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Sample records for irradiated rat brain

  1. Liver irradiation causes distal bystander effects in the rat brain and affects animal behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Kovalchuk, Anna; Mychasiuk, Richelle; Muhammad, Arif; Hossain, Shakhawat; Ilnytskyy, Slava; Ghose, Abhijit; Kirkby, Charles; Ghasroddashti, Esmaeel; Kovalchuk, Olga; Kolb, Bryan

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy can not only produce effects on targeted organs, but can also influence shielded bystander organs, such as the brain in targeted liver irradiation. The brain is sensitive to radiation exposure, and irradiation causes significant neuro-cognitive deficits, including deficits in attention, concentration, memory, and executive and visuospatial functions. The mechanisms of their occurrence are not understood, although they may be related to the bystander effects. We analyzed the induction, mechanisms, and behavioural repercussions of bystander effects in the brain upon liver irradiation in a well-established rat model. Here, we show for the first time that bystander effects occur in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus regions upon liver irradiation, where they manifest as altered gene expression and somewhat increased levels of γH2AX. We also report that bystander effects in the brain are associated with neuroanatomical and behavioural changes, and are more pronounced in females than in males. PMID:26678032

  2. SU-E-T-492: Implementing a Method for Brain Irradiation in Rats Utilizing a Commercially Available Radiosurgery Irradiator

    SciTech Connect

    Cates, J; Drzymala, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was to implement a method for accurate rat brain irradiation using the Gamma Knife Perfexion unit. The system needed to be repeatable, efficient, and dosimetrically and spatially accurate. Methods: A platform (“rat holder”) was made such that it is attachable to the Leskell Gamma Knife G Frame. The rat holder utilizes two ear bars contacting bony anatomy and a front tooth bar to secure the rat. The rat holder fits inside of the Leskell localizer box, which utilizes fiducial markers to register with the GammaPlan planning system. This method allows for accurate, repeatable setup.A cylindrical phantom was made so that film can be placed axially in the phantom. We then acquired CT image sets of the rat holder and localizer box with both a rat and the phantom. Three treatment plans were created: a plan on the rat CT dataset, a phantom plan with the same prescription dose as the rat plan, and a phantom plan with the same delivery time as the rat plan. Results: Film analysis from the phantom showed that our setup is spatially accurate and repeatable. It is also dosimetrically accurate, with an difference between predicted and measured dose of 2.9%. Film analysis with prescription dose equal between rat and phantom plans showed a difference of 3.8%, showing that our phantom is a good representation of the rat for dosimetry purposes, allowing for +/- 3mm diameter variation. Film analysis with treatment time equal showed an error of 2.6%, which means we can deliver a prescription dose within 3% accuracy. Conclusion: Our method for irradiation of rat brain has been shown to be repeatable, efficient, and accurate, both dosimetrically and spatially. We can treat a large number of rats efficiently while delivering prescription doses within 3% at millimeter level accuracy.

  3. Fetal hypothalamic transplants into brain irradiated rats: Graft morphometry and host behavioral responses

    SciTech Connect

    Pearlman, S.H.; Rubin, P.; White, H.C.; Wiegand, S.J.; Gash, D.M. )

    1990-08-01

    This study was designed to test the hypothesis that neural implants can ameliorate or prevent some of the long-term changes associated with CNS irradiation. Using a rat model, the initial study focused on establishing motor, regulatory, and morphological changes associated with brain radiation treatments. Secondly, fetal hypothalamic tissue grafts were placed into the third ventricle of rats which had been previously irradiated. Adult male Long Evans rats received one of three radiation doses (15, 22.5, 30 Gy) or no radiation. Three days after irradiation, 7 animals in each dose group received an embryonic day 17 hypothalamic graft into the third ventricle while the remaining 8-9 animals in each group received injections of vehicle solution (sham). Few changes were observed in the 15 and 22.5 Gy animals, however rats in the 30 Gy treatment group showed stereotypic and ambulatory behavioral hyperactivity 32 weeks after irradiation. Regulatory changes in the high dose group included decreased growth rate and decreased urine osmolalities, but these measures were extremely variable among animals. Morphological results demonstrated that 30 Gy irradiated animals showed extensive necrosis primarily in the fimbria, which extended into the internal capsule, optic nerve, hippocampus, and thalamus. Hemorrhages were found in the hippocampus, thalamus, and fimbria. Defects in the blood-brain barrier also were evident by entry of intravascularly injected horseradish peroxidase into the parenchyma of the brain. Animals in the 30 Gy grafted group showed fewer behavioral changes and less brain damage than their sham grafted counterparts. Specifically, activity measures were comparable to normal levels, and a dilute urine was not found in the 30 Gy implanted rats. Morphological changes support these behavioral results since only two 30 Gy implanted rats showed necrosis.

  4. Effects of single-dose and fractionated cranial irradiation on rat brain accumulation of methotrexate

    SciTech Connect

    Kamen, B.A.; Moulder, J.E.; Kun, L.E.; Ring, B.J.; Adams, S.M.; Fish, B.L.; Holcenberg, J.S.

    1984-11-01

    The effects of single-dose and fractionated whole-brain irradiation on brain methotrexate (MTX) has been studied in a rat model. The amount of MTX present in the brain 24 hr after a single i.p. dose (100 mg/kg) was the same whether animals were sham irradiated or given a single dose of 2000 rads 6 or 48 hr prior to the drug (6.9, 8.3, and 6.8 pmol MTX/g, wet weight, respectively). Animals sham irradiated or given 2000 rads in 10 fractions over 11 days and treated with an average dose of 1.2 mg MTX/kg i.p. twice a week for 24 weeks did not differ significantly in their brain MTX concentration (7.9 and 8.3 pmol MTX/g, wet weight, respectively). Chronically MTX-treated animals became folate deficient whether they were irradiated or not (450 and 670 pmol folate/g, wet weight, brain in MTX-treated and control animals). Thus, MTX accumulates in the brain with acute or chronic administration, and this accumulation is not altered by this amount of brain irradiation.

  5. Gamma Knife irradiation method based on dosimetric controls to target small areas in rat brains

    SciTech Connect

    Constanzo, Julie; Paquette, Benoit; Charest, Gabriel; Masson-Côté, Laurence; Guillot, Mathieu

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: Targeted and whole-brain irradiation in humans can result in significant side effects causing decreased patient quality of life. To adequately investigate structural and functional alterations after stereotactic radiosurgery, preclinical studies are needed. The purpose of this work is to establish a robust standardized method of targeted irradiation on small regions of the rat brain. Methods: Euthanized male Fischer rats were imaged in a stereotactic bed, by computed tomography (CT), to estimate positioning variations relative to the bregma skull reference point. Using a rat brain atlas and the stereotactic bregma coordinates obtained from CT images, different regions of the brain were delimited and a treatment plan was generated. A single isocenter treatment plan delivering ≥100 Gy in 100% of the target volume was produced by Leksell GammaPlan using the 4 mm diameter collimator of sectors 4, 5, 7, and 8 of the Gamma Knife unit. Impact of positioning deviations of the rat brain on dose deposition was simulated by GammaPlan and validated with dosimetric measurements. Results: The authors’ results showed that 90% of the target volume received 100 ± 8 Gy and the maximum of deposited dose was 125 ± 0.7 Gy, which corresponds to an excellent relative standard deviation of 0.6%. This dose deposition calculated with GammaPlan was validated with dosimetric films resulting in a dose-profile agreement within 5%, both in X- and Z-axes. Conclusions: The authors’ results demonstrate the feasibility of standardizing the irradiation procedure of a small volume in the rat brain using a Gamma Knife.

  6. Mitochondrial activity assessed by cytofluorescence after in-vitro-irradiation of primary rat brain cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Cervos-Navarro, J.; Hamdorf, G. )

    1993-05-01

    Mitochondria play a key role in cell homeostasis and are the first cell organells affected by ionizing irradiation, as it was proved by previous electron microscopic investigations. In order to observe functional parameters of mitochondria after low-dose irradiation, primary rat brain cultures (prepared from 15-day-old rat fetuses) were irradiated from a [sup 60]Co-source with 0.5 and 1 Gy at the age of 2 or 7 days in vitro (div). Cytofluorescence measurement was made by a Cytofluor[sup [trademark]2350] using Rhodamine 123. This fluorescent dye is positively charged and accumulates specifically in the mitochondria of living cells without cytotoxic effect. Since its retention depends on the negative membrane potential as well as the proton gradient that exists across the inner mitochondrial membrane, Rhodamine 123 accumulation reflects the status of mitochondrial activity as a whole. After irradiation with 0.5 and 1 Gy on day 2 in culture there was a decrease in Rhodamine uptake in the irradiated cultures during the first week after the irradiation insult which reached minimum values after 3 days. Rhodamine uptake increased during the following period and finally reached the values of the control cultures. In the second experiment with irradiated cultures on day 7 and the same doses of 0.5 and 1 Gy the accumulation of Rhodamine decreased only initially then increased tremendously. After both doses values of Rhodamine-accumulation were higher than the control level. The results demonstrated that irradiation caused a change in mitochondrial activity depending on the time of irradiation. The dramatic increase over the control levels after irradiation on day 7 in vitro is attributed to the fact that at this time synapses have already developed. Deficiency of mitochondrial activity as well as hyperactivity and the consequent change in energy production may lead to changes in neuronal metabolism including an increase in production of free radicals.

  7. Modulation of gamma-irradiation and carbon tetrachloride induced oxidative stress in the brain of female rats by flaxseed oil.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Amel F M; Salem, Asmaa A M; Eassawy, Mamdouh M T

    2016-08-01

    The activity of flaxseed oil (FSO) on gamma-irradiation (7Gy) and/or carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) induced acute neurotoxicity in rats' brain was investigated. The results revealed a significant decrease (p<0.05) in superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione-peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities, reduced glutathione (GSH) and manganese (Mn) contents. Further, a significant elevation (p<0.05) in malondialdehyde, nitric oxide (NO), Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha (TNF-α), Interleukin-1-beta (IL-1β), Interleukin-6 (IL-6), transforming growth factor-beta-1 (TGF-β1), iron (Fe), calcium (Ca), copper (Cu) and magnesium (Mg) levels were observed. Furthermore, the relative ratio of xanthine oxidase (XO) and inducible nitric-oxide synthase (iNOS) gene expression levels were elevated in the brain tissues of γ-irradiated and CCl4 intoxicated animals. Those effects were augmented due to the effect of CCl4-induced toxicity in γ-irradiated rats. The treatment of FSO displayed significant amendment of the studied parameters in the brain tissues of γ-irradiated and CCl4 intoxicated animals. FSO has a neuroprotective effect against CCl4-induced brain injury in gamma-irradiated rats. This effect is interrelated to the ability of FSO to scavenges the free radicals, enhances the antioxidant enzymes activity, increases GSH contents, down-regulates the inflammatory responses, ameliorates the iron, calcium, copper, magnesium, manganese levels and inhibiting the gene expression level of XO and iNOS in the brain tissues of intoxicated animals. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that the potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of FSO have the ability to improve the antioxidant status, suppress the inflammatory responses, and regulate the trace elements in the brain tissues of γ-irradiated, CCl4, and their combined effect in intoxicated animals. Consequently, FSO exhibited neuroprotective activity on γ-irradiated, CCl4, and their combined effect induced brain injury in

  8. Effect of Alpha-Particle Irradiation on Brain Glycogen in the Rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, L. S.; Klatzo, Igor; Miquel, Jaime; Tobias, Cornelius; Haymaker, Webb

    1962-01-01

    The studies of Klatzo, Miquel, Tobias and Haymaker (1961) have shown that one of the earliest and most sensitive indications of the effects of alpha-particle irradiation on rat bran is the appearance of glycogen granules mainly in the neuroglia of the exposed area of the brain. Periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) positive, alpha-amylase soluble granules were demonstrated within 12 hr after irradiation, preceding by approximately 36 hr the first microscopically detectable vascular permeability disturbances, as shown by the fluorescein labeled serum protein technique. These studies suggested that the injurious effects of alpha-particle energy were on cellular elements primarily, according to the physical properties and distribution of the radiation in the tissue, and that the vascular permeability disturbances played a secondary role in pathogenesis. The purpose of this study was to correlate the histochemical observations on glycogen with a quantitative assessment of the glycogen in the irradiated brain tissue. It is felt that such a study may contribute to the understanding of radiation injury at the molecular level. A practical aspect of this problem is that the information on biological radiation effects due to accelerated particles from the cyclotron source, is employed in this study, is applicable to radiation from cosmic particles both in free space and entrapped in the Van Allen belts.

  9. Control of anoxic depolarization in rat brain by near-infrared laser irradiation and its monitoring by intrinsic optical signal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawauchi, Satoko; Sato, Shunichi; Uozumi, Yoichi; Nawashiro, Hiroshi; Ishihara, Miya; Ashida, Hiroshi

    2012-03-01

    In brain anoxia or ischemia, spreading depolarization is a key event that deterimines brain tissue survival. After onset of anoxia/ischemia, impairment of energy metabolism causes anoxic/ischemic depolarization (AD), which considerably consumes energy, leading to acute neuronal death in the brain. Our previous intrinsic-optical-signal imaging for the rat brains showed that about 2 min after starting hypoxia, AD-related light-scattering waves were focally generated in the bilateral outermost regions in the cortex and spread toward the midline, indicating that AD can be monitored by lightscattering signal. The behaviors of the scattering waves were found to be correlated with the survival of the rats. In the present study, we used the scattering signal-based monitoring method for AD and examined whether near-infrared laser irradiation can control AD in the rat brains. The left hemisphere was irradiated with 808-nm laser transcranially at 7.5 mW/cm2 before (30 min) and during hypoxia. The onset time of the scattering wave (AD) was significantly delayed in the irradiated hemisphere when compared with that in the non-irradiated hemisphere (3.4 s, n=8). The area of AD spreading in the irradiated hemisphere was significantly smaller than that in the non-irradiated hemisphere (27-90% reduction at 10-50 s after AD onset). These results suggest that near-infrared light can delay and reduce anoxic depolarization in the brain, which is probably due to increase in the cerebral ATP by near-infrared laser irradiation.

  10. Effects of naltrexone in postnatal rats on the recovery of disturbed brain and lymphatic tissues after X-irradiation or ethylnitrosourea treatment in utero

    SciTech Connect

    Schmahl, W.G.; Plendl, J.; Reinoehl-Kompa, S.

    1987-01-01

    The role of endogenous opioid systems in preweaning development after intrauterine exposure to X-irradiation or ethylnitrosourea (ENU) was explored in rats using naltrexone, a potent antagonist of beta-endorphin. After daily s.c. injections of 50 mg/kg naltrexone only the prenatally untreated controls had body weights increased by 11% from control level on day 28 (weaning). In the X-irradiated as well as the ENU-treated pups no significant effects of naltrexone on body weight gain were observed. However, brain weight increased in all animals under the influence of naltrexone, irrespective of prenatal treatment or the severity of brain lesions: 9.5% above control values in untreated offspring and 14% after X-irradiation (1 Gy) on gestation day 14. The brain weight of ENU-treated rats (50 mg/kg on gest. day 14) was 13% higher after postnatal naltrexone application than that of their postnatally untreated counterparts. ENU (80 mg/kg) effects on the brain when given on gestation day 18 were ameliorated to 9.2% by naltrexone in the weaning period. Naltrexone significantly increased the thymus weight in controls. Prenatally treated animals also showed an increased thymus weight at weaning, presumably due to compensatory growth. In these cases naltrexone revealed a suppressive effect on the thymus, whereas spleen weight was apparently not influenced by naltrexone treatment. These results provide compelling evidence that endogenous opioid systems play a crucial role not only in normal development, but also in reparative growth events of the brain after prenatal injuries. The thymus, predominantly containing T-lymphocytes, seems to represent another sensitive system which is regulated under the influence of opioids.

  11. Washout rate in rat brain irradiated by a 11C beam after acetazolamide loading using a small single-ring OpenPET prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Yoshiyuki; Takuwa, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Eiji; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Nakajima, Yasunori; Wakizaka, Hidekatsu; Yamaya, Taiga

    2016-03-01

    In dose verification techniques of particle therapies based on in-beam positron emission tomography (PET), the causes of washout of positron emitters by physiological effects should be clarified to correct washout for accurate verification. As well, the quantitative washout rate has a potential usefulness as a diagnostic index which should be explored. Therefore, we measured washout rates of rat brain after vasodilator acetazolamide loading to investigate the possible effects of blood flow on washout. Six rat brains were irradiated by a radioisotope 11C beam and time activity curves on the whole brains were obtained with a small single-ring OpenPET prototype. Then, washout rates were calculated with the Mizuno model, where two washout rates (k 2m and k 2s ) were assumed, and a two-compartment model including efflux from tissue to blood (k 2) and influx (k 3) and efflux (k 4) between the two tissue compartments. Before the irradiations, we used laser-Doppler flowmetry to confirm that acetazolamide increased cerebral blood flow (CBF) of a rat. We compared means of k 2m , k 2s and k 2, k 3 and k 4 without acetazolamide loading (Rest) and with acetazolamide loading (ACZ). For all k values, ACZ values were lower than Rest values. In other words, though CBF increased, washout rates were decreased. This may be attributed to the implanted 11C reacting to form 11CO2. Because acetazolamide increased the concentration of CO2 in brain, suppressed diffusion of 11CO2 and decomposition of 11CO2 into ions were prevented.

  12. Local brain heavy ion irradiation induced Immunosuppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Runhong; Deng, Yulin; Huiyang Zhu, Bitlife.; Zhao, Tuo; Wang, Hailong; Yu, Yingqi; Ma, Hong; Wang, Xiao; Zhuang, Fengyuan; Qing, Hong

    Purpose: To investigate the long term effect of acute local brain heavy ion irradiation on the peripheral immune system in rat model. Methodology: Only the brain of adult male Wistar rats were radiated by heavy ions at the dose of 15 Gy. One, two and three months after irradiation, thymus and spleen were analyzed by four ways. Tunel assay was performed to evaluate the percentage of apoptotic cells in thymus and spleen, level of Inflammatory cytokines (IL-2, IL-6, SSAO, and TNF-α) was detected by ELISA assay, the differentiation of thymus T lymphocyte subsets were measured by flow cytometry and the relative expression levels of genes related to thymus immune cell development were measured by using quantitative real-time PCR. Results: Thymus and spleen showed significant atrophy from one month to three months after irradiation. A high level of apoptosis in thymus and spleen were obtained and the latter was more vulnerable, also, high level of inflammatory cytokines were found. Genes (c-kit, Rag1, Rag2 and Sca1) related to thymus lymphocytes’ development were down-regulated. Conclusion: Local area radiation in the rat brain would cause the immunosuppression, especially, the losing of cell-mediated immune functions. In this model, radiation caused inflammation and then induced apoptosis of cells in the immune organs, which contributed to immunosuppression.

  13. Effects of chronic postnatal opioid receptor blockade by naltrexone upon proliferation capacity in the prenatally x-irradiated brain of the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Schmahl, W.; Miaskowski, U. )

    1991-01-01

    We recently reported that in rats prenatally x-irradiated on gestation day 14 with 1 Gy, postnatal chronic application of the opioid antagonist naltrexone (Nx) led to a remarkable growth spurt of the microencephalic brain. In the present study we present histological and autoradiographic results found in the subependymal layer (SEL) of the forebrain lateral ventricles. Nx led to an intermittent augmentation of the mitotic index of the x-irradiated brains within a postnatal observation period of 24 weeks. The most conspicuous finding was transient hyperplasia of the SEL at 4-6 weeks of age which occurred in close proximity to an intact ependymal lining. Districts of the lateral ventricles which were denuded from ependyme and where the rest of the ependymal layer (EL) was dislocated peripherally showed upon Nx treatment a long-lasting SEL hyperplasia with a tendency towards dysplasia. These results revealed that repair proliferation of embryotoxic x-irradiation is normally under strong control by the opioid system. If that system, which exerts a suppressing effect upon glial growth, is blocked by Nx, prominent hyperplastic reactions occur which may be useful for repairing the lesion pattern.

  14. Gene expression in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Milner, R J; Sutcliffe, J G

    1983-08-25

    191 randomly selected cDNA clones prepared from rat brain cytoplasmic poly (A)+ RNA were screened by Northern blot hybridization to rat brain, liver and kidney RNA to determine the tissue distribution, abundance and size of the corresponding brain mRNA. 18% hybridized to mRNAs each present equally in the three tissues, 26% to mRNAs differentially expressed in the tissues, and 30% to mRNAs present only in the brain. An additional 26% of the clones failed to detect mRNA in the three tissues at an abundance level of about 0.01%, but did contain rat cDNA as demonstrated by Southern blotting; this class probably represents rare mRNAs expressed in only some brain cells. Therefore, most mRNA expressed in brain is either specific to brain or otherwise displays regulation. Rarer mRNA species tend to be larger than the more abundant species, and tend to be brain specific; the rarest, specific mRNAs average 5000 nucleotides in length. Ten percent of the clones hybridize to multiple mRNAs, some of which are expressed from small multigenic families. From these data we estimate that there are probably at most 30,000 distinct mRNA species expressed in the rat brain, the majority of which are uniquely expressed in the brain. PMID:6193485

  15. Interstitial irradiation of brain tumors: a review

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, M.; Gutin, P.H.

    1981-12-01

    As an adjuvant to surgery, radiation therapy has consistently proven to be the most successful form of treatment for primary and secondary malignant brain tumors and possibly for inoperable benign tumors. Because the risk of radiation necrosis of normal brain limits the amount of radiation that can be given by external beam therapy at conventional dose rates, interstitial radiation of brain tumors is a logical alternative treatment approach. We discuss the radiobiological advantages of low dose rate irradiation and intratumoral placement of sources that make interstitial irradiation an attractive treatment for brain tumors and review the history of clinical brachytherapy for intracranial neoplasia.

  16. Radiation protection from whole-body gamma irradiation (6.7 Gy): behavioural effects and brain protein-level changes by an aminothiol compound GL2011 in the Wistar rat.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Minu Karthika; Jovanovic, Milos; Secerov, Bojana; Ignjatovic, Marija; Bilban, Martin; Andjus, Pavle; Pavle, Andjus; Refaei, Amal El; Jung, Gangsoo; Li, Lin; Sase, Ajinkya; Chen, Weiqiang; Bacic, Goran; Lubec, Gert

    2014-07-01

    GL2011 is a naturally occurring thiol compound and a series of thiol compounds have been proposed as radioprotectors. Radioprotective efficacy of a triple intraperitoneal dose of GL2011 of 100 mg/kg body weight of Wistar rats, 30 min prior to and 3 and 6 h following irradiation (6.7 Gy) was evaluated. Four groups of animals were used, vehicle-treated non-irradiated (VN), GL2011-treated and irradiated (GI), GL2011-treated and non-irradiated (GN) and vehicle-treated and irradiated (VI) (n = 30 per group). The radioprotective efficacy of GL2011 was determined by measuring 28-day survival and intestinal crypt cell survival. Neuroprotection in terms of behaviour was evaluated using the behavioural observational battery, open field test and elevated plus maze paradigm. An RNA microarray was carried out in order to show differences at the RNA level between VI and VN groups. Brain protein changes were identified using a gel-based proteomics method and major brain receptor complex levels were determined by blue-native gels followed by immunoblotting. 28-Day survival rate in VI was 30 %, in GI survival was 93 %, survival of VN and GN was 100 %. Jejunal crypt cell survival was significantly enhanced in GI. Protein-level changes of peroxiredoxin-5, Mn-superoxide dismutase 2, voltage-dependent anion-selective channel protein 1, septin 5 and dopamine D2 receptor complex levels were paralleling radiation damage and protection. Taken together, the findings demonstrate that GL2011 improves survival rates and jejunal crypt survival, provides partial neuroprotection at the behavioural level and modulates proteins known to be involved in protection against oxidative stress-mediated cell damage. PMID:24682445

  17. The rat brain hippocampus proteome.

    PubMed

    Fountoulakis, Michael; Tsangaris, George T; Maris, Antony; Lubec, Gert

    2005-05-01

    The hippocampus is crucial in memory storage and retrieval and plays an important role in stress response. In humans, the CA1 area of hippocampus is one of the first brain areas to display pathology in Alzheimer's disease. A comprehensive analysis of the hippocampus proteome has not been accomplished yet. We applied proteomics technologies to construct a two-dimensional database for rat brain hippocampus proteins. Hippocampus samples from eight months old animals were analyzed by two-dimensional electrophoresis and the proteins were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The database comprises 148 different gene products, which are in the majority enzymes, structural proteins and heat shock proteins. It also includes 39 neuron specific gene products. The database may be useful in animal model studies of neurological disorders. PMID:15797529

  18. Brain tumors in irradiated monkeys.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haymaker, W.; Miquel, J.; Rubinstein, L. J.

    1972-01-01

    A study was made of 32 monkeys which survived one to seven years after total body exposure to protons or to high-energy X rays. Among these 32 monkeys there were 21 which survived two years or longer after exposure to 200 to 800 rad. Glioblastoma multiforme developed in 3 of the 10 monkeys surviving three to five years after receiving 600 or 800 rad 55-MeV protons. Thus, the incidence of tumor development in the present series was far higher than the incidence of spontaneously developing brain tumors in monkeys cited in the literature. This suggests that the tumors in the present series may have been radiation-induced.

  19. Head and neck tumors after energetic proton irradiation in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, D.; Cox, A.; Hardy, K.; Salmon, Y.; Trotter, R.

    1994-10-01

    This is a two-year progress report on a life span dose-response study of brain tumor risk at moderate to high doses of energetic protons. It was initiated because a joint NASA/USAF life span study of rhesus monkeys that were irradiated with 55-MeV protons (average surface dose, 3.5 Gy) indicated that the incidence of brain tumors per unit surface absorbed dose was over 19 times that of the human tinea capitis patients whose heads were exposed to 100 kv x-rays. Examination of those rats that died in the two-year interval after irradiation of the head revealed a linear dose-response for total head and neck tumor incidence in the dose range of 0-8.5 Gy. The exposed rats had a greater incidence of pituitary chromophobe adenomas, epithelial and mesothelial cell tumors than the unexposed controls but the excessive occurrence of malignant gliomas that was observed in the monkeys was absent in the rats. The estimated dose required to double the number of all types of head and neck tumors was 5.2 Gy. The highest dose, 18 Gy, resulted in high mortality due to obstructive squamous metaplasia at less than 50 weeks, prompting a new study of the relative bological effectiveness of high energy protons in producing this lesion.

  20. Damage and repair of irradiated mammalian brain

    SciTech Connect

    Frankel, K.; Lo, E.; Phillips, M.; Fabrikant, J.; Brennan, K.; Valk, P.; Poljak, A.; Delapaz, R.; Woodruff, K.; Stanford Univ., CA . Medical Center; Brookside Hospital, San Pablo, CA )

    1989-07-01

    We have demonstrated that focal charged particle irradiation of the rabbit brain can create well-defined lesions which are observable by nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMR) and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging techniques. These are similar, in terms of location and characteristic NMR and PET features, to those that occur in the brain of about 10% of clinical research human subjects, who have been treated for intracranial vascular malformations with stereotactic radiosurgery. These lesions have been described radiologically as vasogenic edema of the deep white matter,'' and the injury is of variable intensity and temporal duration, can recede or progress to serious neurologic sequelae, and persist for a considerable period of time, frequently 18 mon to 3 yr. 8 refs., 6 figs.

  1. Radioprotective effects of valproic acid, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, in the rat brain

    PubMed Central

    ZHOU, YONG; NIU, JUNJIE; LI, SHUPENG; HOU, HUAYING; XU, YING; ZHANG, WEI; JIANG, YUHUA

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy is commonly used in the treatment of brain tumors but can cause significant damage to surrounding normal brain. The radioprotective effects of valproic acid (VPA) on normal tissue in the rat brain were evaluated following irradiation. Male Wistar rats were used in the present study and 48 rats were randomly divided into four groups consisting of 12 rats each. The whole-brain irradiation (WBI) was delivered by X-ray and the rats received the following treatment once a day for 5 days. The control group (sham-exposed group) received sham irradiation plus physiological saline. The VPA group received sham irradiation plus 150 mg VPA/kg. The X-ray group received WBI plus physiological saline. The combined group received WBI plus 150 mg/kg intraperitoneally VPA. A total of 6 months post-irradiation, the rats were sacrificed and the brains were harvested. Cell apoptosis in the cortex was determined by immunohistochemistry 24 h post-irradiation using an antibody for protein caspase-3. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) analyses were used to assess the effects of VPA on the radioprotection of rat normal brain cells 6 months post-irradiation. The weights of the animals in the TEM group measured over the two weeks after the first injection of VPA were also observed. Histological findings demonstrated that apoptosis occurred on the cortex 1 day after treatment, peaking in the X-ray group. The cells of the combined group showed a moderate caspase-3 staining compared to the X-ray group. There was a trend towards a lower body weight of the X-ray group following irradiation compared to either no-irradiation or rats of the combined group, although there was no significant difference in the average weight between the combined group and irradiated rats. Mild swelling of the capillary endothelial cells in the irregular lumen was observed in the combined group, whereas the X-ray group showed a severe structural disorder. In conclusion, VPA supplementation during

  2. Aspartame and the rat brain monoaminergic system.

    PubMed

    Perego, C; De Simoni, M G; Fodritto, F; Raimondi, L; Diomede, L; Salmona, M; Algeri, S; Garattini, S

    1988-12-01

    A high dose of aspartame (APM) was administered to rats to study possible effects on brain monoaminergic systems. APM and its metabolite phenylalanine (Phe) were given orally at doses of 1000 and 500 mg/kg, respectively. Significant increases were seen in brain Phe and tyrosine (Tyr) levels. Two different approaches were used to study monoaminergic systems: whole tissue measurements by HPLC-ED and in vivo voltammetry in freely moving rats. Dopamine, serotonin and their metabolites were taken as indexes of neuronal activity. In spite of the high dose used, no modification was found in monoamines or their metabolites in striatum, hippocampus and nucleus accumbens. PMID:2464204

  3. Neurons from rat brain coupled to transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vassanelli, S.; Fromherz, P.

    Field-effect transistors form spontaneously capacitive junctions with cultured nerve cells from rat brains. The transfer of ac signals from neurons to silicon is studied and used to parametrize an equivalent circuit. The coupling is distinctly weaker than in junctions assembled with leech nerve cells. The implications with respect to the recording and stimulation of neuronal activity by silicon devices are considered.

  4. Laser scattering by transcranial rat brain illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, Marcelo V. P.; Prates, Renato; Kato, Ilka T.; Sabino, Caetano P.; Suzuki, Luis C.; Ribeiro, Martha S.; Yoshimura, Elisabeth M.

    2012-06-01

    Due to the great number of applications of Low-Level-Laser-Therapy (LLLT) in Central Nervous System (CNS), the study of light penetration through skull and distribution in the brain becomes extremely important. The aim is to analyze the possibility of precise illumination of deep regions of the rat brain, measure the penetration and distribution of red (λ = 660 nm) and Near Infra-Red (NIR) (λ = 808 nm) diode laser light and compare optical properties of brain structures. The head of the animal (Rattus Novergicus) was epilated and divided by a sagittal cut, 2.3 mm away from mid plane. This section of rat's head was illuminated with red and NIR lasers in points above three anatomical structures: hippocampus, cerebellum and frontal cortex. A high resolution camera, perpendicularly positioned, was used to obtain images of the brain structures. Profiles of scattered intensities in the laser direction were obtained from the images. There is a peak in the scattered light profile corresponding to the skin layer. The bone layer gives rise to a valley in the profile indicating low scattering coefficient, or frontal scattering. Another peak in the region related to the brain is an indication of high scattering coefficient (μs) for this tissue. This work corroborates the use of transcranial LLLT in studies with rats which are subjected to models of CNS diseases. The outcomes of this study point to the possibility of transcranial LLLT in humans for a large number of diseases.

  5. Genetic influence on brain catecholamines: high brain norepinephrine in salt-sensitive rats

    SciTech Connect

    Iwai, J; Friedman, R; Tassinari, L

    1980-01-01

    Rats genetically sensitive to salt-induced hypertension evinced higher levels of plasma norepinephrine and epinephrine than rats genetically resistant to hypertension. The hypertension-sensitive rats showed higher hypothalamic norepinephrine and lower epinephrine than resistant rats. In response to a high salt diet, brain stem norepinephrine increased in sensitive rats while resistant rats exhibited a decrease on the same diet.

  6. Purified Rabies Vaccine (Suckling Rat Brain Origin)

    PubMed Central

    Lavender, J. F.

    1970-01-01

    A 10% suckling rat brain rabies vaccine free from encephalitogenic activity was prepared and inactivated with 1:8,000 beta-propiolactone (BPL), or ultraviolet light, or a combination of ultraviolet light and BPL, or 1% phenol. Potency was excellent in all samples, with the exception of the phenolized product which was marginal. A purified suckling rat brain (SRB) vaccine prepared by zonal centrifugation and inactivated with 1:8,000 BPL contained about 0.01 the amount of protein nitrogen of the unpurified 10% SRB vaccine. This purified product passed the National Institutes of Health potency test for rabies vaccine after administration of a quantity equivalent to a standard 10% brain suspension. PMID:5456012

  7. Interaction of ethanol and microwaves on the blood-brain barrier of rats

    SciTech Connect

    Neilly, J.P.; Lin, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    The combined effects of ethanol and microwaves on the permeation of Evans blue dye through the mammalian blood-brain barrier was studied in male Wistar rats. Anesthetized rats were infused through a cannula in the left femoral vein with 0.1, 0.3, 0.5 or 0.7 grams of absolute ethanol per kilogram of body mass. A control group was given 0.7 g/kg of isotonic saline. The left hemisphere of the brain was irradiated by 3.15-GHz microwave energy at 3.0 W/cm2 rms for 15 min. The rat's rectal temperature was maintained at 37.0 degrees C. Immediately after irradiation, 2% Evans blue dye in saline (2.0 ml/kg body mass) was injected through the cannula. The results show that as the quantity of alcohol was increased, the degree of staining was decreased or eliminated. The temperature of the irradiated area of the brain increased for the first 4 to 5 minutes of irradiation and then stabilized for the remainder of the irradiation period. The steady-state temperature was highest in animals receiving saline or the smallest dose of alcohol. As the quantity of alcohol was increased, the steady-state temperature was reduced. These results indicate that ethanol inhibits microwave-induced permeation of the blood-brain barrier through reduced heating of the brain.

  8. Hypothalamic dysfunction following whole-brain irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Mechanick, J.I.; Hochberg, F.H.; LaRocque, A.

    1986-10-01

    The authors describe 15 cases with evidence of hypothalamic dysfunction 2 to 9 years following megavoltage whole-brain x-irradiation for primary glial neoplasm. The patients received 4000 to 5000 rads in 180- to 200-rad fractions. Dysfunction occurred in the absence of computerized tomography-delineated radiation necrosis or hypothalamic invasion by tumor, and antedated the onset of dementia. Fourteen patients displayed symptoms reflecting disturbances of personality, libido, thirst, appetite, or sleep. Hyperprolactinemia (with prolactin levels up to 70 ng/ml) was present in all of the nine patients so tested. Of seven patients tested with thyrotropin-releasing hormone, one demonstrated an abnormal pituitary gland response consistent with a hypothalamic disorder. Seven patients developed cognitive abnormalities. Computerized tomography scans performed a median of 4 years after tumor diagnosis revealed no hypothalamic tumor or diminished density of the hypothalamus. Cortical atrophy was present in 50% of cases and third ventricular dilatation in 58%. Hypothalamic dysfunction, heralded by endocrine, behavioral, and cognitive impairment, represents a common, subtle form of radiation damage.

  9. Heterogeneous expression of transketolase in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Calingasan, N Y; Sheu, K F; Baker, H; Jung, E H; Paoletti, F; Gibson, G E

    1995-03-01

    Transketolase (TK; EC 2.2.1.1) is a key pentose phosphate shunt enzyme that plays an important role in the production of reducing equivalents and pentose sugars. TK activity declines in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease or Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, as well as in thiamine-deficient rats. Understanding the role of TK in the pathophysiology of these neurodegenerative conditions requires knowledge of its regional, cellular, and subcellular distribution within the brain. The current study employed in situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry to examine the distribution of TK mRNA and its encoded protein in adult rat brain. TK mRNA and protein were widely distributed throughout the brain. However, they were enriched in selective perikarya in the piriform cortex, nucleus of the diagonal band, red nucleus, dorsal raphe, pontine nucleus, locus coeruleus, trapezoid, inferior olive, and several cranial nerve nuclei. Lower expression of TK mRNA and protein occurred in layer V of cortex, olfactory tubercle, ventral pallidum, medial septal nucleus, hippocampus, thalamic and hypothalamic nuclei, mammillary body, central gray, and the substantia nigra. TK immunoreactivity also occurred in the nuclei of ubiquitously distributed glial cells, as well as ependymal cells. The heterogeneous distribution of TK may reflect a variety of metabolic activities among different brain regions but does not provide a simple molecular explanation for selective cell death in either thiamine deficiency or other conditions where TK is reduced. PMID:7861132

  10. EVALUATION OF PERFLUOROOCTANE SULFONATE (PFOS) IN THE RAT BRAIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study examined whether there is a differential distribution of PFOS within the brain, and compares adult rats with neonatal rats at an age when formation of the blood-brain barrier is not yet complete (postnatal day 7). Male and female Sprague-Dawley rats (60-70 day old, 4/...

  11. Secretin: specific binding to rat brain membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Fremeau, R.T. Jr.; Jensen, R.T.; Charlton, C.G.; Miller, R.L.; O'Donohue, T.L.; Moody, T.W.

    1983-08-01

    The binding of (/sup 125/I)secretin to rat brain membranes was investigated. Radiolabeled secretin bound with high affinity (KD . 0.2 nM) to a single class of noninteracting sites. Binding was specific, saturable, and reversible. Regional distribution studies indicated that the specific binding was greatest in the cerebellum, intermediate in the cortex, thalamus, striatum, hippocampus, and hypothalamus, and lowest in the midbrain and medulla/pons. Pharmacological studies indicated that only secretin, but not other peptides, inhibits binding of (/sup 125/I)secretin with high affinity. Also, certain guanine nucleotides inhibited high affinity binding. These data indicate that rat brain membranes possess high affinity binding sites specific for secretin and that with the use of (/sup 125/I) secretin the kinetics, stoichiometry, specificity, and distribution of secretin receptors can be directly investigated.

  12. Regulation of brain aromatase activity in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Roselli, C.E.; Ellinwood, W.E.; Resko, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    The distribution and regulation of aromatase activity in the adult rat brain with a sensitive in vitro assay that measures the amount of /sup 3/H/sub 2/O formed during the conversion of (1 beta-/sup 3/H)androstenedione to estrone. The rate of aromatase activity in the hypothalamus-preoptic area (HPOA) was linear with time up to 1 h, and with tissue concentrations up to 5 mgeq/200 microliters incubation mixture. The enzyme demonstrated a pH optimum of 7.4 and an apparent Michaelis-Menten constant (Km) of 0.04 microns. The greatest amount of aromatase activity was found in amygdala and HPOA from intact male rats. The hippocampus, midbrain tegmentum, cerebral cortex, cerebellum, and anterior pituitary all contained negligible enzymatic activity. Castration produced a significant decrease in aromatase activity in the HPOA, but not in the amygdala or cerebral cortex. The HPOAs of male rats contained significantly greater aromatase activity than the HPOAs of female rats. In females, this enzyme activity did not change during the estrous cycle or after ovariectomy. Administration of testosterone to gonadectomized male and female rats significantly enhanced HPOA aromatase activities to levels approximating those found in HPOA from intact males. Therefore, the results suggest that testosterone, or one of its metabolites, is a major steroidal regulator of HPOA aromatase activity in rats.

  13. Imaging of tumor angiogenesis in rat brains in vivo by photoacoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ku, Geng; Wang, Xueding; Xie, Xueyi; Stoica, George; Wang, Lihong V.

    2005-02-01

    Green laser pulses at a wavelength of 532 nm from a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser were employed as irradiation sources for photoacoustic tomography (PAT). The vascular structure of the brain was imaged clearly, with optimal contrast, because blood has strong absorption near this wavelength. The photoacoustic images of rat brain tumors in this study clearly reveal the angiogenesis that is associated with tumors. Brain tumors can be identified based on the distorted vascular architecture of brain tumorigenesis and related vascular changes, such as hemorrhage. This research demonstrates that PAT can potentially provide a powerful tool for small-animal biological research.

  14. Profound and Sexually Dimorphic Effects of Clinically-Relevant Low Dose Scatter Irradiation on the Brain and Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Kovalchuk, Anna; Mychasiuk, Richelle; Muhammad, Arif; Hossain, Shakhawat; Ilnytskyy, Yaroslav; Ghose, Abhijit; Kirkby, Charles; Ghasroddashti, Esmaeel; Kolb, Bryan; Kovalchuk, Olga

    2016-01-01

    Irradiated cells can signal damage and distress to both close and distant neighbors that have not been directly exposed to the radiation (naïve bystanders). While studies have shown that such bystander effects occur in the shielded brain of animals upon body irradiation, their mechanism remains unexplored. Observed effects may be caused by some blood-borne factors; however they may also be explained, at least in part, by very small direct doses received by the brain that result from scatter or leakage. In order to establish the roles of low doses of scatter irradiation in the brain response, we developed a new model for scatter irradiation analysis whereby one rat was irradiated directly at the liver and the second rat was placed adjacent to the first and received a scatter dose to its body and brain. This work focuses specifically on the response of the latter rat brain to the low scatter irradiation dose. Here, we provide the first experimental evidence that very low, clinically relevant doses of scatter irradiation alter gene expression, induce changes in dendritic morphology, and lead to behavioral deficits in exposed animals. The results showed that exposure to radiation doses as low as 0.115 cGy caused changes in gene expression and reduced spine density, dendritic complexity, and dendritic length in the prefrontal cortex tissues of females, but not males. In the hippocampus, radiation altered neuroanatomical organization in males, but not in females. Moreover, low dose radiation caused behavioral deficits in the exposed animals. This is the first study to show that low dose scatter irradiation influences the brain and behavior in a sex-specific way. PMID:27375442

  15. Hippocampal Neuron Number Is Unchanged 1 Year After Fractionated Whole-Brain Irradiation at Middle Age

    SciTech Connect

    Shi Lei Molina, Doris P.; Robbins, Michael E.; Wheeler, Kenneth T.; Brunso-Bechtold, Judy K.

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: To determine whether hippocampal neurons are lost 12 months after middle-aged rats received a fractionated course of whole-brain irradiation (WBI) that is expected to be biologically equivalent to the regimens used clinically in the treatment of brain tumors. Methods and Materials: Twelve-month-old Fischer 344 X Brown Norway male rats were divided into WBI and control (CON) groups (n = 6 per group). Anesthetized WBI rats received 45 Gy of {sup 137}Cs {gamma} rays delivered as 9 5-Gy fractions twice per week for 4.5 weeks. Control rats were anesthetized but not irradiated. Twelve months after WBI completion, all rats were anesthetized and perfused with paraformaldehyde, and hippocampal sections were immunostained with the neuron-specific antibody NeuN. Using unbiased stereology, total neuron number and the volume of the neuronal and neuropil layers were determined in the dentate gyrus, CA3, and CA1 subregions of hippocampus. Results: No differences in tissue integrity or neuron distribution were observed between the WBI and CON groups. Moreover, quantitative analysis demonstrated that neither total neuron number nor the volume of neuronal or neuropil layers differed between the two groups for any subregion. Conclusions: Impairment on a hippocampal-dependent learning and memory test occurs 1 year after fractionated WBI at middle age. The same WBI regimen, however, does not lead to a loss of neurons or a reduction in the volume of hippocampus.

  16. The Effect of Photoluminescence of Bioceramic Irradiation on Middle Cerebral Arterial Occlusion in Rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Chan, Paul; Liu, Zhong-Min; Hwang, Ling-Ling; Lin, Kuo-Chi; Chan, Wing P; Leung, Ting-Kai; Choy, Cheuk Sing

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the possible effect of photoluminescence of bioceramic (PLB) on ischemic cerebral infarction (stroke), by using an animal model of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Sprague-Dawley rats were used to induce MCAO to block the origin of the left MCAO; three months later, the positive chronic stroke rats were selected by running tunnel maze; the MCAO rats with significant chronic stroke and neurological defects were used for treadmill experiments with varying speed settings to test their capability for restoration after muscular fatigue under conditions of with and without PLB irradiation. As a result, PLB irradiation could improve exercise completion rate and average running speed during slow and fast treadmill settings. After PLB irradiation, the selected MCAO rats successfully completed all the second-round treadmill exercises at the maximum speed setting, and they had better restoration from muscular fatigue. An in vitro cell study on astrocytes of rats by bioceramic irradiation further demonstrated increased intracellular nitric oxide. To explain these results, we suggest that cortical brain stimulation of microcirculation and enhancement of peripheral muscular activity are the main causes of the improved exercise performance in MCAO rats by PLB. PMID:27375765

  17. The Effect of Photoluminescence of Bioceramic Irradiation on Middle Cerebral Arterial Occlusion in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Chan, Paul; Liu, Zhong-Min; Hwang, Ling-Ling; Lin, Kuo-Chi; Chan, Wing P.; Leung, Ting-Kai; Choy, Cheuk Sing

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the possible effect of photoluminescence of bioceramic (PLB) on ischemic cerebral infarction (stroke), by using an animal model of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Sprague-Dawley rats were used to induce MCAO to block the origin of the left MCAO; three months later, the positive chronic stroke rats were selected by running tunnel maze; the MCAO rats with significant chronic stroke and neurological defects were used for treadmill experiments with varying speed settings to test their capability for restoration after muscular fatigue under conditions of with and without PLB irradiation. As a result, PLB irradiation could improve exercise completion rate and average running speed during slow and fast treadmill settings. After PLB irradiation, the selected MCAO rats successfully completed all the second-round treadmill exercises at the maximum speed setting, and they had better restoration from muscular fatigue. An in vitro cell study on astrocytes of rats by bioceramic irradiation further demonstrated increased intracellular nitric oxide. To explain these results, we suggest that cortical brain stimulation of microcirculation and enhancement of peripheral muscular activity are the main causes of the improved exercise performance in MCAO rats by PLB. PMID:27375765

  18. Effects of Irradiation on Brain Vasculature Using an In Situ Tumor Model

    SciTech Connect

    Zawaski, Janice A.; Gaber, M. Waleed; Sabek, Omaima M.; Wilson, Christy M.; Duntsch, Christopher D.; Merchant, Thomas E.

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: Damage to normal tissue is a limiting factor in clinical radiotherapy (RT). We tested the hypothesis that the presence of tumor alters the response of normal tissues to irradiation using a rat in situ brain tumor model. Methods and Materials: Intravital microscopy was used with a rat cranial window to assess the in situ effect of rat C6 glioma on peritumoral tissue with and without RT. The RT regimen included 40 Gy at 8 Gy/day starting Day 5 after tumor implant. Endpoints included blood-brain barrier permeability, clearance index, leukocyte-endothelial interactions and staining for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) glial fibrillary acidic protein, and apoptosis. To characterize the system response to RT, animal survival and tumor surface area and volume were measured. Sham experiments were performed on similar animals implanted with basement membrane matrix absent of tumor cells. Results: The presence of tumor alone increases permeability but has little effect on leukocyte-endothelial interactions and astrogliosis. Radiation alone increases tissue permeability, leukocyte-endothelial interactions, and astrogliosis. The highest levels of permeability and cell adhesion were seen in the model that combined tumor and irradiation; however, the presence of tumor appeared to reduce the volume of rolling leukocytes. Unirradiated tumor and peritumoral tissue had poor clearance. Irradiated tumor and peritumoral tissue had a similar clearance index to irradiated and unirradiated sham-implanted animals. Radiation reduces the presence of VEGF in peritumoral normal tissues but did not affect the amount of apoptosis in the normal tissue. Apoptosis was identified in the tumor tissue with and without radiation. Conclusions: We developed a novel approach to demonstrate that the presence of the tumor in a rat intracranial model alters the response of normal tissues to irradiation.

  19. Ethanol effects on rat brain phosphoinositide metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, H.M.

    1987-01-01

    An increase in acidic phospholipids in brain plasma and synaptic plasma membranes upon chronic ethanol administration was observed. Chronic ethanol administration resulted in an increase in {sup 32}P{sub i} incorporation into the acidic phospholipids in synaptosomes. Postdecapitative ischemic treatment resulted rapid degradation of poly-PI in rat brain. However, there was a rapid appearance of IP{sub 2} in ethanol group which indicated a more rapid turnover of IP{sub 3} in the ethanol-treated rats. Carbachol stimulated accumulation of labeled inositol phosphates in brain slices and synaptosomes. Carbachol-stimulated release of IP and IP{sub 2} was calcium dependent and was inhibited by EGTA and atropine. Adenosine triphosphates and 1 mM further enhanced carbachol-induced formation of IP and IP{sub 2}, but showed an increase and a decrease in IP{sub 3} at 1 mM and 0.01 mM, respectively. Guanosine triphosphate at 0.1 mM did not change in labeled IP, but there was a significant increase in labeled IP{sub 2} and decrease in IP{sub 3}. Mn and CMP greatly enhanced incorporation of ({sup 3}H)-inositol into PI, but not into poly-PI labeling in brain synaptosomes. Incubation of brain synaptosomes resulted in a Ca{sup 2+}, time-dependent release of labeled IP. However, the pool of PI labeled through this pathway is not susceptible to carbachol stimulation. When saponin permeabilized synaptosomal preparations were incubated with ({sup 3}H)-inositol-PI or ({sup 14}C)-arachidonoyl-PI, ATP enhanced the formation of labeled IP and DG.

  20. 3D surface analysis of hippocampal microvasculature in the irradiated brain.

    PubMed

    Craver, Brianna M; Acharya, Munjal M; Allen, Barrett D; Benke, Sarah N; Hultgren, Nan W; Baulch, Janet E; Limoli, Charles L

    2016-06-01

    Cranial irradiation used to control CNS malignancies can also disrupt the vasculature and impair neurotransmission and cognition. Here we describe two distinct methodologies for quantifying early and late radiation injury in CNS microvasculature. Intravascular fluorescently labeled lectin was used to visualize microvessels in the brain of the irradiated mouse 2 days post exposure and RECA-1 immunostaining was similarly used to visualize microvessels in the brain of the irradiated rat 1-month post exposure. Confocal microscopy, image deconvolution and 3-dimensional rendering methods were used to define vascular structure in a ∼4 × 10(7) μm(3) defined region of the brain. Quantitative analysis of these 3D images revealed that irradiation caused significant short- and long-term reductions in capillary density, diameter and volume. In mice, irradiation reduced mean vessel volume from 2,250 to 1,470 μm(3) and mean vessel diameter from 5.0 to 4.5 μm, resulting in significant reductions of 34% and 10%, in the hippocampus respectively. The number of vessel branch points and area was also found to also drop significantly in mice 2 days after irradiation. For rats, immunostaining revealed a significant, three-fold drop in capillary density 1 month after exposure compared to controls. Such radiation-induced disruption of the CNS microvasculature may be contributory if not causal to any number of neurocognitive side effects that manifest in cancer patients following cranial radiotherapy. This study demonstrates the utility of two distinct methodologies for quantifying these important adverse effects of radiotherapy. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 57:341-349, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27175611

  1. Studies of aluminum in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Lipman, J.J.; Brill, A.B.; Som, P.; Jones, K.W.; Colowick, S.; Cholewa, M.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of high aluminum concentrations in rat brains were studied using /sup 14/C autoradiography to measure the uptake of /sup 14/C 2-deoxy-D-glucose (/sup 14/C-2DG) and microbeam proton-induced x-ray emission (microPIXE) with a 20-..mu..m resolution to measure concentrations of magnesium, aluminum, potassium, and calcium. The aluminum was introduced intracisternally in the form of aluminum tartrate (Al-T) while control animals were given sodium tartrate (Na-T). The /sup 14/C was administered intravenously. The animals receiving Al-T developed seizure disorders and had pathological changes that included cerebral cortical atrophy. The results showed that there was a decreased uptake of /sup 14/C-2DG in cortical regions in which increased aluminum levels were measured, i.e., there is a correlation between the aluminum in the rat brain and decreased brain glucose metabolism. A minimum detection limit of about 16 ppM (mass fraction) or 3 x 10/sup 9/ Al atoms was obtained for Al under the conditions employed. 14 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Unilateral Opening of Rat Blood-Brain Barrier Assisted by Diagnostic Ultrasound Targeted Microbubbles Destruction.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yali; Cui, Hai; Zhu, Qiong; Hua, Xing; Xia, Hongmei; Tan, Kaibin; Gao, Yunhua; Zhao, Jing; Liu, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a key obstacle that prevents the medication from blood to the brain. Microbubble-enhanced cavitation by focused ultrasound can open the BBB and proves to be valuable in the brain drug delivery. The study aimed to explore the feasibility, efficacy, and safety of unilateral opening of BBB using diagnostic ultrasound targeted microbubbles destruction in rats. Methods. A transtemporal bone irradiation of diagnostic ultrasound and intravenous injection of lipid-coated microbubbles were performed at unilateral hemisphere. Pathological changes were monitored. Evans Blue extravasation grades, extraction from brain tissue, and fluorescence optical density were quantified. Lanthanum nitrate was traced by transmission electron microscopy. Results. After diagnostic ultrasound mediated microbubbles destruction, Evans Blue extravasation and fluorescence integrated optical density were significantly higher in the irradiated hemisphere than the contralateral side (all p < 0.01). Erythrocytes extravasations were demonstrated in the ultrasound-exposed hemisphere (4 ± 1, grade 2) while being invisible in the control side. Lanthanum nitrate tracers leaked through interendothelial cleft and spread to the nerve fiber existed in the irradiation side. Conclusions. Transtemporal bone irradiation under DUS mediated microbubble destruction provides us with a more accessible, safer, and higher selective BBB opening approach in rats, which is advantageous in brain targeted drugs delivery. PMID:27579317

  3. Unilateral Opening of Rat Blood-Brain Barrier Assisted by Diagnostic Ultrasound Targeted Microbubbles Destruction

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Hai; Zhu, Qiong; Hua, Xing; Xia, Hongmei; Tan, Kaibin; Gao, Yunhua; Zhao, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a key obstacle that prevents the medication from blood to the brain. Microbubble-enhanced cavitation by focused ultrasound can open the BBB and proves to be valuable in the brain drug delivery. The study aimed to explore the feasibility, efficacy, and safety of unilateral opening of BBB using diagnostic ultrasound targeted microbubbles destruction in rats. Methods. A transtemporal bone irradiation of diagnostic ultrasound and intravenous injection of lipid-coated microbubbles were performed at unilateral hemisphere. Pathological changes were monitored. Evans Blue extravasation grades, extraction from brain tissue, and fluorescence optical density were quantified. Lanthanum nitrate was traced by transmission electron microscopy. Results. After diagnostic ultrasound mediated microbubbles destruction, Evans Blue extravasation and fluorescence integrated optical density were significantly higher in the irradiated hemisphere than the contralateral side (all p < 0.01). Erythrocytes extravasations were demonstrated in the ultrasound-exposed hemisphere (4 ± 1, grade 2) while being invisible in the control side. Lanthanum nitrate tracers leaked through interendothelial cleft and spread to the nerve fiber existed in the irradiation side. Conclusions. Transtemporal bone irradiation under DUS mediated microbubble destruction provides us with a more accessible, safer, and higher selective BBB opening approach in rats, which is advantageous in brain targeted drugs delivery. PMID:27579317

  4. Altered ovarian responsiveness to gonadotropins in neonatally irradiated immature rats

    SciTech Connect

    Freud, A.; Sod-Moriah, U.A.

    1988-01-01

    Female rats which were exposed to a single low dose of gamma irradiation (6R or 15R) at the age of 8 days produce smaller litters when mature than untreated controls. In order to study the possibility that such an impaired reproductive performance could result from a reduced ovulation rate, neonatally irradiated females were treated with PMSG (12 iu/rat) at the age of 26 days. Another group of rats, similarly treated, was further injected with hCG (5 iu/rat) 48 hours later. Animals were killed 48, 55, 60 and 72 hours after PMSG treatment or 72 and 120 after hCG injection. The results indicated that PMSG treatment increased the ovarian weight of non-irradiated controls as well as of irradiated rats and in all animals induced a proestrus like profile of LH. Only a combined treatment of PMSG and hCG resulted in ovulation and corpora lutea formation with significantly increased numbers of corpora lutea in the ovaries of the irradiated rats. The latter was associated with higher progesterone plasma levels not correlated to the number of corpora lutea. The gradual decrease in the number of ovarian binding sites for hCG with increased radiation dose and the increased association constant in the 15R group could not explain the increased sensitivity of the ovary to exogenous gonadotropins which results from neonatal exposure to low doses of gamma irradiation.

  5. Dichloroacetate increases glucose use and decreases lactate in developing rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, A.L.; Hatch, J.P.; Prihoda, T.J. )

    1990-12-01

    Dichloroacetate (DCA) activates pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) by inhibiting PDH kinase. Neutralized DCA (100 mg/kg) or saline was intravenously administered to 20 to 25-day-old rats (50-75g). Fifteen minutes later a mixture of {sup 6-14}C glucose and {sup 3}H fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) was administered intravenously and the animals were sacrificed by microwave irradiation (2450 MHz, 8.0 kW, 0.6-0.8 sec) after 2 or 5 min. Brain regional rates of glucose use and metabolite levels were determined. DCA-treated rats had increased rates of glucose use in all regions studied (cortex, thalamus, striatum, and brain stem), with an average increase of 41%. Lactate levels were lower in all regions, by an average of 35%. There were no significant changes in levels of ATP, creatine phosphate, or glycogen in any brain region. Blood levels of lactate did not differ significantly between the DCA- and the saline-treated groups. Blood glucose levels were higher in the DCA group. In rats sacrificed by freeze-blowing, DCA treatment caused lower brain levels of both lactate and pyruvate. These results cannot be explained by any systemic effect of DCA. Rather, it appears that in the immature rat, DCA treatment results in activation of brain PDH, increased metabolism of brain pyruvate and lactate, and a resulting increase in brain glycolytic rate.

  6. Brain cholecystokinin and nutritional status in rats and mice.

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, B S; Monahan, J W; Hirsch, J

    1979-01-01

    Under certain conditions, exogenously administered cholecystokinin (CCK) or its COOH-terminal octapeptide can terminate feeding and cause behavioral satiety in animals. Furthermore, high concentrations of CCK are normally found in the brains of vertebrate species. It has thus been hypothesized that brain CCK plays a role in the control of appetite. To explore this possibility, a COOH-terminal radioimmunoassay was used to measure concentrations of CCK in the cerebral cortex, hypothalamus, and brain stem of rats and mice after a variety of nutritional manipulations. CCK, mainly in the form of its COOH-terminal octapeptide, was found to appear in rat brain shortly before birth and to increase rapidly in cortex and brain stem throughout the first 5 wk of life. Severe early undernutrition had no effect on the normal pattern of CCK development in rat brain. Adult rats deprived of food for up to 72 h and rats made hyperphagic with highly palatable diets showed no alterations in brain CCK concentrations or distribution of molecular forms of CCK as determined by Sephadex gel filtration of brain extracts. Normal CCK concentrations were also found in the brains of four strains of genetically obese rodents and in the brains of six animals made hyperphagic and obese by surgical or chemical lesioning of the ventromedial hypothalamus. It is concluded that despite extreme variations in the nutritional status of rats and mice, CCK concentrations in major structures of the brain are maintained with remarkable constancy. PMID:500815

  7. Physiologic consequences of local heart irradiation in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Geist, B.J.; Lauk, S.; Bornhausen, M.; Trott, K.R. )

    1990-05-01

    Noninvasive methods have been used to study the long-term cardiovascular and pulmonary functional changes at rest and after exercise in adult rats following local heart irradiation with single x-ray doses of 15, 17.5 or 20 Gy, and in non-irradiated control animals. Rats that had undergone a chronic exercise program were compared with untrained cohorts. The earliest dysfunction detected was an increased respiratory rate (f) at 10 weeks after irradiation in the highest dose group. In contrast, both telemetric heart-rate (HR) and rhythm and indirect systolic blood pressure measurements performed at rest only revealed changes starting at 43 weeks after irradiation with 20 Gy, up to which point the rats showed no clinical signs of heart failure. However, the number of minutes required for the recovery of the HR to pre-exercise levels following the implementation of a standardized exercise challenge was elevated in untrained rats compared with their trained cohorts at 18 weeks after irradiation with 20 Gy. Increases in recovery times were required in the two lowest dose groups, starting at 26 weeks after irradiation. It was concluded that the reserve capacity of the cardiopulmonary system masks functional decrements at rest for many months following local heart irradiation, necessitating the use of techniques which reveal reductions in reserve capacities. Further, the influence of local irradiation to the heart and lungs deserves closer scrutiny due to mutual interactions.

  8. [Treatment of delayed brain injury after pituitary irradiation].

    PubMed

    Fujii, T; Misumi, S; Shibasaki, T; Tamura, M; Kunimine, H; Hayakawa, K; Niibe, H; Miyazaki, M; Miyagi, O

    1988-03-01

    Treatment for delayed brain injury after pituitary irradiation is discussed. Six cases with delayed brain injury were treated with a combination of dexamethasone or betamethasone, with heparin, glycerol, dextran 40 and some vasodilators. Two cases with temporal lobe syndrome were treated in the early stages of brain injury for a period of over 12 months were almost completely cured, another two cases with chiasma syndrome were treated in the relatively late stages, showed a partial improvement. One case which was irradiated 120 GY during 13 years did not improve. The final case treated with steroids for a short period also resulted in failure and the patient underwent an operation for the removal of the necrotic mass three years after the radiotherapy. Steroid therapy started in the early stages of brain injury after irradiation for over the 12 months is thought to be effective. Heparin therapy was also effective in one out of three cases, but in one of the cases subarachnoid hemorrhage from a traumatic aneurysm occurred during the therapy. In an acute phase, showing edematous change of the injured brain, the administration of glycerol is also thought to be useful. But the effectiveness of the other medicines containing some vasodilators was obscure or doubtful. We propose the following: (1) A meticulous observation is essential for the patients who received high doses of irradiation to diagnose brain injury in the early reversible stage. (2) Steroids should be given immediately in this reversible stage of brain injury before the irreversible "necrosis" occurs. (3) Steroids should be maintained for a long period over 12 months.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2453809

  9. NADPH oxidase mediates radiation-induced oxidative stress in rat brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Collins-Underwood, J Racquel; Zhao, Weiling; Sharpe, Jessica G; Robbins, Mike E

    2008-09-15

    The need to both understand and minimize the side effects of brain irradiation is heightened by the ever-increasing number of patients with brain metastases that require treatment with whole brain irradiation (WBI); some 200,000 cancer patients/year receive partial or WBI. At the present time, there are no successful treatments for radiation-induced brain injury, nor are there any known effective preventive strategies. Data support a role for chronic oxidative stress in radiation-induced late effects. However, the pathogenic mechanism(s) involved remains unknown. One candidate source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is nicotinamide adenosine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase, which converts molecular oxygen (O(2)) to the superoxide anion (O(2)(-)) on activation. We hypothesize that brain irradiation leads to activation of NADPH oxidase. We report that irradiating rat brain microvascular endothelial cells in vitro leads to increased (i) intracellular ROS generation, (ii) activation of the transcription factor NFkappaB, (iii) expression of ICAM-1 and PAI-1, and (iv) expression of Nox4, p22(phox), and p47(phox). Pharmacologic and genetic inhibition of NADPH oxidase blocked the radiation-mediated upregulation of intracellular ROS, activation of NFkappaB, and upregulation of ICAM-1 and PAI-1. These results suggest that activation of NADPH oxidase may play a role in radiation-induced oxidative stress. PMID:18640264

  10. Effect of irradiation and endogenous nucleases on rat liver chromatin

    SciTech Connect

    Gelderblom, D.; Smit, B.J.; Boehm, L.

    1984-08-01

    The assessment of the consequences of irradiation on chromatin is complicated by endogenous nucleases. Isolation and prolonged storage of rat liver nuclei in buffers containing divalent metal ions activates these enzymes and promotes the degradation of chromatin. Irradiation of rat liver nuclei to dose levels of 20,000 rad under conditions in which endogenous nucleases are inhibited and analysis of the irradiated chromatin by sucrose density gradient centrifugation gave no evidence for monosomes or oligosomes. When chromatin from irradiated nuclei was digested with micrococcal nuclease, the levels of monosomes and oligosomes were identical to those of micrococcal nuclease digests of unirradiated control nuclei. These results suggest that irradiation results in neither a direct fragmentation of linkers nor the sensitization of linkers for subsequent cleavage by micrococcal nuclease.

  11. Propofol Attenuates Early Brain Injury After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Rats.

    PubMed

    Shi, Song-sheng; Zhang, Hua-bin; Wang, Chun-hua; Yang, Wei-zhong; Liang, Ri-sheng; Chen, Ye; Tu, Xian-kun

    2015-12-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that propofol protects rat brain against focal cerebral ischemia. However, whether propofol attenuates early brain injury after subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats remains unknown until now. The present study was performed to evaluate the effect of propofol on early brain injury after subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats and further explore the potential mechanisms. Sprague-Dawley rats underwent subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) by endovascular perforation then received treatment with propofol (10 or 50 mg/kg) or vehicle after 2 and 12 h of SAH. SAH grading, neurological scores, brain water content, Evans blue extravasation, the myeloperoxidase activity, and malondialdehyde (MDA) content were measured 24 h after SAH. Expression of nuclear factor erythroid-related factor 2 (Nrf2), nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) p65, and aquaporin 4 (AQP4) expression in rat brain were detected by Western blot. Expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) were determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Expressions of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) were assessed by ELISA. Neurological scores, brain water content, Evans blue extravasation, the myeloperoxidase activity, and MDA content were significantly reduced by propofol. Furthermore, expression of Nrf2 in rat brain was upregulated by propofol, and expression of NF-κB p65, AQP4, COX-2, MMP-9, TNF-α, and IL-1β in rat brain were attenuated by propofol. Our results demonstrated that propofol improves neurological scores, reduces brain edema, blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability, inflammatory reaction, and lipid peroxidation in rats of SAH. Propofol exerts neuroprotection against SAH-induced early brain injury, which might be associated with the inhibition of inflammation and lipid peroxidation. PMID:26342279

  12. Efficacy of intracerebral delivery of cisplatin in combination with photon irradiation for treatment of brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Rousseau, Julia; Barth, Rolf F.; Fernandez, Manuel; Adam, Jean-François; Balosso, Jacques; Estève, François; Elleaume, Hélène

    2010-01-01

    We have evaluated the efficacy of intracerebral (i.c.) convection-enhanced delivery (CED) of cisplatin in combination with photon irradiation for the treatment of F98 glioma-bearing rats. One thousand glioma cells were stereotactically implanted into the brains of Fischer rats and 13 days later cisplatin (6μg/20μL) was administered i.c. by CED at a flow rate of 0.5μL/min. On the following day the animals were irradiated with a single 15 Gy dose of X-rays, administered by a linear accelerator (LINAC) or 78.8 keV synchrotron X-rays at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). Untreated controls had a mean survival time (MST) ± standard error of 24 ± 1 d. compared to > 59 ± 13 d. for rats that received cisplatin alone with 13% of the latter surviving >200 d. Rats that received cisplatin in combination with either 6 MV (LINAC) or 78.8 keV (synchrotron) X-rays had almost identical MSTs of > 75±18 d. and > 74±19 d., respectively with 17% and 18% long term survivors. Microscopic examination of the brains of long term surviving rats revealed an absence of viable tumor cells and cystic areas at the presumptive site of the tumor. Our data demonstrate that i.c. CED of cisplatin in combination with external X-irradiation significantly enhanced the survival of F98 glioma-bearing rats. This was independent of the X-ray beam energy and probably was not due to the production of Auger electrons as we previously had postulated. Our data provide strong support for the approach of concomitantly administering platinum based chemotherapy in combination with radiotherapy for the treatment of brain tumors. Since a conventional LINAC can be used as the radiation source, this should significantly broaden the clinical applicability of this approach compared to synchrotron radiotherapy, which could only be carried out at a very small number of specialized facilities. PMID:20012464

  13. Brain Injury After Intracerebral Hemorrhage in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Gang; Bao, Xuhui; Xi, Guohua; Keep, Richard; Thompson, B. Gregory; Hua, Ya

    2011-01-01

    Object Hypertension is the main cause of spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhages (ICH), but the effects of hypertension on ICH-induced brain injury have not been well studied. In this study, we examined ICH-induced brain injury in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Methods This two-part study was performed on 12 weeks old male SHR and Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats. First, rats received an intracaudate injection of 0.3 units collagenase and hematoma sizes were determined at 24 hours. Second, rats were injected with 100-μL autologous whole blood into the right basal ganglia. Brain edema, neuronal death, ferritin expression, microglia activation, and neurological deficits were examined. Results Hematoma sizes were the same in SHR and WKY rats 24 hours after collagenase injection. SHR had greater neuronal death and neurological deficits after blood injection. ICH also resulted in higher brain ferritin levels and stronger activation of microglia in SHR. However, perihematomal brain edema was same in the SHR and WKY rats. Conclusion Moderate chronic hypertension resulted in more severe ICH-induced neuronal death and neurological deficits, but did not exaggerate hematoma enlargement and perihematomal brain edema in the rat ICH models. PMID:21294617

  14. The AT1 receptor antagonist, L-158,809, prevents or ameliorates fractionated whole-brain irradiation-induced cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Mike E.; Payne, Valerie; Tommasi, Ellen; Diz, Debra I; Hsu, Fang-Chi; Brown, William R.; Wheeler, Kenneth T.; Olson, John; Zhao, Weiling

    2009-01-01

    Purpose We hypothesized that administration of the angiotensin type 1 (AT1) receptor antagonist, L-158,809, to young adult male rats would prevent or ameliorate fractionated whole-brain irradiation (WBI)-induced cognitive impairment. Methods and Materials Groups of 80 young adult male Fischer 344 × Brown Norway (F344×BN) rats, 12–14 weeks old, received either: i] fractionated WBI; 40 Gy of γ rays in 4 weeks, 2 fractions/week, ii] sham-irradiation; iii] WBI plus L-158,809 (20 mg/L drinking water) starting 3 days prior, during and for 14, 28, or 54 weeks post-irradiation; and iv] sham-irradiation plus L-158,809 for 14, 28, or 54 weeks post-irradiation. An additional group of rats (n = 20) received L-158,809 prior to, during, and for 5 weeks post-irradiation, after which they received normal drinking water up to 28 weeks post-irradiation Results Administration of L-158,809 prior to, during, and for 28 or 54 weeks after fractionated WBI prevented or ameliorated the radiation-induced cognitive impairment observed 26 and 52 weeks post-irradiation. Moreover, giving L-158,809 prior to, during, and for only 5 weeks post-irradiation ameliorated the significant cognitive impairment observed 26 weeks post-irradiation. These radiation-induced cognitive impairments occurred without any changes in brain metabolites or gross histologic changes assessed at 28 and 54 weeks post-irradiation, respectively. Conclusions Administering L-158,809 prior to, during, and after fractionated WBI can prevent or ameliorate the chronic, progressive, cognitive impairment observed in rats at 26 and 52 weeks post-irradiation. These findings offer the promise of improving the quality of life for brain tumor patients. PMID:19084353

  15. 26Al uptake and accumulation in the rat brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yumoto, S.; Nagai, H.; Imamura, M.; Matsuzaki, H.; Hayashi, K.; Masuda, A.; Kumazawa, H.; Ohashi, H.; Kobayashi, K.

    1997-03-01

    To investigate the cause of Alzheimer's disease (senile dementia), 26Al incorporation in the rat brain was studied by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). When 26Al was injected into healthy rats, a considerable amount of 26Al entered the brain (cerebrum) through the blood-brain barrier 5 days after a single injection, and the brain 26Al level remained almost constant from 5 to 270 days. On the other hand, the level of 26Al in the blood decreased remarkably 75 days after injection. Approximately 89% of the 26Al taken in by the brain cell nuclei bound to chromatin. This study supports the theory that Alzheimer's disease is caused by irreversible accumulation of aluminium (Al) in the brain, and brain cell nuclei.

  16. Aluminium toxicity in the rat liver and brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yumoto, S.; Ohashi, H.; Nagai, H.; Kakimi, S.; Ishikawa, A.; Kobayashi, K.; Ogawa, Y.; Ishii, K.

    1993-04-01

    To investigate the etiology of Alzheimer's disease, we examined the brain and liver tissue uptake of aluminium 5-75 days after aluminium injection into healthy rats. Ten days after the last injection, Al was detected in the brain and the brain cell nuclei by particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis. Al was also demonstrated in the liver and the liver cell nuclei by PIXE analysis and electron energy loss spectrometry (EELS). The morphological changes of the rat brain examined 75 days after the injection were similar to those which have been reportedly observed in the brain of patients with Alzheimer's disease. These results support the theory that Alzheimer's disease is caused by irreversible accumulation of aluminium in the brain, as well as in the nuclei of brain cells.

  17. Neurosarcoidosis associated with hypersomnolence treated with corticosteroids and brain irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinstein, I.; Gray, T.A.; Moldofsky, H.; Hoffstein, V.

    1988-07-01

    Narcoleptic features developed in a young man with CNS sarcoidosis. This was associated with a structural lesion in the hypothalamus as demonstrated on CT scans of the head. The diagnosis of narcolepsy was established by compatible clinical history and the Multiple Sleep Latency Test. Treatment with high-dose corticosteroids was ineffective, but when the low-dose, whole-brain irradiation was added, complete resolution of the narcoleptic features ensued.

