their anaerobic respiration, which is recognized as an important energy-conversion process in natural and engineered environments, such as in mineral cycling, bioremediation, and

  11. Facilitated extracellular electron transfer of Shewanella loihica PV-4 by antimony-doped tin oxide nanoparticles as active microelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaojian; Liu, Huan; Wang, Jinrong; Ren, Guangyuan; Xie, Beizhen; Liu, Hong; Zhu, Ying; Jiang, Lei

    2015-11-28

    Dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria are capable of extracellular electron transfer (EET) to insoluble metal oxides as external electron acceptors for their anaerobic respiration, which is recognized as an important energy-conversion process in natural and engineered environments, such as in mineral cycling, bioremediation, and microbial fuel/electrolysis cells. However, the low EET efficiency remains one of the major bottlenecks for its practical application. We report firstly that the microbial current generated by Shewanella loihica PV-4 (S. loihica PV-4) could be greatly improved that is up to ca. 115 fold, by adding antimony-doped tin oxide (ATO) nanoparticles in the electrochemical reactor. The results demonstrate that the biocompatible, electrically conductive ATO nanoparticles acted as active microelectrodes could facilitate the formation of a cells/ATO composite biofilm and the reduction of the outer membrane c-type cytochromes (OM c-Cyts) that are beneficial for the electron transfer from cells to electrode. Meanwhile, a synergistic effect between the participation of OM c-Cyts and the accelerated EET mediated by cell-secreted flavins may play an important role for the enhanced current generation in the presence of ATO nanoparticles. Moreover, it is worth noting that the TCA cycle in S. loihica PV-4 cells is activated by adding ATO nanoparticles, even if the potential is poised at +0.2 V, thereby also improving the EET process. The results presented here may provide a simple and effective strategy to boost the EET of S. loihica PV-4 cells, which is conducive to providing potential applications in bioelectrochemical systems. PMID:26505239

  12. Epitaxially stabilized iridium spinel oxide without cations in the tetrahedral site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuriyama, Hiromichi; Matsuno, Jobu; Niitaka, Seiji; Uchida, Masaya; Hashizume, Daisuke; Nakao, Aiko; Sugimoto, Kunihisa; Ohsumi, Hiroyuki; Takata, Masaki; Takagi, Hidenori

    2010-05-01

    Single-crystalline thin film of an iridium dioxide polymorph Ir2O4 has been fabricated by the pulsed laser deposition of LixIr2O4 precursor and the subsequent Li-deintercalation using soft chemistry. Ir2O4 crystallizes in a spinel (AB2O4) without A cations in the tetrahedral site, which is isostructural to λ-MnO2. Ir ions form a pyrochlore sublattice, which is known to give rise to a strong geometrical frustration. This Ir spinel was found to be a narrow gap insulator, in remarkable contrast to the metallic ground state of rutile-type IrO2. We argue that an interplay of a strong spin-orbit coupling and a Coulomb repulsion gives rise to an insulating ground state as in a layered perovskite Sr2IrO4.

  13. Magnetic symmetries in neutron and resonant x-ray Bragg diffraction patterns of four iridium oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovesey, S. W.; Khalyavin, D. D.; Manuel, P.; Chapon, L. C.; Cao, G.; Qi, T. F.

    2012-12-01

    The magnetic properties of Sr2IrO4, Na2IrO3, Sr3Ir2O7 and CaIrO3 are discussed, principally in the light of experimental data in recent literature for Bragg intensities measured in x-ray diffraction with enhancement at iridium L-absorption edges. The electronic structure factors we report, which incorporate parity-even and acentric entities, serve the immediate purpose of making full use of crystal and magnetic symmetry to refine our knowledge of the magnetic properties of the four iridates from resonant x-ray diffraction data. They also offer a platform on which to interpret future investigations, using dichroic signals, resonant x-ray diffraction and neutron diffraction, for example, as well as ab initio calculations of electronic structure. Unit-cell structure factors, suitable for x-ray Bragg diffraction enhanced by an electric dipole-electric dipole (E1-E1) event, reveal exactly which iridium multipoles are visible, e.g., a magnetic dipole parallel to the crystal c-axis (z-axis) and an electric quadrupole with yz-like symmetry in the specific case of CaIrO3. Magnetic space-groups are assigned to Sr2IrO4, Sr3Ir2O7 and CaIrO3, namely, PIcca, PAban and Cm‧cm‧, respectively, in the Belov-Neronova-Smirnova notation. The assignment for Sr2IrO4 is possible because of our new high-resolution neutron diffraction data, gathered on a powder sample. In addition, the new data are used to show that the ordered magnetic moment of an Ir4+ ion in Sr2IrO4 does not exceed 0.29(4) μB. Na2IrO3 has two candidate magnetic space-groups that are not resolved with currently available resonant x-ray data.

  14. Analysis of diffusion-controlled stochastic events of iridium oxide single nanoparticle collisions by scanning electrochemical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Seong Jung; Bard, Allen J

    2012-04-25

    We investigated the electrochemical detection of single iridium oxide nanoparticle (IrO(x) NP) collisions at the NaBH(4)-treated Pt ultramicroelectrode (UME) in a scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM) over an insulating surface. The NP collision events were monitored by observing the electrocatalytic water oxidation reaction at potentials where it does not take place on the Pt UME. These collisions occurred stochastically, resulting in a transient response ("blip") for each collision. The frequency of the collisions is proportional to the flux of NPs to the UME tip, and thus equivalent to the SECM current. A plot of collision frequency versus distance followed the theoretical approach curve behavior for negative feedback for a high concentration of mediator, demonstrating that the collisions were diffusion-controlled and that single-particle measurements of mass transport are equivalent to ensemble ones. When the SECM was operated with a Pt substrate at the same potential as the tip, the behavior followed that expected of the shielding mode. These studies and additional ones result in a model where the IrO(x) NP collision on the Pt UME is adsorptive, with oxygen produced by the catalyzed water oxidation causing a current decay. This results in a blip current response, with the current decay diminished in the presence of the oxygen scavenger, sulfite ion. Random walk and theoretical bulk simulations agreed with the proposed mechanism of IrO(x) NP collision, adsorption, and subsequent deactivation. PMID:22452267

  15. In vitro screening of metal oxide nanoparticles for effects on neural function using cortical networks on microelectrode arrays.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Jenna D; Lefew, William R; Crooks, James; Hall, Diana; Ortenzio, Jayna Nr; Dreher, Kevin; Shafer, Timothy J

    2016-06-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) may translocate to the brain following inhalation or oral exposures, yet higher throughput methods to screen NPs for potential neurotoxicity are lacking. The present study examined effects of 5 CeO2 (5- 1288 nm), and 4 TiO2 (6-142 nm) NPs and microparticles (MP) on network function in primary cultures of rat cortex on 12 well microelectrode array (MEA) plates. Particles were without cytotoxicity at concentrations ≤50 µg/ml. After recording 1 h of baseline activity prior to particle (3-50 µg/ml) exposure, changes in the total number of spikes (TS) and # of active electrodes (#AEs) were assessed 1, 24, and 48 h later. Following the 48 h recording, the response to a challenge with the GABAA antagonist bicuculline (BIC; 25 µM) was assessed. In all, particles effects were subtle, but 69 nm CeO2 and 25 nm TiO2 NPs caused concentration-related decreases in TS following 1 h exposure. At 48 h, 5 and 69 nm CeO2 and 25 and 31 nm TiO2 decreased #AE, while the two MPs increased #AEs. Following BIC, only 31 nm TiO2 produced concentration-related decreases in #AEs, while 1288 nm CeO2 caused concentration-related increases in both TS and #AE. The results indicate that some metal oxide particles cause subtle concentration-related changes in spontaneous and/or GABAA receptor-mediated neuronal activity in vitro at times when cytotoxicity is absent, and that MEAs can be used to screen and prioritize nanoparticles for neurotoxicity hazard. PMID:26593696

  16. Iridium-catalyzed anti-diastereo- and enantioselective carbonyl (trimethylsilyl)allylation from the alcohol or aldehyde oxidation level.

    PubMed

    Han, Soo Bong; Gao, Xin; Krische, Michael J

    2010-07-01

    Using the ortho-cyclometalated pi-allyl iridium precatalyst (R)-I derived from [Ir(cod)Cl](2), 4-cyano-3-nitrobenzoic acid, (R)-SEGPHOS, and allyl acetate, enantioselective transfer hydrogenation of alpha-(trimethylsilyl)allyl acetate in the presence of aldehydes 2a-i mediated by 2-propanol delivers products of (trimethylsilyl)allylation 4a-i in good isolated yields and with exceptional levels of anti-diastereoselectivity and enantioselectivity (90-99% ee). In the absence of 2-propanol, but under otherwise identical reaction conditions, carbonyl (trimethylsilyl)allylation is achieved directly from the alcohol oxidation level to furnish an equivalent set of adducts 4a-i with roughly equivalent isolated yields and stereoselectivities. To evaluate the synthetic utility of the reaction products 4a-i, adduct 4g was converted to the 1,4-ene-diol 5g via dioxirane-mediated oxidative desilylation with allylic transposition, the allylic alcohol 6g via protodesilylation with allylic transposition, and the gamma-lactam 7g via chlorosulfonyl isocyanate-mediated cycloaddition. PMID:20540509

  17. In situ, time-resolved reflectance spectroscopy in the microsecond domain: oxidation of adsorbed carbon monoxide on polycrystalline pt microelectrodes in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ping; Fromondi, Iosif; Scherson, Daniel A

    2006-12-01

    The dynamics of the electrooxidation of adsorbed CO, COads, on polycrystalline Pt microelectrodes has been examined in CO-saturated 0.5 M H2SO4 and 0.5 M HClO4 aqueous solutions, using in situ, time-resolved, normalized differential reflectance spectroscopy lambda = 633 nm). Attention was focused on the unique dependence of COads oxidation on the potential at which the adsorbed full CO monolayer is assembled (i.e., hydrogen adsorption/desorption vs the double-layer region) using both fast linear scan voltammetry and potential step techniques. As evidenced from the data collected, COads oxidation at a fixed potential proceeds at slower rates when the monolayer is formed in the double- layer region compared to when it is formed in the hydrogen adsorption/desorption region. Possible explanations for this effect are discussed. PMID:17129007

  18. Metalloporphyrin-sensitized photooxidation of water to oxygen on the surface of colloidal iridium oxides. Photochemical and pulse radiolytic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Nahor, G.S.; Neta, P. ); Hambright, P. ); Thompson, A.N. Jr. ); Harriman, A. )

    1989-08-10

    Derivatives of TSPP (tetrakis(4-sulfonatophenyl)porphyrin) were prepared and tested as photosensitizers for oxidation of water to oxygen on the surface of colloidal iridium oxide. Triplet quantum yields, energies, and lifetimes were measured by laser flash photolysis. Rate constants for quenching the porphyrin triplet state with O{sub 2} and with persulfate ions were also determined. The rates of interaction between the porphyrin radical cations and colloidal IrO{sub x} particles were measured by pulse radiolysis for several of the compounds. The one-electron oxidation potentials of the porphyrins, measured by cyclic voltammetry, were varied between 0.7 and 1.4 V vs. NHE by using different metal centers and by substitution on the phenyl rings. Illumination of a porphyrin in the presence of sodium persulfate and an IrO{sub x} colloid resulted in generation of O{sub 2} in a process that was strongly dependent upon pH and upon the nature of the photosensitizer in the same manner as the kinetics determined by pulse radiolysis. The rate of O{sub 2} production under any conditions could be explained on the basis of thermodynamic criteria relating to either of the individual quenching or water oxidation steps. Zn porphyrins (0.9 < E{sub {1/2}} < 1.02 V) effected O{sub 2} production only in alkaline solution, whereas PdTSPP (E{sub {1/2}} = 1.1 V) gave efficient O{sub 2} evolution even in neutral solution. Further increase in E{sub 1/2}, as achieved with InTSPP (E{sub {1/2}} = 1.16 V), lowers the threshold pH for O{sub 2} evolution, and pulse radiolysis experiments confirmed that the radical cation of this porphyrin is the most reactive toward the catalyst, reacting at diffusion-controlled rates even in acidic solutions. However, the rate of O{sub 2} formation with InTSPP was very low due to the inefficient photochemistry arising from the incomplete quenching of this less-reducing porphyrin triplet state by persulfate ions.

  19. Fabrication of two-layer poly(dimethyl siloxane) devices for hydrodynamic cell trapping and exocytosis measurement with integrated indium tin oxide microelectrodes arrays

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Changlu; Sun, Xiuhua; Gillis, Kevin D.

    2016-01-01

    The design, fabrication and test of a microfluidic cell trapping device to measure single cell exocytosis were reported. Research on the patterning of double layer template based on repetitive standard photolithography of AZ photoresist was investigated. The replicated poly(dimethyl siloxane) devices with 2.5 μm deep channels were proved to be efficient for stopping cells. Quantal exocytosis measurement can be achieved by targeting single or small clumps of chromaffin cells on top of the 10 μm ×10 μm indium tin oxide microelectrodes arrays with the developed microdevice. And about 72% of the trapping sites can be occupied by cells with hydrodynamic trapping method and the recorded amperometric signals are comparable to the results with traditional carbon fiber microelectrodes. The method of manufacturing the microdevices is simple, low-cost and easy to perform. The manufactured device offers a platform for the high throughput detection of quantal catecholamine exocytosis from chromaffin cells with sufficient sensitivity and broad application. PMID:23329291

  20. Composite wire microelectrode and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Isaacs, Hugh S.; Aldykiewicz, Jr., Antonio J.

    1996-12-03

    A composite wire microelectrode for making electro-chemical measurements, and method of making same. The microelectrode includes an inner conductive sensing wire and an outer tube that is oxidized to form a dielectric, self-healing oxide layer around the sensing wire.

  1. Composite wire microelectrode and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Isaacs, H.S.; Aldykiewicz, A.J. Jr.

    1996-12-03

    A composite wire microelectrode for making electro-chemical measurements, and method of making same, are disclosed. The microelectrode includes an inner conductive sensing wire and an outer tube that is oxidized to form a dielectric, self-healing oxide layer around the sensing wire. 4 figs.

  2. Iridium-Tin oxide solid-solution nanocatalysts with enhanced activity and stability for oxygen evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guangfu; Yu, Hongmei; Yang, Donglei; Chi, Jun; Wang, Xunying; Sun, Shucheng; Shao, Zhigang; Yi, Baolian

    2016-09-01

    Addressing major challenges from the material cost, efficiency and stability, it is highly desirable to develop high-performance catalysts for oxygen evolution reaction (OER). Herein we explore a facile surfactant-assisted approach for fabricating Irsbnd Sn (Ir/Sn = 0.6/0.4, by mol.) nano-oxide catalysts with good morphology control. Direct proofs from XRD and X-ray photoelectron spectra indicate hydrophilic triblock polymer (TBP, like Pluronic® F108) surfactant can boost the formation of stable solid-solution structure. With the TBP hydrophilic and block-length increase, the fabricated Irsbnd Sn oxides undergoing the rod-to-sphere transition obtain the relatively lower crystallization, decreased crystallite size, Ir-enriched surface and incremental available active sites, all of which can bolster the OER activity and stability. Meanwhile, it is observed that the coupled Ir oxidative etching takes a crucial role in determining the material structure and performance. Compared with commercial Ir black, half-cell tests confirm F108-assistant catalysts with over 40 wt% Ir loading reduction show 2-fold activity enhancement as well as significant stability improvement. The lowest cell voltage using 0.88 mg cm-2 Ir loading is only 1.621 V at 1000 mA cm-2 and 80 °C with a concomitant energy efficiency of 75.8% which is beyond the DOE 2017 efficiency target of 74%.

  3. Bias voltages at microelectrodes change neural interface properties in vivo.

    PubMed

    Johnson, M D; Otto, K J; Williams, J C; Kipke, D R

    2004-01-01

    Rejuvenation of iridium microelectrode sites, which involves applying a 1.5 V bias for 4 s, has been shown to reduce site impedances of chronically implanted microelectrode arrays. This study applied complex impedance spectroscopy measurements to an equivalent circuit model of the electrode-tissue interface. Rejuvenation was found to cause a transient increase in electrode conductivity through an IrO2 layer and a decrease in the surrounding extracellular resistance by 85 +/- 1% (n=73, t-test p < 0.001) and a decrease in the immediate site resistance by 44 +/- 7% (n=73, t-test p<0.001). These findings may be useful as an intervention strategy to prolong the lifetime of chronic microelectrode implants for neuroprostheses. PMID:17271203

  4. Anisotropic magnetic interactions in 5d iridium oxides by many-body quantum chemistry calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katukuri, Vamshi M.; Nishimoto, Satoshi; Yushankhai, Viktor; Rousochatzakis, Ioannis; Hozoi, Liviu; van den Brink, Jeroen

    2014-03-01

    Ir 5d5 oxides are being actively studied due to the realization of novel spin-orbit coupled jeff ~ 1/2 ground states. One remarkable feature in these compounds is the highly anisotropic magnetic interactions, orders of magnitude stronger than in 3d oxides. We address the nature of the anisotropic exchange in the 2D honeycomb (Na/Li)2IrO3 ((Na/Li)213) and square-lattice (Sr/Ba)2IrO4 ((Sr/Ba)213) iridates, by ab initio multireference configuration-interaction calculations on large embedded clusters. For Na213 we find that the Kitaev term is ferromagnetic and defines the dominant energy scale while the nearest-neighbor Heisenberg contribution is antiferromagnetic. Although Li213 is structurally similar, we predict quite different set of interaction parameters in Li213. We further analyze the magnetic order and the essential differences between these two materials by exact diagonalization and density-matrix renormalization-group calculations that additionally include 2nd and 3rd neighbor couplings. Sizable symmetric anisotropic interactions are also computed for Ba214. From the ab initio data, the relevant in-plane spin model for Ba214 turns out to be a Heisenberg-compass effective model. We finally discuss the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya exchange in Sr214.

  5. Field emission in air and space-charge-limited currents from iridium-iridium oxide tips with gaps below 100 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brimley, Scott; Miller, Mark S.; Hagmann, Mark J.

    2011-05-01

    Field emission diodes made with Ir/IrO2 tips separated by gaps below 100 nm and operating in air gave currents of up to 1 μA just above 10 V and largely survived potentials up to 200 V. The current-voltage characteristics included signatures of Fowler-Nordheim emission and both coherent and incoherent space-charge limited emission, where both behaviors implied molecular-scale effective emission areas. The significant, nanoampere currents that flowed at biases below the expected bulk work functions corroborate the 0.1 eV work functions from Fowler-Nordheim analysis, and are attributed to molecular scale oxide structures and adsorbates shifting the surface Fermi level. Electron transit time analysis indicates that on average only one electron crossed the gap at a time, implying that the space-charge effects are due to self-interactions.

  6. Kinetics of the chemical oxidation of (5,10,15,20-tetraphenyl-21H,23H-porphinato)(chloro)(aqua)iridium(III)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyulyaeva, E. Yu.; Bichan, N. G.; Mozhzhukhina, E. G.; Lomova, T. N.

    2016-01-01

    The oxidation of (Cl)(H2O)IrTPP with atmospheric oxygen in the presence of concentrated H2SO4 accompanied by coordination of molecular O2 and substitution of axial ligands was studied spectrophotometrically. In 16.785-18.09 MH2SO4 at 298-318 K, (Cl)(H2O)IrTPP experienced two single-electron oxidations in sequence: with an increase in the oxidation state of the iridium cation and with formation of the π-radical cation form (HSO4)IrIVTPP•+ oxidized at the aromatic ligand ( k 298 = 7.2 × 10-6 mol-1 L s-1). Referring to the literature data on the oxidation of (Cl)(H2O)IrTPP in AcOH and CF3COOH, it was shown that the medium acidity and the nature of the axial ligands affect the electron removal site in the chemical oxidation of (Cl)(H2O)IrTPP with atmospheric oxygen in proton-donor solvents.

  7. Processing of Iridium and Iridium Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Ohriner, Evan Keith

    2008-01-01

    Iridium and its alloys have been considered to be difficult to fabricate due to their high melting temperatures, limited ductility, sensitivity to impurity content, and chemical properties. The variety of processing methods used for iridium and its alloys are reviewed, including purification, melting, forming, joining, and powder metallurgy techniques. Also included are coating and forming by the methods of electroplating, chemical and physical vapor deposition, and melt particle deposition.

  8. The effect of the addition of colloidal iridium oxide into sol-gel obtained titanium and ruthenium oxide coatings on titanium on their electrochemical properties.

    PubMed

    Panić, Vladimir V; Dekanski, Aleksandar B; Mitrić, Miodrag; Milonjić, Slobodan K; Misković-Stanković, Vesna B; Nikolić, Branislav Z

    2010-07-21

    Electrochemical properties of sol-gel processed Ti(0.6)Ir(0.4)O(2) and Ti(0.6)Ru(0.3)Ir(0.1)O(2) coatings on titanium substrate were investigated using cyclic voltammetry, polarization measurements and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and compared to the properties of Ti(0.6)Ru(0.4)O(2) coating. The role of iridium oxide in the improvement of the electrocatalytic, capacitive and stability properties of titanium anodes activated by a RuO(2)-TiO(2) coating is discussed. The oxide sols were prepared by forced hydrolysis of the metal chlorides. The characterization by dynamic light scattering and X-ray diffraction showed that polydisperse oxide sols were obtained with the particles tending to form agglomerates. The presence of IrO(2) causes a suppression of the X-ray diffraction peaks of TiO(2) and RuO(2) in the sol-gel prepared Ti(0.6)Ir(0.4)O(2) and Ti(0.6)Ru(0.3)Ir(0.1)O(2) coatings. The IrO(2)-containing coatings had an enhanced charge storage ability and activity for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in comparison to Ti(0.6)Ru(0.4)O(2) coating. The voltammogram of the Ti(0.6)Ir(0.4)O(2)/Ti electrode showed well-resolved peaks related to Ir redox transitions, which are responsible for the enhanced charge storage ability of IrO(2)-containing coatings. Redox transitions of Ir were also registered in the high-frequency domain of the ac impedance spectra of the coatings as a semicircle with characteristics insensitive to the electrolyte composition and to the electrode potential prior to OER. However, the semicircle characteristics were different for the two IrO(2)-containing coatings, as well as at potentials outside the OER in comparison to those at which the OER occurs. PMID:20544088

  9. Iridium-mediated Bond Activation and Water Oxidation as an Exemplary Case of CARISMA, A European Network for the Development of Catalytic Routines for Small Molecule Activation.

    PubMed

    Licini, Giulia; Albrecht, Martin

    2015-01-01

    CARISMA is a currently running COST Action that pools leading European experts in computational and experimental chemistry to foster synergies for developing new catalytic processes for the transformation of abundant small molecules such as water, carbon dioxide, or ammonia into high-value chemicals and energy-relevant products. CARISMA promotes new collaborations, exchange of knowledge and skills, frontier training to young as well as established researchers, and a platform for the advancement of theoretical and experimental research in an iterative process, comprised of expertise in various connate domains including synthesis, catalysis, spectroscopy, kinetics, and computational chemistry. These interactions stimulate the discovery of new and efficient catalytic processes, illustrated in the second part of this contribution with the collaborative development of powerful iridium-based complexes for bond activation and water oxidation catalysis. PMID:26507475

  10. Iridium ultrasmall nanoparticles, worm-like chain nanowires, and porous nanodendrites: One-pot solvothermal synthesis and catalytic CO oxidation activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tao; Li, Shuai-Chen; Zhu, Wei; Ke, Jun; Yu, Jing-Wen; Zhang, Zhi-Ping; Dai, Lin-Xiu; Gu, Jun; Zhang, Ya-Wen

    2016-06-01

    We report a facile one-pot solvothermal synthesis of monodisperse iridium (Ir) ultrasmall (1.5-2.5 nm in diameter) nanoparticles (NPs), worm-like chain nanowires (NWs), and porous nanodendrites (NDs), for which CO oxidation reaction has been employed as a probe reaction to investigate the effects of nanoparticle size and surface-capping organics on the catalytic activities. Time-dependent experiments revealed that an oriented attachment mechanism induced by the strong adsorption of halide anions (Br- and I-) on specific facet of Ir nanoclusters or by decreasing the reduction rate of Ir precursors with changing their concentrations during the synthesis was responsible for the formation of Ir NWs and NDs. Annealing tests indicated that an O2-H2 atmosphere treatment turned out to be an effective measure to clean up the surface-capping organics of Ir NPs supported on commercial SiO2. Catalytic CO oxidation reaction illustrated that a significant improvement in the catalytic activity of CO oxidation reaction was achieved together with the changing of activation energies after such atmosphere treatment for the supported catalysts of the ultrasmall Ir NPs. It is noteworthy that this enhancement in catalytic activity could be ascribed to the changes in the surface status (including populations of Ir species in metallic and oxidized states, removal of surface capping organics, the variety of active sites, and total effective active site number) for the supported nanocatalysts during the atmosphere treatment.

  11. Electrical performance of penetrating microelectrodes chronically implanted in cat cortex.

    PubMed

    Kane, Sheryl R; Cogan, Stuart F; Ehrlich, Julia; Plante, Timothy D; McCreery, Douglas B; Troyk, Philip R

    2013-08-01

    Penetrating microelectrode arrays with 2000 μm (2) sputtered iridium oxide (SIROF) electrode sites were implanted in cat cerebral cortex, and their long-term electrochemical performance evaluated in vivo by cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and current pulsing. Measurements were made from days 33 to 328 postimplantation. The CV-defined charge storage capacity, measured at 50 mV/s, increased linearly with time over the course of implantation for two arrays and was unchanged for one array. A modest decrease in 1 kHz impedance was also observed. These results suggest an ongoing increase in the apparent electrochemical surface area of the electrodes, which is attributed to electrical leakage pathways arising from cracking of Parylene insulation observed by SEM of explanted arrays. During current pulsing with a 0.0 V interpulse bias, the electrodes readily delivered 8 nC/phase in vitro, but some channels approached or exceeded the water reduction potential during in vivo pulsing. The charge injection capacity in vivo increased linearly with the interpulse bias (0-0.6 V Ag\\vert AgCl) from 11.5 to 21.8 nC/ph and with pulse width (150-500 μs) from 8.8 to 14 nC/ph (at 0.0 V bias). These values are lower than those determined from measurements in buffered physiological saline, emphasizing the importance of in vivo measurements in assessing chronic electrode performance. The consequence of current leakage pathways on the charge-injection measurements is also discussed. PMID:23475329

  12. Structure, electrochemical properties and capacitance performance of polypyrrole electrodeposited onto 1-D crystals of iridium complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wysocka-Żołopa, Monika; Winkler, Krzysztof

    2015-12-01

    Composites of polypyrrole and one-dimensional iridium complex crystals [(C2H5)4N]0.55[IrCl2(CO)2] were prepared by in situ two-step electrodeposition. Initially, iridium complex crystals were formed during [IrCl2(CO)2]- complex oxidation. Next, pyrrole was electropolymerized on the surface of the iridium needles. The morphology of the composite was investigated by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. At positive potentials, the iridium complex crystals and the polypyrrole were oxidized. In aprotic solvents, oxidation of the iridium complex crystals resulted in their dissolution. In water containing tetra(n-butyl)ammonium chlorides, the 1-D iridium complex crystals were reversibly oxidized. The product of the iridium complex oxidation remained on the electrode surface in crystalline form. The iridium complex needles significantly influenced the redox properties of the polymer. The polypyrrole involved electrode processes become more reversible in presence of crystals of iridium complex. The current of polypyrrole oxidation was higher compared to that of pure polypyrrole and the capacitance properties of the polymer were significantly enhanced. A specific capacitance as high as 590 F g-1 was obtained for a composite of polypyrrole and 1-D crystals of the iridium complex in water containing tetra(n-butyl)ammonium chloride. This value is approximately twice as high as the capacitance of the pure polymer deposited onto the electrode surface.

  13. Iridium Interfacial Stack (IRIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spry, David James (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An iridium interfacial stack ("IrIS") and a method for producing the same are provided. The IrIS may include ordered layers of TaSi.sub.2, platinum, iridium, and platinum, and may be placed on top of a titanium layer and a silicon carbide layer. The IrIS may prevent, reduce, or mitigate against diffusion of elements such as oxygen, platinum, and gold through at least some of its layers.

  14. Composition-dependent electrocatalytic activity of palladium-iridium binary alloy nanoparticles supported on the multiwalled carbon nanotubes for the electro-oxidation of formic acid.

    PubMed

    Bao, Jianming; Dou, Meiling; Liu, Haijing; Wang, Feng; Liu, Jingjun; Li, Zhilin; Ji, Jing

    2015-07-22

    Surface-functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) supported Pd100-xIrx binary alloy nanoparticles (Pd100-xIrx/MWCNT) with tunable Pd/Ir atomic ratios were synthesized by a thermolytic process at varied ratios of bis(acetylacetonate) palladium(II) and iridium(III) 2,4-pentanedionate precursors and then applied as the electrocatalyst for the formic acid electro-oxidation. The X-ray diffraction pattern (XRD) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) analysis showed that the Pd100-xIrx alloy nanoparticles with the average size of 6.2 nm were uniformly dispersed on the MWCNTs and exhibited a single solid solution phase with a face-centered cubic structure. The electrocatalytic properties were evaluated through the cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry tests, and the results indicated that both the activity and stability of Pd100-xIrx/MWCNT were strongly dependent on the Pd/Ir atomic ratios: the best electrocatalytic performance in terms of onset potential, current density, and stability against CO poisoning was obtained for the Pd79Ir21/MWCNT. Moreover, compared with pure Pd nanoparticles supported on MWCNTs (Pd/MWCNT), the Pd79Ir21/MWCNT exhibited enhanced steady-state current density and higher stability, as well as maintained excellent electrocatalytic activity in high concentrated formic acid solution, which was attributed to the bifunctional effect through alloying Pd with transition metal. PMID:26132867

  15. Longitudinally-vibrating surgical microelectrode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldstein, C.; Crawford, D.; Kawabus, E. W.

    1977-01-01

    Microelectrode attached to cone of loudspeaker imparting longitudinal vibrations, penetrates relatively tough tissue of arterial walls easier and with more precise depth control because dimpling is eliminated. Vibrating microelectrode has been successfully used to make accurate oxygen-content measurements in arterial walls.

  16. Iridium: failures & successes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, CarissaBryce; Beard, Suzette

    2001-03-01

    This paper will provide an overview of the Iridium business venture in terms of the challenges faced, the successes achieved, and the causes of the ultimate failure of the venture — bankruptcy and system de-orbit. The paper will address technical, business, and policy issues. The intent of the paper is to provide a balanced and accurate overview of the Iridium experience, to aid future decision-making by policy makers, the business community, and technical experts. Key topics will include the history of the program, the objectives and decision-making of Motorola, the market research and analysis conducted, partnering strategies and their impact, consumer equipment availability, and technical issues — target performance, performance achieved, technical accomplishments, and expected and unexpected technical challenges. The paper will use as sources trade media and business articles on the Iridium program, technical papers and conference presentations, Wall Street analyst's reports, and, where possible, interviews with participants and close observers.

  17. Elucidating molecular iridium water oxidation catalysts using metal-organic frameworks: a comprehensive structural, catalytic, spectroscopic, and kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cheng; Wang, Jin-Liang; Lin, Wenbin

    2012-12-01

    As a new class of porous, crystalline, molecular materials, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have shown great promise as recyclable and reusable single-site solid catalysts. Periodic order and site isolation of the catalytic struts in MOFs facilitate the studies of their activities and reaction mechanisms. Herein we report the construction of two highly stable MOFs (1 and 2) using elongated dicarboxylate bridging ligands derived from Cp*Ir(L)Cl complexes (L = dibenzoate-substituted 2,2'-bipyridine, bpy-dc, or dibenzoate-substituted 2-phenylpyridine, ppy-dc) and Zr(6)O(4)(OH)(4)(carboxylate)(12) cuboctahedral secondary building units (SBUs) and the elucidation of water oxidation pathways of the Cp*Ir(L)Cl catalysts using these MOFs. We carried out detailed kinetic studies of Ce(4+)-driven water oxidation reactions (WORs) catalyzed by the MOFs using UV-vis spectroscopy, phosphorescent oxygen detection, and gas chromatographic analysis. These results confirmed not only water oxidation activity of the MOFs but also indicated oxidative degradation of the Cp* rings during the WOR. The (bpy-dc)Ir(H(2)O)(2)XCl (X is likely a formate or acetate group) complex resulted from the oxidative degradation process was identified as a competent catalyst responsible for the water oxidation activity of 1. Further characterization of the MOFs recovered from WORs using X-ray photoelectron, diffuse-reflectance UV-vis absorption, luminescence, and infrared spectroscopies supported the identity of (bpy-dc)Ir(H(2)O)(2)XCl as an active water oxidation catalyst. Kinetics of MOF-catalyzed WORs were monitored by Ce(4+) consumptions and fitted with a reaction-diffusion model, revealing an intricate relationship between reaction and diffusion rates. Our work underscores the opportunity in using MOFs as well-defined single-site solid catalytic systems to reveal mechanistic details that are difficult to obtain for their homogeneous counterparts. PMID:23136923

  18. Multi-component nanoporous platinum-ruthenium-copper-osmium-iridium alloy with enhanced electrocatalytic activity towards methanol oxidation and oxygen reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaoting; Si, Conghui; Gao, Yulai; Frenzel, Jan; Sun, Junzhe; Eggeler, Gunther; Zhang, Zhonghua

    2015-01-01

    Multi-component nanoporous platinum-ruthenium-copper-osmium-iridium (np-PtRuCuOsIr) electrocatalyst has been facilely fabricated by chemical dealloying of mechanically alloyed AlCuPtRuOsIr precursor. The np-PtRuCuOsIr catalyst exhibits a typical three-dimensional bi-continuous interpenetrating ligament/channel structure with a length scale of ∼2.5 nm. The np-PtRuCuOsIr catalyst reaches a higher level in the mass activity (857.5 mA mgPt-1) and specific activity (3.0 mA cm-2) towards methanol oxidation compared to the commercial PtC catalyst (229.5 mA mgPt-1 and 0.5 mA cm-2 respectively). Moreover, the CO stripping peak of np-PtRuCuOsIr is 0.54 V (vs. SCE), 130 mV negative shift in comparison with the commercial PtC (0.67 V vs. SCE). The half-wave potential of np-PtRuCuOsIr is 0.900 V vs. RHE, 36 mV positive compared with that of the commercial PtC (0.864 V vs. RHE). The np-PtRuCuOsIr catalyst also shows 1.8 and 3.8 times enhancement in the mass and specific activity towards oxygen reduction than the commercial PtC. Moreover, the np-PtRuCuOsIr alloy exhibits superior oxygen reduction activities even after 15 K cycles, indicating its excellent long-term stability. The present np-PtRuCuOsIr can act as a promising candidate for the electrocatalyst in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs).

  19. Cp* Iridium Precatalysts for Selective C-H Oxidation via Direct Insertion. A Joint Experimental/Computational Study

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Meng; Balcells, David; Parent, Alexander R.; Crabtree, Robert H; Eisenstein, Odile

    2012-01-01

    A series of Cp*Ir complexes are active precatalysts in C–H oxidation of cis-decalin, cyclooctane, 1-acetylpyrrolidine, tetrahydrofurans, and γ-lactones. Moderate to high yields were achieved, and surprisingly, high selectivity for mono-oxidation of cyclooctane to cyclooctanone was observed. Kinetic isotope effect experiments in the C–H oxidation of ethylbenezene to acetophenone yield kH/kD = 15.4 ± 0.8 at 23 °C and 17.8 ± 1.2 at 0 °C, which are consistent with C–H oxidation being the rate-limiting step with a significant tunneling contribution. The nature of the active species was investigated by TEM, UV–vis, microfiltration, and control experiments. DFT calculations showed that the C–H oxidation of cis-decalin by Cp*Ir(ppy)(Cl) (ppy = o-phenylpyridine) follows a direct oxygen insertion mechanism on the singlet potential energy surface, rather than the radical rebound route that would be seen for the triplet, in good agreement with the retention of stereochemistry observed in this reaction.

  20. Iridium-coated rhenium thrusters by CVD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, J. T.; Kazaroff, J. M.; Appel, M. A.

    1989-01-01

    Operation of spacecraft thrusters at increased temperature reduces propellant requirements. Inasmuch as propellant comprises the bulk of a satellite's mass, even a small percentage reduction makes possible a significant enhancement of the mission in terms of increased payload. Because of its excellent high temperature strength, rhenium is often the structural material of choice. It can be fabricated into free-standing shapes by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) onto an expendable mandrel. What rhenium lacks is oxidation resistance, but this can be provided by a coating of iridium, also by CVD. This paper describes the process used by Ultramet to fabricate 22-N (5-lbf) and, more recently, 445-N (100-lbf) Ir/Re thrusters; characterizes the CVD-deposited materials; and summarizes the materials effects of firing these thrusters. Optimal propellant mixture ratios can be employed because the materials withstand an oxidizing environment up to the melting temperature of iridium, 2400 C (4350 F).

  1. Iridium-coated rhenium thrusters by CVD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, John T.; Kazaroff, John M.; Appel, Marshall A.

    1988-01-01

    Operation of spacecraft thrusters at increased temperature reduces propellant requirements. Inasmuch as propellant comprises the bulk of a satellite's mass, even a small percentage reduction makes possible a significant enhancement of the mission in terms of increased payload. Because of its excellent high temperature strength, rhenium is often the structural material of choice. It can be fabricated into free-standing shapes by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) onto an expendable mandrel. What rhenium lacks is oxidation resistance, but this can be provided by a coating of iridium, also by CVD. This paper describes the process used by Ultramet to fabricate 22-N (5-lbf) and, more recently, 445-N (100-lbf) Ir/Re thrusters; characterizes the CVD-deposited materials; and summarizes the materials effects of firing these thrusters. Optimal propellant mixture ratios can be employed because the materials withstand an oxidizing environment up to the meltimg temperature of iridium, 2400 C (4350 F).

  2. Low energy cyclotron production and cyclometalation chemistry of iridium-192.

    PubMed

    Langille, G; Yang, H; Zeisler, S K; Hoehr, C; Storr, T; Andreoiu, C; Schaffer, P

    2016-09-01

    This work demonstrates the labelling of a novel class of iridium lumophore with radioiridium, as proof-of-feasibility for producing and using the medically useful isotope iridium-192. Natural osmium was electroplated onto silver target backings in basic media and irradiated for up to two hours with ≤20μA of 12.8MeV protons. A range of iridium isotopes were generated, characterized and quantified using γ-spectroscopy methods. The target material was removed from the backings via oxidative dissolution with hydrogen peroxide, and the iridium radioisotopes isolated using an anion exchange resin. Both no-carrier-added as well as carrier-added formulations were then used in subsequent cyclometalation reactions. PMID:27344003

  3. Ultrafast photodriven intramolecular electron transfer from an iridium-based water-oxidation catalyst to perylene diimide derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Vagnini, Michael T.; Smeigh, Amanda L.; Blakemore, James D.; Eaton, Samuel W.; Schley, Nathan D.; D’Souza, Francis; Crabtree, Robert H.; Brudvig, Gary W.; Co, Dick T.; Wasielewski, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Photodriving the activity of water-oxidation catalysts is a critical step toward generating fuel from sunlight. The design of a system with optimal energetics and kinetics requires a mechanistic understanding of the single-electron transfer events in catalyst activation. To this end, we report here the synthesis and photophysical characterization of two covalently bound chromophore-catalyst electron transfer dyads, in which the dyes are derivatives of the strong photooxidant perylene-3,4:9,10-bis(dicarboximide) (PDI) and the molecular catalyst is the Cp∗Ir(ppy)Cl metal complex, where ppy = 2-phenylpyridine. Photoexcitation of the PDI in each dyad results in reduction of the chromophore to PDI•- in less than 10 ps, a process that outcompetes any generation of 3∗PDI by spin-orbit-induced intersystem crossing. Biexponential charge recombination largely to the PDI-Ir(III) ground state is suggestive of multiple populations of the PDI•--Ir(IV) ion-pair, whose relative abundance varies with solvent polarity. Electrochemical studies of the dyads show strong irreversible oxidation current similar to that seen for model catalysts, indicating that the catalytic integrity of the metal complex is maintained upon attachment to the high molecular weight photosensitizer. PMID:22586073

  4. Iridium Aluminide Coats For Protection Against Ox idation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, Richard B.; Tuffias, Robert H.; La Ferla, Raffaele; Jang, Qin

    1996-01-01

    Iridium aluminide coats investigated for use in protecting some metallic substrates against oxidation at high temperatures. Investigation prompted by need for cost-effective anti-oxidation coats for walls of combustion chambers in rocket engines. Also useful in special terrestrial applications like laboratory combustion chambers and some chemical-processing chambers.

  5. Method for refining contaminated iridium

    DOEpatents

    Heshmatpour, B.; Heestand, R.L.

    1982-08-31

    Contaminated iridium is refined by alloying it with an alloying agent selected from the group consisting of manganese and an alloy of manganese and copper, and then dissolving the alloying agent from the formed alloy to provide a purified iridium powder.

  6. Method for refining contaminated iridium

    DOEpatents

    Heshmatpour, Bahman; Heestand, Richard L.

    1983-01-01

    Contaminated iridium is refined by alloying it with an alloying agent selected from the group consisting of manganese and an alloy of manganese and copper, and then dissolving the alloying agent from the formed alloy to provide a purified iridium powder.

  7. Carbon Microelectrodes with a Renewable Surface

    PubMed Central

    Takmakov, Pavel; Zachek, Matthew K.; Keithley, Richard B.; Walsh, Paul L.; Donley, Carrie; McCarty, Gregory S.; Wightman, R. Mark

    2010-01-01

    Electrode fouling decreases sensitivity and can be a substantial limitation in electrochemical experiments. In this work we describe an electrochemical procedure that constantly renews the surface of a carbon microelectrode using periodic triangle voltage excursions to an extended anodic potential at a scan rate of 400 Vs−1. This methodology allows for the regeneration of an electrochemically active surface and restores electrode sensitivity degraded by irreversible adsorption of chemical species. We show that repeated voltammetric sweeps to moderate potentials in aqueous solution causes oxidative etching of carbon thereby constantly renewing the electrochemically active surface. Oxidative etching was established by tracking surface-localized fluorine atoms with XPS, by monitoring changes in carbon surface morphology with AFM on pyrolyzed photoresist films, and also by optical and electron microscopy. The use of waveforms with extended anodic potentials showed substantial increases in sensitivity towards the detection of catechols. This enhancement arose from the adsorption of the catechol moiety that could be maintained with a constant regeneration of the electrode surface. We also demonstrate that application of the extended waveform could restore the sensitivity of carbon microelectrodes diminished by irreversible adsorption (electrode fouling) of byproducts resulting from the electrooxidation and polymerization of tyramine. Overall, this work brings new insight into the factors that affect electrochemical processes at carbon electrodes and provides a simple method to remove or reduce fouling problems associated with many electrochemical experiments. PMID:20146453

  8. In Vivo Validation of Custom-Designed Silicon-Based Microelectrode Arrays for Long-Term Neural Recording and Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Manoonkitiwongsa, Panya S.; Wang, Cindy X.; McCreery, Douglas B.

    2012-01-01

    We developed and validated silicon-based neural probes for neural stimulating and recording in long-term implantation in the brain. The probes combine the deep reactive ion etching process and mechanical shaping of their tip region, yielding a mechanically sturdy shank with a sharpened tip to reduce insertion force into the brain and spinal cord, particularly, with multiple shanks in the same array. The arrays’ insertion forces have been quantified in vitro. Five consecutive chronically-implanted devices were fully functional from 3 to 18 months. The microelectrode sites were electroplated with iridium oxide, and the charge injection capacity measurements were performed both in vitro and after implantation in the adult feline brain. The functionality of the chronic array was validated by stimulating in the cochlear nucleus and recording the evoked neuronal activity in the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus. The arrays’ recording quality has also been quantified in vivo with neuronal spike activity recorded up to 566 days after implantation. Histopathology evaluation of neurons and astrocytes using immunohistochemical stains indicated minimal alterations of tissue architecture after chronic implantation. PMID:22020666

  9. In vivo validation of custom-designed silicon-based microelectrode arrays for long-term neural recording and stimulation.

    PubMed

    Han, Martin; Manoonkitiwongsa, Panya S; Wang, Cindy X; McCreery, Douglas B

    2012-02-01

    We developed and validated silicon-based neural probes for neural stimulating and recording in long-term implantation in the brain. The probes combine the deep reactive ion etching process and mechanical shaping of their tip region, yielding a mechanically sturdy shank with a sharpened tip to reduce insertion force into the brain and spinal cord, particularly, with multiple shanks in the same array. The arrays' insertion forces have been quantified in vitro. Five consecutive chronically-implanted devices were fully functional from 3 to 18 months. The microelectrode sites were electroplated with iridium oxide, and the charge injection capacity measurements were performed both in vitro and after implantation in the adult feline brain. The functionality of the chronic array was validated by stimulating in the cochlear nucleus and recording the evoked neuronal activity in the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus. The arrays' recording quality has also been quantified in vivo with neuronal spike activity recorded up to 566 days after implantation. Histopathology evaluation of neurons and astrocytes using immunohistochemical stains indicated minimal alterations of tissue architecture after chronic implantation. PMID:22020666

  10. Iridium-Catalyzed Hydrogen Transfer Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saidi, Ourida; Williams, Jonathan M. J.

    This chapter describes the application of iridium complexes to catalytic hydrogen transfer reactions. Transfer hydrogenation reactions provide an alternative to direct hydrogenation for the reduction of a range of substrates. A hydrogen donor, typically an alcohol or formic acid, can be used as the source of hydrogen for the reduction of carbonyl compounds, imines, and alkenes. Heteroaromatic compounds and even carbon dioxide have also been reduced by transfer hydrogenation reactions. In the reverse process, the oxidation of alcohols to carbonyl compounds can be achieved by iridium-catalyzed hydrogen transfer reactions, where a ketone or alkene is used as a suitable hydrogen acceptor. The reversible nature of many hydrogen transfer processes has been exploited for the racemization of alcohols, where temporary removal of hydrogen generates an achiral ketone intermediate. In addition, there is a growing body of work where temporary removal of hydrogen provides an opportunity for using alcohols as alkylating agents. In this chemistry, an iridium catalyst "borrows" hydrogen from an alcohol to give an aldehyde or ketone intermediate, which can be transformed into either an imine or alkene under the reaction conditions. Return of the hydrogen from the catalyst provides methodology for the formation of amines or C-C bonds where the only by-product is typically water.

  11. Electrodeposition of platinum-iridium coatings and nanowires for neurostimulating applications: Fabrication, characterization and in-vivo retinal stimulation/recording. EIS studies of hexavalent and trivalent chromium based military coating systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrossians, Artin

    The studies presented in this thesis are composed of two different projects demonstrated in two different parts. The first part of this thesis represents an electrochemical approach to possible improvements of the interface between an implantable device and biological tissue. The second part of this thesis represents electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) studies on the corrosion resistance behavior of different types of polymer coated Al2024 alloys. In the first part of this thesis, a broad range of investigations on the development of an efficient and reproducible electrochemical deposition method for fabrication of thin-film platinum-iridium alloys were performed. The developed method for production of dense films was then modified to produce very high surface area coatings with ultra-low electrochemical impedance characteristics. The high-surface area platinum-iridium coating was applied on microelectrode arrays for chronic in-vitro stimulation. Using the same method of producing dense films, platinum-iridium nanowires were fabricated using Anodized Aluminum Oxide (AAO) templates for hermetic packaging applications to be used in implantable microelectronics. The implantable microelectronics will be used to perform data reception and transmission management, power recovery, digital processing and analog output of stimulus current. Finally, in-vivo electrical stimulation tests were performed on an animal retina using high surface-area platinum-iridium coated single microelectrodes to verify the charge transfer characteristics of the coatings. In the second part of this thesis, three different sets of samples with different combinations of pretreatments, primers with the same type of topcoat were tested in 0.5 N NaCl for period of 30 days. The surface changes measured by EIS as a function of time were then analyzed. The analysis of the fit parameters of the impedance spectra showed that the different primers had the most effect on the corrosion protection

  12. Fiber microelectrodes for electrophysiological recordings.

    PubMed

    Reitboeck, H J

    1983-07-01

    Methods for the fabrication of tungsten-glass and platinum-rhodium-quartz fiber microelectrodes and of fiber pipettes are described and the electrical and mechanical properties of fiber electrodes are discussed. These properties (minimal tissue damage, good single unit isolation and temporal stability) make them particularly suited for multielectrode recordings from the central nervous system. PMID:6312201

  13. Voltage pulses change neural interface properties and improve unit recordings with chronically implanted microelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Otto, Kevin J; Johnson, Matthew D; Kipke, Daryl R

    2006-02-01

    Current neuroprosthetic systems based on electro-physiological recording have an extended, yet finite working lifetime. Some posited lifetime-extension solutions involve improving device biocompatibility or suppressing host immune responses. Our objective was to test an alternative solution comprised of applying a voltage pulse to a microelectrode site, herein termed "rejuvenation." Previously, investigators have reported preliminary electrophysiological results by utilizing a similar voltage pulse. In this study we sought to further explore this phenomenon via two methods: 1) electrophysiology; 2) an equivalent circuit model applied to impedance spectroscopy data. The experiments were conducted via chronically implanted silicon-substrate iridium microelectrode arrays in the rat cortex. Rejuvenation voltages resulted in increased unit recording signal-to-noise ratios (10% +/- 2%), with a maximal increase of 195% from 3.74 to 11.02. Rejuvenation also reduced the electrode site impedances at 1 kHz (67% +/- 2%). Neither the impedance nor recording properties of the electrodes changed on neighboring microelectrode sites that were not rejuvenated. In the equivalent circuit model, we found a transient increase in conductivity, the majority of which corresponded to a decrease in the tissue resistance component (44% +/- 7%). These findings suggest that rejuvenation may be an intervention strategy to prolong the functional lifetime of chronically implanted microelectrodes. PMID:16485763

  14. A characterization of the effects on neuronal excitability due to prolonged microstimulation with chronically implanted microelectrodes.

    PubMed

    McCreery, D B; Yuen, T G; Agnew, W F; Bullara, L A

    1997-10-01

    Localized, long-lasting stimulation-induced depression of neuronal excitability (SIDNE) is a consequence of prolonged, high-frequency microstimulation in the central nervous system (CNS). It represents a persisting refractory state in the neurons and axons near the stimulating microelectrode, that occurs in the absence of histologically detectable tissue injury. It does not involve a change in synaptic efficacy and, in this respect, it differs from the more familiar phenomenon of long-term depression (LTD). Although SIDNE is ultimately reversible (after several days), it must be taken into account in the design of neural prostheses based on microstimulation in the central nervous system and in animal studies that require prolonged microstimulation in the CNS. In this study, we have characterized the phenomenon, using as the paradigm, iridium microelectrodes implanted chronically in the cat's posteroventral cochlear nucleus. Although the SIDNE may persist for several days after the end of the stimulation protocol, it does not become more severe from day to day when the stimulation protocol is repeated on successive days. The severity of the SIDNE is strongly dependent upon both the instantaneous frequency and the duty cycle of the electrical stimulation. The character of the SIDNE, including its localization to the immediate vicinity of the stimulating microelectrodes, suggests that the phenomenon is a direct consequence of the prolonged electrical excitation of the neurons close to the microelectrode. The problem of designing microstimulation systems that allow high-frequency stimulation of a neural substrate, while minimizing SIDNE are discussed. PMID:9311162

  15. Magnetohydrodynamic flow at microelectrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragsdale, Steven Ronald

    1998-12-01

    Voltammetric reduction of nitrobenzene (NB) at a 12.5 μm-radius Pt microdisk electrode in acetonitrile solutions containing 0.001/le x NB/le 0.999 is reported (x NB is the mole fraction of NB). The voltammetric response displays a reversible, sigmoidalshape wave, corresponding to the one-electron reduction of NB. The maximum limiting current occurs in solutions containing intermediate redox concentrations, x NB/le0.2. Voltammetric currents are analyzed using the Cullinan-Vignes model to describe the interdiffusion of the redox species and solvent. Mutual diffusivities are corrected for activity effects using isothermal liquid-vapor equilibrium data. Application of the activity-corrected diffusivities in the Cullinan- Vignes model yields reasonably accurate predictions of the dependence of the voltammetric current on solution composition. The influence of an external magnetic field (0-1 Tesla) on the voltammetric response of Pt and Au microdisk electrodes (0.1, 6.4, 12.5 and 25 μm radius) is described. Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow within a microscopic volume element adjacent to the microdisk surface results from the magnetic force generated by the flux of electrogenerated ions through the magnetic field. An analytic expression is presented for the magnetic force generated during steady-state voltammetry at a hemispherical microelectrode immersed in a uniform magnetic field. The magnetic volume force, F/bf mag (N/m3), is shown to decrease as r-2 (where r is the distance from the center of the electrode). The dependence of F/bf mag on r-2 confines the MHD flow to small volumes very close to the electrode surface (e.g., ~2×10-9 L for a 12.5 μm-radius electrode). Scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) is used to map MHD flows at a 25 μm-radius Pt microdisk electrode during the one-electron reduction of NB. Unidirectional lateral flow is observed when the magnetic field is aligned parallel to the electrode surface; rotational or cyclotron flow is observed when

  16. Voltammetric and reference microelectrodes with integrated microchannels for flow through microvoltammetry. 1. The microcell

    PubMed

    Keller; Buffle

    2000-03-01

    This paper describes the construction of 2 microsensor units for on-line voltammetric detection inside a cylindrical microcell (a working microsensor unit and a reference and auxiliary microsensor unit), for application to heavy-metal analysis in complex media such as natural waters. Both microsensor units include a channel for the solution renewal in the microcell after analysis. The working microsensor, a Hg-plated Ir microelectrode, is protected against fouling with an agarose gel including a hydrophobic chromatographic phase (C18). The fabrication steps and the quality tests related to long-term use and reliability, as well as to precision, are described. The application of the protective gel layer against fouling by hydrophobic or surface active small molecules is of general application, reliable, and very efficient. The reference and auxiliary unit is composed by an iridium oxide based mini reference electrode, an auxiliary Pt electrode, and a circulation channel. It is built to enable its use inside a 700-microm-diameter tubing connected to a hollow fiber supported liquid membrane lumen (volume, 5-10 microL) for heavy-metal analysis. However, it can be used in any other microanalytical system. The reference electrode is sufficiently stable for voltammetric applications (1-2 mV drift/day), and its lifetime is more than one year. The Ti/IrO2 core is immersed in a pH-buffered agarose gel, to guarantee potential stability even when the electrode is immersed in variable pH solutions. PMID:10739195

  17. Validation of EXAFS Analysis of Iridium Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feiters, M. C.; Longo, A.; Banerjee, D.; van der Ham, C. J. M.; Hetterscheid, D. G. H.

    2016-05-01

    Results of iridium L3 edge EXAFS measurements of compounds relevant for water oxidation catalysis are compared to those of other structural techniques. The structural results from EXAFS for the Ir compounds investigated here compare well to those of other structural techniques. Multiple scattering contributions are important in the coordinated Cp* and NHC ligands as well as in the IrCl6 unit and the IrO2 rutile structure. NHC is relatively weak compared to Ir, Cl, and even Cp* and O, and often out of phase with the other contributions.

  18. Iridium/Rhenium Parts For Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Steven J.; Harding, John T.; Wooten, John R.

    1991-01-01

    Oxidation/corrosion of metals at high temperatures primary life-limiting mechanism of parts in rocket engines. Combination of metals greatly increases operating temperature and longevity of these parts. Consists of two transition-element metals - iridium and rhenium - that melt at extremely high temperatures. Maximum operating temperature increased to 2,200 degrees C from 1,400 degrees C. Increases operating lifetimes of small rocket engines by more than factor of 10. Possible to make hotter-operating, longer-lasting components for turbines and other heat engines.

  19. Solar abundance of iridium

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Stephen; Aller, Lawrence H.

    1976-01-01

    By a method of spectrum synthesis, which yields log gfA, where g is the statistical weight of the lower level, f is the oscillator strength, and A is the abundance, an attempt is made to deduce the solar iridium abundance from one relatively unblended, but fairly weak IrI line, λ 3220.78 Å. If the Corliss-Bozman f-value for this line is adopted, we find log A(Ir) = 0.82 on the scale log A(H) = 12.00. The discordance with the value found from carbonaceous chondrites may arise from faulty f-values or from difficulties arising from line blending in this far ultraviolet domain of the solar spectrum. PMID:16578735

  20. Microelectrode Measurements of the Activity Distribution in Nitrifying Bacterial Aggregates

    PubMed Central

    de Beer, D.; van den Heuvel, J. C.; Ottengraf, S. P. P.

