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Sample records for iron oxides coated

  1. Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Iron Aluminide by CVD Coated Powders

    SciTech Connect

    Asit Biswas Andrew J. Sherman

    2006-09-25

    This I &I Category2 program developed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of iron, aluminum and aluminum oxide coated iron powders and the availability of high temperature oxidation, corrosion and erosion resistant coating for future power generation equipment and can be used for retrofitting existing fossil-fired power plant equipment. This coating will provide enhanced life and performance of Coal-Fired Boilers components such as fire side corrosion on the outer diameter (OD) of the water wall and superheater tubing as well as on the inner diameter (ID) and OD of larger diameter headers. The program also developed a manufacturing route for readily available thermal spray powders for iron aluminide coating and fabrication of net shape component by powder metallurgy route using this CVD coated powders. This coating can also be applid on jet engine compressor blade and housing, industrial heat treating furnace fixtures, magnetic electronic parts, heating element, piping and tubing for fossil energy application and automotive application, chemical processing equipment , heat exchanger, and structural member of aircraft. The program also resulted in developing a new fabrication route of thermal spray coating and oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) iron aluminide composites enabling more precise control over material microstructures.

  2. Versatile ferrofluids based on polyethylene glycol coated iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brullot, W.; Reddy, N. K.; Wouters, J.; Valev, V. K.; Goderis, B.; Vermant, J.; Verbiest, T.

    2012-06-01

    Versatile ferrofluids based on polyethylene glycol coated iron oxide nanoparticles were obtained by a facile protocol and thoroughly characterized. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles synthesized using a modified forced hydrolysis method were functionalized with polyethylene glycol silane (PEG silane), precipitated and dried. These functionalized particles are dispersable in a range of solvents and concentrations depending on the desired properties. Examples of tunable properties are magnetic behavior, optical and magneto-optical response, thermal features and rheological behavior. As such, PEG silane functionalized particles represent a platform for the development of new materials that have broad applicability in e.g. biomedical, industrial or photonic environments. Magnetic, optical, magneto-optical, thermal and rheological properties of several ferrofluids based on PEG coated particles with different concentrations of particles dispersed in low molecular mass polyethylene glycol were investigated, establishing the applicability of such materials.

  3. Photocatalytic Iron Oxide Coatings Produced by Thermal Spraying Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navidpour, A. H.; Salehi, M.; Amirnasr, M.; Salimijazi, H. R.; Azarpour Siahkali, M.; Kalantari, Y.; Mohammadnezhad, M.

    2015-12-01

    Recently, hematite coatings with semiconductor properties have received attention for photocatalytic applications. In this study, plasma and flame spraying techniques were used for hematite deposition on 316 stainless steel plates. X-ray diffraction was used for phase composition analysis, and methylene blue was used as an organic pollutant to evaluate the photocatalytic activity of thermally sprayed coatings. The results showed that all these coatings could act under visible-light irradiation but the one deposited by flame spraying at 20 cm stand-off distance showed the highest photocatalytic activity. The results showed that wavelength of the light source and pH of the solution affected the photocatalytic activity significantly. It was also shown that thermally sprayed iron oxide coatings could have a high photo-absorption ability, which could positively affect the photocatalytic activity.

  4. Iron oxide nanoparticles for magnetically assisted patterned coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodi, Gianina; Hritcu, Doina; Draganescu, Dan; Popa, Marcel I.

    2015-08-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles able to magnetically assemble during the curing stage of a polymeric support to create micro-scale surface protuberances in a controlled manner were prepared and characterized. The bare Fe3O4 particles were obtained by two methods: co-precipitation from an aqueous solution containing Fe3+/Fe2+ ions with a molar ratio of 2:1 and partial oxidation of ferrous ions in alkaline conditions. The products were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and magnetization measurement. They were subsequently functionalized using oleic acid, sodium oleate, or non-ionic surfactant mixtures with various hydrophilic to lipophilic balance (HLB) values. Composite nanoparticle-polymer films prepared by spraying were deposited and cured by drying on glass slides under a static magnetic field in the range of 1.5-5.5 mT. Magnetic field generated surface roughness was evidenced by optical and scanning electron microscopy. The optimum hierarchical patterning was obtained with the nanoparticles produced by partial oxidation and functionalized with hydrophobic surfactants. Possible applications may include ice-phobic composite coatings.

  5. Interaction of polyacrylic acid coated and non-coated iron oxide nanoparticles with human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Couto, Diana; Freitas, Marisa; Vilas-Boas, Vânia; Dias, Irene; Porto, Graça; Lopez-Quintela, M Arturo; Rivas, José; Freitas, Paulo; Carvalho, Félix; Fernandes, Eduarda

    2014-02-10

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (ION), with different coatings and sizes, have attracted extensive interest in the last years to be applied in drug delivery, cancer therapy and as contrast agents in imagiologic techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging. However, the safety of these nanoparticles is still not completely established, particularly to host defense systems that are usually recruited for their clearance from the body. In this paper, given the importance of neutrophils in the immune response of the organism to nanoparticles, the effect of polyacrylic acid (PAA)-coated and non-coated ION on human neutrophils was evaluated in vitro, namely their capacity to activate the oxidative burst and to modify their lifespan. The obtained results showed that the studied PAA-coated and non-coated ION triggered neutrophils' oxidative burst in a NADPH oxidase dependent manner, and that PAA-coated ION increased - while non-coated ION prevented - apoptotic signaling and apoptosis. These effects may have important clinical implications in biomedical applications of ION. PMID:24291037

  6. Magnetic hyperthermia in phosphate coated iron oxide nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahiri, B. B.; Muthukumaran, T.; Philip, John

    2016-06-01

    We study the magnetic field induced hyperthermia in water based phosphate coated Fe3O4 nanofluids, synthesized by a co-precipitation method using ferrous and ferric salt solutions, ammonia and orthophosphoric acid. The specific absorption rate (SAR) values were measured at a fixed frequency of 126 kHz and at extremely low field amplitudes. The SAR values were determined from the initial rate of temperature rise curves under non-adiabatic conditions. It was observed that the SAR initially increases with sample concentration, attains a maximum at an optimum concentration and beyond which SAR decreases. The decrease in SAR values beyond the optimum concentration was attributed to the enhancement of dipolar interaction and agglomeration of the particles. The system independent intrinsic loss power (ILP) values, obtained by normalizing the SAR values with respect to field amplitude and frequency, were found to vary between 158-125 nHm2 kg-1, which were the highest benchmark values reported in the biologically safe experimental limit of 1.03-0.92×108 Am-1 s-1. The very high value of ILP observed in the bio-compatible phosphate coated iron oxide nanofluids may find practical applications for these nanoparticles in tumor targeted hyperthermia treatment.

  7. Transport and viability of Escherichia coli cells in clean and iron oxide coated sand following coating with silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ngwenya, Bryne T; Curry, Philip; Kapetas, Leon

    2015-08-01

    A mechanistic understanding of processes controlling the transport and viability of bacteria in porous media is critical for designing in situ bioremediation and microbiological water decontamination programs. We investigated the combined influence of coating sand with iron oxide and silver nanoparticles on the transport and viability of Escherichia coli cells under saturated conditions. Results showed that iron oxide coatings increase cell deposition which was generally reversed by silver nanoparticle coatings in the early stages of injection. These observations are consistent with short-term, particle surface charge controls on bacteria transport, where a negatively charged surface induced by silver nanoparticles reverses the positive charge due to iron oxide coatings, but columns eventually recovered irreversible cell deposition. Silver nanoparticle coatings significantly increased cell inactivation during transit through the columns. However, when viability data is normalised to volume throughput, only a small improvement in cell inactivation is observed for silver nanoparticle coated sands relative to iron oxide coating alone. This counterintuitive result underscores the importance of net surface charge in controlling cell transport and inactivation and implies that the extra cost for implementing silver nanoparticle coatings on porous beds coated with iron oxides may not be justified in designing point of use water filters in low income countries. PMID:26042624

  8. Chitosan-Iron Oxide Coated Graphene Oxide Nanocomposite Hydrogel: A Robust and Soft Antimicrobial Biofilm.

    PubMed

    Konwar, Achyut; Kalita, Sanjeeb; Kotoky, Jibon; Chowdhury, Devasish

    2016-08-17

    We report a robust biofilm with antimicrobial properties fabricated from chitosan-iron oxide coated graphene oxide nanocomposite hydrogel. For the first time, the coprecipitation method was used for the successful synthesis of iron oxide coated graphene oxide (GIO) nanomaterial. After this, films were fabricated by the gel-casting technique aided by the self-healing ability of the chitosan hydrogel network system. Both the nanomaterial and the nanocomposite films were characterized by techniques such as scanning electron microscopy, FT-IR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and vibrating sample magnetometry. Measurements of the thermodynamic stability and mechanical properties of the films indictaed a significant improvement in their thermal and mechanical properties. Moreover, the stress-strain profile indicated the tough nature of the nanocomposite hydrogel films. These improvements, therefore, indicated an effective interaction and good compatibility of the GIO nanomaterial with the chitosan hydrogel matrix. In addition, it was also possible to fabricate films with tunable surface properties such as hydrophobicity simply by varying the loading percentage of GIO nanomaterial in the hydrogel matrix. Fascinatingly, the chitosan-iron oxide coated graphene oxide nanocomposite hydrogel films displayed significant antimicrobial activities against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strains, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus aureus, and Escherichia coli, and also against the opportunistic dermatophyte Candida albicans. The antimicrobial activities of the films were tested by agar diffusion assay and antimicrobial testing based on direct contact. A comparison of the antimicrobial activity of the chitosan-GIO nanocomposite hydrogel films with those of individual chitosan-graphene oxide and chitosan-iron oxide nanocomposite films demonstrated a higher antimicrobial activity for the former in both types of tests. In vitro hemolysis

  9. Growth of textured thin Au coatings on iron oxide nanoparticles with near infrared absorbance

    PubMed Central

    Ma, L L; Borwankar, A U; Willsey, B W; Yoon, K Y; Tam, J O; Sokolov, K V; Feldman, M D; Milner, T E; Johnston, K P

    2013-01-01

    A homologous series of Au-coated iron oxide nanoparticles, with hydrodynamic diameters smaller than 60 nm was synthesized with very low Auto-iron mass ratios as low as 0.15. The hydrodynamic diameter was determined by dynamic light scattering and the composition by atomic absorption spectroscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Unusually low Au precursor supersaturation levels were utilized to nucleate and grow Au coatings on iron oxide relative to formation of pure Au nanoparticles. This approach produced unusually thin coatings, by lowering autocatalytic growth of Au on Au, as shown by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Nearly all of the nanoparticles were attracted by a magnet indicating a minimal amount of pure Au particles The coatings were sufficiently thin to shift the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) to the near infrared (NIR), with large extinction coefficients., despite the small particle hydrodynamic diameters, observed from dynamic light scattering to be less than 60 nm. PMID:23238021

  10. Preparation and characterization of hydroxyapatite-coated iron oxide particles by spray-drying technique.

    PubMed

    Donadel, Karina; Felisberto, Marcos D V; Laranjeira, Mauro C M

    2009-06-01

    Magnetic particles of iron oxide have been increasingly used in medical diagnosis by magnetic resonance imaging and in cancer therapies involving targeted drug delivery and magnetic hyperthermia. In this study we report the preparation and characterization of iron oxide particles coated with bioceramic hydroxyapatite by spray-drying. The iron oxide magnetic particles (IOMP) were coated with hydroxyapatite (HAp) by spray-drying using two IOMP/HAp ratios (0.7 and 3.2). The magnetic particles were characterized by way of scanning electronic microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, flame atomic absorption spectrometry,vibrating sample magnetometry and particle size distribution (laser diffraction). The surface morphology of the coated samples is different from that of the iron oxide due to formation of hydroxyapatite coating. From an EDX analysis, it was verified that the surface of the coated magnetic particles is composed only of HAp, while the interior containsiron oxide and a few layers of HAp as expected. The results showed that spray-drying technique is an efficient and relatively inexpensive method for forming spherical particles with a core/shell structure. PMID:19488622

  11. Accumulation of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles coated with variably sized polyethylene glycol in murine tumors.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Esben Kjær Unmack; Nielsen, Thomas; Wittenborn, Thomas; Rydtoft, Louise Munk; Lokanathan, Arcot R; Hansen, Line; Østergaard, Leif; Kingshott, Peter; Howard, Kenneth A; Besenbacher, Flemming; Nielsen, Niels Chr; Kjems, Jørgen

    2012-04-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles have found widespread applications in different areas including cell separation, drug delivery and as contrast agents. Due to water insolubility and stability issues, nanoparticles utilized for biological applications require coatings such as the commonly employed polyethylene glycol (PEG). Despite its frequent use, the influence of PEG coatings on the physicochemical and biological properties of iron nanoparticles has hitherto not been studied in detail. To address this, we studied the effect of 333-20,000 Da PEG coatings that resulted in larger hydrodynamic size, lower surface charge, longer circulation half-life, and lower uptake in macrophage cells when the particles were coated with high molecular weight (M(w)) PEG molecules. By use of magnetic resonance imaging, we show coating-dependent in vivo uptake in murine tumors with an optimal coating M(w) of 10,000 Da. PMID:22395568

  12. Preparation and characterization of thermosensitive PNIPAA-coated iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shengmao; Zhang, Linna; He, Benfang; Wu, Zhishen

    2008-08-01

    A new and facile approach was established to fabricate thermoresponsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAA) coated iron oxide nanoparticles in a non-aqueous medium. The morphology and structure of the nanoparticle-doped composite were analyzed by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM), x-ray powder diffraction (XRD), and Fourier transformation infrared spectrometry (FTIR). The thermosensitivity of the composite was also investigated. Results indicated that the oil-soluble iron oxide nanoparticles encapsulated with PNIPAA, composed of an inorganic iron oxide core and biocompatible PNIPAA shell, were dispersed well in water and had a sphere-like shape. The PNIPAA-coated iron oxide nanoparticles with such a kind of core-shell structure showed excellent thermosensitivity. Namely, the aqueous suspension of PNIPAA-coated iron oxide nanoparticles dramatically changed from transparent to opaque as the temperature increased from room temperature to 38 °C, showing potential as optical transmittance switch materials and their significance in the fields of protein adsorption and purification controlled release, and drug delivery.

  13. Mechanisms controlling adsorption of natural organic matter on surfactant-modified iron oxide-coated sand.

    PubMed

    Ding, Chunli; Shang, Chii

    2010-06-01

    Mechanisms contributing to the adsorption of natural organic matter (NOM) on surfactant-modified iron oxide-coated sand (IOCS) were explored by microscopic surface characterization techniques and adsorption tests. Electrostatic interactions that were thought to be from the positively charged, surface-coated surfactant, hexadecyltrimethyl ammonium (HDTMA), seemed to be unimportant, likely because the outward-pointing tail groups of the surface-coated HDTMA monolayers hindered the interactions. Improved hydrophobic interactions followed by ligand exchange are believed to be the dominant mechanisms. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) force analysis with chemically modified tips was used to explore the adsorption mechanisms between NOM and IOCS, where an iron oxide-coated mica surface was utilized as a substitute for the IOCS surface. It demonstrates the changes of pull-on forces and the increases in hydrophobic interactions from the modification of IOCS with HDTMA. PMID:20457463

  14. Effect of coating thickness of iron oxide nanoparticles on their relaxivity in the MRI

    PubMed Central

    Hajesmaeelzadeh, Farzaneh; Shanehsazzadeh, Saeed; Grüttner, Cordula; Daha, Fariba Johari; Oghabian, Mohammad Ali

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Iron oxide nanoparticles have found prevalent applications in various fields including drug delivery, cell separation and as contrast agents. Super paramagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles allow researchers and clinicians to enhance the tissue contrast of an area of interest by increasing the relaxation rate of water. In this study, we evaluate the dependency of hydrodynamic size of iron oxide nanoparticles coated with Polyethylene glycol (PEG) on their relativities with 3 Tesla clinical MRI. Materials and Methods: We used three groups of nanoparticles with nominal sizes 20, 50 and 100 nm with a core size of 8.86 nm, 8.69 nm and 10.4 nm that they were covered with PEG 300 and 600 Da. A clinical magnetic resonance scanner determines the T1 and T2 relaxation times for various concentrations of PEG-coated nanoparticles. Results: The size measurement by photon correlation spectroscopy showed the hydrodynamic sizes of MNPs with nominal 20, 50 and 100 nm with 70, 82 and 116 nm for particles with PEG 600 coating and 74, 93 and 100 nm for particles with PEG 300 coating, respectively. We foud that the relaxivity decreased with increasing overall particle size (via coating thickness). Magnetic resonance imaging showed that by increasing the size of the nanoparticles, r2/r1 increases linearly. Conclusion: According to the data obtained from this study it can be concluded that increments in coating thickness have more influence on relaxivities compared to the changes in core size of magnetic nanoparticles. PMID:27081461

  15. New carboxysilane-coated iron oxide nanoparticles for nonspecific cell labelling.

    PubMed

    Bridot, Jean-Luc; Stanicki, Dimitri; Laurent, Sophie; Boutry, Sébastien; Gossuin, Yves; Leclère, Philippe; Lazzaroni, Roberto; Vander Elst, Luce; Muller, Robert N

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers the possibility of tracking cells labelled with a contrast agent and evaluating the progress of cell therapies. This requires efficient cell labelling with contrast agents. A basic incubation of cells with iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) is a common method. This study reports the synthesis at the gram scale of iron oxide nanoparticles as MRI T₂ contrast agents for cell labelling. These NPs are based on small iron oxide cores coated with a thin polysiloxane shell presenting carboxylic acid functions. The iron oxide cores produced have been characterized by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, ζ-potential, infrared, photon correlation spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, magnetometry and relaxometric measurements. These measurements confirmed the expected surface modification by carboxysilane. Carboxylic groups created electrostatic repulsion between NPs when they are deprotonated. Therefore, highly concentrated aqueous solutions of carboxysilane coated iron oxide NPs can be obtained, up to 70% (w/w). These NPs could be used for cell labelling owing to their aggregation and re-dispersion properties. NPs precipitated in Dulbecco's modified Eagle medium induced a rapid association with 3 T6 fibroblast cells and could easily be re-dispersed in phosphate buffer saline solution to obtain properly labelled cells. PMID:24375902

  16. Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles: Synthesis and surface coating techniques for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Sheng-Nan; Wei, Chao; Zhu, Zan-Zan; Hou, Yang-Long; Subbu, S. Venkatraman; Xu, Zhi-Chuan

    2014-03-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles are the most popular magnetic nanoparticles used in biomedical applications due to their low cost, low toxicity, and unique magnetic property. Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, including magnetite (Fe3O4) and maghemite (γ-Fe2O3), usually exhibit a superparamagnetic property as their size goes smaller than 20 nm, which are often denoted as superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) and utilized for drug delivery, diagnosis, therapy, and etc. This review article gives a brief introduction on magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in terms of their fundamentals of magnetism, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and drug delivery, as well as the synthesis approaches, surface coating, and application examples from recent key literatures. Because the quality and surface chemistry play important roles in biomedical applications, our review focuses on the synthesis approaches and surface modifications of iron oxide nanoparticles. We aim to provide a detailed introduction to readers who are new to this field, helping them to choose suitable synthesis methods and to optimize the surface chemistry of iron oxide nanoparticles for their interests.

  17. Predictable Heating and Positive MRI Contrast from a Mesoporous Silica-Coated Iron Oxide Nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Katie R; Ring, Hattie L; Etheridge, Michael; Zhang, Jinjin; Gao, Zhe; Shao, Qi; Klein, Nathan D; Szlag, Victoria M; Chung, Connie; Reineke, Theresa M; Garwood, Michael; Bischof, John C; Haynes, Christy L

    2016-07-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles have great potential as diagnostic and therapeutic agents in cancer and other diseases; however, biological aggregation severely limits their function in vivo. Aggregates can cause poor biodistribution, reduced heating capability, and can confound their visualization and quantification by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Herein, we demonstrate that the incorporation of a functionalized mesoporous silica shell can prevent aggregation and enable the practical use of high-heating, high-contrast iron oxide nanoparticles in vitro and in vivo. Unmodified and mesoporous silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles were characterized in biologically relevant environments including phosphate buffered saline, simulated body fluid, whole mouse blood, lymph node carcinoma of prostate (LNCaP) cells, and after direct injection into LNCaP prostate cancer tumors in nude mice. Once coated, iron oxide nanoparticles maintained colloidal stability along with high heating and relaxivity behaviors (SARFe = 204 W/g Fe at 190 kHz and 20 kA/m and r1 = 6.9 mM(-1) s(-1) at 1.4 T). Colloidal stability and minimal nonspecific cell uptake allowed for effective heating in salt and agarose suspensions and strong signal enhancement in MR imaging in vivo. These results show that (1) aggregation can lower the heating and imaging performance of magnetic nanoparticles and (2) a coating of functionalized mesoporous silica can mitigate this issue, potentially improving clinical planning and practical use. PMID:26991550

  18. Improvement of hot-dip zinc coating by enriching the inner layers with iron oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibli, S. M. A.; Manu, R.

    2006-02-01

    The performance of hot-dip galvanic coating formed on steel not only depends on the alloy composition of the superficial layer but also significantly, on the composition of the inner alloy layers at the coating/substrate interface. Further, the presence of barrier oxide layers, if any can also improve the performance of galvanic coating. In the present work, the effect of inner iron oxide barrier layer formed prior to hot-dip galvanization was investigated. A continuous and adherent iron oxide layer was formed on steel by anodic oxidation of the steel substrate. Although the wettability of oxide surface by liquid zinc was initially poor, the increase in dipping time and the transition of the oxide layer to unstable form due to the presence of Cl - ion in the flux facilitated localized growth of Fe-Zn alloy phases. The inhibitive nature of the oxide layer was temporary, since the presence of Cl - induces micro cracks on the oxide surface thereby facilitating better zinc diffusion. The modification of the substrate structure during galvanization was found to influence the galvanizing process significantly. The present study predicts scope for application of this process for protection of rusted steel specimens too.

  19. Compact Zwitterion-coated Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for In Vitro and In Vivo Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wei, He; Bruns, Oliver T.; Chen, Ou

    2012-01-01

    We have recently developed compact and water-soluble zwitterionic dopamine sulfonate (ZDS) ligand coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) for use in various biomedical applications. The defining characteristics of ZDS-coated SPIONs are small hydrodynamic diameters, low non-specific interactions with fetal bovine serum, the opportunity for specific labeling, and stability with respect to time, pH, and salinity. We report here on the magnetic characterization of ZDS-coated SPIONs and their in vitro and in vivo performance relative to non-specific interactions with HeLa cells and in mice, respectively. ZDS-coated SPIONs retained the superparamagnetism and saturation magnetization (Ms) of as-synthesized hydrophobic SPIONs, with Ms=74 emu/g [Fe]. Moreover, ZDS-coated SPIONs showed only small non-specific uptake into HeLa cancer cells in vitro and low non-specific binding to serum proteins in vivo in mice. PMID:23042209

  20. Mechanisms of enhanced osteoblast gene expression in the presence of hydroxyapatite coated iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Nhiem; Hall, Douglas; Webster, Thomas J.

    2012-11-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) coated iron oxide (Fe3O4) magnetic nanoparticles have been shown to enhance osteoblast (bone forming cells) proliferation and osteoblast differentiation into calcium depositing cells (through increased secretion of alkaline phosphatase, collagen and calcium deposition) compared to control samples without nanoparticles. Such nanoparticles are, thus, very promising for numerous orthopedic applications including magnetically directed osteoporosis treatment. The objective of the current study was to elucidate the mechanisms of the aforementioned improved osteoblast responses in the presence of HA coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles. Results demonstrated large amounts of fibronectin (a protein known to increase osteoblast functions) adsorption on HA coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles. Specifically, fibronectin adsorption almost doubled when HA coated Fe3O4 nanoparticle concentrations increased from 12.5 to 100 μg ml-1, and from 12.5 to 200 μg ml-1, a four fold increase was observed. Results also showed greater osteoblast gene regulation (specifically, osteocalcin, type I collagen and cbfa-1) in the presence of HA coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles. Collectively, these results provide a mechanism for the observed enhanced osteoblast functions in the presence of HA coated iron oxide nanoparticles, allowing their further investigation for a number of orthopedic applications.

  1. Uptake of dimercaptosuccinate-coated magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles by cultured brain astrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geppert, Mark; Hohnholt, Michaela C.; Thiel, Karsten; Nürnberger, Sylvia; Grunwald, Ingo; Rezwan, Kurosch; Dringen, Ralf

    2011-04-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe-NP) are currently considered for various diagnostic and therapeutic applications in the brain. However, little is known on the accumulation and biocompatibility of such particles in brain cells. We have synthesized and characterized dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) coated Fe-NP and have investigated their uptake by cultured brain astrocytes. DMSA-coated Fe-NP that were dispersed in physiological medium had an average hydrodynamic diameter of about 60 nm. Incubation of cultured astrocytes with these Fe-NP caused a time- and concentration-dependent accumulation of cellular iron, but did not lead within 6 h to any cell toxicity. After 4 h of incubation with 100-4000 µM iron supplied as Fe-NP, the cellular iron content reached levels between 200 and 2000 nmol mg - 1 protein. The cellular iron content after exposure of astrocytes to Fe-NP at 4 °C was drastically lowered compared to cells that had been incubated at 37 °C. Electron microscopy revealed the presence of Fe-NP-containing vesicles in cells that were incubated with Fe-NP at 37 °C, but not in cells exposed to the nanoparticles at 4 °C. These data demonstrate that cultured astrocytes efficiently take up DMSA-coated Fe-NP in a process that appears to be saturable and strongly depends on the incubation temperature.

  2. Synthesis and characterization of ultra-small superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles thinly coated with silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bumb, A.; Brechbiel, M. W.; Choyke, P. L.; Fugger, L.; Eggeman, A.; Prabhakaran, D.; Hutchinson, J.; Dobson, P. J.

    2008-08-01

    Ultra-small superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles were synthesized by co-precipitation of iron chloride salts with ammonia and then encapsulated with thin (~2 nm) layers of silica. The particles have been characterized for size, diffraction pattern, surface charge, and magnetic properties. This rapid and economical synthesis has a number of industrial applications; however, the silica-coated particles have been optimized for use in medical applications such as magnetic resonance contrast agents and biosensors, and in DNA capturing, bioseparation and enzyme immobilization.

  3. Synthesis and characterization of poly(divinylbenzene)-coated magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as precursor for the formation of air-stable carbon-coated iron crystalline nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Boguslavsky, Yonit; Margel, Shlomo

    2008-01-01

    Maghemite (gamma-Fe2O3) nanoparticles of 15 +/- 3 nm diameter were prepared by nucleation of gelatin/iron oxide followed by growth of gamma-Fe2O3 films onto these nuclei. The gamma-Fe2O3 nanoparticles were coated with polydivinylbenzene (PDVB) by emulsion polymerization of divinylbenzene (DVB) in an aqueous continuous phase containing the gamma-Fe2O3 nanoparticles. The PDVB-coated gamma-Fe2O3 nanoparticles, dispersed in water, were separated from homo-PDVB nanoparticles using the high gradient magnetic field (HGMF) technique. The influence of DVB concentration on the amount of PDVB coating, on the size and size distribution of the coated gamma-Fe2O3 nanoparticles and on their magnetic properties, has been investigated. Air-stable carbon-coated iron (alpha-Fe/C) crystalline nanoparticles of 41 +/- 12 nm diameter have been prepared by annealing the PDVB-coated gamma-Fe2O3 nanoparticles at 1050 degrees C in an inert atmosphere. These nanoparticles exhibit high saturation magnetization value (83 emu g(-1)) and excellent resistance to oxidation. Characterization of the PDVB-coated gamma-Fe2O3 and of the alpha-Fe/C nanoparticles has been accomplished by TEM, HRTEM, DLS, FTIR, XRD, thermal analysis, zeta-potential, and magnetic measurements. PMID:17927999

  4. Antibacterial activity and cytocompatibility of titanium oxide coating modified by iron ion implantation.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yaxin; Cao, Huiliang; Qiao, Yuqin; Meng, Fanhao; Liu, Xuanyong

    2014-10-01

    In this work, zero valent iron nanoparticles (Fezero-NPs) and iron oxide nanoparticles (Feox-NPs) were synthesized at the subsurface and surface regions of titanium oxide coatings (TOCs) by plasma immersion ion implantation. This novel Fe-NPs/TOC system showed negligible iron releasing, great electron storage capability and excellent cytocompatibility in vitro. Importantly, the system showed selective antibacterial ability which can kill Staphylococcus aureus under dark conditions but has no obvious antibacterial effect against Escherichia coli. Owing to a bipolar Schottky barrier between Fezero-NPs/TOC and Fezero-NPs/Feox-NPs, electrons could be captured by the Fezero-NPs bounded at the subsurface region of the coating. This electron storage capability of the Fe-NPs/TOC system induced extracellular electron transportation and accumulation of adequate valence-band holes (h(+)) at the external side, which caused oxidation damage to S. aureus cells in the dark. No obvious biocide effect against E. coli resulted from lack of electron transfer ability between E. coli and substrate materials. This work may open up a novel and controlled strategy to design coatings of implants with antibacterial ability and cytocompatibility for medical applications. PMID:24914826

  5. Gold-Coated Cementite Nanoparticles: An Oxidation-Resistant Alternative to -Iron

    SciTech Connect

    Shultz, M.; Calvin, S; Gonzalez-Jimenez, F; Mujica, V; Alleluia, B; Carpenter, E

    2009-01-01

    Iron-based nanoparticles are desirable for many applications because of their magnetic properties and inherent biocompatibility. Metallic iron, or {alpha}-Fe, is the most sought after because of its high saturation magnetization (up to 220 emu/g). This magnetization in iron nanoparticles is difficult to reach or maintain because of the ease of oxidation, which greatly reduces the magnetization values (90 emu/g or less). Here, we report the synthesis of an iron-based nanoparticle comprising a magnetic cementite core (Fe{sub 3}C) that is more oxidation-resistant than {alpha}-Fe, an oxide layer, and a gold coating for passivation and easy functionalization. The nanoparticle structure was confirmed via X-ray absorption fine structure and Moessbauer experiments, and morphology was confirmed using transmission electron microscopy. Magnetic characterization yielded a saturation magnetization of 110 emu/g, thus demonstrating cementite as more stable alternative to {alpha}-Fe with higher magnetic moments than the iron oxides.

  6. Self-assembly of graphene oxide coated soft magnetic carbonyl iron particles and their magnetorheology

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, W. L.; Choi, H. J.

    2014-05-07

    The surface of carbonyl iron (CI) microspheres was modified with graphene oxide (GO) as a coating material using 4-aminobenzoic acid as the grafting agent. The morphology, elemental composition, and magnetic properties of the GO-coated CI (GO/CI) particles were examined by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and vibrating sample magnetometry, respectively, confirming their composite formation. The magnetorheological (MR) performance of the GO/CI particle-based suspension was examined using a rotational rheometer connected to a magnetic field supply. The GO/CI particles suspension exhibited typical MR properties with increasing shear stress and viscosity depending on the applied magnetic field strength.

  7. Electrochemical reduction of nitroaromatic compounds by single sheet iron oxide coated electrodes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Li-Zhi; Hansen, Hans Christian B; Bjerrum, Morten Jannik

    2016-04-01

    Nitroaromatic compounds are substantial hazard to the environment and to the supply of clean drinking water. We report here the successful reduction of nitroaromatic compounds by use of iron oxide coated electrodes, and demonstrate that single sheet iron oxides formed from layered iron(II)-iron(III) hydroxides have unusual electrocatalytic reactivity. Electrodes were produced by coating of single sheet iron oxides on indium tin oxide electrodes. A reduction current density of 10 to 30μAcm(-2) was observed in stirred aqueous solution at pH 7 with concentrations of 25 to 400μM of the nitroaromatic compound at a potential of -0.7V vs. SHE. Fast mass transfer favors the initial reduction of the nitroaromatic compound which is well explained by a diffusion layer model. Reduction was found to comprise two consecutive reactions: a fast four-electron first-order reduction of the nitro-group to the hydroxylamine-intermediate (rate constant=0.28h(-1)) followed by a slower two-electron zero-order reduction resulting in the final amino product (rate constant=6.9μM h(-1)). The zero-order of the latter reduction was attributed to saturation of the electrode surface with hydroxylamine-intermediates which have a more negative half-wave potential than the parent compound. For reduction of nitroaromatic compounds, the SSI electrode is found superior to metal electrodes due to low cost and high stability, and superior to carbon-based electrodes in terms of high coulombic efficiency and low over potential. PMID:26716570

  8. Gold-coated iron oxide nanoparticles as a T2 contrast agent in magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Tanveer; Bae, Hongsub; Rhee, Ilsu; Chang, Yongmin; Jin, Seong-Uk; Hong, Sungwook

    2012-07-01

    Gold-coated iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles were synthesized for use as a T2 contrast agent in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The coated nanoparticles were spherical in shape with an average diameter of 20 nm. The gold shell was about 2 nm thick. The bonding status of the gold on the nanoparticle surfaces was checked using a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR). The FTIR spectra confirmed the attachment of homocysteine, in the form of thiolates, to the Au shell of the Au-Fe3O4 nanoparticles. The relaxivity ratio, R2/R1, for the coated nanoparticles was 3-fold higher than that of a commercial contrast agent, Resovist, which showed the potential for their use as a T2 contrast agent with high efficacy. In animal experiments, the presence of the nanoparticles in rat liver resulted in a 71% decrease in signal intensity in T2-weighted MR images, indicating that our gold-coated iron oxide nanoparticles are suitable for use as a T2 contrast agent in MRI. PMID:22966533

  9. Chelator free gallium-68 radiolabelling of silica coated iron oxide nanorods via surface interactions.

    PubMed

    Burke, Benjamin P; Baghdadi, Neazar; Kownacka, Alicja E; Nigam, Shubhanchi; Clemente, Gonçalo S; Al-Yassiry, Mustafa M; Domarkas, Juozas; Lorch, Mark; Pickles, Martin; Gibbs, Peter; Tripier, Raphaël; Cawthorne, Christopher; Archibald, Stephen J

    2015-09-28

    The commercial availability of combined magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)/positron emission tomography (PET) scanners for clinical use has increased demand for easily prepared agents which offer signal or contrast in both modalities. Herein we describe a new class of silica coated iron-oxide nanorods (NRs) coated with polyethylene glycol (PEG) and/or a tetraazamacrocyclic chelator (DO3A). Studies of the coated NRs validate their composition and confirm their properties as in vivo T2 MRI contrast agents. Radiolabelling studies with the positron emitting radioisotope gallium-68 (t1/2 = 68 min) demonstrate that, in the presence of the silica coating, the macrocyclic chelator was not required for preparation of highly stable radiometal-NR constructs. In vivo PET-CT and MR imaging studies show the expected high liver uptake of gallium-68 radiolabelled nanorods with no significant release of gallium-68 metal ions, validating our innovation to provide a novel simple method for labelling of iron oxide NRs with a radiometal in the absence of a chelating unit that can be used for high sensitivity liver imaging. PMID:26292197

  10. Protein corona composition of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with various physico-chemical properties and coatings.

    PubMed

    Sakulkhu, Usawadee; Mahmoudi, Morteza; Maurizi, Lionel; Salaklang, Jatuporn; Hofmann, Heinrich

    2014-01-01

    Because of their biocompatibility and unique magnetic properties, superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles NPs (SPIONs) are recognized as some of the most prominent agents for theranostic applications. Thus, understanding the interaction of SPIONs with biological systems is important for their safe design and efficient applications. In this study, SPIONs were coated with 2 different polymers: polyvinyl alcohol polymer (PVA) and dextran. The obtained NPs with different surface charges (positive, neutral, and negative) were used as a model study of the effect of surface charges and surface polymer materials on protein adsorption using a magnetic separator. We found that the PVA-coated SPIONs with negative and neutral surface charge adsorbed more serum proteins than the dextran-coated SPIONs, which resulted in higher blood circulation time for PVA-coated NPs than the dextran-coated ones. Highly abundant proteins such as serum albumin, serotransferrin, prothrombin, alpha-fetoprotein, and kininogen-1 were commonly found on both PVA- and dextran-coated SPIONs. By increasing the ionic strength, soft- and hard-corona proteins were observed on 3 types of PVA-SPIONs. However, the tightly bound proteins were observed only on negatively charged PVA-coated SPIONs after the strong protein elution. PMID:24846348

  11. Protein Corona Composition of Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles with Various Physico-Chemical Properties and Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakulkhu, Usawadee; Mahmoudi, Morteza; Maurizi, Lionel; Salaklang, Jatuporn; Hofmann, Heinrich

    2014-05-01

    Because of their biocompatibility and unique magnetic properties, superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles NPs (SPIONs) are recognized as some of the most prominent agents for theranostic applications. Thus, understanding the interaction of SPIONs with biological systems is important for their safe design and efficient applications. In this study, SPIONs were coated with 2 different polymers: polyvinyl alcohol polymer (PVA) and dextran. The obtained NPs with different surface charges (positive, neutral, and negative) were used as a model study of the effect of surface charges and surface polymer materials on protein adsorption using a magnetic separator. We found that the PVA-coated SPIONs with negative and neutral surface charge adsorbed more serum proteins than the dextran-coated SPIONs, which resulted in higher blood circulation time for PVA-coated NPs than the dextran-coated ones. Highly abundant proteins such as serum albumin, serotransferrin, prothrombin, alpha-fetoprotein, and kininogen-1 were commonly found on both PVA- and dextran-coated SPIONs. By increasing the ionic strength, soft- and hard-corona proteins were observed on 3 types of PVA-SPIONs. However, the tightly bound proteins were observed only on negatively charged PVA-coated SPIONs after the strong protein elution.

  12. Magnetorheology of suspensions based on graphene oxide coated or added carbonyl iron microspheres and sunflower oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kaikai; Zhang, Wen Ling; Shan, Lei; Zhang, Xiangjun; Meng, Yonggang; Choi, Hyoung Jin; Tian, Yu

    2014-10-01

    Magnetorheological (MR) fluids based on carbonyl iron (CI) particles coated with graphene oxide (GO) and sunflower oils were studied and compared with MR fluids (MRFs) prepared with CI particles added with GO sheets. Adding GO sheets into CI had a negligible effect on the rheological properties of the MRF. Coating the spheres with GO markedly decreased the shear strength at high shear rates due to the remarkable lubricating function of the GO surface. Different behaviors were observed in the shear thickening phenomenon when the GO surface changed the mechanical interaction between particles. The results demonstrated the importance of the role of interparticle friction for MRF in shear mode and discussed the weak shear thickening phenomenon with fine lubricating coating layers and oils.

  13. Magnetic studies of iron oxide nanoparticles coated with oleic acid and Pluronic® block copolymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, M. A.; Jain, Tapan Kumar; Labhasetwar, V.; Leslie-Pelecky, D. L.

    2005-05-01

    We have prepared and studied iron-oxide nanoparticles coated with oleic acid (OA) and Pluronic® polymer. The mean diameter of the iron-oxide nanoparticles was 9.3(±)0.8nm. Saturation magnetization values measured at 10K varied from 66.1(±0.7)emu/gto98.7(±0.5)emu/g. At 300K the loops showed negligible coercive field. The peaks in zero-field-cooled susceptibility decreased from 280to168K with increasing OA concentration up to 10.6wt%, and remained nearly constant for higher concentrations. This suggests that incomplete coverage of the OA allows small, interacting agglomerates to form.

  14. Efficient internalization of silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles of different sizes by primary human macrophages and dendritic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kunzmann, Andrea; Andersson, Britta; Vogt, Carmen; Feliu, Neus; Ye Fei; Gabrielsson, Susanne; Toprak, Muhammet S.; Buerki-Thurnherr, Tina; Laurent, Sophie; Vahter, Marie; Krug, Harald; Muhammed, Mamoun; Scheynius, Annika; Fadeel, Bengt

    2011-06-01

    Engineered nanoparticles are being considered for a wide range of biomedical applications, from magnetic resonance imaging to 'smart' drug delivery systems. The development of novel nanomaterials for biomedical applications must be accompanied by careful scrutiny of their biocompatibility. In this regard, particular attention should be paid to the possible interactions between nanoparticles and cells of the immune system, our primary defense system against foreign invasion. On the other hand, labeling of immune cells serves as an ideal tool for visualization, diagnosis or treatment of inflammatory processes, which requires the efficient internalization of the nanoparticles into the cells of interest. Here, we compare novel monodispersed silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles with commercially available dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles. The silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles displayed excellent magnetic properties. Furthermore, they were non-toxic to primary human monocyte-derived macrophages at all doses tested whereas dose-dependent toxicity of the smaller silica-coated nanoparticles (30 nm and 50 nm) was observed for primary monocyte-derived dendritic cells, but not for the similarly small dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles. No macrophage or dendritic cell secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines was observed upon administration of nanoparticles. The silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles were taken up to a significantly higher degree when compared to the dextran-coated nanoparticles, irrespective of size. Cellular internalization of the silica-coated nanoparticles was through an active, actin cytoskeleton-dependent process. We conclude that these novel silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles are promising materials for medical imaging, cell tracking and other biomedical applications.

  15. High-temperature oxidation/sulfidation resistance of iron-aluminide coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Tortorelli, P.F.; Wright, I.G.; Goodwin, G.M.; Howell, M.

    1996-04-01

    Iron aluminides containing > 20-25 at. % Al have oxidation and sulfidation resistance at temperatures well above those at which these alloys have adequate mechanical strength. Accordingly, these alloys may find application as coatings or claddings on more conventional higher-strength materials which are generally less corrosion-resistant at high temperatures. To this end, iron-aluminide coatings were prepared by gas tungsten arc and gas metal arc weld-overlay techniques. Specimens were cut from weld deposits and exposed to a highly aggressive oxidizing-sulfidizing (H2S-H2-H2O-Ar) environment at 800 C. All the weld overlayers showed good corrosion behavior under isothermal conditions, including a gas metal arc-produced deposit with only 21 at. % Al. Rapid degradation in corrosion resistance was observed under thermal cycling conditions when the initally grown scales spalled and the rate of reaction was then not controlled by formation of slowly growing Al oxide. Higher starting Al concentrations (> {approximately} 25 at. %) are needed to assure overall oxidation-sulfidation resistance of the weld overlays, but hydrogen cracking susceptibility must be minimized in order to physically separate the corrosive species from the reactive substrate material.

  16. Toxicity Assessment of Silica Coated Iron Oxide Nanoparticles and Biocompatibility Improvement by Surface Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Malvindi, Maria Ada; De Matteis, Valeria; Galeone, Antonio; Brunetti, Virgilio; Anyfantis, George C.; Athanassiou, Athanassia; Cingolani, Roberto; Pompa, Pier Paolo

    2014-01-01

    We have studied in vitro toxicity of iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) coated with a thin silica shell (Fe3O4/SiO2 NPs) on A549 and HeLa cells. We compared bare and surface passivated Fe3O4/SiO2 NPs to evaluate the effects of the coating on the particle stability and toxicity. NPs cytotoxicity was investigated by cell viability, membrane integrity, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), reactive oxygen species (ROS) assays, and their genotoxicity by comet assay. Our results show that NPs surface passivation reduces the oxidative stress and alteration of iron homeostasis and, consequently, the overall toxicity, despite bare and passivated NPs show similar cell internalization efficiency. We found that the higher toxicity of bare NPs is due to their stronger in-situ degradation, with larger intracellular release of iron ions, as compared to surface passivated NPs. Our results indicate that surface engineering of Fe3O4/SiO2 NPs plays a key role in improving particles stability in biological environments reducing both cytotoxic and genotoxic effects. PMID:24465736

  17. Microwave-assisted combustion synthesis of nano iron oxide/iron-coated activated carbon, anthracite, cellulose fiber, and silica, with arsenic adsorption studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Combustion synthesis of iron oxide/iron coated carbons such as activated carbon, anthracite, cellulose fiber and silica is described. The reactions were carried out in alumina crucibles using a Panasonic kitchen microwave with inverter technology, and the reaction process was com...

  18. A magnetic poly(dimethylesiloxane) composite membrane incorporated with uniformly dispersed, coated iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirmoradi, Fatemeh Nazly; Cheng, Luna; Chiao, Mu

    2010-01-01

    We report a new magnetic polymer membrane for MEMS application. The polymeric magnetic composite has coated iron oxide nanoparticles incorporated in a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) matrix. Existing magnetic polymeric materials have particle agglomeration problems, which result in rough surfaces and uneven mechanical and optical properties. We show that the use of iron oxide nanoparticles (10 nm in diameter) with fatty acid and hydrophobic coatings inhibits aggregation of particles in the PDMS polymer matrix. Agglomerated particle sizes in thin-film PDMS composites incorporated with uncoated and coated particles are 51 ± 24 µm and 1.6 ± 0.25 µm, respectively. The PDMS composites exhibit saturation magnetization of 22.8 to 23.94 emu g-1. Stress-strain curves of the composites are characterized by tensile tests. Free-standing magnetic PDMS membranes are fabricated in different sizes from 4 mm to 7 mm in diameter and with the thickness of 35.5 ± 1.5 µm. The membrane of 7 mm diameter achieves deflection of 625 µm in a 0.417 T magnetic field. The magnetic PDMS membranes may be used in micro-pumps and lab-on-a-chip applications.

  19. Producing ultra-thin silica coatings on iron-oxide nanoparticles to improve their surface reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kralj, Slavko; Makovec, Darko; Čampelj, Stanislav; Drofenik, Miha

    2010-07-01

    The reactivity of the relatively inert surfaces of iron-oxide magnetic nanoparticles can be significantly improved by coating the surfaces with silica. Unfortunately, however, this nonmagnetic silica layer tends to dilute the magnetic properties of the nanoparticles. Therefore, the silica layer should be as continuous, homogeneous, and as thin as possible. In this investigation we coated superparamagnetic maghemite nanoparticles by hydrolysis and the polycondensation of tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS), with the ethanol solution of TEOS being added to a stable suspension of citric acid-coated nanoparticles. The influences of the various parameters of the procedure on the quality of the coatings were systematically evaluated. The quality of the silica layer was characterized using electron microscopy and by performing leaching of the nanoparticles in HCl, while the surface reactivity was tested by grafting (3-aminopropyl) triethoxysilane (APS) onto the nanoparticles. We observed that the surface concentration of the grafted APS strongly increased when the nanoparticles were coated with a silica layer. The choice of experimental conditions for the coating procedure that favors the heterogeneous nucleation of silica on the surfaces of the nanoparticles enabled the preparation of very thin silica layers, less than 2 nm thick. By decreasing the amount of added TEOS to correspond to a monolayer of -Si-OH at the nanoparticles' surfaces, their surface reactivity could be very much improved, and with a reduction in their magnetization of only ˜10%.

  20. The One Year Fate of Iron Oxide Coated Gold Nanoparticles in Mice.

    PubMed

    Kolosnjaj-Tabi, Jelena; Javed, Yasir; Lartigue, Lénaic; Volatron, Jeanne; Elgrabli, Dan; Marangon, Iris; Pugliese, Giammarino; Caron, Benoit; Figuerola, Albert; Luciani, Nathalie; Pellegrino, Teresa; Alloyeau, Damien; Gazeau, Florence

    2015-08-25

    Safe implementation of nanotechnology and nanomedicine requires an in-depth understanding of the life cycle of nanoparticles in the body. Here, we investigate the long-term fate of gold/iron oxide heterostructures after intravenous injection in mice. We show these heterostructures degrade in vivo and that the magnetic and optical properties change during the degradation process. These particles eventually eliminate from the body. The comparison of two different coating shells for heterostructures, amphiphilic polymer or polyethylene glycol, reveals the long lasting impact of initial surface properties on the nanocrystal degradability and on the kinetics of elimination of magnetic iron and gold from liver and spleen. Modulation of nanoparticles reactivity to the biological environment by the choice of materials and surface functionalization may provide new directions in the design of multifunctional nanomedicines with predictable fate. PMID:26168364

  1. Magnetoelectric behavior of carbonyl iron mixed Mn oxide-coated ferrite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahad, Faris B. Abdul; Lee, Shang-Fan; Hung, Dung-Shing; Yao, Yeong-Der; Yang, Ruey-Bin; Lin, Chung-Kwei; Tsay, Chien-Yie

    2010-05-01

    The dielectric and magnetic properties of manganese oxide-coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NPs) were measured by the cavity perturbation method at x-band microwave frequencies ranging from 7-12.5 GHz with controlled external magnetic field up to 2.2 kOe at room temperature. Different ratios (5%, 10%, and 20% by weight) of coated NPs were prepared by sol-gel method then mixed with carbonyl iron powder in epoxy matrix. The saturation magnetization is inversely proportional to the NPs ratio in the mixture between 150 and 180 emu/g. The real part of the permittivity decreased with increasing NPs concentration, but the permittivity change by magnetic field increased. The tunability behavior is explained by insulator-ferromagnetic interface magnetoelectricity and the large surface volume ratio for the NPs.

  2. Shellac-coated iron oxide nanoparticles for removal of cadmium(II) ions from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Gong, Jilai; Chen, Long; Zeng, Guangming; Long, Fei; Deng, Jiuhua; Niu, Qiuya; He, Xun

    2012-01-01

    This study describes a new effective adsorbent for cadmium removal from aqueous solution synthesized by coating a shellac layer, a natural biodegradable and renewable resin with abundant hydroxyl and carboxylic groups, on the surface of iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) imaging showed shellac-coated magnetic nanoparticle (SCMN) adsorbents had a core-shell structure with a core of 20 nm and shell of 5 nm. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopic analysis suggested the occurrence of reaction between carboxyl groups on the SCMN adsorbent surface and cadmium ions in aqueous solution. Kinetic data were well described by pseudo second-order model and adsorption isotherms were fitted with both Langmuir and Freundlich models with maximum adsorption capacity of 18.80 mg/g. SCMN adsorbents provided a favorable adsorption capacity under high salinity conditions, and cadmium could easily be desorbed using mild organic acid solutions at low concentration. PMID:23513435

  3. Rapid Size- Controlled Synthesis of Dextran-Coated, Copper-Doped Iron Oxide Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Ray M.

    2011-12-01

    Development of dual modality probes enabled for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) has been on the rise in recent years due to the potential for these probes to facilitate combining the complementary high resolution of MRI and the high sensitivity of PET. The efficient synthesis of multimodal probes that include the radiolabels for PET can be hindered due to prolonged reaction times during radioisotope incorporation, and the resulting decay of the radiolabel. Along with a time-efficient synthesis, one also needs an optimal synthesis that yields products in a desirable size range (between 20-100 nm) to increase blood retention time. In this work, we describe a novel, rapid, microwave-based synthesis of dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles doped with copper (DIO/Cu). Traditional methods for synthesizing dextran-coated iron oxide particles require refluxing for 2 hours and result in approximately 50 nm particles. We demonstrate that microwave synthesis can produce 50 nm nanoparticles in 5 minutes of heating. We discuss the various parameters used in the microwave synthesis protocol to vary the size distribution of DIO/Cu, and demonstrate the successful incorporation of copper into these particles with the aim of future use for rapid 64Cu incorporation.

  4. The tolerability of dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles during in vivo observation of the rats.

    PubMed

    Popa, Cristina L; Prodan, Alina M; Ciobanu, Carmen S; Predoi, Daniela

    2016-07-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) have attracted a lot of interest due to their widespread biomedical and diagnostic applications. Coating the SPIONs with various surface layers can provide an interface between the core and the surrounding environment. The aim of this study was to examine the in vivo behaviour of dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles (D-IONPs) in aqueous suspensions. The SPIONs stabilized with dextran (D-IONPs) were synthesized in aqueous solutions by co-precipitation method. The average grain size deduced from transmission electron microscopy is 7.5 nm. The hematological parameters registered for the rats exposed to D-IONPs at 1 ml/kg have had values approximately equal to those examined for the control specimen. The architecture of liver and kidneys was not affected after one day of intraperitoneal injection of D-IONPs compared to the reference group. After 21 and 28 days respectively from the administration of the D-IONPs solution, the liver and kidneys from the injected rats showed a normal aspect without abnormalities compared to the rats uninjected. Our findings suggest that the administration of 1 ml/kg D-IONPs did not cause any toxicological effect since the parameters of renal and liver function were in the normal range as reported to the control group. PMID:27045672

  5. Kinetics and mechanism of arsenate removal by nanosized iron oxide-coated perlite.

    PubMed

    Mostafa, M G; Chen, Yen-Hua; Jean, Jiin-Shuh; Liu, Chia-Chuan; Lee, Yao-Chang

    2011-03-15

    This study discussed the adsorption kinetics of As(V) onto nanosized iron oxide-coated perlite. The effects of pH, initial concentration of As(V) and common anions on the adsorption efficiency were also investigated. It was observed that a 100% As(V) adsorption was achieved at pH value of 4-8 from the initial concentration containing 1.0 mg-As(V)L(-1) and the adsorption percentage depended on the initial concentration; the phosphate and silicate ions would not interfere with the adsorption efficiency. Furthermore, nanosized iron oxide-coated perlite (IOCP) has been shown to be an effective adsorbent for the removal of arsenate from water. The adsorption kinetics were studied using pseudo-first- and pseudo-second-order models, and the experimental data fitted well with the pseudo-second-order model. Moreover, it suggests that the Langmuir isotherm is more adequate than the Freundlich isotherm in simulating the adsorption isotherm of As(V). The adsorption rate constant is 44.84 L mg(-1) and the maximum adsorption capacity is 0.39 mg g(-1). These findings indicate that the adsorption property of IOCP gives the compound a great potential for applications in environmental remediation. PMID:21282000

  6. Rapid size-controlled synthesis of dextran-coated, 64Cu-doped iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ray M; Gilbert, Dustin A; Liu, Kai; Louie, Angelique Y

    2012-04-24

    Research into developing dual modality probes enabled for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) has been on the rise recently due to the potential to combine the high resolution of MRI and the high sensitivity of PET. Current synthesis techniques for developing multimodal probes is largely hindered in part by prolonged reaction times during radioisotope incorporation--leading to a weakening of the radioactivity. Along with a time-efficient synthesis, the resulting products must fit within a critical size range (between 20 and 100 nm) to increase blood retention time. In this work, we describe a novel, rapid, microwave-based synthesis technique to grow dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles doped with copper (DIO/Cu). Traditional methods for coprecipitation of dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles require refluxing for 2 h and result in approximately 50 nm diameter particles. We demonstrate that microwave synthesis can produce 50 nm nanoparticles with 5 min of heating. We discuss the various parameters used in the microwave synthesis protocol to vary the size distribution of DIO/Cu and demonstrate the successful incorporation of (64)Cu into these particles with the aim of future use for dual-mode MR/PET imaging. PMID:22417124

  7. Genotoxicity assessment of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with different particle sizes and surface coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yanping; Xia, Qiyue; Liu, Ying; Zhang, Shuyang; Cheng, Feng; Zhong, Zhihui; Wang, Li; Li, Hongxia; Xiao, Kai

    2014-10-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) have been widely used for various biomedical applications such as magnetic resonance imaging and drug delivery. However, their potential toxic effects, including genotoxicity, need to be thoroughly understood. In the present study, the genotoxicity of IONPs with different particle sizes (10, 30 nm) and surface coatings (PEG, PEI) were assessed using three standard genotoxicity assays, the Salmonella typhimurium reverse mutation assay (Ames test), the in vitro mammalian chromosome aberration test, and the in vivo micronucleus assay. In the Ames test, SMG-10 (PEG coating, 10 nm) showed a positive mutagenic response in all the five test bacterial strains with and without metabolic activation, whereas SEI-10 (PEI coating, 10 nm) showed no mutagenesis in all tester strains regardless of metabolic activation. SMG-30 (PEG coating, 30 nm) was not mutagenic in the absence of metabolic activation, and became mutagenic in the presence of metabolic activation. In the chromosomal aberration test, no increase in the incidence of chromosomal aberrations was observed for all three IONPs. In the in vivo micronucleus test, there was no evidence of increased micronuclei frequencies for all three IONPs, indicating that they were not clastogenic in vivo. Taken together, our results demonstrated that IONPs with PEG coating exhibited mutagenic activity without chromosomal and clastogenic abnormalities, and smaller IONPs (SMG-10) had stronger mutagenic potential than larger ones (SMG-30); whereas, IONPs with SEI coating (SEI-10) were not genotoxic in all three standard genotoxicity assays. This suggests that the mutagenicity of IONPs depends on their particle size and surface coating.

  8. Genotoxicity assessment of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with different particle sizes and surface coatings.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanping; Xia, Qiyue; Liu, Ying; Zhang, Shuyang; Cheng, Feng; Zhong, Zhihui; Wang, Li; Li, Hongxia; Xiao, Kai

    2014-10-24

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) have been widely used for various biomedical applications such as magnetic resonance imaging and drug delivery. However, their potential toxic effects, including genotoxicity, need to be thoroughly understood. In the present study, the genotoxicity of IONPs with different particle sizes (10, 30 nm) and surface coatings (PEG, PEI) were assessed using three standard genotoxicity assays, the Salmonella typhimurium reverse mutation assay (Ames test), the in vitro mammalian chromosome aberration test, and the in vivo micronucleus assay. In the Ames test, SMG-10 (PEG coating, 10 nm) showed a positive mutagenic response in all the five test bacterial strains with and without metabolic activation, whereas SEI-10 (PEI coating, 10 nm) showed no mutagenesis in all tester strains regardless of metabolic activation. SMG-30 (PEG coating, 30 nm) was not mutagenic in the absence of metabolic activation, and became mutagenic in the presence of metabolic activation. In the chromosomal aberration test, no increase in the incidence of chromosomal aberrations was observed for all three IONPs. In the in vivo micronucleus test, there was no evidence of increased micronuclei frequencies for all three IONPs, indicating that they were not clastogenic in vivo. Taken together, our results demonstrated that IONPs with PEG coating exhibited mutagenic activity without chromosomal and clastogenic abnormalities, and smaller IONPs (SMG-10) had stronger mutagenic potential than larger ones (SMG-30); whereas, IONPs with SEI coating (SEI-10) were not genotoxic in all three standard genotoxicity assays. This suggests that the mutagenicity of IONPs depends on their particle size and surface coating. PMID:25274166

  9. The effect of coating on heat generation properties of Iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yuan

    Magnetic nanoparticles have attracted more and more attention for their potential application as heating agents in cancer hyperthermia. The effectiveness of cancer hyperthermia can be increased by using particles that have a higher heat generation rate, quantified by specific absorption rate (SAR), at a smaller applied field. In order to optimize the functionality of nanoparticles as heating agents, it is essential to have a comprehensive understanding of factors that may influence SAR including coating and aggregation. In all biomedical applications, the magnetic particles are coated with surfactants and polymers to enhance biocompatibility, prevent agglomeration and add functionality. Coatings may profoundly influence particles' clustering behavior and magnetic properties. Yet its effect on the heat generation rate of the nanoparticles has been scarcely investigated. In this context, a systematic investigation was carried out in this dissertation in order to understand the impact of the surface coating of magnetic nanoparticles on their heat generation rate. The study also includes investigation of normal nerve cell viability in presence of biofunctionalized magnetic nanoparticles with and without exposure to magnetic heating. Commercially available suspensions of iron oxide nanoparticles with a diameter of approximately 10 nm and different coatings relevant to biomedical applications such as aminosilane, carboxymethyl-dextran, protein A, biotin were extensively characterized. First of all, magnetic phase reduction of magnetite nanoparticles was examined by studying the discrepancy between the volume fraction of magnetic phase calculated from magnetization curve and the magnetic core concentration obtained from Tiron chelation test. The findings indicated that coatings might interact with the surface atoms of the magnetic core and form a magnetically disordered layer reducing the total amount of the magnetic phase. Secondly, the impact of coating and aggregation

  10. Arsenate removal with 3-mercaptopropanoic acid-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Morillo, D; Uheida, A; Pérez, G; Muhammed, M; Valiente, M

    2015-01-15

    In the present work, superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) surface-coated with 3-mercaptopropanoic acid (3-MPA) were prepared and their feasibility for the removal of arsenate from dilute aqueous solutions was demonstrated. The synthesized 3-MPA-coated SPION was characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and Fourier transform infra-red spectrometry (FTIR). Separation efficiency of the coated nanoparticles and the equilibrium isotherm of arsenate adsorption were investigated. The obtained results reveal the arsenate adsorption to be highly pH-dependent, and the maximum adsorption was attained in less than 60 min. The resulting increase of 3-MPA-coated SPION adsorption capacity to twice the adsorption capacity of SPION alone under the same conditions is attributed to the increase of active adsorption sites. An adsorption reaction is proposed. On the other hand, efficient recovery of arsenate from the loaded nanoparticles was achieved using nitric acid (HNO3) solution, which also provides a concentration over the original arsenate solution. PMID:25454446

  11. Enhancement of irradiation effects on cancer cells by cross-linked dextran-coated iron oxide (CLIO) nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Fu-Kuo; Chen, Wen-Chang; Lai, Sheng-Feng; Liu, Chi-Jen; Wang, Cheng-Liang; Wang, Chang-Hai; Chen, Hsiang-Hsin; Hua, Tzu-En; Cheng, Yi-Yun; Wu, M. K.; Hwu, Y.; Yang, Chung-Shi; Margaritondo, G.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated iron oxide nanoparticles with two different surface modifications, dextran coating and cross-linked dextran coating, showing that their different internalization affects their capability to enhance radiation damage to cancer cells. The internalization was monitored with an ultrahigh resolution transmission x-ray microscope (TXM), indicating that the differences in the particle surface charge play an essential role and dominate the particle-cell interaction. We found that dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles cannot be internalized by HeLa and EMT-6 cells without being functionalized with amino groups (the cross-linked dextran coating) that modify the surface potential from -18 mV to 13.4 mV. The amount of cross-linked dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles uptaken by cancer cells reached its maximum, 1.33 × 109 per HeLa cell, when the co-culture concentration was 40 µg Fe mL-1 or more. Standard tests indicated that these internalized nanoparticles increased the damaging effects of x-ray irradiation, whereas they are by themselves biocompatible. These results could lead to interesting therapy applications; furthermore, iron oxide also produces high contrast for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnosis and therapy stages.

  12. Enhancement of irradiation effects on cancer cells by cross-linked dextran-coated iron oxide (CLIO) nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Huang, Fu-Kuo; Chen, Wen-Chang; Lai, Sheng-Feng; Liu, Chi-Jen; Wang, Cheng-Liang; Wang, Chang-Hai; Chen, Hsiang-Hsin; Hua, Tzu-En; Cheng, Yi-Yun; Wu, M K; Hwu, Y; Yang, Chung-Shi; Margaritondo, G

    2010-01-21

    We investigated iron oxide nanoparticles with two different surface modifications, dextran coating and cross-linked dextran coating, showing that their different internalization affects their capability to enhance radiation damage to cancer cells. The internalization was monitored with an ultrahigh resolution transmission x-ray microscope (TXM), indicating that the differences in the particle surface charge play an essential role and dominate the particle-cell interaction. We found that dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles cannot be internalized by HeLa and EMT-6 cells without being functionalized with amino groups (the cross-linked dextran coating) that modify the surface potential from -18 mV to 13.4 mV. The amount of cross-linked dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles uptaken by cancer cells reached its maximum, 1.33 x 10(9) per HeLa cell, when the co-culture concentration was 40 microg Fe mL(-1) or more. Standard tests indicated that these internalized nanoparticles increased the damaging effects of x-ray irradiation, whereas they are by themselves biocompatible. These results could lead to interesting therapy applications; furthermore, iron oxide also produces high contrast for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnosis and therapy stages. PMID:20023329

  13. Preparation of composite with silica-coated nanoparticles of iron oxide spinels for applications based on magnetically induced hyperthermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, Angela L.; Fabris, José D.; Pereira, Márcio C.; Domingues, Rosana Z.; Ardisson, José D.

    2013-04-01

    It is reported a novel method to prepare magnetic core (iron oxide spinels)-shell (silica) composites containing well-dispersed magnetic nanoparticles in aqueous solution. The synthetic process consists of two steps. In a first step, iron oxide nanoparticles obtained through co-precipitation are dispersed in an aqueous solution containing tetramethylammonium hydroxide; in a second step, particles of this sample are coated with silica, through hydrolyzation of tetraethyl orthosilicate. The intrinsic atomic structure and essential properties of the core-shell system were assessed with powder X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, Mössbauer spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The heat released by this ferrofluid under an AC-generated magnetic field was evaluated by following the temperature evolution under increasing magnetic field strengths. Results strongly indicate that this ferrofluid based on silica-coated iron oxide spinels is technologically a very promising material to be used in medical practices, in oncology.

  14. Role of coating agent in iron oxide nanoparticle formation in an aqueous dispersion: Experiments and simulation.

    PubMed

    Bachhar, Nirmalya; Bandyopadhyaya, Rajdip

    2016-02-15

    Iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticle was synthesized by coprecipitation and was modeled and solved using a hybrid (discrete-continuous) model, based on a kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) simulation scheme. The latter was combined with the constant number MC method, to improve both speed and accuracy of the simulation. Complete particle size distribution (PSD) from simulation matches very well with PSD of both uncoated and coated (with either polyacrylic acid or dextran) Fe3O4 nanoparticles, obtained from our experiments. The model is general, as the time scales of various processes (nucleation, diffusion-growth and coagulation-growth) are incorporated in rate equations, while, input simulation parameters are experimentally measured quantities. With the help of the validated model, effect of coating agent on coagulation-growth was estimated by a single, fitted, coagulation-efficiency parameter. Our simulation shows that, logarithm of coagulation-efficiency scales linearly with logarithm of inverse of the molecular weight of the coating agent. With this scaling law, our model is able to a priori predict the experimental PSD of Fe3O4 nanoparticles, synthesized with an even higher molecular weight of dextran. PMID:26624531

  15. Effective delivery of immunosuppressive drug molecules by silica coated iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jangsun; Lee, Eunwon; Kim, Jieun; Seo, Youngmin; Lee, Kwan Hong; Hong, Jong Wook; Gilad, Assaf A; Park, Hansoo; Choi, Jonghoon

    2016-06-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles have been used in a wide range of biomedical applications, including drug delivery, molecular imaging, and cellular imaging. Various surface modifications have been applied to the particles to stabilize their surface and to give them a moiety for anchoring tags and/or drug molecules. Conventional methods of delivering immunosuppressant drugs often require a high dose of drugs to ensure therapeutic effects, but this can lead to toxic side effects. In this study, we used silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles (IOSs) for a drug delivery application in which the nanoparticles carry the minimum amount of drug required to be effective to the target cells. IOSs could be loaded with water-insoluble immunosuppressive drug molecules (MPA: mycophenolic acid) and be used as a contrast agent for MRI. We characterized the IOSs for their physicochemical properties and found their average hydrodynamic diameter and core size to be 40.5nm and 5nm, respectively. Following the introduction of MPA-loaded IOSs (IOS/M), we evaluated the secretion dynamics of cytokines from peripheral blood mononuclear cells stimulated with phytohemagglutinin (PHA). The results showed that IOS/M effectively inhibited the secretion of the cytokines interleukin-2 and tumor necrosis factor α, with a minimal concentration of MPA. In conclusion, IOS/M may have potential applications in both efficient drug delivery and MRI. PMID:26966999

  16. BACTERIOPHAGE PRD1 AND SILICA COLLOID TRANSPORT AND RECOVERY IN AN IRON OXIDE-COATED SAND AQUIFER. (R826179)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bacteriophage PRD1 and silica colloids were co-injected into
    sewage-contaminated and uncontaminated zones of an iron oxide-coated sand
    aquifer on Cape Cod, MA, and their transport was monitored over distances up to
    6 m in three arrays. After deposition, the attache...

  17. Pharmaceutical formulation of HSA hybrid coated iron oxide nanoparticles for magnetic drug targeting.

    PubMed

    Zaloga, Jan; Pöttler, Marina; Leitinger, Gerd; Friedrich, Ralf P; Almer, Gunter; Lyer, Stefan; Baum, Eva; Tietze, Rainer; Heimke-Brinck, Ralph; Mangge, Harald; Dörje, Frank; Lee, Geoffrey; Alexiou, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    In this work we present a new formulation of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) for magnetic drug targeting. The particles were reproducibly synthesized from current good manufacturing practice (cGMP) - grade substances. They were surface coated using fatty acids as anchoring molecules for human serum albumin. We comprehensively characterized the physicochemical core-shell structure of the particles using sophisticated methods. We investigated biocompatibility and cellular uptake of the particles using an established flow cytometric method in combination with microwave-plasma assisted atomic emission spectroscopy (MP-AES). The cytotoxic drug mitoxantrone was adsorbed on the protein shell and we showed that even in complex media it is slowly released with a close to zero order kinetics. We also describe an in vitro proof-of-concept assay in which we clearly showed that local enrichment of this SPION-drug conjugate with a magnet allows site-specific therapeutic effects. PMID:26854862

  18. Dextran coated bismuth-iron oxide nanohybrid contrast agents for computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Naha, Pratap C.; Zaki, Ajlan Al; Hecht, Elizabeth; Chorny, Michael; Chhour, Peter; Blankemeyer, Eric; Yates, Douglas M.; Witschey, Walter R. T.; Litt, Harold I.; Tsourkas, Andrew; Cormode, David P.