  18. Dexmedetomidine Postconditioning Reduces Brain Injury after Brain Hypoxia-Ischemia in Neonatal Rats.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiaoyan; Ma, Hong; Zuo, Zhiyi

    2016-06-01

    Perinatal asphyxia can lead to death and severe disability. Brain hypoxia-ischemia (HI) injury is the major pathophysiology contributing to death and severe disability after perinatal asphyxia. Here, seven-day old Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to left brain HI. Dexmedetomidine was given intraperitoneally after the brain HI. Yohimbine or atipamezole, two α2 adrenergic receptor antagonists, were given 10 min before the dexmedetomidine injection. Neurological outcome was evaluated 7 or 28 days after the brain HI. Frontal cerebral cortex was harvested 6 h after the brain HI. Left brain HI reduced the left cerebral hemisphere weight assessed 7 days after the brain HI. This brain tissue loss was dose-dependently attenuated by dexmedetomidine. Dexmedetomidine applied within 1 h after the brain HI produced this effect. Dexmedetomidine attenuated the brain HI-induced brain tissue and cell loss as well as neurological and cognitive dysfunction assessed from 28 days after the brain HI. Dexmedetomidine postconditioning-induced neuroprotection was abolished by yohimbine or atipamezole. Brain HI increased tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin 1β in the brain tissues. This increase was attenuated by dexmedetomidine. Atipamezole inhibited this dexmedetomidine effect. Our results suggest that dexmedetomidine postconditioning reduces HI-induced brain injury in the neonatal rats. This effect may be mediated by α2 adrenergic receptor activation that inhibits inflammation in the ischemic brain tissues. PMID:26932203

  19. Influence of a single gamma-irradiation on rat microflora.

    PubMed

    Benová, K; Falis, M; Toropila, M; Sehnalková, H; Pastvová, L

    2002-01-01

    Changes in leukocyte counts and in the gut microflora of laboratory rats irradiated with single whole-body dose of gamma rays (5.0 Gy) were determined. The number of leukocytes was lower especially 1 and 2 weeks after irradiation. A significant decrease in lymphocytes was observed 1 week and in monocytes 1 and 2 weeks after irradiation. In parallel with these changes, an increase in common microflora was observed; some microorganisms, which normally are not present in duodenum, liver and mouth cavity, were detected in these organs. PMID:12422530

  20. Increased sensitivity to transient global ischemia in aging rat brain.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kui; Sun, Xiaoyan; Puchowicz, Michelle A; LaManna, Joseph C

    2007-01-01

    Transient global brain ischemia induced by cardiac arrest and resuscitation (CAR) results in reperfusion injury associated with oxidative stress. Oxidative stress is known to produce delayed selective neuronal cell loss and impairment of brainstem function, leading to post-resuscitation mortality. Levels of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) modified protein adducts, a marker of oxidative stress, was found to be elevated after CAR in rat brain. In this study we investigated the effects of an antioxidant, alpha-phenyl-tert-butyl-nitrone (PBN) on the recovery following CAR in the aged rat brain. Male Fischer 344 rats (6, 12 and 24-month old) underwent 7-minute cardiac arrest before resuscitation. Brainstem function was assessed by hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) and HNE-adducts were measured by western blot analysis. Our data showed that in the 24-month old rats, overall survival rate, hippocampal CAl neuronal counts and HVR were significantly reduced compared to the younger rats. With PBN treatment, the recovery was improved in the aged rat brain, which was consistent with reduced HNE adducts in brain following CAR. Our data suggest that aged rats are more vulnerable to oxidative stress insult and treatment with PBN improves the outcome following reperfusion injury. The mechanism of action is most likely through the scavenging of reactive oxygen species resulting in reduced lipid peroxidation. PMID:17727265

  1. Morphological changes in cultures of hippocampus following prenatal irradiation in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Hamdorf, G.; Shahar, A.; Cervos-Navarro, J.; Scheffler, A.; Sparenberg, A.; Skoberla, A. )

    1990-07-01

    The effect of prenatal irradiation was studied in organotypic cultures of hippocampus, prepared from newborn rats that had been exposed to whole-body irradiation of 1 Gy from a {sup 60}Co-source at day 13 of pregnancy. Light and electron microscopic observations showed remarkable damage to neuronal mitochondria accompanied by extensive swelling, vacuolation of the Golgi complex, and formation of multilamellar bodies and vesicles of the lysosomal type. In contrast to neuronal alterations, no delay in synaptogenesis or onset of myelination was observed based upon the absence of significant morphological changes in synapses and myelin sheaths. Using this tissue culture model it could be confirmed that prenatal exposure to irradiation, even at low doses, induces specific morphological changes in the brain.

  2. ALA-PDT of glioma cell micro-clusters in BD-IX rat brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, Steen J.; Angell-Petersen, Even; Spetalen, Signe; Carper, Stephen W.; Ziegler, Sarah A.; Hirschberg, Henry

    2006-02-01

    A significant contributory factor to the poor prognosis of patients with glioblastoma multiforme is the inability of conventional treatments to eradicate infiltrating glioma cells. A syngeneic rat brain tumor model is used to investigate the effects of aminolevulinic acid (ALA)-mediated photodynamic therapy (PDT) on small clusters of tumor cells sequestered in normal brain. The intrinsic sensitivity of rat glioma cells to PDT was investigated by exposing ALA-incubated cells to a range of radiant exposures and irradiances using 635 nm light. Biodistribution studies were undertaken on tumor-bearing animals in order to determine the tumor selectivity of the photosensitizer following systemic administration (i.p.) of ALA. Effects of ALA-PDT on normal brain and gross tumor were evaluated using histopathology. Effects of PDT on isolated glioma cells in normal brain were investigated by treating animals 48 h after tumor cell implantation: a time when the micro-clusters of cells are protected by an intact blood-brain-barrier (BBB). Rat glioma cells in monolayer are susceptible to ALA-PDT - lower irradiances are more effective than higher ones. Fluorescence microscopy of frozen tissue sections showed that photosensitizer is produced with better than 200:1 tumor-to-normal tissue selectivity following i.p. ALA administration. ALA-PDT resulted in significant damage to both gross tumor and normal brain, however, the treatment failed to prolong survival of animals with newly implanted glioma cells compared to non-treated controls if the drug was delivered either i.p. or directly into the brain. In contrast, animals inoculated with tumor cells pre-incubated in vitro with ALA showed a significant survival advantage in response to PDT.

  3. IN VITRO COMPARISON OF RAT AND CHICKEN BRAIN NEUROTOXIC ESTERASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A systematic comparison was undertaken to characterize neurotoxic esterase (NTE) from rat and chicken brain in terms of inhibitor sensitivities, pH optima, and molecular weights. Paraoxon titration of phenyl valerate (PV)-hydrolyzing carboxylesterased showed that rat esterases we...

  4. Aging-Dependent Changes in the Radiation Response of the Adult Rat Brain

    SciTech Connect

    Schindler, Matthew K. Forbes, M. Elizabeth; Robbins, Mike E.; Riddle, David R.

    2008-03-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of aging on the radiation response in the adult rat brain. Methods and Materials: Male rats 8, 18, or 28 months of age received a single 10-Gy dose of whole-brain irradiation (WBI). The hippocampal dentate gyrus was analyzed 1 and 10 weeks later for sensitive neurobiologic markers associated with radiation-induced damage: changes in density of proliferating cells, immature neurons, total microglia, and activated microglia. Results: A significant decrease in basal levels of proliferating cells and immature neurons and increased microglial activation occurred with normal aging. The WBI induced a transient increase in proliferation that was greater in older animals. This proliferation response did not increase the number of immature neurons, which decreased after WBI in young rats, but not in old rats. Total microglial numbers decreased after WBI at all ages, but microglial activation increased markedly, particularly in older animals. Conclusions: Age is an important factor to consider when investigating the radiation response of the brain. In contrast to young adults, older rats show no sustained decrease in number of immature neurons after WBI, but have a greater inflammatory response. The latter may have an enhanced role in the development of radiation-induced cognitive dysfunction in older individuals.

  5. Brain Volume Determination in Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Using Rats.

    PubMed

    Lekic, Tim; Hardy, Maurice; Fujii, Mutsumi; McBride, Devin W; Zhang, John H

    2016-01-01

    Brain edema is routinely measured using the wet-dry method. Volume, however, is the sum total of all cerebral tissues, including water. Therefore, volumetric change following injury may not be adequately quantified using percentage of edema. We thus tested the hypothesis that dried brains can be reconstituted with water and then re-measured to determine the actual volume. Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) was induced by endovascular perforation in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 30). Animals were euthanized at 24 and 72 h after evaluation of neurobehavior for determination of brain water content. Dried brains were thereafter reconstituted with equal parts of water (lost from brain edema) and centrifuged to remove air bubbles. The total volume was quantified using hydrostatic (underwater) physics principles that 1 ml water (mass) = 1 cm(3) (volume). The amount of additional water needed to reach a preset level marked on 2-ml test tubes was added to that lost from brain edema, and from the brain itself, to determine the final volume. SAH significantly increased both brain water and volume while worsening neurological function in affected rats. Volumetric measurements demonstrated significant brain swelling after SAH, in addition to the brain edema approach. This modification of the "wet-dry" method permits brain volume determination using valuable post hoc dried brain tissue. PMID:26463930

  6. Transcranial Photoacoustic Measurements of Cold-Injured Brains in Rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, Yoshinori; Sato, Shunichi; Hasegawa, Makoto; Nawashiro, Hiroshi; Saitoh, Daizoh; Shima, Katsuji; Ashida, Hiroshi; Obara, Minoru

    2005-09-01

    We performed transcranial photoacoustic measurements of cold-injured brains in rats. Before inducing injury, a signal peak was observed at two locations corresponding to the surfaces of the skull and brain, while after injury, a third peak appeared at a location corresponding to the back surface of the skull; the third peak was found to be caused by subdural hematoma. The signal peak for the brain surface shifted to a deeper region with elapse of time after injury, indicating deformation of the brain. These findings suggest that small hemorrhage and morphological change of the brain can be transcranially detected by photoacoustic measurement.

  7. Gastroprotective effect of kefir on ulcer induced in irradiated rats.

    PubMed

    Fahmy, Hanan A; Ismail, Amel F M

    2015-03-01

    The current study was designed to investigate the protective effect of kefir milk on ethanol-induced gastric ulcers in γ-irradiated rats. The results of the present study revealed that treatment with γ-irradiation and/or ethanol showed a significant increase in ulcers number, total acidity, peptic, H(+)K(+)ATPase, MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities and MDA level, which were accompanied by a significant decrease in the mucus content, the stomach GSH level, the GSH-Px activity and DNA damage. Pre-treatment with kefir milk exert significant improvement in all the tested parameters. Kefir milk exerts comparable effect to that of the antiulcer drug ranitidine. In conclusion, the present study revealed that oral administration of kefir milk prevents ethanol-induced gastric ulcer in γ-irradiated rats that could attribute to its antioxidant, anti-apoptotic and radio-protective activities. PMID:25728227

  8. Induction of acute phase gene expression by brain irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Ji-Hong |; Sun, Ji-Rong; Withers, H.R.

    1995-10-15

    To investigate the in vivo acute phase molecular response of the brain to ionizing radiation, C3Hf/Sed/Kam mice were given midbrain or whole-body irradiation. Cerebral expression of interleukins (IL-1{alpha}, IL-1{beta}, IL-2, IL-3, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6), interferon (IFN-{gamma}), tumor necrosis factors (TNF-{alpha} and TNF-{beta}), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), inducible nitric oxide synthetase (iNOS), von Willebrand factor (vWF), {alpha}1-antichymotrypsin (EB22/5.3), and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) was measured at various times after various radiation doses by ribonuclease (RNase) protection assay. The effects of dexamethasone or pentoxifylline treatment of mice on radiation-induced gene expression were also examined. Levels of TNF-{alpha}, IL-1{beta}, ICAM-1, EB22/5.3, and to a lesser extent IL-1{alpha} and GFAP, messenger RNA were increased in the brain after irradiation, whether the dose was delivered to the whole body or only to the midbrain. Responses were radiation dose dependent, but were not found below 7 Gy; the exception being ICAM-1, which was increased by doses as low as 2 Gy. Most responses were rapid, peaking within 4-8 h, but antichymotrypsin and GFAP responses were delayed and still elevated at 24 h, by which time the others had subsided. Pretreatment of mice with dexamethasone or pentoxifylline suppressed radiation-induced gene expression, either partially or completely. Dexamethasone was more inhibitory than pentoxifylline at the doses chosen. The initial response of the brain to irradiation involves expression of inflammatory gene products, which are probably responsible for clinically observed early symptoms of brain radiotherapy. This mechanism explains the beneficial effects of the clinical use of steroids in such circumstances. 64 refs., 4 figs.

  9. Anticonvulsant compounds and 5-hydroxytryptamine in rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Bonnycastle, D. D.; Giarman, N. J.; Paasonen, M. K.

    1957-01-01

    In rats, a series of anticonvulsant compounds have been shown to cause a significant elevation of brain 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) levels in comparison with control values. This increase in 5-HT only occurred in brain tissue and was not observed in spleen, upper small intestine or blood. Elevation of brain levels of 5-HT by iproniazid (Marsilid) or 5-hydroxytryptophan failed to give protection against the convulsant or lethal action of lept zol (75 mg./kg.). PMID:13446378

  10. Actin purification from a gel of rat brain extracts.

    PubMed

    Levilliers, N; Peron-Renner, M; Coffe, G; Pudles, J

    1984-01-01

    Actin, 99% pure, has been recovered from rat brain with a high yield (greater than 15 mg/100 g brain). We have shown that: 1. a low ionic strength extract from rat brain tissue is capable of giving rise to a gel; 2. actin is the main gel component and its proportion is one order of magnitude higher than in the original extract; 3. actin can be isolated from this extract by a three-step procedure involving gelation, dissociation of the gel in 0.6 M KCl, followed by one or two depolymerization-polymerization cycles. PMID:6529588

  11. Hepatic injury after whole-liver irradiation in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Geraci, J.P.; Jackson, K.L.; Mariano, M.S.; Leitch, J.M.

    1985-03-01

    Radiation-induced hepatic injury in rats, which is characterized by marked ascites accompanied by liver necrosis, fibrosis, and vein lesions, is described in this study. These adverse sequelae are produced within 30 days after irradiation if there is surgical removal of two-thirds of the liver immediately after whole-liver irradiation. The LD/sub 50/30/ day and median survival time after liver irradiation and two-thirds partial hepatectomy is 24 Gy and 17 days, respectively. Death is preceded by reduction in liver function as measured by (/sup 131/I)-labeled rose bengal clearance. Prior to death, liver sepsis and endotoxemia were detected in most irradiated, partially hepatectomized animals. Pretreatment of the animals with endotoxin and/or antibiotic decontamination of the GI tract resulted in increased survival time, but no irradiated, partially hepatectomized animal survived beyond 63 days. This suggests that sepsis and endotoxemia resulting from the bacteria in the intestine are the immediate cause of death after 30-Gy liver irradiation and partial hepatectomy. It is concluded that the hepatectomized rat model is an economical and scientifically manageable experimental system to study a form of radiation hepatitis that occurs in compromised human livers.

  12. Effects of photoradiation therapy on normal rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, M.K.; McKean, J.; Boisvert, D.; Tulip, J.; Mielke, B.W.

    1984-12-01

    Laser photoradiation of the brain via an optical fiber positioned 5 mm above a burr hole was performed after the injection of hematoporphyrin derivative (HpD) in 33 normal rats and 6 rats with an intracerebral glioma. Normal rats received HpD, 5 or 10 mg/kg of body weight, followed by laser exposure at various doses or were exposed to a fixed laser dose after the administration of HpD, 2.5 to 20 mg/kg. One control group received neither HpD nor laser energy, and another was exposed to laser energy only. The 6 rats bearing an intracranial 9L glioma were treated with HpD, 5 mg/kg, followed by laser exposure at various high doses. The temperature in the cortex or tumor was measured with a probe during laser exposure. The rats were killed 72 hours after photoradiation, and the extent of necrosis of cerebral tissue was measured microscopically. In the normal rats, the extent of brain damage correlated with increases in the dose of both the laser and the HpD. In all 6 glioma-bearing rats, the high laser doses produced some focal necrosis in the tumors but also damaged adjacent normal brain tissue. The authors conclude that damage to normal brain tissue may be a significant complication of high dose photoradiation therapy for intracranial tumors.

  13. In vitro comparison of rat and chicken brain neurotoxic esterase

    SciTech Connect

    Novak, R.; Padilla, S.

    1986-04-01

    A systematic comparison was undertaken to characterize neurotoxic esterase (NTE) from rat and chicken brain in terms of inhibitor sensitivities, pH optima, and molecular weights. Paraoxon titration of phenyl valerate (PV)-hydrolyzing carboxylesterases showed that rat esterases were more sensitive than chicken to paraoxon inhibition at concentrations less than or equal to microM and superimposable with chicken esterases at concentrations of 2.5-1000 microM. Mipafox titration of the paraoxon-resistant esterases at a fixed paraoxon concentration of 100 microM (mipafox concentration: 0-1000 microM) resulted in a mipafox I50 of 7.3 microM for chicken brain NTE and 11.6 microM for rat brain NTE. NTE (i.e., paraoxon-resistant, mipafox-sensitive esterase activity) comprised 80% of chicken and 60% of rat brain paraoxon-resistant activity with the specific activity of chicken brain NTE approximately twice that of rat brain NTE. The pH maxima for NTE from both species was similar showing broad, slightly alkaline optima from pH 7.9 to 8.6. (/sup 3/H)Diisopropyl phosphorofluoridate (DFP)-labeled NTE from the brains of both species had an apparent mol wt of 160,000 measured by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. In conclusion, NTE from both species was very similar, with the mipafox I50 for rat NTE within the range of reported values for chicken and human NTE, and the inhibitor parameters of the chicken NTE assay were applicable for the rat NTE assay.

  14. Transport of 3-hydroxybutyrate by cultured rat brain astrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    McKenna, M.C.; Tildon, J.T.; Stevenson, J.H.; Couto, R.; Caprio, F.J. )

    1990-02-26

    Studies by a number of investigators have shown that 3-hydroxybutyrate is a preferred energy substrate for brain during early development. Since recent studies by the authors group suggest that the utilization of oxidizable substrates by brain may be regulated in part by transport across the plasma membrane, the authors investigated the transport of ({sup 3}H) D- and L-3-hydroxybutyrate and 3-hydroxy-(3-{sup 14}C) butyrate by primary cultures of rat brain astrocytes. The data is consistent with the hypothesis that 3-hydroxybutyrate is taken up into cultured rat brain astrocytes by both diffusion and a carrier mediated transport system, and further support the concept that transport at the cellular level contributes to the regulation of substrate utilization by brain cells.

  15. Brain glucose content in fetuses of ethanol-fed rats

    SciTech Connect

    Pullen, G.; Singh, S.P.; Snyder, A.K.; Hoffen, B.

    1986-03-01

    The authors have previously demonstrated impaired placental glucose transfer and fetal hypoglycemia in association with ethanol ingestion by pregnant rats. The present study examines the relationship between glucose availability and fetal brain growth under the same conditions. Rats (EF) were fed ethanol (30% of caloric intake) in liquid diet throughout gestation. Controls received isocaloric diet without ethanol by pair-feeding (PF) or ad libitum (AF). On the 22nd day of gestation fetuses were obtained by cesarean section. Fetal brains were removed and freeze-clamped. Brain weight was significantly reduced (p < 0.001) by maternal ethanol ingestion (206 +/- 2, 212 +/- 4 and 194 +/- 2 mg in AF, FP and EF fetuses respectively). Similarly, fetal brain glucose content was lower (p < 0.05) in the EF group (14.3 +/- 0.9 mmoles/g dry weight) than in the PF (18.6 +/- 1.0) or the AF (16.2 +/- 0.9) groups. The protein: DNA ratio, an indicator of cell size, correlated positively (r = 0.371, p < 0.005) with brain glucose content. In conclusion, maternal ethanol ingestion resulted in lower brain weight and reduced brain glucose content. Glucose availability may be a significant factor in the determination of cell size in the fetal rat brain.

  16. Cocaine disposition in discrete regions of rat brain.

    PubMed

    Javaid, J I; Davis, J M

    1993-05-01

    It has been proposed that various effects of psychoactive drugs on the central nervous system may be related to the capacity of the drug to selectively concentrate in specific regions of the brain. In rat brain, cocaine effects on striatal and nucleus accumbens dopaminergic systems show quantitative differences. However, the disposition of cocaine in various brain regions has not been reported. In the present studies we examined the cocaine concentrations over time in serum and discrete brain regions of the rat after single intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection. At different time points (5, 10, 20, 30, 60, 120, and 240 min) after i.p. injection of cocaine hydrochloride (10 mg kg-1, free base) the rats were decapitated and cocaine in serum and various brain regions was quantitated by a specific gas liquid chromatographic method. There was large inter-individual variability in different rats at each time-point. The disposition pattern of cocaine in rats after i.p. administration was similar to that observed in humans after intranasal administration. Initial absorption rate was rapid and, on average, the peak levels of cocaine were achieved in 10 min. The cocaine levels remained relatively high over the next 50 min indicating continual absorption, and then declined with a rate such that the levels 4 h after cocaine administration were undetectable in most of the animals. The overall changes in cocaine levels in various brain regions paralleled the serum concentrations. The area under the cocaine concentration-time curve (AUC) revealed more than three-fold differences in cocaine accumulation in various brain regions. This unequal disposition of cocaine may be responsible in part for differential biochemical effects in different brain regions. PMID:8499585

  17. Wearable 3-D Photoacoustic Tomography for Functional Brain Imaging in Behaving Rats.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jianbo; Coleman, Jason E; Dai, Xianjin; Jiang, Huabei

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the relationship between brain function and behavior remains a major challenge in neuroscience. Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is an emerging technique that allows for noninvasive in vivo brain imaging at micrometer-millisecond spatiotemporal resolution. In this article, a novel, miniaturized 3D wearable PAT (3D-wPAT) technique is described for brain imaging in behaving rats. 3D-wPAT has three layers of fully functional acoustic transducer arrays. Phantom imaging experiments revealed that the in-plane X-Y spatial resolutions were ~200 μm for each acoustic detection layer. The functional imaging capacity of 3D-wPAT was demonstrated by mapping the cerebral oxygen saturation via multi-wavelength irradiation in behaving hyperoxic rats. In addition, we demonstrated that 3D-wPAT could be used for monitoring sensory stimulus-evoked responses in behaving rats by measuring hemodynamic responses in the primary visual cortex during visual stimulation. Together, these results show the potential of 3D-wPAT for brain study in behaving rodents. PMID:27146026

  18. Wearable 3-D Photoacoustic Tomography for Functional Brain Imaging in Behaving Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jianbo; Coleman, Jason E.; Dai, Xianjin; Jiang, Huabei

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the relationship between brain function and behavior remains a major challenge in neuroscience. Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is an emerging technique that allows for noninvasive in vivo brain imaging at micrometer-millisecond spatiotemporal resolution. In this article, a novel, miniaturized 3D wearable PAT (3D-wPAT) technique is described for brain imaging in behaving rats. 3D-wPAT has three layers of fully functional acoustic transducer arrays. Phantom imaging experiments revealed that the in-plane X-Y spatial resolutions were ~200 μm for each acoustic detection layer. The functional imaging capacity of 3D-wPAT was demonstrated by mapping the cerebral oxygen saturation via multi-wavelength irradiation in behaving hyperoxic rats. In addition, we demonstrated that 3D-wPAT could be used for monitoring sensory stimulus-evoked responses in behaving rats by measuring hemodynamic responses in the primary visual cortex during visual stimulation. Together, these results show the potential of 3D-wPAT for brain study in behaving rodents. PMID:27146026

  19. Brain perfusion in acute and chronic hyperglycemia in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kikano, G.E.; LaManna, J.C.; Harik, S.I. )

    1989-08-01

    Recent studies show that acute and chronic hyperglycemia cause a diffuse decrease in regional cerebral blood flow and that chronic hyperglycemia decreases the brain L-glucose space. Since these changes can be caused by a decreased density of perfused brain capillaries, we used 30 adult male Wistar rats to study the effect of acute and chronic hyperglycemia on (1) the brain intravascular space using radioiodinated albumin, (2) the anatomic density of brain capillaries using alkaline phosphatase histochemistry, and (3) the fraction of brain capillaries that are perfused using the fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran method. Our results indicate that acute and chronic hyperglycemia do not affect the brain intravascular space nor the anatomic density of brain capillaries. Also, there were no differences in capillary recruitment among normoglycemic, acutely hyperglycemic, and chronically hyperglycemic rats. These results suggest that the shrinkage of the brain L-glucose space in chronic hyperglycemia is more likely due to changes in the blood-brain barrier permeability to L-glucose.

  20. Neuropeptide Y receptors in rat brain: autoradiographic localization

    SciTech Connect

    Martel, J.C.; St-Pierre, S.; Quirion, R.

    1986-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) receptor binding sites have been characterized in rat brain using both membrane preparations and receptor autoradiography. Radiolabelled NPY binds with high affinity and specificity to an apparent single class of sites in rat brain membrane preparations. The ligand selectivity pattern reveals strong similarities between central and peripheral NPY receptors. NPY receptors are discretely distributed in rat brain with high densities found in the olfactory bulb, superficial layers of the cortex, ventral hippocampus, lateral septum, various thalamic nuclei and area postrema. The presence of high densities of NPY and NPY receptors in such areas suggests that NPY could serve important functions as a major neurotransmitter/neuromodulator in the central nervous system.

  1. Resting-State Functional Connectivity of the Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Pawela, Christopher P.; Biswal, Bharat B.; Cho, Younghoon R.; Kao, Dennis S.; Li, Rupeng; Jones, Seth R.; Schulte, Marie L.; Matloub, Hani S.; Hudetz, Anthony G.; Hyde, James S.

    2008-01-01

    Regional-specific average time courses of spontaneous fluctuations in blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) MRI contrast at 9.4T in lightly anesthetized resting rat brain are formed, and correlation coefficients between time course pairs are interpreted as measures of connectivity. A hierarchy of regional pairwise correlation coefficients (RPCCs) is observed, with the highest values found in the thalamus and cortex, both intra- and interhemisphere, and lower values between cortex and thalamus. Independent sensory networks are distinguished by two methods: data driven, where task activation defines regions of interest (ROI), and hypothesis driven, where regions are defined by the rat histological atlas. Success in these studies is attributed in part to the use of medetomidine hydrochloride (Domitor) for anesthesia. Consistent results in two different rat-brain systems, the sensorimotor and visual, strongly support the hypothesis that resting-state BOLD fluctuations are conserved across mammalian species and can be used to map brain systems. PMID:18429028

  2. Hydrophilic solute transport across the rat blood-brain barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Lucchesi, K.J.

    1987-01-01

    Brain capillary permeability-surface area products (PS) of hydrophilic solutes ranging in size from 180 to 5,500 Daltons were measured in rats according to the method of Ohno, Pettigrew and Rapoport. The distribution volume of 70 KD dextran at 10 minutes after i.v. injection was also measured to determine the residual volume of blood in brain tissue at the time of sacrifice. Small test solutes were injected in pairs in order to elucidate whether their transfer into the brain proceeds by diffusion through water- or lipid-filled channels or by vesicular transport. This issue was examined in rats whose blood-brain barrier (BBB) was presumed to be intact (untreated) and in rats that received intracarotid infusions to open the BBB (isosmotic salt (ISS) and hyperosmolar arabinose). Ohno PS values of {sup 3}H-inulin and {sup 14}C-L-glucose in untreated rats were found to decrease as the labelling time was lengthened. This was evidence that a rapidly equilibrating compartment exists between blood and brain that renders the Ohno two-compartment model inadequate for computing true transfer rate constants. When the data were reanalyzed using a multi-compartment graphical analysis, solutes with different molecular radii were found to enter the brain at approximately equal rates. Furthermore, unidirectional transport is likely to be initiated by solute adsorption to a glycocalyx coat on the luminal surface of brain capillary endothelium. Apparently, more inulin than L-glucose was adsorbed, which may account for its slightly faster transfer across the BBB. After rats were treated with intracarotid infusions of ISS or hyperosmolar arabinose, solute PS values were significantly increased, but the ratio of PS for each of the solute pairs approached that of their free-diffusion coefficients.

  3. Castration affects male rat brain opiate receptor content.

    PubMed

    Hahn, E F; Fishman, J

    1985-07-01

    We previously reported that saturable stereospecific binding of [3H]-naltrexone in rat brain homogenates prepared from castrated male rats was greater than the corresponding binding in intact animals. We now report that we have replicated these results and that the difficulty of other investigators in observing these differences is due to methodological factors. Specifically, when samples were filtered individually and rapidly, differences between castrated and intact rats were maintained. The increase in binding was also observed when tissues were washed to remove endogenous opioids prior to incubation, when [3H]-naloxone was used as the ligand, and when various antagonists were used as displacers in the radioreceptor assay. PMID:2991795

  4. Voltametric assessment of brain nitric oxide during heatstroke in rats.

    PubMed

    Canini, F; Bourdon, L; Cespuglio, R; Buguet, A

    1997-08-01

    Anesthetized rats exposed to a high ambient temperature develop heatstroke with brain ischemia. Since nitric oxide (NO) plays an important role during normothermic ischemia, its cortical and cerebellar production were continuously assessed in pentobarbital anesthetized rats exposed to heat by using differential pulsed voltammetry. After 60 min at thermoneutrality, the rats were submitted to an ambient temperature of 40 degrees C until death. After 60 min in the heat, the rats were injected intraperitoneally with saline, MK801 (1 mg.kg(-1)), an antagonist of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, or L-arginine p-nitroanilide (L-ANA; 100 mg.kg(-1)), an inhibitor of NO synthase. Just before death, a 70% increase in NO production was observed in both the cerebellum and the cortex of saline-treated rats. The cortical increase in NO was not modified by MK801 while the NO signal was suppressed by L-ANA. PMID:9291142

  5. Activity of respiratory system during laser irradiation of brain structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkulova, N. A.; Sergeyeva, L. I.

    1984-06-01

    The performance of one of the principal links of the respiratory system, the respiratory center, was studied as a function of the exposure of the medulla oblongata and the sensomotor zone of the cerebral hemisphere cortex to low level laser irradiation in the red wavelength of the spectrum. Experiments were done on white rats under barbital anesthesia. Under such conditions a substantial effect was observed on the activity of the respiratory center. Laser light may display activating or inhibitory influences, in some cases the bilateral symmetry of the activity of the respiratory center is affected indicating deep changes in the integrative mechanism of the functioning of the right and left sides of the hemispheres. The laser beam effect depends on many factors: specific light properties, duration of the exposure, repetition of exposures, initial functional state of the CNS, etc.

  6. Regulation of atrial natriuretic peptide receptors in the rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Saavedra, J.M.

    1987-06-01

    We have studied the localization, kinetics, and regulation of receptors for the circulating form of the atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP; 99-126) in the rat brain. Quantitative autoradiographic techniques and a /sup 125/I-labeled ligand, /sup 125/I-ANP (99-126), were employed. After in vitro autoradiography, quantification was achieved by computerized microdensitometry followed by comparison with /sup 125/I-standards. ANP receptors were discretely localized in the rat brain, with the highest concentrations in circumventricular organs, the choroid plexus, and selected hypothalamic nuclei involved in the production of the antidiuretic hormone vasopressin and in blood-pressure control. Spontaneously (genetic) hypertensive rats showed much lower numbers of ANP receptors than normotensive controls in the subfornical organ, the area postrema, the nucleus of the solitary tract, and the choroid plexus. These changes are in contrast to those observed for receptors of angiotensin II, another circulating peptide with actions opposite to those of ANP. Under conditions of acute dehydration after water deprivation, as well as under conditions of chronic dehydration such as those present in homozygous Brattleboro rats, there was an up-regulation of ANP receptors in the subfornical organ. Our results indicate that in the brain, circumventricular organs contain ANP receptors which could respond to variations in the concentration of circulating ANP. In addition, brain areas inside the blood-brain barrier contain ANP receptors probably related to the endogenous, central ANP system. The localization of ANP receptors and the alterations in their regulation present in genetically hypertensive rats and after dehydration indicate that brain ANP receptors are probably related to fluid regulation, including the secretion of vasopressin, and to cardiovascular function.

  7. Brain microsomal metabolism of phencyclidine in male and female rats.

    PubMed

    Laurenzana, E M; Owens, S M

    1997-05-01

    These studies examined the microsomal brain metabolism of phencyclidine (PCP) in male and female Sprague-Dawley rats. Several monohydroxylated metabolites of PCP were detected including cis- and trans-1-(1-phenyl-4-hydroxycyclohexyl)piperidine (c-PPC and t-PPC) and 1-(1-phenylcyclohexyl)-4-hydroxypiperidine (PCHP). The in vitro formation of these metabolites required NADPH and was inhibited by carbon monoxide. c-PPC was formed in the male and female brain microsomes at rates of 7.1 +/- 1.3 and 5.7 +/- 1.1 fmol/min per mg, respectively, while t-PPC was formed at rates of 16.2 +/- 3.3 and 16.5 +/- 4.2 fmol/min per mg. PCHP had the highest formation rate at 50.7 +/- 8.9 and 48.2 +/- 8.8 fmol/min per mg, respectively. Although previous studies with rat liver microsomes find higher levels of PCP metabolism in male rats and the formation of an irreversibly bound metabolite in male rats, the present study of brain metabolism found no sex differences in brain metabolism. The formation of PCP metabolites in male rat livers is at least partially mediated by the male-specific isozyme CYP2C11, and possibly CYP2D1. Nevertheless, the formation of the major brain metabolite, PCHP, was not inhibited by an anti-CYP2C11 or an anti-CYP2D6 antibody. However, PCHP formation was inhibited by drug inhibitors of CYP2D1-mediated metabolism, suggesting the involvement of a CYP2D isoform. These data indicate brain metabolism of PCP is significant, but unlike the liver it is not sexually dimorphic. PMID:9187340

  8. Differentiation in boron distribution in adult male and female rats' normal brain: a BNCT approach.

    PubMed

    Goodarzi, Samereh; Pazirandeh, Ali; Jameie, Seyed Behnamedin; Khojasteh, Nasrin Baghban

    2012-06-01

    Boron distribution in adult male and female rats' normal brain after boron carrier injection (0.005 g Boric Acid+0.005 g Borax+10 ml distilled water, pH: 7.4) was studied in this research. Coronal sections of control and trial animal tissue samples were irradiated with thermal neutrons. Using alpha autoradiography, significant differences in boron concentration were seen in forebrain, midbrain and hindbrain sections of male and female animal groups with the highest value, four hours after boron compound injection. PMID:22484141

  9. Brain damage following prophylactic cranial irradiation in lung cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Simó, Marta; Vaquero, Lucía; Ripollés, Pablo; Jové, Josep; Fuentes, Rafael; Cardenal, Felipe; Rodríguez-Fornells, Antoni; Bruna, Jordi

    2016-03-01

    Long-term toxic effects of prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) on cognition in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) patients have not yet been well-established. The aim of our study was to examine the cognitive toxic effects together with brain structural changes in a group of long-term SCLC survivors treated with PCI. Eleven SCLC patients, who underwent PCI ≥ 2 years before, were compared with an age and education matched healthy control group. Both groups were evaluated using a neuropsychological battery and multimodal structural magnetic resonance imaging. Voxel-based morphometry and Tract-based Spatial Statistics were used to study gray matter density (GMD) and white matter (WM) microstructural changes. Cognitive deterioration was correlated with GMD and Fractional Anisotropy (FA). Finally, we carried out a single-subject analysis in order to evaluate individual structural brain changes. Nearly half of the SCLC met criteria for cognitive impairment, all exhibiting a global worsening of cognitive functioning. Patients showed significant decreases of GMD in basal ganglia bilaterally (putamen and caudate), bilateral thalamus and right insula, together with WM microstructural changes of the entire corpus callosum. Cognitive deterioration scores correlated positively with mean FA values in the corpus callosum. Single-subject analysis revealed that GMD and WM changes were consistently observed in nearly all patients. This study showed neuropsychological deficits together with brain-specific structural differences in long-term SCLC survivors. Our results suggest that PCI therapy, possibly together with platinum-based chemotherapy, was associated to permanent long-term cognitive and structural brain effects in a SCLC population. PMID:26015269

  10. The Brain Metabolome of Male Rats across the Lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiaojiao; Chen, Tianlu; Zhao, Aihua; Wang, Xiaoyan; Xie, Guoxiang; Huang, Fengjie; Liu, Jiajian; Zhao, Qing; Wang, Shouli; Wang, Chongchong; Zhou, Mingmei; Panee, Jun; He, Zhigang; Jia, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Comprehensive and accurate characterization of brain metabolome is fundamental to brain science, but has been hindered by technical limitations. We profiled the brain metabolome in male Wistar rats at different ages (day 1 to week 111) using high-sensitivity and high-resolution mass spectrometry. Totally 380 metabolites were identified and 232 of them were quantitated. Compared with anatomical regions, age had a greater effect on variations in the brain metabolome. Lipids, fatty acids and amino acids accounted for the largest proportions of the brain metabolome, and their concentrations varied across the lifespan. The levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids were higher in infancy (week 1 to week 3) compared with later ages, and the ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acids increased in the aged brain (week 56 to week 111). Importantly, a panel of 20 bile acids were quantitatively measured, most of which have not previously been documented in the brain metabolome. This study extends the breadth of the mammalian brain metabolome as well as our knowledge of functional brain development, both of which are critically important to move the brain science forward. PMID:27063670

  11. Acetate Transport and Utilization in the Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Deelchand, Dinesh K.; Shestov, Alexander A.; Koski, Dee M.; Uğurbil, Kâmil; Henry, Pierre-Gilles

    2009-01-01

    Acetate, a glial-specific substrate, is an attractive alternative to glucose for the study of neuronal-glial interactions. The present study investigates the kinetics of acetate uptake and utilization in the rat brain in vivo during infusion of [2-13C]acetate using NMR spectroscopy. When plasma acetate concentration was increased, the rate of brain acetate utilization (CMRace) increased progressively and reached close to saturation for plasma acetate concentration > 2-3 mM, whereas brain acetate concentration continued to increase. The Michaelis-Menten constant for brain acetate utilization ( KMutil=0.01±0.14mM) was much smaller than for acetate transport through the blood-brain barrier ( KMt=4.18±0.83mM). The maximum transport capacity of acetate through the blood-brain barrier ( Vmaxt=0.96±0.18μmol/g/min) was nearly two-fold higher than the maximum rate of brain acetate utilization ( Vmaxutil=0.50±0.08μmol/g/min). We conclude that, under our experimental conditions, brain acetate utilization is saturated when plasma acetate concentrations increase above 2-3 mM. At such high plasma acetate concentration, the rate-limiting step for glial acetate metabolism is not the blood-brain barrier, but occurs after entry of acetate into the brain. PMID:19393008

  12. A Model for Assessing Cognitive Impairment after Fractionated Whole-Brain Irradiation in Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Mike E.; Bourland, J. Daniel; Cline, J. Mark; Wheeler, Kenneth T.; Deadwyler, Sam A.

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the effect of fractionated whole-brain irradiation on nonhuman primates, 6–9-year-old male rhesus monkeys were irradiated with 40 Gy delivered as two 5-Gy fractions/week for 4 weeks. Cognitive function was assessed 5 days/week for 4 months prior to fractionated whole-brain irradiation and for 11 months after irradiation using a Delayed-Match-to-Sample (DMS) task at both low and high cognitive loads. Local rates of cerebral glucose metabolism were measured prior to and 9 months after irradiation using [18F]-2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography. Low cognitive load trials did not reveal a significant reduction in performance until 7 months after irradiation; performance then declined progressively. In high cognitive load trials, the initial impairment was observed ~1 month after irradiation. This was followed by a transient recovery period over the next 1–2 months, after which performance declined progressively through 11 months after irradiation. Nine months after irradiation, glucose uptake during the DMS task was decreased in the cuneate and prefrontal cortex and was increased in the cerebellum and thalamus compared with the levels prior to irradiation. Results from this pilot study suggest that the radiation-induced changes in cognition and brain metabolism observed in rhesus monkeys may be similar to those observed in brain tumor patients receiving brain irradiation. PMID:21275607

  13. A model for assessing cognitive impairment after fractionated whole-brain irradiation in nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Mike E; Bourland, J Daniel; Cline, J Mark; Wheeler, Kenneth T; Deadwyler, Sam A

    2011-04-01

    To investigate the effect of fractionated whole-brain irradiation on nonhuman primates, 6-9-year-old male rhesus monkeys were irradiated with 40 Gy delivered as two 5-Gy fractions/week for 4 weeks. Cognitive function was assessed 5 days/week for 4 months prior to fractionated whole-brain irradiation and for 11 months after irradiation using a Delayed-Match-to-Sample (DMS) task at both low and high cognitive loads. Local rates of cerebral glucose metabolism were measured prior to and 9 months after irradiation using [(18)F]-2-deoxy-2-fluoro-d-glucose positron emission tomography. Low cognitive load trials did not reveal a significant reduction in performance until 7 months after irradiation; performance then declined progressively. In high cognitive load trials, the initial impairment was observed ∼1 month after irradiation. This was followed by a transient recovery period over the next 1-2 months, after which performance declined progressively through 11 months after irradiation. Nine months after irradiation, glucose uptake during the DMS task was decreased in the cuneate and prefrontal cortex and was increased in the cerebellum and thalamus compared with the levels prior to irradiation. Results from this pilot study suggest that the radiation-induced changes in cognition and brain metabolism observed in rhesus monkeys may be similar to those observed in brain tumor patients receiving brain irradiation. PMID:21275607

  14. Cytoprotective effect of prostaglandin E2 in irradiated rat ileum

    SciTech Connect

    Tomas-de la Vega, J.E.; Banner, B.F.; Hubbard, M.; Boston, D.L.; Thomas, C.W.; Straus, A.K.; Roseman, D.L.

    1984-01-01

    Radiation injury to the gastrointestinal tract is an infrequent but major clinical problem. Results of previous studies have shown that prostaglandins provide cytoprotection of the gastrointestinal mucosa against a variety of noxious agents, although, prior to this study, the protection against radiation exposure had not been documented. Exteriorized segment of Sprague-Dawley rat ileum was radiated with 10 and 15 Gy (/sup 137/Cs). One group of rats was pretreated with prostaglandin E2 one hour before and 24 hours after radiation injury. The rats were sacrificed three and five days following radiation injury. Morphometric measurement of mucosal thickness, villous height, crypt of Lieberkuehn height and number of mitoses per square millimeter swath of tissue were analyzed. Also, /sup 125/IUdR and /sup 3/HTdR were injected in a group of rats radiated with 15 Gy (/sup 137/Cs). /sup 125/IUdR counts per minute per milligram of dry weight and /sup 3/HTdR labeled cells were counted and analyzed. The morphometric measurements and radioactive labeled tissue counts suggest that prostaglandin E2 has a cytoprotective effect upon irradiated rat ileum. Speculations about the possible mechanism and usefulness of this observation are included.

  15. Busulfan Conditioning Enhances Engraftment of Hematopoietic Donor-derived Cells in the Brain Compared With Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Fiona L; Sergijenko, Ana; Langford-Smith, Kia J; Malinowska, Marcela; Wynn, Rob F; Bigger, Brian W

    2013-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy for neurological disorders relies on transmigration of donor-derived monocytes to the brain, where they can engraft as microglia and deliver therapeutic proteins. Many mouse studies use whole-body irradiation to investigate brain transmigration pathways, but chemotherapy is generally used clinically. The current evidence for transmigration to the brain after chemotherapy is conflicting. We compared hematopoietic donor cell brain engraftment after bone marrow (BM) transplants in busulfan- or irradiation-conditioned mice. Significantly more donor-derived microglial cells engrafted posttransplant in busulfan-conditioned brain compared with the irradiated, in both the short and long term. Although total Iba-1+ microglial content was increased in irradiated brain in the short term, it was similar between groups over long-term engraftment. MCP-1, a key regulator of monocyte transmigration, showed long-term elevation in busulfan-conditioned brain, whereas irradiated brains showed long-term elevation of the proinflammatory chemokine interleukin 1α (IL-1α), with increased in situ proliferation of resident microglia, and significant increases in the relative number of amoeboid activated microglia in the brain. This has implications for the choice of conditioning regimen to promote hematopoietic cell brain engraftment and the relevance of irradiation in mouse models of transplantation. PMID:23423338

  16. Waxholm Space atlas of the Sprague Dawley rat brain.

    PubMed

    Papp, Eszter A; Leergaard, Trygve B; Calabrese, Evan; Johnson, G Allan; Bjaalie, Jan G

    2014-08-15

    Three-dimensional digital brain atlases represent an important new generation of neuroinformatics tools for understanding complex brain anatomy, assigning location to experimental data, and planning of experiments. We have acquired a microscopic resolution isotropic MRI and DTI atlasing template for the Sprague Dawley rat brain with 39 μm isotropic voxels for the MRI volume and 78 μm isotropic voxels for the DTI. Building on this template, we have delineated 76 major anatomical structures in the brain. Delineation criteria are provided for each structure. We have applied a spatial reference system based on internal brain landmarks according to the Waxholm Space standard, previously developed for the mouse brain, and furthermore connected this spatial reference system to the widely used stereotaxic coordinate system by identifying cranial sutures and related stereotaxic landmarks in the template using contrast given by the active staining technique applied to the tissue. With the release of the present atlasing template and anatomical delineations, we provide a new tool for spatial orientation analysis of neuroanatomical location, and planning and guidance of experimental procedures in the rat brain. The use of Waxholm Space and related infrastructures will connect the atlas to interoperable resources and services for multi-level data integration and analysis across reference spaces. PMID:24726336

  17. EVALUATION OF PERFLUOROOCTANE SULFONATE IN THE RAT BRAIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorooctane Sulfonate (PFOS) is an environmentally persistent chemical that has been detected in humans and wildlife. PFOS is primarily distributed in liver and blood. The current study evaluated the level of PFOS in the adult and neonatal rat brain and determined whether t...

  18. Autoradiographic localization of relaxin binding sites in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Osheroff, P.L.; Phillips, H.S. )

    1991-08-01

    Relaxin is a member of the insulin family of polypeptide hormones and exerts its best understood actions in the mammalian reproductive system. Using a biologically active 32P-labeled human relaxin, the authors have previously shown by in vitro autoradiography specific relaxin binding sites in rat uterus, cervix, and brain tissues. Using the same approach, they describe here a detailed localization of human relaxin binding sites in the rat brain. Displaceable relaxin binding sites are distributed in discrete regions of the olfactory system, neocortex, hypothalamus, hippocampus, thalamus, amygdala, midbrain, and medulla of the male and female rat brain. Characterization of the relaxin binding sites in the subfornical organ and neocortex reveals a single class of high-affinity sites (Kd = 1.4 nM) in both regions. The binding of relaxin to two of the circumventricular organs (subfornical organ and organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis) and the neurosecretory magnocellular hypothalamic nuclei (i.e., paraventricular and supraoptic nuclei) provides the anatomical and biochemical basis for emerging physiological evidence suggesting a central role for relaxin in the control of blood pressure and hormone release. They conclude that specific, high-affinity relaxin binding sites are present in discrete regions of the rat brain and that the distribution of some of these sites may be consistent with a role for relaxin in control of vascular volume and blood pressure.

  19. EFFECTS OF CHLORINE DIOXIDE ON THE DEVELOPING RAT BRAIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Male and female Long-Evans rat pups, exposed to an oral dose of 14 mg chlorine dioxide C102)/kg/d (postnatal d 10), were examined for effects on brain development and for changes in thyroid activity. ody weight reductions were observed on postnatal (pn) d 11, 21, and 35. orebrain...

  20. Thyroid insufficiency in developing rat brain: A genomic analysis.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thyroid Insufficiency in the Developing Rat Brain: A Genomic Analysis. JE Royland and ME Gilbert, Neurotox. Div., U.S. EPA, RTP, NC, USA. Endocrine disruption (ED) is an area of major concern in environmental neurotoxicity. Severe deficits in thyroid hormone (TH) levels have bee...

  1. Corticotropin-releasing factor antagonist blocks microwave-induced decreases in high-affinity choline uptake in the rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, H.; Carino, M.A.; Horita, A.; Guy, A.W. )

    1990-10-01

    Acute (45-min) irradiation with pulsed low-level microwaves (2450-MHz, 2 microseconds pulses at 500 pps, average power density of 1 mW/cm2, whole-body average specific absorption rate of 0.6 W/kg) decreased sodium-dependent high-affinity choline uptake (HACU) activity in the frontal cortex and hippocampus of the rat. These effects were blocked by pretreating the animals before exposure with intracerebroventricular injection of the specific corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) receptor antagonist, alpha-helical-CRF9-41 (25 micrograms). Similar injection of the antagonist had no significant effect on HACU in the brain of the sham-exposed rats. These data suggest that low-level microwave irradiation activates CRF in the brain, which in turn causes the changes in central HACU.

  2. Inducible Gene Manipulations in Brain Serotonergic Neurons of Transgenic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tews, Björn; Bartsch, Dusan

    2011-01-01

    The serotonergic (5-HT) system has been implicated in various physiological processes and neuropsychiatric disorders, but in many aspects its role in normal and pathologic brain function is still unclear. One reason for this might be the lack of appropriate animal models which can address the complexity of physiological and pathophysiological 5-HT functioning. In this respect, rats offer many advantages over mice as they have been the animal of choice for sophisticated neurophysiological and behavioral studies. However, only recently technologies for the targeted and tissue specific modification of rat genes - a prerequisite for a detailed study of the 5-HT system - have been successfully developed. Here, we describe a rat transgenic system for inducible gene manipulations in 5-HT neurons. We generated a Cre driver line consisting of a tamoxifen-inducible CreERT2 recombinase under the control of mouse Tph2 regulatory sequences. Tissue-specific serotonergic Cre recombinase expression was detected in four transgenic TPH2-CreERT2 rat founder lines. For functional analysis of Cre-mediated recombination, we used a rat Cre reporter line (CAG-loxP.EGFP), in which EGFP is expressed after Cre-mediated removal of a loxP-flanked lacZ STOP cassette. We show an in-depth characterisation of this rat Cre reporter line and demonstrate its applicability for monitoring Cre-mediated recombination in all major neuronal subpopulations of the rat brain. Upon tamoxifen induction, double transgenic TPH2-CreERT2/CAG-loxP.EGFP rats show selective and efficient EGFP expression in 5-HT neurons. Without tamoxifen administration, EGFP is only expressed in few 5-HT neurons which confirms minimal background recombination. This 5-HT neuron specific CreERT2 line allows Cre-mediated, inducible gene deletion or gene overexpression in transgenic rats which provides new opportunities to decipher the complex functions of the mammalian serotonergic system. PMID:22140568

  3. Irradiation Alters MMP-2/TIMP-2 System and Collagen Type IV Degradation in Brain

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Won Hee; Warrington, Junie P.; Sonntag, William E.; Lee, Yong Woo

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: Blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption is one of the major consequences of radiation-induced normal tissue injury in the central nervous system. We examined the effects of whole-brain irradiation on matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)/tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) and extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation in the brain. Methods and Materials: Animals received either whole-brain irradiation (a single dose of 10 Gy {gamma}-rays or a fractionated dose of 40 Gy {gamma}-rays, total) or sham-irradiation and were maintained for 4, 8, and 24 h following irradiation. mRNA expression levels of MMPs and TIMPs in the brain were analyzed by real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The functional activity of MMPs was measured by in situ zymography, and degradation of ECM was visualized by collagen type IV immunofluorescent staining. Results: A significant increase in mRNA expression levels of MMP-2, MMP-9, and TIMP-1 was observed in irradiated brains compared to that in sham-irradiated controls. In situ zymography revealed a strong gelatinolytic activity in the brain 24 h postirradiation, and the enhanced gelatinolytic activity mediated by irradiation was significantly attenuated in the presence of anti-MMP-2 antibody. A significant reduction in collagen type IV immunoreactivity was also detected in the brain at 24 h after irradiation. In contrast, the levels of collagen type IV were not significantly changed at 4 and 8 h after irradiation compared with the sham-irradiated controls. Conclusions: The present study demonstrates for the first time that radiation induces an imbalance between MMP-2 and TIMP-2 levels and suggests that degradation of collagen type IV, a major ECM component of BBB basement membrane, may have a role in the pathogenesis of brain injury.

  4. Chronic Methamphetamine Effects on Brain Structure and Function in Rats.

    PubMed

    Thanos, Panayotis K; Kim, Ronald; Delis, Foteini; Ananth, Mala; Chachati, George; Rocco, Mark J; Masad, Ihssan; Muniz, Jose A; Grant, Samuel C; Gold, Mark S; Cadet, Jean Lud; Volkow, Nora D

    2016-01-01

    Methamphetamine (MA) addiction is a growing epidemic worldwide. Chronic MA use has been shown to lead to neurotoxicity in rodents and humans. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies in MA users have shown enlarged striatal volumes and positron emission tomography (PET) studies have shown decreased brain glucose metabolism (BGluM) in the striatum of detoxified MA users. The present study examines structural changes of the brain, observes microglial activation, and assesses changes in brain function, in response to chronic MA treatment. Rats were randomly split into three distinct treatment groups and treated daily for four months, via i.p. injection, with saline (controls), or low dose (LD) MA (4 mg/kg), or high dose (HD) MA (8 mg/kg). Sixteen weeks into the treatment period, rats were injected with a glucose analog, [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), and their brains were scanned with micro-PET to assess regional BGluM. At the end of MA treatment, magnetic resonance imaging at 21T was performed on perfused rats to determine regional brain volume and in vitro [3H]PK 11195 autoradiography was performed on fresh-frozen brain tissue to measure microglia activation. When compared with controls, chronic HD MA-treated rats had enlarged striatal volumes and increases in [3H]PK 11195 binding in striatum, the nucleus accumbens, frontal cortical areas, the rhinal cortices, and the cerebellar nuclei. FDG microPET imaging showed that LD MA-treated rats had higher BGluM in insular and somatosensory cortices, face sensory nucleus of the thalamus, and brainstem reticular formation, while HD MA-treated rats had higher BGluM in primary and higher order somatosensory and the retrosplenial cortices, compared with controls. HD and LD MA-treated rats had lower BGluM in the tail of the striatum, rhinal cortex, and subiculum and HD MA also had lower BGluM in hippocampus than controls. These results corroborate clinical findings and help further examine the mechanisms behind MA

  5. Chronic Methamphetamine Effects on Brain Structure and Function in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Thanos, Panayotis K.; Kim, Ronald; Delis, Foteini; Ananth, Mala; Chachati, George; Rocco, Mark J.; Masad, Ihssan; Muniz, Jose A.; Grant, Samuel C.; Gold, Mark S.; Cadet, Jean Lud; Volkow, Nora D.

    2016-01-01

    Methamphetamine (MA) addiction is a growing epidemic worldwide. Chronic MA use has been shown to lead to neurotoxicity in rodents and humans. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies in MA users have shown enlarged striatal volumes and positron emission tomography (PET) studies have shown decreased brain glucose metabolism (BGluM) in the striatum of detoxified MA users. The present study examines structural changes of the brain, observes microglial activation, and assesses changes in brain function, in response to chronic MA treatment. Rats were randomly split into three distinct treatment groups and treated daily for four months, via i.p. injection, with saline (controls), or low dose (LD) MA (4 mg/kg), or high dose (HD) MA (8 mg/kg). Sixteen weeks into the treatment period, rats were injected with a glucose analog, [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), and their brains were scanned with micro-PET to assess regional BGluM. At the end of MA treatment, magnetic resonance imaging at 21T was performed on perfused rats to determine regional brain volume and in vitro [3H]PK 11195 autoradiography was performed on fresh-frozen brain tissue to measure microglia activation. When compared with controls, chronic HD MA-treated rats had enlarged striatal volumes and increases in [3H]PK 11195 binding in striatum, the nucleus accumbens, frontal cortical areas, the rhinal cortices, and the cerebellar nuclei. FDG microPET imaging showed that LD MA-treated rats had higher BGluM in insular and somatosensory cortices, face sensory nucleus of the thalamus, and brainstem reticular formation, while HD MA-treated rats had higher BGluM in primary and higher order somatosensory and the retrosplenial cortices, compared with controls. HD and LD MA-treated rats had lower BGluM in the tail of the striatum, rhinal cortex, and subiculum and HD MA also had lower BGluM in hippocampus than controls. These results corroborate clinical findings and help further examine the mechanisms behind MA

  6. DNA methylation markers in the postnatal developing rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Rebecca K.; Stringfellow, Sara A.; Glover, Matthew E.; Wagle, Anjali A.; Clinton, Sarah M.

    2013-01-01

    In spite of intense interest in how altered epigenetic processes including DNA methylation may contribute to psychiatric and neurodevelopmental disorders, there is a limited understanding of how methylation processes change during early postnatal brain development. The present study used in situ hybridization to assess mRNA expression for the three major DNA methyltranserases (DNMTs) – DNMT1, DNMT3a and DNMT3b – in the developing rat brain at seven developmental timepoints: postnatal days (P) 1, 4, 7, 10, 14, 21, and 75. We also assessed 5-methylcytosine levels (an indicator of global DNA methylation) in selected brain regions during the first three postnatal weeks. DNMT1, DNMT3a and DNMT3b mRNAs are widely expressed throughout the adult and postnatal developing rat brain. Overall, DNMT mRNA levels reached their highest point in the first week of life and gradually decreased over the first three postnatal weeks within the hippocampus, amygdala, striatum, cingulate and lateral septum. Global DNA methylation levels did not follow this developmental pattern; methylation levels gradually increased over the first three postnatal weeks in the hippocampus, and remained stable in the developing amygdala and prefrontal cortex. Our results contribute to a growing understanding of how DNA methylation markers unfold in the developing brain, and highlight how these developmental processes may differ within distinct brain regions. PMID:23954679

  7. Developmental Vitamin D3 deficiency alters the adult rat brain.

    PubMed

    Féron, F; Burne, T H J; Brown, J; Smith, E; McGrath, J J; Mackay-Sim, A; Eyles, D W

    2005-03-15

    There is growing evidence that Vitamin D(3) (1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3)) is involved in brain development. We have recently shown that the brains of newborn rats from Vitamin D(3) deficient dams were larger than controls, had increased cell proliferation, larger lateral ventricles, and reduced cortical thickness. Brains from these animals also had reduced expression of nerve growth factor (NGF) and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor. The aim of the current study was to examine if there were any permanent outcomes into adulthood when the offspring of Vitamin D(3) deficient dams were restored to a normal diet. The brains of adult rats were examined at 10 weeks of age after Vitamin D(3) deficiency until birth or weaning. Compared to controls animals that were exposed to transient early Vitamin D(3) deficiency had larger lateral ventricles, reduced NGF protein content, and reduced expression of a number genes involved in neuronal structure, i.e. neurofilament or MAP-2 or neurotransmission, i.e. GABA-A(alpha4). We conclude that transient early life hypovitaminosis D(3) not only disrupts brain development but leads to persistent changes in the adult brain. In light of the high incidence of hypovitaminosis D(3) in women of child-bearing age, the public health implications of these findings warrant attention. PMID:15763180

  8. Proinflammatory effects of local abdominal irradiation on rat gastrointestinal tract

    SciTech Connect

    Buell, M.G.; Harding, R.K.

    1989-03-01

    Although the role of inflammatory processes in the genesis of late changes in the gastrointestinal tract following exposure to ionizing irradiation has been extensively studied, few studies have concentrated on the presence of an acute inflammatory response in the period immediately following radiation. We therefore examined, in rats, whether the local application of 10 Gy cobalt-60 irradiation to the abdomen led to changes in the gut within the first 24 hr that were consistent with an acute inflammatory response. In stomach, small intestine, and colon, local irradiation led to a significant increase in the accumulation of plasma within the tissue by 4-8 hr following irradiation. This increase in tissue plasma volume, indicative of an increased microvascular permeability, was then sustained until the end of the 24-hr assessment period in all tissues examined. Concurrent with this was a consistent transient increase in tissue red blood cell volume, suggestive of vasodilation. Of particular note, a significant increase in the number of mucosal neutrophils was also observed between 2 and 12 hr following irradiation. This elevation in mucosal neutrophils was particularly marked in the pericryptal or deep mucosal regions of small intestine and colon and consistently preceded the vasodilation and enhanced permeability. Furthermore these pathophysiological alterations occurred at a time when histological changes in the mucosa consistent with an impaired mucosal microcirculation (ie, edema of the lamina propria and subepithelial bleb formation) were present. These results support the hypothesis that an inflammatory response occurs in the gut during the first 24 hr following abdominal irradiation. Such changes may then further exacerbate the damage initiated by the ionizing radiation.

  9. Correlation between subacute sensorimotor deficits and brain water content after surgical brain injury in rats.

    PubMed

    McBride, Devin W; Wang, Yuechun; Sherchan, Prativa; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H

    2015-09-01

    Brain edema is a major contributor to poor outcome and reduced quality of life after surgical brain injury (SBI). Although SBI pathophysiology is well-known, the correlation between cerebral edema and neurological deficits has not been thoroughly examined in the rat model of SBI. Thus, the purpose of this study was to determine the correlation between brain edema and deficits in standard sensorimotor neurobehavior tests for rats subjected to SBI. Sixty male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to either sham surgery or surgical brain injury via partial frontal lobectomy. All animals were tested for neurological deficits 24 post-SBI and fourteen were also tested 72 h after surgery using seven common behavior tests: modified Garcia neuroscore (Neuroscore), beam walking, corner turn test, forelimb placement test, adhesive removal test, beam balance test, and foot fault test. After assessing the functional outcome, animals were euthanized for brain water content measurement. Surgical brain injury resulted in significantly elevated frontal lobe brain water content 24 and 72 h after surgery compared to that of sham animals. In all behavior tests, significance was observed between sham and SBI animals. However, a correlation between brain water content and functional outcome was observed for all tests except Neuroscore. The selection of behavior tests is critical to determine the effectiveness of therapeutics. Based on this study's results, we recommend using beam walking, the corner turn test, the beam balance test, and the foot fault test since correlations with brain water content were observed at both 24 and 72 h post-SBI. PMID:25975171

  10. Alcohol induced changes in phosphoinositide signaling system in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, S.; Piano, M.; Schwertz, D.; Davis, J.; Pandey, G. )

    1991-03-11

    Agonist-induced phosphoinositide break down functions as a signal generating system in a manner similar to the C-AMP system. In order to examine if the changes produced by chronic ethanol treatment on membrane lipid composition and metabolism effect the cellular functions of the neuron, the authors have examined the effect of chronic ethanol exposure on norepinephrine (NE) serotonin (5HT) and calcium ionophore (CI) stimulated phosphoinositide (PI) hydrolysis in rat cortical slices. Rats were maintained on liber-decarli diet alcohol and control liquid diet containing isocaloric sucrose substitute for two months. They were then sacrificed and brain was removed for determination of PI turnover. 5HT stimulated {sup 3}H- inositol monophosphate ({sup 3}H-IPI) formation was significantly lower in the cortex of alcohol treated rats as compared to control rats. However, neither CI nor NE stimulated IP1 formation was significantly different from control rats. The results thus indicate that chronic exposure to ethanol decreases 5HT induced PI breakdown in rat cortex. In order to examine if this decrease is related to a decrease in 5HT2 receptors, or decreased in coupling of receptor to the effector pathway, the authors are currently determining the number and affinity of 5HT2 receptors in alcohol treated rats.

  11. Abdominal surgery activates nesfatin-1 immunoreactive brain nuclei in rats.

    PubMed

    Stengel, Andreas; Goebel, Miriam; Wang, Lixin; Taché, Yvette

    2010-02-01

    Abdominal surgery-induced postoperative gastric ileus is well established to induce Fos expression in specific brain nuclei in rats within 2-h after surgery. However, the phenotype of activated neurons has not been thoroughly characterized. Nesfatin-1 was recently discovered in the rat hypothalamus as a new anorexigenic peptide that also inhibits gastric emptying and is widely distributed in rat brain autonomic nuclei suggesting an involvement in stress responses. Therefore, we investigated whether abdominal surgery activates nesfatin-1-immunoreactive (ir) neurons in the rat brain. Two hours after abdominal surgery with cecal palpation under short isoflurane anesthesia or anesthesia alone, rats were transcardially perfused and brains processed for double immunohistochemical labeling of Fos and nesfatin-1. Abdominal surgery, compared to anesthesia alone, induced Fos expression in neurons of the supraoptic nucleus (SON), paraventricular nucleus (PVN), locus coeruleus (LC), Edinger-Westphal nucleus (EW), rostral raphe pallidus (rRPa), nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) and ventrolateral medulla (VLM). Double Fos/nesfatin-1 labeling showed that of the activated cells, 99% were nesfatin-1-immunoreactive in the SON, 91% in the LC, 82% in the rRPa, 74% in the EW and VLM, 71% in the anterior parvicellular PVN, 47% in the lateral magnocellular PVN, 41% in the medial magnocellular PVN, 14% in the NTS and 9% in the medial parvicellular PVN. These data established nesfatin-1 immunoreactive neurons in specific nuclei of the hypothalamus and brainstem as part of the neuronal response to abdominal surgery and suggest a possible implication of nesfatin-1 in the alterations of food intake and gastric transit associated with such a stressor. PMID:19944727

  12. Human and rat brain lipofuscin proteome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The accumulation of an autofluorescent pigment called lipofuscin in neurons is an invariable hallmark of brain aging. So far, this material has been considered to be waste material without particular relevance for cellular pathology. However, two lines of evidence argue that lipofuscin may have yet ...

  13. Preserved Modular Network Organization in the Sedated Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Bruns, Andreas; Künnecke, Basil; von Kienlin, Markus; Van der Linden, Annemie; Mueggler, Thomas; Verhoye, Marleen

    2014-01-01

    Translation of resting-state functional connectivity (FC) magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) applications from human to rodents has experienced growing interest, and bears a great potential in pre-clinical imaging as it enables assessing non-invasively the topological organization of complex FC networks (FCNs) in rodent models under normal and various pathophysiological conditions. However, to date, little is known about the organizational architecture of FCNs in rodents in a mentally healthy state, although an understanding of the same is of paramount importance before investigating networks under compromised states. In this study, we characterized the properties of resting-state FCN in an extensive number of Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 40) under medetomidine sedation by evaluating its modular organization and centrality of brain regions and tested for reproducibility. Fully-connected large-scale complex networks of positively and negatively weighted connections were constructed based on Pearson partial correlation analysis between the time courses of 36 brain regions encompassing almost the entire brain. Applying recently proposed complex network analysis measures, we show that the rat FCN exhibits a modular architecture, comprising six modules with a high between subject reproducibility. In addition, we identified network hubs with strong connections to diverse brain regions. Overall our results obtained under a straight medetomidine protocol show for the first time that the community structure of the rat brain is preserved under pharmacologically induced sedation with a network modularity contrasting from the one reported for deep anesthesia but closely resembles the organization described for the rat in conscious state. PMID:25181007

  14. Effect of acute thioacetamide administration on rat brain phospholipid metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Osada, J.; Aylagas, H.; Miro-Obradors, M.J.; Arce, C.; Palacios-Alaiz, E.; Cascales, M. )

    1990-09-01

    Brain phospholipid composition and the ({sup 32}P)orthophosphate incorporation into brain phospholipids of control and rats treated for 3 days with thioacetamide were studied. Brain phospholipid content, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, lysolecithin and phosphatidic acid did not show any significant change by the effect of thioacetamide. In contrast, thioacetamide induced a significant decrease in the levels of phosphatidylserine, sphingomyelin, phosphatidylinositol and diphosphatidylglycerol. After 75 minutes of intraperitoneal label injection, specific radioactivity of all the above phospholipids with the exception of phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylcholine significantly increased. After 13 hours of isotope administration the specific radioactivity of almost all studied phospholipid classes was elevated, except for phosphatidic acid, the specific radioactivity of which did not change and for diphosphatidylglycerol which showed a decrease in specific radioactivity. These results suggest that under thioacetamide treatment brain phospholipids undergo metabolic transformations that may contribute to the hepatic encephalopathy induced by thioacetamide.

  15. Determination of boron distribution in rat's brain, kidney and liver.

    PubMed

    Pazirandeh, Ali; Jameie, Behnam; Zargar, Maysam

    2009-07-01

    To determine relative boron distribution in rat's brain, liver and kidney, a mixture of boric acid and borax, was used. After transcardial injection of the solution, the animals were sacrificed and the brain, kidney and liver were removed. The coronal sections of certain areas of the brain were prepared by freezing microtome. The slices were sandwiched within two pieces of CR-39. The samples were bombarded in a thermal neutron field of the TRR pneumatic facility. The alpha tracks are registered on CR-39 after being etched in NaOH. The boron distribution was determined by counting these alpha tracks CR-39 plastics. The distribution showed non-uniformity in brain, liver and kidney. PMID:19375929

  16. Analysis of pralidoxime in serum, brain and CSF of rats.

    PubMed

    Kalász, Huba; Szöko, Eva; Tábi, Tamás; Petroianu, Georg A; Lorke, Dietrich E; Omar, Abdulrab; Alafifi, Salem; Jasem, Almerri; Tekes, Kornélia

    2009-05-01

    After administration of various amounts of pralidoxime to rats, the levels in serum, brain and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were measured using capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE). The calibration curves were established using spiked samples. The calibration covers the ranges from 0.3 - 200 microg/mL, 0.3 - 7 microg/mL and 0.1 - 7 microg/mL for serum, brain and CSF, respectively. The CZE measurement opens the way to the fast and reliable determination of pyridinium aldoxime concentrations in serum, cerebrospinal fluid and brain, thereby monitoring blood-brain and blood-CSF penetration of pyridinium aldoxime-type antidotes clinically used in organophosphate poisoning. PMID:19442213

  17. Increase of 5-hydroxytryptamine in the rat brain by raunescine

    PubMed Central

    Paasonen, M. K.; Kärki, N. T.

    1959-01-01

    The Rauwolfia alkaloid raunescine (5 mg./kg., intraperitoneally) increased the concentration of 5-hydroxytryptamine in the brains of rats after iproniazid pre-treatment. This was evident 3 to 4 hr. after raunescine administration. There was no general increase in the noradrenaline content of the brains. In the intestine, raunescine depleted the 5-hydroxytryptamine content by about 50% within 3 to 4 hr. if the animals had been pre-treated with iproniazid. Iproniazid did not increase the content of noradrenaline in the intestine. PMID:13662567

  18. Spectral and lifetime domain measurements of rat brain tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abi Haidar, D.; Leh, B.; Allaoua, K.; Genoux, A.; Siebert, R.; Steffenhagen, M.; Peyrot, D.; Sandeau, N.; Vever-Bizet, C.; Bourg-Heckly, G.; Chebbi, I.; Collado-Hilly, M.

    2012-02-01

    During glioblastoma surgery, delineation of the brain tumour margins remains difficult especially since infiltrated and normal tissues have the same visual appearance. This problematic constitutes our research interest. We developed a fibre-optical fluorescence probe for spectroscopic and time domain measurements. First measurements of endogenous tissue fluorescence were performed on fresh and fixed rat tumour brain slices. Spectral characteristics, fluorescence redox ratios and fluorescence lifetime measurements were analysed. Fluorescence information collected from both, lifetime and spectroscopic experiments, appeared promising for tumour tissue discrimination. Two photon measurements were performed on the same fixed tissue. Different wavelengths are used to acquire two-photon excitation-fluorescence of tumorous and healthy sites.

  19. MR assessment of radiation-induced blood-brain barrier permeability changes in a rat glioma model

    SciTech Connect

    Krueck, W.G. Univ. of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA ); Schmiedl, U.P.; Maravilla, K.R.; Starr, F.L.; Kenney, J. )

    1994-04-01

    To assess the potential of a T1-weighted, gadolinium-enhanced MR technique for quantifying radiation-induced changes of blood-brain barrier permeability in a model of stereotactically implanted intracerebral gliomas in rats. We calculated the gadolinium blood-to-tissue transport coefficient for gadopentetate dimeglumine from signal intensities in sequential MR images in nine control animals that were not irradiated and in five and three animals that had received 2500 cGy and 1500 cGy whole-brain irradiation, respectively, at 2 days before imaging. The average blood-to-tissue transport coefficient values were 9.76 mL[center dot]kg[sup [minus]1][center dot]min[sup [minus]1] in the control group, 23.41 mL[center dot]kg[sup [minus]1][center dot]min[sup [minus]1] in the 2500-cGy group, and 25.63 mL[center dot]kg[sup [minus]1][center dot]min[sup [minus]1] in the 1500-cGy group. Blood-to-tissue transport coefficients were significantly higher after irradiation, indicating increased radiation-induced blood-brain barrier permeability. Similar increased blood-brain barrier leakiness in brain tumors after high-dose irradiation has been shown by previous nuclear medicine studies using quantitative autoradiography. Contrast-enhanced dynamic MR of brain gliomas is a sensitive method to document radiation-induced blood-brain barrier breakdown. Quantitative gadolinium-enhanced MR may become a useful tool for the management of patients with brain tumors undergoing radiation therapy. 28 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Brain and behavioral perturbations in rats following Western diet access.

    PubMed

    Hargrave, Sara L; Davidson, Terry L; Lee, Tien-Jui; Kinzig, Kimberly P

    2015-10-01

    Energy dense "Western" diets (WD) are known to cause obesity as well as learning and memory impairments, blood-brain barrier damage, and psychological disturbances. Impaired glucose (GLUT1) and monocarboxylate (MCT1) transport may play a role in diet-induced dementia development. In contrast, ketogenic diets (KD) have been shown to be neuroprotective. We assessed the effect of 10, 40 and 90 days WD, KD and Chow maintenance on spontaneous alternation (SA) and vicarious trial and error (VTE) behaviors in male rats, then analyzed blood glucose, insulin, and ketone levels; and hippocampal GLUT1 and MCT1 mRNA. Compared to Chow and KD, rats fed WD had increased 90 day insulin levels. SA was decreased in WD rats at 10, but not 40 or 90 days. VTE was perturbed in WD-fed rats, particularly at 10 and 90 days, indicating hippocampal deficits. WD rats had lower hippocampal GLUT1 and MCT1 expression compared to Chow and KD, and KD rats had increased 90 day MCT1 expression compared to Chow and WD. These data suggest that WD reduces glucose and monocarboxylate transport at the hippocampus, which may result in learning and memory deficits. Further, KD consumption may be useful for MCT1 transporter recovery, which may benefit cognition. PMID:25862980

  1. Oxidative changes in brain of aniline-exposed rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kakkar, P.; Awasthi, S.; Viswanathan, P.N. )

    1992-10-01

    Oxidative stress in rat cerebellum, cortex and brain stem after a short-term high-dose exposure to aniline vapors under conditions akin to those after major chemical accidents, was studied. Significant increases in superoxide dismutase isozyme activities and formation of thiobarbituric acid reactive material along with depletion of ascorbic acid and non-protein sulfhydryl content suggest impairment of antioxidant defenses 24 h after single exposure to 15,302 ppm aniline vapors for 10 min.

  2. [Effect of phenibut on interhemispheric transmission in the rat brain].

    PubMed

    Borodkina, L E; Molodavkin, G M; Tiurenkov, I N

    2009-01-01

    Effects of the nootropic drug phenibut on the transcallosal potential amplitude in the sensomotor brain cortex have been studied in rats. It is established that a single administration of phenibut in a dose of 25 mg/kg (i.p.) increases the transcallosal response amplitude, thus improving the interhemispheric transmission. This effect, being an objective evidence of the nootrope activity, confirms the drug status and corroborates the positive action of phenibut on the learning and memory processes. PMID:19334513

  3. Identification of rat brain opioid (enkephalin) receptor by photoaffinity labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Yeung, C.W.

    1986-01-01

    A photoreactive, radioactive enkephalin derivative was prepared and purified by high performance liquid chromatography. Rat brain and spinal cord plasma membranes were incubated with this radioiodinated photoprobe and were subsequently photolysed. Autoradiography of the sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis of the solubilized and reduced membranes showed that a protein having an apparent molecular weight of 46,000 daltons was specifically labeled, suggesting that this protein may be the opioid (enkephalin) receptor.

  4. Multiple opiate receptors in the brain of spontaneously hypertensive rats

    SciTech Connect

    Das, S.; Bhargava, H.N.

    1986-03-01

    The characteristics of ..mu.., delta and kappa -opiate receptors in the brain of spontaneously hypertensive (SH) and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats were determined using the receptor binding assays. The ligands used were /sup 3/H-naltrexone (..mu..), /sup 3/H-ethylketocyclazocine (EKC, kappa) and /sup 3/H-Tyr-D-Ser-Gly-Phe-Leu-Thr (DSTLE, delta). Since EKC binds to ..mu.. and delta receptors in addition to kappa, the binding was done in the presence of 100 nM each of DAGO and DADLE to suppress ..mu.. and delta sites, respectively. All three ligands bound to brain membranes of WKY rats at a single high affinity site with the following B/sub max/ (fmol/mg protein) and K/sub d/ (nM) values: /sup 3/H-naltrexone (130.5; 0.43) /sup 3/H-EKC (19.8, 1.7) and /sup 3/H-DSTLE (139, 2.5). The binding of /sup 3/H-naltrexone and /sup 3/H-DSTLE in the brain of WKY and SH did not differ. A consistent increase (22%) in B/sub max/ of /sup 3/H-EKC was found in SHR compared to WKY rats. However, the K/sub d/ values did not differ. The increase in B/sub max/ was due to increases in hypothalamus and cortex. It is concluded that SH rats have higher density of kappa-opiate receptors, particularly in hypothalamus and cortex, compared to WKY rats, and that kappa-opiate receptors may be involved in the pathophysiology of hypertension.