    1993-01-01

    Microelectrodes for ammonium, oxygen, nitrate, and pH were used to study nitrifying aggregates grown in a fluidized-bed reactor. Local reactant fluxes and distribution of microbial activity could be determined from the microprofiles. The interfacial fluxes of the reactants closely reflected the stoichiometry of bacterial nitrification. Both ammonium consumption and nitrate production were localized in the outer shells, with a thickness of approximately 100 to 120 μm, of the aggregates. Under conditions in which ammonium and oxygen penetrated the whole aggregate, nitrification was restricted to this zone; oxygen was consumed in the central parts of the aggregates as well, probably because of oxidation of dead biomass. A sudden increase of the oxygen concentration to saturation (pure oxygen) was inhibitory to nitrification. The pH profiles showed acidification in the aggregates, but not to an inhibitory level. The distribution of activity was determined by the penetration depth of oxygen during aggregate development in the reactor. Mass transfer was significantly limited by the boundary layer surrounding the aggregates. Microelectrode measurements showed that the thickness of this layer was correlated with the diffusion coefficient of the species. Determination of the distribution of nitrifying activity required the use of ammonium or nitrate microelectrodes, whereas the use of oxygen microelectrodes alone would lead to erroneous results. Images PMID:16348875

  1. Characterization of Platinum and Iridium Oxyhydrate Surface Layers from Platinum and Iridium Foils.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Benjamin; Ranjan, Chinmoy; Greiner, Mark; Arrigo, Rosa; Schuster, Manfred Erwin; Höpfner, Britta; Gorgoi, Mihaela; Lauermann, Iver; Willinger, Marc; Knop-Gericke, Axel; Schlögl, Robert

    2016-07-01

    Platinum and iridium polycrystalline foils were oxidized electrochemically through anodization to create thin platinum and iridium hydrous oxide layers, which were analyzed through laboratory photoelectron spectroscopy during heating and time series (temperature-programmed spectroscopy). The films contain oxygen in the form of bound oxides, water, and hydroxides and were investigated by depth profiling with high-energy photoelectron spectroscopy. The Pt films are unstable and begin to degrade immediately after removal from the electrolyte to form core-shell structures with a metallic inner core and a hydrous oxide outer shell almost devoid of Pt. However, evidence was found for metastable intermediate states of degradation; therefore, it may be possible to manufacture PtOx phases with increased stability. Heating the film to even 100 °C causes accelerated degradation, which shows that stoichiometric oxides such as PtO2 or PtO are not the active species in the electrolyte. The Ir films exhibit increased stability and higher surface Ir content, and gentle heating at low temperatures leads to a decrease in defect density. Although both layers are based on noble metals, their surface structures are markedly different. The complexity of such hydrous oxide systems is discussed in detail with the goal of identifying the film composition more precisely. PMID:27226255

  2. Grain boundary cavitation and weld underbead cracking in DOP-26 iridium alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Mosley, W.C. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Plutonium-238 oxide fuel pellets for the General Purpose Heat Source Radioisotopic Thermoelectric Generators to be used on the NASA Galileo Mission to Jupiter and the International Solar Polar Mission are produced and encapsulated in DOP-26 iridium alloy at the Savannah River Plant. DOP-26 iridium alloy was developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and contains nominally 0.3 wt.% tungsten, 60 ppm thorium, and 50 ppm aluminum. Underbead cracks occasionally occur in the girth weld on the iridium alloy cladding in the area where the gas tungsten arc is quenched. Various electron-beam techniques have been used to determine the cause of cracking.

  3. Hydridomethyl iridium complex

    DOEpatents

    Bergman, Robert G.; Buchanan, J. Michael; Stryker, Jeffrey M.; Wax, Michael J.

    1989-01-01

    A process for functionalizing methane comprising: (a) reacting methane with a hydridoalkyl metal complex of the formula: CpIr[P(R.sub.1).sub.3 ]H(R.sub.2) wherein Cp represents a cyclopentadienyl or alkylcyclopentadienyl radical having from 1 to 5 carbon atoms; Ir represents an iridium atom; P represents a phosphorus atom; R.sub.1 represents an alkyl group; R.sub.2 represents an alkyl group having at least two carbon atoms; and H represents a hydrogen atom, in the presence of a liquid alkane R.sub.3 H having at least three carbon atoms to form a hydridomethyl complex of the formula: CpIr[P(R.sub.1).sub.3 ]HMe where Me represents a methyl radical. (b) reacting said hydridomethyl complex with an organic halogenating agent such as a tetrahalomethane or a haloform of the formulas: CX'X"X'"X"" or CHX'X"X'"; wherein X', X", X"', and X"" represent halogens selected from bromine, iodine and chlorine, to halomethyl complex of step (a) having the formula: CpIr[P(R.sub.1).sub.3 ]MeX: (c) reacting said halomethyl complex with a mercuric halide of the formula HgX.sub.2 to form a methyl mercuric halide of the formula HgMeX; and (d) reacting said methyl mercuric halide with a molecular halogen of the formula X.sub.2 to form methyl halide.

  4. Revealing neuronal function through microelectrode array recordings

    PubMed Central

    Obien, Marie Engelene J.; Deligkaris, Kosmas; Bullmann, Torsten; Bakkum, Douglas J.; Frey, Urs

    2015-01-01

    Microelectrode arrays and microprobes have been widely utilized to measure neuronal activity, both in vitro and in vivo. The key advantage is the capability to record and stimulate neurons at multiple sites simultaneously. However, unlike the single-cell or single-channel resolution of intracellular recording, microelectrodes detect signals from all possible sources around every sensor. Here, we review the current understanding of microelectrode signals and the techniques for analyzing them. We introduce the ongoing advancements in microelectrode technology, with focus on achieving higher resolution and quality of recordings by means of monolithic integration with on-chip circuitry. We show how recent advanced microelectrode array measurement methods facilitate the understanding of single neurons as well as network function. PMID:25610364

  5. Stretchable Micro-Electrode Array

    SciTech Connect

    Maghribi, M; Hamilton, J; Polla, D; Rose, K; Wilson, T; Krulevitch, P

    2002-03-08

    This paper focuses on the design consideration, fabrication processes and preliminary testing of the stretchable micro-electrode array. We are developing an implantable, stretchable micro-electrode array using polymer-based microfabrication techniques. The device will serve as the interface between an electronic imaging system and the human eye, directly stimulating retinal neurons via thin film conducting traces and electroplated electrodes. The metal features are embedded within a thin ({approx}50 micron) substrate fabricated using poly (dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), a biocompatible elastomeric material that has very low water permeability. The conformable nature of PDMS is critical for ensuring uniform contact with the curved surface of the retina. To fabricate the device, we developed unique processes for metalizing PDMS to produce robust traces capable of maintaining conductivity when stretched (5%, SD 1.5), and for selectively passivating the conductive elements. An in situ measurement of residual strain in the PDMS during curing reveals a tensile strain of 10%, explaining the stretchable nature of the thin metalized devices.

  6. Iridium-Catalyzed Allylic Substitution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartwig, John F.; Pouy, Mark J.

    Iridium-catalyzed asymmetric allylic substitution has become a valuable method to prepare products from the addition of nucleophiles at the more substituted carbon of an allyl unit. The most active and selective catalysts contain a phosphoramidite ligand possessing at least one arylethyl substituent on the nitrogen atom of the ligand. In these systems, the active catalyst is generated by a base-induced cyclometalation at the methyl group of this substituent to generate an iridium metalacycle bound by the COD ligand of the [Ir(COD)Cl]2 precursor and one additional labile dative ligand. Such complexes catalyze the reactions of linear allylic esters with alkylamines, arylamines, phenols, alcohols, imides, carbamates, ammonia, enolates and enolate equivalents, as well as typical stabilized carbon nucleophiles generated from malonates and cyanoesters. Iridium catalysts for enantioselective allylic substitution have also been generated from phosphorus ligands with substituents bound by heteroatoms, and an account of the studies of such systems, along with a description of the development of iridium catalysts is included.

  7. Processing and properties of iridium alloys for space power applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ohriner, E.K.

    1994-12-31

    Iridium alloys are used as fuel cladding in radioisotope thermoelectric generators due to their high-melting point, high- temperature strength, and oxidation and corrosion resistance. Although iridium has a face-centered cubic crystal structure, it undergoes a distinct ductile-to-brittle transition characteristic of many body-centered cubic metals. Improved ductility in the alloys is achieved through material purification and controlled alloy additions at the parts per million (ppm) level. A vacuum arc remelt operation produces a nearly defect-free casting, which is further processed to sheet products. A change in processing from drop castings of small arc-melted buttons to large arc-remelted ingots has substantially improved product yields. The effects of processing changes on alloy microstructure, sheet textures, oxidation effects, high-strain-rate ductility, and fabricability are discussed.

  8. Iridium-catalyst-based autonomous bubble-propelled graphene micromotors with ultralow catalyst loading.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Sofer, Zdeněk; Eng, Alex Yong Sheng; Pumera, Martin

    2014-11-10

    A novel concept of an iridium-based bubble-propelled Janus-particle-type graphene micromotor with very high surface area and with very low catalyst loading is described. The low loading of Ir catalyst (0.54 at %) allows for fast motion of graphene microparticles with high surface area of 316.2 m(2)  g(-1). The micromotor was prepared with a simple and scalable method by thermal exfoliation of iridium-doped graphite oxide precursor composite in hydrogen atmosphere. Oxygen bubbles generated from the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide at the iridium catalytic sites provide robust propulsion thrust for the graphene micromotor. The high surface area and low iridium catalyst loading of the bubble-propelled graphene motors offer great possibilities for dramatically enhanced cargo delivery. PMID:25293511

  9. Excursion of vibrating microelectrodes in tissue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanabus, E. W.; Feldstein, C.; Crawford, D. W.

    1980-01-01

    The paper deals with a vibrating microelectrode holder consisting of a support rod attached to the cone of a miniature loudspeaker. This holder facilitates a microelectrode penetration into arterial wall tissue, eliminates surface dimpling, and relieves polarographic artifacts believed to be due to tissue compression. The paper presents construction and performance details of the electrode holder, and evaluates the extent of possible damage incurred during such vibration by measuring electrode motion relative to surrounding tissue in an excised segment of femoral artery in the rabbit. It is concluded that under proper vibratory conditions microelectrodes can be easily inserted into the arterial wall with minimum tissue disturbance.

  10. IRIDIUM LINER FOR NASA 5 LBF CLASS MATERIAL TEST CHAMBER IRIDIUM LINER FOR ATLANTIC RESEARCH CORPORA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    IRIDIUM LINER FOR NASA 5 LBF CLASS MATERIAL TEST CHAMBER IRIDIUM LINER FOR ATLANTIC RESEARCH CORPORATION 5 LBF CLASS ROCKET CHAMBER 25 LBF CLASS 75 HFC 25 TAC CERAMIC COMPOSITE ROCKET CHAMBER FROM REFRACTURY COMPOSITES INC. PURCHASE ORDER C-551941-

  11. Microelectrode array microscopy: investigation of dynamic behavior of localized corrosion at type 304 stainless steel surfaces.

    PubMed

    Lister, Tedd E; Pinhero, Patrick J

    2005-04-15

    Scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) and a recently developed microelectrode array microscope have been used to study localized corrosion and electron-transfer characteristics of native oxide layers of type 304 stainless steels. The I-/I3- redox couple was employed as a mediator and allowed sensitive detection of oxide breakdown events. In solutions containing I-, a signal at the microelectrode was observed on type 304 stainless steel surfaces at active pitting corrosion sites. Under conditions where pitting corrosion occurs, SECM was used to track the temporal characteristics of the reaction in a spatial manner. However, because of the time required to create an image, much of the temporal information was not obtained. To improve the temporal resolution of the measurement, microelectrode array microscopy (MEAM) was developed as a parallel method of performing SECM. The demonstration shown reveals the potential of MEAM for analysis of surface chemistry on temporal and spatial domains. PMID:15828799

  12. Quantification of noise sources for amperometric measurement of quantal exocytosis using microelectrodes

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jia

    2016-01-01

    Electrochemical microelectrodes are commonly used to record amperometric spikes of current that result from oxidation of transmitter released from individual vesicles during exocytosis. Whereas the exquisite sensitivity of these measurements is well appreciated, a better understanding of the noise sources that limit the resolution of the technique is needed to guide the design of next-generation devices. We measured the current power spectral density (SI) of electrochemical microelectrodes to understand the physical basis of dominant noise sources and to determine how noise varies with the electrode material and geometry. We find that the current noise is thermal in origin in that SI is proportional to the real part of the admittance of the electrode. The admittance of microelectrodes is well described by a constant phase element model such that both the real and imaginary admittance increase with frequency raised to a power of 0.84 – 0.96. Our results demonstrate that the current standard deviation is proportional to the square root of the area of the working electrode, increases ~linearly with the bandwidth of the recording, and varies with the choice of the electrode material with Au ≈ carbon fiber > nitrogen-doped diamond-like carbon > indium-tin-oxide. Contact between a cell and a microelectrode does not appreciably increase noise. Surface-patterned microchip electrodes can have a noise performance that is superior to that of carbon-fiber microelectrodes of the same area. PMID:22540116

  13. Toward the Digital Electrochemical Recognition of Cobalt, Iridium, Nickel, and Iron Ion Collisions by Catalytic Amplification.

    PubMed

    Dick, Jeffrey E; Bard, Allen J

    2016-07-13

    We report the electrochemical detection of femtomolar amounts of cobalt, iridium, nickel, and iron ions in solution by electrocatalyst formation and amplification. The metal oxides of these ions can be formed electrochemically and can catalyze the oxidation of water. Alternatively, the reduction of metal ions to metals, such as the reduction of IrCl6(3-) to iridium, is capable of electrocatalytically reducing protons to molecular hydrogen, as shown previously with Pt. These events, which manifest themselves in amperometry, correspond to the formation of electrocatalytic nuclei on the electrode surface, capable of electrocatalytically oxidizing water or reducing protons. An analysis of the frequency of anodic blips compared to theory implies that the requirement for water oxidation is 10 ± 1 ions of cobalt, 13 ± 4 ions of iridium, and 11 ± 3 ions of nickel. A similar analysis for iridium reduction and the corresponding catalytic reduction of protons implies that 6 ± 2 ions of iridium are required for proton reduction. These numbers are confirmed in an analysis of the time of first nucleation event, i.e. the time at which the first blip on the amperometric i-t experiment occurs. We further show that the anodic blips in detecting nickel increase in intensity upon increasing amounts of iron ions in solution to a ratio of Ni/Fe of ∼5, surprisingly close to that for bulk electrocatalysts of Ni-Fe. PMID:27295309

  14. Rhenium and iridium

    SciTech Connect

    Ohriner, E.K.

    1997-02-01

    Re is used together with Ir in a number of metallurgical applications. Ir has been used as coating for Re rocket thrusters and as an oxidation-resistant coating in a number of other applications. The high strength of Re at elevated temperature is combined with the oxidation resistance and high melting point of Ir. The use of the two metals together is advantageous due to absence of stable intermetallic compounds. Both Re and Ir alloying additions improve the ductility of W. The high solubility of Re in Ir is also taken advantage of to produce Ir-based alloys for structural applications. Uses of Re in conjunction with Ir are discussed.

  15. Carbon Nanotube-based microelectrodes for enhanced detection of neurotransmitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Christopher B.

    Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) is one of the common techniques used for rapid measurement of neurotransmitters in vivo. Carbon-fiber microelectrodes (CFMEs) are typically used for neurotransmitter detection because of sub-second measurement capabilities, ability to measure changes in neurotransmitter concentration during neurotransmission, and the small size electrode diameter, which limits the amount of damage caused to tissue. Cylinder CFMEs, typically 50 -- 100 microm long, are commonly used for in vivo experiments because the electrode sensitivity is directly related to the electrode surface area. However the length of the electrode can limit the spatial resolution of neurotransmitter detection, which can restrict experiments in Drosophila and other small model systems. In addition, the electrode sensitivity toward dopamine and serotonin detection drops significantly for measurements at rates faster than 10 Hz, limiting the temporal resolution of CFMEs. While the use of FSCV at carbon-fiber microelectrodes has led to substantial strides in our understanding of neurotransmission, techniques that expand the capabilities of CFMEs are crucial to fully maximize the potential uses of FSCV. This dissertation introduces new methods to integrate carbon nanotubes (CNT) into microelectrodes and discusses the electrochemical enhancements of these CNT-microelectrodes. The electrodes are specifically designed with simple fabrication procedures so that highly specialized equipment is not necessary, and they utilize commercially available materials so that the electrodes could be easily integrated into existing systems. The electrochemical properties of CNT modified CFMEs are characterized using FSCV and the effect of CNT functionalization on these properties is explored in Chapter 2. For example, CFME modification using carboxylic acid functionalized CNTs yield about a 6-fold increase in dopamine oxidation current, but modification with octadecylamine CNTs results in a

  16. Electronic Structure of Iridium Clusters on Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Bradford A.; Bradley, Aaron J.; Ugeda, Miguel M.; Coh, Sinisa; Zettl, Alex; Crommie, Michael F.; Cohen, Marvin L.; Louie, Steven G.

    2015-03-01

    Graphene was predicted to exhibit non-trivial Z2 topology, but its exceedingly weak spin-orbit coupling prevented this from being observed. Previous theoretical work has proposed enhancing the spin-orbit coupling strength by depositing individual adatoms adsorbed onto the surface of graphene. We show experimental evidence that the iridium adatoms cluster, with a cluster size of at least two atoms. We investigate through theoretical calculations the orientation of the iridium dimers on graphene, contrast the electronic structure of iridium dimers with iridium monomers, and compare the theoretical iridium dimer electronic structure calculations with the experimental results determined via scanning tunneling spectroscopy. This work was supported by NSF Grant No. DMR10-1006184 and U.S. DOE under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. Computational resources have been provided by DOE at LBNL's NERSC facility.

  17. Band-type microelectrodes for amperometric immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ga-Yeon; Chang, Young Wook; Ko, Hyuk; Kang, Min-Jung; Pyun, Jae-Chul

    2016-07-20

    A band-type microelectrode was made using a parylene-N film as a passivation layer. A circular-type, mm-scale electrode with the same diameter as the band-type microelectrode was also made with an electrode area that was 5000 times larger than the band-type microelectrode. By comparing the amperometric signals of 3,5,3',5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) samples at different optical density (OD) values, the band-type microelectrode was determined to be 9 times more sensitive than the circular-type electrode. The properties of the circular-type and the band-type electrodes (e.g., the shape of their cyclic voltammograms, the type of diffusion layer used, and the diffusion layer thickness per unit electrode area) were characterized according to their electrode area using the COMSOL Multiphysics software. From these simulations, the band-type electrode was estimated to have the conventional microelectrode properties, even when the electrode area was 100 times larger than a conventional circular-type electrode. These results show that both the geometry and the area of an electrode can influence the properties of the electrode. Finally, amperometric analysis based on a band-type electrode was applied to commercial ELISA kits to analyze human hepatitis B surface antigen (hHBsAg) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antibodies. PMID:27251855

  18. Study of degradation intermediates formed during electrochemical oxidation of pesticide residue 2,6-dichlorobenzamide (BAM) at boron doped diamond (BDD) and platinum-iridium anodes.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Henrik Tækker; Søgaard, Erik Gydesen; Muff, Jens

    2014-08-01

    Electrochemical oxidation is a promising technique for degradation of otherwise recalcitrant organic micropollutants in waters. In this study, the applicability of electrochemical oxidation was investigated concerning the degradation of the groundwater pollutant 2,6-dichlorobenzamide (BAM) through the electrochemical oxygen transfer process with two anode materials: Ti/Pt90-Ir10 and boron doped diamond (Si/BDD). Besides the efficiency of the degradation of the main pollutant, it is also of outmost importance to control the formation and fate of stable degradation intermediates. These were investigated quantitatively with HPLC-MS and TOC measurements and qualitatively with a combined HPLC-UV and HPLC-MS protocol. 2,6-Dichlorobenzamide was found to be degraded most efficiently by the BDD cell, which also resulted in significantly lower amounts of intermediates formed during the process. The anodic degradation pathway was found to occur via substitution of hydroxyl groups until ring cleavage leading to carboxylic acids. For the BDD cell, there was a parallel cathodic degradation pathway that occurred via dechlorination. The combination of TOC with the combined HPLC-UV/MS was found to be a powerful method for determining the amount and nature of degradation intermediates. PMID:24873711

  19. TCP Performance Enhancement Over Iridium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torgerson, Leigh; Hutcherson, Joseph; McKelvey, James

    2007-01-01

    In support of iNET maturation, NASA-JPL has collaborated with NASA-Dryden to develop, test and demonstrate an over-the-horizon vehicle-to-ground networking capability, using Iridium as the vehicle-to-ground communications link for relaying critical vehicle telemetry. To ensure reliability concerns are met, the Space Communications Protocol Standards (SCPS) transport protocol was investigated for its performance characteristics in this environment. In particular, the SCPS-TP software performance was compared to that of the standard Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) over the Internet Protocol (IP). This paper will report on the results of this work.

  20. Stimulation with chronically implanted microelectrodes in the cochlear nucleus of the cat: histologic and physiologic effects.

    PubMed

    McCreery, D B; Yuen, T G; Agnew, W F; Bullara, L A

    1992-09-01

    The effects of several hours of continuous electrical stimulation in the cats' cochlear nucleus with chronically implanted activated iridium microelectrodes was investigated from the changes in the evoked response near the inferior colliculus and also by histologic evaluation of the stimulated tissue. The stimulating microelectrodes had geometric surface areas of 75-500 microns2. They were pulsed continuously for 4 h, at a pulse repetition rate of 200 Hz, using charge-balanced pulse pairs. The charge per phase was 1.8 or 3.6 nC/ph. The animals were sacrificed for histologic evaluation 2 h, or several days later. The only remarkable histologic change resulting from the 4 h of stimulation was some aggregation of lymphocytes at the site of stimulation. However, depression of the electrical excitability of neurons near the sites often persisted for several days after 4 h of stimulation at 3.6 nC/phase. The charge per phase of the stimulus pulse pair was correlated strongly with the depression of excitability, and there was a weaker correlation between the depression and the amplitude of the first phase of voltage transient induced across the electrode-tissue interface. The charge density, calculated from the geometric surface area of the stimulating electrodes, was poorly correlated with the severity of the depression. The findings suggest a means of detecting impending stimulation-induced neural damage while it is still reversible. PMID:1429250

  1. On the dissolution of iridium by aluminum.

    SciTech Connect

    Hewson, John C.

    2009-08-01

    The potential for liquid aluminum to dissolve an iridium solid is examined. Substantial uncertainties exist in material properties, and the available data for the iridium solubility and iridium diffusivity are discussed. The dissolution rate is expressed in terms of the regression velocity of the solid iridium when exposed to the solvent (aluminum). The temperature has the strongest influence in the dissolution rate. This dependence comes primarily from the solubility of iridium in aluminum and secondarily from the temperature dependence of the diffusion coefficient. This dissolution mass flux is geometry dependent and results are provided for simplified geometries at constant temperatures. For situations where there is negligible convective flow, simple time-dependent diffusion solutions are provided. Correlations for mass transfer are also given for natural convection and forced convection. These estimates suggest that dissolution of iridium can be significant for temperatures well below the melting temperature of iridium, but the uncertainties in actual rates are large because of uncertainties in the physical parameters and in the details of the relevant geometries.

  2. Determining the Altitude of Iridium Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, James; Owe, Manfred

    1999-01-01

    Iridium flares have nothing to do with the element iridium. Iridium is also the name of a telecommunications company that has been launching satellites into low orbits around the Earth. These satellites are being used for a new type of wireless phone and paging service. Flares have been observed coming from these satellites. These flares have the potential, especially when the full fleet of satellites is in orbit, to disrupt astronomical observations. The paper reviews using simple trigonometry how to calculate the altitude of one of these satellites.

  3. The Effect of Residual Endotoxin Contamination on the Neuroinflammatory Response to Sterilized Intracortical Microelectrodes

    PubMed Central

    Ravikumar, Madhumitha; Hageman, Daniel J.; Tomaszewski, William H.; Chandra, Gabriella M.; Skousen, John L.; Capadona, Jeffrey R.

    2014-01-01

    A major limitation to the use of microelectrode technologies in both research and clinical applications is our inability to consistently record high quality neural signals. There is increasing evidence that recording instability is linked, in part, to neuroinflammation. A number of factors including extravasated blood products and macrophage released soluble factors are believed to mediate neuroinflammation and the resulting recording instability. However, the roles of other inflammatory stimuli, such as residual endotoxin contamination, are poorly understood. Therefore, to determine the effect of endotoxin contamination we examined the brain tissue response of C57/BL6 mice to non-functional microelectrodes with a range of endotoxin levels. Endotoxin contamination on the sterilized microelectrodes was measured using a limulus amebocyte lysate test following FDA guidelines. Microelectrodes sterilized by autoclave, dry heat, or ethylene oxide gas, resulted in variable levels of residual endotoxins of 0.55 EU/mL, 0.22 EU/mL, and 0.11 EU/mL, respectively. Histological evaluation at two weeks showed a direct correlation between microglia/macrophage activation and endotoxin levels. Interestingly, astrogliosis, neuronal loss, and blood brain barrier dysfunction demonstrated a threshold-dependent response to bacterial endotoxins. However, at sixteen weeks, no histological differences were detected, regardless of initial endotoxin levels. Therefore, our results demonstrate that endotoxin contamination, within the range examined, contributes to initial but not chronic microelectrode associated neuroinflammation. Our results suggest that minimizing residual endotoxins may impact early recording quality. To this end, endotoxins should be considered as a potent stimulant to the neuroinflammatory response to implanted intracortical microelectrodes. PMID:24778808

  4. Analysis of capacitive coupling within microelectrode array.

    PubMed

    Hu, Z; Troyk, P R; Detlefsen, D E

    2006-01-01

    Capacitive coupling within high-density microelectrode arrays can degrade neural recording signal or disperse neural stimulation current. Material deterioration in a chronically implanted neural stimulation/recording system can cause such an undesired effect. We present a simple method with an iterative algorithm to quantify the cross-coupling capacitance, in-situ. PMID:17947024

  5. Electrodeposition of platinum-iridium alloy nanowires for hermetic packaging of microelectronics.

    PubMed

    Petrossians, Artin; Whalen, John J; Weiland, James D; Mansfeld, Florian

    2012-01-01

    An electrodeposition technique was applied for fabrication of dense platinum-iridium alloy nanowires as interconnect structures in hermetic microelectronic packaging to be used in implantable devices. Vertically aligned arrays of platinum-iridium alloy nanowires with controllable length and a diameter of about 200 nm were fabricated using a cyclic potential technique from a novel electrodeposition bath in nanoporous aluminum oxide templates. Ti/Au thin films were sputter deposited on one side of the alumina membranes to form a base material for electrodeposition. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) were used to characterize the morphology and the chemical composition of the nanowires, respectively. SEM micrographs revealed that the electrodeposited nanowires have dense and compact structures. EDS analysis showed a 60:40% platinum-iridium nanowire composition. Deposition rates were estimated by determining nanowire length as a function of deposition time. High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) images revealed that the nanowires have a nanocrystalline structure with grain sizes ranging from 3 nm to 5 nm. Helium leak tests performed using a helium leak detector showed leak rates as low as 1 × 10(-11) mbar L s(-1) indicating that dense nanowires were electrodeposited inside the nanoporous membranes. Comparison of electrical measurements on platinum and platinum-iridium nanowires revealed that platinum-iridium nanowires have improved electrical conductivity. PMID:23365995

  6. Grain-boundary cavitation and weld-underbead cracking in DOP-26 iridium alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Mosley, W.C. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Plutonium-238 oxide fuel pellets for the General Purpose Heat Source Radioisotopic thermoelectric generators to be used on the NASA Galileo Mission to Jupiter and the International Solar Polar Mission are produced and encapsulated in DOP-26 iridium alloy at the Savannah River Plant. DOP-26 iridium alloy was developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and contains nominally 0.3 weight-percent tungsten, 60-ppM thorium and 50-ppM aluminum. Underbead cracks occasionally occur in the girth weld on the iridium alloy cladding in the area where the gas tungsten arc is quenched. A variety of electron beam techniques have been used to determine the cause of cracking. Results are discussed. (WHK)

  7. Thermal stability of sputtered iridium oxide films

    SciTech Connect

    Sanjines, R.; Aruchamy, A.; Levy, F. )

    1989-06-01

    Dry and partially hydrated films of IrO/sub 2/ were prepared by reactive sputtering. The authors discuss their thermal stability investigated by means of XPS, x-ray diffraction, and resistivity measurements. Dry films decomposed at about 400{sup 0}C iin air and at 200{sup 0}C in vacuum (10/sup -2/ Pa), whereas partially hydrated films decomposed at 350{sup 0} and 150{sup 0}C, respectively. After electrochemical treatments of the films mounted as electrochromic electrodes in an electrolytic cell, the decomposition occurred at different temperatures. In particular, the bleached state was found to have the relatively low decomposition temperature of about 100{sup 0}C in air.

  8. Electrical performance of penetrating microelectrodes chronically implanted in cat cortex.

    PubMed

    Kane, Sheryl R; Cogan, Stuart F; Ehrlich, Julia; Plante, Timothy D; McCreery, Douglas B

    2011-01-01

    Penetrating multielectrode arrays with electrode coatings of sputtered iridium oxide (SIROF) have been implanted chronically in cat cortex for periods over 300 days. The ability of these electrodes to inject charge at levels above expected thresholds for neural excitation has been examined in vivo by measurements of voltage transients in response to current-controlled, cathodal stimulation pulsing. The effect of current pulse width from 150 μs to 500 μs and voltage biasing of the electrodes in the interpulse period at two levels, 0.0 V and 0.6 V vs. Ag|AgCl, were also investigated. The results of in vivo characterization of the electrodes by open-circuit potential measurements, cyclic voltammetry and impedance spectroscopy are also reported. PMID:22255562

  9. Electrostatic microactuators for precise positioning of neural microelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Muthuswamy, Jit; Okandan, Murat; Jain, Tilak; Gilletti, Aaron

    2005-10-01

    Microelectrode arrays used for monitoring single and multineuronal action potentials often fail to record from the same population of neurons over a period of time likely due to micromotion of neurons away from the microelectrode, gliosis around the recording site and also brain movement due to behavior. We report here novel electrostatic microactuated microelectrodes that will enable precise repositioning of the microelectrodes within the brain tissue. Electrostatic comb-drive microactuators and associated microelectrodes are fabricated using the SUMMiT V (Sandia's Ultraplanar Multilevel MEMS Technology) process, a five-layer polysilicon micromachining technology of the Sandia National labs, NM. The microfabricated microactuators enable precise bidirectional positioning of the microelectrodes in the brain with accuracy in the order of 1 microm. The microactuators allow for a linear translation of the microelectrodes of up to 5 mm in either direction making it suitable for positioning microelectrodes in deep structures of a rodent brain. The overall translation was reduced to approximately 2 mm after insulation of the microelectrodes with epoxy for monitoring multiunit activity. The microactuators are capable of driving the microelectrodes in the brain tissue with forces in the order of several micro-Newtons. Single unit recordings were obtained from the somatosensory cortex of adult rats in acute experiments demonstrating the feasibility of this technology. Further optimization of the insulation, packaging and interconnect issues will be necessary before this technology can be validated in long-term experiments. PMID:16235660

  10. Electrostatic Microactuators for Precise Positioning of Neural Microelectrodes

    PubMed Central

    Muthuswamy, Jit; Okandan, Murat; Jain, Tilak; Gilletti, Aaron

    2006-01-01

    Microelectrode arrays used for monitoring single and multineuronal action potentials often fail to record from the same population of neurons over a period of time likely due to micromotion of neurons away from the microelectrode, gliosis around the recording site and also brain movement due to behavior. We report here novel electrostatic microactuated microelectrodes that will enable precise repositioning of the microelectrodes within the brain tissue. Electrostatic comb-drive microactuators and associated microelectrodes are fabricated using the SUMMiT V™ (Sandia's Ultraplanar Multilevel MEMS Technology) process, a five-layer polysilicon micromachining technology of the Sandia National labs, NM. The microfabricated microactuators enable precise bidirectional positioning of the microelectrodes in the brain with accuracy in the order of 1 μm. The microactuators allow for a linear translation of the microelectrodes of up to 5 mm in either direction making it suitable for positioning microelectrodes in deep structures of a rodent brain. The overall translation was reduced to approximately 2 mm after insulation of the microelectrodes with epoxy for monitoring multiunit activity. The microactuators are capable of driving the microelectrodes in the brain tissue with forces in the order of several micro-Newtons. Single unit recordings were obtained from the somatosensory cortex of adult rats in acute experiments demonstrating the feasibility of this technology. Further optimization of the insulation, packaging and interconnect issues will be necessary before this technology can be validated in long-term experiments. PMID:16235660

  11. Carbon nanospikes grown on metal wires as microelectrode sensors for dopamine

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zestos, Alexander G.; Yang, Cheng; Jacobs, Christopher B.; Hensley, Dale; Venton, B. Jill

    2015-09-14

    Carbon nanomaterials are advantageous as electrodes for neurotransmitter detection, but the difficulty of nanomaterials deposition on electrode substrates limits the reproducibility and future applications. In our study, we used plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) to directly grow a thin layer of carbon nanospikes (CNS) on cylindrical metal substrates. No catalyst is required and the CNS surface coverage is uniform over the cylindrical metal substrate. We characterized the CNS growth on several metallic substrates including tantalum, niobium, palladium, and nickel wires. Using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV), bare metal wires could not detect 1 mu M dopamine while carbon nanospike coatedmore » wires could. Moreover, the highest sensitivity and optimized S/N ratio was recorded from carbon nanospike-tantalum (CNS-Ta) microwires grown for 7.5 minutes, which had a LOD of 8 +/- 2 nM for dopamine with FSCV. CNS-Ta microelectrodes were more reversible and had a smaller Delta E-p for dopamine than carbon-fiber microelectrodes, suggesting faster electron transfer kinetics. The kinetics of dopamine redox were adsorption controlled at CNS-Ta microelectrodes and repeated electrochemical measurements displayed stability for up to ten hours in vitro and over a ten day period as well. The oxidation potential was significantly different for ascorbic acid and uric acid compared to dopamine. Finally, growing carbon nanospikes on metal wires is a promising method to produce uniformly-coated, carbon nanostructured cylindrical microelectrodes for sensitive dopamine detection.« less

  12. Carbon nanospikes grown on metal wires as microelectrode sensors for dopamine

    SciTech Connect

    Zestos, Alexander G.; Yang, Cheng; Jacobs, Christopher B.; Hensley, Dale; Venton, B. Jill

    2015-09-14

    Carbon nanomaterials are advantageous as electrodes for neurotransmitter detection, but the difficulty of nanomaterials deposition on electrode substrates limits the reproducibility and future applications. In our study, we used plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) to directly grow a thin layer of carbon nanospikes (CNS) on cylindrical metal substrates. No catalyst is required and the CNS surface coverage is uniform over the cylindrical metal substrate. We characterized the CNS growth on several metallic substrates including tantalum, niobium, palladium, and nickel wires. Using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV), bare metal wires could not detect 1 mu M dopamine while carbon nanospike coated wires could. Moreover, the highest sensitivity and optimized S/N ratio was recorded from carbon nanospike-tantalum (CNS-Ta) microwires grown for 7.5 minutes, which had a LOD of 8 +/- 2 nM for dopamine with FSCV. CNS-Ta microelectrodes were more reversible and had a smaller Delta E-p for dopamine than carbon-fiber microelectrodes, suggesting faster electron transfer kinetics. The kinetics of dopamine redox were adsorption controlled at CNS-Ta microelectrodes and repeated electrochemical measurements displayed stability for up to ten hours in vitro and over a ten day period as well. The oxidation potential was significantly different for ascorbic acid and uric acid compared to dopamine. Finally, growing carbon nanospikes on metal wires is a promising method to produce uniformly-coated, carbon nanostructured cylindrical microelectrodes for sensitive dopamine detection.

  13. Carbon nanospikes grown on metal wires as microelectrode sensors for dopamine.

    PubMed

    Zestos, Alexander G; Yang, Cheng; Jacobs, Christopher B; Hensley, Dale; Venton, B Jill

    2015-11-01

    Carbon nanomaterials are advantageous as electrodes for neurotransmitter detection, but the difficulty of nanomaterials deposition on electrode substrates limits the reproducibility and future applications. In this study, we used plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) to directly grow a thin layer of carbon nanospikes (CNS) on cylindrical metal substrates. No catalyst is required and the CNS surface coverage is uniform over the cylindrical metal substrate. The CNS growth was characterized on several metallic substrates including tantalum, niobium, palladium, and nickel wires. Using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV), bare metal wires could not detect 1 μM dopamine while carbon nanospike coated wires could. The highest sensitivity and optimized S/N ratio was recorded from carbon nanospike-tantalum (CNS-Ta) microwires grown for 7.5 minutes, which had a LOD of 8 ± 2 nM for dopamine with FSCV. CNS-Ta microelectrodes were more reversible and had a smaller ΔE(p) for dopamine than carbon-fiber microelectrodes, suggesting faster electron transfer kinetics. The kinetics of dopamine redox were adsorption controlled at CNS-Ta microelectrodes and repeated electrochemical measurements displayed stability for up to ten hours in vitro and over a ten day period as well. The oxidation potential was significantly different for ascorbic acid and uric acid compared to dopamine. Growing carbon nanospikes on metal wires is a promising method to produce uniformly-coated, carbon nanostructured cylindrical microelectrodes for sensitive dopamine detection. PMID:26389138

  14. Extruded ceramic microelectrodes for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Perale, G; Giordano, C; Daniele, F; Tunesi, M; Colombo, P; Gottardo, L; Maccagnan, S; Masi, M

    2008-03-01

    A new process, based on the micro-co-extrusion of preceramic precursors, has been studied for manufacturing ceramic microelectrodes to be used in biomedical applications. Commercially available silicon polymers were applied and proper doping resulted in electrically conductive ceramic filaments. Chemical reticulation and high-temperature pyrolysis were applied to convert the polymeric resins into Si-O-C ceramic materials. Circular microelectrodes were manufactured with diameters between 100 microm and 5 mm with a different number of inner conductive lines (from 1 to 80). The flexural strength of the filaments depended on the outer diameter size; doping with carbon black produced filaments with an average conductivity of approximately 0.4 S/cm for a 50% weight carbon black load. The results achieved by in vitro studies confirmed a good biological performance of Si-O-C ceramic structures with both hard and soft tissue cell models. PMID:18373322

  15. Effect of ultrasound sonication on electroplating of iridium.

    PubMed

    Ohsaka, Takashi; Isaka, Motohiro; Hirano, Katsuhiko; Ohishi, Tomoji

    2008-04-01

    Effect of ultrasound sonication was examined on the electroplating of iridium in aqueous hexabromoiridate(III) solution. The electrodeposits were evaluated by observing the defects of the iridium deposits by means of voltammetry, in which the current-potential curves of the iridium deposits on copper were measured. Applying ultrasound sonication to the electroplating of iridium decreased the defects including the cracks in the deposit whenever the glycerol as the additives was contained or not in the electrolyte. PMID:18164231

  16. Electrochemical and chemical routes to hydride loss from an iridium dihydride.

    PubMed

    Walden, A G; Kumar, A; Lease, N; Goldman, A S; Miller, A J M

    2016-06-14

    With a view towards replacing sacrificial hydrogen acceptors in alkane dehydrogenation catalysis, electrochemical methods for oxidative activation of a pincer-ligated iridium hydride intermediate were explored. A 1H(+)/2e(-) oxidation process was observed in THF solvent, with net hydride loss leading to a reactive cationic intermediate that can be trapped by chloride. Analogous reactivity was observed with the concerted hydride transfer reagent Ph3C(+), connecting chemical and electrochemical hydride loss pathways. PMID:26979786

  17. Localized electron transfer rates and microelectrode-based enrichment of microbial communities within a phototrophic microbial mat

    SciTech Connect

    Babauta, Jerome T.; Atci, Erhan; Ha, Phuc T.; Lindemann, Stephen R.; Ewing, Timothy; Call, Douglas R.; Fredrickson, James K.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2014-01-01

    Phototrophic microbial mats frequently exhibit sharp, light-dependent redox gradients that regulate microbial respiration on specific electron acceptors as a function of depth. In this work, a benthic phototrophic microbial mat from Hot Lake, a hypersaline, epsomitic lake located near Oroville in north-central Washington, was used to develop a microscale electrochemical method to study local electron transfer processes within the mat. To characterize the physicochemical variables influencing electron transfer, we initially quantified redox potential, pH, and dissolved oxygen gradients by depth in the mat under photic and aphotic conditions. We further demonstrated that power output of a mat fuel cell was light-dependent. To study local electron transfer processes, we deployed a microscale electrode (microelectrode) with tip size ~20 μm. To enrich a subset of microorganisms capable of interacting with the microelectrode, we anodically polarized the microelectrode at depth in the mat. Subsequently, to characterize the microelectrode- associated community and compare it to the neighboring mat community, we performed amplicon sequencing of the V1-V3 region of the 16S gene. Differences in Bray-Curtis beta diversity, illustrated by large changes in relative abundance at the phylum level, suggested successful enrichment of specific mat community members on the microelectrode surface. The microelectrode-associated community exhibited substantially reduced alpha diversity and elevated relative abundances of Prosthecochloris, Loktanella, Catellibacterium, other unclassified members of Rhodobacteraceae, Thiomicrospira, and Limnobacter, compared with the community at an equivalent depth in the mat. Our results suggest that local electron transfer to an anodically polarized microelectrode selected for a specific microbial population, with substantially more abundance and diversity of sulfur-oxidizing phylotypes compared with the neighboring mat community.

  18. Localized electron transfer rates and microelectrode-based enrichment of microbial communities within a phototrophic microbial mat.

    PubMed

    Babauta, Jerome T; Atci, Erhan; Ha, Phuc T; Lindemann, Stephen R; Ewing, Timothy; Call, Douglas R; Fredrickson, James K; Beyenal, Haluk

    2014-01-01

    Phototrophic microbial mats frequently exhibit sharp, light-dependent redox gradients that regulate microbial respiration on specific electron acceptors as a function of depth. In this work, a benthic phototrophic microbial mat from Hot Lake, a hypersaline, epsomitic lake located near Oroville in north-central Washington, was used to develop a microscale electrochemical method to study local electron transfer processes within the mat. To characterize the physicochemical variables influencing electron transfer, we initially quantified redox potential, pH, and dissolved oxygen gradients by depth in the mat under photic and aphotic conditions. We further demonstrated that power output of a mat fuel cell was light-dependent. To study local electron transfer processes, we deployed a microscale electrode (microelectrode) with tip size ~20 μm. To enrich a subset of microorganisms capable of interacting with the microelectrode, we anodically polarized the microelectrode at depth in the mat. Subsequently, to characterize the microelectrode-associated community and compare it to the neighboring mat community, we performed amplicon sequencing of the V1-V3 region of the 16S gene. Differences in Bray-Curtis beta diversity, illustrated by large changes in relative abundance at the phylum level, suggested successful enrichment of specific mat community members on the microelectrode surface. The microelectrode-associated community exhibited substantially reduced alpha diversity and elevated relative abundances of Prosthecochloris, Loktanella, Catellibacterium, other unclassified members of Rhodobacteraceae, Thiomicrospira, and Limnobacter, compared with the community at an equivalent depth in the mat. Our results suggest that local electron transfer to an anodically polarized microelectrode selected for a specific microbial population, with substantially more abundance and diversity of sulfur-oxidizing phylotypes compared with the neighboring mat community. PMID:24478768

  19. Localized electron transfer rates and microelectrode-based enrichment of microbial communities within a phototrophic microbial mat

    PubMed Central

    Babauta, Jerome T.; Atci, Erhan; Ha, Phuc T.; Lindemann, Stephen R.; Ewing, Timothy; Call, Douglas R.; Fredrickson, James K.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2014-01-01

    Phototrophic microbial mats frequently exhibit sharp, light-dependent redox gradients that regulate microbial respiration on specific electron acceptors as a function of depth. In this work, a benthic phototrophic microbial mat from Hot Lake, a hypersaline, epsomitic lake located near Oroville in north-central Washington, was used to develop a microscale electrochemical method to study local electron transfer processes within the mat. To characterize the physicochemical variables influencing electron transfer, we initially quantified redox potential, pH, and dissolved oxygen gradients by depth in the mat under photic and aphotic conditions. We further demonstrated that power output of a mat fuel cell was light-dependent. To study local electron transfer processes, we deployed a microscale electrode (microelectrode) with tip size ~20 μm. To enrich a subset of microorganisms capable of interacting with the microelectrode, we anodically polarized the microelectrode at depth in the mat. Subsequently, to characterize the microelectrode-associated community and compare it to the neighboring mat community, we performed amplicon sequencing of the V1–V3 region of the 16S gene. Differences in Bray-Curtis beta diversity, illustrated by large changes in relative abundance at the phylum level, suggested successful enrichment of specific mat community members on the microelectrode surface. The microelectrode-associated community exhibited substantially reduced alpha diversity and elevated relative abundances of Prosthecochloris, Loktanella, Catellibacterium, other unclassified members of Rhodobacteraceae, Thiomicrospira, and Limnobacter, compared with the community at an equivalent depth in the mat. Our results suggest that local electron transfer to an anodically polarized microelectrode selected for a specific microbial population, with substantially more abundance and diversity of sulfur-oxidizing phylotypes compared with the neighboring mat community. PMID:24478768

  20. IRIDIUM (R): A Lockheed transition to commercial space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tadano, Thomas N.

    1995-01-01

    At Lockheed Missiles & Space Company, the IRIDIUM commercial space program is dramatically revolutionizing spacecraft development and manufacturing processes to reduce cost while maintaining quality and reliability. This report includes the following sections: an overview of the IRIDIUM system, the Lockheed IRIDIUM project and challenges; cycle-time reduction through production reorganization; and design for manufacturing and quality.

  1. Iridium satellites light up the sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, N. D.

    1998-08-01

    Motorola's Iridium satellite system is the largest and most ambitious of a set of competing satellite-based mobile phone systems. Motorola's objective is to allow handheld mobiles to be used from anywhere on the planet, with the call being routed directly from handset to handset via one or several of the satellites. After a bad start when the first Delta launch failed, Iridium spacecraft have been launched up to five at a time and the system is due to go operational late this year.

  2. Origin of brittle cleavage in iridium.

    PubMed

    Cawkwell, Marc J; Nguyen-Manh, Duc; Woodward, Christopher; Pettifor, David G; Vitek, Vaclav

    2005-08-12

    Iridium is unique among the face-centered cubic metals in that it undergoes brittle cleavage after a period of plastic deformation under tensile stress. Atomistic simulation using a quantum-mechanically derived bond-order potential shows that in iridium, two core structures for the screw dislocation are possible: a glissile planar core and a metastable nonplanar core. Transformation between the two core structures is athermal and leads to exceptionally high rates of cross slip during plastic deformation. Associated with this athermal cross slip is an exponential increase in the dislocation density and strong work hardening from which brittle cleavage is a natural consequence. PMID:16099981

  3. Annealing Increases Stability Of Iridium Thermocouples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Germain, Edward F.; Daryabeigi, Kamran; Alderfer, David W.; Wright, Robert E.; Ahmed, Shaffiq

    1989-01-01

    Metallurgical studies carried out on samples of iridium versus iridium/40-percent rhodium thermocouples in condition received from manufacturer. Metallurgical studies included x-ray, macroscopic, resistance, and metallographic studies. Revealed large amount of internal stress caused by cold-working during manufacturing, and large number of segregations and inhomogeneities. Samples annealed in furnace at temperatures from 1,000 to 2,000 degree C for intervals up to 1 h to study effects of heat treatment. Wire annealed by this procedure found to be ductile.

  4. Iridium emissions from Hawaiian volcanoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finnegan, D. L.; Zoller, W. H.; Miller, T. M.

    1988-01-01

    Particle and gas samples were collected at Mauna Loa volcano during and after its eruption in March and April, 1984 and at Kilauea volcano in 1983, 1984, and 1985 during various phases of its ongoing activity. In the last two Kilauea sampling missions, samples were collected during eruptive activity. The samples were collected using a filterpack system consisting of a Teflon particle filter followed by a series of 4 base-treated Whatman filters. The samples were analyzed by INAA for over 40 elements. As previously reported in the literature, Ir was first detected on particle filters at the Mauna Loa Observatory and later from non-erupting high temperature vents at Kilauea. Since that time Ir was found in samples collected at Kilauea and Mauna Loa during fountaining activity as well as after eruptive activity. Enrichment factors for Ir in the volcanic fumes range from 10,000 to 100,000 relative to BHVO. Charcoal impregnated filters following a particle filter were collected to see if a significant amount of the Ir was in the gas phase during sample collection. Iridium was found on charcoal filters collected close to the vent, no Ir was found on the charcoal filters. This indicates that all of the Ir is in particulate form very soon after its release. Ratios of Ir to F and Cl were calculated for the samples from Mauna Loa and Kilauea collected during fountaining activity. The implications for the KT Ir anomaly are still unclear though as Ir was not found at volcanoes other than those at Hawaii. Further investigations are needed at other volcanoes to ascertain if basaltic volcanoes other than hot spots have Ir enrichments in their fumes.

  5. Neuronal loss due to prolonged controlled-current stimulation with chronically implanted microelectrodes in the cat cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    McCreery, Douglas; Pikov, Victor; Troyk, Philip R

    2010-06-01

    Activated iridium microelectrodes were implanted for 450-1282 days in the sensorimotor cortex of seven adult domestic cats and then pulsed for 240 h (8 h per day for 30 days) at 50 Hz. Continuous stimulation at 2 nC/phase and with a geometric charge density of 100 microC cm(-2) produced no detectable change in neuronal density in the tissue surrounding the microelectrode tips. However, pulsing with a continuous 100% duty cycle at 4 nC/phase and with a geometric charge density of 200 microC cm(-2) induced loss of cortical neurons over a radius of at least 150 microm from the electrode tips. The same stimulus regimen but with a duty cycle of 50% (1 s of stimulation, and then 1 s without stimulation repeated for 8 h) produced neuronal loss within a smaller radius, approximately 60 microm from the center of the electrode tips. However, there also was significant loss of neurons surrounding the unpulsed electrodes, presumably as a result of mechanical injury due to their insertion into and long-term residence in the tissue, and this was responsible for most of the neuronal loss within 150 microm of the electrodes pulsed with the 50% duty cycle. PMID:20460692

  6. Neuronal loss due to prolonged controlled-current stimulation with chronically implanted microelectrodes in the cat cerebral cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCreery, Douglas; Pikov, Victor; Troyk, Philip R.

    2010-06-01

    Activated iridium microelectrodes were implanted for 450-1282 days in the sensorimotor cortex of seven adult domestic cats and then pulsed for 240 h (8 h per day for 30 days) at 50 Hz. Continuous stimulation at 2 nC/phase and with a geometric charge density of 100 µC cm-2 produced no detectable change in neuronal density in the tissue surrounding the microelectrode tips. However, pulsing with a continuous 100% duty cycle at 4 nC/phase and with a geometric charge density of 200 µC cm-2 induced loss of cortical neurons over a radius of at least 150 µm from the electrode tips. The same stimulus regimen but with a duty cycle of 50% (1 s of stimulation, and then 1 s without stimulation repeated for 8 h) produced neuronal loss within a smaller radius, approximately 60 µm from the center of the electrode tips. However, there also was significant loss of neurons surrounding the unpulsed electrodes, presumably as a result of mechanical injury due to their insertion into and long-term residence in the tissue, and this was responsible for most of the neuronal loss within 150 µm of the electrodes pulsed with the 50% duty cycle.

  7. Novel microelectrode-based online system for monitoring N2O gas emissions during wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Marques, Ricardo; Oehmen, Adrian; Pijuan, Maite

    2014-11-01

    Clark-type nitrous oxide (N2O) microelectrodes are commonly used for measuring dissolved N2O levels, but have not previously been tested for gas-phase applications, where the N2O emitted from wastewater systems can be directly quantified. In this study, N2O microelectrodes were tested and validated for online gas measurements, and assessed with respect to their temperature, gas flow, composition dependence, gas pressure, and humidity. An exponential correlation between temperature and sensor signal was found, whereas gas flow, composition, pressure, and humidity did not have any influence on the signal. Two of the sensors were tested at different N2O concentration ranges (0-422.3, 0-50, 0-10, and 0-2 ppmv N2O) and exhibited a linear response over each range. The N2O emission dynamics from two laboratory scale sequencing batch reactors performing ammonia or nitrite oxidation were also monitored using one of the microsensors and results were compared with two other analytical methods. Results show that N2O emissions were accurately described with these microelectrodes and support their application for assessing gaseous N2O emissions from wastewater treatment systems. Advantages of the sensors as compared to conventional measurement techniques include a wider quantification range of N2O fluxes, and a single measurement system that can assess both liquid and gas-phase N2O dynamics. PMID:25317738

  8. Osmium-191/iridium-191m radionuclide

    DOEpatents

    Knapp, Jr., Furn F.; Butler, Thomas A.; Brihaye, Claude

    1987-01-01

    A generator system to provide iridium-191m for clinical imaging applications comprises an activated carbon adsorbent loaded with a compound containing the parent nuclide, osmium-191. The generator, which has a shelf-life in excess of two weeks and does not require a scavenger column, can be eluted with physiologically compatible saline.

  9. Osmium-191/iridium-191m radionuclide

    DOEpatents

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Butler, T.A.; Brihaye, C.

    1985-08-26

    A generator system to provide iridium-191m for clinical imaging applications comprises an activated carbon adsorbent loaded with a compound containing the parent nuclide, osmium-191. The generator, which has a shelf-life in excess of two weeks and does not require a scavenger column, can be eluted with physiologically compatible saline. 4 figs. 3 tabs.

  10. Iridium-192 Production for Cancer Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Rostelato, M.E.C.M.; Silva, C.P.G.; Rela, P.R.; Zeituni, C.A.; Lepki, V.; Feher, A.

    2004-10-05

    The purpose of this work is to settle a laboratory for Iridium -192 sources production, that is, to determine a wire activation method and to build a hot cell for the wires manipulation, quality control and packaging. The paper relates, mainly, the wire activation method and its quality control. The wire activation is carried out in our nuclear reactor, IEA- R1m.

  11. Iridium-Coated Rhenium Combustion Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Steven J.; Tuffias, Robert H.; Rosenberg, Sanders D.

    1994-01-01

    Iridium-coated rhenium combustion chamber withstands operating temperatures up to 2,200 degrees C. Chamber designed to replace older silicide-coated combustion chamber in small rocket engine. Modified versions of newer chamber could be designed for use on Earth in gas turbines, ramjets, and scramjets.

  12. Calcium-sensitive mini- and microelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Roger C; Bers, Donald M

    2013-04-01

    It is widely agreed that the best method for measuring the ionized free calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]) in large volumes of biological solutions is to use Ca(2+)-sensitive macroelectrodes. These are commercially available. To measure [Ca(2+)] in small volumes of solution, minielectrodes with 1-2-mm tips can easily be made and used, and may also be commercially available. Ca(2+)-sensitive microelectrodes (CaSMs, with 0.5-2-μm tips) can also be made and used extracellularly or intracellularly in robust cells, but interest in their use has recently been largely eclipsed. This is because of practical difficulties and the introduction of a large number of fluorescent and other optical calcium probes with calcium sensitivities varying from the nanomolar to the millimolar range, such as Fura-2, Indo-1, Fluo-4, and many others. In this article, we emphasize the utility of Ca(2+)-selective electrodes and show that their use is complementary to use of fluorescent and other optical methods. Each method has advantages and disadvantages. Because numerous reviews and books have been dedicated to the theoretical aspects of ion-selective electrode principles and technology, this article is mainly intended for investigators who have some degree of electrophysiological experience with ion-selective electrodes or microelectrodes. PMID:23547145

  13. Estimation of neural energy in microelectrode signals.

    PubMed

    Gaumond, R P; Clement, R; Silva, R; Sander, D

    2004-09-01

    We considered the problem of determining the neural contribution to the signal recorded by an intracortical electrode. We developed a linear least-squares approach to determine the energy fraction of a signal attributable to an arbitrary number of autocorrelation-defined signals buried in noise. Application of the method requires estimation of autocorrelation functions R(ap)(tau) characterizing the action potential (AP) waveforms and R(n)(tau) characterizing background noise. This method was applied to the analysis of chronically implanted microelectrode signals from motor cortex of rat. We found that neural (AP) energy consisted of a large-signal component which grows linearly with the number of threshold-detected neural events and a small-signal component unrelated to the count of threshold-detected AP signals. The addition of pseudorandom noise to electrode signals demonstrated the algorithm's effectiveness for a wide range of noise-to-signal energy ratios (0.08 to 39). We suggest, therefore, that the method could be of use in providing a measure of neural response in situations where clearly identified spike waveforms cannot be isolated, or in providing an additional 'background' measure of microelectrode neural activity to supplement the traditional AP spike count. PMID:15876631

  14. Estimation of neural energy in microelectrode signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaumond, R. P.; Clement, R.; Silva, R.; Sander, D.

