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Sample records for irritable bowel syndrome

  1. Irritable bowel syndrome - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) may be a lifelong condition. You may be suffering from cramping and loose stools, diarrhea, ... Ferri FF. Irritable bowel syndrome. In: Ferri FF, ed. Ferri's ... . Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2015:pages 669-70. What I ...

  2. Irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Beck, E; Hurwitz, B

    1992-12-01

    1. Irritable bowel syndrome is a functional disorder of the lower intestinal tract affecting approximately 10% of the population and causing a wide range of symptoms. 2. Most cases of irritable bowel syndrome can be diagnosed in general practice on the basis of the presenting history and clinical examination but some patients may need to be referred to a gastro-enterologist for further assessment including sigmoidoscopy and barium enema. 3. The clinical picture may include symptoms of abdominal pain and/or distension and altered bowel habit. Nausea, dyspepsia, gynaecological or bladder symptoms are also common. About a third of patients may give a family history of recurrent abdominal pain. 4. Clinical signs include general anxiety, scars on the abdomen (from previous laparotomies for severe abdominal pain), a palpable and tender left colon or generalized abdominal tenderness, and loud borborygmi. 5. Absolute indications for a specialist assessment are: weight loss rectal bleeding onset of symptoms after the age of 40 a mass. Even in the absence of any of these findings referral is frequently necessary to allay patient anxiety and reinforce the diagnosis. 6. Blood tests are usually non-contributory. Stool specimens should be sent if diarrhoea is a feature. 7. A full explanation emphasizing the benign and often recurrent nature of the condition should be given to help patients understand the nature of their symptoms. Only after review of lifestyle and advice about diet have been provided should drug therapy be tried. PMID:1345152

  3. Irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Enck, Paul; Aziz, Qasim; Barbara, Giovanni; Farmer, Adam D; Fukudo, Shin; Mayer, Emeran A; Niesler, Beate; Quigley, Eamonn M M; Rajilić-Stojanović, Mirjana; Schemann, Michael; Schwille-Kiuntke, Juliane; Simren, Magnus; Zipfel, Stephan; Spiller, Robin C

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional gastrointestinal disease with a high population prevalence. The disorder can be debilitating in some patients, whereas others may have mild or moderate symptoms. The most important single risk factors are female sex, younger age and preceding gastrointestinal infections. Clinical symptoms of IBS include abdominal pain or discomfort, stool irregularities and bloating, as well as other somatic, visceral and psychiatric comorbidities. Currently, the diagnosis of IBS is based on symptoms and the exclusion of other organic diseases, and therapy includes drug treatment of the predominant symptoms, nutrition and psychotherapy. Although the underlying pathogenesis is far from understood, aetiological factors include increased epithelial hyperpermeability, dysbiosis, inflammation, visceral hypersensitivity, epigenetics and genetics, and altered brain-gut interactions. IBS considerably affects quality of life and imposes a profound burden on patients, physicians and the health-care system. The past decade has seen remarkable progress in our understanding of functional bowel disorders such as IBS that will be summarized in this Primer. PMID:27159638

  4. Irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Enck, Paul; Aziz, Qasim; Barbara, Giovanni; Farmer, Adam D.; Fukudo, Shin; Mayer, Emeran A.; Niesler, Beate; Quigley, Eamonn M. M.; Rajilić-Stojanović, Mirjana; Schemann, Michael; Schwille-Kiuntke, Juliane; Simren, Magnus; Zipfel, Stephan; Spiller, Robin C.

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional gastrointestinal disease with a high population prevalence. The disorder can be debilitating in some patients, whereas others may have mild or moderate symptoms. The most important single risk factors are female sex, younger age and preceding gastrointestinal infections. Clinical symptoms of IBS include abdominal pain or discomfort, stool irregularities and bloating, as well as other somatic, visceral and psychiatric comorbidities. Currently, the diagnosis of IBS is based on symptoms and the exclusion of other organic diseases, and therapy includes drug treatment of the predominant symptoms, nutrition and psychotherapy. Although the underlying pathogenesis is far from understood, aetiological factors include increased epithelial hyperpermeability, dysbiosis, inflammation, visceral hypersensitivity, epigenetics and genetics, and altered brain–gut interactions. IBS considerably affects quality of life and imposes a profound burden on patients, physicians and the health-care system. The past decade has seen remarkable progress in our understanding of functional bowel disorders such as IBS that will be summarized in this Primer. PMID:27159638

  5. Postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Barbara, Giovanni; Cremon, Cesare; Pallotti, Francesca; De Giorgio, Roberto; Stanghellini, Vincenzo; Corinaldesi, Roberto

    2009-04-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a gastrointestinal disorder characterized by abdominal pain and changes in bowel habits, not sustained by structural changes. There is now consistent evidence indicating that IBS may be the adverse outcome of an acute episode of infectious gastroenteritis, the so-called postinfectious (PI) IBS. The infectious agents involved in the development of PI-IBS include pathogenic bacteria, parasites, and viruses. Abdominal pain and diarrhea are the most common symptoms of PI-IBS. Several studies identified a number of risk factors increasing the susceptibility for PI-IBS development. These include the virulence of the pathogen, the severity, and duration of the acute enteritis, younger age, female sex, and psychological disturbances. Several mucosal abnormalities in the colon or ileum of patients who develop PI-IBS have been described. These changes include increased mucosal permeability, an increased amount of intraepithelial lymphocytes, lamina propria T cells, and mast cells, as well as serotonin-containing enteroendocrine cells. The mediators released by these activated cells may evoke enteric nervous system responses, excite sensory afferent pathways, and induce visceral hyperalgesia. Little is known about the prognosis of PI-IBS, although it is likely better than that of nonspecific IBS. There is little evidence about a specific treatment for PI-IBS. Although probiotics and antibiotics may be promising in the prevention of PI-IBS, the efficacy of these treatments should be assessed in an ad hoc designed study. PMID:19300138

  6. Irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The prevalence of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) varies depending on the criteria used to diagnose it, but it ranges from about 5% to 20%. IBS is associated with abnormal gastrointestinal motor function and enhanced visceral perception, as well as psychosocial and genetic factors. People with IBS often have other bodily and psychiatric symptoms, and have an increased likelihood of having unnecessary surgery compared with people without IBS. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments in people with IBS? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to July 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 18 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: 5HT3 receptor antagonists (alosetron and ramosetron); 5HT4 receptor agonists (tegaserod); antidepressants (tricyclic antidepressants and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors [SSRIs]); antispasmodics (including peppermint oil); cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT); hypnotherapy; soluble and insoluble fibre supplementation; and loperamide. PMID:21718578

  7. Irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The prevalence of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) varies depending on the criteria used to diagnose it, but it ranges from about 5% to 20%. IBS is associated with abnormal gastrointestinal motor function and enhanced visceral perception, as well as psychosocial and genetic factors. People with IBS often have other bodily and psychiatric symptoms, and have an increased likelihood of having unnecessary surgery compared with people without IBS. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments in people with IBS? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to August 2011 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 27 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: 5HT3 receptor antagonists (alosetron and ramosetron), 5HT4 receptor agonists (tegaserod), antidepressants (tricyclic antidepressants and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors [SSRIs]), antispasmodics (including peppermint oil), cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), hypnotherapy, loperamide, and soluble and insoluble fibre supplementation. PMID:22296841

  8. [Irritable bowel syndrome in adolescence].

    PubMed

    Shimada, A; Takano, M

    1992-11-01

    We studied seventy patients, 23 males and 47 females with irritable bowel syndrome in adolescence aged 13-19 yrs, who visited the department of psychosomatic medicine in Takano Hospital during about six year period of April, 1986-July, 1992. Takano Hospital is a coloproctological center in Kumamoto. In the clinical pattern of adolescent patients with irritable bowel syndrome the "gas" pattern was dominant (51.4%). Patients with the gas pattern have severe symptoms of flatus, fullness, rumbling sound and abdominal pain as well as bowel dysfunction, constipation and diarrhea in a classroom. Next, the diarrheal pattern occurred in 20.0%. Diarrheal patients complained of frequent bowel movements and retention feelings before attending school. Recurrent abdominal pain-like pattern was found in 7.1% patients. Clinical symptoms in the adolescent patients seem to derived from a mental tension and stress in a close classroom or before attending school. Many adolescenct patients (67.1%) with irritable bowel syndrome are embarrassed in school-maladjustment; leaving class early, late coming, a long absence, and a withdrawal. PMID:1363122

  9. Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Or if a kid sees his or her parents fighting and begins to feel worried — that's stress, too. A kid in this situation can learn ... 1 • 2 • 3 For Teens For Kids For Parents MORE ON ... Bowel Disease Five Steps for Fighting Stress Are Your Bowels Moving? What's a Fart? Your ...

  10. Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Emeran A.

    2013-01-01

    A 28-year-old woman presents with a 7-month history of recurrent, crampy pain in the left lower abdominal quadrant, bloating with abdominal distention, and frequent, loose stools. She reports having had similar but milder symptoms since childhood. She spends long times in the bathroom because she is worried about uncontrollable discomfort and fecal soiling if she does not completely empty her bowels before leaving the house. She feels anxious and fatigued and is frustrated that her previous physician did not seem to take her distress seriously. Physical examination is unremarkable except for tenderness over the left lower quadrant. How should her case be evaluated and treated? PMID:18420501

  11. Focus on irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Scalera, A; Loguercio, C

    2012-09-01

    The Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a clinical syndrome characterized by chronic abdominal dis-comfort associated with changes in bowel habits and these symptoms can't be explained by any biochemical or organic abnormalities. The review summarizes the relevant findings that have emerged in recent years on the pathogenesis of this syndrome. The most important mechanisms recently implicated in the genesis of IBS symptoms are the abnormal intestinal motility, the incongruous intestinal gas production and the enhanced intestinal nociception. A lot evidence confirms the presence of dysfunction of the intrinsic enteric nervous system (ENS) as demonstrated by the presence of altered expression of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), acid sensing ion channel 3 (ASIC3), putinergic receptor P2X, ligand-gated ion channel 3 (P2X3r), tetrodoxin-sensitive receptor 2 (TTRX2), protease activated receptors (PPARs) and others. There are different assumption that explain these phenomena, and the impairment of the immune system is one of the most reliable. In IBS subjects it was found that the immune system is altered in both the cellular composition and its activation. Many studies have shown that inflammation and immune dysregulation affect the sensitivity of nerve fibers so it is vital to build on this argument for the development of effective therapies to control the symptoms of this syndrome. PMID:23047498

  12. Management of irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Torii, Akira; Toda, Gotaro

    2004-05-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is one of the most common functional gastrointestinal disorders. The prevalence rate is 10-20% and women have a higher prevalence. IBS adversely affects quality of life and is associated with health care use and costs. IBS comprises a group of functional bowel disorders in which abdominal discomfort or pain is associated with defecation or a change in bowel habit, and with features of disordered defecation. The consensus definition and criteria for IBS have been formalized in the "Rome II criteria". Food, psychiatric disorders, and gastroenteritis are risk factors for developing IBS. The mechanism in IBS involves biopsychosocial disorders; psychosocial factors, altered motility, and heightened sensory function. Brain-gut interaction is the most important in understanding the pathophysiology of IBS. Effective management requires an effective physician-patient relationship. Dietary treatment, lifestyle therapy, behavioral therapy, and pharmacologic therapy play a major role in treating IBS. Calcium polycarbophil can benefit IBS patients with constipation or alternating diarrhea and constipation. PMID:15206545

  13. Probiotics and irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Cong; Zheng, Chang-Qing; Jiang, Min; Ma, Xiao-Yu; Jiang, Li-Juan

    2013-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is common gastrointestinal problems. It is characterized by abdominal pain or discomfort, and is associated with changes in stool frequency and/or consistency. The etiopathogenesis of IBS may be multifactorial, as is the pathophysiology, which is attributed to alterations in gastrointestinal motility, visceral hypersensitivity, intestinal microbiota, gut epithelium and immune function, dysfunction of the brain-gut axis or certain psychosocial factors. Current therapeutic strategies are often unsatisfactory. There is now increasing evidence linking alterations in the gastrointestinal microbiota and IBS. Probiotics are living organisms which, when ingested in certain numbers, exert health benefits beyond inherent basic nutrition. Probiotics have numerous positive effects in the gastrointestinal tract. Recently, many studies have suggested that probiotics are effective in the treatment of IBS. The mechanisms of probiotics in IBS are very complex. The purpose of this review is to summarize the evidence and mechanisms for the use of probiotics in the treatment of IBS. PMID:24106397

  14. Genetics of irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Henström, Maria; D'Amato, Mauro

    2016-12-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common condition with a complex and largely unknown etiology. There is no cure, and treatment options are mainly directed to the amelioration of symptoms. IBS causes reduced quality of life and poses considerable repercussions on health and socioeconomic systems. There is a heritable component in IBS, and genetic research is a valuable tool for the identification of causative pathways, which will provide important insight into the pathophysiology. However, although some gene-hunting efforts have been conducted and a few risk genes proposed, IBS genetic research is lagging behind compared to other complex diseases. In this mini-review, we briefly summarize existing genetic studies, discuss the main challenges in IBS genetic research, and propose strategies to overcome these challenges for IBS gene discovery. PMID:26873717

  15. [Contemporary dietotherapy of the irritable bowel syndrome].

    PubMed

    Pilipenko, V I; Burliaeva, E A; Isakov, V A

    2013-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most prevalent functional disease of the gastrointestinal tract. This highly prevalent condition is best diagnosed by assessing the constellation of symptoms with which patients present to their physicians. Because some critics have previously questioned whether irritable bowel syndrome and other functional gastrointestinal disorders truly exist because they do not have defining structural features, the Rome Foundation fostered the use of symptom-based criteria for universal use. In most cases treatment is reduced to symptomatic therapy because a lot of unknown in pathogenesis by irritable bowel syndrome. Irritable bowel syndrome leads to decrease of quality of life of the patients and could be one of the reasons of patients' disability. Food is believed by patients promotes symptoms and the diet or avoiding specific food can reduce symptoms. Possible role of different food and microbiota in the pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome, as well as the data from randomized, controlled clinical trials dedicated to the effects of diet in irritable bowel syndrome are summarized and discussed in this review. The efficacy of the diet, enriched by fiber, prebiotics, probiotics, peppermint oil, curcumin and vitamin B6 in irritable bowel syndrome patients was shown in numerous studies. In some studies restriction in consumption of fermented carbohydrates, coffee and alcohol, as well as diet with elimination IgG-sensed food was also shown to be effective in irritable bowel syndrome. Food intolerances, defined as non-toxic non-immune adverse reactions to food, include reactions to bioactive chemicals in foods and metabolic reactions to poorly absorbed dietary carbohydrates. New dietary approaches like polyunsaturated fatty acids intake correction and the low tryptophan intake are discussed. PMID:23808281

  16. Diet in irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    El-Salhy, Magdy; Gundersen, Doris

    2015-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common chronic gastrointestinal disorder that is characterized by intermittent abdominal pain/discomfort, altered bowel habits and abdominal bloating/distension. This review aimed at presenting the recent developments concerning the role of diet in the pathophysiology and management of IBS. There is no convincing evidence that IBS patients suffer from food allergy/intolerance, and there is no evidence that gluten causes the debated new diagnosis of non-coeliac gluten sensitivity (NCGS). The component in wheat that triggers symptoms in NCGS appears to be the carbohydrates. Patients with NCGS appear to be IBS patients who are self-diagnosed and self-treated with a gluten-free diet. IBS symptoms are triggered by the consumption of the poorly absorbed fermentable oligo-, di-, monosaccharides and polyols (FODMAPs) and insoluble fibre. On reaching the distal small intestine and colon, FODMAPS and insoluble fibre increase the osmotic pressure in the large-intestine lumen and provide a substrate for bacterial fermentation, with consequent gas production, abdominal distension and abdominal pain or discomfort. Poor FODMAPS and insoluble fibres diet reduces the symptom and improve the quality of life in IBS patients. Moreover, it changes favourably the intestinal microbiota and restores the abnormalities in the gastrointestinal endocrine cells. Five gastrointestinal endocrine cell types that produce hormones regulating appetite and food intake are abnormal in IBS patients. Based on these hormonal abnormalities, one would expect that IBS patients to have increased food intake and body weight gain. However, the link between obesity and IBS is not fully studied. Individual dietary guidance for intake of poor FODMAPs and insoluble fibres diet in combination with probiotics intake and regular exercise is to be recommended for IBS patients. PMID:25880820

  17. [Parasitosis and irritable bowel syndrome].

    PubMed

    Ibarra, Catalina; Herrera, Valentina; Pérez de Arce, Edith; Gil, Luis Carlos; Madrid, Ana María; Valenzuela, Lucía; Beltrán, Caroll J

    2016-06-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional disorder of the gastrointestinal tract characterised by multi-factorial aetiology. In IBS physiopathology are involved diverse factors between them biological, psychosocial, and environmental components which affect the immune activation status of gut mucosa. Among these factors is recognized the intestinal parasitosis. Post-infection IBS (PI-IBS) is recognised as a subgroup of functional disorders whose symptoms onset appear after a symptomatic intestinal infection caused by microbial agents. There are few studies regarding of relationship between IBS and intestinal parasitosis in Chile. However, is has been well described a positive association between IBS and Blastocystis hominis infections, one of prevalent parasites in Chile. In other countries, is also described a relationship between IBS and amebiasis and giardiasis. Both, characterized by a common mode of transmission through water as well as contaminated food. Because the high prevalence of parasitosis in our country it is necessary to expand the association studies to clarify the strength of the parasites ethiology in IBS. PMID:27598274

  18. Irritable bowel syndrome: aeromedical considerations.

    PubMed

    Rayman, Russell B

    2011-11-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a gastrointestinal disorder diagnosed in accordance with the Rome III criteria. The pathophysiology of this illness is not well defined and there are no known structural abnormalities, biomedical markers, nor inflammatory causes to explain the symptoms. There are a number of serious illnesses, such as colon cancer, ulcerative colitis, and celiac disease that mimic IBS. If the Rome III criteria are satisfied and there are no alarm features of more serious illness, an in-depth workup is not necessary. There are numerous treatment regimens for IBS, none of which are curative nor offer universal relief. Some of the treatment regimens, such as antispasmodics and antidiarrheals, are not suitable for aviators because of anticholinergic effects and sedation. The aeromedical disposition decision is always challenging because of the vagaries of this illness. In general, a more liberal policy for pilots in civil aviation would be in order as long as symptoms are not frequent nor severe and not requiring antispasmodics or antidiarrheals while flying. A more conservative policy is in order for military pilots, possibly requiring restriction to multiseat aircraft. PMID:22097642

  19. Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Female Patients.

    PubMed

    Harris, Lucinda A; Umar, Sarah B; Baffy, Noemi; Heitkemper, Margaret M

    2016-06-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome is probably the most common functional gastrointestinal disorder and is characterized by abdominal pain along with altered bowel function. It is a disorder of female predominance. This article focuses on how being female influences the pathophysiology, diagnosis, management, and treatment of this common disorder and discusses the evidence and important controversies related to these areas. PMID:27261893

  20. Definition and Facts for Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Next: Symptoms and Causes of Irritable Bowel Syndrome Digestive Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support to patients and medical professionals. View the full list of Digestive Disease Organizations​​ (PDF, 341 KB)​​​​​ Contact Us Health ...

  1. [Irritable bowel syndrome: a functional disorder?].

    PubMed

    Man, Fernando; Bustos Fernández, Luis María

    2013-12-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome is a highly prevalent condition responsible for almost one third of visits to the gastroenterologist and huge expenses for diagnosis, treatment and loss of working days. A unique pathophysiologic mechanism has not been elucidated yet and several possibilities have been proposed such as senso-perception and motor disturbances, the effect of stress and anxiety, serotonin receptor failures, activation of abnormal brain areas and pain modulation differences, among others. The absence of a biological marker has led the investigators to consider this syndrome as an exclusion diagnostic condition, once the organic diseases have been discarded The changes in gut microbiota have recently raised great interest among gastroenterologists. The study of the small intestinal bowel overgrowth syndrome, the effect of antibiotics upon the flora, the recognition of post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome and the action of probiotics, together with the effect of malabsortion of diet carbohydrates have brought some new light in our knowledge. The present update will focus on the published evidence about the subject, bearing in mind that the mechanisms elicited here are only suitable for a subgroup of patients. PMID:24516961

  2. Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Review Article

    PubMed Central

    Vahedi, H; Ansari, R; Mir-Nasseri, MM; Jafari, E

    2010-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most prevalent functional gastrointestinal disorder noted in the general population worldwide. Its chronic nature, signs and symptoms which vary periodically from mild to severe have many negative effects on the quality of life for the sufferer; therefore the appropriate treatment of these patients is highly important. Patients should be informed by their doctors that the nature of the disease is benign, and educated on how to deal with and control symptoms of the disease. This article sets out a review of recent studies on the prevalence of IBS in Iran and appropriate methods for management of patients affected by IBS. PMID:25197516

  3. Novel pharmacological therapies for irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Corsetti, Maura; Whorwell, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a prevalent functional gastrointestinal disorder, which represents a major cost to healthcare services. Current pharmacological treatment includes fibre supplements, antispasmodics, laxatives, loperamide and antidepressants. This article reviews the novel pharmacological treatments already or recently approved for patients with IBS-C (lubiprostone, linaclotide) and IBS-D (alosetron, ramosetron, rifaximin, eluxadoline). Furthermore, results for drugs in development (plecanatide, ibudutant and ebastine) or used in chronic constipation or for other indications, with potential application in IBS (prucalopride, elobixibat, mesalazine, ondansetron and colesevelam) are also reviewed. PMID:26907518

  4. Butyric acid in irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Załęski, Andrzej; Banaszkiewicz, Aleksandra; Walkowiak, Jarosław

    2013-01-01

    Butyric acid (butanoic acid) belongs to a group of short-chain fatty acids and is thought to play several beneficial roles in the gastrointestinal tract. Butyric anion is easily absorbed by enteric cells and used as a main source of energy. Moreover, butyric acid is an important regulator of colonocyte proliferation and apoptosis, gastrointestinal tract motility and bacterial microflora composition in addition to its involvement in many other processes including immunoregulation and anti-inflammatory activity. The pathogenesis of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), the most commonly diagnosed functional gastrointestinal condition, is complex, and its precise mechanisms are still unclear. This article describes the potential benefits of butyric acid in IBS. PMID:24868283

  5. Butyric acid in irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Załęski, Andrzej; Walkowiak, Jarosław

    2013-01-01

    Butyric acid (butanoic acid) belongs to a group of short-chain fatty acids and is thought to play several beneficial roles in the gastrointestinal tract. Butyric anion is easily absorbed by enteric cells and used as a main source of energy. Moreover, butyric acid is an important regulator of colonocyte proliferation and apoptosis, gastrointestinal tract motility and bacterial microflora composition in addition to its involvement in many other processes including immunoregulation and anti-inflammatory activity. The pathogenesis of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), the most commonly diagnosed functional gastrointestinal condition, is complex, and its precise mechanisms are still unclear. This article describes the potential benefits of butyric acid in IBS. PMID:24868283

  6. Rifaximin therapy of irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Koo, Hoonmo L; Sabounchi, Saman; Huang, David B; DuPont, Herbert L

    2012-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common gastrointestinal disorder characterized by abdominal pain and altered bowel habits in the absence of specific organic pathology. Although the underlying pathogenesis of IBS is not well-understood, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) or other abnormalities in the gut flora is believed to contribute to the development of a subset of IBS cases. Rifaximin is a poorly absorbed antimicrobial with activity against enteric pathogens. A number of studies have shown a significant improvement in IBS symptoms with antibiotic therapy including rifaximin. In this review, we discuss the pharmacokinetics, in vitro susceptibility profile, and efficacy and safety data from clinical trials of rifaximin treatment of IBS. PMID:24833932

  7. Rifaximin Therapy of Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Hoonmo L.; Sabounchi, Saman; Huang, David B.; DuPont, Herbert L.

    2012-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common gastrointestinal disorder characterized by abdominal pain and altered bowel habits in the absence of specific organic pathology. Although the underlying pathogenesis of IBS is not well-understood, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) or other abnormalities in the gut flora is believed to contribute to the development of a subset of IBS cases. Rifaximin is a poorly absorbed antimicrobial with activity against enteric pathogens. A number of studies have shown a significant improvement in IBS symptoms with antibiotic therapy including rifaximin. In this review, we discuss the pharmacokinetics, in vitro susceptibility profile, and efficacy and safety data from clinical trials of rifaximin treatment of IBS. PMID:24833932

  8. Childhood Sexual Abuse and Psychosomatic Symptoms in Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Colin A.

    2005-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome is characterized by chronic gastrointestinal symptoms without a demonstrable physical cause. In a subgroup of patients, irritable bowel syndrome may be part of a cluster of psychosomatic symptoms related to childhood sexual abuse. To investigate this possibility, the Dissociative Disorders Interview Schedule (DDIS), the…

  9. [Irritable Bowel Syndrome treatment: a multidisciplinary approach].

    PubMed

    Shani-Zur, Dana; Wolkomir, Keren

    2015-01-01

    Irritable Bowel Syndrome affects 9-23% of the general population. This diagnosis contributes to more frequent doctor visits and multiple consultations by patients. The current approach to treating IBS is symptomatic and consists of a regimen of first line pharmacological treatment options; the use of anti-depressant drugs is also common. The efficiency of complementary medicine in the treatment of IBS has been studied in the last few years. Qualitative multidisciplinary approach studies, using personalized medicines with complementary therapies are needed. We present the case of a 39-year-old woman with a diagnosis of IBS since 2009, who complained about gastrointestinal symptoms since the age of 13 and severe episodes of spasmodic stomach aches in the last year self-ranked as 10, on a 0-10 scale; 3-4 episodes a month, which last for 5 days, accompanied by severe flatulence and bloating. In addition, she has constipation (one bowel movement every 10 days), alternating with multiple diarrheic bowel movements (6 times a day). Using a multidisciplinary approach, including medicinal care, Chinese medicine, reflexology and naturopathy resulted in significant improvement in symptoms and quality of life, as well as gradual reduction of drugs, approved by her physician. Stomach ache self-ranked now as 1, on a 0-10 scale; and flatulence and bloating self-ranked as mild. Bowel movement frequency increased and is now every other day. She no longer has diarrheic and/or multiple bowel movements. This case report emphasizes the importance of integrative treatment in IBS and its benefit in improving patients' quality of life. PMID:25796677

  10. Common gastrointestinal symptoms: irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fashner, Julia; Gitu, Alfred Chege

    2013-10-01

    The diagnosis of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) should be considered when patients have had abdominal pain/discomfort, bloating, and change in bowel habits for 6 months. Patients may experience variation between periods of constipation and diarrhea. When evaluating patients with IBS, physicians should be alert for red flag symptoms, such as rectal bleeding, anemia, nighttime pain, and weight loss. Physicians also should consider other medical conditions that manifest similarly to IBS. Clinicians who are confident in diagnosing IBS based on symptoms typically do not obtain many tests unless the patient has red flag symptoms. Various etiologic mechanisms have been proposed for IBS, including abnormal bowel motility, inflammation, altered mucosal permeability, genetic predisposition, and visceral hypersensitivity. Lack of certainty about the etiology makes it difficult to develop effective management approaches; thus, management is directed toward symptom relief. Dietary changes, such as avoiding fermentable carbohydrates, may benefit some patients, especially those with bloating. Constipation-dominant IBS can be managed with antispasmodics, lubiprostone, or linaclotide, whereas diarrhea-dominant IBS can be managed with loperamide or alosetron, though the latter drug can cause ischemic colitis. For long-term therapy, tricyclic antidepressants or selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors have good efficacy. Peppermint oil and probiotics also may provide benefit. PMID:24124703

  11. Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Yoga as Remedial Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kavuri, Vijaya; Raghuram, Nagarathna; Malamud, Ariel; Selvan, Senthamil R.

    2015-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a group of symptoms manifesting as a functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorder in which patients experience abdominal pain, discomfort, and bloating that is often relieved with defecation. IBS is often associated with a host of secondary comorbidities such as anxiety, depression, headaches, and fatigue. In this review, we examined the basic principles of Pancha Kosha (five sheaths of human existence) concept from an Indian scripture Taittiriya Upanishad and the pathophysiology of a disease from the Yoga approach, Yoga Vasistha's Adhi (originated from mind) and Vyadhi (ailment/disease) concept. An analogy between the age old, the most profound concept of Adhi-Vyadhi, and modern scientific stress-induced dysregulation of brain-gut axis, as it relates to IBS that could pave way for impacting IBS, is emphasized. Based on these perspectives, a plausible Yoga module as a remedial therapy is provided to better manage the primary and secondary symptoms of IBS. PMID:26064164

  12. [Importance of diet in irritable bowel syndrome].

    PubMed

    Mearin, Fermín; Peña, Enrique; Balboa, Agustín

    2014-05-01

    About two-thirds of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients associate their symptoms with certain foods. We reviewed food-related factors putatively associated with manifestations of IBS. Soluble fiber may improve constipation but frequently increases bloating and abdominal pain. Carbohydrate malabsorption seems to be more frequent in IBS. A low FODMAP (fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols) diet significantly reduces IBS symptoms and has been suggested as a therapeutic option. Serological screening for celiac disease should be done in patients without constipation. Moreover, non-celiac disease gluten sensitivity, defined as gluten intolerance once celiac disease and wheat allergy have been ruled out, should be considered in these patients. There is no specific diet for IBS patients but small and frequent meals, avoiding greasy foods, dairy products, many carbohydrates, caffeine and alcohol, is recommended. PMID:24582764

  13. Food components and irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Peter R; Varney, Jane; Malakar, Sreepurna; Muir, Jane G

    2015-05-01

    Ingestion of food has long been linked with gut symptoms, and there is increasing interest in using diet in the management of patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The West has developed an intense interest in specialized, restrictive diets, such as those that target multiple food groups, avoid gluten, or reduce fermentable oligo-, di-, and mono-saccharides and polyols. However, most gastroenterologists are not well educated about diets or their effects on the gut. It is important to understand the various dietary approaches, their putative mechanisms, the evidence that supports their use, and the benefits or harm they might produce. The concepts behind, and delivery of, specialized diets differ from those of pharmacologic agents. High-quality research is needed to determine the efficacy of different dietary approaches and the place of specific strategies. PMID:25680668

  14. Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Yoga as Remedial Therapy.

    PubMed

    Kavuri, Vijaya; Raghuram, Nagarathna; Malamud, Ariel; Selvan, Senthamil R

    2015-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a group of symptoms manifesting as a functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorder in which patients experience abdominal pain, discomfort, and bloating that is often relieved with defecation. IBS is often associated with a host of secondary comorbidities such as anxiety, depression, headaches, and fatigue. In this review, we examined the basic principles of Pancha Kosha (five sheaths of human existence) concept from an Indian scripture Taittiriya Upanishad and the pathophysiology of a disease from the Yoga approach, Yoga Vasistha's Adhi (originated from mind) and Vyadhi (ailment/disease) concept. An analogy between the age old, the most profound concept of Adhi-Vyadhi, and modern scientific stress-induced dysregulation of brain-gut axis, as it relates to IBS that could pave way for impacting IBS, is emphasized. Based on these perspectives, a plausible Yoga module as a remedial therapy is provided to better manage the primary and secondary symptoms of IBS. PMID:26064164

  15. Diet and the irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Friedman, G

    1991-06-01

    Food intake plays a key role in triggering or perpetuating symptoms in patients with IBS. Evaluation of the impact of diet in the individual patient requires a precise dietary history and a 7-day prospective dietary analysis, which should include the quality and quantity of food consumed, chronologic sequence and nature of symptoms, and the frequency and consistency of bowel movements. The caloric density of the meal, total fat intake, the quantity and quality of lactose-containing foods, sorbitol, fructose, and the nature and quantity of soluble and insoluble fiber intake must be noted. Patients with reflux esophageal symptoms should eliminate foods that decrease LES pressure, such as chocolate, peppermint, alcohol, and coffee. Direct esophageal mucosal irritants such as tomatoes, citrus juices, sharp condiments, and alcohol should be limited. Gastric emptying is slowed with the ingestion of fats and soluble fiber. Small bowel motility is slowed by soluble fiber and fatty foods. Gaseous syndromes may be reduced by avoidance of smoking, chewing gum, excessive liquid intake, and carbonated drinks. The reduced intake of large amounts of lactose-containing foods, sorbitol, and fructose may limit postprandial bloating. Flatus production can be lowered by reducing fermentable carbohydrates such as beans, cabbage, lentils, brussel sprouts, and legumes. Soluble and insoluble fiber ingestion will reduce sigmoidal intraluminal pressures and overcome spastic constipation when given in progressive graded doses. Effective dietary manipulations remain a key factor in reducing symptoms in IBS. PMID:2066155

  16. Irritable bowel syndrome: emerging paradigm in pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yoo Jin; Park, Kyung Sik

    2014-03-14

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is one of the most common gastrointestinal disorders, characterized by abdominal pain, bloating, and changes in bowel habits. These symptoms cannot be explained by structural abnormalities and there is no specific laboratory test or biomarker for IBS. Therefore, IBS is classified as a functional disorder with diagnosis dependent on the history taking about manifested symptoms and careful physical examination. Although a great deal of research has been carried out in this area, the pathophysiology of IBS is complex and not completely understood. Multiple factors are thought to contribute to the symptoms in IBS patients; altered gastrointestinal motility, visceral hypersensitivity, and the brain-gut interaction are important classical concepts in IBS pathophysiology. New areas of research in this arena include inflammation, postinfectious low-grade inflammation, genetic and immunologic factors, an altered microbiota, dietary factors, and enteroendocrine cells. These emerging studies have not shown consistent results, provoking controversy in the IBS field. However, certain lines of evidence suggest that these mechanisms are important at least a subset of IBS patients, confirming that IBS symptoms cannot be explained by a single etiological mechanism. Therefore, it is important to keep in mind that IBS requires a more holistic approach to determining effective treatment and understanding the underlying mechanisms. PMID:24627583

  17. Is irritable bowel syndrome an infectious disease?

    PubMed

    Thompson, John Richard

    2016-01-28

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most common of all gastroenterological diseases. While many mechanisms have been postulated to explain its etiology, no single mechanism entirely explains the heterogeneity of symptoms seen with the various phenotypes of the disease. Recent data from both basic and clinical sciences suggest that underlying infectious disease may provide a unifying hypothesis that better explains the overall symptomatology. The presence of small intestinal bowel overgrowth (SIBO) has been documented in patients with IBS and reductions in SIBO as determined by breath testing correlate with IBS symptom improvement in clinical trials. The incidence of new onset IBS symptoms following acute infectious gastroenteritis also suggests an infectious cause. Alterations in microbiota-host interactions may compromise epithelial barrier integrity, immune function, and the development and function of both central and enteric nervous systems explaining alterations in the brain-gut axis. Clinical evidence from treatment trials with both probiotics and antibiotics also support this etiology. Probiotics appear to restore the imbalance in the microflora and improve IBS-specific quality of life. Antibiotic trials with both neomycin and rifaximin show improvement in global IBS symptoms that correlates with breath test normalization in diarrhea-predominant patients. The treatment response to two weeks of rifaximin is sustained for up to ten weeks and comparable results are seen in symptom reduction with retreatment in patients who develop recurrent symptoms. PMID:26819502

  18. Is irritable bowel syndrome an infectious disease?

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, John Richard

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most common of all gastroenterological diseases. While many mechanisms have been postulated to explain its etiology, no single mechanism entirely explains the heterogeneity of symptoms seen with the various phenotypes of the disease. Recent data from both basic and clinical sciences suggest that underlying infectious disease may provide a unifying hypothesis that better explains the overall symptomatology. The presence of small intestinal bowel overgrowth (SIBO) has been documented in patients with IBS and reductions in SIBO as determined by breath testing correlate with IBS symptom improvement in clinical trials. The incidence of new onset IBS symptoms following acute infectious gastroenteritis also suggests an infectious cause. Alterations in microbiota-host interactions may compromise epithelial barrier integrity, immune function, and the development and function of both central and enteric nervous systems explaining alterations in the brain-gut axis. Clinical evidence from treatment trials with both probiotics and antibiotics also support this etiology. Probiotics appear to restore the imbalance in the microflora and improve IBS-specific quality of life. Antibiotic trials with both neomycin and rifaximin show improvement in global IBS symptoms that correlates with breath test normalization in diarrhea-predominant patients. The treatment response to two weeks of rifaximin is sustained for up to ten weeks and comparable results are seen in symptom reduction with retreatment in patients who develop recurrent symptoms. PMID:26819502

  19. Irritable bowel syndrome: diagnosis and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    El-Salhy, Magdy

    2012-10-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common gastrointestinal (GI) disorder that considerably reduces the quality of life. It further represents an economic burden on society due to the high consumption of healthcare resources and the non-productivity of IBS patients. The diagnosis of IBS is based on symptom assessment and the Rome III criteria. A combination of the Rome III criteria, a physical examination, blood tests, gastroscopy and colonoscopy with biopsies is believed to be necessary for diagnosis. Duodenal chromogranin A cell density is a promising biomarker for the diagnosis of IBS. The pathogenesis of IBS seems to be multifactorial, with the following factors playing a central role in the pathogenesis of IBS: heritability and genetics, dietary/intestinal microbiota, low-grade inflammation, and disturbances in the neuroendocrine system (NES) of the gut. One hypothesis proposes that the cause of IBS is an altered NES, which would cause abnormal GI motility, secretions and sensation. All of these abnormalities are characteristic of IBS. Alterations in the NES could be the result of one or more of the following: genetic factors, dietary intake, intestinal flora, or low-grade inflammation. Post-infectious IBS (PI-IBS) and inflammatory bowel disease-associated IBS (IBD-IBS) represent a considerable subset of IBS cases. Patients with PI- and IBD-IBS exhibit low-grade mucosal inflammation, as well as abnormalities in the NES of the gut. PMID:23066308

  20. Irritable Bowel Syndrome, Gut Microbiota and Probiotics

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Beom Jae

    2011-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a complex disorder characterized by abdominal symptoms including chronic abdominal pain or discomfort and altered bowel habits. The etiology of IBS is multifactorial, as abnormal gut motility, visceral hypersensitivity, disturbed neural function of the brain-gut axis and an abnormal autonomic nervous system are all implicated in disease progression. Based on recent experimental and clinical studies, it has been suggested that additional etiological factors including low-grade inflammation, altered gut microbiota and alteration in the gut immune system play important roles in the pathogenesis of IBS. Therefore, therapeutic restoration of altered intestinal microbiota may be an ideal treatment for IBS. Probiotics are live organisms that are believed to cause no harm and result in health benefits for the host. Clinical efficacy of probiotics has been shown in the treatment or prevention of some gastrointestinal inflammation-associated disorders including traveler's diarrhea, antibiotics-associated diarrhea, pouchitis of the restorative ileal pouch and necrotizing enterocolitis. The molecular mechanisms, as cause of IBS pathogenesis, affected by altered gut microbiota and gut inflammation-immunity are reviewed. The effect of probiotics on the gut inflammation-immune systems and the results from clinical trials of probiotics for the treatment of IBS are also summarized. PMID:21860817

  1. The Treatment of Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Weiser, Kirsten; De Lee, Ryan

    2009-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a highly prevalent functional bowel disorder routinely encountered by healthcare providers. Although not life-threatening, this chronic disorder reduces patients’ quality of life and imposes a significant economic burden to the healthcare system. IBS is no longer considered a diagnosis of exclusion that can only be made after performing a battery of expensive diagnostic tests. Rather, IBS should be confidently diagnosed in the clinic at the time of the first visit using the Rome III criteria and a careful history and physical examination. Treatment options for IBS have increased in number in the past decade and clinicians should not be limited to using only fiber supplements and smooth muscle relaxants. Although all patients with IBS have symptoms of abdominal pain and disordered defecation, treatment needs to be individualized and should focus on the predominant symptom. This paper will review therapeutic options for the treatment of IBS using a tailored approach based on the predominant symptom. Abdominal pain, bloating, constipation and diarrhea are the four main symptoms that can be addressed using a combination of dietary interventions and medications. Treatment options include probiotics, antibiotics, tricyclic antidepressants, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and agents that modulate chloride channels and serotonin. Each class of agent will be reviewed using the latest data from the literature. PMID:21180545

  2. Irritable bowel syndrome: Diagnosis and pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    El-Salhy, Magdy

    2012-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common gastrointestinal (GI) disorder that considerably reduces the quality of life. It further represents an economic burden on society due to the high consumption of healthcare resources and the non-productivity of IBS patients. The diagnosis of IBS is based on symptom assessment and the Rome III criteria. A combination of the Rome III criteria, a physical examination, blood tests, gastroscopy and colonoscopy with biopsies is believed to be necessary for diagnosis. Duodenal chromogranin A cell density is a promising biomarker for the diagnosis of IBS. The pathogenesis of IBS seems to be multifactorial, with the following factors playing a central role in the pathogenesis of IBS: heritability and genetics, dietary/intestinal microbiota, low-grade inflammation, and disturbances in the neuroendocrine system (NES) of the gut. One hypothesis proposes that the cause of IBS is an altered NES, which would cause abnormal GI motility, secretions and sensation. All of these abnormalities are characteristic of IBS. Alterations in the NES could be the result of one or more of the following: genetic factors, dietary intake, intestinal flora, or low-grade inflammation. Post-infectious IBS (PI-IBS) and inflammatory bowel disease-associated IBS (IBD-IBS) represent a considerable subset of IBS cases. Patients with PI- and IBD-IBS exhibit low-grade mucosal inflammation, as well as abnormalities in the NES of the gut. PMID:23066308

  3. Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Clinical Review.

    PubMed

    Cashman, Michael D; Martin, Daniel K; Dhillon, Sonu; Puli, Srinivas R

    2016-01-01

    Symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are common in population studies including chronic abdominal pain associated with altered bowel habits. Patients often have associated gastrointestinal and somatic symptoms suggesting a possible common contributing mechanism, but the heterogeneous symptom patterns of individual patients make generalizations difficult. The pathophysiology of IBS is incompletely understood but includes disturbances of the brain-gut axis. Central mechanisms are: the psychosocial history and environment, dysfunctional brain processing of peripheral signals attributed to the intestine including the enteric nervous system, the microbiome and the innate and adaptive immune system. As a result there is visceral hypersensitivity and disturbed intestinal secretory and motor activity. Some mechanisms of visceral pain hypersensitivity may overlap with other pain syndromes including fibromyalgia (FMS). Central Sensitization (CS) would offer a way to conceptualize an integration of life experience and psychologic response into a biopsychosocial framework of pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of IBS. Corticotropin-releasing factor, a principle regulator in the stress and pain response may contribute to a neuroendocrine mechanism for the brain-gut interaction. The positive diagnostic approach to IBS symptoms to avoid excess testing and enhance the patient-provider therapeutic relationship requires the recognition of the "cluster" of IBS symptoms while identifying "alarm" symptoms requiring specific attention. The severity of the symptoms and other individual psychosocial factors characterize patients who seek medical care. The presence of significant psychosocial comorbidities adds to the complexity of management which often requires a multidisciplinary approach. Several treatment options exist but no single method is effective for all the symptoms of IBS. The therapeutic benefit of the well-executed physician-patient relationship is considered

  4. Patterns of alternation in irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    CHIRA, ALEXANDRA; FILIP, MIHAELA; DUMITRAŞCU, DAN LUCIAN

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is one of the most frequent functional gastrointestinal disorders, having its subtypes related to the predominant bowel pattern: IBS with diarrhea (IBS-D), IBS with constipation (IBS-C), mixed IBS (IBS-M) or alternating IBS (IBS-A). Some patients alternate between subtypes (IBS-A). We looked for the prevalence of alternation between subtypes in patients with IBS. We also analyzed changes in pharmacological therapy specifically addressed to IBS. Methods We performed a retrospective observational study that included 60 patients diagnosed with IBS according to Rome III criteria. Patients were asked using a detailed structured interview about their stool form changes regarding previous six months. Alternators were defined as patients that changed IBS subtype over time (previous six months). Results Out of the 60 patients diagnosed with IBS, 18 patients (30%) were alternators. Of these, 8 patients (44%) changed twice the subtype. Two patients (66.66%) of the IBS-M subgroup shifted between subtypes. Eight patients (44.44%) changed medication over the six months. Four patients (22.2%) of the alternators were on double association of therapy (antispasmodics) addressed to IBS. Four patients (22.22%) discontinued medication. Conclusions Patients with IBS often change between subtypes even within six months. Alternators in our pilot study represented 30% of IBS patients. IBS-M seems to be the least stable phenotype. The rarest change is the shift between IBS-C and IBS-D. Alternators also often change their pharmacological treatment (antispasmodics). PMID:27152072

  5. Is irritable bowel syndrome an organic disorder?

    PubMed Central

    El-Salhy, Magdy; Gundersen, Doris; Gilja, Odd Helge; Hatlebakk, Jan Gunnar; Hausken, Trygve

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common gastrointestinal disorder that is generally considered to be functional because there appears to be no associated anatomical defect. Stress and psychological factors are thought to play an important role in IBS. The gut neuroendocrine system (NES), which regulates all functions of the gastrointestinal tract, consists of endocrine cells that are scattered among the epithelial cells of the mucosa, and the enteric nervous system. Although it is capable of operating independently from the central nervous system (CNS), the gut NES is connected to and modulated by the CNS. This review presents evidence for the presence of an anatomical defect in IBS patients, namely in the gastrointestinal endocrine cells. These cells have specialized microvilli that project into the lumen and function as sensors for the luminal content and respond to luminal stimuli by releasing hormones into the lamina propria, which starts a chain reaction that progresses throughout the entire NES. The changes in the gastrointestinal endocrine cells observed in IBS patients are highly consistent with the other abnormalities reported in IBS patients, such as visceral hypersensitivity, dysmotility, and abnormal secretion. PMID:24574708

  6. Irritable bowel syndrome and food interaction

    PubMed Central

    Cuomo, Rosario; Andreozzi, Paolo; Zito, Francesco Paolo; Passananti, Valentina; De Carlo, Giovanni; Sarnelli, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is one of the most common gastrointestinal disorders in Western countries. Despite the high prevalence of this disorders, the therapeutic management of these patients is often unsatisfactory. A number of factors have been suggested to be involved in the pathogenesis of IBS, including impaired motility and sensitivity, increased permeability, changes in the gut microbiome and alterations in the brain-gut axis. Also food seems to play a critical role: the most of IBS patients report the onset or the exacerbation of their symptoms after the meals. Recently, an increasing attention has been paid to the role of food in IBS. In this review we summarize the most recent evidences about the role of diet on IBS symptoms. A diet restricted in fermentable, poorly absorbed carbohydrates and sugar alcohols has beneficial effects on IBS symptoms. More studies are needed to improve our knowledge about the relationship between food and IBS. However, in the foreseeable future, dietary strategies will represent one of the key tools in the therapeutic management of patients with IBS. PMID:25083057

  7. Molecular basis of the irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Vaiopoulou, Anna; Karamanolis, Georgios; Psaltopoulou, Theodora; Karatzias, George; Gazouli, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional disorder characterized by abdominal pain, discomfort and bloating. The pathophysiology of IBS is poorly understood, but the presence of psychosocial basis is now known. There is an increasing number of publications supporting the role of genetics in IBS. Most of the variations are found in genes associated with the brain-gut axis, revealing the strong correlation of brain-gut axis and IBS. miRNAs, which play critical roles in physiological processes, are not well studied in IBS. However, so far there is found an involvement of alterations in miRNA expression or sequence, in IBS symptoms. IBS phenotype is affected by epigenetic alteration and environment. Changes in DNA and histone methylation are observed in patients who suffered childhood trauma or abuse, resulting in altered gene expression, such as the glucocorticoid receptor gene. Finally, diet is another factor associated with IBS, which may contribute to symptom onset. Certain foods may affect on bacterial metabolism and epigenetic modifications, predisposing to IBS. PMID:24574707

  8. [Irritable bowel syndrome, celiac disease and gluten].

    PubMed

    Mearin, Fermín; Montoro, Miguel

    2014-08-01

    For many years irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and celiac disease (CD) have been considered 2 completely separate entities, with CD being clearly related to a permanent gluten intolerance and IBS having no relation with gluten ingestion. However IBS and CD symptoms may be indistinguishable, especially when diarrhea, bloating or abdominal pain predominate. In the last decade several studies have shown that the separation between CD and IBS is not so clear. Thus, some patients who have been diagnosed of IBS suffer in fact from CD. In addition, it seems that there is a group of patients who, without having CD, suffer gluten intolerance that cause them digestive symptoms similar to those of IBS. Gluten sensitivity is defined as the spectrum of morphological, immunological and functional abnormalities that respond to a gluten-free diet. This concept includes histological, immunological and clinical manifestations in the absence of evident morphological abnormalities. Therefore, it is mandatory to establish in a scientific way in which patients a gluten-free diet will be beneficial as well as when this is not justified. PMID:24029448

  9. The Intestinal Microbiota and Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ringel, Yehuda; Ringel-Kulka, Tamar

    2015-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most prevalent and the best studied functional gastrointestinal disorder. The etiology and the pathogenesis of IBS are still not clear; however, recent studies have implicated a role for alterations in the intestinal microbiota (dysbiosis) in the pathophysiology of the disorder. Epidemiological observations have demonstrated that the development of IBS symptoms is often preceded by a disruption of the individual's normal intestinal microbiota, and microbiological studies have demonstrated compositional differences in the intestinal microbiota between patients with IBS patients and healthy controls. In addition, animal studies and a few recent human clinical studies have demonstrated that compositional changes in the intestinal microbiota in IBS are associated with relevant abnormal gastrointestinal and brain-gut axis functions that are often observed in patients with IBS. This article discusses points of interest from the current research on the microbiota-gut-brain interactions in IBS and highlights the relevance of the emerging data to our understanding of the disorder and the clinical implications for patients' care. PMID:26447966

  10. Irritable bowel syndrome and food interaction.

    PubMed

    Cuomo, Rosario; Andreozzi, Paolo; Zito, Francesco Paolo; Passananti, Valentina; De Carlo, Giovanni; Sarnelli, Giovanni

    2014-07-21

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is one of the most common gastrointestinal disorders in Western countries. Despite the high prevalence of this disorders, the therapeutic management of these patients is often unsatisfactory. A number of factors have been suggested to be involved in the pathogenesis of IBS, including impaired motility and sensitivity, increased permeability, changes in the gut microbiome and alterations in the brain-gut axis. Also food seems to play a critical role: the most of IBS patients report the onset or the exacerbation of their symptoms after the meals. Recently, an increasing attention has been paid to the role of food in IBS. In this review we summarize the most recent evidences about the role of diet on IBS symptoms. A diet restricted in fermentable, poorly absorbed carbohydrates and sugar alcohols has beneficial effects on IBS symptoms. More studies are needed to improve our knowledge about the relationship between food and IBS. However, in the foreseeable future, dietary strategies will represent one of the key tools in the therapeutic management of patients with IBS. PMID:25083057

  11. Urinary proteome analysis of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) symptom subgroups

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorder characterized by chronic abdominal pain associated with alterations in bowel function. Given the heterogeneity of the symptoms, multiple pathophysiologic factors are suspected to play a role. We classified women with IBS i...

  12. Breath tests and irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rana, Satya Vati; Malik, Aastha

    2014-06-28

    Breath tests are non-invasive tests and can detect H₂ and CH₄ gases which are produced by bacterial fermentation of unabsorbed intestinal carbohydrate and are excreted in the breath. These tests are used in the diagnosis of carbohydrate malabsorption, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, and for measuring the orocecal transit time. Malabsorption of carbohydrates is a key trigger of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)-type symptoms such as diarrhea and/or constipation, bloating, excess flatulence, headaches and lack of energy. Abdominal bloating is a common nonspecific symptom which can negatively impact quality of life. It may reflect dietary imbalance, such as excess fiber intake, or may be a manifestation of IBS. However, bloating may also represent small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. Patients with persistent symptoms of abdominal bloating and distension despite dietary interventions should be referred for H₂ breath testing to determine the presence or absence of bacterial overgrowth. If bacterial overgrowth is identified, patients are typically treated with antibiotics. Evaluation of IBS generally includes testing of other disorders that cause similar symptoms. Carbohydrate malabsorption (lactose, fructose, sorbitol) can cause abdominal fullness, bloating, nausea, abdominal pain, flatulence, and diarrhea, which are similar to the symptoms of IBS. However, it is unclear if these digestive disorders contribute to or cause the symptoms of IBS. Research studies show that a proper diagnosis and effective dietary intervention significantly reduces the severity and frequency of gastrointestinal symptoms in IBS. Thus, diagnosis of malabsorption of these carbohydrates in IBS using a breath test is very important to guide the clinician in the proper treatment of IBS patients. PMID:24976698

  13. Irritable bowel syndrome: A clinical review

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Rosa LS

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) remains a clinical challenge in the 21st century. It’s the most commonly diagnosed gastrointestinal condition and also the most common reason for referral to gastroenterology clinics. Its can affect up to one in five people at some point in their lives, and has a significantly impact of life quality and health care utilization. The prevalence varies according to country and criteria used to define IBS. Various mechanisms and theories have been proposed about its etiology, but the biopsychosocial model is the most currently accepted for IBS. The complex of symptoms would be the result of the interaction between psychological, behavioral, psychosocial and environmental factors. The diagnosis of IBS is not confirmed by a specific test or structural abnormality. It is made using criteria based on clinical symptoms such as Rome criteria, unless the symptoms are thought to be atypical. Today the Rome Criteria III is the current gold-standard for the diagnoses of IBS. Secure positive evidence of IBS by means of specific disease marker is currently not possible and cannot be currently recommended for routine diagnosis. There is still no clinical evidence to recommend the use of biomarkers in blood to diagnose IBS. However, a number of different changes in IBS patients were demonstrated in recent years, some of which can be used in the future as a diagnostic support. IBS has no definitive treatment but could be controlled by non-pharmacologic management eliminating of some exacerbating factors such certain drugs, stressor conditions and changes in dietary habits.The traditional pharmacologic management of IBS has been symptom based and several drugs have been used. However, the cornerstone of its therapy is a solid patient physician relationship. This review will provide a summary of pathophysiology, diagnostic criteria and current and emerging therapies for IBS. PMID:25232249

  14. Breath tests and irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Satya Vati; Malik, Aastha

    2014-01-01

    Breath tests are non-invasive tests and can detect H2 and CH4 gases which are produced by bacterial fermentation of unabsorbed intestinal carbohydrate and are excreted in the breath. These tests are used in the diagnosis of carbohydrate malabsorption, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, and for measuring the orocecal transit time. Malabsorption of carbohydrates is a key trigger of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)-type symptoms such as diarrhea and/or constipation, bloating, excess flatulence, headaches and lack of energy. Abdominal bloating is a common nonspecific symptom which can negatively impact quality of life. It may reflect dietary imbalance, such as excess fiber intake, or may be a manifestation of IBS. However, bloating may also represent small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. Patients with persistent symptoms of abdominal bloating and distension despite dietary interventions should be referred for H2 breath testing to determine the presence or absence of bacterial overgrowth. If bacterial overgrowth is identified, patients are typically treated with antibiotics. Evaluation of IBS generally includes testing of other disorders that cause similar symptoms. Carbohydrate malabsorption (lactose, fructose, sorbitol) can cause abdominal fullness, bloating, nausea, abdominal pain, flatulence, and diarrhea, which are similar to the symptoms of IBS. However, it is unclear if these digestive disorders contribute to or cause the symptoms of IBS. Research studies show that a proper diagnosis and effective dietary intervention significantly reduces the severity and frequency of gastrointestinal symptoms in IBS. Thus, diagnosis of malabsorption of these carbohydrates in IBS using a breath test is very important to guide the clinician in the proper treatment of IBS patients. PMID:24976698

  15. Meditation over medication for irritable bowel syndrome? On exercise and alternative treatments for irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Asare, Fredrick; Störsrud, Stine; Simrén, Magnus

    2012-08-01

    Complimentary alternative treatment regimens are widely used in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), but the evidence supporting their use varies. For psychological treatment options, such as cognitive behavioral therapy, mindfulness, gut-directed hypnotherapy, and psychodynamic therapy, the evidence supporting their use in IBS patients is strong, but the availability limits their use in clinical practice. Dietary interventions are commonly included in the management of IBS patients, but these are primarily based on studies assessing physiological function in relation to dietary components, and to a lesser degree upon research examining the role of dietary components in the therapeutic management of IBS. Several probiotic products improve a range of symptoms in IBS patients. Physical activity is of benefit for health in general and recent data implicates its usefulness also for IBS patients. Acupuncture does not seem to have an effect beyond placebo in IBS. A beneficial effect of some herbal treatments has been reported. PMID:22661301

  16. [Current approaches to the diagnosis and treatment of irritable bowel syndrome].

    PubMed

    Kharchenko, N V; Chernenko, V V

    2001-01-01

    Modern definition, classifications, diagnosis and treatment of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are presented together with results of treatment of 30 patients with irritable bowel syndrome with the new selective calcium-channel blocker dicetel. PMID:11881362

  17. Double blind study of ispaghula in irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Prior, A; Whorwell, P J

    1987-11-01

    A double blind placebo controlled trial of ispaghula husk in 80 patients with irritable bowel syndrome is reported. Global assessment judged treatment to be satisfactory in 82% of patients receiving ispaghula and 53% of the placebo group (p less than 0.02). Bowel habit was unchanged in the placebo group, while constipation significantly improved in patients taking ispaghula (p = 0.026). Transit time decreased significantly in those taking ispaghula compared with placebo (p = 0.001), especially in patients with initially high transit times. Abdominal pain and bloating improved in both groups, with no significant differences between ispaghula and placebo. Four of the eight withdrawals on ispaghula and 10 of the 15 withdrawals on placebo were because of treatment failure. Ispaghula significantly improves overall well being in patients with irritable bowel syndrome, and in those with constipation favourably affects bowel habit and transit time. PMID:3322956

  18. Underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms in childhood irritable bowel syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) affects a large number of children throughout the world. The symptom expression of IBS is heterogeneous, and several factors which may be interrelated within the IBS biopsychosocial model play a role. These factors include visceral hyperalgesia, intestinal permeability...

  19. Subtypes of irritable bowel syndrome in children and adolescents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pharmacologic treatments for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and medical management of symptoms are increasingly based on IBS subtype, so it is important to accurately differentiate patients. Few studies have classified subtypes of pediatric IBS, and conclusions have been challenged by methodologic l...

  20. Gastrointestinal microbiome signatures of pediatric patients with irritable bowel syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The intestinal microbiomes of healthy children and pediatric patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are not well defined. Studies in adults have indicated that the gastrointestinal microbiota could be involved in IBS. We analyzed 71 samples from 22 children with IBS (pediatric Rome III criteri...

  1. Conditioned pain modulation in women with irritable bowel syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Evidence suggests that patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are more vigilant to pain-associated stimuli. The aims of this study were to compare women with IBS (n = 20) to healthy control (HC, n = 20) women on pain sensitivity, conditioned pain modulation (CPM) efficiency, and salivary corti...

  2. New and emerging therapies for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome: an update for gastroenterologists

    PubMed Central

    Foxx-Orenstein, Amy E.

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome is a functional bowel disorder with gastrointestinal symptoms (e.g. abdominal pain, straining, urgency, incomplete evacuation, nausea, and bloating) that occur alongside bowel function alterations (i.e. constipation, diarrhea, or both). Patients with irritable bowel syndrome may also experience comorbid anxiety and depression. Irritable bowel syndrome is common, with a prevalence estimated between 3% and 28%, affecting patient health and quality of life. Patients with moderate or severe irritable bowel syndrome generally seek medical care, whereas those with milder symptoms may choose self-management. Most patients with irritable bowel syndrome receive outpatient care, but irritable bowel syndrome-related hospitalizations do occur. The pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome is multifactorial (i.e. genetics, immune components, changes in the gut microbiota, disturbances in physiologic stress response systems, and psychosocial factors). Management of irritable bowel syndrome can include lifestyle changes, dietary interventions, counseling, psychologic medication, and agents that affect gastrointestinal motility. A number of therapies have emerged in recent years with clinical trial data demonstrating efficacy and safety for patients with irritable bowel syndrome, including agents that target gastrointestinal motility (i.e. linaclotide), gastrointestinal opioid receptors (i.e. asimadoline, eluxadoline), and gut microbiota (i.e. rifaximin). Linaclotide has been shown to significantly improve stool frequency and abdominal pain compared with placebo in constipation-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (number needed to treat, 5.1). Asimadoline shows efficacy in patients with moderate-to-severe irritable bowel syndrome-related pain. Rifaximin provided adequate relief of global irritable bowel syndrome symptoms versus placebo for a significantly greater percentage of patients with diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (p < 0

  3. New and emerging therapies for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome: an update for gastroenterologists.

