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Sample records for iron 45

  1. 33 CFR 334.45 - Kennebec River, Bath Iron Works Shipyard, naval restricted area, Bath, Maine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Kennebec River, Bath Iron Works Shipyard, naval restricted area, Bath, Maine. 334.45 Section 334.45 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS... REGULATIONS § 334.45 Kennebec River, Bath Iron Works Shipyard, naval restricted area, Bath, Maine. (a)...

  2. 33 CFR 334.45 - Kennebec River, Bath Iron Works Shipyard, naval restricted area, Bath, Maine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Kennebec River, Bath Iron Works Shipyard, naval restricted area, Bath, Maine. 334.45 Section 334.45 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS... REGULATIONS § 334.45 Kennebec River, Bath Iron Works Shipyard, naval restricted area, Bath, Maine. (a)...

  3. 33 CFR 334.45 - Kennebec River, Bath Iron Works Shipyard, naval restricted area, Bath, Maine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Kennebec River, Bath Iron Works Shipyard, naval restricted area, Bath, Maine. 334.45 Section 334.45 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS... REGULATIONS § 334.45 Kennebec River, Bath Iron Works Shipyard, naval restricted area, Bath, Maine. (a)...

  4. 33 CFR 334.45 - Kennebec River, Bath Iron Works Shipyard, naval restricted area, Bath, Maine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Kennebec River, Bath Iron Works Shipyard, naval restricted area, Bath, Maine. 334.45 Section 334.45 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS... REGULATIONS § 334.45 Kennebec River, Bath Iron Works Shipyard, naval restricted area, Bath, Maine. (a)...

  5. 33 CFR 334.45 - Kennebec River, Bath Iron Works Shipyard, naval restricted area, Bath, Maine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Kennebec River, Bath Iron Works Shipyard, naval restricted area, Bath, Maine. 334.45 Section 334.45 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS... REGULATIONS § 334.45 Kennebec River, Bath Iron Works Shipyard, naval restricted area, Bath, Maine. (a)...

  6. Continuous pig iron making by microwave heating with 12.5 kW at 2.45 GHz.

    PubMed

    Hara, Kyosuke; Hayashi, Miyuki; Sato, Motoyasu; Nagata, Kazuhiro

    2011-01-01

    A continuous process of pig iron making using microwave of 2.45 GHz was constructed in a microwave furnace with maximum power of 12.5 kW. Pig iron was produced from the mixed powder of magnetite ore and carbon such as coal, coke and graphite. Molten pig iron initially poured from reaction chamber after about 40 min when temperature attained over 1200 degrees C. After temperature attained at 1400 degrees C, 50 or 200 g of mixed powder was added several times in regular interval and pig iron continuously dropped out from reaction chamber. When mixed powder was supplied, temperature in reaction chamber decreased by about 200 degrees C and recovered during 5 min. Finally, the recovery time of temperature lengthened. In order to make the scale-up of the microwave furnace for iron making, it has been discussed how to improve energy efficiency and to make a preferable construction. PMID:24427877

  7. De novo WDR45 mutation in a patient showing clinically Rett syndrome with childhood iron deposition in brain.

    PubMed

    Ohba, Chihiro; Nabatame, Shin; Iijima, Yoshitaka; Nishiyama, Kiyomi; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Nakashima, Mitsuko; Miyake, Noriko; Tanaka, Fumiaki; Ozono, Keiichi; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2014-05-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a neurodevelopmental disorder mostly caused by MECP2 mutations. We identified a de novo WDR45 mutation, which caused a subtype of neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation, in a patient showing clinically typical RTT. The mutation (c.830+1G>A) led to aberrant splicing in lymphoblastoid cells. Sequential brain magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated that iron deposition in the globus pallidus and the substantia nigra was observed as early as at 11 years of age. Because the patient showed four of the main RTT diagnostic criteria, WDR45 should be investigated in patients with RTT without MECP2 mutations. PMID:24621584

  8. Iron

    MedlinePlus

    Iron is a mineral that our bodies need for many functions. For example, iron is part of hemoglobin, a protein which carries ... It helps our muscles store and use oxygen. Iron is also part of many other proteins and ...

  9. IRON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The document surveys the effects of organic and inorganic iron that are relevant to humans and their environment. The biology and chemistry of iron are complex and only partially understood. Iron participates in oxidation reduction processes that not only affect its geochemical m...

  10. Iron

    MedlinePlus

    ... organ failure, coma, convulsions, and death. Child-proof packaging and warning labels on iron supplements have greatly ... levodopa that the body absorbs, making it less effective. Levodopa, found in Sinemet® and Stalevo®, is used ...

  11. Use of a 4,5-dicyanoimidazolate anion based ionic liquid for the synthesis of iron and silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Suvendu Sekhar; Marquardt, Dorothea; Janiak, Christoph; Holdt, Hans-Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    Sixteen new ionic liquids (ILs) with tetraethylammonium, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium, 3-methyl-1-octylimidazolium and tetrabutylphosphonium cations paired with 2-substituted 4,5-dicyanoimidazolate anions (substituent at C2 = methyl, trifluoromethyl, pentafluoroethyl, N,N'-dimethyl amino and nitro) have been synthesized and characterized by using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The effects of cation and anion type and structure of the resulting ILs, including several room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs), are reflected in the crystallization, melting points and thermal decomposition of the ILs. ILs exhibited large liquid and crystallization ranges and formed glasses on cooling with glass transition temperatures in the range of -22 to -71 °C. We selected one of the newly designed ILs due to its bigger size, compared to the common conventional IL anion and high electron-withdrawing nitrile group leads to an overall stabilization anion that may stabilize the metal nanoparticles. Stable and better separated iron and silver nanoparticles are obtained by the decomposition of corresponding Fe2(CO)9 and AgPF6, respectively, under N2-atmosphere in newly designed nitrile functionalized 4,5-dicyanoimidazolate anion based IL. Very small and uniform size for Fe-nanoparticles of about 1.8 ± 0.6 nm were achieved without any additional stabilizers or capping molecules. Comparatively bigger size of Ag-nanoparticles was obtained through the reduction of AgPF6 by hydrogen gas. Additionally, the AgPF6 precursor was decomposed under microwave irradiation (MWI), fabricating nut-in-shell-like, that is, core-separated-from-shell Ag-nano-structures. PMID:26885778

  12. Evaluation of sol-gel based magnetic 45S5 bioglass and bioglass-ceramics containing iron oxide.

    PubMed

    Shankhwar, Nisha; Srinivasan, A

    2016-05-01

    Multicomponent oxide powders with nominal compositions of (45-x)·SiO2·24.5CaO·24.5Na2O·6P2O5xFe2O3 (in wt.%) were prepared by a modified sol-gel procedure. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns and high resolution transmission electron microscope images of the sol-gel products show fully amorphous structure for Fe2O3 substitutions up to 2 wt.%. Sol-gel derived 43SiO2·24.5CaO·24.5Na2O·6P2O5·2Fe2O3 glass (or bioglass 45S5 with SiO2 substituted with 2 wt.% Fe2O3), exhibited magnetic behavior with a coercive field of 21 Oe, hysteresis loop area of 33.25 erg/g and saturation magnetization of 0.66 emu/g at an applied field of 15 kOe at room temperature. XRD pattern of this glass annealed at 850 °C for 1h revealed the formation of a glass-ceramic containing sodium calcium silicate and magnetite phases in nanocrystalline form. Temperature dependent magnetization and room temperature electron spin resonance data have been used to obtain information on the magnetic phase and distribution of iron ions in the sol-gel glass and glass-ceramic samples. Sol-gel derived glass and glass-ceramic exhibit in-vitro bioactivity by forming a hydroxyapatite surface layer under simulated physiological conditions and their bio-response is superior to their melt quenched bulk counterparts. This new form of magnetic bioglass and bioglass ceramics opens up new and more effective biomedical applications. PMID:26952414

  13. On the crack growth resistance and strength of the B2 iron aluminides Fe-40Al, Fe-45Al, and Fe-10Ni-40Al (at. %)

    SciTech Connect

    Schneibel, J.H.; Maziasz, P.J.

    1994-09-01

    The crack growth resistance and yield strength of the B2 iron aluminides Fe-40Al, Fe-45Al, are Fe-10Ni-40Al (at. %) have been investigated at room temperature laboratory air. After fast cooling from 1273 K, Fe-45Al and Fe-10Ni-40Al are much stronger than Fe-40Al, and exhibit considerably lower crack growth resistance. The crack growth resistance decreases with decreasing crack propagation velocity. Low crack propagation velocities favor intergranular fracture, whereas high velocities can lead to significant contributions from transgranular fracture. Boron additions to Fe-40Al and Fe-10Ni-40Al improve the crack growth resistance, reduce its dependence on the crack propagation velocity, and cause the path to be predominantly transgranular. In a plot of fracture toughness versus yield strength, the properties of the iron aluminides are similar to those of typical aluminum alloys.

  14. A highly selective fluorescent chemosensor for iron ion based on 1H-imidazo [4,5-b] phenazine derivative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Guo-ying; Qu, Wen-juan; Shi, Bing-bing; Zhang, Peng; Lin, Qi; Yao, Hong; Yang, Wen-long; Zhang, You-ming; Wei, Tai-bao

    2014-03-01

    Two kinds of fluorescent sensors (S and S1) for Fe3+ bearing 1H-Imidazo [4,5-b] phenazine derivatives have been designed and synthesized. Between the two sensors, S showed excellent fluorescent specific selectivity and high sensitivity for Fe3+ in DMSO solution. The test strip based on S was fabricated, which could act as a convenient and efficient Fe3+ test kit. The recognition mechanism of the sensor toward Fe3+ was evaluated by MS, IR and XRD. The detection limit of the sensor S towards Fe3+ is 4.8 × 10-6 M. And other cations, including Hg2+,Ag+, Ca2+, Cu2+, Co2+, Ni2+, Cd2+, Pb2+, Zn2+, Cr3+, and Mg2+ had no influence on the probing behavior.

  15. Iron Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... detect and help diagnose iron deficiency or iron overload. In people with anemia , these tests can help ... also be ordered when iron deficiency or iron overload is suspected. Early iron deficiency often goes unnoticed. ...

  16. Incoherent c-Axis Interplane Response of the Iron Chalcogenide FeTe0:55Se0:45 Superconductor from Infrared Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, G.D.; Moon, S.J.; Homes, C.C.; Akrap, A.; Xu,, Z.J.; Wen, J.S.; Lin,, Z.W.; Li, Q.; Basov, D.N.

    2011-05-23

    We report on the interplane c-axis electronic response of FeTe{sub 0.55}Se{sub 0.45} investigated by infrared spectroscopy. We find that the normal-state c-axis electronic response of FeTe{sub 0.55}Se{sub 0.45} is incoherent and bears significant similarities to those of mildly underdoped cuprates. The c-axis optical conductivity {sigma}{sub c}({omega}) of FeTe{sub 0.55}Se{sub 0.45} does not display well-defined Drude response at all temperatures. As temperature decreases, {sigma}{sub c}({omega}) is continuously suppressed. The incoherent c-axis response is found to be related to the strong dissipation in the ab-plane transport: a pattern that holds true for various correlated materials as well as FeTe{sub 0.55}Se{sub 0.45}.

  17. Iron Chelation

    MedlinePlus

    ... iron overload and need treatment. What is iron overload? Iron chelation therapy is used when you have ... may want to perform: How quickly does iron overload happen? This is different for each person. It ...

  18. Iron overdose

    MedlinePlus

    Iron is an ingredient in many mineral and vitamin supplements. Iron supplements are also sold by themselves. Types include: Ferrous sulfate (Feosol, Slow Fe) Ferrous gluconate (Fergon) Ferrous fumarate (Femiron, Feostat) Other products may also contain iron.

  19. Iron deficiency.

    PubMed

    Scrimshaw, N S

    1991-10-01

    The world's leading nutritional problem is iron deficiency. 66% of children and women aged 15-44 years in developing countries have it. Further, 10-20% of women of childbearing age in developed countries are anemic. Iron deficiency is identified with often irreversible impairment of a child's learning ability. It is also associated with low capacity for adults to work which reduces productivity. In addition, it impairs the immune system which reduces the body's ability to fight infection. Iron deficiency also lowers the metabolic rate and the body temperature when exposed to cold. Hemoglobin contains nearly 73% of the body's iron. This iron is always being recycled as more red blood cells are made. The rest of the needed iron does important tasks for the body, such as binds to molecules that are reservoirs of oxygen for muscle cells. This iron comes from our diet, especially meat. Even though some plants, such as spinach, are high in iron, the body can only absorb 1.4-7% of the iron in plants whereas it can absorb 20% of the iron in red meat. In many developing countries, the common vegetarian diets contribute to high rates of iron deficiency. Parasitic diseases and abnormal uterine bleeding also promote iron deficiency. Iron therapy in anemic children can often, but not always, improve behavior and cognitive performance. Iron deficiency during pregnancy often contributes to maternal and perinatal mortality. Yet treatment, if given to a child in time, can lead to normal growth and hinder infections. However, excess iron can be damaging. Too much supplemental iron in a malnourished child promotes fatal infections since the excess iron is available for the pathogens use. Many countries do not have an effective system for diagnosing, treating, and preventing iron deficiency. Therefore a concerted international effort is needed to eliminate iron deficiency in the world. PMID:1745900

  20. Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    De Falco, Luigia; Sanchez, Mayka; Silvestri, Laura; Kannengiesser, Caroline; Muckenthaler, Martina U.; Iolascon, Achille; Gouya, Laurent; Camaschella, Clara; Beaumont, Carole

    2013-01-01

    Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia is a hereditary recessive anemia due to a defect in the TMPRSS6 gene encoding Matriptase-2. This protein is a transmembrane serine protease that plays an essential role in down-regulating hepcidin, the key regulator of iron homeostasis. Hallmarks of this disease are microcytic hypochromic anemia, low transferrin saturation and normal/high serum hepcidin values. The anemia appears in the post-natal period, although in some cases it is only diagnosed in adulthood. The disease is refractory to oral iron treatment but shows a slow response to intravenous iron injections and partial correction of the anemia. To date, 40 different Matriptase-2 mutations have been reported, affecting all the functional domains of the large ectodomain of the protein. In vitro experiments on transfected cells suggest that Matriptase-2 cleaves Hemojuvelin, a major regulator of hepcidin expression and that this function is altered in this genetic form of anemia. In contrast to the low/undetectable hepcidin levels observed in acquired iron deficiency, in patients with Matriptase-2 deficiency, serum hepcidin is inappropriately high for the low iron status and accounts for the absent/delayed response to oral iron treatment. A challenge for the clinicians and pediatricians is the recognition of the disorder among iron deficiency and other microcytic anemias commonly found in pediatric patients. The current treatment of iron refractory iron deficiency anemia is based on parenteral iron administration; in the future, manipulation of the hepcidin pathway with the aim of suppressing it might become an alternative therapeutic approach. PMID:23729726

  1. Iron bioaccumulation in mycelium of Pleurotus ostreatus

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Sandra M.; Umeo, Suzana H.; Marcante, Rafael C.; Yokota, Meire E.; Valle, Juliana S.; Dragunski, Douglas C.; Colauto, Nelson B.; Linde, Giani A.

    2015-01-01

    Pleurotus ostreatus is able to bioaccumulate several metals in its cell structures; however, there are no reports on its capacity to bioaccumulate iron. The objective of this study was to evaluate cultivation variables to increase iron bioaccumulation in P. ostreatus mycelium. A full factorial design and a central composite design were utilized to evaluate the effect of the following variables: nitrogen and carbon sources, pH and iron concentration in the solid culture medium to produce iron bioaccumulated in mycelial biomass. The maximum production of P. ostreatus mycelial biomass was obtained with yeast extract at 2.96 g of nitrogen L −1 and glucose at 28.45 g L −1 . The most important variable to bioaccumulation was the iron concentration in the cultivation medium. Iron concentration at 175 mg L −1 or higher in the culture medium strongly inhibits the mycelial growth. The highest iron concentration in the mycelium was 3500 mg kg −1 produced with iron addition of 300 mg L −1 . The highest iron bioaccumulation in the mycelium was obtained in culture medium with 150 mg L −1 of iron. Iron bioaccumulation in P. ostreatus mycelium is a potential alternative to produce non-animal food sources of iron. PMID:26221108

  2. Iron bioaccumulation in mycelium of Pleurotus ostreatus.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Sandra M; Umeo, Suzana H; Marcante, Rafael C; Yokota, Meire E; Valle, Juliana S; Dragunski, Douglas C; Colauto, Nelson B; Linde, Giani A

    2015-03-01

    Pleurotus ostreatus is able to bioaccumulate several metals in its cell structures; however, there are no reports on its capacity to bioaccumulate iron. The objective of this study was to evaluate cultivation variables to increase iron bioaccumulation in P. ostreatus mycelium. A full factorial design and a central composite design were utilized to evaluate the effect of the following variables: nitrogen and carbon sources, pH and iron concentration in the solid culture medium to produce iron bioaccumulated in mycelial biomass. The maximum production of P. ostreatus mycelial biomass was obtained with yeast extract at 2.96 g of nitrogen L (-1) and glucose at 28.45 g L (-1) . The most important variable to bioaccumulation was the iron concentration in the cultivation medium. Iron concentration at 175 mg L (-1) or higher in the culture medium strongly inhibits the mycelial growth. The highest iron concentration in the mycelium was 3500 mg kg (-1) produced with iron addition of 300 mg L (-1) . The highest iron bioaccumulation in the mycelium was obtained in culture medium with 150 mg L (-1) of iron. Iron bioaccumulation in P. ostreatus mycelium is a potential alternative to produce non-animal food sources of iron. PMID:26221108

  3. METABOLISM OF IRON STORES

    PubMed Central

    SAITO, HIROSHI

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Remarkable progress was recently achieved in the studies on molecular regulators of iron metabolism. Among the main regulators, storage iron, iron absorption, erythropoiesis and hepcidin interact in keeping iron homeostasis. Diseases with gene-mutations resulting in iron overload, iron deficiency, and local iron deposition have been introduced in relation to the regulators of storage iron metabolism. On the other hand, the research on storage iron metabolism has not advanced since the pioneering research by Shoden in 1953. However, we recently developed a new method for determining ferritin iron and hemosiderin iron by computer-assisted serum ferritin kinetics. Serum ferritin increase or decrease curves were measured in patients with normal storage iron levels (chronic hepatitis C and iron deficiency anemia treated by intravenous iron injection), and iron overload (hereditary hemochromatosis and transfusion dependent anemia). We thereby confirmed the existence of two iron pathways where iron flows followed the numbered order (1) labile iron, (2) ferritin and (3) hemosiderin in iron deposition and mobilization among many previously proposed but mostly unproven routes. We also demonstrated the increasing and decreasing phases of ferritin iron and hemosiderin iron in iron deposition and mobilization. The author first demonstrated here the change in proportion between pre-existing ferritin iron and new ferritin iron synthesized by removing iron from hemosiderin in the course of iron removal. In addition, the author disclosed the cause of underestimation of storage iron turnover rate which had been reported by previous investigators in estimating storage iron turnover rate of normal subjects. PMID:25741033

  4. Iron Dextran Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Iron dextran injection is used to treat iron-deficiency anemia (a lower than normal number of red blood cells ... treated with iron supplements taken by mouth. Iron dextran injection is in a class of medications called ...

  5. Iron and alloys of iron. [lunar resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sastri, Sankar

    1992-01-01

    All lunar soil contains iron in the metallic form, mostly as an iron-nickel alloy in concentrations of a few tenths of 1 percent. Some of this free iron can be easily separated by magnetic means. It is estimated that the magnetic separation of 100,000 tons of lunar soil would yield 150-200 tons of iron. Agglutinates contain metallic iron which could be extracted by melting and made into powder metallurgy products. The characteristics and potential uses of the pure-iron and iron-alloy lunar products are discussed. Processes for working iron that might be used in a nonterrestrial facility are also addressed.

  6. Iron and iron derived radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Borg, D.C.; Schaich, K.M.

    1987-04-01

    We have discussed some reactions of iron and iron-derived oxygen radicals that may be important in the production or treatment of tissue injury. Our conclusions challenge, to some extent, the usual lines of thought in this field of research. Insofar as they are born out by subsequent developments, the lessons they teach are two: Think fastexclamation Think smallexclamation In other words, think of the many fast reactions that can rapidly alter the production and fate of highly reactive intermediates, and when considering the impact of competitive reactions on such species, think how they affect the microenvironment (on the molecular scale) ''seen'' by each reactive molecule. 21 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  7. M45

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    M45 is better known as the Pleiades, a young open cluster in Taurus. Again, this is a very bright (1.6 mag) object known since antiquity. The Pleiades are sometimes referred to as the `Seven Sisters' since that is the number of stars normally visible to the naked eye. In Greek mythology these represent Pleione and her daughters with Atlas: Alcyone, Asterope (a double star), Electra, Maia, Merope,...

  8. 45. INTERIOR VIEW SHOWING CONVEYOR BELT SYSTEM WHICH CONVEY THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    45. INTERIOR VIEW SHOWING CONVEYOR BELT SYSTEM WHICH CONVEY THE HARDENED NAILS TO THE DRAWBACK TUBE FOR TEMPERING; MOTIONED STOPPED - LaBelle Iron Works, Thirtieth & Wood Streets, Wheeling, Ohio County, WV

  9. Dysmetabolic hyperferritinemia: all iron overload is not hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Makker, Jasbir; Hanif, Ahmad; Bajantri, Bharat; Chilimuri, Sridhar

    2015-01-01

    Disturbances in iron metabolism can be genetic or acquired and accordingly manifest as primary or secondary iron overload state. Organ damage may result from iron overload and manifest clinically as cirrhosis, diabetes mellitus, arthritis, endocrine abnormalities and cardiomyopathy. Hemochromatosis inherited as an autosomal recessive disorder is the most common genetic iron overload disorder. Expert societies recommend screening of asymptomatic and symptomatic individuals with hemochromatosis by obtaining transferrin saturation (calculated as serum iron/total iron binding capacity × 100). Further testing for the hemochromatosis gene is recommended if transferrin saturation is >45% with or without hyperferritinemia. However, management of individuals with low or normal transferrin saturation is not clear. In patients with features of iron overload and high serum ferritin levels, low or normal transferrin saturation should alert the physician to other - primary as well as secondary - causes of iron overload besides hemochromatosis. We present here a possible approach to patients with hyperferritinemia but normal transferrin saturation. PMID:25759633

  10. Ferrous iron content of intravenous iron formulations.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ajay; Pratt, Raymond D; Crumbliss, Alvin L

    2016-06-01

    The observed biological differences in safety and efficacy of intravenous (IV) iron formulations are attributable to physicochemical differences. In addition to differences in carbohydrate shell, polarographic signatures due to ferric iron [Fe(III)] and ferrous iron [Fe(II)] differ among IV iron formulations. Intravenous iron contains Fe(II) and releases labile iron in the circulation. Fe(II) generates toxic free radicals and reactive oxygen species and binds to bacterial siderophores and other in vivo sequestering agents. To evaluate whether differences in Fe(II) content may account for some observed biological differences between IV iron formulations, samples from multiple lots of various IV iron formulations were dissolved in 12 M concentrated HCl to dissociate and release all iron and then diluted with water to achieve 0.1 M HCl concentration. Fe(II) was then directly measured using ferrozine reagent and ultraviolet spectroscopy at 562 nm. Total iron content was measured by adding an excess of ascorbic acid to reduce Fe(III) to Fe(II), and Fe(II) was then measured by ferrozine assay. The Fe(II) concentration as a proportion of total iron content [Fe(III) + Fe(II)] in different lots of IV iron formulations was as follows: iron gluconate, 1.4 and 1.8 %; ferumoxytol, 0.26 %; ferric carboxymaltose, 1.4 %; iron dextran, 0.8 %; and iron sucrose, 10.2, 15.5, and 11.0 % (average, 12.2 %). The average Fe(II) content in iron sucrose was, therefore, ≥7.5-fold higher than in the other IV iron formulations. Further studies are needed to investigate the relationship between Fe(II) content and increased risk of oxidative stress and infections with iron sucrose. PMID:26956439

  11. Hepatic iron metabolism.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Gregory J; Frazer, David M

    2005-11-01

    The liver performs three main functions in iron homeostasis. It is the major site of iron storage, it regulates iron traffic into and around the body through its production of the peptide hepcidin, and it is the site of synthesis of major proteins of iron metabolism such as transferrin and ceruloplasmin. Most of the iron that enters the liver is derived from plasma transferrin under normal circumstances, and transferrin receptors 1 and 2 play important roles in this process. In pathological situations, non-transferrin-bound iron, ferritin, and hemoglobin/haptoglobin and heme/hemopexin complexes assume greater importance in iron delivery to the organ. Iron is stored in the liver as ferritin and, with heavy iron loading, as hemosiderin. The liver can divest itself of iron through the plasma membrane iron exporter ferroportin 1, a process that also requires ceruloplasmin. Hepcidin can regulate this iron release through its interaction with ferroportin. PMID:16315136

  12. Iron Sucrose Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Iron sucrose injection is used treat iron-deficiency anemia (a lower than normal number of red blood cells due to too little iron) in people with chronic kidney disease (damage to the kidneys which may worsen over ...

  13. Iron in tubewell water and linear growth in rural Bangladesh.

    PubMed Central

    Briend, A; Hoque, B A; Aziz, K M

    1990-01-01

    The growth of 694 children from rural Bangladesh was studied. Children drinking water containing greater than 1 mg iron/l (n = 628) were significantly taller than those drinking less than 1 mg iron/l (n = 66): their mean (SD) height for age Z score was -2.10 (1.34) compared with -2.45 (1.24), p less than 0.05. This suggests that iron deficiency may contribute to growth retardation in poor communities. PMID:2317069

  14. Genetics Home Reference: iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... refractory iron deficiency anemia iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Close All Description Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia is one of many types of anemia , which ...

  15. 45 CFR 90.45 - Information requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Information requirements. 90.45 Section 90.45..., Conciliation and Enforcement Procedures § 90.45 Information requirements. Each agency shall provide in its regulations a requirement that the recipient: (a) Provide to the agency information necessary to...

  16. 45 CFR 90.45 - Information requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Information requirements. 90.45 Section 90.45... BASIS OF AGE IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Investigation, Conciliation and Enforcement Procedures § 90.45 Information requirements. Each agency shall provide in...

  17. 45 CFR 90.45 - Information requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Information requirements. 90.45 Section 90.45... BASIS OF AGE IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Investigation, Conciliation and Enforcement Procedures § 90.45 Information requirements. Each agency shall provide in...

  18. 45 CFR 90.45 - Information requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Information requirements. 90.45 Section 90.45... BASIS OF AGE IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Investigation, Conciliation and Enforcement Procedures § 90.45 Information requirements. Each agency shall provide in...

  19. 45 CFR 605.45 - Housing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Housing. 605.45 Section 605.45 Public Welfare... § 605.45 Housing. (a) Housing provided by the recipient. A recipient that provides housing to its nonhandicapped students shall provide comparable, convenient, and accessible housing to handicapped students...

  20. 45 CFR 84.45 - Housing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Housing. 84.45 Section 84.45 Public Welfare... PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Postsecondary Education § 84.45 Housing. (a) Housing provided by the recipient. A recipient that provides housing to its nonhandicapped students...

  1. 45 CFR 90.45 - Information requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Information requirements. 90.45 Section 90.45..., Conciliation and Enforcement Procedures § 90.45 Information requirements. Each agency shall provide in its regulations a requirement that the recipient: (a) Provide to the agency information necessary to...

  2. Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Yılmaz Keskin, Ebru; Yenicesu, İdil

    2015-03-01

    Iron is essential for life because it is indispensable for several biological reactions, such as oxygen transport, DNA synthesis, and cell proliferation. Over the past few years, our understanding of iron metabolism and its regulation has changed dramatically. New disorders of iron metabolism have emerged, and the role of iron as a cofactor in other disorders has begun to be recognized. The study of genetic conditions such as hemochromatosis and iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA) has provided crucial insights into the molecular mechanisms controlling iron homeostasis. In the future, these advances may be exploited to improve treatment of both genetic and acquired iron disorders. IRIDA is caused by mutations in TMPRSS6, the gene encoding matriptase-2, which downregulates hepcidin expression under conditions of iron deficiency. The typical features of this disorder are hypochromic, microcytic anemia with a very low mean corpuscular volume of erythrocytes, low transferrin saturation, no (or inadequate) response to oral iron, and only a partial response to parenteral iron. In contrast to classic iron deficiency anemia, serum ferritin levels are usually low-normal, and serum or urinary hepcidin levels are inappropriately high for the degree of anemia. Although the number of cases reported thus far in the literature does not exceed 100, this disorder is considered the most common of the "atypical" microcytic anemias. The aim of this review is to share the current knowledge on IRIDA and increase awareness in this field. PMID:25805669

  3. Estimation of dietary iron bioavailability from food iron intake and iron status.

    PubMed

    Dainty, Jack R; Berry, Rachel; Lynch, Sean R; Harvey, Linda J; Fairweather-Tait, Susan J

    2014-01-01

    Currently there are no satisfactory methods for estimating dietary iron absorption (bioavailability) at a population level, but this is essential for deriving dietary reference values using the factorial approach. The aim of this work was to develop a novel approach for estimating dietary iron absorption using a population sample from a sub-section of the UK National Diet and Nutrition Survey (NDNS). Data were analyzed in 873 subjects from the 2000-2001 adult cohort of the NDNS, for whom both dietary intake data and hematological measures (hemoglobin and serum ferritin (SF) concentrations) were available. There were 495 men aged 19-64 y (mean age 42.7±12.1 y) and 378 pre-menopausal women (mean age 35.7±8.2 y). Individual dietary iron requirements were estimated using the Institute of Medicine calculations. A full probability approach was then applied to estimate the prevalence of dietary intakes that were insufficient to meet the needs of the men and women separately, based on their estimated daily iron intake and a series of absorption values ranging from 1-40%. The prevalence of SF concentrations below selected cut-off values (indicating that absorption was not high enough to maintain iron stores) was derived from individual SF concentrations. An estimate of dietary iron absorption required to maintain specified SF values was then calculated by matching the observed prevalence of insufficiency with the prevalence predicted for the series of absorption estimates. Mean daily dietary iron intakes were 13.5 mg for men and 9.8 mg for women. Mean calculated dietary absorption was 8% in men (50th percentile for SF 85 µg/L) and 17% in women (50th percentile for SF 38 µg/L). At a ferritin level of 45 µg/L estimated absorption was similar in men (14%) and women (13%). This new method can be used to calculate dietary iron absorption at a population level using data describing total iron intake and SF concentration. PMID:25356629

  4. [Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia].

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Hiroshi

    2016-02-01

    The major causes of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) include iron loss due to bleeding, increased iron requirements, and decreased iron absorption by the intestine. The most common cause of IDA in Japanese women is iron loss during menstruation. Autoimmune atrophic gastritis and Helicobacter pylori infection can also cause IDA by reducing intestinal iron absorption. In addition to these common etiologies, germline mutations of TMPRSS6 can cause iron-refractory IDA (IRIDA). TMPRSS6 encodes matriptase-2, a membrane-bound serine protease primarily expressed in the liver. Functional loss of matriptase-2 due to homozygous mutations results in an increase in the expression of hepcidin, which is the key regulator of systemic iron homeostasis. The serum hepcidin increase in turn leads to a decrease in iron supply from the intestine and macrophages to erythropoietic cells. IRIDA is microcytic and hypochromic, but decreased serum ferritin is not observed as in IDA. IRIDA is refractory to oral iron supplementation, but does respond to intravenous iron supplementation to some extent. Because genetic testing is required for the diagnoses of IRIDA, a considerable number of cases may go undiagnosed and may thus be overlooked. PMID:26935626

  5. Iron deficiency anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Anemia - iron deficiency ... iron from old red blood cells. Iron deficiency anemia develops when your body's iron stores run low. ... You may have no symptoms if the anemia is mild. Most of the time, ... slowly. Symptoms may include: Feeling weak or tired more often ...

  6. Mammalian iron transport.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Gregory Jon; Vulpe, Christopher D

    2009-10-01

    Iron is essential for basic cellular processes but is toxic when present in excess. Consequently, iron transport into and out of cells is tightly regulated. Most iron is delivered to cells bound to plasma transferrin via a process that involves transferrin receptor 1, divalent metal-ion transporter 1 and several other proteins. Non-transferrin-bound iron can also be taken up efficiently by cells, although the mechanism is poorly understood. Cells can divest themselves of iron via the iron export protein ferroportin in conjunction with an iron oxidase. The linking of an oxidoreductase to a membrane permease is a common theme in membrane iron transport. At the systemic level, iron transport is regulated by the liver-derived peptide hepcidin which acts on ferroportin to control iron release to the plasma. PMID:19484405

  7. Pathways of iron absorption.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Marcel E; Umbreit, Jay N

    2002-01-01

    Iron is vital for all living organisms but excess iron can be lethal because it facilitates free radical formation. Thus iron absorption is carefully regulated to maintain an equilibrium between absorption and body loss of iron. In countries where meat is a significant part of the diet, most body iron is derived from dietary heme because heme binds few of the dietary chelators that bind inorganic iron. Uptake of heme into enterocytes occurs as a metalloporphyrin in an endosomal process. Intracellular iron is released from heme by heme oxygenase to enter plasma as inorganic iron. Ferric iron is absorbed via a beta(3) integrin and mobilferrin pathway (IMP) which is unshared with other nutritional metals. Ferrous iron uptake is facilitated by a DMT-1 pathway which is shared with manganese. In the iron deficient gut, large quantities of both mobilferrin and DMT-1 are found in goblet cells and intraluminal mucins suggesting that they are secreted with mucin into the intestinal lumen to bind iron to facilitate uptake by the cells. In the cytoplasm, IMP and DMT associate in a large protein complex called paraferritin which serves as a ferrireductase. Paraferritin solublizes iron binding proteins and reduces iron to make iron available for production of iron containing proteins such as heme. Iron uptake by intestinal absorptive cells is regulated by the iron concentration within the cell. Except in hemochromatosis it remains in equilibrium with total body stores via transferrin receptors on the basolateral membrane of absorptive cells. Increased intracellular iron either up-regulates or satiates iron binding proteins on regulatory proteins to alter their location in the intestinal mucosa. PMID:12547224

  8. Iron mobilization in North African dust.

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, A.; Feng, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for phytoplankton. Although iron-containing dust mobilized from arid regions supplies the majority of the iron to the oceans, the key flux in terms of the biogeochemical response to atmospheric deposition is the amount of soluble or bioavailable iron. Atmospheric processing of mineral aerosols by anthropogenic pollutants (e.g. sulfuric acid) may transform insoluble iron into soluble forms. Previous studies have suggested higher iron solubility in smaller particles, as they are subject to more thorough atmospheric processing due to a longer residence time than coarse particles. On the other hand, the specific mineralogy of iron in dust may also influence the particulate iron solubility in size. Compared to mineral dust aerosols, iron from combustion sources could be more soluble, and found more frequently in smaller particles. Internal mixing of alkaline dust with iron-containing minerals could significantly reduce iron dissolution in large dust aerosols due to the buffering effect, which may, in contrast, yield higher solubility in smaller particles externally mixed with alkaline dust (Ito and Feng, 2010). Here, we extend the modeling study of Ito and Feng (2010) to investigate atmospheric processing of mineral aerosols from African dust. In contrast to Asian dust, we used a slower dissolution rate for African dust in the fine mode. We compare simulated fractional iron solubility with observations. The inclusion of alkaline compounds in aqueous chemistry substantially limits the iron dissolution during long-range transport to the Atlantic Ocean: only a small fraction of iron (<0.2%) dissolves from illite in coarsemode dust aerosols with 0.45% soluble iron initially. In contrast, a significant fraction (1-1.5%) dissolves in fine-mode dust aerosols due to the acid mobilization of the iron-containing minerals externally mixed with carbonate minerals. Consequently, the model generally reproduces higher iron solubility in smaller particles

  9. 45 CFR 1180.45 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false 1180.45 Section 1180.45 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES INSTITUTE OF MUSEUM AND LIBRARY SERVICES GRANTS REGULATIONS General Conditions Which Must Be Met by a...

  10. 45 CFR 1180.45 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false 1180.45 Section 1180.45 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES INSTITUTE OF MUSEUM AND LIBRARY SERVICES GRANTS REGULATIONS General Conditions Which Must Be Met by a...

  11. 45 CFR 1180.45 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false 1180.45 Section 1180.45 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES INSTITUTE OF MUSEUM AND LIBRARY SERVICES GRANTS REGULATIONS General Conditions Which Must Be Met by a...

  12. 45 CFR 1180.45 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false 1180.45 Section 1180.45 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES INSTITUTE OF MUSEUM AND LIBRARY SERVICES GRANTS REGULATIONS General Conditions Which Must Be Met by a...

  13. 45 CFR 1180.45 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false 1180.45 Section 1180.45 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES INSTITUTE OF MUSEUM AND LIBRARY SERVICES GRANTS REGULATIONS General Conditions Which Must Be Met by a...

  14. 45 CFR 149.45 - Funding limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Funding limitation. 149.45 Section 149.45 Public... Funding limitation. (a) Based on the projected or actual availability of program funding, the Secretary... accepting applications or satisfying reimbursement requests based on the availability of funding is...

  15. 45 CFR 149.45 - Funding limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Funding limitation. 149.45 Section 149.45 Public... Funding limitation. (a) Based on the projected or actual availability of program funding, the Secretary... accepting applications or satisfying reimbursement requests based on the availability of funding is...

  16. 45 CFR 149.45 - Funding limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Funding limitation. 149.45 Section 149.45 Public... Funding limitation. (a) Based on the projected or actual availability of program funding, the Secretary... accepting applications or satisfying reimbursement requests based on the availability of funding is...

  17. 45 CFR 149.45 - Funding limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Funding limitation. 149.45 Section 149.45 Public... Funding limitation. (a) Based on the projected or actual availability of program funding, the Secretary... accepting applications or satisfying reimbursement requests based on the availability of funding is...

  18. 45 CFR 149.45 - Funding limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Funding limitation. 149.45 Section 149.45 Public... Funding limitation. (a) Based on the projected or actual availability of program funding, the Secretary... accepting applications or satisfying reimbursement requests based on the availability of funding is...

  19. 45 CFR 1170.45 - Housing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Housing. 1170.45 Section 1170.45 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN FEDERALLY ASSISTED PROGRAMS...

  20. 45 CFR 1170.45 - Housing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Housing. 1170.45 Section 1170.45 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN FEDERALLY ASSISTED PROGRAMS...

  1. 45 CFR 1170.45 - Housing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Housing. 1170.45 Section 1170.45 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN FEDERALLY ASSISTED PROGRAMS...

  2. 45 CFR 1170.45 - Housing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Housing. 1170.45 Section 1170.45 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN FEDERALLY ASSISTED PROGRAMS...

  3. 45 CFR 1170.45 - Housing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Housing. 1170.45 Section 1170.45 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN FEDERALLY ASSISTED PROGRAMS...

  4. Iron and Diabetes Risk

    PubMed Central

    Simcox, Judith A.; McClain, Donald A.

    2013-01-01

    Iron overload is a risk factor for diabetes. The link between iron and diabetes was first recognized in pathologic conditions—hereditary hemochromatosis and thalassemia—but high levels of dietary iron also impart diabetes risk. Iron plays a direct and causal role in diabetes pathogenesis mediated both by β-cell failure and insulin resistance. Iron is also a factor in the regulation of metabolism in most tissues involved in fuel homeostasis, with the adipocyte in particular serving an iron-sensing role. The underlying molecular mechanisms mediating these effects are numerous and incompletely understood, but include oxidant stress and modulation of adipokines and intracellular signal transduction pathways. PMID:23473030

  5. Iron deficiency in Europe.

    PubMed

    Hercberg, S; Preziosi, P; Galan, P

    2001-04-01

    In Europe, iron deficiency is considered to be one of the main nutritional deficiency disorders affecting large fractions of the population, particularly such physiological groups as children, menstruating women and pregnant women. Some factors such as type of contraception in women, blood donation or minor pathological blood loss (haemorrhoids, gynaecological bleeding...) considerably increase the difficulty of covering iron needs. Moreover, women, especially adolescents consuming low-energy diets, vegetarians and vegans are at high risk of iron deficiency. Although there is no evidence that an absence of iron stores has any adverse consequences, it does indicate that iron nutrition is borderline, since any further reduction in body iron is associated with a decrease in the level of functional compounds such as haemoglobin. The prevalence of iron-deficient anaemia has slightly decreased in infants and menstruating women. Some positive factors may have contributed to reducing the prevalence of iron-deficiency anaemia in some groups of population: the use of iron-fortified formulas and iron-fortified cereals; the use of oral contraceptives and increased enrichment of iron in several countries; and the use of iron supplements during pregnancy in some European countries. It is possible to prevent and control iron deficiency by counseling individuals and families about sound iron nutrition during infancy and beyond, and about iron supplementation during pregnancy, by screening persons on the basis of their risk for iron deficiency, and by treating and following up persons with presumptive iron deficiency. This may help to reduce manifestations of iron deficiency and thus improve public health. Evidence linking iron status with risk of cardiovascular disease or cancer is unconvincing and does not justify changes in food fortification or medical practice, particularly because the benefits of assuring adequate iron intake during growth and development are well established

  6. Iron oxide surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkinson, Gareth S.

    2016-03-01

    known with a high degree of precision and the major defects and properties are well characterised. A major factor in this is that a termination at the Feoct-O plane can be reproducibly prepared by a variety of methods, as long as the surface is annealed in 10-7-10-5 mbar O2 in the final stage of preparation. Such straightforward preparation of a monophase termination is generally not the case for iron oxide surfaces. All available evidence suggests the oft-studied (√2×√2)R45° reconstruction results from a rearrangement of the cation lattice in the outermost unit cell in which two octahedral cations are replaced by one tetrahedral interstitial, a motif conceptually similar to well-known Koch-Cohen defects in Fe1-xO. The cation deficiency results in Fe11O16 stoichiometry, which is in line with the chemical potential in ultra-high vacuum (UHV), which is close to the border between the Fe3O4 and Fe2O3 phases. The Fe3O4(111) surface is also much studied, but two different surface terminations exist close in energy and can coexist, which makes sample preparation and data interpretation somewhat tricky. Both the Fe3O4(100) and Fe3O4(111) surfaces exhibit Fe-rich terminations as the sample selvedge becomes reduced. The Fe3O4(110) surface forms a one-dimensional (1×3) reconstruction linked to nanofaceting, which exposes the more stable Fe3O4(111) surface. α-Fe2O3(0001) is the most studied haematite surface, but difficulties preparing stoichiometric surfaces under UHV conditions have hampered a definitive determination of the structure. There is evidence for at least three terminations: a bulk-like termination at the oxygen plane, a termination with half of the cation layer, and a termination with ferryl groups. When the surface is reduced the so-called "bi-phase" structure is formed, which eventually transforms to a Fe3O4(111)-like termination. The structure of the bi-phase surface is controversial; a largely accepted model of coexisting Fe1-xO and α-Fe2O3(0001) islands

  7. Ocean iron cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Philip W.

    Interest in the biogeochemical cycle of iron has grown rapidly over the last two decades, due to the potential role of this element in modulating global climate in the geological past and ocean productivity in the present day. This trace metal has a disproportionately large effect (1 × 105 C:Fe) on photosynthetic carbon fixation by phytoplankton. In around one third of the open ocean, so-called high-nitrate low-chlorophyll (HNLC) regions, the resident phytoplankton have low growth rates despite an abundance of plant nutrients. This is due to the low supply of iron. Iron is present in the ocean in three phases, dissolved, colloidal, and particulate (biogenic and lithogenic). However, iron chemistry is complex with interactions between chemistry and biology such as the production of iron-binding siderophores by oceanic bacteria. This results in the interplay of inorganic chemistry, photochemistry, and organic complexation. Sources of new iron include dust deposition, upwelling of iron-rich deep waters, and the resuspension and lateral transport of sediments. Sinks for iron are mainly biological as evidenced by the vertical nutrient-like profile for dissolved iron in the ocean. Iron is rapidly recycled by the upper ocean biota within a so-called "ferrous wheel." The fe ratio [(new iron)/(new + regenerated iron)] provides an index of the relative supply of iron to the biota by new versus recycled iron. Over the last 15 years, interest in the potential role of iron in shaping climate in the geological past resulted in some of the most ambitious experiments in oceanography: large-scale (i.e., 50-1000 km2) iron enrichment of HNLC waters. They have provided valuable insights into how iron supply influences the biogeochemical cycles of elements such as carbon, sulfur, silicon, nitrogen, and phosphate.

  8. Iron oxide surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkinson, Gareth S.

    2016-03-01

    known with a high degree of precision and the major defects and properties are well characterised. A major factor in this is that a termination at the Feoct-O plane can be reproducibly prepared by a variety of methods, as long as the surface is annealed in 10-7-10-5 mbar O2 in the final stage of preparation. Such straightforward preparation of a monophase termination is generally not the case for iron oxide surfaces. All available evidence suggests the oft-studied (√2×√2)R45° reconstruction results from a rearrangement of the cation lattice in the outermost unit cell in which two octahedral cations are replaced by one tetrahedral interstitial, a motif conceptually similar to well-known Koch-Cohen defects in Fe1-xO. The cation deficiency results in Fe11O16 stoichiometry, which is in line with the chemical potential in ultra-high vacuum (UHV), which is close to the border between the Fe3O4 and Fe2O3 phases. The Fe3O4(111) surface is also much studied, but two different surface terminations exist close in energy and can coexist, which makes sample preparation and data interpretation somewhat tricky. Both the Fe3O4(100) and Fe3O4(111) surfaces exhibit Fe-rich terminations as the sample selvedge becomes reduced. The Fe3O4(110) surface forms a one-dimensional (1×3) reconstruction linked to nanofaceting, which exposes the more stable Fe3O4(111) surface. α-Fe2O3(0001) is the most studied haematite surface, but difficulties preparing stoichiometric surfaces under UHV conditions have hampered a definitive determination of the structure. There is evidence for at least three terminations: a bulk-like termination at the oxygen plane, a termination with half of the cation layer, and a termination with ferryl groups. When the surface is reduced the so-called "bi-phase" structure is formed, which eventually transforms to a Fe3O4(111)-like termination. The structure of the bi-phase surface is controversial; a largely accepted model of coexisting Fe1-xO and α-Fe2O3(0001) islands

  9. The vapor pressure of iron pentacarbonyl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, A. G.; Sulzmann, K. G. P.

    1974-01-01

    Vapor pressure measurements have been made on pure iron pentacarbonyl between +31 and -19 C. The experimental results may be expressed by the logarithm of pressure (mm Hg) to the base 10 equals -(2096.7 K/T) + 8.4959, which corresponds to a heat of vaporization for the liquid carbonyl of delta H ? (9.588 plus or minus 0.12) kcal/mole. This result confirms and extends the earlier measurements made by Trautz and Badstuebner between 0 and 140 C. The need for careful purification of commercially available iron pentacarbonyl is emphasized, particularly for establishing the correct vapor pressure below 45 C.

  10. Iron losses in sweat

    SciTech Connect

    Brune, M.; Magnusson, B.; Persson, H.; Hallberg, L.

    1986-03-01

    The losses of iron in whole body cell-free sweat were determined in eleven healthy men. A new experimental design was used with a very careful cleaning procedure of the skin and repeated consecutive sampling periods of sweat in a sauna. The purpose was to achieve a steady state of sweat iron losses with minimal influence from iron originating from desquamated cells and iron contaminating the skin. A steady state was reached in the third sauna period (second sweat sampling period). Iron loss was directly related to the volume of sweat lost and amounted to 22.5 micrograms iron/l sweat. The findings indicate that iron is a physiological constituent of sweat and derived not only from contamination. Present results imply that variations in the amount of sweat lost will have only a marginal effect on the variation in total body iron losses.

  11. Iron Sucrose Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... stop working). Iron sucrose injection is in a class of medications called iron replacement products. It works ... hands, feet, ankles, or lower legs; loss of consciousness; or seizures. If you experience a severe reaction, ...

  12. Serum iron test

    MedlinePlus

    ... GM. Disorders of iron homeostasis: iron deficiency and overload. In: Hoffman R, Benz EJ Jr, Silberstein LE, ... to achieve this important distinction for online health information and services. Learn more about A.D.A. ...

  13. Total iron binding capacity

    MedlinePlus

    ... GM. Disorders of iron homeostasis: iron deficiency and overload. In: Hoffman R, Benz EJ Jr, Silberstein LE, ... to achieve this important distinction for online health information and services. Learn more about A.D.A. ...

  14. Iron and Your Child

    MedlinePlus

    ... 24 months old. Serve iron-rich foods alongside foods containing vitamin C — such as tomatoes, broccoli, oranges, and strawberries — which improves the body's absorption of iron. Avoid serving coffee ...

  15. Iron supplements (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The mineral iron is an essential nutrient for humans because it is part of blood cells, which carry oxygen to all body cells. There is no conclusive evidence that iron supplements contribute to heart attacks.

  16. Iron in diet

    MedlinePlus

    Diet - iron; Ferric acid; Ferrous acid; Ferritin ... The human body needs iron to make the oxygen-carrying proteins hemoglobin and myoglobin. Hemoglobin is found in red blood cells and myoglobin is found ...

