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Sample records for iron core nanoparticle

  1. Application of novel iron core/iron oxide shell nanoparticles to sentinel lymph node identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cousins, Aidan; Howard, Douglas; Henning, Anna M.; Nelson, Melanie R. M.; Tilley, Richard D.; Thierry, Benjamin

    2015-12-01

    Current `gold standard' staging of breast cancer and melanoma relies on accurate in vivo identification of the sentinel lymph node. By replacing conventional tracers (dyes and radiocolloids) with magnetic nanoparticles and using a handheld magnetometer probe for in vivo identification, it is believed the accuracy of sentinel node identification in nonsuperficial cancers can be improved due to increased spatial resolution of magnetometer probes and additional anatomical information afforded by MRI road-mapping. By using novel iron core/iron oxide shell nanoparticles, the sensitivity of sentinel node mapping via MRI can be increased due to an increased magnetic saturation compared to traditional iron oxide nanoparticles. A series of in vitro magnetic phantoms (iron core vs. iron oxide nanoparticles) were prepared to simulate magnetic particle accumulation in the sentinel lymph node. A novel handheld magnetometer probe was used to measure the relative signals of each phantom, and determine if clinical application of iron core particles can improve in vivo detection of the sentinel node compared to traditional iron oxide nanoparticles. The findings indicate that novel iron core nanoparticles above a certain size possess high magnetic saturation, but can also be produced with low coercivity and high susceptibility. While some modification to the design of handheld magnetometer probes may be required for particles with large coercivity, use of iron core particles could improve MRI and magnetometer probe detection sensitivity by up to 330 %.

  2. Surface Engineering of Core/Shell Iron/Iron Oxide Nanoparticles from Microemulsions for Hyperthermia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guandong; Liao, Yifeng; Baker, Ian

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the synthesis and surface engineering of core/shell-type iron/iron oxide nanoparticles for magnetic hyperthermia cancer therapy. Iron/iron oxide nanoparticles were synthesized from microemulsions of NaBH4 and FeCl3, followed by surface modification in which a thin hydrophobic hexamethyldisilazane layer - used to protect the iron core - replaced the CTAB coating on the particles. Phosphatidylcholine was then assembled on the nanoparticle surface. The resulting nanocomposite particles have a biocompatible surface and show good stability in both air and aqueous solution. Compared to iron oxide nanoparticles, the nanocomposites show much better heating in an alternating magnetic field. They are good candidates for both hyperthermia and magnetic resonance imaging applications. PMID:21833157

  3. High temperature oxidation of iron-iron oxide core-shell nanowires composed of iron nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Krajewski, M; Brzozka, K; Lin, W S; Lin, H M; Tokarczyk, M; Borysiuk, J; Kowalski, G; Wasik, D

    2016-02-01

    This work describes an oxidation process of iron-iron oxide core-shell nanowires at temperatures between 100 °C and 800 °C. The studied nanomaterial was synthesized through a simple chemical reduction of iron trichloride in an external magnetic field under a constant flow of argon. The electron microscopy investigations allowed determining that the as-prepared nanowires were composed of self-assembled iron nanoparticles which were covered by a 3 nm thick oxide shell and separated from each other by a thin interface layer. Both these layers exhibited an amorphous or highly-disordered character which was traced by means of transmission electron microscopy and Mössbauer spectroscopy. The thermal oxidation was carried out under a constant flow of argon which contained the traces of oxygen. The first stage of process was related to slow transformations of amorphous Fe and amorphous iron oxides into crystalline phases and disappearance of interfaces between iron nanoparticles forming the studied nanomaterial (range: 25-300 °C). After that, the crystalline iron core and iron oxide shell became oxidized and signals for different compositions of iron oxide sheath were observed (range: 300-800 °C) using X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and Mössbauer spectroscopy. According to the thermal gravimetric analysis, the nanowires heated up to 800 °C under argon atmosphere gained 37% of mass with respect to their initial weight. The structure of the studied nanomaterial oxidized at 800 °C was mainly composed of α-Fe2O3 (∼ 93%). Moreover, iron nanowires treated above 600 °C lost their wire-like shape due to their shrinkage and collapse caused by the void coalescence. PMID:26766540

  4. Microemulsion Synthesis of Iron Core/Iron Oxide Shell Magnetic Nanoparticles and Their Physicochemical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Kekalo, Katsiaryna; Koo, Katherine; Zeitchick, Evan; Baker, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Iron magnetic nanoparticles were synthesized under an inert atmosphere via the reaction between FeCl3 and NaBH4 in droplets of water in a microemulsion consisting of octane with cetyl trimethylammonium bromide and butanol as surfactants. A thin Fe3O4 layer was produced on the iron nanoparticles using slow, controlled oxidation at room temperature. A silica shell was deposited on the Fe3O4 using 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane following the method of Zhang et al. [Mater. Sci. Eng. C 30 (2010) 92–97]. The structure and chemistry of the resulting nanoparticles were studied using variety of methods and their magnetic properties were determined. The diameter of the iron core was typically 8–16 nm, while the thickness of the Fe3O4 shell was 2–3 nm. The presence of the silica layer was confirmed using Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy and the number of NH2-groups on each nanoparticle was determined based on colorimetric tests using ortho-phthalaldehyde. PMID:26549922

  5. Functionalized magnetic iron oxide/alginate core-shell nanoparticles for targeting hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Liao, Shih-Hsiang; Liu, Chia-Hung; Bastakoti, Bishnu Prasad; Suzuki, Norihiro; Chang, Yung; Yamauchi, Yusuke; Lin, Feng-Huei; Wu, Kevin C-W

    2015-01-01

    Hyperthermia is one of the promising treatments for cancer therapy. However, the development of a magnetic fluid agent that can selectively target a tumor and efficiently elevate temperature while exhibiting excellent biocompatibility still remains challenging. Here a new core-shell nanostructure consisting of inorganic iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles as the core, organic alginate as the shell, and cell-targeting ligands (ie, D-galactosamine) decorated on the outer surface (denoted as Fe3O4@Alg-GA nanoparticles) was prepared using a combination of a pre-gel method and coprecipitation in aqueous solution. After treatment with an AC magnetic field, the results indicate that Fe3O4@Alg-GA nanoparticles had excellent hyperthermic efficacy in a human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (HepG2) owing to enhanced cellular uptake, and show great potential as therapeutic agents for future in vivo drug delivery systems. PMID:26005343

  6. Functionalized magnetic iron oxide/alginate core-shell nanoparticles for targeting hyperthermia

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Shih-Hsiang; Liu, Chia-Hung; Bastakoti, Bishnu Prasad; Suzuki, Norihiro; Chang, Yung; Yamauchi, Yusuke; Lin, Feng-Huei; Wu, Kevin C-W

    2015-01-01

    Hyperthermia is one of the promising treatments for cancer therapy. However, the development of a magnetic fluid agent that can selectively target a tumor and efficiently elevate temperature while exhibiting excellent biocompatibility still remains challenging. Here a new core-shell nanostructure consisting of inorganic iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles as the core, organic alginate as the shell, and cell-targeting ligands (ie, D-galactosamine) decorated on the outer surface (denoted as Fe3O4@Alg-GA nanoparticles) was prepared using a combination of a pre-gel method and coprecipitation in aqueous solution. After treatment with an AC magnetic field, the results indicate that Fe3O4@Alg-GA nanoparticles had excellent hyperthermic efficacy in a human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (HepG2) owing to enhanced cellular uptake, and show great potential as therapeutic agents for future in vivo drug delivery systems. PMID:26005343

  7. High performance multi-core iron oxide nanoparticles for magnetic hyperthermia: microwave synthesis, and the role of core-to-core interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco-Andujar, C.; Ortega, D.; Southern, P.; PankhurstJoint Last Authors., Q. A.; Thanh, N. T. K.

    2015-01-01

    The adoption of magnetic hyperthermia as either a stand-alone or adjunct therapy for cancer is still far from being optimised due to the variable performance found in many iron oxide nanoparticle systems, including commercially available formulations. Herein, we present a reproducible and potentially scalable microwave-based method to make stable citric acid coated multi-core iron oxide nanoparticles, with exceptional magnetic heating parameters, viz. intrinsic loss parameters (ILPs) of up to 4.1 nH m2 kg-1, 35% better than the best commercial equivalents. We also probe the core-to-core magnetic interactions in the particles via remanence-derived Henkel and ΔM plots. These reveal a monotonic dependence of the ILP on the magnetic interaction field Hint, and show that the interactions are demagnetising in nature, and act to hinder the magnetic heating mechanism.The adoption of magnetic hyperthermia as either a stand-alone or adjunct therapy for cancer is still far from being optimised due to the variable performance found in many iron oxide nanoparticle systems, including commercially available formulations. Herein, we present a reproducible and potentially scalable microwave-based method to make stable citric acid coated multi-core iron oxide nanoparticles, with exceptional magnetic heating parameters, viz. intrinsic loss parameters (ILPs) of up to 4.1 nH m2 kg-1, 35% better than the best commercial equivalents. We also probe the core-to-core magnetic interactions in the particles via remanence-derived Henkel and ΔM plots. These reveal a monotonic dependence of the ILP on the magnetic interaction field Hint, and show that the interactions are demagnetising in nature, and act to hinder the magnetic heating mechanism. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Reproducibility studies and additional characterisation data including SQUID Magnetometry, TEM, ATR-FTIR, XRD and Mossbauer spectroscopy. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr06239f

  8. Core-shell composite particles composed of biodegradable polymer particles and magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, Chiemi; Ushimaru, Kazunori; Horiishi, Nanao; Tsuge, Takeharu; Kitamoto, Yoshitaka

    2015-05-01

    Core-shell composite particles with biodegradability and superparamagnetic behavior were prepared using a Pickering emulsion for targeted drug delivery based on magnetic guidance. The composite particles were composed of a core of biodegradable polymer and a shell of assembled magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. It was found that the dispersibility of the nanoparticles is crucial for controlling the core-shell structure. The addition of a small amount of dispersant into the nanoparticle's suspension could improve the dispersibility and led to the formation of composite particles with a thin magnetic shell covering a polymeric core. The composite particles were also fabricated with a model drug loaded into the core, which was released via hydrolysis of the core under strong alkaline conditions. Because the core can also be biodegraded by lipase, this result suggests that the slow release of the drug from the composite particles should occur inside the body.

  9. Size-dependent structural evolution of the biomineralized iron-core nanoparticles in ferritins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Eunsook; Kim, D. H.; Hwang, Jihoon; Lee, Kiho; Yoon, Sungwon; Suh, B. J.; Hyun Kim, Kyung; Kim, J.-Y.; Jang, Z. H.; Kim, Bongjae; Min, B. I.; Kang, J.-S.

    2013-04-01

    The structural identity of the biomineralized iron core nanoparticles in Helicobacter pylori ferritins (Hpf's) has been determined by employing soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy and soft x-ray magnetic circular dichroism. Valence states of Fe ions are nearly trivalent in all Hpf's, indicating that the amount of magnetite (Fe3O4) is negligible. With increasing filling of Fe ions, the local configurations of Fe3+ ions change from the mixture of the tetrahedral and octahedral symmetries to the octahedral symmetry. These results demonstrate that the biomineralization of the ferritin core changes from maghemite-like (γ-Fe2O3) formation to hematite-like (α-Fe2O3) formation with increasing Fe content.

  10. Magnetism of iron oxide based core-shell nanoparticles from interface mixing with enhanced spin-orbit coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skoropata, E.; Desautels, R. D.; Chi, C.-C.; Ouyang, H.; Freeland, J. W.; van Lierop, J.

    2014-01-01

    We show that the magnetism of core-shell nanoparticles (made of maghemite, γ-Fe2O3, cores and transition-metal and metal-oxide shells) is altered substantially by the interface, which is a doped iron-oxide layer formed naturally during the seed-mediated synthesis process, a route used typically to produce core-shell nanoparticles. Characteristics fundamental to useful applications, such as the anisotropy and superparamagnetic blocking temperature, were altered substantially with Cu, CoO, MnO, and NiO shells. To ascertain the origin of this behavior, the prototype γ-Fe2O3/CoO core-shell nanoparticles are described in detail. We show that the magnetism originates essentially from an interfacial doped iron-oxide layer formed via migration of shell ions, e.g., Co2+, into octahedral site vacancies in the surface layers of the γ-Fe2O3 core. For this system, an overall Fe morb/mspin=0.15±0.03 is measured (morb˜0 for the Fe-oxides) and an enhanced Co morb/mspin=0.65±0.03 elucidates the origin of the unexpectedly high overall anisotropy of the nanoparticle. This interfacial layer is responsible for the overall (e.g., bulk) magnetism and provides a perspective on how the magnetism of core-shell nanoparticles manifests from the selected core and shell materials.

  11. Engineering of Superparamagnetic Core-Shell Iron Oxide/N-Chloramine Nanoparticles for Water Purification.

    PubMed

    Haham, Hai; Natan, Michal; Gutman, Ori; Kolitz-Domb, Michal; Banin, Ehud; Margel, Shlomo

    2016-07-20

    In this study, we describe the synthesis and characterization of superparamagnetic core-shell iron oxide (IO)/N-halamine antibacterial nanoparticles (NPs). For this purpose, superparamagnetic IO core NPs were coated with cross-linked polymethacrylamide (PMAA) by surfactant-free dispersion copolymerization of methacrylamide and N,N-methylenebis(acrylamide) in an aqueous continuous phase. The effect of the polymerization process on the chemical composition, size, shape, crystallinity, and magnetic properties of the IO/PMAA NPs was elucidated. Conversion of the core-shell IO/PMAA NPs into their N-halamine form, IO/PMAA-Cl, was accomplished using a chlorination reaction with sodium hypochlorite. The influence of chlorination on the shape, crystallinity, and magnetic properties of the IO/PMAA NPs was studied. The IO/PMAA-Cl NPs demonstrated excellent antibacterial activity against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Finally, the chlorination recharging capabilities of the NPs and their potential for use in the purification of water containing bacteria were demonstrated with magnetic columns packed with the IO/PMAA-Cl NPs. PMID:27348740

  12. Anti-cancer drug loaded iron-gold core-shell nanoparticles (Fe@Au) for magnetic drug targeting.

    PubMed

    Kayal, Sibnath; Ramanujan, Raju Vijayaraghavan

    2010-09-01

    Magnetic drug targeting, using core-shell magnetic carrier particles loaded with anti-cancer drugs, is an emerging and significant method of cancer treatment. Gold shell-iron core nanoparticles (Fe@Au) were synthesized by the reverse micelle method with aqueous reactants, surfactant, co-surfactant and oil phase. XRD, XPS, TEM and magnetic property measurements were utilized to characterize these core-shell nanoparticles. Magnetic measurements showed that the particles were superparamagnetic at room temperature and that the saturation magnetization decreased with increasing gold concentration. The anti-cancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) was loaded onto these Fe@Au nanoparticle carriers and the drug release profiles showed that upto 25% of adsorbed drug was released in 80 h. It was found that the amine (-NH2) group of DOX binds to the gold shell. An in vitro apparatus simulating the human circulatory system was used to determine the retention of these nanoparticle carriers when exposed to an external magnetic field. A high percentage of magnetic carriers could be retained for physiologically relevant flow speeds of fluid. The present findings show that DOX loaded gold coated iron nanoparticles are promising for magnetically targeted drug delivery. PMID:21133071

  13. Enhanced bio-compatibility of ferrofluids of self-assembled superparamagnetic iron oxide-silica core-shell nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, T N; Mary, A P Reena; Swalih, P K Anas; Kumar, D Sakthi; Makarov, D; Albrecht, M; Puthumana, Jayesh; Anas, Abdulaziz; Anantharaman, M R

    2011-03-01

    Self-assembled magnetic colloidal suspensions are sought after by material scientists owing to its huge application potential. The biomedical applications of colloidal nanoparticles necessitate that they are biocompatible, non-interacting, monodispersed and hence the synthesis of such nanostructures has great relevance in the realm of nanoscience. Silica-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles based ferrofluids were prepared using polyethylene glycol as carrier fluid by employing a controlled co-precipitation technique followed by a modified sol-gel synthesis. A plausible mechanism for the formation of stable suspension of SiO2-coated Iron Oxide nanoparticles with a size of about 9 nm dispersed in polyethylene glycol (PEG) is proposed. Core-shell nature of the resultant SiO2-Iron Oxide nanocomposite was verified using transmission electron microscopy. Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy studies were carried out to understand the structure and nature of chemical bonds. The result suggests that Iron Oxide exist in an isolated state inside silica matrix. Moreover, the presence of silanol bonds establishes the hydrophilic nature of silica shell confirming the formation of stable ferrofluid with PEG as carrier fluid. The magnetic characterization reveals the superparamagnetic behavior of the nanoparticles with a rather narrow distribution of blocking temperatures. These properties are not seen in ferrofluids prepared from Iron Oxide nanoparticles without SiO2 coating. The latter suggests the successful tuning of the inter-particle interactions preventing agglomeration of nanoparticles. Cytotoxicity studies on citric acid coated water based ferrofluid and silica-coated PEG-based ferrofluid were evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazole-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium chloride assay and it shows an enhanced compatibility for silica modified nanoparticles. PMID:21449334

  14. Solvent-surface interactions control the phase structure in laser-generated iron-gold core-shell nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wagener, Philipp; Jakobi, Jurij; Rehbock, Christoph; Chakravadhanula, Venkata Sai Kiran; Thede, Claas; Wiedwald, Ulf; Bartsch, Mathias; Kienle, Lorenz; Barcikowski, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    This work highlights a strategy for the one-step synthesis of FeAu nanoparticles by the pulsed laser ablation of alloy targets in the presence of different solvents. This method allows particle generation without the use of additional chemicals; hence, solvent-metal interactions could be studied without cross effects from organic surface ligands. A detailed analysis of generated particles via transmission electron microscopy in combination with EDX elemental mapping could conclusively verify that the nature of the used solvent governs the internal phase structure of the formed nanoparticles. In the presence of acetone or methyl methacrylate, a gold shell covering a non-oxidized iron core was formed, whereas in aqueous media, an Au core with an Fe3O4 shell was generated. This core-shell morphology was the predominant species found in >90% of the examined nanoparticles. These findings indicate that fundamental chemical interactions between the nanoparticle surface and the solvent significantly contribute to phase segregation and elemental distribution in FeAu nanoparticles. A consecutive analysis of resulting Fe@Au core-shell nanoparticles revealed outstanding oxidation resistance and fair magnetic and optical properties. In particular, the combination of these features with high stability magnetism and plasmonics may create new opportunities for this hybrid material in imaging applications. PMID:27004738

  15. Solvent-surface interactions control the phase structure in laser-generated iron-gold core-shell nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagener, Philipp; Jakobi, Jurij; Rehbock, Christoph; Chakravadhanula, Venkata Sai Kiran; Thede, Claas; Wiedwald, Ulf; Bartsch, Mathias; Kienle, Lorenz; Barcikowski, Stephan

    2016-03-01

    This work highlights a strategy for the one-step synthesis of FeAu nanoparticles by the pulsed laser ablation of alloy targets in the presence of different solvents. This method allows particle generation without the use of additional chemicals; hence, solvent-metal interactions could be studied without cross effects from organic surface ligands. A detailed analysis of generated particles via transmission electron microscopy in combination with EDX elemental mapping could conclusively verify that the nature of the used solvent governs the internal phase structure of the formed nanoparticles. In the presence of acetone or methyl methacrylate, a gold shell covering a non-oxidized iron core was formed, whereas in aqueous media, an Au core with an Fe3O4 shell was generated. This core-shell morphology was the predominant species found in >90% of the examined nanoparticles. These findings indicate that fundamental chemical interactions between the nanoparticle surface and the solvent significantly contribute to phase segregation and elemental distribution in FeAu nanoparticles. A consecutive analysis of resulting Fe@Au core-shell nanoparticles revealed outstanding oxidation resistance and fair magnetic and optical properties. In particular, the combination of these features with high stability magnetism and plasmonics may create new opportunities for this hybrid material in imaging applications.

  16. Solvent-surface interactions control the phase structure in laser-generated iron-gold core-shell nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Wagener, Philipp; Jakobi, Jurij; Rehbock, Christoph; Chakravadhanula, Venkata Sai Kiran; Thede, Claas; Wiedwald, Ulf; Bartsch, Mathias; Kienle, Lorenz; Barcikowski, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    This work highlights a strategy for the one-step synthesis of FeAu nanoparticles by the pulsed laser ablation of alloy targets in the presence of different solvents. This method allows particle generation without the use of additional chemicals; hence, solvent-metal interactions could be studied without cross effects from organic surface ligands. A detailed analysis of generated particles via transmission electron microscopy in combination with EDX elemental mapping could conclusively verify that the nature of the used solvent governs the internal phase structure of the formed nanoparticles. In the presence of acetone or methyl methacrylate, a gold shell covering a non-oxidized iron core was formed, whereas in aqueous media, an Au core with an Fe3O4 shell was generated. This core-shell morphology was the predominant species found in >90% of the examined nanoparticles. These findings indicate that fundamental chemical interactions between the nanoparticle surface and the solvent significantly contribute to phase segregation and elemental distribution in FeAu nanoparticles. A consecutive analysis of resulting Fe@Au core-shell nanoparticles revealed outstanding oxidation resistance and fair magnetic and optical properties. In particular, the combination of these features with high stability magnetism and plasmonics may create new opportunities for this hybrid material in imaging applications. PMID:27004738

  17. Hematite Core Nanoparticles with Carbon Shell: Potential for Environmentally Friendly Production from Iron Mining Sludge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stević, Dragana; Mihajlović, Dijana; Kukobat, Radovan; Hattori, Yoshiyuki; Sagisaka, Kento; Kaneko, Katsumi; Atlagić, Suzana Gotovac

    2016-02-01

    Hematite nanoparticles with amorphous, yet relatively uniform carbon shell, were produced based exclusively on the waste sludge from the iron mine as the raw material. The procedure for acid digestion-based purification of the sludge with the full recovery of acid vapors and the remaining non-toxic rubble is described. Synthesis of the hematite nanoparticles was performed by the arrested precipitation method with cationic surfactant. The particles were thoroughly characterized and the potential of their economical production for the battery industry is indicated.

  18. Vacancy coalescence during oxidation of iron nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Cabot, Andreu; Puntes, Victor F.; Shevchenko, Elena; Yin, Yadong; Balcells, Lluis; Markus, Matthew A.; Hughes, Steven M.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2007-06-14

    In the present work, we analyze the geometry and composition of the nanostructures obtained from the oxidation of iron nanoparticles. The initial oxidation of iron takes place by outward diffusion of cations through the growing oxide shell. This net material flow is balanced by an opposite flow of vacancies, which coalesce at the metal/oxide interface. Thus, the partial oxidation of colloidal iron nanoparticles leads to the formation of core-void-shell nanostructures. Furthermore, the complete oxidation of iron nanoparticles in the 3-8 nm size range leads to the formation of hollow iron oxide nanoparticles. We analyze the size and temperature range in which vacancy coalescence during oxidation of amine-stabilized iron nanoparticles takes place. Maghemite is the crystallographic structure obtained from the complete oxidation of iron nanoparticles under our synthetic conditions.

  19. Synthesis and morphology of iron-iron oxide core-shell nanoparticles produced by high pressure gas condensation.

    PubMed

    Xing, Lijuan; Ten Brink, Gert H; Chen, Bin; Schmidt, Franz P; Haberfehlner, Georg; Hofer, Ferdinand; Kooi, Bart J; Palasantzas, George

    2016-05-27

    Core-shell structured Fe nanoparticles (NPs) produced by high pressure magnetron sputtering gas condensation were studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques, electron diffraction, electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS), tomographic reconstruction, and Wulff shape construction analysis. The core-shell structure, which is composed of an Fe core surrounded by a maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) and/or magnetite (Fe3O4) shell, was confirmed by fast Fourier transform (FFT) analysis combined with EELS. It was found that the particle size and shape strongly depend on the gas environment. Moreover, extensive analysis showed that NPs with a size between 10-20 nm possess a truncated cubic morphology, which is confined by the 6 {100} planes that are truncated by the 12 {110} planes at different degrees. For NPs larger than 20 nm, the rhombic dodecahedron defined by the 12 {110} planes is the predominant crystal shape, while truncated rhombic dodecahedrons, as well as non-truncated and truncated cubic NPs, were also observed. The NPs without truncation showed a characteristic inward relaxation indicating that besides thermodynamics kinetics also plays a crucial role during particle growth. PMID:27089553

  20. Earth's core iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geophysicist J. Michael Brown of Texas A & M University noted recently at the Spring AGU Meeting in Baltimore that the structure and phase of metallic iron at pressures of the earth's inner core (approximately 3.3 Mbar) could have great significance in defining geometrical aspects of the core itself. Brown worked at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory with R.B. McQueen to redetermine the phase relations of metallic iron in a series of new shock-wave experiments. They found the melting point of iron at conditions equal to those at the boundary of the earth's outer (liquid) and inner (solid) cores to be 6000°±500°C (Geophysical Research Letters, 7, 533-536, 1980).

  1. Iron oxide core oil-in-water emulsions as a multifunctional nanoparticle platform for tumor targeting and imaging

    PubMed Central

    Jarzyna, Peter A.; Skajaa, Torjus; Gianella, Anita; Cormode, David P.; Samber, Dan D.; Dickson, Stephen D.; Chen, Wei; Griffioen, Arjan W.; Fayad, Zahi A.; Mulder, Willem J. M.

    2009-01-01

    Nanoemulsions are increasingly investigated for the delivery of hydrophobic drugs to improve their bioavailability or make their administration possible. In the current study, oil-in-water emulsions with three different mean diameters (30, 60, and 95 nm) were developed as a new multimodality nanoparticle platform for tumor targeting and imaging. To that aim, hydrophobically coated iron oxide particles were included in the soybean oil core of the nanoemulsions to enable their detection with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), while the conjugation of a near infrared fluorophore allowed optical imaging. The accumulation of this novel nanocomposite in subcutaneous human tumors in nude mice was demonstrated with MRI and fluorescence imaging in vivo, and with Perl’s staining of histological tumor sections ex vivo. PMID:19783295

  2. Magnetorotational iron core collapse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Symbalisty, E. M. D.

    1984-01-01

    During its final evolutionary stages, a massive star, as considered in current astrophysical theory, undergoes rapid collapse, thereby triggering a sequence of a catastrophic event which results in a Type II supernova explosion. A remnant neutron star or a black hole is left after the explosion. Stellar collapse occurs, when thermonuclear fusion has consumed the lighter elements present. At this stage, the core consists of iron. Difficulties arise regarding an appropriate model with respect to the core collapse. The present investigation is concerned with the evolution of a Type II supernova core including the effects of rotation and magnetic fields. A simple neutrino model is developed which reproduced the spherically symmetric results of Bowers and Wilson (1982). Several two-dimensional computational models of stellar collapse are studied, taking into account a case in which a 15 solar masses iron core was artificially given rotational and magnetic energy.

  3. New Approach to Selective Stem Cell Sorting: Separation of Undifferentiated Stem Cells from Differentiated Stem Cells by Using Iron Oxide Core Shell Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisa, Fikrullah

    An alternative approach to stem cell enrichment in another words sorting methods without changing the microenvironment of the cells to avoid the detrimental effects of present cell sorting methods by adopting iron-oxide gold (cFeAu) core-shell nanoparticles (NPs) is the focus of this thesis. Each chapter of this thesis focuses on different preliminary research in order to engender the adoption of cFeAu NPs for the selective killing of the mouse embryonic stem cells that are immunolabeled with the nanoparticles. The first part of the research focuses on the synthesis of superparamagnetic iron-oxide nanoparticles with the co-precipitation method and coating the nanoparticles with colloidal gold (cAu) to stabilize the characteristics of the nanoparticles. Detailed information regarding the chemistry of iron-oxide nanoparticles, common synthesis methods, and some of the factors that affect nanoparticle growth and synthesis have been investigated. The heating ability of the nanoparticles under an oscillating magnetic field (OMF) and the size distribution of the particles under a transmission electron microscope (TEM) are shown. The second part of the research focuses on selectively killing the RAW 264.7 macrophages which have internalized the synthesized nanoparticles in order to prove the biocompatibility and effectiveness of the nanoparticles. The particles' effect on the cells, the mechanism of killing, and the effectiveness of nanoparticles coated with colloidal gold and bovine serum albumin are investigated. The last part of the research focuses on effectively labeling the mESCs with a specific antibody conjugated to cFeAu nanoparticles that has an affinity to stage specific embryonic antigen 1 (SSEA-1). The influence of the OMF and the effects of immunolabeling on cell growth were investigated. The successful conjugation of the nanoparticles onto the cell surface is shown under scanning electron microscope. The damage inflicted by the nanoparticles on the cells

  4. Dietary iron-loaded rat liver haemosiderin and ferritin: in situ measurement of iron core nanoparticle size and cluster structure using anomalous small-angle x-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bovell, Eliza; Buckley, Craig E.; Chua-anusorn, Wanida; Cookson, David; Kirby, Nigel; Saunders, Martin; St. Pierre, Timothy G.

    2009-03-01

    The morphology, particle size distribution and cluster structure of the hydrated iron(III) oxyhydroxide particles associated with haemosiderin and ferritin in dietary iron-loaded rat liver tissue have been investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and anomalous small-angle x-ray scattering (ASAXS). Rat liver tissue was removed from a series of female Porton rats which had been fed an iron-rich diet until sacrifice at various ages from 2-24 months. Hepatic iron concentrations ranged from 1 to 65 mg Fe g-1 dry tissue. TEM studies showed both dispersed and clustered iron-containing nanoparticles. The dispersed particles were found to have mean sizes (±standard deviation) of 54 ± 8 Å for the iron-loaded animals and 55 ± 7 Å for the controls. Superposition of particles in TEM images prevented direct measurement of nanoparticulate size in the clusters. The ASAXS data were modelled to provide a quantitative estimate of both the size and spacing of iron oxyhydroxide particles in the bulk samples. The modelling yielded close-packed particles with sizes of 60 to 78 Å which when corrected for anomalous scattering suggests sizes from 54 to 70 Å. Particle size distributions are of particular importance since they determine the surface iron to core iron ratios, which in turn are expected to be related to the molar toxicity of iron deposits in cells.

  5. Magnetic-Plasmonic Core-Shell Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Carly S.; Hofmann, Cristina; Ali, Tamer A.; Kelly, Anna T.; Morosan, Emilia; Nordlander, Peter; Whitmire, Kenton H.; Halas, Naomi J.

    2013-01-01

    Nanoparticles composed of magnetic cores with continuous Au shell layers simultaneously possess both magnetic and plasmonic properties. Faceted and tetracubic nanocrystals consisting of wüstite with magnetite-rich corners and edges retain magnetic properties when coated with an Au shell layer, with the composite nanostructures showing ferrimagnetic behavior. The plasmonic properties are profoundly influenced by the high dielectric constant of the mixed-iron-oxide nanocrystalline core. A comprehensive theoretical analysis that examines the geometric plasmon tunability over a range of core permittivities enables us to identify the dielectric properties of the mixed-oxide magnetic core directly from the plasmonic behavior of the core-shell nanoparticle. PMID:19441794

  6. Synthesis of carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles via solid state reduction of iron oxide nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Bystrzejewski, M.

    2011-06-15

    The encapsulation of iron nanoparticles in protective carbon cages leads to unique hybrid core-shell nanomaterials. Recent literature reports suggest that such nanocomposites can be obtained in a relatively simple process involving the solid state carbothermal reduction of iron oxide nanoparticles. This approach is very attractive because it does not require advanced equipment and consumes less energy in comparison to widely used plasma methods. The presented more-in-depth study shows that the carbothermal approach is sensitive to temperature and the process yield strongly depends on the morphology and crystallinity of the carbon material used as a reductant. - Graphical abstract: Reduction of iron oxide nanoparticles by carbon black at 1200 deg. C yields well crystallized carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles. Highlights: > Carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles were synthesized by carbothermal reduction of iron oxide nanoparticles. > The process has the highest selectivity at 1200 C. > Lower temperatures result in iron oxide nanoparticles wrapped in carbon matrix. > The encapsulation rate of Fe at 1200 deg. C was found to be 15%.

  7. 34. DESPATCH CORE OVENS, GREY IRON FOUNDRY CORE ROOM, BAKES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. DESPATCH CORE OVENS, GREY IRON FOUNDRY CORE ROOM, BAKES CORES THAT ARE NOT MADE ON HEATED OR COLD BOX CORE MACHINES, TO SET BINDING AGENTS MIXED WITH THE SAND CREATING CORES HARD ENOUGH TO WITHSTAND THE FLOW OF MOLTEN IRON INSIDE A MOLD. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  8. Comparison of the Properties of γ-Fe_22O3 Nanoparticles Synthesized Inside of Ferritin Protein Cages to the Native Iron Oxy-hydroxide Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmore, Keith

    2004-03-01

    The structural and magnetic properties of native iron oxy-hydroxide in ferritin and γ-Fe_22O3 artificially mineralized inside of horse spleen ferritin have been compared. While the native material has been studied in detail, little work has been done on artificially mineralized materials. Such synthetic materials can form highly uniform, self assembling systems which can be used in magnetic recording and other applications. We show that the mineralized iron oxide has more favorable magnetic properties for these applications than the native material. Specifically, through XAS and XAFS spectra, we conclude that the native cores are highly disordered and non-uniform while the mineralized sample is uniform and ordered γ-Fe_22O_3. γ-Fe_22O3 is ferrimagnetic while it has been shown that the native material is antiferromagnetic. Alternating current susceptibility measurements reveal that, relative to the native material, the mineralized sample has a higher blocking temperature by a factor of two, is about 20 times more susceptible to magnetization, and has a larger anisotropy energy by 150also been extracted from the AC data indicating a mean diameter of 5 nm for the native cores and 6 nm for the mineralized cores. DC magnetic measurements provide supporting evidence of the magnetic structure, blocking temperatures, and crystalline disorder of the two samples. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using of biological containers as reaction vessels to synthesize uniform ensembles of novel magnetic nanoparticles.

  9. Acid monolayer functionalized iron oxide nanoparticle catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikenberry, Myles

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle functionalization is an area of intensely active research, with applications across disciplines such as biomedical science and heterogeneous catalysis. This work demonstrates the functionalization of iron oxide nanoparticles with a quasi-monolayer of 11-sulfoundecanoic acid, 10-phosphono-1-decanesulfonic acid, and 11-aminoundecanoic acid. The carboxylic and phosphonic moieties form bonds to the iron oxide particle core, while the sulfonic acid groups face outward where they are available for catalysis. The particles were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), potentiometric titration, diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS), inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS), and dynamic light scattering (DLS). The sulfonic acid functionalized particles were used to catalyze the hydrolysis of sucrose at 80° and starch at 130°, showing a higher activity per acid site than the traditional solid acid catalyst Amberlyst-15, and comparing well against results reported in the literature for sulfonic acid functionalized mesoporous silicas. In sucrose catalysis reactions, the phosphonic-sulfonic nanoparticles (PSNPs) were seen to be incompletely recovered by an external magnetic field, while the carboxylic-sulfonic nanoparticles (CSNPs) showed a trend of increasing activity over the first four recycle runs. Between the two sulfonic ligands, the phosphonates produced a more tightly packed monolayer, which corresponded to a higher sulfonic acid loading, lower agglomeration, lower recoverability through application of an external magnetic field, and higher activity per acid site for the hydrolysis of starch. Functionalizations with 11-aminoundecanoic acid resulted in some amine groups binding to the surfaces of iron oxide nanoparticles. This amine binding is commonly ignored in iron oxide

  10. Characterization of tetraethylene glycol passivated iron nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, Eloiza da Silva; Viali, Wesley Renato; da Silva, Sebastião William; Coaquira, José Antonio Huamaní; Garg, Vijayendra Kumar; de Oliveira, Aderbal Carlos; Morais, Paulo César; Jafelicci Júnior, Miguel

    2014-10-01

    The present study describes the synthesis and characterization of iron@iron oxide nanoparticles produced by passivation of metallic iron in tetraethylene glycol media. Structural and chemical characterizations were performed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Pomegranate-like core@shell nanoparticulate material in the size range of 90-120 nm was obtained. According to quantitative phase analysis using Rietveld structure refinement the synthesized iron oxide was identified as magnetite (Fe3O4) whereas the iron to magnetite mass fractions was found to be 47:53. These findings are in good agreement with the data obtained from Mössbauer and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). The XPS data revealed the presence of a surface organic layer with higher hydrocarbon content, possibly due to the tetraethylene glycol thermal degradation correlated with iron oxidation. The room-temperature (300 K) saturation magnetization measured for the as-synthesized iron and for the iron-iron oxide were 145 emu g-1 and 131 emu g-1, respectively. The measured saturation magnetizations are in good agreement with data obtained from TEM, XRD and Mössbauer spectroscopy.

  11. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor mediated cellular and subcellular targeted delivery of Iron oxide core-Titanium dioxide shell nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Ye

    TiO2 nanomaterials can carry a multitude of therapeutic and diagnostic agents and the semiconductor properties of TiO2 allow for the production of cytotoxic reactive oxygen species following photoactivation. However, the delivery of these nanomaterials to specific cancer cells and specific subcellular organelles within these cells can have a substantial impact on the efficacy and safety of TiO2 nanoparticle therapeutics. Targeting cell surface receptors that are overexpressed by cancer cells is one strategy to improve the specificity of nanoparticle delivery. Therefore we decided to target the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) because ligand- binding induces rapid receptor endocytosis and ligand-bound EGFR can translocate to the nucleus of cancer cells. To create NPs that can bind EGFR, we identified a peptide derived from the B-loop of Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF) that has been shown to bind and activate EGFR and conjugated it to the surface of Fe3O4 core-TiO2 shell NPs to produce B-loop NCs. We then devised a pulldown assay to show that B-loop NCs, but not bare NPs or NCs carrying a scrambled B-loop peptide, can bind and extract EGFR from HeLa cell protein extracts. Interestingly, B-loop NCs can also pulldown importin-beta, a protein that can transport EGFR to the nucleus. Furthermore, we used flow cytometry and fluorescently labeled NPs to show that B-loop peptides can significantly improve the internalization of NPs by EGFR-expressing HeLa cells. We determined that B-loop NCs can bind EGFR on the membrane of HeLa cells and that these NCs can be transported to the nucleus, by using a combination of confocal microscopy and X-ray Fluorescence Microscopy (XFM) to indirectly and directly track the subcellular distribution of NCs. Finally, we demonstrate how the Bionanoprobe, a novel high-resolution XFM apparatus that can scan whole-mounted, frozen-hydrated cells at multiple angles can be used to verify the subcellular distribution of B-loop NCs.

  12. Effects of Size and Size Distribution on the Magnetic Properties of Maghemite Nanoparticles and Iron-Platinum Core-Shell Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisane, Kelly

    Magnetic nanoparticles with large magnetic moments that can be manipulated with an external magnetic field, have potential uses in medicine because their sizes are comparable to biological scales. For such applications it is important to understand how their magnetic properties are affected by their size and size distribution inherently present in magnetic nanoparticles. For this purpose, maghemite (gamma-Fe2O3) nanoparticles with average diameters of 7.0+/-0.8 nm, 6.3+/-0.6 nm, 3.4+/-0.8 nm and 2.5+/-0.7 nm and Fe-Pt core-shell nanoparticles with an approximate core diameter of 2.2 nm were synthesized and investigated. To aid in the interpretation of the magnetic properties, the structural properties of these nanoparticles were investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). For investigations of the magnetic properties, detailed ac and dc magnetic characterization is presented and discussed in terms of a distribution of particle sizes and magnetic moments. The dc magnetization measurements cover the temperature range from 2 K to 350 K and magnetic fields up to 90 kOe. The temperature dependence of the ac susceptibilities, χ' and χ'', was measured at various frequencies from 10 Hz to 5 kHz. From the zero field-cooled dc magnetization, the values of blocking temperature TB have been determined and the ac magnetic data was used to determine the contribution of interparticle interactions to the observed blocking temperature for different sized nanoparticles. The measured blocking temperatures of the maghemite nanoparticles are TB=35 K, 42 K, 21 K, and 29 K with contributions from interparticle interactions given in terms of To=0 K, 11 K, 2.5 K, and 12.5 K for the 7.0 nm, 6.3 nm, 3.4 nm, and 2.5 nm samples respectively. From the variation of TB with ac measurement frequency, the anisotropy constants Ka determined for the maghemite nanoparticles are: Ka=5.57, 7

  13. 33. BENCH CORE STATION, GREY IRON FOUNDRY CORE ROOM WHERE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. BENCH CORE STATION, GREY IRON FOUNDRY CORE ROOM WHERE CORE MOLDS WERE HAND FILLED AND OFTEN PNEUMATICALLY COMPRESSED WITH A HAND-HELD RAMMER BEFORE THEY WERE BAKED. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  14. Multifunctional iron oxide nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloemen, M.; Denis, C.; Van Stappen, T.; De Meester, L.; Geukens, N.; Gils, A.; Verbiest, T.

    2015-03-01

    Multifunctional nanoparticles have attracted a lot of attention since they can combine interesting properties like magnetism, fluorescence or plasmonic effects. As a core material, iron oxide nanoparticles have been the subject of intensive research. These cost-effective and non-toxic particles are used nowadays in many applications. We developed a heterobifunctional PEG ligand that can be used to introduce functional groups (carboxylic acids) onto the surface of the NP. Via click chemistry, a siloxane functionality was added to this ligand, for a subsequent covalent ligand exchange reaction. The functionalized nanoparticles have an excellent colloidal stability in complex environments like buffers and serum or plasma. Antibodies were coupled to the introduced carboxylic acids and these NP-antibody bioconjugates were brought into contact with Legionella bacteria for magnetic separation experiments.

  15. The use of the core-shell structure of zero-valent iron nanoparticles (NZVI) for long-term removal of sulphide in sludge during anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Su, Lianghu; Zhen, Guangyin; Zhang, Longjiang; Zhao, Youcai; Niu, Dongjie; Chai, Xiaoli

    2015-12-01

    A core-shell structure results in zero-valent iron nanoparticles (NZVI) with manifold functional properties. In this study, the long-term effects of NZVI on hydrogen sulphide removal in an anaerobic sludge digester were investigated. Within 20 days, the average hydrogen sulphide content in the biogas was successfully reduced from 300 (or 3620 of sulphate-rich sludge) mg Nm(-3) to 6.1 (121), 0.9 (3.3) and 0.5 (1.3) mg Nm(-3) in the presence of 0.05, 0.10 and 0.20% (wt) NZVI, respectively. Methane yield was enhanced at the low NZVI dose (0.05-0.10%) but decreased at the elevated dose (0.20%). Methane production and volatile solid degradation analyses implied that doses of 0.5-0.10% NZVI could accelerate sludge stabilization during anaerobic digestion. The phosphorus fractionation profile suggested that methane production could be inhibited at the elevated NZVI dose, partly due to the limited availability of soluble phosphorus due to the immobilization of bioavailable-P through the formation of vivianite. An analysis of the reducible inorganic sulphur species revealed that the elimination of hydrogen sulphide occurred via the reaction between hydrogen sulphide and the oxide shell of NZVI, which mainly formed FeS and some FeS2 and S(0). PMID:26565792

  16. Tannin biosynthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera-Becerra, R.; Rius, J. L.; Zorrilla, C.

    2010-08-01

    In this work, iron oxide nanoparticles synthesized with gallic acid and tannic acid are characterized using High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM). Its size, form, and structure are compared with nanoparticles obtained previously using alfalfa biomass in order to find a simpler, consistent, and environmentally friendly method in the production of iron oxide nanoparticles.

  17. Biocompatible core-shell magnetic nanoparticles for cancer treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Amit M.; Qiang, You; Meyer, Daniel R.; Souza, Ryan; Mcconnaughoy, Alan; Muldoon, Leslie; Baer, Donald R.

    2008-04-01

    Non-toxic magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have expanded the treatment delivery options in the medical world. With a size range from 2 to 200 nm MNPs can be compiled with most of the small cells and tissues in living body. Monodispersive iron-iron oxide core shell nanoparticles were prepared in our novel cluster deposition system. This unique method of preparing the core shell MNPs gives nanoparticles very high magnetic moment. We tested the nontoxicity and uptake of MNPs coated with/without dextrin by incubating them with rat LX-1 small cell lung cancer cells (SCLC). Since core iron enhances the heating effect [7] the rate of oxidation of iron nanoparticles was tested in deionized water at certain time interval. Both coated and noncoated MNPs were successfully uptaken by the cells, indicating that the nanoparticles were not toxic. The stability of MNPs was verified by X-ray diffraction (XRD) scan after 0, 24, 48, 96, 204 hours. Due to the high magnetic moment offered by MNPs produced in our lab, we predict that even in low applied external alternating field desired temperature can be reached in cancer cells in comparison to the commercially available nanoparticles. Moreover, our MNPs do not require additional anti-coagulating agents and provide a cost effective means of treatment with significantly lower dosage in the body in comparison to commercially available nanoparticles.

  18. The toxicity and distribution of iron oxide-zinc oxide core-shell nanoparticles in C57BL/6 mice after repeated subcutaneous administration.

    PubMed

    Yun, Jun-Won; Yoon, Jung-Hee; Kang, Byeong-Cheol; Cho, Nam-Hyuk; Seok, Seung Hyeok; Min, Seung-Kee; Min, Ji Hyun; Che, Jeong-Hwan; Kim, Young Keun

    2015-06-01

    Therapeutic cancer vaccines promote immune responses by delivering tumour-specific antigens. Recently, we developed iron oxide (Fe3 O4 )-zinc oxide (ZnO) core-shell nanoparticles (CSNPs) as carriers for antigen delivery into dendritic cells (DCs), and the CSNPs were injected subcutaneously into C57BL/6 mice to examine the systemic toxicity, tissue distribution and excretion of the CSNPs. The doses injected were 0, 4, 20 and 200 mg kg(-1) weekly for 4 weeks. No significant changes were observed after the CSNPs administration with respect to mortality, clinical observations, body weight, food intake, water consumption, urinalysis, haematology, serum biochemistry,and organ weights. A dose-dependent increase in granulomatous inflammation was observed at the injection site of the CSNP-treated animals, but no other histopathological lesions in other organs could be attributed to the CSNPs. The Zn concentration, which is an indicator for CSNPs, was not significantly higher in the sampled tissues, urine, or faeces after the CSNP injection. In contrast, the Zn concentration at the subcutaneous skin of the site injected with the CSNPs increased in a dose-dependent manner, along with a macroscopic deposition of the CSNPs. The CSNP residue at the injection site resulted in a foreign body response with the appearance of macrophage infiltration, but otherwise did not show any systemic distribution or toxicity at up to 200 mg kg(-1) during this study. In conclusion, CSNPs could be used as good antigen carriers for DC-based immunotherapy, although further study is needed to completely clear the residue of the CSNPs at the injection site. PMID:25572658

  19. Biocompatible multishell architecture for iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wotschadlo, Jana; Liebert, Tim; Clement, Joachim H; Anspach, Nils; Höppener, Stephanie; Rudolph, Tobias; Müller, Robert; Schacher, Felix H; Schubert, Ulrich S; Heinze, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The coating of super-paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) with multiple shells is demonstrated by building a layer assembled from carboxymethyldextran and poly(diallydimethylammonium chloride). Three shells are produced stepwise around aggregates of SPIONs by the formation of a polyelectrolyte complex. A growing particle size from 96 to 327 nm and a zeta potential in the range of +39 to -51 mV are measured. Microscopic techniques such as TEM, SEM, and AFM exemplify the core-shell structures. Magnetic force microscopy and vibrating sample magnetometer measurements confirm the architecture of the multishell particles. Cell culture experiments show that even nanoparticles with three shells are still taken up by cells. PMID:23161745

  20. Structural and magnetic properties of iron nanowires and iron nanoparticles fabricated through a reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Krajewski, Marcin; Lin, Wei Syuan; Lin, Hong Ming; Brzozka, Katarzyna; Lewinska, Sabina; Nedelko, Natalia; Slawska-Waniewska, Anna; Borysiuk, Jolanta; Wasik, Dariusz

    2015-01-01

    The main goal of this work is to study the structural and magnetic properties of iron nanowires and iron nanoparticles, which have been fabricated in almost the same processes. The only difference in the synthesis is an application of an external magnetic field in order to form the iron nanowires. Both nanomaterials have been examined by means of transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry, X-ray diffractometry and Mössbauer spectrometry to determine their structures. Structural investigations confirm that obtained iron nanowires as well as nanoparticles reveal core-shell structures and they are composed of crystalline iron cores that are covered by amorphous or highly defected phases of iron and iron oxides. Magnetic properties have been measured using a vibrating sample magnetometer. The obtained values of coercivity, remanent magnetization, saturation magnetization as well as Curie temperature differ for both studied nanostructures. Higher values of magnetizations are observed for iron nanowires. At the same time, coercivity and Curie temperature are higher for iron nanoparticles. PMID:26425415

  1. Platinum Attachments on Iron Oxide Nanoparticle Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Palchoudhury, Soubantika; Xu, Yaolin; An, Wei; Turner, C. H.; Bao, Yuping

    2010-04-30

    Platinum nanoparticles supported on metal oxide surfaces have shown great potential as heterogeneous catalysts to accelerate electrochemical processes, such as the oxygen reduction reaction in fuel cells. Recently, the use of magnetic supports has become a promising research topic for easy separation and recovery of catalysts using magnets, such as Pt nanoparticles supported on iron oxide nanoparticles. The attachment of Pt on iron oxide nanoparticles is limited by the wetting ability of the Pt (metal) on ceramic surfaces. A study of Pt nanoparticle attachment on iron oxide nanoparticle surfaces in an organic solvent is reported, which addresses the factors that promote or inhibit such attachment. It was discovered that the Pt attachment strongly depends on the capping molecules of the iron oxide seeds and the reaction temperature. For example, the attachment of Pt nanoparticles on oleic acid coated iron oxide nanoparticles was very challenging, because of the strong binding between the carboxylic groups and iron oxide surfaces. In contrast, when nanoparticles are coated with oleic acid/tri-n-octylphosphine oxide or oleic acid/oleylamine, a significant increase in Pt attachment was observed. Electronic structure calculations were then applied to estimate the binding energies between the capping molecules and iron ions, and the modeling results strongly support the experimental observations.

  2. Fully Crystalline Faceted Fe-Au Core-Shell Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Langlois, C; Benzo, P; Arenal, R; Benoit, M; Nicolai, J; Combe, N; Ponchet, A; Casanove, M J

    2015-08-12

    Fe-Au core-shell nanoparticles displaying an original polyhedral morphology have been successfully synthesized through a physical route. Analyses using transmission electron microscopy show that the Au shell forms truncated pyramids epitaxially grown on the (100) facets of the iron cubic core. The evolution of the elastic energy and strain field in the nanoparticles as a function of their geometry and composition is calculated using the finite-element method. The stability of the remarkable centered core-shell morphology experimentally observed is attributed to the weak elastic energy resulting from the low misfit at the Fe/Au (100) interface compared to the surface energy contribution. PMID:26146846

  3. Evaluating the mobility of polymer-stabilised zero-valent iron nanoparticles and their potential to co-transport contaminants in intact soil cores.

    PubMed

    Chekli, L; Brunetti, G; Marzouk, E R; Maoz-Shen, A; Smith, E; Naidu, R; Shon, H K; Lombi, E; Donner, E

    2016-09-01

    The use of zero-valent iron nanoparticles (nZVI) has been advocated for the remediation of both soils and groundwater. A key parameter affecting nZVI remediation efficacy is the mobility of the particles as this influences the reaction zone where remediation can occur. However, by engineering nZVI particles with increased stability and mobility we may also inadvertently facilitate nZVI-mediated contaminant transport away from the zone of treatment. Previous nZVI mobility studies have often been limited to model systems as the presence of background Fe makes detection and tracking of nZVI in real systems difficult. We overcame this problem by synthesising Fe-59 radiolabelled nZVI. This enabled us to detect and quantify the leaching of nZVI-derived Fe-59 in intact soil cores, including a soil contaminated by Chromated-Copper-Arsenate. Mobility of a commercially available nZVI was also tested. The results showed limited mobility of both nanomaterials; <1% of the injected mass was eluted from the columns and most of the radiolabelled nZVI remained in the surface soil layers (the primary treatment zone in this contaminated soil). Nevertheless, the observed breakthrough of contaminants and nZVI occurred simultaneously, indicating that although the quantity transported was low in this case, nZVI does have the potential to co-transport contaminants. These results show that direct injection of nZVI into the surface layers of contaminated soils may be a viable remediation option for soils such as this one, in which the mobility of nZVI below the injection/remediation zone was very limited. This Fe-59 experimental approach can be further extended to test nZVI transport in a wider range of contaminated soil types and textures and using different application methods and rates. The resulting database could then be used to develop and validate modelling of nZVI-facilitated contaminant transport on an individual soil basis suitable for site specific risk assessment prior to n

  4. Isolation and Characterization of Monodisperse Core-Shell Nanoparticle Fractions.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Ferrer, Antoni; Carney, Randy P; Stellacci, Francesco; Mezzenga, Raffaele; Isa, Lucio

    2015-10-20

    Monodispersity is a key property to control the self-assembly of colloidal particles, and is typically reached after fine-tuning of the synthesis conditions. Monodisperse particle fractions can also be separated from polydisperse suspensions via ultracentrifugation. This paper demonstrates the capability of isolating and characterizing suspensions of core-shell iron oxide-polymer nanoparticles with extremely low polydispersity (p < 0.01) and, thus, of complementing nanoparticle synthetic approaches in the pursuit of highly monodisperse materials. PMID:26406563

  5. Improved Thermoplastic/Iron-Particle Transformer Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Russell A.; Bryant, Robert G.; Namkung, Min

    2004-01-01

    A method of fabricating improved transformer cores from composites of thermoplastic matrices and iron-particles has been invented. Relative to commercially available laminated-iron-alloy transformer cores, the cores fabricated by this method weigh less and are less expensive. Relative to prior polymer-matrix/ iron-particle composite-material transformer cores, the cores fabricated by this method can be made mechanically stronger and more magnetically permeable. In addition, whereas some prior cores have exhibited significant eddy-current losses, the cores fabricated by this method exhibit very small eddy-current losses. The cores made by this method can be expected to be attractive for use in diverse applications, including high-signal-to-noise transformers, stepping motors, and high-frequency ignition coils. The present method is a product of an experimental study of the relationships among fabrication conditions, final densities of iron particles, and mechanical and electromagnetic properties of fabricated cores. Among the fabrication conditions investigated were molding pressures (83, 104, and 131 MPa), and molding temperatures (250, 300, and 350 C). Each block of core material was made by uniaxial-compression molding, at the applicable pressure/temperature combination, of a mixture of 2 weight percent of LaRC (or equivalent high-temperature soluble thermoplastic adhesive) with 98 weight percent of approximately spherical iron particles having diameters in the micron range. Each molded block was cut into square cross-section rods that were used as core specimens in mechanical and electromagnetic tests. Some of the core specimens were annealed at 900 C and cooled slowly before testing. For comparison, a low-carbon-steel core was also tested. The results of the tests showed that density, hardness, and rupture strength generally increased with molding pressure and temperature, though the correlation was rather weak. The weakness of the correlation was attributed to

  6. Structural and magnetic properties of iron nanowires and iron nanoparticles fabricated through a reduction reaction

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wei Syuan; Lin, Hong Ming; Brzozka, Katarzyna; Lewinska, Sabina; Nedelko, Natalia; Slawska-Waniewska, Anna; Borysiuk, Jolanta; Wasik, Dariusz

    2015-01-01

    Summary The main goal of this work is to study the structural and magnetic properties of iron nanowires and iron nanoparticles, which have been fabricated in almost the same processes. The only difference in the synthesis is an application of an external magnetic field in order to form the iron nanowires. Both nanomaterials have been examined by means of transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry, X-ray diffractometry and Mössbauer spectrometry to determine their structures. Structural investigations confirm that obtained iron nanowires as well as nanoparticles reveal core–shell structures and they are composed of crystalline iron cores that are covered by amorphous or highly defected phases of iron and iron oxides. Magnetic properties have been measured using a vibrating sample magnetometer. The obtained values of coercivity, remanent magnetization, saturation magnetization as well as Curie temperature differ for both studied nanostructures. Higher values of magnetizations are observed for iron nanowires. At the same time, coercivity and Curie temperature are higher for iron nanoparticles. PMID:26425415

  7. Synthesis and characterization of iron based nanoparticles for novel applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khurshid, Hafsa

    The work in this thesis has been focused on the fabrication and characterization of iron based nanoparticles with controlled size and morphology with the aim: (i) to investigate their properties for potential applications in MICR toners and biomedical field and (ii) to study finite size effects on the magnetic properties of the nanoparticles. For the biomedical applications, core/shell structured iron/iron-oxide and hollow shell nanoparticles were synthesized by thermal decomposition of iron organometallic compounds [Fe(CO)5] at high temperature. Core/shell structured iron/iron-oxide nanoparticles have been prepared in the presence of oleic acid and oleylamine. Particle size and composition was controlled by varying the reaction parameters during synthesis. The as-made particles are hydrophobic and not dispersible in water. Water dispersibility was achieved by ligand exchange a with double hydrophilic diblock copolymer. Relaxometery measurements of the transverse relaxation time T2 of the nanoparticles solution at 3 Tesla confirm that the core/shell nanoparticles are an excellent MRI contrast agent using T2 weighted imaging sequences. In comparison to conventionally used iron oxide nanoparticles, iron/iron-oxide core/shell nanoparticles offer four times stronger T2 shortening effect at comparable core size due to their higher magnetization. The magnetic properties were studied as a function of particle size, composition and morphology. Hollow nanostructures are composed of randomly oriented grains arranged together to make a shell layer and make an interesting class of materials. The hollow morphology can be used as an extra degree of freedom to control the magnetic properties. Owing to their hollow morphology, they can be used for the targeted drug delivery applications by filling the drug inside their cavity. For the magnetic toners applications, particles were synthesized by chemically reducing iron salt using sodium borohydride and then coated with polyethylene

  8. The iron alloys of the Earth's core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caracas, R.; Verstraete, M. J.; Vargas Calderon, A.; Labrosse, S.; Hernlund, J. W.; Gomi, H.; Ohta, K.; Hirose, K.

    2012-12-01

    We estimate the necessary amount of several light elements - C, S, P, O, Si - as major alloying components to match the observed seismic properties of the Earth's inner core. For this we compute the elastic constants tensors and determine the seismic properties of Fe3X compounds, with X = C, S, P, O and Si, using first-principles calculations. Assuming linear relations and similar temperature corrections of velocities, we obtain as most reasonable silicon and oxygen. We perform the same exercise on Fe-Ni alloys and see a minor effect of Ni on the seismic properties of iron. We compute the electrical conductivity of iron and iron alloys at Earth's core conditions from electron-phonon coupling in the ABINIT implementation. We find an excellent agreement with experimental results for pure hcp iron below 1 mbars. We confidently use our results up to core pressure conditions. We show that the conductivity exhibits saturation at high pressures. We treat in detail the effect of Si on hcp iron and show a marked saturation effect, an increase in anisotropy and a strong dependence with the substitution pattern. The computed values suggest that the outer core should have conductivities in excess of 90 W/K/m, which is considerably larger than current estimates. This implies an inner core younger than 1 bil. years and stratification of the outer core.

  9. Multimodal Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for Hybrid Biomedical Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Heidt, Timo; Nahrendorf, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Iron oxide core nanoparticles are attractive imaging agents because their material properties allow the tuning of pharmacokinetics as well as attachment of multiple moieties to their surface. In addition to affinity ligands, these include fluorochromes and radioisotopes for detection with optical and nuclear imaging. As the iron oxide core can be detected by MRI, options for combining imaging modalities are manifold. Already, preclinical imaging strategies combine non-invasive imaging with higher resolution techniques such as intravital microscopy to gain unprecedented insight into steady state biology and disease. Going forward, hybrid iron oxide nanoparticles will likely help to merge modalities, creating a synergy that enables imaging in basic research and, potentially, also in the clinic. PMID:23065771

  10. Synthesis of carbon-coated iron nanoparticles by detonation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Guilei; Li, Xiaojie; Wang, Qiquan; Yan, Honghao

    2010-05-15

    Carbon-coated iron nanoparticles were synthesized by detonating a mixture of ferrocene, naphthalene and hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) in an explosion vessel under low vacuum conditions (8.1 kPa). The RDX functioned as an energy source for the decomposition of ferrocene and naphthalene. The carbon-coated iron nanoparticles were formed as soot-like deposits on the inner surface of the reactor, which were characterized by XRD, TEM, HRTEM, Raman spectroscopy and vibrating sample magnetometer. And a portion of the detonation soot was treated with hydrochloric acid. The product was carbon-coated nanoparticles in perfect core-shell structures with graphitic shells and bcc-Fe cores. The detonation technique offers an energy-saving route to the synthesis of carbon-coated nanomaterials.

  11. Properties of iron under core conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, J. M.

    2003-04-01

    Underlying an understanding of the geodynamo and evolution of the core is knowledge of the physical and chemical properties of iron and iron mixtures under high pressure and temperature conditions. Key properties include the viscosity of the fluid outer core, thermal diffusivity, equations-of-state, elastic properties of solid phases, and phase equilibria for iron and iron-dominated mixtures. As is expected for work that continues to tax technological and intellectual limits, controversy has followed both experimental and theoretical progress in this field. However, estimates for the melting temperature of the inner core show convergence and the equation-of-state for iron as determined in independent experiments and theories are in remarkable accord. Furthermore, although the structure and elastic properties of the solid inner-core phase remains uncertain, theoretical and experimental underpinnings are better understood and substantial progress is likely in the near future. This talk will focus on an identification of properties that are reasonably well known and those that merit further detailed study. In particular, both theoretical and experimental (static and shock wave) determinations of the density of iron under extreme conditions are in agreement at the 1% or better level. The behavior of the Gruneisen parameter (which determines the geothermal gradient and controls much of the outer core heat flux) is constrained by experiment and theory under core conditions for both solid and liquid phases. Recent experiments and theory are suggestive of structure or structures other than the high-pressure hexagonal close-packed (HCP) phase. Various theories and experiments for the elasticity of HCP iron remain in poor accord. Uncontroversial constraints on core chemistry will likely never be possible. However, reasonable bounds are possible on the basis of seismic profiles, geochemical arguments, and determinations of sound velocities and densities at high pressure and

  12. Photo-Switching of Magnetization in Iron Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Aqtash, Nabil; Hostetter, Alexander; Sabirianov, Renat

    2012-02-01

    We report the theoretical studies of light induced switching in core-shell nanoparticles. The core of the nanoparticle is made of Fe coated with the shell of azobenzene. The latter is a photochromic material with the reversible trans-cis photoisomerization upon irradiation by UV and visible light. The magnetization of nanoparticles can be reversibly switched by using specific wavelengths of light. trans-cis photoisomerization of azobenzene induces both the change in surface local magnetic moments and alters the exchange interactions on the surfaces of the nanoparticles. These two mechanisms can lead to induced magnetization switchable by light pulse. We study the effects of photoisomerization of azobenzene on iron (Fe) nanoparticle. Ab initio calculations using SIESTA code show that the ferromagnetic (FM) and antiferromagnetic (AFM) exchange interaction in Fe dimer increase by 40% due to photoisomerization of azobenzene. While an infinite flat Fe monolayer shows variation on the exchange interactions on the surfaces as result of photoisomerization. The local magnetic moments of Fe sheet increase by 6% due to photoisomerization. Using an ab initio parameterization of magnetic interactions, we propose statistical model based on competing exchange interactions for the investigation of Fe nanoparticle magnetization. We performed Monte Carlo simulations of magnetization of the core-shell nanoparticle as a function of temperature. The results show that Fe nanoparticles magnetization at room temperature can change by at least 40% due to photoisomerization of azobenzene.

  13. The synthesis and characterization of iron nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Tyler

    Nanoparticle synthesis has garnered attention for technological applications for catalysts, industrial processing, and medical applications. The size ranges for these is in the particles nanostructural domain. Pure iron nanoparticles have been of particular interest for their reactivity and relative biological inertness. Applications include cancer treatment and carrying medicine to a relevant site. Unfortunately, because of their reactivity, pure iron nanoparticles have been difficult to study. This is because of their accelerated tendency to form oxides in air, due to the increased surface area to volume ratio. Using synthesis processes with polyphenols or long chain amines, air stable iron nanoparticles have been produced with a diameter size range of ~ 2 to about ~10 nm, but apparently have transformed due to internal pressure and crystallographic defects to the FCC phase. The FCC crystals have been seen to form icosahedral and decahedral shapes. This size is within the range for use as a catalyst for the growth of both carbon nanotubes and boron nitride nanotubes as well for biomedical applications. The advantages of these kinds of catalysts are that nanotube growth can be for the first time separated from the catalyst formation. Additionally, the catalyst size can be preselected for a certain size nanotube to grow. In summary: (1) we found the size distributions of nanoparticles for various synthesis processes, (2) we discovered the right size range for growth of nanotubes from the iron nanoparticles, (3) the nanoparticles are under a very high internal pressure, (4) the nanoparticles are in the FCC phase, (5) they appear to be in icosahedral and decahedral structures, (6) they undergo room temperature twinning, (7) the FCC crystals are distorted due to carbon in octahedral sites, (8) the iron nanoparticles are stable in air, (9) adding small amounts of copper make the iron nanoparticles smaller.

  14. Zero-valent iron nanoparticles preparation

    SciTech Connect

    Oropeza, S.; Corea, M.; Gómez-Yáñez, C.; Cruz-Rivera, J.J.; Navarro-Clemente, M.E.

    2012-06-15

    Graphical abstract: Zero-valent iron nanoparticles were synthesized by hydrogenating [Fe[N(Si(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}){sub 2}]{sub 2}] at room temperature and a pressure of 3 atm. The synthesized nanoparticles were spherical and had diameters less than 5 nm. Highlights: ► Zero-valent iron nanoparticles were synthesized by hydrogenating [Fe[N(Si(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}){sub 2}]{sub 2}]. ► The conditions of reaction were at room temperature and a pressure of 3 atm. ► The synthesized nanoparticles were spherical and had diameters less than 5 nm. -- Abstract: Zero-valent iron nanoparticles were synthesized by hydrogenating [Fe[N(Si(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}){sub 2}]{sub 2}] at room temperature and a pressure of 3 atm. To monitor the reaction, a stainless steel pressure reactor lined with PTFE and mechanically stirred was designed. This design allowed the extraction of samples at different times, minimizing the perturbation in the system. In this way, the shape and the diameter of the nanoparticles produced during the reaction were also monitored. The results showed the production of zero-valent iron nanoparticles that were approximately 5 nm in diameter arranged in agglomerates. The agglomerates grew to 900 nm when the reaction time increased up to 12 h; however, the diameter of the individual nanoparticles remained almost the same. During the reaction, some byproducts constituted by amino species acted as surfactants; therefore, no other surfactants were necessary.

  15. Void formation during early stages of passivation: Initial oxidation of iron nanoparticles at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C. M.; Baer, D. R.; Thomas, L. E.; Amonette, J. E.; Antony, Jiji; Qiang, You; Duscher, G.

    2005-11-01

    The examination of nanoparticles allows study of some processes and mechanisms that are not as easily observed for films or other types of studies in which sample preparation artifacts have been the cause of some uncertainties. Microstructure of iron nanoparticles passivated with iron oxide shell was studied using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and high-angle annular dark-field imaging in aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy. Voids were readily observed on both small single-crystal α-Fe nanoparticles formed in a sputtering process and the more complex particles created by reduction of an oxide by hydrogen. Although the formation of hollow spheres of nanoparticles has been engineered for Co at higher temperatures [Y. Yin, R. M. Riou, C. K. Erdonmez, S. Hughes, G. A. Somorjari, and A. P. Alivisatos, Science 304, 711 (2004)], they occur for iron at room temperature and provide insight into the initial oxidation processes of iron. There exists a critical size of ~8 nm for which the iron has been fully oxidized, leading to a hollow iron-oxide nanoparticle. For particles larger than the critical size, an iron/iron-oxide core-shell structure was formed and voids reside at the interface between the oxide shell and the iron core. The present observation provides new insight for tailoring of metal/metal-oxide core-shell structured nanoparticles for applications related to optics, magnetism, and nanoelectronics.

  16. Enrichment and encapsulation of uranium with iron nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Ling, Lan; Zhang, Wei-Xian

    2015-03-01

    The ability to recover uranium from water is significant because of its potential applications on nuclear fuel capture and mitigation of nuclear wastes. In this work, a unique nanostructure is presented by which trace level (2.32-882.68 μg/L) uranium can be quickly separated from water and encapsulated at the center of zero-valent iron nanoparticles. Over 90% of the uranium is recovered with 1 g/L nanoparticles in less than 2 min. Near atomic-resolution elemental mapping on the U(VI) intraparticle reactions in a single iron nanoparticle is obtained with aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, which provides direct evidence on U(VI) diffusion, reduction to U(IV), and deposition in the core area. PMID:25689272

  17. Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Sophie; Bridot, Jean-Luc; Elst, Luce Vander; Muller, Robert N

    2010-03-01

    Due to their high magnetization, superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles induce an important decrease in the transverse relaxation of water protons and are, therefore, very efficient negative MRI contrast agents. The knowledge and control of the chemical and physical characteristics of nanoparticles are of great importance. The choice of the synthesis method (microemulsions, sol-gel synthesis, laser pyrolysis, sonochemical synthesis or coprecipitation) determines the magnetic nanoparticle's size and shape, as well as its size distribution and surface chemistry. Nanoparticles can be used for numerous in vivo applications, such as MRI contrast enhancement and hyperthermia drug delivery. New developments focus on targeting through molecular imaging and cell tracking. PMID:21426176

  18. Compositional analysis of iron-platinum nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Chandan

    FePt nanoparticles are candidates for the future magnetic recording technology because of their good chemical stability and high magnetocrystalline anisotropy. One of the fundamental problems that limit the application of these nanoparticles is the particle-to-particle compositional and size variations. This dissertation addresses the following: (a) The mechanism of formation of FePt nanoparticles by two synthesis methods, the iron pentacarbonyl method and the superhydride method (b) determines how the sequence of the nucleation and growth processes contribute to the size and compositional variability and (c) provides a method to engineer the nucleation and growth sequence to produce nanoparticle dispersions with high degree of compositional and size uniformity.

  19. Cardioprotective activity of iron oxide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Fei; Wang, Hao; Feng, Yidong; Li, Yunman; Hua, Xiaoqing; Pang, Xingyun; Zhang, Song; Song, Lina; Zhang, Yu; Gu, Ning

    2015-01-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) are chemically inert materials and have been mainly used for imaging applications and drug deliveries. However, the possibility whether they can be used as therapeutic drugs themselves has not yet been explored. We reported here that Fe2O3 nanoparticles (NPs) can protect hearts from ischemic damage at the animal, tissue and cell level. The cardioprotective activity of Fe2O3 NPs requires the integrity of nanoparticles and is not dependent upon their surface charges and molecules that were integrated into nanoparticles. Also, Fe2O3 NPs showed no significant toxicity towards normal cardiomyocytes, indicative of their potential to treat cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25716309

  20. Fe/Au Core-Shell Nanoparticles for Biomedical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sra, Amandeep; Leslie-Pelecky, Diandra

    2009-10-01

    The physical properties of nanoparticles, including size, composition and surface chemistry, greatly influence biological and pharmacological properties and, ultimately, their clinical applications. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are widely used for applications such as MRI contrast agents, drug delivery via magnetic targeting and hyperthermia due to their chemical stability and biocompatibility; however, enhancing the saturation magnetization (Ms) of nanoparticles would produce greater sensitivity. Our design strategy involves a bottom-up wet chemistry approach to the synthesis of Fe nanoparticles. Specific advantages of Fe are the high value of Ms (210 emu/g in bulk) coupled with low toxicity; however, Fe nanoparticles must be protected from oxidation, which causes a dramatic reduction in Ms. To circumvent oxidation, Fe nanoparticles are coated with a Au shell that prevents the oxidation of the magnetic core and also provides the nanoparticles with plasmonic properties for optical stimulation. Ligands of various functionalities can be introduced through the well established Au-thiol surface chemistry for different biomedical applications while maintaining the magnetic functionality of the Fe core. In this presentation, we will discuss the physical, chemical and magnetic properties of our Fe/Au nanoparticles and their resistance to oxidation.

  1. Synthesis, Characterization, and Properties of Zero-Valent Iron Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, Donald R.; Tratnyek, P. G.; Qiang, You; Amonette, James E.; Linehan, John C.; Sarathy, Vaishnavi; Nurmi, J. T.; Wang, Chong M.; Antony, Jiji

    2007-04-04

    This chapter provides an overview of synthesis, characterization and property measurements techniques important for making understanding the nature of zero valent iron nanoparticles. The chemical reactivity of nanometer-sized materials can be quite different from that of either bulk forms of a material or the individual atoms and molecules that comprise it. Advances in our ability to synthesize, visualize, characterize and model these materials have created new opportunities to control the rates and products of chemical reactions in ways not previously possible. Zero valent iron (ZVI), including non-nanoparticle forms for iron, is one of the most promising remediation technologies for the removal of mobile chlorinated hydrocarbons and reducible inorganic anions for ground water. ZVI nanoparticles may have great potential to assist environmental remediation, but there are significant scientific and technological questions that remain to be answered. Understanding of ZVI reactive metal core-shell nanoparticles requires use of particles that are as well characterized and understood as possible. In this chapter we describe the issues and provide examples that include synthesis of nanoparticles, analytical characterization of the particles and finally measurements of their chemical properties.