    2014-01-01

    Bismuth nanoparticles have been proposed as a novel CT contrast agent, however few syntheses of biocompatible bismuth nanoparticles have been achieved. We herein report the synthesis of composite bismuth-iron oxide nanoparticles (BION) that are based on a clinically approved, dextran-coated iron oxide formulation; the particles have the advantage of acting as contrast agents for both CT and MRI. BION were synthesized and characterized using various analytical methods. BION CT phantom images revealed that the X-ray attenuation of the different formulations was dependent upon the amount of bismuth present in the nanoparticle, while T2-weighted MRI contrast decreased with increasing bismuth content. No cytotoxicity was observed in Hep G2 and BJ5ta cells after 24 hours incubation with BION. The above properties, as well as the yield of synthesis and bismuth inclusion efficiency, led us to select the Bi-30 formulation for in vivo experiments, performed in mice using a micro-CT and a 9.4 T MRI system. X-ray contrast was observed in the heart and blood vessels over a 2 hour period, indicating that Bi-30 has a prolonged circulation half-life. Considerable signal loss in T2-weighted MR images was observed in the liver compared to pre-injection scans. Evaluation of the biodistribution of Bi-30 revealed that bismuth is excreted via the urine, with significant concentrations found in the kidneys and urine. In vitro experiments confirmed the degradability of Bi-30. In summary, dextran coated BION are biocompatible, biodegradable, possess strong X-ray attenuation properties and also can be used as T2-weighted MR contrast agents. PMID:25485115

  19. Urban runoff treatment using nano-sized iron oxide coated sand with and without magnetic field applying

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Increase of impervious surfaces in urban area followed with increases in runoff volume and peak flow, leads to increase in urban storm water pollution. The polluted runoff has many adverse impacts on human life and environment. For that reason, the aim of this study was to investigate the efficiency of nano iron oxide coated sand with and without magnetic field in treatment of urban runoff. In present work, synthetic urban runoff was treated in continuous separate columns system which was filled with nano iron oxide coated sand with and without magnetic field. Several experimental parameters such as heavy metals, turbidity, pH, nitrate and phosphate were controlled for investigate of system efficiency. The prepared column materials were characterized with Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis (EDXA) instruments. SEM and EDXA analyses proved that the sand has been coated with nano iron oxide (Fe3O4) successfully. The results of SEM and EDXA instruments well demonstrate the formation of nano iron oxide (Fe3O4) on sand particle. Removal efficiency without magnetic field for turbidity; Pb, Zn, Cd and PO4 were observed to be 90.8%, 73.3%, 75.8%, 85.6% and 67.5%, respectively. When magnetic field was applied, the removal efficiency for turbidity, Pb, Zn, Cd and PO4 was increased to 95.7%, 89.5%, 79.9%, 91.5% and 75.6% respectively. In addition, it was observed that coated sand and magnetic field was not able to remove NO3 ions. Statistical analyses of data indicated that there was a significant difference between removals of pollutants in two tested columns. Results of this study well demonstrate the efficiency of nanosized iron oxide-coated sand in treatment of urban runoff quality; upon 75% of pollutants could be removed. In addition, in the case of magnetic field system efficiency can be improved significantly. PMID:24360061

  20. The effect of coating on heat generation properties of Iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yuan

    Magnetic nanoparticles have attracted more and more attention for their potential application as heating agents in cancer hyperthermia. The effectiveness of cancer hyperthermia can be increased by using particles that have a higher heat generation rate, quantified by specific absorption rate (SAR), at a smaller applied field. In order to optimize the functionality of nanoparticles as heating agents, it is essential to have a comprehensive understanding of factors that may influence SAR including coating and aggregation. In all biomedical applications, the magnetic particles are coated with surfactants and polymers to enhance biocompatibility, prevent agglomeration and add functionality. Coatings may profoundly influence particles' clustering behavior and magnetic properties. Yet its effect on the heat generation rate of the nanoparticles has been scarcely investigated. In this context, a systematic investigation was carried out in this dissertation in order to understand the impact of the surface coating of magnetic nanoparticles on their heat generation rate. The study also includes investigation of normal nerve cell viability in presence of biofunctionalized magnetic nanoparticles with and without exposure to magnetic heating. Commercially available suspensions of iron oxide nanoparticles with a diameter of approximately 10 nm and different coatings relevant to biomedical applications such as aminosilane, carboxymethyl-dextran, protein A, biotin were extensively characterized. First of all, magnetic phase reduction of magnetite nanoparticles was examined by studying the discrepancy between the volume fraction of magnetic phase calculated from magnetization curve and the magnetic core concentration obtained from Tiron chelation test. The findings indicated that coatings might interact with the surface atoms of the magnetic core and form a magnetically disordered layer reducing the total amount of the magnetic phase. Secondly, the impact of coating and aggregation

  1. In-situ identification of iron--zinc intermetallics in galvannealed steel coatings and iron oxides on exposed steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Desmond C.

    1998-12-01

    Identification of all the compounds present in various coatings on steels is particularly difficult. Non-destructive, in-situ analysis is necessary if the fraction of each compound as well as its probable layering within the coating, is to be determined. Mössbauer spectroscopy is one valuable probe capable of uniquely identifying all iron compounds which form as coatings on steel and other iron alloy surfaces. To investigate a complete coating several criteria need to be considered. Removing the coating inevitably leaves a small and perhaps important component intact on the substrate. Therefore investigating the coating as it remains intact on the steel is important if complete identification of the iron compounds is to be made. This also preserves crystalline texture or preferred growth orientation within the coating to which the Mössbauer effect is sensitive. Mössbauer spectroscopy is a non-destructive technique which allows the integrity of the coating to be maintained during analysis. The combined transmission and scattering Mössbauer geometries generally result in accurate analysis of the coating composition. For the scattering geometry added information on compound layering is obtained if separate Mössbauer spectra are recorded using the re-emitted gamma rays as well as the conversion electrons and subsequently emitted X-rays. In-situ scattering Mössbauer spectroscopy has been used to characterize the iron--zinc alloys which form in the coatings of commercially produced corrosion resistant galvannealed sheet steel, a product of great interest to automotive producers. The results show that different amounts of four iron--zinc phases are present depending on the production conditions of the coating. The different phases are also distinctly layered. Mössbauer analyses of corrosion coatings formed on the surface of steels which have been exposed to different environments has also been undertaken. Materials include structural steels exposed for up to 25

  2. Refinement of adsorptive coatings for fluorescent riboflavin-receptor-targeted iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Tsvetkova, Yoanna; Beztsinna, Nataliia; Jayapaul, Jabadurai; Weiler, Marek; Arns, Susanne; Shi, Yang; Lammers, Twan; Kiessling, Fabian

    2016-01-01

    Flavin mononucleotide (FMN) is a riboflavin derivative that can be exploited to target the riboflavin transporters (RFTs) and the riboflavin carrier protein (RCP) in cells with high metabolic activity. In this study we present the synthesis of different FMN-coated ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (USPIOs) and their efficiency as targeting contrast agents. Since FMN alone cannot stabilize the nanoparticles, we used adenosine phosphates - AMP, ADP and ATP - as spacers to obtain colloidally stable nanoparticles. Nucleotides with di- and triphosphate groups were intended to increase the USPIO charge and thus improve zeta potential and stability. However, all nanoparticles formed negatively charged clusters with similar properties in terms of zeta potential (-28 ± 2 mV), relaxivity (228-259 mM(-1)  s(-1) at 3 T) and hydrodynamic radius (53-85 nm). Molecules with a higher number of phosphate groups, such as ADP and ATP, have a higher adsorption affinity towards iron oxide, which, instead of providing more charge, led to partial desorption and replacement of FMN. Hence, we obtained USPIOs carrying different amounts of targeting agent, which significantly influenced the nanoparticles' uptake. The nanoparticles' uptake by different cancer cells and HUVECs was evaluated photometrically and with MR relaxometry, showing that the cellular uptake of the USPIOs increases with the FMN amount on their surface. Thus, for USPIOs targeted with riboflavin derivatives the use of spacers with increasing numbers of phosphate groups does not improve either zeta potential or the particles' stability, but rather detaches the targeting moieties from their surface, leading to lower cellular uptake. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26265388

  3. Synthesis and magnetic study of carbon coated iron oxide nanoparticles by laser ablation in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prajapat, C. L.; Sharma, P.; Gonal, M. R.; Vatsa, R. K.; Singh, M. R.; Ravikumar, G.

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic Iron oxides nanoparticles (NPs) were prepared by Laser Ablation in Solution method. Formation and average size of iron oxide NPs (~8 nm) is confirmed by XRD pattern and magnetization studies. Detailed magnetic studies have been carried out using SQUID magnetometer. The saturation magnetization for the iron oxide NPs was found to be 60.07 emu/g. Below the blocking temperature of 150 K the hysteresis loop shows ferromagnetic nature, whereas it shows superparamagnetic behavior at 300 K, for the synthesized NPs.

  4. Bacteriophage PRD1 and silica colloid transport and recovery in an iron oxide-coated sand aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ryan, J.N.; Elimelech, M.; Ard, R.A.; Harvey, R.W.; Johnson, P.R.

    1999-01-01

    Bacteriophage PRD1 and silica colloids were co-injected into sewage- contaminated and uncontaminated zones of an iron oxide-coated sand aquifer on Cape Cod, MA, and their transport was monitored over distances up to 6 m in three arrays. After deposition, the attached PRD1 and silica colloids were mobilized by three different chemical perturbations (elevated pH, anionic surfactant, and reductant). PRD1 and silica colloids experienced less attenuation in the contaminated zone where adsorbed organic matter and phosphate may be hindering attachment of PRD1 and silica colloids to the iron oxide coatings. The PRD1 collision efficiencies agree well with collision efficiencies predicted by assuming favorable PRD1 deposition on iron oxide coatings for which the surface area coverage was measured by microprobe analysis of sediment thin sections. ?? potentials of the PRD1, silica colloids, and aquifer grains corroborated the transport results, indicating that electrostatic forces dominated the attachment of PRD1 and silica colloids. Elevated pH was the chemical perturbation most effective at mobilizing the attached PRD1 and silica colloids. Elevated surfactant concentration mobilized the attached PRD1 and silica colloids more effectively in the contaminated zone than in the uncontaminated zone.Bacteriophage PRD1 and silica colloids were co-injected into sewage-contaminated and uncontaminated zones of an iron oxide-coated sand aquifer on Cape Cod, MA, and their transport was monitored over distances up to 6 m in three arrays. After deposition, the attached PRD1 and silica colloids were mobilized by three different chemical perturbations (elevated pH, anionic surfactant, and reductant). PRD1 and silica colloids experienced less attenuation in the contaminated zone where adsorbed organic matter and phosphate may be hindering attachment of PRD1 and silica colloids to the iron oxide coatings. The PRD1 collision efficiencies agree well with collision efficiencies predicted by

  5. Synthesis of monodisperse biotinylated p(NIPAAm)-coated iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles and their bioconjugation to streptavidin.

    PubMed

    Narain, Ravin; Gonzales, Marcela; Hoffman, Allan S; Stayton, Patrick S; Krishnan, Kannan M

    2007-05-22

    We describe here the synthesis of 10 nm, monodisperse, iron oxide nanoparticles that we have coated with temperature-sensitive, biotinylated p(NIPAAm) (b-PNIPAAm). The PNIPAAm was prepared by the reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer polymerization (RAFT), and one end was biotinylated with a PEO maleimide-activated biotin to form a stable thioether linkage. The original synthesized iron oxide particles were stabilized with oleic acid. They were dispersed in dioxane, and the oleic acid molecules were then reversibly exchanged with a mixture of PNIPAAm and b-PNIPAAm at 60 degrees C. The b-PNIPAAm-coated magnetic nanoparticles were found to have an average diameter of approximately 15 nm by dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy. The ability of the biotin terminal groups on the b-PNIPAAm-coated nanoparticles to interact with streptavidin was confirmed by fluorescence and surface plasmon resonance. It was found that the b-PNIPAAm-coated iron oxide nanoparticles can still bind with high affinity to streptavidin in solution or when the streptavidin is immobilized on a surface. We have also demonstrated that the binding of the biotin ligands on the surface of the temperature-responsive magnetic nanoparticles to streptavidin can be turned on and off as a function of temperature. PMID:17451262

  6. Rhamnose-coated superparamagnetic iron-oxide nanoparticles: an evaluation of their in vitro cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and carcinogenicity.

    PubMed

    Paolini, Alessandro; Guarch, Constança Porredon; Ramos-López, David; de Lapuente, Joaquín; Lascialfari, Alessandro; Guari, Yannick; Larionova, Joulia; Long, Jerome; Nano, Rosanna

    2016-04-01

    Tumor recurrence after the incomplete removal of a tumor mass inside brain tissue is the main reason that scientists are working to identify new strategies in brain oncologic therapy. In particular, in the treatment of the most malignant astrocytic tumor glioblastoma, the use of magnetic nanoparticles seems to be one of the most promising keys in overcoming this problem, namely by means of magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) treatment. However, the major unknown issue related to the use of nanoparticles is their toxicological behavior when they are in contact with biological tissues. In the present study, we investigated the interaction of glioblastoma and other tumor cell lines with superparamagnetic iron-oxide nanoparticles covalently coated with a rhamnose derivative, using proper cytotoxic assays. In the present study, we focused our attention on different strategies of toxicity evaluation comparing different cytotoxicological approaches in order to identify the biological damages induced by the nanoparticles. The data show an intensive internalization process of rhamnose-coated iron oxide nanoparticles by the cells, suggesting that rhamnose moiety is a promising biocompatible coating in favoring cells' uptake. With regards to cytotoxicity, a 35% cell death at a maximum concentration, mainly as a result of mitochondrial damages, was found. This cytotoxic behavior, along with the high uptake ability, could facilitate the use of these rhamnose-coated iron-oxide nanoparticles for future MFH therapeutic treatments. PMID:26708321

  7. Caveolin-1 and CDC42 mediated endocytosis of silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles in HeLa cells

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Summary Nanomedicine is a rapidly growing field in nanotechnology, which has great potential in the development of new therapies for numerous diseases. For example iron oxide nanoparticles are in clinical use already in the thermotherapy of brain cancer. Although it has been shown, that tumor cells take up these particles in vitro, little is known about the internalization routes. Understanding of the underlying uptake mechanisms would be very useful for faster and precise development of nanoparticles for clinical applications. This study aims at the identification of key proteins, which are crucial for the active uptake of iron oxide nanoparticles by HeLa cells (human cervical cancer) as a model cell line. Cells were transfected with specific siRNAs against Caveolin-1, Dynamin 2, Flotillin-1, Clathrin, PIP5Kα and CDC42. Knockdown of Caveolin-1 reduces endocytosis of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) and silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles (SCIONs) between 23 and 41%, depending on the surface characteristics of the nanoparticles and the experimental design. Knockdown of CDC42 showed a 46% decrease of the internalization of PEGylated SPIONs within 24 h incubation time. Knockdown of Dynamin 2, Flotillin-1, Clathrin and PIP5Kα caused no or only minor effects. Hence endocytosis in HeLa cells of iron oxide nanoparticles, used in this study, is mainly mediated by Caveolin-1 and CDC42. It is shown here for the first time, which proteins of the endocytotic pathway mediate the endocytosis of silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles in HeLa cells in vitro. In future studies more experiments should be carried out with different cell lines and other well-defined nanoparticle species to elucidate possible general principles. PMID:25671161

  8. The catalytic activity of the iron-coated pumice particles used as heterogeneous catalysts in the oxidation of natural organic matter by H2O2.

    PubMed

    Alver, Alper; Karaarslan, Mihrican; Kılıç, Ahmet

    2016-08-01

    The oxidative removal of natural organic matter (NOM) from waters was investigated by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and iron-coated pumice particles in heterogeneous catalytic oxidation process (HCOP). Removal of trihalomethane (THM) precursors, which is formed THM by the reacts with chloride, was performed with the hydroxyl radicals. Coating the original pumice particles with iron oxides significantly enhanced the removal of NOM with peroxide. The studies were carried out in two sections: (1) decomposition of hydrogen peroxide in pure water with iron-coated pumice and (2) oxidation of THM Precursor (NOM) by hydrogen peroxide with iron-coated pumice. The monitored parameters in this study include dissolved organic carbon and trihalomethanes formation potential. The results show that iron-coated pumice catalyst significantly increased the removal efficiency of NOM in the HCOP. The results show that iron-coated pumice catalyst significantly increased the removal efficiency of NOM in the HCOP. Results show that the oxidation of NOM and remaining NOM with H2O2 is improved by the addition of iron-coated pumice particles which activate the H2O2 molecule, leading to the formation of hydroxyl radicals in a Fenton-like process. PMID:26881482

  9. Lipopeptide-Coated Iron Oxide Nanoparticles as Potential Glycoconjugate-Based Synthetic Anticancer Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Sungsuwan, Suttipun; Yin, Zhaojun; Huang, Xuefei

    2015-08-12

    Although iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) have been widely utilized in molecular imaging and drug delivery studies, they have not been evaluated as carriers for glycoconjugate-based anticancer vaccines. Tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens (TACAs) are attractive targets for the development of anticancer vaccines. Due to the weak immunogenicity of these antigens, it is highly challenging to elicit strong anti-TACA immune responses. With their high biocompatibilities and large surface areas, magnetic NPs were synthesized for TACA delivery. The magnetic NPs were coated with phospholipid-functionalized TACA glycopeptides through hydrophobic-hydrophobic interactions without the need for any covalent linkages. Multiple copies of glycopeptides were presented on NPs, potentially leading to enhanced interactions with antibody-secreting B cells through multivalent binding. Mice immunized with the NPs generated strong antibody responses, and the glycopeptide structures important for high antibody titers were identified. The antibodies produced were capable of recognizing both mouse and human tumor cells expressing the glycopeptide, resulting in tumor cell death through complement-mediated cytotoxicities. These results demonstrate that magnetic NPs can be a new and simple platform for multivalently displaying TACA and boosting anti-TACA immune responses without the need for a typical protein carrier. PMID:26200668

  10. Targeting multiple types of tumors using NKG2D-coated iron oxide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ming-Ru; Cook, W. James; Zhang, Tong; Sentman, Charles L.

    2015-01-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) hold great potential for cancer therapy. Actively targeting IONPs to tumor cells can further increase therapeutic efficacy and decrease off-target side effects. To target tumor cells, a natural killer (NK) cell activating receptor, NKG2D, was utilized to develop pan-tumor targeting IONPs. NKG2D ligands are expressed on many tumor types and its ligands are not found on most normal tissues under steady state conditions. The data showed that mouse and human fragment crystallizable (Fc) -fusion NKG2D (Fc-NKG2D) coated IONPs (NKG2D/NPs) can target multiple NKG2D ligand positive tumor types in vitro in a dose dependent manner by magnetic cell sorting. Tumor targeting effect was robust even under a very low tumor cell to normal cell ratio and targeting efficiency correlated with NKG2D ligand expression level on tumor cells. Furthermore, the magnetic separation platform utilized to test NKG2D/NP specificity has the potential to be developed into high throughput screening strategies to identify ideal fusion proteins or antibodies for targeting IONPs. In conclusion, NKG2D/NPs can be used to target multiple tumor types and magnetic separation platform can facilitate the proof-of-concept phase of tumor targeting IONP development. PMID:25371538

  11. Targeted gold-coated iron oxide nanoparticles for CD163 detection in atherosclerosis by MRI

    PubMed Central

    Tarin, Carlos; Carril, Monica; Martin-Ventura, Jose Luis; Markuerkiaga, Irati; Padro, Daniel; Llamas-Granda, Patricia; Moreno, Juan Antonio; García, Isabel; Genicio, Nuria; Plaza-Garcia, Sandra; Blanco-Colio, Luis Miguel; Penades, Soledad; Egido, Jesus

    2015-01-01

    CD163 is a membrane receptor expressed by macrophage lineage. Studies performed in atherosclerosis have shown that CD163 expression is increased at inflammatory sites, pointing at the presence of intraplaque hemorrhagic sites or asymptomatic plaques. Hence, imaging of CD163 expressing macrophages is an interesting strategy in order to detect atherosclerotic plaques. We have prepared a targeted probe based on gold-coated iron oxide nanoparticles vectorized with an anti-CD163 antibody for the specific detection of CD163 by MRI. Firstly, the specificity of the targeted probe was validated in vitro by incubation of the probe with CD163(+) or (−) macrophages. The probe was able to selectively detect CD163(+) macrophages both in human and murine cells. Subsequently, the targeted probe was injected in 16 weeks old apoE deficient mice developing atherosclerotic lesions and the pararenal abdominal aorta was imaged by MRI. The accumulation of probe in the site of interest increased over time and the signal intensity decreased significantly 48 hours after the injection. Hence, we have developed a highly sensitive targeted probe capable of detecting CD163-expressing macrophages that could provide useful information about the state of the atheromatous lesions. PMID:26616677

  12. Facile, high efficiency immobilization of lipase enzyme on magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles via a biomimetic coating

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Immobilization of lipase on appropriate solid supports is one way to improve their stability and activity, and can be reused for large scale applications. A sample, cost- effective and high loading capacity method is still challenging. Results A facile method of lipase immobilization was developed in this study, by the use of polydopamine coated magnetic nanoparticles (PD-MNPs). Under optimal conditions, 73.9% of the available lipase was immobilized on PD-MNPs, yielding a lipase loading capacity as high as 429 mg/g. Enzyme assays revealed that lipase immobilized on PD-MNPs displayed enhanced pH and thermal stability compared to free lipase. Furthermore, lipase immobilized on PD-MNPs was easily isolated from the reaction medium by magnetic separation and retained more than 70% of initial activity after 21 repeated cycles of enzyme reaction followed by magnetic separation. Conclusions Immobilization of enzyme onto magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles via poly-dopamine film is economical, facile and efficient. PMID:21649934

  13. Arsenic removal by iron oxide coated sponge: treatment and waste management.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tien Vinh; Rahman, Abdur; Vigneswaran, Saravanamuthu; Ngo, Huu Hao; Kandasamy, Jaya; Nguyen, Duc Tho; Do, Tuan Anh; Nguyen, Trung Kien

    2009-01-01

    One of the problems in drinking water that raises concern over the world is that millions of people still have to use arsenic-contaminated water. There is a worldwide need to develop appropriate technologies to remove arsenic from water for household and community water supply systems. In this study, a new material namely iron oxide coated sponge (IOCSp) was developed and used to remove arsenic (As) from contaminated groundwater in Vietnam. The results indicated that IOCSp has a high capacity in removing both As (V) and As (III). The adsorption capacity of IOCSp was up to 4.6 mg As/g IOCSp, showing better than many other materials. It was observed from a pilot study that a small quantity of IOCSp (180 g) could reduce As concentration of 480 microg/L in 1.5 m3 of contaminated natural water to below 40 microg/L. In addition, an exhausted IOCSp, containing a large amount of arsenic (up to 0.42 wt %) could safely be disposed through the solidification/stabilization with cement. Addition of fly ash also reduced the amount of arsenic in the leachate. PMID:19759451

  14. Targeting multiple types of tumors using NKG2D-coated iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ming-Ru; Cook, W. James; Zhang, Tong; Sentman, Charles L.

    2014-11-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) hold great potential for cancer therapy. Actively targeting IONPs to tumor cells can further increase therapeutic efficacy and decrease off-target side effects. To target tumor cells, a natural killer (NK) cell activating receptor, NKG2D, was utilized to develop pan-tumor targeting IONPs. NKG2D ligands are expressed on many tumor types and its ligands are not found on most normal tissues under steady state conditions. The data showed that mouse and human fragment crystallizable (Fc)-fusion NKG2D (Fc-NKG2D) coated IONPs (NKG2D/NPs) can target multiple NKG2D ligand positive tumor types in vitro in a dose dependent manner by magnetic cell sorting. Tumor targeting effect was robust even under a very low tumor cell to normal cell ratio and targeting efficiency correlated with NKG2D ligand expression level on tumor cells. Furthermore, the magnetic separation platform utilized to test NKG2D/NP specificity has the potential to be developed into high throughput screening strategies to identify ideal fusion proteins or antibodies for targeting IONPs. In conclusion, NKG2D/NPs can be used to target multiple tumor types and magnetic separation platform can facilitate the proof-of-concept phase of tumor targeting IONP development.

  15. Characterization of PEI-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for transfection: Size distribution, colloidal properties and DNA interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steitz, Benedikt; Hofmann, Heinrich; Kamau, Sarah W.; Hassa, Paul O.; Hottiger, Michael O.; von Rechenberg, Brigitte; Hofmann-Amtenbrink, Magarethe; Petri-Fink, Alke

    2007-04-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) were coated with polyethylenimine. Here, we briefly describe the synthesis as well as DNA:PEI:SPION complexes and the characterization of the compounds according to their particle size, ζ-potential, morphology, DNA complexing ability, magnetic sedimentation, and colloidal stability. PEI coating of SPIONs led to colloidally stable beads even in high salt concentrations over a wide pH range. DNA plasmids and PCR products encoding for green fluorescent protein were associated with the described beads. The complexes were added to cells and exposed to permanent and pulsating magnetic fields. Presence of these magnetic fields significantly increased the transfection efficiency.

  16. Validation of In-Situ Iron-Manganese Oxide Coated Stream Pebbles as Sensors for Arsenic Source Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, J.; Peters, S. C.; Casteel, A.

    2013-12-01

    Locating nonpoint source contaminant fluxes can be challenging due to the inherent heterogeneity of source and of the subsurface. Contaminants such as arsenic are a concern for drinking water quality and ecosystem health. Arsenic contamination can be the result of several natural and anthropogenic sources, and therefore it can be difficult to trace and identify major areas of arsenic in natural systems. Identifying a useful source indicator for arsenic is a crucial step for environmental remediation efforts. Previous studies have found iron-manganese oxide coated streambed pebbles as useful source indicators due to their high attraction for heavy metals in water. In this study, pebbles, surface water at baseflow and nearby rocks were sampled from the Pennypack Creek and its tributaries, in southwestern Pennsylvania, to test the ability of coated streambed pebbles as environmental source indicators for arsenic. Quartz pebbles, 5-7 cm in diameter, were sampled to minimize elemental contamination from rock chemistry. In addition, quartz provides an excellent substrate for iron and manganese coatings to form. These coatings were leached from pebbles using 4M nitric acid with 0.1% concentrated hydrochloric acid. Following sample processing, analyses were performed using an ICP-MS and the resulting data were spatially organized using ArcGIS software. Arsenic, iron and manganese concentrations in the leachate are normalized to pebble surface area and each location is reported as a ratio of arsenic to iron and manganese. Results suggest that iron-manganese coated stream pebbles are useful indicators of arsenic location within a watershed.

  17. Polyethylene Glycol Modified, Cross-Linked Starch Coated Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for Enhanced Magnetic Tumor Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Adam J.; David, Allan E.; Wang, Jianxin; Galbán, Craig J.; Hill, Hannah L.; Yang, Victor C.

    2010-01-01

    While successful magnetic tumor targeting of iron oxide nanoparticles has been achieved in a number of models, the rapid blood clearance of magnetically suitable particles by the reticuloendothelial system (RES) limits their availability for targeting. This work aimed to develop a long-circulating magnetic iron oxide nanoparticle (MNP) platform capable of sustained tumor exposure via the circulation and, thus, enhanced magnetic tumor targeting. Aminated, cross-linked starch (DN) and aminosilane (A) coated MNPs were successfully modified with 5 kDa (A5, D5) or 20 kDa (A20, D20) polyethylene glycol (PEG) chains using simple N-Hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) chemistry and characterized. Identical PEG-weight analogues between platforms (A5 & D5, A20 & D20) were similar in size (140–190 nm) and relative PEG labeling (1.5% of surface amines – A5/D5, 0.4% – A20/D20), with all PEG-MNPs possessing magnetization properties suitable for magnetic targeting. Candidate PEG-MNPs were studied in RES simulations in vitro to predict long-circulating character. D5 and D20 performed best showing sustained size stability in cell culture medium at 37°C and 7 (D20) to 10 (D5) fold less uptake in RAW264.7 macrophages when compared to previously targeted, unmodified starch MNPs (D). Observations in vitro were validated in vivo, with D5 (7.29 hr) and D20 (11.75 hr) showing much longer half-lives than D (0.12 hr). Improved plasma stability enhanced tumor MNP exposure 100 (D5) to 150 (D20) fold as measured by plasma AUC0-∞ Sustained tumor exposure over 24 hours was visually confirmed in a 9L-glioma rat model (12 mg Fe/kg) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Findings indicate that both D5 and D20 are promising MNP platforms for enhanced magnetic tumor targeting, warranting further study in tumor models. PMID:21176955

  18. Enhancement of phosphorus sorption onto light expanded clay aggregates by means of aluminum and iron oxide coatings.

    PubMed

    Yaghi, Nader; Hartikainen, Helinä

    2013-11-01

    Phosphorus (P) loading from non-point or point sources increases the eutrophication risk of natural waters. The functioning of constructed wetlands (CWs) used as natural water treatment systems can be improved by means of additional materials adsorbing soluble P. In this study, light expanded clay aggregates (LECA) and LECA coated with aluminum (Al) oxide (Al-LECA) or iron (Fe) oxide (Fe-LECA) were tested for their efficiency as P sorbents in the pH range 3-8. The oxide coatings duplicated the actual sorption capacity calculated from the sorption isotherms at the P concentration in the equilibrium solution of 20 μg L(-1), assumed to be the allowable P level in purified water. In the oxide-coated LECAs the sorption was fast and followed both the first- and second-order Lagergren kinetic models, suggesting that the formation of a binuclear surface complex was feasible. In LECA, sorption was markedly slower and followed the first-order kinetic model, indicating that retention occurred through a monodentate attachment. These findings were in harmony with the degree of P saturation (DPS) of the sorbent surfaces at the highest P addition level (200 μg L(-1)), DPS being decisively higher for LECA than for the oxide-coated sorbents. Accordingly, at higher pH values the competition by hydroxyl ions diminished the sorption in LECA relatively more than that in the coated sorbents. In agreement with the acidity of Al(3+) being 100 times lower than that of Fe(3+), at elevated pH the sorption by Al-LECA proved to be less reversible than that by Fe-LECA. The results provide evidence that in CWs Al-coated sorbents are superior to Fe-coated ones that are also redox-sensitive and may lose their sorption properties in anoxic conditions. PMID:23866174

  19. Biodistribution of polyacrylic acid-coated iron oxide nanoparticles is associated with proinflammatory activation and liver toxicity.

    PubMed

    Couto, Diana; Freitas, Marisa; Costa, Vera Marisa; Chisté, Renan Campos; Almeida, Agostinho; Lopez-Quintela, M Arturo; Rivas, José; Freitas, Paulo; Silva, Paula; Carvalho, Félix; Fernandes, Eduarda

    2016-10-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONs) have physical and chemical properties that render them useful for several new biomedical applications. Still, so far, in vivo safety studies of IONs with coatings of biomedical interest are still scarce. The aim of this study, therefore, was to clarify the acute biological effects of polyacrylic acid (PAA)-coated IONs, by determining their biodistribution and their potential proinflammatory and toxic effects in CD-1 mice. The biodistribution of PAA-coated IONs in several organs (liver, spleen, kidneys, brain, heart, testes and lungs), the plasma cytokines, chemokine and aminotransferases levels, white blood cell count, oxidative stress parameters, adenosine triphosphate and histologic features of liver, spleen and kidneys were evaluated 24 h after a single acute (8, 20 or 50 mg kg(-1) ) intravenous administration of PAA-coated IONs in magnetite form. The obtained results showed that these IONs accumulate mainly in the liver and spleen and, to a lesser extent, in the lungs. Although our data showed that PAA-coated IONs do not cause severe organ damage, an inflammatory process was triggered in vivo, as evidenced by as evidenced by increased neutrophils and large lymphocytes in the differential blood count. Moreover, an accumulation of iron in macrophages of the liver and spleen was observed and hepatic lipid peroxidation was elicited, showing that the IONs are able to induce oxidative stress. The effects of these nanoparticles need to be further investigated regarding the mechanisms involved and the long-term consequences of intravenous administration of PAA-coated IONs. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27102234

  20. Effect of HSA coated iron oxide labeling on human umbilical cord derived mesenchymal stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanganeria, Purva; Chandra, Sudeshna; Bahadur, Dhirendra; Khanna, Aparna

    2015-03-01

    Human umbilical cord derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUC-MSCs) are known for self-renewal and differentiation into cells of various lineages like bone, cartilage and fat. They have been used in biomedical applications to treat degenerative disorders. However, to exploit the therapeutic potential of stem cells, there is a requirement of sensitive non-invasive imaging techniques which will offer the ability to track transplanted cells, bio-distribution, proliferation and differentiation. In this study, we have analyzed the efficacy of human serum albumin coated iron oxide nanoparticles (HSA-IONPs) on the differentiation of hUC-MSCs. The colloidal stability of the HSA-IONPs was tested over a long period of time (≥20 months) and the optimized concentration of HSA-IONPs for labeling the stem cells was 60 μg ml-1. Detailed in vitro assays have been performed to ascertain the effect of the nanoparticles (NPs) on stem cells. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay showed minimum release of LDH depicting the least disruptions in cellular membrane. At the same time, mitochondrial impairment of the cells was also not observed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Flow cytometry analysis revealed lesser generation of reactive oxygen species in HSA-IONPs labeled hUC-MSCs in comparison to bare and commercial IONPs. Transmission electron microscopy showed endocytic engulfment of the NPs by the hUC-MSCs. During the process, the gross morphologies of the actin cytoskeleton were found to be intact as shown by immunofluorescence microscopy. Also, the engulfment of the HSA-IONPs did not show any detrimental effect on the differentiation potential of the stem cells into adipocytes, osteocytes and chondrocytes, thereby confirming that the inherent properties of stem cells were maintained.

  1. Arsenic remediation of drinking water using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash

    SciTech Connect

    MATHIEU, JOHANNA L.; GADGIL, ASHOK J.; ADDY, SUSAN E.A.; KOWOLIK, KRISTIN

    2010-06-01

    We describe laboratory and field results of a novel arsenic removal adsorbent called 'Arsenic Removal Using Bottom Ash' (ARUBA). ARUBA is prepared by coating particles of coal bottom ash, a waste material from coal fired power plants, with iron (hydr)oxide. The coating process is simple and conducted at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. Material costs for ARUBA are estimated to be low (~;;$0.08 per kg) and arsenic remediation with ARUBA has the potential to be affordable to resource-constrained communities. ARUBA is used for removing arsenic via a dispersal-and-removal process, and we envision that ARUBA would be used in community-scale water treatment centers. We show that ARUBA is able to reduce arsenic concentrations in contaminated Bangladesh groundwater to below the Bangladesh standard of 50 ppb. Using the Langmuir isotherm (R2 = 0.77) ARUBA's adsorption capacity in treating real groundwater is 2.6x10-6 mol/g (0.20 mg/g). Time-to-90percent (defined as the time interval for ARUBA to remove 90percent of the total amount of arsenic that is removed at equilibrium) is less than one hour. Reaction rates (pseudo-second-order kinetic model, R2>_ 0.99) increase from 2.4x105 to 7.2x105 g mol-1 min-1 as the groundwater arsenic concentration decreases from 560 to 170 ppb. We show that ARUBA's arsenic adsorption density (AAD), defined as the milligrams of arsenic removed at equilibrium per gram of ARUBA added, is linearly dependent on the initial arsenic concentration of the groundwater sample, for initial arsenic concentrations of up to 1600 ppb and an ARUBA dose of 4.0 g/L. This makes it easy to determine the amount of ARUBA required to treat a groundwater source when its arsenic concentration is known and less than 1600 ppb. Storing contaminated groundwater for two to three days before treatment is seen to significantly increase ARUBA's AAD. ARUBA can be separated from treated water by coagulation and clarification, which is expected to be less expensive than

  2. Multifunctional Silver Coated E-33/Iron Oxide Water Filters: Inhibition of Biofilm Growth and Arsenic Removal

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bayoxide® E33 (E-33, Goethite) is a widely used commercial material for arsenic adsorption. It is a mixture of iron oxyhydroxide and oxides. E-33 is primarily used to remove arsenic from water and to a lesser extent, other anions, but generally lacks multifunctuality. It is a non...

  3. The magnetic and oxidation behavior of bare and silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles synthesized by reverse co-precipitation of ferrous ion (Fe2+) in ambient atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmed, N.; Heczko, O.; Lancok, A.; Hannula, S.-P.

    2014-03-01

    The synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles, i.e., magnetite was attempted by using only ferrous ion (Fe2+) as a magnetite precursor, under an ambient atmosphere. The room temperature reverse co-precipitation method was used, by applying two synthesis protocols. The freshly prepared iron oxide was also immediately coated with Stöber silica (SiO2) layer, forming the coreshell structure. The phase, stoichiometry, crystallite and the particle size of the synthesized powders were determined by using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscope (TEM), while the magnetic and oxidation behaviors were studied by using the vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Based on the results, the bare iron oxide nanoparticles are in the stoichiometry between the magnetite and the maghemite stoichiometry, i.e., oxidation occurs. This oxidation is depending on the synthesis protocols used. With the silica coating, the oxidation can be prevented, as suggested by the fits of Mössbauer spectra and low temperature magnetic measurement.

  4. The iron-coating role on the oxidation kinetics of a pyritic sludge doped with fly ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-López, Rafael; Cama, Jordi; Nieto, José Miguel; Ayora, Carles

    2007-04-01

    The present study examines the processes that control the oxidation attenuation of a pyrite-rich sludge (72 wt% pyrite) from the Iberian Pyrite Belt by the buffer capacity of a fly ash from Los Barrios power station (S Spain), using saturated column experiments. In addition, in order to understand the behaviour of both materials inside these experiments, a fly-ash leaching test and flow-through experiments with pyritic sludge were carried out. The fly-ash leaching test showed that after leaching this material with a slightly acid solution (Millipore MQ water; pH 5.6) the pH raised up to 10.2 and that the metals released by the fly-ash dissolution did not increase significantly the metal concentrations in the output solutions. The flow-through experiments with the pyritic sludge were performed at pH 9, 22 °C and O 2 partial pressure of 0.21 atm, to calculate the dissolution rate of this residue simulating the fly-ash addition. In the experiments Fe bearing oxyhydroxides precipitated as the sludge dissolved. In two non-stirred experiments the iron precipitates formed Fe-coatings on the pyrite surfaces preventing the interaction between the oxidizing agents and the pyrite grains, halting pyrite oxidation (this process is known as pyrite microencapsulation), whereas in two stirred experiments, stirring hindered the iron precipitates to coat the pyrite grains. Thus, based on the release of S (aqueous sulphate) the steady-state pyritic sludge dissolution rate obtained was 9.0 ± 0.2 × -11 mol m -2 s -1. In the saturated column experiments, the sludge dissolution was examined at acidic and basic pH at 22 °C and oxygen-saturated atmosphere. In a saturated column experiment filled with the pyritic sludge, pyrite oxidation occurred favourably at pH approx. 3.7. As the leachates of the fly ash yielded high basic pH, in another saturated column, consisting of an initial thick layer of fly-ash material and a layer of pyritic sludge, the pyrite dissolution took place at p

  5. Doxorubicin loaded PEG-b-poly(4-vinylbenzylphosphonate) coated magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hałupka-Bryl, Magdalena; Bednarowicz, Magdalena; Dobosz, Bernadeta; Krzyminiewski, Ryszard; Zalewski, Tomasz; Wereszczyńska, Beata; Nowaczyk, Grzegorz; Jarek, Marcin; Nagasaki, Yukio

    2015-06-01

    Due to their unique physical properties, superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are increasingly used in medical applications. They are very useful carriers for delivering antitumor drugs in targeted cancer treatment. Magnetic nanoparticles with chemiotherapeutic were synthesized by coprecipitation method followed by coating with biocompatible polymer. The aim of this work is to characterize physical and magnetic properties of synthesized nanoparicles. Characterization was carried out using EPR, HRTEM, X-ray diffraction, SQUID and NMR methods. The present findings show that synthesized nanosystem is promising tool for potential magnetic drug delivery.

  6. Short and long term biosorption of silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles in heterotrophic biofilms.

    PubMed

    Herrling, Maria P; Lackner, Susanne; Tatti, Oleg; Guthausen, Gisela; Delay, Markus; Franzreb, Matthias; Horn, Harald

    2016-02-15

    The increased application of engineered nanoparticles (ENP) in industrial processes and consumer products has raised concerns about their impact on health and environmental safety. When ENP enter the global water cycle by e.g. wastewater streams, wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) represent potential sinks for ENP. During biological WWT, the attachment of ENP to biofilms is responsible for the desired removal of ENP from the water phase avoiding their release into the aquatic environment. However, the fundamental mechanisms guiding the interactions between ENP and biofilms are not yet fully understood. Therefore, this study investigates the behavior and biosorption of inorganic ENP, here magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles coated with silica (scFe3O4-NP), with heterotrophic biofilms at different time scales. Their magnetic properties enable to follow scFe3O4-NP in the biofilm system by a magnetic susceptibility balance and magnetic resonance imaging. Biofilms were exposed to scFe3O4-NP at short contact times (5 min) in flow cells and complementary, scFe3O4-NP were introduced into a moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) to be observed for 27 d. Mass balances revealed that scFe3O4-NP sorbed to the biofilm within a few minutes, but that the total biosorption was rather low (3.2 μg Fe/mg TSS). scFe3O4-NP mainly sorbed to the biofilm surface inducing the detachment of outer biofilm parts starting after an exposure time of 3h in the MBBR. The biosorption depended on the exposure concentration of scFe3O4-NP, but less on the contact time. Most scFe3O4-NP exited the flow cell (up to 65%) and the MBBR (57%) via the effluent. This effect was favored by the stabilization of scFe3O4-NP in the bulk liquid by organic matter leading to a low retention capacity of the MBBR system. The results contribute to improve our understanding about the fate of ENP in environmental and in technical biofilm systems and give indications for future investigations needed. PMID:26674701

  7. DMSA-Coated Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Greatly Affect the Expression of Genes Coding Cysteine-Rich Proteins by Their DMSA Coating.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Wang, Xin; Zou, Jinglu; Liu, Yingxun; Wang, Jinke

    2015-10-19

    The dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) was widely used to coat iron oxide nanoparticles (FeNPs); however, its intracellular cytotoxicity remains to be adequately elucidated. This study analyzed the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in four mammalian cells treated by a DMSA-coated magnetite FeNP at various doses at different times. The results revealed that about one-fourth of DEGs coded cysteine-rich proteins (CRPs) in all cells under each treatment, indicating that the nanoparticles greatly affected the expressions of CRP-coding genes. Additionally, about 26% of CRP-coding DEGs were enzyme genes in all cells, indicating that the nanoparticles greatly affected the expression of enzyme genes. Further experiments with the nanoparticles and a polyethylenimine (PEI)-coated magnetite FeNP revealed that the effect mainly resulted from DMSA carried into cells by the nanoparticles. This study thus first reported the cytotoxicity of DMSA at the gene transcription level as coating molecules of FeNPs. This study provides new insight into the molecular mechanism by which the DMSA-coated nanoparticles resulted in the transcriptional changes of many CRP-coding genes in cells. This study draws attention toward the intracellular cytotoxicity of DMSA as a coating molecule of nanoparticles, which has very low toxicity as an orally administered antidote due to its extracellular distribution. PMID:26378955

  8. Zero-valent iron and iron oxide-coated sand as a combination for removal of co-present chromate and arsenate from groundwater with humic acid.

    PubMed

    Mak, Mark S H; Rao, Pinhua; Lo, Irene M C

    2011-02-01

    The combination of zero-valent iron (Fe(0)) and iron oxide-coated sand (IOCS) was used to remove Cr(VI) and As(V) from groundwater in this study. The efficiency and the removal mechanism of Cr(VI) and As(V) by using this combination, with the influence of humic acid (HA), were investigated using batch experiments. Results showed that, compared to using Fe(0) or IOCS alone, the Fe(0)-IOCS can perform better on the removal of both Cr(VI) and As(V). Metal extraction studies showed that As(V) was mainly removed by IOCS and iron corrosion products while Cr(VI) was mainly removed by Fe(0) and its corrosion products. Competition was found between Cr(VI) and As(V) for the adsorption sites on the iron corrosion products. HA had shown insignificant effects on Cr(VI) removal but some effects on As(V) removal kinetics. As(V) was adsorbed on IOCS at the earlier stage, but adsorbed/coprecipitated with the iron corrosion products at the later stage. PMID:21130550

  9. Synthesis of iron oxide rods coated with polymer brushes and control of their assembly in thin films.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yun; Ishige, Ryohei; Tsujii, Yoshinobu; Ohno, Kohji

    2015-01-27

    We investigated the surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) of methyl methacrylate (MMA) using monodisperse rod-type particles of iron oxide, β-FeOOH. The slow hydrolysis of iron(III) chloride yielded monodisperse β-FeOOH rods with an average length-to-width ratio, L/W, of 6 (L = 210 nm and W = 35 nm on average). The surfaces of the β-FeOOH rods were modified with a triethoxysilane derivative as an ATRP-initiating site, namely, (2-bromo-2-methyl)propionyloxypropyl triethoxysilane. The SI-ATRP of MMA, mediated by a copper complex, was performed using the initiator-coated β-FeOOH rods in the presence of a "sacrificial" free initiator. Well-defined poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) brushes with molecular weights of up to 700,000 could be grafted on the β-FeOOH rods with a surface density as high as 0.3 chains/nm(2). The resultant polymer-brush-afforded hybrid rods exhibited high dispersibility in various solvents for PMMA without forming aggregates. Thin films were prepared by dip-coating from a suspension of the hybrid rods, and the rods were oriented in a specific direction in the films. The arrangement of the rods could be controlled by varying the chain length of the polymer brush and the withdrawal speed during the dip-coating process. PMID:25552325

  10. TREG coated iron oxide nanoparticles as contrast agent for MRI in-vivo use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutierrez-Garcia, Eric; Hidalgo-Tobon, Silvia; Lopez, Ciro; Gonzalez-Rodriguez, Roberto; Coffer, Jeffery; De Celis Alonso, Benito; Dies Suarez, Pilar; Obregon, Manuel; Perez-Pena, Mario; Platas-Neri, Diana; Mendez-Rojas, Miguel

    2014-11-01

    Super-paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are of interest due to their great potential applications in diverse fields such as biomedicine. In this work we have prepared SPION nanoparticles using the polyol technique and characterized the magnetic properties of them for MRI in-vivo use. Nanoparticle preparation: All reagents were purchased from commercial sources (Sigma-Aldrich, St. Louis, USA) Iron (III) acetylacetonate, [Fe(acac)3], was used as the iron oxide precursor and thermally decomposed at high temperatures in triethyleneglycol (TREG). Nano-sized magnetite particles were prepared by an adaptation of the method proposed by Wei Cai et al[1-3]. A healthy rabbit was scanned on a clinical 1.5 T Philips MR scanner. Images were taken in 2D mode with a mFFE sequence. Relaxation time T2 was obtained from the MR images using a Matlab algorithm where the signal intensity decay was calculated at each image and then adjusted to a mono-exponential curve. Images were obtained before contrast injection, 24 hours and 36 hours following SPIONs administration. Signal decay at different Echo times for the prepared magnetic SPIONs, before and after contrast injection was measured. It was visualized a concentration of the agent contrast in brain and liver and the results were compared with images obtained from histopathology.

  11. Design and optimization of lipid-modified poly(amidoamine) dendrimer coated iron oxide nanoparticles as probes for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boni, A.; Bardi, G.; Bertero, A.; Cappello, V.; Emdin, M.; Flori, A.; Gemmi, M.; Innocenti, C.; Menichetti, L.; Sangregorio, C.; Villa, S.; Piazza, V.

    2015-04-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with a wide size range (2.6-14.1 nm) were synthesized and coated with the amphiphilic poly(amidoamine) PAMAM-C12 dendrimer. The resulting well dispersed and stable water suspensions were fully characterized in order to explore their possible use in biomedical applications. The structural and magnetic properties of the nanoparticles were preserved during the coating and were related to their relaxometric behaviour. The Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Dispersion (NMRD) profiles were found to be in accordance with the Roch model. The biocompatibility was assessed by means of cell viability tests and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) analysis. The nanoparticles' capability of being detected via Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) was investigated by means of clinical MRI scanners both in water and agar gel phantoms, and in a mouse model.Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with a wide size range (2.6-14.1 nm) were synthesized and coated with the amphiphilic poly(amidoamine) PAMAM-C12 dendrimer. The resulting well dispersed and stable water suspensions were fully characterized in order to explore their possible use in biomedical applications. The structural and magnetic properties of the nanoparticles were preserved during the coating and were related to their relaxometric behaviour. The Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Dispersion (NMRD) profiles were found to be in accordance with the Roch model. The biocompatibility was assessed by means of cell viability tests and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) analysis. The nanoparticles' capability of being detected via Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) was investigated by means of clinical MRI scanners both in water and agar gel phantoms, and in a mouse model. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr01148e

  12. Immobilization of bacterial S-layer proteins from Caulobacter crescentus on iron oxide-based nanocomposite: synthesis and spectroscopic characterization of zincite-coated Fe₂O₃ nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Habibi, Neda

    2014-05-01

    Zinc oxide was coated on Fe2O3 nanoparticles using sol-gel spin-coating. Caulobacter crescentus have a crystalline surface layer (S-layer), which consist of one protein or glycoprotein species. The immobilization of bacterial S-layers obtained from C. crescentus on zincite-coated nanoparticles of iron oxide was investigated. The SDS PAGE results of S-layers isolated from C. crescentus showed the weight of 50 KDa. Nanoparticles of the Fe2O3 and zinc oxide were synthesized by a sol-gel technique. Fe2O3 nanoparticles with an average size of 50 nm were successfully prepared by the proper deposition of zinc oxide onto iron oxide nanoparticles surface annealed at 450 °C. The samples were characterized by field-emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). PMID:24566114

  13. Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry (LDI-MS) of Lipids with Iron Oxide Nanoparticle-Coated Targets.

    PubMed

    Kusano, Maiko; Kawabata, Shin-Ichirou; Tamura, Yusuke; Mizoguchi, Daigou; Murouchi, Masato; Kawasaki, Hideya; Arakawa, Ryuichi; Tanaka, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticle (NP)-coated target plates were employed for the direct detection and analysis of low molecular weight lipids by laser desorption/ionization (LDI) mass spectrometry (MS). We have demonstrated that the use of the iron oxide NP-coated target provides a simple, direct, and rapid detection method for lipid standards and epidermal surface lipids without any cumbersome sample pretreatment as well as mass spectra that are free of background matrix peaks. Lipid standards (1-stearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycerol, 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-3-linoleoyl-rac-glycerol, 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) were detected as either protonated or cationated species. Clean MS/MS spectra for each lipid were also successfully obtained. Pre-MS surface cleaning of the target plates with UV-ozone treatment successfully removed organic contaminants that would interfere with the mass spectra especially in the low molecular weight region. Preliminary application of the presented target plate to the detection of endogenous lipids in latent fingerprints showed promising results and for potential use in the visualization and chemical composition determination of latent fingerprints by nanoparticle assistance. PMID:24860715

  14. Effect of surface charge on the colloidal stability and in vitro uptake of carboxymethyl dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Ayala, Vanessa; Herrera, Adriana P.; Latorre-Esteves, Magda; Torres-Lugo, Madeline

    2013-01-01

    Nanoparticle physicochemical properties such as surface charge are considered to play an important role in cellular uptake and particle–cell interactions. In order to systematically evaluate the role of surface charge on the uptake of iron oxide nanoparticles, we prepared carboxymethyl-substituted dextrans with different degrees of substitution, ranging from 38 to 5 groups per chain, and reacted them using carbodiimide chemistry with amine–silane-coated iron oxide nanoparticles with narrow size distributions in the range of 33–45 nm. Surface charge of carboxymethyl-substituted dextran-coated nano-particles ranged from −50 to 5 mV as determined by zeta potential measurements, and was dependent on the number of carboxymethyl groups incorporated in the dextran chains. Nanoparticles were incubated with CaCo-2 human colon cancer cells. Nanoparticle–cell interactions were observed by confocal laser scanning microscopy and uptake was quantified by elemental analysis using inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. Mechanisms of internalization were inferred using pharmacological inhibitors for fluid-phase, clathrin-mediated, and caveola-mediated endocytosis. Results showed increased uptake for nanoparticles with greater negative charge. Internalization patterns suggest that uptake of the most negatively charged particles occurs via non-specific interactions. PMID:24470787

  15. Water-dispersible sugar-coated iron oxide nanoparticles. An evaluation of their relaxometric and magnetic hyperthermia properties.

    PubMed

    Lartigue, Lenaic; Innocenti, Claudia; Kalaivani, Thangavel; Awwad, Azzam; Sanchez Duque, Maria del Mar; Guari, Yannick; Larionova, Joulia; Guérin, Christian; Montero, Jean-Louis Georges; Barragan-Montero, Véronique; Arosio, Paolo; Lascialfari, Alessandro; Gatteschi, Dante; Sangregorio, Claudio

    2011-07-13

    Synthesis of functionalized magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) for biomedical applications represents a current challenge. In this paper we present the synthesis and characterization of water-dispersible sugar-coated iron oxide NPs specifically designed as magnetic fluid hyperthermia heat mediators and negative contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. In particular, the influence of the inorganic core size was investigated. To this end, iron oxide NPs with average size in the range of 4-35 nm were prepared by thermal decomposition of molecular precursors and then coated with organic ligands bearing a phosphonate group on one side and rhamnose, mannose, or ribose moieties on the other side. In this way a strong anchorage of the organic ligand on the inorganic surface was simply realized by ligand exchange, due to covalent bonding between the Fe(3+) atom and the phosphonate group. These synthesized nanoobjects can be fully dispersed in water forming colloids that are stable over very long periods. Mannose, ribose, and rhamnose were chosen to test the versatility of the method and also because these carbohydrates, in particular rhamnose, which is a substrate of skin lectin, confer targeting properties to the nanosystems. The magnetic, hyperthermal, and relaxometric properties of all the synthesized samples were investigated. Iron oxide NPs of ca. 16-18 nm were found to represent an efficient bifunctional targeting system for theranostic applications, as they have very good transverse relaxivity (three times larger than the best currently available commercial products) and large heat release upon application of radio frequency (RF) electromagnetic radiation with amplitude and frequency close to the human tolerance limit. The results have been rationalized on the basis of the magnetic properties of the investigated samples. PMID:21604803

  16. Removal of Trace Arsenic to Meet Drinking Water Standards Using Iron Oxide Coated Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Ntim, Susana Addo; Mitra, Somenath

    2011-01-01

    This study presents the removal of trace level arsenic to meet drinking water standards using an iron oxide-multi-walled carbon nanotube (Fe-MWCNT) hybrid as a sorbent. The synthesis was facilitated by the high degree of nanotube functionalization using a microwave assisted process, and a controlled assembly of iron oxide was possible where the MWCNT served as an effective support for the oxide. In the final product, 11 % of the carbon atoms were attached to Fe. The Fe-MWCNT was effective in arsenic removal to below the drinking water standard levels of 10 µg L−1. The absorption capacity of the composite was 1723 µg g−1 and 189 µg g−1 for As(III) and As(V) respectively. The adsorption of As(V) on Fe-MWCNT was faster than that of As(III). The pseudo-second order rate equation was found to effectively describe the kinetics of arsenic adsorption. The adsorption isotherms for As(III) and As(V) fitted both the Langmuir and Freundlich models. PMID:21625394

  17. Contribution of coated humic acids calculated through their surface coverage on nano iron oxides for ofloxacin and norfloxacin sorption.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hongbo; Liang, Ni; Li, Hao; Chen, Fangyuan; Zhang, Di; Pan, Bo; Xing, Baoshan

    2015-09-01

    Sorption of organic contaminants on organo-mineral complexes has been investigated extensively, but the sorption contribution of mineral particles was not properly addressed before calculating KOC, especially for ionic organic contaminants. We measured the surface coverage of a humic acid (HA) on nano iron oxides (n-Fe2O3) in a series of synthesized organo-mineral complexes. The contribution of the coated HA to ofloxacin (OFL) and norfloxacin (NOR) sorption in HA-n-Fe2O3 complexes was over 80% of the total sorption with the surface coverage of 36% and fOC of 1.6%. All the coated HA showed higher sorption to NOR and OFL in comparison to the original HA, suggesting HA fractionation and/or physical re-conformation during organo-mineral complex formation. The decreased KOC with multilayer coating may suggest the importance of site-specific interactions for OFL sorption, while the increased KOC with multilayer coating may suggest the importance of partitioning in hydrophobic region for NOR sorption. PMID:25978351

  18. A facile and cost-effective method for separation of oil-water mixtures using polymer-coated iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Palchoudhury, Soubantika; Lead, Jamie R

    2014-12-16

    Catastrophic oil spills and oil from waste waters such as bilge and fracking waters pose major environmental concerns. The limitations of existing cleanup techniques for benign oil remediation has inspired a recent scientific impetus to develop oil-absorbing smart nanomaterials. Magnetic nanocomposites were here designed to allow easy recovery from various systems. In this study, sorption of reference MC252 oil with easy-to-synthesize and low-cost hydrophilic polyvinylpyrrolidone-coated iron oxide nanoparticles is reported for the first time. The one-step modified polyol synthesis in air directly generates water-soluble nanoparticles. Stable polyvinylpyrrolidone-coatings are known to minimize environmental alterations of nanoparticles from aggregation and other processes. Iron oxide provides effective magnetic actuation, while both PVP and iron oxide have low toxicity. These nanoparticles gave quantitative (near 100%) oil removal under optimized conditions. The facile synthesis and ease of use represents a significant improvement over existing techniques. PMID:25409536

  19. Labeling transplanted mice islet with polyvinylpyrrolidone coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for in vivo detection by magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hai; Xie, Qiuping; Kang, Muxing; Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Hui; Chen, Jin; Zhai, Chuanxin; Yang, Deren; Jiang, Biao; Wu, Yulian

    2009-09-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIO) are emerging as a novel probe for noninvasive cell tracking with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and have potential wide usage in medical research. In this study, we have developed a method using high-temperature hydrolysis of chelate metal alkoxide complexes to synthesize polyvinylpyrrolidone coated iron oxide nanoparticles (PVP-SPIO), as a biocompatible magnetic agent that can efficiently label mice islet β-cells. The size, crystal structure and magnetic properties of the as-synthesized nanoparticles have been characterized. The newly synthesized PVP-SPIO with high stability, crystallinity and saturation magnetization can be efficiently internalized into β-cells, without affecting viability and function. The imaging of 100 PVP-SPIO-labeled mice islets in the syngeneic renal subcapsular model of transplantation under a clinical 3.0 T MR imager showed high spatial resolution in vivo. These results indicated the great potential application of the PVP-SPIO as an MRI contrast agent for monitoring transplanted islet grafts in the clinical management of diabetes in the near future.

  20. Exposure to Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Coated with Phospholipid-Based Polymeric Micelles Induces Biochemical and Histopathological Pulmonary Changes in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Radu (Balas), Mihaela; Din (Popescu), Ioana Mihaela; Hermenean, Anca; Cinteză, Otilia Ludmila; Burlacu, Radu; Ardelean, Aurel; Dinischiotu, Anca

    2015-01-01

    The biochemical and histopathological changes induced by the exposure to iron oxide nanoparticles coated with phospholipid-based polymeric micelles (IONPs-PM) in CD-1 mice lungs were analyzed. After 2, 3, 7 and 14 days following the intravenous injection of IONPs-PM (5 and 15 mg Fe/kg bw), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity, oxidative stress parameters and the expression of Bax, Bcl-2, caspase-3 and TNF-α were evaluated in lung tissue. An increase of catalase (CAT) and glutathione reductase (GR) activities on the second day followed by a decrease on the seventh day, as well as a decline of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity on the third and seventh day were observed in treated groups vs. controls. However, all these enzymatic activities almost fully recovered on the 14th day. The reduced glutathione (GSH) and protein thiols levels decreased significantly in nanoparticles-treated groups and remained diminished during the entire experimental period; by contrast malondialdehyde (MDA) and protein carbonyls increased between the 3rd and 14th day of treatment vs. control. Relevant histopathological modifications were highlighted using Hematoxylin and Eosin (H&E) staining. In addition, major changes in the expression of apoptosis markers were observed in the first week, more pronounced for the higher dose. The injected IONPs-PM generated a dose-dependent decrease of the mouse lung capacity, which counteracted oxidative stress, thus creating circumstances for morphopathological lesions and oxidation processes. PMID:26690409

  1. Treatment of heavy metals by iron oxide coated and natural gravel media in Sustainable urban Drainage Systems.

    PubMed

    Norris, M J; Pulford, I D; Haynes, H; Dorea, C C; Phoenix, V R

    2013-01-01

    Sustainable urban Drainage Systems (SuDS) filter drains are simple, low-cost systems utilized as a first defence to treat road runoff by employing biogeochemical processes to reduce pollutants. However, the mechanisms involved in pollution attenuation are poorly understood. This work aims to develop a better understanding of these mechanisms to facilitate improved SuDS design. Since heavy metals are a large fraction of pollution in road runoff, this study aimed to enhance heavy metal removal of filter drain gravel with an iron oxide mineral amendment to increase surface area for heavy metal scavenging. Experiments showed that amendment-coated and uncoated (control) gravel removed similar quantities of heavy metals. Moreover, when normalized to surface area, iron oxide coated gravels (IOCGs) showed poorer metal removal capacities than uncoated gravel. Inspection of the uncoated microgabbro gravel indicated that clay particulates on the surface (a natural product of weathering of this material) augmented heavy metal removal, generating metal sequestration capacities that were competitive compared with IOCGs. Furthermore, when the weathered surface was scrubbed and removed, metal removal capacities were reduced by 20%. When compared with other lithologies, adsorption of heavy metals by microgabbro was 10-70% higher, indicating that both the lithology of the gravel, and the presence of a weathered surface, considerably influence its ability to immobilize heavy metals. These results contradict previous assumptions which suggest that gravel lithology is not a significant factor in SuDS design. Based upon these results, weathered microgabbro is suggested to be an ideal lithology for use in SuDS. PMID:23925197

  2. The effects of synthesis method on the physical and chemical properties of dextran coated iron oxide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Anastasia K.; Mathias, Ronita; Anderson, Kimberly W.; Hilt, J. Zach

    2015-01-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles coated with dextran were synthesized via four variations on the co-precipitation method. The methods ranged from in situ formation of the nanoparticles within the dextran solution to the adsorption of dextran to the nanoparticle surface following nucleation and extensive washing. The timing of the addition of dextran into the reaction mixture was found to greatly influence the physical and chemical properties of the magnetic nanoparticles. Batches of dextran coated iron oxide nanoparticles were synthesized by each method in triplicate, and the nanoparticles were further crosslinked with epichlorohydrin. The properties of the nanoparticles such as size, percentage of dextran coating, stability in solution, crystallinity, and magnetic properties were evaluated. The simultaneous semi-two-step method injected the reducing agent and the dextran solution into the reaction vessel at the same time. This method resulted in the greatest batch-to-batch reproducibility of nanoparticle properties and the least variation in nanoparticles synthesized in the same batch. The two-step method resulted in the greatest variation of the characteristics examined between batches. The one-step method was synthesized with both five grams and one gram of dextran to investigate the effects of solution viscosity on the resulting nanoparticle characteristics. The one-step method with five grams of dextran resulted in nanoparticles with significantly smaller crystal sizes (5.4 ± 1.9 nm) and lower specific adsorption rate (SAR) values (138.4 ± 13.6 W/g) in an alternating magnetic field (58 kA/m, 292 kHz). However, this method resulted in nanoparticles that were very stable in PBS over 12 hours, which is most likely due to the greater dextran coating (60.0 ± 2.7 weight percent). For comparison, the simultaneous semi-two-step method generated nanoparticles 179.2 ± 18.3 nm in diameter (crystal size 12.1 ± 0.2 nm) containing 18.3 ± 1.2 weight percent dextran with a SAR

  3. Dual-responsive polymer-coated iron oxide nanoparticles for drug delivery and imaging applications.

    PubMed

    Sundaresan, Varsha; Menon, Jyothi U; Rahimi, Maham; Nguyen, Kytai T; Wadajkar, Aniket S

    2014-05-15

    We reported the synthesis and characterization of dual-responsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-acrylamide-chitosan) (PAC)-coated magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) for controlled and targeted drug delivery and imaging applications. The PAC-MNPs size was about 150nm with 70% iron mass content and excellent superparamagnetic properties. PAC-MNPs loaded with anti-cancer drug doxorubicin showed dual-responsive drug release characteristics with the maximum release of drugs at 40°C (∼78%) than at 37°C (∼33%) and at pH of 6 (∼55%) than at pH of 7.4 (∼28%) after 21 days. Further, the conjugation of prostate cancer-specific R11 peptides increased the uptake of PAC-MNPs by prostate cancer PC3 cells. The dose-dependent cellular uptake of the nanoparticles was also significantly increased with the presence of 1.3T magnetic field. The nanoparticles demonstrated cytocompatibility up to concentrations of 500μg/ml when incubated over a period of 24h with human dermal fibroblasts and normal prostate epithelial cells. Finally, pharmacokinetic studies indicated that doxorubicin-loaded PAC-MNPs caused significant prostate cancer cell death at 40°C than at 37°C, thereby confirming the temperature-dependent drug release kinetics and in vitro therapeutic efficacy. Future evaluation of in vivo therapeutic efficacy of targeted image-guided cancer therapy using R11-PAC-MNPs will reinforce a significant impact of the multifunctional PAC-MNPs on the future drug delivery systems. PMID:24607216

  4. Effect of iron oxide nanoparticles coating type on the relationship between nanoparticles concentration and signal intensity in inversion recovery T1-weighted MRI

    PubMed Central

    Gharehaghaji, Nahideh; Nazarpoor, Mahmood; Saharkhiz, Hodaiseh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) nanoparticles are used as blood pool contrast agent for magnetic resonance angiography and perfusion imaging. Our aim in this study was to investigate the effect of the two coating types of iron oxide nanoparticles on the relationship between nanoparticles concentration and signal intensity (SI) in T1-weighted MR images. Methods: Different concentrations of the polyethylene glycol (PEG), and carboxydextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles were imaged using inversion recovery Turbo-FLASH (Turbo fast low-angle shot) pulse sequence with inversion times (TIs) of 300-900 ms (interval of 100 ms). The maximum non-linear and linear relationship between the corrected SI (after non-uniformity correction) and the concentration of the two coated nanoparticles were calculated in T1-weighted images. Results: The maximum non-linear relationship between the corrected SI and the concentration of the PEG, and carboxydextran-coated nanoparticles were obtained at concentrations of 400 and 200 μmol Fe/L at a TI of 900 ms, respectively. In addition, the maximum linear relationship between the corrected SI and the concentration of the PEG, and carboxydextran-coated nanoparticles (R2=0.99) appeared at 228.184 and 205.654 μmolFe/L with a TI of 300 ms, respectively. Conclusion: The maximum non-linear corrected SI of the carboxydextran-coated nanoparticles was slightly higher than that of the PEG-coated nanoparticles at similar TIs. However, the PEG-coated nanoparticles were better than the carboxydextran-coated nanoparticles as a T1 contrast agent for perfusion measurements. PMID:26478869

  5. Reduction of polyethylenimine-coated iron oxide nanoparticles induced autophagy and cytotoxicity by lactosylation.

    PubMed

    Du, Jiuju; Zhu, Wencheng; Yang, Li; Wu, Changqiang; Lin, Bingbing; Wu, Jun; Jin, Rongrong; Shen, Taipeng; Ai, Hua

    2016-12-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles are excellent magnetic resonance contrast agents and surface engineering can expand their applications. When covered with amphiphilic alkyl-polyethyleneimine (PEI), the modified SPIO nanoparticles can be used as MRI visible gene/drug delivery carriers and cell tracking probes. However, the positively charged amines of PEI can also cause cytotoxicity and restricts their further applications. In this study, we used lactose to modify amphiphilic low molecular weight polyethylenimine (C12-PEI2K) at different lactosylation degree. It was found that the N-alkyl-PEI-lactobionic acid wrapped SPIO nanocomposites show better cell viability without compromising their labelling efficacy as well as MR imaging capability in RAW 264.7 cells, comparing to the unsubstituted ones. Besides, we found the PEI induced cell autophagy can be reduced via lactose modification, indicating the increased cell viability might rely on down-regulating autophagy. Thus, our findings provide a new approach to overcome the toxicity of PEI wrapped SPIO nanocomposites by lactose modification. PMID:27482464

  6. Magnetic removal of Entamoeba cysts from water using chitosan oligosaccharide-coated iron oxide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Sudeep; Arora, Vikas; Jadaun, Alka; Kumar, Jitender; Singh, Nishant; Jain, Vinod Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Amebiasis, a major health problem in developing countries, is the second most common cause of death due to parasitic infection. Amebiasis is usually transmitted by the ingestion of Entamoeba histolytica cysts through oral–fecal route. Herein, we report on the use of chitosan oligosaccharide-functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles for efficient capture and removal of pathogenic protozoan cysts under the influence of an external magnetic field. These nanoparticles were synthesized through a chemical synthesis process. The synthesized particles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and zeta potential analysis. The particles were found to be well dispersed and uniform in size. The capture and removal of pathogenic cysts were demonstrated by fluorescent microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Three-dimensional modeling of various biochemical components of cyst walls, and thereafter, flexible docking studies demonstrate the probable interaction mechanism of nanoparticles with various components of E. histolytica cyst walls. Results of the present study suggest that E. histolytica cysts can be efficiently captured and removed from contaminated aqueous systems through the application of synthesized nanoparticles. PMID:26261417

  7. Reduction of polyethylenimine-coated iron oxide nanoparticles induced autophagy and cytotoxicity by lactosylation

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jiuju; Zhu, Wencheng; Yang, Li; Wu, Changqiang; Lin, Bingbing; Wu, Jun; Jin, Rongrong; Shen, Taipeng; Ai, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles are excellent magnetic resonance contrast agents and surface engineering can expand their applications. When covered with amphiphilic alkyl-polyethyleneimine (PEI), the modified SPIO nanoparticles can be used as MRI visible gene/drug delivery carriers and cell tracking probes. However, the positively charged amines of PEI can also cause cytotoxicity and restricts their further applications. In this study, we used lactose to modify amphiphilic low molecular weight polyethylenimine (C12-PEI2K) at different lactosylation degree. It was found that the N-alkyl-PEI-lactobionic acid wrapped SPIO nanocomposites show better cell viability without compromising their labelling efficacy as well as MR imaging capability in RAW 264.7 cells, comparing to the unsubstituted ones. Besides, we found the PEI induced cell autophagy can be reduced via lactose modification, indicating the increased cell viability might rely on down-regulating autophagy. Thus, our findings provide a new approach to overcome the toxicity of PEI wrapped SPIO nanocomposites by lactose modification. PMID:27482464

  8. Size-controlled synthesis of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and their surface coating by gold for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maleki, H.; Simchi, A.; Imani, M.; Costa, B. F. O.

    2012-11-01

    The size mono-dispersity, saturation magnetization, and surface chemistry of magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) are recognized as critical factors for efficient biomedical applications. Here, we performed modified water-in-oil inverse nano-emulsion procedure for preparation of stable colloidal superparamagnetic iron oxide NPs (SPIONs) with high saturation magnetization. To achieve mono-dispersed SPIONs, optimization process was probed on several important factors including molar ratio of iron salts [Fe3+ and Fe2+], the concentration of ammonium hydroxide as reducing agent, and molar ratio of water to surfactant. The biocompatibility of the obtained NPs, at various concentrations, was evaluated via MTT (3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay and the results showed that the NPs were non-toxic at concentrations <0.1 mg/mL. Surface functionalization was performed by conformal coating of the NPs with a thin shell of gold (˜4 nm) through chemical reduction of attached gold salts at the surface of the SPIONs. The Fe3O4 core/Au shell particles demonstrate strong plasmon resonance absorption and can be separated from solution using an external magnetic field. Experimental data from both physical and chemical determinations of the changes in particle size, surface plasmon resonance optical band, phase components, core-shell surface composition, and magnetic properties have confirmed the formation of the mono-dispersed core-shell nanostructure.