  5. Elevation of serum 25-hydroxycalciferol levels in androgen-treated and ultraviolet-irradiated rats.

    PubMed

    Ohata, M; Sakagami, Y; Fujita, T

    1977-10-01

    Administration of 4-8 mg testosterone propionate significantly raised 25-hydroxycalciferol levels in the ultraviolet irradiated rats compared to the ultraviolet irradiated controls, but failed to influence serum 25-hydroxycalciferol levels in the non-irradiated animals. Estradiol benzoate and progesterone did not influence serum 25-hydroxycalciferol levels regardless of the ultraviolet irradiation. These findings implicate that testosterone enhances vitamin D biosynthesis induced by ultraviolet irradiation in rats, in accordance with the clinical observation that males often show higher levels of serum 25-hydroxycalciferol than females. PMID:303993

  6. Gelation and fodrin purification from rat brain extracts.

    PubMed

    Levilliers, N; Péron-Renner, M; Coffe, G; Pudles, J

    1986-06-01

    Extracts from rat brain tissue have been shown to give rise to a gel which exhibits the following features. It is mainly enriched in actin and in a high-molecular-weight protein with polypeptide chains of 235 and 240 kDa, which we identified as fodrin. Tubulin is also a major component of the gel but it appears to be trapped non-specifically during the gelation process. Gelation is pH-, ionic strength- and Ca2+-concentration-dependent, and is optimal under the conditions which promote the interaction between polymerized actin and fodrin. In a similar way to that described for the purification of rat brain actin (Levilliers, N., Péron-Renner, M., Coffe, G. and Pudles, J. (1984) Biochimie 66, 531-537), we used the gelation system as a selective means of recovering fodrin from the mixture of a low-ionic-strength extract from whole rat brain and a high-ionic-strength extract of the particulate fraction. From this gel, fodrin was purified with a good yield by a simple procedure involving gel dissociation in 0.5 M KCl and depolymerization in 0.7 M KI, Bio-Gel A-15m chromatography, followed by ammonium sulfate precipitation. PMID:3707993

  7. Ketone-body utilization by homogenates of adult rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes-Cardozo, M.; Klein, W.

    1982-06-01

    The regulation of ketone-body metabolism and the quantitative importance of ketone bodies as lipid precursors in adult rat brain has been studied in vitro. Utilization of ketone bodies and of pyruvate by homogenates of adult rat brain was measured and the distribution of /sup 14/C from (3-/sup 14/C)ketone bodies among the metabolic products was analysed. The rate of ketone-body utilization was maximal in the presence of added Krebs-cycle intermediates and uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation. The consumption of acetoacetate was faster than that of D-3-hydroxybutyrate, whereas, pyruvate produced twice as much acetyl-CoA as acetoacetate under optimal conditions. Millimolar concentrations of ATP in the presence of uncoupler lowered the consumption of ketone bodies but not of pyruvate. Indirect evidence is presented suggesting that ATP interferes specifically with the mitochondrial uptake of ketone bodies. Interconversion of ketone bodies and the accumulation of acid-soluble intermediates (mainly citrate and glutamate) accounted for the major part of ketone-body utilization, whereas only a small part was oxidized to CO/sub 2/. Ketone bodies were not incorporated into lipids or protein. We conclude that adult rat-brain homogenates use ketone bodies exclusively for oxidative purposes.

  8. Astaxanthin reduces ischemic brain injury in adult rats

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hui; Kuo, Chi-Chung; Chou, Jenny; Delvolve, Alice; Jackson, Shelley N.; Post, Jeremy; Woods, Amina S.; Hoffer, Barry J.; Wang, Yun; Harvey, Brandon K.

    2009-01-01

    Astaxanthin (ATX) is a dietary carotenoid of crustaceans and fish that contributes to their coloration. Dietary ATX is important for development and survival of salmonids and crustaceans and has been shown to reduce cardiac ischemic injury in rodents. The purpose of this study was to examine whether ATX can protect against ischemic injury in the mammalian brain. Adult rats were injected intracerebroventricularly with ATX or vehicle prior to a 60-min middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo). ATX was present in the infarction area at 70-75 min after onset of MCAo. Treatment with ATX, compared to vehicle, increased locomotor activity in stroke rats and reduced cerebral infarction at 2 d after MCAo. To evaluate the protective mechanisms of ATX against stroke, brain tissues were assayed for free radical damage, apoptosis, and excitoxicity. ATX antagonized ischemia-mediated loss of aconitase activity and reduced glutamate release, lipid peroxidation, translocation of cytochrome c, and TUNEL labeling in the ischemic cortex. ATX did not alter physiological parameters, such as body temperature, brain temperature, cerebral blood flow, blood gases, blood pressure, and pH. Collectively, our data suggest that ATX can reduce ischemia-related injury in brain tissue through the inhibition of oxidative stress, reduction of glutamate release, and antiapoptosis. ATX may be clinically useful for patients vulnerable or prone to ischemic events.—Shen, H., Kuo, C.-C., Chou, J., Delvolve, A., Jackson, S. N., Post, J., Woods, A. S., Hoffer, B. J., Wang, Y., Harvey, B. K. Astaxanthin reduces ischemic brain injury in adult rats. PMID:19218497

  9. Outer brain barriers in rat and human development

    PubMed Central

    Brøchner, Christian B.; Holst, Camilla B.; Møllgård, Kjeld

    2015-01-01

    Complex barriers at the brain's surface, particularly in development, are poorly defined. In the adult, arachnoid blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier separates the fenestrated dural vessels from the CSF by means of a cell layer joined by tight junctions. Outer CSF-brain barrier provides diffusion restriction between brain and subarachnoid CSF through an initial radial glial end feet layer covered with a pial surface layer. To further characterize these interfaces we examined embryonic rat brains from E10 to P0 and forebrains from human embryos and fetuses (6–21st weeks post-conception) and adults using immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy. Antibodies against claudin-11, BLBP, collagen 1, SSEA-4, MAP2, YKL-40, and its receptor IL-13Rα2 and EAAT1 were used to describe morphological characteristics and functional aspects of the outer brain barriers. Claudin-11 was a reliable marker of the arachnoid blood-CSF barrier. Collagen 1 delineated the subarachnoid space and stained pial surface layer. BLBP defined radial glial end feet layer and SSEA-4 and YKL-40 were present in both leptomeningeal cells and end feet layer, which transformed into glial limitans. IL-13Rα2 and EAAT1 were present in the end feet layer illustrating transporter/receptor presence in the outer CSF-brain barrier. MAP2 immunostaining in adult brain outlined the lower border of glia limitans; remnants of end feet were YKL-40 positive in some areas. We propose that outer brain barriers are composed of at least 3 interfaces: blood-CSF barrier across arachnoid barrier cell layer, blood-CSF barrier across pial microvessels, and outer CSF-brain barrier comprising glial end feet layer/pial surface layer. PMID:25852456

  10. Magnetic micelles for DNA delivery to rat brains after mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Das, Mahasweta; Wang, Chunyan; Bedi, Raminder; Mohapatra, Shyam S; Mohapatra, Subhra

    2014-10-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) causes significant mortality, long term disability and psychological symptoms. Gene therapy is a promising approach for treatment of different pathological conditions. Here we tested chitosan and polyethyleneimine (PEI)-coated magnetic micelles (CP-mag micelles or CPMMs), a potential MRI contrast agent, to deliver a reporter DNA to the brain after mild TBI (mTBI). CPMM-tomato plasmid (ptd) conjugate expressing a red-fluorescent protein (RFP) was administered intranasally immediately after mTBI or sham surgery in male SD rats. Evans blue extravasation following mTBI suggested CPMM-ptd entry into the brain via the compromised blood-brain barrier. Magnetofection increased the concentration of CPMMs in the brain. RFP expression was observed in the brain (cortex and hippocampus), lung and liver 48 h after mTBI. CPMM did not evoke any inflammatory response by themselves and were excreted from the body. These results indicate the possibility of using intranasally administered CPMM as a theranostic vehicle for mTBI. From the clinical editor: In this study, chitosan and PEI-coated magnetic micelles (CPMM) were demonstrated as potentially useful vehicles in traumatic brain injury in a rodent model. Magnetofection increased the concentration of CPMMs in the brain and, after intranasal delivery, CPMM did not evoke any inflammatory response and were excreted from the body. PMID:24486465

  11. Deferoxamine attenuates acute hydrocephalus after traumatic brain injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jinbing; Chen, Zhi; Xi, Guohua; Keep, Richard F.; Hua, Ya

    2014-01-01

    Acute post-traumatic ventricular dilation and hydrocephalus are relatively frequent consequences of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Several recent studies have indicated that high iron level in brain may relate to hydrocephalus development after intracranial hemorrhage. However, the role of iron in the development of post-traumatic hydrocephalus is still unclear. This study was to determine whether or not iron has a role in hydrocephalus development after TBI. TBI was induced by lateral fluid-percussion in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Some rats had intraventricular injection of iron. Acute hydrocephalus was measured by magnetic resonance T2-weighted imaging and brain hemorrhage was determined by T2* gradient-echo sequence imaging and brain hemoglobin levels. The effect of deferoxamine on TBI-induced hydrocephalus was examined. TBI resulted in acute hydrocephalus at 24 hours (lateral ventricle volume: 24.1±3.0 vs. 9.9±0.2 mm3 in sham group). Intraventricular injection of iron also caused hydrocephalus (25.7 ± 3.4 vs. 9.0 ± 0.6 mm3 in saline group). Deferoxamine treatment attenuated TBI-induced hydrocephalus and heme oxygenase-1 upregulation. In conclusion, iron may contribute to acute hydrocephalus after TBI. PMID:24935175

  12. Astaxanthin reduces ischemic brain injury in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hui; Kuo, Chi-Chung; Chou, Jenny; Delvolve, Alice; Jackson, Shelley N; Post, Jeremy; Woods, Amina S; Hoffer, Barry J; Wang, Yun; Harvey, Brandon K

    2009-06-01

    Astaxanthin (ATX) is a dietary carotenoid of crustaceans and fish that contributes to their coloration. Dietary ATX is important for development and survival of salmonids and crustaceans and has been shown to reduce cardiac ischemic injury in rodents. The purpose of this study was to examine whether ATX can protect against ischemic injury in the mammalian brain. Adult rats were injected intracerebroventricularly with ATX or vehicle prior to a 60-min middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo). ATX was present in the infarction area at 70-75 min after onset of MCAo. Treatment with ATX, compared to vehicle, increased locomotor activity in stroke rats and reduced cerebral infarction at 2 d after MCAo. To evaluate the protective mechanisms of ATX against stroke, brain tissues were assayed for free radical damage, apoptosis, and excitoxicity. ATX antagonized ischemia-mediated loss of aconitase activity and reduced glutamate release, lipid peroxidation, translocation of cytochrome c, and TUNEL labeling in the ischemic cortex. ATX did not alter physiological parameters, such as body temperature, brain temperature, cerebral blood flow, blood gases, blood pressure, and pH. Collectively, our data suggest that ATX can reduce ischemia-related injury in brain tissue through the inhibition of oxidative stress, reduction of glutamate release, and antiapoptosis. ATX may be clinically useful for patients vulnerable or prone to ischemic events. PMID:19218497

  13. Photoacoustic imaging for transvascular drug delivery to the rat brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Ryota; Sato, Shunichi; Tsunoi, Yasuyuki; Kawauchi, Satoko; Takemura, Toshiya; Terakawa, Mitsuhiro

    2015-03-01

    Transvascular drug delivery to the brain is difficult due to the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Thus, various methods for safely opening the BBB have been investigated, for which real-time imaging methods are desired both for the blood vessels and distribution of a drug. Photoacoustic (PA) imaging, which enables depth-resolved visualization of chromophores in tissue, would be useful for this purpose. In this study, we performed in vivo PA imaging of the blood vessels and distribution of a drug in the rat brain by using an originally developed compact PA imaging system with fiber-based illumination. As a test drug, Evans blue (EB) was injected to the tail vein, and a photomechanical wave was applied to the targeted brain tissue to increase the permeability of the blood vessel walls. For PA imaging of blood vessels and EB distribution, nanosecond pulses at 532 nm and 670 nm were used, respectively. We clearly visualized blood vessels with diameters larger than 50 μm and the distribution of EB in the brain, showing spatiotemporal characteristics of EB that was transvascularly delivered to the target tissue in the brain.

  14. Localized dose delivering by ion beam irradiation for experimental trial of establishing brain necrosis model.

    PubMed

    Takata, Takushi; Kondo, Natsuko; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Tanaka, Hiroki; Hasegawa, Takashi; Kume, Kyo; Suzuki, Minoru

    2015-11-01

    Localized dose delivery techniques to establish a brain radiation necrosis model are described. An irradiation field was designed by using accelerated protons or helium ions with a spread-out Bragg peak. Measurement of the designed field confirmed that a high dose can be confined to a local volume of an animal brain. The irradiation techniques described here are very useful for establishing a necrosis model without existence of extraneous complications. PMID:26454176

  15. Detecting Behavioral Deficits Post Traumatic Brain Injury in Rats.

    PubMed

    Awwad, Hibah O

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI), ranging from mild to severe, almost always elicits an array of behavioral deficits in injured subjects. Some of these TBI-induced behavioral deficits include cognitive and vestibulomotor deficits as well as anxiety and other consequences. Rodent models of TBI have been (and still are) fundamental in establishing many of the pathophysiological mechanisms of TBI. Animal models are also utilized in screening and testing pharmacological effects of potential therapeutic agents for brain injury treatment. This chapter details validated protocols for each of these behavioral deficits post traumatic brain injury in Sprague-Dawley male rats. The elevated plus maze (EPM) protocol is described for assessing anxiety-like behavior; the Morris water maze protocol for assessing cognitive deficits in learning memory and spatial working memory and the rotarod test for assessing vestibulomotor deficits. PMID:27604739

  16. Royal jelly modulates oxidative stress and tissue injury in gamma irradiated male Wister Albino rats

    PubMed Central

    Azab, Khaled Shaaban; Bashandy, Mohamed; Salem, Mahmoud; Ahmed, Osama; Tawfik, Zaki; Helal, Hamed

    2011-01-01

    Background: Royal jelly is a nutritive secretion produced by the worker bees, rich in proteins, carbohydrates, vitamins and minerals. Aim: The present study was designed to determine the possible protective effects of royal jelly against radiation induced oxidative stress, hematological, biochemical and histological alterations in male Wister albino rats. Materials and Methods: Male Wister albino rats were exposed to a fractionated dose of gamma radiation (2 Gy every 3 days up to 8 Gy total doses). Royal jelly was administrated (g/Kg/day) by gavages 14 days before exposure to the 1st radiation fraction and the treatment was continued for 15 days after the 1st irradiation fraction till the end of the experiment. The rats were sacrificed 3rd, equivalent to 3rd post 2nd irradiation fraction, and equivalent to 3rd day post last irradiation fraction. Results: In the present study, gamma- irradiation induced hematological, biochemical and histological effects in male Wister albino rats. In royal jelly treated irradiated group, there was a noticeable decrease recorded in thiobarbituric reactive substances concentration when compared to γ-irradiated group. Also, the serum nitric oxide concentration was significantly improved. The administration of royal jelly to irradiated rats according to the current experimental design significantly ameliorates the changes induced in serum lipid profile. Moreover, in royal jelly treated irradiated group, there was a noticeable amelioration recorded in all hematological parameters along the three experimental intervals. The microscopic examination of cardiac muscle of royal jelly treated irradiated rats demonstrated structural amelioration, improved nuclei and normal features of capillaries and veins in endomysium when compared to gamma-irradiated rats. Conclusion: It was suggested that the biochemical, hematological and histological amelioration observed in royal jelly (g/Kg/day) treated irradiated rats might be due to the antioxidant

  17. Protective effects of shikonin on brain injury induced by carbon ion beam irradiation in mice.

    PubMed

    Gan, Lu; Wang, Zhen Hua; Zhang, Hong; Zhou, Rong; Sun, Chao; Liu, Yang; Si, Jing; Liu, Yuan Yuan; Wang, Zhen Guo

    2015-02-01

    Radiation encephalopathy is the main complication of cranial radiotherapy. It can cause necrosis of brain tissue and cognitive dysfunction. Our previous work had proved that a natural antioxidant shikonin possessed protective effect on cerebral ischemic injury. Here we investigated the effects of shikonin on carbon ion beam induced radiation brain injury in mice. Pretreatment with shikonin significantly increased the SOD and CAT activities and the ratio of GSH/GSSG in mouse brain tissues compared with irradiated group (P<0.01), while obviously reduced the MDA and PCO contents and the ROS levels derived from of the brain mitochondria. The shikonin also noticeably improved the spatial memory deficits caused by carbon ion beam irradiation. All results demonstrated that shikonin could improve the irradiated brain injury which might resulted from its modulation effects on the oxidative stress induced by the 12C6+ ion beam. PMID:25716567

  18. Global Proteomic Analysis of Brain Tissues in Transient Ischemia Brain Damage in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiann-Hwa; Kuo, Hsing-Chun; Lee, Kam-Fai; Tsai, Tung-Hu

    2015-01-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury resulting from arterial occlusion or hypotension in patients leads to tissue hypoxia with glucose deprivation, which causes endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and neuronal death. A proteomic approach was used to identify the differentially expressed proteins in the brain of rats following a global ischemic stroke. The mechanisms involved the action in apoptotic and ER stress pathways. Rats were treated with ischemia-reperfusion brain injuries by the bilateral occlusion of the common carotid artery. The cortical neuron proteins from the stroke animal model (SAM) and the control rats were separated using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) to purify and identify the protein profiles. Our results demonstrated that the SAM rats experienced brain cell death in the ischemic core. Fifteen proteins were expressed differentially between the SAM rats and control rats, which were assayed and validated in vivo and in vitro. Interestingly, the set of differentially expressed, down-regulated proteins included catechol O-methyltransferase (COMT) and cathepsin D (CATD), which are implicated in oxidative stress, inflammatory response and apoptosis. After an ischemic stroke, one protein spot, namely the calretinin (CALB2) protein, showed increased expression. It mediated the effects of SAM administration on the apoptotic and ER stress pathways. Our results demonstrate that the ischemic injury of neuronal cells increased cell cytoxicity and apoptosis, which were accompanied by sustained activation of the IRE1-alpha/TRAF2, JNK1/2, and p38 MAPK pathways. Proteomic analysis suggested that the differential expression of CALB2 during a global ischemic stroke could be involved in the mechanisms of ER stress-induced neuronal cell apoptosis, which occurred via IRE1-alpha/TRAF2 complex formation, with activation of JNK1/2 and p38 MAPK. Based on these results, we also provide the molecular evidence supporting the ischemia-reperfusion-related neuronal injury

  19. Cell and tissue kinetics of the subependymal layer in mouse brain following heavy charged particle irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Manley, N.B.; Fabrikant, J.I.; Alpen, E.L.

    1988-12-01

    The following studies investigate the cellular response and cell population kinetics of the subependymal layer in the mouse brain exposed to heavy charged particle irradiation. Partial brain irradiation with helium and neon ions was confined to one cortex of the brain. Both the irradiated and the unirradiated contralateral cortex showed similar disturbances of the cell and tissue kinetics in the subependymal layers. The irradiated hemisphere exhibited histological damage, whereas the unirradiated side appeared normal histologically. This study concerns the cell population and cell cycle kinetics of the subependymal layer in the mouse brain, and the effects of charged particle irradiations on this cell population. Quantitative high resolution autoradiography was used to study the kinetic parameters in this cell layer. This study should help in understanding the effects of these high-energy heavy ions on normal mammalian brain tissue. The response of the mammalian brain exposure to charged particle ionizing radiation may be extremely variable. It varies from minimal physiological changes to overt tissue necrosis depending on a number of factors such as: the administered dose, dose-rate, the volume of the irradiated tissue, and the biological end-point being examined.

  20. Dietary aspartame with protein on plasma and brain amino acids, brain monoamines and behavior in rats.

    PubMed

    Torii, K; Mimura, T; Takasaki, Y; Ichimura, M

    1986-01-01

    Aspartame (APM; L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester), was investigated for its ability to alter levels of the large neutral amino acids and monoamines in overnight fasted rats allowed to consume meals with or without protein for two hours. Additionally, the possible long term behavioral consequences of APM in 25% casein diets with or without 10% sucrose were determined. Acute APM ingestion increased both plasma and brain phenylalanine and tyrosine levels, but brain tryptophan levels were not altered regardless of dietary protein. Brain norepinephrine and dopamine levels were unaltered by any of the diet while serotonin levels were slightly increased when a protein-free diet was consumed. But APM and/or protein ingestion minimized this increase of brain serotonin levels as much as controls. Chronic APM ingestion failed to influence diurnal feeding patterns, meal size distributions, or diurnal patterns of spontaneous motor activity. The chronic ingestion of abuse doses of APM produced no significant chemical changes in brain capable of altering behavioral parameters believed to be controlled by monoamines in rats. PMID:3714850

  1. Light-sheet microscopy imaging of a whole cleared rat brain with Thy1-GFP transgene

    PubMed Central

    Stefaniuk, Marzena; Gualda, Emilio J.; Pawlowska, Monika; Legutko, Diana; Matryba, Paweł; Koza, Paulina; Konopka, Witold; Owczarek, Dorota; Wawrzyniak, Marcin; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo; Kaczmarek, Leszek

    2016-01-01

    Whole-brain imaging with light-sheet fluorescence microscopy and optically cleared tissue is a new, rapidly developing research field. Whereas successful attempts to clear and image mouse brain have been reported, a similar result for rats has proven difficult to achieve. Herein, we report on creating novel transgenic rat harboring fluorescent reporter GFP under control of neuronal gene promoter. We then present data on clearing the rat brain, showing that FluoClearBABB was found superior over passive CLARITY and CUBIC methods. Finally, we demonstrate efficient imaging of the rat brain using light-sheet fluorescence microscopy. PMID:27312902

  2. Light-sheet microscopy imaging of a whole cleared rat brain with Thy1-GFP transgene.

    PubMed

    Stefaniuk, Marzena; Gualda, Emilio J; Pawlowska, Monika; Legutko, Diana; Matryba, Paweł; Koza, Paulina; Konopka, Witold; Owczarek, Dorota; Wawrzyniak, Marcin; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo; Kaczmarek, Leszek

    2016-01-01

    Whole-brain imaging with light-sheet fluorescence microscopy and optically cleared tissue is a new, rapidly developing research field. Whereas successful attempts to clear and image mouse brain have been reported, a similar result for rats has proven difficult to achieve. Herein, we report on creating novel transgenic rat harboring fluorescent reporter GFP under control of neuronal gene promoter. We then present data on clearing the rat brain, showing that FluoClearBABB was found superior over passive CLARITY and CUBIC methods. Finally, we demonstrate efficient imaging of the rat brain using light-sheet fluorescence microscopy. PMID:27312902

  3. Comparison of the radiosensitivities of neurons and glial cells derived from the same rat brain

    PubMed Central

    KUDO, SHIGEHIRO; SUZUKI, YOSHIYUKI; NODA, SHIN-EI; MIZUI, TOSHIYUKI; SHIRAI, KATSUYUKI; OKAMOTO, MASAHIKO; KAMINUMA, TAKUYA; YOSHIDA, YUKARI; SHIRAO, TOMOAKI; NAKANO, TAKASHI

    2014-01-01

    Non-proliferating cells, such as mature neurons, are generally believed to be more resistant to X-rays than proliferating cells, such as glial and vascular endothelial cells. Therefore, the late adverse effects of radiotherapy on the brain have been attributed to the radiation-induced damage of glial and vascular endothelial cells. However, little is known about the radiosensitivities of neurons and glial cells due to difficulties in culturing these cells, particularly neurons, independently. In the present study, primary dissociated neurons and glial cultures were prepared separately from the hippocampi and cerebrum, respectively, which had been obtained from the same fetal rat on embryonic day 18. X-irradiations of 50 Gy were performed on the cultured neurons and glial cells at 7 and 21 days in vitro (DIV). The cells were fixed at 24 h after irradiation. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling was then performed to measure the apoptotic indices (AIs). The AIs of non-irradiated and irradiated neurons at 7 DIV were 23.7±6.7 and 64.9±4.8%, and those at 21 DIV were 52.1±17.4 and 44.6±12.5%, respectively. The AIs of non-irradiated and irradiated glial cells at 7 DIV were 5.8±1.5 and 78.4±3.3% and those at 21 DIV were 9.6±2.6 and 86.3±4.9%, respectively. Glial cells and neurons were radiosensitive at 7 DIV. However, while glial cells were radiosensitive at 21 DIV, neurons were not. PMID:25120594

  4. Effect of 2,450 MHz microwave radiation on the development of the rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Inouye, M.; Galvin, M.J.; McRee, D.I.

    1983-12-01

    Male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to 2,450 MHz microwave radiation at an incident power density of 10 mW/cm2 daily for 3 hours from day 4 of pregnancy (in utero exposure) through day 40 postpartum, except for 2 days at the perinatal period. The animals were killed, and the brains removed, weighed, measured, and histologically examined at 15, 20, 30, and 40 days of age. The histologic parameters examined included the cortical architecture of the cerebral cortex, the decline of the germinal layer along the lateral ventricles, the myelination of the corpus callosum, and the decline of the external germinal layer of the cerebellar cortex. In 40-day-old rats, quantitative measurements of neurons were also made. The spine density of the pyramidal cells in layer III of the somatosensory cortex, and the density of basal dendritic trees of the pyramidal cells in layer V were measured in Golgi-Cox impregnated specimens. In addition, the density of Purkinje cells and the extent of the Purkinje cell layer in each lobule were measured in midsagittal sections of the cerebellum stained with thionin. There were no remarkable differences between microwave-exposed and control (sham-irradiated) groups for any of the histologic or quantitative parameters examined; however, the findings provide important information on quantitative measurements of the brain. The data from this study failed to demonstrate that there is a significant effect on rat brain development due to microwave exposure (10 mW/cm2) during the embryonic, fetal, and postnatal periods.

  5. Autoradiographic localization of angiotensin II receptors in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelsohn, F.A.O.; Quirion, R.; Saavedra, J.M.; Aguilera, G.; Catt, K.J.

    1984-03-01

    The /sup 125/I-labeled agonist analog (1-sarcosine)-angiotensin II ((Sar/sup 1/)AII) bound with high specificity and affinity (K/sub a/ = 2 x 10/sup 9/ M/sup -1/) to a single class of receptor sites in rat brain. This ligand was used to analyze the distribution of AII receptors in rat brain by in vitro autoradiography followed by computerized densitometry and color coding. A very high density of AII receptors was found in the subfornical organ, paraventricular and periventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus, nucleus of the tractus solitarius, and area postrema. A high concentration of receptors was found in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus, lateral olfactory tracts, nuclei of the accessory and lateral olfactory tracts, triangular septal nucleus, subthalamic nucleus, locus coeruleus, and inferior olivary nuclei. Moderate receptor concentrations were found in the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis, median preoptic nucleus, medial habenular nucleus, lateral septum, ventroposterior thalamic nucleus, median eminence, medial geniculate nucleus, superior colliculus, subiculum, pre- and parasubiculum, and spinal trigeminal tract. Low concentrations of sites were seen in caudate-putamen, nucleus accumbens, amygdala, and gray matter of the spinal cord. These studies have demonstrated that AII receptors are distributed in a highly characteristic anatomical pattern in the brain. The high concentrations of AII receptors at numerous physiologically relevant sites are consistent with the emerging evidence for multiple roles of AII as a neuropeptide in the central nervous system. 75 references, 2 figures.

  6. Autoradiographic localization of angiotensin II receptors in rat brain.

    PubMed Central

    Mendelsohn, F A; Quirion, R; Saavedra, J M; Aguilera, G; Catt, K J

    1984-01-01

    The 125I-labeled agonist analog [1-sarcosine]-angiotensin II ( [Sar1]AII) bound with high specificity and affinity (Ka = 2 X 10(9) M-1) to a single class of receptor sites in rat brain. This ligand was used to analyze the distribution of AII receptors in rat brain by in vitro autoradiography followed by computerized densitometry and color coding. A very high density of AII receptors was found in the subfornical organ, paraventricular and periventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus, nucleus of the tractus solitarius, and area postrema. A high concentration of receptors was found in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus, lateral olfactory tracts, nuclei of the accessory and lateral olfactory tracts, triangular septal nucleus, subthalamic nucleus, locus coeruleus, and inferior olivary nuclei. Moderate receptor concentrations were found in the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis, median preoptic nucleus, medial habenular nucleus, lateral septum, ventroposterior thalamic nucleus, median eminence, medial geniculate nucleus, superior colliculus, subiculum, pre- and parasubiculum, and spinal trigeminal tract. Low concentrations of sites were seen in caudate-putamen, nucleus accumbens, amygdala, and gray matter of the spinal cord. These studies have demonstrated that AII receptors are distributed in a highly characteristic anatomical pattern in the brain. The high concentrations of AII receptors at numerous physiologically relevant sites are consistent with the emerging evidence for multiple roles of AII as a neuropeptide in the central nervous system. Images PMID:6324205

  7. Localization of histidine decarboxylase mRNA in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Bayliss, D A; Wang, Y M; Zahnow, C A; Joseph, D R; Millhorn, D E

    1990-08-01

    The recent cloning of a cDNA encoding fetal rat liver histidine decarboxylase (HDC), the synthesizing enzyme for histamine, allows the study of the central histaminergic system at the molecular level. To this end, Northern blot and in situ hybridization analyses were used to determine the regional and cellular distribution of neurons which express HDC mRNA in rat brain. Three hybridizing species which migrate as 1.6-, 2.6-, and 3.5-kb RNA were identified with Northern blots. The major (2.6 kb) and minor (3.5 kb) species, characteristic of HDC mRNA in fetal liver, were expressed at high levels in diencephalon and at just detectable levels in hippocampus, but not in other brain regions. In contrast, the 1.6-kb species was present in all brain regions examined except the olfactory bulb. Cells which contain HDC mRNA were found by in situ hybridization in the hypothalamus; HDC mRNA-containing cells were not detected in other areas, including the hippocampus. Hypothalamic neurons which express HDC mRNA were localized to all aspects of the tuberomammillary nucleus, a result consistent with previous immunohistochemical findings. PMID:19912749

  8. Appearance of cell fragments in thymus after a whole-body X-irradiation of rat

    SciTech Connect

    Ohyama, H.; Yamada, T.

    1983-01-01

    Changes in surface architecture and three dimensional structure of rat thymus cortex were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) after a whole-body X-irradiation. The samples of thymus prepared from rats 4 to 8 hr after a 400 R irradiation were observed by SEM. Normal thymocytes, having tiny microvilli and shallow ridges, decreased in number after irradiation, with a corresponding increase in radiation damaged round shaped cells with occasional protrusions and pores. With time after irradiation, smaller spherical fragments of cells having smooth or porous surfaces increased in number.

  9. The blood-brain barrier penetration and distribution of PEGylated fluorescein-doped magnetic silica nanoparticles in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Ku, Shuting; Yan, Feng; Wang, Ying; Sun, Yilin; Yang, Nan; Ye, Ling

    2010-04-16

    PEGylated PAMAM conjugated fluorescein-doped magnetic silica nanoparticles (PEGylated PFMSNs) have been synthesized for evaluating their ability across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and distribution in rat brain. The obtained nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermal gravimetry analyses (TGA), zeta potential ({zeta}-potential) titration, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The BBB penetration and distribution of PEGylated PFMSNs and FMSNs in rat brain were investigated not only at the cellular level with Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), but also at the subcellular level with transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results provide direct evidents that PEGylated PFMSNs could penetrate the BBB and spread into the brain parenchyma.

  10. Assessment of MRI Parameters as Imaging Biomarkers for Radiation Necrosis in the Rat Brain

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Silun; Tryggestad, Erik; Zhou Tingting; Armour, Michael; Wen Zhibo; Fu Dexue; Ford, Eric; Zijl, Peter C.M. van; Zhou Jinyuan

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: Radiation necrosis is a major complication of radiation therapy. We explore the features of radiation-induced brain necrosis in the rat, using multiple MRI approaches, including T{sub 1}, T{sub 2}, apparent diffusion constant (ADC), cerebral blood flow (CBF), magnetization transfer ratio (MTR), and amide proton transfer (APT) of endogenous mobile proteins and peptides. Methods and Materials: Adult rats (Fischer 344; n = 15) were irradiated with a single, well-collimated X-ray beam (40 Gy; 10 Multiplication-Sign 10 mm{sup 2}) in the left brain hemisphere. MRI was acquired on a 4.7-T animal scanner at {approx}25 weeks' postradiation. The MRI signals of necrotic cores and perinecrotic regions were assessed with a one-way analysis of variance. Histological evaluation was accomplished with hematoxylin and eosin staining. Results: ADC and CBF MRI could separate perinecrotic and contralateral normal brain tissue (p < 0.01 and < 0.05, respectively), whereas T{sub 1}, T{sub 2}, MTR, and APT could not. MRI signal intensities were significantly lower in the necrotic core than in normal brain for CBF (p < 0.001) and APT (p < 0.01) and insignificantly higher or lower for T{sub 1}, T{sub 2}, MTR, and ADC. Histological results demonstrated coagulative necrosis within the necrotic core and reactive astrogliosis and vascular damage within the perinecrotic region. Conclusion: ADC and CBF are promising imaging biomarkers for identifying perinecrotic regions, whereas CBF and APT are promising for identifying necrotic cores.

  11. Intranasal pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate decreases brain inflammatory mediators and provides neuroprotection after brain hypoxia-ischemia in neonatal rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhi; Zhao, Huijuan; Peng, Shuling; Zuo, Zhiyi

    2013-01-01

    Brain injury due to birth asphyxia is the major cause of death and long-term disabilities in newborns. We determined whether intranasal pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) could provide neuroprotection in neonatal rats after brain hypoxia-ischemia (HI). Seven-day old male and female Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to brain HI. They were then treated by intranasal PDTC. Neurological outcome were evaluated 7 or 30 days after the brain HI. Brain tissues were harvested 6 or 24 h after the brain HI for biochemical analysis. Here, PDTC dose-dependently reduced brain HI-induced brain tissue loss with an effective dose (ED)50 at 27 mg/kg. PDTC needed to be applied within 45 min after the brain HI for this neuroprotection. This treatment reduced brain tissue loss and improved neurological and cognitive functions assessed 30 days after the HI. PDTC attenuated brain HI-induced lipid oxidative stress, nuclear translocation of nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells, and various inflammatory mediators in the brain tissues. Inhibition of inducible nitric oxide synthase after brain HI reduced brain tissue loss. Our results suggest that intranasal PDTC provides neuroprotection possibly via reducing inflammation and oxidative stress. Intranasal PDTC may have a potential to provide neuroprotection to human neonates after birth asphyxia. PMID:23994718

  12. Immunochemical characterization of phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate kinase from rat brain.

    PubMed Central

    van Dongen, C J; Kok, J W; Schrama, L H; Oestreicher, A B; Gispen, W H

    1986-01-01

    Affinity-purified antibodies were used to identify a protein of molecular mass 45 kDa (45 kDa protein) in rat brain cytosol as phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PtdIns4P) kinase. Antibodies were raised in rabbits by immunization with the purified 45 kDa protein. Anti-(45 kDa protein) immunoglobulins were isolated by affinity chromatography of the antiserum on a solid immunosorbent, which was prepared by coupling a soluble rat brain fraction, the DEAE-cellulose pool containing 10-15% 45 kDa protein, to CNBr-activated Sepharose 4B. The purified IgGs were specific for the 45 kDa protein as judged by immunoblot and by immunoprecipitation. The purified anti-(45 kDa protein) IgGs inhibited the enzyme activity of partially purified PtdIns4P kinase, whereas preimmune IgGs were ineffective. Immunoprecipitation of the 45 kDa protein from the partially purified enzyme preparation with the purified IgGs resulted in a concomitant decrease in the amount of 45 kDa protein and in PtdIns4P kinase activity. The amount of 45 kDa protein remaining in the supernatant and the activity of PtdIns4P kinase correlated with a coefficient of r = 0.87. The evidence presented lends further support for the notion that the catalytic activity of PtdIns4P kinase in rat brain cytosol resides in a 45 kDa protein. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:3010943

  13. Investigations on iodothyronine deiodinase activity in the maturing rat brain.

    PubMed

    Ködding, R; Fuhrmann, H; von zur Mühlen, A

    1986-04-01

    5-Monodeiodination of T4 and T3 and 5'-monodeiodination of T4 and rT3 were studied in brain homogenates of male Sprague-Dawley rats, aged 1-60 days. Portions of the homogenates were incubated with the substrates at 37 C for 30 min. The reaction products were estimated by specific RIAs. All of the four reactions were dependent upon time, temperature, pH, and upon the concentrations of substrate, thiol, and tissue protein. Maximal reactions were obtained between 40 and 160 mM dithioerythritol. T4 5'-deiodination proceeded optimally at pH 7.4 and 0.4 microM substrate, the other reactions at pH 8.5 and 10 microM substrate. The four reactions were inactivated by heat (56 C, 30 min) and inhibited by 10(-5) M iopanoic acid. Only rT3 5'-deiodination was inhibited by 3 X 10(-4) M propylthiouracil (greater than 95%). In cerebellum, basal ganglia, brainstem, and hypothalamus both T4 and T3 5-deiodinase activity were very high in perinatal rats [up to 5.56 pmol/(min X mg protein) in hypothalamus], and decreased rapidly with age. In cortex and olfactory bulb these enzyme activities were low after birth, followed by an increase during the growth spurt [up to 632 fmol/(min X mg protein) in olfactory bulb]. T4 and rT3 5'-deiodinase activity in all brain regions studied were at their lowest in perinatal rats. During and after the growth spurt an increase was observed [up to 457 fmol/(min X mg protein) in cerebellum]. The reciprocal course of 5- and 5'-deiodination between birth and growth spurt in most of the brain regions studied might lead to a reduced intracellular thyromimetic activity during the perinatal period. PMID:3948784

  14. Amifostine, a radioprotectant agent, protects rat brain tissue lipids against ionizing radiation induced damage: An FTIR microspectroscopic imaging study

    SciTech Connect

    Cakmak G.; Miller L.; Zorlu, F.; Severcan, F.

    2012-03-03

    Amifostine is the only approved radioprotective agent by FDA for reducing the damaging effects of radiation on healthy tissues. In this study, the protective effect of amifostine against the damaging effects of ionizing radiation on the white matter (WM) and grey matter (GM) regions of the rat brain were investigated at molecular level. Sprague-Dawley rats, which were administered amifostine or not, were whole-body irradiated at a single dose of 800 cGy, decapitated after 24 h and the brain tissues of these rats were analyzed using Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIRM). The results revealed that the total lipid content and CH{sub 2} groups of lipids decreased significantly and the carbonyl esters, olefinic=CH and CH{sub 3} groups of lipids increased significantly in the WM and GM after exposure to ionizing radiation, which could be interpreted as a result of lipid peroxidation. These changes were more prominent in the WM of the brain. The administration of amifostine before ionizing radiation inhibited the radiation-induced lipid peroxidation in the brain. In addition, this study indicated that FTIRM provides a novel approach for monitoring ionizing radiation induced-lipid peroxidation and obtaining different molecular ratio images can be used as biomarkers to detect lipid peroxidation in biological systems.

  15. Mitochondrial dysfunction in aging rat brain following transient global ischemia.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kui; Puchowicz, Michelle A; Sun, Xiaoyan; LaManna, Joseph C

    2008-01-01

    Aged rat brain is more sensitive to reperfusion injury induced by cardiac arrest and resuscitation. The mitochondrial respiratory chain, the major source of free radicals during reperfusion, is likely to be the target of lipid peroxidation. Previous work has shown a higher mortality and lower hippocampal neuronal survival in older rats. 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE), a major product of lipid peroxidation, was found to be elevated in cortex and brainstem after resuscitation. In this study we investigated the acute changes of mitochondrial function in aging rat brain following cardiac arrest and resuscitation; the effect of an antioxidant, alpha-phenyl-tert-butyl-nitrone (PBN) was also tested. Fischer 344 rats, 6 and 24-month old, were subjected to cardiac arrest (7-10 minutes) and allowed to recover 1 hour after resuscitation. Mitochondria of cortex and brainstem were isolated and assayed for respiratory function. Compared to their respective non-arrested control group, 1h untreated groups (both 6 month and 24 month) had similar state 3 (ADP-stimulated) but higher state 4 (resting state) respiratory rates. The respiratory control ratio (state 3/state 4) of cortex in the 1h untreated group was 26% lower than the non-arrested control group; similar results were found in brainstem. The decreased mitochondrial respiratory function was improved by PBN treatment. HNE-modified mitochondrial proteins were elevated 1h after resuscitation, with an evident change in the aged. Treatment with PBN reduced the elevated HNE production in mitochondria of cortex. The data suggest (i) there is increased sensitivity to lipid peroxidation with aging, (ii) mitochondrial respiratory function related to coupled oxidation decreases following cardiac arrest and resuscitation, and (iii) treatment with antioxidant, such as PBN, reduces the oxidative damage following cardiac arrest and resuscitation. PMID:18290349

  16. Brain tumor imaging of rat fresh tissue using terahertz spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Sayuri; Fukushi, Yasuko; Kubota, Oichi; Itsuji, Takeaki; Ouchi, Toshihiko; Yamamoto, Seiji

    2016-07-01

    Tumor imaging by terahertz spectroscopy of fresh tissue without dye is demonstrated using samples from a rat glioma model. The complex refractive index spectrum obtained by a reflection terahertz time-domain spectroscopy system can discriminate between normal and tumor tissues. Both the refractive index and absorption coefficient of tumor tissues are higher than those of normal tissues and can be attributed to the higher cell density and water content of the tumor region. The results of this study indicate that terahertz technology is useful for detecting brain tumor tissue.

  17. Brain tumor imaging of rat fresh tissue using terahertz spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Sayuri; Fukushi, Yasuko; Kubota, Oichi; Itsuji, Takeaki; Ouchi, Toshihiko; Yamamoto, Seiji

    2016-01-01

    Tumor imaging by terahertz spectroscopy of fresh tissue without dye is demonstrated using samples from a rat glioma model. The complex refractive index spectrum obtained by a reflection terahertz time-domain spectroscopy system can discriminate between normal and tumor tissues. Both the refractive index and absorption coefficient of tumor tissues are higher than those of normal tissues and can be attributed to the higher cell density and water content of the tumor region. The results of this study indicate that terahertz technology is useful for detecting brain tumor tissue. PMID:27456312

  18. 2-hydroxyestradiol modifies serotonergic processes in the male rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalik, S.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of chronic (5 day) 2-hydroxyestradiol or estradiol on catecholaminergic and serotonergic neurons in the male rat brain were studied. The results indicate estrogen to be specific is inducing changes in dopaminergic systems; whereas its hydroxymetabolite appears to have a preference for serotonergic processes. In particular, in vitro 2-hydroxyestradiol appears to be a potent inhibitor of /sup 3/H-imipramine binding in brain; this inhibition is especially potent in the cortex, where it is equal in potency to serotonin. However, unlike serotonin, which is a competitive inhibitor of imipramine, 2-hydroxyestradiol is an uncompetitive inhibitor of /sup 3/H-imipramine binding in cortex and hypothalamus and a noncompetitive inhibitor in the striatum; this suggests that the inhibition of binding takes place at a point other than the site of serotonin uptake. In vitro 2-hydroxyestradiol also appears to increase the uptake of serotonin into these tissues, a change which would be expected if the imipramine binding is blocked.

  19. The impact of chronic stress on the rat brain lipidome.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, T G; Chan, R B; Bravo, F V; Miranda, A; Silva, R R; Zhou, B; Marques, F; Pinto, V; Cerqueira, J J; Di Paolo, G; Sousa, N

    2016-01-01

    Chronic stress is a major risk factor for several human disorders that affect modern societies. The brain is a key target of chronic stress. In fact, there is growing evidence indicating that exposure to stress affects learning and memory, decision making and emotional responses, and may even predispose for pathological processes, such as Alzheimer's disease and depression. Lipids are a major constituent of the brain and specifically signaling lipids have been shown to regulate brain function. Here, we used a mass spectrometry-based lipidomic approach to evaluate the impact of a chronic unpredictable stress (CUS) paradigm on the rat brain in a region-specific manner. We found that the prefrontal cortex (PFC) was the area with the highest degree of changes induced by chronic stress. Although the hippocampus presented relevant lipidomic changes, the amygdala and, to a greater extent, the cerebellum presented few lipid changes upon chronic stress exposure. The sphingolipid and phospholipid metabolism were profoundly affected, showing an increase in ceramide (Cer) and a decrease in sphingomyelin (SM) and dihydrosphingomyelin (dhSM) levels, and a decrease in phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and ether phosphatidylcholine (PCe) and increase in lysophosphatidylethanolamine (LPE) levels, respectively. Furthermore, the fatty-acyl profile of phospholipids and diacylglycerol revealed that chronic stressed rats had higher 38 carbon(38C)-lipid levels in the hippocampus and reduced 36C-lipid levels in the PFC. Finally, lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) levels in the PFC were found to be correlated with blood corticosterone (CORT) levels. In summary, lipidomic profiling of the effect of chronic stress allowed the identification of dysregulated lipid pathways, revealing putative targets for pharmacological intervention that may potentially be used to modulate stress-induced deficits. PMID:25754084

  20. Data for mitochondrial proteomic alterations in the developing rat brain.

    PubMed

    Villeneuve, Lance M; Stauch, Kelly L; Fox, Howard S

    2014-12-01

    Mitochondria are a critical organelle involved in many cellular processes, and due to the nature of the brain, neuronal cells are almost completely reliant on these organelles for energy generation. Due to the fact that biomedical research tends to investigate disease state pathogenesis, one area of mitochondrial research commonly overlooked is homeostatic responses to energy demands. Therefore, to elucidate mitochondrial alterations occurring during the developmentally important phase of E18 to P7 in the brain, we quantified the proteins in the mitochondrial proteome as well as proteins interacting with the mitochondria. We identified a large number of significantly altered proteins involved in a variety of pathways including glycolysis, mitochondrial trafficking, mitophagy, and the unfolded protein response. These results are important because we identified alterations thought to be homeostatic in nature occurring within mitochondria, and these results may be used to identify any abnormal deviations in the mitochondrial proteome occurring during this period of brain development. A more comprehensive analysis of this data may be obtained from the article "Proteomic analysis of mitochondria from embryonic and postnatal rat brains reveals response to developmental changes in energy demands" in the Journal of Proteomics. PMID:26217684

  1. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Activates Specific Regions in Rat Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Ru-Rong; Schlaepfer, Thomas E.; Aizenman, Carlos D.; Epstein, Charles M.; Qiu, Dike; Huang, Justin C.; Rupp, Fabio

    1998-12-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a noninvasive technique to induce electric currents in the brain. Although rTMS is being evaluated as a possible alternative to electroconvulsive therapy for the treatment of refractory depression, little is known about the pattern of activation induced in the brain by rTMS. We have compared immediate early gene expression in rat brain after rTMS and electroconvulsive stimulation, a well-established animal model for electroconvulsive therapy. Our result shows that rTMS applied in conditions effective in animal models of depression induces different patterns of immediate-early gene expression than does electroconvulsive stimulation. In particular, rTMS evokes strong neural responses in the paraventricular nucleus of the thalamus (PVT) and in other regions involved in the regulation of circadian rhythms. The response in PVT is independent of the orientation of the stimulation probe relative to the head. Part of this response is likely because of direct activation, as repetitive magnetic stimulation also activates PVT neurons in brain slices.

  2. Gene Transfer into Rat Brain Using Adenoviral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Puntel, Mariana; Kroeger, Kurt M.; Sanderson, Nicholas S.R.; Thomas, Clare E.; Castro, Maria G.; Lowenstein, Pedro R.

    2010-01-01

    Viral vector–mediated gene delivery is an attractive procedure for introducing genes into the brain, both for purposes of basic neuroscience research and to develop gene therapy for neurological diseases. Replication-defective adenoviruses possess many features which make them ideal vectors for this purpose—efficiently transducing terminally differentiated cells such as neurons and glial cells, resulting in high levels of transgene expression in vivo. Also, in the absence of anti-adenovirus immunity, these vectors can sustain very long-term transgene expression within the brain parenchyma. This unit provides protocols for the stereotactic injection of adenoviral vectors into the brain, followed by protocols to detect transgene expression or infiltrates of immune cells by immunocytochemistry or immunofluorescence. ELISPOT and neutralizing antibody assay methodologies are provided to quantitate the levels of cellular and humoral immune responses against adenoviruses. Quantitation of adenoviral vector genomes within the rat brain using qPCR is also described. Curr. Protoc. Neurosci. 50:4.24.1–4.24.49. © 2010 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:20066657

  3. Data for mitochondrial proteomic alterations in the developing rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Villeneuve, Lance M.; Stauch, Kelly L.; Fox, Howard S.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria are a critical organelle involved in many cellular processes, and due to the nature of the brain, neuronal cells are almost completely reliant on these organelles for energy generation. Due to the fact that biomedical research tends to investigate disease state pathogenesis, one area of mitochondrial research commonly overlooked is homeostatic responses to energy demands. Therefore, to elucidate mitochondrial alterations occurring during the developmentally important phase of E18 to P7 in the brain, we quantified the proteins in the mitochondrial proteome as well as proteins interacting with the mitochondria. We identified a large number of significantly altered proteins involved in a variety of pathways including glycolysis, mitochondrial trafficking, mitophagy, and the unfolded protein response. These results are important because we identified alterations thought to be homeostatic in nature occurring within mitochondria, and these results may be used to identify any abnormal deviations in the mitochondrial proteome occurring during this period of brain development. A more comprehensive analysis of this data may be obtained from the article “Proteomic analysis of mitochondria from embryonic and postnatal rat brains reveals response to developmental changes in energy demands” in the Journal of Proteomics. PMID:26217684

  4. [Sequencing of low-molecular-weight DNA in blood plasma of irradiated rats].

    PubMed

    Vasilieva, I N; Bespalov, V G; Zinkin, V N; Podgornaya, O I

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular low-molecular-weight DNA in blood of irradiated rats was sequenced for the first time. The screening of sequences in the DDBJ database displayed homology of various parts of the rodent genome. Sequences of low-molecular-weight DNA in rat's plasma are enriched with G/C pairs and long interspersed elements relative to rat genome. DNA sequences in blood of rats irradiated at the doses of 8 and 100 Gy have marked distinctions. Data of sequencing of extracellular DNA from normal humans and with pathology were analyzed. DNA sequences of irradiated rats differ from the human ones by a wealth of long interspersed elements. This new knowledge lays the foundation for development of minimally invasive technologies of diagnosing the probability of pathology and controlling the adaptive resources of people in extreme environments. PMID:25958466

  5. Time course of lipolytic activity and lipid peroxidation after whole-body gamma irradiation of rats

    SciTech Connect

    Rejholcova, M.; Wilhelm, J.

    1989-01-01

    The content of fluorescing products of lipid peroxidation (LFP) and hormone-stimulated lipolytic activity were determined in rat epididymal adipose tissue during a 29-day interval after whole-body gamma irradiation. An increase in LFP was accompanied by a decrease in lipolytic activity. It is suggested that these effects are interrelated and that the decrease in lipolysis in irradiated, semi fasting rats is an additional deteriorating factor leading to death in some animals.

  6. Regulation of prostaglandin E{sub 2} synthesis after brain irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Amy H.; Olschowka, John A.; Williams, Jacqueline P.; Okunieff, Paul; O'Banion, M. Kerry . E-mail: kerry_obanion@urmc.rochester.edu

    2005-05-01

    Purpose: A local tissue reaction, termed neuroinflammation, occurs after irradiation of brain tissue. Previous work suggested that cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 activity was important for changes in gene expression associated with neuroinflammation as well as increased prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}) levels seen after radiation treatment. Methods and materials: To begin to determine the contributions of other enzymes involved in PGE{sub 2} production, we examined protein levels of COX-1 and COX-2 as well as 2 PGE synthases (membrane and cytosolic PGES) 4 h after 35 Gy single dose irradiation to the brains of C3HeN mice. We also evaluated the effects of specific COX inhibitors on PGE{sub 2} production and PGES expression. Results: As expected, COX-2 expression increased after radiation exposure. Brain irradiation also increased tissue protein levels for both PGES isoforms. Specific COX-2 inhibition with NS398 lowered brain PGE{sub 2} levels by about 60%. Surprisingly, COX-1 inhibition with SC560 completely prevented the elevation of PGE{sub 2} seen after irradiation. Interestingly, NS398 reduced the membrane-associated PGES isoform, whereas SC560 treatment lowered cytosolic isoform levels below those seen in unirradiated controls. Conclusions: Taken together, these data indicate that both cyclooxygenases contribute to PGE{sub 2} production in irradiated brain and reveal dependence of PGES isoforms expression on specific cyclooxygenase activities.

  7. Correlation between light scattering signal and tissue reversibility in rat brain exposed to hypoxia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawauchi, Satoko; Sato, Shunichi; Uozumi, Yoichi; Nawashiro, Hiroshi; Ishihara, Miya; Kikuchi, Makoto

    2010-02-01

    Light scattering signal is a potential indicator of tissue viability in brain because cellular and subcellular structural integrity should be associated with cell viability in brain tissue. We previously performed multiwavelength diffuse reflectance measurement for a rat global ischemic brain model and observed a unique triphasic change in light scattering at a certain time after oxygen and glucose deprivation. This triphasic scattering change (TSC) was shown to precede cerebral ATP exhaustion, suggesting that loss of brain tissue viability can be predicted by detecting scattering signal. In the present study, we examined correlation between light scattering signal and tissue reversibility in rat brain in vivo. We performed transcranial diffuse reflectance measurement for rat brain; under spontaneous respiration, hypoxia was induced for the rat by nitrogen gas inhalation and reoxygenation was started at various time points. We observed a TSC, which started at 140 +/- 15 s after starting nitrogen gas inhalation (mean +/- SD, n=8). When reoxygenation was started before the TSC, all rats survived (n=7), while no rats survived when reoxygenation was started after the TSC (n=8). When reoxygenation was started during the TSC, rats survived probabilistically (n=31). Disability of motor function was not observed for the survived rats. These results indicate that TSC can be used as an indicator of loss of tissue reversibility in brains, providing useful information on the critical time zone for treatment to rescue the brain.

  8. BRAIN TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENT IN RATS: A COMPARISON OF MICROWAVE AND AMBIENT TEMPERATURE EXPOSURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The brain and core temperatures of rats and rat carcasses exposed to microwave radiation (2450 MHz) or elevated air temperatures were measured in two studies. In general, no substantial evidence for temperature differentials, or hot spots, in the brain of these animals was found....

  9. Microwave irradiation of human brain tissue: production of microscopic slides within one day.

    PubMed Central

    Boon, M E; Marani, E; Adriolo, P J; Steffelaar, J W; Bots, G T; Kok, L P

    1988-01-01

    A three step method using microwave irradiation enabled microscopic slides of human brain tissue to be obtained within one working day: steps 1 and 2 hardened and solidified brain tissue; step 3 completed formalin fixation. The efficacy and precision of the method was compared with slides of conventionally processed brain tissue that had been fixed in formalin for six weeks. The microscopic quality of the sections was excellent with good presentation of brain tissue and equalled that of conventionally processed slides. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 Fig 3 PMID:3290268

  10. Whole Brain Irradiation With Hippocampal Sparing and Dose Escalation on Multiple Brain Metastases: A Planning Study on Treatment Concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Prokic, Vesna; Wiedenmann, Nicole; Fels, Franziska; Schmucker, Marianne; Nieder, Carsten; Grosu, Anca-Ligia

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a new treatment planning strategy in patients with multiple brain metastases. The goal was to perform whole brain irradiation (WBI) with hippocampal sparing and dose escalation on multiple brain metastases. Two treatment concepts were investigated: simultaneously integrated boost (SIB) and WBI followed by stereotactic fractionated radiation therapy sequential concept (SC). Methods and Materials: Treatment plans for both concepts were calculated for 10 patients with 2-8 brain metastases using volumetric modulated arc therapy. In the SIB concept, the prescribed dose was 30 Gy in 12 fractions to the whole brain and 51 Gy in 12 fractions to individual brain metastases. In the SC concept, the prescription was 30 Gy in 12 fractions to the whole brain followed by 18 Gy in 2 fractions to brain metastases. All plans were optimized for dose coverage of whole brain and lesions, simultaneously minimizing dose to the hippocampus. The treatment plans were evaluated on target coverage, homogeneity, and minimal dose to the hippocampus and organs at risk. Results: The SIB concept enabled more successful sparing of the hippocampus; the mean dose to the hippocampus was 7.55 {+-} 0.62 Gy and 6.29 {+-} 0.62 Gy, respectively, when 5-mm and 10-mm avoidance regions around the hippocampus were used, normalized to 2-Gy fractions. In the SC concept, the mean dose to hippocampus was 9.8 {+-} 1.75 Gy. The mean dose to the whole brain (excluding metastases) was 33.2 {+-} 0.7 Gy and 32.7 {+-} 0.96 Gy, respectively, in the SIB concept, for 5-mm and 10-mm hippocampus avoidance regions, and 37.23 {+-} 1.42 Gy in SC. Conclusions: Both concepts, SIB and SC, were able to achieve adequate whole brain coverage and radiosurgery-equivalent dose distributions to individual brain metastases. The SIB technique achieved better sparing of the hippocampus, especially when a10-mm hippocampal avoidance region was used.

  11. Hypobaric Hypoxia Imbalances Mitochondrial Dynamics in Rat Brain Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Khushbu; Prasad, Dipti; Singh, Shashi Bala; Kohli, Ekta

    2015-01-01

    Brain is predominantly susceptible to oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction during hypobaric hypoxia, and therefore undergoes neurodegeneration due to energy crisis. Evidences illustrate a high degree of association for mitochondrial fusion/fission imbalance and mitochondrial dysfunction. Mitochondrial fusion/fission is a recently reported dynamic mechanism which frequently occurs among cellular mitochondrial network. Hence, the study investigated the temporal alteration and involvement of abnormal mitochondrial dynamics (fusion/fission) along with disturbed mitochondrial functionality during chronic exposure to hypobaric hypoxia (HH). The Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to simulated high altitude equivalent to 25000 ft for 3, 7, 14, 21, and 28 days. Mitochondrial morphology, distribution within neurons, enzyme activity of respiratory complexes, Δψm, ADP: ATP, and expression of fission/fusion key proteins were determined. Results demonstrated HH induced alteration in mitochondrial morphology by damaged, small mitochondria observed in neurons with disturbance of mitochondrial functionality and reduced mitochondrial density in neuronal processes manifested by excessive mitochondrial fragmentation (fission) and decreased mitochondrial fusion as compared to unexposed rat brain hippocampus. The study suggested that imbalance in mitochondrial dynamics is one of the noteworthy mechanisms occurring in hippocampal neurons during HH insult. PMID:26236504

  12. Anticonvulsant and neuroprotective effects of Pimpinella anisum in rat brain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Essential oil of Pimpinella anisum L. Apiaceae (anise oil) has been widely used in traditional Persian medicine to treat a variety of diseases, including some neurological disorders. This study was aimed to test the possible anti-seizure and anti-hypoxia effects of anise oil. Methods The effects of different concentrations of anise oil were tested on seizure attacks induced by pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) injection and neuronal hypoxia induced by oxygen withdrawal as well as on production of dark neurons and induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) in in vivo and in vitro experimental models of rat brain. Results Anise oil significantly prolonged the latency of seizure attacks and reduced the amplitude and duration of epileptiform burst discharges induced by injection of intraperitoneal PTZ. In addition, anise oil significantly inhibited production of dark neurons in different regions of the brain in epileptic rats. Anise oil also significantly enhanced the duration of the appearance of anoxic terminal negativity induced by oxygen withdrawal and inhibited induction of LTP in hippocampal slices. Conclusions Our data indicate the anticonvulsant and neuroprotective effects of anise oil, likely via inhibition of synaptic plasticity. Further evaluation of anise oil to use in the treatment of neurological disorders is suggested. PMID:22709243

  13. Wearable scanning photoacoustic brain imaging in behaving rats.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jianbo; Dai, Xianjin; Jiang, Huabei

    2016-06-01

    A wearable scanning photoacoustic imaging (wPAI) system is presented for noninvasive brain study in behaving rats. This miniaturized wPAI system consists of four pico linear servos and a single transducer-based PAI probe. It has a dimension of 50 mm × 35 mm × 40 mm, and a weight of 26 g excluding cablings. Phantom evaluation shows that wPAI achieves a lateral resolution of ∼0.5 mm and an axial resolution of ∼0.1 mm at a depth of up to 11 mm. Its imaging ability is also tested in a behaving rat, and the results indicate that wPAI is able to image blood vessels at a depth of up to 5 mm with intact scalp and skull. With its noninvasive, deep penetration, and functional imaging ability in behaving animals, wPAI can be used for behavior, cognition, and preclinical brain disease studies. PMID:26777064

  14. Donepezil markedly potentiates memantine neurotoxicity in the adult rat brain.

    PubMed

    Creeley, Catherine E; Wozniak, David F; Nardi, Anthony; Farber, Nuri B; Olney, John W

    2008-02-01

    The NMDA antagonist, memantine (Namenda), and the cholinesterase inhibitor, donepezil (Aricept), are currently being used widely, either individually or in combination, for treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). NMDA antagonists have both neuroprotective and neurotoxic properties; the latter is augmented by drugs, such as pilocarpine, that increase cholinergic activity. Whether donepezil, by increasing cholinergic activity, might augment memantine's neurotoxic potential has not been investigated. In the present study, we determined that a dose of memantine (20mg/kg, i.p.), considered to be in the therapeutic (neuroprotective) range for rats, causes a mild neurotoxic reaction in the adult rat brain. Co-administration of memantine (20 or 30 mg/kg) with donepezil (2.5-10mg/kg) markedly potentiated this neurotoxic reaction, causing neuronal injury at lower doses of memantine, and causing the toxic reaction to become disseminated and lethal to neurons throughout many brain regions. These findings raise questions about using this drug combination in AD, especially in the absence of evidence that the combination is beneficial, or that either drug arrests or reverses the disease process. PMID:17112636

  15. Distribution of beacon immunoreactivity in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Tian, De-Run; Tian, Nan; Chen, Hui; Shi, Yu-Shun; Chang, Jaw-Kang; Yang, Jun; Yuan, Lan; Han, Ji-Sheng

    2006-01-01

    Beacon is a novel peptide isolated from the hypothalamus of Israeli sand rat. In the present study, we determined the distribution of beacon in the rat brain using immunohistochemical approach with a polyclonal antiserum directed against the synthetic C-terminal peptide fragment (47-73). The hypothalamus represented the major site of beacon-immunoreactive (IR) cell bodies that were concentrated in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and the supraoptic nucleus (SON). Additional immunostained cells were found in the septum, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, subfornical organ and subcommissural organ. Beacon-IR fibers were seen with high density in the internal layer of the median eminence and low to moderate density in the external layer. Significant beacon-IR fibers were also seen in the nucleus of the solitary tract and lateral reticular formation. The beacon neurons found in the PVN were further characterized by double label immunohistochemistry. Several beacon-IR neurons that resided in the medial PVN were shown to coexpress corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH) and most labeled beacon fibers in the external layer of median eminence coexist with CRH. The topographical distribution of beacon-IR in the brain suggests multiple biological activities for beacon in addition to its proposed roles in modulating feeding behaviors and pituitary hormone release. PMID:16157417

  16. Functional MRI during Hippocampal Deep Brain Stimulation in the Healthy Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Van Den Berge, Nathalie; Vanhove, Christian; Descamps, Benedicte; Dauwe, Ine; van Mierlo, Pieter; Vonck, Kristl; Keereman, Vincent; Raedt, Robrecht; Boon, Paul; Van Holen, Roel

    2015-01-01

    Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) is a promising treatment for neurological and psychiatric disorders. The mechanism of action and the effects of electrical fields administered to the brain by means of an electrode remain to be elucidated. The effects of DBS have been investigated primarily by electrophysiological and neurochemical studies, which lack the ability to investigate DBS-related responses on a whole-brain scale. Visualization of whole-brain effects of DBS requires functional imaging techniques such as functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI), which reflects changes in blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) responses throughout the entire brain volume. In order to visualize BOLD responses induced by DBS, we have developed an MRI-compatible electrode and an acquisition protocol to perform DBS during BOLD fMRI. In this study, we investigate whether DBS during fMRI is valuable to study local and whole-brain effects of hippocampal DBS and to investigate the changes induced by different stimulation intensities. Seven rats were stereotactically implanted with a custom-made MRI-compatible DBS-electrode in the right hippocampus. High frequency Poisson distributed stimulation was applied using a block-design paradigm. Data were processed by means of Independent Component Analysis. Clusters were considered significant when p-values were <0.05 after correction for multiple comparisons. Our data indicate that real-time hippocampal DBS evokes a bilateral BOLD response in hippocampal and other mesolimbic structures, depending on the applied stimulation intensity. We conclude that simultaneous DBS and fMRI can be used to detect local and whole-brain responses to circuit activation with different stimulation intensities, making this technique potentially powerful for exploration of cerebral changes in response to DBS for both preclinical and clinical DBS. PMID:26193653

  17. Lipid peroxidative stress and antioxidative enzymes in brains of milk-supplemented rats.

    PubMed

    Bay, B H; Lee, Y K; Tan, B K; Ling, E A

    1999-12-24

    Skim milk cultured with lactic acid bacteria has been previously reported to reduce lipid peroxidation in rat livers. In this study, the effects of skim milk and cultured milk supplementation on peroxidative stress in brains of weanling rats were investigated. We observed a reduction of brain thiobarbituric acid reacting substances (TBARS) concentration in milk-supplemented animals as compared with controls. In brains of control rats, the superoxide dismutase (SOD) enzyme levels were significantly higher than those from the milk-supplemented animals. In addition, SOD activity in control animal brains had a positive correlation with the TBARS concentration. There was no significant differences in the brain glutathione-S-transferase (GST) levels of all the three groups of animals. The results suggest that milk supplementation may be beneficial in reducing peroxidative stress in the developing rat brain. PMID:10624826

  18. Exercise induces mitochondrial biogenesis after brain ischemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Q; Wu, Y; Zhang, P; Sha, H; Jia, J; Hu, Y; Zhu, J

    2012-03-15

    Stroke is a major cause of death worldwide. Previous studies have suggested both exercise and mitochondrial biogenesis contribute to improved post-ischemic recovery of brain function. However, the exact mechanism underlying this effect is unclear. On the other hand, the benefit of exercise-induced mitochondrial biogenesis in brain has been confirmed. In this study, we attempted to determine whether treadmill exercise induces functional improvement through regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis after brain ischemia. We subjected adult male rats to ischemia, followed by either treadmill exercise or non-exercise and analyzed the effect of exercise on the amount of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), expression of mitochondrial biogenesis factors, and mitochondrial protein. In the ischemia-exercise group, only peroxisome proliferator activated receptor coactivator-1 (PGC-1) expression was increased significantly after 3 days of treadmill training. However, after 7 days of training, the levels of mtDNA, nuclear respiratory factor 1, NRF-1, mitochondrial transcription factor A, TFAM, and the mitochondrial protein cytochrome C oxidase subunit IV (COXIV) and heat shock protein-60 (HSP60) also increased above levels observed in non-exercised ischemic animals. These changes followed with significant changes in behavioral scores and cerebral infarct volume. The results indicate that exercise can promote mitochondrial biogenesis after ischemic injury, which may serve as a novel component of exercise-induced repair mechanisms of the brain. Understanding the molecular basis for exercise-induced neuroprotection may be beneficial in the development of therapeutic approaches for brain recovery from the ischemic injury. Based upon our findings, stimulation or enhancement of mitochondrial biogenesis may prove a novel neuroprotective strategy in the future. PMID:22266265

  19. Expression of UGT1A subfamily in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Sakakibara, Yukiko; Katoh, Miki; Imai, Kuniyuki; Kondo, Yuya; Asai, Yuki; Ikushiro, Shin-Ichi; Nadai, Masayuki

    2016-07-01

    UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) is an enzyme that catalyses a major phase II reaction in drug metabolism. Glucuronidation occurs mainly in the liver, but UGTs are also expressed in extrahepatic tissues, where they play an important role in local metabolism. UGT1A isoforms catalyse the glucuronidation of several drugs, neurotransmitters and neurosteroids that exert pharmacological and physiological effects on the brain. The aim of the current study was to determine UGT1A mRNA expression levels and glucuronidation activities in different regions of the rat brain (namely the cerebellum, frontal cortex, parietal cortex, piriform cortex, hippocampus, medulla oblongata, olfactory bulb, striatum and thalamus). It was found that all UGT1A isoforms were expressed in all the nine regions, but their expression levels differed between the regions. The difference between the regions of the brain where the mRNA levels were highest and those where they were lowest ranged between 2.1- to 7.8-fold. Glucuronidation activities were measured using the UGT substrates such as mycophenolic acid, p-nitrophenol and umbelliferone. Glucuronidation activity was detected in all nine regions of the brain. Activity levels differed between the regions, and were highest in the cerebellum, medulla oblongata and olfactory bulb. Differences in glucuronidation activity between regions with the highest rates and those with the lowest rates ranged from 5.3- to 10.1-fold. These results will contribute to our current understanding of the physiological and pharmacokinetic roles of drug-metabolizing enzymes in the brain. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27061716

  20. [Effects of total saponins of semen ziziphi Spinosae on brain damages and brain biochemical parameters under cerebral ischemia of rats].

    PubMed

    Bai, X; Huang, Z; Mo, Z; Pan, H; Ding, H

    1996-02-01

    Total saponins of Semen Ziziphi Spinosae (ZS) can reduce the contents of water and MDA in ischemic rat's brain tissues, elevate the activity of SOD, CK and LDH, cut down the content of lactate and alleviate the damages of nerve cells in brain. The study shows that ZS possesses protective effects on cerebral ischemic injuries. PMID:8758767

  1. Brain polyphosphoinositide metabolism during focal ischemia in rat cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, T.N.; Liu, T.H.; Xu, J.; Hsu, C.Y.; Sun, G.Y. )

    1991-04-01

    Using a rat model of stroke, we examined the effects of focal cerebral ischemia on the metabolism of polyphosphoinositides by injecting {sup 32}Pi into both the left and right cortices. After equilibration of the label for 2-3 hours, ischemia induced a significant decrease (p less than 0.001) in the concentrations of labeled phosphatidyl 4,5-bisphosphates (66-78%) and phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (64-67%) in the right middle cerebral artery cortex of four rats. The phospholipid labeling pattern in the left middle cerebral artery cortex, which sustained only mild ischemia and no permanent tissue damage, was not different from that of two sham-operated controls. However, when {sup 32}Pi was injected 1 hour after the ischemic insult, there was a significant decrease (p less than 0.01) in the incorporation of label into the phospholipids in both cortices of four ischemic rats compared with four sham-operated controls. Furthermore, differences in the phospholipid labeling pattern were observed in the left cortex compared with the sham-operated controls. The change in labeling pattern was attributed to the partial reduction in blood flow following ligation of the common carotid arteries. We provide a sensitive procedure for probing the effects of focal cerebral ischemia on the polyphosphoinositide signaling pathway in the brain, which may play an important role in the pathogenesis of tissue injury.

  2. Effect of exposure to diazinon on adult rat's brain.

    PubMed

    Rashedinia, Marzieh; Hosseinzadeh, Hossein; Imenshahidi, Mohsen; Lari, Parisa; Razavi, Bibi Marjan; Abnous, Khalil

    2016-04-01

    Diazinon (DZN), a commonly used agricultural organophosphate insecticide, is one of the major concerns for human health. This study was planned to investigate neurotoxic effects of subacute exposure to DZN in adult male Wistar rats. Animals received corn oil as control and 15 and 30 mg/kg DZN orally by gastric gavage for 4 weeks. The cerebrum malondialdehyde and glutathione (GSH) contents were assessed as biomarkers of lipid peroxidation and nonenzyme antioxidants, respectively. Moreover, activated forms of caspase 3, -9, and Bax/Bcl-2 ratios were evaluated as key apoptotic proteins. Results of this study suggested that chronic administration of DZN did not change lipid peroxidation and GSH levels significantly in comparison with control. Also, the active forms of caspase 3 and caspase 9 were not significantly altered in DZN-treated rat groups. Moreover, no significant changes were observed in Bax and Bcl-2 ratios. This study indicated that generation of reactive oxygen species was probably modulated by intracellular antioxidant system. In conclusion, subacute oral administration of DZN did not alter lipid peroxidation. Moreover, apoptosis induction was not observed in rat brain. PMID:24217015

  3. Kyotorphin (tyrosine-arginine) synthetase in rat brain synaptosomes.

    PubMed

    Ueda, H; Yoshihara, Y; Fukushima, N; Shiomi, H; Nakamura, A; Takagi, H

    1987-06-15

    Kyotorphin (Tyr-Arg) is a unique neuropeptide which produces analgesia by releasing Met-enkephalin from slices of the brain and spinal cord. Recent studies revealed that kyotorphin possesses the properties of neurotransmitter/neuroregulator. In the present study, we identified a kyotorphin synthetase in the soluble fraction of rat brain synaptosomes (synaptosol) and characterized it. The enzyme partially purified with Sephacryl S-300 showed an absolute requirement for ATP, MgCl2, tyrosine, and arginine. The optimal pH was 7.5-9.0 and the pI was determined to be 6.1-6.2 by isoelectric focusing. The Km was 25.6 microM for tyrosine, 926 microM for arginine, 294 microM for ATP, and 442 microM for MgCl2. The Vmax was 34.0 pmol/mg of protein/h. The apparent molecular size of this "kyotorphin synthetase" further purified by the DE52 column was 240,000-245,000 daltons, estimated using TSKgel G4000SW column chromatography. The enzyme reaction is represented by the following equation: Tyr + Arg + ATP + MgCl2 + kyotorphin synthetase----Tyr-Arg (kyotorphin) + AMP + PPi + MgCl2 + kyotorphin synthetase. The regional distribution and subcellular localization of the synthetase showed a close correlation to that of kyotorphin levels in the rat brain. The amounts of kyotorphin formed from amino acids by the synthetase in the dialyzed synaptosol was 3.0-4.0 times higher than that from precursor proteins by processing enzymes within the 30 min incubation. PMID:3597366

  4. An improved filtration procedure for measuring opiate receptors in small regions of rat brain.

    PubMed

    Bardo, M T; Bhatnagar, R K; Gebhart, G F

    1982-12-01

    A modified filtration method for in vitro receptor binding was used to determine specific binding of [3H]naloxone to small regions of adult rat brain. Reliable determinations of ligand binding were quantified with about 50 micrograms of protein per assay tube. Large differences in [3H]naloxone binding were obtained between various brain nuclei, and these differences were consistent with prior determinations of opiate receptor densities in various rat brain nuclei using autoradiographic techniques. PMID:6292368

  5. Citrobacter koseri Brain Abscess in the Neonatal Rat: Survival and Replication within Human and Rat Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Stacy M.; Pollack, Harvey A.; Gonzalez-Gomez, Ignacio; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Badger, Julie L.