  17. Iron, radiation, and cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, R G; Kalkwarf, D R

    1990-01-01

    Increased iron content of cells and tissue may increase the risk of cancer. In particular, high available iron status may increase the risk of a radiation-induced cancer. There are two possible mechanisms for this effect: iron can catalyze the production of oxygen radicals, and it may be a limiting nutrient to the growth and development of a transformed cell in vivo. Given the high available iron content of the western diet and the fact that the world is changing to the western model, it is important to determine if high iron increases the risk of cancer. PMID:2269234

  18. Iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    Naigamwalla, Dinaz Z.; Webb, Jinelle A.; Giger, Urs

    2012-01-01

    Iron is essential to virtually all living organisms and is integral to multiple metabolic functions. The most important function is oxygen transport in hemoglobin. Iron deficiency anemia in dogs and cats is usually caused by chronic blood loss and can be discovered incidentally as animals may have adapted to the anemia. Severe iron deficiency is characterized by a microcytic, hypochromic, potentially severe anemia with a variable regenerative response. Iron metabolism and homeostasis will be reviewed, followed by a discussion of diagnostic testing and therapeutic recommendations for dogs and cats with iron deficiency anemia. PMID:22942439

  19. Microbial Biosignatures in High Iron Thermal Springs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parenteau, M. N.; Embaye, T.; Jahnke, L. L.; Cady, S. L.

    2003-12-01

    The emerging anoxic source waters at Chocolate Pots hot springs in Yellowstone National Park contain 2.6 to 11.2 mg/L Fe(II) and are 51-54° C and pH 5.5-6.0. These waters flow down the accumulating iron deposits and over three major phototrophic mat communities: Synechococcus/Chloroflexus at 51-54° C, Pseudanabaena at 51-54° C, and a narrow Oscillatoria at 36-45° C. We are assessing the contribution of the phototrophs to biosignature formation in this high iron system. These biosignatures can be used to assess the biological contribution to ancient iron deposits on Earth (e.g. Precambrian Banded Iron Formations) and, potentially, to those found on Mars. Most studies to date have focused on chemotrophic iron-oxidizing communities; however, recent research has demonstrated that phototrophs have a significant physiological impact on these iron thermal springs (Pierson et al. 1999, Pierson and Parenteau 2000, and Trouwborst et al., 2003). We completed a survey of the microfossils, biominerals, biofabrics, and lipid biomarkers in the phototrophic mats and stromatolitic iron deposits using scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM), energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS). The Synechococcus/Chloroflexus mat was heavily encrusted with iron silicates while the narrow Oscillatoria mat was encrusted primarily with iron oxides. Encrustation of the cells increased with depth in the mats. Amorphous 2-line ferrihydrite is the primary precipitate in the spring and the only iron oxide mineral associated with the mats. Goethite, hematite, and siderite were detected in dry sediment samples on the face of the main iron deposit. Analysis of polar lipid fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) generated a suite of lipid biomarkers. The Synechococcus/Chloroflexus mat contained two mono-unsaturated isomers of n-C18:1 with smaller amounts of polyunsaturated n-C18:2, characteristic of cyanobacteria

  20. Iron toxicity in yeast.

    PubMed

    Wiśnicka, R; Krzepiłko, A; Wawryn, J; Biliński, T

    1997-01-01

    It has been found that yeast cells are sensitive to iron overload only when grown on glucose as a carbon source. Effective concentration of ferrous iron is much higher than that found in natural environments. Effects of ferrous iron are strictly oxygen dependent, what suggest that the formation of hydroxyl radicals in the Fenton reaction is a cause of the toxicity. Respiratory deficiency and pretreatment of cells with antimycin A prevent toxic effects in the late exponential phase of growth, whereas uncouplers and 2mM magnesium salts completely protect even the most vulnerable exponential cells. Generally, toxic effects correlate with the ability of cells to take up this metal. The results presented suggest that during ferrous iron overload iron is transported through the unspecific divalent cation uptake system which is known in fungi. The data suggest that recently described high and low affinity systems of iron uptake in yeast are the only source of iron in natural environments. PMID:9516981

  1. [Iron function and carcinogenesis].

    PubMed

    Akatsuka, Shinya; Toyokuni, Shinya

    2016-07-01

    Though iron is an essential micronutrient for humans, the excess state is acknowledged to be associated with oncogenesis. For example, iron overload in the liver of the patients with hereditary hemocromatosis highly increases the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma. Also, as to asbestos-related mesothelioma, such kinds of asbestos with a higher iron content are considered to be more carcinogenic. Iron is a useful element, which enables fundamental functions for life such as oxygen carrying and electron transport. However, in the situation where organisms are unable to have good control of it, iron turns into a dangerous element which catalyzes generation of reactive oxygen. In this review, I first outline the relationships between iron and cancer in general, then give an explanation about iron-related animal carcinogenesis models. PMID:27455808

  2. The ubiquity of iron.

    PubMed

    Frey, Perry A; Reed, George H

    2012-09-21

    The importance of iron in living systems can be traced to the many complexes within which it is found, to its chemical mobility in undergoing oxidation-reduction reactions, and to the abundance of iron in Earth's crust. Iron is the most abundant element, by mass, in the Earth, constituting about 80% of the inner and outer cores of Earth. The molten outer core is about 8000 km in diameter, and the solid inner core is about 2400 km in diameter. Iron is the fourth most abundant element in Earth's crust. It is the chemically functional component of mononuclear iron complexes, dinuclear iron complexes, [2Fe-2S] and [4Fe-4S] clusters, [Fe-Ni-S] clusters, iron protophorphyrin IX, and many other complexes in protein biochemistry. Metals such as nickel, cobalt, copper, and manganese are present in the crust and could in principle function chemically in place of iron, but they are scarce in Earth's crust. Iron is plentiful because of its nuclear stability in stellar nuclear fusion reactions. It seems likely that other solid planets, formed by the same processes as Earth, would also foster the evolution of life and that iron would be similarly important to life on those planets as it is on Earth. PMID:22845493

  3. Iron deficiency anaemia.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Anthony; Cacoub, Patrice; Macdougall, Iain C; Peyrin-Biroulet, Laurent

    2016-02-27

    Anaemia affects roughly a third of the world's population; half the cases are due to iron deficiency. It is a major and global public health problem that affects maternal and child mortality, physical performance, and referral to health-care professionals. Children aged 0-5 years, women of childbearing age, and pregnant women are particularly at risk. Several chronic diseases are frequently associated with iron deficiency anaemia--notably chronic kidney disease, chronic heart failure, cancer, and inflammatory bowel disease. Measurement of serum ferritin, transferrin saturation, serum soluble transferrin receptors, and the serum soluble transferrin receptors-ferritin index are more accurate than classic red cell indices in the diagnosis of iron deficiency anaemia. In addition to the search for and treatment of the cause of iron deficiency, treatment strategies encompass prevention, including food fortification and iron supplementation. Oral iron is usually recommended as first-line therapy, but the most recent intravenous iron formulations, which have been available for nearly a decade, seem to replenish iron stores safely and effectively. Hepcidin has a key role in iron homoeostasis and could be a future diagnostic and therapeutic target. In this Seminar, we discuss the clinical presentation, epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and acute management of iron deficiency anaemia, and outstanding research questions for treatment. PMID:26314490

  4. Brain iron homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Moos, Torben

    2002-11-01

    Iron is essential for virtually all types of cells and organisms. The significance of the iron for brain function is reflected by the presence of receptors for transferrin on brain capillary endothelial cells. The transport of iron into the brain from the circulation is regulated so that the extraction of iron by brain capillary endothelial cells is low in iron-replete conditions and the reverse when the iron need of the brain is high as in conditions with iron deficiency and during development of the brain. Whereas there is good agreement that iron is taken up by means of receptor-mediated uptake of iron-transferrin at the brain barriers, there are contradictory views on how iron is transported further on from the brain barriers and into the brain extracellular space. The prevailing hypothesis for transport of iron across the BBB suggests a mechanism that involves detachment of iron from transferrin within barrier cells followed by recycling of apo-transferrin to blood plasma and release of iron as non-transferrin-bound iron into the brain interstitium from where the iron is taken up by neurons and glial cells. Another hypothesis claims that iron-transferrin is transported into the brain by means of transcytosis through the BBB. This thesis deals with the topic "brain iron homeostasis" defined as the attempts to maintain constant concentrations of iron in the brain internal environment via regulation of iron transport through brain barriers, cellular iron uptake by neurons and glia, and export of iron from brain to blood. The first part deals with transport of iron-transferrin complexes from blood to brain either by transport across the brain barriers or by uptake and retrograde axonal transport in motor neurons projecting beyond the blood-brain barrier. The transport of iron and transport into the brain was examined using radiolabeled iron-transferrin. Intravenous injection of [59Fe-125]transferrin led to an almost two-fold higher accumulation of 59Fe than of

  5. Mechanisms of mammalian iron homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Pantopoulos, Kostas; Porwal, Suheel Kumar; Tartakoff, Alan; Devireddy, L.

    2012-01-01

    Iron is vital for almost all organisms because of its ability to donate and accept electrons with relative ease. It serves as a cofactor for many proteins and enzymes necessary for oxygen and energy metabolism, as well as for several other essential processes. Mammalian cells utilize multiple mechanisms to acquire iron. Disruption of iron homeostasis is associated with various human diseases: iron deficiency resulting from defects in acquisition or distribution of the metal causes anemia; whereas iron surfeit resulting from excessive iron absorption or defective utilization causes abnormal tissue iron deposition, leading to oxidative damage. Mammals utilize distinct mechanisms to regulate iron homeostasis at the systemic and cellular levels. These involve the hormone hepcidin and iron regulatory proteins, which collectively ensure iron balance. This review outlines recent advances in iron regulatory pathways, as well as in mechanisms underlying intracellular iron trafficking, an important but less-studied area of mammalian iron homeostasis. PMID:22703180

  6. Iron and transfusion medicine.

    PubMed

    Waldvogel-Abramovski, Sophie; Waeber, Gérard; Gassner, Christoph; Buser, Andreas; Frey, Beat M; Favrat, Bernard; Tissot, Jean-Daniel

    2013-11-01

    Blood bankers have focused their energy to secure blood transfusion, and only recently have studies been published on the effect of blood donation on iron metabolism. In many facilities, hemoglobin measurement is only performed just before or even during blood donation, but the determination of iron stores is largely ignored. The 2013 paradox of transfusion medicine is due to the fact that blood donation may be harmful and leads to iron deficiency with or without anemia, but for other individuals, it may be a healthy measure preventing type 2 diabetes. The purpose of this review is to discuss iron metabolism in the perspective of blood donation, notably regarding their possible genetic profiles that eventually will discriminate "good" iron absorbers from "bad" iron responders. PMID:24148756

  7. IRON IN MULTIPLE MYELOMA

    PubMed Central

    VanderWall, Kristina; Daniels-Wells, Tracy R; Penichet, Manuel; Lichtenstein, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is a non-curable B cell malignancy in which iron metabolism plays an important role. Patients with this disorder almost universally suffer from a clinically significant anemia, which is often symptomatic, and which is due to impaired iron utilization. Recent studies indicate that the proximal cause of dysregulated iron metabolism and anemia in these patients is cytokine-induced upregulation of hepcidin expression. Malignant myeloma cells are dependent on an increased influx of iron and therapeutic efforts are being made to target this requirement. The studies detailing the characteristics and biochemical abnormalities in iron metabolism causing anemia and the initial attempts to target iron therapeutically are described in this review. PMID:23879589

  8. Cellular iron transport.

    PubMed

    Garrick, Michael D; Garrick, Laura M

    2009-05-01

    Iron has a split personality as an essential nutrient that also has the potential to generate reactive oxygen species. We discuss how different cell types within specific tissues manage this schizophrenia. The emphasis in enterocytes is on regulating the body's supply of iron by regulating transport into the blood stream. In developing red blood cells, adaptations in transport manage the body's highest flux of iron. Hepatocytes buffer the body's stock of iron. Macrophage recycle the iron from effete red cells among other iron management tasks. Pneumocytes provide a barrier to prevent illicit entry that, when at risk of breaching, leads to a need to handle the dangers in a fashion essentially shared with macrophage. We also discuss or introduce cell types including renal cells, neurons, other brain cells, and more where our ignorance, currently still vast, needs to be removed by future research. PMID:19344751

  9. Austempered Ductile Iron Machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilc, Jozef; Šajgalík, Michal; Holubják, Jozef; Piešová, Marianna; Zaušková, Lucia; Babík, Ondrej; Kuždák, Viktor; Rákoci, Jozef

    2015-12-01

    This article deals with the machining of cast iron. In industrial practice, Austempered Ductile Iron began to be used relatively recently. ADI is ductile iron that has gone through austempering to get improved properties, among which we can include strength, wear resistance or noise damping. This specific material is defined also by other properties, such as high elasticity, ductility and endurance against tenigue, which are the properties, that considerably make the tooling characteristic worse.

  10. Physics of iron

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, O.

    1993-10-01

    This volume comprises papers presented at the AIRAPT Conference, June 28 to July 1993. The iron sessions at the meeting were identified as the Second Ironworkers Convention. The renewal of interest stems from advances in technologies in both diamond-anvil cell (DAC) and shock wave studies as well as from controversies arising from a lack of consensus among both experimentalists and theoreticians. These advances have produced new data on iron in the pressure-temperature regime of interest for phase diagrams and for temperatures of the core/mantle and inner-core/outer-core boundaries. Particularly interesting is the iron phase diagram inferred from DAC studies. A new phase, {beta}, with a {gamma}-{beta}-{epsilon} triple point at about 30 GPa and 1190 K, and possible sixth phase, {omega}, with an {epsilon}-{Theta}-melt triple point at about 190 GPa and 4000 K are deemed possible. The importance of the equation of state of iron in consideration of Earth`s heat budget and the origin of its magnetic field invoke the interest of theoreticians who argue on the basis of molecular dynamics and other first principles methods. While the major thrust of both meetings was on the physics of pure iron, there was notable contributions on iron alloys. Hydrogen-iron alloys, iron-sulfur liquids, and the comparability to rhenium in phase diagram studies are discussed. The knowledge of the physical properties of iron were increased by several contributions.

  11. Physiology of Iron Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Waldvogel-Abramowski, Sophie; Waeber, Gérard; Gassner, Christoph; Buser, Andreas; Frey, Beat M.; Favrat, Bernard; Tissot, Jean-Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Summary A revolution occurred during the last decade in the comprehension of the physiology as well as in the physiopathology of iron metabolism. The purpose of this review is to summarize the recent knowledge that has accumulated, allowing a better comprehension of the mechanisms implicated in iron homeostasis. Iron metabolism is very fine tuned. The free molecule is very toxic; therefore, complex regulatory mechanisms have been developed in mammalian to insure adequate intestinal absorption, transportation, utilization, and elimination. ‘Ironomics’ certainly will be the future of the understanding of genes as well as of the protein-protein interactions involved in iron metabolism. PMID:25053935

  12. 35. GREY IRON TUMBLERS, IN THE GREY IRON FOUNDRY ROTATE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. GREY IRON TUMBLERS, IN THE GREY IRON FOUNDRY ROTATE CASTINGS WITH SHOT TO REMOVE AND SURFACE OXIDES AND REMAINING EXCESS METALS. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  13. On T2* Magnetic Resonance and Cardiac Iron

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, John-Paul; He, Taigang; Kirk, Paul; Roughton, Michael; Anderson, Lisa J; de Noronha, Sofia V; Sheppard, Mary N; Porter, John B; Walker, J Malcolm; Wood, John C; Galanello, Renzo; Forni, Gianluca; Catani, Gualtiero; Matta, Gildo; Fucharoen, Suthat; Fleming, Adam; House, Michael J; Black, Greg; Firmin, David N; Pierre, Timothy G St.; Pennell, Dudley J

    2012-01-01

    Background Measurement of myocardial iron is key to the clinical management of patients at risk of siderotic cardiomyopathy. The cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) relaxation parameter R2* (assessed clinically via its reciprocal T2*) measured in the ventricular septum is used to assess cardiac iron, but iron calibration and distribution data in humans is limited. Methods and Results Twelve human hearts were studied from transfusion dependent patients following either death (heart failure n=7, stroke n=1) or transplantation for end-stage heart failure (n=4). After CMR R2* measurement, tissue iron concentration was measured in multiple samples of each heart using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. Iron distribution throughout the heart showed no systematic variation between segments, but epicardial iron concentration was higher than in the endocardium. The mean (±SD) global myocardial iron causing severe heart failure in 10 patients was 5.98 ±2.42mg/g dw (range 3.19–9.50), but in 1 outlier case of heart failure was 25.9mg/g dw. Myocardial ln[R2*] was strongly linearly correlated with ln[Fe] (R2=0.910, p<0.001) leading to [Fe]=45.0•(T2*)−1.22 for the clinical calibration equation with [Fe] in mg/g dw and T2* in ms. Mid-ventricular septal iron concentration and R2* were both highly representative of mean global myocardial iron. Conclusions These data detail the iron distribution throughout the heart in iron overload and provide calibration in humans for CMR R2* against myocardial iron concentration. The iron values are of considerable interest with regard to the level of cardiac iron associated with iron-related death and indicate that the heart is more sensitive to iron loading than the liver. The results also validate the current clinical practice of monitoring cardiac iron in-vivo by CMR of the mid septum. PMID:21444881

  14. 45. DETAIL ELEVATION OF STAMP BATTERIES AND APRONS, LOOKING SOUTHEAST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    45. DETAIL ELEVATION OF STAMP BATTERIES AND APRONS, LOOKING SOUTHEAST. MORTARS, BOSSES, MOST SHOES, STEMS, TAPPETS, CAMS AND BULL WHEELS ARE CLEARLY VISIBLE ON THE UPPER MORTAR BLOCKS (BELOW CENTER) UNION IRON WORKS, SAN FRANCISCO C-L. SEE CA-290-18 FOR A SIMILAR B&W NEGATIVE. - Skidoo Mine, Park Route 38 (Skidoo Road), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  15. Neurodegeneration with Brain Iron Accumulation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Neurodegeneration with Brain Iron Accumulation Information Page Synonym(s): Hallervorden-Spatz Disease, ... done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Neurodegeneration with Brain Iron Accumulation? Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) ...

  16. Perspectives on nutritional iron deficiency.

    PubMed

    Hallberg, L

    2001-01-01

    Nutritional iron deficiency (ID) is caused by an intake of dietary iron insufficient to cover physiological iron requirements. Studies on iron absorption from whole diets have examined relationships between dietary iron bioavailability/absorption, iron losses, and amounts of stored iron. New insights have been obtained into regulation of iron absorption and expected rates of changes of iron stores or hemoglobin iron deficits when bioavailability or iron content of the diet has been modified and when losses of iron occur. Negative effects of ID are probably related to age, up to about 20 years, explaining some of earlier controversies. Difficulties in establishing the prevalence of mild ID are outlined. The degree of underestimation of the prevalence of mild ID when using multiple diagnostic criteria is discussed. It is suggested that current low-energy lifestyles are a common denominator for the current high prevalence not only of ID but also of obesity, diabetes, and osteoporosis. PMID:11375427

  17. Exploring Mercury. The iron planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strom, Robert G.; Sprague, Ann L.

    How did Mercury get such an enormous iron core? Why is its tectonic framework so different from any other planet or satellite? What is its crystal composition? Why is the crust so depleted in iron when the interior is so rich in that element? What are the polar deposits? Where do the elements in the exosphere come from? Mercury is a planet shrouded in mystery. Only 45 percent of its surface has been seen in any detail, and that was from the Mariner 10 flyby in 1974. Yet what is known only makes the planet more fascinating. New Earth-based observations have shed light on surface and exosphere compositions, and re-evaluations of the Mariner 10 data, using modern image processing techniques, show evidence for volcanic flow fronts, pyroclastics and other volcanic phenomena not seen before. This ground-breaking book not only chronicles what has been discovered, but looks ahead to what has yet to emerge. An accompanying CD contains all the best Mariner 10 images, including the data for each image, photomosaics and maps.

  18. Taking iron supplements

    MedlinePlus

    ... The stools are tarry-looking as well as black If they have red streaks Cramps, sharp pains, or soreness in the stomach occur Liquid forms of iron may stain your teeth. Try mixing the iron with water or other liquids (such as fruit juice or ...

  19. Thin Wall Iron Castings

    SciTech Connect

    J.F. Cuttino; D.M. Stefanescu; T.S. Piwonka

    2001-10-31

    Results of an investigation made to develop methods of making iron castings having wall thicknesses as small as 2.5 mm in green sand molds are presented. It was found that thin wall ductile and compacted graphite iron castings can be made and have properties consistent with heavier castings. Green sand molding variables that affect casting dimensions were also identified.

  20. Hypersensitivity from intravenous iron products.

    PubMed

    Bircher, Andreas J; Auerbach, Michael

    2014-08-01

    In the last several years, intravenous therapy with iron products has been more widely used. Although it has been a standard procedure in dialysis-associated anemia since the early 1990s, its use is expanding to a host of conditions associated with iron deficiency, especially young women with heavy uterine bleeding and pregnancy. Free iron is associated with unacceptable high toxicity inducing severe, hemodynamically significant symptoms. Subsequently, formulations that contain the iron as an iron carbohydrate nanoparticle have been designed. With newer formulations, including low-molecular-weight iron dextran, iron sucrose, ferric gluconate, ferumoxytol, iron isomaltoside, and ferric carboxymaltose, serious adverse events are rare. PMID:25017687

  1. Microbes: mini iron factories.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Kumar Batuk

    2014-12-01

    Microbes have flourished in extreme habitats since beginning of the Earth and have played an important role in geological processes like weathering, mineralization, diagenesis, mineral formation and destruction. Biotic mineralization is one of the most fascinating examples of how microbes have been influencing geological processes. Iron oxidizing and reducing bacteria are capable of precipitating wide varieties of iron oxides (magnetite), carbonates (siderite) and sulphides (greigite) via controlled or induced mineralization processes. Microbes have also been considered to play an important role in the history of evolution of sedimentary rocks on Earth from the formation of banded iron formations during the Archean to modern biotic bog iron and ochre deposits. Here, we discuss the role that microbes have been playing in precipitation of iron and the role and importance of interdisciplinary studies in the field of geology and biology in solving some of the major geological mysteries. PMID:25320452

  2. Iron studies in hemophilia

    SciTech Connect

    Lottenberg, R.; Kitchens, C.S.; Roessler, G.S.; Noyes, W.D.

    1981-12-01

    Although iron deficiency is not recognized as a usual complication of hemophilia, we questioned whether intermittent occult loss of blood in urine or stool might predispose hemophiliacs to chronic iron deficiency. Seven men with factor VII and one with factor IX deficiency were studied. Blood studied, bone marrow aspirates, urine and stool samples, and ferrokinetics with total-body counting up to five months were examined. These data showed no excessive loss of blood during the study period; however, marrow iron stores were decidedly decreased, being absent in four subjects. We suggest that in some hemophiliacs, iron deposits in tissues such as synovial membranes may form a high proportion of the body's total iron stores.

  3. Iron Deficiency in Patients with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease is Associated with Obesity, Female Sex, and Low Serum Hepcidin

    PubMed Central

    Siddique, Asma; Nelson, James E.; Aouizerat, Bradley; Yeh, Matthew M.; Kowdley, Kris V.

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims Iron deficiency is often observed in obese individuals. The iron regulatory hormone hepcidin is regulated by iron and cytokines IL6 and IL1β. We examine the relationship between obesity, circulating levels of hepcidin and IL6 and IL1β, and other risk factors in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) with iron deficiency. Methods We collected data on 675 adult subjects (>18 y old) enrolled in the Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis Clinical Research Network. Subjects with transferrin saturation <20% were categorized as iron deficient, whereas those with transferrin saturation ≥20% were classified as iron normal. We assessed clinical, demographic, anthropometric, laboratory, dietary, and histologic data from patients, as well as serum levels of hepcidin and cytokines IL6 and IL1β. Univariate and multivariate analysis were used to identify risk factors for iron deficiency. Results One third of patients (231/675; 34%) were iron deficient. Obesity, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome were more common in subjects with iron deficiency (P<.01), compared with those that were iron normal. Serum levels of hepcidin were significantly lower in subjects with iron deficiency (61±45 vs 81±51 ng/mL; P<.0001). Iron deficiency was significantly associated with female sex, obesity, increased body mass index and waist circumference, presence of diabetes, lower alcohol consumption, Black or American Indian/Alaska Native race (P≤.018), and increased levels of IL6 and IL1β (6.6 vs 4.8 for iron normal; P≤.0001 and 0.45 vs 0.32 for iron normal; P≤.005). Conclusion Iron deficiency is prevalent in patients with NAFLD and associated with female sex, increased body mass index, and non-white race. Serum levels of hepcidin were lower in iron-deficient subjects, reflecting an appropriate physiological response to decreased circulating levels of iron, rather than a primary cause of iron deficiency in the setting of obesity and NAFLD. PMID:24269922

  4. Iron economy in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Glaesener, Anne G.; Merchant, Sabeeha S.; Blaby-Haas, Crysten E.

    2013-01-01

    While research on iron nutrition in plants has largely focused on iron-uptake pathways, photosynthetic microbes such as the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii provide excellent experimental systems for understanding iron metabolism at the subcellular level. Several paradigms in iron homeostasis have been established in this alga, including photosystem remodeling in the chloroplast and preferential retention of some pathways and key iron-dependent proteins in response to suboptimal iron supply. This review presents our current understanding of iron homeostasis in Chlamydomonas, with specific attention on characterized responses to changes in iron supply, like iron-deficiency. An overview of frequently used methods for the investigation of iron-responsive gene expression, physiology and metabolism is also provided, including preparation of media, the effect of cell size, cell density and strain choice on quantitative measurements and methods for the determination of metal content and assessing the effect of iron supply on photosynthetic performance. PMID:24032036

  5. Prenatal Iron Supplementation Reduces Maternal Anemia, Iron Deficiency, and Iron Deficiency Anemia in a Randomized Clinical Trial in Rural China, but Iron Deficiency Remains Widespread in Mothers and Neonates123

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Gengli; Xu, Guobin; Zhou, Min; Jiang, Yaping; Richards, Blair; Clark, Katy M; Kaciroti, Niko; Georgieff, Michael K; Zhang, Zhixiang; Tardif, Twila; Li, Ming; Lozoff, Betsy

    2015-01-01

    Background: Previous trials of prenatal iron supplementation had limited measures of maternal or neonatal iron status. Objective: The purpose was to assess effects of prenatal iron-folate supplementation on maternal and neonatal iron status. Methods: Enrollment occurred June 2009 through December 2011 in Hebei, China. Women with uncomplicated singleton pregnancies at ≤20 wk gestation, aged ≥18 y, and with hemoglobin ≥100 g/L were randomly assigned 1:1 to receive daily iron (300 mg ferrous sulfate) or placebo + 0.40 mg folate from enrollment to birth. Iron status was assessed in maternal venous blood (at enrollment and at or near term) and cord blood. Primary outcomes were as follows: 1) maternal iron deficiency (ID) defined in 2 ways as serum ferritin (SF) <15 μg/L and body iron (BI) <0 mg/kg; 2) maternal ID anemia [ID + anemia (IDA); hemoglobin <110 g/L]; and 3) neonatal ID (cord blood ferritin <75 μg/L or zinc protoporphyrin/heme >118 μmol/mol). Results: A total of 2371 women were randomly assigned, with outcomes for 1632 women or neonates (809 placebo/folate, 823 iron/folate; 1579 mother-newborn pairs, 37 mothers, 16 neonates). Most infants (97%) were born at term. At or near term, maternal hemoglobin was significantly higher (+5.56 g/L) for iron vs. placebo groups. Anemia risk was reduced (RR: 0.53; 95% CI: 0.43, 0.66), as were risks of ID (RR: 0.74; 95% CI: 0.69, 0.79 by SF; RR: 0.65; 95% CI: 0.59, 0.71 by BI) and IDA (RR: 0.49; 95% CI: 0.38, 0.62 by SF; RR: 0.51; 95% CI: 0.40, 0.65 by BI). Most women still had ID (66.8% by SF, 54.7% by BI). Adverse effects, all minor, were similar by group. There were no differences in cord blood iron measures; >45% of neonates in each group had ID. However, dose-response analyses showed higher cord SF with more maternal iron capsules reported being consumed (β per 10 capsules = 2.60, P < 0.05). Conclusions: Prenatal iron supplementation reduced anemia, ID, and IDA in pregnant women in rural China, but most women

  6. 21 CFR 310.518 - Drug products containing iron or iron salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Drug products containing iron or iron salts. 310... Drug products containing iron or iron salts. Drug products containing elemental iron or iron salts as...) that contains iron or iron salts for use as an iron source shall bear the following statement:...

  7. 21 CFR 310.518 - Drug products containing iron or iron salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Drug products containing iron or iron salts. 310... Drug products containing iron or iron salts. Drug products containing elemental iron or iron salts as...) that contains iron or iron salts for use as an iron source shall bear the following statement:...

  8. 21 CFR 310.518 - Drug products containing iron or iron salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Drug products containing iron or iron salts. 310... Drug products containing iron or iron salts. Drug products containing elemental iron or iron salts as...) that contains iron or iron salts for use as an iron source shall bear the following statement:...

  9. 21 CFR 310.518 - Drug products containing iron or iron salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Drug products containing iron or iron salts. 310... Drug products containing iron or iron salts. Drug products containing elemental iron or iron salts as...) that contains iron or iron salts for use as an iron source shall bear the following statement:...

  10. 21 CFR 310.518 - Drug products containing iron or iron salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Drug products containing iron or iron salts. 310... Drug products containing iron or iron salts. Drug products containing elemental iron or iron salts as...) that contains iron or iron salts for use as an iron source shall bear the following statement:...

  11. Iron status in Danes updated 1994. I: prevalence of iron deficiency and iron overload in 1332 men aged 40-70 years. Influence Of blood donation, alcohol intake, and iron supplementation.

    PubMed

    Milman, N; Ovesen, L; Byg, K; Graudal, N

    1999-09-01

    Iron status, S-ferritin, and hemoglobin (Hb) were assessed in a population survey in 1994 (DAN-MONICA 10) comprising 1332 Caucasian Danish men equally distributed in age cohorts of 40, 50, 60 and 70 years. Blood donors (n=186) had lower S-ferritin, median 76 microg/l, than nondonors, median 169 microg/l (p<0.0001). S-ferritin in donors was inversely correlated with the number of phlebotomies (r(s)=-0.57, p<0.0001). S-ferritin in nondonors (n=1146) was similar in men 40-60 years of age, median 176 microg/l, and subsequently decreased at 70 years of age to a median of 146 microg/l (p=0.01). In the entire series, the prevalence of small iron stores (S-ferritin 16-32 microg/l) was 2.7%, that of depleted iron stores (S-ferritin <16 microg/l) 0.45%, and that of iron deficiency anemia (S-ferritin <13 microg/l and Hb <129 g/l) 0.15%. Among nondonors, the prevalence of iron overload (S-ferritin >300 microg/l) was 20%. S-ferritin in nondonors correlated with body mass index (r(s)=0.19, p=0.0001) and with alcohol intake (r(s)=0.26, p=0.0001). In the entire series, 28% of the subjects took supplemental iron (median 14 mg ferrous iron daily). Iron supplements had no influence on iron status. Nondonors (n=170) treated with acetylsalicylic acid had lower S-ferritin, median 136 microg/l, than nontreated, median 169 microg/l (p<0.001) and those treated with H(2)-receptor antagonists (n=30) had lower S-ferritin, median 142 microg/l, than nontreated, median 171 microg/l (p<0.04). Compared with the DAN-MONICA 1 iron status survey of Danish men in 1984, the prevalences of iron depletion and iron deficiency anemia are unchanged whereas the prevalence of iron overload has increased significantly. In Denmark, iron fortification of flour was abolished in 1987. This apparently had no negative effect on iron status in men. PMID:10525826

  12. Coal desulfurization. [using iron pentacarbonyl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, G. C. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    Organic sulfur is removed from coal by treatment with an organic solution of iron pentacarbonyl. Organic sulfur compounds can be removed by reaction of the iron pentacarbonyl with coal to generate CO and COS off-gases. The CO gas separated from COS can be passed over hot iron fillings to generate iron pentacarbonyl.

  13. Iron in diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... Some foods reduce iron absorption. For example, commercial black or pekoe teas contain substances that bind to ... nih.gov/pubmed/19297463 . Mason JB. Vitamins, trace minerals, and other micronutrients. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, ...

  14. Iron-Air Rechargeable Battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayan, Sri R. (Inventor); Prakash, G.K. Surya (Inventor); Kindler, Andrew (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Embodiments include an iron-air rechargeable battery having a composite electrode including an iron electrode and a hydrogen electrode integrated therewith. An air electrode is spaced from the iron electrode and an electrolyte is provided in contact with the air electrode and the iron electrodes. Various additives and catalysts are disclosed with respect to the iron electrode, air electrode, and electrolyte for increasing battery efficiency and cycle life.

  15. Iron deficiency in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Lawrence P

    2010-01-01

    Iron deficiency (ID) and related anaemia (IDA) during pregnancy are highly prevalent worldwide in both developed and developing nations although the causes are often different. At conception, many women lack sufficient iron stores to meet the increased requirements of pregnancy, which are calculated at approximately 1200 mg. Appraisal of iron status in pregnant women is problematic, however the most reliable available diagnostic test is a serum ferritin < 20 µg/L. ID is often associated with other nutritional disorders, and there is frequently a secondary cause or association. A greater oral intake is usually insufficient to meet the increased demands of pregnancy, however regular oral supplements (given either daily or intermittently) can often meet maternal needs and avoid associated neonatal complications of IDA. Over-treatment with iron should be avoided, but intravenous administration is useful when deficiency is discovered late, is severe, or if the woman is intolerant of oral formulations. This paper reviews the current literature, and addresses differences in the prevalence and causes of ID betwen developed and developing nations. It examines gestational iron requirements, distinguishes between ID and IDA, and highlights difficulties in diagnostic testing. Finally, it appraises the evidence for and against different treatment regimens, ranging from food fortification to intravenous iron infusions, according to availability and to need.

  16. An update on iron physiology

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Manuel; Villar, Isabel; García-Erce, José Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Iron is an essential micronutrient, as it is required for adequate erythropoietic function, oxidative metabolism and cellular immune responses. Although the absorption of dietary iron (1-2 mg/d) is regulated tightly, it is just balanced with losses. Therefore, internal turnover of iron is essential to meet the requirements for erythropoiesis (20-30 mg/d). Increased iron requirements, limited external supply, and increased blood loss may lead to iron deficiency (ID) and iron-deficiency anemia. Hepcidin, which is made primarily in hepatocytes in response to liver iron levels, inflammation, hypoxia and anemia, is the main iron regulatory hormone. Once secreted into the circulation, hepcidin binds ferroportin on enterocytes and macrophages, which triggers its internalization and lysosomal degradation. Thus, in chronic inflammation, the excess of hepcidin decreases iron absorption and prevents iron recycling, which results in hypoferremia and iron-restricted erythropoiesis, despite normal iron stores (functional ID), and anemia of chronic disease (ACD), which can evolve to ACD plus true ID (ACD + ID). In contrast, low hepcidin expression may lead to iron overload, and vice versa. Laboratory tests provide evidence of iron depletion in the body, or reflect iron-deficient red cell production. The appropriate combination of these laboratory tests help to establish a correct diagnosis of ID status and anemia. PMID:19787824

  17. From Ore to Tool Iron Age Iron Smelting in the Largest and Oldest Meteorite Crater in the World

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waanders, F. B.; Tiedt, L. R.; Brink, M. C.; Bisschoff, A. A.

    2005-02-01

    The Vredefort Impact Structure in South Africa is the biggest and oldest remnant meteorite impact crater in the world where various ancient cultures thrived. In this paper some light will be shed on the Iron Age, iron smelting aspects of the people that inhabited the area and the results of a laboratory study of iron artefacts and a possible source of iron ore in the region is given. A sectional piece from a hoe manufactured in a small bloomery furnace was polished and etched and subsequently analyses with SEM and Mössbauer techniques were obtained. The hoe has a typical cast iron composition (2.9% C, 0.1% Mn, 0.4% Si, 0.4% P and 96.2% Fe, all wt.%) and contains many slag inclusions with wustite dendrites. The Mössbauer spectrum consisted of iron (86%), wustite (5%) and oxihydroxide (9%) and the thin (200 μm) corrosion layer consisted of hematite (55%) and oxihydroxides (45%). At a furnace site, various slag clumps (26.3% C, 24.8% SiO2, 11.3% Al2O3, 1.3% P2O5, 1.0% K2O, 0.4% CaO and 30.2 FeO, all wt.%, average of four samples) and iron nodules (7.6% C, 6.0% Mn, 4.3% Si, 1.4% Al, 80.7% Fe, all wt.%) were found. The Mössbauer spectrum of the slag consisted of iron (7%), magnetite (56%), fayalite (2%) and oxihydroxides (35%) and that of the iron nodules yielded iron (28%), wustite (12%), magnetite (20%) and oxihydroxides (40%). A possible ore source containing 84% FeO, 7% of Al2O3 and SiO2 (all in wt.%) and minor impurities is located a few kilometers from the furnace site, yielding a Mössbauer spectrum consisting of hematite (70%) and oxihydroxides (30%).

  18. The Effect of Intravenous Iron Treatment on Quality of Life in Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patients with Nonanemic Iron Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Çekiç, Cem; İpek, Serkan; Akpınar, Zehra; Topal, Firdevs; Alper, Emrah; Ünsal, Belkıs

    2015-01-01

    Background. Iron deficiency is the prevalent complication of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Herein, we investigated the effect of intravenous iron treatment on quality of life (QoL) in nonanemic and iron deficient IBD patients. Methods. Eighty-five IBD patients were recruited for this study. The patients were intravenously administered 500 mg iron sucrose in the first week of the study. Hematologic parameters and QoL were evaluated before to iron treatment and during the 12th week of treatment. The Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire (IBDQ) and the Short Form-36 (SF-36) Health Survey were used to assess QoL. Results. Prior to intravenous iron administration, the IBDQ, SF-36 Physical Component Summary (PCS) and Mental Component Summary (MCS) scores were 152.3 ± 30.6, 46.7 ± 7.3, and 45.7 ± 9.8, respectively. In the 12th week of iron administration, those scores were 162.3 ± 25.5 (P < 0.001), 49.3 ± 6.4 (P < 0.001), and 47.6 ± 8.9 (P = 0.024), respectively, which were all significantly different from the scores prior to iron administration. The mean changes in the IBDQ scores for ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease were 8.7% and 3.0% (P = 0.029), were 6.4% and 4.7% (P = 0.562) for the SF-36 PCS, and were 4.6% and 3.2% (P = 0.482) for the SF-36 MCS, respectively. Conclusion. Intravenous iron treatment may improve QoL in nonanemic, but iron deficient, IBD patients. PMID:25691898

  19. 21 CFR 184.1375 - Iron, elemental.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Iron, elemental. 184.1375 Section 184.1375 Food... GRAS § 184.1375 Iron, elemental. (a) Iron, elemental (CAS Reg. No. 7439-89-6) is metallic iron obtained by any of the following processes: reduced iron, electrolytic iron, and carbonyl iron. (1)...

  20. Clinical utility of serum tests for iron deficiency in hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Burns, E R; Goldberg, S N; Lawrence, C; Wenz, B

    1990-02-01

    Serum iron and ferritin measurements lack the requisite sensitivity and/or specificity to accurately diagnose iron deficiency. To determine their utility in hospitalized patients, the authors compared the results of these tests with the presence of stainable iron in bone marrow aspirates of 301 patients. Forty (13.3%) had absent marrow iron. The serum diagnosis of iron deficiency was accepted on the basis of the following: iron less than 11 mumol/L, total iron-binding capacity (TIBC) greater than 45 mumol/L, transferrin saturation (%Sat) less than 0.20, and ferritin less than 13 micrograms/L for females and less than 25 micrograms/L for males. Using these criteria, iron deficiency was correctly diagnosed by serum iron in 41%, TIBC in 84%, %Sat in 50%, and ferritin in 90% of the patients. The serum ferritin is clearly the only useful serum test for diagnosing iron deficiency in hospitalized patients but is limited by a low sensitivity. The bone marrow examination is the most sensitive test for diagnosing iron deficiency in hospitalized patients. PMID:2242107

  1. Iron Absorption in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Mandilaras, Konstantinos; Pathmanathan, Tharse; Missirlis, Fanis

    2013-01-01

    The way in which Drosophila melanogaster acquires iron from the diet remains poorly understood despite iron absorption being of vital significance for larval growth. To describe the process of organismal iron absorption, consideration needs to be given to cellular iron import, storage, export and how intestinal epithelial cells sense and respond to iron availability. Here we review studies on the Divalent Metal Transporter-1 homolog Malvolio (iron import), the recent discovery that Multicopper Oxidase-1 has ferroxidase activity (iron export) and the role of ferritin in the process of iron acquisition (iron storage). We also describe what is known about iron regulation in insect cells. We then draw upon knowledge from mammalian iron homeostasis to identify candidate genes in flies. Questions arise from the lack of conservation in Drosophila for key mammalian players, such as ferroportin, hepcidin and all the components of the hemochromatosis-related pathway. Drosophila and other insects also lack erythropoiesis. Thus, systemic iron regulation is likely to be conveyed by different signaling pathways and tissue requirements. The significance of regulating intestinal iron uptake is inferred from reports linking Drosophila developmental, immune, heat-shock and behavioral responses to iron sequestration. PMID:23686013

  2. Iron absorption in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Mandilaras, Konstantinos; Pathmanathan, Tharse; Missirlis, Fanis

    2013-05-01

    The way in which Drosophila melanogaster acquires iron from the diet remains poorly understood despite iron absorption being of vital significance for larval growth. To describe the process of organismal iron absorption, consideration needs to be given to cellular iron import, storage, export and how intestinal epithelial cells sense and respond to iron availability. Here we review studies on the Divalent Metal Transporter-1 homolog Malvolio (iron import), the recent discovery that Multicopper Oxidase-1 has ferroxidase activity (iron export) and the role of ferritin in the process of iron acquisition (iron storage). We also describe what is known about iron regulation in insect cells. We then draw upon knowledge from mammalian iron homeostasis to identify candidate genes in flies. Questions arise from the lack of conservation in Drosophila for key mammalian players, such as ferroportin, hepcidin and all the components of the hemochromatosis-related pathway. Drosophila and other insects also lack erythropoiesis. Thus, systemic iron regulation is likely to be conveyed by different signaling pathways and tissue requirements. The significance of regulating intestinal iron uptake is inferred from reports linking Drosophila developmental, immune, heat-shock and behavioral responses to iron sequestration. PMID:23686013

  3. 46 CFR 148.275 - Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent. 148.275 Section... § 148.275 Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent. (a) Before spent iron oxide or spent iron sponge is... been cooled and weathered for at least eight weeks. (b) Both spent iron oxide and spent iron sponge...

  4. 46 CFR 148.275 - Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent. 148.275 Section... § 148.275 Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent. (a) Before spent iron oxide or spent iron sponge is... been cooled and weathered for at least eight weeks. (b) Both spent iron oxide and spent iron sponge...

  5. 46 CFR 148.275 - Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent. 148.275 Section... § 148.275 Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent. (a) Before spent iron oxide or spent iron sponge is... been cooled and weathered for at least eight weeks. (b) Both spent iron oxide and spent iron sponge...

  6. 46 CFR 148.275 - Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent. 148.275 Section... § 148.275 Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent. (a) Before spent iron oxide or spent iron sponge is... been cooled and weathered for at least eight weeks. (b) Both spent iron oxide and spent iron sponge...

  7. Biological variability of transferrin saturation and unsaturated iron binding capacity

    PubMed Central

    Adams, PC; Reboussin, DM; Press, RD; Barton, JC; Acton, RT; Moses, GC; Leiendecker-Foster, C; McLaren, GD; Dawkins, FW; Gordeuk, VR; Lovato, L; Eckfeldt, JH

    2007-01-01

    Background Transferrin saturation is widely considered the preferred screening test for hemochromatosis. Unsaturated iron binding capacity has similar performance at lower cost. However, the within-person biological variability of both these tests may limit their ability at commonly used cut points to detect HFE C282Y homozygous patients. Methods The Hemochromatosis and Iron Overload Screening (HEIRS) Study screened 101,168 primary care participants for iron overload using tansferrin saturation, unsaturated iron binding capacity, ferritin and HFE C282Y and H63D genotyping. Transferrin saturation and unsaturated iron binding capacity were performed at initial screening and again when selected participants and controls returned for a clinical examination several months later. A missed case was defined as a C282Y homozygote who had transferrin saturation below cut point (45 % women, 50 % men) or unsaturated iron binding capacity above cut point (150 μmol/L women, 125 μmol/L men) at either the initial screening or clinical examination, or both, regardless of serum ferritin. Results There were 209 C282Y previously undiagnosed homozygotes with transferrin saturation and unsaturated iron binding capacity testing done at initial screening and clinical examination. Sixty-eight C282Y homozygotes (33%) would have been missed at these transferrin saturation cut points (19 men, 49 women, median SF 170 μg/L, first and third quartiles 50 and 474 μg/L), and 58 homozygotes (28 %) would have been missed at the unsaturated iron binding capacity cut points (20 men, 38 women, median SF 168 μg/L, quartiles 38 and 454 μg/L). There was no advantage to using fasting samples. Conclusions The within-person biological variability of transferrin saturation and unsaturated iron binding capacity limit their usefulness as an initial screening test for expressing C282Y homozygotes. PMID:17976429

  8. Mammalian iron metabolism and its control by iron regulatory proteins☆

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Cole P.; Shen, Lacy; Eisenstein, Richard S.; Leibold, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    Cellular iron homeostasis is maintained by iron regulatory proteins 1 and 2 (IRP1 and IRP2). IRPs bind to iron-responsive elements (IREs) located in the untranslated regions of mRNAs encoding protein involved in iron uptake, storage, utilization and export. Over the past decade, significant progress has been made in understanding how IRPs are regulated by iron-dependent and iron-independent mechanisms and the pathological consequences of IRP2 deficiency in mice. The identification of novel IREs involved in diverse cellular pathways has revealed that the IRP–IRE network extends to processes other than iron homeostasis. A mechanistic understanding of IRP regulation will likely yield important insights into the basis of disorders of iron metabolism. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cell Biology of Metals. PMID:22610083

  9. Iron-sensitive fluorescent probes: monitoring intracellular iron pools.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yongmin; Abbate, V; Hider, R C

    2015-02-01

    Several iron-sensitive fluorophores have been investigated in a range of cell types in order to quantify iron(II) levels in the cytosol and the cytoplasm. Both iron(II) and iron(III) cause fluorescence quenching of these probes and changes in cytosolic iron levels can be monitored in a reproducible manner. However the precise quantification of iron(II) in the cytosol is complicated by the uncertainty of the structure of many of the quenched species that exist under in vivo conditions. Precise knowledge of these structures is essential for quantitative purposes. The lysosomal and mitochondrial iron pools have only been the subject of relatively few studies at the time of writing. Calcein-AM has been widely adopted for the monitoring of changes in iron levels in a range different cell types. PMID:25315476

  10. Earth's core iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geophysicist J. Michael Brown of Texas A & M University noted recently at the Spring AGU Meeting in Baltimore that the structure and phase of metallic iron at pressures of the earth's inner core (approximately 3.3 Mbar) could have great significance in defining geometrical aspects of the core itself. Brown worked at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory with R.B. McQueen to redetermine the phase relations of metallic iron in a series of new shock-wave experiments. They found the melting point of iron at conditions equal to those at the boundary of the earth's outer (liquid) and inner (solid) cores to be 6000°±500°C (Geophysical Research Letters, 7, 533-536, 1980).

  11. INTERIOR VIEW OF IRON TREATMENT (DESULPHURIZATION) AREA. MOLTEN IRON PROCEEDS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW OF IRON TREATMENT (DESULPHURIZATION) AREA. MOLTEN IRON PROCEEDS FROM CUPOLA TO IRON TREATMENT AREAS BEFORE BEING TRANSFERRED TO PIPE CASTING MACHINES. - United States Pipe & Foundry Company Plant, Melting & Treatment Areas, 2023 St. Louis Avenue at I-20/59, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  12. Anemia caused by low iron - children

    MedlinePlus

    Anemia - iron deficiency - children ... able to absorb iron well, even though the child is eating enough iron Slow blood loss over ... bleeding in the digestive tract Iron deficiency in children can also be related to lead poisoning .

  13. Silver-iron batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindstroem, O.

    1980-04-01

    Production methods for iron electrodes were studied. It was found that a sintering temperature of 700 C gave the best strength and capacity. Production methods and additions for silver electrodes were also studied. The capacity of the produced iron and silver electrodes were 1100 mAh/cu cm. Different separators were investigated. Cellophane I and II from Du Pont was found to be the best. In tests open cells achieved 60 percent of the calculated capacity. In order to minimize the increase of the pressure in closed cells different additions to the electrodes were studied.

  14. Iron Meteorite on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity has found an iron meteorite on Mars, the first meteorite of any type ever identified on another planet. The pitted, basketball-size object is mostly made of iron and nickel. Readings from spectrometers on the rover determined that composition. Opportunity used its panoramic camera to take the images used in this approximately true-color composite on the rover's 339th martian day, or sol (Jan. 6, 2005). This composite combines images taken through the panoramic camera's 600-nanometer (red), 530-nanometer (green), and 480-nanometer (blue) filters.

  15. EXAFS Study on the Reactions Between Iron And Fulvic Acid in Acid Aqueous Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Schaik, J.W.J.van; Persson, I.; Kleja, D.B.; Gustafsson, J.P.