  9. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles coated with different polymers and their MRI contrast effects in the mouse brains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Songbo; Zhang, Baolin; Wang, Lei; Wang, Jun; Li, Xuan; Yang, Gao; Gao, Fabao

    2015-01-01

    PEG and PEG/PEI modified superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) were synthesized by the thermal decomposition of iron (III) acetylacetonate (Fe(acac)3) in poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) containing poly (ethylene imine) (PEI) (0 or 0.3 g). PEG/PEI-SPIONs were coated with Tween 80 (PEG/PEI/Tween 80-SPIONs). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analyses indicated that PEG, PEG/PEI and PEG/PEI/Tween 80 were attached to the surfaces of the SPIONs. The PEG-SPIONs, PEG/PEI-SPIONs and PEG/PEI/Tween 80-SPIONs performed excellent colloidal stability in the phosphate buffered saline (PBS), and in deionized water with the mean hydrodynamic sizes of 19.5, 21.0, 24.0 nm and the zeta potentials of -5.0, 35.0, 19.0 mV, respectively. All the SPIONs showed low cytotoxicity assessed by the MTT assay. In vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the Kunming (KM) mouse brains were performed, the PEG-SPIONs, PEG/PEI-SPIONs and PEG/PEI/Tween 80-SPIONs exhibited vascular imaging effects in bulbus olfactorius, frontal cortex, temporal, thalamus and brain stem of the mouse brains after 24 h intravenous injection of the nanoparticles. The SPIONs have potentials as MRI contrast agents in the mouse brains.

  10. Catechol-functionalized chitosan/iron oxide nanoparticle composite inspired by mussel thread coating and squid beak interfacial chemistry.

    PubMed

    Zvarec, Ondrej; Purushotham, Sreekanth; Masic, Admir; Ramanujan, Raju V; Miserez, Ali

    2013-08-27

    Biological materials offer a wide range of multifunctional and structural properties that are currently not achieved in synthetic materials. Herein we report on the synthesis and preparation of bioinspired organic/inorganic composites that mimic the key physicochemical features associated with the mechanical strengthening of both squid beaks and mussel thread coatings using chitosan as an initial template. While chitosan is a well-known biocompatible material, it suffers from key drawbacks that have limited its usage in a wider range of structural biomedical applications. First, its load-bearing capability in hydrated conditions remains poor, and second it completely dissolves at pH < 6, preventing its use in mild acidic microenvironments. In order to overcome these intrinsic limitations, a chitosan-based organic/inorganic biocomposite is prepared that mimics the interfacial chemistry of squid beaks and mussel thread coating. Chitosan was functionalized with catechol moieties in a highly controlled fashion and combined with superparamagnetic iron oxide (γ-Fe2O3) nanoparticles to give composites that represent a significant improvement in functionality of chitosan-based biomaterials. The inorganic/organic (γ-Fe2O3/catechol) interfaces are stabilized and strengthened by coordination bonding, resulting in hybrid composites with improved stability at high temperatures, physiological pH conditions, and acid/base conditions. The inclusion of superparamagnetic particles also makes the composites stimuli-responsive. PMID:23865752

  11. Nano-Structured Magnesium Oxide Coated Iron Ore: Its Application to the Remediation of Wastewater Containing Lead.

    PubMed

    Nagarajah, Ranjini; Jang, Min; Pichiah, Saravanan; Cho, Jongman; Snyder, Shane A

    2015-12-01

    Magnetically separable nano-structured magnesium oxide coated iron ore (IO(MgO)) was prepared using environmentally benign chemicals, such as iron ore (IO), magnesium(II) nitrate hexahydrate [Mg(NO3)2 x 6H2O] and urea; via an easy and fast preparation method. The lO(MgO) was characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and alternating gradient magnetometer (AGM) analyses. The isotherm and kinetic studies indicated that lO(MgO) has a comparably higher Langmuir constant (K(L), 1.69 L mg(-1)) and maximum sorption capacity (33.9 mg g(-1)) for lead (Pb) than other inorganic media. Based on MgO amount, the removal capacity of Pb by IO(MgO) was 2,724 mg Pb (g MgO)(-1), which was higher than that (1,980 mg g(-1)) for flowerlike magnesium oxide nanostructures reported by Cao et al. The kinetics, FE-SEM, elemental mapping and XRD results revealed that the substitution followed by precipitation was identified as the mechanism of Pb removal and plumbophyllite (Pb2Si4O10 x H2O) was the precipitated phase of Pb. A leaching test revealed that IOMgO) had negligible concentrations of leached Fe at pH 4-9. Since the base material, IO, is cheap and easily available, lO(MgO) could be produced in massive amounts and used for remediation of wastewater containing heavy metals, applying simple and fast magnetic separation. PMID:26682385

  12. Surface functionalization for tailoring the aggregation and magnetic behaviour of silica-coated iron oxide nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roca, A. G.; Carmona, D.; Miguel-Sancho, N.; Bomatí-Miguel, O.; Balas, F.; Piquer, C.; Santamaría, J.

    2012-04-01

    We report here a detailed structural and magnetic study of different silica nanocapsules containing uniform and highly crystalline maghemite nanoparticles. The magnetic phase consists of 5 nm triethylene glycol (TREG)- or dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA)-coated maghemite particles. TREG-coated nanoparticles were synthesized by thermal decomposition. In a second step, TREG ligands were exchanged by DMSA. After the ligand exchange, the ζ potential of the particles changed from - 10 to - 40 mV, whereas the hydrodynamic size remained constant at around 15 nm. Particles coated by TREG and DMSA were encapsulated in silica following a sol-gel procedure. The encapsulation of TREG-coated nanoparticles led to large magnetic aggregates, which were embedded in coalesced silica structures. However, DMSA-coated nanoparticles led to small magnetic clusters inserted in silica spheres of around 100 nm. The final nanostructures can be described as the result of several competing factors at play. Magnetic measurements indicate that in the TREG-coated nanoparticles the interparticle magnetic interaction scenario has not dramatically changed after the silica encapsulation, whereas in the DMSA-coated nanoparticles, the magnetic interactions were screened due to the function of the silica template. Moreover, the analysis of the AC susceptibility suggests that our systems essentially behave as cluster spin glass systems.

  13. Impact of Iron-Reducing Bacteria on Metals and Radionuclides Adsorbed to Humic-Coated Iron(III) Oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Burgos, W. D.

    2005-02-01

    This is the final report for Grant No. DEFGO2-98ER62691 submitted to the DOE NABR Program. This research has focused on (1) the role of natural organic matter (NOM), quinines, and complexants in enhancing the biological reduction of solid-phase crystalline ferric oxides, (2) the effect of heavy metals (specifically zinc) and NOM on ferric oxide bioreduction, (3) the sorption of Me(II) [Cu(II), Fe(II), Mn(II) and Zn(II)] to ferric oxides and subsequent Me(II)-promoted phase transformations of the ferric oxides, and (4) the development of reaction-based biogeochemical models to numerically simulate our experimental results.

  14. Study on iron oxide nanoparticles coated with glucose-derived polymers for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herea, D. D.; Chiriac, H.; Lupu, N.; Grigoras, M.; Stoian, G.; Stoica, B. A.; Petreus, T.

    2015-10-01

    This study reports an approach for a facile one-step synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) coated with glucose-derived polymers (GDP) through a mechanochemical hydrothermal process for biomedical applications. Polymer-coated magnetic nanoparticles (Fe2O3/Fe3O4), with sizes below 10 nm, exhibited superparamagnetic behavior, with a specific magnetization saturation value of about 40 emu/g, and a maximum specific absorption rate (SAR) of 30 W/g in AC magnetic fields. Depending on the intensity of the applied AC magnetic field, a temperature of 42 °C can be achieved in 4-17 min. The surface polymerized layer affords functional hydroxyl groups for binding to biomolecules containing carboxyl, thiol, or amino groups, thereby making the coated nanoparticles feasible for bio-conjugation. In vitro cytotoxicity evaluation pointed out that a relatively high concentration of polymer-coated magnetic nanoparticles (GDP-MNPs) did not induce severe cell alteration, suggesting a good biocompatibility.

  15. Interactions between sub-10-nm iron and cerium oxide nanoparticles and 3T3 fibroblasts: the role of the coating and aggregation state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safi, M.; Sarrouj, H.; Sandre, O.; Mignet, N.; Berret, J.-F.

    2010-04-01

    Recent nanotoxicity studies revealed that the physico-chemical characteristics of engineered nanomaterials play an important role in the interactions with living cells. Here, we report on the toxicity and uptake of cerium and iron oxide sub-10-nm nanoparticles by NIH/3T3 mouse fibroblasts. Coating strategies include low-molecular weight ligands (citric acid) and polymers (poly(acrylic acid), MW = 2000 g mol - 1). Electrostatically adsorbed on the surfaces, the organic moieties provide a negatively charged coating in physiological conditions. We find that most particles were biocompatible, as exposed cells remained 100% viable relative to controls. Only the bare and the citrate-coated nanoceria exhibit a slight decrease in mitochondrial activity at very high cerium concentrations (>1 g l - 1). We also observe that the citrate-coated particles are internalized/adsorbed by the cells in large amounts, typically 250 pg/cell after 24 h incubation for iron oxide. In contrast, the polymer-coated particles are taken up at much lower rates (<30 pg/cell). The strong uptake shown by the citrated particles is related to the destabilization of the dispersions in the cell culture medium and their sedimentation down to the cell membranes. In conclusion, we show that the uptake of nanomaterials by living cells depends on the coating of the particles and on its ability to preserve the colloidal nature of the dispersions.

  16. A comparison of iron oxide-rich joint coatings and rock chips as geochemical sampling media in exploration for disseminated gold deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crone, W.; Larson, L.T.; Carpenter, R.H.; Chao, T.T.; Sanzolone, R.F.

    1984-01-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of iron oxide-rich fracture coatings as a geochemical sampling medium for disseminated gold deposits, as compared with conventional lithogeochemical methods, for samples from the Pinson mine and Preble prospect in southeastern Humboldt County, Nevada. That disseminated gold mineralization is associated with Hg, As, and Sb is clearly demonstrated in these deposits for both fracture coatings and rock chip samples. However, the relationship is more pronounced for fracture coatings. Fracture coatings at Pinson contain an average of 3.61, 5.13, 14.37, and 3.42 times more Au, As, Sb and Hg, respectively, than adjacent rock samples. At Preble, fracture coatings contain 3.13, 9.72, 9.18, and 1.85 times more Au, As, Sb and Hg, respectively, than do adjacent rock samples. Geochemical anomalies determined from fracture coatings are thus typically more intense than those determined from rock samples for these elements. The sizes of anomalies indicated by fracture coatings are also somewhat larger, but this is less obvious. In both areas, Sb anomalies are more extensive in fracture coatings. At Preble, some Hg and Au anomalies are also more extensive in fracture coatings. In addition to halos formed by the Hg, As and Sb, high values for Au/Ag and Zn/(Fe + Mn) are closely associated with gold mineralization at the Pinson mine. The large enhancement in geochemical response afforded by fracture coatings indicates a definite potential in the search for buried disseminated gold deposits. ?? 1984.

  17. Facile non-hydrothermal synthesis of oligosaccharides coated sub-5 nm magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with dual MRI contrast enhancement effect

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jing; Wang, Liya; Zhong, Xiaodong; Li, Yuancheng; Yang, Lily

    2014-01-01

    Ultrafine sub-5 nm magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles coated with oligosaccharides (SIO) with dual T1-T2 weighted contrast enhancing effect and fast clearance has been developed as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent. Excellent water solubility, biocompatibility and high stability of such sub-5 nm SIO nanoparticles were achieved by using the “in-situ polymerization” coating method, which enables glucose forming oligosaccharides directly on the surface of hydrophobic iron oxide nanocrystals. Reported ultrafine SIO nanoparticles exhibit a longitudinal relaxivity (r1) of 4.1 mM−1s−1 and a r1/r2 ratio of 0.25 at 3 T (clinical field strength), rendering improved T1 or “brighter” contrast enhancement in T1-weighted MRI in addition to typical T2 or “darkening” contrast of conventional iron oxide nanoparticles. Such dual contrast effect can be demonstrated in liver imaging with T2 “darkening” contrast in the liver parenchyma but T1 “bright” contrast in the hepatic vasculature. More importantly, this new class of ultrafine sub-5 nm iron oxide nanoparticles showed much faster body clearance than those with larger sizes, promising better safety for clinical applications. PMID:25181490

  18. Contact potential induced enhancement of magnetization in polyaniline coated nanomagnetic iron oxides by plasma polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sethulakshmi, N.; Sooraj, V.; Sajeev, U. S.; Nair, Swapna S.; Narayanan, T. N.; Joy, Lija K.; Joy, P. A.; Ajayan, P. M.; Anantharaman, M. R.

    2013-10-01

    The present work derives motivation from the so called surface/interfacial magnetism in core shell structures and commercial samples of Fe3O4 and γ Fe2O3 with sizes ranging from 20 to 30 nm were coated with polyaniline using plasma polymerization and studied. The High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy images indicate a core shell structure after polyaniline coating and exhibited an increase in saturation magnetization by 2 emu/g. For confirmation, plasma polymerization was performed on maghemite nanoparticles which also exhibited an increase in saturation magnetization. This enhanced magnetization is rather surprising and the reason is found to be an interfacial phenomenon resulting from a contact potential.

  19. Thermodynamic and kinetic controls on cotransport of Pantoea agglomerans cells and Zn through clean and iron oxide coated sand columns.

    PubMed

    Kapetas, Leon; Ngwenya, Bryne T; Macdonald, Alan M; Elphick, Stephen C

    2012-12-18

    Recent observations that subsurface bacteria quickly adsorb metal contaminants raise concerns that they may enhance metal transport, given the high mobility of bacteria themselves. However, metal adsorption to bacteria is also reversible, suggesting that mobility within porous medium will depend on the interplay between adsorption-desorption kinetics and thermodynamic driving forces for adsorption. Till now there has been no systematic investigation of these important interactions. This study investigates the thermodynamic and kinetic controls of cotransport of Pantoea agglomerans cells and Zn in quartz and iron-oxide coated sand (IOCS) packed columns. Batch kinetic studies show that significant Zn sorption on IOCS takes place within two hours. Adsorption onto P. agglomerans surfaces reaches equilibrium within 30 min. Experiments in flow through quartz sand systems demonstrate that bacteria have negligible effect on zinc mobility, regardless of ionic strength and pH conditions. Zinc transport exhibits significant retardation in IOCS columns at high pH in the absence of cells. Yet, when mobile bacteria (non attached) are passed through simultaneously with zinc, no facilitated transport is observed. Adsorption onto cells becomes significant and plays a role in mobile metal speciation only once the IOCS is saturated with zinc. This suggests that IOCS exhibits stronger affinity for Zn than cell surfaces. However, when bacteria and Zn are preassociated on entering the column, zinc transport is initially facilitated. Subsequently, zinc partly desorbs from the cells and redistributes onto the IOCS as a result of the higher thermodynamic affinity for IOCS. PMID:23153272

  20. Kinetic modeling of pH-dependent antimony (V) sorption and transport in iron oxide-coated sand.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yongbing; Li, Lulu; Zhang, Hua

    2015-11-01

    Understanding the mechanisms and kinetics controlling the retention and transport of antimony (Sb) is prerequisite for evaluating the risk of groundwater contamination by the toxic element. In this study, kinetic batch and saturated miscible displacement experiments were performed to investigate effects of protonation-deprotonation reactions on sorption-desorption and transport of Sb(V) in iron oxide-coated sand (IOCS). Results clearly demonstrated that Sb(V) sorption was highly nonlinear and time dependent, where both sorption capacity and kinetic rates decreased with increasing solution pH. Breakthrough curves (BTCs) obtained at different solution pH exhibited that mobility of Sb(V) were higher under neutral to alkaline condition than under acidic condition. Because of the nonlinear and non-equilibrium nature of Sb(V) retention and transport, multi-reaction models (MRM) with equilibrium and kinetic sorption expressions were utilized successfully to simulate the experiment data. Equilibrium distribution coefficient (Ke) and reversible kinetic retention parameters (k1 and k2) of both kinetic sorption and transport experiment showed marked decrease as pH increased from 4.0 to 7.5. Surface complexation is suggested as the dominant mechanism for the observed pH-dependent phenomena, which need to be incorporated into the kinetic models to accurately simulate the reactive transport of Sb(V) in vadose zone and aquifers. PMID:26291756

  1. PEI-PEG-Chitosan Copolymer Coated Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for Safe Gene Delivery: synthesis, complexation, and transfection**

    PubMed Central

    Kievit, Forrest M.; Veiseh, Omid; Bhattarai, Narayan; Fang, Chen; Gunn, Jonathan W.; Lee, Donghoon; Ellenbogen, Richard G.; Olson, James M.

    2009-01-01

    Gene therapy offers the potential of mediating disease through modification of specific cellular functions of target cells. However, effective transport of nucleic acids to target cells with minimal side effects remains a challenge despite the use of unique viral and non-viral delivery approaches. Here we present a non-viral nanoparticle gene carrier that demonstrates effective gene delivery and transfection both in vitro and in vivo. The nanoparticle system (NP-CP-PEI) is made of a superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle (NP), which enables magnetic resonance imaging, coated with a novel copolymer (CP-PEI) comprised of short chain polyethylenimine (PEI) and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) grafted to the natural polysaccharide, chitosan (CP), which allows efficient loading and protection of the nucleic acids. The function of each component material in this nanoparticle system is illustrated by comparative studies of three nanoparticle systems of different surface chemistries, through material property characterization, DNA loading and transfection analyses, and toxicity assessment. Significantly, NP-CP-PEI demonstrates an innocuous toxic profile and a high level of expression of the delivered plasmid DNA in a C6 xenograft mouse model, making it a potential candidate for safe in vivo delivery of DNA for gene therapy. PMID:20160995

  2. RGDS-functionalized polyethylene glycol hydrogel-coated magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles enhance specific intracellular uptake by HeLa cells

    PubMed Central

    Nazli, Caner; Ergenc, Tugba Ipek; Yar, Yasemin; Acar, Havva Yagci; Kizilel, Seda

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop thin, biocompatible, and biofunctional hydrogel-coated small-sized nanoparticles that exhibit favorable stability, viability, and specific cellular uptake. This article reports the coating of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MIONPs) with covalently cross-linked biofunctional polyethylene glycol (PEG) hydrogel. Silanized MIONPs were derivatized with eosin Y, and the covalently cross-linked biofunctional PEG hydrogel coating was achieved via surface-initiated photopolymerization of PEG diacrylate in aqueous solution. The thickness of the PEG hydrogel coating, between 23 and 126 nm, was tuned with laser exposure time. PEG hydrogel-coated MIONPs were further functionalized with the fibronectin-derived arginine-glycine-aspartic acid-serine (RGDS) sequence, in order to achieve a biofunctional PEG hydrogel layer around the nanoparticles. RGDS-bound PEG hydrogel-coated MIONPs showed a 17-fold higher uptake by the human cervical cancer HeLa cell line than that of amine-coated MIONPs. This novel method allows for the coating of MIONPs with nano-thin biofunctional hydrogel layers that may prevent undesirable cell and protein adhesion and may allow for cellular uptake in target tissues in a specific manner. These findings indicate that the further biofunctional PEG hydrogel coating of MIONPs is a promising platform for enhanced specific cell targeting in biomedical imaging and cancer therapy. PMID:22619531

  3. Development and characterization of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with a cisplatin-bearing polymer coating for targeted drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Unterweger, Harald; Tietze, Rainer; Janko, Christina; Zaloga, Jan; Lyer, Stefan; Dürr, Stephan; Taccardi, Nicola; Goudouri, Ourania-Menti; Hoppe, Alexander; Eberbeck, Dietmar; Schubert, Dirk W; Boccaccini, Aldo R; Alexiou, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    A highly selective and efficient cancer therapy can be achieved using magnetically directed superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) bearing a sufficient amount of the therapeutic agent. In this project, SPIONs with a dextran and cisplatin-bearing hyaluronic acid coating were successfully synthesized as a novel cisplatin drug delivery system. Transmission electron microscopy images as well as X-ray diffraction analysis showed that the individual magnetite particles were around 4.5 nm in size and monocrystalline. The small crystallite sizes led to the superparamagnetic behavior of the particles, which was exemplified in their magnetization curves, acquired using superconducting quantum interference device measurements. Hyaluronic acid was bound to the initially dextran-coated SPIONs by esterification. The resulting amide bond linkage was verified using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The additional polymer layer increased the vehicle size from 22 nm to 56 nm, with a hyaluronic acid to dextran to magnetite weight ratio of 51:29:20. A maximum payload of 330 μg cisplatin/mL nanoparticle suspension was achieved, thus the particle size was further increased to around 77 nm with a zeta potential of −45 mV. No signs of particle precipitation were observed over a period of at least 8 weeks. Analysis of drug-release kinetics using the dialysis tube method revealed that these were driven by inverse ligand substitution and diffusion through the polymer shell as well as enzymatic degradation of hyaluronic acid. The biological activity of the particles was investigated in a nonadherent Jurkat cell line using flow cytometry. Further, cell viability and proliferation was examined in an adherent PC-3 cell line using xCELLigence analysis. Both tests demonstrated that particles without cisplatin were biocompatible with these cells, whereas particles with the drug induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner, with secondary necrosis after prolonged incubation

  4. Optimal design and characterization of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles coated with polyvinyl alcohol for targeted delivery and imaging.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudi, Morteza; Simchi, Abdolreza; Imani, Mohammad; Milani, Abbas S; Stroeve, Pieter

    2008-11-20

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) with narrow size distribution and stabilized by polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) were synthesized. The particles were prepared by a coprecipitation technique using ferric and ferrous salts with a molar Fe3+/Fe2+ ratio of 2. Using a design of experiments (DOE) approach, the effect of different synthesis parameters (stirring rate and base molarity) on the structure, morphology, saturation magnetization, purity, size, and size distribution of the synthesized magnetite nanoparticles was studied by various analysis techniques including X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements, vibrating-sample magnetometer (VSM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), UV-visible, and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometer. PVA not only stabilized the colloid but also played a role in preventing further growth of SPION followed by the formation of large agglomerates by chemisorption on the surface of particles. A rich behavior in particle size, particle formation, and super paramagnetic properties is observed as a function of molarity and stirring conditions. The particle size and the magnetic properties as well as particle shape and aggregation (individual nanoparticles, magnetic beads, and magnetite colloidal nanocrystal clusters (CNCs) are found to be influenced by changes in the stirring rate and the base molarity. The formation of magnetic beads results in a decrease in the saturation magnetization, while CNCs lead to an increase in saturation magnetization. On the basis of the DOE methodology and the resulting 3-D response surfaces for particle size and magnetic properties, it is shown that optimum regions for stirring rate and molarity can be obtained to achieve coated SPION with desirable size, purity, magnetization, and shape. PMID:18729404

  5. Iodinated oil-loaded, fluorescent mesoporous silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles for magnetic resonance imaging/computed tomography/fluorescence trimodal imaging.

    PubMed

    Xue, Sihan; Wang, Yao; Wang, Mengxing; Zhang, Lu; Du, Xiaoxia; Gu, Hongchen; Zhang, Chunfu

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)/computed tomography (CT)/fluorescence trifunctional probe was prepared by loading iodinated oil into fluorescent mesoporous silica-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (i-fmSiO4@SPIONs). Fluorescent mesoporous silica-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (fmSiO4@SPIONs) were prepared by growing fluorescent dye-doped silica onto superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) directed by a cetyltrimethylammonium bromide template. As prepared, fmSiO4@SPIONs had a uniform size, a large surface area, and a large pore volume, which demonstrated high efficiency for iodinated oil loading. Iodinated oil loading did not change the sizes of fmSiO4@SPIONs, but they reduced the MRI T2 relaxivity (r2) markedly. I-fmSiO4@SPIONs were stable in their physical condition and did not demonstrate cytotoxic effects under the conditions investigated. In vitro studies indicated that the contrast enhancement of MRI and CT, and the fluorescence signal intensity of i-fmSiO4@SPION aqueous suspensions and macrophages, were intensified with increased i-fmSiO4@SPION concentrations in suspension and cell culture media. Moreover, for the in vivo study, the accumulation of i-fmSiO4@SPIONs in the liver could also be detected by MRI, CT, and fluorescence imaging. Our study demonstrated that i-fmSiO4@SPIONs had great potential for MRI/CT/fluorescence trimodal imaging. PMID:24904212

  6. Iodinated oil-loaded, fluorescent mesoporous silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles for magnetic resonance imaging/computed tomography/fluorescence trimodal imaging

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Sihan; Wang, Yao; Wang, Mengxing; Zhang, Lu; Du, Xiaoxia; Gu, Hongchen; Zhang, Chunfu

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)/computed tomography (CT)/fluorescence trifunctional probe was prepared by loading iodinated oil into fluorescent mesoporous silica-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (i-fmSiO4@SPIONs). Fluorescent mesoporous silica-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (fmSiO4@SPIONs) were prepared by growing fluorescent dye-doped silica onto superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) directed by a cetyltrimethylammonium bromide template. As prepared, fmSiO4@SPIONs had a uniform size, a large surface area, and a large pore volume, which demonstrated high efficiency for iodinated oil loading. Iodinated oil loading did not change the sizes of fmSiO4@SPIONs, but they reduced the MRI T2 relaxivity (r2) markedly. I-fmSiO4@SPIONs were stable in their physical condition and did not demonstrate cytotoxic effects under the conditions investigated. In vitro studies indicated that the contrast enhancement of MRI and CT, and the fluorescence signal intensity of i-fmSiO4@SPION aqueous suspensions and macrophages, were intensified with increased i-fmSiO4@SPION concentrations in suspension and cell culture media. Moreover, for the in vivo study, the accumulation of i-fmSiO4@SPIONs in the liver could also be detected by MRI, CT, and fluorescence imaging. Our study demonstrated that i-fmSiO4@SPIONs had great potential for MRI/CT/fluorescence trimodal imaging. PMID:24904212

  7. Platinum Attachments on Iron Oxide Nanoparticle Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Palchoudhury, Soubantika; Xu, Yaolin; An, Wei; Turner, C. H.; Bao, Yuping

    2010-04-30

    Platinum nanoparticles supported on metal oxide surfaces have shown great potential as heterogeneous catalysts to accelerate electrochemical processes, such as the oxygen reduction reaction in fuel cells. Recently, the use of magnetic supports has become a promising research topic for easy separation and recovery of catalysts using magnets, such as Pt nanoparticles supported on iron oxide nanoparticles. The attachment of Pt on iron oxide nanoparticles is limited by the wetting ability of the Pt (metal) on ceramic surfaces. A study of Pt nanoparticle attachment on iron oxide nanoparticle surfaces in an organic solvent is reported, which addresses the factors that promote or inhibit such attachment. It was discovered that the Pt attachment strongly depends on the capping molecules of the iron oxide seeds and the reaction temperature. For example, the attachment of Pt nanoparticles on oleic acid coated iron oxide nanoparticles was very challenging, because of the strong binding between the carboxylic groups and iron oxide surfaces. In contrast, when nanoparticles are coated with oleic acid/tri-n-octylphosphine oxide or oleic acid/oleylamine, a significant increase in Pt attachment was observed. Electronic structure calculations were then applied to estimate the binding energies between the capping molecules and iron ions, and the modeling results strongly support the experimental observations.

  8. Bcl-2-functionalized ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles coated with amphiphilic polymer enhance the labeling efficiency of islets for detection by magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bin; Cai, Haolei; Qin, Wenjie; Zhang, Bo; Zhai, Chuanxin; Jiang, Biao; Wu, Yulian

    2013-01-01

    Based on their versatile, biocompatible properties, superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) or ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) nanoparticles are utilized for detecting and tracing cells or tumors in vivo. Here, we developed an innoxious and concise synthesis approach for a novel B-cell lymphoma (Bcl)-2 monoclonal antibody-functionalized USPIO nanoparticle coated with an amphiphilic polymer (carboxylated polyethylene glycol monooleyl ether [OE-PEG-COOH]). These nanoparticles can be effectively internalized by beta cells and label primary islet cells, at relatively low iron concentration. The biocompatibility and cytotoxicity of these products were investigated by comparison with the commercial USPIO product, FeraSpin™ S. We also assessed the safe dosage range of the product. Although some cases showed a hypointensity change at the site of transplant, a strong magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was detectable by a clinical MRI scanner, at field strength of 3.0 Tesla, in vivo, and the iron deposition/attached in islets was confirmed by Prussian blue and immunohistochemistry staining. It is noteworthy that based on our synthesis approach, in future, we could exchange the Bcl-2 with other probes that would be more specific for the targeted cells and that would have better labeling specificity in vivo. The combined results point to the promising potential of the novel Bcl-2-functionalized PEG-USPIO as a molecular imaging agent for in vivo monitoring of islet cells or other cells. PMID:24204136

  9. Lipid peroxidation and its control in Anguilla anguilla hepatocytes under silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles (with or without mercury) exposure.

    PubMed

    Srikanth, Koigoora; Anjum, Naser A; Trindade, Tito; Duarte, Armando C; Pereira, Edurda; Ahmad, Iqbal

    2015-07-01

    Having multidisciplinary applications, iron oxide nanoparticles can inevitably enter aquatic system and impact inhabitants such as fish. However, the studies in this context have ignored the significance of obvious interaction of iron oxide nanoparticles with other persistent co-contaminants such as mercury (Hg) in the modulation of the toxicity and underlying mechanisms of iron oxide nanoparticles and Hg alone, and concomitant exposures. This study aimed to evaluate lipid peroxidation (LPO) and its control with glutathione (GSH) and associated enzymes (such as glutathione reductase, GR; glutathione peroxidase, GPX; glutathione sulfo-transferase, GST) in European eel (Anguilla anguilla L.) hepatocytes exposed to stressors with following schemes: (i) no silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles functionalized with dithiocarbamate (Fe3O4@SiO2/Si DTC, hereafter called 'FeNPs'; size range 82 ± 21 to 100 ± 30 nm) or Hg, (ii) FeNPs (2.5 μg L(-1)) alone, (iii) Hg (50 μg L(-1)) alone and (iv) FeNPs + Hg concomitant condition during 0 to 72 h. The exhibition of a differential coordination between GSH regeneration (determined as GR activity) and GSH metabolism (determined as the activity of GPX and GST) was perceptible in A. anguilla hepatocytes in order to control FeNPs, Hg and FeNPs + Hg exposure condition-mediated LPO. This study revealed the significance of a fine tuning among GR, GPX and GST in keeping LPO level under control during FeNPs or Hg alone exposure, and a direct role of total GSH (TGSH) in the control of LPO level and impaired GSH metabolism under the concomitant (FeNPs + Hg) exposure. An interpretation of the fish risk to FeNPs in a multi-pollution state should equally consider the potential outcome of the interaction of FeNPs with other contaminants. PMID:25613805

  10. Lead isotopes in iron and manganese oxide coatings and their use as an exploration guide for concealed mineralization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gulson, B.L.; Church, S.E.; Mizon, K.J.; Meier, A.L.

    1992-01-01

    Lead isotopes from Fe and Mn oxides that coat stream pebbles from around the Mount Emmons porphyry molybdenum deposit in Colorado were studied to assess the feasibility of using Pb isotopes to detect concealed mineral deposits. The Fe/Mn oxide coatings were analyzed to determine their elemental concentrations using ICP-AES. The Pb isotope compositions of solutions from a selected suite of samples were measured, using both thermal ionization and ICP mass spectrometry, to compare results determined by the two analytical methods. Heavy mineral concentrates from the same sites were also analyzed to compare the Pb isotope compositions of the Fe/Mn coatings with those found in panned concentrates. The Fe/Mn and 206Pb/204Pb ratios of the oxide coatings are related to the lithology of the host rocks; Fe/Mn oxide coatings on pebbles of black shale have higher Fe/Mn values than do the coatings on either sandstone or igneous rocks. The shale host rocks have a more radiogenic signature (e.g. higher 206Pb/ 204Pb) than the sandstone or igneous host rocks. The Pb isotope data from sandstone and igneous hosts can detect concealed mineralized rock on both a regional and local scale, even though there are contributions from: (1) metals from the main-stage molybdenite ore deposit; (2) metals from the phyllic alteration zone which has a more radiogenic Pb isotope signature reflecting hydrothermal leaching of Pb from the Mancos Shale; (3) Pb-rich base metal veins with a highly variable Pb isotope signature; and (4) sedimentary country rocks which have a more radiogenic Pb isotope signature. An investigation of within-stream variation shows that the Pb isotope signature of the molybdenite ore zone is retained in the Fe/Mn oxide coatings and is not camouflaged by contributions from Pb-rich base-metal veins that crop out upstream. In another traverse, the Pb isotope data from Fe/Mn oxide coatings reflect a complex mixing of Pb from the molybdenite ore zone and its hornfels margin, Pb

  11. Immobilization of bacterial S-layer proteins from Caulobacter crescentus on iron oxide-based nanocomposite: Synthesis and spectroscopic characterization of zincite-coated Fe2O3 nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habibi, Neda

    Zinc oxide was coated on Fe2O3 nanoparticles using sol-gel spin-coating. Caulobacter crescentus have a crystalline surface layer (S-layer), which consist of one protein or glycoprotein species. The immobilization of bacterial S-layers obtained from C. crescentus on zincite-coated nanoparticles of iron oxide was investigated. The SDS PAGE results of S-layers isolated from C. crescentus showed the weight of 50 KDa. Nanoparticles of the Fe2O3 and zinc oxide were synthesized by a sol-gel technique. Fe2O3 nanoparticles with an average size of 50 nm were successfully prepared by the proper deposition of zinc oxide onto iron oxide nanoparticles surface annealed at 450 °C. The samples were characterized by field-emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR).

  12. Enzymes of respiratory iron oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, R. II.

    1991-01-01

    This report focuses on the progress made in three areas of research concerned with enzymes involved in respiratory iron oxidation. The three areas are as follows: development of an improved procedure for the routine large scale culture of iron oxidizing chemolithotrophs based on the in-situ electrolysis of the soluble iron in the growth medium; to perform iron oxidation kinetic studies on whole cells using the oxygen electrode; and to identify, separate, purify, and characterize the individual cellular components.

  13. In vivo Tracking of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Labeled with a Novel Chitosan-coated Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles using 3.0T MRI

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Alavala Matta; Shim, Hyung Jin; Ahn, Chiyoung; Lee, Hyo Sook; Suh, Yong Jae; Park, Eon Sub

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to characterize and MRI track the mesenchymal stem cells labeled with chitosan-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide (Chitosan-SPIO). Chitosan-SPIO was synthesized from a mixture of FeCl2 and FeCl3. The human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBM-MSC) were labeled with 50 µg Fe/mL chitosan-SPIO and Resovist. The labeling efficiency was assessed by iron content, Prussian blue staining, electron microscopy and in vitro MR imaging. The labeled cells were also analyzed for cytotoxicity, phenotype and differentiation potential. Electron microscopic observations and Prussian blue staining revealed 100% of cells were labeled with iron particles. MR imaging was able to detect the labeled MSC successfully. Chitosan-SPIO did not show any cytotoxicity up to 200 µg Fe/mL concentration. The labeled stem cells did not exhibit any significant alterations in the surface markers expression or adipo/osteo/chondrogenic differentiation potential when compared to unlabeled control cells. After contralateral injection into rabbit ischemic brain, the iron labeled stem cells were tracked by periodical in vivo MR images. The migration of cells was also confirmed by histological studies. The novel chitosan-SPIO enables to label and track MSC for in vivo MRI without cellular alteration. PMID:20119572

  14. Iron oxide surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkinson, Gareth S.

    2016-03-01

    The current status of knowledge regarding the surfaces of the iron oxides, magnetite (Fe3O4), maghemite (γ-Fe2O3), haematite (α-Fe2O3), and wüstite (Fe1-xO) is reviewed. The paper starts with a summary of applications where iron oxide surfaces play a major role, including corrosion, catalysis, spintronics, magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), biomedicine, photoelectrochemical water splitting and groundwater remediation. The bulk structure and properties are then briefly presented; each compound is based on a close-packed anion lattice, with a different distribution and oxidation state of the Fe cations in interstitial sites. The bulk defect chemistry is dominated by cation vacancies and interstitials (not oxygen vacancies) and this provides the context to understand iron oxide surfaces, which represent the front line in reduction and oxidation processes. Fe diffuses in and out from the bulk in response to the O2 chemical potential, forming sometimes complex intermediate phases at the surface. For example, α-Fe2O3 adopts Fe3O4-like surfaces in reducing conditions, and Fe3O4 adopts Fe1-xO-like structures in further reducing conditions still. It is argued that known bulk defect structures are an excellent starting point in building models for iron oxide surfaces. The atomic-scale structure of the low-index surfaces of iron oxides is the major focus of this review. Fe3O4 is the most studied iron oxide in surface science, primarily because its stability range corresponds nicely to the ultra-high vacuum environment. It is also an electrical conductor, which makes it straightforward to study with the most commonly used surface science methods such as photoemission spectroscopies (XPS, UPS) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The impact of the surfaces on the measurement of bulk properties such as magnetism, the Verwey transition and the (predicted) half-metallicity is discussed. The best understood iron oxide surface at present is probably Fe3O4(100); the structure is

  15. Development and screening of a series of antibody-conjugated and silica coated iron-oxide nanoparticles for targeting the Prostate Specific Membrane Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Amarnath; Darlington, Thomas; Baldwin, Richard; Holz, Charles; Olson, Sage; Kulkarni, Prakash; DeWeese, Theodore L.; Getzenberg, Robert H.; Ivkov, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The Prostate Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA) is an established target for the delivery of cancer therapeutic and imaging agents due to its high expression on the surface of prostate cancer cells and within the neovasculature of other solid tumors. Here we describe the synthesis and screening of antibody-conjugated silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles for PSMA-specific cell targeting. The humanized anti-PSMA antibody, HuJ591, was conjugated to a series of nanoparticles with varying densities of polyethylene glycol and primary amine groups. Customized assays utilizing iron spectral absorbance and Enzyme-Linked Immunoassay (ELISA) were developed to screen microgram quantities of nanoparticle formulations for immunoreactivity and cell targeting ability. Antibody and PSMA-specific targeting of the optimized nanoparticle was evaluated using an isogenic PSMA-positive and PSMA-negative cell line pair. Specific nanoparticle targeting was confirmed by iron quantification with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). These methods and nanoparticles support the promise of targeted theranostic agents for future treatment of prostate and other cancers. PMID:24591351

  16. An in vivo transmission electron microscopy study of injected dextran-coated iron-oxide nanoparticle location in murine breast adenocarcinoma tumors versus time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giustini, Andrew J.; Ivkov, R.; Hoopes, P. J.

    2009-02-01

    Investigators are just beginning to use hyperthermia generated by alternating magnetic field (AMF) activated iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) as a promising avenue for targeted cancer therapy. An important step in understanding cell death mechanisms in nanoparticle AMF treatments is to determine the location of these nanoparticles in relation to cellular organelles. In this paper, we report on transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies designed to define the position of 100 nm diameter dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles in murine breast adenocarcinoma (MTG-B) and human colon adenocarcinoma tumors propagated in mice. METHODS: Iron oxide nanoparticles (5 mg/g tumor) were injected into intradermal MTG-B flank tumors on female C3H/HEJ mice and into HT-29 flank tumors on female Nu/Nu mice. The IONPs were allowed to incubate for various times. The tumors were then excised and examined using TEM. RESULTS: In the MTG-B tumors, most of the nanoparticles reside in aggregates adjacent to cell plasma membranes prior to three hours post-injection. By four hours post injection, however, most of the nanoparticles have been endocytosed by the cells. At time periods after four hours post injection, few visible extracellular nanoparticles remain and intracellular nanoparticles have densely aggregated within endosomes. In the HT-29 tumor, however, endocytosis of nanoparticles has not progressed to the same extent as in the MTG-B tumors by four hours post injection. CONCLUSIONS: The time at which most of the nanoparticles transition from being extracellular to intracellular in the MTG-B system appears to be between two and four hours. The HT-29 cells, however, display different and delayed uptake pattern. These data show that there are IONP uptake differences between tumor types (cell lines) and that, based on known uptake kinetics, nanoparticle hyperthermia can be employed as an extracellular or intracellular modality. These data will be important in guiding future

  17. Superparamagnetic iron oxide coated on the surface of cellulose nanospheres for the rapid removal of textile dye under mild condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Yunfeng; Qin, Zongyi; Liu, Yannan; Cheng, Miao; Qian, Pengfei; Wang, Qian; Zhu, Meifang

    2015-12-01

    Magnetic composite nanoparticles (MNPs) were prepared by anchoring iron oxide (Fe3O4) on the surface of carboxyl cellulose nanospheres through a facile chemical co-precipitation method. The as-prepared MNPs were characterized by atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, wide-angle X-ray diffraction measurement, thermal gravity analysis and vibrating sample magnetometry. These MNPs were of a generally spherical shape with a narrow size distribution, and exhibited superparamagnetic behaviors with high saturation magnetization. High efficient removal of Navy blue in aqueous solution was demonstrated at room temperature in a Fenton-like system containing the MNPs and H2O2, which benefited from small particle size, large surface area, high chemical activity, and good dispersibility of the MNPs. The removal efficiency of Navy blue induced by the MNPs prepared at a weight ratio of cellulose to iron of 1:2 were 90.6% at the first minute of the degradation reaction, and 98.0% for 5 min. Furthermore, these MNPs could be efficiently recycled and reused by using an external magnetic field. The approach presented in this paper promotes the use of renewable natural resources as templates for the preparation and stabilization of various inorganic nanomaterials for the purpose of catalysis, magnetic resonance imaging, biomedical and other potential applications.

  18. Iron oxide surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkinson, Gareth S.

    2016-03-01

    The current status of knowledge regarding the surfaces of the iron oxides, magnetite (Fe3O4), maghemite (γ-Fe2O3), haematite (α-Fe2O3), and wüstite (Fe1-xO) is reviewed. The paper starts with a summary of applications where iron oxide surfaces play a major role, including corrosion, catalysis, spintronics, magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), biomedicine, photoelectrochemical water splitting and groundwater remediation. The bulk structure and properties are then briefly presented; each compound is based on a close-packed anion lattice, with a different distribution and oxidation state of the Fe cations in interstitial sites. The bulk defect chemistry is dominated by cation vacancies and interstitials (not oxygen vacancies) and this provides the context to understand iron oxide surfaces, which represent the front line in reduction and oxidation processes. Fe diffuses in and out from the bulk in response to the O2 chemical potential, forming sometimes complex intermediate phases at the surface. For example, α-Fe2O3 adopts Fe3O4-like surfaces in reducing conditions, and Fe3O4 adopts Fe1-xO-like structures in further reducing conditions still. It is argued that known bulk defect structures are an excellent starting point in building models for iron oxide surfaces. The atomic-scale structure of the low-index surfaces of iron oxides is the major focus of this review. Fe3O4 is the most studied iron oxide in surface science, primarily because its stability range corresponds nicely to the ultra-high vacuum environment. It is also an electrical conductor, which makes it straightforward to study with the most commonly used surface science methods such as photoemission spectroscopies (XPS, UPS) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The impact of the surfaces on the measurement of bulk properties such as magnetism, the Verwey transition and the (predicted) half-metallicity is discussed. The best understood iron oxide surface at present is probably Fe3O4(100); the structure is

  19. Oxidation corrosion resistant superalloys and coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Melvin R. (Inventor); Rairden, III, John R. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An article of manufacture having improved high temperature oxidation and corrosion resistance comprising: (a) a superalloy substrate containing a carbide reinforcing phase, and (b) a coating consisting of chromium, aluminum, carbon, at least one element selected from iron, cobalt or nickel, and optionally an element selected from yttrium or the rare earth elements.

  20. Oxidation corrosion resistant superalloys and coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Melvin R. (Inventor); Rairden, III, John R. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An article of manufacture having improved high temperature oxidation and corrosion resistance comprising: (a) a superalloy substrate containing a carbide reinforcing phase, and (b) a coating consisting of chromium, aluminum, carbon, at least one element selected from iron, cobalt or nickel, and optionally an element selected from yttrium or the rare earth elements.

  1. Enzymes of respiratory iron oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, R. II.

    1992-01-01

    This report describes experimental progress in characterizing and identifying redox proteins in a number of iron-oxidizing bacteria. Sections of the paper are entitled (1) In Situ electrolysis was explored to achieve enhanced yields of iron-oxidizing bacteria, (2)Structure/function studies were performed on redox-active biomolecules from Thiobacillus ferrooxidans, (3) Novel redox-active biomolecules were demonstrated in other iron autotrophs, and (4) New probes of metalloprotein electron-transfer reactions were synthesized and characterized.

  2. Theranostic nanoparticles based on bioreducible polyethylenimine-coated iron oxide for reduction-responsive gene delivery and magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dan; Tang, Xin; Pulli, Benjamin; Lin, Chao; Zhao, Peng; Cheng, Jian; Lv, Zhongwei; Yuan, Xueyu; Luo, Qiong; Cai, Haidong; Ye, Meng

    2014-01-01

    Theranostic nanoparticles based on superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) have a great promise for tumor diagnosis and gene therapy. However, the availability of theranostic nanoparticles with efficient gene transfection and minimal toxicity remains a big challenge. In this study, we construct an intelligent SPIO-based nanoparticle comprising a SPIO inner core and a disulfide-containing polyethylenimine (SSPEI) outer layer, which is referred to as a SSPEI-SPIO nanoparticle, for redox-triggered gene release in response to an intracellular reducing environment. We reveal that SSPEI-SPIO nanoparticles are capable of binding genes to form nano-complexes and mediating a facilitated gene release in the presence of dithiothreitol (5–20 mM), thereby leading to high transfection efficiency against different cancer cells. The SSPEI-SPIO nanoparticles are also able to deliver small interfering RNA (siRNA) for the silencing of human telomerase reverse transcriptase genes in HepG2 cells, causing their apoptosis and growth inhibition. Further, the nanoparticles are applicable as T2-negative contrast agents for magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of a tumor xenografted in a nude mouse. Importantly, SSPEI-SPIO nanoparticles have relatively low cytotoxicity in vitro at a high concentration of 100 μg/mL. The results of this study demonstrate the utility of a disulfide-containing cationic polymer-decorated SPIO nanoparticle as highly potent and low-toxic theranostic nano-system for specific nucleic acid delivery inside cancer cells. PMID:25045265

  3. 21 CFR 186.1374 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Iron oxides. 186.1374 Section 186.1374 Food and....1374 Iron oxides. (a) Iron oxides (oxides of iron, CAS Reg. No. 1332-37-2) are undefined mixtures of iron (II) oxide (CAS Reg. No. 1345-25-1, black cubic crystals) and iron (III) oxide (CAS Reg. No....

  4. Indium Sorption to Iron Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, S. J.; Sacco, S. A.; Hemond, H.; Hussain, F. A.; Runkel, R. L.; Walton-Day, K. E.; Kimball, B. A.; Shine, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    Indium is an increasingly important metal in semiconductors and electronics, and its use is growing rapidly as a semiconductive coating (as indium tin oxide) for liquid crystal displays (LCDs) and flat panel displays. It also has uses in important energy technologies such as light emitting diodes (LEDs) and photovoltaic cells. Despite its rapid increase in use, very little is known about the environmental behavior of indium, and concerns are being raised over the potential health effects of this emerging metal contaminant. One source of indium to the environment is acid mine drainage from the mining of lead, zinc, and copper sulfides. In our previous studies of a stream in Colorado influenced by acid mine drainage from lead and zinc mining activities, indium concentrations were found to be 10,000 times those found in uncontaminated rivers. However, the speciation and mobility of indium could not be reliably modeled because sorption constants to environmental sorbents have not been determined. In this study, we generate sorption constants for indium to ferrihydrite in the laboratory over a range of pHs, sorbent to sorbate ratios, and ionic strengths. Ferrihydrite is one of the most important sorbents in natural systems, and sorption to amorphous iron oxides such as ferrihydrite is thought to be one of the main removal mechanisms of metals from the dissolved phase in aqueous environments. Because of its relatively low solubility, we also find that indium hydroxide precipitation can dominate indium's partitioning at micromolar concentrations of indium. This precipitation may be important in describing indium's behavior in our study stream in Colorado, where modeling sorption to iron-oxides does not explain the complete removal of indium from the dissolved phase when the pH of the system is artificially raised to above 8. This study contributes much-needed data about indium's aqueous behavior, in order to better understand its fate, transport, and impacts in the

  5. IRON COATED URANIUM AND ITS PRODUCTION

    DOEpatents

    Gray, A.G.

    1960-03-15

    A method of applying a protective coating to a metallic uranium article is given. The method comprises etching the surface of the article with an etchant solution containlng chloride ions, such as a solution of phosphoric acid and hydrochloric acid, cleaning the etched surface, electroplating iron thereon from a ferrous ammonium sulfate electroplating bath, and soldering an aluminum sheath to the resultant iron layer.

  6. Theranostic MUC-1 aptamer targeted gold coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for magnetic resonance imaging and photothermal therapy of colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Azhdarzadeh, Morteza; Atyabi, Fatemeh; Saei, Amir Ata; Varnamkhasti, Behrang Shiri; Omidi, Yadollah; Fateh, Mohsen; Ghavami, Mahdi; Shanehsazzadeh, Saeed; Dinarvand, Rassoul

    2016-07-01

    Favorable physiochemical properties and the capability to accommodate targeting moieties make superparamegnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) popular theranostic agents. In this study, we engineered SPIONs for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and photothermal therapy of colon cancer cells. SPIONs were synthesized by microemulsion method and were then coated with gold to reduce their cytotoxicity and to confer photothermal capabilities. Subsequently, the NPs were conjugated with thiol modified MUC-1 aptamers. The resulting NPs were spherical, monodisperse and about 19nm in size, as shown by differential light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). UV and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirmed the successful gold coating. MTT results showed that Au@SPIONs have insignificant cytotoxicity at the concentration range of 10-100μg/ml (P>0.05) and that NPs covered with protein corona exerted lower cytotoxicity than bare NPs. Furthermore, confocal microscopy confirmed the higher uptake of aptamer-Au@SPIONs in comparison with non-targeted SPIONs. MR imaging revealed that SPIONs produced significant contrast enhancement in vitro and they could be exploited as contrast agents. Finally, cells treated with aptamer-Au@SPIONs exhibited a higher death rate compared to control cells upon exposure to near infrared light (NIR). In conclusion, MUC1-aptamer targeted Au@SPIONs could serve as promising theranostic agents for simultaneous MR imaging and photothermal therapy of cancer cells. PMID:27015647

  7. Nanocluster of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles coated with poly (dopamine) for magnetic field-targeting, highly sensitive MRI and photothermal cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ming; Zhang, Da; Zeng, Yongyi; Wu, Lingjie; Liu, Xiaolong; Liu, Jingfeng

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, a core-shell nanocomposite of clusters of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles coated with poly(dopamine) (SPION clusters@PDA) is fabricated as a magnetic field-directed theranostic agent that combines the capabilities of highly sensitive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and photothermal cancer therapy. The highly concentrated SPION cluster core is suitable for sensitive MRI due to its superparamagnetic properties, and the poly(dopamine) coating layer can induce cancer cell death under near-infrared (NIR) laser irradiation because of the photothermal conversion ability of PDA. MRI scanning reveals that the nanocomposite has relatively high r2 and r2* relaxivities, and the r2* values are nearly threefold higher than the r2 values because of the clustering of the SPIONs in the nanocomposite core. Due to the rapid response to magnetic field gradients, enhanced cellular uptake of our nanocomposite mediated by an external magnetic field can be achieved, thus producing significantly enhanced local photothermal killing efficiency against cancer cells under NIR irritation.

  8. Immobilization of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii CLH1 on APTES-Coated Magnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles and Its Potential in the Production of Chlorophyll Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Yen, Chih-Chung; Chuang, Yao-Chen; Ko, Chia-Yun; Chen, Long-Fang O; Chen, Sheau-Shyang; Lin, Chia-Jung; Chou, Yi-Li; Shaw, Jei-Fu

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant Chlamydomonas reinhardtii chlorophyllase 1 (CrCLH1) that could catalyze chlorophyll hydrolysis to chlorophyllide and phytol in vitro was successfully expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant CrCLH1 was immobilized through covalent binding with a cubic (3-aminopropyl) triethoxysilane (APTES) coating on magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MIONPs), which led to markedly improved enzyme performance and decreased biocatalyst costs for potential industrial application. The immobilized enzyme exhibited a high immobilization yield (98.99 ± 0.91 mg/g of gel) and a chlorophyllase assay confirmed that the immobilized recombinant CrCLH1 retained enzymatic activity (722.3 ± 50.3 U/g of gel). Biochemical analysis of the immobilized enzyme, compared with the free enzyme, showed higher optimal pH and pH stability for chlorophyll-a hydrolysis in an acidic environment (pH 3-5). In addition, compared with the free enzyme, the immobilized enzyme showed higher activity in chlorophyll-a hydrolysis in a high temperature environment (50-60 °C). Moreover, the immobilized enzyme retained a residual activity of more than 64% of its initial enzyme activity after 14 cycles in a repeated-batch operation. Therefore, APTES-coated MIONP-immobilized recombinant CrCLH1 can be repeatedly used to lower costs and is potentially useful for the industrial production of chlorophyll derivatives. PMID:27472309

  9. Dynamic behavior of iron forms in rapid reduction of carbon-coated iron ore

    SciTech Connect

    Sugawara, Katsuyasu; Morimoto, Koji; Sugawara, T.; Dranoff, J.S.

    1999-03-01

    As a part of a fundamental study of the kinetics of rapid smelting reduction of iron oxide with solid carbon, particles of carbon-coated iron ore were prepared by heating a mixture of iron ore and phenolphthalein (a model compound of coal tar) at 773 K in a nitrogen stream. The reduction behavior of the carbon-coated iron ore particles during rapid heating was studied using a drop-tube reactor at temperatures from 1,073 to 1,773 K. The reduction extent increased rapidly with the beginning of melting at temperatures over 1,650 K, reaching 60% at 1,773 within 0.7 s. The observed changes in the distribution of iron states in the particles were successfully simulated.

  10. 21 CFR 186.1374 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Iron oxides. 186.1374 Section 186.1374 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 186.1374 Iron oxides. (a) Iron oxides (oxides of iron, CAS Reg. No. 1332-37-2) are undefined mixtures of iron (II) oxide (CAS Reg. No. 1345-25-1, black cubic crystals) and iron...

  11. 21 CFR 186.1374 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Iron oxides. 186.1374 Section 186.1374 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 186.1374 Iron oxides. (a) Iron oxides (oxides of iron, CAS Reg. No. 1332-37-2) are undefined mixtures of iron (II) oxide (CAS Reg. No. 1345-25-1, black cubic crystals) and iron...

  12. 21 CFR 186.1374 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Iron oxides. 186.1374 Section 186.1374 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 186.1374 Iron oxides. (a) Iron oxides (oxides of iron, CAS Reg. No. 1332-37-2) are undefined mixtures of iron (II) oxide (CAS Reg. No. 1345-25-1, black cubic crystals) and iron...

  13. 21 CFR 186.1374 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Iron oxides. 186.1374 Section 186.1374 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 186.1374 Iron oxides. (a) Iron oxides (oxides of iron, CAS Reg. No. 1332-37-2) are undefined mixtures of iron (II) oxide (CAS Reg. No. 1345-25-1, black cubic crystals) and iron...

  14. Synthesis and dose interval dependent hepatotoxicity evaluation of intravenously administered polyethylene glycol-8000 coated ultra-small superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle on Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Balan; Sathish, Shanmugam; Balakumar, Subramanian; Devaki, Thiruvengadam

    2015-03-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are being used in medical imaging, drug delivery, cancer therapy, and so on. However, there is a direct need to identify any nanotoxicity associated with these nanoparticles. However uncommon, drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a major health concern that challenges pharmaceutical industry and drug regulatory agencies alike. In this study we have synthesized and evaluated the dose interval dependent hepatotoxicity of polyethylene glycol-8000 coated ultra-small superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (PUSPIOs). To assess the hepatotoxicity of intravenously injected PUSPIOs, alterations in basic clinical parameters, hematological parameters, hemolysis assay, serum levels of liver marker enzymes, serum and liver lipid peroxidation (LPO) levels, enzymatic antioxidant levels, and finally histology of liver, kidney, spleen, lung, brain, and heart tissues were studied in control and experimental Wistar rat groups over a 30-day period. The results of our study showed a significant increase in the aspartate transaminase (AST) enzyme activity at a dose of 10mg/kg b.w. PUSPIOs twice a week. Besides, alanine transaminase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and gamma-glutamyl transferase (γGT) enzyme activity showed a slender increase when compared with control experimental groups. A significant increase in the serum and liver LPO levels at a dose of 10mg/kg b.w. PUSPIOs twice a week was also observed. Histological analyses of liver, kidney, spleen, lung, brain and heart tissue samples showed no obvious uncharacteristic changes. In conclusion, PUSPIOs were found to posses excellent biocompatibility and Wistar rats showed much better drug tolerance to the dose of 10mg/kg b.w. per week than the dose of 10mg/kg b.w. twice a week for the period of 30 days. PMID:25721486

  15. Colloidal stability and thermo-responsive properties of iron oxide nanoparticles coated with polymers: advantages of Pluronic® F68-PEG mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiper, Manuela; Hervé Aubert, Katel; Augé, Amélie; Fouquenet, Jean-François; Soucé, Martin; Chourpa, Igor

    2013-10-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are recognized to be an attractive platform for developing novel drug delivery approaches and thus several types of functionalized magnetic nanocarriers based on SPIONs have been synthesized and studied. The coating of the metal oxide surface was achieved in a one-pot synthesis with biocompatible polyethylene glycol (PEG) and thermo-responsive modified Pluronic® F68. The resulting thermo-responsive magnetic nanocarriers can incorporate water insoluble drugs into their hydrophobic compartment and later release them in a temperature dependent manner. Here we report novel magnetic nanocarriers with significant improvements regarding the colloidal stability and critical temperature obtained by mixing various molar ratios of hydrophilic PEG with thermo-responsive Pluronic® F68 bearing different end group functionalities. Various methods have been employed to characterize the magnetic nanocarriers, such as photon correlation spectroscopy (DLS), atomic absorption, FT-IR spectroscopy, and surface-enhanced Raman scattering. The transition temperature that determines changes in the conformation of the block copolymer chain was studied by DLS as a function of temperature. Moreover, the drug loading properties of SPION-(F68-OMe)-(F68-FA) and SPION-PEG-F68-FA were analyzed with a hydrophobic fluorescent dye, DID oil. The behavior of the encapsulated DID into the nanocarrier shell was studied as a function of temperature via fluorescence spectroscopy. These results offer original insights into the enhanced colloidal stability and thermo-sensitive properties of the novel synthesized magnetic nanocarriers.

  16. Colloidal stability and thermo-responsive properties of iron oxide nanoparticles coated with polymers: advantages of Pluronic® F68-PEG mixture.

    PubMed

    Chiper, Manuela; Hervé Aubert, Katel; Augé, Amélie; Fouquenet, Jean-François; Soucé, Martin; Chourpa, Igor

    2013-10-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are recognized to be an attractive platform for developing novel drug delivery approaches and thus several types of functionalized magnetic nanocarriers based on SPIONs have been synthesized and studied. The coating of the metal oxide surface was achieved in a one-pot synthesis with biocompatible polyethylene glycol (PEG) and thermo-responsive modified Pluronic® F68. The resulting thermo-responsive magnetic nanocarriers can incorporate water insoluble drugs into their hydrophobic compartment and later release them in a temperature dependent manner. Here we report novel magnetic nanocarriers with significant improvements regarding the colloidal stability and critical temperature obtained by mixing various molar ratios of hydrophilic PEG with thermo-responsive Pluronic® F68 bearing different end group functionalities. Various methods have been employed to characterize the magnetic nanocarriers, such as photon correlation spectroscopy (DLS), atomic absorption, FT-IR spectroscopy, and surface-enhanced Raman scattering. The transition temperature that determines changes in the conformation of the block copolymer chain was studied by DLS as a function of temperature. Moreover, the drug loading properties of SPION-(F68-OMe)-(F68-FA) and SPION-PEG-F68-FA were analyzed with a hydrophobic fluorescent dye, DID oil. The behavior of the encapsulated DID into the nanocarrier shell was studied as a function of temperature via fluorescence spectroscopy. These results offer original insights into the enhanced colloidal stability and thermo-sensitive properties of the novel synthesized magnetic nanocarriers. PMID:24013614

  17. 21 CFR 73.2250 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Iron oxides. 73.2250 Section 73.2250 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2250 Iron oxides. (a) Identity. The color additives iron oxides consist of any one or any combination of synthetically prepared iron oxides, including...

  18. 21 CFR 73.2250 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Iron oxides. 73.2250 Section 73.2250 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2250 Iron oxides. (a) Identity. The color additives iron oxides consist of any one or any combination of synthetically prepared iron oxides, including...

  19. 21 CFR 73.2250 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Iron oxides. 73.2250 Section 73.2250 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2250 Iron oxides. (a) Identity. The color additives iron oxides consist of any one or any combination of synthetically prepared iron oxides, including...

  20. 21 CFR 73.2250 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Iron oxides. 73.2250 Section 73.2250 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2250 Iron oxides. (a) Identity. The color additives iron oxides consist of any one or any combination of synthetically prepared iron oxides, including...

  1. 21 CFR 73.2250 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Iron oxides. 73.2250 Section 73.2250 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2250 Iron oxides. (a) Identity. The color additives iron oxides consist of any one or any combination of synthetically prepared iron oxides, including...

  2. Effect of pH, citrate treatment and silane-coupling agent concentration on the magnetic, structural and surface properties of functionalized silica-coated iron oxide nanocomposite particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammad-Beigi, H.; Yaghmaei, S.; Roostaazad, R.; Bardania, H.; Arpanaei, A.

    2011-12-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles were synthesized by coprecipitation of iron chloride salts at various pH values (9, 10, 11 and12) that were adjusted using an ammonia solution. Increasing the pH from 9 to 12 led to decreases in the size of iron oxide nanoparticles from 7.9±1.4 to 5±0.6 nm and the saturation magnetization ( Ms) from 82.73 to 67.14 emu/g, respectively, when analyzed with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). X-ray diffraction patterns as well as Ms values showed that magnetite is the dominantly synthesized phase in the examined pH values. Unmodified iron oxide nanoparticles were coated with silica via the hydrolysis and condensation of tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS), designated P1 particles. The size distribution diagram of P1 particles showed two regions with mean sizes of 143.3±15.4 and 216.9±13.7 nm corresponding to silica and iron oxide@silica particles, respectively. Stabilization of iron oxide nanoparticles using sodium citrate prior to coating with silica (P2 particles) resulted in nanocomposites with a mean size of 275±16.1 nm and an Ms value of 2.9 emu/g. Subsequently, the surface of P2 particles was functionalized by amine groups using N-(2-aminoethyl)-3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (EDS). Results obtained from the measurement of zeta potential revealed that the highest value of isoelectric point (PI) change, indicating a more efficient surface functionalization, occurs when the EDS concentration of 90 mM is used, as compared to that for particles aminated using 25 and 180 mM EDS.

  3. Stabilizing Alginate Confinement and Polymer Coating of CO-Releasing Molecules Supported on Iron Oxide Nanoparticles To Trigger the CO Release by Magnetic Heating.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Hajo; Winkler, Felix; Kunz, Peter; Schmidt, Annette M; Hamacher, Alexandra; Kassack, Matthias U; Janiak, Christoph

    2015-12-01

    Maghemite (Fe2O3) iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) were synthesized, modified with covalent surface-bound CO-releasing molecules of a tri(carbonyl)-chlorido-phenylalaninato-ruthenium(II) complex (CORM), and coated with a dextran polymer. The time- and temperature-dependent CO release from this CORM-3 analogue was followed by a myoglobin assay. A new measurement method for the myoglobin assay was developed, based on confining "water-soluble" polymer-coated Dextran500k@CORM@IONP particles in hollow spheres of nontoxic and easily prepared calcium alginate. Dropping a mixture of Dextran500k@CORM@IONP and sodium alginate into a CaCl2 solution leads to stable hollow spheres of Ca(2+) cross-linked alginate which contain the Dextran500k@CORM@IONP particles. This "alginate-method" (i) protects CORM-3 analogues from rapid CO-displacement reactions with a protein, (ii) enables a spatial separation of the CORM from its surrounding myoglobin assay with the alginate acting as a CO-permeable membrane, and (iii) allows the use of substances with high absorptivity (such as iron oxide nanoparticles) in the myoglobin assay without interference in the optical path of the UV cell. Embedding the CORM@IONP nanoparticles in the alginate vessel represents a compartmentation of the reactive component and allows for close contact with, yet facile separation from, the surrounding myoglobin assay. The half-life of the CO release from Dextran500k@CORM@IONP particles surrounded by alginate was determined to be 890 ± 70 min at 20 °C. An acceleration of the CO release occurs at higher temperature with a half-life of 172 ± 27 min at 37 °C and 45 ± 7 min at 50 °C. The CO release can be triggered in an alternating current magnetic field (31.7 kA m(-1), 247 kHz, 39.9 mT) through local magnetic heating of the susceptible iron oxide nanoparticles. With magnetic heating at 20 °C in the bulk solution, the half-life of CO release from Dextran500k@CORM@IONP particles decreased to 155 ± 18 min

  4. Poly (dopamine) coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanocluster for noninvasive labeling, tracking, and targeted delivery of adipose tissue-derived stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Naishun; Wu, Ming; Pan, Fan; Lin, Jiumao; Li, Zuanfang; Zhang, Da; Wang, Yingchao; Zheng, Youshi; Peng, Jun; Liu, Xiaolong; Liu, Jingfeng

    2016-01-01

    Tracking and monitoring of cells in vivo after transplantation can provide crucial information for stem cell therapy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) combined with contrast agents is believed to be an effective and non-invasive technique for cell tracking in living bodies. However, commercial superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) applied to label cells suffer from shortages such as potential toxicity, low labeling efficiency, and low contrast enhancing. Herein, the adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs) were efficiently labeled with SPIONs coated with poly (dopamine) (SPIONs cluster@PDA), without affecting their viability, proliferation, apoptosis, surface marker expression, as well as their self-renew ability and multi-differentiation potential. The labeled cells transplanted into the mice through tail intravenous injection exhibited a negative enhancement of the MRI signal in the damaged liver-induced by carbon tetrachloride, and subsequently these homed ADSCs with SPIONs cluster@PDA labeling exhibited excellent repair effects to the damaged liver. Moreover, the enhanced target-homing to tissue of interest and repair effects of SPIONs cluster@PDA-labeled ADSCs could be achieved by use of external magnetic field in the excisional skin wound mice model. Therefore, we provide a facile, safe, noninvasive and sensitive method for external magnetic field targeted delivery and MRI based tracking of transplanted cells in vivo. PMID:26728448

  5. An in vitro study of bare and poly(ethylene glycol)-co-fumarate-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles: a new toxicity identification procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoudi, Morteza; Simchi, Abdolreza; Imani, Mohammad; Milani, Abbas S.; Stroeve, Pieter

    2009-06-01

    As the use of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) in biomedical applications increases (e.g. for targeting drug delivery and imaging), patients are likely to be exposed to products containing SPION. Despite their high biomedical importance, toxicity data for SPION are limited to date. The aim of this study is to investigate the cytotoxicity of SPION and its ability to change cell medium components. Bare and poly(ethylene glycol)-co-fumarate (PEGF)-coated SPION with narrow size distributions were synthesized. The particles were prepared by co-precipitation using ferric and ferrous salts with a molar Fe3+/Fe2+ ratio of 2. Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM) and primary mouse fibroblast (L929) cell lines were exposed to the SPION. Variation of cell medium components and cytotoxicity due to the interactions with nanoparticles were analyzed using ultraviolet and visible spectroscopy (UV/vis) and the 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay methods, respectively. The toxicity amount has been traditionally identified by changes in pH and composition in cells and DMEM due to the tendency of SPION to adsorb proteins, vitamins, amino acids and ions. For in vitro toxicity assessments, a new surface passivation procedure is proposed which can yield more reliable quantitative results. It is shown that a more reliable way of identifying cytotoxicity for in vitro assessments is to use particles with saturated surfaces via interactions with DMEM before usage.

  6. Effect of external magnetic field on IV 99mTc-labeled aminosilane-coated iron oxide nanoparticles: demonstration in a rat model: special report.

