Science.gov

Sample records for iron oxidation state

  1. Iron oxidation state in hydrous rhyolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphreys, M.; Brooker, R.; Fraser, D.; Smith, V. C.

    2012-12-01

    Recent studies have suggested that the Earth's mantle at subduction zones is oxidized relative to that at mid-ocean ridges. One possible origin of the oxidation is thought to be hydrous fluids, which are released into the mantle from the down-going slab during subduction. However, this is controversial; other studies have concluded that there is no intrinsic difference in oxidation state. One potential problem in determining primary oxidation states is that magmas produced by partial melting of the sub-arc mantle undergo significant degassing and crystallisation near the earth's surface, which may overprint the oxidation state of the primary melt. H2O contents of melt inclusions may be affected by partial re-equilibration. The effect of H2O on Fe oxidation state is unclear, although theoretical arguments typically predict increasing Fe3+/ΣFe during shallow degassing as a result of preferential diffusion of H2 out of the melt: FeO (m) + H2O (m) = Fe2O3 (m) + H2 (g) [1] We used XANES to measure Fe3+/Fe2+ in cylinders of rhyolitic obsidian that had been hydrated in gold capsules in cold-seal apparatus. Runs were performed at 850-900 °C under H2O-saturated conditions for short run times (20-80 minutes). Surprisingly, we find a positive correlation between Fe3+/ΣFe and H2O content of the glass. This is inconsistent with the effects of reaction [1], but can be explained by considering the acid-base properties of the hydrous melt. In particular, basic behaviour of FeO but amphoteric behaviour of Fe2O3, and changes in melt basicity relating to dissolution of H2O, can explain increasing Fe3+/Fe2+ with increasing H2O. We discuss the implications of these results for using melt compositions to infer the oxidation state of the earth's mantle.

  2. Iron Partitioning and Oxidation State in Earth's Lower Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piet, H.; Badro, J.; Nabiei, F.; Dennenwaldt, T.; Shim, S. H. D.; Cantoni, M.; Hébert, C.; Gillet, P.

    2015-12-01

    Valence state and concentrations of iron in lower mantle phases have strong effects on their chemical and physical properties. Experimental studies have reported stark differences in iron partitioning between bridgmanite (Brg) and ferropericlase (Fp) for San Carlos olivine [1] and pyrolite [2] systems. We recently performed experiments at lower mantle conditions for an Al-rich olivine system [3] and observed an iron enrichment of the silicate phase very similar to that in pyrolite. Mössbauer studies [4] have shown that in the presence of aluminum non negligible amounts of Fe3+ could be incorporated in bridgmanite explaining the observed iron enrichment. Non negligible amounts of Fe3+ in the lower mantle could influence transport properties of the phases [5]. The evaluation of ferrous and ferric iron concentrations in lower mantle mineral assemblages is then key to a thorough understanding of geophysical observations and associated mantle dynamics. We used electron energy loss spectroscopy technique to quantify the proportions of Fe2+ and Fe3+ iron in Brg and Fp phases previously synthesized from Al-rich olivine composition [3]. The oxidation state of iron in the lower mantle will be discussed as well as ensuing implications on transport properties for relevant lower mantle compositions. References [1] Sakai et al., 2009 [2] Prescher et al., 2014 [3] Piet et al., submitted [4] McCammon et al., 1996 [5] Xu et al., 1998

  3. Synthesis of carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles via solid state reduction of iron oxide nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Bystrzejewski, M.

    2011-06-15

    The encapsulation of iron nanoparticles in protective carbon cages leads to unique hybrid core-shell nanomaterials. Recent literature reports suggest that such nanocomposites can be obtained in a relatively simple process involving the solid state carbothermal reduction of iron oxide nanoparticles. This approach is very attractive because it does not require advanced equipment and consumes less energy in comparison to widely used plasma methods. The presented more-in-depth study shows that the carbothermal approach is sensitive to temperature and the process yield strongly depends on the morphology and crystallinity of the carbon material used as a reductant. - Graphical abstract: Reduction of iron oxide nanoparticles by carbon black at 1200 deg. C yields well crystallized carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles. Highlights: > Carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles were synthesized by carbothermal reduction of iron oxide nanoparticles. > The process has the highest selectivity at 1200 C. > Lower temperatures result in iron oxide nanoparticles wrapped in carbon matrix. > The encapsulation rate of Fe at 1200 deg. C was found to be 15%.

  4. Microanalysis of iron oxidation state in iron oxides using X Ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, S. R.; Delaney, J.; Bajt, S.; Rivers, M. L.; Smith, J. V.

    1993-01-01

    An exploratory application of x ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analysis using the synchrotron x ray microprobe was undertaken to obtain Fe XANES spectra on individual sub-millimeter grains in conventional polished sections. The experiments concentrated on determinations of Fe valence in a suite of iron oxide minerals for which independent estimates of the iron speciation could be made by electron microprobe analysis and x ray diffraction.

  5. The role of iron redox state in the genotoxicity of ultrafine superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Singh, Neenu; Jenkins, Gareth J S; Nelson, Bryant C; Marquis, Bryce J; Maffeis, Thierry G G; Brown, Andy P; Williams, Paul M; Wright, Chris J; Doak, Shareen H

    2012-01-01

    Ultrafine superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (USPION) hold great potential for revolutionising biomedical applications such as MRI, localised hyperthermia, and targeted drug delivery. Though evidence is increasing regarding the influence of nanoparticle physico-chemical features on toxicity, data however, is lacking that assesses a range of such characteristics in parallel. We show that iron redox state, a subtle though important physico-chemical feature of USPION, dramatically modifies the cellular uptake of these nanoparticles and influences their induction of DNA damage. Surface chemistry was also found to have an impact and evidence to support a potential mechanism of oxidative DNA damage behind the observed responses has been demonstrated. As human exposure to ferrofluids is predicted to increase through nanomedicine based therapeutics, these findings are important in guiding the fabrication of USPION to ensure they have characteristics that support biocompatibility. PMID:22027595

  6. Effects of iron oxidation state on viscosity, lunar composition 15555

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cukierman, M.; Uhlmann, D. R.

    1974-01-01

    The viscous flow behavior of a 9.6-kg lunar rock containing 22.5 wt.% FeO was studied in the temperature ranges from 620 to 700 C and from 1215 to 1400 C. The material was synthesized under mildy reducing conditions to simulate the Fe(2+)/total Fe ratio of the lunar environment. The effect of iron oxidation state on flow behavior in the high viscosity region is studied for specimens of the 15555 composition with Fe(2+) concentration ratios of 0.94, 0.76, and 0.20. A change in ratio from 0.94 to 0.76 had no observable effect on viscosity, whereas a change from 0.76 to 0.20 was accompanied by a drastic increase in viscosity (some three orders of magnitude) at a given temperature, but without changing the form of the variation of viscosity with temperature. The flow behavior is analyzed as a function of the structural features of the glasses.

  7. Arsenic removal from water using flame-synthesized iron oxide nanoparticles with variable oxidation states

    PubMed Central

    Abid, Aamir D.; Kanematsu, Masakazu; Young, Thomas M.; Kennedy, Ian M.

    2013-01-01

    We utilized gas-phase diffusion flame synthesis, which has potential for large-scale production of metal oxide nanoparticles, to produce iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) with variable oxidation states. The efficacy of these materials in removal of arsenate (As(V) ) from water was assessed. Two different flame configurations, a diffusion flame (DF) and an inverse diffusion flame (IDF), were employed to synthesize six different IONPs by controlling flame conditions. The IONPs produced in the IDF configuration (IDF-IONPs) had smaller particle diameters (4.8 – 8.2 nm) and larger surface areas (141–213 m2/g) than the IONPs produced in the DF configuration (29 nm, 36 m2/g), which resulted in their higher adsorption capacities. As(V) adsorption capacities of the IDF-IONPs increased when the IONPs were synthesized in more oxidizing conditions. The fully oxidized IDF-IONPs, maghemite (γ-Fe2O3), showed the highest As(V) adsorption capacity, comparable to that of magnetite nanocrystals synthesized by thermal decomposition of iron pentacarbonyl and equivalent to three to four times higher capacity than that of a commonly used goethite-based adsorbent. All IONPs were magnetically responsive, which is of great importance for solid−liquid separation. This study demonstrates that the IONPs synthesized in gas-phase flame, particularly IDF-IONPs, are excellent adsorbents because of their high As(V) sorption capacity, potential for large-scale production, and useful magnetic property. PMID:23645964

  8. In-situ determination of the oxidation state of iron in Fe-bearing silicate melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtial, P.; Wilke, M.; Potuzak, M.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2005-12-01

    Terrestrial lavas commonly contain up to 10 wt% of iron. Furthermore, rocks returned from the Moon indicate lunar lava containing up to 25 wt% of iron and planetary scientists estimated that the martian mantle has about 18 wt% of iron. An experimental challenge in dealing with Fe-bearing silicate melts is that the oxidation state, controlling the proportions of ferric and ferrous iron, is a function of composition, oxygen fugacity and temperature and may vary significantly. Further complications concerning iron originate from its potential to be either four-, six- or even five-fold coordinated in both valence states. Therefore, the oxidation state of iron was determined in air for various Fe-bearing silicate melts. Investigated samples were Na-disilicate (NS), one atmosphere anorthite-diopside eutectic (AD) and haplogranitic (HPG8) melts containing up to 20, 20 and 10 wt% of iron, respectively. XANES spectra at the Fe K-edge were collected for all the melts at beamline A1, HASYLAB, Hamburg, using a Si(111) 4-crystal monochromator. Spectra were collected for temperatures up to 1573 K using a Pt-Rh loop as heating device. The Fe oxidation state was determined from the centroid position of the pre-edge feature using the calibration of Wilke et al. (2004). XANES results suggest that oxidation state of iron does not change within error for NS melts with addition of Fe, while AD and HPG8 melts become more oxidised with increasing iron content. Furthermore, NS melts are well more oxidised than AD and HPG8 melts that exhibit relatively similar oxidation states for identical iron contents. The oxidation state of iron for NS melts appears to be slightly temperature-dependent within the temperature range investigated (1073-1573 K). However, this trend is stronger for AD and HPG8 melts. Assuming that glass reflects a picture of the homogeneous equilibria of the melt, the present in-situ Fe-oxidation states determined for these melts were compared to those obtained on quenched

  9. Determination of oxidation state of iron in normal and pathologically altered human aortic valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czapla-Masztafiak, J.; Lis, G. J.; Gajda, M.; Jasek, E.; Czubek, U.; Bolechała, F.; Borca, C.; Kwiatek, W. M.

    2015-12-01

    In order to investigate changes in chemical state of iron in normal and pathologically altered human aortic valves X-ray absorption spectroscopy was applied. Since Fe is suspected to play detrimental role in aortic valve stenosis pathogenesis the oxidation state of this element has been determined. The experimental material consisted of 10 μm sections of valves excised during routine surgery and from autopsies. The experiment was performed at the MicroXAS beamline of the SLS synchrotron facility in Villigen (Switzerland). The Fe K-edge XANES spectra obtained from tissue samples were carefully analyzed and compared with the spectra of reference compounds containing iron in various chemical structures. The analysis of absorption edge position and shape of the spectra revealed that both chemical forms of iron are presented in valve tissue but Fe3+ is the predominant form. Small shift of the absorption edge toward higher energy in the spectra from stenotic valve samples indicates higher content of the Fe3+ form in pathological tissue. Such a phenomenon suggests the role of Fenton reaction and reactive oxygen species in the etiology of aortic valve stenosis. The comparison of pre-edge regions of XANES spectra for control and stenotic valve tissue confirmed no differences in local symmetry or spin state of iron in analyzed samples.

  10. A detailed study on the transition from the blocked to the superparamagnetic state of reduction-precipitated iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witte, K.; Bodnar, W.; Mix, T.; Schell, N.; Fulda, G.; Woodcock, T. G.; Burkel, E.

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles were prepared by salt-assisted solid-state chemical precipitation method with alternating fractions of the ferric iron content. The physical properties of the precipitated nanoparticles mainly consisting of magnetite were investigated by means of transmission electron microscopy, high energy X-ray diffraction, vibrating sample magnetometry and Mössbauer spectroscopy. With particle sizes ranging from 16.3 nm to 2.1 nm, a gradual transition from the blocked state to the superparamagnetic state was observed. The transition was described as a dependence of the ferric iron content used during the precipitation. Composition, mean particle size, coercivity, saturation polarisation, as well as hyperfine interaction parameters and their evolution were studied systematically over the whole series of iron oxide nanoparticles.

  11. Mössbauer study of iron in high oxidation states in the K Fe O system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dedushenko, Sergey K.; Perfiliev, Yurii D.; Saprykin, Aleksandr A.

    2008-07-01

    Oxidation of metallic iron by potassium superoxide leads to the formation of ferrate(V). Under room temperature this compound is unstable and instantly decomposes by disproportionation mechanism. Grinding the substance into powder accelerates the decomposition process.

  12. Solid-State Thermal Reaction of a Molecular Material and Solventless Synthesis of Iron Oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Debasis; Roy, Madhusudan; Zubko, Maciej; Kusz, Joachim; Bhattacharjee, Ashis

    2016-09-01

    Solid-state thermal decomposition reaction of a molecular material {As}({C}6{H}5)4[{Fe}^{II}{Fe}^{III} ({C}2{O}4)3]}n has been studied using non-isothermal thermogravimetry (TG) in an inert atmosphere. By analyzing the TG data collected at multiple heating rates in 300 K-1300 K range, the kinetic parameters (activation energy, most probable reaction mechanism function and frequency factor) are determined using different multi-heating rate analysis programs. Activation energy and the frequency factor are found to be strongly dependent on the extent of decomposition. The decomposed material has been characterized to be hematite using physical techniques (FT-IR and powder XRD). Particle morphology has been checked by TEM. A solid-state reaction pathway leading the molecular precursor to hematite has been proposed illustrating an example of solventless synthesis of iron oxides utilizing thermal decomposition as a technique using innocuous materials.

  13. Iron oxide surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkinson, Gareth S.

    2016-03-01

    The current status of knowledge regarding the surfaces of the iron oxides, magnetite (Fe3O4), maghemite (γ-Fe2O3), haematite (α-Fe2O3), and wüstite (Fe1-xO) is reviewed. The paper starts with a summary of applications where iron oxide surfaces play a major role, including corrosion, catalysis, spintronics, magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), biomedicine, photoelectrochemical water splitting and groundwater remediation. The bulk structure and properties are then briefly presented; each compound is based on a close-packed anion lattice, with a different distribution and oxidation state of the Fe cations in interstitial sites. The bulk defect chemistry is dominated by cation vacancies and interstitials (not oxygen vacancies) and this provides the context to understand iron oxide surfaces, which represent the front line in reduction and oxidation processes. Fe diffuses in and out from the bulk in response to the O2 chemical potential, forming sometimes complex intermediate phases at the surface. For example, α-Fe2O3 adopts Fe3O4-like surfaces in reducing conditions, and Fe3O4 adopts Fe1-xO-like structures in further reducing conditions still. It is argued that known bulk defect structures are an excellent starting point in building models for iron oxide surfaces. The atomic-scale structure of the low-index surfaces of iron oxides is the major focus of this review. Fe3O4 is the most studied iron oxide in surface science, primarily because its stability range corresponds nicely to the ultra-high vacuum environment. It is also an electrical conductor, which makes it straightforward to study with the most commonly used surface science methods such as photoemission spectroscopies (XPS, UPS) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The impact of the surfaces on the measurement of bulk properties such as magnetism, the Verwey transition and the (predicted) half-metallicity is discussed. The best understood iron oxide surface at present is probably Fe3O4(100); the structure is

  14. Probing the oxidation state of iron in the deep mantle using high P,T Mössbauer spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCammon, C. A.; Kupenko, I.; Sinmyo, R.; Cerantola, V.; Potapkin, V.; Chumakov, A. I.; Kantor, A.; Rüffer, R.; Dubrovinsky, L. S.

    2014-12-01

    The bulk of the Earth's interior is not directly accessible, yet redox processes occurring deep within drive many of the events observed at its surface. Laboratory studies of the relevant minerals at the appropriate pressure and temperature conditions have been pivotal in advancing our understanding of the Earth's interior. Iron plays an important role because it is the only major element with multiple electronic configurations (oxidation and spin state); however most of our knowledge regarding the oxidation state of iron in deep mantle phases is based on measurements of samples quenched from high temperature and sometimes also from high pressure. Mössbauer spectroscopy has been a key player in such studies and results on quenched samples have shown that the oxidation state of iron varies considerably through the mantle, from predominantly ferrous iron in upper mantle and transition zone phases to roughly 50% ferric iron in silicate perovskite (bridgmanite) due to the strong affinity of ferric iron for that phase in the presence of trivalent aluminium. Mössbauer measurements at pressures and temperatures along the geotherm are impractical using conventional radioactive sources due to their low brightness and the extremely limited possibilities for focusing in a laboratory setting. To address these limitations, we have developed an energy domain Synchrotron Mössbauer Source (SMS) on beamline ID18 at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility that enables rapid collection of high quality energy domain Mössbauer spectra, and coupled with a portable double-sided laser heating system, SMS spectra can be collected on iron-containing mantle phases at pressures and temperatures up to those near the Earth's core in only a few hours (or less). The presentation will showcase recent results documenting in situ determination of iron oxidation state in lower mantle phases and discuss their implications for redox sensitive processes taking place throughout the Earth

  15. Iron oxide surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkinson, Gareth S.

    2016-03-01

    The current status of knowledge regarding the surfaces of the iron oxides, magnetite (Fe3O4), maghemite (γ-Fe2O3), haematite (α-Fe2O3), and wüstite (Fe1-xO) is reviewed. The paper starts with a summary of applications where iron oxide surfaces play a major role, including corrosion, catalysis, spintronics, magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), biomedicine, photoelectrochemical water splitting and groundwater remediation. The bulk structure and properties are then briefly presented; each compound is based on a close-packed anion lattice, with a different distribution and oxidation state of the Fe cations in interstitial sites. The bulk defect chemistry is dominated by cation vacancies and interstitials (not oxygen vacancies) and this provides the context to understand iron oxide surfaces, which represent the front line in reduction and oxidation processes. Fe diffuses in and out from the bulk in response to the O2 chemical potential, forming sometimes complex intermediate phases at the surface. For example, α-Fe2O3 adopts Fe3O4-like surfaces in reducing conditions, and Fe3O4 adopts Fe1-xO-like structures in further reducing conditions still. It is argued that known bulk defect structures are an excellent starting point in building models for iron oxide surfaces. The atomic-scale structure of the low-index surfaces of iron oxides is the major focus of this review. Fe3O4 is the most studied iron oxide in surface science, primarily because its stability range corresponds nicely to the ultra-high vacuum environment. It is also an electrical conductor, which makes it straightforward to study with the most commonly used surface science methods such as photoemission spectroscopies (XPS, UPS) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The impact of the surfaces on the measurement of bulk properties such as magnetism, the Verwey transition and the (predicted) half-metallicity is discussed. The best understood iron oxide surface at present is probably Fe3O4(100); the structure is

  16. Iron Stable Isotopes, Magmatic Differentiation and the Oxidation State of Mariana Arc Magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, H. M.; Prytulak, J.; Plank, T. A.; Kelley, K. A.

    2014-12-01

    Arc magmas are widely considered to be oxidized, with elevated ferric iron contents (Fe3+/ΣFe) relative to mid-ocean ridge lavas (1, 2). However, it is unclear whether the oxidized nature of arc basalts is a primary feature, inherited from the sub-arc mantle, or the product of magmatic differentiation and/or post eruptive alteration processes (3). Iron stable isotopes can be used to trace the distribution of Fe during melting and magmatic differentiation processes (4, 5). Here we present Fe isotope data for well-characterized samples (6-8) from islands of the Central Volcanic Zone (CVZ) of the intra-oceanic Mariana Arc to explore the effect of magmatic differentiation processes on Fe isotope systematics. The overall variation in the Fe isotope compositions (δ57Fe) of samples from the CVZ islands ranges from -0.10 ±0.04 to 0.29 ± 0.01 ‰. Lavas from Anatahan are displaced to lower overall δ57Fe values (range -0.10 ±0.04 to 0.18 ±0.01 ‰) relative to other CVZ samples. Fe isotopes in the Anatahan suite (range -0.10 ±0.04 to 0.18 ±0.01 ‰) are positively correlated with SiO2 and negatively correlated with Ca, Fe2O3(t), Cr and V and are displaced to lower overall δ57Fe values relative to other CVZ samples. These correlations can be interpreted in terms of clinopyroxene and magnetite fractionation, with magnetite saturation throughout the differentiation sequence. Magnetite saturation is further supported by negative correlations between V, Fe2O3(t), Cr and MgO (for MgO <3.5 wt%). The early saturation of magnetite in the Anatahan and CVZ lavas is likely to be a function of high melt water content (9, 10) and potentially elevated melt oxidation state. Future work will focus on determining the relationships between mineral Fe isotope partitioning effects and melt composition and oxidation state. 1. R. Arculus, Lithos (1994). 2. K. A. Kelley et al., Science (2009). 3. C.-T. A. Lee et al., J. Pet. (2005). 4. N. Dauphas et al., EPSL (2014). 5. P. A. Sossi et al

  17. Oxidation state of iron in komatiitic melt inclusions indicates hot Archaean mantle

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, A.J.; Danyushevsky, L.; O'Neill, H.C.; Newville, M.; Sutton, S.R.

    2008-10-16

    Komatiites are volcanic rocks mainly of Archaean age that formed by unusually high degrees of melting of mantle peridotite. Their origin is controversial and has been attributed to either anhydrous melting of anomalously hot mantle or hydrous melting at temperatures only modestly greater than those found today. Here we determine the original Fe{sup 3+}/{Sigma}Fe ratio of 2.7-Gyr-old komatiitic magma from Belingwe, Zimbabwe, preserved as melt inclusions in olivine, to be 0.10 {+-} 0.02, using iron K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy. This value is consistent with near-anhydrous melting of a source with a similar oxidation state to the source of present-day mid-ocean-ridge basalt. Furthermore, this low Fe{sup 3+}/{Sigma}Fe value, together with a water content of only 0.2--0.3 wt%, excludes the possibility that the trapped melt contained significantly more water that was subsequently lost from the inclusions by reduction to H{sub 2} and diffusion. Loss of only 1.5 wt% water by this mechanism would have resulted in complete oxidation of iron (that is, the Fe{sup 3+}/{Sigma}Fe ratio would be {approx}1). There is also no petrographic evidence for the loss of molecular water. Our results support the identification of the Belingwe komatiite as a product of high mantle temperatures ({approx}1,700 C), rather than melting under hydrous conditions (3--5-wt% water), confirming the existence of anomalously hot mantle in the Archaean era.

  18. Reconciling data on the iron oxidation state of anhydrous and hydrous aluminosilicate glasses and melts: a polymeric approach.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moretti, R.

    2003-04-01

    The oxidation state of iron has been the object of attentive investigations during the last four decades. A first class of investigation involves glasses synthesized under nominally anhydrous conditions at atmospheric pressure: interpretation of iron oxidation state Vs. composition has given rise to some contradictions in literature about the structural role played by this element in silicate melts. Controversies are particularly relevant in the case of divalent iron, as testified by many spectroscopic determinations. The second class of investigation concerns hydrous aluminosilicate glasses synthesized under different T-P conditions. Again, no unique redox pattern has been found so far in literature, the ferric to ferrous iron ratio depending in a complex fashion on composition, temperature, pressure and oxygen fugacity of synthesis. The present study aims at showing that it is possible to reconcile such data by accounting for the acid-base properties of studied melts/glasses in the framework of a polymeric approach based on the concept of optical basicity and considering water speciation. Useful insights may thus be given about the dissociation equilibria of water in aluminosilicate melts/glasses. It is concluded that the developed model may be usefully employed for studying the evolution of the oxidation state of degassing and erupting silicate melts, showing that redox variations may be more reasonably ascribed to the melt compositional control rather than to changes in oxygen fugacity during magma migration from depth to surface.

  19. Oxidation State of Iron in the Izu-Bonin Arc Initial Magma and Its Influence Factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Arculus, R. J.; Brandl, P. A.; Hamada, M.; Savov, I. P.; Zhu, S.; Hickey-Vargas, R.; Tepley, F. J., III; Meffre, S.; Yogodzinski, G. M.; McCarthy, A.; Barth, A. P.; Kanayama, K.; Kusano, Y.; Sun, W.

    2014-12-01

    The redox state of mantle-derived magmas is a controversial issue, especially whether island arc basalts are more oxidized than those from mid-ocean ridges. Usually, arc magmas have higher Fe3+/Fe2+ and calculated oxygen fugacity (fO2) than mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB). It is the high fO2 of arc magma that apparently delays onset of sulfide fractionation and sequestration of precious/base metals thereby facilitating the formation of many giant gold-copper deposits typically associated with subduction zones. But due to a paucity of Fe3+/Fe2+ data for primary mantle-derived arc magmas, the cause for high fO2 of these magma types is still controversial; causes may include inter alia subduction-released oxidized material addition to the mantle wedge source of arc magma, partial melting of subducted slab, and redox changes occurring during ascent of the magma. Fortunately, IODP expedition 351 drilling at IODP Site U1438 in the Amami-Sankaku Basin of the northwestern Philipine Sea, adjacent to the proto-Izu-Bonin Arc at the Kyushu-Palau Ridge (KPR), recovered not only volcaniclastics derived from the inception of Izu-Bonin Mariana (IBM) arc in the Eocene, but also similar materials for the Arc's subsequent evolution through to the Late Oligocene and abandonment of the KPR as a remnant arc. Samples of the pre-Arc oceanic crustal basement were also recovered enabling us to determine the fO2of the mantle preceding arc inception. As the oxidation state of iron in basaltic glass directly relates to the fO2 , the Fe3+/∑Fe ratio [Fe3+/(Fe3++ Fe2+)] of basaltic glass are quantified by synchrotron-facilitated micro X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) spectroscopy to reflect its fO2. Fe K-edge µ-XANES spectra were recorded in fluorescence mode at Beamline 15U1, Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF). Synthetic silicate glass with known Fe3+/∑Fe ratio was used in data handling. The experimental results as well as preliminary data from IODP Expedition 351

  20. Enzymes of respiratory iron oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, R. II.

    1991-01-01

    This report focuses on the progress made in three areas of research concerned with enzymes involved in respiratory iron oxidation. The three areas are as follows: development of an improved procedure for the routine large scale culture of iron oxidizing chemolithotrophs based on the in-situ electrolysis of the soluble iron in the growth medium; to perform iron oxidation kinetic studies on whole cells using the oxygen electrode; and to identify, separate, purify, and characterize the individual cellular components.

  1. Iron oxides as pedoenvironmental indicators: state of the art, answers and questions (Philippe Duchaufour Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrent, J.

    2012-04-01

    The colour and magnetic properties of soils largely reflect the content and mineralogy of their iron oxides, which in turn relate to the physical, chemical and biological characteristics of the soil environment. For more than 50 years, soil mineralogists and chemists have collected data for iron oxides in soils formed in widely different environments and tried to understand the complex nature of the different suites and formation pathways for these minerals via laboratory experiments. The discovery of ferrihydrite —the poorly crystalline precursor of most Fe oxides— in 1971, and the recognition of its common presence in soils, raised interest in deciphering the environmental factors that affect its transformation into goethite and hematite, the two most abundant crystalline iron oxides in soil. Field observations were consistent with laboratory experiments in which temperature, water activity, pH, foreign ions and organic matter were found to play a key role in the crystallization of ferrihydrite. Thus, the hematite/(hematite + goethite) ratio increased with increasing temperature and also with the likelihood of seasonal soil drying. Exploiting this ratio as a (pedo)environment indicator is, however, not devoid of problems derived from insufficient knowledge of the interactions between the influential chemical variables, difficulties in quantifying the two minerals and changes brought about by reductive dissolution. Soil formation usually leads to magnetic enhancement as a result of the production of magnetite and/or maghemite, which are ferrimagnetic iron oxides, and, possibly, an ordered ferrimagnetic ferrihydrite, as suggested by recent laboratory experiments. The concentration of pedogenic ferrimagnets as estimated via proxies such as magnetic susceptibility or frequency-dependent magnetic susceptibility has been found to relate to climate variables [particularly (paleo)rainfall] in many studies reported over the last 30 years. However, extracting accurate

  2. L-Edge Xanes Measurements of the Oxidation State of Tungsten in Iron Bearing and Iron Free Silicate Glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danielson, L. R.; Righter, K.; Sutton, S.; Newville, M.

    2008-01-01

    Tungsten is important in constraining core formation of the Earth because this element is a moderately siderophile element (depleted 10 relative to chondrites) and, as a member of the Hf-W isotopic system, it is useful in constraining the timing of core formation. A number of previous experimental studies have been carried out to determine the silicate solubility and metal-silicate partitioning behavior of W, including its concomitant oxidation state. However, results of previous studies are inconsistent on whether W occurs as W(4+) or W(6+). It is assumed that W(4+) is the cation valence relevant to core formation. Given the sensitivity to silicate composition of high valence cations, knowledge of the oxidation state of W over a wide range of fO2 is critical to understanding the oxidation state of the mantle and core formation processes. This study seeks to measure the W valence and change in valence state over the range of fO2 most relevant to core formation, around IW-2.

  3. Location and oxidation state of iron in Fe-substituted CuInS{sub 2} chalcopyrites

    SciTech Connect

    Burnett, Johanna D.; Xu Tianhong; Sorescu, Monica; Strohmeier, Brian R.; Sturgeon, Jacqueline; Gourdon, Olivier; Baroudi, Kristen; Yao Jinlei; Aitken, Jennifer A.

    2013-01-15

    CuIn{sub 1-x}Fe{sub x}S{sub 2}(x=0-0.30) was synthesized via high-temperature, solid-state synthesis. Phase-pure materials were found in samples where x=0-0.15, after which a secondary phase became apparent. The materials were characterized with the use of X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), and Reitveld refinement revealed a linear decrease in unit cell volume as the amount of iron substitution increases in accordance with Vegard's Law. Inductively coupled plasma (ICP) confirms that the actual stoichiometry is close to the nominal composition of the materials. The temperature for both the chalcopyrite-to-sphalerite and the sphalerite-to-wurtzite phase transitions decreases with increasing iron substitution for indium. These findings suggest that the Fe is being randomly incorporated into the crystal structure of the CuInS{sub 2}. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements were used to determine the oxidation state of the ions (Cu{sup 1+}, In{sup 3+,} and S{sup 2-}), and Fe{sup 57} Moessbauer spectroscopy verified that the iron is in the 3{sup +} oxidation state. Band gaps of the solid solution were estimated to be in the range of 0.70-0.85 eV. Rietveld refinement of neutron diffraction data indicates that the iron is occupying the In site within the chalcopyrite structure. - Graphical abstract: CuIn{sub 1-x}Fe{sub x}S{sub 2} samples were prepared by solid-state synthesis. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Moessbauer spectroscopy indicate Cu{sup +}, In{sup 3+}, Fe{sup 3+} and S{sup 2-} in the samples. Rietveld refinement of neutron powder diffraction data shows Fe{sup 3+} residing on the indium site. The band gaps of the iron-containing samples decrease to {approx}0.7 eV. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirms the presence of Cu{sup +}, In{sup 3+} and S{sup 2-}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Moessbauer spectroscopy indicates the presence of Fe{sup 3+}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rietveld refinement of neutron

  4. Iron biomineralization by anaerobic neutrophilic iron-oxidizing bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miot, Jennyfer; Benzerara, Karim; Morin, Guillaume; Kappler, Andreas; Bernard, Sylvain; Obst, Martin; Férard, Céline; Skouri-Panet, Fériel; Guigner, Jean-Michel; Posth, Nicole; Galvez, Matthieu; Brown, Gordon E., Jr.; Guyot, François

    2009-02-01

    Minerals formed by bio-oxidation of ferrous iron (Fe(II)) at neutral pH, their association with bacterial ultrastructures as well as their impact on the metabolism of iron-oxidizing bacteria remain poorly understood. Here, we investigated iron biomineralization by the anaerobic nitrate-dependent iron-oxidizing bacterium Acidovorax sp. strain BoFeN1 in the presence of dissolved Fe(II) using electron microscopy and Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy (STXM). All detected minerals consisted mainly of amorphous iron phosphates, but based on their morphology and localization, three types of precipitates could be discriminated: (1) mineralized filaments at distance from the cells, (2) globules of 100 ± 25 nm in diameter, at the cell surface and (3) a 40-nm thick mineralized layer within the periplasm. All of those phases were shown to be intimately associated with organic molecules. Periplasmic encrustation was accompanied by an accumulation of protein moieties. In the same way, exopolysaccharides were associated with the extracellular mineralized filaments. The evolution of cell encrustation was followed by TEM over the time course of a culture: cell encrustation proceeded progressively, with rapid precipitation in the periplasm (in a few tens of minutes), followed by the formation of surface-bound globules. Moreover, we frequently observed an asymmetric mineral thickening at the cell poles. In parallel, the evolution of iron oxidation was quantified by STXM: iron both contained in the bacteria and in the extracellular precipitates reached complete oxidation within 6 days. While a progressive oxidation of Fe in the bacteria and in the medium could be observed, spatial redox (oxido-reduction state) heterogeneities were detected at the cell poles and in the extracellular precipitates after 1 day. All these findings provide new information to further the understanding of molecular processes involved in iron biomineralization by anaerobic iron-oxidizing bacteria and

  5. Enzymes of respiratory iron oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, R. II.

    1992-01-01

    This report describes experimental progress in characterizing and identifying redox proteins in a number of iron-oxidizing bacteria. Sections of the paper are entitled (1) In Situ electrolysis was explored to achieve enhanced yields of iron-oxidizing bacteria, (2)Structure/function studies were performed on redox-active biomolecules from Thiobacillus ferrooxidans, (3) Novel redox-active biomolecules were demonstrated in other iron autotrophs, and (4) New probes of metalloprotein electron-transfer reactions were synthesized and characterized.