    2009-05-26

    Iron(III) competes with trace metals for binding sites on organic ligands. We used X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy to determine the binding mode and oxidation state of iron in solutions initially containing only iron(III) and fulvic acid at pHs 2 and 4. EXAFS spectra were recorded at different times after sample preparation. Iron was octahedrally configured with inner-sphere Fe-O interactions at 1.98-2.10 {angstrom}, depending on the oxidation state of iron. Iron(III) formed complexes with fulvic acid within 15 min. Iron(III) was reduced to iron(II) with time at pH 2, whereas no significant reduction occurred at pH 4. No signs of dimeric/trimeric hydrolysis products were found in any of the solution samples (<0.45 {mu}m). However, the isolated precipitate of the pH 2 sample (>0.45 {mu}m) showed Fe{hor_ellipsis}Fe distances, indicating the presence of tightly packed iron(III) trimers and/or clusters of corner-sharing octahedra. It is suggested that the binding mode of iron(III) to fulvic acid at low pH may be phase-dependent: in solution mononuclear complexes predominate, whereas in the solid phase hydrolyzed polynuclear iron(III) complexes form, even at very low pH values. The observed pH dependence of iron(III) reduction was consistent with expected results based on thermodynamic calculations for model ligands.

  16. Iron in Infection and Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Cassat, James E.; Skaar, Eric P.

    2013-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for both humans and pathogenic microbes. Because of its ability to exist in one of two oxidation states, iron is an ideal redox catalyst for diverse cellular processes including respiration and DNA replication. However, the redox potential of iron also contributes to its toxicity, thus iron concentration and distribution must be carefully controlled. Given the absolute requirement for iron by virtually all human pathogens, an important facet of the innate immune system is to limit iron availability to invading microbes in a process termed nutritional immunity. Successful human pathogens must therefore possess mechanisms to circumvent nutritional immunity in order to cause disease. In this review, we discuss regulation of iron metabolism in the setting of infection and delineate strategies used by human pathogens to overcome iron-withholding defenses. PMID:23684303

  17. Protein degradation and iron homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Joel W; Bruick, Richard K

    2012-09-01

    Regulation of both systemic and cellular iron homeostasis requires the capacity to sense iron levels and appropriately modify the expression of iron metabolism genes. These responses are coordinated through the efforts of several key regulatory factors including F-box and Leucine-rich Repeat Protein 5 (FBXL5), Iron Regulatory Proteins (IRPs), Hypoxia Inducible Factor (HIF), and ferroportin. Notably, the stability of each of these proteins is regulated in response to iron. Recent discoveries have greatly advanced our understanding of the molecular mechanisms governing iron-sensing and protein degradation within these pathways. It has become clear that iron's privileged roles in both enzyme catalysis and protein structure contribute to its regulation of protein stability. Moreover, these multiple pathways intersect with one another in larger regulatory networks to maintain iron homeostasis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cell Biology of Metals. PMID:22349011

  18. Iron deficiency anemia in children.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Girish; Girish, Meenakshi

    2015-06-01

    Iron deficiency is not just anemia; it can be responsible for a long list of other manifestations. This topic is of great importance, especially in infancy and early childhood, for a variety of reasons. Firstly, iron need is maximum in this period. Secondly, diet in infancy is usually deficient in iron. Thirdly and most importantly, iron deficiency at this age can result in neurodevelopmental and cognitive deficits, which may not be reversible. Hypochromia and microcytosis in a complete blood count (CBC) makes iron deficiency anemia (IDA) most likely diagnosis. Absence of response to iron should make us look for other differential diagnosis like β thalassemia trait and anemia of chronic disease. Celiac disease is the most important cause of true IDA not responding to oral iron therapy. While oral ferrous sulphate is the cheapest and most effective therapy for IDA, simple nonpharmacological and pharmacological measures can go a long way in prevention of iron deficiency. PMID:25636824

  19. Formation of magnetite and iron-rich carbonates by thermophilic iron-reducing bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, C.; Liu, S.; Roh, Y.; Cole, D.; Phelps, T.; Vali, H.; Kirschvink, J.L.; Onsttot, T.; McKay, D.

    1997-06-01

    Laboratory experiments were performed to study the formation of iron minerals by a thermophilic (45 to 75 C) fermentative iron-reducing bacterial culture (TOR39) obtained from the deep subsurface. Using amorphous Fe(III) oxyhydroxide as an electron acceptor and glucose as an electron donor, TOR39 produced magnetite and iron-rich carbonates at conditions consistent, on a thermodynamic basis, with Eh ({minus}200 mV to {minus}415 mV) and pH (6.2 to 7.7) values determined for these experiments. Analyses of the precipitating solid phases by X-ray diffraction showed that the starting amorphous Fe(III) oxyhydroxide was nearly completely converted to magnetite and Fe-rich carbonate after 20 days of incubation. Increasing bicarbonate concentration in the chemical milieu resulted in increased proportions of siderite relative to magnetite and the addition of MgCl{sub 2} caused the formation of magnesium-rich carbonate in addition to siderite. The results suggest that the TOR39 bacterial culture may have the capacity to form magnetite and iron-rich carbonates in a variety of geochemical conditions. These results may have significant implications for studying the past biogenic activities in the Martian meteorite ALH84001.

  20. Formation of magnetite and iron-rich carbonates by thermophilic iron-reducing bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chuanlun; Vali, Hojatollah; Liu, Shi; Roh, Yul; Cole, Dave; Kirschvink, Joseph L.; Onstott, Tullis C.; McKay, David S.; Phelps, Tommy J.

    1997-07-01

    Laboratory experiments were performed to study the formation of iron minerals by a thermophilic (45 - 75 degree(s)C) fermentative iron-reducing bacterial culture (TOR39) obtained from the deep subsurface. Using amorphous Fe(III) oxyhydroxide as an electron acceptor and glucose as an electron donor, TOR39 produced magnetite and iron-rich carbonates at conditions consistent, on a thermodynamic basis, with Eh (-200 mV to -415 mV) and pH (6.2 to 7.7) values determined for these experiments. Analyses of the precipitating solid phases by X-ray diffraction showed that the starting amorphous Fe(III) oxyhydroxide was nearly completely converted to magnetite and Fe-rich carbonate after 20 days of incubation. Increasing bicarbonate concentration in the chemical milieu resulted in increased proportions of siderite relative to magnetite and the addition of MgCl2 caused the formation of magnesium-rich carbonate in addition to siderite. The results suggest that the TOR39 bacterial culture may have the capacity to form magnetite and iron-rich carbonates in a variety of geochemical conditions. These results may have significant implications for studying the past biogenic activities in the Martian meteorite ALH84001.

  1. β-Carotene can reverse dysregulation of iron protein in an in vitro model of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Katz, Oksana; Reifen, Ram; Lerner, Aaron

    2015-02-01

    Anemia of chronic disease is frequently seen in chronic inflammatory conditions. Its hallmark is disrupted iron homeostasis, with increased uptake and retention of iron in cells of the reticuloendothelial system. Using the Caco-2 cell line as an in vitro model for iron absorption, local intestinal iron-related protein dynamics were evaluated during interleukin (IL)1β/iron-induced inflammation, confirmed by IL8 release, and following β-carotene and vitamin A supplementation. Time- and dose-dependent iron administration to the cells was then studied. The effects on heavy and light ferritin, ferroportin, transferrin receptor and intracellular iron levels were compared in inflamed Caco-2 cells with and without application of the anti-inflammatory agents β-carotene and vitamin A. IL1β treatment led to IL8 release, a surge in both ferritins' expressions and suppression of ferroportin and transferrin receptor expression. β-Carotene significantly reduced IL8 (1,306.2-253.75 pg/ml), decreased light and heavy ferritin by 77.8 and 45.8%, respectively, and increased ferroportin by 59.9% (P < 0.05). Increasing iron concentrations and incubation periods resulted in increased IL8 release. A strong correlation was found between the levels of IL8 and the ferritins. Intracellular iron sequestration was induced by IL1β and iron and alleviated by β-carotene. β-Carotene normalized the main iron-related proteins' levels, reduced IL8 production, and released intracellular trapped iron. These results highlight local mucosal control of iron regulation and suggest that by applying anti-inflammatory compounds, less iron is locked in inflamed intestinal epithelial cells, leading to its increased bioavailability. This suggests a possible approach to combating anemia associated with chronic inflammatory conditions. PMID:25398638

  2. Nonbiological fractionation of iron isotopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anbar, A. D.; Roe, J. E.; Barling, J.; Nealson, K. H.

    2000-01-01

    Laboratory experiments demonstrate that iron isotopes can be chemically fractionated in the absence of biology. Isotopic variations comparable to those seen during microbially mediated reduction of ferrihydrite are observed. Fractionation may occur in aqueous solution during equilibration between inorganic iron complexes. These findings provide insight into the mechanisms of iron isotope fractionation and suggest that nonbiological processes may contribute to iron isotope variations observed in sediments.

  3. Toughness Properties of Nodular Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, Walter L.

    1985-01-01

    The German government recently certified ductile iron for construction of nuclear waste transport containers. This approved use of ductile iron for such a critical application represents the culmination of ten years worth of research bringing to light the surprising toughness of ductile iron. This article explains how modern fracture mechanics and microstructure/property relationships have altered the stereotype of ductile iron as a low toughness material.

  4. Enzymes of respiratory iron oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, R. II.

    1991-01-01

    This report focuses on the progress made in three areas of research concerned with enzymes involved in respiratory iron oxidation. The three areas are as follows: development of an improved procedure for the routine large scale culture of iron oxidizing chemolithotrophs based on the in-situ electrolysis of the soluble iron in the growth medium; to perform iron oxidation kinetic studies on whole cells using the oxygen electrode; and to identify, separate, purify, and characterize the individual cellular components.

  5. Replacing electrolytic iron in a fortification-mix with NaFeEDTA increases both iron and zinc availabilities in traditional African maize porridges.

    PubMed

    Kruger, Johanita

    2016-08-15

    While replacing electrolytic iron with NaFeEDTA in multi-micronutrient fortification-mixes is a popular option, there is no information about the effect on the iron and zinc availabilities in African staple foods. This study evaluated the effects of adding a multi-micronutrient fortification-mix, with no iron, electrolytic iron or NaFeEDTA on the availabilities of iron and zinc from thick and fermented special-grade maize porridges using a Caco-2 cell model. Replacing electrolytic iron with NaFeEDTA significantly (p ⩽ 0.05) increased iron and, importantly zinc, availabilities in both the thick (2.16% vs. 1.45% and 2.51% vs. 2.29%, respectively) and fermented (3.35% vs. 2.66% and 3.04% vs. 2.61%, respectively) porridges. Some of the NaFeEDTA complexes perhaps partially dissociated because of pH changes during simulated digestion, binding with zinc and increasing its availability. NaFeEDTA in a multi-micronutrient fortification-mix, added to less refined, high phytate maize meal, would be more effective than electrolytic iron in addressing both iron and zinc deficiencies in low socio-economic populations of sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:27006207

  6. Elevated levels of iron in groundwater in Prey Veng province in Cambodia: a possible factor contributing to high iron stores in women.

    PubMed

    Karakochuk, Crystal D; Murphy, Heather M; Whitfield, Kyly C; Barr, Susan I; Vercauteren, Suzanne M; Talukder, Aminuzzaman; Porter, Keith; Kroeun, Hou; Eath, Many; McLean, Judy; Green, Timothy J

    2015-06-01

    Iron is a natural element found in food, water and soil and is essential for human health. Our aim was to determine the levels of iron and 25 other metals and trace elements in groundwater from 22 households in Prey Veng, Cambodia. Water analyses were conducted using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry and optical emission spectrometry. Compared to the 2011 World Health Organization guidelines for drinking water quality, aluminum, iron and manganese exceeded maximum levels (in 4.5, 72.7 and 40.9% of samples, respectively). Compared to the 2004 Cambodian drinking water quality standards, iron and manganese exceeded maximum levels (in 59.1 and 36.4% of samples, respectively). We found no evidence of arsenic contamination. Guidelines for iron were established primarily for esthetic reasons (e.g. taste), whereas other metals and elements have adverse effects associated with toxicity. Iron in groundwater ranged from 134 to 5,200 μg/L (mean ∼1,422 μg/L). Based on a daily consumption of 3 L groundwater, this equates to ∼0.4-15.6 mg iron (mean ∼4.3 mg/day), which may be contributing to high iron stores and the low prevalence of iron deficiency anemia in Prey Veng women. Elevated levels of manganese in groundwater are a concern and warrant further investigation. PMID:26042988

  7. 45 CFR 2543.45 - Cost and price analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cost and price analysis. 2543.45 Section 2543.45... ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Property Standards § 2543.45 Cost and price analysis. Some form of cost or price analysis shall be made and documented in the procurement files in connection with...

  8. 45 CFR 681.45 - What happens to collections?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What happens to collections? 681.45 Section 681.45 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES ACT REGULATIONS Decisions and Appeals § 681.45 What happens to collections?...

  9. 45 CFR 4.5 - Effect of regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Effect of regulations. 4.5 Section 4.5 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION SERVICE OF PROCESS § 4.5 Effect of regulations. The regulations in this part are intended solely to identify Department officials who...

  10. 45 CFR 74.45 - Cost and price analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cost and price analysis. 74.45 Section 74.45... ORGANIZATIONS, AND COMMERCIAL ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Procurement Standards § 74.45 Cost and price analysis. Some form of cost or price analysis shall be made and documented in the procurement files...

  11. 45 CFR 74.45 - Cost and price analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cost and price analysis. 74.45 Section 74.45... ORGANIZATIONS, AND COMMERCIAL ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Procurement Standards § 74.45 Cost and price analysis. Some form of cost or price analysis shall be made and documented in the procurement files...

  12. 45 CFR 2543.45 - Cost and price analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cost and price analysis. 2543.45 Section 2543.45... ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Property Standards § 2543.45 Cost and price analysis. Some form of cost or price analysis shall be made and documented in the procurement files in connection with...

  13. 45 CFR 2543.45 - Cost and price analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cost and price analysis. 2543.45 Section 2543.45... ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Property Standards § 2543.45 Cost and price analysis. Some form of cost or price analysis shall be made and documented in the procurement files in connection with...

  14. 45 CFR 2543.45 - Cost and price analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cost and price analysis. 2543.45 Section 2543.45... ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Property Standards § 2543.45 Cost and price analysis. Some form of cost or price analysis shall be made and documented in the procurement files in connection with...

  15. 27 CFR 45.45a - Notice for pipe tobacco.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Notice for pipe tobacco. 45.45a Section 45.45a Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) TOBACCO REMOVAL OF TOBACCO PRODUCTS AND CIGARETTE PAPERS AND...

  16. 27 CFR 45.45a - Notice for pipe tobacco.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Notice for pipe tobacco. 45.45a Section 45.45a Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) TOBACCO REMOVAL OF TOBACCO PRODUCTS AND CIGARETTE PAPERS AND...

  17. 27 CFR 45.45a - Notice for pipe tobacco.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Notice for pipe tobacco. 45.45a Section 45.45a Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) TOBACCO REMOVAL OF TOBACCO PRODUCTS AND CIGARETTE PAPERS AND...

  18. 27 CFR 45.45a - Notice for pipe tobacco.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Notice for pipe tobacco. 45.45a Section 45.45a Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) TOBACCO REMOVAL OF TOBACCO PRODUCTS AND CIGARETTE PAPERS AND...

  19. 45 CFR 2543.45 - Cost and price analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cost and price analysis. 2543.45 Section 2543.45... SERVICE GRANTS AND AGREEMENTS WITH INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION, HOSPITALS, AND OTHER NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Post-Award Requirements Property Standards § 2543.45 Cost and price analysis. Some form of cost...

  20. 45 CFR 96.45 - Preventive health and health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Preventive health and health services. 96.45 Section 96.45 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION BLOCK GRANTS Direct Funding of Indian Tribes and Tribal Organizations § 96.45 Preventive health and health...

  1. 45 CFR 96.45 - Preventive health and health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Preventive health and health services. 96.45 Section 96.45 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION BLOCK GRANTS Direct Funding of Indian Tribes and Tribal Organizations § 96.45 Preventive health and health...

  2. 45 CFR 96.45 - Preventive health and health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Preventive health and health services. 96.45 Section 96.45 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION BLOCK GRANTS Direct Funding of Indian Tribes and Tribal Organizations § 96.45 Preventive health and health...

  3. 45 CFR 96.45 - Preventive health and health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Preventive health and health services. 96.45 Section 96.45 Public Welfare Department of Health and Human Services GENERAL ADMINISTRATION BLOCK GRANTS Direct Funding of Indian Tribes and Tribal Organizations § 96.45 Preventive health and health...

  4. 45 CFR 96.45 - Preventive health and health services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Preventive health and health services. 96.45 Section 96.45 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION BLOCK GRANTS Direct Funding of Indian Tribes and Tribal Organizations § 96.45 Preventive health and health...

  5. 45 CFR 4.5 - Effect of regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Effect of regulations. 4.5 Section 4.5 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION SERVICE OF PROCESS § 4.5 Effect of regulations. The regulations in this part are intended solely to identify Department officials who...

  6. 45 CFR 4.5 - Effect of regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Effect of regulations. 4.5 Section 4.5 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION SERVICE OF PROCESS § 4.5 Effect of regulations. The regulations in this part are intended solely to identify Department officials who...

  7. 27 CFR 45.45a - Notice for pipe tobacco.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., WITHOUT PAYMENT OF TAX, FOR USE OF THE UNITED STATES Packaging Requirements § 45.45a Notice for pipe... of the product contained therein. Effective Date Note: By T.D. TTB-78, at 74 FR 29420, June 22, 2009, § 45.45a was amended by removing the last sentence, effective June 22, 2009 through June 22, 2012....

  8. Feasibility study of iron mineral separation from red mud by high gradient superconducting magnetic separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yiran; Wang, Jun; Wang, Xiaojun; Wang, Baoqiang; Luan, Zhaokun

    2011-02-01

    The disposal of bayer red mud tailings now seriously threats the environment safety. Reduction and recycling of red mud is now an urgent work in aluminum industry. High gradient superconducting magnetic separation (HGSMS) system was applied to separate the extreme fine RM particles (<100 μm) into high iron content part and low iron content part. Two sorts of RM were fed in the HGSMS. The iron oxide contents in concentrates were about 65% and 45% when RM 1# and RM 2# were fed respectively. Meanwhile, the residues contained 52.0% or 14.1% iron oxide in residues after eight separation stages when RM 1# and RM 2# were fed respectively. The mass recovery of iron concentrates was about 10% after once separation process regardless of RM 1# or RM 2# was fed. Extreme fine particles (<10 μm) could be captured in the HGSMS. Intergrowth of Fe and other elements is disadvantages for iron mineral separation from RM by HGSMS. Some improvement should be studied to enhance the efficiency of iron separation. It is possible for HGSMS to separate RM into high iron content part and low iron content part, the former part could be used in iron-making furnace and the later part could be recycling to sintering process for alumina production or used as construction material.

  9. 21 CFR 184.1375 - Iron, elemental.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Iron, elemental. 184.1375 Section 184.1375 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1375 Iron, elemental. (a) Iron, elemental (CAS Reg. No. 7439-89-6) is metallic iron obtained by any of the following processes: reduced iron, electrolytic iron,...

  10. 21 CFR 184.1375 - Iron, elemental.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Iron, elemental. 184.1375 Section 184.1375 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1375 Iron, elemental. (a) Iron, elemental (CAS Reg. No. 7439-89-6) is metallic iron obtained by any of the following processes: reduced iron, electrolytic iron,...

  11. 21 CFR 184.1375 - Iron, elemental.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Iron, elemental. 184.1375 Section 184.1375 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1375 Iron, elemental. (a) Iron, elemental (CAS Reg. No. 7439-89-6) is metallic iron obtained by any of the following processes: reduced iron, electrolytic iron, and...

  12. 21 CFR 184.1375 - Iron, elemental.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Iron, elemental. 184.1375 Section 184.1375 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1375 Iron, elemental. (a) Iron, elemental (CAS Reg. No. 7439-89-6) is metallic iron obtained by any of the following processes: reduced iron, electrolytic iron,...

  13. Intracellular iron minerals in a dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium.

    PubMed

    Glasauer, Susan; Langley, Sean; Beveridge, Terry J

    2002-01-01

    Among prokaryotes, there are few examples of controlled mineral formation; the formation of crystalline iron oxides and sulfides [magnetite (Fe3O4) or greigite (Fe3S4)] by magnetotactic bacteria is an exception. Shewanella putrefaciens CN32, a Gram-negative, facultative anaerobic bacterium that is capable of dissimilatory iron reduction, produced microscopic intracellular grains of iron oxide minerals during growth on two-line ferrihydrite in a hydrogen-argon atmosphere. The minerals, formed at iron concentrations found in the soil and sedimentary environments where these bacteria are active, could represent an unexplored pathway for the cycling of iron by bacteria. PMID:11778045

  14. Iron deficiency anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... or blood in the stool Heavy menstrual bleeding (women) Pain in the upper belly (from ulcers) Weight loss (in people with cancer) ... an injection into the muscle. Pregnant and breastfeeding women ... bone marrow. Iron-rich foods include: Chicken and turkey Dried ...

  15. Iron dominated magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, G.E.

    1985-07-01

    These two lectures on iron dominated magnets are meant for the student of accelerator science and contain general treatments of the subjects design and construction. The material is arranged in the categories: General Concepts and Cost Considerations, Profile Configuration and Harmonics, Magnetic Measurements, a few examples of ''special magnets'' and Materials and Practices. Extensive literature is provided.

  16. Development of iron aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, S.; Sikka, V.K.; Andleigh, V.K.

    1995-06-01

    The primary reason for the poor room-temperature ductility of Fe{sub 3}Al-based alloys is generally accepted to be environmental embrittlement due to hydrogen produced by the reaction of aluminum with water vapor present in the test atmosphere. In the as-cast condition, another possible reason for the low room-temperature ductility is the large grain size (0.5 to 3 mm) of the cast material. While recent studies on iron aluminides in the wrought condition have led to higher room-temperature ductility and increased high-temperature strength, limited studies have been conducted on iron aluminides in the as-cast condition. The purpose of this study was to induce grain refinement of the as-cast alloy through alloying additions to the melt and study the effect on room-temperature ductility as measured by the strain corresponding to the maximum stress obtained in a three-point bend test. A base charge of Fe-28% Al-5% Cr alloy was used; as in previous studies this ternary alloy exhibited the highest tensile ductility of several alloys tested. Iron aluminide alloys are being considered for many structural uses, especially for applications where their excellent corrosion resistance is needed. Several alloy compositions developed at ORNL have been licensed to commercial vendors for development of scale-up procedures. With the licensees and other vendors, several applications for iron aluminides are being pursued.

  17. Canada's iron creek meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spratt, C. E.

    1989-04-01

    An iron mass, of meteoritical origin, found on a hilltop in the southern Canadian prairies, is unique to Canadian scientific history. It is the third largest meteorite to have been found in Canada (at one time it was reported to be Canada's largest single meteorite mass). A brief historical account, and a corrected official weight (145 kilograms), of this interesting meteorite is presented.

  18. Taking iron supplements

    MedlinePlus

    ... J. Martin, MD, MPH, ABIM Board Certified in Internal Medicine and Hospice and Palliative Medicine, Atlanta, GA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Iron Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A. ...

  19. Extracting Iron from Cereal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, David A.

    1992-01-01

    Describes an activity in which students can investigate and evaluate the amount of iron found in most fortified breakfast cereals or cream of wheat. Includes a list of necessary materials, safety precautions, experimental procedure, disposal protocol, and nutritional explanation, utilization, and variations. (JJK)

  20. Iron, transferrin and myelinogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeant, C.; Vesvres, M. H.; Devès, G.; Baron, B.; Guillou, F.

    2003-09-01

    Transferrin (Tf), the iron binding protein of vertebrates serum, is known to be synthesized by oligodendrocytes (Ols) in the central nervous system. It has been postulated that Tf is involved in Ols maturation and myelinogenesis. This link is particularly important in the understanding of a severe human pathology: the multiple sclerosis, which remains without efficient treatment. We generated transgenic mice containing the complete human Tf gene and extensive regulatory sequences from the 5 ' and 3 ' untranslated regions that specifically overexpress Tf in Ols. Brain cytoarchitecture of the transgenic mice appears to be normal in all brain regions examined, total myelin content is increased by 30% and motor coordination is significantly improved when compared with non-transgenic littermates. Tf role in the central nervous system may be related to its affinity for metallic cations. Normal and transgenic mice were used for determination of trace metals (iron, copper and zinc) and minerals (potassium and calcium) concentration in cerebellum and corpus callosum. The freeze-dried samples were prepared to allow proton-induced X-ray emission and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry analyses with the nuclear microprobe in Bordeaux. Preliminary results were obtained and carbon distribution was revealed as a very good analysis to distinguish precisely the white matter region. A comparison of metallic and mineral elements contents in brain between normal and transgenic mice shows that iron, copper and zinc levels remained constant. This result provides evidence that effects of Tf overexpression in the brain do not solely relate to iron transport.

  1. Ferrous Sulfate (Iron)

    MedlinePlus

    (fer' us)Accidental overdose of products containing iron is a leading cause of fatal poisoning in children under the age of 6. Keep this product out of the reach of children. In case of an accidental overdose, call your doctor or a poison ...

  2. Role of clay minerals in the transportation of iron

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carroll, D.

    1958-01-01

    The clay minerals have iron associated with them in several ways: 1. (1) as an essential constituent 2. (2) as a minor constituent within the crystal lattice where it is in isomorphous substitution and 3. (3) as iron oxide on the surface of the mineral platelets. Nontronite, "hydromica," some chlorites, vermiculite, glauconite and chamosite contain iron as an essential constituent. Kaolinite and halloysite have no site within the lattice for iron, but in certain environments iron oxide (goethite or hematite) is intimately associated as a coating on the micelles. Analyses of clay minerals show that the content of Fe2O3 varies: 29 per cent (nontronite), 7??3 per cent (griffithite), 4.5 per cent ("hydromica"), 5.5 per cent (chlorite), 4 per cent (vermiculite) and 18 per cent (glauconite). The FeO content is: 40 per cent (chamosite), 7.8 per cent (griffithite), 1-2 per cent ("hydromica"), 3 per cent (glauconite) and 2 per cent (chlorite). The iron associated with the clay minerals remains stable in the environment in which the minerals occur, but if either pH or Eh or both are changed the iron may be affected. Change of environment will cause: 1. (1) removal of iron by reduction of Fe3+ to Fe2+; 2. (2) ion-exchange reactions; 3. (3) instability of the crystal lattice. Experiments using bacterial activity to produce reducing conditions with kaolinite and halloysite coated with iron oxides and with nontronite in which ferric iron is in the octahedral position within the lattice showed that ferric oxide is removed at Eh +0??215 in fresh water and at Eh +0.098 in sea water. Hematite, goethite, and indefinite iron oxides were removed at different rates. Red ferric oxides were changed to black indefinite noncrystalline ferrous sulphide at Eh -0.020 but reverted to ferric oxide under oxidizing conditions. Nontronite turned bright green under reducing conditions and some of the ferrous iron remained within the lattice on a return to oxidizing conditions. Bacterial activity

  3. Thermodynamic analysis of nanoparticle size effect on kinetics in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis by lanthanum promoted iron catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakhaei Pour, Ali; Housaindokht, Mohammad Reza; Behroozsarand, Alireza; Khodagholi, Mohammad Ali

    2014-08-01

    The kinetic parameters of the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) on iron catalyst are analyzed by size-dependent thermodynamic method. A Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetic equation is considered for evaluation of catalytic activity of lanthanum promoted iron catalyst. A series of unsupported iron catalysts with different particle sizes were prepared via microemulsion method. The experimental results showed that catalyst activity pass from a maximum value by increasing the iron particle size. Also, data presented that iron particle size has considerable effects on adsorption parameters and FTS rates. The ratio of surface tension ( σ) to nanoparticle radius ( r) is important in FTS reaction on iron catalyst. Finally, the results showed that by increasing of iron particle size from 18 to 45 nm the activation energies of catalysts and heats of adsorption of catalysts as two main parameters of FTS reaction increased from 89 to 114 kJ/mol and from 51 to 71 kJ/mol, respectively.

  4. Iron Aluminide Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Schneibel, J.H.

    1998-11-20

    Iron aluminides with the B2 structure are highly oxidation and corrosion resistant. They are thermodynamically compatible with a wide range of ceramics such as TiC, WC, TiB{sub 2}, and ZrB{sub 2}. In addition, liquid iron aluminides wet these ceramics very well. Therefore, FeAl/ceramic composites may be produced by techniques such as liquid phase sintering of powder mixtures, or pressureless melt infiltration of ceramic powders with liquid FeAl. These techniques, the resulting microstructure, and their advantages as well as limitations are described. Iron aluminide composites can be very strong. Room temperature flexure strengths as high as 1.8 GPa have been observed for FeAl/WC. Substantial gains in strength at elevated temperatures (1073 K) have also been demonstrated. Above 40 vol.% WC the room temperature flexure strength becomes flaw-limited. This is thought to be due to processing flaws and limited interfacial strength. The fracture toughness of FeAl/WC is unexpectedly high and follows a mile of mixtures. Interestingly, sufficiently thin (< 1 {micro}m) FeAl ligaments between adjacent WC particles fracture not by cleavage, but in a ductile manner. For these thin ligaments the dislocation pile-ups formed during deformation are not long enough to nucleate cleavage fracture, and their fracture mode is therefore ductile. For several reasons, this brittle-to-ductile size transition does not improve the fracture toughness of the composites significantly. However, since no cleavage cracks are nucleated in sufficiently thin FeAl ligaments, slow crack growth due to ambient water vapor does not occur. Therefore, as compared to monolithic iron aluminizes, environmental embrittlement is dramatically reduced in iron aluminide composites.

  5. Geochemical and mineralogical composition of bog iron ore as a resource for prehistoric iron production - A case study of the Widawa catchment area in Eastern Silesia, Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thelemann, Michael; Bebermeier, Wiebke; Hoelzmann, Philipp

    2016-04-01

    Spreading from the Near East in the declining Bronze Age from the 2nd millennium BCE onwards, the technique of iron smelting reached Eastern Silesia, Poland, in approximately the 2nd century BCE (pre-Roman Iron Age). At this time the region of the Widawa catchment area was inhabited by the Przeworsk culture. While the older moraine landscape of the study area lacks ores from geological rock formations, bog iron ores were relatively widespread and, due to their comparatively easy accessibility, were commonly exploited for early iron production. In this poster the mineralogical and elemental composition of local bog iron ore deposits and iron slag finds, as a by-product of the smelting process, are investigated. The crystalline mineralogical composition of local bog iron ores is dominated by quartz (SiO2) and goethite (α FeO(OH)), in contrast to slag samples in which fayalite (Fe2SiO4), wüstite (FeO) and quartz, with traces of goethite, represent the main minerals. Ores and slags are both characterized by notable hematite (Fe2O3), magnetite (Fe3O4) and maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) contents. Analyzed bog iron ore samples show iron contents of up to 64.9 mass% Fe2O3 (45.4 mass% Fe), whereas the iron contents of bloomery slags vary between 48.7 and 72.0 mass% FeO (37.9 and 56.0 mass% Fe). A principal component analysis of the element contents, which were quantified by portable energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (p-ED-XRF), indicates local variations in the elemental composition. Our results show that bog iron ores are relatively widely distributed with spatially varying iron contents along the Widawa floodplain but present-day formation conditions (e.g. different ground-water levels) are negatively affected by modern land-use practices, such as agriculture and melioration measures.

  6. 49 CFR 192.373 - Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. 192.373... Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.373 Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. (a) Cast or ductile iron... cast iron pipe or ductile iron pipe is installed for use as a service line, the part of the...

  7. 49 CFR 192.373 - Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. 192.373... Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.373 Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. (a) Cast or ductile iron... cast iron pipe or ductile iron pipe is installed for use as a service line, the part of the...

  8. 49 CFR 192.373 - Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. 192.373... Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.373 Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. (a) Cast or ductile iron... cast iron pipe or ductile iron pipe is installed for use as a service line, the part of the...

  9. 49 CFR 192.373 - Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. 192.373... Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.373 Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. (a) Cast or ductile iron... cast iron pipe or ductile iron pipe is installed for use as a service line, the part of the...

  10. 49 CFR 192.373 - Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. 192.373... Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.373 Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. (a) Cast or ductile iron... cast iron pipe or ductile iron pipe is installed for use as a service line, the part of the...

  11. Iron status in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Fairweather-Tait, Susan J.; Wawer, Anna A.; Gillings, Rachel; Jennings, Amy; Myint, Phyo K.

    2014-01-01

    Iron deficiency anaemia is prevalent in older age, particularly after the age of 80. Serum ferritin concentrations also decline, although there is no evidence to suggest that changes in iron stores are an inevitable consequence of ageing. Chronic inflammation is a common condition in older people, making the measurement of iron status difficult, and it is likely that elevated levels of circulating hepcidin are responsible for changes in iron metabolism that result in systemic iron depletion. Other contributory factors are poor diet and some medications, such as aspirin. Anaemia in older age has undesirable health outcomes, including increased susceptibility to falling and depression. However, there are concerns about possible adverse effects of iron supplements, either in relation to pro-inflammatory effects in the gut or inappropriate tissue iron deposition. Brain iron levels are increased with age-related degenerative diseases, but it is not known if this is the cause or a consequence of the disease, and genetic factors are likely to play a role. In order to maintain body iron within the normal range a personalised approach is required, taking into account all of the factors that may affect iron metabolism and the available strategies for preventing iron deficiency or overload. PMID:24275120

  12. Iron and cancer: recent insights.

    PubMed

    Manz, David H; Blanchette, Nicole L; Paul, Bibbin T; Torti, Frank M; Torti, Suzy V

    2016-03-01

    Iron is an essential dietary element. However, the ability of iron to cycle between oxidized and reduced forms also renders it capable of contributing to free radical formation, which can have deleterious effects, including promutagenic effects that can potentiate tumor formation. Dysregulation of iron metabolism can increase cancer risk and promote tumor growth. Cancer cells exhibit an enhanced dependence on iron relative to their normal counterparts, a phenomenon we have termed iron addiction. Work conducted in the past few years has revealed new cellular processes and mechanisms that deepen our understanding of the link between iron and cancer. Control of iron efflux through the combined action of ferroportin, an iron efflux pump, and its regulator hepcidin appears to play an important role in tumorigenesis. Ferroptosis is a form of iron-dependent cell death involving the production of reactive oxygen species. Specific mechanisms involved in ferroptosis, including depletion of glutathione and inhibition of glutathione peroxidase 4, have been uncovered. Ferritinophagy is a newly identified mechanism for degradation of the iron storage protein ferritin. Perturbations of mechanisms that control transcripts encoding proteins that regulate iron have been observed in cancer cells, including differences in miRNA, methylation, and acetylation. These new insights may ultimately provide new therapeutic opportunities for treating cancer. PMID:26890363

  13. Protein Degradation and Iron Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Joel W.; Bruick, Richard K.

    2013-01-01

    Regulation of both systemic and cellular iron homeostasis requires the capacity to sense iron levels and appropriately modify the expression of iron metabolism genes. These responses are coordinated through the efforts of several key regulatory factors including F-box and Leucine-rich Repeat Protein 5 (FBXL5), Iron Regulatory Proteins (IRPs), Hypoxia Inducible Factor (HIF), and ferroportin. Notably, the stability of each of these proteins is regulated in response to iron. Recent discoveries have greatly advanced our understanding of the molecular mechanisms governing iron-sensing and protein degradation within these pathways. It has become clear that iron’s privileged roles in both enzyme catalysis and protein structure contribute to its regulation of protein stability. Moreover, these multiple pathways intersect with one another in larger regulatory networks to maintain iron homeostasis. PMID:22349011

  14. Ferrioxamine excretion in iron-loaded man

    SciTech Connect

    Pippard, M.J.; Callender, S.T.; Finch, C.A.

    1982-08-01

    Factors affecting iron excretion after subcutaneous desferrioxamine infusion were evaluated in individuals with iron overload. Urinary iron varied directly, whereas stool iron varied inversely with the level of erythropoiesis. Ascorbic acid greatly enhanced urinary iron excretion but had a less constant effect on stool iron. Stool iron losses contributed a greater proportion of total iron excretion at higher chelator dosage. These studies indicate the importance of biliary iron excretion in monitoring the effectiveness of desferrioxamine. They also suggest that large chelator doses may remove established iron overload much more rapidly than has previously been realized.

  15. Performance of Nonmigratory Iron Chelating Active Packaging Materials in Viscous Model Food Systems.

    PubMed

    Roman, Maxine J; Decker, Eric A; Goddard, Julie M

    2015-09-01

    Many packaged food products undergo quality deterioration due to iron promoted oxidative reactions. Recently, we have developed a nonmigratory iron chelating active packaging material that represents a novel approach to inhibit oxidation of foods while addressing consumer demands for "cleanˮ labels. A challenge to the field of nonmigratory active packaging is ensuring that surface-immobilized active agents retain activity in a true food system despite diffusional limitations. Yet, the relationship between food viscosity and nonmigratory active packaging activity retention has never been characterized. The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of food viscosity on iron chelation by a nonmigratory iron chelating active packaging material. Methyl cellulose was added to aqueous buffered iron solutions to yield model systems with viscosities ranging from ∼1 to ∼10(5)  mPa·s, representing viscosities ranging from beverage to mayonnaise. Iron chelation was quantified by material-bound iron content using colorimetry and inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES).  Maximum iron chelation was reached in solutions up to viscosity ∼10(2)  mPa·s. In more viscous solutions (up to ∼10(4)  mPa·s), there was a significant decrease in iron chelating capacity (P < 0.05). However, materials still retained at least 76% iron chelating capacity. Additionally, the influence of different food hydrocolloids on the performance of nonmigratory iron chelating active packaging was characterized. Methyl cellulose and carrageenan did not compete with the material for specific iron chelation (P > 0.05). Materials retained 32% to 45% chelating capacity when in contact with competitively chelating hydrocolloids guar gum, locust bean gum, and xanthan gum. This work demonstrates the potential application of nonmigratory iron chelating active packaging in liquid and semi-liquid foods to allow for the removal of synthetic chelators, while

  16. Safe administration of iron sucrose in a patient with a previous hypersensitivity reaction to ferric gluconate.

    PubMed

    Sane, Radhika; Baribeault, David; Rosenberg, Carol L

    2007-04-01

    A 67-year-old woman with iron deficiency anemia required parenteral iron therapy and was treated with intravenous ferric gluconate. She tolerated the first dose, but after the second dose, she developed a tingling feeling all over her body, along with swelling in her hands and feet, and a rash with hives over most of her body. It was thought that she had likely experienced a hypersensitivity reaction to ferric gluconate. The decision was made to continue therapy; however, two modifications were made. The patient was given dexamethasone, diphenhydramine, and ibuprofen 1 hour before administering the third dose, and the infusion time was prolonged by 1 hour. Approximately 45 minutes after the infusion was completed, the patient developed hives on her arms and legs. At the patient's next clinic visit, it was decided that continuation of parenteral iron repletion was necessary, and the decision was made to attempt a challenge with iron sucrose. The patient was given dexamethasone 8 mg to be taken the night before and the morning of treatment. She successfully completed the iron repletion therapy with iron sucrose. Three parenteral iron products are available in the United States: iron dextran, sodium ferric gluconate complex, and iron sucrose. Iron dextran, the oldest of these products, carries the highest risk for hypersensitivity reactions. Available data suggest that either iron sucrose or ferric gluconate can be safely administered to patients with known hypersensitivity to iron dextran. Our patient's experience implies that it may be possible to safely administer iron sucrose to a patient with hypersensitivity to ferric gluconate. This finding has clinical implications and warrants confirmation in a larger population. PMID:17381390

  17. Degradation of chlorofluorocarbons using granular iron and bimetallic irons.

    PubMed

    Jeen, Sung-Wook; Lazar, Snezana; Gui, Lai; Gillham, Robert W

    2014-03-01

    Degradation of trichlorofluoromethane (CFC11) and 1,1,2-trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoroethane (CFC113) by granular iron and bimetallic (nickel- or palladium-enhanced) irons was studied in flow-through column tests. Both compounds were rapidly degraded, following pseudo-first-order kinetics with respect to the parent compounds. The average pseudo-first-order rate constants for CFC11 were similar among different materials, except for palladium-enhanced iron (PdFe), in which the rate of degradation was about two times faster than for the other materials. In the case of CFC113, the rate constants for bimetallic irons were about two to three times greater than for the regular iron material. The smaller than expected differences in degradation rate constants of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) between regular iron and bimetallic irons suggested little, if any, catalytic effect of the bimetallic materials in the initial degradation step. Subsequent degradation steps involved catalytic hydrogenation, however, playing a significant role in further degradation of reaction intermediates. The degradation intermediates and final products of CFC11 and CFC113 suggested that degradation proceeded through hydrogenolysis and α/β-elimination in the presence of regular iron (Fe) and nickel-enhanced iron (NiFe). Even though there is only minor benefit in the use of bimetallic iron in terms of degradation kinetics of the parent CFCs, enhanced degradation rates of intermediates such as chlorotriflouroethene (CTFE) in subsequent reaction steps could be beneficial. PMID:24492233

  18. Aluminium and iron air pollution near an iron casting and aluminium foundry in Turin district (Italy).

    PubMed

    Polizzi, Salvatore; Ferrara, Mauro; Bugiani, Massimiliano; Barbero, Domenico; Baccolo, Tiziana

    2007-09-01

    This work reports the results of an environmental survey carried out in an industrial area in the Province of Turin: its main aim is to assess the levels of iron and aluminium in the outside air during the period from July to September to assess the influence of industrial activity (a cast-iron and aluminium foundry) which is interrupted during the month of August, on the level of metals present in the air. Conducting the analysis during this period of time made it possible to avoid the confounding effect of pollution due to domestic central heating. The measurements were taken from nine areas at different distances from the foundry in the area and according to the direction of the prevailing winds, as deduced from the historical data. The results of this survey show a statistically significant difference in iron and aluminium levels in the outside air in the geographic areas between the two main periods examined: during August (no foundry activity) v/s July-September (foundry activity). The values recorded are: Aluminium 0.4+/-0.45 microg/m(3) v/s 1.12+/-1.29 microg/m(3) (p<0.0001); Iron 0.95+/-0.56 microg/m(3) v/s 1.6+/-1.0 microg/m(3) (p<0.0001). There were no statistically significant differences between the nine sampling points from the point of view of the sampling sites, climate conditions and wind directions. We found no correlation with car traffic, in terms of the number of vehicles, and metals. The values of iron tended to be higher in the areas farther away from the foundry site in the areas located along the path of the prevailing winds. PMID:17637476

  19. Magnetorotational iron core collapse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Symbalisty, E. M. D.

    1984-01-01

    During its final evolutionary stages, a massive star, as considered in current astrophysical theory, undergoes rapid collapse, thereby triggering a sequence of a catastrophic event which results in a Type II supernova explosion. A remnant neutron star or a black hole is left after the explosion. Stellar collapse occurs, when thermonuclear fusion has consumed the lighter elements present. At this stage, the core consists of iron. Difficulties arise regarding an appropriate model with respect to the core collapse. The present investigation is concerned with the evolution of a Type II supernova core including the effects of rotation and magnetic fields. A simple neutrino model is developed which reproduced the spherically symmetric results of Bowers and Wilson (1982). Several two-dimensional computational models of stellar collapse are studied, taking into account a case in which a 15 solar masses iron core was artificially given rotational and magnetic energy.

  20. Iron pages of HTSC

    SciTech Connect

    Gasparov, V. A.

    2010-08-15

    Experimental data are presented on the superconducting and electronic properties of iron-based high-temperature superconductors in the normal and superconducting states. The following topics are discussed: lattice structure; structure of magnetic vortices; magnetic penetration depth; Fermi surface; isotope effect; and critical magnetic fields both in oxide compounds of 1111 type and oxide-free compounds of 122, 111, and 011 types as a function of the doping level, temperature, and external pressure.

  1. Iron respiration by Acidiphilium cryptum at pH 5.

    PubMed

    Bilgin, Azize Azra; Silverstein, JoAnn; Jenkins, Joy D

    2004-07-01

    The growth of acidophilic iron respiring bacteria at pH > 4.5 may be a key to the transition from acidic to circumneutral conditions that would occur during restoration of acid mine drainage sites. Flasks containing Acidiphilium cryptum ATCC 33463 were incubated initially under aerobic conditions in liquid medium containing Fe(2)(SO(4))(3) and glucose at an initial pH of 5. Significant iron respiration was observed after flasks were sealed to prevent oxygenation; at the same time, medium pH increased from 4.5 to 6. No soluble Fe(III) was detected throughout the experiments, consistent with pH conditions, indicating that bacteria were able to respire using precipitated ferric iron species. In addition, the concentration of soluble Fe(2+) reached a plateau, even though iron respiration appeared to continue, possibly due to precipitation of mixed Fe (II)/Fe(III)-oxide as magnetite. Results suggest that A. cryptum has a wide range of pH tolerance, which may enable it to play a role in controlling acid generation by means of establishing growth conditions favorable to neutrophilic bacteria such as sulfate reduction. PMID:19712391

  2. Cold iron cos THETA magnet option for the SSC

    SciTech Connect

    Reardon, P.

    1985-01-01

    We review first the evolution over the past several years of a cold iron, high field cos THETA magnet design option for the SSC. We note the collaborative approach pursued by BNL and LBL on the 2-in-1 option, and the culmination of this effort in the tests of the BNL 4.5 m model magnets. Next, we discuss the subsequent 1-in-1 option being pursued jointly by BNL, Fermilab and LBL.

  3. Polyaniline layer for iron protection in sulfate medium

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, M.C.; Goff, A.H.L.; Joiret, S.; Dinh, N.N.; Toan, N.N.

    1999-03-01

    Polyaniline (PANI) has been electrodeposited on iron in oxalic medium in order to evaluate the protective character of this polymer. PANI has been found to be efficient for corrosion protection during at least 10 h in a pH 4.5 sulfate medium. Interaction between the passive layer and polymer has been studied using spectroelectrochemical techniques such as Raman spectroscopy and reflectance measurements.

  4. Tungsten in iron meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, E. R. D.

    1978-01-01

    Tungsten concentrations have been determined by instrumental neutron activation in 104 iron meteorites, and range from 0.07 to 5 microg/g. In individual groups, concentrations vary by factors of between 1.5 and 8, but there are negative W-Ni correlations in 8 groups: IAB, IC, IIAB, IID, IIE, IIIAB, IIICD, and IIIF. The lowest W concentrations are found in groups IAB and IIICD, which also have the smallest slopes on a W-Ni plot. Eighteen anomalous irons have W concentrations between 5 microg/g (Butler) and 0.11 microg/g (Rafrueti). The distribution of W in irons shows similarities to that of other refractory sideophilic elements (except Mo), but is closest to the distribution of Ru and Pt. Assuming that chemical trends in group IIIAB were produced by fractional crystallization, a value of 1.6 can be deduced for the distribution coefficient of W between solid and liquid metal, as compared with 0.89 for Mo. Experimental evidence in support of these values is tenuous.

  5. Flare Plasma Iron Abundance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Brian R.; Dan, Chau; Jain, Rajmal; Schwartz, Richard A.; Tolbert, Anne K.

    2008-01-01

    The equivalent width of the iron-line complex at 6.7 keV seen in flare X-ray spectra suggests that the iron abundance of the hottest plasma at temperatures >approx.10 MK may sometimes be significantly lower than the nominal coronal abundance of four times the photospheric value that is commonly assumed. This conclusion is based on X-ray spectral observations of several flares seen in common with the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and the Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS) on the second Indian geostationary satellite, GSAT-2. The implications of this will be discussed as it relates to the origin of the hot flare plasma - either plasma already in the corona that is directly heated during the flare energy release process or chromospheric plasma that is heated by flare-accelerated particles and driven up into the corona. Other possible explanations of lower-than-expected equivalent widths of the iron-line complex will also be discussed.

  6. Measurement of iron absorption from meals contaminated with iron

    SciTech Connect

    Hallberg, L.; Bjoern-Rasmussen, E.

    1981-12-01

    A method is described to measure in vitro the extent of isotopic exchange between the native nonheme food iron and added inorganic reduction to radioiron tracer. The food is digested with pepsin and trypsin in the presence of radioiron. The exchangeability of food iron is calculated from the specific activity in the food and in an extract of bathophenantroline in isoamyl alcohol obtained after digesting this food. The precision and accuracy of the method is illustrated by two kinds of studies, those in which different amounts of contamination iron are added to a meal and those evaluating contamination iron in natural meals. The present method will make it possible to measure validly iron absorption from meals contaminated with unknown amounts of iron of unknown exchangeability with the extrinsic radioiron tracer.

