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Sample records for iron absorption conditioning

  1. Pathways of iron absorption.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Marcel E; Umbreit, Jay N

    2002-01-01

    Iron is vital for all living organisms but excess iron can be lethal because it facilitates free radical formation. Thus iron absorption is carefully regulated to maintain an equilibrium between absorption and body loss of iron. In countries where meat is a significant part of the diet, most body iron is derived from dietary heme because heme binds few of the dietary chelators that bind inorganic iron. Uptake of heme into enterocytes occurs as a metalloporphyrin in an endosomal process. Intracellular iron is released from heme by heme oxygenase to enter plasma as inorganic iron. Ferric iron is absorbed via a beta(3) integrin and mobilferrin pathway (IMP) which is unshared with other nutritional metals. Ferrous iron uptake is facilitated by a DMT-1 pathway which is shared with manganese. In the iron deficient gut, large quantities of both mobilferrin and DMT-1 are found in goblet cells and intraluminal mucins suggesting that they are secreted with mucin into the intestinal lumen to bind iron to facilitate uptake by the cells. In the cytoplasm, IMP and DMT associate in a large protein complex called paraferritin which serves as a ferrireductase. Paraferritin solublizes iron binding proteins and reduces iron to make iron available for production of iron containing proteins such as heme. Iron uptake by intestinal absorptive cells is regulated by the iron concentration within the cell. Except in hemochromatosis it remains in equilibrium with total body stores via transferrin receptors on the basolateral membrane of absorptive cells. Increased intracellular iron either up-regulates or satiates iron binding proteins on regulatory proteins to alter their location in the intestinal mucosa. PMID:12547224

  2. Determining the Effect of Environmental Conditions on Iron Corrosion by Atomic Absorption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malel, Esteban; Shalev, Deborah E.

    2013-01-01

    Iron corrosion is a complex process that occurs when iron is exposed to oxygen and humidity and is exacerbated by the presence of chloride ions. The deterioration of iron structures or other components can be costly to society and is usually evaluated by following the properties of the corroding material. Here, the iron ions released into solution…

  3. Iron Absorption in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Mandilaras, Konstantinos; Pathmanathan, Tharse; Missirlis, Fanis

    2013-01-01

    The way in which Drosophila melanogaster acquires iron from the diet remains poorly understood despite iron absorption being of vital significance for larval growth. To describe the process of organismal iron absorption, consideration needs to be given to cellular iron import, storage, export and how intestinal epithelial cells sense and respond to iron availability. Here we review studies on the Divalent Metal Transporter-1 homolog Malvolio (iron import), the recent discovery that Multicopper Oxidase-1 has ferroxidase activity (iron export) and the role of ferritin in the process of iron acquisition (iron storage). We also describe what is known about iron regulation in insect cells. We then draw upon knowledge from mammalian iron homeostasis to identify candidate genes in flies. Questions arise from the lack of conservation in Drosophila for key mammalian players, such as ferroportin, hepcidin and all the components of the hemochromatosis-related pathway. Drosophila and other insects also lack erythropoiesis. Thus, systemic iron regulation is likely to be conveyed by different signaling pathways and tissue requirements. The significance of regulating intestinal iron uptake is inferred from reports linking Drosophila developmental, immune, heat-shock and behavioral responses to iron sequestration. PMID:23686013

  4. Iron absorption in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Mandilaras, Konstantinos; Pathmanathan, Tharse; Missirlis, Fanis

    2013-05-01

    The way in which Drosophila melanogaster acquires iron from the diet remains poorly understood despite iron absorption being of vital significance for larval growth. To describe the process of organismal iron absorption, consideration needs to be given to cellular iron import, storage, export and how intestinal epithelial cells sense and respond to iron availability. Here we review studies on the Divalent Metal Transporter-1 homolog Malvolio (iron import), the recent discovery that Multicopper Oxidase-1 has ferroxidase activity (iron export) and the role of ferritin in the process of iron acquisition (iron storage). We also describe what is known about iron regulation in insect cells. We then draw upon knowledge from mammalian iron homeostasis to identify candidate genes in flies. Questions arise from the lack of conservation in Drosophila for key mammalian players, such as ferroportin, hepcidin and all the components of the hemochromatosis-related pathway. Drosophila and other insects also lack erythropoiesis. Thus, systemic iron regulation is likely to be conveyed by different signaling pathways and tissue requirements. The significance of regulating intestinal iron uptake is inferred from reports linking Drosophila developmental, immune, heat-shock and behavioral responses to iron sequestration. PMID:23686013

  5. Mechanisms and regulation of intestinal iron absorption.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Evan H; Oates, Phillip S

    2002-01-01

    Iron absorption from the small intestine is regulated according to the body's needs, increasing in iron deficiency and decreasing in iron overload. It has been proposed that the efficiency of absorption is determined by the amount of iron acquired by developing enterocytes when they are in the crypts of Lieberkůhn and that this regulates expression of iron transporters such as DMT1 in mature enterocytes of the intestinal villi. In the crypts the cells take up iron from plasma transferrin by receptor-mediated endocytosis, a process that is influenced by the hemochromatosis protein, HFE. Hence, the availability of plasma transferrin-bound iron and the expression and function of transferrin receptors (TfR1), HFE and DMT1 should all contribute to the absorptive capacity of villus enterocytes. These aspects of the regulation and mechanism of iron absorption were investigated in genetically normal rats and mice, and in Belgrade anemic (b/b) rats and HFE knockout mice. In most experiments the function of the TfR1 was assessed by the uptake of radiolabeled transferrin-bound iron given intravenously. Absorption of non-heme iron was measured using closed in situ duodenal loops. The expression and cellular distribution of DMT1 and TfR1 were determined by in situ hybridisation and immunohistochemistry. The uptake of transferrin-bound iron and expression of functional TfR1 was shown to occur mainly in crypt cells and to be proportional to the plasma concentration of iron. It was not impaired by the mutation of DMT1 that occurs in b/b rats but was impaired in HFE knockout mice. Iron absorption was increased in these mice but was still influenced by the level of iron stores, as in normal mice. These results are in accordance with the proposed regulation of iron absorption and suggest that DMT1 is not the only iron transporter operating within endosomes of crypt cells. This view was supported by the failure to detect DMT1 mRNA or protein in crypt cells. Expression of DMT1 m

  6. Iron absorption from intrinsically-labeled lentils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Low iron (Fe) absorption from important staple foods may contribute to Fe deficiency in developing countries. To date, there are few studies examining the Fe bioavailability of pulse crops as commonly prepared and consumed by humans. The objectives of this study were to characterize the Fe absorpt...

  7. Measurement of iron absorption from meals contaminated with iron

    SciTech Connect

    Hallberg, L.; Bjoern-Rasmussen, E.

    1981-12-01

    A method is described to measure in vitro the extent of isotopic exchange between the native nonheme food iron and added inorganic reduction to radioiron tracer. The food is digested with pepsin and trypsin in the presence of radioiron. The exchangeability of food iron is calculated from the specific activity in the food and in an extract of bathophenantroline in isoamyl alcohol obtained after digesting this food. The precision and accuracy of the method is illustrated by two kinds of studies, those in which different amounts of contamination iron are added to a meal and those evaluating contamination iron in natural meals. The present method will make it possible to measure validly iron absorption from meals contaminated with unknown amounts of iron of unknown exchangeability with the extrinsic radioiron tracer.

  8. Iron, lead, and cobalt absorption: similarities and dissimilarities

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, J.C.; Conrad, M.E.; Holland, R.

    1981-01-01

    Using isolated intestinal segments in rats, the absorption of iron, lead, and cobalt was increased in iron deficiency and decreased in iron loading. Similarly, the absorption of these metals was decreased in transfusional erythocytosis, after intravenous iron injection and after parenteral endotoxin injection. Acute bleeding or abbreviated intervals of dietary iron deprivation resulted in increased iron absorption from isolated intestinal segments and in intact animals, while the absorption of lead and cobalt was unaffected. These results suggest that the specificity of the mucosal metal absorptive mechanism is either selectively enhanced for iron absorption by phlebotomy or brief periods of dietary iron deprivation, or that two or more mucosal pathways for iron absorption may exist.

  9. Non-heme iron as ferrous sulfate does not interact with heme iron absorption in humans.

    PubMed

    Gaitán, Diego; Olivares, Manuel; Lönnerdal, Bo; Brito, Alex; Pizarro, Fernando

    2012-12-01

    The absorption of heme iron has been described as distinctly different from that of non-heme iron. Moreover, whether heme and non-heme iron compete for absorption has not been well established. Our objective was to investigate the potential competition between heme and non-heme iron as ferrous sulfate for absorption, when both iron forms are ingested on an empty stomach. Twenty-six healthy nonpregnant women were selected to participate in two iron absorption studies using iron radioactive tracers. We obtained the dose-response curve for absorption of 0.5, 10, 20, and 50 mg heme iron doses, as concentrated red blood cells. Then, we evaluated the absorption of the same doses, but additionally we added non-heme iron, as ferrous sulfate, at constant heme/non-heme iron molar ratio (1:1). Finally, we compare the two curves by a two-way ANOVA. Iron sources were administered on an empty stomach. One factor analysis showed that heme iron absorption was diminished just by increasing total heme iron (P < 0.0001). The addition of non-heme iron as ferrous sulfate did not have any effect on heme iron absorption (P = NS). We reported evidence that heme and non-heme iron as ferrous sulfate does not compete for absorption. The mechanism behind the absorption of these iron sources is not clear. PMID:22935997

  10. Regulation of heme iron absorption by young children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heme iron is an important source of dietary iron for children. Little is known of its absorption as only radio-isotopically labeled heme iron has been available to date. We have recently developed a method of intrinsically labeling bovine heme iron in vivo with the stable isotope iron-58. Our object...

  11. Effects of divalent amino acids on iron absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, J.M.; Ghannam, M.; Ayres, J.W.

    1984-09-01

    Solutions of each of 10 amino acids or ascorbic acid were mixed with iron and orally administered to rats. Iron was absorbed to a statistically significantly greater extent when mixed with asparagine, glycine, serine, or ascorbic acid as compared with a control solution of iron. The largest effects were for asparagine and glycine, which also increased iron absorption to a significantly greater extent than did serine or ascorbic acid. No statistically significant increase in iron absorption occurred when any of the other amino acids was mixed with iron. The extent of iron absorption from each test solution, as measured by area under the concentration of iron-59 in the blood-time curve (r2 . 0.0002), and the initial rate of iron absorption for each test solution (r2 . 0.01) showed no correlation with the stability constant of the amino acid-iron complex.

  12. Mechanistic and regulatory aspects of intestinal iron absorption

    PubMed Central

    Gulec, Sukru; Anderson, Gregory J.

    2014-01-01

    Iron is an essential trace mineral that plays a number of important physiological roles in humans, including oxygen transport, energy metabolism, and neurotransmitter synthesis. Iron absorption by the proximal small bowel is a critical checkpoint in the maintenance of whole-body iron levels since, unlike most other essential nutrients, no regulated excretory systems exist for iron in humans. Maintaining proper iron levels is critical to avoid the adverse physiological consequences of either low or high tissue iron concentrations, as commonly occurs in iron-deficiency anemia and hereditary hemochromatosis, respectively. Exquisite regulatory mechanisms have thus evolved to modulate how much iron is acquired from the diet. Systemic sensing of iron levels is accomplished by a network of molecules that regulate transcription of the HAMP gene in hepatocytes, thus modulating levels of the serum-borne, iron-regulatory hormone hepcidin. Hepcidin decreases intestinal iron absorption by binding to the iron exporter ferroportin 1 on the basolateral surface of duodenal enterocytes, causing its internalization and degradation. Mucosal regulation of iron transport also occurs during low-iron states, via transcriptional (by hypoxia-inducible factor 2α) and posttranscriptional (by the iron-sensing iron-regulatory protein/iron-responsive element system) mechanisms. Recent studies demonstrated that these regulatory loops function in tandem to control expression or activity of key modulators of iron homeostasis. In health, body iron levels are maintained at appropriate levels; however, in several inherited disorders and in other pathophysiological states, iron sensing is perturbed and intestinal iron absorption is dysregulated. The iron-related phenotypes of these diseases exemplify the necessity of precisely regulating iron absorption to meet body demands. PMID:24994858

  13. Hydrogen absorption in iron exposed to simulated concrete pore solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Lillard, R.S.; Scully, J.R.

    1996-02-01

    Safe cathodic protection (CP) limits are required for prestressed steel in concrete to avoid the risk of hydrogen embrittlement (HE). This preliminary study addressed some effects of concrete pore solution chemistry and metal surface condition on hydrogen absorption in iron. To accomplish this, the Devanathan-Stachurski permeation technique was used to investigate hydrogen absorption in 99.5% iron foils exposed to NaOH, saturated Ca(OH){sub 2}, and saturated Ca(OH){sub 2} + 0.6 M NaCl, all at pH 12.5. The foils used in this investigation were tested after various surface preparations: (a) polished, (b) with a thermal oxide formed by a heat treatment designed to simulate the stress relief oxide, and (c) with corrosion films to simulate an inservice tendon that was exposed to a marine environment for some time prior to CP. Hydrogen uptake in iron was most efficient for foils covered with Portland cement-based mortar, at least 2.5 times greater than that in NaOH of the same pH and hydrogen production rate. Absorption in saturated Ca(OH){sub 2} was somewhat less than that from the mortar cover. While chloride had no direct effect on the hydrogen absorption rate, the corrosion product and the thermal oxide were found to decrease hydrogen absorption compared to polished iron. The thermal oxide acted as a complete barrier at all charging current densities investigated. The effectiveness of this thermal oxide barrier to hydrogen, however, was compromised by corrosion resulting from alternate immersion exposure to a chloride environment.

  14. Influence of Inflammatory Disorders and Infection on Iron Absorption and Efficacy of Iron- Fortified Foods

    PubMed Central

    Hurrell, Richard F.

    2014-01-01

    The provision of iron- fortified foods is a common strategy to prevent iron deficiency; however, ensuring adequate iron absorption is a challenge. Iron bioavailability depends on the choice of iron compound, the presence enhancers and inhibitors of absorption in the food matrix, and the physiological state of the consumer, including iron status, other nutritional deficiencies and inflammatory disorders. Inflammation associated with infections and inflammatory disorders would be expected to decrease iron absorption and reduce the efficacy of iron- fortified foods. The decreased absorption is due to an increase in circulating hepcidin in response to inflammatory cytokines. Hepcidin degrades ferroportin and blocks the passage of iron from the intestinal cell to the plasma. This is the innate immune response to infections and aims to restrict pathogen growth by restricting iron supply. Stable isotope studies have reported women and children with chronic malaria parasitemia or febrile malaria to have increased inflammatory cytokines, increased hepcidin and much decreased iron absorption. No studies have specifically investigated the efficacy of iron- fortified foods in the absence and presence of infections. In contrast, inflammation and increased hepcidin associated with adiposity in overweight have been linked to both lower iron absorption and the decreased efficacy of iron- fortified foods. PMID:25762975

  15. The effect of some beverage extracts on intestinal iron absorption.

    PubMed

    el-Shobaki, F A; Saleh, Z A; Saleh, N

    1990-12-01

    The effect of some beverage extracts namely anise, mint, caraway, cumin, tilia, liquorice, karkade and tea, on the absorption of iron was tested in tied-off intestinal segments of rats. The rate of intestinal iron absorption was calculated in terms of an absorption index. The tannin, phytic acid and ascorbic acid contents of these beverages were analysed. The results show that anise, mint, caraway, cumin, tilia, liquorice, arranged in decreasing order of their effect, promoted the absorption of iron. Karkade did not exert an appreciable effect while tea inhibited absorption. The results are discussed in relation to the content of these beverages of tannins, phytic or ascorbic acids. It is recommended to offer these beverages to children and also to adults as a preventive agent to iron deficiency anemia. Also can be used for the preparation of bioavailable medicinal iron. PMID:2080638

  16. Absorption of fortification iron from milk formulas in infants

    SciTech Connect

    Stekel, A.; Olivares, M.; Pizarro, F.; Chadud, P.; Lopez, I.; Amar, M.

    1986-06-01

    The bioavailability of iron added to different types of cows' milk formulas was studied using mono-isotopic and double-isotopic methods in 396 infants aged 5-18 mo. All the milk formulas were fortified with ferrous sulfate in concentrations varying between 10 and 19 mg elemental iron/liter. Iron absorption from low-fat milks and full-fat milks varied from 2.9 to 5.1%. A higher range of mean absorption, 5.9 to 11.3%, was observed in the same formulas with the addition of ascorbic acid at concentrations of 100 mg/l or higher (up to 800 mg/l), demonstrating its enhancing effect on iron absorption in fortified milks. The amount of milk fat, the addition of carbohydrates, or acidification did not seem to influence iron absorption.

  17. The inhibitory effect of bran on iron absorption in man.

    PubMed

    Simpson, K M; Morris, E R; Cook, J D

    1981-08-01

    The effects of whole wheat bran and its components on the absorption of nonheme dietary iron were measured using a double isotope technique in human volunteers. When 12 g bran was added to a light meal, absorption decreased by 51 to 74%; this inhibitory effect of bran was shown for meals of both high and low iron availability. Inhibition was not explained by monoferric phytate, the major form of iron in bran, because labeled iron from monoferric phytate was absorbed at least as well as the common pool of nonheme dietary iron. Furthermore, removal of phytate from bran by endogenous phytase did not in itself alter the inhibitory effect of the bran on iron absorption. Studies in which dephytinized bran was separated into a soluble, phosphate-rich fraction and an insoluble, high-fiber fraction indicated that the soluble fraction was more inhibitory than the insoluble fraction. PMID:6267927

  18. Calcium and iron absorption: mechanism of action and nutritional importance.

    PubMed

    Hallberg, L; Rossander-Hultén, L; Brune, M; Gleerup, A

    1992-05-01

    We investigated the inhibitory effect of calcium on iron absorption in 57 human subjects. Three studies suggested that the effect is not located in the gastrointestinal tract. The presence of phytate in a meal and formation of calcium-iron-phytate complexes is not a prerequisite for the inhibition. The relative increase in iron absorption by ascorbic acid was the same in meals with and without calcium, suggesting that calcium did not influence the balance between enhancing and inhibiting ligands in the gastrointestinal lumen. No inhibiting effect on iron absorption was seen when adding 3 mg calcium to 0.01 mg iron (molar ratio Ca/Fe = 420). Previous studies showing a marked inhibition by calcium had a lower molar ratio, but greater amounts of calcium were given. This suggests that a minimal concentration of calcium is needed to achieve an effect. The present results indirectly support our original hypothesis that the inhibitory effect of calcium on iron absorption is situated within the intestinal mucosal cells. The practical nutritional implications of the inhibitory effect of calcium are considerable since addition of milk, milkshake or cheese to common meals such as pizza or hamburger meals reduced iron absorption by 50-60%. It is recommended to reduce the intake of dairy products with the main meals providing most of the dietary iron, especially for those having the highest iron requirements i.e. children, teenagers and women at childbearing age. PMID:1600930

  19. Adaptation of iron requirement to hypoxic conditions at high altitude.

    PubMed

    Gassmann, Max; Muckenthaler, Martina U

    2015-12-15

    Adequate acclimatization time to enable adjustment to hypoxic conditions is one of the most important aspects for mountaineers ascending to high altitude. Accordingly, most reviews emphasize mechanisms that cope with reduced oxygen supply. However, during sojourns to high altitude adjustment to elevated iron demand is equally critical. Thus in this review we focus on the interaction between oxygen and iron homeostasis. We review the role of iron 1) in the oxygen sensing process and erythropoietin (Epo) synthesis, 2) in gene expression control mediated by the hypoxia-inducible factor-2 (HIF-2), and 3) as an oxygen carrier in hemoglobin, myoglobin, and cytochromes. The blood hormone Epo that is abundantly expressed by the kidney under hypoxic conditions stimulates erythropoiesis in the bone marrow, a process requiring high iron levels. To ensure that sufficient iron is provided, Epo-controlled erythroferrone that is expressed in erythroid precursor cells acts in the liver to reduce expression of the iron hormone hepcidin. Consequently, suppression of hepcidin allows for elevated iron release from storage organs and enhanced absorption of dietary iron by enterocytes. As recently observed in sojourners at high altitude, however, iron uptake may be hampered by reduced appetite and gastrointestinal bleeding. Reduced iron availability, as observed in a hypoxic mountaineer, enhances hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension and may contribute to other hypoxia-related diseases. Overall, adequate systemic iron availability is an important prerequisite to adjust to high-altitude hypoxia and may have additional implications for disease-related hypoxic conditions. PMID:26183475

  20. Iron deficiency, but not anemia, upregulates iron absorption in breast-fed Peruvian infants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Iron absorption in adults is regulated by homeostatic mechanisms that decrease absorption when iron status is high. There are few data, however, regarding the existence of a similar homeostatic regulation in infants. We studied 2 groups of human milk-fed infants using (57)Fe (given as ferrous sulfat...

  1. Solar powered absorption air conditioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vardon, J. M.

    1980-04-01

    Artificial means of providing or removing heat from the building are discussed along with the problem of the appropriate building design and construction for a suitable heat climate inside the building. The use of a lithium bromide-water absorption chiller, powered by a hot water store heated by an array of stationary flat collectors, is analyzed. An iterative method of predicting the cooling output from a LiBr-water absorption refrigeration plant having variable heat input is described and a model allowing investigation of the performance of a solar collector and thermal storage system is developed.

  2. Oral exposure to polystyrene nanoparticles affects iron absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahler, Gretchen J.; Esch, Mandy B.; Tako, Elad; Southard, Teresa L.; Archer, Shivaun D.; Glahn, Raymond P.; Shuler, Michael L.

    2012-04-01

    The use of engineered nanoparticles in food and pharmaceuticals is expected to increase, but the impact of chronic oral exposure to nanoparticles on human health remains unknown. Here, we show that chronic and acute oral exposure to polystyrene nanoparticles can influence iron uptake and iron transport in an in vitro model of the intestinal epithelium and an in vivo chicken intestinal loop model. Intestinal cells that are exposed to high doses of nanoparticles showed increased iron transport due to nanoparticle disruption of the cell membrane. Chickens acutely exposed to carboxylated particles (50 nm in diameter) had a lower iron absorption than unexposed or chronically exposed birds. Chronic exposure caused remodelling of the intestinal villi, which increased the surface area available for iron absorption. The agreement between the in vitro and in vivo results suggests that our in vitro intestinal epithelium model is potentially useful for toxicology studies.

  3. Infant iron status affects iron absorption in Peruvian breastfed infants at 2 and 5 mo of age

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effects of prenatal iron supplementation on maternal postpartum iron status and early infant iron homeostasis remain largely unknown. We examined iron absorption and growth in exclusively breastfed infants in relation to fetal iron exposure and iron status during early infancy. Longitudinal, paired ...

  4. Effect of tea on iron absorption from the typical Tunisian meal 'couscous' fed to healthy rats.

    PubMed

    Hamdaoui, M; Hedhili, A; Doghri, T; Tritar, B

    1994-01-01

    Black and green tea decoctions are popular beverages in Tunisia, especially after eating. Our study was performed to examine the effect of graded amounts of black and green tea decoction prepared under realistic Tunisian conditions on nonheme iron absorption from a typical Tunisian meal, 'couscous', by extrinsic radioiron labeling in rats. Concentrations of 300, 200 and 100 micrograms/ml of black tea decreased dramatically nonheme iron bioavailability from couscous, but 50 micrograms/ml did not influence iron absorption. The inhibition of nonheme iron from couscous varied from 36 to 61% with black tea and 30.5% with green tea. Taken together, our findings show that the tea decoction in Tunisia has a great inhibitory power and may constitute an important factor for the development of iron deficiency anemia throughout Tunisia. PMID:7832583

  5. Iron Absorption from Two Milk Formulas Fortified with Iron Sulfate Stabilized with Maltodextrin and Citric Acid

    PubMed Central

    Pizarro, Fernando; Olivares, Manuel; Maciero, Eugenia; Krasnoff, Gustavo; Cócaro, Nicolas; Gaitan, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Background: Fortification of milk formulas with iron is a strategy widely used, but the absorption of non-heme iron is low. The purpose of this study was to measure the bioavailability of two iron fortified milk formulas designed to cover toddlers’ nutritional needs. These milks were fortified with iron sulfate stabilized with maltodextrin and citric acid. Methods: 15 women (33–47 years old) participated in study. They received on different days, after an overnight fast, 200 mL of Formula A; 200 mL of Formula B; 30 mL of a solution of iron and ascorbic acid as reference dose and 200 mL of full fat cow’s milk fortified with iron as ferrous sulfate. Milk formulas and reference dose were labeled with radioisotopes 59Fe or 55Fe, and the absorption of iron measured by erythrocyte incorporation of radioactive Fe. Results: The geometric mean iron absorption corrected to 40% of the reference dose was 20.6% for Formula A and 20.7% for Formula B, versus 7.5% of iron fortified cow’s milk (p < 0.001). The post hoc Sheffé indeed differences between the milk formulas and the cow’s milk (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Formulas A and B contain highly bioavailable iron, which contributes to covering toddlers’ requirements of this micronutrient. PMID:26529007

  6. Absorption of iron from ferritin is independent of heme iron and ferrous salts in women and rat intestinal segments.

    PubMed

    Theil, Elizabeth C; Chen, Huijun; Miranda, Constanza; Janser, Heinz; Elsenhans, Bernd; Núñez, Marco T; Pizarro, Fernando; Schümann, Klaus

    2012-03-01

    Ferritin iron from food is readily bioavailable to humans and has the potential for treating iron deficiency. Whether ferritin iron absorption is mechanistically different from iron absorption from small iron complexes/salts remains controversial. Here, we studied iron absorption (RBC (59)Fe) from radiolabeled ferritin iron (0.5 mg) in healthy women with or without non-ferritin iron competitors, ferrous sulfate, or hemoglobin. A 9-fold excess of non-ferritin iron competitor had no significant effect on ferritin iron absorption. Larger amounts of iron (50 mg and a 99-fold excess of either competitor) inhibited iron absorption. To measure transport rates of iron that was absorbed inside ferritin, rat intestinal segments ex vivo were perfused with radiolabeled ferritin and compared to perfusion with ferric nitrilotriacetic (Fe-NTA), a well-studied form of chelated iron. Intestinal transport of iron absorbed inside exogenous ferritin was 14.8% of the rate measured for iron absorbed from chelated iron. In the steady state, endogenous enterocyte ferritin contained >90% of the iron absorbed from Fe-NTA or ferritin. We found that ferritin is a slow release source of iron, readily available to humans or animals, based on RBC iron incorporation. Ferritin iron is absorbed by a different mechanism than iron salts/chelates or heme iron. Recognition of a second, nonheme iron absorption process, ferritin endocytosis, emphasizes the need for more mechanistic studies on ferritin iron absorption and highlights the potential of ferritin present in foods such as legumes to contribute to solutions for global iron deficiency. PMID:22259191

  7. Iron absorption is more closely related to iron status than to daily iron intake in 12- to 48-mo-old children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Few studies have evaluated iron absorption in small children after the first year of life. Our objective was to examine the relations among iron intake, iron absorption, and iron status in a group of healthy children. We studied 28 children, ages 12 to 48 mo, after a 7-d home adaptation to a diet re...

  8. Melting of iron determined by X-ray absorption spectroscopy to 100 GPa

    PubMed Central

    Aquilanti, Giuliana; Trapananti, Angela; Karandikar, Amol; Kantor, Innokenty; Marini, Carlo; Mathon, Olivier; Pascarelli, Sakura; Boehler, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Temperature, thermal history, and dynamics of Earth rely critically on the knowledge of the melting temperature of iron at the pressure conditions of the inner core boundary (ICB) where the geotherm crosses the melting curve. The literature on this subject is overwhelming, and no consensus has been reached, with a very large disagreement of the order of 2,000 K for the ICB temperature. Here we report new data on the melting temperature of iron in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell to 103 GPa obtained by X-ray absorption spectroscopy, a technique rarely used at such conditions. The modifications of the onset of the absorption spectra are used as a reliable melting criterion regardless of the solid phase from which the solid to liquid transition takes place. Our results show a melting temperature of iron in agreement with most previous studies up to 100 GPa, namely of 3,090 K at 103 GPa. PMID:26371317

  9. The relationship between iron and lead absorption in humans.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, P R; Chamberlain, M J; Valberg, L S

    1982-11-01

    Approximately 60% of an oral dose of 100 micrograms of 203Pb was retained in 85 fasting subjects with no difference noted between males and females. Body retention was proportional to dose up to 400 micrograms of lead. It was not related to the capacity to absorb iron or to the size of body iron stores, nor was it affected by the simultaneous ingestion of a 10-fold molar excess of iron. The effect of several dietary factors was also determined. Lead retention was lowered by eating food, slightly increased by ingestion of fat, but was unaffected by the administration of lactose or a 10-fold molar excess of zinc, cobalt, or calcium. One chelating agent, ascorbic acid, slightly lowered lead retention, whereas another agent ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, produced a marked reduction. Several of these results suggest that human gastrointestinal lead absorption behaves differently to that of rodents. In particular, human lead retention was found to be unrelated to iron absorption or to body iron stores. PMID:6814228

  10. Iron absorption in raw and cooked bananas: A field study using stable isotopes in women

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Banana is a staple food in many regions with high iron deficiency and may be a potential vehicle for iron fortification. However, iron absorption from bananas is not known. The objective of this study was to evaluate total iron absorption from raw and cooked bananas. Thirty women (34.9 +/- 6.6 years...

  11. IRON DISSOCIATES FROM THE NAFEEDTA COMPLEX PRIOR TO OR DURING INTESTINAL ABSORPTION IN RATS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sodium Iron EDTA (NaFeEDTA) has superior iron bioavailability especially in foods containing iron absorption inhibitors. However, mechanisms involved in the absorption and subsequent partitioning of iron complexed with EDTA are poorly understood. Our objectives were to compare retention and tissue...

  12. Microanalysis of iron oxidation state in iron oxides using X Ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, S. R.; Delaney, J.; Bajt, S.; Rivers, M. L.; Smith, J. V.

    1993-01-01

    An exploratory application of x ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analysis using the synchrotron x ray microprobe was undertaken to obtain Fe XANES spectra on individual sub-millimeter grains in conventional polished sections. The experiments concentrated on determinations of Fe valence in a suite of iron oxide minerals for which independent estimates of the iron speciation could be made by electron microprobe analysis and x ray diffraction.

  13. Iron-59 absorption from soy hulls: intrinsic vs extrinsic labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Lykken, G.I.; Mahalko, J.R.; Nielsen, E.J.; Dintzis, F.R.

    1986-03-05

    As part of an evaluation of the validity of the extrinsic labeling technique for measuring iron absorption, absorption from soy hulls extrinsically labeled (/sup 59/Fe added to bread dough) was compared with that from soy hulls intrinsically labeled (/sup 59/Fe incorporated into the soy plant during growth). Century soybeans were grown in a greenhouse. After pods had formed and were filling, each plant was stem injected twice, at 3 day intervals, with 22 ..mu..Ci /sup 59/Fe as FeCl/sub 2/ in 25 ..mu..l of 0.5 M HCl solution. After the plants had senesced, the soybeans were harvested, dried, shelled and the hulls removed. Standard meals containing 3.5 mg Fe/meal and up to 0.06 ..mu..Ci /sup 59/Fe in a soy hull bun were fed on 2 consecutive days to free-living volunteers in a crossover design. Absorption of /sup 59/Fe was greater from intrinsically labeled soy hulls than from extrinsically labeled soy hulls, 20 +/- 20% vs 15 +/- 11% (n=14, p > 0.05 by paired t-test). Apparent absorption ranged from 1.3% to 77% from intrinsically labeled soy hulls and .5% to 29% from extrinsically labeled soy hulls with the highest absorption occurring in persons with low serum ferritin (S.F. < 8 ng/ml). These findings provide additional evidence that the extrinsic labeling method is a valid measure of iron bioavailability to humans.

  14. Food Iron Absorption in Man APPLICATIONS OF THE TWO-POOL EXTRINSIC TAG METHOD TO MEASURE HEME AND NONHEME IRON ABSORPTION FROM THE WHOLE DIET

    PubMed Central

    Björn-Rasmussen, Erik; Hallberg, Leif; Isaksson, Björn; Arvidsson, Bertil

    1974-01-01

    A new radioisotope method to measure iron absorption from the whole diet was used in this study. The method is based on the concept that food iron is absorbed from two pools, the heme iron pool and the nonheme iron pool, which can be especially labeled with two radioiron isotopes given as hemoglobin and as an iron salt. The purpose of this study was to test the accuracy of this two-pool extrinsic tag method. The meals served were composed as an average of 6 wk consumption in the present material of 32 young enlisted men. The mean and total heme and nonheme iron absorption in all the 32 young men was 1.01±0.11. This figure agrees well with the mean daily losses expected for this group of subjects (1.0 mg). The conclusion can therefore be made that there are no major systematic errors of the present method to measure the total iron absorption from a mixed diet. In one series a comparison was made of the absorption of heme and nonheme iron from the meals. A significant correlation between the absorption of the two kinds of iron was found. However, a much greater fraction of the heme iron was absorbed (37%) than of the nonheme iron (5%). The absorption both from breakfast and lunch was in two series found to give a good prediction of the total daily nonheme iron absorption. One series was designed to compare the effect of two levels of iron fortification. There was a significant increase in iron absorption when the level of iron fortification of the meals was increased. PMID:4808639

  15. Effect of iron status on iron absorption in different habitual meals in young south Indian women

    PubMed Central

    Kalasuramath, Suneeta; Kurpad, Anura V.; Thankachan, Prashanth

    2013-01-01

    Background & objectives: Iron deficiency (ID) affects a large number of women in India. An inverse relationship exists between iron (Fe) status and Fe absorption. Dietary inhibitory and enhancing factors exert a profound influence on bioavailability of Fe. Although the current recommended dietary allowance (RDA) for Fe is based on 8 per cent bioavailability, it is not clear if this holds good for the usual highly inhibitory Indian diet matrix. This study was aimed to determine Fe absorption from several habitually consumed south Indian food and to evaluate the interaction of Fe status with absorption. Methods: Four Fe absorption studies were performed on 60 apparently healthy young women, aged 18-35 years. Based on blood biochemistry, 45 of them were ID and 15 were iron replete (IR). The habitual meals assessed were rice, millet and wheat based meals in the ID subjects and rice based meal alone in the IR subjects. Each subject received the test meal labelled with 3 mg of 57Fe and Fe absorption was measured based on erythrocyte incorporation of isotope label 14 days following administration. Results: Mean fractional Fe absorption from the rice, wheat and millet based meals in the ID subjects were 8.3, 11.2 and 4.6 per cent, respectively. Fe absorption from the rice-based meals was 2.5 per cent in IR subjects. Interpretation & conclusions: Fe absorption is dictated by Fe status from low bioavailability meals. Millet based meals have the lowest bioavailability, while the rice and wheat based meals had moderate to good bioavailability. In millet based meals, it is prudent to consider ways to improve Fe absorption. PMID:23563376

  16. Properties of iron under core conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, J. M.

    2003-04-01

    Underlying an understanding of the geodynamo and evolution of the core is knowledge of the physical and chemical properties of iron and iron mixtures under high pressure and temperature conditions. Key properties include the viscosity of the fluid outer core, thermal diffusivity, equations-of-state, elastic properties of solid phases, and phase equilibria for iron and iron-dominated mixtures. As is expected for work that continues to tax technological and intellectual limits, controversy has followed both experimental and theoretical progress in this field. However, estimates for the melting temperature of the inner core show convergence and the equation-of-state for iron as determined in independent experiments and theories are in remarkable accord. Furthermore, although the structure and elastic properties of the solid inner-core phase remains uncertain, theoretical and experimental underpinnings are better understood and substantial progress is likely in the near future. This talk will focus on an identification of properties that are reasonably well known and those that merit further detailed study. In particular, both theoretical and experimental (static and shock wave) determinations of the density of iron under extreme conditions are in agreement at the 1% or better level. The behavior of the Gruneisen parameter (which determines the geothermal gradient and controls much of the outer core heat flux) is constrained by experiment and theory under core conditions for both solid and liquid phases. Recent experiments and theory are suggestive of structure or structures other than the high-pressure hexagonal close-packed (HCP) phase. Various theories and experiments for the elasticity of HCP iron remain in poor accord. Uncontroversial constraints on core chemistry will likely never be possible. However, reasonable bounds are possible on the basis of seismic profiles, geochemical arguments, and determinations of sound velocities and densities at high pressure and

  17. Probing iron spin state by optical absorption in laser-heated diamond anvil cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobanov, S.; Goncharov, A. F.; Holtgrewe, N.; Lin, J. F.

    2015-12-01

    Pressure-induced spin-pairing transitions in iron-bearing minerals have been in the focus of geophysical studies1. Modern consensus is that iron spin state in the lower mantle is a complex function of crystal structure, composition, pressure, and temperature. Discontinuities in physical properties of lower mantle minerals have been revealed over the spin transition pressure range, but at room temperature. In this work, we have used a supercontinuum laser source and an intensified CCD camera to probe optical properties of siderite, FeCO3, and post-perovskite, Mg0.9Fe0.1SiO3, across the spin transition in laser-heated diamond anvil cell. Synchronously gating the CCD with the supercontinuum pulses (Fig. 1A) allowed diminishing thermal background to ~8.3*10-4. Utilizing the experimental setup we infer the spin state of ferrous iron in siderite at high pressure and temperature conditions (Fig. 1B). Similar behavior is observed for low spin ferric iron in post-perovskite at 130 GPa indicating that all iron in post-perovskite is high spin at lower mantle conditions. Also, our experimental setup holds promise for measuring radiative thermal conductivity of mantle minerals at relevant mantle conditions. Figure 1. (A) Timing of the optical absorption measurements at high temperature. (B) High temperature siderite absorption spectra at 45 GPa. Before heating and quenched after 1300 K spectra are shown in light and dark blue, respectively. Green and red curves are absorption spectra at 1200 K and 1300 K, respectively. Spectra shown in black represent room temperature absorption data on HS (43 GPa) and LS (45.5 GPa) siderite after Lobanov et al., 2015, shown for comparison.

  18. The gut in iron homeostasis: role of HIF-2 under normal and pathological conditions

    PubMed Central

    Mastrogiannaki, Maria; Matak, Pavle

    2013-01-01

    Although earlier, seminal studies demonstrated that the gut per se has the intrinsic ability to regulate the rates of iron absorption, the spotlight in the past decade has been placed on the systemic regulation of iron homeostasis by the hepatic hormone hepcidin and the molecular mechanisms that regulate its expression. Recently, however, attention has returned to the gut based on the finding that hypoxia inducible factor-2 (HIF-2α) regulates the expression of key genes that contribute to iron absorption. Here we review the current understanding of the molecular mechanisms that regulate iron homeostasis in the gut by focusing on the role of HIF-2 under physiological steady-state conditions and in the pathogenesis of iron-related diseases. We also discuss implications for adapting HIF-2–based therapeutic strategies in iron-related pathological conditions. PMID:23678007

  19. Some interferences in atomic-absorption spectrometry and extraction of iron and copper.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, M; Kihara, H; Suzuki, M; Takeuchi, T

    1970-09-01

    The effect of complexing agents on the atomic-absorption spectrometry of iron and copper extracts was investigated Thiocyanate complexes gave a marked depression of absorption by iron and copper, especially in fuel-rich flames. Chloride, diethyldithiocarbamate and hydroxyquinoline complexes of iron behaved alike, but differently from the thiocyanate complex. PMID:18960816

  20. An iron absorption model of gamma-ray burst spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Edison P.; Kargatis, Vincent E.

    1994-01-01

    Most gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) exhibit deficits of X-rays below approximately 200 keV. Here we consider a spectral model in which the burst source is shielded by an optically thick layer of circumburster material (CBM) rich in iron-group elements whose photoelectric absorption opacity exceeds the Thomson opacity below approximately 120 keV. For power-law distributions of absorption depths along the lines of sight the absorbed spectrum can indeed mimic the typial GRB spectrum. This model predicts that (a) the spectrum should evolve monotonically from hard to soft during each energy release, which is observed in most bursts, especially in fast rise exponential decay bursts; (b) Fe spectral features near 7 keV may be present in some bursts; and (c) the ratio of burst distances to the CBM and to Earth should be approximately 10(exp -11) if the spectral evolution is purely due to Fe stripping by the photons.

  1. Effect of increasing concentrations of zinc on the absorption of iron from iron-fortified milk.

    PubMed

    Olivares, Manuel; Wiedeman, Alejandra; Bolívar, Lorena; López de Romaña, Daniel; Pizarro, Fernando

    2012-12-01

    The cofortification of milk with iron (Fe) and zinc (Zn) is a strategy used to prevent these deficiencies during childhood. Given that Zn can negatively interact with iron in aqueous solutions, the objective of the present study was to determine the effect of Zn on Fe absorption of milk fortified with Fe and Zn. Twenty-eight women between 33 and 47 years of age, with contraception and a negative pregnancy test, participated in one of two absorption studies. They received on four different days, after an overnight fast, 200 mL of milk (26 % fat) fortified with 10 mg Fe/L, as (A) ferrous sulfate, or the same milk but with graded doses of added Zn, as Zn sulfate of (B) 5, (C) 10, and (D) 20 mg/L (study 1, n = 15). In study 2 (n = 13), subjects received the same milk formulations, but these were also fortified with ascorbic acid (70 mg/L). Milk was labeled with radioisotopes ⁵⁹Fe or ⁵⁵Fe, and the absorption of iron was measured by erythrocyte incorporation of radioactive Fe. The geometric mean and range of ±1 SD of Fe absorption in study 1 were as follows: formula A = 6.0 % (2.8-13.0 %); B = 6.7 % (3.3-13.6 %); C = 5.4 % (2.2-13.2 %); and D = 5.2 % (2.8-10.0 %) (ANOVA for repeated measures, not significant). For study 2, data are as follows: 8.2 % (3.6-18.7 %); B = 6.4 % (2.5-16.4 %); C = 7.7 % (3.2-18.9 %); and D = 5.2 (1.8-14.8 %) (ANOVA for repeated measures, not significant). In conclusion, according to the results from this study, it appears that the addition of zinc up to 20 mg/L does not significantly inhibit iron absorption from milk fortified with 10 mg/L of iron. PMID:22760642

  2. Production of stable-isotope-labeled bovine heme and its use to measure heme-iron absorption in children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    BACKGROUND: The use of stable isotopes has provided valuable insights into iron absorption in humans, but the data have been limited to nonheme iron. OBJECTIVE: Our objectives were to produce heme iron enriched in (58)Fe and to use it to study the absorption of heme iron and the effect of iron and ...

  3. Iron supplementation does not affect copper and zinc absorption in breastfed infants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Iron supplements are commonly recommended for infants but were suggested to inhibit zinc and copper absorption. The objective of this study was to investigate potential effects of iron supplementation, infant age, and mineral status on zinc and copper absorption in infants at 6 and 9 mo of age. Twen...

  4. Iron absorption in raw and cooked bananas: a field study using stable isotopes in women

    PubMed Central

    García, Olga P.; Martínez, Mara; Romano, Diana; Camacho, Mariela; de Moura, Fabiana F.; Abrams, Steve A.; Khanna, Harjeet K.; Dale, James L.; Rosado, Jorge L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Banana is a staple food in many regions with high iron deficiency and may be a potential vehicle for iron fortification. However, iron absorption from bananas is not known. Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate total iron absorption from raw and cooked bananas. Design Thirty women (34.9±6.6 years) from rural Mexico were randomly assigned to one of two groups each consuming: 1) 480 g/day of raw banana for 6 days, or 2) 500 g/day of cooked banana for 4 days. Iron absorption was measured after extrinsically labeling with 2 mg of 58Fe and a reference dose of 6 mg 57Fe; analysis was done using ICP-MS. Results Iron content in cooked bananas was significantly higher than raw bananas (0.53 mg/100 g bananas vs. 0.33 mg/100 mg bananas, respectively) (p<0.001). Percent iron absorption was significantly higher in raw bananas (49.3±21.3%) compared with cooked banana (33.9±16.2%) (p=0.035). Total amount of iron absorbed from raw and cooked bananas was similar (0.77±0.33 mg vs. 0.86±0.41 mg, respectively). Conclusion Total amount of absorbed iron is similar between cooked and raw bananas. The banana matrix does not affect iron absorption and is therefore a potential effective target for genetic modification for iron biofortification. PMID:25660254

  5. Conditions and drugs interfering with thyroxine absorption.

    PubMed

    Liwanpo, Llanyee; Hershman, Jerome M

    2009-12-01

    Food, dietary fibre and espresso coffee interfere with the absorption of levothyroxine. Malabsorptive disorders reported to affect the absorption of levothyroxine include coeliac disease, inflammatory bowel disease, lactose intolerance as well as Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and atrophic gastritis. Many commonly used drugs, such as bile acid sequestrants, ferrous sulphate, sucralfate, calcium carbonate, aluminium-containing antacids, phosphate binders, raloxifene and proton-pump inhibitors, have also been shown to interfere with the absorption of levothyroxine. PMID:19942153

  6. Dietary inulin supplementation does not promote colonic iron absorption in a porcine model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prebiotics may enhance iron bioavailability by increasing iron absorption in the colon. Anemic pigs fitted with cecal cannulas were fed a low-iron diet with or without 4% inulin. Over 7 days, pigs were administered 1 mg 54 Fe in the morning feed followed by cannula infusion of 0.5 mg 58 Fe to measu...

  7. Quercetin inhibits intestinal iron absorption and ferroportin transporter expression in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lesjak, Marija; Hoque, Rukshana; Balesaria, Sara; Skinner, Vernon; Debnam, Edward S; Srai, Surjit K S; Sharp, Paul A

    2014-01-01

    Balancing systemic iron levels within narrow limits is critical for maintaining human health. There are no known pathways to eliminate excess iron from the body and therefore iron homeostasis is maintained by modifying dietary absorption so that it matches daily obligatory losses. Several dietary factors can modify iron absorption. Polyphenols are plentiful in human diet and many compounds, including quercetin--the most abundant dietary polyphenol--are potent iron chelators. The aim of this study was to investigate the acute and longer-term effects of quercetin on intestinal iron metabolism. Acute exposure of rat duodenal mucosa to quercetin increased apical iron uptake but decreased subsequent basolateral iron efflux into the circulation. Quercetin binds iron between its 3-hydroxyl and 4-carbonyl groups and methylation of the 3-hydroxyl group negated both the increase in apical uptake and the inhibition of basolateral iron release, suggesting that the acute effects of quercetin on iron transport were due to iron chelation. In longer-term studies, rats were administered quercetin by a single gavage and iron transporter expression measured 18 h later. Duodenal FPN expression was decreased in quercetin-treated rats. This effect was recapitulated in Caco-2 cells exposed to quercetin for 18 h. Reporter assays in Caco-2 cells indicated that repression of FPN by quercetin was not a transcriptional event but might be mediated by miRNA interaction with the FPN 3'UTR. Our study highlights a novel mechanism for the regulation of iron bioavailability by dietary polyphenols. Potentially, diets rich in polyphenols might be beneficial for patients groups at risk of iron loading by limiting the rate of intestinal iron absorption. PMID:25058155

  8. Effect of tannic acid on iron absorption in straw-colored fruit bats(Eidolon helvum)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Excessive absorption and subsequent storage of dietary iron has been found in a variety of captively held birds and mammals, including fruit bats. It is thought that feeding a diet that is low in iron can prevent the onset of this disease; however, manufacturing a diet with commonly available foodst...

  9. Equilibrium iron isotope fractionation at core-mantle boundary conditions.

    PubMed

    Polyakov, Veniamin B

    2009-02-13

    The equilibrium iron isotope fractionation between lower mantle minerals and metallic iron at core-mantle boundary conditions can be evaluated from the high-pressure 57Fe partial vibrational density of states determined by synchrotron inelastic nuclear resonant x-ray scattering spectroscopy using a diamond anvil. Ferropericlase [(Mg,Fe)O] and (Fe,Mg)SiO3- post-perovskite are enriched in heavy iron isotopes relative to metallic iron at ultrahigh pressures, as opposed to the equilibrium iron isotope fractionation between these compounds at low pressure. The enrichment of Earth and Moon basalts in heavy iron isotopes relative to those from Mars and asteroid Vesta can be explained by the equilibrium iron isotope fractionation during the segregation of Earth's core and the assumption that Earth was already differentiated before the Moon-forming "giant impact." PMID:19213913

  10. Attractive microwave absorption and the impedance match effect in zinc oxide and carbonyl iron composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Zhi; Zhang, Yi; Cao, ChenTao; Yuan, Jing; Liu, QingFang; Wang, JianBo

    2011-12-01

    The flower-like ZnO and ZnO/carbonyl-iron composite have been prepared by a sonochemical route and ball-milling process, respectively. For ZnO/carbonyl-iron composite, a reflection loss ( RL) exceeding -20 dB was obtained in a broad frequency range of 8.4-17.9 GHz with a thin thickness of 1.2-2.3 mm. An optimal RL of -61 dB was found at 11.7 GHz for an absorber thickness of 1.91 mm. It is demonstrated that the attractive microwave-absorption properties are a consequence of a proper electro-magnetic impedance match and geometrical cancellation at the air-material interface. In addition, an impedance mismatch function was proposed, which provides an effective method to determine the microwave absorbing properties from the intrinsic materials constants. The calculated value of matching frequency and thickness is well consistent with the experimental data. The method also provides a simple theoretical graphic aid for determining the absorption characteristics and the location of the matching conditions in the frequency domain.

  11. Oral exposure to polystyrene nanoparticles effects iron absorption

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of engineered nanoparticles in food and pharmaceuticals is expected to increase, but the impact of chronic oral exposure to nanoparticles on human health remains unknown. Here, we show that chronic and acute oral exposure to polystyrene nanoparticles can influence iron uptake and iron trans...

  12. Total Iron Absorption by Young Women from Iron-Biofortified Pearl Millet Composite Meals Is Double That from Regular Millet Meals but Less Than That from Post-Harvest Iron-Fortified Millet Meals123

    PubMed Central

    Cercamondi, Colin I.; Egli, Ines M.; Mitchikpe, Evariste; Tossou, Felicien; Zeder, Christophe; Hounhouigan, Joseph D.; Hurrell, Richard F.

    2013-01-01

    Iron biofortification of pearl millet (Pennisetum glaucum) is a promising approach to combat iron deficiency (ID) in the millet-consuming communities of developing countries. To evaluate the potential of iron-biofortified millet to provide additional bioavailable iron compared with regular millet and post-harvest iron-fortified millet, an iron absorption study was conducted in 20 Beninese women with marginal iron status. Composite test meals consisting of millet paste based on regular-iron, iron-biofortified, or post-harvest iron-fortified pearl millet flour accompanied by a leafy vegetable sauce or an okra sauce were fed as multiple meals for 5 d. Iron absorption was measured as erythrocyte incorporation of stable iron isotopes. Fractional iron absorption from test meals based on regular-iron millet (7.5%) did not differ from iron-biofortified millet meals (7.5%; P = 1.0), resulting in a higher quantity of total iron absorbed from the meals based on iron-biofortified millet (1125 vs. 527 μg; P < 0.0001). Fractional iron absorption from post-harvest iron-fortified millet meals (10.4%) was higher than from regular-iron and iron-biofortified millet meals (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01, respectively), resulting in a higher quantity of total iron absorbed from the post-harvest iron-fortified millet meals (1500 μg; P < 0.0001 and P < 0.05, respectively). Results indicate that consumption of iron-biofortified millet would double the amount of iron absorbed and, although fractional absorption of iron from biofortification is less than that from fortification, iron-biofortified millet should be highly effective in combatting ID in millet-consuming populations. PMID:23884388

  13. Serum hepcidin is significantly associated with iron absorption from food and supplemental sources in healthy young woman

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hepcidin is a key regulator of iron homeostasis, but to date no studies have examined the effect of hepcidin on iron absorption in humans. Our objective was to assess relations between both serum hepcidin and serum prohepcidin with nonheme-iron absorption in the presence and absence of food with the...

  14. A carbonyl iron/carbon fiber material for electromagnetic wave absorption.

    PubMed

    Youh, Meng-Jey; Wu, Hung-Chih; Lin, Wang-Hua; Chiu, Sheng-Cheng; Huang, Chien-Fa; Yu, Hsin-Chih; Hsu, Jen-Sung; Li, Yuan-Yao

    2011-03-01

    A carbonyl iron/carbon fiber material consisting of carbon fibers grown on micrometer-sized carbonyl iron sphere, was synthesized by chemical vapor deposition using a mixture of C2H2 and H2. The hollow-core carbon fibers (outer diameter: 140 nm and inner diameter: 40 nm) were composed of well-ordered graphene layers which were almost parallel to the long axis of the fibers. A composite (2 mm thick) consisting of the carbonyl iron/carbon fibers and epoxy resin demonstrated excellent electromagnetic (EM) wave absorption. Minimum reflection losses of -36 dB (99.95% of EM wave absorption) at 7.6 GHz and -32 dB (99.92% of EM wave absorption) at 34.1 GHz were achieved. The well-dispersed and network-like carbon fibers in the resin matrix affected the dielectric loss of the EM wave while the carbonyl iron affected the magnetic loss. PMID:21449387

  15. The influence of high iron diet on rat lung manganese absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Khristy; Molina, Ramon; Donaghey, Thomas; Brain, Joseph D.; Wessling-Resnick, Marianne . E-mail: wessling@hsph.harvard.edu

    2006-01-15

    Individuals chronically exposed to manganese are at high risk for neurotoxic effects of this metal. A primary route of exposure is through respiration, although little is known about pulmonary uptake of metals or factors that modify this process. High dietary iron levels inversely affect intestinal uptake of manganese, and a major goal of this study was to determine if dietary iron loading could increase lung non-heme iron levels and alter manganese absorption. Rats were fed a high iron (1% carbonyl iron) or control diet for 4 weeks. Lung non-heme iron levels increased {approx}2-fold in rats fed the high iron diet. To determine if iron-loading affected manganese uptake, {sup 54}Mn was administered by intratracheal (it) instillation or intravenous (iv) injection for pharmacokinetic studies. {sup 54}Mn absorption from the lungs to the blood was lower in it-instilled rats fed the 1% carbonyl iron diet. Pharmacokinetics of iv-injected {sup 54}Mn revealed that the isotope was cleared more rapidly from the blood of iron-loaded rats. In situ analysis of divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT1) expression in lung detected mRNA in airway epithelium and bronchus-associated lymphatic tissue (BALT). Staining of the latter was significantly reduced in rats fed the high iron diet. In situ analysis of transferrin receptor (TfR) mRNA showed staining in BALT alone. These data demonstrate that manganese absorption from the lungs to the blood can be modified by iron status and the route of administration.

  16. Effect of phosphate binders on supplemental iron absorption in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Pruchnicki, Maria C; Coyle, James D; Hoshaw-Woodard, Stacy; Bay, William H

    2002-10-01

    A single-dose, prospective, randomized, four-treatment, four-period crossover study was conducted to determine the acute effect of therapeutically equivalent doses of three commonly used phosphate binders on oral iron absorption. Twenty-three healthy subjects received 65 mg of elemental iron alone and with each phosphate binder (calcium carbonate 3000 mg, calcium acetate 2668 mg, or sevelamer HCl 2821 mg). Area under the change in plasma iron concentration-time curve over 6 hours postdosing was measured. ANOVA was used to assess the statistical significance of differences in iron absorption among the treatments. The relative bioavailability of iron administered with each phosphate binder compared to iron administered alone was estimated. The relative iron bioavailabilities (95% confidence intervals) for the calcium carbonate, calcium acetate, and sevelamer HCI treatments were 0.81 (0.70, 0.94), 0.73 (0.63, 0.85), and 0.90 (0.78, 1.05), respectively. Thus, single doses of both calcium-based phosphate binders significantly reduced single-dose iron absorption, while sevelamer HCl did not. PMID:12362933

  17. Effect of dietary pectin on iron absorption and turnover in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Baig, M.M.; Burgin, C.W.; Cerda, J.J.

    1983-12-01

    The influence of dietary pectin on iron absorption and retention was studied in rats. Basal diet with low and normal iron levels were fed with and without addition of 2% citrus pectin. After 40 days rats were fasted for 24 hours and were given /sup 59/Fe in dilute HCl with or without 2% pectin by gavage. Whole-body counting techniques were employed to monitor /sup 59/Fe absorption and turnover. Rats maintained on low iron diet absorbed and retained a much higher proportion of /sup 59/Fe than rats maintained on normal level of iron. Dietary pectin at the level fed in this study had no influence on iron uptake and/or turnover in rats.

  18. X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies of mononuclear non-heme iron enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Westre, T.E.

    1996-01-01

    Fe-K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been used to investigate the electronic and geometric structure of the iron active site in non-heme iron enzymes. A new theoretical extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis approach, called GNXAS, has been tested on data for iron model complexes to evaluate the utility and reliability of this new technique, especially with respect to the effects of multiple-scattering. In addition, a detailed analysis of the 1s{yields}3d pre-edge feature has been developed as a tool for investigating the oxidation state, spin state, and geometry of iron sites. Edge and EXAFS analyses have then been applied to the study of non-heme iron enzyme active sites.

  19. Alpha-lactalbumin and casein-glycomacropeptide do not affect iron absorption from formula in healthy term infants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Iron absorption from infant formula is relatively low. Alpha-lactalbumin and casein-glycomacropeptide have been suggested to enhance mineral absorption. We therefore assessed the effect of alpha-lactalbumin and casein-glycomacropeptide on iron absorption from infant formula in healthy term infants. ...

  20. Removal of iron interferences by solvent extraction for geochemical analysis by atomic-absorption spectrophotometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhou, L.; Chao, T.T.; Sanzolone, R.F.

    1985-01-01

    Iron is a common interferent in the determination of many elements in geochemical samples. Two approaches for its removal have been taken. The first involves removal of iron by extraction with methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) from hydrochloric acid medium, leaving the analytes in the aqueous phase. The second consists of reduction of iron(III) to iron(II) by ascorbic acid to minimize its extraction into MIBK, so that the analytes may be isolated by extraction. Elements of interest can then be determined using the aqueous solution or the organic extract, as appropriate. Operating factors such as the concentration of hydrochloric acid, amounts of iron present, number of extractions, the presence or absence of a salting-out agent, and the optimum ratio of ascorbic acid to iron have been determined. These factors have general applications in geochemical analysis by atomic-absorption spectrophotometry. ?? 1985.

  1. Zinc Absorption from Micronutrient Powder Is Low but Is not Affected by Iron in Kenyan Infants

    PubMed Central

    Esamai, Fabian; Liechty, Edward; Ikemeri, Justus; Westcott, Jamie; Kemp, Jennifer; Culbertson, Diana; Miller, Leland V.; Hambidge, K. Michael; Krebs, Nancy F.

    2014-01-01

    Interference with zinc absorption is a proposed explanation for adverse effects of supplemental iron in iron-replete children in malaria endemic settings. We examined the effects of iron in micronutrient powder (MNP) on zinc absorption after three months of home fortification with MNP in maize-based diets in rural Kenyan infants. In a double blind design, six-month-old, non-anemic infants were randomized to MNP containing 5 mg zinc, with or without 12.5 mg of iron (MNP + Fe and MNP − Fe, respectively); a control (C) group received placebo powder. After three months, duplicate diet collections and zinc stable isotopes were used to measure intake from MNP + non-breast milk foods and fractional absorption of zinc (FAZ) by dual isotope ratio method; total absorbed zinc (TAZ, mg/day) was calculated from intake × FAZ. Mean (SEM) TAZ was not different between MNP + Fe (n = 10) and MNP − Fe (n = 9) groups: 0.85 (0.22) and 0.72 (0.19), respectively, but both were higher than C (n = 9): 0.24 (0.03) (p = 0.04). Iron in MNP did not significantly alter zinc absorption, but despite intakes over double estimated dietary requirement, both MNP groups’ mean TAZ barely approximated the physiologic requirement for age. Impaired zinc absorption may dictate need for higher zinc doses in vulnerable populations. PMID:25493942

  2. Zinc absorption from micronutrient powder is low but is not affected by iron in Kenyan infants.

    PubMed

    Esamai, Fabian; Liechty, Edward; Ikemeri, Justus; Westcott, Jamie; Kemp, Jennifer; Culbertson, Diana; Miller, Leland V; Hambidge, K Michael; Krebs, Nancy F

    2014-12-01

    Interference with zinc absorption is a proposed explanation for adverse effects of supplemental iron in iron-replete children in malaria endemic settings. We examined the effects of iron in micronutrient powder (MNP) on zinc absorption after three months of home fortification with MNP in maize-based diets in rural Kenyan infants. In a double blind design, six-month-old, non-anemic infants were randomized to MNP containing 5 mg zinc, with or without 12.5 mg of iron (MNP + Fe and MNP − Fe, respectively); a control (C) group received placebo powder. After three months, duplicate diet collections and zinc stable isotopes were used to measure intake from MNP + non-breast milk foods and fractional absorption of zinc (FAZ) by dual isotope ratio method; total absorbed zinc (TAZ, mg/day) was calculated from intake × FAZ. Mean (SEM) TAZ was not different between MNP + Fe (n = 10) and MNP - Fe (n = 9) groups: 0.85 (0.22) and 0.72 (0.19), respectively, but both were higher than C (n = 9): 0.24 (0.03) (p = 0.04). Iron in MNP did not significantly alter zinc absorption, but despite intakes over double estimated dietary requirement, both MNP groups' mean TAZ barely approximated the physiologic requirement for age. Impaired zinc absorption may dictate need for higher zinc doses in vulnerable populations. PMID:25493942

  3. Alginate Inhibits Iron Absorption from Ferrous Gluconate in a Randomized Controlled Trial and Reduces Iron Uptake into Caco-2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wawer, Anna A.; Harvey, Linda J.; Dainty, Jack R.; Perez-Moral, Natalia; Sharp, Paul; Fairweather-Tait, Susan J.

    2014-01-01

    Previous in vitro results indicated that alginate beads might be a useful vehicle for food iron fortification. A human study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that alginate enhances iron absorption. A randomised, single blinded, cross-over trial was carried out in which iron absorption was measured from serum iron appearance after a test meal. Overnight-fasted volunteers (n = 15) were given a test meal of 200 g cola-flavoured jelly plus 21 mg iron as ferrous gluconate, either in alginate beads mixed into the jelly or in a capsule. Iron absorption was lower from the alginate beads than from ferrous gluconate (8.5% and 12.6% respectively, p = 0.003). Sub-group B (n = 9) consumed the test meals together with 600 mg calcium to determine whether alginate modified the inhibitory effect of calcium. Calcium reduced iron absorption from ferrous gluconate by 51%, from 11.5% to 5.6% (p = 0.014), and from alginate beads by 37%, from 8.3% to 5.2% (p = 0.009). In vitro studies using Caco-2 cells were designed to explore the reasons for the difference between the previous in vitro findings and the human study; confirmed the inhibitory effect of alginate. Beads similar to those used in the human study were subjected to simulated gastrointestinal digestion, with and without cola jelly, and the digestate applied to Caco-2 cells. Both alginate and cola jelly significantly reduced iron uptake into the cells, by 34% (p = 0.009) and 35% (p = 0.003) respectively. The combination of cola jelly and calcium produced a very low ferritin response, 16.5% (p<0.001) of that observed with ferrous gluconate alone. The results of these studies demonstrate that alginate beads are not a useful delivery system for soluble salts of iron for the purpose of food fortification. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01528644 PMID:25391138

  4. Iron absorption in humans: bovine serum albumin compared with beef muscle and egg white

    SciTech Connect

    Hurrell, R.F.; Lynch, S.R.; Trinidad, T.P.; Dassenko, S.A.; Cook, J.D.

    1988-01-01

    We studied the influence of bovine serum albumin and beef meat on nonheme iron absorption in humans and on dialyzable iron in vitro. The addition of serum albumin to a maize gruel had no significant effect on nonheme Fe absorption whereas the addition of beef meat caused a threefold increase. When added to a bread meal, serum albumin caused a modest 60% increase in nonheme Fe absorption and beef meat had no effect. When added to a protein-free meal, serum albumin reduced Fe absorption by 47% compared with a 72% reduction on addition of egg white. The bioavailability of nonheme Fe from meals containing serum albumin was consistently overestimated by the in vitro technique. We conclude that the facilitation of nonheme Fe absorption by meat is not a general property of all animal protein but is better explained by the action of one or more specific animal tissues.

  5. Dissimilatory Iron Reduction by Microorganisms Under Hot Deep Subsurface Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruper, S.; Sharma, A.; Scott, J. H.

    2010-04-01

    In subsurface environments the availability of terminal electron acceptors will be the major biogeochemical constraint, before temperature or pressure begin plays a role. Data is presented to show the impact of deep hot subsurface conditions on dissimilatory iron reduction.

  6. Selective microwave absorption of iron-rich carbon nanotube composites.

    PubMed

    Gui, Xuchun; Wang, Kunlin; Cao, Anyuan; Wei, Jinquan; Lv, Ruitao; Kang, Feiyu; Shu, Qinke; Jia, Yi; Wu, Dehai

    2010-03-01

    We report on high selectivity of microwave absorption by controlling the concentration of carbon nanotubes in polymer composites and matching the dielectric loss and magnetic loss through encapsulation of crystalline Fe nanorods inside nanotubes. The reflection loss reached more than 10 dB (> 90% absorption) by loading nanotubes at concentrations of 1 wt% to 10 wt% into the composites, and the frequencies corresponding to the maximum loss can be tailored throughout the range of 2 to 18 GHz by changing the concentration. A maximum absorption capability (75 dB x GHz) was observed at a CNT loading of about 4.5 wt%. The crystalline structure of encapsulated Fe nanorods can be modified to enhance the reflection loss. Control of absorption selectivity by modifying the structure and concentration of nanoscale fillers could facilitate potential higher-frequency applications (e.g., radar absorbing) of nanocomposites. PMID:20355578

  7. Synergistic intracellular iron chelation combinations: mechanisms and conditions for optimizing iron mobilization.

    PubMed

    Vlachodimitropoulou Koumoutsea, Evangelia; Garbowski, Maciej; Porter, John

    2015-09-01

    Iron chelators are increasingly combined clinically but the optimal conditions for cellular iron mobilization and mechanisms of interaction are unclear. Speciation plots for iron(III) binding of paired combinations of the licensed iron chelators desferrioxamine (DFO), deferiprone (DFP) and deferasirox (DFX) suggest conditions under which chelators can combine as 'shuttle' and 'sink' molecules but this approach does not consider their relative access and interaction with cellular iron pools. To address this issue, a sensitive ferrozine-based detection system for intracellular iron removal from the human hepatocyte cell line (HuH-7) was developed. Antagonism, synergism or additivity with paired chelator combinations was distinguished using mathematical isobologram analysis over clinically relevant chelator concentrations. All combinations showed synergistic iron mobilization at 8 h with clinically achievable concentrations of sink and shuttle chelators. Greatest synergism was achieved by combining DFP with DFX, where about 60% of mobilized iron was attributable to synergistic interaction. These findings predict that the DFX dose required for a half-maximum effect can be reduced by 3·8-fold when only 1 μmol/l DFP is added. Mechanisms for the synergy are suggested by consideration of the iron-chelate speciation plots together with the size, charge and lipid solubilities for each chelator. Hydroxypyridinones with low lipid solubilities but otherwise similar properties to DFP were used to interrogate the mechanistic interactions of chelator pairs. These studies confirm that synergistic cellular iron mobilization requires one chelator to have the physicochemical properties to enter cells, chelate intracellular iron and subsequently donate iron to a second 'sink' chelator. PMID:26033030

  8. Citric acid mediates the iron absorption from low molecular weight human milk fractions.

    PubMed

    Palika, Ravindranadh; Mashurabad, Purna Chandra; Kilari, Sreenivasulu; Kasula, Sunanda; Nair, Krishnapillai Madhavan; Raghu, Pullakhandam

    2013-11-20

    Previously, we have demonstrated increased iron absorption from low molecular weight (LMW) human milk whey fractions. In the present study, we investigated the effect of heat denaturation, zinc (a competitor of iron), duodenal cytochrome b (DcytB) antibody neutralization and citrate lyase treatment on LMW human milk fraction (>5 kDa referred as 5kF) induced ferric iron reduction, solubilization, and uptake in Caco-2 cells. Heat denaturation and zinc inhibited the 5kF fraction induced ferric iron reduction. In contrast, zinc but not heat denaturation abrogated the ferric iron solubilization activity. Despite inhibition of ferric iron reduction, iron uptake in Caco-2 cells was similar from both native and heat denatured 5kF fractions. However, iron uptake was higher from native compared to heat denatured 5kF fractions in the cells preincubated with the DcytB antibody. Citrate lyase treatment inhibited the ferric iron reduction, solubilization, and uptake in Caco-2 cells. These findings demonstrate that citric acid present in human milk solubilizes the ferric iron which could be reduced by other heat labile components leading to increased uptake in intestinal cells. PMID:24160751

  9. Detection, identification and mapping of iron anomalies in brain tissue using X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhaylova, A.; Davidson, M.; Toastmann, H.; Channell, J.E.T.; Guyodo, Y.; Batich, C.; Dobson, J.

    2008-06-16

    This work describes a novel method for the detection, identification and mapping of anomalous iron compounds in mammalian brain tissue using X-ray absorption spectroscopy. We have located and identified individual iron anomalies in an avian tissue model associated with ferritin, biogenic magnetite and haemoglobin with a pixel resolution of less than 5 {micro}m. This technique represents a breakthrough in the study of both intra- and extra-cellular iron compounds in brain tissue. The potential for high-resolution iron mapping using microfocused X-ray beams has direct application to investigations of the location and structural form of iron compounds associated with human neurodegenerative disorders - a problem which has vexed researchers for 50 years.

  10. Detection, identification and mapping of iron anomalies in brain tissue using X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Mikhaylova, A; Davidson, M; Toastmann, H; Channell, J.E.T; Guyodo, Y; Batich, C; Dobson, J

    2005-01-01

    This work describes a novel method for the detection, identification and mapping of anomalous iron compounds in mammalian brain tissue using X-ray absorption spectroscopy. We have located and identified individual iron anomalies in an avian tissue model associated with ferritin, biogenic magnetite and haemoglobin with a pixel resolution of less than 5 μm. This technique represents a breakthrough in the study of both intra- and extra-cellular iron compounds in brain tissue. The potential for high-resolution iron mapping using microfocused X-ray beams has direct application to investigations of the location and structural form of iron compounds associated with human neurodegenerative disorders—a problem which has vexed researchers for 50 years. PMID:16849161

  11. Probing iron at Super-Earth core conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Amadou, N.; Brambrink, E.; Vinci, T.; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.; Huser, G.; Brygoo, S.; Morard, G.; Guyot, F.; Resseguier, T. de; Mazevet, S.; Miyanishi, K.; Ozaki, N.; Kodama, R.; Henry, O.; Raffestin, D.; Boehly, T.; and others

    2015-02-15

    In this paper, we report on the quasi-isentropic compression of an iron sample using ramp shaped laser irradiation. This technique allows us to quasi-isentropically compress iron up to 700 GPa and 8500 K. To our knowledge, these data are the highest pressures reached on iron in off-Hugoniot conditions and the closest to the thermodynamic states thought to exist in Earth-like planetary cores. The experiment was performed on the Ligne d'Intégration laser facility at CESTA, Bordeaux, France.

  12. Proposing a Caco-2/HepG2 cell model for in vitro iron absorption studies.

    PubMed

    Scheers, Nathalie M; Almgren, Annette B; Sandberg, Ann-Sofie

    2014-07-01

    The Caco-2 cell line is well established as an in vitro model for iron absorption. However, the model does not reflect the regulation of iron absorption by hepcidin produced in the liver. We aimed to develop the Caco-2 model by introducing human liver cells (HepG2) to Caco-2 cells. The Caco-2 and HepG2 epithelia were separated by a liquid compartment, which allowed for epithelial interaction. Ferritin levels in cocultured Caco-2 controls were 21.7±10.3 ng/mg protein compared to 7.7±5.8 ng/mg protein in monocultured Caco-2 cells. The iron transport across Caco-2 layers was increased when liver cells were present (8.1%±1.5% compared to 3.5%±2.5% at 120 μM Fe). Caco-2 cells were exposed to 0, 80 and 120 μM Fe and responded with increased hepcidin production at 120 μM Fe (3.6±0.3 ng/ml compared to 2.7±0.3 ng/ml). The expression of iron exporter ferroportin in Caco-2 cells was decreased at the hepcidin concentration of 3.6 ng/ml and undetectable at external addition of hepcidin (10 ng/ml). The apical transporter DMT1 was also undetectable at 10 ng/ml but was unchanged at the lower concentrations. In addition, we observed that sourdough bread, in comparison to heat-treated bread, increased the bioavailability of iron despite similar iron content (53% increase in ferritin formation, 97% increase in hepcidin release). This effect was not observed in monocultured Caco-2 cells. The Caco-2/HepG2 model provides an alternative approach to in vitro iron absorption studies in which the hepatic regulation of iron transport must be considered. PMID:24746839

  13. Paenibacillus polymyxa BFKC01 enhances plant iron absorption via improved root systems and activated iron acquisition mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Cheng; Guo, Jiansheng; Zhu, Lin; Xiao, Xin; Xie, Yue; Zhu, Jian; Ma, Zhongyou; Wang, Jianfei

    2016-08-01

    Despite the high abundance of iron (Fe) in most earth's soils, Fe is the major limiting factor for plant growth and development due to its low bioavailability. With an increasing recognition that soil microbes play important roles in plant growth, several strains of beneficial rhizobactria have been applied to improve plant nutrient absorption, biomass, and abiotic or biotic stress tolerance. In this study, we report the mechanisms of microbe-induced plant Fe assimilation, in which the plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) Paenibacillus polymyxa BFKC01 stimulates plant's Fe acquisition machinery to enhance Fe uptake in Arabidopsis plants. Mechanistic studies show that BFKC01 transcriptionally activates the Fe-deficiency-induced transcription factor 1 (FIT1), thereby up-regulating the expression of IRT1 and FRO2. Furthermore, BFKC01 has been found to induce plant systemic responses with the increased transcription of MYB72, and the biosynthetic pathways of phenolic compounds are also activated. Our data reveal that abundant phenolic compounds are detected in root exudation of the BFKC01-inoculated plants, which efficiently facilitate Fe mobility under alkaline conditions. In addition, BFKC01 can secret auxin and further improved root systems, which enhances the ability of plants to acquire Fe from soils. As a result, BFKC01-inoculated plants have more endogenous Fe and increased photosynthetic capacity under alkaline conditions as compared to control plants. Our results demonstrate the potential roles of BFKC01 in promoting Fe acquisition in plants and underline the intricate integration of microbial signaling in controlling plant Fe acquisition. PMID:27105423

  14. Modeling of the Temperature Effect on Oxygen Absorption by Iron-Based Oxygen Scavengers.

    PubMed

    Polyakov, Vladimir A; Miltz, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    A new engineering-oriented model for prediction of the effect of temperature on the kinetics of oxygen absorption by iron-based oxygen scavengers (IOSs) was developed. The model is based on the physicochemical mechanism of the O2 scavenging process by the active component of the IOS (iron powder). The conclusions of this study are: (1) the iron deposits formed on the iron particles are composed of 2 different layers: an inner layer of Fe3 O4 and an outer layer of FeOOH that vanishes with the depletion of oxygen. (2) The model considers the chemical processes in the heterogeneous closed system "Fe-H2 O-NaCl-O2 " and describes the kinetics of oxygen absorption by the powder, depending on the characteristics of the system. (3) The nonlinear ordinary differential equation (ODE) of the O2 absorption kinetics was derived and a simple approximate solution to this ODE was obtained theoretically that is similar to the empirical exponential formula published in the relevant literature. (4) The temperature dependence of the oxygen absorption rate is more complicated than that described by the Arrhenius equation. PMID:26650762

  15. Absorption of zinc and iron by rats fed meals containing sorghum food products

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, S.M.A.; Johnson, P.E.; Hamaker, B.; Kirleis, A.