    PubMed

    Foxx-Orenstein, Amy E

    2016-05-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome is a functional bowel disorder with gastrointestinal symptoms (e.g. abdominal pain, straining, urgency, incomplete evacuation, nausea, and bloating) that occur alongside bowel function alterations (i.e. constipation, diarrhea, or both). Patients with irritable bowel syndrome may also experience comorbid anxiety and depression. Irritable bowel syndrome is common, with a prevalence estimated between 3% and 28%, affecting patient health and quality of life. Patients with moderate or severe irritable bowel syndrome generally seek medical care, whereas those with milder symptoms may choose self-management. Most patients with irritable bowel syndrome receive outpatient care, but irritable bowel syndrome-related hospitalizations do occur. The pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome is multifactorial (i.e. genetics, immune components, changes in the gut microbiota, disturbances in physiologic stress response systems, and psychosocial factors). Management of irritable bowel syndrome can include lifestyle changes, dietary interventions, counseling, psychologic medication, and agents that affect gastrointestinal motility. A number of therapies have emerged in recent years with clinical trial data demonstrating efficacy and safety for patients with irritable bowel syndrome, including agents that target gastrointestinal motility (i.e. linaclotide), gastrointestinal opioid receptors (i.e. asimadoline, eluxadoline), and gut microbiota (i.e. rifaximin). Linaclotide has been shown to significantly improve stool frequency and abdominal pain compared with placebo in constipation-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (number needed to treat, 5.1). Asimadoline shows efficacy in patients with moderate-to-severe irritable bowel syndrome-related pain. Rifaximin provided adequate relief of global irritable bowel syndrome symptoms versus placebo for a significantly greater percentage of patients with diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (p < 0

  4. [Current issues on irritable bowel syndrome: diet and irritable bowel syndrome].

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong Hwan; Sung, In-Kyung

    2014-09-25

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is one of the most prevalent functional gastrointestinal disorders. It is a multifactorial disorder with its pathogenesis attributed to abnormal gastrointestinal motility, low-grade inflammation, visceral hypersensitivity, communication in the gut-brain axis, and so on. Traditionally, IBS has been treated with diet and lifestyle modification, fiber supplementation, psychological therapy, and pharmacological treatment. Carbohydrates are intermingled with a wide range of regularly consumed food including grains such as rye and wheat, vegetables, fruits, and legumes. Short-chain carbohydrates that are poorly absorbed exert osmotic effects in the intestinal lumen increasing its water volume, and are rapidly fermented by bacteria with consequent gas production. These effects may be the basis for the induction of most of the gastrointestinal symptoms. This has led to the use of lactose-free diets in those with lactose intolerance and of fructose-reduced diets for fructose malabsorption. As all poorly absorbed short-chain carbohydrates have similar and additive effects in the intestine, a concept has been developed to regard them collectively as FODMAPs (fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols) and to evaluate a dietary approach that restricts them all. Based on the observational and comparative studies, and randomized-controlled trials, FODMAPs have been shown to trigger gastrointestinal symptoms in patients with IBS. Food choice via the low FODMAPs and potentially other dietary strategies is now a realistic and efficacious therapeutic approach for managing symptoms of IBS. PMID:25252862

  5. Irritable bowel syndrome: Is it “irritable brain” or “irritable bowel”?

    PubMed Central

    Padhy, Susanta Kumar; Sahoo, Swapnajeet; Mahajan, Sonali; Sinha, Saroj Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) has been recognized as one of the most common and best studied disorders among the group of functional gastrointestinal disorders. It is a functional bowel disorder in which abdominal pain or discomfort is associated with defecation or a change in bowel habit. In the Western world, IBS appears to affect up to 20% of the population at any given time but in Asian countries, the median value of IBS prevalence defined by various criteria ranges between 6.5% and 10.1%, and community prevalence of 4% is found in North India. Those attending gastroenterology clinics represent only the tip of the iceberg. The disorder substantially impairs the quality of life, and the overall health-care costs are high. IBS has therefore gained increased attention from clinicians, researchers, and pharmaceutical industries. It is often frustrating to both patients and physicians as the disease is usually chronic in nature and difficult to treat. However, the understanding of IBS has been changing from time to time and still most of its concepts are unknown. In this review we have discussed, debated, and synthesized the evidence base, focusing on underlying mechanisms in the brain and bowel. We conclude that it is both brain and bowel mechanisms that are responsible. The clinical implication of such mechanisms is discussed. PMID:26752904

  6. [NEWS IN ETIOLOGY AND PATHOGENESIS OF IRRITATED BOWEL SYNDROME].

    PubMed

    Sheptulin, A A; Vize-Khripunova, M A

    2016-01-01

    The concept of irritated bowel syndrome as a complex of functional disorders that can not be explained by organic changes and are totally due to intestinal motility and visceral sensitivity needs revision. The development of this syndrome also depends on a number of pathogenetic and etiological factors, such as inflammation of intestinal mucosa, changes of its permeability, previous infection, altered microflora, gene polymorphism, and food hypersensitivity. PMID:27459756

  7. Acupuncture for treatment of irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Manheimer, Eric; Cheng, Ke; Wieland, L. Susan; Min, Li Shih; Shen, Xueyong; Berman, Brian M; Lao, Lixing

    2013-01-01

    Background Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common, costly, and difficult to treat disorder that impairs health-related quality of life and work productivity. Evidence-based treatment guidelines have been unable to provide guidance on the effects of acupuncture for IBS because the only previous systematic review included only small, heterogeneous and methodologically unsound trials. Objectives The primary objectives were to assess the efficacy and safety of acupuncture for treating IBS. Search methods MEDLINE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, EMBASE, the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health, and the Chinese databases Sino-Med, CNKI, and VIP were searched through November 2011. Selection criteria Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared acupuncture with sham acupuncture, other active treatments, or no (specific) treatment, and RCTs that evaluated acupuncture as an adjuvant to another treatment, in adults with IBS were included. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently assessed the risk of bias and extracted data. We extracted data for the outcomes overall IBS symptom severity and health-related quality of life. For dichotomous data (e.g. the IBS Adequate Relief Question), we calculated a pooled relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for substantial improvement in symptom severity after treatment. For continuous data (e.g. the IBS Severity Scoring System), we calculated the standardized mean difference (SMD) and 95% CI in post-treatment scores between groups. Main results Seventeen RCTs (1806 participants) were included. Five RCTs compared acupuncture versus sham acupuncture. The risk of bias in these studies was low.We found no evidence of an improvement with acupuncture relative to sham (placebo) acupuncture for symptom severity (SMD-0.11, 95%CI −0.35 to 0.13; 4 RCTs; 281 patients) or quality of life (SMD = −0.03, 95%CI −0.27 to 0.22; 3 RCTs; 253 patients). Sensitivity analyses based on study

  8. Nutritional therapy of irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Friedman, G

    1989-09-01

    Nutritional factors relative to IBS include diagnostic and therapeutic considerations. Etiologically, foods do not cause IBS. A small percentage of patients with childhood allergic diatheses, usually in association with atopic dermatitis and asthma, may be intolerant to one or more of wheat, corn, dairy products, coffee, tea, or citrus fruits. Diagnostically, many patients labeled as IBS subjects are in fact intolerant to the ingestion of lactose-containing foods, sorbitol, fructose, or combinations of fructose and sorbitol. A precise dietary history will characterize this group. Taken in its broadest context, IBS involves the entire hollow tract inclusive of esophagus, stomach, small bowel, and colon. The symptomatic presentation relative to the hollow organ involved allows the selection of dietary manipulations that may help to reduce symptoms. Gastroesophageal reflux, a consequence of low LES pressure in some IBS patients, may be treated with the elimination of fatty foods, alcohol, chocolate, and peppermint. Delayed gastric emptying may be helped by the elimination of fatty foods and reduction of soluble fiber. Aberrant small bowel motor function may be ameliorated by reduction of lactose, sorbitol, and fructose and the addition of soluble fiber. Gas syndromes may be improved by reduced intake of beans, cabbage, lentils, legumes, apples, grapes, and raisins. Colonic motor dysfunction may be overcome by the gradual addition of combinations of soluble and insoluble fiber-containing foods and supplements. The selective use of activated charcoal and simethicone may be helpful. PMID:2553606

  9. Clinical trials in irritable bowel syndrome: a review.

    PubMed

    Ervin, Claire M; Mangel, Allen W

    2013-03-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is one of the most common gastrointestinal disorders and it is characterized by episodes of abdominal pain and altered bowel functions. The specific bowel disturbances of diarrhea, constipation or an alternation between the two defines the IBS subtypes of diarrhea-predominant, constipation-predominant, and mixed or alternating IBS. Because of the abnormalities in bowel states associated with each IBS subtype, it is not likely that one agent would successfully treat all three subtypes. As a result, clinical trials have focused, for the most part, on one IBS subtype. Over the past 2 decades very few agents have achieved regulatory approval for the treatment of IBS. In the present article we review publications reporting on phase 2 and phase 3 studies evaluating agents to potentially be used in the treatment of patients with IBS. PMID:23130604

  10. Irritable bowel syndrome: a mild disorder; purely symptomatic treatment.

    PubMed

    2009-04-01

    (1) Patients frequently complain of occasional bowel movement disorders, associated with abdominal pain or discomfort, but they are rarely due to an underlying organ involvement. Even when patients have recurrent symptoms, serious disorders are no more frequent in these patients than in the general population, unless other manifestations, anaemia, or an inflammatory syndrome is also present; (2) There is currently no way of radically modifying the natural course of recurrent irritable bowel syndrome; (3) The effects of antispasmodics on abdominal pain have been tested in about 20 randomised controlled trials. Pinaverium and peppermint essential oil have the best-documented efficacy and only moderate adverse effects. Antispasmodics with marked atropinic effects do not have a favourable risk-benefit balance; (4) Tricylic antidepressants seem to have only modest analgesic effects in this setting. In contrast, their adverse effects are frequent and they have somewhat negative risk-benefit balances. Nor has the efficacy of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressants (SSRIs) been demonstrated; (5) Alosetron and tegaserod carry a risk of potentially life-threatening adverse effects and therefore have negative risk-benefit balances; (6) Seeds of plants such as psyllium and ispaghul, as well as raw apples and pears, have a limited impact on constipation and pain. Osmotic laxatives are effective on constipation. Symptomatic treatments for constipation can sometimes aggravate abdominal discomfort; (7) Loperamide has been poorly assessed in patients with recurrent irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhoea. It modestly slows bowel movement but does not relieve pain or abdominal discomfort; (8) Dietary measures have not been tested in comparative trials. Some patients are convinced that certain foods provoke a recurrence of irritable bowel syndrome, but restrictive diets carry a risk of nutritional deficiencies; (9) Various techniques intended to control emotional and

  11. Rifaximin in irritable bowel syndrome: rationale, evidence and clinical use.

    PubMed

    Saadi, Mohammed; McCallum, Richard W

    2013-03-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most common functional bowel disease that affects up to 15% of the US population. The majority of patients with IBS have significant bloating and gas. Recent evidence is beginning to suggest that patients with IBS may have an alteration in the gastrointestinal flora. Specifically, findings suggest that patients with IBS have excessive bacteria in the small bowel, referred to as bacterial overgrowth. Therefore there may be benefits of antibiotic-based therapies for IBS. Rifaximin is a nonabsorbable antibiotic that demonstrates no clinically relevant bacterial resistance. Some studies have demonstrated the efficacy and durable improvement of IBS symptoms after treatment with rifaximin. In this review we explore the current data showing the association of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) and IBS as well as review the available data on the clinical use of rifaximin in the treatment of SIBO in patients with IBS. PMID:23556126

  12. Rifaximin in irritable bowel syndrome: rationale, evidence and clinical use

    PubMed Central

    Saadi, Mohammed

    2013-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most common functional bowel disease that affects up to 15% of the US population. The majority of patients with IBS have significant bloating and gas. Recent evidence is beginning to suggest that patients with IBS may have an alteration in the gastrointestinal flora. Specifically, findings suggest that patients with IBS have excessive bacteria in the small bowel, referred to as bacterial overgrowth. Therefore there may be benefits of antibiotic-based therapies for IBS. Rifaximin is a nonabsorbable antibiotic that demonstrates no clinically relevant bacterial resistance. Some studies have demonstrated the efficacy and durable improvement of IBS symptoms after treatment with rifaximin. In this review we explore the current data showing the association of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) and IBS as well as review the available data on the clinical use of rifaximin in the treatment of SIBO in patients with IBS. PMID:23556126

  13. [Pharmaceutical treatment of irritable bowel syndrome].

    PubMed

    Inoue, M

    1992-11-01

    In the treatment of IBS best results could be obtained by implementing a comprehensive program for the patients. This might include a through examination, an explanation of the condition to the patients, psychologic managements, and correction of any bad habits, as well as drug therapy. The aim of drug therapy of IBS is the relief of the symptoms: such as abdominal pain, disturbed bowel function, anxiety or depression. As there is no drug which is effective in relieving the entire range of symptoms, drug should be chosen according to specific symptoms. Tranquilizers and antispasmodics may be the most commonly used drugs, however their efficacy is limited. To postprandial pain antispasmodics or trimebutine are most effective when prescribed before meal. Antidepressant are beneficial for the depressive state. Bulking agents are preferable mainly in relieving constipation, and loperamide is effective in treating diarrhea. PMID:1363124

  14. Complementary and alternative medicine for treatment of irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yi-Hao A.; Nahas, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE To review the evidence supporting selected complementary and alternative medicine approaches used in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). QUALITY OF EVIDENCE MEDLINE (from January 1966), EMBASE (from January 1980), and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews were searched until March 2008, combining the terms irritable bowel syndrome or irritable colon with complementary therapies, alternative medicine, acupuncture, fiber, peppermint oil, herbal, traditional, yoga, massage, meditation, mind, relaxation, probiotic, hypnotherapy, psychotherapy, cognitive therapy, or behavior therapy. Results were screened to include only clinical trials, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses. Level I evidence was available for most interventions. MAIN MESSAGE Soluble fibre improves constipation and global IBS symptoms. Peppermint oil alleviates IBS symptoms, including abdominal pain. Probiotic trials show overall benefit for IBS but there is little evidence supporting the use of any specific strain. Hypnotherapy and cognitive-behavioural therapy are also effective therapeutic options for appropriate patients. Certain herbal formulas are supported by limited evidence, but safety is a potential concern. All interventions are supported by systematic reviews or meta-analyses. CONCLUSION Several complementary and alternative therapies can be recommended as part of an evidence-based approach to the treatment of IBS; these might provide patients with satisfactory relief and improve the therapeutic alliance. PMID:19221071

  15. Methylglyoxal Induces Systemic Symptoms of Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuang; Jiao, Taiwei; Chen, Yushuai; Gao, Nan; Zhang, Lili; Jiang, Min

    2014-01-01

    Patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) show a wide range of symptoms including diarrhea, abdominal pain, changes in bowel habits, nausea, vomiting, headache, anxiety, depression and cognitive impairment. Methylglyoxal has been proved to be a potential toxic metabolite produced by intestinal bacteria. The present study was aimed at investigating the correlation between methylglyoxal and irritable bowel syndrome. Rats were treated with an enema infusion of methylglyoxal. Fecal water content, visceral sensitivity, behavioral tests and serum 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) were assessed after methylglyoxal exposure. Our data showed that fecal water content was significantly higher than controls after methylglyoxal exposure except that of 30 mM group. Threshold volumes on balloon distension decreased in the treatment groups. All exposed rats showed obvious head scratching and grooming behavior and a decrease in sucrose preference. The serum 5-HT values were increased in 30, 60, 90 mM groups and decreased in 150 mM group. Our findings suggested that methylglyoxal could induce diarrhea, visceral hypersensitivity, headache as well as depression-like behaviors in rats, and might be the key role in triggering systemic symptoms of IBS. PMID:25157984

  16. Role of FODMAPs in Patients With Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mansueto, Pasquale; Seidita, Aurelio; D'Alcamo, Alberto; Carroccio, Antonio

    2015-10-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a condition characterized by abdominal pain, bloating, flatus, and altered bowel habits. The role of dietary components in inducing IBS symptoms is difficult to explore. To date, foods are not considered a cause but rather symptom-triggering factors. Particular interest has been given to the so-called FODMAPs (fermentable oligo-, di-, and monosaccharides and polyols). We aimed to summarize the evidence from the most common approaches to manage suspected food intolerance in IBS, with a particular interest in the role of FODMAPs and the effects of a low FODMAP diet. We reviewed literature, consulting PubMed and Medline by using the search terms FODMAP(s), fructose, lactose, fructans, galactans, polyols (sorbitol, mannitol, maltitol, xylitol, erythritol, polydextrose, and isomalt), irritable bowel syndrome, and functional gastrointestinal symptoms. FODMAP-restricted diets have been used for a long time to manage patients with IBS. The innovation in the so-called FODMAP concept is that a global restriction should have a more consistent effect than a limited one in preventing abdominal distension. Even though all the potential low FODMAP diets provide good relief of symptoms in many patients, there is just a little relief in others. Several studies highlight the role of low FODMAP diets to improve symptoms in patients with IBS. The evidence on this dietary approach supports the hypothesis that a low FODMAP diet should be the first dietary approach. However, many points remain to be clarified, including the evaluation of possibly significant nutrition concerns. PMID:25694210

  17. Methylglyoxal induces systemic symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuang; Jiao, Taiwei; Chen, Yushuai; Gao, Nan; Zhang, Lili; Jiang, Min

    2014-01-01

    Patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) show a wide range of symptoms including diarrhea, abdominal pain, changes in bowel habits, nausea, vomiting, headache, anxiety, depression and cognitive impairment. Methylglyoxal has been proved to be a potential toxic metabolite produced by intestinal bacteria. The present study was aimed at investigating the correlation between methylglyoxal and irritable bowel syndrome. Rats were treated with an enema infusion of methylglyoxal. Fecal water content, visceral sensitivity, behavioral tests and serum 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) were assessed after methylglyoxal exposure. Our data showed that fecal water content was significantly higher than controls after methylglyoxal exposure except that of 30 mM group. Threshold volumes on balloon distension decreased in the treatment groups. All exposed rats showed obvious head scratching and grooming behavior and a decrease in sucrose preference. The serum 5-HT values were increased in 30, 60, 90 mM groups and decreased in 150 mM group. Our findings suggested that methylglyoxal could induce diarrhea, visceral hypersensitivity, headache as well as depression-like behaviors in rats, and might be the key role in triggering systemic symptoms of IBS. PMID:25157984

  18. Irritable bowel syndrome: a test of the colonic hyperalgesia hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Latimer, P; Campbell, D; Latimer, M; Sarna, S; Daniel, E; Waterfall, W

    1979-09-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that, patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), there is a primary hyperalgesia of the colon. Previous work, which examined these patients and normals, has not included subjects who provide a control for relevant psychological characteristics. We compared ratings of pain, following varying degrees of distension of the sigmoid colon, in normals, patients with IBS, and patients who were psychologically disturbed but without bowel symptoms. Psychological characteristics were assessed by a psychiatric interview and psychometric inventories; response to distension was tested by placing a tube in the rectosigmoid colon and successively inflating a nd deflating a balloon at its tip at 10 cm3 increments up to 50 cm3. Ratings of pain were recorded at each volume. The results indicated that the two patient groups were psychologically similar and both were more disturbed than normals. A linear relation was found between reports of pain and volume of distension in all three groups. There were no significant differences between the proportions of subjects experiencing pain in each group or the average of the ratings. There were no significant associations between the pain ratings and measures of anxiety, depression, neuroticism, and extraversion. The data do not support the hypothesis that colonic hyperalgesia is an important contributory factor in the etiology of the irritable bowel syndrome. PMID:537039

  19. Irritable bowel syndrome: Relations with functional, mental, and somatoform disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hausteiner-Wiehle, Constanze; Henningsen, Peter

    2014-01-01

    This review describes the conceptual and clinical relations between irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), other functional, somatoform, and mental disorders, and points to appropriate future conceptualizations. IBS is considered to be a functional somatic syndrome (FSS) with a considerable symptom overlap with other FSSs like chronic fatigue syndrome or fibromyalgia syndrome. IBS patients show an increased prevalence of psychiatric symptoms and disorders, especially depression and anxiety. IBS is largely congruent with the concepts of somatoform and somatic symptom disorders. Roughly 50% of IBS patients complain of gastrointestinal symptoms only and have no psychiatric comorbidity. IBS concepts, treatment approaches, as well as health care structures should acknowledge its variability and multidimensionality by: (1) awareness of additional extraintestinal and psychobehavioral symptoms in patients with IBS; (2) general and collaborative care rather than specialist and separated care; and (3) implementation of “interface disorders” to abandon the dualistic classification of purely organic or purely mental disorders. PMID:24876725

  20. Irritable bowel syndrome: relations with functional, mental, and somatoform disorders.

    PubMed

    Hausteiner-Wiehle, Constanze; Henningsen, Peter

    2014-05-28

    This review describes the conceptual and clinical relations between irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), other functional, somatoform, and mental disorders, and points to appropriate future conceptualizations. IBS is considered to be a functional somatic syndrome (FSS) with a considerable symptom overlap with other FSSs like chronic fatigue syndrome or fibromyalgia syndrome. IBS patients show an increased prevalence of psychiatric symptoms and disorders, especially depression and anxiety. IBS is largely congruent with the concepts of somatoform and somatic symptom disorders. Roughly 50% of IBS patients complain of gastrointestinal symptoms only and have no psychiatric comorbidity. IBS concepts, treatment approaches, as well as health care structures should acknowledge its variability and multidimensionality by: (1) awareness of additional extraintestinal and psychobehavioral symptoms in patients with IBS; (2) general and collaborative care rather than specialist and separated care; and (3) implementation of "interface disorders" to abandon the dualistic classification of purely organic or purely mental disorders. PMID:24876725

  1. Irritable bowel syndrome: a concise review of current treatment concepts.

    PubMed

    Wall, Geoffrey C; Bryant, Ginelle A; Bottenberg, Michelle M; Maki, Erik D; Miesner, Andrew R

    2014-07-21

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is one of the most common gastrointestinal disorders causing patients to seek medical treatment. It is relatively resource intensive and the source of significant morbidity. Recent insights into the pathophysiology and treatment of IBS has given clinicians more options than ever to contend with this disorder. The purpose of our paper is to review older, "classic" treatments for IBS as well as newer agents and "alternative" therapies. We discuss the evidence base of these drugs and provide context to help develop appropriate treatment plans for IBS patients. PMID:25083054

  2. Irritable bowel syndrome: A concise review of current treatment concepts

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Geoffrey C; Bryant, Ginelle A; Bottenberg, Michelle M; Maki, Erik D; Miesner, Andrew R

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is one of the most common gastrointestinal disorders causing patients to seek medical treatment. It is relatively resource intensive and the source of significant morbidity. Recent insights into the pathophysiology and treatment of IBS has given clinicians more options than ever to contend with this disorder. The purpose of our paper is to review older, “classic” treatments for IBS as well as newer agents and “alternative” therapies. We discuss the evidence base of these drugs and provide context to help develop appropriate treatment plans for IBS patients. PMID:25083054

  3. Gut Microbiota as Potential Orchestrators of Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bennet, Sean M.P.; Öhman, Lena; Simrén, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a multifactorial functional disorder with no clearly defined etiology or pathophysiology. Modern culture-independent techniques have improved the understanding of the gut microbiota’s composition and demonstrated that an altered gut microbiota profile might be found in at least some subgroups of IBS patients. Research on IBS from a microbial perspective is gaining momentum and advancing. This review will therefore highlight potential links between the gut microbiota and IBS by discussing the current knowledge of the gut microbiota; it will also illustrate bacterial-host interactions and how alterations to these interactions could exacerbate, induce or even help alleviate IBS. PMID:25918261

  4. Traditional thoughts on the pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hasler, William L

    2011-03-01

    The pathogenesis of symptoms in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is multifactorial and varies from patient to patient. Disturbances of motor function in the small intestine and colon and smooth-muscle dysfunction in other gut and extraintestinal regions are prominent. Abnormalities of sensory function in visceral and somatic structures are detected in most patients with IBS, which may relate to peripheral sensitization or altered central nervous system processing of afferent information. Contributions from psychosocial disturbances are observed in patients from tertiary centers and primary practice. Proof of causation of symptom genesis for most of these factors is limited. PMID:21333899

  5. Food: the forgotten factor in the irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Eswaran, Shanti; Tack, Jan; Chey, William D

    2011-03-01

    After years of inattention, there is a growing body of evidence to suggest that dietary constituents at least exacerbate symptoms and perhaps contribute to the pathogenesis of the irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Although patients with IBS self-report food allergies more often than the general population, the evidence suggests that true food allergies are relatively uncommon. Less clearly defined food intolerances may be an important contributor to symptoms in IBS patients. This article reviews the literature supporting a causal link between food and the symptoms of IBS as well as the evidence supporting dietary interventions as a means of managing IBS symptoms. PMID:21333905

  6. Gut microbiota as potential orchestrators of irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bennet, Sean M P; Ohman, Lena; Simren, Magnus

    2015-05-23

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a multifactorial functional disorder with no clearly defined etiology or pathophysiology. Modern culture-independent techniques have improved the understanding of the gut microbiota's composition and demonstrated that an altered gut microbiota profile might be found in at least some subgroups of IBS patients. Research on IBS from a microbial perspective is gaining momentum and advancing. This review will therefore highlight potential links between the gut microbiota and IBS by discussing the current knowledge of the gut microbiota; it will also illustrate bacterial-host interactions and how alterations to these interactions could exacerbate, induce or even help alleviate IBS. PMID:25918261

  7. When to reconsider the diagnosis of irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hammerle, Christopher W; Crowe, Sheila E

    2011-06-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a highly prevalent disorder characterized by nonspecific symptoms that can mimic other common medical conditions. A careful history and physical examination may reveal clues that suggest a coexisting or alternative diagnosis, such as small intestinal bacterial overgrowth or celiac disease (CD). Testing for bacterial overgrowth has limitations, but emerging data suggest that antibiotics may be of some benefit in patients with IBS with diarrhea and bloating. CD seems to have a higher prevalence in patients with IBS. Some patients with IBS may have symptomatic improvement on gluten-restricted diets, without histologic or serologic evidence of CD. PMID:21601781

  8. [Treatment of irritable bowel syndrome with dicetelium and spasmomen].

    PubMed

    Nedogoda, S V; Parshev, V V

    2000-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare clinical efficacy of new spasmolytics--pinaverium bromide (dicetel, Solvay Pharma) and otilonium bromide (spasmomen, Menarini-Berlin-Chemie)--in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome. Effects appearing during the treatment with anxiolytic drug tofisopam (grandaxin, Egis) after using dicetel and spasmomen were also studied. The results indicate marked clinical efficiency of dicetel and spasmomen which improve vegetative functions and psychoemotional status. Grandaxin provides further improvement of clinical symptoms and additionally corrects psychoemotional status. PMID:11220900

  9. Underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms in childhood irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chumpitazi, Bruno P; Shulman, Robert J

    2016-12-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) affects a large number of children throughout the world. The symptom expression of IBS is heterogeneous, and several factors which may be interrelated within the IBS biopsychosocial model play a role. These factors include visceral hyperalgesia, intestinal permeability, gut microbiota, psychosocial distress, gut inflammation, bile acids, food intolerance, colonic bacterial fermentation, and genetics. The molecular and cellular mechanisms of these factors are being actively investigated. In this mini-review, we present updates of these mechanisms and, where possible, relate the findings to childhood IBS. Mechanistic elucidation may lead to the identification of biomarkers as well as personalized childhood IBS therapies. PMID:26883355

  10. Irritable bowel syndrome. Strategy for the family physician.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, W. G.

    1994-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome is one of the most common reasons for disability and health care seeking. A sensible strategy for management incorporates a confident diagnosis based upon history, physical examination, and pertinent tests. The physician can then reassure the patient, offer dietary and stress management advice, and recommend bran to relieve constipation and to evoke the placebo response. Patients who do not respond could require supportive psychotherapy or a drug for the dominant symptom. A few require careful referral, but overall responsibility should remain with the primary physician. Images Figures 1-2 PMID:8130678

  11. Impact of psychological stress on irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Hong-Yan; Cheng, Chung-Wah; Tang, Xu-Dong; Bian, Zhao-Xiang

    2014-01-01

    Psychological stress is an important factor for the development of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). More and more clinical and experimental evidence showed that IBS is a combination of irritable bowel and irritable brain. In the present review we discuss the potential role of psychological stress in the pathogenesis of IBS and provide comprehensive approaches in clinical treatment. Evidence from clinical and experimental studies showed that psychological stresses have marked impact on intestinal sensitivity, motility, secretion and permeability, and the underlying mechanism has a close correlation with mucosal immune activation, alterations in central nervous system, peripheral neurons and gastrointestinal microbiota. Stress-induced alterations in neuro-endocrine-immune pathways acts on the gut-brain axis and microbiota-gut-brain axis, and cause symptom flare-ups or exaggeration in IBS. IBS is a stress-sensitive disorder, therefore, the treatment of IBS should focus on managing stress and stress-induced responses. Now, non-pharmacological approaches and pharmacological strategies that target on stress-related alterations, such as antidepressants, antipsychotics, miscellaneous agents, 5-HT synthesis inhibitors, selective 5-HT reuptake inhibitors, and specific 5-HT receptor antagonists or agonists have shown a critical role in IBS management. A integrative approach for IBS management is a necessary. PMID:25339801

  12. Impact of psychological stress on irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Qin, Hong-Yan; Cheng, Chung-Wah; Tang, Xu-Dong; Bian, Zhao-Xiang

    2014-10-21

    Psychological stress is an important factor for the development of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). More and more clinical and experimental evidence showed that IBS is a combination of irritable bowel and irritable brain. In the present review we discuss the potential role of psychological stress in the pathogenesis of IBS and provide comprehensive approaches in clinical treatment. Evidence from clinical and experimental studies showed that psychological stresses have marked impact on intestinal sensitivity, motility, secretion and permeability, and the underlying mechanism has a close correlation with mucosal immune activation, alterations in central nervous system, peripheral neurons and gastrointestinal microbiota. Stress-induced alterations in neuro-endocrine-immune pathways acts on the gut-brain axis and microbiota-gut-brain axis, and cause symptom flare-ups or exaggeration in IBS. IBS is a stress-sensitive disorder, therefore, the treatment of IBS should focus on managing stress and stress-induced responses. Now, non-pharmacological approaches and pharmacological strategies that target on stress-related alterations, such as antidepressants, antipsychotics, miscellaneous agents, 5-HT synthesis inhibitors, selective 5-HT reuptake inhibitors, and specific 5-HT receptor antagonists or agonists have shown a critical role in IBS management. A integrative approach for IBS management is a necessary. PMID:25339801

  13. Quantitative Risk-Benefit Analysis of Probiotic Use for Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Bennett, William E

    2016-04-01

    Probiotics have seen widespread use for a variety of gastrointestinal problems, especially in two common disorders: irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease. Since a wide variety of probiotic preparations has been used, and despite a large number of studies performed, a great deal of heterogeneity exists among them. Straightforward evidence-based recommendations for the use of probiotics in irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease have thus been difficult to formulate. In an effort to improve understanding of the risk-benefit balance of probiotics in these conditions, this study (1) queried the US FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) database for all reported adverse drug events related to probiotics in 2013, and (2) constructed risk-benefit planes for both irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease using a geometric approximation of the confidence region between risk and benefit. The results show that adverse events from probiotics vary widely by disease, and when they occur, they are mild and may be difficult to distinguish from the natural history of the underlying disorders they are used to treat. The risk-benefit plane for irritable bowel syndrome straddles the risk-benefit threshold, so patients can expect a balance between a low chance of risk and also a low chance of benefit. The risk-benefit plane for inflammatory bowel disease largely lies above the risk-benefit threshold, so patients may expect more benefit than risk in most cases. More standardized and high-quality research is needed to improve our understanding of risk and benefit for these complex biopharmaceuticals. PMID:26467550

  14. [Irritable Bowel Syndrome; gut microbiota and probiotic therapy].

    PubMed

    Tojo González, Rafael; Suarez Gonzalez, Adolfo; Rúas Madiedo, Patricia; Mancebo Mata, Alejo; Pipa Muñiz, María; Barreiro Alonso, Eva; Roman Llorente, Francisco Javier; Moro Villar, María Carmen; Arce González, Marta María; Villegas Diaz, María Francisca; Mosquera Sierra, Eugenia; Ruiz Ruiz, Mónica

    2015-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is characterized by symptoms of abdominal pain and altered bowel habits. This common disorder is managed by varying clinical styles as no dominant therapeutic strategy has emerged. The pathophysiology of IBS remains unknown, but several lines of evidence link this disorder with the gut microbiota. Although controversy exists, gut microbiota is likely contributing to symptoms of IBS, at least in some patients, through an altered fermentation process, an impaired intestinal barrier function, a harmful modulation of enteric sensorimotor function, a promotion of low-grade inflammation without tissue damage, and a harmful modulation of the brain-gut axis. Probiotic therapy has a modest effect on IBS symptomatic relief, but the actual evidence is not strong enough to support a general recommendation of use. The best results are achieved, in children, with Lactobacillus rhamnusus GG, which moderately improves abdominal pain, while in adults the benefit appears to be greatest employing Bifidobacterium species. PMID:25659060

  15. Role of environmental pollution in irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Marynowski, Mateusz; Likońska, Aleksandra; Zatorski, Hubert; Fichna, Jakub

    2015-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), with the prevalence of 10%-20 % of the population has become an emerging problem worldwide. IBS is a functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorder characterized by abdominal pain or discomfort and altered bowel habits. The etiology of IBS contains genetic, psychological, and immunological factors, and has not been fully elucidated; of note, recent studies also point at environmental pollution and its role in the development of functional GI diseases. In this review we focus on several environmental factors, such as bacterial contamination, air pollution, radiation and even stress as potential triggers of IBS. We discuss associated disturbances in homeostasis, such as changes in intestinal microbiome and related pathophysiological mechanisms. Based on the effect of environmental factors on the GI tract, we also propose novel targets in IBS treatment. PMID:26523104

  16. Intestinal secretory mechanisms in irritable bowel syndrome-diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Camilleri, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Although diarrhea is the predominant bowel dysfunction in as many as one-third of patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), it is unclear whether there is a specific disorder of intestinal fluid or electrolyte secretion in IBS. Diarrhea is generally considered a result of accelerated colonic transit in patients with IBS. Although a primary secretory diathesis has not been well-documented in patients with IBS with diarrhea (IBS-D), several mechanisms that could potentially contribute to intestinal secretion have been reported. Some of these mechanisms also influence motor and secretory dysfunctions that contribute to the pathophysiology of IBS-D. We review the evidence supporting secretion in IBS-D caused by peptides and amines produced by enteroendocrine cells or submucosal neurons, enterocyte secretory processes, and intraluminal factors (bile acids and short-chain fatty acids). Understanding these mechanisms and developing clinical methods for their identification could improve management of patients with IBS-D. PMID:25041862

  17. Low-FODMAP Diet for Treatment of Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Magge, Suma

    2012-01-01

    Functional bowel disorders, including irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), are common disorders that have a significant impact on patients’ quality of life. These disorders present major challenges to healthcare providers, as few effective medical therapies are currently available. Recently, there has been increasing interest in dietary therapies for IBS, particularly a diet low in fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides, and polyols (FODMAPs). Since ingestion of FODMAPs increases the delivery of readily fermentable substrates and water to the distal small intestine and colon—which results in luminal distention and gas—the reduction of FODMAPs in a patient’s diet may improve functional gastrointestinal symptoms. This paper will review the pathophysiology of IBS and the role of FODMAPs for the treatment of this condition. PMID:24672410

  18. Current and Novel Therapeutic Options for Irritable Bowel Syndrome Management

    PubMed Central

    Camilleri, Michael; Andresen, Viola

    2009-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional gastrointestinal disorder affecting up to 3-15% of the general population in western countries. It is characterized by unexplained abdominal pain, discomfort, and bloating in association with altered bowel habits. The pathophysiology of IBS is multifactorial involving disturbances of the brain-gut-axis. The pathophysiology provides the rationale for pharmacotherapy: abnormal gastrointestinal motor functions, visceral hypersensitivity, psychosocial factors, autonomic dysfunction, and mucosal immune activation. Understanding the mechanisms, and their mediators or modulators including neurotransmitters and receptors have led to several therapeutic approaches including agents acting on the serotonin receptor or serotonin transporter system, antidepressants, novel selective anticholinergics, α-adrenergic agonists, opioid agents, cholecystokinin-antagonists, neurokinin-antagonists, somatostatin receptor agonists, corticotropin releasing factor antagonists, chloride-channel activators, guanylate-cyclase-c agonists, melatonin, atypical benzodiazepines, antibiotics, immune modulators and probiotics. The mechanisms and current evidence regarding efficacy of these agents are reviewed. PMID:19665953

  19. Subtypes of irritable bowel syndrome based on abdominal pain/discomfort severity and bowel pattern

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) has traditionally been classified by stooling pattern (e.g., diarrhea-predominant). However, other patterns of symptoms have long been recognized, e.g., pain severity. Our objective was to examine the utility of subtyping women with IBS based on pain/discomfort severit...

  20. [Manometric effects of pinaverium bromide in irritable bowel syndrome].

    PubMed

    Soifer, L; Varela, E; Olmos, J

    1992-01-01

    The effects of pinaverium bromide on colonic motility were investigated in a controlled, controlled, cross-over study in 32 patients with irritable bowel syndrome. Constipation was clearly predominant in one group of 16 patients, and diarrhea in the other group of 16. Manometric measurements were taken of the colonic motor response generated by distention of a balloon inserted to the rectosigmoid junction. Measurements were taken before and one hour after ingestion of two tablets containing placebo or two tablets each containing 50 mg of pinaverium bromide. Following intake of placebo the motility index increased from the basal value in patients with constipation, and resistance to distention decreased in the diarrhea group. These changes were attributable to repetition of the mechanical stimulus within a relatively brief time lapse, or more probably to the ingestion of liquid which accompanied intake of tablets. Compared with placebo, pinaverium bromide induced inhibition of both effects. From the therapeutic point of view, the decrease in motility index seen in patients with irritable bowel syndrome and constipation is particularly interesting. PMID:1295286

  1. Guidelines on the irritable bowel syndrome: mechanisms and practical management

    PubMed Central

    Spiller, R; Aziz, Q; Creed, F; Emmanuel, A; Houghton, L; Hungin, P; Jones, R; Kumar, D; Rubin, G; Trudgill, N; Whorwell, P

    2007-01-01

    Background IBS affects 5–11% of the population of most countries. Prevalence peaks in the third and fourth decades, with a female predominance. Aim To provide a guide for the assessment and management of adult patients with irritable bowel syndrome. Methods Members of the Clinical Services Committee of The British Society of Gastroenterology were allocated particular areas to produce review documents. Literature searching included systematic searches using electronic databases such as Pubmed, EMBASE, MEDLINE, Web of Science, and Cochrane databases and extensive personal reference databases. Results Patients can usefully be classified by predominant bowel habit. Few investigations are needed except when diarrhoea is a prominent feature. Alarm features may warrant further investigation. Adverse psychological features and somatisation are often present. Ascertaining the patients' concerns and explaining symptoms in simple terms improves outcome. IBS is a heterogeneous condition with a range of treatments, each of which benefits a small proportion of patients. Treatment of associated anxiety and depression often improves bowel and other symptoms. Randomised placebo controlled trials show benefit as follows: cognitive behavioural therapy and psychodynamic interpersonal therapy improve coping; hypnotherapy benefits global symptoms in otherwise refractory patients; antispasmodics and tricyclic antidepressants improve pain; ispaghula improves pain and bowel habit; 5‐HT3 antagonists improve global symptoms, diarrhoea, and pain but may rarely cause unexplained colitis; 5‐HT4 agonists improve global symptoms, constipation, and bloating; selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors improve global symptoms. Conclusions Better ways of identifying which patients will respond to specific treatments are urgently needed. PMID:17488783

  2. Chronic Rhinosinusitis and Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kogan, Mikhail; Castillo, Carlos Cuellar; Barber, Melissa S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) can be comorbidities that are difficult to treat. In this patient, an evidence-informed treatment pathway guided by laboratory biomarkers was used to address both conditions. Case Presentation A 69-y-old female patient presented with a 50-y history of sinusitis that was worse in the winter, postnasal drip, frequent sore throats, gastrointestinal complaints, headaches, and yeast infections. Two sinus surgeries (in years 2000 and 2002) and multiple courses of antibiotics had not resolved her sinus symptoms. In addition to CRS and IBS, this patient was noted to have intestinal overgrowth of Candida albicans, multiple food sensitivities, and leaky gut syndrome. Conclusion Antifungal medication and dietary changes in the course of 8 mo resulted in the resolution of her CRS and IBS. PMID:27547167

  3. Quaternary ammonium derivatives as spasmolytics for irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Evangelista, S

    2004-01-01

    Quaternary ammonium derivatives such as cimetropium, n-butyl scopolammonium, otilonium and pinaverium bromide have been discovered and developed as potent spasmolytics of the gastrointestinal tract. Their pharmacological activity has been proven in both "in vivo" and "in vitro" studies of hypermotility. "In vitro" experiments showed that they possess antimuscarinic activity at nM level but only pinaverium and otilonium are endowed with calcium channel blocker properties. These latter compounds relaxed the gastrointestinal smooth muscle mainly through a specific inhibition of calcium ion influx through L-type voltage operated calcium channels. Molecular pharmacology trials have indicated that pinaverium and otilonium can bind specific subunits of the calcium channel in the external surface of the plasma membrane and in this way they block the machinery of the contraction. Recent evidence showed that otilonium is able to bind tachykinin NK(2) receptors and not only inhibits one of the major contractile agents but can reduce the activation of afferent nerves devoted to the passage of sensory signals from the periphery to the central nervous system. Thanks to their typical physico-chemical characteristics, they are poorly absorbed by the systemic circulation and generally remain in the gastrointestinal tract where they exert the muscle relaxant activity by a local activity. Some differences exists in the absorption among these compounds: both n-butyl scopolammonium and cimetropium are partially taken up in the bloodstream, pinaverium has a low absorption (8-10 %) but is endowed with an excellent hepato-biliary excretion and otilonium, which has the lowest absorption (3 %), is almost totally excreted by faeces. Quaternary ammonium derivatives are widely used for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome and recent meta-analyses have supported their efficacy in this disease. Due to its therapeutic index, the use of n-butyl scopolammonium is more indicated to treat acute

  4. Intestinal microbiota in pathophysiology and management of irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kang Nyeong; Lee, Oh Young

    2014-07-21

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional bowel disorder without any structural or metabolic abnormalities that sufficiently explain the symptoms, which include abdominal pain and discomfort, and bowel habit changes such as diarrhea and constipation. Its pathogenesis is multifactorial: visceral hypersensitivity, dysmotility, psychosocial factors, genetic or environmental factors, dysregulation of the brain-gut axis, and altered intestinal microbiota have all been proposed as possible causes. The human intestinal microbiota are composed of more than 1000 different bacterial species and 10(14) cells, and are essential for the development, function, and homeostasis of the intestine, and for individual health. The putative mechanisms that explain the role of microbiota in the development of IBS include altered composition or metabolic activity of the microbiota, mucosal immune activation and inflammation, increased intestinal permeability and impaired mucosal barrier function, sensory-motor disturbances provoked by the microbiota, and a disturbed gut-microbiota-brain axis. Therefore, modulation of the intestinal microbiota through dietary changes, and use of antibiotics, probiotics, and anti-inflammatory agents has been suggested as strategies for managing IBS symptoms. This review summarizes and discusses the accumulating evidence that intestinal microbiota play a role in the pathophysiology and management of IBS. PMID:25083061

  5. Optimal management of constipation associated with irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Furnari, Manuele; de Bortoli, Nicola; Martinucci, Irene; Bodini, Giorgia; Revelli, Matteo; Marabotto, Elisa; Moscatelli, Alessandro; Del Nero, Lorenzo; Savarino, Edoardo; Giannini, Edoardo G; Savarino, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common chronic functional disorder of the gastrointestinal tract, meanly characterized by recurrent abdominal pain or discomfort and altered bowel habit. It is a complex disorder involving biological, environmental, and psychosocial factors. The diagnosis is achieved according to the Rome III criteria provided that organic causes have been excluded. Although IBS does not constitute a life-threatening condition, it has a remarkable prevalence and profoundly reduces the quality of life with burdening socioeconomic costs. One of the principal concerns about IBS is the lack of effective therapeutic options. Up to 40% of patients are not satisfied with any available medications, especially those suffering from chronic constipation. A correct management of IBS with constipation should evolve through a global approach focused on the patient, starting with careful history taking in order to assess the presence of organic diseases that might trigger the disorder. Therefore, the second step is to examine lifestyle, dietary habits, and psychological status. On these bases, a step-up management of disease is recommended: from fiber and bulking agents, to osmotic laxative drugs, to new molecules like lubiprostone and linaclotide. Although new promising tools for relief of bowel-movement-related symptoms are being discovered, a dedicated doctor-patient relationship still seems to be the key for success. PMID:26028974

  6. Intestinal microbiota in pathophysiology and management of irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kang Nyeong; Lee, Oh Young

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional bowel disorder without any structural or metabolic abnormalities that sufficiently explain the symptoms, which include abdominal pain and discomfort, and bowel habit changes such as diarrhea and constipation. Its pathogenesis is multifactorial: visceral hypersensitivity, dysmotility, psychosocial factors, genetic or environmental factors, dysregulation of the brain-gut axis, and altered intestinal microbiota have all been proposed as possible causes. The human intestinal microbiota are composed of more than 1000 different bacterial species and 1014 cells, and are essential for the development, function, and homeostasis of the intestine, and for individual health. The putative mechanisms that explain the role of microbiota in the development of IBS include altered composition or metabolic activity of the microbiota, mucosal immune activation and inflammation, increased intestinal permeability and impaired mucosal barrier function, sensory-motor disturbances provoked by the microbiota, and a disturbed gut-microbiota-brain axis. Therefore, modulation of the intestinal microbiota through dietary changes, and use of antibiotics, probiotics, and anti-inflammatory agents has been suggested as strategies for managing IBS symptoms. This review summarizes and discusses the accumulating evidence that intestinal microbiota play a role in the pathophysiology and management of IBS. PMID:25083061

  7. Optimal management of constipation associated with irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Furnari, Manuele; de Bortoli, Nicola; Martinucci, Irene; Bodini, Giorgia; Revelli, Matteo; Marabotto, Elisa; Moscatelli, Alessandro; Del Nero, Lorenzo; Savarino, Edoardo; Giannini, Edoardo G; Savarino, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common chronic functional disorder of the gastrointestinal tract, meanly characterized by recurrent abdominal pain or discomfort and altered bowel habit. It is a complex disorder involving biological, environmental, and psychosocial factors. The diagnosis is achieved according to the Rome III criteria provided that organic causes have been excluded. Although IBS does not constitute a life-threatening condition, it has a remarkable prevalence and profoundly reduces the quality of life with burdening socioeconomic costs. One of the principal concerns about IBS is the lack of effective therapeutic options. Up to 40% of patients are not satisfied with any available medications, especially those suffering from chronic constipation. A correct management of IBS with constipation should evolve through a global approach focused on the patient, starting with careful history taking in order to assess the presence of organic diseases that might trigger the disorder. Therefore, the second step is to examine lifestyle, dietary habits, and psychological status. On these bases, a step-up management of disease is recommended: from fiber and bulking agents, to osmotic laxative drugs, to new molecules like lubiprostone and linaclotide. Although new promising tools for relief of bowel-movement-related symptoms are being discovered, a dedicated doctor–patient relationship still seems to be the key for success. PMID:26028974

  8. New Receptor Targets for Medical Therapy in Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Camilleri, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Background Despite setbacks to the approval of new medications for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome, interim guidelines on endpoints for IBS trials have enhanced interest as new targets for medical therapy are proposed based on novel mechanisms or chemical entities. Aim To review the approved lubiprostone, two targets that are not meeting expectations (tachykinins and corticotrophin-releasing hormone), the efficacy and safety of new 5-HT4 agonists, intestinal secretagogues (chloride channel activators, and guanylate cyclase-C agonists), bile acid modulation, anti-inflammatory agents and visceral analgesics. Methods Review of selected articles based on PubMed search and clinically relevant information on mechanism of action, safety, pharmacodynamics, and efficacy Conclusions The spectrum of peripheral targets of medical therapy address chiefly the bowel dysfunction of IBS, and these effects are associated with pain relief. There are less clear targets related to the abdominal pain or visceral sensation in IBS. The new 5-HT4 agonists are more specific than older agents, and show cardiovascular safety to date. Secretory agents have high specificity, low bioavailability, and efficacy. The potential risks of agents “borrowed” from other indications (like hyperlipidemia, inflammatory bowel disease or somatic pain) deserve further study. There is reason for optimism in medical treatment of IBS. PMID:19785622

  9. POST-INFECTIOUS IRRITABLE BOWEL SYNDROME: A LONG TERM CONSEQUENCE OF BACTERIAL GASTROENTERITIS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a commonly diagnosed disease characterized by gastrointestinal symptoms often associated with psychological illness and emotional problems. The prevalence rate world-wide for IBS ranges from 10 to 20% and is higher for women than for men. Irritable bowel disease ...

  10. Overgrowth of the indigenous gut microbiome and irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bye, William; Ishaq, Naveed; Bolin, Terry D; Duncombe, Vic M; Riordan, Stephen M

    2014-03-14

    Culture-independent molecular techniques have demonstrated that the majority of the gut microbiota is uncultivable. Application of these molecular techniques to more accurately identify the indigenous gut microbiome has moved with great pace over recent years, leading to a substantial increase in understanding of gut microbial communities in both health and a number of disorders, including irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Use of culture-independent molecular techniques already employed to characterise faecal and, to a lesser extent, colonic mucosal microbial populations in IBS, without reliance on insensitive, traditional microbiological culture techniques, has the potential to more accurately determine microbial composition in the small intestine of patients with this disorder, at least that occurring proximally and within reach of sampling. Current data concerning culture-based and culture-independent analyses of the small intestinal microbiome in IBS are considered here. PMID:24627582

  11. Placebo Effect in Clinical Trial Design for Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Eric; Pimentel, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Ongoing efforts to improve clinical trial design in irritable bowel syndrome have been hindered by high placebo response rates and ineffective outcome measures. We assessed established strategies to minimize placebo effect as well as the various approaches to placebo effect which can affect trial design. These include genetic markers such as catechol-O-methyltransferase, opioidergic and dopaminergic neurobiologic theory, pre-cebo effect centered on expectancy theory, and side effect unblinding grounded on conditioning theory. We reviewed endpoints used in the study of IBS over the past decade including adequate relief and subjective global relief, emphasizing their weaknesses in fully evaluating the IBS condition, specifically their motility effects based on functional net value and relative benefit-harm based on dropouts due to adverse events. The focus of this review is to highlight ongoing efforts to improve clinical trial design which can lead to better outcomes in a real-world setting. PMID:24840369

  12. Is fructose malabsorption a cause of irritable bowel syndrome?

    PubMed

    DiNicolantonio, James J; Lucan, Sean C

    2015-09-01

    Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) is a condition that may be marked by abdominal pain, bloating, fullness, indigestion, belching, constipation and/or diarrhea. IBS symptoms can result from malabsorption of fructose. Fructose is a monosaccharide found naturally in small quantities in fruits and some vegetables, and in much larger quantities in industrially manufactured sweets with added sugars (e.g. sucrose and high fructose corn syrup). Fructose malabsorption leads to osmotic diarrhea as well as gas and bloating due to fermentation in the colon. A low-fructose diet has been found to improve IBS symptoms in some patients. This paper discusses the prevalence of fructose malabsorption and considers fructose ingestion as a possible cause of--and fructose restriction as a possible dietary treatment for--IBS. PMID:26059250

  13. New and Investigational Agents for Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wadhwa, Akhilesh; Camilleri, Michael; Grover, Madhusudan

    2015-12-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) affects about 15 % of the US population and results in significant morbidity and health care costs. There remains a significant unmet need for effective treatments particularly for the pain component of IBS and other functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs). Progress made in our understanding of pathophysiological mechanisms such as the role of altered bile acid metabolism, neurohormonal regulation, immune dysfunction, the epithelial barrier and secretory properties of the gut has led to advancements in therapeutic armamentarium for IBS. This review discusses the new drugs for constipation and diarrhea-predominant IBS subtypes that have been tested or have been under investigation over the last 3-4 years. Overall, there is a promising pipeline of investigational drugs for the future treatment of IBS and related FGIDs. PMID:26446557

  14. Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Global Challenge Among Medical Students

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Sarah Rauf; Abdelaal, Ahmed M; Janjua, Zaynab A; Alasmari, Hajar A; Obad, Adam S; Alamodi, Abdulhadi

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) has been identified as one of the more highly prevalent and costly gastrointestinal disorders. Despite its uncertain etiology, risk factors, such as stress and academic load, are well correlated with the prevalence of the disease. Being in one of the most stressful and challenging environments, medical students are predisposed to have high rates of IBS. The socioeconomic burden of the disease on its sufferers is devastating as their quality of life is reduced, mandating additional health care precautions. The aim of this article, therefore, is to review the current literature about IBS among medical students, its prevalence, associated risk factors, and diagnostic criteria. Additionally, different solutions and management options are recommended to control the disease.  PMID:27625907

  15. Inflammation in irritable bowel syndrome: Myth or new treatment target?

    PubMed Central

    Sinagra, Emanuele; Pompei, Giancarlo; Tomasello, Giovanni; Cappello, Francesco; Morreale, Gaetano Cristian; Amvrosiadis, Georgios; Rossi, Francesca; Lo Monte, Attilio Ignazio; Rizzo, Aroldo Gabriele; Raimondo, Dario

    2016-01-01

    Low-grade intestinal inflammation plays a key role in the pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), and this role is likely to be multifactorial. The aim of this review was to summarize the evidence on the spectrum of mucosal inflammation in IBS, highlighting the relationship of this inflammation to the pathophysiology of IBS and its connection to clinical practice. We carried out a bibliographic search in Medline and the Cochrane Library for the period of January 1966 to December 2014, focusing on publications describing an interaction between inflammation and IBS. Several evidences demonstrate microscopic and molecular abnormalities in IBS patients. Understanding the mechanisms underlying low-grade inflammation in IBS may help to design clinical trials to test the efficacy and safety of drugs that target this pathophysiologic mechanism. PMID:26900287

  16. Recent advances in the diagnosis of irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    El-Salhy, Magdy

    2015-01-01

    The symptom-based diagnosis of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) has not been established in everyday clinical practice, and the diagnosis of this disorder remains one of exclusion. It has been demonstrated that the densities of duodenal chromogranin A, rectal peptide YY and somatostatin cells are good biomarkers for the diagnosis of sporadic IBS, and low-grade mucosal inflammation is a promising biomarker for the diagnosis of postinfectious IBS. Genetic markers are not useful as biomarkers for IBS since the potential risk genes have yet to be validated, and the intestinal microbiota cannot be used because of the lack of an association between a specific bacterial species and IBS. Furthermore, gastrointestinal dysmotility and visceral hypersensitivity tests produce results that are too nonconsistent and noncharacteristic to be used in the diagnosis of IBS. A combination of symptom-based assessment, exclusion of overlapping gastrointestinal diseases and positive biomarkers appears to be the best way to diagnose IBS. PMID:26162959

  17. Cluster belly: a variant of irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Matthew S

    2014-01-01

    Cluster headache (CH) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are pain disorders that possess relationships with circadian rhythms. However, they have not been compared to assess similarities that could yield pathophysiologic insights. A young male adult with periodic episodes of abdominal pain highly reminiscent of CH is described. Since childhood, he experienced severe attacks featuring excruciating, abdominal pain accompanied by prominent restlessness, lasting 30-120 minutes, occurring in the evening and in discrete 2- to 8-week periods, interspersed with remissions where typical triggers did not lead to attacks. Although all of the patient's symptoms fell within the spectrum of IBS, the semiology was highly evocative of CH, based on the attack duration, restlessness, periodicity, and selective vulnerability to particular triggers only during attack periods. A subset of patients thought to have IBS may feature similar attack profiles and could suggest the importance of the hypothalamus in its pathophysiology, akin to CH. PMID:25039367

  18. Mind/Body Psychological Treatments for Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Fresé, Michael P.; Rapgay, Lobsang

    2008-01-01

    Currently, the goal of treatment for those with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is to improve the quality of life through a reduction in symptoms. While the majority of treatment approaches involve the use of traditional medicine, more and more patients seek out a non-drug approach to managing their symptoms. Current forms of non-drug psychologic or mind/body treatment for IBS include hypnotherapy, cognitive behavioral therapy and brief psychodynamic psychotherapy, all of which have been proven efficacious in clinical trials. We propose that incorporating the constructs of mindfulness and acceptance into a mind/body psychologic treatment of IBS may be of added benefit due to the focus on changing awareness and acceptance of one's own state which is a strong component of traditional and Eastern healing philosophies. PMID:18317547

  19. [Irritable bowel syndrome: New pathophysiological hypotheses and practical issues].