  2. Intratumoral iron oxide nanoparticle hyperthermia and radiation cancer treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoopes, P. J.; Strawbridge, R. R.; Gibson, U. J.; Zeng, Q.; Pierce, Z. E.; Savellano, M.; Tate, J. A.; Ogden, J. A.; Baker, I.; Ivkov, R.; Foreman, A. R.

    2007-02-01

    The potential synergism and benefit of combined hyperthermia and radiation for cancer treatment is well established, but has yet to be optimized clinically. Specifically, the delivery of heat via external arrays /applicators or interstitial antennas has not demonstrated the spatial precision or specificity necessary to achieve appropriate a highly positive therapeutic ratio. Recently, antibody directed and possibly even non-antibody directed iron oxide nanoparticle hyperthermia has shown significant promise as a tumor treatment modality. Our studies are designed to determine the effects (safety and efficacy) of iron oxide nanoparticle hyperthermia and external beam radiation in a murine breast cancer model. Methods: MTG-B murine breast cancer cells (1 x 106) were implanted subcutaneous in 7 week-old female C3H/HeJ mice and grown to a treatment size of 150 mm3 +/- 50 mm3. Tumors were then injected locally with iron oxide nanoparticles and heated via an alternating magnetic field (AMF) generator operated at approximately 160 kHz and 400 - 550 Oe. Tumor growth was monitored daily using standard 3-D caliper measurement technique and formula. specific Mouse tumors were heated using a cooled, 36 mm diameter square copper tube induction coil which provided optimal heating in a 1 cm wide region in the center of the coil. Double dextran coated 80 nm iron oxide nanoparticles (Triton Biosystems) were used in all studies. Intra-tumor, peri-tumor and rectal (core body) temperatures were continually measured throughout the treatment period. Results: Preliminary in vivo nanoparticle-AMF hyperthermia (167 KHz and 400 or 550 Oe) studies demonstrated dose responsive cytotoxicity which enhanced the effects of external beam radiation. AMF associated eddy currents resulted in nonspecific temperature increases in exposed tissues which did not contain nanoparticles, however these effects were minor and not injurious to the mice. These studies also suggest that iron oxide nanoparticle

  3. Iron Nanoparticles in Reactive Environmental Barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Nuxoll, Eric E.; Shimotori, Tsutomu; Arnold, William A.; Cussler, Edward L.

    2003-09-23

    Zero-valent iron is cheap, environmentally innocuous, and effective at reducing chlorinated organics. It has, as a result, become a popular candidate for remediating aquifers contaminated with trichloroethylene and other halogenated pollutants. In this paper, we discuss one such system, where iron nanoparticles are synthesized and incorporated into polyvinyl alcohol membranes, forming water-permeable barriers to these pollutants. These barriers are tested against a variety of contaminants, including carbon tetrachloride, copper, and chromate.

  4. Photon upconversion in core-shell nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xian; Peng, Denfeng; Ju, Qiang; Wang, Feng

    2015-03-21

    Photon upconversion generally results from a series of successive electronic transitions within complex energy levels of lanthanide ions that are embedded in the lattice of a crystalline solid. In conventional lanthanide-doped upconversion nanoparticles, the dopant ions homogeneously distributed in the host lattice are readily accessible to surface quenchers and lose their excitation energy, giving rise to weak and susceptible emissions. Therefore, present studies on upconversion are mainly focused on core-shell nanoparticles comprising spatially confined dopant ions. By doping upconverting lanthanide ions in the interior of a core-shell nanoparticle, the upconversion emission can be substantially enhanced, and the optical integrity of the nanoparticles can be largely preserved. Optically active shells are also frequently employed to impart multiple functionalities to upconversion nanoparticles. Intriguingly, the core-shell design introduces the possibility of constructing novel upconversion nanoparticles by exploiting the energy exchange interactions across the core-shell interface. In this tutorial review, we highlight recent advances in the development of upconversion core-shell nanoparticles, with particular emphasis on the emerging strategies for regulating the interplay of dopant interactions through core-shell nanostructural engineering that leads to unprecedented upconversion properties. The improved control over photon energy conversion will open up new opportunities for biological and energy applications. PMID:25058157

  5. Process to Produce Iron Nanoparticle Lunar Dust Simulant Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, Ching-cheh; McNatt, Jeremiah

    2010-01-01

    A document discusses a method for producing nanophase iron lunar dust composite simulant by heating a mixture of carbon black and current lunar simulant types (mixed oxide including iron oxide) at a high temperature to reduce ionic iron into elemental iron. The product is a chemically modified lunar simulant that can be attracted by a magnet, and has a surface layer with an iron concentration that is increased during the reaction. The iron was found to be -iron and Fe3O4 nanoparticles. The simulant produced with this method contains iron nanoparticles not available previously, and they are stable in ambient air. These nanoparticles can be mass-produced simply.

  6. Low temperature hydrogenation of iron nanoparticles on graphene

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Keisuke; Wang, Yongming; Chiba, Shotaro; Nakagawa, Yuki; Isobe, Shigehito; Ohnuki, Somei

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogenation of iron nanoparticles was performed both computationally and experimentally where previously chemically-bonded iron hydride is considered to be unachievable under ordinary conditions. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations predict that hydrogenated iron nanoparticles are stabilized on a single-layer graphene/Cu substrate. Experimentally, iron nanoparticles were deposited onto a graphene/Cu substrate by vacuum deposition. Hydrogenation was done at 1atm of hydrogen gas and under liquid nitrogen. Mass spectrometry peak confirmed the hydrogen release from hydrogenated iron nanoparticles while a scanning transmission electron microscopy is used in order to link a geometrical shape of iron hydride nanoparticles between experimental and theoretical treatments. The hydrogenated iron nanoparticles were successfully synthesized where hydrogenated iron nanoparticles are stable under ordinary conditions. PMID:24710406

  7. Platinum-Maghemite Core-Shell Nanoparticles Using a Sequential Synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, X.; Black, D.; Watkins, N.J.; Gao, Y.; Yang, H.

    2003-01-11

    OAK-B135 Pt{at}Fe2O3 core-shell nanoparticles have been made using a sequential synthetic method. Platinum nanoparticles were synthesized via reduction of platinum acetylacetonate in octyl ether, and layers of iron oxide were subsequently deposited on the surface of Pt nanoparticles through thermal decomposition of iron pentacarbonyl. The core-shell nanoparticles were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy. Thickness of the shell can be controlled by changing concentrations of the reactants and the reaction conditions. These Pt{at}Fe2O3 core-shell nanoparticles could have potential applications in catalysis and as precursors for making property-tunable magnetic nanoparticles, thin films, and nanocomposites.

  8. Spectroscopic characterization of magnetic Fe3O4@Au core shell nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Fouad, Dina M; El-Said, Waleed A; Mohamed, Mona B

    2015-04-01

    The magnetic nanoparticles iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles and iron oxide/gold core-shell (Fe3O4/Au) nanoparticles were synthesized and their catalytic photo-degradation activity towards malathion as example of organophosphorus pesticides were reported. Iron oxide (Fe3O4) magnetic nanoparticle was successfully prepared through co-precipitation method by the reduction of ferric chloride (FeCl3) using ascorbic acid. The morphology of the prepared nanoparticles was characterized by the TEM and XRD (X-ray diffraction) techniques. Degradation of 10 ppm of malathion in the presence of these nanoparticles under UV radiation was monitored using (HPLC) and UV-visible spectra. Fe3O4/Au nanoparticles showed higher efficiency in photo-degradation of malathion than Fe3O4 ones. PMID:25617979

  9. Core size determination and structural characterization of intravenous iron complexes by cryogenic transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yong; Petrochenko, Peter; Chen, Lynn; Wong, Sook Yee; Absar, Mohammad; Choi, Stephanie; Zheng, Jiwen

    2016-05-30

    Understanding physicochemical properties of intravenous (IV) iron drug products is essential to ensure the manufacturing process is consistent and streamlined. The history of physicochemical characterization of IV iron complex formulations stretches over several decades, with disparities in iron core size and particle morphology as the major source of debate. One of the main reasons for this controversy is room temperature sample preparation artifacts, which affect accurate determination of size, shape and agglomeration/aggregation of nanoscale iron particles. The present study is first to report the ultra-fine iron core structures of four IV iron complex formulations, sodium ferric gluconate, iron sucrose, low molecular weight iron dextran and ferumoxytol, using a cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) preservation technique, as opposed to the conventional room temperature (RT-TEM) technique. Our results show that room temperature preparation causes nanoparticle aggregation and deformation, while cryo-TEM preserves IV iron colloidal suspension in their native frozen-hydrated and undiluted state. In contrast to the current consensus in literature, all four IV iron colloids exhibit a similar morphology of their iron oxide cores with a spherical shape, narrow size distribution and an average size of 2nm. Moreover, out of the four tested formulations, ferumoxytol exhibits a cluster-like community of several iron carbohydrate particles which likely accounts for its large hydrodynamic size of 25nm, measured with dynamic light scattering. Our findings outline a suitable method for identifying colloidal nanoparticle core size in the native state, which is increasingly important for manufacturing and design control of complex drug formulations, such as IV iron drug products. PMID:27001529

  10. 29. DEPENDABLE FORDATHSHELL CORE MACHINES IN THE GREY IRON FOUNDRY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. DEPENDABLE FORDATH-SHELL CORE MACHINES IN THE GREY IRON FOUNDRY INJECTS SAND INTO A CLOSED CORE BOX. SOME OF THE UNITS HEAT THE CORE BOX TO FIX THE RESINS AS THE CORE REMAINS IN THE BOX, OTHERS MERELY SHAPED THE CORE SAND REQUIRING BAKING OF THE CORES TO HARDEN THEM. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  11. 30. NATIONAL SHELL CORE MACHINE IN THE GREY IRON FOUNDRY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. NATIONAL SHELL CORE MACHINE IN THE GREY IRON FOUNDRY AUTOMATICALLY INJECTS SAND INTO CLOSED, HEATED CORE BOXES THAT SET THE RESINS AND PERMIT A HARDENED CORE TO BE REMOVED BY THE OPERATOR. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  12. Oral exposure to polystyrene nanoparticles effects iron absorption

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of engineered nanoparticles in food and pharmaceuticals is expected to increase, but the impact of chronic oral exposure to nanoparticles on human health remains unknown. Here, we show that chronic and acute oral exposure to polystyrene nanoparticles can influence iron uptake and iron trans...

  13. Hybrid response surface methodology-genetic algorithm optimization of ultrasound-assisted transesterification of waste oil catalysed by immobilized lipase on mesoporous silica/iron oxide magnetic core-shell nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Mahmoud; Keyhani, Alireza; Akram, Asadolah; Rahman, Masoud; Jenkins, Bryan; Stroeve, Pieter

    2013-01-01

    The production ofbiodiesel by transesterification of waste cooking oil (WCO) to partially substitute petroleum diesel is one of the measures for solving the twin problems of environment pollution and energy demand. An environmentally benign process for the enzymatic transesterification using immobilized lipase has attracted considerable attention for biodiesel production. Here, a superparamagnetic, high surface area substrate for lipase immobilization is evaluated. These immobilization substrates are composed of mesoporous silica/superparamagnetic iron oxide core-shell nanoparticles. The effects of methanol ratio to WCO, lipase concentration, water content and reaction time on the synthesis of biodiesel were analysed by utilizing the response surface methodology (RSM). A quadratic response surface equation for calculating fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) content as the objective function was established based on experimental data obtained in accordance with the central composite design. The RSM-based model was then used as the fitness function for genetic algorithm (GA) to optimize its input space. Hybrid RSM-GA predicted the maximum FAME content (91%) at the optimum level of medium variables: methanol ratio to WCO, 4.34; lipase content, 43.6%; water content, 10.22%; and reaction time, 6h. Moreover, the immobilized lipase could be used for four times without considerable loss of the activity. PMID:24350474

  14. Increased optical contrast in imaging of epidermal growth factor receptor using magnetically actuated hybrid gold/iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaron, Jesse S.; Oh, Junghwan; Larson, Timothy A.; Kumar, Sonia; Milner, Thomas E.; Sokolov, Konstantin V.

    2006-12-01

    We describe a new approach for optical imaging that combines the advantages of molecularly targeted plasmonic nanoparticles and magnetic actuation. This combination is achieved through hybrid nanoparticles with an iron oxide core surrounded by a gold layer. The nanoparticles are targeted in-vitro to epidermal growth factor receptor, a common cancer biomarker. The gold portion resonantly scatters visible light giving a strong optical signal and the superparamagnetic core provides a means to externally modulate the optical signal. The combination of bright plasmon resonance scattering and magnetic actuation produces a dramatic increase in contrast in optical imaging of cells labeled with hybrid gold/iron oxide nanoparticles.

  15. Size-Dependent Specific Surface Area of Nanoporous Film Assembled by Core-Shell Iron Nanoclusters

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Antony, Jiji; Nutting, Joseph; Baer, Donald R.; Meyer, Daniel; Sharma, Amit; Qiang, You

    2006-01-01

    Nmore » anoporous films of core-shell iron nanoclusters have improved possibilities for remediation, chemical reactivity rate, and environmentally favorable reaction pathways. Conventional methods often have difficulties to yield stable monodispersed core-shell nanoparticles. We produced core-shell nanoclusters by a cluster source that utilizes combination of Fe target sputtering along with gas aggregations in an inert atmosphere at 7 ∘ C . Sizes of core-shell iron-iron oxide nanoclusters are observed with transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The specific surface areas of the porous films obtained from Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) process are size-dependent and compared with the calculated data.« less

  16. Towards the development of multifunctional chitosan-based iron oxide nanoparticles: Optimization and modelling of doxorubicin release.

    PubMed

    Soares, Paula I P; Sousa, Ana Isabel; Ferreira, Isabel M M; Novo, Carlos M M; Borges, João Paulo

    2016-11-20

    In the present work composite nanoparticles with a magnetic core and a chitosan-based shell were produced as drug delivery systems for doxorubicin (DOX). The results show that composite nanoparticles with a hydrodynamic diameter within the nanometric range are able to encapsulate more DOX than polymeric nanoparticles alone corresponding also to a higher drug release. Moreover the synthesis method of the iron oxide nanoparticles influences the total amount of DOX released and a high content of iron oxide nanoparticles inhibits DOX release. The modelling of the experimental results revealed a release mechanism dominated by Fickian diffusion. PMID:27561489

  17. 28. CORE STORAGE AREA OF THE GREY IRON FOUNDRY SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. CORE STORAGE AREA OF THE GREY IRON FOUNDRY SHOWING CORES THAT WILL BE USED TO CREATE INTERIOR WALLS OF SMALL BALL VALVES, FOREGROUND, AND LARGE GATE VALVES, BACKGROUND. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  18. Lactoferrin conjugated iron oxide nanoparticles for targeting brain glioma cells in magnetic particle imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomitaka, Asahi; Arami, Hamed; Gandhi, Sonu; Krishnan, Kannan M.

    2015-10-01

    Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) is a new real-time imaging modality, which promises high tracer mass sensitivity and spatial resolution directly generated from iron oxide nanoparticles. In this study, monodisperse iron oxide nanoparticles with median core diameters ranging from 14 to 26 nm were synthesized and their surface was conjugated with lactoferrin to convert them into brain glioma targeting agents. The conjugation was confirmed with the increase of the hydrodynamic diameters, change of zeta potential, and Bradford assay. Magnetic particle spectrometry (MPS), performed to evaluate the MPI performance of these nanoparticles, showed no change in signal after lactoferrin conjugation to nanoparticles for all core diameters, suggesting that the MPI signal is dominated by Néel relaxation and thus independent of hydrodynamic size difference or presence of coating molecules before and after conjugations. For this range of core sizes (14-26 nm), both MPS signal intensity and spatial resolution improved with increasing core diameter of nanoparticles. The lactoferrin conjugated iron oxide nanoparticles (Lf-IONPs) showed specific cellular internalization into C6 cells with a 5-fold increase in MPS signal compared to IONPs without lactoferrin, both after 24 h incubation. These results suggest that Lf-IONPs can be used as tracers for targeted brain glioma imaging using MPI.

  19. Polymer/Iron Oxide Nanoparticle Composites—A Straight Forward and Scalable Synthesis Approach

    PubMed Central

    Sommertune, Jens; Sugunan, Abhilash; Ahniyaz, Anwar; Stjernberg Bejhed, Rebecca; Sarwe, Anna; Johansson, Christer; Balceris, Christoph; Ludwig, Frank; Posth, Oliver; Fornara, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticle systems can be divided into single-core nanoparticles (with only one magnetic core per particle) and magnetic multi-core nanoparticles (with several magnetic cores per particle). Here, we report multi-core nanoparticle synthesis based on a controlled precipitation process within a well-defined oil in water emulsion to trap the superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) in a range of polymer matrices of choice, such as poly(styrene), poly(lactid acid), poly(methyl methacrylate), and poly(caprolactone). Multi-core particles were obtained within the Z-average size range of 130 to 340 nm. With the aim to combine the fast room temperature magnetic relaxation of small individual cores with high magnetization of the ensemble of SPIONs, we used small (<10 nm) core nanoparticles. The performed synthesis is highly flexible with respect to the choice of polymer and SPION loading and gives rise to multi-core particles with interesting magnetic properties and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast efficacy. PMID:26307966

  20. Polymer/Iron Oxide Nanoparticle Composites--A Straight Forward and Scalable Synthesis Approach.

    PubMed

    Sommertune, Jens; Sugunan, Abhilash; Ahniyaz, Anwar; Bejhed, Rebecca Stjernberg; Sarwe, Anna; Johansson, Christer; Balceris, Christoph; Ludwig, Frank; Posth, Oliver; Fornara, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticle systems can be divided into single-core nanoparticles (with only one magnetic core per particle) and magnetic multi-core nanoparticles (with several magnetic cores per particle). Here, we report multi-core nanoparticle synthesis based on a controlled precipitation process within a well-defined oil in water emulsion to trap the superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) in a range of polymer matrices of choice, such as poly(styrene), poly(lactid acid), poly(methyl methacrylate), and poly(caprolactone). Multi-core particles were obtained within the Z-average size range of 130 to 340 nm. With the aim to combine the fast room temperature magnetic relaxation of small individual cores with high magnetization of the ensemble of SPIONs, we used small (<10 nm) core nanoparticles. The performed synthesis is highly flexible with respect to the choice of polymer and SPION loading and gives rise to multi-core particles with interesting magnetic properties and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast efficacy. PMID:26307966

  1. The convenient preparation of stable aryl-coated zerovalent iron nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Guselnikova, Olga A; Galanov, Andrey I; Gutakovskii, Anton K; Postnikov, Pavel S

    2015-01-01

    A novel approach for the in situ synthesis of zerovalent aryl-coated iron nanoparticles (NPs) based on diazonium salt chemistry is proposed. Surface-modified zerovalent iron NPs (ZVI NPs) were prepared by simple chemical reduction of iron(III) chloride aqueous solution followed by in situ modification using water soluble arenediazonium tosylate. The resulting NPs, with average iron core diameter of 21 nm, were coated with a 10 nm thick organic layer to provide long-term protection in air for the highly reactive zerovalent iron core up to 180 °C. The surface-modified iron NPs possess a high grafting density of the aryl group on the NPs surface of 1.23 mmol/g. FTIR spectroscopy, XRD, HRTEM, TGA/DTA, and elemental analysis were performed in order to characterize the resulting material. PMID:26171295

  2. The convenient preparation of stable aryl-coated zerovalent iron nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Guselnikova, Olga A; Galanov, Andrey I; Gutakovskii, Anton K

    2015-01-01

    Summary A novel approach for the in situ synthesis of zerovalent aryl-coated iron nanoparticles (NPs) based on diazonium salt chemistry is proposed. Surface-modified zerovalent iron NPs (ZVI NPs) were prepared by simple chemical reduction of iron(III) chloride aqueous solution followed by in situ modification using water soluble arenediazonium tosylate. The resulting NPs, with average iron core diameter of 21 nm, were coated with a 10 nm thick organic layer to provide long-term protection in air for the highly reactive zerovalent iron core up to 180 °C. The surface-modified iron NPs possess a high grafting density of the aryl group on the NPs surface of 1.23 mmol/g. FTIR spectroscopy, XRD, HRTEM, TGA/DTA, and elemental analysis were performed in order to characterize the resulting material. PMID:26171295

  3. Facile One-pot Transformation of Iron Oxides from Fe2O3 Nanoparticles to Nanostructured Fe3O4@C Core-Shell Composites via Combustion Waves.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jungho; Lee, Kang Yeol; Yeo, Taehan; Choi, Wonjoon

    2016-01-01

    The development of a low-cost, fast, and large-scale process for the synthesis and manipulation of nanostructured metal oxides is essential for incorporating materials with diverse practical applications. Herein, we present a facile one-pot synthesis method using combustion waves that simultaneously achieves fast reduction and direct formation of carbon coating layers on metal oxide nanostructures. Hybrid composites of Fe2O3 nanoparticles and nitrocellulose on the cm scale were fabricated by a wet impregnation process. We demonstrated that self-propagating combustion waves along interfacial boundaries between the surface of the metal oxide and the chemical fuels enabled the release of oxygen from Fe2O3. This accelerated reaction directly transformed Fe2O3 into Fe3O4 nanostructures. The distinctive color change from reddish-brown Fe2O3 to dark-gray Fe3O4 confirmed the transition of oxidation states and the change in the fundamental properties of the material. Furthermore, it simultaneously formed carbon layers of 5-20 nm thickness coating the surfaces of the resulting Fe3O4 nanoparticles, which may aid in maintaining the nanostructures and improving the conductivity of the composites. This newly developed use of combustion waves in hybridized nanostructures may permit the precise manipulation of the chemical compositions of other metal oxide nanostructures, as well as the formation of organic/inorganic hybrid nanostructures. PMID:26902260

  4. Facile One-pot Transformation of Iron Oxides from Fe2O3 Nanoparticles to Nanostructured Fe3O4@C Core-Shell Composites via Combustion Waves

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jungho; Lee, Kang Yeol; Yeo, Taehan; Choi, Wonjoon

    2016-01-01

    The development of a low-cost, fast, and large-scale process for the synthesis and manipulation of nanostructured metal oxides is essential for incorporating materials with diverse practical applications. Herein, we present a facile one-pot synthesis method using combustion waves that simultaneously achieves fast reduction and direct formation of carbon coating layers on metal oxide nanostructures. Hybrid composites of Fe2O3 nanoparticles and nitrocellulose on the cm scale were fabricated by a wet impregnation process. We demonstrated that self-propagating combustion waves along interfacial boundaries between the surface of the metal oxide and the chemical fuels enabled the release of oxygen from Fe2O3. This accelerated reaction directly transformed Fe2O3 into Fe3O4 nanostructures. The distinctive color change from reddish-brown Fe2O3 to dark-gray Fe3O4 confirmed the transition of oxidation states and the change in the fundamental properties of the material. Furthermore, it simultaneously formed carbon layers of 5–20 nm thickness coating the surfaces of the resulting Fe3O4 nanoparticles, which may aid in maintaining the nanostructures and improving the conductivity of the composites. This newly developed use of combustion waves in hybridized nanostructures may permit the precise manipulation of the chemical compositions of other metal oxide nanostructures, as well as the formation of organic/inorganic hybrid nanostructures. PMID:26902260

  5. Facile One-pot Transformation of Iron Oxides from Fe2O3 Nanoparticles to Nanostructured Fe3O4@C Core-Shell Composites via Combustion Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jungho; Lee, Kang Yeol; Yeo, Taehan; Choi, Wonjoon

    2016-02-01

    The development of a low-cost, fast, and large-scale process for the synthesis and manipulation of nanostructured metal oxides is essential for incorporating materials with diverse practical applications. Herein, we present a facile one-pot synthesis method using combustion waves that simultaneously achieves fast reduction and direct formation of carbon coating layers on metal oxide nanostructures. Hybrid composites of Fe2O3 nanoparticles and nitrocellulose on the cm scale were fabricated by a wet impregnation process. We demonstrated that self-propagating combustion waves along interfacial boundaries between the surface of the metal oxide and the chemical fuels enabled the release of oxygen from Fe2O3. This accelerated reaction directly transformed Fe2O3 into Fe3O4 nanostructures. The distinctive color change from reddish-brown Fe2O3 to dark-gray Fe3O4 confirmed the transition of oxidation states and the change in the fundamental properties of the material. Furthermore, it simultaneously formed carbon layers of 5-20 nm thickness coating the surfaces of the resulting Fe3O4 nanoparticles, which may aid in maintaining the nanostructures and improving the conductivity of the composites. This newly developed use of combustion waves in hybridized nanostructures may permit the precise manipulation of the chemical compositions of other metal oxide nanostructures, as well as the formation of organic/inorganic hybrid nanostructures.

  6. Washing effect on superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Mireles, Laura-Karina; Sacher, Edward; Yahia, L'Hocine; Laurent, Sophie; Stanicki, Dimitri

    2016-06-01

    Much recent research on nanoparticles has occurred in the biomedical area, particularly in the area of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs); one such area of research is in their use as magnetically directed prodrugs. It has been reported that nanoscale materials exhibit properties different from those of materials in bulk or on a macro scale [1]. Further, an understanding of the batch-to-batch reproducibility and uniformity of the SPION surface is essential to ensure safe biological applications, as noted in the accompanying article [2], because the surface is the first layer that affects the biological response of the human body. Here, we consider a comparison of the surface chemistries of a batch of SPIONs, before and after the supposedly gentle process of dialysis in water. PMID:27141527

  7. Washing effect on superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Mireles, Laura-Karina; Sacher, Edward; Yahia, L’Hocine; Laurent, Sophie; Stanicki, Dimitri

    2016-01-01

    Much recent research on nanoparticles has occurred in the biomedical area, particularly in the area of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs); one such area of research is in their use as magnetically directed prodrugs. It has been reported that nanoscale materials exhibit properties different from those of materials in bulk or on a macro scale [1]. Further, an understanding of the batch-to-batch reproducibility and uniformity of the SPION surface is essential to ensure safe biological applications, as noted in the accompanying article [2], because the surface is the first layer that affects the biological response of the human body. Here, we consider a comparison of the surface chemistries of a batch of SPIONs, before and after the supposedly gentle process of dialysis in water. PMID:27141527

  8. Preparation and characterization of thermosensitive PNIPAA-coated iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shengmao; Zhang, Linna; He, Benfang; Wu, Zhishen

    2008-08-01

    A new and facile approach was established to fabricate thermoresponsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAA) coated iron oxide nanoparticles in a non-aqueous medium. The morphology and structure of the nanoparticle-doped composite were analyzed by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM), x-ray powder diffraction (XRD), and Fourier transformation infrared spectrometry (FTIR). The thermosensitivity of the composite was also investigated. Results indicated that the oil-soluble iron oxide nanoparticles encapsulated with PNIPAA, composed of an inorganic iron oxide core and biocompatible PNIPAA shell, were dispersed well in water and had a sphere-like shape. The PNIPAA-coated iron oxide nanoparticles with such a kind of core-shell structure showed excellent thermosensitivity. Namely, the aqueous suspension of PNIPAA-coated iron oxide nanoparticles dramatically changed from transparent to opaque as the temperature increased from room temperature to 38 °C, showing potential as optical transmittance switch materials and their significance in the fields of protein adsorption and purification controlled release, and drug delivery.

  9. Oral exposure to polystyrene nanoparticles affects iron absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahler, Gretchen J.; Esch, Mandy B.; Tako, Elad; Southard, Teresa L.; Archer, Shivaun D.; Glahn, Raymond P.; Shuler, Michael L.

    2012-04-01

    The use of engineered nanoparticles in food and pharmaceuticals is expected to increase, but the impact of chronic oral exposure to nanoparticles on human health remains unknown. Here, we show that chronic and acute oral exposure to polystyrene nanoparticles can influence iron uptake and iron transport in an in vitro model of the intestinal epithelium and an in vivo chicken intestinal loop model. Intestinal cells that are exposed to high doses of nanoparticles showed increased iron transport due to nanoparticle disruption of the cell membrane. Chickens acutely exposed to carboxylated particles (50 nm in diameter) had a lower iron absorption than unexposed or chronically exposed birds. Chronic exposure caused remodelling of the intestinal villi, which increased the surface area available for iron absorption. The agreement between the in vitro and in vivo results suggests that our in vitro intestinal epithelium model is potentially useful for toxicology studies.

  10. Equilibrium iron isotope fractionation at core-mantle boundary conditions.

    PubMed

    Polyakov, Veniamin B

    2009-02-13

    The equilibrium iron isotope fractionation between lower mantle minerals and metallic iron at core-mantle boundary conditions can be evaluated from the high-pressure 57Fe partial vibrational density of states determined by synchrotron inelastic nuclear resonant x-ray scattering spectroscopy using a diamond anvil. Ferropericlase [(Mg,Fe)O] and (Fe,Mg)SiO3- post-perovskite are enriched in heavy iron isotopes relative to metallic iron at ultrahigh pressures, as opposed to the equilibrium iron isotope fractionation between these compounds at low pressure. The enrichment of Earth and Moon basalts in heavy iron isotopes relative to those from Mars and asteroid Vesta can be explained by the equilibrium iron isotope fractionation during the segregation of Earth's core and the assumption that Earth was already differentiated before the Moon-forming "giant impact." PMID:19213913

  11. Iron oxide nanoparticle enhancement of radiation cytotoxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazur, Courtney M.; Tate, Jennifer A.; Strawbridge, Rendall R.; Gladstone, David J.; Hoopes, P. Jack

    2013-02-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) have been investigated as a promising means for inducing tumor cell-specific hyperthermia. Although the ability to generate and use nanoparticles that are biocompatible, tumor specific, and have the ability to produce adequate cytotoxic heat is very promising, significant preclinical and clinical development will be required for clinical efficacy. At this time it appears using IONP-induced hyperthermia as an adjunct to conventional cancer therapeutics, rather than as an independent treatment, will provide the initial IONP clinical treatment. Due to their high-Z characteristics, another option is to use intracellular IONPs to enhance radiation therapy without excitation with AMF (production of heat). To test this concept IONPs were added to cell culture media at a concentration of 0.2 mg Fe/mL and incubated with murine breast adenocarcinoma (MTG-B) cells for either 48 or 72 hours. Extracellular iron was then removed and all cells were irradiated at 4 Gy. Although samples incubated with IONPs for 48 hrs did not demonstrate enhanced post-irradiation cytotoxicity as compared to the non-IONP-containing cells, cells incubated with IONPs for 72 hours, which contained 40% more Fe than 48 hr incubated cells, showed a 25% decrease in clonogenic survival compared to their non-IONP-containing counterparts. These results suggest that a critical concentration of intracellular IONPs is necessary for enhancing radiation cytotoxicity.

  12. Effect of coating thickness of iron oxide nanoparticles on their relaxivity in the MRI

    PubMed Central

    Hajesmaeelzadeh, Farzaneh; Shanehsazzadeh, Saeed; Grüttner, Cordula; Daha, Fariba Johari; Oghabian, Mohammad Ali

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Iron oxide nanoparticles have found prevalent applications in various fields including drug delivery, cell separation and as contrast agents. Super paramagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles allow researchers and clinicians to enhance the tissue contrast of an area of interest by increasing the relaxation rate of water. In this study, we evaluate the dependency of hydrodynamic size of iron oxide nanoparticles coated with Polyethylene glycol (PEG) on their relativities with 3 Tesla clinical MRI. Materials and Methods: We used three groups of nanoparticles with nominal sizes 20, 50 and 100 nm with a core size of 8.86 nm, 8.69 nm and 10.4 nm that they were covered with PEG 300 and 600 Da. A clinical magnetic resonance scanner determines the T1 and T2 relaxation times for various concentrations of PEG-coated nanoparticles. Results: The size measurement by photon correlation spectroscopy showed the hydrodynamic sizes of MNPs with nominal 20, 50 and 100 nm with 70, 82 and 116 nm for particles with PEG 600 coating and 74, 93 and 100 nm for particles with PEG 300 coating, respectively. We foud that the relaxivity decreased with increasing overall particle size (via coating thickness). Magnetic resonance imaging showed that by increasing the size of the nanoparticles, r2/r1 increases linearly. Conclusion: According to the data obtained from this study it can be concluded that increments in coating thickness have more influence on relaxivities compared to the changes in core size of magnetic nanoparticles. PMID:27081461

  13. Influence of structure of iron nanoparticles in aggregates on their magnetic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosická, Dana; Šembera, Jan

    2011-09-01

    Zero-valent iron nanoparticles rapidly aggregate. One of the reasons is magnetic forces among the nanoparticles. Magnetic field around particles is caused by composition of the particles. Their core is formed from zero-valent iron, and shell is a layer of magnetite. The magnetic forces contribute to attractive forces among the nanoparticles and that leads to increasing of aggregation of the nanoparticles. This effect is undesirable for decreasing of remediation properties of iron particles and limited transport possibilities. The aggregation of iron nanoparticles was established for consequent processes: Brownian motion, sedimentation, velocity gradient of fluid around particles and electrostatic forces. In our previous work, an introduction of influence of magnetic forces among particles on the aggregation was presented. These forces have significant impact on the rate of aggregation. In this article, a numerical computation of magnetic forces between an aggregate and a nanoparticle and between two aggregates is shown. It is done for random position of nanoparticles in an aggregate and random or arranged directions of magnetic polarizations and for structured aggregates with arranged vectors of polarizations. Statistical computation by Monte Carlo is done, and range of dominant area of magnetic forces around particles is assessed.

  14. Targeted iron oxide nanoparticles for the enhancement of radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Anastasia K; Mitov, Mihail I; Daley, Emily F; McGarry, Ronald C; Anderson, Kimberly W; Hilt, J Zach

    2016-10-01

    To increase the efficacy of radiation, iron oxide nanoparticles can be utilized for their ability to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS). Radiation therapy promotes leakage of electrons from the electron transport chain and leads to an increase in mitochondrial production of the superoxide anion which is converted to hydrogen peroxide by superoxide dismutase. Iron oxide nanoparticles can then catalyze the reaction from hydrogen peroxide to the highly reactive hydroxyl radical. Therefore, the overall aim of this project was to utilize iron oxide nanoparticles conjugated to a cell penetrating peptide, TAT, to escape lysosomal encapsulation after internalization by cancer cells and catalyze hydroxyl radical formation. It was determined that TAT functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles and uncoated iron oxide nanoparticles resulted in permeabilization of the lysosomal membranes. Additionally, mitochondrial integrity was compromised when A549 cells were treated with both TAT-functionalized nanoparticles and radiation. Pre-treatment with TAT-functionalized nanoparticles also significantly increased the ROS generation associated with radiation. A long term viability study showed that TAT-functionalized nanoparticles combined with radiation resulted in a synergistic combination treatment. This is likely due to the TAT-functionalized nanoparticles sensitizing the cells to subsequent radiation therapy, because the nanoparticles alone did not result in significant toxicities. PMID:27521615

  15. Two-component magnetic structure of iron oxide nanoparticles mineralized in Listeria innocua protein cages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usselman, Robert J.; Klem, Michael T.; Russek, Stephen E.; Young, Mark; Douglas, Trevor; Goldfarb, Ron B.

    2010-06-01

    Magnetometry was used to determine the magnetic properties of maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) nanoparticles formed within Listeria innocua protein cage. The electron magnetic resonance spectrum shows the presence of at least two magnetization components. The magnetization curves are explained by a sum of two Langevin functions in which each filled protein cage contains both a large magnetic iron oxide core plus an amorphous surface consisting of small noncoupled iron oxide spin clusters. This model qualitatively explains the observed decrease in the temperature dependent saturation moment and removes an unrealistic temperature dependent increase in the particle moment often observed in nanoparticle magnetization measurements.

  16. Safety assessment of chronic oral exposure to iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamorro, Susana; Gutiérrez, Lucía; Vaquero, María Pilar; Verdoy, Dolores; Salas, Gorka; Luengo, Yurena; Brenes, Agustín; José Teran, Francisco

    2015-05-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles with engineered physical and biochemical properties are finding a rapidly increasing number of biomedical applications. However, a wide variety of safety concerns, especially those related to oral exposure, still need to be addressed for iron oxide nanoparticles in order to reach clinical practice. Here, we report on the effects of chronic oral exposure to low doses of γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles in growing chickens. Animal observation, weight, and diet intake reveal no adverse signs, symptoms, or mortality. No nanoparticle accumulation was observed in liver, spleen, and duodenum, with feces as the main excretion route. Liver iron level and duodenal villi morphology reflect the bioavailability of the iron released from the partial transformation of γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles in the acid gastric environment. Duodenal gene expression studies related to the absorption of iron from γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles indicate the enhancement of a ferric over ferrous pathway supporting the role of mucins. Our findings reveal that oral administration of iron oxide nanoparticles is a safe route for drug delivery at low nanoparticle doses.

  17. Tuning the Properties of Iron Nanoparticles: Doping Effects on Reactivity and Aging

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, Donald R.; Tratnyek, Paul G.; Amonette, James E.; Chun, Chan Lan; Nachimuthu, Ponnusamy; Nurmi, James; Penn, Ryland L.; Matson, Dean W.; Linehan, John C.; Qiang, You; Sharma, Amit

    2009-11-01

    Predicting and controlling the behaviors nanoparticles in the environment must include understanding the impact of trace elements and impurities (including dopants) on their properties including reactivity and lifetime. The significant impact of many trace elements on the redox activity of iron metal and iron oxide nanoparticles in natural and engineering systems is well established. However, the fundamental mechanisms responsible for specific behaviors and the relationship of the mechanisms to the structural characteristics of the particles and dopants are not as well understood. In addition, the role of trace elements on particle aging and the overall reaction lifetime has not yet received much attention. Here we report the impact of three different processes on the reactivity of iron metal-core oxide-shell nanoparticles with carbon tetrachloride.

  18. Core-size-dependent catalytic properties of bimetallic Au/Ag core-shell nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Haldar, Krishna Kanta; Kundu, Simanta; Patra, Amitava

    2014-12-24

    Bimetallic core-shell nanoparticles have recently emerged as a new class of functional materials because of their potential applications in catalysis, surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate and photonics etc. Here, we have synthesized Au/Ag bimetallic core-shell nanoparticles with varying the core diameter. The red-shifting of the both plasmonic peaks of Ag and Au confirms the core-shell structure of the nanoparticles. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis, line scan EDS measurement and UV-vis study confirm the formation of core-shell nanoparticles. We have examined the catalytic activity of these core-shell nanostructures in the reaction between 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) and NaBH4 to form 4-aminophenol (4-AP) and the efficiency of the catalytic reaction is found to be increased with increasing the core size of Au/Ag core-shell nanocrystals. The catalytic efficiency varies from 41.8 to 96.5% with varying core size from 10 to 100 nm of Au/Ag core-shell nanoparticles, and the Au100/Ag bimetallic core-shell nanoparticle is found to be 12-fold more active than that of the pure Au nanoparticles with 100 nm diameter. Thus, the catalytic properties of the metal nanoparticles are significantly enhanced because of the Au/Ag core-shell structure, and the rate is dependent on the size of the core of the nanoparticles. PMID:25456348

  19. Bubble nucleation and migration in a lead–iron hydr(oxide) core–shell nanoparticle

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Kaiyang; Frolov, Timofey; Xin, Huolin L.; Wang, Junling; Asta, Mark; Zheng, Haimei

    2015-01-01

    Iron hydroxide is found in a wide range of contexts ranging from biominerals to steel corrosion, and it can transform to anhydrous oxide via releasing O2 gas and H2O. However, it is not well understood how gases transport through a crystal lattice. Here, we present in situ observation of the nucleation and migration of gas bubbles in iron (hydr)oxide using transmission electron microscopy. We create Pb–FeOOH model core–shell nanoparticles in a liquid cell. Under electron irradiation, iron hydroxide transforms to iron oxide, during which bubbles are generated, and they migrate through the shell to the nanoparticle surface. Geometric phase analysis of the shell lattice shows an inhomogeneous stain field at the bubbles. Our modeling suggests that the elastic interaction between the core and the bubble provides a driving force for bubble migration. PMID:26438864

  20. Synthesis and Magneto-Thermal Actuation of Iron Oxide Core–PNIPAM Shell Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Superparamagnetic nanoparticles have been proposed for many applications in biotechnology and medicine. In this paper, it is demonstrated how the excellent colloidal stability and magnetic properties of monodisperse and individually densely grafted iron oxide nanoparticles can be used to manipulate reversibly the solubility of nanoparticles with a poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)nitrodopamine shell. “Grafting-to” and “grafting-from” methods for synthesis of an irreversibly anchored brush shell to monodisperse, oleic acid coated iron oxide cores are compared. Thereafter, it is shown that local heating by magnetic fields as well as global thermal heating can be used to efficiently and reversibly aggregate, magnetically extract nanoparticles from solution and spontaneously redisperse them. The coupling of magnetic and thermally responsive properties points to novel uses as smart materials, for example, in integrated devices for molecular separation and extraction. PMID:26270412

  1. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles: magnetic nanoplatforms as drug carriers

    PubMed Central

    Wahajuddin; Arora, Sumit

    2012-01-01

    A targeted drug delivery system is the need of the hour. Guiding magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with the help of an external magnetic field to its target is the principle behind the development of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) as novel drug delivery vehicles. SPIONs are small synthetic γ-Fe2O3 (maghemite) or Fe3O4 (magnetite) particles with a core ranging between 10 nm and 100 nm in diameter. These magnetic particles are coated with certain biocompatible polymers, such as dextran or polyethylene glycol, which provide chemical handles for the conjugation of therapeutic agents and also improve their blood distribution profile. The current research on SPIONs is opening up wide horizons for their use as diagnostic agents in magnetic resonance imaging as well as for drug delivery vehicles. Delivery of anticancer drugs by coupling with functionalized SPIONs to their targeted site is one of the most pursued areas of research in the development of cancer treatment strategies. SPIONs have also demonstrated their efficiency as nonviral gene vectors that facilitate the introduction of plasmids into the nucleus at rates multifold those of routinely available standard technologies. SPION-induced hyperthermia has also been utilized for localized killing of cancerous cells. Despite their potential biomedical application, alteration in gene expression profiles, disturbance in iron homeostasis, oxidative stress, and altered cellular responses are some SPION-related toxicological aspects which require due consideration. This review provides a comprehensive understanding of SPIONs with regard to their method of preparation, their utility as drug delivery vehicles, and some concerns which need to be resolved before they can be moved from bench top to bedside. PMID:22848170

  2. Iron oxide nanoparticles stabilized with dendritic polyglycerols as selective MRI contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordmeyer, Daniel; Stumpf, Patrick; Gröger, Dominic; Hofmann, Andreas; Enders, Sven; Riese, Sebastian B.; Dernedde, Jens; Taupitz, Matthias; Rauch, Ursula; Haag, Rainer; Rühl, Eckart; Graf, Christina

    2014-07-01

    Monodisperse small iron oxide nanoparticles functionalized with dendritic polyglycerol (dPG) or dendritic polyglycerol sulfate (dPGS) are prepared. They are highly stable in aqueous solutions as well as physiological media. In particular, oleic acid capped iron oxide particles (core diameter = 11 +/- 1 nm) were modified by a ligand exchange process in a one pot synthesis with dPG and dPGS bearing phosphonate as anchor groups. Dynamic light scattering measurements performed in water and different biological media demonstrate that the hydrodynamic diameter of the particles is only slightly increased by the ligand exchange process resulting in a final diameter of less than 30 nm and that the particles are stable in these media. It is also revealed by magnetic resonance studies that their magnetic relaxivity is reduced by the surface modification but it is still sufficient for high contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Additionally, incubation of dPGS functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles with human umbilical vein endothelial cells showed a 50% survival at 85 nM (concentration of nanoparticles). Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) studies demonstrate that the dPGS functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles inhibit L-selectin ligand binding whereas the particles containing only dPG do not show this effect. Experiments in a flow chamber with human myelogenous leukemia cells confirmed L-selectin inhibition of the dPGS functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles and with that the L-selectin mediated leukocyte adhesion. These results indicate that dPGS functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles are a promising contrast agent for inflamed tissue probed by MRI.Monodisperse small iron oxide nanoparticles functionalized with dendritic polyglycerol (dPG) or dendritic polyglycerol sulfate (dPGS) are prepared. They are highly stable in aqueous solutions as well as physiological media. In particular, oleic acid capped iron oxide particles (core diameter = 11 +/- 1 nm) were modified by a

  3. A multifunctional core-shell nanoparticle for dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Nam-Hyuk; Cheong, Taek-Chin; Min, Ji Hyun; Wu, Jun Hua; Lee, Sang Jin; Kim, Daehong; Yang, Jae-Seong; Kim, Sanguk; Kim, Young Keun; Seong, Seung-Yong

    2011-10-01

    Dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy requires tumour antigens to be delivered efficiently into dendritic cells and their migration to be monitored in vivo. Nanoparticles have been explored as carriers for antigen delivery, but applications have been limited by the toxicity of the solvents used to make nanoparticles, and by the need to use transfection agents to deliver nanoparticles into cells. Here we show that an iron oxide-zinc oxide core-shell nanoparticle can deliver carcinoembryonic antigen into dendritic cells while simultaneously acting as an imaging agent. The nanoparticle-antigen complex is efficiently taken up by dendritic cells within one hour and can be detected in vitro by confocal microscopy and in vivo by magnetic resonance imaging. Mice immunized with dendritic cells containing the nanoparticle-antigen complex showed enhanced tumour antigen specific T-cell responses, delayed tumour growth and better survival than controls.

  4. Iron oxide nanoparticles: the Influence of synthesis method and size on composition and magnetic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Carvalho, M.D.; Godinho, M.; Cruz, M.M.

    2013-05-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles with mean diameter ranging from 7 to 20 nm were synthesized using two routes: the precipitation method in controlled atmosphere and a reduction–precipitation method under air, in some cases followed by a hydrothermal treatment. The smallest nanoparticles were obtained by the reduction–precipitation method. In order to establish the composition of the iron oxide nanoparticles and its relation with size, the morphological, structural and magnetic properties of the prepared samples were investigated using X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, Mössbauer spectroscopy and SQUID magnetometry. The results allow to conclude that the nanoparticles can be essentially described as Fe3–xO₄, x decreasing with the particle size increase. The composition and magnetic behavior of the synthesized iron oxide nanoparticles are directly related with their size. The overall results are compatible with a core@shell structure model, where a magnetite core is surrounded by an oxidized magnetite layer (labeled as maghemite), the magnetite core dimension depending on the average particle size. - Graphical abstract: TEM images and Mössbauer spectroscopy spectra of Fe3–xO₄ samples with different sizes. Highlights: • Fe3–xO₄ nanoparticles with a mean size between 7 and 20 nm were synthesized. • The smallest nanoparticles were obtained by a reduction precipitation method, under air. • The increase of particles size was succeeded using a hydrothermal treatment at 150 °C. • The magnetic properties of the nanoparticles are directly related with their size.

  5. Multifunctional composite core-shell nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Suying; Wang, Qiang; Zhu, Jiahua; Sun, Luyi; Lin, Hongfei; Guo, Zhanhu

    2011-11-01

    In this review paper, the state-of-the-art knowledge of the core-shell multifunctional nanoparticles (MNPs), especially with unique physiochemical properties, is presented. The synthesis methods were summarized from the aspects of both the advantages and the demerits. The core includes the inexpensive and easily oxidized metals and the noble shells include the relatively noble metals, carbon, silica, other oxides, and polymers. The properties including magnetic, optical, anti-corrosion and the surface chemistry of the NPs are thoroughly reviewed. The current status of the applications is reviewed with the detailed examples including the catalysis, giant magnetoresistance (GMR) sensing, electromagnetic interface shielding or microwave absorption, biomedical drug delivery, and the environmental remediation.

  6. The structure of iron in Earth's inner core.

    PubMed

    Tateno, Shigehiko; Hirose, Kei; Ohishi, Yasuo; Tatsumi, Yoshiyuki

    2010-10-15

    Earth's solid inner core is mainly composed of iron (Fe). Because the relevant ultrahigh pressure and temperature conditions are difficult to produce experimentally, the preferred crystal structure of Fe at the inner core remains uncertain. Static compression experiments showed that the hexagonal close-packed (hcp) structure of Fe is stable up to 377 gigapascals and 5700 kelvin, corresponding to inner core conditions. The observed weak temperature dependence of the c/a axial ratio suggests that hcp Fe is elastically anisotropic at core temperatures. Preferred orientation of the hcp phase may explain previously observed inner core seismic anisotropy. PMID:20947762

  7. Iron oxide and gold nanoparticles in cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotman, Irena; Psakhie, Sergey G.; Lozhkomoev, Aleksandr S.; Gutmanas, Elazar Y.

    2016-08-01

    Continuous research activities in the field of nanomedicine in the past decade have, to a great extent, been focused on nanoparticle technologies for cancer therapy. Gold and iron oxide nanoparticles (NP) are two of the most studied inorganic nanomaterials due to their unique optical and magnetic properties. Both types of NPs are emerging as promising systems for anti-tumor drug delivery and for nanoparticle-mediated thermal therapy of cancer. In thermal therapy, localized heating inside tumors or in proximity of tumor cells can be induced, for example, with Au NPs by radiofrequency ablation heating or conversion of photon energy (photothermal therapy) and in iron oxide magnetic NPs by heat generation through relaxation in an alternating magnetic field (magnetic hyperthermia). Furthermore, the superparamagnetic properties of iron oxide nanoparticles have led to their use as potent MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) contrast agents. Surface modification/coating can produce NPs with tailored and desired properties, such as enhanced blood circulation time, stability, biocompatibility and water solubility. To target nanoparticles to specific tumor cells, NPs should be conjugated with targeting moieties on the surface which bind to receptors or other molecular structures on the cell surface. The article presents several approaches to enhancing the specificity of Au and iron oxide nanoparticles for tumor tissue by appropriate surface modification/functionalization, as well as the effect of these treatments on the saturation magnetization value of iron oxide NPs. The use of other nanoparticles and nanostructures in cancer treatment is also briefly reviewed.

  8. Thermal and electrical conductivity of iron at Earth's core conditions.

    PubMed

    Pozzo, Monica; Davies, Chris; Gubbins, David; Alfè, Dario

    2012-05-17

    The Earth acts as a gigantic heat engine driven by the decay of radiogenic isotopes and slow cooling, which gives rise to plate tectonics, volcanoes and mountain building. Another key product is the geomagnetic field, generated in the liquid iron core by a dynamo running on heat released by cooling and freezing (as the solid inner core grows), and on chemical convection (due to light elements expelled from the liquid on freezing). The power supplied to the geodynamo, measured by the heat flux across the core-mantle boundary (CMB), places constraints on Earth's evolution. Estimates of CMB heat flux depend on properties of iron mixtures under the extreme pressure and temperature conditions in the core, most critically on the thermal and electrical conductivities. These quantities remain poorly known because of inherent experimental and theoretical difficulties. Here we use density functional theory to compute these conductivities in liquid iron mixtures at core conditions from first principles--unlike previous estimates, which relied on extrapolations. The mixtures of iron, oxygen, sulphur and silicon are taken from earlier work and fit the seismologically determined core density and inner-core boundary density jump. We find both conductivities to be two to three times higher than estimates in current use. The changes are so large that core thermal histories and power requirements need to be reassessed. New estimates indicate that the adiabatic heat flux is 15 to 16 terawatts at the CMB, higher than present estimates of CMB heat flux based on mantle convection; the top of the core must be thermally stratified and any convection in the upper core must be driven by chemical convection against the adverse thermal buoyancy or lateral variations in CMB heat flow. Power for the geodynamo is greatly restricted, and future models of mantle evolution will need to incorporate a high CMB heat flux and explain the recent formation of the inner core. PMID:22495307

  9. In vivo biodistribution of iron oxide nanoparticles: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tate, Jennifer A.; Petryk, Alicia A.; Giustini, Andrew J.; Hoopes, P. Jack

    2011-03-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles present a promising alternative to conventional energy deposition-based tissue therapies. The success of such nanoparticles as a therapeutic for diseases like cancer, however, depends heavily on the particles' ability to localize to tumor tissue as well as provide minimal toxicity to surrounding tissues and key organs such as those involved in the reticuloendothelial system (RES). We present here the results of a long term clearance study where mice injected intravenously with 2 mg Fe of 100 nm dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles were sacrificed at 14 and 580 days post injection. Histological analysis showed accumulation of the nanoparticles in some RES organs by the 14 day time point and clearance of the nanoparticles by the 580 day time point with no obvious toxicity to organs. An additional study reported herein employs 20 nm and 110 nm starch-coated iron oxide nanoparticles at 80 mg Fe/kg mouse in a size/biodistribution study with endpoints at 4, 24 and 72 hours. Preliminary results show nanoparticle accumulation in the liver and spleen with some elevated iron accumulation in tumoral tissues with differences between the 20 nm and the 110 nm nanoparticle depositions.

  10. Gold-Coated Cementite Nanoparticles: An Oxidation-Resistant Alternative to -Iron

    SciTech Connect

    Shultz, M.; Calvin, S; Gonzalez-Jimenez, F; Mujica, V; Alleluia, B; Carpenter, E

    2009-01-01

    Iron-based nanoparticles are desirable for many applications because of their magnetic properties and inherent biocompatibility. Metallic iron, or {alpha}-Fe, is the most sought after because of its high saturation magnetization (up to 220 emu/g). This magnetization in iron nanoparticles is difficult to reach or maintain because of the ease of oxidation, which greatly reduces the magnetization values (90 emu/g or less). Here, we report the synthesis of an iron-based nanoparticle comprising a magnetic cementite core (Fe{sub 3}C) that is more oxidation-resistant than {alpha}-Fe, an oxide layer, and a gold coating for passivation and easy functionalization. The nanoparticle structure was confirmed via X-ray absorption fine structure and Moessbauer experiments, and morphology was confirmed using transmission electron microscopy. Magnetic characterization yielded a saturation magnetization of 110 emu/g, thus demonstrating cementite as more stable alternative to {alpha}-Fe with higher magnetic moments than the iron oxides.

  11. Pulsed Plasma Synthesis of Iron and Nickel Nanoparticles Coated by Carbon for Medical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullaeva, Zhypargul; Omurzak, Emil; Iwamoto, Chihiro; Ihara, Hirotaka; Subban Ganapathy, Hullathy; Sulaimankulova, Saadat; Koinuma, Michio; Mashimo, Tsutomu

    2013-01-01

    Fe and Ni magnetic nanoparticles coated by carbon were synthesized between the Fe-Fe and Ni-Ni metal electrodes, submerged in ethanol using pulsed plasma in a liquid method. Iron coated carbon (Fe@C) nanoparticles have an average size of 32 nm, and Ni@C nanoparticles are 40 nm. Obtained samples exhibit a well-defined crystalline structure of the inner Fe and Ni cores, encapsulated in the graphitic carbon coatings. Cytotoxicity studies performed on the MCF-7 (breast cancer) cell line showed small toxicity about 88-74% at 50 µg/mL of Fe@C and Ni@C nanoparticles, which can be significant criteria for use them in medical cancer treatment. In addition, appropriate sizes, good magnetic properties and well-organized graphitic carbon coatings are highlight merits of Fe@C and Ni@C nanoparticles synthesized by pulsed plasma.

  12. Magnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticle Seeded Growth of Nucleotide Coordinated Polymers.

    PubMed

    Liang, Hao; Liu, Biwu; Yuan, Qipeng; Liu, Juewen

    2016-06-22

    The introduction of functional molecules to the surface of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) is of critical importance. Most previously reported methods were focused on surface ligand attachment either by physisorption or covalent conjugation, resulting in limited ligand loading capacity. In this work, we report the seeded growth of a nucleotide coordinated polymer shell, which can be considered as a special form of adsorption by forming a complete shell. Among all of the tested metal ions, Fe(3+) is the most efficient for this seeded growth. A diverse range of guest molecules, including small organic dyes, proteins, DNA, and gold NPs, can be encapsulated in the shell. All of these molecules were loaded at a much higher capacity compared to that on the naked iron oxide NP core, confirming the advantage of the coordination polymer (CP) shell. In addition, the CP shell provides better guest protein stability compared to that of simple physisorption while retaining guest activity as confirmed by the entrapped glucose oxidase assay. Use of this system as a peroxidase nanozyme and glucose biosensor was demonstrated, detecting glucose as low as 1.4 μM with excellent stability. This work describes a new way to functionalize inorganic materials with a biocompatible shell. PMID:27248668

  13. Cell Labeling and Targeting with Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Tefft, Brandon J; Uthamaraj, Susheil; Harburn, J Jonathan; Klabusay, Martin; Dragomir-Daescu, Dan; Sandhu, Gurpreet S

    2015-01-01

    Targeted delivery of cells and therapeutic agents would benefit a wide range of biomedical applications by concentrating the therapeutic effect at the target site while minimizing deleterious effects to off-target sites. Magnetic cell targeting is an efficient, safe, and straightforward delivery technique. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) are biodegradable, biocompatible, and can be endocytosed into cells to render them responsive to magnetic fields. The synthesis process involves creating magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles followed by high-speed emulsification to form a poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) coating. The PLGA-magnetite SPIONs are approximately 120 nm in diameter including the approximately 10 nm diameter magnetite core. When placed in culture medium, SPIONs are naturally endocytosed by cells and stored as small clusters within cytoplasmic endosomes. These particles impart sufficient magnetic mass to the cells to allow for targeting within magnetic fields. Numerous cell sorting and targeting applications are enabled by rendering various cell types responsive to magnetic fields. SPIONs have a variety of other biomedical applications as well including use as a medical imaging contrast agent, targeted drug or gene delivery, diagnostic assays, and generation of local hyperthermia for tumor therapy or tissue soldering. PMID:26554870

  14. Probing iron at Super-Earth core conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Amadou, N.; Brambrink, E.; Vinci, T.; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.; Huser, G.; Brygoo, S.; Morard, G.; Guyot, F.; Resseguier, T. de; Mazevet, S.; Miyanishi, K.; Ozaki, N.; Kodama, R.; Henry, O.; Raffestin, D.; Boehly, T.; and others

    2015-02-15

    In this paper, we report on the quasi-isentropic compression of an iron sample using ramp shaped laser irradiation. This technique allows us to quasi-isentropically compress iron up to 700 GPa and 8500 K. To our knowledge, these data are the highest pressures reached on iron in off-Hugoniot conditions and the closest to the thermodynamic states thought to exist in Earth-like planetary cores. The experiment was performed on the Ligne d'Intégration laser facility at CESTA, Bordeaux, France.

  15. Core-shell-corona doxorubicin-loaded superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles for cancer theranostics.

    PubMed

    Semkina, A; Abakumov, M; Grinenko, N; Abakumov, A; Skorikov, A; Mironova, E; Davydova, G; Majouga, A G; Nukolova, N; Kabanov, A; Chekhonin, V

    2015-12-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are successfully used as contrast agents in magnetic-resonance imaging. They can be easily functionalized for drug delivery functions, demonstrating great potential for both imaging and therapeutic applications. Here we developed new pH-responsive theranostic core-shell-corona nanoparticles consisting of superparamagentic Fe3O4 core that displays high T2 relaxivity, bovine serum albumin (BSA) shell that binds anticancer drug, doxorubicin (Dox) and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) corona that increases stability and biocompatibility. The nanoparticles were produced by adsorption of the BSA shell onto the Fe3O4 core followed by crosslinking of the protein layer and subsequent grafting of the PEG corona using monoamino-terminated PEG via carbodiimide chemistry. The hydrodynamic diameter, zeta-potential, composition and T2 relaxivity of the resulting nanoparticles were characterized using transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, thermogravimetric analysis and T2-relaxometry. Nanoparticles were shown to absorb Dox molecules, possibly through a combination of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. The loading capacity (LC) of the nanoparticles was 8 wt.%. The Dox loaded nanoparticles release the drug at a higher rate at pH 5.5 compared to pH 7.4 and display similar cytotoxicity against C6 and HEK293 cells as the free Dox. PMID:26595387

  16. Iron in the Earth's Lower Mantle and Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, J.

    2006-12-01

    Iron is the most abundant transition metal in the Earth's interior. The multiple electronic configurations of iron with different oxidation and spin states give rise to complex physical and chemical properties of the Earth's interior. Knowledge of the spin and oxidation states as well as sound velocities of iron and iron-containing minerals at high pressures and temperatures can provide new insights into the geophysics and geochemistry of the Earth's mantle and core. Electronic spin-pairing transitions of iron in magnesiowuestite-(Mg,Fe)O and silicate persovkite- (Mg,Fe)SiO3, the most abundant mineral assemblage in the lower mantle, have been recently reported experimentally and theoretically. Here I will address the spin states of iron in these minerals as well as potential effects of the transitions on their properties, namely sound velocities, under lower mantle pressure- temperature conditions. In particular, recent high pressure-temperature studies indicate that the electronic spin-pairing transition in (Mg,Fe)O should occur over an extended pressure range at high temperatures. Considering the spin crossover in magnesiowuestite and possibly in silicate perovskite in the lower mantle, it is likely that the effects of the spin transitions on the physical and transport properties of the mantle minerals will be reduced significantly; though, it remains to be seen how future results at high pressures and temperatures will influence geophysical, geochemical, and geodynamic modeling of the lower mantle. Sound velocities of iron and iron-containing mantle oxide and silicate under high pressures and high temperatures have been used to relate seismic observations in the Earth's core and mantle and to constrain their mineralogy and chemistry. Recently, sound velocities of hcp-Fe, the most abundant constitute of the Earth's core, and magnesiowuestite, the second most abundant mineral in the lower mantle, have been measured with nuclear inelastic X-ray scattering in a

  17. Iron-carbonate interaction at Earth's core-mantle boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorfman, S. M.; Badro, J.; Nabiei, F.; Prakapenka, V.; Gillet, P.

    2015-12-01

    Carbon storage and flux in the deep Earth are moderated by oxygen fugacity and interactions with iron-bearing phases. The amount of carbon stored in Earth's mantle versus the core depends on carbon-iron chemistry at the core-mantle boundary. Oxidized carbonates subducted from Earth's surface to the lowermost mantle may encounter reduced Fe0 metal from disproportionation of Fe2+ in lower mantle silicates or mixing with the core. To understand the fate of carbonates in the lowermost mantle, we have performed experiments on sandwiches of single-crystal (Ca0.6Mg0.4)CO3 dolomite and Fe foil in the laser-heated diamond anvil cell at lower mantle conditions of 49-110 GPa and 1800-2500 K. Syntheses were conducted with in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction to identify phase assemblages. After quench to ambient conditions, samples were sectioned with a focused Ga+ ion beam for composition analysis with transmission electron microscopy. At the centers of the heated spots, iron melted and reacted completely with the carbonate to form magnesiowüstite, iron carbide, diamond, magnesium-rich carbonate and calcium carbonate. In samples heated at 49 and 64 GPa, the two carbonates exhibit a eutectoid texture. In the sample heated at 110 GPa, the carbonates form rounded ~150-nm-diameter grains with a higher modal proportion of interspersed diamonds. The presence of reduced iron in the deep lower mantle and core-mantle boundary region will promote the formation of diamonds in carbonate-bearing subducted slabs. The complete reaction of metallic iron to oxides and carbides in the presence of mantle carbonate supports the formation of these phases at the Earth's core-mantle boundary and in ultra-low velocity zones.

  18. Strength of iron at core pressures and evidence for a weak Earth’s inner core

    SciTech Connect

    Gleason, A. E.; Mao, W. L.

    2013-05-12

    The strength of iron at extreme conditions is crucial information for interpreting geophysical observations of the Earth’s core and understanding how the solid inner core deforms. However, the strength of iron, on which deformation depends, is challenging to measure and accurately predict at high pressure. Here we present shear strength measurements of iron up to pressures experienced in the Earth’s core. Hydrostatic X-ray spectroscopy and non-hydrostatic radial X-ray diffraction measurements of the deviatoric strain in hexagonally close-packed iron uniquely determine its shear strength to pressures above 200 GPa at room temperature. Applying numerical modelling of the rheologic behaviour of iron under pressure, we extrapolate our experimental results to inner-core pressures and temperatures, and find that the bulk shear strength of hexagonally close-packed iron is only ~ 1 GPa at the conditions of the Earth’s centre, 364 GPa and 5,500 K. This suggests that the inner core is rheologically weak, which supports dislocation creep as the dominant creep mechanism influencing deformation.

  19. Tuning the reactivity of energetic nanoparticles by creation of a core-shell nanostructure.

    PubMed

    Prakash, A; McCormick, A V; Zachariah, M R

    2005-07-01

    This article presents a novel method for tuning the reactivity of nanoenergetic materials by coating a strong oxidizer nanoparticle (potassium permanganate; approximately 150 nm) with a layer of a relatively mild oxidizer (iron oxide). The measured reactivity for a nano-Al/composite oxidizer could be varied by more than a factor of 10, as measured by the pressurization rate in a closed vessel (psl/micros), by changing the coating thickness of the iron oxide. The composite oxidizer nanoparticles were synthesized by a new aerosol approach in which the nonwetting interaction between iron oxide and molten potassium permanganate aids the phase segregation of a nanocomposite droplet into a core-shell structure. PMID:16178238

  20. Melting of Iron Close to the Inner Core Boundary Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, R. G.; Coppari, F.; Fratanduono, D. E.; Eggert, J.; Collins, G. W.

    2014-12-01

    The melting curve of iron at the pressure of the inner core boundary places a strong constraint on the thermal profile within the Earth, the heat flux to the mantle, and also the power to drive the geodynamo. Recent static diamond anvil cell measurements by Anzellini et al. 2013 have accurately measured the melting curve of iron to 200 GPa, which is a tremendous improvement in the available data but is still only 60% of the pressure at the inner core boundary, and thus requires significant extrapolation. Nguyen and Holmes, 2004, have used the sound velocity technique to measure the melting transition on the principal Hugoniot, up to 270 GPa, but some still believe that sound velocity is not an accurate diagnostic of melting as it detects a loss of strength and also that kinetics can mitigate the utility of dynamic melting techniques. Here we use in-situ x-ray diffraction to unambiguously measure the melting transition on the principal Hugoniot of iron to 270 GPa. We also show that iron melts from the hcp phase at pressures up to 270 GPa, which is significantly closer to the inner core boundary than any previous melting curve measurement capable of phase discrimination. From comparison of our measurements to those of Nguyen and Holmes, we show that sound velocity measurements can accurately constrain the melting curve and that the kinetics of melting iron are faster than both laser shock and gas gun experimental timescales. Thereby, dynamic techniques should be trusted for probing the melting curve of metals and they also offer the greatest opportunity to probe the melting curve of iron at the pressure of the inner core boundary and also the higher pressures achieved within the interiors of super-Earths. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  1. New carboxysilane-coated iron oxide nanoparticles for nonspecific cell labelling.

    PubMed

    Bridot, Jean-Luc; Stanicki, Dimitri; Laurent, Sophie; Boutry, Sébastien; Gossuin, Yves; Leclère, Philippe; Lazzaroni, Roberto; Vander Elst, Luce; Muller, Robert N

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers the possibility of tracking cells labelled with a contrast agent and evaluating the progress of cell therapies. This requires efficient cell labelling with contrast agents. A basic incubation of cells with iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) is a common method. This study reports the synthesis at the gram scale of iron oxide nanoparticles as MRI T₂ contrast agents for cell labelling. These NPs are based on small iron oxide cores coated with a thin polysiloxane shell presenting carboxylic acid functions. The iron oxide cores produced have been characterized by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, ζ-potential, infrared, photon correlation spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, magnetometry and relaxometric measurements. These measurements confirmed the expected surface modification by carboxysilane. Carboxylic groups created electrostatic repulsion between NPs when they are deprotonated. Therefore, highly concentrated aqueous solutions of carboxysilane coated iron oxide NPs can be obtained, up to 70% (w/w). These NPs could be used for cell labelling owing to their aggregation and re-dispersion properties. NPs precipitated in Dulbecco's modified Eagle medium induced a rapid association with 3 T6 fibroblast cells and could easily be re-dispersed in phosphate buffer saline solution to obtain properly labelled cells. PMID:24375902

  2. Magnesium and iron nanoparticles production using microorganisms and various salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaul, R. K.; Kumar, P.; Burman, U.; Joshi, P.; Agrawal, A.; Raliya, R.; Tarafdar, J. C.

    2012-09-01

    Response of five fungi and two bacteria to different salts of magnesium and iron for production of nanoparticles was studied. Pochonia chlamydosporium, and Aspergillus fumigatus were exposed to three salts of magnesium while Curvularia lunata, Chaetomium globosum, A. fumigatus, A. wentii and the bacteria Alcaligenes faecalis and Bacillus coagulans were exposed to two salts of iron for nanoparticle production. The results revealed that P. chlamydosporium induces development of extracellular nanoparticles in MgCl2 solution while A. fumigatus produces also intracellular nanoparticles when exposed to MgSO4 solution. C. globosum was found as the most effective in producing nanoparticles when exposed to Fe2O3 solution. The FTIR analysis of the nanoparticles obtained from Fe2O3 solution showed the peaks similar to iron (Fe). In general, the species of the tested microbes were selective to different chemicals in their response for synthesis of nanoparticles. Further studies on their characterization and improving the efficiency of promising species of fungi need to be undertaken before tapping their potential as nanonutrients for plants.

  3. Core-Shell Composite Nanoparticles: Synthesis, Characterization, and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanyal, Sriya

    Nanoparticles are ubiquitous in various fields due to their unique properties not seen in similar bulk materials. Among them, core-shell composite nanoparticles are an important class of materials which are attractive for their applications in catalysis, sensing, electromagnetic shielding, drug delivery, and environmental remediation. This dissertation focuses on the study of core-shell type of nanoparticles where a polymer serves as the core and inorganic nanoparticles are the shell. This is an interesting class of supramolecular building blocks and can "exhibit unusual, possibly unique, properties which cannot be obtained simply by co-mixing polymer and inorganic particles". The one-step Pickering emulsion polymerization method was successfully developed and applied to synthesize polystyrene-silica core-shell composite particles. Possible mechanisms of the Pickering emulsion polymerization were also explored. The silica nanoparticles were thermodynamically favorable to self-assemble at liquid-liquid interfaces at the initial stage of polymerization and remained at the interface to finally form the shells of the composite particles. More importantly, Pickering emulsion polymerization was employed to synthesize polystyrene/poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm)-silica core-shell nanoparticles with N-isopropylacrylamide incorporated into the core as a co-monomer. The composite nanoparticles were temperature sensitive and could be up-taken by human prostate cancer cells and demonstrated effectiveness in drug delivery and cancer therapy. Similarly, by incorporating poly-2-(N,N)-dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (PDMA) into the core, pH sensitive core-shell composite nanoparticles were synthesized and applied as effective carriers to release a rheological modifier upon a pH change. Finally, the research focuses on facile approaches to engineer the transition of the temperature-sensitive particles and develop composite core-shell nanoparticles with a metallic shell.

  4. Core@shell bimetallic nanoparticle synthesis via anion coordination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serpell, Christopher J.; Cookson, James; Ozkaya, Dogan; Beer, Paul D.

    2011-06-01

    Core@shell structured bimetallic nanoparticles are currently of immense interest due to their unique electronic, optical and catalytic properties. However, their synthesis is non-trivial. We report a new supramolecular route for the synthesis of core@shell nanoparticles, based on an anion coordination protocol—the first to function by binding the shell metal to the surface of the pre-formed primary metal core before reduction. The resultant gold/palladium and platinum/palladium core@shell nanoparticles have been characterized by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (as well as other techniques), giving striking atomic-resolution images of the core@shell architecture, and the unique catalytic properties of the structured nanoparticles have been demonstrated in a remarkable improvement of the selective production of industrially valuable chloroaniline from chloronitrobenzene.

  5. Complete Exchange of the Hydrophobic Dispersant Shell on Monodisperse Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Bixner, Oliver; Lassenberger, Andrea; Baurecht, Dieter; Reimhult, Erik

    2015-08-25

    High-temperature synthesized monodisperse superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are obtained with a strongly bound ligand shell of oleic acid and its decomposition products. Most applications require a stable presentation of a defined surface chemistry; therefore, the native shell has to be completely exchanged for dispersants with irreversible affinity to the nanoparticle surface. We evaluate by attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) and thermogravimetric analysis/differential scanning calorimetry (TGA/DSC) the limitations of commonly used approaches. A mechanism and multiple exchange scheme that attains the goal of complete and irreversible ligand replacement on monodisperse nanoparticles of various sizes is presented. The obtained hydrophobic nanoparticles are ideally suited for magnetically controlled drug delivery and membrane applications and for the investigation of fundamental interfacial properties of ultrasmall core-shell architectures. PMID:26226071

  6. Synthesis, characterization and potential applications of iron-platinum nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandwana, Vikas

    Monodisperse FePt nanoparticles with controlled size and geometry have drawn great attention in the last decade for fundamental scientific studies and for their potential applications in advanced materials and devices such as ultra-high-density magnetic recording media, exchange-coupled nanocomposite magnets, biomedicines and nanodevices. This dissertation focuses on the synthesis and characterization of FePt nanoparticles and their use in potential applications. The FePt nanoparticles of different size (2 to 16 nm) and shape (spherical, cubic, rod) were synthesized by a chemical solution method. The size and shape of these particles were controlled by adjusting reaction parameters. The as-synthesized FePt nanoparticles have chemically disordered fcc structure and are superparamagnetic at room temperature. Upon heat treatment the nanoparticles were transformed into ordered L10 structure, and high coercivity up to 27 kOe was achieved. Magnetic properties of annealed FePt nanoparticles including magnetization and coercivity were strongly dependent on particle size, shape, composition and annealing temperature. FePt/Fe3O4 bimagnetic nanoparticles with two different morphologies, core/shell and heterodimer, were prepared by coating or attaching Fe3O4 on surface of FePt nanoparticles. The size of FePt and Fe3O4 was tuned very finely to obtain most effective exchange coupling. The heterodimer nanoparticles resulted in relatively poor magnetic properties compared to the core/shell nanoparticles due to insufficient exchange coupling. By optimizing the dimensions of the FePt and Fe3O 4 in core/shell bimagnetic nanoparticles, energy products up to 17.8 MGOe were achieved. FePt/Fe3O4 core/shell and FePt+Fe3O 4 mixed nanoparticles with similar magnetic properties were compacted under 2.0 GPa at 400°C, 500°C and 600°C. A density up to 84% of the full density was achieved. After annealing at 650°C in forming gas, the FePt/Fe3O4 compacted samples were converted into L10 Fe

  7. Magnetic and optical properties of multifunctional core-shell radioluminescence nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hongyu; Colvin, Daniel C.; Qi, Bin; Moore, Thomas; He, Jian; Mefford, O. Thompson; Alexis, Frank; Gore, John C.; Anker, Jeffrey N.