    1986-03-05

    Zinc and iron absorption from freeze-dried traditionally-prepared sorghum food products was studied in rats. After a period of marginal zinc or iron depletion, rats were fed test meals containing 1 of 4 sorghum foods cooked maize gruel or an inorganic mineral each of which was extrinsically labeled with either /sup 65/Zn or /sup 59/Fe before being added to the diets. Absorption was determined by whole body percent retention of the initial radioisotope dose over a period of 19 days. Iron was highly available from all products tested (75-83%) with no significant differences in absorption among groups (p>0.05). Zinc from fermented Aceta (97%) was more available than that from the other sorghum products (69-78%) or maize gruel (76%). Zinc from acid To (78%) and Aceta (97%) was as available as that from zinc oxide in the control diet (93%) (p>0.05). There were no significant differences in zinc absorption among groups fed Acid To (78%), neutral To (76), alkali To (69%) or maize gruel (76%) (p<0.05). Phytate in the fermented Aceta was 33% lower than in the other sorghum foods. Iron and zinc were highly available from all sorghum foods. Reduction phytate by fermentation increased Zn availability.

  16. Multiband microwave absorption films based on defective multiwalled carbon nanotubes added carbonyl iron/acrylic resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yong; Chen, Changxin; Pan, Xiaoyan; Ni, Yuwei; Zhang, Song; Huang, Jie; Chen, Da; Zhang, Yafei

    2009-05-01

    Defective multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were introduced to the carbonyl iron (CI) based composites to improve its microwave absorption by a simple ultrasonic mixing process. The electromagnetic parameters were measured in the 2-18 GHz range. Microwave absorption of CI based composites with 2 mm in thickness was evidently enhanced by adding as little as 1.0 wt% defective MWCNTs with two well separated absorption peaks exceeding -20 dB, as compared with that of pure CI based and defective MWCNTs composites. The enhancement mechanism is thought due to the interaction and better electromagnetic match between defective MWCNTs and ferromagnetic CI particles.

  17. The Effect of Plant Proteins Derived from Cereals and Legumes on Heme Iron Absorption

    PubMed Central

    Weinborn, Valerie; Pizarro, Fernando; Olivares, Manuel; Brito, Alex; Arredondo, Miguel; Flores, Sebastián; Valenzuela, Carolina

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the effect of proteins from cereals and legumes on heme iron (Fe) absorption. The absorption of heme Fe without its native globin was measured. Thirty adult females participated in two experimental studies (15 per study). Study I focused on the effects of cereal proteins (zein, gliadin and glutelin) and study II on the effects of legume proteins (soy, pea and lentil) on heme Fe absorption. When heme was given alone (as a control), study I and II yielded 6.2% and 11.0% heme absorption (p > 0.05). In study I, heme Fe absorption was 7.2%, 7.5% and 5.9% when zein, gliadin and glutelin were added, respectively. From this, it was concluded that cereal proteins did not affect heme Fe absorption. In study II, heme Fe absorption was 7.3%, 8.1% and 9.1% with the addition of soy, pea and lentil proteins, respectively. Only soy proteins decreased heme Fe absorption (p < 0.05). These results suggest that with the exception of soy proteins, which decreased absorption, proteins derived from cereals and legumes do not affect heme Fe absorption. PMID:26529009

  18. The Effect of Plant Proteins Derived from Cereals and Legumes on Heme Iron Absorption.

    PubMed

    Weinborn, Valerie; Pizarro, Fernando; Olivares, Manuel; Brito, Alex; Arredondo, Miguel; Flores, Sebastián; Valenzuela, Carolina

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the effect of proteins from cereals and legumes on heme iron (Fe) absorption. The absorption of heme Fe without its native globin was measured. Thirty adult females participated in two experimental studies (15 per study). Study I focused on the effects of cereal proteins (zein, gliadin and glutelin) and study II on the effects of legume proteins (soy, pea and lentil) on heme Fe absorption. When heme was given alone (as a control), study I and II yielded 6.2% and 11.0% heme absorption (p > 0.05). In study I, heme Fe absorption was 7.2%, 7.5% and 5.9% when zein, gliadin and glutelin were added, respectively. From this, it was concluded that cereal proteins did not affect heme Fe absorption. In study II, heme Fe absorption was 7.3%, 8.1% and 9.1% with the addition of soy, pea and lentil proteins, respectively. Only soy proteins decreased heme Fe absorption (p < 0.05). These results suggest that with the exception of soy proteins, which decreased absorption, proteins derived from cereals and legumes do not affect heme Fe absorption. PMID:26529009

  19. Iron and phosphorus speciation in Fe-conditioned membrane bioreactor activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hao; Ikeda-Ohno, Atsushi; Wang, Yuan; Waite, T David

    2015-06-01

    Iron dosing of membrane bioreactors (MBRs) is widely used as a means of meeting effluent phosphorus targets but there is limited understanding of the nature of iron and phosphorus-containing solids that are formed within the bioreactor (an important issue in view of the increasing interest in recovering phosphorus from wastewaters). Of particular challenge is the complexity of the MBR system and the variety of reactions that can occur on addition of iron salts to a membrane bioreactor. In this study, the performances of bench scale MBRs with dosing of either ferrous or ferric salts were monitored for a period of four months. The distributions of Fe and P-species in the Fe-conditioned sludges were determined using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at the Fe K-edge and the P K-edge. Regardless of whether iron was dosed to the anoxic or aerobic chambers and regardless of whether ferrous (Fe(II)) or ferric (Fe(III)) iron was dosed, iron present in the minerals in the conditioned sludges was consistently in the +III oxidation state. Fitting of the Fe K-edge EXAFS spectra revealed that an Fe(III)-phosphate species was the main Fe species present in all cases with the remaining fraction dominated by lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH) in the Fe(II)-dosed case and ferrihydrite (am-FeOOH) in the Fe(III)-dosed case. Approximately half the phosphorus in the activated sludge samples was present as a distinct Fe-PO4 mineral (such as strengite or an amorphous ferric hydroxyl phosphate analogue of strengite) and half as phosphorus adsorbed to an iron oxyhydroxide mineral phase indicating that both co-precipitation and adsorption of phosphorus by iron contribute to removal of phosphorus from the MBR supernatant. PMID:25900910

  20. The inhibitory effect of soy products on nonheme iron absorption in man.

    PubMed

    Cook, J D; Morck, T A; Lynch, S R

    1981-12-01

    Radioiron absorption studies were performed in male volunteer subjects to determine the effect on nonheme iron absorption of various semipurified proteins. When egg albumen and casein were substituted in protein-equivalent quantities in a semisynthetic meal, similar mean absorptions of 2.5 and 2.7% were observed. In contrast, isolated soy protein reduced absorption sharply, to an average of 0.5%. When egg albumen in the semisynthetic meal was replaced with full fat soy flour, textured soy flour, and isolated soy protein, absorption fell from 5.5 to 1.0, 1.9, and 0.4%, respectively, indicating an inhibitory effect by a wide range of soy products. The effect of substituting textured soy flour for meat in a meal containing a hamburger, french fries, and a milkshake was also evaluated. With 3:1 and 2.1 ratios of meat to unhydrated textured soy flour, absorption decreased by 61 and 53%, respectively. The soy products tested in this study have a pronounced inhibitory effect on the absorption of nonheme iron. PMID:7198374

  1. Bioactive Dietary Polyphenols Inhibit Heme Iron Absorption in A Dose-Dependent Manner in Human Intestinal Caco-2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qianyi; Kim, Eun-Young; Lindsay, Elizabeth Ann; Han, Okhee

    2011-01-01

    Although heme iron is an important form of dietary iron, its intestinal absorption mechanism remains elusive. Our previous work revealed that (−)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) and grape seed extract (GSE) markedly inhibited intestinal heme iron absorption by reducing the basolateral iron export in Caco-2 cells. The aims of this study were to examine whether small amounts of EGCG, GSE and green tea extract (GT) could inhibit heme iron absorption, and to test whether the inhibitory action of polyphenols could be offset by ascorbic acid. A heme-55Fe absorption study was conducted by adding various concentrations of EGCG, GSE and GT to Caco-2 cells in the absence and presence of ascorbic acid. Polyphenolic compounds significantly inhibited heme-55Fe absorption in a dose-dependent manner. The addition of ascorbic acid did not modulate the inhibitory effect of dietary polyphenols on heme iron absorption when the cells were treated with polyphenols at a concentration of 46 mg/L. However, ascorbic acid was able to offset or reverse the inhibitory effects of polyphenolic compounds when lower concentrations of polyphenols were added (≤ 4.6 mg/L). Ascorbic acid modulated the heme iron absorption without changing the apical heme uptake, the expression of the proteins involved in heme metabolism and basolateral iron transport, and heme oxygenase activity, indicating that ascorbic acid may enhance heme iron absorption by modulating the intracellular distribution of 55Fe. These results imply that the regular consumption of dietary ascorbic acid can easily counteract the inhibitory effects of low concentrations of dietary polyphenols on heme iron absorption but cannot counteract the inhibitory actions of high concentrations of polyphenols. PMID:22417433

  2. Ferroportin mediates the intestinal absorption of iron from a nanoparticulate ferritin core mimetic in mice.

    PubMed

    Aslam, Mohamad F; Frazer, David M; Faria, Nuno; Bruggraber, Sylvaine F A; Wilkins, Sarah J; Mirciov, Cornel; Powell, Jonathan J; Anderson, Greg J; Pereira, Dora I A

    2014-08-01

    The ferritin core is composed of fine nanoparticulate Fe(3+) oxohydroxide, and we have developed a synthetic mimetic, nanoparticulate Fe(3+) polyoxohydroxide (nanoFe(3+)). The aim of this study was to determine how dietary iron derived in this fashion is absorbed in the duodenum. Following a 4 wk run-in on an Fe-deficient diet, mice with intestinal-specific disruption of the Fpn-1 gene (Fpn-KO), or littermate wild-type (WT) controls, were supplemented with Fe(2+) sulfate (FeSO4), nanoFe(3+), or no added Fe for a further 4 wk. A control group was Fe sufficient throughout. Direct intestinal absorption of nanoFe(3+) was investigated using isolated duodenal loops. Our data show that FeSO4 and nanoFe(3+) are equally bioavailable in WT mice, and at wk 8 the mean ± SEM hemoglobin increase was 18 ± 7 g/L in the FeSO4 group and 30 ± 5 g/L in the nanoFe(3+) group. Oral iron failed to be utilized by Fpn-KO mice and was retained in enterocytes, irrespective of the iron source. In summary, although nanoFe(3+) is taken up directly by the duodenum its homeostasis is under the normal regulatory control of dietary iron absorption, namely via ferroportin-dependent efflux from enterocytes, and thus offers potential as a novel oral iron supplement. PMID:24776745

  3. Arsenate precipitation using ferric iron in acidic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Cadena, F.; Kirk, T.L.

    1995-12-31

    Arsenates (i.e., As(V)) can be removed from aqueous solution by precipitation with ferric iron (i.e., Fe(III)). The chemistry of arsenic acid describes the main properties of arsenates. This triprotic acid resembles the phosphoric acid system. For example, free arsenate ions (i.e., AsO{sub 4}{sup 3-}), like free phosphates, are present in significant concentration at pH values above pK{sub a,3}. On the other hand, the concentration of free ferric iron in solution, Fe{sup 3+}, is limited by ferric hydroxide precipitation and hydroxy complexation under neutral or basic conditions. Fe{sup 3+} is the predominant iron form only under very acidic conditions. Therefore, the absence of either ferric ions or arsenate ligands prevents ferric arsenate (FeAsO{sub 4}) precipitation in extreme pH conditions. Precipitation studies using ferric chloride show that the formation of ferric arsenate in water containing 0.667 mM/L (50 mg/L as As) is favored in the pH range between 3 and 4. Ferric iron dose required to remove arsenic from solution increases with pH in the range of 3 to 10. Sludge production also increases with increasing pH conditions. Optimum ferric iron doses at pH 3 and 4 are 4.8 and 10.0 mM/L, respectively, where the arsenate is removed from solution by 98.72 and 99.68 percent. Corresponding iron requirement to arsenate ratios at these two pH conditions are 7.2 and 15.0. Adverse effects on arsenic removal are observed at pH = 3, where the concentration of applied ferric iron exceeds the optimal dose. This effect is probably due to charge reversal on the surface of the precipitates. Overdosing above the optimal iron concentration at pH = 4 does not reduce treatment efficiency significantly. Presence of sodium chloride in solution at a concentration of 171 mM/L (10,000 mg/L as NaCl) does not impair system performance. However, sodium sulfate at a concentration of 104 mM/L (10,000 mg/L) affects adversely treatment performance.

  4. The determination of aluminum, copper, iron, and lead in glycol formulations by atomic absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Initial screening tests and the results obtained in developing procedures to determine Al, Cu, Fe, and Pb in glycol formulations are described. Atomic absorption completion was selected for Cu, Fe and Pb, and after comparison with emission spectroscopy, was selected for Al also. Before completion, carbon, iron, and lead are extracted with diethyl dithio carbamate (DDC) into methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK). Aluminum was also extracted into MIBK using 8-hydroxyquinoline as a chelating agent. As little as 0.02 mg/l carbon and 0.06 mg/l lead or iron may be determined in glycol formulations. As little as 0.3 mg/l aluminum may be determined.

  5. Absorption and adsorption chillers applied to air conditioning systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuczyńska, Agnieszka; Szaflik, Władysław

    2010-07-01

    This work presents an application possibility of sorption refrigerators driven by low temperature fluid for air conditioning of buildings. Thermodynamic models were formulated and absorption LiBr-water chiller with 10 kW cooling power as well as adsorption chiller with silica gel bed were investigated. Both of them are using water for desorption process with temperature Tdes = 80 °C. Coefficient of performance (COP) for both cooling cycles was analyzed in the same conditions of the driving heat source, cooling water Tc = 25 °C and temperature in evaporator Tevap = 5 °C. In this study, the computer software EES was used to investigate the performance of absorption heat pump system and its behaviour in configuration with geothermal heat source.

  6. Lithium bromide absorption chiller passes gas conditioning field test

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, M.J.; Huey, M.A.

    1995-07-31

    A lithium bromide absorption chiller has been successfully used to provide refrigeration for field conditioning of natural gas. The intent of the study was to identify a process that could provide a moderate level of refrigeration necessary to meet the quality restrictions required by natural-gas transmission companies, minimize the initial investment risk, and reduce operating expenses. The technology in the test proved comparatively less expensive to operate than a propane refrigeration plant. Volatile product prices and changes in natural-gas transmission requirements have created the need for an alternative to conventional methods of natural-gas processing. The paper describes the problems with the accumulation of condensed liquids in pipelines, gas conditioning, the lithium bromide absorption cycle, economics, performance, and operating and maintenance costs.

  7. Cucumis sativus secretes 4'-ketoriboflavin under iron-deficient conditions.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Junichi; Koshino, Hiroyuki; Sekino, Kouta; Ito, Shinsaku; Katsuta, Ryo; Takeda, Kouji; Yoshimura, Etsuro; Shinmachi, Fumie; Kawasaki, Shinji; Niimura, Youichi; Nukada, Tomoo

    2016-01-01

    A new compound in cucumber, Cucumis sativus, nutrient solution that appears under iron-deficient conditions, but not under ordinary culture conditions, has been revealed by HPLC analysis. The chemical structure of this compound was identified using LC-MS and NMR techniques as that of 4'-ketoriboflavin. This is the first report to show that 4'-ketoriboflavin can be found in metabolites from organisms. PMID:26523955

  8. Dephytinisation with Intrinsic Wheat Phytase and Iron Fortification Significantly Increase Iron Absorption from Fonio (Digitaria exilis) Meals in West African Women

    PubMed Central

    Moretti, Diego; Schuth, Stephan; Egli, Ines; Zimmermann, Michael B.; Brouwer, Inge D.

    2013-01-01

    Low iron and high phytic acid content make fonio based meals a poor source of bioavailable iron. Phytic acid degradation in fonio porridge using whole grain cereals as phytase source and effect on iron bioavailability when added to iron fortified fonio meals were investigated. Grains, nuts and seeds collected in Mali markets were screened for phytic acid and phytase activity. We performed an iron absorption study in Beninese women (n = 16), using non-dephytinised fonio porridge (FFP) and dephytinised fonio porridge (FWFP; 75% fonio-25% wheat), each fortified with 57Fe or 58Fe labeled FeSO4. Iron absorption was quantified by measuring the erythrocyte incorporation of stable iron isotopes. Phytic acid varied from 0.39 (bambara nut) to 4.26 g/100 g DM (pumpkin seed), with oilseeds values higher than grains and nuts. Phytase activity ranged from 0.17±1.61 (fonio) to 2.9±1.3 phytase unit (PU) per g (whole wheat). Phytic acid was almost completely degraded in FWFP after 60 min of incubation (pH≈5.0, 50°C). Phytate∶iron molar ratios decreased from 23.7∶1 in FFP to 2.7∶1 in FWFP. Iron fortification further reduced phytate∶iron molar ratio to 1.9∶1 in FFP and 0.3∶1 in FWFP, respectively. Geometric mean (95% CI) iron absorption significantly increased from 2.6% (0.8–7.8) in FFP to 8.3% (3.8–17.9) in FWFP (P<0.0001). Dephytinisation of fonio porridge with intrinsic wheat phytase increased fractional iron absorption 3.2 times, suggesting it could be a possible strategy to decrease PA in cereal-based porridges. PMID:24124445

  9. Acute Copper and Ascorbic Acid Supplementation Inhibits Non-heme Iron Absorption in Humans.

    PubMed

    Olivares, Manuel; Figueroa, Constanza; Pizarro, Fernando

    2016-08-01

    The objective of the study is to determine the effect of copper (Cu) plus the reducing agent ascorbic acid (AA) on the absorption of non-heme iron (Fe). Experimental study with block design in which each subject was his own control. After signing an informed consent, 14 adult women using an effective method of contraception and negative pregnancy test received 0.5 mg Fe, as ferrous sulfate, alone or with Cu, as copper sulfate, plus ascorbic acid (AA/Cu 2/1 molar ratio) at 4/1; 6/1 and 8/1 Cu/Fe molar ratios as an aqueous solution on days 1, 2, 14, and 15 of the study. Fe absorption was assessed by erythrocyte incorporation of iron radioisotopes (55)Fe and (59)Fe. Geometric mean (range ± SD) absorption of Fe at 4/1 and 6/1 Cu/Fe molar ratios (and AA/Cu 2/1 molar ratio) and Fe alone was 57.4 % (35.7-92.1 %), 64.2 % (45.8-89.9 %), and 38.8 % (20.4-73.8 %), respectively (ANOVA for repeated measures p < 0.001; post hoc test Scheffé, p < 0.05). This is attributable to the enhancing effect of AA on non-heme Fe absorption; however, Fe absorption at Cu/Fe 8/1 molar ratio was 47.3 % (27.7-80.8) (p = NS compared with Fe alone). It was expected that Fe absorption would have been equal or greater than at 4/1 and 6/1 molar ratios. Copper in the presence of ascorbic acid inhibits non-heme Fe absorption at Cu/Fe 8/1 molar ratio. PMID:26715577

  10. Immobilization of selenate by iron in aqueous solution under anoxic conditions and the influence of uranyl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puranen, Anders; Jonsson, Mats; Dähn, Rainer; Cui, Daqing

    2009-08-01

    In proposed high level radioactive waste repositories a large part of the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) canisters are commonly composed of iron. Selenium is present in spent nuclear fuel as a long lived fission product. This study investigates the influence of iron on the uptake of dissolved selenium in the form of selenate and the effect of the presence of dissolved uranyl on the above interaction of selenate. The iron oxide, and selenium speciation on the surfaces was investigated by Raman spectroscopy. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy was used to determine the oxidation state of the selenium and uranium on the surfaces. Under the simulated groundwater conditions (10 mM NaCl, 2 mM NaHCO 3, <0.1 ppm O 2) the immobilized selenate was found to be reduced to oxidation states close to zero or lower and uranyl was found to be largely reduced to U(IV). The near simultaneous reduction of uranyl was found to greatly enhance the rate of selenate reduction. These findings suggest that the presence of uranyl being reduced by an iron surface could substantially enhance the rate of reduction of selenate under anoxic conditions relevant for a repository.

  11. Colorimetric and atomic absorption spectrometric determination of mucolytic drug ambroxol through ion-pair formation with iron and thiocyanate.

    PubMed

    Levent, Abdulkadir; Sentürk, Zühre

    2010-09-01

    Colorimetric and atomic absorption spectrometric methods have been developed for the determination of mucolytic drug Ambroxol. These procedures depend upon the reaction of iron(III) metal ion with the drug in the presence of thiocyanate ion to form stable ion-pair complex which extractable chloroform. The red-coloured complex was determined either colorimetrically at 510 nm or by indirect atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) via the determination of the iron content in the formed complex. The optimum experimental conditions for pH, concentrations of Fe(3+) and SCN(-), shaking time, phase ratio, and the number of extractions were determined. Under the proposed conditions, linearity was obeyed in the concentration ranges 4.1x10(-6) - 5.7x10(-5) M (1.7-23.6 µg mL(-1)) using both methods, with detection limits of 4.6x10(-7) M (0.19 µg mL(-1)) for colorimetry and 1.1x10(-6) M (0.46 µg mL(-1)) for AAS. The proposed methods were applied for the determination of Ambroxol in tablet dosage forms. The results obtained were statistically analyzed and compared with those obtained by applying the high-performance liquid chromatographic method with diode-array detection. PMID:20426742

  12. Iron deficiency in cyanobacteria causes monomerization of photosystem I trimers and reduces the capacity for state transitions and the effective absorption cross section of photosystem I in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Alexander G; Krol, Marianna; Sveshnikov, Dmitry; Selstam, Eva; Sandström, Stefan; Koochek, Maryam; Park, Youn-Il; Vasil'ev, Sergej; Bruce, Doug; Oquist, Gunnar; Huner, Norman P A

    2006-08-01

    The induction of the isiA (CP43') protein in iron-stressed cyanobacteria is accompanied by the formation of a ring of 18 CP43' proteins around the photosystem I (PSI) trimer and is thought to increase the absorption cross section of PSI within the CP43'-PSI supercomplex. In contrast to these in vitro studies, our in vivo measurements failed to demonstrate any increase of the PSI absorption cross section in two strains (Synechococcus sp. PCC 7942 and Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803) of iron-stressed cells. We report that iron-stressed cells exhibited a reduced capacity for state transitions and limited dark reduction of the plastoquinone pool, which accounts for the increase in PSII-related 685 nm chlorophyll fluorescence under iron deficiency. This was accompanied by lower abundance of the NADP-dehydrogenase complex and the PSI-associated subunit PsaL, as well as a reduced amount of phosphatidylglycerol. Nondenaturating polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis separation of the chlorophyll-protein complexes indicated that the monomeric form of PSI is favored over the trimeric form of PSI under iron stress. Thus, we demonstrate that the induction of CP43' does not increase the PSI functional absorption cross section of whole cells in vivo, but rather, induces monomerization of PSI trimers and reduces the capacity for state transitions. We discuss the role of CP43' as an effective energy quencher to photoprotect PSII and PSI under unfavorable environmental conditions in cyanobacteria in vivo. PMID:16798943

  13. Microwave absorption properties of double-layer absorber based on carbonyl iron/barium hexaferrite composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Xiaohu; Fan, Huiqing; Cheng, Yankui

    2016-05-01

    The microwave absorption properties of BaCo0.4Zn1.6Fe16O27 ferrite and carbonyl iron powder with single-layer and double-layer composite absorbers were investigated based on the electromagnetic transmission line theory in the frequency range from 1 to 14 GHz. XRD was used to characterize the structure of prepared absorbing particles. SEM was used to examine the micromorphology of the particles and composites. The complex permittivity and permeability of composites were measured by using a vector network analyzer. The reflection loss of the single-layer and double-layer absorbers with different thicknesses and orders was investigated. The results show that double-layer absorbers have better microwave absorption properties than single-layer absorbers. The microwave absorption properties of the double-layer structure are influenced by the coupling interactions between the matching and absorption layers. As the pure ferrite used as matching layer and the composite of BF-5CI used as absorption, the minimum RL of absorber can achieve to -55.4 dB and the bandwidth of RL <-10 dB ranged from 5.6 to 10.8 GHz when the thicknesses of matching layer and absorption layer were 0.9 and 1.4 mm, respectively.

  14. Electroweak absorptive parts in the matching conditions of nonrelativistic QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Hoang, Andre H.; Reisser, Christoph J.

    2005-04-01

    Electroweak corrections associated with the instability of the top quark to the next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic (NNLL) total top pair threshold cross section in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation are determined. Our method is based on absorptive parts in electroweak matching conditions of the operators of nonrelativistic QCD and the optical theorem. The corrections lead to ultraviolet phase space divergences that have to be renormalized and lead to NLL mixing effects. Numerically, the corrections can amount to several percent and are comparable to the known NNLL QCD corrections.

  15. NA2EDTA ENHANCES THE ABSORPTION OF IRON AND ZINC FROM FORTIFIED RICE FLOUR IN SRI LANKAN CHILDREN

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice flour was proposed as a vehicle for iron and zinc fortification in Sri Lanka. Although widely consumed, rice flour has not been evaluated as a fortified food, and the absorption of minerals including iron and zinc from this flour is unknown. Determination of the bioavailability of these nutrien...

  16. Na2EDTA enhances the absorption of iron and zinc from fortified rice flour in Sri Lankan children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice flour was proposed as a vehicle for iron and zinc fortification in Sri Lanka. Although widely consumed, rice flour has not been evaluated as a fortified food, and the absorption of minerals including iron and zinc from this flour is unknown. Determination of the bioavailability of these nutrien...

  17. Energy absorption characteristics of lightweight structural member by stacking conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Juho; Yang, Yongjun; Hwang, Woochae; Pyeon, Seokbeom; Min, Hanki; Yeo, Ingoo; Yang, Inyoung

    2012-04-01

    The recent trend in vehicle design is aimed at improving crash safety and environmental-friendliness. To solve these issues, the needs for lighter vehicle to limit exhaust gas and improve fuel economy has been requested for environmental-friendliness. Automobile design should be made for reduced weight once the safety of vehicle is maintained. In this study, composite structural members were manufactured using carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) which are representative lightweight structural materials. Carbon fiber has been researched as alternative to metals for lightweight vehicle and better fuel economy. CFRP is an anisotropic material which is the most widely adapted lightweight structural member because of their inherent design flexibility and high specific strength and stiffness. Also, variation of CFRP interface number is important to increase the energy absorption capacity. In this study, one type of circular shaped composite tube was used, combined with reinforcing foam. The stacking condition was selected to investigate the effect of the fiber orientation angle and interface number. The crashworthy behavior of circular composite material tubes subjected to static axial compression under same conditions is reported. The axial static collapse tests were carried out for each section member. The collapse modes and the energy absorption capability of the members were analyzed.

  18. Energy absorption characteristics of lightweight structural member by stacking conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Juho; Yang, Yongjun; Hwang, Woochae; Pyeon, Seokbeom; Min, Hanki; Yeo, Ingoo; Yang, Inyoung

    2011-11-01

    The recent trend in vehicle design is aimed at improving crash safety and environmental-friendliness. To solve these issues, the needs for lighter vehicle to limit exhaust gas and improve fuel economy has been requested for environmental-friendliness. Automobile design should be made for reduced weight once the safety of vehicle is maintained. In this study, composite structural members were manufactured using carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) which are representative lightweight structural materials. Carbon fiber has been researched as alternative to metals for lightweight vehicle and better fuel economy. CFRP is an anisotropic material which is the most widely adapted lightweight structural member because of their inherent design flexibility and high specific strength and stiffness. Also, variation of CFRP interface number is important to increase the energy absorption capacity. In this study, one type of circular shaped composite tube was used, combined with reinforcing foam. The stacking condition was selected to investigate the effect of the fiber orientation angle and interface number. The crashworthy behavior of circular composite material tubes subjected to static axial compression under same conditions is reported. The axial static collapse tests were carried out for each section member. The collapse modes and the energy absorption capability of the members were analyzed.

  19. Corrosion of iron under alternating wet and dry conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, D.S.; Bogart, M.B.; Brossia, C.S.; Cragnolino, G.A.

    2000-05-01

    In-situ alternating current (AC) and direct current (DC) electrochemical techniques were used to determine the corrosion rate and corrosion potential of high-purity iron under alternate wet and dry conditions. Comparisons between DC electrochemical measurements and weight loss were conducted to verify the validity of the corrosion rate measurements. Identification of the corrosion products was performed using Raman spectroscopy. Corrosion products contained layers of iron oxides and oxyhydroxides. At low Cl{sup {minus}} concentrations, corrosion products consisted of lepidocrocite ({gamma}-FeOOH) and magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}). At higher Cl{sup {minus}} concentrations, the formation of akaganeite ({beta}-FeOOH) was observed. Corrosion rates and corrosion potentials fluctuated through-out the wet cycles depending on electrolyte layer thickness, ionic strength, and wetting cycle. Accelerated corrosion rates of high-purity iron, up to three times those observed under continuously immersed conditions, were the result of Fe(III) reduction in the corrosion product layer, increased Cl{sup {minus}} concentration during evaporation, and accelerated oxygen transport across the thin electrolyte layer.

  20. Corrosion of iron under alternating wet and dry conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, D.S.; Bogart, M.B.; Brossia, C.S.; Cragnolino, G.A.

    1999-11-01

    In-situ AC and DC electrochemical techniques were used to determine the corrosion rate and corrosion potential of high purity iron under alternate wet and dry conditions. Comparisons between DC electrochemical measurements and weight loss were also performed to verify the validity of the corrosion rate measurements. Identification of the corrosion products was performed using Raman spectroscopy. The corrosion products were found to contain layers of iron oxides and oxyhydroxides. At low chloride concentrations the corrosion products consisted of {gamma}-FeOOH and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, whereas at higher chloride concentrations the formation of {beta}-FeOOH was observed. Corrosion rates and corrosion potentials fluctuated throughout the wet cycles based on electrolyte layer thickness, ionic strength, and wetting cycle. Accelerated corrosion rates of high purity iron up to 3 times that observed under continuously immersed conditions were found to be the result of Fe(III) reduction in the corrosion product layer, increased chloride concentration during evaporation, and accelerated oxygen transport across the thin electrolyte layer.

  1. Silica-coated iron nanocubes: preparation, characterization and application in microwave absorption.

    PubMed

    Ni, Xiaomin; Zheng, Zhong; Hu, Xiang; Xiao, Xiukun

    2010-01-01

    Novel cubic nanocapsules consisting of metallic iron core and amorphous silica shell were fabricated through a simple chemical reduction route followed by a Stöber process. Thus-prepared Fe@SiO(2) nanocubes were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectrometer (XPS), Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR), thermogravimetry-differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and scalar network analysis (SNA). Comparing with that of pure iron counterparts, silica-coated iron nanocubes exhibited improved magnetic properties, oxidation resistance and microwave absorption performance. A reflection loss (RL) exceeding -12 dB was obtained in the frequency range of 8-14 GHz for an absorber thickness of 2 mm, with an optimal RL of -18.2 dB at 9 GHz. Mechanism of the improved microwave absorption properties of the Fe@SiO(2) composite was discussed based on their magnetic properties and electromagnetic theory. PMID:19833348

  2. An x-ray absorption study of the iron site in bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers.

    PubMed Central

    Bunker, G; Stern, E A; Blankenship, R E; Parson, W W

    1982-01-01

    Measurements were made of the extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) of the iron site in photosynthetic reaction centers from the bacterium Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides. Forms with two quinones, two quinones with added o-phenanthroline, and one quinone were studied. Only the two forms containing two quinones maintained their integrity and were analyzed. The spectra show directly that the added o-phenanthroline does not chelate the iron atom. Further analysis indicates that the iron is octahedrally coordinated by nitrogen and/or oxygen atoms located at various distances, with the average value of about 2.14 A. The analysis suggests that most of the ligands are nitrogens and that three of the nitrogen ligands belong to histidine rings. This interpretation accounts for several unusual features of the EXAFS spectrum. We speculate that the quinones are bound to the histidine rings in some manner. Qualitative features of the absorption edge spectra also are discussed and are related to the Fe-ligand distance. PMID:6977382

  3. Thermal and electrical conductivity of iron at Earth's core conditions.

    PubMed

    Pozzo, Monica; Davies, Chris; Gubbins, David; Alfè, Dario

    2012-05-17

    The Earth acts as a gigantic heat engine driven by the decay of radiogenic isotopes and slow cooling, which gives rise to plate tectonics, volcanoes and mountain building. Another key product is the geomagnetic field, generated in the liquid iron core by a dynamo running on heat released by cooling and freezing (as the solid inner core grows), and on chemical convection (due to light elements expelled from the liquid on freezing). The power supplied to the geodynamo, measured by the heat flux across the core-mantle boundary (CMB), places constraints on Earth's evolution. Estimates of CMB heat flux depend on properties of iron mixtures under the extreme pressure and temperature conditions in the core, most critically on the thermal and electrical conductivities. These quantities remain poorly known because of inherent experimental and theoretical difficulties. Here we use density functional theory to compute these conductivities in liquid iron mixtures at core conditions from first principles--unlike previous estimates, which relied on extrapolations. The mixtures of iron, oxygen, sulphur and silicon are taken from earlier work and fit the seismologically determined core density and inner-core boundary density jump. We find both conductivities to be two to three times higher than estimates in current use. The changes are so large that core thermal histories and power requirements need to be reassessed. New estimates indicate that the adiabatic heat flux is 15 to 16 terawatts at the CMB, higher than present estimates of CMB heat flux based on mantle convection; the top of the core must be thermally stratified and any convection in the upper core must be driven by chemical convection against the adverse thermal buoyancy or lateral variations in CMB heat flow. Power for the geodynamo is greatly restricted, and future models of mantle evolution will need to incorporate a high CMB heat flux and explain the recent formation of the inner core. PMID:22495307

  4. Iron near absorption edge X-ray spectroscopy at aqueous-membrane interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wenjie; Kuzmenko, Ivan; Vaknin, David

    2014-01-01

    Employing synchrotron X-ray scattering, we systematically determine the absorption near-edge spectra (XANES) of iron in its ferrous (Fe2+) and ferric (Fe3+) states both as ions in aqueous solutions and as they bind to form a single layer to anionic templates that consist of carboxyl or phosphate groups at aqueous/vapor interfaces. While the XANES of bulk iron ions show that the electronic state and coordination of iron complexes in the bulk are isotropic, the interfacial bound ions show a signature of a broken inversion-symmetry environment. The XANES of Fe2+ and Fe3+ in the bulk possess distinct profiles however, upon binding they practically exhibit similar patterns. This indicates that both bound ions settle into a stable electronic and coordination configuration with an effective fractional valence (for example, Fe[2+nu]+, 0 < nu < 1) at charged organic templates. Such two dimensional properties may render interfacial iron, abundant in living organisms, a more efficient and versatile catalytic behavior.

  5. An Iron Catalyst for Ketone Hydrogenations Under Mild Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Bullock, R. Morris

    2007-10-01

    Casey and Guan reported a homogeneous catalyst for ketone hydrogenation that does not require a precious metal, but instead is based on iron. Excellent yields and chemoselectivity for hydrogenation are found under mild conditions (25 °C, 3 atm H2). An ionic hydrogenation mechanism allows the delivery of a proton from the OH and a hydride from the metal. RMB gratefully acknowledges funding from the Division of Chemical Sciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, US Department of Energy, and from a grant from the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  6. Copper, iron and zinc absorption, retention and status of young women fed vitamin B-6 deficient diets

    SciTech Connect

    Turnlund, J.R.; Keyes, W.R.; Hudson, C.A.; Betschart, A.A.; Kretsch, M.J.; Sauberlich, H.E. Western Regional Research Center, Albany, CA )

    1991-03-11

    A study was conducted in young women to determine the effect of vitamin B-6 deficient diets on copper, iron and zinc metabolism. Young women were confined to a metabolic research unit for 84 and 98 days. They were fed a vitamin B-6 deficient formula diet initially, followed by food diet containing four increasing levels of vitamin B-6. Copper, iron and zinc absorption, retention and status were determined at intervals throughout the study. Absorption was determined using the stable isotopes {sup 65}Cu, {sup 54}Fe, and {sup 67}Zn. Status was based on serum copper and zinc, hemoglobin, hematocrit and mean corpuscular volume. Copper absorption averaged 18 {plus minus} 1% during vitamin B-6 depletion, significantly lower than 24 {plus minus} 1% during repletion, but serum copper was not affected and balance was positive. Iron absorption was not impaired significantly by vitamin B-6 deficient diets, but status declined during the depletion period. Zinc absorption averaged 40 {plus minus} 2% during depletion and 27 {plus minus} 2% during repletion. Zinc absorption and retention were significantly greater during vitamin B-6 depletion, but serum zinc declined suggesting the absorbed zinc was not available for utilization. The results suggest that vitamin B-6 depletion of young women may inhibit copper absorption, affect iron status and alter zinc metabolism. The effects of vitamin B-6 depletion differ markedly among these elements.

  7. Mode of oral iron administration and the amount of iron habitually consumed do not affect iron absorption, systemic iron utilisation or zinc absorption in iron-sufficient infants: a randomised trial.

    PubMed

    Szymlek-Gay, Ewa A; Domellöf, Magnus; Hernell, Olle; Hurrell, Richard F; Lind, Torbjörn; Lönnerdal, Bo; Zeder, Christophe; Egli, Ines M

    2016-09-01

    Different metabolic pathways of supplemental and fortification Fe, or inhibition of Zn absorption by Fe, may explain adverse effects of supplemental Fe in Fe-sufficient infants. We determined whether the mode of oral Fe administration or the amount habitually consumed affects Fe absorption and systemic Fe utilisation in infants, and assessed the effects of these interventions on Zn absorption, Fe and Zn status, and growth. Fe-sufficient 6-month-old infants (n 72) were randomly assigned to receive 6·6 mg Fe/d from a high-Fe formula, 1·3 mg Fe/d from a low-Fe formula or 6·6 mg Fe/d from Fe drops and a formula with no added Fe for 45 d. Fractional Fe absorption, Fe utilisation and fractional Zn absorption were measured with oral (57Fe and 67Zn) and intravenous (58Fe and 70Zn) isotopes. Fe and Zn status, infection and growth were measured. At 45 d, Hb was 6·3 g/l higher in the high-Fe formula group compared with the Fe drops group, whereas serum ferritin was 34 and 35 % higher, respectively, and serum transferrin 0·1 g/l lower in the high-Fe formula and Fe drops groups compared with the low-Fe formula group (all P<0·05). No intervention effects were observed on Fe absorption, Fe utilisation, Zn absorption, other Fe status indices, plasma Zn or growth. We concluded that neither supplemental or fortification Fe nor the amount of Fe habitually consumed altered Fe absorption, Fe utilisation, Zn absorption, Zn status or growth in Fe-sufficient infants. Consumption of low-Fe formula as the only source of Fe was insufficient to maintain Fe stores. PMID:27546308

  8. Evaluation of iron-containing carbon nanotubes by near edge X-ray absorption technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osorio, A. G.; Bergmann, C. P.

    2015-10-01

    The synthesis of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) via Chemical Vapor Deposition method with ferrocene results in CNTs filled with Fe-containing nanoparticles. The present work proposes a novel route to characterize the Fe phases in CNTs inherent to the synthesis process. CNTs were synthesized and, afterwards, the CNTs were heat treated at 1000 °C for 20 min in an inert atmosphere during a thermogravimetric experiment. X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) experiments were performed on the CNTs before and after the heat treatment and, also, during the heat treatment, e.g., in situ tests were performed while several Near-Edge X-Ray Absorption (XANES) spectra were collected during the heating of the samples. The XAS technique was successfully applied to evaluate the phases encapsulated by CNTs. Phase transformations of the Fe-based nanoparticles were also observed from iron carbide to metallic iron when the in situ experiments were performed. Results also indicated that the applied synthesis method guarantees that Fe phases are not oxidize. In addition, the results show that heat treatment under inert atmosphere can control which phase remains encapsulated by the CNTs.

  9. Phytoestrogens modulate hepcidin expression by Nrf2: Implications for dietary control of iron absorption

    PubMed Central

    Bayele, Henry K.; Balesaria, Sara; Srai, Surjit K.S.

    2015-01-01

    Hepcidin is a liver-derived antimicrobial peptide that regulates iron absorption and is also an integral part of the acute phase response. In a previous report, we found evidence that this peptide could also be induced by toxic heavy metals and xenobiotics, thus broadening its teleological role as a defensin. However it remained unclear how its sensing of disparate biotic and abiotic stressors might be integrated at the transcriptional level. We hypothesized that its function in cytoprotection may be regulated by NFE2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), the master transcriptional controller of cellular stress defenses. In this report, we show that hepcidin regulation is inextricably linked to the acute stress response through Nrf2 signaling. Nrf2 regulates hepcidin expression from a prototypical antioxidant response element in its promoter, and by synergizing with other basic leucine-zipper transcription factors. We also show that polyphenolic small molecules or phytoestrogens commonly found in fruits and vegetables including the red wine constituent resveratrol can induce hepcidin expression in vitro and post-prandially, with concomitant reductions in circulating iron levels and transferrin saturation by one such polyphenol quercetin. Furthermore, these molecules derepress hepcidin promoter activity when its transcription by Nrf2 is repressed by Keap1. Taken together, the data show that hepcidin is a prototypical antioxidant response or cytoprotective gene within the Nrf2 transcriptional circuitry. The ability of phytoestrogens to modulate hepcidin expression in vivo suggests a novel mechanism by which diet may impact iron homeostasis. PMID:26546695

  10. Bioavailability of iron in geophagic earths and clay minerals, and their effect on dietary iron absorption using an in vitro digestion/Caco-2 cell model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Geophagy, the deliberate consumption of earth, is strongly associated with iron (Fe) deficiency. It has been proposed that geophagy may be practiced as a means to improve Fe status by increasing Fe intakes and, conversely, that geophagy may cause Fe deficiency by inhibiting Fe absorption. We tested ...

  11. Optimization of absorption air-conditioning for solar energy applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, E. H.

    1976-01-01

    Improved performance of solar cooling systems using the lithium bromide water absorption cycle is investigated. Included are computer simulations of a solar-cooled house, analyses and measurements of heat transfer rates in absorption system components, and design and fabrication of various system components. A survey of solar collector convection suppression methods is presented.

  12. Prediction of Iron K-Edge Absorption Spectra Using Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory

    SciTech Connect

    George, S.DeBeer; Petrenko, T.; Neese, F.

    2009-05-14

    Iron K-edge X-ray absorption pre-edge features have been calculated using a time-dependent density functional approach. The influence of functional, solvation, and relativistic effects on the calculated energies and intensities has been examined by correlation of the calculated parameters to experimental data on a series of 10 iron model complexes, which span a range of high-spin and low-spin ferrous and ferric complexes in O{sub h} to T{sub d} geometries. Both quadrupole and dipole contributions to the spectra have been calculated. We find that good agreement between theory and experiment is obtained by using the BP86 functional with the CP(PPP) basis set on the Fe and TZVP one of the remaining atoms. Inclusion of solvation yields a small improvement in the calculated energies. However, the inclusion of scalar relativistic effects did not yield any improved correlation with experiment. The use of these methods to uniquely assign individual spectral transitions and to examine experimental contributions to backbonding is discussed.

  13. Low temperature charge transport and microwave absorption of carbon coated iron nanoparticles–polymer composite films

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, V.

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: ► Carbon coated Fe nanoparticle–PVC composite films were prepared by solution casting method. ► A low electrical percolation threshold of 2.2 was achieved. ► The low temperature electrical conductivity follows variable range hopping type conduction. ► An EMI shielding of 18 dB was achieved in 200 micron thick film. -- Abstract: In this paper, the low temperature electrical conductivity and microwave absorption properties of carbon coated iron nanoparticles–polyvinyl chloride composite films are investigated for different filler fractions. The filler particles are prepared by the pyrolysis of ferrocene at 980 °C and embedded in polyvinyl chloride matrix. The high resolution transmission electron micrographs of the filler material have shown a 5 nm thin layer graphitic carbon covering over iron particles. The room temperature electrical conductivity of the composite film changes by 10 orders of magnitude with the increase of filler concentration. A percolation threshold of 2.2 and an electromagnetic interference shielding efficiency (EMI SE) of ∼18.6 dB in 26.5–40 GHz range are observed for 50 wt% loading. The charge transport follows three dimensional variable range hopping conduction.

  14. Quantitative analysis of dietary iron utilization for erythropoiesis in response to body iron status.

    PubMed

    Matsuo-Tezuka, Yukari; Noguchi-Sasaki, Mariko; Kurasawa, Mitsue; Yorozu, Keigo; Shimonaka, Yasushi

    2016-06-01

    Erythropoiesis requires large amounts of iron for hemoglobin synthesis. There are two sources of iron for erythropoiesis, dietary and stored iron; however, their relative contributions to erythropoiesis remain unknown. In this study, we used the stable iron isotope (57)Fe to quantify synthesis of hemoglobin derived from dietary iron. Using this method, we investigated the activities of dietary iron absorption and the utilization of dietary iron for erythropoiesis in responses to stimulated erythropoiesis and to interventions to alter body iron status. Under iron-loaded conditions, the activity of dietary iron absorption was clearly lowered in response to up-regulation of hepcidin, although the estimated activity of iron release from stored iron was not compared with that under control conditions. This result was supported by the observation that two duodenal iron transporters, divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) and ferroportin, were downregulated by iron loading, although the levels of expression of ferroportin in iron storage tissues were not changed by iron loading under erythropoietic stimulation by epoetin-β pegol (C.E.R.A., a long-acting erythropoiesis-stimulating agent). These results indicate that the dietary iron absorption system is more sensitive to body iron status than are reticuloendothelial iron- release mechanisms. Our data indicated that there could be a regulatory mechanism favoring use of stored iron over dietary iron under iron-loaded conditions. PMID:26911670

  15. Planktonic marine iron oxidizers drive iron mineralization under low-oxygen conditions.

    PubMed

    Field, E K; Kato, S; Findlay, A J; MacDonald, D J; Chiu, B K; Luther, G W; Chan, C S

    2016-09-01

    Observations of modern microbes have led to several hypotheses on how microbes precipitated the extensive iron formations in the geologic record, but we have yet to resolve the exact microbial contributions. An initial hypothesis was that cyanobacteria produced oxygen which oxidized iron abiotically; however, in modern environments such as microbial mats, where Fe(II) and O2 coexist, we commonly find microaerophilic chemolithotrophic iron-oxidizing bacteria producing Fe(III) oxyhydroxides. This suggests that such iron oxidizers could have inhabited niches in ancient coastal oceans where Fe(II) and O2 coexisted, and therefore contributed to banded iron formations (BIFs) and other ferruginous deposits. However, there is currently little evidence for planktonic marine iron oxidizers in modern analogs. Here, we demonstrate successful cultivation of planktonic microaerophilic iron-oxidizing Zetaproteobacteria from the Chesapeake Bay during seasonal stratification. Iron oxidizers were associated with low oxygen concentrations and active iron redox cycling in the oxic-anoxic transition zone (<3 μm O2 , <0.2 μm H2 S). While cyanobacteria were also detected in this transition zone, oxygen concentrations were too low to support significant rates of abiotic iron oxidation. Cyanobacteria may be providing oxygen for microaerophilic iron oxidation through a symbiotic relationship; at high Fe(II) levels, cyanobacteria would gain protection against Fe(II) toxicity. A Zetaproteobacteria isolate from this site oxidized iron at rates sufficient to account for deposition of geologic iron formations. In sum, our results suggest that once oxygenic photosynthesis evolved, microaerophilic chemolithotrophic iron oxidizers were likely important drivers of iron mineralization in ancient oceans. PMID:27384464

  16. Regulation of Iron Metabolism by Hepcidin under Conditions of Inflammation*

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Iron is a redox-active metal required as a cofactor in multiple metalloproteins essential for a host of life processes. The metal is highly toxic when present in excess and must be strictly regulated to prevent tissue and organ damage. Hepcidin, a molecule first characterized as an antimicrobial peptide, plays a critical role in the regulation of iron homeostasis. Multiple stimuli positively influence the expression of hepcidin, including iron, inflammation, and infection by pathogens. In this Minireview, I will discuss how inflammation regulates hepcidin transcription, allowing for sufficient concentrations of iron for organismal needs while sequestering the metal from infectious pathogens. PMID:26055723

  17. HIGH RESOLUTION INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA MASS SPECTROMETRY ALLOWS RAPID ASSESSMENT OF IRON ABSORPTION IN INFANTS AND CHILDREN

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stable isotope absorption studies of iron have been limited by the high cost and limited availability of isotope ratio analysis using thermal ionization MS (TIMS). The development of high-resolution double focusing inductively coupled plasma MS (ICP-MS) may permit more cost-efficient sample analysis...

  18. Effects of proteins on absorption by the rat of iron from polymeric and low-molecular-weight iron species

    SciTech Connect

    Berner, L.; Miller, D.

    1986-03-05

    To examine effects of proteins on Fe absorption from polymeric ferric hydroxides (polys) or low-molecular-weight complexes (LMW Fe), 2 studies were conducted. First, anemic rats were given /sup 59/Fe-labeled polys or LMW Fe in the presence and absence of pepsin-digested soy protein isolate, casein, and BSA. The doses were introduced into ligated duodenal segments for 1 hr. Uptake into the carcass of /sup 59/Fe from polys was doubled in the presence of BSA (7.8 vs 16.1%, p < .05) while casein and soy had no effect (5.5 and 6.5%). Absorption of /sup 59/Fe from LMW Fe was 7X greater than from polys; BSA and casein had no effect but soy depressed Fe uptake by almost 50% (57.4 vs 35.5%, p < .05). The second experiment repeated the first except that the proteins were not pepsin-digested and the doses were given by gastric intubation. All Fe, whether from polys or LMW Fe, was highly available (although in vitro digestions reveal that polys are not depolymerized to a large degree under simulated stomach conditions). Soy depressed Fe uptake from both sources (92.9 vs. 81.6%, LMW Fe and 85.4 vs 73.7%, polys) while casein and BSA had no effect. These results show: (1) BSA can depolymerize polys in the rat duodenum, thus enhancing absorption; (2) soy isolate generally depressed Fe uptake; and (3) the rat stomach appears to have an exceptional capacity for equalizing Fe sources.

  19. Probiotic strain Lactobacillus plantarum 299v increases iron absorption from an iron-supplemented fruit drink: a double-isotope cross-over single-blind study in women of reproductive age.

    PubMed

    Hoppe, Michael; Önning, Gunilla; Berggren, Anna; Hulthén, Lena

    2015-10-28

    Iron deficiency is common, especially among young women. Adding probiotics to foods could be one way to increase iron absorption. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that non-haem iron absorption from a fruit drink is improved by adding Lactobacillus plantarum 299v (Lp299v). Iron absorption was studied in healthy women of reproductive age using a single-blind cross-over design in two trials applying the double-isotope (55Fe and 59Fe) technique. In Trial 1, iron absorption from a fruit drink containing 109 colony-forming units (CFU) Lp299v was compared with that from a control drink without Lp299v. Trial 2 had the same design but 1010 CFU were used. The test and control drinks contained approximately 5 mg of iron as ferrous lactate and were labelled with 59Fe (B) and 55Fe (A), respectively, and consumed on 4 consecutive days in the order AABB. Retention of the isotopes was measured with whole-body counting and in blood. Mean iron absorption from the drink containing 109 CFU Lp299v (28·6(sd 12·5) %) was significantly higher than from the control drink (18·5(sd 5·8) %), n 10, P<0·028). The fruit drink with 1010 CFU Lp299v gave a mean iron absorption of 29·1(sd 17·0) %, whereas the control drink gave an absorption of (20·1(sd 6·4) %) (n 11, P<0·080). The difference in iron absorption between the 109 CFU Lp299v and the 1010 CFU Lp299v drinks was not significant (P=0·941). In conclusion, intake of probiotics can increase iron absorption by approximately 50 % from a fruit drink having an already relatively high iron bioavailability. PMID:26428277

  20. Enigmatic photon absorption in plasmas near solar interior conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iglesias, Carlos A.

    2015-06-01

    Large systematic discrepancies between theoretical and experimental photon absorption of Fe plasmas applicable to the solar interior were reported [Bailey et al., Nature 517, 56 (2015)]. The disagreement is examined in the context of the Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn f-sum rule. The analysis identifies several anomalies in the experimental results.

  1. The influences of iron characteristics, operating conditions and solution chemistry on contaminants removal by zero-valent iron: A review.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuankui; Li, Jinxiang; Huang, Tinglin; Guan, Xiaohong

    2016-09-01

    For successful application of a zero-valent iron (ZVI) system, of particular interest is the performance of ZVI under various conditions. The current review comprehensively summarizes the potential effects of the major influencing factors, such as iron intrinsic characteristics (e.g., surface area, iron impurities and oxide films), operating conditions (e.g., pH, dissolved oxygen, iron dosage, iron pretreatment, mixing conditions and temperature) and solution chemistry (e.g., anions, cations and natural organic matter) on the performance of ZVI reported in literature. It was demonstrated that all of the factors could exert significant effects on the ZVI performance toward contaminants removal, negatively or positively. Depending on the removal mechanisms of the respective contaminants and other environmental conditions, an individual variable may exhibit different effects. On the other hand, many of these influences have not been well understood or cannot be individually isolated in experimental or natural systems. Thus, more research is required in order to elucidate the exact roles and mechanisms of each factor in affecting the performance of ZVI. Furthermore, based on these understandings, future research may attempt to establish some feasible strategies to minimize the deteriorating effects and utilize the positive effects so as to improve the performance of ZVI. PMID:27206056

  2. Effect of iron oxide reductive dissolution on the transformation and immobilization of arsenic in soils: New insights from X-ray photoelectron and X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jian-Xin; Wang, Yu-Jun; Liu, Cun; Wang, Li-Hua; Yang, Ke; Zhou, Dong-Mei; Li, Wei; Sparks, Donald L

    2014-08-30

    The geochemical behavior and speciation of arsenic (As) in paddy soils is strongly controlled by soil redox conditions and the sequestration by soil iron oxyhydroxides. Hence, the effects of iron oxide reductive dissolution on the adsorption, transformation and precipitation of As(III) and As(V) in soils were investigated using batch experiments and synchrotron based techniques to gain a deeper understanding at both macroscopic and microscopic scales. The results of batch sorption experiments revealed that the sorption capacity of As(V) on anoxic soil was much higher than that on control soil. Synchrotron based X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF) mapping studies indicated that As was heterogeneously distributed and was mainly associated with iron in the soil. X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES), micro-X-ray absorption near edge structure (μ-XANES) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses revealed that the primary speciation of As in the soil is As(V). These results further suggested that, when As(V) was introduced into the anoxic soil, the rapid coprecipitation of As(V) with ferric/ferrous ion prevented its reduction to As(III), and was the main mechanism controlling the immobilization of As. This research could improve the current understanding of soil As chemistry in paddy and wetland soils. PMID:25064258

  3. Morphology of biogenic iron oxides records microbial physiology and environmental conditions: toward interpreting iron microfossils.

    PubMed

    Krepski, S T; Emerson, D; Hredzak-Showalter, P L; Luther, G W; Chan, C S

    2013-09-01

    Despite the abundance of Fe and its significance in Earth history, there are no established robust biosignatures for Fe(II)-oxidizing micro-organisms. This limits our ability to piece together the history of Fe biogeochemical cycling and, in particular, to determine whether Fe(II)-oxidizers played a role in depositing ancient iron formations. A promising candidate for Fe(II)-oxidizer biosignatures is the distinctive morphology and texture of extracellular Fe(III)-oxyhydroxide stalks produced by mat-forming microaerophilic Fe(II)-oxidizing micro-organisms. To establish the stalk morphology as a biosignature, morphologic parameters must be quantified and linked to the microaerophilic Fe(II)-oxidizing metabolism and environmental conditions. Toward this end, we studied an extant model organism, the marine stalk-forming Fe(II)-oxidizing bacterium, Mariprofundus ferrooxydans PV-1. We grew cultures in flat glass microslide chambers, with FeS substrate, creating opposing oxygen/Fe(II) concentration gradients. We used solid-state voltammetric microelectrodes to measure chemical gradients in situ while using light microscopy to image microbial growth, motility, and mineral formation. In low-oxygen (2.7-28 μm) zones of redox gradients, the bacteria converge into a narrow (100 μm-1 mm) growth band. As cells oxidize Fe(II), they deposit Fe(III)-oxyhydroxide stalks in this band; the stalks orient directionally, elongating toward higher oxygen concentrations. M. ferrooxydans stalks display a narrow range of widths and uniquely biogenic branching patterns, which result from cell division. Together with filament composition, these features (width, branching, and directional orientation) form a physical record unique to microaerophilic Fe(II)-oxidizer physiology; therefore, stalk morphology is a biosignature, as well as an indicator of local oxygen concentration at the time of formation. Observations of filamentous Fe(III)-oxyhydroxide microfossils from a ~170 Ma marine Fe

  4. Reactivity screening of microscale zerovalent irons and iron sulfides towards different CAHs under standardized experimental conditions.

    PubMed

    Velimirovic, Milica; Larsson, Per-Olof; Simons, Queenie; Bastiaens, Leen

    2013-05-15

    A standardized batch test procedure was developed and used to evaluate the reactivity of twelve newly designed microscale zerovalent iron (mZVI) particles and two biogenic iron sulfides towards a mixture of chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs) and their breakdown products. For comparison, commercially available mZVIs, nanoscale zerovalent irons (nZVIs), iron sulfides (FeS) and granular zerovalent iron were also tested. Reactivity of the particles was based on observed (kobs) and mass normalized (kM) pseudo-first-order degradation rate constants, as well as specific surface area normalized reaction rate constants (kSA). Sorption characteristics of the particles were based on mass balance data. Among the new mZVIs, significant differences in reactivity were observed and the most reactive particles were identified. Based on kM data, nZVI degraded the examined contaminants one to two orders of magnitude faster than the mZVIs. kM values for biogenic iron sulfides were similar to the least reactive mZVIs. On the other hand, comparison of kSA data revealed that the reactivity of some newly designed mZVIs was similar to highly reactive nZVIs, and even up to one order of magnitude higher. kSA values for biogenic iron sulfides were one to two orders of magnitude lower than those reported for reactive mZVIs. PMID:23510992

  5. Alternating magnetic field energy absorption in the dispersion of iron oxide nanoparticles in a viscous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolkova, Ilona S.; Kazantseva, Natalia E.; Babayan, Vladimir; Smolka, Petr; Parmar, Harshida; Vilcakova, Jarmila; Schneeweiss, Oldrich; Pizurova, Nadezda

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles were obtained by a coprecipitation method in a controlled growth process leading to the formation of uniform highly crystalline nanoparticles with average size of 13 nm, which corresponds to the superparamagnetic state. Nanoparticles obtained are a mixture of single-phase nanoparticles of magnetite and maghemite as well as nanoparticles of non-stoichiometric magnetite. The subsequent annealing of nanoparticles at 300 °C in air during 6 h leads to the full transformation to maghemite. It results in reduced value of the saturation magnetization (from 56 emu g-1 to 48 emu g-1) but does not affect the heating ability of nanoparticles. A 2-7 wt% dispersion of as-prepared and annealed nanoparticles in glycerol provides high heating rate in alternating magnetic fields allowed for application in magnetic hyperthermia; however the value of specific loss power does not exceed 30 W g-1. This feature of heat output is explained by the combined effect of magnetic interparticle interactions and the properties of the carrier medium. Nanoparticles coalesce during the synthesis and form aggregates showing ferromagnetic-like behavior with magnetization hysteresis, distinct sextets on Mössbauer spectrum, blocking temperature well about room temperature, which accounts for the higher energy barrier for magnetization reversal. At the same time, low specific heat capacity of glycerol intensifies heat transfer in the magnetic dispersion. However, high viscosity of glycerol limits the specific loss power value, since predominantly the Neel relaxation accounts for the absorption of AC magnetic field energy.

  6. Repletion of copper-deficient rats with dietary copper restores duodenal hephaestin protein and iron absorption.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Philip G; Demars, Lana C S

    2005-05-01

    Copper (Cu) deficiency in rats reduces the relative concentration of duodenal hephaestin (Hp), reduces iron (Fe) absorption, and causes anemia. An experiment was conducted to determine whether these effects could be reversed by dietary Cu repletion. Five groups of eight weanling male rats each were used. Group 1 was fed a Cu-adequate diet (5.0 mg Cu/kg; CuA) and Group 2 was fed a Cu-deficient diet (0.25 mg Cu/kg; CuD) for 28 days. The rats were fed 1.0 g each of their respective diets labeled with 59Fe (37 kBq/g), and the amount of label retained was measured one week later by whole-body-counting (WBC). Group 3 was fed a CuA diet and Groups 4 and 5 were fed a CuD diet for 28 days. Group 5 was then fed the CuA diet for another week while Groups 3 and 4 continued on their previous regimens. Rats in Groups 3, 4, and 5 were fed 1.0 g of diet labeled with 59Fe, and the amount of label retained was measured by WBC one week later. Rats were killed and duodenal enterocytes isolated for Hp protein analysis, whole blood was analyzed for hematological parameters, and various organs for 59Fe content. CuD rats absorbed less (P<0.05) Fe than CuA rats, the relative amount of duodenal Hp was less (P<0.05) in CuD rats, and the CuD rats developed anemia. After the CuD rats had been repleted with Cu for one week, Fe retention rose to values even higher (P<0.05) than those in CuA rats. After two weeks, the relative amount of duodenal Hp was higher (P<0.05) than normal, and most signs of anemia were reversed. Liver 59Fe was elevated in CuD rats, but was restored to normal upon Cu repletion. These findings suggest a strong association between duodenal Hp abundance and Fe absorption in the CuD rat, and that reduced Fe absorption is an important factor in the cause of anemia. PMID:15855298

  7. Simultaneous determination of cadmium, iron and tin in canned foods using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Leao, Danilo J; Junior, Mario M S; Brandao, Geovani C; Ferreira, Sergio L C

    2016-06-01

    A method was established to simultaneously determine cadmium, iron and tin in canned-food samples using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS GF AAS). The quantification step has been performed using the primary line (228.802nm) for cadmium and the adjacent secondary lines (228.725nm and 228.668nm) for iron and tin, respectively. The selected chemical modifier was an acid solution that contained a mixture of 0.1% (w/v) Pd and 0.05% (w/v) Mg. The absorbance signals were measured based on the peak area using 3 pixels for cadmium and 5 pixels for iron and tin. Under these conditions, cadmium, iron and tin have been determined in canned-food samples using the external calibration technique based on aqueous standards, where the limits of quantification were 2.10ngg(-1) for cadmium, 1.95mgkg(-1) for iron and 3.00mgkg(-1) for tin, and the characteristic masses were 1.0pg for cadmium, 0.9ng for iron and 1.1ng for tin. The precision was evaluated using two solutions of each metal ion, and the results, which were expressed as the relative standard deviation (RSD%), were 3.4-6.8%. The method accuracy for cadmium and iron was confirmed by analyzing a certified reference material of apple leaves (NIST 1515), which was supplied by NIST. However, for tin, the accuracy was confirmed by comparing the results of the proposed method and another analytical technique (inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry). The proposed procedure was applied to determine cadmium, iron and tin in canned samples of peeled tomato and sardine. Eleven samples were analyzed, and the analyte concentrations were 3.57-62.9ngg(-1), 2.68-31.48mgkg(-1) and 4.06-122.0mgkg(-1) for cadmium, iron and tin, respectively. In all analyzed samples, the cadmium and tin contents were lower than the permissible maximum levels for these metals in canned foods in the Brazilian legislation. PMID:27130088

  8. Iron

    MedlinePlus

    Iron is a mineral that our bodies need for many functions. For example, iron is part of hemoglobin, a protein which carries ... It helps our muscles store and use oxygen. Iron is also part of many other proteins and ...

  9. The IRP1-HIF-2α axis coordinates iron and oxygen sensing with erythropoiesis and iron absorption.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Sheila A; Nizzi, Christopher P; Chang, Yuan-I; Deck, Kathryn M; Schmidt, Paul J; Galy, Bruno; Damnernsawad, Alisa; Broman, Aimee T; Kendziorski, Christina; Hentze, Matthias W; Fleming, Mark D; Zhang, Jing; Eisenstein, Richard S

    2013-02-01

    Red blood cell production is a finely tuned process that requires coordinated oxygen- and iron-dependent regulation of cell differentiation and iron metabolism. Here, we show that translational regulation of hypoxia-inducible factor 2α (HIF-2α) synthesis by iron regulatory protein 1 (IRP1) is critical for controlling erythrocyte number. IRP1-null (Irp1(-/-)) mice display a marked transient polycythemia. HIF-2α messenger RNA (mRNA) is derepressed in kidneys of Irp1(-/-) mice but not in kidneys of Irp2(-/-) mice, leading to increased renal erythropoietin (Epo) mRNA and inappropriately elevated serum Epo levels. Expression of the iron transport genes DCytb, Dmt1, and ferroportin, as well as other HIF-2α targets, is enhanced in Irp1(-/-) duodenum. Analysis of mRNA translation state in the liver revealed IRP1-dependent dysregulation of HIF-2α mRNA translation, whereas IRP2 deficiency derepressed translation of all other known 5' iron response element (IRE)-containing mRNAs expressed in the liver. These results uncover separable physiological roles of each IRP and identify IRP1 as a therapeutic target for manipulating HIF-2α action in hematologic, oncologic, and other disorders. PMID:23395174

  10. Electron transfer during selenium reduction by iron surfaces in aqueous solution: High resolution X-ray absorption study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvashnina, K. O.; Butorin, S. M.; Cui, D.; Vegelius, J.; Puranen, A.; Gens, R.; Glatzel, P.

    2009-11-01

    We present a study of selenate (SeO42-) on an iron surface in ground water solution by X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy. Spectral sharpening is obtained by using the high energy resolution fluorescence detection technique that also efficiently suppresses the strong fluorescence signal from the Fe surface in the highly dilute samples (Se concentration < 3 ppm). We observe fully reduced Se on polished Fe surfaces while no changes are found for Se on oxidized Fe surface.

  11. Diagnosing the plasma nonuniformity in an iron opacity experiment by spatially resolved Al 1s-2p absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiaoding, Zhang; Jiyan, Zhang; Yang, Zhao; Gang, Xiong; Bin, Zhao; Guohong, Yang; Jian, Zheng; Jiamin, Yang

    2012-12-01

    Generating a well-characterized hot-dense sample is of great importance to high quality opacity measurements. In this paper, we report on an experimental investigation of the plasma nonuniformity in a radiatively heated iron opacity sample by spatially resolved Al 1s-2p absorption spectroscopy. The iron sample was tamped by plastic at both sides and was heated by thermal x-ray radiation generated in a gold Hohlraum, and an Al layer attached to it was used as a tracer for temperature diagnosis. Spatially resolved 1s-2p transition absorption spectra of the Al tracer were measured by the technique of point-projection-spectroscopy, and temperatures in the sample were obtained by comparing the measured spectra with detailed-term-accounting model calculations, with the density of the sample deduced using a combination of side-on radiography and radiative hydrodynamic simulation. The results showed the existence of axial temperature nonuniformity in the sample, and these temperature variations have been used to explain the shift of iron 2p-3d transition absorption feature along the axial direction of the Hohlraum used to heat the sample successfully.

  12. Diagnosing the plasma nonuniformity in an iron opacity experiment by spatially resolved Al 1s-2p absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Xiaoding; Zhang Jiyan; Zhao Yang; Xiong Gang; Yang Guohong; Yang Jiamin; Zhao Bin; Zheng Jian

    2012-12-15

    Generating a well-characterized hot-dense sample is of great importance to high quality opacity measurements. In this paper, we report on an experimental investigation of the plasma nonuniformity in a radiatively heated iron opacity sample by spatially resolved Al 1s-2p absorption spectroscopy. The iron sample was tamped by plastic at both sides and was heated by thermal x-ray radiation generated in a gold Hohlraum, and an Al layer attached to it was used as a tracer for temperature diagnosis. Spatially resolved 1s-2p transition absorption spectra of the Al tracer were measured by the technique of point-projection-spectroscopy, and temperatures in the sample were obtained by comparing the measured spectra with detailed-term-accounting model calculations, with the density of the sample deduced using a combination of side-on radiography and radiative hydrodynamic simulation. The results showed the existence of axial temperature nonuniformity in the sample, and these temperature variations have been used to explain the shift of iron 2p-3d transition absorption feature along the axial direction of the Hohlraum used to heat the sample successfully.

  13. Iron requirements based upon iron absorption tests are poorly predicted by haematological indices in patients with inactive inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Lomer, Miranda C E; Cook, William B; Jan-Mohamed, Hamid Jan B; Hutchinson, Carol; Liu, Ding Yong; Hider, Robert C; Powell, Jonathan J

    2012-06-01

    Fe deficiency and Fe-deficiency anaemia are common in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Traditional clinical markers of Fe status can be skewed in the presence of inflammation, meaning that a patient's Fe status can be misinterpreted. Additionally, Fe absorption is known to be down-regulated in patients with active IBD. However, whether this is the case for quiescent or mildly active disease has not been formally assessed. The present study aimed to investigate the relationship between Fe absorption, Fe requirements and standard haematological indices in IBD patients without active disease. A group of twenty-nine patients with quiescent or mildly active IBD and twenty-eight control subjects undertook an Fe absorption test that measured sequential rises in serum Fe over 4 h following ingestion of 200 mg ferrous sulphate. At baseline, serum Fe, transferrin saturation, non-transferrin-bound Fe (NTBI), ferritin and soluble transferrin receptor were all measured. Thereafter (30-240 min), only serum Fe and NTBI were measured. Fe absorption did not differ between the two groups (P = 0·9; repeated-measures ANOVA). In control subjects, baseline haematological parameters predicted Fe absorption (i.e. Fe requirements), but this was not the case for patients with IBD. Fe absorption is normal in quiescent or mildly active IBD patients but standard haematological parameters do not accurately predict Fe requirements. PMID:22152498

  14. Quantifying intra- and extracellular aggregation of iron oxide nanoparticles and its influence on specific absorption rate.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Seongho; Hurley, Katie R; Bischof, John C; Haynes, Christy L; Hogan, Christopher J

    2016-09-21

    A promising route to cancer treatment is hyperthermia, facilitated by superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs). After exposure to an alternating external magnetic field, SPIONs generate heat, quantified by their specific absorption rate (SAR, in W g(-1) Fe). However, without surface functionalization, commercially available, high SAR SPIONs (EMG 308, Ferrotec, USA) aggregate in aqueous suspensions; this has been shown to reduce SAR. Further reduction in SAR has been observed for SPIONs in suspensions containing cells, but the origin of this further reduction has not been made clear. Here, we use image analysis methods to quantify the structures of SPION aggregates in the extra- and intracellular milieu of LNCaP cell suspensions. We couple image characterization with nanoparticle tracking analysis and SAR measurements of SPION aggregates in cell-free suspensions, to better quantify the influence of cellular uptake on SPION aggregates and ultimately its influence on SAR. We find that in both the intra- and extracellular milieu, SPION aggregates are well-described by a quasifractal model, with most aggregates having fractal dimensions in the 1.6-2.2 range. Intracellular aggregates are found to be significantly larger than extracellular aggregates and are commonly composed of more than 10(3) primary SPION particles (hence they are "superaggregates"). By using high salt concentrations to generate such superaggregates and measuring the SAR of suspensions, we confirm that it is the formation of superaggregates in the intracellular milieu that negatively impacts SAR, reducing it from above 200 W g(-1) Fe for aggregates composed of fewer than 50 primary particles to below 50 W g(-1) for superaggregates. While the underlying physical mechanism by which aggregation leads to reduction in SAR remains to be determined, the methods developed in this study provide insight into how cellular uptake influences the extent of SPION aggregation, and enable estimation of the

  15. Intestinal absorption of dietary cadmium in women depends on body iron stores and fiber intake.

    PubMed Central

    Berglund, M; Akesson, A; Nermell, B; Vahter, M

    1994-01-01

    Measurements of intake and uptake of cadmium in relation to diet composition were carried out in 57 nonsmoking women, 20-50 years of age. A vegetarian/high-fiber diet and a mixed-diet group were constructed based on results from a food frequency questionnaire. Duplicate diets and the corresponding feces were collected during 4 consecutive days in parallel with dietary recording of type and amount of food ingested for determination of the dietary intake of cadmium and various nutrients. Blood and 24-hr urine samples were collected for determination of cadmium, hemoglobin, ferritin, and zinc. There were no differences in the intake of nutrients between the mixed-diet and the high-fiber diet groups, except for a significantly higher intake of fiber (p < 0.001) and cadmium (p < 0.002) in the high-fiber group. Fecal cadmium corresponded to 98% in the mixed-diet group and 100% in the high-fiber diet group. No differences in blood cadmium (BCd) or urinary cadmium (UCd) between groups could be detected. There was a tendency toward higher BCd and UCd concentrations with increasing fiber intake; however, the concentrations were not statistically significant at the 5% level, indicating an inhibitory effect of fiber on the gastrointestinal absorption of cadmium. Sixty-seven percent of the women had serum ferritin < 30 micrograms/l, indicating reduced body iron stores, which were highly associated with higher BCd (irrespective of fiber intake). BCd was mainly correlated with UCd, serum ferritin, age, anf fibre intake. UCd and serum ferritin explained almost 60% of the variation in BCd.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. A Figure 3. B Figure 4. Figure 5. PMID:7713018

  16. MYB10 and MYB72 are required for growth under iron-limiting conditions.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Christine M; Hindt, Maria N; Schmidt, Holger; Clemens, Stephan; Guerinot, Mary Lou

    2013-11-01

    Iron is essential for photosynthesis and is often a limiting nutrient for plant productivity. Plants respond to conditions of iron deficiency by increasing transcript abundance of key genes involved in iron homeostasis, but only a few regulators of these genes have been identified. Using genome-wide expression analysis, we searched for transcription factors that are induced within 24 hours after transferring plants to iron-deficient growth conditions. Out of nearly 100 transcription factors shown to be up-regulated, we identified MYB10 and MYB72 as the most highly induced transcription factors. Here, we show that MYB10 and MYB72 are functionally redundant and are required for plant survival in alkaline soil where iron availability is greatly restricted. myb10myb72 double mutants fail to induce transcript accumulation of the nicotianamine synthase gene NAS4. Both myb10myb72 mutants and nas4-1 mutants have reduced iron concentrations, chlorophyll levels, and shoot mass under iron-limiting conditions, indicating that these genes are essential for proper plant growth. The double myb10myb72 mutant also showed nickel and zinc sensitivity, similar to the nas4 mutant. Ectopic expression of NAS4 rescues myb10myb72 plants, suggesting that loss of NAS4 is the primary defect in these plants and emphasizes the importance of nicotianamine, an iron chelator, in iron homeostasis. Overall, our results provide evidence that MYB10 and MYB72 act early in the iron-deficiency regulatory cascade to drive gene expression of NAS4 and are essential for plant survival under iron deficiency. PMID:24278034

  17. Iron Deficiency in Cyanobacteria Causes Monomerization of Photosystem I Trimers and Reduces the Capacity for State Transitions and the Effective Absorption Cross Section of Photosystem I in Vivo1

    PubMed Central

    Ivanov, Alexander G.; Krol, Marianna; Sveshnikov, Dmitry; Selstam, Eva; Sandström, Stefan; Koochek, Maryam; Park, Youn-Il; Vasil'ev, Sergej; Bruce, Doug; Öquist, Gunnar; Huner, Norman P.A.