  6. Arsenic Adsorption Onto Iron Oxides Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aredes, S.; Klein, B.; Pawlik, M.

    2004-12-01

    The predominant form of arsenic in water is as an inorganic ion. Under different redox conditions arsenic in water is stable in the +5 and +3 oxidation states. Arsenic oxidation state governs its toxicity, chemical form and solubility in natural and disturbed environments. As (III) is found in anoxic environments such as ground water , it is toxic and the common species is the neutral form, H3AsO3. As (V) is found in aerobic conditions such as surface water, it is less toxic and the common species in water are: H2AsO4 - and HAsO4 {- 2}. The water pH determines the predominant arsenate or arsenite species, however, both forms of arsenic can be detected in natural water systems. Iron oxides minerals often form in natural waters and sediments at oxic-anoxic boundaries. Over time they undergo transformation to crystalline forms, such as goethite or hematite. Both As(V) and As(III) sorbs strongly to iron oxides, however the sorption behavior of arsenic is dependent on its oxidation state and the mineralogy of the iron oxides. Competition between arsenic and others ions, such fluoride, sulphate and phosphate also play a role. On the other hand, calcium may increase arsenic adsorption onto iron oxides. Electrokinetic studies and adsorption experiments were carried out in order to determine which conditions favour arsenic adsorption. Hematite, goethite and magnetite as iron based sorbents were used. Test were also conducted with a laterite soil rich in iron minerals. The focus of this study is to evaluate physical and chemical conditions which favour arsenic adsorption onto iron oxides minerals, the results contribute to an understanding of arsenic behaviour in natural and disturbed environments. Furthermore, results could contribute in developing an appropriate remediation technology for arsenic removal in water using iron oxides minerals.

  7. 21 CFR 186.1374 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Iron oxides. 186.1374 Section 186.1374 Food and....1374 Iron oxides. (a) Iron oxides (oxides of iron, CAS Reg. No. 1332-37-2) are undefined mixtures of iron (II) oxide (CAS Reg. No. 1345-25-1, black cubic crystals) and iron (III) oxide (CAS Reg. No....

  8. Breakdown of Clays by Ectomycorrhizal Fungi Through Changes in Oxidation State of Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arocena, J. M.; Velde, B.

    2012-04-01

    Organisms are known to play a significant role in the transformation of clay minerals in soils. In our earlier work on canola, barley and alfalfa, we reported that Glomus, an arbuscular mycorrhizae, selectively transformed biotite into 2:1 expanding clays through the oxidation of Fe (II) in biotite to Fe(III). In this presentation, we will share similar results on clay transformations mediated by ectomycorrhizal fungi colonizing the roots of coniferous trees. Clay samples were isolated from rhizosphere soils of sub-alpine fir (Abies lasiocarpa (Hook.) Nutt.) in northern British Columbia (Canada). Chemical and mineralogical properties of these soils had been reported in our earlier paper. In this study, we subjected the clay samples to iron X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectroscopy (Fe-XANES) at the Canadian Light Source synchrotron facility in Saskatoon (Canada). Our initial results showed relatively higher amounts of Fe (III) than Fe(II) in clays collected from rhizosphere of Piloderma (an ectomycorrhizal fungus) compared to soils influenced by non-Piloderma species and Control (non-rhizosphere soil). Coupled with the results of X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, there seems to be a positive relationship between the relative amounts of Fe(III) and the 2:1 expanding clays. This relationship is consistent with our results on agricultural plants in laboratory experiments on biotites where we suggested that oxidation of Fe(II) to Fe(III) results in the formation of 2:1 expanding clays. In a related data set on chlorite alteration we observed that after dithionite-citrate-bicarbonate (DCB) treatment, the d-spacing of a slight portion of chloritic expanding clays shifted to higher angles indicating decreased d-spacing towards micaceous clays. The reductive process initiated through the action of the DCB treatment seems to indicate the collapsed of expandable clays upon the reduction of Fe(III) to Fe(II). Initial results from the Fe-XANES and XRD analysis of DCB

  9. 21 CFR 186.1374 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Iron oxides. 186.1374 Section 186.1374 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 186.1374 Iron oxides. (a) Iron oxides (oxides of iron, CAS Reg. No. 1332-37-2) are undefined mixtures of iron (II) oxide (CAS Reg. No. 1345-25-1, black cubic crystals) and iron...

  10. 21 CFR 186.1374 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Iron oxides. 186.1374 Section 186.1374 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 186.1374 Iron oxides. (a) Iron oxides (oxides of iron, CAS Reg. No. 1332-37-2) are undefined mixtures of iron (II) oxide (CAS Reg. No. 1345-25-1, black cubic crystals) and iron...

  11. 21 CFR 186.1374 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Iron oxides. 186.1374 Section 186.1374 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 186.1374 Iron oxides. (a) Iron oxides (oxides of iron, CAS Reg. No. 1332-37-2) are undefined mixtures of iron (II) oxide (CAS Reg. No. 1345-25-1, black cubic crystals) and iron...

  12. 21 CFR 186.1374 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Iron oxides. 186.1374 Section 186.1374 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 186.1374 Iron oxides. (a) Iron oxides (oxides of iron, CAS Reg. No. 1332-37-2) are undefined mixtures of iron (II) oxide (CAS Reg. No. 1345-25-1, black cubic crystals) and iron...

  13. 21 CFR 73.2250 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Iron oxides. 73.2250 Section 73.2250 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2250 Iron oxides. (a) Identity. The color additives iron oxides consist of any one or any combination of synthetically prepared iron oxides, including...

  14. 21 CFR 73.2250 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Iron oxides. 73.2250 Section 73.2250 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2250 Iron oxides. (a) Identity. The color additives iron oxides consist of any one or any combination of synthetically prepared iron oxides, including...

  15. 21 CFR 73.2250 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Iron oxides. 73.2250 Section 73.2250 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2250 Iron oxides. (a) Identity. The color additives iron oxides consist of any one or any combination of synthetically prepared iron oxides, including...

  16. 21 CFR 73.2250 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Iron oxides. 73.2250 Section 73.2250 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2250 Iron oxides. (a) Identity. The color additives iron oxides consist of any one or any combination of synthetically prepared iron oxides, including...

  17. 21 CFR 73.2250 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Iron oxides. 73.2250 Section 73.2250 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2250 Iron oxides. (a) Identity. The color additives iron oxides consist of any one or any combination of synthetically prepared iron oxides, including...

  18. Iron-oxidation-state-dependent O-O bond cleavage of meta-chloroperbenzoic acid to form an iron(IV)-oxo complex

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Kallol; Lee, Sang Mok; Que, Lawrence

    2008-01-01

    The mechanism of formation of [FeIV(O)(N4Py)]2+ (2, N4Py = N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-N-bis(2-pyridyl)methylamine) from the reaction of [FeII(N4Py)(CH3CN)]2+ (1) with m-chloroperbenzoic acid (mCPBA) in CH2Cl2 at −30 °C has been studied on the basis of the visible spectral changes observed and the reaction stoichiometry. It is shown that the conversion of 1 to 2 in 90% yield requires 1.5 equiv peracid and takes place in two successive one-electron steps via an [FeIII(N4Py)OH]2+(3) intermediate. The first oxidation step uses 0.5 equiv peracid and produces 0.5 equiv 3-chlorobenzoic acid, while the second step uses 1 equiv peracid and affords byproducts derived from chlorophenyl radical. We conclude that the FeII(N4Py) center promotes O-O bond heterolysis, while the FeIII(N4Py) center favors O-O bond homolysis, so the nature of O-O bond cleavage is dependent on the iron oxidation state. PMID:18443654

  19. Water oxidation: High five iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloret-Fillol, Julio; Costas, Miquel

    2016-03-01

    The oxidation of water is essential to the sustainable production of fuels using sunlight or electricity, but designing active, stable and earth-abundant catalysts for the reaction is challenging. Now, a complex containing five iron atoms is shown to efficiently oxidize water by mimicking key features of the oxygen-evolving complex in green plants.

  20. Proton Control of Oxidation and Spin State in a Series of Iron Tripodal Imidazole Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Brewer, Cynthia; Brewer, Greg; Luckett, Charles; Marbury, Gwen S.; Viragh, Carol; Beatty, Alicia M.; Scheidt, W. Robert

    2007-01-01

    Reaction of iron salts with three tripodal imidazole ligands, H3(1), H3(2), H3(3), formed from the condensation of tris(2-aminoethyl)amine (tren) with 3 equiv of an imidazole carboxaldehyde yielded eight new cationic iron(III) and iron(II), [FeH3L]3+or2+, and neutral iron(III), FeL, complexes. All complexes were characterized by EA(CHN), IR, UV, Mössbauer, mass spectral techniques and cyclic voltammetry. Structures of three of the complexes, Fe(2)·3H2O (C18H27FeN10O3, a = b = c = 20.2707(5), cubic, I4̄3d, Z = 16), Fe(3)·4.5H2O (C18H30FeN10O4.5, a = 20.9986(10), b = 11.7098(5), c = 19.9405(9), β= 109.141(1), monoclinic, P2(1)/c), Z = 8), and [FeH3(3)](ClO4)2·H2O (C18H26Cl2FeN10O9, a = 9.4848(4), b = 23.2354(9), c = 12.2048(5), β= 111.147(1)°, monoclinic, P2(1)/n, Z = 4) were determined at 100 K. The structures are similar to one another and feature an octahedral iron with facial coordination of imidazoles and imine nitrogen atoms. The iron(III) complexes of the deprotonated ligands, Fe(1), Fe(2), and Fe(3), are low-spin while the protonated iron(III) cationic complexes, [FeH3(1)](ClO4)3 and [FeH3(2)](ClO4)3, are high-spin and spin-crossover, respectively. The iron(II) cationic complexes, [FeH3(1)]S4O6, [FeH3(2)](ClO4)2, [FeH3(3)](ClO4)2, and [FeH3(3)][B(C6H5)4]2 exhibit spin-crossover behavior. Cyclic voltammetric measurements on the series of complexes show that complete deprotonation of the ligands produces a negative shift in the Fe(III)/Fe(II) reduction potential of 981 mV on average. Deprotonation in air of either cationic iron(II) or iron(III) complexes, [FeH3L]3+or2+, yields the neutral iron(III) complex, FeL. The process is reversible for Fe(3), where protonation of Fe(3) yields [FeH3(3)]2+. PMID:15046517

  1. High-precision determination of iron oxidation state in silicate glasses using XANES

    SciTech Connect

    Cottrell, Elizabeth; Kelley, Katherine A.; Lanzirotti, Antonio; Fischer, Rebecca A.

    2009-11-04

    Fe K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and Moessbauer spectra were collected on natural basaltic glasses equilibrated over a range of oxygen fugacity (QFM - 3.5 to QFM + 4.5). The basalt compositions and fO{sub 2} conditions were chosen to bracket the natural range of redox conditions expected for basalts from mid-ocean ridge, ocean island, back-arc basin, and arc settings, in order to develop a high-precision calibration for the determination of Fe{sup 3+}/{Sigma}Fe in natural basalts. The pre-edge centroid energy, corresponding to the 1s {yields} 3d transition, was determined to be the most robust proxy for Fe oxidation state, affording significant advantages compared to the use of other spectral features. A second-order polynomial models the correlation between the centroid and Fe{sup 3+}/{Sigma}Fe, yielding a precision of {+-} 0.0045 in Fe{sup 3+}/{Sigma}Fe for glasses with Fe{sup 3+}/{Sigma}Fe > 8%, which is comparable to the precision of wet chemistry. This high precision relies on a Si (311) monochromator to better define the Fe{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+} transitions, accurate and robust modeling of the pre-edge feature, dense fO{sub 2}-coverage and compositional appropriateness of reference glasses, and application of a non-linear drift correction. Through re-analysis of the reference glasses across three synchrotron beam sessions, we show that the quoted precision can be achieved (i.e., analyses are reproducible) across multiple synchrotron beam sessions, even when spectral collection conditions (detector parameters or sample geometry) change. Rhyolitic glasses were also analyzed and yield a higher centroid energy at a given Fe{sup 3+}/{Sigma}Fe than basalts, implying that major variations in melt structure affect the relationship between centroid position and Fe{sup 3+}/{Sigma}Fe, and that separate calibrations are needed for the determination of oxidation state in basalts and rhyolites.

  2. Distinguishing Protonation States of Histidine Ligands to the Oxidized Rieske Iron-Sulfur Cluster through (15) N Vibrational Frequency Shifts.

    PubMed

    Jagger, Benjamin R; Koval, Ashlyn M; Wheeler, Ralph A

    2016-01-18

    The Rieske [2Fe-2S] cluster is a vital component of many oxidoreductases, including mitochondrial cytochrome bc1; its chloroplast equivalent, cytochrome b6f; one class of dioxygenases; and arsenite oxidase. The Rieske cluster acts as an electron shuttle and its reduction is believed to couple with protonation of one of the cluster's His ligands. In cytochromes bc1 and b6f, for example, the Rieske cluster acts as the first electron acceptor in a modified Q cycle. The protonation states of the cluster's His ligands determine its ability to accept a proton and possibly an electron through a hydrogen bond to the electron carrier, ubiquinol. Experimental determination of the protonation states of a Rieske cluster's two His ligands by NMR spectroscopy is difficult, due to the close proximity of the two paramagnetic iron atoms of the cluster. Therefore, this work reports density functional calculations and proposes that difference vibrational spectroscopy with (15) N isotopic substitution may be used to assign the protonation states of the His ligands of the oxidized Rieske [2Fe-2S] complex. PMID:26603967

  3. 46 CFR 148.275 - Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent. 148.275 Section... § 148.275 Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent. (a) Before spent iron oxide or spent iron sponge is... been cooled and weathered for at least eight weeks. (b) Both spent iron oxide and spent iron sponge...

  4. 46 CFR 148.275 - Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent. 148.275 Section... § 148.275 Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent. (a) Before spent iron oxide or spent iron sponge is... been cooled and weathered for at least eight weeks. (b) Both spent iron oxide and spent iron sponge...

  5. 46 CFR 148.275 - Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent. 148.275 Section... § 148.275 Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent. (a) Before spent iron oxide or spent iron sponge is... been cooled and weathered for at least eight weeks. (b) Both spent iron oxide and spent iron sponge...

  6. 46 CFR 148.275 - Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent. 148.275 Section... § 148.275 Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent. (a) Before spent iron oxide or spent iron sponge is... been cooled and weathered for at least eight weeks. (b) Both spent iron oxide and spent iron sponge...

  7. Vacancy coalescence during oxidation of iron nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Cabot, Andreu; Puntes, Victor F.; Shevchenko, Elena; Yin, Yadong; Balcells, Lluis; Markus, Matthew A.; Hughes, Steven M.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2007-06-14

    In the present work, we analyze the geometry and composition of the nanostructures obtained from the oxidation of iron nanoparticles. The initial oxidation of iron takes place by outward diffusion of cations through the growing oxide shell. This net material flow is balanced by an opposite flow of vacancies, which coalesce at the metal/oxide interface. Thus, the partial oxidation of colloidal iron nanoparticles leads to the formation of core-void-shell nanostructures. Furthermore, the complete oxidation of iron nanoparticles in the 3-8 nm size range leads to the formation of hollow iron oxide nanoparticles. We analyze the size and temperature range in which vacancy coalescence during oxidation of amine-stabilized iron nanoparticles takes place. Maghemite is the crystallographic structure obtained from the complete oxidation of iron nanoparticles under our synthetic conditions.

  8. 21 CFR 73.3125 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Iron oxides. 73.3125 Section 73.3125 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3125 Iron oxides. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive iron oxides (CAS Reg. No. 1332-37-2), Color Index No. 77491, shall conform...

  9. 21 CFR 73.3125 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Iron oxides. 73.3125 Section 73.3125 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3125 Iron oxides. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive iron oxides (CAS Reg. No. 1332-37-2), Color Index No. 77491, shall conform...

  10. 21 CFR 73.3125 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Iron oxides. 73.3125 Section 73.3125 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3125 Iron oxides. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive iron oxides (CAS Reg. No. 1332-37-2), Color Index No. 77491, shall conform...

  11. 21 CFR 73.3125 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Iron oxides. 73.3125 Section 73.3125 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3125 Iron oxides. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive iron oxides (CAS Reg. No. 1332-37-2), Color Index No. 77491, shall conform...

  12. 21 CFR 73.3125 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Iron oxides. 73.3125 Section 73.3125 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3125 Iron oxides. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive iron oxides (CAS Reg. No. 1332-37-2), Color Index No. 77491, shall conform...

  13. Characterisation of iron-(hydr)oxides in bulk soils and colloidal fractions using state-of-the-art techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regelink, Inge C.; Weng, Liping; Voegelin, Andreas; Koopmans, Gerwin F.; Comans, Rob

    2013-04-01

    Iron-(hydr)oxide particles in soils have extremely large surface-to-mass ratios and are therefore considered to make up the largest fraction of the soils reactive surface area. Fe-(hydr)oxide particles are only a few nanometer in size when their surface-to-mass ratios are expressed as equivalent particle diameters. This suggests that Fe-(hydr)oxides are predominantly present as nano-sized particles in the soil. However, Fe-(hydr)oxides may aggregate or may be tightly attached to surfaces of larger particles. As a consequence, Fe-(hydr)oxides can have large surface-to-mass ratios without being present in the nanofraction. To understand the role of Fe-(hydr)oxides in aggregation and to assess their potential mobility in soils, it is important to know the size-distribution and setting of the Fe-(hydr)oxide particles. Therefore, the objective of this study is to characterize Fe-(hydr)oxides in the colloidal fraction, which we defined as the fraction smaller than 0.45 µm, and to compare these outcomes with characteristics of Fe-(hydr)oxides in the bulk soil. Two procedures were used to disperse the colloids from the bulk soil: 1) mechanical dispersion by ultrasonic treatment of NaHCO3-soil suspensions and 2) chemical/mechanical dispersion by ultrasonic treatment of pyrophosphate-soil suspensions. The size-distribution and elemental composition of the colloids of seven soils were analysed by Asymmetric Flow Field-Flow Fractionation (AF4) coupled to High-Resolution Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (HR-ICP-MS). For two soils, Fe speciation of bulk soil and colloidal fractions were determined by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. In addition, Fe-(hydr)oxides in bulk soils and colloids were visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive X-ray detection (EDX) for element detection. Results for the bulk soils showed that reactive surface areas of Fe-(hydr)oxides correspond to equivalent particle diameters of a

  14. Carcinogenesis studies with iron oxides.

    PubMed

    Steinhoff, D; Mohr, U; Hahnemann, S

    1991-01-01

    Seven different types of iron oxide were examined for carcinogenic properties in intratracheal instillation and intraperitoneal injection tests on rats, which represent particularly sensitive methods for local carcinogenic effects. The total doses lay in the range of maximum tolerance (390/1,530 mg/kg i.t. or 600 mg/kg i.p.). With one exception, at least 50 male and 50 female Sprague-Dawley rats were used per test group, control group and route of administration. Two iron oxides were additionally instilled intratracheally in combination with benzo[a]pyrene. No carcinogenic effect could be demonstrated for the test iron oxides RBW 07105/SV2 (fibrous, magnetic, surface doped with 1.85% cobalt), development product Bayferrox AC 5100 M (fibrous, magnetic, bulk doped with 2.1% cobalt), Bayferrox 1352 (fibrous alpha-Fe2O3), Bayferrox 920 (fibrous alpha-FeOOH), Bayferrox 130 (cubic alpha-Fe2O3), Bayferrox 306 (cubic Fe3O4), or Brazilian iron ore AC 5031 N (alpha-Fe2O3). PMID:1797572

  15. Reduction of Soluble Iron and Reductive Dissolution of Ferric Iron-Containing Minerals by Moderately Thermophilic Iron-Oxidizing Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Bridge, Toni A. M.; Johnson, D. Barrie

    1998-01-01

    Five moderately thermophilic iron-oxidizing bacteria, including representative strains of the three classified species (Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans, Sulfobacillus acidophilus, and Acidimicrobium ferrooxidans), were shown to be capable of reducing ferric iron to ferrous iron when they were grown under oxygen limitation conditions. Iron reduction was most readily observed when the isolates were grown as mixotrophs or heterotrophs with glycerol as an electron donor; in addition, some strains were able to couple the oxidation of tetrathionate to the reduction of ferric iron. Cycling of iron between the ferrous and ferric states was observed during batch culture growth in unshaken flasks incubated under aerobic conditions, although the patterns of oxidoreduction of iron varied in different species of iron-oxidizing moderate thermophiles and in strains of a single species (S. acidophilus). All three bacterial species were able to grow anaerobically with ferric iron as a sole electron acceptor; the growth yields correlated with the amount of ferric iron reduced when the isolates were grown in the absence of oxygen. One of the moderate thermophiles (identified as a strain of S. acidophilus) was able to bring about the reductive dissolution of three ferric iron-containing minerals (ferric hydroxide, jarosite, and goethite) when it was grown under restricted aeration conditions with glycerol as a carbon and energy source. The significance of iron reduction by moderately thermophilic iron oxidizers in both environmental and applied contexts is discussed. PMID:9603832

  16. A method for the determination of vanadium and iron oxidation states in naturally occurring oxides and silicates.

    PubMed

    Wanty, R B; Goldhaber, M B

    1985-05-01

    A valence-specific analytical method for determining V(3+) in ore minerals has been developed that involves two steps: dissolution of a mineral sample without disturbing the V(3+)/V(tot) ratio, followed by determination of V(3+) in the presence of V(4+). The samples are dissolved in a mixture of hydrofluoric and sulphuric acids at 100 degrees in Teflon-lined reaction vessels. Tervalent vanadium is then determined colorimetrically by formation of a V(3+)-thiocyanate complex in aqueous-acetone medium. Fe(3+) is measured semi-quantitatively in the same solution. The method has been tested with two naturally occurring samples containing vanadium and iron. The results obtained were supported by those obtained by other methods, including electron spin resonance spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and Mössbauer spectroscopy. PMID:18963866

  17. A method for the determination of vanadium and iron oxidation states in naturally occurring oxides and silicates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wanty, R.B.; Goldhaber, M.B.

    1985-01-01

    A valence-specific analytical method for determining V3+ in ore minerals has been developed that involves two steps: dissolution of a mineral sample without disturbing the V3+/Vtot ratio, followed by determination of V3+ in the presence of V4+. The samples are dissolved in a mixture of hydrofluoric and sulphuric acids at 100?? in Teflon-lined reaction vessels. Tervalent vanadium is then determined colorimetrically by formation of a V3+-thiocyanate complex in aqueous-acetone medium. Fe3+ is measured semi-quantitatively in the same solution. The method has been tested with two naturally occurring samples containing vanadium and iron. The results obtained were supported by those obtained by other methods, including electron spin resonance spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and Mo??ssbauer spectroscopy. ?? 1985.

  18. High temperature oxidation of iron-iron oxide core-shell nanowires composed of iron nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Krajewski, M; Brzozka, K; Lin, W S; Lin, H M; Tokarczyk, M; Borysiuk, J; Kowalski, G; Wasik, D

    2016-02-01

    This work describes an oxidation process of iron-iron oxide core-shell nanowires at temperatures between 100 °C and 800 °C. The studied nanomaterial was synthesized through a simple chemical reduction of iron trichloride in an external magnetic field under a constant flow of argon. The electron microscopy investigations allowed determining that the as-prepared nanowires were composed of self-assembled iron nanoparticles which were covered by a 3 nm thick oxide shell and separated from each other by a thin interface layer. Both these layers exhibited an amorphous or highly-disordered character which was traced by means of transmission electron microscopy and Mössbauer spectroscopy. The thermal oxidation was carried out under a constant flow of argon which contained the traces of oxygen. The first stage of process was related to slow transformations of amorphous Fe and amorphous iron oxides into crystalline phases and disappearance of interfaces between iron nanoparticles forming the studied nanomaterial (range: 25-300 °C). After that, the crystalline iron core and iron oxide shell became oxidized and signals for different compositions of iron oxide sheath were observed (range: 300-800 °C) using X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and Mössbauer spectroscopy. According to the thermal gravimetric analysis, the nanowires heated up to 800 °C under argon atmosphere gained 37% of mass with respect to their initial weight. The structure of the studied nanomaterial oxidized at 800 °C was mainly composed of α-Fe2O3 (∼ 93%). Moreover, iron nanowires treated above 600 °C lost their wire-like shape due to their shrinkage and collapse caused by the void coalescence. PMID:26766540

  19. The Oxidation State Of Iron In Chromite As A Record Of Deep Earth Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGowan, N.; Griffin, W. L.; Pearson, N.; O'Reilly, S. Y.; Clark, S. M.; Roque-Rosell, J.; Marcus, M.; McCammon, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    Recent work on podiform chromitite from the Luobusa massif, Tibet, suggests that a lithospheric slab containing the chromitite was driven into the Transition Zone (>400 km) after primary crystallisation at shallow depth [1]. Exsolution of coesite and pyroxenes from chromite is believed to reflect conversion from the spinel structure to the ultra-high pressure (UHP) calcium ferrite (CF) polymorph below 400 km [2]. Experimental studies report that UHP polymorphs can have a high affinity for Fe3+, leading to disproportionation of Fe2+ to Fe3+ + Fe0 [3], despite low fO2 as evidenced by inclusions of diamond, native metals and alloys, moissanite, and Cr2+-bearing chromite. Luobusa chromitites may be the first natural example of this phenomenon; one study reported a massive chromitite with higher Fe3+/∑Fe than nodular or disseminated varieties with lower modal chromite [4]. The absence of indicators of oxidation implies that the high Fe3+/∑Fe was not produced by formation or alteration of chromite at Earth's surface. A study using samples from Luobusa and the low-pressure Antalya Complex, Turkey was carried out to investigate relationships between pressure, fO2 and Fe3+/∑Fe. In the first application of μ-X-ray absorption near edge structure (μ-XANES) spectroscopy to measure chromite Fe3+/∑Fe, we constructed calibration curves for the pre-edge centroid and main edge maximum features using Fe3+/∑Fe (from Mössbauer spectroscopy) in synthetic and natural spinels. Pre-edge results show that Fe3+/∑Fe increases with vol.% chromite in chromitites from Luobusa, but not from Antalya (fig. 1). High Fe3+/∑Fe thus appears to be a consequence of crystallographic stabilisation of Fe3+ in the UHP polymorph stable below 400 km, despite low-fO2 conditions. The rapid upwelling of the Luobusa chromitite to the uppermost mantle (<10 Ma) has preserved the high Fe3+/∑Fe in samples where re-equilibration with olivine was limited. [1] McGowan et al., Geology (2015) 43, 179

  20. How Innocent are Potentially Redox Non-Innocent Ligands? Electronic Structure and Metal Oxidation States in Iron-PNN Complexes as a Representative Case Study.

    PubMed

    Butschke, Burkhard; Fillman, Kathlyn L; Bendikov, Tatyana; Shimon, Linda J W; Diskin-Posner, Yael; Leitus, Gregory; Gorelsky, Serge I; Neidig, Michael L; Milstein, David

    2015-05-18

    Herein we present a series of new α-iminopyridine-based iron-PNN pincer complexes [FeBr2LPNN] (1), [Fe(CO)2LPNN] (2), [Fe(CO)2LPNN](BF4) (3), [Fe(F)(CO)2LPNN](BF4) (4), and [Fe(H)(CO)2LPNN](BF4) (5) with formal oxidation states ranging from Fe(0) to Fe(II) (LPNN = 2-[(di-tert-butylphosphino)methyl]-6-[1-(2,4,6-mesitylimino)ethyl]pyridine). The complexes were characterized by a variety of methods including (1)H, (13)C, (15)N, and (31)P NMR, IR, Mössbauer, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) as well as electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) spectroscopy, SQUID magnetometry, and X-ray crystallography, focusing on the assignment of the metal oxidation states. Ligand structural features suggest that the α-iminopyridine ligand behaves as a redox non-innocent ligand in some of these complexes, particularly in [Fe(CO)2LPNN] (2), in which it appears to adopt the monoanionic form. In addition, the NMR spectroscopic features ((13)C, (15)N) indicate the accumulation of charge density on parts of the ligand for 2. However, a combination of spectroscopic measurements that more directly probe the iron oxidation state (e.g., XPS), density functional theory (DFT) calculations, and electronic absorption studies combined with time-dependent DFT calculations support the description of the metal atom in 2 as Fe(0). We conclude from our studies that ligand structural features, while useful in many assignments of ligand redox non-innocence, may not always accurately reflect the ligand charge state and, hence, the metal oxidation state. For complex 2, the ligand structural changes are interpreted in terms of strong back-donation from the metal center to the ligand as opposed to electron transfer. PMID:25918944

  1. Ferric iron reduction by sulfur- and iron-oxidizing bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Brock, T D; Gustafson, J

    1976-01-01

    Acidophilic bacteria of the genera Thiobacillus and Sulfolobus are able to reduce ferric iron when growing on elemental sulfur as an energy source. It has been previously thought that ferric iron serves as a nonbiological oxidant in the formation of acid mine drainage and in the leaching of ores, but these results suggest that bacterial catalysis may play a significant role in the reactivity of ferric iron. PMID:825043

  2. Indium Sorption to Iron Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, S. J.; Sacco, S. A.; Hemond, H.; Hussain, F. A.; Runkel, R. L.; Walton-Day, K. E.; Kimball, B. A.; Shine, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    Indium is an increasingly important metal in semiconductors and electronics, and its use is growing rapidly as a semiconductive coating (as indium tin oxide) for liquid crystal displays (LCDs) and flat panel displays. It also has uses in important energy technologies such as light emitting diodes (LEDs) and photovoltaic cells. Despite its rapid increase in use, very little is known about the environmental behavior of indium, and concerns are being raised over the potential health effects of this emerging metal contaminant. One source of indium to the environment is acid mine drainage from the mining of lead, zinc, and copper sulfides. In our previous studies of a stream in Colorado influenced by acid mine drainage from lead and zinc mining activities, indium concentrations were found to be 10,000 times those found in uncontaminated rivers. However, the speciation and mobility of indium could not be reliably modeled because sorption constants to environmental sorbents have not been determined. In this study, we generate sorption constants for indium to ferrihydrite in the laboratory over a range of pHs, sorbent to sorbate ratios, and ionic strengths. Ferrihydrite is one of the most important sorbents in natural systems, and sorption to amorphous iron oxides such as ferrihydrite is thought to be one of the main removal mechanisms of metals from the dissolved phase in aqueous environments. Because of its relatively low solubility, we also find that indium hydroxide precipitation can dominate indium's partitioning at micromolar concentrations of indium. This precipitation may be important in describing indium's behavior in our study stream in Colorado, where modeling sorption to iron-oxides does not explain the complete removal of indium from the dissolved phase when the pH of the system is artificially raised to above 8. This study contributes much-needed data about indium's aqueous behavior, in order to better understand its fate, transport, and impacts in the

  3. Tannin biosynthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera-Becerra, R.; Rius, J. L.; Zorrilla, C.

    2010-08-01

    In this work, iron oxide nanoparticles synthesized with gallic acid and tannic acid are characterized using High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM). Its size, form, and structure are compared with nanoparticles obtained previously using alfalfa biomass in order to find a simpler, consistent, and environmentally friendly method in the production of iron oxide nanoparticles.

  4. Enzymatic iron oxidation by Leptothrix discophora: identification of an iron-oxidizing protein.

    PubMed Central

    Corstjens, P L; de Vrind, J P; Westbroek, P; de Vrind-de Jong, E W

    1992-01-01

    An iron-oxidizing factor was identified in the spent culture medium of the iron- and manganese-oxidizing bacterial strain Leptothrix discophora SS-1. It appeared to be a protein, with an apparent molecular weight of approximately 150,000. Its activity could be demonstrated after fractionation of the spent medium by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. A spontaneous mutant of L. discophora SS-1 was isolated which excreted neither manganese- nor iron-oxidizing activity, whereas excretion of other proteins seemed to be unaffected. Although the excretion of both metal-oxidizing factors was probably linked, the difference in other properties suggests that manganese and iron oxidation represent two different pathways. With a dot-blot assay, it was established that different bacterial species have different metal-oxidizing capacities. Whereas L. discophora oxidized both iron and manganese, Sphaerotilus natans oxidized only iron and two Pseudomonas spp. oxidized only manganese. Images PMID:1610168

  5. Enzymatic iron oxidation by Leptothrix discophora: identification of an iron-oxidizing protein.

    PubMed

    Corstjens, P L; de Vrind, J P; Westbroek, P; de Vrind-de Jong, E W

    1992-02-01

    An iron-oxidizing factor was identified in the spent culture medium of the iron- and manganese-oxidizing bacterial strain Leptothrix discophora SS-1. It appeared to be a protein, with an apparent molecular weight of approximately 150,000. Its activity could be demonstrated after fractionation of the spent medium by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. A spontaneous mutant of L. discophora SS-1 was isolated which excreted neither manganese- nor iron-oxidizing activity, whereas excretion of other proteins seemed to be unaffected. Although the excretion of both metal-oxidizing factors was probably linked, the difference in other properties suggests that manganese and iron oxidation represent two different pathways. With a dot-blot assay, it was established that different bacterial species have different metal-oxidizing capacities. Whereas L. discophora oxidized both iron and manganese, Sphaerotilus natans oxidized only iron and two Pseudomonas spp. oxidized only manganese. PMID:1610168

  6. Oxidation state of the lower mantle: In situ observations of the iron electronic configuration in bridgmanite at extreme conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupenko, I.; McCammon, C.; Sinmyo, R.; Cerantola, V.; Potapkin, V.; Chumakov, A. I.; Kantor, A.; Rüffer, R.; Dubrovinsky, L.