    2014-01-01

    When X-rays irradiate radioluminescence nanoparticles, they generate visible and near infrared light that can penetrate through centimeters of tissue. X-ray luminescence tomography (XLT) maps the location of these radioluminescent contrast agents at high resolution by scanning a narrow X-ray beam through the tissue sample and collecting the luminescence at every position. Adding magnetic functionality to these radioluminescent particles would enable them to be guided, oriented, and heated using external magnetic fields, while their location and spectrum could be imaged with XLT and complementary magnetic resonance imaging. In this work, multifunctional monodispersed magnetic radioluminescent nanoparticles were developed as potential drug delivery carriers and radioluminescence imaging agents. The particles consisted of a spindle-shaped magnetic γ-Fe2O3 core and a radioluminescent europium-doped gadolinium oxide shell. Particles with solid iron oxide cores displayed saturation magnetizations consistent with their ~13% core volume, however, the iron oxide quenched their luminescence. In order to increase the luminescence, we partially etched the iron oxide core in oxalic acid while preserving the radioluminescent shell. The core size was controlled by the etching time which in turn affected the particles’ luminescence and magnetic properties. Particles with intermediate core sizes displayed both strong magnetophoresis and luminescence properties. They also served as MRI contrast agents with relaxivities of up to 58 mM−1s−1 (r2) and 120 mM−1s−1 (r2*). These particles offer promising multimodal MRI/fluorescence/X-ray luminescence contrast agents. Our core-shell synthesis technique offers a flexible method to control particle size, shape, and composition for a wide range of biological applications of magnetic/luminescent nanoparticles. PMID:24520183

  8. Magnetic and optical properties of multifunctional core-shell radioluminescence nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongyu; Colvin, Daniel C; Qi, Bin; Moore, Thomas; He, Jian; Mefford, O Thompson; Alexis, Frank; Gore, John C; Anker, Jeffrey N

    2012-07-01

    When X-rays irradiate radioluminescence nanoparticles, they generate visible and near infrared light that can penetrate through centimeters of tissue. X-ray luminescence tomography (XLT) maps the location of these radioluminescent contrast agents at high resolution by scanning a narrow X-ray beam through the tissue sample and collecting the luminescence at every position. Adding magnetic functionality to these radioluminescent particles would enable them to be guided, oriented, and heated using external magnetic fields, while their location and spectrum could be imaged with XLT and complementary magnetic resonance imaging. In this work, multifunctional monodispersed magnetic radioluminescent nanoparticles were developed as potential drug delivery carriers and radioluminescence imaging agents. The particles consisted of a spindle-shaped magnetic γ-Fe2O3 core and a radioluminescent europium-doped gadolinium oxide shell. Particles with solid iron oxide cores displayed saturation magnetizations consistent with their ~13% core volume, however, the iron oxide quenched their luminescence. In order to increase the luminescence, we partially etched the iron oxide core in oxalic acid while preserving the radioluminescent shell. The core size was controlled by the etching time which in turn affected the particles' luminescence and magnetic properties. Particles with intermediate core sizes displayed both strong magnetophoresis and luminescence properties. They also served as MRI contrast agents with relaxivities of up to 58 mM(-1)s(-1) (r2) and 120 mM(-1)s(-1) (r2*). These particles offer promising multimodal MRI/fluorescence/X-ray luminescence contrast agents. Our core-shell synthesis technique offers a flexible method to control particle size, shape, and composition for a wide range of biological applications of magnetic/luminescent nanoparticles. PMID:24520183

  9. Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles: Recent trends in design and synthesis of magnetoresponsive nanosystems.

    PubMed

    Tombácz, Etelka; Turcu, Rodica; Socoliuc, Vlad; Vékás, Ladislau

    2015-12-18

    Recent developments in nanotechnology and application of magnetic nanoparticles, in particular in magnetic iron oxide nanosystems, offer exciting possibilities for nanomedicine. Facile and precise synthesis procedures, high magnetic response, tunable morphologies and multiple bio-functionalities of single- and multi-core magnetic particles designed for nanomedicine applications are thoroughly appraised. This review focuses on the structural and magnetic characterization of the cores, the synthesis of single- and multicore iron oxide NPs, especially the design of the latter, as well as their protection, stabilization and functionalization by desired coating in order to protect against the corrosion of core, to prevent non-specific protein adsorption and particle aggregation in biological media, and to provide binding sites for targeting and therapeutic agents. PMID:26275707

  10. Synthesis and heating effect of iron/iron oxide composite and iron oxide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Q.; Baker, I.; Loudis, J. A.; Liao, Y.F.; Hoopes, P.J.

    2014-01-01

    Fe/Fe oxide nanoparticles, in which the core consists of metallic Fe and the shell is composed of Fe oxides, were obtained by reduction of an aqueous solution of FeCl3 within a NaBH4 solution, or, using a water-in-oil micro-emulsion with CTAB as the surfactant. The reduction was performed either in an inert atmosphere or in air, and passivation with air was performed to produce the Fe/Fe3O4 core/shell composite. Phase identification and particle size were determined by X-ray diffraction and TEM. Thermal analysis was performed using a differential scanning calorimeter. The quasistatic magnetic properties were measured using a VSM, and the specific absorption rates (SARs) of both Fe oxide and Fe/Fe3O4 composite nanoparticles either dispersed in methanol or in an epoxy resin were measured by Luxtron fiber temperature sensors in an alternating magnetic field of 150 Oe at 250 kHz. It was found that the preparation conditions, including the concentrations of solutions, the mixing procedure and the heat treatment, influence the particle size, the crystal structure and consequently the magnetic properties of the particles. Compared with Fe oxides, the saturation magnetization (MS) of Fe/Fe3O4 particles (100–190 emu/g) can be twice as high, and the coercivity (HC) can be tunable from several Oe to several hundred Oe. Hence, the SAR of Fe/Fe3O4 composite nanoparticles can be much higher than that of Fe oxides, with a maximum SAR of 345 W/g. The heating behavior is related to the magnetic behavior of the nanoparticles. PMID:25301983

  11. Synthesis and heating effect of iron/iron oxide composite and iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Q.; Baker, I.; Loudis, J. A.; Liao, Y. F.; Hoopes, P. J.

    2007-02-01

    Fe/Fe oxide nanoparticles, in which the core consists of metallic Fe and the shell is composed of Fe oxides, were obtained by reduction of an aqueous solution of FeCl 3 within a NaBH 4 solution, or, using a water-in-oil micro-emulsion with CTAB as the surfactant. The reduction was performed either in an inert atmosphere or in air, and passivation with air was performed to produce the Fe/Fe 3O 4 core/shell composite. Phase identification and particle size were determined by X-ray diffraction and TEM. Thermal analysis was performed using a differential scanning calorimeter. The quasistatic magnetic properties were measured using a VSM, and the specific absorption rates (SARs) of both Fe oxide and Fe/Fe 3O 4 composite nanoparticles either dispersed in methanol or in an epoxy resin were measured by Luxtron fiber temperature sensors in an alternating magnetic field of 150 Oe at 250 kHz. It was found that the preparation conditions, including the concentrations of solutions, the mixing procedure and the heat treatment, influence the particle size, the crystal structure and consequently the magnetic properties of the particles. Compared with Fe oxides, the saturation magnetization (MS) of Fe/Fe 3O 4 particles (100-190 emu/g) can be twice as high, and the coercivity (H C) can be tunable from several Oe to several hundred Oe. Hence, the SAR of Fe/Fe 3O 4 composite nanoparticles can be much higher than that of Fe oxides, with a maximum SAR of 345 W/g. The heating behavior is related to the magnetic behavior of the nanoparticles.

  12. The responses of immune cells to iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yaolin; Sherwood, Jennifer A; Lackey, Kimberly H; Qin, Ying; Bao, Yuping

    2016-04-01

    Immune cells play an important role in recognizing and removing foreign objects, such as nanoparticles. Among various parameters, surface coatings of nanoparticles are the first contact with biological system, which critically affect nanoparticle interactions. Here, surface coating effects on nanoparticle cellular uptake, toxicity and ability to trigger immune response were evaluated on a human monocyte cell line using iron oxide nanoparticles. The cells were treated with nanoparticles of three types of coatings (negatively charged polyacrylic acid, positively charged polyethylenimine and neutral polyethylene glycol). The cells were treated at various nanoparticle concentrations (5, 10, 20, 30, 50 μg ml(-1) or 2, 4, 8, 12, 20 μg cm(-2)) with 6 h incubation or treated at a nanoparticle concentration of 50 μg ml(-1) (20 μg cm(-2)) at different incubation times (6, 12, 24, 48 or 72 h). Cell viability over 80% was observed for all nanoparticle treatment experiments, regardless of surface coatings, nanoparticle concentrations and incubation times. The much lower cell viability for cells treated with free ligands (e.g. ~10% for polyethylenimine) suggested that the surface coatings were tightly attached to the nanoparticle surfaces. The immune responses of cells to nanoparticles were evaluated by quantifying the expression of toll-like receptor 2 and tumor necrosis factor-α. The expression of tumor necrosis factor-α and toll-like receptor 2 were not significant in any case of the surface coatings, nanoparticle concentrations and incubation times. These results provide useful information to select nanoparticle surface coatings for biological and biomedical applications. PMID:26817529

  13. Enhanced Magnetic Properties in Antiferromagnetic-Core/Ferrimagnetic-Shell Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Vasilakaki, Marianna; Trohidou, Kalliopi N.; Nogués, Josep

    2015-01-01

    Bi-magnetic core/shell nanoparticles are gaining increasing interest due to their foreseen applications. Inverse antiferromagnetic(AFM)/ferrimagnetic(FiM) core/shell nanoparticles are particularly appealing since they may overcome some of the limitations of conventional FiM/AFM systems. However, virtually no simulations exist on this type of morphology. Here we present systematic Metropolis Monte Carlo simulations of the exchange bias properties of such nanoparticles. The coercivity, HC, and loop shift, Hex, present a non-monotonic dependence with the core diameter and the shell thickness, in excellent agreement with the available experimental data. Additionally, we demonstrate novel unconventional behavior in FiM/AFM particles. Namely, while HC and Hex decrease upon increasing FiM thickness for small AFM cores (as expected), they show the opposite trend for large cores. This presents a counterintuitive FiM size dependence for large AFM cores that is attributed to the competition between core and shell contributions, which expands over a wider range of core diameters leading to non-vanishing Hex even for very large cores. Moreover, the results also hint different possible ways to enhance the experimental performance of inverse core/shell nanoparticles for diverse applications. PMID:25872473

  14. Iron Isotope Fractionation in Iron Meteorites: New Insights into Metal-Sulfide Segregation and Core Crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, H. M.; Halliday, A. N.; Teutsch, N.; Levasseur, S.

    2004-12-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that substantial iron isotope fractionation occurs between pallasite metal, troilite and olivine [1,2] and that smaller variations exist in the iron isotope compositions (δ 57/54Fe) of bulk meteorites [3-5]. Interpreting such isotopic variations in terms of planetary formation processes is hampered by a lack of knowledge regarding the behavior of iron isotopes during accretion and core-mantle differentiation. Many iron meteorites are considered to be remnants of asteroidal cores and may be used to place preliminary constraints on the behavior of iron isotopes during planetary core formation and crystallization. We present iron isotope data obtained using standard MC-ICPMS methods [6] for metal and sulfide fractions extracted from iron meteorites. The metal fractions have δ 57/54Fe values ranging from 0.02‰ to 0.27‰ . Replicate large samples (10-15g) of the metal fractions of several meteorites have δ 57/54Fe values within 0.02‰ of each other. There do not appear to be any strong relationships between the δ 57/54Fe values of the metal phases and the trace element compositions of the meteorites studied. However, considerable variation exists in the δ 57/54Fe values of the troilites. These range from -0.40‰ to 0.29‰ . In most cases, the troilites have δ 57/54Fe values that are lighter than those of the corresponding metal fractions by ˜ 0.5‰ . Given the slow cooling rates inferred for iron meteorites it is likely that these phases are in isotopic equilibrium. If the isotopic fractionation between metal and troilite is representative of the fractionation between sulfide and melt during core crystallization, then the large differences recently proposed for the initial S contents of the cores of the different iron meteorite parent bodies [7] could be reflected in the δ 57/54Fe values of bulk iron meteorites. This hypothesis will be evaluated in the light of further data. 1 F. Poitrasson et al., Lunar and Planetary

  15. Synthesis and Stability of Iron Nanoparticles for Lunar Environment Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, Ching-cheh; McNatt, Jeremiah

    2009-01-01

    Simulant of lunar dust is needed when researching the lunar environment. However, unlike the true lunar dust, today s simulants do not contain nanophase iron. Two different processes have been developed to fabricate nanophase iron to be used as part of the lunar dust simulant: (1) Sequentially treating a mixture of ferric chloride, fluorinated carbon, and soda lime glass beads at about 300 C in nitrogen, at room temperature in air, and then at 1050 C in nitrogen. The product includes glass beads that are grey in color, can be attracted by a magnet, and contain alpha-iron nanoparticles (which seem to slowly lose their lattice structure in ambient air during a period of 12 months). This product may have some similarity to the lunar glassy regolith that contains Fe(sup 0). (2) Heating a mixture of carbon black and a lunar simulant (a mixed metal oxide that includes iron oxide) at 1050 C in nitrogen. This process simulates lunar dust reaction to the carbon in a micrometeorite at the time of impact. The product contains a chemically modified simulant that can be attracted by a magnet and has a surface layer whose iron concentration increased during the reaction. The iron was found to be alpha-iron and Fe3O4 nanoparticles, which appear to grow after the fabrication process, but stabilizes after 6 months of ambient air storage.

  16. Local Structure, Electronic Behavior, and Electrocatalytic Reactivity of CO-Reduced Platinum-Iron Oxide Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Duchesne, Paul N.; Chen, Guangxu; Zheng, Nanfeng; Zhang, Peng

    2014-02-18

    A series of platinum–iron oxide nanoparticles was synthesized using a “clean” CO-reduction method that employed different ratios of Pt-Fe precursor salts in oleylamine at elevated temperatures. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) studies revealed that nearly monodisperse (i.e., with relative standard deviations of less than 15%) nanoparticles with mean diameters of 3.5–4.4 nm and varied elemental compositions (Pt54Fe46 Pt70Fe30, and Pt87Fe13) were obtained. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements at the Pt L3- and Fe K-edges revealed that these nanoparticles all consisted of a Pt core with amorphous iron oxide on the surface. Furthermore, it was observed that the local structure (e.g., Pt–Pt bond distance and coordination number) and electronic behavior of the Pt–FeO nanoparticles (e.g., Pt d electron density and Fe valence state) are dependent on the Pt-Fe precursor ratios used in their synthesis. Quantum mechanical ab initio calculations were employed to interpret the results from X-ray spectroscopy and help elucidate the relationships between local structure and electronic properties in the nanoparticle samples. Finally, the surface reactivity of these nanoparticles in the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) was explored, demonstrating higher electrocatalytic activity for all three platinum–iron oxide samples in comparison with a commercial Pt catalyst. The surface reactivity was also found to be sensitive to the Pt-Fe ratios of the nanoparticles and could be correlated with their local structure and electronic behavior.

  17. Large enhanced dielectric permittivity in polyaniline passivated core-shell nano magnetic iron oxide by plasma polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Joy, Lija K.; Sooraj, V.; Sethulakshmi, N.; Anantharaman, M. R.; Sajeev, U. S.; Nair, Swapna S.; Narayanan, T. N.; Ajayan, P. M.

    2014-03-24

    Commercial samples of Magnetite with size ranging from 25–30 nm were coated with polyaniline by using radio frequency plasma polymerization to achieve a core shell structure of magnetic nanoparticle (core)–Polyaniline (shell). High resolution transmission electron microscopy images confirm the core shell architecture of polyaniline coated iron oxide. The dielectric properties of the material were studied before and after plasma treatment. The polymer coated magnetite particles exhibited a large dielectric permittivity with respect to uncoated samples. The dielectric behavior was modeled using a Maxwell–Wagner capacitor model. A plausible mechanism for the enhancement of dielectric permittivity is proposed.

  18. Is iron at the Earth's core conditions hcp-structured?

    SciTech Connect

    Dubrovinsky, L; Dubrovinskaia, N; Prakapenka, V

    2012-02-07

    Iron is the main component of the Earth's core and its structure and properties are important for interpretation of geophysical observations and modeling dynamics of the core. We argue that the diffraction lines in the high temperature high pressure X-ray diffraction pattern, presented by Tateno et al., 2010 and interpreted as those of solely hot hcp-Fe, correspond indeed to the insufficiently heated part of the sample. We show that observed diffraction spots are either due to bcc-Fe or carbides.

  19. High-temperature stable, iron-based core-shell catalysts for ammonia decomposition.

    PubMed

    Feyen, Mathias; Weidenthaler, Claudia; Güttel, Robert; Schlichte, Klaus; Holle, Ulrich; Lu, An-Hui; Schüth, Ferdi

    2011-01-10

    High-temperature, stable core-shell catalysts for ammonia decomposition have been synthesized. The highly active catalysts, which were found to be also excellent model systems for fundamental studies, are based on α-Fe(2)O(3) nanoparticles coated by porous silica shells. In a bottom-up approach, hematite nanoparticles were firstly obtained from the hydrothermal reaction of ferric chlorides, L-lysine, and water with adjustable average sizes of 35, 47, and 75 nm. Secondly, particles of each size could be coated by a porous silica shell by means of the base-catalyzed hydrolysis of tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) with cetyltetramethylammonium bromide (CTABr) as porogen. After calcination, TEM, high-resolution scanning electron microscopy (HR-SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX), XRD, and nitrogen sorption studies confirmed the successful encapsulation of hematite nanoparticles inside porous silica shells with a thickness of 20 nm, thereby leading to composites with surface areas of approximately 380 m(2)  g(-1) and iron contents between 10.5 and 12.2 wt %. The obtained catalysts were tested in ammonia decomposition. The influence of temperature, iron oxide core size, possible diffusion limitations, and dilution effects of the reagent gas stream with noble gases were studied. The catalysts are highly stable at 750 °C with a space velocity of 120,000 cm(3)  g(cat)(-1)  h(-1) and maintained conversions of around 80 % for the testing period time of 33 h. On the basis of the excellent stability under reaction conditions up to 800 °C, the system was investigated by in situ XRD, in which body-centered iron was determined, in addition to FeN(x), as the crystalline phase under reaction conditions above 650 °C. PMID:21207578

  20. Bacteria-mediated precursor-dependent biosynthesis of superparamagnetic iron oxide and iron sulfide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Bharde, Atul A; Parikh, Rasesh Y; Baidakova, Maria; Jouen, Samuel; Hannoyer, Baetrice; Enoki, Toshiaki; Prasad, B L V; Shouche, Yogesh S; Ogale, Satish; Sastry, Murali

    2008-06-01

    The bacterium Actinobacter sp. has been shown to be capable of extracellularly synthesizing iron based magnetic nanoparticles, namely maghemite (gamma-Fe2O3) and greigite (Fe3S4) under ambient conditions depending on the nature of precursors used. More precisely, the bacterium synthesized maghemite when reacted with ferric chloride and iron sulfide when exposed to the aqueous solution of ferric chloride-ferrous sulfate. Challenging the bacterium with different metal ions resulted in induction of different proteins, which bring about the specific biochemical transformations in each case leading to the observed products. Maghemite and iron sulfide nanoparticles show superparamagnetic characteristics as expected. Compared to the earlier reports of magnetite and greigite synthesis by magnetotactic bacteria and iron reducing bacteria, which take place strictly under anaerobic conditions, the present procedure offers significant advancement since the reaction occurs under aerobic condition. Moreover, reaction end products can be tuned by the choice of precursors used. PMID:18454562

  1. Preparation of Iron Nanoparticles from Iron Pentacarbonyl Using an Atmospheric Microwave Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Boya; Wang, Qiang; Zhang, Guixin; Liao, Shanshan; Wang, Zhong; Li, Guobin

    2015-10-01

    A novel method is introduced for preparing iron nanoparticles from iron pentacarbonyl using an atmospheric microwave plasma. The prepared iron nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The results show that the size of the particles can be controlled by adjusting the microwave power and the flow rate of the carrier gas. The magnetic properties of the synthesized iron particles were studied and a saturation magnetization of ∼95 emu/g was obtained. The convenient preparation process and considerable production rate were also found to be satisfactory for industrial applications. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51177085), the State Key Laboratory Foundation of Power System of China (No. SKLD10M07) and China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (No. 2013M540942)

  2. Thermosensitive liposomes entrapping iron oxide nanoparticles for controllable drug release.

    PubMed

    Tai, Lin-Ai; Tsai, Pi-Ju; Wang, Yu-Chao; Wang, Yu-Jing; Lo, Leu-Wei; Yang, Chung-Shi

    2009-04-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles can serve as a heating source upon alternative magnetic field (AMF) exposure. Iron oxide nanoparticles can be mixed with thermosensitive nanovehicles for hyperthermia-induced drug release, yet such a design and mechanism may not be suitable for controllable drug release applications in which the tissues are susceptible to environmental temperature change such as brain tissue. In the present study, iron oxide nanoparticles were entrapped inside of thermosensitive liposomes for AMF-induced drug release while the environmental temperature was maintained at a constant level. Carboxyfluorescein was co-entrapped with the iron oxide nanoparticles in the liposomes as a model compound for monitoring drug release and environmental temperature was maintained with a water circulator jacket. These experiments have been successfully performed in solution, in phantom and in anesthetized animals. Furthermore, the thermosensitive liposomes were administered into rat forearm skeletal muscle, and the release of carboxylfluorescein triggered by the external alternative magnetic field was monitored by an implanted microdialysis perfusion probe with an on-line laser-induced fluorescence detector. In the future such a device could be applied to simultaneous magnetic resonance imaging and non-invasive drug release in temperature-sensitive applications. PMID:19420485

  3. IRON OXIDE NANOPARTICLE-INDUCED OXIDATIVE STRESS AND INFLAMMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    1. Nanoparticle Physicochemical Characterizations
    2. We first focused on creating NP systems that could be used to test our hypotheses and assessing their stability in aqueous media. The iron oxide NP systems were not stable in cell culture medium o...

    3. Mercury removal in wastewater by iron oxide nanoparticles

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Vélez, E.; Campillo, G. E.; Morales, G.; Hincapié, C.; Osorio, J.; Arnache, O.; Uribe, J. I.; Jaramillo, F.

      2016-02-01

      Mercury is one of the persistent pollutants in wastewater; it is becoming a severe environmental and public health problem, this is why nowadays its removal is an obligation. Iron oxide nanoparticles are receiving much attention due to their properties, such as: great biocompatibility, ease of separation, high relation of surface-area to volume, surface modifiability, reusability, excellent magnetic properties and relative low cost. In this experiment, Fe3O4 and γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles were synthesized using iron salts and NaOH as precipitation agents, and Aloe Vera as stabilizing agent; then these nanoparticles were characterized by three different measurements: first, using a Zetasizer Nano ZS for their size estimation, secondly UV-visible spectroscopy which showed the existence of resonance of plasmon at λmax∼360 nm, and lastly by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) to determine nanoparticles form. The results of this characterization showed that the obtained Iron oxides nanoparticles have a narrow size distribution (∼100nm). Mercury removal of 70% approximately was confirmed by atomic absorption spectroscopy measurements.

    4. Synthesis, structure, and magnetic properties of iron and nickel nanoparticles encapsulated into carbon

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Tsurin, V. A.; Yermakov, A. Ye.; Uimin, M. A.; Mysik, A. A.; Shchegoleva, N. N.; Gaviko, V. S.; Maikov, V. V.

      2014-02-01

      Nanocomposites based on iron and nickel particles encapsulated into carbon (Fe@C and Ni@C), with an average size of the metal core in the range from 5 to 20 nm and a carbon shell thickness of approximately 2 nm, have been prepared by the gas-phase synthesis method in a mixture of argon and butane. It has been found using X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and Mössbauer spectroscopy that iron nanocomposites prepared in butane, apart from the carbon shell, contain the following phases: iron carbide (cementite), α-Fe, and γ-Fe. The phase composition of the Fe@C nanocomposite correlates with the magnetization of approximately 100 emu/g at room temperature. The replacement of butane by methane as a carbon source leads to another state of nanoparticles: no carbon coating is formed, and upon subsequent contact with air, the Fe3O4 oxide shell is formed on the surface of nanoparticles. Nickel-based nanocomposites prepared in butane, apart from pure nickel in the metal core, contain the supersaturated metastable solid solution Ni(C) and carbon coating. The Ni(C) solid solution can decompose both during the synthesis and upon the subsequent annealing. The completeness and degree of decomposition depend on the synthesis regime and the size of nickel nanoparticles: the smaller is the size of nanoparticles, the higher is the degree of decomposition into pure nickel and carbon. The magnetization of the Ni@C nanocomposites is determined by several contributions, for example, the contribution of the magnetic solid solution Ni(C) and the contribution of the nonmagnetic carbon coating; moreover, some contribution to the magnetization can be caused by the superparamagnetic behavior of nanoparticles.

    5. Magnetic resonance imaging contrast of iron oxide nanoparticles developed for hyperthermia is dominated by iron content

      PubMed Central

      Wabler, Michele; Zhu, Wenlian; Hedayati, Mohammad; Attaluri, Anilchandra; Zhou, Haoming; Mihalic, Jana; Geyh, Alison; DeWeese, Theodore L.; Ivkov, Robert; Artemov, Dmitri

      2015-01-01

      Purpose Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MNPs) are used as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and hyperthermia for cancer treatment. The relationship between MRI signal intensity and cellular iron concentration for many new formulations, particularly MNPs having magnetic properties designed for heating in hyperthermia, is lacking. In this study, we examine the correlation between MRI T2 relaxation time and iron content in cancer cells loaded with various MNP formulations. Materials and methods Human prostate carcinoma DU-145 cells were loaded with starch-coated bionised nanoferrite (BNF), iron oxide (Nanomag® D-SPIO), Feridex™, and dextran-coated Johns Hopkins University (JHU) particles at a target concentration of 50 pg Fe/cell using poly-D-lysine transfection reagent. T2-weighted MRI of serial dilutions of these labelled cells was performed at 9.4 T and iron content quantification was performed using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Clonogenic assay was used to characterise cytotoxicity. Results No cytotoxicity was observed at twice the target intracellular iron concentration (~100 pg Fe/cell). ICP-MS revealed highest iron uptake efficiency with BNF and JHU particles, followed by Feridex and Nanomag-D-SPIO, respectively. Imaging data showed a linear correlation between increased intracellular iron concentration and decreased T2 times, with no apparent correlation among MNP magnetic properties. Conclusions This study demonstrates that for the range of nanoparticle concentrations internalised by cancer cells the signal intensity of T2-weighted MRI correlates closely with absolute iron concentration associated with the cells. This correlation may benefit applications for cell-based cancer imaging and therapy including nanoparticle-mediated drug delivery and hyperthermia. PMID:24773041

    6. Homogeneous Iron Phosphate Nanoparticles by Combustion of Sprays

      PubMed Central

      Rudin, Thomas; Pratsinis, Sotiris E.

      2013-01-01

      Low-cost synthesis of iron phosphate nanostructured particles is attractive for large scale fortification of basic foods (rice, bread, etc.) as well as for Li-battery materials. This is achieved here by flame-assisted and flame spray pyrolysis (FASP and FSP) of inexpensive precursors (iron nitrate, phosphate), solvents (ethanol), and support gases (acetylene and methane). The iron phosphate powders produced here were mostly amorphous and exhibited excellent solubility in dilute acid, an indicator of relative iron bioavailability. The amorphous and crystalline fractions of such powders were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and their cumulative size distribution by X-ray disk centrifuge. Fine and coarse size fractions were obtained also by sedimentation and characterized by microscopy and XRD. The coarse size fraction contained maghemite Fe2O3 while the fine was amorphous iron phosphate. Furthermore, the effect of increased production rate (up to 11 g/h) on product morphology and solubility was explored. Using increased methane flow rates through the ignition/pilot flame of the FSP-burner and inexpensive powder precursors resulted in also homogeneous iron phosphate nanoparticles essentially converting the FSP to a FASP process. The powders produced by FSP at increased methane flow had excellent solubility in dilute acid as well. Such use of methane or even natural gas might be economically attractive for large scale flame-synthesis of nanoparticles. PMID:23407874

    7. Development and use of iron oxide nanoparticles (Part 1): Synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles for MRI.

      PubMed

      Lodhia, J; Mandarano, G; Ferris, Nj; Eu, P; Cowell, Sf

      2010-01-01

      Contrast agents, such as iron oxide, enhance MR images by altering the relaxation times of tissues in which the agent is present. They can also be used to label targeted molecular imaging probes. Unfortunately, no molecular imaging probe is currently available on the clinical MRI market. A promising platform for MRI contrast agent development is nanotechnology, where superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONS) are tailored for MR contrast enhancement, and/or for molecular imaging. SPIONs can be produced using a range of methods and the choice of method will be influenced by the characteristics most important for a particular application. In addition, the ability to attach molecular markers to SPIONS heralds their application in molecular imaging.There are many reviews on SPION synthesis for MRI; however, these tend to be targeted to a chemistry audience. The development of MRI contrast agents attracts experienced researchers from many fields including some researchers with little knowledge of medical imaging or MRI. This situation presents medical radiation practitioners with opportunities for involvement, collaboration or leadership in research depending on their level of commitment and their ability to learn. Medical radiation practitioners already possess a large portion of the understanding, knowledge and skills necessary for involvement in MRI development and molecular imaging. Their expertise in imaging technology, patient care and radiation safety provides them with skills that are directly applicable to research on the development and application of SPIONs and MRI.In this paper we argue that MRI SPIONs, currently limited to major research centres, will have widespread clinical use in the future. We believe that knowledge about this growing area of research provides an opportunity for medical radiation practitioners to enhance their specialised expertise to ensure best practice in a truly multi-disciplinary environment. This review outlines how and

    8. Development and use of iron oxide nanoparticles (Part 1): Synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles for MRI

      PubMed Central

      Lodhia, J; Mandarano, G; Ferris, NJ; Eu, P; Cowell, SF

      2010-01-01

      Contrast agents, such as iron oxide, enhance MR images by altering the relaxation times of tissues in which the agent is present. They can also be used to label targeted molecular imaging probes. Unfortunately, no molecular imaging probe is currently available on the clinical MRI market. A promising platform for MRI contrast agent development is nanotechnology, where superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONS) are tailored for MR contrast enhancement, and/or for molecular imaging. SPIONs can be produced using a range of methods and the choice of method will be influenced by the characteristics most important for a particular application. In addition, the ability to attach molecular markers to SPIONS heralds their application in molecular imaging. There are many reviews on SPION synthesis for MRI; however, these tend to be targeted to a chemistry audience. The development of MRI contrast agents attracts experienced researchers from many fields including some researchers with little knowledge of medical imaging or MRI. This situation presents medical radiation practitioners with opportunities for involvement, collaboration or leadership in research depending on their level of commitment and their ability to learn. Medical radiation practitioners already possess a large portion of the understanding, knowledge and skills necessary for involvement in MRI development and molecular imaging. Their expertise in imaging technology, patient care and radiation safety provides them with skills that are directly applicable to research on the development and application of SPIONs and MRI. In this paper we argue that MRI SPIONs, currently limited to major research centres, will have widespread clinical use in the future. We believe that knowledge about this growing area of research provides an opportunity for medical radiation practitioners to enhance their specialised expertise to ensure best practice in a truly multi-disciplinary environment. This review outlines how and

    9. Preparation of composite with silica-coated nanoparticles of iron oxide spinels for applications based on magnetically induced hyperthermia

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Andrade, Angela L.; Fabris, José D.; Pereira, Márcio C.; Domingues, Rosana Z.; Ardisson, José D.

      2013-04-01

      It is reported a novel method to prepare magnetic core (iron oxide spinels)-shell (silica) composites containing well-dispersed magnetic nanoparticles in aqueous solution. The synthetic process consists of two steps. In a first step, iron oxide nanoparticles obtained through co-precipitation are dispersed in an aqueous solution containing tetramethylammonium hydroxide; in a second step, particles of this sample are coated with silica, through hydrolyzation of tetraethyl orthosilicate. The intrinsic atomic structure and essential properties of the core-shell system were assessed with powder X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, Mössbauer spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The heat released by this ferrofluid under an AC-generated magnetic field was evaluated by following the temperature evolution under increasing magnetic field strengths. Results strongly indicate that this ferrofluid based on silica-coated iron oxide spinels is technologically a very promising material to be used in medical practices, in oncology.

    10. Optimized optical "tractor beam" for core-shell nanoparticles.

      PubMed

      Wang, Neng; Lu, Wanli; Ng, Jack; Lin, Zhifang

      2014-04-15

      It is known that core-shell subwavelength nanoparticles consisting of a dielectric shell and a metallic core can simultaneously support electric and magnetic dipolar resonances, which enhance forward scattering and suppress backward scattering. This creates favorable conditions for optical tractor beam applications. Using the generalized Lorenz-Mie theory and Maxwell stress tensor formulation, we demonstrate how optical pulling forces can be induced and optimized by first-order Bessel beams with appropriate polarization. The transverse stability of the core-shell nanoparticle under ambient damping is also verified by linear stability analysis and dynamical simulation. PMID:24979003

    11. Enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and staining of cancer cells using ferrimagnetic H-ferritin nanoparticles with increasing core size

      PubMed Central

      Cai, Yao; Cao, Changqian; He, Xiaoqing; Yang, Caiyun; Tian, Lanxiang; Zhu, Rixiang; Pan, Yongxin

      2015-01-01

      Purpose This study is to demonstrate the nanoscale size effect of ferrimagnetic H-ferritin (M-HFn) nanoparticles on magnetic properties, relaxivity, enzyme mimetic activities, and application in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and immunohistochemical staining of cancer cells. Materials and methods M-HFn nanoparticles with different sizes of magnetite cores in the range of 2.7–5.3 nm were synthesized through loading different amounts of iron into recombinant human H chain ferritin (HFn) shells. Core size, crystallinity, and magnetic properties of those M-HFn nanoparticles were analyzed by transmission electron microscope and low-temperature magnetic measurements. The MDA-MB-231 cancer cells were incubated with synthesized M-HFn nanoparticles for 24 hours in Dulbecco’s Modified Eagle’s Medium. In vitro MRI of cell pellets after M-HFn labeling was performed at 7 T. Iron uptake of cells was analyzed by Prussian blue staining and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Immunohistochemical staining by using the peroxidase-like activity of M-HFn nanoparticles was carried out on MDA-MB-231 tumor tissue paraffin sections. Results The saturation magnetization (Ms), relaxivity, and peroxidase-like activity of synthesized M-HFn nanoparticles were monotonously increased with the size of ferrimagnetic cores. The M-HFn nanoparticles with the largest core size of 5.3 nm exhibit the strongest saturation magnetization, the highest peroxidase activity in immunohistochemical staining, and the highest r2 of 321 mM−1 s−1, allowing to detect MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells as low as 104 cells mL−1. Conclusion The magnetic properties, relaxivity, and peroxidase-like activity of M-HFn nanoparticles are size dependent, which indicates that M-HFn nanoparticles with larger magnetite core can significantly enhance performance in MRI and staining of cancer cells. PMID:25878496

    12. Synthesis and characterization of fluorinated magnetic core-shell nanoparticles for inhibition of insulin amyloid fibril formation

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Skaat, Hadas; Belfort, Georges; Margel, Shlomo

      2009-06-01

      Maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) magnetic nanoparticles of 15.0 ± 2.1 nm are formed by nucleation followed by controlled growth of maghemite thin films on gelatin-iron oxide nuclei. Uniform magnetic γ-Fe2O3/poly (2,2,3,3,4,4,4-heptafluorobutyl acrylate) (γ-Fe2O3/PHFBA) core-shell nanoparticles are prepared by emulsion polymerization of the fluorinated monomer 2,2,3,3,4,4,4-heptafluorobutyl acrylate (HFBA) in the presence of the maghemite nanoparticles. The kinetics of the insulin fibrillation process in the absence and in the presence of the γ-Fe2O3/PHFBA core-shell nanoparticles are elucidated. A significant direct slow transition from α-helix to β-sheets during insulin fibril formation is observed in the presence of the γ-Fe2O3/PHFBA nanoparticles. This is in contradiction to our previous manuscript, which illustrated that the γ-Fe2O3 core nanoparticles do not affect the kinetics of the formation of the insulin fibrils, and to other previous publications that describe acceleration of the fibrillation process by using various types of nanoparticles. These core-shell nanoparticles may therefore be also useful for the inhibition of conformational changes of other amyloidogenic proteins that lead to neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington's, mad cow and prion diseases.

    13. Core-shell of FePt@SiO2-Au magnetic nanoparticles for rapid SERS detection.

      PubMed

      Hardiansyah, Andri; Chen, An-Yu; Liao, Hung-Liang; Yang, Ming-Chien; Liu, Ting-Yu; Chan, Tzu-Yi; Tsou, Hui-Ming; Kuo, Chih-Yu; Wang, Juen-Kai; Wang, Yuh-Lin

      2015-12-01

      In this study, multifunctional hybrid nanoparticles composed of iron platinum (FePt), silica (SiO2), and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) had been developed for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) application. Core-shell structure of SiO2 and FePt nanoparticles (FePt@SiO2) was fabricated through sol-gel process and then immobilized gold nanoparticles onto the surface of FePt@SiO2, which displays huge Raman enhancement effect and magnetic separation capability. The resulting core-shell nanoparticles were subject to evaluation by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), zeta potential measurement, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). TEM observation revealed that the particle size of resultant nanoparticles displayed spherical structure with the size ~30 nm and further proved the successful immobilization of Au onto the surface of FePt@SiO2. Zeta potential measurement exhibited the successful reaction between FePt@SiO2 and AuNPs. The rapid SERS detection and identification of small biomolecules (adenine) and microorganisms (gram-positive bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus) was conducted through Raman spectroscopy. In summary, the novel core-shell magnetic nanoparticles could be anticipated to apply in the rapid magnetic separation under the external magnetic field due to the core of the FePt superparamagnetic nanoparticles and label-free SERS bio-sensing of biomolecules and bacteria. PMID:26489855

    14. Core-shell of FePt@SiO2-Au magnetic nanoparticles for rapid SERS detection

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Hardiansyah, Andri; Chen, An-Yu; Liao, Hung-Liang; Yang, Ming-Chien; Liu, Ting-Yu; Chan, Tzu-Yi; Tsou, Hui-Ming; Kuo, Chih-Yu; Wang, Juen-Kai; Wang, Yuh-Lin

      2015-10-01

      In this study, multifunctional hybrid nanoparticles composed of iron platinum (FePt), silica (SiO2), and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) had been developed for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) application. Core-shell structure of SiO2 and FePt nanoparticles (FePt@SiO2) was fabricated through sol-gel process and then immobilized gold nanoparticles onto the surface of FePt@SiO2, which displays huge Raman enhancement effect and magnetic separation capability. The resulting core-shell nanoparticles were subject to evaluation by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), zeta potential measurement, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). TEM observation revealed that the particle size of resultant nanoparticles displayed spherical structure with the size ~30 nm and further proved the successful immobilization of Au onto the surface of FePt@SiO2. Zeta potential measurement exhibited the successful reaction between FePt@SiO2 and AuNPs. The rapid SERS detection and identification of small biomolecules (adenine) and microorganisms (gram-positive bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus) was conducted through Raman spectroscopy. In summary, the novel core-shell magnetic nanoparticles could be anticipated to apply in the rapid magnetic separation under the external magnetic field due to the core of the FePt superparamagnetic nanoparticles and label-free SERS bio-sensing of biomolecules and bacteria.

    15. Release Activation of Iron Oxide Nanoparticles (REACTION): A novel environmentally sensitive MRI paradigm

      PubMed Central

      Granot, Dorit; Shapiro, Erik M.

      2011-01-01

      Smart contrast agents for MRI-based cell tracking would enable the use of MRI methodologies to not only detect the location of cells, but also gene expression. Here we report on a new enzyme/contrast agent paradigm which involves the enzymatic degradation of the polymer coating of magnetic nanoparticles to release encapsulated magnetic cores. Cells were labeled with particles coated with a polymer which is cleavable by a specific enzyme. This coat restricts the approach of water to the particle, preventing the magnetic core from efficiently relaxing protons. The reactive enzyme was delivered to cells and changes in cellular T2 and T2* relaxation times of ~ 35% and ~ 50% were achieved in vitro. Large enhancements of dark contrast volume (240%) and CNR (48%) within the contrast regions were measured, in vivo, for cells co-labeled with enzyme and particles. These results warrant exploration of genetic avenues towards achieving RElease ACTivation of Iron Oxide Nanoparticles (REACTION). PMID:21360745

    16. Shellac-coated iron oxide nanoparticles for removal of cadmium(II) ions from aqueous solution.

      PubMed

      Gong, Jilai; Chen, Long; Zeng, Guangming; Long, Fei; Deng, Jiuhua; Niu, Qiuya; He, Xun

      2012-01-01

      This study describes a new effective adsorbent for cadmium removal from aqueous solution synthesized by coating a shellac layer, a natural biodegradable and renewable resin with abundant hydroxyl and carboxylic groups, on the surface of iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) imaging showed shellac-coated magnetic nanoparticle (SCMN) adsorbents had a core-shell structure with a core of 20 nm and shell of 5 nm. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopic analysis suggested the occurrence of reaction between carboxyl groups on the SCMN adsorbent surface and cadmium ions in aqueous solution. Kinetic data were well described by pseudo second-order model and adsorption isotherms were fitted with both Langmuir and Freundlich models with maximum adsorption capacity of 18.80 mg/g. SCMN adsorbents provided a favorable adsorption capacity under high salinity conditions, and cadmium could easily be desorbed using mild organic acid solutions at low concentration. PMID:23513435

    17. Direct synthesis of magnetite nanoparticles from iron(II) carboxymethylcellulose and their performance as NMR contrast agents

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      da Silva, Delmarcio Gomes; Hiroshi Toma, Sergio; de Melo, Fernando Menegatti; Carvalho, Larissa Vieira C.; Magalhães, Alvicler; Sabadini, Edvaldo; dos Santos, Antônio Domingues; Araki, Koiti; Toma, e. Henrique E.

      2016-01-01

      Iron(II) carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) has been successfully employed in the synthesis of hydrophylic magnetite nanoparticles stabilized with a biopolymer coating, aiming applications in NMR imaging. The new method encompasses a convenient one-step synthetic procedure, allowing a good size control and yielding particles of about 10 nm (core size). In addition to the biocompatibility, the nanoparticles have promoted a drastic reduction in the transverse relaxation time (T2) of the water protons. The relaxivity rates have been investigated as a function of the nanoparticles concentration, showing a better performance in relation to the common NMR contrast agents available in the market.

    18. Evaluation of iron oxide nanoparticle biocompatibility

      PubMed Central

      Hanini, Amel; Schmitt, Alain; Kacem, Kamel; Chau, François; Ammar, Souad; Gavard, Julie

      2011-01-01

      Nanotechnology is an exciting field of investigation for the development of new treatments for many human diseases. However, it is necessary to assess the biocompatibility of nanoparticles in vitro and in vivo before considering clinical applications. Our characterization of polyol-produced maghemite γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles showed high structural quality. The particles showed a homogeneous spherical size around 10 nm and could form aggregates depending on the dispersion conditions. Such nanoparticles were efficiently taken up in vitro by human endothelial cells, which represent the first biological barrier to nanoparticles in vivo. However, γ-Fe2O3 can cause cell death within 24 hours of exposure, most likely through oxidative stress. Further in vivo exploration suggests that although γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles are rapidly cleared through the urine, they can lead to toxicity in the liver, kidneys and lungs, while the brain and heart remain unaffected. In conclusion, γ-Fe2O3 could exhibit harmful properties and therefore surface coating, cellular targeting, and local exposure should be considered before developing clinical applications. PMID:21589646

    19. Evaluation of iron oxide nanoparticle biocompatibility.

      PubMed

      Hanini, Amel; Schmitt, Alain; Kacem, Kamel; Chau, François; Ammar, Souad; Gavard, Julie

      2011-01-01

      Nanotechnology is an exciting field of investigation for the development of new treatments for many human diseases. However, it is necessary to assess the biocompatibility of nanoparticles in vitro and in vivo before considering clinical applications. Our characterization of polyol-produced maghemite γ-Fe(2)O(3) nanoparticles showed high structural quality. The particles showed a homogeneous spherical size around 10 nm and could form aggregates depending on the dispersion conditions. Such nanoparticles were efficiently taken up in vitro by human endothelial cells, which represent the first biological barrier to nanoparticles in vivo. However, γ-Fe(2)O(3) can cause cell death within 24 hours of exposure, most likely through oxidative stress. Further in vivo exploration suggests that although γ-Fe(2)O(3) nanoparticles are rapidly cleared through the urine, they can lead to toxicity in the liver, kidneys and lungs, while the brain and heart remain unaffected. In conclusion, γ-Fe(2)O(3) could exhibit harmful properties and therefore surface coating, cellular targeting, and local exposure should be considered before developing clinical applications. PMID:21589646

  1. Magnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles: Synthesis and Surface Functionalization Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wei; He, Quanguo; Jiang, Changzhong

    2008-10-01

    Surface functionalized magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) are a kind of novel functional materials, which have been widely used in the biotechnology and catalysis. This review focuses on the recent development and various strategies in preparation, structure, and magnetic properties of naked and surface functionalized iron oxide NPs and their corresponding application briefly. In order to implement the practical application, the particles must have combined properties of high magnetic saturation, stability, biocompatibility, and interactive functions at the surface. Moreover, the surface of iron oxide NPs could be modified by organic materials or inorganic materials, such as polymers, biomolecules, silica, metals, etc. The problems and major challenges, along with the directions for the synthesis and surface functionalization of iron oxide NPs, are considered. Finally, some future trends and prospective in these research areas are also discussed.

  2. Magnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles: Synthesis and Surface Functionalization Strategies

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Surface functionalized magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) are a kind of novel functional materials, which have been widely used in the biotechnology and catalysis. This review focuses on the recent development and various strategies in preparation, structure, and magnetic properties of naked and surface functionalized iron oxide NPs and their corresponding application briefly. In order to implement the practical application, the particles must have combined properties of high magnetic saturation, stability, biocompatibility, and interactive functions at the surface. Moreover, the surface of iron oxide NPs could be modified by organic materials or inorganic materials, such as polymers, biomolecules, silica, metals, etc. The problems and major challenges, along with the directions for the synthesis and surface functionalization of iron oxide NPs, are considered. Finally, some future trends and prospective in these research areas are also discussed. PMID:21749733

  3. Genotoxicity of Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles in Granulosa Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pöttler, Marina; Staicu, Andreas; Zaloga, Jan; Unterweger, Harald; Weigel, Bianca; Schreiber, Eveline; Hofmann, Simone; Wiest, Irmi; Jeschke, Udo; Alexiou, Christoph; Janko, Christina

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles that are aimed at targeting cancer cells, but sparing healthy tissue provide an attractive platform of implementation for hyperthermia or as carriers of chemotherapeutics. According to the literature, diverse effects of nanoparticles relating to mammalian reproductive tissue are described. To address the impact of nanoparticles on cyto- and genotoxicity concerning the reproductive system, we examined the effect of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) on granulosa cells, which are very important for ovarian function and female fertility. Human granulosa cells (HLG-5) were treated with SPIONs, either coated with lauric acid (SEONLA) only, or additionally with a protein corona of bovine serum albumin (BSA; SEONLA-BSA), or with dextran (SEONDEX). Both micronuclei testing and the detection of γH2A.X revealed no genotoxic effects of SEONLA-BSA, SEONDEX or SEONLA. Thus, it was demonstrated that different coatings of SPIONs improve biocompatibility, especially in terms of genotoxicity towards cells of the reproductive system. PMID:26540051

  4. Iron oxide nanoparticles in different modifications for antimicrobial phototherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuchina, Elena S.; Kozina, Kristina V.; Shelest, Nikita A.; Kochubey, Vyacheslav I.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2014-03-01

    The main goal of this study was to investigate the sensitivity of microorganisms to combined action of blue light and iron oxide nanoparticles. Two strains of Staphylococcus aureus - methicillin-sensitive and meticillin-resistant were used. As a blue light source LED with spectral maximum at 405 nm was taken. The light exposure was ranged from 5 to 30 min. The Fe2O3 (diameter ˜27 nm), Fe3O4 nanoparticles (diameter ˜19 nm), and composite Fe2O3/TiO2 nanoparticles (diameter ˜100 nm) were synthesized. It was shown that irradiation by blue light caused from 20% to 88% decrease in the number of microorganisms treated with nanoparticles. Morphological changes in bacterial cells after phototreatment were analyzed using scanning electron microscope.

  5. Size-dependent magnetic properties of iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patsula, Vitalii; Moskvin, Maksym; Dutz, Silvio; Horák, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Uniform iron oxide nanoparticles in the size range from 10 to 24 nm and polydisperse 14 nm iron oxide particles were prepared by thermal decomposition of Fe(III) carboxylates in the presence of oleic acid and co-precipitation of Fe(II) and Fe(III) chlorides by ammonium hydroxide followed by oxidation, respectively. While the first method produced hydrophobic oleic acid coated particles, the second one formed hydrophilic, but uncoated, nanoparticles. To make the iron oxide particles water dispersible and colloidally stable, their surface was modified with poly(ethylene glycol) and sucrose, respectively. Size and size distribution of the nanoparticles was determined by transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering and X-ray diffraction. Surface of the PEG-functionalized and sucrose-modified iron oxide particles was characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and Raman spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Magnetic properties were measured by means of vibration sample magnetometry and specific absorption rate in alternating magnetic fields was determined calorimetrically. It was found, that larger ferrimagnetic particles showed higher heating performance than smaller superparamagnetic ones. In the transition range between superparamagnetism and ferrimagnetism, samples with a broader size distribution provided higher heating power than narrow size distributed particles of comparable mean size. Here presented particles showed promising properties for a possible application in magnetic hyperthermia.

  6. Remediation of PCB contaminated soils using iron nano-particles.

    PubMed

    Varanasi, Patanjali; Fullana, Andres; Sidhu, Sukh

    2007-01-01

    In this study, iron nano-particles were used to remediate PCB contaminated soil and an attempt was made to maximize PCB destruction in each treatment step. The results show that nano-particles do aid in the dechlorination process and high PCB destruction efficiencies can be achieved. The destruction efficiency during the preliminary treatment (mixing of soil and iron nano-particles in water) can be increased by increasing the water temperature. The maximum thermal destruction (pyrolysis/combustion of soil after preliminary treatment) of soil-bound PCBs occurs at 300 degrees C in air. A minimum total PCB destruction efficiency of 95% can be achieved by this process. The effect of changing treatment parameters such as type of mixing, time of mixing and mixing conditions and application of other catalysts like iron oxide and V(2)O(5)/TiO(2) was also investigated. It was found that at 300 degrees C in air, iron oxide and V(2)O(5)/TiO(2) are also good catalysts for remediating PCB contaminated soils. PMID:16962632

  7. Tactic response of bacteria to zero-valent iron nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Calvo, José-Julio; Jimenez-Sanchez, Celia; Pratarolo, Paolo; Pullin, Huw; Scott, Thomas B; Thompson, Ian P

    2016-06-01

    The microbial assessment of pollutant toxicity rarely includes behavioral responses. In this study, we investigated the tactic response of Pseudomonas putida G7, a representative of soil bacterium, towards engineered zero-valent iron nanoparticles (nZVIs), as a new end-point assessment of toxicity. The study integrated the characterization of size distribution and charge of nZVIs and tactic reaction response by means of inverted capillary assay and computer-assisted motion analysis of motility behavior. Iron nanoparticles (diameter ≤ 100 nm) were prepared in the absence of oxygen to prevent aggregation, and then exposed in aerobic conditions. We first demonstrate that iron nanoparticles can elicit a negative tactic response in bacteria at low but environmentally-relevant, sub-lethal concentrations (1-10 μg/L). Cells were repelled by nZVIs in the concentration gradients created inside the capillaries, and a significant increase in turning events, characteristic of negative taxis, was detected under exposure to nZVIs. These tactic responses were not detectable after sustained exposure of the nanoparticles to oxygen. This new behavioral assessment may be prospected for the design of sensitive bioassays for nanomaterial toxicity. PMID:26967351

  8. Synthesis of amorphous carbon nanofibers using iron nanoparticles as catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Mokhtar; Ramana, G. Venkata; Padya, Balaji; Srikanth, V. V. S. S.; Jain, P. K.

    2013-06-01

    Amongst various carbon nanomaterials, carbon nanofibers (CNFs) have lately attracted considerable interest as a promising reinforcement in polymer matrix composites. CNFs are often synthesized using copper nanoparticles as catalysts and by using chemical vapor deposition (CVD). In this work iron (Fe) nanoparticles are used as catalysts to synthesize amorphous carbon nanofibers. This owes significance since Fe nanoparticles often lead to tubes rather than fibers. Fe nanoparticles (size ˜30-60nm) are prepared by first mixing an appropriate quantity of potassium sodium tartrate tetrahydrate salt with iron (II) chloride dehydrate to obtain iron tartrate and then dried and heated in vacuum oven at about 250°C to remove tartrate. In a subsequent step, CNFs are obtained by using CVD. Acetylene was used as the carbon source in the CVD process. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy show the formation of nanofibers whose diameter is dependent on the size of Fe catalysts. Raman scattering from the fibers show that they are made up of carbon and are amorphous.

  9. Evaluation of Biodistribution of Functionalized Magnetic Core/Carbon-Shell Nanoparticles in Systemic Method of Administration.

    PubMed

    Yushkov, B G; Artashyan, O S; Medvedeva, S Yu; Byzov, I V; Uimin, M A; Ermakov, A E; Bykova, M Yu; Petrova, I M

    2015-08-01

    We studied new magnetic nanocomposites consisting of a core(Fe) and carbon-shell inert to biological media. Iron-carbon nanoparticles circulate in the bloodstream for several minutes and are primarily accumulated in the liver; less intensive accumulation was found in the spleen and minimum in the lungs, kidneys, and heart. Accumulation of nanoparticles in the liver leads to the development of destructive processes and is accompanied by activation of compensatory-adaptive mechanisms. In the liver and spleen, structural changes are mild and mainly relate to changes in the microvasculature. In 6 months, the total content of nanoparticles in all tissues decreased due to their elimination from the body and the structure of the organs returned to normal. PMID:26395633

  10. The role of iron redox state in the genotoxicity of ultrafine superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Singh, Neenu; Jenkins, Gareth J S; Nelson, Bryant C; Marquis, Bryce J; Maffeis, Thierry G G; Brown, Andy P; Williams, Paul M; Wright, Chris J; Doak, Shareen H

    2012-01-01

    Ultrafine superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (USPION) hold great potential for revolutionising biomedical applications such as MRI, localised hyperthermia, and targeted drug delivery. Though evidence is increasing regarding the influence of nanoparticle physico-chemical features on toxicity, data however, is lacking that assesses a range of such characteristics in parallel. We show that iron redox state, a subtle though important physico-chemical feature of USPION, dramatically modifies the cellular uptake of these nanoparticles and influences their induction of DNA damage. Surface chemistry was also found to have an impact and evidence to support a potential mechanism of oxidative DNA damage behind the observed responses has been demonstrated. As human exposure to ferrofluids is predicted to increase through nanomedicine based therapeutics, these findings are important in guiding the fabrication of USPION to ensure they have characteristics that support biocompatibility. PMID:22027595

  11. Development of Iron Doped Silicon Nanoparticles as Bimodal Imaging Agents

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Mani P.; Atkins, Tonya M.; Muthuswamy, Elayaraja; Kamali, Saeed; Tu, Chuqiao; Louie, Angelique Y.; Kauzlarich, Susan M.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate the synthesis of water-soluble allylamine terminated Fe doped Si (SixFe) nanoparticles as bimodal agents for optical and magnetic imaging. The preparation involves the synthesis of a single source iron containing precursor, Na4Si4 with x% Fe (x = 1, 5, 10), and its subsequent reaction with NH4Br to produce hydrogen terminated SixFe nanoparticles. The hydrogen-capped nanoparticles are further terminated with allylamine via thermal hydrosilylation. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) indicates that the average particle diameter is ~3.0±1.0 nm. The Si5Fe nanoparticles show strong photoluminescence quantum yield in water (~ 10 %) with significant T2 contrast (r2/r1value of 4.31). Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and Mössbauer spectroscopies indicate that iron in the nanoparticles is in the +3 oxidation state. Analysis of cytotoxicity using the resazurin assay on HepG2 liver cells indicates that the particles have minimal toxicity. PMID:22616623

  12. The end of the iron-core age.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyttleton, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    The terrestrial planets aggregated essentially from small particles, to begin as solid cool bodies with the same general compositions, and there is no possibility of an iron-core developing within any of them at any stage. Their differing internal and surface properties receive ready explanation from their different masses which determine whether the pressures within are sufficient to bring about phase-changes. The claim that the terrestrial core can be identified by means of shock-wave data as nickel-iron is based on theoretical misconception, whereas the actual seismic data establish an uncompressed-density value much lower than any such mixture could have. The onset of the Ramsey phase-change in the earth takes the form of a rapid initial collapse to produce a large core in metallic state which thereafter continues to grow secularly as a result of radioactive heating and leads to reduction of surface-area at long last adequate to account for folded and thrusted mountain-building.

  13. Single-cell nanotoxicity assays of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Eustaquio, Trisha; Leary, James F

    2012-01-01

    Properly evaluating the nanotoxicity of nanoparticles involves much more than bulk-cell assays of cell death by necrosis. Cells exposed to nanoparticles may undergo repairable oxidative stress and DNA damage or be induced into apoptosis. Exposure to nanoparticles may cause the cells to alter their proliferation or differentiation or their cell-cell signaling with neighboring cells in a tissue. Nanoparticles are usually more toxic to some cell subpopulations than others, and toxicity often varies with cell cycle. All of these facts dictate that any nanotoxicity assay must be at the single-cell level and must try whenever feasible and reasonable to include many of these other factors. Focusing on one type of quantitative measure of nanotoxicity, we describe flow and scanning image cytometry approaches to measuring nanotoxicity at the single-cell level by using a commonly used assay for distinguishing between necrotic and apoptotic causes of cell death by one type of nanoparticle. Flow cytometry is fast and quantitative, provided that the cells can be prepared into a single-cell suspension for analysis. But when cells cannot be put into suspension without altering nanotoxicity results, or if morphology, attachment, and stain location are important, a scanning image cytometry approach must be used. Both methods are described with application to a particular type of nanoparticle, a superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle (SPION), as an example of how these assays may be applied to the more general problem of determining the effects of nanomaterial exposure to living cells. PMID:22975957

  14. Multifunctional iron oxide nanoparticles for diagnostics, therapy and macromolecule delivery.

    PubMed

    Yen, Swee Kuan; Padmanabhan, Parasuraman; Selvan, Subramanian Tamil

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, multifunctional nanoparticles (NPs) consisting of either metal (e.g. Au), or magnetic NP (e.g. iron oxide) with other fluorescent components such as quantum dots (QDs) or organic dyes have been emerging as versatile candidate systems for cancer diagnosis, therapy, and macromolecule delivery such as micro ribonucleic acid (microRNA). This review intends to highlight the recent advances in the synthesis and application of multifunctional NPs (mainly iron oxide) in theranostics, an area used to combine therapeutics and diagnostics. The recent applications of NPs in miRNA delivery are also reviewed. PMID:24396508

  15. Multifunctional Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for Diagnostics, Therapy and Macromolecule Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Swee Kuan; Padmanabhan, Parasuraman; Selvan, Subramanian Tamil

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, multifunctional nanoparticles (NPs) consisting of either metal (e.g. Au), or magnetic NP (e.g. iron oxide) with other fluorescent components such as quantum dots (QDs) or organic dyes have been emerging as versatile candidate systems for cancer diagnosis, therapy, and macromolecule delivery such as micro ribonucleic acid (microRNA). This review intends to highlight the recent advances in the synthesis and application of multifunctional NPs (mainly iron oxide) in theranostics, an area used to combine therapeutics and diagnostics. The recent applications of NPs in miRNA delivery are also reviewed. PMID:24396508

  16. Process to make core-shell structured nanoparticles

    DOEpatents

    Luhrs, Claudia; Phillips, Jonathan; Richard, Monique N

    2014-01-07

    Disclosed is a process for making a composite material that contains core-shell structured nanoparticles. The process includes providing a precursor in the form of a powder a liquid and/or a vapor of a liquid that contains a core material and a shell material, and suspending the precursor in an aerosol gas to produce an aerosol containing the precursor. In addition, the process includes providing a plasma that has a hot zone and passing the aerosol through the hot zone of the plasma. As the aerosol passes through the hot zone of the plasma, at least part of the core material and at least part of the shell material in the aerosol is vaporized. Vapor that contains the core material and the shell material that has been vaporized is removed from the hot zone of the plasma and allowed to condense into core-shell structured nanoparticles.

  17. Single-step gas phase synthesis of stable iron aluminide nanoparticles with soft magnetic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Vernieres, Jerome Benelmekki, Maria; Kim, Jeong-Hwan; Grammatikopoulos, Panagiotis; Diaz, Rosa E.; Bobo, Jean-François; Sowwan, Mukhles

    2014-11-01

    Soft magnetic alloys at the nanoscale level have long generated a vivid interest as candidate materials for technological and biomedical purposes. Consequently, controlling the structure of bimetallic nanoparticles in order to optimize their magnetic properties, such as high magnetization and low coercivity, can significantly boost their potential for related applications. However, traditional synthesis methods stumble upon the long standing challenge of developing true nanoalloys with effective control over morphology and stability against oxidation. Herein, we report on a single-step approach to the gas phase synthesis of soft magnetic bimetallic iron aluminide nanoparticles, using a versatile co-sputter inert gas condensation technique. This method allowed for precise morphological control of the particles; they consisted of an alloy iron aluminide crystalline core (DO{sub 3} phase) and an alumina shell, which reduced inter-particle interactions and also prevented further oxidation and segregation of the bimetallic core. Remarkably, the as-deposited alloy nanoparticles show interesting soft magnetic properties, in that they combine a high saturation magnetization (170 emu/g) and low coercivity (less than 20 Oe) at room temperature. Additional functionality is tenable by modifying the surface of the particles with a polymer, to ensure their good colloidal dispersion in aqueous environments.

  18. Reductive degradation of tetrabromobisphenol A over iron-silver bimetallic nanoparticles under ultrasound radiation.

    PubMed

    Luo, Si; Yang, Shaogui; Wang, Xiaodong; Sun, Cheng

    2010-04-01

    The present study described the degradation behavior of tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) in Fe-Ag suspension solutions under ultrasonic radiation (US). The Fe-Ag bimetallic nanoparticles with core-shell structure were successfully synthesized by reduction and deposition of Ag on nanoscale Fe surface, and were further characterized by BET, XRD, TEM, SEM, X-ray fluorescence and X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy. The results revealed that the displacement plating produced a non-uniform overlayer of Ag additive on iron; the as-synthesized bimetallic nanoparticles were spherical with diameters of 20-100 nm aggregated in the form of chains. Batch studies demonstrated that the TBBPA (2 mg L(-1)) was completely degraded in 20 min over Fe-Ag nanoparticles, which has higher degradation efficiency than Fe(0) nanoparticles under US. The effects of Fe-Ag bimetallic nanoparticles loading, initial TBBPA concentration, pH of the solution, Ag loading and temperature on the reduction efficiency of TBBPA under US were investigated. The complete reduction of TBBPA in 20 min was determined selectively under the conditions of pH (pH=6.0+/-0.5), Ag loading(1 wt.%) at 30 degrees C over the fabricated Fe-Ag nanoparticles. Additionally, the major intermediates identified by LC-MS technique were tri-BBPA, di-BBPA, mono-BBPA and BPA and the degradation mechanism was also proposed. PMID:20236681

  19. Dual-responsive magnetic core-shell nanoparticles for nonviral gene delivery and cell separation.

    PubMed

    Majewski, Alexander P; Schallon, Anja; Jérôme, Valérie; Freitag, Ruth; Müller, Axel H E; Schmalz, Holger

    2012-03-12

    We present the synthesis of dual-responsive (pH and temperature) magnetic core-shell nanoparticles utilizing the grafting-from approach. First, oleic acid stabilized superparamagnetic maghemite (γ-Fe(2)O(3)) nanoparticles (NPs), prepared by thermal decomposition of iron pentacarbonyl, were surface-functionalized with ATRP initiating sites bearing a dopamine anchor group via ligand exchange. Subsequently, 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA) was polymerized from the surface by ATRP, yielding dual-responsive magnetic core-shell NPs (γ-Fe(2)O(3)@PDMAEMA). The attachment of the dopamine anchor group on the nanoparticle's surface is shown to be reversible to a certain extent, resulting in a grafting density of 0.15 chains per nm(2) after purification. Nevertheless, the grafted NPs show excellent long-term stability in water over a wide pH range and exhibit a pH- and temperature-dependent reversible agglomeration, as revealed by turbidimetry. The efficiency of γ-Fe(2)O(3)@PDMAEMA hybrid nanoparticles as a potential transfection agent was explored under standard conditions in CHO-K1 cells. Remarkably, γ-Fe(2)O(3)@PDMAEMA led to a 2-fold increase in the transfection efficiency without increasing the cytotoxicity, as compared to polyethyleneimine (PEI), and yielded on average more than 50% transfected cells. Moreover, after transfection with the hybrid nanoparticles, the cells acquired magnetic properties that could be used for selective isolation of transfected cells. PMID:22296556

  20. Soft template strategy to synthesize iron oxide-titania yolk-shell nanoparticles as high-performance anode materials for lithium-ion battery applications.

    PubMed

    Lim, Joohyun; Um, Ji Hyun; Ahn, Jihoon; Yu, Seung-Ho; Sung, Yung-Eun; Lee, Jin-Kyu

    2015-05-18

    Yolk-shell-structured nanoparticles with iron oxide core, void, and a titania shell configuration are prepared by a simple soft template method and used as the anode material for lithium ion batteries. The iron oxide-titania yolk-shell nanoparticles (IO@void@TNPs) exhibit a higher and more stable capacity than simply mixed nanoparticles of iron oxide and hollow titania because of the unique structure obtained by the perfect separation between iron oxide nanoparticles, in combination with the adequate internal void space provided by stable titania shells. Moreover, the structural effect of IO@void@TNPs clearly demonstrates that the capacity retention value after 50 cycles is approximately 4 times that for IONPs under harsh operating conditions, that is, when the temperature is increased to 80 °C. PMID:25846958

  1. Versatile ferrofluids based on polyethylene glycol coated iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brullot, W.; Reddy, N. K.; Wouters, J.; Valev, V. K.; Goderis, B.; Vermant, J.; Verbiest, T.

    2012-06-01

    Versatile ferrofluids based on polyethylene glycol coated iron oxide nanoparticles were obtained by a facile protocol and thoroughly characterized. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles synthesized using a modified forced hydrolysis method were functionalized with polyethylene glycol silane (PEG silane), precipitated and dried. These functionalized particles are dispersable in a range of solvents and concentrations depending on the desired properties. Examples of tunable properties are magnetic behavior, optical and magneto-optical response, thermal features and rheological behavior. As such, PEG silane functionalized particles represent a platform for the development of new materials that have broad applicability in e.g. biomedical, industrial or photonic environments. Magnetic, optical, magneto-optical, thermal and rheological properties of several ferrofluids based on PEG coated particles with different concentrations of particles dispersed in low molecular mass polyethylene glycol were investigated, establishing the applicability of such materials.

  2. All Metal Iron Core For A Low Aspect Ratio Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    D.A. Gates, C. Jun, I. Zatz, A. Zolfaghari

    2010-06-02

    A novel concept for incorporating a iron core transformer within a axisymmetric toroidal plasma containment device with a high neutron flux is described. This design enables conceptual design of low aspect ratio devices which employ standard transformer-driven plasma startup by using all-metal high resistance separators between the toroidal field windings. This design avoids the inherent problems of a multiturn air core transformer which will inevitably suffer from strong neutron bombardment and hence lose the integrity of its insulation, both through long term material degradation and short term neutron- induced conductivity.. A full 3-dimensional model of the concept has been developed within the MAXWELL program and the resultant loop voltage calculated. The utility of the result is found to be dependent on the resistivity of the high resistance separators. Useful loop voltage time histories have been obtained using achievable resistivities.

  3. Dielectric studies of iron nanoparticles-ferroelectric liquid crystal mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khushboo, Sharma, Puneet; Jayoti, Divya; Malik, Praveen; Raina, K. K.

    2016-05-01

    Iron nanoparticles doped ferroelectric liquid crystal mixtures have been prepared and studied in thin planar cell. The effect of temperature and frequency on permittivity behavior in SmC* phase has been studied. Permittivity increases with increasing the temperature in SmC* phase and show a reduction near the SmC*-SmA transition temperature. A Goldstone mode is clearly observed at ~100 Hz.

  4. The effect of coating on heat generation properties of Iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yuan

    Magnetic nanoparticles have attracted more and more attention for their potential application as heating agents in cancer hyperthermia. The effectiveness of cancer hyperthermia can be increased by using particles that have a higher heat generation rate, quantified by specific absorption rate (SAR), at a smaller applied field. In order to optimize the functionality of nanoparticles as heating agents, it is essential to have a comprehensive understanding of factors that may influence SAR including coating and aggregation. In all biomedical applications, the magnetic particles are coated with surfactants and polymers to enhance biocompatibility, prevent agglomeration and add functionality. Coatings may profoundly influence particles' clustering behavior and magnetic properties. Yet its effect on the heat generation rate of the nanoparticles has been scarcely investigated. In this context, a systematic investigation was carried out in this dissertation in order to understand the impact of the surface coating of magnetic nanoparticles on their heat generation rate. The study also includes investigation of normal nerve cell viability in presence of biofunctionalized magnetic nanoparticles with and without exposure to magnetic heating. Commercially available suspensions of iron oxide nanoparticles with a diameter of approximately 10 nm and different coatings relevant to biomedical applications such as aminosilane, carboxymethyl-dextran, protein A, biotin were extensively characterized. First of all, magnetic phase reduction of magnetite nanoparticles was examined by studying the discrepancy between the volume fraction of magnetic phase calculated from magnetization curve and the magnetic core concentration obtained from Tiron chelation test. The findings indicated that coatings might interact with the surface atoms of the magnetic core and form a magnetically disordered layer reducing the total amount of the magnetic phase. Secondly, the impact of coating and aggregation

  5. Octapod iron oxide nanoparticles as high-performance T₂ contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhenghuan; Zhou, Zijian; Bao, Jianfeng; Wang, Zhenyu; Hu, Juan; Chi, Xiaoqin; Ni, Kaiyuan; Wang, Ruifang; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Chen, Zhong; Gao, Jinhao

    2013-01-01

    Spherical superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles have been developed as T2-negative contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging in clinical use because of their biocompatibility and ease of synthesis; however, they exhibit relatively low transverse relaxivity. Here we report a new strategy to achieve high transverse relaxivity by controlling the morphology of iron oxide nanoparticles. We successfully fabricate size-controllable octapod iron oxide nanoparticles by introducing chloride anions. The octapod iron oxide nanoparticles (edge length of 30 nm) exhibit an ultrahigh transverse relaxivity value (679.3 ± 30 mM(-1) s(-1)), indicating that these octapod iron oxide nanoparticles are much more effective T2 contrast agents for in vivo imaging and small tumour detection in comparison with conventional iron oxide nanoparticles, which holds great promise for highly sensitive, early stage and accurate detection of cancer in the clinic. PMID:23903002

  6. Magnetization measurements and XMCD studies on ion irradiated iron oxide and core-shell iron/iron-oxide nanomaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Maninder; Qiang, You; Jiang, Weilin; Pearce, Carolyn; McCloy, John S.

    2014-12-02

    Magnetite (Fe3O4) and core-shell iron/iron-oxide (Fe/Fe3O4) nanomaterials prepared by a cluster deposition system were irradiated with 5.5 MeV Si2+ ions and the structures determined by x-ray diffraction as consisting of 100% magnetite and 36/64 wt% Fe/FeO, respectively. However, x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) indicates similar surfaces in the two samples, slightly oxidized and so having more Fe3+ than the expected magnetite structure, with XMCD intensity much lower for the irradiated core-shell samples indicating weaker magnetism. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) data lack the signature for FeO, but the irradiated core-shell system consists of Fe-cores with ~13 nm of separating oxide crystallite, so it is likely that FeO exists deeper than the probe depth of the XAS (~5 nm). Exchange bias (Hex) for both samples becomes increasingly negative as temperature is lowered, but the irradiated Fe3O4 sample shows greater sensitivity of cooling field on Hex. Loop asymmetries and Hex sensitivities of the irradiated Fe3O4 sample are due to interfaces and interactions between grains which were not present in samples before irradiation as well as surface oxidation. Asymmetries in the hysteresis curves of the irradiated core/shell sample are related to the reversal mechanism of the antiferromagnetic FeO and possibly some near surface oxidation.