    2003-01-01

    A unique feature of Citrobacter koseri is the extremely high propensity to initiate brain abscesses during neonatal meningitis. Previous clinical reports and studies on infant rats have documented many Citrobacter-filled macrophages within the ventricles and brain abscesses. It has been hypothesized that intracellular survival and replication within macrophages may be a mechanism by which C. koseri subverts the host response and elicits chronic infection, resulting in brain abscess formation. In this study, we showed that C. koseri causes meningitis and brain abscesses in the neonatal rat model, and we utilized histology and magnetic resonance imaging technology to visualize brain abscess formation. Histology and electron microscopy (EM) revealed that macrophages (and not fibroblasts, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, or neurons) were the primary target for long-term C. koseri infection. To better understand C. koseri pathogenesis, we have characterized the interactions of C. koseri with human macrophages. We found that C. koseri survives and replicates within macrophages in vitro and that uptake of C. koseri increases in the presence of human pooled serum in a dose-dependent manner. EM studies lend support to the hypothesis that C. koseri uses morphologically different methods of uptake to enter macrophages. FcγRI blocking experiments show that this receptor primarily facilitates the entry of opsonized C. koseri into macrophages. Further, confocal fluorescence microscopy demonstrates that C. koseri survives phagolysosomal fusion and that more than 90% of intracellular C. koseri organisms are colocalized within phagolysosomes. The ability of C. koseri to survive phagolysosome fusion and replicate within macrophages may contribute to the establishment of chronic central nervous system infection including brain abscesses.   PMID:14500508

  6. Kappa opioid receptors stimulate phosphoinositide turnover in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Periyasamy, S.; Hoss, W. )

    1990-01-01

    The effects of various subtype-selective opioid agonists and antagonists on the phosphoinositide (PI) turnover response were investigated in the rat brain. The {kappa}-agonists U-50,488H and ketocyclazocine produced a concentration-dependent increase in the accumulation of IP's in hippocampal slices. The other {kappa}-agonists Dynorphin-A (1-13) amide, and its protected analog D(Ala){sup 2}-dynorphin-A (1-13) amide also produced a significant increase in the formation of ({sup 3}H)-IP's, whereas the {mu}-selective agonists (D-Ala{sup 2}-N-Me-Phe{sup 4}-Gly{sup 5}-ol)-enkephalin and morphine and the {delta}-selective agonist (D-Pen{sup 2,5})-enkephalin were ineffective. The increase in IP's formation elicited by U-50,488H was partially antagonized by naloxone and more completely antagonized by the {kappa}-selective antagonists nor-binaltorphimine and MR 2266. The formation of IP's induced by U-50,488H varies with the regions of the brain used, being highest in hippocampus and amygdala, and lowest in striatum and pons-medullar. The results indicate that brain {kappa}- but neither {mu}- nor {delta}- receptors are coupled to the PI turnover response.

  7. A scanning SAXS/WAXS study of rat brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagi, Naoto

    2011-01-01

    A simultaneous SAXS (small-angle X-ray scattering) and WAXS (wide-angle X-ray scattering) measurement setup was installed at BL45XU in SPring-8. The system comprises of a short (specimen-to-sample distance about 50cm) vacuum path and a mosaic CCD detector. It covers a q-range of 0.02-2.5 nm-1. Using this setup, lipids in formalin-fixed rat brain were analyzed. A brain slice was moved across the X-ray beam with a step size of 0.5 mm to map reflections from lipids in various areas of brain. White matter that contains myelin gave strong lamellar reflections in the small-angle region which are often unisotropic. Gray matter shows only a central scatter in the small-angle region. In the wide angle region, both white and gray matters gave rise to sharp rings that are due to lateral packing of hydrocarbon chains in the lipid membranes. The relative intensities of these rings were different in white and gray matters, showing that the lateral arrangements of the lipids in bilayers are different.

  8. Maturation of metabolic connectivity of the adolescent rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hongyoon; Choi, Yoori; Kim, Kyu Wan; Kang, Hyejin; Hwang, Do Won; Kim, E Edmund; Chung, June-Key; Lee, Dong Soo

    2015-01-01

    Neuroimaging has been used to examine developmental changes of the brain. While PET studies revealed maturation-related changes, maturation of metabolic connectivity of the brain is not yet understood. Here, we show that rat brain metabolism is reconfigured to achieve long-distance connections with higher energy efficiency during maturation. Metabolism increased in anterior cerebrum and decreased in thalamus and cerebellum during maturation. When functional covariance patterns of PET images were examined, metabolic networks including default mode network (DMN) were extracted. Connectivity increased between the anterior and posterior parts of DMN and sensory-motor cortices during maturation. Energy efficiency, a ratio of connectivity strength to metabolism of a region, increased in medial prefrontal and retrosplenial cortices. Our data revealed that metabolic networks mature to increase metabolic connections and establish its efficiency between large-scale spatial components from childhood to early adulthood. Neurodevelopmental diseases might be understood by abnormal reconfiguration of metabolic connectivity and efficiency. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11571.001 PMID:26613413

  9. Heatstroke Effect on Brain Heme Oxygenase-1 in Rats.

    PubMed

    Wen, Ya-Ting; Liu, Tsung-Ta; Lin, Yuh-Feng; Chen, Chun-Chi; Kung, Woon-Man; Huang, Chi-Chang; Lin, Tien-Jen; Wang, Yuan-Hung; Wei, Li

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to high environmental temperature leading to increased core body temperature above 40°C and central nervous system abnormalities such as convulsions, delirium, or coma is defined as heat stroke. Studies in humans and animals indicate that the heat shock responses of the host contribute to multiple organ injury and death during heat stroke. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1)-a stress-responsive enzyme that catabolizes heme into iron, carbon monoxide, and biliverdin-has an important role in the neuroprotective mechanism against ischemic stroke. Here, we investigated the role of endogenous HO-1 in heat-induced brain damage in rats. RT-PCR results revealed that levels of HO-1 mRNA peaked at 0 h after heat exposure and immunoblot analysis revealed that the maximal protein expression occurred at 1 h post-heat exposure. Subsequently, we detected the HO-1 expression in the cortical brain cells and revealed the neuronal cell morphology. In conclusion, HO-1 is a potent protective molecule against heat-induced brain damage. Manipulation of HO-1 may provide a potential therapeutic approach for heat-related diseases. PMID:26392811

  10. Pharmaco-thermodynamics of deuterium-induced oedema in living rat brain via 1H2O MRI: implications for boron neutron capture therapy of malignant brain tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, Daniel C.; Li, Xin; Springer, Charles S., Jr.

    2005-05-01

    In addition to its common usage as a tracer in metabolic and physiological studies, deuterium possesses anti-tumoural activity and confers protection against γ-irradiation. A more recent interest in deuterium emanates from the search for alternatives capable of improving neutron penetrance whilst reducing healthy tissue radiation dose deposition in boron neutron capture therapy of malignant brain tumours. Despite this potential clinical application, deuterium induces brain oedema, which is detrimental to neutron capture therapy. In this study, five adult male rats were titrated with deuterated drinking water while brain oedema was monitored via water proton magnetic resonance imaging. This report concludes that deuterium, as well as deuterium-induced brain oedema, possesses a uniform brain bio-distribution. At a steady-state blood fluid deuteration value of 16%, when the deuterium isotope fraction in drinking water was 25%, a mean oedematous volume change of 9 ± 2% (p-value <0.001) was observed in the rat brain—this may account for neurological and behavioural abnormalities found in mammals drinking highly deuterated water. In addition to characterizing the pharmaco-thermodynamics of deuterium-induced oedema, this report also estimates the impact of oedema on thermal neutron enhancement and effective dose reduction factors using simple linear transport calculations. While body fluid deuteration enhances thermal neutron flux penetrance and reduces dose deposition, oedema has the opposite effect because it increases the volume of interest, e.g., the brain volume. Thermal neutron enhancement and effective dose reduction factors could be reduced by as much as ~10% in the presence of a 9% water volume increase (oedema). All three authors have contributed equally to this work.

  11. Intranasal delivery of mesenchymal stem cells significantly extends survival of irradiated mice with experimental brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Balyasnikova, Irina V; Prasol, Melanie S; Ferguson, Sherise D; Han, Yu; Ahmed, Atique U; Gutova, Margarita; Tobias, Alex L; Mustafi, Devkumar; Rincón, Esther; Zhang, Lingjiao; Aboody, Karen S; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2014-01-01

    Treatment options of glioblastoma multiforme are limited due to the blood-brain barrier (BBB). In this study, we investigated the utility of intranasal (IN) delivery as a means of transporting stem cell-based antiglioma therapeutics. We hypothesized that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) delivered via nasal application could impart therapeutic efficacy when expressing TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) in a model of human glioma. ¹¹¹In-oxine, histology and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were utilized to track MSCs within the brain and associated tumor. We demonstrate that MSCs can penetrate the brain from nasal cavity and infiltrate intracranial glioma xenografts in a mouse model. Furthermore, irradiation of tumor-bearing mice tripled the penetration of (¹¹¹In)-oxine-labeled MSCs in the brain with a fivefold increase in cerebellum. Significant increase in CXCL12 expression was observed in irradiated xenograft tissue, implicating a CXCL12-dependent mechanism of MSCs migration towards irradiated glioma xenografts. Finally, MSCs expressing TRAIL improved the median survival of irradiated mice bearing intracranial U87 glioma xenografts in comparison with nonirradiated and irradiated control mice. Cumulatively, our data suggest that IN delivery of stem cell-based therapeutics is a feasible and highly efficacious treatment modality, allowing for repeated application of modified stem cells to target malignant glioma. PMID:24002694

  12. Intranasal Delivery of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Significantly Extends Survival of Irradiated Mice with Experimental Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Balyasnikova, Irina V; Prasol, Melanie S; Ferguson, Sherise D; Han, Yu; Ahmed, Atique U; Gutova, Margarita; Tobias, Alex L; Mustafi, Devkumar; Rincón, Esther; Zhang, Lingjiao; Aboody, Karen S; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2014-01-01

    Treatment options of glioblastoma multiforme are limited due to the blood–brain barrier (BBB). In this study, we investigated the utility of intranasal (IN) delivery as a means of transporting stem cell–based antiglioma therapeutics. We hypothesized that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) delivered via nasal application could impart therapeutic efficacy when expressing TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) in a model of human glioma. 111In-oxine, histology and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were utilized to track MSCs within the brain and associated tumor. We demonstrate that MSCs can penetrate the brain from nasal cavity and infiltrate intracranial glioma xenografts in a mouse model. Furthermore, irradiation of tumor-bearing mice tripled the penetration of 111In-oxine–labeled MSCs in the brain with a fivefold increase in cerebellum. Significant increase in CXCL12 expression was observed in irradiated xenograft tissue, implicating a CXCL12-dependent mechanism of MSCs migration towards irradiated glioma xenografts. Finally, MSCs expressing TRAIL improved the median survival of irradiated mice bearing intracranial U87 glioma xenografts in comparison with nonirradiated and irradiated control mice. Cumulatively, our data suggest that IN delivery of stem cell–based therapeutics is a feasible and highly efficacious treatment modality, allowing for repeated application of modified stem cells to target malignant glioma. PMID:24002694

  13. The AT{sub 1} Receptor Antagonist, L-158,809, Prevents or Ameliorates Fractionated Whole-Brain Irradiation-Induced Cognitive Impairment

    SciTech Connect

    Robbins, Mike E. Payne, Valerie B.S.; Tommasi, Ellen B.S.; Diz, Debra I.; Hsu, Fang-Chi; Brown, William R.; Wheeler, Kenneth T.; Olson, John; Zhao Weiling

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: We hypothesized that administration of the angiotensin type 1 (AT1) receptor antagonist, L-158,809, to young adult male rats would prevent or ameliorate fractionated whole-brain irradiation (WBI)-induced cognitive impairment. Materials and Methods: Groups of 80 young adult male Fischer 344 x Brown Norway (F344xBN) rats, 12-14 weeks old, received either: (1) fractionated WBI; 40 Gy of {gamma} rays in 4 weeks, 2 fractions/week, (2) sham-irradiation; (3) WBI plus L-158,809 (20 mg/L drinking water) starting 3 days prior, during, and for 14, 28, or 54 weeks postirradiation; and (4) sham-irradiation plus L-158,809 for 14, 28, or 54 weeks postirradiation. An additional group of rats (n = 20) received L-158,809 before, during, and for 5 weeks postirradiation, after which they received normal drinking water up to 28 weeks postirradiation. Results: Administration of L-158,809 before, during, and for 28 or 54 weeks after fractionated WBI prevented or ameliorated the radiation-induced cognitive impairment observed 26 and 52 weeks postirradiation. Moreover, giving L-158,809 before, during, and for only 5 weeks postirradiation ameliorated the significant cognitive impairment observed 26 weeks postirradiation. These radiation-induced cognitive impairments occurred without any changes in brain metabolites or gross histologic changes assessed at 28 and 54 weeks postirradiation, respectively. Conclusions: Administering L-158,809 before, during, and after fractionated WBI can prevent or ameliorate the chronic, progressive, cognitive impairment observed in rats at 26 and 52 weeks postirradiation. These findings offer the promise of improving the quality of life for brain tumor patients.

  14. In vivo deep brain imaging of rats using oral-cavity illuminated photoacoustic computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Li; Xia, Jun; Wong, Terence T. W.; Zhang, Ruiying; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate, by means of internal light delivery, photoacoustic imaging of the deep brain of rats in vivo. With fiber illumination via the oral cavity, we delivered light directly into the bottom of the brain, much more than can be delivered by external illumination. The study was performed using a photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) system equipped with a 512-element full-ring transducer array, providing a full two-dimensional view aperture. Using internal illumination, the PACT system provided clear cross sectional photoacoustic images from the palate to the middle brain of live rats, revealing deep brain structures such as the hypothalamus, brain stem, and cerebral medulla.

  15. Induction of acute brain injury in mice by irradiation with high-LET charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Zhang, Hong

    The present study was performed to evaluate the induction of acute brain injury in mice after 235 Mev/u carbon ion irradiation. In our study, young outbred Kunming mice were divided into four treatment groups according to the penetration depth of carbon ions. Animals were irradiated with a sublethal dose of carbon ion beams prior to the Bragg curve. An experiment was performed to evaluate the acute alterations in histology, DNA double-strand breaks (DNA DSBs) as well as p53and Bax expression in the brain 96 h post-irradiation. The results demonstrated that various histopathological changes, a significant number of DNA DSBs and elevated p53 and Bax protein expression were induced in the brain following exposure to carbon ions. This was particularly true for mice irradiated with ions having a 9.1 cm-pentration depth, indicating that carbon ions can led to deleterious lesions in the brain of young animals within 96 h. Moreover, there was a remarkable increase in DNA DSBs and in the severity of histopathological changes as the penetration depths of ions increased, which may be associated with the complex track structure of heavy ions. These data reveal that carbon ions can promote serious neuropathological degeneration in the cerebral cortex of young mice. Given that damaged neurons cannot regenerate, these findings warrant further investigation of the adverse effects of the space radiation and the passage of a therapeutic heavy ion beam in the plateau region of the Bragg curve through healthy brain tissue.

  16. Continuous and simultaneous electrochemical measurements of glucose, lactate, and ascorbate in rat brain following brain ischemia.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yuqing; Yu, Ping; Hao, Jie; Wang, Yuexiang; Ohsaka, Takeo; Mao, Lanqun

    2014-04-15

    Developing new tools and technologies to enable recording the dynamic changes of multiple neurochemicals is the essence of better understanding of the molecular basis of brain functions. This study demonstrates a microfluidic chip-based online electrochemical system (OECS) for in vivo continuous and simultaneous monitoring of glucose, lactate, and ascorbate in rat brain. To fabricate the microfluidic chip-based detecting system, a microfluidic chip with patterned channel is developed into an electrochemical flow cell by incorporating the chip with three surface-modified indium-tin oxide (ITO) electrodes as working electrodes, a Ag/AgCl wire as reference electrode, and a stainless steel tube as counter electrode. Selective detection of ascorbate is achieved by the use of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) to largely facilitate the electrochemical oxidation of ascorbate, while a dehydrogenase-based biosensing mechanism with methylene green (MG) adsorbed onto SWNTs as an electrocatalyst for the oxidation of dihydronicotiamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) is employed for biosensing of glucose and lactate. To avoid the crosstalk among three sensors, the sensor alignment is carefully designed with the SWNT-modified electrode in the upstream channel and paralleled glucose and lactate biosensors in the downstream channels. With the microfluidic chip-based electrochemical flow cell as the detector, an OECS is successfully established by directly integrating the microfluidic chip-based electrochemical flow cell with in vivo microdialysis. The OECS exhibits a good linear response toward glucose, lactate, and ascorbate with less crosstalk. This property, along with the high stability and selectivity, enables the OECS for continuously monitoring three species in rat brain following brain ischemia. PMID:24621127

  17. Reduction in brain immunoreactive corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) in spontaneously hypertensive rats

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, K.; Hattori, T.; Murakami, K.; Suemaru, S.; Kawada, Y.; Kageyama, J.; Ota, Z.

    1985-02-18

    The brain CRF concentration of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and normotensive Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY) was examined by rat CRF radioimmunoassay. Anti-CRF serum was developed by immunizing rabbits with synthetic rat CRF. Synthetic rat CRF was also used as tracer and standard. The displacement of /sup 125/I-rat CRF by serially diluted extracts of male Wistar rats hypothalamus, thalamus, midbrain, pons, medulla oblongata, cerebral cortex, cerebellum and neurointermediate lobe was parallel to the displacement of synthetic rat CRF. In both WKY and SHR the highest levels of CRF immunoreactivity were shown by the hypothalamus and neurointermediate lobe, and considerable CRF immunoreactivity was also detected in other brain regions. The CRF immunoreactivity in the hypothalamus, neurointermediate lobe, midbrain, medulla oblongata and cerebral cortex was significantly reduced in SHR and it may suggest that CRF abnormality may be implicated in the reported abnormalities in the pituitary-adrenal axis, autonomic response and behavior of SHR.

  18. Developmental disturbance of rat cerebral cortex following prenatal low-dose gamma-irradiation: a quantitative study

    SciTech Connect

    Fukui, Y.; Hoshino, K.; Hayasaka, I.; Inouye, M.; Kameyama, Y. )

    1991-06-01

    Pregnant rats were exposed to a single whole-body gamma-irradiation on Day 15 of gestation at a dose of 0.27, 0.48, 1.00, or 1.46 Gy. They were allowed to give birth and the offspring were killed at 6 or 12 weeks of age for microscopic and electron microscopic examinations of the cerebrum. Their body weight, brain weight, cortical thickness, and numerical densities of whole cells and synapses in somatosensory cortex were examined. Growth of the dendritic arborization of layer V pyramidal cells was also examined quantitatively with Golgi-Cox specimens. A significant dose-related reduction in brain weight was found in all irradiated groups. Neither gross malformation nor abnormality of cortical architecture was observed in the groups exposed to 0.27 Gy. A significant change was found in thickness of cortex in the groups exposed to 0.48 Gy or more. Cell packing density increased significantly in the group exposed to 1.00 Gy. Significant reduction in the number of intersections of dendrites with the zonal boundaries were found in the groups exposed to 0.27 Gy or more. There was no difference in the numerical density of synapses in layer I between the control and irradiated groups. These results suggested that doses as low as 0.27 Gy could cause a morphologically discernible change in the mammalian cerebrum.

  19. Ultrafast in vivo microwave irradiation for enhanced metabolic stability of brain biopsy samples during HRMAS NMR analysis.

    PubMed

    Detour, J; Elbayed, K; Piotto, M; Moussallieh, F M; Nehlig, A; Namer, I J

    2011-09-30

    High resolution magic-angle spinning (HRMAS) NMR spectroscopy is a well established technique for ex vivo metabolite investigations but experimental factors such as ischemic delay or mechanical stress due to continuous spinning deserve further investigations. Cortical brain samples from rats that underwent ultrafast in vivo microwave irradiation (MWp group) were compared to similar samples that underwent standard nitrogen freezing with and without exposure to domestic microwaves (FN and FN+MWd groups). One dimensional (1)H HRMAS NMR spectra were acquired and 16 metabolites of interest were quantified. Within each group 3 samples underwent long lasting acquisition (up to 15 h). Statistically significant differences in metabolite concentrations were observed between groups for metabolites associated to post mortem biochemical changes and/or anaerobic glycolysis including several neurotransmitters. Spectral assessment over time showed a drastic reduction of biochemical variations in both MW groups. Only 2/16 metabolites exhibited significant signal variations after 15 h of continuous spinning and acquisition in the MWp group. This number increased to 10 in the FN group. We confirmed limited anaerobic metabolism and post mortem degradation after ultra fast in vivo MW irradiation. Furthermore, spectra obtained after MWp and MWd irradiation exhibited an extremely stable spectral pattern over extended periods of continuous acquisition. PMID:21803072

  20. Unraveling the fundamental molecular mechanisms of morphological and cognitive defects in the irradiated brain.

    PubMed

    Verheyde, Joris; Benotmane, Mohammed Abderrafi

    2007-02-01

    Prenatal radiation exposure may have serious consequences for normal brain development. Results of epidemiological studies clearly pointed towards an increased risk of mental retardation in children of the surviving women of the Hiroshima/Nagasaki atomic bombing when in utero exposure had occurred between weeks 8 and 15 of pregnancy or, at a lower extend between weeks 15 and 25. The high sensitivity of the developing brain, in comparison to the adult brain is related to its higher number of non-differentiated, dividing neural precursor cells. Exposure of the developing brain to ionizing radiation can lead to three main outcomes in the developing brain, depending on the radiation dose and the elapsed period after irradiation. A first event occurs early after irradiation and triggers disturbances in cell proliferation, migration, differentiation, and cell death. A second event involves the generation of morphological abnormalities in the developing brain, if the radiation dose is sufficient. A third event involves cognitive dysfunctions that are a direct consequence from a disturbance in regional brain formation. The latter results from exposure to low doses and is usually only observed in the later period of development. In order to understand the mechanisms of radiation-induced cognitive dysfunctions, it is important to track back the underlying changes in specific molecular pathways. In this review, we present the possible relationships within and between molecular pathways potentially involved in cognitive dysfunctions induced by ionizing radiation in the developing brain. PMID:17188364

  1. Voltammetric detection of 5-hydroxytryptamine release in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Hashemi, Parastoo; Dankoski, Elyse C; Petrovic, Jelena; Keithley, Richard B; Wightman, R M

    2009-11-15

    5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) is an important molecule in the brain that is implicated in mood and emotional processes. In vivo, its dynamic release and uptake kinetics are poorly understood due to a lack of analytical techniques for its rapid measurement. Whereas fast-scan cyclic voltammetry with carbon fiber microelectrodes is used frequently to monitor subsecond dopamine release in freely moving and anesthetized rats, the electrooxidation of 5-HT forms products that quickly polymerize and irreversibly coat the carbon electrode surface. Previously described modifications of the electrochemical waveform allow stable and sensitive 5-HT measurements in mammalian tissue slice preparations and in the brain of fruit fly larvae. For in vivo applications in mammals, however, the problem of electrode deterioration persists. We identify the root of this problem to be fouling by extracellular metabolites such as 5-hydoxyindole acetic acid (5-HIAA), which is present in 200-1000 times the concentration of 5-HT and displays similar electrochemical properties, including filming of the electrode surface. To impede access of the 5-HIAA to the electrode surface, a thin layer of Nafion, a cation exchange polymer, has been electrodeposited onto cylindrical carbon-fiber microelectrodes. The presence of the Nafion film was confirmed with environmental scanning electron microscopy and was demonstrated by the diminution of the voltammetric signals for 5-HIAA as well as other common anionic species. The modified microelectrodes also display increased sensitivity to 5-HT, yielding a characteristic cyclic voltammogram that is easily distinguishable from other common electroactive brain species. The thickness of the Nafion coating and a diffusion coefficient (D) in the film for 5-HT were evaluated by measuring permeation through Nafion. In vivo, we used physiological, anatomical, and pharmacological evidence to validate the signal as 5-HT. Using Nafion-modified microelectrodes, we present the

  2. Therapeutic irradiation and brain injury. [/sup 60/Co, x-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Sheline, G.E.; Wara, W.M.; Smith, V.

    1980-09-01

    This is a review and reanalysis of the literature on adverse effects of therapeutic irradiation on the brain. Reactions have been grouped and considered according to time of appearance. The emphasis of the analysis is on delayed reactions, especially those that occur from a few months to several years after irradiation. All dose specifications were converted into equivalent megavoltage rads. The data were analyzed in terms of total dose, overall treatment time and number of treatment fractions. Also discussed were acute radiation reactions, early delayed radiation reactions, somnolence and leukoencephalopathy post-irradiation/chemotherapy and combined effects of radiation and chemotherapy.

  3. SPECT study of low intensity He-Ne laser intravascular irradiation therapy for brain infarction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Xue-Chang; Dong, Jia-Zheng; Chu, Xiao-Fan; Jia, Shao-Wei; Liu, Timon C.; Jiao, Jian-Ling; Zheng, Xi-Yuan; Zhou, Ci-Xiong

    2003-12-01

    We used single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in brain perfusion imaging to study the changes of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and cerebral function in brain infarction patients treated with intravascular laser irradiation of blood (ILIB). 17 of 35 patients with brain infarction were admitted to be treated by ILIB on the base of standard drug therapy, and SPECT brain perfusion imaging was performed before and after ILIB therapy with self-comparison. The results were analyzed in quantity with brain blood flow function change rate (BFCR%) model. Effect of ILIB during the therapy process in the other 18 patients were also observed. In the 18 patients, SPECT indicated an improvement of rCBF (both in focus and in total brain) and cerebral function after a 30 min-ILIB therapy. And the 17 patients showed an enhancement of total brain rCBF and cerebral function after ILIB therapy in comparison with that before, especially for the focus side of the brain. The enhancement for focus itself was extremely obvious with a higher significant difference (P<0.0001). The mirror regions had no significant change (P>0.05). BFCR% of foci was prominently higher than that of mirror regions (P<0.0001). In conclusion, the ILIB therapy can improve rCBF and cerebral function and activate brain cells of patients with brain infarction. The results denote new evidence of ILIB therapy for those patients with cerebral ischemia.

  4. TOF-SIMS imaging of lipids on rat brain sections.

    PubMed

    Touboul, David; Brunelle, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Since several decades, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) coupled to time of flight (TOF) is used for atomic or small inorganic/organic fragments imaging on different materials. With the advent of polyatomic ion sources leading to a significant increase of sensitivity in combination with a reasonable spatial resolution (1-10 μm), TOF-SIMS is becoming a more and more popular analytical platform for MS imaging. Even if this technique is limited to small molecules (typically below 1,000 Da), it offers enough sensitivity to detect and locate various classes of lipids directly on the surface of tissue sections. This chapter is thus dedicated to the TOF-SIMS analysis of lipids in positive and negative ion modes on rat brain tissue sections using a bismuth cluster ion source. PMID:25361663

  5. Sex Differences in Serotonin 1 Receptor Binding in Rat Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischette, Christine T.; Biegon, Anat; McEwen, Bruce S.

    1983-10-01

    Male and female rats exhibit sex differences in binding by serotonin 1 receptors in discrete areas of the brain, some of which have been implicated in the control of ovulation and of gonadotropin release. The sex-specific changes in binding, which occur in response to the same hormonal (estrogenic) stimulus, are due to changes in the number of binding sites. Castration alone also affects the number of binding sites in certain areas. The results lead to the conclusion that peripheral hormones modulate binding by serotonin 1 receptors. The status of the serotonin receptor system may affect the reproductive capacity of an organism and may be related to sex-linked emotional disturbances in humans.

  6. Methylglyoxal can mediate behavioral and neurochemical alterations in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Fernanda; Pandolfo, Pablo; Galland, Fabiana; Torres, Felipe Vasconcelos; Dutra, Márcio Ferreira; Batassini, Cristiane; Guerra, Maria Cristina; Leite, Marina Concli; Gonçalves, Carlos-Alberto

    2016-10-01

    Diabetes is associated with loss of cognitive function and increased risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are elevated in diabetes and AD and have been suggested to act as mediators of the cognitive decline observed in these pathologies. Methylglyoxal (MG) is an extremely reactive carbonyl compound that propagates glycation reactions and is, therefore, able to generate AGEs. Herein, we evaluated persistent behavioral and biochemical parameters to explore the hypothesis that elevated exogenous MG concentrations, induced by intracerebroventricular (ICV) infusion, lead to cognitive decline in Wistar rats. A high and sustained administration of MG (3μmol/μL; subdivided into 6days) was found to decrease the recognition index of rats, as evaluated by the object-recognition test. However, MG was unable to impair learning-memory processes, as shown by the habituation in the open field (OF) and Y-maze tasks. Moreover, a single high dose of MG induced persistent alterations in anxiety-related behavior, diminishing the anxiety-like parameters evaluated in the OF test. Importantly, MG did not alter locomotion behavior in the different tasks performed. Our biochemical findings support the hypothesis that MG induces persistent alterations in the hippocampus, but not in the cortex, related to glyoxalase 1 activity, AGEs content and glutamate uptake. Glial fibrillary acidic protein and S100B content, as well as S100B secretion (astroglial-related parameters of brain injury), were not altered by ICV MG administration. Taken together, our data suggest that MG interferes directly in brain function and that the time and the levels of exogenous MG determine the different features that can be seen in diabetic patients. PMID:27235733

  7. Irradiated lymphocytes do not adoptively transfer diabetes or prevent spontaneous disease in the BB/W rat

    SciTech Connect

    Mordes, J.P.; Handler, E.S.; Like, A.A.; Nakano, K.; Rossini, A.A.

    1986-06-01

    Diabetes in the BB/W rat is autoimmune in origin, and lymphocytes from acutely diabetic animals activated by concanavalin A (con A) induce the disease in adoptive recipients. We report that irradiation of these cells prevents adoptive transfer of diabetes. Through 60 days of age, diabetes occurred in none of 47 BB/W rats given irradiated con A cells, but in 21 of 36 (58%) given nonirradiated cells. Between 60 and 130 days of age, however, spontaneous diabetes occurred in 18 of 34 untreated control rats (53%) and 16 of 32 rats (50%) given two injections of irradiated con A activated spleen cells. We conclude that irradiation prevents adoptive transfer of BB/W rat diabetes and that irradiated con A activated lymphocytes from acutely diabetic rats do not protect against spontaneous disease in susceptible recipients.

  8. Relationship between oxidative damage and colon carcinogenesis in irradiated rats: influence of dietary countermeasures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Nancy; Sanders, Lisa; Wu, Guoyao; Davidson, Laurie; Ford, John; Braby, Leslie; Carroll, Raymond; Chapkin, Robert; Lupton, Joanne

    Galactic cosmic radiation not only kills colon epithelial cells, it also generates a cellular environment that can lead to oxidative DNA damage. We previously demonstrated that a diet containing fish oil and pectin protects against initiation of colon cancer by enhancing apoptotic removal of cells with oxidative DNA adducts (8-OHdG), and that apoptosis was highly correlated with colon cancer suppression. We hypothesized this diet combination will mitigate the oxidative damage occurring from radiation and thus reduce colon cancer. The experiment tested the effect of radiation (± 1 Gy, 1 GeV/n Fe ions) on redox balance, apoptosis, and 8-OHdG levels at initiation and colon tumor incidence. Diets contained fish oil or corn oil, and cellulose or pectin (2x2 factorial design). Rats received the diets 3 wk before irradiation (half of the rats), followed by azoxymethane (AOM) injections 10 and 17 d later (all rats). Just prior to AOM injection, irradiated fish oil/pectin rats had a more reduced redox state in colonocytes (lower GSSG, P < 0.05; higher GSH/GSSG ratio), which was not observed in irradiated corn oil/cellulose rats. A shift to a more oxidative state (lower GSH and GSH/GSSG ratio, P < 0.05) occurred between 6 and 12 h after AOM in the fish oil/pectin irradiated rats. Changes in redox balance likely contributed to lower 8-OHdG levels in colonocytes from rats consuming the fish oil diets. Dietary pectin enhanced (P < 0.04) apoptosis induction 12 h after AOM injection in irradiated rats. Similar to the 8-OHdG results, colon tumor incidence was 42% higher (P < 0.05) in rats fed corn oil vs fish oil diets. In summary, fish oil/pectin diets created a more reduced colon environment in irradiated rats that was evident 10 d after irradiation. The ensuing oxidative shift in those rats after AOM injection may have enhanced apoptosis; effectively eliminating more DNA damaged cells. Thus, inclusion of fish oil and pectin in diets for long-duration space flights should help

  9. Protective effect of ginseng against gamma-irradiation-induced oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction in rats

    PubMed Central

    Mansour, Heba Hosny

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the potential protective effects of ginseng on gamma-irradiation-induced oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction in rats. Twenty four male albino rats were divided into four groups. In the control group, rats were administered vehicle by tube for 7 consecutive days. The second group was administered ginseng extract (100 mg/kg, by gavage) for 7 consecutive days. Animals in the third group were administered vehicle by tube for 7 consecutive days, then exposed to single dose gamma-irradiation (6 Gy). The Fourth group received ginseng extract for 7 consecutive days, one hour later rats were exposed to gamma-irradiation. Oral administration of ginseng extract prior to irradiation produced a significant protection which was evidenced by a significant reduction in serum creatine kinase (CPK) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activities and asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), urea and creatinine levels with significant increase in serum total nitrate/nitrite (NO(x)) level. Moreover, ginseng significantly increased cardiac and renal superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx) activities, and reduced glutathione (GSH) content, associated with a significant depletion in malondialdehyde (MDA) and NO(x) levels compared to irradiated group. This study suggests that ginseng may serve as a potential protective agent against gamma-irradiation-induced cardio-nephrotoxicity via enhancing the antioxidant activity and inhibition of endothelial dysfunction. PMID:26622217

  10. Mechanical properties of UV irradiated rat tail tendon (RTT) collagen.

    PubMed

    Sionkowska, Alina; Wess, Tim

    2004-04-01

    The mechanical properties of RTT collagen tendon before and after UV irradiation have been investigated by mechanical testing (Instron). Air-dried tendon were submitted to treatment with UV irradiation (wavelength 254 nm) for different time intervals. The changes in such mechanical properties as breaking strength and percentage elongation have been investigated. The results have shown, that the mechanical properties of the tendon were greatly affected by time of UV irradiation. Ultimate tensile strength and ultimate percentage elongation decreased after UV irradiation of the tendon. Increasing UV irradiation leads to a decrease in Young's modulus of the tendon. PMID:15178003

  11. Are soluble and membrane-bound rat brain acetylcholinesterase different

    SciTech Connect

    Andres, C.; el Mourabit, M.; Stutz, C.; Mark, J.; Waksman, A. )

    1990-11-01

    Salt-soluble and detergent-soluble acetylcholinesterases (AChE) from adult rat brain were purified to homogeneity and studied with the aim to establish the differences existing between these two forms. It was found that the enzymatic activities of the purified salt-soluble AChE as well as the detergent-soluble AChE were dependent on the Triton X-100 concentration. Moreover, the interaction of salt-soluble AChE with liposomes suggests amphiphilic behaviour of this enzyme. Serum cholinesterase (ChE) did not bind to liposomes but its activity was also detergent-dependent. Detergent-soluble AChE remained in solution below critical micellar concentrations of Triton X-100. SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of purified, Biobeads-treated and iodinated detergent-soluble 11 S AChE showed, under non reducing conditions, bands of 69 kD, 130 kD and greater than 250 kD corresponding, respectively, to monomers, dimers and probably tetramers of the same polypeptide chain. Under reducing conditions, only a 69 kD band was detected. It is proposed that an amphiphilic environment stabilizes the salt-soluble forms of AChE in the brain in vivo and that detergent-soluble Biobeads-treated 11 S AChE possess hydrophobic domain(s) different from the 20 kD peptide already described.

  12. Brain Pathology in Adult Rats Treated With Domoic Acid.

    PubMed

    Vieira, A C; Alemañ, N; Cifuentes, J M; Bermúdez, R; Peña, M López; Botana, L M

    2015-11-01

    Domoic acid (DA) is a neurotoxin reported to produce damage to the hippocampus, which plays an important role in memory. The authors inoculated rats intraperitoneally with an effective toxic dose of DA to study the distribution of the toxin in major internal organs by using immunohistochemistry, as well as to evaluate the induced pathology by means of histopathologic and immunohistochemical methods at different time points after toxin administration (6, 10, and 24 hours; 5 and 54 days). DA was detected by immunohistochemistry exclusively in pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus at 6 and 10 hours after dosing. Lesions induced by DA were prominent at 5 days following treatment in selected regions of the brain: hippocampus, amygdala, piriform and perirhinal cortices, olfactory tubercle, septal nuclei, and thalamus. The authors found 2 types of lesions: delayed death of selective neurons and large areas of necrosis, both accompanied by astrocytosis and microgliosis. At 54 days after DA exposure, the pathology was characterized by still-distinguishable dying neurons, calcified lesions in the thalamus, persistent astrocytosis, and pronounced microgliosis. The expression of nitric oxide synthases suggests a role for nitric oxide in the pathogenesis of neuronal degeneration and chronic inflammation induced by DA in the brain. PMID:25939577

  13. Expression and distribution of TRPV2 in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Nedungadi, Thekkethil Prashant; Dutta, Mayurika; Bathina, Chandra Sekhar; Caterina, Michael J; Cunningham, J Thomas

    2012-09-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) proteins are non-selective cation channels that mediate sensory transduction. The neuroanatomical localization and the physiological roles of isoform TRPV2 in the rodent brain are largely unknown. We report here the neuroanatomical distribution of TRPV2 in the adult male rat brain focusing on the hypothalamus and hindbrain regions involved in osmoregulation, autonomic function and energy metabolism. For this we utilized immunohistochemistry combined with brightfield microscopy. In the forebrain, the densest immunostaining was seen in both the supraoptic nucleus (SON) and the magnocellular division of the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus. TRPV2 immunoreactivity was also seen in the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis, the median preoptic nucleus and the subfornical organ, in addition to the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus (ARH), the medial forebrain bundle, the cingulate cortex and the globus pallidus to name a few. In the hindbrain, intense staining was seen in the nucleus of the solitary tract, hypoglossal nucleus, nucleus ambiguous, and the rostral division of the ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) and some mild staining in the area prostrema. To ascertain the specificity of the TRPV2 antibody used in this paper, we compared the TRPV2 immunoreactivity of wildtype (WT) and knockout (KO) mouse brain tissue. Double immunostaining with arginine vasopressin (AVP) using confocal microscopy showed a high degree of colocalization of TRPV2 in the magnocellular SON and PVN. Using laser capture microdissection (LCM) we also show that AVP neurons in the SON contain TRPV2 mRNA. TRPV2 was also co-localized with dopamine beta hydroxylase (DBH) in the NTS and the RVLM of the hindbrain. Based on our results, TRPV2 may play an important role in several CNS networks that regulate body fluid homeostasis, autonomic function, and metabolism. PMID:22750329

  14. Subcellular localization and compartmentation of thiamine derivatives in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Bettendorff, L; Wins, P; Lesourd, M

    1994-05-26

    The subcellular distribution of thiamine derivatives in rat brain was studied. Thiamine diphosphate content was highest in the mitochondrial and synaptosomal fractions, and lowest in microsomal, myelin and cytosolic fractions. Only 3-5% of total thiamine diphosphate was bound to transketolase, a cytosolic enzyme. Thiamine triphosphate was barely detectable in the microsomal and cytosolic fraction, but synaptosomes were slightly enriched in this compound compared to the crude homogenate. Both myelin and mitochondrial fractions contained significant amounts of thiamine triphosphate. In order to estimate the relative turnover rates of these compounds, the animals received an intraperitoneal injection of either [14C]thiamine or [14C]sulbutiamine (isobutyrylthiamine disulfide) 1 h before decapitation. The specific radioactivities of thiamine compounds found in the brain decreased in the order: thiamine > thiamine triphosphate > thiamine monophosphate > thiamine diphosphate. Incorporation of radioactivity into thiamine triphosphate was more marked with [14C]sulbutiamine than with [14C]thiamine. The highest specific radioactivity of thiamine diphosphate was found in the cytosolic fraction of the brain, though this pool represents less than 10% of total thiamine diphosphate. Cytosolic thiamine diphosphate had a twice higher specific radioactivity when [14C]sulbutiamine was used as precursor compared with thiamine though no significant differences were found in the other cellular compartments. Our results suggest the existence of two thiamine diphosphate pools: the bound cofactor pool is essentially mitochondrial and has a low turnover; a much smaller cytosolic pool (6-7% of total TDP) of high turnover is the likely precursor of thiamine triphosphate. PMID:8186256

  15. Tannic acid alleviates lead acetate-induced neurochemical perturbations in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Ashafaq, Mohammad; Tabassum, Heena; Vishnoi, Shruti; Salman, Mohd; Raisuddin, Sheikh; Parvez, Suhel

    2016-03-23

    Oxidative stress has been projected as a promising mechanism involved in lead exposure. The lead predisposition catalyzes oxidative reactions and generates reactive oxygen species. The present study was carried out to investigate the effect of oral administration of tannic acid (TA) on behavioral deficit, antioxidative deterioration induced by lead acetate (LA) exposure on experimental rat brain. Male Wistar rats were treated with 50mg/kg body weight of LA and TA for three times a week for two weeks. Our data showed LA-induced profound elevation of ROS production and oxidative stress, as evidenced by increased levels of oxidative stress markers such as lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyl observed in LA treated rats, whereas significant depletion in the activity of non-enzymatic antioxidants, enzymatic antioxidants, neurotoxicity biomarker and histological changes were observed in LA treated rat brain. However, TA administration restored antioxidant status of brain significantly when compared to control. Our results demonstrate that TA exhibits potent antioxidant properties and suppresses oxidative damages in rat brain induced by LA treatment. These findings were further supported by the neurotoxicity biomarker and histopathological findings in the brain tissue showed that TA protected tissue from deleterious effects of LA exposure. It is concluded, these data suggest that LA induces oxidative stress and supplementation of TA has a powerful antioxidant effect, and it protected rat brain from poisonous effect of LA exposure in experimental rat. PMID:26851560

  16. Synchrotron X Ray Induced Axonal Transections in the Brain of Rats Assessed by High-Field Diffusion Tensor Imaging Tractography

    PubMed Central

    Serduc, Raphaël; Bouchet, Audrey; Pouyatos, Benoît; Renaud, Luc; Bräuer-Krisch, Elke; Le Duc, Géraldine; Laissue, Jean A.; Bartzsch, Stefan; Coquery, Nicolas; van de Looij, Yohan

    2014-01-01

    Since approximately two thirds of epileptic patients are non-eligible for surgery, local axonal fiber transections might be of particular interest for them. Micrometer to millimeter wide synchrotron-generated X-ray beamlets produced by spatial fractionation of the main beam could generate such fiber disruptions non-invasively. The aim of this work was to optimize irradiation parameters for the induction of fiber transections in the rat brain white matter by exposure to such beamlets. For this purpose, we irradiated cortex and external capsule of normal rats in the antero-posterior direction with a 4 mm×4 mm array of 25 to 1000 µm wide beamlets and entrance doses of 150 Gy to 500 Gy. Axonal fiber responses were assessed with diffusion tensor imaging and fiber tractography; myelin fibers were examined histopathologically. Our study suggests that high radiation doses (500 Gy) are required to interrupt axons and myelin sheaths. However, a radiation dose of 500 Gy delivered by wide minibeams (1000 µm) induced macroscopic brain damage, depicted by a massive loss of matter in fiber tractography maps. With the same radiation dose, the damage induced by thinner microbeams (50 to 100 µm) was limited to their paths. No macroscopic necrosis was observed in the irradiated target while overt transections of myelin were detected histopathologically. Diffusivity values were found to be significantly reduced. A radiation dose ≤ 500 Gy associated with a beamlet size of < 50 µm did not cause visible transections, neither on diffusion maps nor on sections stained for myelin. We conclude that a peak dose of 500 Gy combined with a microbeam width of 100 µm optimally induced axonal transections in the white matter of the brain. PMID:24505446

  17. Glucose and amino acid metabolism in rat brain during sustained hypoglycemia

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, K.L.; Tyce, G.M.

    1983-04-01

    The metabolism of glucose in brains during sustained hypoglycemia was studied. (U-/sup 14/C)Glucose (20 microCi) was injected into control rats, and into rats at 2.5 hr after a bolus injection of 2 units of insulin followed by a continuous infusion of 0.2 units/100 g rat/hr. This regimen of insulin injection was found to result in steady-state plasma glucose levels between 2.5 and 3.5 mumol per ml. In the brains of control rats carbon was transferred rapidly from glucose to glutamate, glutamine, gamma-aminobutyric acid and aspartate and this carbon was retained in the amino acids for at least 60 min. In the brains of hypoglycemic rats, the conversion of carbon from glucose to amino acids was increased in the first 15 min after injection. After 15 min, the specific activity of the amino acids decreased in insulin-treated rats but not in the controls. The concentrations of alanine, glutamate, and gamma-amino-butyric acid decreased, and the concentration of aspartate increased, in the brains of the hypoglycemic rats. The concentration of pyridoxal-5'-phosphate, a cofactor in many of the reactions whereby these amino acids are formed from tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates, was less in the insulin-treated rats than in the controls. These data provide evidence that glutamate, glutamine, aspartate, and GABA can serve as energy sources in brain during insulin-induced hypoglycemia.

  18. The Effects of Shilajit on Brain Edema, Intracranial Pressure and Neurologic Outcomes following the Traumatic Brain Injury in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Khaksari, Mohammad; Mahmmodi, Reza; Shahrokhi, Nader; Shabani, Mohammad; Joukar, Siavash; Aqapour, Mobin

    2013-01-01

    Objective(s): Brain edema is one of the most serious causes of death within the first few days after trauma brain injury (TBI). In this study we have investigated the role of Shilajit on brain edema, blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability, intracranial pressure (ICP) and neurologic outcomes following brain trauma. Materials and Methods: Diffuse traumatic brain trauma was induced in rats by drop of a 250 g weight from a 2 m high (Marmarou’s methods). Animals were randomly divided into 5 groups including sham, TBI, TBI-vehicle, TBI-Shi150 group and TBI-Shi250 group. Rats were undergone intraperitoneal injection of Shilajit and vehicle at 1, 24, 48 and 72 hr after trauma. Brain water content, BBB permeability, ICP and neurologic outcomes were finally measured. Results: Brain water and Evans blue dye contents showed significant decrease in Shilajit-treated groups compared to the TBI-vehicle and TBI groups. Intracranial pressure at 24, 48 and 72 hr after trauma had significant reduction in Shilajit-treated groups as compared to TBI-vehicle and TBI groups (P<0.001). The rate of neurologic outcomes improvement at 4, 24, 48 and 72 hr after trauma showed significant increase in Shilajit-treated groups in comparison to theTBI- vehicle and TBI groups (P <0.001). Conclusion: The present results indicated that Shilajit may cause in improvement of neurologic outcomes through decreasing brain edema, disrupting of BBB, and ICP after the TBI. PMID:23997917

  19. A rat model for the treatment of melanoma metastatic to the brain by means of neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Matalka, K.Z.; Bailey, M.Q.; Barth, R.F.; Staubus, A.E.; Adams, D.M.; Soloway, A.H.; James, S.M.; Goodman, J.H. ); Coderre, J.A.; Fairchild, R.G. ); Rofstad, E.K. )

    1991-01-01

    Melanoma metastatic to the brain is a serious clinical problem for which there currently is no satisfactory treatment. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) has been shown by Mishima et al. to be clinically effective in the treatment of cutaneous melanoma using {sup 10}B-enriched boronophenylalaine (BPA) as the capture agent. In the present pilot study we have observed a significant prolongation in survival time of nude rats bearing intracerebral implants of the human melanoma cell line MRA 27 following administration of BPA and neutron irradiation. These findings suggest therapeutic efficacy, but unequivocal proof depends upon confirmation in a more definitive experiment using large numbers of animals with both solitary and multiple implants of melanoma. If our preliminary results are confirmed, then this will lay the groundwork for a clinical study of BNCT for the treatment of melanoma metastatic to the brain. 7 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Rat strain differences in brain structure and neurochemistry in response to binge alcohol

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Dirk; Rohlfing, Torsten; Hsu, Oliver; Vinco, Shara; Orduna, Juan; Luong, Richard; Bell, Richard L; Sullivan, Edith V; Pfefferbaum, Adolf

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Ventricular enlargement is a robust phenotype of the chronically dependent alcoholic human brain, yet the mechanism of ventriculomegaly is unestablished. Heterogeneous stock Wistar rats administered binge EtOH (3 g/kg intragastrically every 8 h for 4 days to average blood alcohol levels (BALs) of 250 mg/dL) demonstrate profound but reversible ventricular enlargement and changes in brain metabolites (e.g., N-acetylaspartate (NAA) and choline-containing compounds (Cho)). Objectives Here, alcohol-preferring (P) and alcohol-nonpreferring (NP) rats systematically bred from heterogeneous stock Wistar rats for differential alcohol drinking behavior were compared with Wistar rats to determine whether genetic divergence and consequent morphological and neurochemical variation affect the brain’s response to binge EtOH treatment. Methods The three rat lines were dosed equivalently and approached similar BALs. Magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy evaluated the effects of binge EtOH on brain. Results As observed in Wistar rats, P and NP rats showed decreases in NAA. Neither P nor NP rats, however, responded to EtOH intoxication with ventricular expansion or increases in Cho levels as previously noted in Wistar rats. Increases in ventricular volume correlated with increases in Cho in Wistar rats. Conclusions The latter finding suggests that ventricular volume expansion is related to adaptive changes in brain cell membranes in response to binge EtOH. That P and NP rats responded differently to EtOH argues for intrinsic differences in their brain cell membrane composition. Further, differential metabolite responses to EtOH administration by rat strain implicate selective genetic variation as underlying heterogeneous effects of chronic alcoholism in the human condition. PMID:24030467

  1. Forced running exercise attenuates hippocampal neurogenesis impairment and the neurocognitive deficits induced by whole-brain irradiation via the BDNF-mediated pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Jian-feng; Ji, Sheng-jun; Sun, Rui; Li, Kun; Zhang, Yuan; Zhang, Li-yuan; Tian, Ye

    2014-01-10

    Highlights: •Forced exercise can ameliorate WBI induced cognitive impairment in our rat model. •Mature BDNF plays an important role in the effects of forced exercise. •Exercise may be a possible treatment of the radiation-induced cognitive impairment. -- Abstract: Cranial radiotherapy induces progressive and debilitating cognitive deficits, particularly in long-term cancer survivors, which may in part be caused by the reduction of hippocampal neurogenesis. Previous studies suggested that voluntary exercise can reduce the cognitive impairment caused by radiation therapy. However, there is no study on the effect of forced wheel exercise and little is known about the molecular mechanisms mediating the effect of exercise. In the present study, we investigated whether the forced running exercise after irradiation had the protective effects of the radiation-induced cognitive impairment. Sixty-four Male Sprague–Dawley rats received a single dose of 20 Gy or sham whole-brain irradiation (WBI), behavioral test was evaluated using open field test and Morris water maze at 2 months after irradiation. Half of the rats accepted a 3-week forced running exercise before the behavior detection. Immunofluorescence was used to evaluate the changes in hippocampal neurogenesis and Western blotting was used to assess changes in the levels of mature brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), phosphorylated tyrosine receptor kinase B (TrkB) receptor, protein kinase B (Akt), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), calcium-calmodulin dependent kinase (CaMKII), cAMP-calcium response element binding protein (CREB) in the BDNF–pCREB signaling. We found forced running exercise significantly prevented radiation-induced cognitive deficits, ameliorated the impairment of hippocampal neurogenesis and attenuated the down-regulation of these proteins. Moreover, exercise also increased behavioral performance, hippocampal neurogenesis and elevated BDNF–pCREB signaling in non-irradiation

  2. Effects of radiofrequency radiation exposure on blood-brain barrier permeability in male and female rats.

    PubMed

    Sirav, Bahriye; Seyhan, Nesrin

    2011-12-01

    During the last several decades, numerous studies have been performed aiming at the question of whether or not exposure to radiofrequency radiation (RFR) influences the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of RFR on the permeability of BBB in male and female Wistar albino rats. Right brain, left brain, cerebellum, and total brain were analyzed separately in the study. Rats were exposed to 0.9 and 1.8 GHz continuous-wave (CW) RFR for 20 min (at SARs of 4.26 mW/kg and 1.46 mW/kg, respectively) while under anesthesia. Control rats were sham-exposed. Disruption of BBB integrity was detected spectrophotometrically using the Evans-blue dye, which has been used as a BBB tracer and is known to be bound to serum albumin. Right brain, left brain, cerebellum, and total brain were evaluated for BBB permeability. In female rats, no albumin extravasation was found in in the brain after RFR exposure. A significant increase in albumin was found in the brains of the RF-exposed male rats when compared to sham-exposed male brains. These results suggest that exposure to 0.9 and 1.8 GHz CW RFR at levels below the international limits can affect the vascular permeability in the brain of male rats. The possible risk of RFR exposure in humans is a major concern for the society. Thus, this topic should be investigated more thoroughly in the future. PMID:22047463

  3. EFFECTS OF HYPERTHERMIA AND HYPERTHERMIA PLUS MICROWAVES ON RAT BRAIN ENERGY METABOLISM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of hyperthermia, alone and in conjunction with microwave exposure, on brain energetics were studied in anesthetized male Sprague-Dawley rats. The effects of temperature on adenosine triphosphate concentration (ATP) and creatine phosphate concentration (CP) was determi...

  4. Low glucose utilization and neurodegenerative changes caused by sodium fluoride exposure in rat's developmental brain.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chunyang; Zhang, Shun; Liu, Hongliang; Guan, Zhizhong; Zeng, Qiang; Zhang, Cheng; Lei, Rongrong; Xia, Tao; Wang, Zhenglun; Yang, Lu; Chen, Yihu; Wu, Xue; Zhang, Xiaofei; Cui, Yushan; Yu, Linyu; Wang, Aiguo

    2014-03-01

    Fluorine, a toxic and reactive element, is widely prevalent throughout the environment and can induce toxicity when absorbed into the body. This study was to explore the possible mechanisms of developmental neurotoxicity in rats treated with different levels of sodium fluoride (NaF). The rats' intelligence, as well as changes in neuronal morphology, glucose absorption, and functional gene expression within the brain were determined using the Morris water maze test, transmission electron microscopy, small-animal magnetic resonance imaging and Positron emission tomography and computed tomography, and Western blotting techniques. We found that NaF treatment-impaired learning and memory in these rats. Furthermore, NaF caused neuronal degeneration, decreased brain glucose utilization, decreased the protein expression of glucose transporter 1 and glial fibrillary acidic protein, and increased levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the rat brains. The developmental neurotoxicity of fluoride may be closely associated with low glucose utilization and neurodegenerative changes. PMID:23982469

  5. Incidence and nature of tumors induced in Sprague-Dawley rats by gamma-irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, L.; Dreyfuss, Y.; Faraggiana, T.

    1988-05-01

    In our previous studies carried out on inbred rats of the Sprague-Dawley strain, the tumor incidence was increased following irradiation (150 rads, 5 times, at weekly intervals), from 22 to 93% in females and from 5 to 59% in males. Experiments here reported suggest that 2 consecutive total-body gamma-irradiations of 150 rads each are sufficient to induce in rats the development of tumors, some malignant; 18 of 19 females (94.7%) developed tumors at an average age of 11.4 mo, and seven of the 14 males in this group (50%) developed tumors at an average age of 10.4 mo. In the second group, which received 3 consecutive gamma-irradiations, 20 of 23 females (86.9%) and 5 of 13 males (38.4%) developed tumors at average ages of 9.1 and 7.5 mo, respectively. In the third group, among rats which received 4 consecutive gamma-irradiations, 17 of 19 females (89.4%) and 4 of 12 males (33.3%) developed tumors at average ages of 9.4 and 10.5 mo, respectively. The etiology of tumors either developing spontaneously or induced by irradiation in rats remains to be clarified. Our attempts to detect virus particles by electron microscopy in such tumors or lymphomas have not been successful. As a working hypothesis, we are tempted to theorize that tumors or lymphomas developing spontaneously or induced by gamma irradiation in rats are caused by latent viral agents which are integrated into the cell genome and are cell associated, i.e., not separable from the rat tumor cells by conventional methods thus far used.

  6. A Novel Technique for Image-Guided Local Heart Irradiation in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sunil; Moros, Eduardo G.; Boerma, Marjan; Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Han, Eun Young; Clarkson, Richard; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Corry, Peter M.

    2014-01-01

    In radiotherapy treatment of thoracic, breast and chest wall tumors, the heart may be included (partially or fully) in the radiation field. As a result, patients may develop radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD) several years after exposure to radiation. There are few methods available to prevent or reverse RIHD and the biological mechanisms remain poorly understood. In order to further study the effects of radiation on the heart, we developed a model of local heart irradiation in rats using an image-guided small animal conformal radiation therapy device (SACRTD) developed at our institution. First, Monte Carlo based simulations were used to design an appropriate collimator. EBT-2 films were used to measure relative dosimetry, and the absolute dose rate at the isocenter was measured using the AAPM protocol TG-61. The hearts of adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were irradiated with a total dose of 21 Gy. For this purpose, rats were anesthetized with isoflurane and placed in a custom-made vertical rat holder. Each heart was irradiated with a 3-beam technique (one AP field and 2 lateral fields), with each beam delivering 7 Gy. For each field, the heart was visualized with a digital flat panel X-ray imager and placed at the isocenter of the 1.8 cm diameter beam. In biological analysis of radiation exposure, immunohistochemistry showed γH2Ax foci and nitrotyrosine throughout the irradiated hearts but not in the lungs. Long-term follow-up of animals revealed histopathological manifestations of RIHD, including myocardial degeneration and fibrosis. The results demonstrate that the rat heart irradiation technique using the SACRTD was successful and that surrounding untargeted tissues were spared, making this approach a powerful tool for in vivo radiobiological studies of RIHD. Functional and structural changes in the rat heart after local irradiation are ongoing. PMID:24000983

  7. A novel technique for image-guided local heart irradiation in the rat.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sunil; Moros, Eduardo G; Boerma, Marjan; Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Han, Eun Young; Clarkson, Richard; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Corry, Peter M

    2014-12-01

    In radiotherapy treatment of thoracic, breast and chest wall tumors, the heart may be included (partially or fully) in the radiation field. As a result, patients may develop radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD) several years after exposure to radiation. There are few methods available to prevent or reverse RIHD and the biological mechanisms remain poorly understood. In order to further study the effects of radiation on the heart, we developed a model of local heart irradiation in rats using an image-guided small animal conformal radiation therapy device (SACRTD) developed at our institution. First, Monte Carlo based simulations were used to design an appropriate collimator. EBT-2 films were used to measure relative dosimetry, and the absolute dose rate at the isocenter was measured using the AAPM protocol TG-61. The hearts of adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were irradiated with a total dose of 21 Gy. For this purpose, rats were anesthetized with isoflurane and placed in a custom-made vertical rat holder. Each heart was irradiated with a 3-beam technique (one AP field and 2 lateral fields), with each beam delivering 7 Gy. For each field, the heart was visualized with a digital flat panel X-ray imager and placed at the isocenter of the 1.8 cm diameter beam. In biological analysis of radiation exposure, immunohistochemistry showed γH2Ax foci and nitrotyrosine throughout the irradiated hearts but not in the lungs. Long-term follow-up of animals revealed histopathological manifestations of RIHD, including myocardial degeneration and fibrosis. The results demonstrate that the rat heart irradiation technique using the SACRTD was successful and that surrounding untargeted tissues were spared, making this approach a powerful tool for in vivo radiobiological studies of RIHD. Functional and structural changes in the rat heart after local irradiation are ongoing. PMID:24000983

  8. Different subcellular localization of muscarinic and serotonin (S2) receptors in human, dog, and rat brain.

    PubMed

    Luabeya, M K; Maloteaux, J M; De Roe, C; Trouet, A; Laduron, P M

    1986-02-01

    Cortex from rat, dog, and human brain was submitted to subcellular fractionation using an analytical approach consisting of a two-step procedure. First, fractions were obtained by differential centrifugation and were analyzed for their content of serotonin S2 and muscarinic receptors, serotonin uptake, and marker enzymes. Second, the cytoplasmic extracts were subfractionated by equilibration in sucrose density gradient. In human brain, serotonin and muscarinic receptors were found associated mostly with mitochondrial fractions which contain synaptosomes, whereas in rat brain they were concentrated mainly in the microsomal fractions. Density gradient centrifugation confirmed a more marked synaptosomal localization of receptors in human than in rat brain, the dog displaying an intermediate profile. In human brain, indeed, more receptor sites were found to be associated with the second peak characterized in electron microscopy by the largest number of nerve terminals. In addition, synaptosomes from human brain are denser than those from rat brain and some marker enzymes reveal different subcellular distribution in the three species. These data indicate that more receptors are of synaptosomal nature in human brain than in other species and this finding is compatible with a larger amount of synaptic contacts in human brain. PMID:2934515

  9. Iron-induced Necrotic Brain Cell Death in Rats with Different Aerobic Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Mingzhe; Du, Hanjian; Ni, Wei; Koch, Lauren G.; Britton, Steven L.; Keep, Richard F.; Xi, Guohua; Hua, Ya

    2015-01-01

    Brain iron overload has a key role in brain injury after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Our recent study demonstrated that ICH-induced brain injury was greater in low capacity runner (LCR) than in high capacity runner (HCR) rats. The present study examines whether iron-induced brain injury differs between LCRs and HCRs. Adult male LCR and HCR rats had an intracaudate injection of iron or saline. Rats were euthanized at 2 and at 24 hours after T2 magnetic resonance imaging and the brains were used for immunostaining and Western blotting. LCRs had more hemispheric swelling, T2 lesion volumes, blood-brain barrier disruption and neuronal death at 24 hours after iron injection (p < 0.05). Many propidium iodide (PI) positive cells, indicative of necrotic cell death, were observed in the ipsilateral basal ganglia of both HCRs and LCRs at 2 hours after iron injection. PI fluorescence intensity was higher in LCRs than in HCRs. In addition, membrane attack complex (MAC) expression was increased at 2 hours after iron injection and was higher in LCRs than in HCRs. The PI positive cells colocalized with MAC positive cells in the ipsilateral basal ganglia. Iron induces more severe necrotic brain cell death, brain swelling, and blood-brain barrier disruption in LCR rats, which may be related with complement activation and MAC formation. PMID:25649272

  10. Expression of aquaporin-4 and pathological characteristics of brain injury in a rat model of traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, CHENGCHENG; CHEN, JIANQIANG; LU, HONG

    2015-01-01

    Aquaporin 4 (AQP4) is a widely distributed membrane protein, which is found in glial cells, ependymocytes and capillary endothelial cells in the brain, and particularly in the choroid plexus. AQP4 is a key regulator of water metabolism, and changes in its expression following brain injury are associated with pathological changes in the damaged side of the brain; however, the effects of brain injury on AQP4 and injury-induced pathological changes in the contralateral non-damaged side of the brain remain to be fully elucidated. In the present study, male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to traumatic brain injury (TBI) and changes in brain water content, the expression of AQP4 expression and pathological characteristics in the damaged and contralateral non-damaged sides of the brain were examined. In the damaged side of the brain, vasogenic edema appeared first, followed by cellular edema. The aggravated cellular edema in the damaged side of the brain resulted in two periods of peak edema severity. Pathological changes in the contralateral non-damaged side of the brain occurred later than those in the damaged side; cellular edema appeared first, followed by vasogenic edema, which was alleviated earlier than the cellular edema. AQP4 was downregulated during vasogenic edema, and upregulated during cellular edema. Taken together, these results suggested that the downregulation of AQP4 was a result of vasogenic edema and that the upregulation of AQP4 may have induced cellular edema. PMID:26459070

  11. Effects of Chronic Renal Failure on Brain Cytochrome P450 in Rats.

    PubMed

    Naud, Judith; Harding, Jessica; Lamarche, Caroline; Beauchemin, Stephanie; Leblond, Francois A; Pichette, Vincent

    2016-08-01

    Chronic renal failure (CRF) impedes renal excretion of drugs and their metabolism by reducing the expression of liver cytochrome P450 (P450). Uremic serum contains factors, such as parathyroid hormone (PTH), that decrease liver P450s. The P450s are also involved in the metabolism of xenobiotics in the brain. This study investigates: 1) the effects of CRF on rat brain P450, 2) the role of PTH in the downregulation of brain P450s in CRF rats, and 3) the effects of PTH on P450s in astrocytes. Protein and mRNA expression of P450s were assessed in the brain of CRF and control (CTL) rats, as well as from CTL or CRF rats that underwent parathyroidectomy (PTX) 1 week before nephrectomy. CYP3A activity was measured using 3-[(3, 4-difluorobenzyl) oxy]-5, 5-dimethyl-4-[4-methylsulfonyl) phenyl] furan-2(5H)-1 metabolism in brain microsomal preparation. CYP3A protein expression was assessed in primary cultured astrocytes incubated with serum obtained from CRF or CTL rats or with PTH. Significant downregulations (≥40%) of CYP1A, CYP2C11, and CYP3A proteins were observed in microsomes from CRF rat brains. CYP3A activity reduction was also observed. CYP3A expression and activity were unaffected in PTX-pretreated CRF rats. Serum of PTX-treated CRF rats had no impact on CYP3A levels in astrocytes compared with that of untreated CRF rats. Finally, PTH addition to normal calf serum induced a reduction in CYP3A protein similar to CRF serum, suggesting that CRF-induced hyperparathyroidism is associated with a significant decrease in P450 drug-metabolizing enzymes in the brain, which may have implications in drug response. PMID:27271372

  12. MRI Reveals Edema in Larynx (But Not in Brain) During Anaphylactic Hypotension in Anesthetized Rats

    PubMed Central

    Toyota, Ichiro; Tanida, Mamoru; Wang, Mofei; Kurata, Yasutaka; Tonami, Hisao

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Anaphylactic shock is sometimes accompanied by local interstitial edema due to increased vascular permeability. We performed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to compare edema in the larynx and brain of anesthetized rats during anaphylactic hypotension versus vasodilator-induced hypotension. Methods Male Sprague Dawley rats were subjected to hypotension induced by the ovalbumin antigen (n=7) or a vasodilator sodium nitroprusside (SNP; n=7). Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and T2-relaxation time (T2RT) were quantified on MRI performed repeatedly for up to 68 min after the injection of either agent. The presence of laryngeal edema was also examined by histological examination. Separately, the occurrence of brain edema was assessed by measuring brain water content using the wet/dry method in rats with anaphylaxis (n=5) or SNP (n=5) and the non-hypotensive control rats (n=5). Mast cells in hypothalamus were morphologically examined. Results Mean arterial blood pressure similarly decreased to 35 mmHg after an injection of the antigen or SNP. Hyperintensity on T2-weighted images (as reflected by elevated T2RT) was found in the larynx as early as 13 min after an injection of the antigen, but not SNP. A postmortem histological examination revealed epiglottic edema in the rats with anaphylaxis, but not SNP. In contrast, no significant changes in T2RT or ADC were detectable in the brains of any rats studied. In separate experiments, the quantified brain water content did not increase in either anaphylaxis or SNP rats, as compared with the non-hypotensive control rats. The numbers of mast cells with metachromatic granules in the hypothalamus were not different between rats with anaphylaxis and SNP, suggesting the absence of anaphylactic reaction in hypothalamus. Conclusion Edema was detected using the MRI technique in the larynx during rat anaphylaxis, but not in the brain. PMID:24179686

  13. Prolongation of rat heart allografts by donor-specific blood transfusion treated with ultraviolet irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Oluwole, S.F.; Iga, C.; Lau, H.; Hardy, M.A.

    1985-07-01

    The effect of donor-specific blood transfusion was compared to that of UVB-irradiated donor-specific blood transfusion on heart allograft survival in inbred rats with major histocompatibility differences. In one series ACI rats received heterotopic heart grafts from Lewis rats and 1 mL transfusion of donor-type blood at 1, 2, and 3 weeks prior to the transplantation. Fifty percent of the grafts were permanently accepted (survival greater than 200 days). Following UVB-irradiated donor-specific blood transfusion, 55% of the grafts survived indefinitely. In a mixed lymphocyte reaction ACI lymphocytes are weak responders to Lewis lymphocytes. In another series, Lewis rats received ACI hearts. Donor-specific transfusions at 1, 2, and 3 weeks prior to transplantation did not significantly alter the survival of heart allografts. Lewis lymphocytes react strongly to ACI stimulator cells in a mixed lymphocyte reaction. However, when the donor blood was UVB-irradiated prior to transfusion, the ACI allograft survival was significantly prolonged in this ACI-to-Lewis strain combination. When Lewis rats received W/F hearts following either donor-specific or UVB-irradiated donor-specific transfusions, the hearts' survival was similarly and significantly prolonged, but did not become permanent. Mixed lymphocyte reaction reveals that the stimulation index of Lewis lymphocytes against W/F lymphocytes is greater than that of ACI versus Lewis, but is less than that between Lewis responder cells against ACI stimulators.

  14. Allodynia-like effects in rat after ischaemic spinal cord injury photochemically induced by laser irradiation.

    PubMed

    Hao, J X; Xu, X J; Aldskogius, H; Seiger, A; Wiesenfeld-Hallin, Z

    1991-05-01

    We report behaviours suggesting the presence of allodynia elicited by non-noxious brushing and mechanical pressure following photochemically induced ischaemic spinal cord injury in the rat. Female rats were intravenously injected with Erythrosin B and the T10 vertebra was irradiated with a laser beam for 1, 5 or 10 min. These procedures initiated an intravascular photochemical reaction, resulting in ischaemic spinal cord injury. After irradiation a clear allodynia was observed in most rats. The animals vocalized intensely to light touch during gentle handling and were clearly agitated to light brushing of the flanks. The vocalization threshold in response to the mechanical pressure measured with von Frey hairs was markedly decreased during this period. In some animals the existence of spontaneous pain was suggested by spontaneous vocalization. The duration of the allodynia varied among animals from several hours to several days. The severity and duration of allodynia seemed not to be related to the duration of irradiation. In sham-operated rats a slight, transient allodynia was also noted around the wound within a few hours after surgery, which was effectively relieved by systemic morphine (2 mg/kg, i.p.). Morphine (2 mg/kg, i.p.) also partially relieved the allodynia in spinally injured rats 4 h after irradiation. However, morphine, even at a higher dose (5 mg/kg, i.p.), failed to alleviate the allodynia in spinally injured rats 24-48 h after the injury. Systemic injection of the GABAB agonist baclofen (0.01-0.1 mg/kg, i.p.), but not the GABAA agonist muscimol (1 mg/kg, i.p.), effectively relieved allodynia during this period. Pretreatment with guanethidine 24 h and just prior to the irradiation (20 mg/kg, s.c.) did not prevent the occurrence of allodynia in spinal cord injured rats. The present observation is the first to show that ischaemic spinal cord injury could result in cutaneous mechanical allodynia. This phenomenon is resistant to morphine and may not

  15. Ultrasonography in acute interstitial laser irradiation of the pig brain: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Menovsky, T; Beek, J F; Phoa, S S; Brouwer, P A; Klein, M G; Verlaan, C W; van Acker, R E; van Gemert, M J

    1995-01-01

    In this preliminary study, the use of real-time ultrasonography to visualize the effects of acute interstitial Nd:YAG laser irradiation was investigated in the normal pig brain. In six pigs, a craniotomy was performed. In the frontal or temporal lobe, a thermal laser lesion was made using a 600-micron-diameter optical fiber at powers of 1 W, 2 W, and 4 W with exposure times of 5 min and 10 min. Ten to thirty minutes after laser irradiation, the pigs were sacrificed. Ultrasound imaging was performed before, during, and after laser irradiation. During laser irradiation, a clear hyperechogenic area was observed around the fiber tip. The onset of the changes and the extent of the lesion were dependent on the power and exposure time. Histologic examination showed thermal lesions consisting of coagulation necrosis and edema. The size of the lesions correlated well with size on ultrasound imaging. The maximal lesion dimension was 12 mm in diameter (4 W for 5 min). In conclusion, within the limitations of this experimental setup, it is feasible to visualize interstitial laser-induced lesions in the brain by ultrasonography. This method is safe and simple and may be helpful in future applications of interstitial thermotherapy in brain tissue. PMID:9079450

  16. Effect of MCI-186 on ischemia-induced changes in monoamine metabolism in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Oishi, R; Itoh, Y; Nishibori, M; Watanabe, T; Nishi, H; Saeki, K

    1989-11-01

    We examined the effects of MCI-186 (3-methyl-1-phenyl-2-pyrazolin-5-one), a novel free radical scavenger and an inhibitor of ischemia-induced brain edema, on monoamine metabolism in the brains of both normal and ischemic rats. In normal rats, 3 mg/kg i.v. MCI-186, a dose that prevents ischemic brain edema, had no significant effect on brain concentrations of dopamine, norepinephrine, 5-hydroxytryptamine, or their metabolites. After the injection of 5 microliters of 3% polyvinyl acetate into the left internal carotid artery, concentrations of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and homovanillic acid markedly increased, but that of norepinephrine decreased, in the left telencephalon of embolized rats compared with control rats injected with vehicle; the concentration of 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid also increased slightly. These effects were maximal 2 hours after embolization. The turnover rate of dopamine between 6 and 8 hours after embolization was significantly higher but that of norepinephrine was slightly lower than that in vehicle-treated rats. When rats were treated with 3 mg/kg i.v. MCI-186 immediately after the injection of polyvinyl acetate, the embolization-induced changes in monoamine metabolism were less marked. Our results suggest that MCI-186 attenuates ischemia-induced changes in brain monoamine metabolism, probably due to its free radical scavenging action, although it has no marked effect in normal rats. PMID:2815191

  17. Population-averaged diffusion tensor imaging atlas of the Sprague Dawley rat brain.

    PubMed

    Veraart, Jelle; Leergaard, Trygve B; Antonsen, Bjørnar T; Van Hecke, Wim; Blockx, Ines; Jeurissen, Ben; Jiang, Yi; Van der Linden, Annemie; Johnson, G Allan; Verhoye, Marleen; Sijbers, Jan

    2011-10-15

    Rats are widely used in experimental neurobiological research, and rat brain atlases are important resources for identifying brain regions in the context of experimental microsurgery, tissue sampling, and neuroimaging, as well as comparison of findings across experiments. Currently, most available rat brain atlases are constructed from histological material derived from single specimens, and provide two-dimensional or three-dimensional (3D) outlines of diverse brain regions and fiber tracts. Important limitations of such atlases are that they represent individual specimens, and that finer details of tissue architecture are lacking. Access to more detailed 3D brain atlases representative of a population of animals is needed. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is a unique neuroimaging modality that provides sensitive information about orientation structure in tissues, and is widely applied in basic and clinical neuroscience investigations. To facilitate analysis and assignment of location in rat brain neuroimaging investigations, we have developed a population-averaged three-dimensional DTI atlas of the normal adult Sprague Dawley rat brain. The atlas is constructed from high resolution ex vivo DTI images, which were nonlinearly warped into a population-averaged in vivo brain template. The atlas currently comprises a selection of manually delineated brain regions, the caudate-putamen complex, globus pallidus, entopeduncular nucleus, substantia nigra, external capsule, corpus callosum, internal capsule, cerebral peduncle, fimbria of the hippocampus, fornix, anterior commisure, optic tract, and stria terminalis. The atlas is freely distributed and potentially useful for several purposes, including automated and manual delineation of rat brain structural and functional imaging data. PMID:21749925

  18. Effect of Cyclosporin A on the Uptake of D3-Selective PET Radiotracers in Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Zhude; Li, Shihong; Xu, Jinbin; Chu, Wenhua; Jones, Lynne A.; Luedtke, Robert R.; Mach, Robert H.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Four benzamide analogs having a high affinity and selectivity for D3 versus D2 receptors were radiolabeled with 11C or 18F for in vivo evaluation. Methods Precursors were synthesized and the four D3 selective benzamide analogs were radiolabeled. The tissue distribution and brain uptake of the four compounds were evaluated in control rats and rats pretreated with cyclosporin A, a modulator of P-glycoprotein and an inhibitor of other ABC efflux transporters that contribute to the blood brain barrier. MicroPET imaging was carried out for [11C]6 in a control and a cyclosporin A pre-treated rat. Results All four compounds showed low brain uptake in control rats at 5 and 30 min post-injection; despite recently reported rat behavioral studies conducted on analogs 6 (WC-10) and 7 (WC-44). Following administration of cyclosporin A, increased brain uptake was observed with all four PET radiotracers at both 5 and 30 min post-i.v. injection. An increase in brain uptake following modulation/inhibition of the ABC transporters was also observed in the microPET study. Conclusions These data suggest that D3 selective conformationally-flexible benzamide analogs which contain a N-2-methoxyphenylpiperazine moiety are substrates for P-glycoprotein or other ABC transporters expressed at the blood-brain barrier, and that PET radiotracers containing this pharmacophore may display low brain uptake in rodents due to the action of these efflux transporters. PMID:21718948

  19. The metabolism of malate by cultured rat brain astrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    McKenna, M.C.; Tildon, J.T.; Couto, R.; Stevenson, J.H.; Caprio, F.J. )

    1990-12-01

    Since malate is known to play an important role in a variety of functions in the brain including energy metabolism, the transfer of reducing equivalents and possibly metabolic trafficking between different cell types; a series of biochemical determinations were initiated to evaluate the rate of 14CO2 production from L-(U-14C)malate in rat brain astrocytes. The 14CO2 production from labeled malate was almost totally suppressed by the metabolic inhibitors rotenone and antimycin A suggesting that most of malate metabolism was coupled to the electron transport system. A double reciprocal plot of the 14CO2 production from the metabolism of labeled malate revealed biphasic kinetics with two apparent Km and Vmax values suggesting the presence of more than one mechanism of malate metabolism in these cells. Subsequent experiments were carried out using 0.01 mM and 0.5 mM malate to determine whether the addition of effectors would differentially alter the metabolism of high and low concentrations of malate. Effectors studied included compounds which could be endogenous regulators of malate metabolism and metabolic inhibitors which would provide information regarding the mechanisms regulating malate metabolism. Both lactate and aspartate decreased 14CO2 production from malate equally. However, a number of effectors were identified which selectively altered the metabolism of 0.01 mM malate including aminooxyacetate, furosemide, N-acetylaspartate, oxaloacetate, pyruvate and glucose, but had little or no effect on the metabolism of 0.5 mM malate. In addition, alpha-ketoglutarate and succinate decreased 14CO2 production from 0.01 mM malate much more than from 0.5 mM malate. In contrast, a number of effectors altered the metabolism of 0.5 mM malate more than 0.01 mM. These included methionine sulfoximine, glutamate, malonate, alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamate and ouabain.