    2004-09-01

    We considered the problem of determining the neural contribution to the signal recorded by an intracortical electrode. We developed a linear least-squares approach to determine the energy fraction of a signal attributable to an arbitrary number of autocorrelation-defined signals buried in noise. Application of the method requires estimation of autocorrelation functions Rap(tgr) characterizing the action potential (AP) waveforms and Rn(tgr) characterizing background noise. This method was applied to the analysis of chronically implanted microelectrode signals from motor cortex of rat. We found that neural (AP) energy consisted of a large-signal component which grows linearly with the number of threshold-detected neural events and a small-signal component unrelated to the count of threshold-detected AP signals. The addition of pseudorandom noise to electrode signals demonstrated the algorithm's effectiveness for a wide range of noise-to-signal energy ratios (0.08 to 39). We suggest, therefore, that the method could be of use in providing a measure of neural response in situations where clearly identified spike waveforms cannot be isolated, or in providing an additional 'background' measure of microelectrode neural activity to supplement the traditional AP spike count.

  15. One-Pot Catalysis Using a Chiral Iridium Complex/Brønsted Base: Catalytic Asymmetric Synthesis of Catalponol.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takeyuki; Ismiyarto; Ishizaka, Yuka; Zhou, Da-Yang; Asano, Kaori; Sasai, Hiroaki

    2015-11-01

    Tandem asymmetric hydrogen transfer oxidation/aldol condensation under relay catalysis of a chiral iridium complex/achiral Brønsted base binary system is described for the synthesis of α-benzylidene-γ-hydroxytetralones with high ee's. A two-step synthesis of catalponol was achieved using this sequential methodology together with regio- and stereoselective hydroboration. PMID:26496409

  16. Application of the Iridium Satellite System to Aeronautical Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerczewski, Robert J.; Meza, Mike; Gupta, Om

    2008-01-01

    The next generation air transportation system will require greater air-ground communications capacity to accommodate more air traffic with increased safety and efficiency. Communications will remain primarily terrestrially based, but satellite communications will have an increased role. Inmarsat s aeronautical services have been approved and are in use for aeronautical safety communications provided by geostationary satellites. More recently the approval process for the Iridium low earth orbit constellation is nearing completion. The current Iridium system will be able to provide basic air traffic services communications suitable for oceanic, remote and polar regions. The planned second generation of the Iridium system, called Iridium NEXT, will provide enhanced capabilities and enable a greater role in the future of aeronautical communications. This paper will review the potential role of satellite communications in the future of air transportation, the Iridium approval process and relevant system testing, and the potential role of Iridium NEXT.

  17. Apparatus and method of inserting a microelectrode in body tissue or the like using vibration means

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldstein, C.; Crawford, D. W.; Kanabus, E. W. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    An arrangement for and method of inserting a glass microelectrode having a tip in the micron range into body tissue is presented. The arrangement includes a microelectrode. The top of the microelectrode is attached to the diaphragm center of a first speaker. The microelectrode tip is brought into contact with the tissue by controlling a micromanipulator. Thereafter, an audio signal is applied to the speaker to cause the microelectrode to vibrate and thereby pierce the tissue surface without breaking the microelectrode tip. Thereafter, the tip is inserted into the tissue to the desired depth by operating the micromanipulator with the microelectrode in a vibratory or non-vibratory state.

  18. Boron-doped diamond nano/microelectrodes for bio-sensing and in vitro measurements

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Hua; Wang, Shihua; Galligan, James J.; Swain, Greg M.

    2015-01-01

    Since the fabrication of the first diamond electrode in the mid 1980s, repid progress has been made on the development and application of this new type of electrode material. Boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrodes exhibit outstanding properties compared to oxygen-containing sp2 carbon electrodes. These properties make BDD electrodes an ideal choice for use in complex samples. In recent years, BDD microelectrodes have been applied to in vitro and in vivo measurements of biological molecules in animals, tissues and cells. This review will summarize recent progress in the development and applications of BDD electrodes in bio-sensing and in vitro measurements of biomolecules. In the first section, the methods for BDD nanocrystalline diamond film deposition and BDD microelectrodes preparation are described. This is followed by a description and discussion of several approaches for characterization of the BDD electrode surface structure, morphology, and electrochemical activity. Further, application of BDD microelectrodes for use in the in vitro analysis of norepinephrine (NE), serotonin (5-HT), nitric oxide (NO), histamine, and adenosine from tissues are summarized and finally some of the remaining challenges are discussed. PMID:21196394

  19. Boron-doped diamond nano/microelectrodes for biosensing and in vitro measurements.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hua; Wang, Shihua; Galligan, James J; Swain, Greg M

    2011-01-01

    Since the fabrication of the first diamond electrode in the mid 1980s, repid progress has been made on the development and application of this new type of electrode material. Boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrodes exhibit outstanding properties compared to oxygen-containing sp2 carbon electrodes. These properties make BDD electrodes an ideal choice for use in complex samples. In recent years, BDD microelectrodes have been applied to in vitro measurements of biological molecules in tissues and cells. This review will summarize recent progress in the development and applications of BDD electrodes in bio-sensing and in vitro measurements of biomolecules. In the first section, the methods for BDD diamond film deposition and BDD microelectrodes preparation are described. This is followed by a description and discussion of several approaches for characterization of the BDD electrode surface structure, morphology, and electrochemical activity. Further, application of BDD microelectrodes for use in the in vitro analysis of norepinephrine (NE), serotonin (5-HT), nitric oxide (NO), histamine, and adenosine from tissues are summarized and finally some of the remaining challenges are discussed. PMID:21196394

  20. Evaluation of the stability of intracortical microelectrode arrays.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xindong; McCreery, Douglas B; Bullara, Leo A; Agnew, William F

    2006-03-01

    In order to use recorded neural activities from the brain as control signals for neuroprosthesis devices, it is important to maintain a stable interface between chronically implanted microelectrodes and neural tissue. Our previous paper introduced a method to quantify the stability of the recording microelectrodes. In this paper, the method is refined 1) by incorporating stereotypical behavioral patterns into the spike sorting program and 2) by using a classifier based on Bayes theorem for assigning the recorded action potentials to the underlying neural generators. An improved method for calculating stability index is proposed. The results for the stability of microelectrode arrays that differ in structure are presented. PMID:16562636

  1. Vesicular exocytosis and microdevices - microelectrode arrays.

    PubMed

    Amatore, Christian; Delacotte, Jérôme; Guille-Collignon, Manon; Lemaître, Frédéric

    2015-06-01

    Among all the analytical techniques capable of monitoring exocytosis in real time at the single cell level, electrochemistry (particularly amperometry at a constant potential) using ultramicroelectrodes has been demonstrated to be an important and convenient tool for more than two decades. Indeed, because the electrochemical sensor is located in the close vicinity of the emitting cell ("artificial synapse" configuration), much data can be gathered from the whole cell activity (secretion frequency) to the individual vesicular release (duration, fluxes or amount of molecules released) with an excellent sensitivity. However, such a single cell analysis and its intrinsic benefits are at the expense of the spatial resolution and/or the number of experiments. The quite recent development of microdevices/microsystems (and mainly the microelectrode arrays (MEAs)) offers in some way a complementary approach either by combining spectroscopy-microscopy or by implementing a multianalysis. Such developments are described and discussed in the present review over the 2005-2014 period. PMID:25803190

  2. Handling System for Iridium-192 Seeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, W.; Wodicka, D.

    1973-01-01

    A complete system is proposed for safe handling of iridium-192 seeds used to internally irradiate malignant growths. A vibratory hopper feeds the seeds onto a transport system for deposit in a magazine or storage area. A circular magazine consisting of segmented plastic tubing with holes in the walls to accommodate the seeds seems feasible. The magazine is indexed to stop and release a seed for calibration and deposition.

  3. Advances in iridium alloy processing in 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Heestand, R.L.; Ohriner, E.K.; Roche, T.K.

    1988-08-01

    A new process for the production of DOP-26 iridium alloy blanks is being evaluated and optimized. The alloy is prepared by electron-beam (EB) melting of Ir-0.3% W powder compacts followed by doping with aluminum and thorium by arc melting. Drop-cast alloy rod segments are EB welded to produce an electrode that is consumable arc melted to produce an ingot for extrusion and subsequent rolling. Initial results showed rejections for ultrasonic indications of alloy blanks produced by this process to be very low. Subsequently, some ingots have exhibited delaminations in the sheet, leading to rejection rates similar to that obtained in the standard process. The increase in delaminations is related to near-surface porosity in the consumable arc-melted ingot. A number of modifications to the arc-melting process and plans for further experimental work are described. In addition, the tensile properties of the DOP-26 iridium alloys have been measured over a range of test temperatures and strain rates. A laboratory evaluation of alternative cleaning procedures indicates that electrolytic dissolution of DOP-26 iridium alloy in an HCl solution is a potential substitute to the KCN process now in use. 7 refs., 13 figs., 6 tabs.

  4. Sonochemically Fabricated Microelectrode Arrays for Use as Sensing Platforms

    PubMed Central

    Collyer, Stuart D.; Davis, Frank; Higson, Séamus P.J.

    2010-01-01

    The development, manufacture, modification and subsequent utilisation of sonochemically-formed microelectrode arrays is described for a range of applications. Initial fabrication of the sensing platform utilises ultrasonic ablation of electrochemically insulating polymers deposited upon conductive carbon substrates, forming an array of up to 70,000 microelectrode pores cm−2. Electrochemical and optical analyses using these arrays, their enhanced signal response and stir-independence area are all discussed. The growth of conducting polymeric “mushroom” protrusion arrays with entrapped biological entities, thereby forming biosensors is detailed. The simplicity and inexpensiveness of this approach, lending itself ideally to mass fabrication coupled with unrivalled sensitivity and stir independence makes commercial viability of this process a reality. Application of microelectrode arrays as functional components within sensors include devices for detection of chlorine, glucose, ethanol and pesticides. Immunosensors based on microelectrode arrays are described within this monograph for antigens associated with prostate cancer and transient ischemic attacks (strokes). PMID:22399926

  5. C-H activation and C=C double bond formation reactions in iridium ortho-methyl arylphosphane complexes.

    PubMed

    Baratta, Walter; Ballico, Maurizio; Del Zotto, Alessandro; Zangrando, Ennio; Rigo, Pierluigi

    2007-01-01

    The Vaska-type iridium(I) complex [IrCl(CO){PPh(2)(2-MeC(6)H(4))}(2)] (1), characterized by an X-ray diffraction study, was obtained from iridium(III) chloride hydrate and PPh(2)(2,6-MeRC(6)H(3)) with R=H in DMF, whereas for R=Me, activation of two ortho-methyl groups resulted in the biscyclometalated iridium(III) compound [IrCl(CO){PPh(2)(2,6-CH(2)MeC(6)H(3))}(2)] (2). Conversely, for R=Me the iridium(I) compound [IrCl(CO){PPh(2)(2,6-Me(2)C(6)H(3))}(2)] (3) can be obtained by treatment of [IrCl(COE)(2)](2) (COE=cyclooctene) with carbon monoxide and the phosphane in acetonitrile. Compound 3 in CH(2)Cl(2) undergoes intramolecular C-H oxidative addition, affording the cyclometalated hydride iridium(III) species [IrHCl(CO){PPh(2)(2,6-CH(2)MeC(6)H(3))}{PPh(2)(2,6-Me(2)C(6)H(3))}] (4). Treatment of 2 with Na[BAr(f) (4)] (Ar(f)=3,5-C(6)H(3)(CF(3))(2)) gives the fluxional cationic 16-electron complex [Ir(CO){PPh(2)(2,6-CH(2)MeC(6)H(3))}(2)][BAr(f) (4)] (5), which reversibly reacts with dihydrogen to afford the delta-agostic complex [IrH(CO){PPh(2)(2,6-CH(2)MeC(6)H(3))}{PPh(2)(2,6-Me(2)C(6)H(3))}][BAr(f)(4)] (6), through cleavage of an Ir-C bond. This species can also be formed by treatment of 4 with Na[BAr(f)(4)] or of 2 with Na[BAr(f)(4)] through C-H oxidative addition of one ortho-methyl group, via a transient 14-electron iridium(I) complex. Heating of the coordinatively unsaturated biscyclometalated species 5 in toluene gives the trans-dihydride iridium(III) complex [IrH(2)(CO){PPh(2)(2,6-MeC(6)H(3)CH=CHC(6)H(3)Me-2,6)PPh(2)}][BAr(f) (4)] (7), containing a trans-stilbene-type terdentate ligand, as result of a dehydrogenative carbon-carbon double bond coupling reaction, possibly through an iridium carbene species. PMID:17535000

  6. Surface studies of iridium-alloy grain boundaries associated with weld cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Mosley, W.C.

    1982-01-01

    Plutonium-238 oxide fuel pellets for the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) Radioisotopic Thermoelectric Generators to be used on the NASA Galileo Mission to Jupiter and the International Solar Polar Mission are produced and encapsulated in iridium alloy at the Savannah River Plant (SRP). Underbead cracks occasionally occur in the girth weld on the iridium-alloy-clad vent sets in the region where the gas tungsten arc is quenched. Grain-boundary structures and compositions were characterized by scanning electron microscopy/x-ray energy spectroscopy, electron microprobe analysis and scanning Auger microprobe analysis to determine the cause of weld quench area cracking. Results suggest that weld quench area cracking may be caused by gas porosity or liquation in the grain boundaries.

  7. Variation of iridium in a differentiated tholeiitic dolerite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greenland, L.P.

    1971-01-01

    Iridium has been determined in a drill core from the Great Lake (Tasmania) dolerite sheet. Iridium decreases systematically from the mafic dolerites (0.25 ppb) to the granophyres (0.006 ppb). The trend with differentiation closely parallels that of chromium. ?? 1971.

  8. Enzymatic Determination of Diglyceride Using an Iridium Nano-Particle Based Single Use, Disposable Biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Shu-Yi; Bartling, Brandon; Wang, Christina; Shieu, Fuh-Sheng; Liu, Chung-Chiun

    2010-01-01

    A single use, disposable iridium-nano particle contained biosensor had been developed for the determination of diglyceride (DG). In this study hydrogen peroxide, formed through the enzymatic breakdown of DG via lipase, glycerol kinase and glycerol 3-phosphate oxidase, was electrochemically oxidized at an applied potential of +0.5 V versus the Ag/AgCl reference electrode. The oxidation current was then used to quantify the diglyceride concentration. Optimum enzyme concentrations and the surfactant loading used were established for successful sensor response. Good linear performance was observed over a DG concentration range of 0 to 25 μM in phosphate buffer and bovine serum media. PMID:22219685

  9. Iridium enrichment in airborne particles from kilauea volcano: january 1983.

    PubMed

    Zoller, W H; Parrington, J R; Kotra, J M

    1983-12-01

    Airborne particulate matter from the January 1983 eruption of Kilauea volcano was inadvertently collected on air filters at Mauna Loa Observatory at a sampling station used to observe particles in global circulation. Analyses of affected samples revealed unusually large concentrations of selenium, arsenic, indium, gold, and sulfur, as expected for volcanic emissions. Strikingly large concentrations of iridium were also observed, the ratio of iridium to aluminum being 17,000 times its value in Hawaiian basalt. Since iridium enrichments have not previously been observed in volcanic emissions, the results for Kilauea suggest that it is part of an unusual volcanic system which may be fed by magma from the mantle. The iridium enrichment appears to be linked with the high fluorine content of the volcanic gases, which suggests that the iridium is released as a volatile IrF(6). PMID:17747384

  10. Graphene microelectrode arrays for neural activity detection.

    PubMed

    Du, Xiaowei; Wu, Lei; Cheng, Ji; Huang, Shanluo; Cai, Qi; Jin, Qinghui; Zhao, Jianlong

    2015-09-01

    We demonstrate a method to fabricate graphene microelectrode arrays (MEAs) using a simple and inexpensive method to solve the problem of opaque electrode positions in traditional MEAs, while keeping good biocompatibility. To study the interface differences between graphene-electrolyte and gold-electrolyte, graphene and gold electrodes with a large area were fabricated. According to the simulation results of electrochemical impedances, the gold-electrolyte interface can be described as a classical double-layer structure, while the graphene-electrolyte interface can be explained by a modified double-layer theory. Furthermore, using graphene MEAs, we detected the neural activities of neurons dissociated from Wistar rats (embryonic day 18). The signal-to-noise ratio of the detected signal was 10.31 ± 1.2, which is comparable to those of MEAs made with other materials. The long-term stability of the MEAs is demonstrated by comparing differences in Bode diagrams taken before and after cell culturing. PMID:25712492

  11. Electric potential microelectrode for studies of electrobiogeophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damgaard, Lars Riis; Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2014-09-01

    Spatially separated electron donors and acceptors in sediment can be exploited by the so-called "cable bacteria." Electric potential microelectrodes (EPMs) were constructed to measure the electric fields that should appear when cable bacteria conduct electrons over centimeter distances. The EPMs were needle-shaped, shielded Ag/AgCl half-cells that were rendered insensitive to redox-active species in the environment. Tip diameters of 40 to 100 µm and signal resolution of approximately 10 μV were achieved. A test in marine sediments with active cable bacteria showed an electric potential increase by approximately 2 mV from the sediment-water interface to a depth of approximately 20 mm, in accordance with the location and direction of the electric currents estimated from oxygen, pH, and H2S microprofiles. The EPM also captured emergence and decay of electric diffusion potentials in the upper millimeters of artificial sediment in response to changes in ion concentrations in the overlying water. The results suggest that the EPM can be used to track electric current sources and sinks with submillimeter resolution in microbial, biogeochemical, and geophysical studies.

  12. Synthesis and Electroluminescent Property of New Orange Iridium Compounds for Flexible White Organic Light Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ho Won; Jeong, Hyunjin; Kim, Young Kwan; Ha, Yunkyoung

    2015-10-01

    Recently, white organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) have aroused considerable attention because they have the potential of next-generation flexible displays and white illuminated applications. White OLED applications are particularly heading to the industry but they have still many problems both materials and manufacturing. Therefore, we proposed that the new iridium compounds of orange emitters could be demonstrated and also applied to flexible white OLEDs for verification of potential. First, we demonstrated the chemical properties of new orange iridium compounds. Secondly, conventional two kinds of white phosphorescent OLEDs were fabricated by following devices; indium-tin oxide coated glass substrate/4,4'-bis[N-(napthyl)-N-phenylamino]biphenyl/N,N'-dicarbazolyl-3,5-benzene doped with blue and new iridium compounds for orange emitting 8 wt%/1,3,5-tris[N-phenylbenzimidazole-2-yl]benzene/lithium quinolate/aluminum. In addition, we fabricated white OLEDs using these emitters to verify the potential on flexible substrate. Therefore, this work could be proposed that white light applications can be applied and could be extended to additional research on flexible applications. PMID:26726407

  13. Iridium Interfacial Stack - IrIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spry, David

    2012-01-01

    Iridium Interfacial Stack (IrIS) is the sputter deposition of high-purity tantalum silicide (TaSi2-400 nm)/platinum (Pt-200 nm)/iridium (Ir-200 nm)/platinum (Pt-200 nm) in an ultra-high vacuum system followed by a 600 C anneal in nitrogen for 30 minutes. IrIS simultaneously acts as both a bond metal and a diffusion barrier. This bondable metallization that also acts as a diffusion barrier can prevent oxygen from air and gold from the wire-bond from infiltrating silicon carbide (SiC) monolithically integrated circuits (ICs) operating above 500 C in air for over 1,000 hours. This TaSi2/Pt/Ir/Pt metallization is easily bonded for electrical connection to off-chip circuitry and does not require extra anneals or masking steps. There are two ways that IrIS can be used in SiC ICs for applications above 500 C: it can be put directly on a SiC ohmic contact metal, such as Ti, or be used as a bond metal residing on top of an interconnect metal. For simplicity, only the use as a bond metal is discussed. The layer thickness ratio of TaSi2 to the first Pt layer deposited thereon should be 2:1. This will allow Si from the TaSi2 to react with the Pt to form Pt2Si during the 600 C anneal carried out after all layers have been deposited. The Ir layer does not readily form a silicide at 600 C, and thereby prevents the Si from migrating into the top-most Pt layer during future anneals and high-temperature IC operation. The second (i.e., top-most) deposited Pt layer needs to be about 200 nm to enable easy wire bonding. The thickness of 200 nm for Ir was chosen for initial experiments; further optimization of the Ir layer thickness may be possible via further experimentation. Ir itself is not easily wire-bonded because of its hardness and much higher melting point than Pt. Below the iridium layer, the TaSi2 and Pt react and form desired Pt2Si during the post-deposition anneal while above the iridium layer remains pure Pt as desired to facilitate easy and strong wire-bonding to the Si

  14. Iridium Film For Charge-Coupled Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hecht, Michael H.

    1990-01-01

    Usability extended to different environments. Application of thin film of iridium to back surface of back-surface-illuminated charge-coupled device expected to increase and stabilize quantum efficiency at wavelengths less than 4,500 Angstrom. Enhances quantum efficiency according to principle discussed in "Metal Film Increases CCD Output" (NPO-16815). Does not react with hydrogen, so device need not be kept in oxygen: Advantage where high absorption of ultraviolet light by oxygen undesirable; for example, when device used to make astronomical observations from high altitudes.

  15. Diminiode thermionic conversion with 111-iridium electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koeger, E. W.; Bair, V. L.; Morris, J. F.

    1976-01-01

    Preliminary data indicating thermionic-conversion potentialities for a 111-iridium emitter and collector spaced 0.2 mm apart are presented. These results comprise output densities of current and of power as functions of voltage for three sets of emitter, collector, and reservoir temperatures: 1553, 944, 561 K; 1605, 898, 533 K; and 1656, 1028, 586 K. For the 1605 K evaluation, estimates produced work-function values of 2.22 eV for the emitter and 1.63 eV for the collector with a 2.0-eV barrier index (collector work function plus interelectrode voltage drop) corresponding to the maximum output of 5.5 W/sq cm at 0.24 volt. The current, voltage curve for the 1656 K 111-iridium diminiode yields a 6.2 W/sq cm maximum at 0.25 volt and is comparable with the 1700 K envelope for a diode with an etched-rhenium emitter and a 0.025-mm electrode gap made by TECO and evaluated by NASA.

  16. Double Potential Pulse Chronocoulometry for Detection of Plasma Membrane Cholesterol Efflux at Disk Platinum Microelectrodes

    PubMed Central

    West, Richard H.; Lu, Hui; Shaw, Kendrick; Chiel, Hillel J.; Kelley, Thomas J.; Burgess, James D.

    2016-01-01

    A double potential pulse scheme is reported for observation of cholesterol efflux from the plasma membrane of a single neuron cell. Capillary Pt disk microelectrodes having a thin glass insulator allow the 10 μm diameter electrode and cell to be viewed under optical magnification. The electrode, covalently functionalized with cholesterol oxidase, is positioned in contact with the cell surface resulting in enzyme catalyzed cholesterol oxidation and efflux of cholesterol from the plasma membrane at the electrode contact site. Enzymatically generated hydrogen peroxide accumulates at the electrode/cell interface during a 5 s hold-time and is oxidized during application of a potential pulse. A second, replicate potential pulse is applied 0.5 s after the first potential pulse to gauge background charge prior to significant accumulation of hydrogen peroxide. The difference in charge passed between the first and second potential pulse provides a measure of hydrogen peroxide generated by the enzyme and is an indication of the cholesterol efflux. Control experiments for bare Pt microelectrodes in contact with the cell plasma membrane show difference charge signals in the range of about 7–10 pC. Enzyme-modified electrodes in contact with the plasma membrane show signals in the range of 16–26 pC. PMID:27330196

  17. Monochloramine Microelectrode for In-Situ Application Within Chloraminated Distribution System Biofilm

    EPA Science Inventory

    A monochloramine microelectrode with a tip size between 5 and 15 μm and using platinum wire was successfully designed, fabricated and characterized for in-situ monochloramine measurement within chloraminated distribution system biofilm. The monochloramine microelectrode showed s...

  18. Characterization and Application of a Chlorine Microelectrode for Measuring Monochloramine within a Biofilm

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chlorine microelectrodes with tip sizes of 5-15 μm were developed and used to measure biofilm monochloramine penetration profiles. The chlorine microelectrode showed response to total chlorine, including free chlorine, monochloramine, and dichloramine under various conditions. ...

  19. Modeling and Simulation of Microelectrode-Retina Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Beckerman, M

    2002-11-30

    The goal of the retinal prosthesis project is the development of an implantable microelectrode array that can be used to supply visually-driven electrical input to cells in the retina, bypassing nonfunctional rod and cone cells, thereby restoring vision to blind individuals. This goal will be achieved through the study of the fundamentals of electrical engineering, vision research, and biomedical engineering with the aim of acquiring the knowledge needed to engineer a high-density microelectrode-tissue hybrid sensor that will restore vision to millions of blind persons. The modeling and simulation task within this project is intended to address the question how best to stimulate, and communicate with, cells in the retina using implanted microelectrodes.

  20. Superconductivity in Ca10(Ir4As8)(Fe2As2)5 with Square-Planar Coordination of Iridium

    PubMed Central

    Kudo, Kazutaka; Mitsuoka, Daisuke; Takasuga, Masaya; Sugiyama, Yuki; Sugawara, Kento; Katayama, Naoyuki; Sawa, Hiroshi; Kubo, Hiroaki S.; Takamori, Kenta; Ichioka, Masanori; Fujii, Tatsuo; Mizokawa, Takashi; Nohara, Minoru

    2013-01-01

    We report the unprecedented square-planar coordination of iridium in the iron iridium arsenide Ca10(Ir4As8)(Fe2As2)5. This material experiences superconductivity at 16 K. X-ray photoemission spectroscopy and first-principles band calculation suggest Ir(II) oxidation state, which yields electrically conductive Ir4As8 layers. Such metallic spacer layers are thought to enhance the interlayer coupling of Fe2As2, in which superconductivity emerges, thus offering a way to control the superconducting transition temperature. PMID:24173038

  1. Rhodium- and iridium-catalyzed dehydrogenative cyclization through double C-H bond cleavages to produce fluorene derivatives.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Masaki; Hirano, Koji; Satoh, Tetsuya; Shibata, Yu; Tanaka, Ken; Miura, Masahiro

    2013-02-15

    The rhodium-catalyzed cyclization of a series of 2,2-diarylalkanoic acids in the presence of copper acetate as an oxidant smoothly proceeded through double C-H bond cleavages and subsequent decarboxylation to produce the corresponding fluorene derivatives. The direct cyclization of triarylmethanols also took place efficiently by using an iridium catalyst in place of the rhodium, while the hydroxy function was still intact. PMID:23360206

  2. Mechanism of iridium-catalysed branched-selective hydroarylation of vinyl ethers: a computational study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mei; Huang, Genping

    2016-02-16

    The iridium-catalysed branched-selective hydroarylation of vinyl ethers represents a rare example of the branched-selective hydroarylation involving the non-styrene-type alkenes. Herein, we report our DFT calculations on the mechanism of this reaction. The results show that after C-H oxidative addition, instead of the widely accepted Chalk-Harrod type mechanism, the branched-selective hydroarylation may proceed through an unconventional modified Chalk-Harrod type mechanism, involving the migratory insertion into the Ir-C bond and C-H reductive elimination. Both steric and electronic effects of the alkoxy group were found to account for the complete branched selectivity. PMID:26804666

  3. Iridium anomaly approximately synchronous with terminal eocene extinctions

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, W.; Asaro, F.; Michel, H.V.; Alvarez, L.W.

    1982-05-21

    An iridium anomaly has been found in coincidence with the known microtektite level in cores from Deep Sea Drilling Project site 149 in the Caribbean Sea. The iridium was probably not in the microtektites but deposited simultaneously with them; this could occur if the iridium was deposited from a dust cloud resulting from a bolide impact, as suggested for the anomaly associated with the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary. Other workers have deduced that the microtektites are part of the North American strewn tektite field, which is dated at about 34 million years before present, and that the microtektite horizon in deep-sea cores is synchronous with the extinction of five radiolarian species. Mass extinctions also occur in terrestrial mammals within 4 million years of this time. The iridium anomaly and the tektites and microtektites are supportive of a major bolide impact about 34 million years ago.

  4. Iridium anomaly approximately synchronous with terminal eocene extinctions.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, W; Asaro, F; Michel, H V; Alvarez, L W

    1982-05-21

    An iridium anomaly has been found in coincidence with the known microtektite level in cores from Deep Sea Drilling Project site 149 in the Caribbean Sea. The iridium was probably not in the microtektites but deposited simultaneously with them; this could occur if the iridium was deposited from a dust cloud resulting from a bolide impact, as suggested for the anomaly associated with the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary. Other workers have deduced that the microtektites are part of the North American strewn tektite field, which is dated at about 34 million years before present, and that the microtektite horizon in deep-sea cores is synchronous with the extinction of five radiolarian species. Mass extinctions also occur in terrestrial mammals within 4 million years of this time. The iridium anomaly and the tektites and microtektites are supportive of a major bolide impact about 34 million years ago. PMID:17819180

  5. Acute radiodermatitis from occupational exposure to iridium 192

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, J.; Rosen, T. )

    1989-12-01

    Industrial radiography using the man-made radioisotope iridium 192 is commonplace in the southern states. Despite established procedures and safeguards, accidental exposure may result in typical acute radiodermatitis. We have presented a clinical example of this phenomenon.9 references.

  6. GPS/GNSS Interference from Iridium Data Transmitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berglund, H. T.; Blume, F.; Estey, L.; White, S.

    2011-12-01

    The Iridium satellite communication system broadcasts in the 1610 to 1626.5 MHz band. The L1 frequencies broadcast by GPS, Galileo and GLONASS satellites are 1575.42 MHz, 1575.42 MHz and 1602 MHz + n × 0.5625 MHz, respectively (each GLONASS satellite uses a unique frequency). The proximity of the Iridium frequency band with the L1 frequencies of the GPS, Galileo and GLONASS systems leaves GNSS receivers susceptible to interference from Iridium data transmissions. Interference from Iridium transmissions can cause cycle slips and loss of lock on the carrier and code phases, thereby degrading the quality of GNSS observations and position estimates. In 2008, UNAVCO staff members observed that the percent of slips vs. the number of observations increased as the distance between a GPS choke ring antenna (TRM29659.00) and an Iridium antenna decreased. From those observations they suggested that Iridium antennas and GPS antennas should be separated by >30 m to minimize cycle slips caused by the interference from Iridium data transmissions. A second test conducted in 2009 using a newer Trimble GNSS choke ring antenna (TRM59800.00) showed similar results to the previous test despite the wider frequency range of the newer antenna. More recent testing conducted to investigate the response of new receiver models to iridium transmissions has shown that many GNSS enabled models, when combined with GNSS enabled antennas, have increased sensitivity to interference when compared to older GPS-only models. The broader frequency spectrum of the Low Noise Amplifiers (LNA) installed in many newer GNSS antennas can increase the impact of near-band RF interference on tracking performance. Our testing has shown that the quality of data collected at sites collocated with iridium communications is highly degraded for antenna separations exceeding 100m. Using older GPS antenna models (e.g. TRM29659.00) with newer GNSS enabled receivers can reduce this effect. To mitigate the effects that

  7. Highly Sensitive and Long Term Stable Electrochemical Microelectrodes for Implantable Glucose Monitoring Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, Liangliang

    A miniature wireless implantable electrochemical glucose system for continuous glucose monitoring with good selectivity, sensitivity, linearity and long term stability was developed. First, highly sensitive, long-term stable and reusable planar H2O2 microelectrodes have been fabricated by microlithography. These electrodes composed of a 300 nm Pt black layer situated on a 5 um thick Au layer, provide effective protection to the underlying chromium adhesion layer. Using repeated cyclic voltammetric sweeps in flowing buffer solution, highly sensitive Pt black working electrodes were realized with five-decade linear dynamic range and low detection limit (10 nM) for H2O2 at low oxidation potentials. Second, a highly sensitive, low cost and flexible microwire biosensor was described using 25-mum thick gold wire as working electrode together with 125-mum thick Pt/Ir and Ag wires as counter and reference electrode, embedded within a PDMS-filled polyethylene tube. Surface area and activity of sensor was enhanced by converting gold electrode to nanoporous configuration followed by electrodeposition of platinum black. Glucose oxidase based biosensors by electrodeposition of poly(o-phenylenediamine) and glucose oxidase on the working electrode, displayed a higher glucose sensitivity (1.2 mA mM-1 cm-2) than highest literature reported. In addition it exhibits wide detection range (up to 20 mM) and selectivity (>95%). Third, novel miniaturized and flexible microelectrode arrays with 8 of 25 mum electrodes displayed the much needed 3D diffusion profiles similar to a single 25 mum microelectrode, but with one order increase in current levels. These microelectrode arrays displayed a H2O2 sensitivity of 13 mA mM-1 cm-2, a wide dynamic range of 100 nM to 10 mM, limit of detection of 10 nM. These microwire based edge plane microsensors incorporated flexibility, miniaturization and low operation potential are an promising approach for continuous in vivo metabolic monitoring. Fourth

  8. The fourth spectrum of iridium (Ir IV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azarov, Vladimir I.; Gayasov, Robert R.

    2016-03-01

    The spectrum of three times ionized iridium, Ir IV, was investigated in the 650-2045 Å wavelength region. The analysis has led to the determination of the 5d6, 5d5 6 s and 5d5 6 p configurations. Twenty-nine of 34 theoretically possible 5d6 levels, 44 of 74 possible 5d5 6 s levels and 150 of 214 possible 5d5 6 p levels have been established. The levels are based on 1348 classified spectral lines. The level structure and transition probabilities were calculated using the orthogonal operators technique. The energy parameters have been determined by the least squares fit to the observed levels. Calculated energy values and LS-compositions obtained from the fitted parameter values are given. The level optimization procedure and the determination of uncertainties of the obtained energy level values are discussed.

  9. Iridium Complexes as a Roadblock for DNA Polymerase during Amplification.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Falguni; Kumar, Prashant; Tripathi, Suman Kumar; Patra, Srikanta; Koner, Apurba L

    2016-07-01

    Iridium-based metal complexes containing polypyridyl-pyrazine ligands show properties of DNA intercalation. They serve as roadblocks to DNA polymerase activity, thereby inhibiting the polymerization process. Upon the addition of increasing concentrations of these iridium complexes, a rapid polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based assay reveals the selective inhibition of the DNA polymerization process. This label-free approach to study the inhibition of fundamental cellular processes via physical roadblock can offer an alternative route toward cancer therapy. PMID:27240728

  10. Synthesis and characterization of nitrides of iridium and palladiums

    SciTech Connect

    Crowhurst, Jonathan C.; Goncharov, Alexander F.; Sadigh, B.; Zaug, J.M.; Aberg, D.; Meng, Yue; Prakapenka, Vitali B.

    2008-08-14

    We describe the synthesis of nitrides of iridium and palladium using the laser-heated diamond anvil cell. We have used the in situ techniques of x-ray powder diffraction and Raman scattering to characterize these compounds and have compared our experimental findings where possible to the results of first-principles theoretical calculations. We suggest that palladium nitride is isostructural with pyrite, while iridium nitride has a monoclinic symmetry and is isostructural with baddeleyite.

  11. Iridium{reg_sign} worldwide personal communication system

    SciTech Connect

    Helm, J.

    1997-01-01

    The IRIDIUM system is a personal worldwide communication system designed to support portable, low power subscriber units through the use of a constellation of satellites in low earth polar orbit. The satellites are networked together to form a system which provides continuous line-of-sight communications between the IRIDIUM system and any point within 30 km of the earth{close_quote}s surface. The system architecture and operation are described. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. PURIFICATION OF IRIDIUM BY ELECTRON BEAM MELTING

    SciTech Connect

    Ohriner, Evan Keith

    2008-01-01

    The purification of iridium metal by electron beam melting has been characterized for 48 impurity elements. Chemical analysis was performed by glow discharge mass spectrographic (GDMS) analysis for all elements except carbon, which was analyzed by combustion. The average levels of individual elemental impurities in the starting powder varied from 37 g/g to 0.02 g/g. The impurity elements Li, Na, Mg, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Pd, Ag, Cd, Sn, Sb, Te, Ba, Ce, Tl, Pb, and Bi were not detectable following the purification. No significant change in concentration of the elements Ti, V, Zr, Nb, Mo, and Re was found. The elements B, C, Al, Si, Cr, Fe, Ru, Rh, and Pt were partially removed by vaporization during electron beam melting. Langmuir's equation for ideal vaporization into a vacuum was used to calculate for each impurity element the expected ratio of impurity content after melting to that before melting. Equilibrium vapor pressures were calculated using Henry's law, with activity coefficients obtained from published data for the elements Fe, Ti, and Pt. Activity coefficients were estimated from enthalpy data for Al, Si, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Zr, Nb, Mo, and Hf and an ideal solution model was used for the remaining elements. The melt temperature was determined from measured iridium weight loss. Excellent agreement was found between measured and calculated impurity ratios for all impurity elements. The results are consistent with some localized heating of the melt pool due to rastering of the electron beam, with an average vaporization temperature of 3100 K as compared to a temperature of 2965 K calculated for uniform heating of the melt pool. The results are also consistent with ideal mixing in the melt pool.

  13. Dielectrophoresis with 3D microelectrodes fabricated by surface tension assisted lithography.

    PubMed

    Nasabi, Mahyar; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar; Tovar-Lopez, Francisco J; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kourosh; Mitchell, Arnan

    2013-12-01

    This paper demonstrates the utilization of 3D semispherical shaped microelectrodes for dielectrophoretic manipulation of yeast cells. The semispherical microelectrodes are capable of producing strong electric field gradients, and in turn dielectrophoretic forces across a large area of channel cross-section. The semispherical shape of microelectrodes avoids the formation of undesired sharp electric fields along the structure and also minimizes the disturbance of the streamlines of nearby passing fluid. The advantage of semispherical microelectrodes over the planar microelectrodes is demonstrated in a series of numerical simulations and proof-of-concept experiments aimed toward immobilization of viable yeast cells. PMID:24347270

  14. Fabrication of PMMA nanofluidic electrochemical chips with integrated microelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Junshan; Wang, Liang; Ouyang, Wei; Wang, Wei; Qin, Jun; Xu, Zheng; Xu, Shenbo; Ge, Dan; Wang, Longchang; Liu, Chong; Wang, Liding

    2015-10-15

    A novel method based on plasma etching was proposed for monolithically integrating planar nanochannels and microelectrodes on a poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) plate, and complete PMMA nanofluidic electrochemical chips with integrated microelectrodes were constructed by bonding with another PMMA plate containing microchannels. The fabrication sequences of nanochannels and microelectrodes were optimized. The oxygen plasma etching rate of PMMA nanochannels was studied, and the average rate was 15 nm/min under optimal conditions. An UV-ozone assisted thermal bonding method was developed to realize a low-temperature chip bonding, and the variations in width and depth of nanochannels before and after bonding were 2% and 5%, respectively. As a demonstration, a nanoparticle crystal (NPC)-based nanofluidic biosensor with integrated Ag microelectrodes was designed and fabricated. Sub-microchannel arrays with a depth of 400 nm and a width of 30 μm on the biosensor functioned as filters, and trapped 540 nm silica nanoparticles modified with streptavidin inside the connected microchannel to assemble the NPC. The interspaces in the NPC formed a three-dimensional nanochannel network with an equivalent diameter of 81 nm. By measuring the conductance across the NPC, a high quality nanofluidic sensing of biotin was achieved. The limit of detection was 1 aM, and the detection range was from 1 aM to 0.1 nM. PMID:26000461

  15. Neurotoxicity testing using Microelectrode Arrays (MEAs): a growing trend

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microelectrode arrays (MEAs) are groups of extracellular electrodes that are 10-30 microns in diameter and can be utilized in vivo or in vitro. For in vitro uses, an MEA typically contains up to 64 electrodes and can be utilized to measure the activity of cells and tissues that a...

  16. Electrochemical platinum coatings for improving performance of implantable microelectrode arrays.

    PubMed

    de Haro, C; Mas, R; Abadal, G; Muñoz, J; Perez-Murano, F; Dominguez, C

    2002-12-01

    The formation and properties of electrochemical platinum films grown on platinum contacts contained in implantable flexible microelectrodes were investigated. The resulting platinum deposits were obtained by applying cyclic voltammetry to baths containing concentrations around 70 mM of chloroplatinic acid. A pre-activation step was necessary before the platinum-electroplating step in order to achieve good adhesive properties. The benefits of this process were ascribed to higher corrosion resistance, lower impedance and improved adhesion to the sputtered platinum. These improvements can make the application of this electrochemical technique highly useful for increasing the lifetime of implantable microelectrode arrays, such as cuff structures (IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng. 40 (1993) 640). These medical devices, obtained by semiconductor technology could be used for selective stimulation of nerve fascicles, although, poor long-term performance has been achieved with them. The dissolution rate for platinum thin-film microelectrodes under fixed corrosion test conditions was 38.8 ng/C. Lower rates were observed for electroplated microelectrodes, obtaining a dissolution rate of 7.8 ng/C under analogous experimental ageing conditions. The corrosion behaviour of the electroplated platinum during stimulation experimental conditions was estimated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. PMID:12322971

  17. In vivo microelectrode track reconstruction using magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Fung, S.H.; Burstein, D.; Born, R.T.

    2010-01-01

    To obtain more precise anatomical information about cortical sites of microelectrode recording and microstimulation experiments in alert animals, we have developed a non-invasive, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique for reconstructing microelectrode tracks. We made microelectrode penetrations in the brains of anesthetized rats and marked sites along them by depositing metal, presumably iron, with anodic monophasic or biphasic current from the tip of a stainless steel microelectrode. The metal deposits were clearly visible in the living animal as approximately 200 μm wide hypointense punctate marks using gradient echo sequences in a 4.7T MRI scanner. We confirmed the MRI findings by comparing them directly to the postmortem histology in which the iron in the deposits could be rendered visible with a Prussian blue reaction. MRI-visible marks could be created using currents as low as 1 μA (anodic) for 5 s, and they remained stable in the brains of living rats for up to nine months. We were able to make marks using either direct current or biphasic current pulses. Biphasic pulses caused less tissue damage and were similar to those used by many laboratories for functional microstimulation studies in the brains of alert monkeys. PMID:9667395

  18. Progress towards biocompatible intracortical microelectrodes for neural interfacing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorfi, Mehdi; Skousen, John L.; Weder, Christoph; Capadona, Jeffrey R.

    2015-02-01

    To ensure long-term consistent neural recordings, next-generation intracortical microelectrodes are being developed with an increased emphasis on reducing the neuro-inflammatory response. The increased emphasis stems from the improved understanding of the multifaceted role that inflammation may play in disrupting both biologic and abiologic components of the overall neural interface circuit. To combat neuro-inflammation and improve recording quality, the field is actively progressing from traditional inorganic materials towards approaches that either minimizes the microelectrode footprint or that incorporate compliant materials, bioactive molecules, conducting polymers or nanomaterials. However, the immune-privileged cortical tissue introduces an added complexity compared to other biomedical applications that remains to be fully understood. This review provides a comprehensive reflection on the current understanding of the key failure modes that may impact intracortical microelectrode performance. In addition, a detailed overview of the current status of various materials-based approaches that have gained interest for neural interfacing applications is presented, and key challenges that remain to be overcome are discussed. Finally, we present our vision on the future directions of materials-based treatments to improve intracortical microelectrodes for neural interfacing.

  19. Progress Towards Biocompatible Intracortical Microelectrodes for Neural Interfacing Applications

    PubMed Central

    Jorfi, Mehdi; Skousen, John L.; Weder, Christoph; Capadona, Jeffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    To ensure long-term consistent neural recordings, next-generation intracortical microelectrodes are being developed with an increased emphasis on reducing the neuro-inflammatory response. The increased emphasis stems from the improved understanding of the multifaceted role that inflammation may play in disrupting both biologic and abiologic components of the overall neural interface circuit. To combat neuro-inflammation and improve recording quality, the field is actively progressing from traditional inorganic materials towards approaches that either minimizes the microelectrode footprint or that incorporate compliant materials, bioactive molecules, conducting polymers or nanomaterials. However, the immune-privileged cortical tissue introduces an added complexity compared to other biomedical applications that remains to be fully understood. This review provides a comprehensive reflection on the current understanding of the key failure modes that may impact intracortical microelectrode performance. In addition, a detailed overview of the current status of various materials-based approaches that have gained interest for neural interfacing applications is presented, and key challenges that remain to be overcome are discussed. Finally, we present our vision on the future directions of materials-based treatments to improve intracortical microelectrodes for neural interfacing. PMID:25460808

  20. Iridium NEXT: A Global access for your sensor needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, O. P.; Fish, C. S.

    2010-12-01

    The operational Iridium constellation is comprised of 66 satellites, used to primarily provide worldwide voice and data coverage to satellite phones, pagers and integrated transceivers. The satellites are in low Earth orbit at 781 km and inclination of 86.4 deg, resulting in unprecedented 24/7 coverage and real-time visibility of the entire globe. Recently, through funding from the National Science Foundation (NSF), Iridium has been utilized by the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL), with help from The Boeing Company, as an infrastructure for a comprehensive network for space environment measurements. Known as the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE), the Iridium-based system provides real-time magnetic field measurements using the satellites as part of a new observation network to forecast weather in space. In February 2007, Iridium announced Iridium NEXT, a novel design for a second-generation satellite constellation. Anticipated to begin launching in 2015, Iridium NEXT will maintain the existing Iridium constellation architecture of 66 cross-linked satellite LEO covering 100 percent of the globe. In the spirit of AMPERE, for commercial, government, and scientific organizations Iridium NEXT also plans to offer new earth and space observation opportunities through hosted hosted payloads on the 66 Iridium NEXT satellite network. To provide seamless support and access to this latest innovation in payload transportation, Iridium NEXT has teamed with Space Dynamics Laboratory - Utah State University which has delivered thousands of successful sensors and subsystems for over 400 space borne and aircraf based payloads. One such innovation called SensorPOD will offer unique benefits such as unprecedented spatial and temporal coverage, real-time relay of data to and from up to 5 Kg payloads in space, and access to space at a fraction of the cost of a dedicated missions such as 3U or larger Cubesats. In this

  1. Iridium complexes containing mesoionic C donors: selective C(sp3)-H versus C(sp2)-H bond activation, reactivity towards acids and bases, and catalytic oxidation of silanes and water.

    PubMed

    Petronilho, Ana; Woods, James A; Mueller-Bunz, Helge; Bernhard, Stefan; Albrecht, Martin

    2014-11-24

    Metalation of a C2-methylated pyridylimidazolium salt with [IrCp*Cl2]2 affords either an ylidic complex, resulting from C(sp(3))-H bond activation of the C2-bound CH3 group if the metalation is performed in the presence of a base, such as AgO2 or Na2CO3, or a mesoionic complex via cyclometalation and thermally induced heterocyclic C(sp(2))-H bond activation, if the reaction is performed in the absence of a base. Similar cyclometalation and complex formation via C(sp(2))-H bond activation is observed when the heterocyclic ligand precursor consists of the analogous pyridyltriazolium salt, that is, when the metal bonding at the C2 position is blocked by a nitrogen rather than a methyl substituent. Despite the strongly mesoionic character of both the imidazolylidene and the triazolylidene, the former reacts rapidly with D(+) and undergoes isotope exchange at the heterocyclic C5 position, whereas the triazolylidene ligand is stable and only undergoes H/D exchange under basic conditions, where the imidazolylidene is essentially unreactive. The high stability of the Ir-C bond in aqueous solution over a broad pH range was exploited in catalytic water oxidation and silane oxidation. The catalytic hydrosilylation of ketones proceeds with turnover frequencies as high as 6,000 h(-1) with both the imidazolylidene and the triazolylidene system, whereas water oxidation is enhanced by the stronger donor properties of the imidazol-4-ylidene ligands and is more than three times faster than with the triazolylidene analogue. PMID:25302630

  2. Mobility of iridium in terrestrial environments: Implications for the interpretation of impact-related mass-extinctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín-Peinado, F. J.; Rodríguez-Tovar, F. J.

    2010-08-01

    Traditionally, iridium has been considered an element of low mobility, but its behavior is still debated. Ir concentration in a soil affected by a catastrophic mining spill in 1998 that covered the soil with a layer of tailings offers the opportunity to analyse an exceptional Ir-bearing horizon 10 years after deposition. This has enabled comparisons with the values of past Ir-bearing horizons associated to impact-related mass-extinction events. Iridium concentration in the tailings (0.349 ppm) was 5-fold higher than the anomaly in the K-Pg at The Moody Creek Mine section (the highest values obtained from terrestrial sections). The oxidative weathering of the tailings caused the release of Ir and infiltration into the soil. Iridium distribution in depth indicates redistribution throughout the profile in relation to the change in the physico-chemical properties of the soil. With regard to the background concentration in the soil (0.056 ppm), anomalous values of Ir (0.129 ppm) can be detected to 11 cm below the layer of tailings. The correlation analysis between the Ir concentration and the main properties and constituents of the soils indicated a significant correlation with sulfur, iron, clay content, and pH. Selective extractions were made to study the forms in which Ir can be mobilized in the soil. The residual/insoluble fraction was >90% of the total Ir concentration in soil. Soluble-in-water concentration of Ir (1.5% of total) was detected in the uppermost 2-3 cm of the soil, which were directly affected by the leaching of acidic waters coming from the oxidation of the pyrite tailings. Iridium retention in the affected part of the soil reached 9% of the total Ir concentration; this retention could be related to the amorphous iron forms dissolved by the oxalic-oxalate extraction. However, according to our research, original Ir abundance could be secondarily modified, and then a direct analysis of the iridium values recorded in sediments could induce

  3. DETERMINATION OF HETEROGENEOUS ELECTRON TRANSFER RATE CONSTANTS AT MICROFABRICATED IRIDIUM ELECTRODES. (R825511C022)

    EPA Science Inventory

    There has been an increasing use of both solid metal and microfabricated iridium electrodes as substrates for various types of electroanalysis. However, investigations to determine heterogeneous electron transfer rate constants on iridium, especially at an electron beam evapor...

  4. Iridium complexes demonstrating broadband emission through controlled geometric distortion and applications thereof

    DOEpatents

    Li, Jian; Turner, Eric

    2016-04-12

    Iridium compounds and their uses are disclosed herein. For example, carbazole containing iridium compounds are disclosed. The compounds are useful in many devices, including, but not limited to, electroluminescent devices.

  5. IR-doped ruthenium oxide catalyst for oxygen evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valdez, Thomas I. (Inventor); Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A method for preparing a metal-doped ruthenium oxide material by heating a mixture of a doping metal and a source of ruthenium under an inert atmosphere. In some embodiments, the doping metal is in the form of iridium black or lead powder, and the source of ruthenium is a powdered ruthenium oxide. An iridium-doped or lead-doped ruthenium oxide material can perform as an oxygen evolution catalyst and can be fabricated into electrodes for electrolysis cells.

  6. A VOLTAMMETRIC FLAVIN MICROELECTRODE FOR USE IN BIOFILMS

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Hung Duc; Renslow, Ryan; Babauta, Jerome; Ahmed, Bulbul; Beyenal, Haluk

    2011-01-01

    Biofilms used in bioelectrochemical systems are expected to transfer electrons using electron transfer mediators. One mediator type, flavins, which includes flavin mononucleotide, riboflavin, and flavin adenine dinucleotide, has been found to be endogenously produced by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. However, the presence and concentration of flavins inside a S. oneidensis MR-1 biofilm have never been reported. The goal of this study was to develop a flavin microelectrode capable of measuring flavins inside a living biofilm and apply it to a biofilm which produces flavins. Because flavins are electrochemically active molecules, the flavin microelectrode was based on detection via square-wave voltammetry. The microelectrode consisted of a carbon working electrode with a 10–30 μm tip diameter, a built-in platinum counter electrode, and a Ag/AgCl reference electrode, all enclosed in a glass outer case. The microelectrode was calibrated between 0.1 μM and 10 μM flavins and showed a linear correlation between flavin concentration and peak currents located at −424 mVAg/AgCl on a square-wave voltammogram. We also developed a model to explain the electrochemical mechanism of flavin detection, and to determine the effective surface area of the microelectrode, the standard reduction potential, and the transfer coefficient. We found that the effective surface area of the microelectrode was close to 100 times the projected surface area. The model predicted a standard reduction potential for RF/RFH2 of −419 mVAg/AgCl at 20 °C and a transfer coefficient of 0.45. Lastly, we measured flavin concentration inside a S. oneidensis MR-1 biofilm grown on a glass surface using oxygen as the electron acceptor. The flavin concentration reached 0.7 μM, increasing near the bottom of the biofilm, where no oxygen was present. This shows the possibility that flavins are produced in the anaerobic zone to act as intermediate electron acceptors in the deeper parts of the biofilm, where

  7. A VOLTAMMETRIC FLAVIN MICROELECTRODE FOR USE IN BIOFILMS.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hung Duc; Renslow, Ryan; Babauta, Jerome; Ahmed, Bulbul; Beyenal, Haluk

    2012-01-01

    Biofilms used in bioelectrochemical systems are expected to transfer electrons using electron transfer mediators. One mediator type, flavins, which includes flavin mononucleotide, riboflavin, and flavin adenine dinucleotide, has been found to be endogenously produced by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. However, the presence and concentration of flavins inside a S. oneidensis MR-1 biofilm have never been reported. The goal of this study was to develop a flavin microelectrode capable of measuring flavins inside a living biofilm and apply it to a biofilm which produces flavins. Because flavins are electrochemically active molecules, the flavin microelectrode was based on detection via square-wave voltammetry. The microelectrode consisted of a carbon working electrode with a 10-30 μm tip diameter, a built-in platinum counter electrode, and a Ag/AgCl reference electrode, all enclosed in a glass outer case. The microelectrode was calibrated between 0.1 μM and 10 μM flavins and showed a linear correlation between flavin concentration and peak currents located at -424 mV(Ag/AgCl) on a square-wave voltammogram. We also developed a model to explain the electrochemical mechanism of flavin detection, and to determine the effective surface area of the microelectrode, the standard reduction potential, and the transfer coefficient. We found that the effective surface area of the microelectrode was close to 100 times the projected surface area. The model predicted a standard reduction potential for RF/RFH2 of -419 mV(Ag/AgCl) at 20 °C and a transfer coefficient of 0.45. Lastly, we measured flavin concentration inside a S. oneidensis MR-1 biofilm grown on a glass surface using oxygen as the electron acceptor. The flavin concentration reached 0.7 μM, increasing near the bottom of the biofilm, where no oxygen was present. This shows the possibility that flavins are produced in the anaerobic zone to act as intermediate electron acceptors in the deeper parts of the biofilm, where there

  8. Testing of electroformed deposited iridium/powder metallurgy rhenium rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Brian D.; Dickerson, Robert

    1996-01-01

    High-temperature, oxidation-resistant chamber materials offer the thermal margin for high performance and extended lifetimes for radiation-cooled rockets. Rhenium (Re) coated with iridium (Ir) allow hours of operation at 2200 C on Earth-storable propellants. One process for manufacturing Ir/Re rocket chambers is the fabrication of Re substrates by powder metallurgy (PM) and the application of Ir coatings by using electroformed deposition (ED). ED Ir coatings, however, have been found to be porous and poorly adherent. The integrity of ED Ir coatings could be improved by densification after the electroforming process. This report summarizes the testing of two 22-N, ED Ir/PM Re rocket chambers that were subjected to post-deposition treatments in an effort to densify the Ir coating. One chamber was vacuum annealed, while the other chamber was subjected to hot isostatic pressure (HIP). The chambers were tested on gaseous oxygen/gaseous hydrogen propellants, at mixture ratios that simulated the oxidizing environments of Earth-storable propellants. ne annealed ED Ir/PM Re chamber was tested for a total of 24 firings and 4.58 hr at a mixture ratio of 4.2. After only 9 firings, the annealed ED Ir coating began to blister and spall upstream of the throat. The blistering and spalling were similar to what had been experienced with unannealed, as-deposited ED Ir coatings. The HIP ED Ir/PM Re chamber was tested for a total of 91 firings and 11.45 hr at mixture ratios of 3.2 and 4.2. The HIP ED Ir coating remained adherent to the Re substrate throughout testing; there were no visible signs of coating degradation. Metallography revealed, however, thinning of the HIP Ir coating and occasional pores in the Re layer upstream of the throat. Pinholes in the Ir coating may have provided a path for oxidation of the Re substrate at these locations. The HIP ED Ir coating proved to be more effective than vacuum annealed and as-deposited ED Ir. Further densification is still required to

  9. Stimulation of human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes on thin-film microelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Viitanen, Jouko; Heimala, Päivi; Hokkanen, Ari; Iljin, Kristiina; Kerkelä, Erja; Kolari, Kai; Kattelus, Hannu

    2011-05-01

    We describe successful long-term stimulation of human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte clusters on thin-film microelectrode structures in vitro. Interdigitated electrode structures were constructed using plain titanium on glass as the electrode material. Titanium rapidly oxidizes in atmospheric conditions to produce an insulating TiO(χ) layer with high relative permittivity. Capacitive coupling to the incubation medium and to the cells adherent to the electrodes was still efficient, and the dielectric layer prevented electrolysis, allowing a wider window of possible stimulation amplitudes to be used, relative to conducting surfaces. A common hypothesis suggests that to achieve proper differentiation of electroactive cells from the stem cells electrical stimuli are also needed. Spontaneously beating cardiomyocyte clusters were seeded on the glass-electrode surfaces, and we successfully altered and resynchronized a clearly different beat interval. The new pace was reliably maintained for extended periods of several tens of minutes. PMID:21416608

  10. Antifouling self-assembled monolayers on microelectrodes for patterning biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Noel, John; Teizer, Winfried; Hwang, Wonmuk

    2009-01-01

    We present a procedure for forming a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) trimethoxysilane self-assembled monolayer (SAM) on a silicon substrate with gold microelectrodes. The PEG-SAM is formed in a single assembly step and prevents biofouling on silicon and gold surfaces. The SAM is used to coat microelectrodes patterned with standard, positive-tone lithography. Using the microtubule as an example, we apply a DC voltage to induce electrophoretic migration to the SAM-coated electrode in a reversible manner. A flow chamber is used for imaging the electrophoretic migration and microtubule patterning in situ using epifluorescence microscopy. This method is generally applicable to biomolecule patterning, as it employs electrophoresis to immobilize target molecules and thus does not require specific molecular interactions. Further, it avoids problems encountered when attempting to pattern the SAM molecules directly using lithographic techniques. The compatibility with electron beam lithography allows this method to be used to pattern biomolecules at the nanoscale. PMID:19707178

  11. Electrochemical measurements on a droplet using gold microelectrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenabi, Amin; Souri, Asma; Rastkhadiv, Ali

    2016-03-01

    Facile methods of ion recognition are important for the fabrication of electronic tongue systems. In this work, we demonstrate performing pulsed conductometry on microliter electrolyte droplets dropped on gold microelectrodes vapor deposited on soda lime glass slides. A droplet is dropped between two microelectrodes when a voltage waveform from a preprogramed power supply is applied on them. The temporal variation of the electric current passing through the droplet is recorded, digitized and stored. The obtained data are compared with the database formed out of the previous experiences for the classification of the sample electrolytes. It is shown that the shape of the voltage waveform is the important parameter of the process. We devised a method for the optimization of the voltage waveform profile for obtaining the maximum of discriminating information from the recorded current variations.