  7. Solid lipid nanoparticles loaded with iron to overcome barriers for treatment of iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    Hosny, Khaled Mohamed; Banjar, Zainy Mohammed; Hariri, Amani H; Hassan, Ali Habiballah

    2015-01-01

    According to the World Health Organization, 46% of the world’s children suffer from anemia, which is usually treated with iron supplements such as ferrous sulfate. The aim of this study was to prepare iron as solid lipid nanoparticles, in order to find an innovative way for alleviating the disadvantages associated with commercially available tablets. These limitations include adverse effects on the digestive system resulting in constipation and blood in the stool. The second drawback is the high variability in the absorption of iron and thus in its bioavailability. Iron solid lipid nanoparticles (Fe-SLNs) were prepared by hot homogenization/ultrasonication. Solubility of ferrous sulfate in different solid lipids was measured, and effects of process variables such as the surfactant type and concentration, homogenization and ultrasonication times, and charge-inducing agent on the particle size, zeta potential, and encapsulation efficiency were determined. Furthermore, in vitro drug release and in vivo pharmacokinetics were studied in rabbits. Results indicated that Fe-SLNs consisted of 3% Compritol 888 ATO, 1% Lecithin, 3% Poloxamer 188, and 0.2% dicetylphosphate, with an average particle size of 25 nm with 92.3% entrapment efficiency. In vivo pharmacokinetic study revealed more than fourfold enhanced bioavailability. In conclusion, Fe-SLNs could be a promising carrier for iron with enhanced oral bioavailability. PMID:25609917

  8. Solid lipid nanoparticles loaded with iron to overcome barriers for treatment of iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Hosny, Khaled Mohamed; Banjar, Zainy Mohammed; Hariri, Amani H; Hassan, Ali Habiballah

    2015-01-01

    According to the World Health Organization, 46% of the world's children suffer from anemia, which is usually treated with iron supplements such as ferrous sulfate. The aim of this study was to prepare iron as solid lipid nanoparticles, in order to find an innovative way for alleviating the disadvantages associated with commercially available tablets. These limitations include adverse effects on the digestive system resulting in constipation and blood in the stool. The second drawback is the high variability in the absorption of iron and thus in its bioavailability. Iron solid lipid nanoparticles (Fe-SLNs) were prepared by hot homogenization/ultrasonication. Solubility of ferrous sulfate in different solid lipids was measured, and effects of process variables such as the surfactant type and concentration, homogenization and ultrasonication times, and charge-inducing agent on the particle size, zeta potential, and encapsulation efficiency were determined. Furthermore, in vitro drug release and in vivo pharmacokinetics were studied in rabbits. Results indicated that Fe-SLNs consisted of 3% Compritol 888 ATO, 1% Lecithin, 3% Poloxamer 188, and 0.2% dicetylphosphate, with an average particle size of 25 nm with 92.3% entrapment efficiency. In vivo pharmacokinetic study revealed more than fourfold enhanced bioavailability. In conclusion, Fe-SLNs could be a promising carrier for iron with enhanced oral bioavailability. PMID:25609917

  9. Comparative In Vitro Study on Magnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for MRI Tracking of Adipose Tissue-Derived Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kasten, Annika; Grüttner, Cordula; Kühn, Jens-Peter; Bader, Rainer; Pasold, Juliane; Frerich, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using measurement of the transverse relaxation time (R2*) is to be considered as a promising approach for cell tracking experiments to evaluate the fate of transplanted progenitor cells and develop successful cell therapies for tissue engineering. While the relationship between core composition of nanoparticles and their MRI properties is well studied, little is known about possible effects on progenitor cells. This in vitro study aims at comparing two magnetic iron oxide nanoparticle types, single vs. multi-core nanoparticles, regarding their physico-chemical characteristics, effects on cellular behavior of adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ASC) like differentiation and proliferation as well as their detection and quantification by means of MRI. Quantification of both nanoparticle types revealed a linear correlation between labeling concentration and R2* values. However, according to core composition, different levels of labeling concentrations were needed to achieve comparable R2* values. Cell viability was not altered for all labeling concentrations, whereas the proliferation rate increased with increasing labeling concentrations. Likewise, deposition of lipid droplets as well as matrix calcification revealed to be highly dose-dependent particularly regarding multi-core nanoparticle-labeled cells. Synthesis of cartilage matrix proteins and mRNA expression of collagen type II was also highly dependent on nanoparticle labeling. In general, the differentiation potential was decreased with increasing labeling concentrations. This in vitro study provides the proof of principle for further in vivo tracking experiments of progenitor cells using nanoparticles with different core compositions but also provides striking evidence that combined testing of biological and MRI properties is advisable as improved MRI properties of multi-core nanoparticles may result in altered cell functions. PMID:25244560

  10. Nanomagnetism of Core-Shell Magnetic Nanoparticles and Application in Spent Nuclear Fuel Separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarsem Singh, Maninder Kaur

    This dissertation presents the study on novel core-shell magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) with unique magnetic properties. Understanding the fundamental physics of antiferromagnetic - ferromagnetic interactions is essential to apply in different applications. Chromium (Cr) doped and undoped core-shell iron/iron-oxide NPs have been synthesized using cluster deposition system and studied with respect to their nanostructures, morphologies, sizes, chemical composition and magnetic properties. The room-temperature magnetic properties of Fe based NPs shows the strong dependence of intra/inter-particle interaction on NP size. The Cr-doped Fe NP shows the origin of sigma-FeCr phase at very low Cr concentration (2 at.%) unlike others reported at high Cr content and interaction reversal from dipolar to exchange interaction. A theoretical model of watermelon is constructed based on the experimental results and core-shell NP system in order to explain the physics of exchange interaction in Cr-doped Fe particles. The magnetic nanoparticle---chelator separation nanotechnology is investigated for spent nuclear fuel recycling and is reported 97% and 80% of extraction for Am(III) and Pu(IV) actinides respectively. If the long-term heat generating actinides such as Am(III) can be efficiently removed from the used fuel raffinates, the volume of material that can be placed in a given amount of repository space can be significantly increased. As it is a simple, versatile, compact, and cost efficient process that minimizes secondary waste and improves storage performance.

  11. Highly Stable Amine Functionalized Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Designed for Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI)

    PubMed Central

    Arami, Hamed; Krishnan, Kannan M.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is a promising medical imaging technology that uses iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) as clinically safe tracers. The core and hydrodynamic size of these NPs determine the signal intensity and spatial resolution in MPI, whilst their monodispersity when preserved during the biomedical applications, generates a consistently high quality MPI image. Using an effective process to coat the synthesized NPs with amine terminated PEG molecules, we show by dynamic light scattering (DLS) that they are water-soluble with long-term stability in biological media such as phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and sodium bicarbonate buffers and Dulbecco’s modified Eagle medium (DMEM) enriched with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS). Further, using magnetic particle spectroscopy (MPS), to measure the particle response function (PRF), defined as the derivative of the magnetization of the nanoparticles, we predict the MPI performance of these nanoparticles at a driving field frequency of 25 kHz. The MPS efficacy of the functionalized nanoparticles was also monitored over time, and both signal intensity and resolution remained unchanged even after seven days of incubation. This is attributed to the dominant contribution of the Néel relaxation mechanism of the monodisperse and highly stable nanoparticles, which was preserved through the incubation period. PMID:25554710

  12. Single-shell carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles: synthesis and high electrocatalytic activity for hydrogen evolution reaction.

    PubMed

    Tavakkoli, Mohammad; Kallio, Tanja; Reynaud, Olivier; Nasibulin, Albert G; Johans, Christoffer; Sainio, Jani; Jiang, Hua; Kauppinen, Esko I; Laasonen, Kari

    2015-04-01

    Efficient hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) through effective and inexpensive electrocatalysts is a valuable approach for clean and renewable energy systems. Here, single-shell carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles (SCEINs) decorated on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are introduced as a novel highly active and durable non-noble-metal catalyst for the HER. This catalyst exhibits catalytic properties superior to previously studied nonprecious materials and comparable to those of platinum. The SCEIN/SWNT is synthesized by a novel fast and low-cost aerosol chemical vapor deposition method in a one-step synthesis. In SCEINs the single carbon layer does not prevent desired access of the reactants to the vicinity of the iron nanoparticles but protects the active metallic core from oxidation. This finding opens new avenues for utilizing active transition metals such as iron in a wide range of applications. PMID:25683139

  13. Magnesium solubility in metallic iron during core formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badro, J.; Siebert, J.; Nimmo, F.

    2015-12-01

    Terrestrial core formation occurred by gravitational segregation of immiscible metal and silicate melts in an extensively molten proto-Earth. This stripped the bulk silicate Earth of most of its siderophile elements, which were concentrated in the core. The process occurs by virtue of partitioning through a redox reaction (e.g. [1]) whereby iron in the metal exchanges for a bonded siderophile element in the mantle. By performing metal-silicate equilibration experiments at extreme pressures and temperatures using the laser-heated diamond anvil cell, we find that the major lithophile component of the silicate Earth, namely MgO, can also become soluble in the metal. At close to 5000 K, our experiments show that up to 1.2 % MgO can be incorporated in the metal. We show that Mg incorporation in the metal isn't a redox reaction as with siderophile element partitioning, but rather a direct solubility of the MgO component as temperatures approach the metal-silicate solvus; in that respect, our results are fully consistent with the recently calculated Fe-MgO solvus [2]. This confirms that significant amounts of magnesium could have been added to the early core, provided that a giant impact had generated the necessary temperature increase. The subsequent exsolution of MgO driven by core cooling would have provided a significant buoyancy source, likely sufficient to drive core convection and producing an ancient magnetic field [3]. [1] J. Wade and B. J. Wood, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 236, 78-95 (2005) [2] S. M. Wahl and B. Militzer, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 410, 25-33 (2015) [3] D. J. Stevenson, DI11C-03, Fall AGU 2012.

  14. Synthesis, characterization, applications, and challenges of iron oxide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Attarad; Zafar, Hira; Zia, Muhammad; ul Haq, Ihsan; Phull, Abdul Rehman; Ali, Joham Sarfraz; Hussain, Altaf

    2016-01-01

    Recently, iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) have attracted much consideration due to their unique properties, such as superparamagnetism, surface-to-volume ratio, greater surface area, and easy separation methodology. Various physical, chemical, and biological methods have been adopted to synthesize magnetic NPs with suitable surface chemistry. This review summarizes the methods for the preparation of iron oxide NPs, size and morphology control, and magnetic properties with recent bioengineering, commercial, and industrial applications. Iron oxides exhibit great potential in the fields of life sciences such as biomedicine, agriculture, and environment. Nontoxic conduct and biocompatible applications of magnetic NPs can be enriched further by special surface coating with organic or inorganic molecules, including surfactants, drugs, proteins, starches, enzymes, antibodies, nucleotides, nonionic detergents, and polyelectrolytes. Magnetic NPs can also be directed to an organ, tissue, or tumor using an external magnetic field for hyperthermic treatment of patients. Keeping in mind the current interest in iron NPs, this review is designed to report recent information from synthesis to characterization, and applications of iron NPs. PMID:27578966

  15. Synthesis, characterization, applications, and challenges of iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ali, Attarad; Zafar, Hira; Zia, Muhammad; Ul Haq, Ihsan; Phull, Abdul Rehman; Ali, Joham Sarfraz; Hussain, Altaf

    2016-01-01

    Recently, iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) have attracted much consideration due to their unique properties, such as superparamagnetism, surface-to-volume ratio, greater surface area, and easy separation methodology. Various physical, chemical, and biological methods have been adopted to synthesize magnetic NPs with suitable surface chemistry. This review summarizes the methods for the preparation of iron oxide NPs, size and morphology control, and magnetic properties with recent bioengineering, commercial, and industrial applications. Iron oxides exhibit great potential in the fields of life sciences such as biomedicine, agriculture, and environment. Nontoxic conduct and biocompatible applications of magnetic NPs can be enriched further by special surface coating with organic or inorganic molecules, including surfactants, drugs, proteins, starches, enzymes, antibodies, nucleotides, nonionic detergents, and polyelectrolytes. Magnetic NPs can also be directed to an organ, tissue, or tumor using an external magnetic field for hyperthermic treatment of patients. Keeping in mind the current interest in iron NPs, this review is designed to report recent information from synthesis to characterization, and applications of iron NPs. PMID:27578966

  16. Effect of surface modification on magnetization of iron oxide nanoparticle colloids.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yuan; Rende, Deniz; Altan, Cem Levent; Bucak, Seyda; Ozisik, Rahmi; Borca-Tasciuc, Diana-Andra

    2012-09-11

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles have numerous applications in the biomedical field, some more mature, such as contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and some emerging, such as heating agents in hyperthermia for cancer therapy. In all of these applications, the magnetic particles are coated with surfactants and polymers to enhance biocompatibility, prevent agglomeration, and add functionality. However, the coatings may interact with the surface atoms of the magnetic core and form a magnetically disordered layer, reducing the total amount of the magnetic phase, which is the key parameter in many applications. In the current study, amine and carboxyl functionalized and bare iron oxide nanoparticles, all suspended in water, were purchased and characterized. The presence of the coatings in commercial samples was verified with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The class of iron oxide (magnetite) was verified via Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. In addition to these, in-house prepared iron oxide nanoparticles coated with oleic acid and suspended in heptane and hexane were also investigated. The saturation magnetization obtained from vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) measurements was used to determine the effective concentration of magnetic phase in all samples. The Tiron chelation test was then utilized to check the real concentration of the iron oxide in the suspension. The difference between the concentration results from VSM and the Tiron test confirmed the reduction of magnetic phase of magnetic core in the presence of coatings and different suspension media. For the biocompatible coatings, the largest reduction was experienced by amine particles, where the ratio of the effective weight of magnetic phase reported to the real weight was 0.5. Carboxyl-coated samples experienced smaller reduction with a ratio of 0.64. Uncoated sample also exhibits a reduction with a ratio of 0.6. Oleic acid covered samples show a solvent

  17. Design of Super-Paramagnetic Core-Shell Nanoparticles for Enhanced Performance of Inverted Polymer Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo, Johny; Boudouris, Bryan W; Barrero, César A; Jaramillo, Franklin

    2015-11-18

    Controlling the nature and transfer of excited states in organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices is of critical concern due to the fact that exciton transport and separation can dictate the final performance of the system. One effective method to accomplish improved charge separation in organic electronic materials is to control the spin state of the photogenerated charge-carrying species. To this end, nanoparticles with unique iron oxide (Fe3O4) cores and zinc oxide (ZnO) shells were synthesized in a controlled manner. Then, the structural and magnetic properties of these core-shell nanoparticles (Fe3O4@ZnO) were tuned to ensure superior performance when they were incorporated into the active layers of OPV devices. Specifically, small loadings of the core-shell nanoparticles were blended with the previously well-characterized OPV active layer of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM). Upon addition of the core-shell nanoparticles, the performance of the OPV devices was increased up to 25% relative to P3HT-PCBM active layer devices that contained no nanoparticles; this increase was a direct result of an increase in the short-circuit current densities of the devices. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that the increase in photocurrent was not due to enhanced absorption of the active layer due to the presence of the Fe3O4@ZnO core-shell nanoparticles. In fact, this increase in device performance occurred because of the presence of the superparamagnetic Fe3O4 in the core of the nanoparticles as incorporation of ZnO only nanoparticles did not alter the device performance. Importantly, however, the ZnO shell of the nanoparticles mitigated the negative optical effect of Fe3O4, which have been observed previously. This allowed the core-shell nanoparticles to outperform bare Fe3O4 nanoparticles when the single-layer nanoparticles were incorporated into the active layer of OPV devices. As such, the new materials described here present a

  18. Synthesis and characterization of metal-carbon core-shell nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, He

    Superparamagnetic nanoparticles have been actively investigated as the contrast agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) since the last decade owing to their relatively high magnetic susceptibility, longer retention in the blood stream and better toxicity profile compared to gadolinium-based contrast agents. Most research in this regard has been focused on iron oxides primarily because nanoparticles made of materials that have higher saturation magnetization are usually prone to degradation due to oxidation and are difficult to retain under ambient conditions. Attempts to preserve the high saturation magnetization phases have been made through passivating the surface of the nanoparticles with Au or oxides. However, these approaches are not very effective. In this work, the synthesis, structures, compositions, magnetic properties and potential applications of some metallic nanoparticles, stabilized with protective graphitic carbons, have been studied. Fe, Co, FexCo(1-x) and AuxFe (1-x) alloy nanoparticles encapsulated by graphitic carbon are synthesized by chemical vapor deposition. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) reveals that the nanoparticles are mostly about 10 nm in diameter and each nanoparticle is enclosed by at least one layer of graphitic carbon. Phase identification by high resolution TEM indicates the metallic phases were indeed obtained and preserved, even after three years of exposure to ambient conditions. The Fe-containing nanoparticles were found to be either BCC or FCC or Fe 3C, the Co nanoparticles being FCC, the FexCo(1-x) (0.1 < x < 0.6) nanoparticles being BCC alloys and AuxFe (1-x) (0.2 < x < 0.8) nanoparticles being FCC alloys. Energy dispersive spectrometry analysis of the Au0.67Fe0.33 nanoparticles indicates the composition of nanoparticles is consistent with the molar ratio of metal precursors, while quantitative EELS analysis suggest that the composition distribution of FexCo(1-x) rather wide. Preliminary Energy-Filtered TEM

  19. Exchange bias in Core-Shell Iron-Iron Oxide Nanoclusters

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Maninder; McCloy, John S.; Qiang, You

    2013-04-03

    An exchange bias study has been performed on core-shell iron-iron oxide (Fe-Fe3O4) nanoclusters (NCs) of size 11 nm and 14 nm carrying a different core to shell ratio. NCs show complicated behaviors due to competition between interfacial exchange and Zeeman energy in the presence of magnetic field during cooling. These behaviors are accompanied by the evolution of size- dependent cluster structures in the ferromagnetic-core/ferri- or antiferro-magnetic-shell. Smaller clusters have larger coercive field, exchange bias field, and vertical magnetization shift due to the greater contribution from frozen spins of shell/interfaces. These smaller clusters thus also show more dramatic changes with the training effect. Both sizes of clusters display an additional anomaly of the upper part of the hysteresis loop at 10 K under low cooling field (0.1 kOe). This anomaly decreases with number of loop cycles with same field, and disappear with large cooling field (> 0.1 kOe). It may be caused by the competition between the magnetization reversal and the magnetostatic interactions.

  20. Chondroitin sulfate-capped super-paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as potential carriers of doxorubicin hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Mallick, Neha; Anwar, Mohammed; Asfer, Mohammed; Mehdi, Syed Hassan; Rizvi, Mohammed Moshahid Alam; Panda, Amulya Kumar; Talegaonkar, Sushama; Ahmad, Farhan Jalees

    2016-10-20

    Chondroitin-4-sulfate (CS), a glycosaminoglycan, was used to prepare CS-capped super-paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, which were further employed for loading a water-soluble chemotherapeutic agent (doxorubicin hydrochloride, DOX). CS-capped SPIONs have potential biomedical application in cancer targeting. The optimized formulation had a hydrodynamic size of 91.2±0.8nm (PDI; 0.228±0.004) and zeta potential of -49.1±1.66mV. DOX was loaded onto the formulation up to 2% (w/w) by physical interaction with CS. TEM showed nano-sized particles having a core-shell structure. XRD confirmed crystal phase of iron oxide. FT-IR conceived the interaction of iron oxide with CS as bidentate chelation and also confirmed DOX loading. Vibration sample magnetometry confirmed super-paramagnetic nature of nanoparticles, with saturation magnetization of 0.238emug(-1). In vitro release profile at pH 7.4 showed that 96.67% of DOX was released within 24h (first order kinetics). MTT assay in MCF7 cells showed significantly higher (p<0.0001) cytotoxicity for DOX in SPIONs than DOX solution (IC50 values 6.294±0.4169 and 11.316±0.1102μgmL(-1), respectively). PMID:27474599

  1. Effective delivery of immunosuppressive drug molecules by silica coated iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jangsun; Lee, Eunwon; Kim, Jieun; Seo, Youngmin; Lee, Kwan Hong; Hong, Jong Wook; Gilad, Assaf A; Park, Hansoo; Choi, Jonghoon

    2016-06-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles have been used in a wide range of biomedical applications, including drug delivery, molecular imaging, and cellular imaging. Various surface modifications have been applied to the particles to stabilize their surface and to give them a moiety for anchoring tags and/or drug molecules. Conventional methods of delivering immunosuppressant drugs often require a high dose of drugs to ensure therapeutic effects, but this can lead to toxic side effects. In this study, we used silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles (IOSs) for a drug delivery application in which the nanoparticles carry the minimum amount of drug required to be effective to the target cells. IOSs could be loaded with water-insoluble immunosuppressive drug molecules (MPA: mycophenolic acid) and be used as a contrast agent for MRI. We characterized the IOSs for their physicochemical properties and found their average hydrodynamic diameter and core size to be 40.5nm and 5nm, respectively. Following the introduction of MPA-loaded IOSs (IOS/M), we evaluated the secretion dynamics of cytokines from peripheral blood mononuclear cells stimulated with phytohemagglutinin (PHA). The results showed that IOS/M effectively inhibited the secretion of the cytokines interleukin-2 and tumor necrosis factor α, with a minimal concentration of MPA. In conclusion, IOS/M may have potential applications in both efficient drug delivery and MRI. PMID:26966999

  2. Characterization of insoluble nanoparticles in Antarctic ice cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, A.; Edwards, R.; Van Riessen, A.; Saunders, M.; Smith, A. M.; Curran, M. A.; Goodwin, I. D.; Feiteng, W.

    2013-12-01

    Insoluble nanoparticles in the form of aerosols have significant effects on climate and biogeochemical cycles. Records of these aerosols are essential for understanding paleoclimate forcing and future climate change. These particles and their precursors are emitted to the atmosphere from a variety of primary and secondary sources including biomass burning as well as biogenic, anthropogenic, volcanic, extraterrestrial, and terrestrial mineral emissions. While a large body of research exists with respect to mineral dust particles (on the micrometer scale) derived from ice and sediment cores, very little is known with regards to the history of insoluble particles on the nano scale. Ice core records are the only reliable way to study the past history of these particles. Here, we will present new data regarding the physical and chemical properties of nanoparticles found in ice cores from East Antarctica.

  3. Iron and iron oxide nanoparticles obtained by ultra-short laser ablation in liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Bonis, A.; Lovaglio, T.; Galasso, A.; Santagata, A.; Teghil, R.

    2015-10-01

    Laser ablation of an iron target in water and acetone has been carried out using a frequency doubled Nd:glass laser source (pulse duration of 250 fs and frequency repetition rate of 10 Hz). The observation of the nanostructures formed in the laser irradiated region of the metallic target and fast shadowgraphic analysis of the laser induced cavitation bubble have been performed in order to correlate the size distribution of the obtained nanoparticles to the dynamics of the ablation process. The composition, morphology and oxidation state of the synthesized nanoproducts have been investigated by XPS (X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy), TEM (Transmission Electron Microscopy) and microRaman spectroscopy. The experimental data support a relationship between the nanoparticles size distribution and the femtosecond laser ablation mechanism, while the chemical and structural characteristics of the nanoparticles can be tuned by varying the liquid medium.

  4. Thermal and magnetic properties of chitosan-iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Soares, Paula I P; Machado, Diana; Laia, César; Pereira, Laura C J; Coutinho, Joana T; Ferreira, Isabel M M; Novo, Carlos M M; Borges, João Paulo

    2016-09-20

    Chitosan is a biopolymer widely used for biomedical applications such as drug delivery systems, wound healing, and tissue engineering. Chitosan can be used as coating for other types of materials such as iron oxide nanoparticles, improving its biocompatibility while extending its range of applications. In this work iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe3O4 NPs) produced by chemical precipitation and thermal decomposition and coated with chitosan with different molecular weights were studied. Basic characterization on bare and chitosan-Fe3O4 NPs was performed demonstrating that chitosan does not affect the crystallinity, chemical composition, and superparamagnetic properties of the Fe3O4 NPs, and also the incorporation of Fe3O4 NPs into chitosan nanoparticles increases the later hydrodynamic diameter without compromising its physical and chemical properties. The nano-composite was tested for magnetic hyperthermia by applying an alternating current magnetic field to the samples demonstrating that the heating ability of the Fe3O4 NPs was not significantly affected by chitosan. PMID:27261762

  5. Characterization of oxidation resistant Fe@M (M=Cr, Ni) core@shell nanoparticles prepared by a modified reverse micelle reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naik, Sweta H.; Carroll, Kyler J.; Carpenter, Everett E.

    2011-04-01

    Iron-based nanoparticles are the forerunners in the field of nanotechnology due to their high magnetization saturation and biocompability which affords them use in a variety of applications. However, iron-based nanoparticles, due to a high surface-to-volume ratio, suffer from oxidation and limit its practicality by lowering the magnetic moment significantly. To avoid this oxidation, the surfaces of the particles have to be passivated. One such way to accomplish this passivation is to synthesize core@shell nanoparticles that have a surface treatment of chromium or nickel. These core@shell nanoparticles have been synthesized using a reverse micelle technique. The Cr and Ni passivated iron nanoparticles were characterized by x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, vibrating sample magnetometry, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to determine their phase, morphology, surface properties, and magnetization saturation. A high magnetization saturation of 160 and 165 emu/g for Cr and Ni passivated iron core@shell nanoparticles was achieved.

  6. Surfactant templating effects on the encapsulation of iron oxide nanoparticles within silica microspheres.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Tonghua; Pang, Jiebin; Tan, Grace; He, Jibao; McPherson, Gary L; Lu, Yunfeng; John, Vijay T; Zhan, Jingjing

    2007-04-24

    Hollow silica microspheres encapsulating ferromagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles were synthesized by a surfactant-aided aerosol process and subsequent treatment. The cationic surfactant cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) played an essential role in directing the structure of the composite. Translation from mesoporous silica particles to hollow particles was a consequence of increased loading of ferric species in the precursor solution and the competitive partitioning of CTAB between silicate and ferric colloids. The hypothesis was that CTAB preferentially adsorbed onto more positively charged ferric colloids under acidic conditions. At a critical Fe/Si ratio, most of the CTAB was adsorbed onto ferric colloids and coagulated the colloids to form larger clusters. During the aerosol process, a silica shell was first formed due to the preferred silicate condensation on the gas-liquid interface of the aerosol droplet. Subsequent drying concentrated the ferric clusters inside the silica shell and resulted in a silica shell/ferric core particle. Thermal treatment of the core shell particle led to encapsulation of a single iron oxide nanoparticle inside each silica hollow microsphere. PMID:17397201

  7. Development of a lauric acid/albumin hybrid iron oxide nanoparticle system with improved biocompatibility

    PubMed Central

    Zaloga, Jan; Janko, Christina; Nowak, Johannes; Matuszak, Jasmin; Knaup, Sabine; Eberbeck, Dietmar; Tietze, Rainer; Unterweger, Harald; Friedrich, Ralf P; Duerr, Stephan; Heimke-Brinck, Ralph; Baum, Eva; Cicha, Iwona; Dörje, Frank; Odenbach, Stefan; Lyer, Stefan; Lee, Geoffrey; Alexiou, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    The promising potential of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) in various nanomedical applications has been frequently reported. However, although many different synthesis methods, coatings, and functionalization techniques have been described, not many core-shell SPION drug delivery systems are available for clinicians at the moment. Here, bovine serum albumin was adsorbed onto lauric acid-stabilized SPIONs. The agglomeration behavior, zeta potential, and their dependence on the synthesis conditions were characterized with dynamic light scattering. The existence and composition of the core-shell-matrix structure was investigated by transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and zeta potential measurements. We showed that the iron oxide cores form agglomerates in the range of 80 nm. Moreover, despite their remarkably low tendency to aggregate even in a complex media like whole blood, the SPIONs still maintained their magnetic properties and were well attractable with a magnet. The magnetic properties were quantified by vibrating sample magnetometry and a superconducting quantum interference device. Using flow cytometry, we further investigated the effects of the different types of nanoparticle coating on morphology, viability, and DNA integrity of Jurkat cells. We showed that by addition of bovine serum albumin, the toxicity of nanoparticles is greatly reduced. We also investigated the effect of the particles on the growth of primary human endothelial cells to further demonstrate the biocompatibility of the particles. As proof of principle, we showed that the hybrid-coated particles are able to carry payloads of up to 800 μg/mL of the cytostatic drug mitoxantrone while still staying colloidally stable. The drug-loaded system exhibited excellent therapeutic potential in vitro, exceeding that of free mitoxantrone. In conclusion, we have synthesized a biocompatible ferrofluid that shows great potential for clinical

  8. Development of a lauric acid/albumin hybrid iron oxide nanoparticle system with improved biocompatibility.

    PubMed

    Zaloga, Jan; Janko, Christina; Nowak, Johannes; Matuszak, Jasmin; Knaup, Sabine; Eberbeck, Dietmar; Tietze, Rainer; Unterweger, Harald; Friedrich, Ralf P; Duerr, Stephan; Heimke-Brinck, Ralph; Baum, Eva; Cicha, Iwona; Dörje, Frank; Odenbach, Stefan; Lyer, Stefan; Lee, Geoffrey; Alexiou, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    The promising potential of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) in various nanomedical applications has been frequently reported. However, although many different synthesis methods, coatings, and functionalization techniques have been described, not many core-shell SPION drug delivery systems are available for clinicians at the moment. Here, bovine serum albumin was adsorbed onto lauric acid-stabilized SPIONs. The agglomeration behavior, zeta potential, and their dependence on the synthesis conditions were characterized with dynamic light scattering. The existence and composition of the core-shell-matrix structure was investigated by transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and zeta potential measurements. We showed that the iron oxide cores form agglomerates in the range of 80 nm. Moreover, despite their remarkably low tendency to aggregate even in a complex media like whole blood, the SPIONs still maintained their magnetic properties and were well attractable with a magnet. The magnetic properties were quantified by vibrating sample magnetometry and a superconducting quantum interference device. Using flow cytometry, we further investigated the effects of the different types of nanoparticle coating on morphology, viability, and DNA integrity of Jurkat cells. We showed that by addition of bovine serum albumin, the toxicity of nanoparticles is greatly reduced. We also investigated the effect of the particles on the growth of primary human endothelial cells to further demonstrate the biocompatibility of the particles. As proof of principle, we showed that the hybrid-coated particles are able to carry payloads of up to 800 μg/mL of the cytostatic drug mitoxantrone while still staying colloidally stable. The drug-loaded system exhibited excellent therapeutic potential in vitro, exceeding that of free mitoxantrone. In conclusion, we have synthesized a biocompatible ferrofluid that shows great potential for clinical

  9. Theranostic nanoparticles based on bioreducible polyethylenimine-coated iron oxide for reduction-responsive gene delivery and magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dan; Tang, Xin; Pulli, Benjamin; Lin, Chao; Zhao, Peng; Cheng, Jian; Lv, Zhongwei; Yuan, Xueyu; Luo, Qiong; Cai, Haidong; Ye, Meng

    2014-01-01

    Theranostic nanoparticles based on superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) have a great promise for tumor diagnosis and gene therapy. However, the availability of theranostic nanoparticles with efficient gene transfection and minimal toxicity remains a big challenge. In this study, we construct an intelligent SPIO-based nanoparticle comprising a SPIO inner core and a disulfide-containing polyethylenimine (SSPEI) outer layer, which is referred to as a SSPEI-SPIO nanoparticle, for redox-triggered gene release in response to an intracellular reducing environment. We reveal that SSPEI-SPIO nanoparticles are capable of binding genes to form nano-complexes and mediating a facilitated gene release in the presence of dithiothreitol (5–20 mM), thereby leading to high transfection efficiency against different cancer cells. The SSPEI-SPIO nanoparticles are also able to deliver small interfering RNA (siRNA) for the silencing of human telomerase reverse transcriptase genes in HepG2 cells, causing their apoptosis and growth inhibition. Further, the nanoparticles are applicable as T2-negative contrast agents for magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of a tumor xenografted in a nude mouse. Importantly, SSPEI-SPIO nanoparticles have relatively low cytotoxicity in vitro at a high concentration of 100 μg/mL. The results of this study demonstrate the utility of a disulfide-containing cationic polymer-decorated SPIO nanoparticle as highly potent and low-toxic theranostic nano-system for specific nucleic acid delivery inside cancer cells. PMID:25045265

  10. Microbial Synthesis of Iron Sulfide (FeS) and Iron Carbonate (FeCO3) Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yumi; Lee, Yuri; Roh, Yul

    2015-08-01

    This study examined mineral transformations during anoxic bioreduction of iron hydroxide and iron oxyhydroxysulfate found in acid mine drainage (AMD) into iron sulfide (FeS) and siderite (FeCO3) nanoparticles. Glucose (10 mM) was inoculated into AMD to stimulate indigenous bacterial growth for bioreduction of Fe(III)-containing minerals. Changes in microbial, geochemical, and mineralogical characteristics were monitored via 16S rRNA, XRD, SEM-EDX, TEM-EDX, ICP-AES, and IC analyses. The AMD was found to be rich in elements, including Fe, Al, Mn, Na, and S (SO4), and had a pH of 5.2. The mineral contents mainly consisted of Fe(III)-containing minerals, such as schwertmannite [Fe8O8 (OH)8-2x(SO4)x · nH2O] and akaganeite [β-FeO(OH)]. During anoxic bioreduction of AMD, the Fe(III)-containing minerals were transformed by indigenous iron-reducing bacteria (e.g., Geobactersp.) into Fe(II)-containing minerals, such as iron sulfide (FeS) and iron carbonate, siderite (FeCO3), within 3-4 days. The microbially-formed iron sulfide (FeS) and siderite (FeCO3) were of 40-60 nm and 10 nm-3 µm in size, respectively. These results not only show that indigenous iron-reducing bacteria in AMD can aid or accelerate formation of Fe(II)-containing minerals when under anoxic environments, but can also offer a simple method for microbial synthesis of nano-sized Fe(II)-containing minerals that can be used as catalysts for environmental remediation by recycling AMD. PMID:26369153

  11. Reduced aggregation and sedimentation of zero-valent iron nanoparticles in the presence of guar gum.

    PubMed

    Tiraferri, Alberto; Chen, Kai Loon; Sethi, Rajandrea; Elimelech, Menachem

    2008-08-01

    Injection of nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI) is potentially a promising technology for remediation of contaminated groundwaters. However, the efficiency of this process is significantly hindered by the rapid aggregation of the iron nanoparticles. The aim of this study was to enhance the colloidal stability of the nanoparticles through the addition of the "green" polymer guar gum. We evaluated the properties of guar gum and its influence on the surface properties, particle size, aggregation, and sedimentation of iron nanoparticles. Commercial iron nanoparticles were dispersed in guar gum solutions, and their aggregation and sedimentation behaviors were compared to those of bare iron nanoparticles and commercial nanoparticles modified with a biodegradable polymer (polyaspartate). High performance size exclusion chromatography, charge titration, and viscosity assessment showed that guar gum is a high molecular weight polymer which is nearly neutrally charged, rendering it suitable for steric stabilization of the iron nanoparticles. Electrophoretic mobility measurements demonstrated the ability of guar gum to adsorb on the nanoparticles, forming a slightly negatively charged layer. Dynamic light scattering experiments were conducted to estimate the particle size of the different nanoparticle suspensions and to determine the aggregation behavior at different ionic strengths. Guar gum effectively reduced the hydrodynamic radius of the bare nanoparticles from 500 nm to less than 200 nm and prevented aggregation of the nanoparticles even at very high salt concentrations (0.5 M NaCl and 3 mM CaCl(2)). Sedimentation profiles of the different nanoparticle suspensions confirmed the improved stability of the iron nanoparticles in the presence of guar gum. The results strongly suggest that guar gum can be used to effectively deliver stabilized zero-valent iron nanoparticles for remediation of contaminated groundwater aquifers. PMID:18508073

  12. Experimental determination of the electrical resistivity of iron at Earth’s core conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Kenji; Kuwayama, Yasuhiro; Hirose, Kei; Shimizu, Katsuya; Ohishi, Yasuo

    2016-06-01

    Earth continuously generates a dipole magnetic field in its convecting liquid outer core by a self-sustained dynamo action. Metallic iron is a dominant component of the outer core, so its electrical and thermal conductivity controls the dynamics and thermal evolution of Earth’s core. However, in spite of extensive research, the transport properties of iron under core conditions are still controversial. Since free electrons are a primary carrier of both electric current and heat, the electron scattering mechanism in iron under high pressure and temperature holds the key to understanding the transport properties of planetary cores. Here we measure the electrical resistivity (the reciprocal of electrical conductivity) of iron at the high temperatures (up to 4,500 kelvin) and pressures (megabars) of Earth’s core in a laser-heated diamond-anvil cell. The value measured for the resistivity of iron is even lower than the value extrapolated from high-pressure, low-temperature data using the Bloch–Grüneisen law, which considers only the electron–phonon scattering. This shows that the iron resistivity is strongly suppressed by the resistivity saturation effect at high temperatures. The low electrical resistivity of iron indicates the high thermal conductivity of Earth’s core, suggesting rapid core cooling and a young inner core less than 0.7 billion years old. Therefore, an abrupt increase in palaeomagnetic field intensity around 1.3 billion years ago may not be related to the birth of the inner core.

  13. Experimental determination of the electrical resistivity of iron at Earth's core conditions.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Kenji; Kuwayama, Yasuhiro; Hirose, Kei; Shimizu, Katsuya; Ohishi, Yasuo

    2016-06-01

    Earth continuously generates a dipole magnetic field in its convecting liquid outer core by a self-sustained dynamo action. Metallic iron is a dominant component of the outer core, so its electrical and thermal conductivity controls the dynamics and thermal evolution of Earth's core. However, in spite of extensive research, the transport properties of iron under core conditions are still controversial. Since free electrons are a primary carrier of both electric current and heat, the electron scattering mechanism in iron under high pressure and temperature holds the key to understanding the transport properties of planetary cores. Here we measure the electrical resistivity (the reciprocal of electrical conductivity) of iron at the high temperatures (up to 4,500 kelvin) and pressures (megabars) of Earth's core in a laser-heated diamond-anvil cell. The value measured for the resistivity of iron is even lower than the value extrapolated from high-pressure, low-temperature data using the Bloch-Grüneisen law, which considers only the electron-phonon scattering. This shows that the iron resistivity is strongly suppressed by the resistivity saturation effect at high temperatures. The low electrical resistivity of iron indicates the high thermal conductivity of Earth's core, suggesting rapid core cooling and a young inner core less than 0.7 billion years old. Therefore, an abrupt increase in palaeomagnetic field intensity around 1.3 billion years ago may not be related to the birth of the inner core. PMID:27251282

  14. Iron oxide nanoparticles as drug delivery agents in MIA PaCa-2 pancreatic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, Christopher; Randriamahefa, Alexandrine; Lokko, Carl; Evans, Whitney; Watkins, Julian; Carrell, Holly; King, Natalie; Patel, Darayas

    2007-02-01

    Oleic acid (OA)-Pluronic-coated iron oxide nanoparticles were synthesized and characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). FT-IR confirmed the bonding of oleic acid and Pluronic (surfactant) to the nanoparticles. AFM measurements on these nanoparticles indicated a root mean square (RMS) roughness, a measure of nanoparticle size of (50 +/- 20) nm. The efficiency of these functionalized nanoparticles was investigated by loading with 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) in aqueous solution. AFM measurements were used to characterize modified iron oxide nanoparticles and pancreatic MIA PaCa-2 cells, including size distribution, stability and cellular uptake. Nanoparticles were added to MIA PaCa-2 cells and assayed for their cytotoxic effects after 24 and 48 hours. The outcome of this study demonstrated the effectiveness of oleic acid (OA)-Pluronic-coated iron oxide nanoparticles as a non-toxic drug delivery agent for pancreatic cancer.

  15. Conquering the Dark Side: Colloidal Iron Oxide Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Senpan, Angana; Caruthers, Shelton D.; Rhee, Ilsu; Mauro, Nicholas A.; Pan, Dipanjan; Hu, Grace; Scott, Michael J.; Fuhrhop, Ralph W.; Gaffney, Patrick J.; Wickline, Samuel A.; Lanza, Gregory M.

    2009-01-01

    Nanomedicine approaches to atherosclerotic disease will have significant impact on the practice and outcomes of cardiovascular medicine. Iron oxide nanoparticles have been extensively used for nontargeted and targeted imaging applications based upon highly sensitive T2* imaging properties, which typically result in negative contrast effects that can only be imaged 24 or more hours after systemic administration due to persistent blood pool interference. Although recent advances involving MR pulse sequences have converted these dark contrast voxels into bright ones, the marked delays in imaging from persistent magnetic background interference and prominent dipole blooming effects of the magnetic susceptibility remain barriers to overcome. We report a T1-weighted (T1w) theranostic colloidal iron oxide nanoparticle platform, CION, which is achieved by entrapping oleate-coated magnetite particles within a cross-linked phospholipid nanoemulsion. Contrary to expectations, this formulation decreased T2 effects thus allowing positive T1w contrast detection down to low nanomolar concentrations. CION, a vascular constrained nanoplatform administered in vivo permitted T1w molecular imaging 1 hour after treatment without blood pool interference, although some T2 shortening effects on blood, induced by the superparamagnetic particles persisted. Moreover, CION was shown to encapsulate antiangiogenic drugs, like fumagillin, and retained them under prolonged dissolution, suggesting significant theranostic functionality. Overall, CION is a platform technology, developed with generally recognized as safe components, that overcomes the temporal and spatial imaging challenges associated with current iron oxide nanoparticle T2 imaging agents, and which has theranostic potential in vascular diseases for detecting unstable ruptured plaque or treating atherosclerotic angiogenesis. PMID:19908850

  16. Magnetically nonlinear and anisotropic iron core model of synchronous reluctance motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Štumberger, G.; Štumberger, B.; Dolinar, D.

    2003-01-01

    The magnetically nonlinear and anisotropic iron core model of a synchronous reluctance motor (SRM) is presented. The iron core model is given by the current-dependent flux linkages and their partial derivatives. It is included in a dynamic SRM model and confirmed through the comparison of measured and calculated results in the case of current-controlled linear synchronous reluctance servomotor.

  17. Iron-rich Oxides at the Core-mantle Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wicks, J. K.; Jackson, J. M.; Sturhahn, W.; Bower, D. J.; Zhuravlev, K. K.; Prakapenka, V.

    2013-12-01

    Seismic observations near the base of the core-mantle boundary (CMB) have detected 5-20 km thick patches in which the seismic wave velocities are reduced by up to 30%. These ultra-low velocity zones (ULVZs) have been interpreted as aggregates of partially molten material (e.g. Williams and Garnero 1996, Hernlund and Jellinek, 2010) or as solid, iron-enriched residues (e.g. Knittle and Jeanloz, 1991; Mao et al., 2006; Wicks et al., 2010), typically based on proposed sources of velocity reduction. The stabilities of these structure types have been explored through dynamic models that have assembled a relationship between ULVZ stability and density (Hernlund and Tackley, 2007; Bower et al., 2010). Now, to constrain the chemistry and mineralogy of ULVZs, more information is needed on the relationship between density and sound velocity of candidate phases. We present the pressure-volume-temperature equation of state of (Mg0.06 57Fe0.94)O determined up to pressures of 120 GPa and temperatures of 2000 K. Volume was measured with X-ray diffraction at beamline 13-ID-D of the Advanced Photon Source (APS), where high pressures and temperatures are achieved in a diamond anvil cell with in-situ laser heating. Sample assemblies were prepared using dehydrated NaCl as an insulator and neon as a pressure transmitting medium. We present results with and without iron as a buffer and thermal pressure gauge. We have also determined the room temperature Debye velocity (VD) of (Mg0.06 57Fe0.94)O using nuclear resonant inelastic x-ray scattering and in-situ X-ray diffraction, up to 80 GPa at 3-ID-B of the APS. The effect of the electronic environment of the iron sites on the velocities was tracked in-situ using synchrotron Moessbauer spectroscopy. Using our measured equation of state, the seismically relevant compressional (VP) and shear (VS) wave velocities were calculated from the Debye velocities. We combine these studies with a simple mixing model to predict the properties of a solid

  18. Dietary Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Delay Aging and Ameliorate Neurodegeneration in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Wang, Zhuyao; Li, Xiaojiao; Wang, Lu; Yin, Min; Wang, Lihua; Chen, Nan; Fan, Chunhai; Song, Haiyun

    2016-02-17

    Dietary iron oxide nanoparticles are shown to ameliorate neurodegeneration in a Drosophelia Alzheimer's disease model. Iron oxide nanoparticles can mimic catalase and can decompose reactive oxygen species (ROS). This has potential therapeutic uses for aging, metabolic disorders, and neurodegenerative diseases, in which increased production of ROS is closely implicated. PMID:26643597

  19. Recovery of Iron/Iron Oxide Nanoparticles from Solution: Comparison of Methods and their Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Nurmi, James; Sarathy, Vaishnavi; Tratnyek, P. G.; Baer, Donald R.; Amonette, James E.; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.

    2011-05-15

    Most methods currently being used to recover Fe0-core/oxide-shell nanoparticles from solutions (including the solvents they are synthesized or stored in) are potentially problematic because they may alter the particle composition (e.g., depositing salts formed from solutes) or leave the particles prone to transformations during subsequent storage and handling (e.g., due to residual moisture). In this study, several methods for recovery of nanoparticles from aqueous solution were studied to determine how they affect the structure and reactivity of the recovered materials. Simple washing of the nanoparticles during vacuum filtration (i.e., “flash drying”) can leave up to ~17 weight percent residual moisture. Modeling calculations suggest this moisture is mostly capillary or matric water held between particles and particle aggregates, which can be removed by drying for short periods at relative vapor pressures below 0.9. Flash drying followed by vacuum drying, all under N2, leaves no detectable residue from precipitation of solutes (detectable by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, XPS), no significant changes in overall particle composition or structure (determined by transmission electron microscopy, TEM), and negligible residual moisture (by thermogravimetric analysis, TGA). While this improved flash-drying protocol may be the preferred method for recovering nanoparticles for many purposes, we found that Fe0-core/oxide-shell nanoparticles still exhibit gradual aging during storage when characterized electrochemically with voltammetry.

  20. Genotoxicity of Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles in Granulosa Cells.

    PubMed

    Pöttler, Marina; Staicu, Andreas; Zaloga, Jan; Unterweger, Harald; Weigel, Bianca; Schreiber, Eveline; Hofmann, Simone; Wiest, Irmi; Jeschke, Udo; Alexiou, Christoph; Janko, Christina

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles that are aimed at targeting cancer cells, but sparing healthy tissue provide an attractive platform of implementation for hyperthermia or as carriers of chemotherapeutics. According to the literature, diverse effects of nanoparticles relating to mammalian reproductive tissue are described. To address the impact of nanoparticles on cyto- and genotoxicity concerning the reproductive system, we examined the effect of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) on granulosa cells, which are very important for ovarian function and female fertility. Human granulosa cells (HLG-5) were treated with SPIONs, either coated with lauric acid (SEONLA) only, or additionally with a protein corona of bovine serum albumin (BSA; SEON(LA-BSA)), or with dextran (SEON(DEX)). Both micronuclei testing and the detection of γH2A.X revealed no genotoxic effects of SEON(LA-BSA), SEON(DEX) or SEON(LA). Thus, it was demonstrated that different coatings of SPIONs improve biocompatibility, especially in terms of genotoxicity towards cells of the reproductive system. PMID:26540051

  1. Phase relations in iron-rich systems and implications for the earth's core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, William W.; Svendsen, Bob; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1987-01-01

    Recent experimental data concerning the properties of iron, iron sulfide, and iron oxide at high pressures are combined with theoretical arguments to constrain the probable behavior of the Fe-rich portions of the Fe-O and Fe-S phase diagrams. Phase diagrams are constructed for the Fe-S-O system at core pressures and temperatures. These properties are used to evaluate the current temperature distribution and composition of the core.

  2. Synthesis, purification and assembly of gold and iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Penghe

    , 6 & 7), nanoparticles were assembled into three different hierachical structures through both template-assisted and template-free approaches. In the template-assisted assembly, gold nanorods were aligned into ordered 1D linear pattern by using soft biological filamentous, namely bacteria flagella, as templates. Two different ways of assembling nanorods onto flagella were investigated. In another study, a highly commercialized polymer, polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), was discovered for the first time to be able to self-assemble into branched hollow fibers. Based on this discovery, two approaches (one through direct deposition of silica onto the PVP aggregate and the other through co-assembly of PVP covered gold nanoparticles with free PVP molecules) by which the self-assembly behavior of PVP could be exploited to template the formation of branched hollow inorganic fibers were demonstrated. In the template-free assembly, a general method for assembling nanoparticle into clusters (NPCs) in an oil-in-water emulsion system was investigated. Detailed studies on the mechanism of formation of NPCs structure, optimized conditions, scalable production and surface chemistry manipulation were carried out. Besides, comparison of the properties of individual and clustered iron oxide nanoparticles was conducted. It was discovered that due to their collective properties, NPCs are more responsive to an external magnetic field and can potentially serve as better contrast enhancement agents than individually dispersed magnetic NPs in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI).

  3. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as radiosensitizer via enhanced reactive oxygen species formation.

    PubMed

    Klein, Stefanie; Sommer, Anja; Distel, Luitpold V R; Neuhuber, Winfried; Kryschi, Carola

    2012-08-24

    Internalization of citrate-coated and uncoated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles by human breast cancer (MCF-7) cells was verified by transmission electron microscopy imaging. Cytotoxicity studies employing metabolic and trypan blue assays manifested their excellent biocompatibility. The production of reactive oxygen species in iron oxide nanoparticle loaded MCF-7 cells was explained to originate from both, the release of iron ions and their catalytically active surfaces. Both initiate the Fenton and Haber-Weiss reaction. Additional oxidative stress caused by X-ray irradiation of MCF-7 cells was attributed to the increase of catalytically active iron oxide nanoparticle surfaces. PMID:22842461

  4. New surface radiolabeling schemes of super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) for biodistribution studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nallathamby, Prakash D.; Mortensen, Ninell P.; Palko, Heather A.; Malfatti, Mike; Smith, Catherine; Sonnett, James; Doktycz, Mitchel J.; Gu, Baohua; Roeder, Ryan K.; Wang, Wei; Retterer, Scott T.

    2015-04-01

    Nanomaterial based drug delivery systems allow for the independent tuning of the surface chemical and physical properties that affect their biodistribution in vivo and the therapeutic payloads that they are intended to deliver. Additionally, the added therapeutic and diagnostic value of their inherent material properties often provides extra functionality. Iron based nanomaterials with their magnetic properties and easily tailorable surface chemistry are of particular interest as model systems. In this study the core radius of the iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) was 14.08 +/- 3.92 nm while the hydrodynamic radius of the NPs, as determined by Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS), was between 90-110 nm. In this study, different approaches were explored to create radiolabeled NPs that are stable in solution. The NPs were functionalized with polycarboxylate or polyamine surface functional groups. Polycarboxylate functionalized NPs had a zeta potential of -35 mV and polyamine functionalized NPs had a zeta potential of +40 mV. The polycarboxylate functionalized NPs were chosen for in vivo biodistribution studies and hence were radiolabeled with 14C, with a final activity of 0.097 nCi mg-1 of NPs. In chronic studies, the biodistribution profile is tracked using low level radiolabeled proxies of the nanoparticles of interest. Conventionally, these radiolabeled proxies are chemically similar but not chemically identical to the non-radiolabeled NPs of interest. This study is novel as different approaches were explored to create radiolabeled NPs that are stable, possess a hydrodynamic radius of <100 nm and most importantly they exhibit an identical surface chemical functionality as their non-radiolabeled counterparts. Identical chemical functionality of the radiolabeled probes to the non-radiolabeled probes was an important consideration to generate statistically similar biodistribution data sets using multiple imaging and detection techniques. The radiolabeling approach described

  5. Shape control of the magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles under different chain length of reducing agents

    SciTech Connect

    Ngoi, Kuan Hoon; Chia, Chin-Hua Zakaria, Sarani; Chiu, Wee Siong

    2015-09-25

    We report on the effect of using reducing agents with different chain-length on the synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles by thermal decomposition of iron (III) acetylacetonate in 1-octadecene. This modification allows us to control the shape of nanoparticles into spherical and cubic iron oxide nanoparticles. The highly monodisperse 14 nm spherical nanoparticles are obtained under 1,2-dodecanediol and average 14 nm edge-length cubic iron oxide nanoparticles are obtained under 1,2-tetradecanediol. The structural characterization such as transmission electron microscope (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) shows similar properties between two particles with different shapes. The vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) shows no significant difference between spherical and cubic nanoparticles, which are 36 emu/g and 37 emu/g respectively and superparamagnetic in nature.

  6. Discrete dipole approximation analysis of plasmonic core/alloy nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wenjie; Maye, Mathew M

    2014-08-25

    The surface plasmon resonance (SPR) properties of Au/Au(x)Ag(1-x) core/alloy nanoparticles (NPs) have been investigated by means of the discrete dipole approximation. The core/alloy microstructure was varied by changing the shell alloy composition x, its thickness t(S), and the shell thickness to core radius ratio (t(S)/r(C)) in the range of 0.05-1.0. These changes resulted in a novel tuning of SPR shape, frequency, and extinction. These models were compared with experimental results for Au/Au(x)Ag(1-x) NPs prepared by a microwave-mediated hydrothermal processing method, which produces core/alloy NPs with SPR signatures closely resembling those of the models. PMID:24889191

  7. Synthesis of triangular Au core-Ag shell nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Rai, Akhilesh; Chaudhary, Minakshi; Ahmad, Absar; Bhargava, Suresh; Sastry, Murali . E-mail: msastry@tatachemicals.com

    2007-07-03

    In this paper, we demonstrate a simple and reproducible method for the synthesis of triangular Au core-Ag shell nanoparticles. The triangular gold core is obtained by the reduction of gold ions by lemongrass extract. Utilizing the negative charge on the gold nanotriangles, silver ions are bound to their surface and thereafter reduced by ascorbic acid under alkaline conditions. The thickness of the silver shell may be modulated by varying the pH of the reaction medium. The formation of the Au core-Ag shell triangular nanostructures has been followed by UV-vis-NIR Spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements. The sharp vertices of the triangles coupled with the core-shell structure is expected to have potential for application in surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy and in the sensitive detection of biomolecules.

  8. The effect of coating on heat generation properties of Iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yuan

    Magnetic nanoparticles have attracted more and more attention for their potential application as heating agents in cancer hyperthermia. The effectiveness of cancer hyperthermia can be increased by using particles that have a higher heat generation rate, quantified by specific absorption rate (SAR), at a smaller applied field. In order to optimize the functionality of nanoparticles as heating agents, it is essential to have a comprehensive understanding of factors that may influence SAR including coating and aggregation. In all biomedical applications, the magnetic particles are coated with surfactants and polymers to enhance biocompatibility, prevent agglomeration and add functionality. Coatings may profoundly influence particles' clustering behavior and magnetic properties. Yet its effect on the heat generation rate of the nanoparticles has been scarcely investigated. In this context, a systematic investigation was carried out in this dissertation in order to understand the impact of the surface coating of magnetic nanoparticles on their heat generation rate. The study also includes investigation of normal nerve cell viability in presence of biofunctionalized magnetic nanoparticles with and without exposure to magnetic heating. Commercially available suspensions of iron oxide nanoparticles with a diameter of approximately 10 nm and different coatings relevant to biomedical applications such as aminosilane, carboxymethyl-dextran, protein A, biotin were extensively characterized. First of all, magnetic phase reduction of magnetite nanoparticles was examined by studying the discrepancy between the volume fraction of magnetic phase calculated from magnetization curve and the magnetic core concentration obtained from Tiron chelation test. The findings indicated that coatings might interact with the surface atoms of the magnetic core and form a magnetically disordered layer reducing the total amount of the magnetic phase. Secondly, the impact of coating and aggregation

  9. Hydride formation in core-shell alloyed metal nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P.

    2016-07-01

    The model and analysis presented are focused on hydride formation in nanoparticles with a Pd shell and a core formed by another metal. The arrangement of metal atoms is assumed to be coherent (no dislocations). The lattice strain distribution, elastic energy, and chemical potential of hydrogen atoms are scrutinized. The slope of the chemical potential (as a function of hydrogen uptake) is demonstrated to decrease with increasing the core volume, and accordingly the critical temperature for hydride formation and the corresponding hysteresis loops are predicted to decrease as well.

  10. Melting of iron at Earth's inner core boundary based on fast X-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Anzellini, S; Dewaele, A; Mezouar, M; Loubeyre, P; Morard, G

    2013-04-26

    Earth's core is structured in a solid inner core, mainly composed of iron, and a liquid outer core. The temperature at the inner core boundary is expected to be close to the melting point of iron at 330 gigapascal (GPa). Despite intensive experimental and theoretical efforts, there is little consensus on the melting behavior of iron at these extreme pressures and temperatures. We present static laser-heated diamond anvil cell experiments up to 200 GPa using synchrotron-based fast x-ray diffraction as a primary melting diagnostic. When extrapolating to higher pressures, we conclude that the melting temperature of iron at the inner core boundary is 6230 ± 500 kelvin. This estimation favors a high heat flux at the core-mantle boundary with a possible partial melting of the mantle. PMID:23620049

  11. Core-shell upconversion nanoparticle - semiconductor heterostructures for photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Dou, Qing Qing; Rengaramchandran, Adith; Selvan, Subramanian Tamil; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy; Zhang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Core-shell nanoparticles (CSNPs) with diverse chemical compositions have been attracting greater attention in recent years. However, it has been a challenge to develop CSNPs with different crystal structures due to the lattice mismatch of the nanocrystals. Here we report a rational design of core-shell heterostructure consisting of NaYF4:Yb,Tm upconversion nanoparticle (UCN) as the core and ZnO semiconductor as the shell for potential application in photodynamic therapy (PDT). The core-shell architecture (confirmed by TEM and STEM) enables for improving the loading efficiency of photosensitizer (ZnO) as the semiconductor is directly coated on the UCN core. Importantly, UCN acts as a transducer to sensitize ZnO and trigger the generation of cytotoxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) to induce cancer cell death. We also present a firefly luciferase (FLuc) reporter gene based molecular biosensor (ARE-FLuc) to measure the antioxidant signaling response activated in cells during the release of ROS in response to the exposure of CSNPs under 980 nm NIR light. The breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231 and 4T1) exposed to CSNPs showed significant release of ROS as measured by aminophenyl fluorescein (APF) and ARE-FLuc luciferase assays, and ~45% cancer cell death as measured by MTT assay, when illuminated with 980 nm NIR light. PMID:25652742

  12. Core - shell upconversion nanoparticle - semiconductor heterostructures for photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Qing Qing; Rengaramchandran, Adith; Selvan, Subramanian Tamil; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy; Zhang, Yong

    2015-02-01

    Core-shell nanoparticles (CSNPs) with diverse chemical compositions have been attracting greater attention in recent years. However, it has been a challenge to develop CSNPs with different crystal structures due to the lattice mismatch of the nanocrystals. Here we report a rational design of core-shell heterostructure consisting of NaYF4:Yb,Tm upconversion nanoparticle (UCN) as the core and ZnO semiconductor as the shell for potential application in photodynamic therapy (PDT). The core-shell architecture (confirmed by TEM and STEM) enables for improving the loading efficiency of photosensitizer (ZnO) as the semiconductor is directly coated on the UCN core. Importantly, UCN acts as a transducer to sensitize ZnO and trigger the generation of cytotoxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) to induce cancer cell death. We also present a firefly luciferase (FLuc) reporter gene based molecular biosensor (ARE-FLuc) to measure the antioxidant signaling response activated in cells during the release of ROS in response to the exposure of CSNPs under 980 nm NIR light. The breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231 and 4T1) exposed to CSNPs showed significant release of ROS as measured by aminophenyl fluorescein (APF) and ARE-FLuc luciferase assays, and ~45% cancer cell death as measured by MTT assay, when illuminated with 980 nm NIR light.

  13. Temperature-tunable iron oxide nanoparticles for remote-controlled drug release.

    PubMed

    Dani, Raj K; Schumann, Canan; Taratula, Olena; Taratula, Oleh

    2014-08-01

    Herein, we report the successful development of a novel nanosystem capable of an efficient delivery and temperature-triggered drug release specifically aimed at cancer. The water-soluble 130.1 ± 0.2 nm iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) were obtained via synthesis of a monodispersed iron oxide core stabilized with tetramethylammonium hydroxide pentahydrate (TMAOH), followed by coating with the thermoresponsive copolymer poly-(NIPAM-stat-AAm)-block-PEI (PNAP). The PNAP layer on the surface of the IONP undergoes reversible temperature-dependent structural changes from a swollen to a collapsed state resulting in the controlled release of anticancer drugs loaded in the delivery vehicle. We demonstrated that the phase transition temperature of the prepared copolymer can be precisely tuned to the desired value in the range of 36°C-44°C by changing the monomers ratio during the preparation of the nanoparticles. Evidence of modification of the IONPs with the thermoresponsive copolymer is proven by ATR-FTIR and a quantitative analysis of the polymeric and iron oxide content obtained by thermogravimetric analysis. When loaded with doxorubicin (DOX), the IONPs-PNAP revealed a triggered drug release at a temperature that is a few degrees higher than the phase transition temperature of a copolymer. Furthermore, an in vitro study demonstrated an efficient internalization of the nanoparticles into the cancer cells and showed that the drug-free IONPs-PNAP were nontoxic toward the cells. In contrast, sufficient therapeutic effect was observed for the DOX-loaded nanosystem as a function of temperature. Thus, the developed temperature-tunable IONPs-based delivery system showed high potential for remotely triggered drug delivery and the eradication of cancer cells. PMID:24821220

  14. Nanoparticle and Iron Chelators as a Potential Novel Alzheimer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Gang; Men, Ping; Perry, George; Smith, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    Current therapies for Alzheimer disease (AD) such as the acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and the latest NMDA receptor inhibitor, Namenda, provide moderate symptomatic delay at various stages of the disease, but do not arrest the disease progression or bring in meaningful remission. New approaches to the disease management are urgently needed. Although the etiology of AD is largely unknown, oxidative damage mediated by metals is likely a significant contributor since metals such as iron, aluminum, zinc, and copper are dysregulated and/or increased in AD brain tissue and create a pro-oxidative environment. This role of metal ion-induced free radical formation in AD makes chelation therapy an attractive means of dampening the oxidative stress burden in neurons. The chelator desferrioxamine, FDA approved for iron overload, has shown some benefit in AD, but like many chelators, it has a host of adverse effects and substantial obstacles for tissue-specific targeting. Other chelators are under development and have shown various strengths and weaknesses. Here, we propose a novel system of chelation therapy through the use of nanoparticles. Nanoparticles conjugated to chelators show unique ability to cross the blood–brain barrier (BBB), chelate metals, and exit through the BBB with their corresponding complexed metal ions. This method may provide a safer and more effective means of reducing the metal load in neural tissue, thus attenuating the harmful effects of oxidative damage and its sequelae. Experimental procedures are presented in this chapter. PMID:20013176

  15. Physiological effects of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles towards watermelon.

    PubMed

    Li, Junli; Chang, Peter R; Huang, Jin; Wang, Yunqiang; Yuan, Hong; Ren, Hongxuan

    2013-08-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) have been exploited in a diverse range of products in the past decade or so. However, the biosafety/environmental impact or legislation pertaining to this newly created, highly functional composites containing NPs (otherwise called nanomaterials) is generally lagging behind their technological innovation. To advance the agenda in this area, our current primary interest is focused on using crops as model systems as they have very close relationship with us. Thus, the objective of the present study was to evaluate the biological effects of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles towards watermelon seedlings. We have systematically studied the physiological effects of Fe2O3 nanoparticles (nano-Fe2O3) on watermelon, and present the first evidence that a significant amount of Fe2O3 nanoparticles suspended in a liquid medium can be taken up by watermelon plants and translocated throughout the plant tissues. Changes in important physiological indicators, such as root activity, activity of catalase (CAT), peroxidase (POD) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), chlorophyll and malondialdehyde (MDA) contents, ferric reductase activity, root apoplastic iron content were clearly presented. Different concentrations of nano-Fe2O3 all increased seed germination, seedling growth, and enhanced physiological function to some degree; and the positive effects increased quickly and then slowed with an increase in the treatment concentrations. Changes in CAT, SOD and POD activities due to nano-Fe2O3 were significantly larger than that of the control. The 20 mg/L treatment had the most obvious effect on the increase of root activity. Ferric reductase activity, root apoplastic iron content, and watermelon biomass were significantly affected by exposure to nano-Fe2O3. Results of statistical analysis showed that there were significant differences in all the above indexes between the treatment at optimal concentration and the control. This proved that the proper concentration of nano

  16. Differentiated planetesimal impacts into a terrestrial magma ocean: Fate of the iron core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendall, Jordan D.; Melosh, H. J.

    2016-08-01

    The abundance of moderately siderophile elements ("iron-loving"; e.g. Co, Ni) in the Earth's mantle is 10 to 100 times larger than predicted by chemical equilibrium between silicate melt and iron at low pressure, but it does match expectation for equilibrium at high pressure and temperature. Recent studies of differentiated planetesimal impacts assume that planetesimal cores survive the impact intact as concentrated masses that passively settle from a zero initial velocity and undergo turbulent entrainment in a global magma ocean; under these conditions, cores greater than 10 km in diameter do not fully mix without a sufficiently deep magma ocean. We have performed hydrocode simulations that revise this assumption and yield a clearer picture of the impact process for differentiated planetesimals possessing iron cores with radius = 100 km that impact into magma oceans. The impact process strips away the silicate mantle of the planetesimal and then stretches the iron core, dispersing the liquid iron into a much larger volume of the underlying liquid silicate mantle. Lagrangian tracer particles track the initially intact iron core as the impact stretches and disperses the core. The final displacement distance of initially closest tracer pairs gives a metric of core stretching. The statistics of stretching imply mixing that separates the iron core into sheets, ligaments, and smaller fragments, on a scale of 10 km or less. The impact dispersed core fragments undergo further mixing through turbulent entrainment as the molten iron fragments rain through the magma ocean and settle deeper into the planet. Our results thus support the idea that iron in the cores of even large differentiated planetesimals can chemically equilibrate deep in a terrestrial magma ocean.

  17. Macroscopic and microscopic biodistribution of intravenously administered iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Adwiteeya; Petryk, Alicia A.; Strawbridge, Rendall R.; Hoopes, P. Jack

    2015-03-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONP) are being developed for use as a cancer treatment. They have demonstrated efficacy when used either as a monotherapy or in conjunction with conventional chemotherapy and radiation. The success of IONP as a therapeutic tool depends on the delivery of a safe and controlled cytotoxic thermal dose to tumor tissue following activation with an alternating magnetic field (AMF). Prior to clinical approval, knowledge of IONP toxicity, biodistribution and physiological clearance is essential. This preliminary time-course study determines the acute toxicity and biodistribution of 110 nm dextran-coated IONP (iron) in mice, 7 days post systemic, at doses of 0.4, 0.6, and 1.0 mg Fe/ g mouse bodyweight. Acute toxicity, manifested as changes in the behavior of mice, was only observed temporarily at 1.0 mg Fe/ g mouse bodyweight, the highest dose administered. Regardless of dose, mass spectrometry and histological analysis demonstrated over 3 mg Fe/g tissue in organs within the reticuloendotheilial system (i.e. liver, spleen, and lymph nodes). Other organs (brain, heart, lungs, and kidney) had less than 0.5 mg Fe/g tissue with iron predominantly confined to the organ vasculature.

  18. Removal of Trichloroethylene and Heavy Metals by Zerovalent Iron Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boparai, H. K.; O'Carroll, D. M.

    2009-05-01

    Heavy metals combined with chlorinated solvents are one class of mixed waste found at various hazardous waste sites in North America. Nano zerovalent iron (nZVI), an emerging technology, is being successfully used for treating chlorinated solvents and heavy metals independently, however comparatively little research has investigated the remediation of the wastes when they are present in the same mixture. The remediation of trichloroethylene (TCE)/heavy metal waste mixtures via nZVI has been investigated in the present study. Results suggest that some metals are reduced by nZVI to their zerovalent state and thus precipitate on nZVI particles. This improves the contaminant removal performance of nZVI by forming bimetallic iron nanoparticles. Other metals are directly precipitated or adsorbed on the nZVI particles in their original oxidation state and are rendered immobile. In some cases the presence of the heavy metals in the waste mixture enhanced the dechlorination of TCE while in other cases it did not. This study suggests that nano zerovalent iron particles can be effectively used for the remediation of mixed contamination of heavy metals and chlorinated solvents. Results have been supported by a variety of techniques including X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis.

  19. Iron oxide nanoparticles for magnetically assisted patterned coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodi, Gianina; Hritcu, Doina; Draganescu, Dan; Popa, Marcel I.

    2015-08-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles able to magnetically assemble during the curing stage of a polymeric support to create micro-scale surface protuberances in a controlled manner were prepared and characterized. The bare Fe3O4 particles were obtained by two methods: co-precipitation from an aqueous solution containing Fe3+/Fe2+ ions with a molar ratio of 2:1 and partial oxidation of ferrous ions in alkaline conditions. The products were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and magnetization measurement. They were subsequently functionalized using oleic acid, sodium oleate, or non-ionic surfactant mixtures with various hydrophilic to lipophilic balance (HLB) values. Composite nanoparticle-polymer films prepared by spraying were deposited and cured by drying on glass slides under a static magnetic field in the range of 1.5-5.5 mT. Magnetic field generated surface roughness was evidenced by optical and scanning electron microscopy. The optimum hierarchical patterning was obtained with the nanoparticles produced by partial oxidation and functionalized with hydrophobic surfactants. Possible applications may include ice-phobic composite coatings.

  20. Biocompatible capped iron oxide nanoparticles for Vibrio cholerae detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Anshu; Baral, Dinesh; Rawat, Kamla; Solanki, Pratima R.; Bohidar, H. B.

    2015-05-01

    We report the studies relating to fabrication of an efficient immunosensor for Vibrio cholerae detection. Magnetite (iron oxide (Fe3O4)) nanoparticles (NPs) have been synthesized by the co-precipitation method and capped by citric acid (CA). These NPs were electrophoretically deposited onto indium-tin-oxide (ITO)-coated glass substrate and used for immobilization of monoclonal antibodies against Vibrio cholerae (Ab) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) for Vibrio cholerae detection using an electrochemical technique. The structural and morphological studies of Fe3O4 and CA-Fe3O4/ITO were characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and dynamic light scattering (DLS) techniques. The average crystalline size of Fe3O4, CA-Fe3O4 nanoparticles obtained were about 29 ± 1 nm and 37 ± 1 nm, respectively. The hydrodynamic radius of the nanoparticles was found to be 77.35 nm (Fe3O4) and 189.51 nm (CA-Fe3O4) by DLS measurement. The results of electrochemical response studies of the fabricated BSA/Ab/CA-Fe2O3/ITO immunosensor exhibits a good detection range of 12.5-500 ng mL-1 with a low detection limit of 0.32 ng mL-1, sensitivity 0.03 Ω/ng ml-1 cm-2, and reproducibility more than 11 times.

  1. Magnetic hyperthermia efficiency and 1H-NMR relaxation properties of iron oxide/paclitaxel-loaded PLGA nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggiero, Maria R.; Geninatti Crich, Simonetta; Sieni, Elisabetta; Sgarbossa, Paolo; Forzan, Michele; Cavallari, Eleonora; Stefania, Rachele; Dughiero, Fabrizio; Aime, Silvio

    2016-07-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe-NPs) can be exploited in biomedicine as agents for magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) treatments and as contrast enhancers in magnetic resonance imaging. New, oleate-covered, iron oxide particles have been prepared either by co-precipitation or thermal decomposition methods and incorporated into poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles (PLGA-Fe-NPs) to improve their biocompatibility and in vivo stability. Moreover, the PLGA-Fe-NPs have been loaded with paclitaxel to pursue an MFH-triggered drug release. Remarkably, it has been found that the nanoparticle formulations are characterized by peculiar 1H nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD) profiles that directly correlate with their heating potential when exposed to an alternating magnetic field. By prolonging the magnetic field exposure to 30 min, a significant drug release was observed for PLGA-Fe-NPs in the case of the larger-sized magnetic nanoparticles. Furthermore, the immobilization of lipophilic Fe-NPs in PLGA-NPs also made it possible to maintain Néel relaxation as the dominant relaxation contribution in the presence of large iron oxide cores (diameters of 15–20 nm), with the advantage of preserving their efficiency when they are entrapped in the intracellular environment. The results reported herein show that NMRD profiles are a useful tool for anticipating the heating capabilities of Fe-NPs designed for MFH applications.