    2015-08-01

    We have investigated the electronic configuration of iron in Fe-, Al-containing magnesium silicate perovskite, i.e., bridgmanite, the main component of the lower mantle, at conditions of the deep Earth's interior using the energy domain Synchrotron Mössbauer Source technique. We show that the high ferric iron content observed previously in quenched samples is preserved at high temperatures and high pressures. Our data are consistent with high-spin to intermediate-spin (HS-IS) crossover in Fe2+ at high pressures and ambient temperature. We see no evidence of spin crossover in Fe3+ occupying the A-position of bridgmanite. On laser heating at pressures above ∼40 GPa we observe a new doublet with relative area below 5% which is assigned to Fe3+ in the octahedral (B-site) position in bridgmanite. We conclude that at lower mantle conditions Fe3+ remains predominantly in the HS state, while Fe2+ occurs solely in the IS state.

  7. Facile and Sustainable Synthesis of Shaped Iron Oxide Nanoparticles: Effect of Iron Precursor Salts on the Shapes of Iron Oxides

    PubMed Central

    Sayed, Farheen N.; Polshettiwar, Vivek

    2015-01-01

    A facile and sustainable protocol for synthesis of six different shaped iron oxides is developed. Notably, all the six shapes of iron oxides can be synthesised using exactly same synthetic protocol, by simply changing the precursor iron salts. Several of the synthesised shapes are not reported before. This novel protocol is relatively easy to implement and could contribute to overcome the challenge of obtaining various shaped iron oxides in economical and sustainable manner. PMID:25939969

  8. Platinum Attachments on Iron Oxide Nanoparticle Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Palchoudhury, Soubantika; Xu, Yaolin; An, Wei; Turner, C. H.; Bao, Yuping

    2010-04-30

    Platinum nanoparticles supported on metal oxide surfaces have shown great potential as heterogeneous catalysts to accelerate electrochemical processes, such as the oxygen reduction reaction in fuel cells. Recently, the use of magnetic supports has become a promising research topic for easy separation and recovery of catalysts using magnets, such as Pt nanoparticles supported on iron oxide nanoparticles. The attachment of Pt on iron oxide nanoparticles is limited by the wetting ability of the Pt (metal) on ceramic surfaces. A study of Pt nanoparticle attachment on iron oxide nanoparticle surfaces in an organic solvent is reported, which addresses the factors that promote or inhibit such attachment. It was discovered that the Pt attachment strongly depends on the capping molecules of the iron oxide seeds and the reaction temperature. For example, the attachment of Pt nanoparticles on oleic acid coated iron oxide nanoparticles was very challenging, because of the strong binding between the carboxylic groups and iron oxide surfaces. In contrast, when nanoparticles are coated with oleic acid/tri-n-octylphosphine oxide or oleic acid/oleylamine, a significant increase in Pt attachment was observed. Electronic structure calculations were then applied to estimate the binding energies between the capping molecules and iron ions, and the modeling results strongly support the experimental observations.

  9. The Oxidation State of Tungsten in Iron Bearing and Iron Free Silicate Glasses: Results from W L-Edge Xanes Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danielson, Lisa R.; Righter, K.; Sutton S.; Newville, M.; Le, L.

    2007-01-01

    Tungsten is important in constraining core formation of the Earth because this element is a moderately siderophile element (depleted approx. 10 relative to chondrites) and, as a member of the Hf-W isotopic system, it is useful in constraining the timing of core formation. A number of previous experimental studies have been carried out to determine the silicate solubility and metal-silicate partitioning behavior of W, including its concomitant oxidation state. However, results of previous studies (figure 1) are inconsistent on whether W occurs as W(4+) or W(6+).

  10. 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy investigations of iron oxidation states in the Harmattan dust nutrient contribution to West African soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adetunji, Jacob

    2014-12-01

    A variety of investigations have been carried out on Harmattan dust over many decades demonstrating the continuing importance of the Harmattan dust phenomenon. The investigations have included elemental enrichment factors, mineralogical nutrient input through dust deposition on the soil, meteorological studies, etc. Harmattan dust is important, not only for its impact on radio communication and low visibility in the shipping lanes over the Atlantic, but also on the livelihood and health of people living in countries over which the dust-laden Harmattan wind blows. However, so far, the aspect of nutrient mineral deposition on the soil has not been thoroughly investigated and requires attention, since the majority of people living in West Africa rely heavily on agriculture. It is therefore relevant to know the useful nutrients in the Harmattan dust deposited on soils of the region. This study is therefore aimed at determining the ferric-ferrous ratio of the iron-bearing minerals contained in the Harmattan dust, so their nutritional contribution can be considered. The Mössbauer technique is a powerful tool for studying the ferric-ferrous ratio and has therefore been used, for the first time, to determine the oxidation states of iron in the dust samples. The results of the analysis show that the Harmattan dust is seriously deficient in ferrous iron, which is the more soluble Fe-ion, needed in the soil for healthy crops and plants in general.

  11. Immobilisation of arsenic by iron(II)-oxidizing bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kappler, A.; Hohmann, C.; Winkler, E.; Muehe, M.; Morin, G.

    2008-12-01

    Arsenic-contaminated groundwater is an environmental problem that affects about 1-2% of the world's population. As arsenic-contaminated water is also used for irrigating rice fields, the uptake of arsenic via rice is in some cases even higher than via drinking water. Arsenic is often of geogenic origin and in many cases bound to iron(III) minerals. Microbial iron(III) reduction leads to dissolution of Fe(III) minerals and thus the arsenic bound to these minerals is released to the environment. In turn, iron(II)-oxidizing bacteria have the potential to co-precipitate or sorb arsenic during iron(II) oxidation followed by iron(III) mineral formation. Here, we present work on arsenic co-precipitation and immobilization by anaerobic and aerobic iron(II)-oxidizing bacteria. Co-precipitation batch experiments with pure cultures of nitrate-dependent, phototrophic, and microaerophilic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria are used to quantify the amount of arsenic that can be immobilized during microbial iron mineral precipitation. Iron and arsenic speciation and redox state are determined by X- ray diffraction and synchrotron-based X-ray absorption methods (EXAFS, XANES). Microcosm experiments are set-up either with liquid media or with rice paddy soil amended with arsenic. Rice paddy soil from arsenic contaminated rice fields in China that include a natural population of Fe(II)-oxidizing microorganisms is used as inoculum. Dissolved and solid-phase arsenic and iron are quantified, Arsenic speciation is determined and the iron minerals are identified. Additionally, Arsenic uptake into the rice plant is quantified and a gene expression pattern in rice (Oryza sativa cv Gladia) is determined by microarrays as a response to the presence of Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria.

  12. Soluble Iron as an In Situ Indicator of the Redox State of Humic Substances in Arctic Soil: Implications for Seasonal Regeneration of Oxidized Terminal Electron Acceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipson, D.; Zlamal, J. E.; Srinivas, A. J.; Raab, T. K.

    2014-12-01

    Ferric iron (Fe(III)) and humic substances (HS) are important terminal electron acceptors for anaerobic respiration in wet tundra soils of the Arctic Coastal Plain near Barrow, Alaska. These soils are rich in both solid phase Fe minerals (including oxides such as ferrihydrite and goethite and other minerals with reduced or mixed valence such as siderite and magnetite) and soluble Fe, chelated by siderophores and other small organic molecules. This latter pool may also include nanocolloidal Fe: extremely fine-grained minerals that pass through a 0.2 micron filter. Both the solid phase and aqueous Fe pools undergo seasonal changes in redox state as a result of biological reduction by Fe-reducing microorganisms and oxidation by a variety of potential mechanisms, both abiotic and biotic. These redox cycles of solid and aqueous pools are not in phase: solid phase Fe became progressively more reduced from mid- to late summer, while aqueous phase Fe became reduced over the first half of the summer. It is well-known that HS interact with Fe, and that HS can act as electron shuttles in the reduction of Fe oxides. In other ecosystems chelated Fe(III) has been incubated with soil samples and the resulting Fe(II) produced is used as an indicator of the reducing power of HS. In these Fe-rich Arctic soils, HS are continuously in contact with chelated Fe, and therefore we interpret the redox state of this pool as an indicator of HS redox status. To verify this we conducted redox titrations of extracted HS with both reduced and oxidized Fe chelates and showed that chelated Fe could interact with HS both as electron acceptor and donator. In a field experiment, the addition of oxidized humic acids to soils resulted in an immediate oxidation of the aqueous Fe pool within 24 hours, which we attribute to abiotic oxidation of Fe by HS, followed by a slow reduction of this pool over the next week, presumably due to biological Fe reduction of the HS/aqueous Fe pool. At the end of summer

  13. The Irony of Iron - Biogenic Iron Oxides as an Iron Source to the Ocean.

    PubMed

    Emerson, David

    2015-01-01

    Primary productivity in at least a third of the sunlit open ocean is thought to be iron-limited. Primary sources of dissolved iron (dFe) to the ocean are hydrothermal venting, flux from the sediments along continental margins, and airborne dust. This article provides a general review of sources of hydrothermal and sedimentary iron to the ocean, and speculates upon the role that iron-cycling microbes play in controlling iron dynamics from these sources. Special attention is paid to iron-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) that live by oxidizing iron and producing biogenic iron oxides as waste products. The presence and ubiquity of FeOB both at hydrothermal systems and in sediments is only beginning to be appreciated. The biogenic oxides they produce have unique properties that could contribute significantly to the dynamics of dFe in the ocean. Changes in the physical and chemical characteristics of the ocean due to climate change and ocean acidification will undoubtedly impact the microbial iron cycle. A better understanding of the contemporary role of microbes in the iron cycle will help in predicting how these changes could ultimately influence marine primary productivity. PMID:26779157

  14. The Irony of Iron – Biogenic Iron Oxides as an Iron Source to the Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Emerson, David

    2016-01-01

    Primary productivity in at least a third of the sunlit open ocean is thought to be iron-limited. Primary sources of dissolved iron (dFe) to the ocean are hydrothermal venting, flux from the sediments along continental margins, and airborne dust. This article provides a general review of sources of hydrothermal and sedimentary iron to the ocean, and speculates upon the role that iron-cycling microbes play in controlling iron dynamics from these sources. Special attention is paid to iron-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) that live by oxidizing iron and producing biogenic iron oxides as waste products. The presence and ubiquity of FeOB both at hydrothermal systems and in sediments is only beginning to be appreciated. The biogenic oxides they produce have unique properties that could contribute significantly to the dynamics of dFe in the ocean. Changes in the physical and chemical characteristics of the ocean due to climate change and ocean acidification will undoubtedly impact the microbial iron cycle. A better understanding of the contemporary role of microbes in the iron cycle will help in predicting how these changes could ultimately influence marine primary productivity. PMID:26779157

  15. Removal of Metallic Iron on Oxide Slags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shannon, George N.; Fruehan, R. J.; Sridhar, Seetharaman

    2009-10-01

    It is possible, in some cases, for ground coal particles to react with gasifier gas during combustion, allowing the ash material in the coal to form phases besides the expected slag phase. One of these phases is metallic iron, because some gasifiers are designed to operate under a reducing atmosphere ({p_{O2}} of approximately 10-4 atm). Metallic iron can become entrained in the gas stream and deposit on, and foul, downstream equipment. To improve the understanding of the reaction between different metallic iron particles and gas, which eventually oxidizes them, and the slag that the resulting oxide dissolves in, the kinetics of iron reaction on slag were predicted using gas-phase mass-transfer limitations for the reaction and were compared with diffusion in the slag; the reaction itself was observed under confocal scanning laser microscopy. The expected rates for iron droplet removal are provided based on the size and effective partial pressure of oxygen, and it is found that decarburization occurs before iron reaction, leading to an extra 30- to 100-second delay for carbon-saturated particles vs pure iron particles. A pure metallic iron particle of 0.5 mg should be removed in about 220 seconds at 1400 °C and in 160 seconds at 1600 °C.

  16. Removal of metallic iron on oxide slags

    SciTech Connect

    Shannon, G.N.; Fruehan, R.J.; Sridhar, S.

    2009-10-15

    It is possible, in some cases, for ground coal particles to react with gasifier gas during combustion, allowing the ash material in the coal to form phases besides the expected slag phase. One of these phases is metallic iron, because some gasifiers are designed to operate under a reducing atmosphere (pO{sub 2}) of approximately 10{sup -4} atm). Metallic iron can become entrained in the gas stream and deposit on, and foul, downstream equipment. To improve the understanding of the reaction between different metallic iron particles and gas, which eventually oxidizes them, and the slag that the resulting oxide dissolves in, the kinetics of iron reaction on slag were predicted using gas-phase mass-transfer limitations for the reaction and were compared with diffusion in the slag; the reaction itself was observed under confocal scanning laser microscopy. The expected rates for iron droplet removal are provided based on the size and effective partial pressure of oxygen, and it is found that decarburization occurs before iron reaction, leading to an extra 30- to 100-second delay for carbon-saturated particles vs pure iron particles. A pure metallic iron particle of 0.5 mg should be removed in about 220 seconds at 1400{sup o}C and in 160 seconds at 1600{sup o}C.

  17. Exploring Microbial Iron Oxidation in Wetland Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Muyzer, G.; Bodelier, P. L. E.; den Oudsten, F.; Laanbroek, H. J.

    2009-04-01

    Iron is one of the most abundant elements on earth and is essential for life. Because of its importance, iron cycling and its interaction with other chemical and microbial processes has been the focus of many studies. Iron-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) have been detected in a wide variety of environments. Among those is the rhizosphere of wetland plants roots which release oxygen into the soil creating suboxic conditions required by these organisms. It has been reported that in these rhizosphere microbial iron oxidation proceeds up to four orders of magnitude faster than strictly abiotic oxidation. On the roots of these wetland plants iron plaques are formed by microbial iron oxidation which are involved in the sequestering of heavy metals as well organic pollutants, which of great environmental significance.Despite their important role being catalysts of iron-cycling in wetland environments, little is known about the diversity and distribution of iron-oxidizing bacteria in various environments. This study aimed at developing a PCR-DGGE assay enabling the detection of iron oxidizers in wetland habitats. Gradient tubes were used to enrich iron-oxidizing bacteria. From these enrichments, a clone library was established based on the almost complete 16s rRNA gene using the universal bacterial primers 27f and 1492r. This clone library consisted of mainly α- and β-Proteobacteria, among which two major clusters were closely related to Gallionella spp. Specific probes and primers were developed on the basis of this 16S rRNA gene clone library. The newly designed Gallionella-specific 16S rRNA gene primer set 122f/998r was applied to community DNA obtained from three contrasting wetland environments, and the PCR products were used in denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis. A second 16S rRNA gene clone library was constructed using the PCR products from one of our sampling sites amplified with the newly developed primer set 122f/998r. The cloned 16S rRNA gene

  18. Biogeochemistry of Iron Oxidation in a Circumneutral Freshwater Habitat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duckworth, O.; Homstrom, S.; Pena, J.; Zacharias, E.; Sposito, G.

    2007-12-01

    Iron(II) oxidation in natural waters at circumneutral pH, often regarded as an abiotic process, may be biologically- mediated when it occurs in iron-rich redox gradients. West Berry Creek, a small circumneutral tributary flowing through a mixed coniferous forest in Big Basin State Park, California, contains localized iron (hydr)oxide precipitates at points along its course where anoxic groundwater meets oxygenated creek water. These mixing zones establish redox gradients and iron-rich microbial mats that may create microenvironments that promote active biogeochemical cycling of Fe. Water sampling revealed strong correlations between the concentrations of aqueous inorganic species, suggesting a rock-weathering source for most of these solutes. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry detected significant concentrations of organic exudates, including low molecular mass organic acids and siderophores, indicating active biogeochemical cycling of iron is occurring in the creek. X-ray diffraction and elemental analysis showed the iron precipitates to be amorphous minerals, such as ferrihydrite. Microbial biofilm communities are associated with the iron (hydr)oxide deposits. Clone libraries developed from 16s rDNA sequences revealed the presence of microorganisms related to the neutrophilic iron- oxidizing bacteria Gallionella and Siderooxidans; in addition, micrographs suggest the widespread presence of sheath-forming bacteria (e.g., Leptothrix). Sequences from these libraries also indicated the presence of significant populations of organisms related to bacteria in the genera Pseudomonas, Sphingomonas, and Nitrospira. These geosymbiotic systems appear to be significant not only for the biogeochemical cycling of iron in the creek, but also for the cycling of organic species, inorganic nutrients, and trace metals.

  19. A pentanuclear iron catalyst designed for water oxidation.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Masaya; Kondo, Mio; Kuga, Reiko; Kurashige, Yuki; Yanai, Takeshi; Hayami, Shinya; Praneeth, Vijayendran K K; Yoshida, Masaki; Yoneda, Ko; Kawata, Satoshi; Masaoka, Shigeyuki

    2016-02-25

    Although the oxidation of water is efficiently catalysed by the oxygen-evolving complex in photosystem II (refs 1 and 2), it remains one of the main bottlenecks when aiming for synthetic chemical fuel production powered by sunlight or electricity. Consequently, the development of active and stable water oxidation catalysts is crucial, with heterogeneous systems considered more suitable for practical use and their homogeneous counterparts more suitable for targeted, molecular-level design guided by mechanistic understanding. Research into the mechanism of water oxidation has resulted in a range of synthetic molecular catalysts, yet there remains much interest in systems that use abundant, inexpensive and environmentally benign metals such as iron (the most abundant transition metal in the Earth's crust and found in natural and synthetic oxidation catalysts). Water oxidation catalysts based on mononuclear iron complexes have been explored, but they often deactivate rapidly and exhibit relatively low activities. Here we report a pentanuclear iron complex that efficiently and robustly catalyses water oxidation with a turnover frequency of 1,900 per second, which is about three orders of magnitude larger than that of other iron-based catalysts. Electrochemical analysis confirms the redox flexibility of the system, characterized by six different oxidation states between Fe(II)5 and Fe(III)5; the Fe(III)5 state is active for oxidizing water. Quantum chemistry calculations indicate that the presence of adjacent active sites facilitates O-O bond formation with a reaction barrier of less than ten kilocalories per mole. Although the need for a high overpotential and the inability to operate in water-rich solutions limit the practicality of the present system, our findings clearly indicate that efficient water oxidation catalysts based on iron complexes can be created by ensuring that the system has redox flexibility and contains adjacent water-activation sites. PMID:26863188

  20. A pentanuclear iron catalyst designed for water oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamura, Masaya; Kondo, Mio; Kuga, Reiko; Kurashige, Yuki; Yanai, Takeshi; Hayami, Shinya; Praneeth, Vijayendran K. K.; Yoshida, Masaki; Yoneda, Ko; Kawata, Satoshi; Masaoka, Shigeyuki

    2016-02-01

    Although the oxidation of water is efficiently catalysed by the oxygen-evolving complex in photosystem II (refs 1 and 2), it remains one of the main bottlenecks when aiming for synthetic chemical fuel production powered by sunlight or electricity. Consequently, the development of active and stable water oxidation catalysts is crucial, with heterogeneous systems considered more suitable for practical use and their homogeneous counterparts more suitable for targeted, molecular-level design guided by mechanistic understanding. Research into the mechanism of water oxidation has resulted in a range of synthetic molecular catalysts, yet there remains much interest in systems that use abundant, inexpensive and environmentally benign metals such as iron (the most abundant transition metal in the Earth’s crust and found in natural and synthetic oxidation catalysts). Water oxidation catalysts based on mononuclear iron complexes have been explored, but they often deactivate rapidly and exhibit relatively low activities. Here we report a pentanuclear iron complex that efficiently and robustly catalyses water oxidation with a turnover frequency of 1,900 per second, which is about three orders of magnitude larger than that of other iron-based catalysts. Electrochemical analysis confirms the redox flexibility of the system, characterized by six different oxidation states between FeII5 and FeIII5; the FeIII5 state is active for oxidizing water. Quantum chemistry calculations indicate that the presence of adjacent active sites facilitates O-O bond formation with a reaction barrier of less than ten kilocalories per mole. Although the need for a high overpotential and the inability to operate in water-rich solutions limit the practicality of the present system, our findings clearly indicate that efficient water oxidation catalysts based on iron complexes can be created by ensuring that the system has redox flexibility and contains adjacent water-activation sites.

  1. Microbially Induced Iron Oxidation: What, Where, How

    SciTech Connect

    SCHIERMEYER,ELISA M.; PROVENCIO,PAULA P.; NORTHUP,DIANA E.

    2000-08-15

    From the results of the different bacterial cells seen, it is fairly certain that Gallionella is present because of the bean-shaped cells and twisted stalks found with the TEM. The authors cannot confirm, though, what other iron-oxidizing genera exist in the tubes, since the media was only preferential and not one that isolated a specific genus of bacteria. Based on the environment in which they live and the source of the water, they believe their cultures contain Gallionella, Leptothrix, and possibly Crenothrix and Sphaerotilus. They believe the genus Leptothrix rather than Sphaerotilus exist in the tubes because the water source was fresh, unlike the polluted water in which Sphaerotilus are usually found. The TEM preparations worked well. The cryogenic method rapidly froze the cells in place and allowed them to view their morphology. The FAA method, as stated previously, was the best of the three methods because it gave the best contrast. The gluteraldehyde samples did not come out as well. It is possible that the gluteraldehyde the authors prepared was still too concentrated and did not mix well. Although these bacteria were collected from springs and then cultured in an environment containing a presumably pure iron-bearing metal, it seems the tube already containing Manganese Gradient Medium could be used with a piece of metal containing these bacteria. A small piece of corroding metal could then be inserted into the test tube and cultured to study the bacteria.

  2. Evidence of cell surface iron speciation of acidophilic iron-oxidizing microorganisms in indirect bioleaching process.

    PubMed

    Nie, Zhen-yuan; Liu, Hong-chang; Xia, Jin-lan; Yang, Yi; Zhen, Xiang-jun; Zhang, Li-Juan; Qiu, Guan-zhou

    2016-02-01

    While indirect model has been widely accepted in bioleaching, but the evidence of cell surface iron speciation has not been reported. In the present work the iron speciation on the cell surfaces of four typically acidophilic iron-oxidizing microorganism (mesophilic Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans ATCC 23270, moderately thermophilic Leptospirillum ferriphilum YSK and Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans St, and extremely thermophilic Acidianus manzaensis YN25) grown on different energy substrates (chalcopyrite, pyrite, ferrous sulfate and elemental sulfur (S(0))) were studied in situ firstly by using synchrotron-based micro- X-ray fluorescence analysis and X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy. Results showed that the cells grown on iron-containing substrates had apparently higher surface iron content than the cells grown on S(0). Both ferrous iron and ferric iron were detected on the cell surface of all tested AIOMs, and the Fe(II)/Fe(III) ratios of the same microorganism were affected by different energy substrates. The iron distribution and bonding state of single cell of A. manzaensis were then studied in situ by scanning transmission soft X-ray microscopy based on dual-energy contrast analysis and stack analysis. Results showed that the iron species distributed evenly on the cell surface and bonded with amino, carboxyl and hydroxyl groups. PMID:26645388

  3. Multimodal Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for Hybrid Biomedical Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Heidt, Timo; Nahrendorf, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Iron oxide core nanoparticles are attractive imaging agents because their material properties allow the tuning of pharmacokinetics as well as attachment of multiple moieties to their surface. In addition to affinity ligands, these include fluorochromes and radioisotopes for detection with optical and nuclear imaging. As the iron oxide core can be detected by MRI, options for combining imaging modalities are manifold. Already, preclinical imaging strategies combine non-invasive imaging with higher resolution techniques such as intravital microscopy to gain unprecedented insight into steady state biology and disease. Going forward, hybrid iron oxide nanoparticles will likely help to merge modalities, creating a synergy that enables imaging in basic research and, potentially, also in the clinic. PMID:23065771

  4. Metal ion binding to iron oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponthieu, M.; Juillot, F.; Hiemstra, T.; van Riemsdijk, W. H.; Benedetti, M. F.

    2006-06-01

    The biogeochemistry of trace elements (TE) is largely dependent upon their interaction with heterogeneous ligands including metal oxides and hydrous oxides of iron. The modeling of TE interactions with iron oxides has been pursued using a variety of chemical models. The objective of this work is to show that it is possible to model the adsorption of protons and TE on a crystallized oxide (i.e., goethite) and on an amorphous oxide (HFO) in an identical way. Here, we use the CD-MUSIC approach in combination with valuable and reliable surface spectroscopy information about the nature of surface complexes of the TE. The other objective of this work is to obtain generic parameters to describe the binding of the following elements (Cd, Co, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn) onto both iron oxides for the CD-MUSIC approach. The results show that a consistent description of proton and metal ion binding is possible for goethite and HFO with the same set of model parameters. In general a good prediction of almost all the collected experimental data sets corresponding to metal ion binding to HFO is obtained. Moreover, dominant surface species are in agreement with the recently published surface complexes derived from X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) data. Until more detailed information on the structure of the two iron oxides is available, the present option seems a reasonable approximation and can be used to describe complex geochemical systems. To improve our understanding and modeling of multi-component systems we need more data obtained at much lower metal ion to iron oxide ratios in order to be able to account eventually for sites that are not always characterized in spectroscopic studies.

  5. Iron oxides in human spleen.

    PubMed

    Kopáni, Martin; Miglierini, Marcel; Lančok, Adriana; Dekan, Július; Čaplovicová, Mária; Jakubovský, Ján; Boča, Roman; Mrazova, Hedviga

    2015-10-01

    Iron is an essential element for fundamental cell functions and a catalyst for chemical reactions. Three samples extracted from the human spleen were investigated by scanning (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Mössbauer spectrometry (MS), and SQUID magnetometry. The sample with diagnosis of hemosiderosis (H) differs from that referring to hereditary spherocytosis and the reference sample. SEM reveals iron-rich micrometer-sized aggregate of various structures-tiny fibrils in hereditary spherocytosis sample and no fibrils in hemochromatosis. Hematite and magnetite particles from 2 to 6 μm in TEM with diffraction in all samples were shown. The SQUID magnetometry shows different amount of diamagnetic, paramagnetic and ferrimagnetic structures in the tissues. The MS results indicate contribution of ferromagnetically split sextets for all investigated samples. Their occurrence indicates that at least part of the sample is magnetically ordered below the critical temperature. The iron accumulation process is different in hereditary spherocytosis and hemosiderosis. This fact may be the reason of different iron crystallization. PMID:26292972

  6. The fate of arsenic adsorbed on iron oxides in the presence of arsenite-oxidizing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhennan; Yin, Naiyi; Du, Huili; Cai, Xiaolin; Cui, Yanshan

    2016-05-01

    Arsenic (As) is a redox-active metalloid whose toxicity and mobility in soil depend on its oxidation state. Arsenite [As(III)] can be oxidized by microbes and adsorbed by minerals in the soil. However, the combined effects of these abiotic and biotic processes are not well understood. In this study, the fate of arsenic in the presence of an isolated As(III)-oxidizing bacterium (Pseudomonas sp. HN-1, 10(9) colony-forming units (CFUs)·ml(-1)) and three iron oxides (goethite, hematite, and magnetite at 1.6 g L(-1)) was determined using batch experiments. The total As adsorption by iron oxides was lower with bacteria present and was higher with iron oxides alone. The total As adsorption decreased by 78.6%, 36.0% and 79.7% for goethite, hematite and magnetite, respectively, due to the presence of bacteria. As(III) adsorbed on iron oxides could also be oxidized by Pseudomonas sp. HN-1, but the oxidation rate (1.3 μmol h(-1)) was much slower than the rate in the aqueous phase (96.2 μmol h(-1)). Therefore, the results of other studies with minerals only might overestimate the adsorptive capacity of solids in natural systems; the presence of minerals might hinder As(III) oxidation by microbes. Under aerobic conditions, in the presence of iron oxides and As(III)-oxidizing bacteria, arsenic is adsorbed onto iron oxides within the adsorption capacity, and As(V) is the primary form in the solid and aqueous phases. PMID:26933901

  7. Catalytic iron oxide for lime regeneration in carbonaceous fuel combustion

    DOEpatents

    Shen, Ming-Shing; Yang, Ralph T.

    1980-01-01

    Lime utilization for sulfurous oxides absorption in fluidized combustion of carbonaceous fuels is improved by impregnation of porous lime particulates with iron oxide. The impregnation is achieved by spraying an aqueous solution of mixed iron sulfate and sulfite on the limestone before transfer to the fluidized bed combustor, whereby the iron compounds react with the limestone substrate to form iron oxide at the limestone surface. It is found that iron oxide present in the spent limestone acts as a catalyst to regenerate the spent limestone in a reducing environment. With only small quantities of iron oxide the calcium can be recycled at a significantly increased rate.

  8. The oxidized state of the nanocomposite Carbo-Iron® causes no adverse effects on growth, survival and differential gene expression in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Weil, Mirco; Meißner, Tobias; Busch, Wibke; Springer, Armin; Kühnel, Dana; Schulz, Ralf; Duis, Karen

    2015-10-15

    For degradation of halogenated chemicals in groundwater Carbo-Iron®, a composite of activated carbon and nano-sized Fe(0), was developed (Mackenzie et al., 2012). Potential effects of this nanocomposite on fish were assessed. Beyond the contaminated zone Fe(0) can be expected to have oxidized and Carbo-Iron was used in its oxidized form in ecotoxicological tests. Potential effects of Carbo Iron in zebrafish (Danio rerio) were investigated using a 48 h embryo toxicity test under static conditions, a 96 h acute test with adult fish under semi-static conditions and a 34 d fish early life stage test (FELST) in a flow-through system. Particle diameters in test suspensions were determined via dynamic light scattering (DLS) and ranged from 266 to 497 nm. Particle concentrations were measured weekly in samples from the FELST using a method based on the count rate in DLS. Additionally, uptake of particles into test organisms was investigated using microscopic methods. Furthermore, effects of Carbo-Iron on gene expression were investigated by microarray analysis in zebrafish embryos. In all tests performed, no significant lethal effects were observed. Furthermore, Carbo-Iron had no significant influence on weight and length of fish as determined in the FELST. In the embryo test and the early life stage test, growth of fungi on the chorion was observed at Carbo-Iron concentrations between 6.3 and 25mg/L. Fungal growth did not affect survival, hatching success and growth. In the embryo test, no passage of Carbo-Iron particles into the perivitelline space or the embryo was observed. In juvenile and adult fish, Carbo-Iron was detected in the gut at the end of exposure. In juvenile fish exposed to Carbo-Iron for 29 d and subsequently kept for 5d in control water, Carbo-Iron was no longer detectable in the gut. Global gene expression in zebrafish embryos was not significantly influenced by Carbo-Iron. PMID:26042533

  9. Defluoridation by Bacteriogenic Iron Oxides: Sorption Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, K.; Ferris, F.

    2009-05-01

    At concentrations above 1 mg/L, fluoride in drinking water can lead to dental and skeletal fluorosis, a disease that causes mottling of the teeth, calcification of ligaments, crippling bone deformities and many other physiological disorders that can, ultimately, lead to death. Conservative estimates are that fluorosis afflicts tens of millions of people worldwide. As there is no treatment for fluorosis, prevention is the only means of controlling the disease. While numerous defluoridation techniques have been explored, no single method has been found to be both effective and inexpensive enough to implement widely. Our research began in India, with a large-scale geochemical study of the groundwater in a fluoride-contaminated region of Orissa. Having developed a better understanding of the geochemical relationships that exist between fluoride and other parameters present in an affected area, as well as the complex relationships that arise among those parameters that can impact the presence of fluoride, we began investigating certain remediation scenarios involving iron oxides. A common approach to remediation involves the partitioning of fluoride from groundwater by sorption onto a variety of materials, one of the most effective of which is iron oxide whose surface area acts as a scavenger for fluoride. In the presence of iron oxidizing bacteria, the oxidation rate of iron has been shown to be ˜6 times greater than in their absence; fluoride should, therefore, be removed from an aqueous environment by bacteriogenic iron oxides (BIOS) much more quickly than by abiotic iron oxides. Most recently, sorption studies have been conducted using both BIOS and synthetic hydrous ferric oxides in order to compare the behavior between biotic and abiotic sorbents. These studies have provided sorption isotherms that allow comparison of fluoride removed by sorption to BIOS versus synthetic iron oxides. Sorption affinity constants have also been determined, which allow for the

  10. The Iron-Catalyzed Oxidation of Hydrazine by Nitric Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Karraker, D.G.

    2001-07-17

    To assess the importance of iron to hydrazine stability, the study of hydrazine oxidation by nitric acid has been extended to investigate the iron-catalyzed oxidation. This report describes those results.

  11. 21 CFR 73.1200 - Synthetic iron oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Synthetic iron oxide. 73.1200 Section 73.1200 Food... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1200 Synthetic iron oxide. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive synthetic iron oxide consists of any one or any combination of synthetically...

  12. 21 CFR 73.1200 - Synthetic iron oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Synthetic iron oxide. 73.1200 Section 73.1200 Food... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1200 Synthetic iron oxide. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive synthetic iron oxide consists of any one or any combination of synthetically...

  13. 21 CFR 73.200 - Synthetic iron oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Synthetic iron oxide. 73.200 Section 73.200 Food... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.200 Synthetic iron oxide. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive synthetic iron oxide consists of any one or any combination of synthetically...

  14. 21 CFR 73.200 - Synthetic iron oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Synthetic iron oxide. 73.200 Section 73.200 Food... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.200 Synthetic iron oxide. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive synthetic iron oxide consists of any one or any combination of synthetically...

  15. 21 CFR 73.200 - Synthetic iron oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Synthetic iron oxide. 73.200 Section 73.200 Food... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.200 Synthetic iron oxide. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive synthetic iron oxide consists of any one or any combination of synthetically...

  16. 21 CFR 73.200 - Synthetic iron oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Synthetic iron oxide. 73.200 Section 73.200 Food... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.200 Synthetic iron oxide. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive synthetic iron oxide consists of any one or any combination of synthetically...

  17. 21 CFR 73.1200 - Synthetic iron oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Synthetic iron oxide. 73.1200 Section 73.1200 Food... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1200 Synthetic iron oxide. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive synthetic iron oxide consists of any one or any combination of synthetically...

  18. 21 CFR 73.200 - Synthetic iron oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Synthetic iron oxide. 73.200 Section 73.200 Food... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.200 Synthetic iron oxide. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive synthetic iron oxide consists of any one or any combination of synthetically...