  12. Oxidation of Ruthenium and Iridium Metal by XeF2 and Crystal Structure Determination of [Xe2F3][RuF6]·XeF2 and [Xe2F3][MF6] (M = Ru, Ir).

    PubMed

    Tramšek, Melita; Goreshnik, Evgeny; Tavčar, Gašper

    2016-01-01

    Salts containing [Xe2F3]+ cations and [MF6]- anions (M = Ru, Ir) were synthesized by the oxidation of metal with excess of XeF2 in anhydrous hydrogen fluoride (aHF) as a solvent. Single crystals of [Xe2F3][RuF6]·XeF2, [Xe2F3][RuF6] and [Xe2F3][IrF6] were grown by slow evaporation of the solvent. [Xe2F3][RuF6]·XeF2 crystallizes in a triclinic P-1 space group (a = 8.3362(1) Å, b = 8.8197(2) Å, c = 9.3026(4) Å; α = 68.27(1)°, β = 63.45(1)°, γ = 82.02°, V = 568.09(9) Å3 (Z = 2)). Discrete [Xe2F3]+, XeF2 and [RuF6]- units are found in the asymmetric unit. [Xe2F3][RuF6] and [Xe2F3][IrF6] compounds are isostructural and crystallize in a monoclinic Cc space group (a = 14.481(3) Å (Ru); 14.544(3) Å (Ir); b = 8.0837(8) Å (Ru), 8.0808(7) Å (Ir), c = 10.952(2) Å (Ru), 11.014(2) Å (Ir); β = 136.825(6)° (Ru), 139.954(7)°, V = 877.2(3) Å3 (Ru), 883.6(3) Å3 (Ir); Z = 4). The asymmetric unit in the [Xe2F3][MF6] (M = Ru, Ir) consists of one [Xe2F3]+ and one [MF6]- unit. PMID:27333561

  13. Characterization of a light switchable microelectrode array for retinal prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xinyi; Xiong, Tao; Chiou, Pei-Yu; Li, Zhihong

    2011-12-01

    A light switchable microelectrode array for retinal prosthesis, which is performed with the photosensitive conductivity of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and of more advantages over the two major current retinal prosthetic categories, is characterized. Sensitivity to different visible wavelengths and light intensities are verified as well. Preliminary impedance test invitro shows appropriate impedance for neuron stimulation applications. It is indicated that such device provides a promising potential to restore a certain degree of visual function.

  14. Electrochemical properties and myocyte interaction of carbon nanotube microelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Fung, Andrew O; Tsiokos, Christos; Paydar, Omeed; Chen, Li Han; Jin, Sungho; Wang, Yibin; Judy, Jack W

    2010-11-10

    Arrays of carbon nanotube (CNT) microelectrodes (nominal geometric surface areas 20-200 μm(2)) were fabricated by photolithography with chemical vapor deposition of randomly oriented CNTs. Raman spectroscopy showed strong peak intensities in both G and D bands (G/D = 0.86), indicative of significant disorder in the graphitic layers of the randomly oriented CNTs. The impedance spectra of gold and CNT microelectrodes were compared using equivalent circuit models. Compared to planar gold surfaces, pristine nanotubes lowered the overall electrode impedance at 1 kHz by 75%, while nanotubes treated in O(2) plasma reduced the impedance by 95%. Cyclic voltammetry in potassium ferricyanide showed potential peak separations of 133 and 198 mV for gold and carbon nanotube electrodes, respectively. The interaction of cultured cardiac myocytes with randomly oriented and vertically aligned CNTs was investigated by the sectioning of myocytes using focused-ion-beam milling. Vertically aligned nanotubes deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) were observed to penetrate the membrane of neonatal-rat ventricular myocytes, while randomly oriented CNTs remained external to the cells. These results demonstrated that CNT electrodes can be leveraged to reduce impedance and enhance biological interfaces for microelectrodes of subcellular size. PMID:20954739

  15. In vivo deployment of mechanically adaptive nanocomposites for intracortical microelectrodes

    PubMed Central

    Harris, J P; Hess, A E; Rowan, S J; Weder, C; Zorman, C A; Tyler, D J; Capadona, J R

    2012-01-01

    We recently introduced a series of stimuli-responsive, mechanically-adaptive polymer nanocomposites. Here, we report the first application of these bio-inspired materials as substrates for intracortical microelectrodes. Our hypothesis is that the ideal electrode should be initially stiff to facilitate minimal trauma during insertion into the cortex, yet becomes mechanically compliant to match the stiffness of the brain tissue and minimize forces exerted on the tissue, attenuating inflammation. Microprobes created from mechanically reinforced nanocomposites demonstrated a significant advantage compared to model microprobes composed of neat polymer only. The nanocomposite microprobes exhibit a higher storage modulus (E’ = ~5 GPa) than the neat polymer microprobes (E’ = ~2 GPa) and could sustain higher loads (~17 mN), facilitating penetration through the pia mater and insertion into the cerebral cortex of a rat. In contrast, the neat polymer microprobes mechanically failed under lower loads (~7 mN) before they were capable of inserting into cortical tissue. Further, we demonstrated the material’s ability to morph while in the rat cortex to more closely match the mechanical properties of the cortical tissue. Nanocomposite microprobes that were implanted into the rat cortex for up to 8 weeks demonstrated increased cell density at the microelectrode-tissue interface and a lack of tissue necrosis or excessive gliosis. This body of work introduces our nanocomposite-based microprobes as adaptive substrates for intracortical microelectrodes and potentially other biomedical applications. PMID:21654037

  16. The high-temperature impact properties of DOP-26 iridium

    SciTech Connect

    George, T.G.; Stevens, M.F. )

    1988-10-01

    A study of the impact properties of DOP-26 iridium (which contains 0.3% tungsten and --40 pm thorium) at temperatures of 600 to 1,440/sup 0/C revealed that the predominant mode of failure for the material is intergranular separation with occasional transgranular cleavage. DOP-26 iridium also appears to have a high notch sensitivity, in contrast to most other face-centered-cubic (fcc) metals; at elevated deformation temperatures, the dislocation substructure is similar to that of other fcc metals. In addition, regular arrays of pure edge character dislocations have been found. In the test specimens used in this study, the presence of Ir Th particles was observed within iridium grains. The existence of these particles indicates that the role of thorium is not well understood, particularly in light of the fact that previous studies, which depended on grain boundary segregation, have shown thorium to improve grain boundary cohesion.

  17. Experimental determination of the solubility of iridium in silicate melts: Preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borisov, Alexander; Dingwell, Donald B.; Oneill, Hugh ST.C.; Palme, Herbert

    1992-01-01

    Little is known of the geochemical behavior of iridium. Normally this element is taken to be chalcophile and/or siderophile so that during planetary differentiation processes, e.g., core formation, iridium is extracted from silicate phases into metallic phases. Experimental determination of the metal/silicate partition coefficient of iridium is difficult simply because it is so large. Also there are no data on the solubility behavior of iridium in silicate melts. With information on the solubility of iridium in silicate melts it is possible, in combination with experimental data for Fe-Ir alloys, to calculate the partition coefficient between a metallic phase and a silicate melt.

  18. Iridium(iii)-catalyzed regioselective C7-sulfonamidation of indoles.

    PubMed

    Song, Zengqiang; Antonchick, Andrey P

    2016-06-01

    Iridium(iii)-catalyzed direct C7-sulfonamidation of indoles with sulfonyl azides is described. The developed method has good compatibility with diverse functional groups, providing various 7-amino-substituted indoles with good to excellent yields in a short time under mild reaction conditions. The key feature of the developed method is the regioselective functionalization at the C7-position of 2,3-unsubstituted indoles. Biologically active compounds can be obtained using this protocol. The application of the iridium(iii) catalyst and directing group plays a crucial role in the regioselectivity of the developed reaction. PMID:27173668

  19. Field desorption of Na and Cs from graphene on iridium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernatskii, D. P.; Pavlov, V. G.

    2015-08-01

    Field electron and desorption microscopy has been used to study specific features of the field desorption of sodium and cesium ions adsorbed on the surface of iridium with graphene. It was found that adsorbed sodium atoms most strongly reduce the work function on graphene islands situated over densely packed faces of iridium. A strong electric field qualitatively similarly affects the sodium and cesium desorption processes from a field emitter to give two desorption phases and has no noticeable effect on the disintegration of the graphene layer.

  20. Effects of carbon nanotube and conducting polymer coated microelectrodes on single-unit recordings in vitro.

    PubMed

    Charkhkar, Hamid; Knaack, Gretchen L; Mandal, Himadri S; Keefer, Edward W; Pancrazio, Joseph J

    2014-01-01

    Neuronal networks cultured on microelectrode arrays (MEAs) have been utilized as biosensors that can detect all or nothing extracellular action potentials, or spikes. Coating the microelectrodes with carbon nanotubes (CNTs), either pristine or conjugated with a conductive polymer, has been previously reported to improve extracellular recordings presumably via reduction in microelectrode impedance. The goal of this work was to examine the basis of such improvement in vitro. Every other microelectrode of in vitro MEAs was electrochemically modified with either conducting polymer, poly-3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (PEDOT) or a blend of CNT and PEDOT. Mouse cortical tissue was dissociated and cultured on the MEAs to form functional neuronal networks. The performance of the modified and unmodified microelectrodes was evaluated by activity measures such as spike rate, spike amplitude, burst duration and burst rate. We observed that the yield, defined as percentage of microelectrodes with neuronal activity, was significantly higher by 55% for modified microelectrodes compared to the unmodified sites. However, the spike rate and burst parameters were similar for modified and unmodified microelectrodes suggesting that neuronal networks were not physiologically altered by presence of PEDOT or PEDOT-CNT. Our observations from immunocytochemistry indicated that neuronal cells were more abundant in proximity to modified microelectrodes. PMID:25569998

  1. An array of microactuated microelectrodes for monitoring single-neuronal activity in rodents.

    PubMed

    Muthuswamy, Jit; Okandan, Murat; Gilletti, Aaron; Baker, Michael S; Jain, Tilak

    2005-08-01

    Arrays of microelectrodes used for monitoring single- and multi-neuronal action potentials often fail to record from the same population of neurons over a period of time for several technical and biological reasons. We report here a novel Neural Probe chip with a 3-channel microactuated microelectrode array that will enable precise repositioning of the individual microelectrodes within the brain tissue after implantation. Thermal microactuators and associated microelectrodes in the Neural Probe chip are microfabricated using the Sandia's Ultraplanar Multi-level MEMS Technology (SUMMiTV) process, a 5-layer polysilicon micromachining technology of the Sandia National labs, Albuquerque, NM. The Neural Probe chip enables precise bi-directional positioning of the microelectrodes in the brain with a step resolution in the order of 8.8 microm. The thermal microactuators allow for a linear translation of the microelectrodes of up to 5 mm in either direction making it suitable for positioning microelectrodes in deep structures of a rodent brain. The overall translation in either direction was reduced to approximately 2 mm after insulation of the microelectrodes with epoxy for monitoring multi-unit activity. Single unit recordings were obtained from the somatosensory cortex of adult rats over a period of three days demonstrating the feasibility of this technology. Further optimization of the microelectrode insulation and chip packaging will be necessary before this technology can be validated in chronic experiments. PMID:16119243

  2. An Array of Microactuated Microelectrodes for Monitoring Single-Neuronal Activity in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Okandan, Murat; Gilletti, Aaron; Baker, Michael S.; Jain, Tilak

    2006-01-01

    Arrays of microelectrodes used for monitoring single-and multi-neuronal action potentials often fail to record from the same population of neurons over a period of time for several technical and biological reasons. We report here a novel Neural Probe chip with a 3-channel microactuated microelectrode array that will enable precise repositioning of the individual microelectrodes within the brain tissue after implantation. Thermal microactuators and associated microelectrodes in the Neural Probe chip are microfabricated using the Sandia’s Ultraplanar Multi-level MEMS Technology (SUMMiTV) process, a 5-layer polysilicon microma-chining technology of the Sandia National labs, Albuquerque, NM. The Neural Probe chip enables precise bi-directional positioning of the microelectrodes in the brain with a step resolution in the order of 8.8μm. The thermal microactuators allow for a linear translation of the microelectrodes of up to 5 mm in either direction making it suitable for positioning microelectrodes in deep structures of a rodent brain. The overall translation in either direction was reduced to approximately 2 mm after insulation of the microelectrodes with epoxy for monitoring multi-unit activity. Single unit recordings were obtained from the somatosensory cortex of adult rats over a period of three days demonstrating the feasibility of this technology. Further optimization of the microelectrode insulation and chip packaging will be necessary before this technology can be validated in chronic experiments. PMID:16119243

  3. A tapered aluminium microelectrode array for improvement of dielectrophoresis-based particle manipulation.

    PubMed

    Buyong, Muhamad Ramdzan; Larki, Farhad; Faiz, Mohd Syafiq; Hamzah, Azrul Azlan; Yunas, Jumrail; Majlis, Burhanuddin Yeop

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the dielectrophoretic force (F(DEP)) response of Aluminium Microelectrode Arrays with tapered profile is investigated through experimental measurements and numerical simulations. A standard CMOS processing technique with a step for the formation of a tapered profile resist is implemented in the fabrication of Tapered Aluminium Microelectrode Arrays (TAMA). The F(DEP) is investigated through analysis of the Clausius-Mossotti factor (CMF) and cross-over frequency (f(xo)). The performance of TAMA with various side wall angles is compared to that of microelectrodes with a straight cut sidewall profile over a wide range of frequencies through FEM numerical simulations. Additionally, electric field measurement (EFM) is performed through scanning probe microscopy (SPM) in order to obtain the region of force focus in both platforms. Results showed that the tapered profile microelectrodes with angles between 60° and 70° produce the highest electric field gradient on the particles. Also, the region of the strongest electric field in TAMA is located at the bottom and top edge of microelectrode while the strongest electric field in microelectrodes with straight cut profile is found at the top corner of the microelectrode. The latter property of microelectrodes improves the probability of capturing/repelling the particles at the microelectrode's side wall. PMID:25970255

  4. Synthesis of new heteroscorpionate iridium(I) and iridium(III) complexes.

    PubMed

    Roa, A E; Campos, J; Paneque, M; Salazar, V; Otero, A; Lara-Sánchez, A; Rodríguez, A M; López-Solera, I; Gómez, M V

    2015-04-21

    The reactivity of different heteroscorpionate ligands based on bis(pyrazol-1-yl)methane, with different iridium-(i) and -(iii) precursors is reported. The reaction of the heteroscorpionate lithium salts "Li(bdmpza)", [bdmpza = bis(3,5-dimethylpyrazol-1-yl)acetate], "Li(bdmpzdta)" [bdmpzdta = bis(3,5-dimethylpyrazol-1-yl)dithioacetate] and "Li(S)-mbpam" [(S)-mbpam = (S)-(-)-N-α-methylbenzyl-2,2-bis(3,5-dimethylpyrazol-1-yl)acetamidate] with 1 equivalent of [IrCl3(THF)3] in THF for 18 h affords high yields of neutral and anionic heteroscorpionate chloride iridium complexes [IrCl2(bdmpza)(THF)] (), [Li(THF)4][IrCl3(bdmpzdta)] () and [IrCl2{(S)-mbpam})(THF)] (). Solution of complex in acetonitrile at room temperature leads to complex [IrCl2{(S)-mbpam})(NCCH3)] (). Complexes and were isolated as enantiopure compounds. The reaction of the lithium salt "Li(bdmpza)" with [IrCl(η(4)-CH2[double bond, length as m-dash]C(Me)C(Me)[double bond, length as m-dash]CH2)]2 in THF for 18 h gave the Ir(i) complex [Ir(bdmpza)(η(4)-CH2[double bond, length as m-dash]C(Me)C(Me)[double bond, length as m-dash]CH2)] (). The reaction of complex with CO (2 atm) at room temperature leads to a new complex of Ir(iii), [Ir(bdmpza)(k(2)-CH2C(Me)[double bond, length as m-dash]C(Me)CH2)(CO)] (). Treatment of heteroscorpionate ligand precursors "Li(bdmpza)" and "Li(bdmpzdta)" with [IrCp*Cl2]2 in THF yielded the iridium(iii) complexes [Ir2Cp*2Cl2(bdmpzx)] (x = a , x = dta ). These complexes have helical chirality due to the demands of the fixed pyrazole rings. The stereoisomerism and the self-assembly processes of these helicates have been studied in some detail in solution by NMR spectroscopy and in the solid state by X-ray diffraction. Mixtures of M- and P-handed enantiomers were obtained. Complex undergoes a decarboxylation process initiated by the HCl generated in the previous step leading to the known ionic complex [IrClCp*(bdmpm)][IrCl3Cp*] [bdmpm = bis(3,5-dimethylpyrazol-1-yl)methane] (). The

  5. Corrosion-resistant iridium-platinum anode material for high polarization application in corrosive acids

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J.; Summers, L.; Lewis, P.

    1993-09-08

    The present invention relates to highly corrosion resistant components for use in an electrochemical cell. Specifically, these components are resistant to corrosion under very extreme conditions such as exposure to aqua regia in the presence of a constant current density of 100mA/m{sup 2}. The components are comprised of an iridium-platinum alloy that comprises less than 30% iridium. In a preferred embodiment of the present invention, the iridium-platinum alloy comprises 15-20% iridium. In another preferred embodiment of the present invention, the iridium-platinum alloy is deposited on the surface of an electrochemical cell component by magnetron sputtering. The present invention also relates to a method for conducting an electrochemical reaction in the presence of highly corrosive acids under a high degree of polarization wherein the electrochemical cell comprises a component, preferably the anode, containing an iridium-platinum alloy that comprises less than 30% iridium.

  6. A comparison of electrochemically pre-treated and spark-platinized carbon fiber microelectrode. Measurement of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine in human urine and plasma.

    PubMed

    Bartosova, Z; Riman, D; Halouzka, V; Vostalova, J; Simanek, V; Hrbac, J; Jirovsky, D

    2016-09-01

    A novel method of carbon fiber microelectrode activation using spark discharge was demonstrated and compared to conventional electrochemical pretreatment by potential cycling. The spark discharge was performed at 800 V between the microelectrode connected to positive pole of the power supply and platinum counter electrode. Spark discharge led both to trimming of the fiber tip into conical shape and to the modification of carbon fiber microelectrode with platinum, as proven by scanning electron microscopy and electron dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. After the characterization of electrochemical properties using ferricyanide voltammetry, the activated electrodes were used for electrochemical analysis of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine, an oxidative stress marker. Subnanomolar detection limits (0.55 nmol L(-1)) in high-performance liquid chromatography were achieved for spark platinized electrodes incorporated into the flow detection cell. PMID:27543016

  7. Rapid, sensitive detection of neurotransmitters at microelectrodes modified with self-assembled SWCNT forests

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Ning; Venton, B. Jill

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) modification of microelectrodes can result in increased sensitivity without compromising time response. However, dip coating CNTs is not very reproducible and the CNTs tend to lay flat on the electrode surface which limits access to the electroactive sites on the ends. In this study, aligned CNT forests were formed using a chemical self-assembly method, which resulted in more exposed CNT ends to the analyte. Shortened, carboxylic acid functionalized single-walled CNTs were assembled from a DMF suspension onto a carbon-fiber disk microelectrode modified with a thin iron hydroxide-decorated Nafion film. The modified electrodes were highly sensitive, with 36-fold higher oxidation currents for dopamine using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry than bare electrodes and 34-fold more current than electrodes dipped in CNTs. The limit of detection for dopamine was 17 ± 3 nM at a 10 Hz repetition rate and 65 ± 7 nM at 90 Hz. The LOD at 90 Hz was the same as a bare electrode at 10 Hz, allowing a 9-fold increase in temporal resolution without a decrease in sensitivity. Similar increases were observed for other cationic catecholamine neurotransmitters and the increases in current were greater than for anionic interferents such as ascorbic acid and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC). The CNT forest electrodes had high sensitivity at 90 Hz repetition rate when stimulated dopamine release was measured in Drosophila. The sensitivity, temporal resolution, and spatial resolution of these CNT forest modified disk electrodes facilitate enhanced electrochemical measurements of neurotransmitters release in vivo. PMID:22823497

  8. The Iridium (tm) system: Personal communications anytime, anyplace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatlelid, John E.; Casey, Larry

    1993-01-01

    The Iridium system is designed to provide handheld personal communications between diverse locations around the world at any time and without prior knowledge of the location of the personal units. This paper provides an overview of the system, the services it provides, its operation, and an overview of the commercial practices and relatively high volume satellite production techniques which will make the system cost effective. A constellation of 66 satellites will provide an orbiting, spherical-shell, infrastructure for this global calling capability. The satellites act as tall cellular towers and allow convenient operation for portable handheld telephones. The system will provide a full range of services including voice, paging, data, geolocation, and fax capabilities. Motorola is a world leader in the production of high volume, high quality, reliable telecommunications hardware. One of Iridium's goals is to apply these production techniques to high reliability space hardware. Concurrent engineering, high performance work teams, advanced manufacturing technologies, and improved assembly and test methods are some of the techniques that will keep the Iridium system cost effective. Mobile, global, flexible personal communications are coming that will allow anyone to call or receive a call from/to anyplace at anytime. The Iridium system will provide communications where none exist today. This connectivity will allow increased information transfer, open new markets for various business endeavors, and in general increase productivity and development.

  9. Iridium alloy Clad Vent Set manufacturing qualification studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulrich, George B.

    Metallurgical qualification studies to demonstrate the manufacturing readiness of the iridium alloy Clad Vent Set (CVS) for the General Purpose Heat Source program at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant are described. Microstructural data for various materials/test conditions are presented.

  10. Discovery of tantalum, rhenium, osmium, and iridium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, R.; Thoennessen, M.

    2012-09-15

    Currently, thirty-eight tantalum, thirty-eight rhenium, thirty-nine osmium, and thirty-eight iridium isotopes have been observed and the discovery of these isotopes is described here. For each isotope a brief synopsis of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  11. Iridium-catalyzed enantioselective hydrogenation of unsaturated heterocyclic acids.

    PubMed

    Song, Song; Zhu, Shou-Fei; Pu, Liu-Yang; Zhou, Qi-Lin

    2013-06-01

    Spiral binding: A highly enantioselective hydrogenation of unsaturated heterocyclic acids has been developed by using chiral iridium/spirophosphino oxazoline catalysts (see scheme; BArF(-) =tetrakis[3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]borate, Boc=tert-butoxycarbonyl). This reaction provided an efficient method for the preparation of optically active heterocyclic acids with excellent enantioselectivities. PMID:23610004

  12. Magnetostratigraphy, Late devonian iridium anomaly, and impact hypotheses

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, N.F.; Van der Voo, R. )

    1990-04-01

    Paleomagnetism, sedimentology, and fine-scale stratigraphy have been integrated to explain the origin of an iridium anomaly in the Late Devonian of Western Australia. Thermal demagnetization experiments were carried out on 93 specimens of marginal-slope limestone form the northern Canning Basin. Samples are from a condensed sequence of deep-water (> 100 m) Frutexites microstromatolites. Frutexites is a shrublike cyanobacterial organism that probably precipitated hematite, or a metastable precursor, from sea water. When plotted within the microstratigraphic framework for the study area, the observed characteristic directions from the sampled interval (14.5 cm thick) are in five discrete, layer-parallel, normal- and reversed-polarity zones. The measured northeast-southwest declinations and shallow inclinations probably record Late Devonian magnetostratigraphy on a centimetre scale. The Frutexites bed studied there occurs close to the Frasnian/Famennian (Late Devonian) boundary, a time of mass extinction of a wide variety of marine organisms throughout the world. Anomalously high iridium concentrations observed in the Frutexites bed have suggested to some authors that the mass extinction was caused by meteorite impact. This study concludes that iridium, which is present over the span of five layer-parallel magnetic reversals, was concentrated over a long period of time by biologic processes. Thus, the Canning Basin iridium anomaly may be unrelated to meteorite impact.

  13. The Iridium (tm) system: Personal communications anytime, anyplace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatlelid, John E.; Casey, Larry

    The Iridium system is designed to provide handheld personal communications between diverse locations around the world at any time and without prior knowledge of the location of the personal units. This paper provides an overview of the system, the services it provides, its operation, and an overview of the commercial practices and relatively high volume satellite production techniques which will make the system cost effective. A constellation of 66 satellites will provide an orbiting, spherical-shell, infrastructure for this global calling capability. The satellites act as tall cellular towers and allow convenient operation for portable handheld telephones. The system will provide a full range of services including voice, paging, data, geolocation, and fax capabilities. Motorola is a world leader in the production of high volume, high quality, reliable telecommunications hardware. One of Iridium's goals is to apply these production techniques to high reliability space hardware. Concurrent engineering, high performance work teams, advanced manufacturing technologies, and improved assembly and test methods are some of the techniques that will keep the Iridium system cost effective. Mobile, global, flexible personal communications are coming that will allow anyone to call or receive a call from/to anyplace at anytime. The Iridium system will provide communications where none exist today. This connectivity will allow increased information transfer, open new markets for various business endeavors, and in general increase productivity and development.

  14. Mononuclear iridium dinitrogen complexes bonded to zeolite HY

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Dong; Chen, Mingyang; Martinez-Macias, Claudia; Dixon, David A.; Gates, Bruce C.

    2014-11-07

    In this study, the adsorption of N2 on structurally well-defined dealuminated HY zeolite-supported iridium diethylene complexes was investigated. Iridium dinitrogen complexes formed when the sample was exposed to N2 in H2 at 298 K, as shown by infrared spectra recorded with isotopically labeled N2. Four supported species formed in various flowing gases: Ir(N2), Ir(N2)(N2), Ir(C2H5)(N2), and Ir(H)(N2). Their interconversions are summarized in a reaction network, showing, for example, that, in the presence of N2, Ir(N2) was the predominant dinitrogen species at temperatures of 273-373 K. Ir(CO)(N2) formed transiently in flowing CO, and in the presence of H2, rather stable iridium hydride complexes formed. Here, four structural models of each iridium complex bonded at the acidic sites of the zeolite were employed in a computational investigation, showing that the calculated vibrational frequencies agree well with experiment when full calculations are done at the level of density functional theory, independent of the size of the model of the zeolite.

  15. Achieving Zero Stress in Iridium, Chromium, and Nickle Thin Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broadway, David M.; Weimer, Jeffrey; Gurgew, Danielle; Lis, Tomasz; Ramsey, Brian D.; O'Dell, Stephen L.; Ames, A.; Bruni, R.

    2015-01-01

    We examine a method for achieving zero intrinsic stress in thin films of iridium, chromium, and nickel deposited by magnetron sputter deposition. The examination of the stress in these materials is motivated by efforts to advance the optical performance of light-weight x-ray space telescopes into the regime of sub-arc second resolution that rely on control of the film stress to values within 10-100 MPa. A characteristic feature of the intrinsic stress behavior in chromium and nickel is their sensitivity to the magnitude and sign of the intrinsic stress with argon gas pressure, including the existence of a critical pressure that results in zero film stress. This critical pressure scales linearly with the film's density. While the effect of stress reversal with argon pressure has been previously reported by Hoffman and others for nickel and chromium, we have discovered a similar behavior for iridium. Additionally, we have identified zero stress in iridium shortly after island coalescence. This feature of film growth is used for achieving a total internal stress of -2.89 MPa for a 15.8 nm thick iridium film. The surface roughness of this low-stress film was examined using scanning probe microscopy (SPM) and x-ray reflectivity (XRR) at CuKa and these results presented and discussed.

  16. Achieving zero stress in iridium, chromium, and nickel thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broadway, David M.; Weimer, Jeffrey; Gurgew, Danielle; Lis, Tomasz; Ramsey, Brian D.; O'Dell, Stephen L.; Gubarev, Mikhail; Ames, A.; Bruni, R.

    2015-05-01

    We examine a method for achieving zero intrinsic stress in thin films of iridium, chromium, and nickel deposited by magnetron sputter deposition. The examination of the stress in these materials is motivated by efforts to advance the optical performance of light-weight x-ray space telescopes into the regime of sub-arc second resolution. A characteristic feature of the intrinsic stress behavior in chromium and nickel is their sensitivity to the magnitude and sign of the intrinsic stress with argon gas pressure, including the existence of a critical pressure that results in zero film stress. This critical pressure scales linearly with the film's density. While the effect of stress reversal with argon pressure has been previously reported by Hoffman and others for nickel and chromium, we have discovered a similar behavior for the intrinsic stress in iridium films. Additionally, we have identified zero stress in iridium shortly after island coalescence in the high adatom mobility growth regime. This feature of film growth is used for achieving a total internal stress of -2.89 MPa for a 15.8 nm thick iridium film with a surface roughness of 5.0 +/- 0.5Å based on x-ray reflectivity (XRR) measurement at CuKα. The surface topography was also examined using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The examination of the stress in these films has been performed with a novel in-situ measurement device. The methodology and sensitivity of the in-situ instrument is also described herein.

  17. In situ, time-resolved normal incidence reflectance spectroscopy of polycrystalline platinum microelectrodes in aqueous electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Fromondi, Iosif; Shi, Ping; Mineshige, Atsushi; Scherson, Daniel A

    2005-01-13

    In situ normal incidence reflectance spectra of polycrystalline Pt microelectrodes have been monitored as a function of the applied potential in aqueous 0.5 M H(2)SO(4) using a He-Ne laser source (633 nm) and a beam splitter/microscope objective arrangement. Data recorded during voltammetric cycles in Ar-purged solutions revealed a linear correlation between the normalized change in reflectance, DeltaR/R = (R(s) - R(ref))/R(ref) (where R(s) and R(ref) are the light intensities measured by the detector at the sampling, s, and reference potentials, ref, respectively), and the extent of oxidation of the Pt surface over a wide coverage range. Reflectance spectra were also collected in CO-saturated 0.5 M H(2)SO(4) during chronocoulometric measurements involving judiciously selected limits for both the potential step and duty cycle parameters. Analysis of these results made it possible to extract contributions to the current derived from oxide formation during oxidation of adsorbed and bulk CO, based strictly on the optical response. PMID:16850980

  18. A MULTIPLEXED ASSAY FOR DETERMINATION OF NEUROTOXICANT EFFECTS ON SPONTANEOUS NETWORK ACTIVITY AND CELL VIABILITY FROM MICROELECTRODE ARRAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    AbstractTITLE: A MULTIPLEXED ASSAY FOR DETERMINATION OF NEUROTOXICANT EFFECTS ON SPONTANEOUS NETWORK ACTIVITY AND CELL VIABILITY FROM MICROELECTRODE ARRAYSABSTRACT BODY: Microelectrode array (MEA) recordings are increasingly being used as an in vitro method to detect and characte...

  19. Thin-Film Microelectrode Arrays for Biomedical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Karen C.

    Microfabrication offers many advantages for the batch manufacture of reliable, microscale electrode arrays. Such arrays have been used for highly localized recording and stimulation of neural tissue. This chapter gives a survey of the most commonly used materials and methods in the fabrication of microelectrodes, including planar silicon-based electrodes, three-dimensional silicon-based electrodes, sieve electrodes, and polymer-based structures. Several techniques for electrode modification with nanostructures are described, including carbon nanotube and conductive polymer nanotube coatings. Biocompatibility is described in the context of central nervous system response to chronically implanted devices, which leads to the eventual development of a glial scar.

  20. Optimization of microelectrode design for cortical recording based on thermal noise considerations.

    PubMed

    Lempka, Scott F; Johnson, Matthew D; Barnett, David W; Moffitt, Michael A; Otto, Kevin J; Kipke, Daryl R; McIntyre, Cameron C

    2006-01-01

    Intracortical microelectrode recordings of neural activity show great promise as control signals for neuroprosthetic applications. However, faithful, consistent recording of single unit spiking activity with chronically implanted silicon-substrate microelectrode arrays has proven difficult. Many approaches seek to enhance the long-term performance of microelectrode arrays by, for example, increasing electrode biocompatibility, decreasing electrode impedance, or improving electrode interface properties through application of small voltage pulses. The purpose of this study was to use computational models to optimize the design of microelectrodes. We coupled detailed models of the neural source signal, silicon-substrate microelectrodes, and thermal noise to define the electrode contact size that maximized the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Model analysis combined a multi-compartment cable model of a layer V cortical pyramidal neuron with a 3D finite element model of the head and microelectrode to define the amplitude and time course of the recorded signal. A spatially-lumped impedance model was parameterized with in vitro and in vivo spectroscopy data and used to define thermal noise as a function of electrode contact size. Our results suggest that intracortical microelectrodes with a contact size of ~380 microm2 will provide an increased SNR in vivo and improve the long-term recording capabilities of silicon-substrate microelectrode arrays. PMID:17947023

  1. A Tapered Aluminium Microelectrode Array for Improvement of Dielectrophoresis-Based Particle Manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Buyong, Muhamad Ramdzan; Larki, Farhad; Faiz, Mohd Syafiq; Hamzah, Azrul Azlan; Yunas, Jumrail; Majlis, Burhanuddin Yeop

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the dielectrophoretic force (FDEP) response of Aluminium Microelectrode Arrays with tapered profile is investigated through experimental measurements and numerical simulations. A standard CMOS processing technique with a step for the formation of a tapered profile resist is implemented in the fabrication of Tapered Aluminium Microelectrode Arrays (TAMA). The FDEP is investigated through analysis of the Clausius-Mossotti factor (CMF) and cross-over frequency (fxo). The performance of TAMA with various side wall angles is compared to that of microelectrodes with a straight cut sidewall profile over a wide range of frequencies through FEM numerical simulations. Additionally, electric field measurement (EFM) is performed through scanning probe microscopy (SPM) in order to obtain the region of force focus in both platforms. Results showed that the tapered profile microelectrodes with angles between 60° and 70° produce the highest electric field gradient on the particles. Also, the region of the strongest electric field in TAMA is located at the bottom and top edge of microelectrode while the strongest electric field in microelectrodes with straight cut profile is found at the top corner of the microelectrode. The latter property of microelectrodes improves the probability of capturing/repelling the particles at the microelectrode’s side wall. PMID:25970255

  2. Electrocatalysis with vitamin B sub 12 in water-in-oil microemulsions at carbon-fiber microelectrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Owlia, A.

    1989-01-01

    Microemulsions are clear, thermodynamically stable dispersions containing oil, surfactant and water. They are crude models of biological membranes and can be used to investigate some of the organizational influence of membranes in lipid and protein synthesis, energy transduction, ion and group transport, etc. This thesis concerns the investigation of microemulsion properties as media in which catalytic reduction of vicinal dibromides can take place with the electrochemically generated Co(I) form of Vitamin B{sub 12}. Methods to study fundamental properties of resistive w/o AOT/H{sub 2}O/isoctane were developed. Microelectrodes of approximate radius of 6 {mu}m were prepared and characterized. Nonlinear regression was applied to the analysis of steady state voltammograms obtained at carbon-fiber microelectrodes. Reversible regression models were used to analyze data for oxidation of ferrocene in acetonitrile with and without added electrolyte. An estimate of cell resistance in highly resistive media was obtained by including ohmic drop in the model for reversible electron transfer. The electrocatalytic reduction of 1,2-dibromoethane (EDB), 1,2-dibromobutane (DBB), and trans-1,2-dibromocyclohexane (DBCH) with Vitamin B{sub 12} in pH {le} 3 water MeCN and w/o microemulsions of AOT/H{sub 2}O/isoctane at carbon fiber microelectrode was investigated. The microviscosity of w/o microemulsions were estimated from the Stokes-Einstein equation using ferrocene as a probe. Results show that the diffusion of molecules in the microemulsions are similar to their diffusion in organic phase (isoctane). Nonlinear regression analysis of the data for AOT w/o microemulsions describing the dependence of D{prime} on C{sub x} enables an estimate of micelle diffusion coefficients.

  3. Highly conductive and flexible silver nanowire-based microelectrodes on biocompatible hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yumi; Lee, Hyungjin; Lee, Donghwa; Lee, Youngu

    2014-01-01

    We successfully fabricated silver nanowire (AgNW)-based microelectrodes on various substrates such as a glass and polydimethylsiloxane by using a photolithographic process for the first time. The AgNW-based microelectrodes exhibited excellent electrical conductivity and mechanical flexibility. We also demonstrated the direct transfer process of AgNW-based microelectrodes from a glass to a biocompatible polyacrylamide-based hydrogel. The AgNW-based microelectrodes on the biocompatible hydrogel showed excellent electrical performance. Furthermore, they showed great mechanical flexibility as well as superior stability under wet conditions. We anticipate that the AgNW-based microelectrodes on biocompatible hydrogel substrates can be a promising platform for realization of practical bioelectronics devices. PMID:25347028

  4. Formation of C-C Bonds via Iridium-Catalyzed Hydrogenation and Transfer Hydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Bower, John F; Krische, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    The formation of C-C bonds via catalytic hydrogenation and transfer hydrogenation enables carbonyl and imine addition in the absence of stoichiometric organometallic reagents. In this review, iridium-catalyzed C-C bond-forming hydrogenations and transfer hydrogenations are surveyed. These processes encompass selective, atom-economic methods for the vinylation and allylation of carbonyl compounds and imines. Notably, under transfer hydrogenation conditions, alcohol dehydrogenation drives reductive generation of organoiridium nucleophiles, enabling carbonyl addition from the aldehyde or alcohol oxidation level. In the latter case, hydrogen exchange between alcohols and π-unsaturated reactants generates electrophile-nucleophile pairs en route to products of hydro-hydroxyalkylation, representing a direct method for the functionalization of carbinol C-H bonds. PMID:21822399

  5. Iridium-catalysed direct C-C coupling of methanol and allenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, Joseph; Preetz, Angelika; Mesch, Ryan A.; Krische, Michael J.

    2011-04-01

    Methanol is an abundant (35 million metric tons per year), renewable chemical feedstock, yet its use as a one-carbon building block in fine chemical synthesis is highly underdeveloped. Using a homogeneous iridium catalyst developed in our laboratory, methanol engages in a direct C-C coupling with allenes to furnish higher alcohols that incorporate all-carbon quaternary centres, free of stoichiometric by-products. A catalytic mechanism that involves turnover-limiting methanol oxidation, a consequence of the high energetic demand of methanol dehydrogenation, is corroborated through a series of competition kinetics experiments. This process represents the first catalytic C-C coupling of methanol to provide discrete products of hydrohydroxymethylation.

  6. High performance optical oxygen sensors based on iridium complexes exhibiting interchromophore energy shuttling.

    PubMed

    Medina-Rodríguez, Santiago; Denisov, Sergey A; Cudré, Yanouk; Male, Louise; Marín-Suárez, Marta; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Alberto; Fernández-Sánchez, Jorge F; Tron, Arnaud; Jonusauskas, Gediminas; McClenaghan, Nathan D; Baranoff, Etienne

    2016-05-10

    A doubly pyrene-grafted bis-cyclometallated iridium complex with engineered electronically excited states demonstrates reversible electronic energy transfer between adjacent chromophores giving rise to extremely long-lived red luminescence in solution (τ = 480 μs). Time-resolved spectroscopic studies afforded determination of pertinent photophysical parameters including rates of energy transfer and energy distribution between constituent chromophores in the equilibrated excited molecule (ca. 98% on the organic chromophores). Incorporation into a nanostructured metal-oxide matrix (AP200/19) gave highly sensitive O2 sensing films, as the detection sensitivity was 200-300% higher than with the commonly used PtTFPP and approaches the sensitivity of the best O2-sensing dyes reported to date. PMID:27094953

  7. Formation of C-C Bonds via Iridium-Catalyzed Hydrogenation and Transfer Hydrogenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bower, John F.; Krische, Michael J.

    The formation of C-C bonds via catalytic hydrogenation and transfer hydrogenation enables carbonyl and imine addition in the absence of stoichiometric organometallic reagents. In this review, iridium-catalyzed C-C bond-forming hydrogenations and transfer hydrogenations are surveyed. These processes encompass selective, atom-economic methods for the vinylation and allylation of carbonyl compounds and imines. Notably, under transfer hydrogenation conditions, alcohol dehydrogenation drives reductive generation of organoiridium nucleophiles, enabling carbonyl addition from the aldehyde or alcohol oxidation level. In the latter case, hydrogen exchange between alcohols and π-unsaturated reactants generates electrophile-nucleophile pairs en route to products of hydro-hydroxyalkylation, representing a direct method for the functionalization of carbinol C-H bonds.

  8. Digital microfluidic operations on micro-electrode dot array architecture.

    PubMed

    Wang, G; Teng, D; Fan, S-K

    2011-12-01

    As digital microfluidics-based biochips find more applications, their complexity is expected to increase significantly owing to the trend of multiple and concurrent assays on the chip. There is a pressing need to deliver a top-down design methodology that the biochip designer can leverage the same level of computer-aided design support as the semi-conductor industry now does. Moreover, as microelectronics fabrication technology is scaling up and integrated device performance is improving, it is expected that these microfluidic biochips will be integrated with microelectronic components in next-generation system-on-chip designs. This study presents the analysis and experiments of digital microfluidic operations on a novel electrowetting-on-dielectric-based 'micro-electrode dot array architecture' that fosters a development path for hierarchical top-down design approach for digital microfluidics. The proposed architecture allows dynamic configurations and activations of identical basic microfluidic unit called 'micro-electrode cells' to design microfluidic components, layouts, routing, microfluidic operations and applications of the biochip hierarchically. Fundamental microfluidic operations have been successfully performed by the architecture. In addition, this novel architecture demonstrates a number of advantages and flexibilities over the conventional digital microfluidics in performing advanced microfluidic operations. PMID:22149873

  9. Simulation of dose distribution for iridium-192 brachytherapy source type-H01 using MCNPX

    SciTech Connect

    Purwaningsih, Anik

    2014-09-30

    Dosimetric data for a brachytherapy source should be known before it used for clinical treatment. Iridium-192 source type H01 was manufactured by PRR-BATAN aimed to brachytherapy is not yet known its dosimetric data. Radial dose function and anisotropic dose distribution are some primary keys in brachytherapy source. Dose distribution for Iridium-192 source type H01 was obtained from the dose calculation formalism recommended in the AAPM TG-43U1 report using MCNPX 2.6.0 Monte Carlo simulation code. To know the effect of cavity on Iridium-192 type H01 caused by manufacturing process, also calculated on Iridium-192 type H01 if without cavity. The result of calculation of radial dose function and anisotropic dose distribution for Iridium-192 source type H01 were compared with another model of Iridium-192 source.

  10. Simulation of dose distribution for iridium-192 brachytherapy source type-H01 using MCNPX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purwaningsih, Anik

    2014-09-01

    Dosimetric data for a brachytherapy source should be known before it used for clinical treatment. Iridium-192 source type H01 was manufactured by PRR-BATAN aimed to brachytherapy is not yet known its dosimetric data. Radial dose function and anisotropic dose distribution are some primary keys in brachytherapy source. Dose distribution for Iridium-192 source type H01 was obtained from the dose calculation formalism recommended in the AAPM TG-43U1 report using MCNPX 2.6.0 Monte Carlo simulation code. To know the effect of cavity on Iridium-192 type H01 caused by manufacturing process, also calculated on Iridium-192 type H01 if without cavity. The result of calculation of radial dose function and anisotropic dose distribution for Iridium-192 source type H01 were compared with another model of Iridium-192 source.

  11. In-Vivo Characterization of Glassy Carbon Micro-Electrode Arrays for Neural Applications and Histological Analysis of the Brain Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vomero, Maria

    The aim of this work is to fabricate and characterize glassy carbon Microelectrode Arrays (MEAs) for sensing and stimulating neural activity, and conduct histological analysis of the brain tissue after the implant to determine long-term performance. Neural applications often require robust electrical and electrochemical response over a long period of time, and for those applications we propose to replace the commonly used noble metals like platinum, gold and iridium with glassy carbon. We submit that such material has the potential to improve the performances of traditional neural prostheses, thanks to better charge transfer capabilities and higher electrochemical stability. Great interest and attention is given in this work, in particular, to the investigation of tissue response after several weeks of implants in rodents' brain motor cortex and the associated materials degradation. As part of this work, a new set of devices for Electrocorticography (ECoG) has been designed and fabricated to improve durability and quality of the previous generation of devices, designed and manufactured by the same research group in 2014. In-vivo long-term impedance measurements and brain activity recordings were performed to test the functionality of the neural devices. In-vitro electrical characterization of the carbon electrodes, as well as the study of the adhesion mechanisms between glassy carbon and different substrates is also part of the research described in this book.

  12. A carbon needle microelectrode decorated with TiO₂ nanosheets dominated by reactive facets as a highly electrocatalytic sensing element.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xue; Huang, Xin; Zhang, Qi; Hua, Zulin; Qin, Caidie; Qin, Qin

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate a highly efficient electrocatalytic activity of TiO2 nanosheets with reactive (001) facets grown on a carbon needle microelectrode (TiO2-CNE). This microelectrode is prepared by a simple hydrothermal process. Scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were used to characterize as-prepared TiO2-CNE. These methods confirm that the surface area-to-volume ratio and electron transfer rate of TiO2-CNE are considerably greater than those of the bare electrode. In addition, the amperometric response for acetaminophen (AP) oxidation is remarkably facilitated by 13.9 times at the TiO2-CNE by the enlarged surface area-to-volume ratio, as well as the exposure of high-energy (001) facets. Furthermore, the constructed electrochemical sensor displays excellent analytical performance for AP detection over a range of 0.002-100.0 μM, with a detection limit of 0.83 nM (S/N=3). The electrode was applied for the in vitro determination of AP in fish blood 30 min after injection in the abdominal cavity. Consequently, the present approach shows feasibility and great potential in constructing highly sensitive and low-consumption miniaturized electrochemical sensors in the field of biological applications. PMID:26078147

  13. HPLC-ED of low-molecular weight brominated phenols and tetrabromobisphenol A using pretreated carbon fiber microelectrode.

    PubMed

    Bartosova, Zdenka; Jirovsky, David; Riman, Daniel; Halouzka, Vladimir; Svidrnoch, Martin; Hrbac, Jan

    2014-05-01

    Electrochemically pretreated carbon fiber microelectrode was used to develop a simple, fast and sensitive HPLC-ECD method for the determination of brominated phenols. In addition to simple mono-, di- and tri-bromophenols (4-bromophenol, 2,4-dibromophenol, 2,6-dibromophenol, 2,4,6-tri-bromophenol) the possibility of electrochemical detection of 3,3',5,5'-tetrabromobisphenol A in oxidation mode is reported for the first time. The isocratic separation was achieved within 14 min using ternary mobile phase consisting of 50mM-phosphate buffer (pH 3.5), acetonitrile and methanol (35/15/50, v/v), and detection potential of E=+1450 mV (vs. Ag/AgCl). The carbon fiber microelectrode permitted to use high anodic potentials (up to +1800 mV vs. Ag/AgCl), the optimum analytical response was achieved at +1450 mV vs. Ag/AgCl. The limits of detection (LOD) for the studied analytes were within the range of 1.8-56.6 ng mL(-1). The developed method was applied to determination of brominated phenols in spiked water samples. Furthermore, after simple extraction with methyl tert-butyl ether, it was possible to quantify tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBA) in a piece of CRT monitor plastic casing. The found amount of TBBA was 10.22 mg kg(-1) (±0.43). PMID:24720971

  14. Circularly polarised phosphorescent photoluminescence and electroluminescence of iridium complexes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tian-Yi; Jing, Yi-Ming; Liu, Xuan; Zhao, Yue; Shi, Lin; Tang, Zhiyong; Zheng, You-Xuan; Zuo, Jing-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Nearly all the neutral iridium complexes widely used as dopants in PhOLEDs are racemic mixtures; however, this study observed that these complexes can be separated into stable optically active Λ and ∆ isomers and that their chirality is an intrinsic property. The circularly polarised phosphorescent photoluminescence (CPPPL) signals of Λ/Δ isomers are perfect mirror images with opposite polarisation and equal intensity exhibiting a “handedness” for the polarisation. For the first time, we applied the Λ/Δ iridium isomers as emitters in OLEDs, and the circularly polarised phosphorescent electroluminescence (CPPEL) spectra reveal completely positive or negative broad peaks consistent with the CPPPL spectra. The results demonstrate that the Λ/Δ isomers have potential application for 3D OLEDs because they can exhibit high efficiency and luminance, and 3D display technology based on circularly polarised light is the most comfortable for the eyes. PMID:26446521

  15. Iridium alloy clad vent set manufacturing qualification studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulrich, George B.

    1991-01-01

    Qualification studies have been successfully conducted to demonstrate iridium alloy Clad Vent Set (CVS) manufacturing readiness for the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) program at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. These studies were joint comparison evaluations of both the Y-12 Plant and EG&G Mound G-MAT) products. Note: EG&G-MAT formerly manufactured the iridium alloy CVS. The comparison evaluations involved work in a number of areas; however, only the CVS cup metallurgical evalution will be presented here. The initial metallurgical comparisons in conjunction with follow-up metallurgical work showed the Y-12 Plant CVS product to be comparable to the fully qualified (for Galileo and Ulysses missions) EG&G-MAT product. This allowed the Y-12 Plant to commence pilot production of CVS components for potential use in the CRAF and CASSINI missions.

  16. Network flexibility of the IRIDIUM (R) Global Mobile Satellite System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutcheson, Jonathan; Laurin, Mala

    1995-01-01

    The IRIDIUM system is a global personal communications system supported by a constellation of 66 low earth orbit (LEO) satellites and a collection of earth-based 'gateway' switching installations. Like traditional wireless cellular systems, coverage is achieved by a grid of cells in which bandwidth is reused for spectral efficiency. Unlike any cellular system ever built, the moving cells can be shared by multiple switching facilities. Noteworthy features of the IRIDIUM system include inter-satellite links, a GSM-based telephony architecture, and a geographically controlled system access process. These features, working in concert, permit flexible and reliable administration of the worldwide service area by gateway operators. This paper will explore this unique concept.

  17. Photoswitchable azobenzene-appended iridium(iii) complexes.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Miqueo, J; Altube, A; García-Lecina, E; Tron, A; McClenaghan, N D; Freixa, Z

    2016-09-21

    Iridium(iii) cyclometalated complexes have been used as models to study the effect that extended conjugation and substitution pattern has on the photochromic behavior of azobenzene-appended 2-phenylpyridyl (ppy) ligands. For this purpose four azobenzene-containing ppy ligands were synthesized. With these ligands, nine iridium(iii) complexes containing up to three appended azobenzenes were synthesized. Analysis of their photochromic behaviour by means of UV-vis and (1)H-NMR spectroscopy permitted us to conclude that the light-induced trans-to-cis isomerization of the azobenzene was strongly inhibited upon coordination to the Ir(iii) cation when the electronic conjugation was extended along the whole ligand. The use of an aliphatic spacer unit (either -CH2- or -OCH2-) between the azobenzene and the ppy fragment of the ligand sufficed to disrupt the electronic communication, and obtain photochromic organometallic complexes. PMID:27460186

  18. Water-soluble iridium phosphorescent complexes for OLED applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eum, Min-Sik; Yoon, Heekoo; Kim, Tae Hyung

    2012-09-01

    Newly prepared water-soluble iridium phosphorescent complexes, trans-[Ir(ppy)(PAr3)2(H)L]0,+ (ppy = bidentate 2-phenylpyridinato anionic ligand; L= Cl (1), CO (2), CN- (3); H being trans to the nitrogen of ppy ligand; PAr3 (TPPTS) = P(m-C6H4SO3Na)3), have been synthesized and characterized. Those complexes containing water-soluble phosphine ligands can emit any color region as altering cyclometalated ligands in aqueous media with high quantum efficiencies. Even though these water-soluble phosphorescent iridium complexes can be the sensing probe for toxic CO gas and CN anion, they will be capable of promising materials in the solution processible OLED applications.

  19. Olefin hydroaryloxylation catalyzed by pincer-iridium complexes.

    PubMed

    Haibach, Michael C; Guan, Changjian; Wang, David Y; Li, Bo; Lease, Nicholas; Steffens, Andrew M; Krogh-Jespersen, Karsten; Goldman, Alan S

    2013-10-01

    Aryl alkyl ethers, which are widely used throughout the chemical industry, are typically produced via the Williamson ether synthesis. Olefin hydroaryloxylation potentially offers a much more atom-economical alternative. Known acidic catalysts for hydroaryloxylation, however, afford very poor selectivity. We report the organometallic-catalyzed intermolecular hydroaryloxylation of unactivated olefins by iridium "pincer" complexes. These catalysts do not operate via the hidden Brønsted acid pathway common to previously developed transition-metal-based catalysts. The reaction is proposed to proceed via olefin insertion into an iridium-alkoxide bond, followed by rate-determining C-H reductive elimination to yield the ether product. The reaction is highly chemo- and regioselective and offers a new approach to the atom-economical synthesis of industrially important ethers and, potentially, a wide range of other oxygenates. PMID:24028199

  20. Platinum nanowire microelectrode arrays for neurostimulation applications: Fabrication, characterization, and in-vitro retinal cell stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whalen, John J., III

    Implantable electrical neurostimulating devices are being developed for a number of applications, including artificial vision through retinal stimulation. The epiretinal prosthesis will use a two-dimensional array microelectrodes to address individual cells of the retina. MEMS fabrication processes can produce arrays of microelectrodes with these dimensions, but there are two critical issues that they cannot satisfy. One, the stimulating electrodes are the only part of the implanted electrical device that penetrate through the water impermeable package, and must do so without sacrificing hermeticity. Two, As electrode size decreases, the current density (A cm-2 ) increases, due to increased electrochemical impedance. This reduces the amount of charge that can be safely injected into the tissue. To date, MEMS processing method, cannot produce electrode arrays with good, prolonged hermetic properties. Similarly, MEMS approaches do not account for the increased impedance caused by decreased surface area. For these reasons there is a strong motivation for the development of a water-impermeable, substrate-penetrating electrode array with low electrochemical impedance. This thesis presents a stimulating electrode array fabricated from platinum nanowires using a modified electrochemical template synthesis approach. Nanowires are electrochemically deposited from ammonium hexachloroplatinate solution into lithographically patterned nanoporous anodic alumina templates to produce microarrays of platinum nanowires. The platinum nanowires penetrating through the ceramic aluminum oxide template serve as parallel electrical conduits through the water impermeable, electrically insulating substrate. Electrode impedance can be adjusted by either controlling the nanowire hydrous platinum oxide content or by partially etching the alumina template to expose additional surface area. A stepwise approach to this project was taken. First, the electrochemistry of ammonium

  1. Microelectrode array with integrated nanowire FET switches for high-resolution retinal prosthetic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sangmin; Jung, Suk Won; Ahn, Jaehyun; Yoo, Hyung Jung; Oh, Sung Jin; ‘Dan' Cho, Dong-Il

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, a novel microelectrode array integrated with nanowire field-effect transistor (FET) switches is developed for retinal prosthetic systems. Retinal prosthetic systems require many electrodes (generally more than several hundreds) and this paper presents a novel method of integrating silicon nanowire-FET switches with microelectrodes that can significantly reduce wiring complexity. Also, in order to fit the curvature of an eyeball, the silicon nanowire FETs are transferred to a flexible substrate. In order to demonstrate the concept of using FETs for switching collocated retinal microelectrodes, a microelectrode array with 32 × 32 pixels is fabricated, which has 1,024 microelectrodes. Using the FET switches in a two-dimensional array addressing configuration, 1,024 microelectrodes are addressed by only 64 lines (32 for scan and 32 for data), as compared to requiring 1,024 lines in the conventional one-to-one configuration. With the gate voltage of -5 V, the threshold voltage, current on/off ratio, and on-resistance of the fabricated silicon nanowire-FET switch are -0.4 V, 1 × 107, and 37-47 kΩ, respectively. The maximum allowable current injection limit of the silicon nanowire-FET switch integrated microelectrode is 44 μA with a pulse duration of 1 ms. These results show an excellent potential for high-resolution retinal prosthetic systems.