  7. Formation of glutathionyl dinitrosyl iron complexes protects against iron genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Lewandowska, Hanna; Sadło, Jarosław; Męczyńska, Sylwia; Stępkowski, Tomasz M; Wójciuk, Grzegorz; Kruszewski, Marcin

    2015-07-28

    Dinitrosyl iron(i) complexes (DNICs), intracellular NO donors, are important factors in nitric oxide-dependent regulation of cellular metabolism and signal transduction. It has been shown that NO diminishes the toxicity of iron ions and vice versa. To gain insight into the possible role of DNIC in this phenomenon, we examined the effect of GS-DNIC formation on the ability of iron ions to mediate DNA damage, by treatment of the pUC19 plasmid with physiologically relevant concentrations of GS-DNIC. It was shown that GS-DNIC formation protects against the genotoxic effect of iron ions alone and iron ions in the presence of a naturally abundant antioxidant, GSH. This sheds new light on the iron-related protective effect of NO under the circumstances of oxidative stress. PMID:26079708

  8. Iron homeostasis and eye disease

    PubMed Central

    Loh, Allison; Hadziahmetovic, Majda; Dunaief, Joshua L.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Iron is necessary for life, but excess iron can be toxic to tissues. Iron is thought to damage tissues primarily by generating oxygen free radicals through the Fenton reaction. We present an overview of the evidence supporting iron's potential contribution to a broad range of eye disease using an anatomical approach. Firstly, iron can be visualized in the cornea as iron lines in the normal aging cornea as well as in diseases like keratoconus and pterygium. In the lens, we present the evidence for the role of oxidative damage in cataractogenesis. Also, we review the evidence that iron may play a role in the pathogenesis of the retinal disease age-related macular degeneration. Although currently there is no direct link between excess iron and development of optic neuropathies, ferrous iron's ability to form highly reactive oxygen species may play a role in optic nerve pathology. Lastly, we discuss recent advances in prevention and therapeutics for eye disease with antioxidants and iron chelators,. PMID:19059309

  9. Ferric iron reduction by sulfur- and iron-oxidizing bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Brock, T D; Gustafson, J

    1976-01-01

    Acidophilic bacteria of the genera Thiobacillus and Sulfolobus are able to reduce ferric iron when growing on elemental sulfur as an energy source. It has been previously thought that ferric iron serves as a nonbiological oxidant in the formation of acid mine drainage and in the leaching of ores, but these results suggest that bacterial catalysis may play a significant role in the reactivity of ferric iron. PMID:825043

  10. 45 CFR 152.45 - Transition to the exchanges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... the Exchanges, established under sections 1311 or 1321 of the Affordable Care Act, to ensure that... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Transition to the exchanges. 152.45 Section 152.45 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES REQUIREMENTS RELATING TO HEALTH CARE ACCESS...

  11. 45 CFR 152.45 - Transition to the exchanges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... the Exchanges, established under sections 1311 or 1321 of the Affordable Care Act, to ensure that... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Transition to the exchanges. 152.45 Section 152.45 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES REQUIREMENTS RELATING TO HEALTH CARE ACCESS...

  12. 45 CFR 74.45 - Cost and price analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cost and price analysis. 74.45 Section 74.45... analysis. Some form of cost or price analysis shall be made and documented in the procurement files in connection with every procurement action. Price analysis may be accomplished in various ways, including...

  13. 45 CFR 74.45 - Cost and price analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cost and price analysis. 74.45 Section 74.45... analysis. Some form of cost or price analysis shall be made and documented in the procurement files in connection with every procurement action. Price analysis may be accomplished in various ways, including...

  14. Intestinal Iron Homeostasis and Colon Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Xiang; Shah, Yatrik M.

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cause of cancer-related deaths in industrialized countries. Understanding the mechanisms of growth and progression of CRC is essential to improve treatment. Iron is an essential nutrient for cell growth. Iron overload caused by hereditary mutations or excess dietary iron uptake has been identified as a risk factor for CRC. Intestinal iron is tightly controlled by iron transporters that are responsible for iron uptake, distribution, and export. Dysregulation of intestinal iron transporters are observed in CRC and lead to iron accumulation in tumors. Intratumoral iron results in oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation, protein modification and DNA damage with consequent promotion of oncogene activation. In addition, excess iron in intestinal tumors may lead to increase in tumor-elicited inflammation and tumor growth. Limiting intratumoral iron through specifically chelating excess intestinal iron or modulating activities of iron transporter may be an attractive therapeutic target for CRC. PMID:23812305

  15. Pagophagia in iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Tatsumi; Kawati, Yasunori

    2014-04-01

    The relationship between pagophagia (ice pica) and iron deficiency anemia was studied. All 81 patients with iron deficiency anemia defined as hemoglobin <12.0 g/dl and ferritin level <12 ng/ml were interviewed about their habits of eating ice or other non-food substances. Pagophagia was defined as compulsive and repeated ingestion of at least one tray of ice or ice eating which was relieved after iron administration. Pagophagia was present in 13 patients (16.0%). All patients who received oral iron were periodically assessed employing a questionnaire on pagophagia and laboratory data. Iron therapy can cure the pagophagia earlier than hemoglobin recovery and repair of tissue iron deficiency. Although the pathogenesis of pagophagia is unclear, a biochemical approach involving the central nervous system might elucidate the mechanism underlying these abnormal behaviors. PMID:24850454

  16. Microbial reduction of iron ore

    DOEpatents

    Hoffmann, M.R.; Arnold, R.G.; Stephanopoulos, G.

    1989-11-14

    A process is provided for reducing iron ore by treatment with microorganisms which comprises forming an aqueous mixture of iron ore, microorganisms operable for reducing the ferric iron of the iron ore to ferrous iron, and a substrate operable as an energy source for the microbial reduction; and maintaining the aqueous mixture for a period of time and under conditions operable to effect the reduction of the ore. Preferably the microorganism is Pseudomonas sp. 200 and the reduction conducted anaerobically with a domestic wastewater as the substrate. An aqueous solution containing soluble ferrous iron can be separated from the reacted mixture, treated with a base to precipitate ferrous hydroxide which can then be recovered as a concentrated slurry. 11 figs.

  17. Microbial reduction of iron ore

    DOEpatents

    Hoffmann, Michael R.; Arnold, Robert G.; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    1989-01-01

    A process is provided for reducing iron ore by treatment with microorganisms which comprises forming an aqueous mixture of iron ore, microorganisms operable for reducing the ferric iron of the iron ore to ferrous iron, and a substrate operable as an energy source for the microbial reduction; and maintaining the aqueous mixture for a period of time and under conditions operable to effect the reduction of the ore. Preferably the microorganism is Pseudomonas sp. 200 and the reduction conducted anaerobically with a domestic wastewater as the substrate. An aqueous solution containing soluble ferrous iron can be separated from the reacted mixture, treated with a base to precipitate ferrous hydroxide which can then be recovered as a concentrated slurry.

  18. Iron metabolism in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Walker, B L; Tiong, J W; Jefferies, W A

    2001-01-01

    Most living things require iron to exist. Iron has many functions within cells but is rarely found unbound because of its propensity to catalyze the formation of toxic free radicals. Thus the regulation of iron requirements by cells and the acquisition and uptake of iron into tissues in multicellular organisms is tightly regulated. In humans, understanding iron transport and utility has recently been advanced by a "great conjunction" of molecular genetics in simple organisms, identifying genes involved in genetic diseases of metal metabolism and by the application of traditional cell physiology approaches. We are now able to approach a rudimentary understanding of the "iron cycle" within mammals. In the future, this information will be applied toward modulating the outcome of therapies designed to overcome diseases involving metals. PMID:11597005

  19. The Irony of Iron – Biogenic Iron Oxides as an Iron Source to the Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Emerson, David

    2016-01-01

    Primary productivity in at least a third of the sunlit open ocean is thought to be iron-limited. Primary sources of dissolved iron (dFe) to the ocean are hydrothermal venting, flux from the sediments along continental margins, and airborne dust. This article provides a general review of sources of hydrothermal and sedimentary iron to the ocean, and speculates upon the role that iron-cycling microbes play in controlling iron dynamics from these sources. Special attention is paid to iron-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) that live by oxidizing iron and producing biogenic iron oxides as waste products. The presence and ubiquity of FeOB both at hydrothermal systems and in sediments is only beginning to be appreciated. The biogenic oxides they produce have unique properties that could contribute significantly to the dynamics of dFe in the ocean. Changes in the physical and chemical characteristics of the ocean due to climate change and ocean acidification will undoubtedly impact the microbial iron cycle. A better understanding of the contemporary role of microbes in the iron cycle will help in predicting how these changes could ultimately influence marine primary productivity. PMID:26779157

  20. The Irony of Iron - Biogenic Iron Oxides as an Iron Source to the Ocean.

    PubMed

    Emerson, David

    2015-01-01

    Primary productivity in at least a third of the sunlit open ocean is thought to be iron-limited. Primary sources of dissolved iron (dFe) to the ocean are hydrothermal venting, flux from the sediments along continental margins, and airborne dust. This article provides a general review of sources of hydrothermal and sedimentary iron to the ocean, and speculates upon the role that iron-cycling microbes play in controlling iron dynamics from these sources. Special attention is paid to iron-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) that live by oxidizing iron and producing biogenic iron oxides as waste products. The presence and ubiquity of FeOB both at hydrothermal systems and in sediments is only beginning to be appreciated. The biogenic oxides they produce have unique properties that could contribute significantly to the dynamics of dFe in the ocean. Changes in the physical and chemical characteristics of the ocean due to climate change and ocean acidification will undoubtedly impact the microbial iron cycle. A better understanding of the contemporary role of microbes in the iron cycle will help in predicting how these changes could ultimately influence marine primary productivity. PMID:26779157

  1. Enzymes of respiratory iron oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, R. II.

    1992-01-01

    This report describes experimental progress in characterizing and identifying redox proteins in a number of iron-oxidizing bacteria. Sections of the paper are entitled (1) In Situ electrolysis was explored to achieve enhanced yields of iron-oxidizing bacteria, (2)Structure/function studies were performed on redox-active biomolecules from Thiobacillus ferrooxidans, (3) Novel redox-active biomolecules were demonstrated in other iron autotrophs, and (4) New probes of metalloprotein electron-transfer reactions were synthesized and characterized.

  2. Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation: update on pathogenic mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Levi, Sonia; Finazzi, Dario

    2014-01-01

    Perturbation of iron distribution is observed in many neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease, but the comprehension of the metal role in the development and progression of such disorders is still very limited. The combination of more powerful brain imaging techniques and faster genomic DNA sequencing procedures has allowed the description of a set of genetic disorders characterized by a constant and often early accumulation of iron in specific brain regions and the identification of the associated genes; these disorders are now collectively included in the category of neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA). So far 10 different genetic forms have been described but this number is likely to increase in short time. Two forms are linked to mutations in genes directly involved in iron metabolism: neuroferritinopathy, associated to mutations in the FTL gene and aceruloplasminemia, where the ceruloplasmin gene product is defective. In the other forms the connection with iron metabolism is not evident at all and the genetic data let infer the involvement of other pathways: Pank2, Pla2G6, C19orf12, COASY, and FA2H genes seem to be related to lipid metabolism and to mitochondria functioning, WDR45 and ATP13A2 genes are implicated in lysosomal and autophagosome activity, while the C2orf37 gene encodes a nucleolar protein of unknown function. There is much hope in the scientific community that the study of the NBIA forms may provide important insight as to the link between brain iron metabolism and neurodegenerative mechanisms and eventually pave the way for new therapeutic avenues also for the more common neurodegenerative disorders. In this work, we will review the most recent findings in the molecular mechanisms underlining the most common forms of NBIA and analyze their possible link with brain iron metabolism. PMID:24847269

  3. Replacing London's cast iron mains

    SciTech Connect

    Thorne, A. ); Mathews, P. )

    1992-07-01

    This paper discusses the cast iron gas distribution systems that exist in many cities and contains considerable amounts of pipe that vary in age from 20 to 150 years. In many ways, cast iron is an excellent material. It is inherently corrosion resistant, easy to install and cheap. However, it is also brittle and smaller diameter cast iron pipe has a relatively low beam strength. This can lead, under some circumstances, to failure without external warning, with typically a full-circumferential failure. In congested areas this can lead to serious consequences. As a result, cast iron replacement programs are a common feature in such urban gas distribution systems.

  4. Heritability of Serum Iron Measures in the Hemochromatosis and Iron Overload Screening (HEIRS) Family Study

    PubMed Central

    McLaren, Christine E.; Barton, James C.; Eckfeldt, John H.; McLaren, Gordon D.; Acton, Ronald T.; Adams, Paul C.; Henkin, Leora F.; Gordeuk, Victor R.; Vulpe, Chris D.; Harris, Emily L.; Harrison, Barbara W.; Reiss, Jacob A.; Snively, Beverly M.

    2013-01-01

    Heritability is the proportion of observed variation in a trait among individuals in a population that is attributable to hereditary factors. The HEIRS Family Study estimated heritability of serum iron measures. Probands were HFE C282Y homozygotes or non-C282Y homozygotes with elevated transferrin saturation (TS > 50%, men; TS > 45%, women) and serum ferritin concentration (SF > 300 μg/L, men; SF > 200 μg/L, women). Heritability (h2) was estimated by variance component analysis of TS, natural logarithm (ln) of SF, and unsaturated iron-binding capacity (UIBC). Participants (N=942) were 77% Caucasians, 10% Asians, 8% Hispanics, and 5% other race/ethnicities. Average age (SD) was 49 (16) y; 57% were female. For HFE C282Y homozygote probands and their family members, excluding variation due to HFE C282Y and H63D genotype and measured demographic and environmental factors, the residual h2 (SE) was 0.21 (0.07) for TS, 0.37 (0.08) for ln SF, and 0.34 (0.08) for UIBC (all P < 0.0004 for comparisons with zero). For the non-C282Y homozygote proband group, residual h2 was significant with a value of 0.64 (0.26) for ln SF (p=0.0096). In conclusion, serum iron measures have significant heritability components, after excluding known genetic and non-genetic sources of variation. PMID:20095037

  5. Registration of Vision 45 Wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ‘Vision 45’ (Reg. No. CV-1110, PI 667642), is a hard red winter (HRW) wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivar that was developed and tested as VA07HRW-45 and released by the Virginia Agricultural Experiment Station in 2012. Vision 45 was derived from the cross ‘Provinciale’/‘Vision 10’ using a modifie...

  6. 49 CFR 192.489 - Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron... for Corrosion Control § 192.489 Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron pipelines. (a) General graphitization. Each segment of cast iron or ductile iron pipe on which general graphitization is found to...

  7. 49 CFR 192.489 - Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron... for Corrosion Control § 192.489 Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron pipelines. (a) General graphitization. Each segment of cast iron or ductile iron pipe on which general graphitization is found to...

  8. 49 CFR 192.489 - Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron... for Corrosion Control § 192.489 Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron pipelines. (a) General graphitization. Each segment of cast iron or ductile iron pipe on which general graphitization is found to...

  9. 49 CFR 192.489 - Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron... for Corrosion Control § 192.489 Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron pipelines. (a) General graphitization. Each segment of cast iron or ductile iron pipe on which general graphitization is found to...

  10. 49 CFR 192.489 - Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron... for Corrosion Control § 192.489 Remedial measures: Cast iron and ductile iron pipelines. (a) General graphitization. Each segment of cast iron or ductile iron pipe on which general graphitization is found to...

  11. Effects of iron deficiency on iron binding and internalization into acidic vacuoles in Dunaliella salina.

    PubMed

    Paz, Yakov; Shimoni, Eyal; Weiss, Meira; Pick, Uri

    2007-07-01

    Uptake of iron in the halotolerant alga Dunaliella salina is mediated by a transferrin-like protein (TTf), which binds and internalizes Fe(3+) ions. Recently, we found that iron deficiency induces a large enhancement of iron binding, which is associated with accumulation of three other plasma membrane proteins that associate with TTf. In this study, we characterized the kinetic properties of iron binding and internalization and identified the site of iron internalization. Iron deficiency induces a 4-fold increase in Fe binding, but only 50% enhancement in the rate of iron uptake and also increases the affinity for iron and bicarbonate, a coligand for iron binding. These results indicate that iron deprivation leads to accumulation and modification of iron-binding sites. Iron uptake in iron-sufficient cells is preceded by an apparent time lag, resulting from prebound iron, which can be eliminated by unloading iron-binding sites. Iron is tightly bound to surface-exposed sites and hardly exchanges with medium iron. All bound iron is subsequently internalized. Accumulation of iron inhibits further iron binding and internalization. The vacuolar inhibitor bafilomycin inhibits iron uptake and internalization. Internalized iron was localized by electron microscopy within vacuolar structures that were identified as acidic vacuoles. Iron internalization is accompanied by endocytosis of surface proteins into these acidic vacuoles. A novel kinetic mechanism for iron uptake is proposed, which includes two pools of bound/compartmentalized iron separated by a rate-limiting internalization stage. The major parameter that is modulated by iron deficiency is the iron-binding capacity. We propose that excessive iron binding in iron-deficient cells serves as a temporary reservoir for iron that is subsequently internalized. This mechanism is particularly suitable for organisms that are exposed to large fluctuations in iron availability. PMID:17513481

  12. Studies of hypervalent iron

    SciTech Connect

    Bielski, B.H.J.

    1989-01-01

    The iron (IV), (V) and (VI) oxidation states are of great interest because of their role in catalytic oxidation/hydroxylation reactions. This report summarizes the information currently available on the kinetic and chemical properties of the water-soluble ions of FeO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}, FeO{sub 4}{sup 3{minus}} and FeO{sub 4}{sup 4{minus}}, their protonated forms, and/or simple complex derivatives. The discussion includes their radiation-induced formation, decay kinetics, reactivity with other compounds, determination of their respective pK{sub a} values as well as spectral properties. 32 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. IRON TEEMING FROM CUPOLA (UPPER RIGHT CORNER) DUCTILE IRON LADLE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    IRON TEEMING FROM CUPOLA (UPPER RIGHT CORNER) DUCTILE IRON LADLE MOVING DOWN TRACK IN PREPARATION FOR DISTRIBUTION TO DE LAVAUD MACHINES. - United States Pipe & Foundry Company Plant, Melting & Treatment Areas, 2023 St. Louis Avenue at I-20/59, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  14. IRON TEEMING FROM CUPOLA (UPPER RIGHT CORNER) DUCTILE IRON LADLE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    IRON TEEMING FROM CUPOLA (UPPER RIGHT CORNER) DUCTILE IRON LADLE MOVING DOWN TRACK IN PREPARATION FOR DISTRIBUTION TO DE LAVAUD MACHINES, LADLE TRANSFER CRANE ON FAR LEFT. - United States Pipe & Foundry Company Plant, Melting & Treatment Areas, 2023 St. Louis Avenue at I-20/59, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  15. MALLEABLE IRON BULL LADLE, HOLDS IRON AFTER IT IS TAPPED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MALLEABLE IRON BULL LADLE, HOLDS IRON AFTER IT IS TAPPED OUT OF THE CUPOLA UNTIL IT NEEDED BY POURERS ON THE CONVEYOR LINES WHO FILL MOBILE LADLES ATTACHED TO OVERHEAD RAIL SYSTEMS AS THE BULL LADLE TIPS. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Malleable Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  16. Iron uptake and iron-repressible polypeptides in Yersinia pestis.

    PubMed Central

    Lucier, T S; Fetherston, J D; Brubaker, R R; Perry, R D

    1996-01-01

    Pigmented (Pgm+) cells of Yersinia pestis are virulent, are sensitive to pesticin, adsorb exogenous hemin at 26 degrees C (Hms+), produce iron-repressible outer membrane proteins, and grow at 37 degrees C in iron-deficient media. These traits are lost upon spontaneous deletion of a chromosomal 102-kb pgm locus (Pgm-). Here we demonstrate that an Hms+ but pesticin-resistant (Pst(r)) mutant acquired a 5-bp deletion in the pesticin receptor gene (psn) encoding IrpB to IrpD. Growth and assimilation of iron by Pgm- and Hms+ Pst(r) mutants were markedly inhibited by ferrous chelators at 37 degrees C; inhibition by ferric and ferrous chelators was less effective at 26 degrees C. Iron-deficient growth at 26 degrees C induced iron-regulated outer membrane proteins of 34, 28.5, and 22.5 kDa and periplasmic polypeptides of 33.5 and 30 kDa. These findings provide a basis for understanding the psn-driven system of iron uptake, indicate the existence of at least one additional 26 degrees C-dependent iron assimilation system, and define over 30 iron-repressible proteins in Y. pestis. PMID:8757829

  17. Colloidal Suspended Iron in Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiller, A. M.

    2009-12-01

    Iron is transported in most rivers predominantly in two physical-chemical forms: a) organic complexes of Fe(III) and b) crystalline or poorly-ordered suspended phases frequently dominated by iron oxides. These two forms have different properties with respect to transport, bioavailability, and sorption. For the suspended phase iron, the fraction in the colloidal size range may be especially important given the interactions of ferric oxide surfaces with dissolved metal ions and organic compounds. We report the concentrations of colloidal (20 - 450 nm) suspended particulate iron in a wide variety of rivers. Goals of this effort are to ascertain the ubiquity of this material and also to examine other fluvial variables as indicators of its sources and nature. This, in turn, should lead to an understanding of how landscape/climate change could affect fluvial colloidal suspended iron. Possible sources of suspended colloidal iron include ferric oxides precipitated from the oxidation of ferrous iron derived from reducing environments, alumino-silicates derived from physical weathering, products of chemical weathering, and flushing of soils. We observe most commonly that increasing concentrations of colloidal suspended iron follow indicators of reducing sources (e.g., higher dissolved Mn and Ce anomaly close to 1), suggesting that this material is dominated by freshly precipitated iron oxides. Only in glacial watersheds do we find colloidal suspended iron instead correlating with colloidal suspended Si, and hence, likely to be associated with alumino-silicates. We also observe that colloidal suspended iron correlates well with the UV absorbance associated with this size range (20 - 450 nm).

  18. Compacted graphite iron: Cast iron makes a comeback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, S.

    1994-08-01

    Although compacted graphite iron has been known for more than four decades, the absence of a reliable mass-production technique has resulted in relatively little effort to exploit its operational benefits. However, a proven on-line process control technology developed by SinterCast allows for series production of complex components in high-quality CGI. The improved mechanical properties of compacted graphite iron relative to conventional gray iron allow for substantial weight reduction in gasoline and diesel engines or substantial increases in horsepower, or an optimal combination of both. Concurrent with these primary benefits, CGI also provides significant emissions and fuel efficiency benefits allowing automakers to meet legislated performance standards. The operational and environmental benefits of compacted graphite iron together with its low cost and recyclability reinforce cast iron as a prime engineering material for the future.

  19. Can Iron Lift Your Learning Ability?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schibeci, Renato

    1997-01-01

    Presents samples of publicly available materials related to the role of iron in the diet. Summarizes what nutritionists feel about iron in the human diet and suggests some experiments related to iron for the classroom. (AIM)

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Iron-Deficiency Anemia KidsHealth > For Parents > Iron-Deficiency Anemia Print A ... common nutritional deficiency in children. About Iron-Deficiency Anemia Every red blood cell in the body contains ...

  1. The Iron Metallome in Eukaryotic Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Dlouhy, Adrienne C.; Outten, Caryn E.

    2013-01-01

    This chapter is focused on the iron metallome in eukaryotes at the cellular and subcellular level, including properties, utilization in metalloproteins, trafficking, storage, and regulation of these processes. Studies in the model eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae and mammalian cells will be highlighted. The discussion of iron properties will center on the speciation and localization of intracellular iron as well as the cellular and molecular mechanisms for coping with both low iron bioavailability and iron toxicity. The section on iron metalloproteins will emphasize heme, iron-sulfur cluster, and non-heme iron centers, particularly their cellular roles and mechanisms of assembly. The section on iron uptake, trafficking, and storage will compare methods used by yeast and mammalian cells to import iron, how this iron is brought into various organelles, and types of iron storage proteins. Regulation of these processes will be compared between yeast and mammalian cells at the transcriptional, post-transcriptional, and post-translational levels. PMID:23595675

  2. 40 CFR 420.45 - Pretreatment standards for existing sources (PSES).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS IRON AND STEEL MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Steelmaking Subcategory § 420.45 Pretreatment standards for existing sources (PSES). Except as provided in 40 CFR 403.7... owned treatment works must comply with 40 CFR part 403 and achieve the following pretreatment...

  3. 40 CFR 420.45 - Pretreatment standards for existing sources (PSES).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS IRON AND STEEL MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Steelmaking Subcategory § 420.45 Pretreatment standards for existing sources (PSES). Except as provided in 40 CFR 403.7... owned treatment works must comply with 40 CFR part 403 and achieve the following pretreatment...

  4. 40 CFR 420.45 - Pretreatment standards for existing sources (PSES).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS IRON AND STEEL MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Steelmaking Subcategory § 420.45 Pretreatment standards for existing sources (PSES). Except as provided in 40 CFR 403.7... owned treatment works must comply with 40 CFR part 403 and achieve the following pretreatment...

  5. 40 CFR 420.45 - Pretreatment standards for existing sources (PSES).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS IRON AND STEEL MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Steelmaking Subcategory § 420.45 Pretreatment standards for existing sources (PSES). Except as provided in 40 CFR 403.7... owned treatment works must comply with 40 CFR part 403 and achieve the following pretreatment...

  6. 40 CFR 420.45 - Pretreatment standards for existing sources (PSES).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS IRON AND STEEL MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Steelmaking Subcategory § 420.45 Pretreatment standards for existing sources (PSES). Except as provided in 40 CFR 403.7... owned treatment works must comply with 40 CFR part 403 and achieve the following pretreatment...

  7. Influence of laser pulse energy on emission lines intensity in the femtosecond laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of iron in aqua solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golik, S. S.; Ilyin, A. A.; Babiy, M. Y.; Biryukova, Yu. S.; Lisitsa, V. V.; Shmirko, K. A.

    2015-11-01

    The influence of pulse energy on the time evolution of the intensity of the continuum and emission lines of plasma generated on the surface of aqueous solutions of iron by focused radiation Ti: sapphire laser with a wavelength of 800 nm and pulse duration of 45 fs and a range of energy 3-7 mJ was investigated. The calibration curve for iron in water and 3-ó limit of detection of iron in water was obtained.

  8. 21 CFR 186.1374 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Iron oxides. 186.1374 Section 186.1374 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 186.1374 Iron oxides. (a) Iron oxides (oxides of iron, CAS Reg. No. 1332-37-2) are undefined mixtures of iron (II) oxide (CAS Reg. No. 1345-25-1, black cubic crystals) and iron...

  9. 21 CFR 186.1374 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Iron oxides. 186.1374 Section 186.1374 Food and....1374 Iron oxides. (a) Iron oxides (oxides of iron, CAS Reg. No. 1332-37-2) are undefined mixtures of iron (II) oxide (CAS Reg. No. 1345-25-1, black cubic crystals) and iron (III) oxide (CAS Reg. No....

  10. 21 CFR 186.1374 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Iron oxides. 186.1374 Section 186.1374 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 186.1374 Iron oxides. (a) Iron oxides (oxides of iron, CAS Reg. No. 1332-37-2) are undefined mixtures of iron (II) oxide (CAS Reg. No. 1345-25-1, black cubic crystals) and iron...

  11. 21 CFR 186.1374 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Iron oxides. 186.1374 Section 186.1374 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 186.1374 Iron oxides. (a) Iron oxides (oxides of iron, CAS Reg. No. 1332-37-2) are undefined mixtures of iron (II) oxide (CAS Reg. No. 1345-25-1, black cubic crystals) and iron...

  12. 21 CFR 186.1374 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Iron oxides. 186.1374 Section 186.1374 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 186.1374 Iron oxides. (a) Iron oxides (oxides of iron, CAS Reg. No. 1332-37-2) are undefined mixtures of iron (II) oxide (CAS Reg. No. 1345-25-1, black cubic crystals) and iron...

  13. Iron biofortification of maize grain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mineral nutrient deficiencies are a worldwide problem that is directly correlated with poverty and food insecurity. The most common of these is iron deficiency; more than one-third of the world’s population suffers from iron deficiency-induced anemia, 80% of which are in developing countries. The co...

  14. Iron biofortification of maize grain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mineral nutrient deficiencies are a worldwide problem that is directly correlated with poverty and food insecurity. The most common of these is iron deficiency; more than one-third of the world’s population suffers from iron deficiency-induced anemia, 80% of which are in developing countries. The de...

  15. Iron contamination in silicon technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Istratov, A. A.; Hieslmair, H.; Weber, E. R.

    This article continues the review of fundamental physical properties of iron and its complexes in silicon (Appl. Phys. A 69, 13 (1999)), and is focused on ongoing applied research of iron in silicon technology. The first section of this article presents an analysis of the effect of iron on devices, including integrated circuits, power devices, and solar cells. Then, sources of unintentional iron contamination and reaction paths of iron during device manufacturing are discussed. Experimental techniques to measure trace contamination levels of iron in silicon, such as minority carrier lifetime techniques (SPV, μ-PCD, and ELYMAT), deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS), total X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) and vapor-phase decomposition TXRF (VPD-TXRF), atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS), mass spectrometry and its modifications (SIMS, SNMS, ICP-MS), and neutron activation analysis (NAA) are reviewed in the second section of the article. Prospective analytical tools, such as heavy-ion backscattering spectroscopy (HIBS) and synchrotron-based X-ray microprobe techniques (XPS, XANES, XRF) are briefly discussed. The third section includes a discussion of the present achievements and challenges of the electrochemistry and physics of cleaning of silicon wafers, with an emphasis on removal of iron contamination from the wafers. Finally, the techniques for gettering of iron are presented.

  16. IRON HOMEOSTATIS IN THE LUNG

    EPA Science Inventory

    Iron is essential for many aspects of cellular function. However, it can also generate oxygen-based free radicals that result in injury to biological molecules. For this reason, iron acquisition and distribution are tightly regulated. Constant exposure to the atmosphere result...

  17. Iron deficiency in the tropics.

    PubMed

    Fleming, A F

    1982-06-01

    Iron in food is classified as belonging to the haem pool, the nonhaem pool, and extraneous sources. Haem iron is derived from vegetable and animal sources with varying bioavailability. Hookworm infestation of the intestinal tract affects 450 million people in the tropics. Schistosoma mansoni caused blood loss in 7 Egyptian patients of 7.5- 25.9 ml/day which is equivalent to a daily loss of iron of .6-7.3 mg daily urinary loss of iron in 9 Egyptian patients. Trichuris trichiura infestation by whipworm is widespread in children with blood loss of 5 ml/day/worm. The etiology of anemia in children besides iron deficiency includes malaria, bacterial or viral infections, folate deficiency and sickle-cell disease. Severe infections cause profound iron-deficiency anemia in children in central American and Malaysia. Plasmodium falciparum malaria-induced anaemia in tropical Africa lowers the mean haemoglobin concentration in the population by 2 g/dI, causing profound anaemia in some. The increased risk of premature delivery, low birthweight, fetal abnormalities, and fetal death is directly related to the degree of maternal anemia. Perinatal mortality was reduced from 38 to 4% in treated anemic mothers. Mental performance was significantly lower in anemic school children and improved after they received iron. Supplements of iron, soy-protein, calcium, and vitamins given to villagers with widespread malnutrition, iron deficiency, and hookworm infestation in Colombia reduced enteric infections in children. Severe iron-deficiency anemia was treated in adults in northern Nigeria by daily in Ferastral 10 ml, which is equivalent to 500 mg of iron per day. Choloroquine, folic acid, rephenium hydroxynaphthoate, and tetrachlorethylene treat adults with severe iron deficiency from hookworm infestation in rural tropical Africa. Blood transfusion is indicated if the patient is dying of anaemia or is pregnant with a haemoglobin concentration 6 gm/dl. In South East Asia, mg per day

  18. The Relationship between Iron Deficiency and Febrile Convulsion: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Sharif, Mohammad Reza; Kheirkhah, Davood; Madani, Mahla; Kashani, Hamed Haddad

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Febrile seizure is among the most common convulsion disorders in children, which strikes 2% to 5% of children between 3 to 60 months of age. Some studies have reported that iron deficiency could be a risk factor for febrile seizure. The present study was conducted to compare the rate of iron deficiency anemia in febrile children with and without seizure. Materials and Methods: This case-control study evaluated 200 children aged 6-60 month in two 100 person groups (febrile seizure and febrile without convulsion) in Kashan. The CBC diff, serum iron and TIBC were done for all of participants. Diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia based on mentioned tests. Results: No significant differences were found in two groups regarding to the age, gender, and the disease causing the fever. The presence of iron deficiency anemia was 45% in the convulsion group and 22% in the group with fever without convulsion. The Chi Square test indicated a significant difference between two groups. Conclusions: The findings suggest that a considerable percentage of children having febrile seizure suffer from iron-deficiency anemia and low serum iron. This means the low serum iron and presence of anemia can serve as a reinforcing factor for the febrile seizure in children. PMID:26383191

  19. Quantitative analysis of dietary iron utilization for erythropoiesis in response to body iron status.

    PubMed

    Matsuo-Tezuka, Yukari; Noguchi-Sasaki, Mariko; Kurasawa, Mitsue; Yorozu, Keigo; Shimonaka, Yasushi

    2016-06-01

    Erythropoiesis requires large amounts of iron for hemoglobin synthesis. There are two sources of iron for erythropoiesis, dietary and stored iron; however, their relative contributions to erythropoiesis remain unknown. In this study, we used the stable iron isotope (57)Fe to quantify synthesis of hemoglobin derived from dietary iron. Using this method, we investigated the activities of dietary iron absorption and the utilization of dietary iron for erythropoiesis in responses to stimulated erythropoiesis and to interventions to alter body iron status. Under iron-loaded conditions, the activity of dietary iron absorption was clearly lowered in response to up-regulation of hepcidin, although the estimated activity of iron release from stored iron was not compared with that under control conditions. This result was supported by the observation that two duodenal iron transporters, divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) and ferroportin, were downregulated by iron loading, although the levels of expression of ferroportin in iron storage tissues were not changed by iron loading under erythropoietic stimulation by epoetin-β pegol (C.E.R.A., a long-acting erythropoiesis-stimulating agent). These results indicate that the dietary iron absorption system is more sensitive to body iron status than are reticuloendothelial iron- release mechanisms. Our data indicated that there could be a regulatory mechanism favoring use of stored iron over dietary iron under iron-loaded conditions. PMID:26911670

  20. Microbial acquisition of iron from ferric iron bearing minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Hersman, L.E.; Sposito, G.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Iron is a universal requirement for all life forms. Although the fourth most abundant element in the geosphere, iron is virtually insoluble at physiological pH in oxidizing environments, existing mainly as very insoluble oxides and hydroxides. Currently it is not understood how iron is solubilized and made available for biological use. This research project addressed this topic by conducting a series of experiments that utilized techniques from both soil microbiology and mineral surface geochemistry. Microbiological analysis consisted of the examination of metabolic and physiological responses to mineral iron supplements. At the same time mineral surfaces were examined for structural changes brought about by microbially mediated dissolution. The results of these experiments demonstrated that (1) bacterial siderophores were able to promote the dissolution of iron oxides, (2) that strict aerobic microorganisms may use anaerobic processes to promote iron oxide dissolution, and (3) that it is possible to image the surface of iron oxides undergoing microbial dissolution.

  1. TCDD, dietary iron and hepatic iron distribution in female rats

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Bayati, Z.A.F.; Stohs, S.J.; Al-Turk, W.A.

    1987-02-01

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is a prototype for a large group of halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons, and is the most potent of these compounds. TCDD is an environmental pollutant with exceptional toxicity for certain mammalian and avian species. The liver is one of the principal target organs affected by TCDD in the rat and other laboratory species. TCDD induces many functional, biochemical and pathological changes, including altered lipid metabolism in the liver. Ferrous iron plays an important role in the initiation of lipid peroxidation. A proposed mechanism for the production of liver injury in chronic iron overload is that organelle damage leading to cell death occurs as a result of membrane lipid peroxidation initiated and promoted by intracellular iron. The presence of iron in subcellular fractions in vitro may catalyze lipid peroxidation and produce membrane damage. There is evidence for the occurrence of hepatic lipid peroxidation after TCDD administration. The purpose of this study was to determine if TCDD induced lipid peroxidation was associated with an increase in the iron content of liver and its subcellular fractions. The effect of TCDD administration on the iron content of whole homogenate, microsomes, mitochondria, and cytosol of livers of female rats fed defined diets containing deficient, normal and excessive levels of iron for 17, 24 and 31 days was investigated.

  2. Maternal iron intake at mid-pregnancy is associated with reduced fetal growth: results from Mothers and Children’s Environmental Health (MOCEH) study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Iron supplementation is a common recommendation for pregnant women to prevent iron deficiency during pregnancy. There is an increasing concern about excessive iron consumption as a general iron prophylaxis by pregnant women without any due consideration about their dietary iron intake or iron status. Our present study investigated the association between total iron intake from diet and supplements and fetal growth in 337 pregnant women at mid-pregnancy in South Korea. Methods Iron intake from diet and supplements was examined by a 24-hour recall method. Subjects were divided into three groups based on tertiles of total iron intake levels. Fetal biometry was assessed by ultrasonography at mid-pregnancy. Results About 99% of the non-supplement users had iron intake below the recommended nutrient intake (RNI) for pregnant women (24 mg), whereas 64.9% of supplement users had iron intake above the upper level (UL) (45 mg). In the babies of mothers in the third tertile of iron intake (>17.04 mg), biparietal diameter, abdominal circumference, and femur length were lower by 0.41 cm (P =0.019), 0.41 cm (P = 0.027), and 0.07 cm (P = 0.051), respectively, than the babies of mothers in the second tertile of iron intake (11.49 ~ 17.04 mg). Conclusion These results suggest that excessive maternal iron intake at mid-pregnancy is associated with reduced fetal growth. Iron supplementation for pregnant women should be individualized according to their iron status. Appropriate diet education is needed for pregnant women so that they can consume adequate amounts of iron from food and supplements. PMID:23547877

  3. Contrasting behavior of oxygen and iron isotopes in banded iron formation revealed by in situ analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beard, B.; Li, W.; Kita, N.; Valley, J. W.; Johnson, C.

    2012-12-01

    Banded iron formations (BIFs) record a period of dramatic secular change in Earth's geologic history, when abundant aqueous Fe(II) was removed from Archean and Proterozoic oceans by oxidation. BIFs are characterized by co-existing of quartz and iron minerals, including oxides and carbonates, and alternating iron-rich and iron-poor layers range from m to Iron Formation, Hamersley Group, Western Australia. Oxygen isotope ratios were measured by Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS), and Fe isotope ratios were measured by femtosecond Laser ablation Multi-Collector ICP-MS (fs-LA-MC-ICP-MS), with spatial resolutions of 15 mm (O) and 30-50 mm (Fe), and external precisions (2s) of +0.7 ‰ for δ18O and +0.2 ‰ for δ56Fe, respectively. Analysis of δ18O in iron oxides by SIMS employed special tuning with a 3kV primary beam to minimize orientation effects (Huberty et al. 2010 ). For hematite, δ18O values range from -7.1 ‰ to -0.6 ‰, with the majority of data clustering around -4.5 ‰, and δ56Fe values range from -0.50 ‰ to +1.53‰. Magnetite has a δ18O range of -5.6 ‰ to +5.6 ‰ and a δ56Fe range of -0.76 ‰ to +1.33 ‰. Notably, magnetite shows significant O isotope heterogeneity at a mineral grain scale, and the highest δ18O values were commonly measured from Si-rich (1-3 wt% SiO2) magnetite overgrowths or magnetite grains that have a recrystallization texture. In contrast, lowest δ18O values were measured from magnetite that contains less than 1 wt% SiO2. Individual magnetite grains can have up to 6 ‰ variation in δ18O values between low-Si core and Si-rich overgrowth. Iron

  4. Iron biomineralization by anaerobic neutrophilic iron-oxidizing bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miot, Jennyfer; Benzerara, Karim; Morin, Guillaume; Kappler, Andreas; Bernard, Sylvain; Obst, Martin; Férard, Céline; Skouri-Panet, Fériel; Guigner, Jean-Michel; Posth, Nicole; Galvez, Matthieu; Brown, Gordon E., Jr.; Guyot, François

    2009-02-01

    Minerals formed by bio-oxidation of ferrous iron (Fe(II)) at neutral pH, their association with bacterial ultrastructures as well as their impact on the metabolism of iron-oxidizing bacteria remain poorly understood. Here, we investigated iron biomineralization by the anaerobic nitrate-dependent iron-oxidizing bacterium Acidovorax sp. strain BoFeN1 in the presence of dissolved Fe(II) using electron microscopy and Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy (STXM). All detected minerals consisted mainly of amorphous iron phosphates, but based on their morphology and localization, three types of precipitates could be discriminated: (1) mineralized filaments at distance from the cells, (2) globules of 100 ± 25 nm in diameter, at the cell surface and (3) a 40-nm thick mineralized layer within the periplasm. All of those phases were shown to be intimately associated with organic molecules. Periplasmic encrustation was accompanied by an accumulation of protein moieties. In the same way, exopolysaccharides were associated with the extracellular mineralized filaments. The evolution of cell encrustation was followed by TEM over the time course of a culture: cell encrustation proceeded progressively, with rapid precipitation in the periplasm (in a few tens of minutes), followed by the formation of surface-bound globules. Moreover, we frequently observed an asymmetric mineral thickening at the cell poles. In parallel, the evolution of iron oxidation was quantified by STXM: iron both contained in the bacteria and in the extracellular precipitates reached complete oxidation within 6 days. While a progressive oxidation of Fe in the bacteria and in the medium could be observed, spatial redox (oxido-reduction state) heterogeneities were detected at the cell poles and in the extracellular precipitates after 1 day. All these findings provide new information to further the understanding of molecular processes involved in iron biomineralization by anaerobic iron-oxidizing bacteria and

  5. Southern Ocean Iron Experiment (SOFex)

    SciTech Connect

    Coale, Kenneth H.

    2005-07-28

    The Southern Ocean Iron Experiment (SOFeX) was an experiment decades in the planning. It's implementation was among the most complex ship operations that SIO has been involved in. The SOFeX field expedition was successful in creating and tracking two experimentally enriched areas of the Southern Ocean, one characterized by low silicic acid, one characterized by high silicic acid. Both experimental sites were replete with abundant nitrate. About 100 scientists were involved overall. The major findings of this study were significant in several ways: (1) The productivity of the southern ocean is limited by iron availability. (2) Carbon uptake and flux is therefore controlled by iron availability (3) In spite of low silicic acid, iron promotes non-silicious phytoplankton growth and the uptake of carbon dioxide. (4) The transport of fixed carbon from the surface layers proceeds with a C:N ratio that would indicate differential remineralization of nitrogen at shallow depths. (5) These finding have major implications for modeling of carbon export based on nitrate utilization. (6) The general results of the experiment indicate that, beyond other southern ocean enrichment experiments, iron inputs have a much wider impact of productivity and carbon cycling than previously demonstrated. Scientific presentations: Coale, K., Johnson, K, Buesseler, K., 2002. The SOFeX Group. Eos. Trans. AGU 83(47) OS11A-0199. Coale, K., Johnson, K. Buesseler, K., 2002. SOFeX: Southern Ocean Iron Experiments. Overview and Experimental Design. Eos. Trans. AGU 83 (47) OS22D-01. Buesseler, K.,et al. 2002. Does Iron Fertilization Enhance Carbon Sequestration? Particle flux results from the Southern Ocean Iron Experiment. Eos. Trans. AGU 83 (47), OS22D-09. Johnson, K. et al. 2002. Open Ocean Iron Fertilization Experiments From IronEx-I through SOFeX: What We Know and What We Still Need to Understand. Eos. Trans. AGU 83 (47), OS22D-12. Coale, K. H., 2003. Carbon and Nutrient Cycling During the Southern

  6. Iron metabolism in aerobes: managing ferric iron hydrolysis and ferrous iron autoxidation

    PubMed Central

    Kosman, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    Aerobes and anaerobes alike express a plethora of essential iron enzymes; in the resting state, the iron atom(s) in these proteins are in the ferrous state. For aerobes, ferric iron is the predominant environmental valence form which, given ferric iron’s aqueous chemistry, occurs as ‘rust’, insoluble, bio-inert polymeric ferric oxide that results from the hydrolysis of [Fe(H2O)6]3+. Mobilizing this iron requires bio-ferrireduction which in turn requires managing the rapid autoxidation of the resulting FeII which occurs at pH > 6. This review examines the aqueous redox chemistry of iron and the mechanisms evolved in aerobes to suppress the ‘rusting out’ of FeIII and the ROS-generating autoxidation of FeII so as to make this metal ion available as the most ubiquitous prosthetic group in metallobiology. PMID:23264695

  7. Weldability of iron aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Zacharia, T.; David, S.A.

    1991-01-01

    Improvements in the ductility of iron aluminide alloys, achieved through control of composition and microstructure, has led to growing interest in using these materials for structural applications. weldability is a key issues in the utilization of these alloys for structural components. This paper describes the welding and welding behavior of an Fe{sub 3}Al alloy (FA-129) containing niobium and carbon. Weldability of this alloy has been found to be a strong function of composition, welding process and processing conditions. Crack free welds were made on both sheet and plate material using the electron beam (EB) welding process. Gas tungsten arc (GTA) welds, on the other hand, exhibited a tendency for delayed cold cracking. However, the study clearly demonstrated that successful welds can be made using matching filler metal and proper choice of processing conditions. 15 ref., 5 figs.

  8. Iron Mountain Electromagnetic Results

    SciTech Connect

    Gail Heath

    2012-07-01

    Iron Mountain Mine is located seventeen miles northwest of Redding, CA. After the completion of mining in early 1960s, the mine workings have been exposed to environmental elements which have resulted in degradation in water quality in the surrounding water sheds. In 1985, the EPA plugged ore stoops in many of the accessible mine drifts in an attempt to restrict water flow through the mine workings. During this process little data was gathered on the orientation of the stoops and construction of the plugs. During the last 25 years, plugs have begun to deteriorate and allow acidic waters from the upper workings to flow out of the mine. A team from Idaho National Laboratory (INL) performed geophysical surveys on a single mine drift and 3 concrete plugs. The project goal was to evaluate several geophysical methods to determine competence of the concrete plugs and orientation of the stopes.

  9. Iron metabolism: current facts and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Tandara, Leida; Salamunic, Ilza

    2012-01-01

    Iron metabolism has been intensively examined over the last decade and there are many new players in this field which are worth to be introduced. Since its discovery many studies confirmed role of liver hormone hepcidin as key regulator of iron metabolism and pointed out liver as the central organ of system iron homeostasis. Liver cells receive multiple signals related to iron balance and respond by transcriptional regulation of hepcidin expression. This liver hormone is negative regulator of iron metabolism that represses iron efflux from macrophages, hepatocytes and enterocytes by its binding to iron export protein ferroportin. Ferroportin degradation leads to cellular iron retention and decreased iron availability. At level of a cell IRE/IRP (iron responsive elements/iron responsive proteins) system allows tight regulation of iron assimilation that prevents an excess of free intracellular iron which could lead to oxidative stress and damage of DNA, proteins and lipid membranes by ROS (reactive oxygen species). At the same time IRE/IRP system provides sufficient iron in order to meet the metabolic needs. Recently a significant progress in understanding of iron metabolism has been made and new molecular participants have been characterized. Article gives an overview of the current understanding of iron metabolism: absorption, distribution, cellular uptake, release, and storage. We also discuss mechanisms underlying systemic and cellular iron regulation with emphasis on central regulatory hormone hepcidin. PMID:23092063

  10. Metallurgy Beyond Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallino, Isabella; Busch, Ralf

    2009-08-01

    Metallurgy is one of the oldest sciences. Its history can be traced back to 6000 BCE with the discovery of Gold, and each new discovery - Copper, Silver, Lead, Tin, Iron and Mercury - marked the beginning of a new era of civilization. Currently there are 86 known metals, but until the end of the 17th century, only 12 of these were known. Steel (Fe-C alloy) was discovered in the 11th century BCE; however, it took until 1709 CE before we mastered the smelting of pig-iron by using coke instead of charcoal and started the industrial revolution. The metallurgy of nowadays is mainly about discovering better materials with superior properties to fulfil the increasing demand of the global market. Promising are the Glassy Metals or Bulk Metallic Glasses (BMGs) - discovered at first in the late 50s at the California Institute of Technology - which are several times stronger than the best industrial steels and 10-times springier. The unusual structure that lacks crystalline grains makes BMGs so promising. They have a liquid-like structure that means they melt at lower temperatures, can be moulded nearly as easily as plastics, and can be shaped into features just 10 nm across. The best BMG formers are based on Zr, Pd, Pt, Ca, Au and, recently discovered, also Fe. They have typically three to five components with large atomic size mismatch and a composition close to a deep eutectic. Packing in such liquids is very dense, with a low content of free volume, resulting in viscosities that are several orders of magnitude higher than in pure metal melts.

  11. High temperature oxidation of iron-iron oxide core-shell nanowires composed of iron nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Krajewski, M; Brzozka, K; Lin, W S; Lin, H M; Tokarczyk, M; Borysiuk, J; Kowalski, G; Wasik, D

    2016-02-01

    This work describes an oxidation process of iron-iron oxide core-shell nanowires at temperatures between 100 °C and 800 °C. The studied nanomaterial was synthesized through a simple chemical reduction of iron trichloride in an external magnetic field under a constant flow of argon. The electron microscopy investigations allowed determining that the as-prepared nanowires were composed of self-assembled iron nanoparticles which were covered by a 3 nm thick oxide shell and separated from each other by a thin interface layer. Both these layers exhibited an amorphous or highly-disordered character which was traced by means of transmission electron microscopy and Mössbauer spectroscopy. The thermal oxidation was carried out under a constant flow of argon which contained the traces of oxygen. The first stage of process was related to slow transformations of amorphous Fe and amorphous iron oxides into crystalline phases and disappearance of interfaces between iron nanoparticles forming the studied nanomaterial (range: 25-300 °C). After that, the crystalline iron core and iron oxide shell became oxidized and signals for different compositions of iron oxide sheath were observed (range: 300-800 °C) using X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and Mössbauer spectroscopy. According to the thermal gravimetric analysis, the nanowires heated up to 800 °C under argon atmosphere gained 37% of mass with respect to their initial weight. The structure of the studied nanomaterial oxidized at 800 °C was mainly composed of α-Fe2O3 (∼ 93%). Moreover, iron nanowires treated above 600 °C lost their wire-like shape due to their shrinkage and collapse caused by the void coalescence. PMID:26766540

  12. TonB Dependent Receptors of Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5: Roles in Siderophore and Iron Uptake

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    TonB-dependent receptors (TBDRs) are outer membrane proteins with essential roles in iron uptake by Gram-negative bacteria. The biological control strain Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5 has 45 predicted TBDRs in its genome, which far exceeds the number of TBDRs in most published bacterial proteomes. Ei...