    2006-01-01

    The induction of the isiA (CP43′) protein in iron-stressed cyanobacteria is accompanied by the formation of a ring of 18 CP43′ proteins around the photosystem I (PSI) trimer and is thought to increase the absorption cross section of PSI within the CP43′-PSI supercomplex. In contrast to these in vitro studies, our in vivo measurements failed to demonstrate any increase of the PSI absorption cross section in two strains (Synechococcus sp. PCC 7942 and Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803) of iron-stressed cells. We report that iron-stressed cells exhibited a reduced capacity for state transitions and limited dark reduction of the plastoquinone pool, which accounts for the increase in PSII-related 685 nm chlorophyll fluorescence under iron deficiency. This was accompanied by lower abundance of the NADP-dehydrogenase complex and the PSI-associated subunit PsaL, as well as a reduced amount of phosphatidylglycerol. Nondenaturating polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis separation of the chlorophyll-protein complexes indicated that the monomeric form of PSI is favored over the trimeric form of PSI under iron stress. Thus, we demonstrate that the induction of CP43′ does not increase the PSI functional absorption cross section of whole cells in vivo, but rather, induces monomerization of PSI trimers and reduces the capacity for state transitions. We discuss the role of CP43′ as an effective energy quencher to photoprotect PSII and PSI under unfavorable environmental conditions in cyanobacteria in vivo. PMID:16798943

  18. Mitigation of scattering defect and absorption of DKDP crystals by laser conditioning.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yueliang; Zhao, Yuanan; Hu, Guohang; Peng, Xiaocong; Chang, Junxiu; Xie, Xiaoyi; He, Jun; Guo, Meng; Shao, Jianda

    2015-06-15

    The variation of scattering and absorption in DKDP crystals by laser conditioning was investigated by combining light scattering technique and on-site transmittance measurement technique. Laser-induced disappearance of scattering defects was observed, and variation of transmittance was achieved. Using Mie theory, a kind of absorbing defects, aside from scattering defect, was discovered. Moreover, the experimental results demonstrated that the absorption of crystal could be mitigated by laser conditioning. PMID:26193600

  19. Multi-harmonic measurements of line shape under low absorption conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, L. J.; Ding, Y. J.; Peng, Z. M.; Du, Y. J.; Liu, Y. F.; Li, Z.

    2014-06-01

    We propose a method that employs the ratios of the 2nd and 4th harmonics at the line center to measure line shape under low absorption conditions. To verify this method, the transition of CO2 at 6,982.0678 cm-1 is selected to measure line shape by using the proposed method and direct absorption spectroscopy in laboratory conditions. The results from both methods have a high degree of consistency. This satisfactory agreement indicates the validity of the proposed method.

  20. The role of iron in Mycobacterium smegmatis biofilm formation: the exochelin siderophore is essential in limiting iron conditions for biofilm formation but not for planktonic growth

    PubMed Central

    Ojha, Anil; Hatfull, Graham F

    2007-01-01

    Many species of mycobacteria form structured biofilm communities at liquid–air interfaces and on solid surfaces. Full development of Mycobacterium smegmatis biofilms requires addition of supplemental iron above 1 μM ferrous sulphate, although addition of iron is not needed for planktonic growth. Microarray analysis of the M. smegmatis transcriptome shows that iron-responsive genes – especially those involved in siderophore synthesis and iron uptake – are strongly induced during biofilm formation reflecting a response to iron deprivation, even when 2 μM iron is present. The acquisition of iron under these conditions is specifically dependent on the exochelin synthesis and uptake pathways, and the strong defect of an iron–exochelin uptake mutant suggests a regulatory role of iron in the transition to biofilm growth. In contrast, although the expression of mycobactin and iron ABC transport operons is highly upregulated during biofilm formation, mutants in these systems form normal biofilms in low-iron (2 μM) conditions. A close correlation between iron availability and matrix-associated fatty acids implies a possible metabolic role in the late stages of biofilm maturation, in addition to the early regulatory role. M. smegmatis surface motility is similarly dependent on iron availability, requiring both supplemental iron and the exochelin pathway to acquire it. PMID:17854402

  1. Decoupling of arsenic and iron release from ferrihydrite suspension under reducing conditions: a biogeochemical model

    PubMed Central

    Burnol, André; Garrido, Francis; Baranger, Philippe; Joulian, Catherine; Dictor, Marie-Christine; Bodénan, Françoise; Morin, Guillaume; Charlet, Laurent

    2007-01-01

    High levels of arsenic in groundwater and drinking water are a major health problem. Although the processes controlling the release of As are still not well known, the reductive dissolution of As-rich Fe oxyhydroxides has so far been a favorite hypothesis. Decoupling between arsenic and iron redox transformations has been experimentally demonstrated, but not quantitatively interpreted. Here, we report on incubation batch experiments run with As(V) sorbed on, or co-precipitated with, 2-line ferrihydrite. The biotic and abiotic processes of As release were investigated by using wet chemistry, X-ray diffraction, X-ray absorption and genomic techniques. The incubation experiments were carried out with a phosphate-rich growth medium and a community of Fe(III)-reducing bacteria under strict anoxic conditions for two months. During the first month, the release of Fe(II) in the aqueous phase amounted to only 3% to 10% of the total initial solid Fe concentration, whilst the total aqueous As remained almost constant after an initial exchange with phosphate ions. During the second month, the aqueous Fe(II) concentration remained constant, or even decreased, whereas the total quantity of As released to the solution accounted for 14% to 45% of the total initial solid As concentration. At the end of the incubation, the aqueous-phase arsenic was present predominately as As(III) whilst X-ray absorption spectroscopy indicated that more than 70% of the solid-phase arsenic was present as As(V). X-ray diffraction revealed vivianite Fe(II)3(PO4)2.8H2O in some of the experiments. A biogeochemical model was then developed to simulate these aqueous- and solid-phase results. The two main conclusions drawn from the model are that (1) As(V) is not reduced during the first incubation month with high Eh values, but rather re-adsorbed onto the ferrihydrite surface, and this state remains until arsenic reduction is energetically more favorable than iron reduction, and (2) the release of As

  2. Is iron at the Earth's core conditions hcp-structured?

    SciTech Connect

    Dubrovinsky, L; Dubrovinskaia, N; Prakapenka, V

    2012-02-07

    Iron is the main component of the Earth's core and its structure and properties are important for interpretation of geophysical observations and modeling dynamics of the core. We argue that the diffraction lines in the high temperature high pressure X-ray diffraction pattern, presented by Tateno et al., 2010 and interpreted as those of solely hot hcp-Fe, correspond indeed to the insufficiently heated part of the sample. We show that observed diffraction spots are either due to bcc-Fe or carbides.

  3. Formation Sequences of Iron Minerals in the Acidic Alteration Products and Variation of Hydrothermal Fluid Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isobe, H.; Yoshizawa, M.

    2008-12-01

    Iron minerals have important role in environmental issues not only on the Earth but also other terrestrial planets. Iron mineral species related to alteration products of primary minerals with surface or subsurface fluids are characterized by temperature, acidity and redox conditions of the fluids. We can see various iron- bearing alteration products in alteration products around fumaroles in geothermal/volcanic areas. In this study, zonal structures of iron minerals in alteration products of the geothermal area are observed to elucidate temporal and spatial variation of hydrothermal fluids. Alteration of the pyroxene-amphibole andesite of Garan-dake volcano, Oita, Japan occurs by the acidic hydrothermal fluid to form cristobalite leaching out elements other than Si. Hand specimens with unaltered or weakly altered core and cristobalite crust show various sequences of layers. XRD analysis revealed that the alteration degree is represented by abundance of cristobalite. Intermediately altered layers are characterized by occurrence including alunite, pyrite, kaolinite, goethite and hematite. A specimen with reddish brown core surrounded by cristobalite-rich white crust has brown colored layers at the boundary of core and the crust. Reddish core is characterized by occurrence of crystalline hematite by XRD. Another hand specimen has light gray core, which represents reduced conditions, and white cristobalite crust with light brown and reddish brown layers of ferric iron minerals between the core and the crust. On the other hand, hornblende crystals, typical ferrous iron-bearing mineral of the host rock, are well preserved in some samples with strongly decolorized cristobalite-rich groundmass. Hydrothermal alteration experiments of iron-rich basaltic material shows iron mineral species depend on acidity and temperature of the fluid. Oxidation states of the iron-bearing mineral species are strongly influenced by the acidity and redox conditions. Variations of alteration

  4. X-ray absorption spectroscopy study of H 2S sorption on iron-rich soil: Characterization of iron-sulfur species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Tzu-Hsing; Yu, Lung-Sheng; Hung, Chien-Jen

    2007-08-01

    Iron-rich soil after sorption of H 2S was characterized using X-ray absorption near-edge structural (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) for determination the possible products in the present work. EXAFS revealed that the main Fe-S species in the sulfided sample were FeS (troilite) and Fe 1- xS (pyrrohotite). Iron in the sulfided sample was found to possess a Fe-S bond distance of 2.36 Å and a Fe-O bond distance of 1.72 Å in the Fe-K-edge spectra whereas the Fe-S bond distance of 2.25 Å was determined in the sulfur K-edge spectra. In the second shells, the bond distance of Fe-O-Si or Fe-O-Al with 3.28 Å was also observed. No FeS 2 (pyrite) was included in the sulfided sample. The formation of Fe 1- xS was probably attributed to the presence of Fe 3O 4, a type of spinel structure with a lattice deficiency.

  5. Preparation and characterization of novel glass-ceramic tile with microwave absorption properties from iron ore tailings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Rui; Liao, SongYi; Dai, ChangLu; Liu, YuChen; Chen, XiaoYu; Zheng, Feng

    2015-03-01

    A novel glass-ceramic tile consisting of one glass-ceramic layer (GC) attaining microwave absorption properties atop ceramic substrate was prepared through quench-heat treatment route derived from iron ore tailings (IOTs) and commercial raw materials (purity range 73-99%). X-ray diffraction (XRD), SEM, Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Physical property measurement system (PPMS) and Vector network analyzer (VNA) measurements were carried out to investigate phase, microstructure, magnetic and microwave absorption aspects of the glass-ceramic layer. Roughly 80.6±1.7 wt% borosilicate glass and 19.4±1.7 wt% spinel ferrite with chemical formula of (Zn2+0.17Fe3+0.83)[Fe3+1.17Fe2+0.06Ni2+0.77]O4 were found among the tested samples. Absorption of Electromagnetic wave by 3 mm thick glass-ceramic layer at frequency of 2-18 GHz reached peak reflection loss (RL) of -17.61 dB (98.27% microwave absorption) at 10.31 GHz. Altering the thickness of the glass-ceramic layer can meet the requirements of different level of microwave absorption.

  6. Candida albicans Hap43 Is a Repressor Induced under Low-Iron Conditions and Is Essential for Iron-Responsive Transcriptional Regulation and Virulence ▿

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Po-Chen; Yang, Cheng-Yao; Lan, Chung-Yu

    2011-01-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic fungal pathogen that exists as normal flora in healthy human bodies but causes life-threatening infections in immunocompromised patients. In addition to innate and adaptive immunities, hosts also resist microbial infections by developing a mechanism of “natural resistance” that maintains a low level of free iron to restrict the growth of invading pathogens. C. albicans must overcome this iron-deprived environment to cause infections. There are three types of iron-responsive transcriptional regulators in fungi; Aft1/Aft2 activators in yeast, GATA-type repressors in many fungi, and HapX/Php4 in Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Aspergillus species. In this study, we characterized the iron-responsive regulator Hap43, which is the C. albicans homolog of HapX/Php4 and is repressed by the GATA-type repressor Sfu1 under iron-sufficient conditions. We provide evidence that Hap43 is essential for the growth of C. albicans under low-iron conditions and for C. albicans virulence in a mouse model of infection. Hap43 was not required for iron acquisition under low-iron conditions. Instead, it was responsible for repression of genes that encode iron-dependent proteins involved in mitochondrial respiration and iron-sulfur cluster assembly. We also demonstrated that Hap43 executes its function by becoming a transcriptional repressor and accumulating in the nucleus in response to iron deprivation. Finally, we found a connection between Hap43 and the global corepressor Tup1 in low-iron-induced flavinogenesis. Taken together, our data suggest a complex interplay among Hap43, Sfu1, and Tup1 to coordinately regulate iron acquisition, iron utilization, and other iron-responsive metabolic activities. PMID:21131439

  7. The chemical environment of iron in mineral fibres. A combined X-ray absorption and Mössbauer spectroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Pollastri, Simone; D'Acapito, Francesco; Trapananti, Angela; Colantoni, Ivan; Andreozzi, Giovanni B; Gualtieri, Alessandro F

    2015-11-15

    Although asbestos represents today one of the most harmful contaminant on Earth, in 72% of the countries worldwide only amphiboles are banned while controlled use of chrysotile is allowed. Uncertainty on the potential toxicity of chrysotile is due to the fact that the mechanisms by which mineral fibres induces cyto- and geno-toxic damage are still unclear. We have recently started a long term project aimed at the systematic investigation of the crystal-chemistry, bio-interaction and toxicity of the mineral fibres. This work presents a systematic structural investigation of iron in asbestos and erionite (considered the most relevant mineral fibres of social and/or economic-industrial importance) using synchrotron X-ray absorption and Mössbauer spectroscopy. In all investigated mineral fibres, iron in the bulk structure is found in octahedral sites and can be made available at the surface via fibre dissolution. We postulate that the amount of hydroxyl radicals released by the fibers depends, among other factors, upon their dissolution rate; in relation to this, a ranking of ability of asbestos fibres to generate hydroxyl radicals, resulting from available surface iron, is advanced: amosite > crocidolite ≈ chrysotile > anthophyllite > tremolite. Erionite, with a fairly high toxicity potential, contains only octahedrally coordinated Fe(3+). Although it needs further experimental evidence, such available surface iron may be present as oxide nanoparticles coating and can be a direct cause of generation of hydroxyl radicals when such coating dissolves. PMID:26073382

  8. Laboratory evaluation and application of microwave absorption properties under simulated conditions for planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, Paul G.

    1987-01-01

    Laboratory measurements were conducted to evaluate properties of atmospheric gases under simulated conditions for the outer planets. A significant addition to this effort was the capability to make such measurements at millimeter wavelengths. Measurements should soon be completed on the millimeter wave absorption from ammonia under Jovian conditions. Also studied will be the feasibility of measuring the microwave and millimeter wave properties of phosphine (PH3) under simulated Jovian conditions. Further analysis and application of the laboratory results to microwave and millimeter wave absorption data for the outer planet, such as Voyager Radio Occultation experiments, will be pursued.

  9. IRON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The document surveys the effects of organic and inorganic iron that are relevant to humans and their environment. The biology and chemistry of iron are complex and only partially understood. Iron participates in oxidation reduction processes that not only affect its geochemical m...

  10. Near infrared iron absorption bands: Applications to geologic mapping and mineral exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowan, L. C.

    1972-01-01

    A spectroscopic analysis of the difference in reflectance of iron-rich and iron-poor minerals was made. Attempts were made to use these minima contrast in geological mapping and metallic mineral exploration of large areas from near infrared and visible satellite images. Data cover pertinent laboratory spectroscopic investigations, applications of spectral differences to the discrimination of two important metamorphic rock types, and mineral exploration by aircraft in Beartooth Mountains, Montana.

  11. Absorption spectroscopy of mid and neighboring Z plasmas: Iron, nickel,copper and germanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loisel, G.; Arnault, P.; Bastiani-Ceccotti, S.; Blenski, T.; Caillaud, T.; Fariaut, J.; Fölsner, W.; Gilleron, F.; Pain, J.-C.; Poirier, M.; Reverdin, C.; Silvert, V.; Thais, F.; Turck-Chièze, S.; Villette, B.

    2009-09-01

    Opacities of four medium Z element plasmas (iron, nickel, copper and germanium) have been measured at the LULI-2000 facility in similar conditions: temperatures between 15 and 25 eV and densities between 2 and 10 mg/cm 3, in a wavelength range (8-18 Å) including the strong 2p-3d structures. Two laser beams from the LULI facility were used in the nanosecond-picosecond configuration. The NANO-2000 beam (at λ = 0.53 μm) heated a gold hohlraum with an energy between 30 and 150 J with a duration of 0.6 ns. Samples covering half a hohlraum hole were thus radiatively heated. The picosecond pulse PICO-2000 beam (at λ = 1.053 μm) has been used to produce a short (about 10 ps) X-ray backlighter in order to reduce time variations of temperatures and densities during the measurement. A crystal high-resolution spectrometer was used as the main diagnostic to record at the same time the non-absorbed and the absorbed backlighter spectra. Radiation temperatures were measured using a broadband spectrometer. 1D and 2D simulations have been performed in order to estimate hydrodynamic plasmas parameters. The measured spectra have been compared with theoretical ones obtained using either the superconfiguration code SCO or the detailed term accounting code HULLAC. These comparisons allow us to check the modeling of the statistical broadening and of the spin-orbit splitting of the 2p-3d transitions and related effects such as the interaction between relativistic subconfigurations belonging to the same non-relativistic configuration.

  12. Photooxidation and photoaquation of iron hexacyanide in aqueous solution: A picosecond X-ray absorption study.

    PubMed

    Reinhard, M; Penfold, T J; Lima, F A; Rittmann, J; Rittmann-Frank, M H; Abela, R; Tavernelli, I; Rothlisberger, U; Milne, C J; Chergui, M

    2014-03-01

    We present a picosecond Fe K-edge absorption study of photoexcited ferrous and ferric hexacyanide in water under 355 and 266 nm excitation. Following 355 nm excitation, the transient spectra for the ferrous and ferric complexes exhibit a red shift of the edge reflecting an increased electron density at the Fe atom. For the former, an enhanced pre-edge transition is also observed. These observations are attributed to the aquated [Fe(CN)5OH2](3-) species, based on quantum chemical calculations which also provide structural parameters. Upon 266 nm excitation of the ferric complex, a transient reminiscent of the aquated species is observed (appearance of a pre-edge feature and red shift of the edge) but it is different from that obtained under 355 nm excitation. This points to a new reaction channel occurring through an intermediate state lying between these two excitation energies. Finally, 266 nm excitation of the ferrous species is dominated by the photooxidation channel with formation of the ferric complex as main photoproduct. However, we observe an additional minor photoproduct, which is identical to the 266 nm generated photoproduct of the ferric species, suggesting that under our experimental conditions, the pump pulse photooxidises the ferrous complex and re-excites the primary ferric photoproduct. PMID:26798775

  13. Water oxidation catalysis with nonheme iron complexes under acidic and basic conditions: homogeneous or heterogeneous?

    PubMed

    Hong, Dachao; Mandal, Sukanta; Yamada, Yusuke; Lee, Yong-Min; Nam, Wonwoo; Llobet, Antoni; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2013-08-19

    Thermal water oxidation by cerium(IV) ammonium nitrate (CAN) was catalyzed by nonheme iron complexes, such as Fe(BQEN)(OTf)2 (1) and Fe(BQCN)(OTf)2 (2) (BQEN = N,N'-dimethyl-N,N'-bis(8-quinolyl)ethane-1,2-diamine, BQCN = N,N'-dimethyl-N,N'-bis(8-quinolyl)cyclohexanediamine, OTf = CF3SO3(-)) in a nonbuffered aqueous solution; turnover numbers of 80 ± 10 and 20 ± 5 were obtained in the O2 evolution reaction by 1 and 2, respectively. The ligand dissociation of the iron complexes was observed under acidic conditions, and the dissociated ligands were oxidized by CAN to yield CO2. We also observed that 1 was converted to an iron(IV)-oxo complex during the water oxidation in competition with the ligand oxidation. In addition, oxygen exchange between the iron(IV)-oxo complex and H2(18)O was found to occur at a much faster rate than the oxygen evolution. These results indicate that the iron complexes act as the true homogeneous catalyst for water oxidation by CAN at low pHs. In contrast, light-driven water oxidation using [Ru(bpy)3](2+) (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine) as a photosensitizer and S2O8(2-) as a sacrificial electron acceptor was catalyzed by iron hydroxide nanoparticles derived from the iron complexes under basic conditions as the result of the ligand dissociation. In a buffer solution (initial pH 9.0) formation of the iron hydroxide nanoparticles with a size of around 100 nm at the end of the reaction was monitored by dynamic light scattering (DLS) in situ and characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) measurements. We thus conclude that the water oxidation by CAN was catalyzed by short-lived homogeneous iron complexes under acidic conditions, whereas iron hydroxide nanoparticles derived from iron complexes act as a heterogeneous catalyst in the light-driven water oxidation reaction under basic conditions. PMID:23895380

  14. Uranium reduction and resistance to reoxidation under iron-reducing and sulfate-reducing conditions.

    PubMed

    Boonchayaanant, Benjaporn; Nayak, Dipti; Du, Xin; Criddle, Craig S

    2009-10-01

    Oxidation and mobilization of microbially-generated U(IV) is of great concern for in situ uranium bioremediation. This study investigated the reoxidation of uranium by oxygen and nitrate in a sulfate-reducing enrichment and an iron-reducing enrichment derived from sediment and groundwater from the Field Research Center in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Both enrichments were capable of reducing U(VI) rapidly. 16S rRNA gene clone libraries of the two enrichments revealed that Desulfovibrio spp. are dominant in the sulfate-reducing enrichment, and Clostridium spp. are dominant in the iron-reducing enrichment. In both the sulfate-reducing enrichment and the iron-reducing enrichment, oxygen reoxidized the previously reduced uranium but to a lesser extent in the iron-reducing enrichment. Moreover, in the iron-reducing enrichment, the reoxidized U(VI) was eventually re-reduced to its previous level. In both, the sulfate-reducing enrichment and the iron-reducing enrichment, uranium reoxidation did not occur in the presence of nitrate. The results indicate that the Clostridium-dominated iron-reducing communities created conditions that were more favorable for uranium stability with respect to reoxidation despite the fact that fewer electron equivalents were added to these systems. The likely reason is that more of the added electrons are present in a form that can reduce oxygen to water and U(VI) back to U(IV). PMID:19651424

  15. Experimental determination of the electrical resistivity of iron at Earth’s core conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Kenji; Kuwayama, Yasuhiro; Hirose, Kei; Shimizu, Katsuya; Ohishi, Yasuo

    2016-06-01

    Earth continuously generates a dipole magnetic field in its convecting liquid outer core by a self-sustained dynamo action. Metallic iron is a dominant component of the outer core, so its electrical and thermal conductivity controls the dynamics and thermal evolution of Earth’s core. However, in spite of extensive research, the transport properties of iron under core conditions are still controversial. Since free electrons are a primary carrier of both electric current and heat, the electron scattering mechanism in iron under high pressure and temperature holds the key to understanding the transport properties of planetary cores. Here we measure the electrical resistivity (the reciprocal of electrical conductivity) of iron at the high temperatures (up to 4,500 kelvin) and pressures (megabars) of Earth’s core in a laser-heated diamond-anvil cell. The value measured for the resistivity of iron is even lower than the value extrapolated from high-pressure, low-temperature data using the Bloch–Grüneisen law, which considers only the electron–phonon scattering. This shows that the iron resistivity is strongly suppressed by the resistivity saturation effect at high temperatures. The low electrical resistivity of iron indicates the high thermal conductivity of Earth’s core, suggesting rapid core cooling and a young inner core less than 0.7 billion years old. Therefore, an abrupt increase in palaeomagnetic field intensity around 1.3 billion years ago may not be related to the birth of the inner core.

  16. Experimental determination of the electrical resistivity of iron at Earth's core conditions.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Kenji; Kuwayama, Yasuhiro; Hirose, Kei; Shimizu, Katsuya; Ohishi, Yasuo

    2016-06-01

    Earth continuously generates a dipole magnetic field in its convecting liquid outer core by a self-sustained dynamo action. Metallic iron is a dominant component of the outer core, so its electrical and thermal conductivity controls the dynamics and thermal evolution of Earth's core. However, in spite of extensive research, the transport properties of iron under core conditions are still controversial. Since free electrons are a primary carrier of both electric current and heat, the electron scattering mechanism in iron under high pressure and temperature holds the key to understanding the transport properties of planetary cores. Here we measure the electrical resistivity (the reciprocal of electrical conductivity) of iron at the high temperatures (up to 4,500 kelvin) and pressures (megabars) of Earth's core in a laser-heated diamond-anvil cell. The value measured for the resistivity of iron is even lower than the value extrapolated from high-pressure, low-temperature data using the Bloch-Grüneisen law, which considers only the electron-phonon scattering. This shows that the iron resistivity is strongly suppressed by the resistivity saturation effect at high temperatures. The low electrical resistivity of iron indicates the high thermal conductivity of Earth's core, suggesting rapid core cooling and a young inner core less than 0.7 billion years old. Therefore, an abrupt increase in palaeomagnetic field intensity around 1.3 billion years ago may not be related to the birth of the inner core. PMID:27251282

  17. Radiation absorption by the C2 band systems for Jupiter entry conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, K.; Moss, J. N.

    1979-01-01

    Revised values of the absorption cross sections for seven electronic band systems of C2 have been calculated using recently published experimental data for the electronic transition moments. Using these revised C2 cross section values, computations were made for the radiating flow field over a Jupiter entry probe with coupled ablation injection from a carbon-phenolic heat shield. Results are presented which show that radiation absorption within the ablation layer for the spectral range of 4 to 6 eV is less than that predicted using previous C2 absorption cross section values. The effect of the reduced radiation absorption by the C2 molecule is an increase in the radiative heating rates and ablation mass loss rates for the Jupiter entry conditions considered in the study.

  18. Saturation of electrical resistivity of solid iron at Earth's core conditions.

    PubMed

    Pozzo, Monica; Alfè, Dario

    2016-01-01

    We report on the temperature dependence of the electrical resistivity of solid iron at high pressure, up to and including conditions likely to be found at the centre of the Earth. We have extended some of the calculations of the resistivities of pure solid iron we recently performed at Earth's core conditions (Pozzo et al. in Earth Planet Sci Lett 393:159-164, 2014) to lower temperature. We show that at low temperature the resistivity increases linearly with temperature, and saturates at high temperature. This saturation effect is well known as the Mott-Ioffe-Regel limit in metals, but has been largely ignored to estimate the resistivity of iron at Earth's core conditions. Recent experiments (Gomi et al. in Phys Earth Planet Int 224:88-103, 2013) coupled new high pressure data and saturation to predict the resitivity of iron and iron alloys at Earth's core conditions, and reported values up to three times lower than previous estimates, confirming recent first principles calculations (de Koker et al. in Proc Natl Acad Sci 109:4070-4073, 2012; Pozzo et al. in Nature 485:355-358, 2012, Phys Rev B 87:014110-10, 2013, Earth Planet Sci Lett 393:159-164, 2014; Davies et al. in Nat Geosci 8:678-685, 2015). The present results support the saturation effect idea. PMID:27026948

  19. Microwave Absorption Properties of Iron Nanoparticles Prepared by Ball-Milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Xuan T. A.; Ta, Bach N.; Ngo, Le T. H.; Do, Manh H.; Nguyen, Phuc X.; Nam, Dao N. H.

    2016-05-01

    A nanopowder of iron was prepared using a high-energy ball milling method, which is capable of producing nanoparticles at a reasonably larger scale compared to conventional chemical methods. Analyses using x-ray diffraction and magnetic measurements indicate that the iron nanoparticles are a single phase of a body-centered cubic structure and have quite stable magnetic characteristics in the air. The iron nanoparticles were then mixed with paraffin and pressed into flat square plates for free-space microwave transmission and reflection measurements in the 4-8 GHz range. Without an Al backing plate, the Fe nanoparticles seem to only weakly absorb microwave radiation. The reflected signal S 11 drops to zero and a very large negative value of reflection loss ( RL) are observed for Al-backed samples, suggesting the existence of a phase matching resonance near frequency f ˜ 6 GHz.

  20. EPO-dependent induction of erythroferrone drives hepcidin suppression and systematic iron absorption under phenylhydrazine-induced hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xingkang; Gao, Ming; Chen, Yue; Liu, Jing; Qi, Shiyong; Ma, Juan; Zhang, Zhihong; Xu, Yong

    2016-05-01

    Hemolytic anemia is a common form of anemia due to hemolysis, resulting in disordered iron homeostasis. In this study, a dose of 40mg/kg phenylhydrazine (PHZ) was injected into mice to successfully establish a pronounced anemia animal model, which resulted in stress erythropoiesis and iron absorption. We found that serum erythropoietin (EPO) concentration was dramatically elevated by nearly 5000-fold for the first 2days, and then drop to the basal level on day 6 after PHZ injection. Mirrored with serum EPO concentration, the mRNA expression of erythroferrone (ERFE) was rapidly increased in the bone marrow and spleen 3days after injection of PHZ, and then gradually decreased but was still higher than baseline on day 6. In addition, we also found that the hepcidin mRNA levels were gradually reduced almost up to 8-fold on day 5, and then was ameliorated compared to the untreated control. Mechanistic investigation manifested that the increase of serum EPO essentially determined the induction of ERFE expression particular at the first 3days after PHZ treatment. Lentiviral mediated ERFE knockdown significantly restrained hepcidin suppression under PHZ treatment. Thus, our data unearthed EPO-dependent ERFE expression acts as an erythropoiesis-driven regulator of iron metabolism under PHZ-induced hemolytic anemia. PMID:27067488

  1. Environmental Factors Affecting Ammonium Oxidation Under Iron Reducing Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffe, P. R.; Huang, S.; Ruiz-Urigüen, M.

    2014-12-01

    Ammonium (NH4+) oxidation coupled to iron (Fe) reduction in the absence of oxygen and nitrate/nitrite (NO3-/NO2-) has been reported by several investigators and referred to as Feammox. Feammox is a biological reaction, where Fe(III) is the electron acceptor, which is reduced to Fe(II), and NH4+ is the electron donor, which is oxidized to NO2-. Through a 180-day anaerobic incubation experiment, and using PCR-DGGE, 454-pyosequecing and qPCR analysis, we have shown that an Acidimicrobiaceae bacterium A6, a previously unreported species in the Acidimicrobiaceae family, might be either responsible or plays a key role in the Feammox process, We have enriched these Feammox bacteria (65.8% in terms of cell numbers) in a membrane reactor, and isolated the pure Acidimicrobiaceae bacterium A6 strain in an autotrophic medium. In samples collected and then incubated from a series of local wetland-, upland-, as well as storm-water detention pond-sediments, Feammox activity was only detected in acidic soil environments that contain Fe oxides. Using primers we developed for this purpose, Acidimicrobiaceae bacterium A6 was detected in all incubations where Feammox was observed. Anaerobic incubations of Feammox enrichment cultures adjusted to different pH, revealed that the optimal pH for Feammox is 4 ~ 5, and the reaction does not proceed when pH > 7. Feammox was still proceeding at pH as low as 2. In Feammox culture amended with different Fe(III) sources, Feammox reaction proceeded only when Fe oxides (ferrihydrite or goethite ) were supplied, whereas samples incubated with ferric chloride or ferric citrate showed no measurable NH4+ oxidation. Furthermore, we have also determined from incubation experiments conducted with a temperature gradient (10 ~ 35℃), that the Feammox process was active when the temperature is above 15℃, and the optimal temperature is 20℃. Incubations of enrichment culture with 79% Feammox bacteria appeared to remove circa 8% more NH4+ at 20ºC than at

  2. Moisture Absorption of Plant Fiber under Annealed, Bleached and Mercerized Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saikia, Dip

    2010-06-01

    The water absorptions behaviors of the okra fibers, which are available in north east India, were studied under ambient, annealed, bleached and mercerized conditions by using ordinary gravimetric absorption method. The gains in moisture content in the fibers due to water absorption as well as their capillarity at constant relative humidity were measured as a function of exposure time. In order to ascertain the environment factor of utility of the fibers, the moisture regain of the fibers were determined at different relative air humidity. The water yielding capacity of okra fibers was also determined in order to understand their drying properties. The diffusion coefficients of the sorption process of the fibers under ambient, annealed, bleached and mercerized conditions were estimated.

  3. Moisture Absorption of Plant Fiber under Annealed, Bleached and Mercerized Condition

    SciTech Connect

    Saikia, Dip

    2010-06-29

    The water absorptions behaviors of the okra fibers, which are available in north east India, were studied under ambient, annealed, bleached and mercerized conditions by using ordinary gravimetric absorption method. The gains in moisture content in the fibers due to water absorption as well as their capillarity at constant relative humidity were measured as a function of exposure time. In order to ascertain the environment factor of utility of the fibers, the moisture regain of the fibers were determined at different relative air humidity. The water yielding capacity of okra fibers was also determined in order to understand their drying properties. The diffusion coefficients of the sorption process of the fibers under ambient, annealed, bleached and mercerized conditions were estimated.

  4. Formation of an interconnected network of iron melt at Earth’s lower mantle conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Crystal Y.; Zhang, Li; Yang, Wenge; Liu, Yijin; Wang, Junyue; Meng, Yue; Andrews, Joy C.; Mao, Wendy L.

    2013-10-06

    Core formation represents the most significant differentiation event in Earth’s history. Our planet’s present layered structure with a metallic core and an overlying mantle implies that there must be a mechanism to separate iron alloy from silicates in the initially accreted material. At upper mantle conditions, percolation has been ruled out as an efficient mechanism because of the tendency of molten iron to form isolated pockets at these pressures and temperatures. Here we present experimental evidence of a liquid iron alloy forming an interconnected melt network within a silicate perovskite matrix under pressure and temperature conditions of the Earth’s lower mantle. Using nanoscale synchrotron X-ray computed tomography, we image a marked transition in the shape of the iron-rich melt in three-dimensional reconstructions of samples prepared at varying pressures and temperatures using a laser-heated diamond-anvil cell. We find that, as the pressure increases from 25 to 64GPa, the iron distribution changes from isolated pockets to an interconnected network. Our results indicate that percolation could be a viable mechanism of core formation at Earth’s lower mantle conditions.

  5. Environmental embrittlement of iron aluminides under cyclic loading conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Castagna, A.; Alven, D.A.; Stoloff, N.S.

    1995-08-01

    The tensile and fatigue crack growth behavior in air in hydrogen and in oxygen of an Fe-Al-Cr-Zr alloy is described. The results are compared to data for FA-129. A detailed analysis of frequency effects on fatigue crack growth rates of FA-129, tested in the B2 condition, shows that dislocation transport of hydrogen from the surface is the rate limiting step in fatigue crack growth.

  6. Facile synthesis of iron oxides/reduced graphene oxide composites: application for electromagnetic wave absorption at high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lili; Yu, Xinxin; Hu, Hongrui; Li, Yang; Wu, Mingzai; Wang, Zhongzhu; Li, Guang; Sun, Zhaoqi; Chen, Changle

    2015-03-01

    Iron oxides/reduced graphene oxide composites were synthesized by facile thermochemical reactions of graphite oxide and FeSO4.7H2O. By adjusting reaction temperature, α-Fe2O3/reduced graphene oxide and Fe3O4/reduced graphene oxide composites can be obtained conveniently. Graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide sheets were demonstrated to regulate the phase transition from α-Fe2O3 to Fe3O4 via γ-Fe2O3, which was reported for the first time. The hydroxyl groups attached on the graphene oxide sheets and H2 gas generated during the annealing of graphene oxide are believed to play an important role during these phase transformations. These samples showed good electromagnetic wave absorption performance due to their electromagnetic complementary effect. These samples possess much better electromagnetic wave absorption properties than the mixture of separately prepared Fe3O4 with rGO, suggesting the crucial role of synthetic method in determining the product properties. Also, these samples perform much better than commercial absorbers. Most importantly, the great stability of these composites is highly advantageous for applications as electromagnetic wave absorption materials at high temperatures.

  7. Facile synthesis of iron oxides/reduced graphene oxide composites: application for electromagnetic wave absorption at high temperature

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lili; Yu, Xinxin; Hu, Hongrui; Li, Yang; Wu, Mingzai; Wang, Zhongzhu; Li, Guang; Sun, Zhaoqi; Chen, Changle

    2015-01-01

    Iron oxides/reduced graphene oxide composites were synthesized by facile thermochemical reactions of graphite oxide and FeSO4·7H2O. By adjusting reaction temperature, α-Fe2O3/reduced graphene oxide and Fe3O4/reduced graphene oxide composites can be obtained conveniently. Graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide sheets were demonstrated to regulate the phase transition from α-Fe2O3 to Fe3O4 via γ-Fe2O3, which was reported for the first time. The hydroxyl groups attached on the graphene oxide sheets and H2 gas generated during the annealing of graphene oxide are believed to play an important role during these phase transformations. These samples showed good electromagnetic wave absorption performance due to their electromagnetic complementary effect. These samples possess much better electromagnetic wave absorption properties than the mixture of separately prepared Fe3O4 with rGO, suggesting the crucial role of synthetic method in determining the product properties. Also, these samples perform much better than commercial absorbers. Most importantly, the great stability of these composites is highly advantageous for applications as electromagnetic wave absorption materials at high temperatures. PMID:25788158

  8. Short term X-ray spectral variability of the strong iron-k absorption feature in PDS 456

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matzeu, G.; Reeves, J.; Gofford, J.; Nardini, E.; Costa, M.; Braito, V.; O'Brien, P.; Ward, M.; Turner, J.; Miller, L.

    2014-07-01

    We present a recent 500 ks Suzaku and a simultaneous 500 ks XMM-Newton & NuSTAR observations, carried out in 2013, of the nearby (z=0.184) luminous (L_{bol}˜10^{47} erg s^{-1}) quasar PDS 456. Short term X-ray spectral variability, including the presence of a strong and rapidly variable iron-K absorption feature, is observed and subsequently investigated. Here, our attention is focused on the physical interpretation of the short term variability where two models are adopted in the spectral analysis (partial covering vs coronal changes), leading to two valid interpretations. In the partial covering scenario, rapidly varying absorption is due to inhomogeneous dense material and such short timescale changes also entail that that the absorption is due to gas located in the vicinity of the black hole possibly shielding part of the outflow. In the second scenario, the complex spectral variability is due to variations in the intrinsic continuum observed as changes in the soft X-ray spectrum leading subsequent changes in the hard X-ray power-law, possibly induced by Comptonisation in the disc corona. Furthermore it was possible to extrapolate the size and the location of the absorber, its outflowing velocity and a direct estimation of the size of the X-ray emitting region ˜20 R_{g}.

  9. Characterization of iron oxides in mineral dust aerosols: Implications for light absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafon, Sandra; Sokolik, Irina N.; Rajot, Jean Louis; Caquineau, Sandrine; Gaudichet, Annie

    2006-11-01

    We report on measurements that were specifically designed to determine iron oxides in mineral dust aerosols needed for improved optical modeling. Atmospheric dust samples as well as samples generated in a wind tunnel from soils were analyzed by a number of analytical techniques for their total and free iron content (bulk and size resolved), hematite and goethite, mineralogy, and size distribution. These samples are representative of several important dust sources in East Asia and northern Africa. A novel data set generated from these measurements enables us to perform an in-depth modeling study of dust optical properties in the solar spectrum. We modeled the iron oxide-clay aggregates, which are the key light-absorbing species, as well as their mixtures with nonabsorbing minerals. A volume fraction of iron oxide in aggregates was determined from measurements. Significant differences in the single-scattering albedo, ω0, were found between hematite- and goethite-clay aggregates, although these calculations involved several important assumptions about the partition of hematite and goethite in size-resolved aggregates. Furthermore, we found that variability of the free iron content is large enough to cause important differences in ω0 of mineral dust originating from different sources. In contrast, this variability has little effect on the extinction coefficient and optical depth. We demonstrate that for the same size distribution, ω0 calculated from data obtained for Chinese and Tunisian samples show higher values and more distinct wavelength dependence than those of Niger dust. All the above ω0 differ from ones calculated using the refractive indices of Patterson et al. (1977) or the OPAC model (Hess et al., 1998), which are often used in radiative transfer studies. We conclude that information on a size-resolved content of free iron and a fraction of hematite and goethite in aggregates will need to be known on a regional basis to improve the prediction of the

  10. Nearest-neighbor nitrogen and oxygen distances in the iron(II)-DNA complex studied by extended X-ray absorption fine structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertoncini, Clelia R. A.; Meneghini, Rogerio; Tolentino, Helio

    2010-11-01

    In mammalian cells, DNA-bound Fe(II) reacts with H 2O 2 producing the highly reactive hydroxyl radical ( rad OH) in situ. Since rad OH attacks nearby DNA residue generating oxidative DNA damage, many questions have arisen regarding iron-DNA complex formations and their implication in pre-malignant mutations and aging. In this work, a solid sample of Fe(II)-DNA complex containing one Fe(II) per 10 nucleotides was analyzed from extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra collected in a synchrotron radiation light source. Best fitting parameters of the EXAFS signal for the first two shells provide evidence of five oxygen atoms at 1.99 ± 0.02 Å and one nitrogen atom at 2.20 ± 0.02 Å in the inner coordination sphere of the Fe(II)-DNA complex. Considering that both purine base moieties bearing nitrogen atoms are prone to chelate iron, these results are consistent with the previously observed lower levels of DNA damage in cytosine nucleotides relative to adenine and guanine sites in cells under more physiological conditions of Fe(II) Fenton reaction.

  11. Iron plaque formed under aerobic conditions efficiently immobilizes arsenic in Lupinus albus L roots.

    PubMed

    Fresno, Teresa; Peñalosa, Jesús M; Santner, Jakob; Puschenreiter, Markus; Prohaska, Thomas; Moreno-Jiménez, Eduardo

    2016-09-01

    Arsenic is a non-threshold carcinogenic metalloid. Thus, human exposure should be minimised, e.g. by chemically stabilizing As in soil. Since iron is a potential As immobiliser, it was investigated whether root iron plaque, formed under aerobic conditions, affects As uptake, metabolism and distribution in Lupinus albus plants. White lupin plants were cultivated in a continuously aerated hydroponic culture containing Fe/EDDHA or FeSO4 and exposed to arsenate (5 or 20 μM). Only FeSO4 induced surficial iron plaque in roots. LA-ICP-MS analysis accomplished on root sections corroborated the association of As to this surficial Fe. Additionally, As(V) was the predominant species in FeSO4-treated roots, suggesting less efficient As uptake in the presence of iron plaque. Fe/EDDHA-exposed roots neither showed such surficial FeAs co-localisation nor As(V) accumulation; in contrast As(III) was the predominant species in root tissue. Furthermore, FeSO4-treated plants showed reduced shoot-to-root As ratios, which were >10-fold lower compared to Fe/EDDHA treatment. Our results highlight the role of an iron plaque formed in roots of white lupin under aerobic conditions on As immobilisation. These findings, to our knowledge, have not been addressed before for this plant and have potential implications on soil remediation (phytostabilisation) and food security (minimising As in crops). PMID:27263113

  12. Formation of iron melt channels in silicate perovskite at Earth's lower mantle conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, C. Y.; Liu, Y.; Wang, J.; Zhang, L.; Yang, W.; Mao, W. L.

    2012-12-01

    Core-formation represents the most significant differentiation event in Earth's history. Earth's current layered structure with a metallic core and an overlying silicate mantle requires mechanism(s) to separate the iron alloy from the silicates in the initially accreted material. Many mechanisms have been proposed. At upper mantle conditions, percolation was ruled out as an efficient mechanism due to the tendency of liquid iron alloy to form isolated pockets at these pressures and temperatures. We investigated the ability of a liquid iron alloy to form an interconnected melt network with (Mg,Fe)SiO3 perovskite (pv) under Earth's lower mantle conditions using a laser-heated diamond-anvil cell (DAC). Using nanoscale synchrotron X-ray computed tomography, we imaged a dramatic change in the shape of the iron-rich melt in the three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions of samples prepared at varying pressures and temperatures. We found that the iron distribution went from isolated pockets to an interconnected network as the pressure increased.

  13. Inhibition of non-haem iron absorption in man by polyphenolic-containing beverages.

    PubMed

    Hurrell, R F; Reddy, M; Cook, J D

    1999-04-01

    The effects of different polyphenol-containing beverages on Fe absorption from a bread meal were estimated in adult human subjects from the erythrocyte incorporation of radio-Fe. The test beverages contained different polyphenol structures and were rich in either phenolic acids (chlorogenic acid in coffee), monomeric flavonoids (herb teas, camomile (Matricaria recutita L.), vervain (Verbena officinalis L.), lime flower (Tilia cordata Mill.), pennyroyal (Mentha pulegium L.) and peppermint (Mentha piperita L.), or complex polyphenol polymerization products (black tea and cocoa). All beverages were potent inhibitors of Fe absorption and reduced absorption in a dose-dependent fashion depending on the content of total polyphenols. Compared with a water control meal, beverages containing 20-50 mg total polyphenols/serving reduced Fe absorption from the bread meal by 50-70%, whereas beverages containing 100-400 mg total polyphenols/serving reduced Fe absorption by 60-90%. Inhibition by black tea was 79-94%, peppermint tea 84%, pennyroyal 73%, cocoa 71%, vervain 59%, lime flower 52% and camomile 47%. At an identical concentration of total polyphenols, black tea was more inhibitory than cocoa, and more inhibitory than herb teas camomile, vervain, lime flower and pennyroyal, but was of equal inhibition to peppermint tea. Adding milk to coffee and tea had little or no influence on their inhibitory nature. Our findings demonstrate that herb teas, as well as black tea, coffee and coca can be potent inhibitors of Fe absorption. This property should be considered when giving dietary advice in relation to Fe nutrition. PMID:10999016

  14. Implementing TOPbase/Iron Project: continuous absorption from FeII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowley, Charles R.; Bautista, Manuel

    2003-06-01

    We discuss implementation of TOPbase and Iron Project opacities for stellar spectral codes. We use a technique employed by Peach, where a Boltzmann-averaged cross-section is calculated for selected temperatures, and the opacity obtained from double interpolation in temperature and wavelength. It is straightforward to include all levels for which cross-sections have been calculated. Boltzmann-averaged cross-sections for FeII show a local maximum between 1700 and 2000 Å. We suggest this feature arises from 3d54snl-> 3d54pnl transitions within FeII. IUE spectra of iron-rich CP stars show local minima in this region. Theoretical calculations of a representative stellar continuum demonstrate that FeII photoionization contributes significantly to the observed minima.

  15. Iron K Features in the Quasar E 1821+643: Evidence for Gravitationally Redshifted Absorption?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yaqoob, Tahir; Serlemitsos, Peter

    2005-01-01

    We report a Chandra high-energy grating detection of a narrow, redshifted absorption line superimposed on the red wing of a broad Fe K line in the z = 0.297 quasar E 1821+643. The absorption line is detected at a confidence level, estimated by two different methods, in the range approx. 2 - 3 sigma. Although the detection significance is not high enough to exclude a non-astrophysical origin, accounting for the absorption feature when modeling the X-ray spectrum implies that the Fe-K emission line is broad, and consistent with an origin in a relativistic accretion disk. Ignoring the apparent absorption feature leads to the conclusion that the Fe-K emission line is narrower, and also affects the inferred peak energy of the line (and hence the inferred ionization state of Fe). If the absorption line (at approx. 6.2 keV in the quasar frame) is real, we argue that it could be due to gravitationally redshifted Fe XXV or Fe XXVI resonance absorption within approx. 10 - 20 gravitational radii of the putative central black hole. The absorption line is not detected in earlier ASCA and Chandra low-energy grating observations, but the absorption line is not unequivocally ruled out by these data. The Chandra high-energy grating Fe-K emission line is consistent with an origin predominantly in Fe I-XVII or so. In an ASCA observation eight years earlier, the Fe-K line peaked at approx. 6.6 keV, closer to the energies of He-like Fe triplet lines. Further, in a Chandra low-energy grating observation the Fe-K line profile was double-peaked, one peak corresponding to Fe I-XVII or so, the other peak to Fe XXVI Ly alpha. Such a wide range in ionization state of Fe is not ruled out by the HEG and ASCA data either, and is suggestive of a complex structure for the line-emitter.

  16. Impacts of Combustion Conditions and Photochemical Processing on the Light Absorption of Biomass Combustion Aerosol.

    PubMed

    Martinsson, J; Eriksson, A C; Nielsen, I Elbæk; Malmborg, V Berg; Ahlberg, E; Andersen, C; Lindgren, R; Nyström, R; Nordin, E Z; Brune, W H; Svenningsson, B; Swietlicki, E; Boman, C; Pagels, J H

    2015-12-15

    The aim was to identify relationships between combustion conditions, particle characteristics, and optical properties of fresh and photochemically processed emissions from biomass combustion. The combustion conditions included nominal and high burn rate operation and individual combustion phases from a conventional wood stove. Low temperature pyrolysis upon fuel addition resulted in "tar-ball" type particles dominated by organic aerosol with an absorption Ångström exponent (AAE) of 2.5-2.7 and estimated Brown Carbon contributions of 50-70% to absorption at the climate relevant aethalometer-wavelength (520 nm). High temperature combustion during the intermediate (flaming) phase was dominated by soot agglomerates with AAE 1.0-1.2 and 85-100% of absorption at 520 nm attributed to Black Carbon. Intense photochemical processing of high burn rate flaming combustion emissions in an oxidation flow reactor led to strong formation of Secondary Organic Aerosol, with no or weak absorption. PM1 mass emission factors (mg/kg) of fresh emissions were about an order of magnitude higher for low temperature pyrolysis compared to high temperature combustion. However, emission factors describing the absorption cross section emitted per kg of fuel consumed (m(2)/kg) were of similar magnitude at 520 nm for the diverse combustion conditions investigated in this study. These results provide a link between biomass combustion conditions, emitted particle types, and their optical properties in fresh and processed plumes which can be of value for source apportionment and balanced mitigation of biomass combustion emissions from a climate and health perspective. PMID:26561964

  17. Laboratory evaluation and application of microwave absorption properties under simulated conditions for planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, P. G.

    1986-01-01

    After long arduous work with the simulator, measurements of the refractivity and absorptivity of nitrogen under conditions similar to those for Titan were completed. The most significant measurements, however, were those of the microwave absorption from gaseous ammonia under simulated conditions for the Jovian atmospheres over wavelengths from 1.3 to 22 cm. The results of these measurements are critical in that they confirm the theoretical calculation of the ammonia opacity using the Ben-Reuven lineshape. The application of both these results, and results obtained previously, to planetary observations at microwave frequencies were especially rewarding. Applications of the results for ammonia to radio astronomical observations of Jupiter in the 1.3 to 20 cm wavelength range and the application of results for gaseous H2SO4 under simulated Venus conditions are discussed.

  18. LiCl dehumidifier LiBr absorption chiller hybrid air conditioning system with energy recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, S.M.

    1980-06-03

    This invention relates to a hybrid air conditioning system that combines a solar powered LiCl dehumidifier with a LiBr absorption chiller. The desiccant dehumidifier removes the latent load by absorbing moisture from the air, and the sensible load is removed by the absorption chiller. The desiccant dehumidifier is coupled to a regenerator and the desiccant in the regenerator is heated by solar heated hot water to drive the moisture therefrom before being fed back to the dehumidifier. The heat of vaporization expended in the desiccant regenerator is recovered and used to partially preheat the driving fluid of the absorption chiller, thus substantially improving the overall COP of the hybrid system. 4 figs.

  19. LiCl Dehumidifier LiBr absorption chiller hybrid air conditioning system with energy recovery

    DOEpatents

    Ko, Suk M.

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to a hybrid air conditioning system that combines a solar powered LiCl dehumidifier with a LiBr absorption chiller. The desiccant dehumidifier removes the latent load by absorbing moisture from the air, and the sensible load is removed by the absorption chiller. The desiccant dehumidifier is coupled to a regenerator and the desiccant in the regenerator is heated by solar heated hot water to drive the moisture therefrom before being fed back to the dehumidifier. The heat of vaporization expended in the desiccant regenerator is recovered and used to partially preheat the driving fluid of the absorption chiller, thus substantially improving the overall COP of the hybrid system.

  20. Growth of the acidophilic iron-sulfur bacterium Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans under Mars-like geochemical conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauermeister, Anja; Rettberg, Petra; Flemming, Hans-Curt

    2014-08-01

    The question of life on Mars has been in focus of astrobiological research for several decades, and recent missions in orbit or on the surface of the planet are constantly expanding our knowledge on Martian geochemistry. For example, massive stratified deposits have been identified on Mars containing sulfate minerals and iron oxides, which suggest the existence of acidic aqueous conditions in the past, similar to acidic iron- and sulfur-rich environments on Earth. Acidophilic organisms thriving in such habitats could have been an integral part of a possibly widely extinct Martian ecosystem, but remains might possibly even exist today in protected subsurface niches. The chemolithoautotrophic strain Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans was selected as a model organism to study the metabolic capacities of acidophilic iron-sulfur bacteria, especially regarding their ability to grow with in situ resources that could be expected on Mars. The experiments were not designed to accurately simulate Martian physical conditions (except when certain single parameters such as oxygen partial pressure were considered), but rather the geochemical environment that can be found on Mars. A. ferrooxidans could grow solely on the minerals contained in synthetic Mars regolith mixtures with no added nutrients, using either O2 as an external electron acceptor for iron oxidation, or H2 as an external electron donor for iron reduction, and thus might play important roles in the redox cycling of iron on Mars. Though the oxygen partial pressure of the Martian atmosphere at the surface was not sufficient for detectable iron oxidation and growth of A. ferrooxidans during short-term incubation (7 days), alternative chemical O2-generating processes in the subsurface might yield microhabitats enriched in oxygen, which principally are possible under such conditions. The bacteria might also contribute to the reductive dissolution of Fe3+-containing minerals like goethite and hematite, which are

  1. Iron

    MedlinePlus

    ... organ failure, coma, convulsions, and death. Child-proof packaging and warning labels on iron supplements have greatly ... levodopa that the body absorbs, making it less effective. Levodopa, found in Sinemet® and Stalevo®, is used ...

  2. Influence of hydrogen absorption on the electrochemical potential noise of an iron electrode under corrosion with gas evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Huet, F.; Jerome, M.; Manolatos, P.; Wenger, F.

    1996-12-31

    Using the electrochemical permeation technique and a model for hydrogen diffusion in a metal, the fluctuations of the concentration, {Delta}C(t), of hydrogen absorbed in the first atomic layers of an Armco iron membrane, under cathodic polarization and at the corrosion potential in sulfuric acid solution, were measured. The fluctuations of the electrode potential, {Delta}E(t), and of the electrolyte resistance, {Delta}R{sub e}(t), induced by bubble evolution were also simultaneously recorded. Under cathodic potential, {Delta}E(t) and {Delta}C(t) are clearly induced by the evolution of big hydrogen gas bubbles. However, at the corrosion potential, another source of {Delta}E(t) and {Delta}C(t) must be proposed. It has been shown that this difference is related to the influence of an intermediate reaction species which partly blocks the hydrogen absorption under cathodic polarization and disappears at the corrosion potential.

  3. Preparation of Ni-B Coating on Carbonyl Iron and Its Microwave Absorption Properties in the X Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Rong; Zhou, Wan-Cheng; Qing, Yu-Chang

    2014-09-01

    Ni-B coated carbonyl iron particles (CI@Ni-B) are prepared by the electroless plating technique. The structure, morphology, and antioxidant properties of the CI@Ni-B particles are analyzed. The results demonstrate that the CI particles have been coated with intact spherical-shell Ni-B coating, indicating the core-shell structure of CI@Ni-B particles, and the Ni-B coating can prevent the further oxidation of the CI particles. Compared with the raw CI particles/paraffin coatings with the same coating thickness of 2.0 mm and particles content of 70%, the CI@Ni-B particles/paraffin coatings possess higher microwave absorption (the RL exceeding -10 dB is obtained in the whole X band (8.2-12.4 GHz) with minimal RL of -35.0 dB at 9.2 GHz).

  4. Relativistic Iron K Emission and Absorption in the Seyfert 1.9 Galaxy MCG-05-23-16

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braito, V.; Reeves, J. N.; Dewangan, G. C.; George, I.; Griffiths, R.; Markowitz, A.; Nandra, K.; Porquet, D.; Ptak, A.; Turner, T. J.; Yaqoob, T.; Weaver, K.

    2007-01-01

    We present the results of the simultaneous deep XMM-Newton and Chandra observations of the bright Seyfert 1.9 galaxy MCG-5-23-16, which is thought to have one of the best known examples of a relativistically broadened iron Kalpha line. We detected a narrow sporadic absorption line at 7.7 keV which appears to be variable on a time-scale of 20 ksec. If associated with FeXXVI this absorption is indicative of a possible variable high ionization, high velocity outflow. The time averaged spectral analysis shows that the iron K-shell complex is best modeled with an unresolved narrow emission component (FWHM less than 5000 kilometers per second, EW approx. 60 eV) plus a broad component. This latter component has FWHM approx. 44000 kilometers per second, an EW approx. 50 eV and its profile is well described with an emission line originating from the accretion disk viewed with an inclination angle approx. 40 deg. and with the emission arising from within a few tens of gravitational radii of the central black hole. The time-resolved spectral analysis of the XMM-Newton EPIC-pn spectrum shows that both the narrow and broad components of the Fe K emission line appear to be constant within the errors. The analysis of the XMM-Newton/RGS spectrum reveals that the soft X-ray emission of MCG-5-23-16 is likely dominated by several emission lines superimposed on an unabsorbed scattered power-law continuum. The lack of strong Fe L shell emission together with the detection of a strong forbidden line in the O VII triplet supports a scenario where the soft X ray emission lines are produced in a plasma photoionized by the nuclear emission.

  5. Liquid iron-sulfur alloys at outer core conditions by first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umemoto, Koichiro; Hirose, Kei; Imada, Saori; Nakajima, Yoichi; Komabayashi, Tetsuya; Tsutsui, Satoshi; Baron, Alfred Q. R.

    2014-10-01

    We perform first-principles calculations to investigate liquid iron-sulfur alloys (Fe, Fe56S8, Fe52S12, and Fe48S16) under high-pressure and high-temperature (150-300 GPa and 4000-6000 K) conditions corresponding to the Earth's outer core. Considering only the density profile, the best match with the preliminary reference Earth model is by liquid Fe-14 wt % S (Fe50S14), assuming sulfur is the only light element. However, its bulk sound velocity is too high, in particular in the deep outer core, suggesting that another light component such as oxygen is required. An experimental check using inelastic X-ray scattering shows good agreement with the calculations. In addition, a present study demonstrates that the Birch's law does not hold for liquid iron-sulfur alloy, consistent with a previous report on pure liquid iron.

  6. Absorption of hydrogen at the iron-solution interface: FTIR and RT approach

    SciTech Connect

    Carbajal-Castaneda, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    An investigation of the relation of surface H to that adsorbed in the metal was carried out. The adsorption of thiourea and thiocyanate in solution on iron was also studied. The work carried out included the measurement of the coverage of iron electrodes with H as a function of potential in borate buffer solution, pH = 8.4, in the presence and absence of inhibitors, utilizing a new technique (FTIR); the determination of the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) with H and D to obtain isotope effect; the determination of adsorption on iron as a function of potential and concentration of thiourea and thiocyanate; the determination of diffusion and solubility of H in Fe at a variety of electrode potentials in ranges relevant to corrosion. Rationalization of the overpotential relation to theta/sub H/ and C/sub H/ was obtained. A plot of C/sub H/ vs theta/sub H/ produces a straight line with slope K which was deduced from a Langmuirian approach. The presence of thiocyanate increased the K value due to a reduction in the rate of hydrogen discharge. It was also found that the majority of H is absorbed on the surface. The increase of hydrogen permeation in the presence of thiourea and thiocyanate is due to the adsorption of these additives on high energy sites leaving the low energy sites for the hydrogen discharge. The adsorption of thiourea fits a Bockris-Swinkels isotherm which represents a water displacement model. Thiourea was found to displace 3 water molecules. Thiocyanate adsorption was found to fit a Bockris-Devanathan-Muller isotherm.

  7. The Pseudomonas fluorescens Siderophore Pyoverdine Weakens Arabidopsis thaliana Defense in Favor of Growth in Iron-Deficient Conditions.

    PubMed

    Trapet, Pauline; Avoscan, Laure; Klinguer, Agnès; Pateyron, Stéphanie; Citerne, Sylvie; Chervin, Christian; Mazurier, Sylvie; Lemanceau, Philippe; Wendehenne, David; Besson-Bard, Angélique

    2016-05-01

    Pyoverdines are siderophores synthesized by fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. Under iron-limiting conditions, these high-affinity ferric iron chelators are excreted by bacteria in the soil to acquire iron. Pyoverdines produced by beneficial Pseudomonas spp. ameliorate plant growth. Here, we investigate the physiological incidence and mode of action of pyoverdine from Pseudomonas fluorescens C7R12 on Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants grown under iron-sufficient or iron-deficient conditions. Pyoverdine was provided to the medium in its iron-free structure (apo-pyoverdine), thus mimicking a situation in which it is produced by bacteria. Remarkably, apo-pyoverdine abolished the iron-deficiency phenotype and restored the growth of plants maintained in the iron-deprived medium. In contrast to a P. fluorescens C7R12 strain impaired in apo-pyoverdine production, the wild-type C7R12 reduced the accumulation of anthocyanins in plants grown in iron-deficient conditions. Under this condition, apo-pyoverdine modulated the expression of around 2,000 genes. Notably, apo-pyoverdine positively regulated the expression of genes related to development and iron acquisition/redistribution while it repressed the expression of defense-related genes. Accordingly, the growth-promoting effect of apo-pyoverdine in plants grown under iron-deficient conditions was impaired in iron-regulated transporter1 and ferric chelate reductase2 knockout mutants and was prioritized over immunity, as highlighted by an increased susceptibility to Botrytis cinerea This process was accompanied by an overexpression of the transcription factor HBI1, a key node for the cross talk between growth and immunity. This study reveals an unprecedented mode of action of pyoverdine in Arabidopsis and demonstrates that its incidence on physiological traits depends on the plant iron status. PMID:26956666

  8. Iron-Mediated Oxidation of Methoxyhydroquinone under Dark Conditions: Kinetic and Mechanistic Insights.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiu; Davis, James A; Nico, Peter S

    2016-02-16

    Despite the biogeochemical significance of the interactions between natural organic matter (NOM) and iron species, considerable uncertainty still remains as to the exact processes contributing to the rates and extents of complexation and redox reactions between these important and complex environmental components. Investigations on the reactivity of low-molecular-weight quinones, which are believed to be key redox active compounds within NOM, toward iron species, could provide considerable insight into the kinetics and mechanisms of reactions involving NOM and iron. In this study, the oxidation of 2-methoxyhydroquinone (MH2Q) by ferric iron (Fe(III)) under dark conditions in the absence and presence of oxygen was investigated within a pH range of 4-6. Although Fe(III) was capable of stoichiometrically oxidizing MH2Q under anaerobic conditions, catalytic oxidation of MH2Q was observed in the presence of O2 due to further cycling between oxygen, semiquinone radicals, and iron species. A detailed kinetic model was developed to describe the predominant mechanisms, which indicated that both the undissociated and monodissociated anions of MH2Q were kinetically active species toward Fe(III) reduction, with the monodissociated anion being the key species accounting for the pH dependence of the oxidation. The generated radical intermediates, namely semiquinone and superoxide, are of great importance in reaction-chain propagation. The kinetic model may provide critical insight into the underlying mechanisms of the thermodynamic and kinetic characteristics of metal-organic interactions and assist in understanding and predicting the factors controlling iron and organic matter transformation and bioavailability in aquatic systems. PMID:26789138

  9. Oxygen, neon, and iron X-ray absorption in the local interstellar medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatuzz, Efraín; García, Javier A.; Kallman, Timothy R.; Mendoza, Claudio

    2016-04-01

    Aims: We present a detailed study of X-ray absorption in the local interstellar medium by analyzing the X-ray spectra of 24 galactic sources obtained with the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer and the XMM-Newton Reflection Grating Spectrometer. Methods: By modeling the continuum with a simple broken power-law and by implementing the new ISMabs X-ray absorption model, we have estimated the total H, O, Ne, and Fe column densities towards the observed sources. Results: We have determined the absorbing material distribution as a function of source distance and galactic latitude-longitude. Conclusions: Direct estimates of the fractions of neutrally, singly, and doubly ionized species of O, Ne, and Fe reveal the dominance of the cold component, thus indicating an overall low degree of ionization. Our results are expected to be sensitive to the model used to describe the continuum in all sources.

  10. Laboratory evaluation and application of microwave absorption properties under simulated conditions for planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, Paul G.

    1987-01-01

    Radio absorptivity data for planetary atmospheres obtained from spacecraft radio occultation experiments and Earth-based radio astronomical observations can be used to infer abundances of microwave absorbing atmospheric constituents in those atmospheres, as long as reliable information regarding the microwave absorping properties of potential constituents is available. The use of theoretically derived microwave absorption properties for such atmospheric constituents, or laboratory measurements of such properties under environmental conditions which are significantly different than those of the planetary atmosphere being studied, often leads to significant misinterpretation of available opacity data. Laboratory measurement of the microwave properties of atmospheric gases under simulated conditions for the outer planets were conducted. Results of these measurements are discussed.

  11. Laboratory evaluation and application of microwave absorption properties under simulated conditions for planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, P. G.

    1985-01-01

    Radio absorptivity data for the Venus middle atmosphere (1 to 6 atm, temperatures from 500 to 575K) obtained from spacecraft radio occultation experiments (at 3.6 to 13.4 cm wavelengths) and earth-based radio astronomical observations (1 to 3 cm wavelength range) are compared to laboratory observations at the latter wavelength range under simulated Venus conditions to infer abundances of microwave-absorbing atmospheric constituents, i.e. H2SO4 in a CO2 atmosphere.

  12. Solar Absorption Refrigeration System for Air-Conditioning of a Classroom Building in Northern India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Tanmay; Varun; Kumar, Anoop

    2015-10-01

    Air-conditioning is a basic tool to provide human thermal comfort in a building space. The primary aim of the present work is to design an air-conditioning system based on vapour absorption cycle that utilizes a renewable energy source for its operation. The building under consideration is a classroom of dimensions 18.5 m × 13 m × 4.5 m located in Hamirpur district of Himachal Pradesh in India. For this purpose, cooling load of the building was calculated first by using cooling load temperature difference method to estimate cooling capacity of the air-conditioning system. Coefficient of performance of the refrigeration system was computed for various values of strong and weak solution concentration. In this work, a solar collector is also designed to provide required amount of heat energy by the absorption system. This heat energy is taken from solar energy which makes this system eco-friendly and sustainable. A computer program was written in MATLAB to calculate the design parameters. Results were obtained for various values of solution concentrations throughout the year. Cost analysis has also been carried out to compare absorption refrigeration system with conventional vapour compression cycle based air-conditioners.

  13. Non-Heme Iron Absorption and Utilization from Typical Whole Chinese Diets in Young Chinese Urban Men Measured by a Double-Labeled Stable Isotope Technique

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lichen; Zhang, Yuhui; Wang, Jun; Huang, Zhengwu; Gou, Lingyan; Wang, Zhilin; Ren, Tongxiang; Piao, Jianhua; Yang, Xiaoguang

    2016-01-01

    Background This study was to observe the non-heme iron absorption and biological utilization from typical whole Chinese diets in young Chinese healthy urban men, and to observe if the iron absorption and utilization could be affected by the staple food patterns of Southern and Northern China. Materials and Methods Twenty-two young urban men aged 18–24 years were recruited and randomly assigned to two groups in which the staple food was rice and steamed buns, respectively. Each subject received 3 meals containing approximately 3.25 mg stable 57FeSO4 (the ratio of 57Fe content in breakfast, lunch and dinner was 1:2:2) daily for 2 consecutive days. In addition, approximately 2.4 mg 58FeSO4 was administered intravenously to each subject at 30–60 min after dinner each day. Blood samples were collected from each subject to measure the enrichment of the 57Fe and 58Fe. Fourteen days after the experimental diet, non-heme iron absorption was assessed by measuring 57Fe incorporation into red blood cells, and absorbed iron utilization was determined according to the red blood cell incorporation of intravenously infused 58Fe SO4. Results Non-heme iron intake values overall, and in the rice and steamed buns groups were 12.8 ±2.1, 11.3±1.3 and 14.3±1.5 mg, respectively; the mean 57Fe absorption rates were 11±7%, 13±7%, and 8±4%, respectively; and the mean infused 58Fe utilization rates were 85±8%, 84±6%, and 85±10%, respectively. There was no significantly difference in the iron intakes, and 57Fe absorption and infused 58Fe utilization rates between rice and steamed buns groups (all P>0.05). Conclusion We present the non-heme iron absorption and utilization rates from typical whole Chinese diets among young Chinese healthy urban men, which was not affected by the representative staple food patterns of Southern and Northern China. This study will provide a basis for the setting of Chinese iron DRIs. PMID:27099954

  14. Effects of prebiotic supplementation on the expression of proteins regulating iron absorption in anaemic growing rats.

    PubMed

    Marciano, Renata; Santamarina, Aline Boveto; de Santana, Aline Alves; Silva, Maísa de Lima Correia; Amancio, Olga Maria Silvério; do Nascimento, Claudia Maria da Penha Oller; Oyama, Lila Missae; de Morais, Mauro Batista

    2015-03-28

    Prebiotics may increase intestinal Fe absorption in anaemic growing rats. The present study evaluated the effects of high-performance (HP) inulin and oligofructose on factors that regulate Fe absorption in anaemic rats during the growth phase. Male Wistar rats aged 21 d of age were fed AIN-93G ration without Fe for 2 weeks to induce Fe-deficiency anaemia. The rats were fed on day 35 a control diet, or a diet with 10 % HP inulin, or a diet with 10 % oligofructose, without Fe supplementation. The animals were euthanised after 2 weeks, and segments of the duodenum, caecum, colon and liver were removed. The expression levels of proteins in the intestinal segments were assessed using Western blotting. The levels of serum, urine and liver hepcidin and the concentrations of IL-10, IL-6 and TNF-α in the caecum, colon and liver were measured using the ELISA test. HP inulin increased the expression of the divalent metal transporter 1 protein in the caecum by 162 % (P= 0·04), and the expression of duodenal cytochrome b reductase in the colon by 136 % (P= 0·02). Oligofructose decreased the expression of the protein ferroportin in the duodenum (P= 0·02), the concentrations of IL-10 (P= 0·044), IL-6 (P= 0·036) and TNF-α (P= 0·004) in the caecum, as well as the level of urinary hepcidin (P< 0·001). These results indicate that prebiotics may interfere with the expression of various intestinal proteins and systemic factors involved in the regulation of intestinal Fe absorption in anaemic rats during the growth phase. PMID:25745840

  15. Tunable Diode Laser Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy for Detection of Potassium under Optically Thick Conditions.

    PubMed

    Qu, Zhechao; Steinvall, Erik; Ghorbani, Ramin; Schmidt, Florian M

    2016-04-01

    Potassium (K) is an important element related to ash and fine-particle formation in biomass combustion processes. In situ measurements of gaseous atomic potassium, K(g), using robust optical absorption techniques can provide valuable insight into the K chemistry. However, for typical parts per billion K(g) concentrations in biomass flames and reactor gases, the product of atomic line strength and absorption path length can give rise to such high absorbance that the sample becomes opaque around the transition line center. We present a tunable diode laser atomic absorption spectroscopy (TDLAAS) methodology that enables accurate, calibration-free species quantification even under optically thick conditions, given that Beer-Lambert's law is valid. Analyte concentration and collisional line shape broadening are simultaneously determined by a least-squares fit of simulated to measured absorption profiles. Method validation measurements of K(g) concentrations in saturated potassium hydroxide vapor in the temperature range 950-1200 K showed excellent agreement with equilibrium calculations, and a dynamic range from 40 pptv cm to 40 ppmv cm. The applicability of the compact TDLAAS sensor is demonstrated by real-time detection of K(g) concentrations close to biomass pellets during atmospheric combustion in a laboratory reactor. PMID:26938713

  16. Arsenic distribution and speciation near rice roots influenced by iron plaques and redox conditions of the soil matrix.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Noriko; Ohkura, Toshiaki; Takahashi, Yoshio; Maejima, Yuji; Arao, Tomohito

    2014-01-01

    Elevated arsenic (As) concentrations in rice and the soil solution result from changes in soil redox conditions, influenced by the water management practices during rice cultivation. Microscale changes in redox conditions from rhizosphere to soil matrix affect the As speciation and Fe plaque deposition. In order to focus on the rhizosphere environment, we observed microscale distribution and speciation of As around the rhizosphere of paddy rice with X-ray fluorescence mapping and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. When the soil matrix was anaerobic during rice growth, Fe-plaque did not cover the entire root, and As(III) was the dominant arsenic species in the soil matrix and rhizosphere. Draining before harvest led the conditions to shift to aerobic. Oxidation of As(III) to As(V) occurred faster in the Fe-plaque than the soil matrix. Arsenic was scavenged by iron mottles originating from Fe-plaque around the roots. The ratio of As(V) to As(III) decreased toward the outer-rim of the subsurface Fe mottles where the soil matrix was not completely aerated. These results provide direct evidence that speciation of As near rice roots depends on spatial and temporal redox variations in the soil matrix. PMID:24384039

  17. Selenate removal by zero-valent iron in oxic condition: the role of Fe(II) and selenate removal mechanism.

    PubMed

    Yoon, In-Ho; Bang, Sunbaek; Kim, Kyoung-Woong; Kim, Min Gyu; Park, Sang Yoon; Choi, Wang-Kyu

    2016-01-01

    In this study, batch experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of the concentration of ferrous [Fe(II)] ions on selenate [Se(VI)] removal using zero-valent iron (ZVI). The mechanism of removal was investigated using spectroscopic and image analyses of the ZVI-Fe(II)-Se(VI) system. The test to remove 50 mg/L of Se(VI) by 1 g/L of ZVI resulted in about 60% removal of Se(VI) in the case with absence of Fe(II), but other tests with the addition of 50 and 100 mg/L of the Fe(II) had increased the removal efficiencies about 93 and 100% of the Se(VI), respectively. In other batch tests with the absence of ZVI, there were little changes on the Se(VI) removal by the varied concentration of the Fe(II). From these results, we found that Fe(II) ion plays an accelerator for the reduction of Se(VI) by ZVI with the stoichiometric balance of 1.4 (=nFe(2+)/nSe(6+)). Under anoxic conditions, the batch test revealed about 10% removal of the Se(VI), indicating that the presence of dissolved oxygen increased the kinetics of Se(VI) removal due to the Fe(II)-containing oxides on the ZVI, as analyzed by scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra also showed that the reductive process of Se(VI) to Se(0)/Se(-II) occurred in the presence of the both ZVI and Fe(II). The final product of iron corrosion was lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH), which acts as an electron transfer barrier from Fe(0) core to Se(VI). Therefore, the addition of Fe(II) enhanced the reactivity of ZVI through the formation of iron oxides (magnetite) favoring electron transfer during the removal of Se(VI), which was through the exhaustion of the Fe(0) core reacted with Se(VI). PMID:25943509

  18. Zero-valent iron removal rates of aqueous Cr(VI) measured under flow conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, Daniel I.; Gilmore, Tyler J.

    2004-06-30

    The rates of Cr(VI) removal from the aqueous phase by zero-valent iron Fe(0) was measured under flow conditions. The intent of this work was to generate removal rate coefficients that would be applicable to the Reactive Well Technology, a gournwater remediation technology that replaces the sand in a filter pack of a conventioanl well with a reactive material, such as Fe(0).

  19. Cascade Reverse Osmosis Air Conditioning System: Cascade Reverse Osmosis and the Absorption Osmosis Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    2010-09-01

    BEETIT Project: Battelle is developing a new air conditioning system that uses a cascade reverse osmosis (RO)-based absorption cycle. Analyses show that this new cycle can be as much as 60% more efficient than vapor compression, which is used in 90% of air conditioners. Traditional vapor-compression systems use polluting liquids for a cooling effect. Absorption cycles use benign refrigerants such as water, which is absorbed in a salt solution and pumped as liquid—replacing compression of vapor. The refrigerant is subsequently separated from absorbing salt using heat for re-use in the cooling cycle. Battelle is replacing thermal separation of refrigerant with a more efficient reverse osmosis process. Research has shown that the cycle is possible, but further investment will be needed to reduce the number of cascade reverse osmosis stages and therefore cost.