  2. Differential proteomics analysis of the surface heterogeneity of dextran iron oxide nanoparticles and the implications for their in vivo clearance

    PubMed Central

    Simberg, Dmitri; Park, Ji-Ho; Karmali, Priya P.; Zhang, Wan-Ming; Merkulov, Sergei; McCrae, Keith; Bhatia, Sangeeta; Sailor, Michael; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2009-01-01

    In order to understand the role of plasma proteins in the rapid liver clearance of dextran-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) in vivo, we analyzed the full repertoire of SPIO-binding blood proteins using novel two-dimensional differential mass spectrometry approach. The identified proteins showed specificity for surface domains of the nanoparticles: mannan-binding lectins bound to the dextran coating, histidine-rich glycoprotein and kininogen bound to the iron oxide part, and the complement lectin and contact clotting factors were secondary binders. Nanoparticle clearance studies in knockout mice suggested that these proteins, as well as several previously identified opsonins, do not play a significant role in the SPIO clearance. However, both the dextran coat and the iron oxide core remained accessible to specific probes after incubation of SPIO in plasma, suggesting that the nanoparticle surface could be available for recognition by macrophages, regardless of protein coating. These data provide guidance to rational design of bioinert, long-circulating nanoparticles. PMID:19394687

  3. Magnetic hyperthermia efficiency and (1)H-NMR relaxation properties of iron oxide/paclitaxel-loaded PLGA nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ruggiero, Maria R; Crich, Simonetta Geninatti; Sieni, Elisabetta; Sgarbossa, Paolo; Forzan, Michele; Cavallari, Eleonora; Stefania, Rachele; Dughiero, Fabrizio; Aime, Silvio

    2016-07-15

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe-NPs) can be exploited in biomedicine as agents for magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) treatments and as contrast enhancers in magnetic resonance imaging. New, oleate-covered, iron oxide particles have been prepared either by co-precipitation or thermal decomposition methods and incorporated into poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles (PLGA-Fe-NPs) to improve their biocompatibility and in vivo stability. Moreover, the PLGA-Fe-NPs have been loaded with paclitaxel to pursue an MFH-triggered drug release. Remarkably, it has been found that the nanoparticle formulations are characterized by peculiar (1)H nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD) profiles that directly correlate with their heating potential when exposed to an alternating magnetic field. By prolonging the magnetic field exposure to 30 min, a significant drug release was observed for PLGA-Fe-NPs in the case of the larger-sized magnetic nanoparticles. Furthermore, the immobilization of lipophilic Fe-NPs in PLGA-NPs also made it possible to maintain Néel relaxation as the dominant relaxation contribution in the presence of large iron oxide cores (diameters of 15-20 nm), with the advantage of preserving their efficiency when they are entrapped in the intracellular environment. The results reported herein show that NMRD profiles are a useful tool for anticipating the heating capabilities of Fe-NPs designed for MFH applications. PMID:27265726

  4. The tolerability of dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles during in vivo observation of the rats.

    PubMed

    Popa, Cristina L; Prodan, Alina M; Ciobanu, Carmen S; Predoi, Daniela

    2016-07-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) have attracted a lot of interest due to their widespread biomedical and diagnostic applications. Coating the SPIONs with various surface layers can provide an interface between the core and the surrounding environment. The aim of this study was to examine the in vivo behaviour of dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles (D-IONPs) in aqueous suspensions. The SPIONs stabilized with dextran (D-IONPs) were synthesized in aqueous solutions by co-precipitation method. The average grain size deduced from transmission electron microscopy is 7.5 nm. The hematological parameters registered for the rats exposed to D-IONPs at 1 ml/kg have had values approximately equal to those examined for the control specimen. The architecture of liver and kidneys was not affected after one day of intraperitoneal injection of D-IONPs compared to the reference group. After 21 and 28 days respectively from the administration of the D-IONPs solution, the liver and kidneys from the injected rats showed a normal aspect without abnormalities compared to the rats uninjected. Our findings suggest that the administration of 1 ml/kg D-IONPs did not cause any toxicological effect since the parameters of renal and liver function were in the normal range as reported to the control group. PMID:27045672

  5. Preparation and characterization of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles stabilized by alginate.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hui-li; Qi, Xian-rong; Maitani, Yoshie; Nagai, Tsuneji

    2007-03-21

    SPION with appropriate surface chemistry have been widely used experimentally for numerous in vivo applications. In this study, SPION stabilized by alginate (SPION-alginate) were prepared by a modified coprecipitation method. The structure, size, morphology, magnetic property and relaxivity of the SPION-alginate were characterized systematically by means of XRD, TEM, ESEM, AFM, DLS, SQUID magnetometer and MRI, respectively, and the interaction between alginate and iron oxide (Fe(3)O(4)) was characterized by FT-IR and AFM. The results revealed that typical iron oxide nanoparticles were Fe(3)O(4) with a core diameter of 5-10 nm and SPION-alginate had a hydrodynamic diameter of 193.8-483.2 nm. From the magnetization curve, the Ms of a suspension of SPION-alginate was 40 emu/g, corresponding to 73% of that of solid SPION-alginate. This high Ms may be due to the binding of Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles to alginate macromolecule strands as visually confirmed by AFM. SPION-alginate of several hundred nanometers was stable in size for 12 months at 4 degrees C. Moreover, T1 relaxivity and T2 relaxivity of SPION-alginate in saline (1.5 T, 20 degrees C) were 7.86+/-0.20 s(-1) mM(-1) and 281.2+/-26.4 s(-1) mM(-1), respectively. PMID:17074454

  6. Uptake and clearance analysis of Technetium99m labelled iron oxide nanoparticles in a rabbit brain.

    PubMed

    Nadeem, Muhammad; Ahmad, Munir; Saeed, M A; Shaari, Amiruddin; Riaz, Saira; Naseem, Shahzad; Rashid, Khalid

    2015-06-01

    Nanoparticles as solid colloidal particles are extensively studied and used as anticancer drug delivery agents because of their physical properties. This current research aims to prepare water base suspension of uncoated iron oxide nanoparticles and their biodistribution study to different organs, especially the brain, by using a single photon emission computed tomography gamma camera. The water-based suspension of iron oxide nanoparticles was synthesised by a reformed version of the co-precipitation method and labelled with Tc99m for intravenous injection. The nanoparticles were injected without surface modification. X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) techniques were used for characterisation. Peaks of XRD and EDS indicate that the particles are magnetite and exist in aqueous suspension. The average diameter of iron oxide nanoparticles without any surface coating determined by TEM is 10 nm. These particles are capable of evading the reticuloendothelial system and can cross the blood-brain barrier in the rabbit. The labelling efficiency of iron oxide nanoparticles labelled with Tc99m is 85%, which is good for the biodistribution study. The sufficient amount of iron oxide nanoparticles concentration in the brain as compared with the surrounding soft tissues and their long blood retention time indicates that the water-based suspension of iron oxide nanoparticles may be an option for drug delivery into the brain. PMID:26023157

  7. Influence of carbon chain length on the synthesis and yield of fatty amine-coated iron-platinum nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Robert M.; Monson, Todd C.; Gullapalli, Rama R.

    2014-06-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles are among the most widely used and characterized magnetic nanoparticles. However, metal alloys such as superparamagnetic iron-platinum particles (SIPPs), which have better magnetic properties, are receiving increased attention. Scalable techniques to routinely synthesize SIPPs in bulk need further study. Here, we focus on the role played by the fatty amine ligand in the formation of the bimetallic FePt nanocrystal. More specifically, we compare the effect of varying lengths of fatty amine ligands on the shape, structure, uniformity, composition, and magnetic properties of the SIPPs. We synthesized SIPPs by employing a `green' thermal decomposition reaction using fatty amine ligands containing 12 to 18 carbons in length. Greater fatty amine chain length increased the polydispersity, particle concentration, iron concentration, and the stability of the SIPPs. Additionally, longer reflux times increased the diameter of the particles, but decreased the iron concentration, suggesting that shorter reaction times are preferable. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy of the SIPPs indicates that the ligands are successfully bound to the FePt cores through the amine group. Superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry measurements suggest that all of the SIPPs were superparamagnetic at room temperature and that SIPPs synthesized using tetradecylamine had the highest saturation magnetization. Our findings indicate that the octadecylamine ligand, which is currently used for the routine synthesis of SIPPs, may not be optimal. Overall, we found that using tetradecylamine and a 30-min reflux reaction resulted in optimal particles with the highest degree of monodispersity, iron content, stability, and saturation magnetization.

  8. Supramolecular core-shell nanoparticles for photoconductive device applications.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chih-Chia; Chen, Jem-Kun; Shieh, Yeong-Tarng; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2016-08-12

    We report a breakthrough discovery involving supramolecular-based strategies to construct novel core-shell heterojunction nanoparticles with hydrophilic adenine-functionalized polythiophene (PAT) as the core and hydrophobic phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) as the shell, which enables the conception of new functional supramolecular assemblies for constructing functional nanomaterials for applications in optoelectronic devices. The generated nanoparticles exhibit uniform spherical shape, well-controlled tuning of particle size with narrow size distributions, and excellent electrochemical stability in solution and the solid state owing to highly efficient energy transfer from PAT to PCBM. When the PAT/PCBM nanoparticles were fabricated into a photoconducting layer in an electronic device, the resulting device showed excellent electric conduction characteristics, including an electrically-tunable voltage-controlled switch, and high short-circuit current and open-circuit voltage. These observations demonstrate how the self-assembly of PAT/PCBM into specific nanostructures may help to promote efficient charge generation and transport processes, suggesting potential for a wide variety of applications as a promising candidate material for bulk heterojunction polymer devices. PMID:27353003

  9. Photosensitizer decorated iron oxide nanoparticles: bimodal agent for combined hyperthermia and photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhimou; Xu, Keming; Zhang, Bei; Xu, Bing; Zhang, Xixiang; Chang, Chi K.

    2006-02-01

    As the PDT effect may be enhanced by localized hyperthermia (HT), it would be logical to find a single agent that could bring about these two modalities at precisely the target site for synergism. Since highly localized HT can be induced by magnetic field excitation of superparamagnetic nanoparticles, we report here the design and synthesis of photosensitizer-decorated iron oxide nanoparticles and their tumoricidal effect. Thus, a porphyrin is covalently anchored on the iron oxide nanoparticle via dihydroxybenzene which binds tightly on the surface of the nanoparticle by M-O bond. The morphology of the resultant nanoparticle was studied to show that the crystallinality is not changed and the nanoparticle remains superparamagnetic at room temperature. The conjugate is also strongly fluorescent indicating that the iron oxide hardly affects the optical properties of the surface bound porphyrin moieties. The conjugate is readily taken by cancer cell (Hela cell line) and is able to trigger apoptosis after excitation by light.

  10. Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as drug delivery system in breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcu, A.; Pop, S.; Dumitrache, F.; Mocanu, M.; Niculite, C. M.; Gherghiceanu, M.; Lungu, C. P.; Fleaca, C.; Ianchis, R.; Barbut, A.; Grigoriu, C.; Morjan, I.

    2013-09-01

    Present work was focused on producing improved iron oxide nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery in breast cancer. Nanometric-sized iron oxide particles were synthesized by laser pyrolysis and were morphologically/structurally characterized. These new nanoparticles were compared with some commercial, chemically prepared iron oxide ones. Cytotoxicity and the anti-proliferation effects of nanoparticles were tested in vitro on the breast adenocarcinoma cell line MCF-7. Nanoparticles were further coated with the antracyclinic antibiotic Violamycine B1 and tested for the anti-tumor effect on MCF-7 cells. The nanoparticles produced by us seem more effective in vitro than the commercial ones, with respect to cellular uptake and VB1 delivery. Violamycine B1 bound on nanoparticles is as efficient as the free form, but is better delivered into tumor cells.

  11. Synthesis and characterization of poly(divinylbenzene)-coated magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as precursor for the formation of air-stable carbon-coated iron crystalline nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Boguslavsky, Yonit; Margel, Shlomo

    2008-01-01

    Maghemite (gamma-Fe2O3) nanoparticles of 15 +/- 3 nm diameter were prepared by nucleation of gelatin/iron oxide followed by growth of gamma-Fe2O3 films onto these nuclei. The gamma-Fe2O3 nanoparticles were coated with polydivinylbenzene (PDVB) by emulsion polymerization of divinylbenzene (DVB) in an aqueous continuous phase containing the gamma-Fe2O3 nanoparticles. The PDVB-coated gamma-Fe2O3 nanoparticles, dispersed in water, were separated from homo-PDVB nanoparticles using the high gradient magnetic field (HGMF) technique. The influence of DVB concentration on the amount of PDVB coating, on the size and size distribution of the coated gamma-Fe2O3 nanoparticles and on their magnetic properties, has been investigated. Air-stable carbon-coated iron (alpha-Fe/C) crystalline nanoparticles of 41 +/- 12 nm diameter have been prepared by annealing the PDVB-coated gamma-Fe2O3 nanoparticles at 1050 degrees C in an inert atmosphere. These nanoparticles exhibit high saturation magnetization value (83 emu g(-1)) and excellent resistance to oxidation. Characterization of the PDVB-coated gamma-Fe2O3 and of the alpha-Fe/C nanoparticles has been accomplished by TEM, HRTEM, DLS, FTIR, XRD, thermal analysis, zeta-potential, and magnetic measurements. PMID:17927999

  12. Core-shell biopolymer nanoparticle delivery systems: synthesis and characterization of curcumin fortified zein-pectin nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hu, Kun; Huang, Xiaoxia; Gao, Yongqing; Huang, Xulin; Xiao, Hang; McClements, David Julian

    2015-09-01

    Biopolymer core-shell nanoparticles were fabricated using a hydrophobic protein (zein) as the core and a hydrophilic polysaccharide (pectin) as the shell. Particles were prepared by coating cationic zein nanoparticles with anionic pectin molecules using electrostatic deposition (pH 4). The core-shell nanoparticles were fortified with curcumin (a hydrophobic bioactive molecule) at a high loading efficiency (>86%). The resulting nanoparticles were spherical, relatively small (diameter ≈ 250 nm), and had a narrow size distribution (polydispersity index ≈ 0.24). The encapsulated curcumin was in an amorphous (rather than crystalline form) as detected by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Raman spectra indicated that the encapsulated curcumin interacted with zein mainly through hydrophobic interactions. The nanoparticles were converted into a powdered form that had good water-dispersibility. These core-shell biopolymer nanoparticles could be useful for incorporating curcumin into functional foods and beverages, as well as dietary supplements and pharmaceutical products. PMID:25842338

  13. Biomolecular crystals for material applications and a mechanistic study of an iron oxide nanoparticle synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falkner, Joshua Charles

    The three projects within this work address the difficulties of controlling biomolecular crystal formats (i.e. size and shape), producing 3-D ordered composite materials from biomolecular crystal templates, and understanding the mechanism of a practical iron oxide synthesis. The unifying thread consistent throughout these three topics is the development of methods to manipulate nanomaterials using a bottom-up approach. Biomolecular crystals are nanometer to millimeter sized crystals that have well ordered mesoporous solvent channels. The overall physical dimensions of these crystals are highly dependent on crystallization conditions. The controlled growth of micro- and nanoprotein crystals was studied to provide new pathways for creating smaller crystalline protein materials. This method produced tetragonal hen egg-white lysozyme crystals (250--100,000 nm) with near monodisperse size distributions (<15%). With this degree of control, existing protein crystal applications such as drug delivery and analytical sensors can reach their full potential. Applications for larger crystals with inherently ubiquitous pore structures could extend to materials used for membranes or templates. In this work, the porous structure of larger cowpea mosaic virus crystals was used to template metal nanoparticle growth within the body centered cubic crystalline network. The final composite material was found to have long range ordering of palladium and platinum nonocrystal aggregates (10nm) with symmetry consistent to the virus template. Nanoparticle synthesis itself is an immense field of study with an array of diverse applications. The final piece of this work investigates the mechanism behind a previously developed iron oxide synthesis to gain more understanding and direction to future synthesis strategies. The particle growth mechanism was found to proceed by the formation of a solvated iron(III)oleate complex followed by a reduction of iron (III) to iron (II). This unstable iron

  14. Heterobifunctional PEG Ligands for Bioconjugation Reactions on Iron Oxide Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Bloemen, Maarten; Van Stappen, Thomas; Willot, Pieter; Lammertyn, Jeroen; Koeckelberghs, Guy; Geukens, Nick; Gils, Ann; Verbiest, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    Ever since iron oxide nanoparticles have been recognized as promising scaffolds for biomedical applications, their surface functionalization has become even more important. We report the synthesis of a novel polyethylene glycol-based ligand that combines multiple advantageous properties for these applications. The ligand is covalently bound to the surface via a siloxane group, while its polyethylene glycol backbone significantly improves the colloidal stability of the particle in complex environments. End-capping the molecule with a carboxylic acid introduces a variety of coupling chemistry possibilities. In this study an antibody targeting plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 was coupled to the surface and its presence and binding activity was assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and surface plasmon resonance experiments. The results indicate that the ligand has high potential towards biomedical applications where colloidal stability and advanced functionality is crucial. PMID:25275378

  15. Switching the Magnetic Vortex Core in a Single Nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Pinilla-Cienfuegos, Elena; Mañas-Valero, Samuel; Forment-Aliaga, Alicia; Coronado, Eugenio

    2016-02-23

    Imaging and manipulating the spin structure of nano- and mesoscale magnetic systems is a challenging topic in magnetism, yielding a wide range of spin phenomena such as skyrmions, hedgehog-like spin structures, or vortices. A key example has been provided by the vortex spin texture, which can be addressed in four independent states of magnetization, enabling the development of multibit magnetic storage media. Most of the works devoted to the study of the magnetization reversal mechanisms of the magnetic vortices have been focused on micrometer-size magnetic platelets. Here we report the experimental observation of the vortex state formation and annihilation in individual 25 nm molecular-based magnetic nanoparticles measured by low-temperature variable-field magnetic force microscopy. Interestingly, in these nanoparticles the switching of the vortex core can be induced with very small values of the applied static magnetic field. PMID:26745548

  16. Characterization of the magnetic moment distribution in low-concentration solutions of iron oxide nanoparticles by a high-T{sub c} superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer

    SciTech Connect

    Saari, M. M. Sakai, K.; Kiwa, T.; Tsukada, K.; Sasayama, T.; Yoshida, T.

    2015-05-07

    We developed a highly sensitive AC/DC magnetometer using a high-temperature superconductor superconducting quantum interference device for the evaluation of magnetic nanoparticles in solutions. Using the developed system, we investigated the distribution of magnetic moments of iron oxide multi-core particles of 100 nm at various iron concentrations that are lower than 96 μg/ml by analyzing the measured magnetization curves. Singular value decomposition and non-regularized non-negative least-squares methods were used during the reconstruction of the distribution. Similar distributions were obtained for all concentrations, and the iron concentration could be determined from the measured magnetization curves. The measured harmonics upon the excitation of AC and DC magnetic fields curves agreed well with the harmonics simulated based on the reconstructed magnetization curves, implying that the magnetization curves of magnetic nanoparticles were successfully obtained as we will show in the article. We compared the magnetization curves between multi-core particles of 100 nm and 130 nm, composed of 12-nm iron oxide nanoparticles. A distinctive magnetic property between the 100 nm and 130 nm particles in low-concentration solutions was successfully characterized. The distribution characteristic of magnetic moments suggests that the net magnetic moment in a multi-core particle is affected by the size of the magnetic cores and their degree of aggregation. Exploration of magnetic properties with high sensitivity can be expected using the developed system.

  17. Mutagenic Effects of Iron Oxide Nanoparticles on Biological Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dissanayake, Niluka M.; Current, Kelley M.; Obare, Sherine O.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, there has been an increased interest in the design and use of iron oxide materials with nanoscale dimensions for magnetic, catalytic, biomedical, and electronic applications. The increased manufacture and use of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) in consumer products as well as industrial processes is expected to lead to the unintentional release of IONPs into the environment. The impact of IONPs on the environment and on biological species is not well understood but remains a concern due to the increased chemical reactivity of nanoparticles relative to their bulk counterparts. This review article describes the impact of IONPs on cellular genetic components. The mutagenic impact of IONPs may damage an organism’s ability to develop or reproduce. To date, there has been experimental evidence of IONPs having mutagenic interactions on human cell lines including lymphoblastoids, fibroblasts, microvascular endothelial cells, bone marrow cells, lung epithelial cells, alveolar type II like epithelial cells, bronchial fibroblasts, skin epithelial cells, hepatocytes, cerebral endothelial cells, fibrosarcoma cells, breast carcinoma cells, lung carcinoma cells, and cervix carcinoma cells. Other cell lines including the Chinese hamster ovary cells, mouse fibroblast cells, murine fibroblast cells, Mytilus galloprovincialis sperm cells, mice lung cells, murine alveolar macrophages, mice hepatic and renal tissue cells, and vero cells have also shown mutagenic effects upon exposure to IONPs. We further show the influence of IONPs on microorganisms in the presence and absence of dissolved organic carbon. The results shed light on the transformations IONPs undergo in the environment and the nature of the potential mutagenic impact on biological cells. PMID:26437397

  18. Pharmaceutical formulation of HSA hybrid coated iron oxide nanoparticles for magnetic drug targeting.

    PubMed

    Zaloga, Jan; Pöttler, Marina; Leitinger, Gerd; Friedrich, Ralf P; Almer, Gunter; Lyer, Stefan; Baum, Eva; Tietze, Rainer; Heimke-Brinck, Ralph; Mangge, Harald; Dörje, Frank; Lee, Geoffrey; Alexiou, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    In this work we present a new formulation of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) for magnetic drug targeting. The particles were reproducibly synthesized from current good manufacturing practice (cGMP) - grade substances. They were surface coated using fatty acids as anchoring molecules for human serum albumin. We comprehensively characterized the physicochemical core-shell structure of the particles using sophisticated methods. We investigated biocompatibility and cellular uptake of the particles using an established flow cytometric method in combination with microwave-plasma assisted atomic emission spectroscopy (MP-AES). The cytotoxic drug mitoxantrone was adsorbed on the protein shell and we showed that even in complex media it is slowly released with a close to zero order kinetics. We also describe an in vitro proof-of-concept assay in which we clearly showed that local enrichment of this SPION-drug conjugate with a magnet allows site-specific therapeutic effects. PMID:26854862

  19. Formulation design for target delivery of iron nanoparticles to TCE zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ziheng; Acosta, Edgar

    2013-12-01

    Nanoparticles of zero-valent iron (NZVI) are effective reducing agents for some dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) contaminants such as trichloroethylene (TCE). However, target delivery of iron nanoparticles to DNAPL zones in the aquifer remains an elusive feature for NZVI technologies. This work discusses three strategies to deliver iron nanoparticles to DNAPL zones. To this end, iron oxide nanoparticles coated with oleate (OL) ions were used as stable analogs for NZVI. The OL-coated iron oxide nanoparticles are rendered lipophilic via (a) the addition of CaCl2, (b) acidification, or (c) the addition of a cationic surfactant, benzethonium chloride (BC). Mixtures of OL and BC show promise as a target delivery strategy due to the high stability of the nanoparticles in water, and their preferential partition into TCE in batch experiments. Column tests show that while the OL-BC coated iron oxide nanoparticles remain largely mobile in TCE-free columns, a large fraction of these particles are retained in TCE-contaminated columns, confirming the effectiveness of this target delivery strategy.

  20. Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles: Synthesis and surface coating techniques for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Sheng-Nan; Wei, Chao; Zhu, Zan-Zan; Hou, Yang-Long; Subbu, S. Venkatraman; Xu, Zhi-Chuan

    2014-03-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles are the most popular magnetic nanoparticles used in biomedical applications due to their low cost, low toxicity, and unique magnetic property. Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, including magnetite (Fe3O4) and maghemite (γ-Fe2O3), usually exhibit a superparamagnetic property as their size goes smaller than 20 nm, which are often denoted as superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) and utilized for drug delivery, diagnosis, therapy, and etc. This review article gives a brief introduction on magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in terms of their fundamentals of magnetism, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and drug delivery, as well as the synthesis approaches, surface coating, and application examples from recent key literatures. Because the quality and surface chemistry play important roles in biomedical applications, our review focuses on the synthesis approaches and surface modifications of iron oxide nanoparticles. We aim to provide a detailed introduction to readers who are new to this field, helping them to choose suitable synthesis methods and to optimize the surface chemistry of iron oxide nanoparticles for their interests.

  1. Inner Core Anisotropy Due to the Magnetic Field--induced Preferred Orientation of Iron.

    PubMed

    Karato, S

    1993-12-10

    Anisotropy of the inner core of the Earth is proposed to result from the lattice preferred orientation of anisotropic iron crystals during their solidification in the presence of a magnetic field. The resultant seismic anisotropy is related to the geometry of the magnetic field in the core. This hypothesis implies that the observed anisotropy (fast velocity along the rotation axis) indicates a strong toroidal field in the core, which supports a strong field model for the geodynamo if the inner core is made of hexagonal close-packed iron. PMID:17781788

  2. Introduction of biotin or folic acid into polypyrrole magnetite core-shell nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Nan, Alexandrina; Turcu, Rodica; Liebscher, Jürgen

    2013-11-13

    In order to contribute to the trend in contemporary research to develop magnetic core shell nanoparticles with better properties (reduced toxicity, high colloidal and chemical stability, wide scope of application) in straightforward and reproducible methods new core shell magnetic nanoparticles were developed based on polypyrrole shells functionalized with biotin and folic acid. Magnetite nanoparticles stabilized by sebacic acid were used as magnetic cores. The morphology of magnetite was determined by transmission electron microscopy TEM, while the chemical structure investigated by FT-IR.

  3. Iron nanoparticles embedded in carbon films: structural and optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashayekhi, Fatemeh; Shafiekhani, Azizollah; Sebt, Seyed Ali

    2016-06-01

    In the present work amorphous hydrogenated carbon films with sputtered iron nanoparticles (Fe NPs @ a-C:H) were deposited by co-deposition of RF-sputtering and RF-plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition methods using acetylene gas and iron target on quartz and silicon substrates. Samples were prepared in different initial pressures and during constant deposition time. The crystalline structure of Fe NPs @ a-C:H was studied using X-ray diffraction and selected area electron diffraction patterns. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis presents that increasing the initial pressure decreases the atomic ratio of Fe/C and the sp3-hybridized carbon content in prepared samples. The transmission electron microscope image shows the encapsulated Fe NPs in carbon films. The optical properties and localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of samples were studied using UV-visible spectrophotometry, which is shown that increasing of Fe content decreases the intensity of LSPR peak and increases the optical band gap.

  4. Solvothermal synthesis and characterization of monodisperse superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shichuan; Zhang, Tonglai; Tang, Runze; Qiu, Hao; Wang, Caiqin; Zhou, Zunning

    2015-04-01

    A series of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticle clusters with different structure guide agents were synthesized by a modified solvothermal method and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), thermogravimetric analyses (TG), a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). It is found that the superparamagnetic nanoparticles guided by NaCit (sodium citrate) have high saturation magnetization (Ms) of 69.641 emu/g and low retentivity (Mr) of 0.8 emu/g. Guiding to form superparamagnetic clusters with size range of 80-110 nm, the adherent small-molecule citrate groups on the surface prevent the prefabricated ferrite crystals growing further. In contrast, the primary small crystal guided and stabilized by the PVP long-chain molecules assemble freely to larger ones and stop growing in size range of 100-150 nm, which has saturation magnetization (Ms) of 97.979 emu/g and retentivity (Mr) of 46.323 emu/g. The relevant formation mechanisms of the two types of samples are proposed at the end. The superparamagnetic ferrite clusters guided by sodium citrate are expected to be used for movement controlling of passive interference particles to avoid aggregation and the sample guided by PVP will be a candidate of nanometer wave absorbing material.

  5. Thermal motion of magnetic iron nanoparticles in a frozen solvent.

    PubMed

    Klokkenburg, Mark; Erné, Ben H; Philipse, Albert P

    2005-02-15

    The thermal rotation of iron nanoparticles dispersed in cyclohexane was studied by measuring the dynamic magnetic susceptibility above and below the freezing point of the solvent. Above the freezing point, the orientation of the magnetic dipoles changes mainly by reorientation of the entire particle. Below the freezing point, complete arrest of particle motion was expected, such that the magnetic dipoles would only be able to reorient themselves inside the nanoparticles (Neel relaxation). However, we find that thermal motion continues well below the temperature at which the bulk of the solvent is frozen. We ascribe this to local lowering of the freezing point, due to the presence of polymers in the close vicinity of the colloids. Furthermore, because strong dipole-dipole interactions result in the formation of dipolar chains, we have systematically studied the effect of particle size on dynamics in a frozen solvent. For the larger particles, our data indicate that local wiggling of the individual particles in a chain may become the dominating mode of thermal motion. PMID:15697259

  6. Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticle-Based Delivery Systems for Biotherapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Mok, Hyejung; Zhang, Miqin

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle (SPION)-based carrier systems have many advantages over other nanoparticle-based systems. They are biocompatible, biodegradable, facilely tunable, and superparamagnetic and thus controllable by an external magnetic field. These attributes enable their broad biomedical applications. In particular, magnetically-driven carriers are drawing considerable interest as an emerging therapeutic delivery system because of their superior delivery efficiency. Area covered This article reviews the recent advances in use of SPION-based carrier systems to improve the delivery efficiency and target specificity of biotherapeutics. We examine various formulations of SPION-based delivery systems, including SPION micelles, clusters, hydrogels, liposomes, and micro/nanospheres, as well as their specific applications in delivery of biotherapeutics. Expert opinion Recently, biotherapeutics including therapeutic cells, proteins and genes have been studied as alternative treatments to various diseases. Despite the advantages of high target specificity and low adverse effects, clinical translation of biotherapeutics has been hindered by the poor stability and low delivery efficiency compared to chemical drugs. Accordingly, biotherapeutic delivery systems that can overcome these limitations are actively pursued. SPION-based materials can be ideal candidates for developing such delivery systems because of their excellent biocompatibility and superparamagnetism that enables long-term accumulation/retention at target sites by utilization of a suitable magnet. In addition, synthesis technologies for production of finely-tuned, homogeneous SPIONs have been well developed, which may promise their rapid clinical translation. PMID:23199200

  7. Comparative structural and chemical studies of ferritin cores with gradual removal of their iron contents.

    PubMed

    Gálvez, Natividad; Fernández, Belén; Sánchez, Purificación; Cuesta, Rafael; Ceolín, Marcelo; Clemente-León, Miguel; Trasobares, Susana; López-Haro, Miguel; Calvino, Jose J; Stéphan, Odile; Domínguez-Vera, José M

    2008-06-25

    Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectroscopy (XANES), Electron Energy-Loss Spectroscopy (EELS), Small-Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS), and SQUID magnetic studies were performed in a batch of horse spleen ferritins from which iron had been gradually removed, yielding samples containing 2200, 1200, 500, and 200 iron atoms. Taken together, findings obtained demonstrate that the ferritin iron core consists of a polyphasic structure (ferrihydrite, magnetite, hematite) and that the proportion of phases is modified by iron removal. Thus, the relative amount of magnetite in ferritin containing 2200 to 200 iron atoms rose steadily from approximately 20% to approximately 70% whereas the percentage of ferrihydrite fell from approximately 60% to approximately 20%. These results indicate a ferrihydrite-magnetite core-shell structure. It was also found that the magnetite in the ferritin iron core is not a source of free toxic ferrous iron, as previously believed. Therefore, the presence of magnetite in the ferritin cores of patients with Alzheimer's disease is not a cause of their increased brain iron(II) concentration. PMID:18507465

  8. Excellent improvement in the static and dynamic magnetic properties of carbon coated iron nanoparticles for microwave absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khani, Omid; Shoushtari, Morteza Zargar; Farbod, Mansoor

    2015-11-01

    Carbon coated iron nanoparticles were synthesized, using a simple arc-discharge method. The morphology and the internal structure of the core/shell nanoparticles were studied, using field emission scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. X-ray diffraction analysis showed that both magnetic α-Fe and nonmagnetic γ-Fe phases existed in the as-prepared particles. In order to improve the static and dynamic magnetic properties of the core/shell nanoparticles, the produced nanocapsules were annealed in argon atmosphere at two different temperatures. Hysteresis loops revealed that the value of the saturation magnetization (MS) increased more than 4.1 times of its original value by annealing and this led to 70% increase in the imaginary part of the permeability. Phase analysis showed that heat treatment eliminated the nonmagnetic γ-Fe phase completely. The reflection loss plots were studied for composite layers containing 20 vol% of the annealed and not annealed nanocapsules. One of the absorber layers which contained annealed nanocapsules showed at least -10 dB loss in the whole G, C, X and Ku frequency bands and the optimal absorption exceeded -37 dB at 5.8 GHz for the as-prepared sample with a thickness of 3.2 mm. The results revealed that the magnetic properties of the arc-made Fe/C core/shell nanoparticle can be improved significantly by annealing in argon.

  9. Zero Valent Iron: Impact of Anions Present during Synthesis on Subsequent Nanoparticle Reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Kirsten; Forsberg, Brady; Baer, Donald R.; Arnold, William A.; Penn, R. Lee

    2011-10-01

    Zero-valent iron particles are an effective remediation technology for groundwater contaminated with halogenated organic compounds. In particular, nano-scale zero-valent iron is a promising material for remediation due to its high specific surface area, which results in faster rate constants and more effective use of the iron. An aspect of iron nanoparticle reactivity that has not been explored is the impact of anions present during iron metal nanoparticle synthesis. Solutions containing chloride, phosphate, sulfate, and nitrate anions and ferric ions were used to generate iron oxide nanoparticles. The resulting materials were dialyzed to remove dissolved byproducts and then dried and reduced by hydrogen gas at high temperature. The reactivity of the resulting zero valent iron nanoparticles was quantified by monitoring the kinetics as well as products of carbon tetrachloride reduction, and significant differences in reactivity and chloroform yield were observed. The reactivity of nanoparticles prepared in the presence of sulfate and phosphate demonstrated the highest reactivity and chloroform yield. Furthermore, substantial variations in the solid-state products of oxidation (magnetite, iron sulfide, and goethite, among others) were also observed.

  10. D-mannose-modified iron oxide nanoparticles for stem cell labeling.

    PubMed

    Horak, Daniel; Babic, Michal; Jendelová, Pavla; Herynek, Vít; Trchová, Miroslava; Pientka, Zbynek; Pollert, Emil; Hájek, Milan; Syková, Eva

    2007-01-01

    New surface-modified iron oxide nanoparticles were developed by precipitation of Fe(II) and Fe(III) salts with ammonium hydroxide according to two methods. In the first method, precipitation was done in the presence of D-mannose solution (in situ coating); the second method involved oxidation of precipitated magnetite with sodium hypochlorite followed by addition of D-mannose solution (postsynthesis coating). Selected nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), elemental analysis, dynamic light scattering, infrared (IR), X-ray powder analysis, and ultrasonic spectrometry. While the first preparation method produced very fine nanoparticles ca. 2 nm in diameter, the second one yielded ca. 6 nm particles. Addition of D-mannose after synthesis did not affect the iron oxide particle size. UV-vis spectroscopy suggested that D-mannose suppresses the nonspecific sorption of serum proteins from DMEM culture medium on magnetic nanoparticles. Rat bone marrow stromal cells (rMSCs) were labeled with uncoated and d-mannose-modified iron oxide nanoparticles and with Endorem (Guerbet, France; control). Optical and transmission electron microscopy confirmed the presence of D-mannose-modified iron oxide nanoparticles inside the cells. D-mannose-modified nanoparticles crossed the cell membranes and were internalized well by the cells. Relaxivity measurements of labeled cells in gelatin revealed very high relaxivities only for postsynthesis D-mannose-coated iron oxide nanoparticles. PMID:17370996

  11. Magnetic and fluorescent core-shell nanoparticles for ratiometric pH sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapresta-Fernández, Alejandro; Doussineau, Tristan; Dutz, Silvio; Steiniger, Frank; Moro, Artur J.; Mohr, Gerhard J.

    2011-10-01

    This paper describes the preparation of nanoparticles composed of a magnetic core surrounded by two successive silica shells embedding two fluorophores, showing uniform nanoparticle size (50-60 nm in diameter) and shape, which allow ratiometric pH measurements in the pH range 5-8. Uncoated iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (~10 nm in diameter) were formed by the coprecipitation reaction of ferrous and ferric salts. Then, they were added to a water-in-oil microemulsion where the hydrophilic silica shells were obtained through hydrolysis and condensation of tetraethoxyorthosilicate together with the corresponding silylated dye derivatives—a sulforhodamine was embedded in the inner silica shell and used as the reference dye while a pH-sensitive fluorescein was incorporated in the outer shell as the pH indicator. The magnetic nanoparticles were characterized using vibrating sample magnetometry, dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The relationship between the analytical parameter, that is, the ratio of fluorescence between the sensing and reference dyes versus the pH was adjusted to a sigmoidal fit using a Boltzmann type equation giving an apparent pKa value of 6.8. The fluorescence intensity of the reference dye did not change significantly (~3.0%) on modifying the pH of the nanoparticle dispersion. Finally, the proposed method was statistically validated against a reference procedure using samples of water and physiological buffer with 2% of horse serum, indicating that there are no significant statistical differences at a 95% confidence level.

  12. The role of interfacial metal silicates on the magnetism in FeCo/SiO{sub 2} and Fe{sub 49%}Co{sub 49%}V{sub 2%}/SiO{sub 2} core/shell nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Desautels, R. D.; Freeland, J. W.; Rowe, M. P.; Lierop, J. van

    2015-05-07

    We have investigated the role of spontaneously formed interfacial metal silicates on the magnetism of FeCo/SiO{sub 2} and Fe{sub 49%}Co{sub 49%}V{sub 2%}/SiO{sub 2} core/shell nanoparticles. Element specific x-ray absorption and photoelectron spectroscopy experiments have identified the characteristic spectral features of metallic iron and cobalt from within the nanoparticle core. In addition, metal silicates of iron, cobalt, and vanadium were found to have formed spontaneously at the interface between the nanoparticle core and silica shell. X-ray magnetic circular dichroism experiments indicated that the elemental magnetism was a result of metallic iron and cobalt with small components from the iron, cobalt, and vanadium silicates. Magnetometry experiments have shown that there was no exchange bias loop shift in the FeCo nanoparticles; however, exchange bias from antiferromagnetic vanadium oxide was measured in the V-doped nanoparticles. These results showed clearly that the interfacial metal silicates played a significant role in the magnetism of these core/shell nanoparticles, and that the vanadium percolated from the FeCo-cores into the SiO{sub 2}-based interfacial shell.

  13. Physicochemical Characterization of Nebulized Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles (SPIONs)

    PubMed Central

    Graczyk, Halshka; Bryan, Louise C.; Lewinski, Nastassja; Suarez, Guillaume; Coullerez, Geraldine; Bowen, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Aerosol-mediated delivery of nano-based therapeutics to the lung has emerged as a promising alternative for treatment and prevention of lung diseases. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) have attracted significant attention for such applications due to their biocompatibility and magnetic properties. However, information is lacking about the characteristics of nebulized SPIONs for use as a therapeutic aerosol. To address this need, we conducted a physicochemical characterization of nebulized Rienso, a SPION-based formulation for intravenous treatment of anemia. Methods: Four different concentrations of SPION suspensions were nebulized with a one-jet nebulizer. Particle size was measured in suspension by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS), and nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA), and in the aerosol by a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS). Results: The average particle size in suspension as measured by TEM, PCS, and NTA was 9±2 nm, 27±7 nm, and 56±10 nm, respectively. The particle size in suspension remained the same before and after the nebulization process. However, after aerosol collection in an impinger, the suspended particle size increased to 159±46 nm as measured by NTA. The aerosol particle concentration increased linearly with increasing suspension concentration, and the aerodynamic diameter remained relatively stable at around 75 nm as measured by SMPS. Conclusions: We demonstrated that the total number and particle size in the aerosol were modulated as a function of the initial concentration in the nebulizer. The data obtained mark the first known independent characterization of nebulized Rienso and, as such, provide critical information on the behavior of Rienso nanoparticles in an aerosol. The data obtained in this study add new knowledge to the existing body of literature on potential applications of SPION suspensions as inhaled aerosol therapeutics. PMID

  14. Antimicrobial and Genotoxicity Effects of Zero-valent Iron Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Barzan, Elham; Mehrabian, Sedigheh; Irian, Saeed

    2014-01-01

    Background: In a world of nanotechnology, the first concern is the potential environmental impact of nanoparticles. An efficient way to estimate nanotoxicity is to monitor the responses of bacteria exposed to these particles. Objectives: The current study explored the antimicrobial properties of nZVI (zero-valent Iron nanoparticles) on the Gram-negative bacterial systems Erwinia amylovora, Xanthomonas oryzae and the Gram-positive bacterial systems Bacillus cereus and Streptomyces spp. The genotoxicity potential of nZVI was also assayed. Materials and Methods: The toxicity of nZVI was tested by two different methods: Growing bacteria in liquid (broth dilution) and agar media (challenge test) containing different nZVI concentrations for 24-72 hours. The genotoxicity of nZVI was assessed using the preincubation version of the Ames test. Results: The lowest concentrations of nZVI that inhibited the visible growth (MIC) of E. amylovora, X. oryzae, B. cereus and Streptomyces spp. were 625, 550, 1250 and 1280 ppm, respectively. The minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) for E. amylovora and X. oryzae were 10,000 and 5,000 ppm of nZVI, respectively. MBC was not observed for the Gram positive bacteria. No bacteriostatic and bactericidal effects were observed for oxidized nZVI. Mutant frequency did not increase according to the vehicle control at the concentrations assayed, indicating a lack of mutagenicity associated with nZVI. Conclusions: nZVI nanoparticles are not mutagenic at low concentrations, therefore they can be used without detrimental effects on soil bacteria. PMID:25147712

  15. pH sensitive core-shell magnetic nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Lungu, Iulia Ioana; Rădulescu, Marius; Mogoşanu, George Dan; Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade, nanobiotechnology has evolved rapidly with an extensive impact on biomedical area. In order to improve bioavailability and minimize adverse effects, drug delivery systems based on magnetic nanocomposites are under development mainly for cancer imaging and antitumor therapy. In this regard, pH sensitive core-shell magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) with accurate controlled size and shape are synthesized by various modern methods, such as homogeneous precipitation, coprecipitation, microemulsion or polyol approaches, high temperature and hydrothermal reactions, sol-gel reactions, aerosol÷vapor processes and sonolysis. Due to their unique combined physico-chemical and biological properties (such as higher dispensability, chemical and thermal stability, biocompatibility), pH responsive core-shell magnetic NPs are widely investigated for controlled release of cytostatic drugs into the tumor site by means of pH change: magnetite@silicon dioxide (Fe3O4@SiO2), Fe3O4@titanium dioxide (TiO2), β-thiopropionate-polyethylene glycol (PEG)-modified Fe3O4@mSiO2, Fe3O4 NPs core coated with SiO2 with an imidazole group modified PEG-polypeptide (mPEG-poly-L-Asparagine), polyacrylic acid (PAA) and folic acid (FA) coating of the iron oxide NP core, methoxy polyethylene glycol-block-polymethacrylic acid-block-polyglycerol monomethacrylate (MPEG-b-PMAA-b-PGMA) attached by a PGMA block to a Fe3O4 core, PEG-modified polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimer shell with Fe3O4 core and mesoporous silica coated on Fe3O4, mostly coated with an anticancer drug. This review paper highlights the modern research directions currently employed to demonstrate the utility of the pH responsive core-shell magnetic NPs in diagnosis and treatment of oncological diseases. PMID:27151685

  16. Rapid Spectrophotometric Technique for Quantifying Iron in Cells Labeled with Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles: Potential Translation to the Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Dadashzadeh, Esmaeel R.; Hobson, Matthew; Bryant, L. Henry; Dean, Dana D.; Frank, Joseph A.

    2012-01-01

    Labeling cells with superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles provides the ability to track cells by Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Quantifying intracellular iron concentration in SPIO labeled cells would allow for the comparison of agents and techniques used to magnetically label cells. Here we describe a rapid spectrophotometric technique (ST) to quantify iron content of SPIO labeled cells, circumventing the previous requirement of an overnight acid digestion. Following lysis with 10% SDS of magnetically labeled cells, quantification of SPIO doped or labeled cells was performed using commonly available spectrophotometric instrument(s) by comparing absorptions at 370 and 750 nm with correction for turbidity of cellular products to determine iron content of each sample. Standard curves demonstrated high linear correlation (R2 = 0.998) between absorbance spectra of iron oxide nanoparticles and concentration in known SPIO doped cells. Comparisons of the ST to ICP-MS or NMR relaxometric (R2) determinations of intracellular iron contents in SPIO containing samples resulted in significant linear correlation between the techniques (R2 vs. ST, R2>0.992, p<0.0001, ST vs. ICP-MS, R2>0.995, p<0.0001) with the limit of detection of ST for iron = 0.66μg/ml. We have developed a rapid straightforward protocol that does not require overnight acid digestion for quantifying iron oxide content in magnetically labeled cells using readily available analytic instrumentation that should greatly expedite advances in comparing SPIO agents and protocols for labeling cells. PMID:23109392

  17. Synthesis and characterization of iron based hybrid nanoparticles with polymer surfactant-Pluronic(R) F127

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Jriuan

    2005-12-01

    Nanotechnology is one of the current major research fields. Due to numerous applications, magnetic nanoparticles have become one of the most interesting areas of research. In a previous study Mn-Fe mixed oxide nanoparticles were synthesized by irradiating the solution of Mn and Fe carbonyls with high intensity ultrasound. They exhibited crystal structure and magnetism which changed with the Mn:Fe ratio. However, since these materials were amorphous, they had to be annealed and this led to aggregation decreasing the surface:volume ratio. In order to prevent this sintering, we have now adopted a wet chemical method in which organometals were decomposed by heating to form metals or metal oxides. Micelles of the polymer PluronicRTM, were used for dimensional confinement, leading to the control of the particle size. Pluronic RTM stabilizes the surface of the particles and the heating crystallizes the particles, so that the resulting products are non-aggregated crystals. By using this synthetic method, we have accomplished the following objectives. (1) Iron/iron oxide particles are obtained from thermo decomposition of Fe(CO)5 solution. The size of the particles is controlled by adjusting the concentration of surfactant. The particles size changed from 5.6 to 22.3 nm from high to low concentration of PluronicRTM. (2) Mn-Fe or Co-Fe mixed oxide particles are obtained by the thermal decomposition of Mn2(CO)10 and Fe(CO)5 or Co2(CO)8 and Fe(CO)5 solutions. We observed crystal structure and magnetism transformations when the Mn:Fe or Co:Fe ratio was increased. (3) Heterostructure core/shell nanoparticles were obtained by using Fe nanoparticles to catalyze the decomposition of chromium hexacarbonyl. The resulting particles have a Cr core and a gamma-Fe2O 3 shell. The materials were characterized by synchrotron power XRD for their crystal structure, SQUID and Mossbauer spectra for their magnetic properties, and TEM and HRTEM for their morphology.

  18. Determining iron oxide nanoparticle heating efficiency and elucidating local nanoparticle temperature for application in agarose gel-based tumor model.

    PubMed

    Shah, Rhythm R; Dombrowsky, Alexander R; Paulson, Abigail L; Johnson, Margaret P; Nikles, David E; Brazel, Christopher S

    2016-11-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MNPs) have been developed for magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) cancer therapy, where cancer cells are treated through the heat generated by application of a high frequency magnetic field. This heat has also been proposed as a mechanism to trigger release of chemotherapy agents. In each of these cases, MNPs with optimal heating performance can be used to maximize therapeutic effect while minimizing the required dosage of MNPs. In this study, the heating efficiencies (or specific absorption rate, SAR) of two types of MNPs were evaluated experimentally and then predicted from their magnetic properties. MNPs were also incorporated in the core of poly(ethylene glycol-b-caprolactone) micelles, co-localized with rhodamine B fluorescent dye attached to polycaprolactone to monitor local, nanoscale temperatures during magnetic heating. Despite a relatively high SAR produced by these MNPs, no significant temperature rise beyond that observed in the bulk solution was measured by fluorescence in the core of the magnetic micelles. MNPs were also incorporated into a macro-scale agarose gel system that mimicked a tumor targeted by MNPs and surrounded by healthy tissues. The agarose-based tumor models showed that targeted MNPs can reach hyperthermia temperatures inside a tumor with a sufficient MNP concentration, while causing minimal temperature rise in the healthy tissue surrounding the tumor. PMID:27523991

  19. Non-seeded synthesis and characterization of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles incorporated into silica nanoparticles via ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Sodipo, Bashiru Kayode; Abdul Aziz, Azlan

    2015-03-01

    A non-seeded method of incorporating superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) into silica nanoparticles is presented. Mixture of both SPION and silica nanoparticles was ultrasonically irradiated. The collapsed bubbles and shockwave generated from the ultrasonic irradiation produce tremendous force that caused inelastic collision and incorporation of SPION into the silica. Physicochemical analyses using transmission electron microscope (TEM), electronic spectroscopic imaging (ESI), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy demonstrated the formation of SPION/silica composite nanoparticles. The prepared composite nanoparticles exhibited superparamagnetic behaviour and nearly 70% of the initial saturation magnetization (Ms) of the SPION was retained. The presence and reactivity of the silica were demonstrated via assembling decanethiol monolayer on the composite nanoparticles. The silanol group of the silica provided the binding site for the alkyl group in the decanethiol molecules. Therefore, the thiol moiety became the terminal and functional group on the magnetic composite nanoparticles. PMID:25315418

  20. Water-soluble core/shell nanoparticles for proton therapy through particle-induced radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jeong Chan; Jung, Myung-Hwan; Kim, Maeng Jun; Kim, Kye-Ryung

    2015-02-01

    Metallic nanoparticles have been used in biomedical applications such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), therapy, and drug delivery systems. Metallic nanoparticles as therapeutic tools have been demonstrated using radio-frequency magnetic fields or near-infrared light. Recently, therapeutic applications of metallic nanomaterials combined with proton beams have been reported. Particle-induced radiation from metallic nanoparticles, which can enhance the therapeutic effects of proton therapy, was released when the nanoparticles were bombarded by a high-energy proton beam. Core/shell nanoparticles, especially Au-coated magnetic nanoparticles, have drawn attention in biological applications due to their attractive characteristics. However, studies on the phase transfer of organic-ligand-based core/shell nanoparticles into water are limited. Herein, we demonstrated that hydrophobic core/shell structured nanomaterials could be successfully dispersed in water through chloroform/surfactant mixtures. The effects of the core/shell nanomaterials and the proton irradiation on Escherichia coli (E. coli) were also explored.

  1. Melt-grafting for the synthesis of core-shell nanoparticles with ultra-high dispersant density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zirbs, Ronald; Lassenberger, Andrea; Vonderhaid, Iris; Kurzhals, Steffen; Reimhult, Erik

    2015-06-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) are used in a rapidly expanding number of applications in e.g. the biomedical field, for which brushes of biocompatible polymers such as poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) have to be densely grafted to the core. Grafting of such shells to monodisperse iron oxide NPs has remained a challenge mainly due to the conflicting requirements to replace the ligand shell of as-synthesized NPs with irreversibly bound PEG dispersants. We introduce a general two-step method to graft PEG dispersants from a melt to iron oxide NPs first functionalized with nitrodopamine (NDA). This method yields uniquely dense spherical PEG-brushes (~3 chains per nm2 of PEG(5 kDa)) compared to existing methods, and remarkably colloidally stable NPs also under challenging conditions.Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) are used in a rapidly expanding number of applications in e.g. the biomedical field, for which brushes of biocompatible polymers such as poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) have to be densely grafted to the core. Grafting of such shells to monodisperse iron oxide NPs has remained a challenge mainly due to the conflicting requirements to replace the ligand shell of as-synthesized NPs with irreversibly bound PEG dispersants. We introduce a general two-step method to graft PEG dispersants from a melt to iron oxide NPs first functionalized with nitrodopamine (NDA). This method yields uniquely dense spherical PEG-brushes (~3 chains per nm2 of PEG(5 kDa)) compared to existing methods, and remarkably colloidally stable NPs also under challenging conditions. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: The ESI contains details on additional synthetic protocols and characterization. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr02313k

  2. Dendritic carbon architectures formed by nanotube core-directed diffusion-limited aggregation of nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhenyu; Kong, Xiaohui

    2010-08-28

    A regular array of fractal patterns with macroscopic dendritic carbon architecture was prepared by catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The dendritic carbon architectures have micrometre-sized stems and hyperbranches evolved by lateral growth, and they are formed by diffusion-limited aggregation of carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticle building blocks generated from catalytic pyrolysis of toluene, which is directed by carbon nanotube cores, and followed by subsequent restructuring from surface to bulk. Incorporation of such proposed processes in Monte Carlo simulations generates dendritic architectures similar to the morphologies observed from the experiments. The findings provide direct information to the time resolved evolution of the morphology and microstructure of the dendritic carbon architecture, which mimic the nature behavior as snowflake attaching on the tree branches. Those will be important to understand the growth of vapor grown carbon fibers and carbon filamentous structures, and further possibility to control branching out of vapor grown carbon fibers. PMID:20607160

  3. The Effect of Gold and Iron-Oxide Nanoparticles on Biofilm-Forming Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Sathyanarayanan, Madhu Bala; Balachandranath, Reneta; Genji Srinivasulu, Yuvasri; Kannaiyan, Sathish Kumar; Subbiahdoss, Guruprakash

    2013-01-01

    Microbial biofilms on biomaterial implants or devices are hard to eliminate by antibiotics due to their protection by exopolymeric substances that embed the organisms in a matrix, impenetrable for most antibiotics and immune-cells. Application of metals in their nanoparticulated form is currently considered to resolve bacterial infections. Gold and iron-oxide nanoparticles are widely used in different medical applications, but their utilisation to eradicate biofilms on biomaterials implants is novel. Here, we studied the effect of gold and iron oxide nanoparticles on Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. We report that biofilm growth was reduced at higher concentrations of gold and iron-oxide nanoparticles compared to absence of nanoparticles. Thus nanoparticles with appropriate concentration could show significant reduction in biofilm formation. PMID:24187645

  4. Effect of radiation energy and intracellular iron dose on iron oxide nanoparticle enhancement of radiation cytotoxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazur, Courtney M.; Strawbridge, Rendall R.; Thompson, Ella S.; Petryk, Alicia A.; Gladstone, David J.; Hoopes, P. Jack

    2015-03-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) are one of several high-Z materials currently being investigated for their ability to enhance the cytotoxic effects of therapeutic ionizing radiation. Studies with iron oxide, silver, gold, and hafnium oxide suggest radiation dose, radiation energy, cell type, and the type and level of metallic nanoparticle are all critical factors in achieving radiation enhancement in tumor cells. Using a single 4 Gy radiation dose, we compared the level of tumor cell cytotoxicity at two different intracellular iron concentrations and two different radiation energies in vitro. IONPs were added to cell culture media at concentrations of 0.25 mg Fe/mL and 1.0 mg Fe/mL and incubated with murine breast adenocarcinoma (MTG-B) cells for 72 hours. Extracellular iron was then removed and cells were irradiated at either 662 keV or 10 MV. At the 0.25 mg Fe/mL dose (4 pg Fe/cell), radiation energy did not affect the level of cytotoxicity. However with 1.0 mg Fe/mL (9 pg Fe/cell), the higher 10 MV radiation energy resulted in 50% greater cytotoxicity as compared to cells without IONPs irradiated at this energy. These results suggest IONPs may be able to significantly enhance the cytotoxic effects of radiation and improve therapeutic ratio if they can be selectively associated with cancer cells and/or tumors. Ongoing in vivo studies of IONP radiation enhancement in a murine tumor model are too immature to draw conclusions from at this time, however preliminary data suggests similar effectiveness of IONP radiation enhancement at 6 MV and 18 MV energy levels. In addition to the IONP-based radiation enhancement demonstrated here, the use of tumor-localized IONP with an externally delivered, non-toxic alternating magnetic field affords the opportunity to selectively heat and kill tumor cells. Combining IONP-based radiation sensitization and heat-based cytotoxicity provides a unique and potentially highly effective opportunity for therapeutic ratio enhancement.

  5. Chemical synthesis and assembly of uniformly sized iron oxide nanoparticles for medical applications.

    PubMed

    Ling, Daishun; Lee, Nohyun; Hyeon, Taeghwan

    2015-05-19

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles have been extensively investigated for their various biomedical applications including diagnostic imaging, biological sensing, drug, cell, and gene delivery, and cell tracking. Recent advances in the designed synthesis and assembly of uniformly sized iron oxide nanoparticles have brought innovation in the field of nanomedicine. This Account provides a review on the recent progresses in the controlled synthesis and assembly of uniformly sized iron oxide nanoparticles for medical applications. In particular, it focuses on three topics: stringent control of particle size during synthesis via the "heat-up" process, surface modification for the high stability and biocompatibility of the nanoparticles for diagnostic purposes, and assembly of the nanoparticles within polymers or mesoporous silica matrices for theranostic applications. Using extremely small 3 nm sized iron oxide nanoparticles (ESION), a new nontoxic T1 MRI contrast agent was realized for high-resolution MRI of blood vessels down to 0.2 mm. Ferrimagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (FION) that are larger than 20 nm exhibit extremely large magnetization and coercivity values. The cells labeled with FIONs showed very high T2 contrast effect so that even a single cell can be readily imaged. Designed assembly of iron oxide nanoparticles with mesoporous silica and polymers was conducted to fabricate multifunctional nanoparticles for theranostic applications. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles are excellent scaffolds for iron oxide nanoparticles, providing magnetic resonance and fluorescence imaging modalities as well as the functionality of the drug delivery vehicle. Polymeric ligands could be designed to respond to various biological stimuli such as pH, temperature, and enzymatic activity. For example, we fabricated tumor pH-sensitive magnetic nanogrenades (termed PMNs) composed of self-assembled iron oxide nanoparticles and pH-responsive ligands. They were utilized to visualize

  6. Intra- and interparticle magnetism of cobalt-doped iron-oxide nanoparticles encapsulated in a synthetic ferritin cage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skoropata, E.; Desautels, R. D.; Falvo, E.; Ceci, P.; Kasyutich, O.; Freeland, J. W.; van Lierop, J.

    2014-11-01

    We present an in-depth examination of the composition and magnetism of cobalt (Co2 +)-doped iron-oxide nanoparticles encapsulated in Pyrococcus furiosus ferritin shells. We show that the Co2 + dopant ions were incorporated into the γ -Fe2O3/Fe3O4 core, with small paramagnetic-like clusters likely residing on the surface of the nanoparticle that were observed for all cobalt-doped samples. In addition, element-specific characterization using Mössbauer spectroscopy and polarized x-ray absorption indicated that Co2 + was incorporated exclusively into the octahedral B sites of the spinel-oxide nanoparticle. Comparable superparamagnetic blocking temperatures, coercivities, and effective anisotropies were obtained for 7%, 10%, and 12% cobalt-doped nanoparticles, and were only slightly reduced for 3% cobalt, indicating a strong effect of cobalt incorporation, with a lesser effect of cobalt content. Due to the regular particle size and separation that result from the use of the ferritin cage, a comparison of the effects of interparticle interactions on the disordered assembly of nanoparticles was also obtained that indicated significantly different behaviors between undoped and cobalt-doped nanoparticles.

  7. Cloaking core-shell nanoparticles from conducting electrons in solids.

    PubMed

    Liao, Bolin; Zebarjadi, Mona; Esfarjani, Keivan; Chen, Gang

    2012-09-21

    In this Letter, we aim at making nanoparticles embedded in a host semiconductor with a size comparable to electronic wavelengths "invisible" to the electron transport. Inspired by the recent progress made in optics and working within the framework of the expansion of partial waves, we demonstrate that the opposite effects imposed by potential barriers and wells of a core-shell nanoparticle on the phase shifts associated with the scattered electron wave could make the scattering cross section of the first two partial waves vanish simultaneously. We show that this is sufficient to cloak the nanoparticle from being detected by electrons with specific energy in the sense that a total scattering cross section smaller than 0.01% of the physical cross section can be obtained and a 4 orders of magnitude difference in the total scattering cross section can be presented within an energy range of only 40 meV, indicating possible applications of the "electron cloaks" as novel electronic switches and sensors, and in efficient energy harvesting and conversion technologies. PMID:23005976

  8. Cloaking Core-Shell Nanoparticles from Conducting Electrons in Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Bolin; Zebarjadi, Mona; Esfarjani, Keivan; Chen, Gang

    2012-09-01

    In this Letter, we aim at making nanoparticles embedded in a host semiconductor with a size comparable to electronic wavelengths “invisible” to the electron transport. Inspired by the recent progress made in optics and working within the framework of the expansion of partial waves, we demonstrate that the opposite effects imposed by potential barriers and wells of a core-shell nanoparticle on the phase shifts associated with the scattered electron wave could make the scattering cross section of the first two partial waves vanish simultaneously. We show that this is sufficient to cloak the nanoparticle from being detected by electrons with specific energy in the sense that a total scattering cross section smaller than 0.01% of the physical cross section can be obtained and a 4 orders of magnitude difference in the total scattering cross section can be presented within an energy range of only 40 meV, indicating possible applications of the “electron cloaks” as novel electronic switches and sensors, and in efficient energy harvesting and conversion technologies.

  9. Gold core@silver semishell Janus nanoparticles prepared by interfacial etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Limei; Deming, Christopher P.; Peng, Yi; Hu, Peiguang; Stofan, Jake; Chen, Shaowei

    2016-07-01

    Gold core@silver semishell Janus nanoparticles were prepared by chemical etching of Au@Ag core-shell nanoparticles at the air/water interface. Au@Ag core-shell nanoparticles were synthesized by chemical deposition of a silver shell onto gold seed colloids followed by the self-assembly of 1-dodecanethiol onto the nanoparticle surface. The nanoparticles then formed a monolayer on the water surface of a Langmuir-Blodgett trough, and part of the silver shell was selectively etched away by the mixture of hydrogen peroxide and ammonia in the water subphase, where the etching was limited to the side of the nanoparticles that was in direct contact with water. The resulting Janus nanoparticles exhibited an asymmetrical distribution of silver on the surface of the gold cores, as manifested in transmission electron microscopy, UV-vis absorption, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements. Interestingly, the Au@Ag semishell Janus nanoparticles exhibited enhanced electrocatalytic activity in oxygen reduction reactions, as compared to their Au@Ag and Ag@Au core-shell counterparts, likely due to a synergistic effect between the gold cores and silver semishells that optimized oxygen binding to the nanoparticle surface.Gold core@silver semishell Janus nanoparticles were prepared by chemical etching of Au@Ag core-shell nanoparticles at the air/water interface. Au@Ag core-shell nanoparticles were synthesized by chemical deposition of a silver shell onto gold seed colloids followed by the self-assembly of 1-dodecanethiol onto the nanoparticle surface. The nanoparticles then formed a monolayer on the water surface of a Langmuir-Blodgett trough, and part of the silver shell was selectively etched away by the mixture of hydrogen peroxide and ammonia in the water subphase, where the etching was limited to the side of the nanoparticles that was in direct contact with water. The resulting Janus nanoparticles exhibited an asymmetrical distribution of silver on the surface of the gold

  10. Cellular level loading and heating of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kalambur, Venkat S; Longmire, Ellen K; Bischof, John C

    2007-11-20

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) hold promise for a variety of biomedical applications due to their properties of visualization using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), heating with radio frequency (rf), and movement in an external magnetic field. In this study, the cellular loading (uptake) mechanism of dextran- and surfactant-coated iron oxide NPs by malignant prostate tumor cells (LNCaP-Pro5) has been studied, and the feasibility of traditional rf treatment and a new laser heating method was evaluated. The kinetics of cell loading was quantified using magnetophoresis and a colorimetric assay. The results showed that loading of surfactant-coated iron oxide NPs with LNCaP-Pro5 was saturable with time (at 24 h) and extracellular concentration (11 pg Fe/cell at 0.5 mg Fe/mL), indicating that the particles are taken up by an "adsorptive endocytosis" pathway. Dextran-coated NPs, however, were taken up less efficiently (1 pg Fe/cell at 0.5 mg Fe/mL). Loading did not saturate with concentration suggesting uptake by fluid-phase endocytosis. Magnetophoresis suggests that NP-loaded cells can be held using external magnetic fields in microcirculatory flow velocities in vivo or in an appropriately designed extracorporeal circuit. Loaded cells were heated using traditional rf (260A, 357 kHz) and a new laser method (532 nm, 7 ns pulse duration, 0.03 J/pulse, 20 pulse/s). Iron oxide in water was found to absorb sufficiently strongly at 532 nm such that heating of individual NPs and thus loaded cells (1 pg Fe/cell) was effective (<10% cell survival) after 30 s of laser exposure. Radio frequency treatment required higher loading (>10 pg Fe/cell) and longer duration (30 min) when compared to laser to accomplish cell destruction (50% viability at 10 pg Fe/cell). Scaling calculations show that the pulsed laser method can lead to single-cell (loaded with NPs) treatments (200 degrees C temperature change at the surface of an individual NP) unlike traditional rf heating

  11. Strong exchange coupling in conventional and inverse ferrimagnetic hard/soft and soft/hard core/shell heterostructured nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogues, Josep

    2013-03-01

    Bi-magnetic core/shell nanoparticles are becoming increasingly appealing for diverse fields such as for permanent magnets, microawave absortion, biomedical applications, sensing applications, or future magnetic recording media. Ferrromagnetic (FM)/ antiferromagnetic (AFM) core/shell nanoparticles (or inverted AFM/FM) have been extensively studied. However, exchange coupled hard/soft, or inverse soft/hard, core/shell nanoparticles have been far less investigated. Interestingly, most bi-magnetic core/shell systems are derived by simple partial oxidation of the core, e.g., Co/CoO (FM/AFM) or FePt/Fe3O4 (hard/soft) and only few studies of heterostructured (where core and shell are formed by different magnetic ions) can be found in the literature. We have investigated conventional hard/soft and inverted soft/hard core/shell hetroestructured nanoparticles based on magnetically soft iron oxide (Fe3O4) and magnetically hard manganese oxide (Mn3O4) . The core/shell samples were synthesized by seeded growth using either Fe3O4 or Mn3O4 nanoparticles as seeds. Subsequently, thin layers of the complementary material were grown by thermal decomposition of the corresponding metallorganic precursors. The structure characterization (X-ray diffraction and electron diffraction) confirms the presence of cubic (Fe3O4) and tetragonal (Mn3O4) phases both at the bulk and local levels. In addition, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) with electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) mapping confirms the core/shell structure of the nanopartciles. Magnetic characterization and element-selective hysteresis loops obtained by x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) reveal a strong exchange coupling between the core and the shell which results in homogeneous loops with moderate coercivity. Moreover, the magnetic properties can be tuned by controlling the core diameter or shell thickness. However, the results depend only weakly on the hard/soft or inverse soft/hard morphology

  12. Contact activation of kallikrein-kinin system by superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Simberg, Dmitri; Zhang, Wan-Ming; Merkulov, Sergei; McCrae, Keith; Park, Ji-Ho; Sailor, Michael J.; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2009-01-01

    Previously we reported that plasma kallikrein and high molecular weight kininogen attach to the surface of dextran-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) through the incompletely covered iron oxide core (Simberg et al., Biomaterials, 2009). Here we show that SPIONs also activate kallikrein-kinin system in vitro and in vivo. The serine protease activity of kallikrein was stably associated with SPIONs and could be detected on the nanoparticles even after extensive washing steps. The enzymatic activity was not detectable in kininogen-deficient and Factor XII-deficient plasma. The enzymatic activation could be blocked by precoating SPIONs with histidine-rich Domain 5 (D5) of kininogen. Importantly, the kallikrein activity was detectable in plasma of SPION-injected, but not of D5/SPION-injected mice. Tumor-targeted SPIONs when injected into kininogen-deficient and control mice, produced high levels of vascular clotting in tumors, suggesting that kallikrein activation is not responsible for the nanoparticle-induced thrombosis. These data could help in understanding the toxicity of nanomaterials and could be used in designing nanoparticles with controlled enzymatic activity. PMID:19508879

  13. Flame synthesis and in vitro biocompatibility assessment of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles: cellular uptake, toxicity and proliferation studies.

    PubMed

    Buyukhatipoglu, K; Miller, T A; Clyne, A Morss

    2009-12-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are used in diverse applications, such as targeted drug delivery, magnetic resonance imaging and hyperthermic malignant cell therapy. In the current work, superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles were produced by flame synthesis, which has improved nanoparticle property control and is capable of commercial production rates with minimal post-processing. The iron oxide nanoparticle material characteristics were analyzed by electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Finally, flame synthesized iron oxide nanoparticle interaction with endothelial cells was compared to commercially available iron oxide nanoparticles. Flame synthesis produced a heterogeneous mixture of 6-12 nm diameter hematite and magnetite nanoparticles with superparamagnetic properties. Endothelial cell scanning electron microscopy, confirmed by energy dispersive spectroscopy, demonstrated that flame synthesized nanoparticles are ingested into cells in a similar manner to commercially available nanoparticles. The flame synthesized particles showed no statistically significant toxicity difference from commercially available nanoparticles, as measured by Live/Dead assay, Alamar blue, and lactase dehydrogenase release. Neither type of nanoparticle affected cell proliferation induced by fibroblast growth factor-2. These data suggest that combustion synthesized iron oxide nanoparticles are comparable to commercially available nanoparticles for biological applications, yet flame synthesis is a simpler process with higher purity products and lower manufacturing costs. Future work will include functionalizing nanoparticles for specific cell targeting and bioactive factor delivery. PMID:19908687

  14. Magnetoacoustic imaging of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles embedded in biological tissues with microsecond magnetic stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Gang; He, Bin

    2012-01-01

    We present an experimental study on magnetoacoustic imaging of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles embedded in biological tissues. In experiments, a large-current-carrying coil is used to deliver microsecond pulsed magnetic stimulation to samples. The ultrasound signals induced by magnetic forces on SPIO nanoparticles are measured by a rotating transducer. The distribution of nanoparticles is reconstructed by a back-projection imaging algorithm. The results demonstrated the feasibility to obtain cross-sectional image of magnetic nanoparticle targets with faithful dimensional and positional information, which suggests a promising tool for tomographic reconstruction of magnetic nanoparticle-labeled diseased tissues (e.g., cancerous tumor) in molecular or clinic imaging.

  15. Hf-W chronometry of core formation in planetesimals inferred from weakly irradiated iron meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruijer, Thomas S.; Sprung, Peter; Kleine, Thorsten; Leya, Ingo; Burkhardt, Christoph; Wieler, Rainer

    2012-12-01

    The application of Hf-W chronometry to determine the timescales of core formation in the parent bodies of magmatic iron meteorites is severely hampered by 182W burnout during cosmic ray exposure of the parent meteoroids. Currently, no direct method exists to correct for the effects of 182W burnout, making the Hf-W ages for iron meteorites uncertain. Here we present noble gas and Hf-W isotope systematics of iron meteorite samples whose W isotopic compositions remained essentially unaffected by cosmic ray interactions. Most selected samples have concentrations of cosmogenic noble gases at or near the lowermost level observed in iron meteorites and, for iron meteorite standards, have very low noble gas and radionuclide based cosmic ray exposure ages (<60 Ma). In contrast to previous studies, no corrections of measured W isotope compositions are required for these iron meteorite samples. Their ɛ182W values (parts per 104 deviations from the terrestrial value) are higher than those measured for most other iron meteorites and range from -3.42 to -3.31, slightly elevated compared to the initial 182W/184W of Ca-Al-rich Inclusions (CAI; ɛ182W = -3.51 ± 0.10). The new W isotopic data indicate that core formation in the parent bodies of the IIAB, IIIAB, and IVA iron meteorites occurred ˜1-1.5 Myr after CAI formation (with an uncertainty of ˜1 Myr), consistent with earlier conclusions that the accretion and differentiation of iron meteorite parent bodies predated the accretion of most chondrite parent bodies. One ungrouped iron meteorite (Chinga) exhibits small nucleosynthetic W isotope anomalies, but after correction for these anomalies its ɛ182W value agrees with those of the other samples. Another ungrouped iron (Mbosi), however, has elevated ɛ182W relative to the other investigated irons, indicating metal-silicate separation ˜2-3 Myr later than in the parent bodies of the three major iron meteorite groups studied here.

  16. VAPOR PHASE MERCURY SORPTION BY ORGANIC-SULFIDE COATED BIMETALLIC IRON-COPPER NANOPARTICLE AGGREGATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Tetra sulfide silane coated iron-copper nano-particle aggregates are found to be potentially very high capacity sorbents for vapor phase mercury capture. High equilibrium capacities were obtained for the silane coated iron copper nano-aggregate sorbent at 70 oC and 120 oC. Even a...

  17. Fabrication of a nanocomposite from in situ iron nanoparticle reinforced copper alloy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zidong; Wang, Xuewen; Wang, Qiangsong; Shih, I; Xu, J J

    2009-02-18

    In situ iron nanoparticle reinforced Cu-3Sn-8Zn-6Pb alloy has been fabricated by centrifugal casting in a vacuum chamber with a medium frequency electrical furnace. The microstructure of this alloy was analyzed with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and a high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), and the results show that the grains of Cu-3Sn-8Zn-6Pb alloy without iron have a typical dendrite structure with dimensions from 500 to 1500 microm, and the grains of the alloy with the addition of 1% iron are small and equiaxed, with dimensions from 20 to 60 microm. Then, the relatively uniform dispersed particles in the copper matrix were identified with the HRTEM to be pure iron with dimensions in the order of 2-20 nm. The mechanical properties of the alloys were measured and the results show a significant increase in the tensile strength of the alloy with iron nanoparticles and a slight increase of the elongation compared to that without iron. The mechanism of formation of the iron nanoparticles was analyzed by thermodynamic and dynamic theories, and the results indicate that the in situ iron nanoparticles of Cu-3Sn-8Zn-6Pb alloy can reasonably form during solidification in the centrifugal casting technique. PMID:19417426

  18. Fabrication of a nanocomposite from in situ iron nanoparticle reinforced copper alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zidong; Wang, Xuewen; Wang, Qiangsong; Shih, I.; Xu, J. J.