    PubMed

    Duboc, H; Dior, M; Coffin, B

    2016-08-01

    In 2015, besides the fact that it still fills the gastroenterologists' offices and impairs patient's quality of life, the irritable bowel syndrome has considerably evolved on several points. The pathophysiology is now organized around a consensual hypothesis called the "brain-gut axis", which gather all the influences of peripheral factors as gut microbiota or local serotonin secretion, on the central pain perception, contributing to visceral hypersensitivity and transit modifications. About the diagnosis, the key message is "avoid over-prescription" of additional tests, and reminds that a positive clinical diagnosis based on Rome III criteria is possible after the elimination of simple clinical warning signs. Finally, the food component, a neglected and historical claim of patients, finally finds a strong scientific rational, with a diet low in fermentable sugar and polyols, that gives positive and reproducible results. PMID:26872433

  20. Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Global Challenge Among Medical Students.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Sarah Rauf; Abdelaal, Ahmed M; Janjua, Zaynab A; Alasmari, Hajar A; Obad, Adam S; Alamodi, Abdulhadi; Shareef, Mohammad Abrar

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) has been identified as one of the more highly prevalent and costly gastrointestinal disorders. Despite its uncertain etiology, risk factors, such as stress and academic load, are well correlated with the prevalence of the disease. Being in one of the most stressful and challenging environments, medical students are predisposed to have high rates of IBS. The socioeconomic burden of the disease on its sufferers is devastating as their quality of life is reduced, mandating additional health care precautions. The aim of this article, therefore, is to review the current literature about IBS among medical students, its prevalence, associated risk factors, and diagnostic criteria. Additionally, different solutions and management options are recommended to control the disease. PMID:27625907

  1. Quality of life measures in irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wong, Reuben K M; Drossman, Douglas A

    2010-06-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional gastrointestinal disorder with significant morbidity, resulting from the interaction of physiologic, psychological, social, cultural and behavioral factors. In view of this complex interaction, and in the absence of a measurable biological index of disease, health-related quality of life (HRQoL) has emerged as an ideal measure for use in clinical trials and outcome studies. This article discusses the relevance of HRQoL measurement in IBS and its definition. It then explores the research methodology in HRQoL and describes how global measures and generic HRQoL instruments have been used in IBS. Finally, the IBS-specific HRQoL measures are described in detail, with an emphasis on their development, content and validation. PMID:20528115

  2. Irritable bowel syndrome: a microbiome-gut-brain axis disorder?

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Paul J; Cryan, John F; Dinan, Timothy G; Clarke, Gerard

    2014-10-21

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is an extremely prevalent but poorly understood gastrointestinal disorder. Consequently, there are no clear diagnostic markers to help diagnose the disorder and treatment options are limited to management of the symptoms. The concept of a dysregulated gut-brain axis has been adopted as a suitable model for the disorder. The gut microbiome may play an important role in the onset and exacerbation of symptoms in the disorder and has been extensively studied in this context. Although a causal role cannot yet be inferred from the clinical studies which have attempted to characterise the gut microbiota in IBS, they do confirm alterations in both community stability and diversity. Moreover, it has been reliably demonstrated that manipulation of the microbiota can influence the key symptoms, including abdominal pain and bowel habit, and other prominent features of IBS. A variety of strategies have been taken to study these interactions, including probiotics, antibiotics, faecal transplantations and the use of germ-free animals. There are clear mechanisms through which the microbiota can produce these effects, both humoral and neural. Taken together, these findings firmly establish the microbiota as a critical node in the gut-brain axis and one which is amenable to therapeutic interventions. PMID:25339800

  3. Irritable bowel syndrome: A microbiome-gut-brain axis disorder?

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Paul J; Cryan, John F; Dinan, Timothy G; Clarke, Gerard

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is an extremely prevalent but poorly understood gastrointestinal disorder. Consequently, there are no clear diagnostic markers to help diagnose the disorder and treatment options are limited to management of the symptoms. The concept of a dysregulated gut-brain axis has been adopted as a suitable model for the disorder. The gut microbiome may play an important role in the onset and exacerbation of symptoms in the disorder and has been extensively studied in this context. Although a causal role cannot yet be inferred from the clinical studies which have attempted to characterise the gut microbiota in IBS, they do confirm alterations in both community stability and diversity. Moreover, it has been reliably demonstrated that manipulation of the microbiota can influence the key symptoms, including abdominal pain and bowel habit, and other prominent features of IBS. A variety of strategies have been taken to study these interactions, including probiotics, antibiotics, faecal transplantations and the use of germ-free animals. There are clear mechanisms through which the microbiota can produce these effects, both humoral and neural. Taken together, these findings firmly establish the microbiota as a critical node in the gut-brain axis and one which is amenable to therapeutic interventions. PMID:25339800

  4. [Irritable bowel syndrome: diet and complementary medicine therapies?].

    PubMed

    Gerkens, A

    2012-09-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a frequent and invalidating functional bowel disorder with entangled mechanisms. Its therapeutic approach is therefore complex. Classical therapies, prescribed alone or in combination in light of the predominant symptom, consist of antispasmodics, fibers, laxatives, antidiarrheals, and psychotropic agents. Other emerging pharmacological therapies, such as prokinetics, prosecretory or serotoninergic agents, bile acid modulators and antibiotics have been recently studied in clinical trials. Dietary measures can include reduction of short-chain poorly absorbed carbohydrates (FODMAPs) and gluten restriction. Assessment of food allergy can be proposed in a subgroup of IBS patients. Complementary and alternative medicine therapies, that are generally low cost and safe, appear to be appreciated by patients. Probiotics have demonstrated action on the gut microbiote modulation, and may be helpful in a subset of patients. Peppermint oil has an established visceral analgesic effect. Hypnotherapy represents an original, global and effective approach. Finally, education, reassurance and listening to the patient, leading to a solid therapeutic relationship, represents an essential backdrop of remedy or diet effectiveness. PMID:23091952

  5. [Irritable Bowel Syndrome, Emotion Regulation, and Gut Microbiota].

    PubMed

    Fukudo, Shin

    2016-06-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is defined as a representative functional gastrointestinal disorder which is characterized by chronic or recurrent abdominal pain and/or abdominal discomfort associated with abnormal bowel movement. Gut microbiota are related to the pathophysiology of IBS. In the field of IBS, post-infectious etiology, stress-induced alteration of microbiota, increased mucosal permeability, bacterial overgrowth, disease-specific microbiota, microbial products, and brain-gut interactions are being investigated. In some individuals, IBS develops after recovery from acute gastroenteritis known as post-infectious IBS. Gut microbiota in IBS patients differ from those in healthy individuals, and the profiles of gut microbiota in IBS patients also vary among IBS patients with constipation, diarrhea, and mixed subtypes. In Japan, gut microbiota in IBS patients also differ from those observed in healthy individuals, and organic acid by-products observed in the patients correlated with symptoms, quality of life, and alexithymia. Further research on gut microbiota in IBS patients is warranted. PMID:27279158

  6. Immunomodulation of enteric neural function in irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, Dervla

    2015-06-28

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common functional gastrointestinal disorder which is characterised by symptoms such as bloating, altered bowel habit and visceral pain. It's generally accepted that miscommunication between the brain and gut underlies the changes in motility, absorpto-secretory function and pain sensitivity associated with IBS. However, partly due to the lack of disease-defining biomarkers, understanding the aetiology of this complex and multifactorial disease remains elusive. Anecdotally, IBS patients have noted that periods of stress can result in symptom flares and many patients exhibit co-morbid stress-related mood disorders such as anxiety and depression. However, in addition to psychosocial stressors, infection-related stress has also been linked with the initiation, persistence and severity of symptom flares. Indeed, prior gastrointestinal infection is one of the strongest predictors of developing IBS. Despite a lack of overt morphological inflammation, the importance of immune factors in the pathophysiology of IBS is gaining acceptance. Subtle changes in the numbers of mucosal immune cell infiltrates and elevated levels of circulating pro-inflammatory cytokines have been reproducibly demonstrated in IBS populations. Moreover, these immune mediators directly affect neural signalling. An exciting new area of research is the role of luminal microbiota in the modulation of neuro-immune signalling, resulting in local changes in gastrointestinal function and alterations in central neural functioning. Progress in this area has begun to unravel some of the complexities of neuroimmune and neuroendocrine interactions and how these molecular exchanges contribute to GI dysfunction. PMID:26139983

  7. Irritable bowel syndrome: the role of gut neuroendocrine peptides.

    PubMed

    El-Salhy, Magdy; Seim, Inge; Chopin, Lisa; Gundersen, Doris; Hatlebakk, Jan Gunnar; Hausken, Trygve

    2012-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common chronic disorder with a prevalence ranging from 5 to 10 percent of the world's population. This condition is characterised by abdominal discomfort or pain, altered bowel habits, and often bloating and abdominal distension. IBS reduces quality of life in the same degree of impairment as major chronic diseases such as congestive heart failure and diabetes and the economic burden on the health care system and society is high. Abnormalities have been reported in the neuroendocrine peptides/amines of the stomach, small- and large intestine in patients with IBS. These abnormalities would cause disturbances in digestion, gastrointestinal motility and visceral hypersensitivity, which have been reported in patients with IBS. These abnormalities seem to contribute to the symptom development and appear to play a central role in the pathogenesis of IBS. Neuroendocrine peptides/amines are potential tools in the treatment and diagnosis of IBS. In particular, the cell density of duodenal chromogranin A expressing cells appears to be a good histopathological marker for the diagnosis of IBS with high sensitivity and specificity. PMID:22652678

  8. Practical management of irritable bowel syndrome: a clinical review.

    PubMed

    Almquist, Ellinor; Törnblom, Hans; Simrén, Magnus

    2016-03-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional gastrointestinal disorder, frequently managed by general practitioners and gastroenterologists. It is a complex condition, characterized by abdominal pain or discomfort associated with altered bowel habits, and it affects 11% of the population worldwide. It has a profound effect on quality of life for many patients and poses a substantial cost to society. Due to the complexity and diversity of IBS, diagnosis and treatment can be challenging. Common drawbacks in diagnosing and treating this disorder include unnecessary tests, failure to establish trust in the physician-patient relationship and difficulties in explaining the diagnosis. Research in recent years has however refined the diagnostic criteria and improved our ability to safely identify IBS with a limited number of investigations. A concise diagnostic evaluation, guided adequate information, prompt initiation of symptom-guided treatment and consistency in the patient-doctor relationship can help relieve the suffering experienced by patients with IBS. For patients with mild symptoms, reassurance, education, lifestyle changes and dietary advice are often sufficient. Patients with moderate to severe symptoms might need symptom modifying drugs, and psychological treatments such as CBT or hypnotherapy may be offered at this stage. For patients with severe and incapacitating symptoms, a multidisciplinary approach is recommended and psychotropic drugs are often used. This clinical review offers suggestions for a diagnostic approach as well as a treatment strategy, based on the current evidence on pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment in IBS. PMID:26448307

  9. Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Complementary Health Practices: What the Science Says

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Approaches for Irritable Bowel Syndrome: What the Science Says Share: July 2015 © Tom Le Goff/Digital ... products and practices in the context of rigorous science, training complementary health researchers, and disseminating authoritative information ...

  10. Genetic epidemiology and pharmacogenetics in irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Katzka, David A.

    2012-01-01

    The objectives of this review are twofold. Our first objective is to evaluate the evidence supporting a role for genetics in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Specific examples of the associations of genetic variation and symptoms, syndromes, and intermediate phenotypes, including neurotransmitter (serotonergic, α2-adrenergic, and cannabinoid) mechanisms, inflammatory pathways (IL-10, TNFα, GNβ3, and susceptibility loci involved in Crohn's disease), and bile acid metabolism, are explored. The second objective is to review pharmacogenetics in IBS, with the focus on cytochrome P-450 metabolism of drugs used in IBS, modulation of motor and sensory responses to serotonergic agents based on the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) transporter-linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) and 5-HT3 genetic variants, responses to a nonselective cannabinoid agonist (dronabinol) based on cannabinoid receptor (CNR1) and fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) variation, and responses to a bile acid (sodium chenodeoxycholate) and bile acid binding (colesevelam) based on klothoβ (KLB) and fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4) variation. Overall, there is limited evidence of a genetic association with IBS; the most frequently studied association is with 5-HTTLPR, and the most replicated association is with TNF superfamily member 15. Most of the pharmacogenetic associations are reported with intermediate phenotypes in relatively small trials, and confirmation in large clinical trials using validated clinical end points is still required. No published genome-wide association studies in functional gastrointestinal or motility disorders have been published. PMID:22403795

  11. Sex hormones in the modulation of irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mulak, Agata; Taché, Yvette; Larauche, Muriel

    2014-03-14

    Compelling evidence indicates sex and gender differences in epidemiology, symptomatology, pathophysiology, and treatment outcome in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Based on the female predominance as well as the correlation between IBS symptoms and hormonal status, several models have been proposed to examine the role of sex hormones in gastrointestinal (GI) function including differences in GI symptoms expression in distinct phases of the menstrual cycle, in pre- and post-menopausal women, during pregnancy, hormonal treatment or after oophorectomy. Sex hormones may influence peripheral and central regulatory mechanisms of the brain-gut axis involved in the pathophysiology of IBS contributing to the alterations in visceral sensitivity, motility, intestinal barrier function, and immune activation of intestinal mucosa. Sex differences in stress response of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and autonomic nervous system, neuroimmune interactions triggered by stress, as well as estrogen interactions with serotonin and corticotropin-releasing factor signaling systems are being increasingly recognized. A concept of "microgenderome" related to the potential role of sex hormone modulation of the gut microbiota is also emerging. Significant differences between IBS female and male patients regarding symptomatology and comorbidity with other chronic pain syndromes and psychiatric disorders, together with differences in efficacy of serotonergic medications in IBS patients confirm the necessity for more sex-tailored therapeutic approach in this disorder. PMID:24627581

  12. Role of antispasmodics in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Annaházi, Anita; Róka, Richárd; Rosztóczy, András; Wittmann, Tibor

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a long-lasting, relapsing disorder characterized by abdominal pain/discomfort and altered bowel habits. Intestinal motility impairment and visceral hypersensitivity are the key factors among its multifactorial pathogenesis, both of which require effective treatment. Voltage-gated calcium channels mediate smooth muscle contraction and endocrine secretion and play important roles in neuronal transmission. Antispasmodics are a group of drugs that have been used in the treatment of IBS for decades. Alverine citrate, a spasmolytic, decreases the sensitivity of smooth muscle contractile proteins to calcium, and it is a selective 5-HT1A receptor antagonist. Alverine, in combination with simethicone, has been demonstrated to effectively reduce abdominal pain and discomfort in a large placebo-controlled trial. Mebeverine is a musculotropic agent that potently blocks intestinal peristalsis. Non-placebo-controlled trials have shown positive effects of mebeverine in IBS regarding symptom control; nevertheless, in recent placebo-controlled studies, mebeverine did not exhibit superiority over placebo. Otilonium bromide is poorly absorbed from the GI tract, where it acts locally as an L-type calcium channel blocker, an antimuscarinic and a tachykinin NK2 receptor antagonist. Otilonium has effectively reduced pain and improved defecation alterations in placebo-controlled trials in IBS patients. Pinaverium bromide is also an L-type calcium channel blocker that acts locally in the GI tract. Pinaverium improves motility disorders and consequently reduces stool problems in IBS patients. Phloroglucinol and trimethylphloroglucinol are non-specific antispasmodics that reduced pain in IBS patients in a placebo-controlled trial. Antispasmodics have excellent safety profiles. T-type calcium channel blockers can abolish visceral hypersensitivity in animal models, which makes them potential candidates for the development of novel therapeutic agents in the

  13. Role of opioid ligands in the irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Corazziari, E

    1999-03-01

    Endogenous opioid peptides - enkephalins, beta-endorphin and dynorphins - are located in specific sites of the brain, the spinal cord, the autonomic ganglia and the enteric nervous system. Endogenous opioids participate in the regulation of nervous visceral afference and sensitivity as well as of several visceral motor function induced by the central nervous system and through the enteroenteric and the myoenteric reflexes. Their final effect on gut physiology is the net and harmonically balanced result of their binding to mu, delta and kappa opioid receptor subtypes. Exogenous opioid receptor ligands with different affinities for the opioid receptor subtypes have been effectively used to modify and normalize altered gut functions. The mu receptor agonists - morphine and, to a greater extent, the meperidine congeners diphenoxylate and loperamide - have been shown to slow gastrointestinal transit by their effects on the circular and longitudinal muscle of the intestine. Diphenoxylate and, more efficiently, loperamide, for the lack of any effect on the central nervous system, have been usefully employed in the treatment of diarrhea in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients. Unlike the mu receptor agonists morphine and loperamide, which invariably stimulate colonic motility, trimebutine, which has almost equal affinity for mu, delta and kappa receptors, has no effect on normal colonic activity but reduces the abnormal increase in postprandial motor activity in IBS patients and accelerates slow large bowel transit in constipated patients. Opioid ligands can be usefully employed to normalize altered visceral sensitivity in IBS patients. The kappa receptor agonist fedotozine exerts its antinociceptive effect by acting on peripheral nerve endings of sensory vagal and nonvagal afferent pathways. Fedotozine has been shown to increase the threshold of perception to colonic distension in experimental conditions and to affect favourably symptoms of IBS in clinical trials. PMID

  14. Role of antispasmodics in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Annaházi, Anita; Róka, Richárd; Rosztóczy, András; Wittmann, Tibor

    2014-05-28

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a long-lasting, relapsing disorder characterized by abdominal pain/discomfort and altered bowel habits. Intestinal motility impairment and visceral hypersensitivity are the key factors among its multifactorial pathogenesis, both of which require effective treatment. Voltage-gated calcium channels mediate smooth muscle contraction and endocrine secretion and play important roles in neuronal transmission. Antispasmodics are a group of drugs that have been used in the treatment of IBS for decades. Alverine citrate, a spasmolytic, decreases the sensitivity of smooth muscle contractile proteins to calcium, and it is a selective 5-HT1A receptor antagonist. Alverine, in combination with simethicone, has been demonstrated to effectively reduce abdominal pain and discomfort in a large placebo-controlled trial. Mebeverine is a musculotropic agent that potently blocks intestinal peristalsis. Non-placebo-controlled trials have shown positive effects of mebeverine in IBS regarding symptom control; nevertheless, in recent placebo-controlled studies, mebeverine did not exhibit superiority over placebo. Otilonium bromide is poorly absorbed from the GI tract, where it acts locally as an L-type calcium channel blocker, an antimuscarinic and a tachykinin NK2 receptor antagonist. Otilonium has effectively reduced pain and improved defecation alterations in placebo-controlled trials in IBS patients. Pinaverium bromide is also an L-type calcium channel blocker that acts locally in the GI tract. Pinaverium improves motility disorders and consequently reduces stool problems in IBS patients. Phloroglucinol and trimethylphloroglucinol are non-specific antispasmodics that reduced pain in IBS patients in a placebo-controlled trial. Antispasmodics have excellent safety profiles. T-type calcium channel blockers can abolish visceral hypersensitivity in animal models, which makes them potential candidates for the development of novel therapeutic agents in the

  15. The microbiome of the oral mucosa in irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Fourie, Nicolaas H.; Wang, Dan; Abey, Sarah K.; Sherwin, LeeAnne B.; Joseph, Paule V.; Rahim-Williams, Bridgett; Ferguson, Eric G.; Henderson, Wendy A.

    2016-01-01

    abstract Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a poorly understood disorder characterized by persistent symptoms, including visceral pain. Studies have demonstrated oral microbiome differences in inflammatory bowel diseases suggesting the potential of the oral microbiome in the study of non-oral conditions. In this exploratory study we examine whether differences exist in the oral microbiome of IBS participants and healthy controls, and whether the oral microbiome relates to symptom severity. The oral buccal mucosal microbiome of 38 participants was characterized using PhyloChip microarrays. The severity of visceral pain was assessed by orally administering a gastrointestinal test solution. Participants self-reported their induced visceral pain. Pain severity was highest in IBS participants (P = 0.0002), particularly IBS-overweight participants (P = 0.02), and was robustly correlated to the abundance of 60 OTUs, 4 genera, 5 families and 4 orders of bacteria (r2 > 0.4, P < 0.001). IBS-overweight participants showed decreased richness in the phylum Bacteroidetes (P = 0.007) and the genus Bacillus (P = 0.008). Analysis of β-diversity found significant separation of the IBS-overweight group (P < 0.05). Our oral microbial results are concordant with described fecal and colonic microbiome-IBS and -weight associations. Having IBS and being overweight, rather than IBS-subtypes, was the most important factor in describing the severity of visceral pain and variation in the microbiome. Pain severity was strongly correlated to the abundance of many taxa, suggesting the potential of the oral microbiome in diagnosis and patient phenotyping. The oral microbiome has potential as a source of microbial information in IBS. PMID:26963804

  16. Personality traits and emotional patterns in irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Muscatello, Maria Rosaria A; Bruno, Antonio; Mento, Carmela; Pandolfo, Gianluca; Zoccali, Rocco A

    2016-01-01

    The review focuses on those personality traits (neuroticism, extraversion, openness to experience, agreeableness, and conscientiousness), constructs (alexithymia and distressed - Type D personality) and emotional patterns (negative and positive) that are of particular concern in health psychology, with the aim to highlight their potential role on the pathogenesis, onset, symptom clusters, clinical course, and outcome of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Personality traits and emotional patterns play key roles in affecting autonomic, immune, inflammatory, and endocrine functions, thus contributing not only to IBS clinical expression and symptomatic burden, but also to disease physiopathology. In this sense, psychological treatments should address those personality traits and emotional features that are constitutive of, and integral to IBS. The biopsychosocial model of illness applied to IBS acknowledges the interaction between biological, psychological, environmental, and social factors in relation to pain and functional disability. A holistic approach to IBS should take into account the heterogeneous nature of the disorder, and differentiate treatments for different types of IBS, also considering the marked individual differences in prevalent personality traits and emotional patterns. Beyond medications, and lifestyle/dietary interventions, psychological and educational treatments may provide the optimal chance of addressing clinical symptoms, comorbid conditions, and quality of life in IBS patients. PMID:27605876

  17. Irritable bowel syndrome and chronic constipation: Fact and fiction

    PubMed Central

    Bellini, Massimo; Gambaccini, Dario; Usai-Satta, Paolo; De Bortoli, Nicola; Bertani, Lorenzo; Marchi, Santino; Stasi, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and functional constipation (FC) are the most common functional gastrointestinal disorders. According to the Rome III Criteria these two disorders should be theoretically separated mainly by the presence of abdominal pain or discomfort relieved by defecation (typical of IBS) and they should be mutually exclusive. However, many gastroenterologists have serious doubts as regards a clear separation. Both IBS-C and FC, often associated with many other functional digestive and non digestive disorders, are responsible for a low quality of life. The impact of the media on patients’ perception of these topics is sometimes disruptive, often suggesting a distorted view of pathophysiology, diagnosis and therapy. These messages frequently overlap with previous subjective opinions and are further processed on the basis of the different culture and the previous experience of the constipated patients, often producing odd, useless or even dangerous behaviors. The aim of this review was to analyze the most common patients’ beliefs about IBS-C and CC, helping physicians to understand where they should focus their attention when communicating with patients, detecting false opinions and misconceptions and correcting them on the basis of scientific evidence. PMID:26523103

  18. Treatment of Dientamoeba fragilis in Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Engsbro, Anne Line; Stensvold, C. Rune; Nielsen, Henrik V.; Bytzer, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The role of Dientamoeba fragilis in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is incompletely known. We aimed to investigate whether eradication of D. fragilis alleviates symptoms in IBS. Twenty-five D. fragilis-positive IBS patients were treated with Metronidazole (MZ) or Tetracycline. The patients were mostly female (89%), and mean age (SD) was 35.1 (8.2) years. Microbiological response, evaluated 2 weeks post-treatment, was observed in 15 of 25 patients (60%), all by MZ. Clinical response, defined as adequate relief of symptoms, was observed in 7 of 22 patients (32%), all by MZ. In a logistic regression analysis, we found no significant association between clinical and microbiological response. This case study did not support our hypothesis of a simple association between D. fragilis and IBS. Some D. fragilis-infections were insufficiently treated by MZ. Further studies into the prevalence and effect of eradication of D. fragilis in IBS and into efficient treatments of D. fragilis are warranted. PMID:23091195

  19. Unraveling the ties between irritable bowel syndrome and intestinal microbiota.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sung Noh; Rhee, Poong-Lyul

    2014-03-14

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most prevalent functional gastrointestinal disorder. It is a multifactorial disorder. Intestinal microbiota may cause the pathogenesis of IBS by contributing to abnormal gastrointestinal motility, low-grade inflammation, visceral hypersensitivity, communication in the gut-brain axis, and so on. Previous attempts to identify the intestinal microbiota composition in IBS patients have yielded inconsistent and occasionally contradictory results. This inconsistency may be due to the differences in the molecular techniques employed, the sample collection and handling methods, use of single samples that are not linked to fluctuating symptoms, or other factors such as patients' diets and phenotypic characterizations. Despite these difficulties, previous studies found that the intestinal microbiota in some IBS patients was completely different from that in healthy controls, and there does appear to be a consistent theme of Firmicutes enrichment and reduced abundance of Bacteroides. Based on the differences in intestinal microbiota composition, many studies have addressed the roles of microbiota-targeted treatments, such as antibiotics and probiotics, in alleviating certain symptoms of IBS. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the associations between intestinal microbiota and IBS as well as the possible modes of action of intestinal microbiota in the pathogenesis of IBS. Improving the current level of understanding of host-microbiota interactions in IBS is important not only for determining the role of intestinal microbiota in IBS pathogenesis but also for therapeutic modulation of the microbiota. PMID:24627584

  20. Treatment of irritable bowel syndrome: beyond fiber and antispasmodic agents

    PubMed Central

    Sainsbury, Anita; Ford, Alexander C.

    2011-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a chronic functional disorder of the gastrointestinal tract of unknown etiology. The diagnosis of IBS is made clinically, using symptom-based criteria such as the Manning or Rome criteria. Medical therapy for this condition has traditionally been directed towards symptom relief, using fiber or antispasmodic agents. In recent years, emerging data have confirmed the efficacy of antidepressants, psychological therapies, 5-HT3 antagonists, 5-HT4 agonists, and probiotics in the short-term treatment of IBS, although whether these therapies influence the long-term course of the disease is unknown. Increasing knowledge regarding the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying IBS has resulted in a number of novel molecular treatments, which show promise. These include therapies targeting gastrointestinal mucosal chloride channels and guanylate cyclase-C receptors, as well as highly selective agents influencing serotonergic transmission that, at the time of writing, do not appear to have any severe deleterious effects. In this article we provide a summary of current and emerging therapies in this field. PMID:21694813

  1. Recent advances in pharmacological treatment of irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lazaraki, Georgia; Chatzimavroudis, Grigoris; Katsinelos, Panagiotis

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a highly prevalent functional disorder that reduces patients’ quality of life. It is a chronic disorder characterized by abdominal pain or discomfort associated with disordered defecation in the absence of identifiable structural or biochemical abnormalities. IBS imposes a significant economic burden to the healthcare system. Alteration in neurohumoral mechanisms and psychological factors, bacterial overgrowth, genetic factors, gut motility, visceral hypersensitivity, and immune system factors are currently believed to influence the pathogenesis of IBS. It is possible that there is an interaction of one or more of these etiologic factors leading to heterogeneous symptoms of IBS. IBS treatment is predicated upon the patient’s most bothersome symptoms. Despite the wide range of medications and the high prevalence of the disease, to date no completely effective remedy is available. This article reviews the literature from January 2008 to July 2013 on the subject of IBS peripherally acting pharmacological treatment. Drugs are categorized according to their administration for IBS-C, IBS-D or abdominal pain predominant IBS. PMID:25083060

  2. Irritable bowel syndrome and chronic constipation: Fact and fiction.

    PubMed

    Bellini, Massimo; Gambaccini, Dario; Usai-Satta, Paolo; De Bortoli, Nicola; Bertani, Lorenzo; Marchi, Santino; Stasi, Cristina

    2015-10-28

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and functional constipation (FC) are the most common functional gastrointestinal disorders. According to the Rome III Criteria these two disorders should be theoretically separated mainly by the presence of abdominal pain or discomfort relieved by defecation (typical of IBS) and they should be mutually exclusive. However, many gastroenterologists have serious doubts as regards a clear separation. Both IBS-C and FC, often associated with many other functional digestive and non digestive disorders, are responsible for a low quality of life. The impact of the media on patients' perception of these topics is sometimes disruptive, often suggesting a distorted view of pathophysiology, diagnosis and therapy. These messages frequently overlap with previous subjective opinions and are further processed on the basis of the different culture and the previous experience of the constipated patients, often producing odd, useless or even dangerous behaviors. The aim of this review was to analyze the most common patients' beliefs about IBS-C and CC, helping physicians to understand where they should focus their attention when communicating with patients, detecting false opinions and misconceptions and correcting them on the basis of scientific evidence. PMID:26523103

  3. New and Emerging Treatment Options for Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lacy, Brian E; Chey, William D; Lembo, Anthony J

    2015-04-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional gastrointestinal disorder associated with abdominal pain, diarrhea, constipation, or a mix of symptoms. The pathophysiology of IBS is not completely understood but appears to involve genetics, the gut microbiome, immune activation, altered intestinal permeability, and brain-gut interactions. There is no gold standard for diagnosis. Several sets of symptom-based guidelines exist. Treatment strategies for IBS may include both nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic approaches. Lifestyle modifications that aim to improve exercise, sleep, diet, and stress may be warranted. Recent data suggest that a gluten-free diet and a diet low in fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides, and polyols (FODMAPs) may benefit some patients. For patients with diarrhea-predominant IBS, treatment options include the synthetic peripheral μ-opioid receptor agonist loperamide, antispasmodic agents, antidepressants, serotonin 5-HT3 antagonists, and the gut-specific antibiotic rifaximin. Ongoing research is evaluating the use of probiotics. For patients with constipation-predominant IBS, therapeutic strategies may include dietary fiber, laxatives, and the prosecretory agents lubiprostone and linaclotide. Research is continuing to optimize the use of available agents and evaluating new approaches to further improve the care of patients with IBS. PMID:26491416

  4. Gut microbiota role in irritable bowel syndrome: New therapeutic strategies

    PubMed Central

    Distrutti, Eleonora; Monaldi, Lorenzo; Ricci, Patrizia; Fiorucci, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade the impressive expansion of our knowledge of the vast microbial community that resides in the human intestine, the gut microbiota, has provided support to the concept that a disturbed intestinal ecology might promote development and maintenance of symptoms in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). As a correlate, manipulation of gut microbiota represents a new strategy for the treatment of this multifactorial disease. A number of attempts have been made to modulate the gut bacterial composition, following the idea that expansion of bacterial species considered as beneficial (Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria) associated with the reduction of those considered harmful (Clostridium, Escherichia coli, Salmonella, Shigella and Pseudomonas) should attenuate IBS symptoms. In this conceptual framework, probiotics appear an attractive option in terms of both efficacy and safety, while prebiotics, synbiotics and antibiotics still need confirmation. Fecal transplant is an old treatment translated from the cure of intestinal infective pathologies that has recently gained a new life as therapeutic option for those patients with a disturbed gut ecosystem, but data on IBS are scanty and randomized, placebo-controlled studies are required. PMID:26900286

  5. Irritable bowel syndrome: Physicians' awareness and patients' experience

    PubMed Central

    Olafsdottir, Linda Bjork; Gudjonsson, Hallgrímur; Jonsdottir, Heidur Hrund; Jonsson, Jon Steinar; Bjornsson, Einar; Thjodleifsson, Bjarni

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To study if and how physicians use the irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) diagnostic criteria and to assess treatment strategies in IBS patients. METHODS: A questionnaire was sent to 191 physicians regarding IBS criteria, diagnostic methods and treatment. Furthermore, 94 patients who were diagnosed with IBS underwent telephone interview. RESULTS: A total of 80/191 (41.9%) physicians responded to the survey. Overall, 13 patients were diagnosed monthly with IBS by specialists in gastroenterology (SGs) and 2.5 patients by general practitioners (GPs). All the SGs knew of the criteria to diagnose IBS, as did 46/70 (65.7%) GPs. Seventy-nine percent used the patient’s history, 38% used a physical examination, and 38% exclusion of other diseases to diagnose IBS. Only 18/80 (22.5%) physicians used specific IBS criteria. Of the patients interviewed, 59/94 (62.8%) knew they had experienced IBS. Two out of five patients knew IBS and had seen a physician because of IBS symptoms. Half of those received a diagnosis of IBS. A total of 13% were satisfied with treatment. IBS affected daily activities in 43% of cases. CONCLUSION: Half of the patients with IBS who consulted a physician received a diagnosis. Awareness and knowledge of diagnostic criteria for IBS differ between SGs and GPs. PMID:22851864

  6. Therapeutic Advances in Functional Gastrointestinal Disease: Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gaman, Alexandru; Bucur, Maria Cristina

    2009-01-01

    Reported prevalence rates of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are between 8% to 20% in the US general population with an average medical expenditure of US$1.35 billion direct and US$205 million indirect costs. Current pathophysiologic theories are based on abnormalities of both the brain and gut, thus setting a new stage for current and future therapeutic approaches. There are numerous treatment options in IBS acting centrally and peripherally by influencing motility and visceral sensitivity. Clinical evidence is variable; however, newer emerging treatments are being evaluated using better-designed clinical trials. Accurate assessment of IBS drug efficacy is still hampered by heterogeneity of the IBS population. Novel methods such as pharmacogenomics or brain imaging may be helpful in the future to better understand and characterize IBS patient subtypes, and this in turn will lead to more specific and efficient therapeutic options. Patient subpopulation measurement of side effects is also a clinical challenge and further understanding could improve treatment efficacy by enhancing the patient compliance. PMID:19936327

  7. Unraveling the ties between irritable bowel syndrome and intestinal microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Sung Noh; Rhee, Poong-Lyul

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most prevalent functional gastrointestinal disorder. It is a multifactorial disorder. Intestinal microbiota may cause the pathogenesis of IBS by contributing to abnormal gastrointestinal motility, low-grade inflammation, visceral hypersensitivity, communication in the gut-brain axis, and so on. Previous attempts to identify the intestinal microbiota composition in IBS patients have yielded inconsistent and occasionally contradictory results. This inconsistency may be due to the differences in the molecular techniques employed, the sample collection and handling methods, use of single samples that are not linked to fluctuating symptoms, or other factors such as patients’ diets and phenotypic characterizations. Despite these difficulties, previous studies found that the intestinal microbiota in some IBS patients was completely different from that in healthy controls, and there does appear to be a consistent theme of Firmicutes enrichment and reduced abundance of Bacteroides. Based on the differences in intestinal microbiota composition, many studies have addressed the roles of microbiota-targeted treatments, such as antibiotics and probiotics, in alleviating certain symptoms of IBS. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the associations between intestinal microbiota and IBS as well as the possible modes of action of intestinal microbiota in the pathogenesis of IBS. Improving the current level of understanding of host-microbiota interactions in IBS is important not only for determining the role of intestinal microbiota in IBS pathogenesis but also for therapeutic modulation of the microbiota. PMID:24627584

  8. Gut microbiota role in irritable bowel syndrome: New therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Distrutti, Eleonora; Monaldi, Lorenzo; Ricci, Patrizia; Fiorucci, Stefano

    2016-02-21

    In the last decade the impressive expansion of our knowledge of the vast microbial community that resides in the human intestine, the gut microbiota, has provided support to the concept that a disturbed intestinal ecology might promote development and maintenance of symptoms in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). As a correlate, manipulation of gut microbiota represents a new strategy for the treatment of this multifactorial disease. A number of attempts have been made to modulate the gut bacterial composition, following the idea that expansion of bacterial species considered as beneficial (Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria) associated with the reduction of those considered harmful (Clostridium, Escherichia coli, Salmonella, Shigella and Pseudomonas) should attenuate IBS symptoms. In this conceptual framework, probiotics appear an attractive option in terms of both efficacy and safety, while prebiotics, synbiotics and antibiotics still need confirmation. Fecal transplant is an old treatment translated from the cure of intestinal infective pathologies that has recently gained a new life as therapeutic option for those patients with a disturbed gut ecosystem, but data on IBS are scanty and randomized, placebo-controlled studies are required. PMID:26900286

  9. Recent developments in the pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    El-Salhy, Magdy

    2015-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common gastrointestinal disorder, the pathophysiology of which is not completely known, although it has been shown that genetic/social learning factors, diet, intestinal microbiota, intestinal low-grade inflammation, and abnormal gastrointestinal endocrine cells play a major role. Studies of familial aggregation and on twins have confirmed the heritability of IBS. However, the proposed IBS risk genes are thus far nonvalidated hits rather than true predisposing factors. There is no convincing evidence that IBS patients suffer from food allergy/intolerance, with the effect exerted by diet seemingly caused by intake of poorly absorbed carbohydrates and fiber. Obesity is a possible comorbidity of IBS. Differences in the microbiota between IBS patients and healthy controls have been reported, but the association between IBS symptoms and specific bacterial species is uncertain. Low-grade inflammation appears to play a role in the pathophysiology of a major subset of IBS, namely postinfectious IBS. The density of intestinal endocrine cells is reduced in patients with IBS, possibly as a result of genetic factors, diet, intestinal microbiota, and low-grade inflammation interfering with the regulatory signals controlling the intestinal stem-cell clonogenic and differentiation activities. Furthermore, there is speculation that this decreased number of endocrine cells is responsible for the visceral hypersensitivity, disturbed gastrointestinal motility, and abnormal gut secretion seen in IBS patients. PMID:26167065

  10. Diagnosis and treatment of diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lacy, Brian E

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is one of the most common gastrointestinal disorders worldwide. The economic impact of IBS on the health care system is substantial, as is the personal impact on patients. Patients with diarrhea-predominant IBS (IBS-D) comprise a substantial proportion of the overall IBS population. Primary care providers are often the first point of contact for patients with IBS-D and can accurately diagnose IBS after a careful history and examination without extensive diagnostic tests. Several pharmacologic treatments (eg, loperamide, alosetron, and antidepressants) and non-pharmacologic treatments (eg, dietary modification and probiotics) are available for IBS-D, but restrictions on use (eg, alosetron) or the lack of controlled trial data showing reductions in both global and individual IBS-D symptoms (eg, bloating, pain and stool frequency) emphasize the need for alternative treatment options. Two newer medications (eluxadoline and rifaximin) were approved in May 2015 for the treatment of IBS-D, and represent new treatment options for this common gastrointestinal condition. PMID:26929659

  11. Recent developments in the pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    El-Salhy, Magdy

    2015-07-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common gastrointestinal disorder, the pathophysiology of which is not completely known, although it has been shown that genetic/social learning factors, diet, intestinal microbiota, intestinal low-grade inflammation, and abnormal gastrointestinal endocrine cells play a major role. Studies of familial aggregation and on twins have confirmed the heritability of IBS. However, the proposed IBS risk genes are thus far nonvalidated hits rather than true predisposing factors. There is no convincing evidence that IBS patients suffer from food allergy/intolerance, with the effect exerted by diet seemingly caused by intake of poorly absorbed carbohydrates and fiber. Obesity is a possible comorbidity of IBS. Differences in the microbiota between IBS patients and healthy controls have been reported, but the association between IBS symptoms and specific bacterial species is uncertain. Low-grade inflammation appears to play a role in the pathophysiology of a major subset of IBS, namely postinfectious IBS. The density of intestinal endocrine cells is reduced in patients with IBS, possibly as a result of genetic factors, diet, intestinal microbiota, and low-grade inflammation interfering with the regulatory signals controlling the intestinal stem-cell clonogenic and differentiation activities. Furthermore, there is speculation that this decreased number of endocrine cells is responsible for the visceral hypersensitivity, disturbed gastrointestinal motility, and abnormal gut secretion seen in IBS patients. PMID:26167065

  12. Rifaximin: The Revolutionary Antibiotic Approach for Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Triantafyllou, Konstantinos; Sioulas, Athanasios D; Giamarellos-Bourboulis, Evangelos J

    2015-01-01

    A large number of clinical studies using breath testing and a smaller number of studies using quantitative cultures of the upper small intestine established a link between irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO). A series of 12 studies both prospective and retrospective in design in a population of patients with SIBO without IBS showed that the non-absorbable antibiotic rifaximin can eradicate SIBO as proved through decrease of the exhaled hydrogen and methane in breath tests. The efficacy of rifaximin was superior over the comparator treatment in most of these studies. Based on these findings, short course rifaximin was tested in various concentrations in eight open-label trials in patients with IBS and proven SIBO by breath test. Similar efficacy of rifaximin was shown in SIBO eradication; this was accompanied by improvement of the global score for IBS symptoms. Finally, five double-blind randomized clinical trials were conducted in patients with IBS; four were placebo-controlled. The larger trials were TARGET 1 and TARGET 2 studies testing rifaximin at a regimen of 550 mg tid for 14 days. All trials showed a significant superiority of rifaximin over comparator for the improvement of global symptoms of IBS and bloating. Although the aforementioned results render rifaximin a revolutionary therapeutic approach for IBS, several concerns on induction of antimicrobial resistant flora remain. PMID:26202193

  13. Celiac disease: Serologic prevalence in patients with irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mehdi, Zobeiri; Sakineh, Ebrahimi; Mohammad, Farahvash; Mansour, Rezaei; Alireza, Abdollahi

    2012-01-01

    Background: The prevalence of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) in the community is 10%–20% and have symptom based diagnostic criteria. Many symptoms of celiac disease (CD) with 1% prevalence in some communities can mimic IBS. Sensitive and specific serologic tests of CD can detect asymptomatic cases. The purpose of this study was to compare the level of anti-tissue-transglutaminase (tTG) IgA in IBS patients and controls group. Materials and Methods: This case-control study was performed at a University hospital in which 107 patients with IBS who met the Rome II criteria for their diagnosis were compared with 126 healthy age and sex-matched controls. Both groups were investigated for CD by analysis of their serum tTG IgA antibody with human recombinant antigen. Titers were positive containing over 10u/ml and borderline if they were between 4 and 10 u/ml. Result: 86 percent of IBS patients were female. The mean antibody level was 0.837 u/ml in IBS group and 0.933 u/ml in control group without any significant difference. Discussion and Conclusion: Results of this study may intensify disagreement on the situation of CD in IBS patients. PMID:23826010

  14. Irritable bowel syndrome treatment: cognitive behavioral therapy versus medical treatment

    PubMed Central

    Mahvi-Shirazi, Majid; Rasoolzade-Tabatabaei, Sayed-Kazem; Amini, Mohsen

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The study aims to investigate two kinds of treatment in patients suffering from irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and consequently compares its efficacy on improving the symptoms and mental health of patients; one with just medical treatment and another through a combination of psychotherapy and medical treatment. Material and methods Applying general sampling, 50 IBS patients were selected from among those who used to refer to a Gastroenterology Clinic. After physical and mental evaluations based on ROME-II scale and SCL-90-R questionnaires, the subjects were randomly superseded into: the control group with medical treatment and, the case group with a combination of medical and psychological treatments. The acquired data were then analyzed through t-test and Mann-Whitney U-test. Results The findings show that the mental health of patients receiving cognitive behavioral therapy along with the medical treatment was higher than those of the control group at post-test level. It was observed that the therapy reduces the disability caused by IBS. Comparatively, while the cognitive therapy and medical treatments cured 80% of the patients, those receiving cognitive therapy alone showed an extensive reduction of symptoms. Conclusions Considering the role of cognitive behavioral therapy, it is therefore recommend that such patients be managed by a combined team of gastroenterologists and psychologists. PMID:22457686

  15. Treatment of irritable bowel syndrome in China: A review

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chun-Yan; Li, Shu-Chuen

    2015-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common, chronic, functional gastrointestinal disorder with a high incidence rate in the general population, and it is common among the Chinese population. The pathophysiology, etiology and pathogenesis of IBS are poorly understood, with no evidence of inflammatory, anatomic, metabolic, or neoplastic factors to explain the symptoms. Treatment approaches are mainly focused on symptom management to maintain everyday functioning and to improve quality of life for patients with IBS. However, prescribed medications often result in significant side effects, and many IBS sufferers (particularly Chinese) do not improve. Instead of taking a variety of conventional medications, many have turned to taking traditional Chinese medicine or integrated Chinese and Western medicine for remedy. A number of clinical trials have shown that Chinese herbal, acupuncture or integrative therapies presented improved treatment outcomes and reduced side effects in IBS patients. The purpose of this review article is to examine the treatment approaches of IBS that have been published in recent years, especially in China, to assess the possible differences in treating IBS between China and other countries. This would provide some useful information of unique treatment approach in clinical practice for physicians in the management of IBS in China, thus offering more treatment options for IBS patients with potentially better treatment outcomes while reducing the medical cost burden. PMID:25741137

  16. Personality traits and emotional patterns in irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Muscatello, Maria Rosaria A; Bruno, Antonio; Mento, Carmela; Pandolfo, Gianluca; Zoccali, Rocco A

    2016-07-28

    The review focuses on those personality traits (neuroticism, extraversion, openness to experience, agreeableness, and conscientiousness), constructs (alexithymia and distressed - Type D personality) and emotional patterns (negative and positive) that are of particular concern in health psychology, with the aim to highlight their potential role on the pathogenesis, onset, symptom clusters, clinical course, and outcome of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Personality traits and emotional patterns play key roles in affecting autonomic, immune, inflammatory, and endocrine functions, thus contributing not only to IBS clinical expression and symptomatic burden, but also to disease physiopathology. In this sense, psychological treatments should address those personality traits and emotional features that are constitutive of, and integral to IBS. The biopsychosocial model of illness applied to IBS acknowledges the interaction between biological, psychological, environmental, and social factors in relation to pain and functional disability. A holistic approach to IBS should take into account the heterogeneous nature of the disorder, and differentiate treatments for different types of IBS, also considering the marked individual differences in prevalent personality traits and emotional patterns. Beyond medications, and lifestyle/dietary interventions, psychological and educational treatments may provide the optimal chance of addressing clinical symptoms, comorbid conditions, and quality of life in IBS patients. PMID:27605876

  17. Diagnosis and treatment of diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lacy, Brian E

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is one of the most common gastrointestinal disorders worldwide. The economic impact of IBS on the health care system is substantial, as is the personal impact on patients. Patients with diarrhea-predominant IBS (IBS-D) comprise a substantial proportion of the overall IBS population. Primary care providers are often the first point of contact for patients with IBS-D and can accurately diagnose IBS after a careful history and examination without extensive diagnostic tests. Several pharmacologic treatments (eg, loperamide, alosetron, and antidepressants) and non-pharmacologic treatments (eg, dietary modification and probiotics) are available for IBS-D, but restrictions on use (eg, alosetron) or the lack of controlled trial data showing reductions in both global and individual IBS-D symptoms (eg, bloating, pain and stool frequency) emphasize the need for alternative treatment options. Two newer medications (eluxadoline and rifaximin) were approved in May 2015 for the treatment of IBS-D, and represent new treatment options for this common gastrointestinal condition. PMID:26929659

  18. New and Emerging Treatment Options for Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lacy, Brian E.; Chey, William D.; Lembo, Anthony J.

    2015-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional gastrointestinal disorder associated with abdominal pain, diarrhea, constipation, or a mix of symptoms. The pathophysiology of IBS is not completely understood but appears to involve genetics, the gut microbiome, immune activation, altered intestinal permeability, and brain-gut interactions. There is no gold standard for diagnosis. Several sets of symptom-based guidelines exist. Treatment strategies for IBS may include both nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic approaches. Lifestyle modifications that aim to improve exercise, sleep, diet, and stress may be warranted. Recent data suggest that a gluten-free diet and a diet low in fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides, and polyols (FODMAPs) may benefit some patients. For patients with diarrhea-predominant IBS, treatment options include the synthetic peripheral μ-opioid receptor agonist loperamide, antispasmodic agents, antidepressants, serotonin 5-HT3 antagonists, and the gut-specific antibiotic rifaximin. Ongoing research is evaluating the use of probiotics. For patients with constipation-predominant IBS, therapeutic strategies may include dietary fiber, laxatives, and the prosecretory agents lubiprostone and linaclotide. Research is continuing to optimize the use of available agents and evaluating new approaches to further improve the care of patients with IBS. PMID:26491416

  19. Possible pathogenetic roles of abdominal surgery in irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Li, Sen; Yu, Yifeng; Prakash, Ravi

    2011-04-01

    Recently, a plethora of studies have reported that irritably bowel syndrome (IBS) patients have increased incidences of abdominal surgeries, mainly gut surgeries. This high incidence of surgeries highlights the fact that the surgery was done because diagnosis of IBS was not suspected in them. It is then a matter of inquisitiveness as to why the diagnosis of IBS was missed in so many patients. Lack of clinical diagnostic sophistication could be one of the reasons. However, inspite of these facts, it has never been documented that the typical IBS like picture was present in these patients before surgery. Mostly, the preoperative complaints in negative appendectomy patients have been atypical pain syndromes. Thus we should also take into account the possibility that the typical IBS symptom profile was not present in these patients before surgery and that the surgical intervention could have resulted in subsequent development of complete picture of IBS. Infact, in one study, various surgical procedures were known to precede IBS symptoms, where they have also been conceptualized as one of the stressors which could lead to IB. Seeing from the other perspective, the etiological understanding of IBS in medical literature is still so preliminary that we have only been able to enumerate some possible factors. In such a scenario, we need to explore in detail the events which occur frequently in IBS patients, like abdominal surgery. Here, we hypothesize that any abdominal surgical intervention could itself be a reason for development of IBS. We provide evidences from literature in favor of two such possible mechanisms through which any abdominal surgical procedure could act resulting in development of IBS. In addition, we present the report of follow-up of 4 of our own patients where we specifically inquired about IBS before the appendectomy, which turned out to be negative. After 6 months of the followup, the patients developed symptoms which were diagnosable as IBS. PMID

  20. Irritable Bowel Syndrome and the Small Intestinal Microflora. What Do We Know?

    PubMed

    Moraru, Ioana G; Moraru, A G; Dumitraşcu, D L

    2015-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome, one of the most common functional gastro intestinal disorders all over the world is considered to have a multi factorial pathogenesis. Recently more and more studies are focusing on the changes that take place in the microbiota of patients with irritable bowel syndrome, underlining the bacterial role in this pathogenesis. As a consequence, bacterial overgrowth, along with intestinal dysmotility, altered brain-gut axis and genetic factors are considered part of this pathophysiology. This report intends to summarize the actual knowledge on irritable bowel syndrome and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth syndrome, from details on the epidemiology, clinical manifestation, pathophysiology, diagnosis, treatment to details on the relationship between these two syndromes. PMID:26076568

  1. Microbial community and metabolomic comparison of irritable bowel syndrome faeces.

    PubMed

    Ponnusamy, Kannan; Choi, Jung Nam; Kim, Jiyoung; Lee, Sun-Young; Lee, Choong Hwan

    2011-06-01

    Human health relies on the composition of microbiota in an individual's gut and the synthesized metabolites that may alter the gut environment. Gut microbiota and faecal metabolites are involved in several gastrointestinal diseases. In this study, 16S rRNA-specific denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and quantitative PCR analysis showed that the mean similarity of total bacteria was significantly different (P<0.001) in faecal samples from patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS; n = 11) and from non-IBS (nIBS) patients (n = 8). IBS subjects had a significantly higher diversity of total bacteria, as measured by the Shannon index (H') (3.360.05). GC/MS-based multivariate analysis delineated the faecal metabolites of IBS from nIBS samples. Elevated levels of amino acids (alanine and pyroglutamic acid) and phenolic compounds (hydroxyphenyl acetate and hydroxyphenyl propionate) were found in IBS. These results were highly correlated with the abundance of lactobacilli and Clostridium, which indicates an altered metabolism rate associated with these gut micro-organisms. A higher diversity of Bacteroidetes and Lactobacillus groups in IBS faecal samples also correlated with the respective total quantity. In addition, these changes altered protein and carbohydrate energy metabolism in the gut. PMID:21330412

  2. Anti-Enteric Neuronal Antibodies and the Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Sumei; Drossman, Douglas A; Ringel, Yehuda; Whitehead, William E

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aims Functional gastrointestinal disorders are those in which no abnormal metabolic or physical processes, which can account for the symptoms, can be identified. The irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a significant functional disorder, which affects 10-20 percent of the population worldwide. Predominant symptoms of IBS are abnormal defecation associated with abdominal pain, both of which may be exacerbated by psychogenic stress. Our study was designed to test a hypothesis that symptoms in a subset of patients with a diagnosis of IBS are associated with an autoimmune degenerative neuropathy in the enteric nervous system. Methods Serum was collected from Rome II-IBS patients and controls at the University of North Carolina Functional Gastrointestinal Diseases Center. Assay procedures were immunohistochemical localization of antibody binding to enteric neurons and human protein microarray assay for antigens recognized by antibodies in the sera. Results Eighty-seven percent of IBS sera and 59% of control sera contained anti-enteric neuronal antibodies. Antibody immunostaining was seen in the nucleus and cytoplasm of neurons in the enteric nervous system. Protein microarray analysis detected antibody reactivity for autoantigens in serum with anti-enteric neuronal antibodies and no reactivity for the same autoantigens in samples not containing anti-enteric neuronal antibodies in our immunostaining assay. Antibodies in sera from IBS patients recognized only 3 antigens out of an 8,000 immunoprotein array. The 3 antigens were: (1) a nondescript ribonucleoprotein (RNP-complex); (2) small nuclear ribonuclear polypeptide A; and (3) Ro-5,200 kDa. Conclusions Results of the present study suggest that symptoms in a subset of IBS patients might be a reflection of enteric neuronal damage or loss, caused by circulating anti-enteric autoimmune antibodies. PMID:22323991

  3. Modern Management of Irritable Bowel Syndrome: More Than Motility.

    PubMed

    Tack, Jan; Vanuytsel, Tim; Corsetti, Maura

    2016-01-01

    In the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), loperamide seems efficacious for diarrhea and ispaghula for constipation, while musculotropic spasmolytics may relieve abdominal pain. Antidepressants were found to be efficacious for abdominal pain, but their tolerance may be problematic and the therapeutic effect varied largely between trials. While meta-analyses suggest efficacy of probiotics as a group, the quality of the trials is often suboptimal and there is large variability. Lubiprostone, a chloride channel activator, and linaclotide, a guanylyl cyclase-C agonist, showed favorable effects on multiple symptoms in IBS with constipation. For IBS with diarrhea (IBS-D), the 5-HT3 receptor antagonist ramosetron showed efficacy in men and women, but is currently only approved in Japan. A multicenter study with the anti-emetic 5-HT3 receptor antagonist ondansetron showed efficacy on stool pattern in IBS-D. The poorly absorbable antibiotic rifaximin and eluxadoline, a mu opioid receptor agonist and delta antagonist, both showed efficacy in phase III trials in IBS-D and were approved by the FDA. Eluxadoline was associated with increased occurrence of sphincter of Oddi spasm and biliary pancreatitis. The non-pharmacological treatment of IBS, with dietary interventions (mainly gluten elimination and low FODMAP (fructose, oligo-, di-, monosaccharides and polyols)) has received a lot of attention lately. While responder rates vary across studies, perhaps based on regional variations in dietary intake of FODMAPs, the dietary approach seems to have acquired recognition as a valid therapeutic alternative. Long-term studies and comparative studies with pharmacotherapy, as well as elucidation of the underlying mechanisms of action, are needed. PMID:27331917

  4. Treatment of abdominal pain in irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Vanuytsel, Tim; Tack, Jan F; Boeckxstaens, Guy E

    2014-08-01

    Functional abdominal pain in the context of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a challenging problem for primary care physicians, gastroenterologists and pain specialists. We review the evidence for the current and future non-pharmacological and pharmacological treatment options targeting the central nervous system and the gastrointestinal tract. Cognitive interventions such as cognitive behavioral therapy and hypnotherapy have demonstrated excellent results in IBS patients, but the limited availability and labor-intensive nature limit their routine use in daily practice. In patients who are refractory to first-line therapy, tricyclic antidepressants (TCA) and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are both effective to obtain symptomatic relief, but only TCAs have been shown to improve abdominal pain in meta-analyses. A diet low in fermentable carbohydrates and polyols (FODMAP) seems effective in subgroups of patients to reduce abdominal pain, bloating, and to improve the stool pattern. The evidence for fiber is limited and only isphagula may be somewhat beneficial. The efficacy of probiotics is difficult to interpret since several strains in different quantities have been used across studies. Antispasmodics, including peppermint oil, are still considered the first-line treatment for abdominal pain in IBS. Second-line therapies for diarrhea-predominant IBS include the non-absorbable antibiotic rifaximin and the 5HT3 antagonists alosetron and ramosetron, although the use of the former is restricted because of the rare risk of ischemic colitis. In laxative-resistant, constipation-predominant IBS, the chloride-secretion stimulating drugs lubiprostone and linaclotide, a guanylate cyclase C agonist that also has direct analgesic effects, reduce abdominal pain and improve the stool pattern. PMID:24845149

  5. Latent structure of irritable bowel syndrome symptom severity

    PubMed Central

    Jasper, Fabian; Egloff, Boris; Roalfe, Andrea; Witthöft, Michael

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the latent structure of an irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) symptom severity scale in a population of healthy adults. METHODS: The Birmingham IBS symptom questionnaire which consists of three symptom specific scales (diarrhea, constipation, pain) was evaluated by means of structural equation modeling. We compared the original 3-factor solution to a general factor model and a bifactor solution in a large internet sample of college students (n = 875). Statistical comparisons of competing models were conducted by means of χ2 difference tests. Regarding the evaluation of model fit, we examined the comparative fit index (CFI) and the Root Mean Square Error of Approximation (RMSEA). RESULTS: Results clearly favored a bifactor model of IBS symptom severity (CFI = 0.99, RMSEA = 0.05) which consisted of a strong general IBS somatization factor and three symptom specific factors (diarrhea, constipation, pain) based on the subscales of the Birmingham IBS symptom questionnaire. The fit indices of the competing one factor model (CFI = 0.85, RMSEA = 0.17) and three factor model (CFI = 0.97, RMSEA = 0.08) were clearly inferior. χ2 difference tests showed that the differences between the models were indeed significant in favor of the bifactor model (P < 0.001). Correlations of the four latent factors with measures of pain sensitivity, somatoform dissociation, fatigue severity, and demographic variables support the validity of our bifactor model of IBS specific symptom severity. CONCLUSION: The findings suggest that IBS symptom severity might best be understood as a continuous and multidimensional construct which can be reliably and validly assessed with the B-IBS. PMID:25574104

  6. Evaluation of drug treatment in irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Talley, Nicholas J

    2003-01-01

    The irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) remains a therapeutic challenge in part because of the limited understanding of the pathophysiology. The placebo response rate varies in randomized controlled trials from 20 to 70%, and can persist for up to at least 1 year. It is contentious whether dietary fibre and bulking agents relieve the symptoms of IBS; constipation probably improves. Anticholinergic and antispasmodic agents are of questionable benefit in IBS despite positive meta-analyses of poor quality trials. A meta-analysis concluded that the tricyclic antidepressants were superior to placebo in IBS, although the individual trial results were variable. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are of uncertain benefit. Laxatives are used for constipation but probably poorly control the IBS symptom complex. Loperamide is superior to placebo in improvement of diarrhoea but not abdominal pain in IBS. Tegaserod is a well- tolerated aminoguanidine indole derivative of serotonin that is a partial 5HT4–receptor agonist with prokinetic properties; a therapeutic gain over placebo of 5% to 15% has been observed in constipation-predominant IBS in females. Alosetron is a 5HT3-receptor antagonist that is efficacious in females with diarrhoea-predominant IBS, with a 12% to 17% therapeutic gain; the risk of ischaemic colitis is 1 in 350, with very severe constipation occurring in about 1 in 1000. Optimizing study design remains a challenge in IBS. New visceral analgesic and motility modifying agents, as well as anti-inflammatory agents are in trials, and hopefully additional efficacious therapeutic options for patients with IBS will soon emerge. PMID:12968980

  7. Personality factors and profiles in variants of irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Farnam, Alireza; Somi, Mohammad H; Sarami, Firouz; Farhang, Sara; Yasrebinia, Sanaz

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To study the association between irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) variants (constipation, diarrhea, or both) and personality traits in non-psychiatric patients. METHODS: IBS was diagnosed using the Rome II diagnostic criteria after exclusion of organic bowel pathology. The entry of each patient was confirmed following a psychiatric interview. Personality traits and the score of each factor were evaluated using the NEO Five Factor Inventory. RESULTS: One hundred and fifty patients were studied. The mean age (± SD) was 33.4 (± 11.0) year (62% female). Subjects scored higher in neuroticism (26.25 ± 7.80 vs 22.92 ± 9.54, P < 0.0005), openness (26.25 ± 5.22 vs 27.94 ± 4.87, P < 0.0005) and conscientiousness (32.90 ± 7.80 vs 31.62 ± 5.64, P < 0.01) compared to our general population derived from universities of Iran. Our studied population consisted of 71 patients with Diarrhea dominant-IBS, 33 with Constipation dominant-IBS and 46 with Altering type-IBS. Scores of conscientiousness and neuroticism were significantly higher in C-IBS compared to D-IBS and A-IBS (35.79 ± 5.65 vs 31.95 ± 6.80, P = 0.035 and 31.97 ± 9.87, P = 0.043, respectively). Conscientiousness was the highest dimension of personality in each of the variants. Patients with C-IBS had almost similar personality profiles, composed of higher scores for neuroticism and conscientiousness, with low levels of agreeableness, openness and extraversion that were close to those of the general population. CONCLUSION: Differences were observed between IBS patients and the general population, as well as between IBS subtypes, in terms of personality factors. Patients with constipation-predominant IBS showed similar personality profiles. Patients with each subtype of IBS may benefit from psychological interventions, which can be focused considering the characteristics of each subtype. PMID:18081232

  8. No difference in small bowel microbiota between patients with irritable bowel syndrome and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Dlugosz, Aldona; Winckler, Björn; Lundin, Elin; Zakikhany, Katherina; Sandström, Gunnar; Ye, Weimin; Engstrand, Lars; Lindberg, Greger

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have indicated that colonic microbiota may exhibit important differences between patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and healthy controls. Less is known about the microbiota of the small bowel. We used massive parallel sequencing to explore the composition of small bowel mucosa-associated microbiota in patients with IBS and healthy controls. We analysed capsule biopsies from the jejunum of 35 patients (26 females) with IBS aged 18-(36)-57 years and 16 healthy volunteers (11 females) aged 20-(32)-48 years. Sequences were analysed based on taxonomic classification. The phyla with the highest total abundance across all samples were: Firmicutes (43%), Proteobacteria (23%), Bacteroidetes (15%), Actinobacteria (9.3%) and Fusobacteria (7.0%). The most abundant genera were: Streptococcus (19%), Veillonella (13%), Prevotella (12%), Rothia (6.4%), Haemophilus (5.7%), Actinobacillus (5.5%), Escherichia (4.6%) and Fusobacterium (4.3%). We found no difference among major phyla or genera between patients with IBS and controls. We identified a cluster of samples in the small bowel microbiota dominated by Prevotella, which may represent a common enterotype of the upper small intestine. The remaining samples formed a gradient, dominated by Streptococcus at one end and Escherichia at the other. PMID:25687743

  9. Irritable Bowel Syndrome Increases the Risk of Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chien-Hua; Lin, Cheng-Li; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract An abnormal interaction in the brain–gut axis is regarded as the cause of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). We attempted to determine the association between IBS and subsequent development of epilepsy. A total of 32,122 patients diagnosed with IBS between 2000 and 2011 were identified from the Longitudinal Health Insurance Database as the study cohort, and 63,295 controls were randomly selected from the insurants without IBS and frequency-matched according to age, sex, and index year as the comparison cohort. Both cohorts were followed up until the end of 2011 to measure the incidence of epilepsy. We analyzed the risks of epilepsy using Cox proportional hazards regression models. The IBS patients had greater cumulative incidence of epilepsy than the cohort without IBS (log-rank test, P < 0.001 and 2.54 versus 1.86 per 1000 person-years). The IBS cohort had a higher risk of epilepsy after adjusting for age, sex, diabetes, hypertension, stroke, coronary artery disease, head injury, depression, systemic lupus erythematosus, brain tumor, and antidepressants usage (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR]: 1.30, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.17–1.45). Stratified by the presence of other risk factors, the relative risk was also greater for patients with (aHR: 1.25, 95% CI: 1.10–1.41) or without other risk factors (aHR: 1.68, 95% CI: 1.35–2.10) in the IBS cohort than for those in the non-IBS cohort. The age-specific relative risk of epilepsy in the IBS cohort was greater than that in the non-IBS cohort for both 35 to 49 age group and 50 to 64 age group (age ≤ 34, aHR:1.31, 95% CI: 0.93–1.85; age 35–49, aHR: 1.43, 95% CI: 1.12–1.83; age 50–64, aHR: 1.56, 95% CI: 1.27–1.91). However, there was no difference between patients > 65 years with IBS and those without IBS (aHR: 1.11, 95% CI: 0.94–1.31). This population-based cohort study revealed that IBS increases the risk of developing epilepsy. However, IBS may be less influential than other risk factors

  10. Methodological issues in the study of intestinal microbiota in irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Taverniti, Valentina; Guglielmetti, Simone

    2014-07-21

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is an intestinal functional disorder with the highest prevalence in the industrialized world. The intestinal microbiota (IM) plays a role in the pathogenesis of IBS and is not merely a consequence of this disorder. Previous research efforts have not revealed unequivocal microbiological signatures of IBS, and the experimental results are contradictory. The experimental methodologies adopted to investigate the complex intestinal ecosystem drastically impact the quality and significance of the results. Therefore, to consider the methodological aspects of the research on IM in IBS, we reviewed 29 relevant original research articles identified through a PubMed search using three combinations of keywords: "irritable bowel syndrome + microflora", "irritable bowel syndrome + microbiota" and "irritable bowel syndrome + microbiome". For each study, we reviewed the quality and significance of the scientific evidence obtained with respect to the experimental method adopted. The data obtained from each study were compared with all considered publications to identify potential inconsistencies and explain contradictory results. The analytical revision of the studies referenced in the present review has contributed to the identification of microbial groups whose relative abundance significantly alters IBS, suggesting that these microbial groups could be IM signatures for this syndrome. The identification of microbial biomarkers in the IM can be advantageous for the development of new diagnostic tools and novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of different subtypes of IBS. PMID:25083056

  11. Methodological issues in the study of intestinal microbiota in irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Taverniti, Valentina; Guglielmetti, Simone

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is an intestinal functional disorder with the highest prevalence in the industrialized world. The intestinal microbiota (IM) plays a role in the pathogenesis of IBS and is not merely a consequence of this disorder. Previous research efforts have not revealed unequivocal microbiological signatures of IBS, and the experimental results are contradictory. The experimental methodologies adopted to investigate the complex intestinal ecosystem drastically impact the quality and significance of the results. Therefore, to consider the methodological aspects of the research on IM in IBS, we reviewed 29 relevant original research articles identified through a PubMed search using three combinations of keywords: “irritable bowel syndrome + microflora”, “irritable bowel syndrome + microbiota” and “irritable bowel syndrome + microbiome”. For each study, we reviewed the quality and significance of the scientific evidence obtained with respect to the experimental method adopted. The data obtained from each study were compared with all considered publications to identify potential inconsistencies and explain contradictory results. The analytical revision of the studies referenced in the present review has contributed to the identification of microbial groups whose relative abundance significantly alters IBS, suggesting that these microbial groups could be IM signatures for this syndrome. The identification of microbial biomarkers in the IM can be advantageous for the development of new diagnostic tools and novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of different subtypes of IBS. PMID:25083056

  12. Role of pinaverium bromide in south Indian patients with irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jayanthi, V; Malathi, S; Ramathilakam, B; Dinakaran, N; Balasubramanian, V; Mathew, S

    1998-04-01

    The effect of pinaverium bromide in controlling gastrointestinal symptoms in 61 patients with irritable bowel syndrome was studied, as an open trial. Individually, there was significant relief in abdominal discomfort/pain as well as in bowel symptoms in most of the patients. Abdominal pain was reduced in 49%, stool consistency improved in 74%, straining and urgency decreased in 71% and mucus decreased in 64%. Tolerance to the drug administered was good and side-effects reported were few. PMID:11273320

  13. Towards an Irritable Bowel Syndrome Control System Based on Artificial Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podolski, Ina; Rettberg, Achim

    To solve health problems with medical applications that use complex algorithms is a trend nowadays. It could also be a chance to help patients with critical problems caused from nerve irritations to overcome them and provide a better living situation. In this paper a system for monitoring and controlling the nerves from the intestine is described on a theoretical basis. The presented system could be applied to the irritable bowel syndrome. For control a neural network is used. The advantages for using a neural network for the control of irritable bowel syndrome are the adaptation and learning. These two aspects are important because the syndrome behavior varies from patient to patient and have also concerning the time a lot of variations with respect to each patient. The developed neural network is implemented and can be simulated. Therefore, it can be shown how the network monitor and control the nerves for individual input parameters.