  20. Melting of iron at the physical conditions of the Earth's core.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Jeffrey H; Holmes, Neil C

    2004-01-22

    Seismological data can yield physical properties of the Earth's core, such as its size and seismic anisotropy. A well-constrained iron phase diagram, however, is essential to determine the temperatures at core boundaries and the crystal structure of the solid inner core. To date, the iron phase diagram at high pressure has been investigated experimentally through both laser-heated diamond-anvil cell and shock-compression techniques, as well as through theoretical calculations. Despite these contributions, a consensus on the melt line or the high-pressure, high-temperature phase of iron is lacking. Here we report new and re-analysed sound velocity measurements of shock-compressed iron at Earth-core conditions. We show that melting starts at 225 +/- 3 GPa (5,100 +/- 500 K) and is complete at 260 +/- 3 GPa (6,100 +/- 500 K), both on the Hugoniot curve-the locus of shock-compressed states. This new melting pressure is lower than previously reported, and we find no evidence for a previously reported solid-solid phase transition on the Hugoniot curve near 200 GPa (ref. 16). PMID:14737164

  1. The interactive biotic and abiotic processes of DDT transformation under dissimilatory iron-reducing conditions.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xin; Wang, Fang; Gu, Chenggang; Yang, Xinglun; Kengara, Fredrick O; Bian, Yongrong; Song, Yang; Jiang, Xin

    2015-11-01

    The objective of the study was to elucidate the biotic and abiotic processes under dissimilatory iron reducing conditions involved in reductive dechlorination and iron reduction. DDT transformation was investigated in cultures of Shewanella putrefaciens 200 with/without α-FeOOH. A modified first-order kinetics model was developed and described DDT transformation well. Both the α-FeOOH reduction rate and the dechlorination rate of DDT were positively correlated to the biomass. Addition of α-FeOOH enhanced reductive dechlorination of DDT by favoring the cell survival and generating Fe(II) which was absorbed on the surface of bacteria and iron oxide. 92% of the absorbed Fe(II) was Na-acetate (1M) extractable. However, α-FeOOH also played a negative role of competing for electrons as reflected by the dechlorination rate of DDT was inhibited when increasing the α-FeOOH from 1 g L(-1) to 5 g L(-1). DDT was measured to be toxic to S. putrefaciens 200. The metabolites DDD, DDE and DDMU were recalcitrant to S. putrefaciens 200. The results suggested that iron oxide was not the key factor to promote the dissipation of DDX (DDT and the metabolites), whereas the one-electron reduction potential (E1) of certain organochlorines is the main factor and that the E1 higher than the threshold of the reductive driving forces of DIRB probably ensures the occur of reductive dechlorination. PMID:26025430

  2. Calcite precipitation dominates the electrical signatures of zero valent iron columns under simulated field conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yuxin; Versteeg, R.; Slater, L.; LaBrecque, D.

    2009-06-01

    Calcium carbonate is a secondary mineral precipitate influencing zero valent iron (ZVI) barrier reactivity and hydraulic performance. We conducted column experiments to investigate electrical signatures resulting from concurrent CaCO{sub 3} and iron oxides precipitation under simulated field geochemical conditions. We identified CaCO{sub 3} as a major mineral phase throughout the columns, with magnetite present primarily close to the influent based on XRD analysis. Electrical measurements revealed decreases in conductivity and polarization of both columns, suggesting that electrically insulating CaCO{sub 3} dominates the electrical response despite the presence of electrically conductive iron oxides. SEM/EDX imaging suggests that the electrical signal reflects the geometrical arrangement of the mineral phases. CaCO{sub 3} forms insulating films on ZVI/magnetite surfaces, restricting charge transfer between the pore electrolyte and ZVI particles, as well as across interconnected ZVI particles. As surface reactivity also depends on the ability of the surface to engage in redox reactions via charge transfer, electrical measurements may provide a minimally invasive technology for monitoring reactivity loss due to CaCO{sub 3} precipitation. Comparison between laboratory and field data shows consistent changes in electrical signatures due to iron corrosion and secondary mineral precipitation.

  3. Bread supplemented with amaranth (Amaranthus cruentus): effect of phytates on in vitro iron absorption.

    PubMed

    Mario Sanz-Penella, Juan; Laparra, José Moisés; Sanz, Yolanda; Haros, Monika

    2012-03-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of the bread supplemented with whole amaranth flour (0, 20 and 40%) on iron bioavailability using Caco-2 cells model. The phytate and lower myo-inositol phosphates content in in vitro bread digests were measured by high pressure liquid chromatography. The breads made with amaranth showed significant increase of soluble phytates levels (up to 1.20 μmol/g in dry matter for the 40% of substitution) in comparison with controls, which have not detectable values. A negative correlation among phytate and Fe availability was found when increased levels of amaranth.Ferritin concentration was found 2.7- and 2.0-fold higher (P<0.05) in cultures exposed to 20% and 40% of amaranth formulated bread samples, respectively, compared to control bread. The soluble phytate/Fe molar ratio explained the whole amaranth flour-mediated inhibitory effect associated to the limitation of available Fe; however, the use up to 20% of amaranth in bread formulation appears as a promising strategy to improve the nutritional value of bread, as indicated by the ferritin concentrations quantified in cell cultures. Higher proportion of amaranth flour increased Fe concentration although there was not detected any increase in Fe uptake. PMID:22298026

  4. Alginate-Iron Speciation and Its Effect on In Vitro Cellular Iron Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Horniblow, Richard D.; Dowle, Miriam; Iqbal, Tariq H.; Latunde-Dada, Gladys O.; Palmer, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    Alginates are a class of biopolymers with known iron binding properties which are routinely used in the fabrication of iron-oxide nanoparticles. In addition, alginates have been implicated in influencing human iron absorption. However, the synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles employs non-physiological pH conditions and whether nanoparticle formation in vivo is responsible for influencing cellular iron metabolism is unclear. Thus the aims of this study were to determine how alginate and iron interact at gastric-comparable pH conditions and how this influences iron metabolism. Employing a range of spectroscopic techniques under physiological conditions alginate-iron complexation was confirmed and, in conjunction with aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, nanoparticles were observed. The results infer a nucleation-type model of iron binding whereby alginate is templating the condensation of iron-hydroxide complexes to form iron oxide centred nanoparticles. The interaction of alginate and iron at a cellular level was found to decrease cellular iron acquisition by 37% (p < 0.05) and in combination with confocal microscopy the alginate inhibits cellular iron transport through extracellular iron chelation with the resulting complexes not internalised. These results infer alginate as being useful in the chelation of excess iron, especially in the context of inflammatory bowel disease and colorectal cancer where excess unabsorbed luminal iron is thought to be a driver of disease. PMID:26378798

  5. Sound velocities of iron carbides (Fe3C and Fe7C3) under core conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, B.; Li, Z.; Zhang, D.; Liu, J.; Bi, W.; Zhao, J.; Alp, E. E.; Hu, M. Y.; Li, J.

    2014-12-01

    For a carbon-rich core, iron carbides might be the major phase crystallizing to form the Earth's solid inner core. On basis of high-pressure experiments and theoretical calculations, Fe3C, Fe7C3 and more recently Fe2C have been considered as the most stable carbide phase under the inner core conditions. The identity of the stable carbide phase in a carbon-containing inner core is still a topic under active debate. It is crucial to determine the elastic and acoustic properties of the relevant carbide phases to core conditions, in order to test the carbon-rich core composition model. In this study, we have performed nuclear resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (NRIXS) measurements of both Fe7C3 and Fe3C up to core pressures at 300 K and determined their shear-wave (VS) and compressional-wave (VP) velocities for comparison with seismic observations of the inner core. The high-pressure magnetic properties of both phases have also been investigated by X-ray Emission Spectroscopy (XES) and Synchrotron Mössbauer Spectroscopy (SMS). Our results show that the magnetic transitions from ferromagnetic to paramagnetic and then to nonmagnetic in Fe7C3 and Fe3C significantly affects their VS and VP at high pressures. Extrapolating the sound velocities of the nonmagnetic phases to the inner core conditions, we found that sound velocities, particularly VS, of the iron carbides are markedly low comparing with iron and other iron-rich alloys, making them compelling candidates to explain the seismic observations of the inner core. Our hypothesis of a carbon-rich core may also be consistent with geochemical and petrological evidence on deep carbon inventory in Earth's interior.

  6. Dietary copper deficiency reduces iron absorption and duodenal enterocyte hephaestin protein in male and female rats.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Philip G; Demars, Lana C S; Johnson, W Thomas; Lukaski, Henry C

    2005-01-01

    The mechanism for reduced Fe absorption in Cu deficiency is unknown, but may involve the intestinal Cu-dependent ferroxidase, Hephaestin (Hp). A 2 x 2 factorial experiment was designed to include Cu-deficient (CuD) and Cu-adequate (CuA) male and female rats. Weanling rats of both sexes were randomly divided into 2 groups each and fed an AIN-93G diet with low (<0.3 mg/kg; CuD) or adequate Cu (5.0 mg/kg; CuA). After 19 d, rats were fed 1.0 g each of their respective diets labeled with (59)Fe. Retained (59)Fe was monitored by whole-body counting for 12 d. Then, rats were killed for (59)Fe and Fe measurements in blood and various organs. Duodenal enterocytes were isolated for Western blot analysis of Hp. Signs of Cu and Fe deficiency were evident in both sexes. CuD male rats absorbed 60% as much Fe as CuA male rats (P < 0.001), whereas CuD female rats absorbed 70% (P < 0.001) as much as CuA females, with no difference between the sexes. Hp protein in enterocytes of CuD rats of both sexes was only 35% of that in CuA rats. The biological half-life of (59)Fe in CuD rats was only 50% (P < 0.001) of that in CuA rats, suggesting that Fe turnover was faster in CuD rats than CuA rats. Serum, spleen, and kidney Fe were lower (P < 0.001) in CuD rats than in CuA rats. Duodenal mucosa and liver Fe were higher (P < 0.01) in CuD male rats than CuA rats. Duodenal Fe but not liver Fe was higher in CuD female rats than CuA rats. Liver Fe was much higher (<0.001) overall in females than males. The data suggest that Cu deficiency reduces Fe absorption in rats through reduced expression of duodenal Hp protein. PMID:15623839

  7. Redox State of Iron in Lunar Glasses using X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy and Multivariate Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyar, M. D.; McCanta, M. C.; Lanzirotti, A.; Sutton, S. R.; Carey, C. J.; Mahadevan, S.; Rutherford, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    The oxidation state of igneous materials on a planet is a critically-important variable in understanding magma evolution on bodies in our solar system. However, direct and indirect methods for quantifying redox states are challenging, especially across the broad spectrum of silicate glass compositions found on airless bodies. On the Moon, early Mössbauer studies of bulk samples suggested the presence of significant Fe3+ (>10%) in lunar glasses (green, orange, brown); lunar analog glasses synthesized at fO2 <10-11 have similar Fe3+. All these Mössbauer spectra are challenging to interpret due to the presence of multiple coordination environments in the glasses. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) allows pico- and nano-scale interrogation of primitive planetary materials using the pre-edge, main edge, and EXAFS regions of absorption edge spectra. Current uses of XAS require availability of standards with compositions similar to those of unknowns and complex procedures for curve-fitting of pre-edge features that produce results with poorly constrained accuracy. A new approach to accurate and quantitative redox measurements with XAS is to couple use of spectra from synthetic glass standards covering a broad compositional range with multivariate analysis (MVA) techniques. Mössbauer and XAS spectra from a suite of 33 synthetic glass standards covering a wide range of compositions and fO2(Dyar et al., this meeting) were used to develop a MVA model that utilizes valuable predictive information not only in the major spectral peaks/features, but in all channels of the XAS region. Algorithms for multivariate analysis t were used to "learn" the characteristics of a data set as a function of varying spectral characteristics. These models were applied to the study of lunar glasses, which provide a challenging test case for these newly-developed techniques due to their very low fO2. Application of the new XAS calibration model to Apollo 15 green (15426, 15427 and 15425

  8. Anaerobic Biodegradation Of Methyl tert-Butyl Ether Under Iron-Reducing Conditions In Batch And Continuous-Flow Cultures

    EPA Science Inventory

    The feasibility of biodegradation of the fuel oxygenate methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) under iron-reducing conditions was explored in batch and continuous-flow systems. A porous pot completely-mixed reactor was seeded with diverse cultures and operated under iron-reducing...

  9. Effect of different levels of an ascorbic acid and tea mixture on nonheme iron absorption from a typical Tunisian meal fed to healthy rats.

    PubMed

    Hamdauoui, M; Doghri, T; Tritar, B

    1995-01-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the bioavailability of iron from a typical Tunisian meal 'couscous' provided to healthy rats with or without appropriate mixtures of tea plus ascorbic acid and to search for the optimal amount of ascorbic acid able to overcome the inhibitory effect of tea prepared under realistic Tunisian circumstances. Our findings show that a tea decoction (100 mg/ml) reduced nonheme iron absorption from couscous by 50% (16.5 vs. 33.1%; p < 0.01). In contrast, administration of 20 mg ascorbic acid increased nonheme iron absorption from couscous by more than 100% (66.8 vs. 33.1%; p < 0.001). Administration of ascorbic acid (20 mg) in a tea decoction (100 mg/ml) completely counteracted the inhibiting effect of tea and significantly improved the nonheme iron absorption from couscous (34 vs. 33% in the control group; NS). The same effect was shown when 10 mg ascorbic acid was added to the tea decoction; however, 5 mg ascorbic acid was not able to overcome the inhibitory effect of tea on nonheme iron absorption from couscous (33.1 vs. 19.4%; p < 0.01). Our findings demonstrate that a molar ratio of ascorbic acid and tea equal or superior to 0.25 or 0.50 is necessary to overcome the inhibitory effect in rats of tea prepared under Tunisian circumstances. In relation to human nutrition, for Tunisians who regularly drink tea, we suggest a much greater amount of ascorbic acid than that normally recommended for normal subjects. PMID:8585701

  10. Rotational Profiles of Molecular Absorption Bands in Astrophysically Relevant Conditions: Ab-Initio Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Malloci, Giuliano; Mulas, Giacomo; Cappellini, Giancarlo; Satta, Guido; Porceddu, Ignazio; Benvenuti, Piero

    2004-05-01

    A theoretical study of rotational profiles of molecular absorption bands is essential for direct comparison with observations of diffuse interstellar bands. Applications using gaussian quantum-chemical approach within DFT are presented. Structural and vibrational properties of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon ovalene cation (C32H14+) are obtained. We discuss the expected profile of the first electronic transition of such molecule, obtained with a Monte Carlo model of its rotation in the physical conditions of low temperatures and absence of collisions which are characteristic of the interstellar medium (ISM).

  11. Inclusion of guava enhances non-heme iron bioavailability but not fractional zinc absorption from a rice-based meal in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Nair, Krishnapillai Madhavan; Brahmam, Ginnela N V; Radhika, Madhari S; Dripta, Roy Choudhury; Ravinder, Punjal; Balakrishna, Nagalla; Chen, Zhensheng; Hawthorne, Keli M; Abrams, Steven A

    2013-06-01

    Assessing the bioavailability of non-heme iron and zinc is essential for recommending diets that meet the increased growth-related demand for these nutrients. We studied the bioavailability of iron and zinc from a rice-based meal in 16 adolescent boys and girls, 13-15 y of age, from 2 government-run residential schools. Participants were given a standardized rice meal (regular) and the same meal with 100 g of guava fruit (modified) with (57)Fe on 2 consecutive days. A single oral dose of (58)Fe in orange juice was given at a separate time as a reference dose. Zinc absorption was assessed by using (70)Zn, administered intravenously, and (67)Zn given orally with meals. The mean hemoglobin concentration was similar in girls (129 ± 7.8 g/L) and boys (126 ± 7.1 g/L). There were no sex differences in the indicators of iron and zinc status except for a higher hepcidin concentration in boys (P < 0.05). The regular and modified meals were similar in total iron (10-13 mg/meal) and zinc (2.7 mg/meal) content. The molar ratio of iron to phytic acid was >1:1, but the modified diet had 20 times greater ascorbic acid content. The absorption of (57)Fe from the modified meal, compared with regular meal, was significantly (P < 0.05) greater in both girls (23.9 ± 11.2 vs. 9.7 ± 6.5%) and boys (19.2 ± 8.4 vs. 8.6 ± 4.1%). Fractional zinc absorption was similar between the regular and modified meals in both sexes. Hepcidin was found to be a significant predictor of iron absorption (standardized β = -0.63, P = 0.001, R(2) = 0.40) from the reference dose. There was no significant effect of sex on iron and zinc bioavailability from meals. We conclude that simultaneous ingestion of guava fruit with a habitual rice-based meal enhances iron bioavailability in adolescents. PMID:23596161

  12. Fretting wear of iron, nickel, and titanium under varied environmental conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bill, R. C.

    1978-01-01

    Fretting wear experiments were conducted on high purity iron, nickel and titanium in air under conditions of varied humidity and temperature, and in nitrogen. For iron and titanium, maximum fretting occurred at 10 and 30 percent relative humidity respectively. Nickel showed a minimum in fretting wear at about 10 percent relative humidity. With increasing temperature, all three metals initially showed reduced fretting wear, with increasing wear observed as temperatures increased beyond 200-300 C. For titanium, dramatically reduced fretting wear was observed at temperatures above 500 C, relatable to a change in oxidation kinetics. All three metals showed much less fretting wear in N2 with the presence of moisture in N2 having a proportionally stronger effect than in air.

  13. Absorption of Sunlight by Water Vapor in Cloudy Conditions: A Partial Explaination for the Cloud Absorption Anomaly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crisp, D.

    1996-01-01

    The atmospheric radiative transfer algorithms used in most global general circulation models underestimate the globally-averaged solar energy absorbed by cloudy atmospheres by up to 25 Wm(sup -2)...Here, a sophisticated atmospheric radiative transfer model was used to provide a more comprehensive description of the physical processes that contribute to the absorption of solar radiation by the Earth's atmosphere.

  14. Inclusion of ancient Latin-American crops in bread formulation improves intestinal iron absorption and modulates inflammatory markers.

    PubMed

    Laparra, José Moisés; Haros, Monika

    2016-02-01

    This study compares iron (Fe) absorption in Fe-deficient animals from bread formulations prepared by substitution of white wheat flour (WB) by whole wheat flour (WWB), amaranth flour (Amaranthus hypochondriacus, 25%) (AB) and quinoa flour (Chenopodium quinoa, 25%) (QB), or chia flour (Salvia hispanica L, 5%) (ChB). Hematological parameters of Fe homeostasis, plasmatic active hepcidin peptide production (LC coupled to Ms/Ms), and liver TfR-2 and IL-6 expression (RT-qPCR) were determined. The different bread formulations increased Fe content between 14% and 83% relative to white bread. Only animals fed with WWB, AB and ChB increased haemoglobin concentrations significantly. Feeding the different bread formulations did not increase hepcidin levels, but down-regulated transferrin receptor 2 (TfR2) (apart from WWB) and IL-6 (apart from QB) expression levels. Only AB and ChB had a significant influence on Fe bioavailability at the investigated level of substitution. The potential contribution of these flours would not differ considerably from that of WWB. PMID:26787109

  15. Excellent improvement in the static and dynamic magnetic properties of carbon coated iron nanoparticles for microwave absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khani, Omid; Shoushtari, Morteza Zargar; Farbod, Mansoor

    2015-11-01

    Carbon coated iron nanoparticles were synthesized, using a simple arc-discharge method. The morphology and the internal structure of the core/shell nanoparticles were studied, using field emission scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. X-ray diffraction analysis showed that both magnetic α-Fe and nonmagnetic γ-Fe phases existed in the as-prepared particles. In order to improve the static and dynamic magnetic properties of the core/shell nanoparticles, the produced nanocapsules were annealed in argon atmosphere at two different temperatures. Hysteresis loops revealed that the value of the saturation magnetization (MS) increased more than 4.1 times of its original value by annealing and this led to 70% increase in the imaginary part of the permeability. Phase analysis showed that heat treatment eliminated the nonmagnetic γ-Fe phase completely. The reflection loss plots were studied for composite layers containing 20 vol% of the annealed and not annealed nanocapsules. One of the absorber layers which contained annealed nanocapsules showed at least -10 dB loss in the whole G, C, X and Ku frequency bands and the optimal absorption exceeded -37 dB at 5.8 GHz for the as-prepared sample with a thickness of 3.2 mm. The results revealed that the magnetic properties of the arc-made Fe/C core/shell nanoparticle can be improved significantly by annealing in argon.

  16. Opacity of iron, nickel, and copper plasmas in the x-ray wavelength range: Theoretical interpretation of 2p-3d absorption spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blenski, T.; Loisel, G.; Poirier, M.; Thais, F.; Arnault, P.; Caillaud, T.; Fariaut, J.; Gilleron, F.; Pain, J.-C.; Porcherot, Q.; Reverdin, C.; Silvert, V.; Villette, B.; Bastiani-Ceccotti, S.; Turck-Chièze, S.; Foelsner, W.; de Gaufridy de Dortan, F.

    2011-09-01

    This paper deals with theoretical studies on the 2p-3d absorption in iron, nickel, and copper plasmas related to LULI2000 (Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses, 2000J facility) measurements in which target temperatures were of the order of 20 eV and plasma densities were in the range 0.004-0.01 g/cm3. The radiatively heated targets were close to local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). The structure of 2p-3d transitions has been studied with the help of the statistical superconfiguration opacity code sco and with the fine-structure atomic physics codes hullac and fac. A new mixed version of the sco code allowing one to treat part of the configurations by detailed calculation based on the Cowan’s code rcg has been also used in these comparisons. Special attention was paid to comparisons between theory and experiment concerning the term features which cannot be reproduced by sco. The differences in the spin-orbit splitting and the statistical (thermal) broadening of the 2p-3d transitions have been investigated as a function of the atomic number Z. It appears that at the conditions of the experiment the role of the term and configuration broadening was different in the three analyzed elements, this broadening being sensitive to the atomic number. Some effects of the temperature gradients and possible non-LTE effects have been studied with the help of the radiative-collisional code scric. The sensitivity of the 2p-3d structures with respect to temperature and density in medium-Z plasmas may be helpful for diagnostics of LTE plasmas especially in future experiments on the Δn=0 absorption in medium-Z plasmas for astrophysical applications.

  17. Opacity of iron, nickel, and copper plasmas in the x-ray wavelength range: Theoretical interpretation of 2p-3d absorption spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Blenski, T.; Loisel, G.; Poirier, M.; Thais, F.; Arnault, P.; Caillaud, T.; Fariaut, J.; Gilleron, F.; Pain, J.-C.; Porcherot, Q.; Reverdin, C.; Silvert, V.; Villette, B.; Bastiani-Ceccotti, S.; Turck-Chieze, S.; Foelsner, W.; Gaufridy de Dortan, F. de

    2011-09-15

    This paper deals with theoretical studies on the 2p-3d absorption in iron, nickel, and copper plasmas related to LULI2000 (Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses, 2000J facility) measurements in which target temperatures were of the order of 20 eV and plasma densities were in the range 0.004-0.01 g/cm{sup 3}. The radiatively heated targets were close to local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). The structure of 2p-3d transitions has been studied with the help of the statistical superconfiguration opacity code sco and with the fine-structure atomic physics codes hullac and fac. A new mixed version of the sco code allowing one to treat part of the configurations by detailed calculation based on the Cowan's code rcg has been also used in these comparisons. Special attention was paid to comparisons between theory and experiment concerning the term features which cannot be reproduced by sco. The differences in the spin-orbit splitting and the statistical (thermal) broadening of the 2p-3d transitions have been investigated as a function of the atomic number Z. It appears that at the conditions of the experiment the role of the term and configuration broadening was different in the three analyzed elements, this broadening being sensitive to the atomic number. Some effects of the temperature gradients and possible non-LTE effects have been studied with the help of the radiative-collisional code scric. The sensitivity of the 2p-3d structures with respect to temperature and density in medium-Z plasmas may be helpful for diagnostics of LTE plasmas especially in future experiments on the {Delta}n=0 absorption in medium-Z plasmas for astrophysical applications.

  18. Laboratory Evaluation and Application of Microwave Absorption Properties under Simulated Conditions for Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, Paul G.

    2002-01-01

    Radio absorptivity data for planetary atmospheres obtained from spacecraft radio occultation experiments, entry probe radio signal absorption measurements, and earth-based or spacecraft-based radio astronomical (emission) observations can be used to infer abundances of microwave absorbing constituents in those atmospheres, as long as reliable information regarding the microwave absorbing properties of potential constituents is available. The use of theoretically-derived microwave absorption properties for such atmospheric constituents, or the use of laboratory measurements of such properties taken under environmental conditions that are significantly different than those of the planetary atmosphere being studied, often leads to significant misinterpretation of available opacity data. Laboratory measurements have shown that the centimeter-wavelength opacity from gaseous phosphine (PH3) under simulated conditions for the outer planets far exceeds that predicted from theory over a wide range of temperatures and pressures. This fundamentally changed the resulting interpretation of Voyager radio occultation data at Saturn and Neptune. It also directly impacts planning and scientific goals for study of Saturn's atmosphere with the Cassini Radio Science Experiment and the Rossini RADAR instrument. The recognition of the need to make such laboratory measurements of simulated planetary atmospheres over a range of temperatures and pressures which correspond to the altitudes probed by both radio occultation experiments and radio astronomical observations, and over a range of frequencies which correspond to those used in both spacecraft entry probe and orbiter (or flyby) radio occultation experiments and radio astronomical observations, has led to the development of a facility at Georgia Tech which is capable of making such measurements. It has been the goal of this investigation to conduct such measurements and to apply the results to a wide range of planetary observations

  19. Laboratory Evaluation and Application of Microwave Absorption Properties Under Simulated Conditions for Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, Paul G.

    1998-01-01

    Radio absorptivity data for planetary atmospheres obtained from spacecraft radio occultation experiments, entry probe radio signal absorption measurements, and earth-based radio astronomical observations can be used to infer abundances of microwave absorbing constituents in those atmospheres, as long as reliable information regarding the microwave absorbing properties of potential constituents is available. The use of theoretically-derived microwave absorption properties for such atmospheric constituents, or using laboratory measurements of such properties taken under environmental conditions which are significantly different than those of the planetary atmosphere being studied, often leads to significant misinterpretation of available opacity data. For example, laboratory measurements completed recently by Kolodner and Steffes (ICARUS 132, pp. 151-169, March 1998, attached as Appendix A) under this grant (NAGS-4190), have shown that the opacity from gaseous H2SO4 under simulated Venus conditions is best described by a different formalism than was previously used. The recognition of the need to make such laboratory measurements of simulated planetary atmospheres over a range of temperatures and pressures which correspond to the altitudes probed by both spacecraft entry probe and orbiter radio occultation experiments and by radio astronomical observations, and over a range of frequencies which correspond to those used in such experiments, has led to the development of a facility at Georgia Tech which is capable of making such measurements. It has been the goal of this investigation to conduct such measurements and to apply the results to a wide range of planetary observations, both spacecraft and earth-based, in order to determine the identity and abundance profiles of constituents in those planetary atmospheres.

  20. Ligandless dispersive liquid--liquid microextraction of iron in biological and foodstuff samples and its determination by Electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Madadizadeh, Mohadeseh; Taher, Mohammad Ali; Ashkenani, Hamid

    2013-01-01

    A new, simple, and efficient method comprising ligandless dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction combined with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry is reported for the preconcentration and determination of ultratrace amounts of Fe(III). Carbon tetrachloride and acetone were used as the extraction and disperser solvents, respectively. Some effective parameters of the microextraction such as choice of extraction and disperser solvents, their volume, extraction time and temperature, salt and surfactant effect, and pH were optimized. Under the optimum conditions, the calibration curve was linear in the range of 0.02 to 0.46 microg/L of Fe(III), with LOD and LOQ of 5.2 and 17.4 ng/L, respectively. The RSD for seven replicated determinations of Fe(IIl) ion at 0.1 microg/L concentration level was 5.2%. Operational simplicity, rapidity, low cost, good repeatability, and low consumption of extraction solvent are the main advantages of the proposed method. The method was successfully applied to the determination of iron in biological, food, and certified reference samples. PMID:24645530

  1. Examination of Cr(VI) treatment by zero-valent iron using in situ, real-time X-ray absorption spectroscopy and Cr isotope measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamieson-Hanes, Julia H.; Lentz, Adam M.; Amos, Richard T.; Ptacek, Carol J.; Blowes, David W.

    2014-10-01

    A series of replicate flow-through cell experiments was conducted to characterize Cr isotope fractionation during Cr(VI) treatment by granular zero-valent iron (ZVI). Synthetic groundwater containing 50 mg L-1 Cr(VI) was pumped upward through a custom-made cell packed with ZVI under anaerobic conditions. The geochemical evolution of the system was monitored using pH and redox measurements, while aqueous effluent samples were retained for analysis of cations and Cr isotopes. Real-time, in situ X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy collected via a Kapton® window in the cell provided additional information on the speciation of the reaction products. Increases in δ53Cr values corresponding to decreases in Cr(VI) concentration suggested the occurrence of redox processes. Spectroscopic results correlated well with the isotope data, indicating reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III). The isotope data did not appear to follow a single trend. A two-stage system was proposed to explain the complex isotope trend, where the rapid Cr removal was associated with very little fractionation (ε = -0.2‰), whereas slower removal was associated with a greater degree of fractionation (ε = -1.2‰ to -1.5‰). Reactive transport modeling was used to quantify distinct isotope fractionation values (ε), differentiated by a significant change in the Cr removal rate.

  2. A photo-oxidation procedure using UV radiation/H 2O 2 for decomposition of wine samples — Determination of iron and manganese content by flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, Walter N. L.; Brandão, Geovani C.; Portugal, Lindomar A.; David, Jorge M.; Ferreira, Sérgio L. C.

    2009-06-01

    This paper proposes the use of photo-oxidation with UV radiation/H 2O 2 as sample pretreatment for the determination of iron and manganese in wines by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The optimization involved the study of the following variables: pH and concentration of buffer solution, concentrated hydrogen peroxide volume and irradiation time. The evaluation of sample degradation was monitored by measuring the absorbance at the maximum wavelength of red wine (530 nm). Using the experimental conditions established during the optimization (irradiation time of 30 min, oxidant volume of 2.5 mL, pH 10, and a buffer concentration of 0.15 mol L - 1 ), this procedure allows the determination of iron and manganese with limits of detection of 30 and 22 μg L - 1 , respectively, for a 5 mL volume of digested sample. The precision levels, expressed as relative standard deviation (RSD), were 2.8% and 0.65% for iron and 2.7% and 0.54% for manganese for concentrations of 0.5 and 2.0 mg L - 1 , respectively. Addition/recovery tests for evaluation of the accuracy were in the ranges of 90%-111% and 95%-107% for iron and manganese, respectively. This digestion procedure has been applied for the determination of iron and manganese in six wine samples. The concentrations varied from 1.58 to 2.77 mg L - 1 for iron and from 1.30 to 1.91 mg L - 1 for manganese. The results were compared with those obtained by an acid digestion procedure and determination of the elements by FAAS. There was no significant difference between the results obtained by the two methods based on a paired t-test (at 95% confidence level).

  3. THE PHYSICAL CONDITIONS OF THE INTRINSIC N V NARROW ABSORPTION LINE SYSTEMS OF THREE QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Jian; Charlton, Jane C.; Misawa, Toru; Eracleous, Michael; Ganguly, Rajib E-mail: misawatr@shinshu-u.ac.j

    2010-10-20

    We employ detailed photoionization models to infer the physical conditions of intrinsic narrow absorption line systems found in high-resolution spectra of three quasars at z = 2.6-3.0. We focus on a family of intrinsic absorbers characterized by N V lines that are strong relative to the Ly{alpha} lines. The inferred physical conditions are similar for the three intrinsic N V absorbers, with metallicities greater than 10 times the solar value (assuming a solar abundance pattern), and with high ionization parameters (log U {approx} 0). Thus, we conclude that the unusual strength of the N V lines results from a combination of partial coverage, a high ionization state, and high metallicity. We consider whether dilution of the absorption lines by flux from the broad emission line region can lead us to overestimate the metallicities and we find that this is an unlikely possibility. The high abundances that we infer are not surprising in the context of scenarios in which metal enrichment takes place very early on in massive galaxies. We estimate that the mass outflow rate in the absorbing gas (which is likely to have a filamentary structure) is less than a few M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} under the most optimistic assumptions, although it may be embedded in a much hotter, more massive outflow.

  4. Laboratory Evaluation and Application of Microwave Absorption Properties Under Simulated Conditions for Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, Paul G.

    1997-01-01

    Radio absorptivity data for planetary atmospheres obtained from spacecraft radio occultation experiments and earth-based radio astronomical observations can be used to infer abundances of microwave absorbing constituents in those atmospheres, as long as reliable information regarding the microwave absorbing properties of potential constituents is available. The use of theoretically-derived microwave absorption properties for such atmospheric constituents, or using laboratory measurements of such properties under environmental conditions which are significantly different than those of the planetary atmosphere being studied, often leads to significant misinterpretation of available opacity data. Laboratory measurements completed under this grant (NAGW-533), have shown that the opacity from, SO2 under simulated Venus conditions is best described by a different lineshape than was previously used in theoretical predictions. The recognition of the need to make such laboratory measurements of simulated planetary atmospheres over a range of temperatures and pressures which correspond to the altitudes probed by both radio occultation experiments and radio astronomical observations, and over a range of frequencies which correspond to those used in both radio occultation experiments and radio astronomical observations, has led to the development of a facility at Georgia Tech which is capable of making such measurements. It has been the goal of this investigation to conduct such measurements and to apply the results to a wide range of planetary observations, both spacecraft and earth-based, in order to determine the identity and abundance profiles of constituents in those planetary atmospheres.

  5. Absorption of Sunlight by Water Vapor in Cloudy Conditions: A Partial Explanation for the Cloud Absorption Anomaly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crisp, D.

    1997-01-01

    The atmospheric radiative transfer algorithms used in most global general circulation models underestimate the globally-averaged solar energy absorbed by cloudy atmospheres by up to 25 W/sq m. The origin of this anomalous absorption is not yet known, but it has been attributed to a variety of sources including oversimplified or missing physical processes in these models, uncertainties in the input data, and even measurement errors. Here, a sophisticated atmospheric radiative transfer model was used to provide a more comprehensive description of the physical processes that contribute to the absorption of solar radiation by the Earth's atmosphere. We found that the amount of sunlight absorbed by a cloudy atmosphere is inversely proportional to the solar zenith angle and the cloud top height, and directly proportional to the cloud optical depth and the water vapor concentration within the clouds. Atmospheres with saturated, optically-thick, low clouds absorbed about 12 W/sq m more than clear atmospheres. This accounts for about 1/2 to 1/3 of the anomalous ab- sorption. Atmospheres with optically thick middle and high clouds usually absorb less than clear atmospheres. Because water vapor is concentrated within and below the cloud tops, this absorber is most effective at small solar zenith angles. An additional absorber that is distributed at or above the cloud tops is needed to produce the amplitude and zenith angle dependence of the observed anomalous absorption.

  6. Iron-silica interaction at extreme conditions and the electrically conducting layer at the base of Earth's mantle.

    PubMed

    Dubrovinsky, L; Dubrovinskaia, N; Langenhorst, F; Dobson, D; Rubie, D; Gessmann, C; Abrikosov, I A; Johansson, B; Baykov, V I; Vitos, L; Le Bihan, T; Crichton, W A; Dmitriev, V; Weber, H-P

    2003-03-01

    The boundary between the Earth's metallic core and its silicate mantle is characterized by strong lateral heterogeneity and sharp changes in density, seismic wave velocities, electrical conductivity and chemical composition. To investigate the composition and properties of the lowermost mantle, an understanding of the chemical reactions that take place between liquid iron and the complex Mg-Fe-Si-Al-oxides of the Earth's lower mantle is first required. Here we present a study of the interaction between iron and silica (SiO2) in electrically and laser-heated diamond anvil cells. In a multianvil apparatus at pressures up to 140 GPa and temperatures over 3,800 K we simulate conditions down to the core-mantle boundary. At high temperature and pressures below 40 GPa, iron and silica react to form iron oxide and an iron-silicon alloy, with up to 5 wt% silicon. At pressures of 85-140 GPa, however, iron and SiO2 do not react and iron-silicon alloys dissociate into almost pure iron and a CsCl-structured (B2) FeSi compound. Our experiments suggest that a metallic silicon-rich B2 phase, produced at the core-mantle boundary (owing to reactions between iron and silicate), could accumulate at the boundary between the mantle and core and explain the anomalously high electrical conductivity of this region. PMID:12621431

  7. Mechanisms for iron oxide formation under hydrothermal conditions: an in situ total scattering study.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Kirsten M Ø; Andersen, Henrik L; Tyrsted, Christoffer; Bøjesen, Espen D; Dippel, Ann-Christin; Lock, Nina; Billinge, Simon J L; Iversen, Bo B; Christensen, Mogens

    2014-10-28

    The formation and growth of maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) nanoparticles from ammonium iron(III) citrate solutions (C(6)O(7)H(6) · xFe(3+) · yNH(4)) in hydrothermal synthesis conditions have been studied by in situ total scattering. The local structure of the precursor in solution is similar to that of the crystalline coordination polymer [Fe(H(2)cit(H2O)](n), where corner-sharing [FeO(6)] octahedra are linked by citrate. As hydrothermal treatment of the solution is initiated, clusters of edge-sharing [FeO(6)] units form (with extent of the structural order <5 Å). Tetrahedrally coordinated iron subsequently appears, and as the synthesis continues, the clusters slowly assemble into crystalline maghemite, giving rise to clear Bragg peaks after 90 s at 320 °C. The primary transformation from amorphous clusters to nanocrystallites takes place by condensation of the clusters along the corner-sharing tetrahedral iron units. The crystallization process is related to large changes in the local structure as the interatomic distances in the clusters change dramatically with cluster growth. The local atomic structure is size dependent, and particles smaller than 6 nm are highly disordered. The final crystallite size (<10 nm) is dependent on both synthesis temperature and precursor concentration. PMID:25256366

  8. IsdC from Staphylococcus lugdunensis Induces Biofilm Formation under Low-Iron Growth Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Missineo, Antonino; Di Poto, Antonella; Geoghegan, Joan A.; Rindi, Simonetta; Heilbronner, Simon; Gianotti, Valentina; Arciola, Carla Renata; Foster, Timothy J.; Pietrocola, Giampiero

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus lugdunensis is a coagulase-negative staphylococcus that is a commensal of humans and an opportunistic pathogen. It can cause a spectrum of infections, including those that are associated with the ability to form biofilm, such as occurs with endocarditis or indwelling medical devices. The genome sequences of two strains revealed the presence of orthologues of the ica genes that are responsible for synthesis of poly-N-acetylglucosamine (PNAG) that is commonly associated with biofilm in other staphylococci. However, we discovered that biofilm formed by a panel of S. lugdunensis isolates growing in iron-restricted medium was susceptible to degradation by proteases and not by metaperiodate, suggesting that the biofilm matrix comprised proteins and not PNAG. When the iron concentration was raised to 1 mM biofilm formation by all strains tested was greatly reduced. A mutant of strain N920143 lacking the entire locus that encodes iron-regulated surface determinant (Isd) proteins was defective in biofilm formation under iron-limited conditions. An IsdC-null mutant was defective, whereas IsdK, IsdJ, and IsdB mutants formed biofilm to the same level as the parental strain. Expression of IsdC was required both for the primary attachment to unconditioned polystyrene and for the accumulation phase of biofilm involving cell-cell interactions. Purified recombinant IsdC protein formed dimers in solution and Lactococcus lactis cells expressing only IsdC adhered to immobilized recombinant IsdC but not to IsdJ, IsdK, or IsdB. This is consistent with a specific homophilic interaction between IsdC molecules on neighboring cells contributing to accumulation of S. lugdunensis biofilm in vivo. PMID:24686057

  9. Liquid Iron Alloys with Hydrogen at Outer Core Conditions by First Principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umemoto, K.; Hirose, K.

    2015-12-01

    Since the density of the outer core deduced from seismic data is about 10% lower than that of pure iron at core pressures and temperatures (P-T), it is widely believed that the outer core includes one or more light elements. Although intensive experimental and theoretical studies have been performed so far, the light element in the core has not yet been identified. Comparison of the density and sound velocity of liquid iron alloys with observations, such as the PREM, is a promising way to determine the species and quantity of light alloying component(s) in the outer core. Here we report the results of a first-principles molecular dynamics study on liquid iron alloyed with hydrogen, one of candidates of the light elements. Hydrogen had been much less studied than other candidates. However, hydrogen has been known to reduce the melting temperature of Fe-H solid [1]. Furthermore, very recently, Nomura et al. argued that the outer core may include 24 at.% H in order to be molten under relatively low temperature (< 3600 K) [2]. Since then hydrogen has attracted strong interests. We clarify the effects of hydrogen on density and sound velocity of liquid iron alloys under outer core P-T conditions. It is shown that ~1 wt% hydrogen can reproduce PREM density and sound velocity simultaneously very well. In addition, we show the presence of hydrogen rather reduces Gruneisen parameters. It indicates that, if hydrogen exists in the outer core, temperature profile of the outer core could be changed considerably from one estimated so far. [1] Sakamaki, K., E. Takahashi, Y. Nakajima, Y. Nishihara, K. Funakoshi, T. Suzuki, and Y. Fukai, Phys. Earth Planet. Inter., 174, 192-201 (2009). [2] Nomura, R., K. Hirose, K. Uesugi, Y. Ohishi, A. Tsuchiyama, A. Miyake, and Y. Ueno, Science 31, 522-525 (2014).

  10. Thermal and magnetic anomalies of α-iron: an exploration by extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy and synchrotron x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boccato, Silvia; Sanson, Andrea; Kantor, Innokenty; Mathon, Olivier; Dyadkin, Vadim; Chernyshov, Dmitry; Carnera, Alberto; Pascarelli, Sakura

    2016-09-01

    The local structure and dynamics of α-iron have been investigated by extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction (XRD) in order to shed light on some thermal and magnetic anomalies observed in the last decades. The quantitative EXAFS analysis of the first two coordination shells reveals a peculiar local vibrational dynamics of α-iron: the second neighbor distance exhibits anharmonicity and vibrational anisotropy larger than the first neighbor distance. We search for possible distortions of the bcc structure to justify the unexplained magnetostriction anomalies of α-iron and provide a value for the maximum dislocation of the central Fe atom. No thermal anomalies have been detected from the current XRD data. On the contrary, an intriguing thermal anomaly at about 150 K, ascribed to a stiffening of the Fe–Fe bonds, was found by EXAFS.

  11. Thermal and magnetic anomalies of α-iron: an exploration by extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy and synchrotron x-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Boccato, Silvia; Sanson, Andrea; Kantor, Innokenty; Mathon, Olivier; Dyadkin, Vadim; Chernyshov, Dmitry; Carnera, Alberto; Pascarelli, Sakura

    2016-09-01

    The local structure and dynamics of α-iron have been investigated by extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction (XRD) in order to shed light on some thermal and magnetic anomalies observed in the last decades. The quantitative EXAFS analysis of the first two coordination shells reveals a peculiar local vibrational dynamics of α-iron: the second neighbor distance exhibits anharmonicity and vibrational anisotropy larger than the first neighbor distance. We search for possible distortions of the bcc structure to justify the unexplained magnetostriction anomalies of α-iron and provide a value for the maximum dislocation of the central Fe atom. No thermal anomalies have been detected from the current XRD data. On the contrary, an intriguing thermal anomaly at about 150 K, ascribed to a stiffening of the Fe-Fe bonds, was found by EXAFS. PMID:27385480

  12. X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies of the dinuclear iron center in methane monooxygenase and the sulfure and chlorine centers in photographic materials

    SciTech Connect

    DeWitt, J.G.

    1992-12-01

    The dinuclear iron center of the hydroxylase component of soluble methane monooxygenase (MMO) from Methylococcus capsulatus and Methylosinus trichosporiwn has been studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Analysis of the Fe K-edge EXAFS revealed that the first shell coordination of the Fe(HI)Fe(IH) oxidized state of the hydroxylase from M. capsulatus consists of approximately 6 N and 0 atoms at an average distance of 2.04 [Angstrom]. The Fe-Fe distance was determined to be 3.4 [Angstrom]. No evidence for the presence of a short oxo bridge in the iron center of the oxidized hydroxylase was found, suggesting that the active site of MMO is significantly different from the active sites of the dinuclear iron proteins hemery and ribonucleotide reductase. In addition, the results of the first shell fits suggest that there are more oxygen than nitrogen donor ligands.

  13. X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies of the dinuclear iron center in methane monooxygenase and the sulfure and chlorine centers in photographic materials

    SciTech Connect

    DeWitt, J.G.

    1992-12-01

    The dinuclear iron center of the hydroxylase component of soluble methane monooxygenase (MMO) from Methylococcus capsulatus and Methylosinus trichosporiwn has been studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Analysis of the Fe K-edge EXAFS revealed that the first shell coordination of the Fe(HI)Fe(IH) oxidized state of the hydroxylase from M. capsulatus consists of approximately 6 N and 0 atoms at an average distance of 2.04 {Angstrom}. The Fe-Fe distance was determined to be 3.4 {Angstrom}. No evidence for the presence of a short oxo bridge in the iron center of the oxidized hydroxylase was found, suggesting that the active site of MMO is significantly different from the active sites of the dinuclear iron proteins hemery and ribonucleotide reductase. In addition, the results of the first shell fits suggest that there are more oxygen than nitrogen donor ligands.

  14. Erosive Wear Behavior of High-Alloy Cast Iron and Duplex Stainless Steel under Mining Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoganandh, J.; Natarajan, S.; Kumaresh Babu, S. P.

    2015-09-01

    Centrifugal pumps used in the lignite mines encounter erosive wear problems, leading to a disastrous failure of the pump casings. This paper attempts to evaluate the erosive wear resistance of Ni-Hard 4, high-chromium iron, and Cast CD4MCu duplex stainless steel (DSS), for mining conditions. The prepared test coupons were subjected to an erosion test by varying the impingement velocity and the angle of impingement, under two different pH conditions of 3 and 7, which pertained to the mining conditions. XRD analysis was carried out to confirm the phases present in the alloy. The eroded surface was subjected to SEM analysis to identify the erosion mechanisms. The surface degradation of Ni-Hard 4 and high-chromium iron came from a low-angle abrasion with a grooving and plowing mechanism at a low angle of impingement. At normal impingement, deep indentations resulted in lips and crater formations, leading to degradation of the surface in a brittle manner. A combined extrusion-forging mechanism is observed in the CD4MCu DSS surface at all the impingement angles.

  15. Understanding Sulfur Poisoning and Regeneration of Nickel Biomass Conditioning Catalysts using X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yung, M. M.; Cheah, S.; Kuhn, J. N.

    2013-01-01

    The production of biofuels can proceed via a biomass gasification to produce syngas, which can then undergo catalytic conditioning and reforming reactions prior to being sent to a fuel synthesis reactor. Catalysts used for biomass conditioning are plagued by short lifetimes which are a result of, among other things, poisoning. Syngas produced from biomass gasification may contain between 30-300 ppm H2S, depending on the feedstock and gasification conditions, and H2S is a key catalyst poison. In order to overcome catalyst poisoning, either an H2S-tolerant catalyst or an efficient regeneration protocol should be employed. In this study, sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) was used to monitor sulfur species on spent catalyst samples and the transformation of these species from sulfides to sulfates during steam and air regeneration on a Ni/Mg/K/Al2O3 catalyst used to condition biomass-derived syngas. Additionally, nickel K-edge EXAFS and XANES are used to examine the state of nickel species on the catalysts. Post-reaction samples showed the presence of sulfides on the H2S-poisoned nickel catalyst and although some gaseous sulfur species were observed to leave the catalyst bed during regeneration, sulfur remained on the catalyst and a transformation from sulfides to sulfates was observed. The subsequent H2 reduction led to a partial reduction of sulfates back to sulfides. A proposed reaction sequence is presented and recommended regeneration strategies are discussed.

  16. Laboratory evaluation and application of microwave absorption properties under simulated conditions for planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, Paul G.

    1992-01-01

    Radio absorptivity data for planetary atmospheres obtained from spacecraft radio occultation experiments and earth-based radio astronomical observations can be used to infer abundances of microwave absorbing atmospheric constituents in those atmospheres, as long as reliable information regarding the microwave absorbing properties of potential constituents is available. The use of theoretically derived microwave absorption properties for such atmospheric constituents, or using laboratory measurements of such properties under environmental conditions which are significantly different than those of the planetary atmosphere being studied, often leads to significant misinterpretation of available opacity data. The recognition of the need to make such laboratory measurements of simulated planetary atmospheres over a range of temperatures and pressures which correspond to the altitudes probed by both radio occultation experiments and radio astronomical observations, and over a range of frequencies which correspond to those used in both radio occultation experiments and radio astronomical observations, has led to the development of a facility at Georgia Tech which is capable of making such measurements. The goal of this investigation was to conduct such measurements and to apply the results to a wide range of planetary observations, both spacecraft and earth-based, in order to determine the identity and abundance profiles of constituents in those planetary atmospheres.

  17. Effect of bionic coupling units' forms on wear resistance of gray cast iron under dry linear reciprocating sliding condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Zuobo; Zhou, Hong; Xie, Guofeng; Cong, Dalong; Meng, Chao; Ren, Luquan

    2015-07-01

    In order to get close to the wear form of guide rails, the homemade linear reciprocating wear testing machine was used for the wear test. In order to improve the wear-resistance of gray cast iron guide rail, bionic coupling units of different forms were manufactured by a laser. Wear behavior of gray-cast-iron with bionic-coupling units has been studied under dry sliding condition at room temperature using the wear testing machine. The wear resistance was evaluated by means of weight loss measurement and wear morphology. The results indicated that bionic coupling unit could improve the wear resistance of gray cast iron. The wear resistance of gray cast iron with reticulation bionic coupling unit is the best. When the load and speed changed, reticulation bionic coupling unit still has excellent performance in improving the wear resistance of gray cast iron.

  18. Iron deficiency: new insights into diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Camaschella, Clara

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia are common conditions worldwide affecting especially children and young women. In developing countries, iron deficiency is caused by poor iron intake and/or parasitic infection, whereas vegetarian dietary choices, poor iron absorption, and chronic blood loss are common causes in high-income countries. Erythropoiesis stimulating agents can result in functional iron deficiency for erythropoiesis even when stores are iron-replete. Diagnosis of iron deficiency is straightforward, except when it occurs in the context of inflammatory disorders. Oral iron salts correct absolute iron deficiency in most patients, because low hepcidin levels facilitate iron absorption. Unfortunately frequent side effects limit oral iron efficacy. Intravenous iron is increasingly utilized, because currently available preparations allow rapid normalization of total body iron even with a single infusion and are effective also in functional iron deficiency and in iron deficiency associated with inflammatory disorders. The evidence is accumulating that these preparations are safe and effective. However, long-term safety issues of high doses of iron need to be further explored. PMID:26637694

  19. Effects of surface condition on aqueous corrosion and environmental embrittlement of iron aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Perrin, R.L.; Buchanan, R.A.

    1996-08-01

    Effects of retained high-temperature surface oxides, produced during thermomechanical processing and/or heat treatment, on the aqueous-corrosion and environmental-embrittlement characteristics of Fe{sub 3}Al-based iron aluminides (FA-84, FA-129 and FAL-Mo), a FeAl-based iron aluminide (FA-385), and a disordered low-aluminum Fe-Al alloy (FAPY) were evaluated. All tests were conducted at room temperature in a mild acid-chloride solution. In cyclic-anodic-polarization testing for aqueous-corrosion behavior, the surface conditions examined were: as-received (i.e., with the retained high-temperature oxides), mechanically cleaned and chemically cleaned. For all materials, the polarization tests showed the critical pitting potentials to be significantly lower in the as-received condition than in the mechanically-cleaned and chemically-cleaned conditions. These results indicate detrimental effects of the retained high-temperature oxides in terms of increased susceptibilities to localized corrosion. In 200-hour U-bend stress-corrosion-cracking tests for environmental-embrittlement behavior, conducted at open-circuit corrosion potentials and at a hydrogen-charging potential of {minus}1500 mV (SHE), the above materials (except FA-385) were examined with retained oxides and with mechanically cleaned surfaces. At the open-circuit corrosion potentials, none of the materials in either surface condition underwent cracking. At the hydrogen-charging potential, none of the materials with retained oxides underwent cracking, but FA-84, FA-129 and FAL-Mo in the mechanically cleaned condition did undergo cracking. These results suggest beneficial effects of the retained high-temperature oxides in terms of increased resistance to environmental hydrogen embrittlement.

  20. Laboratory evaluation and application of microwave absorption properties under simulated conditions for planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, P. G.

    1986-01-01

    The recognition of the need to make laboratory measurements of simulated planetary atmospheres over a range of temperatures and pressure which correspond to the altitudes probed by radio occultation experiments, and over a range of frequencies which correspond to both radio occultation experiments and radio astronomical observations, has led to the development of a facility at Georgia Tech which is capable of making such measurements. Construction was completed of the outer planets simulator and measurements were conducted of the microwave absorption and refraction from nitrogen under simulated Titan conditions. The results of these and previous laboratory measurements were applied to a wide range of microwave opacity measurements, in order to derive constituent densities and distributions in planetary atmospheres such as Venus.

  1. Effect of growth conditions on microbial activity and iron-sulfide production by Desulfovibrio vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chen; Vannela, Raveender; Hayes, Kim F; Rittmann, Bruce E

    2014-05-15

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) can produce iron sulfide (FeS) solids with mineralogical characteristics that may be beneficial for a variety of biogeochemical applications, such as long-term immobilization of uranium. In this study, the growth and metabolism of Desulfovibrio vulgaris, one of the best-studied SRB species, were comprehensively monitored in batch studies, and the biogenic FeS solids were characterized by X-ray diffraction. Controlling the pH by varying the initial pH, the iron-to-sulfate ratio, or the electron donor - affected the growth of D. vulgaris and strongly influenced the formation and growth of FeS solids. In particular, lower pH (from initial conditions or a decrease caused by less sulfate reduction, FeS precipitation, or using pyruvate as the electron donor) produced larger-sized mackinawite (Fe1+xS). Greater accumulation of free sulfide, from more sulfate reduction by D. vulgaris, also led to larger-sized mackinawite and particularly stimulated mackinawite transformation to greigite (Fe3S4) when the free sulfide concentration was 29.3mM. Furthermore, sufficient free Fe(2+) led to the additional formation of vivianite [Fe3(PO4)2·8(H2O)]. Thus, microbially relevant conditions (initial pH, choice of electron donor, and excess or deficiency of sulfide) are tools to generate biogenic FeS solids of different characteristics. PMID:24675611

  2. Laboratory evaluation and application of microwave absorption properties under simulated conditions for planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, Paul G.

    1992-01-01

    Radio absorptivity data for planetary atmospheres obtained from spacecraft radio occultation experiments and earth-based radio astronomical observations can be used to infer abundances of microwave absorbing atmospheric constituents in those atmospheres, as long as reliable information regarding the microwave absorbing properties of potential constituents is available. The use of theoretically-derived microwave absorption properties for such atmospheric constituents, or using laboratory measurements of such properties under environmental conditions which are significantly different than those of the planetary atmosphere being studied, often leads to significant misinterpretation of available opacity data. For example, laboratory measurements performed by Fahd and Steffes have shown that the opacity from gaseous SO2 under simulated Venus conditions can be well described by the Van Vleck-Weisskopf lineshape at wavelengths shortward of 2 cm, but that the opacity of wavelengths greater than 2 cm is best described by a different lineshape that was previously used in theoretical predictions. The recognition of the need to make such laboratory measurements of simulated planetary atmospheres over a range of temperatures and pressures which correspond to the altitudes probed by both radio occultation experiments and radio astronomical observations, and over a range of frequencies which correspond to those used in both radio occultation experiments and radio astronomical observations, has led to the development of a facility at Georgia Tech which is capable of making such measurements. It has been the goal of this investigation to conduct such measurements and to apply the results to a wide range of planetary observations, both spacecraft and earth-based, in order to determine the identity and abundance profiles of constituents in those planetary atmospheres.

  3. Corrosion of iron, aluminum and copper-base alloys in glycols under simulated solar collector conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Beavers, J.A.; Diegle, R.B.

    1981-10-01

    The corrosion behavior of iron, aluminum and copperbase alloys was studied in uninhibited glycol solutions under conditions that simulate those found in non-concentrating solar collectors. It was found that only Type 444 stainless steel exhibited adequate corrosion resistance; there was no evidence of pitting, crevice corrosion, or galvanic attack, and general corrosion rates were low. The general corrosion rate of CDA 122 copper was high (greater than 200 ..mu..m/y) under some test conditions, but copper was resistant to pitting and crevice attack. General corrosion rates of the aluminum alloys (1100, 3003 and 6061) were low, but these alloys were susceptible to pitting and crevice attack. The propensity for pitting was greatest in the presence of chlorides but it also was severe in the absence of chlorides following long exposures. The onset of pitting of the aluminum alloys in chloride-free solutions was attributed to degradation of the glycols.

  4. Microbial Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation Under Iron Reducing Conditions, Alternative Electron Acceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Urigüen, M.; Jaffe, P. R.

    2015-12-01

    Autotrophic Acidimicrobiaceae-bacterium named A6 (A6), part of the Actinobacteria phylum have been linked to anaerobic ammonium (NH4+) oxidation under iron reducing conditions. These organisms obtain their energy by oxidizing NH4+ and transferring the electrons to a terminal electron acceptor (TEA). Under environmental conditions, the TEAs are iron oxides [Fe(III)], which are reduced to Fe(II), this process is known as Feammox. Our studies indicate that alternative forms of TEAs can be used by A6, e.g. iron rich clays (i.e. nontronite) and electrodes in bioelectrochemical systems such as Microbial Electrolysis Cells (MECs), which can sustain NH4+removal and A6 biomass production. Our results show that nontronite can support Feammox and promote bacterial cell production. A6 biomass increased from 4.7 x 104 to 3.9 x 105 cells/ml in 10 days. Incubations of A6 in nontronite resulted in up to 10 times more NH4+ removal and 3 times more biomass production than when ferrihydrite is used as the Fe(III) source. Additionally, Fe in nontronite can be reoxidized by aeration and A6 can reutilize it; however, Fe is still finite in the clay. In contrast, in MECs, A6 harvest electrons from NH4+ and use an anode as an unlimited TEA, as a result current is produced. We operated multiple MECs in parallel using a single external power source, as described by Call & Logan (2011). MECs were run with an applied voltage of 0.7V and different growing mediums always containing initial 5mM NH4+. Results show that current production is favored when anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), an electron shuttled, is present in the medium as it facilitates the transfer of electrons from the bacterial cell to the anode. Additionally, A6 biomass increased from 1 x 104 to 9.77 x 105cells/ml in 14 days of operation. Due to Acidimicrobiaceae-bacterium A6's ability to use various TEAs, MECs represent an alternative, iron-free form, for optimized biomass production of A6 and its application in NH4

  5. Density of alkaline magmas at crustal and upper mantle conditions by X-ray absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, R.; Malfait, W.; Petitgirard, S.; Sanchez-Valle, C.

    2011-12-01

    Silicate melts are essential components of igneous processes and are directly involved in differentiation processes and heat transfer within the Earth. Studies of the physical properties of magmas (e.g., density, viscosity, conductivity, etc) are however challenging and experimental data at geologically relevant pressure and temperature conditions remain scarce. For example, there is virtually no data on the density at high pressure of alkaline magmas (e.g., phonolites) typically found in continental rift zone settings. We present in situ density measurements of alkaline magmas at crustal and upper mantle conditions using synchrotron X-ray absorption. Measurements were conducted on ID27 beamline at ESRF using a panoramic Paris-Edinburgh Press (PE Press). The starting material is a synthetic haplo-phonolite glass similar in composition to the Plateau flood phonolites from the Kenya rift [1]. The glass was synthesized at 1673 K and 2.0 GPa in a piston-cylinder apparatus at ETH Zurich and characterized using EPMA, FTIR and density measurements. The sample contains less than 200 ppm water and is free of CO2. Single-crystal diamond cylinders (Øin = 0.5 mm, height = 1 mm) were used as sample containers and placed in an assembly formed by hBN spacers, a graphite heater and a boron epoxy gasket [2]. The density was determined as a function of pressure (1.0 to 3.1 GPa) and temperature (1630-1860 K) from the X-ray absorption contrast at 20 keV between the sample and the diamond capsule. The molten state of the sample during the data collection was confirmed by X-ray diffraction measurements. Pressure and temperature were determined simultaneously from the equation of state of hBN and platinum using the the double isochor method [3].The results are combined with available density data at room conditions to derive the first experimental equation of state (EOS) of phonolitic liquids at crustal and upper mantle conditions. We will compare our results with recent reports of the

  6. Simultaneous measurement of 59Fe and 51Cr in iron absorption studies using a whole-body scanner with mobile shielding.

    PubMed

    Marx, J J; van den Beld, B; van Dongen, R; Strackee, L H

    1980-07-01

    A whole-body scanner is described with a mobile shadow shield which affords a considerable reduction in space. The scanner has two NaI(T1) scintillation crystals of 4 x 6", placed at opposite sites of the subject. Background radiation, efficiency and geometric qualities made the scanner very useful for clinical whole-body counting. The equipment was used in iron absorption studies using a double isotope technique with 59Fe and 51Cr. After ingestion of an oral test dose total body kinetics of 59Fe and 51Cr was followed up to 60 days in 4 volunteers. Between days 3 and 10 the 51Cr, which was used as an non-absorbable indicator, had left the body completely. The 59Fe reached a constant value not before day 10, indicating that iron retention cannot be measured before that time. From repeated measurement of 59Fe and 51Cr directly after ingestion until the first defaecation it could be deduced that the coefficient of variation for 59Fe was less than 1.5% with a scanning time of 600 sec, and for 51Cr less than 5%. Extreme variations in geometry, such as measurement of the activity in a beaker and of the same amount after ingestion in the body, yielded practically the same value for 59Fe. The double isotope technique made it possible to measure not only iron retention but also mucosal uptake and mucosal transfer of iron. It is pointed out that measurement of the last two parameters of iron absorption is not possible in patients with serious obstipation or with very low mucosal uptake values. PMID:6780983

  7. [Influences of humic acids on the dissimilatory iron reduction of red soil in anaerobic condition].

    PubMed

    Xu, Li-na; Li, Zhong-pei; Che, Yu-ping

    2009-01-01

    Iron oxide is abundant in red soil. Reduction and oxidation of iron oxide are important biogeochemical processes. In this paper, we reported the effects of humic acid on dissimilatory iron reduction (DISSIR) in red soil by adding glucose or humic acid (HA), under an anaerobic condition. Results indicated that DISSIR is weak for the red soil with a low content of organic matter, Glucose that act as electron donators promoted the process of DISSIR in red soil. HA added to soil solely didn't accelerate the DISSIR since it couldn't provide electron donators to microbe. However, adding of both glucose and HA promoted the DISSIR at the beginning of the incubation but then inhibited the process, which maybe caused by the effects of precipitation and adsorption of red soil. Concentrations of HA strongly affected the DISSIR, HA at low concentrations(0.20 and 0.02 g/kg) had weak effects, while HA at a high concentration (2.00 g/kg) promoted the process at the beginning and then inhibited it. HA extracted from different materials had distinct effects on the DISSIR. HA from Weathering coal of Datong in Shanxi Province (HAs), lignite of Gongxian in Henan Province (HAh) and Dianchi Lake sediment in Kunming of Yunnan Province (HAk) all promoted the DISSIR at the beginning of the incubation. However, at the end of incubation, HAk with a low aromaticity still promoted the process, while HAs and HAh with a higher aromaticity weakened the DISSIR. This may be due to the increase in adsorption of soil with the aromaticity of HA. PMID:19353884

  8. Ineffective erythropoiesis and regulation of iron status in iron loading anaemias.

    PubMed

    Camaschella, Clara; Nai, Antonella

    2016-02-01

    The definition 'iron loading anaemias' encompasses a group of inherited and acquired anaemias characterized by ineffective erythropoiesis, low hepcidin levels, excessive iron absorption and secondary iron overload. Non-transfusion-dependent β-thalassaemia is the paradigmatic example of these conditions that include dyserythropoietic and sideroblastic anaemias and some forms of myelodysplasia. Interrupting the vicious cycle between ineffective erythropoiesis and iron overload may be of therapeutic benefit in all these diseases. Induction of iron restriction by means of transferrin infusions, minihepcidins or manipulation of the hepcidin pathway prevents iron overload, redistributes iron from parenchymal cells to macrophage stores and partially controls anaemia in β-thalassaemic mice. Inhibition of ineffective erythropoiesis by activin ligand traps improves anaemia and iron overload in the same models. Targeting iron loading or ineffective erythropoiesis shows promise in preclinical studies; activin ligand traps are in clinical trials with promising results and may be useful in patients with ineffective erythropoiesis. PMID:26491866

  9. Impaired growth under iron-limiting conditions associated with the acquisition of colistin resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    López-Rojas, Rafael; García-Quintanilla, Meritxell; Labrador-Herrera, Gema; Pachón, Jerónimo; McConnell, Michael J

    2016-06-01

    Acquisition of colistin resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii has been associated with reduced bacterial fitness and virulence, although the mechanisms underlying this fitness loss have not been well characterised. In this study, the role played by environmental iron levels on the growth and survival of colistin-resistant strains of A. baumannii was assessed. Growth assays with the colistin-susceptible ATCC 19606 strain and its colistin-resistant derivative RC64 [colistin minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 64 mg/L] demonstrated that the strains grew similarly in rich laboratory medium (Mueller-Hinton broth), whereas RC64 demonstrated impaired growth compared with ATCC 19606 in human serum (>100-fold at 24 h). Compared with RC64, ATCC 19606 grew in the presence of higher concentrations of the iron-specific chelator 2,2'-bipyridine and grew more readily under iron-limiting conditions in solid and liquid media. In addition, iron supplementation of human serum increased the growth of RC64 compared with unsupplemented human serum to a greater extent than ATCC 19606. The ability of 11 colistin-resistant clinical isolates with mutations in the pmrB gene to grow in iron-replete and iron-limiting conditions was assessed, demonstrating that eight of the strains showed reduced growth under iron limitation. Individual mutations in the pmrB gene did not directly correlate with a decreased capacity for growth under iron limitation, suggesting that mutations in pmrB may not directly produce this phenotype. Together these results indicate that acquisition of colistin resistance in A. baumannii can be associated with a decreased ability to grow in low-iron environments. PMID:27179817

  10. A Nanoparticulate Ferritin-Core Mimetic Is Well Taken Up by HuTu 80 Duodenal Cells and Its Absorption in Mice Is Regulated by Body Iron12

    PubMed Central

    Latunde-Dada, Gladys O; Pereira, Dora IA; Tempest, Bethan; Ilyas, Hibah; Flynn, Angela C; Aslam, Mohamad F; Simpson, Robert J; Powell, Jonathan J

    2014-01-01

    Background: Iron (Fe) deficiency anemia remains the largest nutritional deficiency disorder worldwide. How the gut acquires iron from nano Fe(III), especially at the apical surface, is incompletely understood. Objective: We developed a novel Fe supplement consisting of nanoparticulate tartrate-modified Fe(III) poly oxo-hydroxide [here termed nano Fe(III)], which mimics the Fe oxide core of ferritin and effectively treats iron deficiency anemia in rats. Methods: We determined transfer to the systemic circulation of nano Fe(III) in iron-deficient and iron-sufficient outbread Swiss mouse strain (CD1) mice with use of 59Fe-labeled material. Iron deficiency was induced before starting the Fe-supplementation period through reduction of Fe concentrations in the rodent diet. A control group of iron-sufficient mice were fed a diet with adequate Fe concentrations throughout the study. Furthermore, we conducted a hemoglobin repletion study in which iron-deficient CD1 mice were fed for 7 d a diet supplemented with ferrous sulfate (FeSO4) or nano Fe(III). Finally, we further probed the mechanism of cellular acquisition of nano Fe(III) by assessing ferritin formation, as a measure of Fe uptake and utilization, in HuTu 80 duodenal cancer cells with targeted inhibition of divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) and duodenal cytochrome b (DCYTB) before exposure to the supplemented iron sources. Differences in gene expression were assessed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Results: Absorption (means ± SEMs) of nano Fe(III) was significantly increased in iron-deficient mice (58 ± 19%) compared to iron-sufficient mice (18 ± 17%) (P = 0.0001). Supplementation of the diet with nano Fe(III) or FeSO4 significantly increased hemoglobin concentrations in iron-deficient mice (170 ± 20 g/L, P = 0.01 and 180 ± 20 g/L, P = 0.002, respectively). Hepatic hepcidin mRNA expression reflected the nonheme-iron concentrations of the liver and was also comparable for both nano Fe(III)– and

  11. Laboratory evaluation and application of microwave absorption properties under simulated conditions for planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, Paul G.

    1988-01-01

    In the first half of this grant year, laboratory measurements were conducted on the millimeter-wave properties of atmospheric gases under simulated conditions for the outer planet. Significant improvements in the current system have made it possible to accurately characterize the opacity from gaseous NH3 at longer millimeter wavelengths (7 to 10 mm) under simulated Jovian conditions. In the second half of the grant year, it is hoped to extend such measurements to even shorter millimeter-wavelengths. Further analysis and application of the laboratory results to microwave and millimeter-wave absorption data for the outer planets, such as results from Voyager Radio Occultation experiments and earth-based radio astronomical observations will be continued. The analysis of available multispectral microwave opacity data from Venus, including data from the most recent radio astronomical ovservations in the 1.3 to 3.6 cm wavelength range and newly obtained Pioneer-Venus Radio Occulatation measurements at 13 cm, using the laboratory measurements as an interpretative tool will be pursued.

  12. Laboratory evaluation and application of microwave absorption properties under simulated conditions for planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, Paul G.

    1991-01-01

    Laboratory measurements of microwave and millimeter wave properties of the simulated atmosphere of the outer planets and their satellites has continued. One of the focuses is on the development of a radiative transfer model of the Jovian atmosphere at wavelengths from 1 mm to 10 cm. This modeling effort led to laboratory measurements of the millimeter wave opacity of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) under simulated Jovian conditions. Descriptions of the modeling effort, the Laboratory experiment, and the observations are presented. Correlative studies of measurements with Pioneer-Venus radio occultation measurements with longer wavelength emission measurements have provided new ways for characterizing temporal and spatial variations in the abundance of both gases H2SO4 and SO2, and for modeling their roles in the subcloud atmosphere. Laboratory measurements were conducted on 1.35 cm (and 13 cm) opacity of gaseous SO2 and absorptivity of gaseous SO2 at the 3.2 mm wavelength under simulated Venus conditions. Laboratory measurements were completed on millimeter wave dielectric properties of liquid H2SO4, in order to model the effects of the opacity of the clouds of Venus onto millimeter wave emission spectrum.

  13. Structural characterization of poorly-crystalline scorodite, iron(III)-arsenate co-precipitates and uranium mill neutralized raffinate solids using X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, N; Jiang, D T; Cutler, J; Kotzer, T; Jia, Y F; Demopoulos, G P; Rowson, J W

    2009-12-01

    X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) is used to characterize the mineralogy of the iron(III)-arsenate(V) precipitates produced during the raffinate (aqueous effluent) neutralization process at the McClean Lake uranium mill in northern Saskatchewan, Canada. To facilitate the structural characterization of the precipitated solids derived from the neutralized raffinate, a set of reference compounds were synthesized and analyzed. The reference compounds include crystalline scorodite, poorly-crystalline scorodite, iron(III)-arsenate co-precipitates obtained under different pH conditions, and arsenate-adsorbed on goethite. The poorly-crystalline scorodite (prepared at pH 4 with Fe/As = 1) has similar As local structure as that of crystalline scorodite. Both As and Fe K-edge XAFS of poorly-crystalline scorodite yield consistent results on As-Fe (or Fe-As) shell. From As K-edge analysis the As-Fe shell has an inter-atomic distance of 3.33 ± 0.02 Å and coordination number of 3.2; while from Fe K-edge analysis the Fe-As distance and coordination number are 3.31 ± 0.02 Å and 3.8, respectively. These are in contrast with the typical arsenate adsorption on bidentate binuclear sites on goethite surfaces, where the As-Fe distance is 3.26 ± 0.03 Å and coordination number is close to 2. A similar local structure identified in the poorly-crystalline scorodite is also found in co-precipitation solids (Fe(III)/As(V) = 3) when precipitated at the same pH (pH = 4): As-Fe distance 3.30 ± 0.03 Å and coordination number 3.9; while at pH = 8 the co-precipitate has As-Fe distance of 3.27 ± 0.03 Å and coordination number about 2, resembling more closely the adsorption case. The As local structure in the two neutralized raffinate solid series (precipitated at pH values up to 7) closely resembles that in the poorly-crystalline scorodite. All of the raffinate solids have the same As-Fe inter-atomic distance as that in the poorly-crystalline scorodite, and a systematic decrease in the

  14. Effect of surface condition on the aqueous corrosion behavior of iron aluminies

    SciTech Connect

    Buchanan, R.A.; Perrin, R.L.

    1995-08-01

    The effects of retained high-temperature surface oxides, produced during thermomechanical processing and/or heat treatment, on the aqueous-corrosion characteristics of Fe-Al-based alloys were evaluated by electrochemical methods. Cyclic anodic polarization evaluations were conducted at room temperature in a mild acid-chloride solution (pH = 4,200 ppm Cl{sup {minus}}) on the Fe{sub 3}Al-based iron aluminides, FA-84 (Fe-28Al-2Cr-0.05B, at %), FA-129 (Fe-28Al-5Cr-0.5Nb-0.2C, at %), and FAL-Mo (Fe-28Al-5Cr-1Mo-0.04B-0.08Zr, at %), on the FeAl-based iron aluminide, FA-385 (Fe-35.65Al-0.20Mo-0.05Zr-0.11C, at %). The surface conditions evaluated were: As received (i.e. with the retained high-temperature oxides), mechanically cleaned (ground through 600-grit SiC paper), and chemically cleaned (10% HNO{sub 3}, 2%HF, at 43 {degree}C). The principal electrochemical parameter of interest was the critical putting potential with lower values indicating less resistance to chloride-induced localized corrosion. For all materials evaluated, the critical pitting potential was found to be significantly lower in the as-received condition than in the mechanically-cleaned and chemically-cleaned conditions. Mechanisms responsible for the detrimental high-temperature-oxide effect are under study.

  15. Reduction of the Temperature Sensitivity of Halomonas hydrothermalis by Iron Starvation Combined with Microaerobic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Hallsworth, John E.; Cockell, Charles S.

    2015-01-01

    The limits to biological processes on Earth are determined by physicochemical parameters, such as extremes of temperature and low water availability. Research into microbial extremophiles has enhanced our understanding of the biophysical boundaries which define the biosphere. However, there remains a paucity of information on the degree to which rates of microbial multiplication within extreme environments are determined by the availability of specific chemical elements. Here, we show that iron availability and the composition of the gaseous phase (aerobic versus microaerobic) determine the susceptibility of a marine bacterium, Halomonas hydrothermalis, to suboptimal and elevated temperature and salinity by impacting rates of cell division (but not viability). In particular, iron starvation combined with microaerobic conditions (5% [vol/vol] O2, 10% [vol/vol] CO2, reduced pH) reduced sensitivity to temperature across the 13°C range tested. These data demonstrate that nutrient limitation interacts with physicochemical parameters to determine biological permissiveness for extreme environments. The interplay between resource availability and stress tolerance, therefore, may shape the distribution and ecology of microorganisms within Earth's biosphere. PMID:25595757

  16. Reduction of the temperature sensitivity of Halomonas hydrothermalis by iron starvation combined with microaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Jesse P; Hallsworth, John E; Cockell, Charles S

    2015-03-01

    The limits to biological processes on Earth are determined by physicochemical parameters, such as extremes of temperature and low water availability. Research into microbial extremophiles has enhanced our understanding of the biophysical boundaries which define the biosphere. However, there remains a paucity of information on the degree to which rates of microbial multiplication within extreme environments are determined by the availability of specific chemical elements. Here, we show that iron availability and the composition of the gaseous phase (aerobic versus microaerobic) determine the susceptibility of a marine bacterium, Halomonas hydrothermalis, to suboptimal and elevated temperature and salinity by impacting rates of cell division (but not viability). In particular, iron starvation combined with microaerobic conditions (5% [vol/vol] O2, 10% [vol/vol] CO2, reduced pH) reduced sensitivity to temperature across the 13°C range tested. These data demonstrate that nutrient limitation interacts with physicochemical parameters to determine biological permissiveness for extreme environments. The interplay between resource availability and stress tolerance, therefore, may shape the distribution and ecology of microorganisms within Earth's biosphere. PMID:25595757

  17. Direct measurement of thermal conductivity in solid iron at planetary core conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konôpková, Zuzana; McWilliams, R. Stewart; Gómez-Pérez, Natalia; Goncharov, Alexander F.