  13. [Phosphate metabolism and iron deficiency].

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Keitaro

    2016-02-01

    Autosomal dominant hypophosphatemic rickets(ADHR)is caused by gain-of-function mutations in FGF23 that prevent its proteolytic cleavage. Fibroblast growth factor 23(FGF23)is a hormone that inhibits renal phosphate reabsorption and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D biosynthesis. Low iron status plays a role in the pathophysiology of ADHR. Iron deficiency is an environmental trigger that stimulates FGF23 expression and hypophosphatemia in ADHR. It was reported that FGF23 elevation in patients with CKD, who are often iron deficient. In patients with nondialysis-dependent CKD, treatment with ferric citrate hydrate resulted in significant reductions in serum phosphate and FGF23. PMID:26813504

  14. Strength, thermal defects, and solid solution hardening in nickel-containing B2 iron aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Schneibel, J.H.; Munroe, P.R.; Pike, L.M.

    1996-12-31

    Nickel-containing ternary iron aluminides with an aluminum concentration of 45 at.% were investigated with respect to room temperature strength, equilibrium vacancy concentration, and the kinetics of vacancy removal. As compared to binary iron aluminides with the same Al concentration, nickel additions reduce the thermal equilibrium vacancy concentration at 1,273 K, whereas they increase this concentration at 973 K. Furthermore, at low temperatures such as 673 K, nickel additions increase dramatically the time needed to reach vacancy equilibrium. During prolonged annealing at 673 K, the density of <001> dislocations in Fe-45Al-3Ni (at.%) increased by an order of magnitude. This suggests that dislocations act as sinks for vacancies. At the same time, the number density of small (20--50 nm) voids decreased, indicating that they were not stable in the absence of substantial vacancy supersaturations. The findings show also that the solid solution strengthening of iron aluminides due to Ni is much weaker than previously thought.

  15. Iron incorporation and post-malaria anaemia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Iron supplementation is employed to treat post-malarial anaemia in environments where iron deficiency is common. Malaria induces an intense inflammatory reaction that stalls reticulo-endothelial macrophagal iron recycling from haemolysed red blood cells and inhibits oral iron absorption, but the mag...

  16. Hydrolysis of soybean protein improves iron bioavailability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Iron is an important trace metal element in human body. Iron deficiency affects human health, especially pregnant women and children. Soybean protein is a popular food in Asia and can contain a high amount of iron (145.70±0.74 ug/g); however, it is usually reported as an inhibitor of iron absorption...

  17. 21 CFR 73.2250 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Iron oxides. 73.2250 Section 73.2250 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2250 Iron oxides. (a) Identity. The color additives iron oxides consist of any one or any combination of synthetically prepared iron oxides, including...

  18. 21 CFR 73.2250 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Iron oxides. 73.2250 Section 73.2250 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2250 Iron oxides. (a) Identity. The color additives iron oxides consist of any one or any combination of synthetically prepared iron oxides, including...

  19. 21 CFR 73.2250 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Iron oxides. 73.2250 Section 73.2250 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2250 Iron oxides. (a) Identity. The color additives iron oxides consist of any one or any combination of synthetically prepared iron oxides, including...

  20. 21 CFR 73.2250 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Iron oxides. 73.2250 Section 73.2250 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2250 Iron oxides. (a) Identity. The color additives iron oxides consist of any one or any combination of synthetically prepared iron oxides, including...

  1. 21 CFR 73.2250 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Iron oxides. 73.2250 Section 73.2250 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2250 Iron oxides. (a) Identity. The color additives iron oxides consist of any one or any combination of synthetically prepared iron oxides, including...

  2. Elimination of Iron Deficiency Anemia and Soil Transmitted Helminth Infection: Evidence from a Fifty-four Month Iron-Folic Acid and De-worming Program

    PubMed Central

    Casey, Gerard J.; Montresor, Antonio; Cavalli-Sforza, Luca T.; Thu, Hoang; Phu, Luong B.; Tinh, Ta T.; Tien, Nong T.; Phuc, Tran Q.; Biggs, Beverley-Ann

    2013-01-01

    Background Intermittent iron-folic acid supplementation and regular de-worming are effective initiatives to reduce anemia, iron deficiency, iron deficiency anemia, and soil transmitted helminth infections in women of reproductive age. However, few studies have assessed the long-term effectiveness of population-based interventions delivered in resource-constrained settings. Methodology/Principal Findings The objectives were to evaluate the impact of weekly iron-folic acid supplementation and de-worming on mean hemoglobin and the prevalence of anaemia, iron deficiency, and soil transmitted helminth infection in a rural population of women in northern Vietnam and to identify predictive factors for hematological outcomes. A prospective cohort design was used to evaluate a population-based supplementation and deworming program over 54 months. The 389 participants were enrolled just prior to commencement of the intervention. After 54 months 76% (95% CI [68%, 84%]) were taking the iron-folic acid supplement and 95% (95% CI [93%, 98%]) had taken the most recently distributed deworming treatment. Mean hemoglobin rose from 122 g/L (95% CI [120, 124]) to 131 g/L (95% CI [128, 134]) and anemia prevalence fell from 38% (95% CI [31%, 45%]) to 18% (95% CI [12%, 23%]); however, results differed significantly between ethnic groups. Iron deficiency fell from 23% (95% CI [17%, 29%]) to 8% (95% CI [4%, 12%]), while the prevalence of iron deficiency anemia was reduced to 4% (95% CI [1%, 7%]). The prevalence of hookworm infection was reduced from 76% (95% CI [68%, 83%]) to 11% (95% CI [5%, 18%]). The level of moderate or heavy infestation of any soil-transmitted helminth was reduced to less than 1%. Conclusions/Significance Population-based interventions can efficiently and effectively reduce anemia and practically eliminate iron deficiency anemia and moderate to heavy soil transmitted helminth infections, maintaining them below the level of public health concern. PMID:23593517

  3. Correlation, magnetization and conduction in iron pnictides and iron chalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Zhiping; Haule, Kristjan; Kotliar, Gabriel

    2011-03-01

    By combining density functional theory (DFT) and dynamical mean field theory (DMFT), we study the electronic properties of iron pnictides and iron chalcogenides in both the paramagnetic and magnetic states. With ab initio derived realistic Coulomb interaction U and Hund's exchange coupling J, we find detailed agreements bewtween our calculations and many experimental observations in these compounds, including ARPES, magnetic properties, optical conductivity and anisotropy, and so on, WITHOUT any adjustment such as shifting of atomic positions, Fermi level and bands and renormalizations of bands which are commonly needed in DFT calculations in order to compare with experiments. Our theory explains the origin of the different magnetizations in FeTe and other iron pnictides and provides a unique physical picture. We find that in the magnetic phase of the iron pnictides, both the spin and the orbital polarization are strongly energy dependent. The spin polarization becomes weaker around Fermi level when the orbital polarization is stronger and vice verse at high energies. We stress on the role of the Hund's J rather than the Coulomb U and show how the iron pnictides and iron chalcogenides differ from other compounds.

  4. Method for reducing iron losses in an iron smelting process

    DOEpatents

    Sarma, B.; Downing, K.B.

    1999-03-23

    A process of smelting iron that comprises the steps of: (a) introducing a source of iron oxide, oxygen, nitrogen, and a source of carbonaceous fuel to a smelting reactor, at least some of said oxygen being continuously introduced through an overhead lance; (b) maintaining conditions in said reactor to cause (1) at least some of the iron oxide to be chemically reduced, (2) a bath of molten iron to be created and stirred in the bottom of the reactor, surmounted by a layer of slag, and (3) carbon monoxide gas to rise through the slag; (c) causing at least some of said carbon monoxide to react in the reactor with the incoming oxygen, thereby generating heat for reactions taking place in the reactor; and (d) releasing from the reactor an offgas effluent, is run in a way that keeps iron losses in the offgas relatively low. After start-up of the process is complete, steps (a) and (b) are controlled so as to: (1) keep the temperature of the molten iron at or below about 1550 C and (2) keep the slag weight at or above about 0.8 ton per square meter. 13 figs.

  5. Method for reducing iron losses in an iron smelting process

    DOEpatents

    Sarma, Balu; Downing, Kenneth B.

    1999-01-01

    A process of smelting iron that comprises the steps of: a) introducing a source of iron oxide, oxygen, nitrogen, and a source of carbonaceous fuel to a smelting reactor, at least some of said oxygen being continuously introduced through an overhead lance; b) maintaining conditions in said reactor to cause (i) at least some of the iron oxide to be chemically reduced, (ii) a bath of molten iron to be created and stirred in the bottom of the reactor, surmounted by a layer of slag, and (iii) carbon monoxide gas to rise through the slag; c) causing at least some of said carbon monoxide to react in the reactor with the incoming oxygen, thereby generating heat for reactions taking place in the reactor; and d) releasing from the reactor an offgas effluent, is run in a way that keeps iron losses in the offgas relatively low. After start-up of the process is complete, steps (a) and (b) are controlled so as to: e) keep the temperature of the molten iron at or below about 1550.degree. C. and f) keep the slag weight at or above about 0.8 tonne per square meter.

  6. Molybdenum Isotopes in Some Iron Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, L.; Masuda, A.

    1992-07-01

    Measurement of all seven stable Mo isotopes in iron meteorites has been continued for study of possible direct evidences for processes of nucleosynthesis in the pre-solar stage and information on extinct radioactive nuclides. Mo in iron meteorite was extracted by using recently developed chemical separation method [1], then loaded on 5 pass zone refined Re ribbon. Molybdenum isotope analysis was performed [2] in a VG SECTOR 54-30 thermal ionization mass spectrometer using a Faraday collector in peak jumping mode. The measured ratios of Mo were normalized provisionally to ^94Mo/^98Mo = 0.3802. Particular caution was drawn on the isobaric interferences of Zr, Ru, etc., which were negligible as a result. A small but distinct anomaly of Mo isotopes was found in Acuna iron meteorite. The normalized data show a growth trend from ^92Mo to ^97Mo, and this increment decreased suddenly at ^98Mo, then slightly increased at ^100Mo. The isotope variations might be explained as a result of excess s-process component (^95Mo to ^98Mo) contained in the sample. Gibeon suggested that isotopic anomalies at ^92Mo, ^95Mo, and ^97Mo are about -3-epsilon, -1.2-epsilon, and -0.5-epsilon respectively. It is difficult to give a perfect explanation to the observed data at present. However, it is interesting to note that ^92Mo (N=50) has a closed shell and only ^95Mo and ^97Mo are even-odd nuclides in all seven stable Mo isotopes and the 30-keV Maxwellian-averaged neutron capture cross sections for ^95Mo and ^97Mo are about 3 times bigger than others [3]. The depletions at ^95Mo and ^97Mo might be attributed to the higher cross section for their destruction by (n, gamma) reaction. The apparent opposite aberrations are found for Odessa iron. We reported anomalies of Mo isotopes in a specimen of Sikhote-Alin iron meteorite [4,5]. Further investigations have shown that the isotopic compositions of Mo in this iron are heterogeneous and that the "general anomaly" of Mo isotopes is related with the

  7. Iron homeostasis in host defence and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Ganz, Tomas; Nemeth, Elizabeta

    2016-01-01

    Iron is an essential trace element for multicellular organisms and nearly all microorganisms. Although iron is abundant in the environment, common forms of iron are minimally soluble and therefore poorly accessible to biological organisms. Microorganisms entering a mammalian host face multiple mechanisms that further restrict their ability to obtain iron and thereby limit their pathogenicity. Iron levels also modulate host defence, as iron content in macrophages regulates their cytokine production. Here, we review recent advances that highlight the role of systemic and cellular iron-regulating mechanisms in protecting hosts from infection, emphasizing aspects that are applicable to human health and disease. PMID:26160612

  8. Iron shielded MRI optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borghi, C. A.; Fabbri, M.

    1998-09-01

    The design of the main current systems of an actively shielded and of an iron shielded MRI device for nuclear resonance imaging, is considered. The model for the analysis of the magnetic induction produced by the current system, is based on the combination of a Boundary Element technique and of the integration of two Fredholm integral equations of the first and the second kind. The equivalent current magnetization model is used for the calculation of the magnetization produced by the iron shield. High field uniformity in a spherical region inside the device, and a low stray field in the neighborhood of the device are required. In order to meet the design requirements a multi-objective global minimization problem is solved. The minimization method is based on the combination of the filled function technique and the (1+1) evolution strategy algorithm. The multi-objective problem is treated by means of a penalty method. The actively shielded MRI system results to utilize larger amount of conductor and produce higher magnetic energy than the iron shield device. On veut étudier le projet du système des courants principaux d'un MRI à écran en fer et d'un MRI à écran actif. Le modèle d'analyse du champ magnétique produit par le système de courants est basé sur la combinaison d'une technique Boundary Element et de l'intégration de deux équations intégrales de Fredholm de première et de seconde sorte. On utilise pour calculer la magnétisation produite par l'écran en fer le modèle à cou rants de magné ti sa tion équivalents. On exige une élévation uniforme du champ dans une région sphérique au cœur de l'appareil et un bas champ magnétique dispersé à proximité de l'appareil. Dans le but de répondre aux impératifs du projet, on va résoudre un problème multiobjectif de minimisation globale. On utilise une technique de minimisation obtenue par la combinaison des méthodes “Filled Function” et “(1+1) Evolution Strategy”. Le probl

  9. Iron transport and signaling in plants.

    PubMed

    Curie, Catherine; Briat, Jean-François

    2003-01-01

    Cellular and whole organism iron homeostasis must be balanced to supply enough iron for metabolism and to avoid excessive, toxic levels. To perform iron uptake from the environment, iron distribution to various organs and tissues, and iron intracellular compartmentalization, various membranes must be crossed by this metal. The uptake and transport of iron under physiological conditions require particular processes such as chelation or reduction because ferric iron has a very low solubility. The molecular actors involved in iron acquisition from the soil have recently been characterized. A few candidates belonging to various gene families are hypothesized to play major roles in iron distribution throughout the plant. All these transport activities are tightly regulated at transcriptional and posttranslational levels, according to the iron status of the plant. These coordinated regulations result from an integration of local and long-distance transduction pathways. PMID:14509968

  10. Iron and Mechanisms of Emotional Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jonghan; Wessling-Resnick, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    Iron is required for appropriate behavioral organization. Iron deficiency results in poor brain myelination and impaired monoamine metabolism. Glutamate and GABA homeostasis is modified by changes in brain iron status. Such changes not only produce deficits in memory/learning capacity and motor skills, but also emotional and psychological problems. An accumulating body of evidence indicates that both energy metabolism and neurotransmitter homeostasis influence emotional behavior, and both functions are influenced by brain iron status. Like other neurobehavioral aspects, the influence of iron metabolism on mechanisms of emotional behavior are multifactorial: brain region-specific control of behavior, regulation of neurotransmitters and associated proteins, temporal and regional differences in iron requirements, oxidative stress responses to excess iron, sex differences in metabolism, and interactions between iron and other metals. To better understand the role that brain iron plays in emotional behavior and mental health, this review discusses the pathologies associated with anxiety and other emotional disorders with respect to body iron status. PMID:25154570

  11. IRON-TOLERANT CYANOBACTERIA: IMPLICATIONS FOR ASTROBIOLOGY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Igor I.; Allen, Carlton C.; Mummey, Daniel L.; Sarkisova, Svetlana A.; McKay, David S.

    2006-01-01

    The review is dedicated to the new group of extremophiles - iron tolerant cyanobacteria. The authors have analyzed earlier published articles about the ecology of iron tolerant cyanobacteria and their diversity. It was concluded that contemporary iron depositing hot springs might be considered as relative analogs of Precambrian environment. The authors have concluded that the diversity of iron-tolerant cyanobacteria is understudied. The authors also analyzed published data about the physiological peculiarities of iron tolerant cyanobacteria. They made the conclusion that iron tolerant cyanobacteria may oxidize reduced iron through the photosystem of cyanobacteria. The involvement of both Reaction Centers 1 and 2 is also discussed. The conclusion that iron tolerant protocyanobacteria could be involved in banded iron formations generation is also proposed. The possible mechanism of the transition from an oxygenic photosynthesis to an oxygenic one is also discussed. In the final part of the review the authors consider the possible implications of iron tolerant cyanobacteria for astrobiology.

  12. Toxicity of experimental lead-iron shot versus commercial lead shot in mallards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Finley, M.T.; Dieter, M.P.

    1978-01-01

    The toxicity of an experimental lead-iron shot containing 38.1 percent lead was compared with commercial lead shot in mallard ducks (Anas platyrhynchos) fed corn for 14 weeks. Significantly higher mortality occurred in ducks dosed with commercial lead shot compared to ducks given lead-iron shot containing comparable amounts of lead. Loss of body weight was indicative of the difference in toxicity of the 2 types of shot. Mortality was dose related in ducks given commercial lead shot; one # 8 shot (73 mg lead) caused 35 percent mortality with higher amounts of lead causing 80 to 100 percent mortality. Ingestion of up to 2 #4 lead-iron shot (111 mg lead) caused no significant weight loss and only 5 percent mortality. However, ducks dosed with 5 lead-iron shot suffered 45 percent mortality and those given 16 shot 50 percent mortality.

  13. Iron catalyzed coal liquefaction process

    DOEpatents

    Garg, Diwakar; Givens, Edwin N.

    1983-01-01

    A process is described for the solvent refining of coal into a gas product, a liquid product and a normally solid dissolved product. Particulate coal and a unique co-catalyst system are suspended in a coal solvent and processed in a coal liquefaction reactor, preferably an ebullated bed reactor. The co-catalyst system comprises a combination of a stoichiometric excess of iron oxide and pyrite which reduce predominantly to active iron sulfide catalysts in the reaction zone. This catalyst system results in increased catalytic activity with attendant improved coal conversion and enhanced oil product distribution as well as reduced sulfide effluent. Iron oxide is used in a stoichiometric excess of that required to react with sulfur indigenous to the feed coal and that produced during reduction of the pyrite catalyst to iron sulfide.

  14. The characterization of boride layer on the St37 iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutrisno, Soegijono, Bambang

    2012-06-01

    The property such as microhardness of boride layer formed on St37 iron was investigated. Boronizing was carried out in a solid medium consisting of nano size powders of 50% B4C as a donor, 45% SiC as a diluent, and 5% KBF4 as an activator treated at the temperature of 1000°C for 8 hours. The phases that were formed on the substrate was found as Fe2B and FeB layer that had smooth and flate shape morphology. The hardness of boride layer on St37 was over 2000 HV, while the hardness of untreated St37 iron was about 123,82 HV. Depending on process time and temperature, the depth of boride layer ranges from 20 to 60 μm, leading to a diffusion controlled process.

  15. Method for heat treating iron-nickel-chromium alloy

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1980-04-03

    A method is described for heat treating an age-hardenable iron-nickel-chromium alloy to obtain a morphology of the gamma-double prime phase enveloping the gamma-prime, the alloy consisting essentially of about 25 to 45% nickel, 10 to 16% chromium, 1.5 to 3% of an element selected from the group consisting of molybdenum and niobium, about 2% titanium, about 3% aluminum, and the remainder substantially all iron. To obtain optimum results, the alloy is heated to a temperature of 1025 to 1075/sup 0/C for 2 to 5 minutes, cold-worked about 20 to 60%, aged at a temperature of about 775/sup 0/C for 8 hours followed by an air-cool, and then heated to a temperature in the range of 650 to 700/sup 0/C for 2 hours followed by an air-cool.

  16. Method for heat treating iron-nickel-chromium alloy

    DOEpatents

    Merrick, Howard F.; Korenko, Michael K.

    1982-01-01

    A method for heat treating an age-hardenable iron-nickel-chromium alloy to obtain a bimodal distribution of gamma prime phase within a network of dislocations, the alloy consisting essentially of about 25% to 45% nickel, 10% to 16% chromium, 1.5% to 3% of an element selected from the group consisting of molybdenum and niobium, about 2% titanium, about 3% aluminum, and the remainder substantially all iron. To obtain optimum results, the alloy is heated to a temperature of 1025.degree. C. to 1075.degree. C. for 2-5 minutes, cold-worked about 20% to 60%, aged at a temperature of about 775.degree. C. for 8 hours followed by an air-cool, and then heated to a temperature in the range of 650.degree. C. to 700.degree. C. for 2 hours followed by an air-cool.

  17. Oxygen isotope relationships in iron meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, R. N.; Mayeda, T. K.; Olsen, E. J.; Prinz, M.

    1983-01-01

    Iron meteorites with oxygen-bearing phases can be classified in terms of their oxygen isotopic abundances. These iron meteorite classes are isotopically similar to various stony meteorite classes, which may indicate a common origin. The group IAB and IIICD irons may be related to the winonaites; group IIE irons may be related to H chondrites; group IVA irons may be related to L or LL chondrites.

  18. Process for the synthesis of iron powder

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1982-03-06

    A process for preparing iron powder suitable for use in preparing the iron-potassium perchlorate heat-powder fuel mixture used in thermal batteries, comprises preparing a homogeneous, dense iron oxide hydroxide precipitate by homogeneous precipitation from an aqueous mixture of a ferric salt, formic or sulfuric acid, ammonium hydroxide and urea as precipitating agent; and then reducing the dense iron oxide hydroxide by treatment with hydrogen to prepare the iron powder.

  19. Process for the synthesis of iron powder

    DOEpatents

    Welbon, William W.

    1983-01-01

    A process for preparing iron powder suitable for use in preparing the iron-potassium perchlorate heat-powder fuel mixture used in thermal batteries, comprises preparing a homogeneous, dense iron oxide hydroxide precipitate by homogeneous precipitation from an aqueous mixture of a ferric salt, formic or sulfuric acid, ammonium hydroxide and urea as precipitating agent; and then reducing the dense iron oxide hydroxide by treatment with hydrogen to prepare the iron powder.

  20. Process for the synthesis of iron powder

    DOEpatents

    Welbon, W.W.

    1983-11-08

    A process for preparing iron powder suitable for use in preparing the iron-potassium perchlorate heat-powder fuel mixture used in thermal batteries, comprises preparing a homogeneous, dense iron oxide hydroxide precipitate by homogeneous precipitation from an aqueous mixture of a ferric salt, formic or sulfuric acid, ammonium hydroxide and urea as precipitating agent; and then reducing the dense iron oxide hydroxide by treatment with hydrogen to prepare the iron powder. 2 figs.

  1. Iron and zinc concentrations and /sup 59/Fe retention in developing fetuses of zinc-deficient rats

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.M.; Loennerdal, B.H.; Hurley, L.S.; Keen, C.L.

    1987-11-01

    Because disturbances in iron metabolism might contribute to the teratogenicity of zinc deficiency, we examined the effect of zinc deficiency on fetal iron accumulation and maternal and fetal retention of /sup 59/Fe. Pregnant rats were fed from mating a purified diet containing 0.5, 4.5 or 100 micrograms Zn/g. Laparotomies were performed on d 12, 16, 19 and 21 of gestation. Maternal blood and concepti were analyzed for zinc and iron. Additional groups of dams fed 0.5 or 100 micrograms Zn/g diet were gavaged on d 19 with a diet containing /sup 59/Fe. Six hours later maternal blood and tissues, fetuses and placentas were counted for /sup 59/Fe. Maternal plasma zinc, but not iron, concentration was affected by zinc deficiency on d 12. Embryo zinc concentration on d 12 increased with increasing maternal dietary zinc, whereas iron concentration was not different among groups. On d 16-21 plasma iron was higher in dams fed 0.5 micrograms Zn/g diet than in those fed 4.5 or 100 micrograms/g, whereas plasma zinc was lower in dams fed 0.5 or 4.5 micrograms Zn/g than in those fed 100 micrograms Zn/g diet. On d 19 zinc concentration in fetuses from dams fed 0.5 micrograms/g zinc was not different from that of those fed 4.5 micrograms/g zinc, and iron concentration was higher in the 0.5 microgram Zn/g diet group. The increase in iron concentration in zinc-deficient fetuses thus occurs too late to be involved in major structural teratogenesis. Although whole blood concentration of /sup 59/Fe was not different in zinc-deficient and control dams, zinc-deficient dams had more /sup 59/Fe in the plasma fraction.

  2. Iron-ceria Aerogels Doped with Palladium as Water-gas Shift Catalysts for the Production of Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Bali, S.; Huggins, F; Ernst, R; Pugmire, R; Huffman, G; Eyring, E

    2010-01-01

    Mixed 4.5% iron oxide-95.5% cerium oxide aerogels doped with 1% and 2% palladium (Pd) by weight have been synthesized, and their activities for the catalysis of water-gas shift (WGS) reaction have been determined. The aerogels were synthesized using propylene oxide as the proton scavenger for the initiation of hydrolysis and polycondensation of a homogeneous alcoholic solution of cerium(III) chloride heptahydrate and iron(III) chloride hexahydrate precursor. Palladium was doped onto some of these materials by gas-phase incorporation (GPI) using ({eta}{sup 3}-allyl)({eta}{sup 5}-cyclopentadienyl)palladium as the volatile Pd precursor. Water-gas shift catalytic activities were evaluated in a six-channel fixed-bed reactor at atmospheric pressure and reaction temperatures ranging from 150 to 350 C. Both 1% and 2% Pd-doped 4.5% iron oxide-95.5% cerium oxide aerogels showed WGS activities that increased significantly from 150 to 350 C. The activities of 1% Pd-doped 4.5% iron oxide-95.5% cerium oxide aerogels were also compared with that of the 1% Pd-doped ceria aerogel without iron. The WGS activity of 1% Pd on 4.5% iron oxide-95.5% cerium oxide aerogels is substantially higher (5 times) than the activity of 1% Pd-doped ceria aerogel without iron. The gas-phase incorporation results in a better Pd dispersion. Ceria aerogel provides a nonrigid structure wherein iron is not significantly incorporated inside the matrix, thereby resulting in better contact between the Fe and Pd and thus enhancing the WGS activity. Further, neither Fe nor Pd is reduced during the ceria-aerogel-catalyzed WGS reaction. This behavior contrasts with that noted for other Fe-based WGS catalysts, in which the original ferric oxide is typically reduced to a nonstoichiometric magnetite form.

  3. Management of Iron Deficiency Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez, Kristine; Kulnigg-Dabsch, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    Anemia affects one-fourth of the world’s population, and iron deficiency is the predominant cause. Anemia is associated with chronic fatigue, impaired cognitive function, and diminished well-being. Patients with iron deficiency anemia of unknown etiology are frequently referred to a gastroenterologist because in the majority of cases the condition has a gastrointestinal origin. Proper management improves quality of life, alleviates the symptoms of iron deficiency, and reduces the need for blood transfusions. Treatment options include oral and intravenous iron therapy; however, the efficacy of oral iron is limited in certain gastrointestinal conditions, such as inflammatory bowel disease, celiac disease, and autoimmune gastritis. This article provides a critical summary of the diagnosis and treatment of iron deficiency anemia. In addition, it includes a management algorithm that can help the clinician determine which patients are in need of further gastrointestinal evaluation. This facilitates the identification and treatment of the underlying condition and avoids the unnecessary use of invasive methods and their associated risks. PMID:27099596

  4. Ironing Out the Wrinkles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayres, Thomas

    2009-07-01

    This is a Calibration Archival proposal to develop, implement, and test enhancements to the pipeline wavelength scales of STIS echelle spectra, to take full advantage of the extremely high performance of which the instrument is capable. The motivation is a recent extensive investigation--The Deep Lamp Project--which identified systematic wavelength distortions in all 44 primary and secondary settings of the four STIS echelle modes: E140M, E140H, E230M, and E230H. The method was to process deep exposures of the onboard Pt/Cr-Ne calibration source as if they were science images, and measure deviations of the lamp lines from their laboratory wavelengths. An approach has been developed to correct the distortions post facto, but it would be preferable to implement a more robust dispersion model in the pipeline itself. The proposed study will examine a more extensive set of WAVECALs than in the exploratory Deep Lamp effort, and will benefit from a new laboratory line list specifically for the STIS lamps. Ironing out the wrinkles in the STIS wavelength scales will impact many diverse science investigations, especially the Legacy Archival project "StarCAT."

  5. Influence of Iron Chlorosis on Pigment and Protein Metabolism in Leaves of Nicotiana tabacum L. 1

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, A. S.; Miller, G. W.

    1966-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on Nicotiana tabacum, L. to study the relation in the grana among chlorophylls, carotenoids, and proteins. The effect of iron chlorosis on protein and pigment synthesis was studied at different stages of chlorosis using glycine-U-C14. Pigments were separated by thin layer chromatography. Chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b, carotenoid, and protein contents of chloroplasts from chlorotic tissue were less than those of normal tissues. A 25% decrease in protein labeling and a 45% decrease in chlorophyll labeling was noted in deficient tissue compared to normal tissue even before chlorosis was perceptible. Both normal and iron deficient leaf discs which received iron in the incubation medium incorporated higher amounts of radioactive glycine into chlorophyll a and chlorophyll b at all stages of development than their respective counterparts not supplied with iron in the incubation medium. The presence of iron in the incubation medium reduced the amount of glycine incorporated into carotenes and xanthophylls, except where the tissue was severely chlorotic. This may be attributed to active competition for glycine between the iron-dependent- (chlorophyll) and iron-independent-(carotenoid) biosynthetic pathways. Incorporation of glycine into chloroplast pigments was lowest at severe chlorosis, probably due to a reduction in the overall enzyme activity. PMID:16656270

  6. Proteobactin and a yersiniabactin-related siderophore mediate iron acquisition in Proteus mirabilis

    PubMed Central

    Himpsl, Stephanie D.; Pearson, Melanie M.; Arewång, Carl J.; Nusca, Tyler D.; Sherman, David H.; Mobley, Harry L. T.

    2010-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis causes complicated urinary tract infections (UTI). While the urinary tract is an iron-limiting environment, iron acquisition remains poorly characterized for this uropathogen. Microarray analysis of P. mirabilis HI4320 cultured under iron limitation identified 45 significantly up-regulated genes (P ≤ 0.05) that represent 21 putative iron-regulated systems. Two gene clusters, PMI0229-0239 and PMI2596–2605, encode putative siderophore systems. PMI0229-0239 encodes a nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS)-independent siderophore (NIS) system for producing a novel siderophore, proteobactin. PMI2596-2605 are contained within the high-pathogenicity island, originally described in Yersinia pestis, and encodes proteins with apparent homology and organization to those involved in yersiniabactin production and uptake. Cross-feeding and biochemical analysis shows that P. mirabilis is unable to utilize or produce yersiniabactin, suggesting that this yersiniabactin-related locus is functionally distinct. Only disruption of both systems resulted in an in vitro iron-chelating defect; demonstrating production and iron-chelating activity for both siderophores. These findings clearly show that proteobactin and the yersiniabactin-related siderophore function as iron acquisition systems. Despite the activity of both siderophores, only mutants lacking the yersiniabactin-related siderophore reduce fitness in vivo. The fitness requirement for the yersiniabactin-related siderophore during UTI shows, for the first time, the importance of siderophore production in vivo for P. mirabilis. PMID:20923418

  7. Crosstalk between Iron Metabolism and Erythropoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huihui; Ginzburg, Yelena Z.

    2010-01-01

    Iron metabolism and erythropoiesis are inextricably linked. The majority of iron extracted from circulation daily is used for hemoglobin synthesis. In the last 15 years, major advances have been made in understanding the pathways regulating iron metabolism. Hepcidin is a key regulator of iron absorption and recycling and is itself regulated by erythropoiesis. While several viable candidates have been proposed, elucidating the “erythroid regulator” of hepcidin continues to generate significant experimental activity in the field. Although the mechanism responsible for sensing iron demand for erythropoiesis is still incompletely understood, evaluating diseases in which disordered erythropoiesis and/or iron metabolism are showcased has resulted in a more robust appreciation of potential candidates coordinated erythroid iron demand with regulators of iron supply. We present data drawn from four different conditions—iron deficiency, congenital hypotransferrinemia, beta-thalassemia, and hereditary hemochromatosis—both in human and non-human models of disease, together suggesting that erythroid iron demand exerts a stronger influence on circulating iron supply than systemic iron stores. Greater understanding of the interplay between the key factors involved in the regulation of iron metabolism and erythropoiesis will help develop more effective therapies for disorders of iron overload, iron deficiency, and hemoglobin synthesis. PMID:20631898

  8. Dhatrilauha: Right choice for iron deficiency anemia in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Anuradha; Dwivedi, Manjari

    2014-01-01

    Background: Anemia in pregnancy is multi-factorial. Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is the most common one. Major cause is increased demand of iron during pregnancy. In Ayurveda, under Pandu-Roga the features of anemia are described. It is characterized by Vaivarnyata or Varnanasha (change/destruction in normal color of the body), a disorder of Pitta vitiation. Ayurvedic management is an effective way of curing anemia in general by a large number of Lauha preparations of which Dhatrilauha has been used widely for centuries. Aim: To evaluate the effect of Dhatrilauha in the management of IDA based on the scientific parameters among pregnant patients. Materials and Methods: A total of 58 cases were selected by simple randomized sampling method as per inclusion criteria of pregnant women between 4th and 7th months of pregnancy with a clinical diagnosis and laboratory confirmation of IDA. Dhatrilauha 500 mg in two divided doses after food with normal potable water were given for 45 days with three follow-ups, each of 15 days intervals. Final assessment was done after completion of 45 days and results were statistically analyzed by using Cochran's Q-test and Student's t-test. Results: Dhatrilauha showed statistically significant (P < 0.01) improvement in the majority of sign-symptoms and objective parameters such as weakness, fatigue, palpitation, effort intolerance, breathlessness, heartburn, pallor, constipation, hemoglobin, red blood cells (RBC), hematocrit, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, RBC distribution width, mean platelet volume, serum iron, and total iron binding capacity. Conclusion: Dhatrilauha possesses many fold effectiveness in anemia (IDA), which was evidenced with the significant results obtained in the majority of parameters in this study. PMID:25972720

  9. Host iron status and iron supplementation mediate susceptibility to erythrocytic stage Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Clark, Martha A; Goheen, Morgan M; Fulford, Anthony; Prentice, Andrew M; Elnagheeb, Marwa A; Patel, Jaymin; Fisher, Nancy; Taylor, Steve M; Kasthuri, Raj S; Cerami, Carla

    2014-01-01

    Iron deficiency and malaria have similar global distributions, and frequently co-exist in pregnant women and young children. Where both conditions are prevalent, iron supplementation is complicated by observations that iron deficiency anaemia protects against falciparum malaria, and that iron supplements increase susceptibility to clinically significant malaria, but the mechanisms remain obscure. Here, using an in vitro parasite culture system with erythrocytes from iron-deficient and replete human donors, we demonstrate that Plasmodium falciparum infects iron-deficient erythrocytes less efficiently. In addition, owing to merozoite preference for young erythrocytes, iron supplementation of iron-deficient individuals reverses the protective effects of iron deficiency. Our results provide experimental validation of field observations reporting protective effects of iron deficiency and harmful effects of iron administration on human malaria susceptibility. Because recovery from anaemia requires transient reticulocytosis, our findings imply that in malarious regions iron supplementation should be accompanied by effective measures to prevent falciparum malaria. PMID:25059846

  10. Effect of iron status on iron absorption in different habitual meals in young south Indian women

    PubMed Central

    Kalasuramath, Suneeta; Kurpad, Anura V.; Thankachan, Prashanth

    2013-01-01

    Background & objectives: Iron deficiency (ID) affects a large number of women in India. An inverse relationship exists between iron (Fe) status and Fe absorption. Dietary inhibitory and enhancing factors exert a profound influence on bioavailability of Fe. Although the current recommended dietary allowance (RDA) for Fe is based on 8 per cent bioavailability, it is not clear if this holds good for the usual highly inhibitory Indian diet matrix. This study was aimed to determine Fe absorption from several habitually consumed south Indian food and to evaluate the interaction of Fe status with absorption. Methods: Four Fe absorption studies were performed on 60 apparently healthy young women, aged 18-35 years. Based on blood biochemistry, 45 of them were ID and 15 were iron replete (IR). The habitual meals assessed were rice, millet and wheat based meals in the ID subjects and rice based meal alone in the IR subjects. Each subject received the test meal labelled with 3 mg of 57Fe and Fe absorption was measured based on erythrocyte incorporation of isotope label 14 days following administration. Results: Mean fractional Fe absorption from the rice, wheat and millet based meals in the ID subjects were 8.3, 11.2 and 4.6 per cent, respectively. Fe absorption from the rice-based meals was 2.5 per cent in IR subjects. Interpretation & conclusions: Fe absorption is dictated by Fe status from low bioavailability meals. Millet based meals have the lowest bioavailability, while the rice and wheat based meals had moderate to good bioavailability. In millet based meals, it is prudent to consider ways to improve Fe absorption. PMID:23563376

  11. 49 CFR 192.487 - Remedial measures: Distribution lines other than cast iron or ductile iron lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... cast iron or ductile iron lines. 192.487 Section 192.487 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... iron or ductile iron lines. (a) General corrosion. Except for cast iron or ductile iron pipe, each... the purpose of this paragraph. (b) Localized corrosion pitting. Except for cast iron or ductile...

  12. 49 CFR 192.487 - Remedial measures: Distribution lines other than cast iron or ductile iron lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... cast iron or ductile iron lines. 192.487 Section 192.487 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... iron or ductile iron lines. (a) General corrosion. Except for cast iron or ductile iron pipe, each... the purpose of this paragraph. (b) Localized corrosion pitting. Except for cast iron or ductile...

  13. 49 CFR 192.487 - Remedial measures: Distribution lines other than cast iron or ductile iron lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... cast iron or ductile iron lines. 192.487 Section 192.487 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... iron or ductile iron lines. (a) General corrosion. Except for cast iron or ductile iron pipe, each... the purpose of this paragraph. (b) Localized corrosion pitting. Except for cast iron or ductile...

  14. 49 CFR 192.487 - Remedial measures: Distribution lines other than cast iron or ductile iron lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... cast iron or ductile iron lines. 192.487 Section 192.487 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... iron or ductile iron lines. (a) General corrosion. Except for cast iron or ductile iron pipe, each... the purpose of this paragraph. (b) Localized corrosion pitting. Except for cast iron or ductile...

  15. 49 CFR 192.487 - Remedial measures: Distribution lines other than cast iron or ductile iron lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... cast iron or ductile iron lines. 192.487 Section 192.487 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... iron or ductile iron lines. (a) General corrosion. Except for cast iron or ductile iron pipe, each... the purpose of this paragraph. (b) Localized corrosion pitting. Except for cast iron or ductile...

  16. Defect Interaction in Iron and Iron-based Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Haixuan; Stocks, G. Malcolm; Stoller, Roger

    2014-03-01

    Magnetism has a profound influence on the defect properties in iron and iron-based alloys. For instance, it has been shown from first principles calculations that the helium interstitial occupies the tetrahedral site instead of octahedral site in contrast to all previous work that neglected the magnetic effects. In this study, we explore the effects of magnetism on the defect interaction, primarily interstitial-type defects, in bcc iron and Fe-Cr systems. The magnetic moment change during the interaction of two 1/2 <111>interstitial loops in bcc iron was calculated using the ab initio locally self-consistent multiple-scattering (LSMS) method and a significant fluctuation was observed. Adding Cr significantly modifies the magnetic structure of the defects and defect interactions. In addition, the effects of magnetism on the defect energetics are evaluated. This study provides useful insights on whether magnetism can be used as a effective means to manipulate the defect evolution in iron-based structural alloys. This material is based upon work supported as part of the Center for Defect Physics, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  17. Lifetime effects of iron and iron complexes in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Kamal K.; Banan, M.; Moody, Jerry; Chandrasekhar, S.

    1994-09-01

    Iron doped p- and n-type samples were prepared using Czochralski method. The effect of pairing of iron with acceptors B and Al on the minority carrier lifetime was studied using the Surface Photovoltage (SPV) and DLTS methods. The effect of resistivity on the minority carrier lifetime in iron doped samples was investigated over 1 to 60 ohmcm resistivity range. The minority carrier lifetime dominated by Fei was found to be independent of resistivity. On the other hand, the lifetime controlled by FeB pairs increased by a factor of approximately town on increasing the resistivity from 1 ohmcm to 60 ohmcm. The data were analyzed using the Shockley-Reed-Hall model (SRH). The results indicate that the acceptor level of FeB pair at Ec(subscript 0.29 eV is the main recombination level of iron in p-Si. The partitioning of iron between FeB and FeAl pairs in silicon samples codoped with B and Al was found to depend upon the relative concentrations of the two acceptors. Although minority carrier lifetime values dominated by Fe(subscript i in B and Al doped samples were similar, FeAl pair was found to be approximately five times more effective as a lifetime-killer than FeB. FeAl pairs can be dissociated optically.

  18. Effect of Intravenous Iron Supplementation on Iron Stores in Non-Anemic Iron-Deficient Patients with Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    PubMed Central

    Cherif, Honar

    2016-01-01

    In hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT), frequent episodes of nasal and gastrointestinal bleeding commonly lead to iron-deficiency with or without anemia. In the retrospective study presented here we assessed the iron stores, as determined by analysis of plasma ferritin, during oral and intravenous iron supplementation, respectively, in a population of iron-deficient non-anemic HHT patients who were inadequately iron-repleted by oral supplementation. A switch from oral to intravenous iron supplementation was associated with a significant increase in ferritin in this patient population. PMID:27103980

  19. When Less is More: Novel Mechanisms of Iron Conservation

    PubMed Central

    Bayeva, Marina; Chang, Hsiang-Chun; Wu, Rongxue; Ardehali, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Disorders of iron homeostasis are very common, yet the molecular mechanisms of iron regulation remain understudied. Over 20 years have passed since the first characterization of iron regulatory proteins (IRP) as mediators of cellular iron deficiency response in mammals through iron acquisition. However, little is known about other mechanisms necessary for adaptation to low-iron states. In this review we present recent evidence that establishes existence of a new iron regulatory pathway aimed at iron conservation and optimization of iron use through suppression of non-essential iron-consuming processes. Moreover, we discuss the possible links between iron homeostasis and energy metabolism uncovered by studies of iron deficiency response. PMID:23948590

  20. Shigella Iron Acquisition Systems and their Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yahan; Murphy, Erin R.

    2016-01-01

    Survival of Shigella within the host is strictly dependent on the ability of the pathogen to acquire essential nutrients, such as iron. As an innate immune defense against invading pathogens, the level of bio-available iron within the human host is maintained at exceeding low levels, by sequestration of the element within heme and other host iron-binding compounds. In response to sequestration mediated iron limitation, Shigella produce multiple iron-uptake systems that each function to facilitate the utilization of a specific host-associated source of nutrient iron. As a mechanism to balance the essential need for iron and the toxicity of the element when in excess, the production of bacterial iron acquisition systems is tightly regulated by a variety of molecular mechanisms. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge on the iron-uptake systems produced by Shigella species, their distribution within the genus, and the molecular mechanisms that regulate their production. PMID:26904516

  1. Sequestration and Scavenging of Iron in Infection

    PubMed Central

    Parrow, Nermi L.; Fleming, Robert E.

    2013-01-01

    The proliferative capability of many invasive pathogens is limited by the bioavailability of iron. Pathogens have thus developed strategies to obtain iron from their host organisms. In turn, host defense strategies have evolved to sequester iron from invasive pathogens. This review explores the mechanisms employed by bacterial pathogens to gain access to host iron sources, the role of iron in bacterial virulence, and iron-related genes required for the establishment or maintenance of infection. Host defenses to limit iron availability for bacterial growth during the acute-phase response and the consequences of iron overload conditions on susceptibility to bacterial infection are also examined. The evidence summarized herein demonstrates the importance of iron bioavailability in influencing the risk of infection and the ability of the host to clear the pathogen. PMID:23836822

  2. NONEQUILIBRIUM FLUCTUATIONS IN SHOCK COMPRESSION OF POLYCRYSTALLINE ALPHA-IRON

    SciTech Connect

    Y. HORIE; K. YANO

    2001-06-01

    We report a numerical study of heterogeneous and nonequilibrium fluctuations in shock compression of {alpha}-iron at the grain level. A quasi-molecular code called DM2 is used to model the interactions of a plane shock wave with grain boundaries and crystal anisotropy over the pressure range of 5-45 GPa. Highly transient eddies that were reported earlier are again observed. We show new features through an elementary statistical analysis. They are (1) a characteristic decay constant for the non-equilibrium fluctuation on the order of 20ns, (2) a resonance phenomenon at an intermediate shock pressure, and (3) a more uniform shock structure for very high pressures.

  3. Spectral reflectance and discrimination of plutonic rocks in the 0.45- to 2.45-micron region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blom, R. G.; Abrams, M. J.; Adams, H. G.

    1980-01-01

    Visible and near-infrared field spectral reflectance measurements of plutonic rocks were acquired in the 0.45- to 2.45-micron region with a portable field reflectance spectrometer. These spectra were used to determine spectral signatures for the various rock types and to evaluate the separability of these rocks based on their spectral characteristics. A total of 135 samples were divided into 11 groups based on their mineralogy. These 11 groups approximately correspond to traditional rock classifications and include five granitic groups, three gabbroic groups, and three ultramafic groups. The positions, intensity, and presence of iron, CO3(-2), and Al-OH and Mg-OH absorption bands varied among the 11 groups. Each rock group also had a range of albedos characteristic of the group. Stepwise linear discriminant analysis was performed on the spectral data to determine the separability of the 11 groups. Classification accuracy for 30 equally spaced wavelength bands between 0.45 and 2.45 microns was 78% with 10% serious misclassifications. The same analysis was repeated, limiting the spectral data to the wavelength regions corresponding to the proposed Landsat D thematic mapper scanner.

  4. Reduction of Soluble Iron and Reductive Dissolution of Ferric Iron-Containing Minerals by Moderately Thermophilic Iron-Oxidizing Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Bridge, Toni A. M.; Johnson, D. Barrie

    1998-01-01

    Five moderately thermophilic iron-oxidizing bacteria, including representative strains of the three classified species (Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans, Sulfobacillus acidophilus, and Acidimicrobium ferrooxidans), were shown to be capable of reducing ferric iron to ferrous iron when they were grown under oxygen limitation conditions. Iron reduction was most readily observed when the isolates were grown as mixotrophs or heterotrophs with glycerol as an electron donor; in addition, some strains were able to couple the oxidation of tetrathionate to the reduction of ferric iron. Cycling of iron between the ferrous and ferric states was observed during batch culture growth in unshaken flasks incubated under aerobic conditions, although the patterns of oxidoreduction of iron varied in different species of iron-oxidizing moderate thermophiles and in strains of a single species (S. acidophilus). All three bacterial species were able to grow anaerobically with ferric iron as a sole electron acceptor; the growth yields correlated with the amount of ferric iron reduced when the isolates were grown in the absence of oxygen. One of the moderate thermophiles (identified as a strain of S. acidophilus) was able to bring about the reductive dissolution of three ferric iron-containing minerals (ferric hydroxide, jarosite, and goethite) when it was grown under restricted aeration conditions with glycerol as a carbon and energy source. The significance of iron reduction by moderately thermophilic iron oxidizers in both environmental and applied contexts is discussed. PMID:9603832

  5. Collisional Records in Iron Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marti, K.; Lavielle, B.; Jeannot, J.-P.

    1995-09-01

    The asteroid belt is considered to be the ultimate source of iron meteorites and it would be of considerable interest to obtain a chronology of break-ups of asteroidal objects. However, as multiple fragmentation of such objects did likely occur, the exposure ages date the break-off of iron masses from shielded locations within the immediate parent object. Meteorites which were fragmented in more than one collisional event may have recorded integral effects of cosmic ray interactions in varying geometrical configuration and individual stages may be difficult to unravel; we term such exposure histories "complex". Exposure age histograms based on potassium ages have been discussed by Voshage [1] and he concluded that irons of groups IIIA and IIIB reveal similar histograms and probably were derived from the same parent body. He also noted a cluster for group IVA members ,but no clear evidence for other clusters. We present the collisional evidence based on published noble gas data, coupled to the new production rates which we calculate for central locations, adjusted for off-center locations whenever concentration profiles can be inferred. Unlike potassium ages which show large uncertainties for ages < 300 Ma, T38 ages can be obtained for all iron meteorites. We note, however,that T38 values of five "old" irons are systematically 15% lower than potassium ages. We confirm the evidence for stochastic events for IIIAB and IVA irons. The statistics are improved because of the larger data base. There are interesting clusters also among ages < 100 Ma, in the range which overlaps the histograms of chondrites. Recent reports [2,3] of H-chondritic inclusions in IIE irons, whose exposure ages are consistent with H-chondrite clusters, point to a genetic link. Group IIAB reveals two clusters with T38 < 100 Ma, and both events appear to involve also IIE irons. Clusterings of two thirds of group IIIE members and of group IID irons appear significant. The youngest IVB ages coincide

  6. A Systems Biology Approach to Iron Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Chifman, J.; Laubenbacher, R.; Torti, S.V.

    2015-01-01

    Iron is critical to the survival of almost all living organisms. However, inappropriately low or high levels of iron are detrimental and contribute to a wide range of diseases. Recent advances in the study of iron metabolism have revealed multiple intricate pathways that are essential to the maintenance of iron homeostasis. Further, iron regulation involves processes at several scales, ranging from the subcellular to the organismal. This complexity makes a systems biology approach crucial, with its enabling technology of computational models based on a mathematical description of regulatory systems. Systems biology may represent a new strategy for understanding imbalances in iron metabolism and their underlying causes. PMID:25480643

  7. Advances in Pediatric Intravenous Iron Therapy.

    PubMed

    Mantadakis, Elpis

    2016-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) continues to be very common worldwide. Intravenous (IV) iron is an infrequently used therapeutic option in children with IDA despite numerous studies in adults and several small but notable pediatric studies showing efficacy and safety. Presently, the availability of newer IV iron products allows for replacement of the total iron deficit at a single setting. These products appear safer compared to the high molecular weight iron dextrans of the past. Herein, we review the medical literature and suggest that front line use of IV iron should be strongly considered in diseases associated with IDA in children. PMID:26376214

  8. Sonochemical synthesis of iron colloids

    SciTech Connect

    Suslick, K.S.; Fang, M.; Hyeon, T.