    2009-02-01

    In situ iron nanoparticle reinforced Cu-3Sn-8Zn-6Pb alloy has been fabricated by centrifugal casting in a vacuum chamber with a medium frequency electrical furnace. The microstructure of this alloy was analyzed with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and a high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), and the results show that the grains of Cu-3Sn-8Zn-6Pb alloy without iron have a typical dendrite structure with dimensions from 500 to 1500 µm, and the grains of the alloy with the addition of 1% iron are small and equiaxed, with dimensions from 20 to 60 µm. Then, the relatively uniform dispersed particles in the copper matrix were identified with the HRTEM to be pure iron with dimensions in the order of 2-20 nm. The mechanical properties of the alloys were measured and the results show a significant increase in the tensile strength of the alloy with iron nanoparticles and a slight increase of the elongation compared to that without iron. The mechanism of formation of the iron nanoparticles was analyzed by thermodynamic and dynamic theories, and the results indicate that the in situ iron nanoparticles of Cu-3Sn-8Zn-6Pb alloy can reasonably form during solidification in the centrifugal casting technique.

  19. High-performance iron oxide nanoparticles for magnetic particle imaging - guided hyperthermia (hMPI).

    PubMed

    Bauer, Lisa M; Situ, Shu F; Griswold, Mark A; Samia, Anna Cristina S

    2016-06-16

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is an emerging imaging modality that allows the direct and quantitative mapping of iron oxide nanoparticles. In MPI, the development of tailored iron oxide nanoparticle tracers is paramount to achieving high sensitivity and good spatial resolution. To date, most MPI tracers being developed for potential clinical applications are based on spherical undoped magnetite nanoparticles. For the first time, we report on the systematic investigation of the effects of changes in chemical composition and shape anisotropy on the MPI performance of iron oxide nanoparticle tracers. We observed a 2-fold enhancement in MPI signal through selective doping of magnetite nanoparticles with zinc. Moreover, we demonstrated focused magnetic hyperthermia heating by adapting the field gradient used in MPI. By saturating the iron oxide nanoparticles outside of a field free region (FFR) with an external static field, we can selectively heat a target region in our test sample. By comparing zinc-doped magnetite cubic nanoparticles with undoped spherical nanoparticles, we could show a 5-fold improvement in the specific absorption rate (SAR) in magnetic hyperthermia while providing good MPI signal, thereby demonstrating the potential for high-performance focused hyperthermia therapy through an MPI-guided approach (hMPI). PMID:27210742

  20. Iron Oxide Nanoparticles as a Potential Iron Fertilizer for Peanut (Arachis hypogaea)

    PubMed Central

    Rui, Mengmeng; Ma, Chuanxin; Hao, Yi; Guo, Jing; Rui, Yukui; Tang, Xinlian; Zhao, Qi; Fan, Xing; Zhang, Zetian; Hou, Tianqi; Zhu, Siyuan

    2016-01-01

    Nanomaterials are used in practically every aspect of modern life, including agriculture. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe2O3 NPs) as a fertilizer to replace traditional Fe fertilizers, which have various shortcomings. The effects of the Fe2O3 NPs and a chelated-Fe fertilizer (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid-Fe; EDTA-Fe) fertilizer on the growth and development of peanut (Arachis hypogaea), a crop that is very sensitive to Fe deficiency, were studied in a pot experiment. The results showed that Fe2O3 NPs increased root length, plant height, biomass, and SPAD values of peanut plants. The Fe2O3 NPs promoted the growth of peanut by regulating phytohormone contents and antioxidant enzyme activity. The Fe contents in peanut plants with Fe2O3 NPs and EDTA-Fe treatments were higher than the control group. We used energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) to quantitatively analyze Fe in the soil. Peanut is usually cultivated in sandy soil, which is readily leached of fertilizers. However, the Fe2O3 NPs adsorbed onto sandy soil and improved the availability of Fe to the plants. Together, these results show that Fe2O3 NPs can replace traditional Fe fertilizers in the cultivation of peanut plants. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first research on the Fe2O3 NPs as the iron fertilizer. PMID:27375665

  1. Iron Oxide Nanoparticles as a Potential Iron Fertilizer for Peanut (Arachis hypogaea).

    PubMed

    Rui, Mengmeng; Ma, Chuanxin; Hao, Yi; Guo, Jing; Rui, Yukui; Tang, Xinlian; Zhao, Qi; Fan, Xing; Zhang, Zetian; Hou, Tianqi; Zhu, Siyuan

    2016-01-01

    Nanomaterials are used in practically every aspect of modern life, including agriculture. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe2O3 NPs) as a fertilizer to replace traditional Fe fertilizers, which have various shortcomings. The effects of the Fe2O3 NPs and a chelated-Fe fertilizer (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid-Fe; EDTA-Fe) fertilizer on the growth and development of peanut (Arachis hypogaea), a crop that is very sensitive to Fe deficiency, were studied in a pot experiment. The results showed that Fe2O3 NPs increased root length, plant height, biomass, and SPAD values of peanut plants. The Fe2O3 NPs promoted the growth of peanut by regulating phytohormone contents and antioxidant enzyme activity. The Fe contents in peanut plants with Fe2O3 NPs and EDTA-Fe treatments were higher than the control group. We used energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) to quantitatively analyze Fe in the soil. Peanut is usually cultivated in sandy soil, which is readily leached of fertilizers. However, the Fe2O3 NPs adsorbed onto sandy soil and improved the availability of Fe to the plants. Together, these results show that Fe2O3 NPs can replace traditional Fe fertilizers in the cultivation of peanut plants. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first research on the Fe2O3 NPs as the iron fertilizer. PMID:27375665

  2. Cu-Ag core-shell nanoparticles with enhanced oxidation stability for printed electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Changsoo; Kim, Na Rae; Koo, Jahyun; Jong Lee, Yung; Lee, Hyuck Mo

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we synthesized uniform Cu-Ag core-shell nanoparticles using a facile two-step process that consists of thermal decomposition and galvanic displacement methods. The core-shell structure of these nanoparticles was confirmed through characterization using transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction. Furthermore, we investigated the oxidation stability of the Cu-Ag core-shell nanoparticles in detail. Both qualitative and quantitative x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses confirm that the Cu-Ag core-shell nanoparticles have considerably higher oxidation stability than Cu nanoparticles. Finally, we formulated a conductive ink using the synthesized nanoparticles and coated it onto glass substrates. Following the sintering process, we compared the resistivity of the Cu-Ag core-shell nanoparticles with that of the Cu nanoparticles. The results of this study clearly show that the Cu-Ag core-shell nanoparticles can potentially be used as an alternative to Ag nanoparticles because of their superior oxidation stability and electrical properties.

  3. Rheological characterization of a magnetorheological ferrofluid using iron nitride nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armijo, Leisha M.; Ahuré-Powell, Louise A.; Wereley, Norman M.

    2015-05-01

    Magnetorheology of a magnetorheological ferrofluid (MRFF) was investigated to study the role of a ferromagnetic nanoparticle (NP) additive in magnetorheological fluids (MRFs). Iron nitride (Fe16N2) NPs, nominally within the diameter range of ˜16-45 nm (spherical NPs) and ˜30-66 nm (cubic NPs), were coated with carboxy-polyethylene glycol (carboxy-PEG) and dispersed in silicone oil in order to produce a magnetic carrier fluid or ferrofluid for two solids loadings: 2 vol. % and 5 vol. %. Conventional spherical carbonyl iron (CI) particles, varying in diameter from 6 to 10 μm, were suspended in the ferrofluid at 25 vol. % solids loading. Rheological properties of the MRFF synthesized with the carboxy-PEG-based ferromagnetic carrier fluid were compared to the MRF synthesized with silicone oil to determine how ferrofluid can influence dynamic viscosity and yield stress. Rheological measurements of both MRF and MRFF samples were carried out using a Paar Physica 300 rheometer to estimate the field-off viscosity and to measure flow curves (i.e., shear stress vs. shear rate) as a function of magnetic field. A Bingham-plastic model was used to characterize the flow curves, and results show that there is an increase in the dynamic viscosity of the MRFF over the MRF. The ferromagnetic carrier fluid greatly increases yield stress as only 2 vol. % of added carboxy-PEG NPs improves the yield stress performance by almost 5%. A second MRFF sample synthesized with 5 vol. % of added carboxy-PEG NPs contained in the ferrofluid significantly enhanced the yield stress performance by 13% over the MRF at the same CI solids loading (25 vol. %).

  4. Magnetic field calculations for iron oxide nanoparticles for MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, Ricardo; Mendez Rojas, Miguel; Dies Suarez, Pilar; Hidalgo Tobón, Silvia

    2014-11-01

    The susceptibility effects of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) functionalized with triethylenglycol (TREG) and Polyethylen Glycol (PEG) has been studied, those nanoparticles have the necessary properties to be used in the clinic as contrast media in imaging by MRI[1-3]. We are considering the behavior of the magnetic field as plane wave to explain the electrical and magnetic field produced by SPIONs. Images were acquired on a 1.5T imager Philips, using mFFE Sequence. Three glass capillary tubes with a) TREG (10nm) concentration of 300 μg/ml, and PEGCOOH 6000(10nm) with 300 μg/ml, and 2% agarosa. Magnetic field simulations were calculated in Matlab. The plane wave that comes in contact with a sphere of radius a, an propagation constant k1, and it is in an homogeneous space k2. We consider that the electric field is linearly polarized on x-direction, with a propagation on z-positive-axis. The secondary induced field can be explained from the interior of the sphere and valid exterior points. The referred waves are transmitted and reflected, this is valid only when the wavelength is smaller than the radius of the sphere. The obtained vibrational mode is an answer of the electrical oscillation and this is projection of the disturbed magnetic field. TREG-SPIONs produce more serious susceptibility artefacts compared to PEG-SPIONs. This study is promissory due to the concordance of the results of the simulations and the inhomogeneities showed in the MR images.

  5. Iron oxide nanoparticle hyperthermia and radiation cancer treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassim, S. M.; Giustini, A. J.; Petryk, A. A.; Strawbridge, R. A.; Hoopes, P. J.

    2009-02-01

    It is established that heat can enhance the effect of radiation cancer treatment. Due to the ability to localize thermal energy using nanoparticle hyperthermia, as opposed to other, less targeted, hyperthermia modalities, it appears such enhancement could be accomplished without complications normally associated with systemic or regional hyperthermia. This study employs non-curative (suboptimal), doses of heat and radiation, in an effort to determine the therapeutic enhancement potential for IONP hyperthermia and radiation. Methods: MTG-B murine breast adenocarcinoma cell are inoculated into the right flanks of female CH3/HEJ mice and grown to volumes of 150mm3+ /- 40 mm3. A single dose of 15 Gy (6 MeV) radiation was uniformly delivered to the tumor. A pre-defined thermal dose is delivered by direct injection of iron oxide nanoparticles into the tumor. By adjusting the field strength of the 160 KHz alternating magnetic field (AMF) an intra-tumoral temperature between 41.5 and 43 degrees Celsius was maintained for 10min. The alternating magnetic field was delivered by a water-cooled 36mm diameter square copper tube induction coil operating at 160 kHz with variable magnet field strengths up to 450 Oe . The primary endpoint of the study is the number of days required for the tumor to achieve a volume 3 fold greater than the volume at the time of treatment (tumor regrowth delay). Results: Preliminary results suggest the addition of a modest IONP hyperthermia to 15 Gy radiation achieved an approximate 50% increase in tumor regrowth delay as compared to a 15 Gy radiation treatment alone. The therapeutic effects of IONP heat and radiation combined were considered additive, however in mice that demonstrated complete response (no tumor present after 30 days), the effect was considered superadditive or synergistic. Although this data is very encouraging from a multimodality cancer therapy standpoint, additional temporal and dose related information is clearly necessary to

  6. Synthesis of lithium iron phosphate/carbon microspheres by using polyacrylic acid coated iron phosphate nanoparticles derived from iron(III) acrylate.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dongwei; He, Yan-Bing; Chu, Xiaodong; Ding, Zhaojun; Li, Baohua; He, Jianfu; Du, Hongda; Qin, Xianying; Kang, Feiyu

    2015-03-01

    Lithium iron phosphate/carbon (LiFePO4 /C) microspheres with high rate and cycling performance are synthesized from iron phosphate/polyacrylic acid (FePO4 /PAA) nanoparticles. Iron(III) acrylate is used as a precursor for both the iron and carbon sources. FePO4 nanoparticles are first produced by a coprecipitation reaction. The byproduct, acrylic acid ions, is polymerized in situ to form a uniform PAA layer on the surface of the FePO4 nanoparticles. The as-prepared LiFePO4 /C microspheres are composed of primary nanoparticles with sizes of 40-50 nm. The nanoparticles are fully coated with a thin, uniform carbon layer derived from the decomposition of the PAA layer. The uniform carbon-coating layer cooperates with interstitial and boundary carbon derived from sucrose successfully to construct an excellent interconnecting conductive network in the microspheres. As a result of the unique structure, the as-prepared LiFePO4 /C microspheres display both high electronic and ionic conductivities, which contribute to their high rate performance (162.9 mAh g(-1) at 0.1C and 126.1 mAh g(-1) at 5C) and excellent cycling stability (97.1% of capacity retention after 500 cycles at 5C/5C). PMID:25469674

  7. Synthesis of phase-pure and monodisperse iron oxide nanoparticles by thermal decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Hufschmid, Ryan D.; Arami, Hamed; Ferguson, R. Matthew; Gonzales, Marcela; Teeman, Eric M.; Brush, Lucien N.; Browning, Nigel D.; Krishnan, Kannan M.

    2015-06-03

    We present a comprehensive template for the design and synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles with control over size, size distribution, phase, and resulting properties. Monodisperse superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles were synthesized by thermal decomposition of three different iron containing precursors (iron oleate, iron pentacarbonyl, and iron oxyhydroxide) in organic solvents under a variety of synthetic conditions. We compare the suitability of these three kinetically controlled synthesis protocols, which have in common the use of iron oleate as a starting precursor or reaction intermediate, for producing nanoparticles with specific size and magnetic properties. Monodisperse particles were produced over a tunable range of sizes from approximately 2-30 nm. Reaction parameters such as precursor concentration, addition of surfactant, temperature, ramp rate, and time were adjusted to kinetically control size and size-distribution. In particular, large quantities of excess surfactant (up to 25:1 molar ratio) alter reaction kinetics and result in larger particles with uniform size; however, there is often a trade-off between large particles and a narrow size distribution. Iron oxide phase is also critical for establishing magnetic properties. As an example, we show the importance of obtaining the required iron oxide phase for application to Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI), and describe how phase purity can be controlled.

  8. Mesoscale modeling of functional properties in core-shell nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangeri, John; Heinonen, Olle; Karpeev, Dmitry; Nakhmanson, Serge

    2015-03-01

    Core-shell nanoparticle systems of Zn-ZnO and ZnO-TiO2 are studied computationally using the highly scalable MOOSE finite-element framework, developed at Idaho National Lab. The elastic anisotropic mismatch of the core and shell create an imprinting effect within the shell that produces a wide variation of strains. Due to this diversity of strains, the sharp band gap edges of the bulk semiconductor are observed to be ``thinned-out'' much like amorphous silicon. We show that a variety of factors, such as particle size, core-to-shell volume ratio, applied hydrostatic pressure, shell microstructure, as well as the effect of surface elasticity, can influence the distribution of optical band-gap values within the particle, which may prove useful within the field of photovoltaics. Part of the work by O.H. was supported by Award 70NANB14H012 from U.S. Department of Commerce, National Institute of Standards and Technology as part of the Center for Hierarchical Material Design.

  9. Electrosprayed core-shell polymer-lipid nanoparticles for active component delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eltayeb, Megdi; Stride, Eleanor; Edirisinghe, Mohan

    2013-11-01

    A key challenge in the production of multicomponent nanoparticles for healthcare applications is obtaining reproducible monodisperse nanoparticles with the minimum number of preparation steps. This paper focus on the use of electrohydrodynamic (EHD) techniques to produce core-shell polymer-lipid structures with a narrow size distribution in a single step process. These nanoparticles are composed of a hydrophilic core for active component encapsulation and a lipid shell. It was found that core-shell nanoparticles with a tunable size range between 30 and 90 nm and a narrow size distribution could be reproducibly manufactured. The results indicate that the lipid component (stearic acid) stabilizes the nanoparticles against collapse and aggregation and improves entrapment of active components, in this case vanillin, ethylmaltol and maltol. The overall structure of the nanoparticles produced was examined by multiple methods, including transmission electron microscopy and differential scanning calorimetry, to confirm that they were of core-shell form.

  10. Electrosprayed core-shell polymer-lipid nanoparticles for active component delivery.

    PubMed

    Eltayeb, Megdi; Stride, Eleanor; Edirisinghe, Mohan

    2013-11-22

    A key challenge in the production of multicomponent nanoparticles for healthcare applications is obtaining reproducible monodisperse nanoparticles with the minimum number of preparation steps. This paper focus on the use of electrohydrodynamic (EHD) techniques to produce core-shell polymer-lipid structures with a narrow size distribution in a single step process. These nanoparticles are composed of a hydrophilic core for active component encapsulation and a lipid shell. It was found that core-shell nanoparticles with a tunable size range between 30 and 90 nm and a narrow size distribution could be reproducibly manufactured. The results indicate that the lipid component (stearic acid) stabilizes the nanoparticles against collapse and aggregation and improves entrapment of active components, in this case vanillin, ethylmaltol and maltol. The overall structure of the nanoparticles produced was examined by multiple methods, including transmission electron microscopy and differential scanning calorimetry, to confirm that they were of core-shell form. PMID:24164775

  11. Highly stable monodisperse PEGylated iron oxide nanoparticle aqueous suspensions: a nontoxic tracer for homogeneous magnetic bioassays.

    PubMed

    Lak, Aidin; Dieckhoff, Jan; Ludwig, Frank; Scholtyssek, Jan M; Goldmann, Oliver; Lünsdorf, Heinrich; Eberbeck, Dietmar; Kornowski, Andreas; Kraken, Mathias; Litterst, F J; Fiege, Kathrin; Mischnick, Petra; Schilling, Meinhard

    2013-12-01

    Uniformly sized and shaped iron oxide nanoparticles with a mean size of 25 nm were synthesized via decomposition of iron-oleate. High resolution transmission electron microscopy and Mössbauer spectroscopy investigations revealed that the particles are spheres primarily composed of Fe3O4 with a small fraction of FeO. From Mössbauer and static magnetization measurements, it was deduced that the particles are superparamagnetic at room temperature. The hydrophobic particles were successfully transferred into water via PEGylation using nitrodopamine as an anchoring group. IR spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis showed the success and efficiency of the phase transfer reaction. After PEGylation, the particles retained monodispersity and their magnetic core remained intact as proven by photon cross-correlation spectroscopy, ac susceptibility, and transmission electron microscopy. The particle aqueous suspensions revealed excellent water stability over a month of monitoring and also against temperature up to 40 °C. The particles exhibited a moderate cytotoxic effect on in vitro cultured bone marrow-derived macrophages and no release of inflammatory or anti-inflammatory cytokines. The PEGylated particles were functionalized with Herceptin antibodies via a conjugation chemistry, their response to a rotating magnetic field was studied using a fluxgate-based setup and was compared with the one recorded for hydrophobic and PEGylated particles. The particle phase lag rose after labeling with Herceptin, indicating the successful conjugation of Herceptin antibodies to the particles. PMID:24056778

  12. Cleaved iron oxide nanoparticles as T2 contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Sung Lan; Chae, Min Kyung; Jang, Eun Ju; Lee, Chulhyun

    2013-03-25

    Iron oxide nanoparticles as contrast agents are reported to effectively improve magnetic resonance imaging of tissues and cells. In this work, cleaved iron oxide nanoparticles (CIONPs) were generated from hydrophobic FeO nanoparticles (HIONPs) by coating their surfaces with PEG-phospholipids, oxidizing them under water, and slowly removing the residual FeO phase in phthalate buffer. The synthesized CIONPs showed good r2 values of up to 258 s(-1)  mM(-1). Thus, the CIONPs can be employed as vectors for drug delivery due to their unique structure with an empty inner space, which enables their use in a wide range of applications. PMID:23345158

  13. Stability of body-centered cubic iron-magnesium alloys in the Earth's inner core.

    PubMed

    Kádas, Krisztina; Vitos, Levente; Johansson, Börje; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2009-09-15

    The composition and the structure of the Earth's solid inner core are still unknown. Iron is accepted to be the main component of the core. Lately, the body-centered cubic (bcc) phase of iron was suggested to be present in the inner core, although its stability at core conditions is still in discussion. The higher density of pure iron compared with that of the Earth's core indicates the presence of light element(s) in this region, which could be responsible for the stability of the bcc phase. However, so far, none of the proposed composition models were in full agreement with seismic observations. The solubility of magnesium in hexagonal Fe has been found to increase significantly with increasing pressure, suggesting that Mg can also be an important element in the core. Here, we report a first-principles density functional study of bcc Fe-Mg alloys at core pressures and temperatures. We show that at core conditions, 5-10 atomic percent Mg stabilizes the bcc Fe both dynamically and thermodynamically. Our calculated density, elastic moduli, and sound velocities of bcc Fe-Mg alloys are consistent with those obtained from seismology, indicating that the bcc-structured Fe-Mg alloy is a possible model for the Earth's inner core. PMID:19805214

  14. Phase Diagrams of Iron Rich Alloys and Their Influence on the Chemical Structure of Planetary Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, A. J.; Miller, N. A.; Fischer, R. A.; Seagle, C. T.; Prakapenka, V. B.

    2008-12-01

    Many planetary bodies are thought to have metallic, iron rich cores, with a significant component of some 'light' alloying element(s). The identity of this light alloying component has a profound effect on the chemical properties of the core, including its melting/crystallization behavior, partitioning of minor and trace elements during core/mantle segregation and core crystallization, and other phase relations. Despite this importance, the light element component(s) of planetary bodies generally remain unknown, apart from those of a few iron meteorite parent bodies. Experimentally determined physical and chemical properties of iron-rich systems can be compared to observations and models of planetary interiors to constrain compositions of planetary cores. Here we summarize our recent high pressure, high temperature experiments on the phase diagrams of iron+light element (Fe-X) binaries, specifically iron-sulfide, iron-silicide, and iron-oxide systems. Melting as well as subsolidus phase relations have been determined in the laser heated diamond anvil cell, using either synchrotron X-ray diffraction or optical methods to establish phase boundaries. X-ray diffraction while laser heating the sample reveals the nature of structural transitions (including partial melting), and optical methods (such as temperature vs. emissivity and related methods) establish the phase boundaries with finer precision. Drawing on these and other recent experimental results, we compare and contrast the binary Fe-X phase diagrams to address such questions as: Which candidate light elements (S, Si, O, C) cause the largest melting point depression, and how does this change with pressure? Which can produce large density constrasts against crystallizing iron metal? and others. These results are compared to thermal and chemical models of terrestrial planet interiors (including Earth's), and important gaps and discrepancies in the available experimental data are highlighted.

  15. Fibroporous polytetrafluoroethylene modified with iron nanoparticles: Structure and electronic and magnetic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasil'kov, A. Yu.; Suzdalev, I. P.; Maksimov, Yu. V.; Nikitin, L. N.; Naumkin, A. V.; Abramchuk, S. S.; Tolstopyatov, E. M.; Grakovich, P. N.

    2013-06-01

    A method for synthesizing iron-containing nanocomposite based on fibroporous polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) is described. Fibroporous PTFE obtained under the radiation of a CO2 laser on block PTFE is modified in supercritical carbon dioxide (sc CO2) to form micro- and nanoporous structures. Porous fluoropolymer is treated with a solution of bis(toluene)iron(0) obtained by metal-vapor synthesis (MVS). The composition and structure of iron-containing fluoropolymer is studied by transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Fe nanoparticles with an average size of 9 nm, consisting of ˜30% FeO and ˜70% Fe3+, are registered in the sample. Fe0 nanoparticles are stabilized in fluoropolymer pores and are coated with nanoparticles of nonstoichiometric iron oxides that have superparamagnetic properties.

  16. Microwave Absorption Properties of Iron Nanoparticles Prepared by Ball-Milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Xuan T. A.; Ta, Bach N.; Ngo, Le T. H.; Do, Manh H.; Nguyen, Phuc X.; Nam, Dao N. H.

    2016-05-01

    A nanopowder of iron was prepared using a high-energy ball milling method, which is capable of producing nanoparticles at a reasonably larger scale compared to conventional chemical methods. Analyses using x-ray diffraction and magnetic measurements indicate that the iron nanoparticles are a single phase of a body-centered cubic structure and have quite stable magnetic characteristics in the air. The iron nanoparticles were then mixed with paraffin and pressed into flat square plates for free-space microwave transmission and reflection measurements in the 4-8 GHz range. Without an Al backing plate, the Fe nanoparticles seem to only weakly absorb microwave radiation. The reflected signal S 11 drops to zero and a very large negative value of reflection loss ( RL) are observed for Al-backed samples, suggesting the existence of a phase matching resonance near frequency f ˜ 6 GHz.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of microvessels using iron-oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olamaei, N.; Cheriet, F.; Martel, S.

    2013-03-01

    The visualization of microstructures including blood vessels with an inner overall cross-sectional area below approximately 200 μm remains beyond the capabilities of current clinical imaging modalities. But with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, magnetic entities cause susceptibility artifacts in the images by disrupting the homogeneous magnetic field in a much larger scale than their actual size. As validated in this paper through simulation and in-vitro experiments, these artifacts can serve as a source of contrast, enabling microvessels with an inner diameter below the spatial resolution of any medical imaging modalities to be visualized using a clinical MR scanner. For such experiments, micron-sized agglomerations of iron-oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles were injected in microchannels with internal diameters of 200 and 50 μm equivalent to a narrower artery or a larger arteriole, and down to a smaller arteriole, respectively. The results show the feasibility of the proposed method for micro-particle detection and the visualization of microvessels using a 1.5 T clinical MR scanner. It was confirmed that the method is reproducible and accurate at the sub-pixel level.

  18. Novel method for the preparation of core-shell nanoparticles with movable Ag core and polystyrene loop shell

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Weijun; Zhang Zhicheng . E-mail: lwj3600@ustc.edu; He Weidong; Zheng Cheng; Ge Xuewu; Li, Jian; Liu Huarong; Jiang Hao

    2006-04-15

    Core/shell nanoparticles with movable silver (Ag) core and polystyrene (PSt) shell (Ag at PSt nanoparticle) were successfully synthesized at room temperature and under ambient pressure via two steps: {gamma}-irradiation and interfacial-initiated polymerization. Firstly, mono-dispersed Ag nanoparticles with diameters 20 nm were synthesized in inversed microemulsion by reducing silver nitrate under {gamma}-irradiation. Then, Ag nanoparticles were coated with PSt via interfacial-initiated polymerization with cumene hydroperoxide/ferrous sulfate/disodium ethylenediaminetetraacetate/sodium formaldehyde sulfoxylate (CHPO-Fe {sup 2+}-EDTA-SFS) as the redox initiation pair. The resulted Ag at PSt nanoparticles were identified by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS)

  19. Superparamagnetic iron oxide/chitosan core/shells for hyperthermia application: Improved colloidal stability and biocompatibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, R. M.; Shete, P. B.; Thorat, N. D.; Otari, S. V.; Barick, K. C.; Prasad, A.; Ningthoujam, R. S.; Tiwale, B. M.; Pawar, S. H.

    2014-04-01

    Superparamagnetic magnetite nanoparticles are of great interest due to their potential biomedical applications. In the present investigation, Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles were prepared by alkaline precipitation using ferrous chloride as the sole source. An amphiphilic polyelectrolyte with the property of biocompatibility and functional carboxyl groups was used as a stabilizer to prepare a well-dispersed suspension of superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles. The final material composed of Fe3O4 core and chitosan (CH) shell was produced. The amino groups of CH coated on Fe3O4 nanoparticles were further cross linked using glutaraldehyde (GLD) for stable coating. FTIR spectra, XPS and TGA confirmed the coating of CH/GLD on the surface of Fe3O4 nanoparticles. XRD patterns indicate the pure phase Fe3O4 with a spinel structure. The nanoparticles were superparamagnetic at room temperature with saturation magnetization values for bare and coated nanoparticles which were 51.68 emu/g and 48.60 emu/g, respectively. Zeta potential values showed higher colloidal stability of coated nanoparticles than the bare one. Cytotoxicity study up to 2 mg mL-1 concentration showed no drastic change in cell viability of nanoparticles after coating. Also, coated nanoparticles showed increased SAR value, making them suitable for hyperthermia therapy application.

  20. Mitochondrial iron accumulation exacerbates hepatic toxicity caused by hepatitis C virus core protein.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Shuichi; Ito, Konomi; Watanabe, Haruna; Nakano, Takafumi; Moriya, Kyoji; Shintani, Yoshizumi; Fujie, Hajime; Tsutsumi, Takeya; Miyoshi, Hideyuki; Fujinaga, Hidetake; Shinzawa, Seiko; Koike, Kazuhiko; Horie, Toshiharu

    2015-02-01

    Patients with long-lasting hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection are at major risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Iron accumulation in the livers of these patients is thought to exacerbate conditions of oxidative stress. Transgenic mice that express the HCV core protein develop HCC after the steatosis stage and produce an excess of hepatic reactive oxygen species (ROS). The overproduction of ROS in the liver is the net result of HCV core protein-induced dysfunction of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. This study examined the impact of ferric nitrilacetic acid (Fe-NTA)-mediated iron overload on mitochondrial damage and ROS production in HCV core protein-expressing HepG2 (human HCC) cells (Hep39b cells). A decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential and ROS production were observed following Fe-NTA treatment. After continuous exposure to Fe-NTA for six days, cell toxicity was observed in Hep39b cells, but not in mock (vector-transfected) HepG2 cells. Moreover, mitochondrial iron ((59)Fe) uptake was increased in the livers of HCV core protein-expressing transgenic mice. This increase in mitochondrial iron uptake was inhibited by Ru360, a mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter inhibitor. Furthermore, the Fe-NTA-induced augmentation of mitochondrial dysfunction, ROS production, and cell toxicity were also inhibited by Ru360 in Hep39b cells. Taken together, these results indicate that Ca(2+) uniporter-mediated mitochondrial accumulation of iron exacerbates hepatocyte toxicity caused by the HCV core protein. PMID:25545986

  1. Sound velocities of iron carbides (Fe3C and Fe7C3) under core conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, B.; Li, Z.; Zhang, D.; Liu, J.; Bi, W.; Zhao, J.; Alp, E. E.; Hu, M. Y.; Li, J.

    2014-12-01

    For a carbon-rich core, iron carbides might be the major phase crystallizing to form the Earth's solid inner core. On basis of high-pressure experiments and theoretical calculations, Fe3C, Fe7C3 and more recently Fe2C have been considered as the most stable carbide phase under the inner core conditions. The identity of the stable carbide phase in a carbon-containing inner core is still a topic under active debate. It is crucial to determine the elastic and acoustic properties of the relevant carbide phases to core conditions, in order to test the carbon-rich core composition model. In this study, we have performed nuclear resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (NRIXS) measurements of both Fe7C3 and Fe3C up to core pressures at 300 K and determined their shear-wave (VS) and compressional-wave (VP) velocities for comparison with seismic observations of the inner core. The high-pressure magnetic properties of both phases have also been investigated by X-ray Emission Spectroscopy (XES) and Synchrotron Mössbauer Spectroscopy (SMS). Our results show that the magnetic transitions from ferromagnetic to paramagnetic and then to nonmagnetic in Fe7C3 and Fe3C significantly affects their VS and VP at high pressures. Extrapolating the sound velocities of the nonmagnetic phases to the inner core conditions, we found that sound velocities, particularly VS, of the iron carbides are markedly low comparing with iron and other iron-rich alloys, making them compelling candidates to explain the seismic observations of the inner core. Our hypothesis of a carbon-rich core may also be consistent with geochemical and petrological evidence on deep carbon inventory in Earth's interior.

  2. Melting behavior of the iron-sulfur system and chemical convection in iron-rich planetary cores

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J.; Chen, B.

    2009-03-26

    We present experimental data on the high-pressure melting behavior of the Fe-S system from a synchrotron x-ray radiography study using the large volume press, with implications for the role of chemical convection in sulfur-bearing planetary cores. At present, Earth, Mercury and Ganymede are the only three solid bodies in the Solar System that possess intrinsic global magnetic fields. Dynamo simulation reveal that chemical buoyancy force associated with the formation of a solid inner core is critical for sustaining the Earth's magnetic field. Fluid motions in Mercury and Ganymede may be partially driven by chemical buoyancy force as well. The style of chemical convection and its influence on the thermal and chemical state and evolution of iron-rich cores are determined in part by the melting behavior of potential core-forming materials. Sulfur is widely accepted as a candidate light element in iron-rich planetary cores. In order to understand the role of chemical convection in sulfur-bearing cores, we studied the high-pressure melting behavior of Fe-S mixtures containing 9 wt% sulfur using the synchrotron x-ray radiographic method in a large volume press.

  3. Toxicity Assessment of Iron Oxide Nanoparticles in Zebrafish (Danio rerio) Early Life Stages

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiaoshan; Tian, Shengyan; Cai, Zhonghua

    2012-01-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles have been explored recently for their beneficial applications in many biomedical areas, in environmental remediation, and in various industrial applications. However, potential risks have also been identified with the release of nanoparticles into the environment. To study the ecological effects of iron oxide nanoparticles on aquatic organisms, we used early life stages of the zebrafish (Danio rerio) to examine such effects on embryonic development in this species. The results showed that ≥10 mg/L of iron oxide nanoparticles instigated developmental toxicity in these embryos, causing mortality, hatching delay, and malformation. Moreover, an early life stage test using zebrafish embryos/larvae is also discussed and recommended in this study as an effective protocol for assessing the potential toxicity of nanoparticles. This study is one of the first on developmental toxicity in fish caused by iron oxide nanoparticles in aquatic environments. The results will contribute to the current understanding of the potential ecotoxicological effects of nanoparticles and support the sustainable development of nanotechnology. PMID:23029464

  4. Chemically synthesized Iron-Platinum binary alloy nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colak, Levent

    In this dissertation, we explored the fabrication of FePt nanoparticles prepared by a solution-phase synthesis route and characterized their structural/ microstructural and magnetic properties both to gain a fundamental understanding and to check their compatibility for technological applications in ultra high density magnetic storage media. Monodispersed Fe-Pt alloy NPs (nanoparticles) have been prepared by thermal decomposition of iron pentacarbonyl [Fe(CO)5] and reduction of platinum acetylacetonate [Pt(acac)2] with dibenzyl ether in the presence of oleic acid (OA) and oleyl amine (OAm) as surfactants. The composition of the nanoparticles was adjusted by changing the Fe(CO)5/Pt(acac) 2 molar ratio while fixing the Pt(acac)2 amount. Two phases of Fe-Pt binary alloy, FePt3 and FePt, were obtained successfully with the molar ratios of 1.5 and 2.1, respectively. The size of FePt NPs was tuned in the range of 3-6 nm by controlling the injection temperature of the iron precursor. It was found that, low injection temperature of precursors and the usage of surfactants as a reaction solvent, together with a slow heating to a low refluxing temperature were the key parameters for the formation of cubic nanoparticles. Spherical, cubic (with rounded edges) and octapod shapes were successfully produced by changing the OAm/OA molar ratio. Nanorods were formed by simply adjusting the injection time of the surfactants. Although it was reported in the literature that the dominant mechanism of formation of NPs involves the initial formation of platinum rich clusters followed by the gradual diffusion of iron atoms into these clusters during the synthesis, in this work it is clearly shown that Fe rich seeds do form in the early stages of the reaction. And it was these competitive nucleation sites that cause a compositional distribution between individual FePt particles in the final sample, although a narrow distribution is measured for the overall composition. As-synthesized NPs

  5. Gold core@silver semishell Janus nanoparticles prepared by interfacial etching.

    PubMed

    Chen, Limei; Deming, Christopher P; Peng, Yi; Hu, Peiguang; Stofan, Jake; Chen, Shaowei

    2016-08-14

    Gold core@silver semishell Janus nanoparticles were prepared by chemical etching of Au@Ag core-shell nanoparticles at the air/water interface. Au@Ag core-shell nanoparticles were synthesized by chemical deposition of a silver shell onto gold seed colloids followed by the self-assembly of 1-dodecanethiol onto the nanoparticle surface. The nanoparticles then formed a monolayer on the water surface of a Langmuir-Blodgett trough, and part of the silver shell was selectively etched away by the mixture of hydrogen peroxide and ammonia in the water subphase, where the etching was limited to the side of the nanoparticles that was in direct contact with water. The resulting Janus nanoparticles exhibited an asymmetrical distribution of silver on the surface of the gold cores, as manifested in transmission electron microscopy, UV-vis absorption, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements. Interestingly, the Au@Ag semishell Janus nanoparticles exhibited enhanced electrocatalytic activity in oxygen reduction reactions, as compared to their Au@Ag and Ag@Au core-shell counterparts, likely due to a synergistic effect between the gold cores and silver semishells that optimized oxygen binding to the nanoparticle surface. PMID:27417026

  6. Multifunctional superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for combined chemotherapy and hyperthermia cancer treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinto, Christopher A.; Mohindra, Priya; Tong, Sheng; Bao, Gang

    2015-07-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles have the potential for use as a multimodal cancer therapy agent due to their ability to carry anticancer drugs and generate localized heat when exposed to an alternating magnetic field, resulting in combined chemotherapy and hyperthermia. To explore this potential, we synthesized SPIOs with a phospholipid-polyethylene glycol (PEG) coating, and loaded Doxorubicin (DOX) with a 30.8% w/w loading capacity when the PEG length is optimized. We found that DOX-loaded SPIOs exhibited a sustained DOX release over 72 hours where the release kinetics could be altered by the PEG length. In contrast, the heating efficiency of the SPIOs showed minimal change with the PEG length. With a core size of 14 nm, the SPIOs could generate sufficient heat to raise the local temperature to 43 °C, sufficient to trigger apoptosis in cancer cells. Further, we found that DOX-loaded SPIOs resulted in cell death comparable to free DOX, and that the combined effect of DOX and SPIO-induced hyperthermia enhanced cancer cell death in vitro. This study demonstrates the potential of using phospholipid-PEG coated SPIOs for chemotherapy-hyperthermia combinatorial cancer treatment with increased efficacy.Superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles have the potential for use as a multimodal cancer therapy agent due to their ability to carry anticancer drugs and generate localized heat when exposed to an alternating magnetic field, resulting in combined chemotherapy and hyperthermia. To explore this potential, we synthesized SPIOs with a phospholipid-polyethylene glycol (PEG) coating, and loaded Doxorubicin (DOX) with a 30.8% w/w loading capacity when the PEG length is optimized. We found that DOX-loaded SPIOs exhibited a sustained DOX release over 72 hours where the release kinetics could be altered by the PEG length. In contrast, the heating efficiency of the SPIOs showed minimal change with the PEG length. With a core size of 14 nm, the SPIOs could

  7. Mitochondrial iron accumulation exacerbates hepatic toxicity caused by hepatitis C virus core protein

    SciTech Connect

    Sekine, Shuichi; Ito, Konomi; Watanabe, Haruna; Nakano, Takafumi; Moriya, Kyoji; Shintani, Yoshizumi; Fujie, Hajime; Tsutsumi, Takeya; Miyoshi, Hideyuki; Fujinaga, Hidetake; Shinzawa, Seiko; Koike, Kazuhiko; Horie, Toshiharu

    2015-02-01

    Patients with long-lasting hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection are at major risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Iron accumulation in the livers of these patients is thought to exacerbate conditions of oxidative stress. Transgenic mice that express the HCV core protein develop HCC after the steatosis stage and produce an excess of hepatic reactive oxygen species (ROS). The overproduction of ROS in the liver is the net result of HCV core protein-induced dysfunction of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. This study examined the impact of ferric nitrilacetic acid (Fe-NTA)-mediated iron overload on mitochondrial damage and ROS production in HCV core protein-expressing HepG2 (human HCC) cells (Hep39b cells). A decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential and ROS production were observed following Fe-NTA treatment. After continuous exposure to Fe-NTA for six days, cell toxicity was observed in Hep39b cells, but not in mock (vector-transfected) HepG2 cells. Moreover, mitochondrial iron ({sup 59}Fe) uptake was increased in the livers of HCV core protein-expressing transgenic mice. This increase in mitochondrial iron uptake was inhibited by Ru360, a mitochondrial Ca{sup 2+} uniporter inhibitor. Furthermore, the Fe-NTA-induced augmentation of mitochondrial dysfunction, ROS production, and cell toxicity were also inhibited by Ru360 in Hep39b cells. Taken together, these results indicate that Ca{sup 2+} uniporter-mediated mitochondrial accumulation of iron exacerbates hepatocyte toxicity caused by the HCV core protein. - Highlights: • Iron accumulation in the livers of patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is thought to exacerbate oxidative stress. • The impact of iron overload on mitochondrial damage and ROS production in HCV core protein-expressing cells were examined. • Mitochondrial iron uptake was increased in the livers of HCV core protein-expressing transgenic mice. • Ca{sup 2+} uniporter-mediated mitochondrial accumulation of iron exacerbates

  8. Body-Centered Cubic Iron-Nickel Alloy in Earth's Core

    SciTech Connect

    Dubrovinsky, L; Dubrovinskaia, N; Narygina, O; Kantor, I; Kuznetzov, A; Prakapenka, V B; Vitos, L; Johansson, B; Mikhaylushkin, A S; Simak, S I; Abrikosov, I A

    2012-04-17

    Cosmochemical, geochemical, and geophysical studies provide evidence that Earth's core contains iron with substantial (5 to 15%) amounts of nickel. The iron-nickel alloy Fe0.9Ni0.1 has been studied in situ by means of angle-dispersive x-ray diffraction in internally heated diamond anvil cells (DACs), and its resistance has been measured as a function of pressure and temperature. At pressures above 225 gigapascals and temperatures over 3400 kelvin, Fe0.9Ni0.1 adopts a body-centered cubic structure. Our experimental and theoretical results not only support the interpretation of shockwave data on pure iron as showing a solid-solid phase transition above about 200 gigapascals, but also suggest that iron alloys with geochemically reasonable compositions (that is, with substantial nickel, sulfur, or silicon content) adopt the bcc structure in Earth's inner core.

  9. Synthesis and in vitro cellular interactions of superparamagnetic iron nanoparticles with a crystalline gold shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Sulalit; Singh, Gurvinder; Sandvig, Ioanna; Sandvig, Axel; Mathieu, Roland; Anil Kumar, P.; Glomm, Wilhelm Robert

    2014-10-01

    Fe@Au core-shell nanoparticles (NPs) exhibit multiple functionalities enabling their effective use in applications such as medical imaging and drug delivery. In this work, a novel synthetic method was developed and optimized for the synthesis of highly stable, monodisperse Fe@Au NPs of average diameter ∼24 nm exhibiting magneto-plasmonic characteristics. Fe@Au NPs were characterized by a wide range of experimental techniques, including scanning (transmission) electron microscopy (S(T)EM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and UV-vis spectroscopy. The formed particles comprise an amorphous iron core with a crystalline Au shell of tunable thickness, and retain the superparamagnetic properties at room temperature after formation of a crystalline Au shell. After surface modification, PEGylated Fe@Au NPs were used for in vitro studies on olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) and human neural stem cells (hNSCs). No adverse effects of the Fe@Au particles were observed post-labeling, both cell types retaining normal morphology, viability, proliferation, and motility. It can be concluded that no appreciable toxic effects on both cell types, coupled with multifunctionality and chemical stability make them ideal candidates for therapeutic as well as diagnostic applications.

  10. Synthesis and cytotoxicity study of magnesium ferrite-gold core-shell nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Nonkumwong, Jeeranan; Pakawanit, Phakkhananan; Wipatanawin, Angkana; Jantaratana, Pongsakorn; Ananta, Supon; Srisombat, Laongnuan

    2016-04-01

    In this work, the core-magnesium ferrite (MgFe2O4) nanoparticles were prepared by hydrothermal technique. Completed gold (Au) shell coating on the surfaces of MgFe2O4 nanoparticles was obtained by varying core/shell ratios via a reduction method. Phase identification, morphological evolution, optical properties, magnetic properties and cytotoxicity to mammalian cells of these MgFe2O4 core coated with Au nanoparticles were examined by using a combination of X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, UV-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis), vibrating sample magnetometry and resazurin microplate assay techniques. In general, TEM images revealed different sizes of the core-shell nanoparticles generated from various core/shell ratios and confirmed the completed Au shell coating on MgFe2O4 core nanoparticles via suitable core/shell ratio with particle size less than 100nm. The core-shell nanoparticle size and the quality of coating influence the optical properties of the products. The UV-vis spectra of complete coated MgFe2O4-Au core-shell nanoparticles exhibit the absorption bands in the near-Infrared (NIR) region indicating high potential for therapeutic applications. Based on the magnetic property measurement, it was found that the obtained MgFe2O4-Au core-shell nanoparticles still exhibit superparamagnetism with lower saturation magnetization value, compared with MgFe2O4 core. Both of MgFe2O4 and MgFe2O4-Au core-shell also showed in vitro non-cytotoxicity to mouse areola fibroblast (L-929) cell line. PMID:26838832

  11. Nanobarcoded superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for nanomedicine: Quantitative studies of cell-nanoparticle interactions by scanning image cytometry.

    PubMed

    Eustaquio, Trisha; Leary, James F

    2016-02-01

    Oligonucleotide-functionalized nanoparticles (NPs) are promising agents for nanomedicine, but the potential in vitro nanotoxicity that may arise from such conjugates has yet to be evaluated in a dose response manner. Since nanomedicine functions on the single-cell level, measurements of nanotoxicity should also be performed as such. In vitro single-cell nanotoxicity assays based on scanning image cytometry are used to study a specific type of oligo-functionalized NP, "nanobarcoded" superparamagnetic iron oxide NPs (NB-SPIONs). The selected panel of single-cell assays measures well-known modes of nanotoxicity-apoptosis, necrosis, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and cell number. Using these assays, the cytotoxicity of two sizes of NB-SPIONs (10 nm and 30 nm core size) was compared to the parent NP, carboxylated SPIONs (COOH-SPIONs). The results suggest that the conjugated NB confers a biocompatible coating that protects against cytotoxicity at very high SPION doses, but both NB- and COOH-SPIONs of either size generally have low in vitro cytotoxicity at physiologically relevant doses. © 2015 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. PMID:26013098

  12. Plasma Position Measurements in a Tokamak with an Iron Core Transformer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Gi-Chung; Choe, W.; Kim, Jayhyun; Yi, Hyo-Suk; Jeon, Sang-Jean; Huh, Songwhe; Chang, Hong-Young; Choi, Duk-In

    2000-07-01

    Two simple methods of estimating the plasma position in a large-aspect-ratio, low-βp tokamak with an iron core transformer are demonstrated: a magnetic diagnostic method and an optical method. The magnetic diagnostic method utilizes an array of magnetic pickup coils to measure the poloidal magnetic field produced by the plasma current. To include the effects of toroidicity and an iron core transformer, the correction factor was calculated with the magnetic material (or iron core) inside the calculation domain and incorporated in the analysis. The evolution of horizontal and vertical displacement of the plasma center obtained in this way is used to control the KAIST-Tokamak plasmas. To compare the plasma position estimated using the magnetic pickup coils, a simple optical method is also demonstrated on KAIST-TOKAMAK using a composite video signal from a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. The two results are in good agreement.

  13. Ferrate(VI)-induced arsenite and arsenate removal by in situ structural incorporation into magnetic iron(III) oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Prucek, Robert; Tuček, Jiří; Kolařík, Jan; Filip, Jan; Marušák, Zdeněk; Sharma, Virender K; Zbořil, Radek

    2013-04-01

    We report the first example of arsenite and arsenate removal from water by incorporation of arsenic into the structure of nanocrystalline iron(III) oxide. Specifically, we show the capability to trap arsenic into the crystal structure of γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles that are in situ formed during treatment of arsenic-bearing water with ferrate(VI). In water, decomposition of potassium ferrate(VI) yields nanoparticles having core-shell nanoarchitecture with a γ-Fe2O3 core and a γ-FeOOH shell. High-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and in-field (57)Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy give unambiguous evidence that a significant portion of arsenic is embedded in the tetrahedral sites of the γ-Fe2O3 spinel structure. Microscopic observations also demonstrate the principal effect of As doping on crystal growth as reflected by considerably reduced average particle size and narrower size distribution of the "in-situ" sample with the embedded arsenic compared to the "ex-situ" sample with arsenic exclusively sorbed on the iron oxide nanoparticle surface. Generally, presented results highlight ferrate(VI) as one of the most promising candidates for advanced technologies of arsenic treatment mainly due to its environmentally friendly character, in situ applicability for treatment of both arsenites and arsenates, and contrary to all known competitive technologies, firmly bound part of arsenic preventing its leaching back to the environment. Moreover, As-containing γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles are strongly magnetic allowing their separation from the environment by application of an external magnet. PMID:23451768

  14. Versatile and Biomass Synthesis of Iron-based Nanoparticles Supported on Carbon Matrix with High Iron Content and Tunable Reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Dongmao; Shi, Sheldon Q; Jiang, Dongping; Che, Wen; Gai, Zheng; Howe, Jane Y; More, Karren Leslie; Arockiasamy, Antonyraj

    2012-01-01

    Iron-based nanoparticles supported on carbon (FeNPs{at}C) have enormous potential for environmental applications. Reported is a biomass-based method for FeNP{at}C synthesis that involves pyrolysis of bleached wood fiber pre-mixed with Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles. This method allows synthesis of iron-based nanoparticles with tunable chemical reactivity by changing the pyrolysis temperature. The FeNP{at}C synthesized at a pyrolysis temperature of 500 C (FeNP{at}C-500) reacts violently (pyrophoric) when exposed to air, while FeNP{at}C prepared at 800 C (FeNP{at}C-800) remains stable in ambient condition for at least 3 months. The FeNPs in FeNP{at}C-800 are mostly below 50 nm in diameter and are surrounded by carbon. The immediate carbon layer (within 5-15 nm radius) on the FeNPs is graphitized. Proof-of-concept environmental applications of FeNPs{at}C-800 were demonstrated by Rhodamine 6G and arsenate (V) removal from water. This biomass-based method provides an effective way for iron-based nanoparticle fabrication and biomass utilization.

  15. Size dependence of inter- and intra-cluster interactions in core-shell iron-iron oxide nanoclusters

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Maninder; McCloy, John S.; Jiang, Weilin; Yao, Qi; Qiang, You

    2012-06-15

    The room temperature magnetic properties of core-shell iron-iron oxide nanoclusters (NCs) synthesized by a cluster deposition system have been investigated, and their dependence on mean cluster size has been discussed. In this study, the surface/boundary spins of clusters were not frozen and were thermally activated during the measurements. The inter-cluster interactions between clusters and intra-cluster interactions between the iron core (ferromagnetic) and iron oxide shell (ferrimagnetic) have been investigated by field dependent isothermal remanent magnetization and dc demagnetization measurements at room temperature. The Henkel plot and delta M plot support the existence of dipolar inter-cluster interactions which become stronger with the growth of cluster size. The derivative of the initial magnetization curve implies that smaller clusters require less field and time than the bigger ones to overcome various energy barriers before aligning along the field direction. Coercive field and magnetization are also correlated with the interaction parameters. To compare the room temperature magnetic results, one system was studied at low temperature, where exchange coupling at the interface between the oxide and metallic phases was observed through bias effect and anisotropy enhancement.

  16. Massive Intracellular Biodegradation of Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Evidenced Magnetically at Single-Endosome and Tissue Levels.

    PubMed

    Mazuel, François; Espinosa, Ana; Luciani, Nathalie; Reffay, Myriam; Le Borgne, Rémi; Motte, Laurence; Desboeufs, Karine; Michel, Aude; Pellegrino, Teresa; Lalatonne, Yoann; Wilhelm, Claire

    2016-08-23

    Quantitative studies of the long-term fate of iron oxide nanoparticles inside cells, a prerequisite for regenerative medicine applications, are hampered by the lack of suitable biological tissue models and analytical methods. Here, we propose stem-cell spheroids as a tissue model to track intracellular magnetic nanoparticle transformations during long-term tissue maturation. We show that global spheroid magnetism can serve as a fingerprint of the degradation process, and we evidence a near-complete nanoparticle degradation over a month of tissue maturation, as confirmed by electron microscopy. Remarkably, the same massive degradation was measured at the endosome level by single-endosome nanomagnetophoretic tracking in cell-free endosomal extract. Interestingly, this spectacular nanoparticle breakdown barely affected iron homeostasis: only the genes coding for ferritin light chain (iron loading) and ferroportin (iron export) were up-regulated 2-fold by the degradation process. Besides, the magnetic and tissular tools developed here allow screening of the biostability of magnetic nanomaterials, as demonstrated with iron oxide nanocubes and nanodimers. Hence, stem-cell spheroids and purified endosomes are suitable models needed to monitor nanoparticle degradation in conjunction with magnetic, chemical, and biological characterizations at the cellular scale, quantitatively, in the long term, in situ, and in real time. PMID:27419260

  17. Controlled catalytic properties of iron nanoparticles on doped graphene: A first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sol; Jhi, Seung-Hoon

    2014-03-01

    Iron is an important catalyst in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS). Recently carbon-material- supported iron nanoparticles were reported as a good catalyst better than bulk iron surface. Here we employed B- and N-doped graphene as supporting materials for iron nanoparticles and studied the change in d-band center of iron nanoparticles which is a key factor in gas adsorption. We then investigated the molecular adsorption of H2 and CO on the nanoparticles using first-principle calculations. It was found that B doping enhances the binding energy of the Fe13 on the graphene, which lowers the d-band center of Fe13, but N doping reduces it. Difference in the work-function and subsequently in the charge transfer causes such behavior in the binding energies. We showed that the adsorption of H2 and CO on the Fe-graphene substrate is strongly correlated with the d-band center modulated by the doping concentration. We also found that the stability of Fe nanoparticle was enhanced by graphene doping.

  18. High-Pressure Elasticity of Iron and Anisotropy of Earth's Inner Core.

    PubMed

    Stixrude, L; Cohen, R E

    1995-03-31

    A first principles theoretical approach shows that, at the density of the inner core, both hexagonal [hexagonal close-packed (hcp)] and cubic [face-centered-cubic (fcc)] phases of iron are substantially elastically anisotropic. A forward model of the inner core based on the predicted elastic constants and the assumption that the inner core consists of a nearly perfectly aligned aggregate of hcp crystals shows good agreement with seismic travel time anomalies that have been attributed to inner core anisotropy. A cylindrically averaged aggregate of fcc crystals disagrees with the seismic observations. PMID:17770110

  19. Use of silicate shells to prevent sintering during thermally induced chemical ordering of iron platinum nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Dwayne Fitzgerald

    Its very high value of magnetocrystalline anisotropy makes the L1 0 phase of FePt a leading candidate for future high density magnetic recording systems. FePt nanoparticles can be prepared by a number of chemical methods. However, these particles have a face-centered cubic structure, with low anisotropy and are superparamagnetic. They must be heated to temperatures above 500 °C to obtain the chemically ordered L10 phase. However, during heating the particles coalesce to give twinned grains with large sizes (10-30 nm). Here we provide a solution to the sintering problem by developing a sol-gel procedure for coating the FePt particles with an amorphous silica shell. The silica shell prevents the FePt particles from agglomerating when heated to 700 °C to effect chemical ordering. FePt nanoparticles were prepared by the super-hydride reduction of platinum(II) acetylacetonate and iron(II) chloride in hot diphenyl ether in the presence of oleylamine and oleic acid capping ligands. The particles had an average diameter of 5-6 nm, a face-centered cubic structure and were superparamagnetic. The particles were coated using a microemulsion process producing a 6 nm silicon oxide shell with a single nanoparticle core-shell structure. The nanoparticles were heated to 700 °C for times of 30 min and 1hr to achieve L10 phase transformation. These samples were annealed in a tube furnace under 95% Ar/5% H2. Many procedures were found to be ineffective. They mostly consisted of biphasic reaction systems and several trials where reaction variables were altered in search of the appropriate conditions. This work has impacted the search for a higher density magnetic recording medium by allowing the study of FePt under a protected environment while achieving chemical ordering. If the L10 FePt nanoparticles will be used in magnetic recording, the particles will require a hard coating to prevent wear. In the course of the present work, it has been shown that the silicate shells

  20. Glioma-targeted superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as drug-carrying vehicles for theranostic effects.

    PubMed

    Xu, He-Lin; Mao, Kai-Li; Huang, Yin-Ping; Yang, Jing-Jing; Xu, Jie; Chen, Pian-Pian; Fan, Zi-Liang; Zou, Shuang; Gao, Zheng-Zheng; Yin, Jia-Yu; Xiao, Jian; Lu, Cui-Tao; Zhang, Bao-Lin; Zhao, Ying-Zheng

    2016-08-01

    Multifunctional nanoparticles capable of the specific delivery of therapeutics to diseased cells and the real-time imaging of these sites have the potential to improve cancer treatment through personalized therapy. In this study, we have proposed a multifunctional nanoparticle that integrate magnetic targeting, drug-carrier functionality and real-time MRI imaging capabilities in one platform for the theranostic treatment of tumors. The multifunctional nanoparticle was designed with a superparamagnetic iron oxide core and a multifunctional shell composed of PEG/PEI/polysorbate 80 (Ps 80) and was used to encapsulate DOX. DOX-loaded multifunctional nanoparticles (DOX@Ps 80-SPIONs) with a Dh of 58.0 nm, a zeta potential of 28.0 mV, and a drug loading content of 29.3% presented superior superparamagnetic properties with a saturation magnetization (Ms) of 24.1 emu g(-1). The cellular uptake of DOX@Ps 80-SPIONs by C6 cells under a magnetic field was significantly enhanced over that of free DOX in solution, resulting in stronger in vitro cytotoxicity. The real-time therapeutic outcome of DOX@Ps 80-SPIONs was easily monitored by MRI. Furthermore, the negative contrast enhancement effect of the nanoparticles was confirmed in glioma-bearing rats. Prussian blue staining and ex vivo DOX fluorescence assays showed that the magnetic Ps 80-SPIONs and encapsulated DOX were delivered to gliomas by imposing external magnetic fields, indicating effective magnetic targeting. Due to magnetic targeting and Ps 80-mediated endocytosis, DOX@Ps 80-SPIONs in the presence of a magnetic field led to the complete suppression of glioma growth in vivo at 28 days after treatment. The therapeutic mechanism of DOX@Ps 80-SPIONs acted by inducing apoptosis through the caspase-3 pathway. Finally, DOX@Ps 80-SPIONs' safety at therapeutic dosage was verified using pathological HE assays of the heart, liver, spleen, lung and kidney. Multifunctional SPIONs could be used as potential carriers for the

  1. The anticancer properties of iron core–gold shell nanoparticles in colorectal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ya-Na; Wu, Ping-Ching; Yang, Li-Xing; Ratinac, Kyle R; Thordarson, Pall; Jahn, Kristina A; Chen, Dong-Hwang; Shieh, Dar-Bin; Braet, Filip

    2013-01-01

    Previously, iron core–gold shell nanoparticles (Fe@Au) have been shown to possess cancer-preferential cytotoxicity in oral and colorectal cancer (CRC) cells. However, CRC cell lines are less sensitive to Fe@Au treatment when compared with oral cancer cell lines. In this research, Fe@Au are found to decrease the cell viability of CRC cell lines, including Caco-2, HT-29, and SW480, through growth inhibition rather than the induction of cell death. The cytotoxicity induced by Fe@Au in CRC cells uses different subcellular pathways to the mitochondria-mediated autophagy found in Fe@Au-treated oral cancer cells, OECM1. Interestingly, the Caco-2 cell line shows a similar response to OECM1 cells and is thus more sensitive to Fe@Au treatment than the other CRC cell lines studied. We have investigated the underlying cell resistance mechanisms of Fe@Au-treated CRC cells. The resistance of CRC cells to Fe@Au does not result from the total amount of Fe@Au internalized. Instead, the different amounts of Fe and Au internalized appear to determine the different response to treatment with Fe-only nanoparticles in Fe@Au-resistant CRC cells compared with the Fe@Au-sensitive OECM1 cells. The only moderately cytotoxic effect of Fe@Au nanoparticles on CRC cells, when compared to the highly sensitive OECM1 cells, appears to arise from the CRC cells’ relative insensitivity to Fe, as is demonstrated by our Fe-only treatments. This is a surprising outcome, given that Fe has thus far been considered to be the “active” component of Fe@Au nanoparticles. Instead, we have found that the Au coatings, previously considered only as a passivating coating to protect the Fe cores from oxidation, significantly enhance the cytotoxicity of Fe@Au in certain CRC cells. Therefore, we conclude that both the Fe and Au in these core–shell nanoparticles are essential for the anticancer properties observed in CRC cells. PMID:24039416

  2. Vapour phase approach for iron oxide nanoparticle synthesis from solid precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Mandeep; Ulbrich, Pavel; Prokopec, Vadym; Svoboda, Pavel; Šantavá, Eva; Štěpánek, František

    2013-04-15

    A new non-solution mediated approach to the synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles directly from solid FeCl{sub 2} salt precursors has been developed. The method is rapid, simple and scalable. The structural properties and the phase of the resulting iron oxide particles has been determined by a range of methods including XRD, FT-IR and Mössbauer spectroscopy, and the phase is shown to be maghemite (γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}). The magnetic properties of the iron oxide particles have been measured using SQUID, confirming superparamagnetic behaviour of the powder and a saturation magnetization of 53.0 emu g{sup −1} at 300 K. Aqueous dispersions at increasing concentrations were prepared and their heating rate under a 400 kHz alternating magnetic field measured. The specific absorption rate (SAR) of the iron oxide was found to be 84.8 W g{sup −1}, which makes the material suitable for the formulation of ferrofluids or ferrogels with RF heating properties. - Graphical Abstract: Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles obtained by a novel vapour phase approach. Highlights: ► Novel vapour phase (non-solvent) approach for iron oxide nanoparticle synthesis. ► Attractive alternative approach to the present co-precipitation method. ► Better magnetic properties with high coercivity of nanoparticles. ► A high specific absorption rate (SAR) for hyperthermia applications.

  3. Liquid Iron Alloys with Hydrogen at Outer Core Conditions by First Principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umemoto, K.; Hirose, K.

    2015-12-01

    Since the density of the outer core deduced from seismic data is about 10% lower than that of pure iron at core pressures and temperatures (P-T), it is widely believed that the outer core includes one or more light elements. Although intensive experimental and theoretical studies have been performed so far, the light element in the core has not yet been identified. Comparison of the density and sound velocity of liquid iron alloys with observations, such as the PREM, is a promising way to determine the species and quantity of light alloying component(s) in the outer core. Here we report the results of a first-principles molecular dynamics study on liquid iron alloyed with hydrogen, one of candidates of the light elements. Hydrogen had been much less studied than other candidates. However, hydrogen has been known to reduce the melting temperature of Fe-H solid [1]. Furthermore, very recently, Nomura et al. argued that the outer core may include 24 at.% H in order to be molten under relatively low temperature (< 3600 K) [2]. Since then hydrogen has attracted strong interests. We clarify the effects of hydrogen on density and sound velocity of liquid iron alloys under outer core P-T conditions. It is shown that ~1 wt% hydrogen can reproduce PREM density and sound velocity simultaneously very well. In addition, we show the presence of hydrogen rather reduces Gruneisen parameters. It indicates that, if hydrogen exists in the outer core, temperature profile of the outer core could be changed considerably from one estimated so far. [1] Sakamaki, K., E. Takahashi, Y. Nakajima, Y. Nishihara, K. Funakoshi, T. Suzuki, and Y. Fukai, Phys. Earth Planet. Inter., 174, 192-201 (2009). [2] Nomura, R., K. Hirose, K. Uesugi, Y. Ohishi, A. Tsuchiyama, A. Miyake, and Y. Ueno, Science 31, 522-525 (2014).

  4. Compact Ag@Fe3O4 Core-shell Nanoparticles by Means of Single-step Thermal Decomposition Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Brollo, Maria Eugênia F.; López-Ruiz, Román; Muraca, Diego; Figueroa, Santiago J. A.; Pirota, Kleber R.; Knobel, Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    A temperature pause introduced in a simple single-step thermal decomposition of iron, with the presence of silver seeds formed in the same reaction mixture, gives rise to novel compact heterostructures: brick-like Ag@Fe3O4 core-shell nanoparticles. This novel method is relatively easy to implement, and could contribute to overcome the challenge of obtaining a multifunctional heteroparticle in which a noble metal is surrounded by magnetite. Structural analyses of the samples show 4 nm silver nanoparticles wrapped within compact cubic external structures of Fe oxide, with curious rectangular shape. The magnetic properties indicate a near superparamagnetic like behavior with a weak hysteresis at room temperature. The value of the anisotropy involved makes these particles candidates to potential applications in nanomedicine. PMID:25354532

  5. Iron Oxide Nanoparticle-Micelles (ION-Micelles) for Sensitive (Molecular) Magnetic Particle Imaging and Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Starmans, Lucas W. E.; Burdinski, Dirk; Haex, Nicole P. M.; Moonen, Rik P. M.; Strijkers, Gustav J.; Nicolay, Klaas; Grüll, Holger

    2013-01-01

    Background Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONs) are a promising nanoplatform for contrast-enhanced MRI. Recently, magnetic particle imaging (MPI) was introduced as a new imaging modality, which is able to directly visualize magnetic particles and could serve as a more sensitive and quantitative alternative to MRI. However, MPI requires magnetic particles with specific magnetic properties for optimal use. Current commercially available iron oxide formulations perform suboptimal in MPI, which is triggering research into optimized synthesis strategies. Most synthesis procedures aim at size control of iron oxide nanoparticles rather than control over the magnetic properties. In this study, we report on the synthesis, characterization and application of a novel ION platform for sensitive MPI and MRI. Methods and Results IONs were synthesized using a thermal-decomposition method and subsequently phase-transferred by encapsulation into lipidic micelles (ION-Micelles). Next, the material and magnetic properties of the ION-Micelles were analyzed. Most notably, vibrating sample magnetometry measurements showed that the effective magnetic core size of the IONs is 16 nm. In addition, magnetic particle spectrometry (MPS) measurements were performed. MPS is essentially zero-dimensional MPI and therefore allows to probe the potential of iron oxide formulations for MPI. ION-Micelles induced up to 200 times higher signal in MPS measurements than commercially available iron oxide formulations (Endorem, Resovist and Sinerem) and thus likely allow for significantly more sensitive MPI. In addition, the potential of the ION-Micelle platform for molecular MPI and MRI was showcased by MPS and MRI measurements of fibrin-binding peptide functionalized ION-Micelles (FibPep-ION-Micelles) bound to blood clots. Conclusions The presented data underlines the potential of the ION-Micelle nanoplatform for sensitive (molecular) MPI and warrants further investigation of the FibPep-ION-Micelle platform for

  6. Antimicrobial activity of iron oxide nanoparticle upon modulation of nanoparticle-bacteria interface

    PubMed Central

    Arakha, Manoranjan; Pal, Sweta; Samantarrai, Devyani; Panigrahi, Tapan K.; Mallick, Bairagi C.; Pramanik, Krishna; Mallick, Bibekanand; Jha, Suman

    2015-01-01

    Investigating the interaction patterns at nano-bio interface is a key challenge for safe use of nanoparticles (NPs) to any biological system. The study intends to explore the role of interaction pattern at the iron oxide nanoparticle (IONP)-bacteria interface affecting antimicrobial propensity of IONP. To this end, IONP with magnetite like atomic arrangement and negative surface potential (n-IONP) was synthesized by co-precipitation method. Positively charged chitosan molecule coating was used to reverse the surface potential of n-IONP, i.e. positive surface potential IONP (p-IONP). The comparative data from fourier transform infrared spectroscope, XRD, and zeta potential analyzer indicated the successful coating of IONP surface with chitosan molecule. Additionally, the nanocrystals obtained were found to have spherical size with 10–20 nm diameter. The BacLight fluorescence assay, bacterial growth kinetic and colony forming unit studies indicated that n-IONP (<50 μM) has insignificant antimicrobial activity against Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli. However, coating with chitosan molecule resulted significant increase in antimicrobial propensity of IONP. Additionally, the assay to study reactive oxygen species (ROS) indicated relatively higher ROS production upon p-IONP treatment of the bacteria. The data, altogether, indicated that the chitosan coating of IONP result in interface that enhances ROS production, hence the antimicrobial activity. PMID:26437582

  7. Antimicrobial activity of iron oxide nanoparticle upon modulation of nanoparticle-bacteria interface.

    PubMed

    Arakha, Manoranjan; Pal, Sweta; Samantarrai, Devyani; Panigrahi, Tapan K; Mallick, Bairagi C; Pramanik, Krishna; Mallick, Bibekanand; Jha, Suman

    2015-01-01

    Investigating the interaction patterns at nano-bio interface is a key challenge for safe use of nanoparticles (NPs) to any biological system. The study intends to explore the role of interaction pattern at the iron oxide nanoparticle (IONP)-bacteria interface affecting antimicrobial propensity of IONP. To this end, IONP with magnetite like atomic arrangement and negative surface potential (n-IONP) was synthesized by co-precipitation method. Positively charged chitosan molecule coating was used to reverse the surface potential of n-IONP, i.e. positive surface potential IONP (p-IONP). The comparative data from fourier transform infrared spectroscope, XRD, and zeta potential analyzer indicated the successful coating of IONP surface with chitosan molecule. Additionally, the nanocrystals obtained were found to have spherical size with 10-20 nm diameter. The BacLight fluorescence assay, bacterial growth kinetic and colony forming unit studies indicated that n-IONP (<50 μM) has insignificant antimicrobial activity against Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli. However, coating with chitosan molecule resulted significant increase in antimicrobial propensity of IONP. Additionally, the assay to study reactive oxygen species (ROS) indicated relatively higher ROS production upon p-IONP treatment of the bacteria. The data, altogether, indicated that the chitosan coating of IONP result in interface that enhances ROS production, hence the antimicrobial activity. PMID:26437582

  8. Antimicrobial activity of iron oxide nanoparticle upon modulation of nanoparticle-bacteria interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakha, Manoranjan; Pal, Sweta; Samantarrai, Devyani; Panigrahi, Tapan K.; Mallick, Bairagi C.; Pramanik, Krishna; Mallick, Bibekanand; Jha, Suman

    2015-10-01

    Investigating the interaction patterns at nano-bio interface is a key challenge for safe use of nanoparticles (NPs) to any biological system. The study intends to explore the role of interaction pattern at the iron oxide nanoparticle (IONP)-bacteria interface affecting antimicrobial propensity of IONP. To this end, IONP with magnetite like atomic arrangement and negative surface potential (n-IONP) was synthesized by co-precipitation method. Positively charged chitosan molecule coating was used to reverse the surface potential of n-IONP, i.e. positive surface potential IONP (p-IONP). The comparative data from fourier transform infrared spectroscope, XRD, and zeta potential analyzer indicated the successful coating of IONP surface with chitosan molecule. Additionally, the nanocrystals obtained were found to have spherical size with 10-20 nm diameter. The BacLight fluorescence assay, bacterial growth kinetic and colony forming unit studies indicated that n-IONP (<50 μM) has insignificant antimicrobial activity against Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli. However, coating with chitosan molecule resulted significant increase in antimicrobial propensity of IONP. Additionally, the assay to study reactive oxygen species (ROS) indicated relatively higher ROS production upon p-IONP treatment of the bacteria. The data, altogether, indicated that the chitosan coating of IONP result in interface that enhances ROS production, hence the antimicrobial activity.

  9. Nature of diffraction fringes originating in the core of core-shell nanoparticle Cu/SiO2 and formation mechanism of the structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radnaev, A. R.; Kalashnikov, S. V.; Nomoev, A. V.

    2016-05-01

    This article is devoted to the analysis of the reasons for the occurrence of diffraction fringes in the cores of the core-shell nanoparticles Cu/SiO2. Moiré and diffraction fringes are observed while studying the nanoparticle cores under a transmission electron microscope. The formation of diffraction fringes is closely connected to the mechanism of nanoparticle formation under study and appears to be its consequence, letting us develop a hypothesis of metastable phase formation in nanoparticle cores. In our opinion, the emergence of diffraction fringes in cores of copper is connected to clasterisation in solid solution oversaturated with silicon α-Cu with the diffused interphase state.

  10. Size-controlled synthesis of thermal stable single-cored Ru@H-SiO2 core-shell nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiaolong; Yu, Hongbo; Lim, Zi-Yian; Yang, Guangming; Xie, Zhaohui; Zhou, Shenghu; Yin, Hongfeng

    2016-06-01

    Single-cored Ru@H-SiO2 (H: hollow) core-shell nanoparticles (NPs) with around 4.3 nm Ru cores and hollow SiO2 shells were prepared successfully. In this synthetic process, we obtained multi-cored Ru@SiO2 NPs initially, single-cored RuO2@H-SiO2 NPs during treatment, and single-cored Ru@H-SiO2 NPs in the end. The Ru@SiO2 NPs were prepared by water-in-oil microemulsion method, and the size and core number of Ru@SiO2 NPs can be controlled. Single-cored RuO2@H-SiO2 NPs and Ru@H-SiO2 NPs were successively obtained by calcination and reduction. The structure showed promising aggregate-resistant performance and potential application in catalysis.

  11. Comparison of iron oxide nanoparticle and waterbath hyperthermia cytotoxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogden, J. A.; Tate, J. A.; Strawbridge, R. R.; Ivkov, R.; Hoopes, P. J.