    2016-06-01

    The conduction of heat through minerals and melts at extreme pressures and temperatures is of central importance to the evolution and dynamics of planets. In the cooling Earth’s core, the thermal conductivity of iron alloys defines the adiabatic heat flux and therefore the thermal and compositional energy available to support the production of Earth’s magnetic field via dynamo action. Attempts to describe thermal transport in Earth’s core have been problematic, with predictions of high thermal conductivity at odds with traditional geophysical models and direct evidence for a primordial magnetic field in the rock record. Measurements of core heat transport are needed to resolve this difference. Here we present direct measurements of the thermal conductivity of solid iron at pressure and temperature conditions relevant to the cores of Mercury-sized to Earth-sized planets, using a dynamically laser-heated diamond-anvil cell. Our measurements place the thermal conductivity of Earth’s core near the low end of previous estimates, at 18–44 watts per metre per kelvin. The result is in agreement with palaeomagnetic measurements indicating that Earth’s geodynamo has persisted since the beginning of Earth’s history, and allows for a solid inner core as old as the dynamo.

  18. Direct measurement of thermal conductivity in solid iron at planetary core conditions.

    PubMed

    Konôpková, Zuzana; McWilliams, R Stewart; Gómez-Pérez, Natalia; Goncharov, Alexander F

    2016-06-01

    The conduction of heat through minerals and melts at extreme pressures and temperatures is of central importance to the evolution and dynamics of planets. In the cooling Earth's core, the thermal conductivity of iron alloys defines the adiabatic heat flux and therefore the thermal and compositional energy available to support the production of Earth's magnetic field via dynamo action. Attempts to describe thermal transport in Earth's core have been problematic, with predictions of high thermal conductivity at odds with traditional geophysical models and direct evidence for a primordial magnetic field in the rock record. Measurements of core heat transport are needed to resolve this difference. Here we present direct measurements of the thermal conductivity of solid iron at pressure and temperature conditions relevant to the cores of Mercury-sized to Earth-sized planets, using a dynamically laser-heated diamond-anvil cell. Our measurements place the thermal conductivity of Earth's core near the low end of previous estimates, at 18-44 watts per metre per kelvin. The result is in agreement with palaeomagnetic measurements indicating that Earth's geodynamo has persisted since the beginning of Earth's history, and allows for a solid inner core as old as the dynamo. PMID:27251283

  19. Liquid iron-hydrogen alloys at outer core conditions by first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umemoto, Koichiro; Hirose, Kei

    2015-09-01

    We examined the density, bulk sound (compressional) velocity, and Grüneisen parameter of liquid pure Fe, Fe100H28 (0.50 wt % H), Fe88H40 (0.81 wt % H), and Fe76H52 (1.22 wt % H) at Earth's outer core pressure and temperature (P-T) conditions (~100 to 350 GPa, 4000 to 7000 K) based on first-principles molecular dynamics calculations. The results demonstrate that the thermodynamic Grüneisen parameter of liquid iron alloy decreases with increasing pressure, temperature, and hydrogen concentration, indicating a relatively small temperature gradient in the outer core when hydrogen is present. Along such temperature profile, both the density and compressional velocity of liquid iron containing ~1 wt % hydrogen match seismological observations. It suggests that hydrogen could be a primary light element in the core, although the shear velocity of the inner core is not reconciled with solid Fe-H alloy and thus requires another impurity element.

  20. METABOLISM OF IRON STORES

    PubMed Central

    SAITO, HIROSHI

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Remarkable progress was recently achieved in the studies on molecular regulators of iron metabolism. Among the main regulators, storage iron, iron absorption, erythropoiesis and hepcidin interact in keeping iron homeostasis. Diseases with gene-mutations resulting in iron overload, iron deficiency, and local iron deposition have been introduced in relation to the regulators of storage iron metabolism. On the other hand, the research on storage iron metabolism has not advanced since the pioneering research by Shoden in 1953. However, we recently developed a new method for determining ferritin iron and hemosiderin iron by computer-assisted serum ferritin kinetics. Serum ferritin increase or decrease curves were measured in patients with normal storage iron levels (chronic hepatitis C and iron deficiency anemia treated by intravenous iron injection), and iron overload (hereditary hemochromatosis and transfusion dependent anemia). We thereby confirmed the existence of two iron pathways where iron flows followed the numbered order (1) labile iron, (2) ferritin and (3) hemosiderin in iron deposition and mobilization among many previously proposed but mostly unproven routes. We also demonstrated the increasing and decreasing phases of ferritin iron and hemosiderin iron in iron deposition and mobilization. The author first demonstrated here the change in proportion between pre-existing ferritin iron and new ferritin iron synthesized by removing iron from hemosiderin in the course of iron removal. In addition, the author disclosed the cause of underestimation of storage iron turnover rate which had been reported by previous investigators in estimating storage iron turnover rate of normal subjects. PMID:25741033

  1. Structural features and the reaction mechanism of cytochrome oxidase: iron and copper X-ray absorption fine structure.

    PubMed Central

    Powers, L; Chance, B; Ching, Y; Angiolillo, P

    1981-01-01

    X-ray edge absorption of copper and extended fine structure studies of both copper and iron centers have been made of cytochrome oxidase from beef heart, Paracoccus dentrificans, and HB-8 thermophilic bacteria (1-2.5 mM in heme). The desired redox state (fully oxidized, reduced CO, mixed valence formate and CO) in the x-ray beam was controlled by low temperature (-140 degrees C) and was continuously monitored by simultaneous optical spectroscopy and by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) monitoring every 30 min of x-ray exposure. The structure of the active site, a cytochrome a3-copper pair in fully oxidized and in mixed valence formate states where they are spin coupled, contains a sulphur bridge with three ligands 2.60 +/- 0.03 A from Fea3 and 2.18 +/- 0.03 A from Cua3. The distance between Fea3 and Cua3 is 3.75 +/- 0.05 A, making the sulphur bond angle 103 degrees reasonable for sp3 sulphur bonding. The Fea3 first shell has four typical heme nitrogens (2.01 +/- 0.03 A) with a proximal nitrogen at 2.14 +/- 0.03 A. The sixth ligand is the bridging sulphur. The Cua3 first shell is identical to oxidized stellacyanin containing two nitrogens and a bridging sulphur. Upon reduction with CO, the active site is identical to reduced stellacyanin for the Cua3 first shell and contains the sulphur that forms the bridge in fully oxidized and mixed valence formate states. The Fea3 first shell is identical to oxyhemoglobin but has CO instead of O2. The other redox centers, Fea and the other "EPR detectable" Cu are not observed in higher shells of Fea3. Fea has six equidistant nitrogens and Cua has one (or two) nitrogens and three (or two) sulphurs with typical distances; these ligands change only slight on reduction. These structures afford the basis for an oxygen reduction mechanism involving oxy- and peroxy intermediates. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:6264990

  2. Biodegradation of phenols in a sandstone aquifer under aerobic conditions and mixed nitrate and iron reducing conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broholm, Mette M.; Arvin, Erik

    2000-08-01

    Ammonia liquor with very high concentrations of phenol and alkylated phenols is known to have leaked into the subsurface at a former coal carbonization plant in the UK, giving high concentrations of ammonium in the groundwater. In spite of this, no significant concentrations of phenols were found in the groundwater. The potential for biodegradation of the phenols in the sandstone aquifer at the site has been investigated in laboratory microcosms under aerobic (oxygen amended) and mixed nitrate and iron reducing (nitrate enriched and unamended) anaerobic conditions, at a range of concentrations (low: ˜5 mg l -1, high: ˜60 mg l -1, and very high: ˜600 mg l -1) and in the presence of other organic coal-tar compounds (mono- and polyaromatic hydrocarbons (BTEXs and PAHs) and heterocyclic compounds (NSOs)) and ammonia liquor. Sandstone cores and groundwater for the microcosms were collected from within the anaerobic ammonium plume at the field site. Fast and complete degradation of phenol, o- and p-cresol, 2,5- and 3,4-xylenol with no or very short initial lag-phases was observed under aerobic conditions at low concentrations. 2,6- and 3,5-Xylenol were degraded more slowly and 3,5-xylenol degradation was only just complete after about 1 year. The maximum rates of total phenols degradation in duplicate aerobic microcosms were 1.06 and 1.76 mg l -1 day -1. The degradation of phenols in nitrate enriched and unamended anaerobic microcosms was similar. Fast and complete biodegradation of phenol, cresols, 3,4-xylenol and 3,5-xylenol was observed after short lag-phases in the anaerobic microcosms. 2,5-xylenol was partially degraded after a longer lag-phase and 2,6-xylenol persisted throughout the 3 month long experiments. The maximum rates of total phenols degradation in duplicate nitrate enriched and unamended anaerobic microcosms were 0.30-0.38 and 0.29-0.31 mg l -1 day -1, respectively. The highest phenols concentrations in the anaerobic microcosms apparently required

  3. [Effect of dinitrosyl iron complexes on erythrocyte energy metabolism under thermal trauma conditions].

    PubMed

    Martusevich, A K; Solov'eva, A G; Peretiagin, S P; Vanin, A F

    2014-01-01

    The effect of dinitrosyl iron complexes (DNIC) on the energy metabolism of erythrocytes under combined thermal trauma conditions has been studied on a group of 30 Wistar rats, which was divided into 3 groups: intact (n = 10), control (n = 10), and main (n = 10). Combined thermal trauma (skin burn + thermoinhalation damage) was modeled in animals of the control and main groups. Rats of control group received infusions of sodium chloride solution (n = 10) every day. Rats of the main group obtained infusions of DNIC solution in sodium chloride. Rat blood samples were characterized by the activity of lactate dehydrogenase in direct and reverse reaction, lactate level, and coefficients of the substrate provision and energy reactions balance. It was stated, that DNIC clearly normalized the energy metabolism of erythrocytes beginning with the third day after thermal trauma onset. PMID:24791335

  4. The effects of the sputtering conditions on bismuth doped gadolinium iron garnet films

    SciTech Connect

    Eppler, W.; Kryder, M.H. )

    1989-09-01

    The effects of the sputtering conditions on the magnetic and magneto-optic properties of bismuth substituted gadolinium iron garnet (GdIG) films are studied. GdIG films with uniaxial perpendicular anisotropy and room temperature coercivities greater than 1 kOe have been deposited on glass substrates by rf magnetron sputtering. These films have Faraday rotations between 0.6 */{mu}m and 1.3 */{mu}/m and temperature dependent coercivities similar to rare earth-transition metal alloys. Increasing the rf power or argon bleeding pressure results in an increase in the compensation temperature (T/sub comp/) with little change in the Curie temperature (T/sub c/).

  5. In vitro studies of the mechanism of inhibition of rat liver uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase activity by ferrous iron under anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Mukerji, S K; Pimstone, N R

    1986-02-01

    Human porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT) is an unusual consequence of common hepatic disorders such as alcoholic liver disease and iron overload, where hepatic iron plays a key role in the expression of the metabolic lesion, i.e., defective hepatic decarboxylation of porphyrinogens. In this investigation, kinetic studies on a partially purified rat liver uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase have been conducted under controlled conditions to determine how iron perturbs porphyrinogen decarboxylation in vitro. The enzyme, assayed strictly under anaerobic conditions in the dark, was inhibited progressively by ferrous iron. Approximately 0.45 mM ferrous ammonium sulfate was required to observe about 50% inhibition of enzyme activity measured with uroporphyrinogen I as substrate. We showed that (a) all the steps of enzymatic decarboxylation (octa-, hepta-, hexa-, and pentacarboxylic porphyrinogen of isomer I series) were inhibited by ferrous iron. The inhibition was competitive with respect to uroporphyrinogen I and III substrates; (b) the cations, e.g., Fe3+ and Mg2+, had no effect, whereas sulfhydryl group specific cations and compounds such as Hg2+, Zn2+, p-mercuribenzoate, and 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoate) all inhibited the enzyme; (c) the enzyme could be protected from inhibition by Fe2+ and p-mercuribenzoate by preincubation with pentacarboxylic porphyrinogen, a natural substrate and competitive inhibitor. These data suggest for the first time a direct interaction of ferrous iron with cysteinyl residue(s) located at the active site(s) of the enzyme. PMID:3947082

  6. Abiotic stress growth conditions induce different responses in kernel iron concentration across genotypically distinct maize inbred varieties

    PubMed Central

    Kandianis, Catherine B.; Michenfelder, Abigail S.; Simmons, Susan J.; Grusak, Michael A.; Stapleton, Ann E.

    2013-01-01

    The improvement of grain nutrient profiles for essential minerals and vitamins through breeding strategies is a target important for agricultural regions where nutrient poor crops like maize contribute a large proportion of the daily caloric intake. Kernel iron concentration in maize exhibits a broad range. However, the magnitude of genotype by environment (GxE) effects on this trait reduces the efficacy and predictability of selection programs, particularly when challenged with abiotic stress such as water and nitrogen limitations. Selection has also been limited by an inverse correlation between kernel iron concentration and the yield component of kernel size in target environments. Using 25 maize inbred lines for which extensive genome sequence data is publicly available, we evaluated the response of kernel iron density and kernel mass to water and nitrogen limitation in a managed field stress experiment using a factorial design. To further understand GxE interactions we used partition analysis to characterize response of kernel iron and weight to abiotic stressors among all genotypes, and observed two patterns: one characterized by higher kernel iron concentrations in control over stress conditions, and another with higher kernel iron concentration under drought and combined stress conditions. Breeding efforts for this nutritional trait could exploit these complementary responses through combinations of favorable allelic variation from these already well-characterized genetic stocks. PMID:24363659

  7. On the body centered structure of iron at Earth Core Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeanloz, R.; Stixrude, L.; Verma, A.; Modak, P.; Godwal, B.

    2007-12-01

    The stability of the body-centered cubic (bcc) phase of iron is considered at Earth-core conditions (V = 7.2 Å3, T = 5500 K) by way of ab-initio molecular-dynamics simulations and electronic-structure calculations using the density-functional approach. Tetragonal strain splits a peak in the electronic density of states at the Fermi level, lowering the energy of the structure with distortion and therefore documenting the metastability of the bcc structure. As temperature is increased from zero to 5500 K, the bcc structure satisfies the condition of hydrostaticity, with vanishing of stress anisotropy, but it remains energetically unstable with respect to the tetragonal distortion; an increase in elastic anisotropy is documented with increasing tetragonal strain. An energy minimum is observed around c/a = 0.9 in a Bain-path plot, and has previously been interpreted as evidence of an elastically-stable body-centered tetragonal (bct) structure. However, we find from static total-energy calculations as a function of b/a and c/a that this is a local minimum in energy corresponding to a metastable structure. Analysis of the structure with tetragonal strain reveals the presence of anomalous shear stresses that, coupled with phonon instability, suggest a tendency toward formation of a hexagonal closed-packed (hcp) structure. Overall, these results argue against bcc or even bct structures of Fe being present in Earth's core, and instead highlight the importance of the known hcp (ɛ) high-pressure phase of iron.

  8. Ingestion of insoluble dietary fibre increased zinc and iron absorption and restored growth rate and zinc absorption suppressed by dietary phytate in rats.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, K; Hara, H; Asvarujanon, P; Aoyama, Y; Luangpituksa, P

    2001-10-01

    We examined the effects of ingestion of five types of insoluble fibre on growth and Zn absorption in rats fed a marginally Zn-deficient diet (6.75 mg (0.103 mmol) Zn/kg diet) with or without added sodium phytate (12.6 mmol/kg diet). The types of insoluble fibre tested were corn husks, watermelon skin, yam-bean root (Pachyrhizus erosus) and pineapple core, and cellulose was used as a control (100 g/kg diet). Body-weight gain in the cellulose groups was suppressed by 57 % by feeding phytate. Body-weight gain in phytate-fed rats was 80 % greater in the watermelon skin fibre and yam-bean root fibre group than that in the cellulose group. Zn absorption ratio in the cellulose groups was lowered by 46 and 70 % in the first (days 7-10) and second (days 16-19) measurement periods with feeding phytate. In the rats fed the phytate-containing diets, Zn absorption ratio in the watermelon skin, yam-bean root and pineapple core fibre groups was 140, 80 and 54 % higher respectively than that in the cellulose group, in the second period. Fe absorption was not suppressed by phytate, however, feeding of these three types of fibre promoted Fe absorption in rats fed phytate-free diets. The concentration of soluble Zn in the caecal contents in the watermelon skin fibre or yam-bean root fibre groups was identical to that in the control group in spite of a higher short-chain fatty acid concentration and lower pH in the caecum. These findings indicate that ingestion of these types of insoluble fibre recovered the growth and Zn absorption suppressed by feeding a high level of phytate, and factors other than caecal fermentation may also be involved in this effect of insoluble fibre. PMID:11591231

  9. Relationship between absorptive lenses and contrast sensitivity in healthy young subjects with glare under photopic- and mesopic-vision conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanazawa, Masatsugu; Uozato, Hiroshi

    2013-05-01

    We investigated the effect of absorptive lenses on contrast sensitivity under photopic- and mesopic-visions with glare, from the viewpoint of luminous transmittance (LT) and spectral transmittance. The subjects were 24 healthy volunteers. Log contrast sensitivity (logCS) under two luminance conditions with glare was measured with a contrast glare test device. Binocular logCSs with absorptive lenses were compared with those without absorptive lenses (control condition). Furthermore, to investigate the effect of spectral transmittance, we calculated the ratio of stimulus quantity and the correlation between this ratio and logCS. Compared with that in the control, logCS was hardly affected in the case of high-luminous-transmittance absorptive lenses under binocular visions with glare. Middle- and long-wavelength lights effectively contribute to contrast sensitivity under photopic-vision and lights at each wavelength showed almost the same coefficients of correlation under mesopic-vision. Previous studies suggested that absorptive lenses provide users with protection against harmful radiation and glare. Our present results suggested that short-wavelength and high-LT absorptive lenses are particularly useful in daylight.

  10. Removal Rates of Aqueous Cr(VI) by Zero-Valent Iron Measured Under Flow Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, D.I.

    2002-05-10

    Studies were undertaken to measure the rate of Cr(VI) removal from the aqueous phase by zero-valent iron, Fe(0), under flow conditions. The intent of this work was to generate removal rate coefficients that would be applicable to the Reactive Well Technology, a groundwater remediation technology that replaces the sand in a filter pack of a conventional well with a reactive material, such as Fe(0). The pseudo-first-order rate coefficients measured under flow conditions were comparable to those previously measured under batch conditions that had significantly greater ratios of solution volume to Fe(0) surface area. Between the range of 20 and 100 weight percent Fe(0), there was little measurable change in the reaction kinetics. Thus, it may be possible to include sand into the reactive filter packs in the event it is necessary to increase filter pack porosity or to decrease the accumulation of secondary reaction products that may lead to filter pack plugging. Background water chemistry had only marginal effects on reaction rate coefficients. The reaction rates measured in this study indicated that an Fe(0) filter pack could be used to lower Cr(VI) concentrations by several orders of magnitude in a once-through mode of operation of the Reactive Well Technology.

  11. Mechanisms of cadmium accumulation (adsorption and absorption) by the freshwater bivalve Corbicula fluminea under hydrodynamic conditions.

    PubMed

    Nan, Geng; Peifang, Wang; Chao, Wang; Jun, Hou; Jin, Qian; Lingzhan, Miao

    2016-05-01

    Many heavy metals in sediments and water have potential adverse effects on aquatic organisms such as Corbicula fluminea (O.F. Müller, 1774), a bivalve species frequently used as a biomonitor for metal pollution. Studies over the past decades examining the heavy metal uptake by C. fluminea, very few has investigated the effect of hydrodynamic conditions on accumulation of heavy metal by C. fluminea. Therefore, in this study, to investigate the mechanism of intracellular and extracellular accumulation of metal, individuals of C. fluminea were exposed to cadmium (Cd)-treated water under three different hydrodynamic conditions. These included exposures in two set ups: three rates of rotation (500, 350, 200 r/min) in beakers for 10 days, and then exposure to Cd-treated sediment under two naturally turbulent water conditions (14 cm/s and 3.2 cm/s) in experimental flumes for 23 days. Hydrodynamic force increased the burrowing rate but decreased the activity of C. fluminea. After 10 days of exposure, the extracellular concentrations of Cd in the tissues of C. fluminea in the sand group were significantly higher than that in the gravel groups. The intracellular and extracellular concentrations of Cd in the tissues of C. fluminea dramatically increased in the Cd-treated sediment test. Moreover, the concentration of the extracellular Cd adsorbed on the tissues of C. fluminea in the 14 cm/s and 3.2 cm/s groups was significantly higher than that in the control group, whereas the effect of hydrodynamic force on absorption of Cd by C. fluminea was not obvious. These results suggest that hydrodynamic condition plays an important role in extracellular accumulation of Cd by C. fluminea. In future study, when using C. fluminea to assess Cd pollution in aquatic environment, extracellular Cd adsorbed on the tissue should be removed to avoid the influence of hydrodynamics. PMID:26975005

  12. Secoisolariciresinol Diglucoside Abrogates Oxidative Stress-Induced Damage in Cardiac Iron Overload Condition

    PubMed Central

    Puukila, Stephanie; Bryan, Sean; Laakso, Anna; Abdel-Malak, Jessica; Gurney, Carli; Agostino, Adrian; Belló-Klein, Adriane; Prasad, Kailash; Khaper, Neelam

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac iron overload is directly associated with cardiac dysfunction and can ultimately lead to heart failure. This study examined the effect of secoisolariciresinol diglucoside (SDG), a component of flaxseed, on iron overload induced cardiac damage by evaluating oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis in H9c2 cardiomyocytes. Cells were incubated with 50 μ5M iron for 24 hours and/or a 24 hour pre-treatment of 500 μ M SDG. Cardiac iron overload resulted in increased oxidative stress and gene expression of the inflammatory mediators tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-10 and interferon γ, as well as matrix metalloproteinases-2 and -9. Increased apoptosis was evident by increased active caspase 3/7 activity and increased protein expression of Forkhead box O3a, caspase 3 and Bax. Cardiac iron overload also resulted in increased protein expression of p70S6 Kinase 1 and decreased expression of AMP-activated protein kinase. Pre-treatment with SDG abrogated the iron-induced increases in oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis, as well as the increased p70S6 Kinase 1 and decreased AMP-activated protein kinase expression. The decrease in superoxide dismutase activity by iron treatment was prevented by pre-treatment with SDG in the presence of iron. Based on these findings we conclude that SDG was cytoprotective in an in vitro model of iron overload induced redox-inflammatory damage, suggesting a novel potential role for SDG in cardiac iron overload. PMID:25822525

  13. Simultaneous determination of iron and nickel in fluoropolymers by solid sampling high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Soares, Bruno M; Santos, Rafael F; Bolzan, Rodrigo C; Muller, Edson I; Primel, Ednei G; Duarte, Fabio A

    2016-11-01

    This paper reports the development of a method of simultaneous determination of iron and nickel in fluoropolymers by high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS GF AAS) with direct solid sampling. In order to carry out simultaneous measurements, both the main resonance line of nickel (232.003nm) and the adjacent secondary line of iron (232.036nm) were monitored in the same spectral window. The proposed method was optimized with a perfluoroalkoxy (PFA) sample and was applied to the determination of iron and nickel in fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) and modified polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE-TFM) samples. Pyrolysis and atomization temperatures, as well as the use of Pd and H2 (during pyrolysis) as chemical modifiers, were carefully investigated. Compromise temperatures for pyrolysis and atomization of both analytes were achieved at 800 and 2300°C, respectively, using only 0.5Lmin(-1) H2 as chemical modifier during pyrolysis. Calibration curves were performed with aqueous standards by using a single solution which contained both analytes. Limits of detection were 221 and 9.6ngg(-1) for iron and nickel, respectively. Analyte concentrations in all samples ranged from 3.53 to 12.4µgg(-1) for iron and from 37 to 78ngg(-1) for nickel, with relative standard deviation less than 19%. Accuracy was evaluated by comparing these results with those obtained by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry after sample digestion by microwave-induced combustion and no significant statistical difference was observed. PMID:27591638

  14. The iron-site structure of [Fe]-hydrogenase and model systems: an X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy study†‡

    PubMed Central

    Salomone-Stagni, Marco; Stellato, Francesco; Whaley, C. Matthew; Vogt, Sonja; Morante, Silvia; Shima, Seigo; Rauchfuss, Thomas B.; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram

    2012-01-01

    The [Fe]-hydrogenase is an ideal system for studying the electronic properties of the low spin iron site that is common to the catalytic centres of all hydrogenases. Because they have no auxiliary iron-sulfur clusters and possess a cofactor containing a single iron centre, the [Fe]-hydrogenases are well suited for spectroscopic analysis of those factors required for the activation of molecular hydrogen. Specifically, in this study we shed light on the electronic and molecular structure of the iron centre by XAS analysis of [Fe]-hydrogenase from Methanocaldococcus jannashii and five model complexes (Fe(ethanedithiolate)-(CO)2(PMe3)2, [K(18-crown-6)]2[Fe(CN)2(CO)3], K[Fe(CN)(CO)4], K3[Fe(iii)(CN)6], K4[Fe(ii)(CN)6]). The different electron donors have a strong influence on the iron absorption K-edge energy position, which is frequently used to determine the metal oxidation state. Our results demonstrate that the K-edges of Fe(ii) complexes, achieved with low-spin ferrous thiolates, are consistent with a ferrous centre in the [Fe]-hydrogenase from Methanocaldococcus jannashii. The metal geometry also strongly influences the XANES and thus the electronic structure. Using in silico simulation, we were able to reproduce the main features of the XANES spectra and describe the effects of individual donor contributions on the spectra. Thereby, we reveal the essential role of an unusual carbon donor coming from an acyl group of the cofactor in the determination of the electronic structure required for the activity of the enzyme. PMID:20221540

  15. Direct laser-driven ramp compression studies of iron: A first step toward the reproduction of planetary core conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amadou, N.; Brambrink, E.; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.; Huser, G.; Guyot, F.; Mazevet, S.; Morard, G.; de Resseguier, T.; Vinci, T.; Myanishi, K.; Ozaki, N.; Kodama, R.; Boehly, T.; Henry, O.; Raffestin, D.; Koenig, M.

    2013-06-01

    The study of iron under quasi-isentropic compression using high energy lasers, might allow to understand its thermodynamical properties, in particular its melting line in conditions of pressure and temperature relevant to Earth-like planetary cores (330-1500 GPa, 5000-8000 K). However, the iron alpha-epsilon solid-solid phase transition at 13 GPa favors shock formation during the quasi-isentropic compression process which can depart from the appropriate thermodynamical path. Understanding this shock formation mechanism is a key issue for being able to reproduce Earth-like planetary core conditions in the laboratory by ramp compression. In this article, we will present recent results of direct laser-driven quasi-isentropic compression experiments on iron samples obtained on the LULI 2000 and LIL laser facilities.

  16. Different Storage Conditions Influence Biocompatibility and Physicochemical Properties of Iron Oxide Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Zaloga, Jan; Janko, Christina; Agarwal, Rohit; Nowak, Johannes; Müller, Robert; Boccaccini, Aldo R.; Lee, Geoffrey; Odenbach, Stefan; Lyer, Stefan; Alexiou, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) have attracted increasing attention in many biomedical fields. In magnetic drug targeting SPIONs are injected into a tumour supplying artery and accumulated inside the tumour with a magnet. The effectiveness of this therapy is thus dependent on magnetic properties, stability and biocompatibility of the particles. A good knowledge of the effect of storage conditions on those parameters is of utmost importance for the translation of the therapy concept into the clinic and for reproducibility in preclinical studies. Here, core shell SPIONs with a hybrid coating consisting of lauric acid and albumin were stored at different temperatures from 4 to 45 °C over twelve weeks and periodically tested for their physicochemical properties over time. Surprisingly, even at the highest storage temperature we did not observe denaturation of the protein or colloidal instability. However, the saturation magnetisation decreased by maximally 28.8% with clear correlation to time and storage temperature. Furthermore, the biocompatibility was clearly affected, as cellular uptake of the SPIONs into human T-lymphoma cells was crucially dependent on the storage conditions. Taken together, the results show that the particle properties undergo significant changes over time depending on the way they are stored. PMID:25918940

  17. The plasma membrane proteome of maize roots grown under low and high iron conditions.

    PubMed

    Hopff, David; Wienkoop, Stefanie; Lüthje, Sabine

    2013-10-01

    Iron (Fe) homeostasis is essential for life and has been intensively investigated for dicots, while our knowledge for species in the Poaceae is fragmentary. This study presents the first proteome analysis (LC-MS/MS) of plasma membranes isolated from roots of 18-day old maize (Zea mays L.). Plants were grown under low and high Fe conditions in hydroponic culture. In total, 227 proteins were identified in control plants, whereas 204 proteins were identified in Fe deficient plants and 251 proteins in plants grown under high Fe conditions. Proteins were sorted by functional classes, and most of the identified proteins were classified as signaling proteins. A significant number of PM-bound redox proteins could be identified including quinone reductases, heme and copper-containing proteins. Most of these components were constitutive, and others could hint at an involvement of redox signaling and redox homeostasis by change in abundance. Energy metabolism and translation seem to be crucial in Fe homeostasis. The response to Fe deficiency includes proteins involved in development, whereas membrane remodeling and assembly and/or repair of Fe-S clusters is discussed for Fe toxicity. The general stress response appears to involve proteins related to oxidative stress, growth regulation, an increased rigidity and synthesis of cell walls and adaption of nutrient uptake and/or translocation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant Proteomics in Europe. PMID:23353019

  18. X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies of ionic association in aqueous solutions of zinc bromide from normal to critical conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonet, V.; Calzavara, Y.; Hazemann, J. L.; Argoud, R.; Geaymond, O.; Raoux, D.

    2002-08-01

    Ion-pairing and dehydration phenomena occurring in ZnBr2 aqueous solutions from normal to critical T, P conditions were investigated by x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The respective influences of temperature, pressure, and concentration were studied. The evolution of the density of solute ions, probed by the height of the absorption edge, allowed us to get information on phase diagrams and salt precipitation. The average structural evolution deduced from extended x-ray absorption fine structure was related to the formation of complexes identified from x-ray absorption near edge structure analysis. Consequently, in noncritical conditions, an increase of temperature or concentration produces dehydration and ion-pairing, while a rise of pressure destroys the ion-pairs. In contrast, concentration and pressure have weaker effects on the local order in high P, T conditions. Moreover, ion pairing formation is found not to be specifically enhanced when the fluid is close to supercritical conditions as it also occurs at lower temperatures. In a discussion, the modifications induced by a variation of the different structural parameters are related to the macroscopic properties of the solvent.

  19. The impact of changing surface ocean conditions on the dissolution of aerosol iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishwick, Matthew P.; Sedwick, Peter N.; Lohan, Maeve C.; Worsfold, Paul J.; Buck, Kristen N.; Church, Thomas M.; Ussher, Simon J.

    2014-11-01

    The proportion of aerosol iron (Fe) that dissolves in seawater varies greatly and is dependent on aerosol composition and the physicochemical conditions of seawater, which may change depending on location or be altered by global environmental change. Aerosol and surface seawater samples were collected in the Sargasso Sea and used to investigate the impact of these changing conditions on aerosol Fe dissolution in seawater. Our data show that seawater temperature, pH, and oxygen concentration, within the range of current and projected future values, had no significant effect on the dissolution of aerosol Fe. However, the source and composition of aerosols had the most significant effect on the aerosol Fe solubility, with the most anthropogenically influenced samples having the highest fractional solubility (up to 3.2%). The impact of ocean warming and acidification on aerosol Fe dissolution is therefore unlikely to be as important as changes in land usage and fossil fuel combustion. Our experimental results also reveal important changes in the size distribution of soluble aerosol Fe in solution, depending on the chemical conditions of seawater. Under typical conditions, the majority (77-100%) of Fe released from aerosols into ambient seawater existed in the colloidal (0.02-0.4 µm) size fraction. However, in the presence of a sufficient concentration of strong Fe-binding organic ligands (10 nM) most of the aerosol-derived colloidal Fe was converted to soluble Fe (<0.02 µm). This finding highlights the potential importance of organic ligands in retaining aerosol Fe in a biologically available form in the surface ocean.

  20. The effect of administration of copper nanoparticles to chickens in drinking water on estimated intestinal absorption of iron, zinc, and calcium.

    PubMed

    Ognik, Katarzyna; Stępniowska, Anna; Cholewińska, Ewelina; Kozłowski, Krzysztof

    2016-09-01

    Copper nanoparticles used as a dietary supplement for poultry could affect the absorption of mineral elements. Hence the aim of the study was to determine the effect of administration of copper nanoparticles to chickens in drinking water on intestinal absorption of iron, zinc, and calcium. The experiment was carried out on 126 chicks assigned to seven experimental groups of 18 birds each (3 replications of 6 individuals each). The control group (G-C) did not receive copper nanoparticles. Groups: Cu-5(7), Cu-10(7), and Cu-15(7) received gold nanoparticles in their drinking water in the amounts of 5 mg/L for group Cu-5(7), 10 mg/L for group Cu-10(7), and 15 mg/L for group Cu-15(7) during 8 to 14, 22 to 28, and 36 of 42 days of the life of the chicks. The birds in groups Cu-5(3), Cu-10(3), and Cu-15(3) received copper nanoparticles in the same amounts, but only during 8 to 10, 22 to 24, and 36 to 38 days of life. Blood for analysis was collected from the wing vein of all chicks at the age of 42 days. After the rearing period (day 42), six birds from each experimental group with body weight similar to the group average were slaughtered. The carcasses were dissected and samples of the jejunum were collected for analysis of absorption of selected minerals. Mineral absorption was tested using the in vitro gastrointestinal sac technique. Oral administration of copper nanoparticles to chickens in the amount of 5, 10, and 15 mg/L led to accumulation of this element in the intestinal walls. The highest level of copper nanoparticles applied increased Cu content in the blood plasma of the birds. The in vitro study suggests that copper accumulated in the intestines reduces absorption of calcium and zinc, but does not affect iron absorption. PMID:27307476

  1. Effects of heat generation or absorption on mixed convection flow over a stretching porous wedge with convective boundary condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashraf, M.; Narahari, M.; Muthuvalu, Mohana Sundaram

    2014-10-01

    The series solution of the boundary layer flow over a permeable stretching wedge with convective boundary condition has been investigated in the presence of heat generation or absorption effects. The governing coupled non-linear partial differential equations are transformed to dimensionless system of coupled non-linear ordinary differential equations using the similarity variables and then solved by Homotopy Analysis Method (HAM). An analysis of the results shows that the velocity and temperature fields are significantly influenced by the velocity ratio parameter, wedge angle parameter, suction/injection parameter, heat generation/absorption parameter and convective heat transfer parameter.

  2. ZERO-VALENT IRON REMOVAL RATES OF AQUEOUS Cr(VI) MEASURED UNDER FLOW CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, Daniel I.; Gilmore, Tyler J.

    2004-06-01

    The rates of Cr(VI) removal from the aqueous phase by zero-valent iron, Fe(0), was measured under flow conditions. The intent of this work was to generate removal rate coefficients that would be applicable to the Reactive Well Technology, a groundwater remediation technology that replaces the sand in a filter pack of a conventional well with a reactive material, such as Fe(0). Dissolved Cr(VI) concentration, dissolved O2 concentration, and Eh data indicated that Cr(VI) removal from the aqueous phase was mass-transfer limited. All pseudo-first-order regression fits to the data were significant (P≤0.05), however, they did not capture many of the salient aspects of the data, including that the removal rate often decreased as contact time increased. As such, application of these rate coefficients to predict long-term Cr(VI) removal were compromised. The rate coefficients measured under flow conditions were comparable to those measured previously under batch conditions with significantly greater solution:solid ratios. Between the range of 20 and 100 wt-% Fe(0) in the column, there was little measurable change in the reaction kinetics. Thus, it may be possible to include sand into the reactive filter packs in the event it is necessary to increase filter pack porosity or to decrease the accumulation of secondary reaction products that may lead to filter pack plugging. Background water chemistry (0.2 M NaHCO3, distilled water, and a carbonate-dominated groundwater) had only marginal, if any, effects on reaction rate coefficients. The reaction rates measured in this study indicated that an Fe(0) filter pack could be used to lower Cr(VI) concentrations by several orders of magnitude in a once-through mode of operation of the Reactive Well Technology.

  3. X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies of the dinuclear iron center in methane monooxygenase and the sulfur and chlorine centers in photographic materials

    SciTech Connect

    DeWitt, J.G.

    1993-01-01

    The dinuclear iron center of the hydroxylase component of soluble methane monooxygenase (MMO) from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) and Methylosinus trichosporium (OB3b) has been studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Analysis of the Fe K-edge EXAFS revealed that the first shell coordination of the hydroxylase consists of [approximately]6 N and O atoms at an average distance of 2.04[angstrom] in the oxidized form, increasing to 2.06-2.09[angstrom] in the semimet form, and 2.15 [angstrom] for the oxidized and semimet hydroxylase samples. No evidence for the presence of a short oxo bridge in the iron center was found. The presence of component B, the regulatory protein of the MMO enzyme system, had an effect on the distance distribution of first shell atoms in the hydroyxlase active site. No evidence of a Br contribution was seen in the hydroxylase EXAFS in the presence of a brominated substrate, suggesting the substrate binds more than 4[angstrom] from the iron center. An investigation of the EXAFS analysis technique using structurally-characterized iron dimers demonstrated that the results of the second shell fits exhibit a bias for the Fe-FE distance of the model compound from which the fitting parameters were obtained. An asymmetric pre-edge feature in the edge spectra of iron dimers was characteristic of oxo-bridge compounds, while a split pre-edge was characteristic of non-oxo-bridged compounds. Spectral sensitizing dyes and chemical sensitizing centers of importance to the photographic system were characterized by S and Cl K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The appearance of the S K-edge spectra was characteristic of the environment of the S atoms and oriented single-crystal studies permitted the assignment of the features. The nature and extend of interaction between S and Ag and Au was characterized using XAS and used to investigate the nature of the interaction between photographic dyes and the AgBr substrate.

  4. Studies on a Novel Actinobacteria Species Capable of Oxidizing Ammonium under Iron Reduction Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huanh, Shan; Ruiz-Urigüen, Melany; Jaffe, Peter R.

    2014-05-01

    Ammonium (NH4+) oxidation coupled to iron reduction in the absence of oxygen and nitrate/nitrite (NO3-/NO2-) was noted in a forested riparian wetland in New Jersey (1,2), and in tropical rainforest soils (3), and was coined Feammox (4). Through a 180-days anaerobic incubation of soil samples collected at the New Jersey site, and using 16S rDNA PCR-DGGE, 454-pyosequecing, and qPCR analysis, we have shown that an Acidimicrobiaceae bacterium A6, belonging to the phylum Actinobacteria, is responsible for this Feammox process, described previously (1,2). We have enriched these Feammox bacteria in a high efficiency Feammox membrane reactor (with 85% NH4+removal per 48h), and isolated the pure Acidimicrobiaceae bacterium A6 strain 5, in an autotrophic medium. To determine if the Feammox bacteria found in this study are common, at least at the regional scale, we analyzed a series of local wetland-, upland-, as well as storm-water detention pond-sediments. Through anaerobic incubations and molecular biology analysis, the Feammox reaction and Acidimicrobiaceae bacterium A6 were found in three of twenty soil samples collected, indicating that the Feammox pathway might be widespread in selected soil environments. Results show that soil pH and Fe(III) content are key environmental factors controlling the distributions of Feammox bacteria, which require acidic conditions and the presence of iron oxides. Results from incubation experiments conducted at different temperatures have shown that, in contrast to another anaerobic ammonium oxidation pathways (e.g., anammox), the optimal temperature of the Feammox process is ~ 20° and that the organisms are still active when the temperature is around 10°. An incubation experiment amended with acetylene gas (C2H2) as a selected inhibitor showed that in the Feammox reaction, Fe(III) is the electron acceptor, which is reduced to Fe(II), and NH4+is the electron donor, which is oxidized to NO2-. After this process, NO2- is converted to

  5. [Simultaneous Biotransformation of Ammonium and Nitrate via Zero-Valent Iron on Anaerobic Conditions].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jian; Huang, Yong; Yuan, Yi; Liu, Xin; Li, Xiang; Shen, Jie; Yang, Peng-bing

    2015-12-01

    Zero-valent iron (ZVI) was used to improve the biological autotrophic denitrification process between nitrate and ammonia by anaerobic ammonia oxidation ( ANAMMOX) bacteria. With the addition of ZVI, the biological autotrophic denitrification process could be reacted in the influent condition of pH was 7-8, at 35°C ±0.5°C, the concentration of ammonia was 50-100 mg · L⁻¹ and the concentration of nitrate was 50-100 mg · L⁻¹. The highest conversion rate could be reached to 17.2 mg · (L·h) ⁻¹. With the change of reaction time and the molar ratio of nitrate and ammonia in influent, the final molar conversion ratio of nitrate and ammonia in effluent fluctuated between 1.2-3. 5. The result showed that this autotrophic denitrification process was not belonged to elementary reaction. The mechanism of this autotrophic denitrification process could be summarized that with the reduction of ZVI, the nitrate could be reduced to nitrite. Hereafter, the ANAMMOX process reacted between the nitrite and ammonia. PMID:27011992

  6. Transport properties for liquid silicon-oxygen-iron mixtures at Earth's core conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozzo, Monica; Davies, Chris; Gubbins, David; Alfè, Dario

    2013-01-01

    We report on the thermal and electrical conductivities of two liquid silicon-oxygen-iron mixtures (Fe0.82Si0.10O0.08 and Fe0.79Si0.08O0.13), representative of the composition of the Earth's outer core at the relevant pressure-temperature conditions, obtained from density functional theory calculations with the Kubo-Greenwood formulation. We find thermal conductivities k=100(160) W m-1 K-1, and electrical conductivities σ=1.1(1.3)×106Ω-1 m-1 at the top (bottom) of the outer core. These values are between two and three times higher than previous estimates, and have important implications for our understanding of the Earth's thermal history and the functioning of the Earth's magnetic field, including rapid cooling rate for the whole core or high level of radiogenic elements in the core. We also show results for a number of structural and dynamic properties of the mixtures, including the partial radial distribution functions, mean square displacements, viscosities, and speeds of sound.

  7. Constraining the geometry, size scale and physical conditions of outflowing broad absorption line regions in quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Sui Chi

    Quasars are known for generating luminosities of up to 1047 erg s--1 in volumes of scales smaller than 2 x 10 15 cm. The optical/UV continuum emission is generally believed to arise from a rotating accretion disk (AD) surrounding a supermassive black hole (SMBH) of ˜ 108 M⊙ . Such emission can be calculated by treating the AD as a multi-temperature blackbody. While the continuum emitting region is well defined, the properties, location and kinematics of the broad emission line regions (BELRs) and broad absorption line regions (BALRs) remain unclear. On one hand, the reverberation mapping technique can give constraints on the location of the BELRs, but not the kinematics. On the other hand, the line-of-sight kinematics of the BALRs is directly observable, but their locations are not well constrained, resulting in a large range of inferred distances, from 0.01 pc to tens of kpc. Therefore, I combined observational results to investigate the geometry, size, and physical conditions of the BELRs and BALRs. I verified that the Lyalpha and CIV BELRs are located at a similar distance. Using these findings, I was able to constrain the size of the Lyalpha BELR and place a lower limit on the size of the N V BALR. I built an empirical model with the optical/UV continuum emission from the AD, the BELR from the chromosphere of the AD, and the outflowing BALR. In the continuum region, I found that over 95 percent of the total flux comes from the region at ~ 125rg, where rg is the gravitational radius of the SMBH. For the BELRs, I computed a disk-wind model with relativistic effects to explain the often-observed single-peaked BEL profiles. However, I show that such a model cannot explain the observed blue asymmetries in the high-ionization BELs or their blueshifted peaks relative to low-ionization BELs. Using results on time variability of BALR gas, and assuming the variability is caused by the gas moving perpendicular across the line-of-sight over a time scale of about a year

  8. Phytate degradation determines the effect of industrial processing and home cooking on iron absorption from cereal-based foods.

    PubMed

    Hurrell, Richard F; Hurrell, Richard F; Reddy, Manju B; Burri, Joseph; Cook, James D

    2002-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare Fe absorption from industrially-manufactured and home-cooked cereal foods. Fe absorption was measured using the radiolabelled Fe extrinsic tag technique in thirty-nine adult human subjects from cereal porridges manufactured by extrusion cooking or roller-drying, and from the same cereal flours after home cooking to produce pancakes, chappattis or bread. One series of cereal porridges was amylase-treated in addition before roller-drying. Fe absorption was relatively low from all products, ranging from 1.8-5.5 % for rice, 2.5-3.5 % for maize, 4.9-13.6 % for low-extraction wheat, and <1 % for high-extraction wheat foods. The phytic acid content remained high after drying of the cereal porridges being about 1.20, 1.70, 3.20, 3.30 mg/g in low-extraction wheat, rice, high-extraction wheat and maize products respectively, and could explain the low Fe absorption. There were little or no differences in Fe absorption between the extruded and roller-dried cereals, although amylase pre-treatment increased Fe absorption from the roller-dried rice cereal 3-fold. This was not due to phytate degradation but possibly because of the more liquid nature of the cereal meal as fed. There were similarly few or no differences in Fe absorption between the industrially-processed cereals and home-cooked cereals made into pancakes or chappattis. Bread-making, however, degraded phytic acid to zero in the low-extraction wheat flour and Fe absorption increased to 13.6 %, the greatest from all cereal foods tested. It is concluded that Fe absorption from extruded, roller-dried or home-cooked cereal foods is similarly low and that only those cooking procedures such as bread-making, which extensively degrades phytic acid, or amylase pre-treatment, which substantially liquifies cereal porridges, improve Fe absorption. PMID:12144715

  9. Heme Iron Release from Alginate Beads at In Vitro Simulated Gastrointestinal Conditions.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, Carolina; Hernández, Valesca; Morales, María Sol; Pizarro, Fernando

    2016-07-01

    Heme iron (Fe) release from alginate beads at in vitro simulated gastrointestinal conditions for potential use as oral heme Fe supplement was studied. Five beads at different ratios of sodium alginate (SA)-to-spray-dried bovine blood cells (SDBC) with weight ratios of 1:1.25, 1:2.5, 1:5, 1:10, and 1:15 (w/w) were prepared. Release characteristics of these beads were investigated at in vitro simulated gastrointestinal conditions. Release media pH strongly influenced the controlled Fe release from the beads. The heme Fe-beads in simulated gastric fluid (pH 2) remained in a shrinkage state and Fe release was low: 25.8, 21.1, 11.6, 12.1, and 12.0 % for 1:1.25, 1:2.5, 1:5, 1:10, and 1:15 ratios, respectively. Proportion and amount of Fe released by 1:1.25 and 1:2.5 ratios was higher than the other ratios. The heme Fe-beads swelled and dissociated in simulated intestinal fluid (pH 6), releasing three-fourths of the Fe in 200 min. The morphology studies showed that Fe release followed formation of pores in the alginate matrix, generating erosion of the beads and complete disintegration after 75 and 200 min of gastric and intestinal incubation, respectively. These results indicate that heme Fe-beads may be useful for oral delivery of heme Fe supplement. PMID:26610684

  10. Altered immune proteome of Staphylococcus aureus under iron-restricted growth conditions.

    PubMed

    Stentzel, Sebastian; Vu, Hai Chi; Weyrich, Anna Maria; Jehmlich, Nico; Schmidt, Frank; Salazar, Manuela Gesell; Steil, Leif; Völker, Uwe; Bröker, Barbara M

    2014-08-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the major causative agents of severe infections, and is responsible for a high burden of morbidity and mortality. Strains of increased virulence have emerged (e.g. USA300) that can infect healthy individuals in the community and are difficult to treat. To add to the knowledge about the pathophysiology of S. aureus, the adaption to iron restriction, an important in vivo stressor, was studied and the corresponding immune response of the human host characterized. Using a combination of 1D and 2D immune proteomics, the human antibody response to the exoproteomes of S. aureus USA300Δspa grown under iron restriction or with excess iron was compared. Human antibody binding to the altered exoproteome under iron restriction showed a 2.7- to 6.2-fold increase in overall signal intensity, and new antibody specificities appeared. Quantification of the secreted bacterial proteins by gel-free proteomics showed the expected strong increase in level of proteins involved in iron acquisition during iron-restricted growth compared to iron access. This was accompanied by decreased levels of superantigens and hemolysins. The latter was corroborated by functional peripheral blood mononuclear cell proliferation assays. The present data provide a comprehensive view of S. aureus exoproteome adaptation to iron restriction. Adults have high concentrations of serum antibodies specific for some of the newly induced proteins. We conclude that iron restriction is a common feature of the microenvironment, where S. aureus interacts with the immune system of its human host. PMID:24888718

  11. Iron and Your Child

    MedlinePlus

    ... 24 months old. Serve iron-rich foods alongside foods containing vitamin C — such as tomatoes, broccoli, oranges, and strawberries — which improves the body's absorption of iron. Avoid serving coffee ...

  12. [Light Absorption Characteristics of FeS2-Fe1-xS Heterostructures Synthesized under Hydrothermal Conditions].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Huang, Fei; Meng, Lin; Yu, Hao-ran; Chen, Ying-hua

    2015-05-01

    Fe-S series, especially FeS2 and Fe1-x S is the main component of crustal rocks as important metal sulphides. Pyrite (FeS2) shows a promising vision in solar cell materials for its high absorption coefficient and suitable band gap. Predecessors have done some researches on the photovoltaic properties of Fe-S series under different conditions. However, little researches have been done on the coexisted sulphide of FeS2 and Fe1-xS. FeS2 and Fe1-xS often appear as symbiotically due to their similar formation conditions. So the study on the optical absorption characteristics of FeS2 and Fe1-xS are of important significance. In order to study the optical absorption characteristics of FeS2-Fe1-xS heterostructures, using the SEM and XRD to characterize the morphology, composition and structure, respectively. The results show that the samples were cubic pyrite with a certain amount of pyrhotite (Fe1-xS). The crystal partical size was between 5 and 10 nm. Measurement of the absorption spectrum was performed using Cary 500 UV-Vis-NIR spectrophotoineter, acquiring the results of 1 860-1 889 nm, and the absorption peak in 1879nm. According to the band gap (eV) formula, the band gap value is calculated to be 0. 657 8 eV. The extreme electrical-to-optical conversion efficiency achieved was about 15%. By the first principles, we analysed the reason of the changing of the band gap value, and then compared the result with previous one. The internal structure of mineral is the important factor affecting the photoelectric conversion. The light absorption characteristics of FeS2-Fel-xS heterostructures synthesized under hydrothermal conditions is better than the characteristics from natural pyrite with defects of Co and Ni. The heterostructures can improve the electrical-to-optical conversion efficiency and provide scientific basis for the absorption characteristics research of Fe-S series materials. PMID:26415446

  13. Enhancement of iron(II)-dependent reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide by thiocyanate and accumulation of iron(II)/thiocyanate/nitric oxide complex under conditions simulating the mixture of saliva and gastric juice.

    PubMed

    Takahama, Umeo; Hirota, Sachiko

    2012-01-13

    Iron(III) ingested as a food component or supplement for iron deficiencies can react with salivary SCN(-) to produce Fe(SCN)(2+) and can be reduced to iron(II) by ascorbic acid in the stomach. Iron(II) generated in the stomach can react with salivary nitrite and SCN(-) to produce nitric oxide (NO) and FeSCN(+), respectively. The purpose of this investigation is to make clear the reactions among nitrite, SCN(-), iron ions, and ascorbic acid under conditions simulating the mixture of saliva and gastric juice. Iron(II)-dependent reduction of nitrite to NO was enhanced by SCN(-) in acidic buffer solutions, and the oxidation product of iron(II) reacted with SCN(-) to produce Fe(SCN)(2+). Almost all of the NO produced was autoxidized to N(2)O(3) under aerobic conditions. Iron(II)-dependent production of NO was also observed in acidified saliva. Under anaerobic conditions, NO transformed Fe(SCN)(2+) and FeSCN(+) to Fe(SCN)NO(+) in acidic buffer solutions. Fe(SCN)NO(+) was also formed under aerobic conditions when excess ascorbic acid was added to iron(II)/nitrite/SCN(-) systems in acidic buffer solutions and acidified saliva. The Fe(SCN)NO(+) formed was transformed to Fe(SCN)(2+) and iron(III) at pH 2.0 and pH 7.4, respectively, by O(2). Salivary glycoproteins could complex with iron(III) in the stomach preventing the formation of Fe(SCN)(2+). Ascorbic acid reduced iron(III) to iron(II) to react with nitrite and SCN(-) as described above. The above results suggest (i) that iron(II) can have toxic effects on the stomach through the formation of reactive nitrogen oxide species from NO when supplemented without ascorbic acid and through the formation of both reactive nitrogen oxide species and Fe(SCN)NO(+) when supplemented with ascorbic acid, and (ii) that the toxic effects of iron(III) seemed to be smaller than and similar to those of iron(II) when supplemented without and with ascorbic acid, respectively. Possible mechanisms that cause oxidative stress on the stomach

  14. Al-hijamah and oral honey for treating thalassemia, conditions of iron overload, and hyperferremia: toward improving the therapeutic outcomes

    PubMed Central

    El Sayed, Salah Mohamed; Baghdadi, Hussam; Abou-Taleb, Ashraf; Mahmoud, Hany Salah; Maria, Reham A; Ahmed, Nagwa S; Helmy Nabo, Manal Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Iron overload causes iron deposition and accumulation in the liver, heart, skin, and other tissues resulting in serious tissue damages. Significant blood clearance from iron and ferritin using wet cupping therapy (WCT) has been reported. WCT is an excretory form of treatment that needs more research efforts. WCT is an available, safe, simple, economic, and time-saving outpatient modality of treatment that has no serious side effects. There are no serious limitations or precautions to discontinue WCT. Interestingly, WCT has solid scientific and medical bases (Taibah mechanism) that explain its effectiveness in treating many disease conditions differing in etiology and pathogenesis. WCT utilizes an excretory physiological principle (pressure-dependent excretion) that resembles excretion through renal glomerular filtration and abscess evacuation. WCT exhibits a percutaneous excretory function that clears blood (through fenestrated skin capillaries) and interstitial fluids from pathological substances without adding a metabolic or detoxification burden on the liver and the kidneys. Interestingly, WCT was reported to decrease serum ferritin (circulating iron stores) significantly by about 22.25% in healthy subjects (in one session) and to decrease serum iron significantly to the level of causing iron deficiency (in multiple sessions). WCT was reported to clear blood significantly of triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, total cholesterol, uric acid, inflammatory mediators, and immunoglobulin antibodies (rheumatoid factor). Moreover, WCT was reported to enhance the natural immunity, potentiate pharmacological treatments, and to treat many different disease conditions. There are two distinct methods of WCT: traditional WCT and Al-hijamah (WCT of prophetic medicine). Both start and end with skin sterilization. In traditional WCT, there are two steps, skin scarification followed by suction using plastic cups (double S technique); Al-hijamah is a three

  15. [Morphology of soil iron oxides and its correlation with soil-forming process and forming conditions in a karst mountain].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Wei; Zhu, Zhang-Xiong; Fu, Wa-Li; Wen, Zhi-Lin

    2012-06-01

    The quantity and morphology of iron oxides are indicators of soil forming-process and forming conditions. In order to analyze the connection between soil iron oxides and soil forming conditions and degenerative process of karst ecosystem, we have chosen 14 soil profiles on the top and middle section of Jinfo Mountain, a typical karst slope in Chongqing, China. Morphology and contents of soil iron oxides were studied by using chemical selective extraction techniques. We draw conclusions: 1) total iron (Fe(t)) is mainly controlled by parent material and lithology. Significant difference of Fe(t) content exists between soils in Top Mountain (51.49 g x kg(-1), mean value from 5 profiles) and soils at the middle sector of North Slope (86.29 g x kg(-1), mean value of 9 profiles); 2) the results show low concentration of F(d) (29.16 g x kg(-1)) and low ratio of Fe(d) to Fe(t)(35.40%) in soil clay under conditions of high elevation and low temperature on Top Mountain. In contrast, the results indicate advanced weathering and soil-forming process at middle slope sites due to high temperature; this is supported by high mean values of Fe(d) (43.92 g x kg(-1)) and ratio of Fe(d)/Fe(t) in clay (60.41%); 3) long humid climatic setting and large numbers of soil organic matter on top of the mountain result in high activation degrees (F(o)/Fe(d)) and high complexation degrees (Fe(p)/Fe(d)); mean values of them are 73.51%, 17.21% respectively, which are higher than that of soils at middle slope sites (13.06%, 0.41%); 4) after degradation or deforestation of secondary forestland (pines massoniana among bushes) at middle section of the hillslope, soil free iron oxides (Fe(d)) and total iron oxides (Fe(t)) decrease as well as soil organic carbon and clay, because of progressively increasing of soil erosion. Average contents of Fe(t) and Fe(d) in clay from 2 shrub profiles are 98.25 g x kg(-1), 50.81 g x kg(-1) respectively. However, the four tillage soils we have studied reveal lower

  16. Laboratory evaluation and application of microwave absorption properties under simulated conditions for planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, Paul G.

    1988-01-01

    Radio absorptivity data for planetary atmospheres obtained from spacecraft radio occultation experiments and earth-based radio astronomical observations can be used to infer abundances of microwave absorbing atmospheric constituents in those atmospheres, as long as reliable information regarding the microwave absorbing properties of potential constituents is available. The key activity for this grant year has continued to be laboratory measurements of the microwave and millimeter-wave properties of the simulated atmospheres of the outer planets and their satellites. A Fabry-Perot spectrometer system capable of operation from 32 to 41 GHz was developed. Initially this spectrometer was used to complete laboratory measurements of the 7.5 to 9.3 mm absorption spectrum of ammonia. Laboratory measurements were begun at wavelengths near 3.2 mm, where a large number of observations of the emission from the outer planets were made. A description of this system is presented.

  17. Optimization of a solar powered absorption cycle under Abu Dhabi's weather conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Alili, A.; Hwang, Y.; Radermacher, R.; Kubo, I.

    2010-12-15

    In order for the solar absorption air conditioners to become a real alternative to the conventional vapour compression systems, their performance has to be improved and their total cost has to be reduced. A solar powered absorption cycle is modeled using the Transient System Simulation (TRNSYS) program and Typical Meteorological Year 2 data of Abu Dhabi. It uses evacuated tube collectors to drive a 10 kW ammonia-water absorption chiller. Firstly, the system performance and its total cost are optimized separately using single objective optimization algorithms. The design variables considered are: the collector slope, the collector mass flow rate, the collector area and the storage tank volume. The single objective optimization results show that MATLAB global optimization methods agree with the TRNSYS optimizer. Secondly, MATLAB is used to solve a multi-objective optimization problem to improve the system's performance and cost, simultaneously. The optimum designs are presented using Pareto curve and show the potential improvements of the baseline system. (author)

  18. Low-field microwave absorption and magnetoresistance in iron nanostructures grown by electrodeposition on n-type lightly doped silicon substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felix, J. F.; Figueiredo, L. C.; Mendes, J. B. S.; Morais, P. C.; Araujo, C. I. L. de.

    2015-12-01

    In this study we investigate magnetic properties, surface morphology and crystal structure in iron nanoclusters electrodeposited on lightly doped (100) n-type silicon substrates. Our goal is to investigate the spin injection and detection in the Fe/Si lateral structures. The samples obtained under electric percolation were characterized by magnetoresistive and magnetic resonance measurements with cycling the sweeping applied field in order to understand the spin dynamics in the as-produced samples. The observed hysteresis in the magnetic resonance spectra, plus the presence of a broad peak in the non-saturated regime confirming the low field microwave absorption (LFMA), were correlated to the peaks and slopes found in the magnetoresistance curves. The results suggest long range spin injection and detection in low resistive silicon and the magnetic resonance technique is herein introduced as a promising tool for analysis of electric contactless magnetoresistive samples.

  19. Iron L-edge X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy of Oxy-Picket Fence Porphyrin: Experimental Insight into Fe-O2 Bonding

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Samuel A.; Kroll, Thomas; Decreau, Richard A.; Hocking, Rosalie K.; Lundberg, Marcus; Hedman, Britt; Hodgson, Keith O.; Solomon, Edward I.

    2013-01-01

    The electronic structure of the Fe–O2 center in oxy-hemoglobin and oxy-myoglobin is a long-standing issue in the field of bioinorganic chemistry. Spectroscopic studies have been complicated by the highly delocalized nature of the porphyrin and calculations require interpretation of multi-determinant wavefunctions for a highly covalent metal site. Here, iron L-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), interpreted using a valence bond configuration interaction (VBCI) multiplet model, is applied to directly probe the electronic structure of the iron in the biomimetic Fe–O2 heme complex [Fe(pfp)(1-MeIm)O2] (pfp = meso-tetra(α,α,α,α-o-pivalamidophenyl) porphyrin or TpivPP). This method allows separate estimates of σ-donor, π-donor, and π-acceptor interactions through ligand to metal charge transfer (LMCT) and metal to ligand charge transfer (MLCT) mixing pathways. The L-edge spectrum of [Fe(pfp)(1-MeIm)O2] is further compared to those of [FeII(pfp)(1-MeIm)2], [FeII(pfp)], and [FeIII(tpp)(ImH)2]Cl (tpp = meso-tetraphenylporphyrin) which have FeII S = 0, FeII S = 1 and FeIII S = 1/2 ground states, respectively. These serve as references for the three possible contributions to the ground state of oxy-pfp. The Fe–O2 pfp site is experimentally determined to have both significant σ-donation and a strong π-interaction of the O2 with the iron, with the latter having implications with respect to the spin polarization of the ground state. PMID:23259487

  20. Redox speciation analysis of dissolved iron in estuarine and coastal waters with on-line solid phase extraction and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry detection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yaojin; Feng, Sichao; Huang, Yongming; Yuan, Dongxing

    2015-05-01

    An automatic on-line solid phase extraction (SPE) system employing the flow injection (FI) technique directly coupled to a graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometer (GFAAS) was established for speciation and determination of dissolved iron in estuarine and coastal waters. Fe(II) was mixed with ferrozine solution in a sample stream to form the Fe(II)-ferrozine complex which was extracted onto a C18 SPE cartridge, eluted with eluent and detected with GFAAS. In a parallel flow channel, Fe(III) was reduced to Fe(II) with ascorbic acid and then detected in the same way as Fe(II). The home-made interface between FI-SPE and GFAAS efficiently realized the sample introduction to the furnace in a semi-automated way. Parameters of the FI-SPE system and graphite furnace program were optimized based on a univariate experimental design and an orthogonal array design. The salinity effect on the method sensitivity was investigated. The proposed method provided a detection limit of 1.38 nmol L(-1) for Fe(II) and 1.87 nmol L(-1) for Fe(II+III). With variation of the sample loading volume, a broadened determination range of 2.5-200 nmol L(-1) iron could be obtained. The proposed method was successfully applied to analyze iron species in samples collected from the Jiulongjiang Estuary, Fujian, China. With the 2-cartridge FI-SPE system developed, on-line simultaneous determination of Fe species with GFAAS was achieved for the first time. PMID:25770602

  1. Kinetic study for phenol degradation by ZVI-assisted Fenton reaction and related iron corrosion investigated by X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yoon, In-Ho; Yoo, Gursong; Hong, Hye-Jin; Kim, Jungmin; Kim, Min Gyu; Choi, Wang-Kyu; Yang, Ji-Won

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we investigated phenol degradation via zero-valent iron (ZVI)-assisted Fenton reaction through kinetic and spectroscopic analysis. In batch experiments, 100 mg/L of phenol was completely degraded, and 75% of TOC was removed within 3 min under an optimal hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) concentration (50 mM) via the Fenton reaction. In the absence of H2O2, oxygen (O2) was dissolved into the solution and produced H2O2, which resulted in phenol degradation. However, phenol removal efficiency was not very high compared to external H2O2 input. The Fenton reaction rapidly occurred at the surface of ZVI, and then phenol mobility from the solution to the ZVI surface was the rate determining step of the whole reaction. The pseudo-second order adsorption kinetic model well describes phenol removal, and its rate increased according to the H2O2 concentration. X-ray absorption spectroscopic analysis revealed that iron oxide (Fe-O bonding) was formed on ZVI with [H2O2] > 50 mM. A high concentration of H2O2 led to rapid degradation of phenol and caused corrosion on the ZVI surface, indicating that Fe(2+) ions were rapidly oxidized to Fe(3+) ions due to the Fenton reaction and that Fe(3+) was precipitated as iron oxide on the ZVI surface. However, ZVI did not show corroded characteristics in the absence of H2O2 due to the insufficient ZVI-assisted Fenton reaction and oxidation of Fe(2+) to Fe(3+). PMID:26692518

  2. A greenhouse trial to investigate the ameliorative properties of biosolids and plants on physicochemical conditions of iron ore tailings: Implications for an iron ore mine site remediation.

    PubMed

    Cele, Emmanuel Nkosinathi; Maboeta, Mark

    2016-01-01

    An iron ore mine site in Swaziland is currently (2015) in a derelict state as a consequence of past (1964-1988) and present (2011 - current) iron ore mining operations. In order to control problems associated with mine wastes, the Swaziland Water Services Corporation (SWSC) recently (2013) proposed the application of biosolids in sites degraded by mining operations. It is thought that this practice could generally improve soil conditions and enhance plant reestablishment. More importantly, the SWSC foresees this as a potential solution to the biosolids disposal problems. In order to investigate the effects of biosolids and plants in soil physicochemical conditions of iron mine soils, we conducted two plant growth trials. Trial 1 consisted of tailings that received biosolids and topsoil (TUSB mix) while in trial 2, tailings received biosolids only (TB mix). In the two trials, the application rates of 0 (control), 10, 25, 50, 75 and 100 t ha(-1) were used. After 30 days of equilibration, 25 seeds of Cynodon dactylon were sown in each pot and thinned to 10 plants after 4 weeks. Plants were watered twice weekly and remained under greenhouse conditions for 12 weeks, subsequent to which soils were subjected to chemical analysis. According to the results obtained, there were significant improvements in soil parameters related to fertility such as organic matter (OM), water holding capacity (WHC), cation exchange capacity (CEC), ammonium [Formula: see text] , magnesium (Mg(2+)), calcium (Ca(2+)) and phosphorus ( [Formula: see text] ). With regard to heavy metals, biosolids led to significant increases in soil total concentrations of Cu, Zn, Cd, Hg and Pb. The higher concentrations of Zn and Cu in treated tailings compared to undisturbed adjacent soils are a cause for concern because in the field, this might work against the broader objectives of mine soil remediation, which include the recolonization of reclaimed sites by soil-dwelling organisms. Therefore, while

  3. Changes of the corrosion potential of iron in stagnation and flow conditions and their relationship with metal release.

    PubMed

    Fabbricino, Massimiliano; Korshin, Gregory V

    2014-10-01

    This study examined the behavior of corrosion potential (Ecorr) of iron exposed to drinking water during episodes of stagnation and flow. These measurements showed that during stagnation episodes, Ecorr values decrease prominently and consistently. This decrease is initially rapid but it becomes slower as the stagnation time increases. During flow episodes, the Ecorr values increase and reach a quasi-steady state. Experiments with varying concentrations of dissolved oxygen showed that the decrease of Ecorr values characteristic for stagnation is likely to be associated with the consumption of dissolved oxygen by the exposed metal. The corrosion potential of iron and its changes during stagnation were sensitive to the concentrations of sulfate and chloride ions. Measurements of iron release showed that both the absolute values of Ecorr measured prior to or after stagnation episodes were well correlated with the logarithms of concentrations of total iron. The slope of this dependence showed that the observed correlations between Ecorr values and Fe concentrations corresponded to the coupling between the oxidant consumption and changes of Fe redox status. These results demonstrate that in situ Ecorr measurements can be a sensitive method with which to ascertain effects of hydrodynamic conditions and short-term variations of water chemistry on metal release and corrosion in drinking water. This approach is valuable practically because Ecorr measurements are precise, can be carried out in situ with any desired time resolution, do not affect the state of exposed surface in any extent and can be carried out with readily available equipment. PMID:24950460

  4. Bile Salts Affect Expression of Escherichia coli O157:H7 Genes for Virulence and Iron Acquisition, and Promote Growth under Iron Limiting Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Hamner, Steve; McInnerney, Kate; Williamson, Kerry; Franklin, Michael J.; Ford, Timothy E.

    2013-01-01

    Bile salts exhibit potent antibacterial properties, acting as detergents to disrupt cell membranes and as DNA-damaging agents. Although bacteria inhabiting the intestinal tract are able to resist bile’s antimicrobial effects, relatively little is known about how bile influences virulence of enteric pathogens. Escherichia coli O157:H7 is an important pathogen of humans, capable of causing severe diarrhea and more serious sequelae. In this study, the transcriptome response of E. coli O157:H7 to bile was determined. Bile exposure induced significant changes in mRNA levels of genes related to virulence potential, including a reduction of mRNA for the 41 genes making up the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) pathogenicity island. Bile treatment had an unusual effect on mRNA levels for the entire flagella-chemotaxis regulon, resulting in two- to four-fold increases in mRNA levels for genes associated with the flagella hook-basal body structure, but a two-fold decrease for “late” flagella genes associated with the flagella filament, stator motor, and chemotaxis. Bile salts also caused increased mRNA levels for seventeen genes associated with iron scavenging and metabolism, and counteracted the inhibitory effect of the iron chelating agent 2,2’-dipyridyl on growth of E. coli O157:H7. These findings suggest that E. coli O157:H7 may use bile as an environmental signal to adapt to changing conditions associated with the small intestine, including adaptation to an iron-scarce environment. PMID:24058617

  5. Equimolar carbon absorption by potassium phthalimide and in situ catalytic conversion under mild conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuai; Li, Yu-Nong; Zhang, Ya-Wei; He, Liang-Nian; Yu, Bing; Song, Qing-Wen; Lang, Xian-Dong

    2014-05-01

    Potassium phthalimide, with weak basicity, is an excellent absorbent for rapid carbon dioxide capture with almost equimolar absorption. This process is assumed to proceed through the potassium carbamate formation pathway, as supported by NMR spectroscopy, an in situ FTIR study, and computational calculations. Both the basicity and nucleophilicity of phthalimide salts have a crucial effect on the capture process. Furthermore, the captured carbon dioxide could more easily be converted in situ into value-added chemicals and fuel-related products through carbon capture and utilization, rather than going through a desorption process. PMID:24677616

  6. Perspectives on nutritional iron deficiency.

    PubMed

    Hallberg, L

    2001-01-01

    Nutritional iron deficiency (ID) is caused by an intake of dietary iron insufficient to cover physiological iron requirements. Studies on iron absorption from whole diets have examined relationships between dietary iron bioavailability/absorption, iron losses, and amounts of stored iron. New insights have been obtained into regulation of iron absorption and expected rates of changes of iron stores or hemoglobin iron deficits when bioavailability or iron content of the diet has been modified and when losses of iron occur. Negative effects of ID are probably related to age, up to about 20 years, explaining some of earlier controversies. Difficulties in establishing the prevalence of mild ID are outlined. The degree of underestimation of the prevalence of mild ID when using multiple diagnostic criteria is discussed. It is suggested that current low-energy lifestyles are a common denominator for the current high prevalence not only of ID but also of obesity, diabetes, and osteoporosis. PMID:11375427

  7. Wavelength dependence of aerosol light absorption in urban and biomass burning impacted conditions: An integrative perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnott, W. P.; Gyawali, M.; Lewis, K.; Moosmuller, H.

    2009-12-01

    Aerosol light absorption depends on aerosol size, morphology, mixing state, and composition. The wavelength dependence is often characterized with use of the Angstrom coefficient for absorption (AAE) determined from measurements at two or more wavelengths. Low fractal dimension black carbon (BC) particles are often expected to have an AAE near unity. Values of AAE significantly larger than unity are often attributed to the presence of an organic coating that absorbs strongly at lower wavelengths, though we have found that even non absorbing coatings on small, biomass burning related BC cores can have large AAE. Values of AAE significantly less than unity are often ascribed to experimental errors or large particle sizes, however, we find that they are most commonly associated with modest absorbing or non absorbing organic coatings that collapse the fractal soot BC core in urban aerosol to a dimension near that of a sphere. Photoacoustic measurements at 405 nm, 532 nm, 870 nm, and 1047 nm in urban Reno and Las Vegas NV, and for biomass burning experiments are used presented to illustrate the range of AAE possible, and coated sphere modeling results are presented to interpret the measurements.

  8. Iron speciation in human cancer cells by K-edge total reflection X-ray fluorescence-X-ray absorption near edge structure analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polgári, Zs.; Meirer, F.; Sasamori, S.; Ingerle, D.; Pepponi, G.; Streli, C.; Rickers, K.; Réti, A.; Budai, B.; Szoboszlai, N.; Záray, G.

    2011-03-01

    X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analysis in combination with synchrotron radiation induced total reflection X-ray fluorescence (SR-TXRF) acquisition was used to determine the oxidation state of Fe in human cancer cells and simultaneously their elemental composition by applying a simple sample preparation procedure consisting of pipetting the cell suspension onto the quartz reflectors. XANES spectra of several inorganic and organic iron compounds were recorded and compared to that of different cell lines. The XANES spectra of cells, independently from the phase of cell growth and cell type were very similar to that of ferritin, the main Fe store within the cell. The spectra obtained after CoCl 2 or NiCl 2 treatment, which could mimic a hypoxic state of cells, did not differ noticeably from that of the ferritin standard. After 5-fluorouracil administration, which could also induce an oxidative-stress in cells, the absorption edge position was shifted toward higher energies representing a higher oxidation state of Fe. Intense treatment with antimycin A, which inhibits electron transfer in the respiratory chain, resulted in minor changes in the spectrum, resembling rather the N-donor Fe-α,α'-dipyridyl complex at the oxidation energy of Fe(III), than ferritin. The incorporation of Co and Ni in the cells was followed by SR-TXRF measurements.

  9. Uranium Immobilization in an Iron-Rich Rhizosphere of a Native Wetland Plant from the Savannah River Site under Reducing Conditions

    EPA Science Inventory

    The hypothesis of this study was that iron plaque formed on the roots of wetland plants and their rhizospheres create environmental conditions favorable for iron reducing bacteria that promote the in situ immobilization of uranium. Greenhouse microcosm studies were conducted usin...