    PubMed

    Liberatore, Mauro; Barteri, Mario; Megna, Valentina; D'Elia, Piera; Rebonato, Stefania; Latini, Augusto; De Angelis, Francesca; Scaramuzzo, Francesca Anna; De Stefano, Maria Egle; Guadagno, Noemi Antonella; Chondrogiannis, Sotirios; Maffione, Anna Margherita; Rubello, Domenico; Pala, Alessandro; Colletti, Patrick M

    2015-02-01

    Among the most interesting applications of ferromagnetic nanoparticles (NPs) in medicine is the potential for localizing pharmacologically or radioactively tagged agents directly to selected tissues selected by an adjustable external magnetic field. This concept is demonstrated by the application external magnetic field on IV Tc-labeled aminosilane-coated iron oxide NPs in a rat model. In a model comparing a rat with a 0.3-T magnet over a hind paw versus a rat without a magnet, a static acquisition at 45 minutes showed that 27% of the administered radioactivity was in the area subtended by the magnet, whereas the liver displays a percentage of binding of 14% in the presence of the magnet and of 16% in the absence of an external magnetic field. These preliminary results suggest that the application of an external magnetic field may be a viable route for the development of methods for the confinement of magnetic NPs labeled with radioactive isotopes targeted for predetermined sites of the body. PMID:25551623

  7. CD163-Macrophages Are Involved in Rhabdomyolysis-Induced Kidney Injury and May Be Detected by MRI with Targeted Gold-Coated Iron Oxide Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Rubio-Navarro, Alfonso; Carril, Mónica; Padro, Daniel; Guerrero-Hue, Melanie; Tarín, Carlos; Samaniego, Rafael; Cannata, Pablo; Cano, Ainhoa; Villalobos, Juan Manuel Amaro; Sevillano, Ángel Manuel; Yuste, Claudia; Gutiérrez, Eduardo; Praga, Manuel; Egido, Jesús; Moreno, Juan Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages play an important role in rhabdomyolysis-acute kidney injury (AKI), although the molecular mechanisms involved in macrophage differentiation are poorly understood. We analyzed the expression and regulation of CD163, a membrane receptor mainly expressed by anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages, in rhabdomyolysis-AKI and developed targeted probes for its specific detection in vivo by MRI. Intramuscular injection of glycerol in mice promoted an early inflammatory response, with elevated proportion of M1 macrophages, and partial differentiation towards a M2 phenotype in later stages, where increased CD163 expression was observed. Immunohistological studies confirmed the presence of CD163-macrophages in human rhabdomyolysis-AKI. In cultured macrophages, myoglobin upregulated CD163 expression via HO-1/IL-10 axis. Moreover, we developed gold-coated iron oxide nanoparticles vectorized with an anti-CD163 antibody that specifically targeted CD163 in kidneys from glycerol-injected mice, as determined by MRI studies, and confirmed by electron microscopy and immunological analysis. Our findings are the first to demonstrate that CD163 is present in both human and experimental rhabdomyolysis-induced AKI, suggesting an important role of this molecule in this pathological condition. Therefore, the use of probes targeting CD163-macrophages by MRI may provide important information about the cellular composition of renal lesion in rhabdomyolysis. PMID:27162559

  8. CD163-Macrophages Are Involved in Rhabdomyolysis-Induced Kidney Injury and May Be Detected by MRI with Targeted Gold-Coated Iron Oxide Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Navarro, Alfonso; Carril, Mónica; Padro, Daniel; Guerrero-Hue, Melanie; Tarín, Carlos; Samaniego, Rafael; Cannata, Pablo; Cano, Ainhoa; Villalobos, Juan Manuel Amaro; Sevillano, Ángel Manuel; Yuste, Claudia; Gutiérrez, Eduardo; Praga, Manuel; Egido, Jesús; Moreno, Juan Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages play an important role in rhabdomyolysis-acute kidney injury (AKI), although the molecular mechanisms involved in macrophage differentiation are poorly understood. We analyzed the expression and regulation of CD163, a membrane receptor mainly expressed by anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages, in rhabdomyolysis-AKI and developed targeted probes for its specific detection in vivo by MRI. Intramuscular injection of glycerol in mice promoted an early inflammatory response, with elevated proportion of M1 macrophages, and partial differentiation towards a M2 phenotype in later stages, where increased CD163 expression was observed. Immunohistological studies confirmed the presence of CD163-macrophages in human rhabdomyolysis-AKI. In cultured macrophages, myoglobin upregulated CD163 expression via HO-1/IL-10 axis. Moreover, we developed gold-coated iron oxide nanoparticles vectorized with an anti-CD163 antibody that specifically targeted CD163 in kidneys from glycerol-injected mice, as determined by MRI studies, and confirmed by electron microscopy and immunological analysis. Our findings are the first to demonstrate that CD163 is present in both human and experimental rhabdomyolysis-induced AKI, suggesting an important role of this molecule in this pathological condition. Therefore, the use of probes targeting CD163-macrophages by MRI may provide important information about the cellular composition of renal lesion in rhabdomyolysis. PMID:27162559

  9. In vitro and ex vivo evaluation of silica-coated super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) as biomedical photoacoustic contrast agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alwi, Rudolf; Telenkov, Sergey A.; Mandelis, Andreas; Leshuk, Timothy; Gu, Frank; Oladepo, Sulayman; Michaelian, Kirk; Dickie, Kristopher

    2013-03-01

    The employment of contrast agents in photoacoustic imaging has gained significant attention within the past few years for their biomedical applications. In this study, the use of silica-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles (SPION) was investigated as a contrast agent in biomedical photoacoustic imaging. SPIONs have been widely used as Food-and-Drug-Administration (FDA)-approved contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and are known to have an excellent safety profile. Using our frequency-domain photoacoustic correlation technique ("the photoacoustic radar") with modulated laser excitation, we examined the effects of nanoparticle size, concentration and biological medium (e.g. serum, sheep blood) on its photoacoustic response in turbid media (intralipid solution). Maximum detection depth and minimum measurable SPION concentration were determined experimentally. The detection was performed using a single element transducer. The nanoparticle-induced optical contrast ex vivo in dense muscular tissues (avian pectus) was evaluated using a phased array photoacoustic probe and the strong potential of silicacoated SPION as a possible photoacoustic contrast agent was demonstrated. This study opens the way for future clinical applications of nanoparticle-enhanced photoacoustic imaging in cancer therapy.

  10. Poly (dopamine) coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanocluster for noninvasive labeling, tracking, and targeted delivery of adipose tissue-derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Liao, Naishun; Wu, Ming; Pan, Fan; Lin, Jiumao; Li, Zuanfang; Zhang, Da; Wang, Yingchao; Zheng, Youshi; Peng, Jun; Liu, Xiaolong; Liu, Jingfeng

    2016-01-01

    Tracking and monitoring of cells in vivo after transplantation can provide crucial information for stem cell therapy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) combined with contrast agents is believed to be an effective and non-invasive technique for cell tracking in living bodies. However, commercial superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) applied to label cells suffer from shortages such as potential toxicity, low labeling efficiency, and low contrast enhancing. Herein, the adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs) were efficiently labeled with SPIONs coated with poly (dopamine) (SPIONs cluster@PDA), without affecting their viability, proliferation, apoptosis, surface marker expression, as well as their self-renew ability and multi-differentiation potential. The labeled cells transplanted into the mice through tail intravenous injection exhibited a negative enhancement of the MRI signal in the damaged liver-induced by carbon tetrachloride, and subsequently these homed ADSCs with SPIONs cluster@PDA labeling exhibited excellent repair effects to the damaged liver. Moreover, the enhanced target-homing to tissue of interest and repair effects of SPIONs cluster@PDA-labeled ADSCs could be achieved by use of external magnetic field in the excisional skin wound mice model. Therefore, we provide a facile, safe, noninvasive and sensitive method for external magnetic field targeted delivery and MRI based tracking of transplanted cells in vivo. PMID:26728448

  11. Poly (dopamine) coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanocluster for noninvasive labeling, tracking, and targeted delivery of adipose tissue-derived stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Naishun; Wu, Ming; Pan, Fan; Lin, Jiumao; Li, Zuanfang; Zhang, Da; Wang, Yingchao; Zheng, Youshi; Peng, Jun; Liu, Xiaolong; Liu, Jingfeng

    2016-01-01

    Tracking and monitoring of cells in vivo after transplantation can provide crucial information for stem cell therapy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) combined with contrast agents is believed to be an effective and non-invasive technique for cell tracking in living bodies. However, commercial superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) applied to label cells suffer from shortages such as potential toxicity, low labeling efficiency, and low contrast enhancing. Herein, the adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs) were efficiently labeled with SPIONs coated with poly (dopamine) (SPIONs cluster@PDA), without affecting their viability, proliferation, apoptosis, surface marker expression, as well as their self-renew ability and multi-differentiation potential. The labeled cells transplanted into the mice through tail intravenous injection exhibited a negative enhancement of the MRI signal in the damaged liver-induced by carbon tetrachloride, and subsequently these homed ADSCs with SPIONs cluster@PDA labeling exhibited excellent repair effects to the damaged liver. Moreover, the enhanced target-homing to tissue of interest and repair effects of SPIONs cluster@PDA-labeled ADSCs could be achieved by use of external magnetic field in the excisional skin wound mice model. Therefore, we provide a facile, safe, noninvasive and sensitive method for external magnetic field targeted delivery and MRI based tracking of transplanted cells in vivo.

  12. Pheomelanin-coated iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles: a promising candidate for negative T2 contrast enhancement in magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Zottis, Alexandre D A; Beltrame, Jeovandro M; Lara, Luciano R S; Costa, Thiago G; Feldhaus, Mateus J; Pedrosa, Rozangela Curi; Ourique, Fabiana; de Campos, Carlos E M; Isoppo, Eduardo de A; da Silva Miranda, Fabio; Szpoganicz, Bruno

    2015-06-30

    We describe herein a novel type of monodisperse water-soluble magnetite nanoparticle coated with pheomelanin using an environmentally-friendly approach in aqueous medium. The results indicate superparamagnetic behaviour at room temperature and show improved negative contrast in T2-weighted MRI with a transverse relaxivity of 218 mM(-1) s(-1). PMID:26073290

  13. Glucose-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles prepared by metal vapour synthesis are electively internalized in a pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell line expressing GLUT1 transporter.

    PubMed

    Barbaro, Daniele; Di Bari, Lorenzo; Gandin, Valentina; Evangelisti, Claudio; Vitulli, Giovanni; Schiavi, Eleonora; Marzano, Cristina; Ferretti, Anna M; Salvadori, Piero

    2015-01-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONP) can have a variety of biomedical applications due to their visualization properties through Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and heating with radio frequency or alternating magnetic fields. In the oncological field, coating IONP with organic compounds to provide specific features and to achieve the ability of binding specific molecular targets appears to be very promising. To take advantage of the high avidity of tumor cells for glucose, we report the development of very small glucose-coated IONP (glc-IONP) by employing an innovative technique, Metal Vapor Synthesis (MVS). Moreover, we tested the internalization of our gl-IONP on a tumor line, BxPC3, over-expressing GLUT 1 transporter. Both glc-IONP and polyvinylpyrrolidone-IONP (PVP-IONP), as control, were prepared with MVS and were tested on BxPC3 at various concentrations. To evaluate the role of GLUT-1 transporter, we also investigated the effect of adding a polyclonal anti-GLUT1 antibody. After proper treatment, the iron value was assessed by atomic absorption spectrometer, reported in mcg/L and expressed in mg of protein. Our IONP prepared with MVS were very small and homogeneously distributed in a narrow range (1.75-3.75 nm) with an average size of 2.7 nm and were super-paramagnetic. Glc-IONP were internalized by BxPC3 cells in a larger amount than PVP-IONP. After 6h of treatment with 50 mcg/mL of IONPs, the content of Fe was 1.5 times higher in glc-IONP-treated cells compared with PVP-IONP-treated cells. After 1h pre-treatment with anti-GLUT1, a reduction of 41% cellular accumulation of glc-IONP was observed. Conversely, the uptake of PVP-IONPs was reduced only by 14% with antibody pretreatment. In conclusion, MVS allowed us to prepare small, homogeneous, super-paramagnetic glc-IONP, which are electively internalized by a tumor line over-expressing GLUT1. Our glc-IONP appear to have many requisites for in vivo use. PMID:25874906

  14. Glucose-Coated Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Prepared by Metal Vapour Synthesis Are Electively Internalized in a Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Cell Line Expressing GLUT1 Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Evangelisti, Claudio; Vitulli, Giovanni; Schiavi, Eleonora; Marzano, Cristina; Ferretti, Anna M.; Salvadori, Piero

    2015-01-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONP) can have a variety of biomedical applications due to their visualization properties through Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and heating with radio frequency or alternating magnetic fields. In the oncological field, coating IONP with organic compounds to provide specific features and to achieve the ability of binding specific molecular targets appears to be very promising. To take advantage of the high avidity of tumor cells for glucose, we report the development of very small glucose-coated IONP (glc-IONP) by employing an innovative technique, Metal Vapor Synthesis (MVS). Moreover, we tested the internalization of our gl-IONP on a tumor line, BxPC3, over-expressing GLUT 1 transporter. Both glc-IONP and polyvinylpyrrolidone-IONP (PVP-IONP), as control, were prepared with MVS and were tested on BxPC3 at various concentrations. To evaluate the role of GLUT-1 transporter, we also investigated the effect of adding a polyclonal anti-GLUT1 antibody. After proper treatment, the iron value was assessed by atomic absorption spectrometer, reported in mcg/L and expressed in mg of protein. Our IONP prepared with MVS were very small and homogeneously distributed in a narrow range (1.75-3.75 nm) with an average size of 2.7 nm and were super-paramagnetic. Glc-IONP were internalized by BxPC3 cells in a larger amount than PVP-IONP. After 6h of treatment with 50 mcg/mL of IONPs, the content of Fe was 1.5 times higher in glc-IONP-treated cells compared with PVP-IONP-treated cells. After 1h pre-treatment with anti-GLUT1, a reduction of 41% cellular accumulation of glc-IONP was observed. Conversely, the uptake of PVP-IONPs was reduced only by 14% with antibody pretreatment. In conclusion, MVS allowed us to prepare small, homogeneous, super-paramagnetic glc-IONP, which are electively internalized by a tumor line over-expressing GLUT1. Our glc-IONP appear to have many requisites for in vivo use. PMID:25874906

  15. Water oxidation: High five iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloret-Fillol, Julio; Costas, Miquel

    2016-03-01

    The oxidation of water is essential to the sustainable production of fuels using sunlight or electricity, but designing active, stable and earth-abundant catalysts for the reaction is challenging. Now, a complex containing five iron atoms is shown to efficiently oxidize water by mimicking key features of the oxygen-evolving complex in green plants.

  16. Enhanced aggregation of alginate-coated iron oxide (hematite) nanoparticles in the presence of calcium, strontium, and barium cations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kai Loon; Mylon, Steven E; Elimelech, Menachem

    2007-05-22

    Early-stage aggregation kinetics studies of alginate-coated hematite nanoparticles in solutions containing alkaline-earth metal cations revealed enhanced aggregation rates in the presence of Ca2+, Sr2+, and Ba2+, but not with Mg2+. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging of the aggregates provided evidence that alginate gel formation was essential for enhanced aggregation to occur. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) aggregation results clearly indicated that a much lower concentration of Ba2+ compared to Ca2+ and Sr2+ was required to achieve a similar degree of enhanced aggregation in each system. To elucidate the relationship between the alginate's affinities for divalent cations and the enhanced aggregation of the alginate-coated hematite nanoparticles, atomic force microscopy (AFM) was employed to probe the interaction forces between alginate-coated hematite surfaces under the solution chemistries used for the aggregation study. Maximum adhesion forces, maximum pull-off distances, and the work of adhesion were used as indicators to gauge the alginate's affinity for the divalent cations and the resulting attractive interactions between alginate-coated hematite nanoparticles. The results showed that alginate had higher affinity for Ba2+ than either Sr2+ or Ca2+. This same trend was consistent with the cation concentrations required for comparable enhanced aggregation kinetics, suggesting that the rate of alginate gel formation controls the enhanced aggregation kinetics. An aggregation mechanism incorporating the gelation of alginate is proposed to explain the accelerated aggregate growth in the presence of Ca2+, Sr2+, and Ba2+. PMID:17469860

  17. Iron Oxide as an MRI Contrast Agent for Cell Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Korchinski, Daniel J.; Taha, May; Yang, Runze; Nathoo, Nabeela; Dunn, Jeff F.

    2015-01-01

    Iron oxide contrast agents have been combined with magnetic resonance imaging for cell tracking. In this review, we discuss coating properties and provide an overview of ex vivo and in vivo labeling of different cell types, including stem cells, red blood cells, and monocytes/macrophages. Furthermore, we provide examples of applications of cell tracking with iron contrast agents in stroke, multiple sclerosis, cancer, arteriovenous malformations, and aortic and cerebral aneurysms. Attempts at quantifying iron oxide concentrations and other vascular properties are examined. We advise on designing studies using iron contrast agents including methods for validation. PMID:26483609

  18. Compound semiconductor oxide antireflection coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knopp, K. J.; Mirin, R. P.; Bertness, K. A.; Silverman, K. L.; Christensen, D. H.

    2000-05-01

    We report the development of high quality, broad-bandwidth, antireflection (AR) coatings using the low index provided by wet thermally oxidized Al0.98Ga0.02As. We address the design criteria, fabrication, and characterizations of AR coatings composed of surface and buried oxide layers on GaAs. We show, using native-oxide dispersion data, that surface oxide coatings can be designed to offer a nearly zero minimum of reflectance and a reflectance of <1% over bandwidths as large as 500 nm. Surface coatings having a reflectance minimum of 0.4% and a reflectance of <1% over >250 nm have been experimentally demonstrated at a design wavelength of 1 micrometer. Additionally, buried oxide coatings can be designed with an AlxGa1-xAs matching layer of any composition to exactly match the admittance of any substrate with effective index between 2.5 and 3.5. We have demonstrated buried oxide coatings, also designed for 1 micrometer, having a reflectance minimum of 0.4% and a reflectance of <1% over 21 nm. The calculated optical scattering loss from measured roughness data indicates that reflectance minima as low as 10-4 % are ultimately achievable with native-oxide antireflection coatings.

  19. Surface Engineering of Core/Shell Iron/Iron Oxide Nanoparticles from Microemulsions for Hyperthermia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guandong; Liao, Yifeng; Baker, Ian

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the synthesis and surface engineering of core/shell-type iron/iron oxide nanoparticles for magnetic hyperthermia cancer therapy. Iron/iron oxide nanoparticles were synthesized from microemulsions of NaBH4 and FeCl3, followed by surface modification in which a thin hydrophobic hexamethyldisilazane layer - used to protect the iron core - replaced the CTAB coating on the particles. Phosphatidylcholine was then assembled on the nanoparticle surface. The resulting nanocomposite particles have a biocompatible surface and show good stability in both air and aqueous solution. Compared to iron oxide nanoparticles, the nanocomposites show much better heating in an alternating magnetic field. They are good candidates for both hyperthermia and magnetic resonance imaging applications. PMID:21833157

  20. Preparation and characterization of chitosan-Polyethylene glycol-polyvinylpyrrolidone-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as carrier system: Drug loading and in vitro drug release study.

    PubMed

    Prabha, G; Raj, V

    2016-05-01

    In the present research work, the anticancer drug "curcumin" is loaded with Chitosan (CS)-polyethylene glycol (PEG)-polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) (CS-PEG-PVP) polymer nanocomposites coated with superparamagnetic iron oxide (Fe3 O4 ) nanoparticles. The system can be used for targeted and controlled drug delivery of anticancer drugs with reduced side effects and greater efficiency. The prepared nanoparticles were characterized by Fourier transmission infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Curcumin drug-loaded Fe3 O4 -CS, Fe3 O4 -CS- PEG and Fe3 O4 -CS-PEG-PVP nanoparticles exhibited the mean particle size in the range of 183 - 390 nm with a zeta potential value of 26 mV-41 mV as measured using Malvern Zetasizer. The encapsulation efficiency, loading capacity and in-vitro drug release behaviour of curcumin drug-loaded Fe3 O4 -CS, Fe3 O4 -CS-PEG, and Fe3 O4 -CS-PEG-PVP nanoparticles were studied using UV spectrophotometer. Besides, the cytotoxicity of the prepared nanoparticles using MTT assay was also studied. The curcumin drug release was examined at different pH medium (4.5 and 7.4) and temperature (37°C and 45°C), and it was proved that the drug release depends upon the pH medium and temperature in addition to the nature of matrix. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 104B: 808-816, 2016. PMID:26996397

  1. 46 CFR 148.275 - Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent. 148.275 Section... § 148.275 Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent. (a) Before spent iron oxide or spent iron sponge is... been cooled and weathered for at least eight weeks. (b) Both spent iron oxide and spent iron sponge...

  2. 46 CFR 148.275 - Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent. 148.275 Section... § 148.275 Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent. (a) Before spent iron oxide or spent iron sponge is... been cooled and weathered for at least eight weeks. (b) Both spent iron oxide and spent iron sponge...

  3. 46 CFR 148.275 - Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent. 148.275 Section... § 148.275 Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent. (a) Before spent iron oxide or spent iron sponge is... been cooled and weathered for at least eight weeks. (b) Both spent iron oxide and spent iron sponge...

  4. 46 CFR 148.275 - Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent. 148.275 Section... § 148.275 Iron oxide, spent; iron sponge, spent. (a) Before spent iron oxide or spent iron sponge is... been cooled and weathered for at least eight weeks. (b) Both spent iron oxide and spent iron sponge...

  5. Oxide coating development

    SciTech Connect

    Stinton, D.P.

    1995-06-01

    Monolithic SiC heat exchangers and fiber-reinforced SiC-matrix composite heat exchangers and filters are susceptible to corrosion by alkali metals at elevated temperatures. Protective coatings are currently being developed to isolate the SiC materials from the corrodants. Unfortunately, these coatings typically crack and spall when applied to SiC substrates. The purpose of this task is to determine the feasibility of using a compliant material between the protective coating and the substrate. The low-modulus compliant layer could absorb stresses and eliminate cracking and spalling of the protective coatings.

  6. Vacancy coalescence during oxidation of iron nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Cabot, Andreu; Puntes, Victor F.; Shevchenko, Elena; Yin, Yadong; Balcells, Lluis; Markus, Matthew A.; Hughes, Steven M.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2007-06-14

    In the present work, we analyze the geometry and composition of the nanostructures obtained from the oxidation of iron nanoparticles. The initial oxidation of iron takes place by outward diffusion of cations through the growing oxide shell. This net material flow is balanced by an opposite flow of vacancies, which coalesce at the metal/oxide interface. Thus, the partial oxidation of colloidal iron nanoparticles leads to the formation of core-void-shell nanostructures. Furthermore, the complete oxidation of iron nanoparticles in the 3-8 nm size range leads to the formation of hollow iron oxide nanoparticles. We analyze the size and temperature range in which vacancy coalescence during oxidation of amine-stabilized iron nanoparticles takes place. Maghemite is the crystallographic structure obtained from the complete oxidation of iron nanoparticles under our synthetic conditions.

  7. 21 CFR 73.3125 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Iron oxides. 73.3125 Section 73.3125 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3125 Iron oxides. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive iron oxides (CAS Reg. No. 1332-37-2), Color Index No. 77491, shall conform...

  8. 21 CFR 73.3125 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Iron oxides. 73.3125 Section 73.3125 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3125 Iron oxides. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive iron oxides (CAS Reg. No. 1332-37-2), Color Index No. 77491, shall conform...

  9. 21 CFR 73.3125 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Iron oxides. 73.3125 Section 73.3125 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3125 Iron oxides. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive iron oxides (CAS Reg. No. 1332-37-2), Color Index No. 77491, shall conform...

  10. 21 CFR 73.3125 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Iron oxides. 73.3125 Section 73.3125 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3125 Iron oxides. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive iron oxides (CAS Reg. No. 1332-37-2), Color Index No. 77491, shall conform...

  11. 21 CFR 73.3125 - Iron oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Iron oxides. 73.3125 Section 73.3125 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3125 Iron oxides. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive iron oxides (CAS Reg. No. 1332-37-2), Color Index No. 77491, shall conform...

  12. Carcinogenesis studies with iron oxides.

    PubMed

    Steinhoff, D; Mohr, U; Hahnemann, S

    1991-01-01

    Seven different types of iron oxide were examined for carcinogenic properties in intratracheal instillation and intraperitoneal injection tests on rats, which represent particularly sensitive methods for local carcinogenic effects. The total doses lay in the range of maximum tolerance (390/1,530 mg/kg i.t. or 600 mg/kg i.p.). With one exception, at least 50 male and 50 female Sprague-Dawley rats were used per test group, control group and route of administration. Two iron oxides were additionally instilled intratracheally in combination with benzo[a]pyrene. No carcinogenic effect could be demonstrated for the test iron oxides RBW 07105/SV2 (fibrous, magnetic, surface doped with 1.85% cobalt), development product Bayferrox AC 5100 M (fibrous, magnetic, bulk doped with 2.1% cobalt), Bayferrox 1352 (fibrous alpha-Fe2O3), Bayferrox 920 (fibrous alpha-FeOOH), Bayferrox 130 (cubic alpha-Fe2O3), Bayferrox 306 (cubic Fe3O4), or Brazilian iron ore AC 5031 N (alpha-Fe2O3). PMID:1797572

  13. Rheological Properties of Iron Oxide Based Ferrofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devi, M.; Mohanta, D.

    2009-06-01

    In the present work, we report synthesis and magneto-viscous properties of cationic and anionic surfactant coated, iron oxide nanoparticles based ferrofluids. Structural and morphological aspects are revealed by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies. We compare the rheological/magneto-viscous properties of different ferrofluids for various shear rates (2-450 sec-1) and applied magnetic fields (0-100 gauss). In the absence of a magnetic field, and under no shear case, the ferrofluid prepared with TMAH coated particle is found to be 12% more viscous compared to its counterpart. The rheological properties are governed by non-Newtonian features, and for a definite shear rate, viscosity of a given ferrofluid is found to be strongly dependent on the applied magnetic field as well as nature of the surfactant.

  14. High temperature oxidation of iron-iron oxide core-shell nanowires composed of iron nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Krajewski, M; Brzozka, K; Lin, W S; Lin, H M; Tokarczyk, M; Borysiuk, J; Kowalski, G; Wasik, D

    2016-02-01

    This work describes an oxidation process of iron-iron oxide core-shell nanowires at temperatures between 100 °C and 800 °C. The studied nanomaterial was synthesized through a simple chemical reduction of iron trichloride in an external magnetic field under a constant flow of argon. The electron microscopy investigations allowed determining that the as-prepared nanowires were composed of self-assembled iron nanoparticles which were covered by a 3 nm thick oxide shell and separated from each other by a thin interface layer. Both these layers exhibited an amorphous or highly-disordered character which was traced by means of transmission electron microscopy and Mössbauer spectroscopy. The thermal oxidation was carried out under a constant flow of argon which contained the traces of oxygen. The first stage of process was related to slow transformations of amorphous Fe and amorphous iron oxides into crystalline phases and disappearance of interfaces between iron nanoparticles forming the studied nanomaterial (range: 25-300 °C). After that, the crystalline iron core and iron oxide shell became oxidized and signals for different compositions of iron oxide sheath were observed (range: 300-800 °C) using X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and Mössbauer spectroscopy. According to the thermal gravimetric analysis, the nanowires heated up to 800 °C under argon atmosphere gained 37% of mass with respect to their initial weight. The structure of the studied nanomaterial oxidized at 800 °C was mainly composed of α-Fe2O3 (∼ 93%). Moreover, iron nanowires treated above 600 °C lost their wire-like shape due to their shrinkage and collapse caused by the void coalescence. PMID:26766540

  15. Lutetium Oxide Coatings by PVD

    PubMed Central

    Topping, Stephen G; Park, CH; Rangan, SK; Sarin, VK

    2009-01-01

    Due to its high density and cubic structure, Lutetium oxide (Lu2O3) has been extensively researched for scintillating applications. Present manufacturing methods, such as hot pressing and sintering, do not provide adequate resolution due to light scattering of polycrystalline materials. Vapor deposition has been investigated as an alternative manufacturing method. Lutetium oxide transparent optical coatings by magnetron sputtering offer a means of tailoring the coating for optimum scintillation and resolution. Sputter deposited coatings typically have inherent stress and defects that adversely affect transparency and emission. The effect of process parameters on the coating properties is being investigated via x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and emission spectroscopy, and will be presented and discussed. PMID:20390046

  16. Electroless plating preparation and electromagnetic properties of Co-coated carbonyl iron particles/polyimide composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yingying; Zhou, Wancheng; Li, Rong; Qing, Yuchang; Luo, Fa; Zhu, Dongmei

    2016-03-01

    To solve the serious electromagnetic interference problems at elevated temperature, one thin microwave-absorbing sheet employing Co-coated carbonyl iron particles and polyimide was prepared. The Co-coated carbonyl iron particles were successfully prepared using an electroless plating method. The microstructure, composition, phase and static magnetic properties of Co-coated carbonyl iron particles were characterized by combination of scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The electromagnetic parameters of Co-coated carbonyl iron particles/polyimide composite were measured in the frequency range of 2-18 GHz, and the electromagnetic loss mechanism of the material-obtained was discussed. The microwave absorption properties of composites before and after heat treatment at 300 °C for 100 h were characterized in 2-18 GHz frequency range. It was established that composites based on Co-coated carbonyl iron demonstrate thermomagnetic stability, indicating that Co coating reduces the oxidation of carbonyl iron. Thus, Co-coated carbonyl iron particles/polyimide composites are useful in the design of microwave absorbers operating at temperatures up to 300 °C.

  17. Chondroitin sulfate-polyethylenimine copolymer-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as an efficient magneto-gene carrier for microRNA-encoding plasmid DNA delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Yu-Lun; Chou, Han-Lin; Liao, Zi-Xian; Huang, Shih-Jer; Ke, Jyun-Han; Liu, Yu-Sheng; Chiu, Chien-Chih; Wang, Li-Fang

    2015-04-01

    MicroRNA-128 (miR-128) is an attractive therapeutic molecule with powerful glioblastoma regulation properties. However, miR-128 lacks biological stability and leads to poor delivery efficacy in clinical applications. In our previous study, we demonstrated two effective transgene carriers, including polyethylenimine (PEI)-decorated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) as well as chemically-conjugated chondroitin sulfate-PEI copolymers (CPs). In this contribution, we report optimized conditions for coating CPs onto the surfaces of SPIONs, forming CPIOs, for magneto-gene delivery systems. The optimized weight ratio of the CPs and SPIONs is 2 : 1, which resulted in the formation of a stable particle as a good transgene carrier. The hydrodynamic diameter of the CPIOs is ~136 nm. The gel electrophoresis results demonstrate that the weight ratio of CPIO/DNA required to completely encapsulate pDNA is >=3. The in vitro tests of CPIO/DNA were done in 293 T, CRL5802, and U87-MG cells in the presence and absence of an external magnetic field. The magnetofection efficiency of CPIO/DNA was measured in the three cell lines with or without fetal bovine serum (FBS). CPIO/DNA exhibited remarkably improved gene expression in the presence of the magnetic field and 10% FBS as compared with a gold non-viral standard, PEI/DNA, and a commercial magnetofection reagent, PolyMag/DNA. In addition, CPIO/DNA showed less cytotoxicity than PEI/DNA and PolyMag/DNA against the three cell lines. The transfection efficiency of the magnetoplex improved significantly with an assisted magnetic field. In miR-128 delivery, a microRNA plate array and fluorescence in situ hybridization were used to demonstrate that CPIO/pMIRNA-128 indeed expresses more miR-128 with the assisted magnetic field than without. In a biodistribution test, CPIO/Cy5-DNA showed higher accumulation at the tumor site where an external magnet is placed nearby.MicroRNA-128 (miR-128) is an attractive therapeutic molecule

  18. Oxidation protection coatings for polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, M. J.; Sovey, J. S.; Banks, B. A. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A polymeric substrate is coated with a metal oxide film to provide oxidation protection in low Earth orbital environments. The film contains about 4 volume percent polymer to provide flexibility. A coil of polymer material moves through an ion beam as it is fed between reels. The ion beam first cleans the polymer material surface and then sputters the film material from a target onto this surface.

  19. A construction of novel iron-foam-based calcium phosphate/chitosan coating biodegradable scaffold material.

    PubMed

    Wen, Zhaohui; Zhang, Liming; Chen, Chao; Liu, Yibo; Wu, Changjun; Dai, Changsong

    2013-04-01

    Slow corrosion rate and poor bioactivity restrict iron-based implants in biomedical application. In this study, we design a new iron-foam-based calcium phosphate/chitosan coating biodegradable composites offering a priority mechanical and bioactive property for bone tissue engineering through electrophoretic deposition (EPD) followed by a conversion process into a phosphate buffer solution (PBS). Tensile test results showed that the mechanical property of iron foam could be regulated through altering the construction of polyurethane foam. The priority coatings were deposited from 40% nano hydroxyapatite (nHA)/ethanol suspension mixed with 60% nHA/chitosan-acetic acid aqueous solution. In vitro immersion test showed that oxidation-iron foam as the matrix decreased the amount of iron implanted and had not influence on the bioactivity of this implant, obviously. So, this method could also be a promising method for the preparation of a new calcium phosphate/chitosan coating on foam construction. PMID:23827538

  20. Anti-friction Coating for Drilling of Green Austempered Ductile Iron (ADI) grade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meena, A.; El Mansori, M.; Ghidossi, P.; Mkaddem, A.

    2011-05-01

    In this paper the anti-friction performance of two types of coating, post-coated coating and PVD-TiAlN coating were investigated when drilling green austempered ductile iron (ADI) grade. The green ADI grade is produced by a new processing technology known as continuous casting-heat treatment process. The effect of coatings on tool wear and surface finish of the holes when drilling using coolant were reported. Results showed that the tool with post-coated coating has higher anti-friction properties as compared to PVD-TiAlN coating in terms of tool wear and surface roughness. Results also showed that there is a formation of preventive aluminum oxide layer during machining for both types of coating.

  1. Biocompatible multishell architecture for iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wotschadlo, Jana; Liebert, Tim; Clement, Joachim H; Anspach, Nils; Höppener, Stephanie; Rudolph, Tobias; Müller, Robert; Schacher, Felix H; Schubert, Ulrich S; Heinze, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The coating of super-paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) with multiple shells is demonstrated by building a layer assembled from carboxymethyldextran and poly(diallydimethylammonium chloride). Three shells are produced stepwise around aggregates of SPIONs by the formation of a polyelectrolyte complex. A growing particle size from 96 to 327 nm and a zeta potential in the range of +39 to -51 mV are measured. Microscopic techniques such as TEM, SEM, and AFM exemplify the core-shell structures. Magnetic force microscopy and vibrating sample magnetometer measurements confirm the architecture of the multishell particles. Cell culture experiments show that even nanoparticles with three shells are still taken up by cells. PMID:23161745

  2. Ferric iron reduction by sulfur- and iron-oxidizing bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Brock, T D; Gustafson, J

    1976-01-01

    Acidophilic bacteria of the genera Thiobacillus and Sulfolobus are able to reduce ferric iron when growing on elemental sulfur as an energy source. It has been previously thought that ferric iron serves as a nonbiological oxidant in the formation of acid mine drainage and in the leaching of ores, but these results suggest that bacterial catalysis may play a significant role in the reactivity of ferric iron. PMID:825043

  3. Iron biomineralization by anaerobic neutrophilic iron-oxidizing bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miot, Jennyfer; Benzerara, Karim; Morin, Guillaume; Kappler, Andreas; Bernard, Sylvain; Obst, Martin; Férard, Céline; Skouri-Panet, Fériel; Guigner, Jean-Michel; Posth, Nicole; Galvez, Matthieu; Brown, Gordon E., Jr.; Guyot, François

    2009-02-01

    Minerals formed by bio-oxidation of ferrous iron (Fe(II)) at neutral pH, their association with bacterial ultrastructures as well as their impact on the metabolism of iron-oxidizing bacteria remain poorly understood. Here, we investigated iron biomineralization by the anaerobic nitrate-dependent iron-oxidizing bacterium Acidovorax sp. strain BoFeN1 in the presence of dissolved Fe(II) using electron microscopy and Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy (STXM). All detected minerals consisted mainly of amorphous iron phosphates, but based on their morphology and localization, three types of precipitates could be discriminated: (1) mineralized filaments at distance from the cells, (2) globules of 100 ± 25 nm in diameter, at the cell surface and (3) a 40-nm thick mineralized layer within the periplasm. All of those phases were shown to be intimately associated with organic molecules. Periplasmic encrustation was accompanied by an accumulation of protein moieties. In the same way, exopolysaccharides were associated with the extracellular mineralized filaments. The evolution of cell encrustation was followed by TEM over the time course of a culture: cell encrustation proceeded progressively, with rapid precipitation in the periplasm (in a few tens of minutes), followed by the formation of surface-bound globules. Moreover, we frequently observed an asymmetric mineral thickening at the cell poles. In parallel, the evolution of iron oxidation was quantified by STXM: iron both contained in the bacteria and in the extracellular precipitates reached complete oxidation within 6 days. While a progressive oxidation of Fe in the bacteria and in the medium could be observed, spatial redox (oxido-reduction state) heterogeneities were detected at the cell poles and in the extracellular precipitates after 1 day. All these findings provide new information to further the understanding of molecular processes involved in iron biomineralization by anaerobic iron-oxidizing bacteria and

  4. The character of fracture of iron based thermal coating during fretting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalevskaya, Zh G.; Kovalevskiy, E. A.; Khimich, M. A.

    2016-04-01

    The character of destruction of thermal coatings during fretting has been investigated. An iron based plasma coating has been tested with oscillation amplitude from 30 to 200 microns. The tests were conducted in air. It has been determined that the main factor influencing the rate of the wear of the coating during fretting corrosion is the size of the coating area involved into the wear process. The coating exhibits high wear resistance when the amplitude of the oscillation is commensurate with the size of the sprayed particles. During destruction of the coating the leading role belongs to fatigue-oxidation processes. The wear of the coating acquires a catastrophic character when coating macro defects - pores and interlayer boundaries - are involved into the wear process.

  5. Tannin biosynthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera-Becerra, R.; Rius, J. L.; Zorrilla, C.

    2010-08-01

    In this work, iron oxide nanoparticles synthesized with gallic acid and tannic acid are characterized using High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM). Its size, form, and structure are compared with nanoparticles obtained previously using alfalfa biomass in order to find a simpler, consistent, and environmentally friendly method in the production of iron oxide nanoparticles.

  6. Enzymatic iron oxidation by Leptothrix discophora: identification of an iron-oxidizing protein.

    PubMed Central

    Corstjens, P L; de Vrind, J P; Westbroek, P; de Vrind-de Jong, E W

    1992-01-01

    An iron-oxidizing factor was identified in the spent culture medium of the iron- and manganese-oxidizing bacterial strain Leptothrix discophora SS-1. It appeared to be a protein, with an apparent molecular weight of approximately 150,000. Its activity could be demonstrated after fractionation of the spent medium by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. A spontaneous mutant of L. discophora SS-1 was isolated which excreted neither manganese- nor iron-oxidizing activity, whereas excretion of other proteins seemed to be unaffected. Although the excretion of both metal-oxidizing factors was probably linked, the difference in other properties suggests that manganese and iron oxidation represent two different pathways. With a dot-blot assay, it was established that different bacterial species have different metal-oxidizing capacities. Whereas L. discophora oxidized both iron and manganese, Sphaerotilus natans oxidized only iron and two Pseudomonas spp. oxidized only manganese. Images PMID:1610168

  7. Enzymatic iron oxidation by Leptothrix discophora: identification of an iron-oxidizing protein.

    PubMed

    Corstjens, P L; de Vrind, J P; Westbroek, P; de Vrind-de Jong, E W

    1992-02-01

    An iron-oxidizing factor was identified in the spent culture medium of the iron- and manganese-oxidizing bacterial strain Leptothrix discophora SS-1. It appeared to be a protein, with an apparent molecular weight of approximately 150,000. Its activity could be demonstrated after fractionation of the spent medium by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. A spontaneous mutant of L. discophora SS-1 was isolated which excreted neither manganese- nor iron-oxidizing activity, whereas excretion of other proteins seemed to be unaffected. Although the excretion of both metal-oxidizing factors was probably linked, the difference in other properties suggests that manganese and iron oxidation represent two different pathways. With a dot-blot assay, it was established that different bacterial species have different metal-oxidizing capacities. Whereas L. discophora oxidized both iron and manganese, Sphaerotilus natans oxidized only iron and two Pseudomonas spp. oxidized only manganese. PMID:1610168

  8. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as radiosensitizer via enhanced reactive oxygen species formation.

    PubMed

    Klein, Stefanie; Sommer, Anja; Distel, Luitpold V R; Neuhuber, Winfried; Kryschi, Carola

    2012-08-24

    Internalization of citrate-coated and uncoated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles by human breast cancer (MCF-7) cells was verified by transmission electron microscopy imaging. Cytotoxicity studies employing metabolic and trypan blue assays manifested their excellent biocompatibility. The production of reactive oxygen species in iron oxide nanoparticle loaded MCF-7 cells was explained to originate from both, the release of iron ions and their catalytically active surfaces. Both initiate the Fenton and Haber-Weiss reaction. Additional oxidative stress caused by X-ray irradiation of MCF-7 cells was attributed to the increase of catalytically active iron oxide nanoparticle surfaces. PMID:22842461

  9. Enhanced catalysis and enantioselective resolution of racemic naproxen methyl ester by lipase encapsulated within iron oxide nanoparticles coated with calix[8]arene valeric acid complexes.

    PubMed

    Sayin, Serkan; Akoz, Enise; Yilmaz, Mustafa

    2014-09-14

    In this study, two types of nanoparticles have been used as additives for the encapsulation of Candida rugosa lipase via the sol-gel method. In one case, the nanoparticles were covalently linked with a new synthesized calix[8]arene octa valeric acid derivative (C[8]-C4-COOH) to produce new calix[8]arene-adorned magnetite nanoparticles (NP-C[8]-C4-COOH), and then NP-C[8]-C4-COOH was used as an additive in the sol-gel encapsulation process. In the other case, iron oxide nanoparticles were directly added into the sol-gel encapsulation process in order to interact electrostatically with both C[8]-C4-COOH and Candida rugosa lipase. The catalytic activities and enantioselectivities of two novel encapsulated lipases (Enc-NP-C[8]-C4-COOH and Enc-C[8]-C4-COOH@Fe3O4) in the hydrolysis reaction of racemic naproxen methyl ester were evaluated. The results showed that the activity and enantioselectivity of the lipase were improved when the lipase was encapsulated in the presence of calixarene-based additives. Indeed, the encapsulated lipases have an excellent rate of enantioselectivity, with E = 371 and 265, respectively, as compared to the free enzyme (E = 137). The lipases encapsulated with C[8]-C4-COOH and iron oxide nanoparticles (Enc-C[8]-C4-COOH@Fe3O4) retained more than 86% of their initial activities after 5 repeated uses and 92% with NP-C[8]-C4-COOH. PMID:25012138

  10. Oxidation resistant nanocrystalline MCrAl(Y) coatings and methods of forming such coatings

    DOEpatents

    Cheruvu, Narayana S.; Wei, Ronghua

    2014-07-29

    The present disclosure relates to an oxidation resistant nanocrystalline coating and a method of forming an oxidation resistant nanocrystalline coating. An oxidation resistant coating comprising an MCrAl(Y) alloy may be deposited on a substrate, wherein M, includes iron, nickel, cobalt, or combinations thereof present greater than 50 wt % of the MCrAl(Y) alloy, chromium is present in the range of 15 wt % to 30 wt % of the MCrAl(Y) alloy, aluminum is present in the range of 6 wt % to 12 wt % of the MCrAl(Y) alloy and yttrium, is optionally present in the range of 0.1 wt % to 0.5 wt % of the MCrAl(Y) alloy. In addition, the coating may exhibit a grain size of 200 nm or less as deposited.

  11. Facile and Sustainable Synthesis of Shaped Iron Oxide Nanoparticles: Effect of Iron Precursor Salts on the Shapes of Iron Oxides

    PubMed Central

    Sayed, Farheen N.; Polshettiwar, Vivek

    2015-01-01

    A facile and sustainable protocol for synthesis of six different shaped iron oxides is developed. Notably, all the six shapes of iron oxides can be synthesised using exactly same synthetic protocol, by simply changing the precursor iron salts. Several of the synthesised shapes are not reported before. This novel protocol is relatively easy to implement and could contribute to overcome the challenge of obtaining various shaped iron oxides in economical and sustainable manner. PMID:25939969

  12. Iron oxide and gold nanoparticles in cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotman, Irena; Psakhie, Sergey G.; Lozhkomoev, Aleksandr S.; Gutmanas, Elazar Y.

    2016-08-01

    Continuous research activities in the field of nanomedicine in the past decade have, to a great extent, been focused on nanoparticle technologies for cancer therapy. Gold and iron oxide nanoparticles (NP) are two of the most studied inorganic nanomaterials due to their unique optical and magnetic properties. Both types of NPs are emerging as promising systems for anti-tumor drug delivery and for nanoparticle-mediated thermal therapy of cancer. In thermal therapy, localized heating inside tumors or in proximity of tumor cells can be induced, for example, with Au NPs by radiofrequency ablation heating or conversion of photon energy (photothermal therapy) and in iron oxide magnetic NPs by heat generation through relaxation in an alternating magnetic field (magnetic hyperthermia). Furthermore, the superparamagnetic properties of iron oxide nanoparticles have led to their use as potent MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) contrast agents. Surface modification/coating can produce NPs with tailored and desired properties, such as enhanced blood circulation time, stability, biocompatibility and water solubility. To target nanoparticles to specific tumor cells, NPs should be conjugated with targeting moieties on the surface which bind to receptors or other molecular structures on the cell surface. The article presents several approaches to enhancing the specificity of Au and iron oxide nanoparticles for tumor tissue by appropriate surface modification/functionalization, as well as the effect of these treatments on the saturation magnetization value of iron oxide NPs. The use of other nanoparticles and nanostructures in cancer treatment is also briefly reviewed.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging contrast of iron oxide nanoparticles developed for hyperthermia is dominated by iron content

    PubMed Central

    Wabler, Michele; Zhu, Wenlian; Hedayati, Mohammad; Attaluri, Anilchandra; Zhou, Haoming; Mihalic, Jana; Geyh, Alison; DeWeese, Theodore L.; Ivkov, Robert; Artemov, Dmitri

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MNPs) are used as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and hyperthermia for cancer treatment. The relationship between MRI signal intensity and cellular iron concentration for many new formulations, particularly MNPs having magnetic properties designed for heating in hyperthermia, is lacking. In this study, we examine the correlation between MRI T2 relaxation time and iron content in cancer cells loaded with various MNP formulations. Materials and methods Human prostate carcinoma DU-145 cells were loaded with starch-coated bionised nanoferrite (BNF), iron oxide (Nanomag® D-SPIO), Feridex™, and dextran-coated Johns Hopkins University (JHU) particles at a target concentration of 50 pg Fe/cell using poly-D-lysine transfection reagent. T2-weighted MRI of serial dilutions of these labelled cells was performed at 9.4 T and iron content quantification was performed using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Clonogenic assay was used to characterise cytotoxicity. Results No cytotoxicity was observed at twice the target intracellular iron concentration (~100 pg Fe/cell). ICP-MS revealed highest iron uptake efficiency with BNF and JHU particles, followed by Feridex and Nanomag-D-SPIO, respectively. Imaging data showed a linear correlation between increased intracellular iron concentration and decreased T2 times, with no apparent correlation among MNP magnetic properties. Conclusions This study demonstrates that for the range of nanoparticle concentrations internalised by cancer cells the signal intensity of T2-weighted MRI correlates closely with absolute iron concentration associated with the cells. This correlation may benefit applications for cell-based cancer imaging and therapy including nanoparticle-mediated drug delivery and hyperthermia. PMID:24773041

  14. Reflection spectra and magnetochemistry of iron oxides and natural surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wasilewski, P.

    1978-01-01

    The magnetic properties and spectral characteristics of iron oxides are distinctive. Diagnostic features in reflectance spectra (0.5 to 2.4 micron) for alpha Fe2O3, gamma Fe2O3, and FeOOH include location of Fe3(+) absorption features, intensity ratios at various wavelengths, and the curve shape between 1.2 micron and 2.4 micron. The reflection spectrum of natural rock surfaces are seldom those of the bulk rock because of weathering effects. Coatings are found to be dominated by iron oxides and clay. A simple macroscopic model of rock spectra (based on concepts of stains and coatings) is considered adequate for interpretation of LANDSAT data. The magnetic properties of materials associated with specific spectral types and systematic changes in both spectra and magnetic properties are considered.

  15. In vivo biodistribution of iron oxide nanoparticles: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tate, Jennifer A.; Petryk, Alicia A.; Giustini, Andrew J.; Hoopes, P. Jack

    2011-03-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles present a promising alternative to conventional energy deposition-based tissue therapies. The success of such nanoparticles as a therapeutic for diseases like cancer, however, depends heavily on the particles' ability to localize to tumor tissue as well as provide minimal toxicity to surrounding tissues and key organs such as those involved in the reticuloendothelial system (RES). We present here the results of a long term clearance study where mice injected intravenously with 2 mg Fe of 100 nm dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles were sacrificed at 14 and 580 days post injection. Histological analysis showed accumulation of the nanoparticles in some RES organs by the 14 day time point and clearance of the nanoparticles by the 580 day time point with no obvious toxicity to organs. An additional study reported herein employs 20 nm and 110 nm starch-coated iron oxide nanoparticles at 80 mg Fe/kg mouse in a size/biodistribution study with endpoints at 4, 24 and 72 hours. Preliminary results show nanoparticle accumulation in the liver and spleen with some elevated iron accumulation in tumoral tissues with differences between the 20 nm and the 110 nm nanoparticle depositions.

  16. Synthesis of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles coated with a DDNP-carboxyl derivative for in vitro magnetic resonance imaging of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jingting; Fa, Huanbao; Yin, Wei; Zhang, Jin; Hou, Changjun; Huo, Danqun; Zhang, Dong; Zhang, Haifeng

    2014-04-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) have been proposed for use in magnetic resonance imaging as versatile ultra-sensitive nanoprobes for Alzheimer's disease imaging. In this work, we synthetized an efficient contrast agent of Alzheimer's disease using 1,1-dicyano-2-[6-(dimethylamino)naphthalene-2-yl]propene (DDNP) carboxyl derivative to functionalize the surface of SPIONs. The DDNP-SPIONs are prepared by conjugating DDNP carboxyl derivative to oleic acid-treated SPIONs through ligand exchange. The structure, size distribution and magnetic property were identified by IR, TGA-DTA, XRD, TEM, Zetasizer Nano and VSM. TEM and Zetasizer Nano observations indicated that the DDNP-SPIONs are relatively mono-dispersed spherical distribution with an average size of 11.7nm. The DDNP-SPIONs were then further analyzed for their MRI relaxation properties using MR imaging and demonstrated high T2 relaxivity of 140.57s(-1)FemM(-1), and the vitro experiment that DDNP-SPIONs binding to β-Amyloid aggregates were then investigated by fluorophotometry, the results showed that the combination had induced the fluorescence enhancement of the DDNP-SPIONs and displayed tremendous promise for use as a contrast agent of Alzheimer's disease in MRI. PMID:24582259

  17. Multifunctional silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles: a facile four-in-one system for in situ study of neural stem cell harvesting.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yung-Kang; Lui, Cathy N P; Lin, Tsen-Hsuan; Chang, Chen; Chou, Pi-Tai; Yung, Ken K L; Tsang, S C Edman

    2014-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs), which generate the main phenotypes of the nervous system, are multipotent cells and are able to differentiate into multiple cell types via external stimuli from the environment. The extraction, modification and re-application of NSCs have thus attracted much attention and raised hopes for novel neural stem cell therapies and regenerative medicine. However, few studies have successfully identified the distribution of NSCs in a live brain and monitored the corresponding extraction processes both in vitro and in vivo. To address those difficulties, in this study multi-functional uniform nanoparticles comprising an iron oxide core and a functionalized silica shell (Fe(3)O(4)@SiO(2)(FITC)-CD133, FITC: a green emissive dye, CD133: anti-CD133 antibody) have been strategically designed and synthesized for use as probe nanocomposites that provide four-in-one functionality, i.e., magnetic agitation, dual imaging (both magnetic resonance and optical) and specific targeting. It is shown that these newly synthesized Fe(3)O(4)@SiO(2)(FITC)-CD133 particles have clearly demonstrated their versatility in various applications. (1) The magnetic core enables magnetic cell collection and T(2) magnetic resonance imaging. (2) The fluorescent FITC embedded in the silica framework enables optical imaging. (3) CD133 anchored on the outermost surface is demonstrated to be capable of targeting neural stem cells for cell collection and bimodal imaging. PMID:25355610

  18. Arsenic Adsorption Onto Iron Oxides Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aredes, S.; Klein, B.; Pawlik, M.

    2004-12-01

    The predominant form of arsenic in water is as an inorganic ion. Under different redox conditions arsenic in water is stable in the +5 and +3 oxidation states. Arsenic oxidation state governs its toxicity, chemical form and solubility in natural and disturbed environments. As (III) is found in anoxic environments such as ground water , it is toxic and the common species is the neutral form, H3AsO3. As (V) is found in aerobic conditions such as surface water, it is less toxic and the common species in water are: H2AsO4 - and HAsO4 {- 2}. The water pH determines the predominant arsenate or arsenite species, however, both forms of arsenic can be detected in natural water systems. Iron oxides minerals often form in natural waters and sediments at oxic-anoxic boundaries. Over time they undergo transformation to crystalline forms, such as goethite or hematite. Both As(V) and As(III) sorbs strongly to iron oxides, however the sorption behavior of arsenic is dependent on its oxidation state and the mineralogy of the iron oxides. Competition between arsenic and others ions, such fluoride, sulphate and phosphate also play a role. On the other hand, calcium may increase arsenic adsorption onto iron oxides. Electrokinetic studies and adsorption experiments were carried out in order to determine which conditions favour arsenic adsorption. Hematite, goethite and magnetite as iron based sorbents were used. Test were also conducted with a laterite soil rich in iron minerals. The focus of this study is to evaluate physical and chemical conditions which favour arsenic adsorption onto iron oxides minerals, the results contribute to an understanding of arsenic behaviour in natural and disturbed environments. Furthermore, results could contribute in developing an appropriate remediation technology for arsenic removal in water using iron oxides minerals.

  19. Synthesis of dual-functional targeting probes for cancer theranostics based on iron oxide nanoparticles coated by centipede-like polymer connected with pH-responsive anticancer drug.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Haochen; Li, Zhiping; Yang, Bohan; Wang, Jingyuan; Li, Yapeng

    2015-01-01

    A tumor-targeted and pH-responsive drug release system based on superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) coated by poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and dodecylamine (DDA)-modified polyitaconic acid (PIA) connecting with bortezomib (BTZ) (PIA-PEG-DDA-BTZ@IOs) has been constructed and characterized. The anticancer drug BTZ was first conjugated using dopamine as the linker via catechol borate ester bond, which is acid cleavable and used as an ideal pH-responsive drug release system. The IONPs were then coated by PIA-PEG-DDA-BTZ to form micelles with good biocompatibility. The conjugates were further designed to target liver cancer cells overexpressing vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) by the targeting molecule anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF). The magnetic resonance imaging showed that the targeting capability of IONPs-anti-VEGF conjugates to Hep G2 cells was more significant than that of non-anti-VEGF IONPs. From the above, this kind of novel dual-functional targeting probe could provide a new idea for the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. PMID:26249213

  20. Size-dependent magnetic properties of iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patsula, Vitalii; Moskvin, Maksym; Dutz, Silvio; Horák, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Uniform iron oxide nanoparticles in the size range from 10 to 24 nm and polydisperse 14 nm iron oxide particles were prepared by thermal decomposition of Fe(III) carboxylates in the presence of oleic acid and co-precipitation of Fe(II) and Fe(III) chlorides by ammonium hydroxide followed by oxidation, respectively. While the first method produced hydrophobic oleic acid coated particles, the second one formed hydrophilic, but uncoated, nanoparticles. To make the iron oxide particles water dispersible and colloidally stable, their surface was modified with poly(ethylene glycol) and sucrose, respectively. Size and size distribution of the nanoparticles was determined by transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering and X-ray diffraction. Surface of the PEG-functionalized and sucrose-modified iron oxide particles was characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and Raman spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Magnetic properties were measured by means of vibration sample magnetometry and specific absorption rate in alternating magnetic fields was determined calorimetrically. It was found, that larger ferrimagnetic particles showed higher heating performance than smaller superparamagnetic ones. In the transition range between superparamagnetism and ferrimagnetism, samples with a broader size distribution provided higher heating power than narrow size distributed particles of comparable mean size. Here presented particles showed promising properties for a possible application in magnetic hyperthermia.

  1. Synthesis, characterization, applications, and challenges of iron oxide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Attarad; Zafar, Hira; Zia, Muhammad; ul Haq, Ihsan; Phull, Abdul Rehman; Ali, Joham Sarfraz; Hussain, Altaf

    2016-01-01

    Recently, iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) have attracted much consideration due to their unique properties, such as superparamagnetism, surface-to-volume ratio, greater surface area, and easy separation methodology. Various physical, chemical, and biological methods have been adopted to synthesize magnetic NPs with suitable surface chemistry. This review summarizes the methods for the preparation of iron oxide NPs, size and morphology control, and magnetic properties with recent bioengineering, commercial, and industrial applications. Iron oxides exhibit great potential in the fields of life sciences such as biomedicine, agriculture, and environment. Nontoxic conduct and biocompatible applications of magnetic NPs can be enriched further by special surface coating with organic or inorganic molecules, including surfactants, drugs, proteins, starches, enzymes, antibodies, nucleotides, nonionic detergents, and polyelectrolytes. Magnetic NPs can also be directed to an organ, tissue, or tumor using an external magnetic field for hyperthermic treatment of patients. Keeping in mind the current interest in iron NPs, this review is designed to report recent information from synthesis to characterization, and applications of iron NPs. PMID:27578966

  2. Synthesis, characterization, applications, and challenges of iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ali, Attarad; Zafar, Hira; Zia, Muhammad; Ul Haq, Ihsan; Phull, Abdul Rehman; Ali, Joham Sarfraz; Hussain, Altaf

    2016-01-01

    Recently, iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) have attracted much consideration due to their unique properties, such as superparamagnetism, surface-to-volume ratio, greater surface area, and easy separation methodology. Various physical, chemical, and biological methods have been adopted to synthesize magnetic NPs with suitable surface chemistry. This review summarizes the methods for the preparation of iron oxide NPs, size and morphology control, and magnetic properties with recent bioengineering, commercial, and industrial applications. Iron oxides exhibit great potential in the fields of life sciences such as biomedicine, agriculture, and environment. Nontoxic conduct and biocompatible applications of magnetic NPs can be enriched further by special surface coating with organic or inorganic molecules, including surfactants, drugs, proteins, starches, enzymes, antibodies, nucleotides, nonionic detergents, and polyelectrolytes. Magnetic NPs can also be directed to an organ, tissue, or tumor using an external magnetic field for hyperthermic treatment of patients. Keeping in mind the current interest in iron NPs, this review is designed to report recent information from synthesis to characterization, and applications of iron NPs. PMID:27578966

  3. The interplay of catechol ligands with nanoparticulate iron oxides.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Alexander K L; Hutton, Georgina A; Masters, Anthony F; Maschmeyer, Thomas

    2012-03-01

    The unique properties exhibited by nanoscale materials, coupled with the multitude of chemical surface derivatisation possibilities, enable the rational design of multifunctional nanoscopic devices. Such functional devices offer exciting new opportunities in medical research and much effort is currently invested in the area of "nanomedicine", including: multimodal imaging diagnostic tools, platforms for drug delivery and vectorisation, polyvalent, multicomponent vaccines, and composite devices for "theranostics". Here we will review the surface derivatisation of nanoparticulate oxides of iron and iron@iron-oxide core-shells. They are attractive candidates for MRI-active therapeutic platforms, being potentially less toxic than lanthanide-based materials, and amenable to functionalisation with ligands. However successful grafting of groups onto the surface of iron-based nanoparticles, thus adding functionality whilst preserving their inherent properties, is one of the most difficult challenges for creating truly useful nanodevices from them. Functionalised catechol-derived ligands have enjoyed success as agents for the masking of superparamagnetic iron-oxide particles, often so as to render them biocompatible with medium to long-term colloidal stability in the complex chemical environments of biological milieux. In this perspective, the opportunities and limitations of functionalising the surfaces of iron-oxide nanoparticles, using coatings containing a catechol-derived anchor, are analysed and discussed, including recent advances using dopamine-terminated stabilising ligands. If light-driven ligand to metal charge transfer (LMCT) processes, and pH-dependent ligand desorption, leading to nanoparticle degradation under physiologically relevant conditions can be suppressed, colloidal stability of samples can be maintained and toxicity ascribed to degradation products avoided. Modulation of the redox behaviour of iron catecholate systems through the introduction of an

  4. Wear of Selected Oxide Ceramics and Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Sayir, A.; Farmer, S. C.

    2005-01-01

    The use of oxide ceramics and coatings for moving mechanical components operating in high-temperature, oxidizing environments creates a need to define the tribological performance and durability of these materials. Results of research focusing on the wear behavior and properties of Al2O3/ZrO2 (Y2O3) eutectics and coatings under dry sliding conditions are discussed. The importance of microstructure and composition on wear properties of directionally solidified oxide eutectics is illustrated. Wear data of selected oxide-, nitride-, and carbide-based ceramics and coatings are given for temperatures up to 973K in air.

  5. The Irony of Iron – Biogenic Iron Oxides as an Iron Source to the Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Emerson, David

    2016-01-01

    Primary productivity in at least a third of the sunlit open ocean is thought to be iron-limited. Primary sources of dissolved iron (dFe) to the ocean are hydrothermal venting, flux from the sediments along continental margins, and airborne dust. This article provides a general review of sources of hydrothermal and sedimentary iron to the ocean, and speculates upon the role that iron-cycling microbes play in controlling iron dynamics from these sources. Special attention is paid to iron-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) that live by oxidizing iron and producing biogenic iron oxides as waste products. The presence and ubiquity of FeOB both at hydrothermal systems and in sediments is only beginning to be appreciated. The biogenic oxides they produce have unique properties that could contribute significantly to the dynamics of dFe in the ocean. Changes in the physical and chemical characteristics of the ocean due to climate change and ocean acidification will undoubtedly impact the microbial iron cycle. A better understanding of the contemporary role of microbes in the iron cycle will help in predicting how these changes could ultimately influence marine primary productivity. PMID:26779157

  6. The Irony of Iron - Biogenic Iron Oxides as an Iron Source to the Ocean.

    PubMed

    Emerson, David

    2015-01-01

    Primary productivity in at least a third of the sunlit open ocean is thought to be iron-limited. Primary sources of dissolved iron (dFe) to the ocean are hydrothermal venting, flux from the sediments along continental margins, and airborne dust. This article provides a general review of sources of hydrothermal and sedimentary iron to the ocean, and speculates upon the role that iron-cycling microbes play in controlling iron dynamics from these sources. Special attention is paid to iron-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) that live by oxidizing iron and producing biogenic iron oxides as waste products. The presence and ubiquity of FeOB both at hydrothermal systems and in sediments is only beginning to be appreciated. The biogenic oxides they produce have unique properties that could contribute significantly to the dynamics of dFe in the ocean. Changes in the physical and chemical characteristics of the ocean due to climate change and ocean acidification will undoubtedly impact the microbial iron cycle. A better understanding of the contemporary role of microbes in the iron cycle will help in predicting how these changes could ultimately influence marine primary productivity. PMID:26779157

  7. Biomedical properties and preparation of iron oxide-dextran nanostructures by MAPLE technique

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In this work the chemical structure of dextran-iron oxide thin films was reported. The films were obtained by MAPLE technique from composite targets containing 10 wt. % dextran with 1 and 5 wt.% iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs). The IONPs were synthesized by co-precipitation method. A KrF* excimer laser source (λ = 248 nm, τFWHM≅25 ns, ν = 10 Hz) was used for the growth of the hybrid, iron oxide NPs-dextran thin films. Results Dextran coated iron oxide nanoparticles thin films were indexed into the spinel cubic lattice with a lattice parameter of 8.36 Å. The particle sized calculated was estimated at around 7.7 nm. The XPS shows that the binding energy of the Fe 2p3/2 of two thin films of dextran coated iron oxide is consistent with Fe3+ oxides. The atomic percentage of the C, O and Fe are 66.71, 32.76 and 0.53 for the films deposited from composite targets containing 1 wt.% maghemite and 64.36, 33.92 and 1.72 respectively for the films deposited from composite targets containing 5 wt.% maghemite. In the case of cells cultivated on dextran coated 5% maghemite γ-Fe2O3, the number of cells and the level of F-actin were lower compared to the other two types of thin films and control. Conclusions The dextran-iron oxide continuous thin films obtained by MAPLE technique from composite targets containing 10 wt.% dextran as well as 1 and 5 wt.% iron oxide nanoparticles synthesized by co-precipitation method presented granular surface morphology. Our data proved a good viability of Hep G2 cells grown on dextran coated maghemite thin films. Also, no changes in cells morphology were noticed under phase contrast microscopy. The data strongly suggest the potential use of iron oxide-dextran nanocomposites as a potential marker for biomedical applications. PMID:22410001

  8. Removal of Metallic Iron on Oxide Slags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shannon, George N.; Fruehan, R. J.; Sridhar, Seetharaman

    2009-10-01

    It is possible, in some cases, for ground coal particles to react with gasifier gas during combustion, allowing the ash material in the coal to form phases besides the expected slag phase. One of these phases is metallic iron, because some gasifiers are designed to operate under a reducing atmosphere ({p_{O2}} of approximately 10-4 atm). Metallic iron can become entrained in the gas stream and deposit on, and foul, downstream equipment. To improve the understanding of the reaction between different metallic iron particles and gas, which eventually oxidizes them, and the slag that the resulting oxide dissolves in, the kinetics of iron reaction on slag were predicted using gas-phase mass-transfer limitations for the reaction and were compared with diffusion in the slag; the reaction itself was observed under confocal scanning laser microscopy. The expected rates for iron droplet removal are provided based on the size and effective partial pressure of oxygen, and it is found that decarburization occurs before iron reaction, leading to an extra 30- to 100-second delay for carbon-saturated particles vs pure iron particles. A pure metallic iron particle of 0.5 mg should be removed in about 220 seconds at 1400 °C and in 160 seconds at 1600 °C.

  9. Removal of metallic iron on oxide slags

    SciTech Connect

    Shannon, G.N.; Fruehan, R.J.; Sridhar, S.

    2009-10-15

    It is possible, in some cases, for ground coal particles to react with gasifier gas during combustion, allowing the ash material in the coal to form phases besides the expected slag phase. One of these phases is metallic iron, because some gasifiers are designed to operate under a reducing atmosphere (pO{sub 2}) of approximately 10{sup -4} atm). Metallic iron can become entrained in the gas stream and deposit on, and foul, downstream equipment. To improve the understanding of the reaction between different metallic iron particles and gas, which eventually oxidizes them, and the slag that the resulting oxide dissolves in, the kinetics of iron reaction on slag were predicted using gas-phase mass-transfer limitations for the reaction and were compared with diffusion in the slag; the reaction itself was observed under confocal scanning laser microscopy. The expected rates for iron droplet removal are provided based on the size and effective partial pressure of oxygen, and it is found that decarburization occurs before iron reaction, leading to an extra 30- to 100-second delay for carbon-saturated particles vs pure iron particles. A pure metallic iron particle of 0.5 mg should be removed in about 220 seconds at 1400{sup o}C and in 160 seconds at 1600{sup o}C.

  10. Exploring Microbial Iron Oxidation in Wetland Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Muyzer, G.; Bodelier, P. L. E.; den Oudsten, F.; Laanbroek, H. J.

    2009-04-01

    Iron is one of the most abundant elements on earth and is essential for life. Because of its importance, iron cycling and its interaction with other chemical and microbial processes has been the focus of many studies. Iron-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) have been detected in a wide variety of environments. Among those is the rhizosphere of wetland plants roots which release oxygen into the soil creating suboxic conditions required by these organisms. It has been reported that in these rhizosphere microbial iron oxidation proceeds up to four orders of magnitude faster than strictly abiotic oxidation. On the roots of these wetland plants iron plaques are formed by microbial iron oxidation which are involved in the sequestering of heavy metals as well organic pollutants, which of great environmental significance.Despite their important role being catalysts of iron-cycling in wetland environments, little is known about the diversity and distribution of iron-oxidizing bacteria in various environments. This study aimed at developing a PCR-DGGE assay enabling the detection of iron oxidizers in wetland habitats. Gradient tubes were used to enrich iron-oxidizing bacteria. From these enrichments, a clone library was established based on the almost complete 16s rRNA gene using the universal bacterial primers 27f and 1492r. This clone library consisted of mainly α- and β-Proteobacteria, among which two major clusters were closely related to Gallionella spp. Specific probes and primers were developed on the basis of this 16S rRNA gene clone library. The newly designed Gallionella-specific 16S rRNA gene primer set 122f/998r was applied to community DNA obtained from three contrasting wetland environments, and the PCR products were used in denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis. A second 16S rRNA gene clone library was constructed using the PCR products from one of our sampling sites amplified with the newly developed primer set 122f/998r. The cloned 16S rRNA gene

  11. Method for depositing an oxide coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, G. E. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A metal oxide coating is plated onto a metal substrate at the cathode from an acid solution which contains an oxidizing agent. The process is particularly useful for producing solar panels. Conventional plating at the cathode avoids the presence of oxidizing agents. Coatings made in accordance with the invention are stable both at high temperatures and while under the influence of high photon flux in the visible range.

  12. Synthesis and Corrosion Study of Zirconia-Coated Carbonyl Iron Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, R.; Shafrir, S.N.; Miao, C.; Wang, M.; Lambropoulos, J.C.; Jacobs, S.D.; Yang, H.

    2010-01-07

    This paper describes the surface modification of micrometer-sized magnetic carbonyl iron particles (CI) with zirconia from zirconium(IV) butoxide using a sol–gel method. Zirconia shells with various thicknesses and different grain sizes and shapes are coated on the surface of CI particles by changing the reaction conditions, such as the amounts of zirconia sol, nitric acid, and CI particles. A silica adhesive layer made from 3-aminopropyl trimethoxysilane (APTMS) can be introduced first onto the surface of CI particles in order to adjust both the size and the shape of zirconia crystals, and thus the roughness of the coating. The microanalyses on these coated particles are studied by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and X-ray-diffraction (XRD). Accelerated acid corrosion and air oxidation tests indicate that the coating process dramatically improved oxidation and acid corrosion resistances, which are critical issues in various applications of CI magnetic particles.

  13. Composition, nucleation, and growth of iron oxide concretions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parry, W. T.

    Iron oxide concretions are formed from post depositional, paleogroundwater chemical interaction with iron minerals in porous sedimentary rocks. The concretions record a history of iron mobilization and precipitation caused by changes in pH, oxidation conditions, and activity of bacteria. Transport limited growth rates may be used to estimate the duration of fluid flow events. The Jurassic Navajo Sandstone, an important hydrocarbon reservoir and aquifer on the Colorado Plateau, USA, is an ideal stratum to study concretions because it is widely distributed, well exposed and is the host for a variety of iron oxide concretions. Many of the concretions are nearly spherical and some consist of a rind of goethite that nearly completely fills the sandstone porosity and surrounds a central sandstone core. The interior and exterior host-rock sandstones are similar in detrital minerals, but kaolinite and interstratified illite-smectite are less abundant in the interior. Lepidocrocite is present as sand-grain rims in the exterior sandstone, but not present in the interior of the concretions. Widespread sandstone bleaching resulted from dissolution of early diagenetic hematite grain coatings by chemically reducing water that gained access to the sandstone through fault conduits. The iron was transported in solution and precipitated as iron oxide concretions by oxidation and increasing pH. Iron diffusion and advection growth time models place limits on minimum duration of the diagenetic, fluid flow events that formed the concretions. Concretion rinds 2 mm thick and 25 mm in radius would take place in 2000 years from transport by diffusion and advection and in 3600 years if transport was by diffusion only. Solid concretions 10 mm in radius would grow in 3800 years by diffusion or 2800 years with diffusion and advection. Goethite (α-FeO (OH)) and lepidocrocite (γ-FeO (OH)) nucleated on K-feldspar grains, on illite coatings on sand grains, and on pore-filling illite, but not on

  14. Iron coated pottery granules for arsenic removal from drinking water.

    PubMed

    Dong, Liangjie; Zinin, Pavel V; Cowen, James P; Ming, Li Chung

    2009-09-15

    A new media, iron coated pottery granules (ICPG) has been developed for As removal from drinking water. ICPG is a solid phase media that produces a stable Fe-Si surface complex for arsenic adsorption. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to document the physical attributes (grain size, pore size and distribution, surface roughness) of the ICPG media. Several advantages of the ICPG media such as (a) its granular structure, (b) its ability to absorb As via the F(0) coating on the granules' surface; (c) the inexpensive preparation process for the media from clay material make ICPG media a highly effective media for removing arsenic at normal pH. A column filtration test demonstrated that within the stability region (flow rate lower than 15L/h, EBCT >3 min), the concentration of As in the influent was always lower than 50 microg/L. The 2-week system ability test showed that the media consistently removed arsenic from test water to below the 5 microg/L level. The average removal efficiencies for total arsenic, As(III), and As(V) for a 2-week test period were 98%, 97%, and 99%, respectively, at an average flow rate of 4.1L/h and normal pH. Measurements of the Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms at normal pH show that the Freundlich constants of the ICPG are very close to those of ferric hydroxide, nanoscale zero-valent iron and much higher than those of nanocrystalline titanium dioxide. The parameter 1/n is smaller than 0.55 indicating a favorable adsorption process [K. Hristovski, A. Baumgardner, P. Westerhoff, Selecting metal oxide nanomaterials for arsenic removal in fixed bed columns: from nanopowders to aggregated nanoparticle media, J. Hazard. Mater. 147 (2007) 265-274]. The maximum adsorption capacity (q(e)) of the ICPG from the Langmuir isotherm is very close to that of nanoscale zero-valent indicating that zero-valent iron is involved in the process of the As removal from the water. The results of the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP

  15. Synthesis of carbon-coated iron nanoparticles by detonation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Guilei; Li, Xiaojie; Wang, Qiquan; Yan, Honghao

    2010-05-15

    Carbon-coated iron nanoparticles were synthesized by detonating a mixture of ferrocene, naphthalene and hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) in an explosion vessel under low vacuum conditions (8.1 kPa). The RDX functioned as an energy source for the decomposition of ferrocene and naphthalene. The carbon-coated iron nanoparticles were formed as soot-like deposits on the inner surface of the reactor, which were characterized by XRD, TEM, HRTEM, Raman spectroscopy and vibrating sample magnetometer. And a portion of the detonation soot was treated with hydrochloric acid. The product was carbon-coated nanoparticles in perfect core-shell structures with graphitic shells and bcc-Fe cores. The detonation technique offers an energy-saving route to the synthesis of carbon-coated nanomaterials.