  2. Luminescence of carbazolyl-containing polymers doped with iridium chelates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skryshevskii, Yu. A.

    2008-05-01

    White light emission is shown to be obtainable at room temperature through the mixing of poly-N-vinylcarbazole (PVC) host fluorescence with fac-tris(2-phenylpyridyl)Ir(III) [Ir(ppy)3] and bis[2-(2'-benzothienyl)pyridinato-N,C3'](acetylacetonate)iridium (III) [Btp2Ir(acac)] dopant phosphorescence whereas at very low temperature through the superposition of poly-N-epoxypropyl-3,6-dibromocarbazole (3,6-DBrPEPC) host and Btp2Ir(acac) dopant phosphorescence emissions. The balance between basic colors is adjusted by the variation of triplet-emitter dopant concentrations. Spin-allowed singlet-singlet energy transfer from the host to iridium chelate dopants by the Forster mechanism is the dominant process in PVC. Spin-forbidden triplet-singlet transfer by the Forster mechanism from the host to the dopant occurs at low temperatures in 3,6-DBrPEPC due to strong spin-orbit coupling induced by the heavy bromine atoms. Spin-allowed transfer from the same host’s triplet excited state to the iridium chelate occurs via electron exchange at high temperatures.

  3. Thermodynamic characterization of hydrogen interaction with iridium polyhydride complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Zidan, R.A.; Rocheleau, R.E.

    1999-01-01

    Hydrogen interaction with solid iridium complexes IrXH{sub 2}(PPr3{sup i}){sub 2} (X=Cl, I) was investigated. Gaseous hydrogen was found to react reversibly with solid chloro-iridium complex IrClH{sub 2}(PPr3{sup i}){sub 2} forming IrClH{sub 2}(PPr3{sup i}){sub 2}H{sub 2}. The relative partial molal enthalpy and entropy were obtained from equilibrium isotherms at different hydrogen concentrations. The decrease in entropy with increasing hydrogen concentration and the absence of plateaus in the equilibrium isotherms were consistent with a single phase solid solution with two chemical components. Hydrogen release from solid iodo-iridium complex IrIH{sub 2}(PPr3{sup i}){sub 2}H{sub 2} was not observed at temperatures up to 350 K, indicating stronger hydrogen bonding. {copyright} {ital 1999 Materials Research Society.}

  4. Advances in iridium alloy processing in FY 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Ohriner, E.K.; Heestand, R.L.

    1989-12-01

    A new process for the production of DOP-26 iridium alloy blanks is being evaluated and optimized. The alloy is prepared by electron-beam (EB) melting of Ir-0.3% W powder compacts followed by doping with aluminum and thorium by arc melting. Drop-cast alloy rod segments are EB welded together into an electrode that is arc melted to produce an ingot for extrusion and subsequent sheet rolling and blanking. Initial results showed rejections for ultrasonic indications for alloy blanks fabricated by this process to be very low. Subsequently, some ingots have exhibited delaminations in the sheet, leading to blank rejection rates similar to that obtained in the standard process. The occurrence of ultrasonic indications in the blanks are now shown to be associated with the presence of subsurface flaws in the arc-melted ingot that are not healed during extrusion or the subsequent rolling of the sheet. There is substantial evidence indicating that the occurrence of surface and subsurface flaws in the ingots are exacerbated by the relatively small clearances between the electrode and the side wall of the 51-mm-diam mold. These results obtained from experimental melts, with both stainless steel and scrap iridium alloy materials, have led to a recommendation for arc melting in a large 63-mm-diam mold. The fabrication of blanks from this larger diameter ingot is under way. The efficiency of iridium material utilization in the new process is also discussed. 2 refs., 23 figs., 12 tabs.

  5. Mononuclear iridium dinitrogen complexes bonded to zeolite HY

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yang, Dong; Chen, Mingyang; Martinez-Macias, Claudia; Dixon, David A.; Gates, Bruce C.

    2014-11-07

    In this study, the adsorption of N2 on structurally well-defined dealuminated HY zeolite-supported iridium diethylene complexes was investigated. Iridium dinitrogen complexes formed when the sample was exposed to N2 in H2 at 298 K, as shown by infrared spectra recorded with isotopically labeled N2. Four supported species formed in various flowing gases: Ir(N2), Ir(N2)(N2), Ir(C2H5)(N2), and Ir(H)(N2). Their interconversions are summarized in a reaction network, showing, for example, that, in the presence of N2, Ir(N2) was the predominant dinitrogen species at temperatures of 273-373 K. Ir(CO)(N2) formed transiently in flowing CO, and in the presence of H2, rather stable iridiummore » hydride complexes formed. Here, four structural models of each iridium complex bonded at the acidic sites of the zeolite were employed in a computational investigation, showing that the calculated vibrational frequencies agree well with experiment when full calculations are done at the level of density functional theory, independent of the size of the model of the zeolite.« less

  6. Mono- and bis-tolylterpyridine iridium(III) complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkle, Lindsay M.; Young, Jr., Victor G.; Mann, Kent R.

    2012-01-20

    The first structure report of trichlorido[4'-(p-tolyl)-2,2':6',2{double_prime}-terpyridine]iridium(III) dimethyl sulfoxide solvate, [IrCl{sub 3}(C{sub 22}H{sub 17}N{sub 3})] {center_dot} C{sub 2}H{sub 6}OS, (I), is presented, along with a higher-symmetry setting of previously reported bis[4'-(p-tolyl)-2,2':6',2{double_prime}-terpyridine]iridium(III) tris(hexafluoridophosphate) acetonitrile disolvate, [Ir(C{sub 22}H{sub 17}N{sub 3})2](PF{sub 6}){sub 3} {center_dot} 2C{sub 2}H{sub 3}N, (II) [Yoshikawa, Yamabe, Kanehisa, Kai, Takashima & Tsukahara (2007). Eur. J. Inorg. Chem. pp. 1911-1919]. For (I), the data were collected with synchrotron radiation and the dimethyl sulfoxide solvent molecule is disordered over three positions, one of which is an inversion center. The previously reported structure of (II) is presented in the more appropriate C2/c space group. The iridium complex and one PF{sub 6}{sup -} anion lie on twofold axes in this structure, making half of the molecule unique.

  7. Effects of poly(ethylene glycol) tert-octylphenyl ether on tris(2-phenylpyridine)iridium(III)-tripropylamine electrochemiluminescence.

    PubMed

    Cole, Christopher; Muegge, Brian D; Richter, Mark M

    2003-02-01

    The effects of the nonionic surfactant Triton X-100 (poly(ethylene glycol) tert-octylphenyl ether) on the properties of tris(2-phenylpyridine)iridium(III) (Ir(ppy)3, where ppy = 2-phenylpyridine, electrochemiluminescence (ECL) have been investigated. Anodic oxidation of Ir(ppy)3 produces ECL in the presence of tri-n-propylamine (TPrA) in aqueous surfactant solution. Increases in ECL efficiency (> or = 10-fold) and TPrA oxidation current (> or = 2.0-fold) have been observed in surfactant media. The data support adsorption of surfactant on the electrode surface, thus facilitating TPrA and Ir(ppy)3 oxidation and leading to higher ECL efficiencies. PMID:12585490

  8. Semiconductor films on flexible iridium substrates

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit

    2005-03-29

    A laminate semiconductor article includes a flexible substrate, an optional biaxially textured oxide buffer system on the flexible substrate, a biaxially textured Ir-based buffer layer on the substrate or the buffer system, and an epitaxial layer of a semiconductor. Ir can serve as a substrate with an epitaxial layer of a semiconductor thereon.

  9. The robo-pigeon based on the multiple brain regions synchronization implanted microelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Huai, Rui-Tuo; Yang, Jun-Qing; Wang, Hui

    2016-07-01

    Almost all multichannel microelectrodes are only applied to the same nucleus. The multiple brain regions synchronization implanted microelectrodes can be implanted in the several brain regions at the same time, when used in the robo-animal, which can reduce the operation process, shorten animals operation time. Due to electrode position relatively fixed, errors caused by each separately implanted electrode were reduced and the animal control effect was greatly increased compared to the original electrodes. The electrode fixed time was also extended. This microelectrode provided beneficial reference function for the study of the free state of small animals in different brain regions. PMID:27459594

  10. Transoral resection of supraglottic tumours using microelectrodes (54 cases).

    PubMed

    Basterra, Jorge; Esteban, Francisco; Reboll, Rosa; Menoyo, Alicia; Zapater, Enrique

    2014-09-01

    We present the oncological and functional results of surgical transoral resection of supraglottic laryngeal carcinomas using microelectrodes. This prospective multicentre trial was conducted from 2005 to 2009. It included 54 patients (23 T1, 14 T2, and 17 T3) with supraglottic cancer, with a follow-up of 2 years. Outcome measurements were: tracheostomy, hospital stay, nasogastric feeding and recurrences. Four patients required permanent tracheostomies. The mean hospital stay was 8.1 days. Temporary nasogastric feeding was necessary in 13 patients. Postoperative complications included two incidences of haemorrhage requiring surgical intervention and one pneumonia. Four patients out of eight with T3 tumours had regional recurrence; in these cases salvage surgery was performed: two cases by the transoral approach and six total laryngectomies. Clinical results were similar to those obtained with CO2 laser therapy. We list other advantages of the technique and include a literature review. PMID:24695940

  11. Independent positioning of microelectrodes for multisite recordings in vitro.

    PubMed

    Albus, Klaus; Sinske, Kurt; Heinemann, Uwe

    2009-01-30

    A robust and easy to handle, inexpensive multisite recording system is described which allows independent positioning of several microelectrodes with high precision axial movement of each electrode. The basic units of the system are a manually operated manipulator for left-right and up-down movement and a micrometer for positioning in the direction of the micrometer axis. The micrometer is actuated with a DC-motor operated by a stand-alone controller module allowing for remote control of the motor in either step mode or continuous mode. The multisite recording system has been proven to allow stable simultaneous recordings of single unit and population activities, extracellular ion concentrations and intracellular potentials in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHSCs) of rat. PMID:18822315

  12. Evaluation of Molybdenum as a Surrogate for Iridium in the GPHS Weld Development

    SciTech Connect

    Stine, Andrew Martin; Pierce, Stanley W.; Moniz, Paul F.

    2015-10-17

    The welding equipment used for welding iridium containers (clads) at Los Alamos National Laboratory is twenty five years old and is undergoing an upgrade. With the upgrade, there is a requirement for requalification of the welding process, and the opportunity for process improvement. Testing of the new system and requalification will require several welds on iridium test parts and clads, and any efforts to improve the process will add to the need for iridium parts. The extreme high cost of iridium imposes a severe limitation on the extent of test welding that can be done. The 2 inch diameter, 0.027 inch thick, iridium blank disc that the clad cup is formed from, is useful for initial weld trials, but it costs $5000. The development clad sets needed for final tests and requalification cost $15,000 per set. A solution to iridium cost issue would be to do the majority of the weld development on a less expensive surrogate metal with similar weld characteristics. One such metal is molybdenum. Since its melting index (melting temperature x thermal conductivity) is closest to iridium, welds on molybdenum should be similar in size for a given weld power level. Molybdenum is inexpensive; a single 2 inch molybdenum disc costs only $9. In order to evaluate molybdenum as a surrogate for iridium, GTA welds were first developed to provide full penetration on 0.030 inch thick molybdenum discs at speeds of 20, 25, and 30 inches per minute (ipm). These weld parameters were then repeated on the standard 0.027 inch thick iridium blanks. The top surface and bottom surface (root) width and grain structure of the molybdenum and iridium welds were compared, and similarities were evident between the two metals. Due to material and thickness differences, the iridium welds were approximately 35% wider than the molybdenum welds. A reduction in iridium weld current of 35% produce welds slightly smaller than the molybdenum welds yet showed that current could be scaled according to molybdenum/iridium

  13. Rockot Launch Vehicle Commercial Operations for Grace and Iridium Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viertel, Y.; Kinnersley, M.; Schumacher, I.

    2002-01-01

    The GRACE mission and the IRIDIUM mission on ROCKOT launch vehicle are presented. Two identical GRACE satellites to measure in tandem the gravitational field of the earth with previously unattainable accuracy - it's called the Gravity Research and Climate Experiment, or and is a joint project of the U.S. space agency, NASA and the German Centre for Aeronautics and Space Flight, DLR. In order to send the GRACE twins into a 500x500 km , 89deg. orbit, the Rockot launch vehicle was selected. A dual launch of two Iridium satellites was scheduled for June 2002 using the ROCKOT launch vehicle from Plesetsk Cosmodrome in Northern Russia. This launch will inject two replacement satellites into a low earth orbit (LEO) to support the maintenance of the Iridium constellation. In September 2001, Eurockot successfully carried out a "Pathfinder Campaign" to simulate the entire Iridium mission cycle at Plesetsk. The campaign comprised the transport of simulators and related equipment to the Russian port-of-entry and launch site and also included the integration and encapsulation of the simulators with the actual Rockot launch vehicle at Eurockot's dedicated launch facilities at Plesetsk Cosmodrome. The pathfinder campaign lasted four weeks and was carried out by a joint team that also included Khrunichev, Russian Space Forces and Eurockot personnel on the contractors' side. The pathfinder mission confirmed the capability of Eurockot Launch Services to perform the Iridium launch on cost and on schedule at Plesetsk following Eurockot's major investment in international standard preparation, integration and launch facilities including customer facilities and a new hotel. In 2003, Eurockot will also launch the Japanese SERVI'S-1 satellite for USEF. The ROCKOT launch vehicle is a 3 stage liquid fuel rocket whose first 2 stages have been adapted from the Russian SS-19. A third stage, called "Breeze", can be repeatedly ignited and is extraordinarily capable of manoeuvre. Rockot can place

  14. Characterization of Iridium Coated Rhenium Used in High-Temperature, Radiation-Cooled Rocket Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stulen, R. H.; Boehme, D. R.; Clift, W. M.; McCarty, K. F.

    1990-01-01

    Materials used for radiation-cooled rocket thrusters must be capable of surviving under extreme conditions of high-temperatures and oxidizing environments. While combustion efficiency is optimized at high temperatures, many refractory metals are unsuitable for thruster applications due to rapid material loss from the formation of volatile oxides. This process occurs during thruster operation by reaction of the combustion products with the material surface. Aerojet Technical Systems has developed a thruster cone chamber constructed of Re coated with Ir on the inside surface where exposure to the rocket exhaust occurs. Re maintains its structural integrity at high temperature and the Ir coating is applied as an oxidation barrier. Ir also forms volatile oxide species (IrO2 and IrO3) but at a considerably slower rate than Re. In order to understand the performance limits of Ir-coated Re thrusters, we are investigating the interdiffusion and oxidation kinetics of Ir/Re. The formation of iridium and rhenium oxides has been monitored in situ by Raman spectroscopy during high temperature exposure to oxygen. For pure Ir, the growth of oxide films as thin as approximately 200 A could be easily detected and the formation of IrO2 was observed at temperatures as low as 600 C. Ir/Re diffusion test specimens were prepared by magnetron sputtering of Ir on Re substrates. Concentration profiles were determined by sputter Auger depth profiles of the heat treated specimens. Significant interdiffusion was observed at temperatures as low as 1000 C. Measurements of the activation energy suggest that below 1350 C, the dominant diffusion path is along defects, most likely grain boundaries, rather than bulk diffusion through the grains. The phases that form during interdiffusion have been examined by x ray diffraction. Analysis of heated test specimens indicates that the Ir-Re reaction produces a solid solution phase of Ir dissolved in the HCP structure of Re.

  15. Investigations of redox magnetohydrodynamic fluid flow at microelectrode arrays using microbeads.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Emily C; Weston, Melissa C; Fritsch, Ingrid

    2010-04-01

    Microbeads are used to track fluid flow over microband electrode arrays to investigate fundamentals of redox magnetohydrodynamics (redox-MHD) in a confined solution. The results may lead toward the design of micro total analysis systems with microfluidics based on the redox-MHD concept. Ion flux was generated by reduction and oxidation of electroactive potassium ferri- and ferrocyanide at selected individually addressable microelectrodes in the array. An external magnetic field was produced by a small, permanent magnet (0.38 T) placed directly below the array with its field perpendicular to the plane of the array. The cross product of ion flux and magnetic field produces a magnetic force (a portion of the Lorentz force equation) that causes the fluid to rotate around the active electrodes. Velocities up to 1.4 mm/s are demonstrated here. The effects on velocities were obtained for different concentrations of redox species, widths of electrodes, gaps between electrodes, and combinations of anodically- and cathodically polarized electrodes. The microbeads allowed mapping of flow patterns and velocities, both parallel and perpendicular to the array chip. The influence of counteracting shear forces, drag along the walls, and reinforcing flow are discussed. A significant result is the fairly flat flow profile across 650 microm, attained between electrodes that are oppositely biased. PMID:20210341

  16. Leptin counteracts the hypoxia-induced inhibition of spontaneously firing hippocampal neurons: a microelectrode array study.

    PubMed

    Gavello, Daniela; Rojo-Ruiz, Jonathan; Marcantoni, Andrea; Franchino, Claudio; Carbone, Emilio; Carabelli, Valentina

    2012-01-01

    Besides regulating energy balance and reducing body-weight, the adipokine leptin has been recently shown to be neuroprotective and antiapoptotic by promoting neuronal survival after excitotoxic and oxidative insults. Here, we investigated the firing properties of mouse hippocampal neurons and the effects of leptin pretreatment on hypoxic damage (2 hours, 3% O(2)). Experiments were carried out by means of the microelectrode array (MEA) technology, monitoring hippocampal neurons activity from 11 to 18 days in vitro (DIV). Under normoxic conditions, hippocampal neurons were spontaneously firing, either with prevailing isolated and randomly distributed spikes (11 DIV), or with patterns characterized by synchronized bursts (18 DIV). Exposure to hypoxia severely impaired the spontaneous activity of hippocampal neurons, reducing their firing frequency by 54% and 69%, at 11 and 18 DIV respectively, and synchronized their firing activity. Pretreatment with 50 nM leptin reduced the firing frequency of normoxic neurons and contrasted the hypoxia-induced depressive action, either by limiting the firing frequency reduction (at both ages) or by increasing it to 126% (in younger neurons). In order to find out whether leptin exerts its effect by activating large conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels (BK), as shown on rat hippocampal neurons, we applied the BK channel blocker paxilline (1 µM). Our data show that paxilline reversed the effects of leptin, both on normoxic and hypoxic neurons, suggesting that the adipokine counteracts hypoxia through BK channels activation in mouse hippocampal neurons. PMID:22848520

  17. Leptin Counteracts the Hypoxia-Induced Inhibition of Spontaneously Firing Hippocampal Neurons: A Microelectrode Array Study

    PubMed Central

    Gavello, Daniela; Rojo-Ruiz, Jonathan; Marcantoni, Andrea; Franchino, Claudio; Carbone, Emilio; Carabelli, Valentina

    2012-01-01

    Besides regulating energy balance and reducing body-weight, the adipokine leptin has been recently shown to be neuroprotective and antiapoptotic by promoting neuronal survival after excitotoxic and oxidative insults. Here, we investigated the firing properties of mouse hippocampal neurons and the effects of leptin pretreatment on hypoxic damage (2 hours, 3% O2). Experiments were carried out by means of the microelectrode array (MEA) technology, monitoring hippocampal neurons activity from 11 to 18 days in vitro (DIV). Under normoxic conditions, hippocampal neurons were spontaneously firing, either with prevailing isolated and randomly distributed spikes (11 DIV), or with patterns characterized by synchronized bursts (18 DIV). Exposure to hypoxia severely impaired the spontaneous activity of hippocampal neurons, reducing their firing frequency by 54% and 69%, at 11 and 18 DIV respectively, and synchronized their firing activity. Pretreatment with 50 nM leptin reduced the firing frequency of normoxic neurons and contrasted the hypoxia-induced depressive action, either by limiting the firing frequency reduction (at both ages) or by increasing it to 126% (in younger neurons). In order to find out whether leptin exerts its effect by activating large conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels (BK), as shown on rat hippocampal neurons, we applied the BK channel blocker paxilline (1 µM). Our data show that paxilline reversed the effects of leptin, both on normoxic and hypoxic neurons, suggesting that the adipokine counteracts hypoxia through BK channels activation in mouse hippocampal neurons. PMID:22848520

  18. Low Frequency Activity of Cortical Networks on Microelectrode Arrays is Differentially Altered by Bicuculline and Carbaryl

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thousands of chemicals need to be characterized for their neurotoxicity potential. Neurons grown on microelectrode arrays (MEAs) are an in vitro model used to screen chemicals for functional effects on neuronal networks. Typically, after removal of low frequency components, effec...

  19. Microelectrode Arrays: A Physiologically-based Neurotoxicity Testing Platform for the 21st Century

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microelectrode Arrays (MEAs) have been in use over the past decade and a half to study multiple aspects ofelectrically excitable cells. Inparticular, MEAs have been applied to explore the pharmacological and toxicological effects ofnumerous compounds on spontaneous activity ofneu...

  20. Synchronizing microelectrode and electronic goniometer data using a pseudo-random binary signal.

    PubMed

    Moore, Tyler Robert; Jacobs, Rennie Underwood; Yang, Alexander Cheung; Richter, Erich Oscar

    2013-04-01

    Intra-operative investigation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) requires concurrent measurement of microelectrode voltage, electrode depth and joint movement during deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery. Commercial solutions to this problem exist but are more expensive. Multiple instruments from different manufacturers can collect the same data, but data from incompatible instruments are collected on disparate clocks, precluding quantitative analysis. A pseudo-random binary signal recorded simultaneously by each set of instruments allows for chronological reconciliation. A custom program collects microelectrode data while simultaneously sending a pseudo-random binary signal to instruments measuring joint movement. The record of this signal is later used to express microelectrode voltage and joint position in a single chronological frame of reference. ClockSynch was used in 15 DBS procedures. After each surgery, records of microelectrode and joint movement were successfully chronologically reconciled. In conclusion, a pseudo-random binary signal integrates disparate systems of instrumentation at a significantly decreased cost. PMID:23547750

  1. Evaluation of a Microelectrode Arrays for Neurotoxicity Testing Using a Chemical Training Set

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microelectrode array (MEA) approaches have been proposed as a tool for detecting functional changes in electrically active cells, including neurons, exposed to drugs, chemicals, or particles. However, conventional single well MEA systems lack the throughput necessary for screenin...

  2. Evaluation of Multi-Well Microelectrode Arrays for Neurotoxicity Screening Using a Chemical Training Set

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microelectrode array (MEA) approaches have been proposed as a tool for detecting functional changes in electrically-excitable cells, including neurons, exposed to drugs, chemical or particles. However, conventional single well-MEA systems lack the throughput necessary for screen...

  3. Microelectrode miRNA sensors enabled by enzymeless electrochemical signal amplification.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tanyu; Viennois, Emilie; Merlin, Didier; Wang, Gangli

    2015-08-18

    Better detections of circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) as disease biomarkers could advance diseases diagnosis and treatment. Current analysis methods or sensors for research and applications are challenged by the low concentrations and wide dynamic range (from aM to nM) of miRNAs in a physiological sample. Here, we report a one-step label-free electrochemical sensor comprising a triple-stem DNA-redox probe structure on a gold microelectrode. A new signal amplification mechanism without the need of a redox enzyme is introduced. The novel strategy overcomes the fundamental limitations of microelectrode DNA sensors that fail to generate detectable current, which is primarily due to the limited amount of redox probes in response to the target analyte binding. By employing a reductant, tris(2-carboxyethyl) phosphine hydrochloride (TCEP) in the detection buffer solution, each redox molecule on the detection probe is cyclically oxidized at the electrode and reduced by the reductant; thus, the signal is amplified in situ during the detection period. The combined merits in the diagnosis power of cyclic voltammetry and the high sensitivity of pulse voltammetry enable parallel analysis for method validation and optimization previously inaccessible. As such, the detection limit of miRNA-122 was 0.1 fM via direct readout, with a wide detection range from sub fM to nM. The detection time is within minutes, which is a significant improvement over other macroscopic sensors and other relevant techniques such as quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The high selectivity of the developed sensors is demonstrated by the discrimination against two most similar family sequences: miR-122-3p present in serum and 2-mismatch synthetic RNA sequence. Interference such as nonspecific adsorption, a common concern in sensor development, is reduced to a negligible amount by adopting a multistep surface modification strategy. Importantly, unlike qRT-PCR, the

  4. Real-Time Characterization of Formation and Breakup of Iridium Clusters in Highly Dealuminated Zeolite Y

    SciTech Connect

    Uzun, Alper; Gates, Bruce C.

    2009-01-15

    The chemistry of formation of iridium clusters from mononuclear iridium diethylene complexes anchored in dealuminated Y zeolite, and their subsequent breakup -- all including changes in the metal-metal, metal-support, and metal-ligand interactions -- is demonstrated by time-resolved EXAFS, XANES, and IR spectroscopy.

  5. Phosphorescent Imaging of Living Cells Using a Cyclometalated Iridium(III) Complex

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Dik-Lung; Zhong, Hai-Jing; Fu, Wai-Chung; Chan, Daniel Shiu-Hin; Kwan, Hiu-Yee; Fong, Wang-Fun; Chung, Lai-Hon; Wong, Chun-Yuen; Leung, Chung-Hang

    2013-01-01

    A cell permeable cyclometalated iridium(III) complex has been developed as a phosphorescent probe for cell imaging. The iridium(III) solvato complex [Ir(phq)2(H2O]2)] preferentially stains the cytoplasm of both live and dead cells with a bright luminescence. PMID:23457478

  6. Highly Doped Polycrystalline Silicon Microelectrodes Reduce Noise in Neuronal Recordings In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Rajarshi; Jackson, Nathan; Patel, Chetan; Muthuswamy, Jit

    2013-01-01

    The aims of this study are to 1) experimentally validate for the first time the nonlinear current-potential characteristics of bulk doped polycrystalline silicon in the small amplitude voltage regimes (0–200 μV) and 2) test if noise amplitudes (0–15 μV) from single neuronal electrical recordings get selectively attenuated in doped polycrystalline silicon microelectrodes due to the above property. In highly doped polycrystalline silicon, bulk resistances of several hundred kilo-ohms were experimentally measured for voltages typical of noise amplitudes and 9–10 kΩ for voltages typical of neural signal amplitudes (>150–200 μV). Acute multiunit measurements and noise measurements were made in n = 6 and n = 8 anesthetized adult rats, respectively, using polycrystalline silicon and tungsten microelectrodes. There was no significant difference in the peak-to-peak amplitudes of action potentials recorded from either microelectrode (p > 0.10). However, noise power in the recordings from tungsten microelectrodes (26.36 ± 10.13 pW) was significantly higher (p < 0.001) than the corresponding value in polycrystalline silicon microelectrodes (7.49 ± 2.66 pW). We conclude that polycrystalline silicon microelectrodes result in selective attenuation of noise power in electrical recordings compared to tungsten microelectrodes. This reduction in noise compared to tungsten microelectrodes is likely due to the exponentially higher bulk resistances offered by highly doped bulk polycrystalline silicon in the range of voltages corresponding to noise in multiunit measurements. PMID:20667815

  7. Measurement of extracellular ion fluxes using the ion-selective self-referencing microelectrode technique.

    PubMed

    Luxardi, Guillaume; Reid, Brian; Ferreira, Fernando; Maillard, Pauline; Zhao, Min

    2015-01-01

    Cells from animals, plants and single cells are enclosed by a barrier called the cell membrane that separates the cytoplasm from the outside. Cell layers such as epithelia also form a barrier that separates the inside from the outside or different compartments of multicellular organisms. A key feature of these barriers is the differential distribution of ions across cell membranes or cell layers. Two properties allow this distribution: 1) membranes and epithelia display selective permeability to specific ions; 2) ions are transported through pumps across cell membranes and cell layers. These properties play crucial roles in maintaining tissue physiology and act as signaling cues after damage, during repair, or under pathological condition. The ion-selective self-referencing microelectrode allows measurements of specific fluxes of ions such as calcium, potassium or sodium at single cell and tissue levels. The microelectrode contains an ionophore cocktail which is selectively permeable to a specific ion. The internal filling solution contains a set concentration of the ion of interest. The electric potential of the microelectrode is determined by the outside concentration of the ion. As the ion concentration varies, the potential of the microelectrode changes as a function of the log of the ion activity. When moved back and forth near a source or sink of the ion (i.e. in a concentration gradient due to ion flux) the microelectrode potential fluctuates at an amplitude proportional to the ion flux/gradient. The amplifier amplifies the microelectrode signal and the output is recorded on computer. The ion flux can then be calculated by Fick's law of diffusion using the electrode potential fluctuation, the excursion of microelectrode, and other parameters such as the specific ion mobility. In this paper, we describe in detail the methodology to measure extracellular ion fluxes using the ion-selective self-referencing microelectrode and present some representative results

  8. Carbon nanotubes grown on metal microelectrodes for the detection of dopamine

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yang, Cheng; Jacobs, Christopher B.; Nguyen, Michael; Ganesana, Mallikarjunarao; Zestos, Alexander; Ivanov, Ilia N.; Puretzky, Alexander A.; Rouleau, Christopher M.; Geohegan, David B.; Venton, B. Jill

    2015-12-07

    Microelectrodes modified with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are useful for the detection of neurotransmitters because the CNTs enhance sensitivity and have electrocatalytic effects. CNTs can be grown on carbon fiber microelectrodes (CFMEs) but the intrinsic electrochemical activity of carbon fibers makes evaluating the effect of CNT enhancement difficult. Metal wires are highly conductive and many metals have no intrinsic electrochemical activity for dopamine, so we investigated CNTs grown on metal wires as microelectrodes for neurotransmitter detection. In this work, we successfully grew CNTs on niobium substrates for the first time. Instead of planar metal surfaces, metal wires with a diameter ofmore » only 25 μm were used as CNT substrates; these have potential in tissue applications due to their minimal tissue damage and high spatial resolution. Scanning electron microscopy shows that aligned CNTs are grown on metal wires after chemical vapor deposition. By use of fast-scan cyclic voltammetry, CNT-coated niobium (CNT-Nb) microelectrodes exhibit higher sensitivity and lower ΔEp value compared to CNTs grown on carbon fibers or other metal wires. The limit of detection for dopamine at CNT-Nb microelectrodes is 11 ± 1 nM, which is approximately 2-fold lower than that of bare CFMEs. Adsorption processes were modeled with a Langmuir isotherm, and detection of other neurochemicals was also characterized, including ascorbic acid, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, serotonin, adenosine, and histamine. CNT-Nb microelectrodes were used to monitor stimulated dopamine release in anesthetized rats with high sensitivity. This research demonstrates that CNT-grown metal microelectrodes, especially CNTs grown on Nb microelectrodes, are useful for monitoring neurotransmitters.« less

  9. Carbon nanotubes grown on metal microelectrodes for the detection of dopamine

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Cheng; Jacobs, Christopher B.; Nguyen, Michael; Ganesana, Mallikarjunarao; Zestos, Alexander; Ivanov, Ilia N.; Puretzky, Alexander A.; Rouleau, Christopher M.; Geohegan, David B.; Venton, B. Jill

    2015-12-07

    Microelectrodes modified with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are useful for the detection of neurotransmitters because the CNTs enhance sensitivity and have electrocatalytic effects. CNTs can be grown on carbon fiber microelectrodes (CFMEs) but the intrinsic electrochemical activity of carbon fibers makes evaluating the effect of CNT enhancement difficult. Metal wires are highly conductive and many metals have no intrinsic electrochemical activity for dopamine, so we investigated CNTs grown on metal wires as microelectrodes for neurotransmitter detection. In this work, we successfully grew CNTs on niobium substrates for the first time. Instead of planar metal surfaces, metal wires with a diameter of only 25 μm were used as CNT substrates; these have potential in tissue applications due to their minimal tissue damage and high spatial resolution. Scanning electron microscopy shows that aligned CNTs are grown on metal wires after chemical vapor deposition. By use of fast-scan cyclic voltammetry, CNT-coated niobium (CNT-Nb) microelectrodes exhibit higher sensitivity and lower ΔEp value compared to CNTs grown on carbon fibers or other metal wires. The limit of detection for dopamine at CNT-Nb microelectrodes is 11 ± 1 nM, which is approximately 2-fold lower than that of bare CFMEs. Adsorption processes were modeled with a Langmuir isotherm, and detection of other neurochemicals was also characterized, including ascorbic acid, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, serotonin, adenosine, and histamine. CNT-Nb microelectrodes were used to monitor stimulated dopamine release in anesthetized rats with high sensitivity. This research demonstrates that CNT-grown metal microelectrodes, especially CNTs grown on Nb microelectrodes, are useful for monitoring neurotransmitters.

  10. Carbon Nanotubes Grown on Metal Microelectrodes for the Detection of Dopamine.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cheng; Jacobs, Christopher B; Nguyen, Michael D; Ganesana, Mallikarjunarao; Zestos, Alexander G; Ivanov, Ilia N; Puretzky, Alexander A; Rouleau, Christopher M; Geohegan, David B; Venton, B Jill

    2016-01-01

    Microelectrodes modified with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are useful for the detection of neurotransmitters because the CNTs enhance sensitivity and have electrocatalytic effects. CNTs can be grown on carbon fiber microelectrodes (CFMEs) but the intrinsic electrochemical activity of carbon fibers makes evaluating the effect of CNT enhancement difficult. Metal wires are highly conductive and many metals have no intrinsic electrochemical activity for dopamine, so we investigated CNTs grown on metal wires as microelectrodes for neurotransmitter detection. In this work, we successfully grew CNTs on niobium substrates for the first time. Instead of planar metal surfaces, metal wires with a diameter of only 25 μm were used as CNT substrates; these have potential in tissue applications due to their minimal tissue damage and high spatial resolution. Scanning electron microscopy shows that aligned CNTs are grown on metal wires after chemical vapor deposition. By use of fast-scan cyclic voltammetry, CNT-coated niobium (CNT-Nb) microelectrodes exhibit higher sensitivity and lower ΔEp value compared to CNTs grown on carbon fibers or other metal wires. The limit of detection for dopamine at CNT-Nb microelectrodes is 11 ± 1 nM, which is approximately 2-fold lower than that of bare CFMEs. Adsorption processes were modeled with a Langmuir isotherm, and detection of other neurochemicals was also characterized, including ascorbic acid, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, serotonin, adenosine, and histamine. CNT-Nb microelectrodes were used to monitor stimulated dopamine release in anesthetized rats with high sensitivity. This study demonstrates that CNT-grown metal microelectrodes, especially CNTs grown on Nb microelectrodes, are useful for monitoring neurotransmitters. PMID:26639609

  11. A flexible and implantable microelectrode arrays using high-temperature grown vertical carbon nanotubes and a biocompatible polymer substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Wenwen; Chen, Chaoyang; Feng, Zhaoying; Xu, Yong; Zhou, Chengpeng; Masurkar, Nirul; Cavanaugh, John; Ming-Cheng Cheng, Mark

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents a novel microelectrode arrays using high-temperature grown vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) integrated on a flexible and biocompatible parylene substrate. A simple microfabrication process is proposed to unite the high quality vertical CNTs grown at high temperature with the heat sensitive parylene substrate in a highly controllable manner. Briefly, the CNTs electrode is encapsulated by two layers of parylene and the device is released using xenon difluoride (XeF2). The process is compatible with wafer-scale post complementary metal oxide semiconductor integration. Lower impedance and larger interfacial capacitance have been demonstrated using CNTs compared to a Pt electrode. The flexible CNT electrodes have been utilized for extracellular neuronal recording and stimulation in rats. The signal-to-noise ratio of the device is about 12.5. The threshold voltage for initiating action potential is about 0.5 V.

  12. Fabrication and testing of polyimide-based microelectrode arrays for cortical mapping of evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Myllymaa, Sami; Myllymaa, Katja; Korhonen, Hannu; Töyräs, Juha; Jääskeläinen, Juha E; Djupsund, Kaj; Tanila, Heikki; Lappalainen, Reijo

    2009-06-15

    Modern microfabrication techniques make it possible to develop microelectrode arrays that may be utilized not only in neurophysiological research but also in the clinic, e.g. in neurosurgery and as elements of neural prostheses. The aim of this study was to test whether a flexible microelectrode array is suitable for recording cortical surface field potentials in rats. Polyimide-based microelectrode arrays were fabricated by utilizing microfabrication techniques e.g. photolithography and magnetron sputter deposition. The present microelectrode array consists of eight platinum microelectrodes (round-shaped, Ø: 200 microm), transmission lines and connector pads sandwiched between two thin layers of biocompatible polyimide. The microelectrode arrays were electrochemically characterized by impedance spectroscopy in physiological saline solution and successfully tested in vivo by conducting acute and chronic measurements of evoked potentials on the surface of rat cortex. The arrays proved excellent flexibility and mechanical strength during handling and implantation onto the surface of cortex. The excellent electrochemical characteristics and stable in vivo recordings with high spatiotemporal resolution highlight the potential of these arrays. The fabrication protocol described here allows implementation of several other neural interfaces with different layouts, material selections or target areas either for recording or stimulation purposes. PMID:19380223

  13. Enhanced Flexible Tubular Microelectrode with Conducting Polymer for Multi-Functional Implantable Tissue-Machine Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Hong-Chang; Liu, Jing-Quan; Kang, Xiao-Yang; Tang, Long-Jun; Wang, Ming-Hao; Ji, Bo-Wen; Yang, Bin; Wang, Xiao-Lin; Chen, Xiang; Yang, Chun-Sheng

    2016-05-01

    Implantable biomedical microdevices enable the restoration of body function and improvement of health condition. As the interface between artificial machines and natural tissue, various kinds of microelectrodes with high density and tiny size were developed to undertake precise and complex medical tasks through electrical stimulation and electrophysiological recording. However, if only the electrical interaction existed between electrodes and muscle or nerve tissue without nutrition factor delivery, it would eventually lead to a significant symptom of denervation-induced skeletal muscle atrophy. In this paper, we developed a novel flexible tubular microelectrode integrated with fluidic drug delivery channel for dynamic tissue implant. First, the whole microelectrode was made of biocompatible polymers, which could avoid the drawbacks of the stiff microelectrodes that are easy to be broken and damage tissue. Moreover, the microelectrode sites were circumferentially distributed on the surface of polymer microtube in three dimensions, which would be beneficial to the spatial selectivity. Finally, the in vivo results confirmed that our implantable tubular microelectrodes were suitable for dynamic electrophysiological recording and simultaneous fluidic drug delivery, and the electrode performance was further enhanced by the conducting polymer modification.

  14. Enhanced Flexible Tubular Microelectrode with Conducting Polymer for Multi-Functional Implantable Tissue-Machine Interface.

    PubMed

    Tian, Hong-Chang; Liu, Jing-Quan; Kang, Xiao-Yang; Tang, Long-Jun; Wang, Ming-Hao; Ji, Bo-Wen; Yang, Bin; Wang, Xiao-Lin; Chen, Xiang; Yang, Chun-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Implantable biomedical microdevices enable the restoration of body function and improvement of health condition. As the interface between artificial machines and natural tissue, various kinds of microelectrodes with high density and tiny size were developed to undertake precise and complex medical tasks through electrical stimulation and electrophysiological recording. However, if only the electrical interaction existed between electrodes and muscle or nerve tissue without nutrition factor delivery, it would eventually lead to a significant symptom of denervation-induced skeletal muscle atrophy. In this paper, we developed a novel flexible tubular microelectrode integrated with fluidic drug delivery channel for dynamic tissue implant. First, the whole microelectrode was made of biocompatible polymers, which could avoid the drawbacks of the stiff microelectrodes that are easy to be broken and damage tissue. Moreover, the microelectrode sites were circumferentially distributed on the surface of polymer microtube in three dimensions, which would be beneficial to the spatial selectivity. Finally, the in vivo results confirmed that our implantable tubular microelectrodes were suitable for dynamic electrophysiological recording and simultaneous fluidic drug delivery, and the electrode performance was further enhanced by the conducting polymer modification. PMID:27229174

  15. Enhanced Flexible Tubular Microelectrode with Conducting Polymer for Multi-Functional Implantable Tissue-Machine Interface

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Hong-Chang; Liu, Jing-Quan; Kang, Xiao-Yang; Tang, Long-Jun; Wang, Ming-Hao; Ji, Bo-Wen; Yang, Bin; Wang, Xiao-Lin; Chen, Xiang; Yang, Chun-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Implantable biomedical microdevices enable the restoration of body function and improvement of health condition. As the interface between artificial machines and natural tissue, various kinds of microelectrodes with high density and tiny size were developed to undertake precise and complex medical tasks through electrical stimulation and electrophysiological recording. However, if only the electrical interaction existed between electrodes and muscle or nerve tissue without nutrition factor delivery, it would eventually lead to a significant symptom of denervation-induced skeletal muscle atrophy. In this paper, we developed a novel flexible tubular microelectrode integrated with fluidic drug delivery channel for dynamic tissue implant. First, the whole microelectrode was made of biocompatible polymers, which could avoid the drawbacks of the stiff microelectrodes that are easy to be broken and damage tissue. Moreover, the microelectrode sites were circumferentially distributed on the surface of polymer microtube in three dimensions, which would be beneficial to the spatial selectivity. Finally, the in vivo results confirmed that our implantable tubular microelectrodes were suitable for dynamic electrophysiological recording and simultaneous fluidic drug delivery, and the electrode performance was further enhanced by the conducting polymer modification. PMID:27229174

  16. Direct-growth carbon nanotubes on 3D structural microelectrodes for electrophysiological recording.

    PubMed

    Pan, Alice Ian; Lin, Min-Hsuan; Chung, Hui-Wen; Chen, Hsin; Yeh, Shih-Rung; Chuang, Yung-Jen; Chang, Yen-Chung; Yew, Tri-Rung

    2016-01-01

    A novel 3D carbon nanotube (CNT) microelectrode was developed through direct growth of CNTs on a gold pin-shaped 3D microelectrode at a low temperature (400 °C) for applications in neural and cardiac recording. With an electroplated Ni catalyst layer covering the entire surface of the pin-shaped structure, CNTs were synthesized on a 3D microelectrode by catalytic thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD). According to the analyses by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, the impedance of 3D microelectrodes after CNT growth and UV/O3 treatment decreased from 9.3 Ω mm(-2) to 1.2 Ω mm(-2) and the capacitance increased largely from 2.2 mF cm(-2) to 73.3 mF cm(-2). The existence of UVO3-treated CNT led to a large improvement of interfacial capacitance, contributing to the decrease of impedance. The electrophysiological detection capability of this 3D CNT microelectrode was demonstrated by the distinguished P waves, QRS complex and T waves in the electrocardiogram of the zebrafish heart and the action potential recorded from individual rat hippocampal neurons. The compatibility of integration with ICs, high resolution in space, electrophysiological signals, and non-invasive long-term recording suggest that the 3D CNT microelectrode exhibits promising potential for applications in electrophysiological research and clinical trials. PMID:26588673

  17. Mechanistically Driven Development of Iridium Catalysts for Asymmetric Allylic Substitution

    PubMed Central

    Hartwig, John F.; Stanley, Levi M.

    2010-01-01

    Conspectus Enantioselective allylic substitution reactions comprise some of the most versatile methods for preparing enantiomerically enriched materials. These reactions form products that contain multiple functionalities by creating carbon–nitrogen, carbon–oxygen, carbon–carbon, and carbon–sulfur bonds. For many years, the development of catalysts for allylic substitution focused on palladium complexes. However, studies of complexes of other metals have revealed selectivities that often complement those of palladium systems. Most striking is the observation that reactions with unsymmetrical allylic electrophiles that typically occur with palladium catalysts at the less hindered site of an allylic electrophile occur at the more hindered site with catalysts based on other metals. In this Account, we describe an iridium precursor and a phosphoramidite ligand that catalyze reactions with a particularly broad scope of nucleophiles. The active form of this iridium catalyst is not generated by the simple binding of the phosphoramidite ligand to the metal precursor. Instead, the initial phosphoramidite and iridium precursor react in the presence of base to form a metallacyclic species that is the active catalyst. This species is generated either in situ or separately in isolated form by reactions with added base. The identification of the structure of the active catalyst led to the development of simplified catalysts as well as the most active form of the catalyst now available, which is stabilized by a loosely bound ethylene. Most recently, this structure was used to prepare intermediates containing allyl ligands, the structures of which provide a model for the enantioselectivities discussed here. Initial studies from our laboratory on the scope of iridium-catalyzed allylic substitution showed that reactions of primary and secondary amines, including alkylamines, benzylamines, and allylamines, and reactions of phenoxides and alkoxides occurred in high yields

  18. Iridium: Global OTH data communications for high altitude scientific ballooning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denney, A.

    beneficial points provided by the Iridium platform include pure global accessibility (as well as polar), cost effectiveness because it is available as a COTS (Commercially Off The Shelf) technology, reliability in that the equipment must operate in extreme conditions (near space), integration and development time into current systems must be minimized. As a bonus Motorola and NAL Research Corporation are developing SBD (Short Burst Data) into the Iridium network. This may lead the way to a global IP (Internet Protocol) node based ballooning platform. The Iridium satellite data modems employ the Iridium Low-Earth Orbit (LEO) satellite network. The scope of this paper is to introduce an OTH communications alternative, albeit not necessarily a primary one, to existing ballooning platforms using COTS based emerging technologies. Design aspects, characteristics, actual flight testing statistics, principles of the Iridium modems and communication paths are described including payload and support instrumentation interfacing. Not limited to high altitude ballooning, the Iridium communications platform opens a new era in remote commanding and data retrieval.

  19. Permanent iridium modifier deposited on tungsten and zirconium-treated platforms in electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry: vaporization of bismuth, silver and tellurium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slaveykova, Vera I.; Lampugnani, Leonardo; Tsalev, Dimiter L.; Sabbatini, L.; De Giglio, Elvira

    1999-04-01

    The stabilizing role of permanent iridium modifier deposited on tungsten-treated (WTP) and zirconium-treated (ZrTP) platforms of transversely heated graphite atomizer (THGA) was studied in detail by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) and different surface techniques in model experiments for Ag, Bi and Te. The comparison of the stabilizing efficiency of permanent Ir modifier on WTP and ZrTP and each of the single components, reveals the better effect of Ir on WTP and Ir itself. The extent of analyte losses during pre-atomization and the strength of analyte association with the modifier were estimated by the plotting of `differential vaporization curves'. The existence of double peaks of Ag, Bi and Te in WTP and Ir on WTP was confirmed and possible reasons for their formation were discussed. The absorbance profiles presented as differential curves reveal an existence of at least two different types of precursors determining processes of atom generation. The observed differences in the behavior of Ir permanent modifier on WTP and ZrTP, respectively, were explained by the different extent of iridium-tungsten and iridium-zirconium interaction and surface distribution. XRF, ESCA and SEM studies reveal non-uniform distribution of the modifier on the graphite substrate and the presence of oxide containing species on the surface.

  20. Methanol dehydrogenation by iridium N-heterocyclic carbene complexes.

    PubMed

    Campos, Jesús; Sharninghausen, Liam S; Manas, Michael G; Crabtree, Robert H

    2015-06-01

    A series of homogeneous iridium bis(N-heterocyclic carbene) catalysts are active for three transformations involving dehydrogenative methanol activation: acceptorless dehydrogenation, transfer hydrogenation, and amine monoalkylation. The acceptorless dehydrogenation reaction requires base, yielding formate and carbonate, as well as 2-3 equivalents of H2. Of the few homogeneous systems known for this reaction, our catalysts tolerate air and employ simple ligands. Transfer hydrogenation of ketones and imines from methanol is also possible. Finally, N-monomethylation of anilines occurs through a "borrowing hydrogen" reaction. Notably, this reaction is highly selective for the monomethylated product. PMID:25615426

  1. Levitation of Iridium and Liquid Mercury by Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, W. J.; Cao, C. D.; Lü, Y. J.; Wei, B.

    2002-08-01

    Single-axis acoustic levitation of the heaviest solid (iridium, ρ=22.6 g cm-3) and liquid (mercury, ρ=13.6 g cm-3 on the Earth is achieved by greatly enhancing both the levitation force and stability through optimizing the geometric parameters of the levitator. The acoustically levitated Pb-Sn eutectic alloy melt (ρ=8.5 g cm-3) is highly undercooled by up to 38K, which results in a microstructural transition of ``lamellae-broken lamellae-dendrites.'' The drastic enhancement of levitation capability indicates a broader application range of single-axis acoustic levitation.

  2. Luminescent cyclometallated iridium(III) complexes having acetylide ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Mark E.; Bossi, Alberto; Djurovich, Peter Ivan

    2014-09-02

    The present invention relates to phosphorescent (triplet-emitting) organometallic materials. The phosphorescent materials of the present invention comprise Ir(III)cyclometallated alkynyl complexes for use as triplet light-emitting materials. The Ir(III)cyclometallated alkynyl complexes comprise at least one cyclometallating ligand and at least one alkynyl ligand bonded to the iridium. Also provided is an organic light emitting device comprising an anode, a cathode and an emissive layer between the anode and the cathode, wherein the emissive layer comprises a Ir(III)cyclometallated alkynyl complex as a triplet emitting material.

  3. Determination of iridium in mafic rocks by atomic absorption

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grimaldi, F.S.; Schnepfe, M.M.

    1970-01-01

    Iridium is determined in mineralized mafic rocks by atomic absorption after fire-assay concentration into a gold bead. Interelement interferences in the atomic-absorption determination are removed and Ir sensitivity is increased by buffering the solutions with a mixture of copper and sodium sulphates. Substantial amounts of Ag, Al, Au, Bi, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Fe, Ho, Hg, K, La, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Te, Ti, V, Y, Zn and platinum metals can be tolerated in the atomic-absorption determination. The sensitivity and detection limits are 3.2 and 0.25 ppm of Ir, respectively. ?? 1970.

  4. Measurements of the hard-x-ray reflectivity of iridium

    SciTech Connect

    Romaine, S.; Bruni, R.; Gorenstein, P.; Zhong, Z

    2007-01-10

    In connection with the design of a hard-x-ray telescope for the Constellation X-Ray Observatory we measured the reflectivity of an iridium-coated zerodur substrate as a function of angle at 55, 60, 70, and 80 keV at the National Synchrotron Light Source of Brookhaven National Laboratory. The optical constants were derived from the reflectivity data. The real component of the index of refraction is in excellent agreement with theoretical values at all four energies. However, the imaginary component, which is related to the mass attenuation coefficient, is 50% to 70% larger at 55, 60, and 70 keV than theoretical values.

  5. The solubility of hydrogen in rhodium, ruthenium, iridium and nickel.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclellan, R. B.; Oates, W. A.

    1973-01-01

    The temperature variation of the solubility of hydrogen in rhodium, ruthenium, iridium, and nickel in equilibrium with H2 gas at 1 atm pressure has been measured by a technique involving saturating the solvent metal with hydrogen, quenching, and analyzing in resultant solid solutions. The solubilities determined are small (atom fraction of H is in the range from 0.0005 to 0.00001, and the results are consistent with the simple quasi-regular model for dilute interstitial solid solutions. The relative partial enthalpy and excess entropy of the dissolved hydrogen atoms have been calculated from the solubility data and compared with well-known correlations between these quantities.

  6. Iridium-Catalyzed Reductive Nitro-Mannich Cyclization

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Alex W; Chambers, Alan; Hawkins, Alison; Jakubec, Pavol; Dixon, Darren J

    2015-01-01

    A new chemoselective reductive nitro-Mannich cyclization reaction sequence of nitroalkyl-tethered lactams has been developed. Relying on the rapid and chemoselective iridium(I)-catalyzed reduction of lactams to the corresponding enamine, subsequent nitro-Mannich cyclization of tethered nitroalkyl functionality provides direct access to important alkaloid natural-product-like structures in yields up to 81 % and in diastereoselectivities that are typically good to excellent. An in-depth understanding of the reaction mechanism has been gained through NMR studies and characterization of reaction intermediates. The new methodology has been applied to the total synthesis of (±)-epi-epiquinamide in four steps. PMID:25399919

  7. Highly Enantioselective Iridium-Catalyzed Hydrogenation of Cyclic Enamides.

    PubMed

    Salomó, Ernest; Orgué, Sílvia; Riera, Antoni; Verdaguer, Xavier

    2016-07-01

    The MaxPHOX-Ir catalyst system provided the highest selectivity ever reported for the reduction of cyclic enamides derived from α- and β-tetralones. This result indicates that iridium catalysts are also proficient in reducing alkenes bearing metal-coordinating groups. In the present system, selectivity was pressure-dependent: In most cases, a decrease in the H2 pressure to 3 bar resulted in an increase in enantioselectivity. Moreover, the process can be carried out in environmentally friendly solvents, such as methanol and ethyl acetate, with no loss of selectivity. PMID:27186653

  8. Levitation of iridium and liquid mercury by ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Xie, W J; Cao, C D; Lü, Y J; Wei, B

    2002-09-01

    Single-axis acoustic levitation of the heaviest solid (iridium, rho=22.6 g cm(-3)) and liquid (mercury, rho=13.6 g cm(-3) on the Earth is achieved by greatly enhancing both the levitation force and stability through optimizing the geometric parameters of the levitator. The acoustically levitated Pb-Sn eutectic alloy melt (rho=8.5 g cm(-3)) is highly undercooled by up to 38 K, which results in a microstructural transition of "lamellae-broken lamellae-dendrites." The drastic enhancement of levitation capability indicates a broader application range of single-axis acoustic levitation. PMID:12225198

  9. Local structure of Iridium organometallic catalysts covalently bonded to carbon nanotubes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blasco, J.; Cuartero, V.; Subías, G.; Jiménez, M. V.; Pérez-Torrente, J. J.; Oro, L. A.; Blanco, M.; Álvarez, P.; Blanco, C.; Menéndez, R.

    2016-05-01

    Hybrid catalysts based on Iridium N-heterocyclic carbenes anchored to carbon nanotubes (CNT) have been studied by XAFS spectroscopy. Oxidation of CNT yields a large amount of functional groups, mainly hydroxyl groups at the walls and carboxylic groups at the tips, defects and edges. Different kinds of esterification reactions were performed to functionalize oxidized CNT with imidazolium salts. Then, the resulting products were reacted with an Ir organometallic compound to form hybrid catalysts efficient in hydrogen transfer processes. XANES spectroscopy agree with the presence of Ir(I) in these catalysts and the EXAFS spectra detected differences in the local structure of Ir atoms between the initial Ir organometallic compound and the Ir complexes anchored to the CNT. Our results confirm that the halide atom, present in the Ir precursor, was replaced by oxygen from -OH groups at the CNT wall in the first coordination shell of Ir. The lability of this group accounts for the good recyclability and the good efficiency shown by these hybrid catalysts.