    1996-11-27

    We present here a new method for the preparation of stable ferromagnetic colloids of iron using high-intensity ultrasound to sonochemically decompose volatile organometallic compounds. These colloids have narrow size distributions centered at a few nanometers and are found to be superparamagnetic. In conclusion, a simple synthetic method has been discovered to produce nanosized iron colloid using high-intensity ultrasound. Nanometer iron particles dispersed in polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) matrix or stabilized by adsorption of oleic acid have been synthesized by sonochemical decomposition of Fe(CO){sub 5}. Transmission electron micrographs show that the iron particles have a relatively narrow range in size from 3 to 8 nm for polyvinylpyrrolidone, while oleic acid gives an even more uniform distribution at 8 nm. magnetic measurements revealed that these nanometer iron particles are superparamagnetic with a saturation magnetization of 101 emu/g (Fe) at 290 K. This work is easily extended to colloids of other metals and to alloys of two or more metals, simply by using multiple volatile precursors. 29 refs., 4 figs.

  9. Graphite Formation in Cast Iron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stefanescu, D. M.

    1985-01-01

    In the first phase of the project it was proven that by changing the ratio between the thermal gradient and the growth rate for commercial cast iron samples solidifying in a Bridgman type furnace, it is possible to produce all types of graphite structures, from flake to spheroidal, and all types of matrices, from ferritic to white at a certain given level of cerium. KC-135 flight experiments have shown that in a low-gravity environment, no flotation occurs even in spheroidal graphite cast irons with carbon equivalent as high as 5%, while extensive graphite flotation occurred in both flake and spheroidal graphite cast irons, in high carbon samples solidified in a high gravity environment. This opens the way for production of iron-carbon composite materials, with high carbon content (e.g., 10%) in a low gravity environment. By using KC-135 flights, the influence of some basic elements on the solidification of cast iron will be studied. The mechanism of flake to spheroidal graphite transition will be studied, by using quenching experiments at both low and one gravity for different G/R ratios.

  10. Spin crossover and hyperfine interactions of iron in (Mg ,Fe ) CO3 ferromagnesite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Han; Huang, Sheng-Chieh

    2016-08-01

    Ferromagnesite, an iron-bearing carbonate stable up to 100-115 GPa, is believed to be the major carbon carrier in the earth's lower mantle and play a key role in the earth's deep carbon cycle. In this paper, we use the local density approximation plus self-consistent Hubbard U (LDA+Usc) method to study the iron spin crossover in ferromagnesite with a wide range of iron concentration (12.5-100%). Our calculation shows that this mineral undergoes a crossover from the high-spin (HS) (S =2 ) to the low-spin (LS) (S =0 ) state at around 45-50 GPa, regardless of the iron concentration. The intermediate-spin (S =1 ) state is energetically unfavorable and not involved in spin crossover. The anomalous changes of volume, density, and bulk modulus accompanying the spin crossover obtained in our calculation are in great agreement with experiments. Our calculation also predicts that an abrupt change of the iron nuclear quadrupole splitting, from ≳2.8 mm/s to ≲0.3 mm/s, can be observed in Mössbauer spectra at 45-50 GPa as a signature of the HS-LS crossover.

  11. Size-fractionated iron distributions and iron-limitation processes in the subarctic NW Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishioka, Jun; Takeda, Shigenobu; Kudo, Isao; Tsumune, Daisuke; Yoshimura, Takeshi; Kuma, Kenshi; Tsuda, Atsushi

    2003-07-01

    Comparison of vertical profiles of size-fractionated iron between the western and eastern subarctic North Pacific clearly showed higher labile particulate iron concentrations towards the west and this result strongly supports the higher iron supply in the western region. Additionally, the results of the SEEDS experiment, the first meso-scale iron enrichment experiment in the subarctic North Pacific, clearly showed that artificially enriched iron in the dissolved fraction (mainly in colloidal fraction) was rapidly transformed to suspended labile particulate iron during phytoplankton growth and was retained in the surface mixed layer. Probably, this same rapid transformation process occurs naturally after sporadic atmospheric iron supply and the labile particulate iron is retained in the western region. Furthermore, this transformation process reduces dissolved concentration of iron and its bioavailability. Therefore, the transformation process is important for understanding how phytoplankton became iron limited and the biogeochemical iron cycle in the western subarctic North Pacific.

  12. Natural organic matter and iron export from the Tanner Moor, Austria

    PubMed Central

    Jirsa, Franz; Neubauer, Elisabeth; Kittinger, Richard; Hofmann, Thilo; Krachler, Regina; von der Kammer, Frank; Keppler, Bernhard K.

    2013-01-01

    Samples from a pristine raised peat bog runoff in Austria, the Tannermoor creek, were analysed for their iron linked to natural organic matter (NOM) content. Dissolved organic carbon < 0.45 μm (DOC) was 41–64 mg L−1, iron 4.4–5.5 mg L−1. Samples were analysed applying asymmetric field flow fractionation (AsFlFFF) coupled to UV–vis absorption, fluorescence and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The samples showed an iron peak associated with the NOM peak, one sample exhibiting a second peak of iron independent from the NOM peak. As highland peat bogs with similar climatic conditions and vegetation to the Tanner Moor are found throughout the world, including areas adjacent to the sea, we examined the behaviour of NOM and iron in samples brought to euhaline (35‰) conditions with artificial sea salt. The enhanced ionic strength reduced NOM by 53% and iron by 82%. Size exclusion chromatography (SEC) of the samples at sea-like salinity revealed two major fractions of NOM associated with different iron concentrations. The larger one, eluting sharply after the upper exclusion limits of 4000–5000 g mol−1, seems to be most important for iron chelating. The results outline the global importance of sub-mountainous and mountainous raised peat bogs as a source of iron chelators to the marine environment at sites where such peat bogs release their run-offs into the sea. PMID:23805012

  13. [Iron supplement to blood donors. II. Effect of continuous iron supply].

    PubMed

    Liedén, G; Höglund, S; Ehn, L

    1975-01-01

    Seventeen conscripts gave blood every second month, the amount representing an average iron loss of 3.5 mg daily. Seven of them were given 20 mg and ten 100 mg iron as ferrous carbonate once daily throughout the study. Before the first and after the fourth and sixth blood donations they were examined with regard to packed red cell volume, serum iron, total iron-binding capacity and stainable bone marrow iron, and a diagnostic iron absoprtion test was performed. Ten conscripts receiving no iron and giving no blood but comparable to those in the test groups with regard to age, exercise and diet served as controls. The stainable bone marrow iron was found to become stabilized at a level with reduced but still perceptible amounts when 20 mg iron was given, and at a level with somewhat greater amounts when the daily dose was 100 mg. Both levels were lower than before blood donation in most subjects, and the negative iron balance was also reflected in the diagnostic iron absorption test. When a healthy person loses 3.5 mg iron daily, supplementation with a 100 mg tablet per day is therefore insufficient to maintain the iron stores at their previous level. The decrease in storage iron is not progressive, however. When the storage iron is reduced, iron absorption seems to be stimulated sufficiently to establish a balance at a reduced storage iron level. PMID:1124659

  14. Alginate-Iron Speciation and Its Effect on In Vitro Cellular Iron Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Horniblow, Richard D.; Dowle, Miriam; Iqbal, Tariq H.; Latunde-Dada, Gladys O.; Palmer, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    Alginates are a class of biopolymers with known iron binding properties which are routinely used in the fabrication of iron-oxide nanoparticles. In addition, alginates have been implicated in influencing human iron absorption. However, the synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles employs non-physiological pH conditions and whether nanoparticle formation in vivo is responsible for influencing cellular iron metabolism is unclear. Thus the aims of this study were to determine how alginate and iron interact at gastric-comparable pH conditions and how this influences iron metabolism. Employing a range of spectroscopic techniques under physiological conditions alginate-iron complexation was confirmed and, in conjunction with aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, nanoparticles were observed. The results infer a nucleation-type model of iron binding whereby alginate is templating the condensation of iron-hydroxide complexes to form iron oxide centred nanoparticles. The interaction of alginate and iron at a cellular level was found to decrease cellular iron acquisition by 37% (p < 0.05) and in combination with confocal microscopy the alginate inhibits cellular iron transport through extracellular iron chelation with the resulting complexes not internalised. These results infer alginate as being useful in the chelation of excess iron, especially in the context of inflammatory bowel disease and colorectal cancer where excess unabsorbed luminal iron is thought to be a driver of disease. PMID:26378798

  15. Non-heme iron as ferrous sulfate does not interact with heme iron absorption in humans.

    PubMed

    Gaitán, Diego; Olivares, Manuel; Lönnerdal, Bo; Brito, Alex; Pizarro, Fernando

    2012-12-01

    The absorption of heme iron has been described as distinctly different from that of non-heme iron. Moreover, whether heme and non-heme iron compete for absorption has not been well established. Our objective was to investigate the potential competition between heme and non-heme iron as ferrous sulfate for absorption, when both iron forms are ingested on an empty stomach. Twenty-six healthy nonpregnant women were selected to participate in two iron absorption studies using iron radioactive tracers. We obtained the dose-response curve for absorption of 0.5, 10, 20, and 50 mg heme iron doses, as concentrated red blood cells. Then, we evaluated the absorption of the same doses, but additionally we added non-heme iron, as ferrous sulfate, at constant heme/non-heme iron molar ratio (1:1). Finally, we compare the two curves by a two-way ANOVA. Iron sources were administered on an empty stomach. One factor analysis showed that heme iron absorption was diminished just by increasing total heme iron (P < 0.0001). The addition of non-heme iron as ferrous sulfate did not have any effect on heme iron absorption (P = NS). We reported evidence that heme and non-heme iron as ferrous sulfate does not compete for absorption. The mechanism behind the absorption of these iron sources is not clear. PMID:22935997

  16. Measurement of hair iron concentration as a marker of body iron content

    PubMed Central

    SAHIN, CEM; PALA, CIGDEM; KAYNAR, LEYLAGUL; TORUN, YASEMIN ALTUNER; CETIN, AYSUN; KURNAZ, FATIH; SIVGIN, SERDAR; SAHIN, FATIH SERDAR

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to define the possible association between blood parameters and hair iron concentration in patient groups showing a difference in body iron content. The study population comprised subjects with iron deficiency anaemia and transfusion-related anaemia with different body iron contents and a healthy control group. All the cases included in the study were examined with respect to hair iron concentration, serum iron, total iron-binding capacity (TIBC), transferrin saturation and erythrocyte markers in the total blood count with ferritin values. Differences in hair iron concentration were evaluated between the groups. Correlation analysis was applied to define the association between the laboratory values used as markers of body iron content and hair iron concentration. A statistically significant difference was determined in hair iron 56Fe and 57Fe concentrations between the group with transfusion-related anaemia, the iron deficiency anaemia group and the healthy control group (P<0.001). In addition, a positive correlation was determined between hair iron 56Fe and 57Fe concentrations and serum iron, ferritin level, transferrin saturation, mean erythrocyte volume and mean erythrocyte haemoglobin values and a negative correlation with TIBC. In conclusion, the results of the present study showed a statistically significant difference in the hair iron concentrations of the patient groups with different body iron content and these values were correlated to the laboratory markers of body iron content. PMID:26137241

  17. Direct Biohydrometallurgical Extraction of Iron from Ore

    SciTech Connect

    T.C. Eisele

    2005-10-01

    A completely novel approach to iron extraction was investigated, based on reductive leaching of iron by anaerobic bacteria. Microorganisms were collected from an anaerobic bog where natural seepage of dissolved iron was observed. This mixed culture was used to reduce insoluble iron in a magnetite ore to the soluble ferrous (Fe{sup +2}) state. While dissolution rates were slow, concentrations of dissolved iron as high as 3487 mg/l could be reached if sufficient time was allowed. A factorial study of the effects of trace nutrients and different forms of organic matter indicated that the best dissolution rates and highest dissolved iron concentrations were achieved using soluble carbohydrate (sucrose) as the bacterial food source, and that nutrients other than nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, sodium, and acetate were not necessary. A key factor in reaching high levels of dissolved iron was maintaining a high level of carbon dioxide in solution, since the solubility of iron carbonates increases markedly as the quantity of dissolved carbon dioxide increases. Once the iron is dissolved, it has been demonstrated that the ferrous iron can then be electroplated from solution, provided that the concentration of iron is sufficiently high and the hydrogen ion concentration is sufficiently low. However, if the leaching solution is electrolyzed directly, organic matter precipitates at the cathode along with the metallic iron. To prevent this problem, the ferrous iron should be separated from the bulk solution in a more concentrated, purified form. One route to accomplishing this is to take advantage of the change in solubility of ferrous iron as a function of carbon dioxide concentration. By cycling the concentration of carbon dioxide in solution, it is possible to produce an iron-rich concentrate that should be suitable for electrolysis. This represents the first viable hydrometallurgical method for leaching iron directly from ore and producing metallic iron.

  18. The reproductive ecology of iron in women.

    PubMed

    Miller, Elizabeth M

    2016-01-01

    Reproductive ecology focuses on the sensitivity of human reproduction to environmental variation. While reproductive ecology has historically focused on the relationship between energy status and reproductive outcomes, iron status is equally critical to women's reproductive health, given the wide-ranging detrimental effects of iron-deficiency anemia on maternal and infant well-being. This review interprets the vast literature on iron status and women's reproduction through an evolutionary framework. First, it will critique the evidence for iron deficiency caused by blood loss during menstruation, reinterpreting the available data as ecological variation in menses within and between populations of women. Second, it will highlight the scant but growing evidence that iron status is implicated in fertility, a relationship that has deep evolutionary roots. Third, this review proposes a new hypothesis for the transfer of iron from mother to infant via pregnancy and breastfeeding: reproductive iron withholding. In this hypothesis, mothers transfer iron to infants in a manner that helps infants avoid iron-mediated infection and oxidative stress, but trades off with potential risk of maternal and infant iron deficiency. Finally, this review explores two main factors that can modify the relationship between iron status and the gestation-lactation cycle: (1) the relationship between long-term reproductive effort (parity) and iron status and (2) supplementation schemes before and during pregnancy. The review concludes by suggesting continued research into iron homeostasis in women using evolutionary, ecological, and biocultural frameworks. PMID:26808104

  19. Fracture of iron aluminide alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, D.J.; Sikka, V.K.

    1992-08-01

    Five heats of iron aluminide alloys have been prepared, and their impact fracture properties compared to FA-129 iron aluminide. The first was a simple ternary alloy of iron, aluminum, and chromium to match the FA-129 composition. The second was similar but with additions of zirconium and carbon. The third alloy had zirconium, carbon, niobium and molybdenum. Two heats were produced produced with reduced aluminum contents so that a disordered body-centered cubic structure would be present. The impact properties, microstructures, and fractography of these alloys were compared to FA-129. The ductile-to-brittle transition temperatures of all of the Fe{sub 3}Al alloys were similar, but the simple ternary alloy had a much higher upper-shelf energy. The reduced aluminum alloys had lower transition temperatures. The microstructures were, in general, coarse and anisotropic. The fracture processes were dominated by second-phase particles.

  20. Fracture of iron aluminide alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, D.J.; Sikka, V.K.

    1992-01-01

    Five heats of iron aluminide alloys have been prepared, and their impact fracture properties compared to FA-129 iron aluminide. The first was a simple ternary alloy of iron, aluminum, and chromium to match the FA-129 composition. The second was similar but with additions of zirconium and carbon. The third alloy had zirconium, carbon, niobium and molybdenum. Two heats were produced produced with reduced aluminum contents so that a disordered body-centered cubic structure would be present. The impact properties, microstructures, and fractography of these alloys were compared to FA-129. The ductile-to-brittle transition temperatures of all of the Fe{sub 3}Al alloys were similar, but the simple ternary alloy had a much higher upper-shelf energy. The reduced aluminum alloys had lower transition temperatures. The microstructures were, in general, coarse and anisotropic. The fracture processes were dominated by second-phase particles.

  1. Monitoring iron uptake by siderophores.

    PubMed

    Hoegy, Françoise; Schalk, Isabelle J

    2014-01-01

    Iron is an important element for almost all forms of life. In order to get access to this essential nutriment, Pseudomonads produce two major siderophores, pyoverdine PVD and pyochelin (PCH). Uptake of iron in bacterial cells can be monitored accurately using (55)Fe. Bacteria cells are incubated in the presence of either PVD or PCH loaded with (55)Fe. After incubation, extracellular iron ions are separated from those accumulated in the bacteria cells by either centrifugation or filtration on glass microfiber filters, for the PCH and PVD assays, respectively. (55)Fe contained in the harvested cells on the filter or in the cell pellet is counted in scintillation cocktail. The number of moles of (55)Fe transported can be determined using the specific activity of the radionuclide. PMID:24818918

  2. Facile and Sustainable Synthesis of Shaped Iron Oxide Nanoparticles: Effect of Iron Precursor Salts on the Shapes of Iron Oxides

    PubMed Central

    Sayed, Farheen N.; Polshettiwar, Vivek

    2015-01-01

    A facile and sustainable protocol for synthesis of six different shaped iron oxides is developed. Notably, all the six shapes of iron oxides can be synthesised using exactly same synthetic protocol, by simply changing the precursor iron salts. Several of the synthesised shapes are not reported before. This novel protocol is relatively easy to implement and could contribute to overcome the challenge of obtaining various shaped iron oxides in economical and sustainable manner. PMID:25939969

  3. Disassembling Iron Availability to Phytoplankton

    PubMed Central

    Shaked, Yeala; Lis, Hagar

    2012-01-01

    The bioavailability of iron to microorganisms and its underlying mechanisms have far reaching repercussions to many natural systems and diverse fields of research, including ocean biogeochemistry, carbon cycling and climate, harmful algal blooms, soil and plant research, bioremediation, pathogenesis, and medicine. Within the framework of ocean sciences, short supply and restricted bioavailability of Fe to phytoplankton is thought to limit primary production and curtail atmospheric CO2 drawdown in vast ocean regions. Yet a clear-cut definition of bioavailability remains elusive, with elements of iron speciation and kinetics, phytoplankton physiology, light, temperature, and microbial interactions, to name a few, all intricately intertwined into this concept. Here, in a synthesis of published and new data, we attempt to disassemble the complex concept of iron bioavailability to phytoplankton by individually exploring some of its facets. We distinguish between the fundamentals of bioavailability – the acquisition of Fe-substrate by phytoplankton – and added levels of complexity involving interactions among organisms, iron, and ecosystem processes. We first examine how phytoplankton acquire free and organically bound iron, drawing attention to the pervasiveness of the reductive uptake pathway in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic autotrophs. Turning to acquisition rates, we propose to view the availability of various Fe-substrates to phytoplankton as a spectrum rather than an absolute “all or nothing.” We then demonstrate the use of uptake rate constants to make comparisons across different studies, organisms, Fe-compounds, and environments, and for gaging the contribution of various Fe-substrates to phytoplankton growth in situ. Last, we describe the influence of aquatic microorganisms on iron chemistry and fate by way of organic complexation and bio-mediated redox transformations and examine the bioavailability of these bio-modified Fe species. PMID:22529839

  4. Nitriding iron at lower temperatures.

    PubMed

    Tong, W P; Tao, N R; Wang, Z B; Lu, J; Lu, K

    2003-01-31

    The microstructure in the surface layer of a pure iron plate was refined at the nanometer scale by means of a surface mechanical attrition treatment that generates repetitive severe plastic deformation of the surface layer. The subsequent nitriding kinetics of the treated iron with the nanostructured surface layer were greatly enhanced, so that the nitriding temperature could be as low as 300 degrees C, which is much lower than conventional nitriding temperatures (above 500 degrees C). This enhanced processing method demonstrates the technological significance of nanomaterials in improving traditional processing techniques and provides a new approach for selective surface reactions in solids. PMID:12560546

  5. Complexed iron removal from groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Munter, R.; Ojaste, H.; Sutt, J.

    2005-07-01

    The paper demonstrates an intensive work carried out and results obtained on the pilot plant of the City of Kogalym Water Treatment Station (Tjumen, Siberia, Russian Federation) to elaborate on a contemporary nonreagent treatment technology for the local iron-rich groundwater. Several filter materials (Birm, Pyrolox, hydroanthracite, Everzit, granulated activated carbon) and chemical oxidants (ozone, chlorine, hydrogen peroxide, oxygen, and potassium permanganate) were tested to solve the problem with complexed iron removal from groundwater. The final elaborated technology consists of raw water intensive aeration in the gas-degas treatment unit followed by sequential filtration through hydroanthracite and the special anthracite Everzit.

  6. Acid-Tolerant Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria Play a Major Role in Iron Cycling in Acidic Iron Rich Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enright, K. A.; Moreau, J. W.

    2008-12-01

    acidic conditions. The dsrAB genes are related to other novel SRB lineages derived from acidic environments in previous reports, suggesting that these species have adapted to the acidity rather than colonized more circumneutral microenvironments. In an acidic hypersaline lake system in NW Victoria (Australia), previous studies suggested that pore water bisulfide derived from anoxic groundwater transported from distal locations. However, isolated potholes of oxic Fe(III)-rich springwater exhibited nearly a two-fold increase in conductivity and pH increase from 4.5 to 8.0 over time periods on the order of days; and biogeochemical and mineralogical observations were consistent with the presence of active acid- and halo-tolerant SRB. Furthermore, stratified active microbial mat communities, with zones of black FeS formation localized several millimeters below the sediment-air interface, were identified in cross-section from lakeshore sediments near groundwater discharge springs. Culture-independent and culture-based work to characterize the SRB population is ongoing at this site. We infer, from previous sulfur isotope tracer experiments at the lake, that overall sulfate reduction rates may be slow, but are nonetheless proceeding and contributing to the recycling of oxidized iron to a significant degree given the abundance of sulfate evidenced by widespread gypsum precipitation. We conclude from the two study-sites described above that acid-tolerant SRB species play an important role in the linked S, Fe and C cycles in acidifying, iron-rich environments, and their phylogenetic and physiological diversity should be further investigated.

  7. Mechanisms of iron metabolism in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Cole P.; Leibold, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    Iron is involved in many biological processes essential for sustaining life. In excess, iron is toxic due to its ability to catalyze the formation of free radicals that damage macromolecules. Organisms have developed specialized mechanisms to tightly regulate iron uptake, storage and efflux. Over the past decades, vertebrate model organisms have led to the identification of key genes and pathways that regulate systemic and cellular iron metabolism. This review provides an overview of iron metabolism in the roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans and highlights recent studies on the role of hypoxia and insulin signaling in the regulation of iron metabolism. Given that iron, hypoxia and insulin signaling pathways are evolutionarily conserved, C. elegans provides a genetic model organism that promises to provide new insights into mechanisms regulating mammalian iron metabolism. PMID:24904417

  8. Human Frataxin: Iron And Ferrochelatase Binding Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Bencze, K.Z.; Yoon, T.; Millan-Pacheco, C.; Bradley, P.B.; Pastor, N.; Cowan, J.A.; Stemmler, T.L.

    2009-06-02

    The coordinated iron structure and ferrochelatase binding surface of human frataxin have been characterized to provide insight into the protein's ability to serve as the iron chaperone during heme biosynthesis.

  9. Molecular Mediators Governing Iron-Copper Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Gulec, Sukru; Collins, James F.

    2015-01-01

    Given their similar physiochemical properties, it is a logical postulate that iron and copper metabolism are intertwined. Indeed, iron-copper interactions were first documented over a century ago, but the homeostatic effects of one on the other has not been elucidated at a molecular level to date. Recent experimental work has, however, begun to provide mechanistic insight into how copper influences iron metabolism. During iron deficiency, elevated copper levels are observed in the intestinal mucosa, liver, and blood. Copper accumulation and/or redistribution within enterocytes may influence iron transport, and high hepatic copper may enhance biosynthesis of a circulating ferroxidase, which potentiates iron release from stores. Moreover, emerging evidence has documented direct effects of copper on the expression and activity of the iron-regulatory hormone hepcidin. This review summarizes current experimental work in this field, with a focus on molecular aspects of iron-copper interplay and how these interactions relate to various disease states. PMID:24995690

  10. Iron, hepcidin, and the metal connection.

    PubMed

    Loréal, Olivier; Cavey, Thibault; Bardou-Jacquet, Edouard; Guggenbuhl, Pascal; Ropert, Martine; Brissot, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Identification of new players in iron metabolism, such as hepcidin, which regulates ferroportin and divalent metal transporter 1 expression, has improved our knowledge of iron metabolism and iron-related diseases. However, from both experimental data and clinical findings, "iron-related proteins" appear to also be involved in the metabolism of other metals, especially divalent cations. Reports have demonstrated that some metals may affect, directly or indirectly, the expression of proteins involved in iron metabolism. Throughout their lives, individuals are exposed to various metals during personal and/or occupational activities. Therefore, better knowledge of the connections between iron and other metals could improve our understanding of iron-related diseases, especially the variability in phenotypic expression, as well as a variety of diseases in which iron metabolism is secondarily affected. Controlling the metabolism of other metals could represent a promising innovative therapeutic approach. PMID:24926268

  11. Ferride geochemistry of Swedish precambrian iron ores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loberg, B. E. H.; Horndahl, A.-K.

    1983-10-01

    Chemical analysis for major and trace elements have been performed on 30 Swedish Precambrian iron ores and on some from Iran and Chile. The Swedish ores consist of apatite iron ores, quartz-banded iron ores, skarn and limestone iron ores from the two main ore districts of Sweden, the Bergslagen and the Norrbotten province. Some Swedish titaniferous iron ores were also included in the investigation. The trace element data show that the Swedish ores can be subdivided into two major groups: 1. orthomagmatic and exhalative, 2. sedimentary. Within group 1 the titaniferous iron ores are distinguished by their high Ti-contents. From the ferride contents of the Kiruna apatite iron ores, the ores are considered to be mobilization products of skarn iron ores from the Norbotten province.

  12. Fatal overdose of iron tablets in adults.

    PubMed

    Abhilash, Kundavaram P P; Arul, J Jonathan; Bala, Divya

    2013-09-01

    Acute iron toxicity is usually seen in children with accidental ingestion of iron-containing syrups. However, the literature on acute iron toxicity with suicidal intent in adults is scant. We report, the first instance of two adults with fatal ingestion of a single drug overdose with iron tablets from India. Two young adults developed severe gastro-intestinal bleeding and fulminant hepatic failure 48 h after deliberate consumption of large doses of iron tablets. Serum iron levels measured 36 h after ingestion were normal presumably due to the redistribution of iron to the intracellular compartment. Despite aggressive supportive management in medical intensive care unit of a tertiary care hospital, the patients succumbed to the toxic doses of iron. PMID:24339645

  13. Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/article/001225.htm Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (formerly known as Hallervorden-Spatz disease) is ...

  14. Effects of developmental iron deficiency and post-weaning iron repletion on the levels of iron transporter proteins in rats

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Sugyoung; Shin, Pill-kyung

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Iron deficiency in early life is associated with developmental problems, which may persist until later in life. The question of whether iron repletion after developmental iron deficiency could restore iron homeostasis is not well characterized. In the present study, we investigated the changes of iron transporters after iron depletion during the gestational-neonatal period and iron repletion during the post-weaning period. MATERIALS/METHODS Pregnant rats were provided iron-deficient (< 6 ppm Fe) or control (36 ppm Fe) diets from gestational day 2. At weaning, pups from iron-deficient dams were fed either iron-deficient (ID group) or control (IDR group) diets for 4 week. Pups from control dams were continued to be fed with the control diet throughout the study period (CON). RESULTS Compared to the CON, ID rats had significantly lower hemoglobin and hematocrits in the blood and significantly lower tissue iron in the liver and spleen. Hepatic hepcidin and BMP6 mRNA levels were also strongly down-regulated in the ID group. Developmental iron deficiency significantly increased iron transporters divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) and ferroportin (FPN) in the duodenum, but decreased DMT1 in the liver. Dietary iron repletion restored the levels of hemoglobin and hematocrit to a normal range, but the tissue iron levels and hepatic hepcidin mRNA levels were significantly lower than those in the CON group. Both FPN and DMT1 protein levels in the liver and in the duodenum were not different between the IDR and the CON. By contrast, DMT1 in the spleen was significantly lower in the IDR, compared to the CON. The splenic FPN was also decreased in the IDR more than in the CON, although the difference did not reach statistical significance. CONCLUSIONS Our findings demonstrate that iron transporter proteins in the duodenum, liver and spleen are differentially regulated during developmental iron deficiency. Also, post-weaning iron repletion efficiently

  15. Quantitative ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, and histologic image analysis of hepatic iron accumulation in pigeons (Columbia livia).

    PubMed

    Matheson, Jodi S; Paul-Murphy, Joanne; O'Brien, Robert T; Steinberg, Howard

    2007-06-01

    Iron overload was induced by iron dextran i.v. in clinically healthy adult pigeons, Columbia livia, (n = 8). Hemosiderosis was induced in all treated birds. Two control pigeons received no iron injections. Pigeons did not show clinical signs of iron overload during the 6-wk study. Ultrasound examination of the liver in the pigeons receiving iron dextran was performed on days 0, 13, 28, and 42. No ultrasound images were collected on the control pigeons. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed on days 0, 13, 28, and 42 on all study pigeons and imaging sequences were collected in three different imaging formats: T1, T2, and gradient-recalled echo (GRE). Surgical liver biopsies were performed on pigeons receiving iron dextran on days 2, 16, and 45 (at necropsy). A single liver sample was collected at necropsy from the control birds. Histologic examination, quantitative image analysis, and tissue iron analysis by thin-layer chromatography were performed on each liver sample and compared to the imaging studies. Although hemosiderosis was confirmed histologically in each experimental pigeon, no significant change in pixel intensity of the ultrasound images was seen at any point in the study. Signal intensity, in all magnetic resonance imaging formats, significantly decreased in a linear fashion as the accumulation of iron increased. PMID:17679505

  16. The Iron-Iron Carbide Phase Diagram: A Practical Guide to Some Descriptive Solid State Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Gary J.; Leighly, H. P., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the solid state chemistry of iron and steel in terms of the iron-iron carbide phase diagram. Suggests that this is an excellent way of introducing the phase diagram (equilibrium diagram) to undergraduate students while at the same time introducing the descriptive solid state chemistry of iron and steel. (Author/JN)

  17. Can an increase in leaf iron reductase activity enhance seed iron accumulation in soybean?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Iron is an important micronutrient for human nutrition, with plant foods providing a significant amount of dietary iron in certain population groups, and in some cases, providing the sole source of dietary iron. Because iron deficiency is unfortunately common in many human populations, we have been...

  18. Intravenous iron-containing products: EMA procrastination.

    PubMed

    2014-07-01

    A European reassessment has led to identical changes in the summaries of product characteristics (SPCs) for all intravenous iron-containing products: the risk of serious adverse effects is now highlighted, underlining the fact that intravenous iron-containing products should only be used when the benefits clearly outweigh the harms. Unfortunately, iron dextran still remains on the market despite a higher risk of hypersensitivity reactions than with iron sucrose. PMID:25162093

  19. Systemic iron overload associated with Welder's siderosis.

    PubMed

    Patel, Rajesh R; Yi, Eunhee S; Ryu, Jay H

    2009-01-01

    Welding involves exposure to fumes, gases, radiation, electricity, noise, and heat. Herein, we describe 2 welders presenting with lung infiltrates and elevated liver enzyme levels. Both of these patients had pulmonary siderosis ("welder's lung") on lung biopsy along with evidence of systemic iron overload. Evaluation for genetic hemochromatosis and other known causes of iron overload was unrevealing. Welding with chronic inhalation of iron particles maybe an under-recognized source of systemic iron overload. PMID:18941405

  20. Broad Iron Emission from Gravitationally Lensed Quasars Observed by Chandra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walton, D. J.; Reynolds, M. T.; Miller, J. M.; Reis, R. C.; Stern, D.; Harrison, F. A.

    2015-06-01

    Recent work has demonstrated the potential of gravitationally lensed quasars to extend measurements of black hole spin out to high redshift with the current generation of X-ray observatories. Here we present an analysis of a large sample of 27 lensed quasars in the redshift range 1.0≲ z≲ 4.5 observed with Chandra, utilizing over 1.6 Ms of total observing time, focusing on the rest-frame iron K emission from these sources. Although the X-ray signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) currently available does not permit the detection of iron emission from the inner accretion disk in individual cases in our sample, we find significant structure in the stacked residuals. In addition to the narrow core, seen almost ubiquitously in local active galactic nuclei (AGNs), we find evidence for an additional underlying broad component from the inner accretion disk, with a clear red wing to the emission profile. Based on simulations, we find the detection of this broader component to be significant at greater than the 3σ level. This implies that iron emission from the inner disk is relatively common in the population of lensed quasars, and in turn further demonstrates that, with additional observations, this population represents an opportunity to significantly extend the sample of AGN spin measurements out to high redshift.

  1. Effects of long-distance running on iron metabolism and hematological parameters.

    PubMed

    Seiler, D; Nagel, D; Franz, H; Hellstern, P; Leitzmann, C; Jung, K

    1989-10-01

    In 110 well-trained participants of a 1000-km running competition lasting for 20 days hematological parameters, iron metabolism, and their respective changes during the race were investigated. Thirty-nine men and 11 women were accustomed to wholesome vegetarian food (lacto-ovovegetarian), 52 men and 8 women consumed a conventional western diet. In each group 50% of the runners finished the race. Before the competition started red blood cell count, hematocrit, and hemoglobin were on average below the values observed in the normal population in all groups. Both male and female runners consuming the wholesome diet showed significantly lower ferritin values than those on a western diet. During the first days of the competition hemolysis occurred leading to increased serum concentrations of bilirubin and iron and decreased haptoglobin levels. Hb concentrations showed a constant decrease during the race. Serum ferritin concentration rose about twofold within the first days and then decreased again without reaching pre-race levels. Serum iron concentrations showed a significant decrease between days 3 and 6. Iron loss was caused by hematuria (25% of all urines tested), gastrointestinal blood loss (10% of all stool specimens tested), and by sweating (4.5 micrograms iron/dl sweat). Our results suggest that especially in female long-distance runners it may be difficult to supply sufficient quantities of iron with the diet. PMID:2599724

  2. Mitochondrial Iron-Sulfur Cluster Activity and Cytosolic Iron Regulate Iron Traffic in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Wofford, Joshua D; Lindahl, Paul A

    2015-11-01

    An ordinary differential equation-based mathematical model was developed to describe trafficking and regulation of iron in growing fermenting budding yeast. Accordingly, environmental iron enters the cytosol and moves into mitochondria and vacuoles. Dilution caused by increasing cell volume is included. Four sites are regulated, including those in which iron is imported into the cytosol, mitochondria, and vacuoles, and the site at which vacuolar Fe(II) is oxidized to Fe(III). The objective of this study was to determine whether cytosolic iron (Fecyt) and/or a putative sulfur-based product of iron-sulfur cluster (ISC) activity was/were being sensed in regulation. The model assumes that the matrix of healthy mitochondria is anaerobic, and that in ISC mutants, O2 diffuses into the matrix where it reacts with nonheme high spin Fe(II) ions, oxidizing them to nanoparticles and generating reactive oxygen species. This reactivity causes a further decline in ISC/heme biosynthesis, which ultimately gives rise to the diseased state. The ordinary differential equations that define this model were numerically integrated, and concentrations of each component were plotted versus the concentration of iron in the growth medium and versus the rate of ISC/heme biosynthesis. Model parameters were optimized by fitting simulations to literature data. The model variant that assumed that both Fecyt and ISC biosynthesis activity were sensed in regulation mimicked observed behavior best. Such "dual sensing" probably arises in real cells because regulation involves assembly of an ISC on a cytosolic protein using Fecyt and a sulfur species generated in mitochondria during ISC biosynthesis and exported into the cytosol. PMID:26306041

  3. The impact of maternal iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia on child’s health

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Ouf, Noran M.; Jan, Mohammed M.

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is extremely common, particularly in the developing world, reaching a state of global epidemic. Iron deficiency during pregnancy is one of the leading causes of anemia in infants and young children. Many women go through the entire pregnancy without attaining the minimum required intake of iron. This review aims to determine the impact of maternal iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia on infants and young children. Extensive literature review revealed that iron deficiency is a global nutritional problem affecting up to 52% of pregnant women. Many of these women are symptomatic. Lack of proper weight gain during pregnancy is an important predictor of iron deficiency. PMID:25719576

  4. Why are biotic iron pools uniform across high- and low-iron pelagic ecosystems?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, P. W.; Strzepek, R. F.; Ellwood, M. J.; Hutchins, D. A.; Nodder, S. D.; Twining, B. S.; Wilhelm, S. W.

    2015-07-01

    Dissolved iron supply is pivotal in setting global phytoplankton productivity and pelagic ecosystem structure. However, most studies of the role of iron have focussed on carbon biogeochemistry within pelagic ecosystems, with less effort to quantify the iron biogeochemical cycle. Here we compare mixed-layer biotic iron inventories from a low-iron (~0.06 nmol L-1) subantarctic (FeCycle study) and a seasonally high-iron (~0.6 nmol L-1) subtropical (FeCycle II study) site. Both studies were quasi-Lagrangian, and had multi-day occupation, common sampling protocols, and indirect estimates of biotic iron (from a limited range of available published biovolume/carbon/iron quotas). Biotic iron pools were comparable (~100 ± 30 pmol L-1) for low- and high-iron waters, despite a tenfold difference in dissolved iron concentrations. Consistency in biotic iron inventories (~80 ± 24 pmol L-1, largely estimated using a limited range of available quotas) was also conspicuous for three Southern Ocean polar sites. Insights into the extent to which uniformity in biotic iron inventories was driven by the need to apply common iron quotas obtained from laboratory cultures were provided from FeCycle II. The observed twofold to threefold range of iron quotas during the evolution of FeCycle II subtropical bloom was much less than reported from laboratory monocultures. Furthermore, the iron recycling efficiency varied by fourfold during FeCycle II, increasing as stocks of new iron were depleted, suggesting that quotas and iron recycling efficiencies together set biotic iron pools. Hence, site-specific differences in iron recycling efficiencies (which provide 20-50% and 90% of total iron supply in high- and low-iron waters, respectively) help offset the differences in new iron inputs between low- and high-iron sites. Future parameterization of iron in biogeochemical models must focus on the drivers of biotic iron inventories, including the differing iron requirements of the resident biota

  5. Fate of blood meal iron in mosquitos

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Guoli; Kohlhepp, Pete; Geiser, Dawn; Frasquillo, Maria del Carmen; Vazquez-Moreno, Luz; Winzerling, Joy J.

    2007-01-01

    Iron is an essential element of living cells and organisms as a component of numerous metabolic pathways. Hemoglobin and ferric-transferrin in vertebrate host blood are the two major iron sources for female mosquitoes. We used inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and radioisotope-labeling to quantify the fate of iron supplied from hemoglobin or as transferrin in Aedes aegypti. At the end of the first gonotrophic cycloe, ~87% of the ingested total meal heme iron was excreted, while 7% was distributed into the eggs and 6% was stored in different tissues. In contrast, ~8% of the iron provided as transferrin was excreted and of that absorbed, 77% was allocated to the eggs and 15% distributed in the tissues. Further analyses indicate that of the iron supplied in a blood meal, ~7% appears in the eggs and of this iron 98% is from hemoglobin and 2% from ferric-transferrin. Whereas of iron from a blood meal retained in body of the female, ~97% is from heme and <1 % is from transferrin. Evaluation of iron-binding proteins in hemolymph and egg following intake of 59Fe-transferrin revealed that ferritin is iron loaded in these animals, and indicate that this protein plays a critical role in meal iron transport and iron storage in eggs in A. aegypti. PMID:17689557

  6. Adipocyte iron regulates leptin and food intake

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yan; Li, Zhonggang; Gabrielsen, J. Scott; Simcox, Judith A.; Lee, Soh-hyun; Jones, Deborah; Cooksey, Bob; Stoddard, Gregory; Cefalu, William T.; McClain, Donald A.

    2015-01-01

    Dietary iron supplementation is associated with increased appetite. Here, we investigated the effect of iron on the hormone leptin, which regulates food intake and energy homeostasis. Serum ferritin was negatively associated with serum leptin in a cohort of patients with metabolic syndrome. Moreover, the same inverse correlation was observed in mice fed a high-iron diet. Adipocyte-specific loss of the iron exporter ferroportin resulted in iron loading and decreased leptin, while decreased levels of hepcidin in a murine hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) model increased adipocyte ferroportin expression, decreased adipocyte iron, and increased leptin. Treatment of 3T3-L1 adipocytes with iron decreased leptin mRNA in a dose-dependent manner. We found that iron negatively regulates leptin transcription via cAMP-responsive element binding protein activation (CREB activation) and identified 2 potential CREB-binding sites in the mouse leptin promoter region. Mutation of both sites completely blocked the effect of iron on promoter activity. ChIP analysis revealed that binding of phosphorylated CREB is enriched at these two sites in iron-treated 3T3-L1 adipocytes compared with untreated cells. Consistent with the changes in leptin, dietary iron content was also directly related to food intake, independently of weight. These findings indicate that levels of dietary iron play an important role in regulation of appetite and metabolism through CREB-dependent modulation of leptin expression. PMID:26301810

  7. Adipocyte iron regulates leptin and food intake.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yan; Li, Zhonggang; Gabrielsen, J Scott; Simcox, Judith A; Lee, Soh-hyun; Jones, Deborah; Cooksey, Bob; Stoddard, Gregory; Cefalu, William T; McClain, Donald A

    2015-09-01

    Dietary iron supplementation is associated with increased appetite. Here, we investigated the effect of iron on the hormone leptin, which regulates food intake and energy homeostasis. Serum ferritin was negatively associated with serum leptin in a cohort of patients with metabolic syndrome. Moreover, the same inverse correlation was observed in mice fed a high-iron diet. Adipocyte-specific loss of the iron exporter ferroportin resulted in iron loading and decreased leptin, while decreased levels of hepcidin in a murine hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) model increased adipocyte ferroportin expression, decreased adipocyte iron, and increased leptin. Treatment of 3T3-L1 adipocytes with iron decreased leptin mRNA in a dose-dependent manner. We found that iron negatively regulates leptin transcription via cAMP-responsive element binding protein activation (CREB activation) and identified 2 potential CREB-binding sites in the mouse leptin promoter region. Mutation of both sites completely blocked the effect of iron on promoter activity. ChIP analysis revealed that binding of phosphorylated CREB is enriched at these two sites in iron-treated 3T3-L1 adipocytes compared with untreated cells. Consistent with the changes in leptin, dietary iron content was also directly related to food intake, independently of weight. These findings indicate that levels of dietary iron play an important role in regulation of appetite and metabolism through CREB-dependent modulation of leptin expression. PMID:26301810

  8. In vivo iron metabolism by IRMS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Iron isotopes are used in both biological and geological investigations. Three low-abundance stable isotopes are available for human studies. They have been widely used to study iron metabolism. They have provided valuable insights into iron deficiency, one of the most common micronutrient deficienc...

  9. Voice Modulations in German Ironic Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scharrer, Lisa; Christmann, Ursula; Knoll, Monja

    2011-01-01

    Previous research has shown that in different languages ironic speech is acoustically modulated compared to literal speech, and these modulations are assumed to aid the listener in the comprehension process by acting as cues that mark utterances as ironic. The present study was conducted to identify paraverbal features of German "ironic criticism"…

  10. Treatment of Iron Deficiency in Women

    PubMed Central

    Breymann, C.; Römer, T.; Dudenhausen, J. W.

    2013-01-01

    Iron deficiency with and without anaemia is a common cause of morbidity, particularly in women. Iron deficiency is generally the result of an imbalance between iron loss and iron absorption. In women with symptoms suspicious for iron deficiency, it is important to confirm or exclude the suspicion using proper tests. The use of serum ferritin levels is considered the gold standard for diagnosis. Although the ideal ferritin levels are not unknown the current consent is that levels < 40 ng/ml indicate iron deficiency, which needs to be treated in symptomatic patients. However, symptoms can already occur at ferritin levels of < 100 ng/ml and treatment must be adapted to the individual patient. Iron supplementation is only indicated in symptomatic patients diagnosed with iron deficiency whose quality of life is affected. It is important to treat iron deficiency together with its causes or risk factors. For example, blood loss from hypermenorrhea should be reduced. Women also need to receive information about the benefits of an iron-rich diet. If oral treatment with iron supplements is ineffective, parenteral iron administration is recommended. PMID:26633902

  11. 21 CFR 73.3125 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Iron oxides. 73.3125 Section 73.3125 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3125 Iron oxides. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive iron oxides (CAS Reg. No. 1332-37-2), Color Index No. 77491, shall conform...

  12. Iron Deficiency in Autism and Asperger Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latif, A.; Heinz, P.; Cook, R.

    2002-01-01

    Retrospective analysis of the full blood count and, when available, serum ferritin measurements of 96 children (52 with autism and 44 with Asperger syndrome) found six autistic children had iron deficiency and 12 of the 23 autistic children with serum ferritin measures were iron deficient. Far fewer Asperger children were iron deficient. Results…

  13. 21 CFR 73.3125 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Iron oxides. 73.3125 Section 73.3125 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3125 Iron oxides. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive iron oxides (CAS Reg. No. 1332-37-2), Color Index No. 77491, shall conform...

  14. 21 CFR 582.5375 - Iron reduced.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Iron reduced. 582.5375 Section 582.5375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5375 Iron reduced. (a) Product. Iron reduced. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  15. 21 CFR 582.5375 - Iron reduced.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Iron reduced. 582.5375 Section 582.5375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5375 Iron reduced. (a) Product. Iron reduced. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  16. 49 CFR 230.91 - Chafing irons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Chafing irons. 230.91 Section 230.91 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Tenders Draw Gear and Draft Systems § 230.91 Chafing irons. Chafing irons that permit proper curving...

  17. 49 CFR 230.91 - Chafing irons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Chafing irons. 230.91 Section 230.91 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Tenders Draw Gear and Draft Systems § 230.91 Chafing irons. Chafing irons that permit proper curving...

  18. 49 CFR 230.91 - Chafing irons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Chafing irons. 230.91 Section 230.91 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Tenders Draw Gear and Draft Systems § 230.91 Chafing irons. Chafing irons that permit proper curving...

  19. 21 CFR 73.3125 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Iron oxides. 73.3125 Section 73.3125 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3125 Iron oxides. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive iron oxides (CAS Reg. No. 1332-37-2), Color Index No. 77491, shall conform...

  20. 21 CFR 73.3125 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Iron oxides. 73.3125 Section 73.3125 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3125 Iron oxides. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive iron oxides (CAS Reg. No. 1332-37-2), Color Index No. 77491, shall conform...

  1. Ligand iron catalysts for selective hydrogenation

    DOEpatents

    Casey, Charles P.; Guan, Hairong

    2010-11-16

    Disclosed are iron ligand catalysts for selective hydrogenation of aldehydes, ketones and imines. A catalyst such as dicarbonyl iron hydride hydroxycyclopentadiene) complex uses the OH on the five member ring and hydrogen linked to the iron to facilitate hydrogenation reactions, particularly in the presence of hydrogen gas.

  2. 21 CFR 582.5375 - Iron reduced.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Iron reduced. 582.5375 Section 582.5375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5375 Iron reduced. (a) Product. Iron reduced. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  3. 21 CFR 73.3125 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Iron oxides. 73.3125 Section 73.3125 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3125 Iron oxides. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive iron oxides (CAS Reg. No. 1332-37-2), Color Index No. 77491, shall conform...

  4. 49 CFR 230.91 - Chafing irons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Chafing irons. 230.91 Section 230.91 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Tenders Draw Gear and Draft Systems § 230.91 Chafing irons. Chafing irons that permit proper curving...

  5. 21 CFR 582.5375 - Iron reduced.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Iron reduced. 582.5375 Section 582.5375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5375 Iron reduced. (a) Product. Iron reduced. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  6. 21 CFR 582.5375 - Iron reduced.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Iron reduced. 582.5375 Section 582.5375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5375 Iron reduced. (a) Product. Iron reduced. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  7. 49 CFR 230.91 - Chafing irons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Chafing irons. 230.91 Section 230.91 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Tenders Draw Gear and Draft Systems § 230.91 Chafing irons. Chafing irons that permit proper curving...

  8. 21 CFR 522.1182 - Iron injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 2 to 4 days of age. (ii) For treatment of iron deficiency anemia, inject 100 mg (1 mL) by... intramuscularly an amount of drug containing 100 to 150 mg of elemental iron to animals from 1 to 3 days of age... age. Dosage may be repeated at 2 weeks of age. (ii) For treatment of iron deficiency...

  9. 21 CFR 522.1182 - Iron injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 2 to 4 days of age. (ii) For treatment of iron deficiency anemia, inject 100 mg (1 mL) by... intramuscularly an amount of drug containing 100 to 150 mg of elemental iron to animals from 1 to 3 days of age... age. Dosage may be repeated at 2 weeks of age. (ii) For treatment of iron deficiency...

  10. 21 CFR 522.1182 - Iron injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 2 to 4 days of age. (ii) For treatment of iron deficiency anemia, inject 100 mg (1 mL) by... intramuscularly an amount of drug containing 100 to 150 mg of elemental iron to animals from 1 to 3 days of age... age. Dosage may be repeated at 2 weeks of age. (ii) For treatment of iron deficiency...