  10. In situ synthesis of hydroxyapatite nanocomposites using iron oxide nanofluids at ambient conditions.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Lubna; Mahto, Neha; Nayar, Suprabha

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a simple method for the room temperature synthesis of magnetite/hydroxyapatite composite nanocomposites using ferrofluids. The in situ synthesis of magnetic-hydroxyapatite results in a homogenous distribution of the two phases as seen both in transmission electron micrographs and assembled to a micron range in the confocal micrographs. The selected area diffraction pattern analysis shows the presence of both phases of iron oxide and hydroxyapatite. To the dialyzed ferrofluid, the constituents of hydroxyapatite synthesis was added, the presence of the superparamagnetic iron oxide particles imparts directionality to the hydroxyapatite crystal growth. Electron probe microanalysis confirms the co-existence of both iron and calcium atoms. Vibrating Sample magnetometer data shows magnetization three times more than the parent ferrofluid, the local concentration of iron oxide nanoparticles affects the strength of dipolar interparticle interactions changing the energy barrier for determining the collective magnetic behavior of the sample. The limitations inherent to the use of external magnetic fields which can be circumvented by the introduction of internal magnets located in the proximity of the target by a minimal surgery or by using a superparamagnetic scaffold under the influence of externally applied magnetic field inspires us to increase the magnetization of our samples. The composite in addition shows anti-bacterial properties against the two gram (-ve) bacteria tested. This work is significant as magnetite-hydroxyapatite composites are attracting a lot of attention as adsorbents, catalysts, hyperthermia agents and even as regenerative medicine. PMID:25589209

  11. Comparison study of oral iron preparations using a human intestinal model.

    PubMed

    Zariwala, Mohammed Gulrez; Somavarapu, Satyanarayana; Farnaud, Sebastien; Renshaw, Derek

    2013-12-01

    Iron deficiency and related iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) are the most prevalent nutritional disorders worldwide. The standard treatment involves supplementation with solid or liquid iron supplement preparations, usually based on a ferrous salt such as ferrous sulphate, ferrous fumarate, or ferrous gluconate. In the present study, we compared iron uptake and absorption from various solid and liquid iron supplement preparations currently available in the United Kingdom using the well-characterised human epithelial adenocarcinoma cell line Caco-2. Intracellular ferritin protein formation by the Caco-2 cell was considered an indicator of cellular iron uptake and absorption. We investigated the effects of formulation ingredients at a defined pH on iron uptake and absorption, and designed a novel two-stage dissolution-absorption protocol that mimicked physiological conditions. Our experiments revealed wide variations in the rate of dissolution between the various solid iron preparations. Conventional-release ferrous iron tablets dissolved rapidly (48 ± 4 mins to 64 ± 4 mins), whereas modified-released tablets and capsules took significantly longer to undergo complete dissolution (274 ± 8 to 256 ± 8 mins). Among the solid iron preparations, ferrous sulphate conventional-release tablets demonstrated the highest iron absorption, whereas modified-release ferrous preparations demonstrated uniformly low iron absorption, as compared to the control (P < 0.05). Taken together, our results demonstrate that there are wide-ranging variations in dissolution times and iron uptake from oral iron preparations, with the physical characteristics of the preparation as well as the form of iron playing a key role. PMID:24482777

  12. Comparison Study of Oral Iron Preparations Using a Human Intestinal Model

    PubMed Central

    Zariwala, Mohammed Gulrez; Somavarapu, Satyanarayana; Farnaud, Sebastien; Renshaw, Derek

    2013-01-01

    Iron deficiency and related iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) are the most prevalent nutritional disorders worldwide. The standard treatment involves supplementation with solid or liquid iron supplement preparations, usually based on a ferrous salt such as ferrous sulphate, ferrous fumarate, or ferrous gluconate. In the present study, we compared iron uptake and absorption from various solid and liquid iron supplement preparations currently available in the United Kingdom using the well-characterised human epithelial adenocarcinoma cell line Caco-2. Intracellular ferritin protein formation by the Caco-2 cell was considered an indicator of cellular iron uptake and absorption. We investigated the effects of formulation ingredients at a defined pH on iron uptake and absorption, and designed a novel two-stage dissolution-absorption protocol that mimicked physiological conditions. Our experiments revealed wide variations in the rate of dissolution between the various solid iron preparations. Conventional-release ferrous iron tablets dissolved rapidly (48 ± 4 mins to 64 ± 4 mins), whereas modified-released tablets and capsules took significantly longer to undergo complete dissolution (274 ± 8 to 256 ± 8 mins). Among the solid iron preparations, ferrous sulphate conventional-release tablets demonstrated the highest iron absorption, whereas modified-release ferrous preparations demonstrated uniformly low iron absorption, as compared to the control (P < 0.05). Taken together, our results demonstrate that there are wide-ranging variations in dissolution times and iron uptake from oral iron preparations, with the physical characteristics of the preparation as well as the form of iron playing a key role. PMID:24482777

  13. Application of Zero-Valent Iron Nanoparticles for the Removal of Aqueous Zinc Ions under Various Experimental Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Wen; Dai, Chaomeng; Zhou, Xuefei; Zhang, Yalei

    2014-01-01

    Application of zero-valent iron nanoparticles (nZVI) for Zn2+ removal and its mechanism were discussed. It demonstrated that the uptake of Zn2+ by nZVI was efficient. With the solids concentration of 1 g/L nZVI, more than 85% of Zn2+ could be removed within 2 h. The pH value and dissolved oxygen (DO) were the important factors of Zn2+ removal by nZVI. The DO enhanced the removal efficiency of Zn2+. Under the oxygen-contained condition, oxygen corrosion gave the nZVI surface a shell of iron (oxy)hydroxide, which could show high adsorption affinity. The removal efficiency of Zn2+ increased with the increasing of the pH. Acidic condition reduced the removal efficiency of Zn2+ by nZVI because the existing H+ inhibited the formation of iron (oxy)hydroxide. Adsorption and co-precipitation were the most likely mechanism of Zn2+ removal by nZVI. The FeOOH-shell could enhance the adsorption efficiency of nZVI. The removal efficiency and selectivity of nZVI particles for Zn2+ were higher than Cd2+. Furthermore, a continuous flow reactor for engineering application of nZVI was designed and exhibited high removal efficiency for Zn2+. PMID:24416439

  14. The phytopathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 has three high-affinity iron-scavenging systems functional under iron limitation conditions but dispensable for pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Jones, Alexander M; Wildermuth, Mary C

    2011-06-01

    High-affinity iron scavenging through the use of siderophores is a well-established virulence determinant in mammalian pathogenesis. However, few examples have been reported for plant pathogens. Here, we use a genetic approach to investigate the role of siderophores in Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (DC3000) virulence in tomato. DC3000, an agronomically important pathogen, has two known siderophores for high-affinity iron scavenging, yersiniabactin and pyoverdin, and we uncover a third siderophore, citrate, required for growth when iron is limiting. Though growth of a DC3000 triple mutant unable to either synthesize or import these siderophores is severely restricted in iron-limited culture, it is fully pathogenic. One explanation for this phenotype is that the DC3000 triple mutant is able to directly pirate plant iron compounds such as heme/hemin or iron-nicotianamine, and our data indicate that DC3000 can import iron-nicotianamine with high affinity. However, an alternative explanation, supported by data from others, is that the pathogenic environment of DC3000 (i.e., leaf apoplast) is not iron limited but is iron replete, with available iron of >1 μM. Growth of the triple mutant in culture is restored to wild-type levels by supplementation with a variety of iron chelates at >1 μM, including iron(III) dicitrate, a dominant chelate of the leaf apoplast. This suggests that lower-affinity iron import would be sufficient for DC3000 iron nutrition in planta and is in sharp contrast to the high-affinity iron-scavenging mechanisms required in mammalian pathogenesis. PMID:21441525

  15. Oxidation of dissolved iron under warmer, wetter conditions on Mars: Transitions to present-day arid environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, R. G.

    1993-01-01

    The copious deposits of ferric-iron assemblages littering the surface of bright regions of Mars indicate that efficient oxidative weathering reactions have taken place during the evolution of the planet. Because the kinetics of atmosphere-surface (gas-solid) reactions are considerably slower than chemical weathering reactions involving an aqueous medium, most of the oxidation products now present in the martian regolith probably formed when groundwater flowed near the surface. This paper examines how chemical weathering reactions were effected by climatic variations when warm, wet environments became arid on Mars. Analogies are drawn with hydrogeochemical and weathering environments on the Australian continent where present-day oxidation of iron is occurring in acidic ground water under arid conditions.

  16. Effects of Surfactants and Synthetic Conditions on the Sizes and Self-Assembly of Monodisperse Iron Oxide Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, X.; Yang, H.

    2004-02-17

    (B204)Monodisperse iron oxide nanoparticles made from the thermal decomposition of iron carbonyl in octyl ether in the presence of oleic and stearic acids have been examined under various reaction conditions. Monodisperse particles with diameters of 3, 5, 10, 16 and 25 nm have been made. Ostwald ripening could be the key reason for making monodisperse nanoparticles with diameters of up to 25 nm, above the largest sizes that have been reported so far for this class of materials. When stearic acid was used as surfactant, the reaction mixtures can reflux at a lower temperature than the reaction using oleic acid, and monodisperse 3 nm Fe2O3 particles can be made. By controlling the temperatures during the drop casting, different superstructures and superlattices can be created. The nanoparticles and their assembly have been characterized by transmission electron microscopy, electron diffraction, powder X-ray diffraction, and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy.

  17. Highly Ionized Iron Absorption Lines from Outflowing Gases in the X-ray Spectrum of NGC 1365

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Risaliti, G.; Bianchi, S.; Matt, G.; Baldi, A.; Elvis, M.; Fabbiano, G.; Zezas, A.

    2006-01-01

    We present the discovery of four absorption lines in the X-ray spectrum of the Seyfert galaxy NGC 1365, at energies between 6.7 and 8.3 keV. The lines are detected with high statistical confidence (from >20 sigma for the strongest to -4 sigma for the weakest) in two XMM-Newton observations 60 ks long. We also detect the same lines, with a lower signal-to-noise ratio (but still >2 sigma for each line), in two previous shorter (-10 ks) XMM-Newton observations. The spectral analysis identifies these features as Fe XXV and Fe XXVI Kalpha and Kbeta lines, outflowing with velocities varying between -1000 and -5000 km/s among the observations. These are the highest quality detections of such lines so far. The high equivalent widths [EW (Kalpha) approximately 100 eV] and the Kalpha/Kbeta ratios imply that the lines are due to absorption of the AGN continuum by a highly ionized gas with column density NH-5?1023 cm(exp -2) at a distance of -(50-100)RS from the continuum source.

  18. A comparison of simultaneous plasma, atomic absorption, and iron colorimetric determinations of major and trace constituents in acid mine waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ball, J.W.; Nordstrom, D.K.

    1994-01-01

    Sixty-three water samples collected during June to October 1982 from the Leviathan/Bryant Creek drainage basin were originally analyzed by simultaneous multielement direct-current plasma (DCP) atomic-emission spectrometry, flame atomic-absorption spectrometry, graphite-furnace atomic-absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) (thallium only), ultraviolet-visible spectrometry, and hydride-generation atomic-absorption spectrometry.Determinations were made for the following metallic and semi-metallic constituents: AI, As, B, Ba, Be, Bi, Cd, Ca, Cr, Co, Cu, Fe(11), Fe(total), Li, Pb, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, K, Sb, Se, Si, Na, Sr, TI, V, and Zn. These samples were re-analyzed later by simultaneous multielement inductively coupled plasma (ICP) atomic-emission spectrometry and Zeeman-corrected GFAAS to determine the concentrations of many of the same constituents with improved accuracy, precision, and sensitivity. The result of this analysis has been the generation of comparative concentration values for a significant subset of the solute constituents. Many of the more recently determined values replace less-than-detection values for the trace metals; others constitute duplicate analyses for the major constituents. The multiple determinations have yielded a more complete, accurate, and precise set of analytical data. They also have resulted in an opportunity to compare the performance of the plasma-emission instruments operated in their respective simultaneous multielement modes. Flame atomic-absorption spectrometry was judged best for Na and K and hydride-generation atomic-absorption spectrometry was judged best for As because of their lower detection limit and relative freedom from interelement spectral effects. Colorimetric determination using ferrozine as the color agent was judged most accurate, precise, and sensitive for Fe. Cadmium, lead, and vanadium concentrations were too low in this set of samples to enable a determination of whether ICP or DCP is a more suitable technique. Of

  19. Does complex absorption behavior leading to conditioning and damage in KDP/DKDP reflect the electronic structure of initiators?

    SciTech Connect

    Feit, M D; DeMange, P P; Negres, R A; Rubenchik, A M; Demos, S G

    2007-10-24

    Currently, most of our thinking about the defects responsible for initiating laser damage considers them as featureless absorbers. However, an increasing body of evidence, particularly involving multi-wavelength irradiation, suggests electronic structure of damage initiators is important in determining both initiation and conditioning behaviors in KDP. The effective absorption coefficient of energy under multi-wavelength irradiation cannot be accounted for by a structureless absorber, but is consistent with an initiator with a multi-level structure. We outline the evidence and assess the ability of such a simple multi-level model to explain these and other experimentally observed behaviors.

  20. Fabrication of Thin Films of α-Fe2O3 via Atomic Layer Deposition Using Iron Bisamidinate and Water under Mild Growth Conditions.

    PubMed

    Avila, Jason R; Kim, Dong Wook; Rimoldi, Martino; Farha, Omar K; Hupp, Joseph T

    2015-08-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) has been shown to be an excellent method for depositing thin films of iron oxide. With limited iron precursors available, the methods widely used require harsh conditions such as high temperatures and/or the use of oxidants such as ozone or peroxide. This letter aims to show that bis(N,N'-di-t-butylacetamidinato) iron(II) (iron bisamidinate or FeAMD) is an ideal ALD precursor because of its reactivity with water and relative volatility. Using in situ QCM analysis, we show outstanding conformal self-limiting growth of FeOx using FeAMD and water at temperatures lower than 200 °C. By annealing thin films of FeOx at 500 °C, we observe the formation of α-Fe2O3, confirming that we can use FeAMD to fabricate thin films of catalytically promising iron oxide materials using moderate growth conditions. PMID:26192606

  1. Observation of x-ray absorption magnetic circular dichroism in well-characterized iron-cobalt-platinum multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowski, A.F.; Waddill, G.D.; Tobin, J.G.

    1993-04-01

    Magnetic circular dichroism in the Fe 2p x-ray absorption is observed in multilayers of(Fe9.5{Angstrom}/Pt9.5{Angstrom}){sub 92}. The magnetization and helicity are both in the plane of this multilayer which is prepared by magnetron sputter deposition. This sample is part of a study to examine magnetization in the ternary multilayer system of FeCo/Pt. Lattice and layer pair spacings are measured using x-ray scattering. The atomic concentration profiles of the multilayer films are characterized using Auger electron spectroscopy coupled with depth profiling. Conventional and high resolution transmission electron microscopy are used to examine the thin film, growth morphology and atomic structure.

  2. Laboratory evaluation and application of microwave absorption properties under simulated conditions for planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, Paul G.

    1989-01-01

    Radio absorptivity data for planetary atmospheres obtained from spacecraft radio occultation experiments and earth-based radio astronomical observations can be used to infer abundances of microwave absorbing atmospheric constituents in those atmospheres, as long as reliable information regarding the microwave absorbing properties of potential constituents is available. Work performed has shown that laboratory measurements of the millimeter-wave opacity of ammonia between 7.5 mm and 9.3 mm and also at the 3.2 mm wavelength require a different lineshape to be used in the theoretical prediction for millimeter-wave ammonia opacity than was previously used. The recognition of the need to make such laboratory measurements of simulated planetary atmospheres over a range of temperatures and pressures which correspond to the altitudes probed by both radio occultation experiments and radio astronomical observations, and over a range of frequencies which correspond to those used in both radio occultation experiments and radio astronomical observations, has led to the development of a facility at Georgia Tech which is capable of making such measurements. It has been the goal of this investigation to conduct such measurements and to apply the results to a wide range of planetary observations, both spacecraft and earth-based, in order to determine the identity and abundance profiles of constituents in those planetary atmospheres.

  3. Melting curves and entropy of melting of iron under Earth's core conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wen-Jin; Liu, Zhi-Yong; Liu, Zhong-Li; Cai, Ling-Cang

    2015-07-01

    The melting curves of iron are determined up to 365 GPa via molecular dynamic (MD) simulations combining with the embedded atom model (EAM) potential developed by Ackland et al. We simulated the melting with three approaches, the hysteresis, two-phase and recently modified Z methods. All three techniques can produce satisfying results, consistent well with most of static compression measurements and shock experiments. Hence, we recommend that these three techniques and this EAM potential are reliable techniques and potential for simulating melting properties of iron. Fitting the well-known Simon equation to our two-phase data we yield the analytical melting curve for iron: 1825(1 + P/57.723)0.654, which gives a melting point at the inner core boundary of 6345 K, very close to the recent diamond anvil cell (DAC) extrapolated value and other ab initio calculations. Furthermore, the analyses of our entropy of melting and solid-liquid interfacial energy γsl indicate that at high pressure, the entropy of fusion shows weak pressure effect. The γsl increases monotonically with pressure, and can be described as a second-order polynomial relation.

  4. Effects of electron correlations on transport properties of iron at Earth's core conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Cohen, R E; Haule, K

    2015-01-29

    Earth's magnetic field has been thought to arise from thermal convection of molten iron alloy in the outer core, but recent density functional theory calculations have suggested that the conductivity of iron is too high to support thermal convection, resulting in the investigation of chemically driven convection. These calculations for resistivity were based on electron-phonon scattering. Here we apply self-consistent density functional theory plus dynamical mean-field theory (DFT + DMFT) to iron and find that at high temperatures electron-electron scattering is comparable to the electron-phonon scattering, bringing theory into agreement with experiments and solving the transport problem in Earth's core. The conventional thermal dynamo picture is safe. We find that electron-electron scattering of d electrons is important at high temperatures in transition metals, in contrast to textbook analyses since Mott, and that 4s electron contributions to transport are negligible, in contrast to numerous models used for over fifty years. The DFT+DMFT method should be applicable to other high-temperature systems where electron correlations are important. PMID:25631449

  5. Applicability of DLVO Approach to Predict Trends in Iron Oxide Colloid Mobility Under Various Physical And Chemical Soil Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florian Carstens, Jannis; Bachmann, Jörg; Neuweiler, Insa

    2014-05-01

    In soil and groundwater, highly mobile iron oxide colloids can act as "shuttles" for transport of adsorbed contaminants such as heavy metals and radionuclides. Artificial iron oxide colloids are injected into polluted porous media to accelerate bacterial degradation of pollutants in the context of bioremediation purposes. The mobility of iron oxide colloids is strongly affected by the hydraulic, physical and chemical conditions of the pore space, the solid particle surface properties, the fluid phase, and the colloids themselves. Most pioneering studies focused on iron oxide colloid transport and retention in simplified model systems. The aim of this study is to investigate iron oxide colloid mobility under more complex, soil-typical conditions that have as yet only been applied for model microspheres, i.e. functionalized latex colloids. Among these conditions is the pivotal impact of organic matter, either dissolved or adsorbed onto solid particles, modifying wettability properties. Of particular importance was to determine if effective chemical surface parameters derived from contact angle and zeta potential measurements can be used as a tool to predict general tendencies for iron oxide colloid mobility in porous media. In column breakthrough experiments, goethite colloids (particle size: 200-900 nm) were percolated through quartz sand (grain size: 100-300 µm) at pH 5. The impact of a multitude of conditions on colloid mobility was determined: dissolved organic matter (DOM) concentration, ionic strength, flow velocity, flow interruption, partial saturation, and drying with subsequent re-wetting. The solid matrix consisted of either clean sand, organic matter-coated sand, goethite-coated sand, or sand hydrophobized with dichlorodimethylsilane. Additionally, contact angles and zeta potentials of the materials applied in the column experiments were measured. By means of these surface parameters, traditional DLVO interaction energies based on zeta potential as well

  6. Efficacy and safety of iron-chelation therapy with deferoxamine, deferiprone, and deferasirox for the treatment of iron-loaded patients with non-transfusion-dependent thalassemia syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Kontoghiorghe, Christina N; Kontoghiorghes, George J

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence rate of thalassemia, which is endemic in Southeast Asia, the Middle East, and the Mediterranean, exceeds 100,000 live births per year. There are many genetic variants in thalassemia with different pathological severity, ranging from a mild and asymptomatic anemia to life-threatening clinical effects, requiring lifelong treatment, such as regular transfusions in thalassemia major (TM). Some of the thalassemias are non-transfusion-dependent, including many thalassemia intermedia (TI) variants, where iron overload is caused by chronic increase in iron absorption due to ineffective erythropoiesis. Many TI patients receive occasional transfusions. The rate of iron overloading in TI is much slower in comparison to TM patients. Iron toxicity in TI is usually manifested by the age of 30–40 years, and in TM by the age of 10 years. Subcutaneous deferoxamine (DFO), oral deferiprone (L1), and DFO–L1 combinations have been effectively used for more than 20 years for the treatment of iron overload in TM and TI patients, causing a significant reduction in morbidity and mortality. Selected protocols using DFO, L1, and their combination can be designed for personalized chelation therapy in TI, which can effectively and safely remove all the excess toxic iron and prevent cardiac, liver, and other organ damage. Both L1 and DF could also prevent iron absorption. The new oral chelator deferasirox (DFX) increases iron excretion and decreases liver iron in TM and TI. There are drawbacks in the use of DFX in TI, such as limitations related to dose, toxicity, and cost, iron load of the patients, and ineffective removal of excess iron from the heart. Furthermore, DFX appears to increase iron and other toxic metal absorption. Future treatments of TI and related iron-loading conditions could involve the use of the iron-chelating drugs and other drug combinations not only for increasing iron excretion but also for preventing iron absorption. PMID:26893541

  7. SEALING LARGE-DIAMETER CAST-IRON PIPE JOINTS UNDER LIVE CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kiran M. Kothari; Gerard T. Pittard

    2004-04-01

    Utilities in the U.S. operate over 75,000 km (47,000 miles) of old cast-iron pipes for gas distribution. The bell-and-spigot joints that connect pipe sections together tend to leak as these pipes age. Current repair practices are costly and highly disruptive. The objective of this program is to design, test and commercialize a robotic system capable of sealing multiple cast-iron bell and spigot joints from a single pipe entry point. The proposed system will perform repairs while the pipe remains in service by traveling through the pipe, cleaning each joint surface, and installing a stainless-steel sleeve lined with an epoxy-impregnated felt across the joint. This approach will save considerable time and labor, avoid traffic disruption, and eliminate any requirement to interrupt service to customers (which would result in enormous expense to utilities). Technical challenges include: (1) repair sleeves must compensate for diametric variation and eccentricity of cast-iron pipes; (2) the assembly must travel long distances through pipes containing debris; (3) the pipe wall must be effectively cleaned in the immediate area of the joint to assure good bonding of the sleeve; and (4) an innovative bolt-on entry fitting is required to conduct repair operations on live mains. The development effort is divided into eleven tasks. Task 1--Program Management and Task 2--were completed in prior quarters while Task 3--Design and Fabricate Ratcheting Stainless-Steel Repair Sleeves has progressed to installing prototype sleeves in cast iron test pipe segments. Efforts in this quarter continued to focus on Tasks 4--8, with significant progress made in each. Task 4 (Design, Fabricate and Test Patch Setting Robotic Train) progressed to the design of the control electronics and pneumatic system to inflate the bladder robotic patch setting module. Task 5 (Design & Fabricate Pipe-Wall Cleaning Robot Train with Pan/Zoom/Tilt Camera) continued with additional in-pipe testing required to

  8. Conditional-likelihood approach to material decomposition in spectral absorption-based or phase-contrast CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baturin, Pavlo

    2015-03-01

    Material decomposition in absorption-based X-ray CT imaging suffers certain inefficiencies when differentiating among soft tissue materials. To address this problem, decomposition techniques turn to spectral CT, which has gained popularity over the last few years. Although proven to be more effective, such techniques are primarily limited to the identification of contrast agents and soft and bone-like materials. In this work, we introduce a novel conditional likelihood, material-decomposition method capable of identifying any type of material objects scanned by spectral CT. The method takes advantage of the statistical independence of spectral data to assign likelihood values to each of the materials on a pixel-by-pixel basis. It results in likelihood images for each material, which can be further processed by setting certain conditions or thresholds, to yield a final material-diagnostic image. The method can also utilize phase-contrast CT (PCI) data, where measured absorption and phase-shift information can be treated as statistically independent datasets. In this method, the following cases were simulated: (i) single-scan PCI CT, (ii) spectral PCI CT, (iii) absorption-based spectral CT, and (iv) single-scan PCI CT with an added tumor mass. All cases were analyzed using a digital breast phantom; although, any other objects or materials could be used instead. As a result, all materials were identified, as expected, according to their assignment in the digital phantom. Materials with similar attenuation or phase-shift values (e.g., glandular tissue, skin, and tumor masses) were especially successfully when differentiated by the likelihood approach.

  9. Effect of molybdenum, vanadium, boron on mechanical properties of high chromium white cast iron in as-cast condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurjaman, F.; Sumardi, S.; Shofi, A.; Aryati, M.; Suharno, B.

    2016-02-01

    In this experiment, the effect of the addition carbide forming elements on high chromium white cast iron, such as molybdenum, vanadium and boron on its mechanical properties and microstructure was investigated. The high chromium white cast iron was produced by casting process and formed in 50 mm size of grinding balls with several compositions. Characterization of these grinding balls was conducted by using some testing methods, such as: chemical and microstructure analysis, hardness, and impact test. From the results, the addition of molybdenum, vanadium, and boron on high chromium white cast iron provided a significant improvement on its hardness, but reduced its toughness. Molybdenum induced fully austenitic matrix and Mo2C formation among eutectic M7C3 carbide. Vanadium was dissolved in the matrix and carbide. While boron was played a role to form fine eutectic carbide. Grinding balls with 1.89 C-13.1 Cr-1.32 Mo-1.36 V-0.00051 B in as-cast condition had the highest hardness, which was caused by finer structure of eutectic carbide, needle like structure (upper bainite) matrix, and martensite on its carbide boundary.

  10. Role of secondary metabolites in the interaction between Pseudomonas fluorescens and soil microorganisms under iron-limited conditions.

    PubMed

    Deveau, Aurélie; Gross, Harald; Palin, Béatrice; Mehnaz, Samina; Schnepf, Max; Leblond, Pierre; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Aigle, Bertrand

    2016-08-01

    Microorganisms can be versatile in their interactions with each other, being variously beneficial, neutral or antagonistic in their effect. Although this versatility has been observed among many microorganisms and in many environments, little is known regarding the mechanisms leading to these changes in behavior. In the present work, we analyzed the mechanism by which the soil bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens BBc6R8 shifts from stimulating the growth of the ectomycorrhizal fungus Laccaria bicolor S238N to killing the fungus. We show that among the three secondary metabolites produced by the bacterial strain-the siderophores enantio-pyochelin and pyoverdine, and the biosurfactant viscosin-the siderophores are mainly responsible for the antagonistic activity of the bacterium under iron-limited conditions. While the bacterial strain continues to produce beneficial factors, their effects are overridden by the action of their siderophores. This antagonistic activity of the strain P. fluorescens BBC6R8 in iron-depleted environments is not restricted to its influence on L. bicolor, since it was also seen to inhibit the growth of the actinomycete Streptomyces ambofaciens ATCC23877. We show that the strain P. fluorescens BBc6R8 uses different strategies to acquire iron, depending on certain biotic and abiotic factors. PMID:27199346

  11. Doppler-broadened NICE-OHMS beyond the cavity-limited weak absorption condition - II: Experimental verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausmaninger, Thomas; Silander, Isak; Ma, Weiguang; Axner, Ove

    2016-01-01

    Doppler-broadened (Db) noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical heterodyne molecular spectrometry (NICE-OHMS) is normally described by an expression, here termed the conventional (CONV) description, that is restricted to the conventional cavity-limited weak absorption condition (CCLWA), i.e. when the single pass absorbance is significantly smaller than the empty cavity losses, i.e. when α0 L < < π / F. To describe NICE-OHMS signals beyond this limit two simplified extended descriptions (termed the extended locking and extended transmission description, ELET, and the extended locking and full transmission description, ELFT), which are assumed to be valid under the relaxed cavity-limited weak absorption condition (RCLWA), i.e. when α0 L < π / F, and a full description (denoted FULL), presumed to be valid also when the α0 L < π / F condition does not hold, have recently been derived in an accompanying work (Ma W, et al. Doppler-broadened NICE-OHMS beyond the cavity-limited weak absorption condition - I. Theoretical Description. J Quant Spectrosc Radiat Transfer, 2015, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jqsrt.2015.09.007). The present work constitutes an experimental verification and assessment of the validity of these, performed in the Doppler limit for a set of Fα0 L / π values (up to 3.5); it is shown under which conditions the various descriptions are valid. It is concluded that for samples with Fα0 L / π up to 0.01, all descriptions replicate the data well. It is shown that the CONV description is adequate and provides accurate assessments of the signal strength (and thereby the analyte concentration) up to Fα0 L / π of around 0.1, while the ELET is accurate for Fα0 L / π up to around 0.3. The ELFT description mimics the Db NICE-OHMS signal well for Fα0 L / π up to around unity, while the FULL description is adequate for all Fα0 L / π values investigated. Access to these descriptions both increases considerably the dynamic range of the technique and

  12. Simulations of iron K pre-edge X-ray absorption spectra using the restricted active space method.

    PubMed

    Guo, Meiyuan; Sørensen, Lasse Kragh; Delcey, Mickaël G; Pinjari, Rahul V; Lundberg, Marcus

    2016-01-28

    The intensities and relative energies of metal K pre-edge features are sensitive to both geometric and electronic structures. With the possibility to collect high-resolution spectral data it is important to find theoretical methods that include all important spectral effects: ligand-field splitting, multiplet structures, 3d-4p orbital hybridization, and charge-transfer excitations. Here the restricted active space (RAS) method is used for the first time to calculate metal K pre-edge spectra of open-shell systems, and its performance is tested against on six iron complexes: [FeCl6](n-), [FeCl4](n-), and [Fe(CN)6](n-) in ferrous and ferric oxidation states. The method gives good descriptions of the spectral shapes for all six systems. The mean absolute deviation for the relative energies of different peaks is only 0.1 eV. For the two systems that lack centrosymmetry [FeCl4](2-/1-), the ratios between dipole and quadrupole intensity contributions are reproduced with an error of 10%, which leads to good descriptions of the integrated pre-edge intensities. To gain further chemical insight, the origins of the pre-edge features have been analyzed with a chemically intuitive molecular orbital picture that serves as a bridge between the spectra and the electronic structures. The pre-edges contain information about both ligand-field strengths and orbital covalencies, which can be understood by analyzing the RAS wavefunction. The RAS method can thus be used to predict and rationalize the effects of changes in both the oxidation state and ligand environment in a number of hard X-ray studies of small and medium-sized molecular systems. PMID:26742851

  13. Real-time x-ray absorption spectroscopy of uranium, iron, and manganese in contaminated sediments during bioreduction

    SciTech Connect

    Tokunaga, Tetsu; Tokunaga, T.K.; Wan, J.; Kim, Y.; Sutton, S.R.; Newville, M.; Lanzirotti, A.; Rao, W.

    2008-01-15

    The oxidation status of uranium in sediments is important because the solubility of this toxic and radioactive element is much greater for U(VI) than for U(IV) species. Thus, redox manipulation to promote precipitation of UO{sub 2} is receiving interest as a method to remediate U-contaminated sediments. Presence of Fe and Mn oxides in sediments at much higher concentrations than U requires understanding of their redox status as well. This study was conducted to determine changes in oxidation states of U, Fe, and Mn in U-contaminated sediments from Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Oxidation states of these elements were measured in real-time and nondestructively using X-ray absorption spectroscopy, on sediment columns supplied with synthetic groundwater containing organic carbon (OC, 0, 3, 10, 30 and 100 mM OC as lactate) for over 400 days. In sediments supplied with OC {ge} 30 mM, 80% of the U was reduced to U(IV), with transient reoxidation at about 150 days. Mn(III,IV) oxides were completely reduced to Mn(II) in sediments infused with OC {ge} 3 mM. However, Fe remained largely unreduced in all sediment columns, showing that Fe(III) can persist as an electron acceptor in reducing sediments over long times. This result in combination with the complete reduction of all other potential electron acceptors supports the hypothesis that the reactive Fe(III) fraction was responsible for reoxidizing U(IV).

  14. Laboratory evaluation of microwave absorption properties under simulated conditions for planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, P. G.

    1984-01-01

    The microwave absorbing properties of gaseous sulfuric acid (H2SO4) under Venus atmospheric conditions are investigated. The results are applied to measurements from Mariner 5, Mariner 10, and Pioneer/Venus Radio Occultation experiments, to determine abundancies of gaseous sulfuric acid in the Venus atmosphere. The microwave properties of the vapors accompanying liquid H2SO4 are studied to estimate the vapor pressure in an atmospheric model.

  15. Study on the solidification condition of exudation penetration occurrence in grey cast iron castings based on solidification simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jianmin; Hansen, S. F.

    2000-11-01

    The solidification condition of eutectic exudation penetration occurrence, a kind of casting defect in grey cast-iron castings, is studied with computer solidification simulation and experiments on specially designed castings. A hot hole refers to the solidification condition when the temperature gradient or solidifying time gradient from the centre to the surface at some location in a casting is positive during the solidification process. It is a term proposed in this paper to better describe the condition of exudation penetration occurrence and for predicting its location at hot spots in a casting. The term is useful for improving the foundry technology used for solving the penetration problem with the help of computer simulation.

  16. Monosaccharide absorption activity of Arabidopsis roots depends on expression profiles of transporter genes under high salinity conditions.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Kohji; Kanai, Motoki; Osakabe, Yuriko; Ohiraki, Haruka; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko

    2011-12-16

    Plant roots are able to absorb sugars from the rhizosphere but also release sugars and other metabolites that are critical for growth and environmental signaling. Reabsorption of released sugar molecules could help reduce the loss of photosynthetically fixed carbon through the roots. Although biochemical analyses have revealed monosaccharide uptake mechanisms in roots, the transporters that are involved in this process have not yet been fully characterized. In the present study we demonstrate that Arabidopsis STP1 and STP13 play important roles in roots during the absorption of monosaccharides from the rhizosphere. Among 14 STP transporter genes, we found that STP1 had the highest transcript level and that STP1 was a major contributor for monosaccharide uptake under normal conditions. In contrast, STP13 was found to be induced by abiotic stress, with low expression under normal conditions. We analyzed the role of STP13 in roots under high salinity conditions where membranes of the epidermal cells were damaged, and we detected an increase in the amount of STP13-dependent glucose uptake. Furthermore, the amount of glucose efflux from stp13 mutants was higher than that from wild type plants under high salinity conditions. These results indicate that STP13 can reabsorb the monosaccharides that are released by damaged cells under high salinity conditions. Overall, our data indicate that sugar uptake capacity in Arabidopsis roots changes in response to environmental stresses and that this activity is dependent on the expression pattern of sugar transporters. PMID:22041897

  17. Convection induced by selective absorption of radiation: A laboratory model of conditional instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamurti, Ruby

    1998-01-01

    When there is internal heating in a fluid layer, convection can occur even if the static state is one of stable stratification. We have been investigating through laboratory experiments such a stably stratified layer of water which is heated above and cooled below. The water contains in dilute solution thymol blue (a pH indicator), which normally colors the water orange. It turns yellow if the pH is low, blue if the pH is high. A small DC voltage is applied across the layer, by using the bottom boundary as the positive electrode, the top boundary as the negative electrode. The hydroxyl ions formed near the bottom boundary cause the orange fluid to turn blue. The fluid layer is uniformly and steadily illuminated from above with light from a sodium vapor lamp. This radiation travels with negligible absorption through the orange fluid but is strongly absorbed by the blue fluid. The resultant warming of the blue fluid can lead to convective instability, with the blue fluid rising into warm upper layers, which it would continue to penetrate as long as it remains blue and as long as the radiative heating is sufficient to exceed the higher ambient temperatures above. This radiative heating occurs only in the blue rising flow; the sinking fluid is orange and is not heated. We have found that with a strongly stably stratified layer, convective plumes are unable to penetrate far and they remain shallow. However, for a weakly stratified layer, plumes grow tall and furthermore collect into a large convective cluster which persists as a steady coherent structure. The present paper deals also with the formulation of the governing equations to include the fluid-state-dependent heat source. A linear stability analysis shows that the critical Rayleigh number for onset of motion is drastically reduced. Furthermore, the cell size at onset is larger by a factor of √ 3/2 than in the classical Rayleigh-Benard convection problem. However, the laboratory fluid cells were much further

  18. Vibrational, X-ray absorption, and Mössbauer spectra of sulfate minerals from the weathered massive sulfide deposit at Iron Mountain, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Majzlan, Juraj; Alpers, Charles N.; Bender Koch, Christian; McCleskey, R. Blaine; Myneni, Satish B.C.; Neil, John M.

    2014-01-01

    The Iron Mountain Mine Superfund site in California is a prime example of an acid mine drainage (AMD) system with well developed assemblages of sulfate minerals typical for such settings. Here we present and discuss the vibrational (infrared), X-ray absorption, and Mössbauer spectra of a number of these phases, augmented by spectra of a few synthetic sulfates related to the AMD phases. The minerals and related phases studied in this work are (in order of increasing Fe2O3/FeO): szomolnokite, rozenite, siderotil, halotrichite, römerite, voltaite, copiapite, monoclinic Fe2(SO4)3, Fe2(SO4)3·5H2O, kornelite, coquimbite, Fe(SO4)(OH), jarosite and rhomboclase. Fourier transform infrared spectra in the region 750–4000 cm−1 are presented for all studied phases. Position of the FTIR bands is discussed in terms of the vibrations of sulfate ions, hydroxyl groups, and water molecules. Sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectra were collected for selected samples. The feature of greatest interest is a series of weak pre-edge peaks whose position is determined by the number of bridging oxygen atoms between Fe3+ octahedra and sulfate tetrahedra. Mössbauer spectra of selected samples were obtained at room temperature and 80 K for ferric minerals jarosite and rhomboclase and mixed ferric–ferrous minerals römerite, voltaite, and copiapite. Values of Fe2+/[Fe2+ + Fe3+] determined by Mössbauer spectroscopy agree well with those determined by wet chemical analysis. The data presented here can be used as standards in spectroscopic work where spectra of well-characterized compounds are required to identify complex mixtures of minerals and related phases.

  19. Vibrational, X-ray absorption, and Mössbauer spectra of sulfate minerals from the weathered massive sulfide deposit at Iron Mountain, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Majzlan, Juraj; Alpers, Charles N.; Bender Koch, Christian; McCleskey, R. Blaine; Myneni, Satish B.C.; Neil, John M.

    2011-01-01

    The Iron Mountain Mine Superfund site in California is a prime example of an acid mine drainage (AMD) system with well developed assemblages of sulfate minerals typical for such settings. Here we present and discuss the vibrational (infrared), X-ray absorption, and M??ssbauer spectra of a number of these phases, augmented by spectra of a few synthetic sulfates related to the AMD phases. The minerals and related phases studied in this work are (in order of increasing Fe2O3/FeO): szomolnokite, rozenite, siderotil, halotrichite, r??merite, voltaite, copiapite, monoclinic Fe2(SO4)3, Fe2(SO4)3??5H2O, kornelite, coquimbite, Fe(SO4)(OH), jarosite and rhomboclase. Fourier transform infrared spectra in the region 750-4000cm-1 are presented for all studied phases. Position of the FTIR bands is discussed in terms of the vibrations of sulfate ions, hydroxyl groups, and water molecules. Sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectra were collected for selected samples. The feature of greatest interest is a series of weak pre-edge peaks whose position is determined by the number of bridging oxygen atoms between Fe3+ octahedra and sulfate tetrahedra. M??ssbauer spectra of selected samples were obtained at room temperature and 80K for ferric minerals jarosite and rhomboclase and mixed ferric-ferrous minerals r??merite, voltaite, and copiapite. Values of Fe2+/[Fe2++Fe3+] determined by M??ssbauer spectroscopy agree well with those determined by wet chemical analysis. The data presented here can be used as standards in spectroscopic work where spectra of well-characterized compounds are required to identify complex mixtures of minerals and related phases. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  20. SEALING LARGE-DIAMETER CAST-IRON PIPE JOINTS UNDER LIVE CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kiran M. Kothari, Gerard T. Pittard

    2004-01-01

    Utilities in the U.S. operate over 75,000 km (47,000 miles) of old cast-iron pipes for gas distribution. The bell-and-spigot joints that connect pipe sections together tend to leak as these pipes age. Current repair practices are costly and highly disruptive. The objective of this program is to design, test and commercialize a robotic system capable of sealing multiple cast iron bell and spigot joints from a single pipe entry point. The proposed system will perform repairs while the pipe remains in service by traveling through the pipe, cleaning each joint surface, and installing a stainless-steel sleeve lined with an epoxy-impregnated felt across the joint. This approach will save considerable time and labor, avoid traffic disruption, and eliminate any requirement to interrupt service to customers (which would result in enormous expense to utilities). Technical challenges include: (1) repair sleeves must compensate for diametric variation and eccentricity of cast-iron pipes; (2) the assembly must travel long distances through pipes containing debris; (3) the pipe wall must be effectively cleaned in the immediate area of the joint to assure good bonding of the sleeve; and (4) an innovative bolt-on entry fitting is required to conduct repair operations on live mains. The development effort is divided into eleven tasks. Task 1--Program Management and Task 2--were completed in prior quarters while Task 3--Design and Fabricate Ratcheting Stainless-Steel Repair Sleeves has progressed to installing prototype sleeves in cast iron test pipe segments. Efforts in this quarter continued to focus on Tasks 4--8, with significant progress made in each. Task 4 (Design, Fabricate and Test Patch Setting Robotic Train) progressed to the design of the control electronics and pneumatic system to inflate the bladder robotic patch setting module. Task 5 (Design & Fabricate Pipe-Wall Cleaning Robot Train with Pan/Zoom/Tilt Camera) continued with additional in-pipe testing required to

  1. SEALING LARGE-DIAMETER CAST-IRON PIPE JOINTS UNDER LIVE CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kiran M Kothari; Gerard T. Pittard

    2004-07-01

    Utilities in the U.S. operate over 75,000 km (47,000 miles) of old cast-iron pipes for gas distribution. The bell-and-spigot joints that connect pipe sections together tend to leak as these pipes age. Current repair practices are costly and highly disruptive. The objective of this program is to design, test and commercialize a robotic system capable of sealing multiple castiron bell and spigot joints from a single pipe entry point. The proposed system will perform repairs while the pipe remains in service by traveling through the pipe, cleaning each joint surface, and installing a stainless-steel sleeve lined with an epoxy-impregnated felt across the joint. This approach will save considerable time and labor, avoid traffic disruption, and eliminate any requirement to interrupt service to customers (which would result in enormous expense to utilities). Technical challenges include: (1) repair sleeves must compensate for diametric variation and eccentricity of cast-iron pipes; (2) the assembly must travel long distances through pipes containing debris; (3) the pipe wall must be effectively cleaned in the immediate area of the joint to assure good bonding of the sleeve; and (4) an innovative bolt-on entry fitting is required to conduct repair operations on live mains. The development effort is divided into eleven tasks. Task 1 (Program Management) and Task 2 (Establishment of Detailed Design Specifications) were completed in prior quarters while Task 3 (Design and Fabricate Ratcheting Stainless-Steel Repair Sleeves) has progressed to installing prototype sleeves in cast iron test pipe segments. Efforts in this quarter continued to focus on Tasks 4-8, with significant progress made in each. Task 4 (Design, Fabricate and Test Patch Setting Robotic Train) progressed to the design of the control electronics and pneumatic system to inflate the bladder robotic patch setting module. Task 5 (Design & Fabricate Pipe-Wall Cleaning Robot Train with Pan/Zoom/Tilt Camera

  2. Structural Analysis of Shipping Casks, Vol. 9. Energy Absorption Capabilities of Plastically Deformed Struts Under Specified Impact Loading Conditions (Thesis)

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, F.C.

    2001-02-19

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the energy absorption characteristics of plastically deformed inclined struts under impact loading. This information is needed to provide a usable method by which designers and analysts of shipping casks for radioactive or fissile materials can determine the energy absorption capabilities of external longitudinal fins on cylindrical casks under specified impact conditions. A survey of technical literature related to experimental determination of the dynamic plastic behavior of struts revealed no information directly applicable to the immediate problem, especially in the impact velocity ranges desired, and an experimental program was conducted to obtain the needed data. Mild-steel struts with rectangular cross sections were impacted by free-falling weights dropped from known heights. These struts or fin specimens were inclined at five different angles to simulate different angles of impact that fins on a shipping cask could experience under certain accident conditions. The resisting force of the deforming strut was measured and recorded as a function of time by using load cells instrumented with resistance strain gage bridges, signal conditioning equipment, an oscilloscope, and a Polaroid camera. The acceleration of the impacting weight was measured and recorded as a function of time during the latter portion of the testing program by using an accelerometer attached to the drop hammer, appropriate signal conditioning equipment, the oscilloscope, and the camera. A digital computer program was prepared to numerically integrate the force-time and acceleration-time data recorded during the tests to obtain deformation-time data. The force-displacement relationships were then integrated to obtain values of absorbed energy with respect to deformation or time. The results for various fin specimen geometries and impact angles are presented graphically, and these curves may be used to compute the energy absorption capacity of

  3. Calcite precipitation dominates the electrical signatures of zero valent iron columns under simulated field conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Yuxin Wu; Roelof Versteeg; Lee Slater; Doug Labrecque

    2009-05-01

    Calcium carbonate is a major secondary mineral precipitate that influences PRB reactivity and hydraulic performance. In this study, we conducted column experiments to investigate electrical signatures resulting from concurrent CaCO3 and iron oxides precipitation in two simulated PRB media. Solid phase analysis identified CaCO3 (calcite and aragonite) as a major mineral phase throughout the columns, with magnetite being another major phase present close to the influent. Electrical measurements revealed a consistent decrease in conductivity and polarization magnitude of both columns, suggesting that the electrically insulating CaCO3 dominates the electrical response despite the presence of both electrically conductive iron oxides and CaCO3 precipitates. SEM/EDX imaging suggests that the electrical properties result from the geometrical arrangement of the mineral phases. The CaCO3 forms an insulating film on ZVI/magnetite surfaces, which we assume restricts redox-driven transfer of electric charge between the pore electrolyte and ZVI particles, as well as across interconnected ZVI particles. As surface reactivity also depends on the ability of the surface to engage in redox reactions, electrical measurements may provide a minimally invasive technology for monitoring reactivity loss.

  4. SEALING LARGE-DIAMETER CAST-IRON PIPE JOINTS UNDER LIVE CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kiran M. Kothari; Gerard T. Pittard

    2005-07-01

    Utilities in the U.S. operate over 75,000 km (47,000 miles) of old cast-iron pipes for gas distribution. Bell-and-spigot joints that connect pipe sections together tend to leak as these pipes age. Current repair practices are costly and highly disruptive. The objective of this program is to design, test and commercialize a robotic system capable of sealing multiple castiron bell and spigot joints from a single pipe entry point. The proposed system will perform repairs with the pipe in service by traveling through the pipe, cleaning each joint surface, and installing a stainless-steel sleeve lined with an epoxy-impregnated felt across the joint. This approach will save considerable time and labor, minimize excavation, avoid traffic disruption, and eliminate any requirement to interrupt service to customers (which would result in enormous expense to utilities). Technical challenges include: (1) repair sleeves must compensate for diametric variation and eccentricity of old cast-iron pipes; (2) the assembly must travel long distances through pipes containing debris; (3) the pipe wall must be effectively cleaned in the immediate area of the joint to assure good bonding of the sleeve; and (4) an innovative bolt-on entry fitting is required to conduct safe repair operations on live mains.

  5. Application of zero-valent iron nanoparticles for the removal of aqueous zinc ions under various experimental conditions.

    PubMed

    Liang, Wen; Dai, Chaomeng; Zhou, Xuefei; Zhang, Yalei

    2014-01-01

    Application of zero-valent iron nanoparticles (nZVI) for Zn²⁺ removal and its mechanism were discussed. It demonstrated that the uptake of Zn²⁺ by nZVI was efficient. With the solids concentration of 1 g/L nZVI, more than 85% of Zn²⁺ could be removed within 2 h. The pH value and dissolved oxygen (DO) were the important factors of Zn²⁺ removal by nZVI. The DO enhanced the removal efficiency of Zn²⁺. Under the oxygen-contained condition, oxygen corrosion gave the nZVI surface a shell of iron (oxy)hydroxide, which could show high adsorption affinity. The removal efficiency of Zn²⁺ increased with the increasing of the pH. Acidic condition reduced the removal efficiency of Zn²⁺ by nZVI because the existing H⁺ inhibited the formation of iron (oxy)hydroxide. Adsorption and co-precipitation were the most likely mechanism of Zn²⁺ removal by nZVI. The FeOOH-shell could enhance the adsorption efficiency of nZVI. The removal efficiency and selectivity of nZVI particles for Zn²⁺ were higher than Cd²⁺. Furthermore, a continuous flow reactor for engineering application of nZVI was designed and exhibited high removal efficiency for Zn²⁺. PMID:24416439

  6. Occupancy of the iron binding sites of human transferrin.

    PubMed Central

    Huebers, H A; Josephson, B; Huebers, E; Csiba, E; Finch, C A

    1984-01-01

    The in vivo distribution of iron between the binding sites of transferrin was examined. Plasma was obtained from normal subjects under basal conditions and after in vitro and in vivo iron loading. Independent methods, including measurement of the transferrin profile after isoelectric focusing and cross immunoelectrophoresis, and determination of the iron content in the separated fractions were in agreement that there was a random distribution of iron on binding sites. This held true with in vitro loading, when iron was increased by intestinal absorption and with loading from the reticuloendothelial system. The data indicate that the distribution of apo-, monoferric, and diferric transferrins is predictable on the basis of the plasma transferrin saturation and negate the concept that iron loading of transferrin in vitro is a selective process with possible functional consequences in tissue iron delivery. PMID:6589596

  7. Uranium immobilization in an iron-rich rhizosphere of a native wetland plant from the Savannah River Site under reducing conditions.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hyun-shik; Buettner, Shea W; Seaman, John C; Jaffé, Peter R; van Groos, Paul G Koster; Li, Dien; Peacock, Aaron D; Scheckel, Kirk G; Kaplan, Daniel I

    2014-08-19

    The hypothesis of this study was that iron plaques formed on the roots of wetland plants and their rhizospheres create environmental conditions favorable for iron reducing bacteria that promote the in situ immobilization of uranium. Greenhouse microcosm studies were conducted using native plants (Sparganium americanum) from a wetland located on the Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC. After iron plaques were established during a 73-day period by using an anoxic Fe(II)-rich nutrient solution, a U(VI) amended nutrient solution was added to the system for an additional two months. Compared to plant-free control microcosms, microcosms containing iron plaques successfully stimulated the growth of targeted iron reducing bacteria, Geobacter spp. Their population continuously increased after the introduction of the U(VI) nutrient solution. The reduction of some of the U(VI) to U(IV) by iron reducing bacteria was deduced based on the observations that the aqueous Fe(II) concentrations increased while the U(VI) concentrations decreased. The Fe(II) produced by the iron reducing bacteria was assumed to be reoxidized by the oxygen released from the roots. Advanced spectroscopic analyses revealed that a significant fraction of the U(VI) had been reduced to U(IV) and they were commonly deposited in association with phosphorus on the iron plaque. PMID:25051143

  8. SEALING LARGE-DIAMETER CAST-IRON PIPE JOINTS UNDER LIVE CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kiran M. Kothari; Gerard T. Pittard

    2005-04-01

    Utilities in the U.S. operate over 75,000 km (47,000 miles) of old cast-iron pipes for gas distribution. The bell-and-spigot joints that connect pipe sections together tend to leak as these pipes age. Current repair practices are costly and highly disruptive. The objective of this program is to design, test and commercialize a robotic system capable of sealing multiple cast-iron bell and spigot joints from a single pipe entry point. The proposed system will perform repairs while the pipe remains in service by traveling through the pipe, cleaning each joint surface, and installing a stainless-steel sleeve lined with an epoxy-impregnated felt across the joint. This approach will save considerable time and labor, avoid traffic disruption, and eliminate any requirement to interrupt service to customers (which would result in enormous expense to utilities). Technical challenges include: (1) repair sleeves must compensate for diametric variation and eccentricity of old cast-iron pipes; (2) the assembly must travel long distances through pipes containing debris; (3) the pipe wall must be effectively cleaned in the immediate area of the joint to assure good bonding of the sleeve; and (4) an innovative bolt-on entry fitting is required to conduct repair operations on live mains. The development effort is divided into eleven tasks. Task 1 (Program Management) and Task 2 (Establishment of Detailed Design Specifications) were completed previously. Task 3 (Design and Fabricate Ratcheting Stainless-Steel Repair Sleeves) has progressed to installing prototype sleeves in test cast-iron pipe segments. Efforts in the current quarter continued to be focused on Tasks 4-8. Highly valuable lessons were learned from field tests of the 4-inch gas pipe repair robot in cast-iron pipe at Public Service Electric & Gas. (These field tests were conducted and reported previously.) Several design issues were identified which need to be implemented in both the small- and large-diameter repair

  9. SEALING LARGE-DIAMETER CAST-IRON PIPE JOINTS UNDER LIVE CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kiran M. Kothari; Gerard T. Pittard

    2005-01-01

    Utilities in the U.S. operate over 75,000 km (47,000 miles) of old cast-iron pipes for gas distribution. The bell-and-spigot joints that connect pipe sections together tend to leak as these pipes age. Current repair practices are costly and highly disruptive. The objective of this program is to design, test and commercialize a robotic system capable of sealing multiple cast-iron bell and spigot joints from a single pipe entry point. The proposed system will perform repairs while the pipe remains in service by traveling through the pipe, cleaning each joint surface, and installing a stainless-steel sleeve lined with an epoxy-impregnated felt across the joint. This approach will save considerable time and labor, avoid traffic disruption, and eliminate any requirement to interrupt service to customers (which would result in enormous expense to utilities). Technical challenges include: (1) repair sleeves must compensate for diametric variation and eccentricity of cast-iron pipes; (2) the assembly must travel long distances through pipes containing debris; (3) the pipe wall must be effectively cleaned in the immediate area of the joint to assure good bonding of the sleeve; and (4) an innovative bolt-on entry fitting is required to conduct repair operations on live mains. The development effort is divided into eleven tasks. Task 1 (Program Management) and Task 2 (Establishment of Detailed Design Specifications) were completed in prior quarters while Task 3 (Design and Fabricate Ratcheting Stainless-Steel Repair Sleeves) has progressed to installing prototype sleeves in cast-iron test pipe segments. Efforts in the current quarter continued to focus on Tasks 4-8. Highly valuable lessons were learned from field tests of the 4-inch gas pipe repair robot in cast-iron pipe at Public Service Electric & Gas. (These field tests were conducted and reported last quarter.) These tests identified several design issues which need to be implemented in both the small- and large

  10. Oxidation state of the lower mantle: In situ observations of the iron electronic configuration in bridgmanite at extreme conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupenko, I.; McCammon, C.; Sinmyo, R.; Cerantola, V.; Potapkin, V.; Chumakov, A. I.; Kantor, A.; Rüffer, R.; Dubrovinsky, L.

    2015-08-01

    We have investigated the electronic configuration of iron in Fe-, Al-containing magnesium silicate perovskite, i.e., bridgmanite, the main component of the lower mantle, at conditions of the deep Earth's interior using the energy domain Synchrotron Mössbauer Source technique. We show that the high ferric iron content observed previously in quenched samples is preserved at high temperatures and high pressures. Our data are consistent with high-spin to intermediate-spin (HS-IS) crossover in Fe2+ at high pressures and ambient temperature. We see no evidence of spin crossover in Fe3+ occupying the A-position of bridgmanite. On laser heating at pressures above ∼40 GPa we observe a new doublet with relative area below 5% which is assigned to Fe3+ in the octahedral (B-site) position in bridgmanite. We conclude that at lower mantle conditions Fe3+ remains predominantly in the HS state, while Fe2+ occurs solely in the IS state.

  11. Conditional knockout of the Slc5a6 gene in mouse intestine impairs biotin absorption

    PubMed Central

    Ghosal, Abhisek; Lambrecht, Nils; Subramanya, Sandeep B.; Kapadia, Rubina

    2013-01-01

    The Slc5a6 gene expresses a plasma membrane protein involved in the transport of the water-soluble vitamin biotin; the transporter is commonly referred to as the sodium-dependent multivitamin transporter (SMVT) because it also transports pantothenic acid and lipoic acid. The relative contribution of the SMVT system toward carrier-mediated biotin uptake in the native intestine in vivo has not been established. We used a Cre/lox technology to generate an intestine-specific (conditional) SMVT knockout (KO) mouse model to address this issue. The KO mice exhibited absence of expression of SMVT in the intestine compared with sex-matched littermates as well as the expected normal SMVT expression in other tissues. About two-thirds of the KO mice died prematurely between the age of 6 and 10 wk. Growth retardation, decreased bone density, decreased bone length, and decreased biotin status were observed in the KO mice. Microscopic analysis showed histological abnormalities in the small bowel (shortened villi, dysplasia) and cecum (chronic active inflammation, dysplasia) of the KO mice. In vivo (and in vitro) transport studies showed complete inhibition in carrier-mediated biotin uptake in the intestine of the KO mice compared with their control littermates. These studies provide the first in vivo confirmation in native intestine that SMVT is solely responsible for intestinal biotin uptake. These studies also provide evidence for a casual association between SMVT function and normal intestinal health. PMID:23104561

  12. Insights on fission products behaviour in nuclear severe accident conditions by X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiger, E.; Bès, R.; Martin, Ph; Pontillon, Y.; Ducros, G.; Solari, P. L.

    2016-04-01

    Many research programs have been carried out aiming to understand the fission products behaviour during a Nuclear Severe Accident. Most of these programs used highly radioactive irradiated nuclear fuel, which requires complex instrumentation. Moreover, the radioactive character of samples hinders an accurate chemical characterisation. In order to overcome these difficulties, SIMFUEL stand out as an alternative to perform complementary tests. A sample made of UO2 doped with 11 fission products was submitted to an annealing test up to 1973 K in reducing atmosphere. The sample was characterized before and after the annealing test using SEM-EDS and XAS at the MARS beam-line, SOLEIL Synchrotron. It was found that the overall behaviour of several fission products (such as Mo, Ba, Pd and Ru) was similar to that observed experimentally in irradiated fuels and consistent with thermodynamic estimations. The experimental approach presented in this work has allowed obtaining information on chemical phases evolution under nuclear severe accident conditions, that are yet difficult to obtain using irradiated nuclear fuel samples.

  13. Insights on fission products behaviour in nuclear severe accident conditions by X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiger, E.; Bès, R.; Martin, Ph; Pontillon, Y.; Ducros, G.; Solari, P. L.

    2016-04-01

    Many research programs have been carried out aiming to understand the fission products behaviour during a Nuclear Severe Accident. Most of these programs used highly radioactive irradiated nuclear fuel, which requires complex instrumentation. Moreover, the radioactive character of samples hinders an accurate chemical characterisation. In order to overcome these difficulties, SIMFUEL stand out as an alternative to perform complementary tests. A sample made of UO2 doped with 11 fission products was submitted to an annealing test up to 1973 K in reducing atmosphere. The sample was characterized before and after the annealing test using SEM-EDS and XAS at the MARS beam-line, SOLEIL Synchrotron. It was found that the overall behaviour of several fission products (such as Mo, Ba, Pd and Ru) was similar to that observed experimentally in irradiated fuels and consistent with thermodynamic estimations. The experimental approach presented in this work has allowed obtaining information on chemical phases evolution under nuclear severe accident conditions, that are yet difficult to obtain using irradiated nuclear fuel samples.

  14. Laboratory Measurements of the Millimeter-Wavelength Sulfur Dioxide Absorption Spectrum under Simulated Venus Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellotti, Amadeo; Steffes, Paul G.

    2014-11-01

    Over 130 laboratory measurements of the 2-4 millimeter wavelength opacity of sulfur dioxide in a carbon dioxide atmosphere under simulated conditions for the upper Venus troposphere (temperatures between 308-343 K and pressures between 0.03- 2 bar) have been made. These measurements along with the centimeter wavelength measurements by Steffes et al. (Icarus, 2014, in press) have been used to empirically assess existing formalisms for sulfur dioxide opacity in a carbon dioxide atmosphere (Fahd and Steffes Icarus 97, 1992 and Suleiman et al. JGR 101, E2 1996). The Van Vleck and Weisskopf Model (VVW) used by Fahd and Steffes with the JPL rotational line catalog (Pickett, et al. JQSRT 60, 1998) was found to fit 85.88% of all 500 measurements within the 2-sigma uncertainty. This model was implemented in the new Georgia Tech Venus Radiative Transfer Model (GT-VRTM) which is capable of computing both disk-averaged and localized brightness temperatures of Venus. These are compared to observations. This work will improve retrievals of the atmospheric abundance of sulfur dioxide from observations of the Venus atmosphere. This work was supported by the NASA Planetary Atmospheres Program under Grant NNX11AD66G.

  15. The millimeter-wavelength sulfur dioxide absorption spectra measured under simulated Venus conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellotti, Amadeo; Steffes, Paul G.

    2015-07-01

    Over 130 laboratory measurements of the 2-4 mm wavelength opacity of sulfur dioxide in a carbon dioxide atmosphere under simulated conditions for the upper Venus troposphere (temperatures between 308 and 343 K and pressures between 0.03 and 2 bar) have been made. These measurements along with the centimeter wavelength measurements by Steffes et al. (Steffes, P.G. et al. [2015]. Icarus 245, 153-161) have been used to empirically assess existing formalisms for sulfur dioxide opacity in a carbon dioxide atmosphere (Fahd, A.K., Steffes, P.G. [1992]. Icarus 97(2), 200-210; Suleiman, S.H. et al. [1996]. J. Geophys. Res.: Planets 101(E2), 4623-4635). The Van Vleck and Weisskopf Model (VVW) used by Fahd and Steffes with the JPL rotational line catalog (Pickett, H. et al. [1998]. J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transfer 60(5), 499-890) was found to fit 85.88% of all 500 measurements within the 2-sigma uncertainty. This work will improve the confidence in retrievals of the atmospheric abundance of sulfur dioxide from millimeter-wavelength observations of the Venus atmosphere.

  16. First-principles Exploration of Crystal Structures of Pure Iron at Earth’s Inner Core Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, T.; Tsuchiya, T.; Tsuchiya, J.

    2009-12-01

    Determining the structure of Earth’s inner core has been a long standing challenge for geoscience. Iron has been considered as a main composition of the inner core and expected to exist as an iron-nickel-light elements alloy there. In order to get some information about the structure of the inner core, pure iron has been also investigated by many experimental and ab-initio studies. Pure iron has been expected to take the hexagonal close-packed (hcp) structure at the inner core conditions (Jephcoat and Olson, Nature 325, 332-335, 1987.; Mao et al., Nature 396, 741-743, 1998.; Fiquet et al., Science 291, 468-471, 2001.; Uchida et al., J. Geophys. Res. 106, 21799-21810, 2001.). On the other hand, the face-centered cubic (fcc) structure (Mikhaylushkin et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 165505-165508, 2007.) and the body-centered cubic structure (Vocadlo et al., Phys. Earth Planet In. 170, 52-59, 2008.) have been also considered as the candidate structures. In this study, first we explored the crystal structures of pure iron at 400 GPa by our originally developing algorithm for the structure exploration, Free Energy Surface Trekking (FEST). In FEST, using a minus sign of driving force acting on a simulation cell, we force a system to climb up to a ridge of a free energy surface (ascent-run). Then, flipping the negative driving force to an original one, we make the system go down to a neighboring potential well (descent-run). The more different directions we examine in the ascent-run, the more accurate topography we capture of free energy surface. For the exploration of the ultrahigh-pressure structures of pure iron, we used 16 atoms supercell and explored 64 pathways around the initial local minimum corresponding to hcp. As the result, 30 pathways lead to a complex hcp (chcp) structure, which has ABCACABCBCAB stacking with 12 layers. Other 33 pathways lead to hcp and 1 pathway fcc. The enthalpy of chcp was found higher than that of hcp but only by 4 mRy/atom and lower than

  17. Effect of carbon decoration on the absorption of 〈 100 〉 dislocation loops by dislocations in iron.

    PubMed

    Terentyev, D; Bakaev, A; Zhurkin, E E

    2014-04-23

    This work closes a series of molecular dynamics studies addressing how solute/interstitial segregation at dislocation loops affects their interaction with moving dislocations in body-centred cubic Fe-based alloys. We consider the interaction of 〈 100 〉 interstitial dislocation loops decorated by different numbers of carbon atoms in a wide temperature range. The results reveal clearly that the decoration affects the reaction mechanism and increases the unpinning stress, in general. The most pronounced and reproducible increase of the unpinning stress is found in the intermediate temperature range from 300 up to 600 K. The carbon-decoration effect is related to the modification of the loop-dislocation reaction and its importance at the technologically relevant neutron irradiation conditions is discussed. PMID:24691268

  18. New developments and controversies in iron metabolism and iron chelation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kontoghiorghe, Christina N; Kontoghiorghes, George J

    2016-01-01

    Iron is essential for all organisms including microbial, cancer and human cells. More than a quarter of the human population is affected by abnormalities of iron metabolism, mainly from iron deficiency and iron overload. Iron also plays an important role in free radical pathology and oxidative damage which is observed in almost all major diseases, cancer and ageing. New developments include the complete treatment of iron overload and reduction of morbidity and mortality in thalassaemia using deferiprone and selected deferiprone/deferoxamine combinations and also the use of the maltol iron complex in the treatment of iron deficiency anaemia. There is also a prospect of using deferiprone as a universal antioxidant in non iron overloaded diseases such as neurodegenerative, cardiovascular, renal, infectious diseases and cancer. New regulatory molecules of iron metabolism such as endogenous and dietary chelating molecules, hepcidin, mitochondrial ferritin and their role in health and disease is under evaluation. Similarly, new mechanisms of iron deposition, removal, distribution and toxicity have been identified using new techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging increasing our understanding of iron metabolic processes and the targeted treatment of related diseases. The uniform distribution of iron in iron overload between organs and within each organ is no longer valid. Several other controversies such as the toxicity impact of non transferrin bound iron vs injected iron, the excess levels of iron in tissues causing toxicity and the role of chelation on iron absorption need further investigation. Commercial interests of pharmaceutical companies and connections to leading journals are playing a crucial role in shaping worldwide medical opinion on drug sales and use but also patients’ therapeutic outcome and safety. Major controversies include the selection criteria and risk/benefit assessment in the use of deferasirox in thalassaemia and more so in idiopathic

  19. New developments and controversies in iron metabolism and iron chelation therapy.

    PubMed

    Kontoghiorghe, Christina N; Kontoghiorghes, George J

    2016-03-26

    Iron is essential for all organisms including microbial, cancer and human cells. More than a quarter of the human population is affected by abnormalities of iron metabolism, mainly from iron deficiency and iron overload. Iron also plays an important role in free radical pathology and oxidative damage which is observed in almost all major diseases, cancer and ageing. New developments include the complete treatment of iron overload and reduction of morbidity and mortality in thalassaemia using deferiprone and selected deferiprone/deferoxamine combinations and also the use of the maltol iron complex in the treatment of iron deficiency anaemia. There is also a prospect of using deferiprone as a universal antioxidant in non iron overloaded diseases such as neurodegenerative, cardiovascular, renal, infectious diseases and cancer. New regulatory molecules of iron metabolism such as endogenous and dietary chelating molecules, hepcidin, mitochondrial ferritin and their role in health and disease is under evaluation. Similarly, new mechanisms of iron deposition, removal, distribution and toxicity have been identified using new techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging increasing our understanding of iron metabolic processes and the targeted treatment of related diseases. The uniform distribution of iron in iron overload between organs and within each organ is no longer valid. Several other controversies such as the toxicity impact of non transferrin bound iron vs injected iron, the excess levels of iron in tissues causing toxicity and the role of chelation on iron absorption need further investigation. Commercial interests of pharmaceutical companies and connections to leading journals are playing a crucial role in shaping worldwide medical opinion on drug sales and use but also patients' therapeutic outcome and safety. Major controversies include the selection criteria and risk/benefit assessment in the use of deferasirox in thalassaemia and more so in idiopathic

  20. Inhibition of iron-induced lipid peroxidation by newly identified bacterial carotenoids in model gastric conditions: comparison with common carotenoids.

    PubMed

    Sy, Charlotte; Caris-Veyrat, Catherine; Dufour, Claire; Boutaleb, Malika; Borel, Patrick; Dangles, Olivier

    2013-04-30

    Newly identified spore-forming pigmented marine bacteria, Bacillus indicus HU36 and Bacillus firmus GB1, are sources of carotenoids (mainly 15 yellow and orange pigments and 13 pink pigments, respectively) with original structures. These bacterial carotenoids were evaluated for their ability to inhibit the iron-induced peroxidation of linoleic acid micelles, or sunflower oil-in-water emulsions, in comparison with β-carotene, lycopene and astaxanthin. Lipid peroxidation was carried out in acidic conditions and initiated by dietary heme or non-heme iron (metmyoglobin or Fe(II), respectively) so as to simply simulate the postprandial gastric medium, a possible site for dietary oxidative stress. Lipid hydroperoxide formation and carotenoid consumption were followed by UV-vis spectroscopy and appropriate indicators of the antioxidant activity were estimated in each model. The bacterial carotenoids were found to be better inhibitors of heme-induced lipid peroxidation than the reference carotenoids as a likely consequence of their location closer to the interface in micelles and lipid droplets. However, this trend was not confirmed in lipid peroxidation induced by non-heme iron, possibly because of the redox recycling of Fe(II) by carotenoids. The quantitative kinetic analysis of the peroxidation curves suggests that the carotenoids mainly inhibit the propagation phase of lipid peroxidation by direct scavenging of the lipid peroxyl radicals, in agreement with independent experiments showing that carotenoids are unable to reduce the one-electron oxidized form of metmyoglobin (ferrylmyoglobin), a model of initiating species in heme-induced lipid peroxidation. Overall, carotenoids from Bacillus indicus HU36 and Bacillus firmus GB1 were found to be interesting antioxidants to fight postprandial oxidative stress in the stomach. PMID:23411789

  1. SEALING LARGE-DIAMETER CAST-IRON PIPE JOINTS UNDER LIVE CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kiran M. Kothari; Gerard T. Pittard

    2004-11-01

    Utilities in the U.S. operate over 75,000 km (47,000 miles) of old cast-iron pipes for gas distribution. The bell-and-spigot joints that connect pipe sections together tend to leak as these pipes age. Current repair practices are costly and highly disruptive. The objective of this program is to design, test and commercialize a robotic system capable of sealing multiple castiron bell and spigot joints from a single pipe entry point. The proposed system will perform repairs while the pipe remains in service by traveling through the pipe, cleaning each joint surface, and installing a stainless-steel sleeve lined with an epoxy-impregnated felt across the joint. This approach will save considerable time and labor, avoid traffic disruption, and eliminate any requirement to interrupt service to customers (which would result in enormous expense to utilities). Technical challenges include: (1) repair sleeves must compensate for diametric variation and eccentricity of cast-iron pipes; (2) the assembly must travel long distances through pipes containing debris; (3) the pipe wall must be effectively cleaned in the immediate area of the joint to assure good bonding of the sleeve; and (4) an innovative bolt-on entry fitting is required to conduct repair operations on live mains. The development effort is divided into eleven tasks. Task 1 (Program Management) and Task 2 (Establishment of Detailed Design Specifications) were completed in prior quarters while Task 3 (Design and Fabricate Ratcheting Stainless-Steel Repair Sleeves) has progressed to installing prototype sleeves in cast iron test pipe segments. Efforts in this quarter continued to focus on Tasks 4-8, with significant progress made in each as well as field testing of the 4-inch gas pipe repair robot in cast iron pipe at Public Service Electric & Gas. The field tests were conducted August 23-26, 2004 in Oradell, New Jersey. The field tests identified several design issues which need to be implemented in both the small

  2. SEALING LARGE-DIAMETER CAST-IRON PIPE JOINTS UNDER LIVE CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kiran M. Kothari; Gerard T. Pittard

    2003-01-01

    Utilities in the U.S. operate over 75,000 km (47,000 miles) of old cast-iron pipes for gas distribution. The bell-and-spigot joints tend to leak as these pipes age. Current repair practices are costly and highly disruptive. The objective of this program is to design, test and commercialize a robotic system capable of sealing multiple cast-iron bell and spigot joints from a single pipe entry point. The proposed system will perform repairs while the pipe remains in service by traveling through the pipe, cleaning each joint surface, and attaching a stainless-steel sleeve lined with an epoxy-impregnated felt across the joint. This approach will save considerable time and labor, avoid traffic disruption, and eliminate any requirement to interrupt service (which results in enormous expense to utilities). Technical challenges include: (1) repair sleeves must compensate for diametric variation and eccentricity of cast-iron pipes; (2) the assembly must travel long distances through pipes containing debris; (3) the pipe wall must be effectively cleaned in the immediate area of the joint to assure good bonding of the sleeve; and (4) an innovative bolt-on entry fitting is required to conduct repair operations on live mains. The development effort is divided into eleven tasks. Task 1--Program Management was previously completed. Two reports, one describing the program management plan and the other consisting of the technology assessment, were submitted to the DOE COR in the first quarter. Task 2--Establishment of Detailed Design Specifications and Task 3--Design and Fabricate Ratcheting Stainless-Steel Repair Sleeves are now well underway. First-quarter activities included conducting detailed analyses to determine the capabilities of coiled-tubing locomotion for entering and repairing gas mains and the first design iteration of the joint-sealing sleeve. The maximum horizontal reach of coiled tubing inside a pipeline before buckling prevents further access was calculated for a

  3. SEALING LARGE-DIAMETER CAST-IRON PIPE JOINTS UNDER LIVE CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kiran M. Kothari; Gerard T. Pittard

    2003-06-01

    Utilities in the U.S. operate over 75,000 km (47,000 miles) of old cast-iron pipes for gas distribution. The bell-and-spigot joints tend to leak as these pipes age. Current repair practices are costly and highly disruptive. The objective of this program is to design, test and commercialize a robotic system capable of sealing multiple cast-iron bell and spigot joints from a single pipe entry point. The proposed system will perform repairs while the pipe remains in service by traveling through the pipe, cleaning each joint surface, and attaching a stainless-steel sleeve lined with an epoxy-impregnated felt across the joint. This approach will save considerable time and labor, avoid traffic disruption, and eliminate any requirement to interrupt service (which results in enormous expense to utilities). Technical challenges include: (1) repair sleeves must compensate for diametric variation and eccentricity of cast-iron pipes; (2) the assembly must travel long distances through pipes containing debris; (3) the pipe wall must be effectively cleaned in the immediate area of the joint to assure good bonding of the sleeve; and (4) an innovative bolt-on entry fitting is required to conduct repair operations on live mains. The development effort is divided into eleven tasks. Task 1-Program Management was previously completed. Two reports, one describing the program management plan and the other consisting of the technology assessment, were submitted to the DOE COR in the first quarter. Task 2-Establishment of Detailed Design Specifications and Task 3-Design and Fabricate Ratcheting Stainless-Steel Repair Sleeves are now well underway. First-quarter activities included conducting detailed analyses to determine the capabilities of coiled-tubing locomotion for entering and repairing gas mains and the first design iteration of the joint-sealing sleeve. The maximum horizontal reach of coiled tubing inside a pipeline before buckling prevents further access was calculated for a wide

  4. First-principles calculations of properties of orthorhombic iron carbide Fe7C3 at the Earth's core conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raza, Zamaan; Shulumba, Nina; Caffrey, Nuala M.; Dubrovinsky, Leonid; Abrikosov, Igor A.

    2015-06-01

    A recently discovered phase of orthorhombic iron carbide o-Fe7C3 [Prescher et al., Nat. Geosci. 8, 220 (2015), 10.1038/ngeo2370] is assessed as a potentially important phase for interpretation of the properties of the Earth's core. In this paper, we carry out first-principles calculations on o-Fe7C3 , finding properties to be in broad agreement with recent experiments, including a high Poisson's ratio (0.38). Our enthalpy calculations suggest that o-Fe7C3 is more stable than Eckstrom-Adcock hexagonal iron carbide (h-Fe7C3 ) below approximately 100 GPa. However, at 150 GPa, the two phases are essentially degenerate in terms of Gibbs free energy, and further increasing the pressure towards Earth's core conditions stabilizes h-Fe7C3 with respect to the orthorhombic phase. Increasing the temperature tends to stabilize the hexagonal phase at 360 GPa, but this trend may change beyond the limit of the quasiharmonic approximation.

  5. Report on field experiment program lithium bromide absorption chiller: Field gas conditioning project, Grayson County, Texas. Topical report, May 1991-December 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, M.J.; Kilbourn, R.A.; Huey, M.A.

    1995-12-01

    The primary objective of the project was to determine the applicability of using commercial absorption air conditioning technology in an oil and gas field environment to condition natural gas to meet contractual limitations. Operational and maintenance requirements were documented throughout the test period of 1992 through 1994.