  10. Investigating brain functional evolution and plasticity using microelectrode array technology.

    PubMed

    Napoli, Alessandro; Obeid, Iyad

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate long and short-term plasticity responsible for memory formation in dissociated neuronal networks. In order to address this issue, a set of experiments was designed and implemented in which the microelectrode array electrode grid was divided into four quadrants, two of which were chronically stimulated, every two days for one hour with a stimulation paradigm that varied over time. Overall network and quadrant responses were then analyzed to quantify what level of plasticity took place in the network and how this was due to the stimulation interruption. The results demonstrate that there were no spatial differences in the stimulus-evoked activity within quadrants. Furthermore, the implemented stimulation protocol induced depression effects in the neuronal networks as demonstrated by the consistently lower network activity following stimulation sessions. Finally, the analysis demonstrated that the inhibitory effects of the stimulation decreased over time, thus suggesting a habituation phenomenon. These findings are sufficient to conclude that electrical stimulation is an important tool to interact with dissociated neuronal cultures, but localized stimuli are not enough to drive spatial synaptic potentiation or depression. On the contrary, the ability to modulate synaptic temporal plasticity was a feasible task to achieve by chronic network stimulation. PMID:26476356

  11. Dielectrophoretic registration of living cells to a microelectrode array.

    PubMed

    Gray, Darren S; Tan, John L; Voldman, Joel; Chen, Christopher S

    2004-02-15

    We present a novel microfabricated device to simultaneously and actively trap thousands of single mammalian cells in alignment with a planar microelectrode array. Thousands of 3 micromdiameter trapping electrodes were fabricated within the bottom of a parallel-plate flow chamber. Cells were trapped on the electrodes and held against destabilizing fluid flows by dielectrophoretic forces generated in the device. In general, each electrode trapped only one cell. Adhesive regions were patterned onto the surface in alignment with the traps such that cells adhered to the array surface and remained in alignment with the electrodes. By driving the device with different voltages, we showed that trapped cells could be killed by stronger electric fields. However, with weaker fields, cells were not damaged during trapping, as indicated by the similar morphologies and proliferation rates of trapped cells versus controls. As a test of the device, we patterned approximately 20000 cells onto a 1cm(2) grid of rectangular adhesive regions, with two electrodes and thus two cells per rectangle. Our method obtained 70+/-1% fidelity versus 17+/-1% when using an existing cell-registration technique. By allowing the placement of desired numbers of cells at specified locations, this approach addresses many needs to manipulate and register cells to the surfaces of biosensors and other devices with high precision and fidelity. PMID:14709396

  12. Dielectrophoretic registration of living cells to a microelectrode array.

    PubMed

    Gray, Darren S; Tan, John L; Voldman, Joel; Chen, Christopher S

    2004-07-15

    We present a novel microfabricated device to simultaneously and actively trap thousands of single mammalian cells in alignment with a planar microelectrode array. Thousands of 3 Ipm diameter trapping electrodes were fabricated within the bottom of a parallel-plate flow chamber. Cells were trapped on the electrodes and held against destabilizing fluid flows by dielectrophoretic forces generated in the device. In general, each electrode trapped only one cell. Adhesive regions were patterned onto the surface in alignment with the traps such that cells adhered to the array surface and remained in alignment with the electrodes. By driving the device with different voltages, we showed that trapped cells could be killed by stronger electric fields. However, with weaker fields, cells were not damaged during trapping, as indicated by the similar morphologies and proliferation rates of trapped cells versus controls. As a test of the device, we patterned approximately 20,000 cells onto aI cm2 grid of rectangular adhesive regions, with two electrodes and thus two cells per rectangle. Our method obtained 70 +/- 1% fidelity versus 17 +/- 1% when using an existing cell-registration technique. By allowing the placement of desired numbers of cells at specified locations, this approach addresses many needs to manipulate and register cells to the surfaces of biosensors and other devices with high precision and fidelity. PMID:15198083

  13. Dynamics of Single Hydrogen Bubbles at a Platinum Microelectrode.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xuegeng; Karnbach, Franziska; Uhlemann, Margitta; Odenbach, Stefan; Eckert, Kerstin

    2015-07-28

    Bubble dynamics, including the formation, growth, and detachment, of single H2 bubbles was studied at a platinum microelectrode during the electrolysis of 1 M H2SO4 electrolyte. The bubbles were visualized through a microscope by a high-speed camera. Electrochemical measurements were conducted in parallel to measure the transient current. The periodic current oscillations, resulting from the periodic formation and detachment of single bubbles, allow the bubble lifetime and size to be predicted from the transient current. A comparison of the bubble volume calculated from the current and from the recorded bubble image shows a gas evolution efficiency increasing continuously with the growth of the bubble until it reaches 100%. Two different substrates, glass and epoxy, were used to embed the Pt wire. While nearly no difference was found with respect to the growth law for the bubble radius, the contact angle differs strongly for the two types of cell. Data provided for the contact point evolution further complete the image of single hydrogen bubble growth. Finally, the velocity field driven by the detached bubble was measured by means of PIV, and the effects of the convection on the subsequent bubble were evaluated. PMID:26133052

  14. An active, flexible carbon nanotube microelectrode array for recording electrocorticograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yung-Chan; Hsu, Hui-Lin; Lee, Yu-Tao; Su, Huan-Chieh; Yen, Shiang-Jie; Chen, Chang-Hsiao; Hsu, Wei-Lun; Yew, Tri-Rung; Yeh, Shih-Rung; Yao, Da-Jeng; Chang, Yen-Chung; Chen, Hsin

    2011-06-01

    A variety of microelectrode arrays (MEAs) has been developed for monitoring intra-cortical neural activity at a high spatio-temporal resolution, opening a promising future for brain research and neural prostheses. However, most MEAs are based on metal electrodes on rigid substrates, and the intra-cortical implantation normally causes neural damage and immune responses that impede long-term recordings. This communication presents a flexible, carbon-nanotube MEA (CMEA) with integrated circuitry. The flexibility allows the electrodes to fit on the irregular surface of the brain to record electrocorticograms in a less invasive way. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) further improve both the electrode impedance and the charge-transfer capacity by more than six times. Moreover, the CNTs are grown on the polyimide substrate directly to improve the adhesion to the substrate. With the integrated recording circuitry, the flexible CMEA is proved capable of recording the neural activity of crayfish in vitro, as well as the electrocorticogram of a rat cortex in vivo, with an improved signal-to-noise ratio. Therefore, the proposed CMEA can be employed as a less-invasive, biocompatible and reliable neuro-electronic interface for long-term usage.

  15. Making and using calcium-selective mini- and microelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Hove-Madsen, L; Baudet, S; Bers, D M

    2010-01-01

    Detection and measurement of intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) have relied on various methods, the popularity of which depends on their ease of use and applicability to different cell types. Historically, Ca(2+)-selective electrodes have been used concomitantly with absorption indicators such as arsenazo-III, but their interest has been eclipsed by the introduction of a large number of fluorescent calcium probes with calcium sensitivities varying from the nanomolar to the micromolar range such as fura-2, indo-1, fluo-4, and many others. In this chapter, we emphasize the utility of Ca(2+)-selective electrodes and show that their use is complementary to use of fluorescent indicators; indeed, each method has advantages and disadvantages. We first describe the preparation and application of Ca(2+)-selective minielectrodes based on the Ca(2+) ligand ETH 129 (Schefer et al., 1986) that have a larger dynamic range and faster response time than most commercially available calcium electrodes. The second part of the chapter is dedicated to ETH 129-based Ca(2+)-selective microelectrodes (MEs), and their application in the determination of [Ca(2+)](i) in cardiac cells. Since numerous reviews and books have been dedicated to the theoretical aspects of ion-selective ME principles and technology, this chapter is not intended for investigators who have no experience with MEs. PMID:21035683

  16. Polycrystalline-Diamond MEMS Biosensors Including Neural Microelectrode-Arrays.

    PubMed

    Varney, Michael W; Aslam, Dean M; Janoudi, Abed; Chan, Ho-Yin; Wang, Donna H

    2011-01-01

    Diamond is a material of interest due to its unique combination of properties, including its chemical inertness and biocompatibility. Polycrystalline diamond (poly-C) has been used in experimental biosensors that utilize electrochemical methods and antigen-antibody binding for the detection of biological molecules. Boron-doped poly-C electrodes have been found to be very advantageous for electrochemical applications due to their large potential window, low background current and noise, and low detection limits (as low as 500 fM). The biocompatibility of poly-C is found to be comparable, or superior to, other materials commonly used for implants, such as titanium and 316 stainless steel. We have developed a diamond-based, neural microelectrode-array (MEA), due to the desirability of poly-C as a biosensor. These diamond probes have been used for in vivo electrical recording and in vitro electrochemical detection. Poly-C electrodes have been used for electrical recording of neural activity. In vitro studies indicate that the diamond probe can detect norepinephrine at a 5 nM level. We propose a combination of diamond micro-machining and surface functionalization for manufacturing diamond pathogen-microsensors. PMID:25586924

  17. Polycrystalline-Diamond MEMS Biosensors Including Neural Microelectrode-Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Varney, Michael W.; Aslam, Dean M.; Janoudi, Abed; Chan, Ho-Yin; Wang, Donna H.

    2011-01-01

    Diamond is a material of interest due to its unique combination of properties, including its chemical inertness and biocompatibility. Polycrystalline diamond (poly-C) has been used in experimental biosensors that utilize electrochemical methods and antigen-antibody binding for the detection of biological molecules. Boron-doped poly-C electrodes have been found to be very advantageous for electrochemical applications due to their large potential window, low background current and noise, and low detection limits (as low as 500 fM). The biocompatibility of poly-C is found to be comparable, or superior to, other materials commonly used for implants, such as titanium and 316 stainless steel. We have developed a diamond-based, neural microelectrode-array (MEA), due to the desirability of poly-C as a biosensor. These diamond probes have been used for in vivo electrical recording and in vitro electrochemical detection. Poly-C electrodes have been used for electrical recording of neural activity. In vitro studies indicate that the diamond probe can detect norepinephrine at a 5 nM level. We propose a combination of diamond micro-machining and surface functionalization for manufacturing diamond pathogen-microsensors. PMID:25586924

  18. Solvent drag across gramicidin channels demonstrated by microelectrodes.

    PubMed Central

    Pohl, P; Saparov, S M

    2000-01-01

    The competition of ion and water fluxes across gramicidin channels was assessed from the concentration distributions of both pore-impermeable and -permeable cations that were simultaneously measured by double-barreled microelectrodes in the immediate vicinity of a planar bilayer. Because water movement across the membrane led to accumulation of solutes on one side of the membrane and depletion on the other, the permeable cation was not only pushed by water across the channel (true solvent drag); it also flowed along its concentration gradient (pseudo-solvent drag). For the demonstration of true solvent drag, a difference between the bulk concentrations on the hypertonic and the hypotonic sides of the membrane was established. It was adjusted to get equal cation concentrations at both membrane/water interfaces. From the sodium and potassium fluxes measured along with membrane conductivity under these conditions, approximately five water molecules were found to be transported simultaneously with one ion through the channel. In diphytanoyl phosphatidylcholine membranes, a single-channel hydraulic permeability coefficient of 1.6 x 10(-14) cm(3) s(-1) was obtained. PMID:10777738

  19. A three-dimensional microelectrode array for chronic neural recording.

    PubMed

    Hoogerwerf, A C; Wise, K D

    1994-12-01

    This paper describes a 3-D microelectrode array for the chronic recording of single-unit activity in the central nervous system. The array is formed by a microassembly of planar silicon multishank microprobes, which are precisely positioned in a micromachined platform that resides on the surface of the cortex. Interconnects between the probes and the platform are formed using electroplated nickel lead transfers, implemented using automated computer control. All dimensions are controlled to +/- 1 micron and sank/probe separations as small as 100 microns are possible. Four-probe 16-shank prototype arrays have been tested chronically in guinea pig cortex. After three months in vivo, no significant tissue reaction has been observed surrounding these structures when they remain free to move with the brain, with normal appearing tissue between shanks spaced at 150 microns to 200 microns intervals. The array structure is compatible with the use of signal processing circuitry both on the probes and on the platform. A platform-based signal processing system has been designed to interface with several active probes, providing direct analog access to the recording sites, performing on-chip analog-to-digital conversion of neural activity, and providing simple binary-output recognition of single-unit spike events using a user-input threshold voltage. PMID:7851915

  20. Silicon ribbon cables for chronically implantable microelectrode arrays.

    PubMed

    Hetke, J F; Lund, J L; Najafi, K; Wise, K D; Anderson, D J

    1994-04-01

    This paper describes the design, fabrication, and testing of miniature ultraflexible ribbon cables for use with micromachined silicon microprobes capable of chronic recording and/or stimulation in the central nervous system (CNS). These interconnects are of critical importance in reliably linking these microelectrodes to the external world through a percutaneous connector. The silicon cables allow the realization of multilead, multistrand shielded local interconnects that are extremely flexible and yet strong enough to withstand normal handling and surgical manipulation. Cables 5 microns thick, 1-5 cm long, and from 60 to 250 microns wide have been fabricated with up to eight leads. The series lead resistance is typically 4 k omega/cm for polysilicon and 500 omega/cm for tantalum, with shunt capacitance values of 5-10 pF/cm and an interlead capacitance below 10 fF/cm. Soak tests in buffered saline performed under electrical and mechanical stress have been underway for over three years and show subpicoampere leakage levels. Silicon microprobes with built-in ribbon cables have remained functional for up to one year in the guinea pig CNS, recording driven single-unit activity and maintaining impedance levels in the 1-7 M omega range. PMID:8063297

  1. Synthesis of dendritic iridium nanostructures based on the oriented attachment mechanism and their enhanced CO and ammonia catalytic activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chao; Xiao, Guanjun; Sui, Yongming; Yang, Xinyi; Liu, Gang; Jia, Mingjun; Han, Wei; Liu, Bingbing; Zou, Bo

    2014-11-01

    Branched iridium nanodendrites (Ir NDs) have been synthesized by a simple method based on the oriented attachment mechanism. Transmission electron microscopy images reveal the temporal growth process from small particles to NDs. Precursor concentrations and reaction temperatures have a limited effect on the morphology of Ir NDs. Metal oxide and hydroxide-supported Ir NDs exhibit enhanced activity for catalytic CO oxidation. Particularly, the Fe(OH)x-supported Ir NDs catalyst with a 4 wt% Ir loading show superior CO oxidation catalytic activity with a full conversion of CO at 120 °C. Furthermore, compared with Ir NPs and commercial Ir black, Ir NDs exhibit higher activity and stability for ammonia oxidation. The specific activity and mass activity of Ir NDs for ammonia oxidation are 1.7 and 7 times higher than that of Ir NPs. The improved catalytic activities of Ir NDs are attributed not only to their large specific surface area, but also to their considerably high index facets and rich edge and corner atoms. Hence, the obtained Ir NDs provide a promising alternative for direct ammonia fuel cells and proton-exchange membrane fuel cells.Branched iridium nanodendrites (Ir NDs) have been synthesized by a simple method based on the oriented attachment mechanism. Transmission electron microscopy images reveal the temporal growth process from small particles to NDs. Precursor concentrations and reaction temperatures have a limited effect on the morphology of Ir NDs. Metal oxide and hydroxide-supported Ir NDs exhibit enhanced activity for catalytic CO oxidation. Particularly, the Fe(OH)x-supported Ir NDs catalyst with a 4 wt% Ir loading show superior CO oxidation catalytic activity with a full conversion of CO at 120 °C. Furthermore, compared with Ir NPs and commercial Ir black, Ir NDs exhibit higher activity and stability for ammonia oxidation. The specific activity and mass activity of Ir NDs for ammonia oxidation are 1.7 and 7 times higher than that of Ir NPs. The

  2. Dynamic high-temperature characterization of an iridium alloy in tension

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Bo; Nelson, Kevin; Jin, Helena; Lipinski, Ronald J.; Bignell, John; Ulrich, G. B.; George, E. P.

    2015-09-01

    Iridium alloys have been utilized as structural materials for certain high-temperature applications, due to their superior strength and ductility at elevated temperatures. The mechanical properties, including failure response at high strain rates and elevated temperatures of the iridium alloys need to be characterized to better understand high-speed impacts at elevated temperatures. A DOP-26 iridium alloy has been dynamically characterized in compression at elevated temperatures with high-temperature Kolsky compression bar techniques. However, the dynamic high-temperature compression tests were not able to provide sufficient dynamic high-temperature failure information of the iridium alloy. In this study, we modified current room-temperature Kolsky tension bar techniques for obtaining dynamic tensile stress-strain curves of the DOP-26 iridium alloy at two different strain rates (~1000 and ~3000 s-1) and temperatures (~750°C and ~1030°C). The effects of strain rate and temperature on the tensile stress-strain response of the iridium alloy were determined. The DOP-26 iridium alloy exhibited high ductility in stress-strain response that strongly depended on both strain rate and temperature.

  3. Microindentation hardness evaluation of iridium alloy clad vent set cups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulrich, George B.; DeRoos, Larry F.; Stinnette, Samuel E.

    1993-01-01

    An iridium alloy, DOP-26, is used as cladding for 238PuO2 fuel in radioisotope heat sources for space power systems. Presently, DOP-26 iridium alloy clad vent sets (CVS) are being manufactured at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant for potential use in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Cassini mission to Saturn. Wrought/ground/stress relieved blanks are warm formed into CVS cups. These cups are then annealed to recrystallize the material for subsequent fabrication/assembly operations as well as for final use. One of the cup manufacturing certification requirements is to test for Vickers microindentation hardness. New microindentation hardness specification limits, 210 to 310 HV, have been established for a test load of 1000 grams-force (gf). The original specification limits, 250 to 350 HV, were for 200 gf testing. The primary reason for switching to a higher test load was to reduce variability in the test data. The DOP-26 alloy exhibits microindentation hardness load dependence, therefore, new limits were needed for 1000 gf testing. The new limits were established by testing material from 15 CVS cups using 200 gf and 1000 gf loads and then statistically analyzing the data. Additional work using a Knoop indenter and a 10 gf load indicated that the DOP-26 alloy grain boundaries have higher hardnesses than the grain interiors.

  4. Microindentation hardness evaluation of iridium alloy clad vent set cups

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrich, G.B.; DeRoos, L.F.; Stinnette, S.E.

    1992-05-15

    An iridium alloy, DOP-26, is used as cladding for {sup 238}PuO{sup 2} fuel in radioisotope heat sources for space power systems. Presently, DOP-26 iridium alloy clad vent sets (CVS) are being manufactured at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant for potential use in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration`s Cassini mission to Saturn. Wrought/ground/stress relieved blanks are warm formed into CVS cups. These cups are then annealed to recrystallize the material for subsequent fabrication/assembly operations as well as for final use. One of the cup manufacturing certification requirements is to test for Vickers microindentation hardness. New microindentation hardness specification limits, 210 to 310 HV, have been established for a test load of 1000 grams-force (gf). The original specification limits, 250 to 350 HV, were for 200 gf testing. The primary reason for switching to a higher test load was to reduce variability in the test data. The DOP-26 alloy exhibits microindentation hardness load dependence, therefore, new limits were needed for 1000 gf testing. The new limits were established by testing material from 15 CVS cups using 200 gf and 1000 gf loads and then statistically analyzing the data. Additional work using a Knoop indenter and a 10 gf load indicated that the DOP-26 alloy grain boundaries have higher hardnesses than the grain interiors.

  5. Microindentation hardness evaluation of iridium alloy clad vent set cups

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrich, G.B.; DeRoos, L.F.; Stinnette, S.E.

    1992-05-15

    An iridium alloy, DOP-26, is used as cladding for {sup 238}PuO{sup 2} fuel in radioisotope heat sources for space power systems. Presently, DOP-26 iridium alloy clad vent sets (CVS) are being manufactured at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant for potential use in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Cassini mission to Saturn. Wrought/ground/stress relieved blanks are warm formed into CVS cups. These cups are then annealed to recrystallize the material for subsequent fabrication/assembly operations as well as for final use. One of the cup manufacturing certification requirements is to test for Vickers microindentation hardness. New microindentation hardness specification limits, 210 to 310 HV, have been established for a test load of 1000 grams-force (gf). The original specification limits, 250 to 350 HV, were for 200 gf testing. The primary reason for switching to a higher test load was to reduce variability in the test data. The DOP-26 alloy exhibits microindentation hardness load dependence, therefore, new limits were needed for 1000 gf testing. The new limits were established by testing material from 15 CVS cups using 200 gf and 1000 gf loads and then statistically analyzing the data. Additional work using a Knoop indenter and a 10 gf load indicated that the DOP-26 alloy grain boundaries have higher hardnesses than the grain interiors.

  6. Microindentation hardness evaluation of iridium alloy clad vent set cups

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrich, G.B.; DeRoos, L.F.; Stinnette, S.E. )

    1993-01-15

    An iridium alloy, DOP-26, is used as cladding for [sup 238]PuO[sub 2] fuel in radioisotope heat sources for space power systems. Presently, DOP-26 iridium alloy clad vent sets (CVS) are being manufactured at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant for potential use in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Cassini mission to Saturn. Wrought/ground/stress relieved blanks are warm formed into CVS cups. These cups are then annealed to recrystallize the material for subsequent fabrication/assembly operations as well as for final use. One of the cup manufacturing certification requirements is to test for Vickers microindentation hardness. New microindentation hardness specification limits, 210 to 310 HV, have been established for a test load of 1000 grams-force (gf). The original specification limits, 250 to 350 HV, were for 200 gf testing. The primary reason for switching to a higher test load was to reduce variability in the test data. The DOP-26 alloy exhibits microindentation hardness load dependence, therefore, new limits were needed for 1000 gf testing. The new limits were established by testing material from 15 CVS cups using 200 gf and 1000 gf loads and then statistically analyzing the data. Additional work using a Knoop indenter and a 10 gf load indicated that the DOP-26 alloy grain boundaries have higher hardnesses than the grain interiors.

  7. Synthesis and Photophysical Studies of Iridium Complexes Having Different Ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rho, Hyeon Hee; Park, Gui Youn; Ha, Yunkyoung; Kim, Young Sik

    2006-01-01

    The synthesis and photophysical study of efficient phosphorescent iridium(III) complexes having two different (C∧N) ligands are reported. In order to improve the luminescence efficiency by avoiding triplet-triplet (T-T) annihilation, the iridium complexes, Ir(ppy)2(piq) and Ir(ppy)2(piq-F), are designed and prepared where ppy, piq and piq-F represent 2-phenylpyridine, 1-(phenyl)isoquinoline and 2-(4'-fluorophenyl)isoquinoline, respectively. Two ppy ligands and a piq derivative act as a source of energy supply and a piq derivative acts as a chromophore. Since Ir(ppy)3, Ir(piq)3 and Ir(piq-F)3 can be placed in the metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) excited state, they absorb light effectively. When Ir(ppy)2(piq-F) is placed in excited state, the excitation energy is neither quenched nor deactivated but quickly intramolecular transferred from two ppy ligands to one luminescent piq-F ligand. This can occure because the triplet energy level of ppy is higher than that of piq-F and light is emitted from piq-F ligand in the end. Thus, Ir(ppy)2(piq-F) shows strong photoluminescence originated from piq-F ligand because piq-F ligand is known to have a shorter lifetime than that of ppy ligand. To analyze luminescent mechanism, we calculated these complexes having two different ligand sets theoretically by using computational method.

  8. Analysis and Consequences of the Iridium 33-Cosmos 2251 Collision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anz-Meador, P. D.; Liou, Jer-Chi

    2010-01-01

    The collision of Iridium 33 and Cosmos 2251, on 10 February 2009, was the first known unintentional hypervelocity collision in space of intact satellites. Iridium 33 was an active commercial telecommunications satellite, while Cosmos 2251 was a derelict communication satellite of the Strela-2M class. The collision occurred at a relative velocity of 11.6 km/s at an altitude of approximately 790 km over the Great Siberian Plain and near the northern apex of Cosmos 2251 s orbit. This paper describes the physical and orbital characteristics of the relevant spacecraft classes and reports upon our analysis of the resulting debris clouds size, mass, area-to-mass ratio, and relative velocity/directionality distributions. We compare these distributions to those predicted by the NASA breakup model and notable recent fragmentation events; in particular, we compare the area-to-mass ratio distribution for each spacecraft to that exhibited by the FY-1C debris cloud for the purpose of assessing the relative contribution of modern aerospace materials to debris clouds resulting from energetic collisions. In addition, we examine the long-term consequences of this event for the low Earth orbit (LEO) environment. Finally, we discuss "lessons learned", which may be incorporated into NASA s environmental models.

  9. Analysis of Abrasive Blasting of DOP-26 Iridium Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Ohriner, Evan Keith; Zhang, Wei; Ulrich, George B

    2012-01-01

    The effects of abrasive blasting on the surface geometry and microstructure of DOP-26 iridium alloy (Ir-0.3% W-0.006% Th 0.005% Al) have been investigated. Abrasive blasting has been used to control emissivity of components operating at elevated temperature. The effects of abrasive blasting conditions on surface morphology were investigated both experimentally and by numerical modeling. The simplified model, based on finite element analysis of a single angular particle impacting on Ir alloy disk, calculates the surface deformation and residual strain distribution. The experimental results and modeling results both indicate that the surface geometry is not sensitive to the abrasive blast process conditions of nozzle pressure and standoff distance considered in this study. On the other hand, the modeling results suggest that the angularity of the abrasive particle has an important role in determining surface geometry, which in turn, affects the emissivity. Abrasive blasting causes localized surface strains and localized recrystallization, but it does not affect grain size following extended exposure at elevated temperature. The dependence of emissivity of the DOP-26 alloy on mean surface slope follows a similar trend to that reported for pure iridium.

  10. Iridium and tantalum foils for spaceflight neutron dosimetry.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    English, R. A.; Liles, E. D.

    1972-01-01

    Description of a two-foil system of iridium and tantalum which can measure thermal and intermediate energy neutrons at flux densities of 1 neutron/sq cm-sec over a ten-day lunar mission (1,000,000 neutrons/sq cm). The foils are chemically inert and nontoxic, weigh less than 1 g each, and require only routine gamma pulse height analysis for activation measurement. Detection of fluences below 1,000,000 neutrons/sq cm are achieved for counts of foil activity made as late as two months following neutron exposure. Tantalum foils flown in Apollo 11 indicated a mean dose equivalent to the astronauts of less than 16 mrem from thermal plus intermediate energy neutrons, while nuclear emulsion track analysis indicated approximately 17 mrem from neutrons of energy greater than 0.6 MeV. Iridium foils flown on Apollo 12 indicated dose equivalents of 1.8 to 2.8 mrem from thermal neutrons, excluding tissue thermalized SNAP-27 neutrons.

  11. Asymmetric Hydrogenation of Isoxazolium Triflates with a Chiral Iridium Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Ryuhei; Kuwano, Ryoichi

    2016-06-13

    The iridium catalyst [IrCl(cod)]2 -phosphine-I2 (cod=1,5-cyclooctadiene) selectively reduced isoxazolium triflates to isoxazolines or isoxazolidines in the presence of H2 . The iridium-catalyzed hydrogenation proceeded in high-to-good enantioselectivity when an optically active phosphine-oxazoline ligand was used. The 3-substituted 5-arylisoxazolium salts were transformed into 4-isoxazolines with up to 95:5 enantiomeric ratio (e.r.). Chiral cis-isoxazolidines were obtained in up to 89:11 e.r., with no formation of their trans isomers, when the substrates had a primary alkyl substituent at the 5-position. The mechanistic studies indicate that the hydridoiridium(III) species prefers to deliver its hydride to the C5 atom of the isoxazole ring. The hydride attack leads to the formation of the chiral isoxazolidine via a 3-isoxazoline intermediate. Meanwhile, in the selective formation of 4-isoxazolines, hydride attack at the C5 atom may be obstructed by steric hindrance from the 5-aryl substituent. PMID:27105605

  12. Identification of an Iridium(III)-Based Inhibitor of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α.

    PubMed

    Kang, Tian-Shu; Mao, Zhifeng; Ng, Chan-Tat; Wang, Modi; Wang, Wanhe; Wang, Chunming; Lee, Simon Ming-Yuen; Wang, Yitao; Leung, Chung-Hang; Ma, Dik-Lung

    2016-04-28

    The novel iridium(III) complex 1 was verified as a potent inhibitor of the TNF-α-TNFR protein-protein interaction in vitro and in cellulo. The iridium(III) center plays a critical role in organizing the structure of the bioactive metal complex, as the isolated ligands were found to be completely inactive. Both iridium enantiomers inhibited TNF-α-induced NF-κB activity and TNF-α-TNFR binding. 1 represents a promising scaffold for the further development of more potent organometallic TNF-α inhibitors. PMID:27054262

  13. Addition of Iridium to the Biopolymer Mediated Synthesis of YBa2Cu3O7 δ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wimbush, Stuart C.; Marx, Werner; Barth, Andreas; Hall, Simon R.

    This work represents the first study into the addition of iridium into the solgel synthesis of the high temperature superconductor YBa2Cu3O7δ (Y123). Through a biopolymermediated synthetic approach, the homogeneous nature of the precursor sol and the preferred nucleation and growth of Y123 phases allow for a high yield of superconducting nanoparticles with no suppression of the superconducting critical temperature, even at high levels (40 wt%) of iridium addition. We attribute this to iridium not substituting into the Y123 crystal lattice, instead forming an associate phase.

  14. Brain machine interfaces combining microelectrode arrays with nanostructured optical biochemical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajj-Hassan, Mohamad; Gonzalez, Timothy; Ghafer-Zadeh, Ebrahim; Chodavarapu, Vamsy; Musallam, Sam; Andrews, Mark

    2009-02-01

    Neural microelectrodes are an important component of neural prosthetic systems which assist paralyzed patients by allowing them to operate computers or robots using their neural activity. These microelectrodes are also used in clinical settings to localize the locus of seizure initiation in epilepsy or to stimulate sub-cortical structures in patients with Parkinson's disease. In neural prosthetic systems, implanted microelectrodes record the electrical potential generated by specific thoughts and relay the signals to algorithms trained to interpret these thoughts. In this paper, we describe novel elongated multi-site neural electrodes that can record electrical signals and specific neural biomarkers and that can reach depths greater than 8mm in the sulcus of non-human primates (monkeys). We hypothesize that additional signals recorded by the multimodal probes will increase the information yield when compared to standard probes that record just electropotentials. We describe integration of optical biochemical sensors with neural microelectrodes. The sensors are made using sol-gel derived xerogel thin films that encapsulate specific biomarker responsive luminophores in their nanostructured pores. The desired neural biomarkers are O2, pH, K+, and Na+ ions. As a prototype, we demonstrate direct-write patterning to create oxygen-responsive xerogel waveguide structures on the neural microelectrodes. The recording of neural biomarkers along with electrical activity could help the development of intelligent and more userfriendly neural prosthesis/brain machine interfaces as well as aid in providing answers to complex brain diseases and disorders.

  15. Acute human brain responses to intracortical microelectrode arrays: challenges and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Eduardo; Greger, Bradley; House, Paul A; Aranda, Ignacio; Botella, Carlos; Albisua, Julio; Soto-Sánchez, Cristina; Alfaro, Arantxa; Normann, Richard A

    2014-01-01

    The emerging field of neuroprosthetics is focused on the development of new therapeutic interventions that will be able to restore some lost neural function by selective electrical stimulation or by harnessing activity recorded from populations of neurons. As more and more patients benefit from these approaches, the interest in neural interfaces has grown significantly and a new generation of penetrating microelectrode arrays are providing unprecedented access to the neurons of the central nervous system (CNS). These microelectrodes have active tip dimensions that are similar in size to neurons and because they penetrate the nervous system, they provide selective access to these cells (within a few microns). However, the very long-term viability of chronically implanted microelectrodes and the capability of recording the same spiking activity over long time periods still remain to be established and confirmed in human studies. Here we review the main responses to acute implantation of microelectrode arrays, and emphasize that it will become essential to control the neural tissue damage induced by these intracortical microelectrodes in order to achieve the high clinical potentials accompanying this technology. PMID:25100989

  16. A preliminary study of factors affecting the calibration stability of the iridium versus iridium-40 percent rhodium thermocouple

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmed, Shaffiq; Germain, Edward F.; Daryabeigi, Kamran; Alderfer, David W.; Wright, Robert E.

    1987-01-01

    An iridium versus iridium-40% rhodium thermocouple was studied. Problems associated with the use of this thermocouple for high temperature applications (up to 2000 C) were investigated. The metallurgical studies included X-ray, macroscopic, resistance, and metallographic studies. The thermocouples in the as-received condition from the manufacturer revealed large amounts of internal stress caused by cold working during manufacturing. The thermocouples also contained a large amount of inhomogeneities and segregations. No phase transformations were observed in the alloy up to 1100 C. It was found that annealing the thermocouple at 1800 C for two hours, and then at 1400 C for 2 to 3 hours yielded a fine grain structure, relieving some of the strains, and making the wire more ductile. It was also found that the above annealing procedure stabilized the thermal emf behavior of the thermocouple for application below 1800 C (an improvement from + or - 1% to + or - 0.02% within the range of the test parameters used).

  17. Sub-Chronic Oral Exposure to Iridium (III) Chloride Hydrate in Female Wistar Rats: Distribution and Excretion of the Metal

    PubMed Central

    Iavicoli, Ivo; Fontana, Luca; Bergamaschi, Antonio; Conti, Marcelo Enrique; Pino, Anna; Mattei, Daniela; Bocca, Beatrice; Alimonti, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    Iridium tissue distribution and excretion in female Wistar rats following oral exposure to iridium (III) chloride hydrate in drinking water (from 1 to 1000 ng/ml) in a sub-chronic oral study were determined. Samples of urine, feces, blood and organs (kidneys, liver, lung, spleen and brain) were collected at the end of exposure. The most prominent fractions of iridium were retained in kidney and spleen; smaller amounts were found in lungs, liver and brain. Iridium brain levels were lower than those observed in other tissues but this finding can support the hypothesis of iridium capability to cross the blood brain barrier. The iridium kidney levels rose significantly with the administered dose. At the highest dose, important amounts of the metal were found in serum, urine and feces. Iridium was predominantly excreted via feces with a significant linear correlation with the ingested dose, which is likely due to low intestinal absorption of the metal. However, at the higher doses iridium was also eliminated through urine. These findings may be useful to help in the understanding of the adverse health effects, particularly on the immune system, of iridium dispersed in the environment as well as in identifying appropriate biological indices of iridium exposure. PMID:22942873

  18. Iridium-Catalyzed Selective Isomerization of Primary Allylic Alcohols.

    PubMed

    Li, Houhua; Mazet, Clément

    2016-06-21

    This Account presents the development of the iridium-catalyzed isomerization of primary allylic alcohols in our laboratory over the past 8 years. Our initial interest was driven by the long-standing challenge associated with the development of a general catalyst even for the nonasymmetric version of this seemingly simple chemical transformation. The added value of the aldehyde products and the possibility to rapidly generate molecular complexity from readily accessible allylic alcohols upon a redox-economical isomerization reaction were additional sources of motivation. Certainly influenced by the success story of the related isomerization of allylic amines, most catalysts developed for the selective isomerization of allylic alcohols were focused on rhodium as a transition metal of choice. Our approach has been based on the commonly accepted precept that hydrogenation and isomerization are often competing processes, with the latter being usually suppressed in favor of the former. The cationic iridium complexes [(Cy3P)(pyridine)Ir(cod)]X developed by Crabtree (X = PF6) and Pfaltz (X = BArF) are usually considered as the most versatile catalysts for the hydrogenation of allylic alcohols. Using molecular hydrogen to generate controlled amounts of the active form of these complexes but performing the reaction in the absence of molecular hydrogen enabled deviation from the typical hydrogenation manifold and favored exclusively the isomerization of allylic alcohols into aldehydes. Isotopic labeling and crossover experiments revealed the intermolecular nature of the process. Systematic variation of the ligand on the iridium center allowed us to identify the structural features beneficial for catalytic activity. Subsequently, three generations of chiral catalysts have been investigated and enabled us to reach excellent levels of enantioselectivity for a wide range of 3,3-disubstituted aryl/alkyl and alkyl/alkyl primary allylic alcohols leading to β-chiral aldehydes. The

  19. Analysis and Implications of the Iridium 33-Cosmos 2251 Collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelso, T. S.

    On 2009 February 10, Iridium 33--an operational US communications satellite in low-Earth orbit--was struck and destroyed by Cosmos 2251--a long-defunct Russian communications satellite. This is the first time since the dawn of the Space Age that two satellites have collided in orbit. To better understand the circumstances of this event and the ramifications for avoiding similar events in the future, this paper provides a detailed analysis of the predictions leading up to the collision, using various data sources, and looks in detail at the collision, the evolution of the debris clouds, and the long-term implications for satellite operations. The only publicly available system available to satellite operators for screening for close approaches, SOCRATES, did predict this close approach, but it certainly wasn't the closest approach predicted for the week of February 10. In fact, at the time of the collision, SOCRATES ranked this close approach 152 of the 11,428 within 5 km of any payload. A detailed breakdown is provided to help understand the limitations of screening for close approaches using the two-line orbital element sets. Information is also provided specifically for the Iridium constellation to provide an understanding of how these limitations affect decision making for satellite operators. Post-event analysis using high-accuracy orbital data sources will be presented to show how that information might have been used to prevent this collision, had it been available and used. Analysis of the collision event, along with the distribution of the debris relative to the original orbits, will be presented to help develop an understanding of the geometry of the collision and the near-term evolution of the resulting debris clouds. Additional analysis will be presented to show the long-term evolution of the debris clouds, including orbital lifetimes, and estimate the increased risk for operations conducted by Iridium and other satellite operators in the low-Earth orbit

  20. Microelectrode Arrays with Overlapped Diffusion Layers as Electroanalytical Detectors: Theory and Basic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Tomčík, Peter

    2013-01-01

    This contribution contains a survey of basic literature dealing with arrays of microelectrodes with overlapping diffusion layers as prospective tools in contemporary electrochemistry. Photolithographic thin layer technology allows the fabrication of sensors of micrometric dimensions separated with a very small gap. This fact allows the diffusion layers of single microelectrodes to overlap as members of the array. Various basic types of microelectrode arrays with interacting diffusion layers are described and their analytical abilities are accented. Theoretical approaches to diffusion layer overlapping and the consequences of close constitution effects such as collection efficiency and redox cycling are discussed. Examples of basis applications in electroanalytical chemistry such as amperometric detectors in HPLC and substitutional stripping voltammetry are also given. PMID:24152927

  1. Simulation of an ac electro-osmotic pump with step microelectrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Byoung Jae; Lee, Seung-Hyun; Rezazadeh, Soghra; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2011-05-01

    Pumps with step microelectrodes subjected to an ac voltage are known to have faster pumping rates than those with planar asymmetric microelectrodes. The driving force for pumping in these systems is ac electro-osmosis. This paper aims to understand the flow behaviors of pumps with step microelectrodes by using a realistic model applicable to high external voltages. This model takes the steric effect due to the finite sizes of ions into account and copes with the exponential sensitivity of the counterion concentration to voltage. The effects on the pumping flow rate of varying the pump parameters were investigated. The geometrical parameters were optimized, and the effects of varying the ac frequency and amplitude were examined. The electrical potential of the fluid and the electrical charge at the electrode surface were solved simultaneously, and the Stokes equation was used to describe the fluid flow.

  2. A Numerical Study to Compare Stimulations by Intraoperative Microelectrodes and Chronic Macroelectrodes in the DBS Technique

    PubMed Central

    Paffi, A.; Apollonio, F.; Puxeddu, M. G.; Parazzini, M.; d'Inzeo, G.; Ravazzani, P.; Liberti, M.

    2013-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation is a clinical technique for the treatment of parkinson's disease based on the electric stimulation, through an implanted electrode, of specific basal ganglia in the brain. To identify the correct target of stimulation and to choose the optimal parameters for the stimulating signal, intraoperative microelectrodes are generally used. However, when they are replaced with the chronic macroelectrode, the effect of the stimulation is often very different. Here, we used numerical simulations to predict the stimulation of neuronal fibers induced by microelectrodes and macroelectrodes placed in different positions with respect to each other. Results indicate that comparable stimulations can be obtained if the chronic macroelectrode is correctly positioned with the same electric center of the intraoperative microelectrode. Otherwise, some groups of fibers may experience a completely different electric stimulation. PMID:24222899

  3. The use of organolithium reagents for the synthesis of 4-aryl-2-phenylpyridines and their corresponding iridium(iii) complexes.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Ross; Hsu, Yu-Ting; Batchelor, Thomas; Yufit, Dmitry; Beeby, Andrew

    2016-07-28

    A versatile palladium-free route for the synthesis of 4-aryl-substituted phenylpyridines (ppy), starting from tert-butyl 4-oxopiperidine-1-carboxylate, is reported. Reaction with an aryllithium, followed by trifluoroacetic acid dehydration/deprotection and oxidation with 2-iodoylbenzoic acid and finally phenylation, gave 4 ligands (L(1-4)H): 2,4-diphenylpyridine, 4-(4-methoxyphenyl)-2-phenylpyridine, 2-phenyl-4-(o-tolyl)pyridine and 4-mesityl-2-phenylpyridine. These ligands were coordinated to iridium to give the corresponding Ir(L)2(A) complexes (Ir1-7), where A = ancillary ligand acetylacetate or 2-picolinate. This was used to demonstrate that, through a combination of ancillary ligand choice and torsional twisting between the 4-aryl substituents of the ppy ligands, it is possible to tune the phosphorescent emission of the complexes in the range 502-560 nm. PMID:27346376

  4. Iridium-Catalyzed Branch-Selective Hydroarylation of Vinyl Ethers via C-H Bond Activation.

    PubMed

    Ebe, Yusuke; Nishimura, Takahiro

    2015-05-13

    Iridium-catalyzed hydroarylation of vinyl ethers via a directed C-H bond activation of aromatic compounds gave high yields of the corresponding addition products with high branch selectivity. PMID:25928127

  5. Laminar iridium coating produced by pulse current electrodeposition from chloride molten salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Li'an; Bai, Shuxin; Zhang, Hong; Ye, Yicong

    2013-10-01

    Due to the unique physical and chemical properties, Iridium (Ir) is one of the most promising oxidation-resistant coatings for refractory materials above 1800 °C in aerospace field. However, the Ir coatings prepared by traditional methods are composed of columnar grains throughout the coating thickness. The columnar structure of the coating is considered to do harm to its oxidation resistance. The laminar Ir coating is expected to have a better high-temperature oxidation resistance than the columnar Ir coating does. The pulse current electrodeposition, with three independent parameters: average current density (Jm), duty cycle (R) and pulse frequency (f), is considered to be a promising method to fabricate layered Ir coating. In this study, laminar Ir coatings were prepared by pulse current electrodeposition in chloride molten salt. The morphology, roughness and texture of the coatings were determined by scanning electron microscope (SEM), profilometer and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. The results showed that the laminar Ir coatings were composed of a nucleation layer with columnar structure and a growth layer with laminar structure. The top surfaces of the laminar Ir coatings consisted of cauliflower-like aggregates containing many fine grains, which were separated by deep grooves. The laminar Ir coating produced at the deposition condition of 20 mA/cm2 (Jm), 10% (R) and 6 Hz (f) was quite smooth (Ra 1.01 ± 0.09 μm) with extremely high degree of preferred orientation of <1 1 1>, and its laminar structure was well developed with clear boundaries and uniform thickness of sub-layers.

  6. Correlations between histology and neuronal activity recorded by microelectrodes implanted chronically in the cerebral cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCreery, Douglas; Cogan, Stuart; Kane, Sheryl; Pikov, Victor

    2016-06-01

    Objective. To quantify relations between the neuronal activity recorded with chronically-implanted intracortical microelectrodes and the histology of the surrounding tissue, using radial distance from the tip sites and time after array implantation as parameters. Approach. ‘Utah’-type intracortical microelectrode arrays were implanted into cats’ sensorimotor cortex for 275–364 days. The brain tissue around the implants was immuno-stained for the neuronal marker NeuN and for the astrocyte marker GFAP. Pearson’s product-moment correlations were used to quantify the relations between these markers and the amplitudes of the recorded neuronal action potentials (APs) and their signal-to-noise ratios (S/N). Main results. S/N was more stable over post-implant time than was AP amplitude, but its increased correlation with neuronal density after many months indicates ongoing loss of neurons around the microelectrodes. S/N was correlated with neuron density out to at least 140 μm from the microelectrodes, while AP amplitude was correlated with neuron density and GFAP density within ∼80 μm. Correlations between AP amplitude and histology markers (GFAP and NeuN density) were strongest immediately after implantation, while correlation between the neuron density and S/N was strongest near the time the animals were sacrificed. Unlike AP amplitude, there was no significant correlation between S/N and density of GFAP around the tip sites. Significance. Our findings indicate an evolving interaction between changes in the tissue surrounding the microelectrodes and the microelectrode’s electrical properties. Ongoing loss of neurons around recording microelectrodes, and the interactions between their delayed electrical deterioration and early tissue scarring around the tips appear to pose the greatest threats to the microelectrodes’ long-term functionality.

  7. In Vivo Monitoring of H2O2 with Polydopamine and Prussian Blue-coated Microelectrode.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruixin; Liu, Xiaomeng; Qiu, Wanling; Zhang, Meining

    2016-08-01

    In vivo monitoring of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in the brain is of importance for understanding the function of both reactive oxygen species (ROS) and signal transmission. Producing a robust microelectrode for in vivo measurement of H2O2 is challenging due to the complex brain environment and the instability of electrocatalysts employed for the reduction of H2O2. Here, we develop a new kind of microelectrode for in vivo monitoring of H2O2, which is prepared by, first, electrodeposition of Prussian blue (PB) onto carbon nanotube (CNT) assembled carbon fiber microelectrodes (CFEs) and then overcoating of the CFEs with a thin membrane of polydopamine (PDA) through self-polymerization. Scanning electron microscopic and X-ray proton spectroscopic results confirm the formation of PDA/PB/CNT/CFEs. The PDA membrane enables PB-based electrodes to show high stability in both in vitro and in vivo studies and to stably catalyze the electrochemical reduction of H2O2. The microelectrode is selective for in vivo measurements of H2O2, interference-free from O2 and other electroactive species coexisting in the brain. These properties, along with good linearity, high biocompatibility, and stability toward H2O2, substantially enable the microelectrode to track H2O2 changes in vivo during electrical stimulation and microinfusion of H2O2 and drug, which demonstrates that the microelectrode could be well suited for in vivo monitoring of dynamic changes of H2O2 in rat brain. PMID:27385361

  8. Application of thin-shielded mercury microelectrodes in anodic stripping voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Daniele, Salvatore; Bragato, Carlo; Baldo, M Antonietta; Ciani, Ilenia

    2008-10-19

    The performance in anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV) of hemispherical mercury microelectrodes, fabricated by electrodeposition of liquid mercury on the surface of Pt microdisks which were surrounded by a rather thick or thin insulating shield, was compared. The Pt microdisks were produced by sealing a wire of 25 microm diameter into a glass capillary, and by coating the cylindrical length of the Pt wire with a cathodic electrophoretic paint. The ratio of the overall tip radius b, to the basal radius of the electrode a, so-called RG=b/a, was equal to 110+/-10 and 1.52+/-0.01 for the thick- and thin-shielded microdisk, respectively. The mercury microelectrodes were characterized by cyclic voltammetry at 1 mVs(-1), in 1mM Ru(NH(3))(6)(3+) aqueous solution. The steady-state voltammogram recorded with the thin-shielded mercury microelectrode displayed less hysteresis, while the steady-state current was about 30% higher than that of the thicker one. This was a consequence of the additional flux due to diffusion from behind the plane of the electrode. The flux enhancement, which was operative at the thin-shielded mercury microelectrode during the deposition step in the ASV experiments, allowed recording stripping peaks for Cd and Pb, which resulted about 32% larger than those recorded at the thicker shielded mercury microelectrode, under same experimental conditions. The usefulness of the thin-shielded mercury microelectrode for ASV measurements in real samples was verified by determining the content of heavy metal ions released in the pore water (pH 4.5) of a soil slurry. PMID:18804626

  9. Synthesis of dendritic iridium nanostructures based on the oriented attachment mechanism and their enhanced CO and ammonia catalytic activities.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Xiao, Guanjun; Sui, Yongming; Yang, Xinyi; Liu, Gang; Jia, Mingjun; Han, Wei; Liu, Bingbing; Zou, Bo

    2014-12-21

    Branched iridium nanodendrites (Ir NDs) have been synthesized by a simple method based on the oriented attachment mechanism. Transmission electron microscopy images reveal the temporal growth process from small particles to NDs. Precursor concentrations and reaction temperatures have a limited effect on the morphology of Ir NDs. Metal oxide and hydroxide-supported Ir NDs exhibit enhanced activity for catalytic CO oxidation. Particularly, the Fe(OH)x-supported Ir NDs catalyst with a 4 wt% Ir loading show superior CO oxidation catalytic activity with a full conversion of CO at 120 °C. Furthermore, compared with Ir NPs and commercial Ir black, Ir NDs exhibit higher activity and stability for ammonia oxidation. The specific activity and mass activity of Ir NDs for ammonia oxidation are 1.7 and 7 times higher than that of Ir NPs. The improved catalytic activities of Ir NDs are attributed not only to their large specific surface area, but also to their considerably high index facets and rich edge and corner atoms. Hence, the obtained Ir NDs provide a promising alternative for direct ammonia fuel cells and proton-exchange membrane fuel cells. PMID:25366566

  10. Iridium-alloy processing experience in FY 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Ohriner, E.K.

    1991-11-01

    Iridium-alloy blanks and foil are produced at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory for use as fuel cladding material in radioisotope thermoelectric generators for space power sources. Until 1984, the material was produced from small, 500-g drop castings. A new process has been developed in which consumable electrodes of about 10 kg are melted, extruded, and then rolled to produce the sheet products. The work performed during FY 1990 included the consumable-electrode arc melting of four ingots and the extruding and rolling to sheet of four billets. Significant improvements made in the extruding and arc-melting processes during FY 1989 have been demonstrated to dramatically increase the rate of blank acceptance in nondestructive evaluations. Efforts to improve the rolling practice and to better characterize intermetallic particle distributions in the sheet are also described.

  11. Iridium-alloy processing experience in FY 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Ohriner, E.K.

    1990-11-01

    Iridium-alloy blanks and foil are produced at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory for use as fuel cladding material in radioisotope thermoelectric generators for space power sources. Until 1984, the material was produced from small 500-g drop castings. A new process has been developed in which consumable electrodes of about 10 kg are arc melted, extruded, and then rolled to produce the sheet products. The work performed during FY 1989 included the arc melting of three electrodes and the extruding and rolling to sheet of three billets. Significant improvements have been made in the extruding and arc-melting processes. Preliminary results show that these improvements have had an important effect in increasing the rate of blank acceptance in nondestructive evaluations. 4 refs., 33 figs., 11 tabs.

  12. Intercalation of graphene on iridium with samarium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanas'eva, E. Yu.; Rut'kov, E. V.; Gall, N. R.

    2016-07-01

    Intercalation of graphene on Ir (111) with Sm atoms is studied by methods of thermal desorption spectroscopy and thermionic emission. It is shown that adsorption of samarium at T = 300 K on graphene to concentrations of N ≤ 6 × 1014 atoms cm-2 followed by heating of the substrate leads to practically complete escape of adsorbate underneath the graphene layer. At N > 6 × 1014 atoms cm-2 and increasing temperature, a fraction of adsorbate remains on graphene in the form of two-dimensional "gas" and samarium islands and are desorbed in the range of temperatures of 1000-1200 K. Samarium remaining under the graphene is desorbed from the surface in the temperature range 1200-2150 K. Model conceptions for the samarium-graphene-iridium system in a wide temperature range are developed.

  13. Iridium abundance maxima in the Upper Cenomanian extinction interval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orth, C. J.; Attrep, M., Jr.; Mao, X. Y.; Kauffman, E. G.; Diner, R.

    1988-01-01

    Two iridium abundance peaks, both 0.11 ppb (whole-rock basis) over a local background of 0.017 ppb, have been found in Middle Cretaceous marine rocks near Pueblo, Colorado. They occur just below the 92-million-year-old Cenomanian-Turonian (C-T) stage boundary. No other peaks were found in 45 meters of strata (about 2.5 million years of deposition) above and below the boundary interval. The broad lower peak straddles the first in a series of extinctions of benthic and nektonic macrobiota which comprise the C-T extinction event. The sharp upper peak occurs stratigraphically about 1.2 meters above the lower peak. The excess Ir might be from meteoroid impacts.

  14. Comparative modelling of chemical ordering in palladium-iridium nanoalloys

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Jack B. A.; Johnston, Roy L.; Rubinovich, Leonid; Polak, Micha

    2014-12-14

    Chemical ordering in “magic-number” palladium-iridium nanoalloys has been studied by means of density functional theory (DFT) computations, and compared to those obtained by the Free Energy Concentration Expansion Method (FCEM) using derived coordination dependent bond energy variations (CBEV), and by the Birmingham Cluster Genetic Algorithm using the Gupta potential. Several compositions have been studied for 38- and 79-atom particles as well as the site preference for a single Ir dopant atom in the 201-atom truncated octahedron (TO). The 79- and 38-atom nanoalloy homotops predicted for the TO by the FCEM/CBEV are shown to be, respectively, the global minima and competitive low energy minima. Significant reordering of minima predicted by the Gupta potential is seen after reoptimisation at the DFT level.

  15. Iridium satellites help map electrical currents in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    The satellite constellation of Iridium LLC, which filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy in 1999 after it failed to win enough business for its commercial satellite communications services, is still orbiting at an altitude of about 780 kilometers. Now, however, the satellites are helping to write a new chapter in understanding space weather.Magnetometers onboard each of the system's 66 polar-orbiting satellites are working in conjunction with the high-frequency, multinational Super Dual Auroral Radar Network, or SuperDARN, to provide the first continuous measurements of electrical currents between Earth's upper atmosphere and space. These tools also are generating the first global maps of electrical power flowing into the polar upper atmosphere.

  16. Inhibition of Beta-Amyloid Fibrillation by Luminescent Iridium(III) Complex Probes

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Lihua; Zhong, Hai-Jing; Wang, Modi; Ho, See-Lok; Li, Hung-Wing; Leung, Chung-Hang; Ma, Dik-Lung

    2015-01-01

    We report herein the application of kinetically inert luminescent iridium(III) complexes as dual inhibitors and probes of beta-amyloid fibrillogenesis. These iridium(III) complexes inhibited Aβ1–40 peptide aggregation in vitro, and protected against Aβ-induced cytotoxicity in neuronal cells. Furthermore, the complexes differentiated between the aggregated and unaggregated forms of Aβ1–40 peptide on the basis of their emission response. PMID:26419607

  17. Determination of ruthenium and iridium in anode coatings by atomic-absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Harrington, D E; Bramstedt, W R

    A method is described for the determination of ruthenium and iridium coated on an electrode surface. The coating is chemically removed from the electrode by fusion with alkali, and the resulting solution prepared for analysis. Interelement interferences are eliminated by using a titanium-potassium matrix solution as a releasing agent. Recovery and precision data are given for ruthenium and iridium. The AAS determination of ruthenium compares favourably with a standard colorimetric method. PMID:18961657

  18. Iridium-Catalyzed Enantioselective Hydroalkynylation of Enamides for the Synthesis of Homopropargyl Amides.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xiao-Yan; Wang, Zi-Xuan; Li, Bi-Jie

    2016-07-25

    Reported is an iridium-catalyzed asymmetric hydroalkynylation of enamides with terminal alkynes. The reaction occurs regioselectively at the β-position of an enamide to produce homopropargyl amides. Good to high enantioselectivity was observed with an iridium complex ligated by a chiral bis(phosphine) ligand. This method provides a straightforward route to synthesize chiral homopropargyl amides with a stereocenter β to the amide. PMID:27111577

  19. Inhibition of Beta-Amyloid Fibrillation by Luminescent Iridium(III) Complex Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Lihua; Zhong, Hai-Jing; Wang, Modi; Ho, See-Lok; Li, Hung-Wing; Leung, Chung-Hang; Ma, Dik-Lung

    2015-09-01

    We report herein the application of kinetically inert luminescent iridium(III) complexes as dual inhibitors and probes of beta-amyloid fibrillogenesis. These iridium(III) complexes inhibited Aβ1-40 peptide aggregation in vitro, and protected against Aβ-induced cytotoxicity in neuronal cells. Furthermore, the complexes differentiated between the aggregated and unaggregated forms of Aβ1-40 peptide on the basis of their emission response.

  20. Cyclic chronopotentiometric determination of sugars at Au and Pt microelectrodes in flowing solutions.

    PubMed

    Basa, Anna; Magnuszewska, Jolanta; Krogulec, Tadeusz; Baranski, Andrzej S

    2007-05-25

    The main advantage of the application of cyclic chronopotentiometry (CCP) in end-column CE detection arises from the fact that the detection parameters and the magnitude of the analytical signal are (in contrast with other electrochemical detection methods) independent of the ohmic polarization of the solution caused by the separation current at the detection end of the capillary. CCP was used to determine sugars on platinum and gold microelectrodes after separation by CE. The results obtained with a gold microelectrode were better. Subsequently this detection method was used for quantitative determination of sugars in honeys and for their authentication. PMID:16997311

  1. BioMEMS for medicine: On-chip cell characterization and implantable microelectrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Karen C.; Renaud, Philippe

    2006-04-01

    This paper surveys a few of the emerging bioMEMS technologies at EPFL for improved, inexpensive health care. The lab-on-a-chip systems use dielectrophoretic forces to direct cell movement within microfluidic networks and impedance spectroscopy for label-free in-flow characterization of living cells. The implantable microelectrodes for neural applications are based on thin-film polymer foils with embedded microelectrodes for both recording and stimulation. Applications for these biomedical microdevices will include stem cell research, cancer cell characterization, drug discovery, treatments for neurological disorders, and neuroprosthetic devices.