  14. Psychological Treatments for Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lackner, Jeffrey M.; Mesmer, Christina; Morley, Stephen; Dowzer, Clare; Hamilton, Simon

    2004-01-01

    This study conducted a systematic review to assess the quality of existing literature on psychological treatments for irritable bowel syndrome and to quantify the evidence for their efficacy. Three independent reviewers (2 from England, 1 from the United States) coded the quality of 32 studies, 17 of which provided data suitable for meta-analysis.…

  15. [Irritable bowel syndrome in the light of Rome consensus III (2006): 10 years later].

    PubMed

    Parfenov, A I; Albulova, E A; Ruchkina, I N

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most common diagnosis in gastroenterology. Over 10 years after Rome consensus III (2006), there has been much new information on the pathogenesis of IBS and its therapy options. The paper analyzes basic investigations that have contributed to the theory of this disease and to a better quality of life in patients. PMID:27135104

  16. Gut microbiota influences low fermentable substrate diet efficacy in children with irritable bowel syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We sought to determine whether a low fermentable substrate diet (LFSD) decreases abdominal pain frequency in children with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and to identify potential microbial factors related to diet efficacy. Pain symptoms, stooling characteristics, breath hydrogen and methane, whole ...

  17. Increased gastrointestinal permeability and gut inflammation in children with functional abdominal pain and Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To determine gastrointestinal (GI) permeability and fecal calprotectin concentration in children 7 to 10 years of age with functional abdominal pain and irritable bowel syndrome (FAP/IBS) versus control subjects and ascertain potential relationships with pain symptoms and stooling, GI permeability a...

  18. Associations among gut permeability, inflammatory markers, and symptoms in patients with irritable bowel syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alterations in gastrointestinal (GI) permeability and immune measures are present in some patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) but the relationship to symptoms is poorly defined. In adults with IBS, we compared permeability, unstimulated peripheral blood monocyte (PBMC) interleukin-10 (IL-10...

  19. Autonomic nervous system function in young children with functional abdominal pain or irritable bowel syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adults with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) have been reported to have alterations in autonomic nervous system function as measured by vagal activity via heart rate variability. Whether the same is true for children is unknown. We compared young children 7 to 10 years of age with functional abdominal...

  20. Small bowel bacterial overgrowth in patients with irritable bowel syndrome: the first study in iran.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, Mehdi HayatBakhsh; Zahedi, MohammadJavad; Darvish Moghadam, Sodaif; Shafieipour, Sara; HayatBakhsh Abbasi, Mahroo

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) may have a role in the pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). So, the aim of this study was to assess the association between SIBO and IBS by using glucose breath test (GBT) in Kerman city as the first study in Iranian population. METHODS 107 patients with IBS and 107 healthy individuals were enrolled in our study. All the participants underwent GBT. A peak of H2 values >20 p.p.m above the basal value after glucose ingestion was considered suggestive of SIBO. SPSS software version 17 was used for data analysis. P value < 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. RESULTS Of the 107 patients with IBS, 40 had positive GBT (37.4%) compared with 14 (12.1%) out of the 107 control participants(p< 0.001). Dominant symptoms in patients with IBS were diarrhea in 36(33.6%), constipation in 12(11.2%), abdominal pain in 22(20.6%), bloating in 28(26.2%), and change in bowel habit in 9(8.4%) patients. There was not statistically significant difference among any of this IBS subgroups and positive GBT (p=0.44). CONCLUSION There is a positive association between IBS and SIBO. We suggest a Placebo-controlled bacterial eradication study for identifying the role of SIBO in IBS. PMID:25628852

  1. Syndrome Differentiation in Chinese Herbal Medicine for Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Literature Review of Randomized Trials

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qing; Yang, Guo-Yan; Liu, Jian-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has been commonly used for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Syndrome differentiation is one of the important characteristics of TCM. To assess the application and basic characteristics of syndrome differentiation in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of Chinese herbal medicine for IBS, we performed this paper. We conducted electronic searches in main Chinese and English databases till March 2012. A total of 735 RCTs involving 67,784 IBS participants were included. 224 (30.5%) studies applied syndrome differentiation. The major syndromes of IBS patients were the syndrome of liver stagnation and spleen deficiency (56.8%), spleen-stomach weakness (49.4%), spleen-kidney yang deficiency (48.1%), and cold and heat in complexity (29.6%). Herbal formulas were prescribed based on syndrome differentiation in 202 studies. Chinese patent medicine was more commonly used in studies that only enrolled patients with a specific syndrome. 15 studies compared the therapeutic effect among different syndromes, of which 6 studies showed that there were significant differences among different syndromes. The low use of TCM syndrome differentiation in randomized trials of Chinese herbal medicine for IBS results in the poor pertinence of treatment. TCM syndrome differentiation should be used in further studies at the stage of recruitment, treatment, and data analyses. PMID:23554827

  2. Contribution of Blastocystishominis subtypes and associated inflammatory factors in development of irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Azizian, Marzieh; Basati, Gholam; Abangah, Ghobad; Mahmoudi, Mohammad Reza; Mirzaei, Asad

    2016-05-01

    Blastocystis hominis with worldwide distribution is a human intestinal protozoa found in all countries. There have been differences in the severity of the pathogenesis of various Blastocystis spp. and a concomitant variation in the plasma concentration of the cytokines in patients with irritable bowel syndrome. In the present study, we aimed to demonstrate the contribution of B. hominis subtypes in the development of irritable bowel syndrome. Stool samples were collected from patients with gastrointestinal disorders. All samples were evaluated through native-lugol method. Total DNA was extracted. A PCR protocol was developed to amplify a specific region of the SSU ribosomal DNA (rDNA) gene. Serum levels of IL-6 and TNF-α were determined by immunoassay methods. The ClustalW algorithm was applied to align and blast the nucleotide sequences of the amplified region of the SSU rDNA gene. To evaluate the phylogenetic and molecular evolutionary of the nucleotide sequences, we used the MEGA software. In this study, we found 26 haplotypes of B. hominis in the studied samples which were collectively belong to five subtypes (ST1, ST2 in patients without irritable bowel syndrome vs. ST3 and two unknown subtypes in patients with irritable bowel syndrome). Result of ELISA showed a high level of IL-6 and TNF-α in the serum of patients with irritable bowel syndrome. The genetic heterogeneity of B. hominis and the existence of different subtypes of the protozoan in patients with IBS may shed light to the fact that some subtypes of parasites may involve in the pathogenesis of IBS. PMID:26841770

  3. Ispaghula therapy in irritable bowel syndrome: improvement in overall well-being is related to reduction in bowel dissatisfaction.

    PubMed

    Jalihal, A; Kurian, G

    1990-01-01

    This placebo controlled, double-blind, cross-over trial involving 20 patients was conducted to assess the effect of ispaghula husk on the major bowel symptoms and the whole gut transit time in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and to determine if changes in these parameters were related to global improvement. All 20 patients were interviewed at the end of the treatment periods and 14 patients kept concurrent daily records. Ispaghula therapy resulted in improvement in global symptoms and satisfying bowel movements (P less than 0.001) but produced no change in abdominal pain or flatulence. There was a correlation between the improvement of well-being and the number of days of satisfying bowel movements (P less than 0.001) but not with the indexes of pain, stool frequency or changes in the transit time. The easing of bowel dissatisfaction appears to be a major reason for the therapeutic success of ispaghula in IBS. PMID:2129822

  4. Protocol for a randomized controlled study of Iyengar yoga for youth with irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Irritable bowel syndrome affects as many as 14% of high school-aged students. Symptoms include discomfort in the abdomen, along with diarrhea and/or constipation and other gastroenterological symptoms that can significantly impact quality of life and daily functioning. Emotional stress appears to exacerbate irritable bowel syndrome symptoms suggesting that mind-body interventions reducing arousal may prove beneficial. For many sufferers, symptoms can be traced to childhood and adolescence, making the early manifestation of irritable bowel syndrome important to understand. The current study will focus on young people aged 14-26 years with irritable bowel syndrome. The study will test the potential benefits of Iyengar yoga on clinical symptoms, psychospiritual functioning and visceral sensitivity. Yoga is thought to bring physical, psychological and spiritual benefits to practitioners and has been associated with reduced stress and pain. Through its focus on restoration and use of props, Iyengar yoga is especially designed to decrease arousal and promote psychospiritual resources in physically compromised individuals. An extensive and standardized teacher-training program support Iyengar yoga's reliability and safety. It is hypothesized that yoga will be feasible with less than 20% attrition; and the yoga group will demonstrate significantly improved outcomes compared to controls, with physiological and psychospiritual mechanisms contributing to improvements. Methods/Design Sixty irritable bowel syndrome patients aged 14-26 will be randomly assigned to a standardized 6-week twice weekly Iyengar yoga group-based program or a wait-list usual care control group. The groups will be compared on the primary clinical outcomes of irritable bowel syndrome symptoms, quality of life and global improvement at post-treatment and 2-month follow-up. Secondary outcomes will include visceral pain sensitivity assessed with a standardized laboratory task (water load task

  5. Overlapping irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease: less to this than meets the eye?

    PubMed Central

    Quigley, Eamonn M. M.

    2016-01-01

    Though distinct in terms of pathology, natural history and therapeutic approach, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have some features in common. These include shared symptomatology and largely similar demographics. However, in most instances, clinical presentation, together with laboratory, imaging and endoscopic findings will readily permit the differentiation of active IBD from IBS. More problematic is the situation where a subject with IBD, in apparent remission, continues to complain of symptoms which, in aggregate, satisfy commonly employed criteria for the diagnosis of IBS. Access to methodologies, such the assay for levels of calprotectin in feces, now allows identification of ongoing inflammation in some such individuals and prompts appropriate therapy. More challenging is the IBD patient with persisting symptoms and no detectable evidence of inflammation; is this coincident IBS, IBS triggered by IBD or an even more subtle level of IBD activity unrecognized by available laboratory or imaging methods? Arguments can be advanced for each of these proposals; lacking definitive data, this issue remains unresolved. The occurrence of IBS-type symptoms in the IBD patient, together with some data suggesting a very subtle level of ‘inflammation‘ or ‘immune activation‘ in IBS, raises other questions: is IBS a prodromal form of IBD; and are IBS and IBD part of the spectrum of the same disease? All of the available evidence indicates that the answer to both these questions should be a resounding ‘no’. Indeed, the whole issue of overlap between IBS and IBD should be declared moot given their differing pathophysiologies, contrasting natural histories and divergent treatment paths. The limited symptom repertoire of the gastrointestinal tract may well be fundamental to the apparent confusion that has, of late, bedeviled this area. PMID:26929782

  6. Are Probiotics or Prebiotics Useful in Pediatric Irritable Bowel Syndrome or Inflammatory Bowel Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Guandalini, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Treatment options for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are notoriously either inadequate (IBS) or loaded with potentially serious side effects and risks (IBD). In recent years, a growing interest in effective and safer alternatives has focused on the potential role of probiotics and their metabolic substrates, prebiotics. It is in fact conceivable that the microbiome might be targeted by providing the metabolic fuel needed for the growth and expansion of beneficial microorganisms (prebiotics) or by administering to the host such microorganisms (probiotics). This review presents a concise update on currently available data, with a special emphasis on children. Data for prebiotics in IBS are scarce. Low doses have shown a beneficial effect, while high doses are counterproductive. On the contrary, several controlled trials of probiotics have yielded encouraging results. A meta-analysis including nine randomized clinical trials in children showed an improvement in abdominal pain for Lactobacillus GG, Lactobacillus reuteri DSM 17938, and the probiotic mixture VSL#3. The patients most benefiting from probiotics were those with predominant diarrhea or with a post-infectious IBS. In IBD, the use of prebiotics has been tested only rarely and in small scale clinical trials, with mixed results. As for probiotics, data in humans from about three dozens clinical trials offer mixed outcomes. So far, none of the tested probiotics has proven successful in Crohn’s disease, while in ulcerative colitis a recent meta-analysis on 12 clinical trials (1 of them in children) showed efficacy for the probiotic mixture VSL#3 in contributing to induce and to maintain remission. It is evident that this is a rapidly evolving and promising field; more data are very likely to yield a better understanding on what strains should be used in different specific clinical settings and in what doses. PMID:25593899

  7. THE INTESTINAL MICROBIOTA AND THE ROLE OF PROBIOTICS IN IRRITABLE BOWEL SYNDROME: a review.

    PubMed

    Moraes-Filho, Joaquim Prado; Quigley, Eamonn M M

    2015-12-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome is a common, chronic relapsing gastrointestinal disorder that affects 7%-22% of the population worldwide. According to Rome III Criteria, the disorder is defined by the coexistence of abdominal discomfort or pain associated with an alteration in bowel habits. Its pathophysiology is not completely understood but, in addition to some important abnormalities, the disturbed intestinal microbiota has also been described supported by several strands of evidence. The treatment of irritable bowel syndrome is based upon several therapeutic approaches but few have been successful or without adverse events and more recently the gut microbiota and the use of probiotics have emerged as a factor to be considered. Probiotics are live micro-organisms which when consumed in adequate amounts confer a health benefit to the host, such as Lactic bacteria among others. An important scientific rationale has emerged for the use of probiotics in irritable bowel syndrome, although the data regarding different species are still limited. Not all probiotics are beneficial: it is important to select the specific strain which should be supported by good evidence base. The mechanisms of action of probiotics are described and the main strains are quoted. PMID:26840477

  8. [Bran in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome].

    PubMed

    Dubinin, A V; Kabanov, A V; Kirkin, B V; Kolkunova, G K; Igorianova, N A

    1987-01-01

    The paper deals with the problem of using wheat bran in the treatment of patients with irritable colon syndrome expressed as spastic constipation. The effectiveness of the treatment with the wheat bran only (in a dose of 30-35 g/day), and in combination with drugs was comparatively studied in 105 patients. The bran fractions differing in the particle size, in the content of cellulose, starch and vitamins were used in the treatment. The combined therapy proved to be advantageous only in the rate of the clinical effect, while the acceleration of the movement along the large intestine did not depend on the treatment type. A long-term (during one year) follow-up of the patients showed that the bran intake led to the cessation of the disease relapse; when the bran was abolished the symptoms of the disease appeared in 11 out of 12 cases. The highest effect was recorded with the bran fraction containing 55.3% cellulose, 18.3% lignin, 157 micrograms tocopherol and the lowest amount of starch--18.0%. A conclusion has been made that the wheat bran are effective in the treatment and prevention of intestinal diseases, the effectiveness of the treatment depends on the summary content of food fibers in the nutrition. PMID:3031879

  9. [Irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease: Is there a connection?].

    PubMed

    Mearin, Fermín; Perelló, Antonia; Balboa, Agustín

    2009-05-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is one of the most common functional gastrointestinal disorders and is that with the greatest socioeconomic impact worldwide. Diagnosis of IBS is based on clinical criteria that have been modified over time, the Rome II criteria being those that are currently followed. Some of the symptoms of IBS are similar to those in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which can hamper or delay diagnosis. The use of inflammatory markers in stools (such as calprotectin) may help to distinguish between these two entities. A possible connection between IBS and IBD could be based on five points: (i) both disorders have similar symptoms; (ii) symptoms often overlap in the same patients; (iii) IBS and IBD have a common familial aggregation; (iv) some predisposing factors, such as a history of acute gastroenteritis, play a role in both disorders, and (v) importantly, signs of microinflammation are found in the bowels of patients with IBS. With regard to this latter point, an increase in inflammatory cells has been found in the intestinal mucosa of patients with IBS and, more specifically, mastocytes have been found to be increased in the jejunum and colon while CD3 and CD25 intraepithelial lymphocytes have be observed to be increased in the colon. Moreover, activated mastocytes are increased near to nerve endings in patients with IBS and this finding has been correlated with the intensity of both intestinal symptoms (abdominal pain) and psychological symptoms (depression and fatigue). A good model of microinflammation is post-infectious IBS, since the timing of the onset of the infectious process is known. In patients with post-infectious IBS, an increase in intraepithelial lymphocytes and enterochromaffin cells is initially found, which is reduced over time; consequently, although the symptoms of IBS persist, after 3 years no differences are detected in the number of inflammatory cells between IBS patients and controls. Among the various

  10. Effectiveness of trimebutine maleate on modulating intestinal hypercontractility in a mouse model of postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Long, Yanqin; Liu, Ying; Tong, Jingjing; Qian, Wei; Hou, Xiaohua

    2010-06-25

    Trimebutine maleate, which modulates the calcium and potassium channels, relieves abdominal pain in patients with irritable bowel syndrome. However, its effect on postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome is not clarified. The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of trimebutine maleate on modulating colonic hypercontractility in a mouse model of postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome. Mice infected up to 8 weeks with T. spiralis underwent abdominal withdrawal reflex to colorectal distention to evaluate the visceral sensitivity at different time points. Tissues were examined for histopathology scores. Colonic longitudinal muscle strips were prepared in the organ bath under basal condition or to be stimulated by acetylcholine and potassium chloride, and consecutive concentrations of trimebutine maleate were added to the bath to record the strip responses. Significant inflammation was observed in the intestines of the mice infected 2 weeks, and it resolved in 8 weeks after infection. Visceral hyperalgesia and colonic muscle hypercontractility emerged after infection, and trimebutine maleate could effectively reduce the colonic hyperreactivity. Hypercontractility of the colonic muscle stimulated by acetylcholine and high K(+) could be inhibited by trimebutine maleate in solution with Ca(2+), but not in Ca(2+) free solution. Compared with 8-week postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome group, 2-week acute infected strips were much more sensitive to the stimulators and the drug trimebutine maleate. Trimebutine maleate was effective in reducing the colonic muscle hypercontractility of postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome mice. The findings may provide evidence for trimebutine maleate to treat postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome patients effectively. PMID:20371236

  11. Food allergy in irritable bowel syndrome: new facts and old fallacies

    PubMed Central

    Isolauri, E; Rautava, S; Kalliomäki, M

    2004-01-01

    The notion of food allergy in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is not new. However, recent evidence suggests significant reduction in IBS symptom severity in patients on elimination diets, provided that dietary elimination is based on foods against which the individual had raised IgG antibodies. These findings should encourage studies dissecting the mechanisms responsible for IgG production against dietary antigens and their putative role in IBS PMID:15361481

  12. [Effectiveness of pharmacotherapy of irritated bowel syndrome from the standpoint of evidence based medicine].

    PubMed

    Sheptulin, A A; Vize-Khripunova, M A

    2014-01-01

    Evaluation of the action of various medicines used to treat irritated bowel syndrome from the standpoint of evidence based medicine indicates that most of them (spasmolytics, probiotics, loperamide, aperients) show but low effectiveness. The use of more efficacious preparations (alosterone, cisapride, tegacerode) is associated with serious adverse reactions whereas prucalopride is applied for unregistered indications. It necessitates the development of new drugs with enhanced effectiveness and tolerability. PMID:25775909

  13. Standardized hypnosis treatment for irritable bowel syndrome: the North Carolina protocol.

    PubMed

    Palsson, Olafur S

    2006-01-01

    The North Carolina protocol is a seven-session hypnosis-treatment approach for irritable bowel syndrome that is unique in that the entire course of treatment is designed for verbatim delivery. The protocol has been tested in two published research studies and found to benefit more than 80% of patients. This article describes the development, content, and testing of the protocol, and how it is used in clinical practice. PMID:16316883

  14. Transrectal ultrasonography: relationship with anorectal manometry, electromyography and sensitivity tests in irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Awad, R A; Martin, J; Cal y Major, M; Noguera, J L; Ramos, R; Amezcua, C; Camacho, S; Santiago, R; Ramirez, J L; Castro, J

    1998-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome is the most frequently diagnosed disorder in gastroenterology. It has been demonstrated with specialized motility studies that these patients compared to healthy subjects show changes in rectoanal electrical and mechanical activity and in rectoanal sensitivity. However, until now no report has been published on morphological alterations in the rectum or the internal anal sphincter. Twenty-five consecutive patients with irritable bowel syndrome (mean age 32, range 17-47 years; 24 females) were evaluated prospectively by transrectal ultrasonography, rectal sensitivity studies, and recordings of both electrical and mechanical activity of the distal rectum and internal anal sphincter during a 2-h inter-digestive period. Ten healthy volunteers (mean age 34.5, range 19-50 years) served as a control group. Paired and non-paired Student's two-tailed t test and linear regression analysis were used. It was shown that muscle thickness of the rectum during rest (4.7 +/- 0.1 mm) was correlated neither with its rectal spike amplitude (0.73 +/- 0.1 mV) nor with rectal spike frequency (17.06 +/- 3.6 spike/2 h). In addition, the diameter of the internal anal sphincter (1.2 +/- 0.1 mm) was correlated neither with its resting pressure, nor with frequency (17.1 +/- 3.2/2 h), duration (14.9 +/- 1.5 s), or amplitude (14.1 +/- 1.9 mmHg), of inhibition of the spontaneous rectoanal inhibitory reflex. No correlation was found between ultrasonographic parameters and rectal distension variables (r = 0.03). This study demonstrates for the first time morphological anorectal changes in patients with irritable bowel syndrome compared to healthy subjects, in addition to showing that morphological changes are independent of physiological ones. Therefore both transrectal ultrasonography to determine anorectal morphology and electromanometry to assess anorectal function are important measures in the evaluation of patients with irritable bowel syndrome. PMID:9638493

  15. What I Need to Know about Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... a day ● ● having loose, watery stools ● ● feeling an urgent need to have a bowel movement Symptoms of ... is in the gut. 5 ● ● Mental health issues. Psychological, or mental health, issues such as anxiety or ...

  16. Pilot study of small bowel mucosal gene expression in patients with irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Camilleri, Michael; Carlson, Paula; Valentin, Nelson; Acosta, Andres; O'Neill, Jessica; Eckert, Deborah; Dyer, Roy; Na, Jie; Klee, Eric W; Murray, Joseph A

    2016-09-01

    Prior studies in with irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhea (IBS-D) patients showed immune activation, secretion, and barrier dysfunction in jejunal or colorectal mucosa. We measured mRNA expression by RT-PCR of 91 genes reflecting tight junction proteins, chemokines, innate immunity, ion channels, transmitters, housekeeping genes, and controls for DNA contamination and PCR efficiency in small intestinal mucosa from 15 IBS-D and 7 controls (biopsies negative for celiac disease). Fold change was calculated using 2((-ΔΔCT)) formula. Nominal P values (P < 0.05) were interpreted with false detection rate (FDR) correction (q value). Cluster analysis with Lens for Enrichment and Network Studies (LENS) explored connectivity of mechanisms. Upregulated genes (uncorrected P < 0.05) were related to ion transport (INADL, MAGI1, and SONS1), barrier (TJP1, 2, and 3 and CLDN) or immune functions (TLR3, IL15, and MAPKAPK5), or histamine metabolism (HNMT); downregulated genes were related to immune function (IL-1β, TGF-β1, and CCL20) or antigen detection (TLR1 and 8). The following genes were significantly upregulated (q < 0.05) in IBS-D: INADL, MAGI1, PPP2R5C, MAPKAPK5, TLR3, and IL-15. Among the 14 nominally upregulated genes, there was clustering of barrier and PDZ domains (TJP1, TJP2, TJP3, CLDN4, INADL, and MAGI1) and clustering of downregulated genes (CCL20, TLR1, IL1B, and TLR8). Protein expression of PPP2R5C in nuclear lysates was greater in patients with IBS-D and controls. There was increase in INADL protein (median 9.4 ng/ml) in patients with IBS-D relative to controls (median 5.8 ng/ml, P > 0.05). In conclusion, altered transcriptome (and to lesser extent protein) expression of ion transport, barrier, immune, and mast cell mechanisms in small bowel may reflect different alterations in function and deserves further study in IBS-D. PMID:27445342

  17. Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Co-morbid Gastrointestinal and Extra-gastrointestinal Functional Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Dekel, Roy

    2010-01-01

    The irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the best known of the functional gastrointestinal tract disorders. Many IBS patients have at least one co-morbid somatic complaint and many meet diagnostic criteria for other functional disorders. Patients with IBS and another functional disorder, in comparison with patients with IBS only, have more severe IBS symptoms, a higher rate of psychopathology, greater impairment of quality of life, and more illness-related work absenteeism. Estimates of the prevalence of IBS in patients with fibromyalgia range from 30-35% to as high as 70%. Studies of IBS among patients with chronic fatigue syndrome have reported a prevalence ranging from 35-92%. The prevalence of IBS among patients with chronic fatigue syndrome is reported to be 14%. IBS patients with other co-morbid functional disorders appear to manifest a greater degree of somatization. It has been suggested that the presence of multiple co-morbid disorders may be a marker for psychological influences on etiology. This raises the question of whether the functional syndromes represent the same pathophysiological process, i.e., are the same entity that has been separated into different clinical entities because of medical sub-specialization, or are indeed separate disorders. While the answer to this question awaits further research, it would appear that most functional patients who meet formal diagnostic criteria for more than one functional disorder manifest one disorder clinically more that the others and seek consultation differentially for that set of symptoms. PMID:20535341

  18. Clinical Practice Guideline: Irritable bowel syndrome with constipation and functional constipation in the adult.

    PubMed

    Mearin, Fermín; Ciriza, Constanza; Mínguez, Miguel; Rey, Enrique; Mascort, Juan José; Peña, Enrique; Cañones, Pedro; Júdez, Javier

    2016-06-01

    In this Clinical Practice Guideline we discuss the diagnostic and therapeutic approach of adult patients with constipation and abdominal complaints at the confluence of the irritable bowel syndrome spectrum and functional constipation. Both conditions are included among the functional bowel disorders, and have a significant personal, healthcare, and social impact, affecting the quality of life of the patients who suffer from them. The first one is the irritable bowel syndrome subtype, where constipation represents the predominant complaint, in association with recurrent abdominal pain, bloating, and abdominal distension. Constipation is characterized by difficulties with or low frequency of bowel movements, often accompanied by straining during defecation or a feeling of incomplete evacuation. Most cases have no underlying medical cause, and are therefore considered as a functional bowel disorder. There are many clinical and pathophysiological similarities between both disorders, and both respond similarly to commonly used drugs, their primary difference being the presence or absence of pain, albeit not in an "all or nothing" manner. Severity depends not only upon bowel symptom intensity but also upon other biopsychosocial factors (association of gastrointestinal and extraintestinal symptoms, grade of involvement, and perception and behavior variants). Functional bowel disorders are diagnosed using the Rome criteria. This Clinical Practice Guideline has been made consistent with the Rome IV criteria, which were published late in May 2016, and discuss alarm criteria, diagnostic tests, and referral criteria between Primary Care and gastroenterology settings. Furthermore, all the available treatment options (exercise, fluid ingestion, diet with soluble fiber-rich foods, fiber supplementation, other dietary components, osmotic or stimulating laxatives, probiotics, antibiotics, spasmolytics, peppermint essence, prucalopride, linaclotide, lubiprostone, biofeedback

  19. Functional Dyspepsia: Subtypes, Risk Factors, and Overlap with Irritable Bowel Syndrome in a Population of African Patients

    PubMed Central

    Nwokediuko, Sylvester Chuks; Ijoma, Uchenna; Obienu, Olive

    2012-01-01

    Background. Functional dyspepsia is the prototype functional gastrointestinal disorder. This study was designed to determine its prevalence, subtypes, and risk factors associated with the subtypes. Method. Patients with upper gastrointestinal symptoms who presented for endoscopy were administered a questionnaire containing the functional dyspepsia and irritable bowel syndrome modules of the Rome III diagnostic criteria. Results. Of 192 patients who had functional dyspepsia, epigastric pain syndrome, postprandial distress syndrome, and combination of the two subtypes accounted for 79.2%, 62.5%, and 50%, respectively. Multivariate analysis of the risk factors showed that independent predictors of postprandial distress syndrome were alcohol and irritable bowel syndrome while irritable bowel syndrome was independent predictor of epigastric pain syndrome. Alcohol, smoking, and use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were independent predictors of cooccurrence of postprandial distress syndrome and epigastric pain syndrome. Conclusion. Functional dyspepsia accounts for 62.5% of dyspepsia in a population of black African patients. Regarding symptomatology, epigastric pain syndrome, postprandial distress syndrome, and combination of the two subtypes account for 79.2%, 62.5%, and 50%, respectively. Risk factors for functional dyspepsia are irritable bowel syndrome, alcohol, smoking, and use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. PMID:23213327

  20. [Frequency of celiac disease and irritable bowel syndrome coexistance and its influence on the disease course].

    PubMed

    Zwolińska-Wcisło, Małgorzata; Galicka-Latała, Danuta; Rozpondek, Piotr; Rudnicka-Sosin, Lucyna; Mach, Tomasz

    2009-01-01

    Celiac disease is increasingly recognized autoimmune enteropathy caused by a permanent gluten intolerance. Gluten is the main storage protein of wheat, in genetically predisposed individuals. Celiac disease risk in first degree relatives is about 10%. Diarrhea and changes of bowel movement, observed as well in celiac disease as in IBS, may lead to misdiagnosis of IBS basing on the Rome criteria or may be associated with coexistence of both diseases. The aim of the study was to assess the celiac disease prevalence in patients with irritable bowel syndrome. The study group comprised 200 patients (120 women and 80 men) aged 18-78 years (mean: 46.7 years) with diarrhoeal form of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), according to the Rome criteria II. At the beginning and after a three month period anti tissue transglutaminase antibodies (IgA tTG) were estimated. Gastroscopy with biopsy where performed in those with IgA tTG titre above 1/200. 40 patients were immunologically positive and 14 of them have histopathologically proven celiac disease. In the group of patients with detected celiac disease, gluten free diet was applied besides the treatment with trimebutin or mebewerin, recommended for IBS. After 6 months the decrease of IgA tTG titre in the serum was observed. In 5 of these patients IgA tTG level was negative. It was associated with the significant decrease of clinical symptoms, such as diarrhea and flatulence. The remaining symptoms, such as abdominal pain, feeling of incomplete defecation demanded continuation of IBS treatment. With regard to often atypical celiac disease symptoms--adult active searching should be performed to differentiate from irritable bowel syndrome. PMID:19689036

  1. Rifaximin for the treatment of diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kane, John S; Ford, Alexander C

    2016-04-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a chronic, functional bowel disorder characterized by abdominal pain or discomfort and altered bowel habit. The pathophysiology is unclear, but may include altered gut motility, visceral hypersensitivity, abnormal central pain processing, chronic low-grade intestinal inflammation, or disturbances in the gut microbiome. These etiological mechanisms, alongside environmental factors such as stress and anxiety, vary between individuals and represent potential targets for treatment. Rifaximin is a poorly absorbed oral antibiotic proposed to act on the gut microenvironment, used in the treatment of travelers' diarrhea and hepatic encephalopathy. Clinical trials suggest the drug can reduce global IBS symptoms and improve bloating, abdominal pain, and stool consistency in some patients with non-constipated IBS, leading to Food and Drug Administration approval in the United States. This article considers the pharmacology of rifaximin, the evidence for its use in IBS, and the safety and tolerability of the drug. PMID:26753693

  2. Stem Cells in the Intestine: Possible Roles in Pathogenesis of Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ratanasirintrawoot, Sutheera; Israsena, Nipan

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome is one of the most common functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorders that significantly impair quality of life in patients. Current available treatments are still not effective and the pathophysiology of this condition remains unclearly defined. Recently, research on intestinal stem cells has greatly advanced our understanding of various GI disorders. Alterations in conserved stem cell regulatory pathways such as Notch, Wnt, and bone morphogenic protein/TGF-β have been well documented in diseases such as inflammatory bowel diseases and cancer. Interaction between intestinal stem cells and various signals from their environment is important for the control of stem cell self-renewal, regulation of number and function of specific intestinal cell types, and maintenance of the mucosal barrier. Besides their roles in stem cell regulation, these signals are also known to have potent effects on immune cells, enteric nervous system and secretory cells in the gut, and may be responsible for various aspects of pathogenesis of functional GI disorders, including visceral hypersensitivity, altered gut motility and low grade gut inflammation. In this article, we briefly summarize the components of these signaling pathways, how they can be modified by extrinsic factors and novel treatments, and provide evidenced support of their roles in the inflammation processes. Furthermore, we propose how changes in these signals may contribute to the symptom development and pathogenesis of irritable bowel syndrome. PMID:27184041

  3. Stem Cells in the Intestine: Possible Roles in Pathogenesis of Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ratanasirintrawoot, Sutheera; Israsena, Nipan

    2016-07-30

    Irritable bowel syndrome is one of the most common functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorders that significantly impair quality of life in patients. Current available treatments are still not effective and the pathophysiology of this condition remains unclearly defined. Recently, research on intestinal stem cells has greatly advanced our understanding of various GI disorders. Alterations in conserved stem cell regulatory pathways such as Notch, Wnt, and bone morphogenic protein/TGF- β have been well documented in diseases such as inflammatory bowel diseases and cancer. Interaction between intestinal stem cells and various signals from their environment is important for the control of stem cell self-renewal, regulation of number and function of specific intestinal cell types, and maintenance of the mucosal barrier. Besides their roles in stem cell regulation, these signals are also known to have potent effects on immune cells, enteric nervous system and secretory cells in the gut, and may be responsible for various aspects of pathogenesis of functional GI disorders, including visceral hypersensitivity, altered gut motility and low grade gut inflammation. In this article, we briefly summarize the components of these signaling pathways, how they can be modified by extrinsic factors and novel treatments, and provide evidenced support of their roles in the inflammation processes. Furthermore, we propose how changes in these signals may contribute to the symptom development and pathogenesis of irritable bowel syndrome. PMID:27184041

  4. Clinical evaluation of Bilvadileha in the management of irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Ramanand; Pandya, Darshana H.; Baghel, Madhav Singh

    2013-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is one of the most common conditions encountered in clinical practice but one of the least well understood. Symptoms of this disorder are chronic, sometimes severe and often respond poorly to treatment, resulting in reduced quality of life. There is no specific test for IBS, although diagnostic tests may be performed to rule out other problems. In present clinical trial 51 patients of IBS were registered out of which 46 patients completed the treatment. Bilvadileha was administered for the duration of 12 weeks. The therapy showed statistically significant improvement in all the clinical features of IBS as well as in the IBS severity score. PMID:24696573

  5. Emerging Pharmacologic Therapies for Constipation-predominant Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Chronic Constipation.

    PubMed

    Eswaran, Shanti; Guentner, Amanda; Chey, William D

    2014-04-30

    Irritable bowel syndrome with constipation and chronic functional constipation are common digestive disorders that negatively impact quality of life and account for billions of dollars in health care costs. Related to the heterogeneity of pathogenesis that underlie these disorders and the failure of symptoms to reliably predict underlying pathophysiology, traditional therapies provide relief to only a subset of affected individuals. The evidence surrounding new and emerging pharmacologic treatments, which include both luminally and systemically acting drugs, is discussed here. These include agents such as lubiprostone, bile acid modulations, guanylate cyclase-C receptor agonists, serotonin receptor modulators and herbal therapies. PMID:24840367

  6. ["Theater of the body" -- the possibilities of psychodrama in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome].

    PubMed

    Pénzes, István; Bánki, Adrienn; Túry, Ferenc

    2014-01-01

    We present the case and psychodrama therapy of a patient suffering from irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). First we provide a review of the literature on IBS. The therapeutic possibilities of psychodrama are in the dramatization of the perception of one's own body. Interpersonal communication is the focus of group work: the greatest challenge for the patient is the expression of her emotions, impulses, wishes - without somatization. The source of the non-specific psychotherapeutic effect is the free, spontaneous and creative communication and the rediscovery of play. PMID:25411224

  7. Hereditary angioedema presenting as irritable bowel syndrome: a case of early closure

    PubMed Central

    Benrajab, Karim M.; Singh, Gurkeerat; Obah, Eugene

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal pain is one of the most common reasons for outpatient and emergency department visits. We present one such case of early closure in a 32-year-old male with recurrent abdominal pain who was diagnosed with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Family history was suspicious for hereditary angioedema (HAE). The HAE workup came back positive, and the patient was started on prophylactic therapy, which led to an improvement in symptoms and quality of life. The purpose of this case is to create awareness among physicians to test for HAE in patients diagnosed with IBS who, based on their history or physical examination, have clinical suspicion for HAE. PMID:26486119

  8. Brain-gut interaction in irritable bowel syndrome: new findings of a multicomponent disease model.

    PubMed

    Schmulson, M J

    2001-02-01

    Knowledge on the pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome has evolved, beginning with disturbances in motility to visceral hypersensitivity, and ultimately to alterations in brain-gut bi-directional communication, where neurotransmitters such as serotonin play a key role. Recently, a multicomponent disease model that integrates all these alterations was proposed. This model is divided into physiological, cognitive, emotional and behavioral components that explain the gastrointestinal as well as the constitutional symptoms. In recent years there has been an explosion of research together with new developments in pharmacological treatments for IBS that support each component of this model. This review presents recent data in favor of these alterations in IBS. PMID:11347592

  9. Main ion channels and receptors associated with visceral hypersensitivity in irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho Rocha, Heraldo Arcela; Dantas, Bruna Priscilla Vasconcelos; Rolim, Thaísa Leite; Costa, Bagnólia Araújo; de Medeiros, Arnaldo Correia

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a very frequent functional gastrointestinal disorder characterized by recurrent abdominal pain or discomfort and alteration of bowel habits. The IBS physiopathology is extremely complex. Visceral hypersensitivity plays an important role in the pathogenesis of abdominal pain in both in vitro and in vivo models of this functional disorder. In order to obtain a general view of the participation of the main ion channels and receptors regarding the visceral hypersensitivity in the IBS and to describe their chemical structure, a literature review was carried out. A bibliographical research in the following electronic databases: Pubmed and Virtual Library in Health (BVS) was fulfilled by using the search terms “ion channels” “or” “receptors” “and” “visceral hypersensitivity” “or” “visceral nociception” “and” “irritable bowel syndrome”. Original and review articles were considered for data acquisition. The activation of the ATP ion-gated channels, voltage-gated sodium (Nav) and calcium (Cav) channels, as well as the activation of protease-activated receptors (PAR2), transient receptor potential vanilloide-1, serotonin, cannabinoids and cholecystokinin are involved in the genesis of visceral hypersensitivity in IBS. The involvement of ion channels and receptors concerning visceral hypersensitivity is noteworthy in IBS models. PMID:24976114

  10. Renzapride: a new drug for the treatment of constipation in the irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Scarpellini, Emidio; Tack, Jan

    2008-11-01

    Renzapride is a novel drug currently under clinical evaluation for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Renzapride is a mixed 5-hydroxytryptamine type 4 (5-HT4) agonist and 5-HT3 receptor antagonist that has a stimulatory effect on gastrointestinal motility and transit, as established by in vivo and in vitro studies. Its therapeutic efficacy, tolerability and safety have been evaluated in diabetic gastroparesis in a single study, as well as in IBS in a few other studies. Phase II studies indicated potential beneficial effects on symptoms and bowel habits in patients with constipation-predominant IBS and mixed-type IBS. The outcome of Phase III studies is currently under evaluation. PMID:18922103

  11. Solitary nonspecific ileal ulcer. Diagnosis by coloileoscopy in a patient with previously assumed irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Börsch, G; Jahnke, A; Bergbauer, M; Nebel, W

    1983-11-01

    We present a case of solitary nonspecific ileal ulcer found by coloileoscopy in a patient with previously assumed irritable bowel syndrome. Follow-up endoscopies two weeks after initiation of short-term prednisone therapy, and again four months later, demonstrated rapid and persistent healing. This observation raises the question of whether or not primary ileal ulcers are indeed as rare as previously assumed when only surgical and autopsy findings were taken into consideration. Also, the natural history of this clinical entity, in general, could be somewhat more benign than suggested by those ulcers in which complications make surgery necessary, since these cases may not adequately reflect the full clinical spectrum of nonspecific small-bowel ulcers. PMID:6628147

  12. Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) subtypes: Nothing resembles less an IBS than another IBS.

    PubMed

    Mearin Manrique, Fermín

    2016-02-01

    Two new members of "IBS Patient Association" met at a meeting. Feeling somewhat lost, not knowing anybody present, they introduced themselves to each other. After exchanging names, one asks the other - "What's your problem?" The other one answers - "I got constipation that laxatives fail to relieve, and my belly, which is always bloated, sometimes hurts so much that I can´t even leave home". Deeply surprised, the first individual inquires - "What are you doing here then?" "Why, I came to this meeting looking for some help for my irritable colon", she answered. "Irritable colon? That's no irritable colon. Irritable bowel syndrome is what I suffer from, and it's diarrhea that won't let me be; can't stop running to the toilet, and cramps just pop up any time". Now both looked surprised. Both thought they had come to the wrong meeting, and both were on the verge of leaving. Luckily, the Association's secretary showed up and explained that both had IBS. PMID:26838485

  13. Electroacupuncture versus Moxibustion for Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Randomized, Parallel-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yin; Chen, Yue-Hua; Yin, Xiao-Jun; Wang, An-Qi; Chen, Xing-Kui; Lu, Jin-Hua; Ji, Rong; Bao, Chun-Hui; Sun, Jie; Zhao, Ji-Meng; Wu, Huan-Gan

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To compare the impacts of electroacupuncture (EA) and mild moxibustion (Mox) on patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Method. Eighty-two IBS patients were randomly allocated into EA group (n = 41) and Mox group (n = 41) and received corresponding interventions for four weeks. Before and after the treatment, the Visual Analogue Scale for Irritable Bowel Syndrome (VAS-IBS) was used to evaluate the gastrointestinal symptoms and mental well-being; and the expression of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT), 5-HT3 receptor (5-HT3R), and 5-HT4 receptor (5-HT4R) in sigmoid mucosal tissue were detected. Results. Both EA and Mox can radically improve the total VAS-IBS score (P < 0.05), and EA was found to be more effective in ameliorating the symptom of constipation, while Mox was found to be more effective in ameliorating the symptom of diarrhoea. The abnormal expressions of 5-HT, 5-HT3R, and 5-HT4R in both groups were significantly improved after the treatments (all P < 0.05), and EA was superior to Mox in regulating the abnormally decreased 5-HT4R expression in IBS patients with constipation (P < 0.05). Conclusion. Electroacupuncture and mild moxibustion were both effective in improving IBS symptoms and modulate abnormal expressions of 5-HT, 5-HT3R, and 5-HT4R in the colonic tissue. PMID:26294923

  14. Long-term treatment of irritable bowel syndrome: results of a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Misra, S P; Thorat, V K; Sachdev, G K; Anand, B S

    1989-10-01

    To examine the long-term management of irritable bowel syndrome we conducted a two-part controlled therapeutic trial on 28 patients who had recovered completely after four to six weeks of treatment with ispaghula husk and propantheline. In part I patients were randomly divided into two groups. Group A received a placebo capsule while Group B continued with treatment as before. After six months the response to treatment was assessed according to a scoring system. The overall relapse rate in Group B was 46 per cent compared to 82 per cent in group A. With continued treatment patients in Group B became asymptomatic from the fourth month while patients in Group A continued to deteriorate. In part II, patients who had relapsed whilst on placebo received active treatment. Six of the seven who agreed to continue with the study became asymptomatic within four weeks. However, all the patients who were asymptomatic while on active treatment relapsed on discontinuation and again recovered on reinstitution of active treatment. We conclude that irritable bowel syndrome is a chronic relapsing disorder and that treatment with a combination of ispaghula husk and propantheline is effective, both in relieving symptoms and in the maintenance of remission. PMID:2697886

  15. Recommendations on chronic constipation (including constipation associated with irritable bowel syndrome) treatment

    PubMed Central

    Paré, Pierre; Bridges, Ronald; Champion, Malcolm C; Ganguli, Subhas C; Gray, James R; Irvine, E Jan; Plourde, Victor; Poitras, Pierre; Turnbull, Geoffrey K; Moayyedi, Paul; Flook, Nigel; Collins, Stephen M

    2007-01-01

    While chronic constipation (CC) has a high prevalence in primary care, there are no existing treatment recommendations to guide health care professionals. To address this, a consensus group of 10 gastroenterologists was formed to develop treatment recommendations. Although constipation may occur as a result of organic disease, the present paper addresses only the management of primary CC or constipation associated with irritable bowel syndrome. The final consensus group was assembled and the recommendations were created following the exact process outlined by the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology for the following areas: epidemiology, quality of life and threshold for treatment; definitions and diagnostic criteria; lifestyle changes; bulking agents and stool softeners; osmotic agents; prokinetics; stimulant laxatives; suppositories; enemas; other drugs; biofeedback and behavioural approaches; surgery; and probiotics. A treatment algorithm was developed by the group for CC and constipation associated with irritable bowel syndrome. Where possible, an evidence-based approach and expert opinions were used to develop the statements in areas with insufficient evidence. The nature of the underlying pathophysiology for constipation is often unclear, and it can be tricky for physicians to decide on an appropriate treatment strategy for the individual patient. The myriad of treatment options available to Canadian physicians can be confusing; thus, the main aim of the recommendations and treatment algorithm is to optimize the approach in clinical care based on available evidence. PMID:17464377

  16. Aerosolized GLP-1 for treatment of diabetes mellitus and irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Siekmeier, Rüdiger; Hofmann, Thomas; Scheuch, Gerhard; Pokorski, Mieczyslaw

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is a global burden and the prevalence of the disease, in particular diabetes mellitus type 2 is rapidly increasing worldwide. After introduction of insulin into clinical therapy about 90 years ago a major number of pharmaceuticals has been developed for treatment of diabetes mellitus type 2. One of these, the incretin glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), like insulin, needs subcutaneous administration causing inconvenience to patients. However, administration of GLP-1 plays also a role for treatment of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). To improve patient convenience inhaled insulin (Exubera(®)) was developed and approved but failed market acceptance some years ago. Recently, another inhalative insulin (Afrezza(®)) received market approval and GLP-1 may serve as another candidate drug for inhalative administration. This review analyzes the current literature investigating alternative administration of GLP-1 and GLP-1 analogs focusing on inhalation. Several formulations for inhalative administration of GLP-1 and analogs were investigated in animal studies, whereas there are only few clinical data. However, feasibility of GLP-1 inhalation has been shown and should be further investigated as such type of drug administration may serve for improvement of therapy in patients with diabetes mellitus or irritable bowel syndrome. PMID:25427821

  17. Irritable bowel syndrome and intestinal parasites: a view from South America.

    PubMed

    Vasquez-Rios, George; Machicado, Jorge D; Terashima, Angelica; Marcos, Luis A

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional gastrointestinal disorder of uncertain etiology. Several studies have proposed the possible role of intestinal parasites in the pathogenesis of IBS. We aimed to summarize the epidemiological studies that describe a possible link between intestinal parasites and IBS, with special interest in endemic areas for intestinal parasitism such as South America. A comprehensive review of the literature was conducted by using the keywords: irritable bowel syndrome, intestinal parasites, protozoan infection, soil-transmitted helminths and South America. Giardia lamblia may cause IBS symptoms that can persist several years after effective treatment. Dientamoeba fragilis can cause IBS-like symptoms, but low sensitive parasitological techniques may fail to detect it. Entamoeba histolytica can cause a chronic non-dysenteric colitis, but several studies have failed to find an association with IBS. The role of Blastocystis hominis in IBS remains controversial. In addition, epidemiological studies evaluating the effect of soil-transmitted helminths in IBS are scant. Symptoms elicited by intestinal parasites may resemble to those in IBS, especially in endemic areas such as South America, where both the prevalence of IBS and intestinal parasitism are high. Whether these organisms are the cause or contributing factors in IBS remains a subject of study. Routine parasitologicalexamination of stools in individuals who full-fit the criteria for IBS should be included upon initial assessment in endemic countries. PMID:27409092

  18. Inhibition of the colonic motor response to eating by pinaverium bromide in irritable bowel syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Fioramonti, J; Frexinos, J; Staumont, G; Bueno, L

    1988-01-01

    The effect of pinaverium bromide on the colonic motor response to eating was investigated in 10 irritable bowel syndrome patients, by means of an intraluminal probe supporting 8 groups of electrodes. At each site examined from transverse to sigmoid colon, the electromyograms exhibited 2 kinds of spike bursts: short spike bursts (SSB) localized at one electrode, and long spike bursts (LSB), isolated, propagated orally or aborally over a few centimeters, or aborally propagated over the whole length of the colon investigated (migrating long spike bursts, MLSB). Recordings were continuously performed over 24 hr. Each patient received at 7.00 p.m. on day 1 and at noon on day 2 an 800-1000 Kcal meal preceded by IV administration of pinaverium bromide (4 mg) or placebo. After placebo administration, the duration of LSB activity and the number of MLSB were significantly increased over 3 postprandial hr by comparison with the 2 hr preceding the meal. After pinaverium injection no significant postprandial change in LSB and MLSB activity was noted. The SSB activity was not modified after the meals preceded by placebo or pinaverium injection. These results suggest that the inhibitory action of pinaverium bromide on postprandial colonic motility may support the clinical efficacy of this agent in the treatment of the irritable bowel syndrome. PMID:3371838

  19. [Effectiveness of pinaverium bromide therapy on colonic motility disorders in irritable bowel syndrome].

    PubMed

    Wittmann, T; Fehér, A; Rosztóczy, A; Jánosi, J

    1999-02-28

    The special patterns of the slow wave activity in irrittable bowel syndrome by means of surface electromyography were examined and the effect of pinaverium bromide on the symptoms and on the colonic motility in this disease was estimated. Twenty two patients with irritable bowel syndrome and 7 healthy controls were selected to the study. The clinical symptoms were abdominal pain and bloating in all patients, constipation in 9, and diarrhoea in 6 cases. Surface electromyography was carried out before and on the 14th day of the treatment with pinaverium bromide (50 mg t. i. d). The colonic motility was analysed in a 2 hour fasting and a 2 hour postprandial period following a standard (800 kCal) meal. The slow wave frequency of 0.01-0.04 Hz were selected and analysed. The mean frequency of activity peaks (n/10 min) and power-index (area under curve, microV 10 min) were measured. For statistical analysis Student's t-test was applied. Electromyogram of patients with irritable bowel syndrome showed a significant increase of the measured colonic motility parameters both in fasting and postprandial states. Fourteen days of pinaverium bromide treatment was able to significantly reduce the intensity of the colonic motor activity. Administration of pinaverium bromide completely released in 6 and significantly improved the abdominal pain in other 12 patients, while the bloating disappeared in 12 and was significantly improved in 5 from 22 patients. Pinaverium bromide was able to normalise the stool frequency: the weekly number of stools was decreased from 16 to 7 in the patients complaining diarrhoea ant it was increased from 2 to 6 in the patients with constipation. PMID:10204402

  20. Irritable Bowel Syndrome May Be Associated with Elevated Alanine Aminotransferase and Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Hwa; Kim, Kwang-Min; Joo, Nam-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Recent studies have revealed close relationships between hepatic injury, metabolic pathways, and gut microbiota. The microorganisms in the intestine also cause irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The aim of this study was to examine whether IBS was associated with elevated hepatic enzyme [alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST)], gamma-glutamyl transferase (γ-GT) levels, and metabolic syndrome (MS). Materials and Methods This was a retrospective, cross-sectional, case-control study. The case and control groups comprised subjects who visited our health promotion center for general check-ups from June 2010 to December 2010. Of the 1127 initially screened subjects, 83 had IBS according to the Rome III criteria. The control group consisted of 260 age- and sex-matched subjects without IBS who visited our health promotion center during the same period. Results Compared to control subjects, patients with IBS showed significantly higher values of anthropometric parameters (body mass index, waist circumference), liver enzymes, γ-GT, and lipid levels. The prevalences of elevated ALT (16.9% vs. 7.7%; p=0.015) and γ-GT (24.1% vs. 11.5%; p=0.037) levels were significantly higher in patients with IBS than in control subjects. A statistically significant difference was observed in the prevalence of MS between controls and IBS patients (12.7% vs. 32.5%; p<0.001). The relationships between elevated ALT levels, MS, and IBS remained statistically significant after controlling for potential confounding factors. Conclusion On the basis of our study results, IBS may be an important condition in certain patients with elevated ALT levels and MS. PMID:26632395

  1. ASSOCIATON BETWEEN INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE AND IRRITABLE BOWEL SYNDROME: A POPULATION-BASED STUDY IN NICARAGUA

    PubMed Central

    Becker-Dreps, Sylvia; Morgan, Douglas; Peña, Rodolfo; Cortes, Loreto; Martin, Christopher F.; Valladares, Eliette

    2010-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a disabling functional gastrointestinal disorder, which serves as a model for abdominal pain syndromes. An association between intimate partner violence and IBS has been shown among Caucasian women in the industrialized world. To determine whether this relationship transcends cultural boundaries, we conducted a population-based, cross-sectional survey in Nicaragua, using the innovative Health and Demographic Surveillance System in the León province. Women who had experienced physical intimate partner violence had significantly increased risk of IBS (OR 2.08, 95% CI, 1.35, 3.21), as did those who had experienced sexual intimate partner violence (OR 2.85, 95% CI 1.45, 5.59). These findings argue for intimate partner violence screening among Latina women with IBS. PMID:20558772

  2. Editorial: new thoughts on the association between diverticulosis and irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Spiller, Robin

    2014-12-01

    As our population ages it is increasingly common to encounter patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)-like symptoms and diverticulosis, but the nature of the association is obscure. This Editorial discusses the paper from Japan showing an association between IBS-like symptoms and left-sided but not right-sided diverticulosis. The left colon with its higher motor activity is more likely to be associated with complications of diverticulosis, including perforation and abscess formation. The underlying pathophysiology of the syndrome of post-diverticulitis IBS is discussed and clinical markers of centrally driven symptoms suggested as a means to avoid ineffective colonic resections in those with IBS-like diverticular disease. PMID:25470583

  3. Endogenous inhibition of somatic pain is impaired in girls with irritable bowel syndrome compared with healthy girls

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Endogenous pain inhibition is often deficient in adults with chronic pain conditions including irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). It is unclear whether deficiencies in pain inhibition are present in young children with IBS. The present study compared endogenous pain inhibition, somatic pain threshold, ...