  16. Preparation and chemical stability of iron-nitride-coated iron microparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xin; Liu, Shixiong

    2007-01-01

    Iron-nitride-coated iron microparticles were prepared by nitridation of the surface of iron microparticles with ammonia gas at a temperature of 510 °C. The phases, composition, morphology, magnetic properties, and chemical stability of the particles were studied. The phases were α-Fe, ɛ-Fe 3N, and γ-Fe 4N. The composition varied from the core to the surface, with 99.8 wt% Fe in the core, and 93.8 wt% Fe and 6 wt% N in the iron-nitride coating. The thickness of the iron-nitride coating was about 0.28 μm. The chemical stability of the microparticles was greatly improved, especially the corrosion resistance in corrosive aqueous media. The saturation magnetization and the coercive force were 17.1×10 3 and 68 kA/m, respectively. It can be concluded that iron-nitride-coated iron microparticles will be very useful in many fields, such as water-based magnetorheological fluids and polishing fluids.

  17. Metal ion binding to iron oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponthieu, M.; Juillot, F.; Hiemstra, T.; van Riemsdijk, W. H.; Benedetti, M. F.

    2006-06-01

    The biogeochemistry of trace elements (TE) is largely dependent upon their interaction with heterogeneous ligands including metal oxides and hydrous oxides of iron. The modeling of TE interactions with iron oxides has been pursued using a variety of chemical models. The objective of this work is to show that it is possible to model the adsorption of protons and TE on a crystallized oxide (i.e., goethite) and on an amorphous oxide (HFO) in an identical way. Here, we use the CD-MUSIC approach in combination with valuable and reliable surface spectroscopy information about the nature of surface complexes of the TE. The other objective of this work is to obtain generic parameters to describe the binding of the following elements (Cd, Co, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn) onto both iron oxides for the CD-MUSIC approach. The results show that a consistent description of proton and metal ion binding is possible for goethite and HFO with the same set of model parameters. In general a good prediction of almost all the collected experimental data sets corresponding to metal ion binding to HFO is obtained. Moreover, dominant surface species are in agreement with the recently published surface complexes derived from X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) data. Until more detailed information on the structure of the two iron oxides is available, the present option seems a reasonable approximation and can be used to describe complex geochemical systems. To improve our understanding and modeling of multi-component systems we need more data obtained at much lower metal ion to iron oxide ratios in order to be able to account eventually for sites that are not always characterized in spectroscopic studies.

  18. Iron oxides in human spleen.

    PubMed

    Kopáni, Martin; Miglierini, Marcel; Lančok, Adriana; Dekan, Július; Čaplovicová, Mária; Jakubovský, Ján; Boča, Roman; Mrazova, Hedviga

    2015-10-01

    Iron is an essential element for fundamental cell functions and a catalyst for chemical reactions. Three samples extracted from the human spleen were investigated by scanning (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Mössbauer spectrometry (MS), and SQUID magnetometry. The sample with diagnosis of hemosiderosis (H) differs from that referring to hereditary spherocytosis and the reference sample. SEM reveals iron-rich micrometer-sized aggregate of various structures-tiny fibrils in hereditary spherocytosis sample and no fibrils in hemochromatosis. Hematite and magnetite particles from 2 to 6 μm in TEM with diffraction in all samples were shown. The SQUID magnetometry shows different amount of diamagnetic, paramagnetic and ferrimagnetic structures in the tissues. The MS results indicate contribution of ferromagnetically split sextets for all investigated samples. Their occurrence indicates that at least part of the sample is magnetically ordered below the critical temperature. The iron accumulation process is different in hereditary spherocytosis and hemosiderosis. This fact may be the reason of different iron crystallization. PMID:26292972

  19. Iron aluminide alloy coatings and joints, and methods of forming

    DOEpatents

    Wright, Richard N.; Wright, Julie K.; Moore, Glenn A.

    1994-01-01

    A method of joining two bodies together, at least one of the bodies being predominantly composed of metal, the two bodies each having a respective joint surface for joining with the joint surface of the other body, the two bodies having a respective melting point, includes the following steps: a) providing aluminum metal and iron metal on at least one of the joint surfaces of the two bodies; b) after providing the aluminum metal and iron metal on the one joint surface, positioning the joint surfaces of the two bodies in juxtaposition against one another with the aluminum and iron positioned therebetween; c) heating the aluminum and iron on the juxtaposed bodies to a temperature from greater than or equal to 600.degree. C. to less than the melting point of the lower melting point body; d) applying pressure on the juxtaposed surfaces; and e) maintaining the pressure and the temperature for a time period effective to form the aluminum and iron into an iron aluminide alloy joint which bonds the juxtaposed surfaces and correspondingly the two bodies together. The method can also effectively be used to coat a body with an iron aluminide coating.

  20. Iron aluminide alloy coatings and joints, and methods of forming

    DOEpatents

    Wright, R.N.; Wright, J.K.; Moore, G.A.

    1994-09-27

    Disclosed is a method of joining two bodies together, at least one of the bodies being predominantly composed of metal, the two bodies each having a respective joint surface for joining with the joint surface of the other body, the two bodies having a respective melting point, includes the following steps: (a) providing aluminum metal and iron metal on at least one of the joint surfaces of the two bodies; (b) after providing the aluminum metal and iron metal on the one joint surface, positioning the joint surfaces of the two bodies in juxtaposition against one another with the aluminum and iron positioned therebetween; (c) heating the aluminum and iron on the juxtaposed bodies to a temperature from greater than or equal to 600 C to less than the melting point of the lower melting point body; (d) applying pressure on the juxtaposed surfaces; and (e) maintaining the pressure and the temperature for a time period effective to form the aluminum and iron into an iron aluminide alloy joint which bonds the juxtaposed surfaces and correspondingly the two bodies together. The method can also effectively be used to coat a body with an iron aluminide coating.

  1. Oxidation/vaporization of silicide coated columbium base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohl, F. J.; Stearns, C. A.

    1971-01-01

    Mass spectrometric and target collection experiments were made at 1600 K to elucidate the mode of oxidative vaporization of two columbium alloys, fused-slurry-coated with a complex silicide former (Si-20Cr-Fe). At oxygen pressures up to 0.0005 torr the major vapor component detected by mass spectrometry for oxidized samples was gaseous silicon monoxide. Analysis of condensates collected at oxygen pressures of 0.1, 1.0 and 10 torr revealed that chromium-, silicon-, iron- and tungsten- containing species were the major products of vaporization. Equilibrium thermochemical diagrams were constructed for the metal-oxygen system corresponding to each constituent metal in both the coating and base alloy. The major vaporizing species are expected to be the gaseous oxides of chromium, silicon, iron and tungsten. Plots of vapor phase composition and maximum vaporization rate versus oxygen pressure were calculated for each coating constituent. The major contribution to weight loss by vaporization at oxygen pressures above 1 torr was shown to be the chromium-containing species.

  2. Catalytic iron oxide for lime regeneration in carbonaceous fuel combustion

    DOEpatents

    Shen, Ming-Shing; Yang, Ralph T.

    1980-01-01

    Lime utilization for sulfurous oxides absorption in fluidized combustion of carbonaceous fuels is improved by impregnation of porous lime particulates with iron oxide. The impregnation is achieved by spraying an aqueous solution of mixed iron sulfate and sulfite on the limestone before transfer to the fluidized bed combustor, whereby the iron compounds react with the limestone substrate to form iron oxide at the limestone surface. It is found that iron oxide present in the spent limestone acts as a catalyst to regenerate the spent limestone in a reducing environment. With only small quantities of iron oxide the calcium can be recycled at a significantly increased rate.

  3. Defluoridation by Bacteriogenic Iron Oxides: Sorption Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, K.; Ferris, F.

    2009-05-01

    At concentrations above 1 mg/L, fluoride in drinking water can lead to dental and skeletal fluorosis, a disease that causes mottling of the teeth, calcification of ligaments, crippling bone deformities and many other physiological disorders that can, ultimately, lead to death. Conservative estimates are that fluorosis afflicts tens of millions of people worldwide. As there is no treatment for fluorosis, prevention is the only means of controlling the disease. While numerous defluoridation techniques have been explored, no single method has been found to be both effective and inexpensive enough to implement widely. Our research began in India, with a large-scale geochemical study of the groundwater in a fluoride-contaminated region of Orissa. Having developed a better understanding of the geochemical relationships that exist between fluoride and other parameters present in an affected area, as well as the complex relationships that arise among those parameters that can impact the presence of fluoride, we began investigating certain remediation scenarios involving iron oxides. A common approach to remediation involves the partitioning of fluoride from groundwater by sorption onto a variety of materials, one of the most effective of which is iron oxide whose surface area acts as a scavenger for fluoride. In the presence of iron oxidizing bacteria, the oxidation rate of iron has been shown to be ˜6 times greater than in their absence; fluoride should, therefore, be removed from an aqueous environment by bacteriogenic iron oxides (BIOS) much more quickly than by abiotic iron oxides. Most recently, sorption studies have been conducted using both BIOS and synthetic hydrous ferric oxides in order to compare the behavior between biotic and abiotic sorbents. These studies have provided sorption isotherms that allow comparison of fluoride removed by sorption to BIOS versus synthetic iron oxides. Sorption affinity constants have also been determined, which allow for the

  4. The Iron-Catalyzed Oxidation of Hydrazine by Nitric Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Karraker, D.G.

    2001-07-17

    To assess the importance of iron to hydrazine stability, the study of hydrazine oxidation by nitric acid has been extended to investigate the iron-catalyzed oxidation. This report describes those results.

  5. D-mannose-modified iron oxide nanoparticles for stem cell labeling.

    PubMed

    Horak, Daniel; Babic, Michal; Jendelová, Pavla; Herynek, Vít; Trchová, Miroslava; Pientka, Zbynek; Pollert, Emil; Hájek, Milan; Syková, Eva

    2007-01-01

    New surface-modified iron oxide nanoparticles were developed by precipitation of Fe(II) and Fe(III) salts with ammonium hydroxide according to two methods. In the first method, precipitation was done in the presence of D-mannose solution (in situ coating); the second method involved oxidation of precipitated magnetite with sodium hypochlorite followed by addition of D-mannose solution (postsynthesis coating). Selected nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), elemental analysis, dynamic light scattering, infrared (IR), X-ray powder analysis, and ultrasonic spectrometry. While the first preparation method produced very fine nanoparticles ca. 2 nm in diameter, the second one yielded ca. 6 nm particles. Addition of D-mannose after synthesis did not affect the iron oxide particle size. UV-vis spectroscopy suggested that D-mannose suppresses the nonspecific sorption of serum proteins from DMEM culture medium on magnetic nanoparticles. Rat bone marrow stromal cells (rMSCs) were labeled with uncoated and d-mannose-modified iron oxide nanoparticles and with Endorem (Guerbet, France; control). Optical and transmission electron microscopy confirmed the presence of D-mannose-modified iron oxide nanoparticles inside the cells. D-mannose-modified nanoparticles crossed the cell membranes and were internalized well by the cells. Relaxivity measurements of labeled cells in gelatin revealed very high relaxivities only for postsynthesis D-mannose-coated iron oxide nanoparticles. PMID:17370996

  6. 21 CFR 73.1200 - Synthetic iron oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Synthetic iron oxide. 73.1200 Section 73.1200 Food... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1200 Synthetic iron oxide. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive synthetic iron oxide consists of any one or any combination of synthetically...

  7. 21 CFR 73.1200 - Synthetic iron oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Synthetic iron oxide. 73.1200 Section 73.1200 Food... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1200 Synthetic iron oxide. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive synthetic iron oxide consists of any one or any combination of synthetically...

  8. 21 CFR 73.200 - Synthetic iron oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Synthetic iron oxide. 73.200 Section 73.200 Food... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.200 Synthetic iron oxide. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive synthetic iron oxide consists of any one or any combination of synthetically...

  9. 21 CFR 73.200 - Synthetic iron oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Synthetic iron oxide. 73.200 Section 73.200 Food... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.200 Synthetic iron oxide. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive synthetic iron oxide consists of any one or any combination of synthetically...

  10. 21 CFR 73.200 - Synthetic iron oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Synthetic iron oxide. 73.200 Section 73.200 Food... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.200 Synthetic iron oxide. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive synthetic iron oxide consists of any one or any combination of synthetically...

  11. 21 CFR 73.200 - Synthetic iron oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Synthetic iron oxide. 73.200 Section 73.200 Food... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.200 Synthetic iron oxide. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive synthetic iron oxide consists of any one or any combination of synthetically...

  12. 21 CFR 73.1200 - Synthetic iron oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Synthetic iron oxide. 73.1200 Section 73.1200 Food... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1200 Synthetic iron oxide. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive synthetic iron oxide consists of any one or any combination of synthetically...

  13. 21 CFR 73.200 - Synthetic iron oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Synthetic iron oxide. 73.200 Section 73.200 Food... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.200 Synthetic iron oxide. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive synthetic iron oxide consists of any one or any combination of synthetically...

  14. 21 CFR 73.1200 - Synthetic iron oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Synthetic iron oxide. 73.1200 Section 73.1200 Food... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1200 Synthetic iron oxide. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive synthetic iron oxide consists of any one or any combination of synthetically...

  15. 21 CFR 73.1200 - Synthetic iron oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Synthetic iron oxide. 73.1200 Section 73.1200 Food... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1200 Synthetic iron oxide. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive synthetic iron oxide consists of any one or any combination of synthetically...

  16. Acid monolayer functionalized iron oxide nanoparticle catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikenberry, Myles

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle functionalization is an area of intensely active research, with applications across disciplines such as biomedical science and heterogeneous catalysis. This work demonstrates the functionalization of iron oxide nanoparticles with a quasi-monolayer of 11-sulfoundecanoic acid, 10-phosphono-1-decanesulfonic acid, and 11-aminoundecanoic acid. The carboxylic and phosphonic moieties form bonds to the iron oxide particle core, while the sulfonic acid groups face outward where they are available for catalysis. The particles were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), potentiometric titration, diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS), inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS), and dynamic light scattering (DLS). The sulfonic acid functionalized particles were used to catalyze the hydrolysis of sucrose at 80° and starch at 130°, showing a higher activity per acid site than the traditional solid acid catalyst Amberlyst-15, and comparing well against results reported in the literature for sulfonic acid functionalized mesoporous silicas. In sucrose catalysis reactions, the phosphonic-sulfonic nanoparticles (PSNPs) were seen to be incompletely recovered by an external magnetic field, while the carboxylic-sulfonic nanoparticles (CSNPs) showed a trend of increasing activity over the first four recycle runs. Between the two sulfonic ligands, the phosphonates produced a more tightly packed monolayer, which corresponded to a higher sulfonic acid loading, lower agglomeration, lower recoverability through application of an external magnetic field, and higher activity per acid site for the hydrolysis of starch. Functionalizations with 11-aminoundecanoic acid resulted in some amine groups binding to the surfaces of iron oxide nanoparticles. This amine binding is commonly ignored in iron oxide

  17. Investigating the cytotoxicity of iron oxide nanoparticles in in vivo and in vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Ghasempour, Sarieh; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Ghasempour, Roghayeh; Alipour, Mohsen

    2015-10-01

    In recent years, iron oxide nanorods find a lot of applications including drug delivery, cell separation, hyperthermia and magnetic resonance imaging. In this study the cytotoxicity of iron oxide nanorods was evaluated based on mouse fibroblast cell behavior and wistar rat's liver and kidney function. At first for modification, nanorods were added to Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM) which contained a lot of sources of vitamins, amino acids, proteins in Fetal Bovine Serum (FBS). The MTT assay was employed for evaluating the toxic effects of 200 and 400 μg/mL modified and non-modified iron oxide nanorods on L929 mouse fibroblast cells in a 24h period. Changes in cell granularity and size as well as cell cycle were investigated using flow cytometry. Moreover liver and kidney function test and serum iron level measurement were performed 24h after the injection of modified iron oxide nanorods via the tail peripheral vein of wistar rats. Results indicated that greater concentration of modified iron oxide nanorods had no significant effect on cell viability while greater concentration of non-modified iron oxide nanorods significantly decreased cell viability. Modified iron oxide nanorods did not have significant effects on cell cycle. The results of liver and kidney function tests did not differ significantly while a significant increase in serum iron level was observed. After H&E staining of slices, there were no changes on morphology of rat's kidney and liver cells. This study suggests that short-time use of 200 and 400 μg/mL iron oxide nanorods are probably safe. Further studies are needed for investigation of toxic effects of different concentrations, coatings, and exposure time periods of iron oxide nanorods. PMID:26279467

  18. Iron oxide from a seasonally anoxic lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tipping, E.; Woof, C.; Cooke, D.

    1981-09-01

    The ferric oxide formed by oxidation of Fe(II) in Esthwaite Water, U.K., during the lake's seasonal thermal stratification and deep-water anoxia consists of amorphous particles which are approximately spherical or ellipsoidal, with diameters in the range 0.05-0.5 μm. Concentrations in the lake are 1011-1012 particles per litre, corresponding to 3 mg l-1 Fe. Unlike iron oxides of similar chemical composition formed by oxidative mechanisms in soil-borne waters, the particles do not appear to be composed of small primary particles. This is possibly because in the lake they form slowly, at low supersaturation. The particles contain 30-40% by weight Fe. The carbon content is uncertain because of contamination but is in the range 4-18%. Humic carbon contributes at least 4-7% of the total weight. Other major elements present are P, N, Mn, Si, S. Ca and Mg, comprising between them up to 8% of the total weight. The particles are negatively charged probably because of adsorbed humic substances, and also phosphate and silicate. Their electrophoretic mobility-pH dependence is similar to those of synthetic iron oxides added to samples of surface Esthwaite Water. The calculated zeta potential is - 27 mV, which is sufficiently high to make flocculation slow under lake conditions. The low flocculation rate partially accounts for the formation of a well-defined peak of particulate iron in the water column of the lake.

  19. Refractory Oxide Coatings on Sic Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Kang N.; Jacobson, Nathan S.; Miller, Robert A.

    1994-01-01

    Silicon carbide with a refractory oxide coating is potentially a very attractive ceramic system. It offers the desirable mechanical and physical properties of SiC and the environmental durability of a refractory oxide. The development of a thermal shock resistant plasma-sprayed mullite coating on SiC is discussed. The durability of the mullite/SiC in oxidizing, reducing, and molten salt environments is discussed. In general, this system exhibits better behavior than uncoated SiC. Areas for further developments are discussed.

  20. COATED ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Harman, C.G.; O'Bannon, L.S.

    1958-07-15

    A coating is described for iron group metals and alloys, that is particularly suitable for use with nickel containing alloys. The coating is glassy in nature and consists of a mixture containing an alkali metal oxide, strontium oxide, and silicon oxide. When the glass coated nickel base metal is"fired'' at less than the melting point of the coating, it appears the nlckel diffuses into the vitreous coating, thus providing a closely adherent and protective cladding.

  1. Graphene coatings: An efficient protection from oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topsakal, Mehmet; Sahin, Hasan; Ciraci, Salim

    2012-02-01

    We demonstrate that graphene coating can provide an efficient protection from oxidation by posing a high energy barrier to the path of oxygen atom, which could have penetrated from the top of graphene to the reactive surface underneath. Graphene bilayer, which blocks the diffusion of oxygen with a relatively higher energy barrier provides even better protection from oxidation. While an oxygen molecule is weakly bound to bare graphene surface and hence becomes rather inactive, it can easily dissociates into two oxygen atoms adsorbed to low coordinated carbon atoms at the edges of a vacancy. For these oxygen atoms the oxidation barrier is reduced and hence the protection from oxidation provided by graphene coatings is weakened. Our predictions obtained from the state of the art first-principles calculations of electronic structure, phonon density of states and reaction path will unravel how a graphene can be used as a corrosion resistant coating and guide further studies aiming at developing more efficient nanocoating materials.

  2. Mn oxide coated catalytic membranes for a hybrid ozonation-membrane filtration: comparison of Ti, Fe and Mn oxide coated membranes for water quality.

    PubMed

    Byun, S; Davies, S H; Alpatova, A L; Corneal, L M; Baumann, M J; Tarabara, V V; Masten, S J

    2011-01-01

    In this study the performance of catalytic membranes in a hybrid ozonation-ceramic membrane filtration system was investigated. The catalytic membranes were produced by coating commercial ceramic ultrafiltration membranes with manganese or iron oxide nanoparticles using a layer-by-layer self-assembly technique. A commercial membrane with a titanium oxide filtration layer was also evaluated. The performance of the coated and uncoated membranes was evaluated using water from a borderline eutrophic lake. The permeate flux and removal of the organic matter was found to depend on the type of the metal oxide present on the membrane surface. The performance of the manganese oxide coated membrane was superior to that of the other membranes tested, showing the fastest recovery in permeate flux when ozone was applied and the greatest reduction in the total organic carbon (TOC) in the permeate. The removal of trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs) precursors using the membrane coated 20 times with manganese oxide nanoparticles was significantly better than that for the membranes coated with 30 or 40 times with manganese oxide nanoparticles or 40 times with iron oxide nanoparticles. PMID:20822791

  3. Intratumoral iron oxide nanoparticle hyperthermia and radiation cancer treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoopes, P. J.; Strawbridge, R. R.; Gibson, U. J.; Zeng, Q.; Pierce, Z. E.; Savellano, M.; Tate, J. A.; Ogden, J. A.; Baker, I.; Ivkov, R.; Foreman, A. R.

    2007-02-01

    The potential synergism and benefit of combined hyperthermia and radiation for cancer treatment is well established, but has yet to be optimized clinically. Specifically, the delivery of heat via external arrays /applicators or interstitial antennas has not demonstrated the spatial precision or specificity necessary to achieve appropriate a highly positive therapeutic ratio. Recently, antibody directed and possibly even non-antibody directed iron oxide nanoparticle hyperthermia has shown significant promise as a tumor treatment modality. Our studies are designed to determine the effects (safety and efficacy) of iron oxide nanoparticle hyperthermia and external beam radiation in a murine breast cancer model. Methods: MTG-B murine breast cancer cells (1 x 106) were implanted subcutaneous in 7 week-old female C3H/HeJ mice and grown to a treatment size of 150 mm3 +/- 50 mm3. Tumors were then injected locally with iron oxide nanoparticles and heated via an alternating magnetic field (AMF) generator operated at approximately 160 kHz and 400 - 550 Oe. Tumor growth was monitored daily using standard 3-D caliper measurement technique and formula. specific Mouse tumors were heated using a cooled, 36 mm diameter square copper tube induction coil which provided optimal heating in a 1 cm wide region in the center of the coil. Double dextran coated 80 nm iron oxide nanoparticles (Triton Biosystems) were used in all studies. Intra-tumor, peri-tumor and rectal (core body) temperatures were continually measured throughout the treatment period. Results: Preliminary in vivo nanoparticle-AMF hyperthermia (167 KHz and 400 or 550 Oe) studies demonstrated dose responsive cytotoxicity which enhanced the effects of external beam radiation. AMF associated eddy currents resulted in nonspecific temperature increases in exposed tissues which did not contain nanoparticles, however these effects were minor and not injurious to the mice. These studies also suggest that iron oxide nanoparticle

  4. Genotoxicity of Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles in Granulosa Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pöttler, Marina; Staicu, Andreas; Zaloga, Jan; Unterweger, Harald; Weigel, Bianca; Schreiber, Eveline; Hofmann, Simone; Wiest, Irmi; Jeschke, Udo; Alexiou, Christoph; Janko, Christina

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles that are aimed at targeting cancer cells, but sparing healthy tissue provide an attractive platform of implementation for hyperthermia or as carriers of chemotherapeutics. According to the literature, diverse effects of nanoparticles relating to mammalian reproductive tissue are described. To address the impact of nanoparticles on cyto- and genotoxicity concerning the reproductive system, we examined the effect of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) on granulosa cells, which are very important for ovarian function and female fertility. Human granulosa cells (HLG-5) were treated with SPIONs, either coated with lauric acid (SEONLA) only, or additionally with a protein corona of bovine serum albumin (BSA; SEONLA-BSA), or with dextran (SEONDEX). Both micronuclei testing and the detection of γH2A.X revealed no genotoxic effects of SEONLA-BSA, SEONDEX or SEONLA. Thus, it was demonstrated that different coatings of SPIONs improve biocompatibility, especially in terms of genotoxicity towards cells of the reproductive system. PMID:26540051

  5. Formulations for iron oxides dissolution

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, Earl P.; Chiarizia, Renato

    1992-01-01

    A mixture of a di- or polyphosphonic acid and a reductant wherein each is present in a sufficient amount to provide a synergistic effect with respect to the dissolution of metal oxides and optionally containing corrosion inhibitors and pH adjusting agents.

  6. Cellular level loading and heating of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kalambur, Venkat S; Longmire, Ellen K; Bischof, John C

    2007-11-20

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) hold promise for a variety of biomedical applications due to their properties of visualization using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), heating with radio frequency (rf), and movement in an external magnetic field. In this study, the cellular loading (uptake) mechanism of dextran- and surfactant-coated iron oxide NPs by malignant prostate tumor cells (LNCaP-Pro5) has been studied, and the feasibility of traditional rf treatment and a new laser heating method was evaluated. The kinetics of cell loading was quantified using magnetophoresis and a colorimetric assay. The results showed that loading of surfactant-coated iron oxide NPs with LNCaP-Pro5 was saturable with time (at 24 h) and extracellular concentration (11 pg Fe/cell at 0.5 mg Fe/mL), indicating that the particles are taken up by an "adsorptive endocytosis" pathway. Dextran-coated NPs, however, were taken up less efficiently (1 pg Fe/cell at 0.5 mg Fe/mL). Loading did not saturate with concentration suggesting uptake by fluid-phase endocytosis. Magnetophoresis suggests that NP-loaded cells can be held using external magnetic fields in microcirculatory flow velocities in vivo or in an appropriately designed extracorporeal circuit. Loaded cells were heated using traditional rf (260A, 357 kHz) and a new laser method (532 nm, 7 ns pulse duration, 0.03 J/pulse, 20 pulse/s). Iron oxide in water was found to absorb sufficiently strongly at 532 nm such that heating of individual NPs and thus loaded cells (1 pg Fe/cell) was effective (<10% cell survival) after 30 s of laser exposure. Radio frequency treatment required higher loading (>10 pg Fe/cell) and longer duration (30 min) when compared to laser to accomplish cell destruction (50% viability at 10 pg Fe/cell). Scaling calculations show that the pulsed laser method can lead to single-cell (loaded with NPs) treatments (200 degrees C temperature change at the surface of an individual NP) unlike traditional rf heating

  7. Failure analysis of blistered organic coatings on gray iron castings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tianen, Matthew N.

    This study investigates the blistering failure of a two part coating consisting of talc-filled polyester resin and polyurethane primer on large gray iron castings. Surface metallography was performed and failed coating was characterized by scanning electron microscopy. Corrosion products were found inside of coating blisters. The proposed blistering mechanism is osmosis as a result of soluble species produced by the corrosion. It was believed that excessively thin primer layers resulted in a poor barrier to permeation of water, leading to blisters, and that a basecoat containing a corrosion inhibitor like zinc phosphate would reduce blistering. These hypotheses were tested with designed experiments using environmental testing in humidity and submersion environments. Thicker primer layers resulted in significant reductions in blistering and prolonged the time required before blister formation. A basecoat containing zinc phosphate was not found to be effective at reducing blistering in this coating system.

  8. Molecular Level Coating of Metal Oxide Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDaniel, Patricia R. (Inventor); St.Clair, Terry L. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Polymer encapsulated metal oxide particles are prepared by combining a polyamide acid in a polar osmotic solvent with a metal alkoxide solution. The polymer was imidized and the metal oxide formed simultaneously in a refluxing organic solvent. The resulting polymer-metal oxide is an intimately mixed commingled blend, possessing, synergistic properties of both the polymer and preceramic metal oxide. The encapsulated metal oxide particles have multiple uses including, being useful in the production of skin lubricating creams, weather resistant paints, as a filler for paper. making ultraviolet light stable filled printing ink, being extruded into fibers or ribbons, and coatings for fibers used in the production of composite structural panels.

  9. Molecular Level Coating for Metal Oxide Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDaniel, Patricia R. (Inventor); Saint Clair, Terry L. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Polymer encapsulated metal oxide particles are prepared by combining a polyamide acid in a polar aprotic solvent with a metal alkoxide solution. The polymer was imidized and the metal oxide formed simultaneously in a refluxing organic solvent. The resulting polymer-metal oxide is an intimately mixed commingled blend, possessing synergistic properties of both the polymer and preceramic metal oxide. The encapsulated metal oxide particles have multiple uses including, being useful in the production of skin lubricating creams, weather resistant paints, as a filler for paper, making ultraviolet light stable filled printing ink, being extruded into fibers or ribbons, and coatings for fibers used in the production of composite structural panels.

  10. Mixed Hemi/Ad-Micelle Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate-Coated Magnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for the Efficient Removal and Trace Determination of Rhodamine-B and Rhodamine-6G.

    PubMed

    Ranjbari, Elias; Hadjmohammadi, Mohammad Reza; Kiekens, Filip; De Wael, Karolien

    2015-08-01

    Mixed hemi/ad-micelle sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-coated magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MHAMS-MIONPs) were used as an efficient adsorbent for both removal and preconcentration of two important carcinogenic xanthine dyes named rhodamine-B (RB) and rhodamine-6G (RG). To gain insight in the configuration of SDS molecules on the surface of MIONPs, zeta potential measurements were performed in different [SDS]/[MIONP] ratios. Zeta potential data indicated that mixed hemi/ad-micelle MHAM was formed in [SDS]/[MIONP] ratios over the range of 1.1 to 7.3. Parameters affecting the adsorption of dyes were optimized as removal efficiency by one variable at-a-time and response surface methodology; the obtained removal efficiencies were ∼100%. Adsorption kinetic and equilibrium studies, under the optimum condition (pH = 2; amount of MIONPs = 87.15 mg; [SDS]/[MIONP] ratio = 2.9), showed that adsorption of both dyes are based on the pseudo-second-order and the Langmuir isotherm models, respectively. The maximum adsorption capacities for RB and RG were 385 and 323 mg g(-1), respectively. MHAMS-MIONPs were also applied for extraction of RB and RG. Under optimum conditions (pH = 2; amount of damped MHAMS-MIONPs = 90 mg; eluent solvent volume = 2.6 mL of 3% acetic acid in acetonitrile), extraction recoveries for 0.5 mg L(-1) of RB and RG were 98% and 99%, with preconcentration factors of 327 and 330, respectively. Limit of detection obtained for rhodamine dyes were <0.7 ng mL(-1). Finally, MHAMS-MIONPs were successfully applied for both removal and trace determination of RB and RG in environmental and wastewater samples. PMID:26154872

  11. Thermal and magnetic properties of chitosan-iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Soares, Paula I P; Machado, Diana; Laia, César; Pereira, Laura C J; Coutinho, Joana T; Ferreira, Isabel M M; Novo, Carlos M M; Borges, João Paulo

    2016-09-20

    Chitosan is a biopolymer widely used for biomedical applications such as drug delivery systems, wound healing, and tissue engineering. Chitosan can be used as coating for other types of materials such as iron oxide nanoparticles, improving its biocompatibility while extending its range of applications. In this work iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe3O4 NPs) produced by chemical precipitation and thermal decomposition and coated with chitosan with different molecular weights were studied. Basic characterization on bare and chitosan-Fe3O4 NPs was performed demonstrating that chitosan does not affect the crystallinity, chemical composition, and superparamagnetic properties of the Fe3O4 NPs, and also the incorporation of Fe3O4 NPs into chitosan nanoparticles increases the later hydrodynamic diameter without compromising its physical and chemical properties. The nano-composite was tested for magnetic hyperthermia by applying an alternating current magnetic field to the samples demonstrating that the heating ability of the Fe3O4 NPs was not significantly affected by chitosan. PMID:27261762

  12. Carbon and oxide coatings on continuous ceramic fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, R.S.; Cinibulk, M.K.; Petry, M.D.; Keller, K.A.; Welch, J.R.

    1995-10-01

    Oxide-carbon multilayer coatings were continuously applied to various fibers of nominal SiC composition. A liquid-phase coating system that allows application of the coatings in a controlled atmosphere at relatively rapid rates was employed. Sugar-ammonium hydroxide solutions were used for carbon coatings, and aqueous sols were used for the oxides. Carbon was also deposited simultaneously with alumina by chemical vapor deposition of a hydrocarbon in the coating furnace. The coatings were extensively characterized by optical microscopy and TEM. Problems with embrittlement by oxide coatings and poor adherence of oxide coatings on carbon, and some possible solutions to these problems, are discussed.

  13. Enhanced electrochemical performance of template-free carbon-coated iron(II, III) oxide hollow nanofibers as anode material for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Mi Eun; Pham-Cong, De; Kim, Ji Yoon; Choi, Hun Seok; Kim, Jae Hyun; Kim, Jong Pil; Kim, Jinwoo; Jeong, Se Young; Cho, Chae Ryong

    2015-06-01

    Carbon-coated Fe3O4 hollow nanofibers (Fe3O4/C hNFs) as a lithium ion battery anode material are prepared through electrospinning, annealing, and hydrothermal processing. At a high current density of 1000 mAg-1, the template-free Fe3O4/C hNFs exhibit high 1st- and 150th-cycle specific capacities of ∼963 and 978 mAhg-1, respectively. Moreover, Fe3O4/C hNFs have excellent and stable rate capability, compared to that of the Fe3O4 hNFs, and a capacity of 704 mAhg-1 at a current density of 2000 mAg-1. Owing to the carbon layer, the Li-ion diffusion coefficient of the Fe3O4/C hNFs, 8.10 × 10-14 cm2 s-1, is 60 times higher than that (1.33 × 10-15 cm2 s-1) of the Fe3O4 hNFs. These results indicate that Fe3O4/C hNFs may have important implications for developing high performance anodes for next-generation lithium ion batteries.

  14. Scandium oxide antireflection coatings for superluminescent LEDs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladany, I.; Zanzucchi, P. J.; Andrews, J. T.; Kane, J.; Depiano, E.

    1986-01-01

    For an employment of laser diodes as superluminescent LEDs (SLDs) or amplifiers, the facets of the diodes must be coated with antireflection films. In the work reported, scandium oxide was evaporated from an e-beam source onto Supersil II fused silica substrates. The obtained samples were used for measurements of absorption and reflectivity. Results of index measurements on e-beam evaporated films are presented. It is shown that excellent coatings with reflectivities of 0.00025 can be obtained using these films. Attention is given to the refractive indices for scandium oxide films as a function of wavelength, the power output vs current for laser before coating and after coating with Sc2O3.

  15. Superparamagnetic iron oxide polyacrylic acid coated γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles do not affect kidney function but cause acute effect on the cardiovascular function in healthy mice

    SciTech Connect

    Iversen, Nina K.; Frische, Sebastian; Thomsen, Karen; Laustsen, Christoffer; Pedersen, Michael; Hansen, Pernille B.L.; Bie, Peter; Fresnais, Jérome; Berret, Jean-Francois; Baatrup, Erik; Wang, Tobias

    2013-01-15

    This study describes the distribution of intravenously injected polyacrylic acid (PAA) coated γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} NPs (10 mg kg{sup −1}) at the organ, cellular and subcellular levels in healthy BALB/cJ mice and in parallel addresses the effects of NP injection on kidney function, blood pressure and vascular contractility. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed accumulation of NPs in the liver within 1 h after intravenous infusion, accommodated by intracellular uptake in endothelial and Kupffer cells with subsequent intracellular uptake in renal cells, particularly the cytoplasm of the proximal tubule, in podocytes and mesangial cells. The renofunctional effects of NPs were evaluated by arterial acid–base status and measurements of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) after instrumentation with chronically indwelling catheters. Arterial pH was 7.46 ± 0.02 and 7.41 ± 0.02 in mice 0.5 h after injections of saline or NP, and did not change over the next 12 h. In addition, the injections of NP did not affect arterial PCO{sub 2} or [HCO{sub 3}{sup −}] either. Twenty-four and 96 h after NP injections, the GFR averaged 0.35 ± 0.04 and 0.35 ± 0.01 ml min{sup −1} g{sup −1}, respectively, values which were statistically comparable with controls (0.29 ± 0.02 and 0.33 ± 0.1 ml{sup –1} min{sup –1} 25 g{sup –1}). Mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) decreased 12–24 h after NP injections (111.1 ± 11.5 vs 123.0 ± 6.1 min{sup −1}) associated with a decreased contractility of small mesenteric arteries revealed by myography to characterize endothelial function. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that accumulation of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles does not affect kidney function in healthy mice but temporarily decreases blood pressure. -- Highlights: ► PAA coated γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles were injected intravenously into healthy mice. ► We examine the distribution and physiological effects of

  16. The responses of immune cells to iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yaolin; Sherwood, Jennifer A; Lackey, Kimberly H; Qin, Ying; Bao, Yuping

    2016-04-01

    Immune cells play an important role in recognizing and removing foreign objects, such as nanoparticles. Among various parameters, surface coatings of nanoparticles are the first contact with biological system, which critically affect nanoparticle interactions. Here, surface coating effects on nanoparticle cellular uptake, toxicity and ability to trigger immune response were evaluated on a human monocyte cell line using iron oxide nanoparticles. The cells were treated with nanoparticles of three types of coatings (negatively charged polyacrylic acid, positively charged polyethylenimine and neutral polyethylene glycol). The cells were treated at various nanoparticle concentrations (5, 10, 20, 30, 50 μg ml(-1) or 2, 4, 8, 12, 20 μg cm(-2)) with 6 h incubation or treated at a nanoparticle concentration of 50 μg ml(-1) (20 μg cm(-2)) at different incubation times (6, 12, 24, 48 or 72 h). Cell viability over 80% was observed for all nanoparticle treatment experiments, regardless of surface coatings, nanoparticle concentrations and incubation times. The much lower cell viability for cells treated with free ligands (e.g. ~10% for polyethylenimine) suggested that the surface coatings were tightly attached to the nanoparticle surfaces. The immune responses of cells to nanoparticles were evaluated by quantifying the expression of toll-like receptor 2 and tumor necrosis factor-α. The expression of tumor necrosis factor-α and toll-like receptor 2 were not significant in any case of the surface coatings, nanoparticle concentrations and incubation times. These results provide useful information to select nanoparticle surface coatings for biological and biomedical applications. PMID:26817529

  17. In situ treatment of arsenic contaminated groundwater by aquifer iron coating: Experimental study.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xianjun; Wang, Yanxin; Pi, Kunfu; Liu, Chongxuan; Li, Junxia; Liu, Yaqing; Wang, Zhiqiang; Duan, Mengyu

    2015-09-15

    In situ arsenic removal from groundwater by an aquifer iron coating method has great potential to be a cost effective and simple groundwater remediation technology, especially in rural and remote areas where groundwater is used as the main water source for drinking. The in situ arsenic removal technology was first optimized by simulating arsenic removal in various quartz sand columns under anoxic conditions. The effectiveness was then evaluated in an actual high-arsenic groundwater environment. The arsenic removal mechanism by the coated iron oxide/hydroxide was investigated under different conditions using scanning electron microscopy (SEM)/X-ray absorption spectroscopy, electron probe microanalysis, and Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy. Aquifer iron coating method was developed via a 4-step alternating injection of oxidant, iron salt and oxygen-free water. A continuous injection of 5.0 mmol/L FeSO4 and 2.5 mmol/L NaClO for 96 h can form a uniform goethite coating on the surface of quartz sand without causing clogging. At a flow rate of 7.2 mL/min of the injection reagents, arsenic (as Na2HAsO4) and tracer fluorescein sodium to pass through the iron-coated quartz sand column were approximately at 126 and 7 column pore volumes, respectively. The retardation factor of arsenic was 23.0, and the adsorption capacity was 0.11 mol As per mol Fe. In situ arsenic removal from groundwater in an aquifer was achieved by simultaneous injections of As(V) and Fe(II) reagents. Arsenic fixation resulted from a process of adsorption/co-precipitation with fine goethite particles by way of bidentate binuclear complexes. Therefore, the study results indicate that the high arsenic removal efficiency of the in situ aquifer iron coating technology likely resulted from the expanded specific surface area of the small goethite particles, which enhanced arsenic sorption capability and/or from co-precipitation of arsenic on the surface of goethite particles. PMID:25956146

  18. IRON OXIDE NANOPARTICLE-INDUCED OXIDATIVE STRESS AND INFLAMMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    1. Nanoparticle Physicochemical Characterizations
    2. We first focused on creating NP systems that could be used to test our hypotheses and assessing their stability in aqueous media. The iron oxide NP systems were not stable in cell culture medium o...

    3. Preparation of Ni-B Coating on Carbonyl Iron and Its Microwave Absorption Properties in the X Band

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Li, Rong; Zhou, Wan-Cheng; Qing, Yu-Chang

      2014-09-01

      Ni-B coated carbonyl iron particles (CI@Ni-B) are prepared by the electroless plating technique. The structure, morphology, and antioxidant properties of the CI@Ni-B particles are analyzed. The results demonstrate that the CI particles have been coated with intact spherical-shell Ni-B coating, indicating the core-shell structure of CI@Ni-B particles, and the Ni-B coating can prevent the further oxidation of the CI particles. Compared with the raw CI particles/paraffin coatings with the same coating thickness of 2.0 mm and particles content of 70%, the CI@Ni-B particles/paraffin coatings possess higher microwave absorption (the RL exceeding -10 dB is obtained in the whole X band (8.2-12.4 GHz) with minimal RL of -35.0 dB at 9.2 GHz).

    4. Iron oxide nanoparticles as drug delivery agents in MIA PaCa-2 pancreatic cells

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Perry, Christopher; Randriamahefa, Alexandrine; Lokko, Carl; Evans, Whitney; Watkins, Julian; Carrell, Holly; King, Natalie; Patel, Darayas

      2007-02-01

      Oleic acid (OA)-Pluronic-coated iron oxide nanoparticles were synthesized and characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). FT-IR confirmed the bonding of oleic acid and Pluronic (surfactant) to the nanoparticles. AFM measurements on these nanoparticles indicated a root mean square (RMS) roughness, a measure of nanoparticle size of (50 +/- 20) nm. The efficiency of these functionalized nanoparticles was investigated by loading with 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) in aqueous solution. AFM measurements were used to characterize modified iron oxide nanoparticles and pancreatic MIA PaCa-2 cells, including size distribution, stability and cellular uptake. Nanoparticles were added to MIA PaCa-2 cells and assayed for their cytotoxic effects after 24 and 48 hours. The outcome of this study demonstrated the effectiveness of oleic acid (OA)-Pluronic-coated iron oxide nanoparticles as a non-toxic drug delivery agent for pancreatic cancer.

  1. Method for preparing hydrous iron oxide gels and spherules

    DOEpatents

    Collins, Jack L.; Lauf, Robert J.; Anderson, Kimberly K.

    2003-07-29

    The present invention is directed to methods for preparing hydrous iron oxide spherules, hydrous iron oxide gels such as gel slabs, films, capillary and electrophoresis gels, iron monohydrogen phosphate spherules, hydrous iron oxide spherules having suspendable particles homogeneously embedded within to form composite sorbents and catalysts, iron monohydrogen phosphate spherules having suspendable particles of at least one different sorbent homogeneously embedded within to form a composite sorbent, iron oxide spherules having suspendable particles homogeneously embedded within to form a composite of hydrous iron oxide fiber materials, iron oxide fiber materials, hydrous iron oxide fiber materials having suspendable particles homogeneously embedded within to form a composite, iron oxide fiber materials having suspendable particles homogeneously embedded within to form a composite, dielectric spherules of barium, strontium, and lead ferrites and mixtures thereof, and composite catalytic spherules of barium or strontium ferrite embedded with oxides of Mg, Zn, Pb, Ce and mixtures thereof. These variations of hydrous iron oxide spherules and gel forms prepared by the gel-sphere, internal gelation process offer more useful forms of inorganic ion exchangers, catalysts, getters, dielectrics, and ceramics.

  2. Health effects of selected nanoparticles in vivo: liver function and hepatotoxicity following intravenous injection of titanium dioxide and Na-oleate-coated iron oxide nanoparticles in rodents.

    PubMed

    Volkovova, Katarina; Handy, Richard D; Staruchova, Marta; Tulinska, Jana; Kebis, Anton; Pribojova, Jana; Ulicna, Olga; Kucharská, Jarmila; Dusinska, Maria

    2015-05-01

    The study determined the effect of intravenous administration of acutely toxic or sub-lethal doses of Na-oleate-coated Fe3O4 (OC-Fe3O4) nanoparticles (NPs) on liver structure and function in Wistar rats, compared to titanium dioxide (TiO2) NPs and saline-injected controls. The acute study, using a modified OECD 425 progressive dosing procedure, found LD50 values of 59.22 and 36.42 mg/kg for TiO2 and OC-Fe3O4 NPs, respectively. In the sub-lethal study, rats were either injected with saline (negative controls), a sub-lethal reference (0.592 mg/kgTiO2 NPs, equal to 1% of LD50 on a body weight basis) or OC-Fe3O4 NPs in doses equivalent to 0.1, 1 or 10% of the LD50, respectively (corresponding to 0.0364, 0.364 and 3.64 mg Fe3O4/kg body weight). Animals were sampled 24 h, 1, 2 and 4 weeks post-injection for adverse effects. Mitochondrial respiration was significantly increased 2 weeks after injection of 10% OC-Fe3O4 NPs compared to controls, but the effect was transient. Cholesterol and triacylglycerol concentrations in the liver tissue did not increase in any treatment. There were some disturbances to antioxidant enzymes after OC-Fe3O4 NPs treatment in the livers of animals 1 week post-exposure; with the most sensitive changes occurring in glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) activities. Lipidosis and mild necrosis with changes in sinusoid space were also observed in histological sections of the liver. Overall, these data suggest that the liver likely retains functional integrity with acute and sub-lethal doses of OC-Fe3O4 NPs, albeit with some stimulation of redox defences and evidence of some tissue injury. PMID:23763576

  3. Phagocytic cell responses to silica-coated dithiocarbamate-functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles and mercury co-exposures in Anguilla anguilla L.

    PubMed

    Costa, Leonor; Mohmood, Iram; Trindade, Tito; Anjum, Naser A; Duarte, Armando C; Pereira, Eduarda

    2016-06-01

    Immune system responses in fish are considered as suitable and sensitive biomarkers for monitoring aquatic pollution. However, a clear knowledge gap persists in the literture on the immunotoxic potential of engineered nanoparticles toward aquatic organisms such as fish. Employing major enzymatic- (glutathione reductase, GR; glutathione peroxidase, GPX; glutathione sulfo-transferase, GST; catalase, CAT) and thiol- (non-protein thiols, NP-SH; total glutathione, TGSH)-based defense biomarkers, this study assessed the response of phagocytes isolated from peritoneum (P-phagocytes), gill (G-phagocytes), head kidney (HK-phagocytes), and spleen (S-phagocytes) of European eel (Anguilla anguilla L.) to silica-coated magnetite particles (Fe3O4@SiO2/SiDTC, hereafter called IONP; size range: 82 ± 21 to 100 ± 30 nm; 2.5 mg L(-1)) alone and IONP and mercury (Hg; 50 μg L(-1)) concomitant exposures. Responses of previous biomarkers were studied in P-phagocytes, G-phagocytes, HK-phagocytes, and S-phagocytes collected during 0, 2, 4, 8, 16, 24, 48, and 72 h of exposures. Contingent to hour of exposure to IONP, Hg, and IONP + Hg GST, GPX, CAT, NP-SH, and TGSH exhibited their differential responses in all the phagocytic cells considered. In particular, under IONP exposure, the potential occurrence of the GSH-independent antioxidant defense was indicated by the observed herein inhibition in the enzymatic- and thiol-based defense in A. anguilla phagocytes. In contrast, the response of P-, G-, HK-, and S-phagocytes to the increasing Hg exposure period reflected an increased detoxification activity. Notably, the occurrence of an antagonism between IONP and Hg was depicted during late hours (72 h) under IONP + Hg concomitant exposure, where elevations in the defense biomarkers were depicted. Overall, the P-, G-, HK-, and S-phagocytic cells exhibited a differential induction in the studied enzymes and thiols to counteract impacts of IONP, Hg, and IONP + Hg concomitant

  4. Cleaved iron oxide nanoparticles as T2 contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Sung Lan; Chae, Min Kyung; Jang, Eun Ju; Lee, Chulhyun

    2013-03-25

    Iron oxide nanoparticles as contrast agents are reported to effectively improve magnetic resonance imaging of tissues and cells. In this work, cleaved iron oxide nanoparticles (CIONPs) were generated from hydrophobic FeO nanoparticles (HIONPs) by coating their surfaces with PEG-phospholipids, oxidizing them under water, and slowly removing the residual FeO phase in phthalate buffer. The synthesized CIONPs showed good r2 values of up to 258 s(-1)  mM(-1). Thus, the CIONPs can be employed as vectors for drug delivery due to their unique structure with an empty inner space, which enables their use in a wide range of applications. PMID:23345158

  5. High Temperature Oxidation Performance of Aluminide Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Pint, Bruce A; Zhang, Ying; Haynes, James A; Wright, Ian G

    2004-01-01

    Aluminide coatings are of interest for many high temperature applications because of the possibility of improving the oxidation resistance of structural alloys by forming a protective external alumina scale. Steam and exhaust gas environments are of particular interest because alumina is less susceptible to the accelerated attack due to hydroxide formation observed for chromia- and silica-forming alloys and ceramics. For water vapor testing, one ferritic (Fe-9Cr-1Mo) and one austenitic alloy (304L) have been selected as substrate materials and CVD coatings have been used in order to have a well-controlled, high purity coating. It is anticipated that similar aluminide coatings could be made by a higher-volume, commercial process such as pack cementation. Previous work on this program has examined as-deposited coatings made by high and low Al activity CVD processes and the short-term performance of these coatings. The current work is focusing on the long term behavior in both diffusion tests16 and oxidation tests of the thicker, high Al activity coatings. For long-term coating durability, one area of concern has been the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) mismatch between coating and substrate. This difference could cause cracking or deformation that could reduce coating life. Corrosion testing using thermal cycling is of particular interest because of this potential problem and results are presented where a short exposure cycle (1h) severely degraded aluminide coatings on both types of substrates. To further study the potential role of aluminide coatings in fossil energy applications, several high creep strength Ni-base alloys were coated by CVD for testing in a high pressure (20atm) steam-CO{sub 2} environment for the ZEST (zero-emission steam turbine) program. Such alloys would be needed as structural and turbine materials in this concept. For Ni-base alloys, CVD produces a {approx}50{mu}m {beta}-NiAl outer layer with an underlying interdiffusion zone

  6. Methyltrimethoxysilane (MTMS)-based silica-iron oxide superhydrophobic nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Nadargi, Digambar; Gurav, Jyoti; Marioni, Miguel A; Romer, Sara; Matam, Santhosh; Koebel, Matthias M

    2015-12-01

    We report a facile synthesis of superhydrophobic silica-iron oxide nanocomposites via a co-precursor sol-gel process. The choice of the silica precursor (Methyltrimethoxysilane, MTMS) in combination with iron nitrate altered the pore structure dramatically. The influence of iron oxide doping on the structural properties of pristine MTMS aerogel is discussed. PMID:26277744

  7. Antibacterial Efficacy of Iron-Oxide Nanoparticles against Biofilms on Different Biomaterial Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Thukkaram, Monica; Sitaram, Soundarya; Kannaiyan, Sathish kumar; Subbiahdoss, Guruprakash

    2014-01-01

    Biofilm growth on the implant surface is the number one cause of the failure of the implants. Biofilms on implant surfaces are hard to eliminate by antibiotics due to the protection offered by the exopolymeric substances that embed the organisms in a matrix, impenetrable for most antibiotics and immune cells. Application of metals in nanoscale is considered to resolve biofilm formation. Here we studied the effect of iron-oxide nanoparticles over biofilm formation on different biomaterial surfaces and pluronic coated surfaces. Bacterial adhesion for 30 min showed significant reduction in bacterial adhesion on pluronic coated surfaces compared to other surfaces. Subsequently, bacteria were allowed to grow for 24 h in the presence of different concentrations of iron-oxide nanoparticles. A significant reduction in biofilm growth was observed in the presence of the highest concentration of iron-oxide nanoparticles on pluronic coated surfaces compared to other surfaces. Therefore, combination of polymer brush coating and iron-oxide nanoparticles could show a significant reduction in biofilm formation. PMID:25332720

  8. Antifouling properties of zinc oxide nanorod coatings.

    PubMed

    Al-Fori, Marwan; Dobretsov, Sergey; Myint, Myo Tay Zar; Dutta, Joydeep

    2014-01-01

    In laboratory experiments, the antifouling (AF) properties of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorod coatings were investigated using the marine bacterium Acinetobacter sp. AZ4C, larvae of the bryozoan Bugula neritina and the microalga Tetraselmis sp. ZnO nanorod coatings were fabricated on microscope glass substrata by a simple hydrothermal technique using two different molar concentrations (5 and 10 mM) of zinc precursors. These coatings were tested for 5 h under artificial sunlight (1060 W m(-2) or 530 W m(-2)) and in the dark (no irradiation). In the presence of light, both the ZnO nanorod coatings significantly reduced the density of Acinetobacter sp. AZ4C and Tetraselmis sp. in comparison to the control (microscope glass substratum without a ZnO coating). High mortality and low settlement of B. neritina larvae was observed on ZnO nanorod coatings subjected to light irradiation. In darkness, neither mortality nor enhanced settlement of larvae was observed. Larvae of B. neritina were not affected by Zn(2+) ions. The AF effect of the ZnO nanorod coatings was thus attributed to the reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by photocatalysis. It was concluded that ZnO nanorod coatings effectively prevented marine micro and macrofouling in static conditions. PMID:25115521

  9. Magnetic Properties of Polyvinyl Alcohol and Doxorubicine Loaded Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for Anticancer Drug Delivery Applications

    PubMed Central

    Nadeem, Muhammad; Ahmad, Munir; Akhtar, Muhammad Saeed; Shaari, Amiruddin; Riaz, Saira; Naseem, Shahzad; Masood, Misbah; Saeed, M. A.

    2016-01-01

    The current study emphasizes the synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) and impact of hydrophilic polymer polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) coating concentration as well as anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) loading on saturation magnetization for target drug delivery applications. Iron oxide nanoparticles particles were synthesized by a reformed version of the co-precipitation method. The coating of polyvinyl alcohol along with doxorubicin loading was carried out by the physical immobilization method. X-ray diffraction confirmed the magnetite (Fe3O4) structure of particles that remained unchanged before and after polyvinyl alcohol coating and drug loading. Microstructure and morphological analysis was carried out by transmission electron microscopy revealing the formation of nanoparticles with an average size of 10 nm with slight variation after coating and drug loading. Transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive, and Fourier transform infrared spectra further confirmed the conjugation of polymer and doxorubicin with iron oxide nanoparticles. The room temperature superparamagnetic behavior of polymer-coated and drug-loaded magnetite nanoparticles were studied by vibrating sample magnetometer. The variation in saturation magnetization after coating evaluated that a sufficient amount of polyvinyl alcohol would be 3 wt. % regarding the externally controlled movement of IONPs in blood under the influence of applied magnetic field for in-vivo target drug delivery. PMID:27348436

  10. Microanalysis of iron oxidation state in iron oxides using X Ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, S. R.; Delaney, J.; Bajt, S.; Rivers, M. L.; Smith, J. V.

    1993-01-01

    An exploratory application of x ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analysis using the synchrotron x ray microprobe was undertaken to obtain Fe XANES spectra on individual sub-millimeter grains in conventional polished sections. The experiments concentrated on determinations of Fe valence in a suite of iron oxide minerals for which independent estimates of the iron speciation could be made by electron microprobe analysis and x ray diffraction.

  11. Polishing characteristics of optical glass using PMMA-coated carbonyl-iron-based magnetorheological fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. W.; Hong, K. P.; Cho, M. W.; Kwon, S. H.; Choi, H. J.

    2015-06-01

    Soft magnetic carbonyl iron (CI) particles for magnetorheological (MR) polishing encounter corrosion problems as a result of their oxidation, leading to unpredictable polishing results. To overcome this issue, CI particles have been coated with either polymer or inorganic materials for improved MR polishing. In this study, CI particles were coated with poly(methyl methacrylate) to achieve improved MR polishing and anti-corrosion protection. In addition to an analysis of their rheological properties, a series of MR polishing experiments were performed to investigate the material removal rate and surface roughness for BK7 optical glass by changing experimental parameters, such as the wheel rotating speed and magnetic field intensity. A very fine surface roughness (Ra = 0.86 nm for PMMA coated CI/Ra = 0.92 nm for pristine CI) was obtained at a wheel speed of 1256 mm s-1 and a magnetic field intensity of 15.92 kA m-1.

  12. Oxidative precipitation of groundwater-derived ferrous iron in the subterranean estuary of a coastal bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charette, Matthew A.; Sholkovitz, Edward R.

    2002-05-01

    Sediment cores from the intertidal zone of Waquoit Bay (Cape Cod, Massachusetts) yielded iron oxide-coated sands in the subterranean estuary, which underlies the head of the bay. The oxides were dark red, yellow and orange colors and are formed by the oxidation of ferrous iron-rich groundwater near the groundwater-seawater interface. Within these iron oxide-rich sediments, the concentration of the combined amorphous and crystalline forms of iron oxides ranged between 2500 and 4100 ppm of Fe. These concentrations were 4-6 times greater than the surface sands, and 10-15 times more Fe rich than sands collected from an off-site location. The precipitation of iron oxides in subterranean estuaries could act as a geochemical barrier by retaining and accumulating certain dissolved chemical species carried to the coast by groundwater. Indeed, phosphorus concentrations in the iron oxide-rich sands of Waquoit Bay were 5-7 times greater than the overlying surface sands.

  13. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as radiosensitizer via enhanced reactive oxygen species formation

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Stefanie; Sommer, Anja; Distel, Luitpold V.R.; Neuhuber, Winfried; Kryschi, Carola

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ultrasmall citrate-coated SPIONs with {gamma}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} structure were prepared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SPIONs uptaken by MCF-7 cells increase the ROS production for about 240%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The SPION induced ROS production is due to released iron ions and catalytically active surfaces. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Released iron ions and SPION surfaces initiate the Fenton and Haber-Weiss reaction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer X-ray irradiation of internalized SPIONs leads to an increase of catalytically active surfaces. -- Abstract: Internalization of citrate-coated and uncoated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles by human breast cancer (MCF-7) cells was verified by transmission electron microscopy imaging. Cytotoxicity studies employing metabolic and trypan blue assays manifested their excellent biocompatibility. The production of reactive oxygen species in iron oxide nanoparticle loaded MCF-7 cells was explained to originate from both, the release of iron ions and their catalytically active surfaces. Both initiate the Fenton and Haber-Weiss reaction. Additional oxidative stress caused by X-ray irradiation of MCF-7 cells was attributed to the increase of catalytically active iron oxide nanoparticle surfaces.

  14. In situ treatment of arsenic contaminated groundwater by aquifer iron coating: Experimental Study

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Xianjun; Wang, Yanxin; Pi, Kunfu; Liu, Chongxuan; Li, Junxia; Liu, Yaqing; Wang, Zhiqiang; Duan, Mengyu

    2015-09-15

    In situ arsenic removal from groundwater by an iron coating method has great potential to be a cost effective and simple groundwater remediation technique, especially in rural and remote areas where groundwater is used as the main source of drinking water. The in situ arsenic removal technique was first optimized by simulating arsenic removal in various quartz sand columns under anoxic conditions., Its effectiveness was then evaluated in an actual high-arsenic groundwater environment. The mechanism of arsenic removal by the iron coating was investigated under different conditions using scanning electron microscopy (SEM)/X-ray absorption spectroscopy, an electron microprobe, and Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy. A 4-step alternative cycle aquifer iron coating method was developed. A continuous injection of 5 mmol/L FeSO4 and 2.5 mmol/L NaClO for 96 hours can create a uniform coating of crystalline goethite on the surface of quartz sand in the columns without causing clogging. At a flow rate of 0.45 cm/min of the injection reagents (vi), the time for arsenic (as Na2HAsO4) to pass through the iron-coated quartz sand column was approximately 35 hours, which was much longer than that for tracer fluorescein sodium (approximately 2 hours). The retardation factor of arsenic was 23, and its adsorption capacity was 0.11 mol As per mol Fe, leading to an excellent arsenic removal. In situ arsenic removal from groundwater in an aquifer was achieved by simultaneous injections of As (V) and Fe (II) reagents. When the arsenic content in the groundwater was 233 μg/L, the aqueous phase arsenic was completely removed with an arsenic adsorption of 0.05 mol As per mol Fe. Arsenic fixation resulted from a process of adsorption/co-precipitation, in which arsenic and iron likely formed the arsenic-bearing iron mineral phases with poor crystallinity by way of bidentate binuclear complexes. Thus, the high arsenic removal efficiency of the technique likely resulted from the

  15. Pilot demonstration of cerium oxide coated anodes

    SciTech Connect

    Gregg, J.S.; Frederick, M.S.; Shingler, M.J.; Alcorn, T.R.

    1992-10-01

    Cu cermet anodes were tested for 213 to 614 hours with an in-situ deposited CEROX coating in a pilot cell operated by Reynolds Manufacturing Technology Laboratory. At high bath ratio ([approximately]1.5) and low current density (0.5 A/cm[sup 2]), a [ge]1 mm thick dense CEROX coating was deposited on the anodes. At lower bath ratios and higher current density, the CEROX coating was thinner and less dense, but no change in corrosion rate was noted. Regions of low current density on the anodes and sides adjacent to the carbon anode sometimes had thin or absent CEROX coatings. Problems with cracking and oxidation of the cermet substrates led to higher corrosion rates in a pilot cell than would be anticipated from lab scale results.

  16. Planktonic marine iron oxidizers drive iron mineralization under low-oxygen conditions.

    PubMed

    Field, E K; Kato, S; Findlay, A J; MacDonald, D J; Chiu, B K; Luther, G W; Chan, C S

    2016-09-01

    Observations of modern microbes have led to several hypotheses on how microbes precipitated the extensive iron formations in the geologic record, but we have yet to resolve the exact microbial contributions. An initial hypothesis was that cyanobacteria produced oxygen which oxidized iron abiotically; however, in modern environments such as microbial mats, where Fe(II) and O2 coexist, we commonly find microaerophilic chemolithotrophic iron-oxidizing bacteria producing Fe(III) oxyhydroxides. This suggests that such iron oxidizers could have inhabited niches in ancient coastal oceans where Fe(II) and O2 coexisted, and therefore contributed to banded iron formations (BIFs) and other ferruginous deposits. However, there is currently little evidence for planktonic marine iron oxidizers in modern analogs. Here, we demonstrate successful cultivation of planktonic microaerophilic iron-oxidizing Zetaproteobacteria from the Chesapeake Bay during seasonal stratification. Iron oxidizers were associated with low oxygen concentrations and active iron redox cycling in the oxic-anoxic transition zone (<3 μm O2 , <0.2 μm H2 S). While cyanobacteria were also detected in this transition zone, oxygen concentrations were too low to support significant rates of abiotic iron oxidation. Cyanobacteria may be providing oxygen for microaerophilic iron oxidation through a symbiotic relationship; at high Fe(II) levels, cyanobacteria would gain protection against Fe(II) toxicity. A Zetaproteobacteria isolate from this site oxidized iron at rates sufficient to account for deposition of geologic iron formations. In sum, our results suggest that once oxygenic photosynthesis evolved, microaerophilic chemolithotrophic iron oxidizers were likely important drivers of iron mineralization in ancient oceans. PMID:27384464

  17. Laser reflection from oxide-coated aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, M. D.

    1982-01-01

    The theory of reflection from an oxide-coated metal is combined with experimentally measured parameters of aluminum to produce useful amplitude and phase shift information applicable to the concentration and direction of laser light. Amplitude and phase are plotted vs angle of incidence for several important laser wavelengths in the near UV, visible, and IR spectral regions.

  18. Manganese oxide supported on gold/iron as a water-oxidizing catalyst in artificial photosynthetic systems.

    PubMed

    Najafpour, Mohammad Mahdi; Hosseini, Seyedeh Maedeh; Zand, Zahra

    2016-05-31

    Herein, we reported that KMnO4 with iron nanoparticles coated with gold layers was a promising catalyst for water oxidation. The compound was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic absorption spectroscopy and electrochemistry. The new compound was a conductive, recyclable, highly dispersible, magnetically separable, environmentally friendly, and nano-sized catalyst for water oxidation via cerium(iv) ammonium nitrate or Ru(bpy)3(3+) and electrochemical water oxidation. The turnover frequency of Mn oxide/gold/iron for water oxidation via cerium(iv) ammonium nitrate is 0.4 mmol O2 per mol Mn per second, which shows that this catalyst is among the best Mn-based catalysts for water oxidation. We also showed a strategy for placing this catalyst on the surface of an electrode without adding any other compounds. PMID:27172430

  19. Inhibition of Sulfide Mineral Oxidation by Surface Coating Agents: Batch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, J.; Ji, M. K.; Yun, H. S.; Park, Y. T.; Gee, E. D.; Lee, W. R.; Jeon, B.-H.

    2012-04-01

    Mining activities and mineral industries have impacted on rapid oxidation of sulfide minerals such as pyrite (FeS2) which leads to Acid Mine Drainage (AMD) formation. Some of the abandoned mines discharge polluted water without proper environmental remediation treatments, largely because of financial constraints in treating AMD. Magnitude of the problem is considerable, especially in countries with a long history of mining. As metal sulfides become oxidized during mining activities, the aqueous environment becomes acid and rich in many metals, including iron, lead, mercury, arsenic and many others. The toxic heavy metals are responsible for the environmental deterioration of stream, groundwater and soils. Several strategies to remediate AMD contaminated sites have been proposed. Among the source inhibition and prevention technologies, microencapsulation (coating) has been considered as a promising technology. The encapsulation is based on inhibition of O2 diffusion by surface coating agent and is expected to control the oxidation of pyrite for a long time. Potential of several surface coating agents for preventing oxidation of metal sulfide minerals from both Young-Dong coal mine and Il-Gwang gold mine were examined by conducting batch experiments and field tests. Powdered pyrite as a standard sulfide mineral and rock samples from two mine outcrops were mixed with six coating agents (KH2PO4, MgO and KMnO4 as chemical agents, and apatite, cement and manganite as mineral agents) and incubated with oxidizing agents (H2O2 or NaClO). Batch experiments with Young-Dong coal mine samples showed least SO42- production in presence of KMnO4 (16% sulfate production compared to no surface coating agents) or cement (4%) within 8 days. In the case of Il-Gwang mine samples, least SO42- production was observed in presence of KH2PO4 (8%) or cement (2%) within 8 days. Field-scale pilot tests at Il-Gwang site also showed that addition of KH2PO4 decreased sulfate production from 200 to

  20. Nitric oxide and plant iron homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Buet, Agustina; Simontacchi, Marcela

    2015-03-01

    Like all living organisms, plants demand iron (Fe) for important biochemical and metabolic processes. Internal imbalances, as a consequence of insufficient or excess Fe in the environment, lead to growth restriction and affect crop yield. Knowledge of signals and factors affecting each step in Fe uptake from the soil and distribution (long-distance transport, remobilization from old to young leaves, and storage in seeds) is necessary to improve our understanding of plant mineral nutrition. In this context, the role of nitric oxide (NO) is discussed as a key player in maintaining Fe homeostasis through its cross talk with hormones, ferritin, and frataxin and the ability to form nitrosyl-iron complexes. PMID:25612116

  1. Oxidation-Resistant Coating For Bipolar Lead/Acid Battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolstad, James J.

    1993-01-01

    Cathode side of bipolar substrate coated with nonoxidizable conductive layer. Coating prepared as water slurry of aqueous dispersion of polyethylene copolymer plus such conductive fillers as tin oxide, titanium, tantalum, or tungsten oxide. Applied easily to substrate of polyethylene carbon plastic. As slurry dries, conductive, oxidation-resistant coating forms on positive side of substrate.

  2. Macroscopic and microscopic biodistribution of intravenously administered iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Adwiteeya; Petryk, Alicia A.; Strawbridge, Rendall R.; Hoopes, P. Jack

    2015-03-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONP) are being developed for use as a cancer treatment. They have demonstrated efficacy when used either as a monotherapy or in conjunction with conventional chemotherapy and radiation. The success of IONP as a therapeutic tool depends on the delivery of a safe and controlled cytotoxic thermal dose to tumor tissue following activation with an alternating magnetic field (AMF). Prior to clinical approval, knowledge of IONP toxicity, biodistribution and physiological clearance is essential. This preliminary time-course study determines the acute toxicity and biodistribution of 110 nm dextran-coated IONP (iron) in mice, 7 days post systemic, at doses of 0.4, 0.6, and 1.0 mg Fe/ g mouse bodyweight. Acute toxicity, manifested as changes in the behavior of mice, was only observed temporarily at 1.0 mg Fe/ g mouse bodyweight, the highest dose administered. Regardless of dose, mass spectrometry and histological analysis demonstrated over 3 mg Fe/g tissue in organs within the reticuloendotheilial system (i.e. liver, spleen, and lymph nodes). Other organs (brain, heart, lungs, and kidney) had less than 0.5 mg Fe/g tissue with iron predominantly confined to the organ vasculature.