  19. 21 CFR 73.1200 - Synthetic iron oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Synthetic iron oxide. 73.1200 Section 73.1200 Food... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1200 Synthetic iron oxide. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive synthetic iron oxide consists of any one or any combination of synthetically...

  20. 21 CFR 73.1200 - Synthetic iron oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Synthetic iron oxide. 73.1200 Section 73.1200 Food... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1200 Synthetic iron oxide. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive synthetic iron oxide consists of any one or any combination of synthetically...

  1. Acid monolayer functionalized iron oxide nanoparticle catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikenberry, Myles

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle functionalization is an area of intensely active research, with applications across disciplines such as biomedical science and heterogeneous catalysis. This work demonstrates the functionalization of iron oxide nanoparticles with a quasi-monolayer of 11-sulfoundecanoic acid, 10-phosphono-1-decanesulfonic acid, and 11-aminoundecanoic acid. The carboxylic and phosphonic moieties form bonds to the iron oxide particle core, while the sulfonic acid groups face outward where they are available for catalysis. The particles were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), potentiometric titration, diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS), inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS), and dynamic light scattering (DLS). The sulfonic acid functionalized particles were used to catalyze the hydrolysis of sucrose at 80° and starch at 130°, showing a higher activity per acid site than the traditional solid acid catalyst Amberlyst-15, and comparing well against results reported in the literature for sulfonic acid functionalized mesoporous silicas. In sucrose catalysis reactions, the phosphonic-sulfonic nanoparticles (PSNPs) were seen to be incompletely recovered by an external magnetic field, while the carboxylic-sulfonic nanoparticles (CSNPs) showed a trend of increasing activity over the first four recycle runs. Between the two sulfonic ligands, the phosphonates produced a more tightly packed monolayer, which corresponded to a higher sulfonic acid loading, lower agglomeration, lower recoverability through application of an external magnetic field, and higher activity per acid site for the hydrolysis of starch. Functionalizations with 11-aminoundecanoic acid resulted in some amine groups binding to the surfaces of iron oxide nanoparticles. This amine binding is commonly ignored in iron oxide

  2. Iron oxide from a seasonally anoxic lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tipping, E.; Woof, C.; Cooke, D.

    1981-09-01

    The ferric oxide formed by oxidation of Fe(II) in Esthwaite Water, U.K., during the lake's seasonal thermal stratification and deep-water anoxia consists of amorphous particles which are approximately spherical or ellipsoidal, with diameters in the range 0.05-0.5 μm. Concentrations in the lake are 1011-1012 particles per litre, corresponding to 3 mg l-1 Fe. Unlike iron oxides of similar chemical composition formed by oxidative mechanisms in soil-borne waters, the particles do not appear to be composed of small primary particles. This is possibly because in the lake they form slowly, at low supersaturation. The particles contain 30-40% by weight Fe. The carbon content is uncertain because of contamination but is in the range 4-18%. Humic carbon contributes at least 4-7% of the total weight. Other major elements present are P, N, Mn, Si, S. Ca and Mg, comprising between them up to 8% of the total weight. The particles are negatively charged probably because of adsorbed humic substances, and also phosphate and silicate. Their electrophoretic mobility-pH dependence is similar to those of synthetic iron oxides added to samples of surface Esthwaite Water. The calculated zeta potential is - 27 mV, which is sufficiently high to make flocculation slow under lake conditions. The low flocculation rate partially accounts for the formation of a well-defined peak of particulate iron in the water column of the lake.

  3. Formulations for iron oxides dissolution

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, Earl P.; Chiarizia, Renato

    1992-01-01

    A mixture of a di- or polyphosphonic acid and a reductant wherein each is present in a sufficient amount to provide a synergistic effect with respect to the dissolution of metal oxides and optionally containing corrosion inhibitors and pH adjusting agents.

  4. Oxidation State 10 Exists.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haoyu S; Truhlar, Donald G

    2016-07-25

    In a recent paper, Wang et al. found an iridium-containing compound with a formal oxidation state of 9. This is the highest oxidation state ever found in a stable compound. To learn if this is the highest chemical oxidation state possible, Kohn-Sham density functional theory was used to study various compounds, including PdO4 (2+) , PtO4 (2+) , PtO3 F2 (2+) , PtO4 OH(+) , PtO5 , and PtO4 SH(+) , in which the metal has an oxidation state of 10. It was found that PtO4 (2+) has a metastable state that is kinetically stable with a barrier height for decomposition of 31 kcal mol(-1) and a calculated lifetime of 0.9 years. All other compounds studied would readily decompose to lower oxidation states. PMID:27273799

  5. Quantitative determination of the oxidation state of iron in biotite using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy: I. Calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Raeburn, S.P.; Ilton, E.S.; Veblen, D.R.

    1997-11-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses of Fe(III)/{Sigma}Fe were calibrated with nine single crystals of biotite of known Fe(III)/{Sigma}Fe content. Peak shape parameters for the component Fe{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+} Fe 3p peaks were obtained by a constrained lease squares fitting method that minimized the difference between Fe(III)/{Sigma}Fe determined by XPS and wet chemistry/electron microprobe (WCEM) analyses. Fe{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+} peak separation was estimated from the separation of minima in the second derivative of Fe 3p spectra. The single set of derived peak parameters yielded a good linear correlation (r = 0.87) between XPS and WCEM values over the sample displaying progressive oxidation during XPS analysis resulted in Fe{sup 2} and Fe{sup 3+} component peak shapes largely consistent with the constrained least squares fitting methods. Beam damage, which appeared to be restricted to three single crystals with low {Sigma}Fe, low Fe/Mg, and high Fe(II)/{Sigma}Fe, caused increases in Fe(III)/{Sigma}Fe that were proportional to the duration of sample exposure. 60 refs., 6 figs., 7 tabs.

  6. Quantitative determination of the oxidation state of iron in biotite using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy: II. In situ analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Raeburn, S.P. |; Ilton, E.S.; Veblen, D.R.

    1997-11-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to determine Fe(III)/{Sigma}Fe in individual biotite crystals in thin sections of ten metapelites and one syenite. The in situ XPS analyses of Fe(III)/{Sigma}Fe in biotite crystals in the metapelites were compared with published Fe(III)/{Sigma}Fe values determined by Moessbauer spectroscopy (MS) for mineral separates from the same hand samples. The difference between Fe(III)/{Sigma}Fe by the two techniques was greatest for samples with the lowest Fe(III)/{Sigma}Fe (by MS). For eight metamorphic biotites with Fe(III)/{Sigma}Fe = 9-27% comparison of the two techniques yielded a linear correlation of r = 0.94 and a statistically acceptable fit of [Fe(III)/{Sigma}Fe]{sub xps} = [Fe(III)/{Sigma}Fe]{sub ms}. The difference between Fe(III)/{Sigma}Fe by the two techniques was greater for two samples with Fe(III)/{Sigma}Fe {le} 6% (by MS). For biotite in the syenite sample, Fe(III)/{Sigma}Fe determined by both in situ XPS and bulk wet chemistry/electron probe microanalysis were similar. This contribution demonstrates that XPS can be used to analyze bulk Fe(III)/{Sigma}Fe in minerals in thin sections when appropriate precautions taken to avoid oxidation of the near-surface during preparation of samples. 25 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Near-Infrared Excited State Dynamics of Melanins: The Effects of Iron Content, Photo-Damage, Chemical Oxidation, and Aggregate Size

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Ultrafast pump–probe measurements can discriminate the two forms of melanin found in biological tissue (eumelanin and pheomelanin), which may be useful for diagnosing and grading melanoma. However, recent work has shown that bound iron content changes eumelanin’s pump–probe response, making it more similar to that of pheomelanin. Here we record the pump–probe response of these melanins at a wider range of wavelengths than previous work and show that with shorter pump wavelengths the response crosses over from being dominated by ground-state bleaching to being dominated by excited-state absorption. The crossover wavelength is different for each type of melanin. In our analysis, we found that the mechanism by which iron modifies eumelanin’s pump–probe response cannot be attributed to Raman resonances or differences in melanin aggregation and is more likely caused by iron acting to broaden the unit spectra of individual chromophores in the heterogeneous melanin aggregate. We analyze the dependence on optical intensity, finding that iron-loaded eumelanin undergoes irreversible changes to the pump–probe response after intense laser exposure. Simultaneously acquired fluorescence data suggest that the previously reported “activation” of eumelanin fluorescence may be caused in part by the dissociation of metal ions or the selective degradation of iron-containing melanin. PMID:24446774

  8. IRON OXIDE NANOPARTICLE-INDUCED OXIDATIVE STRESS AND INFLAMMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    1. Nanoparticle Physicochemical Characterizations
    2. We first focused on creating NP systems that could be used to test our hypotheses and assessing their stability in aqueous media. The iron oxide NP systems were not stable in cell culture medium o...

    3. Method for preparing hydrous iron oxide gels and spherules

      DOEpatents

      Collins, Jack L.; Lauf, Robert J.; Anderson, Kimberly K.

      2003-07-29

      The present invention is directed to methods for preparing hydrous iron oxide spherules, hydrous iron oxide gels such as gel slabs, films, capillary and electrophoresis gels, iron monohydrogen phosphate spherules, hydrous iron oxide spherules having suspendable particles homogeneously embedded within to form composite sorbents and catalysts, iron monohydrogen phosphate spherules having suspendable particles of at least one different sorbent homogeneously embedded within to form a composite sorbent, iron oxide spherules having suspendable particles homogeneously embedded within to form a composite of hydrous iron oxide fiber materials, iron oxide fiber materials, hydrous iron oxide fiber materials having suspendable particles homogeneously embedded within to form a composite, iron oxide fiber materials having suspendable particles homogeneously embedded within to form a composite, dielectric spherules of barium, strontium, and lead ferrites and mixtures thereof, and composite catalytic spherules of barium or strontium ferrite embedded with oxides of Mg, Zn, Pb, Ce and mixtures thereof. These variations of hydrous iron oxide spherules and gel forms prepared by the gel-sphere, internal gelation process offer more useful forms of inorganic ion exchangers, catalysts, getters, dielectrics, and ceramics.

    4. Methyltrimethoxysilane (MTMS)-based silica-iron oxide superhydrophobic nanocomposites.

      PubMed

      Nadargi, Digambar; Gurav, Jyoti; Marioni, Miguel A; Romer, Sara; Matam, Santhosh; Koebel, Matthias M

      2015-12-01

      We report a facile synthesis of superhydrophobic silica-iron oxide nanocomposites via a co-precursor sol-gel process. The choice of the silica precursor (Methyltrimethoxysilane, MTMS) in combination with iron nitrate altered the pore structure dramatically. The influence of iron oxide doping on the structural properties of pristine MTMS aerogel is discussed. PMID:26277744

    5. Planktonic marine iron oxidizers drive iron mineralization under low-oxygen conditions.

      PubMed

      Field, E K; Kato, S; Findlay, A J; MacDonald, D J; Chiu, B K; Luther, G W; Chan, C S

      2016-09-01

      Observations of modern microbes have led to several hypotheses on how microbes precipitated the extensive iron formations in the geologic record, but we have yet to resolve the exact microbial contributions. An initial hypothesis was that cyanobacteria produced oxygen which oxidized iron abiotically; however, in modern environments such as microbial mats, where Fe(II) and O2 coexist, we commonly find microaerophilic chemolithotrophic iron-oxidizing bacteria producing Fe(III) oxyhydroxides. This suggests that such iron oxidizers could have inhabited niches in ancient coastal oceans where Fe(II) and O2 coexisted, and therefore contributed to banded iron formations (BIFs) and other ferruginous deposits. However, there is currently little evidence for planktonic marine iron oxidizers in modern analogs. Here, we demonstrate successful cultivation of planktonic microaerophilic iron-oxidizing Zetaproteobacteria from the Chesapeake Bay during seasonal stratification. Iron oxidizers were associated with low oxygen concentrations and active iron redox cycling in the oxic-anoxic transition zone (<3 μm O2 , <0.2 μm H2 S). While cyanobacteria were also detected in this transition zone, oxygen concentrations were too low to support significant rates of abiotic iron oxidation. Cyanobacteria may be providing oxygen for microaerophilic iron oxidation through a symbiotic relationship; at high Fe(II) levels, cyanobacteria would gain protection against Fe(II) toxicity. A Zetaproteobacteria isolate from this site oxidized iron at rates sufficient to account for deposition of geologic iron formations. In sum, our results suggest that once oxygenic photosynthesis evolved, microaerophilic chemolithotrophic iron oxidizers were likely important drivers of iron mineralization in ancient oceans. PMID:27384464

    6. Nitric oxide and plant iron homeostasis.

      PubMed

      Buet, Agustina; Simontacchi, Marcela

      2015-03-01

      Like all living organisms, plants demand iron (Fe) for important biochemical and metabolic processes. Internal imbalances, as a consequence of insufficient or excess Fe in the environment, lead to growth restriction and affect crop yield. Knowledge of signals and factors affecting each step in Fe uptake from the soil and distribution (long-distance transport, remobilization from old to young leaves, and storage in seeds) is necessary to improve our understanding of plant mineral nutrition. In this context, the role of nitric oxide (NO) is discussed as a key player in maintaining Fe homeostasis through its cross talk with hormones, ferritin, and frataxin and the ability to form nitrosyl-iron complexes. PMID:25612116

    7. Phase Formation Behavior in Ultrathin Iron Oxide.

      PubMed

      Jõgi, Indrek; Jacobsson, T Jesper; Fondell, Mattis; Wätjen, Timo; Carlsson, Jan-Otto; Boman, Mats; Edvinsson, Tomas

      2015-11-17

      Nanostructured iron oxides, and especially hematite, are interesting for a wide range of applications ranging from gas sensors to renewable solar hydrogen production. A promising method for deposition of low-dimensional films is atomic layer deposition (ALD). Although a potent technique, ALD of ultrathin films is critically sensitive to the substrate and temperature conditions where initial formation of islands and crystallites influences the properties of the films. In this work, deposition at the border of the ALD window forming a hybrid ALD/pulsed CVD (pCVD) deposition is utilized to obtain a deposition less sensitive to the substrate. A thorough analysis of iron oxide phases formation on two different substrates, Si(100) and SiO2, was performed. Films between 3 and 50 nm were deposited and analyzed with diffraction techniques, high-resolution Raman spectroscopy, and optical spectroscopy. Below 10 nm nominal film thickness, island formation and phase dependent particle crystallization impose constraints for deposition of phase pure iron oxides on non-lattice-matching substrates. Films between 10 and 20 nm thickness on SiO2 could effectively be recrystallized into hematite whereas for the corresponding films on Si(100), no recrystallization occurred. For films thicker than 20 nm, phase pure hematite can be formed directly with ALD/pCVD with very low influence of the substrate on either Si or SiO2. For more lattice matched substrates such as SnO2:F, Raman spectroscopy indicated formation of the hematite phase already for films with 3 nm nominal thickness and clearly for 6 nm films. Analysis of the optical properties corroborated the analysis and showed a quantum confined blue-shift of the absorption edge for the thinnest films. PMID:26506091

    8. Interactions between sub-10-nm iron and cerium oxide nanoparticles and 3T3 fibroblasts: the role of the coating and aggregation state

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Safi, M.; Sarrouj, H.; Sandre, O.; Mignet, N.; Berret, J.-F.

      2010-04-01

      Recent nanotoxicity studies revealed that the physico-chemical characteristics of engineered nanomaterials play an important role in the interactions with living cells. Here, we report on the toxicity and uptake of cerium and iron oxide sub-10-nm nanoparticles by NIH/3T3 mouse fibroblasts. Coating strategies include low-molecular weight ligands (citric acid) and polymers (poly(acrylic acid), MW = 2000 g mol - 1). Electrostatically adsorbed on the surfaces, the organic moieties provide a negatively charged coating in physiological conditions. We find that most particles were biocompatible, as exposed cells remained 100% viable relative to controls. Only the bare and the citrate-coated nanoceria exhibit a slight decrease in mitochondrial activity at very high cerium concentrations (>1 g l - 1). We also observe that the citrate-coated particles are internalized/adsorbed by the cells in large amounts, typically 250 pg/cell after 24 h incubation for iron oxide. In contrast, the polymer-coated particles are taken up at much lower rates (<30 pg/cell). The strong uptake shown by the citrated particles is related to the destabilization of the dispersions in the cell culture medium and their sedimentation down to the cell membranes. In conclusion, we show that the uptake of nanomaterials by living cells depends on the coating of the particles and on its ability to preserve the colloidal nature of the dispersions.

    9. Iron isotope constraints on the Archean and Paleoproterozoic ocean redox state.

      PubMed

      Rouxel, Olivier J; Bekker, Andrey; Edwards, Katrina J

      2005-02-18

      The response of the ocean redox state to the rise of atmospheric oxygen about 2.3 billion years ago (Ga) is a matter of controversy. Here we provide iron isotope evidence that the change in the ocean iron cycle occurred at the same time as the change in the atmospheric redox state. Variable and negative iron isotope values in pyrites older than about 2.3 Ga suggest that an iron-rich global ocean was strongly affected by the deposition of iron oxides. Between 2.3 and 1.8 Ga, positive iron isotope values of pyrite likely reflect an increase in the precipitation of iron sulfides relative to iron oxides in a redox stratified ocean. PMID:15718467

    10. Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for biomedical applications.

      PubMed

      Laurent, Sophie; Bridot, Jean-Luc; Elst, Luce Vander; Muller, Robert N

      2010-03-01

      Due to their high magnetization, superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles induce an important decrease in the transverse relaxation of water protons and are, therefore, very efficient negative MRI contrast agents. The knowledge and control of the chemical and physical characteristics of nanoparticles are of great importance. The choice of the synthesis method (microemulsions, sol-gel synthesis, laser pyrolysis, sonochemical synthesis or coprecipitation) determines the magnetic nanoparticle's size and shape, as well as its size distribution and surface chemistry. Nanoparticles can be used for numerous in vivo applications, such as MRI contrast enhancement and hyperthermia drug delivery. New developments focus on targeting through molecular imaging and cell tracking. PMID:21426176

    11. Suspension Hydrogen Reduction of Iron Oxide Concentrates

      SciTech Connect

      H.Y. Sohn

      2008-03-31

      The objective of the project is to develop a new ironmaking technology based on hydrogen and fine iron oxide concentrates in a suspension reduction process. The ultimate objective of the new technology is to replace the blast furnace and to drastically reduce CO2 emissions in the steel industry. The goals of this phase of development are; the performance of detailed material and energy balances, thermochemical and equilibrium calculations for sulfur and phosphorus impurities, the determination of the complete kinetics of hydrogen reduction and bench-scale testing of the suspension reduction process using a large laboratory flash reactor.

    12. Cardioprotective activity of iron oxide nanoparticles

      PubMed Central

      Xiong, Fei; Wang, Hao; Feng, Yidong; Li, Yunman; Hua, Xiaoqing; Pang, Xingyun; Zhang, Song; Song, Lina; Zhang, Yu; Gu, Ning

      2015-01-01

      Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) are chemically inert materials and have been mainly used for imaging applications and drug deliveries. However, the possibility whether they can be used as therapeutic drugs themselves has not yet been explored. We reported here that Fe2O3 nanoparticles (NPs) can protect hearts from ischemic damage at the animal, tissue and cell level. The cardioprotective activity of Fe2O3 NPs requires the integrity of nanoparticles and is not dependent upon their surface charges and molecules that were integrated into nanoparticles. Also, Fe2O3 NPs showed no significant toxicity towards normal cardiomyocytes, indicative of their potential to treat cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25716309

    13. Mineral resource of the month: iron oxide pigments

      USGS Publications Warehouse

      U.S. Geological Survey

      2008-01-01

      The article discusses iron oxide pigments, which have been used as colorants since human began painting as they resist color change due to sunlight exposure, have good chemical resistance and are stable under normal ambient conditions. Cyprus, Italy and Spain are among the countries that are known for the production of iron oxide pigments. Granular forms of iron oxides and nano-sized materials are cited as developments in the synthetic iron oxide pigment industry which are being used in computer disk drives and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging.

    14. A Diatom Ferritin Optimized for Iron Oxidation but Not Iron Storage.

      PubMed

      Pfaffen, Stephanie; Bradley, Justin M; Abdulqadir, Raz; Firme, Marlo R; Moore, Geoffrey R; Le Brun, Nick E; Murphy, Michael E P

      2015-11-20

      Ferritin from the marine pennate diatom Pseudo-nitzschia multiseries (PmFTN) plays a key role in sustaining growth in iron-limited ocean environments. The di-iron catalytic ferroxidase center of PmFTN (sites A and B) has a nearby third iron site (site C) in an arrangement typically observed in prokaryotic ferritins. Here we demonstrate that Glu-44, a site C ligand, and Glu-130, a residue that bridges iron bound at sites B and C, limit the rate of post-oxidation reorganization of iron coordination and the rate at which Fe(3+) exits the ferroxidase center for storage within the mineral core. The latter, in particular, severely limits the overall rate of iron mineralization. Thus, the diatom ferritin is optimized for initial Fe(2+) oxidation but not for mineralization, pointing to a role for this protein in buffering iron availability and facilitating iron-sparing rather than only long-term iron storage. PMID:26396187

  1. A Diatom Ferritin Optimized for Iron Oxidation but Not Iron Storage*

    PubMed Central

    Pfaffen, Stephanie; Bradley, Justin M.; Abdulqadir, Raz; Firme, Marlo R.; Moore, Geoffrey R.; Le Brun, Nick E.; Murphy, Michael E. P.

    2015-01-01

    Ferritin from the marine pennate diatom Pseudo-nitzschia multiseries (PmFTN) plays a key role in sustaining growth in iron-limited ocean environments. The di-iron catalytic ferroxidase center of PmFTN (sites A and B) has a nearby third iron site (site C) in an arrangement typically observed in prokaryotic ferritins. Here we demonstrate that Glu-44, a site C ligand, and Glu-130, a residue that bridges iron bound at sites B and C, limit the rate of post-oxidation reorganization of iron coordination and the rate at which Fe3+ exits the ferroxidase center for storage within the mineral core. The latter, in particular, severely limits the overall rate of iron mineralization. Thus, the diatom ferritin is optimized for initial Fe2+ oxidation but not for mineralization, pointing to a role for this protein in buffering iron availability and facilitating iron-sparing rather than only long-term iron storage. PMID:26396187

  2. Ferrous iron sorption by hydrous metal oxides.

    PubMed

    Nano, Genevieve Villaseñor; Strathmann, Timothy J

    2006-05-15

    Ferrous iron is critical to a number of biogeochemical processes that occur in heterogeneous aquatic environments, including the abiotic reductive transformation of subsurface contaminants. The sorption of Fe(II) to ubiquitous soil minerals, particularly iron-free mineral phases, is not well understood. Colloidal TiO2, gamma-AlOOH, and gamma-Al2O2 were used as model hydrous oxides to investigate Fe(II) sorption to iron-free mineral surfaces. Rapid Fe(II) sorption during the first few hours is followed by a much slower uptake process that continues for extended periods (at least 30 days). For equivalent solution conditions, the extent of Fe(II) sorption decreases in the order TiO2 >gamma-Al2O3 >gamma-AlOOH. Short-term equilibrium sorption data measured over a wide range of conditions (pH, ionic strength, Fe(II)-to-sorbent ratio) are well described by the diffuse double layer model. Fe(II) sorption to TiO2 is best described by a single-site model that considers formation of two surface complexes, SOFe+ and SOFeOH0. For gamma-AlOOH and gamma-Al2O3, sorption data are best described by a two-site model that considers formation of SOFe+ complexes at weak- and strong-binding surface sites. Accurate description of sorption data for higher Fe(II) concentrations at alkaline pH conditions requires the inclusion of a Fe(II) surface precipitation reaction in the model formulation. The presence of common groundwater constituents (calcium, sulfate, bicarbonate, or fulvic acid) had no significant effect on Fe(II) sorption. These results demonstrate that iron-free soil minerals can exert a significant influence on Fe(II) sorption and speciation in heterogeneous aquatic systems. PMID:16337955

  3. Insight into the evolution of the iron oxidation pathways.

    PubMed

    Ilbert, Marianne; Bonnefoy, Violaine

    2013-02-01

    Iron is a ubiquitous element in the universe. Ferrous iron (Fe(II)) was abundant in the primordial ocean until the oxygenation of the Earth's atmosphere led to its widespread oxidation and precipitation. This change of iron bioavailability likely put selective pressure on the evolution of life. This element is essential to most extant life forms and is an important cofactor in many redox-active proteins involved in a number of vital pathways. In addition, iron plays a central role in many environments as an energy source for some microorganisms. This review is focused on Fe(II) oxidation. The fact that the ability to oxidize Fe(II) is widely distributed in Bacteria and Archaea and in a number of quite different biotopes suggests that the dissimilatory Fe(II) oxidation is an ancient energy metabolism. Based on what is known today about Fe(II) oxidation pathways, we propose that they arose independently more than once in evolution and evolved convergently. The iron paleochemistry, the phylogeny, the physiology of the iron oxidizers, and the nature of the cofactors of the redox proteins involved in these pathways suggest a possible scenario for the timescale in which each type of Fe(II) oxidation pathways evolved. The nitrate dependent anoxic iron oxidizers are likely the most ancient iron oxidizers. We suggest that the phototrophic anoxic iron oxidizers arose in surface waters after the Archaea/Bacteria-split but before the Great Oxidation Event. The neutrophilic oxic iron oxidizers possibly appeared in microaerobic marine environments prior to the Great Oxidation Event while the acidophilic ones emerged likely after the advent of atmospheric O(2). This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The evolutionary aspects of bioenergetic systems. PMID:23044392

  4. Thermochemistry of iron manganese oxide spinels

    SciTech Connect

    Guillemet-Fritsch, Sophie; Navrotsky, Alexandra . E-mail: anavrotsky@ucdavis.edu; Tailhades, Philippe; Coradin, Herve; Wang Miaojun

    2005-01-15

    Oxide melt solution calorimetry has been performed on iron manganese oxide spinels prepared at high temperature. The enthalpy of formation of (Mn{sub x}Fe{sub 1-x}){sub 3}O{sub 4} at 298K from the oxides, tetragonal Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} (hausmannite) and cubic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} (magnetite), is negative from x=0 to x=0.67 and becomes slightly positive for 0.670.6) spinels of intermediate compositions. The enthalpies of formation are discussed in terms of three factors: oxidation-reduction relative to the end-members, cation distribution, and tetragonality. A combination of measured enthalpies and Gibbs free energies of formation in the literature provides entropies of mixing. {delta}S{sub mix}, consistent with a cation distribution in which all trivalent manganese is octahedral and all other ions are randomly distributed for x>0.5, but the entropy of mixing appears to be smaller than these predicted values for x<0.4.

  5. TRACE ELEMENT BINDING DURING STRUCTURAL TRANSFORMATION IN IRON OXIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Iron (hydr)oxides often control the mobility of inorganic contaminants in soils and sediments. A poorly ordered form of ferrihydrite is commonly produced during rapid oxidation of ferrous iron at sharp redox fronts encountered during discharge of anoxic/suboxic waters into terre...

  6. Cobalt-promoted Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for the Selective Oxidative Dehydrogenation of Cyclohexane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutter, Matthew

    Recent work has shown that both cobalt and iron oxide nanoparticles are active for the oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) of cyclohexane to benzene, the former more active than the latter. Further study has shown that the addition of gold species as a minority component into iron oxide nanocrystals increases the selectivity of the reaction to benzene. Since a primary motivation for this work is the addition of catalysts in jet fuels to facilitate the dehydrogenation and cracking reactions preceding their combustion, a low-cost, sacrificial catalyst is sought after. In this application, catalyst nanoparticles suspended in the fuel stream will dehydrogenate cyclic alkanes (cyclohexane) to their aromatic counterparts (benzene). Alkenes and aromatics have a much higher rate of combustion, which decreases the amount of uncombusted fuel in the exhaust, thereby increasing performance. As these catalysts are not recyclable, there is significant impetus to substitute cheaper base metals for expensive noble metals. In this work, iron oxide nanoparticles are doped with varying levels of cobalt to examine the effect of cobalt content and oxidation state on the selectivity and activity of the iron oxide for the oxidative dehydrogenation of cyclohexane, used as a model cyclic alkane in jet fuel. We have shown previously that small (˜5nm) cobalt oxide nanoparticles favor the production of benzene over the partial dehydrogenation products cyclohexene and cyclohexadiene, or the complete oxidation product carbon dioxide. It is the aim of this work to examine the surface of these cobalt-iron oxide nanoparticles to determine the conditions most favorable for this selective oxidative dehydrogenation. Cobalt-doped iron nanoparticles were prepared by a surfactant-free hydrothermal co-precipitation technique that enabled a high degree of composition control and size control. These samples were characterized via Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), powder X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), X

  7. Ecological succession among iron-oxidizing bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Emily J; Cetinić, Ivona; Chan, Clara S; Whitney King, D; Emerson, David

    2014-01-01

    Despite over 125 years of study, the factors that dictate species dominance in neutrophilic iron-oxidizing bacterial (FeOB) communities remain unknown. In a freshwater wetland, we documented a clear ecological succession coupled with niche separation between the helical stalk-forming Gallionellales (for example, Gallionella ferruginea) and tubular sheath-forming Leptothrix ochracea. Changes in the iron-seep community were documented using microscopy and cultivation-independent methods. Quantification of Fe-oxyhydroxide morphotypes by light microscopy was coupled with species-specific fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) probes using a protocol that minimized background fluorescence caused by the Fe-oxyhydroxides. Together with scanning electron microscopy, these techniques all indicated that Gallionellales dominated during early spring, with L. ochracea becoming more abundant for the remainder of the year. Analysis of tagged pyrosequencing reads of the small subunit ribosomal RNA gene (SSU rRNA) collected during seasonal progression supported a clear Gallionellales to L. ochracea transition, and community structure grouped according to observed dominant FeOB forms. Axis of redundancy analysis of physicochemical parameters collected from iron mats during the season, plotted with FeOB abundance, corroborated several field and microscopy-based observations and uncovered several unanticipated relationships. On the basis of these relationships, we conclude that the ecological niche of the stalk-forming Gallionellales is in waters with low organic carbon and steep redoxclines, and the sheath-forming L. ochracea is abundant in waters that contain high concentrations of complex organic carbon, high Fe and Mn content and gentle redoxclines. Finally, these findings identify a largely unexplored relationship between FeOB and organic carbon. PMID:24225888

  8. Study of nanocomposites based on iron oxides and pectin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chistyakova, Nataliya I.; Shapkin, Alexey A.; Sirazhdinov, Ruslan R.; Gubaidulina, Tatiana V.; Kiseleva, Tatiana Yu.; Kazakov, Alexander P.; Rusakov, Vyacheslav S.

    2014-10-01

    Mössbauer and X-ray diffraction study of nanocomposites based on iron oxides and pectin (PC) was carried out involving magnetization measurements. The concentrations of PC in nanocomposites varied from 0 to 10%. Mössbauer investigations of nanocomposites were carried out in the temperature range from 5 to 300 K. Many-state superparamagnetic relaxation model was used for spectra fitting. The magnetization, M(T,H), was measured in the temperature interval of 80-300 K and magnetic field up to 10 kOe. Formation of the "iron-polymer" interface was not observed. Particle sizes were estimated using the Mössbauer and X-ray powder diffraction data.

  9. Study of nanocomposites based on iron oxides and pectin

    SciTech Connect

    Chistyakova, Nataliya I. Shapkin, Alexey A. Sirazhdinov, Ruslan R. Gubaidulina, Tatiana V. Kiseleva, Tatiana Yu. Kazakov, Alexander P. Rusakov, Vyacheslav S.

    2014-10-27

    Mössbauer and X-ray diffraction study of nanocomposites based on iron oxides and pectin (PC) was carried out involving magnetization measurements. The concentrations of PC in nanocomposites varied from 0 to 10%. Mössbauer investigations of nanocomposites were carried out in the temperature range from 5 to 300 K. Many-state superparamagnetic relaxation model was used for spectra fitting. The magnetization, M(T,H), was measured in the temperature interval of 80-300 K and magnetic field up to 10 kOe. Formation of the 'iron-polymer' interface was not observed. Particle sizes were estimated using the Mössbauer and X-ray powder diffraction data.

  10. Oxidation inhibits iron-induced blood coagulation.

    PubMed

    Pretorius, Etheresia; Bester, Janette; Vermeulen, Natasha; Lipinski, Boguslaw

    2013-01-01

    Blood coagulation under physiological conditions is activated by thrombin, which converts soluble plasma fibrinogen (FBG) into an insoluble clot. The structure of the enzymatically-generated clot is very characteristic being composed of thick fibrin fibers susceptible to the fibrinolytic degradation. However, in chronic degenerative diseases, such as atherosclerosis, diabetes mellitus, cancer, and neurological disorders, fibrin clots are very different forming dense matted deposits (DMD) that are not effectively removed and thus create a condition known as thrombosis. We have recently shown that trivalent iron (ferric ions) generates hydroxyl radicals, which subsequently convert FBG into abnormal fibrin clots in the form of DMDs. A characteristic feature of DMDs is their remarkable and permanent resistance to the enzymatic degradation. Therefore, in order to prevent thrombotic incidences in the degenerative diseases it is essential to inhibit the iron-induced generation of hydroxyl radicals. This can be achieved by the pretreatment with a direct free radical scavenger (e.g. salicylate), and as shown in this paper by the treatment with oxidizing agents such as hydrogen peroxide, methylene blue, and sodium selenite. Although the actual mechanism of this phenomenon is not yet known, it is possible that hydroxyl radicals are neutralized by their conversion to the molecular oxygen and water, thus inhibiting the formation of dense matted fibrin deposits in human blood. PMID:23170793

  11. Iron oxide nanoparticle enhancement of radiation cytotoxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazur, Courtney M.; Tate, Jennifer A.; Strawbridge, Rendall R.; Gladstone, David J.; Hoopes, P. Jack

    2013-02-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) have been investigated as a promising means for inducing tumor cell-specific hyperthermia. Although the ability to generate and use nanoparticles that are biocompatible, tumor specific, and have the ability to produce adequate cytotoxic heat is very promising, significant preclinical and clinical development will be required for clinical efficacy. At this time it appears using IONP-induced hyperthermia as an adjunct to conventional cancer therapeutics, rather than as an independent treatment, will provide the initial IONP clinical treatment. Due to their high-Z characteristics, another option is to use intracellular IONPs to enhance radiation therapy without excitation with AMF (production of heat). To test this concept IONPs were added to cell culture media at a concentration of 0.2 mg Fe/mL and incubated with murine breast adenocarcinoma (MTG-B) cells for either 48 or 72 hours. Extracellular iron was then removed and all cells were irradiated at 4 Gy. Although samples incubated with IONPs for 48 hrs did not demonstrate enhanced post-irradiation cytotoxicity as compared to the non-IONP-containing cells, cells incubated with IONPs for 72 hours, which contained 40% more Fe than 48 hr incubated cells, showed a 25% decrease in clonogenic survival compared to their non-IONP-containing counterparts. These results suggest that a critical concentration of intracellular IONPs is necessary for enhancing radiation cytotoxicity.