  2. Sonochemically fabricated enzyme microelectrode arrays for the environmental monitoring of pesticides.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, Jeanette; Law, Karen; Vakurov, Alexander; Millner, Paul; Higson, Séamus P J

    2004-11-01

    This paper describes the development of a novel sonochemically fabricated microelectrode based acetylcholinesterase and polyaniline carbon/cobalt phthalocyanine biosensor for the ultra-sensitive determination of pesticides. Arrays of this type are fabricated using microelectrode templates with population densities of 2 x 10(5) cm(-2). The enzymatic response of the sensors is inhibited upon incubation with the pesticide and in this report it is shown that paraoxon may be determined down to concentrations of 1 x 10(-17) M. This sensitivity has thus far not been achieved and mechanisms accounting for the enhancement of the sensitivity reported here are discussed. PMID:15522591

  3. Microelectrode for energy and current control of nanotip field electron emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Lüneburg, S.; Müller, M. Paarmann, A. Ernstorfer, R.

    2013-11-18

    Emerging experiments and applications in electron microscopy, holography, and diffraction benefit from miniaturized electron guns for compact experimental setups. We present a highly compact microelectrode integrated field emitter that consists of a tungsten nanotip coated with a few micrometers thick polyimide film followed by a several nanometers thick gold film, both positioned behind the exposed emitter apex by approximately 10–30 μm. The control of the electric field strength at the nanometer scale tip apex allows suppression, extraction, and energy tuning of field-emitted electrons. The performance of the microelectrode is demonstrated experimentally and supported by numerical simulations.

  4. A PARYLENE-BASED MICROELECTRODE ARRAY IMPLANT FOR SPINAL CORD STIMULATION IN RATS

    PubMed Central

    Nandra, Mandheerej. S.; Lavrov, Igor A.; Edgerton, V. Reggie; Tai, Yu-Chong

    2011-01-01

    The design and fabrication of an epidural spinal cord implant using a parylene-based microelectrode array is presented. Rats with hindlimb paralysis from a complete spinal cord transection were implanted with the device and studied for up to eight weeks, where we have demonstrated recovery of hindlimb stepping functionality through pulsed stimulation. The microelectrode array allows for a high degree of freedom and specificity in selecting the site of stimulation compared to wire-based implants, and triggers varied biological responses that can lead to an increased understanding of the spinal cord and locomotion recovery for victims of spinal cord injury. PMID:21841938

  5. Strain response of stretchable micro-electrodes: Controlling sensitivity with serpentine designs and encapsulation

    SciTech Connect

    Gutruf, Philipp; Walia, Sumeet; Nur Ali, Md; Sriram, Sharath E-mail: madhu.bhaskaran@gmail.com; Bhaskaran, Madhu E-mail: madhu.bhaskaran@gmail.com

    2014-01-13

    The functionality of flexible electronics relies on stable performance of thin film micro-electrodes. This letter investigates the behavior of gold thin films on polyimide, a prevalent combination in flexible devices. The dynamic behavior of gold micro-electrodes has been studied by subjecting them to stress while monitoring their resistance in situ. The shape of the electrodes was systematically varied to examine resistive strain sensitivity, while an additional encapsulation was applied to characterize multilayer behavior. The realized designs show remarkable tolerance to repetitive strain, demonstrating that curvature and encapsulation are excellent approaches for minimizing resistive strain sensitivity to enable durable flexible electronics.

  6. Process for catalytically oxidizing cycloolefins, particularly cyclohexene

    DOEpatents

    Mizuno, Noritaka; Lyon, David K.; Finke, Richard G.

    1993-01-01

    This invention is a process for catalytically oxidizing cycloolefins, particularly cyclohexenes, to form a variety of oxygenates. The catalyst used in the process is a covalently bonded iridium-heteropolyanion species. The process uses the catalyst in conjunction with a gaseous oxygen containing gas to form 2-cyclohexen-1-ol and also 2-cyclohexen-1-one.

  7. New yellow-emitting phosphorescent cyclometalated iridium(III) complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, P.; Tomova, R.; Petrova, P.; Stanimirov, S.; Petkov, I.

    2012-12-01

    We have synthesized a new yellow iridium complex Iridium(III) bis[2-phenylbenzothiazolato-N,C2']-(1-phenylicosane-1,3-dionate) (bt)2Ir(bsm), based on the benzothiazole derivative. The synthesized molecule was identified by 1H NMR and elemental analysis. The UV-Visible absorption and photoluminescence (PL) spectra of (bt)Ir2(bsm) in CH2Cl2 solution were found at 273 nm and 559 nm, respectively. The complex was used as a dopant into a hole-transporting layer (HTL) in a multilayered organic light emitting device (OLED) structure: ITO/doped-HTL/EL/ETL/M. ITO was a transparent anode of In2O3:SnO2, M- a metallic Al cathode, HTL- 4,4'-bis(9H-carbazol-9-yl)biphenyl (CBP) incorporated in poly(N-vinylcarbazole) (PVK) matrix, EL- electroluminescent layer of bis(8-hydroxy-2-methylquinoline)-(4-phenylphenoxy)aluminum (BAlq) and ETL- electron-transporting layer of tris(8-hydroxyquinolinato)aluminum (Alq3). The electroluminescent (EL) spectra of OLEDs were basically the sum of the emissions of BAlq at 496 nm and the emission of (bt)2Ir(bsm) at 559 nm. With increasing (bt)2Ir(bsm) concentration, the relative electroluminescent intensity of greenish-blue emission (at 496 nm) decreased, while the yellow (at 559 nm) - increased and CIE coordinates of the device shifted from (0.21, 0.33) at 0 wt % to (0.40, 0.48) at 8 wt % of the dopant. It was found that OLED with 0.5 wt % (bt)2Ir(bsm) had the best performance and stable color chromaticity at various voltages.

  8. The Electric Dipole Moment of Iridium Monosilicide, IrSi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Anh; Steimle, Timothy C.; Cheng, Lan; Stanton, John F.

    2013-06-01

    The optical spectrum of iridium monosilicide (IrSi) was recently observed using REMPI spectroscopy in the range 17200 to 23850 cm^{-1}. The observation was supported by an ab initio calculation which predicted a X^{2}Δ_{5/2} state. Here, we report on the analysis of the optical Stark effect for the X^{2}Δ_{5/2} and [16.0]1.5 (v=6) states. The (6,0)[16.0]1.5 - X^{2}Δ_{5/2} and the (7,0)[16.0]3.5- X^{2}Δ_{5/2} bands of IrSi have been recorded using high-resolution laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. The observed optical Stark shifts for the ^{193}IrSi and ^{191}IrSi isotopologues were analyzed to produce the electric dipole moments of -0.4139(64)D and 0.7821(63)D for the X^{2}Δ_{5/2} and [16.0]1.5 (v=6) states, respectively. The negative sign of electric dipole moment of the X^{2}Δ_{5/2} state is supported by high-level quantum-chemical calculations employing all-electron scalar-relativistic CCSD(T) method augmented with spin-orbit corrections as well as corrections due to full triple excitations. In particular, electron-correlation effects have been shown to be essential in the prediction of the negative sign of the dipole moment. A comparison with other iridium containing molecules will be made. Maria A. Garcia, Carolin Vietz, Fernando Ruipérez, Michael D. Morse, and Ivan Infante, Kimika Fakultatea, Euskal Herriko. J. Chem. Phys., (submitted)

  9. Dynamic high-temperature characterization of an iridium alloy in compression at high strain rates.

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Bo; Nelson, Kevin; Lipinski, Ronald J.; Bignell, John L.; Ulrich, G. B.; George, E. P.

    2014-06-01

    Iridium alloys have superior strength and ductility at elevated temperatures, making them useful as structural materials for certain high-temperature applications. However, experimental data on their high-temperature high-strain-rate performance are needed for understanding high-speed impacts in severe elevated-temperature environments. Kolsky bars (also called split Hopkinson bars) have been extensively employed for high-strain-rate characterization of materials at room temperature, but it has been challenging to adapt them for the measurement of dynamic properties at high temperatures. Current high-temperature Kolsky compression bar techniques are not capable of obtaining satisfactory high-temperature high-strain-rate stress-strain response of thin iridium specimens investigated in this study. We analyzed the difficulties encountered in high-temperature Kolsky compression bar testing of thin iridium alloy specimens. Appropriate modifications were made to the current high-temperature Kolsky compression bar technique to obtain reliable compressive stress-strain response of an iridium alloy at high strain rates (300 10000 s-1) and temperatures (750ÀC and 1030ÀC). Uncertainties in such high-temperature high-strain-rate experiments on thin iridium specimens were also analyzed. The compressive stress-strain response of the iridium alloy showed significant sensitivity to strain rate and temperature.

  10. Development of impedance/external field potential dual measurement system for evaluation of electrophysiological properties of cells on microelectrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Fumimasa; Matsuura, Kenji; Hattori, Akihiro; Odaka, Masao; Sugio, Yoshihiro; Kurotobi, Hiromi; Terazono, Hideyuki; Yasuda, Kenji

    2015-06-01

    A combination of extracellular field potential (FP) and impedance measurement technologies for multielectrode array (MEA) chip architecture is developed for the simultaneous evaluation of information on the ion current and resistance of cells and microelectrodes. The simultaneous measurement system can not only evaluate the time course changes of characteristics in the MEAs but also clarification of the origin of the difference in the waveform of the field potentials of each cell on an microelectrode whether it is caused by the changes in the electrophysiological properties of cells or by the changes in the performance of an microelectrode (and cell-to-electrode contacts). The automatic impedance measurement technology in the system exploited the swiping of the wide frequency range of impedances of microelectrodes and calculated the true impedance of each microelectrode without significant effects on the cells on the MEA chip. Hence, the system can give us invisible cell-to-electrode contact information and its change, and also information on the degradation of the performance of microelectrodes during long-term cultivation and after the application of compounds into the MEA chip. The impedance spectrum measurement showed that (1) the increase in the impedance of microelectrodes correlated with its area decrease from 10-7 to 10-10 m2, (2) even the area of microelectrodes decreased from 10-8 to 10-10 m2, the noise level of field potential signals was independent and did not change, and (3) the attachment of cells on the microelectrode surface can be determined by a significant increase in impedance at 1 kHz corresponding to the width of the depolarization peak on the field potential recordings. These results indicate the potential to evaluate the cell-to-electrode contact and degradation of microelectrodes, which was not evaluated in conventional FP measurements only. These results also indicate that this method should be used for the evaluation of the changes in

  11. The regioselective hydroformylation of vinylsilanes. A remarkable difference in the selectivity and reactivity of cobalt, rhodium, and iridium catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Crudden, C.M.; Alper, H.

    1994-06-03

    Rhodium, iridium, and cobalt complexes were evaluated as catalysts for hydroformylation of vinylsilanes. Regioselectivities, product structures, and reaction yields were widely variable for these catalysts.

  12. Permeability and partitioning of ferrocene ethylene oxide and propylene oxide oligomers into electropolymerized films from acetonitrile and polyether solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Pyati, R.; Murray, R.W. )

    1994-10-27

    We report the first electrochemically-based measurements of the rates of small polymer permeation into another polymer. The small polymer permeants are ferrocene ethylene oxide oligomers containing 2, 7, and 16 units and a propylene oxide oligomer containing 3 units. Their permeation into ultrathin microelectrode-supported films of the metal complex polymer poly[Ru(vbpy)[sub 3

  13. Enhancing the Bipolar Redox Cycling Efficiency of Plane-Recessed Microelectrode Arrays by Adding a Chemically Irreversible Interferent.

    PubMed

    He, Dingwen; Yan, Jiawei; Zhu, Feng; Zhou, Yongliang; Mao, Bingwei; Oleinick, Alexander; Svir, Irina; Amatore, Christian

    2016-09-01

    The individual electrochemical anodic responses of dopamine (DA), epinephrine (EP), and pyrocatechol (CT) were investigated at arrays of recessed gold disk-microelectrodes arrays (MEAs) covered by a gold plane electrode and compared to those of their binary mixture (CT and EP) when the top-plane electrode was operated as a bipolar electrode or as a collector. The interferent species (EP) displays a chemically irreversible wave over the same potential range as the chemically reversible ones of DA or CT. As expected, in the generator-collector (GC) mode, EP did not contribute to the redox cycling amplification that occurred only for DA or CT. Conversely, in the bipolar mode, the presence of EP drastically increased the bipolar redox cycling efficiency of DA and CT. This evidenced that the chemically irreversible oxidation of EP at the anodic poles of the top plane floating electrode provided additional electron fluxes that were used to more efficiently reduce the oxidized DA or CT species at the cathodic poles. This suggests an easy experimental strategy for enhancing the bipolar efficiency of MEAs up to reach a performance identical to that achieved when the same MEAs are operated in a GC mode. PMID:27490270

  14. A molecular catalyst for water oxidation that binds to metal oxide surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Sheehan, Stafford W.; Thomsen, Julianne M.; Hintermair, Ulrich; Crabtree, Robert H.; Brudvig, Gary W.; Schmuttenmaer, Charles A.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular catalysts are known for their high activity and tunability, but their solubility and limited stability often restrict their use in practical applications. Here we describe how a molecular iridium catalyst for water oxidation directly and robustly binds to oxide surfaces without the need for any external stimulus or additional linking groups. On conductive electrode surfaces, this heterogenized molecular catalyst oxidizes water with low overpotential, high turnover frequency and minimal degradation. Spectroscopic and electrochemical studies show that it does not decompose into iridium oxide, thus preserving its molecular identity, and that it is capable of sustaining high activity towards water oxidation with stability comparable to state-of-the-art bulk metal oxide catalysts. PMID:25757425

  15. A Comparison of Neuroinflammation to Implanted Microelectrodes in Rat and Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Potter-Baker, Kelsey A.; Ravikumar, Madhumitha; Burke, Alan A.; Meador, William D.; Householder, Kyle T.; Buck, Amy C.; Sunil, Smrithi; Stewart, Wade G.; Anna, Jake P.; Tomaszewski, William H.; Capadona, Jeffrey R.

    2014-01-01

    Rat models have emerged as a common tool to study neuroinflammation to intracortical microelectrodes. While a number of studies have attempted to understand the factors resulting in neuroinflammation using rat models, a complete understanding of key mechanistic pathways remains elusive. Transgenic mouse models, however, could facilitate a deeper understanding of mechanistic pathways due to an ease of genetic alteration. Therefore, the goal of the present study is to compare neuroinflammation following microelectrode implantation s between the rat and the mouse model. Our study suggests that subtle differences in the classic neuroinflammatory markers exist between the animal models at both two and sixteen weeks post implantation. Most notably, neuronal densities surrounding microelectrodes were significantly lower in the rat model at two weeks, while similar densities were observed between the animal models at sixteen weeks. Physiological differences between the species and slight alterations in surgical methods are likely key contributors to the observed differences. Moving forward, we propose that differences in the time course of neuroinflammation between the animal models should be considered when trying to understand and prevent intracortical microelectrode failure. PMID:24755527

  16. A comparison of neuroinflammation to implanted microelectrodes in rat and mouse models.

    PubMed

    Potter-Baker, Kelsey A; Ravikumar, Madhumitha; Burke, Alan A; Meador, William D; Householder, Kyle T; Buck, Amy C; Sunil, Smrithi; Stewart, Wade G; Anna, Jake P; Tomaszewski, William H; Capadona, Jeffrey R

    2014-07-01

    Rat models have emerged as a common tool to study neuroinflammation to intracortical microelectrodes. While a number of studies have attempted to understand the factors resulting in neuroinflammation using rat models, a complete understanding of key mechanistic pathways remains elusive. Transgenic mouse models, however, could facilitate a deeper understanding of mechanistic pathways due to an ease of genetic alteration. Therefore, the goal of the present study is to compare neuroinflammation following microelectrode implantation between the rat and the mouse model. Our study suggests that subtle differences in the classic neuroinflammatory markers exist between the animal models at both two and sixteen weeks post implantation. Most notably, neuronal densities surrounding microelectrodes were significantly lower in the rat model at two weeks, while similar densities were observed between the animal models at sixteen weeks. Physiological differences between the species and slight alterations in surgical methods are likely key contributors to the observed differences. Moving forward, we propose that differences in the time course of neuroinflammation between the animal models should be considered when trying to understand and prevent intracortical microelectrode failure. PMID:24755527

  17. Printed microelectrodes for scalable, high-areal-capacity lithium-sulfur batteries.

    PubMed

    Milroy, Craig; Manthiram, Arumugam

    2016-03-10

    Printed microelectrodes for lithium-sulfur cathodes are produced with aqueous inks and a one-step printing process. The cathodes exhibit high areal capacities of ≥5 mA h cm(-2) for 50 cycles and withstand ≥500 cycles. This performance meets energy-storage benchmarks for powering microdevices, and presents a strategic option for future microbatteries. PMID:26833188

  18. Effects of Organophosphorus Flame Retardants on Spontaneous Activity in Neuronal Networks Grown on Microelectrode Arrays

    EPA Science Inventory

    EFFECTS OF ORGANOPHOSPHORUS FLAME RETARDANTS ON SPONTANEOUS ACTIVITY IN NEURONAL NETWORKS GROWN ON MICROELECTRODE ARRAYS TJ Shafer1, K Wallace1, WR Mundy1, M Behl2,. 1Integrated Systems Toxicology Division, NHEERL, USEPA, RTP, NC, USA, 2National Toxicology Program, NIEHS, RTP, NC...

  19. Fabrication of a flexible penetrating microelectrode array for use on curved surfaces of neural tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, Donghak; Cho, Sung Joon; Kim, Sohee

    2013-12-01

    Conventionally, invasive neural microelectrodes for recording neuronal signals or stimulating the nervous system have been fabricated based on silicon substrate mainly due to well-established manufacturing processes. However, these silicon-based microelectrode devices have an issue of mechanical stability caused by the absence of flexibility when implanted onto curved surfaces of tissues. In this paper, a flexible and penetrating microelectrode array, a hybrid structure composed of silicon and elastomer, was devised and fabricated by bulk micromachining technologies. The structure uses individual silicon needles as independent electrodes in a square array and polydimethysiloxane (PDMS) as a base to support the needles. The dimensions of the electrode array and the needles are adjustable, depending on the number of needles, the pitch between the needles and the targeted penetration depth of the neural tissue. For mechanical characterization, the adhesion between PDMS and silicon was evaluated and the flexibility and integrity of the fabricated structure were investigated through flexural test and insertion test. Also, the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of the electrodes was measured. The results suggest that the proposed microelectrode array is promising for use in neuronal recording and stimulation over curved surfaces such as cortical surface and peripheral nerves with larger curvatures.

  20. Direct-write assembly of microperiodic planar and spanning ITO microelectrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, Bok Y; Lorang, David J; Duoss, Eric B.; Lewis, Jennifer A

    2010-01-01

    Printed Sn-doped In{sub 2}O{sub 3} (ITO) microelectrodes are fabricated by direct-write assembly of sol–gel inks with varying concentration. This maskless, non-lithographic approach provides a facile route to patterning transparent conductive features in planar arrays and spanning architectures.

  1. Dry-contact microelectrode membranes for wireless detection of electrical phenotypes in neonatal mouse hearts.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yu; Cao, Hung; Beebe, Tyler; Zhang, Hemin; Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Chang, Honglong; Scremin, Oscar; Lien, Ching-Ling; Tai, Yu-Chong; Hsiai, Tzung K

    2015-04-01

    Continuous monitoring of aberrant electrical rhythms during heart injury and repair requires prolonged data acquisition. We hereby developed a wearable microelectrode membrane that could be adherent to the chest of neonatal mice for in situ wireless recording of electrocardiogram (ECG) signals. The novel dry-contact membrane with a meshed parylene-C pad adjacent to the microelectrodes and the expandable meandrous strips allowed for varying size of the neonates. The performance was evaluated at the system level; specifically, the ECG signals (μV) acquired from the microelectrodes underwent two-stage amplification, band-pass filtering, and optical data transmission by an infrared Light Emitting Diode (LED) to the data-receiving unit. The circuitry was prototyped on a printed circuit board (PCB), consuming less than 300 μW, and was completely powered by an inductive coupling link. Distinct P waves, QRS complexes, and T waves of ECG signals were demonstrated from the non-pharmacologically sedated neonates at ~600 beats per minutes. Thus, we demonstrate the feasibility of both real-time and wireless monitoring cardiac rhythms in a neonatal mouse (17-20 mm and <1 g) via dry-contact microelectrode membrane; thus, providing a basis for diagnosing aberrant electrical conduction in animal models of cardiac injury and repair. PMID:25749638

  2. Invariance of exocytotic events detected by amperometry as a function of the carbon fiber microelectrode diameter.

    PubMed

    Amatore, Christian; Arbault, Stéphane; Bouret, Yann; Guille, Manon; Lemaître, Frédéric; Verchier, Yann

    2009-04-15

    Etched carbon fiber microelectrodes of different radii have been used for amperometric measurements of single exocytotic events occurring at adrenal chromaffin cells. Frequency, kinetic, and quantitative information on exocytosis provided by amperometric spikes were analyzed as a function of the surface area of the microelectrodes. Interestingly, the percentage of spikes with foot (as well as their own characteristics), a category revealing the existence of sufficient long-lasting fusion pores, was found to be constant whatever the microelectrode diameter was, whereas the probability of overlapping spikes decreased with the electrode size. This confirmed that the prespike foot could not feature accidental superimposition of separated events occurring at different places. Moreover, the features of amperometric spikes investigated here (charge, intensity and kinetics) were found constant for all microelectrode diameters. This demonstrated that the electrochemical measurement does not introduce significant bias onto the kinetics and thermodynamics of release during individual exocytotic events. All in all, this work evidences that information on exocytosis amperometrically recorded with the usual 7 microm diameter carbon fiber electrodes is biologically relevant, although the frequent overlap between spikes requires a censorship of the data during the analytical treatment. PMID:19290664

  3. Redox processes in silicon dioxide thin films using copper microelectrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tappertzhofen, S.; Menzel, S.; Valov, I.; Waser, R.

    2011-11-01

    Although SiO2 is a typical insulator, we demonstrate an electrochemical characteristic of the Cu/Cu+ oxidation at the interface with 30 nm thick silicon dioxide thin films studied by cyclic voltammetry. This study reveals the process of anodic oxidation and subsequent reduction of oxidized Cu ions injected in the SiO2 layer with special attention to the kinetics of the redox process. We estimated the diffusion coefficient and the mobility of Cu ions in SiO2. The results gain deeper insight in the processes involved during resistive switching of Cu/SiO2 based nonvolatile memory devices.

  4. The roles of blood-derived macrophages and resident microglia in the neuroinflammatory response to implanted Intracortical microelectrodes

    PubMed Central

    Ravikumar, Madhumitha; Sunil, Smrithi; Black, James; Barkauskas, Deborah S.; Haung, Alex Y.; Miller, Robert H.; Selkirk, Stephen M.; Capadona, Jeffrey R.

    2014-01-01

    Resident microglia and blood-borne macrophages have both been implicated to play a dominant role in mediating the neuroinflammatory response affecting implanted intracortical microelectrodes. However, the distinction between each cell type has not been demonstrated due to a lack of discriminating cellular markers. Understanding the subtle differences of each cell population in mediating neuroinflammation can aid in determining the appropriate therapeutic approaches to improve microelectrode performance. Therefore, the goal of this study is to characterize the role of infiltrating blood-derived cells, specifically macrophages, in mediating neuroinflammation following intracortical microelectrode implantation. Interestingly, we found no correlation between microglia and neuron populations at the microelectrode-tissue interface. On the other hand, blood-borne macrophages consistently dominated the infiltrating cell population following microelectrode implantation. Most importantly, we found a correlation between increased populations of blood-derived cells (including the total macrophage population) and neuron loss at the microelectrode-tissue interface. Specifically, the total macrophage population was greatest at two and sixteen weeks post implantation, at the same time points when we observed the lowest densities of neuronal survival in closest proximity to the implant. Together, our results suggest a dominant role of infiltrating macrophages, and not resident microglia, in mediating neurodegeneration following microelectrode implantation. PMID:24973296

  5. The roles of blood-derived macrophages and resident microglia in the neuroinflammatory response to implanted intracortical microelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Ravikumar, Madhumitha; Sunil, Smrithi; Black, James; Barkauskas, Deborah S; Haung, Alex Y; Miller, Robert H; Selkirk, Stephen M; Capadona, Jeffrey R

    2014-09-01

    Resident microglia and blood-borne macrophages have both been implicated to play a dominant role in mediating the neuroinflammatory response affecting implanted intracortical microelectrodes. However, the distinction between each cell type has not been demonstrated due to a lack of discriminating cellular markers. Understanding the subtle differences of each cell population in mediating neuroinflammation can aid in determining the appropriate therapeutic approaches to improve microelectrode performance. Therefore, the goal of this study is to characterize the role of infiltrating blood-derived cells, specifically macrophages, in mediating neuroinflammation following intracortical microelectrode implantation. Interestingly, we found no correlation between microglia and neuron populations at the microelectrode-tissue interface. On the other hand, blood-borne macrophages consistently dominated the infiltrating cell population following microelectrode implantation. Most importantly, we found a correlation between increased populations of blood-derived cells (including the total macrophage population) and neuron loss at the microelectrode-tissue interface. Specifically, the total macrophage population was greatest at two and sixteen weeks post implantation, at the same time points when we observed the lowest densities of neuronal survival in closest proximity to the implant. Together, our results suggest a dominant role of infiltrating macrophages, and not resident microglia, in mediating neurodegeneration following microelectrode implantation. PMID:24973296

  6. Design, Fabrication, Simulation and Characterization of a Novel Dual-Sided Microelectrode Array for Deep Brain Recording and Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zongya; Gong, Ruxue; Huang, Hongen; Wang, Jue

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a novel dual-sided microelectrode array is specially designed and fabricated for a rat Parkinson’s disease (PD) model to study the mechanisms of deep brain stimulation (DBS). The fabricated microelectrode array can stimulate the subthalamic nucleus and simultaneously record electrophysiological information from multiple nuclei of the basal ganglia system. The fabricated microelectrode array has a long shaft of 9 mm and each planar surface is equipped with three stimulating sites (diameter of 100 μm), seven electrophysiological recording sites (diameter of 20 μm) and four sites with diameter of 50 μm used for neurotransmitter measurements in future work. The performances of the fabricated microelectrode array were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and cyclic voltammetry. In addition, the stimulating effects of the fabricated microelectrode were evaluated by finite element modeling (FEM). Preliminary animal experiments demonstrated that the designed microelectrode arrays can record spontaneous discharge signals from the striatum, the subthalamic nucleus and the globus pallidus interna. The designed and fabricated microelectrode arrays provide a powerful research tool for studying the mechanisms of DBS in rat PD models. PMID:27314356

  7. Design, Fabrication, Simulation and Characterization of a Novel Dual-Sided Microelectrode Array for Deep Brain Recording and Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zongya; Gong, Ruxue; Huang, Hongen; Wang, Jue

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a novel dual-sided microelectrode array is specially designed and fabricated for a rat Parkinson's disease (PD) model to study the mechanisms of deep brain stimulation (DBS). The fabricated microelectrode array can stimulate the subthalamic nucleus and simultaneously record electrophysiological information from multiple nuclei of the basal ganglia system. The fabricated microelectrode array has a long shaft of 9 mm and each planar surface is equipped with three stimulating sites (diameter of 100 μm), seven electrophysiological recording sites (diameter of 20 μm) and four sites with diameter of 50 μm used for neurotransmitter measurements in future work. The performances of the fabricated microelectrode array were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and cyclic voltammetry. In addition, the stimulating effects of the fabricated microelectrode were evaluated by finite element modeling (FEM). Preliminary animal experiments demonstrated that the designed microelectrode arrays can record spontaneous discharge signals from the striatum, the subthalamic nucleus and the globus pallidus interna. The designed and fabricated microelectrode arrays provide a powerful research tool for studying the mechanisms of DBS in rat PD models. PMID:27314356

  8. Experimental and theoretical characterization of implantable neural microelectrodes modified with conducting polymer nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Abidian, Mohammad Reza; Martin, David C.

    2009-01-01

    Neural prostheses transduce bioelectric signals to electronic signals at the interface between neural tissue and neural microelectrodes. A low impedance electrode-tissue interface is important for the quality of signal during recording as well as quantity of applied charge density during stimulation. However, neural microelectrode sites exhibit high impedance because of their small geometric surface area. Here we analyze nanostructured-conducting polymers that can be used to significantly decrease the impedance of microelectrode typically by about two orders of magnitude and increase the charge transfer capacity of microelectrodes by three orders of magnitude. In this study poly(pyrrole) (PPy) and poly(3, 4- ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) nanotubes were electrochemically polymerized on the surface of neural microelectrode sites (1250 μm2). An equivalent circuit model comprising a coating capacitance in parallel with a pore resistance and interface impedance in series was developed and fitted to experimental results to characterize the physical and electrical properties of the interface. To confirm that the fitting parameters correlate with physical quantities of interface, theoretical equations were used to calculate the parameter values thereby validating the proposed model. Finally, an apparent diffusion coefficient was calculated for PPy film (29.2 ± 1.1 cm2/s), PPy nanotubes (72.4 ± 3.3 cm2/s), PEDOT film (7.4 ± 2.1 cm2/s), and PEDOT nanotubes (13.0 ± 1.8 cm2/s). The apparent diffusion coefficient of conducting polymer nanotubes was larger than the corresponding conducting polymer films. PMID:18093644

  9. Rhizosphere pH responses to simulated acid rain as measured with glass microelectrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Conkling, B.L.

    1988-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to develop a useful experimental system for studying the rhizosphere of growing roots, and to investigate the effects of bulk soil pH and foliar acid rain application on the rhizosphere pH of alfalfa, corn and soybeans. First, a study was done to compare soil pH measurements made with a standard glass pH electrode with those made using an antimony (Sb) microelectrode. Because of uncertainty with the Sb microelectrodes' response, glass pH-sensitive microelectrodes were made and tested for rhizosphere pH measurements. The influence of soil water pressure gradients in the range of {minus}10 to {minus}1500 kPa in the proximity of the pH and reference electrodes on pH measurements made with microelectrodes was studied. The effect of foliar acid rain application on the rhizosphere pH of alfalfa, corn, and soybean as a function of soil pH were studied. Alfalfa, corn, and soybean were grown into minirhizotrons containing reformed samples of both Seymour A and Bt soil horizons, and the rhizosphere pH measured. The measured in situ bulk soil pH ranged from 4.9 to 6.2 in the A horizon and from 4.0 to 5.7 in the Bt horizon. Plants received acid or non-acid foliar rain applications. Rhizosphere pH was measured using a glass pH-sensitive microelectrode. Acid rain applications caused foliar damage, but had little effect on the rhizosphere pH. The general trend was for the lateral root pH values to be slightly higher than the main root values.

  10. Electrochemistry of lithium-oxygen batteries using microelectrode voltammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemanick, E. Joseph

    2014-02-01

    The electrochemistry of non-aqueous lithium-oxygen (Li-O2) batteries on both reduction and oxidation was investigated using carbon black and single-walled nanotube (SWNT) microcavity electrodes. Two oxidative peaks were observed on oxidation (charge). The first peak at 3.0-3.7 V vs. Li/Li+ was limited in storable charge (∼8 × 103 C cm-3). The oxidation potential of this first peak was independent of Li2O2 thickness (as measured by total charge on reduction) and assigned to interfacial Li2O2, lying between the bulk of the Li2O2 and the carbon surface. A second peak between 4.0 and 4.6+ V showed significant discharge product thickness dependence on oxidation potential and was assigned to bulk Li2O2, away from the carbon surface. On reduction (discharge), deposition of the interfacial Li2O2 showed a significant overpotential indicated by the ratio of interfacial/bulk Li2O2 formed at varying reduction potentials. SWNT were shown to effectively decrease the Li-O2 average charge overpotential for a given charge by increasing the electrode surface area available for formation of interfacial discharge products.

  11. Solution-processable phosphorescence based on iridium-cored small molecules with the trifluoromethyl group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenguan; He, Zhiqun; Wang, Yongsheng; Zhao, Shengmin

    2015-04-01

    A novel cyclometallated ligand 2-(4-(2‧-ethylhexyloxy)phenyl)-5-trifluoromethyl-pyridine (EHO-5CF3-ppy) was synthesized, and two solution-processable iridium complexes bis[2-(4-(2‧-ethylhexyloxy)phenyl)-5-trifluoromethylpyridinto-C3, N] iridium (acetylacetonate) (EHO-5CF3-ppy)2Ir(acac) (5) and bis[2-(4-(2‧-ethylhexyl-oxy)phenyl)-5-trifluoromethylpyridinto-C3, N] iridium (2-picolinic acid) (EHO-5CF3-ppy)2Ir(pic) (6) were afforded. Trifluoromethyl and dendritic ethylhexyloxy group were incorporated into iridium ligands to tune luminescent color, to reduce luminescence quenching and to improve the solution-processable property. Photoluminescent spectra of 5 and 6 in tetrahydrofuran peaked at around 540 and 523 nm. Electrophosphorescent devices were fabricated using 5 and 6 as dopant emitters (2%), which exhibited electroluminescent (EL) peaks at 536 and 524 nm, and current efficiencies of 10.4 and 16.7 cd/A, respectively. With the concentration of iridium complexes increasing to 8%, the main EL peak showed a 4 nm of red shift and a distinct shoulder peak occurred at 583 nm for 5 or 560 nm for 6, respectively. Maximum external quantum efficiencies of the devices at the concentration of 2% and 8% were 2.8% and 4.2% for 5, 4.7% and 4.8% for 6. These indicated that 5 and 6 were efficient solution-processable emitters.

  12. The Boreas concept for imaging polar winds from the Iridium-NEXT constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesters, Dennis; Riishojgaard, Lars Peter

    2008-08-01

    The Iridium communications satellite constellation is a swarm of 66 LEO satellites in 6 pole-crossing orbits. Iridium LLC plans a NEXT generation to be launched 2013-16, and has invited secondary "bolt and go" payloads from Earthobserving agencies. A swarm of infrared imagers on Iridium-NEXT could track water vapor and clouds to estimate the unobserved winds above the 55-60 degree latitude limit of geosynchronous satellite imagery. This kind of polar overpass data has been demonstrated to significantly improve medium-range weather forecasts by tracking water vapor features at 6.7 microns in successive images near the pole from NASA's MODIS instruments. A "Boreas" instrument design is proposed for a push-broom imager combining two miniature sensors: uncooled microbolometric cameras gathering 4- band infrared radiometry, and small star trackers providing attitude information. An autonomous instrument package has been designed with low mass, power, and data rate. The "Boreas" instrument would use the Iridium constellation itself to relay the raw imagery from 3 successive images to ground stations that would navigate the data and extract wind vectors. Wind vectors could be generated automatically for the polar caps every few hours, and delivered for assimilation into numerical weather models during Iridium-NEXT operations, during 2016-2030.

  13. The high-temperature work function of sintered dilute solution tungsten-iridium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    D'Cruz, L.A.; Bosch, D.R.; Jacobsen, D.L. )

    1993-02-01

    The effect of transition element additives molybdenum, rhenium, iridium, and osmium on the effective work function of tungsten has been the focus of thermionics research for several years. In this study, iridium-added tungsten powder mixtures were cold compacted and sintered to produce a range of tungsten-iridium electrodes. An electron emission study was subsequently carried out to evaluate the work function behavior of the consolidated alloys. The work function was obtained from measurements of the current emitted from the electrode surface under ultrahigh vacuum conditions in the temperature range of 1,800 to 2,500 K using a vacuum emission vehicle (VEV). The data show that the magnitude of the work function in these alloys varied with temperature. Microstructural evaluation of the alloys indicated that the tested surfaces displayed accentuated thermal etching of the grain boundaries together with the fact that the final grain sizes in the sintered alloys were three to five times smaller than those found in equivalent arc-melted alloys that were studied in earlier work. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs of the tested surfaces of the sintered alloys containing the highest iridium levels ([approximately]2 wt%) show a high level of structural distortion, particularly in the vicinity of grain boundaries and corners. The extent of these distortions was found to vary with the iridium content, i.e., the W-IR3M and W-IR2M. The samples with compositions lower than 0.5 wt% Ir were virtually devoid of distortions.

  14. Electrochemical properties of silver-copper alloy microelectrodes for use in voltammetric field apparatus.

    PubMed

    Skogvold, Silje M; Mikkelsen, Oyvind; Billon, Gabriel; Garnier, Cedric; Lesven, Ludovic; Barthe, Jean-Francois

    2006-04-01

    Microelectrodes of silver-copper alloys have been evaluated for use in voltammetric analyses. Increased overpotential towards the hydrogen overvoltage reaction (HER) was found as a function of increased copper content in the silver. A study of oxidizing products by cyclic voltammetry (CV) in NaOH solution showed ten anodic and eight cathodic peaks which are described in the present paper. The behaviour of these alloy electrodes is somewhere between pure silver and pure copper electrodes. Differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry (DPASV) was used to measure zinc, cadmium and lead in ultrapure water only (18 MOmegacm), and good linearity was found for all metals (r (2)=0.998) in the range of 0.5 to 5 ppb with a 600- to 1,200-s plating time. It was additionally found that cadmium and lead were better separated on the alloy electrodes compared to pure silver electrodes. Measurements of nickel were carried out on alloy electrodes by use of adsorptive differential pulse cathodic stripping voltammetry (Ad-DPCSV), and good linearity (r (2)=1.000) was found in the range from 0.5 to 5 ppb with an adsorption time of 120 s. The alloy electrodes were also found to be sensitive to nitrate, and good linearity (r (2)=0.997) was found in the range from 1 mg L(-1) to 100 mg L(-1) using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) scanning from -450 mV to -1,500 mV. Addition of nitrate in ultrapure water afforded two different peaks related to the successive reductions of nitrate and nitrite. In ammonium buffer solution (pH 8.6) only one peak resulting from reduction of nitrate was observed. Furthermore, the use of alloy electrodes containing 17% Cu was tested in real samples, by installing it in a voltammetric system for monitoring of zinc and lead in a polluted river, the river Deûle, near the town of Douai in northern France. Results were found to be in agreement with parallel measurements carried out by ICP-MS. PMID:16550424

  15. Iridium containing honeycomb Delafossites by topotactic cation exchange.

    PubMed

    Roudebush, John H; Ross, K A; Cava, R J

    2016-06-01

    We report the structure and magnetic properties of two new iridium-based honeycomb Delafossite compounds, Cu3NaIr2O6 and Cu3LiIr2O6, formed by a topotactic cation exchange reaction. The starting materials Na2IrO3 and Li2IrO3, which are based on layers of IrO6 octahedra in a honeycomb lattice separated by layers of alkali ions, are transformed to the title compounds by a topotactic exchange reaction through heating with CuCl below 450 °C; higher temperature reactions cause decomposition. The new compounds display dramatically different magnetic behavior from their parent compounds - Cu3NaIr2O6 has a ferromagnetic like magnetic transition at 10 K, while Cu3LiIr2O6 retains the antiferromagnetic transition temperature of its parent compound but displays significantly stronger dominance of antiferromagnetic coupling between spins. These results reveal that a surprising difference in the magnetic interactions between the magnetic Ir ions has been induced by a change in the non-magnetic interlayer species. A combination of neutron and X-ray powder diffraction is used for the structure refinement of Cu3NaIr2O6 and both compounds are compared to their parent materials. PMID:27147423

  16. High Strain Rate Tensile Testing of DOP-26 Iridium

    SciTech Connect

    Schneibel, Joachim H; Carmichael Jr, Cecil Albert; George, Easo P

    2007-11-01

    The iridium alloy DOP-26 was developed through the Radioisotope Power Systems Program in the Office of Nuclear Energy of the Department of Energy. It is used for clad vent set cups containing radioactive fuel in radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) heat sources which provide electric power for spacecraft. This report describes mechanical testing results for DOP-26. Specimens were given a vacuum recrystallization anneal of 1 hour at 1375 C and tested in tension in orientations parallel and perpendicular to the rolling direction of the sheet from which they were fabricated. The tests were performed at temperatures ranging from room temperature to 1090 C and strain rates ranging from 1 x 10{sup -3} to 50 s{sup -1}. Room temperature testing was performed in air, while testing at elevated temperatures was performed in a vacuum better than 1 x 10{sup -4} Torr. The yield stress (YS) and the ultimate tensile stress (UTS) decreased with increasing temperature and increased with increasing strain rate. Between 600 and 1090 C, the ductility showed a slight increase with increasing temperature. Within the scatter of the data, the ductility did not depend on the strain rate. The reduction in area (RA), on the other hand, decreased with increasing strain rate. The YS and UTS values did not differ significantly for the longitudinal and transverse specimens. The ductility and RA values of the transverse specimens were marginally lower than those of the longitudinal specimens.

  17. Earth's Radiation Imbalance from a Constellation of 66 Iridium Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, J. C.; Wiscombe, W. J.

    2012-04-01

    The Earth Radiation Imbalance (ERI) at the top of the atmosphere is the primary driving force for climate change. If ERI is not zero, then Earth's temperature, both oceanic and atmospheric, will change gradually over time, tending toward a new steady state. The best estimates of current ERI from climate models range from 0.4 to 0.9 W/m2 (the imbalance being caused mainly by increasing CO2), but current satellite systems do not have the accuracy to measure ERI to even one significant digit. In this paper, we will describe a proposed constellation of 66 Earth radiation budget instruments, to be hosted on Iridium satellites. This system represents a quantum leap over current systems in several ways, in particular in providing ERI to at least one significant digit, thus enabling a crucial test of climate models. Because of its 24/7 coverage, the system will also provide ERI at three-hourly time scales without requiring extrapolations from narrowband geostationary instruments. This would allow studies of ERI's response to fast-evolving phenomena like dust storms and hurricanes. This offers a new, synoptic view of Earth radiation budget that will transform it from a monthly average into a dynamical variable alongside standard meteorological variables like temperature and pressure.

  18. In Situ Identification and Stratification of Monochloramine Inhibition Effects on Nitrifying Biofilms as Determined by the Use of Microelectrodes

    EPA Science Inventory

    The nitrifying biofilm grown in an annular biofilm reactor and the microbial deactivation achieved after monochloramine treatment were investigated using microelectrodes. The nitrifying biofilm ammonium microprofile was measured and the effect of monochloramine on nitrifying bio...

  19. Preparation of iridium targets by electrodeposition for neutron capture cross section measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, Evelyn M.; Moody, W. Allen; Arnold, Charles; Bredeweg, Todd A.; Jandel, Marian; Rusev, Gencho Y.

    2015-11-18

    Here, the preparation of 191Ir and 193Ir electrodeposits for neutron capture cross-section measurements at the detector for advanced neutron capture experiments located at the at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center is described. The electrodeposition of iridium in the desired thickness of 0.4–1 mg/cm2 is challenging. Better yields and thicknesses were obtained using electrodeposition from isopropyl alcohol solutions than from ammonium sulfate solutions. 191Ir and 193Ir targets were initially prepared using the standard single-sided electrodeposition cell. Iridium electrodepositions using a double-sided electrodeposition cell were developed and were optimized, resulting in thick, uniform iridium deposits. LA UR 15-22475.

  20. Preparation of iridium targets by electrodeposition for neutron capture cross section measurements

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bond, Evelyn M.; Moody, W. Allen; Arnold, Charles; Bredeweg, Todd A.; Jandel, Marian; Rusev, Gencho Y.

    2016-03-01

    Here, the preparation of 191Ir and 193Ir electrodeposits for neutron capture cross-section measurements at the detector for advanced neutron capture experiments located at the at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center is described. The electrodeposition of iridium in the desired thickness of 0.4–1 mg/cm2 is challenging. Better yields and thicknesses were obtained using electrodeposition from isopropyl alcohol solutions than from ammonium sulfate solutions. 191Ir and 193Ir targets were initially prepared using the standard single-sided electrodeposition cell. Iridium electrodepositions using a double-sided electrodeposition cell were developed and were optimized, resulting in thick, uniform iridium deposits. LA UR 15-22475.

  1. Identification of an iridium(III) complex with anti-bacterial and anti-cancer activity

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Lihua; Liu, Li-Juan; Chao, Wei-chieh; Zhong, Hai-Jing; Wang, Modi; Chen, Xiu-Ping; Lu, Jin-Jian; Li, Ruei-nian; Ma, Dik-Lung; Leung, Chung-Hang

    2015-01-01

    Group 9 transition metal complexes have been widely explored as therapeutic agents due to their unique geometry, their propensity to undergo ligand exchanges with biomolecules and their diverse steric and electronic properties. These metal complexes can offer distinct modes of action in living organisms compared to carbon-based molecules. In this study, we investigated the antimicrobial and anti-proliferative abilities of a series of cyclometallated iridium(III) complexes. The iridium(III) complex 1 inhibited the growth of S. aureus with MIC and MBC values of 3.60 and 7.19 μM, respectively, indicating its potent bactericidal activity. Moreover, complex 1 also exhibited cytotoxicity against a number of cancer cell lines, with particular potency against ovarian, cervical and melanoma cells. This cyclometallated iridium(III) complex is the first example of a substitutionally-inert, Group 9 organometallic compound utilized as a direct and selective inhibitor of S. aureus. PMID:26416333

  2. C-H activation of ethers by pyridine tethered PCsp3P-type iridium complexes.

    PubMed

    Cui, Peng; Babbini, Dominic C; Iluc, Vlad M

    2016-06-14

    Iridium PCsp3P complexes featuring a novel bis(2-diphenylphosphinophenyl)-2-pyridylmethane ligand (PC(Py)HP) are reported. C-H activation reactions between the dihydride complex [(PC(Py)P)Ir(H)2] and tetrahydrofuran or methyl tert-butyl ether in the presence of a hydrogen acceptor, norbornene (NBE), at ambient temperature led exclusively to the hydrido oxyalkyl complexes, [(PC(Py)P)IrH(C4H7O)] and [(PC(Py)P)IrH(CH2O(t)Bu)], respectively. The internal pyridine donor is important and stabilizes these species by coordination to the iridium center. The coordination of pyridine to the iridium center is labile, however, and its dissociation occurs in the presence of a suitable substrate, as demonstrated by the intramolecular nucleophilic attack of pyridine on a vinylidene intermediate generated from PhC[triple bond, length as m-dash]CH. PMID:27052422

  3. Near-Infrared Phosphorescent Iridium(III) Benzonorrole Complexes Possessing Pyridine-based Axial Ligands.

    PubMed

    Maurya, Yogesh Kumar; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Kawabe, Yasunori; Ishida, Masatoshi; Toganoh, Motoki; Mori, Shigeki; Yasutake, Yuhsuke; Fukatsu, Susumu; Furuta, Hiroyuki

    2016-06-20

    Novel near-infrared phosphorescent iridium(III) complexes based on benzo-annulated N-linked corrole analogue (termed as benzonorrole) were synthesized. The structures of the complexes revealed octahedral coordination geometries involving an organometallic iridium-carbon bond with two external axial ligands. Interestingly, the iridium(III) complex exhibits near-infrared phosphorescence at room temperature at wavelengths beyond 900 nm. The significant redshift of the emission, as compared to the corrole congener, is originated from the ligand-centered triplet character. The fine-tuning of the photophysical properties of the complexes was achieved by introducing electron-donating and electron-withdrawing substituents on the axial pyridine ligands. PMID:27249778

  4. Oxidation-state speciation of

    PubMed

    Hu; Heineman

    2000-06-01

    The analytical utility of chemically modified microelectrodes for oxidation-state speciation of redox couples by cyclic voltammetry has been explored. [Re(I)(DMPE)3]+/[Re(II)(DMPE)3]2+, where DMPE = 1,2-bis(dimethylphosphino)ethane, was studied at carbon-fiber microelectrodes of approximately 5 microm in radius coated with Nafion-entrapped solgel-derived silica (Nafion-silica) composite. The results are compared with cyclic voltammetry of [Fe(CN)6]3-/[Fe(CN)6]4- at bare carbon-fiber microelectrodes. At both microelectrodes, the cathodic and anodic limiting currents are linearly proportional to the concentrations of the reducible and oxidizable species of a redox couple, respectively. The shape of the cyclic voltammogram and the magnitude of the steady-state limiting current are not affected by the potential at which the scan starts. Speciation of both forms of a redox couple could be achieved voltammetrically at the microelectrodes. However, a considerably slower scan rate was required to achieve steady state at the modified electrode because of the smaller diffusion coefficients of [Re(I)(DMPE)3]+ and [Re(II)(DMPE)3]2+ in the Nafion-silica composite. The detection limit at the modified electrode was considerably lower (5 x 10(-9) M for [Re(I)(DMPE)3]+) than at the bare electrode (6 x 10(-5) M for [Fe(CN)6]3- and [Fe(CN)6]4-) because of the substantial preconcentration of [Re(I)(DMPE)3]+ by the Nafion-silica composite. PMID:10857611

  5. Oxidation State 10 Exists.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haoyu S; Truhlar, Donald G

    2016-07-25

    In a recent paper, Wang et al. found an iridium-containing compound with a formal oxidation state of 9. This is the highest oxidation state ever found in a stable compound. To learn if this is the highest chemical oxidation state possible, Kohn-Sham density functional theory was used to study various compounds, including PdO4 (2+) , PtO4 (2+) , PtO3 F2 (2+) , PtO4 OH(+) , PtO5 , and PtO4 SH(+) , in which the metal has an oxidation state of 10. It was found that PtO4 (2+) has a metastable state that is kinetically stable with a barrier height for decomposition of 31 kcal mol(-1) and a calculated lifetime of 0.9 years. All other compounds studied would readily decompose to lower oxidation states. PMID:27273799

  6. Impedance Characterization of the Degradation of Insulating Layer Patterned on Interdigitated Microelectrode.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gihyun; Kim, Sohee; Cho, Sungbo

    2015-10-01

    Life-time and functionality of planar microelectrode-based devices are determined by not only the corrosion-resistance of the electrode, but also the durability of the insulation layer coated on the transmission lines. Degradation of the insulating layer exposed to a humid environment or solution may cause leakage current or signal loss, and a decrease in measurement sensitivity. In this study, degradation of SU-8, an epoxy-based negative photoresist and insulating material, patterned on Au interdigitated microelectrode (IDE) for long-term (>30 days) immersion in an electrolyte at 37 °C was investigated by electrical impedance spectroscopy and theoretical equivalent circuit modeling. From the experiment and simulation results, it was found that the degradation level of the insulating layer of the IDE electrode can be characterized by monitoring the resistance of the insulating layer among the circuit parameters of the designed equivalent circuit modeling. PMID:26726374

  7. Carbon-fiber microelectrodes modified with 4-sulfobenzene have increased sensitivity and selectivity for catecholamines

    PubMed Central

    Hermans, Andre; Seipel, Andrew T.; Miller, Charles E.; Wightman, R. Mark

    2008-01-01

    Elliptical and cylindrical geometries of carbon-fiber microelectrodes were modified by covalent attachment of 4-sulfobenzenediazonium tetrafluoroborate following its electroreduction. Elliptical electrodes fabricated from Thornel P-55 carbon fibers show the highest amount of 4-sulfobenzene attached to the electrode. Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry was used to compare the response to dopamine and other neurochemicals at these modified carbon-fiber microelectrodes. The grafted layer causes an increased sensitivity to dopamine and other positively charged analytes that is due to increased adsorption of analyte in the grafted layer. However, this layer remains permeable to negatively charged compounds. Modified electrodes retain the increased sensitivity for dopamine during measurements in mouse brain tissue. PMID:16489775

  8. Rigid spine reinforced polymer microelectrode array probe and method of fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Tabada, Phillipe; Pannu, Satinderpall S

    2014-05-27

    A rigid spine-reinforced microelectrode array probe and fabrication method. The probe includes a flexible elongated probe body with conductive lines enclosed within a polymeric material. The conductive lines connect microelectrodes found near an insertion end of the probe to respective leads at a connector end of the probe. The probe also includes a rigid spine, such as made from titanium, fixedly attached to the probe body to structurally reinforce the probe body and enable the typically flexible probe body to penetrate and be inserted into tissue, such as neural tissue. By attaching or otherwise fabricating the rigid spine to connect to only an insertion section of the probe body, an integrally connected cable section of the probe body may remain flexible.

  9. The Fabrication of PDMS mould for Microelectrode Array Biochip using NIL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beh, Khi Khim; Samsuri, Fahmi; Lee, Tze Pin; Mohamed, Khairudin

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, low-cost micro and nano fabrication process have gain intention from the manufacturing industry. Biochip is a platform of miniaturized microarrays arranged on a solid substrate that allows various biological tests to achieve immediate results. The development of biochip has established a new platform in biomedical industry. However, to fulfill the demands and availability in the market with affordable cost requires high volume manufacturing techniques for the fabrication of the biochips. In this article we will discuss the fabrication of PDMS mould for replicating microelectrode array of biochip. The fabrication of the microelectrodes utilizes the Nanoimprint lithography (NIL) technique. Finally, the fabrication of PDMS mould has been demonstrated successfully for using Nanoimprint lithography (NIL) technique and achieved 13% of size difference in overall.

  10. High-strain-rate, high-temperature biaxial testing of DOP-26 iridium

    SciTech Connect

    George, T.G.

    1988-05-01

    High-strain-rate biaxial punch tests were performed on DOP-26 (Ir-0.3 wt.% tungsten) iridium-alloy disc given annealing and aging heat treatments. Test temperatures ranged between 600 and 1440/degree/C, and punch velocity was held constant at 45 m/s. Three types of samples were evaluated: Z-batch old-process discs, B-batch old-process discs, and B-batch new-process discs. The results indicate that batch-to-batch variations in ductility are significant and that new-process iridium is slightly more ductile than old-process material. 12 refs., 43 figs., 26 tabs.

  11. New Iridium Complex Coordinated with Tetrathiafulvalene Substituted Triazole-pyridine Ligand: Synthesis, Photophysical and Electrochemical Properties.

    PubMed

    Niu, Zhi-Gang; Xie, Hui; He, Li-Rong; Li, Kai-Xiu; Xia, Qing; Wu, Dong-Min; Li, Gao-Nan

    2016-01-01

    A new iridium(III) complex based on the triazole-pyridine ligand with tetrathiafulvalene unit, [Ir(ppy)2(L)]PF6 (1), has been synthesized and structurally characterized. The absorption spectra, luminescent spectra and electrochemical behaviors of L and 1 have been investigated. Complex 1 is found to be emissive at room temperature with maxima at 481 and 510 nm. The broad and structured emission bands are suggested a mixing of 3LC (3π-π*) and 3CT (3MLCT) excited states. The influence of iridium ion coordination on the redox properties of the TTF has also been investigated by cyclic voltammetry. PMID:27333555

  12. Iridium-catalyzed borylation of thiophenes: versatile, synthetic elaboration founded on selective C–H functionalization

    PubMed Central

    Chotana, Ghayoor A.; Kallepalli, Venkata A.; Maleczka, Robert E.; Smith, Milton R.

    2013-01-01

    Iridium-catalyzed borylation has been applied to various substituted thiophenes to synthesize poly-functionalized thiophenes in good to excellent yields. Apart from common functionalities compatible with iridium-catalyzed borylations, additional functional group tolerance to acyl (COMe), and trimethylsilyl (TMS) groups was also observed. High regioselectivities were observed in borylation of 3-and 2,5-di-substituted thiophenes. Electrophilic aromatic C–H/C-Si bromination on thiophene boronate esters is shown to take place without breaking the C–B bond, and one-pot C–H borylation/Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling has been accomplished on 2- and 3-borylated thiophenes. PMID:24385669

  13. Thermocouples of molybdenum and iridium alloys for more stable vacuum-high temperature performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, J. F. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Thermocouples providing stability and performance reliability in systems involving high temperatures and vacuums by employing a bimetallic thermocouple sensor are described. Each metal of the sensor is selected from a group of metals comprising molybdenum and iridium and alloys containing only those two metals. The molybdenum, iridium thermocouple sensor alloys provide bare metal thermocouple sensors having advantageous vapor pressure compatibility and performance characteristics. The compatibility and physical characteristics of the thermocouple sensor alloys result in improved emf, temperature properties and thermocouple hot junction performance.

  14. Study of the characteristics of iridium-192 wire used in interstitial implants

    SciTech Connect

    Bello, J.E.; Oyarzun, C.; Abrath, A.G.; Sole, J.