  3. Uptake and clearance analysis of Technetium99m labelled iron oxide nanoparticles in a rabbit brain.

    PubMed

    Nadeem, Muhammad; Ahmad, Munir; Saeed, M A; Shaari, Amiruddin; Riaz, Saira; Naseem, Shahzad; Rashid, Khalid

    2015-06-01

    Nanoparticles as solid colloidal particles are extensively studied and used as anticancer drug delivery agents because of their physical properties. This current research aims to prepare water base suspension of uncoated iron oxide nanoparticles and their biodistribution study to different organs, especially the brain, by using a single photon emission computed tomography gamma camera. The water-based suspension of iron oxide nanoparticles was synthesised by a reformed version of the co-precipitation method and labelled with Tc99m for intravenous injection. The nanoparticles were injected without surface modification. X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) techniques were used for characterisation. Peaks of XRD and EDS indicate that the particles are magnetite and exist in aqueous suspension. The average diameter of iron oxide nanoparticles without any surface coating determined by TEM is 10 nm. These particles are capable of evading the reticuloendothelial system and can cross the blood-brain barrier in the rabbit. The labelling efficiency of iron oxide nanoparticles labelled with Tc99m is 85%, which is good for the biodistribution study. The sufficient amount of iron oxide nanoparticles concentration in the brain as compared with the surrounding soft tissues and their long blood retention time indicates that the water-based suspension of iron oxide nanoparticles may be an option for drug delivery into the brain. PMID:26023157

  4. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles: magnetic nanoplatforms as drug carriers

    PubMed Central

    Wahajuddin; Arora, Sumit

    2012-01-01

    A targeted drug delivery system is the need of the hour. Guiding magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with the help of an external magnetic field to its target is the principle behind the development of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) as novel drug delivery vehicles. SPIONs are small synthetic γ-Fe2O3 (maghemite) or Fe3O4 (magnetite) particles with a core ranging between 10 nm and 100 nm in diameter. These magnetic particles are coated with certain biocompatible polymers, such as dextran or polyethylene glycol, which provide chemical handles for the conjugation of therapeutic agents and also improve their blood distribution profile. The current research on SPIONs is opening up wide horizons for their use as diagnostic agents in magnetic resonance imaging as well as for drug delivery vehicles. Delivery of anticancer drugs by coupling with functionalized SPIONs to their targeted site is one of the most pursued areas of research in the development of cancer treatment strategies. SPIONs have also demonstrated their efficiency as nonviral gene vectors that facilitate the introduction of plasmids into the nucleus at rates multifold those of routinely available standard technologies. SPION-induced hyperthermia has also been utilized for localized killing of cancerous cells. Despite their potential biomedical application, alteration in gene expression profiles, disturbance in iron homeostasis, oxidative stress, and altered cellular responses are some SPION-related toxicological aspects which require due consideration. This review provides a comprehensive understanding of SPIONs with regard to their method of preparation, their utility as drug delivery vehicles, and some concerns which need to be resolved before they can be moved from bench top to bedside. PMID:22848170

  5. Conquering the Dark Side: Colloidal Iron Oxide Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Senpan, Angana; Caruthers, Shelton D.; Rhee, Ilsu; Mauro, Nicholas A.; Pan, Dipanjan; Hu, Grace; Scott, Michael J.; Fuhrhop, Ralph W.; Gaffney, Patrick J.; Wickline, Samuel A.; Lanza, Gregory M.

    2009-01-01

    Nanomedicine approaches to atherosclerotic disease will have significant impact on the practice and outcomes of cardiovascular medicine. Iron oxide nanoparticles have been extensively used for nontargeted and targeted imaging applications based upon highly sensitive T2* imaging properties, which typically result in negative contrast effects that can only be imaged 24 or more hours after systemic administration due to persistent blood pool interference. Although recent advances involving MR pulse sequences have converted these dark contrast voxels into bright ones, the marked delays in imaging from persistent magnetic background interference and prominent dipole blooming effects of the magnetic susceptibility remain barriers to overcome. We report a T1-weighted (T1w) theranostic colloidal iron oxide nanoparticle platform, CION, which is achieved by entrapping oleate-coated magnetite particles within a cross-linked phospholipid nanoemulsion. Contrary to expectations, this formulation decreased T2 effects thus allowing positive T1w contrast detection down to low nanomolar concentrations. CION, a vascular constrained nanoplatform administered in vivo permitted T1w molecular imaging 1 hour after treatment without blood pool interference, although some T2 shortening effects on blood, induced by the superparamagnetic particles persisted. Moreover, CION was shown to encapsulate antiangiogenic drugs, like fumagillin, and retained them under prolonged dissolution, suggesting significant theranostic functionality. Overall, CION is a platform technology, developed with generally recognized as safe components, that overcomes the temporal and spatial imaging challenges associated with current iron oxide nanoparticle T2 imaging agents, and which has theranostic potential in vascular diseases for detecting unstable ruptured plaque or treating atherosclerotic angiogenesis. PMID:19908850

  6. Oxidation resistant coating for titanium alloys and titanium alloy matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brindley, William J. (Inventor); Smialek, James L. (Inventor); Rouge, Carl J. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An oxidation resistant coating for titanium alloys and titanium alloy matrix composites comprises an MCrAlX material. M is a metal selected from nickel, cobalt, and iron. X is an active element selected from Y, Yb, Zr, and Hf.

  7. Phase Formation Behavior in Ultrathin Iron Oxide.

    PubMed

    Jõgi, Indrek; Jacobsson, T Jesper; Fondell, Mattis; Wätjen, Timo; Carlsson, Jan-Otto; Boman, Mats; Edvinsson, Tomas

    2015-11-17

    Nanostructured iron oxides, and especially hematite, are interesting for a wide range of applications ranging from gas sensors to renewable solar hydrogen production. A promising method for deposition of low-dimensional films is atomic layer deposition (ALD). Although a potent technique, ALD of ultrathin films is critically sensitive to the substrate and temperature conditions where initial formation of islands and crystallites influences the properties of the films. In this work, deposition at the border of the ALD window forming a hybrid ALD/pulsed CVD (pCVD) deposition is utilized to obtain a deposition less sensitive to the substrate. A thorough analysis of iron oxide phases formation on two different substrates, Si(100) and SiO2, was performed. Films between 3 and 50 nm were deposited and analyzed with diffraction techniques, high-resolution Raman spectroscopy, and optical spectroscopy. Below 10 nm nominal film thickness, island formation and phase dependent particle crystallization impose constraints for deposition of phase pure iron oxides on non-lattice-matching substrates. Films between 10 and 20 nm thickness on SiO2 could effectively be recrystallized into hematite whereas for the corresponding films on Si(100), no recrystallization occurred. For films thicker than 20 nm, phase pure hematite can be formed directly with ALD/pCVD with very low influence of the substrate on either Si or SiO2. For more lattice matched substrates such as SnO2:F, Raman spectroscopy indicated formation of the hematite phase already for films with 3 nm nominal thickness and clearly for 6 nm films. Analysis of the optical properties corroborated the analysis and showed a quantum confined blue-shift of the absorption edge for the thinnest films. PMID:26506091

  8. Reduction of Soluble Iron and Reductive Dissolution of Ferric Iron-Containing Minerals by Moderately Thermophilic Iron-Oxidizing Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Bridge, Toni A. M.; Johnson, D. Barrie

    1998-01-01

    Five moderately thermophilic iron-oxidizing bacteria, including representative strains of the three classified species (Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans, Sulfobacillus acidophilus, and Acidimicrobium ferrooxidans), were shown to be capable of reducing ferric iron to ferrous iron when they were grown under oxygen limitation conditions. Iron reduction was most readily observed when the isolates were grown as mixotrophs or heterotrophs with glycerol as an electron donor; in addition, some strains were able to couple the oxidation of tetrathionate to the reduction of ferric iron. Cycling of iron between the ferrous and ferric states was observed during batch culture growth in unshaken flasks incubated under aerobic conditions, although the patterns of oxidoreduction of iron varied in different species of iron-oxidizing moderate thermophiles and in strains of a single species (S. acidophilus). All three bacterial species were able to grow anaerobically with ferric iron as a sole electron acceptor; the growth yields correlated with the amount of ferric iron reduced when the isolates were grown in the absence of oxygen. One of the moderate thermophiles (identified as a strain of S. acidophilus) was able to bring about the reductive dissolution of three ferric iron-containing minerals (ferric hydroxide, jarosite, and goethite) when it was grown under restricted aeration conditions with glycerol as a carbon and energy source. The significance of iron reduction by moderately thermophilic iron oxidizers in both environmental and applied contexts is discussed. PMID:9603832

  9. Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Sophie; Bridot, Jean-Luc; Elst, Luce Vander; Muller, Robert N

    2010-03-01

    Due to their high magnetization, superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles induce an important decrease in the transverse relaxation of water protons and are, therefore, very efficient negative MRI contrast agents. The knowledge and control of the chemical and physical characteristics of nanoparticles are of great importance. The choice of the synthesis method (microemulsions, sol-gel synthesis, laser pyrolysis, sonochemical synthesis or coprecipitation) determines the magnetic nanoparticle's size and shape, as well as its size distribution and surface chemistry. Nanoparticles can be used for numerous in vivo applications, such as MRI contrast enhancement and hyperthermia drug delivery. New developments focus on targeting through molecular imaging and cell tracking. PMID:21426176

  10. Suspension Hydrogen Reduction of Iron Oxide Concentrates

    SciTech Connect

    H.Y. Sohn

    2008-03-31

    The objective of the project is to develop a new ironmaking technology based on hydrogen and fine iron oxide concentrates in a suspension reduction process. The ultimate objective of the new technology is to replace the blast furnace and to drastically reduce CO2 emissions in the steel industry. The goals of this phase of development are; the performance of detailed material and energy balances, thermochemical and equilibrium calculations for sulfur and phosphorus impurities, the determination of the complete kinetics of hydrogen reduction and bench-scale testing of the suspension reduction process using a large laboratory flash reactor.

  11. Cardioprotective activity of iron oxide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Fei; Wang, Hao; Feng, Yidong; Li, Yunman; Hua, Xiaoqing; Pang, Xingyun; Zhang, Song; Song, Lina; Zhang, Yu; Gu, Ning

    2015-01-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) are chemically inert materials and have been mainly used for imaging applications and drug deliveries. However, the possibility whether they can be used as therapeutic drugs themselves has not yet been explored. We reported here that Fe2O3 nanoparticles (NPs) can protect hearts from ischemic damage at the animal, tissue and cell level. The cardioprotective activity of Fe2O3 NPs requires the integrity of nanoparticles and is not dependent upon their surface charges and molecules that were integrated into nanoparticles. Also, Fe2O3 NPs showed no significant toxicity towards normal cardiomyocytes, indicative of their potential to treat cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25716309

  12. Mineral resource of the month: iron oxide pigments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2008-01-01

    The article discusses iron oxide pigments, which have been used as colorants since human began painting as they resist color change due to sunlight exposure, have good chemical resistance and are stable under normal ambient conditions. Cyprus, Italy and Spain are among the countries that are known for the production of iron oxide pigments. Granular forms of iron oxides and nano-sized materials are cited as developments in the synthetic iron oxide pigment industry which are being used in computer disk drives and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging.

  13. A Diatom Ferritin Optimized for Iron Oxidation but Not Iron Storage.

    PubMed

    Pfaffen, Stephanie; Bradley, Justin M; Abdulqadir, Raz; Firme, Marlo R; Moore, Geoffrey R; Le Brun, Nick E; Murphy, Michael E P

    2015-11-20

    Ferritin from the marine pennate diatom Pseudo-nitzschia multiseries (PmFTN) plays a key role in sustaining growth in iron-limited ocean environments. The di-iron catalytic ferroxidase center of PmFTN (sites A and B) has a nearby third iron site (site C) in an arrangement typically observed in prokaryotic ferritins. Here we demonstrate that Glu-44, a site C ligand, and Glu-130, a residue that bridges iron bound at sites B and C, limit the rate of post-oxidation reorganization of iron coordination and the rate at which Fe(3+) exits the ferroxidase center for storage within the mineral core. The latter, in particular, severely limits the overall rate of iron mineralization. Thus, the diatom ferritin is optimized for initial Fe(2+) oxidation but not for mineralization, pointing to a role for this protein in buffering iron availability and facilitating iron-sparing rather than only long-term iron storage. PMID:26396187

  14. A Diatom Ferritin Optimized for Iron Oxidation but Not Iron Storage*

    PubMed Central

    Pfaffen, Stephanie; Bradley, Justin M.; Abdulqadir, Raz; Firme, Marlo R.; Moore, Geoffrey R.; Le Brun, Nick E.; Murphy, Michael E. P.

    2015-01-01

    Ferritin from the marine pennate diatom Pseudo-nitzschia multiseries (PmFTN) plays a key role in sustaining growth in iron-limited ocean environments. The di-iron catalytic ferroxidase center of PmFTN (sites A and B) has a nearby third iron site (site C) in an arrangement typically observed in prokaryotic ferritins. Here we demonstrate that Glu-44, a site C ligand, and Glu-130, a residue that bridges iron bound at sites B and C, limit the rate of post-oxidation reorganization of iron coordination and the rate at which Fe3+ exits the ferroxidase center for storage within the mineral core. The latter, in particular, severely limits the overall rate of iron mineralization. Thus, the diatom ferritin is optimized for initial Fe2+ oxidation but not for mineralization, pointing to a role for this protein in buffering iron availability and facilitating iron-sparing rather than only long-term iron storage. PMID:26396187

  15. Thermal and magnetic properties of iron oxide colloids: influence of surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, Paula I. P.; Lochte, Frederik; Echeverria, Coro; Pereira, Laura C. J.; Coutinho, Joana T.; Ferreira, Isabel M. M.; Novo, Carlos M. M.; Borges, João P. M. R.

    2015-10-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) have been extensively studied in the last few decades for several biomedical applications such as magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic drug delivery and hyperthermia. Hyperthermia is a technique used for cancer treatment which consists in inducing a temperature of about 41-45 °C in cancerous cells through magnetic NPs and an external magnetic field. Chemical precipitation was used to produce iron oxide NPs 9 nm in size coated with oleic acid and trisodium citrate. The influence of both stabilizers on the heating ability and in vitro cytotoxicity of the produced iron oxide NPs was assessed. Physicochemical characterization of the samples confirmed that the used surfactants do not change the particles’ average size and that the presence of the surfactants has a strong effect on both the magnetic properties and the heating ability. The heating ability of Fe3O4 NPs shows a proportional increase with the increase of iron concentration, although when coated with trisodium citrate or oleic acid the heating ability decreases. Cytotoxicity assays demonstrated that both pristine and trisodium citrate Fe3O4 samples do not reduce cell viability. However, oleic acid Fe3O4 strongly reduces cell viability, more drastically in the SaOs-2 cell line. The produced iron oxide NPs are suitable for cancer hyperthermia treatment and the use of a surfactant brings great advantages concerning the dispersion of NPs, also allowing better control of the hyperthermia temperature.

  16. Thermal and magnetic properties of iron oxide colloids: influence of surfactants.

    PubMed

    Soares, Paula I P; Lochte, Frederik; Echeverria, Coro; Pereira, Laura C J; Coutinho, Joana T; Ferreira, Isabel M M; Novo, Carlos M M; Borges, João P M R

    2015-10-23

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) have been extensively studied in the last few decades for several biomedical applications such as magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic drug delivery and hyperthermia. Hyperthermia is a technique used for cancer treatment which consists in inducing a temperature of about 41-45 °C in cancerous cells through magnetic NPs and an external magnetic field. Chemical precipitation was used to produce iron oxide NPs 9 nm in size coated with oleic acid and trisodium citrate. The influence of both stabilizers on the heating ability and in vitro cytotoxicity of the produced iron oxide NPs was assessed. Physicochemical characterization of the samples confirmed that the used surfactants do not change the particles' average size and that the presence of the surfactants has a strong effect on both the magnetic properties and the heating ability. The heating ability of Fe3O4 NPs shows a proportional increase with the increase of iron concentration, although when coated with trisodium citrate or oleic acid the heating ability decreases. Cytotoxicity assays demonstrated that both pristine and trisodium citrate Fe3O4 samples do not reduce cell viability. However, oleic acid Fe3O4 strongly reduces cell viability, more drastically in the SaOs-2 cell line. The produced iron oxide NPs are suitable for cancer hyperthermia treatment and the use of a surfactant brings great advantages concerning the dispersion of NPs, also allowing better control of the hyperthermia temperature. PMID:26421876

  17. Ferrous iron sorption by hydrous metal oxides.

    PubMed

    Nano, Genevieve Villaseñor; Strathmann, Timothy J

    2006-05-15

    Ferrous iron is critical to a number of biogeochemical processes that occur in heterogeneous aquatic environments, including the abiotic reductive transformation of subsurface contaminants. The sorption of Fe(II) to ubiquitous soil minerals, particularly iron-free mineral phases, is not well understood. Colloidal TiO2, gamma-AlOOH, and gamma-Al2O2 were used as model hydrous oxides to investigate Fe(II) sorption to iron-free mineral surfaces. Rapid Fe(II) sorption during the first few hours is followed by a much slower uptake process that continues for extended periods (at least 30 days). For equivalent solution conditions, the extent of Fe(II) sorption decreases in the order TiO2 >gamma-Al2O3 >gamma-AlOOH. Short-term equilibrium sorption data measured over a wide range of conditions (pH, ionic strength, Fe(II)-to-sorbent ratio) are well described by the diffuse double layer model. Fe(II) sorption to TiO2 is best described by a single-site model that considers formation of two surface complexes, SOFe+ and SOFeOH0. For gamma-AlOOH and gamma-Al2O3, sorption data are best described by a two-site model that considers formation of SOFe+ complexes at weak- and strong-binding surface sites. Accurate description of sorption data for higher Fe(II) concentrations at alkaline pH conditions requires the inclusion of a Fe(II) surface precipitation reaction in the model formulation. The presence of common groundwater constituents (calcium, sulfate, bicarbonate, or fulvic acid) had no significant effect on Fe(II) sorption. These results demonstrate that iron-free soil minerals can exert a significant influence on Fe(II) sorption and speciation in heterogeneous aquatic systems. PMID:16337955

  18. Structure of as-deposited and heat-treated iron-zinc coatings from chloride bath

    SciTech Connect

    Drewien, C.A.; Goldstein, J.I.; Marder, A.R.

    1993-09-01

    The iron content, phase constitution, and microstructure of electrodeposited iron-zinc alloy (EZA) coatings, deposited from chloride baths, is described for as-deposited and heat-treated conditions of coatings containing bulk iron contents of 6, 8, 10, and 13 w/o. The observed influence of current density upon iron content, which in turn influences the phase constitution and microstructure of the coatings, is reported. The microstructure, composed of non-equilibrium phases that have nanometer grain sizes, is illustrated and described with respect to iron content, crystallography, and morphology. As-deposited {eta} phase coatings undergo transformations through a sequence of metastable phases when heated. The sequence of phase transformations varies with iron content, but the mechanisms of phase transformation from the as-deposited eta phase to the metastable G phase was found to be similar in 6, 8, and 10 w/o Fe coatings. Microstructural, compositional, and crystallographic changes associated with this phase transformation are discussed.

  19. Insight into the evolution of the iron oxidation pathways.

    PubMed

    Ilbert, Marianne; Bonnefoy, Violaine

    2013-02-01

    Iron is a ubiquitous element in the universe. Ferrous iron (Fe(II)) was abundant in the primordial ocean until the oxygenation of the Earth's atmosphere led to its widespread oxidation and precipitation. This change of iron bioavailability likely put selective pressure on the evolution of life. This element is essential to most extant life forms and is an important cofactor in many redox-active proteins involved in a number of vital pathways. In addition, iron plays a central role in many environments as an energy source for some microorganisms. This review is focused on Fe(II) oxidation. The fact that the ability to oxidize Fe(II) is widely distributed in Bacteria and Archaea and in a number of quite different biotopes suggests that the dissimilatory Fe(II) oxidation is an ancient energy metabolism. Based on what is known today about Fe(II) oxidation pathways, we propose that they arose independently more than once in evolution and evolved convergently. The iron paleochemistry, the phylogeny, the physiology of the iron oxidizers, and the nature of the cofactors of the redox proteins involved in these pathways suggest a possible scenario for the timescale in which each type of Fe(II) oxidation pathways evolved. The nitrate dependent anoxic iron oxidizers are likely the most ancient iron oxidizers. We suggest that the phototrophic anoxic iron oxidizers arose in surface waters after the Archaea/Bacteria-split but before the Great Oxidation Event. The neutrophilic oxic iron oxidizers possibly appeared in microaerobic marine environments prior to the Great Oxidation Event while the acidophilic ones emerged likely after the advent of atmospheric O(2). This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The evolutionary aspects of bioenergetic systems. PMID:23044392

  20. Thermochemistry of iron manganese oxide spinels

    SciTech Connect

    Guillemet-Fritsch, Sophie; Navrotsky, Alexandra . E-mail: anavrotsky@ucdavis.edu; Tailhades, Philippe; Coradin, Herve; Wang Miaojun

    2005-01-15

    Oxide melt solution calorimetry has been performed on iron manganese oxide spinels prepared at high temperature. The enthalpy of formation of (Mn{sub x}Fe{sub 1-x}){sub 3}O{sub 4} at 298K from the oxides, tetragonal Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} (hausmannite) and cubic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} (magnetite), is negative from x=0 to x=0.67 and becomes slightly positive for 0.670.6) spinels of intermediate compositions. The enthalpies of formation are discussed in terms of three factors: oxidation-reduction relative to the end-members, cation distribution, and tetragonality. A combination of measured enthalpies and Gibbs free energies of formation in the literature provides entropies of mixing. {delta}S{sub mix}, consistent with a cation distribution in which all trivalent manganese is octahedral and all other ions are randomly distributed for x>0.5, but the entropy of mixing appears to be smaller than these predicted values for x<0.4.

  1. Oxidation behavior of a thermal barrier coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. A.

    1984-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings, consisting of a plasma sprayed calcium silicate ceramic layer and a CoCrAlY or NiCrAlY bond coat, were applied on B-1900 coupons and cycled hourly in air in a rapid-response furnace to maximum temperatures of 1030, 1100, or 1160 C. Eight specimens were tested for each of the six conditions of bond-coat composition and temperature. Specimens were removed from test at the onset of failure, which was taken to be the formation of a fine surface crack visible at 10X magnification. Specimens were weighed periodically, and plots of weight gain vs time indicate that weight is gained at a parabolic rate after an initial period where weight was gained at a much greater rate. The high initial oxidation rate is thought to arise from the initially high surface area in the porous bond coat. Specimen life (time to first crack) was found to be a strong function of temperature. However, while test lives varied greatly with time, the weight gain at the time of specimen failure was quite insensitive to temperature. This indicates that there is a critical weight gain at which the coating fails when subjected to this test.

  2. Effect of surface modification on magnetization of iron oxide nanoparticle colloids.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yuan; Rende, Deniz; Altan, Cem Levent; Bucak, Seyda; Ozisik, Rahmi; Borca-Tasciuc, Diana-Andra

    2012-09-11

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles have numerous applications in the biomedical field, some more mature, such as contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and some emerging, such as heating agents in hyperthermia for cancer therapy. In all of these applications, the magnetic particles are coated with surfactants and polymers to enhance biocompatibility, prevent agglomeration, and add functionality. However, the coatings may interact with the surface atoms of the magnetic core and form a magnetically disordered layer, reducing the total amount of the magnetic phase, which is the key parameter in many applications. In the current study, amine and carboxyl functionalized and bare iron oxide nanoparticles, all suspended in water, were purchased and characterized. The presence of the coatings in commercial samples was verified with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The class of iron oxide (magnetite) was verified via Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. In addition to these, in-house prepared iron oxide nanoparticles coated with oleic acid and suspended in heptane and hexane were also investigated. The saturation magnetization obtained from vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) measurements was used to determine the effective concentration of magnetic phase in all samples. The Tiron chelation test was then utilized to check the real concentration of the iron oxide in the suspension. The difference between the concentration results from VSM and the Tiron test confirmed the reduction of magnetic phase of magnetic core in the presence of coatings and different suspension media. For the biocompatible coatings, the largest reduction was experienced by amine particles, where the ratio of the effective weight of magnetic phase reported to the real weight was 0.5. Carboxyl-coated samples experienced smaller reduction with a ratio of 0.64. Uncoated sample also exhibits a reduction with a ratio of 0.6. Oleic acid covered samples show a solvent

  3. Pack cementation diffusion coatings for iron-base alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Rapp, R.A.

    1995-02-01

    With the aid of computer-assisted calculations of the equilibrium vapor pressures in halide-activated cementation packs, processing conditions have been identified and experimentally verified for the codeposition of two or more alloying elements in a diffusion coating on a variety of steels. The Cr-Si ferrite layers have proven to be very resistant to high temperature cyclic oxidation and to pitting in aqueous solutions. The process has been patented, and is being transferred for industrial application, e.g. for water walls of utility boilers, etc. In the proposed extension of this project, the use of mixed pure metal powders in the pack will be extended to achieve similar ferrite Fe-Cr-Al coatings with excellent oxidation resistance, with the eventual transfer of the technology to industry. In other recent studies, Ni-base alloy rods were aluminized by the halide-activated pack cementation process to bring their average composition to that for the ORNL-developed Ni{sub 3}Al, for use as a welding rod. A similar effort to develop a welding rod for the ORNL Fe{sub 3}Al alloy did not yield reproducible coating compositions or growth kinetics. The continued effort to produce Duriron-type (Fe-18Si-5Cr) coatings on steels was not successful. Literature for the intrinsic diffusion coefficients suggests that this task cannot be achieved.

  4. TRACE ELEMENT BINDING DURING STRUCTURAL TRANSFORMATION IN IRON OXIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Iron (hydr)oxides often control the mobility of inorganic contaminants in soils and sediments. A poorly ordered form of ferrihydrite is commonly produced during rapid oxidation of ferrous iron at sharp redox fronts encountered during discharge of anoxic/suboxic waters into terre...

  5. Sodium sulfur container with chromium/chromium oxide coating

    DOEpatents

    Ludwig, Frank A.; Higley, Lin R.

    1981-01-01

    A coating of chromium/chromium oxide is disclosed for coating the surfaces of electrically conducting components of a sodium sulfur battery. This chromium/chromium oxide coating is placed on the surfaces of the electrically conducting components of the battery which are in contact with molten polysulfide and sulfur reactants during battery operation.

  6. Chromium oxide coatings improve thermal emissivity of alumina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Upshaw, V.

    1966-01-01

    Chromium oxide coatings improve thermal radiation characteristics of alumina-coated heater-cathode systems in vacuum tubes. Chromium oxide is applied either as a surface layer or as a doping material. The new coatings eliminate the high temperature migration problems of carbon surface treatments.

  7. Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as drug delivery system in breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcu, A.; Pop, S.; Dumitrache, F.; Mocanu, M.; Niculite, C. M.; Gherghiceanu, M.; Lungu, C. P.; Fleaca, C.; Ianchis, R.; Barbut, A.; Grigoriu, C.; Morjan, I.

    2013-09-01

    Present work was focused on producing improved iron oxide nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery in breast cancer. Nanometric-sized iron oxide particles were synthesized by laser pyrolysis and were morphologically/structurally characterized. These new nanoparticles were compared with some commercial, chemically prepared iron oxide ones. Cytotoxicity and the anti-proliferation effects of nanoparticles were tested in vitro on the breast adenocarcinoma cell line MCF-7. Nanoparticles were further coated with the antracyclinic antibiotic Violamycine B1 and tested for the anti-tumor effect on MCF-7 cells. The nanoparticles produced by us seem more effective in vitro than the commercial ones, with respect to cellular uptake and VB1 delivery. Violamycine B1 bound on nanoparticles is as efficient as the free form, but is better delivered into tumor cells.

  8. Biosignatures in Spheroidal Iron Oxide-Rich Concretions from the Navajo Sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spanbauer, T. L.; Kettler, R. M.; Loope, D. B.; Weber, K. A.

    2009-12-01

    Spheroidal concretions composed of an iron oxide-rich cemented outer rind and a weakly-cemented core of bleached (iron depleted) sandstone are abundant in the Jurassic Navajo Sandstone of the Colorado Plateau. The formation of the spheroidal concretions has been previously described as a result of advective mixing between Fe(II)-rich reducing fluids with oxidizing fluids resulting in the subsequent abiotic precipitation of Fe(III) oxides forming the spheroidal concretions. The role of microbial biomineralization has been suggested as a potential mechanism of various other iron oxide formations, such as banded iron formations and iron-manganese nodules. Here we describe a series of qualitative and quantitative observations within the spheroidal concretions from the Jurassic Navajo Sandstone consistent with prior microbial activity. Spheroidal concretions were collected from Spencer Flat, east of Escalante, in south-central Utah, sectioned, and treated with dilute hydrochloric acid and acetone to remove traces of inorganic and organic carbon (C) from the surface of the samples. Elemental analysis of the treated specimens revealed elevated C as well as nitrogen (N) content with respect to the interior of the concretion (Rind, C, 0.06%, N, 0.006%; Interior, C, 0.009%, N, 0.003%). Elevated C and N values in the rind suggest carbon-nitrogen rich compounds consistent with biomolecules. Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM) confirmed the presence of C as well as N and S via electron backscattering analysis. Additionally, structures morphologically consistent with bacterial cells have been observed via FE-SEM in association with a matrix that coated sand grains within the iron oxide-rich rind. Together these data suggest that microorganisms were associated with the iron oxide-rich spheroidal concretions. Microbial iron oxidation has been demonstrated to be ubiquitous microbial metabolism and is facilitated by a diversity of microorganisms in terrestrial

  9. Microbial iron oxidation in the Arctic tundra and its implications for biogeochemical cycling.

    PubMed

    Emerson, David; Scott, Jarrod J; Benes, Joshua; Bowden, William B

    2015-12-01

    The role that neutrophilic iron-oxidizing bacteria play in the Arctic tundra is unknown. This study surveyed chemosynthetic iron-oxidizing communities at the North Slope of Alaska near Toolik Field Station (TFS) at Toolik Lake (lat 68.63, long -149.60). Microbial iron mats were common in submerged habitats with stationary or slowly flowing water, and their greatest areal extent is in coating plant stems and sediments in wet sedge meadows. Some Fe-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) produce easily recognized sheath or stalk morphotypes that were present and dominant in all the mats we observed. The cool water temperatures (9 to 11°C) and reduced pH (5.0 to 6.6) at all sites kinetically favor microbial iron oxidation. A microbial survey of five sites based on 16S rRNA genes found a predominance of Proteobacteria, with Betaproteobacteria and members of the family Comamonadaceae being the most prevalent operational taxonomic units (OTUs). In relative abundance, clades of lithotrophic FeOB composed 5 to 10% of the communities. OTUs related to cyanobacteria and chloroplasts accounted for 3 to 25% of the communities. Oxygen profiles showed evidence for oxygenic photosynthesis at the surface of some mats, indicating the coexistence of photosynthetic and FeOB populations. The relative abundance of OTUs belonging to putative Fe-reducing bacteria (FeRB) averaged around 11% in the sampled iron mats. Mats incubated anaerobically with 10 mM acetate rapidly initiated Fe reduction, indicating that active iron cycling is likely. The prevalence of iron mats on the tundra might impact the carbon cycle through lithoautotrophic chemosynthesis, anaerobic respiration of organic carbon coupled to iron reduction, and the suppression of methanogenesis, and it potentially influences phosphorus dynamics through the adsorption of phosphorus to iron oxides. PMID:26386054

  10. Microbial Iron Oxidation in the Arctic Tundra and Its Implications for Biogeochemical Cycling

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Jarrod J.; Benes, Joshua; Bowden, William B.

    2015-01-01

    The role that neutrophilic iron-oxidizing bacteria play in the Arctic tundra is unknown. This study surveyed chemosynthetic iron-oxidizing communities at the North Slope of Alaska near Toolik Field Station (TFS) at Toolik Lake (lat 68.63, long −149.60). Microbial iron mats were common in submerged habitats with stationary or slowly flowing water, and their greatest areal extent is in coating plant stems and sediments in wet sedge meadows. Some Fe-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) produce easily recognized sheath or stalk morphotypes that were present and dominant in all the mats we observed. The cool water temperatures (9 to 11°C) and reduced pH (5.0 to 6.6) at all sites kinetically favor microbial iron oxidation. A microbial survey of five sites based on 16S rRNA genes found a predominance of Proteobacteria, with Betaproteobacteria and members of the family Comamonadaceae being the most prevalent operational taxonomic units (OTUs). In relative abundance, clades of lithotrophic FeOB composed 5 to 10% of the communities. OTUs related to cyanobacteria and chloroplasts accounted for 3 to 25% of the communities. Oxygen profiles showed evidence for oxygenic photosynthesis at the surface of some mats, indicating the coexistence of photosynthetic and FeOB populations. The relative abundance of OTUs belonging to putative Fe-reducing bacteria (FeRB) averaged around 11% in the sampled iron mats. Mats incubated anaerobically with 10 mM acetate rapidly initiated Fe reduction, indicating that active iron cycling is likely. The prevalence of iron mats on the tundra might impact the carbon cycle through lithoautotrophic chemosynthesis, anaerobic respiration of organic carbon coupled to iron reduction, and the suppression of methanogenesis, and it potentially influences phosphorus dynamics through the adsorption of phosphorus to iron oxides. PMID:26386054

  11. VAPOR PHASE MERCURY SORPTION BY ORGANIC-SULFIDE COATED BIMETALLIC IRON-COPPER NANOPARTICLE AGGREGATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Tetra sulfide silane coated iron-copper nano-particle aggregates are found to be potentially very high capacity sorbents for vapor phase mercury capture. High equilibrium capacities were obtained for the silane coated iron copper nano-aggregate sorbent at 70 oC and 120 oC. Even a...

  12. Ecological succession among iron-oxidizing bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Emily J; Cetinić, Ivona; Chan, Clara S; Whitney King, D; Emerson, David

    2014-01-01

    Despite over 125 years of study, the factors that dictate species dominance in neutrophilic iron-oxidizing bacterial (FeOB) communities remain unknown. In a freshwater wetland, we documented a clear ecological succession coupled with niche separation between the helical stalk-forming Gallionellales (for example, Gallionella ferruginea) and tubular sheath-forming Leptothrix ochracea. Changes in the iron-seep community were documented using microscopy and cultivation-independent methods. Quantification of Fe-oxyhydroxide morphotypes by light microscopy was coupled with species-specific fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) probes using a protocol that minimized background fluorescence caused by the Fe-oxyhydroxides. Together with scanning electron microscopy, these techniques all indicated that Gallionellales dominated during early spring, with L. ochracea becoming more abundant for the remainder of the year. Analysis of tagged pyrosequencing reads of the small subunit ribosomal RNA gene (SSU rRNA) collected during seasonal progression supported a clear Gallionellales to L. ochracea transition, and community structure grouped according to observed dominant FeOB forms. Axis of redundancy analysis of physicochemical parameters collected from iron mats during the season, plotted with FeOB abundance, corroborated several field and microscopy-based observations and uncovered several unanticipated relationships. On the basis of these relationships, we conclude that the ecological niche of the stalk-forming Gallionellales is in waters with low organic carbon and steep redoxclines, and the sheath-forming L. ochracea is abundant in waters that contain high concentrations of complex organic carbon, high Fe and Mn content and gentle redoxclines. Finally, these findings identify a largely unexplored relationship between FeOB and organic carbon. PMID:24225888

  13. Microbially Induced Iron Oxidation: What, Where, How

    SciTech Connect

    SCHIERMEYER,ELISA M.; PROVENCIO,PAULA P.; NORTHUP,DIANA E.

    2000-08-15

    From the results of the different bacterial cells seen, it is fairly certain that Gallionella is present because of the bean-shaped cells and twisted stalks found with the TEM. The authors cannot confirm, though, what other iron-oxidizing genera exist in the tubes, since the media was only preferential and not one that isolated a specific genus of bacteria. Based on the environment in which they live and the source of the water, they believe their cultures contain Gallionella, Leptothrix, and possibly Crenothrix and Sphaerotilus. They believe the genus Leptothrix rather than Sphaerotilus exist in the tubes because the water source was fresh, unlike the polluted water in which Sphaerotilus are usually found. The TEM preparations worked well. The cryogenic method rapidly froze the cells in place and allowed them to view their morphology. The FAA method, as stated previously, was the best of the three methods because it gave the best contrast. The gluteraldehyde samples did not come out as well. It is possible that the gluteraldehyde the authors prepared was still too concentrated and did not mix well. Although these bacteria were collected from springs and then cultured in an environment containing a presumably pure iron-bearing metal, it seems the tube already containing Manganese Gradient Medium could be used with a piece of metal containing these bacteria. A small piece of corroding metal could then be inserted into the test tube and cultured to study the bacteria.

  14. Oxidation inhibits iron-induced blood coagulation.

    PubMed

    Pretorius, Etheresia; Bester, Janette; Vermeulen, Natasha; Lipinski, Boguslaw

    2013-01-01

    Blood coagulation under physiological conditions is activated by thrombin, which converts soluble plasma fibrinogen (FBG) into an insoluble clot. The structure of the enzymatically-generated clot is very characteristic being composed of thick fibrin fibers susceptible to the fibrinolytic degradation. However, in chronic degenerative diseases, such as atherosclerosis, diabetes mellitus, cancer, and neurological disorders, fibrin clots are very different forming dense matted deposits (DMD) that are not effectively removed and thus create a condition known as thrombosis. We have recently shown that trivalent iron (ferric ions) generates hydroxyl radicals, which subsequently convert FBG into abnormal fibrin clots in the form of DMDs. A characteristic feature of DMDs is their remarkable and permanent resistance to the enzymatic degradation. Therefore, in order to prevent thrombotic incidences in the degenerative diseases it is essential to inhibit the iron-induced generation of hydroxyl radicals. This can be achieved by the pretreatment with a direct free radical scavenger (e.g. salicylate), and as shown in this paper by the treatment with oxidizing agents such as hydrogen peroxide, methylene blue, and sodium selenite. Although the actual mechanism of this phenomenon is not yet known, it is possible that hydroxyl radicals are neutralized by their conversion to the molecular oxygen and water, thus inhibiting the formation of dense matted fibrin deposits in human blood. PMID:23170793

  15. Iron oxide nanoparticle enhancement of radiation cytotoxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazur, Courtney M.; Tate, Jennifer A.; Strawbridge, Rendall R.; Gladstone, David J.; Hoopes, P. Jack

    2013-02-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) have been investigated as a promising means for inducing tumor cell-specific hyperthermia. Although the ability to generate and use nanoparticles that are biocompatible, tumor specific, and have the ability to produce adequate cytotoxic heat is very promising, significant preclinical and clinical development will be required for clinical efficacy. At this time it appears using IONP-induced hyperthermia as an adjunct to conventional cancer therapeutics, rather than as an independent treatment, will provide the initial IONP clinical treatment. Due to their high-Z characteristics, another option is to use intracellular IONPs to enhance radiation therapy without excitation with AMF (production of heat). To test this concept IONPs were added to cell culture media at a concentration of 0.2 mg Fe/mL and incubated with murine breast adenocarcinoma (MTG-B) cells for either 48 or 72 hours. Extracellular iron was then removed and all cells were irradiated at 4 Gy. Although samples incubated with IONPs for 48 hrs did not demonstrate enhanced post-irradiation cytotoxicity as compared to the non-IONP-containing cells, cells incubated with IONPs for 72 hours, which contained 40% more Fe than 48 hr incubated cells, showed a 25% decrease in clonogenic survival compared to their non-IONP-containing counterparts. These results suggest that a critical concentration of intracellular IONPs is necessary for enhancing radiation cytotoxicity.

  16. Iron oxidation and its impact on MR behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunkara, S. R.; Root, T. W.; Ulicny, J. C.; Klingenberg, D. J.

    2009-02-01

    The oxidation of particles in MR fluids and its impact on rheology are investigated. The oxidation of iron spheres in an aliphatic oil follows a linear growth law, suggesting that the oxide forms a nonadherent layer. The magnetic field-induced yield stress decreases with increasing extent of oxidation. The rheological behavior is consistent with that predicted using a core-shell model.

  17. Multiple hearth furnace for reducing iron oxide

    DOEpatents

    Brandon, Mark M.; True, Bradford G.

    2012-03-13

    A multiple moving hearth furnace (10) having a furnace housing (11) with at least two moving hearths (20) positioned laterally within the furnace housing, the hearths moving in opposite directions and each moving hearth (20) capable of being charged with at least one layer of iron oxide and carbon bearing material at one end, and being capable of discharging reduced material at the other end. A heat insulating partition (92) is positioned between adjacent moving hearths of at least portions of the conversion zones (13), and is capable of communicating gases between the atmospheres of the conversion zones of adjacent moving hearths. A drying/preheat zone (12), a conversion zone (13), and optionally a cooling zone (15) are sequentially positioned along each moving hearth (30) in the furnace housing (11).

  18. Multifunctional iron oxide nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloemen, M.; Denis, C.; Van Stappen, T.; De Meester, L.; Geukens, N.; Gils, A.; Verbiest, T.

    2015-03-01

    Multifunctional nanoparticles have attracted a lot of attention since they can combine interesting properties like magnetism, fluorescence or plasmonic effects. As a core material, iron oxide nanoparticles have been the subject of intensive research. These cost-effective and non-toxic particles are used nowadays in many applications. We developed a heterobifunctional PEG ligand that can be used to introduce functional groups (carboxylic acids) onto the surface of the NP. Via click chemistry, a siloxane functionality was added to this ligand, for a subsequent covalent ligand exchange reaction. The functionalized nanoparticles have an excellent colloidal stability in complex environments like buffers and serum or plasma. Antibodies were coupled to the introduced carboxylic acids and these NP-antibody bioconjugates were brought into contact with Legionella bacteria for magnetic separation experiments.

  19. Washing effect on superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Mireles, Laura-Karina; Sacher, Edward; Yahia, L'Hocine; Laurent, Sophie; Stanicki, Dimitri

    2016-06-01

    Much recent research on nanoparticles has occurred in the biomedical area, particularly in the area of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs); one such area of research is in their use as magnetically directed prodrugs. It has been reported that nanoscale materials exhibit properties different from those of materials in bulk or on a macro scale [1]. Further, an understanding of the batch-to-batch reproducibility and uniformity of the SPION surface is essential to ensure safe biological applications, as noted in the accompanying article [2], because the surface is the first layer that affects the biological response of the human body. Here, we consider a comparison of the surface chemistries of a batch of SPIONs, before and after the supposedly gentle process of dialysis in water. PMID:27141527

  20. Washing effect on superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Mireles, Laura-Karina; Sacher, Edward; Yahia, L’Hocine; Laurent, Sophie; Stanicki, Dimitri

    2016-01-01

    Much recent research on nanoparticles has occurred in the biomedical area, particularly in the area of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs); one such area of research is in their use as magnetically directed prodrugs. It has been reported that nanoscale materials exhibit properties different from those of materials in bulk or on a macro scale [1]. Further, an understanding of the batch-to-batch reproducibility and uniformity of the SPION surface is essential to ensure safe biological applications, as noted in the accompanying article [2], because the surface is the first layer that affects the biological response of the human body. Here, we consider a comparison of the surface chemistries of a batch of SPIONs, before and after the supposedly gentle process of dialysis in water. PMID:27141527

  1. Ceramic coating system or water oxidation environments

    DOEpatents

    Hong, Glenn T.

    1996-01-01

    A process for water oxidation of combustible materials in which during at least a part of the oxidation corrosive material is present and makes contact with at least a portion of the apparatus over a contact area on the apparatus. At least a portion of the contact surface area comprises titanium dioxide coated onto a titanium metal substrate. Such ceramic composites have been found to be highly resistant to environments encountered in the process of supercritical water oxidation. Such environments typically contain greater than 50 mole percent water, together with oxygen, carbon dioxide, and a wide range of acids, bases, and salts. Pressures are typically about 27.5 to about 1000 bar while temperatures range as high as 700.degree. C. The ceramic composites are also resistant to degradation mechanisms caused by thermal stresses.

  2. Ceramic coating system for water oxidation environments

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, G.T.

    1996-08-13

    A process is described for water oxidation of combustible materials in which at least a part of the oxidation corrosive material is present and makes contact with at least a portion of the apparatus over a contact area on the apparatus. At least a portion of the contact surface area comprises titanium dioxide coated onto a titanium metal substrate. Such ceramic composites have been found to be highly resistant to environments encountered in the process of supercritical water oxidation. Such environments typically contain greater than 50 mole percent water, together with oxygen, carbon dioxide, and a wide range of acids, bases, and salts. Pressures are typically about 27.5 to about 1000 bar while temperatures range as high as 700 C. The ceramic composites are also resistant to degradation mechanisms caused by thermal stresses. 2 figs.

  3. Oxidative stress response in neural stem cells exposed to different superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Pongrac, Igor M; Pavičić, Ivan; Milić, Mirta; Brkić Ahmed, Lada; Babič, Michal; Horák, Daniel; Vinković Vrček, Ivana; Gajović, Srećko

    2016-01-01

    Biocompatibility, safety, and risk assessments of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are of the highest priority in researching their application in biomedicine. One improvement in the biological properties of SPIONs may be achieved by different functionalization and surface modifications. This study aims to investigate how a different surface functionalization of SPIONs - uncoated, coated with d-mannose, or coated with poly-l-lysine - affects biocompatibility. We sought to investigate murine neural stem cells (NSCs) as important model system for regenerative medicine. To reveal the possible mechanism of toxicity of SPIONs on NSCs, levels of reactive oxygen species, intracellular glutathione, mitochondrial membrane potential, cell-membrane potential, DNA damage, and activities of SOD and GPx were examined. Even in cases where reactive oxygen species levels were significantly lowered in NSCs exposed to SPIONs, we found depleted intracellular glutathione levels, altered activities of SOD and GPx, hyperpolarization of the mitochondrial membrane, dissipated cell-membrane potential, and increased DNA damage, irrespective of the surface coating applied for SPION stabilization. Although surface coating should prevent the toxic effects of SPIONs, our results showed that all of the tested SPION types affected the NSCs similarly, indicating that mitochondrial homeostasis is their major cellular target. Despite the claimed biomedical benefits of SPIONs, the refined determination of their effects on various cellular functions presented in this work highlights the need for further safety evaluations. This investigation helps to fill the knowledge gaps on the criteria that should be considered in evaluating the biocompatibility and safety of novel nanoparticles. PMID:27217748

  4. Genotoxicity of Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles in Granulosa Cells.

    PubMed

    Pöttler, Marina; Staicu, Andreas; Zaloga, Jan; Unterweger, Harald; Weigel, Bianca; Schreiber, Eveline; Hofmann, Simone; Wiest, Irmi; Jeschke, Udo; Alexiou, Christoph; Janko, Christina

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles that are aimed at targeting cancer cells, but sparing healthy tissue provide an attractive platform of implementation for hyperthermia or as carriers of chemotherapeutics. According to the literature, diverse effects of nanoparticles relating to mammalian reproductive tissue are described. To address the impact of nanoparticles on cyto- and genotoxicity concerning the reproductive system, we examined the effect of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) on granulosa cells, which are very important for ovarian function and female fertility. Human granulosa cells (HLG-5) were treated with SPIONs, either coated with lauric acid (SEONLA) only, or additionally with a protein corona of bovine serum albumin (BSA; SEON(LA-BSA)), or with dextran (SEON(DEX)). Both micronuclei testing and the detection of γH2A.X revealed no genotoxic effects of SEON(LA-BSA), SEON(DEX) or SEON(LA). Thus, it was demonstrated that different coatings of SPIONs improve biocompatibility, especially in terms of genotoxicity towards cells of the reproductive system. PMID:26540051

  5. Modification of carbon-coated TiO2 by iron to increase adsorptivity and photoactivity for phenol.

    PubMed

    Tryba, B; Toyoda, M; Morawski, A W; Inagaki, M

    2005-07-01

    Carbon-coated TiO(2) modified by iron, were prepared from TiO(2) of anatase structure and PET modified by FeC(2)O(4). Catalysts were prepared by mixing powders of TiO(2) and modified PET and heating at different temperatures, from 400 to 800 degrees C under flow of Ar gas. High adsorption of phenol was observed on the catalyst heated at 400 degrees C, confirmed by FT-IR analysis. On this catalyst, fast rate of phenol decomposition was achieved by addition of small amount of H(2)O(2) to the reaction mixture. Phenol decomposition proceeded mainly through the direct oxidation of phenol species adsorbed on the catalyst surface due to the photo-Fenton reaction. Iron-modified carbon-coated TiO(2) catalysts heated at 500-800 degrees C showed almost no phenol adsorption or oxidation. PMID:15950040

  6. Red Dawn: Characterizing Iron Oxide Minerals in Atmospheric Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yauk, K.; Ottenfeld, C. F.; Reynolds, R. L.; Goldstein, H.; Cattle, S.; Berquo, T. S.; Moskowitz, B. M.

    2012-12-01

    Atmospheric dust is comprised of many components including small amounts of iron oxide minerals. Although the iron oxides make up a small weight percent of the bulk dust, they are important because of their roles in ocean fertilization, controls on climate, and as a potential health hazard to humans. Here we report on the iron oxide mineralogy in dust from a large dust storm, dubbed Red Dawn, which engulfed eastern Australia along a 3000 km front on 23 September 2009. Red Dawn originated from the lower Lake Eyre Basin of South Australia, western New South Wales (NSW) and southwestern Queensland and was the worst dust storm to have hit the city of Sydney in more than 60 years. Dust samples were collected from various locations across eastern Australia (Lake Cowal, Orange, Hornsby, Sydney) following the Red Dawn event. Our dust collection provides a good opportunity to study the physical and mineralogical properties of iron oxides from Red Dawn using a combination of reflectance spectroscopy, Mössbauer spectroscopy (MB), and magnetic measurements. Magnetization measurements from 20-400 K reveal that magnetite/maghemite, hematite and goethite are present in all samples with magnetite occurring in trace amounts (< 0.5wt%). However, the amount of magnetite/maghemite even in trace concentrations generally increases from Lake Cowal from west to east (0.01 to 0.29 wt%), with highest magnetite contents in the urban-Sydney sites. These observations indicate the additions of magnetite from local urban sources. Variable temperature Mössbauer spectroscopy (300 K and 4.2 K) indicate that goethite and hematite compose approximately 25-45 % of the Fe-bearing phases in the Orange and Lake Cowal samples. Goethite is more abundant than hematite in the Lake Cowal samples whereas the opposite is observed for Orange. Hematite is observed at both temperatures but goethite only at 4.2 K. The identification of goethite in Mössbauer analyses at low-temperature but not at room temperature

  7. Retaining Oxidative Stability of Emulsified Foods by Novel Nonmigratory Polyphenol Coated Active Packaging.

    PubMed

    Roman, Maxine J; Decker, Eric A; Goddard, Julie M

    2016-07-13

    Oxidation causes lipid rancidity, discoloration, and nutrient degradation that decrease shelf life of packaged foods. Synthetic additives are effective oxidation inhibitors, but are undesirable to consumers who prefer "clean" label products. The aim of this study was to improve oxidative stability of emulsified foods by a novel nonmigratory polyphenol coated active packaging. Polyphenol coatings were applied to chitosan functionalized polypropylene (PP) by laccase assisted polymerization of catechol and catechin. Polyphenol coated PP exhibited both metal chelating (39.3 ± 2.5 nmol Fe(3+) cm(-2), pH 4.0) and radical scavenging (up to 52.9 ± 1.8 nmol Trolox eq cm(-2)) capacity, resulting in dual antioxidant functionality to inhibit lipid oxidation and lycopene degradation in emulsions. Nonmigratory polyphenol coated PP inhibited ferric iron promoted degradation better than soluble chelators, potentially by partitioning iron from the emulsion droplet interface. This work demonstrates that polyphenol coatings can be designed for advanced material chemistry solutions in active food packaging. PMID:27310107

  8. Diffusion Barriers to Increase the Oxidative Life of Overlay Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesbitt, James A.; Lei, Jih-Fen

    1999-01-01

    Currently, most blades and vanes in the hottest section of aero gas turbine engines require some type of coating for oxidation protection. Newly developed single crystal superalloys have the mechanical potential to operate at increasingly higher component temperatures. However, at these elevated temperatures, coating/substrate interdiffusion can shorten the protective life of the coating. Diffusion barriers between overlay coatings and substrates are being examined to extend the protective life of the coating. A previously- developed finite-difference diffusion model has been modified to predict the oxidative life enhancement due to use of a diffusion barrier. The original diffusion model, designated COSIM, simulates Al diffusion in the coating to the growing oxide scale as well as Al diffusion into the substrate. The COSIM model incorporates an oxide growth and spalling model to provide the rate of Al consumption during cyclic oxidation. Coating failure is predicted when the Al concentration at the coating surface drops to a defined critical level. The modified COSIM model predicts the oxidative life of an overlay coating when a diffusion barrier is present eliminating diffusion of Al from the coating into the substrate. Both the original and the modified diffusion models have been used to predict the effectiveness of a diffusion barrier in extending the protective life of a NiCrAl overlay coating undergoing cyclic oxidation at 1100 C.

  9. Studies of the kinetics and mechanisms of perfluoroether reactions on iron and oxidized iron surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Napier, Mary E.; Stair, Peter C.

    1992-01-01

    Polymeric perfluoroalkylethers are being considered for use as lubricants in high temperature applications, but have been observed to catalytically decompose in the presence of metals. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) were used to explore the decomposition of three model fluorinated ethers on clean polycrystalline iron surfaces and iron surfaces chemically modified with oxygen. Low temperature adsorption of the model fluorinated ethers on the clean, oxygen modified and oxidized iron surfaces was molecular. Thermally activated defluorination of the three model compounds was observed on the clean iron surface at remarkably low temperatures, 155 K and below, with formation of iron fluoride. Preferential C-F bond scission occurred at the terminal fluoromethoxy, CF3O, of perfluoro-1-methoxy-2-ethoxy ethane and perfluoro-1-methoxy-2-ethoxy propane and at CF3/CF2O of perfluoro-1,3-diethoxy propane. The reactivity of the clean iron toward perfluoroalkylether decomposition when compared to other metals is due to the strength of the iron fluoride bond and the strong electron donating ability of the metallic iron. Chemisorption of an oxygen overlayer lowered the reactivity of the iron surface to the adsorption and decomposition of the three model fluorinated ethers by blocking active sites on the metal surface. Incomplete coverage of the iron surface with chemisorbed oxygen results in a reaction which resembles the defluorination reaction observed on the clean iron surface. Perfluoro-1-methoxy-2-ethoxy ethane reacts on the oxidized iron surface at 138 K, through a Lewis acid assisted cleavage of the carbon oxygen bond, with preferential attack at the terminal fluoromethoxy, CF3O. The oxidized iron surface did not passivate, but became more reactive with time. Perfluoro-1-methoxy-2-ethoxy propane and perfluoro-1,3-diethoxy propane desorbed prior to the observation of decomposition on the oxidized iron surface.

  10. Evaluation of oxide-coated iridium-rhenium chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Brian D.

    1994-01-01

    Iridium-coated rhenium (Ir-Re) provides long life operation of radiation-cooled rockets at temperatures up to 2200 C. Ceramic oxide coatings could be used to increase Ir-Re rocket lifetimes and allow operation in highly oxidizing environments. Ceramic oxide coatings promise to serve as both thermal and diffusion barriers for the iridium layer. Seven ceramic oxide-coated Ir-Re, 22-N rocket chambers were tested with gaseous hydrogen/gaseous oxygen (GHz/G02) propellants. Five chambers had thick (over 10 mils), monolithic coatings of either hafnia (HfO2) or zirconia (ZrO2). Two chambers had coatings with thicknesses less than 5 mils. One of these chambers had a thin-walled coating of ZrO2 infiltrated with sol gel HfO2. The other chamber had a coating composed of an Ir-oxide composite. The purpose of this test program was to assess the ability of the oxide coatings to withstand the thermal shock of combustion initiation, adhere under repeated thermal cycling, and operate in aggressively oxidizing environments. All of the coatings survived the thermal shock of combustion and demonstrated operation at mixture ratios up to 11. Testing the Ir-oxide composite-coated chamber included over 29 min at mixture ratio 16. The thicker walled coatings provided the larger temperature drops across the oxide layer (up to 570 C), but were susceptible to macrocracking and eventual chipping at a stress concentrator. The cracks apparently resealed during firing, under compression of the oxide layer. The thinner walled coatings did not experience the macrocracking and chipping of the chambers that was seen with the thick, monolithic coatings. However, burn-throughs in the throat region did occur in both of the thin-walled chambers at mixture ratios well above stoichiometric. The burn-throughs were probably the result of oxygen diffusion through the oxide coating that allowed the underlying Ir and Re layers to be oxidized. The results of this test program indicated that the thin-walled oxide

  11. Evaluation of oxide-coated iridium-rhenium chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Brian D.

    1994-03-01

    Iridium-coated rhenium (Ir-Re) provides long life operation of radiation-cooled rockets at temperatures up to 2200 C. Ceramic oxide coatings could be used to increase Ir-Re rocket lifetimes and allow operation in highly oxidizing environments. Ceramic oxide coatings promise to serve as both thermal and diffusion barriers for the iridium layer. Seven ceramic oxide-coated Ir-Re, 22-N rocket chambers were tested with gaseous hydrogen/gaseous oxygen (GHz/G02) propellants. Five chambers had thick (over 10 mils), monolithic coatings of either hafnia (HfO2) or zirconia (ZrO2). Two chambers had coatings with thicknesses less than 5 mils. One of these chambers had a thin-walled coating of ZrO2 infiltrated with sol gel HfO2. The other chamber had a coating composed of an Ir-oxide composite. The purpose of this test program was to assess the ability of the oxide coatings to withstand the thermal shock of combustion initiation, adhere under repeated thermal cycling, and operate in aggressively oxidizing environments. All of the coatings survived the thermal shock of combustion and demonstrated operation at mixture ratios up to 11. Testing the Ir-oxide composite-coated chamber included over 29 min at mixture ratio 16. The thicker walled coatings provided the larger temperature drops across the oxide layer (up to 570 C), but were susceptible to macrocracking and eventual chipping at a stress concentrator. The cracks apparently resealed during firing, under compression of the oxide layer. The thinner walled coatings did not experience the macrocracking and chipping of the chambers that was seen with the thick, monolithic coatings. However, burn-throughs in the throat region did occur in both of the thin-walled chambers at mixture ratios well above stoichiometric. The burn-throughs were probably the result of oxygen diffusion through the oxide coating that allowed the underlying Ir and Re layers to be oxidized. The results of this test program indicated that the thin-walled oxide

  12. Iron Photoreduction and Oxidation in an Acidic Mountain Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKnight, D. M.; Kimball, B. A.; Bencala, K. E.

    1988-04-01

    In a small mountain stream in Colorado that receives acidic mine drainage, photoreduction of ferric iron results in a well-defined increase in dissolved ferrous iron during the day. To quantify this process, an instream injection of a conservative tracer was used to measure discharge at the time that each sample was collected. Daytime production of ferrous iron by photoreduction was almost four times as great as nighttime oxidation of ferrous iron. The photoreduction process probably involves dissolved or colloidal ferric iron species and limited interaction with organic species because concentrations of organic carbon are low in this stream.

  13. Magnetization measurements and XMCD studies on ion irradiated iron oxide and core-shell iron/iron-oxide nanomaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Maninder; Qiang, You; Jiang, Weilin; Pearce, Carolyn; McCloy, John S.

    2014-12-02

    Magnetite (Fe3O4) and core-shell iron/iron-oxide (Fe/Fe3O4) nanomaterials prepared by a cluster deposition system were irradiated with 5.5 MeV Si2+ ions and the structures determined by x-ray diffraction as consisting of 100% magnetite and 36/64 wt% Fe/FeO, respectively. However, x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) indicates similar surfaces in the two samples, slightly oxidized and so having more Fe3+ than the expected magnetite structure, with XMCD intensity much lower for the irradiated core-shell samples indicating weaker magnetism. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) data lack the signature for FeO, but the irradiated core-shell system consists of Fe-cores with ~13 nm of separating oxide crystallite, so it is likely that FeO exists deeper than the probe depth of the XAS (~5 nm). Exchange bias (Hex) for both samples becomes increasingly negative as temperature is lowered, but the irradiated Fe3O4 sample shows greater sensitivity of cooling field on Hex. Loop asymmetries and Hex sensitivities of the irradiated Fe3O4 sample are due to interfaces and interactions between grains which were not present in samples before irradiation as well as surface oxidation. Asymmetries in the hysteresis curves of the irradiated core/shell sample are related to the reversal mechanism of the antiferromagnetic FeO and possibly some near surface oxidation.

  14. Oxidation and Emittance Studies of Coated Mo-Re

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, David E.

    1997-01-01

    A commercially available Fe-Cr-Si coating (R512E) and a silicide coating were evaluated regarding their ability to protect Mo-Re from oxidation. The R512E coating provided very good oxidation protection at 1260 C in atmospheric air. Oxidation tests were also performed at Mach 4 in the HYMETS facility at NASA Langley Research Center where again the R512E provided good oxidation protection but for much shorter times. Emittance measurements as a function of wavelength were also obtained for the R512E coating on Mo-Re after exposure to the Mach 4 environment at 1150 C and 1230 C.

  15. Overlay coating degradation by simultaneous oxidation and coating/substrate interdiffusion. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesbitt, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    Degradation of NiCrAlZr overlay coatings on various NiCrAl substrates was examined after cyclic oxidation. Concentration/distance profiles were measured in the coating and substrate after various oxidation exposures at 1150 C. For each stubstrate, the Al content in the coating decreased rapidly. The concentration/distance profiles, and particularly that for Al, reflected the oxide spalling resistance of each coated substrate. A numerical model was developed to simulate diffusion associated with overlay-coating degradation by oxidation and coating/substrate interdiffusion. Input to the numerical model consisted of the Cr and Al content of the coating and substrate, ternary diffusivities, and various oxide spalling parameters. The model predicts the Cr and Al concentrations in the coating and substrate after any number of oxidation/thermal cycles. The numerical model also predicts coating failure based on the ability of the coating to supply sufficient Al to the oxide scale. The validity of the model was confirmed by comparison of the predicted and measured concentration/distance profiles. The model was subsequently used to identify the most critical system parameters affecting coating life.

  16. Nitric Oxide Improves Internal Iron Availability in Plants1

    PubMed Central

    Graziano, Magdalena; Beligni, María Verónica; Lamattina, Lorenzo

    2002-01-01

    Iron deficiency impairs chlorophyll biosynthesis and chloroplast development. In leaves, most of the iron must cross several biological membranes to reach the chloroplast. The components involved in the complex internal iron transport are largely unknown. Nitric oxide (NO), a bioactive free radical, can react with transition metals to form metal-nitrosyl complexes. Sodium nitroprusside, an NO donor, completely prevented leaf interveinal chlorosis in maize (Zea mays) plants growing with an iron concentration as low as 10 μm Fe-EDTA in the nutrient solution. S-Nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine, another NO donor, as well as gaseous NO supply in a translucent chamber were also able to revert the iron deficiency symptoms. A specific NO scavenger, 2-(4-carboxy-phenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide, blocked the effect of the NO donors. The effect of NO treatment on the photosynthetic apparatus of iron-deficient plants was also studied. Electron micrographs of mesophyll cells from iron-deficient maize plants revealed plastids with few photosynthetic lamellae and rudimentary grana. In contrast, in NO-treated maize plants, mesophyll chloroplast appeared completely developed. NO treatment did not increase iron content in plant organs, when expressed in a fresh matter basis, suggesting that root iron uptake was not enhanced. NO scavengers 2-(4-carboxy-phenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide and methylene blue promoted interveinal chlorosis in iron-replete maize plants (growing in 250 μm Fe-EDTA). Even though results support a role for endogenous NO in iron nutrition, experiments did not establish an essential role. NO was also able to revert the chlorotic phenotype of the iron-inefficient maize mutants yellow stripe1 and yellow stripe3, both impaired in the iron uptake mechanisms. All together, these results support a biological action of NO on the availability and/or delivery of metabolically active iron within the plant. PMID:12481068

  17. Biocompatible capped iron oxide nanoparticles for Vibrio cholerae detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Anshu; Baral, Dinesh; Rawat, Kamla; Solanki, Pratima R.; Bohidar, H. B.

    2015-05-01

    We report the studies relating to fabrication of an efficient immunosensor for Vibrio cholerae detection. Magnetite (iron oxide (Fe3O4)) nanoparticles (NPs) have been synthesized by the co-precipitation method and capped by citric acid (CA). These NPs were electrophoretically deposited onto indium-tin-oxide (ITO)-coated glass substrate and used for immobilization of monoclonal antibodies against Vibrio cholerae (Ab) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) for Vibrio cholerae detection using an electrochemical technique. The structural and morphological studies of Fe3O4 and CA-Fe3O4/ITO were characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and dynamic light scattering (DLS) techniques. The average crystalline size of Fe3O4, CA-Fe3O4 nanoparticles obtained were about 29 ± 1 nm and 37 ± 1 nm, respectively. The hydrodynamic radius of the nanoparticles was found to be 77.35 nm (Fe3O4) and 189.51 nm (CA-Fe3O4) by DLS measurement. The results of electrochemical response studies of the fabricated BSA/Ab/CA-Fe2O3/ITO immunosensor exhibits a good detection range of 12.5-500 ng mL-1 with a low detection limit of 0.32 ng mL-1, sensitivity 0.03 Ω/ng ml-1 cm-2, and reproducibility more than 11 times.

  18. Current status of superparamagnetic iron oxide contrast agents for liver magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Xiang J

    2015-12-21

    Five types of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO), i.e. Ferumoxides (Feridex(®) IV, Berlex Laboratories), Ferucarbotran (Resovist(®), Bayer Healthcare), Ferumoxtran-10 (AMI-227 or Code-7227, Combidex(®), AMAG Pharma; Sinerem(®), Guerbet), NC100150 (Clariscan(®), Nycomed,) and (VSOP C184, Ferropharm) have been designed and clinically tested as magnetic resonance contrast agents. However, until now Resovist(®) is current available in only a few countries. The other four agents have been stopped for further development or withdrawn from the market. Another SPIO agent Ferumoxytol (Feraheme(®)) is approved for the treatment of iron deficiency in adult chronic kidney disease patients. Ferumoxytol is comprised of iron oxide particles surrounded by a carbohydrate coat, and it is being explored as a potential imaging approach for evaluating lymph nodes and certain liver tumors. PMID:26715826

  19. Application of novel iron core/iron oxide shell nanoparticles to sentinel lymph node identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cousins, Aidan; Howard, Douglas; Henning, Anna M.; Nelson, Melanie R. M.; Tilley, Richard D.; Thierry, Benjamin

    2015-12-01

    Current `gold standard' staging of breast cancer and melanoma relies on accurate in vivo identification of the sentinel lymph node. By replacing conventional tracers (dyes and radiocolloids) with magnetic nanoparticles and using a handheld magnetometer probe for in vivo identification, it is believed the accuracy of sentinel node identification in nonsuperficial cancers can be improved due to increased spatial resolution of magnetometer probes and additional anatomical information afforded by MRI road-mapping. By using novel iron core/iron oxide shell nanoparticles, the sensitivity of sentinel node mapping via MRI can be increased due to an increased magnetic saturation compared to traditional iron oxide nanoparticles. A series of in vitro magnetic phantoms (iron core vs. iron oxide nanoparticles) were prepared to simulate magnetic particle accumulation in the sentinel lymph node. A novel handheld magnetometer probe was used to measure the relative signals of each phantom, and determine if clinical application of iron core particles can improve in vivo detection of the sentinel node compared to traditional iron oxide nanoparticles. The findings indicate that novel iron core nanoparticles above a certain size possess high magnetic saturation, but can also be produced with low coercivity and high susceptibility. While some modification to the design of handheld magnetometer probes may be required for particles with large coercivity, use of iron core particles could improve MRI and magnetometer probe detection sensitivity by up to 330 %.

  20. Chemical composition, electrochemical, and morphological properties of iron phosphate conversion coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Warburton, Y.J.; Gibbon, D.L.; Jackson, K.M.; Gate, L.F.; Rodnyansky, A.; Warburton, P.R.

    1999-09-01

    Iron phosphate conversion coatings are used widely in the pretreatment industry to enhance paint adherence to metal substrates and therefore improve corrosion resistance. However, very limited nonproprietary literature describing the properties of iron phosphate coating is available, as compared to volumes dedicated to zinc phosphate coating. The present study described chemical, electrochemical, and morphological characterizations of iron phosphate coating using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), potentiodynamic scans, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). For the samples under investigation, the mode of operation of iron phosphate coating was to promote paint adhesion, and the coating itself did not impart significant corrosion protection to the metal substrate. It also was shown that the Fe/P ratio in the phosphate coating ranged from 1:2 to 1:1. When tested in pH 7 buffered phosphate solution, the phosphate coating displayed a passivation region, which also possessed the highest impedance value. The phosphate coating was found to comprise two layers: a dense, adherent layer and a loose, granular top layer. For samples with coating weights of 20 mg/ft{sup 2} to 30 mg/ft{sup 2} (0.22 g/m{sup 2} to 0.32 g/m{sup 2}), the corresponding coating thickness was {approximately} 0.1 {micro}m to 0.3 {micro}m.

  1. Oxidative Stress and the Homeodynamics of Iron Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Bresgen, Nikolaus; Eckl, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Iron and oxygen share a delicate partnership since both are indispensable for survival, but if the partnership becomes inadequate, this may rapidly terminate life. Virtually all cell components are directly or indirectly affected by cellular iron metabolism, which represents a complex, redox-based machinery that is controlled by, and essential to, metabolic requirements. Under conditions of increased oxidative stress—i.e., enhanced formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS)—however, this machinery may turn into a potential threat, the continued requirement for iron promoting adverse reactions such as the iron/H2O2-based formation of hydroxyl radicals, which exacerbate the initial pro-oxidant condition. This review will discuss the multifaceted homeodynamics of cellular iron management under normal conditions as well as in the context of oxidative stress. PMID:25970586

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia Enhances Red Blood Cell Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Nagababu, Enika; Gulyani, Seema; Earley, Christopher J.; Cutler, Roy G.; Mattson, Mark P.; Rifkind, Joseph M.

    2009-01-01

    Oxidative stress associated with iron deficiency anemia in a murine model was studied feeding an iron deficient diet. Anemia was monitored by a decrease in hematocrit and hemoglobin. For the 9 week study an increase in total iron binding capacity was also demonstrated. Anemia resulted in an increase in red blood cells (RBC) oxidative stress as indicated by increased levels of fluorescent heme degradation products (1.24 fold after 5 weeks; 2.1 fold after 9 weeks). The increase in oxidative stress was further confirmed by elevated levels of methemoglobin for mice fed an iron deficient diet. Increased hemoglobin autoxidation and subsequent generation of ROS can account for the shorter RBC lifespan and other pathological changes associated with iron deficiency anemia. PMID:19051108

  3. Immobilisation of arsenic by iron(II)-oxidizing bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kappler, A.; Hohmann, C.; Winkler, E.; Muehe, M.; Morin, G.