  12. Iron oxidation and its impact on MR behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunkara, S. R.; Root, T. W.; Ulicny, J. C.; Klingenberg, D. J.

    2009-02-01

    The oxidation of particles in MR fluids and its impact on rheology are investigated. The oxidation of iron spheres in an aliphatic oil follows a linear growth law, suggesting that the oxide forms a nonadherent layer. The magnetic field-induced yield stress decreases with increasing extent of oxidation. The rheological behavior is consistent with that predicted using a core-shell model.

  13. Washing effect on superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Mireles, Laura-Karina; Sacher, Edward; Yahia, L'Hocine; Laurent, Sophie; Stanicki, Dimitri

    2016-06-01

    Much recent research on nanoparticles has occurred in the biomedical area, particularly in the area of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs); one such area of research is in their use as magnetically directed prodrugs. It has been reported that nanoscale materials exhibit properties different from those of materials in bulk or on a macro scale [1]. Further, an understanding of the batch-to-batch reproducibility and uniformity of the SPION surface is essential to ensure safe biological applications, as noted in the accompanying article [2], because the surface is the first layer that affects the biological response of the human body. Here, we consider a comparison of the surface chemistries of a batch of SPIONs, before and after the supposedly gentle process of dialysis in water. PMID:27141527

  14. Washing effect on superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Mireles, Laura-Karina; Sacher, Edward; Yahia, L’Hocine; Laurent, Sophie; Stanicki, Dimitri

    2016-01-01

    Much recent research on nanoparticles has occurred in the biomedical area, particularly in the area of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs); one such area of research is in their use as magnetically directed prodrugs. It has been reported that nanoscale materials exhibit properties different from those of materials in bulk or on a macro scale [1]. Further, an understanding of the batch-to-batch reproducibility and uniformity of the SPION surface is essential to ensure safe biological applications, as noted in the accompanying article [2], because the surface is the first layer that affects the biological response of the human body. Here, we consider a comparison of the surface chemistries of a batch of SPIONs, before and after the supposedly gentle process of dialysis in water. PMID:27141527

  15. Rheological Properties of Iron Oxide Based Ferrofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devi, M.; Mohanta, D.

    2009-06-01

    In the present work, we report synthesis and magneto-viscous properties of cationic and anionic surfactant coated, iron oxide nanoparticles based ferrofluids. Structural and morphological aspects are revealed by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies. We compare the rheological/magneto-viscous properties of different ferrofluids for various shear rates (2-450 sec-1) and applied magnetic fields (0-100 gauss). In the absence of a magnetic field, and under no shear case, the ferrofluid prepared with TMAH coated particle is found to be 12% more viscous compared to its counterpart. The rheological properties are governed by non-Newtonian features, and for a definite shear rate, viscosity of a given ferrofluid is found to be strongly dependent on the applied magnetic field as well as nature of the surfactant.

  16. Multiple hearth furnace for reducing iron oxide

    DOEpatents

    Brandon, Mark M.; True, Bradford G.

    2012-03-13

    A multiple moving hearth furnace (10) having a furnace housing (11) with at least two moving hearths (20) positioned laterally within the furnace housing, the hearths moving in opposite directions and each moving hearth (20) capable of being charged with at least one layer of iron oxide and carbon bearing material at one end, and being capable of discharging reduced material at the other end. A heat insulating partition (92) is positioned between adjacent moving hearths of at least portions of the conversion zones (13), and is capable of communicating gases between the atmospheres of the conversion zones of adjacent moving hearths. A drying/preheat zone (12), a conversion zone (13), and optionally a cooling zone (15) are sequentially positioned along each moving hearth (30) in the furnace housing (11).

  17. Multifunctional iron oxide nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloemen, M.; Denis, C.; Van Stappen, T.; De Meester, L.; Geukens, N.; Gils, A.; Verbiest, T.

    2015-03-01

    Multifunctional nanoparticles have attracted a lot of attention since they can combine interesting properties like magnetism, fluorescence or plasmonic effects. As a core material, iron oxide nanoparticles have been the subject of intensive research. These cost-effective and non-toxic particles are used nowadays in many applications. We developed a heterobifunctional PEG ligand that can be used to introduce functional groups (carboxylic acids) onto the surface of the NP. Via click chemistry, a siloxane functionality was added to this ligand, for a subsequent covalent ligand exchange reaction. The functionalized nanoparticles have an excellent colloidal stability in complex environments like buffers and serum or plasma. Antibodies were coupled to the introduced carboxylic acids and these NP-antibody bioconjugates were brought into contact with Legionella bacteria for magnetic separation experiments.

  18. Biocompatible multishell architecture for iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wotschadlo, Jana; Liebert, Tim; Clement, Joachim H; Anspach, Nils; Höppener, Stephanie; Rudolph, Tobias; Müller, Robert; Schacher, Felix H; Schubert, Ulrich S; Heinze, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The coating of super-paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) with multiple shells is demonstrated by building a layer assembled from carboxymethyldextran and poly(diallydimethylammonium chloride). Three shells are produced stepwise around aggregates of SPIONs by the formation of a polyelectrolyte complex. A growing particle size from 96 to 327 nm and a zeta potential in the range of +39 to -51 mV are measured. Microscopic techniques such as TEM, SEM, and AFM exemplify the core-shell structures. Magnetic force microscopy and vibrating sample magnetometer measurements confirm the architecture of the multishell particles. Cell culture experiments show that even nanoparticles with three shells are still taken up by cells. PMID:23161745

  19. 3D Visualization of the Iron Oxidation State in FeO/Fe3O4 Core-Shell Nanocubes from Electron Energy Loss Tomography.

    PubMed

    Torruella, Pau; Arenal, Raúl; de la Peña, Francisco; Saghi, Zineb; Yedra, Lluís; Eljarrat, Alberto; López-Conesa, Lluís; Estrader, Marta; López-Ortega, Alberto; Salazar-Alvarez, Germán; Nogués, Josep; Ducati, Caterina; Midgley, Paul A; Peiró, Francesca; Estradé, Sonia

    2016-08-10

    The physicochemical properties used in numerous advanced nanostructured devices are directly controlled by the oxidation states of their constituents. In this work we combine electron energy-loss spectroscopy, blind source separation, and computed tomography to reconstruct in three dimensions the distribution of Fe(2+) and Fe(3+) ions in a FeO/Fe3O4 core/shell cube-shaped nanoparticle with nanometric resolution. The results highlight the sharpness of the interface between both oxides and provide an average shell thickness, core volume, and average cube edge length measurements in agreement with the magnetic characterization of the sample. PMID:27383904

  20. The Iron-Iron Carbide Phase Diagram: A Practical Guide to Some Descriptive Solid State Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Gary J.; Leighly, H. P., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the solid state chemistry of iron and steel in terms of the iron-iron carbide phase diagram. Suggests that this is an excellent way of introducing the phase diagram (equilibrium diagram) to undergraduate students while at the same time introducing the descriptive solid state chemistry of iron and steel. (Author/JN)

  1. Surface Engineering of Core/Shell Iron/Iron Oxide Nanoparticles from Microemulsions for Hyperthermia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guandong; Liao, Yifeng; Baker, Ian

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the synthesis and surface engineering of core/shell-type iron/iron oxide nanoparticles for magnetic hyperthermia cancer therapy. Iron/iron oxide nanoparticles were synthesized from microemulsions of NaBH4 and FeCl3, followed by surface modification in which a thin hydrophobic hexamethyldisilazane layer - used to protect the iron core - replaced the CTAB coating on the particles. Phosphatidylcholine was then assembled on the nanoparticle surface. The resulting nanocomposite particles have a biocompatible surface and show good stability in both air and aqueous solution. Compared to iron oxide nanoparticles, the nanocomposites show much better heating in an alternating magnetic field. They are good candidates for both hyperthermia and magnetic resonance imaging applications. PMID:21833157

  2. Iron Oxide as an MRI Contrast Agent for Cell Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Korchinski, Daniel J.; Taha, May; Yang, Runze; Nathoo, Nabeela; Dunn, Jeff F.

    2015-01-01

    Iron oxide contrast agents have been combined with magnetic resonance imaging for cell tracking. In this review, we discuss coating properties and provide an overview of ex vivo and in vivo labeling of different cell types, including stem cells, red blood cells, and monocytes/macrophages. Furthermore, we provide examples of applications of cell tracking with iron contrast agents in stroke, multiple sclerosis, cancer, arteriovenous malformations, and aortic and cerebral aneurysms. Attempts at quantifying iron oxide concentrations and other vascular properties are examined. We advise on designing studies using iron contrast agents including methods for validation. PMID:26483609

  3. Studies of the kinetics and mechanisms of perfluoroether reactions on iron and oxidized iron surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Napier, Mary E.; Stair, Peter C.

    1992-01-01

    Polymeric perfluoroalkylethers are being considered for use as lubricants in high temperature applications, but have been observed to catalytically decompose in the presence of metals. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) were used to explore the decomposition of three model fluorinated ethers on clean polycrystalline iron surfaces and iron surfaces chemically modified with oxygen. Low temperature adsorption of the model fluorinated ethers on the clean, oxygen modified and oxidized iron surfaces was molecular. Thermally activated defluorination of the three model compounds was observed on the clean iron surface at remarkably low temperatures, 155 K and below, with formation of iron fluoride. Preferential C-F bond scission occurred at the terminal fluoromethoxy, CF3O, of perfluoro-1-methoxy-2-ethoxy ethane and perfluoro-1-methoxy-2-ethoxy propane and at CF3/CF2O of perfluoro-1,3-diethoxy propane. The reactivity of the clean iron toward perfluoroalkylether decomposition when compared to other metals is due to the strength of the iron fluoride bond and the strong electron donating ability of the metallic iron. Chemisorption of an oxygen overlayer lowered the reactivity of the iron surface to the adsorption and decomposition of the three model fluorinated ethers by blocking active sites on the metal surface. Incomplete coverage of the iron surface with chemisorbed oxygen results in a reaction which resembles the defluorination reaction observed on the clean iron surface. Perfluoro-1-methoxy-2-ethoxy ethane reacts on the oxidized iron surface at 138 K, through a Lewis acid assisted cleavage of the carbon oxygen bond, with preferential attack at the terminal fluoromethoxy, CF3O. The oxidized iron surface did not passivate, but became more reactive with time. Perfluoro-1-methoxy-2-ethoxy propane and perfluoro-1,3-diethoxy propane desorbed prior to the observation of decomposition on the oxidized iron surface.

  4. Identification of iron oxide impurities in earliest industrial-scale processed platinum

    SciTech Connect

    Weerd, Jaap van der; Rehren, Thilo . E-mail: th.rehren@ucl.ac.uk; Firth, Steven; Clark, Robin J.H. . E-mail: r.j.h.clark@ucl.ac.uk

    2004-09-15

    A detailed investigation of iron oxide inclusions in a 19th century Russian platinum coin is presented. Such coins represent the products of the first industrial-scale purification of platinum metal. The processed metal is far from pure, however, and two types of iron oxide inclusions are identified by electron microprobe and Raman microscopy. The results show that the inclusions mainly consist of magnetite and haematite. The Raman band of magnetite at 668 cm{sup -1} was found to shift to about 680 cm{sup -1} with an increase in the average oxidation state of the iron. It is concluded that the iron oxides are formed during the heating of the platinum metal powder in the manufacturing process.

  5. Iron Photoreduction and Oxidation in an Acidic Mountain Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKnight, D. M.; Kimball, B. A.; Bencala, K. E.

    1988-04-01

    In a small mountain stream in Colorado that receives acidic mine drainage, photoreduction of ferric iron results in a well-defined increase in dissolved ferrous iron during the day. To quantify this process, an instream injection of a conservative tracer was used to measure discharge at the time that each sample was collected. Daytime production of ferrous iron by photoreduction was almost four times as great as nighttime oxidation of ferrous iron. The photoreduction process probably involves dissolved or colloidal ferric iron species and limited interaction with organic species because concentrations of organic carbon are low in this stream.

  6. Magnetization measurements and XMCD studies on ion irradiated iron oxide and core-shell iron/iron-oxide nanomaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Maninder; Qiang, You; Jiang, Weilin; Pearce, Carolyn; McCloy, John S.

    2014-12-02

    Magnetite (Fe3O4) and core-shell iron/iron-oxide (Fe/Fe3O4) nanomaterials prepared by a cluster deposition system were irradiated with 5.5 MeV Si2+ ions and the structures determined by x-ray diffraction as consisting of 100% magnetite and 36/64 wt% Fe/FeO, respectively. However, x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) indicates similar surfaces in the two samples, slightly oxidized and so having more Fe3+ than the expected magnetite structure, with XMCD intensity much lower for the irradiated core-shell samples indicating weaker magnetism. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) data lack the signature for FeO, but the irradiated core-shell system consists of Fe-cores with ~13 nm of separating oxide crystallite, so it is likely that FeO exists deeper than the probe depth of the XAS (~5 nm). Exchange bias (Hex) for both samples becomes increasingly negative as temperature is lowered, but the irradiated Fe3O4 sample shows greater sensitivity of cooling field on Hex. Loop asymmetries and Hex sensitivities of the irradiated Fe3O4 sample are due to interfaces and interactions between grains which were not present in samples before irradiation as well as surface oxidation. Asymmetries in the hysteresis curves of the irradiated core/shell sample are related to the reversal mechanism of the antiferromagnetic FeO and possibly some near surface oxidation.

  7. Nitric Oxide Improves Internal Iron Availability in Plants1

    PubMed Central

    Graziano, Magdalena; Beligni, María Verónica; Lamattina, Lorenzo

    2002-01-01

    Iron deficiency impairs chlorophyll biosynthesis and chloroplast development. In leaves, most of the iron must cross several biological membranes to reach the chloroplast. The components involved in the complex internal iron transport are largely unknown. Nitric oxide (NO), a bioactive free radical, can react with transition metals to form metal-nitrosyl complexes. Sodium nitroprusside, an NO donor, completely prevented leaf interveinal chlorosis in maize (Zea mays) plants growing with an iron concentration as low as 10 μm Fe-EDTA in the nutrient solution. S-Nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine, another NO donor, as well as gaseous NO supply in a translucent chamber were also able to revert the iron deficiency symptoms. A specific NO scavenger, 2-(4-carboxy-phenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide, blocked the effect of the NO donors. The effect of NO treatment on the photosynthetic apparatus of iron-deficient plants was also studied. Electron micrographs of mesophyll cells from iron-deficient maize plants revealed plastids with few photosynthetic lamellae and rudimentary grana. In contrast, in NO-treated maize plants, mesophyll chloroplast appeared completely developed. NO treatment did not increase iron content in plant organs, when expressed in a fresh matter basis, suggesting that root iron uptake was not enhanced. NO scavengers 2-(4-carboxy-phenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide and methylene blue promoted interveinal chlorosis in iron-replete maize plants (growing in 250 μm Fe-EDTA). Even though results support a role for endogenous NO in iron nutrition, experiments did not establish an essential role. NO was also able to revert the chlorotic phenotype of the iron-inefficient maize mutants yellow stripe1 and yellow stripe3, both impaired in the iron uptake mechanisms. All together, these results support a biological action of NO on the availability and/or delivery of metabolically active iron within the plant. PMID:12481068

  8. Application of novel iron core/iron oxide shell nanoparticles to sentinel lymph node identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cousins, Aidan; Howard, Douglas; Henning, Anna M.; Nelson, Melanie R. M.; Tilley, Richard D.; Thierry, Benjamin

    2015-12-01

    Current `gold standard' staging of breast cancer and melanoma relies on accurate in vivo identification of the sentinel lymph node. By replacing conventional tracers (dyes and radiocolloids) with magnetic nanoparticles and using a handheld magnetometer probe for in vivo identification, it is believed the accuracy of sentinel node identification in nonsuperficial cancers can be improved due to increased spatial resolution of magnetometer probes and additional anatomical information afforded by MRI road-mapping. By using novel iron core/iron oxide shell nanoparticles, the sensitivity of sentinel node mapping via MRI can be increased due to an increased magnetic saturation compared to traditional iron oxide nanoparticles. A series of in vitro magnetic phantoms (iron core vs. iron oxide nanoparticles) were prepared to simulate magnetic particle accumulation in the sentinel lymph node. A novel handheld magnetometer probe was used to measure the relative signals of each phantom, and determine if clinical application of iron core particles can improve in vivo detection of the sentinel node compared to traditional iron oxide nanoparticles. The findings indicate that novel iron core nanoparticles above a certain size possess high magnetic saturation, but can also be produced with low coercivity and high susceptibility. While some modification to the design of handheld magnetometer probes may be required for particles with large coercivity, use of iron core particles could improve MRI and magnetometer probe detection sensitivity by up to 330 %.

  9. Oxidative Stress and the Homeodynamics of Iron Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Bresgen, Nikolaus; Eckl, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Iron and oxygen share a delicate partnership since both are indispensable for survival, but if the partnership becomes inadequate, this may rapidly terminate life. Virtually all cell components are directly or indirectly affected by cellular iron metabolism, which represents a complex, redox-based machinery that is controlled by, and essential to, metabolic requirements. Under conditions of increased oxidative stress—i.e., enhanced formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS)—however, this machinery may turn into a potential threat, the continued requirement for iron promoting adverse reactions such as the iron/H2O2-based formation of hydroxyl radicals, which exacerbate the initial pro-oxidant condition. This review will discuss the multifaceted homeodynamics of cellular iron management under normal conditions as well as in the context of oxidative stress. PMID:25970586

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia Enhances Red Blood Cell Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Nagababu, Enika; Gulyani, Seema; Earley, Christopher J.; Cutler, Roy G.; Mattson, Mark P.; Rifkind, Joseph M.

    2009-01-01

    Oxidative stress associated with iron deficiency anemia in a murine model was studied feeding an iron deficient diet. Anemia was monitored by a decrease in hematocrit and hemoglobin. For the 9 week study an increase in total iron binding capacity was also demonstrated. Anemia resulted in an increase in red blood cells (RBC) oxidative stress as indicated by increased levels of fluorescent heme degradation products (1.24 fold after 5 weeks; 2.1 fold after 9 weeks). The increase in oxidative stress was further confirmed by elevated levels of methemoglobin for mice fed an iron deficient diet. Increased hemoglobin autoxidation and subsequent generation of ROS can account for the shorter RBC lifespan and other pathological changes associated with iron deficiency anemia. PMID:19051108

  11. Atomistic simulations of uranium incorporation into iron (hydr)oxides.

    PubMed

    Kerisit, Sebastien; Felmy, Andrew R; Ilton, Eugene S

    2011-04-01

    Atomistic simulations were carried out to characterize the coordination environments of U incorporated in three Fe-(hydr)oxide minerals: goethite, magnetite, and hematite. The simulations provided information on U-O and U-Fe distances, coordination numbers, and lattice distortion for U incorporated in different sites (e.g., unoccupied versus occupied sites, octahedral versus tetrahedral) as a function of the oxidation state of U and charge compensation mechanisms (i.e., deprotonation, vacancy formation, or reduction of Fe(III) to Fe(II)). For goethite, deprotonation of first shell hydroxyls enables substitution of U for Fe(III) with a minimal amount of lattice distortion, whereas substitution in unoccupied octahedral sites induced appreciable distortion to 7-fold coordination regardless of U oxidation states and charge compensation mechanisms. Importantly, U-Fe distances of ∼3.6 Å were associated with structural incorporation of U and cannot be considered diagnostic of simple adsorption to goethite surfaces. For magnetite, the octahedral site accommodates U(V) or U(VI) with little lattice distortion. U substituted for Fe(III) in hematite maintained octahedral coordination in most cases. In general, comparison of the simulations with available experimental data provides further evidence for the structural incorporation of U in iron (hydr)oxide minerals. PMID:21391633

  12. Atomistic Simulations of Uranium Incorporation into Iron (Hydr)Oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Ilton, Eugene S.

    2011-04-29

    Atomistic simulations were carried out to characterize the coordination environments of U incorporated in three Fe-(hydr)oxide minerals: goethite, magnetite, and hematite. The simulations provided information on U-O and U-Fe distances, coordination numbers, and lattice distortion for U incorporated in different sites (e.g., unoccupied versus occupied sites, octahedral versus tetrahedral) as a function of the oxidation state of U and charge compensation mechanisms (i.e., deprotonation, vacancy formation, or reduction of Fe(III) to Fe(II)). For goethite, deprotonation of first shell hydroxyls enables substitution of U for Fe(III) with a minimal amount of lattice distortion, whereas substitution in unoccupied octahedral sites induced appreciable distortion to 7-fold coordination regardless of U oxidation states and charge compensation mechanisms. Importantly, U-Fe distances of ~3.6 Å were associated with structural incorporation of U and cannot be considered diagnostic of simple adsorption to goethite surfaces. For magnetite, the octahedral site accommodates U(V) or U(VI) with little lattice distortion. U substituted for Fe(III) in hematite maintained octahedral coordination in most cases. In general, comparison of the simulations with available experimental data provides further evidence for the structural incorporation of U in iron (hydr)oxide minerals.

  13. Size- and composition-dependent radio frequency magnetic permeability of iron oxide nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Yun, Hongseok; Liu, Xiyu; Paik, Taejong; Palanisamy, Duraivelan; Kim, Jungkwun; Vogel, William D; Viescas, Arthur J; Chen, Jun; Papaefthymiou, Georgia C; Kikkawa, James M; Allen, Mark G; Murray, Christopher B

    2014-12-23

    We investigate the size- and composition-dependent ac magnetic permeability of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanocrystals for radio frequency (RF) applications. The nanocrystals are obtained through high-temperature decomposition synthesis, and their stoichiometry is determined by Mössbauer spectroscopy. Two sets of oxides are studied: (a) as-synthesized magnetite-rich and (b) aged maghemite nanocrystals. All nanocrystalline samples are confirmed to be in the superparamagnetic state at room temperature by SQUID magnetometry. Through the one-turn inductor method, the ac magnetic properties of the nanocrystalline oxides are characterized. In magnetite-rich iron oxide nanocrystals, size-dependent magnetic permeability is not observed, while maghemite iron oxide nanocrystals show clear size dependence. The inductance, resistance, and quality factor of hand-wound inductors with a superparamagnetic composite core are measured. The superparamagnetic nanocrystals are successfully embedded into hand-wound inductors to function as inductor cores. PMID:25390073

  14. Size- and Composition-Dependent Radio Frequency Magnetic Permeability of Iron Oxide Nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, H; Liu, XY; Paik, T; Palanisamy, D; Kim, J; Vogel, WD; Viescas, AJ; Chen, J; Papaefthymiou, GC; Kikkawa, JM; Allen, MG; Murray, CB

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the size- and composition-dependent ac magnetic permeability of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanocrystals for radio frequency (RF) applications. The nanocrystals are obtained through high-temperature decomposition synthesis, and their stoichiometry is determined by Mossbauer spectroscopy. Two sets of oxides are studied: (a) as-synthesized magnetite-rich and (b) aged maghemite nanocrystals. All nanocrystalline samples are confirmed to be in the superparamagnetic state at room temperature by SQUID magnetometry. Through the one-turn inductor method, the ac magnetic properties of the nanocrystalline oxides are characterized. In magnetite-rich iron oxide nanocrystals, size-dependent magnetic permeability is not observed, while maghemite iron oxide nanocrystals show clear size dependence. The inductance, resistance, and quality factor of hand-wound inductors with a superparamagnetic composite core are measured. The superparamagnetic nanocrystals are successfully embedded into hand-wound inductors to function as inductor cores.

  15. IRON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The document surveys the effects of organic and inorganic iron that are relevant to humans and their environment. The biology and chemistry of iron are complex and only partially understood. Iron participates in oxidation reduction processes that not only affect its geochemical m...

  16. Magnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles: Synthesis and Surface Functionalization Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wei; He, Quanguo; Jiang, Changzhong

    2008-10-01

    Surface functionalized magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) are a kind of novel functional materials, which have been widely used in the biotechnology and catalysis. This review focuses on the recent development and various strategies in preparation, structure, and magnetic properties of naked and surface functionalized iron oxide NPs and their corresponding application briefly. In order to implement the practical application, the particles must have combined properties of high magnetic saturation, stability, biocompatibility, and interactive functions at the surface. Moreover, the surface of iron oxide NPs could be modified by organic materials or inorganic materials, such as polymers, biomolecules, silica, metals, etc. The problems and major challenges, along with the directions for the synthesis and surface functionalization of iron oxide NPs, are considered. Finally, some future trends and prospective in these research areas are also discussed.

  17. Magnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles: Synthesis and Surface Functionalization Strategies

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Surface functionalized magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) are a kind of novel functional materials, which have been widely used in the biotechnology and catalysis. This review focuses on the recent development and various strategies in preparation, structure, and magnetic properties of naked and surface functionalized iron oxide NPs and their corresponding application briefly. In order to implement the practical application, the particles must have combined properties of high magnetic saturation, stability, biocompatibility, and interactive functions at the surface. Moreover, the surface of iron oxide NPs could be modified by organic materials or inorganic materials, such as polymers, biomolecules, silica, metals, etc. The problems and major challenges, along with the directions for the synthesis and surface functionalization of iron oxide NPs, are considered. Finally, some future trends and prospective in these research areas are also discussed. PMID:21749733

  18. Synthesis and heating effect of iron/iron oxide composite and iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Q.; Baker, I.; Loudis, J. A.; Liao, Y. F.; Hoopes, P. J.

    2007-02-01

    Fe/Fe oxide nanoparticles, in which the core consists of metallic Fe and the shell is composed of Fe oxides, were obtained by reduction of an aqueous solution of FeCl 3 within a NaBH 4 solution, or, using a water-in-oil micro-emulsion with CTAB as the surfactant. The reduction was performed either in an inert atmosphere or in air, and passivation with air was performed to produce the Fe/Fe 3O 4 core/shell composite. Phase identification and particle size were determined by X-ray diffraction and TEM. Thermal analysis was performed using a differential scanning calorimeter. The quasistatic magnetic properties were measured using a VSM, and the specific absorption rates (SARs) of both Fe oxide and Fe/Fe 3O 4 composite nanoparticles either dispersed in methanol or in an epoxy resin were measured by Luxtron fiber temperature sensors in an alternating magnetic field of 150 Oe at 250 kHz. It was found that the preparation conditions, including the concentrations of solutions, the mixing procedure and the heat treatment, influence the particle size, the crystal structure and consequently the magnetic properties of the particles. Compared with Fe oxides, the saturation magnetization (MS) of Fe/Fe 3O 4 particles (100-190 emu/g) can be twice as high, and the coercivity (H C) can be tunable from several Oe to several hundred Oe. Hence, the SAR of Fe/Fe 3O 4 composite nanoparticles can be much higher than that of Fe oxides, with a maximum SAR of 345 W/g. The heating behavior is related to the magnetic behavior of the nanoparticles.

  19. Synthesis and heating effect of iron/iron oxide composite and iron oxide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Q.; Baker, I.; Loudis, J. A.; Liao, Y.F.; Hoopes, P.J.

    2014-01-01

    Fe/Fe oxide nanoparticles, in which the core consists of metallic Fe and the shell is composed of Fe oxides, were obtained by reduction of an aqueous solution of FeCl3 within a NaBH4 solution, or, using a water-in-oil micro-emulsion with CTAB as the surfactant. The reduction was performed either in an inert atmosphere or in air, and passivation with air was performed to produce the Fe/Fe3O4 core/shell composite. Phase identification and particle size were determined by X-ray diffraction and TEM. Thermal analysis was performed using a differential scanning calorimeter. The quasistatic magnetic properties were measured using a VSM, and the specific absorption rates (SARs) of both Fe oxide and Fe/Fe3O4 composite nanoparticles either dispersed in methanol or in an epoxy resin were measured by Luxtron fiber temperature sensors in an alternating magnetic field of 150 Oe at 250 kHz. It was found that the preparation conditions, including the concentrations of solutions, the mixing procedure and the heat treatment, influence the particle size, the crystal structure and consequently the magnetic properties of the particles. Compared with Fe oxides, the saturation magnetization (MS) of Fe/Fe3O4 particles (100–190 emu/g) can be twice as high, and the coercivity (HC) can be tunable from several Oe to several hundred Oe. Hence, the SAR of Fe/Fe3O4 composite nanoparticles can be much higher than that of Fe oxides, with a maximum SAR of 345 W/g. The heating behavior is related to the magnetic behavior of the nanoparticles. PMID:25301983

  20. The role of crustal and eruptive processes versus source variations in controlling the oxidation state of iron in Central Andean magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grocke, Stephanie B.; Cottrell, Elizabeth; de Silva, Shanaka; Kelley, Katherine A.

    2016-04-01

    The composition of the continental crust is closely tied to subduction zone magmatism. Elevated oxygen fugacity (fO2) plays a central role in fostering crystallization of oxide minerals and thereby aids in generating the calc-alkaline trend of iron depletion that characterizes the continents. Along continental margins, arc magmas erupt through continental crust and often undergo extensive differentiation that may modify magmatic fO2. The importance of the subducting slab and mantle wedge relative to the effects of this differentiation on the fO2 recorded by continental arc magmas remains relatively unconstrained. Here, we focus on the effect of differentiation on magmatic fO2 using a suite of 14 samples from the Central Volcanic Zone (CVZ) of the Andes where the continental crust is atypically thick (60-80 km). The samples range in composition from ∼55 to 74 wt% SiO2 and represent the Neogene history of the arc. Samples are basaltic andesite to rhyolite and span a range of radiogenic isotopic compositions (87Sr/86Sr = ∼0.705-0.712) that represent 30 to 100% crustal assimilation. We use several proxies to estimate the fO2 recorded by lavas, pumice, and scoria: (1) whole rock Fe3+ / Σ Fe ratios, (2) Fe3+ / Σ Fe ratios in quartz-hosted melt inclusions, and (3) Fe-Ti oxide oxygen-barometry. Comparison of the fO2 calculated from bulk Fe3+ / Σ Fe ratios (post-eruptive) with that derived from Fe-Ti oxides or melt inclusion Fe3+ / Σ Fe ratios (pre-eruptive), enables us to quantify the effect of syn- or post-eruptive alteration, and to select rocks for bulk analysis appropriate for the determination of pre-eruptive magmatic fO2 using a strict criterion developed here. Across our sample suite, and in context with samples from the literature, we do not find evidence for systematic oxidation due to crystal fractionation or crustal contamination. Less evolved samples, ranging from 55 to 61 wt% SiO2, record a range of >3 orders of magnitude in fO2, spanning the fO2 range

  1. Iron oxide-based nanomagnets in nanomedicine: fabrication and applications

    PubMed Central

    Meng Lin, Meng; Kim, Hyung-Hwan; Kim, Hyuck; Muhammed, Mamoun; Kyung Kim, Do

    2010-01-01

    Iron oxide-based nanomagnets have attracted a great deal of attention in nanomedicine over the past decade. Down to the nanoscale, superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles can only be magnetized in the presence of an external magnetic field, which makes them capable of forming stable colloids in a physio-biological medium. Their superparamagnetic property, together with other intrinsic properties, such as low cytotoxicity, colloidal stability, and bioactive molecule conjugation capability, makes such nanomagnets ideal in both in-vitro and in-vivo biomedical applications. In this review, a chemical, physical, and biological synthetic approach to prepare iron oxide-based nanomagnets with different physicochemical properties was illustrated and compared. The growing interest in iron oxide-based nanomagnets with multifunctionalities was explored in cancer diagnostics and treatment, focusing on their combined roles in a magnetic resonance contrast agent, hyperthermia, and magnetic force assisted drug delivery. Iron oxides as magnetic carriers in gene therapy were reviewed with a focus on the sophisticated design and construction of magnetic vectors. Finally, the iron oxide-based nanomagnet also represents a very promising tool in particle/cell interfacing in controlling cellular functionalities, such as adhesion, proliferation, differentiation, and cell patterning, in stem cell therapy and tissue engineering applications. PMID:22110854

  2. Iron oxide nanoparticles in geomicrobiology: from biogeochemistry to bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Braunschweig, Juliane; Bosch, Julian; Meckenstock, Rainer U

    2013-09-25

    Iron oxides are important constituents of soils and sediments and microbial iron reduction is considered to be a significant anaerobic respiration process in the subsurface, however low microbial reduction rates of macroparticulate Fe oxides in laboratory studies led to an underestimation of the role of Fe oxides in the global Fe redox cycle. Recent studies show the high potential of nano-sized Fe oxides in the environment as, for example, electron acceptor for microbial respiration, electron shuttle between different microorganisms, and scavenger for heavy metals. Biotic and abiotic reactivity of iron macroparticles differ significantly from nano-sized Fe oxides, which are usually much more reactive. Factors such as particle size, solubility, ferrous iron, crystal structure, and organic molecules were identified to influence the reactivity. This review discusses factors influencing the microbial reactivity of Fe oxides. It highlights the differences between natural and synthetic Fe oxides especially regarding the presence of organic molecules such as humic acids and natural organic matter. Attention is given to the transport behavior of Fe oxides in laboratory systems and in the environment, because of the high affinity of different contaminants to Fe oxide surfaces and associated co-transport of pollutants. The high reactivity of Fe oxides and their potential as adsorbents for different pollutants are discussed with respect to application and development of remediation technologies. PMID:23557995

  3. Morphology of biogenic iron oxides records microbial physiology and environmental conditions: toward interpreting iron microfossils.