  4. Gastrointestinal (GI) permeability is associated with trait anxiety in children with functional abdominal pain (FAP) and Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    FAP and IBS affect 10-15% of school age children and bear many physiological similarities to irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) in adults (e.g., functional pain, visceral hyperalgesia). Animal models of IBS have suggested a relationship between neonatal stress and increased GI permeability later in life...

  5. The interpretation of Rome II criteria and method of assessment affect the irritable bowel syndrome classification of children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pediatric classification of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is complicated by the potential discrepancy, between parent and child report and by the interpretation of pain-stool relations in the Rome III classification system. The aim of this study was to compare IBS classification by diary and by chi...

  6. Food, fibre, bile acids and the pelvic floor: An integrated low risk low cost approach to managing irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Philpott, Hamish; Nandurkar, Sanjay; Lubel, John; Gibson, Peter R

    2015-01-01

    Patients presenting with abdominal pain and diarrhea are often labelled as suffering from irritable bowel syndrome, and medications may be used often without success. Advances in the understanding of the causes of the symptoms (including pelvic floor weakness and incontinence, bile salt malabsorption and food intolerance) mean that effective, safe and well tolerated treatments are now available. PMID:26525925

  7. Effectiveness of probiotics in irritable bowel syndrome: Updated systematic review with meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Didari, Tina; Mozaffari, Shilan; Nikfar, Shekoufeh; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the efficacy of probiotics in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients. METHODS: PubMed, Cochrane library, Scopus, Google Scholar, and Clinicaltrial.gov databases were searched for literature published between September 2007 and December 2013. The applied Mesh terms were “probiotics,” “irritable bowel syndrome,” and “irritable bowel syndrome treatment.” The collected data contained24 clinical trials, of which 15 were eligible for meta-analysis and nine were reviewed systematically. All studies were randomized placebo-controlled trials in patients with IBS that investigated the efficacy of probiotics in IBS improvement. The Jadad score was used to assess the methodological quality of trials. The quality scale ranges from 0 to 5 points, with a score ≤ 2 indicating a low quality report, and a score of ≥ 3 indicating a high quality report. Relative risk (RR), standardized effect size, and 95%CI were calculated using the DerSimonian-Laird method. The Cochran Q test was used to test heterogeneity with P < 0.05. Funnel plots were constructed and Egger’s and Begg-Mazumdar tests were performed to assess publication bias. RESULTS: A total of 1793 patients were included in the meta-analysis. The RR of responders to therapies based on abdominal pain score in IBS patients for two included trials comparing probiotics to placebo was 1.96 (95%CI: 1.14-3.36; P = 0.01). RR of responders to therapies based on a global symptom score in IBS patients for two included trials comparing probiotics with placebo was 2.43 (95%CI: 1.13-5.21; P = 0.02). For adequate improvement of general symptoms in IBS patients, the RR of seven included trials (six studies) comparing probiotics with placebo was 2.14 (95%CI: 1.08-4.26; P = 0.03). Distension, bloating, and flatulence were evaluated using an IBS severity scoring system in three trials (two studies) to compare the effect of probiotic therapy in IBS patients with placebo, the standardized effect size of mean

  8. The role of experimental models in developing new treatments for irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Holschneider, Daniel P; Bradesi, Sylvie; Mayer, Emeran A

    2011-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is characterized by chronic, recurrent abdominal pain and altered bowel habits and is currently defined by symptom criteria and the absence of detectable organic disease. The underlying pathophysiology remains incompletely understood. Despite considerable efforts by the scientific community and the pharmaceutical industry to develop novel pharmacological treatments aimed at chronic visceral pain, the traditional approach to identifying and evaluating novel drugs for this target have largely failed to translate into effective IBS treatments. However, several novel drugs aimed at normalizing bowel movements have produced clinical effects, not only on the primary target, but also on pain and discomfort. While some of the commonly used experimental animal models for the pain dimension of IBS have some face and construct validity, the predictive validity of most of the models is either unknown, or has been disappointing. A reverse translational approach is proposed, which is based on identification and characterization of brain endophenotypes in patients, followed by translation of these endophenotypes for pharmacological studies in rodent models. PMID:21309671

  9. Profile of rifaximin and its potential in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Iorio, Natalya; Malik, Zubair; Schey, Ron

    2015-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a chronic functional gastrointestinal disorder characterized by recurrent abdominal pain and abnormal bowel patterns. Alteration in gut flora, visceral hypersensitivity, and abnormal bowel motility are among numerous factors in the complex pathophysiology of IBS. Antibiotics have been used adjunctively to treat IBS for many years but are associated with various systemic side effects. Rifaximin is a nonabsorbable, broad-spectrum antimicrobial that inhibits bacterial RNA synthesis by binding the β-subunit of microbial RNA polymerase. It targets the gastrointestinal tract and works by reducing the quantity of gas-producing bacteria and altering the predominant species of bacteria present. In vivo animal studies suggest additional beneficial mechanisms of rifaximin, including reducing mucosal inflammation and visceral hypersensitivity. Clinical studies have demonstrated that rifaximin improves symptoms associated with IBS, such as bloating, flatulence, stool consistency, and abdominal pain, and has a side-effect profile similar to placebo. Although additional investigation into optimal dosing, treatment duration, and potential resistance is required, rifaximin presents as a safe and beneficial addition to the current management options for IBS. PMID:26089696

  10. Profile of rifaximin and its potential in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Iorio, Natalya; Malik, Zubair; Schey, Ron

    2015-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a chronic functional gastrointestinal disorder characterized by recurrent abdominal pain and abnormal bowel patterns. Alteration in gut flora, visceral hypersensitivity, and abnormal bowel motility are among numerous factors in the complex pathophysiology of IBS. Antibiotics have been used adjunctively to treat IBS for many years but are associated with various systemic side effects. Rifaximin is a nonabsorbable, broad-spectrum antimicrobial that inhibits bacterial RNA synthesis by binding the β-subunit of microbial RNA polymerase. It targets the gastrointestinal tract and works by reducing the quantity of gas-producing bacteria and altering the predominant species of bacteria present. In vivo animal studies suggest additional beneficial mechanisms of rifaximin, including reducing mucosal inflammation and visceral hypersensitivity. Clinical studies have demonstrated that rifaximin improves symptoms associated with IBS, such as bloating, flatulence, stool consistency, and abdominal pain, and has a side-effect profile similar to placebo. Although additional investigation into optimal dosing, treatment duration, and potential resistance is required, rifaximin presents as a safe and beneficial addition to the current management options for IBS. PMID:26089696

  11. Pathogenic factors involved in the development of irritable bowel syndrome: focus on a microbial role.

    PubMed

    Bolino, Carolina M; Bercik, Premysl

    2010-12-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a symptom complex characterized by recurrent abdominal pain or discomfort, and accompanied by abnormal bowel habits, in the absence of any discernible organic abnormality. Its origin remains unclear, partly because multiple pathophysiologic mechanisms are likely to be involved. A significant proportion of patients develop IBS symptoms after an episode of gastrointestinal infection. In addition to gastrointestinal pathogens, recent evidence suggests that patients with IBS have abnormal composition and higher temporal instability of their intestinal microbiota. Because the intestinal microbiota is an important determinant of normal gut function and immunity, this instability may constitute an additional mechanism that leads to symptom generation and IBS. More importantly, a role for altered microbiota composition in IBS raises the possibility of therapeutic interventions through selective antibiotic or probiotic administration. The new concept of functional bowel diseases incorporates the bidirectional communication between the gut and the central nervous system (gut-brain axis), which may explain the multiple facets of IBS by linking emotional and cognitive centers of the brain with peripheral functioning of the gastrointestinal tract and vice versa. PMID:20937460

  12. Convergence of neuro-endocrine-immune pathways in the pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Maria M; O'Mahony, Siobhain M; O'Malley, Dervla

    2014-07-21

    Disordered signalling between the brain and the gut are generally accepted to underlie the functional bowel disorder, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). However, partly due to the lack of disease-defining biomarkers, understanding the aetiology of this complex and multifactorial disease remains elusive. This common gastrointestinal disorder is characterised by alterations in bowel habit such as diarrhoea and/or constipation, bloating and abdominal pain, and symptom exacerbation has been linked with periods of stress, both psychosocial and infection-related. Indeed, a high level of comorbidity exists between IBS and stress-related mood disorders such as anxiety and depression. Moreover, studies have observed alterations in autonomic output and neuro-endocrine signalling in IBS patients. Accumulating evidence indicates that a maladaptive stress response, probably mediated by the stress hormone, corticotropin-releasing factor contributes to the initiation, persistence and severity of symptom flares. Other risk factors for developing IBS include a positive family history, childhood trauma, dietary factors and prior gastrointestinal infection. An emerging role has been attributed to the importance of immune factors in the pathophysiology of IBS with evidence of altered cytokine profiles and increased levels of mucosal immune cells. These factors have also been shown to have direct effects on neural signalling. This review discusses how pathological changes in neural, immune and endocrine pathways, and communication between these systems, contribute to symptom flares in IBS. PMID:25083058

  13. Role of Anxiety in the Pathophysiology of Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Importance of the Amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Brent; Meerveld, Beverley Greenwood-Van

    2009-01-01

    A common characteristic of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is that symptoms, including abdominal pain and abnormal bowel habits, are often triggered or exacerbated during periods of stress and anxiety. However, the impact of anxiety and affective disorders on the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is poorly understood and may in part explain the lack of effective therapeutic approaches to treat IBS. The amygdala is an important structure for regulating anxiety with the central nucleus of the amygdala facilitating the activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and the autonomic nervous system in response to stress. Moreover, chronic stress enhances function of the amygdala and promotes neural plasticity throughout the amygdaloid complex. This review outlines the latest findings obtained from human studies and animal models related to the role of the emotional brain in the regulation of enteric function, specifically how increasing the gain of the amygdala to induce anxiety-like behavior using corticosterone or chronic stress increases responsiveness to both visceral and somatic stimuli in rodents. A focus of the review is the relative importance of mineralocorticoid receptor and glucocorticoid receptor-mediated mechanisms within the amygdala in the regulation of anxiety and nociceptive behaviors that are characteristic features of IBS. This review also discusses several outstanding questions important for future research on the role of the amygdala in the generation of abnormal GI function that may lead to potential targets for new therapies to treat functional bowel disorders such as IBS. PMID:20582274

  14. Pharmacologic and Complementary and Alternative Medicine Therapies for Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Maneerattaporn, Monthira; Saad, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a chronic functional gastrointestinal disorder characterized by episodic abdominal pain or discomfort in association with altered bowel habits (diarrhea and/or constipation). Other gastrointestinal symptoms, such as bloating and flatulence, are also common. A variety of factors are believed to play a role in the development of IBS symptoms, including altered bowel motility, visceral hypersensitivity, psychosocial stressors, altered brain-gut interactions, immune activation/low grade inflammation, alterations in the gut microbiome, and genetic factors. In the absence of biomarkers that can distinguish between IBS subgroups on the basis of pathophysiology, treatment of this condition is predicated upon a patient's most bothersome symptoms. In clinical trials, effective therapies have only offered a therapeutic gain over placebos of 7-15%. Evidence based therapies for the global symptoms of constipation predominant IBS (IBS-C) include lubiprostone and tegaserod; evidence based therapies for the global symptoms of diarrhea predominant IBS (IBS-D) include the probiotic Bifidobacter infantis, the nonabsorbable antibiotic rifaximin, and alosetron. Additionally, there is persuasive evidence to suggest that selected antispasmodics and antidepressants are of benefit for the treatment of abdominal pain in IBS patients. Finally, several emerging therapies with novel mechanisms of action are in development. Complementary and alternative medicine therapies including probiotics, herbal therapies and acupuncture are gaining popularity among IBS sufferers, although concerns regarding manufacturing standards and the paucity of high quality efficacy and safety data remain. PMID:21927652

  15. Functional abdominal pain and irritable bowel syndrome in children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Chiou, Eric; Nurko, Samuel

    2011-01-01

    Functional abdominal pain (FAP) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are both associated with recurrent abdominal pain and are among the most commonly diagnosed medical problems in pediatrics. The majority of patients with mild complaints improve with reassurance and time. For a distinct subset of patients with more severe and disabling illness, finding effective treatment for these disorders remains a challenge. Based on the biopsychosocial model of functional disease, the Rome III criteria have helped frame FAP and IBS in terms of being a positive diagnosis and not a diagnosis of exclusion. However, the lack of a single, proven intervention highlights the complex interplay of pathologic mechanisms likely involved in the development of childhood FAP and IBS and the need for a multidisciplinary, integrated approach. This article discusses the epidemiology, proposed mechanisms, clinical approach and therapeutic options for the management of FAP and IBS in children and adolescents. PMID:21731470

  16. Management of functional abdominal pain and irritable bowel syndrome in children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Chiou, Eric; Nurko, Samuel

    2010-01-01

    Functional abdominal pain (FAP) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are among the most commonly diagnosed medical problems in pediatrics. Symptom-based Rome III criteria for FAP and IBS have been validated and help the clinician in making a positive diagnosis. The majority of patients with mild complaints improve with reassurance and time. For a distinct subset of patients with more severe and disabling illness, finding effective treatment for these disorders remains a challenge. Over the years, a wide range of therapies have been proposed and studied. The lack of a single, proven intervention highlights the complex interplay of biopsychosocial factors probably involved in the development of childhood FAP and IBS, and the need for a multidisciplinary, integrated approach. This article reviews the current literature on the efficacy of pharmacologic, dietary and psychosocial interventions for FAP and IBS in children and adolescents. PMID:20528117

  17. Intestinal microbiota and immune function in the pathogenesis of irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ringel, Yehuda; Maharshak, Nitsan

    2013-10-15

    The pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is believed to involve alterations in the brain-gut axis; however, the etiological triggers and mechanisms by which these changes lead to symptoms of IBS remain poorly understood. Although IBS is often considered a condition without an identified "organic" etiology, emerging evidence suggests that alterations in the gastrointestinal microbiota and altered immune function may play a role in the pathogenesis of the disorder. These recent data suggest a plausible model in which changes in the intestinal microbiota and activation of the enteric immune system may impinge upon the brain-gut axis, causing the alterations in gastrointestinal function and the clinical symptoms observed in patients with IBS. This review summarizes the current evidence for altered intestinal microbiota and immune function in IBS. It discusses the potential etiological role of these factors, suggests an updated conceptual model for the pathogenesis of the disorder, and identifies areas for future research. PMID:23886861

  18. What does irritable bowel syndrome share with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease?

    PubMed Central

    Scalera, Antonella; Di Minno, Matteo Nicola Dario; Tarantino, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are two very common diseases in the general population. To date, there are no studies that highlight a direct link between NAFLD and IBS, but some recent reports have found an interesting correlation between obesity and IBS. A systematic PubMed database search was conducted highlighting that common mechanisms are involved in many of the local and systemic manifestations of NAFLD, leading to an increased cardiovascular risk, and IBS, leading to microbial dysbiosis, impaired intestinal barrier and altered intestinal motility. It is not known when considering local and systemic inflammation/immune system activation, which one has greater importance in NAFLD and IBS pathogenesis. Also, the nervous system is implicated. In fact, inflammation participates in the development of mood disorders, such as anxiety and depression, characteristics of obesity and consequently of NAFLD and, on the other hand, in intestinal hypersensitivity and dysmotility. PMID:24023483

  19. Role of negative affects in pathophysiology and clinical expression of irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Muscatello, Maria Rosaria A; Bruno, Antonio; Scimeca, Giuseppe; Pandolfo, Gianluca; Zoccali, Rocco A

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is regarded as a multifactorial disease in which alterations in the brain-gut axis signaling play a major role. The biopsychosocial model applied to the understanding of IBS pathophysiology assumes that psychosocial factors, interacting with peripheral/central neuroendocrine and immune changes, may induce symptoms of IBS, modulate symptom severity, influence illness experience and quality of life, and affect outcome. The present review focuses on the role of negative affects, including depression, anxiety, and anger, on pathogenesis and clinical expression of IBS. The potential role of the autonomic nervous system, stress-hormone system, and immune system in the pathophysiology of both negative affects and IBS are taken into account. Psychiatric comorbidity and subclinical variations in levels of depression, anxiety, and anger are further discussed in relation to the main pathophysiological and symptomatic correlates of IBS, such as sensorimotor functions, gut microbiota, inflammation/immunity, and symptom reporting. PMID:24976697

  20. The effect of enteric-coated, delayed-release peppermint oil on irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Merat, Shahin; Khalili, Shadi; Mostajabi, Pardise; Ghorbani, Anahita; Ansari, Reza; Malekzadeh, Reza

    2010-05-01

    Herbal remedies, particularly peppermint, have been reported to be helpful in controlling symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). We conducted a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study on 90 outpatients with IBS. Subjects took one capsule of enteric-coated, delayed-release peppermint oil (Colpermin) or placebo three times daily for 8 weeks. We visited patients after the first, fourth, and eighth weeks and evaluated their symptoms and quality of life. The number of subjects free from abdominal pain or discomfort changed from 0 at week 0 to 14 at week 8 in the Colpermin group and from 0 to 6 in controls (P < 0.001). The severity of abdominal pain was also reduced significantly in the Colpermin group as compared to controls. Furthermore, Colpermin significantly improved the quality of life. There was no significant adverse reaction. Colpermin is effective and safe as a therapeutic agent in patients with IBS suffering from abdominal pain or discomfort. PMID:19507027

  1. Hot Topics in Primary Care: Individualizing Pharmacologic Management of Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kuritzky, Louis

    2015-12-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome is a common gastrointestinal disorder with constipation, diarrhea, and mixed subtypes. The diagnosis is generally based on a detailed history utilizing the Rome III criteria. Alarm signals necessitate more extensive diagnostic evaluation. Nonpharmacologic options and over-the-counter remedies (e.g., loperamide) might not be supported by strong evidence, but are often chosen as initial treatment for their safety and tolerability. Psychological interventions may be beneficial. Newer pharmacologic agents such as alosetron, eluxadoline, linaclotide, lubiprostone, and rifaximin are supported by higher quality evidence than older agents such as antispasmodics and laxatives. Patients with IBS commonly report that clinicians offer insufficient empathy and validation of their symptoms. Physicians therefore should strive to improve communication methods that specifically provide such reassurance. Individualizing treatment based on patient values and preferences is essential. PMID:26845008

  2. Disability in Children and Adolescents With Irritable Bowel Syndrome and/or Fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Otu-Nyarko, Charles G; Gedalia, Abraham; Karpinski, Aryn C; Kolomensky, Andrew; Hyman, Paul E

    2015-11-01

    To compare disability and emotional health in individuals with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), fibromyalgia, or both, patients completed the Questionnaire on Pediatric Gastrointestinal Symptoms-Rome III, childhood Functional Disability Inventory (FDI), and the Behavior Assessment System for Children, Second Edition. Patients' (age range 8-18 years, 19 IBS, 12 fibromyalgia, and 12 both) FDI scores showed greater disability than scores from historically healthy patients. Fibromyalgia (FDI 22.5 ± 12.7, P = 0.018) and patients with both (FDI 26.2 ± 13.8, P = 0.001) averaged greater disability than those with IBS (FDI 10.6 ± 7.9). Disability was correlated with anxiety and depression symptoms. Disability and psychological symptoms are important when evaluating individuals with fibromyalgia and IBS. PMID:26111293

  3. Group hypnotherapy for irritable bowel syndrome with long-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Gerson, Charles D; Gerson, Jessica; Gerson, Mary-Joan

    2013-01-01

    This study tested whether group gut-focused hypnotherapy would improve irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Several possible outcome predictors were also studied. Before treatment, 75 patients completed a Symptom Severity Scale, a Mind-Body attribution questionnaire, and a Quality of Relationship Inventory (QRI). The symptom scale was completed posttreatment, 3, 6, and 12 months later. There was significant symptom reduction at each data point (p < .001). Sixty percent had a reduction of more than 50 points, indicative of clinical improvement. Initial severity score (p = .0004) and QRI conflict (p = .057) were directly correlated with a response to hypnotherapy, while attribution of symptoms to mind (emotional) causation was inversely correlated (p = .0056). The authors conclude that group hypnotherapy is effective in patients with IBS. PMID:23153384

  4. Food: The Main Course to Wellness and Illness in Patients With Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chey, William D

    2016-03-01

    Food sits at the intersection between gastrointestinal (GI) physiology and symptoms in patients with the irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). It is now clear that the majority of IBS sufferers associate eating a meal with their GI and non-GI symptoms. This is hardly surprising when one considers that food can affect a variety of physiologic factors (motility, visceral sensation, brain-gut interactions, microbiome, permeability, immune activation, and neuro-endocrine function) relevant to the pathogenesis of IBS. In recent years, clinical research has increasingly focused on diet as a treatment for IBS. There is a relative paucity of data from rigorous, randomized, controlled trials for any dietary intervention in IBS patients. Currently, the largest body of literature has addressed the efficacy of dietary restriction of fermentable oligo, di, monosaccharides, and polyols (FODMAPs). In the future, dietary treatments for IBS will move beyond the current focus on elimination to embrace supplementation with "functional" foods. PMID:26856749

  5. The Science, Evidence, and Practice of Dietary Interventions in Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lacy, Brian E

    2015-11-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a highly prevalent disorder that is characterized by symptoms of abdominal pain, bloating, constipation, and/or diarrhea. The diagnosis can be made using Rome III criteria or published guidelines after taking a thoughtful history, excluding warning signs, and performing a careful physical examination. Limited testing (ie, complete blood count and C-reactive protein level) may be useful in appropriate patients. A number of pharmacologic options are available, although many patients fail to respond to pharmacologic therapy. Although several IBS diets frequently are recommended, data supporting their use are limited. This article provides a rationale as to why specific diets might improve IBS symptoms and evaluates published trials. PMID:25769411

  6. Nutritional Interventions for Gastroesophageal Reflux, Irritable Bowel Syndrome, and Hypochlorhydria: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kines, Kasia; Krupczak, Tina

    2016-08-01

    Chronic gastrointestinal (GI) complaints are often treated with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), antibiotics, and other medications that offer temporary relief of acute symptoms. Although these drugs are prescribed to provide promising results, new research indicates the drug treatments often mask unresolved physiological problems and cause further complications. Complex GI cases require a comprehensive assessment and a multifaceted approach. This case reports on the development of PPI-induced hypochlorhydria secondary to a PPI prescription for unresolved gastritis in a patient with irritable bowel syndrome. The patient's gastritis and hypochlorhydria symptoms resolved with the implementation of a comprehensive functional nutrition approach that incorporated dietary guidelines, lifestyle recommendations, and customized nutritional supplementation and herbs. PMID:27574495

  7. [The low FODMAP diet as a therapy for irritable bowel syndrome].

    PubMed

    van der Waaij, Laurens A; Stevens, Janneke

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a very common, sometimes disabling disorder for which there is a lack of effective treatments. Many patients report that the make-up of the diet has an effect on their symptoms. The western diet consists of many different molecules. Some of them are small, fermentable and cannot be absorbed (FODMAPs). The low FODMAP diet was recently developed in Australia. In randomised controlled trials 37-45% of IBS patients experience symptom reduction with this diet. The low FODMAP diet starts with a 6-week elimination phase. If symptoms decrease substantially, it is followed by a structured reintroduction phase of the various FODMAPs over several weeks, after which patients are left with a diet that is simpler to follow. PMID:24823855

  8. Role of negative affects in pathophysiology and clinical expression of irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Muscatello, Maria Rosaria A; Bruno, Antonio; Scimeca, Giuseppe; Pandolfo, Gianluca; Zoccali, Rocco A

    2014-06-28

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is regarded as a multifactorial disease in which alterations in the brain-gut axis signaling play a major role. The biopsychosocial model applied to the understanding of IBS pathophysiology assumes that psychosocial factors, interacting with peripheral/central neuroendocrine and immune changes, may induce symptoms of IBS, modulate symptom severity, influence illness experience and quality of life, and affect outcome. The present review focuses on the role of negative affects, including depression, anxiety, and anger, on pathogenesis and clinical expression of IBS. The potential role of the autonomic nervous system, stress-hormone system, and immune system in the pathophysiology of both negative affects and IBS are taken into account. Psychiatric comorbidity and subclinical variations in levels of depression, anxiety, and anger are further discussed in relation to the main pathophysiological and symptomatic correlates of IBS, such as sensorimotor functions, gut microbiota, inflammation/immunity, and symptom reporting. PMID:24976697

  9. Vulvodynia and Irritable Bowel Syndrome Treated With an Elimination Diet: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Drummond, Jessica; Ford, Deborah; Daniel, Stephanie; Meyerink, Tara

    2016-01-01

    Background A 28-y-old athletic woman was diagnosed with vulvodynia and long-term irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and was treated successfully with an elimination diet. Case/Intervention In the course of 6 mo of nutrition therapy utilizing an elimination diet, specific foods triggering abdominal bloating and pain, and vulvovaginal pain were identified. In the course of treatment, the nutrition and supplement program instituted for this patient allowed her to return to her prior functional level without pain (including sexual activity) and resolution of her IBS. She has remained symptom free for at least 6 mo posttreatment. Conclusion This case demonstrates the potential usefulness of incorporating a customized nutritional approach to determine proinflammatory foods in patients with chronic vulvodynia and overlapping IBS. Long-term pain resolution and healthy sexual functioning in this case was supported by food elimination and nutritional supplementation. PMID:27574494

  10. Gender-related differences in irritable bowel syndrome: Potential mechanisms of sex hormones

    PubMed Central

    Meleine, Mathieu; Matricon, Julien

    2014-01-01

    According to epidemiological studies, twice as many women as men are affected by irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) in western countries, suggesting a role for sex hormones in IBS pathophysiology. Despite growing evidence about the implications of sex hormones in IBS symptom modulation, data on mechanisms by which they influence disease development are sparse. This review aims to determine the state of knowledge about the role of sex hormones in sensorimotor dysfunctions and to address the possible interplay of sex hormones with common risk factors associated with IBS. The scientific bibliography was searched using the following keywords: irritable bowel syndrome, sex, gender, ovarian hormone, estradiol, progesterone, testosterone, symptoms, pain, sensitivity, motility, permeability, stress, immune system, brain activity, spinal, supraspinal, imaging. Ovarian hormones variations along the menstrual cycle affect sensorimotor gastrointestinal function in both healthy and IBS populations. They can modulate pain processing by interacting with neuromodulator systems and the emotional system responsible for visceral pain perception. These hormones can also modulate the susceptibility to stress, which is a pivotal factor in IBS occurrence and symptom severity. For instance, estrogen-dependent hyper-responsiveness to stress can promote immune activation or impairments of gut barrier function. In conclusion, whereas it is important to keep in mind that ovarian hormones cannot be considered as a causal factor of IBS, they arguably modulate IBS onset and symptomatology. However, our understanding of the underlying mechanisms remains limited and studies assessing the link between IBS symptoms and ovarian hormone levels are needed to improve our knowledge of the disease evolution with regard to gender. Further studies assessing the role of male hormones are also needed to understand fully the role of sex hormones in IBS. Finally, investigation of brain-gut interactions is critical

  11. Dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chang, L.; Sundaresh, S.; Elliott, J.; Anton, P. A.; Baldi, P.; Licudine, A.; Mayer, M.; Vuong, T.; Hirano, M.; Naliboff, B. D.; Ameen, V. Z.; Mayer, E. A.

    2009-01-01

    Enhanced stress responsiveness has been implicated as a potential mechanism contributing to the pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), and should be reflected in altered function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and the sympathetic nervous system. Both of these systems can modulate mucosal immune function. The aims of this study were: (i) to characterize the basal circadian rhythm of adrenocorticotropin hormone (ACTH) and cortisol in IBS vs healthy controls; (ii) to compare stimulated ACTH, cortisol and noradrenaline responses to a pelvic visceral stressor (sigmoidoscopy) in IBS and controls; and (iii) to correlate neuroendocrine responses with colonic mucosal cytokine expression and symptoms in IBS. Two separate studies were conducted in women. In Study 1, basal cortisol levels were analysed in 41 IBS and 25 controls using 24-h collections of plasma ACTH and cortisol (q10 min sampling). In Study 2, 10 IBS patients with diarrhoea (IBS-D) and 10 controls underwent sigmoidoscopy with measurements of stimulated neuroendocrine responses and cytokine mRNA expression in colonic tissue. Basal ACTH levels were significantly blunted (P < 0.05), while basal and stimulated plasma cortisol levels were higher in patients. Basal cortisol levels prior to an experimental visceral stressor positively correlated with anxiety symptoms (P < 0.004), but not IBS symptoms. Irritable bowel syndrome patients with diarrhoea had significantly decreased mRNA expression of mucosal cytokines [interleukin (IL)-2, IL-6] in the sigmoid colon vs controls (P < 0.05). Although dysregulations in stress-responsive systems such as the HPA axis and mucosal immune function are demonstrated in IBS, they do not appear to have a primary role in modulating IBS severity and abdominal pain. PMID:18684212

  12. Is the association between irritable bowel syndrome and abuse explained by neuroticism? A population based study

    PubMed Central

    Talley, N; Boyce, P; Jones, M

    1998-01-01

    Background—In outpatients and the community, an association between abuse (particularly sexual abuse) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) has been observed, but whether there is a causal link continues to be disputed. 
Aims—To test the hypothesis that psychological factors explain the apparent association between abuse and IBS. 
Methods—A sample of residents of Penrith (a Sydney suburb sociodemographically similar to the Australian population) selected randomly from the electoral rolls (that by law include the entire population of age 18 years and above) was mailed a validated self report questionnaire. Measured were gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms including the Rome criteria for IBS, abuse (including the standardised Drossman questions), neuroticism (Eysenck Personality Questionnaire), and psychological morbidity (General Health Questionnaire). 
Results—The response rate was 64% (n=730); 12% fulfilled the Rome criteria for IBS. Overall abuse in childhood (odds ratio (OR)=2.02, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.29 to 3.15) but not adulthood (OR=1.39, 95% CI 0.88 to 2.19) was associazted with IBS univariately. Neuroticism and psychological morbidity were also univariately associated with abuse in childhood, abuse in adulthood, and IBS, respectively. However, by logistic regression, abuse in childhood was not associated with IBS after controlling for age, gender, and psychological factors (OR=1.34, 95% CI 0.83to 2.17). The results were not altered by restricting the analyses to more severe forms of abuse, and were not explained by interactions between abuse and psychological variables. 
Conclusion—There is an association between abuse and IBS in the community, but this may be explained in part by other psychological factors. Based on a path analysis, we postulate that abuse may induce the expression of neuroticism that in turn leads to IBS. 

 Keywords: epidemiology; irritable bowel syndrome; abuse; neuroticism PMID:9505885

  13. Predictors of health care seeking for irritable bowel syndrome: a population based study

    PubMed Central

    Talley, N; Boyce, P; Jones, M

    1997-01-01

    Background—It has been suggested that psychological factors rather than symptoms drive subjects with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) to seek medical care, but this issue has not been tackled in a population based study. 
Aim—To identify whether psychological factors or abuse explain health care seeking for IBS. 
Methods—A sample of residents of Penrith (a Sydney suburb representative of the Australian population) selected randomly from the electoral rolls (that by law include the entire population ⩾18 years) was mailed a validated self-report questionnaire. Measured were gastrointestinal symptoms including the Manning (and Rome) criteria for IBS, health care seeking, neuroticism (Eysenck Personality Questionnaire), psychological morbidity (General Health Questionnaire: GHQ) and sexual, physical and emotional abuse (including the standardised Drossman questions). 
Results—Among 730 subjects, 96 (13%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 11-16%) had IBS by the Manning criteria. Of those with IBS, 73% (95% CI 63-81%) had sought medical care for abdominal pain or discomfort. Only increasing pain severity (odds ratio (OR) = 2.10, 95% CI 1.11-3.95) and duration of pain (OR=1.53, 95% CI 1.10-2.13) were independently associated with seeking health care for IBS. Pain severity was also predictive of recent care seeking (OR=1.74, 95% CI 1.12-1.96). Neuroticism, psychological morbidity and abuse history were not significant predictors. 
Conclusion—Psychological factors do not seem to explain health care seeking among community subjects with IBS. 

 Keywords: epidemiology; irritable bowel syndrome; abuse; neuroticism PMID:9378398

  14. Gender-related differences in irritable bowel syndrome: potential mechanisms of sex hormones.

    PubMed

    Meleine, Mathieu; Matricon, Julien

    2014-06-14

    According to epidemiological studies, twice as many women as men are affected by irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) in western countries, suggesting a role for sex hormones in IBS pathophysiology. Despite growing evidence about the implications of sex hormones in IBS symptom modulation, data on mechanisms by which they influence disease development are sparse. This review aims to determine the state of knowledge about the role of sex hormones in sensorimotor dysfunctions and to address the possible interplay of sex hormones with common risk factors associated with IBS. The scientific bibliography was searched using the following keywords: irritable bowel syndrome, sex, gender, ovarian hormone, estradiol, progesterone, testosterone, symptoms, pain, sensitivity, motility, permeability, stress, immune system, brain activity, spinal, supraspinal, imaging. Ovarian hormones variations along the menstrual cycle affect sensorimotor gastrointestinal function in both healthy and IBS populations. They can modulate pain processing by interacting with neuromodulator systems and the emotional system responsible for visceral pain perception. These hormones can also modulate the susceptibility to stress, which is a pivotal factor in IBS occurrence and symptom severity. For instance, estrogen-dependent hyper-responsiveness to stress can promote immune activation or impairments of gut barrier function. In conclusion, whereas it is important to keep in mind that ovarian hormones cannot be considered as a causal factor of IBS, they arguably modulate IBS onset and symptomatology. However, our understanding of the underlying mechanisms remains limited and studies assessing the link between IBS symptoms and ovarian hormone levels are needed to improve our knowledge of the disease evolution with regard to gender. Further studies assessing the role of male hormones are also needed to understand fully the role of sex hormones in IBS. Finally, investigation of brain-gut interactions is critical

  15. Probiotic for irritable bowel syndrome in pediatric patients: a randomized controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Kianifar, Hamidreza; Jafari, Seyed Ali; Kiani, Mohammadali; Ahanchian, Hamid; Ghasemi, Seyed Vahid; Grover, Zubin; Mahmoodi, Leili Zarif; Bagherian, Rita; Khalesi, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Background: Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common gastrointestinal disorder in children. Recently, probiotics have been suggested as a treatment option for gastrointestinal disorders. The most effective species and the most appropriate doses are still unknown. Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the effects of Lactobacillus GG (LGG) for treating IBS in pediatric patients. Methods: In a controlled, double blind, randomized trial, patients with IBS diagnosed by Rome III criteria from August 2012 to September 2012 at Dr. Sheikh Hospital, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Iran, were assigned to one of two groups, i.e., intervention and control groups. For four weeks, the intervention group received a probiotic in capsule form that contained LGG at a concentration of 1×1010 cfu/ml bacteria. For the same period, the control group received a placebo capsule that had the same shape and color but only contained inulin, which also was present in the LGG capsules. The primary outcome was any change in the severity of the patients’ pain, and we used a five-point Likert scale to evaluate the severity of their pain. Secondary outcomes were ghanges of the functional scale, stool patterns, and associated problems. Results: Fifty-two patients participated in the study, and 26 patients were assigned randomly to each of the two groups. The severity of the patients’ pain decreased significantly in the intervention group after one, two, three, and four weeks of treatment, as indicated by P-values of 0.01, 0.00, 0.00, and 0.00, respectively. Also, there was significant improvement in the functional scale after two weeks of treatment (P-value ≤ 0.00). Conclusion: Lactobacillus GG at a concentration of 1×1010 cfu/ml for a period of four weeks can lessen the severity of the patients’ pain and improve the functional scale in patients with irritable bowel syndrome. Probiotics can have therapeutic effects for IBS patients. PMID:26435825

  16. PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF SCINTIGRAPHIC COLON TRANSIT MEASUREMENT IN HEALTH AND IRRITABLE BOWEL SYNDROME AND RELATIONSHIP TO BOWEL FUNCTIONS

    PubMed Central

    Deiteren, Annemie; Camilleri, Michael; Bharucha, Adil E.; Burton, Duane; McKinzie, Sanna; Rao, Archana; Zinsmeister, Alan R.

    2009-01-01

    Background The inter- and intra-subject variations of scintigraphy, which are used to identify colonic transit disturbances in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), are unclear. The relationship between colonic transit and bowel functions is incompletely understood. Aims To assess inter-and intra-subject variations of scintigraphic colonic transit measurements in 86 IBS patients and 17 healthy subjects and to quantify the relationship between colonic transit and bowel symptoms in 147 IBS patients and 46 healthy subjects. Methods Data from participants with multiple colonic transit measurements were analyzed. Primary endpoints were colonic filling at 6h (CF6h) and geometric center (GC) at 24 and 48h for colonic transit. Bowel functions were assessed by daily stool diaries. Results Inter- and intra-subject variations were greater for small intestinal than colonic transit. Overall, inter- and intra-subject variations were relatively narrow for colonic transit (both GC24h and GC48h, with lower COV at 48h); there was little intra-subject variation in health and IBS-constipation over a period of ≤3 weeks and over 2.0 years (median, range 0.1, 11.0 years). Significant intra-individual differences in GC24h were observed only in IBS-D patients. Colonic transit was significantly associated with stool form (accounting for 19–27% of the variance), frequency (19%), and ease of stool passage (12%). Conclusion Despite inter-subject variation in scintigraphic colonic transit results, the intra-subject measurements are reproducible over time in healthy volunteers and patients with IBS; significant changes in colonic transit at 24h were observed only in IBS-D. Colonic transit is associated with stool form, frequency, and ease of passage. PMID:20025675

  17. Irritable bowel syndrome: A disease still searching for pathogenesis, diagnosis and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bellini, Massimo; Gambaccini, Dario; Stasi, Cristina; Urbano, Maria Teresa; Marchi, Santino; Usai-Satta, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most frequently diagnosed functional gastrointestinal disorder in primary and secondary care. It is characterised by abdominal discomfort, pain and changes in bowel habits that can have a serious impact on the patient’s quality of life. The pathophysiology of IBS is not yet completely clear. Genetic, immune, environmental, inflammatory, neurological and psychological factors, in addition to visceral hypersensitivity, can all play an important role, one that most likely involves the complex interactions between the gut and the brain (gut-brain axis). The diagnosis of IBS can only be made on the basis of the symptoms of the Rome III criteria. Because the probability of organic disease in patients fulfilling the IBS criteria is very low, a careful medical history is critical and should pay particular attention to the possible comorbidities. Nevertheless, the severity of the patient’s symptoms or concerns sometimes compels the physician to perform useless and/or expensive diagnostic tests, transforming IBS into a diagnosis of exclusion. The presence of alarming symptoms (fever, weight loss, rectal bleeding, significant changes in blood chemistry), the presence of palpable abdominal masses, any recent onset of symptoms in patient aged over 50 years, the presence of symptoms at night, and a familial history of celiac disease, colorectal cancer and/or inflammatory bowel diseases all warrant investigation. Treatment strategies are based on the nature and severity of the symptoms, the degree of functional impairment of the bowel habits, and the presence of psychosocial disorders. This review examines and discusses the pathophysiological aspects and the diagnostic and therapeutic approaches available for patients with symptoms possibly related to IBS, pointing out controversial issues and the strengths and weaknesses of the current knowledge. PMID:25083055

  18. Therapeutic value of spinal cord stimulation in irritable bowel syndrome: a randomized crossover pilot study.

    PubMed

    Lind, Göran; Winter, Jaleh; Linderoth, Bengt; Hellström, Per M

    2015-05-15

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is characterized by abdominal pain and changed bowel habits. Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) has been used for treatment of chronic pain syndromes. Animal studies have shown SCS to reduce the reaction to colonic balloon distension, known to be increased in IBS patients. To elucidate the potential for SCS as treatment for IBS, a pilot study was performed. Ten IBS patients (age 26-56 yr) were recruited. A SCS system with a four-polar electrode was implanted at the T5-T8 level. After a 2-wk run-in, a randomized, crossover design SCS during 6 wk was compared with no stimulation, with an ensuing stimulation period for 12 wk; total study period 28 wk. Patients recorded pain level, pain attacks, diarrheas, and global quality of life in a diary. At end of the study patients could choose to retain their SCS system or have it removed. Nine patients completed the whole trial. During stimulation periods the median pain scores were significantly reduced from visual analogue scale (VAS) 7 (4-8) to 3 (2.5-7) and to 4 (2-6) during early and late stimulation periods, respectively (P < 0.03-0.04). Pain attacks were numerically reduced. A few patients reported reduced number of diarrheas. After study termination, six patients chose to retain their SCS system. To conclude, SCS is a minimally invasive treatment option for pain in IBS. With SCS the pain level was reduced though with merely a trend for number of attacks and diarrheas. The efficacy of SCS in IBS pain indicates a possible usefulness in other painful bowel disorders. PMID:25786486

  19. The role of rifaximin therapy in patients with irritable bowel syndrome without constipation.

    PubMed

    Schey, Ron; Rao, Satish S C

    2011-08-01

    Alterations in gut flora may play an important role in the pathophysiology of bowel symptoms, especially in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). If so, antibiotics that affect gut flora may offer a novel approach for the management of patients with IBS. Here, we discuss the results of two identically designed, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials (TARGET 1 and TARGET 2) of a poorly absorbed antibiotic, rifaximin, in patients with IBS. In these studies, 1260 patients (females 76.1 and 72.1%, respectively) who had IBS without constipation were randomized to receive either rifaximin 550 mg or placebo, three-times daily for 2 weeks. Subsequently, daily symptoms were assessed and patients were followed up for 10 weeks. The primary outcome measure - adequate relief of global IBS symptoms during the first 4 weeks after treatment - was met in significantly more patients who received rifaximin than placebo (p < 0.001). In addition, more patients in the rifaximin group than in the placebo group (p < 0.001) reported an adequate relief of bloating, and an improvement in abdominal pain and stool consistency - secondary outcome measures. The incidence of adverse events with rifaximin was similar to placebo, and the drug was well tolerated. In summary, a 2-week course of rifaximin provided significant relief of IBS symptoms, as well as bloating and abdominal pain. PMID:21780893

  20. Irritable bowel syndrome in children: Pathogenesis, diagnosis and evidence-based treatment

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, Bhupinder Kaur; Paul, Siba Prosad

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the commonest cause of recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) in children in both more developed and developing parts of the world. It is defined by the Rome III criteria for functional gastrointestinal disorders. It is characterized by abdominal pain that is improved by defecation and whose onset is associated with a change in stool form and or frequency and is not explained by structural or biochemical abnormalities. It is estimated that 10%-15% of older children and adolescents suffer from IBS. IBS can be considered to be a brain-gut disorder possibly due to complex interaction between environmental and hereditary factors. The diagnosis of IBS is made based on the Rome III criteria together with ruling out organic causes of RAP in children such as inflammatory bowel disease and celiac disease. Once the diagnosis of IBS is made, it is important to explain to the parents (and children) that there is no serious underlying disease. This reassurance may be effective treatment in a large number of cases. Lifestyle modifications, stress management, dietary interventions and probiotics may be beneficial in some cases. Although there is limited evidence for efficacy of pharmacological therapies such as antispasmodics and antidiarrheals; these have a role in severe cases. Biopsychosocial therapies have shown encouraging results in initial trials but are beset by limited availability. Further research is necessary to understand the pathophysiology and provide specific focused therapies. PMID:24876724

  1. Comparative efficacy and safety of trimebutine versus mebeverine in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rahman, M Z; Ahmed, D S; Mahmuduzzaman, M; Rahman, M A; Chowdhury, M S; Barua, R; Ishaque, S M

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional disorder characterized by chronic or recurrent abdominal pain or discomfort with bowel disturbances. This prospective, randomized clinical trial has been conducted on IBS patients, using trimebutine and Mebeverine in separate group in parallel design to compare the efficacy and safety of Trimebutine 100mg twice daily with mebeverine 135mg twice daily. Patients of 15 to 60 years old and both sexes were included from the out patient department (OPD) of gastroenterology, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU) from June 2010 to December 2011. A validated IBS-QOL instrument consisted of 34 questions used to assess improvement of quality of life before and after treatment. A total of 140 patients were enrolled in this study. Eighteen patients dropped out. One hundred twenty two patients completed the trial. In this study at the end of 6 weeks therapy, improvement of symptoms was statistically significant. However, differences of improvement between the two groups in relieving various symptoms were not statistically significant. Mean QOL score before treatment was 103 in Trimebutine group and 106 in Mebeverine group. After 6 weeks of treatment mean QOL score was 82 in Trimebutine group and 95 in Mebeverine group indicating improvement in both groups was statistically significant. The difference between the two groups was also significant. No worsening of symptoms and no side effects of the therapeutic agents was observed in any patient during the trial. PMID:24584382

  2. Diagnostic utility of faecal biomarkers in patients with irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Däbritz, Jan; Musci, Jason; Foell, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorder characterized by unspecific symptoms. In clinical practice it is crucial to distinguish between non-inflammatory functional problems and inflammatory, malignant or infectious diseases of the GI tract. Differentiation between these involves the use of clinical, radiological, endoscopic, histological and serological techniques, which are invasive, expensive, time-consuming and/or hindered by inaccuracies arising from subjective components. A range of faecal markers now appears to have the potential to greatly assist in the differentiation of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and IBS. Faecal markers of neutrophil influx into the mucosa are reliable indicators of intestinal inflammation and their role has been mainly studied in discriminating IBD from non-IBD conditions (including IBS) rather than organic from non-organic diseases. Phagocyte-specific proteins of the S100 family (S100A12, calprotectin) are amongst the most promising faecal biomarkers of inflammation. Faecal leukocyte degranulation markers (lactoferrin, polymorphonuclear elastase and myeloperoxidase) have also been suggested as diagnostic tools for the differentiation of IBD and IBS. More recently, additional proteins, including granins, defensins and matrix-metalloproteases, have been discussed as differential diagnostic markers in IBD and IBS. In this review, some of the most promising faecal markers, which have the potential to differentiate IBD and IBS and to advance diagnostic practices, will be discussed. PMID:24574706

  3. Irritable bowel syndrome: new insights into symptom mechanisms and advances in treatment.

    PubMed

    Spiller, Robin

    2016-01-01

    Despite being one of the most common conditions leading to gastroenterological referral, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is poorly understood. However, recent years have seen major advances. These include new understanding of the role of both inflammation and altered microbiota as well as the impact of dietary intolerances as illuminated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which has thrown new light on IBS. This article will review new data on how excessive bile acid secretion mediates diarrhea and evidence from post infectious IBS which has shown how gut inflammation can alter gut microbiota and function. Studies of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have also shown that even when inflammation is in remission, the altered enteric nerves and abnormal microbiota can generate IBS-like symptoms. The efficacy of the low FODMAP diet as a treatment for bloating, flatulence, and abdominal discomfort has been demonstrated by randomized controlled trials. MRI studies, which can quantify intestinal volumes, have provided new insights into how FODMAPs cause symptoms. This article will focus on these areas together with recent trials of new agents, which this author believes will alter clinical practice within the foreseeable future. PMID:27158477

  4. Irritable bowel syndrome and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth: meaningful association or unnecessary hype.

    PubMed

    Ghoshal, Uday C; Srivastava, Deepakshi

    2014-03-14

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common condition characterized by abdominal pain or discomfort, bloating, and altered stool form and passage. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is a condition in which there is overgrowth of bacteria in small bowel in excess of 10⁵ colony forming units per milliliter on culture of the upper gut aspirate. Frequency of SIBO varied from 4%-78% among patients with IBS and from 1%-40% among controls. Higher frequency in some studies might be due to fallacious criteria [post-lactulose breath-hydrogen rise 20 PPM above basal within 90 min (early-peak)]. Glucose hydrogen breath test (GHBT) has a low sensitivity to diagnose SIBO. Hence, studies based on GHBT might have under-estimated frequency of SIBO. Therefore, it is important to analyze these studies carefully to evaluate whether the reported association between IBS and SIBO is over or under-projected. This review evaluates studies on association between SIBO and IBS, discordance between different studies, their strength and weakness including methodological issues and evidence on therapeutic manipulation of gut flora on symptoms of IBS. PMID:24627585

  5. Immune activation in irritable bowel syndrome: can neuroimmune interactions explain symptoms?

    PubMed

    Hughes, Patrick A; Zola, Heddy; Penttila, Irmeli A; Blackshaw, L Ashley; Andrews, Jane M; Krumbiegel, Doreen

    2013-07-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional disorder of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract characterized by pain or discomfort from the lower abdominal region, which is associated with altered bowel habit. Despite its prevalence, there is currently a lack of effective treatment options for patients. IBS has long been considered as a neurological condition resulting from alterations in the brain gut axis, but immunological alterations are increasingly reported in IBS patients, consistent with the hypothesis that there is a chronic, but low-grade, immune activation. Mediators released by immune cells act to either dampen or amplify the activity of GI nerves. Release of a number of these mediators correlates with symptoms of IBS, highlighting the importance of interactions between the immune and the nervous systems. Investigation of the role of microbiota in these interactions is in its early stages, but may provide many answers regarding the mechanisms underlying activation of the immune system in IBS. Identifying what the key changes in the GI immune system are in IBS and how these changes modulate viscerosensory nervous function is essential for the development of novel therapies for the underlying disorder. PMID:23649183

  6. Acupuncture-moxibustion in treating irritable bowel syndrome: how does it work?

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiao-Peng; Hong, Jue; An, Cai-Ping; Zhang, Dan; Huang, Yan; Wu, Huan-Gan; Zhang, Cui-Hong; Meeuwsen, Sian

    2014-05-28

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional intestinal disease characterized by abdominal pain or discomfort and altered bowel habits. It has drawn great attention because of its high prevalence, reoccurring symptoms, and severe influence on patients' lives. Many clinical studies have demonstrated the efficacy of acupuncture-moxibustion in treating IBS. Increasing attention has been paid to research regarding the action mechanisms of acupuncture-moxibustion for IBS, and the adoption of modern techniques has achieved some progress. This article reviews the latest advances among action mechanism studies from the perspectives of gastrointestinal motility, visceral hypersensitivity, the brain-gut axis, the neuroendocrine system, and the immune system. It is shown that acupuncture-moxibustion can effectively regulate the above items, and thus, this treatment should have a high efficacy in the treatment of IBS. This article also identifies existing problems in current mechanism research and raises several ideas for future studies. Further revelations regarding these action mechanisms will promote the application of acupuncture-moxibustion in treating IBS. PMID:24876727

  7. Efficacy of the low FODMAP diet for treating irritable bowel syndrome: the evidence to date

    PubMed Central

    Nanayakkara, Wathsala S; Skidmore, Paula ML; O’Brien, Leigh; Wilkinson, Tim J; Gearry, Richard B

    2016-01-01

    This review summarizes the published clinical studies concerning the management of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) using restriction of Fermentable Oligosaccharide, Disaccharide, Monosaccharide, and Polyols in the diet (low FODMAP diet). In recent years, the data supporting low FODMAP diet for the management of IBS symptoms have emerged, including several randomized controlled trials, case-control studies, and other observational studies. Unlike most dietary manipulations tried in the past to alleviate gastrointestinal symptoms of IBS, all studies on low FODMAP diet have consistently shown symptomatic benefits in the majority of patients with IBS. However, dietary adherence by the patients and clear dietary intervention led by specialized dietitians appear to be vital for the success of the diet. Up to 86% of patients with IBS find improvement in overall gastrointestinal symptoms as well as individual symptoms such as abdominal pain, bloating, constipation, diarrhea, abdominal distention, and flatulence following the diet. FODMAP restriction reduces the osmotic load and gas production in the distal small bowel and the proximal colon, providing symptomatic relief in patients with IBS. Long-term health effects of a low FODMAP diet are not known; however, stringent FODMAP restriction is not recommended owing to risks of inadequate nutrient intake and potential adverse effects from altered gut microbiota. In conclusion, the evidence to date strongly supports the efficacy of a low FODMAP diet in the treatment of IBS. Further studies are required to understand any potential adverse effects of long-term restriction of FODMAPs. PMID:27382323

  8. Mechanisms Underlying the Analgesic Effect of Moxibustion on Visceral Pain in Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Renjia; Zhao, Jimeng; Wu, Luyi; Dou, Chuanzi; Liu, Huirong; Weng, Zhijun; Shi, Yin; Zhou, Cili; Wu, Huangan

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional bowel disorder that causes recurrent abdominal (visceral) pain. Epidemiological data show that the incidence rate of IBS is as high as 25%. Most of the medications may lead to tolerance, addiction and toxic side effects. Moxibustion is an important component of traditional Chinese medicine and has been used to treat IBS-like abdominal pain for several thousand years in China. As a mild treatment, moxibustion has been widely applied in clinical treatment of visceral pain in IBS. In recent years, it has played an irreplaceable role in alternative medicine. Extensive clinical studies have demonstrated that moxibustion for treatment of visceral pain is simple, convenient, and inexpensive, and it is being accepted by an increasing number of patients. There have not been many studies investigating the analgesic mechanisms of moxibustion. Studies exploring the analgesic mechanisms have mainly focused on visceral hypersensitivity, brain-gut axis neuroendocrine system, and immune system. This paper reviews the latest developments in moxibustion use for treatment of visceral pain in IBS from these perspectives. It also evaluates potential problems in relevant studies on the mechanisms of moxibustion therapy to promote the application of moxibustion in the treatment of IBS. PMID:25093032

  9. Effects of oral pinaverium bromide on colonic response to food in irritable bowel syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Bouchoucha, M; Faye, A; Devroede, G; Arsac, M

    2000-08-01

    We have recently developed a simple method to investigate the colonic response to food (CRF). This study describes the modifications of CRF induced by treatment with oral pinaverium bromide in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients. Thirty healthy subjects and 43 patients suffering from IBS were studied. Colonic transit time (CTT) was measured in fasting conditions and after eating a standard test meal. Colonic response to food was quantified by calculating the variation in number of markers in each zone of interest of the large bowel between the X-ray films of the abdomen taken before and after eating. CRF is characterized by caudal propulsion of colonic contents in the two groups. In controls, there is emptying of the caecum-ascending colon region and filling of the rectosigmoid. In IBS patients, only the left transverse colon and the splenic flexure empty. Pinaverium bromide exerts no effect in controls but reverses the CRF of the right colon in IBS patients by inhibiting right colon emptying. These results suggest that the inhibitory action of pinaverium bromide on CRF may support the clinical efficacy of this calcium channel blocker in the treatment of IBS. PMID:10989977

  10. EFFECT OF MEAL INGESTION ON ILEOCOLONIC AND COLONIC TRANSIT IN HEALTH AND IRRITABLE BOWEL SYNDROME

    PubMed Central

    Deiteren, Annemie; Camilleri, Michael; Burton, Duane; McKinzie, Sanna; Rao, Archana; Zinsmeister, Alan R.