    2008-12-01

    Arsenic-contaminated groundwater is an environmental problem that affects about 1-2% of the world's population. As arsenic-contaminated water is also used for irrigating rice fields, the uptake of arsenic via rice is in some cases even higher than via drinking water. Arsenic is often of geogenic origin and in many cases bound to iron(III) minerals. Microbial iron(III) reduction leads to dissolution of Fe(III) minerals and thus the arsenic bound to these minerals is released to the environment. In turn, iron(II)-oxidizing bacteria have the potential to co-precipitate or sorb arsenic during iron(II) oxidation followed by iron(III) mineral formation. Here, we present work on arsenic co-precipitation and immobilization by anaerobic and aerobic iron(II)-oxidizing bacteria. Co-precipitation batch experiments with pure cultures of nitrate-dependent, phototrophic, and microaerophilic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria are used to quantify the amount of arsenic that can be immobilized during microbial iron mineral precipitation. Iron and arsenic speciation and redox state are determined by X- ray diffraction and synchrotron-based X-ray absorption methods (EXAFS, XANES). Microcosm experiments are set-up either with liquid media or with rice paddy soil amended with arsenic. Rice paddy soil from arsenic contaminated rice fields in China that include a natural population of Fe(II)-oxidizing microorganisms is used as inoculum. Dissolved and solid-phase arsenic and iron are quantified, Arsenic speciation is determined and the iron minerals are identified. Additionally, Arsenic uptake into the rice plant is quantified and a gene expression pattern in rice (Oryza sativa cv Gladia) is determined by microarrays as a response to the presence of Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria.

  4. IRON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The document surveys the effects of organic and inorganic iron that are relevant to humans and their environment. The biology and chemistry of iron are complex and only partially understood. Iron participates in oxidation reduction processes that not only affect its geochemical m...

  5. Dielectric coating of iron particles by electrostatic colloidal deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Daniel

    Iron is a soft magnetic material widely used in electric motors, generators, and transformers because they demand high permeability and low core loss. The main goal of this project is to develop a commercially viable coating of iron powders for press-and-sinter processing that would enable higher firing temperatures to anneal out magnetic defects, while maintaining high electrical resistivity (˜10,000 muO-cm) and high iron density (>90 %). An alumina-modified colloidal silica (LUDOX CL), was used in early work to make Fe (-)/SiO2 (+) in a wet-pressed route. The highest relative density and resistivity measurements for a wet-pressing route were 87 % and 7300 +/- 1000 muO-cm respectively. Dry-pressed route is favorable over wet-pressed route because it can be commercially viable. About 100-fold increase in resistivity (860,000 muO-cm) was obtained compared to the wet-pressed route, with only a small decrease in density (1 - 2 %). A study was conducted to explore the separate, and possibly interactive, effects of micro-alumina particulate (Sumitomo AKP-50, 0.2 mum) and lubricant (Kenolube, a proprietary metal soap-wax composite lube). Reducing the LUDOX CL, high shear mixing using a coffee grinder, and multimodal packing were studied to improve density. Only 10 % reduction of LUDOX CL dropped the resistivity by over two orders of magnitude with the same relative density. High shear mixing and multimodal packing had little effects to increase density. An unmodified colloidal silica (LUDOX TM) was also explored to make Fe (+) /SiO2 (-) and resistivity of 120,000 muO-cm and 80 % density were obtained. Addition of cationic polyelectrolyte, polydiallyldimethyl-ammonium chloride (PDADMAC) was studied to provide stronger adhesion between LUDOX TM and surface of iron particles. Reducing the amount of LUDOX TM in PDADMAC showed relative density greater than 90 % but resistivity measurements were less than 1500 iU-cm.

  6. Magnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles: Synthesis and Surface Functionalization Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wei; He, Quanguo; Jiang, Changzhong

    2008-10-01

    Surface functionalized magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) are a kind of novel functional materials, which have been widely used in the biotechnology and catalysis. This review focuses on the recent development and various strategies in preparation, structure, and magnetic properties of naked and surface functionalized iron oxide NPs and their corresponding application briefly. In order to implement the practical application, the particles must have combined properties of high magnetic saturation, stability, biocompatibility, and interactive functions at the surface. Moreover, the surface of iron oxide NPs could be modified by organic materials or inorganic materials, such as polymers, biomolecules, silica, metals, etc. The problems and major challenges, along with the directions for the synthesis and surface functionalization of iron oxide NPs, are considered. Finally, some future trends and prospective in these research areas are also discussed.

  7. Magnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles: Synthesis and Surface Functionalization Strategies

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Surface functionalized magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) are a kind of novel functional materials, which have been widely used in the biotechnology and catalysis. This review focuses on the recent development and various strategies in preparation, structure, and magnetic properties of naked and surface functionalized iron oxide NPs and their corresponding application briefly. In order to implement the practical application, the particles must have combined properties of high magnetic saturation, stability, biocompatibility, and interactive functions at the surface. Moreover, the surface of iron oxide NPs could be modified by organic materials or inorganic materials, such as polymers, biomolecules, silica, metals, etc. The problems and major challenges, along with the directions for the synthesis and surface functionalization of iron oxide NPs, are considered. Finally, some future trends and prospective in these research areas are also discussed. PMID:21749733

  8. Synthesis and heating effect of iron/iron oxide composite and iron oxide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Q.; Baker, I.; Loudis, J. A.; Liao, Y.F.; Hoopes, P.J.

    2014-01-01

    Fe/Fe oxide nanoparticles, in which the core consists of metallic Fe and the shell is composed of Fe oxides, were obtained by reduction of an aqueous solution of FeCl3 within a NaBH4 solution, or, using a water-in-oil micro-emulsion with CTAB as the surfactant. The reduction was performed either in an inert atmosphere or in air, and passivation with air was performed to produce the Fe/Fe3O4 core/shell composite. Phase identification and particle size were determined by X-ray diffraction and TEM. Thermal analysis was performed using a differential scanning calorimeter. The quasistatic magnetic properties were measured using a VSM, and the specific absorption rates (SARs) of both Fe oxide and Fe/Fe3O4 composite nanoparticles either dispersed in methanol or in an epoxy resin were measured by Luxtron fiber temperature sensors in an alternating magnetic field of 150 Oe at 250 kHz. It was found that the preparation conditions, including the concentrations of solutions, the mixing procedure and the heat treatment, influence the particle size, the crystal structure and consequently the magnetic properties of the particles. Compared with Fe oxides, the saturation magnetization (MS) of Fe/Fe3O4 particles (100–190 emu/g) can be twice as high, and the coercivity (HC) can be tunable from several Oe to several hundred Oe. Hence, the SAR of Fe/Fe3O4 composite nanoparticles can be much higher than that of Fe oxides, with a maximum SAR of 345 W/g. The heating behavior is related to the magnetic behavior of the nanoparticles. PMID:25301983

  9. Synthesis and heating effect of iron/iron oxide composite and iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Q.; Baker, I.; Loudis, J. A.; Liao, Y. F.; Hoopes, P. J.

    2007-02-01

    Fe/Fe oxide nanoparticles, in which the core consists of metallic Fe and the shell is composed of Fe oxides, were obtained by reduction of an aqueous solution of FeCl 3 within a NaBH 4 solution, or, using a water-in-oil micro-emulsion with CTAB as the surfactant. The reduction was performed either in an inert atmosphere or in air, and passivation with air was performed to produce the Fe/Fe 3O 4 core/shell composite. Phase identification and particle size were determined by X-ray diffraction and TEM. Thermal analysis was performed using a differential scanning calorimeter. The quasistatic magnetic properties were measured using a VSM, and the specific absorption rates (SARs) of both Fe oxide and Fe/Fe 3O 4 composite nanoparticles either dispersed in methanol or in an epoxy resin were measured by Luxtron fiber temperature sensors in an alternating magnetic field of 150 Oe at 250 kHz. It was found that the preparation conditions, including the concentrations of solutions, the mixing procedure and the heat treatment, influence the particle size, the crystal structure and consequently the magnetic properties of the particles. Compared with Fe oxides, the saturation magnetization (MS) of Fe/Fe 3O 4 particles (100-190 emu/g) can be twice as high, and the coercivity (H C) can be tunable from several Oe to several hundred Oe. Hence, the SAR of Fe/Fe 3O 4 composite nanoparticles can be much higher than that of Fe oxides, with a maximum SAR of 345 W/g. The heating behavior is related to the magnetic behavior of the nanoparticles.

  10. Evaluation of iron oxide nanoparticle biocompatibility

    PubMed Central

    Hanini, Amel; Schmitt, Alain; Kacem, Kamel; Chau, François; Ammar, Souad; Gavard, Julie

    2011-01-01

    Nanotechnology is an exciting field of investigation for the development of new treatments for many human diseases. However, it is necessary to assess the biocompatibility of nanoparticles in vitro and in vivo before considering clinical applications. Our characterization of polyol-produced maghemite γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles showed high structural quality. The particles showed a homogeneous spherical size around 10 nm and could form aggregates depending on the dispersion conditions. Such nanoparticles were efficiently taken up in vitro by human endothelial cells, which represent the first biological barrier to nanoparticles in vivo. However, γ-Fe2O3 can cause cell death within 24 hours of exposure, most likely through oxidative stress. Further in vivo exploration suggests that although γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles are rapidly cleared through the urine, they can lead to toxicity in the liver, kidneys and lungs, while the brain and heart remain unaffected. In conclusion, γ-Fe2O3 could exhibit harmful properties and therefore surface coating, cellular targeting, and local exposure should be considered before developing clinical applications. PMID:21589646

  11. Evaluation of iron oxide nanoparticle biocompatibility.

    PubMed

    Hanini, Amel; Schmitt, Alain; Kacem, Kamel; Chau, François; Ammar, Souad; Gavard, Julie

    2011-01-01

    Nanotechnology is an exciting field of investigation for the development of new treatments for many human diseases. However, it is necessary to assess the biocompatibility of nanoparticles in vitro and in vivo before considering clinical applications. Our characterization of polyol-produced maghemite γ-Fe(2)O(3) nanoparticles showed high structural quality. The particles showed a homogeneous spherical size around 10 nm and could form aggregates depending on the dispersion conditions. Such nanoparticles were efficiently taken up in vitro by human endothelial cells, which represent the first biological barrier to nanoparticles in vivo. However, γ-Fe(2)O(3) can cause cell death within 24 hours of exposure, most likely through oxidative stress. Further in vivo exploration suggests that although γ-Fe(2)O(3) nanoparticles are rapidly cleared through the urine, they can lead to toxicity in the liver, kidneys and lungs, while the brain and heart remain unaffected. In conclusion, γ-Fe(2)O(3) could exhibit harmful properties and therefore surface coating, cellular targeting, and local exposure should be considered before developing clinical applications. PMID:21589646

  12. High-temperature oxidation of titanium silicide coatings on titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Abba, A.; Caillet, M.; Galerie, A.

    1982-02-01

    Coatings of Ti/sub 5/Si/sub 3/ on titanium have been prepared by means of decomposition of silane SiH/sub 4/ on heated titanium ribbons. Oxidation of the coated titanium specimens was much slower than that of the noncoated ones. Gravimetric and morphological experiments allowed to propose a mechanism describing the oxidation process.

  13. Silica-coated iron nanocubes: preparation, characterization and application in microwave absorption.

    PubMed

    Ni, Xiaomin; Zheng, Zhong; Hu, Xiang; Xiao, Xiukun

    2010-01-01

    Novel cubic nanocapsules consisting of metallic iron core and amorphous silica shell were fabricated through a simple chemical reduction route followed by a Stöber process. Thus-prepared Fe@SiO(2) nanocubes were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectrometer (XPS), Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR), thermogravimetry-differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and scalar network analysis (SNA). Comparing with that of pure iron counterparts, silica-coated iron nanocubes exhibited improved magnetic properties, oxidation resistance and microwave absorption performance. A reflection loss (RL) exceeding -12 dB was obtained in the frequency range of 8-14 GHz for an absorber thickness of 2 mm, with an optimal RL of -18.2 dB at 9 GHz. Mechanism of the improved microwave absorption properties of the Fe@SiO(2) composite was discussed based on their magnetic properties and electromagnetic theory. PMID:19833348

  14. Iron oxide-based nanomagnets in nanomedicine: fabrication and applications

    PubMed Central

    Meng Lin, Meng; Kim, Hyung-Hwan; Kim, Hyuck; Muhammed, Mamoun; Kyung Kim, Do

    2010-01-01

    Iron oxide-based nanomagnets have attracted a great deal of attention in nanomedicine over the past decade. Down to the nanoscale, superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles can only be magnetized in the presence of an external magnetic field, which makes them capable of forming stable colloids in a physio-biological medium. Their superparamagnetic property, together with other intrinsic properties, such as low cytotoxicity, colloidal stability, and bioactive molecule conjugation capability, makes such nanomagnets ideal in both in-vitro and in-vivo biomedical applications. In this review, a chemical, physical, and biological synthetic approach to prepare iron oxide-based nanomagnets with different physicochemical properties was illustrated and compared. The growing interest in iron oxide-based nanomagnets with multifunctionalities was explored in cancer diagnostics and treatment, focusing on their combined roles in a magnetic resonance contrast agent, hyperthermia, and magnetic force assisted drug delivery. Iron oxides as magnetic carriers in gene therapy were reviewed with a focus on the sophisticated design and construction of magnetic vectors. Finally, the iron oxide-based nanomagnet also represents a very promising tool in particle/cell interfacing in controlling cellular functionalities, such as adhesion, proliferation, differentiation, and cell patterning, in stem cell therapy and tissue engineering applications. PMID:22110854

  15. Iron oxide nanoparticles in geomicrobiology: from biogeochemistry to bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Braunschweig, Juliane; Bosch, Julian; Meckenstock, Rainer U

    2013-09-25

    Iron oxides are important constituents of soils and sediments and microbial iron reduction is considered to be a significant anaerobic respiration process in the subsurface, however low microbial reduction rates of macroparticulate Fe oxides in laboratory studies led to an underestimation of the role of Fe oxides in the global Fe redox cycle. Recent studies show the high potential of nano-sized Fe oxides in the environment as, for example, electron acceptor for microbial respiration, electron shuttle between different microorganisms, and scavenger for heavy metals. Biotic and abiotic reactivity of iron macroparticles differ significantly from nano-sized Fe oxides, which are usually much more reactive. Factors such as particle size, solubility, ferrous iron, crystal structure, and organic molecules were identified to influence the reactivity. This review discusses factors influencing the microbial reactivity of Fe oxides. It highlights the differences between natural and synthetic Fe oxides especially regarding the presence of organic molecules such as humic acids and natural organic matter. Attention is given to the transport behavior of Fe oxides in laboratory systems and in the environment, because of the high affinity of different contaminants to Fe oxide surfaces and associated co-transport of pollutants. The high reactivity of Fe oxides and their potential as adsorbents for different pollutants are discussed with respect to application and development of remediation technologies. PMID:23557995

  16. Internal oxidation of laminated ternary Ru-Ta-Zr coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yung-I.; Lu, Tso-Shen

    2015-10-01

    Researchers have observed the internal oxidation phenomenon in binary alloy coatings when developing refractory alloy coatings for protective purposes by conducting annealing at high temperatures and in oxygen-containing atmospheres. The coatings were assembled using cyclical gradient concentration deposition during cosputtering by employing a substrate holder rotating at a slow speed. The internally oxidized zone demonstrated a laminated structure, comprising alternating oxygen-rich and oxygen-deficient layers stacked in a general orientation. In the current study, Ru-Ta-Zr coatings were prepared with various stacking sequences during cosputtering. The Ru-Ta-Zr coatings were annealed at 600 °C in an atmosphere continuously purged with 1% O2-99% Ar mixed gas for 30 min. A transmission electron microscope was used to examine the periods of the laminated layers and crystallinity of the annealed coatings. Depth profiles produced using an Auger electron spectroscope and X-ray photoelectron spectroscope were used to certify the periodic variation of the related constituents and chemical states of the elements, respectively. The results indicate that the internally oxidized ternary coatings are stacked of Ru-, Ta2O5-, and ZrO2-dominant sublayers and that the stacking sequences of the sublayers affect the crystalline structure of the coatings. Zr is oxidized preferentially in the Ru-Ta-Zr coatings, increasing the surface hardness of the oxidized coatings.

  17. Oxidation Resistant Ti-Al-Fe Diffusion Barrier for FeCrAlY Coatings on Titanium Aluminides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brady, Michael P. (Inventor); Smialke, James L. (Inventor); Brindley, William J. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A diffusion barrier to help protect titanium aluminide alloys, including the coated alloys of the TiAl gamma + Ti3Al (alpha2) class, from oxidative attack and interstitial embrittlement at temperatures up to at least 1000 C is disclosed. The coating may comprise FeCrAlX alloys. The diffusion barrier comprises titanium, aluminum, and iron in the following approximate atomic percent: Ti-(50-55)Al-(9-20)Fe. This alloy is also suitable as an oxidative or structural coating for such substrates.

  18. Iron oxide nanoparticles stabilized with dendritic polyglycerols as selective MRI contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordmeyer, Daniel; Stumpf, Patrick; Gröger, Dominic; Hofmann, Andreas; Enders, Sven; Riese, Sebastian B.; Dernedde, Jens; Taupitz, Matthias; Rauch, Ursula; Haag, Rainer; Rühl, Eckart; Graf, Christina

    2014-07-01

    ligand exchange process in a one pot synthesis with dPG and dPGS bearing phosphonate as anchor groups. Dynamic light scattering measurements performed in water and different biological media demonstrate that the hydrodynamic diameter of the particles is only slightly increased by the ligand exchange process resulting in a final diameter of less than 30 nm and that the particles are stable in these media. It is also revealed by magnetic resonance studies that their magnetic relaxivity is reduced by the surface modification but it is still sufficient for high contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Additionally, incubation of dPGS functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles with human umbilical vein endothelial cells showed a 50% survival at 85 nM (concentration of nanoparticles). Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) studies demonstrate that the dPGS functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles inhibit L-selectin ligand binding whereas the particles containing only dPG do not show this effect. Experiments in a flow chamber with human myelogenous leukemia cells confirmed L-selectin inhibition of the dPGS functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles and with that the L-selectin mediated leukocyte adhesion. These results indicate that dPGS functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles are a promising contrast agent for inflamed tissue probed by MRI. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: A detailed description of the synthesis of the ligands as well as the preparation and functionalization of the iron oxide nanoparticles including their physico-chemical characterization are presented. Further, details of the cell experiments and the SPR experiments are given. Two representative movies are provided showing leukocyte rolling on the ligand coated surface of the flow chamber. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr04793h

  19. Transparent Aluminium Oxide Coatings of Polymer Brushes.

    PubMed

    Micciulla, Samantha; Duan, XiaoFei; Strebe, Julia; Löhmann, Oliver; Lamb, Robert N; von Klitzing, Regine

    2016-04-11

    A novel method for the preparation of transparent Al2 O3 coatings of polymers is presented. An environmental-friendly sol-gel method is employed, which implies mild conditions and low costs. A thermoresponsive brush is chosen as a model surface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is used to characterize the samples during the conversion of the precursor Al(OH)3 into oxide and to prove the mildness of the protocol. The study evidences a relation between lateral homogeneity of alumina and the wettability of the polymer surface by the precursor solution, while morphology and elasticity are dominated by the polymer properties. The study of the swelling behavior of the underneath brush reveals the absence of water uptake, proving the impermeability of the alumina layer. The broad chemical and structural variety of polymers, combined with the robustness of transparent alumina films, makes these composites promising as biomedical implants, protective sheets and components for electric and optical devices. PMID:26991543

  20. Infrared nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation of stainless steel: micro iron-oxide zones generation.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Morales, M; Frausto-Reyes, C; Soto-Bernal, J J; Acosta-Ortiz, S E; Gonzalez-Mota, R; Rosales-Candelas, I

    2014-07-15

    Nanosecond-pulsed, infrared (1064 nm) laser irradiation was used to create periodic metal oxide coatings on the surface of two samples of commercial stainless steel at ambient conditions. A pattern of four different metal oxide zones was created using a galvanometer scanning head and a focused laser beam over each sample. This pattern is related to traverse direction of the laser beam scanning. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) was used to find the elemental composition and Raman spectroscopy to characterize each oxide zone. Pulsed laser irradiation modified the composition of the stainless steel samples, affecting the concentration of the main components within each heat affected zone. The Raman spectra of the generated oxides have different intensity profiles, which suggest different oxide phases such as magnetite and maghemite. In addition, these oxides are not sensible to the laser power of the Raman system, as are the iron oxide powders reported in the literature. These experiments show that it is possible to generate periodic patterns of various iron oxide zones by laser irradiation, of stainless steel at ambient conditions, and that Raman spectroscopy is a useful punctual technique for the analysis and inspection of small oxide areas. PMID:24699286

  1. Infrared nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation of stainless steel: Micro iron-oxide zones generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz-Morales, M.; Frausto-Reyes, C.; Soto-Bernal, J. J.; Acosta-Ortiz, S. E.; Gonzalez-Mota, R.; Rosales-Candelas, I.

    2014-07-01

    Nanosecond-pulsed, infrared (1064 nm) laser irradiation was used to create periodic metal oxide coatings on the surface of two samples of commercial stainless steel at ambient conditions. A pattern of four different metal oxide zones was created using a galvanometer scanning head and a focused laser beam over each sample. This pattern is related to traverse direction of the laser beam scanning. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) was used to find the elemental composition and Raman spectroscopy to characterize each oxide zone. Pulsed laser irradiation modified the composition of the stainless steel samples, affecting the concentration of the main components within each heat affected zone. The Raman spectra of the generated oxides have different intensity profiles, which suggest different oxide phases such as magnetite and maghemite. In addition, these oxides are not sensible to the laser power of the Raman system, as are the iron oxide powders reported in the literature. These experiments show that it is possible to generate periodic patterns of various iron oxide zones by laser irradiation, of stainless steel at ambient conditions, and that Raman spectroscopy is a useful punctual technique for the analysis and inspection of small oxide areas.

  2. Inflammatory imaging with ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Taro; Kusakabe, Yoshinori; Fujii, Hitomi; Murase, Katsutoshi; Yamazaki, Youichi; Murase, Kenya

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the usefulness and feasibility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) (USPIO-enhanced MRI) for imaging inflammatory tissues. First, we investigated the relationship between the apparent transverse relaxation rate (R2*) and the concentration of USPIO by phantom studies and measured the apparent transverse relaxivity (r2*) of USPIO. Second, we performed animal experiments using a total of 30 mice. The mice were divided into five groups [A (n=6), B (n=6), C (n=6), sham control (n=6), and control (n=6)]. The mice in Groups A, B, C and control were subcutaneously injected with 0.1 ml of turpentine oil on Day 0, while those in the sham control group were subcutaneously injected with 0.1 ml of saline. The mice in Groups A, B, C and sham control were intraperitoneally injected with 200 μmol Fe per kilogram body weight of USPIO (28 nm in diameter) immediately after the first MRI study on Days 3, 5, 7 and 7, respectively, and those in the control group were not injected with USPIO. The second and third MRI studies were performed at 24 and 48 h after USPIO administration, respectively. The maps of R2* were generated from the apparent transverse relaxation time (T2*)-weighted images with six different echo times. The phantom studies showed that there was a linear relationship between R2* and the concentration of USPIO (r=0.99) and the r2* value of USPIO was 105.7 mM(-1) s(-1). There was a significant increase of R2* in inflammatory tissues in Group C at 24 h after USPIO administration compared with the precontrast R2* value. Our results suggest that USPIO-enhanced MRI combined with R2* measurement is useful for detecting inflammatory tissues. PMID:20850245

  3. Synthesis of carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles via solid state reduction of iron oxide nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Bystrzejewski, M.

    2011-06-15

    The encapsulation of iron nanoparticles in protective carbon cages leads to unique hybrid core-shell nanomaterials. Recent literature reports suggest that such nanocomposites can be obtained in a relatively simple process involving the solid state carbothermal reduction of iron oxide nanoparticles. This approach is very attractive because it does not require advanced equipment and consumes less energy in comparison to widely used plasma methods. The presented more-in-depth study shows that the carbothermal approach is sensitive to temperature and the process yield strongly depends on the morphology and crystallinity of the carbon material used as a reductant. - Graphical abstract: Reduction of iron oxide nanoparticles by carbon black at 1200 deg. C yields well crystallized carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles. Highlights: > Carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles were synthesized by carbothermal reduction of iron oxide nanoparticles. > The process has the highest selectivity at 1200 C. > Lower temperatures result in iron oxide nanoparticles wrapped in carbon matrix. > The encapsulation rate of Fe at 1200 deg. C was found to be 15%.

  4. Oxidation-Induced Degradable Nanogels for Iron Chelation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhi; Wang, Yan; Purro, Max; Xiong, May P.

    2016-01-01

    Iron overload can increase cellular oxidative stress levels due to formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS); untreated, it can be extremely destructive to organs and fatal to patients. Since elevated oxidative stress levels are inherent to the condition in such patients, oxidation-induced degradable nanogels for iron chelation were rationally designed by simultaneously polymerizing oxidation-sensitive host-guest crosslinkers between β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) and ferrocene (Fc) and iron chelating moieties composed of deferoxamine (DFO) into the final gel scaffold in reverse emulsion reaction chambers. UV-Vis absorption and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) was used to verify iron chelating capability of nanogels. These materials can degrade into smaller chelating fragments at rates proportional to the level of oxidative stress present. Conjugating DFO reduces the cytotoxicity of the chelator in the macrophage cells. Importantly, the nanogel can effectively reduce cellular ferritin expression in iron overloaded cells and regulate intracellular iron levels at the same time, which is important for maintaining a homeostatic level of this critical metal in cells. PMID:26868174

  5. Enhanced bio-compatibility of ferrofluids of self-assembled superparamagnetic iron oxide-silica core-shell nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, T N; Mary, A P Reena; Swalih, P K Anas; Kumar, D Sakthi; Makarov, D; Albrecht, M; Puthumana, Jayesh; Anas, Abdulaziz; Anantharaman, M R

    2011-03-01

    Self-assembled magnetic colloidal suspensions are sought after by material scientists owing to its huge application potential. The biomedical applications of colloidal nanoparticles necessitate that they are biocompatible, non-interacting, monodispersed and hence the synthesis of such nanostructures has great relevance in the realm of nanoscience. Silica-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles based ferrofluids were prepared using polyethylene glycol as carrier fluid by employing a controlled co-precipitation technique followed by a modified sol-gel synthesis. A plausible mechanism for the formation of stable suspension of SiO2-coated Iron Oxide nanoparticles with a size of about 9 nm dispersed in polyethylene glycol (PEG) is proposed. Core-shell nature of the resultant SiO2-Iron Oxide nanocomposite was verified using transmission electron microscopy. Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy studies were carried out to understand the structure and nature of chemical bonds. The result suggests that Iron Oxide exist in an isolated state inside silica matrix. Moreover, the presence of silanol bonds establishes the hydrophilic nature of silica shell confirming the formation of stable ferrofluid with PEG as carrier fluid. The magnetic characterization reveals the superparamagnetic behavior of the nanoparticles with a rather narrow distribution of blocking temperatures. These properties are not seen in ferrofluids prepared from Iron Oxide nanoparticles without SiO2 coating. The latter suggests the successful tuning of the inter-particle interactions preventing agglomeration of nanoparticles. Cytotoxicity studies on citric acid coated water based ferrofluid and silica-coated PEG-based ferrofluid were evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazole-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium chloride assay and it shows an enhanced compatibility for silica modified nanoparticles. PMID:21449334

  6. Cell Labeling and Targeting with Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Tefft, Brandon J; Uthamaraj, Susheil; Harburn, J Jonathan; Klabusay, Martin; Dragomir-Daescu, Dan; Sandhu, Gurpreet S

    2015-01-01

    Targeted delivery of cells and therapeutic agents would benefit a wide range of biomedical applications by concentrating the therapeutic effect at the target site while minimizing deleterious effects to off-target sites. Magnetic cell targeting is an efficient, safe, and straightforward delivery technique. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) are biodegradable, biocompatible, and can be endocytosed into cells to render them responsive to magnetic fields. The synthesis process involves creating magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles followed by high-speed emulsification to form a poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) coating. The PLGA-magnetite SPIONs are approximately 120 nm in diameter including the approximately 10 nm diameter magnetite core. When placed in culture medium, SPIONs are naturally endocytosed by cells and stored as small clusters within cytoplasmic endosomes. These particles impart sufficient magnetic mass to the cells to allow for targeting within magnetic fields. Numerous cell sorting and targeting applications are enabled by rendering various cell types responsive to magnetic fields. SPIONs have a variety of other biomedical applications as well including use as a medical imaging contrast agent, targeted drug or gene delivery, diagnostic assays, and generation of local hyperthermia for tumor therapy or tissue soldering. PMID:26554870

  7. Iron oxide-loaded slag for arsenic removal from aqueous system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fu-Shen; Itoh, Hideaki

    2005-07-01

    An effective adsorbent for arsenic removal from aqueous system was synthesized by loading iron(III) oxide on municipal solid waste incinerator melted slag. The loading was accomplished via chemical processes and thermal coating technique. The key point of the technique was the simultaneous generation of amorphous FeOOH sol and silica sol in-situ and eventually led to the formation of Fe-Si surface complexes which combined the iron oxide with the melted slag tightly. The surface morphology of the iron oxide-loaded slag was examined and the loading mechanisms were discussed in detail. The adsorbent was effective for both arsenate and arsenite removal and its removal capabilities for As(V) and As(III) were 2.5 and 3 times of those of FeOOH, respectively. Both affinity adsorption and chemical reactions contributed to arsenic removal. The effects of solution pH, contact time, arsenic concentration and adsorbent dosage on arsenic removal were examined and the optimum removal conditions were established. Furthermore, leaching of hazardous elements such as Cr(VI), As, Se, Cd and Pb from the adsorbent at a pH range of 2.5-12.5 was below the regulation values. Accordingly, it is believed that the iron oxide-loaded slag developed in this study is environmentally acceptable and industrially applicable for wastewater treatment. PMID:15924950

  8. Oxidative stress response in neural stem cells exposed to different superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Pongrac, Igor M; Pavičić, Ivan; Milić, Mirta; Brkić Ahmed, Lada; Babič, Michal; Horák, Daniel; Vinković Vrček, Ivana; Gajović, Srećko

    2016-01-01

    Biocompatibility, safety, and risk assessments of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are of the highest priority in researching their application in biomedicine. One improvement in the biological properties of SPIONs may be achieved by different functionalization and surface modifications. This study aims to investigate how a different surface functionalization of SPIONs – uncoated, coated with d-mannose, or coated with poly-l-lysine – affects biocompatibility. We sought to investigate murine neural stem cells (NSCs) as important model system for regenerative medicine. To reveal the possible mechanism of toxicity of SPIONs on NSCs, levels of reactive oxygen species, intracellular glutathione, mitochondrial membrane potential, cell-membrane potential, DNA damage, and activities of SOD and GPx were examined. Even in cases where reactive oxygen species levels were significantly lowered in NSCs exposed to SPIONs, we found depleted intracellular glutathione levels, altered activities of SOD and GPx, hyperpolarization of the mitochondrial membrane, dissipated cell-membrane potential, and increased DNA damage, irrespective of the surface coating applied for SPION stabilization. Although surface coating should prevent the toxic effects of SPIONs, our results showed that all of the tested SPION types affected the NSCs similarly, indicating that mitochondrial homeostasis is their major cellular target. Despite the claimed biomedical benefits of SPIONs, the refined determination of their effects on various cellular functions presented in this work highlights the need for further safety evaluations. This investigation helps to fill the knowledge gaps on the criteria that should be considered in evaluating the biocompatibility and safety of novel nanoparticles. PMID:27217748

  9. Coatings for directional eutectics. [cyclic furnace oxidation tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, M. R.; Rairden, J. R.; Hampton, L. V.

    1974-01-01

    Coating compositions were evaluated for oxidation protection of directionally solidified composite alloy NiTaC-13. These coatings included three NiCrAlY compositions (30-5-1, 25-10-1 and 20-15-1), two FeCrAlY compositions (30-5-1 and 25-10-1), a CoCrAlY composition (25-10-1), and one duplex coating, Ni-35Cr + Al. Duplicate pin samples of each composition were evaluated using two cyclic furnace oxidation tests of 100 hours at 871 C and 500 hours at 1093 C. The two best coatings were Ni-20Cr-15Al-lY and Ni-35Cr + Al. The two preferred coatings were deposited on pins and were evaluated in detail in .05 Mach cyclic burner rig oxidation to 1093 C. The NiCrAlY coating was protective after 830 hours of cycling, while the duplex coating withstood 630 hours. Test bars were coated and cycled for up to 500 hours. Tensile tests indicated no effect of coatings on strength. In 871 C air stress rupture, a degradation was observed for coated relative to bare material. The cycled NiCrAlY coating offered excellent protection with properties superior to the bare cycled NiTaC-13 in 1093 C air stress rupture.

  10. The convenient preparation of stable aryl-coated zerovalent iron nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Guselnikova, Olga A; Galanov, Andrey I; Gutakovskii, Anton K; Postnikov, Pavel S

    2015-01-01

    A novel approach for the in situ synthesis of zerovalent aryl-coated iron nanoparticles (NPs) based on diazonium salt chemistry is proposed. Surface-modified zerovalent iron NPs (ZVI NPs) were prepared by simple chemical reduction of iron(III) chloride aqueous solution followed by in situ modification using water soluble arenediazonium tosylate. The resulting NPs, with average iron core diameter of 21 nm, were coated with a 10 nm thick organic layer to provide long-term protection in air for the highly reactive zerovalent iron core up to 180 °C. The surface-modified iron NPs possess a high grafting density of the aryl group on the NPs surface of 1.23 mmol/g. FTIR spectroscopy, XRD, HRTEM, TGA/DTA, and elemental analysis were performed in order to characterize the resulting material. PMID:26171295

  11. The convenient preparation of stable aryl-coated zerovalent iron nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Guselnikova, Olga A; Galanov, Andrey I; Gutakovskii, Anton K

    2015-01-01

    Summary A novel approach for the in situ synthesis of zerovalent aryl-coated iron nanoparticles (NPs) based on diazonium salt chemistry is proposed. Surface-modified zerovalent iron NPs (ZVI NPs) were prepared by simple chemical reduction of iron(III) chloride aqueous solution followed by in situ modification using water soluble arenediazonium tosylate. The resulting NPs, with average iron core diameter of 21 nm, were coated with a 10 nm thick organic layer to provide long-term protection in air for the highly reactive zerovalent iron core up to 180 °C. The surface-modified iron NPs possess a high grafting density of the aryl group on the NPs surface of 1.23 mmol/g. FTIR spectroscopy, XRD, HRTEM, TGA/DTA, and elemental analysis were performed in order to characterize the resulting material. PMID:26171295

  12. Photochemical Activation of Chlorine by Iron and Iron Oxide Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittmer, J.; Zetzsch, C.

    2015-12-01

    The photochemical activation of chlorine by dissolved iron in sea-salt aerosol droplets and by highly dispersed Fe2O3 aerosol particles (mainly hematite, specific surface > 100 m2/g), exposed to gaseous HCl, was investigated in humidified air in a Teflon simulation chamber. Employing the radical-clock technique, we quantified the production of gaseous atomic Cl. When the artificial sea salt aerosols contained suspended Fe2O3 alone at pH 6, no significant Cl production could be observed, even if the dissolution of iron was forced by "weathering" (repeatedly freezing and thawing for five times). Adjusting the pH in the stock suspension to 2.6, 2.2, and 1.9 and equilibrating for one week resulted in a quantifiable amount of dissolved iron (0.03, 0.2, and 0.6 mmol/L, respectively) and in gaseous Cl production rates of ~1.6, 6, and 8 × 1021 atoms cm-2 h-1, respectively. Exposing the pure Fe2O3 aerosol in the absence of salt to various gaseous HCl concentrations resulted in rates ranging from 8 × 1020 Cl atoms cm-2 h-1 (at ~4 ppb HCl) to 5 × 1022 Cl atoms cm-2 h-1 (at ~350 ppb HCl) and confirmed the uptake and conversion of HCl to atomic Cl (at HCl to Cl conversion yields of 2-5 % mol/mol, depending on the relative humidity). The relevance for environmental processes in the atmosphere will be discussed.

  13. Synthesis of phase pure praseodymium barium copper iron oxide.

    PubMed

    Konne, Joshua L; Davis, Sean A; Glatzel, Stefan; Hall, Simon R

    2013-06-18

    The control of crystallization of praseodymium barium copper iron oxide, an intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cell cathode material, has been demonstrated for the first time using a biotemplated sol-gel synthesis technique. The results obtained showed significant improvement in purity, synthesis time, surface area and simplicity over that previously reported. PMID:23660963

  14. The Oxidation Of Iron In A Gel Using Consumer Chemicals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Stephen W.; Folger, Marsha R.; Quinn, Ryan P.; Sauls, Frederick C.; Krone, Diane

    2005-01-01

    An experiment is conducted for the oxidation of iron in a gel using consumer chemicals, which is pertinent to the students' understanding of redox chemistry and of the relative oxidation potentials of various metals. The experiment can be carried out with consumer chemicals that might be purchased at a supermarket and commonly found in the home.

  15. Potassium promotion of iron oxide dehydrogenation catalysts supported on magnesium oxide: 1. Preparation and characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Stobbe, D.E.; Buren, F.R. van ); Dillen, A.J. van; Geus, J.W. )

    1992-06-01

    Catalysts of iron oxide supported on magnesium oxide and promoted with potassium were prepared by incipient wetness impregnation of preshaped magnesium oxide support pellets with a solution of an iron complex, either ammonium iron (III) citrate or ammonium iron (III) EDTA and potassium carbonate. Iron and potassium were applied wither simultaneously or consecutively. As determined using X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, and magnetic measurements, calcination above 923 K results in the formation of a mixed oxide of iron and potassium, viz., KFeO[sub 2]. After calcination at 973 K the average crystallite size of the KFeO[sub 2] phase is about 300 [angstrom]. The formation of KFeO[sub 2] appeared to have a strong retarding effect on the reduction of the iron oxide phase to metallic iron. It was found that the KFeO[sub 2] phase is unstable in atomspheric air due to reaction with carbon dioxide and moisture to form potassium (hydrogen) carbonate and (hydrated) iron oxide.

  16. Biogeochemistry of Iron Oxidation in a Circumneutral Freshwater Habitat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duckworth, O.; Homstrom, S.; Pena, J.; Zacharias, E.; Sposito, G.

    2007-12-01

    Iron(II) oxidation in natural waters at circumneutral pH, often regarded as an abiotic process, may be biologically- mediated when it occurs in iron-rich redox gradients. West Berry Creek, a small circumneutral tributary flowing through a mixed coniferous forest in Big Basin State Park, California, contains localized iron (hydr)oxide precipitates at points along its course where anoxic groundwater meets oxygenated creek water. These mixing zones establish redox gradients and iron-rich microbial mats that may create microenvironments that promote active biogeochemical cycling of Fe. Water sampling revealed strong correlations between the concentrations of aqueous inorganic species, suggesting a rock-weathering source for most of these solutes. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry detected significant concentrations of organic exudates, including low molecular mass organic acids and siderophores, indicating active biogeochemical cycling of iron is occurring in the creek. X-ray diffraction and elemental analysis showed the iron precipitates to be amorphous minerals, such as ferrihydrite. Microbial biofilm communities are associated with the iron (hydr)oxide deposits. Clone libraries developed from 16s rDNA sequences revealed the presence of microorganisms related to the neutrophilic iron- oxidizing bacteria Gallionella and Siderooxidans; in addition, micrographs suggest the widespread presence of sheath-forming bacteria (e.g., Leptothrix). Sequences from these libraries also indicated the presence of significant populations of organisms related to bacteria in the genera Pseudomonas, Sphingomonas, and Nitrospira. These geosymbiotic systems appear to be significant not only for the biogeochemical cycling of iron in the creek, but also for the cycling of organic species, inorganic nutrients, and trace metals.

  17. Heterogeneous Fenton oxidation of ofloxacin drug by iron alginate support.

    PubMed

    Titouhi, Hana; Belgaied, Jamel-Eddine

    2016-08-01

    A new catalytic wet peroxide oxidation of ofloxacin antibiotic is presented in this work. The removal was achieved using a biodegradable sodium alginate-iron material. Several parameters were studied such as iron content, drying duration of the catalytic support, temperature, solid amount and initial drug concentration. The process showed a strong oxidative ability; at optimum conditions, a nearly complete removal of the drug (around 98%) has been reached after three h of treatment. A relatively low decrease of support activity (around 10%) has been observed after three successive oxidation runs and a low iron leaching has been detected (1.2% of the incorporated quantity). The removal of the substrate has been also examined in the absence of hydrogen peroxide in order to discriminate between the contributions of simple adsorption and oxidation processes in the drug disappearance. We also discussed the influence of the studied experimental parameters on the removal kinetic. PMID:26752017

  18. Release Activation of Iron Oxide Nanoparticles (REACTION): A novel environmentally sensitive MRI paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Granot, Dorit; Shapiro, Erik M.

    2011-01-01

    Smart contrast agents for MRI-based cell tracking would enable the use of MRI methodologies to not only detect the location of cells, but also gene expression. Here we report on a new enzyme/contrast agent paradigm which involves the enzymatic degradation of the polymer coating of magnetic nanoparticles to release encapsulated magnetic cores. Cells were labeled with particles coated with a polymer which is cleavable by a specific enzyme. This coat restricts the approach of water to the particle, preventing the magnetic core from efficiently relaxing protons. The reactive enzyme was delivered to cells and changes in cellular T2 and T2* relaxation times of ~ 35% and ~ 50% were achieved in vitro. Large enhancements of dark contrast volume (240%) and CNR (48%) within the contrast regions were measured, in vivo, for cells co-labeled with enzyme and particles. These results warrant exploration of genetic avenues towards achieving RElease ACTivation of Iron Oxide Nanoparticles (REACTION). PMID:21360745

  19. Thermal expansion mismatch and oxidation in thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, G. C.; Phucharoen, W.; Miller, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBC) for advanced gas turbine blades have been under intensive development during the last several years. This investigation is intended to achieve a clearer understanding of the mechanical behavior of plasma sprayed zirconia-yttria TBCs, involving a nickle-chromium-aluminum bond coat. The near term objectives are to study the stress states in a relatively simple model TBC subjected to steady state thermal loading. The resulting thermal expansion mismatch and oxidation have been primary targets for the study. The finite element approach and the effects of thermal mismatch and oxidation are described. A proposed mechanism for oxidation induced coating failure is also presented.

  20. Targeted iron oxide nanoparticles for the enhancement of radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Anastasia K; Mitov, Mihail I; Daley, Emily F; McGarry, Ronald C; Anderson, Kimberly W; Hilt, J Zach

    2016-10-01

    To increase the efficacy of radiation, iron oxide nanoparticles can be utilized for their ability to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS). Radiation therapy promotes leakage of electrons from the electron transport chain and leads to an increase in mitochondrial production of the superoxide anion which is converted to hydrogen peroxide by superoxide dismutase. Iron oxide nanoparticles can then catalyze the reaction from hydrogen peroxide to the highly reactive hydroxyl radical. Therefore, the overall aim of this project was to utilize iron oxide nanoparticles conjugated to a cell penetrating peptide, TAT, to escape lysosomal encapsulation after internalization by cancer cells and catalyze hydroxyl radical formation. It was determined that TAT functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles and uncoated iron oxide nanoparticles resulted in permeabilization of the lysosomal membranes. Additionally, mitochondrial integrity was compromised when A549 cells were treated with both TAT-functionalized nanoparticles and radiation. Pre-treatment with TAT-functionalized nanoparticles also significantly increased the ROS generation associated with radiation. A long term viability study showed that TAT-functionalized nanoparticles combined with radiation resulted in a synergistic combination treatment. This is likely due to the TAT-functionalized nanoparticles sensitizing the cells to subsequent radiation therapy, because the nanoparticles alone did not result in significant toxicities. PMID:27521615

  1. Large enhanced dielectric permittivity in polyaniline passivated core-shell nano magnetic iron oxide by plasma polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Joy, Lija K.; Sooraj, V.; Sethulakshmi, N.; Anantharaman, M. R.; Sajeev, U. S.; Nair, Swapna S.; Narayanan, T. N.; Ajayan, P. M.

    2014-03-24

    Commercial samples of Magnetite with size ranging from 25–30 nm were coated with polyaniline by using radio frequency plasma polymerization to achieve a core shell structure of magnetic nanoparticle (core)–Polyaniline (shell). High resolution transmission electron microscopy images confirm the core shell architecture of polyaniline coated iron oxide. The dielectric properties of the material were studied before and after plasma treatment. The polymer coated magnetite particles exhibited a large dielectric permittivity with respect to uncoated samples. The dielectric behavior was modeled using a Maxwell–Wagner capacitor model. A plausible mechanism for the enhancement of dielectric permittivity is proposed.

  2. Development and use of iron oxide nanoparticles (Part 1): Synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles for MRI.

    PubMed

    Lodhia, J; Mandarano, G; Ferris, Nj; Eu, P; Cowell, Sf

    2010-01-01

    Contrast agents, such as iron oxide, enhance MR images by altering the relaxation times of tissues in which the agent is present. They can also be used to label targeted molecular imaging probes. Unfortunately, no molecular imaging probe is currently available on the clinical MRI market. A promising platform for MRI contrast agent development is nanotechnology, where superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONS) are tailored for MR contrast enhancement, and/or for molecular imaging. SPIONs can be produced using a range of methods and the choice of method will be influenced by the characteristics most important for a particular application. In addition, the ability to attach molecular markers to SPIONS heralds their application in molecular imaging.There are many reviews on SPION synthesis for MRI; however, these tend to be targeted to a chemistry audience. The development of MRI contrast agents attracts experienced researchers from many fields including some researchers with little knowledge of medical imaging or MRI. This situation presents medical radiation practitioners with opportunities for involvement, collaboration or leadership in research depending on their level of commitment and their ability to learn. Medical radiation practitioners already possess a large portion of the understanding, knowledge and skills necessary for involvement in MRI development and molecular imaging. Their expertise in imaging technology, patient care and radiation safety provides them with skills that are directly applicable to research on the development and application of SPIONs and MRI.In this paper we argue that MRI SPIONs, currently limited to major research centres, will have widespread clinical use in the future. We believe that knowledge about this growing area of research provides an opportunity for medical radiation practitioners to enhance their specialised expertise to ensure best practice in a truly multi-disciplinary environment. This review outlines how and

  3. Development and use of iron oxide nanoparticles (Part 1): Synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles for MRI

    PubMed Central

    Lodhia, J; Mandarano, G; Ferris, NJ; Eu, P; Cowell, SF

    2010-01-01

    Contrast agents, such as iron oxide, enhance MR images by altering the relaxation times of tissues in which the agent is present. They can also be used to label targeted molecular imaging probes. Unfortunately, no molecular imaging probe is currently available on the clinical MRI market. A promising platform for MRI contrast agent development is nanotechnology, where superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONS) are tailored for MR contrast enhancement, and/or for molecular imaging. SPIONs can be produced using a range of methods and the choice of method will be influenced by the characteristics most important for a particular application. In addition, the ability to attach molecular markers to SPIONS heralds their application in molecular imaging. There are many reviews on SPION synthesis for MRI; however, these tend to be targeted to a chemistry audience. The development of MRI contrast agents attracts experienced researchers from many fields including some researchers with little knowledge of medical imaging or MRI. This situation presents medical radiation practitioners with opportunities for involvement, collaboration or leadership in research depending on their level of commitment and their ability to learn. Medical radiation practitioners already possess a large portion of the understanding, knowledge and skills necessary for involvement in MRI development and molecular imaging. Their expertise in imaging technology, patient care and radiation safety provides them with skills that are directly applicable to research on the development and application of SPIONs and MRI. In this paper we argue that MRI SPIONs, currently limited to major research centres, will have widespread clinical use in the future. We believe that knowledge about this growing area of research provides an opportunity for medical radiation practitioners to enhance their specialised expertise to ensure best practice in a truly multi-disciplinary environment. This review outlines how and

  4. Study of Iron oxide nanoparticles using Mössbauer spectroscopy with a high velocity resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshtrakh, M. I.; Ushakov, M. V.; Šepelák, V.; Semionkin, V. A.; Morais, P. C.

    2016-01-01

    Iron oxide (magnetite and maghemite) nanoparticles developed for magnetic fluids were studied using Mössbauer spectroscopy with a high velocity resolution at 295 and 90 K. The recorded Mössbauer spectra have demonstrated that usual physical models based on octahedral and tetrahedral sites were not suitable for fitting. Alternatively, the Mössbauer spectra were nicely fitted using a large number of magnetic sextets. The obtained results showed that the Mössbauer spectra and the assessed parameters were different for nanoparticles as-prepared and dispersed in the dispersing fluid at 295 K. We claim that this finding is mainly due to the interaction of polar molecules with Iron cations at nanoparticle's surface or due to the surface coating using carboxylic-terminated molecules. It is assumed that the large number of spectral components may be related to complexity of the nanoparticle's characteristics and deviations from stoichiometry, including in the latter the influence of the oxidation of magnetite towards maghemite.

  5. Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles: Recent trends in design and synthesis of magnetoresponsive nanosystems.

    PubMed

    Tombácz, Etelka; Turcu, Rodica; Socoliuc, Vlad; Vékás, Ladislau

    2015-12-18

    Recent developments in nanotechnology and application of magnetic nanoparticles, in particular in magnetic iron oxide nanosystems, offer exciting possibilities for nanomedicine. Facile and precise synthesis procedures, high magnetic response, tunable morphologies and multiple bio-functionalities of single- and multi-core magnetic particles designed for nanomedicine applications are thoroughly appraised. This review focuses on the structural and magnetic characterization of the cores, the synthesis of single- and multicore iron oxide NPs, especially the design of the latter, as well as their protection, stabilization and functionalization by desired coating in order to protect against the corrosion of core, to prevent non-specific protein adsorption and particle aggregation in biological media, and to provide binding sites for targeting and therapeutic agents. PMID:26275707

  6. Synthesis and Magneto-Thermal Actuation of Iron Oxide Core–PNIPAM Shell Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Superparamagnetic nanoparticles have been proposed for many applications in biotechnology and medicine. In this paper, it is demonstrated how the excellent colloidal stability and magnetic properties of monodisperse and individually densely grafted iron oxide nanoparticles can be used to manipulate reversibly the solubility of nanoparticles with a poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)nitrodopamine shell. “Grafting-to” and “grafting-from” methods for synthesis of an irreversibly anchored brush shell to monodisperse, oleic acid coated iron oxide cores are compared. Thereafter, it is shown that local heating by magnetic fields as well as global thermal heating can be used to efficiently and reversibly aggregate, magnetically extract nanoparticles from solution and spontaneously redisperse them. The coupling of magnetic and thermally responsive properties points to novel uses as smart materials, for example, in integrated devices for molecular separation and extraction. PMID:26270412

  7. Template assisted self-assembly of iron oxide nanoparticles: An x-ray structural analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, D.; Zabel, H.; Ulyanov, S. V.; Romanov, V. P.; Uzdin, V. M.

    2014-02-07

    We have fabricated by e-beam lithography periodic arrays of rectangular shaped trenches of different widths into Si substrates. The trenches were filled with iron oxide nanoparticles, 20 nm in diameter, by spin-coating them onto the Si substrate. The trenches have the purpose to assist the self-assembly of the iron oxide nanoparticles. Using x-ray scattering techniques, we have analyzed the structure factor of the trenches before and after filling in order to determine the filling factor. We present a theoretical analysis of the x-ray scattering function within the distorted-wave Born approximation and we present a quantitative comparison between theory and experiment.

  8. Microstructural effects on the oxidation of iron aluminide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hale, Peter M.

    This work addresses the impact of processing and microstructure on the oxide chemistry and short-term isothermal oxidation rate, over the first 24h of oxidation, for the B2 iron aluminide, Fe-40Al. Research interests in iron-aluminum alloys, used for high temperature structural applications, are primarily concerned with the improvement of high temperature oxidation performance and mechanical properties. The oxidation performance of alloys with aluminum contents below 20at% is dependent upon processing and microstructure. Before this work, it was not established if there was any impact of material processing and microstructure on the oxidation performance of the high aluminum content Fe-40Al alloy. This study utilized eight industrial processes to produce six different material conditions. Among the characteristics of the microstructures produced were grain sizes from 2 to ≥500mum, oxygen contents from 0--2.6at%, and powder particle surface area-to-volume ratios from 0--0.6 m2/cm3. For the six materials tested, short-term (24h) isothermal oxidation rates were determined at 700, 750, and 800°C. The resultant rates were then used to determine the relationship between the oxidation rate constant and temperature. The chemistry, physical characteristics, and structure of the oxides formed were then characterized. It was concluded that microstructure has a limited impact on oxidation properties: no practical impact was observed on oxidation rate; an initial transient oxide layer formed independent of microstrucure; microstructure can be used to control the formation of oxide-metal interfacial voids, formed during the oxidation process; and oxide inclusion "pegs" serve to improve oxide adhesion. Additionally it was observed that contamination from hot pressing contributed to the formation of oxide nodules during oxidation. Overall the isothermal oxidation properties during the first 24h of exposure proved to be robust over many combinations of microstructures.

  9. Evidence of cell surface iron speciation of acidophilic iron-oxidizing microorganisms in indirect bioleaching process.

    PubMed

    Nie, Zhen-yuan; Liu, Hong-chang; Xia, Jin-lan; Yang, Yi; Zhen, Xiang-jun; Zhang, Li-Juan; Qiu, Guan-zhou

    2016-02-01

    While indirect model has been widely accepted in bioleaching, but the evidence of cell surface iron speciation has not been reported. In the present work the iron speciation on the cell surfaces of four typically acidophilic iron-oxidizing microorganism (mesophilic Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans ATCC 23270, moderately thermophilic Leptospirillum ferriphilum YSK and Sulfobacillus thermosulfidooxidans St, and extremely thermophilic Acidianus manzaensis YN25) grown on different energy substrates (chalcopyrite, pyrite, ferrous sulfate and elemental sulfur (S(0))) were studied in situ firstly by using synchrotron-based micro- X-ray fluorescence analysis and X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy. Results showed that the cells grown on iron-containing substrates had apparently higher surface iron content than the cells grown on S(0). Both ferrous iron and ferric iron were detected on the cell surface of all tested AIOMs, and the Fe(II)/Fe(III) ratios of the same microorganism were affected by different energy substrates. The iron distribution and bonding state of single cell of A. manzaensis were then studied in situ by scanning transmission soft X-ray microscopy based on dual-energy contrast analysis and stack analysis. Results showed that the iron species distributed evenly on the cell surface and bonded with amino, carboxyl and hydroxyl groups. PMID:26645388

  10. A pentanuclear iron catalyst designed for water oxidation.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Masaya; Kondo, Mio; Kuga, Reiko; Kurashige, Yuki; Yanai, Takeshi; Hayami, Shinya; Praneeth, Vijayendran K K; Yoshida, Masaki; Yoneda, Ko; Kawata, Satoshi; Masaoka, Shigeyuki

    2016-02-25

    Although the oxidation of water is efficiently catalysed by the oxygen-evolving complex in photosystem II (refs 1 and 2), it remains one of the main bottlenecks when aiming for synthetic chemical fuel production powered by sunlight or electricity. Consequently, the development of active and stable water oxidation catalysts is crucial, with heterogeneous systems considered more suitable for practical use and their homogeneous counterparts more suitable for targeted, molecular-level design guided by mechanistic understanding. Research into the mechanism of water oxidation has resulted in a range of synthetic molecular catalysts, yet there remains much interest in systems that use abundant, inexpensive and environmentally benign metals such as iron (the most abundant transition metal in the Earth's crust and found in natural and synthetic oxidation catalysts). Water oxidation catalysts based on mononuclear iron complexes have been explored, but they often deactivate rapidly and exhibit relatively low activities. Here we report a pentanuclear iron complex that efficiently and robustly catalyses water oxidation with a turnover frequency of 1,900 per second, which is about three orders of magnitude larger than that of other iron-based catalysts. Electrochemical analysis confirms the redox flexibility of the system, characterized by six different oxidation states between Fe(II)5 and Fe(III)5; the Fe(III)5 state is active for oxidizing water. Quantum chemistry calculations indicate that the presence of adjacent active sites facilitates O-O bond formation with a reaction barrier of less than ten kilocalories per mole. Although the need for a high overpotential and the inability to operate in water-rich solutions limit the practicality of the present system, our findings clearly indicate that efficient water oxidation catalysts based on iron complexes can be created by ensuring that the system has redox flexibility and contains adjacent water-activation sites. PMID:26863188

  11. A pentanuclear iron catalyst designed for water oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamura, Masaya; Kondo, Mio; Kuga, Reiko; Kurashige, Yuki; Yanai, Takeshi; Hayami, Shinya; Praneeth, Vijayendran K. K.; Yoshida, Masaki; Yoneda, Ko; Kawata, Satoshi; Masaoka, Shigeyuki

    2016-02-01

    Although the oxidation of water is efficiently catalysed by the oxygen-evolving complex in photosystem II (refs 1 and 2), it remains one of the main bottlenecks when aiming for synthetic chemical fuel production powered by sunlight or electricity. Consequently, the development of active and stable water oxidation catalysts is crucial, with heterogeneous systems considered more suitable for practical use and their homogeneous counterparts more suitable for targeted, molecular-level design guided by mechanistic understanding. Research into the mechanism of water oxidation has resulted in a range of synthetic molecular catalysts, yet there remains much interest in systems that use abundant, inexpensive and environmentally benign metals such as iron (the most abundant transition metal in the Earth’s crust and found in natural and synthetic oxidation catalysts). Water oxidation catalysts based on mononuclear iron complexes have been explored, but they often deactivate rapidly and exhibit relatively low activities. Here we report a pentanuclear iron complex that efficiently and robustly catalyses water oxidation with a turnover frequency of 1,900 per second, which is about three orders of magnitude larger than that of other iron-based catalysts. Electrochemical analysis confirms the redox flexibility of the system, characterized by six different oxidation states between FeII5 and FeIII5; the FeIII5 state is active for oxidizing water. Quantum chemistry calculations indicate that the presence of adjacent active sites facilitates O-O bond formation with a reaction barrier of less than ten kilocalories per mole. Although the need for a high overpotential and the inability to operate in water-rich solutions limit the practicality of the present system, our findings clearly indicate that efficient water oxidation catalysts based on iron complexes can be created by ensuring that the system has redox flexibility and contains adjacent water-activation sites.

  12. Natural-oxide solar-collector coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krupnick, A. C.; Roberts, M. L.; Sharpe, M. H.

    1979-01-01

    Optically selective coatings for solar collectors are produced by thermally treating stainless steel in furnace after series of cleaning and soaking operations. Coatings have withstood 18-month exposure tests at 100 percent relative humidity and temperatures of 95 F. Room temperature coatings are valuable as they are inexpensive to produce, highly production oriented, and environmentally stable.

  13. Bacterial oxidation of ferrous iron at low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Kupka, Daniel; Rzhepishevska, Olena I; Dopson, Mark; Lindström, E Börje; Karnachuk, Olia V; Tuovinen, Olli H

    2007-08-15

    This study comprises the first report of ferrous iron oxidation by psychrotolerant, acidophilic iron-oxidizing bacteria capable of growing at 5 degrees C. Samples of mine drainage-impacted surface soils and sediments from the Norilsk mining region (Taimyr, Siberia) and Kristineberg (Skellefte district, Sweden) were inoculated into acidic ferrous sulfate media and incubated at 5 degrees C. Iron oxidation was preceded by an approximately 3-month lag period that was reduced in subsequent cultures. Three enrichment cultures were chosen for further work and one culture designated as isolate SS3 was purified by colony isolation from a Norilsk enrichment culture for determining the kinetics of iron oxidation. The 16S rRNA based phylogeny of SS3 and two other psychrotolerant cultures, SS5 from Norilsk and SK5 from Northern Sweden, was determined. Comparative analysis of amplified 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that the psychrotolerant cultures aligned within Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. The rate constant of iron oxidation by growing cultures of SS3 was in the range of 0.0162-0.0104 h(-1) depending on the initial pH. The oxidation kinetics followed an exponential pattern, consistent with a first order rate expression. Parallel iron oxidation by a mesophilic reference culture of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans was extremely slow and linear. Precipitates harvested from the 5 degrees C culture were identified by X-ray diffraction as mixtures of schwertmannite (ideal formula Fe(8)O(8)(OH)(6)SO(4)) and jarosite (KFe(3)(SO(4))(2)(OH)(6)). Jarosite was much more dominant in precipitates produced at 30 degrees C. PMID:17304566

  14. Effects of surface chemistry and size on iron oxide nanoparticle delivery of oligonucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Christopher

    The discovery of RNA interference and the increasing understanding of disease genetics have created a new class of potential therapeutics based on oligonucleotides. This therapeutic class includes antisense molecules, small interfering RNA (siRNA), and microRNA modulators such as antagomirs (antisense directed against microRNA) and microRNA mimics, all of which function by altering gene expression at the translational level. While these molecules have the promise of treating a host of diseases from neurological disorders to cancer, a major hurdle is their inability to enter cells on their own, where they may render therapeutic effect. Nanotechnology is the engineering of materials at the nanometer scale and has gained significant interest for nucleic acid delivery due to its biologically relevant length-scale and amenability to multifunctionality. While a number of nanoparticle vehicles have shown promise for oligonucleotide delivery, there remains a lack of understanding of how nanoparticle coating and size affect these delivery processes. This dissertation seeks to elucidate some of these factors by evaluating oligonucleotide delivery efficiencies of a panel of iron oxide nanoparticles with varying cationic coatings and sizes. A panel of uniformly-sized nanoparticles was prepared with surface coatings comprised of various amine groups representing high and low pKas. A separate panel of nanoparticles with sizes of 40, 80, 150, and 200 nm but with the same cationic coating was also prepared. Results indicated that both nanoparticle surface coating and nanoparticle hydrodynamic size affect transfection efficiency. Specific particle coatings and sizes were identified that gave superior performance. The intracellular fate of iron oxide nanoparticles was also tracked by electron microscopy and suggests that they function via the proton sponge effect. The research presented in this dissertation may aid in the rational design of improved nanoparticle delivery vectors for

  15. Purification of Lysosomes Using Supraparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles (SPIONs).

    PubMed

    Rofe, Adam P; Pryor, Paul R

    2016-04-01

    Lysosomes can be rapidly isolated from tissue culture cells using supraparamagnetic iron oxide particles (SPIONs). In this protocol, colloidal iron dextran (FeDex) particles, a type of SPION, are taken up by cultured mouse macrophage cells via the endocytic pathway. The SPIONs accumulate in lysosomes, the end point of the endocytic pathway, permitting the lysosomes to be isolated magnetically. The purified lysosomes are suitable for in vitro fusion assays or for proteomic analysis. PMID:27037068

  16. Modeling Oxidation Induced Stresses in Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, B. L.; Freborg, A. M.; Petrus, G. J.; Brindley, William J.

    1998-01-01

    The use of thermal barrier coatings (TBC's) in gas turbines has increased dramatically in recent years, due mainly to the need for component protection from ever increasing service temperatures. Oxidation of the bond coat has been identified as an important contributing factor to spallation of the ceramic top coat during service. Additional variables found to influence TBC thermal cycle life include bond coat coefficient of thermal expansion, creep behavior of both the ceramic and bond coat layers, and modulus of elasticity. The purpose of this work was to characterize the effects of oxidation on the stress states within the TBC system, as well as to examine the interaction of oxidation with other factors affecting TBC life.

  17. Safety assessment of chronic oral exposure to iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamorro, Susana; Gutiérrez, Lucía; Vaquero, María Pilar; Verdoy, Dolores; Salas, Gorka; Luengo, Yurena; Brenes, Agustín; José Teran, Francisco

    2015-05-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles with engineered physical and biochemical properties are finding a rapidly increasing number of biomedical applications. However, a wide variety of safety concerns, especially those related to oral exposure, still need to be addressed for iron oxide nanoparticles in order to reach clinical practice. Here, we report on the effects of chronic oral exposure to low doses of γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles in growing chickens. Animal observation, weight, and diet intake reveal no adverse signs, symptoms, or mortality. No nanoparticle accumulation was observed in liver, spleen, and duodenum, with feces as the main excretion route. Liver iron level and duodenal villi morphology reflect the bioavailability of the iron released from the partial transformation of γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles in the acid gastric environment. Duodenal gene expression studies related to the absorption of iron from γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles indicate the enhancement of a ferric over ferrous pathway supporting the role of mucins. Our findings reveal that oral administration of iron oxide nanoparticles is a safe route for drug delivery at low nanoparticle doses.

  18. Development of Novel Biopolymer/Synthetic-Polymer/Iron Oxide Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mena Montoya, Marleth; Carranza, Sugeheidy; Hinojosa, Moisés; González, Virgilio

    2009-03-01

    In this work we report the successful development of a family of magnetic nanocomposites based on chitosan or/and polyamide 6 matrix with dispersed iron oxide nanoparticles synthesized by chemical co-precipitation. The iron oxide contents varied from 5 up to 23 wt%, the nanocomposites were studied by FTIR, UV-vis, TGA, XRD, TEM and magnetometry. The FTIR analysis demonstrates an interaction between the amide group of the polyamide 6 and the ceramic material. In formic acid, the nanocomposites absorb in the UV-Vis range, and the magnitude of the band gap (optical), calculated using the band of higher wavelength, is between 2.16 and 2.19 eV. In nanocomposites with chitosan/polyamide 6 matrix the developed morphologies are spherulites of polyamide 6 surrounded by chitosan, with the iron oxide particles presumably in the form of ferrihidryte. The measured magnetic properties revealed a superparamagnetic character on the studied specimens.

  19. Virus-Templated Near-Amorphous Iron Oxide Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Shah, Sachin N; Khan, Abid A; Espinosa, Ana; Garcia, Miguel A; Nuansing, Wiwat; Ungureanu, Mariana; Heddle, Jonathan G; Chuvilin, Andrey L; Wege, Christina; Bittner, Alexander M

    2016-06-14

    We present a simple synthesis of iron oxide nanotubes, grown under very mild conditions from a solution containing Fe(II) and Fe(III), on rod-shaped tobacco mosaic virus templates. Their well-defined shape and surface chemistry suggest that these robust bionanoparticles are a versatile platform for synthesis of small, thin mineral tubes, which was achieved efficiently. Various characterization tools were used to explore the iron oxide in detail: Electron microscopy (SEM, TEM), magnetometry (SQUID-VSM), diffraction (XRD, TEM-SAED), electron spectroscopies (EELS, EDX, XPS), and X-ray absorption (XANES with EXAFS analysis). They allowed determination of the structure, crystallinity, magnetic properties, and composition of the tubes. The protein surface of the viral templates was crucial to nucleate iron oxide, exhibiting analogies to biomineralization in natural compartments such as ferritin cages. PMID:27181278

  20. Multimodal Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for Hybrid Biomedical Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Heidt, Timo; Nahrendorf, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Iron oxide core nanoparticles are attractive imaging agents because their material properties allow the tuning of pharmacokinetics as well as attachment of multiple moieties to their surface. In addition to affinity ligands, these include fluorochromes and radioisotopes for detection with optical and nuclear imaging. As the iron oxide core can be detected by MRI, options for combining imaging modalities are manifold. Already, preclinical imaging strategies combine non-invasive imaging with higher resolution techniques such as intravital microscopy to gain unprecedented insight into steady state biology and disease. Going forward, hybrid iron oxide nanoparticles will likely help to merge modalities, creating a synergy that enables imaging in basic research and, potentially, also in the clinic. PMID:23065771

  1. Formation of tunable graphene oxide coating with high adhesion.

    PubMed

    Lin, Liangxu; Wu, Huaping; Green, Stephen J; Crompton, Joanna; Zhang, Shaowei; Horsell, David W

    2016-02-10

    Graphene oxide (GO) can be applied as a coating on metals, but few of these coatings have an adhesion suitable for practical applications. We demonstrate here how to form a GO coating on metals with a high adhesion (∼10.6 MPa) and tuneable surface, which can be further applied using similar/modified techniques for special applications (e.g. anti-corrosion and anti-biofouling). PMID:26814138

  2. Transmission electron microscopy of carbon-coated and iron-doped titania nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anjum, Dalaver H.; Memon, Nasir K.; Ismail, Mohamed; Hedhili, Mohamed N.; Sharif, Usman; Chung, Suk Ho

    2016-09-01

    We present a study on the properties of iron (Fe)-doped and carbon (C)-coated titania (TiO2) nanoparticles (NPs) which has been compiled by using x-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). These TiO2 NPs were prepared by using the flame synthesis method. This method allows the simultaneous C coating and Fe doping of TiO2 NPs. XRD investigations revealed that the phase of the prepared NPs was anatase TiO2. Conventional TEM analysis showed that the average size of the TiO2 NPs was about 65 nm and that the NPs were uniformly coated with the element C. Furthermore, from the x-ray energy dispersive spectrometry analysis, it was found that about 8 at.% Fe was present in the synthesized samples. High-resolution TEM (HRTEM) revealed the graphitized carbon structure of the layer surrounding the prepared TiO2 NPs. HRTEM analysis further revealed that the NPs possessed the crystalline structure of anatase titania. Energy-filtered TEM (EFTEM) analysis showed the C coating and Fe doping of the NPs. The ratio of L3 and L2 peaks for the Ti-L23 and Fe-L23 edges present in the core loss electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) revealed a +4 oxidation state for the Ti and a +3 oxidation state for the Fe. These EELS results were further confirmed with XPS analysis. The electronic properties of the samples were investigated by applying Kramers–Kronig analysis to the low-loss EELS spectra acquired from the prepared NPs. The presented results showed that the band gap energy of the TiO2 NPs decreased from an original value of 3.2 eV to about 2.2 eV, which is quite close to the ideal band gap energy of 1.65 eV for photocatalysis semiconductors. The observed decrease in band gap energy of the TiO2 NPs was attributed to the presence of Fe atoms at the lattice sites of the anatase TiO2 lattice. In short, C-coated and Fe-doped TiO2 NPs were synthesized with a rather cost-effective and comparatively easily scalable method. The

  3. Transmission electron microscopy of carbon-coated and iron-doped titania nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Anjum, Dalaver H; Memon, Nasir K; Ismail, Mohamed; Hedhili, Mohamed N; Sharif, Usman; Chung, Suk Ho

    2016-09-01

    We present a study on the properties of iron (Fe)-doped and carbon (C)-coated titania (TiO2) nanoparticles (NPs) which has been compiled by using x-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). These TiO2 NPs were prepared by using the flame synthesis method. This method allows the simultaneous C coating and Fe doping of TiO2 NPs. XRD investigations revealed that the phase of the prepared NPs was anatase TiO2. Conventional TEM analysis showed that the average size of the TiO2 NPs was about 65 nm and that the NPs were uniformly coated with the element C. Furthermore, from the x-ray energy dispersive spectrometry analysis, it was found that about 8 at.% Fe was present in the synthesized samples. High-resolution TEM (HRTEM) revealed the graphitized carbon structure of the layer surrounding the prepared TiO2 NPs. HRTEM analysis further revealed that the NPs possessed the crystalline structure of anatase titania. Energy-filtered TEM (EFTEM) analysis showed the C coating and Fe doping of the NPs. The ratio of L3 and L2 peaks for the Ti-L23 and Fe-L23 edges present in the core loss electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) revealed a +4 oxidation state for the Ti and a +3 oxidation state for the Fe. These EELS results were further confirmed with XPS analysis. The electronic properties of the samples were investigated by applying Kramers-Kronig analysis to the low-loss EELS spectra acquired from the prepared NPs. The presented results showed that the band gap energy of the TiO2 NPs decreased from an original value of 3.2 eV to about 2.2 eV, which is quite close to the ideal band gap energy of 1.65 eV for photocatalysis semiconductors. The observed decrease in band gap energy of the TiO2 NPs was attributed to the presence of Fe atoms at the lattice sites of the anatase TiO2 lattice. In short, C-coated and Fe-doped TiO2 NPs were synthesized with a rather cost-effective and comparatively easily scalable method. The

  4. Role of organic coating on carbonyl iron suspended particles in magnetorheological fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, I. B.; Kim, H. B.; Lee, J. Y.; You, J. L.; Choi, H. J.; Jhon, M. S.