    PubMed

    Krepski, S T; Emerson, D; Hredzak-Showalter, P L; Luther, G W; Chan, C S

    2013-09-01

    Despite the abundance of Fe and its significance in Earth history, there are no established robust biosignatures for Fe(II)-oxidizing micro-organisms. This limits our ability to piece together the history of Fe biogeochemical cycling and, in particular, to determine whether Fe(II)-oxidizers played a role in depositing ancient iron formations. A promising candidate for Fe(II)-oxidizer biosignatures is the distinctive morphology and texture of extracellular Fe(III)-oxyhydroxide stalks produced by mat-forming microaerophilic Fe(II)-oxidizing micro-organisms. To establish the stalk morphology as a biosignature, morphologic parameters must be quantified and linked to the microaerophilic Fe(II)-oxidizing metabolism and environmental conditions. Toward this end, we studied an extant model organism, the marine stalk-forming Fe(II)-oxidizing bacterium, Mariprofundus ferrooxydans PV-1. We grew cultures in flat glass microslide chambers, with FeS substrate, creating opposing oxygen/Fe(II) concentration gradients. We used solid-state voltammetric microelectrodes to measure chemical gradients in situ while using light microscopy to image microbial growth, motility, and mineral formation. In low-oxygen (2.7-28 μm) zones of redox gradients, the bacteria converge into a narrow (100 μm-1 mm) growth band. As cells oxidize Fe(II), they deposit Fe(III)-oxyhydroxide stalks in this band; the stalks orient directionally, elongating toward higher oxygen concentrations. M. ferrooxydans stalks display a narrow range of widths and uniquely biogenic branching patterns, which result from cell division. Together with filament composition, these features (width, branching, and directional orientation) form a physical record unique to microaerophilic Fe(II)-oxidizer physiology; therefore, stalk morphology is a biosignature, as well as an indicator of local oxygen concentration at the time of formation. Observations of filamentous Fe(III)-oxyhydroxide microfossils from a ~170 Ma marine Fe

  4. Inflammatory imaging with ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Taro; Kusakabe, Yoshinori; Fujii, Hitomi; Murase, Katsutoshi; Yamazaki, Youichi; Murase, Kenya

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the usefulness and feasibility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) (USPIO-enhanced MRI) for imaging inflammatory tissues. First, we investigated the relationship between the apparent transverse relaxation rate (R2*) and the concentration of USPIO by phantom studies and measured the apparent transverse relaxivity (r2*) of USPIO. Second, we performed animal experiments using a total of 30 mice. The mice were divided into five groups [A (n=6), B (n=6), C (n=6), sham control (n=6), and control (n=6)]. The mice in Groups A, B, C and control were subcutaneously injected with 0.1 ml of turpentine oil on Day 0, while those in the sham control group were subcutaneously injected with 0.1 ml of saline. The mice in Groups A, B, C and sham control were intraperitoneally injected with 200 μmol Fe per kilogram body weight of USPIO (28 nm in diameter) immediately after the first MRI study on Days 3, 5, 7 and 7, respectively, and those in the control group were not injected with USPIO. The second and third MRI studies were performed at 24 and 48 h after USPIO administration, respectively. The maps of R2* were generated from the apparent transverse relaxation time (T2*)-weighted images with six different echo times. The phantom studies showed that there was a linear relationship between R2* and the concentration of USPIO (r=0.99) and the r2* value of USPIO was 105.7 mM(-1) s(-1). There was a significant increase of R2* in inflammatory tissues in Group C at 24 h after USPIO administration compared with the precontrast R2* value. Our results suggest that USPIO-enhanced MRI combined with R2* measurement is useful for detecting inflammatory tissues. PMID:20850245

  5. The structure and magnetic properties of ultrafine iron particles with oxide layer

    SciTech Connect

    Gavrilyuk, A.G.; Sadykov, R.A.

    1994-12-01

    Ultrafine iron particles (UFIPs) are promising as materials for high-density magnetic recording and ferrofluids because the superparamagnetic state in these particles develops at smaller particle sizes than in conventional magnetic materials. The basic obstacle to producing UFIPs is their high reactivity, which leads to strong oxidation of these particles. Given this, effort is being devoted to extending chemical stabilization to iron particles of the smallest size possible. One possible approach involves the formation of a thin passivating oxide layer on iron particles [1-3], for example, by atmospheric-air oxidation or by oxidation in a special atmosphere. This results in the formation of an interesting structure - an ultrafine particle whose magnetic properties exhibit a marked variation from its center to the surface. The UFIP oxidized at room temperature was shown to consist of an unoxidized {alpha}-Fe core with an average diameter of 110 {Angstrom} and a 45-{Angstrom}-thick oxide layer with a spinel-type structure. The hyperfine magnetic field at the particle core coincides with the field in an infinite sample, whereas in the oxide layer, the average magnetic field was lower. Magnetic interaction between the central region of the UFIP and the oxide layer was found to suppress superparamagnetism and to result in development of a hyperfine structure in the Moessbauer subspectrum of the oxide layer. The observed shape of the Moessbauer spectrum is related to the surface state of the oxide phase and, to some extent, to the presence of defects.

  6. Red Dawn: Characterizing Iron Oxide Minerals in Atmospheric Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yauk, K.; Ottenfeld, C. F.; Reynolds, R. L.; Goldstein, H.; Cattle, S.; Berquo, T. S.; Moskowitz, B. M.

    2012-12-01

    Atmospheric dust is comprised of many components including small amounts of iron oxide minerals. Although the iron oxides make up a small weight percent of the bulk dust, they are important because of their roles in ocean fertilization, controls on climate, and as a potential health hazard to humans. Here we report on the iron oxide mineralogy in dust from a large dust storm, dubbed Red Dawn, which engulfed eastern Australia along a 3000 km front on 23 September 2009. Red Dawn originated from the lower Lake Eyre Basin of South Australia, western New South Wales (NSW) and southwestern Queensland and was the worst dust storm to have hit the city of Sydney in more than 60 years. Dust samples were collected from various locations across eastern Australia (Lake Cowal, Orange, Hornsby, Sydney) following the Red Dawn event. Our dust collection provides a good opportunity to study the physical and mineralogical properties of iron oxides from Red Dawn using a combination of reflectance spectroscopy, Mössbauer spectroscopy (MB), and magnetic measurements. Magnetization measurements from 20-400 K reveal that magnetite/maghemite, hematite and goethite are present in all samples with magnetite occurring in trace amounts (< 0.5wt%). However, the amount of magnetite/maghemite even in trace concentrations generally increases from Lake Cowal from west to east (0.01 to 0.29 wt%), with highest magnetite contents in the urban-Sydney sites. These observations indicate the additions of magnetite from local urban sources. Variable temperature Mössbauer spectroscopy (300 K and 4.2 K) indicate that goethite and hematite compose approximately 25-45 % of the Fe-bearing phases in the Orange and Lake Cowal samples. Goethite is more abundant than hematite in the Lake Cowal samples whereas the opposite is observed for Orange. Hematite is observed at both temperatures but goethite only at 4.2 K. The identification of goethite in Mössbauer analyses at low-temperature but not at room temperature

  7. Oxidation-Induced Degradable Nanogels for Iron Chelation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhi; Wang, Yan; Purro, Max; Xiong, May P.

    2016-01-01

    Iron overload can increase cellular oxidative stress levels due to formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS); untreated, it can be extremely destructive to organs and fatal to patients. Since elevated oxidative stress levels are inherent to the condition in such patients, oxidation-induced degradable nanogels for iron chelation were rationally designed by simultaneously polymerizing oxidation-sensitive host-guest crosslinkers between β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) and ferrocene (Fc) and iron chelating moieties composed of deferoxamine (DFO) into the final gel scaffold in reverse emulsion reaction chambers. UV-Vis absorption and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) was used to verify iron chelating capability of nanogels. These materials can degrade into smaller chelating fragments at rates proportional to the level of oxidative stress present. Conjugating DFO reduces the cytotoxicity of the chelator in the macrophage cells. Importantly, the nanogel can effectively reduce cellular ferritin expression in iron overloaded cells and regulate intracellular iron levels at the same time, which is important for maintaining a homeostatic level of this critical metal in cells. PMID:26868174

  8. Experiments with Unusual Oxidation States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kauffman, G. B.

    1975-01-01

    Describes four synthesis experiments, adapted for the general chemistry laboratory, in which compounds in unusual oxidation are prepared. The abnormal oxidation states involved in the synthesis products are: silver (II), chromium (II), lead (IV), and bromine (I). (MLH)

  9. Photochemical Activation of Chlorine by Iron and Iron Oxide Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittmer, J.; Zetzsch, C.

    2015-12-01

    The photochemical activation of chlorine by dissolved iron in sea-salt aerosol droplets and by highly dispersed Fe2O3 aerosol particles (mainly hematite, specific surface > 100 m2/g), exposed to gaseous HCl, was investigated in humidified air in a Teflon simulation chamber. Employing the radical-clock technique, we quantified the production of gaseous atomic Cl. When the artificial sea salt aerosols contained suspended Fe2O3 alone at pH 6, no significant Cl production could be observed, even if the dissolution of iron was forced by "weathering" (repeatedly freezing and thawing for five times). Adjusting the pH in the stock suspension to 2.6, 2.2, and 1.9 and equilibrating for one week resulted in a quantifiable amount of dissolved iron (0.03, 0.2, and 0.6 mmol/L, respectively) and in gaseous Cl production rates of ~1.6, 6, and 8 × 1021 atoms cm-2 h-1, respectively. Exposing the pure Fe2O3 aerosol in the absence of salt to various gaseous HCl concentrations resulted in rates ranging from 8 × 1020 Cl atoms cm-2 h-1 (at ~4 ppb HCl) to 5 × 1022 Cl atoms cm-2 h-1 (at ~350 ppb HCl) and confirmed the uptake and conversion of HCl to atomic Cl (at HCl to Cl conversion yields of 2-5 % mol/mol, depending on the relative humidity). The relevance for environmental processes in the atmosphere will be discussed.

  10. The Oxidation Of Iron In A Gel Using Consumer Chemicals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Stephen W.; Folger, Marsha R.; Quinn, Ryan P.; Sauls, Frederick C.; Krone, Diane

    2005-01-01

    An experiment is conducted for the oxidation of iron in a gel using consumer chemicals, which is pertinent to the students' understanding of redox chemistry and of the relative oxidation potentials of various metals. The experiment can be carried out with consumer chemicals that might be purchased at a supermarket and commonly found in the home.

  11. Synthesis of phase pure praseodymium barium copper iron oxide.

    PubMed

    Konne, Joshua L; Davis, Sean A; Glatzel, Stefan; Hall, Simon R

    2013-06-18

    The control of crystallization of praseodymium barium copper iron oxide, an intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cell cathode material, has been demonstrated for the first time using a biotemplated sol-gel synthesis technique. The results obtained showed significant improvement in purity, synthesis time, surface area and simplicity over that previously reported. PMID:23660963

  12. Potassium promotion of iron oxide dehydrogenation catalysts supported on magnesium oxide: 1. Preparation and characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Stobbe, D.E.; Buren, F.R. van ); Dillen, A.J. van; Geus, J.W. )

    1992-06-01

    Catalysts of iron oxide supported on magnesium oxide and promoted with potassium were prepared by incipient wetness impregnation of preshaped magnesium oxide support pellets with a solution of an iron complex, either ammonium iron (III) citrate or ammonium iron (III) EDTA and potassium carbonate. Iron and potassium were applied wither simultaneously or consecutively. As determined using X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, and magnetic measurements, calcination above 923 K results in the formation of a mixed oxide of iron and potassium, viz., KFeO[sub 2]. After calcination at 973 K the average crystallite size of the KFeO[sub 2] phase is about 300 [angstrom]. The formation of KFeO[sub 2] appeared to have a strong retarding effect on the reduction of the iron oxide phase to metallic iron. It was found that the KFeO[sub 2] phase is unstable in atomspheric air due to reaction with carbon dioxide and moisture to form potassium (hydrogen) carbonate and (hydrated) iron oxide.

  13. Heterogeneous Fenton oxidation of ofloxacin drug by iron alginate support.

    PubMed

    Titouhi, Hana; Belgaied, Jamel-Eddine

    2016-08-01

    A new catalytic wet peroxide oxidation of ofloxacin antibiotic is presented in this work. The removal was achieved using a biodegradable sodium alginate-iron material. Several parameters were studied such as iron content, drying duration of the catalytic support, temperature, solid amount and initial drug concentration. The process showed a strong oxidative ability; at optimum conditions, a nearly complete removal of the drug (around 98%) has been reached after three h of treatment. A relatively low decrease of support activity (around 10%) has been observed after three successive oxidation runs and a low iron leaching has been detected (1.2% of the incorporated quantity). The removal of the substrate has been also examined in the absence of hydrogen peroxide in order to discriminate between the contributions of simple adsorption and oxidation processes in the drug disappearance. We also discussed the influence of the studied experimental parameters on the removal kinetic. PMID:26752017

  14. Iron and iron oxide nanoparticles obtained by ultra-short laser ablation in liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Bonis, A.; Lovaglio, T.; Galasso, A.; Santagata, A.; Teghil, R.

    2015-10-01

    Laser ablation of an iron target in water and acetone has been carried out using a frequency doubled Nd:glass laser source (pulse duration of 250 fs and frequency repetition rate of 10 Hz). The observation of the nanostructures formed in the laser irradiated region of the metallic target and fast shadowgraphic analysis of the laser induced cavitation bubble have been performed in order to correlate the size distribution of the obtained nanoparticles to the dynamics of the ablation process. The composition, morphology and oxidation state of the synthesized nanoproducts have been investigated by XPS (X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy), TEM (Transmission Electron Microscopy) and microRaman spectroscopy. The experimental data support a relationship between the nanoparticles size distribution and the femtosecond laser ablation mechanism, while the chemical and structural characteristics of the nanoparticles can be tuned by varying the liquid medium.

  15. What is the real role of iron oxides in the optical properties of dust aerosols?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. L.; Wu, G. J.; Zhang, C. L.; Xu, T. L.; Zhou, Q. Q.

    2015-11-01

    Iron oxide compounds constitute an important component of mineral dust aerosols. Several previous studies have shown that these minerals are strong absorbers at visible wavelengths and thus that they play a critical role in the overall climate perturbation caused by dust aerosols. When compiling a database of complex refractive indices of possible mineral species of iron oxides to study their optical properties, we found that uniformly continuous optical constants for a single type of iron oxide in the wavelength range between 0.2 and 50 μm are very scarce, and that the use of hematite to represent all molecular or mineral iron-oxides types is a popular hypothesis. However, the crucial problem is that three continuous data sets for complex refractive indices of hematite are employed in climate models, but there are significant differences between them. Thus, the real role of iron oxides in the optical properties of dust aerosols becomes a key scientific question, and we address this problem by considering different refractive indices, size distributions and more logical weight fractions and mixing states of hematite. Based on the microscopic observations, a semi-external mixture that employs an external mixture between Fe aggregates and other minerals and partly internal mixing between iron oxides and aluminosilicate particles is advised as the optimal approximation. The simulations demonstrate that hematite with a spectral refractive index from Longtin et al. (1988) shows approximately equal absorbing capacity to the mineral illite over the whole wavelength region from 0.55 to 2.5 μm, and only enhances the optical absorption of aerosol mixture at λ < 0.55 μm. Using the data set from Querry (1985) may overestimate the optical absorption of hematite at both visible and near-infrared wavelengths. More laboratory measurements of the refractive index of iron oxides, especially for hematite and goethite in the visible spectrum, should therefore be taken into account

  16. Targeted iron oxide nanoparticles for the enhancement of radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Anastasia K; Mitov, Mihail I; Daley, Emily F; McGarry, Ronald C; Anderson, Kimberly W; Hilt, J Zach

    2016-10-01

    To increase the efficacy of radiation, iron oxide nanoparticles can be utilized for their ability to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS). Radiation therapy promotes leakage of electrons from the electron transport chain and leads to an increase in mitochondrial production of the superoxide anion which is converted to hydrogen peroxide by superoxide dismutase. Iron oxide nanoparticles can then catalyze the reaction from hydrogen peroxide to the highly reactive hydroxyl radical. Therefore, the overall aim of this project was to utilize iron oxide nanoparticles conjugated to a cell penetrating peptide, TAT, to escape lysosomal encapsulation after internalization by cancer cells and catalyze hydroxyl radical formation. It was determined that TAT functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles and uncoated iron oxide nanoparticles resulted in permeabilization of the lysosomal membranes. Additionally, mitochondrial integrity was compromised when A549 cells were treated with both TAT-functionalized nanoparticles and radiation. Pre-treatment with TAT-functionalized nanoparticles also significantly increased the ROS generation associated with radiation. A long term viability study showed that TAT-functionalized nanoparticles combined with radiation resulted in a synergistic combination treatment. This is likely due to the TAT-functionalized nanoparticles sensitizing the cells to subsequent radiation therapy, because the nanoparticles alone did not result in significant toxicities. PMID:27521615

  17. Iron oxide and gold nanoparticles in cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotman, Irena; Psakhie, Sergey G.; Lozhkomoev, Aleksandr S.; Gutmanas, Elazar Y.

    2016-08-01

    Continuous research activities in the field of nanomedicine in the past decade have, to a great extent, been focused on nanoparticle technologies for cancer therapy. Gold and iron oxide nanoparticles (NP) are two of the most studied inorganic nanomaterials due to their unique optical and magnetic properties. Both types of NPs are emerging as promising systems for anti-tumor drug delivery and for nanoparticle-mediated thermal therapy of cancer. In thermal therapy, localized heating inside tumors or in proximity of tumor cells can be induced, for example, with Au NPs by radiofrequency ablation heating or conversion of photon energy (photothermal therapy) and in iron oxide magnetic NPs by heat generation through relaxation in an alternating magnetic field (magnetic hyperthermia). Furthermore, the superparamagnetic properties of iron oxide nanoparticles have led to their use as potent MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) contrast agents. Surface modification/coating can produce NPs with tailored and desired properties, such as enhanced blood circulation time, stability, biocompatibility and water solubility. To target nanoparticles to specific tumor cells, NPs should be conjugated with targeting moieties on the surface which bind to receptors or other molecular structures on the cell surface. The article presents several approaches to enhancing the specificity of Au and iron oxide nanoparticles for tumor tissue by appropriate surface modification/functionalization, as well as the effect of these treatments on the saturation magnetization value of iron oxide NPs. The use of other nanoparticles and nanostructures in cancer treatment is also briefly reviewed.

  18. Development and use of iron oxide nanoparticles (Part 1): Synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles for MRI

    PubMed Central

    Lodhia, J; Mandarano, G; Ferris, NJ; Eu, P; Cowell, SF

    2010-01-01

    Contrast agents, such as iron oxide, enhance MR images by altering the relaxation times of tissues in which the agent is present. They can also be used to label targeted molecular imaging probes. Unfortunately, no molecular imaging probe is currently available on the clinical MRI market. A promising platform for MRI contrast agent development is nanotechnology, where superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONS) are tailored for MR contrast enhancement, and/or for molecular imaging. SPIONs can be produced using a range of methods and the choice of method will be influenced by the characteristics most important for a particular application. In addition, the ability to attach molecular markers to SPIONS heralds their application in molecular imaging. There are many reviews on SPION synthesis for MRI; however, these tend to be targeted to a chemistry audience. The development of MRI contrast agents attracts experienced researchers from many fields including some researchers with little knowledge of medical imaging or MRI. This situation presents medical radiation practitioners with opportunities for involvement, collaboration or leadership in research depending on their level of commitment and their ability to learn. Medical radiation practitioners already possess a large portion of the understanding, knowledge and skills necessary for involvement in MRI development and molecular imaging. Their expertise in imaging technology, patient care and radiation safety provides them with skills that are directly applicable to research on the development and application of SPIONs and MRI. In this paper we argue that MRI SPIONs, currently limited to major research centres, will have widespread clinical use in the future. We believe that knowledge about this growing area of research provides an opportunity for medical radiation practitioners to enhance their specialised expertise to ensure best practice in a truly multi-disciplinary environment. This review outlines how and

  19. Development and use of iron oxide nanoparticles (Part 1): Synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles for MRI.

    PubMed

    Lodhia, J; Mandarano, G; Ferris, Nj; Eu, P; Cowell, Sf

    2010-01-01

    Contrast agents, such as iron oxide, enhance MR images by altering the relaxation times of tissues in which the agent is present. They can also be used to label targeted molecular imaging probes. Unfortunately, no molecular imaging probe is currently available on the clinical MRI market. A promising platform for MRI contrast agent development is nanotechnology, where superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONS) are tailored for MR contrast enhancement, and/or for molecular imaging. SPIONs can be produced using a range of methods and the choice of method will be influenced by the characteristics most important for a particular application. In addition, the ability to attach molecular markers to SPIONS heralds their application in molecular imaging.There are many reviews on SPION synthesis for MRI; however, these tend to be targeted to a chemistry audience. The development of MRI contrast agents attracts experienced researchers from many fields including some researchers with little knowledge of medical imaging or MRI. This situation presents medical radiation practitioners with opportunities for involvement, collaboration or leadership in research depending on their level of commitment and their ability to learn. Medical radiation practitioners already possess a large portion of the understanding, knowledge and skills necessary for involvement in MRI development and molecular imaging. Their expertise in imaging technology, patient care and radiation safety provides them with skills that are directly applicable to research on the development and application of SPIONs and MRI.In this paper we argue that MRI SPIONs, currently limited to major research centres, will have widespread clinical use in the future. We believe that knowledge about this growing area of research provides an opportunity for medical radiation practitioners to enhance their specialised expertise to ensure best practice in a truly multi-disciplinary environment. This review outlines how and

  20. Microstructural effects on the oxidation of iron aluminide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hale, Peter M.

    This work addresses the impact of processing and microstructure on the oxide chemistry and short-term isothermal oxidation rate, over the first 24h of oxidation, for the B2 iron aluminide, Fe-40Al. Research interests in iron-aluminum alloys, used for high temperature structural applications, are primarily concerned with the improvement of high temperature oxidation performance and mechanical properties. The oxidation performance of alloys with aluminum contents below 20at% is dependent upon processing and microstructure. Before this work, it was not established if there was any impact of material processing and microstructure on the oxidation performance of the high aluminum content Fe-40Al alloy. This study utilized eight industrial processes to produce six different material conditions. Among the characteristics of the microstructures produced were grain sizes from 2 to ≥500mum, oxygen contents from 0--2.6at%, and powder particle surface area-to-volume ratios from 0--0.6 m2/cm3. For the six materials tested, short-term (24h) isothermal oxidation rates were determined at 700, 750, and 800°C. The resultant rates were then used to determine the relationship between the oxidation rate constant and temperature. The chemistry, physical characteristics, and structure of the oxides formed were then characterized. It was concluded that microstructure has a limited impact on oxidation properties: no practical impact was observed on oxidation rate; an initial transient oxide layer formed independent of microstrucure; microstructure can be used to control the formation of oxide-metal interfacial voids, formed during the oxidation process; and oxide inclusion "pegs" serve to improve oxide adhesion. Additionally it was observed that contamination from hot pressing contributed to the formation of oxide nodules during oxidation. Overall the isothermal oxidation properties during the first 24h of exposure proved to be robust over many combinations of microstructures.

  1. Bacterial oxidation of ferrous iron at low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Kupka, Daniel; Rzhepishevska, Olena I; Dopson, Mark; Lindström, E Börje; Karnachuk, Olia V; Tuovinen, Olli H

    2007-08-15

    This study comprises the first report of ferrous iron oxidation by psychrotolerant, acidophilic iron-oxidizing bacteria capable of growing at 5 degrees C. Samples of mine drainage-impacted surface soils and sediments from the Norilsk mining region (Taimyr, Siberia) and Kristineberg (Skellefte district, Sweden) were inoculated into acidic ferrous sulfate media and incubated at 5 degrees C. Iron oxidation was preceded by an approximately 3-month lag period that was reduced in subsequent cultures. Three enrichment cultures were chosen for further work and one culture designated as isolate SS3 was purified by colony isolation from a Norilsk enrichment culture for determining the kinetics of iron oxidation. The 16S rRNA based phylogeny of SS3 and two other psychrotolerant cultures, SS5 from Norilsk and SK5 from Northern Sweden, was determined. Comparative analysis of amplified 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that the psychrotolerant cultures aligned within Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. The rate constant of iron oxidation by growing cultures of SS3 was in the range of 0.0162-0.0104 h(-1) depending on the initial pH. The oxidation kinetics followed an exponential pattern, consistent with a first order rate expression. Parallel iron oxidation by a mesophilic reference culture of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans was extremely slow and linear. Precipitates harvested from the 5 degrees C culture were identified by X-ray diffraction as mixtures of schwertmannite (ideal formula Fe(8)O(8)(OH)(6)SO(4)) and jarosite (KFe(3)(SO(4))(2)(OH)(6)). Jarosite was much more dominant in precipitates produced at 30 degrees C. PMID:17304566

  2. Purification of Lysosomes Using Supraparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles (SPIONs).

    PubMed

    Rofe, Adam P; Pryor, Paul R

    2016-04-01

    Lysosomes can be rapidly isolated from tissue culture cells using supraparamagnetic iron oxide particles (SPIONs). In this protocol, colloidal iron dextran (FeDex) particles, a type of SPION, are taken up by cultured mouse macrophage cells via the endocytic pathway. The SPIONs accumulate in lysosomes, the end point of the endocytic pathway, permitting the lysosomes to be isolated magnetically. The purified lysosomes are suitable for in vitro fusion assays or for proteomic analysis. PMID:27037068

  3. Rhodium oxides in unusual oxidation states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisner, Barbara Alice

    Mixed valence RhIII/RhIV oxides have been proposed as a promising class of candidate compounds for superconductivity. Unfortunately, it is difficult to stabilize rhodates with a formal oxidation state approaching RhIV, as other techniques used for the synthesis of rhodium. oxides favor the most commonly observed formal oxidation state, RhIII. One technique which has been used to stabilize metal oxides in high formal oxidation states is crystallization from molten hydroxides. This thesis explores the use of molten hydroxides to enhance the reactivity of rhodium oxides in order to synthesize rhodates with high formal oxidation states. K0.5RhO2, Rb0.2RhO2, and CsxRhO2 were synthesized from pure alkali metal hydroxides. All crystallized with a previously unobserved polytype in the alkali metal rhodate system. Due to the low activity of dissolved oxygen species in LiOH and NaOH, LiRhO2 and NaRhO2 cannot be crystallized. The formal oxidation state of rhodium in AxRhO2 (A = K, Rb, Cs) is a function of the alkali metal hydroxide used to synthesize these oxides. These materials exhibit remarkable stability for layered metal oxides containing the heavier alkali metals, but all phases are susceptible to intercalation by water. The synthesis, structural characterization, magnetic susceptibility, and reactivity of these oxides are reported. Sr2RhO4 and a new rhodate were crystallized from a KOH-Sr(OH)2 flux. The synthesis and characterization of these materials is reported. Efforts to substitute platinum for rhodium in Sr 2RhO4 are also discussed. Mixed alkali metal-alkaline earth metal hydroxide fluxes were used to crystallize LiSr3RhO6, and NaSr3RhO 6. The synthesis of LiSr3RhO6 and NaSr3RhO 6 represents the first example of the stabilization of a rhodium oxide with a formal oxidation state approaching RhV. X-ray diffraction, electron beam microprobe analysis, thermogravimetric analysis, potentiometric titrations, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and magnetic susceptibility

  4. Recycling of a spent iron based catalyst for the complete oxidation of toluene: effect of palladium.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Chai; Nah, Jae Woon

    2015-01-01

    Complete oxidation of volatile organic compound (toluene) was carried out to assess the property and activity of the palladium-spent iron based catalyst. The properties of the prepared catalysts were characterized by using the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller method and by conducting temperature-programmed reduction, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and field emission transmission electron microscopy. The addition of palladium to the spent iron based catalyst pretreated with oxalic acid shifted the conversion curve for the total oxidation of toluene to lower temperature. An increase in the toluene conversion due to palladium was highly related to the easier lattice oxygen mobility of the catalysts. Instrumental analysis suggested the presence of a strong interaction between palladium and iron oxide species. Moreover, in the case of reducing the Pd/Fe catalyst with hydrogen, palladium accelerated the reducing iron oxides, subsequently decreasing the toluene conversion. As a result, the oxidation states of palladium and iron had an important effect on the catalytic activity. PMID:25413115

  5. THE EFFECT OF PH, PHOSPHATE AND OXIDANT TYPE ON THE REMOVAL OF ARSENIC FROM DRINKING WATER DURING IRON REMOVAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    In many regions of the United States, groundwaters that contain arsenic (primarily As[III]) also contain significant amounts of iron (Fe[II]). Arsenic removal will most likely be achieved by iron removal in many of those cases which will consist of oxidization followed by filtra...

  6. Safety assessment of chronic oral exposure to iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamorro, Susana; Gutiérrez, Lucía; Vaquero, María Pilar; Verdoy, Dolores; Salas, Gorka; Luengo, Yurena; Brenes, Agustín; José Teran, Francisco

    2015-05-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles with engineered physical and biochemical properties are finding a rapidly increasing number of biomedical applications. However, a wide variety of safety concerns, especially those related to oral exposure, still need to be addressed for iron oxide nanoparticles in order to reach clinical practice. Here, we report on the effects of chronic oral exposure to low doses of γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles in growing chickens. Animal observation, weight, and diet intake reveal no adverse signs, symptoms, or mortality. No nanoparticle accumulation was observed in liver, spleen, and duodenum, with feces as the main excretion route. Liver iron level and duodenal villi morphology reflect the bioavailability of the iron released from the partial transformation of γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles in the acid gastric environment. Duodenal gene expression studies related to the absorption of iron from γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles indicate the enhancement of a ferric over ferrous pathway supporting the role of mucins. Our findings reveal that oral administration of iron oxide nanoparticles is a safe route for drug delivery at low nanoparticle doses.

  7. Spin state switching in iron coordination compounds

    PubMed Central

    Gaspar, Ana B; Garcia, Yann

    2013-01-01

    Summary The article deals with coordination compounds of iron(II) that may exhibit thermally induced spin transition, known as spin crossover, depending on the nature of the coordinating ligand sphere. Spin transition in such compounds also occurs under pressure and irradiation with light. The spin states involved have different magnetic and optical properties suitable for their detection and characterization. Spin crossover compounds, though known for more than eight decades, have become most attractive in recent years and are extensively studied by chemists and physicists. The switching properties make such materials potential candidates for practical applications in thermal and pressure sensors as well as optical devices. The article begins with a brief description of the principle of molecular spin state switching using simple concepts of ligand field theory. Conditions to be fulfilled in order to observe spin crossover will be explained and general remarks regarding the chemical nature that is important for the occurrence of spin crossover will be made. A subsequent section describes the molecular consequences of spin crossover and the variety of physical techniques usually applied for their characterization. The effects of light irradiation (LIESST) and application of pressure are subjects of two separate sections. The major part of this account concentrates on selected spin crossover compounds of iron(II), with particular emphasis on the chemical and physical influences on the spin crossover behavior. The vast variety of compounds exhibiting this fascinating switching phenomenon encompasses mono-, oligo- and polynuclear iron(II) complexes and cages, polymeric 1D, 2D and 3D systems, nanomaterials, and polyfunctional materials that combine spin crossover with another physical or chemical property. PMID:23504535

  8. Development of Novel Biopolymer/Synthetic-Polymer/Iron Oxide Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mena Montoya, Marleth; Carranza, Sugeheidy; Hinojosa, Moisés; González, Virgilio

    2009-03-01

    In this work we report the successful development of a family of magnetic nanocomposites based on chitosan or/and polyamide 6 matrix with dispersed iron oxide nanoparticles synthesized by chemical co-precipitation. The iron oxide contents varied from 5 up to 23 wt%, the nanocomposites were studied by FTIR, UV-vis, TGA, XRD, TEM and magnetometry. The FTIR analysis demonstrates an interaction between the amide group of the polyamide 6 and the ceramic material. In formic acid, the nanocomposites absorb in the UV-Vis range, and the magnitude of the band gap (optical), calculated using the band of higher wavelength, is between 2.16 and 2.19 eV. In nanocomposites with chitosan/polyamide 6 matrix the developed morphologies are spherulites of polyamide 6 surrounded by chitosan, with the iron oxide particles presumably in the form of ferrihidryte. The measured magnetic properties revealed a superparamagnetic character on the studied specimens.

  9. Virus-Templated Near-Amorphous Iron Oxide Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Shah, Sachin N; Khan, Abid A; Espinosa, Ana; Garcia, Miguel A; Nuansing, Wiwat; Ungureanu, Mariana; Heddle, Jonathan G; Chuvilin, Andrey L; Wege, Christina; Bittner, Alexander M

    2016-06-14

    We present a simple synthesis of iron oxide nanotubes, grown under very mild conditions from a solution containing Fe(II) and Fe(III), on rod-shaped tobacco mosaic virus templates. Their well-defined shape and surface chemistry suggest that these robust bionanoparticles are a versatile platform for synthesis of small, thin mineral tubes, which was achieved efficiently. Various characterization tools were used to explore the iron oxide in detail: Electron microscopy (SEM, TEM), magnetometry (SQUID-VSM), diffraction (XRD, TEM-SAED), electron spectroscopies (EELS, EDX, XPS), and X-ray absorption (XANES with EXAFS analysis). They allowed determination of the structure, crystallinity, magnetic properties, and composition of the tubes. The protein surface of the viral templates was crucial to nucleate iron oxide, exhibiting analogies to biomineralization in natural compartments such as ferritin cages. PMID:27181278

  10. OXIDATION OF CYCLOHEXANE WITH AIR CATALYZED BY A STERICALLY HINDERED IRON (II) COMPLEX

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oxidation of Cyclohexane with Air Catalyzed by a Sterically Hindered Iron(II) Complex.