    2010-01-01

    Background Postprandial symptoms in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) have been associated with increased bowel contractility. Aim To compare ileocolonic and colonic responses to feeding in health and IBS. Methods We prospectively analyzed data from separate research trials in122 IBS patients and 41 healthy volunteers. Ileocolonic transit (ICT) was evaluated before [colonic filling (CF)3h] and immediately after (CF4h) a standard lunch at 3h45min, and 2h thereafter. Colonic geometric center (GC) was calculated 2h (GC6h) after lunch ingested at 4h (GC4h) and directly after (GC8h) a standard dinner ingested at 7h45min. Results ICT immediately after eating was higher in IBS-D than health (23.1±2.4% vs. 17.5±2.8%, p=0.059). ICT 2h after lunch was similar between groups (p=0.55). There was significant overall group difference in colonic transit 2h post-lunch (p=0.045), particularly in IBS-C (GC6-GC4, Δ 0.29±0.08) vs. health (Δ 0.56±0.12 GC units). Conclusions After feeding, ICT is increased in IBS-D, whereas colonic transit is blunted in IBS-C. PMID:19949866

  11. Effect of commensals and probiotics on visceral sensitivity and pain in irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Theodorou, Vassilia; Belgnaoui, Afifa Ait; Agostini, Simona; Eutamene, Helene

    2014-01-01

    The last ten years’ wide progress in the gut microbiota phylogenetic and functional characterization has been made evidencing dysbiosis in several gastrointestinal diseases including inflammatory bowel diseases and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). IBS is a functional gut disease with high prevalence and negative impact on patient’s quality of life characterized mainly by visceral pain and/or discomfort, representing a good paradigm of chronic gut hypersensitivity. The IBS features are strongly regulated by bidirectional gut-brain interactions and there is increasing evidence for the involvement of gut bacteria and/or their metabolites in these features, including visceral pain. Further, gut microbiota modulation by antibiotics or probiotics has been promising in IBS. Mechanistic data provided mainly by animal studies highlight that commensals or probiotics may exert a direct action through bacterial metabolites on sensitive nerve endings in the gut mucosa, or indirect pathways targeting the intestinal epithelial barrier, the mucosal and/or systemic immune activation, and subsequent neuronal sensitization and/or activation. PMID:25184834

  12. Mast Cells and Irritable Bowel Syndrome: From the Bench to the Bedside

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Song, Jun; Hou, Xiaohua

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is traditionally defined as a functional disorder since it lacks demonstrable pathological abnormalities. However, in recent years, low grade inflammatory infiltration, often rich in mast cells, in both the small and large bowel, has been observed in some patients with IBS. The close association of mast cells with major intestinal functions, such as epithelial secretion and permeability, neuroimmune interactions, visceral sensation, and peristalsis, makes researchers and gastroenterologists to focus attention on the key roles of mast cells in the pathogenesis of IBS. Numerous studies have been carried out to identify the mechanisms in the development, infiltration, activation, and degranulation of intestinal mast cells, as well as the actions of mast cells in the processes of mucosal barrier disruption, mucosal immune dysregulation, visceral hypersensitivity, dysmotility, and local and central stress in IBS. Moreover, therapies targeting mast cells, such as mast cell stabilizers (cromoglycate and ketotifen) and antagonists of histamine and serotonin receptors, have been tried in IBS patients, and have partially exhibited considerable efficacy. This review focuses on recent advances in the role of mast cells in IBS, with particular emphasis on bridging experimental data with clinical therapeutics for IBS patients. PMID:26755686

  13. Dietary Interventions and Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Review of the Evidence.

    PubMed

    Shah, Shawn L; Lacy, Brian E

    2016-08-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the best studied of the functional gastrointestinal disorders. It is a highly prevalent disorder characterized by symptoms of abdominal pain, bloating, and disordered bowel habits, which may include constipation, diarrhea, or both. IBS has a significant negative impact on patients, both financially and with regard to their quality-of-life. At present, there is no cure for IBS, and while there are a number of pharmacological therapies available to treat IBS symptoms, they are not uniformly effective. For this reason, many patients and providers are turning to dietary interventions in an attempt to ameliorate IBS symptoms. At first glance, this approach appears reasonable as dietary interventions are generally safe and side effects, including potential adverse reactions with medications, are rare. However, although dietary interventions for IBS are frequently recommended, there is a paucity of data to support their use. The goals of this article are to answer key questions about diets currently recommended for the treatment of IBS, using the best available data from the literature. PMID:27372289

  14. Irritable bowel syndrome: new insights into symptom mechanisms and advances in treatment

    PubMed Central

    Spiller, Robin

    2016-01-01

    Despite being one of the most common conditions leading to gastroenterological referral, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is poorly understood. However, recent years have seen major advances. These include new understanding of the role of both inflammation and altered microbiota as well as the impact of dietary intolerances as illuminated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which has thrown new light on IBS. This article will review new data on how excessive bile acid secretion mediates diarrhea and evidence from post infectious IBS which has shown how gut inflammation can alter gut microbiota and function. Studies of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have also shown that even when inflammation is in remission, the altered enteric nerves and abnormal microbiota can generate IBS-like symptoms. The efficacy of the low FODMAP diet as a treatment for bloating, flatulence, and abdominal discomfort has been demonstrated by randomized controlled trials. MRI studies, which can quantify intestinal volumes, have provided new insights into how FODMAPs cause symptoms. This article will focus on these areas together with recent trials of new agents, which this author believes will alter clinical practice within the foreseeable future. PMID:27158477

  15. Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth in Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Association with Colon Motility, Bowel Symptoms, and Psychological Distress

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Madhusudan; Kanazawa, Motoyori; Palsson, Olafur S.; Chitkara, Denesh K.; Gangarosa, Lisa M.; Drossman, Douglas A.; Whitehead, William E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), although with significant controversy. Aims To determine the prevalence of SIBO in IBS and its association with colonic motility, bowel symptoms and psychological distress. Methods Sucrose hydrogen and methane breath tests were performed in 158 IBS and 34 healthy controls (HC). Thresholds for pain and urgency were tested by barostat in the descending colon. The motility index (MI) was calculated as the average area under the curve for all phasic contractions. Questionnaires assessed psychological distress, IBS symptom severity (IBSSS), IBS Quality of Life (IBS-QOL) and self reported bowel symptoms. Results 52/158 (32.9%) IBS patients had abnormal breath tests compared with 6/34 (17.9%) HC (χ2=0.079). SIBO (SIBO+) and Non-SIBO (SIBO−) did not differ in the prevalence of IBS-subtypes, IBS-SS, IBS-QOL and psychological distress variables. IBS had a greater post-distension increase in MI than HC, but there was no difference between SIBO+ and SIBO−. Predominant methane producers had higher urge thresholds (28.4 vs. 18.3, p<0.05) and higher baseline MI (461 vs. 301.45, p<0.05) than SIBO− IBS, and they reported more “hard or lumpy stools” when compared to predominant hydrogen producers (p<0.05) and SIBO− IBS (p< 0.05). Conclusions SIBO is unlikely to contribute significantly in the pathogenesis of IBS. Methane production is associated with constipation. PMID:18482250

  16. Irritable bowel syndrome: The evolution of multi-dimensional looking and multidisciplinary treatments

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Full-Young

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is common in the society. Among the putative pathogeneses, gut dysmotility results in pain and disturbed defecation. The latter is probably caused by the effect of abnormal gut water secretion. The interaction between abnormal gas accumulation, abdominal pain and bloating remains controversial. Visceral hypersensitivity and its modification along with the central transmission are the characteristics of IBS patients. The identification of biologic markers based on genetic polymorphisms is undetermined. Imbalanced gut microbiota may alter epithelial permeability to activate nociceptive sensory pathways which in turn lead to IBS. Certain food constituents may exacerbate bowel symptoms. The impact of adult and childhood abuses on IBS is underestimated. Using the concept of biopsychosocial dysfunction can integrate multidimensional pathogeneses. Antispasmodics plus stool consistency modifiers to treat the major symptoms and defecation are the first-line drug treatment. New drugs targeting receptors governing bowel motility, sensation and secretion can be considered, but clinicians must be aware of their potential serious side effects. Psychiatric drugs and modalities may be the final options for treating intractable subjects. Probiotics of multi-species preparations are safe and worth to be considered for the treatment. Antibiotics are promising but their long-term safety and effectiveness are unknown. Diet therapy including exclusion of certain food constituents is an economic measure. Using relatively safe complementary and alternative medicines (CAMs) may be optional to those patients who failed classical treatment. In conclusion, IBS is a heterogeneous disorder with multidimensional pathogeneses. Personalized medicines with multidisciplinary approaches using different classes of drugs, psychiatric measures, probiotics and antibiotics, dietary therapy, and finally CAMs, can be considered. PMID:24627587

  17. Irritable bowel syndrome: the evolution of multi-dimensional looking and multidisciplinary treatments.

    PubMed

    Chang, Full-Young

    2014-03-14

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is common in the society. Among the putative pathogeneses, gut dysmotility results in pain and disturbed defecation. The latter is probably caused by the effect of abnormal gut water secretion. The interaction between abnormal gas accumulation, abdominal pain and bloating remains controversial. Visceral hypersensitivity and its modification along with the central transmission are the characteristics of IBS patients. The identification of biologic markers based on genetic polymorphisms is undetermined. Imbalanced gut microbiota may alter epithelial permeability to activate nociceptive sensory pathways which in turn lead to IBS. Certain food constituents may exacerbate bowel symptoms. The impact of adult and childhood abuses on IBS is underestimated. Using the concept of biopsychosocial dysfunction can integrate multidimensional pathogeneses. Antispasmodics plus stool consistency modifiers to treat the major symptoms and defecation are the first-line drug treatment. New drugs targeting receptors governing bowel motility, sensation and secretion can be considered, but clinicians must be aware of their potential serious side effects. Psychiatric drugs and modalities may be the final options for treating intractable subjects. Probiotics of multi-species preparations are safe and worth to be considered for the treatment. Antibiotics are promising but their long-term safety and effectiveness are unknown. Diet therapy including exclusion of certain food constituents is an economic measure. Using relatively safe complementary and alternative medicines (CAMs) may be optional to those patients who failed classical treatment. In conclusion, IBS is a heterogeneous disorder with multidimensional pathogeneses. Personalized medicines with multidisciplinary approaches using different classes of drugs, psychiatric measures, probiotics and antibiotics, dietary therapy, and finally CAMs, can be considered. PMID:24627587

  18. Chenodeoxycholate in Females With Irritable Bowel Syndrome-Constipation: A Pharmacodynamic and Pharmacogenetic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    RAO, ARCHANA S.; WONG, BANNY S.; CAMILLERI, MICHAEL; ODUNSI-SHIYANBADE, SUWEBATU T.; MCKINZIE, SANNA; RYKS, MICHAEL; BURTON, DUANE; CARLSON, PAULA; LAMSAM, JESSE; SINGH, RAVINDER; ZINSMEISTER, ALAN R.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Sodium chenodeoxycholate (CDC) accelerates colonic transit in health. Our aim was to examine pharmacodynamics (colonic transit, bowel function) and pharmacogenetics of CDC in constipation-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-C). METHODS In a double-blind placebo-controlled study, 36 female patients with IBS-C were randomized to treatment with delayed-release oral formulations of placebo, 500 mg CDC, or 1000 mg CDC for 4 days. We assessed gastrointestinal and colonic transit, stool characteristics, and associations of transit with fasting serum 7αC4 (surrogate of bile acid synthesis) and FGF19 (negative regulator of bile acid synthesis) levels. Candidate genetic polymorphisms involved in regulation of bile acid synthesis were analyzed in the 36 patients with IBS-C and 57 healthy volunteers to assess genetic influence on effects of CDC on transit. RESULTS Overall colonic transit and ascending colon emptying (AC t½) were significantly accelerated in the CDC group compared with placebo (P = .005 and P = .028, respectively). Looser stool consistency (P = .003), increased stool frequency (P = .018), and greater ease of passage (P = .024) were noted with CDC compared with placebo. The most common side effect was lower abdominal cramping/pain (P = .01). Fasting serum 7αC4 (but not FGF19) was positively associated with colonic transit (rs = 0.749, P = .003, placebo group). Genetic variation in FGFR4 was associated with AC t½ in response to CDC (uncorrected P = .015); αKlothoβ variant showed a gene-by-treatment interaction based on patient subgroup (uncorrected P = .0088). CONCLUSIONS CDC accelerates colonic transit and improves bowel function in female patients with IBS-C. The rate of bile acid synthesis influences colonic transit. Genetic variation in negative feedback inhibition of bile acid synthesis may affect CDC-mediated acceleration of colonic transit. PMID:20691689

  19. Cannabinoid receptor 1 gene and irritable bowel syndrome: phenotype and quantitative traits.

    PubMed

    Camilleri, Michael; Kolar, Gururaj J; Vazquez-Roque, Maria I; Carlson, Paula; Burton, Duane D; Zinsmeister, Alan R

    2013-03-01

    Genetic variations in metabolism of endocannabinoids and in CNR1 (gene for cannabinoid 1 receptor) are associated with symptom phenotype, colonic transit, and left colon motility in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Our aim was to evaluate associations between two variations in CNR1 genotype (rs806378 and [AAT]n triplets) with symptom phenotype, small bowel and colonic transit, and rectal sensations in 455 patients with IBS and 228 healthy controls. Small bowel and colonic transit were measured by scintigraphy, rectal sensation by isobaric distensions. Associations with genotype were assessed by χ(2) test (symptom phenotype) and ANCOVA (quantitative traits) based on a dominant genetic model. Significant association of CNR1 rs806378 (but not CNR1 [AAT]n) genotype and symptom phenotype was observed (χ(2) P = 0.028). There was significant association of CNR1 rs806378 (P = 0.014; CC vs. CT/TT) with colonic transit in IBS-diarrhea (IBS-D) group; the TT group had the fastest colonic transit at 24 and 48 h. There was significant overall association of CNR1 rs806378 with sensation rating of gas (P = 0.025), but not pain; the strongest associations for gas ratings were in IBS-D (P = 0.002) and IBS-alternating (P = 0.025) subgroups. For CNR1 (AAT)n, gene-by-phenotype interactions were observed for colonic transit at 24 (P = 0.06) and 48 h (P = 0.002) and gas (P = 0.046, highest for IBS-D, P = 0.034), but not pain sensation; the strongest association with transit was in controls, not in IBS. These data support the hypothesis that cannabinoid receptors may play a role in control of colonic transit and sensation in humans and deserve further study as potential mediators or therapeutic targets in lower functional gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:23306084

  20. Effects of Rifaximin on Transit, Permeability, Fecal Microbiome, and Organic Acid Excretion in Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Andrés; Camilleri, Michael; Shin, Andrea; Linker Nord, Sara; O'Neill, Jessica; Gray, Amber V; Lueke, Alan J; Donato, Leslie J; Burton, Duane D; Szarka, Lawrence A; Zinsmeister, Alan R; Golden, Pamela L; Fodor, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Rifaximin relieves irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) symptoms, bloating, abdominal pain, and loose or watery stools. Our objective was to investigate digestive functions in rifaximin-treated IBS patients. Methods: In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study, we compared the effects of rifaximin, 550 mg t.i.d., and placebo for 14 days in nonconstipated IBS and no evidence of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO). All subjects completed baseline and on-treatment evaluation of colonic transit by scintigraphy, mucosal permeability by lactulose–mannitol excretion, and fecal microbiome, bile acids, and short chain fatty acids measured on random stool sample. Overall comparison of primary response measures between treatment groups was assessed using intention-to-treat analysis of covariance (ANCOVA, with baseline value as covariate). Results: There were no significant effects of treatment on bowel symptoms, small bowel or colonic permeability, or colonic transit at 24 h. Rifaximin was associated with acceleration of ascending colon emptying (14.9±2.6 h placebo; 6.9±0.9 h rifaximin; P=0.033) and overall colonic transit at 48 h (geometric center 4.0±0.3 h placebo; 4.7±0.2 h rifaximin; P=0.046); however, rifaximin did not significantly alter total fecal bile acids per g of stool or proportion of individual bile acids or acetate, propionate, or butyrate in stool. Microbiome studies showed strong associations within subjects, modest associations with time across subjects, and a small but significant association of microbial richness with treatment arm (rifaximin vs. treatment). Conclusions: In nonconstipated IBS without documented SIBO, rifaximin treatment is associated with acceleration of colonic transit and changes in microbial richness; the mechanism for reported symptomatic benefit requires further investigation. PMID:27228404

  1. Neural and neuro-immune mechanisms of visceral hypersensitivity in irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Bin; La, Jun Ho; Schwartz, Erica S.

    2012-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is characterized as functional because a pathobiological cause is not readily apparent. Considerable evidence, however, documents that sensitizing proinflammatory and lipotoxic lipids, mast cells and their products, tryptases, enteroendocrine cells, and mononuclear phagocytes and their receptors are increased in tissues of IBS patients with colorectal hypersensitivity. It is also clear from recordings in animals of the colorectal afferent innervation that afferents exhibit long-term changes in models of persistent colorectal hypersensitivity. Such changes in afferent excitability and responses to mechanical stimuli are consistent with relief of discomfort and pain in IBS patients, including relief of referred abdominal hypersensitivity, upon intra-rectal instillation of local anesthetic. In the aggregate, these experimental outcomes establish the importance of afferent drive in IBS, consistent with a larger literature with respect to other chronic conditions in which pain is a principal complaint (e.g., neuropathic pain, painful bladder syndrome, fibromyalgia). Accordingly, colorectal afferents and the environment in which these receptive endings reside constitute the focus of this review. That environment includes understudied and incompletely understood contributions from immune-competent cells resident in and recruited into the colorectum. We close this review by highlighting deficiencies in existing knowledge and identifying several areas for further investigation, resolution of which we anticipate would significantly advance our understanding of neural and neuro-immune contributions to IBS pain and hypersensitivity. PMID:22403791

  2. Low-FODMAP Diet for Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Is It Ready for Prime Time?

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad Ali; Nusrat, Salman; Khan, Muhammad Imran; Nawras, Ali; Bielefeldt, Klaus

    2015-05-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a chronic gastrointestinal disease, which adversely affects the quality of life. Its prevalence has been reported to be around 10-15 % in North America and constitutes the most common cause for gastroenterology referral. Unfortunately, the pathophysiology of IBS is not completely understood. Not surprisingly, the management strategies can leave the patients with inadequate symptom control, making IBS a debilitating gastrointestinal syndrome. Dietary interventions as a treatment strategy for IBS have been recently evaluated. One such intervention includes dietary restriction of fermentable oligo-, di-, and monosaccharides and polyols (FODMAPs). FODMAPs define a group of short-chain carbohydrates that are incompletely absorbed in small intestine and later fermented in the colon. Evidence in the form of randomized controlled trials and observational studies have evaluated the mechanism of action and efficacy of low-FODMAP diet. This dietary intervention has showed promising results in symptom reduction in IBS patients. However, latest trials have also shown that the low-FODMAP diet is associated with marked changes in gut microbiota specifically reduction in microbiota with prebiotic properties. Implications of such changes on gastrointestinal health need to be further evaluated in future trials. PMID:25410635

  3. Irritable Bowel Syndrome may be associated with maternal inheritance and mitochondrial DNA control region sequence variants

    PubMed Central

    van Tilburg, Miranda A.L.; Zaki, Essam A.; Venkatesan, Thangam; Boles, Richard G.

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in various functional disorders that are co-morbid to Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) such as migraine, depression and chronic fatigue syndrome. The aim of the current case-control pilot study was to determine if functional symptoms in IBS show a maternal inheritance bias, and if the degree of this maternal inheritance is related to mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) polymorphisms. Methods Pedigrees were obtained from N=308 adult IBS patients, N=102 healthy controls, and N=36 controls with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD), all from Caucasian heritage, to determine probable maternal inheritance. Two mtDNA polymorphisms (16519T and 3010A), which have previously been implicated in other functional disorders, were assayed in mtDNA haplogroup H IBS subjects and compared to genetic data from N=344 published haplogroup H controls. Results Probable Maternal Inheritance was found in 17.5% IBS, 2% healthy controls and 0% IBD controls (p < 0.0001). No difference was found between IBS and control for 3010A, and a trend was found for 16519T (p=.05). IBS with maternal inheritance were significantly more likely to have the 16519T than controls (OR=5.8; 95%CI=1.5–23.1) or IBS without maternal inheritance (OR=5.2; 95%CI=1.2–22.6). Conclusions This small pilot study shows that a significant minority (1/6) of IBS patients have pedigrees suggestive of maternal inheritance. The mtDNA polymorphism 16519T, which has been previously implicated in other functional disorders, is also associated with IBS patients who display maternal inheritance. These findings suggest that mtDNA-related mitochondrial dysfunction may constitute a sub-group within IBS. Future replication studies in larger samples are needed. PMID:24500451

  4. Screening of coeliac disease in undetected adults and patients diagnosed with irritable bowel syndrome in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Al-Ajlan, Abdulrahman S

    2016-07-01

    The present study is to determine the prevalence and implication of coeliac disease (CD) among adult Saudis and compared to those with diagnosed irritable bowel syndrome. This prospective study was conducted among 980 adults. Out of that, 482 subjects (staff and students of Riyadh Health Science College) were designated as control cohorts for undetected coeliac disease. Furthermore, another contingent of 498 subjects diagnosed with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) at Prince Salman Hospital and Al-Iman General Hospital also constituted a segment of the overall initial 1020 subjects. Both cases and control were tested for serological markers of coeliac disease (tissues transglutaminase (tTGAs) and endomysial autoantibody (EMAs) and were confirmed by histopathology test. All the positive for cases of coeliac disease were screened for iron deficiency anaemia, Vitamin D deficiency, and osteoporosis and weight assessment. The percentage of coeliac disease in control subjects and patients diagnosed with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) were found to be 1.9% and 9.6% respectively, about 38% of the total coeliac disease patients are among females of middle age (20-39-years) and 16% of the males in the same age range. Whereas, 20% and 25% of all coeliac disease cases with ages of 40-59 were remarked as females and males respectively. The identical nature and overlap of symptoms of the two conditions could possibly result in misdiagnosis of coeliac diseases or over-diagnosis of irritable bowel syndrome. The findings of the study might also give considerable implications of the disease in the nutritional level which is noticeable. PMID:27298578

  5. Risk factors for chronic diarrhoea in the community in the absence of irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chang, J Y; Locke, G Richard; Schleck, C D; Zinsmeister, A R; Talley, N J

    2009-10-01

    In contrast to irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), the prevalence and risk factors for diarrhoea in the absence of IBS in the community are unknown. We aimed to evaluate potential risk factors for chronic diarrhoea (non-IBS). A valid questionnaire that recorded gastrointestinal symptoms required for a diagnosis of chronic diarrhoea, self-reported measures of potential risk factors, and a somatic symptom checklist was mailed to an age- and gender-stratified random sample of Olmsted County, Minnesota residents (30-64 year). Chronic diarrhoea was defined as reporting one or more of the following symptoms more than 25% of the time in the past 3 months: > or =3 bowel movements a day, loose or watery stools, or faecal urgency. Subjects with IBS (Rome III) were excluded. Of 892 eligible subjects, 653 (73%) responded. Among 523 respondents not reporting IBS, chronic diarrhoea was reported by 148 (28%); 90 (61%) had chronic painless diarrhoea. Chronic diarrhoea was significantly associated with self-reported food sensitivity (OR = 2.05 [1.31-3.20]) and stress (OR = 1.99 [1.03-3.85]). Both remained significant in the adjusted variable models that excluded subjects with any abdominal pain. Female gender (OR = 0.67 [0.45-0.98]) and higher education level (OR = 0.60 [0.39-0.92]) had smaller odds for chronic diarrhoea. No association was detected for age, marital status, body mass index, cigarette or alcohol use, coffee, analgesics, emotional support, pets or water source. Chronic diarrhoea in the absence of IBS is common; self-reported food sensitivity, male gender and a lower level of education are risk factors. PMID:19460105

  6. Fecal calprotectin: a marker for clinical differentiation of microscopic colitis and irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    von Arnim, Ulrike; Wex, Thomas; Ganzert, Christine; Schulz, Christian; Malfertheiner, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to compare two methods for measuring fecal calprotectin (FC) concentration and to evaluate the possibility of differentiation between microscopic colitis (MC) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Methods Twenty-three patients with MC (six patients with active disease and 17 patients retested in remission) and 20 patients with IBS were prospectively included in this study. Active disease state of MC was determined by clinical symptoms of >3 bowel movements per day and histological correlate. All patients underwent ileocolonoscopy, including segmental biopsy samples for histology. FC levels in stool samples were analyzed using a rapid test system (Quantum Blue®) and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results FC levels were significantly higher in patients with active MC (median 48 μg/g [23–106]) compared to patients with IBS (median 2 μg/g [1–111.83]), P=0.0001 using an ELISA. FC level of patients with MC in remission was 22 μg/g (1–106.4), which is similar to those identified in patients with IBS. The difference of FC levels between active MC and IBS was not detected by the FC rapid test (P=0.635). Discussion FC levels might serve as parameter for differentiation between patients with active MC and IBS. Since there is no surrogate marker available at present for MC, FC appears to be a candidate for differentiating MC from IBS. Conclusion High FC levels, which were analyzed by ELISA, are a potential marker for patients with active MC compared to those with IBS. The FC rapid test was less suitable for this purpose. PMID:27147826

  7. Fecal Calprotectin and serum chromogranin A as potential biomarkers of irritable bowel syndrome symptom severity.

    PubMed

    Pletikosic, Sanda; Plavsic, Ivana; Hauser, Goran; Tkalcic, Mladenka

    2015-09-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a disorder of the lower gastrointestinal (GI) tract, which manifests as abdominal pain and/or discomfort accompanied by altered bowel function, in the absence of structural pathology. The onset and precipitation of IBS is the result of an interaction among several factors, including psychological distress, altered GI sensation and processing of sensory information as well as GI inflammation. These factors have varying contributions to disorder etiology in different patients, and in line with that, there is now emerging evidence about a low-grade inflammation in a subgroup of IBS patients. Because IBS diagnosis is based on the ROME III criteria, with the exclusion of structural pathology, patients are often exposed to numerous invasive and unpleasant tests. In order to decrease the cost of repeated testing, while simultaneously alleviating patients' anxiety, research should be aimed at detecting cost-effective biomarkers. We hypothesize chromogranin A (CgA) and fecal Calprotectin (FC) could be used to eliminate possible organic causes of IBS symptoms. Also, we hypothesize FC could be helpful in detecting IBS patients with low-grade inflammation. Forty-eight outpatients with IBS (76% females) completed a set of psychosocial measures (HRQoL, STAI, BDI, VSI, SF-36), and their FC and CgA levels were obtained. We found elevated CgA levels in 4 patients, but CgA levels were not related to any of the psychological measures used. Elevated FC levels were found in 12 patients. FC levels significantly correlated with the physical component of health related quality of life (HRQoL) (r48=-.42, p<.01). In addition, one-way ANOVA's were performed to test possible differences in psychosocial measures depending on the patient's FC status. The analysis showed only one significant difference. Patients with the highest levels of FC had significantly lower physical component of HRQoL compared to the other two groups of patients. PMID:26112162

  8. Mindfulness for irritable bowel syndrome: protocol development for a controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Gaylord, Susan A; Whitehead, William E; Coble, Rebecca S; Faurot, Keturah R; Palsson, Olafur S; Garland, Eric L; Frey, William; Mann, John Douglas

    2009-01-01

    Background Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), a functional bowel disorder with symptoms of abdominal pain and disturbed defecation experienced by 10% of U.S. adults, results in significant disability, impaired quality of life, and health-care burden. Conventional medical care focusing on pharmacological approaches, diet, and lifestyle management has been partially effective in controlling symptoms. Behavioral treatments, such as cognitive-behavioral therapy and hypnosis, are promising. This paper describes an on-going feasibility study to assess the efficacy of mindfulness training, a behavioral treatment involving directing and sustaining attention to present-moment experience, for the treatment of IBS. Methods/Design The study design involves randomization of adult women with IBS according to Rome II criteria, to either an eight-week mindfulness training group (based on a Mindfulness-based Stress Reduction [MBSR] format) or a previously validated IBS social-support group as an attention-control condition. The primary hypothesis is that, compared to Support Group participants, those in the Mindfulness Program will demonstrate significant improvement in IBS symptoms as measured by the IBS Symptom Severity Scale [1]. Discussion 214 individuals have been screened for eligibility, of whom 148 were eligible for the study. Of those, 87 were enrolled, with 21 withdrawing after having given consent. 66 have completed or are in the process of completing the interventions. It is feasible to undertake a rigorous randomized clinical trial of mindfulness training for people with IBS, using a standardized MBSR protocol adapted for those experiencing IBS, compared to a control social-support group previously utilized in IBS studies. Trial Registration Clinical Trials.gov Identifier: NCT00680693 PMID:19638214

  9. Psychopathological features of irritable bowel syndrome patients with and without functional dyspepsia: a cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and functional dyspepsia (FD) show considerable overlap and are both associated with psychiatric comorbidity. The present study aimed to investigate whether IBS patients with FD show higher levels of psychopathology than those without FD. As a preliminary analysis, it also evaluated the psychopathological differences, if any, between IBS patients featuring the two Rome III-defined FD subtypes, i.e. postprandial distress syndrome (PDS) and epigastric pain syndrome (EPS). Methods Consecutive outpatients (n = 82, F = 67, mean age 41.6 ± 12.7 years) referred to our third level gastroenterological centre, matching the Rome III criteria for IBS and, if present, for concurrent FD, were recruited. They were asked to complete a 90-item self-rating questionnaire, the Symptom Checklist 90 Revised (SCL-90-R), in order to assess the psychological status. Comparisons between groups were carried out using the non-parametric Mann-Whitney U test. Results Patients with IBS only were 56 (68.3%, F = 43, mean age 41.6 ± 13.3 years) and patients with both IBS and FD were 26 (31.7%, F = 24, mean age 41.8 ± 11.5 years), 17 of whom had PDS and 9 EPS. Patients with both IBS and FD scored significantly higher on the SCL-90-R GSI and on eight out of the nine subscales than patients with IBS only (P ranging from 0.000 to 0.03). No difference was found between IBS patients with PDS and IBS patients with EPS (P ranging from 0.07 to 0.97), but this result has to be considered provisional, given the small sample size of the two subgroups. Conclusions IBS-FD overlap is associated with an increased severity of psychopathological features. This finding suggests that a substantial subset of patients of a third level gastroenterological centre with both IBS and FD may benefit from psychological assessment and treatment. PMID:21871075

  10. Immunoglobulin E in irritable bowel syndrome: another target for treatment? A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Niven, Robert M.; Meng, Jie; Atarodi, Sima; Whorwell, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is notoriously difficult to treat and this situation is unlikely to change until the pathophysiology is better understood. There is no doubt that IBS is a multifactorial condition but it is likely that the relative contribution of the various factors involved varies from patient to patient. Consequently, in some individuals one mechanism may have such a strong effect that its elimination may lead to a substantial improvement in symptoms. This paper describes a patient with severe asthma and IBS where the administration of an anti-Immunoglobulin E (IgE) monoclonal antibody not only improved her asthma but also resulted in an almost complete resolution of her IBS symptoms. This observation suggests that some form of allergic process, which may be mediated by IgE, might be driving IBS in some patients and there is evidence from the literature that atopy is more common in this condition. Therefore, in patients with IBS and atopy where the response to standard treatment is poor, it may be worth considering targeting the allergic diathesis. Possible approaches include skin testing with food antigens followed by an appropriate exclusion diet or pharmacological mast cell stabilization. PMID:26327917

  11. Food allergy in irritable bowel syndrome: The case of non-celiac wheat sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Mansueto, Pasquale; D’Alcamo, Alberto; Seidita, Aurelio; Carroccio, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is one of the most common gastrointestinal disorders, having a prevalence of 12%-30% in the general population. Most patients with IBS attribute their symptoms to adverse food reactions. We review the role of diet in the pathogenesis of IBS and the importance of dietary factors in the management of these patients. The MEDLINE electronic database (1966 to Jan 2015) was searched using the following keywords: “food”, “diet”, “food allergy”, “food hypersensitivity”, “food intolerance”, “IBS”, “epidemiology”, “pathogenesis”, “pathophysiology”, “diagnosis”, “treatment”. We found 153 eligible papers; 80 were excluded because: not written in English, exclusive biochemical and experimental research, case reports, reviews, and research otherwise not relevant to our specific interest. We selected 73 papers: 43 original papers, 26 reviews and 4 letters to the editor. These papers focused on IBS pathogenesis, the association between IBS and atopy, and between IBS and food allergy, the relationship between IBS and non-celiac wheat sensitivity, the role of diet in IBS. Pending further scientific evidence, a cautious approach is advisable but the concept of food allergy should be included as a possible cause of IBS, and a dietary approach may have a place in the routine clinical management of IBS. PMID:26109796

  12. The low-FODMAP diet for irritable bowel syndrome: Lights and shadows.

    PubMed

    Molina-Infante, Javier; Serra, Jordi; Fernandez-Bañares, Fernando; Mearin, Fermín

    2016-02-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) affects 10-15% of the western population. Drug therapy for this entity has shown limited efficacy. The low Fermentable Oligo-, Di-, Monosaccharides And Polyols (FODMAP) diet has recently emerged as an effective intervention for reducing gastrointestinal symptoms in IBS. Currently, several mechanistic studies have proven the rational basis of carbohydrate restriction. In addition, high-quality evidence (prospective studies and randomized controlled trials) from a variety of countries supports the high effectiveness of a low-FODMAP diet for IBS symptoms (70%), especially abdominal bloating, pain, and diarrhea. Importantly, this diet seems to be superior to a gluten-free diet for patients with non-celiac gluten sensitivity. The most controversial features of the low FODMAP diet are its short- and long-term limitations (a high level of restriction, the need for monitoring by an expert dietitian, potential nutritional deficiencies, significant gut microbiota reduction, lack of predictors of response), as well as the potential lack of advantage over alternative dietary, pharmacological and psychological interventions for IBS. Although liberalization of carbohydrate intake is recommended in the long-term, the reintroduction process remains to be clarified as, theoretically, global carbohydrate restriction is deemed to be necessary to avoid additive effects. PMID:26548734

  13. Small intestine bacterial overgrowth and irritable bowel syndrome-related symptoms: Experience with Rifaximin

    PubMed Central

    Peralta, Sergio; Cottone, Claudia; Doveri, Tiziana; Almasio, Piero Luigi; Craxi, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To estimate the prevalence of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) in our geographical area (Western Sicily, Italy) by means of an observational study, and to gather information on the use of locally active, non-absorbable antibiotics for treatment of SIBO. METHODS: Our survey included 115 patients fulfilling the Rome II criteria for diagnosis of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS); a total of 97 patients accepted to perform a breath test with lactulose (BTLact), and those who had a positive test, received Rifaximin (Normix®, Alfa Wassermann) 1200 mg/d for 7 d; 3 wk after the end of treatment, the BTLact was repeated. RESULTS: Based on the BTLact results, SIBO was present in about 56% of IBS patients, and it was responsible for some IBS-related symptoms, such as abdominal bloating and discomfort, and diarrhoea. 1-wk treatment with Rifaximin turned the BTLact to negative in about 50% of patients and significantly reduced the symptoms, especially in those patients with an alternated constipation/diarrhoea-variant IBS. CONCLUSION: SIBO should be always suspected in patients with IBS, and a differential diagnosis is done by means of a “breath test”. Rifaximin may represent a valid approach to the treatment of SIBO. PMID:19496193

  14. High-dose rifaximin treatment alleviates global symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jolley, John

    2011-01-01

    Background: To evaluate the efficacy of rifaximin for reduction of gastrointestinal symptoms in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Methods: Medical records were identified for consecutive patients diagnosed with IBS according to Rome III criteria, who had abnormal lactulose breath test results and had received rifaximin 1200 mg/day for 10 days. The efficacy of rifaximin for reducing gastrointestinal symptoms and for eradicating small intestinal bacterial overgrowth was ascertained in these patients. In addition, these endpoints were examined in patients who were initially unresponsive to rifaximin 1200 mg/day and received subsequent rifaximin 2400 mg/day. Results: Patients who received rifaximin 1200 mg/day (n = 162) experienced a mean improvement of 52% in global IBS symptoms at the end of rifaximin treatment. Similarly, initially unresponsive patients who received additional rifaximin 2400 mg/day (n = 81) experienced a 53% mean improvement in global IBS symptoms. Forty-nine percent of patients who received initial rifaximin and 47% of patients who received high-dose rifaximin achieved ≥50% global symptom improvement during at least one follow-up visit. Normalization of lactulose breath test results was only apparent in some patients who received high-dose rifaximin. Rifaximin was well tolerated. Conclusion: Rifaximin 1200 mg/day for 10 days reduced gastrointestinal symptoms in patients with IBS. Patients with incomplete symptom resolution may respond to increased doses of rifaximin. PMID:21694871

  15. Sleep-related autonomic disturbances in symptom subgroups of women with irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Robert, Jennifer J T; Elsenbruch, Sigrid; Orr, William C

    2006-12-01

    The objective was to investigate whether predominant symptom patterns in women with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) affect autonomic activity during sleep. Seventy-five women with IBS underwent a polysomnographic sleep study. Twenty-two of the IBS patients were diarrhea-predominant (IBS-D), 33 were constipation-predominant (IBS-C), and 20 patients had alternating symptoms (IBS-A). Autonomic activity was measured by heart rate variability. The IBS-D group had significant vagal withdrawal compared to the IBS-A group during REM and non-REM sleep (P < 0.05). The IBS-D symptom subgroup had significantly (P < 0.05) greater sympathetic dominance during non-REM than IBS-A patients. Lower abdominal pain correlated with sympathetic dominance during sleep in the IBS-D group (r=0.54, P < 0.01). The IBS-D patients were physiologically distinct with regard to autonomic functioning during sleep compared to the alternating patients, but not the constipated patients. Sleep appears to unmask differences in autonomic activity that may distinguish IBS patients. PMID:17080247

  16. Molecular Characterization and Subtyping of Blastocystis Species in Irritable Bowel Syndrome Patients from North India

    PubMed Central

    Das, Rojaleen; Khalil, Shehla; Mirdha, B. R.; Makharia, Govind K.; Dattagupta, Siddharta; Chaudhry, Rama

    2016-01-01

    Blastocystis species has been extensively studied in recent few years to establish its pathogenecity. Present study was designed to identify and examine the association of Blastocystis sp. and its subtypes with Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS).Blastocystis sp. detected using wet-mount microscopy, trichrome staining, in-vitro culture and Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) assay in a cohort of IBS patients (n = 150) and healthy controls (n = 100). Isolates of Blastocystis sp.were subtyped using Sequence Tagged Site and representative samples were sequenced at SSUrRNA locus.A total of sixty five isolates of Blastocystis sp. were identified [IBS (n = 50); Controls (n = 15)] of which 91% belonged to ST3 and 9% belonged to ST1. No other subtypes could be identified. Statistically significant association was observed between Blastocystis sp. and IBS patients; however no particular subtype could be ascertained to any particular clinical type of IBS.The frequency of occurrence of Blastocystis sp. was more in IBS patients as compared to the controls and ST3 being the most prevalent subtype. The genetic polymorphism of SSU-rRNA gene amongst the different Blastocystis sp.isolates found in this study reinforces the fact that these organisms are genetically highly divergent. PMID:26784888

  17. Stress-Related Alterations of Visceral Sensation: Animal Models for Irritable Bowel Syndrome Study

    PubMed Central

    Mulak, Agata; Taché, Yvette

    2011-01-01

    Stressors of different psychological, physical or immune origin play a critical role in the pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome participating in symptoms onset, clinical presentation as well as treatment outcome. Experimental stress models applying a variety of acute and chronic exteroceptive or interoceptive stressors have been developed to target different periods throughout the lifespan of animals to assess the vulnerability, the trigger and perpetuating factors determining stress influence on visceral sensitivity and interactions within the brain-gut axis. Recent evidence points towards adequate construct and face validity of experimental models developed with respect to animals' age, sex, strain differences and specific methodological aspects such as non-invasive monitoring of visceromotor response to colorectal distension as being essential in successful identification and evaluation of novel therapeutic targets aimed at reducing stress-related alterations in visceral sensitivity. Underlying mechanisms of stress-induced modulation of visceral pain involve a combination of peripheral, spinal and supraspinal sensitization based on the nature of the stressors and dysregulation of descending pathways that modulate nociceptive transmission or stress-related analgesic response. PMID:21860814

  18. Overlap of functional heartburn and gastroesophageal reflux disease with irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    de Bortoli, Nicola; Martinucci, Irene; Bellini, Massimo; Savarino, Edoardo; Savarino, Vincenzo; Blandizzi, Corrado; Marchi, Santino

    2013-01-01

    Several studies indicate a significant degree of overlap between irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Likewise, both functional heartburn (FH) and IBS are functional digestive disorders that may occur in the same patients. However, data establishing a solid link between FH and IBS are lacking, mainly because the clinical definition of FH has undergone substantial changes over the years. The available literature on the overlap between GERD or FH and IBS highlights considerable heterogeneity in terms of the criteria and diagnostic procedures used to assess heartburn and IBS. In particular, several epidemiological studies included patients with concomitant IBS and GERD without any attempt to distinguish FH (as defined by the Rome III criteria) from GERD via pathophysiological investigations. Independent of these critical issues, there is preliminary evidence supporting a significant degree of FH-IBS overlap. This underscores the need for studies based on updated diagnostic criteria and accurate pathophysiological classifications, particularly to distinguish FH from GERD. This distinction would represent an essential starting point to achieving a better understanding of pathophysiology in the subclasses of patients with GERD and FH and properly assessing the different degrees of overlap between IBS and the subcategories of heartburn.The present review article intends to appraise and critically discuss current evidence supporting a possible concomitance of GERD or FH with IBS in the same patients and to highlight the pathophysiological relationships between these disorders. PMID:24124323

  19. Interaction between ingested nutrients and gut endocrine cells in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (Review)

    PubMed Central

    EL-SALHY, MAGDY; GILJA, ODD HELGE; GUNDERSEN, DORIS; HATLEBAKK, JAN G.; HAUSKEN, TRYGVE

    2014-01-01

    Several endocrine cell abnormalities have been reported in different segments of the gastrointestinal tract of patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). These cells have specialized microvilli that project into the lumen; they function as sensors for the gut contents and respond to luminal stimuli (mostly ingested nutrients) by releasing hormones into the lamina propria, where they exert their effects via a paracrine/endocrine mode of action. Certain food items trigger the symptoms experienced by IBS patients, including those rich in fermentable oligo-, di- and monosaccharides, and polyols (FODMAPs). In this review, we present the argument that the effects of both FODMAPs and the proportional intake of proteins, fats and carbohydrates on IBS symptoms may be caused by an interaction with the gut endocrine cells. Since the gut hormones control and regulate gastrointestinal motility and sensation, this interaction may be responsible for abnormal gastrointestinal motility and the visceral hypersensitivity observed in these patients. There is no consistent evidence that IBS patients suffer from food allergy. The role of gluten intolerance in the development of IBS symptoms in these patients remains a matter of controversy. Individual guidance on food management, which includes restrictions in the intake of FODMAP-rich foods and testing diets with different proportions of proteins, fats and carbohydrates has been found to reduce the symptoms, improve the quality of life, and make the habitual diet of IBS patients more healthy. PMID:24939595

  20. Oh my aching gut: irritable bowel syndrome, Blastocystis, and asymptomatic infection

    PubMed Central

    Boorom, Kenneth F; Smith, Huw; Nimri, Laila; Viscogliosi, Eric; Spanakos, Gregory; Parkar, Unaiza; Li, Lan-Hua; Zhou, Xiao-Nong; Ok, Ülgen Z; Leelayoova, Saovanee; Jones, Morris S

    2008-01-01

    Blastocystis is a prevalent enteric protozoan that infects a variety of vertebrates. Infection with Blastocystis in humans has been associated with abdominal pain, diarrhea, constipation, fatigue, skin rash, and other symptoms. Researchers using different methods and examining different patient groups have reported asymptomatic infection, acute symptomatic infection, and chronic symptomatic infection. The variation in accounts has lead to disagreements concerning the role of Blastocystis in human disease, and the importance of treating it. A better understanding of the number of species of Blastocystis that can infect humans, along with realization of the limitations of the existing clinical laboratory diagnostic techniques may account for much of the disagreement. The possibility that disagreement was caused by the emergence of particular pathogenic variants of Blastocystis is discussed, along with the potential role of Blastocystis infection in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Findings are discussed concerning the role of protease-activated receptor-2 in enteric disease which may account for the presence of abdominal pain and diffuse symptoms in Blastocystis infection, even in the absence of fever and endoscopic findings. The availability of better diagnostic techniques and treatments for Blastocystis infection may be of value in understanding chronic gastrointestinal illness of unknown etiology. PMID:18937874

  1. Instability of the faecal microbiota in diarrhoea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Durbán, Ana; Abellán, Juan J; Jiménez-Hernández, Nuria; Artacho, Alejandro; Garrigues, Vicente; Ortiz, Vicente; Ponce, Julio; Latorre, Amparo; Moya, Andrés

    2013-12-01

    The irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional gastrointestinal disorder with a largely unknown aetiology and a wide range of symptoms. Most cross-sectional studies carried out so far suggest subtle alterations in the structure of the intestinal microbiota that are barely reproduced, partly because of the high inter-subject variation in the community composition and disorder-specific features. We performed a longitudinal study to explore the within-subject variation in the faecal microbiota in two patients with IBS classified into the diarrhoea subtype and the healthy spouse of one of them. Faecal communities were monitored over 6-8 weeks and analysed through metagenomic and metatranscriptomic approaches. We found a higher temporal instability in the fraction of active microbiota related to the IBS condition and fluctuating symptoms. Strong and quick shifts in the distribution of the active microbiota and changes in the global pattern of gene expression were detected in association with acute diarrhoea, whereas microbial composition and encoded functions were more stable. The specific alterations in the microbiota were barely reproduced within and between patients. Further research is needed to assess whether these changes are a consequence of the abnormal gut function in acute diarrhoeic episodes and the potential usefulness of tackling them. PMID:23889283

  2. What about OMT and nutrition for managing the irritable bowel syndrome? An overview and treatment plan.

    PubMed

    Collebrusco, Luca; Lombardini, Rita

    2014-01-01

    A chronic continuous or intermittent gastrointestinal tract dysfunction, the irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), appears to be due to dysregulation of brain-gut-microbiota communication. Furthermore, the "microbiota" greatly impacts the bi-directional brain-gut axis communication. This article describes IBS in relation to similar diseases, presents the background to osteopathy, and proposes osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT) to manage IBS. In IBS, OMT focuses on the nervous and circulatory systems, spine, viscera, and thoracic and pelvic diaphragms in order to restore homeostatic balance, normalize autonomic activity in the intestine, promote lymphatic flow, and address somatic dysfunction. Lymphatic and venous congestion are treated by the lymphatic pump techniques and stimulation of Chapman׳s reflex points. A simple treatment plan designed to lessen chronic pain and inflammation in IBS is presented based on current evidence-based literature. Since food itself, food allergies, and intolerance could contribute to symptom onset or even cause IBS, this article also provides dietary modifications to consider for patients. PMID:25224307

  3. Post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome: mechanistic insights into chronic disturbances following enteric infection.

    PubMed

    Beatty, Jennifer K; Bhargava, Amol; Buret, Andre G

    2014-04-14

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a commonly encountered chronic functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorder. Approximately 10% of IBS patients can trace the onset of their symptoms to a previous a bout of infectious dysentery. The appearance of new IBS symptoms following an infectious event is defined as post-infectious-IBS. Indeed, with the World Health Organization estimating between 2 and 4 billion cases annually, infectious diarrheal disease represents an incredible international healthcare burden. Additionally, compounding evidence suggests many commonly encountered enteropathogens as unique triggers behind IBS symptom generation and underlying pathophysiological features. A growing body of work provides evidence supporting a role for pathogen-mediated modifications in the resident intestinal microbiota, epithelial barrier integrity, effector cell functions, and innate and adaptive immune features, all proposed physiological manifestations that can underlie GI abnormalities in IBS. Enteric pathogens must employ a vast array of machinery to evade host protective immune mechanisms, and illicit successful infections. Consequently, the impact of infectious events on host physiology can be multidimensional in terms of anatomical location, functional scope, and duration. This review offers a unique discussion of the mechanisms employed by many commonly encountered enteric pathogens that cause acute disease, but may also lead to the establishment of chronic GI dysfunction compatible with IBS. PMID:24744587

  4. Herbal medicines for the management of irritable bowel syndrome: A comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi, Roja; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional gut disorder with high prevalence. Because of various factors involved in its pathophysiology and disappointing results from conventional IBS medications, the treatment of IBS is challenging and use of complementary and alternative medicines especially herbal therapies is increasing. In this paper, electronic databases including PubMed, Scopus, and Cochrane library were searched to obtain any in vitro, in vivo or human studies evaluating single or compound herbal preparations in the management of IBS. One in vitro, 3 in vivo and 23 human studies were included and systematically reviewed. The majority of studies are about essential oil of Menta piperita as a single preparation and STW 5 as a compound preparation. Some evaluated herbs such as Curcuma xanthorriza and Fumaria officinalis did not demonstrate any benefits in IBS. However, it seems there are many other herbal preparations such as those proposed in traditional medicine of different countries that could be studied and investigated for their efficacy in management of IBS. PMID:22363129

  5. Bacterial metabolic 'toxins': a new mechanism for lactose and food intolerance, and irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Campbell, A K; Matthews, S B; Vassel, N; Cox, C D; Naseem, R; Chaichi, J; Holland, I B; Green, J; Wann, K T

    2010-12-30

    Lactose and food intolerance cause a wide range of gut and systemic symptoms, including gas, gut pain, diarrhoea or constipation, severe headaches, severe fatigue, loss of cognitive functions such as concentration, memory and reasoning, muscle and joint pain, heart palpitations, and a variety of allergies (Matthews and Campbell, 2000; Matthews et al., 2005; Waud et al., 2008). These can be explained by the production of toxic metabolites from gut bacteria, as a result of anaerobic digestion of carbohydrates and other foods, not absorbed in the small intestine. These metabolites include alcohols, diols such as butan 2,3 diol, ketones, acids, and aldehydes such as methylglyoxal (Campbell et al., 2005, 2009). These 'toxins' induce calcium signals in bacteria and affect their growth, thereby acting to modify the balance of microflora in the gut (Campbell et al., 2004, 2007a,b). These bacterial 'toxins' also affect signalling mechanisms in cells around the body, thereby explaining the wide range of symptoms in people with food intolerance. This new mechanism also explains the most common referral to gastroenterologists, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), and the illness that afflicted Charles Darwin for 50 years (Campbell and Matthews, 2005a,b). We propose it will lead to a new understanding of the molecular mechanism of type 2 diabetes and some cancers. PMID:20851732

  6. Constipation-predominant irritable bowel syndrome: A review of current and emerging drug therapies

    PubMed Central

    Jadallah, Khaled A; Kullab, Susan M; Sanders, David S

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a highly prevalent medical condition that adversely affects patient quality of life and constitutes a significant economic burden on healthcare resources. A large proportion of patients suffer from the constipation subtype of IBS (IBS-C), most commonly afflicting older individuals and those with a lower socioeconomic status. Conventional pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic treatment options have limited efficacies and/or significant adverse events, which lead to increased long-term health care expenditures. Failure to effectively treat IBS-C patients over the past decades has largely been due to a poor understanding of disease pathophysiology, lack of a global view of the patient, and an inappropriate selection of patients and treatment endpoints in clinical trials. In recent years, however, more effective and safer drugs have been developed for the treatment of IBS-C. The advancement in the area of pharmacologic treatment is based on new knowledge of the pathophysiologic basis of IBS-C and the development of drugs with increased selectivity within pharmacologic classes with recognized efficacies. This narrative review covers the spectrum of available drugs and their mechanisms of action, as well as the efficacy and safety profiles of each as determined in relevant clinical trials that have investigated treatment options for IBS-C and chronic constipation. A brief summary of laxative-based treatment options is presented, followed by up-to-date assessments for three classes of drugs: prokinetics, prosecretory agents, and bile acid modulators. PMID:25083062

  7. Catechol-O-Methyltransferase val158met Polymorphism Predicts Placebo Effect in Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Kathryn T.; Lembo, Anthony J.; Kirsch, Irving; Ziogas, Dimitrios C.; Douaiher, Jeffrey; Jensen, Karin B.; Conboy, Lisa A.; Kelley, John M.; Kokkotou, Efi; Kaptchuk, Ted J.

    2012-01-01

    Identifying patients who are potential placebo responders has major implications for clinical practice and trial design. Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), an important enzyme in dopamine catabolism plays a key role in processes associated with the placebo effect such as reward, pain, memory and learning. We hypothesized that the COMT functional val158met polymorphism, was a predictor of placebo effects and tested our hypothesis in a subset of 104 patients from a previously reported randomized controlled trial in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The three treatment arms from this study were: no-treatment (“waitlist”), placebo treatment alone (“limited”) and, placebo treatment “augmented” with a supportive patient-health care provider interaction. The primary outcome measure was change from baseline in IBS-Symptom Severity Scale (IBS-SSS) after three weeks of treatment. In a regression model, the number of methionine alleles in COMT val158met was linearly related to placebo response as measured by changes in IBS-SSS (p = .035). The strongest placebo response occurred in met/met homozygotes treated in the augmented placebo arm. A smaller met/met associated effect was observed with limited placebo treatment and there was no effect in the waitlist control. These data support our hypothesis that the COMT val158met polymorphism is a potential biomarker of placebo response. PMID:23110189

  8. Effect of Illness Representations and Catastrophizing on Quality of Life in Adults With Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sherwin, LeeAnne B; Leary, Emily; Henderson, Wendy A

    2016-09-01

    There is limited understanding of the influence of psychosocial factors on irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), which contributes to management difficulties and ineffective long-term treatment. The goal of the current study was to assess the effect illness representations and coping had on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in adults with IBS. Self-report data were collected from 101 adults with IBS. Illness representations were measured with the Revised Illness Perception Questionnaire; catastrophizing was measured with the catastrophizing subscale of the Coping Strategies Questionnaire; and HRQOL was measured using the IBS-Quality of Life Measure. Participants perceived their IBS to be a chronic, cyclical condition with negative consequences, moderate symptomatology, and strong negative emotional impact. Their quality of life was poor and catastrophic thinking was noted to be used. Therefore, integrating illness beliefs and coping style into the management of IBS may improve well-being and minimize suffering. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 54(9), 44-53.]. PMID:27576228

  9. The role of diet in symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome in adults: a narrative review.

    PubMed

    Heizer, William D; Southern, Susannah; McGovern, Susan

    2009-07-01

    This review summarizes what is known about the effect of diet on irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) symptoms emphasizing data from randomized, controlled clinical trials. Studies suggest that IBS symptoms in one quarter of patients may be caused or exacerbated by one or more dietary components. Recent studies indicate that a diet restricted in fermentable, poorly absorbed carbohydrates, including fructose, fructans (present in wheat and onions), sorbitol, and other sugar alcohols is beneficial, but confirmatory studies are needed. Despite a long history of enthusiastic use, fiber is marginally beneficial. Insoluble fiber may worsen symptoms. Some patients with IBS, especially those with constipation, will improve with increased intake of soluble fiber. Prebiotic fibers have not been adequately tested. Daily use of peppermint oil is effective in relieving IBS symptoms. The usefulness of probiotics in the form of foods such as live-culture yogurt and buttermilk for IBS symptoms is not established. In clinical practice, it is very difficult to establish that a patient's symptoms result from an adverse reaction to food. A double blind placebo-controlled food challenge is the most reliable method, but it is not suitable for routine clinical use. A modified exclusion diet and stepwise reintroduction of foods or trials of eliminating classes of food may be useful. PMID:19559137

  10. Drug Development for the Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Current Challenges and Future Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    De Ponti, Fabrizio

    2012-01-01

    Medications are frequently used for the treatment of patients with the irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), although their actual benefit is often debated. In fact, the recent progress in our understanding of the pathophysiology of IBS, accompanied by a large number of preclinical and clinical studies of new drugs, has not been matched by a significant improvement of the armamentarium of medications available to treat IBS. The aim of this review is to outline the current challenges in drug development for IBS, taking advantage of what we have learnt through the Rome process (Rome I, Rome II, and Rome III). The key questions that will be addressed are: (a) do we still believe in the “magic bullet,” i.e., a very selective drug displaying a single receptor mechanism capable of controlling IBS symptoms? (b) IBS is a “functional disorder” where complex neuroimmune and brain-gut interactions occur and minimal inflammation is often documented: do we need to target gut motility, visceral sensitivity, or minimal inflammation? (c) are there validated biomarkers (accepted by regulatory agencies) for studies of sensation and motility with experimental medications in humans? (d) do animal models have predictive and translational value? (e) in the era of personalized medicine, does pharmacogenomics applied to these medications already play a role? Finally, this review will briefly outline medications currently used or in development for IBS. It is anticipated that a more focused interaction between basic science investigators, pharmacologists, and clinicians will lead to better treatment of IBS. PMID:23378837

  11. Challenges to the Therapeutic Pipeline for Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Endpoints and Regulatory Hurdles

    PubMed Central

    Camilleri, Michael; Chang, Lin

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances in our understanding of basic neuroenteric mechanisms and the role of effectors and transmitters in the brain-gut axis have provided opportunities to develop new therapeutic agents for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Furthermore, human pharmacodynamic studies utilizing transit, colonic or rectal sensitivity, and brain imaging have been useful in determining therapeutic efficacy (particularly for drugs that act on motor function). This review provides an overview of medications that have not yet been approved for treatment of patients with IBS, yet have shown promise in phase IIB trials. These include drugs that act on the serotonin receptor and transporter system, antidepressants, norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, opioids, cholecystokinin antagonists, neurokinin-antagonists, chloride channel activators, guanylate cyclase C agonists, atypical benzodiazepines, probiotics and antibiotics. The changing landscape in the regulatory approval process has impacted the development of IBS drugs. Guidance documents from regulatory agencies in Europe and the United States have focused on patients’ reported outcomes and associated quality of life. After a decade of experience with different endpoints that have generated some data on psychometric validation and unprecedented information about responsiveness of the binary or global endpoints to drug therapy, it is necessary to pursue further validation studies before or during pivotal phase IIB or III trials. The hope of providing relief to patients should galvanize all parties to achieve these goals. PMID:18848833

  12. Isolation and whole genome sequencing of a Ruminococcus-like bacterium, associated with irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hynönen, Ulla; Rasinkangas, Pia; Satokari, Reetta; Paulin, Lars; de Vos, Willem M; Pietilä, Taija E; Kant, Ravi; Palva, Airi

    2016-06-01

    In our previous studies on the intestinal microbiota in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), we identified a bacterial phylotype with higher abundance in patients suffering from diarrhea than in healthy controls. In the present work, we have isolated in pure culture strain RT94, belonging to this phylotype, determined its whole genome sequence and performed an extensive genomic analysis and phenotypical testing. This revealed strain RT94 to be a strict anaerobe apparently belonging to a novel species with only 94% similarity in the 16S rRNA gene sequence to the closest relatives Ruminococcus torques and Ruminococcus lactaris. The G + C content of strain RT94 is 45.2 mol% and the major long-chain cellular fatty acids are C16:0, C18:0 and C14:0. The isolate is metabolically versatile but not a mucus or cellulose utilizer. It produces acetate, ethanol, succinate, lactate and formate, but very little butyrate, as end products of glucose metabolism. The mechanisms underlying the association of strain RT94 with diarrhea-type IBS are discussed. PMID:26946362

  13. Prophylactic role of maternal administration of probiotics in the prevention of irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Barouei, J; Adams, M C; Hodgson, D M

    2009-11-01

    Neonatal stress is a common early life event which alters the development of the endocrine and immune systems. Specifically, exposure to neonatal stress results in alterations to the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis resulting in offspring who hyper-respond to stress in adulthood. Recently, this concept has been applied to the ontogeny of functional gastrointestinal (GI) disturbances such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The high prevalence of this disorder and the ineffectiveness of current treatments results in high direct and indirect costs to the society. Recently, administration of probiotics to neonates has been used as a safe and cost-effective preventative strategy to revoke the long term unfavourable imprinting induced on the gastrointestinal system by early life stressors in animal models of human IBS. It is not as yet known however, whether maternal supplementary probiotics may also contribute to improved GI integrity and gut-associated immune functioning in stressed neonates, if these possible improvements persist into adulthood, or how this protective effect may be mediated. Our hypothesis is an attempt to link this proposed nutritional approach and its possible preventive effects against GI dysfunctions provoked by neonatal stress. PMID:19481357

  14. Stress-Induced Visceral Pain: Toward Animal Models of Irritable-Bowel Syndrome and Associated Comorbidities

    PubMed Central

    Moloney, Rachel D.; O’Mahony, Siobhain M.; Dinan, Timothy G.; Cryan, John F.

    2015-01-01

    Visceral pain is a global term used to describe pain originating from the internal organs, which is distinct from somatic pain. It is a hallmark of functional gastrointestinal disorders such as irritable-bowel syndrome (IBS). Currently, the treatment strategies targeting visceral pain are unsatisfactory, with development of novel therapeutics hindered by a lack of detailed knowledge of the underlying mechanisms. Stress has long been implicated in the pathophysiology of visceral pain in both preclinical and clinical studies. Here, we discuss the complex etiology of visceral pain reviewing our current understanding in the context of the role of stress, gender, gut microbiota alterations, and immune functioning. Furthermore, we review the role of glutamate, GABA, and epigenetic mechanisms as possible therapeutic strategies for the treatment of visceral pain for which there is an unmet medical need. Moreover, we discuss the most widely described rodent models used to model visceral pain in the preclinical setting. The theory behind, and application of, animal models is key for both the understanding of underlying mechanisms and design of future therapeutic interventions. Taken together, it is apparent that stress-induced visceral pain and its psychiatric comorbidities, as typified by IBS, has a multifaceted etiology. Moreover, treatment strategies still lag far behind when compared to other pain modalities. The development of novel, effective, and specific therapeutics for the treatment of visceral pain has never been more pertinent. PMID:25762939

  15. The Effect of Dietary Intervention on Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Moayyedi, Paul; Quigley, Eamonn M M; Lacy, Brian E; Lembo, Anthony J; Saito, Yuri A; Schiller, Lawrence R; Soffer, Edy E; Spiegel, Brennan M R; Ford, Alexander C

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Elimination diets have been used for many years to treat irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). These approaches had fallen out of favor until a recent resurgence, which was based on new randomized controlled trial (RCT) data that suggested it might be effective. The evidence for the efficacy of dietary therapies has not been evaluated systematically. We have therefore conducted a systematic review to examine this issue. Methods: MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register were searched up to December 2013. Trials recruiting adults with IBS, which compared any form of dietary restriction or addition of an offending food group in patients already on a restricted diet vs. placebo, control therapy, or “usual management”, were eligible. Dichotomous symptom data were pooled to obtain a relative risk of remaining symptomatic after therapy as well as the number needed to treat with a 95% confidence interval. Results: We identified 17 RCTs involving 1,568 IBS patients that assessed elimination diets. Only three RCTs involving 230 patients met our eligibility criteria, all of which evaluated different approaches, and thus a meta-analysis could not be conducted. Conclusions: More evidence is needed before generally recommending elimination diets for IBS patients. PMID:26291435

  16. Relationship between irritable bowel syndrome, worry and stress in adolescent girls.

    PubMed

    Song, Sang-Wook; Park, Seo-Jin; Kim, Se-Hong; Kang, Sung-Goo

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate prevalence of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) among adolescents and difference in worry and stress between normal and IBS groups. Questionnaire survey was conducted at a girl's middle and high school. Students from seventh to eleventh grade participated in the examination on Rome II criteria, lifestyle and dietary habits. Worry and stress were measured with the Korean version Penn State Worry Questionnaire-Children and the Korean version Brief Encounter Psychosocial Instrument. Worry score was significantly higher in the IBS group (22.07 ± 9.38, P < 0.001) than in the normal group (18.65 ± 8.99) and was higher in high school students than in middle school students (P = 0.02). Stress score also was higher in the IBS group than in the normal group (P < 0.001) and was higher in the high school girls than in the middle school ones (P = 0.04). Of all the lifestyle factors influencing IBS preference for fatty foods, preference for salty foods, drinking alcohol and sleeping for less than six hours a day were found to be significant. Worry and stress seem to be associated with IBS symptoms. The findings of this study draw a clue that less worry and stress will help decrease IBS symptoms. PMID:23166424

  17. Treatment of irritable bowel syndrome: a review of randomised controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    AKEHURST, R; KALTENTHALER, E

    2001-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common chronic disorder that is associated with significant disability and health care costs. The purpose of this paper is to review and assess published randomised controlled trials examining the clinical effectiveness of interventions for IBS for 1987-1998. A literature search was conducted to identify randomised controlled trials of IBS treatments: 45 studies were identified that described randomised controlled trials and of these, six fulfilled all three criteria used to assess the quality of randomised controlled trials, as described by Jadad and colleagues.1 These criteria are: adequate description of randomisation, double blinding, and description of withdrawals and dropouts. It is concluded that there are few studies which offer convincing evidence of effectiveness in treating the IBS symptom complex. This review strongly suggests that future work should include well designed trials that: describe the randomisation method; use internationally approved diagnostic criteria; and are double blinded and placebo controlled. Clear well defined outcome measures are necessary. Inclusion of quality of life measures allows comparison between trials in different therapeutic areas. Conducting such studies will help to overcome some of the difficulties identified in this review.