  20. Rat brain endothelial cells are a target of manganese toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Marreilha dos Santos, Ana Paula; Milatovic, Dejan; Au, Catherine; Yin, Zhaobao; Batoreu, Maria Camila C.; Aschner, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential trace metal, however exposure to high Mn levels can result in neurodegenerative changes resembling Parkinson´s disease (PD). Information on Mn´s effects on endothelial cells of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is lacking. Accordingly, we tested the hypothesis that BBB endothelial cells are a primary target for Mn-induced neurotoxicity. The studies were conducted in an in vitro BBB model of immortalized rat brain endothelial (RBE4) cells. ROS production was determined by F2-Isoprostane (F2-IsoPs) measurement. The relationship between Mn toxicity and redox status was investigated upon intracellular glutathione (GSH) depletion with diethylmaleate (DEM) or L-buthionine sulfoximine (BSO). Mn exposure (200 or 800 µM MnCl2 or MnSO4) for 4 or 24h led to significant decrease in cell viability vs. controls. DEM or BSO pre-treatment led to further enhancement in cytotoxicity vs. exposure to Mn alone, with more pronounced cell death after 24h DEM pre-treatment. F2-IsoPs levels in cells exposed to MnCl2 (200 or 800 µM), were significantly increased after 4h and remained elevated 24h after exposure compared with controls. Consistent with the effects on cell viability and F2-IsoPs, treatment with MnCl2 (200 or 800 µM) was also associated with a significant decrease in membrane potential. This effect was more pronounced in cells exposed to DEM plus MnCl2 vs. cells exposed to Mn alone. We conclude that Mn induces direct injury to mitochondria in RBE4 cells. The ensuing impairment in energy metabolism and redox status may modify the restrictive properties of the BBB compromising its function. PMID:20170646

  1. Brain and Serum Androsterone Is Elevated in Response to Stress in Rats with Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Servatius, Richard J.; Marx, Christine E.; Sinha, Swamini; Avcu, Pelin; Kilts, Jason D.; Naylor, Jennifer C.; Pang, Kevin C. H.

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to lateral fluid percussion (LFP) injury consistent with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) persistently attenuates acoustic startle responses (ASRs) in rats. Here, we examined whether the experience of head trauma affects stress reactivity. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were matched for ASRs and randomly assigned to receive mTBI through LFP or experience a sham surgery (SHAM). ASRs were measured post injury days (PIDs) 1, 3, 7, 14, 21, and 28. To assess neurosteroids, rats received a single 2.0 mA, 0.5 s foot shock on PID 34 (S34), PID 35 (S35), on both days (2S), or the experimental context (CON). Levels of the neurosteroids pregnenolone (PREG), allopregnanolone (ALLO), and androsterone (ANDRO) were determined for the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum. For 2S rats, repeated blood samples were obtained at 15, 30, and 60 min post-stressor for determination of corticosterone (CORT) levels after stress or context on PID 34. Similar to earlier work, ASRs were severely attenuated in mTBI rats without remission for 28 days after injury. No differences were observed between mTBI and SHAM rats in basal CORT, peak CORT levels or its recovery. In serum and brain, ANDRO levels were the most stress-sensitive. Stress-induced ANDRO elevations were greater than those in mTBI rats. As a positive allosteric modulator of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABAA) receptors, increased brain ANDRO levels are expected to be anxiolytic. The impact of brain ANDRO elevations in the aftermath of mTBI on coping warrants further elaboration. PMID:27616978

  2. Does bosentan protect diabetic brain alterations in rats? The role of endothelin-1 in the diabetic brain.

    PubMed

    Demir, Recep; Cadirci, Elif; Akpinar, Erol; Cayir, Yasemin; Atmaca, Hasan Tarik; Un, Harun; Kunak, Celalettin Semih; Yayla, Muhammed; Bayraktutan, Zafer; Demir, Ilknur

    2015-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a major problem all over the world, affecting more people in recent years. Individuals with diabetes are more prone to disease than non-diabetics, especially vascular complications. The aim of this study was to examine the roles of the endothelin (ET)-1 in brain damage formed in a streptozocin (STZ)-induced diabetes model, and the effect of bosentan, which is the non-specific ET1 receptor blocker in the prevention of the diabetes-induced brain damage. To examine the effects of bosentan (50 mg/kg and 100 mg/kg) in this study, the rats were given the drug for 3 months. The rats were divided into four groups: the sham group (n = 10), the diabetic control group (n = 10), the group of diabetic rats given bosentan 50 mg/kg (n = 10) and the group of diabetic rats given bosentan 100 mg/kg (n = 10). Diabetes was induced in the rats by STZ (60 mg/kg i.p.). On day 91, all rats were killed. Brain tissues of the rats were measured by molecular, biochemical and histopathological methods. Antioxidant levels in the therapy groups were observed as quite near to the values in the healthy group. In this study, while the brain eNOS levels in the diabetic groups decreased, the ET1 and iNOS levels were found to be increased. However, in the diabetes group, hippocampus and cerebellum, pericellular oedema and a number of neuronal cytoretraction were increased in neuropiles, whereas these results were decreased in the therapy group. Based on all of these results, ET1 will not be ignored in diabetes-induced cerebral complications. PMID:25200216

  3. Brain and Serum Androsterone Is Elevated in Response to Stress in Rats with Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Servatius, Richard J; Marx, Christine E; Sinha, Swamini; Avcu, Pelin; Kilts, Jason D; Naylor, Jennifer C; Pang, Kevin C H

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to lateral fluid percussion (LFP) injury consistent with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) persistently attenuates acoustic startle responses (ASRs) in rats. Here, we examined whether the experience of head trauma affects stress reactivity. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were matched for ASRs and randomly assigned to receive mTBI through LFP or experience a sham surgery (SHAM). ASRs were measured post injury days (PIDs) 1, 3, 7, 14, 21, and 28. To assess neurosteroids, rats received a single 2.0 mA, 0.5 s foot shock on PID 34 (S34), PID 35 (S35), on both days (2S), or the experimental context (CON). Levels of the neurosteroids pregnenolone (PREG), allopregnanolone (ALLO), and androsterone (ANDRO) were determined for the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum. For 2S rats, repeated blood samples were obtained at 15, 30, and 60 min post-stressor for determination of corticosterone (CORT) levels after stress or context on PID 34. Similar to earlier work, ASRs were severely attenuated in mTBI rats without remission for 28 days after injury. No differences were observed between mTBI and SHAM rats in basal CORT, peak CORT levels or its recovery. In serum and brain, ANDRO levels were the most stress-sensitive. Stress-induced ANDRO elevations were greater than those in mTBI rats. As a positive allosteric modulator of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABAA) receptors, increased brain ANDRO levels are expected to be anxiolytic. The impact of brain ANDRO elevations in the aftermath of mTBI on coping warrants further elaboration. PMID:27616978

  4. Neural stem cell protects aged rat brain from ischemia–reperfusion injury through neurogenesis and angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yaohui; Wang, Jixian; Lin, Xiaojie; Wang, Liuqing; Shao, Bei; Jin, Kunlin; Wang, Yongting; Yang, Guo-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) show therapeutic potential for ischemia in young-adult animals. However, the effect of aging on NSC therapy is largely unknown. In this work, NSCs were transplanted into aged (24-month-old) and young-adult (3-month-old) rats at 1 day after stroke. Infarct volume and neurobehavioral outcomes were examined. The number of differentiated NSCs was compared in aged and young-adult ischemic rats and angiogenesis and neurogenesis were also determined. We found that aged rats developed larger infarcts than young-adult rats after ischemia (P<0.05). The neurobehavioral outcome was also worse for aged rats comparing with young-adult rats. Brain infarction and neurologic deficits were attenuated after NSC transplantation in both aged and young-adult rats. The number of survived NSCs in aged rats was similar to that of the young-adult rats (P>0.05) and most of them were differentiated into glial fibrillary acidic protein+ (GFAP+) cells. More importantly, angiogenesis and neurogenesis were greatly enhanced in both aged and young-adult rats after transplantation compared with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) control (P<0.05), accompanied by increased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Our results showed that NSC therapy reduced ischemic brain injury, along with increased angiogenesis and neurogenesis in aged rats, suggesting that aging-related microenvironment does not preclude a beneficial response to NSCs transplantation during cerebral ischemia. PMID:24714034

  5. Iodine-125-labeled triiodothyronine in rat brain: evidence for localization in discrete neural systems

    SciTech Connect

    Dratman, M.B.; Futaesaku, Y.; Crutchfield, F.L.; Berman, N.; Payne, B.; Sar, M.; Stumpf, W.E.

    1982-01-15

    Autoradiograms prepared from adult rat brains demonstrate that nerve cells and neuropil in different brain regions selectively concentrate and retain intravenously administered triiodothyronine, by mechanisms susceptible to saturation with excess triiodothyronine. A neuroregulatory role for thyroid hormones, strongly supported by the observations, may account for their marked effects on behavior and the activity of the autonomic nervous system.

  6. Enhancement of Sexual Behavior in Female Rats by Neonatal Transplantation of Brain Tissue from Males

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arendash, Gary W.; Gorski, Roger A.

    1982-09-01

    Transplantation of preoptic tissue from male rat neonates into the preoptic area of female littermates increased masculine and feminine sexual behavior in the recipients during adulthood. This suggests that functional connections develop between the transplanted neural tissue and the host brain. A new intraparenchymal brain transplantation technique was used to achieve these results.

  7. Congenital Viral Infections of the Brain: Lessons Learned from Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus in the Neonatal Rat

    PubMed Central

    Bonthius, Daniel J; Perlman, Stanley

    2007-01-01

    The fetal brain is highly vulnerable to teratogens, including many infectious agents. As a consequence of prenatal infection, many children suffer severe and permanent brain injury and dysfunction. Because most animal models of congenital brain infection do not strongly mirror human disease, the models are highly limited in their abilities to shed light on the pathogenesis of these diseases. The animal model for congenital lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection, however, does not suffer from this limitation. LCMV is a well-known human pathogen. When the infection occurs during pregnancy, the virus can infect the fetus, and the developing brain is particularly vulnerable. Children with congenital LCMV infection often have substantial neurological deficits. The neonatal rat inoculated with LCMV is a superb model system of human congenital LCMV infection. Virtually all of the neuropathologic changes observed in humans congenitally infected with LCMV, including microencephaly, encephalomalacia, chorioretinitis, porencephalic cysts, neuronal migration disturbances, periventricular infection, and cerebellar hypoplasia, are reproduced in the rat model. Within the developing rat brain, LCMV selectively targets mitotically active neuronal precursors. Thus, the targets of infection and sites of pathology depend on host age at the time of infection. The rat model has further shown that the pathogenic changes induced by LCMV infection are both virus-mediated and immune-mediated. Furthermore, different brain regions simultaneously infected with LCMV can undergo widely different pathologic changes, reflecting different brain region–virus–immune system interactions. Because the neonatal rat inoculated with LCMV so faithfully reproduces the diverse neuropathology observed in the human counterpart, the rat model system is a highly valuable tool for the study of congenital LCMV infection and of all prenatal brain infections In addition, because LCMV induces delayed

  8. High-strain-rate brain injury model using submerged acute rat brain tissue slices.

    PubMed

    Sarntinoranont, Malisa; Lee, Sung J; Hong, Yu; King, Michael A; Subhash, Ghatu; Kwon, Jiwoon; Moore, David F

    2012-01-20

    Blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI) has received increasing attention in recent years due to ongoing military operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. Sudden impacts or explosive blasts generate stress and pressure waves that propagate at high velocities and affect sensitive neurological tissues. The immediate soft tissue response to these stress waves is difficult to assess using current in vivo imaging technologies. However, these stress waves and resultant stretching and shearing of tissue within the nano- to microsecond time scale of blast and impact are likely to cause initial injury. To visualize the effects of stress wave loading, we have developed a new ex vivo model in which living tissue slices from rat brain, attached to a ballistic gelatin substrate, were subjected to high-strain-rate loads using a polymer split Hopkinson pressure bar (PSHPB) with real-time high-speed imaging. In this study, average peak fluid pressure within the test chamber reached a value of 1584±63.3 psi. Cavitation due to a trailing underpressure wave was also observed. Time-resolved images of tissue deformation were collected and large maximum eigenstrains (0.03-0.42), minimum eigenstrains (-0.33 to -0.03), maximum shear strains (0.09-0.45), and strain rates (8.4×10³/sec) were estimated using digital image correlation (DIC). Injury at 4 and 6 h was quantified using Fluoro-Jade C. Neuronal injury due to PSHPB testing was found to be significantly greater than injury associated with the tissue slice paradigm alone. While large pressures and strains were encountered for these tests, this system provides a controllable test environment to study injury to submerged brain slices over a range of strain rate, pressure, and strain loads. PMID:21970544

  9. Felbamate increases [3H]glycine binding in rat brain and sections of human postmortem brain.

    PubMed

    McCabe, R T; Sofia, R D; Layer, R T; Leiner, K A; Faull, R L; Narang, N; Wamsley, J K

    1998-08-01

    The anticonvulsant compound felbamate (2-phenyl-1,3-propanediol dicarbamate; FBM) appears to inhibit the function of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor complex through an interaction with the strychnine-insensitive glycine recognition site. Since we have demonstrated previously that FBM inhibits the binding of [3H]5, 7-dichlorokynurenic acid (DCKA), a competitive antagonist at the glycine site, we assessed the ability of FBM to modulate the binding of an agonist, [3H]glycine, to rat forebrain membranes and human brain sections. In contrast to its ability to inhibit [3H]5,7-DCKA binding, FBM increased [3H]glycine binding (20 nM; EC50 = 485 microM; Emax = 211% of control; nH = 1.8). FBM, but not carbamazepine, phenytoin, valproic acid or phenobarbital, also increased [3H]glycine binding (50 nM; EC50 = 142 microM; Emax = 157% of control; nH = 1.6) in human cortex sections. Autoradiographic analysis of human brain slices demonstrated that FBM produced the largest increases in [3H]glycine binding in the cortex, hippocampus and the parahippocampal gyrus. Because various ions can influence the binding of glycine-site ligands, we assessed their effects on FBM-modulation of [3H]glycine binding. FBM-enhanced [3H]glycine binding was attenuated by Zn++ and not inhibited by Mg++ in human brain. These results suggest that FBM increases [3H]glycine binding in a manner sensitive to ions which modulate the NMDA receptor. These data support the hypothesis that FBM produces anticonvulsant and neuroprotective effects by inhibiting NMDA receptor function, likely through an allosteric modulation of the glycine site. PMID:9694960

  10. In vivo deep brain imaging of rats using oral-cavity illuminated photoacoustic computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Li; Xia, Jun; Wong, Terence T. W.; Li, Lei; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-01-01

    Using internal illumination with an optical fiber in the oral cavity, we demonstrate, for the first time, photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) of the deep brain of rats in vivo. The experiment was performed on a full-ring-array PACT system, with the capability of providing high-speed cross-sectional imaging of the brain. Compared with external illumination through the cranial skull, internal illumination delivers more light to the base of the brain. Consequently, in vivo photoacoustic images clearly reveal deep brain structures such as the hypothalamus, brain stem, and cerebral medulla.

  11. Irradiation and responsiveness to pain stimuli in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Rutten, E.H.J.M.; Oosterveld, B.J.; Dirksen, R.; Crul, B.J.P.; Egmond, J. van )

    1994-01-01

    This study evaluates whether irradiation inhibits responses to pain in an animal model. The authors found that irradiation with doses of 10 Gy, 15 Gy and 17.5 Gy of the lumbar enlargement of the spinal cord inhibits behavioural responses to the stimulus of the hot-plate. These doses were otherwise without effects. This data is discussed in view of the effects of irradiation of living cells, and the authors propose that a modification of pain signal processing is accomplished. Similar considerations apply to the human condition.

  12. In vivo acylation of rat brain myelin proteolipid protein.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, H C; Randle, C L; Agrawal, D

    1982-04-25

    Examination of brain myelin proteins by sodium dodecyl sulfate-gel electrophoresis followed by fluorography clearly showed that both proteolipid protein (PLP) and DM-20 were acylated 24 h after the intracerebral injection of 30-day-old rats with [3H]palmitic acid. The radioactivity associated with PLP remained after purification, re-electrophoresis, and fluorography. Most of the radioactivity associated with PLP was removed when the gels were treated with hydroxylamine and then fluorographed, indicating that fatty acids were bound to PLP by ester linkage. Cleavage of purified PLP with methanolic sodium hydroxide readily released almost all protein-bound radioactivity. Thin layer chromatography of this material on both silver nitrate and reverse-phase plates provided evidence that most of the radioactivity co-migrated with methyl palmitate (77%) and methyl stearate (19%); however, some radioactivity was associated with methyl oleate (4%). Gas-liquid chromatography of the fatty acids associated with PLP distinctly revealed the presence of methyl palmitate and a detectable peak of methyl stearate. PMID:7068653

  13. Brain stimulation in rats exposed to hyperbaric environments.

    PubMed

    Ackerman, M J; Spencer, J W

    1976-12-01

    Six rats were trained to make an operant response to receive brief trains of electrical current to the lateral hypothalamus (self-stimulation). All animals were then randomly exposed to pressures of 4.03, 5.51, 7.06, or 10.1 ATA breathing either compressed air or N2-O2 and 13.1 ATA (N2-O2 only). When the subjects breathed air at pressures of 7.06 and 10.1 ATA, rate of self-stimulation decreased by 32 and 43%, respectively. No differences were observed in rate of response at any pressure when the animals breathed N2-O2 with the partial pressure of oxygen maintained at 0.2 ATA. When an oxygen-nitrogen mixture was breathed at 3 ATA in which the PO2 was similar to compressed air at 10.1 ATA, self-stimulation rate was decreased by 40%; this suggests that PO2 is a critical variable influencing behavior mediated by brain stimulation. Results are discussed in terms of the use of self-stimulation as one tool for better understanding the neuronal mechanisms of behavior as they relate to breathing-gas mixtures at increased pressures. PMID:10897863

  14. (/sup 3/H)-beta-endorphin binding in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Houghten, R.A.; Johnson, N.; Pasternak, G.W.

    1984-10-01

    The binding of (/sup 3/H)-beta-endorphin to rat brain homogenates is complex. Although Scatchard analysis of saturation studies yields a straight line, detailed competition studies are multiphasic, suggesting that even at low concentrations of the compound, the /sup 3/H-ligand is binding to more than one class of site. A portion of (/sup 3/H)-beta-endorphin binding is sensitive to low concentrations of morphine or D-Ala2-Leu5-enkephalin (less than 5 nM). The inhibition observed with each compound alone (5 nM) is the same as that seen with both together (each at 5 nM). Thus, the binding remaining in the presence of both morphine and the enkephalin does not correspond to either mu or delta sites. The portion of (/sup 3/H)-beta-endorphin binding that is inhibited under these conditions appears to be equally sensitive to both morphine and the enkephalin and may correspond to mu1 sites. Treating membrane homogenates with naloxonazine, a mu1 selective antagonist, lowers (/sup 3/H)-beta-endorphin binding to the same degree as morphine and D-Ala2-Leu5-enkephalin alone or together. This possible binding of (/sup 3/H)-beta-endorphin to mu1 sites is consistent with the role of mu1 sites in beta-endorphin analgesia and catalepsy in vivo.

  15. Induction of Lipocalin2 in a Rat Model of Lung Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Sultan, Sadaf; Ahmad, Shakil; Rave-Fränk, Margret; Malik, Ihtzaz Ahmed; Hess, Clemens F; Christiansen, Hans; Cameron, Silke

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we showed that lipocalin2 (LCN2) serum levels increased after liver irradiation and during acute-phase conditions. Here, we evaluate LCN2 expression and serum levels after single-dose lung irradiation with 25 Gy, percutaneously administered to the lung of randomly-paired male Wistar rats. Due to the concave anatomy of the lung recesses, the irradiation field included the upper part of the liver. No rat died due to irradiation. In control tissue, lung immunohistochemistry showed a high constitutive expression of LCN2+ granulocytes. LCN2 mRNA levels in lung tissue increased up to 24 h (9 ± 2.3-fold) after irradiation. However, serum LCN2 levels remained undetectable after lung irradiation. LCN2 expression in the upper part of the liver increased up to 4.2-fold after lung irradiation, but the lower liver showed an early decrease. Acute-phase cytokines (IL-1β and TNF-α) showed a significant increase on transcript level in both lung and upper liver, whilst the lower liver did not show any considerable increase. In conclusion, constitutive expression of LCN2 in local immune cells demonstrates its local role during stress conditions in the lung. The absence of LCN2 in the serum strengthens our previous findings that the liver is the key player in secreting LCN2 during stress conditions with liver involvement. PMID:27136530

  16. Increased EZH2 and decreased osteoblastogenesis during local irradiation-induced bone loss in rats

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Changjun; Li, Changwei; Yang, Kai; Kang, Hui; Xu, Xiaoya; Xu, Xiangyang; Deng, Lianfu

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy is commonly used to treat cancer patients but exhibits adverse effects, including insufficiency fractures and bone loss. Epigenetic regulation plays an important role in osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs). Here, we reported local bone changes after single-dose exposure to 137CS irradiation in rats. Femur bone mineral density (BMD) and trabecular bone volume in the tibia were significantly decreased at 12 weeks after irradiation. Micro-CT results showed that tBMD, Tb.h and Tb.N were also significantly reduced at 12 weeks after irradiation exposure. ALP-positive OB.S/BS was decreased by 42.3% at 2 weeks after irradiation and was decreased by 50.8% at 12 weeks after exposure. In contrast to the decreased expression of Runx2 and BMP2, we found EZH2 expression was significantly increased at 2 weeks after single-dose 137CS irradiation in BMSCs. Together, our results demonstrated that single-dose 137CS irradiation induces BMD loss and the deterioration of bone microarchitecture in the rat skeleton. Furthermore, EZH2 expression increased and osteoblastogenesis decreased after irradiation. The underlying mechanisms warrant further investigation. PMID:27499068

  17. Induction of Lipocalin2 in a Rat Model of Lung Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Sultan, Sadaf; Ahmad, Shakil; Rave-Fränk, Margret; Malik, Ihtzaz Ahmed; Hess, Clemens F.; Christiansen, Hans; Cameron, Silke

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we showed that lipocalin2 (LCN2) serum levels increased after liver irradiation and during acute-phase conditions. Here, we evaluate LCN2 expression and serum levels after single-dose lung irradiation with 25 Gy, percutaneously administered to the lung of randomly-paired male Wistar rats. Due to the concave anatomy of the lung recesses, the irradiation field included the upper part of the liver. No rat died due to irradiation. In control tissue, lung immunohistochemistry showed a high constitutive expression of LCN2+ granulocytes. LCN2 mRNA levels in lung tissue increased up to 24 h (9 ± 2.3-fold) after irradiation. However, serum LCN2 levels remained undetectable after lung irradiation. LCN2 expression in the upper part of the liver increased up to 4.2-fold after lung irradiation, but the lower liver showed an early decrease. Acute-phase cytokines (IL-1β and TNF-α) showed a significant increase on transcript level in both lung and upper liver, whilst the lower liver did not show any considerable increase. In conclusion, constitutive expression of LCN2 in local immune cells demonstrates its local role during stress conditions in the lung. The absence of LCN2 in the serum strengthens our previous findings that the liver is the key player in secreting LCN2 during stress conditions with liver involvement. PMID:27136530

  18. Increased EZH2 and decreased osteoblastogenesis during local irradiation-induced bone loss in rats.

    PubMed

    Guo, Changjun; Li, Changwei; Yang, Kai; Kang, Hui; Xu, Xiaoya; Xu, Xiangyang; Deng, Lianfu

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy is commonly used to treat cancer patients but exhibits adverse effects, including insufficiency fractures and bone loss. Epigenetic regulation plays an important role in osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs). Here, we reported local bone changes after single-dose exposure to (137)CS irradiation in rats. Femur bone mineral density (BMD) and trabecular bone volume in the tibia were significantly decreased at 12 weeks after irradiation. Micro-CT results showed that tBMD, Tb.h and Tb.N were also significantly reduced at 12 weeks after irradiation exposure. ALP-positive OB.S/BS was decreased by 42.3% at 2 weeks after irradiation and was decreased by 50.8% at 12 weeks after exposure. In contrast to the decreased expression of Runx2 and BMP2, we found EZH2 expression was significantly increased at 2 weeks after single-dose (137)CS irradiation in BMSCs. Together, our results demonstrated that single-dose (137)CS irradiation induces BMD loss and the deterioration of bone microarchitecture in the rat skeleton. Furthermore, EZH2 expression increased and osteoblastogenesis decreased after irradiation. The underlying mechanisms warrant further investigation. PMID:27499068

  19. Effects of low intensity laser irradiation during healing of infected skin lesions in the rat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nussbaum, Ethne L.; Lilge, Lothar; Mazzulli, Tony; Pritzker, Kenneth P.

    2006-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the effect of low intensity laser therapy (LILT) on healing of infected skin wounds in the rat. Methods: Wounds on the dorsum of Sprague-Dawley rats (14 per group) were inoculated or sham-inoculated with P. aeruginosa. Wounds were irradiated or sham-irradiated three times weekly from Day 1-19 using 635nm or 808nm diode lasers at radiant exposure of 1 or 20 J/cm2 delivered in continuous wave (CW) or at an intensity modulation frequency of 3800Hz. Wound area and bacterial growth were evaluated three times weekly. Results: CW 808 nm (1 and 20 J/cm2) irradiation generally delayed healing in acute wounds. However, from Day 10 onwards CW 808 nm (1 J/cm2 and 20 J/cm2) and 808 nm 3800 Hz (1 J/cm2) irradiation improved healing in inoculated wounds. Healing in acute wounds improved using 635 nm irradiation at low radiant exposure (1 J/cm2); however, using 635 nm irradiation at high radiant exposure (20 J/cm2) delayed healing. Bacterial balance in wounds was significantly altered using 635 nm (20 J/cm2) and CW 808 nm irradiation (1 and 20 J/cm2). Conclusion: Clearing wounds of normal flora was not associated with improved healing. Proliferation of staphylococcal species in wounds was associated with delayed healing.

  20. Prognostic factors for outcomes after whole-brain irradiation of brain metastases from relatively radioresistant tumors: a retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background This study investigated potential prognostic factors in patients treated with whole-brain irradiation (WBI) alone for brain metastases from relatively radioresistant tumors such as malignant melanoma, renal cell carcinoma, and colorectal cancer. Additionally, a potential benefit from escalating the radiation dose was investigated. Methods Data from 220 patients were retrospectively analyzed for overall survival and local control. Nine potential prognostic factors were evaluated: tumor type, WBI schedule, age, gender, Karnofsky performance score, number of brain metastases, extracerebral metastases, interval from diagnosis of cancer to WBI, and recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class. Results Survival rates at 6 and 12 months were 32% and 19%, respectively. In the multivariate analysis, WBI doses >30 Gy (p = 0.038), KPS ≥70 (p < 0.001), only 1-3 brain metastases (p = 0.007), no extracerebral metastases (p < 0.001), and RPA class 1 (p < 0.001) were associated with improved survival. Local control rates at 6 and 12 months were 37% and 15%, respectively. In the multivariate analyses, KPS ≥70 (p < 0.001), only 1-3 brain metastases (p < 0.001), and RPA class 1 (p < 0.001) were associated with improved local control. In RPA class 3 patients, survival rates at 6 months were 10% (35 of 39 patients) after 10 × 3 Gy and 9% (2 of 23 patients) after greater doses, respectively (p = 0.98). Conclusions Improved outcomes were associated with WBI doses >30 Gy, better performance status, fewer brain metastases, lack of extracerebral metastases, and lower RPA class. Patients receiving WBI alone appear to benefit from WBI doses >30 Gy. However, such a benefit is limited to RPA class 1 or 2 patients. PMID:20977700

  1. Localization of a brain sulfotransferase, SULT4A1, in the human and rat brain: an immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Liyou, Nancy E; Buller, Kathryn M; Tresillian, Michael J; Elvin, Christopher M; Scott, Heather L; Dodd, Peter R; Tannenberg, Anthony E G; McManus, Michael E

    2003-12-01

    Cytosolic sulfotransferases are believed to play a role in the neuromodulation of certain neurotransmitters and drugs. To date, four cytosolic sulfotransferases have been shown to be expressed in human brain. Recently, a novel human brain sulfotransferase has been identified and characterized, although its role and localization in the brain are unknown. Here we present the first immunohistochemical (IHC) localization of SULT4A1 in human brain using an affinity-purified polyclonal antibody raised against recombinant human SULT4A1. These results are supported and supplemented by the IHC localization of SULT4A1 in rat brain. In both human and rat brains, strong reactivity was found in several brain regions, including cerebral cortex, cerebellum, pituitary, and brainstem. Specific signal was entirely absent on sections for which preimmune serum from the corresponding animal, processed in the same way as the postimmune serum, was used in the primary screen. The findings from this study may assist in determining the physiological role of this SULT isoform. PMID:14623933

  2. Effects of nanoparticle zinc oxide on emotional behavior and trace elements homeostasis in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Amara, Salem; Slama, Imen Ben; Omri, Karim; El Ghoul, Jaber; El Mir, Lassaad; Rhouma, Khemais Ben; Abdelmelek, Hafedh; Sakly, Mohsen

    2015-12-01

    Over recent years, nanotoxicology and the potential effects on human body have grown in significance, the potential influences of nanosized materials on the central nervous system have received more attention. The aim of this study was to determine whether zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs) exposure cause alterations in emotional behavior and trace elements homeostasis in rat brain. Rats were treated by intraperitoneal injection of ZnO NPs (20-30 nm) at a dose of 25 mg/kg body weight. Sub -: acute ZnO NPs treatment induced no significant increase in the zinc content in the homogenate brain. Statistically significant decreases in iron and calcium concentrations were found in rat brain tissue compared to control. However, sodium and potassium contents remained unchanged. Also, there were no significant changes in the body weight and the coefficient of brain. In the present study, the anxiety-related behavior was evaluated using the plus-maze test. ZnO NPs treatment modulates slightly the exploratory behaviors of rats. However, no significant differences were observed in the anxious index between ZnO NP-treated rats and the control group (p > 0.05). Interestingly, our results demonstrated minimal effects of ZnO NPs on emotional behavior of animals, but there was a possible alteration in trace elements homeostasis in rat brain. PMID:23744884

  3. Effects of prenatal X-irradiation on postnatal testicular development and function in the Wistar rat: development/teratology/behavior/radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Jensh, R.P.; Brent, R.L.

    1988-11-01

    It is evident that significant permanent tissue hypoplasia can be produced following radiation exposure late in fetal development. Because two organs, brain and testes, are developmentally and functionally interrelated, it was of interest to determine whether fetal testicular hypoplasia was a primary or a secondary effect of fetal brain irradiation. Twenty-four pregnant Wistar strain rats were randomly assigned to one of four groups, and a laparotomy was performed on day 18 of gestation. The fetuses received sham irradiation, whole body irradiation, or only head/thorax or pelvic body irradiation at a dosage level of 1.5 Gy. Mothers were allowed to deliver and raise their offspring until postnatal day 30, when the offspring were weaned. At 60 days of age, 74 male offspring were allowed to mate with colony control females of similar age until successful insemination or until the males reached 90 days of age, when they were killed. Testes were weighed and processed for histologic examination. Direct radiation of testes, due to whole body or pelvic exposure, resulted in testicular growth retardation and significantly reduced spermatogenesis. Breeding activity of the males and the percent of positive inseminations were also slightly reduced. However, a significant percentage of male offspring receiving direct testicular radiation did produce offspring. Head/thorax-only irradiation did not adversely affect testicular growth or spermatogenesis. Therefore, the use of histologic analysis as the sole determinant of infertility may be misleading. This study indicates that testicular growth retardation and an increased infertility rate result from direct prenatal exposure of rat testes to X-radiation and are not necessarily mediated via X-irradiation effects on the central nervous system.

  4. [Renal pathomorphology of rats fed irradiated food products over a long period].

    PubMed

    Levina, A I; Ivanov, A E

    1978-02-01

    Morphological changes were studied in the kidneys of albino rats and their progeny fed only with irradiated food for 20 months. Morphological signs of the autoimmune process in the form of the membraneous-proliferative glomerulonephritis in combination with characteristic disturbances of the blood vessels and extensive lymphoid-histiocyticeosinophilis infiltration of the stroma were revealed. PMID:630103

  5. Age and sex-related changes in rat brain mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Guevara, Rocío; Gianotti, Magdalena; Roca, Pilar; Oliver, Jordi

    2011-01-01

    Aging is responsible for the decline in the function of mitochondria and their increase in size and number--adaptive mechanism to restore mitochondrial function. Estrogens increase mitochondrial function, especially in female rats. The aim of this study was to determine the age-related changes in rat brain mitochondrial function focusing on sex differences. Cellular and mitochondrial protein and DNA content, mitochondrial oxidative and phosphorylative function in male and female rat brain from four different age groups (6, 12, 18 and 24 months old) were analyzed. Mitochondria protein/DNA content decreased with aging shifting toward lesser mitochondrial functional capacity and the mitochondria number increased. A sex dimorphism was determined, with female rat brain showing mitochondria with greater functional capacity than males. These sex differences gradually increased during aging. PMID:21471708

  6. The effects of Pycnogenol(®) on colon anastomotic healing in rats given preoperative irradiation.

    PubMed

    Değer, K Cumhur; Şeker, Ahmet; Özer, Ilter; Bostancı, E Birol; Dalgıç, Tahsin; Akmansu, Müge; Ekinci, Özgür; Erçin, Uğur; Bilgihan, Ayşe; Akoğlu, Musa

    2013-01-01

    Pycnogenol(®) has excellent radical scavenging properties and enhances the production of antioxidative enzymes which contributes to the anti-inflammatory effect of the extract. Irradiation delivered to the abdominal region, typically results in severe damage to the intestinal mucosa. The effects of ionizing radiation are mediated by the formation of free radicals through radiolysis. Irradiation has local effects on tissues. These local effects of irradiation on the bowel are believed to involve a two-stage process which includes both short and long term components. In our study we aimed to investigate the short term effects of Pycnogenol(®) on the healing of colon anastomoses in irradiated bowel. Sixty male Wistar-Albino rats were used in this study. There were three groups: Group I, control group (n = 20); group II which received preoperative irradiation (n = 20); group III which received per oral Pycnogenol(®) before irradiation (n = 20). Only segmeter colonic resection and anastomosis was performed to the control group (Group I). The other groups (Group II, III) underwent surgery on the 5th day after pelvic irradiation. On postoperative days 3 and 7, half of the rats in each group were sacrificed and then relaparotomy was performed. There was no statistical difference between groups with respect to biochemical parameters. Bursting pressure was significantly higher in the Control and Group III compared with the Group II. In conclusion, the present study showed that preoperative irradiation effect negatively on colonic anastomoses in rats by means of mechanical parameters and administration of Pycnogenol(®) preoperatively ameliorates this unfavorable effect. PMID:23791893

  7. Carnosine pretreatment protects against hypoxia-ischemia brain damage in the neonatal rat model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiangmin; Song, Lili; Cheng, Xiuyong; Yang, Yi; Luan, Bin; Jia, Liting; Xu, Falin; Zhang, Zhan

    2011-09-30

    Perinatal hypoxia-ischemia brain injury is a major cause of mortality and morbidity in neonates and lacks an effective treatment thus far. Carnosine has been demonstrated to play a neuroprotective role in the adult brain injuries. However, there is no information available concerning its neuroprotective role in the immature brains after hypoxia-ischemia insults. Therefore, we investigated whether carnosine could also confer neuroprotective effects in a neonatal rat hypoxia-ischemia model. Hypoxia-ischemia was induced in rats on postnatal day 7 (P7). Carnosine (250 mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally, 30 min prior to hypoxia-ischemia induction. Morphological brain injury and biochemical markers of apoptosis and oxidative stress were evaluated 24 h after hypoxia-ischemia induction. Cognitive performance was evaluated by the Morris Water Maze test on P28-P33. We found that pretreatment with carnosine significantly reduced the infarct volume and the number of terminal-deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL)-positive cells in the hypoxia-ischemia brain. Carnosine also inhibited mRNA expression of apoptosis-inducing factor(AIF) and caspase-3, which was accompanied by an increase in superoxide dismutase(SOD)activity and a decrease in the malondialdehyde(MDA)level in carnosine-treated rats. Furthermore, carnosine also improved the spatial learning and memory abilities of rats declined due to hypoxia-ischemia. These results demonstrate that carnosine can protect rats against hypoxia-ischemia-induced brain damage by antioxidation. PMID:21693116

  8. Postischemic hyperthermia induced caspase-3 activation in the newborn rat brain after hypoxia-ischemia and exacerbated the brain damage.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Hirotsugu; Tomimatsu, Takuji; Kanagawa, Takeshi; Mu, Junwu; Kohzuki, Masatomo; Shimoya, Koichiro; Hosono, Takayoshi; Kanzaki, Toru; Murata, Yuji

    2003-01-01

    The effects of postischemic hyperthermia were investigated in the newborn rat brain after hypoxia-ischemia (HI). Seven-day-old rats were subjected to left carotid artery ligation followed by 8% oxygen for 30 min, and divided into a hyperthermia group (rectal temperature at 39 degrees C for 6 h) and a normothermia group. Hyperthermia resulted in an approximately 5-fold increase in activated caspase-3 24 h after HI when compared with the normothermia group, and gross loss of brain tissue was observed only in the hyperthermia group at 7 and 30 days after HI. Our results show that postischemic hyperthermia exacerbates HI injury in immature brains, and that the mechanism is strongly associated with activation of an apoptotic pathway. PMID:12907852

  9. Reversal of impaired wound healing in irradiated rats by platelet-derived growth factor-BB

    SciTech Connect

    Mustoe, T.A.; Purdy, J.; Gramates, P.; Deuel, T.F.; Thomason, A.; Pierce, G.F. )

    1989-10-01

    This study examined the potential influence of platelet-derived growth factor-BB homodimers (PDGF-BB) on surgical incisions in irradiated animals with depressed wound healing. Rats were irradiated with either 800 rads total body or 2,500 rads surface irradiation. Parallel dorsal skin incisions were made 2 days later, and PDGF-BB was applied topically a single time to one of two incisions. In total body-irradiated rats, bone marrow-derived elements were severely depressed, wound macrophages were virtually eliminated, and PDGF-BB treatment was ineffective. However, in surface-irradiated rats, PDGF-BB treatment recruited macrophages into wounds and partially reversed impaired healing on day 7 (p less than 0.005) and day 12 (p less than 0.001). PDGF-BB-treated wounds were 50 percent stronger than the paired control wounds. The results suggest PDGF requires bone marrow-derived cells, likely wound macrophages, for activity and that it may be useful as a topical agent in postirradiation surgical incisions.

  10. Dantrolene protects erythrocytes against oxidative stress during whole-body irradiation in rats.

    PubMed

    Emin Büyükokuroğlu, Mehmet; Taysi, Seyithan; Koç, Mehmet; Bakan, Nuri

    2003-06-01

    In our study, we examined the radioprotective effects of dantrolene against gamma irradiation-induced damage of blood cells after total body irradiation of rats. Rats were divided into three groups of eight rats each. The first group was the control group receiving no dantrolene or irradiation, the second group received total body irradiation (RT) with 5 Gy of gamma irradiation only, and the third group received dantrolene at a dose of 5 mg x kg(-1) plus RT. Dantrolene was given intraperitoneally 30 min before RT. All groups were sacrificed 2 h after RT, and blood samples were taken. Leukocyte, and thrombocyte counts and hemoglobin levels were measured. Furthermore, malondialdehyde (MDA) levels in plasma and erythrocytes and superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase activities (GSH-Px) in erythrocytes were determined. It was found that pretreatment with dantrolene at a dose of 5 mg x kg(-1) significantly reduced the MDA levels and increased the antioxidant SOD and GSH-Px activities, and prevented the decrease in leukocyte and thrombocyte counts. We conclude that dantrolene has clear antioxidant properties when given prior to radiation exposure and the protective effect of dantrolene against damage inflicted by radiation, depends, at least in part, on the decrease in lipid peroxidation and increase in the activity of antioxidant enzymes SOD and GSH-Px. PMID:12736901

  11. Kidney and lung injury in irradiated rats protected from acute death by partial-body shielding

    SciTech Connect

    Geraci, J.P.; Jackson, K.L.; Mariano, M.S.; Michieli, B.M. )

    1990-04-01

    Ninety-six CD-1 male rats were exposed to gamma-ray doses (0-25 Gy) in increments of 5 Gy. One femur, the surgically exteriorized GI tract, and the oral cavity were shielded during irradiation to protect against acute mortality from injury to the hematopoietic system, small intestine, and oral cavity. In addition, the thoraxes of half of the animals from each dose group were shielded. At approximately monthly intervals from 2 to 10 months after irradiation the hematocrit, plasma urea nitrogen (PUN), and {sup 51}Cr-EDTA clearance were measured. During the study 20 thorax-shielded and 19 thorax-irradiated animals died. All rats whose thoraxes received 25 Gy irradiation and three out of seven rats whose thoraxes received 20 Gy died 1 to 3 months postirradiation with massive pleural fluid accumulation. Shielding the thoraxes prevented this mode of death at these doses. Kidney injury was judged to be the primary cause of death of all thorax-shielded animals and 15- and 20-Gy thorax-irradiated animals. Animals with kidney damage had elevated PUN and reduced {sup 51}Cr-EDTA clearance and hematocrits. The relative merits of each of these end points in assessing radiation-induced kidney injury after total-body exposure are discussed.

  12. Lithium Visibility in Rat Brain and Muscle in Vivoby 7Li NMR Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komoroski, Richard A.; Pearce, John M.; Newton, Joseph E. O.

    1998-07-01

    The apparent concentration of lithium (Li)in vivowas determined for several regions in the brain and muscle of rats by7Li NMR imaging at 4.7 T with inclusion of an external standard of known concentration and visibility. The average apparent concentrations were 10.1 mM for muscle, and 4.2-5.3 mM for various brain regions under the dosing conditions used. The results were compared to concentrations determinedin vitroby high-resolution7Li NMR spectroscopy of extracts of brain and muscle tissue from the same rats. The comparison provided estimates of the7Li NMR visibility of the Li cation in each tissue region. Although there was considerable scatter of the calculated visibilities among the five rats studied, the results suggested essentially full visibility (96%) for Li in muscle, and somewhat reduced visibility (74-93%) in the various brain regions.

  13. Donepezil for Irradiated Brain Tumor Survivors: A Phase III Randomized Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Rapp, Stephen R.; Case, L. Doug; Peiffer, Ann; Naughton, Michelle M.; Chan, Michael D.; Stieber, Volker W.; Moore, Dennis F.; Falchuk, Steven C.; Piephoff, James V.; Edenfield, William J.; Giguere, Jeffrey K.; Loghin, Monica E.; Shaw, Edward G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Neurotoxic effects of brain irradiation include cognitive impairment in 50% to 90% of patients. Prior studies have suggested that donepezil, a neurotransmitter modulator, may improve cognitive function. Patients and Methods A total of 198 adult brain tumor survivors ≥ 6 months after partial- or whole-brain irradiation were randomly assigned to receive a single daily dose (5 mg for 6 weeks, 10 mg for 18 weeks) of donepezil or placebo. A cognitive test battery assessing memory, attention, language, visuomotor, verbal fluency, and executive functions was administered before random assignment and at 12 and 24 weeks. A cognitive composite score (primary outcome) and individual cognitive domains were evaluated. Results Of this mostly middle-age, married, non-Hispanic white sample, 66% had primary brain tumors, 27% had brain metastases, and 8% underwent prophylactic cranial irradiation. After 24 weeks of treatment, the composite scores did not differ significantly between groups (P = .48); however, significant differences favoring donepezil were observed for memory (recognition, P = .027; discrimination, P = .007) and motor speed and dexterity (P = .016). Significant interactions between pretreatment cognitive function and treatment were found for cognitive composite (P = .01), immediate recall (P = .05), delayed recall (P = .004), attention (P = .01), visuomotor skills (P = .02), and motor speed and dexterity (P < .001), with the benefits of donepezil greater for those who were more cognitively impaired before study treatment. Conclusion Treatment with donepezil did not significantly improve the overall composite score, but it did result in modest improvements in several cognitive functions, especially among patients with greater pretreatment impairments. PMID:25897156

  14. Regional Volume Decreases in the Brain of Pax6 Heterozygous Mutant Rats: MRI Deformation-Based Morphometry

    PubMed Central

    Hiraoka, Kotaro; Sumiyoshi, Akira; Nonaka, Hiroi; Kikkawa, Takako; Kawashima, Ryuta; Osumi, Noriko

    2016-01-01

    Pax6 is a transcription factor that pleiotropically regulates various developmental processes in the central nervous system. In a previous study, we revealed that Pax6 heterozygous mutant (rSey2/+) adult rats exhibit abnormalities in social interaction. However, the brain malformations underlying the behavioral abnormality are unknown. To elucidate the brain malformations in rSey2/+ rats, we morphometrically analyzed brains of rSey2/+ and wild type rats using small-animal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Sixty 10-week-old rats underwent brain MRI (29 rSey2/+ rats and 31 wild type rats). SPM8 software was used for image preprocessing and statistical image analysis. Normalized maps of the Jacobian determinant, a parameter for the expansion and/or contraction of brain regions, were obtained for each rat. rSey2/+ rats showed significant volume decreases in various brain regions including the neocortex, corpus callosum, olfactory structures, hippocampal formation, diencephalon, and midbrain compared to wild type rats. Among brain regions, the anterior commissure showed significant interaction between genotype and sex, indicating the effect of genotype difference on the anterior commissure volume was more robust in females than in males. The rSey2/+ rats exhibited decreased volume in various gray and white matter regions of the brain, which may contribute to manifestation of abnormal social behaviors. PMID:27355350

  15. Regional Volume Decreases in the Brain of Pax6 Heterozygous Mutant Rats: MRI Deformation-Based Morphometry.

    PubMed

    Hiraoka, Kotaro; Sumiyoshi, Akira; Nonaka, Hiroi; Kikkawa, Takako; Kawashima, Ryuta; Osumi, Noriko

    2016-01-01

    Pax6 is a transcription factor that pleiotropically regulates various developmental processes in the central nervous system. In a previous study, we revealed that Pax6 heterozygous mutant (rSey2/+) adult rats exhibit abnormalities in social interaction. However, the brain malformations underlying the behavioral abnormality are unknown. To elucidate the brain malformations in rSey2/+ rats, we morphometrically analyzed brains of rSey2/+ and wild type rats using small-animal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Sixty 10-week-old rats underwent brain MRI (29 rSey2/+ rats and 31 wild type rats). SPM8 software was used for image preprocessing and statistical image analysis. Normalized maps of the Jacobian determinant, a parameter for the expansion and/or contraction of brain regions, were obtained for each rat. rSey2/+ rats showed significant volume decreases in various brain regions including the neocortex, corpus callosum, olfactory structures, hippocampal formation, diencephalon, and midbrain compared to wild type rats. Among brain regions, the anterior commissure showed significant interaction between genotype and sex, indicating the effect of genotype difference on the anterior commissure volume was more robust in females than in males. The rSey2/+ rats exhibited decreased volume in various gray and white matter regions of the brain, which may contribute to manifestation of abnormal social behaviors. PMID:27355350

  16. Design and characterization of an economical 192Ir hemi-brain small animal irradiator

    PubMed Central

    Sio, Terence T.; Beltran, Chris J.; Tryggestad, Erik J.; Gupta, Shiv K.; Blackwell, Charles R.; McCollough, Kevin P.; Sarkaria, Jann N.; Furutani, Keith M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To describe the design and dosimetric characterization of a simple and economical small animal irradiator. Materials and methods A high dose rate (HDR) 192Ir brachytherapy source from a commercially available afterloader was used with a 1.3 cm thick tungsten collimator to provide sharp beam penumbra suitable for hemi-brain irradiation of mice. The unit was equipped with continuous gas anesthesia to allow robust animal immobilization. Dosimetric characterization of the device was performed with Gafchromic film measurements. Results The tungsten collimator provided a sharp penumbra suitable for hemi-brain irradiation, and dose rates on the order of 200 cGy/minute were achieved. The sharpness of the penumbra attainable with this device compares favorably to those measured experimentally for 6 MV photons, and 6 and 20 MeV electron beams from a linear accelerator, and was comparable to those measured for a 300 kVp orthovoltage beam and a Monte Carlo simulated 90 MeV proton beam. Conclusions Due to its simplicity and low cost, the apparatus described is an attractive alternative for small animal irradiation experiments requiring steep dose gradients. PMID:24844370

  17. Glatiramer acetate reverses cognitive deficits from cranial-irradiated rat by inducing hippocampal neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    He, Fen; Zou, Jun-Tao; Zhou, Qiong-Fang; Niu, Dao-Li; Jia, Wei-Hua

    2014-06-15

    Patients received cranial-irradiation can be affected with cognitive deficits and decreasing hippocampal neurogenesis. In this work, we characterized the cognitive ability and immune-induced neurogenesis of the pre- and post-treated cranial-irradiated rats with Glatiramer acetate (GA), known as a weak CNS auto-antigen. The GA-treated rats displayed better cognitive abilities in Morris water maze (MWM). The numbers of Iba-I-positive microglia, BrdU(+)/DCX(+) cells and BrdU(+)/NeuN(+) cells in hippocampus increased, which are accompanied with increased IFN-γ and decreased IL-6, IL-4. Furthermore, GA reverted the Th1/Th2 balance. GA treatment can reverse the cognitive deficits caused by cranial irradiation through a mechanism that likely involves immunomodulation. PMID:24713401

  18. Reprint of localized dose delivering by ion beam irradiation for experimental trial of establishing brain necrosis model.

    PubMed

    Takata, Takushi; Kondo, Natsuko; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Tanaka, Hiroki; Hasegawa, Takashi; Kume, Kyo; Suzuki, Minoru

    2015-12-01

    Localized dose delivery techniques to establish a brain radiation necrosis model are described. An irradiation field was designed by using accelerated protons or helium ions with a spread-out Bragg peak. Measurement of the designed field confirmed that a high dose can be confined to a local volume of an animal brain. The irradiation techniques described here are very useful for establishing a necrosis model without existence of extraneous complications. PMID:26515136

  19. Involvement of Nuclear Related Factor 2 Signaling Pathway in the Brain of Obese Rats and Obesity-Resistant Rats Induced by High-Fat Diet.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wei-Wei; Ding, Bing-Jie; Wang, Li-Jing; Shao, Yi; Xiao, Rong

    2016-04-01

    We aimed to investigate the mechanism of brain damage in diet-induced obese (DIO) rats and diet-resistant (DR) rats from the viewpoint of redox state and nuclear related factor 2 (Nrf2) signaling pathway. Sprague-Dawley rats were fed with a high-fat diet for 10 weeks to obtain the DIO and DR rats. d-Galactose was injected subcutaneously through the back of the neck for 10 weeks to establish oxidative stress model rats. Then, the ratio of reduced glutathione (GSH)/oxidized glutathione (GSSG) and the level of glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) in serum and brain tissue were measured by using enzymatic assay kits. The levels of cholecystokinin and peptide YY in the brain tissue were detected by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits. In addition, the protein expression of Nrf2 and its downstream factors such as heme oxygenase 1, manganese superoxide dismutase, and NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) in the brain tissue were measured by Western blotting. In the brain of DIO rats, the level of GSH and ratio of GSH/GSSG were lower, whereas the GSH-Px concentration was higher compared with DR rats significantly. On the other hand, the GSSG level was higher in the serum of DIO rats compared with the DR rats. The oxidative stress state in the brain of DIO rats, but not in DR rats, were observed. In addition, the protein expressions of Nrf2 and NQO1 were downregulated in the brain of DR rats compared with that in DIO rats. Our data suggest that the Nrf2/NQO1 signaling pathway and redox state were involved in the pathogenesis of the rats prone to obesity, but not the DR rats resistant to obesity. PMID:26784831

  20. Increased plasma levels and blunted effects of brain natriuretic peptide in rats with congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, A; Grossman, E; Keiser, H R

    1991-07-01

    The hemodynamic and renal effects of brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) were studied in conscious rats with experimental congestive heart failure (CHF) produced by an aortocaval fistula. The peptide had potent hypotensive, diuretic, and natriuretic effects in control rats, all of which were abolished in CHF. Plasma levels of BNP increased time-dependently during the development of CHF, and were more than four-fold higher in sodium retaining rats than in control rats. The data suggest that BNP secretion from the atria is increased in CHF, and that resistance to BNP, in addition to the relative resistance to atrial natriuretic factor, may contribute to sodium retention in CHF. PMID:1831369

  1. Lactoferrin during lactation protects the immature hypoxic-ischemic rat brain

    PubMed Central

    van de Looij, Yohan; Ginet, Vanessa; Chatagner, Alexandra; Toulotte, Audrey; Somm, Emmanuel; Hüppi, Petra S; Sizonenko, Stéphane V

    2014-01-01

    Objective Lactoferrin (Lf) is an iron-binding glycoprotein secreted in maternal milk presenting anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. It shows efficient absorption into the brain from nutritional source. Brain injury frequently resulting from cerebral hypoxia-ischemia (HI) has a high incidence in premature infants with ensuing neurodevelopmental disabilities. We investigated the neuroprotective effect of maternal nutritional supplementation with Lf during lactation in a rat model of preterm HI brain injury using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), brain gene, and protein expression. Methods Moderate brain HI was induced using unilateral common carotid artery occlusion combined with hypoxia (6%, 30 min) in the postnatal day 3 (P3) rat brain (24–28 weeks human equivalent). High-field multimodal MRI techniques were used to investigate the effect of maternal Lf supplementation through lactation. Expression of cytokine coding genes (TNF-α and IL-6), the prosurvival/antiapoptotic AKT protein and caspase-3 activation were also analyzed in the acute phase after HI. Results MRI analysis demonstrated reduced cortical injury in Lf rats few hours post-HI and in long-term outcome (P25). Lf reduced HI-induced modifications of the cortical metabolism and altered white matter microstructure was recovered in Lf-supplemented rats at P25. Lf supplementation significantly decreased brain TNF-α and IL-6 gene transcription, increased phosphorylated AKT levels and reduced activation of caspase-3 at 24 h post-injury. Interpretation Lf given through lactation to rat pups with cerebral HI injury shows neuroprotective effects on brain metabolism, and cerebral gray and white matter recovery. This nutritional intervention may be of high interest for the clinical field of preterm brain neuroprotection. PMID:25574471

  2. Effects of low intensity laser acupoint irradiation on inhibiting islet beta-cell apoptosis in rats with type 2 diabetes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Guoxin; Xiong, Leilei; Li, Xinzhong

    2016-09-01

    To investigate the effects of low intensity semiconductor laser acupoint irradiation on inhibiting islet beta-cell apoptosis in rats with type 2 diabetes, a method using a high-fat diet and low-dose intraperitoneal injections of streptozotocin established a type 2 diabetes mellitus rat model. Model rats were randomly divided into a laser acupoint irradiation group, rosiglitazone control group, and placebo group; each group had 10 rats. In addition, 10 normal male rats were selected for the normal control group. The Housanli, Neiting and Yishu acupoints of the rats in the laser acupoint irradiation group were irradiated with a 10 mW semiconductor laser; each point was irradiated for 15 min, once every 2 d over 28 d, for a total of 14 episodes of irradiation. The rosiglitazone group rats were given rosiglitazone (0.2 mg kg‑1) intragastrically; the placebo group rats were given 0.9% brine (0.2 mg kg‑1) intragastrically, once daily, for four consecutive weeks. The change of fasting blood glucose was determined before and after each treatment. The islet beta-cell apoptosis was determined. The islet beta-cell apoptosis rates of the laser acupoint irradiation group and the rosiglitazone group were significantly lower than the rate of the placebo group. Even though the rate was lower in the laser acupoint irradiation group than in the rosiglitazone group, there was no significant difference between them. It is shown that acupoint irradiation with a semiconductor laser can effectively inhibit islet beta-cell apoptosis in rats with type 2 diabetes.

  3. Effects of laser irradiation on immature olfactory neuroepithelial explants from the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Mester, A.F.; Snow, J.B. Jr.

    1988-07-01

    The photobiological effect of low-output laser irradiation on the maturation and regeneration of immature olfactory bipolar receptor cells of the rat was studied. The maturation and regeneration of the receptor cells of rat fetuses were quantified in neuroepithelial explants with morphometric analysis. The number of explants with outgrowth and the number and length of neuritic outgrowths were determined on a regular basis for 12 days. Explants in the experimental group were irradiated with a helium-neon laser using different incident energy densities (IED). Explants in the fluorescent light control group were exposed to fluorescent light for the same periods of time as those in the experimental group were exposed to laser irradiation. Explants in another control group were not exposed to laser or fluorescent light irradiation. The IED of 0.5 J/cm2 laser irradiation has been found to increase significantly the number of explants with outgrowth and the number and length of the outgrowths. Other laser IEDs or fluorescent light irradiation did not influence maturation or regeneration.

  4. Effect of X-irradiation on the stomach of the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Breiter, N.; Trott, K.R.; Sassy, T. )

    1989-10-01

    A model for localized 300 kV X-irradiation of the rat stomach was developed. After irradiation with single doses, three distinct gastric disorders were observed which occurred at different latency times. Acute death 2-3 weeks after irradiation was caused by an erosive and ulcerative gastritis and occurred in all animals given 28.5 Gy without diet, in 17% of the animals given 28.5 Gy plus diet, and in 13% of the animals given 23 Gy. Subacute to chronic fatal disorders 4 weeks to 7 months after irradiation were seen as stomach dilatation and gastroparesis, associated with the replacement of the normal gastric mucosa by a hyperkeratinized multilayered squamous epithelium. These disorders occurred in 40-100% of the animals after doses between 16 Gy and 28.5 Gy (+diet). An ED 50 value of 19.2 Gy (16.5-21.2 Gy, 95% confidence interval) was calculated for this gastroparesis. Late gastric obstruction exceeding 7 months after irradiation was seen in the rats because of profound changes in the gastric wall in 13-18% of the animals after doses between 23 Gy and 14 Gy. In animals surviving these three periods, an atrophic mucosa and intestinal metaplasia developed. From functional and morphohistological studies, it can be concluded that there are differences in the pathogenesis of the fatal radiation damage for each of these periods after irradiation.

  5. A magnetic resonance imaging study on changes in rat mandibular bone marrow and pulp tissue after high-dose irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wan; Lee, Byung-Do; Lee, Kang-Kyoo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This study was designed to evaluate whether magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is appropriate for detecting early changes in the mandibular bone marrow and pulp tissue of rats after high-dose irradiation. Materials and Methods The right mandibles of Sprague-Dawley rats were irradiated with 10 Gy (Group 1, n=5) and 20 Gy (Group 2, n=5). Five non-irradiated animals were used as controls. The MR images of rat mandibles were obtained before irradiation and once a week until week 4 after irradiation. From the MR images, the signal intensity (SI) of the mandibular bone marrow and pulp tissue of the incisor was interpreted. The MR images were compared with the histopathologic findings. Results The SI of the mandibular bone marrow had decreased on T2-weighted MR images. There was little difference between Groups 1 and 2. The SI of the irradiated groups appeared to be lower than that of the control group. The histopathologic findings showed that the trabecular bone in the irradiated group had increased. The SI of the irradiated pulp tissue had decreased on T2-weighted MR images. However, the SI of the MR images in Group 2 was high in the atrophic pulp of the incisor apex at week 2 after irradiation. Conclusion These patterns seen on MRI in rat bone marrow and pulp tissue were consistent with histopathologic findings. They may be useful to assess radiogenic sclerotic changes in rat mandibular bone marrow. PMID:24701458

  6. Dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitor improves brain insulin sensitivity, but fails to prevent cognitive impairment in orchiectomy obese rats.

    PubMed

    Pintana, Hiranya; Pongkan, Wanpitak; Pratchayasakul, Wasana; Chattipakorn, Nipon; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C

    2015-08-01

    It is unclear whether the dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4) inhibitor can counteract brain insulin resistance, brain mitochondrial dysfunction, impairment of hippocampal synaptic plasticity and cognitive decline in testosterone-deprived obese rats. We hypothesized that DPP4 inhibitor vildagliptin improves cognitive function in testosterone-deprived obese rats by restoring brain insulin sensitivity, brain mitochondrial function and hippocampal synaptic plasticity. Thirty male Wistar rats received either a sham-operated (S, n=6) or bilateral orchiectomy (ORX, n=24). ORX rats were divided into two groups and fed with either a normal diet (ND (NDO)) or a high-fat diet (HFO) for 12 weeks. Then, ORX rats in each dietary group were divided into two subgroups (n=6/subgroup) to receive either a vehicle or vildagliptin (3 mg/kg per day, p.o.) for 4 weeks. After treatment, cognitive function, metabolic parameters, brain insulin sensitivity, hippocampal synaptic plasticity and brain mitochondrial function were determined in each rat. We found that HFO rats exhibited peripheral and brain insulin resistance, brain mitochondrial dysfunction, impaired hippocampal synaptic plasticity and cognitive decline. NDO rats did not develop peripheral and brain insulin resistance. However, impaired hippocampal synaptic plasticity and cognitive decline occurred. Vildagliptin significantly improved peripheral insulin sensitivity, restored brain insulin sensitivity and decreased brain mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production in HFO rats. However, vildagliptin did not restore hippocampal synaptic plasticity and cognitive function in both NDO and HFO rats. These findings suggest that vildagliptin could not counteract the impairment of hippocampal synaptic plasticity and cognitive decline in testosterone-deprived subjects, despite its effects on improved peripheral and brain insulin sensitivity as well as brain mitochondrial function. PMID:26016746

  7. Lipid peroxidation in rat brain is increased by simulated weightlessness and decreased by a soy-protein diet.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Parimal; Soulsby, Michael

    2002-01-01

    This study tested whether or not simulated weightlessness by tail-suspension increases the levels of lipid peroxidation products in rat brain. The brain tissues of rats on a soybean diet were also assayed for lipid peroxidation products to evaluate the possible role of soy-protein as a dietary anti-oxidant. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were used. Group 1 rats were fed standard Purina rat chow ad libidum and served as controls. Group 2 rats were fed a soybean diet containing 37% soy-protein and were not tail-suspended. Group 3 rats were fed standard Purina rat chow ad libidum and were tail-suspended to induce simulated weightlessness. After 2 wk, all of the rats were killed. Each whole brain was segmented into frontal cortex, cerebellum, and brain stem. After a specific weight of each segment was excised, the residual tissues were combined and used as a whole brain sample. The samples were analyzed for lipid peroxidation products by a chromogenic assay that reacts with malondialdehyde (MDA) and 4-hydroxyalkenals (4-HNE). The mean concentrations of lipid peroxidation products (MDA plus 4-HNE) in whole brain, frontal cortex, cerebellum, and brain stem of the control rats ranged from 16 to 18 micromol/g; the corresponding means ranged from 10 to 13 micromol/g in rats fed the soybean diet, and from 22 to 26 micromol/g in the tail-suspended rats. Thus, the mean levels of lipid peroxidation products in brain tissues were decreased in the rats fed the soy diet and were increased in the rats that were tail-suspended to simulate weightlessness, when compared to those of rats fed a regular diet. PMID:12017202

  8. Pharmacokinetic and metabolic studies of busulfan in rat plasma and brain.

    PubMed

    Hassan, M; Ehrsson, H; Wallin, I; Eksborg, S

    1988-01-01

    Busulfan kinetics were studied in the rat plasma and brain after an I.P. dose of 14C-busulfan or busulfan (15 mg/kg). The distribution of busulfan to the brain was rapid and the ratio brain/plasma concentration was 0.74 during the time-course of busulfan. The elimination half-lives in plasma and brain were 3h for intact busulfan and 8h for the 14C-radioactivity. The radioactivity remaining in plasma and brain after 24h was mostly busulfan metabolites e.g. sulfolane, 3-hydroxysulfolane and tetrahydrothiophene-1-oxide as identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The protein binding to rat plasma was low (9.2 +/- 4.4%). PMID:3243326

  9. Photoacoustic imaging to detect rat brain activation after cocaine hydrochloride injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Janggun; Yang, Xinmai

    2011-03-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) was employed to detect small animal brain activation after the administration of cocaine hydrochloride. Sprague Dawley rats were injected with different concentrations (2.5, 3.0, and 5.0 mg per kg body) of cocaine hydrochloride in saline solution through tail veins. The brain functional response to the injection was monitored by photoacoustic tomography (PAT) system with horizontal scanning of cerebral cortex of rat brain. Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) was also used for coronal view images. The modified PAT system used multiple ultrasonic detectors to reduce the scanning time and maintain a good signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The measured photoacoustic signal changes confirmed that cocaine hydrochloride injection excited high blood volume in brain. This result shows PAI can be used to monitor drug abuse-induced brain activation.

  10. Combined effects of prenatal inhibition of vasculogenesis and neurogenesis on rat brain development

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Q.Y.; Ramakrishna, S.; Marchi, N.; Fazio, Vincent; Hallene, Kerri; Janigro, D.

    2013-01-01

    Malformations of cortical development (MCD) are one of the most common causes of neurological disabilities including autism and epilepsy. To disrupt cortical formation, methylazoxymethanol (MAM) or thalidomide (THAL) has been used to affect neurogenesis or vasculogenesis. Although previous models of MCD have been useful, these models primarily attack a single aspect of cortical development. We hypothesized that simultaneous prenatal exposure to MAM or THAL will lead to the development of a novel and specific type of brain maldevelopment. Rats were prenatally exposed to MAM and THAL. At early postnatal days, brains displayed abnormal ventricular size and hemispheric asymmetry due to altered brain water homeostasis. The postnatal brain was also characterized by gliosis in regions of focal leakage of the blood brain barrier. These morphological abnormalities gradually disappeared at adult stages. Although the adult MAM-THAL rats showed normal cortical morphology, abnormal hippocampal connectivity and mossy fiber sprouting persisted well into adulthood. PMID:18930144

  11. Epsilon Aminocaproic Acid Pretreatment Provides Neuroprotection Following Surgically Induced Brain Injury in a Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Komanapalli, Esther S; Sherchan, Prativa; Rolland, William; Khatibi, Nikan; Martin, Robert D; Applegate, Richard L; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H

    2016-01-01

    Neurosurgical procedures can damage viable brain tissue unintentionally by a wide range of mechanisms. This surgically induced brain injury (SBI) can be a result of direct incision, electrocauterization, or tissue retraction. Plasmin, a serine protease that dissolves fibrin blood clots, has been shown to enhance cerebral edema and hemorrhage accumulation in the brain through disruption of the blood brain barrier. Epsilon aminocaproic acid (EAA), a recognized antifibrinolytic lysine analogue, can reduce the levels of active plasmin and, in doing so, potentially can preserve the neurovascular unit of the brain. We investigated the role of EAA as a pretreatment neuroprotective modality in a SBI rat model, hypothesizing that EAA therapy would protect brain tissue integrity, translating into preserved neurobehavioral function. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to one of four groups: sham (n = 7), SBI (n = 7), SBI with low-dose EAA, 150 mg/kg (n = 7), and SBI with high-dose EAA, 450 mg/kg (n = 7). SBI was induced by partial right frontal lobe resection through a frontal craniotomy. Postoperative assessment at 24 h included neurobehavioral testing and measurement of brain water content. Results at 24 h showed both low- and high-dose EAA reduced brain water content and improved neurobehavioral function compared with the SBI groups. This suggests that EAA may be a useful pretherapeutic modality for SBI. Further studies are needed to clarify optimal therapeutic dosing and to identify mechanisms of neuroprotection in rat SBI models. PMID:26463967

  12. Studies on the potential neurotoxic and convulsant effects of increased blood levels of quinolinic acid in rats with altered blood-brain barrier permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Vezzani, A.; Stasi, M.A.; Wu, H.Q.; Castiglioni, M.; Weckermann, B.; Samanin, R. )

    1989-10-01

    Intravenous injection of 450 mg/kg quinolinic acid (Quin), an endogenous kynurenine metabolite with excitotoxic properties, induced only minor electroencephalographic (EEG) modifications and no neurotoxicity in rats with a mature blood-brain barrier (BBB). BBB permeability was altered in rats by focal unilateral irradiation of the cortex (7 mm in diameter and 5 mm in depth) with protons (60 Gy, 9 Gy/min). Three days after irradiation, Evans blue dye staining showed BBB breakdown in the dorsal hippocampus of the irradiated hemisphere. No neurotoxic or convulsant effects were observed as a consequence of the radiation itself. When BBB-lesioned rats were challenged with 225 mg/kg Quin iv, epileptiform activity was observed on EEG analysis. Tonic-clonic seizures were induced by 225-450 mg/kg Quin. Light microscopic analysis showed a dose-related excitotoxic type of lesion restricted to the hippocampus ipsilateral to the irradiated side. Neuro-degeneration was prevented by local injection of 120 nmol D(-)2-amino-7-phosphonoheptanoic acid, a selective N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist. No lesions or EEG or behavioral modifications occurred after 450 mg/kg nicotinic acid, an inactive analog of Quin. The potential neurotoxic and convulsant effects of increased blood levels of Quin under conditions of altered BBB permeability are discussed.

  13. Effects of 0. 6-Gy prenatal X irradiation on postnatal neurophysiologic development in the Wistar rat

    SciTech Connect

    Jensh, R.P.; Brent, R.L.

    1986-04-01

    Forty-one pregnant Wistar strain rats were irradiated with 0.6-Gy X rays or were sham irradiated on the 9th or 17th days of gestation to determine if this dosage level would result in alterations in postnatal neurophysiologic development. Half of the mothers were sacrificed at term, and the developmental status of 221 newborns was evaluated. The remaining mothers delivered and raised their litters. The 161 offspring were observed for the age of attainment of the following physiologic parameters: pinna detachment, eye opening, testes opening. Offspring were also tested for the acquisition of the following selected reflexes: surface righting, negative geotaxis, auditory startle, air righting, and visual placing. Term fetal weight was lower than the controls in the group irradiated on the 9th day but was recuperable postnatally. None of the 9 developmental tests performed postnatally were abnormal in the animals irradiated on the 9th day. Thus, at least with regard to these measures, the surviving embryos exposed during the all-or-none period could not be differentiated from the controls. Offspring irradiated on the 17th day exhibited retarded growth which persisted during neonatal life. The three-day-mean neonatal weight was significantly lower in the group irradiated on the 17th day compared to controls. There were no significant maternal body weight or organ/weight differences between the groups. Rats exposed in utero on the 17th day had a significantly delayed acquisition of air righting. These results demonstrate that 0.6-Gy in utero irradiation on the 17th day of gestation can cause subtle alterations in growth and development of the Wistar strain rat during postnatal life.