  11. 21 CFR 522.1182 - Iron injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 2 to 4 days of age. (ii) For treatment of iron deficiency anemia, inject 100 mg (1 mL) by... intramuscularly an amount of drug containing 100 to 150 mg of elemental iron to animals from 1 to 3 days of age... age. Dosage may be repeated at 2 weeks of age. (ii) For treatment of iron deficiency...

  12. 21 CFR 522.1182 - Iron injection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 2 to 4 days of age. (ii) For treatment of iron deficiency anemia, inject 100 mg (1 mL) by... intramuscularly an amount of drug containing 100 to 150 mg of elemental iron to animals from 1 to 3 days of age... age. Dosage may be repeated at 2 weeks of age. (ii) For treatment of iron deficiency...

  13. 27 CFR 45.45c - Package use-up rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Package use-up rule. 45.45c Section 45.45c Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU..., WITHOUT PAYMENT OF TAX, FOR USE OF THE UNITED STATES Packaging Requirements § 45.45c Package use-up...

  14. 27 CFR 45.45c - Package use-up rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Package use-up rule. 45.45c Section 45.45c Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT..., WITHOUT PAYMENT OF TAX, FOR USE OF THE UNITED STATES Packaging Requirements § 45.45c Package use-up...

  15. 27 CFR 45.45c - Package use-up rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Package use-up rule. 45.45c Section 45.45c Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU..., WITHOUT PAYMENT OF TAX, FOR USE OF THE UNITED STATES Packaging Requirements § 45.45c Package use-up...

  16. 27 CFR 45.45c - Package use-up rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Package use-up rule. 45.45c Section 45.45c Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU..., WITHOUT PAYMENT OF TAX, FOR USE OF THE UNITED STATES Packaging Requirements § 45.45c Package use-up...

  17. Coal desulfurization with iron pentacarbonyl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, G. C.

    1979-01-01

    Coal desulfurization with iron pentacarbonyl treatment under mild conditions removes up to eighty percent of organic sulfur. Preliminary tests on treatment process suggest it may be economical enough to encourage investigation of use for coal desulfurization. With mild operating conditions, process produces environmentally-acceptable clean coal at reasonable cost.

  18. Carcinogenesis studies with iron oxides.

    PubMed

    Steinhoff, D; Mohr, U; Hahnemann, S

    1991-01-01

    Seven different types of iron oxide were examined for carcinogenic properties in intratracheal instillation and intraperitoneal injection tests on rats, which represent particularly sensitive methods for local carcinogenic effects. The total doses lay in the range of maximum tolerance (390/1,530 mg/kg i.t. or 600 mg/kg i.p.). With one exception, at least 50 male and 50 female Sprague-Dawley rats were used per test group, control group and route of administration. Two iron oxides were additionally instilled intratracheally in combination with benzo[a]pyrene. No carcinogenic effect could be demonstrated for the test iron oxides RBW 07105/SV2 (fibrous, magnetic, surface doped with 1.85% cobalt), development product Bayferrox AC 5100 M (fibrous, magnetic, bulk doped with 2.1% cobalt), Bayferrox 1352 (fibrous alpha-Fe2O3), Bayferrox 920 (fibrous alpha-FeOOH), Bayferrox 130 (cubic alpha-Fe2O3), Bayferrox 306 (cubic Fe3O4), or Brazilian iron ore AC 5031 N (alpha-Fe2O3). PMID:1797572

  19. Wear resistance of ductile irons

    SciTech Connect

    Lerner, Y.S. )

    1994-06-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the wear resistance of different grades of ductile iron as alternatives to high-tensile-strength alloyed and inoculated gray irons and bronzes for machine-tool and high-pressure hydraulic components. Special test methods were employed to simulate typical conditions of reciprocating sliding wear with and without abrasive-contaminated lubricant for machine and press guideways. Quantitative relationships were established among wear rate, microstructure and microhardness of structural constituents, and nodule size of ductile iron. The frictional wear resistance of ductile iron as a bearing material was tested with hardened steel shafts using standard test techniques under continuous rotating movement with lubricant. Lubricant sliding wear tests on specimens and components for hydraulic equipment and apparatus were carried out on a special rig with reciprocating motion, simulating the working conditions in a piston/cylindrical unit in a pressure range from 5 to 32 MPa. Rig and field tests on machine-tool components and units and on hydraulic parts have confirmed the test data.

  20. Iron oxides in human spleen.

    PubMed

    Kopáni, Martin; Miglierini, Marcel; Lančok, Adriana; Dekan, Július; Čaplovicová, Mária; Jakubovský, Ján; Boča, Roman; Mrazova, Hedviga

    2015-10-01

    Iron is an essential element for fundamental cell functions and a catalyst for chemical reactions. Three samples extracted from the human spleen were investigated by scanning (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Mössbauer spectrometry (MS), and SQUID magnetometry. The sample with diagnosis of hemosiderosis (H) differs from that referring to hereditary spherocytosis and the reference sample. SEM reveals iron-rich micrometer-sized aggregate of various structures-tiny fibrils in hereditary spherocytosis sample and no fibrils in hemochromatosis. Hematite and magnetite particles from 2 to 6 μm in TEM with diffraction in all samples were shown. The SQUID magnetometry shows different amount of diamagnetic, paramagnetic and ferrimagnetic structures in the tissues. The MS results indicate contribution of ferromagnetically split sextets for all investigated samples. Their occurrence indicates that at least part of the sample is magnetically ordered below the critical temperature. The iron accumulation process is different in hereditary spherocytosis and hemosiderosis. This fact may be the reason of different iron crystallization. PMID:26292972

  1. Dynamic transition in supercritical iron.

    PubMed

    Fomin, Yu D; Ryzhov, V N; Tsiok, E N; Brazhkin, V V; Trachenko, K

    2014-01-01

    Recent advance in understanding the supercritical state posits the existence of a new line above the critical point separating two physically distinct states of matter: rigid liquid and non-rigid gas-like fluid. The location of this line, the Frenkel line, remains unknown for important real systems. Here, we map the Frenkel line on the phase diagram of supercritical iron using molecular dynamics simulations. On the basis of our data, we propose a general recipe to locate the Frenkel line for any system, the recipe that importantly does not involve system-specific detailed calculations and relies on the knowledge of the melting line only. We further discuss the relationship between the Frenkel line and the metal-insulator transition in supercritical liquid metals. Our results enable predicting the state of supercritical iron in several conditions of interest. In particular, we predict that liquid iron in the Jupiter core is in the "rigid liquid" state and is highly conducting. We finally analyse the evolution of iron conductivity in the core of smaller planets such as Earth and Venus as well as exoplanets: as planets cool off, the supercritical core undergoes the transition to the rigid-liquid conducting state at the Frenkel line. PMID:25424664

  2. Water oxidation: High five iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloret-Fillol, Julio; Costas, Miquel

    2016-03-01

    The oxidation of water is essential to the sustainable production of fuels using sunlight or electricity, but designing active, stable and earth-abundant catalysts for the reaction is challenging. Now, a complex containing five iron atoms is shown to efficiently oxidize water by mimicking key features of the oxygen-evolving complex in green plants.

  3. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OF IRON CASTING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sampling of ductile iron casting in green sand molds with phenolic isocyanate cores and in phenol-formaldehyde bound shell molds did not provide definitive proof that environmentally hazardous organic emission occur. Both molding systems produced the same type of major emissions,...

  4. Dynamic transition in supercritical iron

    PubMed Central

    Fomin, Yu. D.; Ryzhov, V. N.; Tsiok, E. N.; Brazhkin, V. V.; Trachenko, K.

    2014-01-01

    Recent advance in understanding the supercritical state posits the existence of a new line above the critical point separating two physically distinct states of matter: rigid liquid and non-rigid gas-like fluid. The location of this line, the Frenkel line, remains unknown for important real systems. Here, we map the Frenkel line on the phase diagram of supercritical iron using molecular dynamics simulations. On the basis of our data, we propose a general recipe to locate the Frenkel line for any system, the recipe that importantly does not involve system-specific detailed calculations and relies on the knowledge of the melting line only. We further discuss the relationship between the Frenkel line and the metal-insulator transition in supercritical liquid metals. Our results enable predicting the state of supercritical iron in several conditions of interest. In particular, we predict that liquid iron in the Jupiter core is in the “rigid liquid” state and is highly conducting. We finally analyse the evolution of iron conductivity in the core of smaller planets such as Earth and Venus as well as exoplanets: as planets cool off, the supercritical core undergoes the transition to the rigid-liquid conducting state at the Frenkel line. PMID:25424664

  5. Formation of IIAB iron meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasson, John T.; Huber, Heinz; Malvin, Daniel J.

    2007-02-01

    Group IIAB is the third largest group of iron meteorites and the second largest group that formed by fractional crystallization; many of these irons formed from the P-rich portion of a magma consisting of two-immiscible liquids. We report neutron-activation data for 78 IIAB irons. These confirm earlier studies showing that the group has the largest known range in Ir concentrations (a factor of 4000) and that slopes are steeply negative on plots of Ir vs. Au or As (or Ni). High negative slopes imply relatively high distribution coefficients for Ir, Au, and As (but, with rare exceptions, remaining less than unity for the latter). IIAB appears to have had the highest S contents of any magmatic group of iron meteorites, consistent with its high contents of other volatile siderophiles, particularly Ga and Ge. Large fractions of trapped melt were present in the IIAB irons with the highest Au and As and lowest Ir contents. As a result, when these irons crystallized, the DAu and DAs values can, with moderate accuracy, be estimated to have been roughly 0.53 and 0.46, respectively. These low values imply that the initial nonmetal (S + P) content of the magma was much lower than 170 mg/g, as estimated in earlier studies; our estimate is 75 mg/g. Our results are consistent with an initial P/S ratio of 0.25, similar to the ratio estimated for other magmatic groups. There is little doubt that incompatible S-rich and P-rich metallic liquids were involved during the formation of group IIAB. After 20% crystallization of our assumed starting composition the two-liquid boundary is encountered (at 72 mg/g S and 18 mg/g P). Initially the volume of S-rich liquid is very small, but continued crystallization increased the volume of this phase and decreased its P/S ratio while increasing this ratio in the P-rich liquid. Most crystallization of the IIAB magma would have occurred in the lower, P-rich portion of the core. However, metal was still a liquidus phase at the top of the core and

  6. Risk of Oxidative Damage to Bone from Increased Iron Stores During Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwart, S. R.; Smith, S. M.

    2014-01-01

    Iron stores are increased secondary to neocytolysis of red blood cells and a high dietary intake of iron during space flight. This raises concerns about the risk of excess iron causing oxidative damage in many tissues, including bone. Biomarkers of iron status, oxidative damage, and bone resorption during space flight were analyzed for 23 (16 M/7 F) International Space Station crewmembers as part of the Nutrition SMO project. Up to 5 in-flight blood samples and 24-h urine pools were collected over the course of the 4-6 month missions. Serum iron increased slightly during space flight and was decreased at landing (P < 0.0004). An increase in serum ferritin early in flight (217% in women and 68% in men, P < 0.0004), returning to preflight concentrations at landing, and a decrease in transferrin and transferrin receptors during flight indicated that a transient increase in iron stores occurred. No inflammatory response was observed during flight. The oxidative damage markers 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine and prostaglandin F(sub 2(alpha)) were positively correlated (both P < 0.001) with serum ferritin. A greater area under the curve for ferritin during flight was correlated with greater changes in bone mineral density of several bone regions after flight (1). In a separate study (2), a ground-based investigation was conducted that examined the combined effects of radiation exposure and iron overload on sensitivity to radiation injury in several physiological systems in 12-wk male Sprague-Dawley rats. The rats were acclimated to an adequate iron diet (45 mg iron (ferric citrate)/kg diet) for 3 wk and then assigned to one of four groups: adequate iron (Fe) diet/no radiation, adequate Fe diet/ radiation, moderately high Fe diet (650 mg Fe (ferric citrate)/kg diet)/no radiation, and moderately high Fe diet/radiation. Animals remained on the assigned diet for 4 wk. Starting on day 14 of experimental diet treatment, animals were exposed to a fractionated dose (0.375 Gy) of Cs

  7. Atmospheric iron deposition: global distribution, variability, and human perturbations.

    PubMed

    Mahowald, Natalie M; Engelstaedter, Sebastian; Luo, Chao; Sealy, Andrea; Artaxo, Paulo; Benitez-Nelson, Claudia; Bonnet, Sophie; Chen, Ying; Chuang, Patrick Y; Cohen, David D; Dulac, Francois; Herut, Barak; Johansen, Anne M; Kubilay, Nilgun; Losno, Remi; Maenhaut, Willy; Paytan, Adina; Prospero, Joseph M; Shank, Lindsey M; Siefert, Ronald L

    2009-01-01

    Atmospheric inputs of iron to the open ocean are hypothesized to modulate ocean biogeochemistry. This review presents an integration of available observations of atmospheric iron and iron deposition, and also covers bioavailable iron distributions. Methods for estimating temporal variability in ocean deposition over the recent past are reviewed. Desert dust iron is estimated to represent 95% of the global atmospheric iron cycle, and combustion sources of iron are responsible for the remaining 5%. Humans may be significantly perturbing desert dust (up to 50%). The sources of bioavailable iron are less well understood than those of iron, partly because we do not know what speciation of the iron is bioavailable. Bioavailable iron can derive from atmospheric processing of relatively insoluble desert dust iron or from direct emissions of soluble iron from combustion sources. These results imply that humans could be substantially impacting iron and bioavailable iron deposition to ocean regions, but there are large uncertainties in our understanding. PMID:21141037

  8. Iron, anemia and hepcidin in malaria

    PubMed Central

    Spottiswoode, Natasha; Duffy, Patrick E.; Drakesmith, Hal

    2014-01-01

    Malaria and iron have a complex but important relationship. Plasmodium proliferation requires iron, both during the clinically silent liver stage of growth and in the disease-associated phase of erythrocyte infection. Precisely how the protozoan acquires its iron from its mammalian host remains unclear, but iron chelators can inhibit pathogen growth in vitro and in animal models. In humans, iron deficiency appears to protect against severe malaria, while iron supplementation increases risks of infection and disease. Malaria itself causes profound disturbances in physiological iron distribution and utilization, through mechanisms that include hemolysis, release of heme, dyserythropoiesis, anemia, deposition of iron in macrophages, and inhibition of dietary iron absorption. These effects have significant consequences. Malarial anemia is a major global health problem, especially in children, that remains incompletely understood and is not straightforward to treat. Furthermore, the changes in iron metabolism during a malaria infection may modulate susceptibility to co-infections. The release of heme and accumulation of iron in granulocytes may explain increased vulnerability to non-typhoidal Salmonella during malaria. The redistribution of iron away from hepatocytes and into macrophages may confer host resistance to superinfection, whereby blood-stage parasitemia prevents the development of a second liver-stage Plasmodium infection in the same organism. Key to understanding the pathophysiology of iron metabolism in malaria is the activity of the iron regulatory hormone hepcidin. Hepcidin is upregulated during blood-stage parasitemia and likely mediates much of the iron redistribution that accompanies disease. Understanding the regulation and role of hepcidin may offer new opportunities to combat malaria and formulate better approaches to treat anemia in the developing world. PMID:24910614

  9. Transformation rate between ferritin and hemosiderin assayed by serum ferritin kinetics in patients with normal iron stores and iron overload.

    PubMed

    Saito, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Hisao

    2015-11-01

    Ferritin iron, hemosiderin iron, total iron stores and transformation rate were determined by serum ferritin kinetics. The transformation rate between ferritin and hemosiderin is motivated by the potential difference between them. The transformer determines transformation rate according to the potential difference in iron mobilization and deposition. The correlations between transformation rate and iron stores were studied in 11 patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC), 1 patent with treated iron deficiency anemia (TIDA), 9 patients with hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) and 4 patients with transfusion-dependent anemia (TD). The power regression curve of approximation showed an inverse correlation between transformation rate and ferritin iron, hemosiderin iron in part and total iron stores in HH. Such an inverse correlation between transformation rate and iron stores implies that the larger the amount of iron stores, the smaller the transformation of iron stores. On the other hand, a minimal inverse correlation between transformation rate and ferritin iron and no correlation between transformation rate and hemosiderin iron or total iron stores in CHC indicate the derangement of storage iron metabolism in the cells with CHC. Radio-iron fixation on the iron storing tissue in iron overload was larger than that in normal subjects by ferrokinetics. This is consistent with the inverse correlation between transformation rate and total iron stores in HH. The characteristics of iron turnover between ferritin and hemosiderin were disclosed from the correlation between transformation rate and ferritin iron, hemosiderin iron or total iron stores. PMID:26663936

  10. Infant iron status affects iron absorption in Peruvian breastfed infants at 2 and 5 mo of age

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effects of prenatal iron supplementation on maternal postpartum iron status and early infant iron homeostasis remain largely unknown. We examined iron absorption and growth in exclusively breastfed infants in relation to fetal iron exposure and iron status during early infancy. Longitudinal, paired ...

  11. Iron-binding haemerythrin RING ubiquitin ligases regulate plant iron responses and accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Takanori; Nagasaka, Seiji; Senoura, Takeshi; Itai, Reiko Nakanishi; Nakanishi, Hiromi; Nishizawa, Naoko K.

    2013-01-01

    Iron is essential for most living organisms. Plants transcriptionally induce genes involved in iron acquisition under conditions of low iron availability, but the nature of the deficiency signal and its sensors are unknown. Here we report the identification of new iron regulators in rice, designated Oryza sativa Haemerythrin motif-containing Really Interesting New Gene (RING)- and Zinc-finger protein 1 (OsHRZ1) and OsHRZ2. OsHRZ1, OsHRZ2 and their Arabidopsis homologue BRUTUS bind iron and zinc, and possess ubiquitination activity. OsHRZ1 and OsHRZ2 are susceptible to degradation in roots irrespective of iron conditions. OsHRZ-knockdown plants exhibit substantial tolerance to iron deficiency, and accumulate more iron in their shoots and grains irrespective of soil iron conditions. The expression of iron deficiency-inducible genes involved in iron utilization is enhanced in OsHRZ-knockdown plants, mostly under iron-sufficient conditions. These results suggest that OsHRZ1 and OsHRZ2 are iron-binding sensors that negatively regulate iron acquisition under conditions of iron sufficiency. PMID:24253678

  12. 45 CFR Appendix - Unknown Title

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING Agency Reports Inspector General report. Pt. 1230, App. B ER24OC02.007 ER24OC02.008 ER24OC02.009...

  13. Iron-control additives improve acidizing

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, M.; Dill, W. ); Besler, M. )

    1989-07-24

    Iron sulfide and sulfur precipitation in sour wells can be controlled with iron-sequestering agents and sulfide modifiers. Oil production has been routinely increased in sour wells where precipitation of iron sulfide and elemental sulfur has been brought under control. Production increases have been especially noteworthy on wells that had a history of rapid production decline after acid stimulation. Twenty-fold production increases have been recorded. Key to the production increase has been to increase permeability with: Iron chelating agents that control precipitation of iron sulfide. A sulfide modifier that reduces precipitation of solids in the presence of excessive amounts of hydrogen sulfide and prevents precipitation of elemental sulfur.

  14. Hepcidin in the diagnosis of iron disorders.

    PubMed

    Girelli, Domenico; Nemeth, Elizabeta; Swinkels, Dorine W

    2016-06-01

    The discovery of the iron-regulatory hormone hepcidin in 2001 has revolutionized our understanding of iron disorders, and its measurement should advance diagnosis/treatment of these conditions. Although several assays have been developed, a gold standard is still lacking, and efforts toward harmonization are ongoing. Nevertheless, promising applications can already be glimpsed, ranging from the use of hepcidin levels for diagnosing iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia to global health applications such as guiding safe iron supplementation in developing countries with high infection burden. PMID:27044621

  15. Hepcidin, a new iron regulatory peptide.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, Gaël; Viatte, Lydie; Bennoun, Myriam; Beaumont, Carole; Kahn, Axel; Vaulont, Sophie

    2002-01-01

    Maintaining normal iron homeostasis is essential for the organism, as both iron deficiency and iron excess are associated with cellular dysfunction. Recently, several lines of evidence have suggested that hepcidin, a peptide mainly produced by the liver, plays a major role in the control of body iron homeostasis. The subject of this paper is to summarize the advances toward the understanding of function and regulation of hepcidin in iron metabolism and to provide new data on the regulation of hepcidin gene expression by erythropoietin, the major regulator of mammalian erythropoiesis. PMID:12547223

  16. Targeting Iron Homeostasis in Acute Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    Walker, Vyvyca J; Agarwal, Anupam

    2016-01-01

    Iron is an essential metal involved in several major cellular processes required to maintain life. Because of iron's ability to cause oxidative damage, its transport, metabolism, and storage is strictly controlled in the body, especially in the small intestine, liver, and kidney. Iron plays a major role in acute kidney injury and has been a target for therapeutic intervention. However, the therapies that have been effective in animal models of acute kidney injury have not been successful in human beings. Targeting iron trafficking via ferritin, ferroportin, or hepcidin may offer new insights. This review focuses on the biology of iron, particularly in the kidney, and its implications in acute kidney injury. PMID:27085736

  17. Hepcidin in the diagnosis of iron disorders

    PubMed Central

    Girelli, Domenico; Nemeth, Elizabeta

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of the iron-regulatory hormone hepcidin in 2001 has revolutionized our understanding of iron disorders, and its measurement should advance diagnosis/treatment of these conditions. Although several assays have been developed, a gold standard is still lacking, and efforts toward harmonization are ongoing. Nevertheless, promising applications can already be glimpsed, ranging from the use of hepcidin levels for diagnosing iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia to global health applications such as guiding safe iron supplementation in developing countries with high infection burden. PMID:27044621

  18. The poor bioavailability of elemental iron in corn masa flour is not affected by disodium EDTA.

    PubMed

    Walter, Tomas; Pizarro, Fernando; Boy, Erick; Abrams, Steven A

    2004-02-01

    The most sustainable way to eradicate iron deficiency is through food fortification. Elemental iron powders are commonly utilized as fortificants due to their low cost and few sensory problems. However, their bioavailability is unknown. Our goals were to measure the bioavailability of elemental iron in Mexican style corn masa flour tortillas and to evaluate the effects of Na(2)EDTA. We used a stable isotope of H(2)-reduced iron powder, with and without Na(2)EDTA in tortillas prepared with corn masa flour. Two groups of 5- to 7-y-old children (n = 12/group) were fed tortillas to which was added 3 mg/100 g of H(2)-reduced (58)Fe with a mean particle size of 15 micro m. In one group, Na(2)EDTA was incorporated at a ratio of 1:2 mol/mol. The next day, (57)Fe ascorbate was given as a reference dose. After 14 d, blood samples were analyzed for isotopic enrichment. When normalized to 40% absorption of the reference dose, the geometric mean (+/-range 1 SD) bioavailability of reduced iron in tortilla was 3.8% (2.7-5.3). The addition of Na(2)EDTA, tended to increase it (P = 0.18) to 5.1% (2.8-9.2). This observed low absorption was compounded by the use of iron isotopes with smaller particle size (mean diameter 15 micro m) than typical of commercial elemental iron powder (<45 micro m). We conclude that H(2)-reduced iron powder is an ineffective fortificant in corn tortillas. PMID:14747675

  19. Ambient iron-mediated aeration (IMA) for water reuse.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yang; Englehardt, James D; Abdul-Aziz, Samer; Bataille, Tristan; Cueto, Josenrique; De Leon, Omar; Wright, Mary E; Gardinali, Piero; Narayanan, Aarthi; Polar, Jose; Tomoyuki, Shibata

    2013-02-01

    Global water shortages caused by rapidly expanding population, escalating water consumption, and dwindling water reserves have rendered water reuse a strategically significant approach to meet current and future water demand. This study is the first to our knowledge to evaluate the technical feasibility of iron-mediated aeration (IMA), an innovative, potentially economical, holistic, oxidizing co-precipitation process operating at room temperature, atmospheric pressure, and neutral pH, for water reuse. In the IMA process, dissolved oxygen (O₂) was continuously activated by zero-valent iron (Fe⁰) to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) at ambient pH, temperature, and pressure. Concurrently, iron sludge was generated as a result of iron corrosion. Bench-scale tests were conducted to study the performance of IMA for treatment of secondary effluent, natural surface water, and simulated contaminated water. The following removal efficiencies were achieved: 82.2% glyoxylic acid, ~100% formaldehyde as an oxidation product of glyoxylic acid, 94% of Ca²⁺ and associated alkalinity, 44% of chemical oxygen demand (COD), 26% of electrical conductivity (EC), 98% of di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP), 80% of 17β-estradiol (E2), 45% of total nitrogen (TN), 96% of total phosphorus (TP), 99.8% of total Cr, >90% of total Ni, 99% of color, 3.2 log removal of total coliform, and 2.4 log removal of E. Coli. Removal was attributed principally to chemical oxidation, precipitation, co-precipitation, coagulation, adsorption, and air stripping concurrently occurring during the IMA treatment. Results suggest that IMA is a promising treatment technology for water reuse. PMID:23232032

  20. On risks and benefits of iron supplementation recommendations for iron intake revisited.

    PubMed

    Schümann, Klaus; Ettle, Thomas; Szegner, Bernadett; Elsenhans, Bernd; Solomons, Noel W

    2007-01-01

    Iron is an essential trace element with a high prevalence of deficiency in infants and in women of reproductive age from developing countries. Iron deficiency is frequently associated with anaemia and, thus, with reduced working capacity and impaired intellectual development. Moreover, the risk for premature delivery, stillbirth and impaired host-defence is increased in iron deficiency. Iron-absorption and -distribution are homeostatically regulated to reduce the risk for deficiency and overload. These mechanisms interact, in part, with the mechanisms of oxidative stress and inflammation and with iron availability to pathogens. In the plasma, fractions of iron may not be bound to transferrin and are hypothesised to participate in atherogenesis. Repleted iron stores and preceding high iron intakes reduce intestinal iron absorption which, however, offers no reliable protection against oral iron overload. Recommendations for dietary iron intake at different life stages are given by the US Food and Nutrition Board (FNB), by FAO/WHO and by the EU Scientific Committee, among others. They are based, on estimates for iron-losses, iron-bioavailability from the diet, and iron-requirements for metabolism and growth. Differences in choice and interpretation of these estimates lead to different recommendations by the different panels which are discussed in detail. Assessment of iron-related risks is based on reports of adverse health effects which were used in the attempts to derive an upper safe level for dietary iron intake. Iron-related harm can be due to direct intestinal damage, to oxidative stress, or to stimulated growth of pathogens. Unfortunately, it is problematic to derive a reproducible cause-effect and dose-response relationship for adverse health effects that suggest a relationship to iron-intake, be they based on mechanistic or epidemiological observations. Corresponding data and interpretations are discussed for the intestinal lumen, the vascular system and for

  1. Cancer Cells with Irons in the Fire

    PubMed Central

    Bystrom, Laura M.; Rivella, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Iron is essential for the growth and proliferation of cells, as well as for many biological processes that are important for the maintenance and survival of the human body. However, excess iron is associated with the development of cancer and other pathological conditions, due in part to the pro-oxidative nature of iron and its damaging effects on DNA. Current studies suggest that iron depletion may be beneficial for patients that have diseases associated with iron overload or other iron metabolism disorders that may increase the risk for cancer. On the other hand, studies suggest that cancer cells are more vulnerable to the effects of iron depletion and oxidative stress in comparison to normal cells. Therefore, cancer patients might benefit from treatments that alter both iron metabolism and oxidative stress. This review highlights the pro-oxidant effects of iron, the relationship between iron and cancer development, the vulnerabilities of iron-dependent cancer phenotype, and how these characteristics may be exploited to prevent or treat cancer. PMID:24835768

  2. Immunity to plant pathogens and iron homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Aznar, Aude; Chen, Nicolas W G; Thomine, Sebastien; Dellagi, Alia

    2015-11-01

    Iron is essential for metabolic processes in most living organisms. Pathogens and their hosts often compete for the acquisition of this nutrient. However, iron can catalyze the formation of deleterious reactive oxygen species. Hosts may use iron to increase local oxidative stress in defense responses against pathogens. Due to this duality, iron plays a complex role in plant-pathogen interactions. Plant defenses against pathogens and plant response to iron deficiency share several features, such as secretion of phenolic compounds, and use common hormone signaling pathways. Moreover, fine tuning of iron localization during infection involves genes coding iron transport and iron storage proteins, which have been shown to contribute to immunity. The influence of the plant iron status on the outcome of a given pathogen attack is strongly dependent on the nature of the pathogen infection strategy and on the host species. Microbial siderophores emerged as important factors as they have the ability to trigger plant defense responses. Depending on the plant species, siderophore perception can be mediated by their strong iron scavenging capacity or possibly via specific recognition as pathogen associated molecular patterns. This review highlights that iron has a key role in several plant-pathogen interactions by modulating immunity. PMID:26475190

  3. Adipocyte iron regulates adiponectin and insulin sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Gabrielsen, J. Scott; Gao, Yan; Simcox, Judith A.; Huang, Jingyu; Thorup, David; Jones, Deborah; Cooksey, Robert C.; Gabrielsen, David; Adams, Ted D.; Hunt, Steven C.; Hopkins, Paul N.; Cefalu, William T.; McClain, Donald A.

    2012-01-01

    Iron overload is associated with increased diabetes risk. We therefore investigated the effect of iron on adiponectin, an insulin-sensitizing adipokine that is decreased in diabetic patients. In humans, normal-range serum ferritin levels were inversely associated with adiponectin, independent of inflammation. Ferritin was increased and adiponectin was decreased in type 2 diabetic and in obese diabetic subjects compared with those in equally obese individuals without metabolic syndrome. Mice fed a high-iron diet and cultured adipocytes treated with iron exhibited decreased adiponectin mRNA and protein. We found that iron negatively regulated adiponectin transcription via FOXO1-mediated repression. Further, loss of the adipocyte iron export channel, ferroportin, in mice resulted in adipocyte iron loading, decreased adiponectin, and insulin resistance. Conversely, organismal iron overload and increased adipocyte ferroportin expression because of hemochromatosis are associated with decreased adipocyte iron, increased adiponectin, improved glucose tolerance, and increased insulin sensitivity. Phlebotomy of humans with impaired glucose tolerance and ferritin values in the highest quartile of normal increased adiponectin and improved glucose tolerance. These findings demonstrate a causal role for iron as a risk factor for metabolic syndrome and a role for adipocytes in modulating metabolism through adiponectin in response to iron stores. PMID:22996660

  4. Minocycline Attenuates Iron-Induced Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fan; Xi, Guohua; Liu, Wenqaun; Keep, Richard F; Hua, Ya

    2016-01-01

    Iron plays an important role in brain injury after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Our previous study found minocycline reduces iron overload after ICH. The present study examined the effects of minocycline on the subacute brain injury induced by iron. Rats had an intracaudate injection of 50 μl of saline, iron, or iron + minocycline. All the animals were euthanized at day 3. Rat brains were used for immunohistochemistry (n = 5-6 per each group) and Western blotting assay (n = 4). Brain swelling, blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption, and iron-handling proteins were measured. We found that intracerebral injection of iron resulted in brain swelling, BBB disruption, and brain iron-handling protein upregulation (p < 0.05). The co-injection of minocycline with iron significantly reduced iron-induced brain swelling (n = 5, p < 0.01). Albumin, a marker of BBB disruption, was measured by Western blot analysis. Minocycline significantly decreased albumin protein levels in the ipsilateral basal ganglia (p < 0.01). Iron-handling protein levels in the brain, including ceruloplasmin and transferrin, were reduced in the minocycline co-injected animals. In conclusion, the present study suggests that minocycline attenuates brain swelling and BBB disruption via an iron-chelation mechanism. PMID:26463975

  5. Falling clothes irons rarely cause burns.

    PubMed

    Allasio, David; Shanti, Christina

    2014-01-01

    Children's Hospital of Michigan's Burn Center treats approximately three pediatric contact burns annually related to clothes irons, which involve the face, torso, and extremities. These burns leave well-demarcated burn patterns, including the steam holes from the heat plate of the iron. The average age of these children is 15 months. The history given by the parent is that the child pulled the cord of an iron that was on an ironing board or high shelf. It seemed unlikely to the investigators that a falling iron would produce such demarcated burns. A free-standing shelf unit was built with shelf heights of 36, 60, and 72 inches (the height of an ironing board and shelves at home). Three irons of different weights were put in three different positions on each shelf, with the cord dangling. A doll the approximate size of a 15-month old was positioned in front of the shelf. The dangling cord was pulled, and the falling iron was videotaped. The video was edited in freeze frame at the point at which the iron hit the doll. Two hundred seventy falls were recorded. The flat heat plate of the iron never hit the doll. The linear edge of the heat plate hit the doll on only seven falls. This study demonstrates that it is very unlikely for the flat heat plate of a falling iron to contact a toddler-sized doll. Children who allegedly sustain demarcated burns in this manner need to be investigated for nonaccidental injury. PMID:24476991

  6. Ferric Iron Reduction by Acidophilic Heterotrophic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, D. Barrie; McGinness, Stephen

    1991-01-01

    Fifty mesophilic and five moderately thermophilic strains of acidophilic heterotrophic bacteria were tested for the ability to reduce ferric iron in liquid and solid media under aerobic conditions; about 40% of the mesophiles (but none of the moderate thermophiles) displayed at least some capacity to reduce iron. Both rates and extents of ferric iron reduction were highly strain dependent. No acidophilic heterotroph reduced nitrate or sulfate, and (limited) reduction of manganese(IV) was noted in only one strain (Acidiphilium facilis), an acidophile which did not reduce iron. Insoluble forms of ferric iron, both amorphous and crystalline, were reduced, as well as soluble iron. There was evidence that, in at least some acidophilic heterotrophs, iron reduction was enzymically mediated and that ferric iron could act as a terminal electron acceptor. In anaerobically incubated cultures, bacterial biomass increased with increasing concentrations of ferric but not ferrous iron. Mixed cultures of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans or Leptospirillum ferrooxidans and an acidophilic heterotroph (SJH) produced sequences of iron cycling in ferrous iron-glucose media. PMID:16348395

  7. Parkinson's Disease: The Mitochondria-Iron Link

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco, Carlos M.; Núñez, Marco T.

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction, iron accumulation, and oxidative damage are conditions often found in damaged brain areas of Parkinson's disease. We propose that a causal link exists between these three events. Mitochondrial dysfunction results not only in increased reactive oxygen species production but also in decreased iron-sulfur cluster synthesis and unorthodox activation of Iron Regulatory Protein 1 (IRP1), a key regulator of cell iron homeostasis. In turn, IRP1 activation results in iron accumulation and hydroxyl radical-mediated damage. These three occurrences—mitochondrial dysfunction, iron accumulation, and oxidative damage—generate a positive feedback loop of increased iron accumulation and oxidative stress. Here, we review the evidence that points to a link between mitochondrial dysfunction and iron accumulation as early events in the development of sporadic and genetic cases of Parkinson's disease. Finally, an attempt is done to contextualize the possible relationship between mitochondria dysfunction and iron dyshomeostasis. Based on published evidence, we propose that iron chelation—by decreasing iron-associated oxidative damage and by inducing cell survival and cell-rescue pathways—is a viable therapy for retarding this cycle. PMID:27293957

  8. 45 CFR 144.103 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... requirements of 45 CFR parts 146 and 148 for the State involved with respect to the issuer. Beneficiary has the... term in 45 CFR 146.113(a). Dependent means any individual who is or may become eligible for coverage..., for purposes of— (1) The group market provisions in 45 CFR part 146, subpart E, is defined in 45...

  9. 45 CFR 201.5 - Grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... apply to all grants made to States under this part: 45 CFR Part 74 Subpart G—Matching and Cost Sharing... and cancelled checks as described at 45 CFR 201.67 and replacement checks as described at 45 CFR 201... 45 Public Welfare 2 2014-10-01 2012-10-01 true Grants. 201.5 Section 201.5 Public...

  10. 45 CFR 201.5 - Grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... apply to all grants made to States under this part: 45 CFR Part 74 Subpart G—Matching and Cost Sharing... and cancelled checks as described at 45 CFR 201.67 and replacement checks as described at 45 CFR 201... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Grants. 201.5 Section 201.5 Public...

  11. 45 CFR 301.15 - Grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... administrative requirements and cost principles, shall apply to all grants made to States under this part: 45 CFR Part 74 45 CFR 74.23 Cost Sharing or Matching. 45 CFR 74.52 Financial Reporting. (Approved by the... 45 Public Welfare 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Grants. 301.15 Section 301.15 Public...

  12. 45 CFR 301.15 - Grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... administrative requirements and cost principles, shall apply to all grants made to States under this part: 45 CFR Part 74 45 CFR 74.23 Cost Sharing or Matching. 45 CFR 74.52 Financial Reporting. (Approved by the... 45 Public Welfare 2 2014-10-01 2012-10-01 true Grants. 301.15 Section 301.15 Public...

  13. 45 CFR 201.5 - Grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... apply to all grants made to States under this part: 45 CFR Part 74 Subpart G—Matching and Cost Sharing... and cancelled checks as described at 45 CFR 201.67 and replacement checks as described at 45 CFR 201... 45 Public Welfare 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Grants. 201.5 Section 201.5 Public...

  14. 45 CFR 301.15 - Grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... administrative requirements and cost principles, shall apply to all grants made to States under this part: 45 CFR Part 74 45 CFR 74.23 Cost Sharing or Matching. 45 CFR 74.52 Financial Reporting. (Approved by the... 45 Public Welfare 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Grants. 301.15 Section 301.15 Public...

  15. 45 CFR 201.5 - Grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... apply to all grants made to States under this part: 45 CFR Part 74 Subpart G—Matching and Cost Sharing... and cancelled checks as described at 45 CFR 201.67 and replacement checks as described at 45 CFR 201... 45 Public Welfare 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Grants. 201.5 Section 201.5 Public...

  16. 45 CFR 301.15 - Grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... administrative requirements and cost principles, shall apply to all grants made to States under this part: 45 CFR Part 74 45 CFR 74.23 Cost Sharing or Matching. 45 CFR 74.52 Financial Reporting. (Approved by the... 45 Public Welfare 2 2013-10-01 2012-10-01 true Grants. 301.15 Section 301.15 Public...

  17. 45 CFR 201.5 - Grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... apply to all grants made to States under this part: 45 CFR Part 74 Subpart G—Matching and Cost Sharing... and cancelled checks as described at 45 CFR 201.67 and replacement checks as described at 45 CFR 201... 45 Public Welfare 2 2013-10-01 2012-10-01 true Grants. 201.5 Section 201.5 Public...

  18. 45 CFR 301.15 - Grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... administrative requirements and cost principles, shall apply to all grants made to States under this part: 45 CFR Part 74 45 CFR 74.23 Cost Sharing or Matching. 45 CFR 74.52 Financial Reporting. (Approved by the... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Grants. 301.15 Section 301.15 Public...

  19. 45 CFR 1304.50 - Program governance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... requirements of 45 CFR 1305.3; (iv) The program's philosophy and long- and short-range program goals and... program's philosophy and long- and short-range program goals and objectives (see 45 CFR 1304.51(a) and 45... (see 45 CFR 1301.2 for a definition of a delegate agency). (iii) Parent Committee. For...

  20. 45 CFR 1304.50 - Program governance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... requirements of 45 CFR 1305.3; (iv) The program's philosophy and long- and short-range program goals and... program's philosophy and long- and short-range program goals and objectives (see 45 CFR 1304.51(a) and 45... (see 45 CFR 1301.2 for a definition of a delegate agency). (iii) Parent Committee. For...

  1. 45 CFR 1304.50 - Program governance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... requirements of 45 CFR 1305.3; (iv) The program's philosophy and long- and short-range program goals and... program's philosophy and long- and short-range program goals and objectives (see 45 CFR 1304.51(a) and 45... (see 45 CFR 1301.2 for a definition of a delegate agency). (iii) Parent Committee. For...

  2. 45 CFR 1304.50 - Program governance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... requirements of 45 CFR 1305.3; (iv) The program's philosophy and long- and short-range program goals and... program's philosophy and long- and short-range program goals and objectives (see 45 CFR 1304.51(a) and 45... (see 45 CFR 1301.2 for a definition of a delegate agency). (iii) Parent Committee. For...

  3. 45 CFR 1304.50 - Program governance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... requirements of 45 CFR 1305.3; (iv) The program's philosophy and long- and short-range program goals and... program's philosophy and long- and short-range program goals and objectives (see 45 CFR 1304.51(a) and 45... (see 45 CFR 1301.2 for a definition of a delegate agency). (iii) Parent Committee. For...

  4. 46 CFR 45.33 - Diamond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Diamond. 45.33 Section 45.33 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) LOAD LINES GREAT LAKES LOAD LINES Load Line Marks § 45.33 Diamond. (a) Each vessel must be marked with the diamond mark described in figure 2 of § 45.35 amidships...

  5. 46 CFR 45.33 - Diamond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Diamond. 45.33 Section 45.33 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) LOAD LINES GREAT LAKES LOAD LINES Load Line Marks § 45.33 Diamond. (a) Each vessel must be marked with the diamond mark described in figure 2 of § 45.35 amidships...

  6. 46 CFR 45.33 - Diamond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Diamond. 45.33 Section 45.33 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) LOAD LINES GREAT LAKES LOAD LINES Load Line Marks § 45.33 Diamond. (a) Each vessel must be marked with the diamond mark described in figure 2 of § 45.35 amidships...

  7. 46 CFR 45.33 - Diamond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Diamond. 45.33 Section 45.33 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) LOAD LINES GREAT LAKES LOAD LINES Load Line Marks § 45.33 Diamond. (a) Each vessel must be marked with the diamond mark described in figure 2 of § 45.35 amidships...

  8. 46 CFR 45.33 - Diamond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Diamond. 45.33 Section 45.33 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) LOAD LINES GREAT LAKES LOAD LINES Load Line Marks § 45.33 Diamond. (a) Each vessel must be marked with the diamond mark described in figure 2 of § 45.35 amidships...

  9. 45 CFR 1309.31 - Site description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... set forth in 45 CFR part 1309, 45 CFR part 74 and 45 CFR part 92; and Administration for Children and... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Site description. 1309.31 Section 1309.31 Public... PROGRAM HEAD START FACILITIES PURCHASE, MAJOR RENOVATION AND CONSTRUCTION Modular Units § 1309.31...

  10. 45 CFR 1309.31 - Site description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... set forth in 45 CFR part 1309, 45 CFR part 74 and 45 CFR part 92; and Administration for Children and... 45 Public Welfare 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Site description. 1309.31 Section 1309.31 Public... PROGRAM HEAD START FACILITIES PURCHASE, MAJOR RENOVATION AND CONSTRUCTION Modular Units § 1309.31...

  11. 45 CFR 1309.31 - Site description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... set forth in 45 CFR part 1309, 45 CFR part 74 and 45 CFR part 92; and Administration for Children and... 45 Public Welfare 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Site description. 1309.31 Section 1309.31 Public... PROGRAM HEAD START FACILITIES PURCHASE, MAJOR RENOVATION AND CONSTRUCTION Modular Units § 1309.31...

  12. 45 CFR 1309.31 - Site description.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... set forth in 45 CFR part 1309, 45 CFR part 74 and 45 CFR part 92; and Administration for Children and... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Site description. 1309.31 Section 1309.31 Public... PROGRAM HEAD START FACILITIES PURCHASE, MAJOR RENOVATION AND CONSTRUCTION Modular Units § 1309.31...

  13. 14 CFR 45.10 - Marking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Marking. 45.10 Section 45.10 Aeronautics..., § 45.10 was added, effective Apr. 14, 2010. The effective date of this addition was subsequently... REGISTRATION MARKING Identification of Aircraft and Related Products § 45.10 Marking. No person may mark...

  14. 45 CFR 144.103 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... requirements of 45 CFR parts 146 and 148 for the State involved with respect to the issuer. Beneficiary has the... term in 45 CFR 146.113(a). Dependent means any individual who is or may become eligible for coverage..., for purposes of— (1) The group market provisions in 45 CFR part 146, subpart E, is defined in 45...

  15. 45 CFR 1301.10 - General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... this section, the following HHS regulations shall apply to all grants made under the Act: 45 CFR part 16 Department grant appeals process (except as provided in § 1301.34) 45 CFR part 46 Protection of Human Subjects 45 CFR part 74 Administration of grants 45 CFR part 75 Informal grant appeals...

  16. Thermal and impact histories of reheated group IVA, IVB, and ungrouped iron meteorites and their parent asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J.; Goldstein, J. I.; Scott, E. R. D.; Michael, J. R.; Kotula, P. G.; Pham, T.; McCoy, T. J.

    2011-09-01

    cause of reheating. Cooling over years rather than hours precludes shock during the impacts that exposed the irons to cosmic rays. If the reheated irons that we studied are representative, the IVA irons may have been shocked soon after they cooled below 200 °C at 4.5 Gyr in an impact that created a rubblepile asteroid with fragments from diverse depths. The primary cooling rates of the IVA irons and the proposed early history are remarkably consistent with the Pb-Pb ages of troilite inclusions in two IVA irons including the oldest known differentiated meteorite (Blichert-Toft et al. 2010).

  17. Iron control in the Appalachian Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Dill, W.R.; Fredette, G.

    1983-11-01

    The Appalachian Basin presents one of the most challenging production and stimulation problems because of the iron content of its hydrocarbon producing formations. A variety of iron compounds in the producing formations present problems that have to be considered to effectively stimulate these formations. A research program was initiated in the later part of 1980 to determine methods of more effectively controlling the iron problems in the Appalachian Basin. Results of this study provide data for comparing the effectiveness of various iron control systems that are used in acid stimulation or breakdown techniques that minimize the release of acid insoluble solids and stabilizes them to decrease the detrimental effect caused by fines migration. Also developed in this study was an iron control system that helps the compatibility of the treating fluid with ferrous iron in the formation water. Flow test data and field results indicate the effectiveness of these iron control systems and treating techniques.

  18. Carbon in iron phases under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, L.; Skorodumova, N. V.; Belonoshko, A. B.; Johansson, B.; Ahuja, R.

    2005-11-01

    The influence of carbon impurities on the properties of iron phases (bcc, hcp, dhcp, fcc) has been studied using the first-principles projector augmented-wave (PAW) method for a wide pressure range. It is shown that the presence of ~6 at. % of interstitial carbon has a little effect on the calculated structural sequence of the iron phases under high pressure. The bcc -> hcp transition both for pure iron and iron containing carbon takes place around 9 GPa. According to the enthalpies comparison, the solubility of carbon into the iron solid is decreased by high pressure. The coexistence of iron carbide (Fe3C) + pure hcp Fe is most stable phase at high pressure compared with other phases. Based on the analysis of the pressure-density dependences for Fe3C and hcp Fe, we suggest that there might be some fraction of iron carbide present in the core.

  19. Vacancy coalescence during oxidation of iron nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Cabot, Andreu; Puntes, Victor F.; Shevchenko, Elena; Yin, Yadong; Balcells, Lluis; Markus, Matthew A.; Hughes, Steven M.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2007-06-14

    In the present work, we analyze the geometry and composition of the nanostructures obtained from the oxidation of iron nanoparticles. The initial oxidation of iron takes place by outward diffusion of cations through the growing oxide shell. This net material flow is balanced by an opposite flow of vacancies, which coalesce at the metal/oxide interface. Thus, the partial oxidation of colloidal iron nanoparticles leads to the formation of core-void-shell nanostructures. Furthermore, the complete oxidation of iron nanoparticles in the 3-8 nm size range leads to the formation of hollow iron oxide nanoparticles. We analyze the size and temperature range in which vacancy coalescence during oxidation of amine-stabilized iron nanoparticles takes place. Maghemite is the crystallographic structure obtained from the complete oxidation of iron nanoparticles under our synthetic conditions.

  20. Sulfide oxidation by hydrogen peroxide catalyzed by iron complexes: two metal centers are better than one.

    PubMed

    Mekmouche, Yasmina; Hummel, Helga; Ho, Raymond Y N; Que, Lawrence; Schünemann, Volker; Thomas, Fabrice; Trautwein, Alfred X; Lebrun, Colette; Gorgy, Karine; Leprêtre, Jean-Claude; Collomb, Marie-Noëlle; Deronzier, Alain; Fontecave, Marc; Ménage, Stéphane

    2002-03-01

    Peroxoiron species have been proposed to be involved in catalytic cycles of iron-dependent oxygenases and in some cases as the active intermediates during oxygen-transfer reactions. The catalytic properties of a mononuclear iron complex, [Fe(II)(pb)(2)(CH(3)CN)(2)] (pb=(-)4,5-pinene-2,2'-bipyridine), have been compared to those of its related dinuclear analogue. Each system generates specific peroxo adducts, which are responsible for the oxidation of sulfides to sulfoxides. The dinuclear catalyst was found to be more reactive and (enantio)selective than its mononuclear counterpart, suggesting that a second metal site affords specific advantages for stereoselective catalysis. These results might help for the design of future enantioselective iron catalysts. PMID:11891908

  1. Rapid assessment of iron in blood plasma and serum by spectrophotometry with cloud-point extraction

    PubMed Central

    Samarina, Tatyana; Proskurnin, Mikhail

    2015-01-01

    Rapid photometric assessment of iron in blood plasma and serum by a simple procedure after the extraction of iron(II) complex with 1-nitroso-2-naphthol in the micellar phase of a nonionic surfactant at the cloud point upon heating (pH range is 4.5–6.3) is proposed. The procedure trueness was verified using a standard reference protocol using bathophenanthroline. The advantages of the procedure are higher sensitivity than the reference protocol: the limit of detection is 0.03 μg/mL, the limit of quantitation is 0.1 μg/mL, the determination range is 0.1 – 2.8 μg/mL (RSD 0.02–0.10). Copper does not interfere with the iron assessment.