    1982-10-01

    Poor cosmetic results have ocurred in 14% of the skin-cancer patients who underwent treatment with implants of iridium-192 wires that had been used more than twice. Physical characteristics of the iridium wire and the effects of handling on that wire have been studied. Heterogeneities in the core were found, and an increase in ..beta.. radiation was observed when the wire was manipulated. Both factors could explain the poor results in skin-cancer treatment that are of particular concern in facial cancers.

  15. Double-barreled and Concentric Microelectrodes for Measurement of Extracellular Ion Signals in Brain Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Haack, Nicole; Durry, Simone; Kafitz, Karl W.; Chesler, Mitchell; Rose, Christine R.

    2015-01-01

    Electrical activity in the brain is accompanied by significant ion fluxes across membranes, resulting in complex changes in the extracellular concentration of all major ions. As these ion shifts bear significant functional consequences, their quantitative determination is often required to understand the function and dysfunction of neural networks under physiological and pathophysiological conditions. In the present study, we demonstrate the fabrication and calibration of double-barreled ion-selective microelectrodes, which have proven to be excellent tools for such measurements in brain tissue. Moreover, so-called “concentric” ion-selective microelectrodes are also described, which, based on their different design, offer a far better temporal resolution of fast ion changes. We then show how these electrodes can be employed in acute brain slice preparations of the mouse hippocampus. Using double-barreled, potassium-selective microelectrodes, changes in the extracellular potassium concentration ([K+]o) in response to exogenous application of glutamate receptor agonists or during epileptiform activity are demonstrated. Furthermore, we illustrate the response characteristics of sodium-sensitive, double-barreled and concentric electrodes and compare their detection of changes in the extracellular sodium concentration ([Na+]o) evoked by bath or pressure application of drugs. These measurements show that while response amplitudes are similar, the concentric sodium microelectrodes display a superior signal-to-noise ratio and response time as compared to the double-barreled design. Generally, the demonstrated procedures will be easily transferable to measurement of other ions species, including pH or calcium, and will also be applicable to other preparations. PMID:26381747

  16. Enhanced electroanalysis in lithium potassium eutectic (LKE) using microfabricated square microelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Corrigan, Damion K; Blair, Ewen O; Terry, Jonathan G; Walton, Anthony J; Mount, Andrew R

    2014-11-18

    Molten salts (MSs) are an attractive medium for chemical and electrochemical processing and as a result there is demand for MS-compatible analysis technologies. However, MSs containing redox species present a challenging environment in which to perform analytical measurements because of their corrosive nature, significant thermal convection and the high temperatures involved. This paper outlines the fabrication and characterization of microfabricated square microelectrodes (MSMs) designed for electrochemical analysis in MS systems. Their design enables precise control over electrode dimension, the minimization of stress because of differential thermal expansion through design for high temperature operation, and the minimization of corrosive attack through effective insulation. The exemplar MS system used for characterization was lithium chloride/potassium chloride eutectic (LKE), which has potential applications in pyrochemical nuclear fuel reprocessing, metal refining, molten salt batteries and electric power cells. The observed responses for a range of redox ions between 400 and 500 °C (673 and 773 K) were quantitative and typical of microelectrodes. MSMs also showed the reduced iR drop, steady-state diffusion-limited response, and reduced sensitivity to convection seen for microelectrodes under ambient conditions and expected for these electrodes in comparison to macroelectrodes. Diffusion coefficients were obtained in close agreement with literature values, more readily and at greater precision and accuracy than both macroelectrode and previous microelectrode measurements. The feasibility of extracting individual physical parameters from mixtures of redox species (as required in reprocessing) and of the prolonged measurement required for online monitoring was also demonstrated. Together, this demonstrates that MSMs provide enhanced electrode devices widely applicable to the characterization of redox species in a range of MS systems. PMID:25284431

  17. Iridium {mu}-imido/amido A-frame complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Changqing; Sharp, P.R.

    1995-01-04

    The reaction of Ir{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}(CO){sub 2}({mu}-dppm){sub 2}(dppm=bis(diphenylphosphino)methane) with 2 equiv of LiNHR yields Ir{sub 2}({mu}-NR)(CO){sub 2}({mu}-dppm){sub 2}, (1) (R=p-tolyl,Ph,p-BrC{sub 6}H{sub 4}), or its tautomer Ir{sub 2}({mu}-NHR)(CO){sub 2}({mu}-dppm)-({mu}-dppm-H), (2) (dppm-H = bis(diphenylphosphino)methanide; R= Et, Bu{sup 5}). NMR data suggest that (1) (R=p-tolyl, Ph, p-BrC{sub 6}H{sub 4}) are in equilibrium with small amounts of (2) in polar solvents. An X-ray structural determination of (1) (R = p-tolyl) shows that the imido nitrogen atom links two iridium atoms at the apex of an A-frame complex. A very short N-C distance in the imido group suggests extensive N-lone pair donation to the tolyl ring. Crystals of (1) (R = p-tolyl) from benzene are tetragonal (P4{sub 3}) with a = 21.337(1) {Angstrom},c = 14.478-(2) {Angstrom}, and Z = 4. With the exception of R=p-NO{sub 2}C{sub 6}H{sub 4}, p-BrC{sub 6}H{sub 4}, and Et, the complexes react with 1 equiv of CO at ambient temperature to form Ir{sub 2}(CO){sub 3}({mu}-dppm){sub 2} as the major metal containing product. For R = Et, the reaction generates the unstable isocyanate complex Ir{sub 2}(CO){sub 4}({mu}-dppm){sub 2} and amine except for the p-NO{sub 2}C{sub 6}H{sub 4} complex, which gives a complex mixture of products.

  18. Development of low-cost metal oxide pH electrodes based on the polymeric precursor method.

    PubMed

    da Silva, G M; Lemos, S G; Pocrifka, L A; Marreto, P D; Rosario, A V; Pereira, E C

    2008-05-26

    In this work, the polymeric precursor method was used to prepare low-cost solid-state sensors for pH determination based on iridium oxide as the main pH sensitive material. The iridium content was reduced with addition of TiO(2), forming the binary system IrO(x)-TiO(2), whose electroanalytical properties were evaluated in comparison with a commercial glass pH electrode. The minimum iridium content which gave suitable results was 30mol%, and the electrode presented Nernstian and fast response in the pH range from 1 to 13, with no hysteresis effect observed. Besides, the electrode showed high selectivity in the presence of alkali ions as Li(+), Na(+) or K(+). The amount of iridium in the prepared electrodes was very small (<0.1mg), supporting the efficiency of this method on the simple preparation of functional low-cost pH electrodes. PMID:18471481

  19. Efficient Energy Transfer and Metal Coupling in Cyanide-Bridged Heterodinuclear Complexes Based on (Bipyridine)(terpyridine)ruthenium(II) and (Phenylpyridine)iridium(III) Complexes.

    PubMed

    Barthelmes, Kevin; Jäger, Michael; Kübel, Joachim; Friebe, Christian; Winter, Andreas; Wächtler, Maria; Dietzek, Benjamin; Schubert, Ulrich S

    2016-06-01

    We report a series of cyanide-bridged, heterodinuclear iridium(III)-ruthenium(II) complexes with the generalized formula [Ir((R2)2-ppy)2(CN)(μ-CN)Ru(bpy)(tpy-R1)]PF6 (ppy = 2-phenylpyridine, bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine, and tpy = 2,2':6',2″-terpyridine). The structural, spectroscopic, and electrochemical properties were analyzed in the context of variation of the electron-withdrawing (e.g., -F, -Br, -CHO) and -donating (e.g., -Me) and extended π-conjugated groups at several positions. In total, ten dinuclear complexes and the appropriate model complexes have been prepared. The iridium(III)-based emission is almost fully quenched in these complexes, and only the ruthenium(II)-based emission is observed, which indicates an efficient energy transfer toward the Ru center. Upon oxidation of the Ru center, the fluorinated complexes 2 exhibit a broad intervalence charge-transfer transition in the near-infrared region. The complexes are assigned to a weakly coupled class II system according to the Robin-Day classification. The electronic structure was evaluated by density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT calculations to corroborate the experimental data. PMID:27214264

  20. Neural stimulation and recording with bidirectional, soft carbon nanotube fiber microelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Vitale, Flavia; Summerson, Samantha R; Aazhang, Behnaam; Kemere, Caleb; Pasquali, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    The development of microelectrodes capable of safely stimulating and recording neural activity is a critical step in the design of many prosthetic devices, brain-machine interfaces, and therapies for neurologic or nervous-system-mediated disorders. Metal electrodes are inadequate prospects for the miniaturization needed to attain neuronal-scale stimulation and recording because of their poor electrochemical properties, high stiffness, and propensity to fail due to bending fatigue. Here we demonstrate neural recording and stimulation using carbon nanotube (CNT) fiber electrodes. In vitro characterization shows that the tissue contact impedance of CNT fibers is remarkably lower than that of state-of-the-art metal electrodes, making them suitable for recording single-neuron activity without additional surface treatments. In vivo chronic studies in parkinsonian rodents show that CNT fiber microelectrodes stimulate neurons as effectively as metal electrodes with 10 times larger surface area, while eliciting a significantly reduced inflammatory response. The same CNT fiber microelectrodes can record neural activity for weeks, paving the way for the development of novel multifunctional and dynamic neural interfaces with long-term stability. PMID:25803728

  1. Thin-film silica sol-gel coatings for neural microelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Andrew L; Sommakia, Salah; Rickus, Jenna L; Otto, Kevin J

    2009-05-30

    The reactive tissue response of the brain to chronically implanted materials remains a formidable obstacle to stable recording from implanted microelectrodes. One approach to mitigate this response is to apply a bioactive coating in the form of an ultra-porous silica sol-gel, which can be engineered to improve biocompatibility and to enable local drug delivery. The first step in establishing the feasibility of such a coating is to investigate the effects of the coating on electrode properties. In this paper, we describe a method to apply a thin-film silica sol-gel coating to silicon-based microelectrodes, and discuss the resultant changes in the electrode properties. Fluorescently labeled coatings were used to confirm coating adherence to the electrode. Cyclic voltammetry and impedance spectroscopy were used to evaluate electrical property changes. The silica sol-gel was found to successfully adhere to the electrodes as a thin coating. The voltammograms revealed a slight increase in charge carrying capacity of the electrodes following coating. Impedance spectrograms showed a mild increase in impedance at high frequencies but a more pronounced decrease in impedance at mid to low frequencies. These results demonstrate the feasibility of applying silica sol-gel coatings to silicon-based microelectrodes and are encouraging for the continued investigation of their use in mitigating the reactive tissue response. PMID:19427536

  2. Effects of adsorbed proteins, an antifouling agent and long-duration DC voltage pulses on the impedance of silicon-based neural microelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Sommakia, Salah; Rickus, Jenna L; Otto, Kevin J

    2009-01-01

    The successful use of implantable neural microelectrodes as neuroprosthetic devices depends on the mitigation of the reactive tissue response of the brain. One of the factors affecting the ultimate severity of the reactive tissue response and the in vivo electrical properties of the microelectrodes is the initial adsorption of proteins onto the surface of the implanted microelectrodes. In this study we quantify the increase in microelectrode impedance magnitude at physiological frequencies following electrode immersion in a 10% bovine serum albumin (BSA) solution. We also demonstrate the efficacy of a common antifouling molecule, poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), in preventing a significant increase in microelectrode impedance. In addition, we show the feasibility of using long-duration DC voltage pulses to remove adsorbed proteins from the microelectrode surface. PMID:19963693

  3. Production of Oxygen from Lunar Regolith using Molten Oxide Electrolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibille, Laurent; Sadoway, Donald R.; Sirk, Aislinn; Tripathy, Prabhat; Melendez, Orlando; Standish, Evan; Dominquez, Jesus A.; Stefanescu, Doru M.; Curreri, Peter A.; Poizeau, Sophie

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the possible use of molten oxide electrolysis to extract oxygen from the Lunar Regolith. The presentation asserts that molten regolith electrolysis has advanced to be a useful method for production of oxygen and metals in situ on the Moon. The work has demonstrated an 8 hour batch of electrolysis at 5 amps using Iridium inert anodes.

  4. Development of Microelectrode Arrays Using Electroless Plating for CMOS-Based Direct Counting of Bacterial and HeLa Cells.

    PubMed

    Niitsu, Kiichi; Ota, Shoko; Gamo, Kohei; Kondo, Hiroki; Hori, Masaru; Nakazato, Kazuo

    2015-10-01

    The development of two new types of high-density, electroless plated microelectrode arrays for CMOS-based high-sensitivity direct bacteria and HeLa cell counting are presented. For emerging high-sensitivity direct pathogen counting, two technical challenges must be addressed. One is the formation of a bacteria-sized microelectrode, and the other is the development of a high-sensitivity and high-speed amperometry circuit. The requirement for microelectrode formation is that the gold microelectrodes are required to be as small as the target cell. By improving a self-aligned electroless plating technique, the dimensions of the microelectrodes on a CMOS sensor chip in this work were successfully reduced to 1.2 μm × 2.05 μm. This is 1/20th of the smallest size reported in the literature. Since a bacteria-sized microelectrode has a severe limitation on the current flow, the amperometry circuit has to have a high sensitivity and high speed with low noise. In this work, a current buffer was inserted to mitigate the potential fluctuation. Three test chips were fabricated using a 0.6- μm CMOS process: two with 1.2 μm × 2.05 μm (1024 × 1024 and 4 × 4) sensor arrays and one with 6- μm square (16 × 16) sensor arrays; and the microelectrodes were formed on them using electroless plating. The uniformity among the 1024 × 1024 electrodes arranged with a pitch of 3.6 μm × 4.45 μm was optically verified. For improving sensitivity, the trenches on each microelectrode were developed and verified optically and electrochemically for the first time. Higher sensitivity can be achieved by introducing a trench structure than by using a conventional microelectrode formed by contact photolithography. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) measurements obtained using the 1.2 μm × 2.05 μm 4 × 4 and 6- μm square 16 × 16 sensor array with electroless-plated microelectrodes successfully demonstrated direct counting of the bacteria-sized microbeads and HeLa cells. PMID:26561481

  5. Iridium(I) Compounds as Prospective Anticancer Agents: Solution Chemistry, Antiproliferative Profiles and Protein Interactions for a Series of Iridium(I) N-Heterocyclic Carbene Complexes.

    PubMed

    Gothe, Yvonne; Marzo, Tiziano; Messori, Luigi; Metzler-Nolte, Nils

    2016-08-22

    A series of structurally related mono- and bis-NHC-iridium(I) (NHC: N-heterocyclic carbene) complexes have been investigated for their suitability as potential anticancer drugs. Their spectral behaviour in aqueous buffers under physiological-like conditions and their cytotoxicity against the cancer cell lines MCF-7 and HT-29 are reported. Notably, almost all complexes exhibit significant cytotoxic effects towards both cancer cell lines. In general, the cationic bis-carbene complexes show higher stability and greater anticancer activity than their neutral mono-carbene analogues with IC50 values in the high nanomolar range. Furthermore, to gain initial mechanistic insight, the interactions of these iridium(I)-NHC complexes with two model proteins, namely lysozyme and cytochrome c, were explored by HR-ESI-MS analyses. The different protein metalation patterns of the complexes can be roughly classified into two distinct groups. Those interactions give us a first idea about the possible mechanism of action of this class of compounds. Overall, our findings show that iridium(I)-NHC complexes represent very interesting candidates for further development as new metal-based anticancer drugs. PMID:27443984

  6. The growth of graphite phase on an iridium field electron emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernatskii, D. P.; Pavlov, V. G.

    2016-06-01

    The growth of graphite on the surface of an iridium tip in pyrolysis of benzene to give a ribbed crystal has been found by the methods of field electron and desorption microscopy. The formation of a graphite crystal results in the electric field factor increasing. The adsorption of alkali metals on the surface of graphite is accompanied by the intercalation effect.

  7. Anion effects to deliver enhanced iridium catalysts for hydrogen isotope exchange processes.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Alan R; Kerr, William J; Moir, Rory; Reid, Marc

    2014-10-28

    Synthesis of a series of iridium(I) complexes of the type [(COD)Ir(IMes)(PPh3)]X (X = BF4, OTf, and BArF) has been established. Application of these species in mild hydrogen isotope exchange processes revealed more efficient catalysis and, further, a wider solvent scope when employing larger, more weakly coordinating counterions. PMID:25208265

  8. High-temperature compatibility study of iridium (DOP-26 alloy) with graphite and plutonia

    SciTech Connect

    Axler, K.M.; Eash, D.T.

    1987-12-01

    This report outlines the materials compatibility tests conducted on DOP-26 iridium alloy and carbon. The carbon used was in the form of woven graphite as present in the impact shell used to encase plutonia in nuclear heat sources. In addition, compatibility tests of the DOP-26 alloy with plutonia are described. The reactivity observed in both systems is discussed. 4 refs., 6 figs.

  9. Electrocatalytic reduction of dioxygen to water by iridium porphyrins adsorbed on edge plane graphite electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Collman, J.P.; Chng, Leng Leng; Tyvoll, D.A.

    1995-03-15

    Electrocatalytic effects of adsorbed iridium porphyrin complexes for the reduction of oxygen to water was studied. The Ir(II) metal center is proposed as the active catalytic center and catalytic effects can be attributed to transformation to Ir(II) centers.

  10. Report of Iridium/{sup 238}PuO{sub 2} Compatibility Test

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, D.H.

    2001-08-09

    This study indicates that the chemical purity of the fuel used presently to fabricate fueled clad vent sets will not present any special problems to the performance of the fueled clad vent sets as intended. However, cation impurities in the fuel can have a deleterious effect on the iridium cladding and vents and should be minimized as much as practical.

  11. Catalytic cleavage of ether C-O bonds by pincer iridium complexes.

    PubMed

    Haibach, Michael C; Lease, Nicholas; Goldman, Alan S

    2014-09-15

    The development of efficient catalytic methods to cleave the relatively unreactive C-O bonds of ethers remains an important challenge in catalysis. Building on our group's recent work, we report the dehydroaryloxylation of aryl alkyl ethers using pincer iridium catalysts. This method represents a rare fully atom-economical method for ether C-O bond cleavage. PMID:25060043

  12. Luminescent Iridium Complexes Used in Light-Emitting Electrochemical Cells (LEECs).

    PubMed

    Henwood, Adam F; Zysman-Colman, Eli

    2016-08-01

    Cationic iridium(III) complexes represent the single largest class of emitters used in light emitting electrochemical cells (LEECs). In this chapter, we highlight the state-of-the-art emitters in terms of efficiency and stability in LEEC devices, highlighting blue, green, yellow/orange, red and white devices, and provide an outlook to the future of LEECs. PMID:27573388

  13. Arctic Ocean Communications: Performance Of High-Data Transmission Over The Iridium System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, J.; Valcic, L.; Doble, M. J.; Maksym, T. L.; Robst, J.

    2014-12-01

    The Iridium satellite communications service was launched over 15 years ago, and it is presently the "go to" service for transmitting data and voice from the polar regions. However there is very little information available regarding the metrics associated with the throughput of data via this system. During a recent campaign we released over 30 "dial-up" iridium enabled drifting buoys in a relatively small region of the Arctic Ocean. Over the past 6 months relatively large amounts of data have now been routinely downloaded (every hour) from these systems. Each platform, as well as the base station in the UK, independently monitored the throughput of data and here we present an analysis of the metrics (download speed, drop outs, power consumption etc.) associated with the transmission of data through the Iridium system. As the role of autonomous platforms in the polar region increases there is a greater need to better understand the issues associated with data transfer. Iridium is a vital component of any autonomous system and therefore the information presented here will be of value to the technological, scientific and engineering communities.

  14. Iridium-Catalyzed Synthesis of Acylpyridines by [2 + 2 + 2] Cycloaddition of Diynes with Acyl Cyanides.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Toru; Kato, Kaoru; Yano, Reiko; Natori, Tomoki; Miura, Hiroki; Takeuchi, Ryo

    2016-07-01

    2-Acylpyridines were prepared by iridium-catalyzed [2 + 2 + 2] cycloaddition of α,ω-diynes with acyl cyanides. [Ir(cod)Cl]2/rac-BINAP or F-DPPE is an efficient catalyst for this reaction. The scope and limitations of this reaction have been disclosed. PMID:27275734

  15. Nanostructured surface modification of ceramic-based microelectrodes to enhance biocompatibility for a direct brain-machine interface.

    PubMed

    Moxon, Karen A; Kalkhoran, Nader M; Markert, Mathew; Sambito, Marisa A; McKenzie, J L; Webster, J Thomas

    2004-06-01

    Many different types of microelectrodes have been developed for use as a direct Brain-Machine Interface (BMI) to chronically recording single neuron action potentials from ensembles of neurons. Unfortunately, the recordings from these microelectrode devices are not consistent and often last for only a few weeks. For most microelectrode types, the loss of these recordings is not due to failure of the electrodes but most likely due to damage to surrounding tissue that results in the formation of nonconductive glial-scar. Since the extracellular matrix consists of nanostructured microtubules, we have postulated that neurons may prefer a more complex surface structure than the smooth surface typical of thin-film microelectrodes. We, therefore, investigated the suitability of a nano-porous silicon surface layer to increase the biocompatibility of our thin film ceramic-insulated multisite electrodes. In-vitro testing demonstrated, for the first time, decreased adhesion of astrocytes and increased extension of neurites from pheochromocytoma cells on porous silicon surfaces compared to smooth silicon sufaces. Moreover, nano-porous surfaces were more biocompatible than macroporous surfaces. Collectively, these results support our hypothesis that nano-porous silicon may be an ideal material to improve biocompatibility of chronically implanted microelectrodes. We next developed a method to apply nano-porous surfaces to ceramic insulated, thin-film, microelectrodes and tested them in vivo. Chronic testing demonstrated that the nano-porous surface modification did not alter the electrical properties of the recording sites and did not interfere with proper functioning of the microelectrodes in vivo. PMID:15188854

  16. Iridium and Spherules in Late Eocene Impact Deposits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kyte, F. T.; Liu, S.

    2002-01-01

    We have been independently examining the Ir (FTK) and spherule (SL) contents of recently discovered late Eocene impact deposits from the south Atlantic and western Indian oceans. These include ODP Sites 1090 [14,15], 709 [lo], and 699 [Liu in prep.]. Iridium abundances at these sites are within the typical range reported for late Eocene deposits, with peak concentrations between 100 and 1000 pg/g. In Table 1 we present estimated net Ir fluences (in ng Ir/cm ) for these and nine other sites. Although there are fewer sites than the K/T boundary, the average of 9 ng Ir/cm2 is probably a good estimate of the late Eocene global flux. This is enough Ir for a 6 km comet (assuming 250 ng/g Ir, p=1.5), is sufficient to produce the Popigai or Chesapeake Bay structures, and is 16% of the flux estimated for the K/T boundary (55 ng/cm2 [ 161). Figure 1 shows the relative abundances of Ir, glassy microtektites and cpx-bearing spherules in sediments from Sites 699 and 1090, which are separated by only 3100 km. Although these two sites have similar Ir anomalies, the abundances of spherules are quite different. Site 1090 has well-defined peaks for both types of spherules, with a peak of 562 cpx spheruledg, while Site 699 contains only a few glassy microtektites and no cpx spherules. While the different abundances of spherules may reflect a heterogeneous distribution of spherules on the Earth s surface, an equally likely cause of this difference may be differential preservation of spherules in the sediment. recovered are only a trace residue of the initial impact deposit. Earlier work found 0.22 ng/g Ir in glassy microtektites from Site 689 [17], an insufficient concentration to support 0.16 ng/g in the bulk sediment at this site. We measured 15 ng/g Ir in a group of 95 cpx spherules from Site 1090 with sizes from 63 to -200 pm, a set typical of the size distribution at this site. Although this is a significant concentration it also cannot support the Ir peak. We presently lack

  17. Effect of substrate temperature on electrochromic properties of spray-deposited Ir-oxide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, P. S.; Kawar, R. K.; Sadale, S. B.

    2005-08-01

    Electrochromic iridium oxide thin films were prepared by using a simple and inexpensive spray pyrolysis technique onto fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO)-coated glass substrates, from iridium chloride solution. The substrate temperature was varied between 250 and 400 °C. The as-deposited samples were amorphous. The electrochromic properties of thin films were studied in aqueous electrolyte (0.5N H 2SO 4) using cyclic voltammetry (CV), chronoamperometry (CA) and spectroelectrochemical techniques. The films exhibit anodic electrochromism upon intercalation and deintercalation of H + ions. The colouration efficiency at 630 nm was calculated and found maximum for I 250 sample, owing its hydration.

  18. How far can we go? Quantum-chemical investigations of oxidation state +IX.

    PubMed

    Himmel, Daniel; Knapp, Carsten; Patzschke, Michael; Riedel, Sebastian

    2010-03-15

    The highest known oxidation state of any element is +VIII. After the recent discovery of Ir(VIII)O(4) under cryogenic conditions, we have investigated the stability of cationic species [MO(4)](+) (M=Rh,Ir,Mt). Such compounds would formally represent the new oxidation state +IX, which is experimentally unknown so far for the whole periodic table. [IrO(4)](+) is predicted to be the most promising candidate. The calculated spin-orbit (SO) coupling shows only minor effects on the stability of the iridium species, whereas SO-coupling increases enormously for the corresponding Eka-Iridium (Meitnerium) complexes and destabilizes these. PMID:20127784

  19. Corrosion of Tungsten Microelectrodes used in Neural Recording Applications

    PubMed Central

    Patrick, Erin; Orazem, Mark E.; Sanchez, Justin C.; Nishida, Toshikazu

    2011-01-01

    In neuroprosthetic applications, long-term electrode viability is necessary for robust recording of the activity of neural populations used for generating communication and control signals. The corrosion of tungsten microwire electrodes used for intracortical recording applications was analyzed in a controlled bench-top study and compared to the corrosion of tungsten microwires used in an in vivo study. Two electrolytes were investigated for the benchtop electrochemical analysis: 0.9% phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and 0.9% PBS containing 30 mM of hydrogen peroxide. The oxidation and reduction reactions responsible for corrosion were found by measurement of the open circuit potential and analysis of Pourbaix diagrams. Dissolution of tungsten to form the tungstic ion was found to be the corrosion mechanism. The corrosion rate was estimated from the polarization resistance, which was extrapolated from the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy data. The results show that tungsten microwires in an electrolyte of PBS have a corrosion rate of 300–700 µm/yr. The corrosion rate for tungsten microwires in an electrolyte containing PBS and 30 mM H2O2 is accelerated to 10,000–20,000 µm/yr. The corrosion rate was found to be controlled by the concentration of the reacting species in the cathodic reaction (e.g. O2 and H2O2). The in vivo corrosion rate, averaged over the duration of implantation, was estimated to be 100 µm/yr. The reduced in vivo corrosion rate as compared to the benchtop rate is attributed to decreased rate of oxygen diffusion caused by the presence of a biological film and a reduced concentration of available oxygen in the brain. PMID:21470563

  20. Corrosion of tungsten microelectrodes used in neural recording applications.

    PubMed

    Patrick, Erin; Orazem, Mark E; Sanchez, Justin C; Nishida, Toshikazu

    2011-06-15

    In neuroprosthetic applications, long-term electrode viability is necessary for robust recording of the activity of neural populations used for generating communication and control signals. The corrosion of tungsten microwire electrodes used for intracortical recording applications was analyzed in a controlled bench-top study and compared to the corrosion of tungsten microwires used in an in vivo study. Two electrolytes were investigated for the bench-top electrochemical analysis: 0.9% phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and 0.9% PBS containing 30 mM of hydrogen peroxide. The oxidation and reduction reactions responsible for corrosion were found by measurement of the open circuit potential and analysis of Pourbaix diagrams. Dissolution of tungsten to form the tungstic ion was found to be the corrosion mechanism. The corrosion rate was estimated from the polarization resistance, which was extrapolated from the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy data. The results show that tungsten microwires in an electrolyte of PBS have a corrosion rate of 300-700 μm/yr. The corrosion rate for tungsten microwires in an electrolyte containing PBS and 30 mM H₂O₂ is accelerated to 10,000-20,000 μm/yr. The corrosion rate was found to be controlled by the concentration of the reacting species in the cathodic reaction (e.g. O₂ and H₂O₂). The in vivo corrosion rate, averaged over the duration of implantation, was estimated to be 100 μm/yr. The reduced in vivo corrosion rate as compared to the bench-top rate is attributed to decreased rate of oxygen diffusion caused by the presence of a biological film and a reduced concentration of available oxygen in the brain. PMID:21470563

  1. Determination of Sediment Oxygen Demand in the Ziya River Watershed, China: Based on Laboratory Core Incubation and Microelectrode Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Rong, Nan; Shan, Baoqing; Wang, Chao

    2016-01-01

    A study coupling sedimentcore incubation and microelectrode measurementwas performed to explore the sediment oxygen demand (SOD) at 16 stations in the Ziya River Watershed, a severely polluted and anoxic river system in the north of China. Total oxygen flux values in the range 0.19–1.41 g/(m2·d) with an average of 0.62 g/(m2·d) were obtained by core incubations, and diffusive oxygen flux values in the range 0.15–1.38 g/(m2·d) with an average of 0.51 g/(m2·d) were determined by microelectrodes. Total oxygen flux obviously correlated with diffusive oxygen flux (R2 = 0.842). The microelectrode method produced smaller results than the incubation method in 15 of 16 sites, and the diffusive oxygen flux was smaller than the total oxygen flux. Although the two sets of SOD values had significant difference accepted by the two methods via the Wilcoxon signed-rank test (p < 0.05), the microelectrode method was shown to produce results that were similar to those from the core incubation method. The microelectrode method, therefore, could be used as an alternative method for traditional core incubation method, or as a method to verify SOD rates measured by other methods. We consider that high potential sediment oxygen demand would occur in the Ziya River Watershed when the dissolved oxygen (DO) recovered in the overlying water. PMID:26907307

  2. Determination of Sediment Oxygen Demand in the Ziya River Watershed, China: Based on Laboratory Core Incubation and Microelectrode Measurements.

    PubMed

    Rong, Nan; Shan, Baoqing; Wang, Chao

    2016-02-01

    A study coupling sedimentcore incubation and microelectrode measurement was performed to explore the sediment oxygen demand (SOD) at 16 stations in the Ziya River Watershed, a severely polluted and anoxic river system in the north of China. Total oxygen flux values in the range 0.19-1.41 g/(m²·d) with an average of 0.62 g/(m²·d) were obtained by core incubations, and diffusive oxygen flux values in the range 0.15-1.38 g/(m²·d) with an average of 0.51 g/(m²·d) were determined by microelectrodes. Total oxygen flux obviously correlated with diffusive oxygen flux (R² = 0.842). The microelectrode method produced smaller results than the incubation method in 15 of 16 sites, and the diffusive oxygen flux was smaller than the total oxygen flux. Although the two sets of SOD values had significant difference accepted by the two methods via the Wilcoxon signed-rank test (p < 0.05), the microelectrode method was shown to produce results that were similar to those from the core incubation method. The microelectrode method, therefore, could be used as an alternative method for traditional core incubation method, or as a method to verify SOD rates measured by other methods. We consider that high potential sediment oxygen demand would occur in the Ziya River Watershed when the dissolved oxygen (DO) recovered in the overlying water. PMID:26907307

  3. Contrasting Anticancer Activity of Half-Sandwich Iridium(III) Complexes Bearing Functionally Diverse 2-Phenylpyridine Ligands

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report the synthesis, characterization, and antiproliferative activity of 15 iridium(III) half-sandwich complexes of the type [(η5-Cp*)Ir(2-(R′-phenyl)-R-pyridine)Cl] bearing either an electron-donating (−OH, −CH2OH, −CH3) or electron-withdrawing (−F, −CHO, −NO2) group at various positions on the 2-phenylpyridine (2-PhPy) chelating ligand giving rise to six sets of structural isomers. The X-ray crystal structures of [(η5-Cp*)Ir(2-(2′-fluorophenyl)pyridine)Cl] (1) and [(η5-Cp*)Ir(2-(4′-fluorophenyl)pyridine)Cl] (2) exhibit the expected “piano-stool” configuration. DFT calculations showed that substituents caused only localized effects on the electrostatic potential surface of the chelating 2-PhPy ligand of the complexes. Hydrolysis of all complexes is rapid, but readily reversed by addition of NaCl. The complexes show preferential binding to 9-ethylguanine over 9-methyladenine and are active catalysts for the oxidation of NADH to NAD+. Antiproliferative activity experiments in A2780 ovarian, MCF-7 breast, A549 lung, and HCT116 colon cancer cell lines showed IC50 values ranging from 1 to 89 μM, with the most potent complex, [(η5-Cp*)Ir(2-(2′-methylphenyl)pyridine)Cl] (13) (A2780 IC50 = 1.18 μM), being 10× more active than the parent, [(η5-Cp*)Ir(2-phenylpyridine)Cl], and 2× more active than [(η5-CpxPh)Ir(2-phenylpyridine)Cl]. Intriguingly, contrasting biological activities are observed between structural isomers despite exhibiting similar chemical reactivity. For pairs of structural isomers both the nature and position of the functional group can affect the hydrophobicity of the complex. An increase in hydrophobicity resulted in enhanced cellular-iridium accumulation in A2780 ovarian cells, which generally gave rise to an increase in potency. The structural isomers [(η5-Cp*)Ir(2-(4′-fluorophenyl)pyridine)Cl] (2) and [(η5-Cp*)Ir(2-phenyl-5-fluoropyridine)Cl] (4) preferentially localized in the cytosol > membrane and particulate

  4. Manipulating the Excited States of Cyclometalated Iridium Complexes with β-Ketoiminate and β-Diketiminate Ligands.

    PubMed

    Radwan, Yousf K; Maity, Ayan; Teets, Thomas S

    2015-07-20

    A series of cyclometalated iridium complexes with β-ketoiminate and β-diketiminate ligands are described. Two different cyclometalating (C^N) ligands-2-phenylpridine (ppy) and 2-phenylbenzothiazole (bt)-are used in concert with three different ancillary (LX) ligands-a phenyl-substituted β-ketoiminate (acNac(Me)), a phenyl-substituted β-diketiminate (NacNac(Me)), and a fluorinated version of the β-diketiminate (NacNac(CF3))-to furnish a suite of six complexes. The complexes are prepared by metathesis reactions of chloro-bridged dimers [Ir(C^N)2(μ-Cl)]2 with potassium or lithium salts of the ancillary LX ligand. Four of the complexes are characterized by X-ray crystallography, and all six were subjected to in-depth optical and electrochemical interrogation. Cyclic voltammetry shows both reduction and oxidation waves, with the latter strongly dependent on the identity of the LX ligand. The complexes are all luminescent, with the nature of the emissive excited state and the quantum yield (Φ) dependent on the identity of both the C^N and LX ligands. Whereas the complexes Ir(ppy)2(NacNac(Me)) and Ir(ppy)2(acNac(Me)) are weakly luminescent (Φ ≈ 0.01), the complexes Ir(bt)2(NacNac(Me)) and Ir(bt)2(acNac(Me)) are strongly luminescent, with the latter's quantum efficiency (Φ = 0.82) among the highest ever observed for cyclometalated iridium complexes. Fluorination of the NacNac ligand gives rise to completely disparate emission behavior suggestive of a NacNac-centered emissive state. The results described here, in comparison with previous groups' studies on acetylacetonate (acac) analogues, suggest that the weaker-field NacNac and acNac ligands raise the energy of the metal-centered HOMO, with energy of the HOMO increasing in the order NacNac(CF3) < acNac(Me) < NacNac(Me). PMID:26158354

  5. Massively-parallel neuromonitoring and neurostimulation rodent headset with nanotextured flexible microelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Arezu; Gabran, S R I; Salam, Muhammad Tariqus; Perez Velazquez, Jose Luis; Mansour, Raafat R; Salama, M M A; Genov, Roman

    2013-10-01

    We present a compact wireless headset for simultaneous multi-site neuromonitoring and neurostimulation in the rodent brain. The system comprises flexible-shaft microelectrodes, neural amplifiers, neurostimulators, a digital time-division multiplexer (TDM), a micro-controller and a ZigBee wireless transceiver. The system is built by parallelizing up to four 0.35 μm CMOS integrated circuits (each having 256 neural amplifiers and 64 neurostimulators) to provide a total maximum of 1024 neural amplifiers and 256 neurostimulators. Each bipolar neural amplifier features 54 dB-72 dB adjustable gain, 1 Hz-5 kHz adjustable bandwidth with an input-referred noise of 7.99 μVrms and dissipates 12.9 μW. Each current-mode bipolar neurostimulator generates programmable arbitrary-waveform biphasic current in the range of 20-250 μA and dissipates 2.6 μW in the stand-by mode. Reconfigurability is provided by stacking a set of dedicated mini-PCBs that share a common signaling bus within as small as 22 × 30 × 15 mm³ volume. The system features flexible polyimide-based microelectrode array design that is not brittle and increases pad packing density. Pad nanotexturing by electrodeposition reduces the electrode-tissue interface impedance from an average of 2 MΩ to 30 kΩ at 100 Hz. The rodent headset and the microelectrode array have been experimentally validated in vivo in freely moving rats for two months. We demonstrate 92.8 percent seizure rate reduction by responsive neurostimulation in an acute epilepsy rat model. PMID:24144667

  6. Electrocatalytic Microelectrode Detectors for Choline and Acetylcholine following Separation by Capillary Electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Jhindan; Kirchhoff, Jon R.

    2009-01-01

    Two electrocatalytic enzyme modified microelectrode systems were employed as end-column amperometric detectors of choline (Ch) and acetylcholine (ACh) following separation by capillary electrophoresis (CE). Horseradish peroxidase crosslinked in an Os based redox polymer hydrogel (HRP-Os) was physically adsorbed on Au microelectrodes followed by chemical crosslinking of the enzymes acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and choline oxidase (ChO). An alternative approach utilized the deposition of the transition metal catalyst, Prussian Blue (PB), on Pt microelectrodes as the electrocatalyst. Utilizing butyrylcholine (BuCh) as an internal standard, the HRP-Os/AChE-ChO and PB/AChE-ChO electrodes exhibited excellent linear responses from 2–2000 μM and 10–2000 μM, respectively, for both Ch and ACh. Detection limits of 0.1 μM or 38 amol were determined for the HRP-Os/AChE-ChO electrode. The limit of detection for ACh and Ch at the PB/AChE-ChO electrode was 5 μM or 9.5 fmol. The electrodes were operated at potentials of +0.10 and −0.10 V vs. Ag/AgCl (3M NaCl), respectively, and thus minimized the potential response from oxidizable interferences. In addition, both electrocatalytic electrodes showed good operational stability for more than 70 hours. The enhanced detection capability of the HRP-Os/AChE-ChO and PB/AChE-ChO electrodes in combination with efficient CE separation of Ch and ACh provides a new sensitive and selective strategy for monitoring and quantifying these cholinergic biomarkers in biological fluids. PMID:20337384

  7. Microelectrode array recordings from the ventral roots in chronically implanted cats.

    PubMed

    Debnath, Shubham; Bauman, Matthew J; Fisher, Lee E; Weber, Douglas J; Gaunt, Robert A

    2014-01-01

    The ventral spinal roots contain the axons of spinal motoneurons and provide the only location in the peripheral nervous system where recorded neural activity can be assured to be motor rather than sensory. This study demonstrates recordings of single unit activity from these ventral root axons using floating microelectrode arrays (FMAs). Ventral root recordings were characterized by examining single unit yield and signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) with 32-channel FMAs implanted chronically in the L6 and L7 spinal roots of nine cats. Single unit recordings were performed for implant periods of up to 12 weeks. Motor units were identified based on active discharge during locomotion and inactivity under anesthesia. Motor unit yield and SNR were calculated for each electrode, and results were grouped by electrode site size, which were varied systematically between 25 and 160 μm to determine effects on signal quality. The unit yields and SNR did not differ significantly across this wide range of electrode sizes. Both SNR and yield decayed over time, but electrodes were able to record spikes with SNR >2 up to 12 weeks post-implant. These results demonstrate that it is feasible to record single unit activity from multiple isolated motor units with penetrating microelectrode arrays implanted chronically in the ventral spinal roots. This approach could be useful for creating a spinal nerve interface for advanced neural prostheses, and results of this study will be used to improve design of microelectrodes for chronic neural recording in the ventral spinal roots. PMID:25071697

  8. Chronic tissue response to untethered microelectrode implants in the rat brain and spinal cord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ersen, Ali; Elkabes, Stella; Freedman, David S.; Sahin, Mesut

    2015-02-01

    Objective. Microelectrodes implanted in the central nervous system (CNS) often fail in long term implants due to the immunological tissue response caused by tethering forces of the connecting wires. In addition to the tethering effect, there is a mechanical stress that occurs at the device-tissue interface simply because the microelectrode is a rigid body floating in soft tissue and it cannot reshape itself to comply with changes in the surrounding tissue. In the current study we evaluated the scar tissue formation to tetherless devices with two significantly different geometries in the rat brain and spinal cord in order to investigate the effects of device geometry. Approach. One of the implant geometries resembled the wireless, floating microstimulators that we are currently developing in our laboratory and the other was a (shank only) Michigan probe for comparison. Both electrodes were implanted into either the cervical spinal cord or the motor cortices, one on each side. Main results. The most pronounced astroglial and microglial reactions occurred within 20 μm from the device and decreased sharply at larger distances. Both cell types displayed the morphology of non-activated cells past the 100 μm perimeter. Even though the aspect ratios of the implants were different, the astroglial and microglial responses to both microelectrode types were very mild in the brain, stronger and yet limited in the spinal cord. Significance. These observations confirm previous reports and further suggest that tethering may be responsible for most of the tissue response in chronic implants and that the electrode size has a smaller contribution with floating electrodes. The electrode size may be playing primarily an amplifying role to the tethering forces in the brain whereas the size itself may induce chronic response in the spinal cord where the movement of surrounding tissues is more significant.

  9. Microelectrode Array Recordings from the Ventral Roots in Chronically Implanted Cats

    PubMed Central

    Debnath, Shubham; Bauman, Matthew J.; Fisher, Lee E.; Weber, Douglas J.; Gaunt, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    The ventral spinal roots contain the axons of spinal motoneurons and provide the only location in the peripheral nervous system where recorded neural activity can be assured to be motor rather than sensory. This study demonstrates recordings of single unit activity from these ventral root axons using floating microelectrode arrays (FMAs). Ventral root recordings were characterized by examining single unit yield and signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) with 32-channel FMAs implanted chronically in the L6 and L7 spinal roots of nine cats. Single unit recordings were performed for implant periods of up to 12 weeks. Motor units were identified based on active discharge during locomotion and inactivity under anesthesia. Motor unit yield and SNR were calculated for each electrode, and results were grouped by electrode site size, which were varied systematically between 25 and 160 μm to determine effects on signal quality. The unit yields and SNR did not differ significantly across this wide range of electrode sizes. Both SNR and yield decayed over time, but electrodes were able to record spikes with SNR >2 up to 12 weeks post-implant. These results demonstrate that it is feasible to record single unit activity from multiple isolated motor units with penetrating microelectrode arrays implanted chronically in the ventral spinal roots. This approach could be useful for creating a spinal nerve interface for advanced neural prostheses, and results of this study will be used to improve design of microelectrodes for chronic neural recording in the ventral spinal roots. PMID:25071697

  10. A method for electrophysiological characterization of hamster retinal ganglion cells using a high-density CMOS microelectrode array

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Ian L.; Russell, Thomas L.; Farrow, Karl; Fiscella, Michele; Franke, Felix; Müller, Jan; Jäckel, David; Hierlemann, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of neuronal cell types in the mammalian retina is important for the understanding of human retinal disease and the advancement of sight-restoring technology, such as retinal prosthetic devices. A somewhat less utilized animal model for retinal research is the hamster, which has a visual system that is characterized by an area centralis and a wide visual field with a broad binocular component. The hamster retina is optimally suited for recording on the microelectrode array (MEA), because it intrinsically lies flat on the MEA surface and yields robust, large-amplitude signals. However, information in the literature about hamster retinal ganglion cell functional types is scarce. The goal of our work is to develop a method featuring a high-density (HD) complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) MEA technology along with a sequence of standardized visual stimuli in order to categorize ganglion cells in isolated Syrian Hamster (Mesocricetus auratus) retina. Since the HD-MEA is capable of recording at a higher spatial resolution than most MEA systems (17.5 μm electrode pitch), we were able to record from a large proportion of RGCs within a selected region. Secondly, we chose our stimuli so that they could be run during the experiment without intervention or computation steps. The visual stimulus set was designed to activate the receptive fields of most ganglion cells in parallel and to incorporate various visual features to which different cell types respond uniquely. Based on the ganglion cell responses, basic cell properties were determined: direction selectivity, speed tuning, width tuning, transience, and latency. These properties were clustered to identify ganglion cell types in the hamster retina. Ultimately, we recorded up to a cell density of 2780 cells/mm2 at 2 mm (42°) from the optic nerve head. Using five parameters extracted from the responses to visual stimuli, we obtained seven ganglion cell types. PMID:26528115

  11. Fabrication and testing of microelectrodes for small-field cortical surface recordings.

    PubMed

    Kitzmiller, Joseph; Beversdorf, David; Hansford, Derek

    2006-03-01

    A microfabrication approach to produce a microelectrode array that is suitable for use with human patients has been developed. The device is comprised of materials that are consistent with those of clinically used macroelectrodes (platinum electrode contacts suspended within a biomedical grade polydimethylsiloxane, PDMS). Photolithography, metal deposition, wire bonding, and PDMS encapsulation were used to fabricate the device. Cytotoxicity testing with both mammalian and human cortical cells suggests that the device is suitable for use with human patients and implementation of the device in animal studies revealed that reliable evoked potentials could be acquired with the designed spatial resolution. PMID:16491335

  12. Boron-doped diamond microelectrodes for use in capillary electrophoresis with electrochemical detection.

    PubMed

    Cvacka, Josef; Quaiserová, Veronika; Park, JinWoo; Show, Yoshiyuki; Muck, Alexander; Swain, Greg M

    2003-06-01

    The fabrication and characterization of boron-doped diamond microelectrodes for use in electrochemical detection coupled with capillary electrophoresis (CE-EC) is discussed. The microelectrodes were prepared by coating thin films of polycrystalline diamond on electrochemically sharpened platinum wires (76-, 25-, and 10-microm diameter), using microwave-assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The diamond-coated wires were attached to copper wires (current collectors), and several methods were explored to insulate the cylindrical portion of the electrode: nail polish, epoxy, polyimide, and polypropylene coatings. The microelectrodes were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and cyclic voltammetry. They exhibited low and stable background currents and sigmoidally shaped voltammetric curves for Ru(NH3)6(3+/2+) and Fe(CN)6(3-/4-) at low scan rates. The microelectrodes formed with the large diameter Pt and sealed in polypropylene pipet tips were employed for end-column detection in CE. Evaluation of the CE-EC system and the electrode performance were accomplished using a 10 mM phosphate buffer, pH 6.0, run buffer, and a 30-cm-long fused-silica capillary (75-microm i.d.) with dopamine, catechol, and ascorbic acid serving as test analytes. The background current (approximately 100 pA) and noise (approximately 3 pA) were measured at different detection potentials and found to be very stable with time. Reproducible separation (elution time) and detection (peak current or area) of dopamine, catechol, and ascorbic acid were observed with response precisions of 4.1% or less. Calibration curves constructed from the peak area were linear over 4 orders of magnitude, up to a concentration between 0.1 and 1 mM. Mass limits of detection for dopamine and catechol were 1.7 and 2.6 fmol, respectively (S/N = 3). The separation efficiency was approximately 33,000, 56,000, and 98,000 plates/m for dopamine, catechol, and ascorbic acid, respectively. In

  13. Novel method for fast characterization of high-surface-area electrocatalytic materials using carbon fiber microelectrode.

    SciTech Connect

    Strmcnik, D.; Hodnik, N.; Hocevar, S. B.; van der Vliet, D.; Zorko, M.; Stamenovic, V. R.; Pihlar, B.; Markovic, N. M.; Materials Science Division; National Inst. of Chemistry; Univ. Ljubljana

    2010-02-18

    A carbon fiber microelectrode (CFME) was used for characterization of the nanoparticle catalysts as an alternative to the well-established rotating disk electrode (RDE) method. We found that the novel CFME method yielded comparable results to the RDE method when investigating the adsorption/desorption processes as well the specific activity for reactions such as the oxygen reduction reaction. Its major advantage over the RDE method is a fast sample preparation and rapid measurement, reducing significantly the time of a single sample characterization from 2-3 h to a favorable 5-10 min.

  14. Preliminary study of the thermal impact of a microelectrode array implanted in the brain.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sohee; Normann, Richard A; Harrison, Reid; Solzbacher, Florian

    2006-01-01

    One requirement of a chronically implantable, wireless neural interface device is the integration of electronic circuitry with the microelectrode array. Since the electronic IC dissipates a certain amount of power, it will affect the temperature in the tissues surrounding the implant site. In this paper, the thermal influence of an integrated, 3-dimensional Utah electrode array, to be implanted in the brain was investigated with simulations using the finite element method (FEM). A temperature increase in the brain tissue was predicted using preliminary simulations with simplified models. The model and method used in the simulations were verified by simple in vitro experiments. PMID:17946999

  15. Materials approaches for modulating neural tissue responses to implanted microelectrodes through mechanical and biochemical means

    PubMed Central

    Sommakia, Salah; Lee, Heui C.; Gaire, Janak; Otto, Kevin J.

    2014-01-01

    Implantable intracortical microelectrodes face an uphill struggle for widespread clinical use. Their potential for treating a wide range of traumatic and degenerative neural disease is hampered by their unreliability in chronic settings. A major factor in this decline in chronic performance is a reactive response of brain tissue, which aims to isolate the implanted device from the rest of the healthy tissue. In this review we present a discussion of materials approaches aimed at modulating the reactive tissue response through mechanical and biochemical means. Benefits and challenges associated with these approaches are analyzed, and the importance of multimodal solutions tested in emerging animal models are presented. PMID:25530703

  16. Novel carbon-fiber microelectrode batch fabrication using a 3D-printed mold and polyimide resin.

    PubMed

    Trikantzopoulos, Elefterios; Yang, Cheng; Ganesana, Mallikarjunarao; Wang, Ying; Venton, B Jill

    2016-09-21

    Glass insulated carbon-fiber microelectrodes (CFMEs) are standard tools for the measurement of neurotransmitters. However, electrodes are fabricated individually and the glass can shatter, limiting application in higher order mammals. Here, we developed a novel microelectrode batch fabrication method using a 3D-printed mold and polyimide resin insulating agent. The 3D-printed mold is low cost, customizable to change the electrode shape, and allows 40 electrodes to be made simultaneously. The polyimide resin is biocompatible, quick to cure, and does not adhere to the plastic mold. The electrodes were tested for the response to dopamine with fast-scan cyclic voltammetry both in vitro and in vivo and performed similarly to traditional glass-insulated electrodes, but with lower background currents. Thus, polyimide-insulated electrodes can be mass-produced using a 3D-printed mold and are an attractive alternative for making cheap, biocompatible microelectrodes. PMID:27536741

  17. An Analysis of the FY-1C, Iridium 33, and Cosmos 2251 Fragments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, J.-C.

    2014-01-01

    The beginning of the year 2013 marks the sixth anniversary of the destruction of the Fengyun-1C (FY-1C) weather satellite as the result of an anti-satellite test conducted by China in January 2007 and the fourth anniversary of the accidental collision between Cosmos 2251 and the operational Iridium 33 in February 2009. These two events represent the worst satellite breakups in history. A total of 5579 fragments have been cataloged by the U.S. Space Surveillance Network (SSN), and almost 5000 of them were still in orbit in January 2013. In addition to these cataloged objects, hundreds of thousands (or more) of fragments down to the millimeter size regime were also generated during the breakups. These fragments are too small to be tracked by the SSN, but are large enough to be a safety concern for human space activities and robotic missions in low Earth orbit (LEO, the region below 2000 km altitude). Like their cataloged siblings, many of them remain in orbit today. These two breakup events dramatically changed the landscape of the orbital debris environment in LEO. The spatial density of the cataloged population in January 2013 is shown as the top blue curve. The combined FY-1C, Iridium 33, and Cosmos 2251 fragments (black curve) account for about 50 percent of the cataloged population below an altitude of 1000 km. They are also responsible for the concentrations at 770 km and 850 km, altitudes at which the collisions occurred. The effects of the FY-1C, Iridium 33, and Cosmos 2251 fragments will continue to be felt for decades to come. For example, approximately half of the generated FY-1C fragments will remain in orbit 20 years from now. In general, the Iridium 33 and Cosmos 2251 fragments will decay faster than the FY-1C fragments because of their lower altitudes. Of the Iridium 33 and Cosmos 2251 fragments, the former have much shorter orbital lifetimes than the latter, because lightweight composite materials were heavily used in the construction of the Iridium

  18. From Mononuclear to Dinuclear Iridium(III) Complex: Effective Tuning of the Optoelectronic Characteristics for Organic Light-Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaolong; Xu, Xianbin; Dang, Jing-shuang; Zhou, Guijiang; Ho, Cheuk-Lam; Wong, Wai-Yeung

    2016-02-15

    Phosphorescent dinuclear iridium(III) complexes that can show high luminescent efficiencies and good electroluminescent abilities are very rare. In this paper, highly phosphorescent 2-phenylpyrimidine-based dinuclear iridium(III) complexes have been synthesized and fully characterized. Significant differences of the photophysical and electrochemical properties between the mono- and dinuclear complexes are observed. The theoretical calculation results show that the dinuclear complexes adopt a unique molecular orbital spatial distribution pattern, which plays the key role of determining their photophysical and electrochemical properties. More importantly, the solution-processed organic light-emitting diode (OLED) based on the new dinuclear iridium(III) complex achieves a peak external quantum efficiency (η(ext)) of 14.4%, which is the highest η(ext) for OLEDs using dinuclear iridium(III) complexes as emitters. Besides, the efficiencies of the OLED based on the dinuclear iridium(III) complex are much higher that those of the OLED based on the corresponding mononuclear iridium(III) complex. PMID:26814683

  19. A simple implantation method for flexible, multisite microelectrodes into rat brains

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Anja; Xie, Yijing; Schumacher, Anett; Löffler, Susanne; Kirch, Robert D.; Al-Hasani, Jaafar; Rapoport, Daniel H.; Kruse, Charli; Moser, Andreas; Tronnier, Volker; Danner, Sandra; Hofmann, Ulrich G.

    2013-01-01

    A long term functional and reliable coupling between neural tissue and implanted microelectrodes is the key issue in acquiring neural electrophysiological signals or therapeutically excite neural tissue. The currently often used rigid micro-electrodes are thought to cause a severe foreign body reaction resulting in a thick glial scar and consequently a poor tissue-electrode coupling in the chronic phase. We hypothesize, that this adverse effect might be remedied by probes compliant to the soft brain tissue, i.e., replacing rigid electrodes by flexible ones. Unfortunately, this flexibility comes at the price of a low stiffness, which makes targeted low trauma implantation very challenging. In this study, we demonstrate an adaptable and simple method to implant extremely flexible microprobes even to deep areas of rat's brain. Implantation of flexible probes is achieved by rod supported stereotactic insertion fostered by a hydrogel (2% agarose in PBS) cushion on the exposed skull. We were thus able to implant very flexible micro-probes in 70 rats as deep as the rodent's subthalamic nucleus. This work describes in detail the procedures and steps needed for minimal invasive, but reliable implantation of flexible probes. PMID:23898266

  20. Agarose microwell based neuronal micro-circuit arrays on microelectrode arrays for high throughput drug testing.

    PubMed

    Kang, Gyumin; Lee, Ji-Hye; Lee, Chang-Soo; Nam, Yoonkey

    2009-11-21

    For cell-based biosensor applications, dissociated neurons have been cultured on planar microelectrode arrays (MEAs) to measure the network activity with substrate-embedded microelectrodes. There has been a need for a multi-well type platform to reduce the data collection time and increase the statistical power for data analysis. This study presents a novel method to convert a conventional MEA into a multi-well MEA with an array of micrometre-sized neuronal culture ('neuronal micro-circuit array'). An MEA was coated first with cell-adhesive layer (poly-D-lysine) which was subsequently patterned with a cell-repulsive layer (agarose hydrogel) to both pattern the cell adhesive region and isolate neuronal micro-circuits from each other. For a few weeks, primary hippocampal neurons were cultured on the agarose microwell MEA and the development of spontaneous electrical activities were characterized with extracellular action potentials. Using neurotransmission modulators, the simultaneous monitoring of drug responses from neuronal micro-circuit arrays was also demonstrated. The proposed approach will be powerful for neurobiological functional assay studies or neuron-based biosensor fields which require repeated trials to obtain a single data point due to biological variations. PMID:19865730