  14. Delayed Postconditioning Protects against Focal Ischemic Brain Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Chuancheng; Gao, Xuwen; Niu, Gang; Yan, Zhimin; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Zhao, Heng

    2008-01-01

    Background We and others have reported that rapid ischemic postconditioning, interrupting early reperfusion after stroke, reduces infarction in rats. However, its extremely short therapeutic time windows, from a few seconds to minutes after reperfusion, may hinder its clinical translation. Thus, in this study we explored if delayed postconditioning, which is conducted a few hours after reperfusion, offers protection against stroke. Methods and Results Focal ischemia was generated by 30 min occlusion of bilateral common carotid artery (CCA) combined with permanent occlusion of middle cerebral artery (MCA); delayed postconditioning was performed by repetitive, brief occlusion and release of the bilateral CCAs, or of the ipsilateral CCA alone. As a result, delayed postconditioning performed at 3h and 6h after stroke robustly reduced infarct size, with the strongest protection achieved by delayed postconditioning with 6 cycles of 15 min occlusion/15 min release of the ipsilateral CCA executed from 6h. We found that this delayed postconditioning provided long-term protection for up to two months by reducing infarction and improving outcomes of the behavioral tests; it also attenuated reduction in 2-[18F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG)-uptake therefore improving metabolism, and reduced edema and blood brain barrier leakage. Reperfusion in ischemic stroke patients is usually achieved by tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) application, however, t-PA's side effect may worsen ischemic injury. Thus, we tested whether delayed postconditioning counteracts the exacerbating effect of t-PA. The results showed that delayed postconditioning mitigated the worsening effect of t-PA on infarction. Conclusion Delayed postconditioning reduced ischemic injury after focal ischemia, which opens a new research avenue for stroke therapy and its underlying protective mechanisms. PMID:19066627

  15. Mechanisms of blast induced brain injuries, experimental studies in rats.

    PubMed

    Risling, M; Plantman, S; Angeria, M; Rostami, E; Bellander, B-M; Kirkegaard, M; Arborelius, U; Davidsson, J

    2011-01-01

    Traumatic brain injuries (TBI) potentially induced by blast waves from detonations result in significant diagnostic problems. It may be assumed that several mechanisms contribute to the injury. This study is an attempt to characterize the presumed components of the blast induced TBI. Our experimental models include a blast tube in which an anesthetized rat can be exposed to controlled detonations of explosives that result in a pressure wave with a magnitude between 130 and 260 kPa. In this model, the animal is fixed with a metal net to avoid head acceleration forces. The second model is a controlled penetration of a 2mm thick needle. In the third model the animal is subjected to a high-speed sagittal rotation angular acceleration. Immunohistochemical labeling for amyloid precursor protein revealed signs of diffuse axonal injury (DAI) in the penetration and rotation models. Signs of punctuate inflammation were observed after focal and rotation injury. Exposure in the blast tube did not induce DAI or detectable cell death, but functional changes. Affymetrix Gene arrays showed changes in the expression in a large number of gene families including cell death, inflammation and neurotransmitters in the hippocampus after both acceleration and penetration injuries. Exposure to the primary blast wave induced limited shifts in gene expression in the hippocampus. The most interesting findings were a downregulation of genes involved in neurogenesis and synaptic transmission. These experiments indicate that rotational acceleration may be a critical factor for DAI and other acute changes after blast TBI. The further exploration of the mechanisms of blast TBI will have to include a search for long-term effects. PMID:20493951

  16. Standardized Environmental Enrichment Supports Enhanced Brain Plasticity in Healthy Rats and Prevents Cognitive Impairment in Epileptic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kouchi, Hayet Y.; Bodennec, Jacques; Morales, Anne; Georges, Béatrice; Bonnet, Chantal; Bouvard, Sandrine; Sloviter, Robert S.; Bezin, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    Environmental enrichment of laboratory animals influences brain plasticity, stimulates neurogenesis, increases neurotrophic factor expression, and protects against the effects of brain insult. However, these positive effects are not constantly observed, probably because standardized procedures of environmental enrichment are lacking. Therefore, we engineered an enriched cage (the Marlau™ cage), which offers: (1) minimally stressful social interactions; (2) increased voluntary exercise; (3) multiple entertaining activities; (4) cognitive stimulation (maze exploration), and (5) novelty (maze configuration changed three times a week). The maze, which separates food pellet and water bottle compartments, guarantees cognitive stimulation for all animals. Compared to rats raised in groups in conventional cages, rats housed in Marlau™ cages exhibited increased cortical thickness, hippocampal neurogenesis and hippocampal levels of transcripts encoding various genes involved in tissue plasticity and remodeling. In addition, rats housed in Marlau™ cages exhibited better performances in learning and memory, decreased anxiety-associated behaviors, and better recovery of basal plasma corticosterone level after acute restraint stress. Marlau™ cages also insure inter-experiment reproducibility in spatial learning and brain gene expression assays. Finally, housing rats in Marlau™ cages after severe status epilepticus at weaning prevents the cognitive impairment observed in rats subjected to the same insult and then housed in conventional cages. By providing a standardized enriched environment for rodents during housing, the Marlau™ cage should facilitate the uniformity of environmental enrichment across laboratories. PMID:23342033

  17. Standardized environmental enrichment supports enhanced brain plasticity in healthy rats and prevents cognitive impairment in epileptic rats.

    PubMed

    Fares, Raafat P; Belmeguenai, Amor; Sanchez, Pascal E; Kouchi, Hayet Y; Bodennec, Jacques; Morales, Anne; Georges, Béatrice; Bonnet, Chantal; Bouvard, Sandrine; Sloviter, Robert S; Bezin, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    Environmental enrichment of laboratory animals influences brain plasticity, stimulates neurogenesis, increases neurotrophic factor expression, and protects against the effects of brain insult. However, these positive effects are not constantly observed, probably because standardized procedures of environmental enrichment are lacking. Therefore, we engineered an enriched cage (the Marlau™ cage), which offers: (1) minimally stressful social interactions; (2) increased voluntary exercise; (3) multiple entertaining activities; (4) cognitive stimulation (maze exploration), and (5) novelty (maze configuration changed three times a week). The maze, which separates food pellet and water bottle compartments, guarantees cognitive stimulation for all animals. Compared to rats raised in groups in conventional cages, rats housed in Marlau™ cages exhibited increased cortical thickness, hippocampal neurogenesis and hippocampal levels of transcripts encoding various genes involved in tissue plasticity and remodeling. In addition, rats housed in Marlau™ cages exhibited better performances in learning and memory, decreased anxiety-associated behaviors, and better recovery of basal plasma corticosterone level after acute restraint stress. Marlau™ cages also insure inter-experiment reproducibility in spatial learning and brain gene expression assays. Finally, housing rats in Marlau™ cages after severe status epilepticus at weaning prevents the cognitive impairment observed in rats subjected to the same insult and then housed in conventional cages. By providing a standardized enriched environment for rodents during housing, the Marlau™ cage should facilitate the uniformity of environmental enrichment across laboratories. PMID:23342033

  18. Brain activation patterns at exhaustion in rats that differ in inherent exercise capacity.

    PubMed

    Foley, Teresa E; Brooks, Leah R; Gilligan, Lori J; Burghardt, Paul R; Koch, Lauren G; Britton, Steven L; Fleshner, Monika

    2012-01-01

    In order to further understand the genetic basis for variation in inherent (untrained) exercise capacity, we examined the brains of 32 male rats selectively bred for high or low running capacity (HCR and LCR, respectively). The aim was to characterize the activation patterns of brain regions potentially involved in differences in inherent running capacity between HCR and LCR. Using quantitative in situ hybridization techniques, we measured messenger ribonuclease (mRNA) levels of c-Fos, a marker of neuronal activation, in the brains of HCR and LCR rats after a single bout of acute treadmill running (7.5-15 minutes, 15° slope, 10 m/min) or after treadmill running to exhaustion (15-51 minutes, 15° slope, initial velocity 10 m/min). During verification of trait differences, HCR rats ran six times farther and three times longer prior to exhaustion than LCR rats. Running to exhaustion significantly increased c-Fos mRNA activation of several brain areas in HCR, but LCR failed to show significant elevations of c-Fos mRNA at exhaustion in the majority of areas examined compared to acutely run controls. Results from these studies suggest that there are differences in central c-Fos mRNA expression, and potential brain activation patterns, between HCR and LCR rats during treadmill running to exhaustion and these differences could be involved in the variation in inherent running capacity between lines. PMID:23028992

  19. Neuroanatomy-based matrix-guided trimming protocol for the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Defazio, Rossella; Criado, Ana; Zantedeschi, Valentina; Scanziani, Eugenio

    2015-02-01

    Brain trimming through defined neuroanatomical landmarks is recommended to obtain consistent sections in rat toxicity studies. In this article, we describe a matrix-guided trimming protocol that uses channels to reproduce coronal levels of anatomical landmarks. Both setup phase and validation study were performed on Han Wistar male rats (Crl:WI(Han)), 10-week-old, with bodyweight of 298 ± 29 (SD) g, using a matrix (ASI-Instruments(®), Houston, TX) fitted for brains of rats with 200 to 400 g bodyweight. In the setup phase, we identified eight channels, that is, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 19, and 21, matching the recommended landmarks midway to the optic chiasm, frontal pole, optic chiasm, infundibulum, mamillary bodies, midbrain, middle cerebellum, and posterior cerebellum, respectively. In the validation study, we trimmed the immersion-fixed brains of 60 rats using the selected channels to determine how consistently the channels reproduced anatomical landmarks. Percentage of success (i.e., presence of expected targets for each level) ranged from 89 to 100%. Where 100% success was not achieved, it was noted that the shift in brain trimming was toward the caudal pole. In conclusion, we developed and validated a trimming protocol for the rat brain that allow comparable extensiveness, homology, and relevance of coronal sections as the landmark-guided trimming with the advantage of being quickly learned by technicians. PMID:24947989

  20. Shielding effect of mineral schungite during electromagnetic irradiation of rats.

    PubMed

    Kurotchenko, S P; Subbotina, T I; Tuktamyshev, I I; Tuktamyshev, I Sh; Khadartsev, A A; Yashin, A A

    2003-11-01

    We studied the effect of nonthermal 37-GHz radiation on hemopoiesis in schungite-shielded Wistar rats. Radiation with right-handed or left-handed rotation of the polarization plane of electromagnetic wave was used. Shielding with schungite decreased the severity of damage produced by high-frequency electromagnetic radiation. PMID:14968159

  1. The PPARalpha Agonist Fenofibrate Preserves Hippocampal Neurogenesis and Inhibits Microglial Activation After Whole-Brain Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ramanan, Sriram; Kooshki, Mitra; Zhao Weiling; Hsu, F.-C.; Riddle, David R.; Robbins, Mike E.

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: Whole-brain irradiation (WBI) leads to cognitive impairment months to years after radiation. Numerous studies suggest that decreased hippocampal neurogenesis and microglial activation are involved in the pathogenesis of WBI-induced brain injury. The goal of this study was to investigate whether administration of the peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) alpha agonist fenofibrate would prevent the detrimental effect of WBI on hippocampal neurogenesis. Methods and Materials: For this study, 129S1/SvImJ wild-type and PPARalpha knockout mice that were fed either regular or 0.2% wt/wt fenofibrate-containing chow received either sham irradiation or WBI (10-Gy single dose of {sup 137}Cs gamma-rays). Mice were injected intraperitoneally with bromodeoxyuridine to label the surviving cells at 1 month after WBI, and the newborn neurons were counted at 2 months after WBI by use of bromodeoxyuridine/neuronal nuclei double immunofluorescence. Proliferation in the subgranular zone and microglial activation were measured at 1 week and 2 months after WBI by use of Ki-67 and CD68 immunohistochemistry, respectively. Results: Whole-brain irradiation led to a significant decrease in the number of newborn hippocampal neurons 2 months after it was performed. Fenofibrate prevented this decrease by promoting the survival of newborn cells in the dentate gyrus. In addition, fenofibrate treatment was associated with decreased microglial activation in the dentate gyrus after WBI. The neuroprotective effects of fenofibrate were abolished in the knockout mice, indicating a PPARalpha-dependent mechanism or mechanisms. Conclusions: These data highlight a novel role for PPARalpha ligands in improving neurogenesis after WBI and offer the promise of improving the quality of life for brain cancer patients receiving radiotherapy.

  2. Functional mitochondrial analysis in acute brain sections from adult rats reveals mitochondrial dysfunction in a rat model of migraine

    PubMed Central

    Fried, Nathan T.; Moffat, Cynthia; Seifert, Erin L.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in many neurological disorders that only develop or are much more severe in adults, yet no methodology exists that allows for medium-throughput functional mitochondrial analysis of brain sections from adult animals. We developed a technique for quantifying mitochondrial respiration in acutely isolated adult rat brain sections with the Seahorse XF Analyzer. Evaluating a range of conditions made quantifying mitochondrial function from acutely derived adult brain sections from the cortex, cerebellum, and trigeminal nucleus caudalis possible. Optimization of this technique demonstrated that the ideal section size was 1 mm wide. We found that sectioning brains at physiological temperatures was necessary for consistent metabolic analysis of trigeminal nucleus caudalis sections. Oxygen consumption in these sections was highly coupled to ATP synthesis, had robust spare respiratory capacities, and had limited nonmitochondrial respiration, all indicative of healthy tissue. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this technique by identifying a decreased spare respiratory capacity in the trigeminal nucleus caudalis of a rat model of chronic migraine, a neurological disorder that has been associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. This technique allows for 24 acutely isolated sections from multiple brain regions of a single adult rat to be analyzed simultaneously with four sequential drug treatments, greatly advancing the ability to study mitochondrial physiology in adult neurological disorders. PMID:25252946

  3. Positron Spectroscopy Investigation of Normal Brain Section and Brain Section with Glioma Derived from a Rat Glioma Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, SH.; Ballmann, C.; Quarles, C. A.

    2009-03-01

    The application of positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) and Doppler broadening spectroscopy (DBS) to the study of animal or human tissue has only recently been reported [G. Liu, et al. phys. stat. sol. (C) 4, Nos. 10, 3912-3915 (2007)]. We have initiated a study of normal brain section and brain section with glioma derived from a rat glioma model. For the rat glioma model, 200,000 C6 cells were implanted in the basal ganglion of adult Sprague Dawley rats. The rats were sacrificed at 21 days after implantation. The brains were harvested, sliced into 2 mm thick coronal sections, and fixed in 4% formalin. PALS lifetime runs were made with the samples soaked in formalin, and there was not significant evaporation of formalin during the runs. The lifetime spectra were analyzed into two lifetime components. While early results suggested a small decrease in ortho-Positronium (o-Ps) pickoff lifetime between the normal brain section and brain section with glioma, further runs with additional samples have showed no statistically significant difference between the normal and tumor tissue for this type of tumor. The o-Ps lifetime in formalin alone was lower than either the normal tissue or glioma sample. So annihilation in the formalin absorbed in the samples would lower the o-Ps lifetime and this may have masked any difference due to the glioma itself. DBS was also used to investigate the difference in positronium formation between tumor and normal tissue. Tissue samples are heterogeneous and this needs to be carefully considered if PALS and DBS are to become useful tools in distinguishing tissue samples.

  4. Positron Spectroscopy Investigation of Normal Brain Section and Brain Section with Glioma Derived from a Rat Glioma Model

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, SH.; Ballmann, C.; Quarles, C. A.

    2009-03-10

    The application of positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) and Doppler broadening spectroscopy (DBS) to the study of animal or human tissue has only recently been reported [G. Liu, et al. phys. stat. sol. (C) 4, Nos. 10, 3912-3915 (2007)]. We have initiated a study of normal brain section and brain section with glioma derived from a rat glioma model. For the rat glioma model, 200,000 C6 cells were implanted in the basal ganglion of adult Sprague Dawley rats. The rats were sacrificed at 21 days after implantation. The brains were harvested, sliced into 2 mm thick coronal sections, and fixed in 4% formalin. PALS lifetime runs were made with the samples soaked in formalin, and there was not significant evaporation of formalin during the runs. The lifetime spectra were analyzed into two lifetime components. While early results suggested a small decrease in ortho-Positronium (o-Ps) pickoff lifetime between the normal brain section and brain section with glioma, further runs with additional samples have showed no statistically significant difference between the normal and tumor tissue for this type of tumor. The o-Ps lifetime in formalin alone was lower than either the normal tissue or glioma sample. So annihilation in the formalin absorbed in the samples would lower the o-Ps lifetime and this may have masked any difference due to the glioma itself. DBS was also used to investigate the difference in positronium formation between tumor and normal tissue. Tissue samples are heterogeneous and this needs to be carefully considered if PALS and DBS are to become useful tools in distinguishing tissue samples.

  5. An autoradiographic map of (3H)diprenorphine binding in rat brain: effects of social interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Panksepp, J.; Bishop, P.

    1981-10-01

    (3H)Diprenorphine binding was analyzed autoradiographically in the brains of 33 day old rat pups. A photographic atlas of diprenorphine binding in the coronal plane is provided to highlight the dispersion of opioid receptor systems through the brain. To determine whether brain opioid release may be induced by social interactions, half the animals were sacrificed following a 30 min period of social interaction while the other half were sacrificed following 30 min of social isolation. Opioid binding was higher in isolate-tested animals than socially-tested ones, suggesting that social interaction may promote endogenous brain opioid release.

  6. Injected tryptophan increases brain but not plasma tryptophan levels more in ethanol treated rats

    SciTech Connect

    Haleem, D.J. )

    1990-01-01

    In the present study ethanol treatment given for two weeks decreased hepatic apo-tryptophan pyrrolase but not total tryptophan pyrrolase activity in rats. Tryptophan levels in plasma and brain did not increase significantly. But there was a marked increase of 5-HT but not 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) concentration in brain, suggesting a possible increase in the activity of tryptophan hydroxylase. The effect of a tryptophan load on brain 5-HT metabolism was therefore compared in controls and ethanol treated rats. One hour after tryptophan injection plasma concentrations of total and free tryptophan were identical in controls and ethanol treated rats, but the increases of brain tryptophan 5-HT and 5-HIAA were considerably greater in the latter group. The results are consistent with long term ethanol treatment enhancing brain serotonin metabolism and show that brain uptake/utilization of exogenous tryptophan is increased in ethanol treated rats and may be useful to understand the role and possible mechanism of tryptophan/serotonin involvement in mood regulation.

  7. Regional brain glucose use in unstressed rats after two days of starvation

    SciTech Connect

    Mans, A.M.; Davis, D.W.; Hawkins, R.A.

    1987-12-01

    Regional brain glucose use was measured in conscious, unrestrained, fed rats and after 2 days of starvation, using quantitative autoradiography and (6-/sup 14/C)glucose. Plasma glucose, lactate, and ketone body concentrations and brain glucose and lactate content were measured in separate groups of rats. Glucose concentrations were lower in starved rats in both plasma and brain; plasma ketone body concentrations were elevated. Glucose use was found to be lower throughout the brain by about 12%. While some areas seemed to be affected more than others, statistical analysis showed that none were exceptionally different. The results could not be explained by increased loss of /sup 14/C as lactate or pyruvate during the experimental period, because the arteriovenous differences of these species were insignificant. The calculated contribution by ketone bodies to the total energy consumption was between 3 and 9% for the brain as a whole in the starved rats and could, therefore, partially account for the depression seen in glucose use. It was concluded that glucose oxidation is slightly depressed throughout the brain after 2 days of starvation.

  8. Chlorpromazine Protects Against Apoptosis Induced by Exogenous Stimuli in the Developing Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yujun; Zhang, Qingmeng; Chen, Yang; Fu, Yingmei; Fang, Wenjuan; Wang, Jindong; Zhong, Zhaohua; Ling, Hong; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Fengmin

    2011-01-01

    Background Chlorpromazine (CPZ), a commonly used antipsychotic drug, was found to play a neuroprotective role in various models of toxicity. However, whether CPZ has the potential to affect brain apoptosis in vivo is still unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential effect of CPZ on the apoptosis induced by exogenous stimuli. Methodology The ethanol treated infant rat was utilized as a valid apoptotic model, which is commonly used and could trigger robust apoptosis in brain tissue. Prior to the induction of apoptosis by subcutaneous injection of ethanol, 7-day-old rats were treated with CPZ at several doses (5 mg/kg, 10 mg/kg and 20 mg/kg) by intraperitoneal injection. Apoptotic cells in the brain were measured using TUNEL analysis, and the levels of cleaved caspase-3, cytochrome c, the pro-apoptotic factor Bax and the anti-apoptotic factor Bcl-2 were assessed by immunostaining or western blot. Findings Compared to the group injected with ethanol only, the brains of the CPZ-pretreated rats had fewer apoptotic cells, lower expression of cleaved caspase-3, cytochrome c and Bax, and higher expression of Bcl-2. These results demonstrate that CPZ could prevent apoptosis in the brain by regulating the mitochondrial pathway. Conclusions CPZ exerts an inhibitory effect on apoptosis induced by ethanol in the rat brain, intimating that it may offer a means of protecting nerve cells from apoptosis induced by exogenous stimuli. PMID:21779358

  9. Implants containing beta-amyloid protein are not neurotoxic to young and old rat brain.

    PubMed

    Clemens, J A; Stephenson, D T

    1992-01-01

    Because the cellular effects of beta-amyloid protein (beta-AP) are currently unclear, we evaluated the in vivo effects of beta-AP implants in a lipid matrix to prolong tissue exposure in the brains of rats. Young 3-month-old rats and aged 18-month-old rats received implants of beta-AP prepared in a cocoa butter matrix in the dorsal hippocampus and corpus striatum on one side of the brain and implants of either prolactin or scrambled beta-AP peptide in cocoa butter on the contralateral side. The old rats also received implants of beta-AP embedded in a cholesterol matrix or cholesterol alone in the frontal cortex. The young rats were sacrificed 3-4 days after implantation, while the old rats were sacrificed 6-8 weeks after implantation. Lesion size on the beta-AP implanted side did not differ significantly from lesion size observed with control peptides. Bielschowsky silver staining revealed few argyrophilic neurites and axonal spheroids associated with either beta-AP or control implants. Alz 50 and ubiquitin immunoreactivity were not observed. None of the implant sites demonstrated cytopathology characteristic of Alzheimer's disease. The results of this study indicate that beta-AP implantation into the brains of rats produced no consistent effect beyond that seen with control peptide implants. PMID:1461346

  10. Fluoride-Induced Neuron Apoptosis and Expressions of Inflammatory Factors by Activating Microglia in Rat Brain.

    PubMed

    Yan, Nan; Liu, Yan; Liu, Shengnan; Cao, Siqi; Wang, Fei; Wang, Zhengdong; Xi, Shuhua

    2016-09-01

    Excessive exposure to fluoride results in structural and functional damages to the central nervous system (CNS), and neurotoxicity of fluoride may be associated with neurodegenerative changes. Chronic microglial activation appears to cause neuronal damage through producing proinflammatory cytokines and is involved in many neurodegenerative disorders. It is not known about effects on microglia of fluoride. In the present study, healthy adult Wistar rats were exposed to 60 and 120 ppm fluoride in drinking water for 10 weeks, and control rats received deionized water. After 10 weeks, rats were sacrificed under anesthesia then apoptosis in neuron and inflammatory factors secreted by microglia were determined. We found that apoptosis of neurons in fluoride-treated rat brain increased and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL)-positive immunofluorescence increased with increasing fluoride concentrations. Bax protein expression increased and Bcl-2 protein expression decreased in fluoride-treated rat brain compared with that of the control rat brain. The microglia in the hippocampus and cortex of fluoride-treated rats were activated by immunostaining with OX-42, a marker of activated microglia, and OX-42-positive microglia cells were more abundant in the hippocampus than in the cortex. The levels of IL-1β and IL-6 protein expression in OX-42-labeled microglial cells were significantly increased in the cortex and hippocampus of rats exposed to fluoride, and TNF-α immunoreactivity in microglial cells of the hippocampus was significantly higher in the 120 ppm fluoride-treated group than that in the control group. Our results indicate that fluoride induced neuron apoptosis and expressions of inflammatory factors by activating microglia in rat brain. PMID:26253724

  11. Total-Body Irradiation Produces Late Degenerative Joint Damage in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, Ian D.; Olson, John; Lindburg, Carl A.; Payne, Valerie; Collins, Boyce; Smith, Thomas L.; Munley, Michael T.; Wheeler, Kenneth T.; Willey, Jeffrey S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Premature musculoskeletal joint failure is a major source of morbidity among childhood cancer survivors. Radiation effects on synovial joint tissues of the skeleton are poorly understood. Our goal was to assess long-term changes in the knee joint from skeletally mature rats that received total-body irradiation while skeletal growth was ongoing. Materials and Methods 14 week-old rats were irradiated with 1, 3 or 7 Gy total-body doses of 18 MV x-rays. At 53 weeks of age, structural and compositional changes in knee joint tissues (articular cartilage, subchondral bone, and trabecular bone) were characterized using 7T MRI, nanocomputed tomography (nanoCT), microcomputed tomography (microCT), and histology. Results T2 relaxation times of the articular cartilage were lower after exposure to all doses. Likewise, calcifications were observed in the articular cartilage. Trabecular bone microarchitecture was compromised in the tibial metaphysis at 7 Gy. Mild to moderate cartilage erosion was scored in the 3 and 7 Gy rats. Conclusions Late degenerative changes in articular cartilage and bone were observed after total body irradiation in adult rats exposed prior to skeletal maturity. 7T MRI, microCT, nanoCT, and histology identified potential prognostic indicators of late radiation-induced joint damage. PMID:24885745

  12. The expression of aquaporins 1 and 5 in rat lung after thoracic irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Cheng-Ying; Zhao, Yu-Xia; Zhong, Wen; Liu, Da-Wei; Chen, Yan-Zhi; Qin, Li-Li; Bai, Lu; Liu, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Radiation-induced lung toxicity (RILT), leading to radiation pneumonia or fibrosis, is a primary problem of radiation therapy. The pathogenesis of RILT remains unclear. In this study, we used a rat model of RILT to examine the expression of aquaporins (AQPs) after radiation injury. Sprague Dawley rats were given a single dose of 17 Gy (dose rate of 3.0 Gy/min) of X-irradiation to the thorax. Rats that survived acute pneumonitis (at 1–4 weeks) were evaluated weekly for the expression of AQP1 and AQP5 in the lung by immunohistochemical and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analyses. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that AQP1 protein was expressed in the capillary endothelium, and its level was significantly decreased after irradiation. AQP5 protein was expressed in the alveolar epithelium, and its level was increased between Days 7 and 14 after irradiation but decreased at Day 28, compared with the sham group. The RT-PCR results were consistent with the immunohistochemical analysis results. In summary, this study provides the first report of AQP1 and AQP5 expression in a model of radiation-induced pulmonary inflammation and edema. Decreased levels of AQP1 and AQP5 after irradiation suggest that these proteins play a role in the pathogenesis of RILT. PMID:24570172

  13. Brain trace element concentration of rats treated with the plant alkaloid, vincamine.

    PubMed

    Fayed, Abdel-Hasseb A

    2010-09-01

    Trace elements are essential for normal brain functions. Tiny amounts of these elements help in the formation of neurotransmitters and involved in the antioxidant defense and intracellular redox regulation and modulation of neural cells. Vincamine is a plant alkaloid used clinically as a peripheral vasodilator that increases cerebral blood flow and oxygen and glucose utilization by neural tissue to combat the effect of aging. Neurodegenerative diseases associated with aging characterized by a disturbance in trace element levels in the brain. The objective of this study was to determine the level of zinc (Zn), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), Selenium (Se), and chromium (Cr) in the brain of rats treated with vincamine. Vincamine was injected i.m. to rats at a dose of 15 mg/Kg bodyweight daily for 14 days. Twenty-four hours after the last injection, rats were killed, and brains were ashed and digested by concentrated acids and analyzed for trace elements concentrations by flame emission atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The results showed that Zn was the highest trace element in the brain of control rats (3.134 +/- 0.072 ppm) and Cr was the lowest (0.386 +/- 0.027 ppm). Vincamine administration significantly (p < 0.01) reduced the brain Fe concentration (1.393 +/- 0.165 ppm) compared to control (2.807 +/- 0.165 ppm). It was concluded that Zn was the highest trace element in the brain of rats. Vincamine administration resulted in approximately 50% reduction in brain Fe concentration which suggests its beneficial effect to prevent the oxidative stress of Fe in neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, and Huntington's diseases. PMID:19902161

  14. Impact of cranial irradiation and brain tumor location on fertility: a survey.

    PubMed

    Koustenis, E; Pfitzer, C; Balcerek, M; Reinmuth, S; Zynda, A; Stromberger, C; Hohmann, C; Keil, T; Borgmann-Staudt, A

    2013-11-01

    As survival rates of patients with childhood brain tumors have increased to 75%, treatment related side effects are of particular importance. The present study evaluated questionnaire-based fertility characteristics in cancer survivors treated with irradiation to the hypo-thalamic-pituitary-axis.A nationwide survey was conducted in collaboration with the German Childhood Cancer Registry. Questionnaire and treatment data could be retrieved for 1110 former childhood cancer patients with cranial irradiation and/or chemotherapy.Survivors receiving ≥30 gray vs. 18-29 gray and 0-17 gray to the pituitary gland reported less pregnancies or less with their partners (7.4% vs. 32.8% vs. 12.4%; p<0.001), were more often infertile (40% vs. 9.4% vs. 12.5%; p<0.001) and the female participants, had a higher frequency of permanent amenorrhea (16.7% vs. 1.7% vs. 0%; p<0.001).Irradiation of the pituitary gland ≥ 30 gray seemed to be associated with less pregnancies and increased permanent amenorrhea in women. Future studies need to be conducted to confirm these results. Increased knowledge of treatment related side effects might help brain tumor patients to improve their family planning if necessary by gonadotropine replacement. PMID:24158886

  15. Strain-Related Differences after Experimental Traumatic Brain Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Rolfe, Andrew; Register, David; Levasseur, Joseph E.; Churn, Severn B.; Sun, Dong

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The present study directly compares the effects of experimental brain injury in two commonly used rat strains: Fisher 344 and Sprague-Dawley. We previously found that Fisher rats have a higher mortality rate and more frequent seizure attacks at the same injury level than Sprague-Dawley rats. Although strain differences in rats are commonly accepted as contributing to variability among studies, there is a paucity of literature addressing strain influence in experimental neurotrauma. Therefore this study compares outcome measures in two rat strains following lateral fluid percussion injury. Fisher 344 and Sprague-Dawley rats were monitored for changes in physiological measurements, intracranial pressure, and electroencephalographic activity. We further analyzed neuronal degeneration and cell death in the injured brain using Fluoro-Jade-B (FJB) histochemistry and caspase-3 immunostaining. Behavioral studies using the beam walk and Morris water maze were conducted to characterize strain differences in both motor and cognitive functional recovery following injury. We found that Fisher rats had significantly higher intracranial pressure, prolonged seizure activity, increased FJB-positive staining in the injured cortex and thalamus, and increased caspase-3 expression than Sprague-Dawley rats. On average, Fisher rats displayed a greater amount of total recording time in seizure activity and had longer ictal durations. The Fisher rats also had increased motor deficits, correlating with the above results. In spite of these results, Fisher rats performed better on cognitive tests following injury. The results demonstrate that different rat strains respond to injury differently, and thus in preclinical neurotrauma studies strain influence is an important consideration when evaluating outcomes. PMID:20392137

  16. Experimental and numerical study on the mechanical behavior of rat brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Karimi, A; Navidbakhsh, M; Yousefi, H; Haghi, A Motevalli; Sadati, Sja

    2014-02-01

    Brain tissue is a very soft tissue in which the mechanical properties depend on the loading direction. While few studies have characterized these biomechanical properties, it is worth knowing that accurate characterization of the mechanical properties of brain tissue at different loading directions is a key asset for neuronavigation and surgery simulation through haptic devices. In this study, the hyperelastic mechanical properties of rat brain tissue were measured experimentally and computationally. Prepared cylindrical samples were excised from the parietal lobes of rats' brains and experimentally tested by a tensile testing machine. The effects of loading direction on the mechanical properties of brain tissue were measured by applying load on both longitudinal and circumferential directions. The general prediction ability of the proposed hyperelastic model was verified using finite element (FE) simulations of brain tissue tension experiments. The uniaxial experimental results compared well with those predicted by the FE models. The results revealed the influence of loading direction on the mechanical properties of brain tissue. The Ogden hyperelastic material model was suitably represented by the non-linear behavior of the brain tissue, which can be used in future biomechanical simulations. The hyperelastic properties of brain tissue provided here have interest to the medical research community as there are several applications where accurate characterization of these properties are crucial for an accurate outcome, such as neurosurgery, robotic surgery, haptic device design or car manufacturing to evaluate possible trauma due to an impact. PMID:24519528

  17. Relationship between orientation to a blast and pressure wave propagation inside the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Chavko, Mikulas; Watanabe, Tomas; Adeeb, Saleena; Lankasky, Jason; Ahlers, Stephen T; McCarron, Richard M

    2011-01-30

    Exposure to a blast wave generated during an explosion may result in brain damage and related neurological impairments. Several mechanisms by which the primary blast wave can damage the brain have been proposed, including: (1) a direct effect of the shock wave on the brain causing tissue damage by skull flexure and propagation of stress and shear forces; and (2) an indirect transfer of kinetic energy from the blast, through large blood vessels and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), to the central nervous system. To address a basic question related to the mechanisms of blast brain injury, pressure was measured inside the brains of rats exposed to a low level of blast (~35kPa), while positioned in three different orientations with respect to the primary blast wave; head facing blast, right side exposed to blast and head facing away from blast. Data show different patterns and durations of the pressure traces inside the brain, depending on the rat orientation to blast. Frontal exposures (head facing blast) resulted in pressure traces of higher amplitude and longer duration, suggesting direct transmission and reflection of the pressure inside the brain (dynamic pressure transfer). The pattern of the pressure wave inside the brain in the head facing away from blast exposures assumes contribution of the static pressure, similar to hydrodynamic pressure to the pressure wave inside the brain. PMID:21129403

  18. Three-Staged Stereotactic Radiotherapy Without Whole Brain Irradiation for Large Metastatic Brain Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Higuchi, Yoshinori Serizawa, Toru; Nagano, Osamu; Matsuda, Shinji; Ono, Junichi; Sato, Makoto; Iwadate, Yasuo; Saeki, Naokatsu

    2009-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of staged stereotactic radiotherapy with a 2-week interfraction interval for unresectable brain metastases more than 10 cm{sup 3} in volume. Patients and Methods: Subjects included 43 patients (24 men and 19 women), ranging in age from 41 to 84 years, who had large brain metastases (> 10 cc in volume). Primary tumors were in the colon in 14 patients, lung in 12, breast in 11, and other in 6. The peripheral dose was 10 Gy in three fractions. The interval between fractions was 2 weeks. The mean tumor volume before treatment was 17.6 {+-} 6.3 cm{sup 3} (mean {+-} SD). Mean follow-up interval was 7.8 months. The local tumor control rate, as well as overall, neurological, and qualitative survivals, were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: At the time of the second and third fractions, mean tumor volumes were 14.3 {+-} 6.5 (18.8% reduction) and 10.6 {+-} 6.1 cm{sup 3} (39.8% reduction), respectively, showing significant reductions. The median overall survival period was 8.8 months. Neurological and qualitative survivals at 12 months were 81.8% and 76.2%, respectively. Local tumor control rates were 89.8% and 75.9% at 6 and 12 months, respectively. Tumor recurrence-free and symptomatic edema-free rates at 12 months were 80.7% and 84.4%, respectively. Conclusions: The 2-week interval allowed significant reduction of the treatment volume. Our results suggest staged stereotactic radiotherapy using our protocol to be a possible alternative for treating large brain metastases.

  19. Melanocortin MC4 receptor agonists alleviate brain damage in abdominal compartment syndrome in the rat.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dong; Zhang, Hong-Guang; Zhao, Zi-Ai; Chang, Ming-Tao; Li, Yang; Yu, Jian; Zhang, Ye; Zhang, Lian-Yang

    2015-02-01

    Intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) is accompanied by high morbidity and mortality in surgical departments and ICUs. However, its specific pathophysiology is unclear. IAH not only leads to intra-abdominal tissue damage but also causes dysfunction in distal organs, such as the brain. In this study, we explore the protective effects of melanocortin 4 receptor agonists in IAH-induced brain injury. The IAH rat models were induced by hemorrhagic shock/resuscitation (with the mean arterial pressure (MAP) maintained at 30 mm Hg for 90 min followed by the reinfusion of the withdrawn blood with lactated Ringer's solution). Then, air was injected into the peritoneal cavity of the rats to maintain an intra-abdominal pressure of 20 mm Hg for 4 h. The effects of the melanocortin 4 receptor agonist RO27-3225 in alleviating the rats' IAH brain injuries were observed, which indicated that RO27-3225 could reduce brain edema, the expressions of the IL-1β and TNF-α inflammatory cytokines, the blood-brain barrier's permeability and the aquaporin4 (AQP4) and matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) levels. Moreover, the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist chlorisondamine and the selective melanocortin 4 receptor antagonist HS024 can negate the protective effects of the RO27-3225. The MC4R agonist can effectively reduce the intracerebral proinflammatory cytokine gene expression and alleviate the brain injury caused by blood-brain barrier damage following IAH. PMID:25616531

  20. Immunological identification and characterization of a delayed rectifier K+ channel polypeptide in rat brain.

    PubMed Central

    Trimmer, J S

    1991-01-01

    Antibodies specific for the drk1 polypeptide were used to characterize the corresponding protein in rat brain. Recombinant and synthetic immunogens containing fragments of the drk1 polypeptide were produced. Antibodies raised to these immunogens display monospecific reactions with the same 130-kDa polypeptide on immunoblots of adult rat brain membranes. Immunoprecipitation of 125I-labeled brain membranes identifies a 38-kDa peptide in tight association with the drk1 polypeptide. Immunohistochemical staining of sections of adult rat cortex shows that drk1 protein is restricted to neurons, where staining is present on dendrites and cell bodies but not on axons. These studies point to the value of such immunological reagents to the further characterization of the components of this delayed rectifier K+ channel in the mammalian central nervous system. Images PMID:1961744

  1. Avocado Oil Improves Mitochondrial Function and Decreases Oxidative Stress in Brain of Diabetic Rats.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Avila, Omar; Esquivel-Martínez, Mauricio; Olmos-Orizaba, Berenice Eridani; Saavedra-Molina, Alfredo; Rodriguez-Orozco, Alain R; Cortés-Rojo, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic encephalopathy is a diabetic complication related to the metabolic alterations featuring diabetes. Diabetes is characterized by increased lipid peroxidation, altered glutathione redox status, exacerbated levels of ROS, and mitochondrial dysfunction. Although the pathophysiology of diabetic encephalopathy remains to be clarified, oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of chronic diabetic complications. Taking this into consideration, the aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of 90-day avocado oil intake in brain mitochondrial function and oxidative status in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats (STZ rats). Avocado oil improves brain mitochondrial function in diabetic rats preventing impairment of mitochondrial respiration and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ m ), besides increasing complex III activity. Avocado oil also decreased ROS levels and lipid peroxidation and improved the GSH/GSSG ratio as well. These results demonstrate that avocado oil supplementation prevents brain mitochondrial dysfunction induced by diabetes in association with decreased oxidative stress. PMID:26180820

  2. Pharmacological modulation of brain levels of glutamate and GABA in rats exposed to total sleep deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Kamal, Sahar Mohamed

    2010-01-01

    Modulation of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate by selected antidepressants and anticonvulsants could play a beneficial role in total sleep deprivation (TSD) caused by depressed mood. In the present study, albino rats were exposed to TSD for five days. On the sixth day, the brains were removed, and GABA and glutamate levels were measured in the prefrontal cortex and thalamus to identify TSD-induced changes in untreated rats and in rats treated with carbamazepine 40 mg/kg intraperitoneally (IP), fluoxetine 20 mg/kg IP, or desipramine 10 mg/kg IP. Carbamazepine and fluoxetine significantly increased GABA and reduced glutamate levels in both brain areas. Desipramine administration did not affect GABA or glutamate concentrations in the tested brain areas; levels were comparable with those induced by TSD without treatment. These results suggest that administration of carbamazepine or fluoxetine could have a beneficial effect by increasing GABA levels during TSD.

  3. Avocado Oil Improves Mitochondrial Function and Decreases Oxidative Stress in Brain of Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz-Avila, Omar; Esquivel-Martínez, Mauricio; Olmos-Orizaba, Berenice Eridani; Saavedra-Molina, Alfredo; Rodriguez-Orozco, Alain R.; Cortés-Rojo, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic encephalopathy is a diabetic complication related to the metabolic alterations featuring diabetes. Diabetes is characterized by increased lipid peroxidation, altered glutathione redox status, exacerbated levels of ROS, and mitochondrial dysfunction. Although the pathophysiology of diabetic encephalopathy remains to be clarified, oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of chronic diabetic complications. Taking this into consideration, the aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of 90-day avocado oil intake in brain mitochondrial function and oxidative status in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats (STZ rats). Avocado oil improves brain mitochondrial function in diabetic rats preventing impairment of mitochondrial respiration and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), besides increasing complex III activity. Avocado oil also decreased ROS levels and lipid peroxidation and improved the GSH/GSSG ratio as well. These results demonstrate that avocado oil supplementation prevents brain mitochondrial dysfunction induced by diabetes in association with decreased oxidative stress. PMID:26180820

  4. Schwann cell myelination of the myelin deficient rat spinal cord following X-irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, I.D.; Hammang, J.P.; Gilmore, S.A.

    1988-01-01

    The myelin-deficient (md) rat is an X-linked myelin mutant that has an abnormality of oligodendrocytes and a severe paucity of myelin throughout the CNS. This lack of myelin makes it an ideal model in which to study the cellular interactions that occur when foreign myelinating cells are induced in the milieu of this nonmyelinated CNS. In this study, Schwann cells were induced in the lumbosacral spinal cord by exposing it to radiation, a technique demonstrated repeatedly in other nonmutant strains of rats. Md rats and their age-matched littermates were irradiated (3,000 to 4,000 R) at 3 days of age and perfused 16-22 days later after pulse labeling with tritiated thymidine. In the md rat, Schwann cell invasion progressed from the area of the spinal cord-nerve root junction and extended into the dorsal columns and adjacent gray matter. Autoradiographic evidence revealed that many of these cells incorporated 3H-thymidine, indicating that they were undergoing proliferation. Ultrastructural observations showed that there was an integration of these intraspinal Schwann cells with the cells normally occurring in this environment, i.e., oligodendrocytes and astrocytes. The extent of migration and division of Schwann cells, as well as their interactions with glial cells, were similar to those seen in the nonmutant irradiated littermates. These studies provide conclusive evidence that md rat axons are normal with respect to their ability to provide trophic and mitogenic signals to myelinating cells.

  5. U. v. -enhanced reactivation of u. v. -irradiated herpes virus by primary cultures of rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Zurlo, J.; Yager, J.D. )

    1984-04-01

    Carcinogen treatment of cultured mammalian cells prior to infection with u.v.-irradiated virus results in enhanced virus survival and mutagenesis suggesting the induction of SOS-type processes. The development of a primary rat hepatocyte culture system is reported to investigate cellular responses to DNA damage which may be relevant to hepatocarcinogenesis in vivo. Enhanced reactivation of u.v.-irradiated Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) occurred in hepatocytes irradiated with u.v. Cultured hepatocytes were pretreated with u.v. at the time of enhanced DNA synthesis. These treatments caused an inhibition followed by a recovery of DNA synthesis. At various times after pretreatment, the hepatocytes were infected with control or u.v.-irradiated HSV-1 at low multiplicity, and virus survival was measured. U.v.-irradiated HSV-1 exhibited the expected two-component survival curve in control or u.v. pretreated hepatocytes. The magnitude of enhanced reactivation of HSV-1 was dependent on the u.v. dose to the hepatocytes, the time of infection following u.v. pretreatment, and the level of DNA synthesis at the time of pretreatment. These results suggest that u.v. treatment of rat hepatocytes causes the induction of SOS-type functions tht may have a role in the initiation of hepatocarcinogenesis.

  6. In vivo pink-beam imaging and fast alignment procedure for rat brain tumor radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Nemoz, Christian; Kibleur, Astrid; Hyacinthe, Jean Noël; Berruyer, Gilles; Brochard, Thierry; Bräuer-Krisch, Elke; Le Duc, Géraldine; Brun, Emmanuel; Elleaume, Hélène; Serduc, Raphaël

    2016-01-01

    A fast positioning method for brain tumor microbeam irradiations for preclinical studies at third-generation X-ray sources is described. The three-dimensional alignment of the animals relative to the X-ray beam was based on the X-ray tomography multi-slices after iodine infusion. This method used pink-beam imaging produced by the ID17 wiggler. A graphical user interface has been developed in order to define the irradiation parameters: field width, height, number of angles and X-ray dose. This study is the first reporting an image guided method for soft tissue synchrotron radiotherapy. It allowed microbeam radiation therapy irradiation fields to be reduced by a factor of ∼20 compared with previous studies. It permitted more targeted, more efficient brain tumor microbeam treatments and reduces normal brain toxicity of the radiation treatment. PMID:26698083

  7. Effect of mealing on plasma and brain amino acid, and brain monoamine in rats after oral aspartame.

    PubMed

    Torii, K; Mimura, T; Takasaki, Y; Ichimura, M

    1986-01-01

    Aspartame (APM; L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester) was investigated for its ability to alter brain amino acids and monoamines in overnight fasted rats allowed to consume commercial diets for 60 minutes. In addition, the effects of mealing on the changes in plasma and brain amino acids and brain monoamines induced by glucose and/or insulin, and known pharmacologically active compounds, were studied. The consumption of the commercial chow largely prevented changes in blood glucose and amino acids, and brain amino acids and the monoamines dopamine, norepinephrine and serotonin that might be expected to occur following glucose with or without insulin. Feeding failed to prevent changes in the above parameters when 5-hydroxy-tryptophan, p-chlorophenylalanine and reserpine were administered. The oral administration of up to 250 mg/kg BW APM with water or glucose followed by free feeding failed to alter brain monoamines. These studies demonstrate the potent ability of food to normalize biochemical parameters in blood and brain that otherwise might occur, and clearly show the lack of effect on brain monoamine levels of abuse doses of APM when administered with food. PMID:2940610

  8. Expression of Aquaporin 4 and Breakdown of the Blood-Brain Barrier after Hypoglycemia-Induced Brain Edema in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Jiangshan; Zhao, Fei; Yu, Xiaoyan; Zhao, Yuwu; Li, Dawei; Shi, Hong; Sun, Yongning

    2014-01-01

    Background Hypoglycemia-induced brain edema is a severe clinical event that often results in death. The mechanisms by which hypoglycemia induces brain edema are unclear. Methods In a hypoglycemic injury model established in adult rats, brain edema was verified by measuring brain water content and visualizing water accumulation using hematoxylin and eosin staining. Temporal expression of aquaporin 4 (AQP4) and the integrity of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) were evaluated. We assessed the distribution and expression of AQP4 following glucose deprivation in astrocyte cultures. Results Brain edema was induced immediately after severe hypoglycemia but continued to progress even after recovery from hypoglycemia. Upregulation of AQP4 expression and moderate breakdown of the BBB were observed 24 h after recovery. In vitro, significant redistribution of AQP4 to the plasma membrane was induced following 6 h glucose deprivation. Conclusion Hypoglycemia-induced brain edema is caused by cytotoxic and vasogenic factors. Changes in AQP4 location and expression may play a protective role in edema resolution. PMID:25264602

  9. Blood-brain barrier transport of choline is reduced in the aged rat.

    PubMed

    Mooradian, A D

    1988-02-01

    An age-related impairment in choline transport across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) may contribute to the cholinergic mechanisms of geriatric memory dysfunction. To test this hypothesis, the brain choline uptake in male Fisher 344 rats at 2, 18 and 24 months of age was studied using the Oldendorf technique. The Vmax of choline transport in the 24-month-old rats (0.05 +/- 0.04 nmol/min/g) was significantly lower than that in the 2-month-old rat (2.5 +/- 1.0 nmol/min/g) (P less than 0.05). The Km of transport in old rats (13 +/- 35 microM) was also significantly smaller than the value in 24-month-old rats (450 +/- 195 microM), while the constant of the non-saturable component of the transport, Kd, was not significantly different in older rats (1.2 +/- 0.3 vs 0.6 +/- 0.1 microliter/min/g). These results indicate that the carrier in old rats has reduced capacity and increased affinity to choline. The reduced choline carrier capacity explains the significant decrease in BBB choline transport in aged rats. PMID:3359216

  10. Pharmacokinetics and distribution of fluvoxamine to the brain in rats under oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Kobuchi, Shinji; Fukushima, Keizo; Ito, Yukako; Sugioka, Nobuyuki; Takada, Kanji

    2012-07-01

    The effects of oxidative stress (OS) on the pharmacokinetics of fluvoxamine (FLV), particularly on FLV distribution in the plasma, were studied in ferric-nitrilotriacetate-induced OS rat models (OS rats). The study protocol involved a continuous FLV infusion (25.0 μg/kg/min). The resulting mean plasma FLV concentration measured in steady state OS rats was 0.13 ± 0.01 μg/mL, which was significantly lower than plasma concentrations measured in control rats (0.19 ± 0.01 μg/mL). Moreover, the mean FLV concentration in the OS rat brain (0.51 ± 0.08 μg/g) was determined to be approximately half the concentration in control rat brains (0.95 ± 0.11 μg/g). The FLV concentrations in both the unbound fraction of plasma and erythrocytes of OS rats were significantly greater than that of control rats. These results suggest the potential attenuation of FLV's pharmacological effects in patients under OS. PMID:22486632

  11. Characterization and in vivo regulation of V sub 1 -type vasopressin receptors in the rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Shewey, L.M.

    1988-01-01

    Specific, high affinity binding sites for ({sup 3}H)-arginine{sup 8}-vasopressin (AVP) have been characterized in Long-Evans rat septal membranes. Binding displacement studies with peptide analogs of AVP indicate that this binding site is similar to the V{sub 1} (pressor)-type receptor for AVP. When added to rat brain septal slices that had been pre-labeled with ({sup 3}H)-myoinositol, AVP stimulated the accumulation of ({sup 3}H)-inositol-1-phosphate (IP{sub 1}) in the presence of lithium in a dose-dependent manner. This stimulation was completely inhibited by the specific V{sub 1} antagonists, d(CH{sub 2}){sub 5}Tyr(Me)AVP, indicating that AVP stimulates hydrolysis of inositol phospholipids in rat brain septum through an interaction with V{sub 1}-type AVP receptors. Binding studies of AVP receptors in the septum of heterozygous (HE) and homozygous, Brattleboro (BB) rats revealed an increased number of receptors with a lower affinity for AVP in the HO-BB rat when compared to the HE-BB rat. AVP-stimulated accumulation of ({sup 3}H)-IP{sub 1} was significantly greater in the septum of the HO-BB rat than in the HE-BB rat. AVP receptor binding capacity correlated with release of ({sup 3}H)-IP{sub 1} for all three groups studied.

  12. Impact of acute and chronic stress hormone on male albino rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Han, Li-Li; Chen, Ling; Dong, Zhi-Ling

    2015-01-01

    The present investigation aimed to evaluate the acute and chronic effect of stress (stress hormone) in male albino rat brain. Nor-epinephrine was used for the treatment and saline used for the control. Nor-epinephrine was dissolved in the saline and administered orally to the rats. Following nor-epinephrine administration, the brain was removed surgically at 6 h, 12 h and 45 days. Alanine tansaminase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AST) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) were significantly altered in the rats. Lipid peroxidation was measured as malondialdehyde (MDA), showed altered lipid peroxidation. Hematological markers such as packed cell volume (PCV), white blood cells (WBC), neutrophil, lymphocytes and hemoglobin were significantly altered compared to controls. Altered serum biochemical and hematological markers, lipid peroxidation and enzyme activities leads to adverse effect in the cellular metabolism and physiological activities of rats. PMID:26261571

  13. Metabolic brain activity suggestive of persistent pain in a rat model of neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Scott J; Millecamps, Magali; Aliaga, Antonio; Seminowicz, David A; Low, Lucie A; Bedell, Barry J; Stone, Laura S; Schweinhardt, Petra; Bushnell, M Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Persistent pain is a central characteristic of neuropathic pain conditions in humans. Knowing whether rodent models of neuropathic pain produce persistent pain is therefore crucial to their translational applicability. We investigated the Spared Nerve Injury (SNI) model of neuropathic pain and the formalin pain model in rats using Positron Emission Tomography (PET) with the metabolic tracer [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) to determine if there is ongoing brain activity suggestive of persistent pain. For the formalin model, under brief anesthesia we injected one hindpaw with 5% formalin and the FDG tracer into a tail vein. We then allowed the animals to awaken and observed pain behavior for 30 min during the FDG uptake period. The rat was then anesthetized and placed in the scanner for static image acquisition, which took place between minutes 45 and 75 post-tracer injection. A single reference rat brain magnetic resonance image (MRI) was used to align the PET images with the Paxinos and Watson rat brain atlas. Increased glucose metabolism was observed in the somatosensory region associated with the injection site (S1 hindlimb contralateral), S1 jaw/upper lip and cingulate cortex. Decreases were observed in the prelimbic cortex and hippocampus. Second, SNI rats were scanned 3 weeks post-surgery using the same scanning paradigm, and region-of-interest analyses revealed increased metabolic activity in the contralateral S1 hindlimb. Finally, a second cohort of SNI rats were scanned while anesthetized during the tracer uptake period, and the S1 hindlimb increase was not observed. Increased brain activity in the somatosensory cortex of SNI rats resembled the activity produced with the injection of formalin, suggesting that the SNI model may produce persistent pain. The lack of increased activity in S1 hindlimb with general anesthetic demonstrates that this effect can be blocked, as well as highlights the importance of investigating brain activity in awake and behaving

  14. Maternal separation produces alterations of forebrain brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in differently aged rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiong; Shao, Feng; Wang, Weiwen

    2015-01-01

    Early life adversity, such as postnatal maternal separation (MS), play a central role in the development of psychopathologies during individual ontogeny. In this study, we investigated the effects of repeated MS (4 h per day from postnatal day (PND) 1–21) on the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and the hippocampus of male and female juvenile (PND 21), adolescent (PND 35) and young adult (PND 56) Wistar rats. The results indicated that MS increased BDNF in the CA1 and the dentate gyrus (DG) of adolescent rats as well as in the DG of young adult rats. However, the expression of BDNF in the mPFC in the young adult rats was decreased by MS. Additionally, in the hippocampus, there was decreased BDNF expression with age in both the MS and non separated rats. However, in the mPFC, the BDNF expression was increased with age in the non separated rats; nevertheless, the BDNF expression was significantly decreased in the MS young adult rats. In the NAc, the BDNF expression was increased with age in the male non-maternal separation (NMS) rats, and the young adult female MS rats had less BDNF expression than the adolescent female MS rats. The present study shows unique age-differently changes on a molecular level induced by MS and advances the use of MS as a valid animal model to detect the underlying neurobiological mechanisms of mental disorders. PMID:26388728

  15. Intracellular pathways regulating ciliary beating of rat brain ependymal cells

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thien; Chin, Wei-Chun; O’Brien, Jennifer A; Verdugo, Pedro; Berger, Albert J

    2001-01-01

    The mammalian brain ventricles are lined with ciliated ependymal cells. As yet little is known about the mechanisms by which neurotransmitters regulate cilia beat frequency (CBF). Application of 5-HT to ependymal cells in cultured rat brainstem slices caused CBF to increase. 5-HT had an EC50 of 30 μM and at 100 μM attained a near-maximal CBF increase of 52.7 ± 4.1 % (mean ± s.d.) (n= 8). Bathing slices in Ca2+-free solution markedly reduced the 5-HT-mediated increase in CBF. Fluorescence measurements revealed that 5-HT caused a marked transient elevation in cytosolic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]c) that then slowly decreased to a plateau level. Analysis showed that the [Ca2+]c transient was due to release of Ca2+ from inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3)-sensitive stores; the plateau was probably due to extracellular Ca2+ influx through Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ (CRAC) channels. Application of ATP caused a sustained decrease in CBF. ATP had an EC50 of about 50 μM and 100 μM ATP resulted in a maximal 57.5 ± 6.5 % (n= 12) decrease in CBF. The ATP-induced decrease in CBF was unaffected by lowering extracellular [Ca2+], and no changes in [Ca2+]c were observed. Exposure of ependymal cells to forskolin caused a decrease in CBF. Ciliated ependymal cells loaded with caged cAMP exhibited a 54.3 ± 7.5 % (n= 9) decrease in CBF following uncaging. These results suggest that ATP reduces CBF by a Ca2+-independent cAMP-mediated pathway. Application of 5-HT and adenosine-5′-O-3-thiotriphosphate (ATP-γ-S) to acutely isolated ciliated ependymal cells resulted in CBF responses similar to those of ependymal cells in cultured slices suggesting that these neurotransmitters act directly on these cells. The opposite response of ciliated ependymal cells to 5-HT and ATP provides a novel mechanism for their active involvement in central nervous system signalling. PMID:11179397

  16. Neuroprotection by Vitamin C Against Ethanol-Induced Neuroinflammation Associated Neurodegeneration in the Developing Rat Brain.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Ashfaq; Shah, Shahid A; Badshah, Haroon; Kim, Min J; Ali, Tahir; Yoon, Gwang H; Kim, Tae H; Abid, Nouman B; Rehman, Shafiq Ur; Khan, Sohail; Kim, Myeong O

    2016-01-01

    Ethanol induces oxidative stress and its exposure during early developmental age causes neuronal cell death which leads to several neurological disorders. We previously reported that vitamin C can protect against ethanol-induced apoptotic cell death in the developing rat brain. Here, we extended our study to understand the therapeutic efficacy of vitamin C against ethanol-induced oxidative stress, neuroinflammation mediated neurodegeneration in postnatal day 7 (PND7) rat. A single episode of ethanol (5g/kg) subcutaneous administration to postnatal day 7 rat significantly induced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and activated both microglia and astrocytes followed by the induction of different apoptotic markers. On the other hand, due to its free radical scavenging properties, vitamin C treatment significantly reduced the production of reactive oxygen species, suppressed both activated microglia and astrocytes and reversed other changes including elevated level of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, cytochrome c and different caspases such as caspase-9 and caspase-3 induced by ethanol in developing rat brain. Moreover, vitamin C treatment also reduced ethanol-induced activation of Poly [ADP-Ribose] Polymerase 1(PARP-1) and neurodegeneration as evident from Flouro-Jade-B and Nissl stainined neuronal cell death in PND7 rat brain. These findings suggest that vitamin C mitigated ethanol-induced oxidative stress, neuroinflammation and apoptotic neuronal loss and may be beneficial against ethanol damaging effects in brain development. PMID:26831257

  17. Element distribution in the brain sections of rats measured by synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, N. Q.; Zhang, F.; Wang, X. F.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Chai, Z. F.; Huang, Y. Y.; He, W.; Zhao, X. Q.; Zuo, A. J.; Yang, R.

    2004-02-01

    The concentration of trace elements in brain sections was measured by synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence. The relative concentration was calculated by means of the normalization of Compton scattering intensity approximately 22 keV, after the normalization for collecting time of X-ray spectrum and the counting of the ion chamber, and subtracting the contribution of the polycarbonate film for supporting sample. Furthermore, the statistical evaluation of the element distribution in various regions of the brain sections of the 20-day-old rats was tested. For investigating the distribution of elements in the brain of iodine deficient rats, Wistar rats were fed with iodine deficient diet and deionized water (ID group). The rats were fed the same iodine deficient diet, but drank KIO 3 solution as control (CT group). The results showed that the contents of calcium (Ca) in thalamus (TH) and copper (Cu) and iron (Fe) in cerebral cortex (CX) of ID rats were significantly lower than that of control rats, while the contents of phosphor (P), sulfur (S), potassium (K), rubidium (Rb), bromine (Br), chlorine (Cl), zinc (Zn), Ca and Cu of ID in hippocampus (H) and the contents of Br, Cl, Zn and Ca in cerebral cortex of ID rats were significantly higher. Especially, the difference of Br, Cl, Zn and Ca in H between ID and CT was more significant. The contents of all elements measured in H were higher than (or equal to) CX and/or TH for both groups, except low Cl of the control rats. Furthermore Zn and Cu contents along the hippocampal fissure in both groups were 1.5 ( P<0.001) and 0.87( P<0.03) times higher than in hippocampus, respectively. Considering the results of cluster analysis our study shows that the marked alterations in the spatial distribution of Zn and Ca of ID rats brain during brain development stages. In addition, the effect of the perfusion with 0.9% NaCl solution before taking brain on the distribution of elements in the brain sections was observed and

  18. Imaging of water distribution in the rat brain by activation autoradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Kogure, K.; Kawashima, K.; Iwata, R.; Ido, T. )

    1990-01-01

    Regional water distribution in the rat brain was obtained autoradiographically by activation analysis. The autoradiogram obtained for the normal rat brain showed high accumulation of water in the areas of sensory-motor cortex, hippocampus, thalamus, and amygdaloid cortex, whereas corpus callosum and internal capsule showed low water contents as expected. The estimated values of water content were 78.6 +/- 4.9 weight % for gray matter, and 73.5 +/- 4.9 weight % for white matter, respectively. The mean values of the water content were consistent with those obtained by a conventional drying-weighing method.

  19. 26Al incorporation into the brain of rat fetuses through the placental barrier and subsequent metabolism in postnatal development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yumoto, Sakae; Nagai, Hisao; Kakimi, Shigeo; Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki

    2010-04-01

    Aluminium (Al) inhibits prenatal and postnatal development of the brain. We used 26Al as a tracer, and measured 26Al incorporation into rat fetuses through the placental barrier by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). From day 15 to day 18 of gestation, 26AlCl 3 was subcutaneously injected into pregnant rats. Considerable amounts of 26Al were measured in the tissues of newborn rats immediately after birth. The amounts of 26Al in the liver and kidneys decreased rapidly during postnatal development. However, approximately 15% of 26Al incorporated into the brain of fetuses remained in the brain of adult rats 730 days after birth.

  20. State of the antioxidative enzymes of rat bone marrow cells after irradiation, fractures, and a combination of both

    SciTech Connect

    Bogdanova, I.A.; Ovchinnikov, K.G.; Torbenko, V.P.; Gerasimov, A.M.

    1987-11-01

    The authors study bone marrow levels of antioxidative (antiradical) defensive systems (ADS) enzymes, namely superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GP), glutathione reductase (GR), and glutathione: dehydroascorbate oxidoreductase (GDAR), rats and changes in their activity in the bone marrow at various times after irradiation, mechanical trauma, and a combination of both. Development of acute radiation sickness as a result of a single irradiation was accompanied by marked changes in the enzymic antioxidative system of rat bone marrow cells.

  1. Brain macrophages in rats following intravenous labelling of mononuclear leucocytes with colloidal carbon.

    PubMed Central

    Ling, E A

    1978-01-01

    Intravenous injections of colloidal carbon were used to label circulating mononuclear leucocytes. In the neonatal rats (3-5 days old), either 24 or 48 hours later, carbon-labelled macrophages were seen in the brain tissue. In the areas examined, notably the corpus callosum and the cerebral cortex, labelled macrophages were distributed randomly. They were either perivascular, perineuronal or lay between the nerve fibres. The labelled cells were mostly spindle-shaped with an eccentric nucleus and the cytoplasm at one pole of the cell was engorged with dark carbon particles. Abundant labelled cells were also seen over the brain surface in the layers of meninges. There was no evidence of leucocytic infiltration into the brain tissue of mature animals. It is concluded from the present work that a proportion (but not all) of the macrophages in the neonatal rat brain are derived from the blood stream. Images Figs. 1-8 PMID:632205

  2. Chitosan and cyclodextrin in intranasal microemulsion for improved brain buspirone hydrochloride pharmacokinetics in rats.

    PubMed

    Bshara, Hamza; Osman, Rihab; Mansour, Samar; El-Shamy, Abd El-Hameed A

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop buspirone hydrochloride microemulsion formulations for intranasal administration to improve the drug bioavailability and provide high drug brain levels. For the purpose, chitosan aspartate, and hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin were incorporated in the microemulsions. The prepared formulations were characterized. Biological investigations including pharmacokinetic studies, brain drug targeting efficiency determinations and histopathological examinations were performed on rats. The results showed that safe and stable mucoadhesive microemulsion suitable for nasal administration were successfully prepared. Ex vivo drug permeation revealed high drug permeation from microemulsions. Absolute bioavailability after intranasal administration of buspirone mucoadhesive microemulsion increased significantly and plasma concentration peaked at 15 min. The AUC0-360(brain) was 3 times that obtained after intravenous administration. A high brain targeting efficiency (86.6%) and a direct nose to brain transport (88%) confirmed the direct nose to brain transport of buspirone following nasal administration of the microemulsions. PMID:24274510

  3. Brain sarcoma of meningeal origin after cranial irradiation in childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia. Case report

    SciTech Connect

    Tiberin, P.; Maor, E.; Zaizov, R.; Cohen, I.J.; Hirsch, M.; Yosefovich, T.; Ronen, J.; Goldstein, J.

    1984-10-01

    The authors report their experience with an unusual case of intracerebral sarcoma of meningeal cell origin in an 8 1/2-year-old girl. This tumor occurred 6 1/2 years after cranial irradiation at relatively low dosage (2200 rads) had been delivered to the head in the course of a multimodality treatment for acute lymphocytic leukemia. The tumor recurred approximately 10 months after the first surgical intervention. Macroscopic total excision of the recurrent growth followed by whole-brain irradiation (4500 rads) failed to eradicate it completely and local recurrence prompted reoperation 18 months later. This complication of treatment in long-term childhood leukemia survivors is briefly discussed, as well as the pathology of meningeal sarcomas.

  4. CARBONYL SULFIDE INHALATION PRODUCES BRAIN LESIONS IN F344 RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS) is an intermediate in the production of pesticides and herbicides, and is a metabolite of the neurotoxicant carbon disulfide. The potential neurotoxicity of inhaled COS was investigated in F344 rats. Male rats were exposed to 0, 75, 150, 300, or 600 ppm COS...

  5. Aging and sex influence the permeability of the blood-brain barrier in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Saija, A.; Princi, P.; D'Amico, N.; De Pasquale, R.; Costa, G.

    1990-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the existence of aging- and sex-related alterations in the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in the rat, by calculating a unidirectional blood-to-brain transfer constant (Ki) for the circulating tracer ({sup 14}C)-{alpha}-aminoisobutyric acid. The authors observed that: (a) the permeability of the BBB significantly increased within the frontal and temporo-parietal cortex, hypothalamus and cerebellum in 28-30 week old rats, in comparison with younger animals; (b) in several brain areas of female intact rats higher Ki values (even though not significantly different) were calculated at oestrus than at proestrus; (c) in 1-week ovariectomized rats there was a marked increase of Ki values at the level of the frontal, temporo-parietal and occipital cortex, cerebellum and brain-stem. One can speculate that aging and sex-related alterations in thee permeability of the BBB reflect respectively changes in brain neurochemical system activity and in plasma steroid hormone levels.

  6. Acetylcholine content in the brain of rats treated with paraoxon and obidoxime

    PubMed Central

    Milošević, M. P.

    1970-01-01

    1. The effect of obidoxime on the rise in brain acetylcholine caused by the anticholinesterase paraoxon was studied in the rat. 2. In animals poisoned with a sublethal dose of paraoxon and thereafter treated with obidoxime the levels of both “free” and total brain acetylcholine were practically the same as those in rats injected with paraoxon only. 3. After poisoning with doses of paraoxon which are lethal unless an oxime is also given, the total acetylcholine in the brain of obidoxime-protected rats continued to accumulate, reaching a peak 2 h after injection of paraoxon. At this time no signs of central effects such as convulsions or tremor were seen. 4. Atropine, given 30 min before paraoxon, markedly reduced the rise in total brain acetylcholine seen when the anticholinesterase is given alone. 5. In rats pretreated with atropine and obidoxime excessive doses of paraoxon which are lethal in the absence of the antidotes produced a rise in total brain acetylcholine which was directly proportional to the dose of paraoxon administered. PMID:5485148

  7. Brain oxidative damage restored by Sesbania grandiflora in cigarette smoke-exposed rats.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Thiyagarajan; Sureka, Chandrabose; Bhuvana, Shanmugham; Begum, Vavamohaideen Hazeena

    2015-08-01

    Cigarette smoking has been associated with high risk of neurological diseases such as stroke, Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis, etc., The present study was designed to evaluate the restorative effects of Sesbania grandiflora (S. grandiflora) on oxidative damage induced by cigarette smoke exposure in the brain of rats. Adult male Wistar-Kyoto rats were exposed to cigarette smoke for a period of 90 days and consecutively treated with S. grandiflora aqueous suspension (SGAS, 1000 mg/kg body weight per day by oral gavage) for a period of 3 weeks. The levels of protein carbonyl, nitric oxide, and activities of cytochrome P450, NADPH oxidase and xanthine oxidase were significantly increased, whereas the levels of total thiol, protein thiol, non-protein thiol, nucleic acids, tissue protein and the activities of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, Ca(2+)-ATPase and Mg(2+)-ATPase were significantly diminished in the brain of rats exposed to cigarette smoke as compared with control rats. Also cigarette smoke exposure resulted in a significant alteration in brain total lipid, total cholesterol, triglycerides and phospholipids content. Treatment of SGAS is regressed these alterations induced by cigarette smoke. The results of our study suggest that S. grandiflora restores the brain from cigarette smoke induced oxidative damage. S. grandiflora could have rendered protection to the brain by stabilizing their cell membranes and prevented the protein oxidation, probably through its free radical scavenging and anti-peroxidative effect. PMID:25620659

  8. Increased concentrations of 3-hydroxykynurenine in vitamin B6 deficient neonatal rat brain.

    PubMed

    Guilarte, T R; Wagner, H N

    1987-12-01

    Increased concentrations of the endogenous tryptophan metabolite 3-hydroxykynurenine (3-HK) were measured in the brains of vitamin B6 deficient neonatal rats. Mean concentrations of 3-HK in B6 deficient cerebellum, corpus striatum, frontal cortex, and pons/medulla ranged from 9.7 to 18.6 and 102 to 142 nmol/g of wet tissue at 14 and 18 days of age, respectively. 3-HK was not significantly increased in control neonatal or adult rat brain, vitamin B6 deficient rat brain at 7 days of age, or in brains from adult rats deprived of vitamin B6 for 58 days. The administration of daily intraperitoneal injections of vitamin B6 from the 14th to the 18th day of age decreased the concentration of 3-HK to control levels. 3-HK has been shown by other investigators to produce seizures when injected into the cerebral ventricles of adult rodents. Thus, our studies show the accumulation in brain of a putative endogenous convulsant as the result of a nutritional deficiency. PMID:3681302

  9. Enhanced Lithium-Induced Brain Recovery Following Cranial Irradiation Is Not Impeded by Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Malaterre, Jordane; McPherson, Cameron S.; Denoyer, Delphine; Lai, Emily; Hagekyriakou, Jim; Lightowler, Sally; Shudo, Koishi; Ernst, Matthias; Ashley, David M.; Short, Jennifer L.; Wheeler, Greg

    2012-01-01

    Radiation-induced brain injury occurs in many patients receiving cranial radiation therapy, and these deleterious effects are most profound in younger patients. Impaired neurocognitive functions in both humans and rodents are associated with inflammation, demyelination, and neural stem cell dysfunction. Here we evaluated the utility of lithium and a synthetic retinoid receptor agonist in reducing damage in a model of brain-focused irradiation in juvenile mice. We found that lithium stimulated brain progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation following cranial irradiation while also preventing oligodendrocyte loss in the dentate gyrus of juvenile mice. In response to inflammation induced by radiation, which may have encumbered the optimal reparative action of lithium, we used the anti-inflammatory synthetic retinoid Am80 that is in clinical use in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia. Although Am80 reduced the number of cyclooxygenase-2-positive microglial cells following radiation treatment, it did not enhance lithium-induced neurogenesis recovery, and this alone was not significantly different from the effect of lithium on this proinflammatory response. Similarly, lithium was superior to Am80 in supporting the restoration of new doublecortin-positive neurons following irradiation. These data suggest that lithium is superior in its restorative effects to blocking inflammation alone, at least in the case of Am80. Because lithium has been in routine clinical practice for 60 years, these preclinical studies indicate that this drug might be beneficial in reducing post-therapy late effects in patients receiving cranial radiotherapy and that blocking inflammation in this context may not be as advantageous as previously suggested. PMID:23197851

  10. Enhanced lithium-induced brain recovery following cranial irradiation is not impeded by inflammation.

    PubMed

    Malaterre, Jordane; McPherson, Cameron S; Denoyer, Delphine; Lai, Emily; Hagekyriakou, Jim; Lightowler, Sally; Shudo, Koishi; Ernst, Matthias; Ashley, David M; Short, Jennifer L; Wheeler, Greg; Ramsay, Robert G

    2012-06-01

    Radiation-induced brain injury occurs in many patients receiving cranial radiation therapy, and these deleterious effects are most profound in younger patients. Impaired neurocognitive functions in both humans and rodents are associated with inflammation, demyelination, and neural stem cell dysfunction. Here we evaluated the utility of lithium and a synthetic retinoid receptor agonist in reducing damage in a model of brain-focused irradiation in juvenile mice. We found that lithium stimulated brain progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation following cranial irradiation while also preventing oligodendrocyte loss in the dentate gyrus of juvenile mice. In response to inflammation induced by radiation, which may have encumbered the optimal reparative action of lithium, we used the anti-inflammatory synthetic retinoid Am80 that is in clinical use in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia. Although Am80 reduced the number of cyclooxygenase-2-positive microglial cells following radiation treatment, it did not enhance lithium-induced neurogenesis recovery, and this alone was not significantly different from the effect of lithium on this proinflammatory response. Similarly, lithium was superior to Am80 in supporting the restoration of new doublecortin-positive neurons following irradiation. These data suggest that lithium is superior in its restorative effects to blocking inflammation alone, at least in the case of Am80. Because lithium has been in routine clinical practice for 60 years, these preclinical studies indicate that this drug might be beneficial in reducing post-therapy late effects in patients receiving cranial radiotherapy and that blocking inflammation in this context may not be as advantageous as previously suggested. PMID:23197851

  11. Cholestasis induced antinociception and decreased gene expression of MOR1 in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, S; Karami, Z; Mohammadian, A; Khosrobakhsh, F; Rostamzadeh, J

    2015-01-22

    We examined antinociception and gene expression of mu-opioid receptor 1 (MOR1) in some brain areas of cholestatic rats, 21 days after common bile duct ligation (BDL). Cholestasis was induced in male Wistar rats during laparotomy and common BDL. Pain behavior was assessed on days 7, 14 or 21 of BDL using a hotplate test in control, sham and cholestatic groups. On day 21 of BDL, other groups of rats were sacrificed, whole brains were extracted, and the hypothalamus, prefrontal cortex (PFC), hippocampus and striatum in control, sham and cholestatic rats were dissected. We used a semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method for evaluating MOR1 gene expression. The results revealed that cholestatic rats showed significant antinociception on days 14 and 21 of ligation with the most significant effect on day 21, which was prevented by naloxone (1 mg/kg). On the other hand, the expression of MOR1 gene compared to the sham group was decreased by 42% in the hypothalamus, 41% in the PFC, and 67% in the hippocampus after 21 days of BDL, while no significant change in its expression in the striatum was observed. It can be concluded that a change in endogenous opioid levels and its subsequent influence on the gene expression of MOR in some areas of the rat brain may underlie the altered nociception and other possible pathological changes such as pruritus after induction of cholestasis. PMID:25290008

  12. Spontaneous Wheel Running Exercise Induces Brain Recovery via Neurotrophin-3 Expression Following Experimental Traumatic Brain Injury in Rats.