    Thomas M. Becker, Michael A. Gonzalez*

    United States Environmental Protection Agency; National Risk Management Research Laboratory; Sustainable Technology Division; Clean Pr...

  11. New Insight into the Electrochromic Properties of Iron Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Lobato, Marco A.; Martinez, Arturo I.; Zarate, Ramón A.; Castro-Roman, Manuel

    2010-11-01

    We report on the structural, optical and magnetic properties of iron oxide films that were electrochemically cycled in a LiOH aqueous solution. We found that the electrochromic phenomenon is linked to the transformation of the film morphology; it goes from round-shaped particles to platy morphology. Additionally, the following phenomena were observed: a gradual blue shift of the optical-absorption edge, an increase of the saturation magnetization and the appearance of new Raman bands. The change of these properties helped us to understand the coloration mechanism for electrochromism in iron oxides.

  12. Recovery of iron oxide from coal fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Dobbins, Michael S.; Murtha, Marlyn J.

    1983-05-31

    A high quality iron oxide concentrate, suitable as a feed for blast and electric reduction furnaces is recovered from pulverized coal fly ash. The magnetic portion of the fly ash is separated and treated with a hot strong alkali solution which dissolves most of the silica and alumina in the fly ash, leaving a solid residue and forming a precipitate which is an acid soluble salt of aluminosilicate hydrate. The residue and precipitate are then treated with a strong mineral acid to dissolve the precipitate leaving a solid residue containing at least 90 weight percent iron oxide.

  13. Electrolytic photodissociation of chemical compounds by iron oxide electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Somorjai, Gabor A.; Leygraf, Christofer H.

    1984-01-01

    Chemical compounds can be dissociated by contacting the same with a p/n type semi-conductor diode having visible light as its sole source of energy. The diode consists of low cost, readily available materials, specifically polycrystalline iron oxide doped with silicon in the case of the n-type semi-conductor electrode, and polycrystalline iron oxide doped with magnesium in the case of the p-type electrode. So long as the light source has an energy greater than 2.2 electron volts, no added energy source is needed to achieve dissociation.

  14. Electrolytic photodissociation of chemical compounds by iron oxide photochemical diodes

    DOEpatents

    Somorjai, Gabor A.; Leygraf, Christofer H.

    1985-01-01

    Chemical compounds can be dissociated by contacting the same with a p/n type semi-conductor photochemical diode having visible light as its sole source of energy. The photochemical diode consists of low cost, readily available materials, specifically polycrystalline iron oxide doped with silicon in the case of the n-type semi-conductor electrode, and polycrystalline iron oxide doped with magnesium in the case of the p-type electrode. So long as the light source has an energy greater than 2.2 electron volts, no added energy source is needed to achieve dissociation.

  15. Multifunctional iron oxide nanoparticles for diagnostics, therapy and macromolecule delivery.

    PubMed

    Yen, Swee Kuan; Padmanabhan, Parasuraman; Selvan, Subramanian Tamil

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, multifunctional nanoparticles (NPs) consisting of either metal (e.g. Au), or magnetic NP (e.g. iron oxide) with other fluorescent components such as quantum dots (QDs) or organic dyes have been emerging as versatile candidate systems for cancer diagnosis, therapy, and macromolecule delivery such as micro ribonucleic acid (microRNA). This review intends to highlight the recent advances in the synthesis and application of multifunctional NPs (mainly iron oxide) in theranostics, an area used to combine therapeutics and diagnostics. The recent applications of NPs in miRNA delivery are also reviewed. PMID:24396508

  16. Multifunctional Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for Diagnostics, Therapy and Macromolecule Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Swee Kuan; Padmanabhan, Parasuraman; Selvan, Subramanian Tamil

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, multifunctional nanoparticles (NPs) consisting of either metal (e.g. Au), or magnetic NP (e.g. iron oxide) with other fluorescent components such as quantum dots (QDs) or organic dyes have been emerging as versatile candidate systems for cancer diagnosis, therapy, and macromolecule delivery such as micro ribonucleic acid (microRNA). This review intends to highlight the recent advances in the synthesis and application of multifunctional NPs (mainly iron oxide) in theranostics, an area used to combine therapeutics and diagnostics. The recent applications of NPs in miRNA delivery are also reviewed. PMID:24396508

  17. The interplay of catechol ligands with nanoparticulate iron oxides.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Alexander K L; Hutton, Georgina A; Masters, Anthony F; Maschmeyer, Thomas

    2012-03-01

    The unique properties exhibited by nanoscale materials, coupled with the multitude of chemical surface derivatisation possibilities, enable the rational design of multifunctional nanoscopic devices. Such functional devices offer exciting new opportunities in medical research and much effort is currently invested in the area of "nanomedicine", including: multimodal imaging diagnostic tools, platforms for drug delivery and vectorisation, polyvalent, multicomponent vaccines, and composite devices for "theranostics". Here we will review the surface derivatisation of nanoparticulate oxides of iron and iron@iron-oxide core-shells. They are attractive candidates for MRI-active therapeutic platforms, being potentially less toxic than lanthanide-based materials, and amenable to functionalisation with ligands. However successful grafting of groups onto the surface of iron-based nanoparticles, thus adding functionality whilst preserving their inherent properties, is one of the most difficult challenges for creating truly useful nanodevices from them. Functionalised catechol-derived ligands have enjoyed success as agents for the masking of superparamagnetic iron-oxide particles, often so as to render them biocompatible with medium to long-term colloidal stability in the complex chemical environments of biological milieux. In this perspective, the opportunities and limitations of functionalising the surfaces of iron-oxide nanoparticles, using coatings containing a catechol-derived anchor, are analysed and discussed, including recent advances using dopamine-terminated stabilising ligands. If light-driven ligand to metal charge transfer (LMCT) processes, and pH-dependent ligand desorption, leading to nanoparticle degradation under physiologically relevant conditions can be suppressed, colloidal stability of samples can be maintained and toxicity ascribed to degradation products avoided. Modulation of the redox behaviour of iron catecholate systems through the introduction of an

  18. Size-dependent magnetic properties of iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patsula, Vitalii; Moskvin, Maksym; Dutz, Silvio; Horák, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Uniform iron oxide nanoparticles in the size range from 10 to 24 nm and polydisperse 14 nm iron oxide particles were prepared by thermal decomposition of Fe(III) carboxylates in the presence of oleic acid and co-precipitation of Fe(II) and Fe(III) chlorides by ammonium hydroxide followed by oxidation, respectively. While the first method produced hydrophobic oleic acid coated particles, the second one formed hydrophilic, but uncoated, nanoparticles. To make the iron oxide particles water dispersible and colloidally stable, their surface was modified with poly(ethylene glycol) and sucrose, respectively. Size and size distribution of the nanoparticles was determined by transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering and X-ray diffraction. Surface of the PEG-functionalized and sucrose-modified iron oxide particles was characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and Raman spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Magnetic properties were measured by means of vibration sample magnetometry and specific absorption rate in alternating magnetic fields was determined calorimetrically. It was found, that larger ferrimagnetic particles showed higher heating performance than smaller superparamagnetic ones. In the transition range between superparamagnetism and ferrimagnetism, samples with a broader size distribution provided higher heating power than narrow size distributed particles of comparable mean size. Here presented particles showed promising properties for a possible application in magnetic hyperthermia.

  19. Deposition rates of oxidized iron on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, R. G.

    1993-01-01

    The reddened oxidized surface of Mars is indicative of temporal interactions between the Martian atmosphere and its surface. During the evolution of the Martian regolith, primary ferromagnesian silicate and sulfide minerals in basaltic rocks apparently have been oxidized to secondary ferric-bearing assemblages. To evaluate how and when such oxidized deposits were formed on Mars, information about the mechanisms and rates of chemical weathering of Fe(2+)-bearing minerals has been determined. In this paper, mechanisms and rates of deposition of ferric oxide phases on the Martian surface are discussed.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging contrast of iron oxide nanoparticles developed for hyperthermia is dominated by iron content

    PubMed Central

    Wabler, Michele; Zhu, Wenlian; Hedayati, Mohammad; Attaluri, Anilchandra; Zhou, Haoming; Mihalic, Jana; Geyh, Alison; DeWeese, Theodore L.; Ivkov, Robert; Artemov, Dmitri

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MNPs) are used as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and hyperthermia for cancer treatment. The relationship between MRI signal intensity and cellular iron concentration for many new formulations, particularly MNPs having magnetic properties designed for heating in hyperthermia, is lacking. In this study, we examine the correlation between MRI T2 relaxation time and iron content in cancer cells loaded with various MNP formulations. Materials and methods Human prostate carcinoma DU-145 cells were loaded with starch-coated bionised nanoferrite (BNF), iron oxide (Nanomag® D-SPIO), Feridex™, and dextran-coated Johns Hopkins University (JHU) particles at a target concentration of 50 pg Fe/cell using poly-D-lysine transfection reagent. T2-weighted MRI of serial dilutions of these labelled cells was performed at 9.4 T and iron content quantification was performed using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Clonogenic assay was used to characterise cytotoxicity. Results No cytotoxicity was observed at twice the target intracellular iron concentration (~100 pg Fe/cell). ICP-MS revealed highest iron uptake efficiency with BNF and JHU particles, followed by Feridex and Nanomag-D-SPIO, respectively. Imaging data showed a linear correlation between increased intracellular iron concentration and decreased T2 times, with no apparent correlation among MNP magnetic properties. Conclusions This study demonstrates that for the range of nanoparticle concentrations internalised by cancer cells the signal intensity of T2-weighted MRI correlates closely with absolute iron concentration associated with the cells. This correlation may benefit applications for cell-based cancer imaging and therapy including nanoparticle-mediated drug delivery and hyperthermia. PMID:24773041

  1. Unprecedented Selective Oxidation of Styrene Derivatives using a Supported Iron Oxide Nanocatalyst in Aqueous Medium

    EPA Science Inventory

    Iron oxide nanoparticles supported on mesoporous silica-type materials have been successfully utilized in the aqueous selective oxidation of alkenes under mild conditions using hydrogen peroxide as a green oxidant. Catalysts could be easily recovered after completion of the reac...

  2. DETERMINATION OF THE RATES AND PRODUCTS OF FERROUS IRON OXIDATION IN ARSENIC-CONTAMINATED POND WATER.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dissolved ferrous iron and arsenic in the presence of insufficient oxygenated ground water is released into a pond. When the mixing of ferrous iron and oxygenated water within the pond occurs, the ferrous iron is oxidized and precipitated as an iron oxide. Groups of experiments...

  3. Synthesis, characterization, applications, and challenges of iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ali, Attarad; Zafar, Hira; Zia, Muhammad; Ul Haq, Ihsan; Phull, Abdul Rehman; Ali, Joham Sarfraz; Hussain, Altaf

    2016-01-01

    Recently, iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) have attracted much consideration due to their unique properties, such as superparamagnetism, surface-to-volume ratio, greater surface area, and easy separation methodology. Various physical, chemical, and biological methods have been adopted to synthesize magnetic NPs with suitable surface chemistry. This review summarizes the methods for the preparation of iron oxide NPs, size and morphology control, and magnetic properties with recent bioengineering, commercial, and industrial applications. Iron oxides exhibit great potential in the fields of life sciences such as biomedicine, agriculture, and environment. Nontoxic conduct and biocompatible applications of magnetic NPs can be enriched further by special surface coating with organic or inorganic molecules, including surfactants, drugs, proteins, starches, enzymes, antibodies, nucleotides, nonionic detergents, and polyelectrolytes. Magnetic NPs can also be directed to an organ, tissue, or tumor using an external magnetic field for hyperthermic treatment of patients. Keeping in mind the current interest in iron NPs, this review is designed to report recent information from synthesis to characterization, and applications of iron NPs. PMID:27578966

  4. Synthesis, characterization, applications, and challenges of iron oxide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Attarad; Zafar, Hira; Zia, Muhammad; ul Haq, Ihsan; Phull, Abdul Rehman; Ali, Joham Sarfraz; Hussain, Altaf

    2016-01-01

    Recently, iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) have attracted much consideration due to their unique properties, such as superparamagnetism, surface-to-volume ratio, greater surface area, and easy separation methodology. Various physical, chemical, and biological methods have been adopted to synthesize magnetic NPs with suitable surface chemistry. This review summarizes the methods for the preparation of iron oxide NPs, size and morphology control, and magnetic properties with recent bioengineering, commercial, and industrial applications. Iron oxides exhibit great potential in the fields of life sciences such as biomedicine, agriculture, and environment. Nontoxic conduct and biocompatible applications of magnetic NPs can be enriched further by special surface coating with organic or inorganic molecules, including surfactants, drugs, proteins, starches, enzymes, antibodies, nucleotides, nonionic detergents, and polyelectrolytes. Magnetic NPs can also be directed to an organ, tissue, or tumor using an external magnetic field for hyperthermic treatment of patients. Keeping in mind the current interest in iron NPs, this review is designed to report recent information from synthesis to characterization, and applications of iron NPs. PMID:27578966

  5. Thermosensitive liposomes entrapping iron oxide nanoparticles for controllable drug release.

    PubMed

    Tai, Lin-Ai; Tsai, Pi-Ju; Wang, Yu-Chao; Wang, Yu-Jing; Lo, Leu-Wei; Yang, Chung-Shi

    2009-04-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles can serve as a heating source upon alternative magnetic field (AMF) exposure. Iron oxide nanoparticles can be mixed with thermosensitive nanovehicles for hyperthermia-induced drug release, yet such a design and mechanism may not be suitable for controllable drug release applications in which the tissues are susceptible to environmental temperature change such as brain tissue. In the present study, iron oxide nanoparticles were entrapped inside of thermosensitive liposomes for AMF-induced drug release while the environmental temperature was maintained at a constant level. Carboxyfluorescein was co-entrapped with the iron oxide nanoparticles in the liposomes as a model compound for monitoring drug release and environmental temperature was maintained with a water circulator jacket. These experiments have been successfully performed in solution, in phantom and in anesthetized animals. Furthermore, the thermosensitive liposomes were administered into rat forearm skeletal muscle, and the release of carboxylfluorescein triggered by the external alternative magnetic field was monitored by an implanted microdialysis perfusion probe with an on-line laser-induced fluorescence detector. In the future such a device could be applied to simultaneous magnetic resonance imaging and non-invasive drug release in temperature-sensitive applications. PMID:19420485

  6. Oxidation resistant iron and nickel alloys for high temperature use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, V. L.; Misra, S. K.; Wheaton, H. L.

    1970-01-01

    Iron-base and nickel-base alloys exhibit good oxidation resistance and improved ductility with addition of small amounts of yttrium, tantalum /or hafnium/, and thorium. They can be used in applications above the operating temperatures of the superalloys, if high strength materials are not required.

  7. OXYANION SORPTION TO HIGH SURFACE AREA IRON AND ALUMINUM OXIDES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sorption of selected oxyanions (Mo, As, and P) to high surface area iron and aluminum oxides was investigated using in situ Raman and ATR-FTIR spectroscopy, batch sorption methods, electrophoretic mobility measurements, and surface complexation modeling. In situ ATR-FTIR and Raman spectra were coup...

  8. Extending the models for iron and sulfur oxidation in the extreme Acidophile Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans gains energy from the oxidation of ferrous iron and various reduced inorganic sulfur compounds at very acidic pH. Although an initial model for the electron pathways involved in iron oxidation has been developed, much less is known about the sulfur oxidation in this microorganism. In addition, what has been reported for both iron and sulfur oxidation has been derived from different A. ferrooxidans strains, some of which have not been phylogenetically characterized and some have been shown to be mixed cultures. It is necessary to provide models of iron and sulfur oxidation pathways within one strain of A. ferrooxidans in order to comprehend the full metabolic potential of the pangenome of the genus. Results Bioinformatic-based metabolic reconstruction supported by microarray transcript profiling and quantitative RT-PCR analysis predicts the involvement of a number of novel genes involved in iron and sulfur oxidation in A. ferrooxidans ATCC23270. These include for iron oxidation: cup (copper oxidase-like), ctaABT (heme biogenesis and insertion), nuoI and nuoK (NADH complex subunits), sdrA1 (a NADH complex accessory protein) and atpB and atpE (ATP synthetase F0 subunits). The following new genes are predicted to be involved in reduced inorganic sulfur compounds oxidation: a gene cluster (rhd, tusA, dsrE, hdrC, hdrB, hdrA, orf2, hdrC, hdrB) encoding three sulfurtransferases and a heterodisulfide reductase complex, sat potentially encoding an ATP sulfurylase and sdrA2 (an accessory NADH complex subunit). Two different regulatory components are predicted to be involved in the regulation of alternate electron transfer pathways: 1) a gene cluster (ctaRUS) that contains a predicted iron responsive regulator of the Rrf2 family that is hypothesized to regulate cytochrome aa3 oxidase biogenesis and 2) a two component sensor-regulator of the RegB-RegA family that may respond to the redox state of the quinone pool. Conclusion

  9. Iron Kinetics and Evolution of Microbial Populations in Low-pH, Ferrous Iron-Oxidizing Bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Jones, Rose M; Johnson, D Barrie

    2016-08-01

    Iron-rich, acidic wastewaters are commonplace pollutants associated with metal and coal mining. Continuous-flow bioreactors were commissioned and tested for their capacities to oxidize ferrous iron in synthetic and actual acid mine drainage waters using (initially) pure cultures of the recently described acidophilic, iron-oxidizing heterotrophic bacterium Acidithrix ferrooxidans grown in the presence of glucose and yeast extract. The bioreactors became rapidly colonized by this bacterium, which formed macroscopic streamer growths in the flowing waters. Over 97% of ferrous iron in pH 2.0-2.2 synthetic mine water was oxidized (at up to 225 mg L(-1) h(-1)) at dilution rates (D) of 0.6 h(-1). Rates of iron oxidation decreased with pH but were still significant, with influent liquors as low as pH 1.37. When fed with actual mine water, >90% of ferrous iron was oxidized at D values of 0.4 h(-1), and microbial communities within the bioreactors changed over time, with Atx. ferrooxidans becoming increasingly displaced by the autotrophic iron-oxidizing acidophiles Ferrovum myxofaciens, Acidithiobacillus ferrivorans, and Leptospirillum ferrooxidans (which were all indigenous to the mine water), although this did not have a negative impact on net ferrous-iron oxidation. The results confirmed the potential of using a heterotrophic acidophile to facilitate the rapid commissioning of iron-oxidizing bioreactors and illustrated how microbial communities within them can evolve without compromising the performances of the bioreactors. PMID:27377871

  10. 40 CFR 721.10529 - Cobalt iron manganese oxide, carboxylic acid-modified (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Cobalt iron manganese oxide... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10529 Cobalt iron manganese oxide, carboxylic acid... substance identified generically as cobalt iron manganese oxide, carboxylic acid-modified (PMN P-12-35)...

  11. 40 CFR 721.10529 - Cobalt iron manganese oxide, carboxylic acid-modified (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Cobalt iron manganese oxide... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10529 Cobalt iron manganese oxide, carboxylic acid... substance identified generically as cobalt iron manganese oxide, carboxylic acid-modified (PMN P-12-35)...

  12. Simultaneous reductive dissolution of iron oxide and oxidation of iodide in ice.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kitae; Choi, Wonyong

    2015-04-01

    Iron is an important trace element controlling the metabolism and growth of all kinds of living species. Especially, the bio-availability of iron has been regarded as the limiting factor for primary productivity in HNLC (High Nutrients Low Chlorophyll) regions including Southern ocean. The dissolution of iron oxide provides enhanced the bio-availability of iron for phytoplankton growth. The halogen chemistry in polar regions is related to various important environmental processes such as Antarctic Ozone Depletion Event(ODE), mercury depletion, oxidative processes in atmosphere, and the formation of CCN (Cloud Condensation Nuclei). In this study, we investigated the reductive dissolution of iron oxide particles to produce Fe(II)aq and simultaneous oxidation of I- (iodide) to I3- (tri-iodide) in ice phase under UV irradiation or dark condition. The reductive generation of Fe(II)aq from iron oxides and oxidation of iodide to I3- were negligible in water but significantly accelerated in frozen solution both in the presence and absence of light. The enhanced reductive generation of Fe(II)aq and oxidative formation of I3- in ice were observed regardless of the various types of iron oxides [hematite (α-Fe2O3) maghemite (γ- Fe2O3), goethite (α-FeOOH), lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH) and, magnetite (Fe3O4)]. We explained that the enhanced redox production of Fe(II)aq and I3- in ice is contributed to the freeze concentration of iodides, protons, and dissolved oxygen in the unfrozen solution. When the concentration of both iodides and protons were raised by 10-fold each, the formation of Fe(II)aq in water under UV irradiation was approached to those in ice. The outdoor experiments were carried out under ambient solar radiation in winter season of mid-latitude (Pohang, Korea: 36°N latitude) and also confirmed that the production of Fe(II)aq via reductive dissolution of iron oxide and I3- generation via I- oxidation were enhanced in frozen solution. These results suggest that iron

  13. Selective stabilization of aliphatic organic carbon by iron oxide

    PubMed Central

    Adhikari, Dinesh; Yang, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Stabilization of organic matter in soil is important for natural ecosystem to sequestrate carbon and mitigate greenhouse gas emission. It is largely unknown what factors govern the preservation of organic carbon in soil, casting shadow on predicting the response of soil to climate change. Iron oxide was suggested as an important mineral preserving soil organic carbon. However, ferric minerals are subject to reduction, potentially releasing iron and decreasing the stability of iron-bound organic carbon. Information about the stability of iron-bound organic carbon in the redox reaction is limited. Herein, we investigated the sorptive interactions of organic matter with hematite and reductive release of hematite-bound organic matter. Impacts of organic matter composition and conformation on its sorption by hematite and release during the reduction reaction were analyzed. We found that hematite-bound aliphatic carbon was more resistant to reduction release, although hematite preferred to sorb more aromatic carbon. Resistance to reductive release represents a new mechanism that aliphatic soil organic matter was stabilized by association with iron oxide. Selective stabilization of aliphatic over aromatic carbon can greatly contribute to the widely observed accumulation of aliphatic carbon in soil, which cannot be explained by sorptive interactions between minerals and organic matter. PMID:26061259

  14. Chromium Substitution Effect on the Magnetic Structure of Iron Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osman Murat, Ozkendir

    2012-05-01

    The local magnetic and electronic structures of chromium substituted iron oxide polycrystalline samples are investigated via Fe L-edge x-ray absorption near-edge structural and magnetic circular dichroism measurements. A strong dependence of atomic magnetic levels on the applied external magnetic field is observed. The magnetic behavior of Cr-doped iron oxides are determined to be dominantly governed by the d—d hybridization between Fe and Cr valence levels. In addition, the formation of CrO2 and Cr2O3 chromium oxide clusters in the sample are observed to determine the magnetic ordering, i.e. anti-ferromagnetic or ferromagnetic with the changing external magnetic fields. The results highly agree with the previous studies.

  15. Oxidation, carburization and/or sulfidation resistant iron aluminide alloy

    DOEpatents

    Sikka, Vinod K.; Deevi, Seetharama C.; Fleischhauer, Grier S.; Hajaligol, Mohammad R.; Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton

    2003-08-19

    The invention relates generally to aluminum containing iron-base alloys useful as electrical resistance heating elements. The aluminum containing iron-base alloys have improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The alloy has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and includes, in weight %, over 4% Al, .ltoreq.1% Cr and either .gtoreq.0.05% Zr or Zro.sub.2 stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element or .gtoreq.0.1% oxide dispersoid particles. The alloy can contain 14-32% Al, .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Zr, .ltoreq.1% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B. .ltoreq.30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, .ltoreq.1% oxygen, .ltoreq.3% Cu, balance Fe.

  16. The Molecular Mechanism of Iron(III) Oxide Nucleation.

    PubMed

    Scheck, Johanna; Wu, Baohu; Drechsler, Markus; Rosenberg, Rose; Van Driessche, Alexander E S; Stawski, Tomasz M; Gebauer, Denis

    2016-08-18

    A molecular understanding of the formation of solid phases from solution would be beneficial for various scientific fields. However, nucleation pathways are still not fully understood, whereby the case of iron (oxyhydr)oxides poses a prime example. We show that in the prenucleation regime, thermodynamically stable solute species up to a few nanometers in size are observed, which meet the definition of prenucleation clusters. Nucleation then is not governed by a critical size, but rather by the dynamics of the clusters that are forming at the distinct nucleation stages, based on the chemistry of the linkages within the clusters. This resolves a longstanding debate in the field of iron oxide nucleation, and the results may generally apply to oxides forming via hydrolysis and condensation. The (molecular) understanding of the chemical basis of phase separation is paramount for, e.g., tailoring size, shape and structure of novel nanocrystalline materials. PMID:27466739

  17. Zinc in +III oxidation state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Devleena; Jena, Puru

    2012-02-01

    The possibility of Group 12 elements, such as Zn, Cd, and Hg existing in an oxidation state of +III or higher has fascinated chemists for decades. Significant efforts have been made in the past to achieve higher oxidation states for the heavier congener mercury (since the 3^rd ionization potential of the elements decrease as we go down the periodic table). It took nearly 20 years before experiment could confirm the theoretical prediction that Hg indeed can exist in an oxidation state of +IV. While this unusual property of Hg is attributed to the relativistic effects, Zn being much lighter than Hg has not been expected to have an oxidation state higher than +II. Using density functional theory we show that an oxidation state of +III for Zn can be realized by choosing specific ligands with large electron affinities i.e. superhalogens. We demonstrate this by a systematic study of the interaction of Zn with F, BO2, and AuF6 ligands whose electron affinities are progressively higher, namely, 3.4 eV, 4.4 eV, and 8.4 eV, respectively. Discovery of higher oxidation states of elements can help in the formulation of new reactions and hence in the development of new chemistry.

  18. In vivo biodistribution of iron oxide nanoparticles: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tate, Jennifer A.; Petryk, Alicia A.; Giustini, Andrew J.; Hoopes, P. Jack

    2011-03-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles present a promising alternative to conventional energy deposition-based tissue therapies. The success of such nanoparticles as a therapeutic for diseases like cancer, however, depends heavily on the particles' ability to localize to tumor tissue as well as provide minimal toxicity to surrounding tissues and key organs such as those involved in the reticuloendothelial system (RES). We present here the results of a long term clearance study where mice injected intravenously with 2 mg Fe of 100 nm dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles were sacrificed at 14 and 580 days post injection. Histological analysis showed accumulation of the nanoparticles in some RES organs by the 14 day time point and clearance of the nanoparticles by the 580 day time point with no obvious toxicity to organs. An additional study reported herein employs 20 nm and 110 nm starch-coated iron oxide nanoparticles at 80 mg Fe/kg mouse in a size/biodistribution study with endpoints at 4, 24 and 72 hours. Preliminary results show nanoparticle accumulation in the liver and spleen with some elevated iron accumulation in tumoral tissues with differences between the 20 nm and the 110 nm nanoparticle depositions.

  19. Missing Iron-Oxidizing Acidophiles Highly Sensitive to Organic Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Ueoka, Nagayoshi; Kouzuma, Atsushi; Watanabe, Kazuya

    2016-01-01

    The genus Acidithiobacillus includes iron-oxidizing lithoautotrophs that thrive in acidic mine environments. Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans is a representative species and has been extensively studied for its application to the bioleaching of precious metals. In our attempts to cultivate the type strain of A. ferrooxidans (ATCC 23270T), repeated transfers to fresh inorganic media resulted in the emergence of cultures with improved growth traits. Strains were isolated from the resultant culture by forming colonies on inorganic silica-gel plates. A representative isolate (strain NU-1) was unable to form colonies on agarose plates and was more sensitive to organics, such as glucose, than the type strain of A. ferrooxidans. Strain NU-1 exhibited superior growth traits in inorganic iron media to those of other iron-oxidizing acidithiobacilli, suggesting its potential for industrial applications. A draft genome of NU-1 uncovered unique features in catabolic enzymes, indicating that this strain is not a mutant of the A. ferrooxidans type strain. Our results indicate that the use of inorganic silica-gel plates facilitates the isolation of as-yet-unexamined iron-oxidizing acidithiobacilli from environmental samples and enrichment cultures. PMID:27356527

  20. Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Iron Aluminide by CVD Coated Powders

    SciTech Connect

    Asit Biswas Andrew J. Sherman

    2006-09-25

    This I &I Category2 program developed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of iron, aluminum and aluminum oxide coated iron powders and the availability of high temperature oxidation, corrosion and erosion resistant coating for future power generation equipment and can be used for retrofitting existing fossil-fired power plant equipment. This coating will provide enhanced life and performance of Coal-Fired Boilers components such as fire side corrosion on the outer diameter (OD) of the water wall and superheater tubing as well as on the inner diameter (ID) and OD of larger diameter headers. The program also developed a manufacturing route for readily available thermal spray powders for iron aluminide coating and fabrication of net shape component by powder metallurgy route using this CVD coated powders. This coating can also be applid on jet engine compressor blade and housing, industrial heat treating furnace fixtures, magnetic electronic parts, heating element, piping and tubing for fossil energy application and automotive application, chemical processing equipment , heat exchanger, and structural member of aircraft. The program also resulted in developing a new fabrication route of thermal spray coating and oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) iron aluminide composites enabling more precise control over material microstructures.

  1. Composition, nucleation, and growth of iron oxide concretions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parry, W. T.

    Iron oxide concretions are formed from post depositional, paleogroundwater chemical interaction with iron minerals in porous sedimentary rocks. The concretions record a history of iron mobilization and precipitation caused by changes in pH, oxidation conditions, and activity of bacteria. Transport limited growth rates may be used to estimate the duration of fluid flow events. The Jurassic Navajo Sandstone, an important hydrocarbon reservoir and aquifer on the Colorado Plateau, USA, is an ideal stratum to study concretions because it is widely distributed, well exposed and is the host for a variety of iron oxide concretions. Many of the concretions are nearly spherical and some consist of a rind of goethite that nearly completely fills the sandstone porosity and surrounds a central sandstone core. The interior and exterior host-rock sandstones are similar in detrital minerals, but kaolinite and interstratified illite-smectite are less abundant in the interior. Lepidocrocite is present as sand-grain rims in the exterior sandstone, but not present in the interior of the concretions. Widespread sandstone bleaching resulted from dissolution of early diagenetic hematite grain coatings by chemically reducing water that gained access to the sandstone through fault conduits. The iron was transported in solution and precipitated as iron oxide concretions by oxidation and increasing pH. Iron diffusion and advection growth time models place limits on minimum duration of the diagenetic, fluid flow events that formed the concretions. Concretion rinds 2 mm thick and 25 mm in radius would take place in 2000 years from transport by diffusion and advection and in 3600 years if transport was by diffusion only. Solid concretions 10 mm in radius would grow in 3800 years by diffusion or 2800 years with diffusion and advection. Goethite (α-FeO (OH)) and lepidocrocite (γ-FeO (OH)) nucleated on K-feldspar grains, on illite coatings on sand grains, and on pore-filling illite, but not on

  2. The reduction of iron oxides by volatiles in a rotary hearth furnace process: Part II. The reduction of iron oxide/carbon composites

    SciTech Connect

    Sohn, I.; Fruehan, R.J.

    2006-04-15

    The reduction of iron oxide/carbon composite pellets with hydrogen at 900{sup o}C to 1000{sup o}C was studied. Compared to hydrogen, the reduction by carbon was negligible at 900 degrees C and below. However, significant carbon oxidation of the iron oxide/graphite pellets by H{sub 2O generated from the reduction of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} by H-2 was observed. At higher temperatures, reduction by carbon complicates the overall reduction mechanism, with the iron oxide/graphite composite pellet found to be more reactive than the iron oxide/char composite pellet. From the scanning electron micrographs, partially reduced composite pellets showed a typical topochemical interface with an intermediate region between an oxygen-rich unreacted core and an iron-rich outer shell. To determine the possibility of reduction by volatiles, a layer of iron oxide powders was spread on top of a high volatile containing bituminous coal and heated inside a reactor using infra-red radiation. By separating the individual reactions involved for an iron oxide/coal mixture where a complex set of reactions occur simultaneously, it was possible to determine the sole effect of volatile reduction. It was found that the light reducing gases evolve initially and react with the iron oxide, with complex hydrocarbons evolving at the later stages. The volatiles caused about 20 to 50% reduction of the iron oxide.

  3. The reduction of iron oxides by volatiles in a rotary hearth furnace process: Part II. The reduction of iron oxide/carbon composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, I.; Fruehan, R. J.

    2006-04-01

    The reduction of iron oxide/carbon composite pellets with hydrogen at 900 °C to 1000 °C was studied. Compared to hydrogen, the reduction by carbon was negligible at 900 °C and below. However, significant carbon oxidation of the iron oxide/graphite pellets by H2O generated from the reduction of Fe2O3 by H2 was observed. At higher temperatures, reduction by carbon complicates the overall reduction mechanism, with the iron oxide/graphite composite pellet found to be more reactive than the iron oxide/char composite pellet. From the scanning electron micrographs, partially reduced composite pellets showed a typical topochemical interface with an intermediate region between an oxygen-rich unreacted core and an iron-rich outer shell. To determine the possibility of reduction by volatiles, a layer of iron oxide powders was spread on top of a high volatile containing bituminous coal and heated inside a reactor using infra-red radiation. By separating the individual reactions involved for an iron oxide/coal mixture where a complex set of reactions occur simultaneously, it was possible to determine the sole effect of volatile reduction. It was found that the light reducing gases evolve initially and react with the iron oxide, with complex hydrocarbons evolving at the later stages. The volatiles caused about 20 to 50 pct reduction of the iron oxide.