    2009-02-01

    The development of medical grade iron oxide nanoparticles (IONP) has renewed interest in hyperthermia cancer therapy. Because of their modifiable size and heating capabilities under an AC magnetic field (alternating magnetic field, AMF), IONPs have the potential to damage or kill cells in a manner more therapeutically efficient than previous hyperthermia techniques. The use of IONPs in hyperthermia cancer therapy has prompted numerous questions regarding the cytotoxic mechanism associated with IONP heat therapy and if such mechanism is different (more or less effective) with respect to conventional hyperthermia techniques. In this in vitro study, we determine the immediate and long-term (24 hours) cytotoxic effects of isothermal IONP hyperthermia treatment versus a conventional global heating technique (water bath). Using the same heating time and temperature we showed significantly greater cytotoxicity in IONP-heated cells as opposed to water bath-treated cells. We postulate that the difference in treatment efficacy is due to the spatial relationship of particle-induced thermal damage within cells. Although the exact mechanism is still unclear, it appears likely that intracellular IONPs have to achieve a very high temperature in order to heat the surrounding environment; therefore it is reasonable to assume that particles localized to specific areas of the cell such as the membrane can deliver exacerbated injury to those areas. In this experiment, although detectable global temperature for the particle-heated cells stands comparable to the conventional heat treatment, particle-induced cell death is higher. From the results of this study, we propose that the mechanism of IONP hyperthermia renders enhanced cytotoxicity compared to conventional waterbath hyperthermia at the same measured thermal dose.

  12. Preparation of highly dispersed core/shell-type titania nanocapsules containing a single Ag nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Hideki; Kanda, Takashi; Shibata, Hirobumi; Ohkubo, Takahiro; Abe, Masahiko

    2006-04-19

    Core/shell-type titania nanocapsules containing a single Ag nanoparticle were prepared. Ag nanoparticles were prepared using the reduction of silver nitrate with hydrazine in the presence of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) as protective agent. The sol-gel reaction of titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) was used to prepare core/shell-type titania nanocapsules with CTAB-coated Ag nanoparticles as the core. TEM observations revealed that the size of the core (Ag particle) and the thickness of the shell (titania) of the core/shell particles obtained are about 10 nm and 5-10 nm, respectively. In addition, the nanocapsules were found to be dispersed in the medium as individual particles without aggregation. Moreover, titania coating caused the surface plasmon absorption of Ag nanoparticles to shift toward the longer wavelength side. PMID:16608315

  13. Pharmacokinetics study of Zr-89-labeled melanin nanoparticle in iron-overload mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pengjun; Yue, Yuanyuan; Pan, Donghui; Yang, Runlin; Xu, Yuping; Wang, Lizhen; Yan, Junjie; Li, Xiaotian; Yang, Min

    2016-09-01

    Melanin, a natural biological pigment present in many organisms, has been found to exhibit multiple functions. An important property of melanin is its ability to chelate metal ions strongly, which might be developed as an iron chelator for iron overload therapy. Herein, we prepared the ultrasmall water-soluble melanin nanoparticle (MP) and firstly evaluate the pharmacokinetics of MP in iron-overload mice to provide scientific basis for treating iron-overload. To study the circulation time and biodistribution, MP was labeled with (89)Zr, a long half-life (78.4h) positron-emitting metal which is suited for the labeling of nanoparticles and large bioactive molecule. MP was chelated with (89)Zr directly at pH5, resulting in non-decay-corrected yield of 89.6% and a radiochemical purity of more than 98%. The specific activity was at least190 MBq/μmol. The (89)Zr-MP was stable in human plasma and PBS for at least 48h. The half-life of (89)Zr-MP was about 15.70±1.74h in iron-overload mice. Biodistribution studies and MicroPET imaging showed that (89)Zr-MP mainly accumulated in liver and spleen, which are the target organ of iron-overload. The results indicate that the melanin nanoparticle is promising for further iron overload therapy. PMID:27359110

  14. Evolution of molten material in iron cores of small planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teplyakova, S. N.

    2011-12-01

    A parent body of the Lovina meteorite underwent processes which yielded dentritic structures of taenite in phosphide-sulfide-metal matrix unusual for iron meteorites. Similar dendritic structures can be found also in IIE meteorites as microinclusions but are unknown in other iron meteorites. The similarity between dendritic structures in the Lovina meteorite and metal-phosphide inclusions in IIE iron meteorites implies similar processes which led to their crystallization from molten materials in chambers of various sizes. Studying physical and chemical crystallization parameters of metal-phosphide inclusions in the Elga meteorite (IIE) makes it feasible to estimate the p-T conditions required for the unique Lovina meteorite to have formed. It is shown that dendrites in the Lovina meteorite may have been crystallized from molten materials close in composition to P-FeNi and P-S-FeNi that are produced when phosphides and sulfides melt locally in metals as a result of impact events with subsequent fast cooling. The temperature of homogeneous melting is likely to have been more than 1450°C, and the starting temperature of crystallization of such molten materials is estimated to have been between 1050 and 1150°C. The cooling rate of inclusions can be estimated to be 10-3 °C s-1, based on the structural and chemical concordance between samples obtained experimentally (Chabot et al., 2000) and metal-phosphide inclusions (P-FeNi and P-S-FeNi) in the Elga meteorite. Large-sized dendrites in the Lovina meteorite imply cooling rates that are considerably less than 10-3 °C s-1.

  15. Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Induce Autophagosome Accumulation through Multiple Mechanisms: Lysosome Impairment, Mitochondrial Damage, and ER Stress.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xudong; Zhang, Hongqiu; Liang, Xin; Zhang, Jinxie; Tao, Wei; Zhu, Xianbing; Chang, Danfeng; Zeng, Xiaowei; Liu, Gan; Mei, Lin

    2016-07-01

    Magnetite (iron oxide, Fe3O4) nanoparticles have been widely used for drug delivery and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Previous studies have shown that many metal-based nanoparticles including Fe3O4 nanoparticles can induce autophagosome accumulation in treated cells. However, the underlying mechanism is still not clear. To investigate the biosafety of Fe3O4 and PLGA-coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles, some experiments related to the mechanism of autophagy induction by these nanoparticles have been investigated. In this study, the results showed that Fe3O4, PLGA-coated Fe3O4, and PLGA nanoparticles could be taken up by the cells through cellular endocytosis. Fe3O4 nanoparticles extensively impair lysosomes and lead to the accumulation of LC3-positive autophagosomes, while PLGA-coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles reduce this destructive effect on lysosomes. Moreover, Fe3O4 nanoparticles could also cause mitochondrial damage and ER and Golgi body stresses, which induce autophagy, while PLGA-coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles reduce the destructive effect on these organelles. Thus, the Fe3O4 nanoparticle-induced autophagosome accumulation may be caused by multiple mechanisms. The autophagosome accumulation induced by Fe3O4 was also investigated. The Fe3O4, PLGA-coated Fe3O4, and PLGA nanoparticle-treated mice were sacrificed to evaluate the toxicity of these nanoparticles on the mice. The data showed that Fe3O4 nanoparticle treated mice would lead to the extensive accumulation of autophagosomes in the kidney and spleen in comparison to the PLGA-coated Fe3O4 and PLGA nanoparticles. Our data clarifies the mechanism by which Fe3O4 induces autophagosome accumulation and the mechanism of its toxicity on cell organelles and mice organs. These findings may have an important impact on the clinical application of Fe3O4 based nanoparticles. PMID:27287467

  16. New Surface Radiolabeling Schemes of Super Paramagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles (SPIONs) for Biodistribution Studies

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Nallathamby, Prakash D.; Mortensen, Ninell P.; Palko, Heather A.; Malfatti, Mike; Smith, Catherine; Sonnett, Jim; Doktycz, Mitchel John; Gu, Baohua; Roeder, Ryan; Wang, Wei; et al

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterial based drug delivery systems allow for the independent tuning of the surface chemical and physical properties that affect their biodistribution in vivo and the therapeutic payloads that they are intended to deliver. Additionally, the added therapeutic and diagnostic value of their inherent material properties often provides extra functionality. Iron based nanomaterials with their magnetic properties and 10 easily tailorable surface chemistry are of particular interest as model systems. In this study the core radius of the iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) was 14.08 3.92 nm while the hydrodynamic radius of the NPs, as determined by Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS), wasmore » between 90 110 nm. In this study, different approaches were explored to create radiolabeled NPs that are stable in solution. The NPs were functionalized with polycarboxylate or polyamine surface functional groups. Polycarboxylate 15 functionalized NPs had a zeta potential of -35 mV and polyamine functionalized NPs had a zeta potential of +40 mV. The polycarboxylate functionalized NPs were chosen for in vivo biodistribution studies and hence were radiolabeled with 14C, with a final activity of 0.097 nCi/mg-1 of NPs. In chronic studies, the biodistribution profile is tracked using low level radiolabeled proxies of the nanoparticles of interest. Conventionally, these radiolabeled proxies are chemically similar but not chemically identical to the non-20 radiolabeled NPs of interest. This study is novel as different approaches were explored to create radiolabeled NPs that are stable, possess a hydrodynamic radius of <100 nm and most importantly they exhibit an identical surface chemical functionality as their non-radiolabeled counterparts. Identical chemical functionality of the radiolabeled probes to the non-radiolabeled probes was an important consideration to generate statistically similar biodistribution data sets using multiple imaging and 25 detection techniques. The radiolabeling

  17. New Surface Radiolabeling Schemes of Super Paramagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles (SPIONs) for Biodistribution Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Nallathamby, Prakash D.; Mortensen, Ninell P.; Palko, Heather A.; Malfatti, Mike; Smith, Catherine; Sonnett, Jim; Doktycz, Mitchel John; Gu, Baohua; Roeder, Ryan; Wang, Wei; Retterer, Scott T.

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterial based drug delivery systems allow for the independent tuning of the surface chemical and physical properties that affect their biodistribution in vivo and the therapeutic payloads that they are intended to deliver. Additionally, the added therapeutic and diagnostic value of their inherent material properties often provides extra functionality. Iron based nanomaterials with their magnetic properties and 10 easily tailorable surface chemistry are of particular interest as model systems. In this study the core radius of the iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) was 14.08 3.92 nm while the hydrodynamic radius of the NPs, as determined by Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS), was between 90 110 nm. In this study, different approaches were explored to create radiolabeled NPs that are stable in solution. The NPs were functionalized with polycarboxylate or polyamine surface functional groups. Polycarboxylate 15 functionalized NPs had a zeta potential of -35 mV and polyamine functionalized NPs had a zeta potential of +40 mV. The polycarboxylate functionalized NPs were chosen for in vivo biodistribution studies and hence were radiolabeled with 14C, with a final activity of 0.097 nCi/mg-1 of NPs. In chronic studies, the biodistribution profile is tracked using low level radiolabeled proxies of the nanoparticles of interest. Conventionally, these radiolabeled proxies are chemically similar but not chemically identical to the non-20 radiolabeled NPs of interest. This study is novel as different approaches were explored to create radiolabeled NPs that are stable, possess a hydrodynamic radius of <100 nm and most importantly they exhibit an identical surface chemical functionality as their non-radiolabeled counterparts. Identical chemical functionality of the radiolabeled probes to the non-radiolabeled probes was an important consideration to generate statistically similar biodistribution data sets using multiple imaging and 25 detection techniques. The

  18. New surface radiolabeling schemes of super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) for biodistribution studies†

    PubMed Central

    Nallathamby, Prakash D.; Mortensen, Ninell P.; Palko, Heather A.; Malfatti, Mike; Smith, Catherine; Sonnett, James; Doktycz, Mitchel J.; Gu, Baohua; Roeder, Ryan K.; Wang, Wei; Retterer, Scott T.

    2016-01-01

    Nanomaterial based drug delivery systems allow for the independent tuning of the surface chemical and physical properties that affect their biodistribution in vivo and the therapeutic payloads that they are intended to deliver. Additionally, the added therapeutic and diagnostic value of their inherent material properties often provides extra functionality. Iron based nanomaterials with their magnetic properties and easily tailorable surface chemistry are of particular interest as model systems. In this study the core radius of the iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) was 14.08 ± 3.92 nm while the hydrodynamic radius of the NPs, as determined by Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS), was between 90–110 nm. In this study, different approaches were explored to create radiolabeled NPs that are stable in solution. The NPs were functionalized with polycarboxylate or polyamine surface functional groups. Polycarboxylate functionalized NPs had a zeta potential of –35 mV and polyamine functionalized NPs had a zeta potential of +40 mV. The polycarboxylate functionalized NPs were chosen for in vivo biodistribution studies and hence were radiolabeled with 14C, with a final activity of 0.097 nCi mg–1 of NPs. In chronic studies, the biodistribution profile is tracked using low-level radiolabeled proxies of the nanoparticles of interest. Conventionally, these radiolabeled proxies are chemically similar but not chemically identical to the non-radiolabeled NPs of interest. This study is novel as different approaches were explored to create radiolabeled NPs that are stable, possess a hydrodynamic radius of <100 nm and most importantly they exhibit an identical surface chemical functionality as their non-radiolabeled counterparts. Identical chemical functionality of the radiolabeled probes to the non-radiolabeled probes was an important consideration to generate statistically similar biodistribution data sets using multiple imaging and detection techniques. The radiolabeling approach

  19. High-performance iron oxide nanoparticles for magnetic particle imaging - guided hyperthermia (hMPI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Lisa M.; Situ, Shu F.; Griswold, Mark A.; Samia, Anna Cristina S.

    2016-06-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is an emerging imaging modality that allows the direct and quantitative mapping of iron oxide nanoparticles. In MPI, the development of tailored iron oxide nanoparticle tracers is paramount to achieving high sensitivity and good spatial resolution. To date, most MPI tracers being developed for potential clinical applications are based on spherical undoped magnetite nanoparticles. For the first time, we report on the systematic investigation of the effects of changes in chemical composition and shape anisotropy on the MPI performance of iron oxide nanoparticle tracers. We observed a 2-fold enhancement in MPI signal through selective doping of magnetite nanoparticles with zinc. Moreover, we demonstrated focused magnetic hyperthermia heating by adapting the field gradient used in MPI. By saturating the iron oxide nanoparticles outside of a field free region (FFR) with an external static field, we can selectively heat a target region in our test sample. By comparing zinc-doped magnetite cubic nanoparticles with undoped spherical nanoparticles, we could show a 5-fold improvement in the specific absorption rate (SAR) in magnetic hyperthermia while providing good MPI signal, thereby demonstrating the potential for high-performance focused hyperthermia therapy through an MPI-guided approach (hMPI).Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is an emerging imaging modality that allows the direct and quantitative mapping of iron oxide nanoparticles. In MPI, the development of tailored iron oxide nanoparticle tracers is paramount to achieving high sensitivity and good spatial resolution. To date, most MPI tracers being developed for potential clinical applications are based on spherical undoped magnetite nanoparticles. For the first time, we report on the systematic investigation of the effects of changes in chemical composition and shape anisotropy on the MPI performance of iron oxide nanoparticle tracers. We observed a 2-fold enhancement in MPI signal

  20. Advanced piezoresistance of extended metal-insulator core-shell nanoparticle assemblies.

    PubMed

    Athanassiou, E K; Krumeich, F; Grass, R N; Stark, W J

    2008-10-17

    Assembled metal-insulator nanoparticles with a core-shell geometry provide access to materials containing a large number (>10(6)) of tunneling barriers. We demonstrate the production of ceramic coated metal nanoparticles exhibiting an exceptional pressure-sensitive conductivity. We further show that graphene bi- and trilayers on 20 nm copper nanoparticles are insulating in such a core-shell geometry and show a similar pressure-dependent conductivity. This demonstrates that core-shell metal-insulator assemblies offer a route to alternative sensing materials. PMID:18999701

  1. Recent advances in the synthesis of Fe3O4@AU core/shell nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salihov, Sergei V.; Ivanenkov, Yan A.; Krechetov, Sergei P.; Veselov, Mark S.; Sviridenkova, Natalia V.; Savchenko, Alexander G.; Klyachko, Natalya L.; Golovin, Yury I.; Chufarova, Nina V.; Beloglazkina, Elena K.; Majouga, Alexander G.

    2015-11-01

    Fe3O4@Au core/shell nanoparticles have unique magnetic and optical properties. These nanoparticles are used for biomedical applications, such as magnetic resonance imaging, photothermal therapy, controlled drug delivery, protein separation, biosensors, DNA detection, and immunosensors. In this review, recent methods for the synthesis of core/shell nanoparticles are discussed. We divided all of the synthetic methods in two groups: methods of synthesis of bi-layer structures and methods of synthesis of multilayer composite structures. The latter methods have a layer of "glue" material between the core and the shell.

  2. One-pot synthesis of magnetic graphene nanocomposites decorated with core@double-shell nanoparticles for fast chromium removal.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jiahua; Wei, Suying; Gu, Hongbo; Rapole, Sowjanya B; Wang, Qiang; Luo, Zhiping; Haldolaarachchige, Neel; Young, David P; Guo, Zhanhu

    2012-01-17

    A facile thermodecomposition process to synthesize magnetic graphene nanocomposites (MGNCs) is reported. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy and energy filtered elemental mapping revealed a core@double-shell structure of the nanoparticles with crystalline iron as the core, iron oxide as the inner shell and amorphous Si-S-O compound as the outer shell. The MGNCs demonstrate an extremely fast Cr(VI) removal from the wastewater with a high removal efficiency and with an almost complete removal of Cr(VI) within 5 min. The adsorption kinetics follows the pseudo-second-order model and the novel MGNC adsorbent exhibits better Cr(VI) removal efficiency in solutions with low pH. The large saturation magnetization (96.3 emu/g) of the synthesized nanoparticles allows fast separation of the MGNCs from liquid suspension. By using a permanent magnet, the recycling process of both the MGNC adsorbents and the adsorbed Cr(VI) is more energetically and economically sustainable. The significantly reduced treatment time required to remove the Cr(VI) and the applicability in treating the solutions with low pH make MGNCs promising for the efficient removal of heavy metals from the wastewater. PMID:22126606

  3. Growth of textured thin Au coatings on iron oxide nanoparticles with near infrared absorbance

    PubMed Central

    Ma, L L; Borwankar, A U; Willsey, B W; Yoon, K Y; Tam, J O; Sokolov, K V; Feldman, M D; Milner, T E; Johnston, K P

    2013-01-01

    A homologous series of Au-coated iron oxide nanoparticles, with hydrodynamic diameters smaller than 60 nm was synthesized with very low Auto-iron mass ratios as low as 0.15. The hydrodynamic diameter was determined by dynamic light scattering and the composition by atomic absorption spectroscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Unusually low Au precursor supersaturation levels were utilized to nucleate and grow Au coatings on iron oxide relative to formation of pure Au nanoparticles. This approach produced unusually thin coatings, by lowering autocatalytic growth of Au on Au, as shown by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Nearly all of the nanoparticles were attracted by a magnet indicating a minimal amount of pure Au particles The coatings were sufficiently thin to shift the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) to the near infrared (NIR), with large extinction coefficients., despite the small particle hydrodynamic diameters, observed from dynamic light scattering to be less than 60 nm. PMID:23238021

  4. Preparation of iron oxide nanoparticles from FeCl3 solid powder using microemulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassar, Nashaat; Husein, Maen

    2006-05-01

    Nanoparticles of iron oxide were prepared by subjecting iron chloride powder to (w/o) microemulsions consisting of sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT), isooctane and water. FeCl3 was first dissolved in the water pools of the microemulsion, and then reacted with NaOH added as an aqueous solution to form iron oxide. The amount of NaOH solution was limited so that single microemulsion phase is obtained. This technique serves as an in-situ nanoparticle preparation technique aimed at minimizing particle aggregation associated with particle transportation to required sites. In this study, the effects of AOT concentration and water to AOT mole ratio on the nanoparticle size were investigated. UV/Vis spectrophotometry and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to measure the particle size distribution.

  5. Nucleation of Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Mediated by Mms6 Protein in Situ

    SciTech Connect

    Kashyap, Sanjay; Woehl, Taylor J; Liu, Xunpei; Mallapragada, Surya K; Prozorov, Tanya

    2014-09-23

    Biomineralization proteins are widely used as templating agents in biomimetic synthesis of a variety of organic–inorganic nanostructures. However, the role of the protein in controlling the nucleation and growth of biomimetic particles is not well understood, because the mechanism of the bioinspired reaction is often deduced from ex situ analysis of the resultant nanoscale mineral phase. Here we report the direct visualization of biomimetic iron oxide nanoparticle nucleation mediated by an acidic bacterial recombinant protein, Mms6, during an in situ reaction induced by the controlled addition of sodium hydroxide to solution-phase Mms6 protein micelles incubated with ferric chloride. Using in situ liquid cell scanning transmission electron microscopy we observe the liquid iron prenucleation phase and nascent amorphous nanoparticles forming preferentially on the surface of protein micelles. Our results provide insight into the early steps of protein-mediated biomimetic nucleation of iron oxide and point to the importance of an extended protein surface during nanoparticle formation.

  6. Immobilization of Iron Nanoparticles on Multi Substrates and Its Reduction Removal of Chromium (VI) from Waste Streams

    EPA Science Inventory

    This article describes the in-situ synthesis and immobilization of iron nanoparticles on several substrates at room temperature using NaBH4 as a reducing agent and ascorbic acid as capping agent. The method is very effective in protecting iron nanoparticles from air oxidation for...

  7. Effect of size, composition, and morphology on magnetic performance: First-order reversal curves evaluation of iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirt, Ann M.; Sotiriou, Georgios A.; Kidambi, Piran R.; Teleki, Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    Superparamagnetic nanoparticles are employed in a broad range of applications that demand detailed magnetic characterization for superior performance, e.g., in drug delivery or cancer treatment. Magnetic hysteresis measurements provide information on saturation magnetization and coercive force for bulk material but can be equivocal for particles having a broad size distribution. Here, first-order reversal curves (FORCs) are used to evaluate the effective magnetic particle size and interaction between equally sized magnetic iron oxide (Fe2O3) nanoparticles with three different morphologies: (i) pure Fe2O3, (ii) Janus-like, and (iii) core/shell Fe2O3/SiO2 synthesized using flame technology. By characterizing the distribution in coercive force and interaction field from the FORC diagrams, we find that the presence of SiO2 in the core/shell structures significantly reduces the average coercive force in comparison to the Janus-like Fe2O3/SiO2 and pure Fe2O3 particles. This is attributed to the reduction in the dipolar interaction between particles, which in turn reduces the effective magnetic particle size. Hence, FORC analysis allows for a finer distinction between equally sized Fe2O3 particles with similar magnetic hysteresis curves that can significantly influence the final nanoparticle performance.

  8. Magnetic core-shell nanoparticles for drug delivery by nebulization

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Aerosolized therapeutics hold great potential for effective treatment of various diseases including lung cancer. In this context, there is an urgent need to develop novel nanocarriers suitable for drug delivery by nebulization. To address this need, we synthesized and characterized a biocompatible drug delivery vehicle following surface coating of Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) with a polymer poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA). The polymeric shell of these engineered nanoparticles was loaded with a potential anti-cancer drug quercetin and their suitability for targeting lung cancer cells via nebulization was evaluated. Results Average particle size of the developed MNPs and PLGA-MNPs as measured by electron microscopy was 9.6 and 53.2 nm, whereas their hydrodynamic swelling as determined using dynamic light scattering was 54.3 nm and 293.4 nm respectively. Utilizing a series of standardized biological tests incorporating a cell-based automated image acquisition and analysis procedure in combination with real-time impedance sensing, we confirmed that the developed MNP-based nanocarrier system was biocompatible, as no cytotoxicity was observed when up to 100 μg/ml PLGA-MNP was applied to the cultured human lung epithelial cells. Moreover, the PLGA-MNP preparation was well-tolerated in vivo in mice when applied intranasally as measured by glutathione and IL-6 secretion assays after 1, 4, or 7 days post-treatment. To imitate aerosol formation for drug delivery to the lungs, we applied quercitin loaded PLGA-MNPs to the human lung carcinoma cell line A549 following a single round of nebulization. The drug-loaded PLGA-MNPs significantly reduced the number of viable A549 cells, which was comparable when applied either by nebulization or by direct pipetting. Conclusion We have developed a magnetic core-shell nanoparticle-based nanocarrier system and evaluated the feasibility of its drug delivery capability via aerosol administration. This study has

  9. Igneous Evolution of the Core and Mantle in the Parent Body of Group IVA Iron and Stony-Iron Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, E. R. D.; McCoy, T. J.; Haack, H.; Taylor, G. J.

    1992-07-01

    peritectic liquids. Discussion: From the observed size and homogeneity of the Gibeon shower and our fractional crystallization modeling, we can infer that the parental liquid pool was at least many meters in size. Pools this big quickly sink through silicate (unless very reduced), so IVA metal very probably comes from a core. The wide range of metallographic cooling rates that is correlated with Ni concentration in IVA irons must therefore be an artefact. Liquids of pyroxene-silica compositions could be formed in the mantle (Prinz et al., 1984) but trapping them in the core at different stages of core crystallization seems very difficult. We prefer an origin for IVA stony irons by mixing olivine-pyroxene mantle material into the core during core solidification by processes like those that mixed olivine mantle into Fe,Ni cores to make pallasites, followed by addition of silica formed by oxidation of Si from the metal. Pieces of olivine-pyroxene, possibly in the form of a Brenham-like sponge, could be mixed into a crystallizing Fe,Ni core with about 2-4% S at temperatures around 1400 C. Pyroxene might be abundant in the mantle because small body size caused inefficient removal of trapped silicate liquid from an olivine cumulate. Alternatively, temperatures were never high enough to melt the mantle entirely. References: Haack H. and Scott E.R.D. (1992) Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, submitted. Jones J.H. and Malvin (1990) Metall. Trans., 21B, 697-706. Prinz M., Nehru C.E., Delaney J.S., Fredriksson K., and Palme H. (1984) Meteoritics (abstract) 19, 291-292.

  10. Carbon-depleted outer core revealed by sound velocity measurements of liquid iron-carbon alloy.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Yoichi; Imada, Saori; Hirose, Kei; Komabayashi, Tetsuya; Ozawa, Haruka; Tateno, Shigehiko; Tsutsui, Satoshi; Kuwayama, Yasuhiro; Baron, Alfred Q R

    2015-01-01

    The relative abundance of light elements in the Earth's core has long been controversial. Recently, the presence of carbon in the core has been emphasized, because the density and sound velocities of the inner core may be consistent with solid Fe7C3. Here we report the longitudinal wave velocity of liquid Fe84C16 up to 70 GPa based on inelastic X-ray scattering measurements. We find the velocity to be substantially slower than that of solid iron and Fe3C and to be faster than that of liquid iron. The thermodynamic equation of state for liquid Fe84C16 is also obtained from the velocity data combined with previous density measurements at 1 bar. The longitudinal velocity of the outer core, about 4% faster than that of liquid iron, is consistent with the presence of 4-5 at.% carbon. However, that amount of carbon is too small to account for the outer core density deficit, suggesting that carbon cannot be a predominant light element in the core. PMID:26596912

  11. Saturation of electrical resistivity of solid iron at Earth's core conditions.

    PubMed

    Pozzo, Monica; Alfè, Dario

    2016-01-01

    We report on the temperature dependence of the electrical resistivity of solid iron at high pressure, up to and including conditions likely to be found at the centre of the Earth. We have extended some of the calculations of the resistivities of pure solid iron we recently performed at Earth's core conditions (Pozzo et al. in Earth Planet Sci Lett 393:159-164, 2014) to lower temperature. We show that at low temperature the resistivity increases linearly with temperature, and saturates at high temperature. This saturation effect is well known as the Mott-Ioffe-Regel limit in metals, but has been largely ignored to estimate the resistivity of iron at Earth's core conditions. Recent experiments (Gomi et al. in Phys Earth Planet Int 224:88-103, 2013) coupled new high pressure data and saturation to predict the resitivity of iron and iron alloys at Earth's core conditions, and reported values up to three times lower than previous estimates, confirming recent first principles calculations (de Koker et al. in Proc Natl Acad Sci 109:4070-4073, 2012; Pozzo et al. in Nature 485:355-358, 2012, Phys Rev B 87:014110-10, 2013, Earth Planet Sci Lett 393:159-164, 2014; Davies et al. in Nat Geosci 8:678-685, 2015). The present results support the saturation effect idea. PMID:27026948

  12. Transmission electron microscopy and ab initio calculations to relate interfacial intermixing and the magnetism of core/shell nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Chi, C.-C.; Hsiao, C.-H.; Ouyang, Chuenhou; Skoropata, E.; Lierop, J. van

    2015-05-07

    Significant efforts towards understanding bi-magnetic core-shell nanoparticles are underway currently as they provide a pathway towards properties unavailable with single-phased systems. Recently, we have demonstrated that the magnetism of γ-Fe2O3/CoO core-shell nanoparticles, in particular, at high temperatures, originates essentially from an interfacial doped iron-oxide layer that is formed by the migration of Co{sup 2+} from the CoO shell into the surface layers of the γ-Fe2O3 core [Skoropata et al., Phys. Rev. B 89, 024410 (2014)]. To examine directly the nature of the intermixed layer, we have used high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and first-principles calculations to examine the impact of the core-shell intermixing at the atomic level. By analyzing the HRTEM images and energy dispersive spectra, the level and nature of intermixing was confirmed, mainly as doping of Co into the octahedral site vacancies of γ-Fe2O3. The average Co doping depths for different processing temperatures (150 °C and 235 °C) were 0.56 nm and 0.78 nm (determined to within 5% through simulation), respectively, establishing that the amount of core-shell intermixing can be altered purposefully with an appropriate change in synthesis conditions. Through first-principles calculations, we find that the intermixing phase of γ-Fe2O3 with Co doping is ferromagnetic, with even higher magnetization as compared to that of pure γ-Fe2O3. In addition, we show that Co doping into different octahedral sites can cause different magnetizations. This was reflected in a change in overall nanoparticle magnetization, where we observed a 25% reduction in magnetization for the 235 °C versus the 150 °C sample, despite a thicker intermixed layer.

  13. Study of Iron oxide nanoparticles using Mössbauer spectroscopy with a high velocity resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshtrakh, M. I.; Ushakov, M. V.; Šepelák, V.; Semionkin, V. A.; Morais, P. C.

    2016-01-01

    Iron oxide (magnetite and maghemite) nanoparticles developed for magnetic fluids were studied using Mössbauer spectroscopy with a high velocity resolution at 295 and 90 K. The recorded Mössbauer spectra have demonstrated that usual physical models based on octahedral and tetrahedral sites were not suitable for fitting. Alternatively, the Mössbauer spectra were nicely fitted using a large number of magnetic sextets. The obtained results showed that the Mössbauer spectra and the assessed parameters were different for nanoparticles as-prepared and dispersed in the dispersing fluid at 295 K. We claim that this finding is mainly due to the interaction of polar molecules with Iron cations at nanoparticle's surface or due to the surface coating using carboxylic-terminated molecules. It is assumed that the large number of spectral components may be related to complexity of the nanoparticle's characteristics and deviations from stoichiometry, including in the latter the influence of the oxidation of magnetite towards maghemite.

  14. Raman scattering from Zn/ZnO core-shell nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajaj, Geetika; Soni, R. K.

    2008-09-01

    We have synthesized Zn/ZnO core-shell nanoparticles by pulsed laser ablation in liquid (PLAL) media using nanosecond pulsed Nd:YAG laser. The formation of crystalline core-shell nanoparticles of varying core and shell thickness with varying SDS concentration is confirmed by HRTEM images. The optical absorption shows distinct features corresponding to ZnO exciton and Zn surface plasmon. Raman spectrum from Zn/ZnO core-shell nanoparticles shows E2(high) phonon modes of the bulk which are insensitive to the size and modes unique to the core-shell structures. Moreover, the surface optical mode is dominant feature of the nonresonant spectrum. We have also examined the wavelength dependence of the phonon modes in Zn/ZnO core-shell structure.

  15. Polystyrene-Core-Silica-Shell Hybrid Particles Containing Gold and Magnetic Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jia; Vana, Philipp

    2016-02-18

    Polystyrene-core-silica-shell hybrid particles were synthesized by combining the self-assembly of nanoparticles and the polymer with a silica coating strategy. The core-shell hybrid particles are composed of gold-nanoparticle-decorated polystyrene (PS-AuNP) colloids as the core and silica particles as the shell. PS-AuNP colloids were generated by the self-assembly of the PS-grafted AuNPs. The silica coating improved the thermal stability and dispersibility of the AuNPs. By removing the "free" PS of the core, hollow particles with a hydrophobic cage having a AuNP corona and an inert silica shell were obtained. Also, Fe3O4 nanoparticles were encapsulated in the core, which resulted in magnetic core-shell hybrid particles by the same strategy. These particles have potential applications in biomolecular separation and high-temperature catalysis and as nanoreactors. PMID:26639677

  16. A novel approach to the construction of core shell gold polyaniline nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Yang; Ma, Ying; Zhai, Tianyou; Zeng, Yi; Fu, Hongbing; Yao, Jiannian

    2007-11-01

    Uniform core-shell gold-polyaniline (Au-PANI) nanoparticles were successfully fabricated by in situ polymerization of aniline using poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-co-poly(acrylic acid) (PNIPAM-co-PAA)/AuNP hybrid microgel particles as a template. TEM images gave direct evidence of the core-shell nanostructure of Au-PANI particles, which were composed of gold nanoparticles as the core and polyaniline as the shell. The shell thickness of as-prepared core-shell Au-PANI nanoparticles can be easily tuned by controlling the reaction time. A possible mechanism for the formation of core-shell Au-PANI nanostructures was proposed. This novel synthetic method may be extended to the synthesis of other core-shell nanostructures with diverse functionality and high colloidal stability.

  17. Colloidal Stability and Monodispersible Magnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles in Biotechnology Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamili, K.; Rajesh, E. M.; Rajendran, R.; Madhan Shankar, S. R.; Elango, M.; Abitha Devi, N.

    2013-02-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are promising material for various biological applications. In the recent decades, magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MNPs) have great attention in biomedical applications such as drug delivery, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH). This review focuses on the colloidal stability and monodispersity properties of MNPs, which pay more attention toward biomedical applications. The simplest and the most promising method for the synthesis of MNPs is co-precipitation. The biocompatible MNPs are more interested in MRI application. This review also apportions synthesis, characterization and applications of MNP in biological and biomedical as theranostics and imaging.

  18. In vitro cytotoxicity of transparent yellow iron oxide nanoparticles on human glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yun; Zhu, Mo-Tao; Wang, Bing; Wang, Meng; Wang, Hua-Jian; OuYang, Hong; Feng, Wei-Yue

    2010-12-01

    With rapid development of nanotechnology, concerns about the possible adverse health effects on human beings by using nanomaterials have been raised. Transparent yellow iron oxide (alpha-FeOOH) nanoparticles have been widely used in paints, plastic, rubber, building materials, papermaking, food products and pharmaceutical industry, thus the potential health implications by the exposure should be considered. The purpose of this study is to assess the cytotoxicity of transparent yellow iron oxide nanoparticles on U251 human glioma cells. The alpha-FeOOH nanoparticles are in clubbed shapes with 9 nm in diameter and 43 nm long. The specific surface area is 115.3 m2/g. After physicochemical characterization of the nanoparticles, U251 cells were exposed to a-FeOOH at the doses of 0, 3.75, 15, 60 and 120 microg/mL. The results showed that the alpha-FeOOH nanoparticles reduced the cell viability and induced necrosis and apoptosis in U251 cells. In addition, nanoparticle exposure significantly increased the levels of superoxide anion and nitric oxide in a dose-dependent fashion in the cells. Our results suggest that exposure to alpha-FeOOH nanoparticles induce significant free radical formation and cytotoxic effects. The large surface area that induced high surface reactivity may play an important role in the cytotoxic effect of alpha-FeOOH nanoparticles. PMID:21121365

  19. Mechanisms of enhanced osteoblast gene expression in the presence of hydroxyapatite coated iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Nhiem; Hall, Douglas; Webster, Thomas J.

    2012-11-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) coated iron oxide (Fe3O4) magnetic nanoparticles have been shown to enhance osteoblast (bone forming cells) proliferation and osteoblast differentiation into calcium depositing cells (through increased secretion of alkaline phosphatase, collagen and calcium deposition) compared to control samples without nanoparticles. Such nanoparticles are, thus, very promising for numerous orthopedic applications including magnetically directed osteoporosis treatment. The objective of the current study was to elucidate the mechanisms of the aforementioned improved osteoblast responses in the presence of HA coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles. Results demonstrated large amounts of fibronectin (a protein known to increase osteoblast functions) adsorption on HA coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles. Specifically, fibronectin adsorption almost doubled when HA coated Fe3O4 nanoparticle concentrations increased from 12.5 to 100 μg ml-1, and from 12.5 to 200 μg ml-1, a four fold increase was observed. Results also showed greater osteoblast gene regulation (specifically, osteocalcin, type I collagen and cbfa-1) in the presence of HA coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles. Collectively, these results provide a mechanism for the observed enhanced osteoblast functions in the presence of HA coated iron oxide nanoparticles, allowing their further investigation for a number of orthopedic applications.

  20. Melting of iron at the physical conditions of the Earth's core.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Jeffrey H; Holmes, Neil C

    2004-01-22

    Seismological data can yield physical properties of the Earth's core, such as its size and seismic anisotropy. A well-constrained iron phase diagram, however, is essential to determine the temperatures at core boundaries and the crystal structure of the solid inner core. To date, the iron phase diagram at high pressure has been investigated experimentally through both laser-heated diamond-anvil cell and shock-compression techniques, as well as through theoretical calculations. Despite these contributions, a consensus on the melt line or the high-pressure, high-temperature phase of iron is lacking. Here we report new and re-analysed sound velocity measurements of shock-compressed iron at Earth-core conditions. We show that melting starts at 225 +/- 3 GPa (5,100 +/- 500 K) and is complete at 260 +/- 3 GPa (6,100 +/- 500 K), both on the Hugoniot curve-the locus of shock-compressed states. This new melting pressure is lower than previously reported, and we find no evidence for a previously reported solid-solid phase transition on the Hugoniot curve near 200 GPa (ref. 16). PMID:14737164

  1. Systematic chemical variations in large 3AB iron meteorites: Clues to core crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haack, H.; Scott, E. R. D.; Rubio, G. S.; Gutierrez, D. F.; Lewis, C. F.; Wasson, J. T.; Brooks, R. R.; Guo, X.; Ryan, D. E.; Holzbecher, J.

    1993-01-01

    Analysis of numerous individual iron meteorites have shown that fractional crystallization of iron cores result in variations in chemical concentration of the solid core which span several orders of magnitude. The magnitude and direction of the resulting spatial gradients in the core can provide clues to the physical nature of the core crystallization process. We have analyzed suites of samples from three large 3AB irons (Cape York, 58t; Chupaderos, 24t; Morito, 10t) in order to estimate local chemical gradients. Initial results for the concentrations of Ge, Pd, Pt (Massey group), Ir, Au, As, Co, Os, and Rh (Dalhouse group), and P (Arizona group) show significant ranges among the Cape York and Chupaderos samples and marginally significant ranges among the Morito samples. Measurements of Au, Ir, Co, Ni, Cu, Ga, As, W, Re (from UCLA) and Ni and Co (Arizona group) are in progress. We find a spatial Ir gradient in Chupaderos with a magnitude similar to the one reported for Agpalilik (Cape York iron) by Esbensen et al.

  2. Predictable Heating and Positive MRI Contrast from a Mesoporous Silica-Coated Iron Oxide Nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Katie R; Ring, Hattie L; Etheridge, Michael; Zhang, Jinjin; Gao, Zhe; Shao, Qi; Klein, Nathan D; Szlag, Victoria M; Chung, Connie; Reineke, Theresa M; Garwood, Michael; Bischof, John C; Haynes, Christy L

    2016-07-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles have great potential as diagnostic and therapeutic agents in cancer and other diseases; however, biological aggregation severely limits their function in vivo. Aggregates can cause poor biodistribution, reduced heating capability, and can confound their visualization and quantification by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Herein, we demonstrate that the incorporation of a functionalized mesoporous silica shell can prevent aggregation and enable the practical use of high-heating, high-contrast iron oxide nanoparticles in vitro and in vivo. Unmodified and mesoporous silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles were characterized in biologically relevant environments including phosphate buffered saline, simulated body fluid, whole mouse blood, lymph node carcinoma of prostate (LNCaP) cells, and after direct injection into LNCaP prostate cancer tumors in nude mice. Once coated, iron oxide nanoparticles maintained colloidal stability along with high heating and relaxivity behaviors (SARFe = 204 W/g Fe at 190 kHz and 20 kA/m and r1 = 6.9 mM(-1) s(-1) at 1.4 T). Colloidal stability and minimal nonspecific cell uptake allowed for effective heating in salt and agarose suspensions and strong signal enhancement in MR imaging in vivo. These results show that (1) aggregation can lower the heating and imaging performance of magnetic nanoparticles and (2) a coating of functionalized mesoporous silica can mitigate this issue, potentially improving clinical planning and practical use. PMID:26991550

  3. Liquid iron-sulfur alloys at outer core conditions by first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umemoto, Koichiro; Hirose, Kei; Imada, Saori; Nakajima, Yoichi; Komabayashi, Tetsuya; Tsutsui, Satoshi; Baron, Alfred Q. R.

    2014-10-01

    We perform first-principles calculations to investigate liquid iron-sulfur alloys (Fe, Fe56S8, Fe52S12, and Fe48S16) under high-pressure and high-temperature (150-300 GPa and 4000-6000 K) conditions corresponding to the Earth's outer core. Considering only the density profile, the best match with the preliminary reference Earth model is by liquid Fe-14 wt % S (Fe50S14), assuming sulfur is the only light element. However, its bulk sound velocity is too high, in particular in the deep outer core, suggesting that another light component such as oxygen is required. An experimental check using inelastic X-ray scattering shows good agreement with the calculations. In addition, a present study demonstrates that the Birch's law does not hold for liquid iron-sulfur alloy, consistent with a previous report on pure liquid iron.

  4. Magnetite and magnetite/silver core/shell nanoparticles with diluted magnet-like behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Garza-Navarro, Marco; Gonzalez, Virgilio; Ortiz, Ubaldo; De la Rosa, Elder

    2010-01-15

    In the present work is reported the use of the biopolymer chitosan as template for the preparation of magnetite and magnetite/silver core/shell nanoparticles systems, following a two step procedure of magnetite nanoparticles in situ precipitation and subsequent silver ions reduction. The crystalline and morphological characteristics of both magnetite and magnetite/silver core/shell nanoparticles systems were analyzed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and nanobeam diffraction patterns (NBD). The results of these studies corroborate the core/shell morphology and the crystalline structure of the magnetite core and the silver shell. Moreover, magnetization temperature dependent, M(T), measurements show an unusual diluted magnetic behavior attributed to the dilution of the magnetic ordering in the magnetite and magnetite/silver core/shell nanoparticles systems. - Graphical abstract: Biopolymer chitosan was used as stabilization media to synthesize both magnetite and magnetite/silver core/shell nanoparticles. Results of HRTEM and NBD patterns confirm core/shell morphology of the obtained nanoparticles. It was found that the composites show diluted magnet-like behavior.

  5. Surfactant free superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for stable ferrofluids in physiological solutions.

    PubMed

    Mandel, K; Straßer, M; Granath, T; Dembski, S; Sextl, G

    2015-02-18

    A process is reported to obtain a nanoparticle sol from co-precipitated iron oxide particles without using any surfactant. The sol - a true ferrofluid - is not only stable over a wide range of pH but also in physiological solutions. This is a decisive step towards biomedical applications where nanoparticle agglomeration could so far only be prevented by using unwanted surfactants. PMID:25580829

  6. Iron overload by Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles is a High Risk Factor in Cirrhosis by a Systems Toxicology Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yushuang; Zhao, Mengzhu; Yang, Fang; Mao, Yang; Xie, Hang; Zhou, Qibing

    2016-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) as a contrast agent have been widely used in magnetic resonance imaging for tumor diagnosis and theranostics. However, there has been safety concern of SPIONs with cirrhosis related to excess iron-induced oxidative stress. In this study, the impact of iron overload by SPIONs was assessed on a mouse cirrhosis model. A single dose of SPION injection at 0.5 or 5 mg Fe/kg in the cirrhosis group induced a septic shock response at 24 h with elevated serum levels of liver and kidney function markers and extended impacts over 14 days including high levels of serum cholesterols and persistent low serum iron level. In contrast, full restoration of liver functions was found in the normal group with the same dosages over time. Analysis with PCR array of the toxicity pathways revealed the high dose of SPIONs induced significant expression changes of a distinct subset of genes in the cirrhosis liver. All these results suggested that excess iron of the high dose of SPIONs might be a risk factor for cirrhosis because of the marked impacts of elevated lipid metabolism, disruption of iron homeostasis and possibly, aggravated loss of liver functions. PMID:27357559

  7. Iron overload by Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles is a High Risk Factor in Cirrhosis by a Systems Toxicology Assessment.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yushuang; Zhao, Mengzhu; Yang, Fang; Mao, Yang; Xie, Hang; Zhou, Qibing

    2016-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) as a contrast agent have been widely used in magnetic resonance imaging for tumor diagnosis and theranostics. However, there has been safety concern of SPIONs with cirrhosis related to excess iron-induced oxidative stress. In this study, the impact of iron overload by SPIONs was assessed on a mouse cirrhosis model. A single dose of SPION injection at 0.5 or 5 mg Fe/kg in the cirrhosis group induced a septic shock response at 24 h with elevated serum levels of liver and kidney function markers and extended impacts over 14 days including high levels of serum cholesterols and persistent low serum iron level. In contrast, full restoration of liver functions was found in the normal group with the same dosages over time. Analysis with PCR array of the toxicity pathways revealed the high dose of SPIONs induced significant expression changes of a distinct subset of genes in the cirrhosis liver. All these results suggested that excess iron of the high dose of SPIONs might be a risk factor for cirrhosis because of the marked impacts of elevated lipid metabolism, disruption of iron homeostasis and possibly, aggravated loss of liver functions. PMID:27357559

  8. Methods of preparation and modification of advanced zero-valent iron nanoparticles, their properties and application in water treatment technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filip, Jan; Kašlík, Josef; Medřík, Ivo; Petala, Eleni; Zbořil, Radek; Slunský, Jan; Černík, Miroslav; Stavělová, Monika

    2014-05-01

    Zero-valent iron nanoparticles are commonly used in modern water treatment technologies. Compared to conventionally-used macroscopic iron or iron microparticles, the using of nanoparticles has the advantages given mainly by their generally large specific surface area (it drives their high reactivity and/or sorption capacity), small dimensions (it allows their migration e.g. in ground water), and particular physical and chemical properties. Following the applications of zero-valent iron particles in various pilot tests, there arose several critical suggestions for improvements of used nanomaterials and for development of new generation of reactive nanomaterials. In the presentation, the methods of zero-valent iron nanoparticles synthesis will be summarized with a special attention paid to the thermally-induced solid-state reaction allowing preparation of zero-valent iron nanoparticles in an industrial scale. Moreover, the method of thermal reduction of iron-oxide precursors enables to finely tune the critical parameters (mainly particle size and morphology, specific surface area, surface chemistry of nanoparticles etc.) of resulting zero-valet iron nanoparticles. The most important trends of advanced nanoparticles development will be discussed: (i) surface modification of nanomaterilas, (ii) development of nanocomposites and (iii) development of materials for combined reductive-sorption technologies. Laboratory testing of zero-valent iron nanoparticles reactivity and migration will be presented and compared with the field observations: the advanced zero-valent iron nanoparticles were used for groundwater treatment at the locality contaminated by chlorinated hydrocarbons (VC, DCE, TCE and PCE) and reacted nanoparticles were extracted from the sediments for their fate assessment. The authors gratefully acknowledge the support by the Technology Agency of the Czech Republic "Competence Centres" (project No. TE01020218) and the EU FP7 (project NANOREM).

  9. Glioma-targeted superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as drug-carrying vehicles for theranostic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, He-Lin; Mao, Kai-Li; Huang, Yin-Ping; Yang, Jing-Jing; Xu, Jie; Chen, Pian-Pian; Fan, Zi-Liang; Zou, Shuang; Gao, Zheng-Zheng; Yin, Jia-Yu; Xiao, Jian; Lu, Cui-Tao; Zhang, Bao-Lin; Zhao, Ying-Zheng

    2016-07-01

    Multifunctional nanoparticles capable of the specific delivery of therapeutics to diseased cells and the real-time imaging of these sites have the potential to improve cancer treatment through personalized therapy. In this study, we have proposed a multifunctional nanoparticle that integrate magnetic targeting, drug-carrier functionality and real-time MRI imaging capabilities in one platform for the theranostic treatment of tumors. The multifunctional nanoparticle was designed with a superparamagnetic iron oxide core and a multifunctional shell composed of PEG/PEI/polysorbate 80 (Ps 80) and was used to encapsulate DOX. DOX-loaded multifunctional nanoparticles (DOX@Ps 80-SPIONs) with a Dh of 58.0 nm, a zeta potential of 28.0 mV, and a drug loading content of 29.3% presented superior superparamagnetic properties with a saturation magnetization (Ms) of 24.1 emu g-1. The cellular uptake of DOX@Ps 80-SPIONs by C6 cells under a magnetic field was significantly enhanced over that of free DOX in solution, resulting in stronger in vitro cytotoxicity. The real-time therapeutic outcome of DOX@Ps 80-SPIONs was easily monitored by MRI. Furthermore, the negative contrast enhancement effect of the nanoparticles was confirmed in glioma-bearing rats. Prussian blue staining and ex vivo DOX fluorescence assays showed that the magnetic Ps 80-SPIONs and encapsulated DOX were delivered to gliomas by imposing external magnetic fields, indicating effective magnetic targeting. Due to magnetic targeting and Ps 80-mediated endocytosis, DOX@Ps 80-SPIONs in the presence of a magnetic field led to the complete suppression of glioma growth in vivo at 28 days after treatment. The therapeutic mechanism of DOX@Ps 80-SPIONs acted by inducing apoptosis through the caspase-3 pathway. Finally, DOX@Ps 80-SPIONs' safety at therapeutic dosage was verified using pathological HE assays of the heart, liver, spleen, lung and kidney. Multifunctional SPIONs could be used as potential carriers for the

  10. Glioma-targeted superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as drug-carrying vehicles for theranostic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, He-Lin; Mao, Kai-Li; Huang, Yin-Ping; Yang, Jing-Jing; Xu, Jie; Chen, Pian-Pian; Fan, Zi-Liang; Zou, Shuang; Gao, Zheng-Zheng; Yin, Jia-Yu; Xiao, Jian; Lu, Cui-Tao; Zhang, Bao-Lin; Zhao, Ying-Zheng

    2016-07-01

    Multifunctional nanoparticles capable of the specific delivery of therapeutics to diseased cells and the real-time imaging of these sites have the potential to improve cancer treatment through personalized therapy. In this study, we have proposed a multifunctional nanoparticle that integrate magnetic targeting, drug-carrier functionality and real-time MRI imaging capabilities in one platform for the theranostic treatment of tumors. The multifunctional nanoparticle was designed with a superparamagnetic iron oxide core and a multifunctional shell composed of PEG/PEI/polysorbate 80 (Ps 80) and was used to encapsulate DOX. DOX-loaded multifunctional nanoparticles (DOX@Ps 80-SPIONs) with a Dh of 58.0 nm, a zeta potential of 28.0 mV, and a drug loading content of 29.3% presented superior superparamagnetic properties with a saturation magnetization (Ms) of 24.1 emu g-1. The cellular uptake of DOX@Ps 80-SPIONs by C6 cells under a magnetic field was significantly enhanced over that of free DOX in solution, resulting in stronger in vitro cytotoxicity. The real-time therapeutic outcome of DOX@Ps 80-SPIONs was easily monitored by MRI. Furthermore, the negative contrast enhancement effect of the nanoparticles was confirmed in glioma-bearing rats. Prussian blue staining and ex vivo DOX fluorescence assays showed that the magnetic Ps 80-SPIONs and encapsulated DOX were delivered to gliomas by imposing external magnetic fields, indicating effective magnetic targeting. Due to magnetic targeting and Ps 80-mediated endocytosis, DOX@Ps 80-SPIONs in the presence of a magnetic field led to the complete suppression of glioma growth in vivo at 28 days after treatment. The therapeutic mechanism of DOX@Ps 80-SPIONs acted by inducing apoptosis through the caspase-3 pathway. Finally, DOX@Ps 80-SPIONs' safety at therapeutic dosage was verified using pathological HE assays of the heart, liver, spleen, lung and kidney. Multifunctional SPIONs could be used as potential carriers for the

  11. Size-controlled synthesis of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and their surface coating by gold for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maleki, H.; Simchi, A.; Imani, M.; Costa, B. F. O.

    2012-11-01

    The size mono-dispersity, saturation magnetization, and surface chemistry of magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) are recognized as critical factors for efficient biomedical applications. Here, we performed modified water-in-oil inverse nano-emulsion procedure for preparation of stable colloidal superparamagnetic iron oxide NPs (SPIONs) with high saturation magnetization. To achieve mono-dispersed SPIONs, optimization process was probed on several important factors including molar ratio of iron salts [Fe3+ and Fe2+], the concentration of ammonium hydroxide as reducing agent, and molar ratio of water to surfactant. The biocompatibility of the obtained NPs, at various concentrations, was evaluated via MTT (3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay and the results showed that the NPs were non-toxic at concentrations <0.1 mg/mL. Surface functionalization was performed by conformal coating of the NPs with a thin shell of gold (˜4 nm) through chemical reduction of attached gold salts at the surface of the SPIONs. The Fe3O4 core/Au shell particles demonstrate strong plasmon resonance absorption and can be separated from solution using an external magnetic field. Experimental data from both physical and chemical determinations of the changes in particle size, surface plasmon resonance optical band, phase components, core-shell surface composition, and magnetic properties have confirmed the formation of the mono-dispersed core-shell nanostructure.

  12. Understanding the role of iron in the magnetism of Fe doped ZnO nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Beltrán, J J; Barrero, C A; Punnoose, A

    2015-06-21

    The actual role of transition metals like iron in the room temperature ferromagnetism (RTFM) of Fe doped ZnO nanoparticles is still an unsolved problem. While some studies concluded that the Fe ions participate in the magnetic interaction, others in contrast do not believe Fe to play a direct role in the magnetic exchange interaction. To contribute to the understanding of this issue, we have carefully investigated the structural, optical, vibrational and magnetic properties of sol-gel synthesized Zn1-xFexO (0 < x < 0.10) nanoparticles. No Fe(2+) was detected in any sample. We found that high spin Fe(3+) ions are substitutionally incorporated at the Zn(2+) in the tetrahedral-core sites and in pseudo-octahedral surface sites in ZnO. Superficial OH(-) was observed in all samples. For x ≤ 0.03, an increment in Fe doping concentration decreased a and c lattice parameters, average Zn-O bond length, average crystallite size and band gap; while it increased the degree of distortion and quadrupole splitting. Undoped ZnO nanoparticles exhibited very weak RTFM with a saturation magnetization (Ms) of ∼0.47 memu g(-1) and this value increased to ∼2.1 memu g(-1) for Zn0.99Fe0.01O. Very interestingly, the Ms for Zn0.99Fe0.01O and Zn0.97Fe0.03O increased by a factor of about ∼2.3 by increasing annealing for 1 h to 3 h. For x ≥ 0.05, ferrimagnetic disordered spinel ZnFe2O4 was formed and this phase was found to become more ordered with increasing annealing time. Fe does not contribute directly to the RTFM, but its presence promoted the formation of additional single charged oxygen vacancies, zinc vacancies, and more oxygen-ended polar terminations at the nanoparticle surface. These defects, which are mainly superficial, altered the electronic structure and are considered as the main sources of the observed ferromagnetism. PMID:25994044

  13. Carbon Solubility in Silicon-Iron-Bearing Metals during Core Formation on Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vander Kaaden, Kathleen E.; McCubbin, Francis M.; Ross, D. Kent; Rapp, Jennifer F.; Danielson, Lisa R.; Keller, Lindsay P.; Righter, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Recent results obtained from the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft showed the surface of Mercury has high S abundances (approximately 4 wt%) and low Iron(II) Oxide abundances (less than 2 wt%). Based on these extreme values, the oxygen fugacity of Mercury's surface materials was estimated to be approximately 3 to 7 log(sub 10) units below the IW buffer (Delta IW-3 to Delta IW-7). This highly reducing nature of the planet has resulted in a large core and relatively thin mantle, extending to only approximately 420 km depth (corresponding to a core-mantle boundary pressure of approximately 4-7 GPa) within the planet. Furthermore, MESSENGER results have suggested the presence of carbon on the surface of the planet. Previous experimental results from have also suggested the possibility of a primary floatation crust on Mercury composed of graphite, produced after a global magma ocean event. With these exotic conditions of this compositional end-member planet, it begs the question, what is the core composition of Mercury? Although no definitive conclusion has been reached, previous studies have made advances towards answering this question. Riner et al. and Chen et al. looked at iron sulfide systems and implemented various crystallization and layered core scenarios to try and determine the composition and structure of Mercury's core. Malavergne et al. examined core crystallization scenarios in the presence of sulfur and silicon. Hauck et al. used the most recent geophysical constraints from the MESSENGER spacecraft to model the internal structure of Mercury, including the core, in a iron-sulfur-silicon system. More recently, Chabot et al. conducted a series of metal-silicate partitioning experiments in a iron-sulfur-silicon system. These results showed the core of Mercury has the potential to contain more than 15 wt% silicon. However, with the newest results from MESSENGER's low altitude campaign, carbon is another

  14. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as radiosensitizer via enhanced reactive oxygen species formation

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Stefanie; Sommer, Anja; Distel, Luitpold V.R.; Neuhuber, Winfried; Kryschi, Carola

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ultrasmall citrate-coated SPIONs with {gamma}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} structure were prepared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SPIONs uptaken by MCF-7 cells increase the ROS production for about 240%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The SPION induced ROS production is due to released iron ions and catalytically active surfaces. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Released iron ions and SPION surfaces initiate the Fenton and Haber-Weiss reaction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer X-ray irradiation of internalized SPIONs leads to an increase of catalytically active surfaces. -- Abstract: Internalization of citrate-coated and uncoated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles by human breast cancer (MCF-7) cells was verified by transmission electron microscopy imaging. Cytotoxicity studies employing metabolic and trypan blue assays manifested their excellent biocompatibility. The production of reactive oxygen species in iron oxide nanoparticle loaded MCF-7 cells was explained to originate from both, the release of iron ions and their catalytically active surfaces. Both initiate the Fenton and Haber-Weiss reaction. Additional oxidative stress caused by X-ray irradiation of MCF-7 cells was attributed to the increase of catalytically active iron oxide nanoparticle surfaces.

  15. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles incorporated into silica nanoparticles by inelastic collision via ultrasonic field: Role of colloidal stability

    SciTech Connect

    Sodipo, Bashiru Kayode; Azlan, Abdul Aziz

    2015-04-24

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION)/Silica composite nanoparticles were prepared by ultrasonically irradiating colloidal suspension of silica and SPION mixture. Both silica and SPION were synthesized independently via co-precipitation and sol-gel method, respectively. Their mixtures were sonicated at different pH between 3 and 5. Electrophoresis measurement and other physicochemical analyses of the products demonstrate that at lower pH SPION was found incorporated into the silica. However, at pH greater than 4, SPION was unstable and unable to withstand the turbulence flow and shock wave from the ultrasonic field. Results suggest that the formation of the SPION/silica composite nanoparticles is strongly related to the inelastic collision induced by ultrasonic irradiation. More so, the formation the composite nanoparticles via the ultrasonic field are dependent on the zeta potential and colloidal stability of the particles.

  16. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles incorporated into silica nanoparticles by inelastic collision via ultrasonic field: Role of colloidal stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sodipo, Bashiru Kayode; Azlan, Abdul Aziz

    2015-04-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION)/Silica composite nanoparticles were prepared by ultrasonically irradiating colloidal suspension of silica and SPION mixture. Both silica and SPION were synthesized independently via co-precipitation and sol-gel method, respectively. Their mixtures were sonicated at different pH between 3 and 5. Electrophoresis measurement and other physicochemical analyses of the products demonstrate that at lower pH SPION was found incorporated into the silica. However, at pH greater than 4, SPION was unstable and unable to withstand the turbulence flow and shock wave from the ultrasonic field. Results suggest that the formation of the SPION/silica composite nanoparticles is strongly related to the inelastic collision induced by ultrasonic irradiation. More so, the formation the composite nanoparticles via the ultrasonic field are dependent on the zeta potential and colloidal stability of the particles.

  17. Study of photodynamic activity of Au@SiO2 core-shell nanoparticles in vitro.

    PubMed

    Meena, K S; Dhanalekshmi, K I; Jayamoorthy, K

    2016-06-01

    Metal-semiconductor core-shell type Au@SiO2 nanoparticles were prepared by Stober's method. They were characterized by absorption, XRD, HR-TEM and EDAX techniques. The resulting modified core-shell nanoparticles shows that the formation of singlet oxygen, which was confirmed by ESR technique. The photohemolysis studies were carried out under two different experimental conditions. It is observed that the photohemolysis increases with concentration as well as light dose. Cell viability of the core-shell nanoparticles against HeLa cell lines were studied by MTT assay method. The outcomes of the present study indicate that, the Au@SiO2 core-shell nanoparticles are extremely stable with a very high photodynamic efficiency under visible light illumination. PMID:27040225

  18. A pathway for the growth of core-shell Pt-Pd nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Narula, Chaitanya Kumar; Yang, Xiaofan; Li, Chen; Pennycook, Stephen J; Lupini, Andrew R

    2015-10-12

    In this study, the aging of both Pt-Pd nanoparticles and core-shell Pt-Pd nanoparticles has been reported to result in alloying of Pt with Pd. In comparison to monometallic Pt catalysts, the growth of Pd-Pt bimetallics is slower; however, the mechanism of growth of particles and the mechanism by which Pd improves the hydrothermal durability of bimetallic Pd-Pt particles remains uncertain. In our work on hydrothermal aging of core-shell Pt-Pd nanoparticles, synthesized by solution methods, with varying Pd:Pt ratio of 1:4, 1:1, and 4:1, we compare the growth of core-shell Pt-Pd nanoparticles and find that particles grow by migrating and joining together. The unique feature of the observed growth is that Pd shells from both particles open up and join, allowing the cores to merge. At high temperatures, alloying occurs in good agreement with reports by other workers.

  19. Impact of magnetic field parameters and iron oxide nanoparticle properties on heat generation for use in magnetic hyperthermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Rhythm R.; Davis, Todd P.; Glover, Amanda L.; Nikles, David E.; Brazel, Christopher S.

    2015-08-01

    Heating of nanoparticles (NPs) using an AC magnetic field depends on several factors, and optimization of these parameters can improve the efficiency of heat generation for effective cancer therapy while administering a low NP treatment dose. This study investigated magnetic field strength and frequency, NP size, NP concentration, and solution viscosity as important parameters that impact the heating efficiency of iron oxide NPs with magnetite (Fe3O4) and maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) crystal structures. Heating efficiencies were determined for each experimental setting, with specific absorption rates (SARs) ranging from 3.7 to 325.9 W/g Fe. Magnetic heating was conducted on iron oxide NPs synthesized in our laboratories (with average core sizes of 8, 11, 13, and 18 nm), as well as commercially-available iron oxides (with average core sizes of 8, 9, and 16 nm). The experimental magnetic coil system made it possible to isolate the effect of magnetic field parameters and independently study the effect on heat generation. The highest SAR values were found for the 18 nm synthesized particles and the maghemite nanopowder. Magnetic field strengths were applied in the range of 15.1-47.7 kA/m, with field frequencies ranging from 123 to 430 kHz. The best heating was observed for the highest field strengths and frequencies tested, with results following trends predicted by the Rosensweig equation. An increase in solution viscosity led to lower heating rates in nanoparticle solutions, which can have significant implications for the application of magnetic fluid hyperthermia in vivo.

  20. Impact of magnetic field parameters and iron oxide nanoparticle properties on heat generation for use in magnetic hyperthermia

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Rhythm R.; Davis, Todd P.; Glover, Amanda L.; Nikles, David E.; Brazel, Christopher S.

    2015-01-01

    Heating of nanoparticles (NPs) using an AC magnetic field depends on several factors, and optimization of these parameters can improve the efficiency of heat generation for effective cancer therapy while administering a low NP treatment dose. This study investigated magnetic field strength and frequency, NP size, NP concentration, and solution viscosity as important parameters that impact the heating efficiency of iron oxide NPs with magnetite (Fe3O4) and maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) crystal structures. Heating efficiencies were determined for each experimental setting, with specific absorption rates (SARs) ranging from 3.7 to 325.9 W/g Fe. Magnetic heating was conducted on iron oxide NPs synthesized in our laboratories (with average core sizes of 8, 11, 13, and 18 nm), as well as commercially-available iron oxides (with average core sizes of 8, 9, and 16 nm). The experimental magnetic coil system made it possible to isolate the effect of magnetic field parameters and independently study the effect on heat generation. The highest SAR values were found for the 18 nm synthesized particles and the maghemite nanopowder. Magnetic field strengths were applied in the range of 15.1 to 47.7 kA/m, with field frequencies ranging from 123 to 430 kHz. The best heating was observed for the highest field strengths and frequencies tested, with results following trends predicted by the Rosensweig equation. An increase in solution viscosity led to lower heating rates in nanoparticle solutions, which can have significant implications for the application of magnetic fluid hyperthermia in vivo. PMID:25960599

  1. Watermelon-like iron nanoparticles: Cr doping effect on magnetism and magnetization interaction reversal

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Maninder; Dai, Qilin; Bowden, Mark E.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Wu, Yaqiao; Tang, Jinke; Qiang, You

    2013-06-26

    Chromium (Cr) forms a solid solution with iron (Fe) lattice when doped in core-shell iron -iron oxide nanocluster (NC) and shows a mixed phase of sigma (σ) FeCr and bcc Fe. The Cr dopant affects heavily the magnetization and magnetic reversal process, and causes the hysteresis loop to shrink near the zero field axis. Dramatic transformation happens from dipolar interaction (0 at. % Cr) to strong exchange interaction (8 at. % of Cr) is confirmed from the Henkel plot and delta M plot, and is explained by a water-melon model of core-shell NC system.

  2. Surface Reactivity of Core Shell Iron-Iron Oxide Nanoclusters towards Breakdown of Carbon Tetrachloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarsem S., Maninder K.; Qiang, You; Kim, Hongseok; Amonette, James E.; Baer, Donald R.

    2012-02-01

    Zero-valent iron (ZVI) is one of the technologies for groundwater remediation to reduce contaminants by removal of mobile chlorinated hydrocarbons. Iron-Iron oxide (Fe/Fe3O4) nanoclusters (NCs) made in our laboratory using cluster deposition technique have enhanced reactivity towards targeted contaminants due to the presence of ZVI protected by a passivated oxide shell. Here, we investigate the effectiveness of the Fe/Fe3O4 NCs in reducing carbon tetrachloride (CT) under laboratory conditions. The reactivity of the NCs was investigated by conducting unbuffered aqueous batch experiments to reduce CT at room temperature. Initial results show that 80% of the degradation of CT resulted in the formation of dichloromethane (DCM) and chloroform (CF); the remainder likely followed a competing pathway to yield nonhazardous products such as CO. The production of undesirable hydrogenated products such as DCM and CF suggests that the dominant reaction pathway occurs through hydrogen (H) atom transfer via H atoms generated by corrosion of the iron. Comparative experiments with ZVI NCs prepared by other methods are underway and the results will be reported. Future work is to analyze and understand factors that control the reaction pathways between desirable and undesirable products.

  3. Synthesis of monodisperse TiO2-paraffin core-shell nanoparticles for improved dielectric properties.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, Balamurugan; Kraemer, Kristin L; Reding, Nicholas A; Skomski, Ralph; Ducharme, Stephen; Sellmyer, David J

    2010-04-27

    Core-shell structures of oxide nanoparticles having a high dielectric constant, and organic shells with large breakdown field are attractive candidates for large electrical energy storage applications. A high growth temperature, however, is required to obtain the dielectric oxide nanoparticles, which affects the process of core-shell formation and also leads to poor control of size, shape, and size-distribution. In this communication, we report a new synthetic process to grow core-shell nanoparticles by means of an experimental method that can be easily adapted to synthesize core-shell structures from a variety of inorganic-organic or inorganic-inorganic materials. Monodisperse and spherical TiO2 nanoparticles were produced at room temperature as a collimated cluster beam in the gas phase using a cluster-deposition source and subsequently coated with uniform paraffin nanoshells using in situ thermal evaporation, prior to deposition on substrates for further characterization and device processing. The paraffin nanoshells prevent the TiO2 nanoparticles from contacting each other and also act as a matrix in which the volume fraction of TiO2 nanoparticles was varied by controlling the thickness of the nanoshells. Parallel-plate capacitors were fabricated using dielectric core-shell nanoparticles having different shell thicknesses. With respect to the bulk paraffin, the effective dielectric constant of TiO2-paraffin core-shell nanoparticles is greatly enhanced with a decrease in the shell thickness. The capacitors show a minimum dielectric dispersion and low dielectric losses in the frequency range of 100 Hz-1 MHz, which are highly desirable for exploiting these core-shell nanoparticles for potential applications. PMID:20359188

  4. SOLUBILITY OF IRON IN METALLIC HYDROGEN AND STABILITY OF DENSE CORES IN GIANT PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Wahl, Sean M.; Wilson, Hugh F.; Militzer, Burkhard

    2013-08-20

    The formation of the giant planets in our solar system, and likely a majority of giant exoplanets, is most commonly explained by the accretion of nebular hydrogen and helium onto a large core of terrestrial-like composition. The fate of this core has important consequences for the evolution of the interior structure of the planet. It has recently been shown that H{sub 2}O, MgO, and SiO{sub 2} dissolve in liquid metallic hydrogen at high temperature and pressure. In this study, we perform ab initio calculations to study the solubility of an innermost metallic core. We find dissolution of iron to be strongly favored above 2000 K over the entire pressure range (0.4-4 TPa) considered. We compare with and summarize the results for solubilities on other probable core constituents. The calculations imply that giant planet cores are in thermodynamic disequilibrium with surrounding layers, promoting erosion and redistribution of heavy elements. Differences in solubility behavior between iron and rock may influence evolution of interiors, particularly for Saturn-mass planets. Understanding the distribution of iron and other heavy elements in gas giants may be relevant in understanding mass-radius relationships, as well as deviations in transport properties from pure hydrogen-helium mixtures.

  5. Effect of superconducting solenoid model cores on spanwise iron magnet roll control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britcher, C. P.

    1985-01-01

    Compared with conventional ferromagnetic fuselage cores, superconducting solenoid cores appear to offer significant reductions in the projected cost of a large wind tunnel magnetic suspension and balance system. The provision of sufficient magnetic roll torque capability has been a long-standing problem with all magnetic suspension and balance systems; and the spanwise iron magnet scheme appears to be the most powerful system available. This scheme utilizes iron cores which are installed in the wings of the model. It was anticipated that the magnetization of these cores, and hence the roll torque generated, would be affected by the powerful external magnetic field of the superconducting solenoid. A preliminary study has been made of the effect of the superconducting solenoid fuselage model core concept on the spanwise iron magnet roll torque generation schemes. Computed data for one representative configuration indicate that reductions in available roll torque occur over a range of applied magnetic field levels. These results indicate that a 30-percent increase in roll electromagnet capacity over that previously determined will be required for a representative 8-foot wind tunnel magnetic suspension and balance system design.

  6. Preliminary evaluation of a 99mTc labeled hybrid nanoparticle bearing a cobalt ferrite core: in vivo biodistribution.

    PubMed

    Psimadas, Dimitrios; Baldi, Giovanni; Ravagli, Costanza; Bouziotis, Penelope; Xanthopoulos, Stavros; Franchini, Mauro Comes; Georgoulias, Panagiotis; Loudos, George

    2012-08-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles have become important tools for imaging a wide range of diseases, improving drug delivery and applying hyperthermic treatment. Iron oxide based nanoparticles have been widely examined, unlike cobalt ferrite based ones. Herein, monodisperse and stable CoFe2O4 nanoparticles have been produced, coated and further stabilized using ethyl 12-(hydroxyamino)-12-oxododecanoate, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) and bovine serum albumin. The final product, NBRh1, was fully characterized and has been directly radiolabeled with 99mTc using SnCl1 as the reducing agent in high yields. In vitro stability and hyperthermic properties of 99mTC-NBRh1 were encouraging for further application in low frequencies hyperthermia and biomagnetic applications. In vivo evaluation followed after injection in healthy mice. The planar and SPECT imaging data as well as the biodistribution results were in accordance, showing high liver and spleen uptake as expected starting almost immediately after administration. In conclusion the preliminary results for nanoparticles bearing a cobalt ferrite core justify further investigations towards potential hyperthermic applications, drug transportation and liver or spleen imaging. PMID:22852467

  7. Polyethylene Glycol-Mediated Synthesis of Cubic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles with High Heating Power.

    PubMed

    Iacovita, Cristian; Stiufiuc, Rares; Radu, Teodora; Florea, Adrian; Stiufiuc, Gabriela; Dutu, Alina; Mican, Sever; Tetean, Romulus; Lucaciu, Constantin M

    2015-12-01

    Iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (IOMNPs) have been successfully synthesized by means of solvothermal reduction method employing polyethylene glycol (PEG200) as a solvent. The as-synthesized IOMNPs are poly-dispersed, highly crystalline, and exhibit a cubic shape. The size of IOMNPs is strongly dependent on the reaction time and the ration between the amount of magnetic precursor and PEG200 used in the synthesis method. At low magnetic precursor/PEG200 ratio, the cubic IOMNPs coexist with polyhedral IOMNPs. The structure and morphology of the IOMNPs were thoroughly investigated by using a wide range of techniques: TEM, XRD, XPS, FTIR, and RAMAN. XPS analysis showed that the IOMNPs comprise a crystalline magnetite core bearing on the outer surface functional groups from PEG200 and acetate. The presence of physisorbed PEG200 on the IOMNP surface is faintly detected through FT-IR spectroscopy. The surface of IOMNPs undergoes oxidation into maghemite as proven by RAMAN spectroscopy and the occurrence of satellite peaks in the Fe2p XP spectra. The magnetic studies performed on powder show that the blocking temperature (TB) of IOMNPs is around 300 K displaying a coercive field in between 160 and 170 Oe. Below the TB, the field-cooled (FC) curves turn concave and describe a plateau indicating that strong magnetic dipole-dipole interactions are manifested in between IOMNPs. The specific absorption rate (SAR) values increase with decreasing nanoparticle concentrations for the IOMNPs dispersed in water. The SAR dependence on the applied magnetic field, studied up to magnetic field amplitude of 60 kA/m, presents a sigmoid shape with saturation values up to 1700 W/g. By dispersing the IOMNPs in PEG600 (liquid) and PEG1000 (solid), it was found that the SAR values decrease by 50 or 75 %, indicating that the Brownian friction within the solvent was the main contributor to the heating power of IOMNPs. PMID:26446074

  8. Polyethylene Glycol-Mediated Synthesis of Cubic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles with High Heating Power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacovita, Cristian; Stiufiuc, Rares; Radu, Teodora; Florea, Adrian; Stiufiuc, Gabriela; Dutu, Alina; Mican, Sever; Tetean, Romulus; Lucaciu, Constantin M.