    PubMed

    Koo, Hyun Mo; Lee, Sun Min; Kim, Min Hee

    2013-09-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to investigate the expression of neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) after applying spontaneous wheel running exercises (SWR) after experimental traumatic brain injury (TBI). [Subjects and Methods] Thirty male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 3 groups; 20 rats were subjected to controlled cortical impact for TBI, and then, animals were randomly collected from the SWR group and subjected to wheel running exercise for 3 weeks. Ten rats were not subjected to any injury or running exercise to compare with the effect of TBI and SWR. Immunohistochemistry, Western blotting, skilled ladder rung walking test, and 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining analysis for the evaluation of NT-3 expression were used to assess brain damage and recovery. [Results] The TBI-induced decrease in NT-3 expression was recovered by wheel running exercise. Moreover, decreased ischemic volume and progressive neurobehavioral outcome were observed in the SWR group. [Conclusion] Spontaneous running exercise promotes brain recovery and motor function through an increase in expression of NT-3. PMID:24259924

  13. Cerebrovascular responses of the rat brain to noxious stimuli as examined by functional near-infrared whole brain imaging

    PubMed Central

    He, Ji-Wei; Tian, Fenghua; Liu, Hanli

    2012-01-01

    While near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy has been increasingly used to detect stimulated brain activities with an advantage of dissociating regional oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin concentrations simultaneously, it has not been utilized much in pain research. Here, we investigated and demonstrated the feasibility of using this technique to obtain whole brain hemodynamics in rats and speculated on the functional relevance of the NIR-based hemodynamic signals during pain processing. NIR signals were emitted and collected using a 26-optodes array on rat's dorsal skull surface after the removal of skin. Following the subcutaneous injection of formalin (50 μl, 3%) into a hindpaw, several isolable brain regions showed hemodynamic changes, including the anterior cingulate cortex, primary/secondary somatosensory cortexes, thalamus, and periaqueductal gray (n = 6). Time courses of hemodynamic changes in respective regions matched with the well-documented biphasic excitatory response. Surprisingly, an atypical pattern (i.e., a decrease in oxyhemoglobin concentration with a concomitant increase in deoxyhemoglobin concentration) was seen in phase II. In a separate group of rats with innocuous brush and noxious pinch of the same area (n = 11), results confirmed that the atypical pattern occurred more likely in the presence of nociception than nonpainful stimulation, suggesting it as a physiological substrate when the brain processes pain. In conclusion, the NIR whole brain imaging provides a useful alternative to study pain in vivo using small-animal models. Our results support the notion that neurovascular response patterns depend on stimuli, bringing attention to the interpretation of vascular-based neuroimaging data in studies of pain. PMID:22378174

  14. Voluntary Alcohol Intake following Blast Exposure in a Rat Model of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Yi Wei; Meyer, Nathan P.; Shah, Alok S.; Budde, Matthew D.; Stemper, Brian D.; Olsen, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    Alcoholism is a frequent comorbidity following mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), even in patients without a previous history of alcohol dependence. Despite this correlational relationship, the extent to which the neurological effects of mTBI contribute to the development of alcoholism is unknown. In this study, we used a rodent blast exposure model to investigate the relationship between mTBI and voluntary alcohol drinking in alcohol naïve rats. We have previously demonstrated in Sprague Dawley rats that blast exposure leads to microstructural abnormalities in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and other brain regions that progress from four to thirty days. The mPFC is a brain region implicated in alcoholism and drug addiction, although the impact of mTBI on drug reward and addiction using controlled models remains largely unexplored. Alcohol naïve Sprague Dawley rats were subjected to a blast model of mTBI (or sham conditions) and then tested in several common measures of voluntary alcohol intake. In a seven-week intermittent two-bottle choice alcohol drinking test, sham and blast exposed rats had comparable levels of alcohol intake. In a short access test session at the conclusion of the two-bottle test, blast rats fell into a bimodal distribution, and among high intake rats, blast treated animals had significantly elevated intake compared to shams. We found no effect of blast when rats were tested for an alcohol deprivation effect or compulsive drinking in a quinine adulteration test. Throughout the experiment, alcohol drinking was modest in both groups, consistent with other studies using Sprague Dawley rats. In conclusion, blast exposure had a minimal impact on overall alcohol intake in Sprague Dawley rats, although intake was increased in a subpopulation of blast animals in a short access session following intermittent access exposure. PMID:25910266

  15. Establishment and identification of a hypoxia-ischemia brain damage model in neonatal rats

    PubMed Central

    YAO, DAN; ZHANG, WEIRAN; HE, XUE; WANG, JINHU; JIANG, KEWEN; ZHAO, ZHENGYAN

    2016-01-01

    The present study was designed to set up a reliable model of severe hypoxia-ischemia brain damage (HIBD) in neonatal rats and several methods were used to identify whether the model was successful. A total of 40 healthy 7-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 2 groups: The sham-surgery group (n=18) and the HIBD model group (n=22). The HIBD model was produced according to the traditional Rice method. The rats were anesthetized with ethyl ether. The left common carotid artery (CCA) was exposed, ligated and cut. Following this, the rats were exposed to hypoxia in a normobaric chamber filled with 8% oxygen and 92% nitrogen for 2 h. In the sham-surgery group, the left CCA was exposed but was not ligated, cut or exposed to hypoxia. The neurobehavioral changes of the rats were observed in the 24 h after HIBD. The brains were collected after 72 h to observe the pathological morphological changes of the brain tissue. The behavioral ability and neurobehavioral changes were studied in each group. The water maze test was used for evaluating the learning-memory ability when the rats were 28 days old. Compared with the sham-surgery group, all the HIBD model rats had a lag of motor development. The rats had evident changes in anatomy and Nissl staining, and cognitive impairment was shown through the result of the water maze. Therefore, the model of HIBD in neonatal rats is feasible and provides a reliable model for subsequent studies. PMID:27073628

  16. Age-Related Differences in the Disposition of Nicotine and Metabolites in Rat Brain and Plasma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Studies have evaluated the behavioral and neurochemical impact of nicotine administration in rodents. However, the distribution of nicotine and metabolites in rat brain and plasma as a function of age has not been investigated. This is a significant issue because human adolescents have a greater risk for developing nicotine addiction than adults, and reasons underlying this observation have not been fully determined. Thus, in this present study, we evaluated the impact of the transition from adolescence (postnatal day [PND 40]) to adulthood (PND 90) on nicotine distribution in rats. Methods: PND 40, 60, and 90 rats received a single injection of (−) nicotine (0.8mg/kg, subcutaneously). Liquid chromatography tandem-mass spectrometry was used to measure concentration of nicotine and metabolites in selected biological matrices. Results: Nicotine, cotinine, and nornicotine were detected in rat striata and frontal cortex 30min, 1hr, 2hr, and 4hr after a single administration. These and several additional metabolites (nicotine-1′-oxide, cotinine-N-oxide, norcotinine, and trans-3′-hydroxycotinine) were also detected in plasma at these same timepoints. The mean concentration of nicotine in brain and plasma was lower in PND 40 versus PND 90 rats. In contrast, the mean concentration of nornicotine was higher in the plasma and brain of PND 40 versus PND 90 rats. Conclusions: Nicotine and metabolite distribution differs between adolescent and adult rats. These data suggest that adolescent rats metabolize nicotine to some metabolites faster than adult rats. Further studies are needed to investigate the potential correlation between age, drug distribution, and nicotine addiction. PMID:23737496

  17. Effect of cyclosporin on distribution of methotrexate into the brain of rats.

    PubMed

    Ogushi, Naofumi; Sasaki, Kazuaki; Shimoda, Minoru

    2015-09-01

    The effect of the antitumor drug, methotrexate (MTX), which is applied to brain tumors, is restricted by the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which is composed of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and multidrug resistance associated protein (MRP). We, therefore, studied if a potent P-gp and MRP modulator, cyclosporin A (CysA), can modulate the MTX concentration in the rat brain. If it can, which route is more effective, intravenous or intrathecal? We intravenously or intrathecally administered MTX to rats with or without CysA. After 6 hr, brains and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were sampled, and their MTX concentrations were compared. Each MTX concentration was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography with UV detection. CysA had no significant affect on the MTX concentration in the brain or CSF when MTX was intravenously injected. In contrast, when MTX was intrathecally administered, CysA had a larger effect on the MTX concentration in the brain than in the CSF. This indicates CysA potentiated the brain MTX concentration when MTX was intrathecally administered. It is suggested that CysA did not potentiate the distribution of MTX from blood into the brain, but instead potentiated the distribution of MTX from CSF into the brain. Since chemicals in CSF generally diffuse into the brain easily, CysA probably inhibited the excretion of MTX from the brain. This could be caused by inhibition of P-gp or MRP at the BBB. Therefore, CysA can be a useful tool to achieve an appropriate MTX concentration in brain. PMID:25947324

  18. Changes of amino acid gradients in brain tissues induced by microwave irradiation and other means

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, C.F.; Parsons, J.E.; Oh, C.C.; Wasterlain, C.G.; Baldwin, R.A. )

    1989-09-01

    Focused microwave irradiation to the head (FMI) has been used extensively by neurochemists for rapid inactivation of enzymatic activity in brain tissues and the preservation, for in vitro analysis, of in vivo substrate concentrations. Periodically the suitability of this technique for regional studies has been questioned. Evidence has now been obtained, on the basis of altered concentration gradients for GABA and taurine from the Substantia Nigra (SN) to an Adjacent Dorsal Area (ADJ), that FMI not only inactivates enzymes, but also facilitates rapid diffusion of small molecules from areas of high concentrations to adjacent areas of lower concentration. To a lesser extent, the implantation of plastic injection cannulas also decreased these concentration gradients. These results offer clear evidence that FMI is ill suited and unreliable for studies designed to map and compare the in vivo regional concentrations of diffusible organic molecules (such as amino acids) in brain tissues. Any invasive technique that compromises membrane barriers is likely to produce smaller similar effects.

  19. Radiation-induced permeability and leukocyte adhesion in the rat blood-brain barrier: modulation with anti-ICAM-1 antibodies.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Hong; Gaber, M Waleed; McColgan, Tamara; Naimark, Michael D; Kiani, Mohammad F; Merchant, Thomas E

    2003-04-18

    We assessed the acute effects of radiation on the rat blood-brain barrier. A cranial window model and intravital microscopy were used to measure changes in permeability and leukocyte adhesion in pial vessels after a localized, single dose of 20 Gy. Permeability was assessed using five sizes of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextran molecules (4.4-, 10-, 38.2-, 70-, and 150-kDa) with measurements performed before and 2, 24, 48, 72 and 96 h after irradiation for the 4.4 and 38.2-kDa molecules and before and 24 h after irradiation for the other three molecules. To demonstrate the nature of blood-brain barrier permeability, we concurrently studied the permeability of microvessels in the cremaster muscle. In both tissues, permeability to FITC-dextran was significantly greater 24 h after irradiation than before (P<0.05). The exception was that radiation did not affect the permeability of pial vessels to the 150-kDa molecule. The particle-size dependence of the permeability changes in the brain were indicative of altered integrity of endothelial tight junctions and occurred concomitantly with an increase in cell adhesion which was determined by fluorescent labeling of leukocytes with rhodamine 6G. An early inflammatory response to irradiation was apparent in the brain 2 h after irradiation. The numbers of rolling and adherent leukocytes increased significantly and peaked at 24 h. Injection with the anti-ICAM-1 mAb significantly reduced leukocyte adhesion and permeability thereby linking the two processes. These findings provide a target to reduce radiation-related permeability and cell adhesion and potentially the side effects of radiation in the CNS. PMID:12676365

  20. Increased activity of tyrosine hydroxylase in the cerebellum of the x-irradiated dystonic rat

    SciTech Connect

    Dopico, A.M.; Rios, H.; Mayo, J.; Zieher, L.M. )

    1990-08-01

    The exposure of the cephalic end of rats to repeated doses of x-irradiation (150 rad) immediately after birth induces a long-term increase in the noradrenaline (NA) content of cerebellum (CE) (+ 37.8%), and a decrease in cerebellar weight (65.2% of controls), which results in an increased NA concentration (+ 109%). This increase in the neurotransmitter level is accompanied by a dystonic syndrome and histological abnormalities: Purkinje cells (the target cells for NA afferents to CE) fail to arrange in a characteristic monolayer, and their primary dendritic tree appears randomly oriented. The injection of reserpine 0.9 and 1.2 mg/kg ip to adult rats for 18 h depletes cerebellar NA content in both controls (15.7 {plus minus} 4 ng/CE and 2.8 {plus minus} 1.5 ng/CE, respectively) and x-irradiated rats (17.1 {plus minus} 1 ng/CE and 8.3 {plus minus} 2 ng/CE, respectively). The activity of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in CE of adult rats, measured by an in vitro assay, is significantly increased in neonatally x-irradiated animals when compared to age-matched controls (16.4 {plus minus} 1.4 vs 6.32 {plus minus} 0.6 nmol CO2/h/mg prot., p less than 0.01). As observed for NA levels, a net increase in TH activity induced by the ionizing radiation is also measured: 308.9 {plus minus} 23.8 vs 408.2 {plus minus} 21.5 nmol CO2/h/CE, p less than 0.01 (controls and x-treated, respectively). These results suggest that x-irradiation at birth may induce an abnormal sprouting of noradrenergic afferents to CE. The possibility that these changes represent a response of the NA system to the dystonic syndrome is discussed.

  1. Prostaglandins in the brain of rats given, acutely, and chronically, a hyperthermic dose of met-enkephalin.

    PubMed

    Scoto, G M; Spadaro, C; Spampinato, S; Arrigo-Reina, R; Ferri, S

    1979-01-31

    An enhanced prostaglandinlike activity is shown in homogenates of brain from rats treated intracerebroventricularly with 100 microgram of metenkephalin. The increase is significantly reduced by naloxone pretreatment. A relationship is proposed between generation of prostaglandins in the brain following met-enkephalin administration and hyperthermic effect of the opiatelike factor in the rat. Normalization of prostaglandinlike activity following chronic administration of met-enkephalin in the rat may also account for the development of tolerance to its thermic effect. PMID:106433

  2. Tolerance to Dose Escalation in Minibeam Radiation Therapy Applied to Normal Rat Brain: Long-Term Clinical, Radiological and Histopathological Analysis.

    PubMed

    Prezado, Yolanda; Deman, Pierre; Varlet, Pascale; Jouvion, Gregory; Gil, Silvia; Le Clec'H, Céline; Bernard, Hélène; Le Duc, Géraldine; Sarun, Sukhena

    2015-09-01

    The major limitation to reaching a curative radiation dose in radioresistant tumors such as malignant gliomas is the high sensitivity to radiation and subsequent damage of the surrounding normal tissues. Novel dose delivery methods such as minibeam radiation therapy (MBRT) may help to overcome this limitation. MBRT utilizes a combination of spatial fractionation of the dose and submillimetric (600 μm) field sizes with an array ("comb") of parallel thin beams ("teeth"). The dose profiles in MBRT consist of peaks and valleys. In contrast, the seamless irradiations of the several squared centimeter field sizes employed in standard radiotherapy result in homogeneous dose distributions (and consequently, flat dose profiles). The innovative dose delivery methods employed in MBRT, unlike standard radiation therapy, have demonstrated remarkable normal tissue sparing. In this pilot work, we investigated the tolerance of the rat brain after whole-brain MBRT irradiation. A dose escalation was used to study the tissue response as a function of dose, so that a threshold could be established: doses as high as 100 Gy in one fraction were still well tolerated by the rat brain. This finding suggests that MBRT may be used to deliver higher and potentially curative radiation doses in clinical practice. PMID:26284420

  3. Wharton's jelly transplantation improves neurologic function in a rat model of traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Tian; Yang, Bo; Li, Dongpeng; Ma, Shanshan; Tian, Yi; Qu, Ruina; Zhang, Wenjin; Zhang, Yanting; Hu, Kai; Guan, Fangxia; Wang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI), which can lead to disability, dysfunction, and even death, is a prominent health problem worldwide. Effective therapy for this serious and debilitating condition is needed. Human umbilical cord matrix, known as Wharton's jelly (WJ), provides a natural, interface scaffold that is enriched in mesenchymal stem cells. In this study, we tested the efficacy of WJ tissue transplantation in a weight drop model of TBI in rats. WJ tissue was cultured and transplanted into the injury site 24h after TBI. The modified neurologic severity score, body weight, brain edema, and lesion volume were evaluated at various time points after TBI. Cognitive behavior was assessed by the novel object recognition test and the Morris water maze test. Expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the perilesional brain area was measured at day 14 after TBI. We found that WJ tissue transplantation lessened TBI-induced brain edema (day 3), reduced lesion volume (day 28), improved neurologic function (days 21 to 28), and promoted memory and cognitive recovery. Additionally, expression of BDNF mRNA and protein was higher in WJ tissue-treated rats than in sham-operated or vehicle-treated rats. These data suggest that WJ tissue transplantation can reduce TBI-induced brain injury and may have therapeutic potential for the treatment of TBI. PMID:25638565

  4. Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1 (HIF-1) Independent Microvascular Angiogenesis in the Aged Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Ndubuizu, Obinna I.; Tsipis, Constantinos P.; Li, Ang; LaManna, Joseph C.

    2010-01-01

    Angiogenesis is a critical component of mammalian brain adaptation to prolonged hypoxia. Hypoxia-induced angiogenesis is mediated by hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) dependent transcriptional activation of growth factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Microvascular angiogenesis occurs over a three week period in the rodent brain. We have recently reported that HIF-1α accumulation and transcriptional activation of HIF target genes in the aged cortex of 24 month F344 rats is significantly attenuated during acute hypoxic exposure. In the present study, we show that cortical HIF-1α accumulation and HIF-1 activation remains absent during chronic hypoxic exposure in the aged rat brain (24 month F344). Despite this lack of HIF-1 activation, there is no significant difference in baseline or post-hypoxic brain capillary density counts between the young (3 month F344) and old age groups. VEGF mRNA and protein levels are significantly elevated in the aged cortex despite the lack of HIF-1 activation. Other HIF-independent mediators of hypoxia inducible genes could be involved during chronic hypoxia in the aged brain. PPAR-γ coactivator (PGC)-1α, a known regulator of VEGF gene transcription, is elevated in the young and aged cortex during the chronic hypoxic exposure. Overall, our results suggest a compensatory HIF-1 independent preservation of hypoxic-induced microvascular angiogenesis in the aged rat brain. PMID:20875806

  5. Propressophysin is present in neurones at multiple sites in Wistar and homozygous Brattleboro rat brain.

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, F W; Caffé, R; van der Sluis, P J; Sluiter, A A; van der Woude, T P; Seidah, N G; Chrétien, M

    1986-07-30

    Vasopressin (VP) is synthesized as propressophysin, containing also neurophysin (NP) and C-terminal glycopeptide (CPP), within the hypothalamo-neurohypophyseal system (HNS). Recently, VP and NP-immunoreactive cells were demonstrated in other rat brain nuclei. Here we report CPP immunoreactivity in perikarya in these nuclei. Within the homozygous Brattleboro rat, known to be deficient in neuronal VP production, no CPP immunoreactivity was seen in these nuclei. However, intense VP and CPP immunoreactivity was present in solitary cells (52.2 +/- 3.3 per rat) and fibres within the HNS. PMID:3742211

  6. Phototherapeutic Effect of Low-Level Laser on Thyroid Gland of Gamma-Irradiated Rats.

    PubMed

    Morcos, Nadia; Omran, Manar; Ghanem, Hala; Elahdal, Mahmoud; Kamel, Nashwa; Attia, Elbatoul

    2015-01-01

    One inescapable feature of life on the earth is exposure to ionizing radiation. The thyroid gland is one of the most sensitive organs to gamma-radiation and endocrine disrupters. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been used to stimulate tissue repair, and reduce inflammation. The aim of this study was to gauge the value of using Helium-Neon laser to repair the damaged tissues of thyroid gland after gamma-irradiation. Albino rats were used in this study (144 rats), divided into control, gamma, laser, and gamma plus laser-irradiated groups, each group was divided into six subgroups according to time of treatment (total six sessions). Rats were irradiated once with gamma radiation (6 Gy), and an external dose of laser (Wavelength 632.8 nm, 12 mW, CW, Illuminated area 5.73 cm(2), 2.1 mW cm(-2) 120 s, 1.4 J, 0.252 J cm(-2)) twice weekly localized on thyroid region of the neck, for a total of six sessions. Animals were sacrificed after each session. Analysis included thyroid function, oxidative stress markers, liver function and blood picture. Results revealed improvement in thyroid function, liver function and antioxidant levels, and the blood cells count after LLLT. PMID:25975382

  7. Effects of heavy particle irradiation and diet on object recognition memory in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabin, Bernard M.; Carrihill-Knoll, Kirsty; Hinchman, Marie; Shukitt-Hale, Barbara; Joseph, James A.; Foster, Brian C.

    2009-04-01

    On long-duration missions to other planets astronauts will be exposed to types and doses of radiation that are not experienced in low earth orbit. Previous research using a ground-based model for exposure to cosmic rays has shown that exposure to heavy particles, such as 56Fe, disrupts spatial learning and memory measured using the Morris water maze. Maintaining rats on diets containing antioxidant phytochemicals for 2 weeks prior to irradiation ameliorated this deficit. The present experiments were designed to determine: (1) the generality of the particle-induced disruption of memory by examining the effects of exposure to 56Fe particles on object recognition memory; and (2) whether maintaining rats on these antioxidant diets for 2 weeks prior to irradiation would also ameliorate any potential deficit. The results showed that exposure to low doses of 56Fe particles does disrupt recognition memory and that maintaining rats on antioxidant diets containing blueberry and strawberry extract for only 2 weeks was effective in ameliorating the disruptive effects of irradiation. The results are discussed in terms of the mechanisms by which exposure to these particles may produce effects on neurocognitive performance.

  8. Vascular Injury After Whole Thoracic X-Ray Irradiation in the Rat

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, S.N. Wu, Q. M.S.; Maeder, M.; Fish, B.L.; Moulder, J.E.; Jacobs, E.R.; Medhora, M.; Molthen, R.C.

    2009-05-01

    Purpose: To study vascular injury after whole thoracic irradiation with single sublethal doses of X-rays in the rat and to develop markers that might predict the severity of injury. Methods and Materials: Rats that received 5- or 10-Gy thorax-only irradiation and age-matched controls were studied at 3 days, 2 weeks, and 1, 2, 5, and 12 months. Several pulmonary vascular parameters were evaluated, including hemodynamics, vessel density, total lung angiotensin-converting enzyme activity, and right ventricular hypertrophy. Results: By 1 month, the rats in the 10-Gy group had pulmonary vascular dropout, right ventricular hypertrophy, increased pulmonary vascular resistance, increased dry lung weights, and decreases in total lung angiotensin-converting enzyme activity, as well as pulmonary artery distensibility. In contrast, irradiation with 5 Gy resulted in only a modest increase in right ventricular weight and a reduction in lung angiotensin-converting enzyme activity. Conclusion: In a previous investigation using the same model, we observed that recovery from radiation-induced attenuation of pulmonary vascular reactivity occurred. In the present study, we report that deterioration results in several vascular parameters for {<=}1 year after 10 Gy, suggesting sustained remodeling of the pulmonary vasculature. Our data support clinically relevant injuries that appear in a time- and dose-related manner after exposure to relatively low radiation doses.

  9. Compromised Blood-Brain Barrier Competence in Remote Brain Areas in Ischemic Stroke Rats at Chronic Stage

    PubMed Central

    Garbuzova-Davis, Svitlana; Haller, Edward; Williams, Stephanie N.; Haim, Eithan D.; Tajiri, Naoki; Hernandez-Ontiveros, Diana G.; Frisina-Deyo, Aric; Boffeli, Sean M.; Sanberg, Paul R.; Borlongan, Cesario V.

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is a life threatening disease leading to long-term disability in stroke survivors. Cerebral functional insufficiency in chronic stroke might be due to pathological changes in brain areas remote from initial ischemic lesion, i.e. diaschisis. Previously, we showed that the damaged blood-brain barrier (BBB) was implicated in subacute diaschisis. The present study investigated BBB competence in chronic diaschisis using a transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO) rat model. Our results demonstrated significant BBB damage mostly in the ipsilateral striatum and motor cortex in rats at 30 days after tMCAO. The BBB alterations were also determined in the contralateral hemisphere via ultrastructural and immunohistochemical analyses. Major BBB pathological changes in contralateral remote striatum and motor cortex areas included: (1) vacuolated endothelial cells containing large autophagosomes, (2) degenerated pericytes displaying mitochondria with cristae disruption, (3) degenerated astrocytes and perivascular edema, (4) Evans Blue extravasation, and (5) appearance of parenchymal astrogliosis. Importantly, discrete analyses of striatal and motor cortex areas revealed significantly higher autophagosome accumulation in capillaries of ventral striatum and astrogliosis in dorsal striatum in both cerebral hemispheres. These widespread microvascular alterations in ipsilateral and contralateral brain hemispheres suggest persistent and/or continued BBB damage in chronic ischemia. The pathological changes in remote brain areas likely indicate chronic ischemic diaschisis, which should be considered in the development of treatment strategies for stroke. PMID:24610730

  10. Binding sites for atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) in brain: alterations in Brattleboro rats

    SciTech Connect

    McCarty, R.; Plunkett, L.M.

    1986-12-01

    Binding sites for atrial natriuretic factor (ANF-28) were analyzed in discrete brain areas of Brattleboro rats with hereditary diabetes insipidus and Long-Evans (LE) controls by quantitative autoradiography. The maximum binding capacity (Bmax) and affinity constant (Ka) for /sup 125/I-ANF-28 were elevated significantly in the subfornical organ of Brattleboro rats compared to matched LE controls. In contrast, values for Bmax and Ka for /sup 125/I-ANF-28 binding in choroid plexus and area postrema were similar for rats of the two strains. These findings are consistent with a selective upregulation of ANF-28 binding sites in the subfornical organ of Brattleboro rats which exhibit a profound disturbance in body fluid homeostasis. These alterations in ANF-28 binding sites in the subfornical organ may represent a compensatory response to the absence of vasopressin in the Brattleboro rat.

  11. EFFECTS OF HEAVY PARTICLES IRRADIATION AND DIET ON AMPHETAMINE- AND LITHIUM CHLORIDE-INDUCED TASTE AVOIDANCE LEARNING IN RATS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rats were maintained on diets containing either 2% blueberry or strawberry extract or a control diet for 8 weeks prior to being exposed to 1.5 Gy of 56Fe particles in the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Three days following irradiation, the rats were tested for t...

  12. Functional brain activation during retrieval of visceral pain-conditioned passive avoidance in the rat.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhuo; Bradesi, Sylvie; Charles, Jonathan R; Pang, Raina D; Maarek, Jean-Michel I; Mayer, Emeran A; Holschneider, Daniel P

    2011-12-01

    This study assessed functional brain activation in rats during expectation of visceral pain. Male rats were trained in step-down passive avoidance (PA) for 2 days. Upon stepping down from a platform, conditioned animals received noxious colorectal distension delivered through a colorectal balloon, whereas the balloon in control rats remained uninflated. On day 3, PA behavior was assessed while [(14)C]-iodoantipyrine was infused intravenously, followed by immediate euthanasia. Regional cerebral blood flow-related tissue radioactivity (rCBF) was analyzed by statistical parametric mapping using 3-dimensional brains reconstructed from autoradiographic brain slice images. Associated with retrieved PA behavior, conditioned rats compared with control subjects showed increases in rCBF in sensory (anterior insula, somatosensory cortex), limbic/paralimbic regions (anterior cingulate, prelimbic cortex, amygdala), all regions previously reported to show activation during acute visceral pain. Increases in rCBF were also noted in the dorsal hippocampus, nucleus accumbens, and caudate putamen, regions associated with retrieval of PA. Organization of the underlying brain network was further delineated by functional connectivity analysis. This revealed in conditioned rats a strongly and positively connected corticostriatal cluster (cingulate, prelimbic cortex, caudate putamen). The amygdala and cerebellar hemispheres formed another positively connected cluster, which was negatively connected with the corticostriatal cluster, suggesting corticolimbic modulation. Prelimbic cortex, nucleus accumbens, and anterior insula emerged in conditioned animals as hubs. Our results show that during retrieval of PA, brain areas implicated in PA expression as well as those implicated in acute visceral pain processing were recruited, in line with findings from human brain imaging studies on pain expectation. PMID:21944154

  13. Protective effect of Xingnaojia formulation on rats with brain and liver damage caused by chronic alcoholism

    PubMed Central

    LI, SHUANG; WANG, SU; GUO, ZHI-GANG; HUANG, NING; ZHAO, FAN-RONG; ZHU, MO-LI; MA, LI-JUAN; LIANG, JIN-YING; ZHANG, YU-LIN; HUANG, ZHONG-LIN; WAN, GUANG-RUI

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to observe the effect of a formulation of traditional Chinese medicine extracts known as Xingnaojia (XNJ) on the liver function, learning ability and memory of rats with chronic alcoholism and to verify the mechanism by which it protects the brain and liver. A rat model of chronic alcoholism was used in the study. The spatial learning ability and memory of the rats were tested. The rats were then sacrificed and their brains and hepatic tissues were isolated. The activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and levels of glutamate (Glu), N-methyl D-aspartate receptor subtype 2B (NR2B), cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) and cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) in the hippocampus were analyzed. The ultrastructure of the hepatic tissue was observed by electron microscopy. In addition, the activities of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) in serum were tested and the levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL), high-density lipoprotein (HDL), triglycerides (TG) and total cholesterol (TCHOL) were analyzed. XNJ enhanced the learning and memory of rats with chronic alcoholism. Treatment with XNJ increased the activity of SOD, and decreased the expression levels of NR2B mRNA and NR2B, CB1 and CDK5 proteins in the brain tissues compared with those in the model rats. It also increased the activity of ALDH in the serum and liver, decreased the serum levels of LDL, TG and TCHOL and increased the serum level of HDL. These results indicate that XNJ exhibited a protective effect against brain and liver damage in rats with chronic alcoholism. PMID:26640531

  14. Variation in cyclic nucleotide levels and lysosomal enzyme activities in the irradiated rat

    SciTech Connect

    Trocha, P.J.; Catravas, G.N.

    1980-09-01

    Whole-body irradiation of rats causes not only a release of hydrolases from the lysosomes but also fluctuations in the cyclic nucleotide levels in spleen and liver tissues. Significant increases in lysosomal enzyme activities were further observed in spleen following radiation treatment. At 3 to 6 hr after rats were exposed to ..gamma.. radiation, transient increases in both cGMP and cAMP levels were accompanied with the release of ..beta..-glucuronidase and acid phosphatase enzymes from lysosomes in liver and spleen tissues. A second transitory release and activation of lysosomal hydrolases and an increase in cAMP levels occurred between 2 and 5 days after irradiation in spleen but not in liver. On Days 7 and 8, there was a third release of lysosomal hydrolases and a slight increase in the spleen cAMP concentration before they returned to near-control values. Cyclic GMP levels in the spleen decreased on the third day after irradiation, remained suppressed until Day 9, and then increased to levels higher than normal physiological values. The liver cGMP concentration remained unchanged between 9 hr and 11 days after irradiation.

  15. SU-E-T-457: Design and Characterization of An Economical 192Ir Hemi-Brain Small Animal Irradiator

    SciTech Connect

    Grams, M; Wilson, Z; Sio, T; Beltran, C; Tryggestad, E; Gupta, S; Blackwell, C; McCollough, K; Sarkaria, J; Furutani, K

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To describe the design and dosimetric characterization of a simple and economical small animal irradiator. Methods: A high dose rate 192Ir brachytherapy source from a commercially available afterloader was used with a 1.3 centimeter thick tungsten collimator to provide sharp beam penumbra suitable for hemi-brain irradiation of mice. The unit is equipped with continuous gas anesthesia to allow robust animal immobilization. Dosimetric characterization of the device was performed with Gafchromic film. The penumbra from the small animal irradiator was compared under similar collimating conditions to the penumbra from 6 MV photons, 6 MeV electrons, and 20 MeV electrons from a linear accelerator as well as 300 kVp photons from an orthovoltage unit and Monte Carlo simulated 90 MeV protons. Results: The tungsten collimator provides a sharp penumbra suitable for hemi-brain irradiation, and dose rates on the order of 200 cGy/minute were achieved. The sharpness of the penumbra attainable with this device compares favorably to those measured experimentally for 6 MV photons, and 6 and 20 MeV electron beams from a linear accelerator. Additionally, the penumbra was comparable to those measured for a 300 kVp orthovoltage beam and a Monte Carlo simulated 90 MeV proton beam. Conclusions: The small animal irradiator described here can be built for under $1,000 and used in conjunction with any commercial brachytherapy afterloader to provide a convenient and cost-effective option for small animal irradiation experiments. The unit offers high dose rate delivery and sharp penumbra, which is ideal for hemi-brain irradiation of mice. With slight modifications to the design, irradiation of sites other than the brain could be accomplished easily. Due to its simplicity and low cost, the apparatus described is an attractive alternative for small animal irradiation experiments requiring a sharp penumbra.

  16. Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Non-Linear Brain Distribution of Fluvoxamine in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Geldof, Marian; Freijer, Jan; van Beijsterveldt, Ludy

    2007-01-01

    Introduction A pharmacokinetic (PK) model is proposed for estimation of total and free brain concentrations of fluvoxamine. Materials and methods Rats with arterial and venous cannulas and a microdialysis probe in the frontal cortex received intravenous infusions of 1, 3.7 or 7.3 mg.kg−1 of fluvoxamine. Analysis With increasing dose a disproportional increase in brain concentrations was observed. The kinetics of brain distribution was estimated by simultaneous analysis of plasma, free brain ECF and total brain tissue concentrations. The PK model consists of three compartments for fluvoxamine concentrations in plasma in combination with a catenary two compartment model for distribution into the brain. In this catenary model, the mass exchange between a shallow perfusion-limited and a deep brain compartment is described by a passive diffusion term and a saturable active efflux term. Results The model resulted in precise estimates of the parameters describing passive influx into (kin) of 0.16 min−1 and efflux from the shallow brain compartment (kout) of 0.019 min−1 and the fluvoxamine concentration at which 50% of the maximum active efflux (C50) is reached of 710 ng.ml−1. The proposed brain distribution model constitutes a basis for precise characterization of the PK–PD correlation of fluvoxamine by taking into account the non-linearity in brain distribution. PMID:17710515

  17. The distribution of intravenous nicardipine in rat brain after subarachnoid hemorrhage

    SciTech Connect

    Tsukahara, T.; Arista, A.; Kassell, N.F. )

    1989-09-01

    The distribution of intravenously injected nicardipine in rat brain was investigated, as well as the influence of subarachnoid hemorrhage on its distribution. Autoradiographic studies demonstrated the accumulation of {sup 3}H-nicardipine only in the ventricles and subarachnoid spaces around pial vessels in normal brains. Thirty minutes after subarachnoid hemorrhage, the concentration of {sup 3}H-nicardipine was higher in the ventricles and in the subarachnoid space than that found in normal brains. It is concluded that nicardipine penetrates into the subarachnoid spaces and ventricles from pial vessels and/or choroid plexus, and that subarachnoid hemorrhage increases the penetration of nicardipine from vessels into the subarachnoid space.

  18. Brain receptors for thyrotropin releasing hormone in morphine tolerant-dependent rats

    SciTech Connect

    Bhargava, H.N.; Das, S.

    1986-03-01

    The effect of chronic treatment of rats with morphine and its subsequent withdrawal on the brain receptors for thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) labeled with /sup 3/H-(3MeHis/sup 2/)TRH (MeTRH). Male Sprague Dawley rats were implanted with 4 morphine pellets (each containing 75 mg morphine base) during a 3-day period. Placebo pellet implanted rats served as controls. Both tolerance to and dependence on morphine developed as a result of this procedure. For characterization of brain TRH receptors, the animals were sacrificed 72 h after the implantation of first pellet. In another set of animals the pellets were removed and were sacrificed 24 h later. The binding of /sup 3/H-MeTRH to membranes prepared from brain without the cerebellum was determined. /sup 3/H-MeTRH bound to brain membranes prepared from placebo pellet implanted rats at a single high affinity site with a B/sub max/ value of 33.50 +/- 0.97 fmol/mg protein and a K/sub d/ of 5.18 +/- 0.21 nM. Implantation of morphine pellets did not alter the B/sub max/ value of /sup 3/H-MeTRH but decreased the K/sub d/ value significantly. Abrupt or naloxone precipitated withdrawal of morphine did not alter B/sub max/ or the K/sub d/ values. The binding of /sup 3/H-MeTRH to brain areas was also determined. The results suggest that the development of tolerance to morphine is associated with enhanced sensitivity of brain TRH receptors, however abrupt withdrawal of morphine does not change the characteristics of brain TRH receptors.

  19. HIF prolyl hydroxylase inhibition augments dopamine release in the rat brain in vivo.

    PubMed

    Witten, Louise; Sager, Thomas; Thirstrup, Kenneth; Johansen, Jens Leander; Larsen, Dorrit Bjerg; Montezinho, Liliana P; Mørk, Arne

    2009-05-15

    The transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) is essential for the activation of several genes that promote the survival of cells exposed to oxidative stress. Expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), which is the rate-limiting enzyme in the dopamine (DA) synthesis, is one of the genes that are positively regulated by HIF. Accordingly, HIF induction results in elevated DA release in various cell lines in vitro. HIF prolyl hydroxylase (HPH) is critically involved in the negative regulation of HIF levels. We investigated the in vivo effects of the HPH inhibitor FG0041 on brain DA function in rats by microdialysis in freely moving rats, locomotor activity, and Western blot analysis. Administration of FG0041 (10 mg/kg i.p.), as an acute (single injection), or as subchronic (once daily for 6 days) treatment and cobalt chloride (CoCl2) (60 mg/kg s.c.) potentiated potassium (K+) induced increases in extracellular levels of DA levels in the rat striatum. The increase in extracellular DA of freely moving rats was sought in relationship to locomotor activity in rats. A significant increase in locomotor activity was observed in FG0041-treated rats compared with vehicle on a cocaine challenge. In support of these findings, protein levels of TH in the rat brain stem were increased after treatment with FG0041. These data indicate that FG0041 augments DA function in the rat brain. Inhibition of HPH enhances DA function by increasing DA release, which has implications for the use of HIF induction in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:19156859

  20. Aqueous Date Fruit Efficiency as Preventing Traumatic Brain Deterioration and Improving Pathological Parameters after Traumatic Brain Injury in Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Badeli, Hamze; Shahrokhi, Nader; KhoshNazar, Mahdieosadat; Asadi-Shekaari, Majid; Shabani, Mohammad; Eftekhar Vaghefi, Hassan; Khaksari, Mohammad; Basiri, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    Objective Following traumatic brain injury, disruption of blood-brain-barrier and consequent brain edema are critical events which might lead to increasing intracranial pressure (ICP), and nerve damage. The current study assessed the effects of aqueous date fruit extract (ADFE) on the aforementioned parameters. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, diffused traumatic brain injury (TBI) was generated in adult male rats using Marmarou’s method. Experimental groups include two pre-treatment (oral ADFE, 4 and 8 mL/kg for 14 days), vehicle (distilled water, for 14 days) and sham groups. Brain edema and neuronal injury were measured 72 hours after TBI. Veterinary coma scale (VCS) and ICP were determined at -1, 4, 24, 48 and 72 hours after TBI. Differences among multiple groups were assessed using ANOVA. Turkey’s test was employed for the ANOVA post-hoc analysis. The criterion of statistical significance was sign at P<0.05. Results Brain water content in ADFE-treated groups was decreased in comparison with the TBI+vehicle group. VCS at 24, 48 and 72 hours after TBI showed a significant increase in ADFE groups in comparison with the TBI+vehicle group. ICP at 24, 48 and 72 hours after TBI, was decreased in ADFE groups, compared to the TBI+vehicle. Brain edema, ICP and neuronal injury were also decreased in ADFE group, but VCS was increased following on TBI. Conclusion ADFE pre-treatment demonstrated an efficient method for preventing traumatic brain deterioration and improving pathological parameters after TBI. PMID:27602324

  1. Pathologic findings in canine brain irradiated with fractionated fast neutrons or photons

    SciTech Connect

    Zook, B.C.; Bradley, E.W.; Casarett, G.W.; Rogers, C.C.

    1980-12-01

    Thirty-seven adult male purebred beagles received total doses of 1333, 2000, 3000, or 4500 rad of fast neutrons (15 MeV av) in 4 fractions/week for 7 weeks to the entire brain. Nineteen dogs received 4000, 6000, or 9000 rad of photons (/sup 60/Co) in an identical fractionation pattern. Dogs receiving 4500, 3000, and 2000 rad of neutrons and 9000 rad of photons developed neurologic signs and died or were euthanatized when moribund followed irradiation. Cerebrospinal fluid contained excess protein and erythrocytes during and sometimes before the generally brief course. The onset of neurologic symptoms was usually followed by a moribund state in less than 48 h. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) as measured by onset of neurologic symptoms and mortality was greater than 4.5. Gross changes included hemorrhage, edema, and malacia primarily in the white matter, especially the corona radiata, cerebellar white matter, corpus callosum, and corpus fornicis. One beagle developed a brain tumor and died 1207 days following 1333-rad neutron irradiation.

  2. 65zinc uptake from blood into brain and other tissues in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Pullen, R.G.; Franklin, P.A.; Hall, G.H. )

    1990-10-01

    Zinc is essential for normal growth, development and brain function although little is known about brain zinc homeostasis. Therefore, in this investigation we have studied 65Zn uptake from blood into brain and other tissues and have measured the blood-brain barrier permeability to 65Zn in the anaesthetized rat in vivo. Adult male Wistar rats within the weight range 500-600 g were used. 65ZnCl2 and (125I)albumin, the latter serving as a vascular marker, were injected in a bolus of normal saline I.V. Sequential arterial blood samples were taken during experiments that lasted between 5 min and 5 hr. At termination, samples from the liver, spleen, pancreas, lung, heart, muscle, kidney, bone, testis, ileum, blood cells, csf, and whole brain were taken and analysed for radio-isotope activity. Data have been analysed by Graphical Analysis which suggests 65Zn uptake from blood by all tissues sampled was unidirectional during this experimental period except brain, where at circulation times less than 30 min, 65Zn fluxes were bidirectional. In addition to the blood space, the brain appears to contain a rapidly exchanging compartment(s) for 65Zn of about 4 ml/100g which is not csf.

  3. Changes in localization of synaptophysin following fluid percussion injury in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Shojo, Hideki; Kibayashi, Kazuhiko

    2006-03-17

    Traumatic brain injuries damage neurons and cause progressing dysfunctions of the brain. Synaptophysin (SYP), a major integral transmembrane protein of synaptic vesicles, provides a molecular marker for the synapse and serves as a functional marker of the brain. This study examined magnitude-dependent changes of SYP in the rat brain 2 days following low, moderate or high fluid percussion injuries and investigated time-dependent changes of SYP in the rat brain with moderate fluid percussion injury 2, 15 and 30 days after trauma using immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. SYP immunoreactivity increased in the lateral cortex and in the subcortical white matter, with increasing magnitude of injury and time after trauma. Increased SYP immunoreactivity was accompanied with degeneration of neuronal cell bodies, their processes and terminals as well as glial cell proliferations. Amounts of SYP measured by Western blotting remained unchanged in brains with moderate fluid percussion within 30 days after trauma. These findings indicate that trauma accumulates SYP at injured sites of neurons without changing SYP contents and that increased SYP immunoreactivity in the cerebral cortex following traumatic injury reflects an inhibition of synaptic vesicle transportation and dysfunction of synapses, thus providing a histological substrate for brain dysfunctions. PMID:16497279

  4. Rapid and widespread distribution of doxycycline in rat brain: a mass spectrometric imaging study.

    PubMed

    Munyeza, Chiedza F; Shobo, Adeola; Baijnath, Sooraj; Bratkowska, Dominika; Naiker, Suhashni; Bester, Linda A; Singh, Sanil D; Maguire, Glenn E M; Kruger, Hendrik G; Naicker, Tricia; Govender, Thavendran

    2016-01-01

    1. The penetration of tetracyclines into the brain has been widely documented. The aim of this work was to develop a matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI MSI) method for the molecular histology of doxycycline (DOX) in the healthy rat brain. 2. The time-dependent distribution was investigated after an i.p. dose of 25 mg/kg at 0, 5, 30, 120, 240, 360 and 480 min postdose. LCMS/MS was used to quantify the drug in plasma and brain homogenates and MALDI MSI was used to determine the distribution of the analyte. 3. Within the first-hour postdose, the drug showed slow accumulation into the plasma and brain tissues. DOX brain concentration gradually increased and reached a peak (Cmax) of 1034.9 ng/mL at 240 min postdose, resulting in a brain plasma ratio of 31%. The images acquired by MSI matched the quantification results and clearly showed drug distribution over the entire rat brain coronal section from 5 min and its slow elimination after 360-min postdose. 4. Our findings confirm that MALDI MSI provides an advanced, label-free and faster alternative technique for xenobiotic distribution such as DOX in tissues, making it an essential drug discovery tool for other possible neuroprotective agents. PMID:26327274

  5. Blood-ocular and blood-brain barrier function in streptozocin-induced diabetes in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Maeepea, O.; Karlsson, C.; Alm, A.

    1984-09-01

    Edetic acid labeled with chromium 51 was injected intravenously in normal rats and in rats with streptozocin-induced diabetes. One hour after the injection the animals were killed and the concentrations of edetic acid 51Cr in vitreous body, retina, and brain were determined. No significant difference was observed between the two groups for either tissue. In a second series, a mixture of tritiated 1-glucose and aminohippuric acid tagged with carbon 14 was injected instead of edetic acid. A substantial accumulation of aminohippuric acid 14C compared with tritiated 1-glucose was observed in the vitreous body and the brain of diabetic rats in comparison with the control group. It is concluded that untreated streptozocin-induced diabetes in rats for one to two weeks will not cause a generalized increase in the permeability of the blood-ocular or the blood-brain barriers, but organic acids may accumulate in the vitreous body as well as in the brain as a consequence of reduced outward transport through these barriers.

  6. ALUMINUM ALTERS CALCIUM TRANSPORT IN PLASMA MEMBRANE AND ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM FROM RAT BRAIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Calcium is actively transported into intracellular organelles and out of the cytoplasm by Ca2+/Mg2+-ATPases located in the endoplasmic reticulum and plasma membranes. he effects of aluminum on calcium transport were examined in the adult rat brain. 5Ca-uptake was examined in micr...

  7. Blueberry treatment decreased D-galactose-induced oxidative stress and brain damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Çoban, Jale; Doğan-Ekici, Işın; Aydın, A Fatih; Betül-Kalaz, Esra; Doğru-Abbasoğlu, Semra; Uysal, Müjdat

    2015-06-01

    D-galactose (GAL) causes aging-related changes and oxidative stress in the organism. We investigated the effect of whole fresh blueberry (BB) (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) treatment on oxidative stress in age-related brain damage model. Rats received GAL (300 mg/kg; s.c.; 5 days per week) alone or together with 5 % (BB1) and 10 % (BB2) BB containing chow for two months. Malondialdehyde (MDA),protein carbonyl (PC) and glutathione (GSH) levels, and Cu Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and glutathione transferase (GST) activities as well as acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activities were determined. Expressions of B cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2), Bax and caspase-3 were also evaluated in the brain by immunohistochemistry. MDA and PC levels and AChE activity increased, but GSH levels, SOD and GSH-Px activities decreased together with histopathological structural damage in the brain of GAL-treated rats. BB treatments, especially BB2 reduced MDA and PC levels and AChE activity and elevated GSH levels and GSH-Px activity. BB1 and BB2 treatments diminished apoptosis and ameliorated histopathological findings in the brain of GAL-treated rats. These results indicate that BB partially prevented the shift towards an imbalanced prooxidative status and apoptosis together with histopathological amelioration by acting as an antioxidant (radical scavenger) itself in GAL-treated rats. PMID:25511550

  8. Gaussian beam in two-photon fluorescence imaging of rat brain microvessel

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Lingyan; Rodríguez-Contreras, Adrián; Alfano, Robert R.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. The critical optical properties of a Gaussian laser beam in two-photon or multiphoton fluorescence imaging, including the beam spot size, depth of focus, and intensity profile, are investigated for spatially locating nanoscale solutes in and surrounding the microvessels of rat brain. PMID:25490048

  9. THYROID INSUFFICIENCY AND GENE EXPRESSION IN DEVELOPING RAT BRAIN: A DOSE RESPONSE STUDY.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thyroid Insufficiency and Gene Expression in Developing Rat Brain: A Dose Response Study. JE Royland and ME Gilbert, Neurotox. Div., U.S. EPA, RTP, NC, USA. Endocrine disruption is an area of major concern in environmental neurotoxicity. Deficits in thyroid hormone (TH) levels h...

  10. The Physiochemistry of Capped Nanosilver Predicts Its Biological Activity in Rat Brain Endothelial Cells (REBEC4)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The “capping” or coating of nanosilver (nanoAg) extends its potency by limiting its oxidation and aggregation and stabilizing its size and shape. The ability of such coated nanoAg to alter the permeability and activate oxidative stress pathways in rat brain endothelia...

  11. [Sorption of sulfophthaleinic dyes by the brain synaptosomes of rats deprived of parodoxical sleep].

    PubMed

    Nilova, N S

    1984-12-01

    The influence of paradoxical sleep deprivation on sorption of bromphenol blue, bromcresol green and bromthymol blue by rat's brain synaptosomes was studied. Effect of sleep disturbance (increase in the number of dye bindings) was shown to augment with the increase in hydrophobicity of the sulfophtaleinic dye. PMID:6528362

  12. Neuroprotective Effect of Dexmedetomidine on Hyperoxia-Induced Toxicity in the Neonatal Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Sifringer, Marco; von Haefen, Clarissa; Krain, Maria; Paeschke, Nadine; Bendix, Ivo; Bührer, Christoph; Spies, Claudia D.; Endesfelder, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    Dexmedetomidine is a highly selective agonist of α2-receptors with sedative, anxiolytic, analgesic, and anesthetic properties. Neuroprotective effects of dexmedetomidine have been reported in various brain injury models. In the present study, we investigated the effects of dexmedetomidine on neurodegeneration, oxidative stress markers, and inflammation following the induction of hyperoxia in neonatal rats. Six-day-old Wistar rats received different concentrations of dexmedetomidine (1, 5, or 10 µg/kg bodyweight) and were exposed to 80% oxygen for 24 h. Sex-matched littermates kept in room air and injected with normal saline or dexmedetomidine served as controls. Dexmedetomidine pretreatment significantly reduced hyperoxia-induced neurodegeneration in different brain regions of the neonatal rat. In addition, dexmedetomidine restored the reduced/oxidized glutathione ratio and attenuated the levels of malondialdehyde, a marker of lipid peroxidation, after exposure to high oxygen concentration. Moreover, administration of dexmedetomidine induced downregulation of IL-1β on mRNA and protein level in the developing rat brain. Dexmedetomidine provides protections against toxic oxygen induced neonatal brain injury which is likely associated with oxidative stress signaling and inflammatory cytokines. Our results suggest that dexmedetomidine may have a therapeutic potential since oxygen administration to neonates is sometimes inevitable. PMID:25653737

  13. Expression of beta 3-adrenoceptor mRNA in rat brain.

    PubMed Central

    Summers, R. J.; Papaioannou, M.; Harris, S.; Evans, B. A.

    1995-01-01

    The reverse transcription/polymerase chain reaction was used to demonstrate beta 3-adrenoceptor mRNA in rat brain regions. Levels were highest in hippocampus, cerebral cortex and striatum and lower in hypothalamus, brainstem and cerebellum. Images Figure 1 PMID:8590968

  14. CONCENTRATION OF GLIAL FIBRILLARY ACIDIC PROTEIN INCREASES WITH AGE IN THE MOUSE AND RAT BRAIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The role of aging in the expression of the astrocyte protein, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), was examined. n both mice and rats the concentration of GFAP increased throughout the brain as a function of aging. he largest increase (2-fold) was observed in striatum for both...

  15. PRENATAL EXPOSURE TO CHLORPYRIFOS ALTERS NEUROTROPHIN IMMUNOREACTIVITY AND APOPTOSIS IN RAT BRAIN.

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the present study, the effects of the organophosphate pesticide chlorpyrifos [CPF; O,O'diethyl O-3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridyl) phosphorothionate] on the regional distribution of three neurotrophic factors and on levels of apoptosis in gestational rat brain were characterized. P...

  16. The primary structure of rat brain (cytoplasmic) dynein heavy chain, a cytoplasmic motor enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Z; Tanaka, Y; Nonaka, S; Aizawa, H; Kawasaki, H; Nakata, T; Hirokawa, N

    1993-01-01

    Overlapping cDNA clones encoding the heavy chain of rat brain cytoplasmic dynein have been isolated. The isolated cDNA clones contain an open reading frame of 13,932 bp encoding 4644 aa (M(r), 532,213). The deduced protein sequence of the heavy chain of rat brain dynein shows significant similarity to sea urchin flagellar beta-dynein (27.0% identical) and to Dictyostelium cytoplasmic dynein (53.5% identical) throughout the entire sequence. The heavy chain of rat brain (cytoplasmic) dynein contains four putative nucleotide-binding consensus sequences [GX4GK(T/S)] in the central one-third region that are highly similar to those of sea urchin and Dictyostelium dyneins. The N-terminal one-third of the heavy chain of rat brain (cytoplasmic) dynein shows high similarity (43.8% identical) to that of Dictyostelium cytoplasmic dynein but poor similarity (19.4% identical) to that of sea urchin flagellar dynein. These results suggested that the C-terminal two-thirds of the dynein molecule is conserved and plays an essential role in microtubule-dependent motility activity, whereas the N-terminal regions are different between cytoplasmic and flagellar dyneins. Images Fig. 1 PMID:7690137

  17. Brain SERT Expression of Male Rats Is Reduced by Aging and Increased by Testosterone Restitution

    PubMed Central

    Herrera-Pérez, José Jaime; Fernández-Guasti, Alonso; Martínez-Mota, Lucía

    2013-01-01

    In preclinical and clinical studies aging has been associated with a deteriorated response to antidepressant treatment. We hypothesize that such impairment is explained by an age-related decrease in brain serotonin transporter (SERT) expression associated with low testosterone (T) levels. The objectives of this study were to establish (1) if brain SERT expression is reduced by aging and (2) if the SERT expression in middle-aged rats is increased by T-restitution. Intact young rats (3–5 months) and gonad-intact middle-aged rats with or without T-restitution were used. The identification of the brain SERT expression was done by immunofluorescence in prefrontal cortex, lateral septum, hippocampus, and raphe nuclei. An age-dependent reduction of SERT expression was observed in all brain regions examined, while T-restitution recovered the SERT expression only in the dorsal raphe of middle-aged rats. This last action seems relevant since dorsal raphe plays an important role in the antidepressant action of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. All data suggest that this mechanism accounts for the T-replacement usefulness to improve the response to antidepressants in the aged population. PMID:26317087

  18. Acute effect of aspartame-induced oxidative stress in Wistar albino rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Ashok, Iyaswamy; Sheeladevi, Rathinasamy; Wankhar, Dapkupar

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The present study was carried out to investigate the acute effect of aspartame on oxidative stress in the Wistar albino rat brain. We sought to investigate whether acute administration of aspartame (75 mg/kg) could release methanol and induce oxidative stress in the rat brain 24 hours after administration. To mimic human methanol metabolism, methotrexate treated rats were used to study aspartame effects. Wistar strain male albino rats were administered with aspartame orally as a single dose and studied along with controls and methotrexate treated controls. Blood methanol and formate level were estimated after 24 hours and rats were sacrificed and free radical changes were observed in discrete regions by assessing the scavenging enzymes, reduce dglutathione (GSH), lipid peroxidation and protein thiol levels. There was a significant increase in lipid peroxidation levels, superoxide dismutase activity (SOD), glutathione peroxidase levels (GPx), and catalase activity (CAT) with a significant decrease in GSH and protein thiol. Aspartame exposure resulted in detectable methanol even after 24 hours. Methanol and its metabolites may be responsible for the generation of oxidative stress in brain regions. The observed alteration in aspartame fed animals may be due to its metabolite methanol and elevated formate. The elevated free radicals due to methanol induced oxidative stress. PMID:26445572

  19. Acute effect of aspartame-induced oxidative stress in Wistar albino rat brain.

    PubMed

    Ashok, Iyaswamy; Sheeladevi, Rathinasamy; Wankhar, Dapkupar

    2015-09-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate the acute effect of aspartame on oxidative stress in the Wistar albino rat brain. We sought to investigate whether acute administration of aspartame (75 mg/kg) could release methanol and induce oxidative stress in the rat brain 24 hours after administration. To mimic human methanol metabolism, methotrexate treated rats were used to study aspartame effects. Wistar strain male albino rats were administered with aspartame orally as a single dose and studied along with controls and methotrexate treated controls. Blood methanol and formate level were estimated after 24 hours and rats were sacrificed and free radical changes were observed in discrete regions by assessing the scavenging enzymes, reduce dglutathione (GSH), lipid peroxidation and protein thiol levels. There was a significant increase in lipid peroxidation levels, superoxide dismutase activity (SOD), glutathione peroxidase levels (GPx), and catalase activity (CAT) with a significant decrease in GSH and protein thiol. Aspartame exposure resulted in detectable methanol even after 24 hours. Methanol and its metabolites may be responsible for the generation of oxidative stress in brain regions. The observed alteration in aspartame fed animals may be due to its metabolite methanol and elevated formate. The elevated free radicals due to methanol induced oxidative stress. PMID:26445572

  20. Nanoparticle mediated silencing of DNA repair sensitizes pediatric brain tumor cells to γ-irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Kievit, Forrest M.; Stephen, Zachary R.; Wang, Kui; Dayringer, Christopher J.; Sham, Jonathan G.; Ellenbogen, Richard G.; Silber, John R.; Zhang, Miqin

    2015-01-01

    Medulloblastoma (MB) and ependymoma (EP) are the most common pediatric brain tumors, afflicting 3,000 children annually. Radiotherapy (RT) is an integral component in the treatment of these tumors; however, the improvement in survival is often accompanied by radiation-induced adverse developmental and psychosocial sequelae. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop strategies that can increase the sensitivity of brain tumors cells to RT while sparing adjacent healthy brain tissue. Apurinic endonuclease 1 (Ape1), an enzyme in the base excision repair pathway, has been implicated in radiation resistance in cancer. Pharmacological and specificity limitations inherent to small molecule inhibitors of Ape1 have hindered their clinical development. Here we report on a nanoparticle (NP) based siRNA delivery vehicle for knocking down Ape1 expression and sensitizing pediatric brain tumor cells to RT. The NP comprises a superparamagnetic iron oxide core coated with a biocompatible, biodegradable coating of chitosan, polyethylene glycol (PEG), and polyethyleneimine (PEI) that is able to bind and protect siRNA from degradation and to deliver siRNA to the perinuclear region of target cells. NPs loaded with siRNA against Ape1 (NP:siApe1) knocked down Ape1 expression over 75% in MB and EP cells, and reduced Ape1 activity by 80%. This reduction in Ape1 activity correlated with increased DNA damage post-irradiation, which resulted in decreased cell survival in clonogenic assays. The sensitization was specific to therapies generating abasic lesions as evidenced by NP:siRNA not increasing sensitivity to paclitaxel, a microtubule disrupting agent. Our results indicate NP-mediated delivery of siApe1 is a promising strategy for circumventing pediatric brain tumor resistance to RT. PMID:25681012

  1. Compartmental analysis of washout effect in rat brain: in-beam OpenPET measurement using a 11C beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Yoshiyuki; Kinouchi, Shoko; Ikoma, Yoko; Yoshida, Eiji; Wakizaka, Hidekazu; Ito, Hiroshi; Yamaya, Taiga

    2013-12-01

    In-beam positron emission tomography (PET) is expected to enable visualization of a dose verification using positron emitters (β+ decay). For accurate dose verification, correction of the washout of the positron emitters should be made. In addition, the quantitative washout rate has a potential usefulness as a diagnostic index, but modeling for this has not been studied yet. In this paper, therefore, we applied compartment analyses to in-beam PET data acquired by our small OpenPET prototype, which has a physically opened field-of-view (FOV) between two detector rings. A rat brain was located at the FOV and was irradiated by a 11C beam. Time activity curves of the irradiated field were measured immediately after the irradiations, and the washout rate was obtained based on two models: the two-washout model (medium decay, k2m; slow decay, k2s) developed in a study of rabbit irradiation; and the two-compartment model used in nuclear medicine, where efflux from tissue to blood (k2), influx (k3) and efflux (k4) from the first to second compartments in tissue were evaluated. The observed k2m and k2s were 0.34 and 0.005 min-1, respectively, which was consistent with the rabbit study. Also k2m was close to the washout rate in cerebral blood flow (CBF) measurements by dynamic PET with 15O-water, while, k2, k3, and k4 were 0.16, 0.15 and 0.007 min-1. Our present work suggested the dynamics of 11C might be relevant to CBF or permeability of a molecule containing 11C atoms might be regulated by a transporter because the k2 was relatively low compared with a simple diffusion tracer.

  2. Monitoring the process of tissue healing of rat skin in vivo after laser irradiation based on optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Youwu; Wu, Shulian; Li, Zhifang; Cai, Shoudong; Li, Hui

    2010-11-01

    It is imperative to evaluate the tissue wound healing response after laser irradiation so as to develop effective devices for this clinical indication, and evaluate the thermal damage degree to take appropriate treatment. In our research, we prepare 6 white rat (approximately 2 months old, weight :28+/-2g). Each rat was injected intraperitoneally a single dose of 2% pentobarbital sodium. After the rat was anesthetized, the two side of the rats' back were denuded and antisepsised a standardized. An Er:YAG laser (2940nm, 2.5J/cm2, single spot, 4 times) was irradiated on rat skin in vivo, and the skin which before irradiated and the process of renovating scathe that irradiated after Er:YAG laser were observed by an Optical coherence tomography (OCT). The tissue recovery is about a twelve -day period. The results indicate that the scattering coefficient of post- tissue has changed distinctly. The and flexibility fiber is the chief component of rat dermis and the collagen is the main scattering material. The normal tissue has a large scattering coefficient, after laser irradiated, the collagen became concreting and putrescence and caused the structure change. It became more uniform density distribution, which results in a reduced scattering coefficient. In a word, OCT can noninvasively monitor changes in collagen structure and the recover process in thermal damage through monitor the tissue scattering coefficient.

  3. Effects of High-Protein Diet and/or Resveratrol Supplementation on the Immune Response of Irradiated Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyoung Ok; Park, Hyunjin; Kim, Hyun-Sook

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effects of a high-protein diet and resveratrol supplementation on immune cells changes induced by abdominal irradiation in rats. Female Wistar rats were divided into 5 groups: 1) control diet, 2) control diet with irradiation 3) 30% high-protein diet with irradiation, 4) normal diet with resveratrol supplementation and irradiation, and 5) 30% high-protein diet with resveratrol supplementation and irradiation. We measured blood protein and albumin concentrations, lipid profiles, white blood cell (WBC) counts, proinflammatory cytokine production, and splenocyte proliferation in rats that had been treated with a 17.5 Gy dose of radiation 30 days prior. A high-protein diet affected plasma total cholesterol and very low density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels, which were increased by the radiation treatment. In addition, the lymphocyte percentage and immunoglobulin M (IgM) concentration were increased, and the neutrophil percentage was decreased in rats fed a high-protein diet. Resveratrol supplementation decreased the triglyceride (TG) level, but increased the IgM concentration and splenocyte proliferation. Proinflammatory cytokine production was lower in rats fed a high-protein diet supplemented with resveratrol than in rats fed a control diet. The results of the present study indicate that high-protein diets, with or without resveratrol supplementation, might assist with recovery from radiation-induced inflammation by modulating immune cell percentages and cytokine production. PMID:25320712

  4. Testosterone replacement attenuates cognitive decline in testosterone-deprived lean rats, but not in obese rats, by mitigating brain oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Pintana, Hiranya; Pongkan, Wanpitak; Pratchayasakul, Wasana; Chattipakorn, Nipon; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C

    2015-10-01

    Testosterone replacement improves metabolic parameters and cognitive function in hypogonadism. However, the effects of testosterone therapy on cognition in obese condition with testosterone deprivation have not been investigated. We hypothesized that testosterone replacement improves cognitive function in testosterone-deprived obese rats by restoring brain insulin sensitivity, brain mitochondrial function, and hippocampal synaptic plasticity. Thirty male Wistar rats had either a bilateral orchiectomy (ORX: O, n = 24) or a sham operation (S, n = 6). ORX rats were further divided into two groups fed with either a normal diet (NDO) or a high-fat diet (HFO) for 12 weeks. Then, ORX rats in each dietary group were divided into two subgroups (n = 6/subgroup) and were given either castor oil or testosterone (2 mg/kg/day, s.c.) for 4 weeks. At the end of this protocol, cognitive function, metabolic parameters, brain insulin sensitivity, hippocampal synaptic plasticity, and brain mitochondrial function were determined. We found that testosterone replacement increased peripheral insulin sensitivity, decreased circulation and brain oxidative stress levels, and attenuated brain mitochondrial ROS production in HFO rats. However, testosterone failed to restore hippocampal synaptic plasticity and cognitive function in HFO rats. In contrast, in NDO rats, testosterone decreased circulation and brain oxidative stress levels, attenuated brain mitochondrial ROS production, and restored hippocampal synaptic plasticity as well as cognitive function. These findings suggest that testosterone replacement improved peripheral insulin sensitivity and decreased oxidative stress levels, but failed to restore hippocampal synaptic plasticity and cognitive function in testosterone-deprived obese rats. However, it provided beneficial effects in reversing cognitive impairment in testosterone-deprived non-obese rats. PMID:26277724

  5. Antenatal taurine supplementation increases taurine content in intrauterine growth restricted fetal rat brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Li, Fang; Teng, Hui-Yun; Liu, Jing; Wang, Hua-Wei; Zeng, Li; Zhao, Li-Fang

    2014-09-01

    This study aimed to determine the influence of antenatal taurine supplementation on taurine content in the brains of fetal rats with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). Experiments were performed at the Central Laboratory of Bayi Children's Hospital Affiliated to Beijing Military General Hospital in China from January to June 2013. Fifteen pregnant rats were randomly divided into three groups: normal controls, an IUGR group and an IUGR + antenatal taurine supplement group (Taurine group) (n = 5). The IUGR model was induced using a low-protein diet throughout gestation. Rats in the taurine group were fed a diet supplemented with 300 mg/kg/day taurine for 12 days after conception until natural delivery. Two fetal rats were randomly selected in every litter, and taurine levels in the brains of rats were detected using high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Results showed that (1) the mean body weight of the fetal rats in the normal control, IUGR and IUGR + antenatal taurine supplement groups was 6.619 ± 0.4132, 4.509 ± 0.454, and 5.176 ± 0.436 g (F = 429.818, P < 0.01), respectively, and (2) that taurine levels in the brains of the fetal rats in the normal control, IUGR and taurine groups were (2.399 ± 0.134) × 10(5), (1.881 ± 0.166) × 10(5) and (2.170 ± 0.191) × 10(5) μg/g (F = 24.828, P < 0.01), respectively. Overall, our results indicated that taurine levels in IUGR fetal rat brains were lower than in the control animals, and that antenatal taurine supplementation could significantly increase taurine levels in the brains of fetal rats with IUGR. PMID:24676564

  6. Influence of exercise training on ischemic brain injury in type 1 diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Arrick, Denise M; Sun, Hong; Mayhan, William G

    2012-10-01

    While exercise training (ExT) appears to influence cerebrovascular function during type 1 diabetes (T1D), it is not clear whether this beneficial effect extends to protecting the brain from ischemia-induced brain injury. Thus our goal was to examine whether modest ExT could influence transient focal ischemia-induced brain injury along with nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-dependent dilation of cerebral (pial) arterioles during T1D. Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups: nondiabetic sedentary, nondiabetic ExT, diabetic (streptozotocin; 50 mg/kg ip) sedentary, and diabetic ExT. In the first series of studies, we measured infarct volume in all groups of rats following right MCA occlusion for 2 h, followed by 24 h of reperfusion. In a second series of studies, a craniotomy was performed over the parietal cortex, and we measured responses of pial arterioles to an endothelial NOS (eNOS)-dependent, a neuronal NOS (nNOS)-dependent, and a NOS-independent agonist in all groups of rats. We found that sedentary diabetic rats had significantly larger total, cortical, and subcortical infarct volumes following ischemia-reperfusion than sedentary nondiabetic, nondiabetic ExT, and diabetic ExT rats. Infarct volumes were similar in sedentary nondiabetic, ExT nondiabetic, and ExT diabetic rats. In contrast, ExT did not alter infarct size in nondiabetic compared with sedentary nondiabetic rats. In addition, ExT diabetic rats had impaired eNOS- and nNOS-dependent, but not NOS-independent, vasodilation that was restored by ExT. Thus ExT of T1D rats lessened ischemic brain injury following middle cerebral artery occlusion and restored impaired eNOS- and nNOS-dependent vascular function. Since the incidence of ischemic stroke is increased during T1D, we suggest that our finding are significant in that modest ExT may be a viable preventative therapeutic approach to lessen ischemia-induced brain injury that may occur in T1D subjects. PMID:22858624

  7. Transcriptome Sequencing of Gene Expression in the Brain of the HIV-1 Transgenic Rat

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming D.; Cao, Junran; Wang, Shaolin; Wang, Ju; Sarkar, Sraboni; Vigorito, Michael; Ma, Jennie Z.; Chang, Sulie L.

    2013-01-01

    The noninfectious HIV-1 transgenic (HIV-1Tg) rat was developed as a model of AIDs-related pathology and immune dysfunction by manipulation of a noninfectious HIV-1gag-pol virus with a deleted 3-kb SphI-MscI fragment containing the 3′ -region of gag and the 5′ region of pol into F344 rats. Our previous studies revealed significant behavioral differences between HIV-1Tg and F344 control rats in their performance in the Morris water maze and responses to psychostimulants. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these behavioral differences remain largely unknown. The primary goal of this study was to identify differentially expressed genes and enriched pathways affected by the gag-pol-deleted HIV-1 genome. Using RNA deep sequencing, we sequenced RNA transcripts in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, and striatum of HIV-1Tg and F344 rats. A total of 72 RNA samples were analyzed (i.e., 12 animals per group × 2 strains × 3 brain regions). Following deep-sequencing analysis of 50-bp paired-end reads of RNA-Seq, we used Bowtie/Tophat/Cufflinks suites to align these reads into transcripts based on the Rn4 rat reference genome and to measure the relative abundance of each transcript. Statistical analyses on each brain region in the two strains revealed that immune response- and neurotransmission-related pathways were altered in the HIV-1Tg rats, with brain region differences. Other neuronal survival-related pathways, including those encoding myelin proteins, growth factors, and translation regulators, were altered in the HIV-1Tg rats in a brain region-dependent manner. This study is the first deep-sequencing analysis of RNA transcripts associated the HIV-1Tg rat. Considering the functions of the pathways and brain regions examined in this study, our findings of abnormal gene expression patterns in HIV-1Tg rats suggest mechanisms underlying the deficits in learning and memory and vulnerability to drug addiction and other psychiatric disorders observed in HIV

  8. Biochemical effect of a ketogenic diet on the brains of obese adult rats.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Hoda E; El-Swefy, Sahar E; Rashed, Leila A; Abd El-Latif, Sally K

    2010-07-01

    Excess weight, particularly abdominal obesity, can cause or exacerbate cardiovascular and metabolic disease. Obesity is also a proven risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Various studies have demonstrated the beneficial effects of a ketogenic diet (KD) in weight reduction and in modifying the disease activity of neurodegenerative disorders, including AD. Therefore, in this study we examined the metabolic and neurodegenerative changes associated with obesity and the possible neuroprotective effects of a KD in obese adult rats. Compared with obese rats fed a control diet, obese rats fed a KD showed significant weight loss, improvement in lipid profiles and insulin resistance, and upregulation of adiponectin mRNA expression in adipose tissue. In addition, the KD triggered significant downregulation of brain amyloid protein precursor, apolipoprotein E and caspase-3 mRNA expression, and improvement of brain oxidative stress responses. These findings suggest that a KD has anti-obesity and neuroprotective effects. PMID:20395146

  9. Effect of mosquito mats (pyrethroid-based) vapor inhalation on rat brain cytochrome P450s.

    PubMed

    Vences-Mejía, Araceli; Gómez-Garduño, Josefina; Caballero-Ortega, Heriberto; Dorado-González, Víctor; Nosti-Palacios, Rosario; Labra-Ruíz, Norma; Espinosa-Aguirre, J Javier

    2012-01-01

    The effect of transfluthrin (TF) or D-allethrin (DA) pyrethroid (PYR) vapors, often contained as main ingredients in two commercially available mosquito repellent mats, on cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes of rat brain and liver was assessed. Immunodetection of CYP2E1 and CYP3A2 proteins revealed their induction in cerebrum and cerebellum, but not in liver microsomes of rats exposed by inhalation to TF or DA. This overexpression of proteins correlated with an increase of their catalytic activities. The specifically increased expression of CYP isoenzymes, due to PYR exposure in the rat brain, could perturb the normal metabolism of endogenous and xenobiotic compounds and leads to increased risks of neurotoxicity by bioactivation, lipid peroxidation and DNA damage. PMID:22080754

  10. Safety evaluation of mercury based Ayurvedic formulation (Sidh Makardhwaj) on brain cerebrum, liver & kidney in rats

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Gajendra; Srivastava, Amita; Sharma, Surinder Kumar; Gupta, Yogendra Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Background & objectives: Sidh Makardhwaj (SM) is a mercury based Ayurvedic formulation used in rheumatoid arthritis and neurological disorders. However, toxicity concerns due to mercury content are often raised. Therefore, the present study was carried out to evaluate the effect of SM on brain cerebrum, liver and kidney in rats. Methods: Graded doses of SM (10, 50, 100 mg/kg), mercuric chloride (1 mg/kg) and normal saline were administered orally to male Wistar rats for 28 days. Behavioural parameters were assessed on days 1, 7, 14 and 28 using Morris water maze, passive avoidance, elevated plus maze and rota rod. Liver and kidney function tests were done on day 28. Animals were sacrificed and brain cerebrum acetylcholinesterase activity, levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), reduced glutathione (GSH) in brain cerebrum, liver, kidney were estimated. The levels of mercury in brain cerebrum, liver and kidney were estimated and histopathology of these tissues was also performed. Results: SM in the doses used did not cause significant change in neurobehavioural parameters, brain cerebrum AChE activity, liver (ALT, AST, ALP bilirubin) and kidney (serum urea and creatinine) function tests as compared to control. The levels of mercury in brain cerebrum, liver, and kidney were found to be raised in dose dependent manner. However, the levels of MDA and GSH in these tissues did not show significant changes at doses of 10 and 50 mg/kg. Also, there was no histopathological change in cytoarchitecture of brain cerebrum, liver, and kidney tissues at doses of 10 and 50 mg/kg. Interpretation & conclusions: The findings of the present study suggest that Sidh Makardhwaj upto five times the equivalent human dose administered for 28 days did not show any toxicological effects on rat brain cerebrum, liver and kidney. PMID:24927349

  11. Differential metabolism of 4-hydroxynonenal in liver, lung and brain of mice and rats

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Ruijin; Dragomir, Ana-Cristina; Mishin, Vladimir; Richardson, Jason R.; Heck, Diane E.; Laskin, Debra L.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.