  4. Chronic exposure to iron oxide, chromium oxide, and nickel oxide fumes of metal dressers in a steelworks

    PubMed Central

    Jones, J. Graham; Warner, C. G.

    1972-01-01

    Graham Jones, J., and Warner, C. G. (1972).Brit. J. industr. Med.,29, 169-177. Chronic exposure to iron oxide, chromium oxide, and nickel oxide fumes of metal dressers in a steelworks. Occupational and medical histories, smoking habits, respiratory symptoms, chest radiographs, and ventilatory capacities were studied in 14 steelworkers employed as deseamers of steel ingots for periods of up to 16 years. The men were exposed for approximately five hours of each working shift to fume concentrations ranging from 1·3 to 294·1 mg/m3 made up mainly of iron oxide with varying proportions of chromium oxide and nickel oxide. Four of the men, with 14 to 16 years' exposure, showed radiological evidence of pneumoconiosis classified as ILO categories 2 or 3. Of these, two had pulmonary function within the normal range and two had measurable loss of function, moderate in one case and mild in the other. Many observers would diagnose these cases as siderosis but the authors consider that this term should be reserved for cases exposed to pure iron compounds. The correct diagnosis is mixed-dust pneumoconiosis and the loss of pulmonary function is caused by the effects of the mixture of metallic oxides. It is probable that inhalation of pure iron oxide does not cause fibrotic pulmonary changes, whereas the inhalation of iron oxide plus certain other substances obviously does. Images PMID:5021996

  5. High pressure effects on the iron iron oxide and nickel nickel oxide oxygen fugacity buffers

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Andrew J; Danielson, Lisa; Righter, Kevin; Seagle, Christopher T; Wang, Yanbin; Prakapenka, Vitali B

    2009-09-25

    The chemical potential of oxygen in natural and experimental samples is commonly reported relative to a specific oxygen fugacity (fO{sub 2}) buffer. These buffers are precisely known at 1 bar, but under high pressures corresponding to the conditions of the deep Earth, oxygen fugacity buffers are poorly calibrated. Reference (1 bar) fO{sub 2} buffers can be integrated to high pressure conditions by integrating the difference in volume between the solid phases, provided that their equations of state are known. In this work, the equations of state and volume difference between the metal-oxide pairs Fe-FeO and Ni-NiO were measured using synchrotron X-ray diffraction in a multi-anvil press and laser heated diamond anvil cells. The results were used to construct high pressure fO{sub 2} buffer curves for these systems. The difference between the Fe-FeO and Ni-NiO buffers is observed to decrease significantly, by several log units, over 80 GPa. The results can be used to improve interpretation of high pressure experiments, specifically Fe-Ni exchange between metallic and oxide phases.

  6. Intratumoral iron oxide nanoparticle hyperthermia and radiation cancer treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoopes, P. J.; Strawbridge, R. R.; Gibson, U. J.; Zeng, Q.; Pierce, Z. E.; Savellano, M.; Tate, J. A.; Ogden, J. A.; Baker, I.; Ivkov, R.; Foreman, A. R.

    2007-02-01

    The potential synergism and benefit of combined hyperthermia and radiation for cancer treatment is well established, but has yet to be optimized clinically. Specifically, the delivery of heat via external arrays /applicators or interstitial antennas has not demonstrated the spatial precision or specificity necessary to achieve appropriate a highly positive therapeutic ratio. Recently, antibody directed and possibly even non-antibody directed iron oxide nanoparticle hyperthermia has shown significant promise as a tumor treatment modality. Our studies are designed to determine the effects (safety and efficacy) of iron oxide nanoparticle hyperthermia and external beam radiation in a murine breast cancer model. Methods: MTG-B murine breast cancer cells (1 x 106) were implanted subcutaneous in 7 week-old female C3H/HeJ mice and grown to a treatment size of 150 mm3 +/- 50 mm3. Tumors were then injected locally with iron oxide nanoparticles and heated via an alternating magnetic field (AMF) generator operated at approximately 160 kHz and 400 - 550 Oe. Tumor growth was monitored daily using standard 3-D caliper measurement technique and formula. specific Mouse tumors were heated using a cooled, 36 mm diameter square copper tube induction coil which provided optimal heating in a 1 cm wide region in the center of the coil. Double dextran coated 80 nm iron oxide nanoparticles (Triton Biosystems) were used in all studies. Intra-tumor, peri-tumor and rectal (core body) temperatures were continually measured throughout the treatment period. Results: Preliminary in vivo nanoparticle-AMF hyperthermia (167 KHz and 400 or 550 Oe) studies demonstrated dose responsive cytotoxicity which enhanced the effects of external beam radiation. AMF associated eddy currents resulted in nonspecific temperature increases in exposed tissues which did not contain nanoparticles, however these effects were minor and not injurious to the mice. These studies also suggest that iron oxide nanoparticle

  7. Iron-Mediated Lysosomal Membrane Permeabilization in Ethanol-Induced Hepatic Oxidative Damage and Apoptosis: Protective Effects of Quercetin

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanyan; Chen, Man; Xu, Yanyan; Yu, Xiao; Xiong, Ting; Du, Min; Sun, Jian; Liu, Liegang; Tang, Yuhan; Yao, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Iron, in its free ferrous states, can catalyze Fenton reaction to produce OH∙, which is recognized as a crucial role in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver diseases (ALD). As a result of continuous decomposition of iron-containing compounds, lysosomes contain a pool of redox-active iron. To investigate the important role of intralysosomal iron in alcoholic liver injury and the potential protection of quercetin, male C57BL/6J mice fed by Lieber De Carli diets containing ethanol (30% of total calories) were cotreated by quercetin or deferoxamine (DFO) for 15 weeks and ethanol-incubated mice primary hepatocytes were pretreated with FeCl3, DFO, and bafilomycin A1 at their optimal concentrations and exposure times. Chronic ethanol consumption caused an evident increase in lysosomal redox-active iron accompanying sustained oxidative damage. Iron-mediated ROS could trigger lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) and subsequent mitochondria apoptosis. The hepatotoxicity was attenuated by reducing lysosomal iron while being exacerbated by escalating lysosomal iron. Quercetin substantially alleviated the alcoholic liver oxidative damage and apoptosis by decreasing lysosome iron and ameliorating iron-mediated LMP, which provided a new prospective of the use of quercetin against ALD. PMID:27057276

  8. Mutations and environmental factors affecting regulation of riboflavin synthesis and iron assimilation also cause oxidative stress in the yeast Pichia guilliermondii.

    PubMed

    Boretsky, Yuriy R; Protchenko, Olga V; Prokopiv, Tetiana M; Mukalov, Igor O; Fedorovych, Daria V; Sibirny, Andriy A

    2007-10-01

    Iron deficiency causes oversynthesis of riboflavin in several yeast species, known as flavinogenic yeasts. However, the mechanisms of such regulation are not known. We found that mutations causing riboflavin overproduction and iron hyperaccumulation (rib80, rib81 and hit1), as well as cobalt excess or iron deficiency all provoke oxidative stress in the Pichia guilliermondii yeast. Iron content in the cells, production both of riboflavin and malondialdehyde by P. guilliermondii wild type and hit1 mutant strains depend on a type of carbon source used in cultivation media. The data suggest that the regulation of riboflavin biosynthesis and iron assimilation in P. guilliermondii are linked with cellular oxidative state. PMID:17910100

  9. Enzymes of respiratory iron oxidation. Progress report, March 1990--November 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, R. II

    1991-12-31

    This report focuses on the progress made in three areas of research concerned with enzymes involved in respiratory iron oxidation. The three areas are as follows: development of an improved procedure for the routine large scale culture of iron oxidizing chemolithotrophs based on the in-situ electrolysis of the soluble iron in the growth medium; to perform iron oxidation kinetic studies on whole cells using the oxygen electrode; and to identify, separate, purify, and characterize the individual cellular components.

  10. Curcumin Attenuates Iron Accumulation and Oxidative Stress in the Liver and Spleen of Chronic Iron-Overloaded Rats

    PubMed Central

    Badria, Farid A.; Ibrahim, Ahmed S.; Badria, Adel F.; Elmarakby, Ahmed A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Iron overload is now recognized as a health problem in industrialized countries, as excessive iron is highly toxic for liver and spleen. The potential use of curcumin as an iron chelator has not been clearly identified experimentally in iron overload condition. Here, we evaluate the efficacy of curcumin to alleviate iron overload-induced hepatic and splenic abnormalities and to gain insight into the underlying mechanisms. Design and Methods Three groups of male adult rats were treated as follows: control rats, rats treated with iron in a drinking water for 2 months followed by either vehicle or curcumin treatment for 2 more months. Thereafter, we studied the effects of curcumin on iron overload-induced lipid peroxidation and anti-oxidant depletion. Results Treatment of iron-overloaded rats with curcumin resulted in marked decreases in iron accumulation within liver and spleen. Iron-overloaded rats had significant increases in malonyldialdehyde (MDA), a marker of lipid peroxidation and nitric oxide (NO) in liver and spleen when compared to control group. The effects of iron overload on lipid peroxidation and NO levels were significantly reduced by the intervention treatment with curcumin (P<0.05). Furthermore, the endogenous anti-oxidant activities/levels in liver and spleen were also significantly decreased in chronic iron overload and administration of curcumin restored the decrease in the hepatic and splenic antioxidant activities/levels. Conclusion Our study suggests that curcumin may represent a new horizon in managing iron overload-induced toxicity as well as in pathological diseases characterized by hepatic iron accumulation such as thalassemia, sickle cell anemia, and myelodysplastic syndromes possibly via iron chelation, reduced oxidative stress derived lipid peroxidation and improving the body endogenous antioxidant defense mechanism. PMID:26230491

  11. Multiphase equation of state for iron

    SciTech Connect

    Kerley, G I

    1993-02-01

    The PANDA code is used to build a multiphase equation of state (EOS) table for iron. Separate EOS tables were first constructed for each of the individual phases. The phase diagram and multiphase EOS were then determined from the Helmholtz free energies. The model includes four solid phases ([alpha],[gamma], [delta], and [var epsilon]) and a fluid phase (including the liquid, vapor, and supercritical regions). The model gives good agreement with experimental thermophysical data, static compression data, phase boundaries, and shock-wave measurements. Contributions from thermal electronic excitation, computed from a quantum-statistical-mechanical model, were found to be very important. This EOS covers a wide range of densities (0--1000 g/cm[sup 3]) and temperatures (0--1.2[times]10[sup 7] K). It is also applicable to RHA steel. The new EOS is used in hydrocode simulations of plate impact experiments, a nylon ball impact on steel, and the shaped charge perforation of an RHA plate. The new EOS table can be accessed through the SNL-SESAME library as material number 2150.

  12. Radiation induced chemical activity at iron and copper oxide surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiff, Sarah C.

    The radiolysis of three iron oxides, two copper oxides, and aluminum oxide with varying amounts of water were performed using gamma-rays and 5 MeV 4He ions. The adsorbed water on the surfaces was characterized using temperature programmed desorption and diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy, which indicated that all of the oxides had chemisorbed water on the surface. Physisorbed water was observed on the Fe2O 3 and Al2O3 surfaces as well. Molecular hydrogen was produced from adsorbed water only on Fe2O3 and Al 2O3, while the other compounds did not show any hydrogen production due to the low amounts of water on the surfaces. Slurries of varying amounts of water were also examined for hydrogen production, and they showed yields that were greater than the yield for bulk water. However, the yields of hydrogen from the copper compounds were much lower than those of the iron suggesting that the copper oxides are relatively inert to radiation induced damage to nearby water. X-ray diffraction measurements did not show any indication of changes to the bulk crystal structure due to radiolysis for any of the oxides. The surfaces of the oxides were analyzed using Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). For the iron samples, FeO and Fe3O4, Raman spectroscopy revealed areas of Fe2O3 had formed following irradiation with He ions. XPS indicated the formation of a new oxygen species on the iron oxide surfaces. Raman spectroscopy of the copper oxides did not reveal any changes in the surface composition, however, XPS measurements showed a decrease in the amount of OH groups on the surface of Cu2O, while for the CuO samples the amount of OH groups were found to increase following radiolysis. Pristine Al2O3 showed the presence of a surface oxyhydroxide layer which was observed to decrease following radiolysis, consistent with the formation of molecular hydrogen.

  13. Iron aluminide alloy container for solid oxide fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Judkins, Roddie Reagan; Singh, Prabhakar; Sikka, Vinod Kumar

    2000-01-01

    A container for fuel cells is made from an iron aluminide alloy. The container alloy preferably includes from about 13 to about 22 weight percent Al, from about 2 to about 8 weight percent Cr, from about 0.1 to about 4 weight percent M selected from Zr and Hf, from about 0.005 to about 0.5 weight percent B or from about 0.001 to about 1 weight percent C, and the balance Fe and incidental impurities. The iron aluminide container alloy is extremely resistant to corrosion and metal loss when exposed to dual reducing and oxidizing atmospheres at elevated temperatures. The alloy is particularly useful for containment vessels for solid oxide fuel cells, as a replacement for stainless steel alloys which are currently used.

  14. Versatile ferrofluids based on polyethylene glycol coated iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brullot, W.; Reddy, N. K.; Wouters, J.; Valev, V. K.; Goderis, B.; Vermant, J.; Verbiest, T.

    2012-06-01

    Versatile ferrofluids based on polyethylene glycol coated iron oxide nanoparticles were obtained by a facile protocol and thoroughly characterized. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles synthesized using a modified forced hydrolysis method were functionalized with polyethylene glycol silane (PEG silane), precipitated and dried. These functionalized particles are dispersable in a range of solvents and concentrations depending on the desired properties. Examples of tunable properties are magnetic behavior, optical and magneto-optical response, thermal features and rheological behavior. As such, PEG silane functionalized particles represent a platform for the development of new materials that have broad applicability in e.g. biomedical, industrial or photonic environments. Magnetic, optical, magneto-optical, thermal and rheological properties of several ferrofluids based on PEG coated particles with different concentrations of particles dispersed in low molecular mass polyethylene glycol were investigated, establishing the applicability of such materials.

  15. Dendronized iron oxide colloids for imaging the sentinel lymph node

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jouhannaud, J.; Garofalo, A.; Felder-Flesch, D.; Pourroy, G.

    2015-03-01

    Various methods have been used in medicine for more than one century to explore the lymphatic system. Radioactive colloids (RuS labelled with 99mTc) or/and Vital Blue dye are injected around the primary tumour and detected by means of nuclear probe or visual colour inspection respectively. The simultaneous clinical use of both markers (dye and radionuclide) improves the sensitivity of detection close to 100%. Superparamagnetic iron oxides (SPIOs) are currently receiving much attention as strong T2 weighted magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents that can be potentially used for preoperative localization of sentinel nodes, but also for peroperative detection of sentinel node using hand-held probes. In that context, we present the elaboration of dendronized iron oxide nanoparticles elaborated at the Institute of Physics and Chemistry of Materials of Strasbourg.

  16. Reflection spectra and magnetochemistry of iron oxides and natural surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wasilewski, P.

    1978-01-01

    The magnetic properties and spectral characteristics of iron oxides are distinctive. Diagnostic features in reflectance spectra (0.5 to 2.4 micron) for alpha Fe2O3, gamma Fe2O3, and FeOOH include location of Fe3(+) absorption features, intensity ratios at various wavelengths, and the curve shape between 1.2 micron and 2.4 micron. The reflection spectrum of natural rock surfaces are seldom those of the bulk rock because of weathering effects. Coatings are found to be dominated by iron oxides and clay. A simple macroscopic model of rock spectra (based on concepts of stains and coatings) is considered adequate for interpretation of LANDSAT data. The magnetic properties of materials associated with specific spectral types and systematic changes in both spectra and magnetic properties are considered.

  17. Biosynthesis of nitric oxide activates iron regulatory factor in macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Drapier, J C; Hirling, H; Wietzerbin, J; Kaldy, P; Kühn, L C

    1993-01-01

    Biosynthesis of nitric oxide (NO) from L-arginine modulates activity of iron-dependent enzymes, including mitochondrial acontiase, an [Fe-S] protein. We examined the effect of NO on the activity of iron regulatory factor (IRF), a cytoplasmic protein which modulates both ferritin mRNA translation and transferrin receptor mRNA stability by binding to specific mRNA sequences called iron responsive elements (IREs). Murine macrophages were activated with interferon-gamma and lipopolysaccharide to induce NO synthase activity and cultured in the presence or absence of NG-substituted analogues of L-arginine which served as selective inhibitors of NO synthesis. Measurement of the nitrite concentration in the culture medium was taken as an index of NO production. Mitochondria-free cytosols were then prepared and aconitase activity as well as IRE binding activity and induction of IRE binding activity were correlated and depended on NO synthesis after IFN-gamma and/or LPS stimulation. Authentic NO gas as well as the NO-generating compound 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1) also conversely modulated aconitase and IRE binding activities of purified recombinant IRF. These results provide evidence that endogenously produced NO may modulate the post-transcriptional regulation of genes involved in iron homeostasis and support the hypothesis that the [Fe-S] cluster of IRF mediates iron-dependent regulation. Images PMID:7504626

  18. Oxidative stress and intracellular infections: more iron to the fire.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Norma W

    2012-07-01

    The immune system's battle against pathogens includes the "respiratory burst," a rapid release of ROS from leukocytes, thought to play a role in destroying the invading species. In this issue of the JCI, Paiva et al. demonstrate that oxidative stress actually enhances infection with the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, by a mechanism that may involve facilitating parasite access to iron. Their findings suggest a novel direction for the development of drugs against intracellular parasites. PMID:22728929

  19. Iron atoms redistribution in oxide films of Zr-Fe, Zr-Fe-Cu alloys during corrosion in autoclave at 350°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippov, V.; Bateev, A.

    2016-04-01

    The data on changes of iron atoms state in the oxide films of binary Zr-1.24 mas.%Fe and ternary Zr-1.39 mas.%Fe-0.60 mas.%Cu zirconium alloys are obtained. Alloys are subjected to corrosion tests under autoclave conditions at 350°C temperature in a steam-water environment under pressure p = 16.8 MPa. In initial specimens of the alloys the iron atoms are in the form of intermetallic compounds. In oxide films the decomposition of intermetallic compounds and formation of new compounds occurs with structural phase distortion. In the oxide films metallic the metallic iron particles α-Fe, iron oxide in the form of hematite α-Fe2O3, solid solutions of iron ions in ZrO2 are formed. The phase composition of the oxide films depends on the alloy composition and changes during the growth process of the oxide film.

  20. Surface Reactivity of Core Shell Iron-Iron Oxide Nanoclusters towards Breakdown of Carbon Tetrachloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarsem S., Maninder K.; Qiang, You; Kim, Hongseok; Amonette, James E.; Baer, Donald R.

    2012-02-01

    Zero-valent iron (ZVI) is one of the technologies for groundwater remediation to reduce contaminants by removal of mobile chlorinated hydrocarbons. Iron-Iron oxide (Fe/Fe3O4) nanoclusters (NCs) made in our laboratory using cluster deposition technique have enhanced reactivity towards targeted contaminants due to the presence of ZVI protected by a passivated oxide shell. Here, we investigate the effectiveness of the Fe/Fe3O4 NCs in reducing carbon tetrachloride (CT) under laboratory conditions. The reactivity of the NCs was investigated by conducting unbuffered aqueous batch experiments to reduce CT at room temperature. Initial results show that 80% of the degradation of CT resulted in the formation of dichloromethane (DCM) and chloroform (CF); the remainder likely followed a competing pathway to yield nonhazardous products such as CO. The production of undesirable hydrogenated products such as DCM and CF suggests that the dominant reaction pathway occurs through hydrogen (H) atom transfer via H atoms generated by corrosion of the iron. Comparative experiments with ZVI NCs prepared by other methods are underway and the results will be reported. Future work is to analyze and understand factors that control the reaction pathways between desirable and undesirable products.

  1. Measurements of nitric oxide on the heme iron and -93 thiol of human hemoglobin during cycles of oxygenation and deoxygenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiuli; Cho, Man; Spencer, Netanya Y.; Patel, Neil; Huang, Zhi; Shields, Howard; King, S. Bruce; Gladwin, Mark T.; Hogg, Neil; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B.

    2003-09-01

    Nitric oxide has been proposed to be transported by hemoglobin as a third respiratory gas and to elicit vasodilation by an oxygen-linked (allosteric) mechanism. For hemoglobin to transport nitric oxide bioactivity it must capture nitric oxide as iron nitrosyl hemoglobin rather than destroy it by dioxygenation. Once bound to the heme iron, nitric oxide has been reported to migrate reversibly from the heme group of hemoglobin to the -93 cysteinyl residue, in response to an oxygen saturation-dependent conformational change, to form an S-nitrosothiol. However, such a transfer requires redox chemistry with oxidation of the nitric oxide or -93 cysteinyl residue. In this article, we examine the ability of nitric oxide to undergo this intramolecular transfer by cycling human hemoglobin between oxygenated and deoxygenated states. Under various conditions, we found no evidence for intramolecular transfer of nitric oxide from either cysteine to heme or heme to cysteine. In addition, we observed that contaminating nitrite can lead to formation of iron nitrosyl hemoglobin in deoxygenated hemoglobin preparations and a radical in oxygenated hemoglobin preparations. Using 15N-labeled nitrite, we clearly demonstrate that nitrite chemistry could explain previously reported results that suggested apparent nitric oxide cycling from heme to thiol. Consistent with our results from these experiments conducted in vitro, we found no arterial/venous gradient of iron nitrosyl hemoglobin detectable by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. Our results do not support a role for allosterically controlled intramolecular transfer of nitric oxide in hemoglobin as a function of oxygen saturation.

  2. Reducing arsenic accumulation in rice grain through iron oxide amendment.

    PubMed

    Farrow, Eric M; Wang, Jianmin; Burken, Joel G; Shi, Honglan; Yan, Wengui; Yang, John; Hua, Bin; Deng, Baolin

    2015-08-01

    Effects of soil-arsenic (As), phosphorus and iron oxide on As accumulation in rice grain were investigated. Cultivars that have significantly different sensitivity to As, straighthead-resistant Zhe 733 and straighthead-susceptible Cocodrie, were used to represent different cultivar varieties. The grain accumulation of other elements of concern, selenium (Se), molybdenum (Mo), and cadmium (Cd) was also monitored. Results demonstrated that high soil-As not only resulted in high grain-As, but could also result in high grain-Se, and Zhe 733 had significantly less grain-As than Cocodrie did. However, soil-As did not impact grain-Mo and Cd. Among all elements monitored, iron oxide amendment significantly reduced grain-As for both cultivars, while the phosphate application only reduced grain-Se for Zhe 733. Results also indicated that cultivar type significantly impacted grain accumulation of all monitored trace elements. Therefore, applying iron oxide to As-contaminated land, in addition to choosing appropriate rice cultivar, can effectively reduce the grain accumulation of As. PMID:25910688

  3. Electron uptake by iron-oxidizing phototrophic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Bose, A; Gardel, EJ; Vidoudez, C; Parra, EA; Girguis, PR

    2014-02-26

    Oxidation-reduction reactions underlie energy generation in nearly all life forms. Although most organisms use soluble oxidants and reductants, some microbes can access solid-phase materials as electron-acceptors or -donors via extracellular electron transfer. Many studies have focused on the reduction of solid-phase oxidants. Far less is known about electron uptake via microbial extracellular electron transfer, and almost nothing is known about the associated mechanisms. Here we show that the iron-oxidizing photoautotroph Rhodopseudomonas palustris TIE-1 accepts electrons from a poised electrode, with carbon dioxide as the sole carbon source/electron acceptor. Both electron uptake and ruBisCo form I expression are stimulated by light. Electron uptake also occurs in the dark, uncoupled from photosynthesis. Notably, the pioABC operon, which encodes a protein system essential for photoautotrophic growth by ferrous iron oxidation, influences electron uptake. These data reveal a previously unknown metabolic versatility of photoferrotrophs to use extracellular electron transfer for electron uptake.

  4. Oxygen fugacities determined from iron oxidation state in natural (Mg,Fe)O ferropericlase: new insights into lower mantle diamond formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longo, Micaela; McCammon, Catherine; Bulanova, Galina; Kaminsky, Felix; Tappert, Ralf

    2010-05-01

    Mineral inclusions in diamonds reflect the chemical composition and mineral assemblages of the two principal rock types occurring in the deep lithosphere, peridotite and eclogite. However, in the past two decades, the discovery of rare diamonds containing inclusions such as former Mg,Si-perovskite and (Mg,Fe)O ferropericlase led to the possibility that diamonds can form also at greater depths. (Mg,Fe)O ferropericlase is the most commonly found inclusion in lower mantle diamonds (more than 50% of the occurrences). Since the Fe3+ concentration in (Mg,Fe)O is sensitive to oxygen fugacity also at high pressures (Frost et al., 2004), the determination of Fe3+/Σ Fe in such inclusions provides a direct method for investigating lower mantle redox conditions during diamond formation. In the present study we explore whether variations in mantle oxygen fugacity exist as a function of chemical, physical and geographic parameters, by studying (Mg,Fe)O inclusions in lower mantle diamonds from a wide range of localities. Eighteen (Mg,Fe)O ferropericlase inclusions from lower mantle diamonds selected worldwide were measured by the flank method using the calibration previously established for synthetic ferropericlase (Longo et al., in preparation). The Fe3+/Σ Fe measured in (Mg,Fe)O inclusions of the present work (Juina, Brazil, Machado River, Brazil and Orroroo, Australia) were compared to data already available for other inclusions of larger size previously measured by Mössbauer spectroscopy (McCammon et al. 1997, 2004). Oxygen fugacity was estimated for each specimen relative to two reference buffers such as the Fe-(Mg,Fe)O buffer (reducing conditions) and the Re-ReO2 buffer (oxidizing conditions). Our results show a dependence on geographical location, and in particular, inclusions from the African province (Kankan Guinea) seem to record more reducing mantle conditions than the inclusions measured from the other provinces, which cover a larger range of fO2 conditions. It is

  5. Surface photovoltage analysis of iron contamination in silicon processing and the relation to gate oxide integrity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henley, Worth B.

    1995-09-01

    Surface photovoltage (SPV), a contactless optical technique for measuring minority carrier lifetime, is used to quantify the relationship between silicon iron contamination level and thin gate oxide integrity. Iron concentration levels in the range of 1 X 1010 cm-3 to 5 X 1013 cm-3 are evaluated for oxide thicknesses of 8 to 20 nm. Ramp voltage electrical breakdown and time dependant dielectric breakdown measurement on the iron contaminated gate oxide capacitors are reported. Distinct iron contamination threshold limits based on defect density and gate oxide integrity evaluate cleaning efficiencies and metallic cross contamination effects during thermal processing contamination. Iron-silicide precipitation kinetics are investigated by the lifetime analysis procedure.

  6. Magnetization and Mössbauer study of partially oxidized iron cluster films deposited on HOPG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarras-Wahlberg, Nils; Kamali, Saeed; Andersson, Mats; Johansson, Christer; Rosén, Arne

    2014-10-01

    Iron clusters produced in a laser vaporization source were deposited to form cluster-assembled thin films with different thicknesses on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite substrates. The development of oxidation of the clusters with time, up to three years, was investigated by magnetic measurements using an alternating gradient magnetometer. Furthermore, to receive information about the oxidation states, clusters of 57Fe were studied using Mössbauer spectroscopy. The magnetic analysis shows a time evolution of the saturation magnetization, remanence, and coercivity, determined from the hysteresis curves characteristic of a progressing oxidation. The different thicknesses of the iron cluster films as well as a protective layer of vanadium influence the magnetic properties when the samples are subjected to oxidation with time. While the saturation magnetization and remanence decrease and reach half the initial values for almost all the samples after three years, the coercivity increases for all samples and is more substantial for the thickest sample with a vanadium protective layer. This value is three folded after three years. Furthermore, based on a core-shell model and using the saturation magnetization values we have been able to quantitatively calculate the amount of the increase of Fe-oxide as a function of time. The Mössbauer spectroscopy shows peaks corresponding to iron metal and maghemite.

  7. Iron requirement for Mn(II) oxidation by Leptothrix discophora SS-1.

    PubMed

    El Gheriany, Iman A; Bocioaga, Daniela; Hay, Anthony G; Ghiorse, William C; Shuler, Michael L; Lion, Leonard W

    2009-03-01

    A common form of biocatalysis of Mn(II) oxidation results in the formation of biogenic Mn(III, IV) oxides and is a key reaction in the geochemical cycling of Mn. In this study, we grew the model Mn(II)-oxidizing bacterium Leptothrix discophora SS-1 in media with limited iron (0.1 microM iron/5.8 mM pyruvate) and sufficient iron (0.2 microM iron/5.8 mM pyruvate). The influence of iron on the rate of extracellular Mn(II) oxidation was evaluated. Cultures in which cell growth was limited by iron exhibited reduced abilities to oxidize Mn(II) compared to cultures in medium with sufficient iron. While the extracellular Mn(II)-oxidizing factor (MOF) is thought to be a putative multicopper oxidase, Mn(II) oxidation in the presence of zero added Cu(II) was detected and the decrease in the observed Mn(II) oxidation rate in iron-limited cultures was not relieved when the medium was supplemented with Cu(II). The decline of Mn(II) oxidation under iron-limited conditions was not accompanied by siderophore production and is unlikely to be an artifact of siderophore complex formation with Mn(III). The temporal variations in mofA gene transcript levels under conditions of limited and abundant iron were similar, indicating that iron limitation did not interfere with the transcription of the mofA gene. Our quantitative PCR results provide a step forward in understanding the regulation of Mn(II) oxidation. The mechanistic role of iron in Mn(II) oxidation is uncertain; the data are consistent with a direct requirement for iron as a component of the MOF or an indirect effect of iron resulting from the limitation of one of many cellular functions requiring iron. PMID:19114505

  8. Iron Requirement for Mn(II) Oxidation by Leptothrix discophora SS-1▿

    PubMed Central

    El Gheriany, Iman A.; Bocioaga, Daniela; Hay, Anthony G.; Ghiorse, William C.; Shuler, Michael L.; Lion, Leonard W.

    2009-01-01

    A common form of biocatalysis of Mn(II) oxidation results in the formation of biogenic Mn(III, IV) oxides and is a key reaction in the geochemical cycling of Mn. In this study, we grew the model Mn(II)-oxidizing bacterium Leptothrix discophora SS-1 in media with limited iron (0.1 μM iron/5.8 mM pyruvate) and sufficient iron (0.2 μM iron/5.8 mM pyruvate). The influence of iron on the rate of extracellular Mn(II) oxidation was evaluated. Cultures in which cell growth was limited by iron exhibited reduced abilities to oxidize Mn(II) compared to cultures in medium with sufficient iron. While the extracellular Mn(II)-oxidizing factor (MOF) is thought to be a putative multicopper oxidase, Mn(II) oxidation in the presence of zero added Cu(II) was detected and the decrease in the observed Mn(II) oxidation rate in iron-limited cultures was not relieved when the medium was supplemented with Cu(II). The decline of Mn(II) oxidation under iron-limited conditions was not accompanied by siderophore production and is unlikely to be an artifact of siderophore complex formation with Mn(III). The temporal variations in mofA gene transcript levels under conditions of limited and abundant iron were similar, indicating that iron limitation did not interfere with the transcription of the mofA gene. Our quantitative PCR results provide a step forward in understanding the regulation of Mn(II) oxidation. The mechanistic role of iron in Mn(II) oxidation is uncertain; the data are consistent with a direct requirement for iron as a component of the MOF or an indirect effect of iron resulting from the limitation of one of many cellular functions requiring iron. PMID:19114505

  9. Evaluation of iron oxide nanoparticle biocompatibility

    PubMed Central

    Hanini, Amel; Schmitt, Alain; Kacem, Kamel; Chau, François; Ammar, Souad; Gavard, Julie

    2011-01-01

    Nanotechnology is an exciting field of investigation for the development of new treatments for many human diseases. However, it is necessary to assess the biocompatibility of nanoparticles in vitro and in vivo before considering clinical applications. Our characterization of polyol-produced maghemite γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles showed high structural quality. The particles showed a homogeneous spherical size around 10 nm and could form aggregates depending on the dispersion conditions. Such nanoparticles were efficiently taken up in vitro by human endothelial cells, which represent the first biological barrier to nanoparticles in vivo. However, γ-Fe2O3 can cause cell death within 24 hours of exposure, most likely through oxidative stress. Further in vivo exploration suggests that although γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles are rapidly cleared through the urine, they can lead to toxicity in the liver, kidneys and lungs, while the brain and heart remain unaffected. In conclusion, γ-Fe2O3 could exhibit harmful properties and therefore surface coating, cellular targeting, and local exposure should be considered before developing clinical applications. PMID:21589646

  10. Evaluation of iron oxide nanoparticle biocompatibility.

    PubMed

    Hanini, Amel; Schmitt, Alain; Kacem, Kamel; Chau, François; Ammar, Souad; Gavard, Julie

    2011-01-01

    Nanotechnology is an exciting field of investigation for the development of new treatments for many human diseases. However, it is necessary to assess the biocompatibility of nanoparticles in vitro and in vivo before considering clinical applications. Our characterization of polyol-produced maghemite γ-Fe(2)O(3) nanoparticles showed high structural quality. The particles showed a homogeneous spherical size around 10 nm and could form aggregates depending on the dispersion conditions. Such nanoparticles were efficiently taken up in vitro by human endothelial cells, which represent the first biological barrier to nanoparticles in vivo. However, γ-Fe(2)O(3) can cause cell death within 24 hours of exposure, most likely through oxidative stress. Further in vivo exploration suggests that although γ-Fe(2)O(3) nanoparticles are rapidly cleared through the urine, they can lead to toxicity in the liver, kidneys and lungs, while the brain and heart remain unaffected. In conclusion, γ-Fe(2)O(3) could exhibit harmful properties and therefore surface coating, cellular targeting, and local exposure should be considered before developing clinical applications. PMID:21589646