 PMID:11156653

  18. Reduction of butyrate- and methane-producing microorganisms in patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Pozuelo, Marta; Panda, Suchita; Santiago, Alba; Mendez, Sara; Accarino, Anna; Santos, Javier; Guarner, Francisco; Azpiroz, Fernando; Manichanh, Chaysavanh

    2015-01-01

    The pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) remains unclear. Here we investigated the microbiome of a large cohort of patients to identify specific signatures for IBS subtypes. We examined the microbiome of 113 patients with IBS and 66 healthy controls. A subset of these participants provided two samples one month apart. We analyzed a total of 273 fecal samples, generating more than 20 million 16S rRNA sequences. In patients with IBS, a significantly lower microbial diversity was associated with a lower relative abundance of butyrate-producing bacteria (P = 0.002; q < 0.06), in particular in patients with IBS-D and IBS-M. IBS patients who did not receive any treatment harboured a lower abundance of Methanobacteria compared to healthy controls (P = 0.005; q = 0.05). Furthermore, significant correlations were observed between several bacterial taxa and sensation of flatulence and abdominal pain (P < 0.05). Altogether, our findings showed that IBS-M and IBS-D patients are characterized by a reduction of butyrate producing bacteria, known to improve intestinal barrier function, and a reduction of methane producing microorganisms a major mechanism of hydrogen disposal in the human colon, which could explain excess of abdominal gas in IBS. PMID:26239401

  19. Catechol-O-methyltransferase val158met polymorphism predicts placebo effect in irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hall, Kathryn T; Lembo, Anthony J; Kirsch, Irving; Ziogas, Dimitrios C; Douaiher, Jeffrey; Jensen, Karin B; Conboy, Lisa A; Kelley, John M; Kokkotou, Efi; Kaptchuk, Ted J

    2012-01-01

    Identifying patients who are potential placebo responders has major implications for clinical practice and trial design. Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), an important enzyme in dopamine catabolism plays a key role in processes associated with the placebo effect such as reward, pain, memory and learning. We hypothesized that the COMT functional val158met polymorphism, was a predictor of placebo effects and tested our hypothesis in a subset of 104 patients from a previously reported randomized controlled trial in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The three treatment arms from this study were: no-treatment ("waitlist"), placebo treatment alone ("limited") and, placebo treatment "augmented" with a supportive patient-health care provider interaction. The primary outcome measure was change from baseline in IBS-Symptom Severity Scale (IBS-SSS) after three weeks of treatment. In a regression model, the number of methionine alleles in COMT val158met was linearly related to placebo response as measured by changes in IBS-SSS (p = .035). The strongest placebo response occurred in met/met homozygotes treated in the augmented placebo arm. A smaller met/met associated effect was observed with limited placebo treatment and there was no effect in the waitlist control. These data support our hypothesis that the COMT val158met polymorphism is a potential biomarker of placebo response. PMID:23110189

  20. Effect of 5-HT1 agonist (sumatriptan) on anorectal function in irritable bowel syndrome patients

    PubMed Central

    Mulak, Agata; Paradowski, Leszek

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of sumatriptan, a selective 5-HT1 agonist, on anorectal function in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients. METHODS: Twenty-two IBS patients selected according to the Rome II criteria (F 15, M 7; mean age 29.3±6.8, range 22-44 years) were examined. The study was blind, randomized and placebo-controlled with a crossover design. Anorectal manometry and rectal balloon distension test were performed before and after the administration of placebo and sumatriptan. RESULTS: The administration of sumatriptan caused a significant increase in the resting anal canal pressure from 9.2±2.0 kPa to 13.1±3.3 kPa (P<0.0001) connected with the increase in the anal sphincter length and high pressure zone. After sumatriptan injection a remarkable increase in the threshold for the first sensation from 27±9 mL to 34±12 mL (P<0.05) and urge sensation from 61±19 mL to 68±18 mL (P<0.01) was observed. Sumatriptan did not affect either the volume evoking the rectoanal inhibitory reflex or the results of the straining test. CONCLUSION: 5-HT1 receptors participate in the regulation of anorectal function. Elucidation of the role of 5-HT1 receptors in the pathophysiological mechanisms of IBS may have some therapeutic implications. PMID:16570352

  1. Rectal Visceral Sensitivity in Women with Irritable Bowel Syndrome without Psychiatric Comorbidity Compared with Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Spetalen, Signe; Sandvik, Leiv; Blomhoff, Svein; Jacobsen, Morten B.

    2009-01-01

    Background. Psychiatric comorbidity and visceral hypersensitivity are common in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), but little is known about visceral sensitivity in IBS patients without psychiatric disorders. Aim. We wanted to examine rectal visceral sensitivity in IBS patients without comorbid psychiatric disorders, IBS patients with phobic anxiety and healthy volunteers. Methods. A total of thirty-eight female, non-constipated IBS patients without psychiatric disorders and eleven female IBS patients with phobic anxiety were compared to nine healthy women using a barostat double random staircase method. The non-psychiatric patients were divided into those with diarrhoea predominant symptoms and those with alternating stool habits. Results. The IBS patients without psychiatric disorders had normal visceral pressure thresholds. However, in the diarrhoea predominant subgroup, the volume discomfort threshold was reduced while it was unchanged in those with alternating stool habits. The phobic IBS patients had similar thresholds to the healthy volunteers. The rectal tone was increased in the non-psychiatric IBS patients with diarrhoea predominant symptoms and in the IBS patients with phobic anxiety. Conclusions. Non-constipated IBS patients without psychiatric disorders had increased visceral sensitivity regarding volume thresholds but normal pressure thresholds. Our study suggests that the lowered volume threshold was due to increased rectal tone. PMID:19789637

  2. Gut microbiota influences low fermentable substrate diet efficacy in children with irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chumpitazi, Bruno P; Hollister, Emily B; Oezguen, Numan; Tsai, Cynthia M; McMeans, Ann R; Luna, Ruth A; Savidge, Tor C; Versalovic, James; Shulman, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    We sought to determine whether a low fermentable substrate diet (LFSD) decreases abdominal pain frequency in children with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and to identify potential microbial factors related to diet efficacy. Pain symptoms, stooling characteristics, breath hydrogen and methane, whole intestinal transit time, stool microbiome, and metabolite composition were collected and/or documented in eight children with IBS at baseline and during one week of an LFSD intervention. Pain frequency (P < 0.05), pain severity (P < 0.05), and pain-related interference with activities (P < 0.05) decreased in the subjects while on the LFSD. Responders vs. non-responders: four children (50%) were identified as responders (>50% decrease in abdominal pain frequency while on the LFSD). There were no differences between responders and non-responders with respect to hydrogen production, methane production, stooling characteristics, or gut transit time. Responders were characterized by increased pre-LFSD abundance of bacterial taxa belonging to the genera Sporobacter (P < 0.05) and Subdoligranulum (P < 0.02) and decreased abundance of taxa belonging to Bacteroides (P < 0.05) relative to non-responders. In parallel, stool metabolites differed between responders and non-responders and were associated with differences in microbiome composition. These pilot study results suggest that an LFSD may be effective in decreasing GI symptoms in children with IBS. Microbial factors such as gut microbiome composition and stool metabolites while on the diet may relate to LFSD efficacy. PMID:24637601

  3. Psychosocial predictors of self-reported fatigue in patients with moderate to severe irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lackner, Jeffrey M.; Gudleski, Gregory D.; DiMuro, Jennifer; Keefer, Laurie; Brenner, Darren M.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the level, impact, and predictors of fatigue in patients with moderate to severe irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). One hundred seventy five patients meeting Rome III criteria for IBS completed a variety of measures including the vitality scale of the SF-12, IBS-Symptom Severity Scale, IBS-QOL, Brief Symptom Inventory-18, Screening for Somatoform Symptoms (SOMS-7), and a semi structured clinical interview (IBS-PRO) as part of a pretreatment evaluation of an NIH funded clinical trial of cognitive behavior therapy for IBS. Fatigue was the third most common somatic complaint, reported by 61% of the patients. Levels of fatigue were associated with both somatic (more severe IBS symptoms, greater number of unexplained medical symptoms), behavioral (frequency of restorative experiences) and psychological (e.g., trait anxiety, depression) outcomes after holding constant confounding variables. The final model in multiple regression analyses accounted for 41.6% of the variance in self-reported fatigue scores with significant predictors including anxiety sensitivity, perceived stress, IBS symptom severity, restorative activities and depression. The clinical implications of data as they relate to both IBS and CBT in general are discussed in the context of attention restoration theory. PMID:23578499

  4. Fecal calprotectin is a useful marker to diagnose ulcerative colitis from irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kalantari, Hamid; Taheri, Akhtar; Yaran, Majid

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study was aimed to evaluate the predictive value of fecal calprotectin in patients with ulcerative colitis from patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Materials and Methods: Between May and October 2013, 88 adult patients, between the age 18 and 65 years with a history of chronic diarrhea of unknown origin were assessed. Standard colonoscopies were performed in all patients to assess ulcerative colitis. Before colonoscopies, they were asked to supply a stool specimen. Fecal calprotectin value was measured using a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit. Results: The mean of age, gender combination, and body mass index were not significantly different between patients with ulcerative colitis or IBS. The duration of disease in ulcerative colitis patients was significantly higher than IBS patients (P < 0.0001). The level of calprotectin in ulcerative colitis patients was significantly higher than IBS patients (265.9 vs 115.8, respectively, P = 0.001). Also, cutoff value >164 μg/g with sensitivity and specify of 57 (CI: 41%–71.6%), and 75 (CI: 59.7%–56.8%), respectively, was the best for discrimination between patients with ulcerative colitis and those with IBS. Conclusion: Our results show that fecal calprotectin as a noninvasive method, which can be used to identify patients with ulcerative colitis from IBS patients has low sensitivity and specificity. PMID:26015911

  5. Stress Reactivity in Traditional Chinese Medicine–Based Subgroups of Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Megan C.; Shapiro, David; Joshi, Aditi; Shahabi, Leila; Tan, Steven; Smith, Suzanne; Hui, Ka Kit; Tillisch, Kirsten; Mayer, Emeran A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: This study aimed to examine differences in autonomic responses to stress, pain perception, and the role of negative affect in these responses in individuals with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) according to Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) classifications. Design: Fifty-nine female patients with IBS age 18–65 years diagnosed by TCM practitioners as showing primarily an excess (n=32) or an overlap (n=27) pattern (mixed excess and deficiency) were assessed for symptom differences, heart rate, and skin conductance responses to a psychosocial stressor and pain perception. Settings/Locations: University of California in Los Angeles, California. Results: Compared with the excess group, the overlap group showed significantly greater overall gastrointestinal symptom severity, abdominal pain, and negative affect. The excess group with higher levels of negative affect showed greater reactivity to stress, whereas the overlap group showed an opposite response pattern. The overlap group showed increased cold sensitivity. Conclusions: IBS patients with the overlap pattern have greater disease severity and comorbidity than those with excess alone. Those with excess showed a pattern of increased stress response with greater negative affect, whereas the overlap group with greater deficiency showed lower physiologic arousal with greater negative affect, consistent with depletion resulting from allostatic load. PMID:24256027

  6. Soy Isoflavones Supplementation for Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Randomized Double Blind Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Jalili, Mahsa; Vahedi, Homayoon; Janani, Leila; Poustchi, Hossein; Malekzadeh, Reza; Hekmatdoost, Azita

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is one of the common gastrointestinal disorders with unknown etiology. In experimental models, it is proposed that soy isoflavones may suppress the clinical and psychological symptoms of IBS by alteration of gut barrier tight junctions. METHODS We conducted this study to evaluate the effects of soy isoflavones on IBS symptoms and patients’ quality of life. In a randomized double blind placebo-controlled clinical trial, 67 patients with IBS were allocated to consume either soy isoflavones capsules or a placebo for 6 weeks. The primary outcome was a significant reduction in symptoms severity score and the secondary outcome was a significant improvement in quality of life. RESULTS 45 participants completed the study. There was no significant changes in mean differences of symptoms severity score between the two groups; however soy isoflavone supplementation could significantly improve the quality of life scores (p=0.009). CONCLUSION Soy isoflavones supplementation could improve the quality of life in patients with IBS; however it did not suppress the symptoms severity in 6 weeks. Further research with a longer duration is needed to determine the sustained clinical efficacy. This study was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT02026518 PMID:26396720

  7. A novel biomarker panel for irritable bowel syndrome and the application in the general population.

    PubMed

    Mujagic, Zlatan; Tigchelaar, Ettje F; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Ludwig, Thomas; Ramiro-Garcia, Javier; Baranska, Agnieszka; Swertz, Morris A; Masclee, Ad A M; Wijmenga, Cisca; van Schooten, Frederik J; Smolinska, Agnieszka; Jonkers, Daisy M A E

    2016-01-01

    Biological markers that measure gut health and diagnose functional gastro-intestinal (GI) disorders, such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), are lacking. The objective was to identify and validate a biomarker panel associated with the pathophysiology of IBS that discriminates IBS from healthy controls (HC), and correlates with GI symptom severity. In a case-control design, various plasma and fecal markers were measured in a cohort of 196 clinical IBS patients and 160 HC without GI symptoms. A combination of biomarkers, which best discriminates between IBS and HC was identified and validated in an independent internal validation set and by permutation testing. The correlation between the biomarker panel and GI symptom severity was tested in IBS patients and in a general population cohort of 958 subjects. A set of 8 biomarker panel was identified to discriminate IBS from HC with high sensitivity (88.1%) and specificity (86.5%). The results for the IBS subtypes were comparable. Moreover, a moderate correlation was found between the biomarker panel and GI symptom scores in the IBS (r = 0.59, p < 0.001) and the general population cohorts (r = 0.51, p = 0.003). A novel multi-domain biomarker panel has been identified and validated, which correlated moderately to GI symptom severity in IBS and general population subjects. PMID:27263852

  8. Molecular and cellular mechanisms of tight junction dysfunction in the irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    CHENG, PENG; YAO, JIANNING; WANG, CHUNFENG; ZHANG, LIANFENG; KONG, WUMING

    2015-01-01

    The pathophysiological mechanisms of the irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), one of the most prevalent gastrointestinal disorders, are complex and have not been fully elucidated. The present study aimed to investigate the molecular and cellular mechanisms of tight junction (TJ) dysfunction in IBS. Intestinal tissues of IBS and non-IBS patients were examined to observe cellular changes by cell chemical tracer electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, and intestinal claudin-1 protein was detected by immunohistochemistry, western blot analysis and fluorescence quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Compared with the control group, TJ broadening and the tracer extravasation phenomenon were observed in the diarrhea-predominant IBS group, and a greater number of neuroendocrine cells and mast cells filled with high-density particles in the endocrine package pulp as well as a certain extent of vacuolization were present. The expression of claudin-1 in diarrhea-predominant IBS patients was decreased, while it was increased in constipation-predominant IBS patients. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicated that changes in cellular structure and claudin-1 levels were associated with Tjs in IBS. PMID:25998845

  9. The prevalence of celiac disease in patients with irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    El-Salhy, M; Lomholt-Beck, B; Gundersen, D

    2011-01-01

    The diagnosis of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is based on symptom assessment such as the Rome III criteria. It is sometimes difficult to clinically distinguish IBS from adult-onset celiac disease (CD). Individuals with CD presenting with relatively vague abdominal symptoms are at risk of been dismissed as having IBS. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of patients with CD among those that fulfill the Rome III criteria for IBS from among patients referred to the gastroenterology section of our hospital over the last 5 years. The study included a total of 968 patients with an average age of 32 years (range 18-59 years). Females constituted 95% of all patients. Duodenal biopsies were obtained during standard gastroscopy. Sections from these biopsies were stained with haematoxylin and eosin and immunostained for human leucocytes CD45 using the avidin-biotin complex (ABC) method. The sections were then histopathologically examined. Four patients had CD: one with Marsh type 3b, and 3 with Marsh type 1. All four of these patients were positive for tissue transglutminase antibodies (anti-t-TG) IgA and were females aged 24, 20, 36 and 38 years. These 4 patients fulfilled the Rome III criteria for the sub-type IBS-diarrhea. This amounts to a prevalence of 0.4% of CD in IBS patients. The present findings support the notion that IBS patients should be routinely examined for CD. This applies to all subtypes of IBS. PMID:21468583

  10. Irritable bowel syndrome and visceral hypersensitivity : risk factors and pathophysiological mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Deiteren, A; de Wit, A; van der Linden, L; De Man, J G; Pelckmans, P A; De Winter, B Y

    2016-03-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common functional gastro-intestinal disorder, characterized by abdominal pain and altered intestinal motility. Visceral hypersensitivity is an important hallmark feature of IBS and is believed to underlie abdominal pain in patients with IBS. The two main risk factors associated with the development of IBS are gastrointestinal inflammation and psychological distress. On a peripheral level, visceral sensitivity seems to be modulated by several mechanisms. Immune cells in the mucosal wall, such as mast cells, and enterochromaffin cells may sensitize afferent nerves by release of their mediators. Furthermore, increased mucosal permeability, altered intestinal microflora and dietary habits may contribute to this feature. On a central level, an increased prevalence of psychiatric comorbidities is demonstrated in IBS patients, alongside alterations in the hormonal brain-gut axis, increased vigilance towards intestinal stimuli and functional and structural changes in the brain. The pathogenesis of IBS is complicated and multifactorial and the treatment remains clinically challenging. Dietary measures and symptomatic control are the cornerstones for IBS treatment and may be sufficient for patients experiencing mild symptoms, alongside education, reassurance and an effective therapeutic physician-patient relationship. New pharmacological therapies are aimed at interfering with mediator release and/or blockade of the relevant receptors within the gut wall, while modulation of the intestinal flora and diet may also be of therapeutic benefit. Tricyclic anti-depressants and serotonin reuptake inhibitors act both on a central and peripheral level by modulating pain signalling pathways. PMID:26852761

  11. Gastrointestinal permeability in patients with irritable bowel syndrome assessed using a four probe permeability solution

    PubMed Central

    Del Valle-Pinero, Arseima Y.; Van Deventer, Hendrick E.; Fourie, Nicolaas H.; Martino, Angela C.; Patel, Nayan S.; Remaley, Alan T.; Henderson, Wendy A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Abnormal gastrointestinal permeability has been linked to irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The lactulose-to-mannitol ratio is traditionally used to assess small intestine permeability while sucralose and sucrose are used to assess colonic and gastric permeability respectively. We used a single 4-probe test solution to assess permeability throughout the gastrointestinal tract in IBS patients and healthy controls by measuring the recovery of the probes in urine after ingestion using a modified liquid chromatography mass spectrometry protocol. Methods Fasting participants (N = 59) drank a permeability test solution (100 ml: sucralose, sucrose, mannitol, and lactulose). Urine was collected over a 5-h period and kept frozen until analysis. Urinary sugar concentrations were measured using an liquid chromatography/triple quadruple mass spectrometer. Results Colonic permeability was significantly lower in IBS patients when compared to healthy controls (p = 0.011). Gastric and small intestinal permeability did not significantly differ between the groups. Conclusions The study demonstrates the clinical potential of this non-invasive method for assessing alterations in gastrointestinal permeability in patients with IBS. PMID:23328210

  12. MicroRNA-24 inhibits serotonin reuptake transporter expression and aggravates irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Liao, Xiu-Jun; Mao, Wei-Ming; Wang, Qin; Yang, Guan-Gen; Wu, Wen-Jing; Shao, Shu-Xian

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common chronic functional gastrointestinal disorder. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been widely demonstrated to take part in various physiological and pathological processes. In the present study, the role of miR-24 in the pathogenesis of IBS and the potential mechanism in this process were evaluated. Human intestinal mucosa epithelial cells of colon from IBS patients and healthy subjects were collected. An IBS mouse model was established with the induction of trinitro-benzene-sulfonic acid (TNBS). The expression levels of miR-24 and serotonin reuptake transporter (SERT) were analyzed using Real-time PCR and western blot in both human specimen and mice. miR-24 was upregulated in IBS patients and mice intestinal mucosa epithelial cells. Luciferase reporter assay showed that SERT was a potential target gene of miR-24. The treatment of miR-24 inhibitor increased pain threshold and nociceptive threshold levels and reduced MPO activity in proximal colon of IBS mice, and up-regulated the mRNA and protein expression levels of SERT in intestinal mucosa epithelial cells. miR-24 played a role in the pathogenesis of IBS probably through regulating SERT expression. PMID:26631964

  13. Meta-analysis: do irritable bowel syndrome symptoms vary between men and women?

    PubMed Central

    Adeyemo, M. A.; Spiegel, B. M. R.; Chang, L.

    2010-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to evaluate gender differences and the effect of menstrual cycle and menopausal status on irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) symptoms. Methods We performed a systematic review of MEDLINE to search for studies comparing IBS symptoms between gender, menstrual cycle phases, and menopausal states in IBS and/or healthy individuals. We performed meta-analyses to compare the relative risk (RR) of individual IBS symptoms between men and women. Results Twenty-two studies measured gender differences in IBS symptoms. Women were more likely to report abdominal pain (RR=1.12, CI [1.02, 1.22]) and constipation-related symptoms (RR=1.12, CI [1.02, 1.23]) than men (all p<0.05). However, men with IBS were more likely to report the diarrhea-related symptoms than women with IBS (RR=0.84, CI [0.75, 0.94], p<0.05). A systematic review of 13 studies demonstrated that both IBS and healthy women reported increased IBS symptoms during menses vs. other phases. There were insufficient data to determine the effect of menopause and hormone supplementation on IBS symptoms. Conclusion In the general and IBS populations, gender differences in IBS symptoms exist although these differences are modest. Studies suggest that female sex hormones influence the severity of IBS symptoms, but more studies are needed. PMID:20662786

  14. A novel biomarker panel for irritable bowel syndrome and the application in the general population

    PubMed Central

    Mujagic, Zlatan; Tigchelaar, Ettje F.; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Ludwig, Thomas; Ramiro-Garcia, Javier; Baranska, Agnieszka; Swertz, Morris A.; Masclee, Ad A. M.; Wijmenga, Cisca; van Schooten, Frederik J.; Smolinska, Agnieszka; Jonkers, Daisy M. A. E.

    2016-01-01

    Biological markers that measure gut health and diagnose functional gastro-intestinal (GI) disorders, such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), are lacking. The objective was to identify and validate a biomarker panel associated with the pathophysiology of IBS that discriminates IBS from healthy controls (HC), and correlates with GI symptom severity. In a case-control design, various plasma and fecal markers were measured in a cohort of 196 clinical IBS patients and 160 HC without GI symptoms. A combination of biomarkers, which best discriminates between IBS and HC was identified and validated in an independent internal validation set and by permutation testing. The correlation between the biomarker panel and GI symptom severity was tested in IBS patients and in a general population cohort of 958 subjects. A set of 8 biomarker panel was identified to discriminate IBS from HC with high sensitivity (88.1%) and specificity (86.5%). The results for the IBS subtypes were comparable. Moreover, a moderate correlation was found between the biomarker panel and GI symptom scores in the IBS (r = 0.59, p < 0.001) and the general population cohorts (r = 0.51, p = 0.003). A novel multi-domain biomarker panel has been identified and validated, which correlated moderately to GI symptom severity in IBS and general population subjects. PMID:27263852

  15. Recommendations for the management of irritable bowel syndrome in family practice

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, W G; Thompson, W G; Vanner, S J; Faloon, T R; Rosser, W W; Birtwhistle, R W; Morse, J L; Touzel, T A

    1999-01-01

    To help family physicians manage patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), a consensus conference was convened in June 1997 at which 5 internationally recognized experts in IBS presented position papers on selected topics previously circulated to the conference participants. Five working groups comprising family physicians, gastroenterologists and allied health care professionals from across Canada were then charged with developing recommendations for the diagnosis, patient education, psychosocial management, dietary advice and pharmacotherapy, respectively. An evidence-based approach was used where possible; otherwise, recommendations were made by consensus. The participants concluded that family physicians can make a positive diagnosis of IBS using symptom criteria. The pathophysiology is poorly understood, but motility and sensory disturbances appear to play a role. Neither psychological nor specific dietary factors cause IBS, but both can trigger symptoms. Drug therapy is not recommended for the routine treatment of IBS, but short-term trials of drug therapy may be targeted to predominant symptoms in selected patients. A step-wise, patient-centred approach to management is outlined. PMID:10439825

  16. Irritable bowel syndrome in women having diagnostic laparoscopy or hysterectomy. Relation to gynecologic features and outcome.

    PubMed

    Longstreth, G F; Preskill, D B; Youkeles, L

    1990-10-01

    We identified irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) in 47.7% of 86 women having diagnostic laparoscopy for chronic pelvic pain, 39.5% of 172 women having elective hysterectomy, and 32.0% of 172 controls age-matched for the hysterectomy group (P = NS). Constipation and pain subtype IBS were more common in hysterectomy patients than controls (P less than 0.05). In laparoscopy patients, dyspareunia was more common in those with IBS than in those without it (P less than 0.05). In the hysterectomy group, more IBS patients had chronic pelvic pain (P less than 0.005), and abnormal menses (P less than 0.01). Chronic pelvic pain was more frequently the only prehysterectomy diagnosis in IBS patients (P less than 0.05), and IBS was present more often when pain was a reason for hysterectomy (P less than 0.01). One year after laparoscopy, IBS patients gave lower overall status ratings (P less than 0.01) and lower pain improvement ratings (P less than 0.05) than non-IBS patients. In women who had a hysterectomy for pain, there was less pain improvement one year later in those with the pain subtype of IBS than in non-IBS patients (P less than 0.05). IBS is associated with gynecologic symptoms and affects the symptomatic outcome of diagnostic laparoscopy and hysterectomy. PMID:2145139

  17. Low internal radiation alters innate immune status in children with clinical symptom of irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sheikh Sajjadieh, Mohammad Reza; Kuznetsova, L V; Bojenko, V B

    2010-09-01

    Adverse health effect of low radiation is clear. The aim of this study was to determine effect of internal low radiation on innate immune status in Ukrainian children with spastic colitis as a result of Chernobyl disaster. The test population consisted of 95 participants: 75 rural participants with clinical symptom of irritable bowel syndrome, aged 4 to 18, who lived in a contaminated area exposed to radio nucleotide due to the disaster in reactor in Chernobyl nuclear power plant (categorized in three groups) and 20 healthy urban participants from Kiev, aged 5 to 15, as the control group. Internal radiation activity has been measured by gamma-ray spectrometry. Peripheral blood leukocytes were analyzed for CD16(+) subset, serum concentration of circulation immune complex was measured by the polyethylene glycol method. Phagocytic activity function was assessed by using latex article and phagocytic index were calculated. p < 0.05 was considered significant. Percent of CD16(+) cell in groups II and III increased significantly in comparison to control group (p < 0.05). Concentration of circulating immune complexes increased significantly in all study groups compared to control group (p < 0.001). Phagocytes activity and phagocyte index decreased significantly in all study groups in comparison to control group (p < 0.001). The innate immune status of study groups has changed. Our data have demonstrated that this change may be related to radioactivity from technogenic pollution due to the disaster in reactor in Chernobyl nuclear power plant. PMID:20538707

  18. Maladjustment to Academic Life and Employment Anxiety in University Students with Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tayama, Jun; Nakaya, Naoki; Hamaguchi, Toyohiro; Saigo, Tatsuo; Takeoka, Atsushi; Sone, Toshimasa; Fukudo, Shin; Shirabe, Susumu

    2015-01-01

    The present study tested our hypothesis that university students with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) may experience less satisfactory academic lives than those of students without IBS. We also verified the hypothesis that university students with IBS might have higher employment anxiety than students without IBS might. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 1,686 university students. Presence or absence of IBS was assessed via the Rome III Questionnaire. Two original items were used to evaluate academic life. The prevalence rates of IBS with diarrhea, IBS with constipation, mixed IBS, and unsubtyped IBS in the study population were 5%, 2%, 10%, and 3%, respectively. Regarding academic life, the proportions of participants who experienced maladjustment and employment anxiety were 29% and 50%, respectively. After adjusting for age, sex, and faculty, the odds ratios for maladjustment and employment anxiety were significantly higher in students who screened positively, relative to those who screened negatively, for IBS (OR, 1.62; 95% CI, 1.24-2.21; OR, 2.16; 95% CI, 1.68-2.81, respectively). In conclusion, maladjustment and anxiety over future employment were higher in university students with IBS relative to those without. PMID:26083662

  19. Lubiprostone for the Treatment of Adult Women with Irritable Bowel Syndrome with Constipation

    PubMed Central

    Soubra, Mahmoud; Schey, Ron

    2012-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome with constipation (IBS-C) affects approximately 5% of the population in western countries. The majority of those afflicted are women. Symptoms are often detrimental to the individual’s quality of life and incur high healthcare costs to society. There is no evidence to support changes in lifestyle, laxatives or over the counter supplements. Tegaserod appeared to have promising results but was promptly removed from the market due to adverse cardiovascular events. In 2008, lubiprostone (Amitiza) was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of women with IBS-C. It is thought to selectively activate type 2 chloride channels in the apical membrane of the intestinal epithelial cells leading to chloride secretion. As result, sodium and water are passively secreted generating peristalsis and laxation, without stimulating gastrointestinal smooth muscle. Several trials with predominantly female patients have shown it to be effective in the treatment of IBS-C. Overall lubiprostone was safe, well tolerated and associated with mostly benign side effects. Nausea and diarrhea were the most commonly reported. Though there are no head to head comparisons with other pharmacological agents, it is our opinion that lubiprostone should be tried as a first line pharmacotherapy for women with IBS-C at a dose of 8 μg BID. Thus far, lubiprostone offers a welcome approach to our narrow therapeutic armamentarium. Further understanding of its mechanism of action may provide additional insight into the pathophysiology of IBS-C. PMID:24833931

  20. Clinical potential of eluxadoline in the treatment of diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sobolewska-Włodarczyk, Aleksandra; Włodarczyk, Marcin; Storr, Martin; Fichna, Jakub

    2016-01-01

    Diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D) belongs to the group of functional gastrointestinal disorders and is characterized by abdominal pain in conjunction with diarrhea. The incidence of IBS-D is currently increasing, leading to a heavy economic burden for patients and health care systems worldwide. Recent studies suggest eluxadoline as an attractive new tool for the treatment of patients with IBS-D. Eluxadoline is an orally active μ- and κ-opioid receptor agonist and δ-opioid receptor antagonist, with powerful antidiarrheal and analgesic activity. Eluxadoline is believed to act locally in the enteric nervous system, and has no adverse effects in the central nervous system. In this review, we discuss the most recent findings on the mechanism of action of eluxadoline and the results of the clinical trials in patients with IBS-D. We also discuss possible side effects and analyze the potential of eluxadoline to be used in the treatment of IBS-D. PMID:27257381

  1. Rare Variants of the Serotonin Transporter Are Associated With Psychiatric Comorbidity in Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kohen, Ruth; Tracy, Julia H; Haugen, Eric; Cain, Kevin C; Jarrett, Monica E; Heitkemper, Margaret M

    2016-07-01

    Alterations in serotonin signaling are suspected in the pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). By modulating the extracellular reuptake of serotonin, the serotonin transporter (SERT) acts as a key regulator of the bioavailability of serotonin. This study is the first to investigate the impact of rare SERT variants (i.e., those with a minor allele frequency of < 1%) on the risk for IBS, gastrointestinal (GI) symptom level, response to cognitive-behavioral treatment, and psychiatric comorbidity. We sequenced a 0.19 megabase chromosomal stretch containing the SERT gene and surrounding regions in a community sample of 304 IBS patients and 83 controls. We found no significant associations between rare variants in and around the SERT gene and IBS risk, GI symptom profile, or response to treatment. We found preliminary evidence, however, that IBS subjects with a history of either depression or anxiety were significantly more likely to carry multiple rare likely functional variant alleles than IBS patients without psychiatric comorbidity. PMID:26912503

  2. Irritable Bowel Syndrome Treatments Aren't One-Size-Fits-All

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bowel Syndrome Treatments Aren't One-Size-Fits-All Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... the United States. No one remedy works for all patients, so there’s a great medical need to ...

  3. The Epidemiology of Irritable Bowel Syndrome in the US Military: Findings from the Millennium Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Riddle, Mark S; Welsh, Marleen; Porter, Chad K; Nieh, Chiping; Boyko, Edward J; Gackstetter, Gary; Hooper, Tomoko I

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Functional gastrointestinal disorders occur more frequently among deployed veterans, although studies evaluating the relative impact of risk factors, including stress and antecedent infectious gastroenteritis (IGE), are limited. We examined risk factors for new-onset irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) among active duty participants in the military's Millennium Cohort Study. METHODS: Medical encounter data from 2001 to 2009, limited to Cohort members on active duty, were used to identify incident IBS cases (any and highly probable). IGE was identified using medical encounter or self-report. Covariate data were obtained from the Millennium Cohort Study surveys and analyzed using Cox proportional hazards methods. RESULTS: Overall, 41,175 Cohort members met the eligibility criteria for inclusion and 314 new-onset cases of IBS were identified among these. Significant risk factors (adjusted hazard ratio, 95% confidence interval) included antecedent IGE (2.05, 1.53–2.75), female gender (1.96, 1.53–2.52), number of life stressors (1: 1.82, 1.37–2.41; 2: 2.86, 2.01–4.06; 3+: 6.69, 4.59–9.77), and anxiety syndrome (1.74, 1.17–2.58). Limited to highly probable IBS, a stronger association with antecedent IGE was observed, particularly when based on medical encounter records (any IGE: 2.20, 1.10–4.43; medical encounter IGE only: 2.84, 1.33–6.09). Precedent anxiety or depression and IGE interacted with increased IBS risk compared with IGE alone. CONCLUSIONS: These results confirm previous studies on the association between sociodemographic or life stressors and IBS. IGE was significantly associated with IBS risk. Whether deployed or not, US service members often encounter repeated exposure to high levels of stress, which, combined with other environmental factors such as IGE, may result in long-term debilitating functional gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:26729548

  4. Questioning the bacterial overgrowth hypothesis of irritable bowel syndrome: an epidemiologic and evolutionary perspective.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, Brennan M R

    2011-06-01

    Although studies indicate that small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is prevalent in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), it remains unclear whether SIBO causes IBS. This review presents an epidemiologic and evolutionary inquiry that questions the bacterial overgrowth hypothesis of IBS, as follows. (1) Although the hypothesis may be biologically plausible, there is also a strong rationale for competing hypotheses; it is unlikely that SIBO is the predominant cause of IBS in all comers, because competing explanations are sensible and defensible. Moreover, data indicate that the test used to promulgate the SIBO hypothesis - the lactulose hydrogen breath test - may not have measured SIBO in the first place. (2) We do not have evidence of SIBO being absent before IBS symptoms, and present after IBS emerges. (3) There is not a dose-response relationship between small intestinal microbiota and IBS symptoms. (4) The relationship between SIBO and IBS is highly inconsistent among studies. (5) Many effective IBS therapies do not address SIBO at all, yet have a more favorable "number needed to treat" than antibiotics. (6) IBS does not behave like a traditional infectious disease, suggesting that microbes may not principally cause the syndrome. (7) Other factors may confound the relationship between SIBO and IBS, including proton pump inhibitors. (8) Whereas the brain-gut hypothesis is evolutionary sensible, the bacterial hypothesis is harder to defend from an evolutionary perspective. The article concludes that bacteria may contribute to some IBS symptoms, but that bacteria cannot be the only explanation, and a causal link between SIBO and IBS is not secure. PMID:21397724

  5. Aspects of the non-pharmacological treatment of irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Elsa Maria; Andrén, Kristina Ingrid; Kurlberg, Göran Karl; Eriksson, Henry Ture

    2015-10-28

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is one of the most commonly diagnosed gastrointestinal conditions. It represents a significant healthcare burden and remains a clinical challenge. Over the years IBS has been described from a variety of different perspectives; from a strict illness of the gastrointestinal tract (medical model) to a more complex multi-symptomatic disorder of the brain-gut axis (biopsychosocial/psychosomatic model). In this article we present aspects of the pathophysiology and the non-pharmacological treatment of IBS based on current knowledge. Effects of conditioned stress and/or traumatic influences on the emotional system (top-down) as well as effects on the intestine through stressors, infection, inflammation, food and dysbiosis (bottom-up) can affect brain-gut communication and result in dysregulation of the autonomic nervous system (ANS), playing an important role in the pathophysiology of IBS. Conditioned stress together with dysregulation of the autonomic nervous system and the emotional system may involve reactions in which the distress inside the body is not recognized due to low body awareness. This may explain why patients have difficulty identifying their symptoms despite dysfunction in muscle tension, movement patterns, and posture and biochemical functions in addition to gastrointestinal symptoms. IBS shares many features with other idiopathic conditions, such as fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome and somatoform disorders. The key to effective treatment is a thorough examination, including a gastroenterological examination to exclude other diseases along with an assessment of body awareness by a body-mind therapist. The literature suggests that early interdisciplinary diagnostic co-operation between gastroenterologists and body-mind therapists is necessary. Re-establishing balance in the ANS is an important component of IBS treatment. This article discusses the current knowledge of body-mind treatment, addressing the topic from a

  6. Aspects of the non-pharmacological treatment of irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson, Elsa Maria; Andrén, Kristina Ingrid; Kurlberg, Göran Karl; Eriksson, Henry Ture

    2015-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is one of the most commonly diagnosed gastrointestinal conditions. It represents a significant healthcare burden and remains a clinical challenge. Over the years IBS has been described from a variety of different perspectives; from a strict illness of the gastrointestinal tract (medical model) to a more complex multi-symptomatic disorder of the brain-gut axis (biopsychosocial/psychosomatic model). In this article we present aspects of the pathophysiology and the non-pharmacological treatment of IBS based on current knowledge. Effects of conditioned stress and/or traumatic influences on the emotional system (top-down) as well as effects on the intestine through stressors, infection, inflammation, food and dysbiosis (bottom-up) can affect brain-gut communication and result in dysregulation of the autonomic nervous system (ANS), playing an important role in the pathophysiology of IBS. Conditioned stress together with dysregulation of the autonomic nervous system and the emotional system may involve reactions in which the distress inside the body is not recognized due to low body awareness. This may explain why patients have difficulty identifying their symptoms despite dysfunction in muscle tension, movement patterns, and posture and biochemical functions in addition to gastrointestinal symptoms. IBS shares many features with other idiopathic conditions, such as fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome and somatoform disorders. The key to effective treatment is a thorough examination, including a gastroenterological examination to exclude other diseases along with an assessment of body awareness by a body-mind therapist. The literature suggests that early interdisciplinary diagnostic co-operation between gastroenterologists and body-mind therapists is necessary. Re-establishing balance in the ANS is an important component of IBS treatment. This article discusses the current knowledge of body-mind treatment, addressing the topic from a

  7. Evaluation of thermal water in patients with functional dyspepsia and irritable bowel syndrome accompanying constipation

    PubMed Central

    Gasbarrini, Giovanni; Candelli, Marcello; Graziosetto, Riccardo Giuseppe; Coccheri, Sergio; Iorio, Ferdinando Di; Nappi, Giuseppe

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy of water supplementation treatment in patients with functional dyspepsia or irritable bowe syndrome (IBS) accompanying predominant constipation. METHODS: A total of 3 872 patients with functional dyspepsia and 3 609 patients with irritable bowel syndrome were enrolled in the study by 18 Italina thermal centres. Patients underwent a first cycle of thermal therapy for 21 d. A year later patients were re-evaluated at the same centre and received another cycle of thermal therapy. A questionnare to collect personal data on social and occupational status, family and pathological case history, life style, clinical records, utilisation of welfare and health structure and devices was administered to each patient at basal time and one year after each thermal treatment. Sixty patients with functional dyspepsia and 20 with IBS and 80 healthy controls received an evaluation of gastric output and oro-cecal transit time by breath test analysis. Breath test was performed at basal time and after water supplementaton therapies. Gastrointestinal symptoms were evaluated at the same time points. Breath samples were analyzed with a mass spectometer and a gascromatograph. Results were expressed as T1/2 and T-lag for octanoic acid breath test and as oro-cecal transit time for lactulose breath test. RESULTS: A significant reduction of prevalence of symptoms was observed at the end of the first and second cycles of thermal therapy in dyspeptic and IBS patients. The analysis of variance showed a real and persistant improvement of symptoms in all patients. After water supplementation for 3 wk a reduction of gastric output was observed in 49 (87.5%) of 56 dyspeptic patients. Both T1/2 and T-lag were significantly reduced after the therapy compared to basal values [91 ± 12 (T1/2) and 53 ± 11 (T-lag), Tables 1 and 2] with results of octanoic acid breath test similar to healthy subjects. After water supplementation for 3 wk oro-cecal transit time was

  8. Gastric emptying rate and small bowel transit time in patients with irritable bowel syndrome determined with 99mTc-labeled pellets and scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, O.H.; Gjorup, T.; Christensen, F.N.

    1986-12-01

    A new method employing 99mTc-labeled pellets for determination of the gastric emptying rate and small bowel transit time is described. The participants were six normal subjects and 16 patients with irritable bowel syndrome (eight with diarrhea and eight with obstipation as the primary complaint). The gastric emptying rate was the same in the three groups. The patients in the obstipation group had a significantly longer small bowel transit time than the normals (P less than 0.02) and the patients in the diarrhea group (P less than 0.01). There was no demonstrable difference between the small bowel transit time in the normals and in the patients in the diarrhea group.

  9. [Correlation of the microbiota and intestinal mucosa in the pathophysiology and treatment of irritable bowel, irritable eye, and irritable mind syndrome].

    PubMed

    Fehér, János; Kovács, Illés; Pacella, Elena; Radák, Zsolt

    2014-09-14

    Accumulating clinical evidence supports co-morbidity of irritable bowel, irritable eye and irritable mind symptoms. Furthermore, perturbation of the microbiota-host symbiosis (dysbiosis) is considered a common pathogenic mechanism connecting gastrointestinal, ocular and neuropsychiatric symptoms. Consequently, maintaining or restoring microbiota-host symbiosis represents a new approach to treat these symptoms or to prevent their relapses. Current treatment approach assigned a primary role to live probiotics alone or in combination with prebiotics to enhance colonization of beneficial bacteria and to strengthen the symbiosis. However, several papers showed major benefits of heat-killed probiotics as compared to their live counterparts on both intestinal and systemic symptoms. Recently, in addition to killing probiotics, in a proof of concept study lysates (fragments) of probiotics in combination with vitamins A, B, D and omega 3 fatty acids were successfully tested. These findings suggested a conceptual change in the approach addressed to both the microbiota and host as targets for intervention. PMID:25194867

  10. Association of HLA-DQ gene with bowel transit, barrier function, and inflammation in irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez-Roque, Maria I.; Smyrk, Thomas; Murray, Joseph A.; O'Neill, Jessica; Carlson, Paula; Lamsam, Jesse; Eckert, Deborah; Janzow, Denise; Burton, Duane; Ryks, Michael; Rhoten, Deborah; Zinsmeister, Alan R.

    2012-01-01

    Patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) with diarrhea (IBS-D) carrying human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DQ2/8 genotypes benefit from gluten withdrawal. Our objective was to compare gastrointestinal barrier function, mucosal inflammation, and transit in nonceliac IBS-D patients and assess association with HLA-DQ2/8 status. In 45 IBS-D patients who were naive to prior exclusion of dietary gluten, we measured small bowel (SB) and colonic mucosal permeability by cumulative urinary lactulose and mannitol excretion (0–2 h for SB and 8–24 h for colon), inflammation on duodenal and rectosigmoid mucosal biopsies (obtained in 28 of 45 patients), tight junction (TJ) protein mRNA and protein expression in SB and rectosigmoid mucosa, and gastrointestinal and colonic transit by validated scintigraphy. SB mucosal biopsies were stained with hematoxylin-eosin to assess villi and intraepithelial lymphocytes, and immunohistochemistry was used to assess CD3, CD8, tryptase, and zonula occludens 1 (ZO-1); colonic biopsy intraepithelial lymphocytes were quantitated. Associations of HLA-DQ were assessed using Wilcoxon's rank-sum test. Relative to healthy control data, we observed a significant increase in SB permeability (P < 0.001), a borderline increase in colonic permeability (P = 0.10), and a decrease in TJ mRNA expression in rectosigmoid mucosa in IBS-D. In HLA-DQ2/8-positive patients, ZO-1 protein expression in the rectosigmoid mucosa was reduced compared with that in HLA-DQ2/8-negative patients and colonic transit was slower than in HLA-DQ2/8-negative patients. No other associations with HLA genotype were identified. There is abnormal barrier function (increased SB permeability and reduced mRNA expression of TJ proteins) in IBS-D relative to health that may be, in part, related to immunogenotype, given reduced ZO-1 protein expression in rectosigmoid mucosa in HLA-DQ2/8-positive relative to HLA-DQ2/8-negative patients. PMID:23042942

  11. Factorial study of moxibustion in treatment of diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ji-Meng; Wu, Lu-Yi; Liu, Hui-Rong; Hu, Hong-Yi; Wang, Jia-Ying; Huang, Ren-Jia; Shi, Yin; Tao, Shan-Ping; Gao, Qiang; Zhou, Ci-Li; Qi, Li; Ma, Xiao-Peng; Wu, Huan-Gan

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To identify an appropriate therapeutic regimen for using aconite cake-separated moxibustion to treat diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (D-IBS). METHODS: A factorial design was employed to examine the two factors of moxibustion frequency and number of cones. The two tested frequencies were three or six moxibustion sessions per week, and the two tested doses were one or two cones per treatment. A total of 166 D-IBS patients were randomly divided into four treatment groups, which included each combination of the examined frequencies and doses. The bilateral Tianshu acupoints (ST25) and the Qihai acupoint (RN6) were selected for aconite cake-separated moxibustion. Each patient received two courses of treatment, and each course had a duration of 2 wk. For each group, the scores on the Birmingham irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) symptom questionnaire, the IBS Quality of Life scale, the Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS), the Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (SAS), the Hamilton Depression (HAMD) scale, and the Hamilton Anxiety (HAMA) scale were determined before treatment, after the first course of treatment, and after the second course of treatment. RESULTS: The symptom, quality of life, SDS, SAS, HAMD, and HAMA scores of the patients in all 4 aconite cake-separated moxibustion groups were significantly lower after the first and second courses of treatment than before treatment (P < 0.001 for all). The symptom, quality of life, SDS, SAS, HAMD, and HAMA scores of the patients in all four aconite cake-separated moxibustion groups were significantly lower after the second course of treatment than after the first course of treatment (P < 0.001 for all). Between-group comparisons after the second course of treatment revealed that the symptom scores for group 1 (1 cone, 3 treatments/wk) and group 3 (2 cones, 3 treatments/wk) were significantly lower than that for group 2 (1 cone, 6 treatments/wk) (5.55 ± 5.05 vs 10.45 ± 6.61, P < 0.001; 5.65 ± 4.00 vs 10.45 ± 6

  12. Clinical pilot study: efficacy of triple antibiotic therapy in Blastocystis positive irritable bowel syndrome patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Blastocystis species are common human enteric parasites. Carriage has been linked to Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS). Treatment of Blastocystis spp. with antimicrobials is problematic and insensitive diagnostic methods and re-infection complicate assessment of eradication. We investigated whether triple antibiotic therapy comprising diloxanide furoate, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and secnidazole (TAB) given to diarrhoea-predominant IBS (D-IBS) patients positive for Blastocystis would achieve eradication. Methods In a longitudinal, prospective case study 10 D-IBS Blastocystis-positive patients took 14 days of diloxanide furoate 500 mg thrice daily, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole 160/80 mg twice daily and secnidazole 400 mg thrice daily. Faecal specimens were collected at baseline, day 15 and 4 weeks after completion of TAB. Specimens were analysed using faecal smear, culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of the 16 SSU rRNA. Patients kept a concurrent clinical diary. Results Six (60%) patients cleared Blastocystis spp. after TAB, including three who had failed previous therapy. Subtypes detected were ST3 (60%), ST4 (40%), ST1 (20%) and ST7, 8 (10%); four patients had mixed ST infections. Serum immunoglobulin A (IgA) levels were low in 40% of patients. Higher rates of Blastocystis clearance were observed in patients symptomatic for less than a year (Mann–Whitney, p = 0.032, 95% confidence) with no associations found with age, previous antibiotic therapy, faecal parasite load, ST, IgA level or clinical improvement. Conclusions Clearance of Blastocystis spp. was achieved with TAB in 60% of D-IBS patients, an improvement over conventional monotherapy. Higher clearance rates are needed to facilitate investigation of the relevance of this parasite in clinically heterogenous IBS. PMID:25349629

  13. Variation in Care for Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Lacy, Brian E.; Patel, Haridarshan; Guérin, Annie; Dea, Katherine; Scopel, Justin L.; Alaghband, Reza; Wu, Eric Qiong; Mody, Reema

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) affects nearly one in seven Americans. Significant national variations in care may exist, due to a current lack of standardized diagnosis and treatment algorithms; this can translate into a substantial additional economic burden. The study examines healthcare resource utilization in patients with IBS and in the subset of IBS patients with constipation (IBS-C) and analyzes the variation of IBS care for these patients across the United States (US). Methods Healthcare resource use (HRU), including gastrointestinal (GI) procedures and tests, all-cause and intestinal-related medical visits, GI specialist visits, and constipation or diarrhea pharmacy prescriptions for IBS patients enrolled in a large US administrative claims database (2001–2012) were analyzed for the 24-month period surrounding first diagnosis. Multivariate regression models, adjusting for age, gender, year of first diagnosis, insurance type, and Charlson comorbidity index, compared HRU across states (each state vs. the average of all other states). Results Of 201,322 IBS patients included, 77.2% were female. Mean age was 49.4 years. One in three patients had ≥3 distinct GI medical procedures or diagnostic tests; 50.1% visited a GI specialist. Significant HRU differences were observed in individual states compared to the national average. IBS-C patients had more medical visits, procedures, and pharmacy prescriptions for constipation/diarrhea than IBS patients without constipation. Conclusions This study is the first to identify considerable regional variations in IBS healthcare across the US and to note a markedly higher HRU by IBS-C patients than by IBS patients without constipation. Identifying the reasons for these variations may improve quality of care and reduce the economic burden of IBS. PMID:27116612

  14. Giardia lamblia infection in patients with irritable bowel syndrome and dyspepsia: A prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Grazioli, Barbara; Matera, Giovanni; Laratta, Costanza; Schipani, Giuseppina; Guarnieri, Giovanni; Spiniello, Ester; Imeneo, Maria; Amorosi, Andrea; Focà, Alfredo; Luzza, Francesco

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the prevalence of Giardia lamblia (G. lamblia) infection in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and dyspepsia and to establish which is the most accurate test to diagnose the infection in this setting. METHODS: One hundred and thirty-seven patients who consecutively attended the Outpatient Gastroenterology Clinic for the first time between January 2002 and December 2003 due to symptoms of IBS and/or dyspepsia were recruited. All patients underwent clinical evaluation, first-step haematology and chemistry tests, serologic assays for celiac disease, lactose-H2 breath test, abdominal ultrasonography, and esophagogastroduodenoscopy. Helicobacter pylori status was evaluated. In patients with symptoms of IBS older than 45 years, colonoscopy was also performed. In all patients, duodenal biopsies and stool samples were examined for trophozoites and cysts of G. lamblia by several methods. RESULTS: G. lamblia was identified in 9 patients. The following diagnoses were also made: IBS (100/137, 73%), functional dyspepsia (62/137, 45%), organic dyspepsia (33/137, 24%), and lactose intolerance (75/137, 55%). A significant association was found between giardiasis and H pylori infection (χ2 = 6.632, OR = 12.4, CI = 1.5-68.1). There were no symptoms that reliably allowed the recognition of giardiasis. Direct search of the parasite in duodenal biopsy and stool sample examinations gave concordant results in all cases while histological examination of duodenal biopsies displayed a low sensitivity (e.g., 22.2%). CONCLUSION: In this consecutive series, diagnosis of G. lamblia infection accounted for 6.5% of patients with IBS and dyspepsia. Duodenal biopsies for diagnosis of giardiasis may be unnecessary if stool sample examination is performed. PMID:16610003

  15. Catecholaminergic Gene Polymorphisms Are Associated with GI Symptoms and Morphological Brain Changes in Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Wendy; Presson, Angela P.; Hammer, Christian; Niesler, Beate; Heendeniya, Nuwanthi; Mayer, Emeran A.; Chang, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Background Genetic and environmental factors contribute to the pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). In particular, early adverse life events (EALs) and the catecholaminergic system have been implicated. Aims To investigate whether catecholaminergic SNPs with or without interacting with EALs are associated with: 1) a diagnosis of IBS, 2) IBS symptoms and 3) morphological alterations in brain regions associated with somatosensory, viscerosensory, and interoceptive processes. Methods In 277 IBS and 382 healthy control subjects (HCs), 11 SNPs in genes of the catecholaminergic signaling pathway were genotyped. A subset (121 IBS, 209 HCs) underwent structural brain imaging (magnetic resonance imaging [MRI]). Logistic and linear regressions evaluated each SNP separately and their interactions with EALs in predicting IBS and GI symptom severity, respectively. General linear models determined grey matter (GM) alterations from the SNPs and EALs that were predictive of IBS. Results 1) Diagnosis: There were no statistically significant associations between the SNPs and IBS status with or without the interaction with EAL after adjusting for multiple comparisons. 2) Symptoms: GI symptom severity was associated with ADRA1D rs1556832 (P = 0.010). 3) Brain morphometry: In IBS, the homozygous genotype of the major ADRA1D allele was associated with GM increases in somatosensory regions (FDR q = 0.022), left precentral gyrus (q = 0.045), and right hippocampus (q = 0.009). In individuals with increasing sexual abuse scores, the ADRAβ2 SNP was associated with GM changes in the left posterior insula (q = 0.004) and left putamen volume (q = 0.029). Conclusion In IBS, catecholaminergic SNPs are associated with symptom severity and morphological changes in brain regions concerned with sensory processing and modulation and affect regulation. Thus, certain adrenergic receptor genes may facilitate or worsen IBS symptoms. PMID:26288143

  16. The Overlap between Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity: A Clinical Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Makharia, Archita; Catassi, Carlo; Makharia, Govind K.

    2015-01-01

    The spectrum of gluten-related disorders has widened in recent times and includes celiac disease, non-celiac gluten sensitivity, and wheat allergy. The complex of symptoms associated with these diseases, such as diarrhea, constipation or abdominal pain may overlap for the gluten related diseases, and furthermore they can be similar to those caused by various other intestinal diseases, such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The mechanisms underlying symptom generation are diverse for all these diseases. Some patients with celiac disease may remain asymptomatic or have only mild gastrointestinal symptoms and thus may qualify for the diagnosis of IBS in the general clinical practice. Similarly, the overlap of symptoms between IBS and non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) often creates a dilemma for clinicians. While the treatment of NCGS is exclusion of gluten from the diet, some, but not all, of the patients with IBS also improve on a gluten-free diet. Both IBS and NCGS are common in the general population and both can coexist with each other independently without necessarily sharing a common pathophysiological basis. Although the pathogenesis of NCGS is not well understood, it is likely to be heterogeneous with possible contributing factors such as low-grade intestinal inflammation, increased intestinal barrier function and changes in the intestinal microbiota. Innate immunity may also play a pivotal role. One possible inducer of innate immune response has recently been reported to be amylase-trypsin inhibitor, a protein present in wheat endosperm and the source of flour, along with the gluten proteins. PMID:26690475

  17. Effect of breadmaking process on in vitro gut microbiota parameters in irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Costabile, Adele; Santarelli, Sara; Claus, Sandrine P; Sanderson, Jeremy; Hudspith, Barry N; Brostoff, Jonathan; Ward, Jane L; Lovegrove, Alison; Shewry, Peter R; Jones, Hannah E; Whitley, Andrew M; Gibson, Glenn R

    2014-01-01

    A variety of foods have been implicated in symptoms of patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) but wheat products are most frequently cited by patients as a trigger. Our aim was to investigate the effects of breads, which were fermented for different lengths of time, on the colonic microbiota using in vitro batch culture experiments. A set of in vitro anaerobic culture systems were run over a period of 24 h using faeces from 3 different IBS donors (Rome Criteria-mainly constipated) and 3 healthy donors. Changes in gut microbiota during a time course were identified by fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH), whilst the small-molecular weight metabolomic profile was determined by NMR analysis. Gas production was separately investigated in non pH-controlled, 36 h batch culture experiments. Numbers of bifidobacteria were higher in healthy subjects compared to IBS donors. In addition, the healthy donors showed a significant increase in bifidobacteria (P<0.005) after 8 h of fermentation of a bread produced using a sourdough process (type C) compared to breads produced with commercial yeasted dough (type B) and no time fermentation (Chorleywood Breadmaking process) (type A). A significant decrease of δ-Proteobacteria and most Gemmatimonadetes species was observed after 24 h fermentation of type C bread in both IBS and healthy donors. In general, IBS donors showed higher rates of gas production compared to healthy donors. Rates of gas production for type A and conventional long fermentation (type B) breads were almost identical in IBS and healthy donors. Sourdough bread produced significantly lower cumulative gas after 15 h fermentation as compared to type A and B breads in IBS donors but not in the healthy controls. In conclusion, breads fermented by the traditional long fermentation and sourdough are less likely to lead to IBS symptoms compared to bread made using the Chorleywood Breadmaking Process. PMID:25356771

  18. Lubiprostone does not Influence Visceral Pain Thresholds in Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Whitehead, William E.; Palsson, Olafur S.; Gangarosa, Lisa; Turner, Marsha; Tucker, Jane

    2011-01-01

    Background In clinical trials, lubiprostone reduced the severity of abdominal pain. Aims The primary aim was to determine whether lubiprostone raises the threshold for abdominal pain induced by intraluminal balloon distention. A secondary aim was to determine whether changes in pain sensitivity influence clinical pain independently of changes in transit time. Methods Sixty-two patients with irritable bowel syndrome with constipation (IBS-C) participated in an 8-week crossover study. All subjects completed a 14-day baseline ending with a barostat test of pain and urge sensory thresholds. Half, randomly selected, then received 48 ug/day of lubiprostone for 14 days ending with a pain sensitivity test and a Sitzmark test of transit time. This was followed by a 14-day washout and then a crossover to 14 days of placebo with tests of pain sensitivity and transit time. The other half of the subjects received placebo before lubiprostone. All kept symptom diaries. Results Stools were significantly softer when taking lubiprostone compared to placebo (Bristol Stool scores 4.20 vs. 3.44, p<0.001). However, thresholds for pain (17.36 vs. 17.83 mmHg, lubiprostone vs. placebo) and urgency to defecate (14.14 vs. 14.53 mmHg) were not affected by lubiprostone. Transit time was not significantly different between lubiprostone and placebo (51.27 vs. 51.81 hours), and neither pain sensitivity nor transit time was a significant predictor of clinical pain. Conclusions Lubiprostone has no effect on visceral sensory thresholds. The reductions in clinical pain that occur while taking lubiprostone appear to be secondary to changes in stool consistency. PMID:21914041

  19. Effect of Breadmaking Process on In Vitro Gut Microbiota Parameters in Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Costabile, Adele; Santarelli, Sara; Claus, Sandrine P.; Sanderson, Jeremy; Hudspith, Barry N.; Brostoff, Jonathan; Ward, Jane L.; Lovegrove, Alison; Shewry, Peter R.; Jones, Hannah E.; Whitley, Andrew M.; Gibson, Glenn R.