    2014-08-15

    The lipid peroxidation end-product 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) is generated in tissues during oxidative stress. As a reactive aldehyde, it forms Michael adducts with nucleophiles, a process that disrupts cellular functioning. Liver, lung and brain are highly sensitive to xenobiotic-induced oxidative stress and readily generate 4-HNE. In the present studies, we compared 4-HNE metabolism in these tissues, a process that protects against tissue injury. 4-HNE was degraded slowly in total homogenates and S9 fractions of mouse liver, lung and brain. In liver, but not lung or brain, NAD(P)+ and NAD(P)H markedly stimulated 4-HNE metabolism. Similar results were observed in rat S9 fractions from these tissues. In liver, lung and brain S9 fractions, 4-HNE formed protein adducts. When NADH was used to stimulate 4-HNE metabolism, the formation of protein adducts was suppressed in liver, but not lung or brain. In both mouse and rat tissues, 4-HNE was also metabolized by glutathione S-transferases. The greatest activity was noted in livers of mice and in lungs of rats; relatively low glutathione S-transferase activity was detected in brain. In mouse hepatocytes, 4-HNE was rapidly taken up and metabolized. Simultaneously, 4-HNE-protein adducts were formed, suggesting that 4-HNE metabolism in intact cells does not prevent protein modifications. These data demonstrate that, in contrast to liver, lung and brain have a limited capacity to metabolize 4-HNE. The persistence of 4-HNE in these tissues may increase the likelihood of tissue injury during oxidative stress. - Highlights: • Lipid peroxidation generates 4-hydroxynonenal, a highly reactive aldehyde. • Rodent liver, but not lung or brain, is efficient in degrading 4-hydroxynonenal. • 4-hydroxynonenal persists in tissues with low metabolism, causing tissue damage.

  12. Metabolism of AM404 From Acetaminophen at Human Therapeutic Dosages in the Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Muramatsu, Shun; Shiraishi, Seiji; Miyano, Kanako; Sudo, Yuka; Toda, Akiko; Mogi, Masayuki; Hara, Mayumi; Yokoyama, Akinobu; Kawasaki, Yoshihiko; Taniguchi, Mikio; Uezono, Yasuhito

    2016-01-01

    Background: Acetaminophen, an analgesic and antipyretic drug, has been used clinically for more than a century. Previous studies showed that acetaminophen undergoes metabolic transformations to form an analgesic compound, N-(4-hydroxyphenyl) arachidonamide (AM404), in the rodent brain. However, these studies were performed with higher concentrations of acetaminophen than are used in humans. Objectives: The aim of the present study was to examine the metabolism of AM404 from acetaminophen in the rat brain at a concentration of 20 mg/kg, which is used in therapeutic practice in humans, and to compare the pharmacokinetics between them. Materials and Methods: We used rat brains to investigate the metabolism of AM404 from acetaminophen at concentrations (20 mg/kg) used in humans. In addition, we determined the mean pharmacokinetic parameters for acetaminophen and its metabolites, including AM404. Results: The maximum plasma concentrations of acetaminophen and AM404 in the rat brain were 15.8 µg/g and 150 pg/g, respectively, with corresponding AUC0-2h values of 8.96 μg hour/g and 117 pg hour/g. The tmax for both acetaminophen and AM404 was 0.25 hour. Conclusions: These data suggest that AM404’s concentration-time profile in the brain is similar to those of acetaminophen and its other metabolites. Measurement of blood acetaminophen concentration seems to reflect the concentration of the prospective bioactive substance, AM404. PMID:27110534

  13. Effect of Pentoxifylline on Ischemia- induced Brain Damage and Spatial Memory Impairment in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Movassaghi, Shabnam; Nadia Sharifi, Zahra; Soleimani, Mansooreh; Joghataii, Mohammad Taghi; Hashemi, Mehrdad; Shafaroodi, Hamed; Mehdizadeh, Mehdi

    2012-01-01

    Objective(s) The brief interruption of cerebral blood flow causes permanent brain damage and behavioral dysfunction. The hippocampus is highly vulnerable to ischemic insults, particularly the CA1 pyramidal cell layer. There is no effective pharmacological strategy for improving brain tissue damage induced by cerebral ischemia. Previous studies reported that pentoxifylline (PTX) has a neuroprotective effect on brain trauma. The possible neuroprotector effects of PTX on behavioral deficit were studied in male Wistar rats subjected to a model of transient global brain ischemia. Materials and Methods Animals (n= 32) were assigned to control, sham-operated, vehicle, and PTX- treated (200 mg/kg IP) groups. PTX administered at 1hr before and 3 hr after ischemia. Global cerebral ischemia was induced by bilateral common carotid artery occlusion, followed by reperfusion. Results Morris Water maze testing revealed that PTX administration in cerebral ischemia significantly improved hippocampal-dependent memory and cognitive spatial abilities after reperfusion as compared to sham-operated and vehicle-treated animals. After the behavioral test, the rats were sacrificed and brain sections were stained with Nissl staining. There were no significant differences between number of pyramidal cells in both control and PTX groups. Conclusion Our study demonstrated that pentoxifylline had a protective effect on rats with transient global ischemia and could reduce cognitive impairment. PMID:23493977

  14. Propofol anesthesia reduces Lempel-Ziv complexity of spontaneous brain activity in rats.

    PubMed

    Hudetz, Anthony G; Liu, Xiping; Pillay, Siveshigan; Boly, Melanie; Tononi, Giulio

    2016-08-15

    Consciousness is thought to scale with brain complexity, and it may be diminished in anesthesia. Lempel-Ziv complexity (LZC) of field potentials has been shown to be a promising measure of the level of consciousness in anesthetized human subjects, neurological patients, and across the sleep-wake states in rats. Whether this relationship holds for intrinsic networks obtained by functional brain imaging has not been tested. To fill this gap of knowledge, we estimated LZC from large-scale dynamic analysis of functional magnetic resonance images (fMRI) in conscious sedated and unconscious anesthetized rats. Blood oxygen dependent (BOLD) signals were obtained from 30-min whole-brain resting-state scans while the anesthetic propofol was infused intravenously at constant infusion rates of 20mg/kg/h (conscious sedated) and 40mg/kg/h (unconscious). Dynamic brain networks were defined at voxel level by sliding window analysis of regional homogeneity (ReHo) of the BOLD signal. From scans performed at low to high propofol dose, the LZC was significantly reduced by 110%. The results suggest that the difference in LZC between conscious sedated and anesthetized unconscious subjects is conserved in rats and this effect is detectable in large-scale brain network obtained from fMRI. PMID:27291459

  15. Effect of rapid correction of hyponatremia on the blood-brain barrier of rats.

    PubMed

    Adler, S; Verbalis, J G; Williams, D

    1995-05-01

    Brain demyelination sometimes follows rapid correction of hyponatremia, especially if the hyponatremia is chronic. During correction brain water decreases and the brain shrinks. The present study examined whether such shrinkage might be sufficient to disrupt the tight junctions of the blood-brain barrier. Barrier intactness was evaluated using magnetic resonance imaging and intravenous gadolinium contrast administration. Hypertonic saline infusion rapidly increased the plasma sodium concentration and caused barrier disruption more frequently in chronic than in acute hyponatremic rats. Similar increases in plasma sodium concentration did not disrupt the barrier in normonatremic rats. The disruption appeared to be due to altered plasma osmolality since infusion of hypertonic mannitol, which raised plasma osmolality without changing the plasma sodium concentration, disrupted the barrier in hyponatremic but not normonatremic rats. Moreover, the osmotic threshold for barrier disruption was lowest in chronic hyponatremia, intermediate in acute hyponatremia, and highest in normonatremia. The greater susceptibility to osmotic disruption in chronic hyponatremia suggests that blood-brain barrier disruption may play a significant role in causing the demyelination sometimes found following too rapid correction of hyponatremia, possibly through exposure of oligodendrocytes to plasma macromolecules such as complement. PMID:7648255

  16. Acute effects of oral or parenteral aspartame on catecholamine metabolism in various regions of rat brain.

    PubMed

    Yokogoshi, H; Wurtman, R J

    1986-03-01

    Hypertensive (SHR) and nonhypertensive [Wistar-Kyoto (WKY); Sprague-Dawley (SD)] strains of rats received the dipeptide sweetener aspartame (200 mg/kg) or, as a positive control, tyrosine (200 mg/kg) by gavage or parenterally, after a brief (2-h) fast. Two hours later, compared with those of saline controls brain levels of the norepinephrine metabolite 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylethylethyleneglycol (MHPG) sulfate were significantly higher in the hypothalamus (WKY), locus coeruleus (SD and SHR) and brain stem (SHR) in tyrosine-treated animals, and in the locus coeruleus (SD) of those given aspartame. Brain norepinephrine levels were also higher, compared with those of saline-treated control rats, in the cerebral cortex (SD and SHR), amygdala (SD) and locus coeruleus (WKY) after tyrosine administration, and in the amygdala (SD) and cerebral cortex (SHR) after aspartame administration. In another study, oral aspartame was found to be at least as effective as the parenterally administered sweetener in raising regional brain levels of tyrosine or MHPG sulfate (i.e., compared with corresponding levels in saline-treated rats). Animals receiving oral aspartame also exhibited higher plasma tyrosine and phenylalanine ratios (i.e., the ratios of their plasma concentrations to the summed concentrations of other large neutral amino acids that compete with them for uptake into the brain), than animals receiving saline. PMID:3950762

  17. Uptake and biodistribution of rizatriptan to blood and brain following different routes of administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chun; Quan, Li-Hui; Guo, Yi; Liu, Chun-Yu; Liao, Yong-Hong

    2007-06-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the biodistribution profiles of rizatriptan in the blood and brain of Wistar rats after peroral, subcutaneous, intranasal and intratracheal administration with a particular view to determining the applicability of inhalation delivery to achieve rapid and high availability of the drug in both blood and the brain. Following the intratracheal administration of the drug (4.0mg/kg) to the rats, the absolute bioavailability was found to be 91.2%, significantly higher than those from intranasal or peroral routes, and T(max) in plasma and brain was attained within 2 min, significantly shorter than the T(max) of intranasal ( approximately 10 min in both plasma and brain), subcutaneous (16.7 min in plasma and 22.5 min in brain) and peroral (30.0 min in plasma and 45.0 min in brain) administration. In addition, other pharmacokinetic parameters associated with rapid onset of action including AUC(plasma/brain) and C(max), of intratracheal instillated rizatriptan appeared also to be comparable or superior to those of other delivered routes. Although AUC(brain)/AUC(plasma) ratios after intranasal delivery (43.4%) differed significantly from the ratios shown after intratracheal instillation (23.2%), the AUC(brain 0-120 min) via the latter routes was slightly but not significantly higher than that from the former routes. The results in the present study indicated that pulmonary delivery of rizatriptan may achieve maximum plasma and brain concentrations significantly more rapidly compared with intranasal, subcutaneous and peroral administration and be a promising delivery method with extremely rapid onset of action in the pain relief of migraine. PMID:17267150

  18. Effects of methyl isocyanate on rat brain cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Anderson, D; Goyle, S; Phillips, B J; Tee, A; Beech, L; Butler, W H

    1990-09-01

    Since the disaster in Bhopal, India, people exposed to methyl isocyanate (MIC) have complained of various disorders including neuromuscular dysfunction. In an attempt to get information about such dysfunction we have previously shown that MIC can affect muscle cells in culture. The present communication reports investigations into the effect of MIC on brain cells in culture. MIC was toxic to brain cells and the response was dose related. The observations were supported by light and electron microscopy. PMID:2207030

  19. Kainic acid induces expression of caveolin-1 in activated microglia in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Shigeko; Matsuda, Wakoto; Tooyama, Ikuo; Yasuhara, Osamu

    2013-01-01

    Caveolin-1, a major constituent of caveolae, has been implicated in endocytosis, signal transduction and cholesterol transport in a wide variety of cells. In the present study, the expression of caveolin-1 was examined by immunohistochemistry in rat brain with or without systemic injection of kainic acid (KA). Caveolin-1 immunoreactivity was observed in capillary walls in brains of control rats. From one to seven days after KA injection, caveolin-1 immunoreactivity appeared in activated microglia in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and other brain regions. The strongest immunoreactivity of microglia was seen after 3 days after KA administration. The expression of caveolin-1 was confirmed by RT-PCR and Western blot analysis, respectively. The induction of caveolin-1 expression in microglia activated in response to kainic acid administration suggests its possible role in a modulation of inflammation. PMID:23690214

  20. Brain damage in a new hemorrhagic shock model in the rat using long-term recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Yamauchi, Y.; Kato, H.; Kogure, K. )

    1990-03-01

    A new shock model in the rat using hemorrhagic hypotension for production of brain damage is described. Hemorrhagic shock was induced by lowering arterial blood pressure with bleeding. The MABP was maintained at approximately 25 mm Hg, accompanied by isoelectric EEG, and then shed blood was retransfused. At 1 week of recovery, morphological and 45Ca autoradiographic changes were examined. No brain damage was observed in rats after 1 min of isoelectric EEG. Mild neuronal damage in the hippocampal CA1 subfield was seen in some animals after 2 min of isoelectric EEG. Severe and consistent neuronal loss in the hippocampal CA1 subfield was recognized after 3 min of isoelectric EEG. Additional damage was also seen in the dentate hilus and the thalamus in some animals. This model can be used to study the pathophysiology of postshock brain damage and to assess new therapies following shock.

  1. Inhibition of sterol but not fatty acid synthesis by valproate in developing rat brain in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Bolaños, J P; Medina, J M; Williamson, D H

    1990-01-01

    The effect of administration of valproate on lipogenesis in the developing rat brain in vivo was studied. Valproate inhibited by 21-38% the rate of 3H2O incorporation into brain sterols, without significantly affecting fatty acid synthesis. Similarly, R-[2-14C]mevalonate incorporation into sterols was inhibited by 33-54%; the low rate of fatty acid synthesis under these conditions was not affected by valproate. Plasma ketone bodies decreased after treatment with valproate. Valproate inhibited (about 50%) both sterol and fatty acid synthesis in livers of weanling rats. It is concluded that valproate can specifically inhibit sterol synthesis in the brain during development, in part at a stage after mevalonate formation, and also by decreased exogenous precursor supply. PMID:2264830

  2. A detailed viscoelastic characterization of the P17 and adult rat brain.

    PubMed

    Elkin, Benjamin S; Ilankovan, Ashok I; Morrison, Barclay

    2011-11-01

    Brain is a morphologically and mechanically heterogeneous organ. Although rat brain is commonly used as an experimental neurophysiological model for various in vivo biomechanical studies, little is known about its regional viscoelastic properties. To address this issue, we have generated viscoelastic mechanical property data for specific anatomical regions of the P17 and adult rat brain. These ages are commonly used in rat experimental models. We measured mechanical properties of both white and gray matter regions in coronal slices with a custom-designed microindentation device performing stress-relaxation indentations to 10% effective strain. Shear moduli calculated for short (100?ms), intermediate (1?sec), and long (20?sec) time points, ranged from ?1?kPa for short term moduli to ?0.4?kPa for long term moduli. Both age and anatomic region were significant factors affecting the time-dependent shear modulus. White matter regions and regions of the cerebellum were much more compliant than those of the hippocampus, cortex, and thalamus. Linear viscoelastic models (Prony series, continuous phase lag, and a power law model) were fit to the time-dependent shear modulus data. All models fit the data equally with no significant differences between them (F-test; p>0.05). The F-test was also used to statistically determine that a Prony series with three time-dependent parameters accurately fit the data with no added benefit from additional terms. The age- and region-dependent rat brain viscoelastic properties presented here will help inform future biomechanical models of the rat brain with specific and accurate regional mechanical property data. PMID:21341982

  3. Entry of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine into the rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Riachi, N.J.; LaManna, J.C.; Harik, S.I.

    1989-06-01

    We studied blood-to-brain entry of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+) and butanol in anesthetized rats using the indicator-fractionation method with right atrial bolus injection. Minimal amounts of MPP+, which has low octanol/water partition coefficient, crossed the blood-brain barrier. MPTP and butanol, both of which have high octanol/water partition coefficients, were almost completely extracted by all regions of the brain on the first pass. The main difference between the MPTP and butanol tracers is that butanol rapidly left the brain with an exponential rate constant of 1.24 min-1, whereas MPTP was avidly retained by the brain with a washout rate constant of 0.10 min-1 (mean values for the four brain regions that we studied). Early retention of MPTP by the brain was not due to its rapid metabolism by monoamine oxidase because pargyline pretreatment did not affect this rate constant. However, 30 min after (/sup 3/H)MPTP injection, brain retention of the 3H tracer was reduced significantly by pargyline treatment, and the ratio of brain MPTP/MPP+ was increased markedly.

  4. The influence of microwave radiation from cellular phone on fetal rat brain.

    PubMed

    Jing, Ji; Yuhua, Zhang; Xiao-qian, Yang; Rongping, Jiang; Dong-mei, Guo; Xi, Cui

    2012-03-01

    The increasing use of cellular phones in our society has brought focus on the potential detrimental effects to human health by microwave radiation. The aim of our study was to evaluate the intensity of oxidative stress and the level of neurotransmitters in the brains of fetal rats chronically exposed to cellular phones. The experiment was performed on pregnant rats exposed to different intensities of microwave radiation from cellular phones. Thirty-two pregnant rats were randomly divided into four groups: CG, GL, GM, and GH. CG accepted no microwave radiation, GL group radiated 10 min each time, GM group radiated 30 min, and GH group radiated 60 min. The 3 experimental groups were radiated 3 times a day from the first pregnant day for consecutively 20 days, and on the 21st day, the fetal rats were taken and then the contents of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), malondialdehyde (MDA), noradrenaline (NE), dopamine (DA), and 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid (5-HT) in the brain were assayed. Compared with CG, there were significant differences (P<0.05) found in the contents of SOD, GSH-Px, and MDA in GM and GH; the contents of SOD and GSH-Px decreased and the content of MDA increased. The significant content differences of NE and DA were found in fetal rat brains in GL and GH groups, with the GL group increased and the GH group decreased. Through this study, we concluded that receiving a certain period of microwave radiation from cellular phones during pregnancy has certain harm on fetal rat brains. PMID:22268709

  5. Gamma Knife Irradiation of Injured Sciatic Nerve Induces Histological and Behavioral Improvement in the Rat Neuropathic Pain Model

    PubMed Central

    Yagasaki, Yuki; Hayashi, Motohiro; Tamura, Noriko; Kawakami, Yoriko

    2013-01-01

    We examined the effects of gamma knife (GK) irradiation on injured nerves using a rat partial sciatic nerve ligation (PSL) model. GK irradiation was performed at one week after ligation and nerve preparations were made three weeks after ligation. GK irradiation is known to induce immune responses such as glial cell activation in the central nervous system. Thus, we determined the effects of GK irradiation on macrophages using immunoblot and histochemical analyses. Expression of Iba-1 protein, a macrophage marker, was further increased in GK-treated injured nerves as compared with non-irradiated injured nerves. Immunohistochemical study of Iba-1 in GK-irradiated injured sciatic nerves demonstrated Iba-1 positive macrophage accumulation to be enhanced in areas distal to the ligation point. In the same area, myelin debris was also more efficiently removed by GK-irradiation. Myelin debris clearance by macrophages is thought to contribute to a permissive environment for axon growth. In the immunoblot study, GK irradiation significantly increased expressions of βIII-tubulin protein and myelin protein zero, which are markers of axon regeneration and re-myelination, respectively. Toluidine blue staining revealed the re-myelinated fiber diameter to be larger at proximal sites and that the re-myelinated fiber number was increased at distal sites in GK-irradiated injured nerves as compared with non-irradiated injured nerves. These results suggest that GK irradiation of injured nerves facilitates regeneration and re-myelination. In a behavior study, early alleviation of allodynia was observed with GK irradiation in PSL rats. When GK-induced alleviation of allodynia was initially detected, the expression of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), a potent analgesic factor, was significantly increased by GK irradiation. These results suggested that GK irradiation alleviates allodynia via increased GDNF. This study provides novel evidence that GK irradiation of

  6. Mitochondrial decay in the brains of old rats: ameliorating effect of alpha-lipoic acid and acetyl-L-carnitine.

    PubMed

    Long, Jiangang; Gao, Feng; Tong, Liqi; Cotman, Carl W; Ames, Bruce N; Liu, Jiankang

    2009-04-01

    To investigate the mitochondrial decay and oxidative damage resulting from aging, the activities/kinetics of the mitochondrial complexes were examined in the brains of young and old rats as well as in old rats fed R-alpha-lipoic acid plus acetyl-L-carnitine (LA/ALC). The brain mitochondria of old rats, compared with young rats, had significantly decreased endogenous antioxidants and superoxide dismutase activity; more oxidative damage to lipids and proteins; and decreased activities of complex I, IV and V. Complex I showed a decrease in binding affinity (increase in K(m)) for substrates. Feeding LA/ALC to old rats partially restored age-associated mitochondrial dysfunction to the levels of the young rats. These results indicate that oxidative mitochondrial decay plays an important role in brain aging and that a combination of nutrients targeting mitochondria, such as LA/ALC, could ameliorate mitochondrial decay through preventing mitochondrial oxidative damage. PMID:18846423

  7. Mitochondrial Decay in the Brains of Old Rats: Ameliorating Effect of Alpha-Lipoic Acid and Acetyl-L-carnitine

    PubMed Central

    Long, Jiangang; Gao, Feng; Tong, Liqi; Cotman, Carl W.; Ames, Bruce N.

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the mitochondrial decay and oxidative damage resulting from aging, the activities/kinetics of the mitochondrial complexes were examined in the brains of young and old rats as well as in old rats fed R-α-lipoic acid plus acetyl-L-carnitine (LA/ALC). The brain mitochondria of old rats, compared with young rats, had significantly decreased endogenous antioxidants and superoxide dismutase activity; more oxidative damage to lipids and proteins; and decreased activities of complex I, IV and V. Complex I showed a decrease in binding affinity (increase in Km) for substrates. Feeding LA/ALC to old rats partially restored age-associated mitochondrial dysfunction to the levels of the young rats. These results indicate that oxidative mitochondrial decay plays an important role in brain aging and that a combination of nutrients targeting mitochondria, such as LA/ALC, could ameliorate mitochondrial decay through preventing mitochondrial oxidative damage. PMID:18846423

  8. Regional Distribution of Copper, Zinc and Iron in Brain of Wistar Rat Model for Non-Wilsonian Brain Copper Toxicosis.

    PubMed

    Pal, Amit; Prasad, Rajendra

    2016-03-01

    In previous studies, we have reported first in vivo evidence of copper deposition in the choroid plexus, cognitive impairments, astrocytes swelling (Alzheimer type II cells) and astrogliosis (increase in number of astrocytes), and degenerated neurons coupled with significant increase in the hippocampus copper and zinc content in copper-intoxicated Wistar rats. Nonetheless, hippocampus iron levels were not affected by chronic copper-intoxication. Notwithstanding information on distribution of copper, zinc and iron status in different regions of brain due to chronic copper exposure remains fragmentary. In continuation with our previous study, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of intraperitoneally injected copper lactate (0.15 mg Cu/100 g body weight) daily for 90 days on copper, zinc and iron levels in different regions of the brain using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Copper-intoxicated group showed significantly increased cortex, cerebellum and striatum copper content (76, 46.8 and 80.7 % increase, respectively) compared to control group. However, non-significant changes were observed for the zinc and iron content in cortex, cerebellum and striatum due to chronic copper exposure. In conclusion, the current study demonstrates that chronic copper toxicity causes differential copper buildup in cortex, cerebellum and striatum region of central nervous system of male Wistar rats; signifying the critical requirement to discretely evaluate the effect of copper neurotoxicity in different brain regions, and ensuing neuropathological and cognitive dysfunctions. PMID:26855494

  9. Cloning and expression of a rat brain. alpha. sub 2B -adrenergic receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Flordellis, C.S.; Handy, D.E.; Bresnahan, M.R.; Zannis, V.I.; Gavras, H. )

    1991-02-01

    The authors isolated a cDNA clone (RB{alpha}{sub 2B}) and its homologous gene (GR{alpha}{sub 2B}) encoding an {alpha}{sub 2B}-adrenergic receptor subtype by screening a rat brain cDNA and a rat genomic library. Nucleotide sequence analysis showed that both clones code for a protein of 458 amino acids, which is 87% homologous to the human kidney glycosylated adrenergic receptor ({alpha}{sub 2}-C4) and divergent from the rat kidney nonglycosylated {alpha}{sub 2B} subtype (RNG{alpha}{sub 2}). Transient expression of RB{alpha}{sub 2B} in COS-7 cells resulted in high-affinity saturable binding for ({sup 3}H)rauwolscine and a high receptor number in the membranes of transfected COS-7 cells. Pharmacological analysis demonstrated that the expressed receptor bound adrenergic ligands with the following order of potency: rauwolscine {gt} yohimbine {gt} prazosin {gt} oxymetazoline, with a prazosin-to-oxymetazoline K{sub i} ratio of 0.34. This profile is characteristic of the {alpha}{sub 2B}-adrenergic receptor subtype. Blotting analysis of rat brain mRNA gave one major and two minor mRNA species, and hybridization with strand-specific probes showed that both DNA strands of GR{alpha}{sub 2B} may be transcriptionally active. These findings show that rat brain expresses an {alpha}{sub 2B}-adrenergic receptor subtype that is structurally different from the rat kidney nonglycosylated {alpha}{sub 2B} subtype. Thus the rat expresses at least two divergent {alpha}{sub 2B}-adrenergic receptors.

  10. Adenosine transport systems on dissociated brain cells from mouse, guinea-pig, and rat

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, M.E.; Geiger, J.D. )

    1990-09-01

    The kinetics and sodium dependence of adenosine transport were determined using an inhibitor-stop method on dissociated cell body preparations obtained from mouse, guinea-pig and rat brain. Transport affinity (KT) values for the high affinity adenosine transport systems KT(H) were significantly different between these three species; mean +/- SEM values were 0.34 +/- 0.1 in mouse, 0.9 +/- 0.2 in rat, and 1.5 +/- 0.5 microM in guinea-pig. The KT values for the low affinity transport system KT(L) were not different between the three species. Brain cells from rat displayed a significantly greater maximal capacity to accumulate (3H)adenosine (Vmax) than did mouse or guinea-pig for the high affinity system, or than did mouse for the low affinity system. When sodium chloride was replaced in the transport medium with choline chloride, the KT(H) values for guinea-pig and rat were both increased by approximately 100%; only in rat did the change reach statistical significance. The sodium-dependence of adenosine transport in mouse brain was clearly absent. The differences between KT(H) values in mouse and those in guinea-pig or rat were accentuated in the absence of sodium. The differences in kinetic values, ionic requirements, and pharmacological characteristics between adenosine transporters in CNS tissues of mouse, guinea-pig and rat may help account for some of the variability noted among species in terms of their physiological responses to adenosine.

  11. Long-term follow-up for brain metastases treated by percutaneous stereotactic single high-dose irradiation.

    PubMed

    Engenhart, R; Kimmig, B N; Höver, K H; Wowra, B; Romahn, J; Lorenz, W J; van Kaick, G; Wannenmacher, M

    1993-02-15

    Surgery is considered the treatment of choice for solitary brain lesions, and radiation therapy is indicated for metastases only in vital or sensitive regions that cannot be excised without risk of disabling neurologic defects. In these cases, radiosurgery may be an alternative to conventionally fractionated radiation therapy. At the Heidelberg linear accelerator-based radiosurgery facility, 69 patients were treated for 102 inoperable brain metastases. The primary tumor sites included non-small cell lung carcinoma (n = 24), renal cell carcinoma (n = 14), melanoma (skin) (n = 14), colorectal carcinoma (n = 6), carcinoma of unknown primary (n = 4), and others (n = 7). Eleven patients were treated for relapse after surgery or after conventional whole-brain irradiation. The doses at the isocenter varied from 15-50 Gy (mean, 21.5 Gy). Ten patients with multiple metastases received a planned combination of whole-brain irradiation plus a single boost of 15 Gy. The median survival time for the entire group was 6 months, with a 1-year-survival of 28.3%. Factors associated with significant improvement of survival were brain metastases without other metastatic disease and good response to radiation therapy. Five of 22 patients (22.9%) with metastases located only in the brain survived longer than 2 years. An improvement in neurologic function was found in 81% within a period of 3 months. With imaging techniques, complete remission was found in 20%, partial remission in 35%, stable disease in 40%, and relapse in 5%. The authors concluded that radiosurgery is an effective and safe therapy for brain metastases. It can be applied as primary treatment, as boost in combination with whole-brain irradiation, or as treatment for patients with relapse in a previously irradiated field. PMID:8435811

  12. Radiation-Induced Oxidative Stress at Out-of-Field Lung Tissues after Pelvis Irradiation in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Najafi, Masoud; Fardid, Reza; Takhshid, Mohammad Ali; Mosleh-Shirazi, Mohammad Amin; Rezaeyan, Abol-Hassan; Salajegheh, Ashkan

    2016-01-01

    Objective The out-of-field/non-target effect is one of the most important phenomena of ionizing radiation that leads to molecular and cellular damage to distant non-irradiated tissues. The most important concern about this phenomenon is carcinogenesis many years after radiation treatment. In vivo mechanisms and consequences of this phenomenon are not known completely. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the oxidative damages to out-of-field lung tissues 24 and 72 hours after pelvic irradiation in rats. Materials and Methods In this experimentalinterventional study, Sprague-Dawleymale rats (n=49) were divided into seven groups (n=7/each group), including two groups of pelvis- exposed rats (out-of-field groups), two groups of whole bodyexposed rats (scatter groups), two groups of lung-exposed rats (direct irradiation groups), and one control sham group. Out- of-field groups were irradiated at a 2×2 cm area in the pelvis region with 3 Gy using 1.25 MeV cobalt-60 gamma-ray source, and subsequently, malondialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione (GSH) levels as well as superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in out-of-field lung tissues were measured. Results were compared to direct irradiation, control and scatter groups at 24 and 72 hours after exposure. Data were analyzed using Mann-Whitney U test. Results SOD activity decreased in out-of-field lung tissue 24 and 72 hours after irradiation as compared with the controls and scatter groups. GSH level decreased 24 hours after exposure and increased 72 hours after exposure in the out-of-field groups as compared with the scatter groups. MDA level in out-of-field groups only increased 24 hours after irradiation. Conclusion Pelvis irradiation induced oxidative damage in distant lung tissue that led to a dramatic decrease in SOD activity. This oxidative stress was remarkable, but it was less durable as compared to direct irradiation. PMID:27602315

  13. Transmission of a Filterable Agent from Rat Leukaemia Induced by X-Ray Irradiation and Treatment with Methylcholanthrene

    SciTech Connect

    Sveg, F.; Hlavay, E.

    2004-07-01

    Leukemia was induced in rats by combination of x irradiation and oral application of methylcholanthrene. The rats were irradiated by a single dose of 800 r, and methylcholanthrene was applied 3 times a week by stomach tube in a dose of 1 mg for 9 months. From 60 rats, myelogenous leukemia developed in 2 and lymphatic leukemia in 1. The myelobiastic leukemia proved to be transplantable and was maintained as MR-leukemia. After irtravenous injection of 1 to 10 x 10/ sup 6/ leukemic cells, obtained from the liver and spleen, the disease developed in adult rats in 6 to 10 days. As early as the 2nd or 3rd day after inoculation, leukemic infiltration of organs, especially liver and spleen, were seen. The rats died exhibiting signs of generalized leukemia within 10 days. If cell-free filtrates from the liver and spleen of rats bearing MR leukemia were injected into newborn and 4-week-old rats, myelogenous leukemia developed in the newborn group in 24% after a latency period of 520 days and in 33% of the 4-week-old group after 570 days, on an average. The induced leukemias were transplantable into both suckling and adult rats. Many of the injected animals, which did not develop leukemia, died of cirrhosis of the liver. The results suggest that the leukemia induced by irradiation and chemical carcinogen might be caused by a submicroscopic virus-like agent.

  14. Microvesicles from brain-extract-treated mesenchymal stem cells improve neurological functions in a rat model of ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Yong; Kim, Eiru; Choi, Seong-Mi; Kim, Dong-Wook; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Lee, Insuk; Kim, Han-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) was reported to improve functional outcomes in a rat model of ischemic stroke, and subsequent studies suggest that MSC-derived microvesicles (MVs) can replace the beneficial effects of MSCs. Here, we evaluated three different MSC-derived MVs, including MVs from untreated MSCs (MSC-MVs), MVs from MSCs treated with normal rat brain extract (NBE-MSC-MVs), and MVs from MSCs treated with stroke-injured rat brain extract (SBE-MSC-MVs), and tested their effects on ischemic brain injury induced by permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO) in rats. NBE-MSC-MVs and SBE-MSC-MVs had significantly greater efficacy than MSC-MVs for ameliorating ischemic brain injury with improved functional recovery. We found similar profiles of key signalling proteins in NBE-MSC-MVs and SBE-MSC-MVs, which account for their similar therapeutic efficacies. Immunohistochemical analyses suggest that brain-extract-treated MSC-MVs reduce inflammation, enhance angiogenesis, and increase endogenous neurogenesis in the rat brain. We performed mass spectrometry proteomic analyses and found that the total proteomes of brain-extract-treated MSC-MVs are highly enriched for known vesicular proteins. Notably, MSC-MV proteins upregulated by brain extracts tend to be modular for tissue repair pathways. We suggest that MSC-MV proteins stimulated by the brain microenvironment are paracrine effectors that enhance MSC therapy for stroke injury. PMID:27609711

  15. Microvesicles from brain-extract—treated mesenchymal stem cells improve neurological functions in a rat model of ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Yong; Kim, Eiru; Choi, Seong-Mi; Kim, Dong-Wook; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Lee, Insuk; Kim, Han-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) was reported to improve functional outcomes in a rat model of ischemic stroke, and subsequent studies suggest that MSC-derived microvesicles (MVs) can replace the beneficial effects of MSCs. Here, we evaluated three different MSC-derived MVs, including MVs from untreated MSCs (MSC-MVs), MVs from MSCs treated with normal rat brain extract (NBE-MSC-MVs), and MVs from MSCs treated with stroke-injured rat brain extract (SBE-MSC-MVs), and tested their effects on ischemic brain injury induced by permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO) in rats. NBE-MSC-MVs and SBE-MSC-MVs had significantly greater efficacy than MSC-MVs for ameliorating ischemic brain injury with improved functional recovery. We found similar profiles of key signalling proteins in NBE-MSC-MVs and SBE-MSC-MVs, which account for their similar therapeutic efficacies. Immunohistochemical analyses suggest that brain-extract—treated MSC-MVs reduce inflammation, enhance angiogenesis, and increase endogenous neurogenesis in the rat brain. We performed mass spectrometry proteomic analyses and found that the total proteomes of brain-extract—treated MSC-MVs are highly enriched for known vesicular proteins. Notably, MSC-MV proteins upregulated by brain extracts tend to be modular for tissue repair pathways. We suggest that MSC-MV proteins stimulated by the brain microenvironment are paracrine effectors that enhance MSC therapy for stroke injury. PMID:27609711

  16. Development of peptidergic systems in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Swaab, D F; Ter Borg, J P

    1981-01-01

    The brain contains a large variety and number of peptides some of which were known earlier as hypothalamic hormones (vasopressin, oxytocin, luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone, thyrotropin-releasing hormone, somatostatin) or as pituitary hormones (the family of opiomelanocortins), while others, not primarily known as hypothalamic or pituitary hormones, may also have endocrine effects (substance P, angiotensin II, neurotensin, bombesin, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), gastrin-cholecystokinin, glucagon, carnosine, bradykinin). These peptides, which form a new class of putative neurotransmitters, are present early in brain development and show important sex differences in both their pattern of innervation and their effects. Their peripheral effects may include intrauterine growth of the placenta and fetus, the timing of birth, acceleration of the course of labour and responses to haemorrhage (redistribution of cardiac output and stimulation of blood cell formation). Endogenous peptides are probably involved in brain development, which may explain their general, permanent and sex-dependent effects when given in the period of rapid brain development. Although peptides might in the future be useful for stimulating recovery from retarded brain development, at present one should be aware of the potential dangers of their use in, for example, obstetrics. PMID:6279364

  17. In vivo and in vitro assessment of brain bioenergetics in aging rats

    PubMed Central

    Vančová, Ol’ga; Bačiak, Ladislav; Kašparová, Svatava; Kucharská, Jarmila; Palacios, Hector H; Horecký, Jaromír; Aliev, Gjumrakch

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Brain energy disorders can be present in aged men and animals. To this respect, the mitochondrial and free radical theory of aging postulates that age-associated brain energy disorders are caused by an imbalance between pro- and anti-oxidants that can result in oxidative stress. Our study was designed to investigate brain energy metabolism and the activity of endogenous antioxidants during their lifespan in male Wistar rats. In vivo brain bioenergetics were measured using 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and in vitro by polarographic analysis of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. When compared to the young controls, a significant decrease of age-dependent mitochondrial respiration and adenosine-3-phosphate (ATP) production measured in vitro correlated with significant reduction of forward creatine kinase reaction (kfor) and with an increase in phosphocreatine (PCr)/ATP, PCr/Pi and PME/ATP ratio measured in vivo. The levels of enzymatic antioxidants catalase, GPx and GST significantly decreased in the brain tissue as well as in the peripheral blood of aged rats. We suppose that mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative inactivation of endogenous enzymes may participate in age-related disorders of brain energy metabolism. PMID:19906014

  18. Application of intracerebral microdialysis to study regional distribution kinetics of drugs in rat brain.

    PubMed

    de Lange, E C; Bouw, M R; Mandema, J W; Danhof, M; de Boer, A G; Breimer, D D

    1995-11-01

    1. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether intracerebral microdialysis can be used for the assessment of local differences in drug concentrations within the brain. 2. Two transversal microdialysis probes were implanted in parallel into the frontal cortex of male Wistar rats, and used as a local infusion and detection device respectively. Within one rat, three different concentrations of atenolol or acetaminophen were infused in randomized order. By means of the detection probe, concentration-time profiles of the drug in the brain were measured at interprobe distances between 1 and 2 mm. 3. Drug concentrations were found to be dependent on the drug as well as on the interprobe distance. It was found that the outflow concentration from the detection probe decreased with increasing lateral spacing between the probes and this decay was much steeper for acetaminophen than for atenolol. A model was developed which allows estimation of kbp/Deff (transfer coefficient from brain to blood/effective diffusion coefficient in brain extracellular fluid), which was considerably larger for the more lipohilic drug, acetaminophen. In addition, in vivo recovery values for both drugs were determined. 4. The results show that intracerebral microdialysis is able to detect local differences in drug concentrations following infusion into the brain. Furthermore, the potential use of intracerebral microdialysis to obtain pharmacokinetic parameters of drug distribution in brain by means of monitoring local concentrations of drugs in time is demonstrated. PMID:8581296

  19. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling to investigate regional brain distribution kinetics in rats.

    PubMed

    Westerhout, Joost; Ploeger, Bart; Smeets, Jean; Danhof, Meindert; de Lange, Elizabeth C M

    2012-09-01

    One of the major challenges in the development of central nervous system (CNS)-targeted drugs is predicting CNS exposure in human from preclinical data. In this study, we present a methodology to investigate brain disposition in rats using a physiologically based modeling approach aiming at improving the prediction of human brain exposure. We specifically focused on quantifying regional diffusion and fluid flow processes within the brain. Acetaminophen was used as a test compound as it is not subjected to active transport processes. Microdialysis probes were implanted in striatum, for sampling brain extracellular fluid (ECF) concentrations, and in lateral ventricle (LV) and cisterna magna (CM), for sampling cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations. Serial blood samples were taken in parallel. These data, in addition to physiological parameters from literature, were used to develop a physiologically based model to describe the regional brain pharmacokinetics of acetaminophen. The concentration-time profiles of brain ECF, CSF(LV), and CSF(CM) indicate a rapid equilibrium with plasma. However, brain ECF concentrations are on average fourfold higher than CSF concentrations, with average brain-to-plasma AUC(0-240) ratios of 121%, 28%, and 35% for brain ECF, CSF(LV), and CSF(CM), respectively. It is concluded that for acetaminophen, a model compound for passive transport into, within, and out of the brain, differences exist between the brain ECF and the CSF pharmacokinetics. The physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling approach is important, as it allowed the prediction of human brain ECF exposure on the basis of human CSF concentrations. PMID:22588644

  20. Pulmonary endothelial dysfunction induced by unilateral as compared to bilateral thoracic irradiation in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, W.F.; Molteni, A.; Ts'Ao, C.H.; Solliday, N.H.

    1987-07-01

    Rats were sacrificed 2 months after a single dose of 10-30 Gy of /sup 60/Co gamma rays delivered to either a right unilateral or a bilateral thoracic port. Four indices of lung endothelial function were measured: the activities of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and plasminogen activator (PLA) and the production of prostacyclin (PGI2) and thromboxane (TXA2). The number of macrophages recovered by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and the degree of right ventricular hypertrophy (an index of pulmonary hypertension) also were determined. Right lung ACE and PLA activity decreased linearly, and PGI2 and TXA2 production increased linearly with increasing radiation dose. The response curves for right unilateral and bilateral thoracic irradiation were not significantly different. In contrast, bilateral irradiation was more toxic than unilateral, since rats exposed to the former exhibited decreased body weight, an increased incidence of pleural effusions, an increase in the number of macrophages recovered by BAL, and right ventricular hypertrophy. These data demonstrate that pulmonary endothelial dysfunction induced by hemithorax irradiation represents a direct response of the endothelium to radiation injury and is not secondary to other phenomena such as shunting of function to the shielded lung.

  1. Role of the bradykinin B2 receptor in a rat model of local heart irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Lieblong, Benjamin J.; Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Srivastava, Anup K.; Moros, Eduardo G.; Sharma, Sunil K.; Boerma, Marjan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD) is a delayed effect of radiotherapy for cancers of the chest, such as breast, esophageal, and lung. Kinins are small peptides with cardioprotective properties. We previously used a rat model that lacks the precursor kininogen to demonstrate that kinins are involved in RIHD. Here, we examined the role of the kinin B2 receptor (B2R) in early radiation-induced signaling in the heart. Materials and methods Male Brown Norway rats received the B2R-selective antagonist HOE-140 (icatibant) via osmotic minipump from 5 days before until 4 weeks after 21 Gy local heart irradiation. At 4 weeks, signaling events were measured in left ventricular homogenates and nuclear extracts using western blotting and real-time polymerase chain reaction. Numbers of CD68-positive (monocytes/macrophages), CD2-positive (T-lymphocytes), and mast cells were measured using immunohistochemistry. Results Radiation-induced c-Jun phosphorylation and nuclear translocation were enhanced by HOE-140. HOE-140 did not modify endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation or alter numbers of CD2-positive or mast cells, but enhanced CD68-positive cell counts in irradiated hearts. Conclusions B2R signaling may regulate monocyte/macrophage infiltration and c-Jun signals in the irradiated heart. Although eNOS is a main target for kinins, the B2R may not regulate eNOS phosphorylation in response to radiation. PMID:25955317

  2. Induction of tolerance to cardiac allografts in lethally irradiated rats reconstituted with syngeneic bone marrow

    SciTech Connect

    Hartnett, L.C.

    1983-01-01

    Generally, organ grafts from one individual animal to another are rejected in one-two weeks. However, if the recipients are given Total Body Irradiation (TBI) just prior to grafting, followed by reconstitution of hemopoietic function with syngeneic (recipient-type) bone marrow cells, then vascularized organ grafts are permanently accepted. Initially after irradiation, it is possible to induce tolerance to many strain combinations in rats. This thesis examines the system of TBI as applied to the induction of tolerance in LEW recipients of WF cardiac allografts. These two rat strains are mismatched across the entire major histocompatibility complex. When the LEW recipient are given 860 rads, a WF cardiac allograft and LEW bone marrow on the same day, 60% of the grafts are accepted. Methods employed to improve the rate of graft acceptance include: treating either donor or recipient with small amounts of methotrexate, or waiting until two days after irradiation to repopulate with bone marrow. It seems from these investigations of some of the early events in the induction of tolerance to allografts following TBI and syngeneic marrow reconstitution that an immature cell population in the bone marrow interacts with a radioresistant cell population in the spleen to produce tolerance to completely MHC-mismatched allografts.

  3. Delivery of large molecules via poly(butyl cyanoacrylate) nanoparticles into the injured rat brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yong; Pan, Yaohua; Shi, Yinfeng; Huang, Xianjian; Jia, Nengqin; Jiang, Ji-yao

    2012-04-01

    Poly(n-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate) (PBCA) nanoparticles have been successfully applied to deliver small-molecule drugs to the central nervous system (CNS). However, it is unclear whether PBCA nanoparticles can be used as the delivery system for large molecules to potentially treat traumatic brain injury (TBI). In this study, we tested the capacity of PBCA nanoparticles in passing through the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and transporting large molecules into normal and injured brains in the rat. We first synthesized PBCA nanoparticles by dispersion polymerization and then loaded the particles with either horseradish peroxidase (HRP, 44 kDa) or enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP, 29 kDa), which were further coated with polysorbate 80. Next, the polysorbate 80-coated HRP or EGFP-loaded PBCA nanoparticles were intravenously injected into the normal and brain-injured rats. We found that, at 45 min after injection, PBCA nanoparticle-delivered HRP or EGFP was hardly detected in the normal brains of the rats, but a small amount of EGFP carried by PBCA nanoparticles was noted in the normal brains 48 h after administration, which was further confirmed by immunolocalization with anti-EGFP antibodies. In contrast, at 4 h after TBI with a circulation time of 45 min, although the penetration of HRP or EGFP alone was hampered by the BBB, the PBCA nanoparticle-delivered HRP or EGFP was widely distributed near injured sites. Together, our findings provide histological evidence that PBCA nanoparticles can be used as an efficient delivery system for large molecules to overcome the barrier in the brain with TBI.

  4. Aluminum overload increases oxidative stress in four functional brain areas of neonatal rats

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Higher aluminum (Al) content in infant formula and its effects on neonatal brain development are a cause for concern. This study aimed to evaluate the distribution and concentration of Al in neonatal rat brain following Al treatment, and oxidative stress in brain tissues induced by Al overload. Methods Postnatal day 3 (PND 3) rat pups (n =46) received intraperitoneal injection of aluminum chloride (AlCl3), at dosages of 0, 7, and 35 mg/kg body wt (control, low Al (LA), and high Al (HA), respectively), over 14 d. Results Aluminum concentrations were significantly higher in the hippocampus (751.0 ± 225.8 ng/g v.s. 294.9 ± 180.8 ng/g; p < 0.05), diencephalon (79.6 ± 20.7 ng/g v.s. 20.4 ± 9.6 ng/g; p < 0.05), and cerebellum (144.8 ± 36.2 ng/g v.s. 83.1 ± 15.2 ng/g; p < 0.05) in the HA group compared to the control. The hippocampus, diencephalon, cerebellum, and brain stem of HA animals displayed significantly higher levels of lipid peroxidative products (TBARS) than the same regions in the controls. However, the average superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, cerebellum, and brain stem were lower in the HA group compared to the control. The HA animals demonstrated increased catalase activity in the diencephalon, and increased glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, cerebellum, and brain stem, compared to controls. Conclusion Aluminum overload increases oxidative stress (H2O2) in the hippocampus, diencephalon, cerebellum, and brain stem in neonatal rats. PMID:22613782

  5. Multidimensional MRI-CT atlas of the naked mole-rat brain (Heterocephalus glaber).

    PubMed

    Seki, Fumiko; Hikishima, Keigo; Nambu, Sanae; Okanoya, Kazuo; Okano, Hirotaka J; Sasaki, Erika; Miura, Kyoko; Okano, Hideyuki

    2013-01-01

    Naked mole-rats have a variety of distinctive features such as the organization of a hierarchical society (known as eusociality), extraordinary longevity, and cancer resistance; thus, it would be worthwhile investigating these animals in detail. One important task is the preparation of a brain atlas database that provide comprehensive information containing multidimensional data with various image contrasts, which can be achievable using a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Advanced MRI techniques such as diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), which generates high contrast images of fiber structures, can characterize unique morphological properties in addition to conventional MRI. To obtain high spatial resolution images, MR histology, DTI, and X-ray computed tomography were performed on the fixed adult brain. Skull and brain structures were segmented as well as reconstructed in stereotaxic coordinates. Data were also acquired for the neonatal brain to allow developmental changes to be observed. Moreover, in vivo imaging of naked mole-rats was established as an evaluation tool of live animals. The data obtained comprised three-dimensional (3D) images with high tissue contrast as well as stereotaxic coordinates. Developmental differences in the visual system were highlighted in particular by DTI. Although it was difficult to delineate optic nerves in the mature adult brain, parts of them could be distinguished in the immature neonatal brain. From observation of cortical thickness, possibility of high somatosensory system development replaced to the visual system was indicated. 3D visualization of brain structures in the atlas as well as the establishment of in vivo imaging would promote neuroimaging researches towards detection of novel characteristics of eusocial naked mole-rats. PMID:24391551

  6. Longitudinal measurements of postnatal rat brain mechanical properties in-vivo.

    PubMed

    Pong, Alice C; Jugé, Lauriane; Cheng, Shaokoon; Bilston, Lynne E

    2016-06-14

    Information on pediatric brain tissue mechanical properties and, more pertinently, how they change during postnatal development remains scarce despite its importance to investigate mechanisms of neural injury. The aim of this study is to determine whether brain mechanical properties change in-vivo during early postnatal development in a rat model. Rat brain viscoelastic properties were measured longitudinally in ten healthy Sprague Dawley rats at five different time points from postnatal week one to week six using magnetic resonance elastography at 800Hz. Myelination and cell density were assessed histologically at the same time points to understand how the underlying tissue microstructure may be associated with changes in mechanical properties at different brain regions. Longitudinal changes in each variable were assessed using a generalized linear model with pairwise comparisons of means between weeks. The brain shear modulus in the cortical gray matter at postnatal week one was 6.3±0.4kPa, and increased significantly from week one to week two (pairwise comparison, p<0.01), remained stable from week two to week four and decreased significantly by week six (pairwise comparison, p<0.001). In the deep gray matter, brain tissue stiffness at postnatal week one was 6.1±2.0kPa, and increased significantly from one to week four (pairwise comparison, p<0.05) before decreasing significantly by week six (pairwise comparison, p<0.001). Stiffness changes were not directly correlated to histological observations. These data suggest that brain tissue shear modulus initially increases during a period equivalent to early childhood, and then decreases during a period equivalent to adolescence. PMID:27126986

  7. Radiation response of the rat cervical spinal cord after irradiation at different ages: Tolerance, latency and pathology

    SciTech Connect

    Ruifrok, A.C.C.; Van Der Kogel, A.J. ); Stephens, L.C. )

    1994-04-30

    Investigation of the age dependent single-dose radiation tolerance, latency to radiation myelopathy, and the histopathological changes after irradiation of the rat cervical spinal cord is presented. Rats were irradiated with graded single doses of 4 MV photons to the cervical spinal cord. When the rats showed definite signs of paresis of the forelegs, they were killed and processed for histological examination. The radiation dose resulting in paresis due to white matter damage in 50% of the animals (ED[sub 50]) after single dose irradiation was about 21.5 Gy at all ages [ge] 2 weeks. Only the Ed[sub 50] at 1 week was significantly lower. The latency to the development of paresis clearly changed with the age at irradiation, from about 2 weeks after irradiation at 1 week to 6-8 months after irradiation at age [ge] 8 weeks. The white matter damage was similar in all symptomatic animals studied. The most prominent were areas with diffuse demyelination and swollen axons, often with focal necrosis, accompanied by glial reaction. This was observed in all symptomatic animals, irrespective of the age at irradiation. Expression of vascular damage appeared to depend on the age at irradiation. Although the latency to myelopathy is clearly age dependent, single dose tolerance is not age dependent at age [ge] 2 weeks in the rat cervical spinal cord. The white matter damage is similar in all symptomatic animals studied, but the vasculopathies appear to be influenced by the age at irradiation. It is concluded that white matter damage and vascular damage are separate phenomena contributing to the development of radiation myelopathy, expression of which may depend on the radiation dose applied and the age at irradiation. 28 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Valine entry into rat brain after diet-induced changes in plasma amino acids

    SciTech Connect

    Tews, J.K.; Greenwood, J.; Pratt, O.E.; Harper, A.E.

    1987-01-01

    Passage of amino acids across the blood-brain barrier is assumed to be modified by amino acid composition of the blood. To gain a better understanding of the effects of protein intake on brain amino acid uptake, the authors examined associations among diet, plasma amino acid patterns, and the rate of entry of valine into the brain. Rats were fed diets containing 6, 18, or 50% casein before receiving one meal of a diet containing 0, 6, 18, or 50% casein. After 4-7 h, they were anesthetized and infused intravenously with (/sup 14/C)valine for 5 min before plasma and brain samples were taken for determination of radioactivity and content of individual amino acids. As protein content of the meal was increased from 0 to 50% casein, plasma and brain concentrations of valine and most other large neutral amino acid (LNAA) increased severalfold; also the ratio of (/sup 14/C)valine in brain to that in plasma decreased by >50%, and the rate of valine entry into the brain increased 3.5-fold. The increase in valine flux slowed as plasma levels of LNAA, competitors for valine transport, increased. The results were far more dependent on protein content of the final meal than on that of the adaptation diet; thus changes in protein intake, as reflected in altered plasma amino acid patterns, markedly altered valine entry into the brain.

  9. The androgen-binding protein gene is expressed in male and female rat brain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y M; Bayliss, D A; Millhorn, D E; Petrusz, P; Joseph, D R

    1990-12-01

    Extracellular androgen-binding proteins (ABP) are thought to modulate the regulatory functions of androgens and the trans-acting nuclear androgen receptor. Testicular ABP and plasma sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), which is produced in liver, are encoded by the same gene. We have now found that the ABP-SHBG gene is also expressed in male and female rat brain. Immunoreactive ABP was found to be present in neuronal cell bodies throughout the brain as well as in fibers of the hypothalamic median eminence. The highest concentrations of immunoreactive cell bodies were located in the supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei. Likewise, ABP mRNA was present in all brain regions examined. Analysis of cDNA clones representing brain ABP mRNAs revealed amino acid sequence differences in brain and testicular ABPs. The protein encoded by an alternatively processed RNA has sequence characteristics suggesting that the protein could act as a competitior of ABP binding to cell surface receptors. These data and gene-sequencing experiments indicate that a specific ABP gene promoter is used for transcription initiation in brain. ABP may function in brain as an androgen carrier protein; however, in view of the widespread presence of ABP and ABP mRNA in brain, the protein may have a much broader, yet unknown, function. PMID:1701136

  10. Astragaloside IV Alleviates Early Brain Injury Following Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Anwen; Guo, Songxue; Tu, Sheng; Ammar, Al-baadani; Tang, Junjia; Hong, Yuan; Wu, Haijian; Zhang, Jianmin

    2014-01-01

    Astragaloside IV, one of the main effective components isolated from Astragalus membranaceus, has multiple neuroprotective properties, while the effects of astragaloside IV on the attenuation of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH)-induced early brain injury (EBI) and its possible mechanisms are unknown. In the present study, we aimed to determine whether astragaloside IV could inhibit oxidative stress, reduce neuronal apoptosis, and improve neurological deficits after experimental SAH in rats. Rats (n=68) were randomly divided into the following groups: Sham group, SAH group, SAH+vehicle group, and SAH+astragaloside IV group. Astragaloside IV or an equal volume of vehicle was administered at 1 h and 6 h after SAH, all the rats were subsequently sacrificed at 24 h after SAH. Mortality, neurological scores, and brain edema were assessed, biochemical tests and histological studies were also performed at that point. SAH induced an increase in the malondialdehyde (MDA) level, neuronal apoptosis, cleaved caspase 3, brain edema and decreased activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px). Astragaloside IV treatment reversed these changes and improved neurobehavioral outcomes of SAH rats. Our findings suggested that astragaloside IV may alleviate EBI after SAH through antioxidative and anti-apoptotic effects. PMID:25136262

  11. Curcumin Mediated Attenuation of Carbofuran Induced Oxidative Stress in Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Jaiswal, Sunil Kumar; Sharma, Ashish; Gupta, Vivek Kumar; Singh, Rakesh Kumar; Sharma, Bechan

    2016-01-01

    The indiscriminate use of carbofuran to improve crop productivity causes adverse effects in nontargets including mammalian systems. The objective of this study was to evaluate carbofuran induced oxidative stress in rat brain stem and its attenuation by curcumin, a herbal product. Out of 6 groups of rats, 2 groups received two different doses of carbofuran, that is, 15 and 30% of LD50, respectively, for 30 days. Out of these, 2 groups receiving same doses of carbofuran were pretreated with curcumin (100 mg/kg body weight). The levels of antioxidants, TBARS, GSH, SOD, catalase, and GST were determined in rat brain stem. The 2 remaining groups served as placebo and curcumin treated, respectively. The data suggested that carbofuran at different doses caused significant alterations in the levels of TBARS and GSH in dose dependent manner. The TBARS and GSH contents were elevated. The activities of SOD, catalase, and GST were significantly inhibited at both doses of carbofuran. The ratio of P/A was also found to be sharply increased. The pretreatment of curcumin exhibited significant protection from carbofuran induced toxicity. The results suggested that carbofuran at sublethal doses was able to induce oxidative stress in rat brain which could be attenuated by curcumin. PMID:27213055

  12. Melanin-concentrating hormone: unique peptide neuronal systems in the rat brain and pituitary gland

    SciTech Connect

    Zamir, N.; Skofitsch, G.; Bannon, M.J.; Jacobowitz, D.M.

    1986-03-01

    A unique neuronal system was detected in the rat central nervous system by immunohistochemistry and radioimmunoassay with antibodies to salmon melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH). MCH-like immunoreactive (MCH-LI) cell bodies were confined to the hypothalamus. MCH-LI fibers were found throughout the brain but were most prevalent in hypothalamus, mesencephalon, and pons-medulla regions. High concentrations of MCH-LI were measured in the hypothalamic medial forebrain bundle (MFB), posterior hypothalamic nucleus, and nucleus of the diagonal band. Reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography of MFB extracts from rat brain indicate that MCH-like peptide from the rat has a different retention time than that of the salmon MCH. An osmotic stimuls (2% NaCl as drinking water for 120 hr) caused a marked increase in MCH-LI concentrations in the lateral hypothalamus and neurointermediate lobe. The present studies establish the presence of MCH-like peptide in the rat brain. The MCH-LI neuronal system is well situated to coordinate complex functions such as regulation of water intake.

  13. Quantitative autoradiographic assessment of sup 55 Fe-RBC distribution in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, S.Z.; Nakata, H.; Tajima, A.; Gruber, K.; Acuff, V.; Patlak, C.; Fenstermacher, J. )

    1990-11-01

    A simple in vivo technique of labeling erythrocytes (RBCs) with {sup 55}Fe was developed for quantitative autoradiography (QAR). This procedure involved injecting 5-6 ml of ({sup 55}Fe)ferrous citrate solution (1 mCi/ml) intraperitoneally into donor rats. The number of labeled RBCs reached a maximum at around 7 days and declined very slowly thereafter. Labeled RBCs were harvested from donor rats and used for RBC volume measurement in awake rats. Brain radioactivity was assayed by QAR, which yielded spatial resolution of greater than 50 microns. Tight nearly irreversible binding of {sup 55}Fe to RBCs was found in vivo and in vitro. More than 99.5% of the {sup 55}Fe in the blood of donor rats was bound to RBCs. Because of this, labeled blood can be taken from donors and injected into recipients without further preparation. The tissue absorption of {sup 55}Fe emissions was the same in gray and white matter. Microvascular RBC volumes measured with {sup 55}Fe-labeled RBCs agreed with those assayed with {sup 51}Cr-labeled RBCs for many, but not all, brain areas. In conclusion, {sup 55}Fe-RBCs can be readily prepared by this technique and accurately quantitated in brain tissue by QAR.

  14. Curcumin Mediated Attenuation of Carbofuran Induced Oxidative Stress in Rat Brain.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Sunil Kumar; Sharma, Ashish; Gupta, Vivek Kumar; Singh, Rakesh Kumar; Sharma, Bechan

    2016-01-01

    The indiscriminate use of carbofuran to improve crop productivity causes adverse effects in nontargets including mammalian systems. The objective of this study was to evaluate carbofuran induced oxidative stress in rat brain stem and its attenuation by curcumin, a herbal product. Out of 6 groups of rats, 2 groups received two different doses of carbofuran, that is, 15 and 30% of LD50, respectively, for 30 days. Out of these, 2 groups receiving same doses of carbofuran were pretreated with curcumin (100 mg/kg body weight). The levels of antioxidants, TBARS, GSH, SOD, catalase, and GST were determined in rat brain stem. The 2 remaining groups served as placebo and curcumin treated, respectively. The data suggested that carbofuran at different doses caused significant alterations in the levels of TBARS and GSH in dose dependent manner. The TBARS and GSH contents were elevated. The activities of SOD, catalase, and GST were significantly inhibited at both doses of carbofuran. The ratio of P/A was also found to be sharply increased. The pretreatment of curcumin exhibited significant protection from carbofuran induced toxicity. The results suggested that carbofuran at sublethal doses was able to induce oxidative stress in rat brain which could be attenuated by curcumin. PMID:27213055

  15. A Multidimensional Magnetic Resonance Histology Atlas of the Wistar Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, G. Allan; Calabrese, Evan; Badea, Alexandra; Paxinos, George; Watson, Charles

    2012-01-01

    We have produced a multidimensional atlas of the adult Wistar rat brain based on magnetic resonance histology (MRH). This MR atlas has been carefully aligned with the widely used Paxinos-Watson atlas based on optical sections to allow comparisons between histochemical and immuno-marker data, and the use of the Paxinos-Watson abbreviation set. Our MR atlas attempts to make a seamless connection with the advantageous features of the Paxinos-Watson atlas, and to extend the utility of the data through the unique capabilities of MR histology: a) ability to view the brain in the skull with limited distortion from shrinkage or sectioning; b) isotropic spatial resolution, which permits sectioning along any arbitrary axis without loss of detail; c) three-dimensional (3D) images preserving spatial relationships; and d) widely varied contrast dependent on the unique properties of water protons. 3D diffusion tensor images (DTI) at what we believe to be the highest resolution ever attained in the rat provide unique insight into white matter structures and connectivity. The 3D isotropic data allow registration of multiple data sets into a common reference space to provide average atlases not possible with conventional histology. The resulting multidimensional atlas that combines Paxinos-Watson with multidimensional MRH images from multiple specimens provides a new, comprehensive view of the neuroanatomy of the rat and offers a collaborative platform for future rat brain studies. PMID:22634863

  16. Rifaximin, but not growth factor 1, reduces brain edema in cirrhotic rats

    PubMed Central

    Òdena, Gemma; Miquel, Mireia; Serafín, Anna; Galan, Amparo; Morillas, Rosa; Planas, Ramon; Bartolí, Ramon

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To compare rifaximin and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 treatment of hyperammonemia and brain edema in cirrhotic rats with portal occlusion. METHODS: Rats with CCl4-induced cirrhosis with ascites plus portal vein occlusion and controls were randomized into six groups: Cirrhosis; Cirrhosis + IGF-1; Cirrhosis + rifaximin; Controls; Controls + IGF-1; and Controls + rifaximin. An oral glutamine-challenge test was performed, and plasma and cerebral ammonia, glucose, bilirubin, transaminases, endotoxemia, brain water content and ileocecal cultures were measured and liver histology was assessed. RESULTS: Rifaximin treatment significantly reduced bacterial overgrowth and endotoxemia compared with cirrhosis groups, and improved some liver function parameters (bilirubin, alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase). These effects were associated with a significant reduction in cerebral water content. Blood and cerebral ammonia levels, and area-under-the-curve values for oral glutamine-challenge tests were similar in rifaximin-treated cirrhotic rats and control group animals. By contrast, IGF-1 administration failed to improve most alterations observed in cirrhosis. CONCLUSION: By reducing gut bacterial overgrowth, only rifaximin was capable of normalizing plasma and brain ammonia and thereby abolishing low-grade brain edema, alterations associated with hepatic encephalopathy. PMID:22563196

  17. Transcranial MRI-guided FUS-induced BBB opening in the rat brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treat, Lisa H.; McDannold, Nathan J.; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2001-05-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) has been a major limitation in treating diseases of the brain because therapeutic agents are either unable to penetrate or have dose-limiting side effects in diffuse opening of the BBB. A previous study demonstrated that focused ultrasound (FUS) can locally open the BBB in a rabbit model when a piece of skull is removed and that magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used to guide and monitor the procedure. This study examined whether the same desired effect of local BBB disruption can be achieved by applying FUS through an intact skull in a rat model. Twenty-eight Sprague-Dawley rats were anesthetized, shaved, and sonicated at four focal locations in the brain, using a 1.5-MHz focused transducer. Contrast-enhanced MR images were obtained before and after sonication. The images indicated contrast agent penetration at the focal coordinates following Optison-enhanced sonication. This study demonstrated that the distortion of the ultrasound beam by the rat skull was not significant enough to inhibit focal BBB opening. Subsequent experiments using MRI-guided FUS to aid in targeted drug delivery to brain tumors in a rodent model could thus be performed more efficiently without cranial surgery. [Research funded by NIH Grant No. CA76550.

  18. Effect of a chronic GSM 900 MHz exposure on glia in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Ammari, Mohamed; Brillaud, Elsa; Gamez, Christelle; Lecomte, Anthony; Sakly, Mohsen; Abdelmelek, Hafedh; de Seze, René

    2008-01-01

    Extension of the mobile phone technology raises concern about the health effects of 900 MHz microwaves on the central nervous system (CNS). In this study we measured GFAP expression using immunocytochemistry method, to evaluate glial evolution 10 days after a chronic exposure (5 days a week for 24 weeks) to GSM signal for 45 min/day at a brain-averaged specific absorption rate (SAR)=1.5 W/kg and for 15 min/day at a SAR=6 W/kg in the following rat brain areas: prefrontal cortex (PfCx), caudate putamen (Cpu), lateral globus pallidus of striatum (LGP), dentate gyrus of hippocampus (DG) and cerebellum cortex (CCx). In comparison to sham or cage control animals, rats exposed to chronic GSM signal at 6 W/kg have increased GFAP stained surface areas in the brain (p<0.05). But the chronic exposure to GSM at 1.5 W/kg did not increase GFAP expression. Our results indicated that chronic exposure to GSM 900 MHz microwaves (SAR=6 W/kg) may induce persistent astroglia activation in the rat brain (sign of a potential gliosis). PMID:18424058

  19. Protective Effect of Solanum nigrum Leaves Extract on Immobilization Stress Induced Changes in Rat's Brain

    PubMed Central

    Zaidi, Syed Kashif; Hoda, Md. Nasrul; Tabrez, Shams; Ansari, Shakeel Ahmed; Jafri, Mohammad Alam; Shahnawaz Khan, Mohd; Hasan, Shirin; Alqahtani, Mohammed H.; Mohammed Abuzenadah, Adel; Banu, Naheed

    2014-01-01

    The prophylactic or curative antioxidant efficacy of crude extract and the active constituent of S. nigrum leaves were evaluated in modulating inherent antioxidant system altered due to immobilization stress in rat brain tissues, in terms of measurement of glutathione (GSH), lipid peroxidation (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, TBARS), and free radical scavenging enzymes activities. Rats were treated with single dose of crude extract of S. nigrum prior to and after 6 h of immobilization stress exposure. Exposure to immobilization stress resulted in a decrease in the brain levels of glutathione, SOD, GST, and catalase, with an increase in thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) levels. Treatment of S. nigrum extract and its active constituents to both pre- and poststressed rats resulted in significant modulation in the above mentioned parameters towards their control values with a relative dominance by the latter. Brain is vulnerable to stress induced prooxidant insult due to high levels of fat content. Thus, as a safe herbal medication the S. nigrum leaves extract or its isolated constituents can be used as nutritional supplement for scavenging free radicals generated in the brain due to physical or psychological stress or any neuronal diseases per se. PMID:24665335

  20. MALDI Mass Spectrometric Imaging of Lipids in Rat Brain Injury Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hankin, Joseph A.; Farias, Santiago E.; Barkley, Robert M.; Heidenreich, Kim; Frey, Lauren C.; Hamazaki, Kei; Kim, Hee-Yong; Murphy, Robert C.

    2011-06-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization/ionization imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI IMS) with a time-of-flight analyzer was used to characterize the distribution of lipid molecular species in the brain of rats in two injury models. Ischemia/reperfusion injury of the rat brain after bilateral occlusion of the carotid artery altered appearance of the phospholipids present in the hippocampal region, specifically the CA1 region. These brain regions also had a large increase in the ion abundance at m/z 548.5 and collisional activation supported identification of this ion as arising from ceramide (d18:1/18:0), a lipid known to be associated with cellular apoptosis. Traumatic brain injury model in the rat was examined by MALDI IMS and the area of damage also showed an increase in ceramide (d18:1/18:0) and a remarkable loss of signal for the potassium adduct of the most abundant phosphocholine molecular species 16:0/18:1 (PC) with a corresponding increase in the sodium adduct ion. This change in PC alkali attachment ion was suggested to be a result of edema and influx of extracellular fluid likely through a loss of Na/K-ATPase caused by the injury. These studies reveal the value of MALDI IMS to examine tissues for changes in lipid biochemistry and will provide data needed to eventually understand the biochemical mechanisms relevant to tissue injury.

  1. PDE5 Inhibitors Enhance Tumor Permeability and Efficacy of Chemotherapy in a Rat Brain Tumor Model

    PubMed Central

    Black, Keith L.; Yin, Dali; Ong, John M.; Hu, Jinwei; Konda, Bindu M.; Wang, Xiao; Ko, MinHee K.; Bayan, Jennifer-Ann; Sacapano, Manuel R.; Espinoza, Andreas; Morris-Irvin, Dwain K; Shu, Yan

    2008-01-01

    The blood-brain tumor barrier (BTB) significantly limits delivery of therapeutic concentrations of chemotherapy to brain tumors. A novel approach to selectively increase drug delivery is pharmacologic modulation of signaling molecules that regulate BTB permeability, such as those in cGMP signaling. Here we show that oral administration of sildenafil (Viagra) and vardenafil (Levitra), inhibitors of cGMP-specific PDE5, selectively increased tumor capillary permeability in 9L gliosarcoma-bearing rats with no significant increase in normal brain capillaries. Tumor-bearing rats treated with the chemotherapy agent, adriamycin, in combination with vardenafil survived significantly longer than rats treated with adriamycin alone. The selective increase in tumor capillary permeability appears to be mediated by a selective increase in tumor cGMP levels and increased vesicular transport through tumor capillaries, and could be attenuated by iberiotoxin, a selective inhibitor for calcium-dependent potassium (KCa) channels, that are effectors in cGMP signaling. The effect by sildenafil could be further increased by simultaneously using another BTB “opener”, bradykinin. Collectively, this data demonstrates that oral administration of PDE5 inhibitors selectively increases BTB permeability and enhance anti-tumor efficacy for a chemotherapeutic agent. These findings have significant implications for improving delivery of anti-tumor agents to brain tumors. PMID:18674521

  2. Characterization of angiotensin-binding sites in the bovine adrenal and the rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Rogulja, I.

    1989-01-01

    The first study was designed to determine whether systemically administered MSG affects neurons in the CVOs that are potentially important in mediating angiotensin-dependent responses. Rats were pretreated with MSG and the receptors for angiotensin II were assayed by radioligand binding in brain homogenates from the septum anteroventral third ventricular region (AV3V) and the thalamus/hypothalamus region using {sup 125}I-angiotensin II as the radioligand. The results of this experiment indicate that systematically administered MSG in the rat significantly reduced the number (Bmax) of Ang II receptors in a tissue sample which contained both extra blood-brain barrier organs as well as tissue within the blood-brain barrier with no change in the affinity (Kd) of the binding sites. The second chapter reports the successful solubilization of bovine adrenal {sup 125}I Ang II and {sup 125}I Sar{sup 1},Ile{sup 8}-Ang II binding sites with the detergent CHAPS. The results of our studies indicate the presence of two angiotensin binding sites. The one site is specific for naturally occurring angiotensins as well as sarcosine-1 substituted angiotensin analogues. The other site which can be optimally stabilized be re-addition of 0.3% CHAPS into the incubation assay binds sarcosine-1 substituted angiotensins exclusively. Hydrophobic interaction chromatography experiments suggest that these sites, possibly, represent distinct proteins. The third chapter discusses the successful solubilization and partial characterization of the rat brain angiotensin receptor.

  3. Distribution of kappa opioid receptors in the brain of young and old male rats

    SciTech Connect

    Maggi, R.; Limonta, P.; Dondi, D.; Martini, L.; Piva, F. )

    1989-01-01

    The experiments to be described have been designed in order to: (a) provide new information on the concentrations of opioid kappa receptors in different regions of the brain of the male rats; and (b) to analyze whether the density of brain kappa receptors might be modified by the process of aging. The concentration of kappa receptors was investigated in the hypothalamus, amygdala, mesencephalon, corpus striatum, hippocampus, thalamus, frontal poles, anterior and posterior cortex collected from male rats of 2 and 19 months of age. {sup 3}H-bremazocine (BRZ) was used as the ligand of kappa receptors, after protection of mu and delta receptors respectively with dihydromorphine and d-ala-d-leu-enkephalin. The results obtained show that: (1) in young male rats, the number of kappa opioid receptors is different in the various brain areas examined. (2) Aging exerts little influence on the number of kappa receptors in the majority of the brain structures considered. However in the amygdala and in the thalamus the number of kappa receptors was increased in old animals.

  4. Role of 5-hydroxytryptamine in the regulation of brain neuropeptides in normal and diabetic rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolta, Malak G.; Williams, Byron B.; Soliman, Karam F. A.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) alteration on brain dopamine (DA), norepinephrine (NE), beta-endorphin (beta-E), and immunoreactive insulin was studied in Sprague-Dawley diabetic and control rats. Diabetes was induced using alloxan (45 mg/kg), 15 days prior to sacrificing. Both control and diabetic animals were treated with either p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA, 300 mg/kg) three days prior to sacrificing or fluoxetine (10 mg/kg) twice daily for three days. PCPA treatment significantly decreased brain content of 5-HT and 5-hydroxyindolel acetic acid, while it caused significant increase and decrease in brain beta-E and insulin levels, respectively, in both normal and diabetic rat. Meanwhile, the administration of fluoxetine resulted in significant increase in brain content of 5-HT, DA, NE and insulin but significant decline of beta-E in diabetic and saline control rats. The results of this experiment indicate that 5-HT may be regulating both beta-E and insulin regardless of the availability of pancreatic insulin.

  5. Effects of long-term treatment with methyl mercury on the developing rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Lindstroem, H.; Luthman, J.; Olson, L. ); Oskarsson, A.; Sundberg, J. )

    1991-12-01

    Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to low doses of methyl mercury (3.9 mg mercury/kg diet), via their dams during gestation and lactation and directly via their diet until sacrifice at 50 days postpartum, in order to study possible detrimental effects on CNS development. The methyl mercury exposure of the rats resulted in a brain concentration of 1.45 {plus minus} 0.06 mg mercury/kg wet weight (mean {plus minus} SEM). No general toxic effects were observed; body weight was not affected, brain weight was only slightly increased. No discernible general morphological alterations were seen in the brain as evaluated using cresyl violet histology. Furthermore, no effects on GFA-positive astrocytes in brain sections were observed and computerized morphometry of smeared astrocytes from frontal cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum did not reveal any effects of the methyl mercury treatment. The noradrenaline (NA) and dopamine (DA) systems were also studied. In cerebellum the