    2015-10-01

    Iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (IOMNPs) have been successfully synthesized by means of solvothermal reduction method employing polyethylene glycol (PEG200) as a solvent. The as-synthesized IOMNPs are poly-dispersed, highly crystalline, and exhibit a cubic shape. The size of IOMNPs is strongly dependent on the reaction time and the ration between the amount of magnetic precursor and PEG200 used in the synthesis method. At low magnetic precursor/PEG200 ratio, the cubic IOMNPs coexist with polyhedral IOMNPs. The structure and morphology of the IOMNPs were thoroughly investigated by using a wide range of techniques: TEM, XRD, XPS, FTIR, and RAMAN. XPS analysis showed that the IOMNPs comprise a crystalline magnetite core bearing on the outer surface functional groups from PEG200 and acetate. The presence of physisorbed PEG200 on the IOMNP surface is faintly detected through FT-IR spectroscopy. The surface of IOMNPs undergoes oxidation into maghemite as proven by RAMAN spectroscopy and the occurrence of satellite peaks in the Fe2p XP spectra. The magnetic studies performed on powder show that the blocking temperature (TB) of IOMNPs is around 300 K displaying a coercive field in between 160 and 170 Oe. Below the TB, the field-cooled (FC) curves turn concave and describe a plateau indicating that strong magnetic dipole-dipole interactions are manifested in between IOMNPs. The specific absorption rate (SAR) values increase with decreasing nanoparticle concentrations for the IOMNPs dispersed in water. The SAR dependence on the applied magnetic field, studied up to magnetic field amplitude of 60 kA/m, presents a sigmoid shape with saturation values up to 1700 W/g. By dispersing the IOMNPs in PEG600 (liquid) and PEG1000 (solid), it was found that the SAR values decrease by 50 or 75 %, indicating that the Brownian friction within the solvent was the main contributor to the heating power of IOMNPs.

  9. Evaluation of High-Yield Purification Methods on Monodisperse PEG-Grafted Iron Oxide Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lassenberger, Andrea; Bixner, Oliver; Gruenewald, Tilman; Lichtenegger, Helga; Zirbs, Ronald; Reimhult, Erik

    2016-05-01

    Fundamental research on nanoparticle (NP) interactions and development of next-generation biomedical NP applications relies on synthesis of monodisperse, functional, core-shell nanoparticles free of residual dispersants with truly homogeneous and controlled physical properties. Still, synthesis and purification of e.g. such superparamagnetic iron oxide NPs remain a challenge. Comparing the success of different methods is marred by the sensitivity of analysis methods to the purity of the product. We synthesize monodisperse, oleic acid (OA)-capped, Fe3O4 NPs in the superparamagnetic size range (3-10 nm). Ligand exchange of OA for poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) was performed with the PEG irreversibly grafted to the NP surface by a nitrodopamine (NDA) anchor. Four different methods were investigated to remove excess ligands and residual OA: membrane centrifugation, dialysis, size exclusion chromatography, and precipitation combined with magnetic decantation. Infrared spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis were used to determine the purity of samples after each purification step. Importantly, only magnetic decantation yielded pure NPs at high yields with sufficient grafting density for biomedical applications (∼1 NDA-PEG(5 kDa)/nm(2), irrespective of size). The purified NPs withstand challenging tests such as temperature cycling in serum and long-term storage in biological buffers. Dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy, and small-angle X-ray scattering show stability over at least 4 months also in serum. The successful synthesis and purification route is compatible with any conceivable functionalization for biomedical or biomaterial applications of PEGylated Fe3O4 NPs. PMID:27046133

  10. Facile and Sustainable Synthesis of Shaped Iron Oxide Nanoparticles: Effect of Iron Precursor Salts on the Shapes of Iron Oxides

    PubMed Central

    Sayed, Farheen N.; Polshettiwar, Vivek

    2015-01-01

    A facile and sustainable protocol for synthesis of six different shaped iron oxides is developed. Notably, all the six shapes of iron oxides can be synthesised using exactly same synthetic protocol, by simply changing the precursor iron salts. Several of the synthesised shapes are not reported before. This novel protocol is relatively easy to implement and could contribute to overcome the challenge of obtaining various shaped iron oxides in economical and sustainable manner. PMID:25939969

  11. Synthesis and magnetic study of carbon coated iron oxide nanoparticles by laser ablation in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prajapat, C. L.; Sharma, P.; Gonal, M. R.; Vatsa, R. K.; Singh, M. R.; Ravikumar, G.

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic Iron oxides nanoparticles (NPs) were prepared by Laser Ablation in Solution method. Formation and average size of iron oxide NPs (~8 nm) is confirmed by XRD pattern and magnetization studies. Detailed magnetic studies have been carried out using SQUID magnetometer. The saturation magnetization for the iron oxide NPs was found to be 60.07 emu/g. Below the blocking temperature of 150 K the hysteresis loop shows ferromagnetic nature, whereas it shows superparamagnetic behavior at 300 K, for the synthesized NPs.

  12. Multifunctional Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for Combined Chemotherapy and Hyperthermia Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Quinto, Christopher A.; Mohindra, Priya; Tong, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs) have the potential for use as a multimodal cancer therapy agent due to their ability to carry anticancer drugs and generate localized heat when exposed to an alternating magnetic field, resulting in combined chemotherapy and hyperthermia. To explore this potential, we synthesized SPIOs with a phospholipid-polyethylene glycol (PEG) coating, and loaded Doxorubicin (DOX) with 30.8% w/w loading capacity when the PEG length is optimized. We found that DOX-loaded SPIOs exhibited a sustained DOX release over 72 hours where the release kinetics could be altered by PEG length. In contrast, the heating efficiency of the SPIOs showed minimal change with PEG length. With a core size of 14 nm, the SPIOs could generate sufficient heat to raise the local temperature to 43°C, enough to trigger apoptosis in cancer cells. Further, we found that DOX-loaded SPIOs resulted in cell death comparable to free DOX, and that the combined effect of DOX and SPIO-induced hyperthermia enhanced cancer cell death in vitro. This study demonstrates the potential of using phospholipid-PEG coated SPIOs for chemotherapy-hyperthermia combinatorial cancer treatment with increased efficacy. PMID:26154916

  13. Different Storage Conditions Influence Biocompatibility and Physicochemical Properties of Iron Oxide Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Zaloga, Jan; Janko, Christina; Agarwal, Rohit; Nowak, Johannes; Müller, Robert; Boccaccini, Aldo R.; Lee, Geoffrey; Odenbach, Stefan; Lyer, Stefan; Alexiou, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) have attracted increasing attention in many biomedical fields. In magnetic drug targeting SPIONs are injected into a tumour supplying artery and accumulated inside the tumour with a magnet. The effectiveness of this therapy is thus dependent on magnetic properties, stability and biocompatibility of the particles. A good knowledge of the effect of storage conditions on those parameters is of utmost importance for the translation of the therapy concept into the clinic and for reproducibility in preclinical studies. Here, core shell SPIONs with a hybrid coating consisting of lauric acid and albumin were stored at different temperatures from 4 to 45 °C over twelve weeks and periodically tested for their physicochemical properties over time. Surprisingly, even at the highest storage temperature we did not observe denaturation of the protein or colloidal instability. However, the saturation magnetisation decreased by maximally 28.8% with clear correlation to time and storage temperature. Furthermore, the biocompatibility was clearly affected, as cellular uptake of the SPIONs into human T-lymphoma cells was crucially dependent on the storage conditions. Taken together, the results show that the particle properties undergo significant changes over time depending on the way they are stored. PMID:25918940

  14. Generation of drugs coated iron nanoparticles through high energy ball milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhika Devi, A.; Chelvane, J. A.; Prabhakar, P. K.; Padma Priya, P. V.; Doble, Mukesh; Murty, B. S.

    2014-03-01

    The iron nanoparticles coated with oleic acid and drugs such as folic acid/Amoxicillin were synthesized by high energy ball milling and characterized by X-ray diffraction, Transmission electron microscope, zeta potential, dynamic light scattering, Fourier Transform Infra red (FT-IR) measurements, and thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA). FT-IR and TGA measurements show good adsorption of drugs on oleic acid coated nanoparticles. Magnetic measurements indicate that saturation magnetization is larger for amoxicillin coated particles compared to folic acid coated particles. The biocompatibility of the magnetic nanoparticles prepared was evaluated by in vitro cytotoxicity assay using L929 cells as model cells.

  15. Multidentate oligomeric ligands to enhance the biocompatibility of iron oxide and other metal nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wentao; Palui, Goutam; Ji, Xin; Aldeek, Fadi; Mattoussi, Hedi

    2014-03-01

    We prepared a set of multi-coordinating and reactive amphiphilic polymer ligands and used them for surface-functionalizing magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. The amphiphilic oligomers were prepared by coupling (via one step nucleophilic addition) several dopamine anchoring groups, polyethylene glycol moieties and reactive groups onto a poly(isobutylene-alt-maleic anhydride) chain. The availability of several anchoring groups in the same ligand greatly enhances the ligand affinity to the nanoparticle surfaces, via multiplecoordination, while the hydrophilic and reactive groups promote colloidal stability in buffer media and allow subsequent conjugation to target biomolecules. The hydrophilic nanoparticles capped with these polymers maintain compact size and exhibit great long term colloidal stability.

  16. Generation of drugs coated iron nanoparticles through high energy ball milling

    SciTech Connect

    Radhika Devi, A.; Murty, B. S.; Chelvane, J. A.; Prabhakar, P. K.; Padma Priya, P. V.; Doble, Mukesh

    2014-03-28

    The iron nanoparticles coated with oleic acid and drugs such as folic acid/Amoxicillin were synthesized by high energy ball milling and characterized by X-ray diffraction, Transmission electron microscope, zeta potential, dynamic light scattering, Fourier Transform Infra red (FT-IR) measurements, and thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA). FT-IR and TGA measurements show good adsorption of drugs on oleic acid coated nanoparticles. Magnetic measurements indicate that saturation magnetization is larger for amoxicillin coated particles compared to folic acid coated particles. The biocompatibility of the magnetic nanoparticles prepared was evaluated by in vitro cytotoxicity assay using L929 cells as model cells.

  17. Morphological changes in the kidney, liver and spleen during prolonged administration of iron nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navolokin, N. A.; Maslyakova, G. N.; Bucharskya, A. B.; Kong, X. M.; Zuev, V. V.; Medvedev, B. A.; Ignatiev, A. A.; Bochkaryeva, T. V.

    2012-02-01

    We determined the cytotoxic effect of iron nanoparticles of 70 nm, with a single per oral administration in an experiment on white outbred mice. Morphological changes were evaluated in the internal organs. Thus, changes depend on the concentration of nanoparticles at long-term per oral exposure: identified violations of the structure of the liver, kidneys and spleen as venous plethora and degeneration of cells at 250 and 500 mkg / kg dose of nanoparticles are reversible, changes in the organs were pronounced with a dosage of 1000 mkg / kg.

  18. High interfacial activity of polymers "grafted through" functionalized iron oxide nanoparticle clusters.

    PubMed

    Foster, Lynn M; Worthen, Andrew J; Foster, Edward L; Dong, Jiannan; Roach, Clarissa M; Metaxas, Athena E; Hardy, Clifford D; Larsen, Eric S; Bollinger, Jonathan A; Truskett, Thomas M; Bielawski, Christopher W; Johnston, Keith P

    2014-09-01

    The mechanism by which polymers, when grafted to inorganic nanoparticles, lower the interfacial tension at the oil-water interface is not well understood, despite the great interest in particle stabilized emulsions and foams. A simple and highly versatile free radical "grafting through" technique was used to bond high organic fractions (by weight) of poly(oligo(ethylene oxide) monomethyl ether methacrylate) onto iron oxide clusters, without the need for catalysts. In the resulting ∼1 μm hybrid particles, the inorganic cores and grafting architecture contribute to the high local concentration of grafted polymer chains to the dodecane/water interface to produce low interfacial tensions of only 0.003 w/v % (polymer and particle core). This "critical particle concentration" (CPC) for these hybrid inorganic/polymer amphiphilic particles to lower the interfacial tension by 36 mN/m was over 30-fold lower than the critical micelle concentration of the free polymer (without inorganic cores) to produce nearly the same interfacial tension. The low CPC is favored by the high adsorption energy (∼10(6) kBT) for the large ∼1 μm hybrid particles, the high local polymer concentration on the particles surfaces, and the ability of the deformable hybrid nanocluster cores as well as the polymer chains to conform to the interface. The nanocluster cores also increased the entanglement of the polymer chains in bulk DI water or synthetic seawater, producing a viscosity up to 35,000 cP at 0.01 s(-1), in contrast with only 600 cP for the free polymer. As a consequence of these interfacial and rheological properties, the hybrid particles stabilized oil-in-water emulsions at concentrations as low as 0.01 w/v %, with average drop sizes down to 30 μm. In contrast, the bulk viscosity was low for the free polymer, and it did not stabilize the emulsions. The ability to influence the interfacial activity and rheology of polymers upon grafting them to inorganic particles, including clusters

  19. Au/Pd core-shell nanoparticles with varied hollow Au cores for enhanced formic acid oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chiajen; Huang, Chienwen; Hao, Yaowu; Liu, Fuqiang

    2013-03-01

    A facile method has been developed to synthesize Au/Pd core-shell nanoparticles via galvanic replacement of Cu by Pd on hollow Au nanospheres. The unique nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, and electrochemical measurements. When the concentration of the Au solution was decreased, grain size of the polycrystalline hollow Au nanospheres was reduced, and the structures became highly porous. After the Pd shell formed on these Au nanospheres, the morphology and structure of the Au/Pd nanoparticles varied and hence significantly affected the catalytic properties. The Au/Pd nanoparticles synthesized with reduced Au concentrations showed higher formic acid oxidation activity (0.93 mA cm-2 at 0.3 V) than the commercial Pd black (0.85 mA cm-2 at 0.3 V), suggesting a promising candidate as fuel cell catalysts. In addition, the Au/Pd nanoparticles displayed lower CO-stripping potential, improved stability, and higher durability compared to the Pd black due to their unique core-shell structures tuned by Au core morphologies.

  20. Au/Pd core-shell nanoparticles with varied hollow Au cores for enhanced formic acid oxidation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A facile method has been developed to synthesize Au/Pd core-shell nanoparticles via galvanic replacement of Cu by Pd on hollow Au nanospheres. The unique nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy, and electrochemical measurements. When the concentration of the Au solution was decreased, grain size of the polycrystalline hollow Au nanospheres was reduced, and the structures became highly porous. After the Pd shell formed on these Au nanospheres, the morphology and structure of the Au/Pd nanoparticles varied and hence significantly affected the catalytic properties. The Au/Pd nanoparticles synthesized with reduced Au concentrations showed higher formic acid oxidation activity (0.93 mA cm-2 at 0.3 V) than the commercial Pd black (0.85 mA cm-2 at 0.3 V), suggesting a promising candidate as fuel cell catalysts. In addition, the Au/Pd nanoparticles displayed lower CO-stripping potential, improved stability, and higher durability compared to the Pd black due to their unique core-shell structures tuned by Au core morphologies. PMID:23452438

  1. Effects of aluminum and iron nanoparticle additives on composite AP/HTPB solid propellant regression rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Styborski, Jeremy A.

    This project was started in the interest of supplementing existing data on additives to composite solid propellants. The study on the addition of iron and aluminum nanoparticles to composite AP/HTPB propellants was conducted at the Combustion and Energy Systems Laboratory at RPI in the new strand-burner experiment setup. For this study, a large literature review was conducted on history of solid propellant combustion modeling and the empirical results of tests on binders, plasticizers, AP particle size, and additives. The study focused on the addition of nano-scale aluminum and iron in small concentrations to AP/HTPB solid propellants with an average AP particle size of 200 microns. Replacing 1% of the propellant's AP with 40-60 nm aluminum particles produced no change in combustive behavior. The addition of 1% 60-80 nm iron particles produced a significant increase in burn rate, although the increase was lesser at higher pressures. These results are summarized in Table 2. The increase in the burn rate at all pressures due to the addition of iron nanoparticles warranted further study on the effect of concentration of iron. Tests conducted at 10 atm showed that the mean regression rate varied with iron concentration, peaking at 1% and 3%. Regardless of the iron concentration, the regression rate was higher than the baseline AP/HTPB propellants. These results are summarized in Table 3.

  2. Gold-coated iron oxide nanoparticles as a T2 contrast agent in magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Tanveer; Bae, Hongsub; Rhee, Ilsu; Chang, Yongmin; Jin, Seong-Uk; Hong, Sungwook

    2012-07-01

    Gold-coated iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles were synthesized for use as a T2 contrast agent in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The coated nanoparticles were spherical in shape with an average diameter of 20 nm. The gold shell was about 2 nm thick. The bonding status of the gold on the nanoparticle surfaces was checked using a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR). The FTIR spectra confirmed the attachment of homocysteine, in the form of thiolates, to the Au shell of the Au-Fe3O4 nanoparticles. The relaxivity ratio, R2/R1, for the coated nanoparticles was 3-fold higher than that of a commercial contrast agent, Resovist, which showed the potential for their use as a T2 contrast agent with high efficacy. In animal experiments, the presence of the nanoparticles in rat liver resulted in a 71% decrease in signal intensity in T2-weighted MR images, indicating that our gold-coated iron oxide nanoparticles are suitable for use as a T2 contrast agent in MRI. PMID:22966533

  3. Ferritin and ferrihydrite nanoparticles as iron sources for Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Dehner, Carolyn; Morales-Soto, Nydia; Behera, Rabindra K.; Shrout, Joshua; Theil, Elizabeth C.; Maurice, Patricia A.

    2013-01-01

    Metabolism of iron derived from insoluble and/ or scarce sources is essential for pathogenic and environmental microbes. The ability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to acquire iron from exogenous ferritin was assessed; ferritin is an iron-concentrating and antioxidant protein complex composed of a catalytic protein and caged ferrihydrite nanomineral synthesized from Fe(II) and O2 or H2O2. Ferritin and free ferrihydrite supported growth of P. aeruginosa with indistinguishable kinetics and final culture densities. The P. aeruginosa PAO1 mutant (ΔpvdDΔpchEF), which is incapable of siderophore production, grew as well as the wild type when ferritin was the iron source. Such data suggest that P. aeruginosa can acquire iron by siderophore-independent mechanisms, including secretion of small-molecule reductant(s). Protease inhibitors abolished the growth of the siderophore-free strain on ferritins, with only a small effect on growth of the wild type; predictably, protease inhibitors had no effect on growth with free ferrihydrite as the iron source. Proteolytic activity was higher with the siderophore-free strain, suggesting that the role of proteases in the degradation of ferritin is particularly important for iron acquisition in the absence of siderophores. The combined results demonstrate the importance of both free ferrihydrite, a natural environmental form of iron and a model for an insoluble form of partly denatured ferritin called hemosiderin, and caged ferritin iron minerals as bacterial iron sources. Ferritin is also revealed as a growth promoter of opportunistic, pathogenic bacteria such a P. aeruginosa in diseased tissues such as the cystic fibrotic lung, where ferritin concentrations are abnormally high. PMID:23417538

  4. Chromenone-conjugated magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. Toward conveyable DNA binders.

    PubMed

    Yousuf, Sameena; Enoch, Israel V M V; Paulraj, Mosae Selvalumar; Dhanaraj, Premnath

    2015-11-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles can transport drug and possibly target cancer. DNA-binding of ligands loaded in dextran coated magnetic nanoparticles, could aid their better target-specific binding. In this work, we report the loading of chromenones onto aminoethylamino-modified dextran coated iron oxide nanoparticles, their loading efficiency, and openness for binding to DNA. The magnetic behavior, the size, and the morphology of the nanoparticles are analyzed. The crystallite size of the magnetic nanoparticles is around 40 nm. The chromenones are present on the surface of the dextran shell, as revealed by their cyclodextrin-binding characteristics, which is a new approach in comprehending the accessibility of the surface-bound molecules by macromolecules. The mode of binding of the chromenones to DNA is not altered on surface loading on dextran shell, although the binding strength is generally diminished, compared to the strength of binding of the free chromenones to DNA. PMID:26280819

  5. Gold nanoparticle localization at the core surface by using thermosensitive core-shell particles as a template.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Daisuke; Kawaguchi, Haruma

    2005-12-01

    We report novel thermosensitive hybrid core-shell particles via in situ gold nanoparticle formation using thermosensitive core-shell particles as a template. This method for the in situ synthesis of gold nanoparticles with microgel interiors offers the advantage of eliminating or significantly reducing particle aggregation. In addition, by using thermosensitive microgel structures in which the shell has thermosensitive and gel properties in water--whereas the core itself is a water-insoluble polymer--we were able to synthesize the gold nanoparticles only at the surface of the core, which had reactive sites to bind metal ions. After the gold nanoparticles were synthesized, electroless gold plating was carried out to control the thickness of the gold nanoshells. The dispersions of the obtained hybrid particles were characterized by dynamic light scattering and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, and the dried particles were also observed by electron microscopy. Adaptation of the technique shown here will create a number of applications as optical, electronic, and biomedical functional materials. PMID:16316147

  6. VAPOR PHASE MERCURY SORPTION BY ORGANIC SULFIDE MODIFIED BIMETALLIC IRON-COPPER NANOPARTICLE AGGREGATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Novel organic sulfide modified bimetallic iron-copper nanoparticle aggregate sorbent materials have been synthesized for removing elemental mercury from vapor streams at elevated temperatures (120-140 °C). Silane based (disulfide silane and tetrasulfide silane) and alkyl sulfide ...

  7. Antibacterial Efficacy of Iron-Oxide Nanoparticles against Biofilms on Different Biomaterial Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Thukkaram, Monica; Sitaram, Soundarya; Kannaiyan, Sathish kumar; Subbiahdoss, Guruprakash

    2014-01-01

    Biofilm growth on the implant surface is the number one cause of the failure of the implants. Biofilms on implant surfaces are hard to eliminate by antibiotics due to the protection offered by the exopolymeric substances that embed the organisms in a matrix, impenetrable for most antibiotics and immune cells. Application of metals in nanoscale is considered to resolve biofilm formation. Here we studied the effect of iron-oxide nanoparticles over biofilm formation on different biomaterial surfaces and pluronic coated surfaces. Bacterial adhesion for 30 min showed significant reduction in bacterial adhesion on pluronic coated surfaces compared to other surfaces. Subsequently, bacteria were allowed to grow for 24 h in the presence of different concentrations of iron-oxide nanoparticles. A significant reduction in biofilm growth was observed in the presence of the highest concentration of iron-oxide nanoparticles on pluronic coated surfaces compared to other surfaces. Therefore, combination of polymer brush coating and iron-oxide nanoparticles could show a significant reduction in biofilm formation. PMID:25332720

  8. Iron(II,III)-polyphenol complex nanoparticles derived from green tea with remarkable ecotoxicological impact

    EPA Science Inventory

    There are several greener methods exist to synthesize zero–valent iron nanoparticles (nZVI) using different bio-based reducing agents. Although their useful properties in degradation of organic dyes, chlorinated organics, or arsenic have been described earlier, their characteriza...

  9. Magnetic nanoparticles formed in glasses co-doped with iron and larger radius elements

    SciTech Connect

    Edelman, I.; Ivanova, O.; Ivantsov, R.; Velikanov, D.; Zabluda, V.; Zubavichus, Y.; Veligzhanin, A.; Zaikovskiy, V.; Stepanov, S.; Artemenko, A.; Curely, J.; Kliava, J.

    2012-10-15

    A new type of nanoparticle-containing glasses based on borate glasses co-doped with low contents of iron and larger radius elements, Dy, Tb, Gd, Ho, Er, Y, and Bi, is studied. Heat treatment of these glasses results in formation of magnetic nanoparticles, radically changing their physical properties. Transmission electron microscopy and synchrotron radiation-based techniques: x-ray diffraction, extended x-ray absorption fine structure, x-ray absorption near-edge structure, and small-angle x-ray scattering, show a broad distribution of nanoparticle sizes with characteristics depending on the treatment regime; a crystalline structure of these nanoparticles is detected in heat treated samples. Magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) studies of samples subjected to heat treatment as well as of maghemite, magnetite, and iron garnet allow to unambiguously assign the nanoparticle structure to maghemite, independently of co-dopant nature and of heat treatment regime used. Different features observed in the MCD spectra are related to different electron transitions in Fe{sup 3+} ions gathered in the nanoparticles. The static magnetization in heat treated samples has non-linear dependence on the magnetizing field with hysteresis. Zero-field cooled magnetization curves show that at higher temperatures the nanoparticles occur in superparamagnetic state with blocking temperatures above 100 K. Below ca. 20 K, a considerable contribution to both zero field-cooled and field-cooled magnetizations occurs from diluted paramagnetic ions. Variable-temperature electron magnetic resonance (EMR) studies unambiguously show that in as-prepared glasses paramagnetic ions are in diluted state and confirm the formation of magnetic nanoparticles already at earlier stages of heat treatment. Computer simulations of the EMR spectra corroborate the broad distribution of nanoparticle sizes found by 'direct' techniques as well as superparamagnetic nanoparticle behaviour demonstrated in the magnetization

  10. Vector control scheme of synchronous reluctance motor considering iron core loss

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.C.; Lee, J.H.; Jung, I.S.; Hyun, D.S.

    1998-09-01

    This paper proposes the method, in the Synchronous Reluctance Motor (SynRM), which selects appropriate stator d,q-axis current component combination (flux current, torque current) that the influence of iron core loss on the developed torque can be minimized in torque control. A coupled finite element analysis and Preisach`s modeling for SynRM is presented to verify the propriety of proposed method and the characteristics analysis is performed under the effect of saturation and iron loss. The computer simulation and experimental results show the propriety of the proposed method.

  11. Alternating magnetic field energy absorption in the dispersion of iron oxide nanoparticles in a viscous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolkova, Ilona S.; Kazantseva, Natalia E.; Babayan, Vladimir; Smolka, Petr; Parmar, Harshida; Vilcakova, Jarmila; Schneeweiss, Oldrich; Pizurova, Nadezda

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles were obtained by a coprecipitation method in a controlled growth process leading to the formation of uniform highly crystalline nanoparticles with average size of 13 nm, which corresponds to the superparamagnetic state. Nanoparticles obtained are a mixture of single-phase nanoparticles of magnetite and maghemite as well as nanoparticles of non-stoichiometric magnetite. The subsequent annealing of nanoparticles at 300 °C in air during 6 h leads to the full transformation to maghemite. It results in reduced value of the saturation magnetization (from 56 emu g-1 to 48 emu g-1) but does not affect the heating ability of nanoparticles. A 2-7 wt% dispersion of as-prepared and annealed nanoparticles in glycerol provides high heating rate in alternating magnetic fields allowed for application in magnetic hyperthermia; however the value of specific loss power does not exceed 30 W g-1. This feature of heat output is explained by the combined effect of magnetic interparticle interactions and the properties of the carrier medium. Nanoparticles coalesce during the synthesis and form aggregates showing ferromagnetic-like behavior with magnetization hysteresis, distinct sextets on Mössbauer spectrum, blocking temperature well about room temperature, which accounts for the higher energy barrier for magnetization reversal. At the same time, low specific heat capacity of glycerol intensifies heat transfer in the magnetic dispersion. However, high viscosity of glycerol limits the specific loss power value, since predominantly the Neel relaxation accounts for the absorption of AC magnetic field energy.

  12. High yield, facile aqueous synthesis and characterization of C18 functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, Kishore Kumar; Kaur, Ranjeet; Iqbal, Nusrat; Hasan, Abshar; Alam, Samsul; Raza, S. K.

    2015-04-01

    The present study shows the synthesis of magnetite nanoparticles by co-precipitation method in three steps. The steps involve the precipitation of Fe3O4 nanoparticles followed by layer by layer functionalization with silica and tetraethoxy(octadyl)silane (C18). The prepared magnetite nanoparticles were investigated by SEM, TEM, XRD, FTIR and VSM. It was suggested that the intermediate iron oxide nanoparticles were formed by the competing processes of oxidation and crystal growth after decomposition of ferrous and ferric salts. The first step synthesized nanoparticles were of around 16 ± 4 nm, second step silica coating of 18 ± 3 nm and the final step C18 were of 56 ± 6 nm. The tetraethylorthosilicate hydrolyzed to form silicic acid which further polymerizes and thereby forms a layer of silica over magnetite nanoparticles. FTIR peaks at 2854 and 2921 cm-1 confirm the layering of C18 on silica encapsulated nanoparticles which corresponds to ˜CH2 and ˜(CH2)17CH3 carbon chain symmetric extension. The thickness of silica coating and C18 are 1.9 ± 0.3 nm and 38.6 ± 2.5 nm as confirmed from TEM size distribution curve. The saturation magnetism of magnetite, silica coated and C18 nanoparticles are 77.46, 74.53 and 68.76 emu g-1 respectively. Thus, Fe3O4, silica and C18 encapsulated magnetite nanoparticles were superparamagnetic.

  13. Producing ultra-thin silica coatings on iron-oxide nanoparticles to improve their surface reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kralj, Slavko; Makovec, Darko; Čampelj, Stanislav; Drofenik, Miha

    2010-07-01

    The reactivity of the relatively inert surfaces of iron-oxide magnetic nanoparticles can be significantly improved by coating the surfaces with silica. Unfortunately, however, this nonmagnetic silica layer tends to dilute the magnetic properties of the nanoparticles. Therefore, the silica layer should be as continuous, homogeneous, and as thin as possible. In this investigation we coated superparamagnetic maghemite nanoparticles by hydrolysis and the polycondensation of tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS), with the ethanol solution of TEOS being added to a stable suspension of citric acid-coated nanoparticles. The influences of the various parameters of the procedure on the quality of the coatings were systematically evaluated. The quality of the silica layer was characterized using electron microscopy and by performing leaching of the nanoparticles in HCl, while the surface reactivity was tested by grafting (3-aminopropyl) triethoxysilane (APS) onto the nanoparticles. We observed that the surface concentration of the grafted APS strongly increased when the nanoparticles were coated with a silica layer. The choice of experimental conditions for the coating procedure that favors the heterogeneous nucleation of silica on the surfaces of the nanoparticles enabled the preparation of very thin silica layers, less than 2 nm thick. By decreasing the amount of added TEOS to correspond to a monolayer of -Si-OH at the nanoparticles' surfaces, their surface reactivity could be very much improved, and with a reduction in their magnetization of only ˜10%.

  14. Direct measurement of thermal conductivity in solid iron at planetary core conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konôpková, Zuzana; McWilliams, R. Stewart; Gómez-Pérez, Natalia; Goncharov, Alexander F.

    2016-06-01

    The conduction of heat through minerals and melts at extreme pressures and temperatures is of central importance to the evolution and dynamics of planets. In the cooling Earth’s core, the thermal conductivity of iron alloys defines the adiabatic heat flux and therefore the thermal and compositional energy available to support the production of Earth’s magnetic field via dynamo action. Attempts to describe thermal transport in Earth’s core have been problematic, with predictions of high thermal conductivity at odds with traditional geophysical models and direct evidence for a primordial magnetic field in the rock record. Measurements of core heat transport are needed to resolve this difference. Here we present direct measurements of the thermal conductivity of solid iron at pressure and temperature conditions relevant to the cores of Mercury-sized to Earth-sized planets, using a dynamically laser-heated diamond-anvil cell. Our measurements place the thermal conductivity of Earth’s core near the low end of previous estimates, at 18–44 watts per metre per kelvin. The result is in agreement with palaeomagnetic measurements indicating that Earth’s geodynamo has persisted since the beginning of Earth’s history, and allows for a solid inner core as old as the dynamo.

  15. Direct measurement of thermal conductivity in solid iron at planetary core conditions.

    PubMed

    Konôpková, Zuzana; McWilliams, R Stewart; Gómez-Pérez, Natalia; Goncharov, Alexander F

    2016-06-01

    The conduction of heat through minerals and melts at extreme pressures and temperatures is of central importance to the evolution and dynamics of planets. In the cooling Earth's core, the thermal conductivity of iron alloys defines the adiabatic heat flux and therefore the thermal and compositional energy available to support the production of Earth's magnetic field via dynamo action. Attempts to describe thermal transport in Earth's core have been problematic, with predictions of high thermal conductivity at odds with traditional geophysical models and direct evidence for a primordial magnetic field in the rock record. Measurements of core heat transport are needed to resolve this difference. Here we present direct measurements of the thermal conductivity of solid iron at pressure and temperature conditions relevant to the cores of Mercury-sized to Earth-sized planets, using a dynamically laser-heated diamond-anvil cell. Our measurements place the thermal conductivity of Earth's core near the low end of previous estimates, at 18-44 watts per metre per kelvin. The result is in agreement with palaeomagnetic measurements indicating that Earth's geodynamo has persisted since the beginning of Earth's history, and allows for a solid inner core as old as the dynamo. PMID:27251283

  16. Reactive adsorption of SO2 on activated carbons with deposited iron nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Arcibar-Orozco, Javier A; Rangel-Mendez, J Rene; Bandosz, Teresa J

    2013-02-15

    The effect of iron particle size anchored on the surface of commercial activated carbon on the removal of SO(2) from a gas phase was studied. Nanosize iron particles were deposited using forced hydrolysis of FeCl(3) with or without H(3)PO(4) as a capping agent. Dynamic adsorption experiments were carried out on either dry or pre-humidified materials and the adsorption capacities were calculated. The surface of the initial and exhausted materials was extensively characterized by microscopic, porosity, thermogravimetric and surface chemistry. The results indicate that the SO(2) adsorption capacity increased two and half times after the prehumidification process owing to the formation of H(2)SO(4) in the porous system. Iron species enhance the SO(2) adsorption capacity only when very small nanoparticles are deposited on the pore walls as a thin layer. Large iron nanoparticles block the ultramicropores decreasing the accessibility of the active sites and consuming oxygen that rest adsorption centers for SO(2) molecules. Iron nanoparticles of about 3-4 nm provide highly dispersed adsorption sites for SO(2) molecules and thus increase the adsorption capacity of about 80%. Fe(2)(SO(4))(3) was detected on the surface of exhausted samples. PMID:23333487

  17. The diagnostic value of iron oxide nanoparticles for imaging of myocardial inflammation--quo vadis?

    PubMed

    Bietenbeck, Michael; Florian, Anca; Sechtem, Udo; Yilmaz, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is an integral part in the diagnostic work-up of cardiac inflammatory diseases. In this context, superparamagnetic iron oxide-based contrast agents can provide additional diagnostic information regarding the assessment of myocardial infarction and myocarditis. After intravenous administration, these nanoparticles are taken up by activated monocytes and macrophages, which predominantly accumulate in regions associated with inflammation as was successfully shown in recent preclinical studies. Furthermore, first clinical studies with a new iron oxide-complex that was clinically approved for the treatment of iron deficiency anaemia recently demonstrated a superior diagnostic value of iron oxide nanoparticles compared to gadolinium-based compounds for imaging of myocardial inflammation in patients with acute myocardial infarction. In this article, we outline the basic features of superparamagnetic iron oxide-based contrast agents and review recent studies using such nanoparticles for cardiac imaging in case of acute myocardial infarction as well as acute myocarditis. Moreover, we highlight the translational potential of these agents and possible research applications with regard to imaging and therapy. PMID:26152269

  18. The plastic deformation of iron at pressures of the Earth's inner core

    PubMed

    Wenk; Matthies; Hemley; Mao; Shu

    2000-06-29

    Soon after the discovery of seismic anisotropy in the Earth's inner core, it was suggested that crystal alignment attained during deformation might be responsible. Since then, several other mechanisms have been proposed to account for the observed anisotropy, but the lack of deformation experiments performed at the extreme pressure conditions corresponding to the solid inner core has limited our ability to determine which deformation mechanism applies to this region of the Earth. Here we determine directly the elastic and plastic deformation mechanism of iron at pressures of the Earth's core, from synchrotron X-ray diffraction measurements of iron, under imposed axial stress, in diamond-anvil cells. The epsilon-iron (hexagonally close packed) crystals display strong preferred orientation, with c-axes parallel to the axis of the diamond-anvil cell. Polycrystal plasticity theory predicts an alignment of c-axes parallel to the compression direction as a result of basal slip, if basal slip is either the primary or a secondary slip system. The experiments provide direct observations of deformation mechanisms that occur in the Earth's inner core, and introduce a method for investigating, within the laboratory, the rheology of materials at extreme pressures. PMID:10890442

  19. Thiol-Ene Induced Diphosphonic Acid Functionalization of Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Rutledge, Ryan D.; Warner, Cynthia L.; Pittman, Jonathan W.; Addleman, Raymond S.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Chouyyok, Wilaiwan; Warner, Marvin G.

    2010-07-20

    Multi-functional organic molecules represent an interesting challenge for nanoparticle functionalization due to the potential for undesirable interactions between the substrate material and the variable functionalities, making it difficult to control the final orientation of the ligand. In the present study, UV-induced thiol-ene click chemistry has been utilized as a means of directed functionalization of bifunctional ligands on an iron oxide nanoparticle surface. Allyl diphosphonic acid ligand was covalently deposited on the surface of thiol-presenting iron oxide nanoparticles via the formation of a UV-induced thioether. This method of thiol-ene click chemistry offers a set of reaction conditions capable of controlling the ligand deposition and circumventing the natural affinity exhibited by the phosphonic acid moiety for the iron oxide surface. These claims are supported via a multimodal characterization platform which includes thermogravimetric analysis, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and metal contact analysis and are consistent with a properly oriented, highly active ligand on the nanoparticle surface. These experiments suggest thiol-ene click chemistry as both a practical and generally applicable strategy for the directed deposition of multi-functional ligands on metal oxide nanoparticle surfaces.

  20. Magnetic Properties of Polyvinyl Alcohol and Doxorubicine Loaded Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for Anticancer Drug Delivery Applications

    PubMed Central

    Nadeem, Muhammad; Ahmad, Munir; Akhtar, Muhammad Saeed; Shaari, Amiruddin; Riaz, Saira; Naseem, Shahzad; Masood, Misbah; Saeed, M. A.

    2016-01-01

    The current study emphasizes the synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) and impact of hydrophilic polymer polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) coating concentration as well as anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) loading on saturation magnetization for target drug delivery applications. Iron oxide nanoparticles particles were synthesized by a reformed version of the co-precipitation method. The coating of polyvinyl alcohol along with doxorubicin loading was carried out by the physical immobilization method. X-ray diffraction confirmed the magnetite (Fe3O4) structure of particles that remained unchanged before and after polyvinyl alcohol coating and drug loading. Microstructure and morphological analysis was carried out by transmission electron microscopy revealing the formation of nanoparticles with an average size of 10 nm with slight variation after coating and drug loading. Transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive, and Fourier transform infrared spectra further confirmed the conjugation of polymer and doxorubicin with iron oxide nanoparticles. The room temperature superparamagnetic behavior of polymer-coated and drug-loaded magnetite nanoparticles were studied by vibrating sample magnetometer. The variation in saturation magnetization after coating evaluated that a sufficient amount of polyvinyl alcohol would be 3 wt. % regarding the externally controlled movement of IONPs in blood under the influence of applied magnetic field for in-vivo target drug delivery. PMID:27348436

  1. Efficient internalization of silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles of different sizes by primary human macrophages and dendritic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kunzmann, Andrea; Andersson, Britta; Vogt, Carmen; Feliu, Neus; Ye Fei; Gabrielsson, Susanne; Toprak, Muhammet S.; Buerki-Thurnherr, Tina; Laurent, Sophie; Vahter, Marie; Krug, Harald; Muhammed, Mamoun; Scheynius, Annika; Fadeel, Bengt

    2011-06-01

    Engineered nanoparticles are being considered for a wide range of biomedical applications, from magnetic resonance imaging to 'smart' drug delivery systems. The development of novel nanomaterials for biomedical applications must be accompanied by careful scrutiny of their biocompatibility. In this regard, particular attention should be paid to the possible interactions between nanoparticles and cells of the immune system, our primary defense system against foreign invasion. On the other hand, labeling of immune cells serves as an ideal tool for visualization, diagnosis or treatment of inflammatory processes, which requires the efficient internalization of the nanoparticles into the cells of interest. Here, we compare novel monodispersed silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles with commercially available dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles. The silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles displayed excellent magnetic properties. Furthermore, they were non-toxic to primary human monocyte-derived macrophages at all doses tested whereas dose-dependent toxicity of the smaller silica-coated nanoparticles (30 nm and 50 nm) was observed for primary monocyte-derived dendritic cells, but not for the similarly small dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles. No macrophage or dendritic cell secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines was observed upon administration of nanoparticles. The silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles were taken up to a significantly higher degree when compared to the dextran-coated nanoparticles, irrespective of size. Cellular internalization of the silica-coated nanoparticles was through an active, actin cytoskeleton-dependent process. We conclude that these novel silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles are promising materials for medical imaging, cell tracking and other biomedical applications.

  2. Altering the structure and properties of iron oxide nanoparticles and graphene oxide/iron oxide composites by urea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naghdi, Samira; Rhee, Kyong Yop; Jaleh, Babak; Park, Soo Jin

    2016-02-01

    Iron oxide (Fe2O3) nanoparticles were grown on graphene oxide (GO) using a simple microwave-assisted method. The effects of urea concentration on Fe2O3 nanoparticles and GO/Fe2O3 composite were examined. The as-prepared samples were characterized using X-ray powder diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The Fe2O3 nanoparticles were uniformly developed on GO sheets. The results showed that urea affects both Fe2O3 morphology and particle size. In the absence of urea, the Fe2O3 nanostructures exhibited a rod-like morphology. However, increasing urea concentration altered the morphology and decreased the particle size. The Raman results of GO/Fe2O3 showed that the intensity ratio of D band to G band (ID/IG) was decreased by addition of urea, indicating that urea can preserve the GO sheets during synthesis of the composite from exposing more defects. The surface area and thermal stability of GO/Fe2O3 and Fe2O3 were compared using the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller method and thermal gravimetric analysis, respectively. The results showed that the increased concentration of urea induced a larger surface area with more active sites in the Fe2O3 nanoparticles. However, the increase in urea concentration led to decreased thermal stability of the Fe2O3 nanoparticles. The magnetic properties of Fe2O3 nanoparticles were characterized by a vibrating sample magnetometer and results revealed that the magnetic properties of Fe2O3 nanoparticles are affected by the morphology.

  3. Design and characterization of antimicrobial usnic acid loaded-core/shell magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Taresco, Vincenzo; Francolini, Iolanda; Padella, Franco; Bellusci, Mariangela; Boni, Adriano; Innocenti, Claudia; Martinelli, Andrea; D'Ilario, Lucio; Piozzi, Antonella

    2015-01-01

    The application of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in medicine is considered much promising especially because they can be handled and directed to specific body sites by external magnetic fields. MNPs have been investigated in magnetic resonance imaging, hyperthermia and drug targeting. In this study, properly functionalized core/shell MNPs with antimicrobial properties were developed to be used for the prevention and treatment of medical device-related infections. Particularly, surface-engineered manganese iron oxide MNPs, produced by a micro-emulsion method, were coated with two different polymers and loaded with usnic acid (UA), a dibenzofuran natural extract possessing antimicrobial activity. Between the two polymer coatings, the one based on an intrinsically antimicrobial cationic polyacrylamide (pAcDED) resulted to be able to provide MNPs with proper magnetic properties and basic groups for UA loading. Thanks to the establishment of acid-base interactions, pAcDED-coated MNPs were able to load and release significant drug amounts resulting in good antimicrobial properties versus Staphylococcus epidermidis (MIC = 0.1 mg/mL). The use of pAcDED having intrinsic antimicrobial activity as MNP coating in combination with UA likely contributed to obtain an enhanced antimicrobial effect. The developed drug-loaded MNPs could be injected in the patient soon after device implantation to prevent biofilm formation, or, later, in presence of signs of infection to treat the biofilm grown on the device surfaces. PMID:25953542

  4. Determination of anisotropy constants of protein encapsulated iron oxide nanoparticles by electron magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hongyan; Klem, Michael T.; Sebby, Karl B.; Singel, David J.; Young, Mark; Douglas, Trevor; Idzerda, Yves U.

    2009-02-01

    Angle-dependent electron magnetic resonance was performed on 4.9, 8.0, and 19 nm iron oxide nanoparticles encapsulated within protein capsids and suspended in water. Measurements were taken at liquid nitrogen temperature after cooling in a 1 T field to partially align the particles. The angle dependence of the shifts in the resonance field for the iron oxide nanoparticles (synthesized within Listeria-Dps, horse spleen ferritin, and cowpea chlorotic mottle virus) all show evidence of a uniaxial anisotropy. Using a Boltzmann distribution for the particles' easy-axis direction, we are able to use the resonance field shifts to extract a value for the anisotropy energy, showing that the anisotropy energy density increases with decreasing particle size. This suggests that surface anisotropy plays a significant role in magnetic nanoparticles of this size.

  5. Accumulation of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles coated with variably sized polyethylene glycol in murine tumors.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Esben Kjær Unmack; Nielsen, Thomas; Wittenborn, Thomas; Rydtoft, Louise Munk; Lokanathan, Arcot R; Hansen, Line; Østergaard, Leif; Kingshott, Peter; Howard, Kenneth A; Besenbacher, Flemming; Nielsen, Niels Chr; Kjems, Jørgen

    2012-04-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles have found widespread applications in different areas including cell separation, drug delivery and as contrast agents. Due to water insolubility and stability issues, nanoparticles utilized for biological applications require coatings such as the commonly employed polyethylene glycol (PEG). Despite its frequent use, the influence of PEG coatings on the physicochemical and biological properties of iron nanoparticles has hitherto not been studied in detail. To address this, we studied the effect of 333-20,000 Da PEG coatings that resulted in larger hydrodynamic size, lower surface charge, longer circulation half-life, and lower uptake in macrophage cells when the particles were coated with high molecular weight (M(w)) PEG molecules. By use of magnetic resonance imaging, we show coating-dependent in vivo uptake in murine tumors with an optimal coating M(w) of 10,000 Da. PMID:22395568

  6. A New Class of Silica Crosslinked Micellar Core-Shell /nanoparticles."

    SciTech Connect

    Huo, Qisheng; Liu, Jun; Wang, Li Q.; Jiang, Yingbing; Lambert, Timothy N.; Fang, Erica

    2006-05-17

    Micellar nanoparticles made of surfactants and polymers have attracted wide attention in the materials and biomedical community for controlled drug delivery, molecular imaging and sensing; however, their long-term stability remains a topic of intense study. Here we report a new class of robust, ultrafine (10nm) silica core-shell nanoparticles formed from silica crosslinked, individual block copolymer micelles. Compared with pure polymer micelles, the new core-shell nanoparticles have significantly improved stability and do not break down during dilution. They also achieve much higher loading capacity for a wide range of chemicals, with the entrapped molecules slowly released over a much longer period of time. A wide range of functional groups can be easily incorporated through co-condensation with the silica matrix. The potential to deliver hydrophobic agents into cancer cells has been demonstrated. Because of their unique properties, these novel core-shell nanoparticles could potentially provide a new nanomedicine platform for imaging, detection and treatment.

  7. Lectin-functionalized magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for reproductive improvement

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Semen ejaculates contain heterogeneous sperm populations that can jeopardize male fertility. Recent development of nanotechnology in physiological systems may have applications in reproductive biology. Here, we used magnetic nanoparticles as a novel strategy for sperm purification to imp...

  8. Purification of Lysosomes Using Supraparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles (SPIONs).

    PubMed

    Rofe, Adam P; Pryor, Paul R

    2016-04-01

    Lysosomes can be rapidly isolated from tissue culture cells using supraparamagnetic iron oxide particles (SPIONs). In this protocol, colloidal iron dextran (FeDex) particles, a type of SPION, are taken up by cultured mouse macrophage cells via the endocytic pathway. The SPIONs accumulate in lysosomes, the end point of the endocytic pathway, permitting the lysosomes to be isolated magnetically. The purified lysosomes are suitable for in vitro fusion assays or for proteomic analysis. PMID:27037068

  9. Mössbauer study of metallic iron and iron oxide nanoparticles having environmental purifying ability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubuki, Shiro; Watanabe, Yuka; Akiyama, Kazuhiko; Ristić, Mira; Krehula, Stjepko; Homonnay, Zoltán; Kuzmann, Ernő; Nishida, Tetsuaki

    2014-10-01

    A relationship between local structure and methylene blue (MB) decomposing ability of nanoparticles (NPs) of metallic iron ( Fe0) and maghemite (γ- Fe2O3) was investigated by 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffractometry and UV-visible light absorption spectroscopy. γ- Fe2O3 NPs were successfully prepared by mixing ( NH4)2Fe ( SO4)2ṡ6H2O (Mohr's salt) and ( NH4)3Fe ( C2O4)3ṡ3H2O aqueous solution at 30 °C for 1 h, while those of Fe0 were obtained by the reduction of Mohr's salt with NaBH4. From the Scherrer's equation, the smallest crystallite sizes of γ- Fe2O3 NPs and Fe0 NPs were determined to be 9.7 and 1.5 nm, respectively. 57Fe Mössbauer spectrum of γ- Fe2O3 NPs consists of a relaxed sextet with isomer shift (δ) of 0.33±0.01 mm s-1, internal magnetic field (Hint) of 25.8±0.5 T, and linewidth (Γ) of 0.62±0.04 mm s-1. 57Fe Mössbauer spectrum of Fe0 NP is mainly composed of a sextet having δ, Δ, and Hint of 0.00±0.01 mm s-1 0.45±0.01 mm s-1, and 22.8±0.1 T, respectively. A bleaching test of the mixture of Fe0 and γ- Fe2O3 NPs (3:7 ratio, 100 mg) in MB aqueous solution (20 mL) for 6 h showed a remarkable decrease of MB concentration with the first-order rate constant (kMB) of 6.7 × 10-1 h-1. This value is larger than that obtained for the bleaching test using bulk Fe0+γ- Fe2O3 (3:7) mixture (kMB= 6.5×10-3h-1) . These results prove that MB decomposing ability is enhanced by the NPs mixture of Fe0 and γ- Fe2O3.

  10. Synthesis and properties MFe2O4 (M = Fe, Co) nanoparticles and core-shell structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yelenich, O. V.; Solopan, S. O.; Greneche, J. M.; Belous, A. G.

    2015-08-01

    Individual Fe3-xO4 and CoFe2O4 nanoparticles, as well as Fe3-xO4/CoFe2O4 core/shell structures were synthesized by the method of co-precipitation from diethylene glycol solutions. Core/shell structure were synthesized with CoFe2O4-shell thickness of 1.0, 2.5 and 3.5 nm. X-ray diffraction patterns of individual nanoparticles and core/shell are similar and indicate that all synthesized samples have a cubic spinel structure. Compares Mössbauer studies of CoFe2O4, Fe3-xO4 nanoparticles indicate superparamagnetic properties at 300 K. It was shown that individual magnetite nanoparticles are transformed into maghemite through oxidation during the synthesis procedure, wherein the smallest nanoparticles are completely oxidized while a magnetite core does occur in the case of the largest nanoparticles. The Mössbauer spectra of core/shell nanoparticles with increasing CoFe2O4-shell thickness show a gradual decrease in the relative intensity of the quadrupole doublet and significant decrease of the mean isomer shift value at both RT and 77 K indicating a decrease of the superparamagnetic relaxation phenomena. Specific loss power for the prepared ferrofluids was experimentally calculated and it was determined that under influence of ac-magnetic field magnetic fluid based on individual CoFe2O4 and Fe3-xO4 particles are characterized by very low heating temperature, when magnetic fluids based on core/shell nanoparticles demonstrate higher heating effect.

  11. New iron-oxide particles for magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia: an in-vitro and in-vivo pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedayati, Mohammad; Attaluri, Anilchandra; Bordelon, David; Goh, R.; Armour, Michael; Zhou, Haoming; Cornejo, Christine; Wabler, Michele; Zhang, Yonggang; DeWeese, Theodore; Ivkov, Robert

    2013-02-01

    Magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia (mNHP) is regarded as a promising minimally invasive procedure. These nanoparticles generate heat when exposed to alternating magnetic fields (AMFs) and thus have shown a potential for selective delivery of heat to a target such as a cancer cell. Despite the great promise however, successful clinical translation has been limited in part by technical challenges of selectively delivering heat only to the target tissue. Interaction of AMF with tissues also deposits heat through Joule heating via eddy currents. Considerations of patient safety thus constrain the choice of AMF power and frequency to values that are insufficient to produce desirable heating from available nanoparticle formulations. Therefore, considerable effort must be directed to the design of particles and the AMF device to maximize the specific delivery of heat to the intended target while minimizing the unintended and non-specific heating. We have recently developed new iron-oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) having much higher heating capability at the clinically relevant amplitudes and frequencies than other formulations. Here, we utilize a new rectangular coil designed for treating multi well tissue culture plate and show that these particles are superior to two commercially available IONPs for hyperthermia of DU145 prostate cancer cells in culture. We report results of pilot in-vivo experiments using the DU145 human prostate xenograft model in nude male mouse. AMF treatment yielded an intratumor temperature rise > 10 °C in <10 min heating (AMF amplitude 29 kA/m @160 kHz) with ~4 mg nanoparticle /g tumor while maintaining rectal (core) temperature well within physiological range.

  12. Facile method to synthesize magnetic iron oxides/TiO2 hybrid nanoparticles and their photodegradation application of methylene blue

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Many methods have been reported to improving the photocatalytic efficiency of organic pollutant and their reliable applications. In this work, we propose a facile pathway to prepare three different types of magnetic iron oxides/TiO2 hybrid nanoparticles (NPs) by seed-mediated method. The hybrid NPs are composed of spindle, hollow, and ultrafine iron oxide NPs as seeds and 3-aminopropyltriethyloxysilane as linker between the magnetic cores and TiO2 layers, respectively. The composite structure and the presence of the iron oxide and titania phase have been confirmed by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray photoelectron spectra. The hybrid NPs show good magnetic response, which can get together under an external applied magnetic field and hence they should become promising magnetic recovery catalysts (MRCs). Photocatalytic ability examination of the magnetic hybrid NPs was carried out in methylene blue (MB) solutions illuminated under Hg light in a photochemical reactor. About 50% to 60% of MB was decomposed in 90 min in the presence of magnetic hybrid NPs. The synthesized magnetic hybrid NPs display high photocatalytic efficiency and will find recoverable potential applications in cleaning polluted water with the help of magnetic separation. PMID:21961891

  13. Efficient removal of uranium from aqueous solution by zero-valent iron nanoparticle and its graphene composite.

    PubMed

    Li, Zi-Jie; Wang, Lin; Yuan, Li-Yong; Xiao, Cheng-Liang; Mei, Lei; Zheng, Li-Rong; Zhang, Jing; Yang, Ju-Hua; Zhao, Yu-Liang; Zhu, Zhen-Tai; Chai, Zhi-Fang; Shi, Wei-Qun

    2015-06-15

    Zero-valent iron nanoparticle (ZVI-np) and its graphene composites were prepared and applied in the removal of uranium under anoxic conditions. It was found that solutions containing 24 ppm U(VI) could be completely cleaned up by ZVI-nps, regardless of the presence of NaHCO3, humic acid, mimic groundwater constituents or the change of solution pH from 5 to 9, manifesting the promising potential of this reactive material in permeable reactive barrier (PRB) to remediate uranium-contaminated groundwater. In the measurement of maximum sorption capacity, removal efficiency of uranium kept at 100% until C0(U) = 643 ppm, and the saturation sorption of 8173 mg U/g ZVI-nps was achieved at C0(U) = 714 ppm. In addition, reaction mechanisms were clarified based on the results of SEM, XRD, XANES, and chemical leaching in (NH4)2CO3 solution. Partially reductive precipitation of U(VI) as U3O7 was prevalent when sufficient iron was available; nevertheless, hydrolysis precipitation of U(VI) on surface would be predominant as iron got insufficient, characterized by releases of Fe(2+) ions. The dissolution of Fe(0) cores was assigned to be the driving force of continuous formation of U(VI) (hydr)oxide. The incorporation of graphene supporting matrix was found to facilitate faster removal rate and higher U(VI) reduction ratio, thus benefitting the long-term immobilization of uranium in geochemical environment. PMID:25734531

  14. Platinum Monolayer on IrFe Core-Shell Nanoparticle Electrocatalysts for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    K Sasaki; K Kuttiyiel; D Su; R Adzic

    2011-12-31

    We synthesized high activity and stability platinum monolayer on IrFe core-shell nanoparticle electrocatalysts. Carbon-supported IrFe core-shell nanoparticles were synthesized by chemical reduction and subsequent thermal annealing. The formation of Ir shells on IrFe solid-solution alloy cores has been verified by scanning transmission electron microscopy coupled with energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) and in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The Pt monolayers were deposited on IrFe core-shell nanoparticles by galvanic replacement of underpotentially deposited Cu adatoms on the Ir shell surfaces. The specific and Pt mass activities for the ORR on the Pt monolayer on IrFe core-shell nanoparticle electrocatalyst are 0.46 mA/cm{sup 2} and 1.1 A/mg{sub Pt}, which are much higher than those on a commercial Pt/C electrocatalyst. High durability of Pt{sub ML}/IrFe/C has also been demonstrated by potential cycling tests. These high activity and durability observed can be ascribed to the structural and electronic interaction between the Pt monolayer and the IrFe core-shell nanoparticles.

  15. Surface- and tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy reveals spin-waves in iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Raul D.; Sheremet, Evgeniya; Deckert-Gaudig, Tanja; Chaneac, Corinne; Hietschold, Michael; Deckert, Volker; Zahn, Dietrich R. T.

    2015-05-01

    Nanomaterials have the remarkable characteristic of displaying physical properties different from their bulk counterparts. An additional degree of complexity and functionality arises when oxide nanoparticles interact with metallic nanostructures. In this context the Raman spectra due to plasmonic enhancement of iron oxide nanocrystals are here reported showing the activation of spin-waves. Iron oxide nanoparticles on gold and silver tips are found to display a band around 1584 cm-1 attributed to a spin-wave magnon mode. This magnon mode is not observed for nanoparticles deposited on silicon (111) or on glass substrates. Metal-nanoparticle interaction and the strongly localized electromagnetic field contribute to the appearance of this mode. The localized excitation that generates this mode is confirmed by tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS). The appearance of the spin-waves only when the TERS tip is in close proximity to a nanocrystal edge suggests that the coupling of a localized plasmon with spin-waves arises due to broken symmetry at the nanoparticle border and the additional electric field confinement. Beyond phonon confinement effects previously reported in similar systems, this work offers significant insights on the plasmon-assisted generation and detection of spin-waves optically induced.Nanomaterials have the remarkable characteristic of displaying physical properties different from their bulk counterparts. An additional degree of complexity and functionality arises when oxide nanoparticles interact with metallic nanostructures. In this context the Raman spectra due to plasmonic enhancement of iron oxide nanocrystals are here reported showing the activation of spin-waves. Iron oxide nanoparticles on gold and silver tips are found to display a band around 1584 cm-1 attributed to a spin-wave magnon mode. This magnon mode is not observed for nanoparticles deposited on silicon (111) or on glass substrates. Metal-nanoparticle interaction and the strongly

  16. Characterization of Free and Porous Silicon-Encapsulated Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles as Platforms for the Development of Theranostic Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Lundquist, Charles M.; Loo, Christopher; Meraz, Ismail M.; Cerda, Jorge De La; Liu, Xuewu; Serda, Rita E.

    2014-01-01

    Tracking vaccine components from the site of injection to their destination in lymphatic tissue, and simultaneously monitoring immune effects, sheds light on the influence of vaccine components on particle and immune cell trafficking and therapeutic efficacy. In this study, we create a hybrid particle vaccine platform comprised of porous silicon (pSi) and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs). The impact of nanoparticle size and mode of presentation on magnetic resonance contrast enhancement are examined. SPION-enhanced relaxivity increased as the core diameter of the nanoparticle increased, while encapsulation of SPIONs within a pSi matrix had only minor effects on T2 and no significant effect on T2* relaxation. Following intravenous injection of single and hybrid particles, there was an increase in negative contrast in the spleen, with changes in contrast being slightly greater for free compared to silicon encapsulated SPIONs. Incubation of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDC) with pSi microparticles loaded with SPIONs, SIINFEKL peptide, and lipopolysaccharide stimulated immune cell interactions and interferon gamma production in OT-1 TCR transgenic CD8+ T cells. Overall, the hybrid particle platform enabled presentation of a complex payload that was traceable, stimulated functional T cell and BMDC interactions, and resolved in cellular activation of T cells in response to a specific antigen. PMID:24932409

  17. Effects of surface chemistry and size on iron oxide nanoparticle delivery of oligonucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Christopher

    The discovery of RNA interference and the increasing understanding of disease genetics have created a new class of potential therapeutics based on oligonucleotides. This therapeutic class includes antisense molecules, small interfering RNA (siRNA), and microRNA modulators such as antagomirs (antisense directed against microRNA) and microRNA mimics, all of which function by altering gene expression at the translational level. While these molecules have the promise of treating a host of diseases from neurological disorders to cancer, a major hurdle is their inability to enter cells on their own, where they may render therapeutic effect. Nanotechnology is the engineering of materials at the nanometer scale and has gained significant interest for nucleic acid delivery due to its biologically relevant length-scale and amenability to multifunctionality. While a number of nanoparticle vehicles have shown promise for oligonucleotide delivery, there remains a lack of understanding of how nanoparticle coating and size affect these delivery processes. This dissertation seeks to elucidate some of these factors by evaluating oligonucleotide delivery efficiencies of a panel of iron oxide nanoparticles with varying cationic coatings and sizes. A panel of uniformly-sized nanoparticles was prepared with surface coatings comprised of various amine groups representing high and low pKas. A separate panel of nanoparticles with sizes of 40, 80, 150, and 200 nm but with the same cationic coating was also prepared. Results indicated that both nanoparticle surface coating and nanoparticle hydrodynamic size affect transfection efficiency. Specific particle coatings and sizes were identified that gave superior performance. The intracellular fate of iron oxide nanoparticles was also tracked by electron microscopy and suggests that they function via the proton sponge effect. The research presented in this dissertation may aid in the rational design of improved nanoparticle delivery vectors for

  18. pH Titratable Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide for Improved Nanoparticle Accumulation in Acidic Tumor Microenvironments

    PubMed Central

    Crayton, Samuel H.; Tsourkas, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    A wide variety of nanoparticle platforms are being developed for the diagnosis and treatment of malignancy. While many of these are passively targeted or rely on receptor-ligand interactions, metabolically directed nanoparticles provide a complementary approach. It is known that both primary and secondary events in tumorigensis alter the metabolic profile of developing and metastatic cancers. One highly conserved metabolic phenotype is a state of up-regulated glycolysis and reduced use of oxidative phosphorylation, even when oxygen tension is not limiting. This metabolic shift, termed the Warburg effect, creates a “hostile” tumor microenvironment with increased levels of lactic acid and low extracellular pH. In order to exploit this phenomenon and improve the delivery of nanoparticle platforms to a wide variety of tumors, a pH-responsive iron oxide nanoparticle was designed. Specifically, glycol chitosan (GC), a water-soluble polymer with pH titratable charge, was conjugated to the surface of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIO) to generate a T2*-weighted MR contrast agent that responds to alterations in its surrounding pH. Compared to control nanoparticles that lack pH sensitivity, these GC-SPIO nanoparticles demonstrated potent pH-dependent cellular association and MR contrast in vitro. In murine tumor models GC-SPIO also generated robust T2*-weighted contrast, which correlated with increased delivery of the agent to the tumor site, measured quantitatively by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Importantly, the increased delivery of GC-SPIO nanoparticles cannot be solely attributed to the commonly observed enhanced permeability and retention effect, since these nanoparticles have similar physical properties and blood circulation times as control agents. PMID:22035454

  19. Core-shell Au@Pd nanoparticles with enhanced catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction via core-shell Au@Ag/Pd constructions

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dong; Li, Chengyin; Liu, Hui; Ye, Feng; Yang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Core-shell nanoparticles often exhibit improved catalytic properties due to the lattice strain created in these core-shell particles. Herein, we demonstrate the synthesis of core-shell Au@Pd nanoparticles from their core-shell Au@Ag/Pd parents. This strategy begins with the preparation of core-shell Au@Ag nanoparticles in an organic solvent. Then, the pure Ag shells are converted into the shells made of Ag/Pd alloy by galvanic replacement reaction between the Ag shells and Pd2+ precursors. Subsequently, the Ag component is removed from the alloy shell using saturated NaCl solution to form core-shell Au@Pd nanoparticles with an Au core and a Pd shell. In comparison with the core-shell Au@Pd nanoparticles upon directly depositing Pd shell on the Au seeds and commercial Pd/C catalysts, the core-shell Au@Pd nanoparticles via their core-shell Au@Ag/Pd templates display superior activity and durability in catalyzing oxygen reduction reaction, mainly due to the larger lattice tensile effect in Pd shell induced by the Au core and Ag removal. PMID:26144550

  20. Core-shell nano-architectures: the incorporation mechanism of hydrophobic nanoparticles into the aqueous core of a microemulsion.

    PubMed

    Scorciapino, Mariano A; Sanna, Roberta; Ardu, Andrea; Orrù, Federica; Casu, Mariano; Musinu, Anna; Cannas, Carla

    2013-10-01

    This work presents an in-depth investigation of the molecular interactions in the incorporation mechanism of colloidal hydrophobic-capped nanoparticles into the hydrophilic core of reverse microemulsions. (1)H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) was employed to obtain molecular level details of the interaction between the nanoparticles capping amphiphiles and the microemulsion surfactants. The model system of choice involved oleic acid (OAC) and oleylamine (OAM) as capping molecules, while igepal-CO520 was the surfactant. The former were studied both in their "free" state and "ligated" one, i.e., bound to nanoparticles. The latter was investigated either in cyclohexane (micellar solution) or in water/cyclohexane microemulsions. The approach was extremely useful to gain a deeper understanding of the equilibria involved in this complex system (oleic acid capped-Bi2S3 in igepal/water/cyclohexane microemulsions). In difference to previously proposed mechanisms, the experimental data showed that the high affinity of the capping ligands for the reverse micelle interior was the drivingforce for the incorporation of the nanoparticles. A simple ligand-exchange mechanism could be ruled out. The collected information about the nanoparticle incorporation mechanism is extremely useful to develop new synthetic routes with an improved/tuned coating efficiency, in order to tailor the core-shell structure preparation. PMID:23910706

  1. Increased brain uptake of targeted nanoparticles by adding an acid-cleavable linkage between transferrin and the nanoparticle core.

    PubMed

    Clark, Andrew J; Davis, Mark E

    2015-10-01

    Most therapeutic agents are excluded from entering the central nervous system by the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Receptor mediated transcytosis (RMT) is a common mechanism used by proteins, including transferrin (Tf), to traverse the BBB. Here, we prepared Tf-containing, 80-nm gold nanoparticles with an acid-cleavable linkage between the Tf and the nanoparticle core to facilitate nanoparticle RMT across the BBB. These nanoparticles are designed to bind to Tf receptors (TfRs) with high avidity on the blood side of the BBB, but separate from their multidentate Tf-TfR interactions upon acidification during the transcytosis process to allow release of the nanoparticle into the brain. These targeted nanoparticles show increased ability to cross an in vitro model of the BBB and, most important, enter the brain parenchyma of mice in greater amounts in vivo after systemic administration compared with similar high-avidity nanoparticles containing noncleavable Tf. In addition, we investigated this design with nanoparticles containing high-affinity antibodies (Abs) to TfR. With the Abs, the addition of the acid-cleavable linkage provided no improvement to in vivo brain uptake for Ab-containing nanoparticles, and overall brain uptake was decreased for all Ab-containing nanoparticles compared with Tf-containing ones. These results are consistent with recent reports of high-affinity anti-TfR Abs trafficking to the lysosome within BBB endothelium. In contrast, high-avidity, Tf-containing nanoparticles with the acid-cleavable linkage avoid major endothelium retention by shedding surface Tf during their transcytosis. PMID:26392563

  2. Phagocytes mediate targeting of iron oxide nanoparticles to tumors for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Toraya-Brown, Seiko; Sheen, Mee Rie; Baird, Jason R.; Barry, Stephen; Demidenko, Eugene; Turk, Mary Jo; Hoopes, P Jack; Conejo-Garcia, Jose R.; Fiering, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Nanotechnology has great potential to produce novel therapeutic strategies that target malignant cells through the ability of nanoparticles to get access to and be ingested by living cells. However its specificity for accumulation in tumors, which is the key factor that determines its efficacy, has always been a challenge. Here we tested a novel strategy to target and treat ovarian cancer, a representative peritoneal cancer, using iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) and an alternating magnetic field (AMF). Peritoneal tumors in general are directly accessible to nanoparticles administered intraperitoneally (IP), as opposed to the more commonly attempted intravenous (IV) administration. In addition, tumor-associated immunosuppressive phagocytes, a predominant cell population in the tumor microenvironment of almost all solid tumors, and cells that are critical for tumor progression, are constantly recruited to the tumor, and therefore could possibly function to bring nanoparticles to tumors. Here we demonstrate that tumor-associated peritoneal phagocytes ingest and carry IONPs specifically to tumors and that these specifically delivered nanoparticles can damage tumor cells after IONP-mediated hyperthermia generated by AMF. This illustrates therapeutic possibilities of intraperitoneal (IP) injection of nanoparticles and subsequent ingestion by tumor-associated phagocytes, to directly impact tumors or stimulate antitumor immune responses. This approach could use IONPs combined with AMF as done here, or other nanoparticles with cytotoxic potential. Overall, the data presented here support IP injection of nanoparticles to utilize peritoneal phagocytes as a delivery vehicle in association with IONP-mediated hyperthermia as therapeutic strategies for ovarian and other peritoneal cancers. PMID:22935885

  3. Simultaneous in-situ synthesis and characterization of Co@Cu core-shell nanoparticle arrays

    DOE PAGESBeta

    McKeown, Joseph T.; Wu, Yueying; Fowlkes, Jason D.; Rack, Philip D.; Campbell, Geoffrey H.

    2014-12-23

    Core-shell nanostructures have attracted much attention due to their unique and tunable properties relative to bulk structures of the same materials, making core-shell nanoparticles candidates for a variety of applications with multiple functionalities.[1,2] Intriguing magnetic behavior can be tailored by variation of size, interface, crystal orientation, and composition, and core-shell nanostructures with noble-metal shells yield novel optical responses[3] and enhanced electrocatalytic activity.[4

  4. Core-shell palladium nanoparticle@metal-organic frameworks as multifunctional catalysts for cascade reactions.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Meiting; Deng, Ke; He, Liangcan; Liu, Yong; Li, Guodong; Zhao, Huijun; Tang, Zhiyong

    2014-02-01

    Uniform core-shell Pd@IRMOF-3 nanostructures, where single Pd nanoparticle core is surrounded by amino-functionalized IRMOF-3 shell, are prepared by a facile mixed solvothermal method. When used as multifunctional catalysts, the Pd@IRMOF-3 nanocomposites exhibit high activity, enhanced selectivity, and excellent stability in the cascade reaction. Both experimental evidence and theoretical calculations reveal that the high catalytic performance of Pd@IRMOF-3 nanocomposites originates from their unique core-shell structures. PMID:24437922

  5. High pressure and temperature electrical resistivity of iron and implications for planetary cores (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, L.; Seagle, C. T.; Fei, Y.; Shahar, A.

    2013-12-01

    Electrical resistivity measurements of polycrystalline iron have been performed at 5, 7 and 15 GPa and in the temperature range 293-2200 K by employing a four-wired method. The kinks in electrical resistivity associated with solid iron phase transitions and the solid to liquid transition were clearly observed upon increasing temperature. Geometry corrections due to volume variations with pressure and temperature were applied to the entire data set. High pressure and temperature thermal conductivity were calculated by fitting resistivity data through the Wiedemann-Franz law. The temperature dependences of electrical resistivity and thermal conductivity for α, γ and ɛ solid iron have been determined at high pressure conditions. Our study provides the first experimental constraint on the heat flux conducted at Mercury's outmost core, estimated to be 0.29-0.36 TW, assuming an adiabatic core. Extrapolations of our data to Martian outer core conditions yield a series of heat transport parameters (eg. electrical resistivity, thermal conductivity and heat flux), which are in reasonable comparison with various geophysical estimates.

  6. Iron-Platinum Nanoparticles Dispersible in Aqueous Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huynh, Jason; Pal, Angshuman; Khurshid, Hafsa; Hadjipanayis, George

    2013-03-01

    In this work, we have used a low temperature method that reduces Pt(acac)2 and thermally decomposes Fe(CO)5 in th