  6. [Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia].

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Hiroshi

    2016-02-01

    The major causes of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) include iron loss due to bleeding, increased iron requirements, and decreased iron absorption by the intestine. The most common cause of IDA in Japanese women is iron loss during menstruation. Autoimmune atrophic gastritis and Helicobacter pylori infection can also cause IDA by reducing intestinal iron absorption. In addition to these common etiologies, germline mutations of TMPRSS6 can cause iron-refractory IDA (IRIDA). TMPRSS6 encodes matriptase-2, a membrane-bound serine protease primarily expressed in the liver. Functional loss of matriptase-2 due to homozygous mutations results in an increase in the expression of hepcidin, which is the key regulator of systemic iron homeostasis. The serum hepcidin increase in turn leads to a decrease in iron supply from the intestine and macrophages to erythropoietic cells. IRIDA is microcytic and hypochromic, but decreased serum ferritin is not observed as in IDA. IRIDA is refractory to oral iron supplementation, but does respond to intravenous iron supplementation to some extent. Because genetic testing is required for the diagnoses of IRIDA, a considerable number of cases may go undiagnosed and may thus be overlooked. PMID:26935626

  7. Structural diversity of the 3-micron absorption band in Enceladus’ plume from Cassini VIMS: Insights into subsurface environmental conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhingra, Deepak; Hedman, Matthew M.; Clark, Roger N.

    2015-11-01

    Water ice particles in Enceladus’ plume display their diagnostic 3-micron absorption band in Cassini VIMS data. These near infrared measurements of the plume also exhibit noticeable variations in the character of this band. Mie theory calculations reveal that the shape and location of the 3-micron band are controlled by a number of environmental and structural parameters. Hence, this band provides important insights into the properties of the water ice grains and about the subsurface environmental conditions under which they formed. For example, the position of the 3-micron absorption band minimum can be used to distinguish between crystalline and amorphous forms of water ice and to constrain the formation temperature of the ice grains. VIMS data indicates that the water ice grains in the plume are dominantly crystalline which could indicate formation temperatures above 113 K [e.g. 1, 2]. However, there are slight (but observable) variations in the band minimum position and band shape that may hint at the possibility of varying abundance of amorphous ice particles within the plume. The modeling results further indicate that there are systematic shifts in band minimum position with temperature for any given form of ice but the crystalline and amorphous forms of water ice are still distinguishable at VIMS spectral resolution. Analysis of the eruptions from individual source fissures (tiger stripes) using selected VIMS observations reveal differences in the 3-micron band shape that may reflect differences in the size distributions of the water ice particles along individual fissures. Mie theory models suggest that big ice particles (>3 micron) may be an important component of the plume.[1] Kouchi, A., T. Yamamoto, T. Kozasa, T. Kuroda, and J. M. Greenberg (1994) A&A, 290, 1009-1018 [2] Mastrapa, R. M. E., W. M. Grundy, and M. S. Gudipati (2013) in M. S. Gudipati and J. Castillo-Rogez (Eds.), The Science of Solar System Ices, pp. 371.

  8. Mechanisms of mammalian iron homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Pantopoulos, Kostas; Porwal, Suheel Kumar; Tartakoff, Alan; Devireddy, L.

    2012-01-01

    Iron is vital for almost all organisms because of its ability to donate and accept electrons with relative ease. It serves as a cofactor for many proteins and enzymes necessary for oxygen and energy metabolism, as well as for several other essential processes. Mammalian cells utilize multiple mechanisms to acquire iron. Disruption of iron homeostasis is associated with various human diseases: iron deficiency resulting from defects in acquisition or distribution of the metal causes anemia; whereas iron surfeit resulting from excessive iron absorption or defective utilization causes abnormal tissue iron deposition, leading to oxidative damage. Mammals utilize distinct mechanisms to regulate iron homeostasis at the systemic and cellular levels. These involve the hormone hepcidin and iron regulatory proteins, which collectively ensure iron balance. This review outlines recent advances in iron regulatory pathways, as well as in mechanisms underlying intracellular iron trafficking, an important but less-studied area of mammalian iron homeostasis. PMID:22703180

  9. Iron deficiency: the hidden miscreant in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Allocca, Mariangela; Fiorino, Gionata; Danese, Silvio

    2014-01-01

    Iron deficiency (ID) and anemia of chronic diseases (ACD) are the most common causes of anemia in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and frequently coexist. In these circumstances, detection of ID may be difficult as inflammation influences the parameters of iron metabolism. The prevalence of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) ranges between 36% and 76% in this population of patients. Anemia may impair physical condition, quality of life (QOL), and cognitive function, negatively affecting almost every aspect of daily life. Furthermore, it may be one of the causes of death in IBD. Consequently, iron replacement therapy should be initiated as soon as ID or IDA is detected, together with the treatment of underlying inflammation. Oral iron therapy is a simple and cheap treatment, but often is poorly tolerated and may worsen the intestinal damage. Moreover, in inflammatory states, duodenal iron absorption is blocked by a cytokine-mediated mechanism. Consequently, intravenous iron therapy is preferred in the presence of severe anemia, intolerance or lack of response to oral iron, and moderately to severely active disease. Recently, new intravenous iron compounds (iron carboxymaltose, iron isomaltoside 1000, ferumoxytol) have become available. Iron carboxymaltose has been shown to be safe and effective in IBD patients with IDA. Furthermore, it allows for rapid administration of high single doses, saving time and costs. If proven to be efficacious and well tolerated, it may become the standard therapy in the near future. PMID:25213175

  10. Iron absorption by intestinal epithelial cells: 1. CaCo2 cells cultivated in serum-free medium, on polyethyleneterephthalate microporous membranes, as an in vitro model.

    PubMed

    Halleux, C; Schneider, Y J

    1991-04-01

    Iron absorption by intestinal epithelial cells, passage onto plasmatic apotransferrin, and regulation of the process remain largely misunderstood. To investigate this problem, we have set up an in vitro model, consisting in CaCo2 cells (a human colon adenocarcinoma line, which upon cultivation displays numerous differentiation criteria of small intestine epithelial cells). Cells are cultivated in a serum-free medium, containing 1 microgram/ml insulin, 1 ng/ml epidermal growth factor, 10 micrograms/ml albumin-linoleic acid, 100 nM hydrocortisone, and 2 nM T3 on new, transparent, Cyclopore polyethyleneterephthalate microporous membranes coated with type I collagen. Cells rapidly adhere, grow, and form confluent monolayers; after 15 days, scanning electron microscopy reveals numerous uniform microvilli. Domes, which develop on nonporous substrata, are absent on high porosity membranes. Culture medium from upper and lower compartments of microplate inserts and cell lysates were immunoprecipitated after labeling with [3H]glucosamine and leucine; analysis was done by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), followed by autoradiography. [3H]transferrin is found mainly in the lower compartment and in cells; [3H]apolipoprotein B is released in both compartments, and fibronectin almost entirely recovered in the lower compartment; [3H]transferrin receptors and ferritin are only present in cell lysates. Binding experiments also show that transferrin receptors are accessible from the lower compartment. These results suggest that CaCo2 cells, cultivated in synthetic medium on membranes of appropriate porosity, could provide an in vitro model of the intestinal barrier, with the upper compartment of the culture insert corresponding to the apical pole facing the intestinal lumen and the lower one to the basal pole in contact with blood. PMID:1830303

  11. Ammonium Oxidation Under Iron Reducing Conditions: Environmental Factors Characterization and Process Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shan; Ruiz, Melany; Jaffe, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Ammonium (NH4+) oxidation coupled to iron (Fe) reduction in the absence of oxygen and nitrate/nitrite (NO3-/NO2-) has been reported by several investigators and is referred to as Feammox. Feammox is a biological reaction, where Fe(III) is the electron acceptor, which is reduced to Fe(II), and NH4+ is the electron donor, which is oxidized to NO2-. An Acidimicrobiaceae bacterium named A6, a previously unreported species in the Acidimicrobiaceae family, has been identified as being responsible for the Feammox process(1, 2) Feammox process was noted in riparian wetland soils in New Jersey(1,3), in tropical rainforest soils in Puerto Rico (4) and in paddy soils in China (5). In addition to these published locations, Feammox process was also found in samples collected from a series of local wetland-, upland-, as well as storm-water detention pond-sediments in New Jersey, river sediments from South Carolina, and forested soils near an acid mine drainage (Dabaoshan, Guangdong province) in China. Using primers acm342f - 439r (2), Acidimicrobiaceae bacterium A6 was detected in samples where Feammox was observed, after strictly anaerobic incubations. According to a canonical correspondence analysis with environmental characteristics and soil microbial communities, the species-environment relationship indicated that pH and Fe oxides content were the primary factors controlling Feammox process. Anaerobic incubations of Feammox enrichment cultures adjusted to different pH, revealed that the optimal pH for Feammox is 4 ~ 5, and the reaction does not proceed when pH > 7. No correlation was found between the distributions of Feammox bacteria and other NH4+ oxidation bacteria. Pure Acidimicrobiaceae bacterium A6 strain was isolated in an autotrophic medium, from an active Feammox membrane reactor (A6 was enriched to 65.8% of the total bacteria). A 13C labeled CO2 amendment was conducted, and the 13C in cells of A6 increased from 1.80% to 10.3% after 14 days incubation. In a separate

  12. Microscale speciation of arsenic and iron in ferric-based sorbents subjected to simulated landfill conditions.

    PubMed

    Root, Robert A; Fathordoobadi, Sahar; Alday, Fernando; Ela, Wendell; Chorover, Jon

    2013-11-19

    During treatment for potable use, water utilities generate arsenic-bearing ferric wastes that are subsequently dispatched to landfills. The biogeochemical weathering of these residuals in mature landfills affects the potential mobilization of sorbed arsenic species via desorption from solids subjected to phase transformations driven by abundant organic matter and bacterial activity. Such processes are not simulated with the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) currently used to characterize hazard. To examine the effect of sulfate on As retention in landfill leachate, columns of As(V) loaded amorphous ferric hydroxide were reacted biotically at two leachate sulfate concentrations (0.064 mM and 2.1 mM). After 300 days, ferric sorbents were reductively dissolved. Arsenic released to porewaters was partially coprecipitated in mixed-valent secondary iron phases whose speciation was dependent on sulfate concentration. As and Fe XAS showed that, in the low sulfate column, 75-81% of As(V) was reduced to As(III), and 53-68% of the Fe(III) sorbent was transformed, dominantly to siderite and green rust. In the high sulfate column, Fe(III) solids were reduced principally to FeS(am), whereas As(V) was reduced to a polymeric sulfide with local atomic structure of realgar. Multienergy micro-X-ray fluorescence (ME-μXRF) imaging at Fe and As K-edges showed that As formed surface complexes with ferrihydrite > siderite > green rust in the low sulfate column; while discrete realgar-like phases formed in the high sulfate systems. Results indicate that landfill sulfur chemistry exerts strong control over the potential mobilization of As from ferric sorbent residuals by controlling secondary As and Fe sulfide coprecipitate formation. PMID:24102155

  13. Microscale speciation of arsenic and iron in ferric-based sorbents subjected to simulated landfill conditions

    PubMed Central

    Root, Robert A.; Fathordoobadi, Sahar; Alday, Fernando; Ela, Wendell; Chorover, Jon

    2013-01-01

    During treatment for potable use, water utilities generate arsenic-bearing ferric wastes that are subsequently dispatched to landfills. The biogeochemical weathering of these residuals in mature landfills affects the potential mobilization of sorbed arsenic species via desorption from solids subjected to phase transformations driven by abundant organic matter and bacterial activity. Such processes are not simulated with the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) currently used to characterize hazard. To examine the effect of sulfate on As retention in landfill leachate, columns of As(V) loaded amorphous ferric hydroxide were reacted biotically at two leachate sulfate concentrations (0.064 mM and 2.1 mM). After 300 d, ferric sorbents were reductively dissolved. Arsenic released to porewaters was partially co-precipitated in mixed-valent secondary iron phases whose speciation was dependent on sulfate concentration. As and Fe XAS showed that, in the low sulfate column, 75–81% of As(V) was reduced to As(III), and 53–68% of the Fe(III) sorbent was transformed, dominantly to siderite and green rust. In the high sulfate column, Fe(III) solids were reduced principally to FeS(am), whereas As(V) was reduced to a polymeric sulfide with local atomic structure of realgar. Multi-energy micro-X-ray fluorescence (ME-μXRF) imaging at Fe and As K-edges showed that As formed surface complexes with ferrihydrite > siderite > green rust in the low sulfate column; while discrete realgar-like phases formed in the high sulfate systems. Results indicate that landfill sulfur chemistry exerts strong control over the potential mobilization of As from ferric sorbent residuals by controlling secondary As and Fe sulfide co-precipitate formation. PMID:24102155

  14. Constraints on Earth's inner core composition inferred from measurements of the sound velocity of hcp-iron in extreme conditions.

    PubMed

    Sakamaki, Tatsuya; Ohtani, Eiji; Fukui, Hiroshi; Kamada, Seiji; Takahashi, Suguru; Sakairi, Takanori; Takahata, Akihiro; Sakai, Takeshi; Tsutsui, Satoshi; Ishikawa, Daisuke; Shiraishi, Rei; Seto, Yusuke; Tsuchiya, Taku; Baron, Alfred Q R

    2016-02-01

    Hexagonal close-packed iron (hcp-Fe) is a main component of Earth's inner core. The difference in density between hcp-Fe and the inner core in the Preliminary Reference Earth Model (PREM) shows a density deficit, which implies an existence of light elements in the core. Sound velocities then provide an important constraint on the amount and kind of light elements in the core. Although seismological observations provide density-sound velocity data of Earth's core, there are few measurements in controlled laboratory conditions for comparison. We report the compressional sound velocity (V P) of hcp-Fe up to 163 GPa and 3000 K using inelastic x-ray scattering from a laser-heated sample in a diamond anvil cell. We propose a new high-temperature Birch's law for hcp-Fe, which gives us the V P of pure hcp-Fe up to core conditions. We find that Earth's inner core has a 4 to 5% smaller density and a 4 to 10% smaller V P than hcp-Fe. Our results demonstrate that components other than Fe in Earth's core are required to explain Earth's core density and velocity deficits compared to hcp-Fe. Assuming that the temperature effects on iron alloys are the same as those on hcp-Fe, we narrow down light elements in the inner core in terms of the velocity deficit. Hydrogen is a good candidate; thus, Earth's core may be a hidden hydrogen reservoir. Silicon and sulfur are also possible candidates and could show good agreement with PREM if we consider the presence of some melt in the inner core, anelasticity, and/or a premelting effect. PMID:26933678

  15. Conditional iron and pH-dependent activity of a non-enzymatic glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathway

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Markus A.; Zylstra, Andre; Castro, Cecilia; Turchyn, Alexandra V.; Griffin, Julian L.; Ralser, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the evolutionary origins of metabolism. However, key biochemical reactions of glycolysis and the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP), ancient metabolic pathways central to the metabolic network, have non-enzymatic pendants that occur in a prebiotically plausible reaction milieu reconstituted to contain Archean sediment metal components. These non-enzymatic reactions could have given rise to the origin of glycolysis and the PPP during early evolution. Using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and high-content metabolomics that allowed us to measure several thousand reaction mixtures, we experimentally address the chemical logic of a metabolism-like network constituted from these non-enzymatic reactions. Fe(II), the dominant transition metal component of Archean oceanic sediments, has binding affinity toward metabolic sugar phosphates and drives metabolism-like reactivity acting as both catalyst and cosubstrate. Iron and pH dependencies determine a metabolism-like network topology and comediate reaction rates over several orders of magnitude so that the network adopts conditional activity. Alkaline pH triggered the activity of the non-enzymatic PPP pendant, whereas gentle acidic or neutral conditions favored non-enzymatic glycolytic reactions. Fe(II)-sensitive glycolytic and PPP-like reactions thus form a chemical network mimicking structural features of extant carbon metabolism, including topology, pH dependency, and conditional reactivity. Chemical networks that obtain structure and catalysis on the basis of transition metals found in Archean sediments are hence plausible direct precursors of cellular metabolic networks. PMID:26824074

  16. Bio-inspired CO2 conversion by iron sulfide catalysts under sustainable conditions.

    PubMed

    Roldan, A; Hollingsworth, N; Roffey, A; Islam, H-U; Goodall, J B M; Catlow, C R A; Darr, J A; Bras, W; Sankar, G; Holt, K B; Hogarth, G; de Leeuw, N H

    2015-05-01

    The mineral greigite presents similar surface structures to the active sites found in many modern-day enzymes. We show that particles of greigite can reduce CO2 under ambient conditions into chemicals such as methanol, formic, acetic and pyruvic acid. Our results also lend support to the Origin of Life theory on alkaline hydrothermal vents. PMID:25835242

  17. Design Criteria, Operating Conditions, and Nickel-Iron Hydroxide Catalyst Materials for Selective Seawater Electrolysis.

    PubMed

    Dionigi, Fabio; Reier, Tobias; Pawolek, Zarina; Gliech, Manuel; Strasser, Peter

    2016-05-10

    Seawater is an abundant water resource on our planet and its direct electrolysis has the advantage that it would not compete with activities demanding fresh water. Oxygen selectivity is challenging when performing seawater electrolysis owing to competing chloride oxidation reactions. In this work we propose a design criterion based on thermodynamic and kinetic considerations that identifies alkaline conditions as preferable to obtain high selectivity for the oxygen evolution reaction. The criterion states that catalysts sustaining the desired operating current with an overpotential <480 mV in alkaline pH possess the best chance to achieve 100 % oxygen/hydrogen selectivity. NiFe layered double hydroxide is shown to satisfy this criterion at pH 13 in seawater-mimicking electrolyte. The catalyst was synthesized by a solvothermal method and the activity, surface redox chemistry, and stability were tested electrochemically in alkaline and near-neutral conditions (borate buffer at pH 9.2) and under both fresh seawater conditions. The Tafel slope at low current densities is not influenced by pH or presence of chloride. On the other hand, the addition of chloride ions has an influence in the temporal evolution of the nickel reduction peak and on both the activity and stability at high current densities at pH 9.2. Faradaic efficiency close to 100 % under the operating conditions predicted by our design criteria was proven using in situ electrochemical mass spectrometry. PMID:27010750

  18. Roles of iron species and pH optimization on sewage sludge conditioning with Fenton's reagent and lime.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wenbo; Yang, Jiakuan; Shi, Yafei; Song, Jian; Shi, Yao; Xiao, Jun; Li, Chao; Xu, Xinyu; He, Shu; Liang, Sha; Wu, Xu; Hu, Jingping

    2016-05-15

    Conditioning sewage sludge with Fenton's reagent could effectively improve its dewaterability. However, drawbacks of conditioning with Fenton's reagent are requirement of acidic conditions to prevent iron precipitation and subsequent neutralization with alkaline additive to obtain the pH of the filtrate close to neutrality. In this study, roles of pH were thoroughly investigated in the acidification pretreatment, Fenton reaction, and the final filtrate after conditioning. Through the response surface methodology (RSM), the optimal dosages of H2SO4, Fe(2+), H2O2, and lime acted as a neutralizer were found to be 0 (no acidification), 47.9, 34.3 and 43.2 mg/g DS (dry solids). With those optimal doses, water content of the dewatered sludge cakes could be reduced to 55.8 ± 0.6 wt%, and pH of the final filtrate was 6.6 ± 0.2. Fenton conditioning without initial acidification can simplify the conditioning process and reduce the usage of lime. The Fe(3+) content in the sludge cakes showed a close correlation with the dewaterability of conditioned sludge, i.e., the water content of sludge cakes, SRF (specific resistance to filtration), CST (capillary suction time), bound water content, and specific surface area. It indicated that the coagulation by Fe(3+) species in Fenton reaction could play an important role, compared to traditional Fenton oxidation effect on sludge conditioning. Thus, a two-step mechanism of Fenton oxidation and Fe(III) coagulation was proposed in sewage sludge conditioning. The mechanisms include the following: (1) extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) were firstly degraded into dissolved organics by Fenton oxidation; (2) bound water was converted to free water due to degradation of EPS; (3) the sludge particles were disintegrated into small ones by oxidation; (4) Fe(3+) generated from Fenton reaction acted as a coagulant to agglomerate smaller sludge particles into larger dense particles with less bond water; (5) finally, the dewatered

  19. Doppler-broadened NICE-OHMS beyond the cavity-limited weak absorption condition - I. Theoretical description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Weiguang; Silander, Isak; Hausmaninger, Thomas; Axner, Ove

    2016-01-01

    Doppler-broadened (Db) noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical heterodyne molecular spectrometry (NICE-OHMS) is conventionally described by an expression (here referred to as the CONV expression) that is restricted to the case when the single-pass absorbance, α0L, is much smaller than the empty cavity losses, π/F [here termed the conventional cavity-limited weak absorption (CCLWA) condition]. This limits the applicability of the technique, primarily its dynamic range and calibration capability. To remedy this, this work derives extended descriptions of Db NICE-OHMS that are not restricted to the CCLWA condition. First, the general principles of Db NICE-OHMS are scrutinized in some detail. Based solely upon a set of general assumptions, predominantly that it is appropriate to linearize the Beer-Lambert law, that the light is modulated to a triplet, and that the Pound-Drever-Hall sidebands are fully reflected, a general description of Db NICE-OHMS that is not limited to any specific restriction on α0L vs. π/F, here referred to as the FULL description, is derived. However, this description constitutes a set of equations to which no closed form solution has been found. Hence, it needs to be solved numerically (by iterations), which is inconvenient. To circumvent this, for the cases when α0L<π/F but without the requirement that the stronger CCLWA condition needs to be fulfilled, a couple of simplified extended expressions that are expressible in closed analytical form, referred to as the extended locking and extended transmission description, ELET, and the extended locking and full transmission description, ELFT, have been derived. An analysis based on simulations validates the various descriptions and assesses to which extent they agree. It is shown that in the CCLWA limit, all extended descriptions revert to the CONV expression. The latter one deviates though from the extended ones for α0L around and above 0.1π/F. The two simplified extended descriptions agree

  20. Meal conditions affect the absorption of supplemental vitamin D3 but not the plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D response to supplementation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is sometimes assumed that dietary fat is required for vitamin D absorption, although the impact of different amounts of dietary fat on vitamin D absorption is not established. This study was conducted to determine whether the presence of a meal and the fat content of the meal influences vitamin D...

  1. Inclusion of guava enhances non-heme iron bioavailability but not fractional zinc absorption from a rice-based meal in adolescents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Assessing the bioavailability of non-heme iron and zinc is essential for recommending diets that meet the increased growth-related demand for these nutrients. We studied the bioavailability of iron and zinc from a rice-based meal in 16 adolescent boys and girls, 13–15 y of age, from 2 government-run...

  2. Pulsed HF radiowave absorption measurements at 2.1 MHZ. over Delhi under quiet and solar flare conditions and related electron density height profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balachandra Swamy, A. C.

    EXTENDED ABSTRACT Pulsed HF radiowave absorption measurements at 2.1 MHZ. over Delhi under quiet and solar flare conditions and related electron density height profiles A.C.Balachandra swmay & Late C.S.G.K. Setty Absorption of radio waves in the ionosphere is of great practical importance for radio communication and navigation systems. The first attempt to measure the absolute magnitude of the radiowave absorption were made by appletion and Ratcliffe (1930) using the frequency change method for medium frequency waves reflected from the E-region. They concluded from their experiment that the main part of the attenuation occurred below the reflection level and named the absorption region, D-region of the ionosphere. One of the basic properties of the ionosphere is the absorption of high Frequency Radiowaves. HF radiowave absorption results mainly from collisions between electrons (which are set into forced oscillations by the electric field of the wave) and neutral air particles, the RF energy abstracted from the wave being converted into thermal energy. The radiowave absorption in the ionosphere depends on electron density and collision frequency. The most important absorbing regions are the D-region and the lower E-region (50-100 Km.) The regular diurnal variation of the electron density in this height range is caused mainly by the changes in the depth of penetration of solar XUV radiations with solar zenith angle under quiet solar conditions. In 1937 Dellinger J.H.identified fade outs in high frequency radio circuits as due to abnormal ionospheric absorption associated with solar flares. The onset of the fade out was usually rapid and the duration was typically tens of minutes like that of the visible flare, because of the sudden onset, the immediate effects of solar flares are known collectively as sudden Ionospheric Disturbances (STD). The phenomenon discovered by Dellinger is usually called a short Wave Fadeout(SWF). Since the SWF is due to abnormal absorption

  3. Biological reduction of uranium coupled with oxidation of ammonium by Acidimicrobiaceae bacterium A6 under iron reducing conditions.

    PubMed

    Gilson, Emily R; Huang, Shan; Jaffé, Peter R

    2015-11-01

    This study investigated the possibility of links between the biological immobilization of uranium (U) and ammonium oxidation under iron (Fe) reducing conditions. The recently-identified Acidimicrobiaceae bacterium A6 (ATCC, PTA-122488) derives energy from ammonium oxidation coupled with Fe reduction. This bacterium has been found in various soil and wetland environments, including U-contaminated wetland sediments. Incubations of Acidimicrobiaceae bacteria A6 with nontronite, an Fe(III)-rich clay, and approximately 10 µM U indicate that these bacteria can use U(VI) in addition to Fe(III) as an electron acceptor in the presence of ammonium. Measurements of Fe(II) production and ammonium oxidation support this interpretation. Concentrations of approximately 100 µM U were found to entirely inhibit Acidimicrobiaceae bacteria A6 activity. These results suggest that natural sites of active ammonium oxidation under Fe reducing conditions by Acidimicrobiaceae bacteria A6 could be hotspots of U immobilization by bioreduction. This is the first report of biological U reduction that is not coupled to carbon oxidation. PMID:26525893

  4. X-ray Absorption and Emission Spectroscopic Studies of [L2Fe2S2](n) Model Complexes: Implications for the Experimental Evaluation of Redox States in Iron-Sulfur Clusters.

    PubMed

    Kowalska, Joanna K; Hahn, Anselm W; Albers, Antonia; Schiewer, Christine E; Bjornsson, Ragnar; Lima, Frederico A; Meyer, Franc; DeBeer, Serena

    2016-05-01

    Herein, a systematic study of [L2Fe2S2](n) model complexes (where L = bis(benzimidazolato) and n = 2-, 3-, 4-) has been carried out using iron and sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption (XAS) and iron Kβ and valence-to-core X-ray emission spectroscopies (XES). These data are used as a test set to evaluate the relative strengths and weaknesses of X-ray core level spectroscopies in assessing redox changes in iron-sulfur clusters. The results are correlated to density functional theory (DFT) calculations of the spectra in order to further support the quantitative information that can be extracted from the experimental data. It is demonstrated that due to canceling effects of covalency and spin state, the information that can be extracted from Fe Kβ XES mainlines is limited. However, a careful analysis of the Fe K-edge XAS data shows that localized valence vs delocalized valence species may be differentiated on the basis of the pre-edge and K-edge energies. These findings are then applied to existing literature Fe K-edge XAS data on the iron protein, P-cluster, and FeMoco sites of nitrogenase. The ability to assess the extent of delocalization in the iron protein vs the P-cluster is highlighted. In addition, possible charge states for FeMoco on the basis of Fe K-edge XAS data are discussed. This study provides an important reference for future X-ray spectroscopic studies of iron-sulfur clusters. PMID:27097289

  5. Computations of the collapse of a stellar iron core allowing for the absorption, emission, and scattering of electron neutrinos and anti-neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksenov, A. G.; Chechetkin, V. M.

    2012-03-01

    The collapse of the iron core of a star with mass 1.4 M ⊙ is computed. The initial model was chosen to be polytropic, P ∝ ρ 1+1/ n , with n = 3. The equation of state takes into account the equilibrium radiation of photons, a mixture of Fermi gases comprised of free nucleons and ideal gases comprised of nuclei (Fe, He) in equilibrium with respect to nuclear reactions, and electron-positron gas. The transport equation for electron neutrinos and anti-neutrinos is also included. The absorption and emission of neutrinos and anti-neutrinos with the participation of free nucleons and nuclei is taken into account, as well as scattering on electrons. The main goal of this study is to develop a numerical method for the joint solution of the gas-dynamical equations formatter and the Boltzmann kinetic equations for the distribution functions of various types of neutrinos in both optically thin and optically thick regions. The spherically symmetrical case is considered, but the dependences of the distribution functions on all the phase-space variables—the mass coordinate, particle energy, cosine of the angle between the radius vector and the particle momentum, and time, ( m, ɛ, µ, t)—are retained in the description of the neutrino transport. When computing reaction rates, the exact quantum-mechanical expressions for the probabilities of processes are used, with integration over the entire momentum phase space. The gas-dynamical variables depend on the mass coordinate and time, ( m, t). The solution yields neutrino light curves, which have narrow maximum with characteristic widths ≈10 ms. This makes it possible to place constraints on the mass of the electron neutrino based on the detection of short bursts of radiation, ≲4 eV. Part of the neutrino energy is absorbed in the envelope of the stellar core (˜1050 erg). This is associated with the higher mean neutrino energies in this model, which is more exact than models with neutrino thermal conductivity. This

  6. Dynamical stability of body center cubic iron at the Earth’s core conditions

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Wei; Johansson, Börje; Eriksson, Olle; Arapan, Sergiu; Souvatzis, Petros; Katsnelson, Mikhail I.; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2010-01-01

    Here, using self-consistent ab initio lattice dynamical calculations that go beyond the quasiharmonic approximation, we show that the high-pressure high-temperature bcc-Fe phase is dynamically stable. In this treatment the temperature-dependent phonon spectra are derived by exciting all the lattice vibrations, in which the phonon–phonon interactions are considered. The high-pressure and high-temperature bcc-Fe phase shows standard bcc-type phonon dispersion curves except for the transverse branch, which is overdamped along the high symmetry direction Γ-N, at temperatures below 4,500 K. When lowering the temperature down to a critical value TC, the lattice instability of the bcc structure is reached. The pressure dependence of this critical temperature is studied at conditions relevant for the Earth’s core. PMID:20479276

  7. WATER-GAS SHIFT KINETICS OVER IRON OXIDE CATALYSTS AT MEMBRANE REACTOR CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Carl R.F. Lund

    2002-08-02

    The kinetics of water-gas shift were studied over ferrochrome catalysts under conditions with high carbon dioxide partial pressures, such as would be expected in a membrane reactor. The catalyst activity is inhibited by increasing carbon dioxide partial pressure. A microkinetic model of the reaction kinetics was developed. The model indicated that catalyst performance could be improved by decreasing the strength of surface oxygen bonds. Literature data indicated that adding either ceria or copper to the catalyst as a promoter might impart this desired effect. Ceria-promoted ferrochrome catalysts did not perform any better than unpromoted catalyst at the conditions tested, but copper-promoted ferrochrome catalysts did offer an improvement over the base ferrochrome material. A different class of water-gas shift catalyst, sulfided CoMo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is not affected by carbon dioxide and may be a good alternative to the ferrochrome system, provided other constraints, notably the requisite sulfur level and maximum temperature, are not too limiting. A model was developed for an adiabatic, high-temperature water-gas shift membrane reactor. Simulation results indicate that an excess of steam in the feed (three moles of water per mole of CO) is beneficial even in a membrane reactor as it reduces the rate of adiabatic temperature rise. The simulations also indicate that much greater improvement can be attained by improving the catalyst as opposed to improving the membrane. Further, eliminating the inhibition by carbon dioxide will have a greater impact than will increasing the catalyst activity (assuming inhibition is still operative). Follow-up research into the use of sulfide catalysts with continued kinetic and reactor modeling is suggested.

  8. Iron in diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... Some foods reduce iron absorption. For example, commercial black or pekoe teas contain substances that bind to ... nih.gov/pubmed/19297463 . Mason JB. Vitamins, trace minerals, and other micronutrients. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, ...

  9. Iron deficiency in Europe.

    PubMed

    Hercberg, S; Preziosi, P; Galan, P

    2001-04-01

    . But stronger evidence is needed before rejecting the hypothesis that greater iron stores increase the incidence of CVD or cancer. At present, currently available data do not support radical changes in dietary recommendations. They include all means for increasing the content of dietary factors enhancing iron absorption or reducing the content of factors inhibiting iron absorption. Increased knowledge and increased information about factors may be important tools in the prevention of iron deficiency in Europe. PMID:11683548

  10. Analysis of an Air Conditioning Coolant Solution for Metal Contamination Using Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy: An Undergraduate Instrumental Analysis Exercise Simulating an Industrial Assignment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baird, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    A real-life analytical assignment is presented to students, who had to examine an air conditioning coolant solution for metal contamination using an atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). This hands-on access to a real problem exposed the undergraduate students to the mechanism of AAS, and promoted participation in a simulated industrial activity.

  11. Iron and Nickel spectral opacity calculations in conditions relevant for pulsating stellar envelopes and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilles, D.; Turck-Chièze, S.; Busquet, M.; Thais, F.; Loisel, G.; Piau, L.; Ducret, J. E.; Blenski, T.; Blancard, C.; Cossé, P.; Faussurier, G.; Gilleron, F.; Pain, J. C.; Porcherot, Q.; Guzik, J. A.; Kilcrease, D. P.; Magee, N. H.; Harris, J.; Bastiani-Ceccotti, S.; Delahaye, F.; Zeippen, C. J.

    2013-11-01

    Seismology of stars is strongly developing. To address this question we have formed an international collaboration, OPAC, to perform specific experimental measurements, compare opacity calculations, and improve the opacity calculations in stellar codes [1]. We consider the following opacity codes: SCO, CASSANDRA, STA, OPAS, LEDCOP, OP, SCO-RCG. Their comparison has shown large differences for Fe and Ni in equivalent conditions of envelopes of type II supernova precursors, temperatures between 15 and 40 eV and densities of a few mg/cm3 [2-4]. LEDCOP, OPAS, SCO-RCG structure codes and STA give similar results and differ from OP ones for the lower temperatures and for spectral interval values [3]. In this work we discuss the role of Configuration Interaction (CI) and the influence of the number of used configurations. We present and include in the opacity code comparisons new HULLAC-v9 calculations [5, 6] that include full CI. To illustrate the importance of this effect we compare different CI approximations (modes) available in HULLAC-v9 [7]. These results are compared to previous predictions and to experimental data. Differences with OP results are discussed.

  12. Degradation of Monochlorinated and Nonchlorinated Aromatic Compounds under Iron-Reducing Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Kazumi, J.; Haggblom, M. M.; Young, L. Y.

    1995-01-01

    The capacity for Fe(sup3+) to serve as an electron acceptor in the microbial degradation of monochlorinated and nonchlorinated aromatic compounds was investigated in anoxic sediment enrichments. The substrates tested included phenol, benzoate, aniline, their respective monochlorinated isomers, o-, m-, and p-cresol, and all six dimethylphenol isomers. Phenol and 2-, 3-, and 4-chlorophenol were utilized by anaerobic microorganisms, with the concomitant reduction of Fe(sup3+) to Fe(sup2+). The amount of Fe(sup2+) produced in the enrichments was 89 to 138% of that expected for the stoichiometric degradation of these substrates to CO(inf2), suggesting complete mineralization at the expense of Fe reduction. Under Fe-reducing conditions, there was initial loss of benzoate and 3-chlorobenzoate but not of 2- or 4-chlorobenzoate. In addition, there was initial microbial utilization of aniline but not of the chloroaniline isomers. There was also initial loss of o-, m-, and p-cresol in our enrichments. None of the dimethylphenol isomers, however, was degraded within 300 days. Furthermore, we tested the capacity of an Fe-reducing, benzoate-grown culture of Geobacter metallireducens GS-15 to utilize monochlorinated benzoates and phenols. G. metallireducens was able to degrade benzoate and phenol but none of their chlorinated isomers, suggesting that the degradation of chlorophenols in our sediment enrichments may be due to novel Fe-reducing organisms that have yet to be isolated. PMID:16535169

  13. Serpentinization, iron oxidation, and aqueous conditions in an ophiolite: Implications for hydrogen production and habitability on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenberger, Rebecca N.; Mustard, John F.; Cloutis, Edward A.; Pratt, Lisa M.; Sauer, Peter E.; Mann, Paul; Turner, Kathryn; Dyar, M. Darby; Bish, David L.

    2015-04-01

    Molecular hydrogen produced through iron oxidation during formation of serpentine and magnetite can sustain terrestrial subsurface ecosystems. The Fe3+ in serpentine partitions into octahedral and tetrahedral sites differently as serpentinization proceeds, and tetrahedral Fe3+ is present toward the end of serpentinization. We map Fe oxidation states in a serpentinite to determine the degree to which serpentinization progressed and where hydrogen production has been maximized to assess habitability at an abandoned chrysotile mine in Norbestos, Quebec, in association with the Canadian Space Agency's Mars Methane Analogue Mission. We also analyzed stable isotopes of carbon and oxygen in carbonates to constrain the conditions of water-rock interaction during serpentinization. Iron oxidation and coordination was determined through field imaging of rock walls with a visible hyperspectral imager (420-720 nm), and samples collected from imaged rocks and elsewhere in the mine were imaged in the laboratory (420-1100 nm). Sample chemistry, mineralogy, and oxidation state were determined with laboratory measurements of visible through mid-infrared reflectance spectra, major element chemistry, mineralogy, and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Mapping with hyperspectral imaging of outcrops and hand samples shows that tetrahedral Fe3+ is common in serpentinites at this site, and results are confirmed through other measurements. Major element chemistry and mineralogy are consistent with serpentine plus minor carbonate. Carbonate samples show an exceptional range in δ13C (-13.14 to + 16.12 ‰ VPDB) and δ18O (-15.48 to - 3.20 ‰ VPDB) that vary with location in the mine. Carbonates south of a shear zone (δ13C more positive) likely formed during periods of serpentinization in a carbon-limited reservoir closed to carbon addition but open to methane escape. Carbonates in a shear zone (δ13C more negative) probably formed later at low temperatures through CO2-metasomatism or atmospheric

  14. Increasing concentrations of iron in surface waters as a consequence of reducing conditions in the catchment area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekström, Sara M.; Regnell, Olof; Reader, Heather E.; Nilsson, P. Anders; Löfgren, Stefan; Kritzberg, Emma S.

    2016-02-01

    Recent studies report trends of strongly increasing iron (Fe) concentrations in freshwaters. Since Fe is a key element with a decisive role in the biogeochemical cycling of major elements, it is important to understand the mechanisms behind these trends. We hypothesized that variations in Fe concentration are driven mainly by redox dynamics in hydraulically connected soils. Notably, Fe(III), which is the favored oxidation state except in environments where microbial activity provide strong reducing intensity, has several orders of magnitude lower water solubility than Fe(II). To test our hypothesis, seasonal variation in water chemistry, discharge, and air temperature was studied in three Swedish rivers. Methylmercury and sulfate were used as indicators of seasonal redox changes. Seasonal variability in water chemistry, discharge, and air temperature in the Emån and Lyckeby Rivers implied that the variation in Fe was primarily driven by the prevalence of reducing conditions in the catchment. In general, high Fe concentrations were observed when methylmercury was high and sulfate was low, indicative of reducing conditions. The Fe concentrations showed no or weak relationships with variations in dissolved organic matter concentration and aromaticity. The seasonal variation in Fe concentration of the Ume river was primarily dependent on timing of the snowmelt in high- versus low-altitude areas of the catchment. There were long-term trends of increasing temperature in all catchments and also trends of increasing discharge in the southern rivers, which should increase the probability for anaerobic conditions in space and time and thereby increase Fe transport to the aquatic systems.

  15. Iron autoxidation in Mops and Hepes buffers.

    PubMed

    Tadolini, B

    1987-01-01

    Iron autoxidation in Mops and Hepes buffers is characterized by a lag phase that becomes shorter with increasing FeCl2 concentration and pH. During iron oxidation in these buffers a yellow colour develops in the solution. When the reaction is conducted in the presence of nitro blue tetrazolium (NBT), blue formazan is formed. Of the many OH scavengers tested, mannitol and sorbitol are most effective in inhibiting Fe2+ oxidation, yellow colour development and NBT reduction. Some inhibition was also noted with catalase. The iron product of the oxidative reaction differs from Fe3+ in its absorption spectrum and its low reactivity with thiocyanate. Similar results are obtained when iron autoxidation is studied in unbuffered solutions brought to alkaline pH with NaOH. In phosphate buffer, no lag phase is evident and the absorption spectrum of the final solution is identical to that of Fe3+ in this buffer. The iron product reacts immediately with thiocyanate. When iron oxidation is conducted in the presence of NBT the formation of formazan is almost undetectable. Of the many compounds tested only catalase inhibits iron autoxidation in this buffer. The sequence of reactions leading to iron autoxidation in Good-type buffers thus resembles that occurring in unbuffered solutions brought to alkaline pH with NaOH and greatly differs from that occurring in phosphate buffer. These results are in agreement with the observation that these buffers have very low affinity for iron. The data presented define experimental conditions where Fe2+ is substantially stable for a considerable length of time in Mops buffer. PMID:3148493

  16. Mini-Column Ion-Exchange Separation and Atomic Absorption Quantitation of Nickel, Cobalt, and Iron: An Undergraduate Quantitative Analysis Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, James L.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Presents an undergraduate quantitative analysis experiment, describing an atomic absorption quantitation scheme that is fast, sensitive and comparatively simple relative to other titration experiments. (CS)

  17. Conditions and mechanism for the formation of iron-rich Montmorillonite in deep sea sediments (Costa Rica margin): Coupling high resolution mineralogical characterization and geochemical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charpentier, D.; Buatier, M. D.; Jacquot, E.; Gaudin, A.; Wheat, C. G.

    2011-03-01

    Iron-rich smectite is commonly described in the diagenetic fraction of deep-sea sediment, as millimeter to centimeter aggregates dispersed in the sediment, or as a coating on sedimentary particles or nodules. This study examines several factors to elucidate formation mechanisms of a particular iron-rich smectite and its potential transformation to glauconite. The study combines a detailed mineralogical investigation on natural samples and a chemical modeling approach to assess mineralogical reactions and pathways. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations and analytical electron microscopy (TEM-AEM) analyses were conducted on microtomed samples of millimeter- to centimeter-long green grains. These grains are widespread in pelagic calcareous sediment from the Costa Rica margin. They are composed of pyrites that are partially dissolved and are surrounded by amorphous or very poorly crystallized iron-rich particles. Iron-rich montmorillonite grows from an amorphous precursor and its formation requires the input of Si, O, Mg, K, Na and Ca; our results suggest that these inputs are supported by the dissolution of sedimentary phases such as volcanic glasses, siliceous fossils and silicates. Thermodynamic modeling of fluid-sediment interactions was conducted with the geochemical computer code PhreeqC, using mineralogical and pore fluid compositions from sediment samples and calculated estimates for thermodynamic constants of smectites that are not maintained by the computer code. Simulations confirm the possibility that the green grains are the product of pyrite alteration by seawater under oxidizing conditions. The extent of smectite production is controlled by the kinetics of pyrite dissolution and fluid migration. The absence of aluminum in the Costa Rica margin system explains the formation of an iron-rich montmorillonite instead of glauconite, whereas the presence of calcite that buffers the system explains the formation of an iron-rich montmorillonite

  18. X-ray absorption fine structure combined with fluorescence spectrometry for monitoring trace amounts of lead adsorption in the environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Yasuo; Kiyotaki, Fumitaka; Minato, Taketoshi; Seida, Yoshimi

    2002-08-01

    The local structure of trace amounts of lead in an adsorbent matrix that contains a high concentration of iron and magnesium (Mg6Fe2(OH)16(CO3) x 3H2O) was successfully monitored by means of X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy combined with fluorescence spectrometry. A eutectic mixture of PbCO3 and Pb(OH)2 coagulated when Pb2+ was adsorbed from a 1.0 ppm aqueous solution, and in contrast, the major species was ion-exchanged Pb2+ in the case of adsorption from a 100 ppb aqueous solution. The difference was ascribed to the balance between the precipitation equilibrium for coagulation and the rate of the ion exchange reaction with surface hydroxyl groups. PMID:12175171

  19. Effect of austenitizing conditions on the impact properties of an alloyed austempered ductile iron of initially ferritic matrix structure

    SciTech Connect

    Delia, M.; Alaalam, M.; Grech, M.

    1998-04-01

    The effect of austenitizing conditions on the microstructure and impact properties of an austempered ductile iron (ADI) containing 1.6% Cu and 1.6% Ni as the main alloying elements was investigated. Impact tests were carried out on samples of initially ferritic matrix structure and which had been first austenitized at 850, 900, 950, and 1,000 C for 15 to 360 min and austempered at 360 C for 180 min. Results showed that the austenitizing temperature, T{sub {gamma}}, and time, t{sub {gamma}} have a significant effect on the impact properties of the alloy. This has been attributed to the influence of these variables on the carbon kinetics. Microstructures of samples austenitized at 950 and 1,000 C contain no pro-eutectoid ferrite. The impact properties of the former structures are independent of t{sub {gamma}}, while those solution treated at 1,000 C are generally low and show wide variation over the range of soaking time investigated. For fully ausferritic structures, impact properties fall with an increase in T{sub {gamma}}. This is particularly evident at 1,000 C. As the T{sub {gamma}} increases, the amount of carbon dissolved in the original austenite increases. This slows down the rate of austenite transformation and results in coarser structures with lower mechanical properties. Optimum impact properties are obtained following austenitizing between 900 and 950 C for 120 to 180 min.

  20. Anaerobic hydrocarbon degradation in petroleum-contaminated harbor sediments under sulfate-reducing and artificially imposed iron-reducing conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coates, J.D.; Anderson, R.T.; Woodward, J.C.; Phillips, E.J.P.; Lovley, D.R.

    1996-01-01

    The potential use of iron(III) oxide to stimulate in-situ hydrocarbon degradation in anaerobic petroleum-contaminated harbor sediments was investigated. Previous studies have indicated that Fe(III)-reducing bacteria (FeRB) can oxidize some electron donors more effectively than sulfate- reducing bacteria (SRB). In contrast to previous results in freshwater sediments, the addition of Fe(III) to marine sediments from San Diego Bay, CA did not switch the terminal electron-accepting process (TEAP) from sulfate reduction to Fe-(III) reduction. Addition of Fe(III) also did not stimulate anaerobic hydrocarbon oxidation. Exposure of the sediment to air [to reoxidize Fe(II) to Fe(III)] followed by anaerobic incubation of the sediments, resulted in Fe-(III) reduction as the TEAP, but contaminant degradation was not stimulated and in some instances was inhibited. The difference in the ability of FeRB to compete with the SRB in the different sediment treatments was related to relative population sizes. Although the addition of Fe(III) did not stimulate hydrocarbon degradation, the results presented here as well as other recent studies demonstrate that there may be significant anaerobic hydrocarbon degradation under sulfate-reducing conditions in harbor sediments.

  1. Impact of iron-reducing bacteria on the corrosion rate of carbon steel under simulated geological disposal conditions.

    PubMed

    Schütz, Marta K; Schlegel, Michel L; Libert, Marie; Bildstein, Olivier

    2015-06-16

    The current projects for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste rely on underground burial and confinement by metallic envelopes that are susceptible to corrosion processes. The impact of microbial activity must be fully clarified in order to provide biological parameters for predictive reactive transport models. This study investigates the impact of hydrogenotrophic iron-reducing bacteria (Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1) on the corrosion rate of carbon steel under simulated geological disposal conditions by using a geochemical approach. It was found that corrosion damage changes mostly according to the experimental solution (i.e., chemical composition). Magnetite and vivianite were identified as the main corrosion products. In the presence of bacteria, the corrosion rate increased by a factor of 1.3 (according to weight loss analysis) to 1.8 (according to H2 measurements), and the detected amount of magnetite diminished. The mechanism likely to enhance corrosion is the destabilization and dissolution of the passivating magnetite layer by reduction of structural Fe(III) coupled to H2 oxidation. PMID:25988515

  2. A new method for evaluation of the resistance to rice kernel cracking based on moisture absorption in brown rice under controlled conditions

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Asako; Tomita, Katsura; Shimizu, Toyohiro

    2015-01-01

    We developed and evaluated the effectiveness of a new method to detect differences among rice cultivars in their resistance to kernel cracking. The method induces kernel cracking under laboratory controlled condition by moisture absorption to brown rice. The optimal moisture absorption conditions were determined using two japonica cultivars, ‘Nipponbare’ as a cracking-resistant cultivar and ‘Yamahikari’ as a cracking-susceptible cultivar: 12% initial moisture content of the brown rice, a temperature of 25°C, a duration of 5 h, and only a single absorption treatment. We then evaluated the effectiveness of these conditions using 12 japonica cultivars. The proportion of cracked kernels was significantly correlated with the mean 10-day maximum temperature after heading. In addition, the correlation between the proportions of cracked kernels in the 2 years of the study was higher than that for values obtained using the traditional late harvest method. The new moisture absorption method could stably evaluate the resistance to kernel cracking, and will help breeders to develop future cultivars with less cracking of the kernels. PMID:26719740

  3. Spin state of iron and elastic properties of (MgFe)(SiAl)O3 under conditions of the lower mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glazyrin, K.; Boffa Ballaran, T.; Frost, D. J.; McCammon, C. A.; Kantor, A.; Merlini, M.; Hanfland, M.; Dubrovinsky, L. S.

    2012-12-01

    Iron is incorporated into crystal structures of the dominant lower mantle phases, namely, magnesium silicate perovskite (Pv) and ferropericlase (Fp). There is no doubt that iron is the most abundant transition element of the lower mantle. Depending on conditions imposed by the latter, charge distribution between different electronic orbitals of iron may change, giving rise to spin state transitions (SST) which, in turn, may modify bulk elastic and transport properties of the material. Critical conditions promoting SST vary depending on iron cation charge and crystallographic environment. In the case of Pv, it was shown that Fe2+ will occupy exclusively the distorted dodecahedral (A) site, while Fe3+ can substitute in both the A and the B (octahedral) sites. However, the problem becomes more complicated if we consider Fe/Al coupled substitution in Pv and realistic compositions of the lower mantle. Although SST in Pv is a current and highly debated topic, there is clearly a lack of experimental data, and the literature shows strong controversies between theoretical calculations and experiment. The problem of iron SST in Pv is one of the most challenging and important for our understanding of mantle processes and dynamics. We conducted a single crystal diffraction experiment on Mg0.6Fe0.4Si0.63Al0.37O3 Pv at the ID09 beamline, ESRF, Grenoble. Comprehensive characterization of this sample synthesized in a multianvil apparatus revealed that almost all iron in this material is ferric and occupies exclusively the A site (Fe3+A). We studied the combined effect of compression and temperature on the crystal structure and elastic properties of the material, and we observed that (a) below 77 GPa, 1800K there is no SST for Fe3+A and (b) high pressure-high temperature treatment has no effect on Fe/Al cation distribution between different crystallographic sites. These observations are in good agreement with recent theoretical work. Based on a thermal equation of state derived

  4. The ColRS system of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae is required for virulence and growth in iron-limiting conditions.

    PubMed

    Subramoni, Sujatha; Pandey, Alok; Vishnu Priya, M R; Patel, Hitendra Kumar; Sonti, Ramesh V

    2012-09-01

    Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, the causal agent of bacterial blight of rice, produces siderophores only under iron-limiting conditions. We screened 15 400 mTn5-induced mutants of X. oryzae pv. oryzae and isolated 27 mutants that produced siderophores even under iron-replete conditions. We found that the mTn5 insertions in 25 of these mutants were in or close to six genes. Mutants with insertions in five of these genes [colS, XOO1806 (a conserved hypothetical protein), acnB, prpR and prpB] exhibited a deficiency for growth on iron-limiting medium and a decrease in virulence. Insertions in a sixth gene, XOO0007 (a conserved hypothetical protein), were found to affect the ability to grow on iron-limiting medium, but did not affect the virulence. Targeted gene disruptants for colR (encoding the predicted cognate regulatory protein for ColS) also exhibited a deficiency for growth on iron-limiting medium and a decrease in virulence. colR and colS mutants were defective in the elicitation of hypersensitive response symptoms on the nonhost tomato. In addition, colR and colS mutants induced a rice basal defence response, suggesting that they are compromised in the suppression of host innate immunity. Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis demonstrated that a functional ColRS system is required for the optimal expression of several genes encoding components of the type 3 secretion system (T3SS) of X. oryzae pv. oryzae. Our results demonstrate the role of several novel genes, including colR/colS, in the promotion of growth on iron-limiting medium and the virulence of X. oryzae pv. oryzae. PMID:22257308

  5. Relativistic Effects Around Black Holes: Smearing Absorption Edges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, X. L.; Feng, Y. X.; Zhang, S. N.; Yao, Y.

    2002-01-01

    Broad iron absorption structures have been observed in the X-ray spectra of both AGNs and black hole X-ray binaries (BHXBs). A correctly modeled absorption structure can reveal the physical condition of the source, help to determine the continuum spectra and thus help to estimate other spectral lifes more accurately. The absorption structures are usually thought to be caused by the reflection of X-rays by the accretion disks around the central black holes, and the broadening can be a ttributed to the ionization states of the disk and relativistic effects.

  6. Effects of Fusion Zone Size and Failure Mode on Peak Load and Energy Absorption of Advanced High Strength Steel Spot Welds under Lap Shear Loading Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2008-06-01

    This paper examines the effects of fusion zone size on failure modes, static strength and energy absorption of resistance spot welds (RSW) of advanced high strength steels (AHSS) under lap shear loading condition. DP800 and TRIP800 spot welds are considered. The main failure modes for spot welds are nugget pullout and interfacial fracture. Partial interfacial fracture is also observed. Static weld strength tests using lap shear samples were performed on the joint populations with various fusion zone sizes. The resulted peak load and energy absorption levels associated with each failure mode were studied for all the weld populations using statistical data analysis tools. The results in this study show that AHSS spot welds with conventionally required fusion zone size of can not produce nugget pullout mode for both the DP800 and TRIP800 welds under lap shear loading. Moreover, failure mode has strong influence on weld peak load and energy absorption for all the DP800 welds and the TRIP800 small welds: welds failed in pullout mode have statistically higher strength and energy absorption than those failed in interfacial fracture mode. For TRIP800 welds above the critical fusion zone level, the influence of weld failure modes on peak load and energy absorption diminishes. Scatter plots of peak load and energy absorption versus weld fusion zone size were then constructed, and the results indicate that fusion zone size is the most critical factor in weld quality in terms of peak load and energy absorption for both DP800 and TRIP800 spot welds.

  7. Reduced mass absorption cross section of black carbon under an extremely polluted condition in southern suburb of Beijing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Wang, S.; Hua, Y.; Jiang, J.; Zhao, B.; Xing, J.; Jiang, S.; Cai, R.; Hao, J.

    2015-12-01

    Black carbon (BC), as one of the most important climate-warming agent, has been the focus of extensive studies in recent years. Mass absorption cross section (MAC) is a key parameter to assess the radiative forcing by linking the mass concentration with the radiation effect. In this study, we conducted a two-month field campaign in Beijing, the capital city of China, in a October and November, a period that severe PM2.5 pollution occurred. PM2.5 offline samples were collected daily onto quartz fiber filters by a Partisol 2300 Speciation Sampler. Size-segregated aerosol samples of the size ranged from 0.056 - 10 µm with 11 bins were collected onto quartz fiber filters by a cascade impactor developed by National Chiao Tung University (NCTU). A DRI Model 2001 thermal/optical carbon analyzer were used to analyze the samples. The MAC of BC is measured by a thermal-optical carbon analyzer. In contrast to previous studies, we found that after "shadow effect" has been corrected, the MAC is reduced from 14 m2/g to 5 m2/g with the increase of BC concentrations. There was no significant correlation between MAC with secondary inorganic aerosols. Such unexpected reduction in MAC of BC is possibly associated with the microphysical property of BC modulated under serious pollution condition. The study of size-segregated species concentrations shows that the size distribution of BC is unimodal, with the peak around 0.56-1.8 µm. The results also show the proportion of BC larger than 0.56 µm is significant increased. Additionally, "soot superaggregate", as distinct from conventional sub-micron aggregates, was found in the bins of BC with size ranged from 1 to1.8 µm. Such high carbon aerosol proportion and large BC size distribution suggests that emissions from residential biomass burning is dominant during this episode. This study suggests that the optical property for BC from different emission sectors should be considered in the estimation of radiative forcing.

  8. An update on iron physiology

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Manuel; Villar, Isabel; García-Erce, José Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Iron is an essential micronutrient, as it is required for adequate erythropoietic function, oxidative metabolism and cellular immune responses. Although the absorption of dietary iron (1-2 mg/d) is regulated tightly, it is just balanced with losses. Therefore, internal turnover of iron is essential to meet the requirements for erythropoiesis (20-30 mg/d). Increased iron requirements, limited external supply, and increased blood loss may lead to iron deficiency (ID) and iron-deficiency anemia. Hepcidin, which is made primarily in hepatocytes in response to liver iron levels, inflammation, hypoxia and anemia, is the main iron regulatory hormone. Once secreted into the circulation, hepcidin binds ferroportin on enterocytes and macrophages, which triggers its internalization and lysosomal degradation. Thus, in chronic inflammation, the excess of hepcidin decreases iron absorption and prevents iron recycling, which results in hypoferremia and iron-restricted erythropoiesis, despite normal iron stores (functional ID), and anemia of chronic disease (ACD), which can evolve to ACD plus true ID (ACD + ID). In contrast, low hepcidin expression may lead to iron overload, and vice versa. Laboratory tests provide evidence of iron depletion in the body, or reflect iron-deficient red cell production. The appropriate combination of these laboratory tests help to establish a correct diagnosis of ID status and anemia. PMID:19787824

  9. Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Yılmaz Keskin, Ebru; Yenicesu, İdil

    2015-03-01

    Iron is essential for life because it is indispensable for several biological reactions, such as oxygen transport, DNA synthesis, and cell proliferation. Over the past few years, our understanding of iron metabolism and its regulation has changed dramatically. New disorders of iron metabolism have emerged, and the role of iron as a cofactor in other disorders has begun to be recognized. The study of genetic conditions such as hemochromatosis and iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA) has provided crucial insights into the molecular mechanisms controlling iron homeostasis. In the future, these advances may be exploited to improve treatment of both genetic and acquired iron disorders. IRIDA is caused by mutations in TMPRSS6, the gene encoding matriptase-2, which downregulates hepcidin expression under conditions of iron deficiency. The typical features of this disorder are hypochromic, microcytic anemia with a very low mean corpuscular volume of erythrocytes, low transferrin saturation, no (or inadequate) response to oral iron, and only a partial response to parenteral iron. In contrast to classic iron deficiency anemia, serum ferritin levels are usually low-normal, and serum or urinary hepcidin levels are inappropriately high for the degree of anemia. Although the number of cases reported thus far in the literature does not exceed 100, this disorder is considered the most common of the "atypical" microcytic anemias. The aim of this review is to share the current knowledge on IRIDA and increase awareness in this field. PMID:25805669

  10. Effect of Iron and Carbonation of the Diffusion of Iodine and Rhenium in Waste Encasement Concrete and Soil Fill Material under Hydraulically Unsaturated Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Wellman, Dawn M.; Parker, Kent E.; Powers, Laura; Whyatt, Greg A.; Clayton, Libby N.; Mattigod, Shas V.; Wood, Marcus I.

    2008-07-31

    Assessing long-term performance of Category 3 cement wasteforms and accurate prediction for radionuclide encasement requires knowledge of the radionuclide-cement interactions and mechanisms of retention (i.e. sorption or precipitation). A set of sediment-concrete half-cell diffusion experiments was conducted under unsaturated conditions (4% and 7% by weight moisture content) using carbonated and non-carbonated concrete-soil half-cells. Results indicate the behavior of rhenium and iodine release was comparable within a given half-cell test. Diffusivity in soil is a function of moisture content; a 3% increase in moisture content affords a one to two order of magnitude increase in diffusivity. Release of iodine and rhenium was 1 to 3 orders of magnitude less from non-carbonated, relative to carbonated, concrete monoliths. Inclusion of iron in non-carbonate monoliths resulted in the lowest concrete diffusivity values for both iodine and rhenium. This suggests that in the presence of iron, iodine and rhenium are converted to reduced species, which are less soluble and better retained within the concrete monolith. The release of iodine and rhenium was greatest from iron-bearing, carbonated concrete monoliths, suggesting carbonation negates the effect of iron on the retention of iodine and rhenium within concrete monoliths. This is likely due to enhanced formation of microcracks in the presence of iron, which provide preferential paths for contaminant migration. Although the release of iodine and rhenium were greatest from carbonated concrete monoliths containing iron, the migration of iodine and rhenium within a given half-cell is dependent on the moisture content, soil diffusivity, and diffusing species.

  11. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Uses Overlapping Pathways for Iron Reduction at a Distance and by Direct Contact under Conditions Relevant for Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Lies, Douglas P.; Hernandez, Maria E.; Kappler, Andreas; Mielke, Randall E.; Gralnick, Jeffrey A.; Newman, Dianne K.

    2005-01-01

    We developed a new method to measure iron reduction at a distance based on depositing Fe(III) (hydr)oxide within nanoporous glass beads. In this “Fe-bead” system, Shewanella oneidensis reduces at least 86.5% of the iron in the absence of direct contact. Biofilm formation accompanies Fe-bead reduction and is observable both macro- and microscopically. Fe-bead reduction is catalyzed by live cells adapted to anaerobic conditions, and maximal reduction rates require sustained protein synthesis. The amount of reactive ferric iron in the Fe-bead system is available in excess such that the rate of Fe-bead reduction is directly proportional to cell density; i.e., it is diffusion limited. Addition of either lysates prepared from anaerobic cells or exogenous electron shuttles stimulates Fe-bead reduction by S. oneidensis, but iron chelators or additional Fe(II) do not. Neither dissolved Fe(III) nor electron shuttling activity was detected in culture supernatants, implying that the mediator is retained within the biofilm matrix. Strains with mutations in omcB or mtrB show about 50% of the wild-type levels of reduction, while a cymA mutant shows less than 20% of the wild-type levels of reduction and a menF mutant shows insignificant reduction. The Fe-bead reduction defect of the menF mutant can be restored by addition of menaquinone, but menaquinone itself cannot stimulate Fe-bead reduction. Because the menF gene encodes the first committed step of menaquinone biosynthesis, no intermediates of the menaquinone biosynthetic pathway are used as diffusible mediators by this organism to promote iron reduction at a distance. CymA and menaquinone are required for both direct and indirect mineral reduction, whereas MtrB and OmcB contribute to but are not absolutely required for iron reduction at a distance. PMID:16085832

  12. Studying Iron Mineralogy to Understand Redox Conditions in the Mesoproterozoic Belt Basin, USA Using Complementary Microscopic, Spectroscopic, and Magnetic Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slotznick, S. P.; Webb, S.; Kirschvink, J. L.; Fischer, W. W.

    2015-12-01

    Observations of iron chemistry and mineralogy over time provide a valuable tool for studying paleoenvironments, but questions still remain as to the redox character of Proterozoic basins after the rise of oxygen. To evaluate the mechanisms of iron mineralization in Proterozoic samples, we developed an approach that pairs the microscale textural techniques of light microscopy, magnetic scanning microscopy, and (synchrotron-based) microprobe x-ray spectroscopy with sensitive bulk rock magnetic experiments. Samples were collected from stratigraphic sections across the ~1.4 Ga lower Belt Group, Belt Supergroup, MT and ID, USA with a focus on excellently preserved sedimentary rocks, but also including those altered by a variety of diagenetic, metamorphic, and metasomatic events. Results show that even in the best-preserved parts of the Belt Basin, late diagenetic and/or metasomatic fluids affected (in some cases very mildly) the primary iron phases as evidenced by prevalent post-depositional alterations such as rare base metal sulfides. In more heavily altered rocks, the appearance of pyrrhotite and other minerals signaled transformations in iron mineralogy through metamorphism and metasomatism. Despite these secondary phases crystallizing in an open fluid-rich system, primary records of redox chemistry were preserved in the recrystallized early diagenetic framboidal pyrite and (sub)micron-sized detrital magnetite grains. Detrital magnetite is not the most abundant iron-bearing phase in any of the samples (typically <0.01 wt%), but is widely observed in both proximal and deeper basin facies, illustrating an important detrital flux of iron to the basin and a highly reactive iron source for early diagenetic pyrite. Based on our analyses, we interpret the shallow waters of the Belt Basin to be oxic with sulfidic pore fluids and deeper waters in parts of the basin as likely euxinic, consistent with the results of some bulk geochemical proxies. This redox reconstruction also

  13. Physiology of Iron Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Waldvogel-Abramowski, Sophie; Waeber, Gérard; Gassner, Christoph; Buser, Andreas; Frey, Beat M.; Favrat, Bernard; Tissot, Jean-Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Summary A revolution occurred during the last decade in the comprehension of the physiology as well as in the physiopathology of iron metabolism. The purpose of this review is to summarize the recent knowledge that has accumulated, allowing a better comprehension of the mechanisms implicated in iron homeostasis. Iron metabolism is very fine tuned. The free molecule is very toxic; therefore, complex regulatory mechanisms have been developed in mammalian to insure adequate intestinal absorption, transportation, utilization, and elimination. ‘Ironomics’ certainly will be the future of the understanding of genes as well as of the protein-protein interactions involved in iron metabolism. PMID:25053935

  14. Iron absorption from experimental infant formulas based on pea (Pisum sativum)-protein isolate: the effect of phytic acid and ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Davidsson, L; Dimitriou, T; Walczyk, T; Hurrell, R F

    2001-01-01

    Infant formula based on pea (Pisum sativum)-protein isolate has been suggested as an alternative to soybean formula in countries where soybean is not a native crop, or when soybean protein cannot be used due to allergic reactions or intolerances. In the present study, Fe absorption from experimental infant formulas based on pea-protein isolate was measured in healthy non-anaemic young women. The influence of phytic acid and ascorbic acid on Fe absorption was evaluated, using a stable-isotope technique based on incorporation of Fe stable-isotope labels into erythrocytes 14 d after administration. Geometric mean Fe absorption increased from 20.7 (+1 SD 41.6, -1 SD 10.3) % to 33.1 (+1 SD 58.6, -1 SD 18.7) %; (P < 0.0001; n 10) after enzymic degradation of virtually all phytic acid. Doubling the molar ratio Fe:ascorbic acid from 1:2.1 to 1:4.2 in the infant formula with native phytic acid content also increased Fe absorption significantly (P < 0.0001; n 10); geometric mean Fe absorption increased from 14.8 (+1 SD 32.1, -1 SD 6.8) % to 22.1 (+1 SD 47.2, -1 SD 10.4) %. These results confirm the inhibitory and enhancing effects of phytic acid and ascorbic acid respectively on Fe absorption, but also indicate relatively high fractional Fe absorption from the pea-protein-based formulas. After adjusting for differences in Fe status, our data indicate that Fe absorption from dephytinised pea protein might be less inhibitory than dephytinised soybean protein as measured in a previous study (Hurrell et al. 1998). PMID:11227034

  15. Iron Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... detect and help diagnose iron deficiency or iron overload. In people with anemia , these tests can help ... also be ordered when iron deficiency or iron overload is suspected. Early iron deficiency often goes unnoticed. ...

  16. Biochemical and structural characterization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Bfd and FPR: ferredoxin NADP+ reductase and not ferredoxin is the redox partner of heme oxygenase under iron-starvation conditions.

    PubMed

    Wang, An; Zeng, Yuhong; Han, Huijong; Weeratunga, Saroja; Morgan, Bailey N; Moënne-Loccoz, Pierre; Schönbrunn, Ernst; Rivera, Mario

    2007-10-30

    Among the 118 genes upregulated by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in response to iron starvation [Ochsner, U. A., Wilderman, P. J., Vasil, A. I., and Vasil, M. L. (2002) Mol. Microbiol. 45, 1277-1287], we focused on the products of the two genes encoding electron transfer proteins, as a means of identifying the redox partners of the heme oxygenase (pa-HO) expressed under low-iron stress conditions. Biochemical and spectroscopic investigations demonstrated that the bfd gene encodes a 73-amino acid protein (pa-Bfd) that incorporates a [2Fe-2S]2+/+ center, whereas the fpr gene encodes a 258-residue NADPH-dependent ferredoxin reductase (pa-FPR) that utilizes FAD as a cofactor. In vitro reconstitution of pa-HO catalytic activity with the newly characterized proteins led to the surprising observation that pa-FPR efficiently supports the catalytic cycle of pa-HO, without the need of a ferredoxin. In comparison, electron transfer from pa-Bfd to pa-HO is sluggish, which strongly argues against the possibility that the seven electrons needed by pa-HO to degrade biliverdin are transferred from NADPH to pa-HO in a ferredoxin (Bfd)-dependent manner. Given that pa-HO functions to release iron from exogenous heme acquired under iron-starvation conditions, the use of a flavoenzyme rather than an iron-sulfur center-containing protein to support heme degradation is an efficient use of resources in the cell. The crystal structure of pa-FPR (1.6 A resolution) showed that its fold is comparable that of the superfamily of ferredoxin reductases and most similar to the structure of Azotobacter vinelandii FPR and Escherichia coli flavodoxin reductase. The latter two enzymes interact with distinct redox partners, a ferredoxin and a flavodoxin, respectively. Hence, findings reported herein extend the range of redox partners recognized by the fold of pa-FPR to include a heme oxygenase (pa-HO). PMID:17915950

  17. Matrix effects on the determination of manganese in geological materials by atomic-absorption spectrophotometry under different flame conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanzolone, R.F.; Chao, T.T.

    1978-01-01

    Suppression caused by five of the seven matrix elements studied (Si, Al, Fe, Ca and Mg) was observed in the atomic-absorption determination of manganese in geological materials, when synthetic solutions and the recommended oxidizing air-acetylene flame were used. The magnitude of the suppression effects depends on (1) the kind and concentration of the interfering elements, (2) the type of acid medium, and (3) the concentration of manganese to be determined. All interferences noted are removed or alleviated by using a reducing nitrous oxide-acetylene flame. The atomic-absorption method using this flame can be applied to the determination of total and extractable manganese in a wide range of geological materials without interferences. Analyses of six U.S. Geological Survey rock standards for manganese gave results in agreement with the reported values. ?? 1978.

  18. Iron incorporation and post-malaria anaemia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Iron supplementation is employed to treat post-malarial anaemia in environments where iron deficiency is common. Malaria induces an intense inflammatory reaction that stalls reticulo-endothelial macrophagal iron recycling from haemolysed red blood cells and inhibits oral iron absorption, but the mag...

  19. Hydrolysis of soybean protein improves iron bioavailability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Iron is an important trace metal element in human body. Iron deficiency affects human health, especially pregnant women and children. Soybean protein is a popular food in Asia and can contain a high amount of iron (145.70±0.74 ug/g); however, it is usually reported as an inhibitor of iron absorption...

  20. [Structural and functional organization of chloroplasts in leaves of Pisum sativum L. under conditions of root hypoxia and iron deficiency].

    PubMed

    Ladygin, V G; Semenova, G A

    2003-01-01

    A combined effect of iron deficiency and root hypoxia on the biochemical composition activity and structure of chloroplasts in pea leaves have been studied. Both factors are shown to affect the accumulation of chlorophyll causing leaf chlorosis. At iron deficiency chlorosis occurs from the top of plant leaves. At root hypoxia chlorosis starts from the lower strata. At a combined action of both factors the destructive effects are summarized. It was established that light-harvesting complexes of photosystems were reduced stronger at iron deficiency, while complexes of reaction centers of photosystem I and photosystem II are lessened at root hypoxia. Nevertheless, even at a combined effect of both factors yellow leaves preserved small amounts of any pigment-protein complexes and their functional activities. The ultrastructure of chloroplasts during leaf chlorosis was gradually reduced. At first, intergranal sites of thylakoids and then granal ones were destroyed, that was typical of iron deficiency. However, even yellow and almost white leaves kept small thylakoids, capable of forming stacking and small grana made of 2-3 thylakoids. It has been concluded that the destructive effects are summarized due to different kinds of action of iron deficiency and root hypoxia on the structure and functioning of leaves at their combined action. PMID:15216630

  1. Tracer test with As(V) under variable redox conditions controlling arsenic transport in the presence of elevated ferrous iron concentrations.

    PubMed

    Höhn, R; Isenbeck-Schröter, M; Kent, D B; Davis, J A; Jakobsen, R; Jann, S; Niedan, V; Scholz, C; Stadler, S; Tretner, A

    2006-11-20

    To study transport and reactions of arsenic under field conditions, a small-scale tracer test was performed in an anoxic, iron-reducing zone of a sandy aquifer at the USGS research site on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, USA. For four weeks, a stream of groundwater with added As(V) (6.7 muM) and bromide (1.6 mM), was injected in order to observe the reduction of As(V) to As(III). Breakthrough of bromide (Br(-)), As(V), and As(III) as well as additional parameters characterizing the geochemical conditions was observed at various locations downstream of the injection well over a period of 104 days. After a short lag period, nitrate and dissolved oxygen from the injectate oxidized ferrous iron and As(V) became bound to the freshly formed hydrous iron oxides. Approximately one week after terminating the injection, anoxic conditions had been reestablished and increases in As(III) concentrations were observed within 1 m of the injection. During the observation period, As(III) and As(V) were transported to a distance of 4.5 m downgradient indicating significant retardation by sorption processes for both species. Sediment assays as well as elevated concentrations of hydrogen reflected the presence of As(V) reducing microorganisms. Thus, microbial As(V) reduction was thought to be one major process driving the release of As(III) during the tracer test in the Cape Cod aquifer. PMID:16945450

  2. Characterization of incubation experiments and development of an enrichment culture capable of ammonium oxidation under iron-reducing conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, S.; Jaffé, P. R.

    2015-02-01

    Incubation experiments were conducted using soil samples from a forested riparian wetland where we have previously observed anaerobic ammonium oxidation coupled to iron reduction. Production of both nitrite and ferrous iron was measured repeatedly during incubations when the soil slurry was supplied with either ferrihydrite or goethite and ammonium chloride. Significant changes in the microbial community were observed after 180 days of incubation as well as in a continuous flow membrane reactor, using 16S rRNA gene PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, 454 pyrosequencing, and real-time quantitative PCR analysis. We be Acidimicrobiaceae bacterium A6), belonging to the Acidimicrobiaceae family, whose closest cultivated relative is Ferrimicrobium acidiphilum (with 92% identity) and Acidimicrobium ferrooxidans (with 90% identity), might play a key role in this anaerobic biological process that uses ferric iron as an electron acceptor while oxidizing ammonium to nitrite. After ammonium was oxidized to nitrite, nitrogen loss proceeded via denitrification and/or anammox.