    2005-05-01

    Carbonyl iron (CI) has been widely used as a suspended particle in magnetorheological (MR) fluids. However, pristine CI-based MR fluids have several drawbacks, including severe sedimentation of the CI particles due to the large density difference with the carrier liquid, difficulties in redispersion after caking, abrasion of device surfaces during long-term operation, and rust of iron by oxidation. To overcome these shortcomings, we coated the CI particles with a poly(vinyl butyral) (PVB) shell. CI and CI-PVB particles were suspended in mineral oil and their MR characteristics were examined via a rotational rheometer in a parallel plate geometry equipped with a magnetic field supplier. Yield stress and flow response (shear stress and shear viscosity) were investigated at magnetic field strengths ranging from 0to343kA/m. Although the MR properties, such as yield stress and shear viscosity of CI-PVB based MR fluids, changed slightly compared with those of the pristine CI based MR fluid, the dispersion qualities (e.g., sedimentation stability) were noticeably improved.

  5. Coatings for directional eutectics. [for corrosion and oxidation resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Felten, E. J.; Strangman, T. E.; Ulion, N. E.

    1974-01-01

    Eleven coating systems based on MCrAlY overlay and diffusion aluminide prototypes were evaluated to determine their capability for protecting the gamma/gamma prime-delta directionally solidified eutectic alloy (Ni-20Cb-6Cr-2.5Al) in gas turbine engine applications. Furnace oxidation and hot corrosion, Mach 0.37 burner-rig, tensile ductility, stress-rupture and thermomechanical fatigue tests were used to evaluate the coated gamma/gamma prime-delta alloy. The diffusion aluminide coatings provided adequate oxidation resistance at 1144 K (1600 F) but offered very limited protection in 114 K (1600 F) hot corrosion and 1366 K (2000 F) oxidation tests. A platinum modified NiCrAlY overlay coating exhibited excellent performance in oxidation testing and had no adverse effects upon the eutectic alloy.

  6. Improved transmittance measurement with a magnesium oxide coated integrating sphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, R. L.; Spisz, E. W.

    1972-01-01

    Simple and convenient technique has been found for extending transmittance measurement capability of conventional magnesium oxide coated integrating sphere system at low (near ultraviolet) wavelengths. Technique can be used to determine effect of contaminants on window materials and can also be used for measurements on thermal control coatings and telescope mirrors.

  7. Method of producing adherent metal oxide coatings on metallic surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Lane, Michael H.; Varrin, Jr., Robert D.

    2001-01-01

    Provided is a process of producing an adherent synthetic corrosion product (sludge) coating on metallic surfaces. The method involves a chemical reaction between a dry solid powder mixture of at least one reactive metal oxide with orthophosphoric acid to produce a coating in which the particles are bound together and the matrix is adherent to the metallic surface.

  8. Evaluation of Oxidation Damage in Thermal Barrier Coating Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    1996-01-01

    A method based on the technique of dilatometry has been established to quantitatively evaluate the interfacial damage due to the oxidation in a thermal barrier coating system. Strain isolation and adhesion coefficients have been proposed to characterize the thermal barrier coating (TBC) performance based on its thermal expansion behavior. It has been found that, for a thermal barrier coating system consisting of ZrO2-8%Y2O3/FeCrAlY/4140 steel substrate, the oxidation of the bond coat and substrate significantly reduced the ceramic coating adherence, as inferred from the dilatometry measurements. The in-situ thermal expansion measurements under 30 deg C to 700 deg C thermal cycling in air showed that the adhesion coefficient, A(sub i) decreased by 25% during the first 35 oxidation cycles. Metallography showed that delamination occurred at both the ceramic/bond coat and bond coat/substrate interfaces. In addition, the strain isolation effect has been improved by increasing the FeCrAlY bond coat thickness. The strain isolation coefficient, Si, increased from about 0.04 to 0.25, as the bond coat thickness changed from 0.1 mm to 1.0 mm. It may be possible to design optimum values of strain isolation and interface adhesion coefficients to achieve the best TBC performance.

  9. Selective in vitro anticancer effect of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles loaded in hyaluronan polymeric micelles.

    PubMed

    Smejkalová, Daniela; Nešporová, Kristina; Huerta-Angeles, Gloria; Syrovátka, Jakub; Jirák, Daniel; Gálisová, Andrea; Velebný, Vladimír

    2014-11-10

    Due to its native origin, excellent biocompatibility and biodegradability, hyaluronan (HA) represents an attractive polymer for superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) coating. Herein, we report HA polymeric micelles encapsulating oleic acid coated SPIONs, having a hydrodynamic size of about 100 nm and SPION loading capacity of 1-2 wt %. The HA-SPION polymeric micelles were found to be selectively cytotoxic toward a number of human cancer cell lines, mainly those of colon adenocarcinoma (HT-29). The selective inhibition of cell growth was even observed when the SPION loaded HA polymeric micelles were incubated with a mixture of control and cancer cells. The selective in vitro inhibition could not be connected with an enhanced CD44 uptake or radical oxygen species formation and was rather connected with a different way of SPION intracellular release. While aggregated iron particles were visualized in control cells, nonaggregated solubilized iron oxide particles were detected in cancer cells. In vivo SPION accumulation in intramuscular tumor following an intravenous micelle administration was confirmed by magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and histological analysis. Having a suitable hydrodynamic size, high magnetic relaxivity, and being cancer specific and able to accumulate in vivo in tumors, SPION-loaded HA micelles represent a promising platform for theranostic applications. PMID:25268047

  10. Inhibition of pyrite oxidation by surface coating: a long-term field study.

    PubMed

    Kang, Chan-Ung; Jeon, Byong-Hun; Park, Seong-Sook; Kang, Jin-Soo; Kim, Kang-Ho; Kim, Dong-Kwan; Choi, Ui-Kyu; Kim, Sun-Joon

    2016-10-01

    Pyrite and other iron sulfides are readily oxidized by dissolved oxygen in aqueous phase, producing acidity and Fe(2+), which causes significant environmental problems. Applications of surface coating agents (Na2SiO3 and KH2PO4) were conducted at Boeun (Chungbuk, South Korea) outcrop site, and their efficiencies to inhibit the oxidation of sulfide minerals were monitored for a long-term period (449 days). The rock sample showed positive Net Acid Production Potential (NAPP = 20.23) and low Net Acid Generation pH (NAGpH = 2.42) values, suggesting that the rock sample was categorized in the potential acid-forming group. For the monitored time period (449 days), field study results showed that the application of Na2SiO3 effectively inhibited the pyrite oxidation as compared to KH2PO4. Na2SiO3 as a surface coating agent maintained pH 5-6 and reduced oxidation of pyrite surface up to 99.95 and 97.70 % indicated by Fe(2+) and SO4 (2-) release, respectively. The scanning electron microscope and energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer analysis indicated that the morphology of rock surface was completely changed attributable to formation of iron silicate coating. The experimental results suggested that the treatment with Na2SiO3 was highly effective and it might be applicable on field for inhibition of iron sulfide oxidation. PMID:26493832

  11. New Insight into the Electrochromic Properties of Iron Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Lobato, Marco A.; Martinez, Arturo I.; Zarate, Ramón A.; Castro-Roman, Manuel

    2010-11-01

    We report on the structural, optical and magnetic properties of iron oxide films that were electrochemically cycled in a LiOH aqueous solution. We found that the electrochromic phenomenon is linked to the transformation of the film morphology; it goes from round-shaped particles to platy morphology. Additionally, the following phenomena were observed: a gradual blue shift of the optical-absorption edge, an increase of the saturation magnetization and the appearance of new Raman bands. The change of these properties helped us to understand the coloration mechanism for electrochromism in iron oxides.

  12. Recovery of iron oxide from coal fly ash

    DOEpatents

    Dobbins, Michael S.; Murtha, Marlyn J.

    1983-05-31

    A high quality iron oxide concentrate, suitable as a feed for blast and electric reduction furnaces is recovered from pulverized coal fly ash. The magnetic portion of the fly ash is separated and treated with a hot strong alkali solution which dissolves most of the silica and alumina in the fly ash, leaving a solid residue and forming a precipitate which is an acid soluble salt of aluminosilicate hydrate. The residue and precipitate are then treated with a strong mineral acid to dissolve the precipitate leaving a solid residue containing at least 90 weight percent iron oxide.

  13. Multifunctional iron oxide nanoparticles for diagnostics, therapy and macromolecule delivery.

    PubMed

    Yen, Swee Kuan; Padmanabhan, Parasuraman; Selvan, Subramanian Tamil

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, multifunctional nanoparticles (NPs) consisting of either metal (e.g. Au), or magnetic NP (e.g. iron oxide) with other fluorescent components such as quantum dots (QDs) or organic dyes have been emerging as versatile candidate systems for cancer diagnosis, therapy, and macromolecule delivery such as micro ribonucleic acid (microRNA). This review intends to highlight the recent advances in the synthesis and application of multifunctional NPs (mainly iron oxide) in theranostics, an area used to combine therapeutics and diagnostics. The recent applications of NPs in miRNA delivery are also reviewed. PMID:24396508

  14. Multifunctional Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for Diagnostics, Therapy and Macromolecule Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Swee Kuan; Padmanabhan, Parasuraman; Selvan, Subramanian Tamil

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, multifunctional nanoparticles (NPs) consisting of either metal (e.g. Au), or magnetic NP (e.g. iron oxide) with other fluorescent components such as quantum dots (QDs) or organic dyes have been emerging as versatile candidate systems for cancer diagnosis, therapy, and macromolecule delivery such as micro ribonucleic acid (microRNA). This review intends to highlight the recent advances in the synthesis and application of multifunctional NPs (mainly iron oxide) in theranostics, an area used to combine therapeutics and diagnostics. The recent applications of NPs in miRNA delivery are also reviewed. PMID:24396508

  15. Electrolytic photodissociation of chemical compounds by iron oxide electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Somorjai, Gabor A.; Leygraf, Christofer H.

    1984-01-01

    Chemical compounds can be dissociated by contacting the same with a p/n type semi-conductor diode having visible light as its sole source of energy. The diode consists of low cost, readily available materials, specifically polycrystalline iron oxide doped with silicon in the case of the n-type semi-conductor electrode, and polycrystalline iron oxide doped with magnesium in the case of the p-type electrode. So long as the light source has an energy greater than 2.2 electron volts, no added energy source is needed to achieve dissociation.

  16. Electrolytic photodissociation of chemical compounds by iron oxide photochemical diodes

    DOEpatents

    Somorjai, Gabor A.; Leygraf, Christofer H.

    1985-01-01

    Chemical compounds can be dissociated by contacting the same with a p/n type semi-conductor photochemical diode having visible light as its sole source of energy. The photochemical diode consists of low cost, readily available materials, specifically polycrystalline iron oxide doped with silicon in the case of the n-type semi-conductor electrode, and polycrystalline iron oxide doped with magnesium in the case of the p-type electrode. So long as the light source has an energy greater than 2.2 electron volts, no added energy source is needed to achieve dissociation.

  17. Magnetic separation of encapsulated islet cells labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide nano particles.

    PubMed

    Mettler, Esther; Trenkler, Anja; Feilen, Peter J; Wiegand, Frederik; Fottner, Christian; Ehrhart, Friederike; Zimmermann, Heiko; Hwang, Yong Hwa; Lee, Dong Yun; Fischer, Stefan; Schreiber, Laura M; Weber, Matthias M

    2013-01-01

    Islet cell transplantation is a promising option for the restoration of normal glucose homeostasis in patients with type 1 diabetes. Because graft volume is a crucial issue in islet transplantations for patients with diabetes, we evaluated a new method for increasing functional tissue yield in xenogeneic grafts of encapsulated islets. Islets were labeled with three different superparamagnetic iron oxide nano particles (SPIONs; dextran-coated SPION, siloxane-coated SPION, and heparin-coated SPION). Magnetic separation was performed to separate encapsulated islets from the empty capsules, and cell viability and function were tested. Islets labeled with 1000 μg Fe/ml dextran-coated SPIONs experienced a 69.9% reduction in graft volume, with a 33.2% loss of islet-containing capsules. Islets labeled with 100 μg Fe/ml heparin-coated SPIONs showed a 46.4% reduction in graft volume, with a 4.5% loss of capsules containing islets. No purification could be achieved using siloxane-coated SPIONs due to its toxicity to the primary islets. SPION labeling of islets is useful for transplant purification during islet separation as well as in vivo imaging after transplantation. Furthermore, purification of encapsulated islets can also reduce the volume of the encapsulated islets without impairing their function by removing empty capsules. PMID:23789985

  18. Preventing corona effects: multiphosphonic acid poly(ethylene glycol) copolymers for stable stealth iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Torrisi, V; Graillot, A; Vitorazi, L; Crouzet, Q; Marletta, G; Loubat, C; Berret, J-F

    2014-08-11

    When dispersed in biological fluids, engineered nanoparticles are selectively coated with proteins, resulting in the formation of a protein corona. It is suggested that the protein corona is critical in regulating the conditions of entry into the cytoplasm of living cells. Recent reports describe this phenomenon as ubiquitous and independent of the nature of the particle. For nanomedicine applications, however, there is a need to design advanced and cost-effective coatings that are resistant to protein adsorption and that increase the biodistribution in vivo. In this study, phosphonic acid poly(ethylene glycol) copolymers were synthesized and used to coat iron oxide particles. The copolymer composition was optimized to provide simple and scalable protocols as well as long-term stability in culture media. It is shown that polymers with multiple phosphonic acid functionalities and PEG chains outperform other types of coating, including ligands, polyelectrolytes, and carboxylic acid functionalized PEG. PEGylated particles exhibit moreover exceptional low cellular uptake, of the order of 100 femtograms of iron per cell. The present approach demonstrates that the surface chemistry of engineered particles is a key parameter in the interactions with cells. It also opens up new avenues for the efficient functionalization of inorganic surfaces. PMID:25046557

  19. Deposition rates of oxidized iron on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, R. G.

    1993-01-01

    The reddened oxidized surface of Mars is indicative of temporal interactions between the Martian atmosphere and its surface. During the evolution of the Martian regolith, primary ferromagnesian silicate and sulfide minerals in basaltic rocks apparently have been oxidized to secondary ferric-bearing assemblages. To evaluate how and when such oxidized deposits were formed on Mars, information about the mechanisms and rates of chemical weathering of Fe(2+)-bearing minerals has been determined. In this paper, mechanisms and rates of deposition of ferric oxide phases on the Martian surface are discussed.

  20. HIGH TEMPERATURE OXIDATION PERFORMANCE OF ALUMINIDE COATINGS

    SciTech Connect

    Pint, B.A.; Zhang, Y.; Haynes, J.A.; Wright, I.G.

    2003-04-22

    In order to determine the potential benefits and limitations of aluminide coatings, coatings made by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on Fe- and Ni-base alloy substrates are being evaluated in various high-temperature environments. Testing of coatings on representative ferritic (Fe-9Cr-1Mo) and austenitic (type 304L stainless steel) alloys has found that high frequency thermal cycling (1h cycle time) can significantly degrade the coating. Based on comparison with similar specimens with no thermal cycling or a longer cycle time (100h), this degradation was not due to Al loss from the coating but most likely because of the thermal expansion mismatch between the coating and the substrate. Several coated Ni-base alloys were tested in a high pressure (20atm) steam-CO2 environment for the ZEST (zero-emission steam turbine) program. Coated specimens showed less mass loss than the uncoated specimens after 1000h at 900 C and preliminary characterization examined the post-test coating structure and extent of attack.

  1. Unprecedented Selective Oxidation of Styrene Derivatives using a Supported Iron Oxide Nanocatalyst in Aqueous Medium

    EPA Science Inventory

    Iron oxide nanoparticles supported on mesoporous silica-type materials have been successfully utilized in the aqueous selective oxidation of alkenes under mild conditions using hydrogen peroxide as a green oxidant. Catalysts could be easily recovered after completion of the reac...

  2. Differential proteomics analysis of the surface heterogeneity of dextran iron oxide nanoparticles and the implications for their in vivo clearance

    PubMed Central

    Simberg, Dmitri; Park, Ji-Ho; Karmali, Priya P.; Zhang, Wan-Ming; Merkulov, Sergei; McCrae, Keith; Bhatia, Sangeeta; Sailor, Michael; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2009-01-01

    In order to understand the role of plasma proteins in the rapid liver clearance of dextran-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) in vivo, we analyzed the full repertoire of SPIO-binding blood proteins using novel two-dimensional differential mass spectrometry approach. The identified proteins showed specificity for surface domains of the nanoparticles: mannan-binding lectins bound to the dextran coating, histidine-rich glycoprotein and kininogen bound to the iron oxide part, and the complement lectin and contact clotting factors were secondary binders. Nanoparticle clearance studies in knockout mice suggested that these proteins, as well as several previously identified opsonins, do not play a significant role in the SPIO clearance. However, both the dextran coat and the iron oxide core remained accessible to specific probes after incubation of SPIO in plasma, suggesting that the nanoparticle surface could be available for recognition by macrophages, regardless of protein coating. These data provide guidance to rational design of bioinert, long-circulating nanoparticles. PMID:19394687

  3. Generation of drugs coated iron nanoparticles through high energy ball milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhika Devi, A.; Chelvane, J. A.; Prabhakar, P. K.; Padma Priya, P. V.; Doble, Mukesh; Murty, B. S.

    2014-03-01

    The iron nanoparticles coated with oleic acid and drugs such as folic acid/Amoxicillin were synthesized by high energy ball milling and characterized by X-ray diffraction, Transmission electron microscope, zeta potential, dynamic light scattering, Fourier Transform Infra red (FT-IR) measurements, and thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA). FT-IR and TGA measurements show good adsorption of drugs on oleic acid coated nanoparticles. Magnetic measurements indicate that saturation magnetization is larger for amoxicillin coated particles compared to folic acid coated particles. The biocompatibility of the magnetic nanoparticles prepared was evaluated by in vitro cytotoxicity assay using L929 cells as model cells.

  4. Generation of drugs coated iron nanoparticles through high energy ball milling

    SciTech Connect

    Radhika Devi, A.; Murty, B. S.; Chelvane, J. A.; Prabhakar, P. K.; Padma Priya, P. V.; Doble, Mukesh

    2014-03-28

    The iron nanoparticles coated with oleic acid and drugs such as folic acid/Amoxicillin were synthesized by high energy ball milling and characterized by X-ray diffraction, Transmission electron microscope, zeta potential, dynamic light scattering, Fourier Transform Infra red (FT-IR) measurements, and thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA). FT-IR and TGA measurements show good adsorption of drugs on oleic acid coated nanoparticles. Magnetic measurements indicate that saturation magnetization is larger for amoxicillin coated particles compared to folic acid coated particles. The biocompatibility of the magnetic nanoparticles prepared was evaluated by in vitro cytotoxicity assay using L929 cells as model cells.

  5. Coat colour and sex identification in horses from Iron Age Sweden.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Emma M; Telldahl, Ylva; Sjöling, Emma; Sundkvist, Anneli; Hulth, Helena; Sjøvold, Torstein; Götherström, Anders

    2012-01-20

    Domestication of animals and plants marked a turning point in human prehistory. To date archaeology, archaeozoology and genetics have shed light on when and where all of our major livestock species were domesticated. Phenotypic changes associated with domestication have occurred in all farm animals. Coat colour is one of the traits that have been subjected to the strongest human selection throughout history. Here we use genotyping of coat colour SNPs in horses to investigate whether there were any regional differences or preferences for specific colours associated with specific cultural traditions in Iron Age Sweden. We do this by identifying the sex and coat colour of horses sacrificed at Skedemosse, Öland (Sweden) during the Iron Age, as well as in horses from two sites in Uppland, Ultuna and Valsgärde (dated to late Iron Age). We show that bay, black and chestnut colours were all common and two horses with tobiano spotting were found. We also show how the combination of sex identification with genotyping of just a few SNPs underlying the basic coat colours can be used to identify the minimum number of individuals at a site on a higher level than morphological methods alone. Although separated by 500 km and from significantly different archaeological contexts the horses at Skedemosse and Ultuna are quite homogenous when it comes to coat colour phenotypes, indicating that there were no clear geographical variation in coat colouration in Sweden during the late Iron Age and early Viking Age. PMID:22154005

  6. DETERMINATION OF THE RATES AND PRODUCTS OF FERROUS IRON OXIDATION IN ARSENIC-CONTAMINATED POND WATER.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dissolved ferrous iron and arsenic in the presence of insufficient oxygenated ground water is released into a pond. When the mixing of ferrous iron and oxygenated water within the pond occurs, the ferrous iron is oxidized and precipitated as an iron oxide. Groups of experiments...

  7. Biomimetic novel nanoporous niobium oxide coating for orthopaedic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauline, S. Anne; Rajendran, N.

    2014-01-01

    Niobium oxide was synthesized by sol-gel methodology and a crystalline, nanoporous and adherent coating of Nb2O5 was deposited on 316L SS using the spin coating technique and heat treatment. The synthesis conditions were optimized to obtain a nanoporous morphology. The coating was characterized using attenuated total reflectance-Infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR), X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and the formation of crystalline Nb2O5 coating with nanoporous morphology was confirmed. Mechanical studies confirmed that the coating has excellent adherence to the substrate and the hardness value of the coating was excellent. Contact angle analysis showed increased hydrophilicity for the coated substrate. In vitro bioactivity test confirmed that the Nb2O5 coating with nanoporous morphology facilitated the growth of hydroxyapatite (HAp). This was further confirmed by the solution analysis test where increased uptake of calcium and phosphorous ions from simulated body fluid (SBF) was observed. Electrochemical evaluation of the coating confirmed that the crystalline coating is insulative and protective in nature and offered excellent corrosion protection to 316L SS. Thus, this study confirmed that the nanoporous crystalline Nb2O5 coating conferred bioactivity and enhanced corrosion resistance on 316L SS.

  8. Size-dependant heating rates of iron oxide nanoparticles for magnetic fluid hyperthermia

    PubMed Central

    Gonzales-Weimuller, Marcela; Zeisberger, Matthias; Krishnan, Kannan M.

    2015-01-01

    Using the thermal decomposition of organometallics method we have synthesized high-quality, iron oxide nanoparticles of tailorable size up to ~15nm and transferred them to a water phase by coating with a biocompatible polymer. The magnetic behavior of these particles was measured and fit to a log-normal distribution using the Chantrell method and their polydispersity was confirmed to be very narrow. By performing calorimetry measurements with these monodisperse particles we have unambiguously demonstrated, for the first time, that at a given frequency, heating rates of superparamagnetic particles are dependent on particle size, in agreement with earlier theoretical predictions. PMID:26405373

  9. Biocompatible superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles used for contrast agents: a structural and magnetic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamarra, L. F.; Brito, G. E. S.; Pontuschka, W. M.; Amaro, E.; Parma, A. H. C.; Goya, G. F.

    2005-03-01

    The magnetic properties of different biocompatible magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MION) are presented. Dextran-coated, magnetite (Fe 3O 4) MIONs were studied as supplied and after lyophilization, to disentangle the effects of particle interactions. All samples showed superparamagnetic behavior at room temperature, with blocking transitions at TB˜40-56 K (at 100 Oe), depending on the particle interactions. The dynamics of the thermally activated blocking process reveals that the effect of dipolar interactions is to increase the energy barriers of the individual particles.

  10. The fate of arsenic adsorbed on iron oxides in the presence of arsenite-oxidizing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhennan; Yin, Naiyi; Du, Huili; Cai, Xiaolin; Cui, Yanshan

    2016-05-01

    Arsenic (As) is a redox-active metalloid whose toxicity and mobility in soil depend on its oxidation state. Arsenite [As(III)] can be oxidized by microbes and adsorbed by minerals in the soil. However, the combined effects of these abiotic and biotic processes are not well understood. In this study, the fate of arsenic in the presence of an isolated As(III)-oxidizing bacterium (Pseudomonas sp. HN-1, 10(9) colony-forming units (CFUs)·ml(-1)) and three iron oxides (goethite, hematite, and magnetite at 1.6 g L(-1)) was determined using batch experiments. The total As adsorption by iron oxides was lower with bacteria present and was higher with iron oxides alone. The total As adsorption decreased by 78.6%, 36.0% and 79.7% for goethite, hematite and magnetite, respectively, due to the presence of bacteria. As(III) adsorbed on iron oxides could also be oxidized by Pseudomonas sp. HN-1, but the oxidation rate (1.3 μmol h(-1)) was much slower than the rate in the aqueous phase (96.2 μmol h(-1)). Therefore, the results of other studies with minerals only might overestimate the adsorptive capacity of solids in natural systems; the presence of minerals might hinder As(III) oxidation by microbes. Under aerobic conditions, in the presence of iron oxides and As(III)-oxidizing bacteria, arsenic is adsorbed onto iron oxides within the adsorption capacity, and As(V) is the primary form in the solid and aqueous phases. PMID:26933901

  11. Chemical vapor deposition coatings for oxidation protection of titanium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunnington, G. R.; Robinson, J. C.; Clark, R. K.

    1991-01-01

    Results of an experimental investigation of the oxidation protection afforded to Ti-14Al-21Nb and Ti-14Al-23Nb-2V titanium aluminides and Ti-17Mo-3Al-3Nb titanium alloy by aluminum-boron-silicon and boron-silicon coatings are presented. These coatings are applied by a combination of physical vapor deposition (PVD) and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes. The former is for the application of aluminum, and the latter is for codeposition of boron and silicon. Coating thickness is in the range of 2 to 7 microns, and coating weights are 0.6 to 2.0 mg/sq cm. Oxidation testing was performed in air at temperatures to 1255 K in both static and hypersonic flow environments. The degree of oxidation protection provided by the coatings is determined from weight change measurements made during the testing and post test compositional analyses. Temperature-dependent total normal emittance data are also presented for four coating/substrate combinations. Both types of coatings provided excellent oxidation protection for the exposure conditions of this investigation. Total normal emittances were greater than 0.80 in all cases.

  12. Oxidation behaviour and electrical properties of cobalt/cerium oxide composite coatings for solid oxide fuel cell interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harthøj, Anders; Holt, Tobias; Møller, Per

    2015-05-01

    This work evaluates the performance of cobalt/cerium oxide (Co/CeO2) composite coatings and pure Co coatings to be used for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) interconnects. The coatings are electroplated on the ferritic stainless steels Crofer 22 APU and Crofer 22H. Coated and uncoated samples are exposed in air at 800 °C for 3000 h and oxidation rates are measured and oxide scale microstructures are investigated. Area-specific resistances (ASR) in air at 850 °C of coated and uncoated samples are also measured. A dual layered oxide scale formed on all coated samples. The outer layer consisted of Co, Mn, Fe and Cr oxide and the inner layer consisted of Cr oxide. The CeO2 was present as discrete particles in the outer oxide layer after exposure. The Cr oxide layer thicknesses and oxidations rates were significantly reduced for Co/CeO2 coated samples compared to for Co coated and uncoated samples. The ASR of all Crofer 22H samples increased significantly faster than of Crofer 22 APU samples which was likely due to the presence of SiO2 in the oxide/metal interface of Crofer 22H.

  13. Microstructure and Stresses in HVOF-Sprayed Iron Aluminide Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Totemeier, Terry Craig; Wright, Richard Neil; Swank, William David

    2002-09-01

    The microstructure and state of stress present in Fe3Al coatings produced by high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) thermal spraying in air at varying particle velocities were characterized using metallography, curvature measurements, x-ray analysis, and microhardness measurements. Sound coatings were produced for all conditions. The microstructures of coatings prepared at higher velocities showed fewer unmelted particles and a greater extent of deformation. Residual stresses in the coatings were compressive and varied from nearly zero at the lowest velocity to approximately -450 MPa at the highest velocity. X-ray line broadening analyses revealed a corresponding increase in the extent of cold work present in the coating, which was also reflected in increased microhardness. Values of mean coefficient of thermal expansion obtained for as-sprayed coatings using x-ray analysis were significantly lower than those for powder and bulk alloy.

  14. Iron Partitioning and Oxidation State in Earth's Lower Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piet, H.; Badro, J.; Nabiei, F.; Dennenwaldt, T.; Shim, S. H. D.; Cantoni, M.; Hébert, C.; Gillet, P.

    2015-12-01

    Valence state and concentrations of iron in lower mantle phases have strong effects on their chemical and physical properties. Experimental studies have reported stark differences in iron partitioning between bridgmanite (Brg) and ferropericlase (Fp) for San Carlos olivine [1] and pyrolite [2] systems. We recently performed experiments at lower mantle conditions for an Al-rich olivine system [3] and observed an iron enrichment of the silicate phase very similar to that in pyrolite. Mössbauer studies [4] have shown that in the presence of aluminum non negligible amounts of Fe3+ could be incorporated in bridgmanite explaining the observed iron enrichment. Non negligible amounts of Fe3+ in the lower mantle could influence transport properties of the phases [5]. The evaluation of ferrous and ferric iron concentrations in lower mantle mineral assemblages is then key to a thorough understanding of geophysical observations and associated mantle dynamics. We used electron energy loss spectroscopy technique to quantify the proportions of Fe2+ and Fe3+ iron in Brg and Fp phases previously synthesized from Al-rich olivine composition [3]. The oxidation state of iron in the lower mantle will be discussed as well as ensuing implications on transport properties for relevant lower mantle compositions. References [1] Sakai et al., 2009 [2] Prescher et al., 2014 [3] Piet et al., submitted [4] McCammon et al., 1996 [5] Xu et al., 1998

  15. Interactions between the glass fiber coating and oxidized carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ku-Herrera, J. J.; Avilés, F.; Nistal, A.; Cauich-Rodríguez, J. V.; Rubio, F.; Rubio, J.; Bartolo-Pérez, P.

    2015-03-01

    Chemically oxidized multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were deposited onto commercial E-glass fibers using a dipping procedure assisted by ultrasonic dispersion. In order to investigate the role of the fiber coating (known as "sizing"), MWCNTs were deposited on the surface of as-received E-glass fibers preserving the proprietary coating as well as onto glass fibers which had the coating deliberately removed. Scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy were used to assess the distribution of MWCNTs onto the fibers. A rather homogeneous coverage with high density of MWCNTs onto the glass fibers is achieved when the fiber coating is maintained. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analyses of the chemical composition of the glass fiber coating suggest that such coating is a complex mixture with multiple oxygen-containing functional groups such as hydroxyl, carbonyl and epoxy. FTIR and XPS of MWCNTs over the glass fibers and of a mixture of MWCNTs and fiber coating provided evidence that the hydroxyl and carboxyl groups of the oxidized MWCNTs react with the oxygen-containing functional groups of the glass fiber coating, forming hydrogen bonding and through epoxy ring opening. Hydrogen bonding and ester formation between the functional groups of the MWCNTs and the silane contained in the coating are also possible.

  16. Preparation and optical properties of sol-gel-deposited electrochromic iron oxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozer, Nilgun; Tepehan, Fatma; Tepehan, Galip

    1997-10-01

    The preparation and optical properties of sol-gel deposited iron oxide films are investigated in this study. The films are deposited on glass by spin-coating from polymeric sol-gel solutions. The coating solutions were prepared from Fe(OCH3H7)3 and isopropanol. Fe2O3 films were obtained at a firing temperature 180 degrees Celsius. The films were characterized by x-ray diffractometry (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), cyclic voltammetry (CV) and UV-Vis spectroscopy. The electrochemical properties of the films were studied in 0.5 M LiClO4/propylene carbonate (PC) solution. The CV results showed reversibility of the Li+/e- insertion/extraction process in the Fe2O3 films up to 200 cycles. Reduction and oxidation of the amorphous films in 0.5 M LiClO4-PC solution caused noticeable changes in optical absorption. XRD of the films showed that they had an amorphous structure. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) measurements showed that the composition of the film is Fe2O3. In-situ spectrophotometric measurements indicated that these films show weak electrochromism in the spectral range of 350 - 800 nm. The optical band gap is estimated to be 1.92 eV for the amorphous film. The spectroelectrochemical properties clearly indicated that cyclic stability of the iron oxide films deteriorated above 200 cycles.

  17. Toxicity, toxicokinetics and biodistribution of dextran stabilized Iron oxide Nanoparticles for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Remya, N S; Syama, S; Sabareeswaran, A; Mohanan, P V

    2016-09-10

    Advancement in the field of nanoscience and technology has alarmingly raised the call for comprehending the potential health effects caused by deliberate or unintentional exposure to nanoparticles. Iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles have an increasing number of biomedical applications and hence a complete toxicological profile of the nanomaterial is therefore a mandatory requirement prior to its intended usage to ensure safety and to minimize potential health hazards upon its exposure. The present study elucidates the toxicity of in house synthesized Dextran stabilized iron oxide nanoparticles (DINP) in a regulatory perspective through various routes of exposure, its associated molecular, immune, genotoxic, carcinogenic effects and bio distribution profile. Synthesized ferrite nanomaterials were successfully coated with dextran (<25nm) and were physicochemically characterized and subjected to in vitro and in vivo toxicity evaluations. The results suggest that surface coating of ferrite nanoparticles with dextran helps in improvising particle stability in biological environments. The nanoparticles do not seem to induce oxidative stress mediated toxicological effects, nor altered physiological process or behavior changes or visible pathological lesions. Furthermore no anticipated health hazards are likely to be associated with the use of DINP and could be concluded that the synthesized DINP is nontoxic/safe to be used for biomedical applications. PMID:27451271

  18. Thermosensitive liposomes entrapping iron oxide nanoparticles for controllable drug release.

    PubMed

    Tai, Lin-Ai; Tsai, Pi-Ju; Wang, Yu-Chao; Wang, Yu-Jing; Lo, Leu-Wei; Yang, Chung-Shi

    2009-04-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles can serve as a heating source upon alternative magnetic field (AMF) exposure. Iron oxide nanoparticles can be mixed with thermosensitive nanovehicles for hyperthermia-induced drug release, yet such a design and mechanism may not be suitable for controllable drug release applications in which the tissues are susceptible to environmental temperature change such as brain tissue. In the present study, iron oxide nanoparticles were entrapped inside of thermosensitive liposomes for AMF-induced drug release while the environmental temperature was maintained at a constant level. Carboxyfluorescein was co-entrapped with the iron oxide nanoparticles in the liposomes as a model compound for monitoring drug release and environmental temperature was maintained with a water circulator jacket. These experiments have been successfully performed in solution, in phantom and in anesthetized animals. Furthermore, the thermosensitive liposomes were administered into rat forearm skeletal muscle, and the release of carboxylfluorescein triggered by the external alternative magnetic field was monitored by an implanted microdialysis perfusion probe with an on-line laser-induced fluorescence detector. In the future such a device could be applied to simultaneous magnetic resonance imaging and non-invasive drug release in temperature-sensitive applications. PMID:19420485

  19. Oxidation resistant iron and nickel alloys for high temperature use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, V. L.; Misra, S. K.; Wheaton, H. L.

    1970-01-01

    Iron-base and nickel-base alloys exhibit good oxidation resistance and improved ductility with addition of small amounts of yttrium, tantalum /or hafnium/, and thorium. They can be used in applications above the operating temperatures of the superalloys, if high strength materials are not required.

  20. OXYANION SORPTION TO HIGH SURFACE AREA IRON AND ALUMINUM OXIDES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sorption of selected oxyanions (Mo, As, and P) to high surface area iron and aluminum oxides was investigated using in situ Raman and ATR-FTIR spectroscopy, batch sorption methods, electrophoretic mobility measurements, and surface complexation modeling. In situ ATR-FTIR and Raman spectra were coup...

  1. CHROMIUM TRANSPORT, OXIDATION, AND ADSORPTION IN MANGANESE-COATED SAND

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examine how the processes of advection, dispersion, oxidation-reduction, and adsorption combine to affect the transport of chromium through columns packed with pyrolusite (P-MnO$-coated sand. We find that P-Mn02 effectively oxidizes Cr@I) to Cr(VI) and that the extent of oxida...

  2. Antagonistic effects of humic acid and iron oxyhydroxide grain-coating on biochar nanoparticle transport in saturated sand.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dengjun; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Dongmei

    2013-05-21

    Biochar land application may result in multiple agronomic and environmental benefits (e.g., carbon sequestration, improving soil quality, and immobilizing environmental contaminants). However, our understanding of biochar particle transport is largely unknown in natural environments with significant heterogeneity in solid (e.g., patches of iron oxyhydroxide coating) and solution chemistry (e.g., the presence of natural organic matter), which represents a critical knowledge gap in assessing the environmental impact of biochar land application. Transport and retention kinetics of nanoparticles (NPs) from wheat straw biochars produced at two pyrolysis temperatures (i.e., 350 and 550 °C) were investigated in water-saturated sand columns at environmentally relevant concentrations of dissolved humic acid (HA, 0, 1, 5, and 10 mg L(-1)) and fractional surface coverage of iron oxyhydroxide coatings on sand grains (ω, 0.16, 0.28, and 0.40). Transport of biochar NPs increased with increasing HA concentration, largely because of enhanced repulsive interaction energy between biochar NPs and sand grains. Conversely, transport of biochar NPs decreased significantly with increasing ω due to enhanced electrostatic attraction between negatively charged biochar NPs and positively charged iron oxyhydroxides. At a given ω of 0.28, biochar NPs were less retained with increasing HA concentration due to increased electrosteric repulsion between biochar NPs and sand grains. Experimental breakthrough curves and retention profiles were well described using a two-site kinetic retention model that accounted for Langmuirian blocking or random sequential adsorption at one site. Consistent with the blocking effect, the often observed flat retention profiles stemmed from decreased retention rate and/or maximum retention capacity at a higher HA concentration or smaller ω. The antagonistic effects of HA and iron oxyhydroxide grain-coating imparted on the mobility of biochar NPs suggest that

  3. Oxidation resistant coatings for CoSb3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawadzka, K.; Godlewska, E.; Mars, K.; Nocun, M.

    2012-06-01

    Doped cobalt antimonides, are used as components of thermoelectric devices at temperatures not exceeding 450 °C because of poor thermal and chemical stability. In absence of oxygen they degrade by sublimation of antimony, while in air they easily oxidize to form volatile antimony oxides and non-volatile thick double oxide scales [1]. In both cases, protective coatings are indispensable to ensure safe performance of thermoelectric devices over extended times. The most promising solution, reported so far, is a thick aerogel coating, which practically stops antimony loss by sublimation. The assessment of coating effectiveness is generally based on thermogravimetric tests in vacuum, so permeability of oxygen and protection from oxidation cannot be evaluated. The paper presents investigations on the development of protective coatings, which would prevent oxidation of CoSb3. Two types of coatings were applied: magnetron sputtered Cr-Si thin layers [2] and thick enamel layers. Testing involved interrupted oxidation in air for 20-80 h at 500 °C and 600 °C. The Cr-Si thin layers appeared oxygen-tight at 500 °C while the enamel layers - even at 600 °C.

  4. Iron Kinetics and Evolution of Microbial Populations in Low-pH, Ferrous Iron-Oxidizing Bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Jones, Rose M; Johnson, D Barrie

    2016-08-01

    Iron-rich, acidic wastewaters are commonplace pollutants associated with metal and coal mining. Continuous-flow bioreactors were commissioned and tested for their capacities to oxidize ferrous iron in synthetic and actual acid mine drainage waters using (initially) pure cultures of the recently described acidophilic, iron-oxidizing heterotrophic bacterium Acidithrix ferrooxidans grown in the presence of glucose and yeast extract. The bioreactors became rapidly colonized by this bacterium, which formed macroscopic streamer growths in the flowing waters. Over 97% of ferrous iron in pH 2.0-2.2 synthetic mine water was oxidized (at up to 225 mg L(-1) h(-1)) at dilution rates (D) of 0.6 h(-1). Rates of iron oxidation decreased with pH but were still significant, with influent liquors as low as pH 1.37. When fed with actual mine water, >90% of ferrous iron was oxidized at D values of 0.4 h(-1), and microbial communities within the bioreactors changed over time, with Atx. ferrooxidans becoming increasingly displaced by the autotrophic iron-oxidizing acidophiles Ferrovum myxofaciens, Acidithiobacillus ferrivorans, and Leptospirillum ferrooxidans (which were all indigenous to the mine water), although this did not have a negative impact on net ferrous-iron oxidation. The results confirmed the potential of using a heterotrophic acidophile to facilitate the rapid commissioning of iron-oxidizing bioreactors and illustrated how microbial communities within them can evolve without compromising the performances of the bioreactors. PMID:27377871

  5. Porcelain enamelled absorbers, coated by spectral selective tin oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Simonis, F.; Faber, A.J.; Hoogendoorn, C.J.

    1987-02-01

    The use of porcelain enamelled absorbers in flat plate collectors features longevity thanks to the durability and thermal stability of the enamel finish. The porcelain enamel can be made spectral selective by coating with doped tin oxide or indium oxide. The application procedure involves an enamelling step followed by a pyrosol process with tin or indium compounds. The optical properties of tin oxide coated enamel yield values of 0.90-0.92 absorptance and 0.13-0.18 hemispherical emittance. The temperature dependence of the emittance is very small. The thermal stability has been proved up to 400/sup 0/C in air.

  6. Deuterium permeation through erbium oxide coatings on RAFM steels by a dip-coating technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chikada, Takumi; Naitoh, Shunya; Suzuki, Akihiro; Terai, Takayuki; Tanaka, Teruya; Muroga, Takeo

    2013-11-01

    A tritium permeation barrier is a promising solution for the problems of tritium loss and radiological safety in fusion blanket systems. In recent years, erbium oxide coatings have shown remarkable permeation reduction factors. One of the remaining issues for the coatings is the establishment of plant-scale fabrication. In this study, erbium oxide thin films have been fabricated by a dip-coating technique, which has the potential to coat a complex-shaped substrate, and deuterium permeation behavior in the coatings has been examined. Crack-free coatings were formed on a reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel F82H substrate by use of a withdrawal speed of 1.0-1.4 mm s-1 and a heat-treatment process in hydrogen with moisture. In deuterium permeation experiments, a 0.2-μm-thick coating on both sides of the substrate showed a reduction factor of 600-700 in comparison with a F82H substrate below 873 K; however, the coating degraded at above 923 K because of crack formation. A double-coated sample indicated a reduction factor of up to 2000 and did not degrade at up to 923 K. The driving pressure dependence of the deuterium permeation flux indicated that the permeation tended to be limited by surface reactions at low temperatures. Optimization of the number of layers has the possibility to reduce degradation at high temperatures while maintaining high permeation reduction factors.

  7. In vivo monitoring of rat macrophages labeled with poly(l-lysine)-iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Babič, Michal; Schmiedtová, Martina; Poledne, Rudolf; Herynek, Vít; Horák, Daniel

    2015-08-01

    Coprecipitation of FeCl2 and FeCl3 with aqueous ammonia was used to prepare iron oxide nanoparticles dispersible in aqueous medium. Oxidation of the particles with sodium hypochlorite then yielded maghemite (γ-Fe2 O3 ) nanoparticles which were coated with two types of coating -d-mannose or poly(l-lysine) (PLL) as confirmed by FTIR analysis. The particles were <10 nm according to transmission electron microscopy. Their hydrodynamic particle size was ∼180 nm (by dynamic light scattering). The d-mannose-, PLL-coated, and neat γ-Fe2 O3 particles as well as commercial Resovist® were used to label rat macrophages. The viability and contrast properties of labeled macrophages were compared. PLL-coated γ-Fe2 O3 nanoparticles were found optimal. The labeled macrophages were injected to rats monitored in vivo by magnetic resonance imaging up to 48 h. Transport of macrophages labeled with PLL-γ-Fe2 O3 nanoparticles in rats was confirmed. Tracking of macrophages using the developed particles can be used for monitoring of inflammations and cell migration in cell therapy. PMID:25283523

  8. 40 CFR 721.10529 - Cobalt iron manganese oxide, carboxylic acid-modified (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Cobalt iron manganese oxide... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10529 Cobalt iron manganese oxide, carboxylic acid... substance identified generically as cobalt iron manganese oxide, carboxylic acid-modified (PMN P-12-35)...

  9. 40 CFR 721.10529 - Cobalt iron manganese oxide, carboxylic acid-modified (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Cobalt iron manganese oxide... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10529 Cobalt iron manganese oxide, carboxylic acid... substance identified generically as cobalt iron manganese oxide, carboxylic acid-modified (PMN P-12-35)...

  10. Lactoferrin conjugated iron oxide nanoparticles for targeting brain glioma cells in magnetic particle imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomitaka, Asahi; Arami, Hamed; Gandhi, Sonu; Krishnan, Kannan M.

    2015-10-01

    Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) is a new real-time imaging modality, which promises high tracer mass sensitivity and spatial resolution directly generated from iron oxide nanoparticles. In this study, monodisperse iron oxide nanoparticles with median core diameters ranging from 14 to 26 nm were synthesized and their surface was conjugated with lactoferrin to convert them into brain glioma targeting agents. The conjugation was confirmed with the increase of the hydrodynamic diameters, change of zeta potential, and Bradford assay. Magnetic particle spectrometry (MPS), performed to evaluate the MPI performance of these nanoparticles, showed no change in signal after lactoferrin conjugation to nanoparticles for all core diameters, suggesting that the MPI signal is dominated by Néel relaxation and thus independent of hydrodynamic size difference or presence of coating molecules before and after conjugations. For this range of core sizes (14-26 nm), both MPS signal intensity and spatial resolution improved with increasing core diameter of nanoparticles. The lactoferrin conjugated iron oxide nanoparticles (Lf-IONPs) showed specific cellular internalization into C6 cells with a 5-fold increase in MPS signal compared to IONPs without lactoferrin, both after 24 h incubation. These results suggest that Lf-IONPs can be used as tracers for targeted brain glioma imaging using MPI.

  11. Preparation and properties of a novel iron-coated carbon fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yi; Zhang, Baoshan; Xu, Weidong; Shi, Yingbing; Jiang, Zhengsheng; Zhou, Ningsheng; Gu, Benxing; Lu, Huaixian

    2003-01-01

    A novel iron-coated carbon fiber has been fabricated by electrochemical method. Magnetic properties, complex permeability, and complex permitivity have been measured. It is found that the sample has a low coercive force. By doping a few fibers to general absorbers (carbonyl iron), the complex permeability and permitivity of composites achieved a rise without the obvious increase of filling density. This result shows that the doping of fibers to general absorber will effectively decrease the thickness of the microwave absorption layer.

  12. A field investigation of arsenic transport by colloidal iron oxides in the hyporheic zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Carroll, D. M.; Hartland, A.; Larsen, J.; Andersen, M. S.

    2012-12-01

    Conceptual models concerning the fate of arsenic, and many other heavy metals, in aqueous environments including groundwater do not traditionally include colloids as potential facilitators of transport. However, there is significant evidence that heavy metals and oxyanions, including arsenic, preferentially partition into oxide phases. Iron oxides are commonly present as colloids (e.g. Ferrihydrite) and have the potential to mobilise and transport arsenic further than typically assumed. Interactions between Fe-oxides and natural organic matter (NOM) may be particularly significant in hyporheic sediments, given the comparatively high concentrations of dissolved organic carbon present and the presence of pronounced and dynamic redox fronts. Colloidal Fe-oxide stability may be enhanced by NOM surface coatings, potentially limiting colloid sedimentation and making encapsulated colloids more mobile. Furthermore, NOM is a significant agent driving As release, through the consumption of dissolved oxygen by microorganisms (leading to reductive dissolution of Fe-oxides in sediments. In this study the size-distribution and speciation of colloidal phases were studied beneath an ephemeral stream. We determined the proportions of Fe and As in colloidal fractions and determined the proportions held in complexes with NOM. Redox conditions went from aerobic, immediately beneath the stream, to anoxic and finally aerobic away from the stream and into the aquifer. This presentation will discuss dominant arsenic transport pathways including the possible importance of iron and natural organic colloids on arsenic transport.

  13. Iron oxidation state in hydrous rhyolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphreys, M.; Brooker, R.; Fraser, D.; Smith, V. C.

    2012-12-01

    Recent studies have suggested that the Earth's mantle at subduction zones is oxidized relative to that at mid-ocean ridges. One possible origin of the oxidation is thought to be hydrous fluids, which are released into the mantle from the down-going slab during subduction. However, this is controversial; other studies have concluded that there is no intrinsic difference in oxidation state. One potential problem in determining primary oxidation states is that magmas produced by partial melting of the sub-arc mantle undergo significant degassing and crystallisation near the earth's surface, which may overprint the oxidation state of the primary melt. H2O contents of melt inclusions may be affected by partial re-equilibration. The effect of H2O on Fe oxidation state is unclear, although theoretical arguments typically predict increasing Fe3+/ΣFe during shallow degassing as a result of preferential diffusion of H2 out of the melt: FeO (m) + H2O (m) = Fe2O3 (m) + H2 (g) [1] We used XANES to measure Fe3+/Fe2+ in cylinders of rhyolitic obsidian that had been hydrated in gold capsules in cold-seal apparatus. Runs were performed at 850-900 °C under H2O-saturated conditions for short run times (20-80 minutes). Surprisingly, we find a positive correlation between Fe3+/ΣFe and H2O content of the glass. This is inconsistent with the effects of reaction [1], but can be explained by considering the acid-base properties of the hydrous melt. In particular, basic behaviour of FeO but amphoteric behaviour of Fe2O3, and changes in melt basicity relating to dissolution of H2O, can explain increasing Fe3+/Fe2+ with increasing H2O. We discuss the implications of these results for using melt compositions to infer the oxidation state of the earth's mantle.

  14. Coated oxidizers for combustion stability in solid-propellant rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmy, A. M.; Ramohalli, K. N. R.

    1985-01-01

    Experiments are conducted in a laboratory-scale (6.25-cm diameter) end-burning rocket motor with state-of-the-art, ammonium perchlorate hydroxy-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB), nonmetallized propellants. The concept of tailoring the stability characteristics with a small amount (less than 1 percent by weight) of COATING on the oxidizer is explored. The thermal degradation characteristics of the coat chemical are deduced through theoretical arguments on thermal diffusivity of the composite material (propellant). Several candidate coats are selected and propellants are cast. These propellants (with coated oxidizers) are fired in a laboratory-scale end-burning rocket motor, and real-time pressure histories are recorded. The control propellant (with no coating) is also tested for comparison. The uniformity of the coating, confirmed by SEM pictures and BET adsorption measurements, is thought to be an advance in technology. The frequency of bulk mode instability (BMI), the pressure fluctuation amplitudes, and stability boundaries are correlated with parameters related to the characteristic length (L-asterisk) of the rocket motor. The coated oxidizer propellants, in general, display greater combustion stability than the control (state-of-the-art). The correlations of the various parameters are thought to be new to a field filled with much uncertainty.

  15. Simultaneous reductive dissolution of iron oxide and oxidation of iodide in ice.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kitae; Choi, Wonyong

    2015-04-01

    Iron is an important trace element controlling the metabolism and growth of all kinds of living species. Especially, the bio-availability of iron has been regarded as the limiting factor for primary productivity in HNLC (High Nutrients Low Chlorophyll) regions including Southern ocean. The dissolution of iron oxide provides enhanced the bio-availability of iron for phytoplankton growth. The halogen chemistry in polar regions is related to various important environmental processes such as Antarctic Ozone Depletion Event(ODE), mercury depletion, oxidative processes in atmosphere, and the formation of CCN (Cloud Condensation Nuclei). In this study, we investigated the reductive dissolution of iron oxide particles to produce Fe(II)aq and simultaneous oxidation of I- (iodide) to I3- (tri-iodide) in ice phase under UV irradiation or dark condition. The reductive generation of Fe(II)aq from iron oxides and oxidation of iodide to I3- were negligible in water but significantly accelerated in frozen solution both in the presence and absence of light. The enhanced reductive generation of Fe(II)aq and oxidative formation of I3- in ice were observed regardless of the various types of iron oxides [hematite (α-Fe2O3) maghemite (γ- Fe2O3), goethite (α-FeOOH), lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH) and, magnetite (Fe3O4)]. We explained that the enhanced redox production of Fe(II)aq and I3- in ice is contributed to the freeze concentration of iodides, protons, and dissolved oxygen in the unfrozen solution. When the concentration of both iodides and protons were raised by 10-fold each, the formation of Fe(II)aq in water under UV irradiation was approached to those in ice. The outdoor experiments were carried out under ambient solar radiation in winter season of mid-latitude (Pohang, Korea: 36°N latitude) and also confirmed that the production of Fe(II)aq via reductive dissolution of iron oxide and I3- generation via I- oxidation were enhanced in frozen solution. These results suggest that iron

  16. Size-Tunable Synthesis of Stable Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for Potential Biomedical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Faquan; Yang, Victor C.

    2009-01-01

    Dextran-coated superparamagnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have widespread biomedical applications. The superparamagnetic behavior, specifically regulated size, and smooth morphology are crucial requirements for essentially all of these applications. Presented herein is an innovative double-coating strategy that would allow for a size-controlled synthesis of MNPs. Small monocrystalline iron oxide nanoparticles (MIONs) were first synthesized, which served as the source of superparamagnetic properties. These MIONs were then treated in an acetate buffer containing biocompatible dextran polymer. Under such an environment, the colloidal MIONs would be quickly agglomerated by the acetate ions, and the formed coalescent body of MION would then be stabilized simultaneously by coating with dextran. By regulating the MION or dextran concentration as well as the thermal incubation time, the sizes of these first formed nanoparticles (termed 1st-NPs) could be readily controlled. A second dextran coating step was further applied to smoothen the 1st-NPs in attaining a final product (termed 2nd-NPs). The 2nd-NPs exhibited robustly storage stability due to the additional coating shell. Results successfully confirmed the plausibility of this approach, as these MNPs displayed not only a smooth outline and a narrow size distribution, but also the essential superparamagnetic behavior and a significantly prolonged stability upon storage. PMID:19402138

  17. Selective stabilization of aliphatic organic carbon by iron oxide

    PubMed Central

    Adhikari, Dinesh; Yang, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Stabilization of organic matter in soil is important for natural ecosystem to sequestrate carbon and mitigate greenhouse gas emission. It is largely unknown what factors govern the preservation of organic carbon in soil, casting shadow on predicting the response of soil to climate change. Iron oxide was suggested as an important mineral preserving soil organic carbon. However, ferric minerals are subject to reduction, potentially releasing iron and decreasing the stability of iron-bound organic carbon. Information about the stability of iron-bound organic carbon in the redox reaction is limited. Herein, we investigated the sorptive interactions of organic matter with hematite and reductive release of hematite-bound organic matter. Impacts of organic matter composition and conformation on its sorption by hematite and release during the reduction reaction were analyzed. We found that hematite-bound aliphatic carbon was more resistant to reduction release, although hematite preferred to sorb more aromatic carbon. Resistance to reductive release represents a new mechanism that aliphatic soil organic matter was stabilized by association with iron oxide. Selective stabilization of aliphatic over aromatic carbon can greatly contribute to the widely observed accumulation of aliphatic carbon in soil, which cannot be explained by sorptive interactions between minerals and organic matter. PMID:26061259

  18. Aging study on carboxymethyl cellulose-coated zero-valent iron nanoparticles in water: Chemical transformation and structural evolution.

    PubMed

    Dong, Haoran; Zhao, Feng; Zeng, Guangming; Tang, Lin; Fan, Changzheng; Zhang, Lihua; Zeng, Yalan; He, Qi; Xie, Yankai; Wu, Yanan

    2016-07-15

    To assess the long-term fate and the associated risks of nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) used in the water remediation, it is essential to understand the chemical transformations during aging of nZVI in water. This study investigated the compositional and structural evolution of bare nZVI and carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) coated nZVI in static water over a period of 90 days. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy were used to characterize the corrosion products of nZVI and CMC-nZVI. Results show that both the structures and the compositions of the corrosion products change with the process of aging, but the coating of CMC could slow down the aging rate of nZVI (as indicated by the slower drop in Fe(0) intensity in XRD pattern). For the bare nZVI, magnetite (Fe3O4) and/or maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) are the dominant corrosion products after 90 days of aging. However, for the CMC-nZVI, the core-shell spheres collapses to acicular-shaped structures after aging with crystalline lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH) as the primary end product. Moreover, more lepidocrocite present in the corrosion products of CMC-nZVI with higher loading of CMC, which reveals that the CMC coating could influence the transformation of iron oxides. PMID:27037478

  19. Oxidation, carburization and/or sulfidation resistant iron aluminide alloy

    DOEpatents

    Sikka, Vinod K.; Deevi, Seetharama C.; Fleischhauer, Grier S.; Hajaligol, Mohammad R.; Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton

    2003-08-19

    The invention relates generally to aluminum containing iron-base alloys useful as electrical resistance heating elements. The aluminum containing iron-base alloys have improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The alloy has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and includes, in weight %, over 4% Al, .ltoreq.1% Cr and either .gtoreq.0.05% Zr or Zro.sub.2 stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element or .gtoreq.0.1% oxide dispersoid particles. The alloy can contain 14-32% Al, .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Zr, .ltoreq.1% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B. .ltoreq.30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, .ltoreq.1% oxygen, .ltoreq.3% Cu, balance Fe.

  20. The Molecular Mechanism of Iron(III) Oxide Nucleation.

    PubMed

    Scheck, Johanna; Wu, Baohu; Drechsler, Markus; Rosenberg, Rose; Van Driessche, Alexander E S; Stawski, Tomasz M; Gebauer, Denis

    2016-08-18

    A molecular understanding of the formation of solid phases from solution would be beneficial for various scientific fields. However, nucleation pathways are still not fully understood, whereby the case of iron (oxyhydr)oxides poses a prime example. We show that in the prenucleation regime, thermodynamically stable solute species up to a few nanometers in size are observed, which meet the definition of prenucleation clusters. Nucleation then is not governed by a critical size, but rather by the dynamics of the clusters that are forming at the distinct nucleation stages, based on the chemistry of the linkages within the clusters. This resolves a longstanding debate in the field of iron oxide nucleation, and the results may generally apply to oxides forming via hydrolysis and condensation. The (molecular) understanding of the chemical basis of phase separation is paramount for, e.g., tailoring size, shape and structure of novel nanocrystalline materials. PMID:27466739

  1. Chromium Substitution Effect on the Magnetic Structure of Iron Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osman Murat, Ozkendir

    2012-05-01

    The local magnetic and electronic structures of chromium substituted iron oxide polycrystalline samples are investigated via Fe L-edge x-ray absorption near-edge structural and magnetic circular dichroism measurements. A strong dependence of atomic magnetic levels on the applied external magnetic field is observed. The magnetic behavior of Cr-doped iron oxides are determined to be dominantly governed by the d—d hybridization between Fe and Cr valence levels. In addition, the formation of CrO2 and Cr2O3 chromium oxide clusters in the sample are observed to determine the magnetic ordering, i.e. anti-ferromagnetic or ferromagnetic with the changing external magnetic fields. The results highly agree with the previous studies.

  2. SURFACE COMPLEXATION OF ACTINIDES WITH IRON OXIDES: IMPLICATIONS FOR RADIONUCLIDE TRANSPORT IN NEAR-SURFACE AQUIFERS

    SciTech Connect

    J.L. Jerden Jr.; A.J. Kropf; Y. Tsai

    2005-08-25

    The surface complexation of actinides with iron oxides plays a key role in actinide transport and retardation in geosphere-biosphere systems. The development of accurate actinide transport models therefore requires a mechanistic understanding of surface complexation reactions (i.e. knowledge of chemical speciation at mineral/fluid interfaces). Iron oxides are particularly important actinide sorbents due to their pH dependent surface charges, relatively high surface areas and ubiquity in oxic and suboxic near-surface systems. In this paper we present results from field and laboratory investigations that elucidate the mechanisms involved in binding uranium and neptunium to iron oxide mineral substrates in near neutral groundwaters. The field study involved sampling and characterizing uranium-bearing groundwaters and solids from a saprolite aquifer overlying an unmined uranium deposit in the Virginia Piedmont. The groundwaters were analyzed by inductively coupled mass spectrometry and ion chromatography and the aquifer solids were analyzed by electron microprobe. The laboratory study involved a series of batch sorption tests in which U(VI) and Np(V) were reacted with goethite, hematite and magnetite in simulated groundwaters. The pH, ionic strength, aging time, and sorbent/sorbate ratios were varied in these experiments. The oxidation state and coordination environment of neptunium in solutions and sorbents from the batch tests were characterized by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory. Results from this work indicate that, in oxidizing near-surface aquifers, the dissolved concentration of uranium may be limited to less than 30 parts per billion due to uptake by iron oxide mineral coatings and the precipitation of sparingly soluble U(VI) phosphate minerals. Results from the batch adsorption tests showed that, in near neutral groundwaters, a significant fraction of the uranium and neptunium adsorbed as strongly

  3. Missing Iron-Oxidizing Acidophiles Highly Sensitive to Organic Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Ueoka, Nagayoshi; Kouzuma, Atsushi; Watanabe, Kazuya

    2016-01-01

    The genus Acidithiobacillus includes iron-oxidizing lithoautotrophs that thrive in acidic mine environments. Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans is a representative species and has been extensively studied for its application to the bioleaching of precious metals. In our attempts to cultivate the type strain of A. ferrooxidans (ATCC 23270T), repeated transfers to fresh inorganic media resulted in the emergence of cultures with improved growth traits. Strains were isolated from the resultant culture by forming colonies on inorganic silica-gel plates. A representative isolate (strain NU-1) was unable to form colonies on agarose plates and was more sensitive to organics, such as glucose, than the type strain of A. ferrooxidans. Strain NU-1 exhibited superior growth traits in inorganic iron media to those of other iron-oxidizing acidithiobacilli, suggesting its potential for industrial applications. A draft genome of NU-1 uncovered unique features in catabolic enzymes, indicating that this strain is not a mutant of the A. ferrooxidans type strain. Our results indicate that the use of inorganic silica-gel plates facilitates the isolation of as-yet-unexamined iron-oxidizing acidithiobacilli from environmental samples and enrichment cultures. PMID:27356527

  4. Chromenone-conjugated magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. Toward conveyable DNA binders.

    PubMed

    Yousuf, Sameena; Enoch, Israel V M V; Paulraj, Mosae Selvalumar; Dhanaraj, Premnath

    2015-11-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles can transport drug and possibly target cancer. DNA-binding of ligands loaded in dextran coated magnetic nanoparticles, could aid their better target-specific binding. In this work, we report the loading of chromenones onto aminoethylamino-modified dextran coated iron oxide nanoparticles, their loading efficiency, and openness for binding to DNA. The magnetic behavior, the size, and the morphology of the nanoparticles are analyzed. The crystallite size of the magnetic nanoparticles is around 40 nm. The chromenones are present on the surface of the dextran shell, as revealed by their cyclodextrin-binding characteristics, which is a new approach in comprehending the accessibility of the surface-bound molecules by macromolecules. The mode of binding of the chromenones to DNA is not altered on surface loading on dextran shell, although the binding strength is generally diminished, compared to the strength of binding of the free chromenones to DNA. PMID:26280819

  5. Lanthanum oxide-coated stainless steel for bipolar plates in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Jong Seol; Lee, Jun; Hwang, Hae Jin; Whang, Chin Myung; Moon, Ji-Woong; Kim, Do-Hyeong

    Solid oxide fuel cells typically operate at temperatures of about 1000 °C. At these temperatures only ceramic interconnects such as LaCrO 3 can be employed. The development of intermediate-temperature solid oxide fuel cells (IT-SOFCs) can potentially bring about reduced manufacturing costs as it makes possible the use of an inexpensive ferritic stainless steel (STS) interconnector. However, the STS suffers from Cr 2O 3 scale formation and a peeling-off phenomenon at the IT-SOFC operating temperature in an oxidizing atmosphere. Application of an oxidation protective coating is an effective means of providing oxidation resistance. In this study, we coated an oxidation protective layer on ferritic stainless steel using a precursor solution prepared from lanthanum nitrate, ethylene glycol, and nitric acid. Heating the precursor solution at 80 °C yielded a spinable solution for coating. A gel film was coated on a STS substrate by a dip coating technique. At the early stage of the heat-treatment, lanthanum-containing oxides such as La 2O 3 and La 2CrO 6 formed, and as the heat-treatment temperature was increased, an oxidation protective perovskite-type LaCrO 3 layer was produced by the reaction between the lanthanum-containing oxide and the Cr 2O 3 scale on the SUS substrate. As the concentration of La-containing precursor solution was increased, the amount of La 2O 3 and La 2CrO 6 phases was gradually increased. The coating layer, which was prepared from a precursor solution of 0.8 M, was composed of LaCrO 3 and small amounts of (Mn,Cr)O 4 spinel. A relatively dense coating layer without pin-holes was obtained by heating the gel coating layer at 1073 K for 2 h. Microstructures and oxidation behavior of the La 2O 3-coated STS444 were investigated.

  6. Self-assembly of a superparamagnetic raspberry-like silica/iron oxide nanocomposite using epoxy-amine coupling chemistry.

    PubMed

    Cano, Manuel; de la Cueva-Méndez, Guillermo

    2015-02-28

    The fabrication of colloidal nanocomposites would benefit from controlled hetero-assembly of ready-made particles through covalent bonding. Here we used epoxy-amine coupling chemistry to promote the self-assembly of superparamagnetic raspberry-like nanocomposites. This adaptable method induced the covalent attachment of iron oxide nanoparticles sparsely coated with amine groups onto epoxylated silica cores in the absence of other reactants. PMID:25635377

  7. Oxidation resistant slurry coating for carbon-based materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, J. L.; Rybicki, G. C. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    An oxidation resistant coating is produced on carbon-base materials, and the same processing step effects an infiltration of the substrate with silicon containing material. The process comprises making a slurry of nickel and silicon powders in a nitrocellulose lacquer, spraying onto the graphite or carbon-carbon substrate, and sintering in vacuum to form a fused coating that wets and covers the surface as well as penetrates into the pores of the substrate. Optimum wetting and infiltration occurs in the range of Ni-60 w/o Si to Ni-90 w/o Si with deposited thicknesses of 25-100 mg/sq. cm. Sintering temperatures of about 1200 C to about 1400 C are used, depending on the melting point of the specific coating composition. The sintered coating results in Ni-Si intermetallic phases and SiC, both of which are highly oxidation resistant.

  8. Development of RF sputtered chromium oxide coating for wear application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhushan, B.

    1979-01-01

    The radio frequency sputtering technique was used to deposite a hard refractory, chromium oxide coating on an Inconel X-750 foil 0.1 mm thick. Optimized sputtering parameters for a smooth and adherent coating were found to be as follows: target-to-substrate spacing, 41.3 mm; argon pressure, 5-10 mTorr; total power to the sputtering module, 400 W (voltage at the target, 1600 V), and a water-cooled substrate. The coating on the annealed foil was more adherent than that on the heat-treated foil. Substrate biasing during the sputter deposition of Cr2O3 adversely affected adherence by removing naturally occurring interfacial oxide layers. The deposited coatings were amorphous and oxygen deficient. Since amorphous materials are extremely hard, the structure was considered to be desirable.

  9. The reduction of iron oxides by volatiles in a rotary hearth furnace process: Part II. The reduction of iron oxide/carbon composites

    SciTech Connect

    Sohn, I.; Fruehan, R.J.

    2006-04-15

    The reduction of iron oxide/carbon composite pellets with hydrogen at 900{sup o}C to 1000{sup o}C was studied. Compared to hydrogen, the reduction by carbon was negligible at 900 degrees C and below. However, significant carbon oxidation of the iron oxide/graphite pellets by H{sub 2O generated from the reduction of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} by H-2 was observed. At higher temperatures, reduction by carbon complicates the overall reduction mechanism, with the iron oxide/graphite composite pellet found to be more reactive than the iron oxide/char composite pellet. From the scanning electron micrographs, partially reduced composite pellets showed a typical topochemical interface with an intermediate region between an oxygen-rich unreacted core and an iron-rich outer shell. To determine the possibility of reduction by volatiles, a layer of iron oxide powders was spread on top of a high volatile containing bituminous coal and heated inside a reactor using infra-red radiation. By separating the individual reactions involved for an iron oxide/coal mixture where a complex set of reactions occur simultaneously, it was possible to determine the sole effect of volatile reduction. It was found that the light reducing gases evolve initially and react with the iron oxide, with complex hydrocarbons evolving at the later stages. The volatiles caused about 20 to 50% reduction of the iron oxide.

  10. The reduction of iron oxides by volatiles in a rotary hearth furnace process: Part II. The reduction of iron oxide/carbon composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, I.; Fruehan, R. J.

    2006-04-01

    The reduction of iron oxide/carbon composite pellets with hydrogen at 900 °C to 1000 °C was studied. Compared to hydrogen, the reduction by carbon was negligible at 900 °C and below. However, significant carbon oxidation of the iron oxide/graphite pellets by H2O generated from the reduction of Fe2O3 by H2 was observed. At higher temperatures, reduction by carbon complicates the overall reduction mechanism, with the iron oxide/graphite composite pellet found to be more reactive than the iron oxide/char composite pellet. From the scanning electron micrographs, partially reduced composite pellets showed a typical topochemical interface with an intermediate region between an oxygen-rich unreacted core and an iron-rich outer shell. To determine the possibility of reduction by volatiles, a layer of iron oxide powders was spread on top of a high volatile containing bituminous coal and heated inside a reactor using infra-red radiation. By separating the individual reactions involved for an iron oxide/coal mixture where a complex set of reactions occur simultaneously, it was possible to determine the sole effect of volatile reduction. It was found that the light reducing gases evolve initially and react with the iron oxide, with complex hydrocarbons evolving at the later stages. The volatiles caused about 20 to 50 pct reduction of the iron oxide.

  11. Preparing oxidizer coated metal fuel particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shafer, J. I.; Simmons, G. M. (In