  2. Use of the point defect model to interpret the iron oxidation kinetics under proton irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lapuerta, S.; Moncoffre, N.; Jaffrezic, H.; Millard-Pinard, N.; Bererd, N.; Esnouf, C.; Crusset, D.

    2007-03-15

    This article concerns the study of iron corrosion in wet air under mega-electron-volt proton irradiation for different fluxes at room temperature and with a relative humidity fixed to 45%. Oxidized iron sample surfaces are characterized by ion beam analysis (Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and elastic recoil detection analysis), for the elemental analysis. The structural and physicochemical characterization is performed using the x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy techniques. We have also measured the iron oxidation kinetics. Radiation enhanced diffusion and transport processes have been evidenced. The modeling of the experimental data shows that the apparent oxygen diffusion coefficient increases whereas the oxygen transport velocity decreases as function of flux. Finally, the point defect model has been used to determine the electric field value in the samples. Results have shown that the transport process can be attributed to the presence of an electrical potential gradient.

  3. Iron and iron-based alloys for temporary cardiovascular applications.

    PubMed

    Francis, A; Yang, Y; Virtanen, S; Boccaccini, A R

    2015-03-01

    In the last decade, biodegradable metals have emerged as a topic of interest for particular biomedical applications which require high strength to bulk ratio, including for cardiovascular stents. The advantages of biodegradable materials are related to the reduction of long term risks associated with the presence of permanent metal implants, e.g. chronic inflammation and in-stent restenosis. From a structural point of view, the analysis of the literature reveals that iron-based alloys used as temporary biodegradable stents have several advantages over Mg-based alloys in terms of ductility and strength. Efforts on the modification and tunability of iron-based alloys design and compositions have been mainly focused on controlling the degradation rate while retaining the mechanical integrity within a reasonable period. The early pre-clinical results of many iron-based alloys seem promising for future implants developments. This review discusses the available literature focusing mainly on: (i) Fe and Fe-based alloys design and fabrication techniques; (ii) in vitro and in vivo performance; (iii) cytotoxicity and cell viability tests. PMID:25716025

  4. Reactivity of Uranium and Ferrous Iron with Natural Iron Oxyhydroxides.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Brandy D; Cismasu, A Cristina; Williams, Kenneth H; Peyton, Brent M; Nico, Peter S

    2015-09-01

    Determining key reaction pathways involving uranium and iron oxyhydroxides under oxic and anoxic conditions is essential for understanding uranium mobility as well as other iron oxyhydroxide mediated processes, particularly near redox boundaries where redox conditions change rapidly in time and space. Here we examine the reactivity of a ferrihydrite-rich sediment from a surface seep adjacent to a redox boundary at the Rifle, Colorado field site. Iron(II)-sediment incubation experiments indicate that the natural ferrihydrite fraction of the sediment is not susceptible to reductive transformation under conditions that trigger significant mineralogical transformations of synthetic ferrihydrite. No measurable Fe(II)-promoted transformation was observed when the Rifle sediment was exposed to 30 mM Fe(II) for up to 2 weeks. Incubation of the Rifle sediment with 3 mM Fe(II) and 0.2 mM U(VI) for 15 days shows no measurable incorporation of U(VI) into the mineral structure or reduction of U(VI) to U(IV). Results indicate a significantly decreased reactivity of naturally occurring Fe oxyhydroxides as compared to synthetic minerals, likely due to the association of impurities (e.g., Si, organic matter), with implications for the mobility and bioavailability of uranium and other associated species in field environments. PMID:26226398

  5. A Diatom Ferritin Optimized for Iron Oxidation but Not Iron Storage.

    PubMed

    Pfaffen, Stephanie; Bradley, Justin M; Abdulqadir, Raz; Firme, Marlo R; Moore, Geoffrey R; Le Brun, Nick E; Murphy, Michael E P

    2015-11-20

    Ferritin from the marine pennate diatom Pseudo-nitzschia multiseries (PmFTN) plays a key role in sustaining growth in iron-limited ocean environments. The di-iron catalytic ferroxidase center of PmFTN (sites A and B) has a nearby third iron site (site C) in an arrangement typically observed in prokaryotic ferritins. Here we demonstrate that Glu-44, a site C ligand, and Glu-130, a residue that bridges iron bound at sites B and C, limit the rate of post-oxidation reorganization of iron coordination and the rate at which Fe(3+) exits the ferroxidase center for storage within the mineral core. The latter, in particular, severely limits the overall rate of iron mineralization. Thus, the diatom ferritin is optimized for initial Fe(2+) oxidation but not for mineralization, pointing to a role for this protein in buffering iron availability and facilitating iron-sparing rather than only long-term iron storage. PMID:26396187

  6. Ineffective erythropoiesis and regulation of iron status in iron loading anaemias.

    PubMed

    Camaschella, Clara; Nai, Antonella

    2016-02-01

    The definition 'iron loading anaemias' encompasses a group of inherited and acquired anaemias characterized by ineffective erythropoiesis, low hepcidin levels, excessive iron absorption and secondary iron overload. Non-transfusion-dependent β-thalassaemia is the paradigmatic example of these conditions that include dyserythropoietic and sideroblastic anaemias and some forms of myelodysplasia. Interrupting the vicious cycle between ineffective erythropoiesis and iron overload may be of therapeutic benefit in all these diseases. Induction of iron restriction by means of transferrin infusions, minihepcidins or manipulation of the hepcidin pathway prevents iron overload, redistributes iron from parenchymal cells to macrophage stores and partially controls anaemia in β-thalassaemic mice. Inhibition of ineffective erythropoiesis by activin ligand traps improves anaemia and iron overload in the same models. Targeting iron loading or ineffective erythropoiesis shows promise in preclinical studies; activin ligand traps are in clinical trials with promising results and may be useful in patients with ineffective erythropoiesis. PMID:26491866

  7. Control of iron homeostasis by an iron-regulated ubiquitin ligase.

    PubMed

    Vashisht, Ajay A; Zumbrennen, Kimberly B; Huang, Xinhua; Powers, David N; Durazo, Armando; Sun, Dahui; Bhaskaran, Nimesh; Persson, Anja; Uhlen, Mathias; Sangfelt, Olle; Spruck, Charles; Leibold, Elizabeth A; Wohlschlegel, James A

    2009-10-30

    Eukaryotic cells require iron for survival and have developed regulatory mechanisms for maintaining appropriate intracellular iron concentrations. The degradation of iron regulatory protein 2 (IRP2) in iron-replete cells is a key event in this pathway, but the E3 ubiquitin ligase responsible for its proteolysis has remained elusive. We found that a SKP1-CUL1-FBXL5 ubiquitin ligase protein complex associates with and promotes the iron-dependent ubiquitination and degradation of IRP2. The F-box substrate adaptor protein FBXL5 was degraded upon iron and oxygen depletion in a process that required an iron-binding hemerythrin-like domain in its N terminus. Thus, iron homeostasis is regulated by a proteolytic pathway that couples IRP2 degradation to intracellular iron levels through the stability and activity of FBXL5. PMID:19762596

  8. The Role of Iron and Iron Overload in Chronic Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Milic, Sandra; Mikolasevic, Ivana; Orlic, Lidija; Devcic, Edita; Starcevic-Cizmarevic, Nada; Stimac, Davor; Kapovic, Miljenko; Ristic, Smiljana

    2016-01-01

    The liver plays a major role in iron homeostasis; thus, in patients with chronic liver disease, iron regulation may be disturbed. Higher iron levels are present not only in patients with hereditary hemochromatosis, but also in those with alcoholic liver disease, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and hepatitis C viral infection. Chronic liver disease decreases the synthetic functions of the liver, including the production of hepcidin, a key protein in iron metabolism. Lower levels of hepcidin result in iron overload, which leads to iron deposits in the liver and higher levels of non-transferrin-bound iron in the bloodstream. Iron combined with reactive oxygen species leads to an increase in hydroxyl radicals, which are responsible for phospholipid peroxidation, oxidation of amino acid side chains, DNA strain breaks, and protein fragmentation. Iron-induced cellular damage may be prevented by regulating the production of hepcidin or by administering hepcidin agonists. Both of these methods have yielded successful results in mouse models. PMID:27332079

  9. A Diatom Ferritin Optimized for Iron Oxidation but Not Iron Storage*

    PubMed Central

    Pfaffen, Stephanie; Bradley, Justin M.; Abdulqadir, Raz; Firme, Marlo R.; Moore, Geoffrey R.; Le Brun, Nick E.; Murphy, Michael E. P.

    2015-01-01

    Ferritin from the marine pennate diatom Pseudo-nitzschia multiseries (PmFTN) plays a key role in sustaining growth in iron-limited ocean environments. The di-iron catalytic ferroxidase center of PmFTN (sites A and B) has a nearby third iron site (site C) in an arrangement typically observed in prokaryotic ferritins. Here we demonstrate that Glu-44, a site C ligand, and Glu-130, a residue that bridges iron bound at sites B and C, limit the rate of post-oxidation reorganization of iron coordination and the rate at which Fe3+ exits the ferroxidase center for storage within the mineral core. The latter, in particular, severely limits the overall rate of iron mineralization. Thus, the diatom ferritin is optimized for initial Fe2+ oxidation but not for mineralization, pointing to a role for this protein in buffering iron availability and facilitating iron-sparing rather than only long-term iron storage. PMID:26396187

  10. The Role of Iron and Iron Overload in Chronic Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Milic, Sandra; Mikolasevic, Ivana; Orlic, Lidija; Devcic, Edita; Starcevic-Cizmarevic, Nada; Stimac, Davor; Kapovic, Miljenko; Ristic, Smiljana

    2016-01-01

    The liver plays a major role in iron homeostasis; thus, in patients with chronic liver disease, iron regulation may be disturbed. Higher iron levels are present not only in patients with hereditary hemochromatosis, but also in those with alcoholic liver disease, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and hepatitis C viral infection. Chronic liver disease decreases the synthetic functions of the liver, including the production of hepcidin, a key protein in iron metabolism. Lower levels of hepcidin result in iron overload, which leads to iron deposits in the liver and higher levels of non-transferrin-bound iron in the bloodstream. Iron combined with reactive oxygen species leads to an increase in hydroxyl radicals, which are responsible for phospholipid peroxidation, oxidation of amino acid side chains, DNA strain breaks, and protein fragmentation. Iron-induced cellular damage may be prevented by regulating the production of hepcidin or by administering hepcidin agonists. Both of these methods have yielded successful results in mouse models. PMID:27332079

  11. Iron transport in Mycobacterium smegmatis: occurrence of iron-regulated envelope proteins as potential receptors for iron uptake.

    PubMed

    Hall, R M; Sritharan, M; Messenger, A J; Ratledge, C

    1987-08-01

    Cell-envelope fractions were isolated from the rapidly growing saprophyte Mycobacterium smegmatis following growth in glycerol/asparagine medium under both iron-limited (0.02 microgram Fe ml-1) and iron-sufficient (2.0 to 4.0 micrograms Fe ml-1) conditions. Examination of these preparations by SDS-PAGE demonstrated the production of at least four additional proteins when iron was limiting. These iron-regulated envelope proteins (IREPs) were ascribed apparent molecular masses of 180 kDa (protein I), 84 kDa (protein II), 29 kDa (protein III) and 25 kDa (protein IV). All four proteins were present in both cell-wall and membrane preparations but spheroplast preparations were devoid of the 29 kDa protein. Attempts at labelling the proteins with 55FeCl3 or 55Fe-exochelin, the siderophore for iron uptake, were unsuccessful, though this was attributed to the denatured state of the proteins following electrophoresis. Antibodies were raised to each of the four proteins: the one raised to protein III inhibited exochelin-mediated iron uptake into iron-deficiently grown cells by 70% but was ineffective against iron uptake into iron-sufficiently grown cells. As exochelin is taken up into both types of cells by a similar process, protein III may not be a simple receptor for iron uptake though the results imply some function connected with this process. The role of the other IREPs is less certain. PMID:3127539

  12. Influence of Inflammatory Disorders and Infection on Iron Absorption and Efficacy of Iron- Fortified Foods

    PubMed Central

    Hurrell, Richard F.

    2014-01-01

    The provision of iron- fortified foods is a common strategy to prevent iron deficiency; however, ensuring adequate iron absorption is a challenge. Iron bioavailability depends on the choice of iron compound, the presence enhancers and inhibitors of absorption in the food matrix, and the physiological state of the consumer, including iron status, other nutritional deficiencies and inflammatory disorders. Inflammation associated with infections and inflammatory disorders would be expected to decrease iron absorption and reduce the efficacy of iron- fortified foods. The decreased absorption is due to an increase in circulating hepcidin in response to inflammatory cytokines. Hepcidin degrades ferroportin and blocks the passage of iron from the intestinal cell to the plasma. This is the innate immune response to infections and aims to restrict pathogen growth by restricting iron supply. Stable isotope studies have reported women and children with chronic malaria parasitemia or febrile malaria to have increased inflammatory cytokines, increased hepcidin and much decreased iron absorption. No studies have specifically investigated the efficacy of iron- fortified foods in the absence and presence of infections. In contrast, inflammation and increased hepcidin associated with adiposity in overweight have been linked to both lower iron absorption and the decreased efficacy of iron- fortified foods. PMID:25762975

  13. Iron stable isotopes track pelagic iron cycling during a subtropical phytoplankton bloom

    PubMed Central

    Ellwood, Michael J.; Hutchins, David A.; Lohan, Maeve C.; Milne, Angela; Nasemann, Philipp; Nodder, Scott D.; Sander, Sylvia G.; Wilhelm, Steven W.; Boyd, Philip W.

    2015-01-01

    The supply and bioavailability of dissolved iron sets the magnitude of surface productivity for ∼40% of the global ocean. The redox state, organic complexation, and phase (dissolved versus particulate) of iron are key determinants of iron bioavailability in the marine realm, although the mechanisms facilitating exchange between iron species (inorganic and organic) and phases are poorly constrained. Here we use the isotope fingerprint of dissolved and particulate iron to reveal distinct isotopic signatures for biological uptake of iron during a GEOTRACES process study focused on a temperate spring phytoplankton bloom in subtropical waters. At the onset of the bloom, dissolved iron within the mixed layer was isotopically light relative to particulate iron. The isotopically light dissolved iron pool likely results from the reduction of particulate iron via photochemical and (to a lesser extent) biologically mediated reduction processes. As the bloom develops, dissolved iron within the surface mixed layer becomes isotopically heavy, reflecting the dominance of biological processing of iron as it is removed from solution, while scavenging appears to play a minor role. As stable isotopes have shown for major elements like nitrogen, iron isotopes offer a new window into our understanding of the biogeochemical cycling of iron, thereby allowing us to disentangle a suite of concurrent biotic and abiotic transformations of this key biolimiting element. PMID:25535372

  14. Iron stable isotopes track pelagic iron cycling during a subtropical phytoplankton bloom.

    PubMed

    Ellwood, Michael J; Hutchins, David A; Lohan, Maeve C; Milne, Angela; Nasemann, Philipp; Nodder, Scott D; Sander, Sylvia G; Strzepek, Robert; Wilhelm, Steven W; Boyd, Philip W

    2015-01-01

    The supply and bioavailability of dissolved iron sets the magnitude of surface productivity for ∼ 40% of the global ocean. The redox state, organic complexation, and phase (dissolved versus particulate) of iron are key determinants of iron bioavailability in the marine realm, although the mechanisms facilitating exchange between iron species (inorganic and organic) and phases are poorly constrained. Here we use the isotope fingerprint of dissolved and particulate iron to reveal distinct isotopic signatures for biological uptake of iron during a GEOTRACES process study focused on a temperate spring phytoplankton bloom in subtropical waters. At the onset of the bloom, dissolved iron within the mixed layer was isotopically light relative to particulate iron. The isotopically light dissolved iron pool likely results from the reduction of particulate iron via photochemical and (to a lesser extent) biologically mediated reduction processes. As the bloom develops, dissolved iron within the surface mixed layer becomes isotopically heavy, reflecting the dominance of biological processing of iron as it is removed from solution, while scavenging appears to play a minor role. As stable isotopes have shown for major elements like nitrogen, iron isotopes offer a new window into our understanding of the biogeochemical cycling of iron, thereby allowing us to disentangle a suite of concurrent biotic and abiotic transformations of this key biolimiting element. PMID:25535372

  15. Mechanisms and regulation of intestinal iron absorption.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Evan H; Oates, Phillip S

    2002-01-01

    Iron absorption from the small intestine is regulated according to the body's needs, increasing in iron deficiency and decreasing in iron overload. It has been proposed that the efficiency of absorption is determined by the amount of iron acquired by developing enterocytes when they are in the crypts of Lieberkůhn and that this regulates expression of iron transporters such as DMT1 in mature enterocytes of the intestinal villi. In the crypts the cells take up iron from plasma transferrin by receptor-mediated endocytosis, a process that is influenced by the hemochromatosis protein, HFE. Hence, the availability of plasma transferrin-bound iron and the expression and function of transferrin receptors (TfR1), HFE and DMT1 should all contribute to the absorptive capacity of villus enterocytes. These aspects of the regulation and mechanism of iron absorption were investigated in genetically normal rats and mice, and in Belgrade anemic (b/b) rats and HFE knockout mice. In most experiments the function of the TfR1 was assessed by the uptake of radiolabeled transferrin-bound iron given intravenously. Absorption of non-heme iron was measured using closed in situ duodenal loops. The expression and cellular distribution of DMT1 and TfR1 were determined by in situ hybridisation and immunohistochemistry. The uptake of transferrin-bound iron and expression of functional TfR1 was shown to occur mainly in crypt cells and to be proportional to the plasma concentration of iron. It was not impaired by the mutation of DMT1 that occurs in b/b rats but was impaired in HFE knockout mice. Iron absorption was increased in these mice but was still influenced by the level of iron stores, as in normal mice. These results are in accordance with the proposed regulation of iron absorption and suggest that DMT1 is not the only iron transporter operating within endosomes of crypt cells. This view was supported by the failure to detect DMT1 mRNA or protein in crypt cells. Expression of DMT1 m

  16. Beta-propeller protein-associated neurodegeneration: a new X-linked dominant disorder with brain iron accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Hayflick, Susan J.; Kruer, Michael C.; Gregory, Allison; Haack, Tobias B.; Kurian, Manju A.; Houlden, Henry H.; Anderson, James; Boddaert, Nathalie; Sanford, Lynn; Harik, Sami I.; Dandu, Vasuki H.; Nardocci, Nardo; Zorzi, Giovanna; Dunaway, Todd; Tarnopolsky, Mark; Skinner, Steven; Holden, Kenton R.; Frucht, Steven; Hanspal, Era; Schrander-Stumpel, Connie; Mignot, Cyril; Héron, Delphine; Saunders, Dawn E.; Kaminska, Margaret; Lin, Jean-Pierre; Lascelles, Karine; Cuno, Stephan M.; Meyer, Esther; Garavaglia, Barbara; Bhatia, Kailash; de Silva, Rajith; Crisp, Sarah; Lunt, Peter; Carey, Martyn; Hardy, John; Meitinger, Thomas; Prokisch, Holger; Hogarth, Penelope

    2013-01-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders with high iron in the basal ganglia encompass an expanding collection of single gene disorders collectively known as neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation. These disorders can largely be distinguished from one another by their associated clinical and neuroimaging features. The aim of this study was to define the phenotype that is associated with mutations in WDR45, a new causative gene for neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation located on the X chromosome. The study subjects consisted of WDR45 mutation-positive individuals identified after screening a large international cohort of patients with idiopathic neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation. Their records were reviewed, including longitudinal clinical, laboratory and imaging data. Twenty-three mutation-positive subjects were identified (20 females). The natural history of their disease was remarkably uniform: global developmental delay in childhood and further regression in early adulthood with progressive dystonia, parkinsonism and dementia. Common early comorbidities included seizures, spasticity and disordered sleep. The symptoms of parkinsonism improved with l-DOPA; however, nearly all patients experienced early motor fluctuations that quickly progressed to disabling dyskinesias, warranting discontinuation of l-DOPA. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed iron in the substantia nigra and globus pallidus, with a ‘halo’ of T1 hyperintense signal in the substantia nigra. All patients harboured de novo mutations in WDR45, encoding a beta-propeller protein postulated to play a role in autophagy. Beta-propeller protein-associated neurodegeneration, the only X-linked disorder of neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation, is associated with de novo mutations in WDR45 and is recognizable by a unique combination of clinical, natural history and neuroimaging features. PMID:23687123

  17. Ultrasonic cavitation erosion of nodular cast iron with ferrite-pearlite microstructure.

    PubMed

    Mitelea, Ion; Bordeaşu, Ilare; Pelle, Marius; Crăciunescu, Corneliu

    2015-03-01

    The cavitation erosion of ductile cast iron with ferrite-pearlite microstructure was analyzed based on ultrasonic experiments performed according to ASTM G32-2010 and the resistance was compared to the C45 steel with similar hardness. The microstructural observation of the surface for different exposure times to the ultrasonic cavitation reveals the fact that the process initiates at the nodular graphite-ferrite interface and is controlled by micro-galvanic activities and mechanical factors. The cavitation erosion resistance was evaluated based on the evolution of the mean depth erosion and the mean depth erosion rate as a function of the cavitation time. The cavitation erosion rate of the cast iron is up to 1.32 times higher than the one of the C 45 steel with similar hardness. This is explained by the occurrence of stress concentrators due to the expulsion of the graphite from the metallic matrix. PMID:25465881

  18. Pharmacokinetics of Ferrous Sulphate (Tardyferon®) after Single Oral Dose Administration in Women with Iron Deficiency Anaemia.

    PubMed

    Leary, A; Barthe, L; Clavel, T; Sanchez, C; Oulmi-Castel, M; Paillard, B; Edmond, J M; Brunner, V

    2016-01-01

    Iron-containing preparations available on the market vary in dosage, salt, and chemical state of iron contained in the preparation, as well as in the iron delivery process (immediate or prolonged-release). The present study aimed at characterizing the serum pharmacokinetics of iron in non pregnant women with iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) following a single oral administration of a prolonged-release ferrous sulphate tablet. This multicenter, single dose, open-label study was conducted in 30 women aged between 18 and 45 years with IDA. A single 160 mg oral dose of ferrous sulphate was given as 2 tablets of 80 mg of Tardyferon(®) under fasting conditions. Blood samples were collected before dosing and until 24 h post-dosing. Serum iron concentrations were determined using a routine colorimetric analytical method. Pharmacokinetic parameters were determined from the serum concentration profiles using a non compartmental approach. Serum profiles showed elevated levels of iron up to 12 h after drug intake. The median time to maximum serum concentrations (Tmax) occurred 4 h post-dosing. Between 2 and 8 h post-dosing, mean serum iron concentrations fluctuated by only 20%. Additionally, C8h and C12h represented on average 78.6% and 47.5% of the Cmax, respectively. This study demonstrates that a single oral dose of 160 mg Tardyferon(®) administered under fasting condition to 30 women with IDA leads to an optimal long-lasting release of iron in the gastrointestinal tract in the targeted population. This allows the attainment and maintenance of elevated serum iron levels for up to 12 h after administration. PMID:25989284

  19. Clinical efficacy of Amalaki Rasayana in the management of Pandu (Iron deficiency anemia)

    PubMed Central

    Layeeq, Shaizi; Thakar, Anup B.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is one of the most common nutritional deficiencies worldwide, which can be correlated to Pandu described in ayurvedic classics. Poor absorption of iron is one of the main reasons of IDA. Amalaki (Phyllanthus emblica L.) has Tridoshahara, especially Pittashamaka (pacifying Pitta) and Rasayana (rejuvenative) properties, thus nourishes the Dhatus and is also known to enhance the absorption of iron. Aims: To evaluate the efficacy of Amalaki Rasayana in the management of Pandu w.s.r. IDA. Materials and Methods: A randomized controlled open clinical trial was conducted at Institute for Post Graduate Teaching and Research in Ayurveda, Jamnagar. Iron deficient anemic patients (n = 25) having Hb <12g% in females and 13g% in males and S.Iron <50mg/dl were selected and divided into two groups. Group A was given 2 g of Amalaki Rasayana thrice a day with unequal quantity of honey and ghee for 45 days, while Group B was given 150 mg ferrous fumarate + 1500 mcg folic acid (standard control) once a day with water for 45 days. Assessment was done on the basis of relief in cardinal symptoms of Pandu and hematological parameters. Results and Conclusion: The formulation showed highly significant relief in Panduta (pallor), Daurbalya (weakness), Shirahshoola (headache), Shrama (fatigue), and Gaurava (heaviness) while statistically significant relief in Aruchi (anorexia) and Pindikodweshtan (leg cramps) was reported. On hematological parameters statistically significant increase was found in mean corpuscular volume and mean corpuscular hemoglobin while on biochemical markers statistically significant decrease was found in total iron binding capacity only. However the formulation was not found as effective as standard control. PMID:27313416

  20. Iron production maintenance effectiveness system

    SciTech Connect

    Augstman, J.J.

    1996-12-31

    In 1989, an internal study in the Coke and Iron Maintenance Department identified the opportunities available to increase production, by decreasing unscheduled maintenance delays from 4.6%. A five year front loaded plan was developed, and presented to the company president. The plan required an initial investment of $1.4 million and a conservative break-even point was calculated to be 2.5 years. Due to budget restraints, it would have to be self-funded, i.e., generate additional production or savings, to pay for the program. The program began in 1991 at number 2 coke plant and the blast furnaces. This paper will describe the Iron Production Maintenance Effectiveness System (ME), which began with the mechanical and pipefitting trades.

  1. Iron crystals in lunar breccias

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clanton, U. S.; Mckay, D. S.; Laughon, R. B.; Ladle, G. H.

    1973-01-01

    Many of the vugs in the highly recrystallized breccias from Apollos 14, 15, and 16 contain euhedral iron crystals. Three populations have been recognized based on crystal habit. In the first group the trapezohedron predominates and the cube faces are smaller. The second group is characterized by the cube as the dominant form; trapezohedron and tetrahexahedron faces are smaller and about equally developed. The dominant habit of the third group is the octahedron with smaller but equally developed cube and dodecahedron faces. Iron has been mobilized and redistributed in a vapor phase. The euhedral crystals, the abundant growth steps, and the open network of substrate crystals clearly support the concept of growth from a vapor-phase.

  2. Saturation magnetization of polycrystalline iron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behrendt, D. R.; Hegland, D. E.

    1972-01-01

    The magnetic moment per gram, sigma (H sub I, T), where H sub I is the internal field and T is the temperature, was measured for a polycrystalline iron sphere with the vibrating-sample magnetometer. The instrument was calibrated by using a method utilizing the high permeability of an iron sphere. The spontaneous moment, sigma(0, T),was obtained from plots of sigma(H sub I, T) as a function of H sub I for temperatures from 4.2 K to room temperature. The value of the spontaneous moment, sigma(0, T), at 298.9 K was 217.5 + or -0.4 emu/g. The extrapolated moment, sigma(0, 0),at absolute zero from a plot of sigma(0, T) as a function of T to 3/2 power was 221.7 + or - 0.4 emu/g.

  3. [Iron deficiency in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Helsen, Tuur; Joosten, Etienne

    2016-06-01

    Anemia is a common diagnosis in the geriatric population, especially in institutionalized and hospitalized elderly. Most common etiologies for anemia in elderly people admitted to a geriatric ward are iron-deficiency anemia and anemia associated with chronic disease. Determination of serum ferritin is the most used assay in the differential diagnosis, despite low sensitivity and moderate specificity. New insights into iron homeostasis lead to new diagnostic assays such as serum hepcidin, serum transferrin receptor and reticulocyte hemoglobin equivalent.Importance of proper diagnosis and treatment for this population is large since there is a correlation between anemia and morbidity - mortality. Anemia is usually defined as hemoglobin less than 12 g/dl for women and less than 13 g/dl for men. There is no consensus for which hemoglobinvalue an investigation into underlying pathology is obligatory. This needs to be evaluated depending on functional condition of the patient. PMID:27106490

  4. Effects of Iron Supplementation With and Without Docosahexaenoic Acid on the Cardiovascular Disease Risk Based on Paraoxonase-1, hs-CRP, and ApoB/ApoA-I Ratio in Women with Iron Deficiency Anemia.

    PubMed

    Shidfar, Farzad; Amani, Samira; Vafa, Mohammadreza; Shekarriz, Ramin; Hosseini, Sharieh; Shidfar, Shahrzad; Eshraghian, Mohammadreza; Mousavi, Seyedeh Neda

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated that tissue deposition of iron following prolonged high dose of oral supplementation for treatment of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) leads to body iron overload and oxidative stress, which starts the process of atherosclerosis. This study aimed to determine the effect of iron supplementation in combination with docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) on the cardiovascular disease risk based on paraoxonase-1 (PON-1), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), and ApoB/ApoA-I ratio in women with IDA. In this randomized controlled trial, 76 women with IDA, aged 15-45 years, were included. The patients were randomly assigned to receive 500 mg of DHA supplement or placebo with an iron tablet, once daily for 12 weeks. The participants were assessed by measurement of the serum iron, ferritin, PON-1, hs-CRP levels, and the ApoB/ApoA-I ratio at the beginning and end of study. Serum hs-CRP decreased in the DHA-supplemented group (p = 0.036), and ApoA-I decreased in the placebo group (p = 0.013). No significant difference was detected for the serum PON-1 concentration and the ApoB/ApoA-I ratio in two groups. Iron supplementation combined with DHA may have favorable effects on serum hs-CRP in women with IDA. PMID:26077874

  5. Examining Means of Reaching Adolescent Girls for Iron Supplementation in Tigray, Northern Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Mulugeta, Afework; Tessema, Masresha; H/sellasie, Kiday; Seid, Omer; Kidane, Gebremedhin; Kebede, Aweke

    2015-01-01

    Background: Iron deficiency is the most prevalent nutritional deficiency in adolescent girls from the developing world. One of the recommended interventions to improve iron status in adolescent girls is iron supplementation. Yet the provision of iron supplements to adolescent girls proved to be a challenging task for the health systems across the developing world. Objective: The objective of the study was to examine means of reaching adolescent girls for iron supplementation in Northern Ethiopia. Methodology: Analytical cross-sectional study consisting of both quantitative and qualitative approaches to data collection and analysis was used in this study. Stratified multi-stage systematic random sampling technique was adopted and primary quantitative data were collected from 828 (578 school attending and 250 non school attending) adolescent girls recruited from nine districts of Tigray. The primary quantitative data were analyzed using SPSS version 20 software. The qualitative data collected through key informant interviews and focus group discussions were transcribed verbatim and qualitatively analyzed. Results: The mean (SD) age of the girls was 16.7 (1.4) years. Four hundred forty seven (54%), 355 (42.9%) and 26 (3.1%) of the adolescent girls had low, medium and high diet diversity scores, respectively. More than half, 467 (56%), of the adolescent girls believed that adolescent girls were overloaded with household jobs everyday compared to boys from their respective communities. Key informants said that, there is no adolescent nutrition message promoted in the study area. Low community awareness, perceiving iron tablet as a contraceptive, religious and cultural influences, and lack of confidence in supplementation value of iron tablets, are some of the potential barriers mentioned by the key informant and focus group discussion participants. Schools (45%), health centers (27%) and health posts (26%) were the preferred public facilities for provision of iron

  6. Bench-scale evaluation of drinking water treatment parameters on iron particles and water quality.

    PubMed

    Rahman, M Safiur; Gagnon, Graham A

    2014-01-01

    Discoloration of water resulting from suspended iron particles is one of the main customer complaints received by water suppliers. However, understanding of the mechanisms of discoloration as well as role of materials involved in the process is limited. In this study, an array of bench scale experiments were conducted to evaluate the impact of the most common variables (pH, PO4, Cl2 and DOM) on the properties of iron particles and suspensions derived from the oxygenation of Fe(II) ions in NaHCO3 buffered synthetic water systems. The most important factors as well as their rank influencing iron suspension color and turbidity formation were identified for a range of water quality parameters. This was accomplished using a 2(4) full factorial design approach at a 95% confidence level. The statistical analysis revealed that phosphate was found to be the most significant factor to alter color (contribution: 37.9%) and turbidity (contribution: 45.5%) in an iron-water system. A comprehensive study revealed that phosphate and chlorine produced iron suspension with reduced color and turbidity, made ζ-potential more negative, reduced the average particle size, and increased iron suspension stability. In the presence of DOM, color was observed to increase but a reverse trend was observed to decrease the turbidity and to alter particle size distribution. HPSEC results suggest that higher molecular weight fractions of DOM tend to adsorb onto the surfaces of iron particles at early stages, resulting in alteration of the surface charge of iron particles. This in turn limits particles aggregation and makes iron colloids highly stable. In the presence of a phosphate based corrosion inhibitor, this study demonstrated that color and turbidity resulting from suspended iron were lower at a pH value of 6.5 (compared to pH of 8.5). The same trend was observed in presence of DOM. This study also suggested that iron colloid suspension color and turbidity in chlorinated drinking water

  7. Iron granules in plasma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Cook, M K; Madden, M

    1982-01-01

    The curious and unusual finding of coarse iron granules in marrow plasma cells is reported in 13 patients, in whom the finding was incidental. In 10 of these patients there was known alcohol abuse and serious medical complications of that abuse. Previous reports of the finding are reviewed. Haematological data of the 13 patients are presented. A hypothesis is outlined which may account for the finding. Images PMID:7068907

  8. F-8 Iron Bird Cockpit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The F-8 DFBW (Digital-Fly-By-Wire) simulator used an 'Iron-Bird' for its cockpit. It was used from 1971 to 1986. The F-8 DFBW simulator was used in the development, testing, and validation of an all digital flight-control system installed in the F-8 aircraft that replaced the normal mechanical/hydraulic controls. Many military and commercial aircraft have digital flight control systems based on the technologies developed at NASA Dryden.

  9. A new analytical approach to understanding nanoscale lead-iron interactions in drinking water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Trueman, Benjamin F; Gagnon, Graham A

    2016-07-01

    High levels of iron in distributed drinking water often accompany elevated lead release from lead service lines and other plumbing. Lead-iron interactions in drinking water distribution systems are hypothesized to be the result of adsorption and transport of lead by iron oxide particles. This mechanism was explored using point-of-use drinking water samples characterized by size exclusion chromatography with UV and multi-element (ICP-MS) detection. In separations on two different stationary phases, high apparent molecular weight (>669 kDa) elution profiles for (56)Fe and (208)Pb were strongly correlated (average R(2)=0.96, N=73 samples representing 23 single-unit residences). Moreover, (56)Fe and (208)Pb peak areas exhibited an apparent linear dependence (R(2)=0.82), consistent with mobilization of lead via adsorption to colloidal particles rich in iron. A UV254 absorbance peak, coincident with high molecular weight (56)Fe and (208)Pb, implied that natural organic matter was interacting with the hypothesized colloidal species. High molecular weight UV254 peak areas were correlated with both (56)Fe and (208)Pb peak areas (R(2)=0.87 and 0.58, respectively). On average, 45% (std. dev. 10%) of total lead occurred in the size range 0.05-0.45 μm. PMID:26971028

  10. Iron Acquisition and Regulation in Campylobacter jejuni

    PubMed Central

    Palyada, Kiran; Threadgill, Deborah; Stintzi, Alain

    2004-01-01

    Iron affects the physiology of bacteria in two different ways: as a micronutrient for bacterial growth and as a catalyst for the formation of hydroxyl radicals. In this study, we used DNA microarrays to identify the C. jejuni genes that have their transcript abundance affected by iron availability. The transcript levels of 647 genes were affected after the addition of iron to iron-limited C. jejuni cells. Several classes of affected genes were revealed within 15 min, including immediate-early response genes as well as those specific to iron acquisition and metabolism. In contrast, only 208 genes were differentially expressed during steady-state experiments comparing iron-rich and iron-limited growth conditions. As expected, genes annotated as being involved in either iron acquisition or oxidative stress defense were downregulated during both time course and steady-state experiments, while genes encoding proteins involved in energy metabolism were upregulated. Because the level of protein glycosylation increased with iron limitation, iron may modulate the level of C. jejuni virulence by affecting the degree of protein glycosylation. Since iron homeostasis has been shown to be Fur regulated in C. jejuni, an isogenic fur mutant was used to define the Fur regulon by transcriptome profiling. A total of 53 genes were Fur regulated, including many genes not previously associated with Fur regulation. A putative Fur binding consensus sequence was identified in the promoter region of most iron-repressed and Fur-regulated genes. Interestingly, a fur mutant was found to be significantly affected in its ability to colonize the gastrointestinal tract of chicks, highlighting the importance of iron homeostasis in vivo. Directed mutagenesis of other genes identified by the microarray analyses allowed the characterization of the ferric enterobactin receptor, previously named CfrA. Chick colonization assays indicated that mutants defective in enterobactin-mediated iron acquisition

  11. Iron-tolerant Cyanobacteria as a Tool to Study Terrestrial and Extraterrestrial Iron Deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, I. I.; Mummey, D.; Cooksey, K. E.; McKay, D. S.

    2005-01-01

    We are investigating biological mechanisms of terrestrial iron deposition as analogs for Martian hematite recently confirmed by. Possible terrestrial analogs include iron oxide hydrothermal deposits, rock varnish, iron-rich laterites, ferricrete soils, moki balls, and banded iron formations (BIFs). With the discovery of recent volcanic activity in the summit craters of five Martian volcanoes, renewed interest in the iron dynamics of terrestrial hydrothermal environments and associated microorganisms is warranted. In this study we describe a new genus and species of CB exhibiting elevated dissolved iron tolerance and the ability to precipitate hematite on the surface of their exopolymeric sheathes.

  12. Iron deficiency anemia. Every case is instructive.

    PubMed

    Brigden, M L

    1993-03-01

    Awareness of subtle symptoms of mild iron deficiency is increasing, but unsuspected iron deficiency is a persistent problem, especially among certain groups, such as menstruating women and milk-fed infants. The diagnosis must be clearly established through appropriate testing, and an underlying cause should always be sought. Useful tests include determination of serum ferritin and iron levels and of iron-binding capacity. A nomogram is available that correlates the serum ferritin value with the degree of inflammation present, but in some patients, bone marrow aspiration and iron staining is still required. When oral iron therapy is undertaken, an appropriate non-enteric-coated, non-sustained-release preparation should be chosen. Gradually increasing the amount of iron supplementation and taking the tablets with meals help limit side effects and ensure patient compliance. Iron therapy should be continued for 6 months after the hemoglobin level returns to normal so that total iron stores are replaced. Follow-up to ensure that iron deficiency anemia has not recurred and that the diagnosis was correct is required. PMID:8446533

  13. Iron uptake and transport across physiological barriers.

    PubMed

    Duck, Kari A; Connor, James R

    2016-08-01

    Iron is an essential element for human development. It is a major requirement for cellular processes such as oxygen transport, energy metabolism, neurotransmitter synthesis, and myelin synthesis. Despite its crucial role in these processes, iron in the ferric form can also produce toxic reactive oxygen species. The duality of iron's function highlights the importance of maintaining a strict balance of iron levels in the body. As a result, organisms have developed elegant mechanisms of iron uptake, transport, and storage. This review will focus on the mechanisms that have evolved at physiological barriers, such as the intestine, the placenta, and the blood-brain barrier (BBB), where iron must be transported. Much has been written about the processes for iron transport across the intestine and the placenta, but less is known about iron transport mechanisms at the BBB. In this review, we compare the established pathways at the intestine and the placenta as well as describe what is currently known about iron transport at the BBB and how brain iron uptake correlates with processes at these other physiological barriers. PMID:27457588

  14. Bioavailability of caseinophosphopeptide-bound iron.

    PubMed

    Ait-Oukhatar, Nabil; Peres, Jean Michel; Bouhallab, Said; Neuville, Dominique; Bureau, Francois; Bouvard, Gerard; Arhan, Pierre; Bougle, Dominique

    2002-10-01

    Iron deficiency, one of the main worldwide nutritional deficiencies, results from the low bioavailability of most dietary iron, including cow milk. Hydrolysis of the cow milk protein casein produces low molecular weight caseinophosphopeptides (CPPs). Binding of iron to CPPs keeps it soluble in the digestive tract and prevents the formation of high molecular weight ferric hydroxides, which are poorly absorbed. Previous experimental studies have shown that iron bound to the phosphopeptide containing the first 25 amino acids of beta-casein, or beta-CN (1-25), is well absorbed and corrects efficiently iron deficiency. We sought to assess in vivo iron absorption and uptake by tissues involved in iron metabolism and storage (liver, spleen, bone marrow), using radiolabeled iron. beta-CN (1-25)-Fe displayed better absorption and tissue uptake by the vascularized rat loop model compared with a control substance, ferric ascorbate. The metabolism of beta-CN (1-25)-Fe labeled with iron 59, added to cow milk, was also studied in young women. Although the absorption of beta-CN (1-25)-Fe was not significantly higher than that of ferrous sulfate, it displayed significantly higher tissue uptake. This increase was transient and had disappeared by the 14th day of the study, suggesting that iron was used for metabolic purposes. PMID:12389027

  15. Iron deficiency in adolescent female dancers.

    PubMed Central

    Mahlamäki, E; Mahlamäki, S

    1988-01-01

    The iron balance of 25 adolescent dancers and 23 control females of the same age were studied. The concentrations of fasting blood haemoglobin, serum iron, serum transferrin and serum ferritin were determined. Iron supplementation (ferrous sulphate corresponding to 100 mg of elemental iron per day) was instigated if body iron stores were low (serum ferritin less than 30 micrograms.l-1). Blood samples were drawn again after ten weeks. Low haemoglobin concentration (blood haemoglobin less than 125 g.l-1) was more prevalent among dancers than among control subjects. Reduced iron stores as well as completely absent iron stores (serum ferritin concentration less than 12 micrograms.l-1) were equally common in both groups (25% of the subjects). Iron supplementation reduced the number of anaemic girls from 16 to 4 and the highly significant difference in haemoglobin level between the treated and untreated groups disappeared. Ten weeks of iron therapy was not, however, long enough to increase iron stores. PMID:3167502

  16. Integrated gasification iron-air electrical system

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, J.T.

    1988-05-17

    An integrated, gasification, iron-air electrical system, capable of generating electrical energy from a carbonaceous material is described comprising: (A) a gasification means for carbonaceous materials comprising at least one gasification reactor, where a carbonaceous material is contacted and reacted with a gaseous medium containing steam and air, at a temperature and for a time effective to gasify the carbonaceous material and produce a hot gaseous reaction product comprising CO and H/sub 2/; (B) an iron-air cell containing at least one discharged iron electrode; (C) means to remove the discharged iron electrode from the cell of (B), and contact it with the gaseous reaction product produced in (A); (D) the discharged iron electrode removed from the cell of (B), containing material consisting essentially of Fe and Fe(OH)/sub 2/, which electrode is contacted with the hot gaseous reaction product produced in the gasification reactor of (A), directly, at a temperature of from about 450/sup 0/C to about 700/sup 0/C, for a time effective to convert, by reduction, discharged iron compounds consisting essentially of Fe and Fe(OH)/sub 2/ to charge iron compounds in the electrode and provide a recharged iron electrode; (E) an iron-air cell into which the recharged iron electrode provided in (D) is placed; (F) means to transport the recharged iron electrode provided in (D) to the iron-air cell of (E); and (G) electrical connection means attached to the iron-air cell of (E), providing the cell with capability of generating electrical energy.

  17. Iron, phytoplankton growth, and the carbon cycle.

    PubMed

    Street, Joseph H; Paytan, Adina

    2005-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for all living organisms. Iron is required for the synthesis of chlorophyll and of several photosynthetic electron transport proteins and for the reduction of CO2, SO4(2-), and NO3(-) during the photosynthetic production of organic compounds. Iron concentrations in vast areas of the ocean are very low (<1 nM) due to the low solubility of iron in oxic seawater. Low iron concentrations have been shown to limit primary production rates, biomass accumulation, and ecosystem structure in a variety of open-ocean environments, including the equatorial Pacific, the subarctic Pacific and the Southern Ocean and even in some coastal areas. Oceanic primary production, the transfer of carbon dioxide into organic carbon by photosynthetic plankton (phytoplankton), is one process by which atmospheric CO2 can be transferred to the deep ocean and sequestered for long periods of time. Accordingly, iron limitation of primary producers likely plays a major role in the global carbon cycle. It has been suggested that variations in oceanic primary productivity, spurred by changes in the deposition of iron in atmospheric dust, control atmospheric CO2 concentrations, and hence global climate, over glacial-interglacial timescales. A contemporary application of this "iron hypothesis" promotes the large-scale iron fertilization of ocean regions as a means of enhancing the ability of the ocean to store anthropogenic CO2 and mitigate 21st century climate change. Recent in situ iron enrichment experiments in the HNLC regions, however, cast doubt on the efficacy and advisability of iron fertilization schemes. The experiments have confirmed the role of iron in regulating primary productivity, but resulted in only small carbon export fluxes to the depths necessary for long-term sequestration. Above all, these experiments and other studies of iron biogeochemistry over the last two decades have begun to illustrate the great complexity of the ocean system. Attempts to

  18. Iron-Tolerant Cyanobacteria: Ecophysiology and Fingerprinting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, I. I.; Mummey, D.; Lindsey, J.; McKay, D. S.

    2006-01-01

    Although the iron-dependent physiology of marine and freshwater cyanobacterial strains has been the focus of extensive study, very few studies dedicated to the physiology and diversity of cyanobacteria inhabiting iron-depositing hot springs have been conducted. One of the few studies that have been conducted [B. Pierson, 1999] found that cyanobacterial members of iron depositing bacterial mat communities might increase the rate of iron oxidation in situ and that ferrous iron concentrations up to 1 mM significantly stimulated light dependent consumption of bicarbonate, suggesting a specific role for elevated iron in photosynthesis of cyanobacteria inhabiting iron-depositing hot springs. Our recent studies pertaining to the diversity and physiology of cyanobacteria populating iron-depositing hot springs in Great Yellowstone area (Western USA) indicated a number of different isolates exhibiting elevated tolerance to Fe(3+) (up to 1 mM). Moreover, stimulation of growth was observed with increased Fe(3+) (0.02-0.4 mM). Molecular fingerprinting of unialgal isolates revealed a new cyanobacterial genus and species Chroogloeocystis siderophila, an unicellular cyanobacterium with significant EPS sheath harboring colloidal Fe(3+) from iron enriched media. Our preliminary data suggest that some filamentous species of iron-tolerant cyanobacteria are capable of exocytosis of iron precipitated in cytoplasm. Prior to 2.4 Ga global oceans were likely significantly enriched in soluble iron [Lindsay et al, 2003], conditions which are not conducive to growth of most contemporary oxygenic cyanobacteria. Thus, iron-tolerant CB may have played important physiological and evolutionary roles in Earths history.

  19. Iron and other elements (Cu, Zn, Ca) contents in retina of rats during development and hereditary retinal degeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeant, C.; Llabador, Y.; Devès, G.; Vesvres, M. H.; Simonoff, M.; Yefimova, M.; Courtois, Y.; Jeanny, J. C.

    2001-07-01

    The retina as well as other tissues needs iron to survive, but modifications in iron metabolism have also been suggested to contribute to cerebral neurodegenerative diseases. Our study was intended to investigate iron distribution in the retina of normal rats and Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rats affected by hereditary degeneration of the photoreceptors at different developmental stages (35, 45 and 55 days after birth). Iron (Fe) distribution was determined by proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) microanalysis on retinal sections and compared to other tissues (cornea, liver, spleen) and to other elements (Cu, Zn, Ca). Elemental concentrations were determined in different retinal layers especially the photoreceptors, which are progressively altered and disappear in the RCS rats. Iron is unevenly distributed throughout the rat retina. The highest concentration is observed in the choroid and the retinal pigmented epithelium and in the inner segments of photoreceptors. Iron content is lower in the outer segments but still significant. It increases during both the development and the disease at the level of the segments. This last localised iron increase can result in an overproduction of free radicals and be correlated with the photoreceptor cell loss. The distributions of other elements (Cu, Zn, Ca) revealed interesting temporal progressions.

  20. Modelling Iron-Bentonite Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, C.; Savage, D.; Benbow, S.; Wilson, J.

    2009-04-01

    The presence of both iron canisters and bentonitic clay in some engineered barrier system (EBS) designs for the geological disposal of high-level radioactive wastes creates the potential for chemical interactions which may impact upon the long-term performance of the clay as a barrier to radionuclide migration. Flooding of potential radionuclide sorption sites on the clay by ferrous ions and conversion of clay to non-swelling sheet silicates (e.g. berthierine) are two possible outcomes deleterious to long-term performance. Laboratory experimental studies of the corrosion of iron in clay show that corrosion product layers are generally thin (< 1 µm) with magnetite, siderite, or ‘green rust' occurring depending upon temperature and ambient partial pressure of carbon dioxide. In theory, incorporation of iron into clay alteration products could act as a ‘pump' to accelerate corrosion. However, the results of laboratory experiments to characterise the products of iron-bentonite interaction are less than unequivocal. The type and amounts of solid products appear to be strong functions of time, temperature, water/clay ratio, and clay and pore fluid compositions. For example, the products of high temperature experiments (> 250 °C) are dominated by chlorite, whereas lower temperatures produce berthierine, odinite, cronstedtite, or Fe-rich smectite. Unfortunately, the inevitable short-term nature of laboratory experimental studies introduces issues of metastability and kinetics. The sequential formation in time of minerals in natural systems often produces the formation of phases not predicted by equilibrium thermodynamics. Evidence from analogous natural systems suggests that the sequence of alteration of clay by Fe-rich fluids will proceed via an Ostwald step sequence. The computer code, QPAC, has been modified to incorporate processes of nucleation, growth, precursor cannibalisation, and Ostwald ripening to address the issues of the slow growth of bentonite