  3. Molecular and Cellular Bases of Iron Metabolism in Humans.

    PubMed

    Milto, I V; Suhodolo, I V; Prokopieva, V D; Klimenteva, T K

    2016-06-01

    Iron is a microelement with the most completely studied biological functions. Its wide dissemination in nature and involvement in key metabolic pathways determine the great importance of this metal for uni- and multicellular organisms. The biological role of iron is characterized by its indispensability in cell respiration and various biochemical processes providing normal functioning of cells and organs of the human body. Iron also plays an important role in the generation of free radicals, which under different conditions can be useful or damaging to biomolecules and cells. In the literature, there are many reviews devoted to iron metabolism and its regulation in pro- and eukaryotes. Significant progress has been achieved recently in understanding molecular bases of iron metabolism. The purpose of this review is to systematize available data on mechanisms of iron assimilation, distribution, and elimination from the human body, as well as on its biological importance and on the major iron-containing proteins. The review summarizes recent ideas about iron metabolism. Special attention is paid to mechanisms of iron absorption in the small intestine and to interrelationships of cellular and extracellular pools of this metal in the human body. PMID:27301283

  4. A reaction cell with sample laser heating for in situ soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies under environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Escudero, Carlos; Jiang, Peng; Pach, Elzbieta; Borondics, Ferenc; West, Mark W; Tuxen, Anders; Chintapalli, Mahati; Carenco, Sophie; Guo, Jinghua; Salmeron, Miquel

    2013-05-01

    A miniature (1 ml volume) reaction cell with transparent X-ray windows and laser heating of the sample has been designed to conduct X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies of materials in the presence of gases at atmospheric pressures. Heating by laser solves the problems associated with the presence of reactive gases interacting with hot filaments used in resistive heating methods. It also facilitates collection of a small total electron yield signal by eliminating interference with heating current leakage and ground loops. The excellent operation of the cell is demonstrated with examples of CO and H2 Fischer-Tropsch reactions on Co nanoparticles. PMID:23592631

  5. The impact of in vitro digestion on bioaccessibility of polyphenols from potatoes and sweet potatoes and their influence on iron absorption by human intestinal cells.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Lisa; Deußer, Hannah; Evers, Danièle

    2013-11-01

    The composition of potatoes as determined by chemical extraction has been described extensively. It is thus quite well known that, among other compounds, potato is rich in polyphenols, vitamins and in some minerals. This paper underlines the important role of simulated gastro-intestinal in vitro digestion in the bioaccessibility of polyphenols (chlorogenic acid and derivatives, and rutin) from potatoes and sweet potatoes and their impact on iron uptake. Concentrations of polyphenols in the flesh of two potato cultivars (Nicola, white potato, and Vitelotte, purple potato) and sweet potato were measured by Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography after boiling and after in vitro digestion. Chemical extraction underestimates polyphenol amounts that can be released during digestion and that are actually bioaccessible. Iron uptake, as evaluated by a ferritin assay, by intestinal human cells was decreased after incubation with the intestinal phase of in vitro digestion, presumably due to the presence of polyphenols. PMID:24056541

  6. Abiotic stress growth conditions induce different responses in kernel iron concentration across genotypically distinct maize inbred varieties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The improvement of grain nutrient profiles for essential minerals and vitamins through breeding strategies is a target important for agricultural regions where nutrient poor crops like maize contribute a large proportion of the daily caloric intake. Kernel iron concentration in maize exhibits a broa...

  7. Microbial degradation of toluene under sulfate-reducing conditions and the influence of iron on the process.

    PubMed Central

    Beller, H R; Grbić-Galić, D; Reinhard, M

    1992-01-01

    Toluene degradation occurred concomitantly with sulfate reduction in anaerobic microcosms inoculated with contaminated subsurface soil from an aviation fuel storage facility near the Patuxent River (Md.). Similar results were obtained for enrichment cultures in which toluene was the sole carbon source. Several lines of evidence suggest that toluene degradation was directly coupled to sulfate reduction in Patuxent River microcosms and enrichment cultures: (i) the two processes were synchronous and highly correlated, (ii) the observed stoichiometric ratios of moles of sulfate consumed per mole of toluene consumed were consistent with the theoretical ratio for the oxidation of toluene to CO2 coupled with the reduction of sulfate to hydrogen sulfide, and (iii) toluene degradation ceased when sulfate was depleted, and conversely, sulfate reduction ceased when toluene was depleted. Mineralization of toluene was confirmed in experiments with [ring-U-14C]toluene. The addition of millimolar concentrations of amorphous Fe(OH)3 to Patuxent River microcosms and enrichment cultures either greatly facilitated the onset of toluene degradation or accelerated the rate once degradation had begun. In iron-amended microcosms and enrichment cultures, ferric iron reduction proceeded concurrently with toluene degradation and sulfate reduction. Stoichiometric data and other observations indicate that ferric iron reduction was not directly coupled to toluene oxidation but was a secondary, presumably abiotic, reaction between ferric iron and biogenic hydrogen sulfide. PMID:1575481

  8. Microbial degradation of toluene under sulfate-reducing conditions and the influence of iron on the process

    SciTech Connect

    Beller, H.R.; Grbic-Galic, D.; Reinhard, M.

    1992-01-01

    Toluene degradation occurred concomitantly with sulfate reduction in anaerobic microcosms inoculated with contaminated subsurface soil from an aviation fuel storage facility near the Patuxent River (Md.). Similar results were obtained from enrichment cultures in which toluene was the sole carbon source. Several lines of evidence suggest that toluene degradation was directly coupled to sulfate reduction in Patuxent River microcosms and enrichment cultures: (1) the two processes were synchronous and highly correlated, (2) the observed stoichiometric ratios of moles of sulfate consumed per mole of toluene consumed were consistent with the theoretical ratio for the oxidation of toluene to CO2 coupled with the reduction of sulfate to hydrogen sulfide, and (3) toluene degradation ceased when sulfate was depleted, and conversely, sulfate reduction ceased when toluene was depleted. Mineralization of toluene was confirmed in experiments with (ring-U-14C)toluene. The addition of millimolar concentrations of amorphous Fe(OH)3 to Patuxent River microcosms and enrichment cultures either greatly facilitated the onset of toluene degradation or accelerated the rate once degradation had begun. In iron-amended microcosms and enrichment cultures, ferric iron reduction proceeded concurrently with toluene degradation and sulfate reduction. Stoichiometric data and other observations indicate that ferric iron reduction was not directly coupled to toluene oxidation but was a secondary, presumably abiotic, reaction between ferric iron and biogenic hydrogen sulfide. (Copyright (c) 1992, American Society for Microbiology.)

  9. Fast ultrasound-assisted extraction of copper, iron, manganese and zinc from human hair samples prior to flow injection flame atomic absorption spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Yebra-Biurrun, M C; Cespón-Romero, R M

    2007-06-01

    A dynamic ultrasound-assisted extraction procedure utilizing diluted nitric acid was developed for the determination of copper, iron, manganese and zinc in human hair taken from workers in permanent contact with a polluted environment. The extraction unit of the dynamic ultrasound-assisted extraction system contains a minicolumn into which a specified amount of hair (5-50 mg) is placed. Once inserted into the continuous manifold, trace metals were extracted at 3 mL min(-1) with 3 mol L(-1) nitric acid under the action of ultrasound for 2 min for zinc and 3 min for copper, iron and manganese determination, and using an ultrasonic water-bath temperature of 70 degrees C for zinc and 80 degrees C for copper, iron and manganese determination. The system permits the direct analysis of hair and yields concentrations with relative standard deviations of <3% (n = 11). The applicability of the procedure was verified by analysing human hair samples from workers exposed to welding fumes, and its accuracy was assessed through comparison with a conventional sample dissolution procedure and the use of a certified reference material (BCR 397, human hair). PMID:17404713

  10. Experimental study of germanium adsorption on goethite and germanium coprecipitation with iron hydroxide: X-ray absorption fine structure and macroscopic characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokrovsky, O. S.; Pokrovski, G. S.; Schott, J.; Galy, A.

    2006-07-01

    Adsorption of germanium on goethite was studied at 25 °C in batch reactors as a function of pH (1-12), germanium concentration in solution (10 -7 to 0.002 M) and solid/solution ratio (1.8-17 g/L). The maximal surface site density determined via Ge adsorption experiments at pH from 6 to 10 is equal to 2.5 ± 0.1 μmol/m 2. The percentage of adsorbed Ge increases with pH at pH < 9, reaches a maximum at pH ˜ 9 and slightly decreases when pH is further increased to 11. These results allowed generation of a 2-p K Surface Complexation Model (SCM) which implies a constant capacitance of the electric double layer and postulates the presence of two Ge complexes, >FeO-Ge(OH)30 and >FeO-GeO(OH)2-, at the goethite-solution interface. Coprecipitation of Ge with iron oxy(hydr)oxides formed during Fe(II) oxidation by atmospheric oxygen or by Fe(III) hydrolysis in neutral solutions led to high Ge incorporations in solid with maximal Ge/Fe molar ratio close to 0.5. The molar Ge/Fe ratio in precipitated solid is proportional to that in the initial solution according to the equation (Ge/Fe) solid = k × (Ge/Fe) solution with 0.7 ⩽ k ⩽ 1.0. The structure of adsorbed and coprecipitated Ge complexes was further characterized using XAFS spectroscopy. In agreement with previous data on oxyanions adsorption on goethite, bi-dentate bi-nuclear surface complexes composed of tetrahedrally coordinated Ge attached to the corners of two adjacent Fe octahedra represent the dominant contribution to the EXAFS signal. Coprecipitated samples with Ge/Fe molar ratios >0.1, and samples not aged in solution (<1 day) having intermediate Ge/Fe ratios (0.01-0.1) show 4 ± 0.3 oxygen atoms at 1.76 ± 0.01 Å around Ge. Samples less concentrated in Ge (0.001 < Ge/Fe < 0.10) and aged longer times in solution (up to 280 days) exhibit a splitting of the first atomic shell with Ge in both tetrahedral ( R = 1.77 ± 0.02 Å) and octahedral ( R = 1.92 ± 0.03 Å) coordination with oxygen. In these samples

  11. [Prevention of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia in tropical areas].

    PubMed

    Dillon, J C

    2000-01-01

    Iron deficiency is the most widespread nutritional disease in the World. It is prevalent in tropical areas especially in pregnant women and children. The main cause in these areas is consumption of foods containing inhibitors of iron absorption resulting in insufficient bioavailability. In advanced stages of iron deficiency, low hemoglobin levels lead to anemia. Functional consequences of anemia depend on age including mental and physical retardation in children and work disability in adults. Although other disorders including parasitic, infectious, genetic, and nutritional diseases may be involved in anemia in tropical areas, iron deficiency is always a factor because of nutritional conditions. The WHO has proposed laboratory criteria for use in establishing the incidence of iron deficiency and related anemia in a given population. Based on several surveys, four preventive strategies have been developed, i.e., dietary diversification, iron supplementation, general public health measures, and food fortification. Each of these strategies has advantages and disadvantages. The prevailing consensus is that coordinated use of these approaches holds forth the only hope of impacting the incidence of iron-deficiency anemia in tropical regions. PMID:10989795

  12. Hypersensitivity from intravenous iron products.

    PubMed

    Bircher, Andreas J; Auerbach, Michael

    2014-08-01

    In the last several years, intravenous therapy with iron products has been more widely used. Although it has been a standard procedure in dialysis-associated anemia since the early 1990s, its use is expanding to a host of conditions associated with iron deficiency, especially young women with heavy uterine bleeding and pregnancy. Free iron is associated with unacceptable high toxicity inducing severe, hemodynamically significant symptoms. Subsequently, formulations that contain the iron as an iron carbohydrate nanoparticle have been designed. With newer formulations, including low-molecular-weight iron dextran, iron sucrose, ferric gluconate, ferumoxytol, iron isomaltoside, and ferric carboxymaltose, serious adverse events are rare. PMID:25017687

  13. Effects of washing solution and drying condition on reactivity of nano-scale zero valent irons (nZVIs) synthesized by borohydride reduction.

    PubMed

    Woo, Heesoo; Park, Junboum; Lee, Seockheon; Lee, Seunghak

    2014-02-01

    Washing and drying processes are essential when synthesizing nano-scale zero valent irons (nZVIs) by borohydride reduction of iron salts in aqueous phase. However, effects of these processes on nZVI reactivity have not been investigated in detail, although different washing and drying conditions might alter surface characteristics of nZVIs and thus vary their reactivity towards reducible contaminants. In this study, effects of three washing solutions and drying conditions on the reactivity of nZVIs for nitrate were investigated. Washing with volatile solvents and drying under anaerobic condition decreased thickness of Fe-oxide layer on nZVIs and increased content of Fe(2+)-containing oxides in the layer, which enhanced nZVI reactivity toward nitrate. Volatile solvent washing could minimize the decrease in nZVI reactivity according to changing anaerobic drying condition to aerobic. Findings from this study suggest that application of washing with volatile solvents and drying under aerobic condition should be recommended as effective processes to obtain nZVIs with maximum reactivity at reasonable costs and efforts. PMID:24290304

  14. AB INITIO Simulations of Desorption and Reactivity of Glycine at a Water-Pyrite Interface at ``Iron-Sulfur World'' Prebiotic Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollet, Rodolphe; Boehme, Christian; Marx, Dominik

    2006-08-01

    Glycine at the interface of a pyrite surface (001) FeS2, and bulk water at high pressure and temperature conditions relevant to the “iron-sulfur world” scenario of the origin of life is investigated by theoretical means. Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics is used in order to study the desorption process of the zwitterionic form of this amino acid using two different adsorption modes, where either only one or both oxygens of the carboxylate group are anchored to surface iron atoms. It is found that the formation of stabilizing hydrogen bonds plays a key role in the detachment process, leading to longer retention times for the bidentate adsorption mode. In addition, the chemical reactivity of this heterogeneous system is probed by calculating the Fukui functions as site-specific reactivity indices. The most prominent targets for both nucleophilic and electrophilic reactions to occur are surface atoms, whereas the reactivity of glycine is only slightly affected upon anchoring.

  15. WATER ABSORPTION IN GALACTIC TRANSLUCENT CLOUDS: CONDITIONS AND HISTORY OF THE GAS DERIVED FROM HERSCHEL /HIFI PRISMAS OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Flagey, N.; Goldsmith, P. F.; Lis, D. C.; Monje, R.; Phillips, T. G.; Gerin, M.; De Luca, M.; Godard, B.; Neufeld, D.; Sonnentrucker, P.; Goicoechea, J. R.

    2013-01-01

    We present Herschel/HIFI observations of the three ground state transitions of H{sub 2}O (556, 1669, and 1113 GHz) and H{sub 2}{sup 18}O (547, 1655, and 1101 GHz)-as well as the first few excited transitions of H{sub 2}O (987, 752, and 1661 GHz)-toward six high-mass star-forming regions, obtained as part of the PRISMAS (PRobing InterStellar Molecules with Absorption line Studies) Guaranteed Time Key Program. Water vapor associated with the translucent clouds in Galactic arms is detected in absorption along every line of sight in all the ground state transitions. The continuum sources all exhibit broad water features in emission in the excited and ground state transitions. Strong absorption features associated with the source are also observed at all frequencies except 752 GHz. We model the background continuum and line emission to infer the optical depth of each translucent cloud along the lines of sight. We derive the column density of H{sub 2}O or H{sub 2}{sup 18}O for the lower energy level of each transition observed. The total column density of water in translucent clouds is usually about a few 10{sup 13} cm{sup -2}. We find that the abundance of water relative to hydrogen nuclei is 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} in agreement with models for oxygen chemistry in which high cosmic ray ionization rates are assumed. Relative to molecular hydrogen, the abundance of water is remarkably constant through the Galactic plane with X(H{sub 2}O) =5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8}, which makes water a good traced of H{sub 2} in translucent clouds. Observations of the excited transitions of H{sub 2}O enable us to constrain the abundance of water in excited levels to be at most 15%, implying that the excitation temperature, T {sub ex}, in the ground state transitions is below 10 K. Further analysis of the column densities derived from the two ortho ground state transitions indicates that T {sub ex} {approx_equal} 5 K and that the density n(H{sub 2}) in the translucent clouds

  16. Water Absorption in Galactic Translucent Clouds: Conditions and History of the Gas Derived from Herschel/HIFI PRISMAS Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flagey, N.; Goldsmith, P. F.; Lis, D. C.; Gerin, M.; Neufeld, D.; Sonnentrucker, P.; De Luca, M.; Godard, B.; Goicoechea, J. R.; Monje, R.; Phillips, T. G.

    2013-01-01

    We present Herschel/HIFI observations of the three ground state transitions of H2O (556, 1669, and 1113 GHz) and H218O (547, 1655, and 1101 GHz)—as well as the first few excited transitions of H2O (987, 752, and 1661 GHz)—toward six high-mass star-forming regions, obtained as part of the PRISMAS (PRobing InterStellar Molecules with Absorption line Studies) Guaranteed Time Key Program. Water vapor associated with the translucent clouds in Galactic arms is detected in absorption along every line of sight in all the ground state transitions. The continuum sources all exhibit broad water features in emission in the excited and ground state transitions. Strong absorption features associated with the source are also observed at all frequencies except 752 GHz. We model the background continuum and line emission to infer the optical depth of each translucent cloud along the lines of sight. We derive the column density of H2O or H218O for the lower energy level of each transition observed. The total column density of water in translucent clouds is usually about a few 1013 cm-2. We find that the abundance of water relative to hydrogen nuclei is 1 × 10-8 in agreement with models for oxygen chemistry in which high cosmic ray ionization rates are assumed. Relative to molecular hydrogen, the abundance of water is remarkably constant through the Galactic plane with X(H2O) =5 × 10-8, which makes water a good traced of H2 in translucent clouds. Observations of the excited transitions of H2O enable us to constrain the abundance of water in excited levels to be at most 15%, implying that the excitation temperature, T ex, in the ground state transitions is below 10 K. Further analysis of the column densities derived from the two ortho ground state transitions indicates that T ex ~= 5 K and that the density n(H2) in the translucent clouds is below 104 cm-3. We derive the water ortho-to-para ratio for each absorption feature along the line of sight and find that most of the clouds

  17. Effect of red cyst cell inoculation and iron(II) supplementation on autotrophic astaxanthin production by Haematococcus pluvialis under outdoor summer conditions.

    PubMed

    Hong, Min-Eui; Choi, Yoon Young; Sim, Sang Jun

    2016-01-20

    The negative effect of heat stress on the autotrophic astaxanthin production by Haematococcus pluvialis has been observed during outdoor culture in summer. Under the summer conditions, the proliferation of vegetative cells was highly halted in the green stage and the inducibility in the biosynthesis of astaxanthin was partly hindered in the red stage. Herein, under outdoor summer conditions in which variations of the diurnal temperature occur, heat-stress-driven inefficient vegetative growth of H. pluvialis was highly improved by inoculating the red cyst cells; thereby, maintaining relatively moderate intracellular carotenoid levels in the green stage. Subsequently, a remarkably enhanced astaxanthin titer was successfully obtained by supplementing 50 μM iron(II) to induce the heat stress-driven Haber-Weiss reaction in the red stage. As a result, the productivity of astaxanthin in the cells cultured under summer temperature conditions (23.4-33.5 °C) using the two methods of red cell (cyst) inoculation and the iron(Fe(2+)) supplementation was increased by 147% up to 5.53 mg/L day compared with that of the cells cultured under spring temperature conditions (17.5-27.3 °C). Our technical solutions will definitely improve the annual natural astaxanthin productivity in H. pluvialis in locations confronted by hot summer weather, particularly in large-scale closed photobioreactor systems. PMID:26630998

  18. Characterization of incubation experiments and development of an enrichment culture capable of ammonium oxidation under iron reducing conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, S.; Jaffé, P. R.

    2014-08-01

    Incubation experiments were conducted using soil samples from a forested riparian wetland where we have previously observed anaerobic ammonium oxidation coupled to iron reduction. Production of both nitrite and ferrous iron were measured repeatedly during incubations when the soil slurry was supplied with either ferrihydrite or goethite and ammonium chloride. Significant changes in the microbial community were observed after 180 days of incubation as well as in a continuous flow membrane reactor, using 16S rRNA gene PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, 454-pyrosequencing, and real-time quantitative PCR analysis. We believe that one of the dominant microbial species in our system (an uncultured Acidimicrobiaceae bacterium A6), belonging to the Acidimicrobiaceae family, whose closest cultivated relative is Ferrimicrobium acidiphilum (with 92% identity) and Acidimicrobium ferrooxidans (with 90% identity), might play a key role in this anaerobic biological process that uses ferric iron as an electron acceptor while oxidizing ammonium to nitrite. After ammonium was oxidized to nitrite, nitrogen loss proceeded via denitrification and/or anammox.

  19. Iron Chelation

    MedlinePlus

    ... iron overload and need treatment. What is iron overload? Iron chelation therapy is used when you have ... may want to perform: How quickly does iron overload happen? This is different for each person. It ...

  20. Analysis of Absorption Spectra of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Gaseous- and Particle- Phase Emissions from Peat Fuel Combustion Under Controlled Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connolly, J. I.; Samburova, V.; Moosmüller, H.; Khlystov, A.

    2015-12-01

    Biomass and fossil fuel burning processes emit important organic pollutants called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) into the atmosphere. Smoldering combustion of peat is one of the largest contributors (up to 70%) of carbonaceous species and, therefore, it may be one of the main sources of these PAHs. PAHs can be detrimental to health, they are known to be potent mutagens and suspected carcinogens. They may also contribute to solar light absorption as the particles absorb in the blue and near ultraviolet (UV) region of the solar spectrum ("brown carbon" species). There is very little knowledge and large ambiguity regarding the contribution of PAHs to optical properties of organic carbon (OC) emitted from smoldering biomass combustion. This study focuses on quantifying and analyzing PAHs emitted from peat smoldering combustion to gain more knowledge on their optical properties. Five peat fuels collected in different regions of the world (Russia, USA) were burned under controlled conditions (e.g., relative humidity, combustion efficiency, fuel-moisture content) at the Desert Research Institute Biomass Burning facility (Reno, NV, USA). Combustion aerosols collected on TIGF filters followed by XAD resin cartridges were extracted and analyzed for gas-phase (semi-volatile) and particle-phase PAHs. Filter and XAD samples were extracted separately with dichloromethane followed by acetone using Accelerated Solvent Extractor (ACE 300, Dionex). To determine absorption properties, absorption spectra of extracts and standard PAHs were recorded between 190 and 900 nm with a UV/VIS spectrophotometer (PerkinElmer, Lambda 650). This poster will discuss the potential contribution of PAHs to brown carbon emitted from peat combustion and give a brief comparison with absorption spectra from biomass burning aerosols.

  1. Free energy distribution and hydrothermal mineral precipitation in Hadean submarine alkaline vent systems: Importance of iron redox reactions under anoxic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibuya, Takazo; Russell, Michael J.; Takai, Ken

    2016-02-01

    Thermodynamic calculations of mixing between hypothetical seawater and hydrothermal fluid in the Hadean deep ocean were carried out to predict saturation states of mineral precipitates and redox reactions that could occur in Hadean submarine alkaline hydrothermal systems associated with the serpentinization of ultramafic rocks. In the calculations, the seawater was assumed to be weakly acidic (pH = 5.5) and to include carbon dioxide, ferrous iron and silica, with or without nitrate, while the Hadean hydrothermal fluid was assumed to be highly alkaline (pH = 11) and to contain abundant molecular hydrogen, methane and bisulfide, based on the Archean geologic record, the modern low-temperature alkaline hydrothermal vent fluid (Lost City field), and experimental and theoretical considerations. The modeling indicates that potential mineral precipitates in the mixing zone (hydrothermal chimney structures) could consist mainly of iron sulfides but also of ferrous serpentine and brucite, siderite, and ferric iron-bearing minerals such as goethite, hematite and/or magnetite as minor phases. The precipitation of ferric iron-bearing minerals suggests that chemical iron oxidation would be made possible by pH shift even under anoxic condition. In the mixing zone, comprising an inorganic barrier precipitated at the interface of the two contrasting solutions, various redox reactions release free energy with the potential to drive endergonic reactions, assuming the involvement of coupling inorganic protoenzymes. Hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis and acetogenesis - long considered the most ancient forms of biological energy metabolisms - are able to achieve higher maximum energy yield (>0.5 kJ/kg hydrothermal fluid) than those in the modern serpentinization-associated seafloor hydrothermal systems (e.g., Kairei field). Furthermore, the recently proposed methanotrophic acetogenesis pathway was also thermodynamically investigated. It is known that methanotrophic acetogenesis would

  2. Element distribution and iron speciation in mature wheat grains (Triticum aestivum L.) using synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microscopy mapping and X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) imaging.

    PubMed

    De Brier, Niels; Gomand, Sara V; Donner, Erica; Paterson, David; Smolders, Erik; Delcour, Jan A; Lombi, Enzo

    2016-08-01

    Several studies have suggested that the majority of iron (Fe) and zinc (Zn) in wheat grains are associated with phytate, but a nuanced approach to unravel important tissue-level variation in element speciation within the grain is lacking. Here, we present spatially resolved Fe-speciation data obtained directly from different grain tissues using the newly developed synchrotron-based technique of X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy imaging, coupling this with high-definition μ-X-ray fluorescence microscopy to map the co-localization of essential elements. In the aleurone, phosphorus (P) is co-localized with Fe and Zn, and X-ray absorption near-edge structure imaging confirmed that Fe is chelated by phytate in this tissue layer. In the crease tissues, Zn is also positively related to P distribution, albeit less so than in the aleurone. Speciation analysis suggests that Fe is bound to nicotianamine rather than phytate in the nucellar projection, and that more complex Fe structures may also be present. In the embryo, high Zn concentrations are present in the root and shoot primordium, co-occurring with sulfur and presumably bound to thiol groups. Overall, Fe is mainly concentrated in the scutellum and co-localized with P. This high resolution imaging and speciation analysis reveals the complexity of the physiological processes responsible for element accumulation and bioaccessibility. PMID:27038325

  3. High resolution electron microscopy of the Helicobacter pylori Cag type IV secretion system pili produced in varying conditions of iron availability.

    PubMed

    Haley, Kathryn Patricia; Blanz, Eric Joshua; Gaddy, Jennifer Angeline

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a helical-shaped, gram negative bacterium that colonizes the human gastric niche of half of the human population. H. pylori is the primary cause of gastric cancer, the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. One virulence factor that has been associated with increased risk of gastric disease is the Cag-pathogenicity island, a 40-kb region within the chromosome of H. pylori that encodes a type IV secretion system and the cognate effector molecule, CagA. The Cag-T4SS is responsible for translocating CagA and peptidoglycan into host epithelial cells. The activity of the Cag-T4SS results in numerous changes in host cell biology including upregulation of cytokine expression, activation of proinflammatory pathways, cytoskeletal remodeling, and induction of oncogenic cell-signaling networks. The Cag-T4SS is a macromolecular machine comprised of sub-assembly components spanning the inner and outer membrane and extending outward from the cell into the extracellular space. The extracellular portion of the Cag-T4SS is referred to as the "pilus". Numerous studies have demonstrated that the Cag-T4SS pili are formed at the host-pathogen interface(. However, the environmental features that regulate the biogenesis of this important organelle remain largely obscure. Recently, we reported that conditions of low iron availability increased the Cag-T4SS activity and pilus biogenesis. Here we present an optimized protocol to grow H. pylori in varying conditions of iron availability prior to co-culture with human gastric epithelial cells. Further, we present the comprehensive protocol for visualization of the hyper-piliated phenotype exhibited in iron restricted conditions by high resolution scanning electron microscopy analyses. PMID:25489938

  4. Microbial Reduction of Uranium under Iron- and Sulfate-reducing Conditions: Effect of Amended Goethite on Microbial Community Composition and Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Hee Sun; McGuinness, L.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Peacock, Aaron D.; Komlos, John; Kerkhoff, Lee; Long, Philip E.; Jaffe, Peter R.

    2010-07-01

    There is a growing need for a better understanding of the biogeochemical dynamics involved in microbial U(VI) reduction due to an increasing interest in using biostimulation via electron donor addition as a means to remediate uranium contaminated sites. U(VI) reduction has been observed to be maximized during iron reducing conditions and to decrease upon commencement of sulfate reducing conditions. There are many unknowns regarding the impact of iron/sulfate biogeochemistry on U(VI) reduction. This includes Fe(III) availability as well as the microbial community changes, including the activity of iron-reducers during the uranium biostimulation period even after the onset of sulfate reduction. Up-flow column experiments were conducted with Old Rifle site sediments containing Fe-oxides, Fe-clays, and sulfate rich groundwater. Half of the columns had sediment that was augmented with small amounts of small-particle 57Fe-goethite to track continuously minute goethite changes, and to study the effects of increased Fe(III) levels on the overall biostimulation dynamics. The addition of the 57Fe-goethite did not delay the onset of sulfate reduction, but slightly suppressed the overall rate of sulfate reduction and hence acetate utilization, it did not affect the bacterial numbers of Geobacter-like species throughout the experiment, but did lower the numbers of sulfate reducers in the sediments. 57Fe-Mössbauer analyses (a 57Fe-specific technique) confirmed that there was bioavailable iron present after the onset of sulfate reduction and that iron was still being reduced during sulfate reduction. Addition of the 57Fe-goethite to the sediment had a noticeable effect on the overall composition of the microbial population. 16S rRNA analyses of biostimulated sediment using TRFLP (terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism) showed that Geobacter sp. (a known Fe-reducer) was still active and replicating during the period of significant sulfate reduction. DNA fingerprints of

  5. A protective role for zinc on intestinal peroxidative damage during oral iron repletion.

    PubMed

    Sreedhar, B; Subramaniyan, R; Nair, K Madhavan

    2004-06-11

    Oral iron-supplementation is a general practice to correct iron deficiency anemia. Exposure of iron-deficient intestine to large doses of iron is known to induce oxidative damage, leading to loss of functional integrity, and reduced mucosal cell turnover. Conditioning of intestine with anti-oxidants during iron administration was shown to suppress iron-induced oxidative damage. Zinc is known to protect cells from peroxidative damage by inducing metallothionein and maintaining the sulfhydryl group stability. Nevertheless, co-administration of iron and zinc may antagonize each other with respect to absorption. In the present study, we show that combined supplementation of iron and zinc though marginally inhibits iron uptake significantly attenuates the oxidative stress by induction of metallothionein and elevating the levels of GSH. Further, presence of zinc in situ reduced the iron-induced hydroxyl radical production in the intestinal mucosa, as assessed by EPR spectroscopy. These results strongly suggest a protective role for zinc on iron-induced oxidative stress, which might have implications in anemia control programs. PMID:15147971

  6. Assessing microbial responses to iron enrichment in the Subarctic Northeast Pacific: Do microcosms reproduce the in situ condition?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarratt, M. G.; Marchetti, A.; Hale, M. S.; Rivkin, R. B.; Michaud, S.; Matthews, P.; Levasseur, M.; Sherry, N.; Merzouk, A.; Li, W. K. W.; Kiyosawa, H.

    2006-10-01

    A microcosm experiment was conducted in the NE Pacific in July 2002 to compare the microbial response between microcosms and the Subarctic Ecosystem Response to Iron-Enrichment Study (SERIES) in situ iron-enrichment experiment. Seawater microcosms (20 L) were incubated aboard ship under natural light using three treatments: (1) low-iron seawater amended with 4 nmol l -1 FeSO 4 (+Fe); (2) low-iron seawater amended with 4 nmol l -1 FeSO 4 and 86 nmol l -1 GeO 2 (+Fe+Ge); (3) seawater collected from the in situ Fe-enriched patch (PW). The +Fe+Ge treatment used germanium to control diatom growth to assess the role of diatoms in dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) production. The following variables were measured in the microcosms and in situ: chlorophyll a (chl a), nitrate ( NO3-), silicic acid (Si(OH) 4), phytoplankton abundance and species identification, bacterial abundance (including estimates of low- and high-DNA bacteria), bacterial production, bacterial specific growth rate, particulate and dissolved DMSP and dimethylsulfide (DMS) concentrations. There was little or no significant difference (ANCOVA) in the response of most variables between the +Fe and PW microcosms, but large differences were observed between both these treatments and the in situ data from the enriched patch. Chl a in all microcosms increased from ambient levels (approx. 0.5-1 μg l -1) to approx. 4.5-6.2 μg l -1 after 11 d incubation, when NO3- was fully depleted from all microcosms. During this same period, in situ chl a increased more slowly to a maximum of 2.9 μg l -1 on day 11. Nanophytoplankton and picophytoplankton were more abundant in the microcosms relative to the in situ community, which became dominated by large diatoms. Bacterial abundance was similar in the microcosms and in situ, but bacterial production was significantly higher in the microcosms. While neither DMSP d nor DMS accumulation showed significant differences between the microcosms and in situ , particulate DMSP

  7. Oxidation-Induced Degradable Nanogels for Iron Chelation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhi; Wang, Yan; Purro, Max; Xiong, May P.

    2016-01-01

    Iron overload can increase cellular oxidative stress levels due to formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS); untreated, it can be extremely destructive to organs and fatal to patients. Since elevated oxidative stress levels are inherent to the condition in such patients, oxidation-induced degradable nanogels for iron chelation were rationally designed by simultaneously polymerizing oxidation-sensitive host-guest crosslinkers between β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) and ferrocene (Fc) and iron chelating moieties composed of deferoxamine (DFO) into the final gel scaffold in reverse emulsion reaction chambers. UV-Vis absorption and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) was used to verify iron chelating capability of nanogels. These materials can degrade into smaller chelating fragments at rates proportional to the level of oxidative stress present. Conjugating DFO reduces the cytotoxicity of the chelator in the macrophage cells. Importantly, the nanogel can effectively reduce cellular ferritin expression in iron overloaded cells and regulate intracellular iron levels at the same time, which is important for maintaining a homeostatic level of this critical metal in cells. PMID:26868174

  8. Superparamagnetic iron oxide coated on the surface of cellulose nanospheres for the rapid removal of textile dye under mild condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Yunfeng; Qin, Zongyi; Liu, Yannan; Cheng, Miao; Qian, Pengfei; Wang, Qian; Zhu, Meifang

    2015-12-01

    Magnetic composite nanoparticles (MNPs) were prepared by anchoring iron oxide (Fe3O4) on the surface of carboxyl cellulose nanospheres through a facile chemical co-precipitation method. The as-prepared MNPs were characterized by atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, wide-angle X-ray diffraction measurement, thermal gravity analysis and vibrating sample magnetometry. These MNPs were of a generally spherical shape with a narrow size distribution, and exhibited superparamagnetic behaviors with high saturation magnetization. High efficient removal of Navy blue in aqueous solution was demonstrated at room temperature in a Fenton-like system containing the MNPs and H2O2, which benefited from small particle size, large surface area, high chemical activity, and good dispersibility of the MNPs. The removal efficiency of Navy blue induced by the MNPs prepared at a weight ratio of cellulose to iron of 1:2 were 90.6% at the first minute of the degradation reaction, and 98.0% for 5 min. Furthermore, these MNPs could be efficiently recycled and reused by using an external magnetic field. The approach presented in this paper promotes the use of renewable natural resources as templates for the preparation and stabilization of various inorganic nanomaterials for the purpose of catalysis, magnetic resonance imaging, biomedical and other potential applications.

  9. The Effect of Nickel on the Seismic Wave Belocities of Iron at the Pressure Conditions of the Earth's Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martorell Masip, B.; Vocadlo, L.; Brodholt, J. P.; Wood, I.

    2011-12-01

    Understanding the physical properties of the Earth's core is a key step in the study of the evolution and dynamics of our planet. For much of the last century, based on studies of meteorites [1], it was believed that Earth's core was predominantly a mixture of iron and nickel. More specifically, the Earth's inner core is a solid Fe-Ni alloy at high temperature (T, 6000 K) and high pressure (P, 360 GPa). Furthermore, to account for the lower than expected density in the Earth's core, it has been suggested that light elements must also be present [2]. While the effect of light elements on the properties of iron have been the subject of an extensive literature [3-6], the effect of nickel on the properties of iron has often been overlooked; this is due to the expectation, based on their proximity in the periodic table, that the properties of Ni are sufficiently similar to those of iron that the presence of nickel can be neglected. Although recent research using high P-T experiments and theoretical studies of Fe-Ni alloys has been performed in order to establish whether nickel affects the physical properties of iron, the results have been inconclusive and sometimes contradictory [7-11]. Here we present a DFT study of the athermal elastic properties of solid Fe-Ni alloys at core pressures using the GGA. We have calculated the equation of state (EoS) for Fe-Ni alloys at several compositions for bcc, fcc and hcp structures, and fitted the results to Birch-Murnaghan 3rd order equations of state. We have also calculated the elastic constants for each structure at 360 GPa and evaluated the seismic wave velocities. Our results show that the effect of small amounts of Ni is significant (-1.9% in vp and -4.0% in vs for hcp structure of Fe93.25-Ni6.75 alloy), and therefore nickel must be taken into account if a detailed model of the Earth's inner core is to be constructed. Other aspects of the influence of nickel, such as its effect on the high P-T phase diagram and melting curve

  10. β-Carotene can reverse dysregulation of iron protein in an in vitro model of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Katz, Oksana; Reifen, Ram; Lerner, Aaron

    2015-02-01

    Anemia of chronic disease is frequently seen in chronic inflammatory conditions. Its hallmark is disrupted iron homeostasis, with increased uptake and retention of iron in cells of the reticuloendothelial system. Using the Caco-2 cell line as an in vitro model for iron absorption, local intestinal iron-related protein dynamics were evaluated during interleukin (IL)1β/iron-induced inflammation, confirmed by IL8 release, and following β-carotene and vitamin A supplementation. Time- and dose-dependent iron administration to the cells was then studied. The effects on heavy and light ferritin, ferroportin, transferrin receptor and intracellular iron levels were compared in inflamed Caco-2 cells with and without application of the anti-inflammatory agents β-carotene and vitamin A. IL1β treatment led to IL8 release, a surge in both ferritins' expressions and suppression of ferroportin and transferrin receptor expression. β-Carotene significantly reduced IL8 (1,306.2-253.75 pg/ml), decreased light and heavy ferritin by 77.8 and 45.8%, respectively, and increased ferroportin by 59.9% (P < 0.05). Increasing iron concentrations and incubation periods resulted in increased IL8 release. A strong correlation was found between the levels of IL8 and the ferritins. Intracellular iron sequestration was induced by IL1β and iron and alleviated by β-carotene. β-Carotene normalized the main iron-related proteins' levels, reduced IL8 production, and released intracellular trapped iron. These results highlight local mucosal control of iron regulation and suggest that by applying anti-inflammatory compounds, less iron is locked in inflamed intestinal epithelial cells, leading to its increased bioavailability. This suggests a possible approach to combating anemia associated with chronic inflammatory conditions. PMID:25398638

  11. Absorption and translocation of copper and arsenic in an aquatic macrophyte Myriophyllum alterniflorum DC. in oligotrophic and eutrophic conditions.

    PubMed

    Krayem, Maha; Baydoun, Mohamad; Deluchat, Véronique; Lenain, Jean-Francois; Kazpard, Véronique; Labrousse, Pascal

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate copper and arsenic accumulation and translocation at a concentration of 100 μg/L of a submersed macrophyte Myriophyllum alterniflorum. The trophic level (eutrophic and oligotrophic conditions) of the medium was also considered. To achieve this goal, plants were incubated for 21 days in the presence of 100 μg/L of Cu or AsV. The heavy metal transfers from the contaminated medium to plants and into plant tissues was discussed in terms of the bioconcentration factor (BCF) and the translocation factor (TF). Malondialdehyde (MDA) content in tissues was analyzed in order to study the toxicity of these two contaminants. Our results show that copper was more accumulated in shoots, than roots, whereas the opposite trend was observed for arsenic. In addition, the two contaminants were more accumulated in oligotrophic than eutrophic medium. The BCF of copper in shoots was 1356 in oligotrophic condition, while that of arsenic was higher in roots about 620 in the same condition. The TF was less than 1 for arsenic, and higher than 1 for copper, indicating that watermilfoil restrains the translocation of arsenic to shoots, while it has a low capacity to control the translocation of an essential micronutrient like copper. An increase in MDA content was observed under Cu and As stress. On the basis of this experiment, M. alterniflorum has a higher accumulation potential of copper and arsenic, and therefore, it can be a good candidate for the phytofiltration of these two contaminants from water. PMID:26916264

  12. Respective role of Fe and Mn oxide contents for arsenic sorption in iron and manganese binary oxide: an X-ray absorption spectroscopy investigation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gaosheng; Liu, Fudong; Liu, Huijuan; Qu, Jiuhui; Liu, Ruiping

    2014-09-01

    In our previous studies, a synthesized Fe-Mn binary oxide was found to be very effective for both As(V) and As(III) removal in aqueous phase, because As(III) could be easily oxidized to As(V). As(III) oxidation and As(V) sorption by the Fe-Mn binary oxide may also play an important role in the natural cycling of As, because of its common occurrence in the environment. In the present study, the respective role of Fe and Mn contents present in the Fe-Mn binary oxide on As(III) removal was investigated via a direct in situ determination of arsenic speciation using X-ray absorption spectroscopy. X-ray absorption near edge structure results indicate that Mn atoms exist in a mixed valence state of +3 and +4 and further confirm that MnOx (1.5 < x < 2) content is mainly responsible for oxidizing As(III) to As(V) through a two-step pathway [reduction of Mn(IV) to Mn(III) and subsequent Mn(III) to Mn(II)] and FeOOH content is dominant for adsorbing the formed As(V). No significant As(III) oxidation by pure FeOOH had been observed during its sorption, when the system was exposed to air. The extended X-ray absorption fine structure results reveal that the As surface complex on both the As(V)- and As(III)-treated sample surfaces is an inner-sphere bidentate binuclear corner-sharing complex with an As-M (M = Fe or Mn) interatomic distance of 3.22-3.24 Å. In addition, the MnOx and FeOOH contents exist only as a mixture, and no solid solution is formed. Because of its high effectiveness, low cost, and environmental friendliness, the Fe-Mn binary oxide would play a beneficial role as both an efficient oxidant of As(III) and a sorbent for As(V) in drinking water treatment and environmental remediation. PMID:25093452

  13. Numerical prediction of system round-trip efficiency and feasible operating conditions of small-scale solid oxide iron-air battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmori, Hiroko; Iwai, Hiroshi; Itakura, Kotaro; Saito, Motohiro; Yoshida, Hideo

    2016-03-01

    A simulation model of a small-scale solid oxide iron-air battery system was developed to clarify its fundamental characteristics and feasibility from the view point of energy efficiency. The energy flow in one cycle of charge/discharge operations was evaluated under a quasi-state assumption with 0-dimensional models of the system components, i.e., a solid oxide electrochemical cell, an iron (Fe) box and heat exchangers. Special care was taken when considering thermal aspects; not only a simple system but also a more complicated system with thermal recirculation by three heat exchangers was investigated. It was found that the system round-trip efficiency reaches 61% under the base conditions in this study. The results also show that several limitations exist for the operation parameters and conditions in view of practical applications. In particular, higher and lower limits exist for the fuel and air utilization factors under which the system operates effectively because of constraints such as the maximum allowable fuel-blower temperature and no heat input during the discharge operation.

  14. Bacterial Growth Stimulation with Exogenous Siderophore and Synthetic N-Acyl Homoserine Lactone Autoinducers under Iron-Limited and Low-Nutrient Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Le Luo; Onuki, Hiroyuki; Kamino, Kei

    2000-01-01

    The growth of marine bacteria under iron-limited conditions was investigated. Neither siderophore production nor bacterial growth was detected for Pelagiobacter sp. strain V0110 when Fe(III) was present in the culture medium at a concentration of <1.0 μM. However, the growth of V0110 was strongly stimulated by the presence of trace amounts of exogenous siderophore from an alpha proteobacterium, V0902, and 1 nM N-acyl-octanoylhomoserine lactone (C8-HSL), which is known as a quorum-sensing chemical signal. Even though the iron-binding functionality of a hydroxamate siderophore was undetected in the supernatant of V0902, a hydroxamate siderophore was detected in the supernatant of V0110 under the above conditions. These results indicated that hydroxamate siderophore biosynthesis by V0110 began in response to the exogenous siderophore from V0902 when in the presence of C8-HSL; however, C8-HSL production by V0110 and V0902 was not detected. Direct interaction between V0902 and V0110 through siderophore from V0902 was observed in the dialyzing culture. Similar stimulated growth by exogenous siderophore and HSL was also observed in other non-siderophore-producing bacteria isolated from marine sponges and seawater. The requirement of an exogenous siderophore and an HSL for heterologous siderophore production indicated the possibility that cell-cell communication between different species was occurring. PMID:10877770

  15. Escherichia coli nfuA is essential for maintenance of Shiga toxin phage Min27 lysogeny under iron-depleted condition.

    PubMed

    Cao, Dongmei; Ji, Wenhui; Fu, Qiang; Lu, Chenping; Wang, Hengan; Sun, Jianhe; Yan, Yaxian

    2015-10-01

    It has been earlier hypothesized that lysogenic infection with Stx-encoding phages influences protein expression in the bacterial host, and therefore, some differentially expressed proteins could affect survival characteristics and pathogenicity. We compared the protein expression profiles of the host MG1655 and lysogens by 2D electrophoresis. Four different genes identified were all related to Fe/S subunit production, namely, nfuA, fdoH, sdhB and ftnA. To explore the role of nfuA in the biology of Stx prophage lysogeny, gene knockout experiments and phage lysogenic conversion were performed. The inactivation of nfuA caused the prophage to enter its lytic life cycle, especially under an iron-depleted condition. A similar activity was also detected in the Escherichia coli O157:H7 strain from which the Stx phage Min 27 was originally isolated. NfuA might be the positive regulator of genes controlling lysogenic cycle such as cI, cII and cIII since their transcriptional level was significantly reduced in nfuA deletion mutant as shown by qRT-PCR. We conclude that NfuA is essential for maintenance of Stx phage lysogeny in host's genetic reservoir under iron-deficient condition. PMID:26337151

  16. Determination of scandium, yttrium and lanthanides in silicate rocks and four new canadian iron-formation reference materials by flame atomic-absorption spectrometry with microsample injection.

    PubMed

    Sen Gupta, J G

    1984-12-01

    Enhancement of sensitivity by factors of up to 1.5 by use of the microsampling technique, coupled with the advantage of using small samples in small solution volumes, permits rapid flame AAS determination of traces of Sc, Y, Nd, Eu, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm and Yb in ultramafic and most other rocks of low rare-earth content, which would be either impossible or very difficult to analyse by direct aspiration because of the need for much larger sample weights and solution volumes. The rare-earths are separated by a modified ion-exchange or a double calcium oxalate and single hydrous ferric oxide co-precipitation procedure, and ultimately determined in an ethanolic perchlorate solution, buffered with 1% lanthanum, by the flame microsample injection technique, with a nitrous oxide-acetylene flame. The results obtained by this technique for six international reference rocks SY-2 (syenite), BCR-1 (basalt), BHVO-1 (Hawaiian basalt), SCo-1 (cody shale), MAG-1 (marine mud) and STM-1 (syenite) are compared with those obtained previously by the direct aspiration method and with other reported data. Results are given for four new Canadian iron formation reference materials FeR-1 to FeR-4. PMID:18963723

  17. Effect of iron content on the electrical conductivity of perovskite and magnesiowuestite assemblages at lower mantle conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Xiaoyuan; Jeanloz, Raymond

    1991-01-01

    The electrical conductivity of (Mg/0.76/Fe/0.24/)SiO3 perovskite and of an assemblage of (Mg/0.89/Fe/0.11/)SiO3 perovskite + (Mg/0.70/Fe/0.30/)O magnesiowiestite was measured at pressures of 45-80 GPa and temperatures from 295 to 3600 K. The apparent activation energy for electrical conduction is 0.24 (+ or - 0.10) eV for the perovskite and 0.20 (+ or - 0.08) eV for the perovskite + magnesiowuestite assemblage. Comparing present results with those derived previously for Fe-poor samples, it is found that the electrical conductivities of both the silicate perovskite and the perovskite + magnesiowuestite assemblage depend strongly on iron content. Thus, the electrical conductivity distribution inside the earth could provide an important constraint in modeling the composition of the lower mantle.

  18. Optimization of conditions for thermal treatment of rice bran using an accelerator including an organo-iron compound.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Hikari; Tachibana, Naoya; Fukushima, Masami

    2011-02-01

    A method for thermal conversion of raw organic waste (ROW) to a compost-like material (CLM) with higher levels of unsaturated carbohydrates, nitrogen- and oxygen-containing compounds was developed, in which rice bran and an organo-iron compound were employed as a model ROW and the accelerator, respectively. To evaluate the qualities of CLMs, organic substances of an acid insoluble fraction of alkaline extracts (AIAEs) from a CLM were structurally characterized by elemental analysis, pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and FT-IR. The levels of unsaturated carbohydrates, and nitrogen- and oxygen-containing compounds in the CLM samples were increased by long-term treatment (60°C for 5 days, 170°C for 3 days). In particular, the high lipid content of the AIAEs, which was indicative of inadequate digestion of CLM components, was dramatically reduced in the presence of the accelerator. PMID:21044838

  19. Influence of Chemical Composition on Rupture Properties at 1200 Degrees F. of Forged Chromium-Cobalt-Nickel-Iron Base Alloys in Solution-Treated and Aged Condition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, E E; Freeman, J W; White, A E

    1951-01-01

    The influence of systematic variations of chemical composition on rupture properties at 1200 degrees F. was determined for 62 modifications of a basic alloy containing 20 percent chromium, 20 percent nickel, 20 percent cobalt, 3 percent molybdenum, 2 percent tungsten, 1 percent columbium, 0.15 percent carbon, 1.7 percent manganese, 0.5 percent silicon, 0.12 percent nitrogen and the balance iron. These modifications included individual variations of each of 10 elements present and simultaneous variations of molybdenum, tungsten, and columbium. Laboratory induction furnace heats were hot-forged to round bar stock, solution-treated at 2200 degrees F., and aged at 1400 degrees F. The melting and fabrication conditions were carefully controlled in order to minimize all variable effects on properties except chemical composition. Information is presented which indicates that melting and hot-working conditions play an important role in high-temperature properties of alloys of the type investigated.

  20. Impact of Organic Carbon Electron Donors on Microbial Community Development under Iron- and Sulfate-Reducing Conditions.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Man Jae; O'Loughlin, Edward J; Boyanov, Maxim I; Brulc, Jennifer M; Johnston, Eric R; Kemner, Kenneth M; Antonopoulos, Dionysios A

    2016-01-01

    Although iron- and sulfate-reducing bacteria in subsurface environments have crucial roles in biogeochemical cycling of C, Fe, and S, how specific electron donors impact the compositional structure and activity of native iron- and/or sulfate-reducing communities is largely unknown. To understand this better, we created bicarbonate-buffered batch systems in duplicate with three different electron donors (acetate, lactate, or glucose) paired with ferrihydrite and sulfate as the electron acceptors and inoculated them with subsurface sediment as the microbial inoculum. Sulfate and ferrihydrite reduction occurred simultaneously and were faster with lactate than with acetate. 16S rRNA-based sequence analysis of the communities over time revealed that Desulfotomaculum was the major driver for sulfate reduction coupled with propionate oxidation in lactate-amended incubations. The reduction of sulfate resulted in sulfide production and subsequent abiotic reduction of ferrihydrite. In contrast, glucose promoted faster reduction of ferrihydrite, but without reduction of sulfate. Interestingly, the glucose-amended incubations led to two different biogeochemical trajectories among replicate bottles that resulted in distinct coloration (white and brown). The two outcomes in geochemical evolution might be due to the stochastic evolution of the microbial communities or subtle differences in the initial composition of the fermenting microbial community and its development via the use of different glucose fermentation pathways available within the community. Synchrotron-based x-ray analysis indicated that siderite and amorphous Fe(II) were formed in the replicate bottles with glucose, while ferrous sulfide and vivianite were formed with lactate or acetate. These data sets reveal that use of different C utilization pathways projects significant changes in microbial community composition over time that uniquely impact both the geochemistry and mineralogy of subsurface environments

  1. Impact of Organic Carbon Electron Donors on Microbial Community Development under Iron- and Sulfate-Reducing Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Man Jae; O’Loughlin, Edward J.; Boyanov, Maxim I.; Brulc, Jennifer M.; Johnston, Eric R.; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Antonopoulos, Dionysios A.

    2016-01-01

    Although iron- and sulfate-reducing bacteria in subsurface environments have crucial roles in biogeochemical cycling of C, Fe, and S, how specific electron donors impact the compositional structure and activity of native iron- and/or sulfate-reducing communities is largely unknown. To understand this better, we created bicarbonate-buffered batch systems in duplicate with three different electron donors (acetate, lactate, or glucose) paired with ferrihydrite and sulfate as the electron acceptors and inoculated them with subsurface sediment as the microbial inoculum. Sulfate and ferrihydrite reduction occurred simultaneously and were faster with lactate than with acetate. 16S rRNA-based sequence analysis of the communities over time revealed that Desulfotomaculum was the major driver for sulfate reduction coupled with propionate oxidation in lactate-amended incubations. The reduction of sulfate resulted in sulfide production and subsequent abiotic reduction of ferrihydrite. In contrast, glucose promoted faster reduction of ferrihydrite, but without reduction of sulfate. Interestingly, the glucose-amended incubations led to two different biogeochemical trajectories among replicate bottles that resulted in distinct coloration (white and brown). The two outcomes in geochemical evolution might be due to the stochastic evolution of the microbial communities or subtle differences in the initial composition of the fermenting microbial community and its development via the use of different glucose fermentation pathways available within the community. Synchrotron-based x-ray analysis indicated that siderite and amorphous Fe(II) were formed in the replicate bottles with glucose, while ferrous sulfide and vivianite were formed with lactate or acetate. These data sets reveal that use of different C utilization pathways projects significant changes in microbial community composition over time that uniquely impact both the geochemistry and mineralogy of subsurface environments

  2. Effect of processing conditions on phytic acid, calcium, iron, and zinc contents of lime-cooked maize.

    PubMed

    Bressani, Ricardo; Turcios, Juan Carlos; Colmenares de Ruiz, Ana Silvia; de Palomo, Patricia Palocios

    2004-03-10

    Tortillas are made by cooking maize in a lime solution during variable times and temperatures, steeping the grain for up to 12 h, washing and grinding it to a fine dough, and cooking portions as flat cakes for up to 6 min. The effects of the main processing steps on the chemical composition, nutritive value, and functional and physicochemical characteristics have been areas of research. The present work evaluates the effect of lime concentration (0, 1.2, 2.4, and 3.6%) and cooking times (45, 60, and 75 min) on phytic acid retention of whole maize, its endosperm, and germ, as well as on the content of calcium, iron, and zinc on the same samples. The effects of steeping time and temperature and steeping medium on the phytic acid of lime-cooked maize were also studied. Finally, phytic acid changes from raw maize to tortilla were also measured. The results indicated that lime concentration and cooking time reduce phytic acid content in whole grain (17.4%), in endosperm (45.8%), and in germ (17.0%). Statistical analyses suggested higher phytic acid loss with 1.2% lime and 75 min of cooking. Cooking with the lime solution is more effective in reducing phytic acid than cooking with water. Steeping maize in lime solution at 50 degrees C during 8 h reduced phytic acid an additional 8%. The total loss of phytic acid from maize to tortilla was 22%. Calcium content increased in whole maize, endosperm, and germ with lime concentration and cooking and steeping times. The increase was higher in the germ than in the endosperm. The level, however, can be controlled if steeping of the cooked grain is conducted in water. Iron and zinc contents were not affected by nixtamalization processing variables but were affected in steeping. PMID:14995114

  3. Spectroscopic characterization of pigment binding proteins in normal-grown and iron-stressed thermophilic cyanobacteria Synecococcus sp.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovčinský, M.; Dědic, R.; Pšenčík, J.; Benešová, J.; Štys, D.; Hála, J.

    1999-05-01

    The results of low temperature absorption, fluorescence and hole burning spectroscopy of pigment binding proteins in normal-grown and iron-stressed thermophilic Synecococcus sp. are reported. These experiments revealed that the growing of Synecococcus sp. under the iron-limited condition affects spectral characteristics and excited energy transfer (EET) in pigment proteins. The comparison of low temperature absorption spectra of normal-grown and iron-stressed thermophilic cyanobacteria well documents major changes in composition of the antenna systems and in composition of the core of photosystem II. The absorption of membrane chlorophyll in particular, is blue-shifted from 679 nm in normal cells to 673 nm which is caused by absorption of chlorophyll binding protein CP 34 in stressed sample. The presence of CP 34 in the photosystem II (PS II) has also been seen in the low temperature fluorescence spectra where the increased luminescence at 685 nm has been observed. This implies the decreased efficiency of photosynthesis in iron-limited sample. We studied the energy transfer in PS II by the means of fluorescence and absorption hole-burning spectroscopy which enabled to study the influence of iron-stressed condition on energy transfer and pigment-protein interaction (Debye-Waller factor). The stressed cells exhibit the broadened spectral hole width at 682 and 685.5 nm. Abbreviations: APC, allophycocyanin; CC, cylindrical core; Chl, chlorophyll; LT, low temperature; PBS, phycobilisomes; PSB, phonon sideband; PC, phycocyanin; PR, peripheral rods; PS, photosystem; RC, reaction center, ZPH, zero phonon hole.

  4. Corrosion of iron and low alloyed steel within a water saturated brick of clay under anaerobic deep geological disposal conditions: An integrated experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, F. A.; Bataillon, C.; Schlegel, M. L.

    2008-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the corrosion behaviour of iron and low alloyed steels under simulated geological disposal conditions, related to long-term disposal of nuclear wastes in the site of Bure (Meuse-Haute Marne, Champagne, France). The dedicated experiment was a fully integrated set-up: three different bars of material (iron, steel or nickel) have been introduced inside a solid block of clay, which has been saturated with synthetic Bure water and maintained at 90 °C during 8 months. Two types of clay have been tested: first, a compacted MX80 (Wyoming, USA) and second, argilite directly taken from the Bure site (Callovo-Oxfordian). In situ electrochemistry has been performed: impedance spectra, chronopotentiometry… The samples have been analysed using a combination of techniques, such as SEM, XRD, EDS, μXAS, μRaman, gravimetry after desquamation. In both cases, the steel or the iron seemed to passivate in contact with the clay. Post-processing of the EIS determined the corrosion rates and the changes in the kinetics have been noticed. The post mortem analysis of the corrosion products showed in both cases the presence of an internal layer made of magnetite (Raman, EDX). The external layer was made of partially Ca-substituted siderite (Fe 1-xCa xCO 3), which could play an extra role in the passivation. Moreover, the samples embedded in the Bure argilite presented an intermediate unique layer containing Fe, O, Na and Si. This study suggests the corrosion products started to react with the silica issued from the dissolution of the Bure clay minerals, resulting in clay minerals neo-formation and in corrosion kinetic changes.

  5. Channeling of high-power radio waves under conditions of strong anomalous absorption in the presence of an averaged electron heating source

    SciTech Connect

    Vas'kov, V. V.; Ryabova, N. A.

    2010-02-15

    Strong anomalous absorption of a high-power radio wave by small-scale plasma inhomogeneities in the Earth's ionosphere can lead to the formation of self-consistent channels (solitons) in which the wave propagates along the magnetic field, but has a soliton-like intensity distribution across the field. The structure of a cylindrical soliton as a function of the wave intensity at the soliton axis is analyzed. Averaged density perturbations leading to wave focusing were calculated using the model proposed earlier by Vas'kov and Gurevich (Geomagn. Aeron. 16, 1112 (1976)), in which an averaged electron heating source was used. It is shown that, under conditions of strong electron recombination, the radii of individual solitons do not exceed 650 m.

  6. Hepcidin: an emerging biomarker for iron disorders, inflammatory diseases, and infections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westerman, Mark E.; Olbina, Gordana; Ostland, Vaughn E.; Nemeth, Elizabeta; Ganz, Tomas

    2010-04-01

    The peptide hormone hepcidin, has emerged as the master regulator of iron homeostasis. Dysregulation of hepcidin is a principal or contributing factor in most genetic and acquired systemic iron disorders, including anemia of inflammation (anemia of chronic disease). Hepcidin maintains healthy blood iron levels by regulating dietary iron absorption and transport from body iron stores to plasma. High serum hepcidin levels observed in chronic and acute inflammatory conditions can cause anemia by limiting plasma iron available for erythropoiesis. Chronically low serum hepcidin levels cause iron-overload and ultimately, accumulation of iron in liver and heart. We recently validated the first immunoassay for serum hepcidin and established the normal ranges in adults. Hepcidin has excellent potential as a biomarker and has a known mechanism of action, good stability, and rapid response to iron stores, inflammatory stimuli, and bacterial infections. Hepcidin can be measured in blood, urine, and saliva, and is generally not measurable in iron deficient/anemic patients and highly elevated in inflammatory diseases and infections. Intrinsic LifeSciences (ILS) is developing second generation hepcidin immunoassays and lateral-flow POC devices for hepcidin, a well characterized multi-purpose biomarker with applications in global health security.

  7. Iron-Scytonemin Complexes: DFT Calculations on New UV Protectants for Terrestrial Cyanobacteria and Astrobiological Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varnali, Tereza; Edwards, Howell G. M.

    2010-09-01

    Cyanobacterial colonies produce the radiation-protectant biomolecule scytonemin as part of their response strategy for survival in environmentally stressed conditions in hot and cold deserts. These colonies frequently use sandstone rocks as host matrices for subsurface colonization, which is accompanied by a zone of depletion of iron and transportation of iron compounds to the mineral surface. It is suggested that an iron-scytonemin complex could feature in this survival strategy and facilitate the movement of iron through the rock. Calculations were as host matrices for subsurface colonization, which is accompanied by a zone of depletion of iron and transportation of iron compounds to the mineral surface. It is suggested that an iron-scytonemin complex could feature in this survival strategy and facilitate the movement of iron through the rock. Calculations were carried out on several hypothetical iron-scytonemin complexes to evaluate the most stable structure energetically and examine the effect of the complexation of the biomolecule upon the electronic absorption characteristics of the radiation-protectant species. The implications for extraterrestrial planetary detection and analytical monitoring of an iron-scytonemin complex are assessed.

  8. Influence of oxidizing or reducing agents on gastrointestinal absorption of U, Pu, Am, Cm and Pm by rats.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, M F; Ruemmler, P S; Ryan, J L; Buschbom, R L

    1986-02-01

    Absorption of 233U, 238Pu, 241Am, and 244Cm from the gastrointestinal (GI) tract was measured in rats, fed ad libitum or fasted, that were gavaged with solutions containing ferric iron, ferrous iron, iron powder, quinhydrone or ascorbic acid. Absorption and retention of all of these actinides was increased substantially by fasting and by the addition of mild oxidizing agents, ferric iron and quinhydrone. In contrast, absorption and retention were decreased to below the fasted level by all the reducing agents except ascorbic acid, which caused diarrhea and an increase in absorption. Absorption of the lanthanide element 147Pm from the intestine of fasted rats was also increased by ferric iron. Some of these actinide elements are polyvalent and are, in some cases, known to be absorbed from the GI tract more readily in their higher oxidation states. This suggested an oxidation-reduction mechanism for the effect of fasting and the action of the chemical agents used. However, the improbability that either 241Am(III) 244Cm(III) or 147Pm is converted to a different oxidation state under these conditions makes that mechanism unlikely. Other explanations are suggested. PMID:3005196

  9. Two-photon absorption properties of iron(II) and ruthenium(II) trischelate complexes of 2,2':4,4' ':4',4' ''-quaterpyridinium ligands.

    PubMed

    Coe, Benjamin J; Samoc, Marek; Samoc, Anna; Zhu, Lingyun; Yi, Yuanping; Shuai, Zhigang

    2007-01-25

    A series of RuII or FeII trischelate complex salts containing N-methyl/aryl-2,2':4,4' ':4',4' ''-quaterpyridinium ligands that has previously been subjected to quadratic nonlinear optical studies (Coe, B. J. et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2005, 127, 13399) has now been investigated for two-photon absorbing behavior. Z-scan measurements using a 750 nm laser afford reasonably large two-photon absorption (2PA) cross-sections sigma2 of ca. 62-180 GM for the RuII complexes, but only very weak 2PA is observed for the FeII compounds. The excited-state and 2PA properties of the representative chromophore [RuII(Me2Qpy2+)3]8+ (Me2Qpy2+=N' ',N' ''-dimethyl-2,2':4,4' ':4',4' ''-quaterpyridinium) have also been investigated by using semiempirical intermediate neglect of differential overlap/multireference-determinant single and double configuration interaction computations with the optimized geometry obtained via density functional theory. The calculated sigma2 value of ca. 624 GM at 1.70 eV for this metal-to-ligand charge-transfer chromophore is about 10 times larger than that obtained from the Z-scan studies. PMID:17228896

  10. X-rays absorption study on medieval corrosion layers for the understanding of very long-term indoor atmospheric iron corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monnier, J.; Réguer, S.; Vantelon, D.; Dillmann, P.; Neff, D.; Guillot, I.

    2010-05-01

    The study and prediction of very long-term atmospheric corrosion behaviour of ferrous alloys is of great importance in different fields. First the conservation of metallic artefacts in museum and the corrosion diagnosis on ferrous reinforcement used in ancient monuments since medieval times needs reliable data to understand the mechanisms. Second, in the frame of the interim storage of nuclear waste in France, it is necessary to model the long-term corrosion of low alloy steel overcontainer. The nature of phases and elements constituting the corrosion layers can greatly influence the corrosion mechanisms. On the one hand, it is crucial to precisely determine the nature of microscopic phases that can be highly reactive. On the other hand, some elements as P and S could modify this reactivity. To clarify this point and complementary to other studies using Raman micro spectroscopy technique, X-rays Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) under synchrotron radiation plays a crucial role. It allows one to precisely identify the reactive phases in the corrosion layers. Micro-XAS was required in order to refine the spatial variation, at micrometer scale, of the predominant Fe oxidation state and to characterise the corresponding corrosion products. Moreover, the role of minor elements on phase’s stability and the chemical form of these elements in the rust layer, especially phosphorus and sulphur, was investigated.

  11. In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy study of Si(1-x)Ge(x)O2 dissolution and germanium aqueous speciation under hydrothermal conditions.

    PubMed

    Ranieri, V; Haines, J; Cambon, O; Levelut, C; Le Parc, R; Cambon, M; Hazemann, J-L

    2012-01-01

    The dissolution of Si(1-x)Ge(x)O(2) solid solutions under hydrothermal conditions was studied by in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Experiments were performed at the Ge K-edge using a high-pressure cell mounted on the FAME beamline of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. Spectra in both transmission and fluorescence mode were collected in isobaric conditions (100 and 150 MPa) up to 475 °C. The local atomic structure around the Ge atom was investigated as a function of the temperature and in pure water and sodium hydroxide solutions. In pure water, the solubility of the cristobalite-type Si(0.8)Ge(0.2)O(2) increases with the temperature and the Ge atom is in 4-fold coordination. In a sodium hydroxide aqueous solution, a complex between Ge and Na atoms forms and gives rise to precipitation of sodium germanates. Under these conditions, the Ge content in the solution decreases with increasing temperature. These results show that a sodium hydroxide aqueous solution, usually used for quartz crystal growth, is not suitable for Ge-containing crystals. The dissolution kinetics and phase transformation of the solid solution were studied as a function of the atomic fraction of Ge. Ge-rich solid solutions dissolve and transform to stable phases faster than Ge-poorer composition, giving rise to important variations of the Ge content in solution. PMID:22175278

  12. [Iron supplement to blood donors. II. Effect of continuous iron supply].

    PubMed

    Liedén, G; Höglund, S; Ehn, L

    1975-01-01

    Seventeen conscripts gave blood every second month, the amount representing an average iron loss of 3.5 mg daily. Seven of them were given 20 mg and ten 100 mg iron as ferrous carbonate once daily throughout the study. Before the first and after the fourth and sixth blood donations they were examined with regard to packed red cell volume, serum iron, total iron-binding capacity and stainable bone marrow iron, and a diagnostic iron absoprtion test was performed. Ten conscripts receiving no iron and giving no blood but comparable to those in the test groups with regard to age, exercise and diet served as controls. The stainable bone marrow iron was found to become stabilized at a level with reduced but still perceptible amounts when 20 mg iron was given, and at a level with somewhat greater amounts when the daily dose was 100 mg. Both levels were lower than before blood donation in most subjects, and the negative iron balance was also reflected in the diagnostic iron absorption test. When a healthy person loses 3.5 mg iron daily, supplementation with a 100 mg tablet per day is therefore insufficient to maintain the iron stores at their previous level. The decrease in storage iron is not progressive, however. When the storage iron is reduced, iron absorption seems to be stimulated sufficiently to establish a balance at a reduced storage iron level. PMID:1124659

  13. Iron overdose

    MedlinePlus

    Iron is an ingredient in many mineral and vitamin supplements. Iron supplements are also sold by themselves. Types include: Ferrous sulfate (Feosol, Slow Fe) Ferrous gluconate (Fergon) Ferrous fumarate (Femiron, Feostat) Other products may also contain iron.

  14. INVESTIGATION OF THE TRANSFORMATION OF URANIUM UNDER IRON-REDUCING CONDITIONS: REDUCTION OF UVI BY BIOGENIC FEII/FEIII HYDROXIDE (GREEN RUST)

    SciTech Connect

    O'Loughlin, Edward J.; Scherer, Michelle M.; Kemner, Kenneth M.

    2006-12-31

    The recent identification of green rusts (GRs) as products of the reduction of FeIII oxyhydroxides by dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria, coupled with the ability of synthetic (GR) to reduce UVI species to insoluble UO2, suggests that biogenic green rusts (BioGRs) may play an important role in the speciation (and thus mobility) of U in FeIII-reducing environments. The objective of our research was to examine the potential for BioGR to affect the speciation of U under FeIII-reducing conditions. To meet this objective, we designed and executed a hypothesis-driven experimental program to identify key factors leading to the formation of BioGRs as products of dissimilatory FeIII reduction, to determine the key factors controlling the reduction of UVI to UIV by GRs, and to identify the resulting U-bearing mineral phases. The results of this research significantly increase our understanding of the coupling of biotic and abiotic processes with respect to the speciation of U in iron-reducing environments. In particular, the reduction of UVI to UIV by BioGR with the subsequent formation of U-bearing mineral phases may be effective for immobilizing U in suboxic subsurface environments. This information has direct applications to contaminant transport modeling and bioremediation engineering for natural or enhanced in situ remediation of subsurface contamination.

  15. Probing the influence of the center atom coordination structure in iron phthalocyanine multi-walled carbon nanotube-based oxygen reduction reaction catalysts by X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yingxiang; Li, Zhipan; Xia, Dingguo; Zheng, Lirong; Liao, Yi; Li, Kai; Zuo, Xia

    2015-09-01

    Three different pentacoordinate iron phthalocyanine (FePc) electrocatalysts with an axial ligand (pyridyl group, Py) anchored to multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are prepared by a microwave method as high performance composite electrocatalysts (FePc-Py/MWCNTs) for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). For comparison, tetracoordinate FePc electrocatalysts without an axial ligand anchored to MWCNTs (FePc/MWCNTs) are assembled in the same way. Ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry (UV-Vis), Raman spectroscopy (RS), and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) are used to characterize the obtained electrocatalysts. The electrocatalytic activity of the samples is measured by linear sweep voltammetry (LSV), and the onset potential of all of the FePc-Py/MWCNTs electrocatalysts is found to be more positive than that of their FePc/MWCNTs counterparts. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy are employed to elucidate the relationship between molecular structure and electrocatalytic activity. XPS indicates that higher concentrations of Fe3+ and pyridine-type nitrogen play critical roles in determining the electrocatalytic ORR activity of the samples. XAFS spectroscopy reveals that the FePc-Py/MWCNTs electrocatalysts have a coordination geometry around Fe that is closer to the square pyramidal structure, a higher concentration of Fe3+, and a smaller phthalocyanine ring radius compared with those of FePc/MWCNTs.

  16. Determination of Iron in Milk Powdermicrowave Digestion and Flame Atomicabsorption Spectrophotometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Guangyuan; Li, Bo

    To investigate the conditions of microwave digestion for determining Iron in milk powder by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry(FAAS), the content of iron in milk powder was determined by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry after the samples were microwavely digested under different conditions. The optimum parameters for microwave digestion were obtained by the orthogonal test at last. The best optimum parameters for microwave digestion was that, the volume of digestion solution was 8mL, the reagent proportion for HNO3 and H2O2 was 4:1, the digestion time was 8min, the digestion pressure was 2.6 Mpa and the digestion power was 1000 W. The content of Iron in assayed milk powder was 0.0560mg/g. Microwave digestion was a time-saving and practical pretreatment of samples.

  17. Iron metabolism: current facts and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Tandara, Leida; Salamunic, Ilza

    2012-01-01

    Iron metabolism has been intensively examined over the last decade and there are many new players in this field which are worth to be introduced. Since its discovery many studies confirmed role of liver hormone hepcidin as key regulator of iron metabolism and pointed out liver as the central organ of system iron homeostasis. Liver cells receive multiple signals related to iron balance and respond by transcriptional regulation of hepcidin expression. This liver hormone is negative regulator of iron metabolism that represses iron efflux from macrophages, hepatocytes and enterocytes by its binding to iron export protein ferroportin. Ferroportin degradation leads to cellular iron retention and decreased iron availability. At level of a cell IRE/IRP (iron responsive elements/iron responsive proteins) system allows tight regulation of iron assimilation that prevents an excess of free intracellular iron which could lead to oxidative stress and damage of DNA, proteins and lipid membranes by ROS (reactive oxygen species). At the same time IRE/IRP system provides sufficient iron in order to meet the metabolic needs. Recently a significant progress in understanding of iron metabolism has been made and new molecular participants have been characterized. Article gives an overview of the current understanding of iron metabolism: absorption, distribution, cellular uptake, release, and storage. We also discuss mechanisms underlying systemic and cellular iron regulation with emphasis on central regulatory hormone hepcidin. PMID:23092063

  18. Compressed shell conditions extracted from spectroscopic analysis of Ti K-shell absorption spectra with evaluation of line self-emission

    SciTech Connect

    Johns, H. M.; Mancini, R. C.; Hakel, P.; Nagayama, T.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Regan, S. P.; Delettrez, J.

    2014-08-15

    Ti-doped tracer layers embedded in the shell at varying distances from the fuel-shell interface serve as a spectroscopic diagnostic for direct-drive experiments conducted at OMEGA. Detailed modeling of Ti K-shell absorption spectra produced in the tracer layer considers n = 1–2 transitions in F- through Li-like Ti ions in the 4400–4800 eV range, both including and excluding line self-emission. Testing the model on synthetic spectra generated from 1-D LILAC hydrodynamic simulations reveals that the model including self-emission best reproduces the simulation, while the model excluding self-emission overestimates electron temperature T{sub e} and density N{sub e} to a higher degree for layers closer to the core. The prediction of the simulation that the magnitude of T{sub e} and duration of Ti absorption will be strongly tied to the distance of the layer from the core is consistent with the idea that regions of the shell close to the core are more significantly heated by thermal transport out of the hot dense core, but more distant regions are less affected by it. The simulation predicts more time variation in the observed T{sub e}, N{sub e} conditions in the compressed shell than is observed in the experiment, analysis of which reveals conditions remain in the range T{sub e} = 400–600 eV and N{sub e} = 3.0–10.0 × 10{sup 24} cm{sup −3} for all but the most distant Ti-doped layer, with error bars ∼5% T{sub e} value and ∼10% N{sub e} on average. The T{sub e}, N{sub e} conditions of the simulation lead to a greater degree of ionization for zones close to the core than occurs experimentally, and less ionization for zones far from the core.

  19. Constraints on Earth’s inner core composition inferred from measurements of the sound velocity of hcp-iron in extreme conditions

    PubMed Central

    Sakamaki, Tatsuya; Ohtani, Eiji; Fukui, Hiroshi; Kamada, Seiji; Takahashi, Suguru; Sakairi, Takanori; Takahata, Akihiro; Sakai, Takeshi; Tsutsui, Satoshi; Ishikawa, Daisuke; Shiraishi, Rei; Seto, Yusuke; Tsuchiya, Taku; Baron, Alfred Q. R.

    2016-01-01

    Hexagonal close-packed iron (hcp-Fe) is a main component of Earth’s inner core. The difference in density between hcp-Fe and the inner core in the Preliminary Reference Earth Model (PREM) shows a density deficit, which implies an existence of light elements in the core. Sound velocities then provide an important constraint on the amount and kind of light elements in the core. Although seismological observations provide density–sound velocity data of Earth’s core, there are few measurements in controlled laboratory conditions for comparison. We report the compressional sound velocity (VP) of hcp-Fe up to 163 GPa and 3000 K using inelastic x-ray scattering from a laser-heated sample in a diamond anvil cell. We propose a new high-temperature Birch’s law for hcp-Fe, which gives us the VP of pure hcp-Fe up to core conditions. We find that Earth’s inner core has a 4 to 5% smaller density and a 4 to 10% smaller VP than hcp-Fe. Our results demonstrate that components other than Fe in Earth’s core are required to explain Earth’s core density and velocity deficits compared to hcp-Fe. Assuming that the temperature effects on iron alloys are the same as those on hcp-Fe, we narrow down light elements in the inner core in terms of the velocity deficit. Hydrogen is a good candidate; thus, Earth’s core may be a hidden hydrogen reservoir. Silicon and sulfur are also possible candidates and could show good agreement with PREM if we consider the presence of some melt in the inner core, anelasticity, and/or a premelting effect. PMID:26933678