    2014-01-01

    A variety of foods have been implicated in symptoms of patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) but wheat products are most frequently cited by patients as a trigger. Our aim was to investigate the effects of breads, which were fermented for different lengths of time, on the colonic microbiota using in vitro batch culture experiments. A set of in vitro anaerobic culture systems were run over a period of 24 h using faeces from 3 different IBS donors (Rome Criteria–mainly constipated) and 3 healthy donors. Changes in gut microbiota during a time course were identified by fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH), whilst the small -molecular weight metabolomic profile was determined by NMR analysis. Gas production was separately investigated in non pH-controlled, 36 h batch culture experiments. Numbers of bifidobacteria were higher in healthy subjects compared to IBS donors. In addition, the healthy donors showed a significant increase in bifidobacteria (P<0.005) after 8 h of fermentation of a bread produced using a sourdough process (type C) compared to breads produced with commercial yeasted dough (type B) and no time fermentation (Chorleywood Breadmaking process) (type A). A significant decrease of δ-Proteobacteria and most Gemmatimonadetes species was observed after 24 h fermentation of type C bread in both IBS and healthy donors. In general, IBS donors showed higher rates of gas production compared to healthy donors. Rates of gas production for type A and conventional long fermentation (type B) breads were almost identical in IBS and healthy donors. Sourdough bread produced significantly lower cumulative gas after 15 h fermentation as compared to type A and B breads in IBS donors but not in the healthy controls. In conclusion, breads fermented by the traditional long fermentation and sourdough are less likely to lead to IBS symptoms compared to bread made using the Chorleywood Breadmaking Process. PMID:25356771

  20. Ehealth: Low FODMAP diet vs Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG in irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Natalia; Andersen, Nynne Nyboe; Végh, Zsuzsanna; Jensen, Lisbeth; Ankersen, Dorit Vedel; Felding, Maria; Simonsen, Mette Hestetun; Burisch, Johan; Munkholm, Pia

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of a low fermentable, oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols diet (LFD) and the probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). METHODS: Randomised, unblinded controlled trial on the effect of 6-wk treatment with LFD, LGG or a normal Danish/Western diet (ND) in patients with IBS fulfilling Rome III diagnostic criteria, recruited between November 2009 and April 2013. Patients were required to complete on a weekly basis the IBS severity score system (IBS-SSS) and IBS quality of life (IBS-QOL) questionnaires in a specially developed IBS web self-monitoring application. We investigated whether LFD or LGG could reduce IBS-SSS and improve QOL in IBS patients. RESULTS: One hundred twenty-three patients (median age 37 years, range: 18-74 years), 90 (73%) females were randomised: 42 to LFD, 41 to LGG and 40 to ND. A significant reduction in mean ± SD of IBS-SSS from baseline to week 6 between LFD vs LGG vs ND was revealed: 133 ± 122 vs 68 ± 107, 133 ± 122 vs 34 ± 95, P < 0.01. Adjusted changes of IBS-SSS for baseline covariates showed statistically significant reduction of IBS-SSS in LFD group compared to ND (IBS-SSS score 75; 95%CI: 24-126, P < 0.01), but not in LGG compared to ND (IBS-SSS score 32; 95%CI: 18-80, P = 0.20). IBS-QOL was not altered significantly in any of the three groups: mean ± SD in LFD 8 ± 18 vs LGG 7 ± 17, LFD 8 ± 18 vs ND 0.1 ± 15, P = 0.13. CONCLUSION: Both LFD and LGG are efficatious in patients with IBS. PMID:25473176

  1. A randomised trial of ondansetron for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhoea

    PubMed Central

    Garsed, Klara; Chernova, Julia; Hastings, Margaret; Lam, Ching; Marciani, Luca; Singh, Gulzar; Henry, Amanda; Hall, Ian; Whorwell, Peter; Spiller, Robin

    2014-01-01

    Background Irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhoea (IBS-D) is particularly debilitating due to urgency and episodic incontinence. Some 5-hydroxytryptamine 3 (5-HT3) receptor antagonists (5-HT3RAs) have proven effective but have serious side effects. Ondansetron, also a 5-HT3RA, has been widely used as an antiemetic with an excellent safety record for over two decades. Our aim was to assess its effectiveness in IBS-D. Methods 120 patients meeting Rome III criteria for IBS-D entered a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study of 5 weeks of ondansetron 4 mg versus placebo with dose titration allowed, up to two tablets three times daily in the first 3 weeks. Patients completed daily diaries documenting stool consistency using the Bristol Stool Form score. Gut transit was measured in the last week of each treatment. The primary endpoint was average stool consistency in the last 2 weeks of treatment. Results Ondansetron significantly improved stool consistency (mean difference in stool form between ondansetron and placebo −0.9, 95% CI −1.1 to −0.6, p<0.001). Compared with placebo, patients on ondansetron experienced fewer days with urgency (p<0.001), lower urgency scores (p<0.001), reduced frequency of defaecation (p=0.002) and less bloating (p=0.002), although pain scores did not change significantly. IBS symptom severity score fell more with ondansetron than placebo (83±9.8 vs 37±9.7, p=0.001). 65% reported adequate relief with ondansetron but not placebo compared with 14% reporting relief with placebo but not ondansetron, relative risk 4.7, 95% CI 2.6 to 8.5, p<0.001. Conclusions Ondansetron relieves some of the most intrusive symptoms of IBS-D, namely loose stools, frequency and urgency. PMID:24334242

  2. Intervention to increase physical activity in irritable bowel syndrome shows long-term positive effects

    PubMed Central

    Johannesson, Elisabet; Ringström, Gisela; Abrahamsson, Hasse; Sadik, Riadh

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To assess the long-term effects of physical activity on irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) symptoms and on quality of life, fatigue, depression and anxiety. METHODS: Seventy-six patients from a previous randomized controlled interventional study on increased physical activity in IBS were asked to participate in this long-term follow-up study. The included patients attended one visit in which they filled out questionnaires and they underwent a submaximal cycle ergometer test. The primary end point was the change in the IBS Severity Scoring System (IBS-SSS) at baseline, i.e., before the intervention and at follow-up. The secondary endpoints were changes in quality of life, fatigue, depression and anxiety. RESULTS: A total of 39 [32 women, median age 45 (28-61) years] patients were included in this follow-up. Median follow-up time was 5.2 (range: 3.8-6.2) years. The IBS symptoms were improved compared with baseline [IBS-SSS: 276 (169-360) vs 218 (82-328), P = 0.001]. This was also true for the majority of the dimensions of psychological symptoms such as disease specific quality of life, fatigue, depression and anxiety. The reported time of physical activity during the week before the visit had increased from 3.2 (0.0-10.0) h at baseline to 5.2 (0.0-15.0) h at follow-up, P = 0.019. The most common activities reported were walking, aerobics and cycling. There was no significant difference in the oxygen uptake 31.8 (19.7-45.8) mL per min per kg at baseline vs 34.6 (19.0-54.6) mL/min per kg at follow-up. CONCLUSION: An intervention to increase physical activity has positive long-term effects on IBS symptoms and psychological symptoms. PMID:25593485

  3. Enteric P2X receptors as potential targets for drug treatment of the irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Galligan, James J

    2004-01-01

    The irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a gastrointestinal motility disorder affecting millions of patients. IBS symptoms include diarrhea, constipation and pain. The etiology of IBS is due partly to changes in the function of nerves supplying the gastrointestinal tract, immune system activation and to psychological factors. P2X receptors are multimeric ATP-gated cation channels expressed by neuronal and non-neuronal cells. Sensory nerve endings in the gastrointestinal tract express P2X receptors. ATP released from gastrointestinal cells activates P2X receptors on sensory nerve endings to stimulate motor reflexes and to transmit nociceptive signals. Antagonists acting at P2X receptors on sensory nerves could attenuate abdominal pain in IBS patients. Primary afferent neurons intrinsic to the gut, and enteric motor- and interneurons express P2X receptors. These neurons participate in motor reflexes. Agonists acting at enteric P2X receptors may enhance gastrointestinal propulsion and secretion, and these drugs could be useful for treating constipation-predominant IBS. Antagonists acting at enteric P2X receptors would decrease propulsion and secretion and they might be useful for treating diarrhea-predominant IBS. Current knowledge of P2X receptor distribution and function in the gut of laboratory animals provides a rational basis for further exploration of the therapeutic potential for drugs acting at P2X receptors in IBS patients. However, more information about P2X receptor distribution and function in the human gastrointestinal tract is needed. Data on the distribution and function of P2X receptors on gastrointestinal immune cells would also provide insights into the therapeutic potential of P2X receptor agents in IBS. PMID:15051631

  4. Increased VGLUT3 involved in visceral hyperalgesia in a rat model of irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chang-Qing; Duan, Li-Ping; Qiao, Pei-Tang; Zhao, Li; Guo, Li-Li

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the activity of vesicular glutamate transporter-3 (VGLUT3) in a visceral hyperalgesia rat model of irritable bowel syndrome, and the role of mast cells (MCs). METHODS: Transient intestinal infection was induced by oral administration of Trichinella spiralis larvae in rats. On the 100th day post-infection (PI), the rats were divided into an acute cold restraint stress (ACRS) group and a non-stressed group. Age-matched untreated rats served as controls. The abdominal withdrawal reflex was used to measure the visceromotor response to colorectal distension (CRD). The expression levels of VGLUT3 in peripheral and central neurons were analyzed by immunofluorescence and western blotting. RESULTS: VGLUT3 expression in the L6S1 dorsal root ganglion cells was significantly higher in the PI group than in the control group (0.32 ± 0.009 vs 0.22 ± 0.008, P < 0.01), and there was no significant difference in the expression of VGLUT3 between MC-deficient rats and their normal wild-type littermates. Immunofluorescence showed that the expression levels of VGLUT3 in PI + ACRS rats were enhanced in the prefrontal cortex of the brain compared with the control group. CONCLUSION: VGLUT3 is involved in the pathogenesis of visceral hyperalgesia. Coexpression of c-fos, 5-hydroxytryptamine and VGLUT3 after CRD was observed in associated neuronal pathways. Increased VGLUT3 induced by transient intestinal infection was found in peripheral nerves, and was independent of MCs. Moreover, the expression of VGLUT3 was enhanced in the prefrontal cortex in rats with induced infection and stress. PMID:25780293

  5. Irritable bowel syndrome: Pathogenesis, diagnosis, treatment, and evidence-based medicine

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Lekha

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a chronic and debilitating functional gastrointestinal disorder that affects 9%-23% of the population across the world. The percentage of patients seeking health care related to IBS approaches 12% in primary care practices and is by far the largest subgroup seen in gastroenterology clinics. It has been well documented that these patients exhibit a poorer quality of life and utilize the health care system to a greater degree than patients without this diagnosis. The pathophysiology of IBS is not clear. Many theories have been put forward, but the exact cause of IBS is still uncertain. According to the updated ROME III criteria, IBS is a clinical diagnosis and presents as one of the three predominant subtypes: (1) IBS with constipation (IBS-C); (2) IBS with diarrhea (IBS-D); and (3) mixed IBS (IBS-M); former ROME definitions refer to IBS-M as alternating IBS (IBS-A). Across the IBS subtypes, the presentation of symptoms may vary among patients and change over time. Patients report the most distressing symptoms to be abdominal pain, straining, myalgias, urgency, bloating and feelings of serious illness. The complexity and diversity of IBS presentation makes treatment difficult. Although there are reviews and guidelines for treating IBS, they focus on the efficacy of medications for IBS symptoms using high-priority endpoints, leaving those of lower priority largely unreported. Therefore, the aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive evidence-based review of the diagnosis, pathogenesis and treatment to guide clinicians diagnosing and treating their patients. PMID:24944467

  6. Bidirectional Association between Asthma and Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Two Population-Based Retrospective Cohort Studies

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Cheng-Li; Wei, Chang-Ching; Chen, Chia-Hung; Tu, Chih-Yen; Hsia, Te-Chun; Shih, Chuen-Ming; Hsu, Wu-Huei

    2016-01-01

    Background There is a demonstrated association between asthma and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). In this study, we examined the bidirectional association between asthma and IBS using a nationwide database. Methods We conducted two retrospective cohort studies using data obtained from the National Health Insurance of Taiwan. Study 1 included 29,648 asthma patients newly diagnosed between 2000 and 2010. Study 2 included 29,875 IBS patient newly diagnosed between 2000 and 2010. For each study, four subjects without asthma and IBS were selected, respectively, frequency-matched by sex, age, and the diagnosis date. All four cohorts were followed up until the end of 2011 to estimate incident IBS for Study 1 and incident asthma for study 2. Adjusted hazard ratios (aHRs) were estimated using the Cox proportional hazards model after controlling for sex, age and comorbidities. Results The incidence of IBS was 1.89 times higher in the asthma cohort than in the comparison cohort (8.26 vs. 4.36 per 1,000 person-years), with an aHR of 1.57 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.47–1.68]. The aHRs remained significant in all subgroups measured by sex, age and the presence of comorbidities. In contrast, the incidence of asthma was 1.76 times higher in the IBS cohort than the comparison cohort (7.09 vs. 4.03 per 1,000 person-years), with an aHR of 1.54 (95% CI = 1.44−1.64). Similarly, aHRs remained significant in all subgroups measured by sex, age and the presence of comorbidities. Conclusion The present study suggests a bidirectional association between asthma and IBS. Atopy could be a shared pathophysiology underlying this association, deserving a further investigation. PMID:27093172

  7. Overlapping gastroesophageal reflux disease and irritable bowel syndrome: Increased dysfunctional symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Yarandi, Shadi Sadeghi; Nasseri-Moghaddam, Siavosh; Mostajabi, Pardis; Malekzadeh, Reza

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the association of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) in Iranian patients and examine the prevalence of functional symptoms of the gastrointestinal tract in patients presenting with either IBS, GERD or both. METHODS: Six thousand four hundred and seventy six patients presented to the Gastro-intestinal (GI) clinic with symptoms of functional dysfunction of GI tract, 1419 patients (62.0% women, 38.0% men; mean age: 37.4 ± 11.5 years) met Rome II or Rome III criteria (depending on the year of diagnosis) for IBS. 2658 patients were diagnosed with GERD based on clinical presentation and endoscopic findings. We assessed other functional symptoms (epigastric pain, nausea, vomiting, belching, constipation and diarrhea) in patients suffering from GERD, IBS or both. RESULTS: Among IBS subjects, 63.6% (69.0% women, 31.0% men; mean age: 36.4 ± 10.3 years) also had GERD, whereas 34.7% of the non-IBS patients had GERD [odds ratio (OR) = 3.2, 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.9-3.7, P < 0.0001]. Among patients with GERD, 33.9% of subjects met Rome criteria compared to 13.5% of non-GERD patients (OR = 3.6, 95% CI: 3.1-4.3, P < 0.0001). Prevalence of all functional symptoms was higher in overlapping GERD and IBS subjects, when compared with their prevalence in the IBS subjects without GERD or GERD only subjects (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: This finding shows that in overlapping GERD and IBS, other functional abnormalities of the GI tract are also highly prevalent, suggesting a common underlying dysfunction. PMID:20222167

  8. The scintigraphic determination of small intestinal transit time in patients with irritable bowel syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Marano, A.R.; Caride, V.J.; Shah, R.V.; Prokop, E.K.; Troncale, F.J.; McCallum, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    Diffuse disturbance in gastrointestinal motility may be present in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). To further investigate small intestinal motility in IBS patients small intestinal transit time (SITT) was determined and related to the symptom status. 11 female patients with IBS (mean age 29 years) were divided into those whose predominate symptom was diarrhea (N=6), and those with only constipation (N=5). All subjects ingested an isosmotic solution of lactulose (10 gm in 150cc of water) labeled with 99m-Tc-DTPA (Sn). The patient was studied supine under a 25 inch gamma camera with data collected at 1 frame per minute for 180 minutes or until activity appeared in the ascending colon. Regions of interest were selected over the cecum and ascending colon. The time of first appearance of radioactivity in the region of the cecum was taken as the small intestinal transit time. SITT in the 5 normal females was 98.7 +- 13 min (mean +- SEM). SITT in the IBS patients with diarrhea, 67.3 +- 7 min was significantly faster (p< 0.08). SITT in the constipated IBS patients, 126 +- 12 min, was slower than normals and significantly different from diarrhea patients (p< 0.001). These studies show that IBS patients with diarrhea have significantly faster SITT than normals while constipated IBS patients have significantly slower SITT than the diarrhea subgroup. Further, this study emphasizes the need to study the various symptomatic subgroups of IBs patients independently and indicates a possible role for abnormal SITT in the pathogenesis of IBS.

  9. Evidence for alterations in central noradrenergic signaling in irritable bowel syndrome*, **

    PubMed Central

    Berman, Steven; Suyenobu, Brandall; Naliboff, Bruce D.; Bueller, Joshua; Stains, Jean; Wong, Heng; Mandelkern, Mark; Fitzgerald, Leah; Ohning, Gordon; Gupta, Arpana; Labus, Jennifer S.; Tillisch, Kirsten; Mayer, Emeran A.

    2014-01-01

    Background/aims Alterations in noradrenergic (NE) signaling have been implicated in the pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), and adrenergic receptors are potential treatment targets. Methods To characterize central NE signaling in IBS, 11 patients and 11 healthy controls (HCs) were studied 3 times during an auditory oddball vigilance task after double-blind ingestion of the α2-adrenoreceptor (α2AR) antagonist yohimbine (YOH), the α2AR agonist clonidine (CLO), or placebo (PLA). Regional cerebral glucose metabolism was measured with [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET). Measures of anxiety, early-life trauma, plasma NE and blood pressure were acquired. Results Patients had higher plasma NE levels than HCs before and after ingestion of all drugs (all p <0.05). YOH increased plasma NE and more anxiety in patients than in HCs. After YOH, NE levels directly correlated with drug-induced increases in anxiety in IBS patients (r=0.61), but not in HCs. IBS patients showed less YOH-mediated reduction of activity in a central arousal circuit, consistent with fewer functional presynaptic α2AR. In HCs, but not in patients, activation of amygdala and subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (sgACC) was inversely correlated with activation of anterior mid cingulate cortex (aMCC), and state anxiety covaried directly with activity in limbic and right frontotemporal cortices, but indirectly with activity in the left frontotemporal cortex. YOH-mediated reduction of activity in brainstem and amygdala inversely correlated with early life trauma. Conclusions IBS patients showed evidence for increased noradrenergic activity consistent with downregulation of presynaptic inhibitory α2ARs. Activity within central arousal circuits was biased toward greater excitability and reduced corticolimbic inhibition in IBS. Early life trauma may be one mediator of these abnormalities. PMID:22917679

  10. Self-reported dietary fructose intolerance in irritable bowel syndrome: Proposed diagnostic criteria

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Leif Kyrre; Fagerli, Erik; Myhre, Arnt-Otto; Florholmen, Jon; Goll, Rasmus

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To study the criteria for self-reported dietary fructose intolerance (DFI) and to evaluate subjective global assessment (SGA) as outcome measure. METHODS: Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients were randomized in an open study design with a 2 wk run-in on a habitual IBS diet, followed by 12 wk with/without additional fructose-reduced diet (FRD). Daily registrations of stool frequency and consistency, and symptoms on a visual analog scale (VAS) were performed during the first 4 wk. SGA was used for weekly registrations during the whole study period. Provocation with high-fructose diet was done at the end of the registration period. Fructose breath tests (FBTs) were performed. A total of 182 subjects performed the study according to the protocol (88 FRD, 94 controls). RESULTS: We propose a new clinically feasible diagnostic standard for self-reported fructose intolerance. The instrument is based on VAS registrations of symptom relief on FRD combined with symptom aggravation upon provocation with fructose-rich diet. Using these criteria 43 of 77 patients (56%) in the present cohort of IBS patients had self-reported DFI. To improve the concept for clinical evaluation, we translated the SGA scale instrument to Norwegian and validated it in the context of the IBS diet regimen. The validation procedures showed a sensitivity, specificity and κ value for SGA detecting the self-reported DFI group by FRD response within the IBS patients of 0.79, 0.75 and 0.53, respectively. Addition of the provocation test yielded values of 0.84, 0.76 and 0.61, respectively. The corresponding validation results for FBT were 0.57, 0.34 and -0.13, respectively. CONCLUSION: FRD improves symptoms in a subgroup of IBS patients. A diet trial followed by a provocation test evaluated by SGA can identify most responders to FRD. PMID:25987795

  11. Neuroimaging the brain-gut axis in patients with irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Kristen R; Sherwin, LeeAnne B; Walitt, Brian; Melkus, Gail D’Eramo; Henderson, Wendy A

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To summarize and synthesize current literature on neuroimaging the brain-gut axis in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). METHODS: A database search for relevant literature was conducted using PubMed, Scopus and Embase in February 2015. Date filters were applied from the year 2009 and onward, and studies were limited to those written in the English language and those performed upon human subjects. The initial search yielded 797 articles, out of which 38 were pulled for full text review and 27 were included for study analysis. Investigations were reviewed to determine study design, methodology and results, and data points were placed in tabular format to facilitate analysis of study findings across disparate investigations. RESULTS: Analysis of study data resulted in the abstraction of four key themes: Neurohormonal differences, anatomic measurements of brain structure and connectivity, differences in functional responsiveness of the brain during rectal distention, and confounding/correlating patient factors. Studies in this review noted alterations of glutamate in the left hippocampus (HIPP), commonalities across IBS subjects in terms of brain oscillation patterns, cortical thickness/gray matter volume differences, and neuroanatomical regions with increased activation in patients with IBS: Anterior cingulate cortex, mid cingulate cortex, amygdala, anterior insula, posterior insula and prefrontal cortex. A striking finding among interventions was the substantial influence that patient variables (e.g., sex, psychological and disease related factors) had upon the identification of neuroanatomical differences in structure and connectivity. CONCLUSION: The field of neuroimaging can provide insight into underlying physiological differences that distinguish patients with IBS from a healthy population. PMID:27158548

  12. Visceral hypersensitive rats share common dysbiosis features with irritable bowel syndrome patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiao-Yan; Li, Ming; Li, Xia; Long, Xin; Zuo, Xiu-Li; Hou, Xiao-Hua; Cong, Ying-Zi; Li, Yan-Qing

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate gut microbial dysbiosis in two visceral hypersensitive models in comparison with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients and to explore the extent to which these models capture the dysbiosis of IBS patients. METHODS: Visceral hypersensitivity was developed using the maternal separation (MS) rat model and post-inflammatory rat model. The visceral sensitivity of the model groups and control group was evaluated using the abdominal withdraw reflex score and electromyography in response to graded colorectal distention. The 16S ribosomal RNA gene from fecal samples was pyrosequenced and analyzed. The correlation between dysbiosis in the microbiota and visceral hypersensitivity was calculated. Positive findings were compared to sequencing data from a published human IBS cohort. RESULTS: Dysbiosis triggered by neonatal maternal separation was lasting but not static. Both MS and post-inflammatory rat fecal microbiota deviated from that of the control rats to an extent that was larger than the co-housing effect. Two short chain fatty acid producing genera, Fusobacterium and Clostridium XI, were shared by the human IBS cohort and by the maternal separation rats and post-inflammatory rats, respectively, to different extents. Fusobacterium was significantly increased in the MS group, and its abundance positively correlated with the degree of visceral hypersensitivity. Porphyromonadaceae was a protective biomarker for both the rat control group and healthy human controls. CONCLUSION: The dysbiosis MS rat model and the post-inflammatory rat model captured some of the dysbiosis features of IBS patients. Fusobacterium, Clostridium XI and Porphyromonadaceae were identified as targets for future mechanistic research. PMID:27298564

  13. Dietary guidance and ileal enteroendocrine cells in patients with irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mazzawi, Tarek; El-Salhy, Magdy

    2016-01-01

    The enteroendocrine cells of the ileum are stimulated by the luminal contents to release specific hormones that regulate its functions. The density of ileal enteroendocrine cells is abnormal in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), and the majority of patients with IBS associate their symptoms to the consumption of certain foodstuffs. The present study investigated the effect of dietary guidance on the enteroendocrine cells of the ileum in 11 patients with IBS. A total of 10 control subjects were also included. Each patient received three sessions of dietary guidance. Colonoscopies were performed on both controls and patients with IBS (at baseline and 3–9 months after the patients had received dietary guidance). Biopsy samples from the ileum were immunostained for all enteroendocrine cells and quantified by computerized image analysis. The densities of serotonin-immunoreactive cells in controls and in patients with IBS prior to and following dietary guidance were 35.5±5.7, 38.7±7.1 and 22.3±2.6 cells/mm2, respectively (mean ± standard error of the mean; P=0.046); the corresponding values for PYY-immunoreactive cells were 16.7±2.8, 20.2±5.1 and 21.3±2.7 cells/mm2 (P=0.86). These results suggest that changes in enteroendocrine cell densities in the ileum along with changes in enteroendocrine cells throughout the gastrointestinal tract may contribute to the improvement in IBS symptoms following dietary guidance. PMID:27588061

  14. Meta-analysis of probiotics for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    McFarland, Lynne V; Dublin, Sascha

    2008-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a chronic condition affecting 3%-25% of the general population. As no curative treatment is available, therapy is aimed at reducing symptoms, often with little success. Because alteration of the normal intestinal microflora has been observed in IBS, probiotics (beneficial microbes taken to improve health) may be useful in reducing symptoms. This paper systematically reviews randomized, controlled, blinded trials of probiotics for the treatment of IBS and synthesizes data on efficacy across trials of adequate quality. PubMed, Medline, Google Scholar, NIH registry of clinical trials, metaRegister, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched from 1982-2007. We also conducted secondary searches of reference lists, reviews, commentaries, relevant articles on associated diseases, books and meeting abstracts. Twenty trials with 23 probiotic treatment arms and a total of 1404 subjects met inclusion criteria. Probiotic use was associated with improvement in global IBS symptoms compared to placebo [pooled relative risk (RRpooled) 0.77, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.62-0.94]. Probiotics were also associated with less abdominal pain compared to placebo [RRpooled = 0.78 (0.69-0.88)]. Too few studies reported data on other IBS symptoms or on specific probiotic strains to allow estimation of a pooled RR. While our analyses suggest that probiotic use may be associated with improvement in IBS symptoms compared to placebo, these results should be interpreted with caution, given the methodological limitations of contributing studies. Probiotics warrant further study as a potential therapy for IBS. PMID:18461650

  15. Biomarkers to distinguish functional constipation from irritable bowel syndrome with constipation.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, W E; Palsson, O S; Simrén, M

    2016-06-01

    Treatments for functional constipation (FC) and irritable bowel syndrome with constipation (IBS-C) differ, but symptom criteria do not reliably distinguish between them; some regard FC and IBS-C as parts of a single constipation spectrum. Our goal was to review studies comparing FC and IBS-C to identify possible biomarkers that separate them. A systematic review identified 15 studies that compared physiologic tests in FC vs IBS-C. Pain thresholds were lower in IBS-C than FC for 3/5 studies and not different in 2/5. Colonic motility was decreased more in FC than IBS-C for 3/3 studies, and whole gut transit was delayed more in FC than IBS-C in 3/8 studies and not different in 5/8. Pelvic floor dyssynergia was unrelated to diagnosis. Sympathetic arousal, measured in only one study, was greater in IBS-C than FC. The most reliable separation of FC from IBS-C was shown by a novel new magnetic resonance imaging technique described in this issue of the journal. These authors showed that drinking one liter of polyethylene glycol laxative significantly increased water content in the small intestine, volume of contents in the ascending colon, and time to first evacuation in FC vs IBS-C; and resulted in less colon motility and delayed whole gut transit in FC compared to IBS-C. Although replication is needed, this well-tolerated, non-invasive test promises to become a new standard for differential diagnosis of FC vs IBS-C. These data suggest that FC and IBS-C are different disorders rather than points on a constipation spectrum. PMID:27214096

  16. The Overlap between Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity: A Clinical Dilemma.

    PubMed

    Makharia, Archita; Catassi, Carlo; Makharia, Govind K

    2015-12-01

    The spectrum of gluten-related disorders has widened in recent times and includes celiac disease, non-celiac gluten sensitivity, and wheat allergy. The complex of symptoms associated with these diseases, such as diarrhea, constipation or abdominal pain may overlap for the gluten related diseases, and furthermore they can be similar to those caused by various other intestinal diseases, such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The mechanisms underlying symptom generation are diverse for all these diseases. Some patients with celiac disease may remain asymptomatic or have only mild gastrointestinal symptoms and thus may qualify for the diagnosis of IBS in the general clinical practice. Similarly, the overlap of symptoms between IBS and non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) often creates a dilemma for clinicians. While the treatment of NCGS is exclusion of gluten from the diet, some, but not all, of the patients with IBS also improve on a gluten-free diet. Both IBS and NCGS are common in the general population and both can coexist with each other independently without necessarily sharing a common pathophysiological basis. Although the pathogenesis of NCGS is not well understood, it is likely to be heterogeneous with possible contributing factors such as low-grade intestinal inflammation, increased intestinal barrier function and changes in the intestinal microbiota. Innate immunity may also play a pivotal role. One possible inducer of innate immune response has recently been reported to be amylase-trypsin inhibitor, a protein present in wheat endosperm and the source of flour, along with the gluten proteins. PMID:26690475

  17. Efficacy of tandospirone in patients with irritable bowel syndrome-diarrhea and anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Ling; Chen, Yu-Long; Zhang, Hao; Jia, Bai-Ling; Chu, Yan-Jun; Wang, Jin; Tang, Shi-Xiao; Xia, Guo-Dong

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the efficacy of tandospirone in patients with irritable bowel syndrome-diarrhea (IBS-D) and anxiety in a prospective, randomized, controlled study. METHODS: Two hundred patients with IBS-D and moderate anxiety were randomized to receive pinaverium and tandospirone (arm A) or pinaverium and placebo (arm B). Tandospirone or placebo was given thrice daily at a fixed dose of 10 mg and pinaverium was given thrice daily at a fixed dose of 50 mg. The duration of treatment was 8 wk. Patients were assessed for abdominal pain and diarrhea. Anxiety was evaluated using the Hamilton Rating Scale for Anxiety (HAM-A). The primary study endpoints were response rates for abdominal pain and diarrhea. The secondary study endpoints were response rates for anxiety. Adverse events were also evaluated. RESULTS: One hundred and seventy of 200 patients (82 patients in arm A and 88 patients in arm B) completed the study. Demographic and baseline characteristics of the 200 participants were comparable in the two arms. At week 8, the overall response rate for abdominal pain and diarrhea was 52.0% for arm A and 37.0% for arm B (P < 0.05). The HAM-A score showed that the response rate was 61.0% for arm A and 21.0% for arm B (P < 0.01). The treatments were well tolerated and no significant adverse events were reported. CONCLUSION: Tandospirone is effective and can be combined with pinaverium in IBS-D patients with anxiety. PMID:25170231

  18. Effectiveness of acupuncture to treat irritable bowel syndrome: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Guan-Qun; Zhang, Shuo

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy of acupuncture for treatment of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) through meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. METHODS: We searched MEDLIINE, PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials from 1966 to February 2013 for double-blind, placebo-controlled trials investigating the efficacy of acupuncture in the management of IBS. Studies were screened for inclusion based on randomization, controls, and measurable outcomes reported. We used the modified Jadad score for assessing the quality of the articles. STATA 11.0 and Revman 5.0 were used for meta-analysis. Publication bias was assessed by Begg’s and Egger’s tests. RESULTS: Six randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials met the criteria and were included in the meta-analysis. The modified Jadad score of the articles was > 3, and five articles were of high quality. We analyzed the heterogeneity and found that these studies did not cause heterogeneity in our meta-analysis. Begg’s test showed P = 0.707 and Egger’s test showed P = 0.334. There was no publication bias in our meta-analysis (Begg’s test, P = 0.707; Egger’s test, P = 0.334). From the forest plot, the diamond was on the right side of the vertical line and did not intersect with the line. The pooled relative risk for clinical improvement with acupuncture was 1.75 (95%CI: 1.24-2.46, P = 0.001). Using the two different systems of STATA 11.0 and Revman 5.0, we confirmed the significant efficacy of acupuncture for treating IBS. CONCLUSION: Acupuncture exhibits clinically and statistically significant control of IBS symptoms. PMID:24587665

  19. Estimating the Burden of Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Analysis of a Nationwide Korean Database

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hye-Kyung; Kim, Youn Hee; Park, Joo Yeon; Jang, Bo Hyoung; Park, Sun-Young; Nam, Mi-Hee; Choi, Myung-Gyu

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims Management of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) imposes a heavy economic burden. This study was to estimate the epidemiologic features of IBS and to report the IBS burden for the first time in the Korean population. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted using the National Health Insurance (NHI) system database, which covers the entire population of Korea. IBS was defined as diagnostic code −10 in adults with any outpatient clinic visits or hospitalization related to IBS. We excluded diseases that mimic IBS symptoms. Results A total of 2.42 million (58.2% female) individuals were identified as patients with IBS, yielding an age- and gender-adjusted prevalence of 5.1% in males and 6.9% in females. The prevalence of IBS increased proportionally with age, with higher medical costs in middle-aged patients. Outpatient clinics were visited by 98.6% of IBS patients, and 1.9% were treated upon admission. Of these patients, 87.6% were given a prescription. Co-morbidities that commonly accompanied IBS included upper gastrointestinal (36.1%), respiratory (12.3%), musculoskeletal (8.0%) disease, somatoform (4.3%) and depression/anxiety disorders (3.1%). The NHI costs of IBS, which include the NHI covered cost and beneficiary copayment charges, were estimated to be 155 million USD, which accounts for 0.46% of the total NHI costs for the entire Korean population. Conclusions According to the Korean national claims database, about 6% of the Korean population seeks medical care for IBS at least once per year. This high prevalence places a large economic burden on the Korean healthcare system, accounting for 0.46% of overall national medical expenditure. PMID:24840377

  20. The Tryptophan Hydroxylase Inhibitor LX1031 Shows Clinical Benefit in Patients With Nonconstipating Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Philip M.; Drossman, Douglas A.; Wood, Alastair J. J.; Cline, Gary A.; Frazier, Kenny S.; Jackson, Jessica I.; Bronner, Johanna; Freiman, Joel; Zambrowicz, Brian; Sands, Arthur; Gershon, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine [5-HT]) has an important role in gastrointestinal function. LX1031 is an oral, locally acting, small molecule inhibitor of tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH). Local inhibition of TPH in the gastrointestinal tract might reduce mucosal production of serotonin (5-HT) and be used to treat patients with nonconstipating irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). METHODS We evaluated 2 dose levels of LX1031 (250 mg or 1000 mg, given 4 times/day) in a 28-day, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of 155 patients with nonconstipating IBS. 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), a biomarker of pharmacodynamic activity, was measured in urine samples at baseline (24 hours after LX1031 administration), and at weeks 4 and 6 (n = 76). RESULTS Each dose of LX1031 was safe and well-tolerated. The primary efficacy end point, relief of IBS pain and discomfort, improved significantly in patients given 1000 mg LX1031 (25.5%), compared with those given placebo, at week 1 (P = .018); with nonsignificant improvements at weeks 2, 3, and 4 (17.9%, 16.3%, and 11.6%, respectively). Symptom improvement correlated with a dose-dependent reduction in 5-HIAA, a marker for TPH inhibition, from baseline until week 4. This suggests the efficacy of LX1031 is related to the extent of inhibition of 5-HT biosynthesis. Stool consistency significantly improved, compared with the group given placebo, at weeks 1 and 4 (P < .01) and at week 2 (P < .001). CONCLUSIONS In a phase 2 study, LX1031 was well tolerated, relieving symptoms and increasing stool consistency in patients with nonconstipating IBS. Symptom relief was associated with reduced levels of 5-HIAA in urine samples. This marker might be used to identify patients with nonconstipating IBS who respond to inhibitors of 5-HT synthesis. PMID:21684281

  1. Irritable bowel syndrome is associated not only with organic but also psychogenic erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hsu, C-Y; Lin, C-L; Kao, C-H

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the correlation between irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and organic erectile dysfunction (OED) and psychogenic erectile dysfunction (PED), and analyzed the influence of various comorbidities. Data were obtained from reimbursement claims of the National Health Insurance Program in Taiwan. We selected male patients aged >20 years, who were diagnosed with IBS during the 2000-2011 period as the IBS cohort. The index date for patients with IBS was the date of their first medical visit. We excluded patients with a diagnosis of OED and PED at baseline and those without information on age and sex. The IBS to non-IBS cohorts were estimated using univariable and multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression model. Adjusted hazard ratios were determined after adjusting for age and comorbidities. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to plot the cumulative incidence of OED and PED, and a log-rank test was used to compare the cohorts. A total of 15,533 IBS patients and 62,124 controls without IBS were enrolled in our study. Among the study participants, 48.2% were 49 years of age or younger. Patients with IBS were more likely to develop erectile dysfunction (ED) than those without IBS. Patients with IBS were 2.12 times more likely to develop OED and 2.38 times more likely to develop PED than the controls. There is an increased risk of both PED and OED in patients with IBS. Not only with organic but also PED should be considered when patients with IBS complain of ED. PMID:26548409

  2. Real-time PCR analysis of enteric pathogens from fecal samples of irritable bowel syndrome subjects

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Growing amount of scientific evidence suggests that microbes are involved in the pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The predominant fecal microbiota composition of IBS subjects has been widely studied with DNA-based techniques but less research has been focused on the intestinal pathogens in this disorder. Here, we optimized a highly sensitive panel of 12 quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assays to shed light on the putative presence of intestinal pathogens in IBS sufferers. The panel was used to screen fecal samples from 96 IBS subjects and 23 healthy controls. Results Fifteen IBS samples (17%) tested positive for Staphylococcus aureus with a thermonuclease (nuc) gene-targeting qPCR assay, whereas none of the healthy controls were positive for S. aureus (p <0.05). The S. aureus -positive IBS samples were confirmed by sequencing of the PCR amplicons. Clostridium perfringens was detected from IBS and control groups with a similar frequency (13% and 17%, respectively) with α-toxin (plc) gene -targeting qPCR assay while none of the samples tested positive for the Cl. perfringens enterotoxin-encoding gene (cpe). Conclusions The qPCR panel consisting of 12 assays for an extensive set of pathogenic microorganisms provides an efficient alternative to the conventional detection of gastrointestinal pathogens and could accelerate the initiation of targeted antibiotic therapy reducing the risk of post-infectious IBS (PI-IBS). S. aureus has not been previously reported to be associated with the onset of IBS. Although we discovered significant differences in the prevalence of S. aureus between the study groups, its importance in giving rise to IBS symptoms requires further studies. PMID:21518462

  3. The effect of biofeedback therapy on dyssynergic constipation in patients with or without Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ahadi, Tannaz; Madjlesi, Faezeh; Mahjoubi, Bahar; Mirzaei, Rezvan; Forogh, Bijan; Daliri, Seyedeh Somayeh; Derakhshandeh, Seyed Majid; Behbahani, Roxana Bazaz; Raissi, G. Reza

    2014-01-01

    Background: The Rome II and III diagnostic criteria for dyssynergic defecation recommended the exclusion of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). This study determined the effect of biofeedback therapy on dyssynergic constipation in patients with or without IBS. Materials and Methods: This study was a nonrandomized, single blinded, semi experimental study. Dyssynergic defecation patients with and without IBS were asked to undergo biofeedback therapy 8 sessions. The defecation dynamics and balloon expulsion time were evaluated before, at the end and 1 month after the biofeedback therapy. IBS symptoms were graded using a 4-point Likert scale. Mann–Whitney U-test, Wilcoxon test and Friedman test were applied to analyze data using SPSS software package (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). Results: After the biofeedback therapy, the IBS symptoms have been decreased significantly (the median of 2 before and 1 after therapy, P < 0.01). The biofeedback therapy significantly decreased the anismus index in IBS group by the mean of 0.75 ± 0.31, 0.28 ± 0.07 and 0.28 ± 0.06 in three phases, respectively. Similar results were found in non-IBS patients (the mean of 0.74 ± 0.32, 0.28 ± 0.08, 0.27 ± 0.08 in three phases, respectively). The symptoms of constipation (sensation of incomplete evacuation, difficult and painful defecation), defecation facilitative manual maneuver frequency, pelvic floor muscles resting amplitude and strain amplitude decreased and squeezing amplitude improved significantly after biofeedback therapy in both groups with and without IBS (P < 0.001). There were not significant differences between patients with and without IBS (P > 0.05) with respect to outcome. No complication was observed in treatment groups. Conclusion: Dyssynergic constipation patients with and without IBS will likely benefit from biofeedback therapy. PMID:25538778

  4. Self-medication of irritable bowel syndrome and dyspepsia: How appropriate is it?

    PubMed Central

    Niknam, Ramin; Mousavi, Sarah; Safarpour, Alireza; Mahmoudi, Laleh; Mahmoudi, Paria

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Self-medication is common among patients with gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms. This study was performed to evaluate self-medication among patients who fulfilled irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and dyspepsia diagnostic criteria and to investigate the appropriateness of self-medication with chemical and herbal drugs. Methods: A prospective, descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted in outpatient's GI clinics at Shiraz from November 2011 to May 2012. A GI specialist visited the patients and recruited those who had IBS (base on Rome III adapted criteria) or functional dyspepsia. We surveyed self-medication among these patients, using a questionnaire containing specific questions about self-medication. Findings: One thousand four hundred and forty-seven patients visited by the GI specialist during the study period. Seven hundred and forty-seven patients had the inclusion criteria, 337 of them fulfilled criteria for IBS, with IBS-mixed (52%) being the most prevalent subtype, and 410 patients had dyspepsia. Overall, 78.8% of the total participants had recently sought medical attention for their GI complaint. Twenty-eight percent of patients selected inappropriate medication for their GI complaints. The H2-blockers class were most common medicines reportedly used. We did not find any significant relationship between age, gender, level of education, marital status, and self-medication frequency. Conclusion: Patients who fulfilled criteria for IBS had a high tendency to self-treat their GI symptoms, use of acid-suppressive agents was common among patients. Around one-third of patients self-treated GI symptoms inappropriately. Consequently, the concept of self-medication among patients has to be revised. We recommend conduction of educational programs to improve self-medications selection and attitude among patients to reduce the burden on other health care resources. PMID:27162806

  5. The Role of Positive Personality Traits in Emotion Regulation of Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)

    PubMed Central

    MAZAHERI, Mina; NIKNESHAN, Shekoufeh; DAGHAGHZADEH, Hamed; AFSHAR, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Personality traits and emotion regulation processes play an important role in human health. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of positive personality traits (psychological hardiness and interpersonal forgiveness) in emotion regulation of patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome. Methods: The research was a cross-sectional study. Statistical population included all of IBS patients referred to the Subspecialty Center of Psychiatry in Isfahan in 2013. Overall, 123 subjects (100 women, 83.3%, and 30 men, 16.7%) were selected by census method, according to criteria of research and during a particular period. To collect data, the Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale (DERS), Lang and Goulet Hardiness Scale (LGHS) and Interpersonal forgiveness Inventory (IFI) were used. Data was analyzed using Pearson’s correlation coefficient and Multivariate and Binary Logistic regression analyses. Results: Mean age of patients was 33.82±10.45 years and 83.3% (100) of them were female. Regression analyses showed that both personality traits of hardiness and forgiveness were as protective factors for emotional dysregulation with OR, 95% CI: 0.93 and 0.96 sequentially, with adjusting demographic variables (age, gender, and education level and disease duration). Conclusion: Patients who are more hardy and forgiving toward others, are likely more successful at adaptive emotion regulation. It emphasizes the positive and beneficial role of the personality traits in regulating of emotional problems of IBS patients. Hence, these variables should be considered as effective factors in the treatment process of the patients. PMID:26056675

  6. Irritable bowel syndrome among nurses working in King Abdulaziz University Hospital, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Nahla Khamis; Al-Bloushy, Randa Ibrahim; Sait, Salma Hani; Al-Azhary, Hatoon Wahid; Al Bar, Nusaybah Hussain; Mirdad, Ghazal A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a highly prevalent gastrointestinal disorder that can cause disability and economic burden. Nurses are a vital part of the medical team and their well-being is an important issue. Yet, few studies have been done concerning IBS among nurses. Objectives To determine the prevalence, severity, and predictors of IBS among nurses working at King Abdulaziz University Hospital, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Materials and methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among 229 nurses who fulfilled the eligibility criteria. They were selected by stratified random sampling during 2014–2015. A validated, confidential, self-administered data collection sheet was used for collection of personal and sociodemographic data. Rome III Criteria, IBS Severity Scoring System (IBS-SSS), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) were included. Both descriptive and inferential statistics were done. A multiple logistic regression analysis was done to determine the predictors of IBS. Results The prevalence of IBS among nurses was 14.4%, and IBS-Mixed type was the commonest variety (54.5%). Positive family history of IBS, working in outpatient clinics, having day shift, poor sleep quality, and high anxiety and depression scale scores were significantly associated with IBS. After controlling for confounding factors in regression analysis, the predictors of IBS were food hypersensitivity (aOR=4.52; 95% CI: 1.80−11.33), morbid anxiety (aOR=4.34; 95% CI: 1.49–12.67), and positive family history of IBS (aOR=3.38; 95% CI: 1.12–13.23). Conclusion The prevalence of IBS was 14.4%. Food hypersensitivity, morbid anxiety, and family history were the predictors of IBS. Screening and management of IBS, food hypersensitivity, and psychological problems among nurses are recommended. PMID:27032964

  7. Development and Validation of a Biomarker for Diarrhea-Predominant Irritable Bowel Syndrome in Human Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Pimentel, Mark; Morales, Walter; Rezaie, Ali; Marsh, Emily; Lembo, Anthony; Mirocha, James; Leffler, Daniel A.; Marsh, Zachary; Weitsman, Stacy; Chua, Kathleen S.; Barlow, Gillian M.; Bortey, Enoch; Forbes, William; Yu, Allen; Chang, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is diagnosed through clinical criteria after excluding “organic” conditions, and can be precipitated by acute gastroenteritis. Cytolethal distending toxin B (CdtB) is produced by bacteria that cause acute gastroenteritis, and a post-infectious animal model demonstrates that host antibodies to CdtB cross-react with vinculin in the host gut, producing an IBS-like phenotype. Therefore, we assessed circulating anti-CdtB and anti-vinculin antibodies as biomarkers for D-IBS in human subjects. Subjects with D-IBS based on Rome criteria (n=2375) were recruited from a large-scale multicenter clinical trial for D-IBS (TARGET 3). Subjects with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) (n=142), subjects with celiac disease (n=121), and healthy controls (n=43) were obtained for comparison. Subjects with IBD and celiac disease were recruited based on the presence of intestinal complaints and histologic confirmation of chronic inflammatory changes in the colon or small intestine. Subjects with celiac disease were also required to have an elevated tTG and biopsy. All subjects were aged between 18 and 65 years. Plasma levels of anti-CdtB and anti-vinculin antibodies were determined by ELISA, and compared between groups. Anti-CdtB titers were significantly higher in D-IBS subjects compared to IBD, healthy controls and celiac disease (P<0.001). Anti-vinculin titers were also significantly higher in IBS (P<0.001) compared to the other groups. The area-under-the-receiver operating curves (AUCs) were 0.81 and 0.62 for diagnosis of D-IBS against IBD for anti-CdtB and anti-vinculin, respectively. Both tests were less specific in differentiating IBS from celiac disease. Optimization demonstrated that for anti-CdtB (optical density≥2.80) the specificity, sensitivity and likelihood ratio were 91.6%, 43.7 and 5.2, respectively, and for anti-vinculin (OD≥1.68) were 83.8%, 32.6 and 2.0, respectively. These results confirm that anti-CdtB and

  8. Intestinal microecology and quality of life in irritable bowel syndrome patients

    PubMed Central

    Si, Jian-Min; Yu, Ying-Cong; Fan, Yu-Jing; Chen, Shu-Jie

    2004-01-01

    AIM: It has been noticed that gastroenteritis or dysentery plays a role in pathogenesis of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), and antibiotics can increase functional abdominal symptoms, both of which may be partly due to intestinal flora disorders. This study was to determine the change of gut flora of IBS, a cluster of abdominal symptoms. Because of the chronic course and frequent occurrence of the disease, IBS patients suffered much from it. So the quality of life (Qol) of IBS patients was also evaluated in this study. METHODS: Twenty-five Rome II criteria-positive IBS patients were recruited, and 25 age and gender-matched healthy volunteers were accepted as control. The fecal flora, including Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium, Bacteroides , C. perfringens Enterobacteriacea and Enterococus, were analyzed quantitatively and qualitatively. We also calculated the ratio of Bifidobacterium to Enterobacteriaceae (B/E ratio) in both IBS patients and controls. In both groups, the data were further analyzed based on age difference, and comparisons were made between the younger and elder subgroups. We also evaluated the quality of life (QoL) of IBS patients and the control group using the Chinese version of SF-36 health questionnaire. RESULTS: In IBS patients, the number of fecal Bifidobacterium was significantly decreased and that of Enterobacteriaceae was significantly increased compared with that in healthy controls (both P < 0.05).The mean microbial colonization resistance (CR) of the bowel in IBS patients was smaller than 1, making a significant difference compared with that in control which was more than 1 (P < 0.01). There was no significant difference in gut flora between two subgroups. While in control, the elder subgroup presented more Enterobacteriacea than the younger one (P < 0.05). Compared with the control group, IBS patients had significantly lower scores on all SF-36 scales, with the exception of physical functioning. However, there was no significant

  9. Treatment of irritable bowel syndrome with probiotics. An etiopathogenic approach at last?

    PubMed

    Bixquert Jiménez, M

    2009-08-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most common functional digestive disorder, and may affect 11-20% of the adult population in industrialized countries. In accordance with Rome III criteria (2006) IBS involves abdominal pain and bowel habit disturbance, which are not explained by structural or biochemical abnormalities. Several hypotheses attempt to account for the pathophysiology of IBS, but the etiology still remains uncertain or obscure, perhaps multifactorial. Abnormalities in colonic microflora have recently been suggested in such patients, as has abnormal small-intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO), or in particular a significant reduction in the amount of intraluminal Bifidobacteria or Lactobacilli, with consequences like the production of colonic gas, and motility or sensitivity disturbances of the intestinal tract. The disorder is difficult to treat, and the wide spectrum of non-drug and drug treatments shows our ignorance about the cause of the condition. Newer drugs, both pro- and anti-serotonin, have failed to show long-term efficacy or have been withdrawn due to concerns about harmful effects. Recent research has provided increasing support for the idea that disturbances of intestinal microbiota occur in patients with IBS, and that such abnormalities may contribute to IBS symptoms. Studies in Scandinavian countries in the last ten years emphasize the role of probiotics in the modulation of intestinal microbiota, and as a consequence in the regulation of the motility and hypersensitivity of the digestive tract. Although results between studies are difficult to compare because of differences in study design, probiotic dose, strain, and duration of therapy, some studies show symptom improvement. Lactobacilli are found among the normal bacterial flora of the gastrointestinal tract, and Lactobacillus plantarum (Lp) is one of the species frequently isolated from the human mucosa, which is capable of surviving the low pH of the stomach and duodenum

  10. New therapeutic option for irritable bowel syndrome: Serum-derived bovine immunoglobulin

    PubMed Central

    Good, Larry; Rosario, Roxanne; Panas, Raymond

    2015-01-01

    Oral prescription medical foods have long been used in hospital settings but are also appropriate therapies for gastrointestinal disorders in outpatient medical practice. Oral serum-derived bovine immunoglobulin/protein isolate (SBI) has been shown in clinical studies to reduce loose stools and improve stool consistency as well as other symptoms (i.e., abdominal pain, bloating, and urgency) in patients with irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhea (IBS-D) and human immunodeficiency virus-associated enteropathy. This case series reports the outcomes of 14 IBS patients who received SBI as an addition to standard of care at an individual physician’s clinical practice. The patients: 2 IBS with constipation (IBS-C), 7 IBS-D, 2 mixed diarrhea and constipation IBS (IBS-M) and 3 undefined IBS (IBS-U; also described by some physicians as IBS-Bloating), ranged in age from 22-87 years. SBI (5 g or 10 g daily dose) was added to the patient’s current standard care and followed for several weeks to determine if symptoms were improved with the addition of SBI. Overall, 12 of the 14 patients indicated some level of improvement through direct questioning of the patients regarding changes from the prior visit. One IBS-Bloating patient had a resolution of symptoms and two patients (1 IBS-Bloating and 1 IBS-C) discontinued therapy because of insufficient relief. The 12 patients who continued on therapy reported an overall improvement in symptoms with better stool consistency, decreased frequency as well as reductions in abdominal pain, bloating, distention, and incontinence. In most cases, therapeutic effects of SBI were seen within the first four weeks of therapy with continued improvements at subsequent visits. SBI has a multifaceted mechanism of action and may help to manage IBS by providing a distinct protein source required to normalize bowel function, gastrointestinal microbiota, and nutritionally enhance tight junction protein expression between intestinal epithelial cells

  11. New therapeutic option for irritable bowel syndrome: serum-derived bovine immunoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Good, Larry; Rosario, Roxanne; Panas, Raymond

    2015-03-21

    Oral prescription medical foods have long been used in hospital settings but are also appropriate therapies for gastrointestinal disorders in outpatient medical practice. Oral serum-derived bovine immunoglobulin/protein isolate (SBI) has been shown in clinical studies to reduce loose stools and improve stool consistency as well as other symptoms (i.e., abdominal pain, bloating, and urgency) in patients with irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhea (IBS-D) and human immunodeficiency virus-associated enteropathy. This case series reports the outcomes of 14 IBS patients who received SBI as an addition to standard of care at an individual physician's clinical practice. The patients: 2 IBS with constipation (IBS-C), 7 IBS-D, 2 mixed diarrhea and constipation IBS (IBS-M) and 3 undefined IBS (IBS-U; also described by some physicians as IBS-Bloating), ranged in age from 22-87 years. SBI (5 g or 10 g daily dose) was added to the patient's current standard care and followed for several weeks to determine if symptoms were improved with the addition of SBI. Overall, 12 of the 14 patients indicated some level of improvement through direct questioning of the patients regarding changes from the prior visit. One IBS-Bloating patient had a resolution of symptoms and two patients (1 IBS-Bloating and 1 IBS-C) discontinued therapy because of insufficient relief. The 12 patients who continued on therapy reported an overall improvement in symptoms with better stool consistency, decreased frequency as well as reductions in abdominal pain, bloating, distention, and incontinence. In most cases, therapeutic effects of SBI were seen within the first four weeks of therapy with continued improvements at subsequent visits. SBI has a multifaceted mechanism of action and may help to manage IBS by providing a distinct protein source required to normalize bowel function, gastrointestinal microbiota, and nutritionally enhance tight junction protein expression between intestinal epithelial cells. SBI

  12. Management of irritable bowel syndrome: novel approaches to the pharmacology of gut motility.

    PubMed

    Scarpignato, C; Pelosini, I

    1999-03-01

    Although it is unclear to what extent irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) symptoms represent a normal perception of abnormal function or an abnormal perception of normal function, many believe that IBS constitutes the clinical expression of an underlying motility disorder, affecting primarily the mid- and lower gut. Indeed, transit and contractile abnormalities have been demonstrated with sophisticated techniques in a subset of patients with IBS. As a consequence, drugs affecting gastrointestinal (GI) motility have been widely employed with the aim of correcting the major IBS manifestations, ie, pain and altered bowel function. Unfortunately, no single drug has proven to be effective in treating IBS symptom complex. In addition, the use of some medications has often been associated with unpleasant side effects. Therefore, the search for a truly effective and safe drug to control motility disturbances in IBS continues. Several classes of drugs look promising and are under evaluation. Among the motor-inhibiting drugs, gut selective muscarinic antagonists (such as zamifenacin and darifenacin), neurokinin2 antagonists (such as MEN-10627 and MEN-11420), beta3-adrenoreceptor agonists (eg, SR-58611A) and GI-selective calcium channel blockers (eg, pinaverium bromide and octylonium) are able to decrease painful contractile activity in the gut (antispasmodic effect), without significantly affecting other body functions. Novel mechanisms to stimulate GI motility and transit include blockade of cholecystokinin (CCK)A receptors and stimulation of motilin receptors. Loxiglumide (and its dextroisomer, dexloxiglumide) is the only CCKA receptor antagonist that is being evaluated clinically. This drug accelerates gastric emptying and colonic transit, thereby increasing the number of bowel movements in patients with chronic constipation. It is also able to reduce visceral perception. Erythromycin and related 14-member macrolide compounds inhibit the binding of motilin to its receptors on

  13. Effect of fibre, antispasmodics, and peppermint oil in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Talley, Nicholas J; Spiegel, Brennan M R; Foxx-Orenstein, Amy E; Schiller, Lawrence; Quigley, Eamonn M M; Moayyedi, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Objective To determine the effect of fibre, antispasmodics, and peppermint oil in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials. Data sources Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane controlled trials register up to April 2008. Review methods Randomised controlled trials comparing fibre, antispasmodics, and peppermint oil with placebo or no treatment in adults with irritable bowel syndrome were eligible for inclusion. The minimum duration of therapy considered was one week, and studies had to report either a global assessment of cure or improvement in symptoms, or cure of or improvement in abdominal pain, after treatment. A random effects model was used to pool data on symptoms, and the effect of therapy compared with placebo or no treatment was reported as the relative risk (95% confidence interval) of symptoms persisting. Results 12 studies compared fibre with placebo or no treatment in 591 patients (relative risk of persistent symptoms 0.87, 95% confidence interval 0.76 to 1.00). This effect was limited to ispaghula (0.78, 0.63 to 0.96). Twenty two trials compared antispasmodics with placebo in 1778 patients (0.68, 0.57 to 0.81). Various antispasmodics were studied, but otilonium (four trials, 435 patients, relative risk of persistent symptoms 0.55, 0.31 to 0.97) and hyoscine (three trials, 426 patients, 0.63, 0.51 to 0.78) showed consistent evidence of efficacy. Four trials compared peppermint oil with placebo in 392 patients (0.43, 0.32 to 0.59). Conclusion Fibre, antispasmodics, and peppermint oil were all more effective than placebo in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome. PMID:19008265

  14. Motor effects of locally administered pinaverium bromide in the sigmoid tract of patients with irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Passaretti, S; Sorghi, M; Colombo, E; Mazzotti, G; Tittobello, A; Guslandi, M

    1989-01-01

    The effects of pinaverium bromide, a non-absorbable antispasmodic agent, administered locally, on sigmoid-rectal motility was investigated in 20 patients with irritable bowel syndrome. The influence of either pinaverium (10 subjects) or placebo (10 subjects) on a neostigmine-induced increase of sigmoid pressure was assessed and compared by means of computerized electromanometry. The drug was found to counteract significantly the motor effects of neostigmine, thus appearing to be an effective compound for the treatment of functional disorders of the colon. PMID:2744907

  15. Visceral pain perception in patients with irritable bowel syndrome and healthy volunteers is affected by the MRI scanner environment

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Reuben K; Van Oudenhove, Lukas; Li, Xinhua; Cao, Yang; Ho, Khek Yu

    2015-01-01

    Background The MRI scanner environment induces marked psychological effects, but specific effects on pain perception and processing are unknown and relevant to all brain imaging studies. Objectives and methods We performed visceral and somatic quantitative sensory and pain testing and studied endogenous pain modulation by heterotopic stimulation outside and inside the functional MRI scanner in 11 healthy controls and 13 patients with irritable bowel syndrome. Results Rectal pain intensity (VAS 0–100) during identical distension pressures increased from 39 (95% confidence interval: 35–42) outside the scanner to 53 (43–63) inside the scanner in irritable bowel syndrome, and from 42 (31–52) to 49 (39–58), respectively, in controls (ANOVA for scanner effect: p = 0.006, group effect: p = 0.92). The difference in rectal pain outside versus inside correlated significantly with stress (r = −0.76, p = 0.006), anxiety (r = −0.68, p = 0.02) and depression scores (r = −0.67, p = 0.02) in controls, but not in irritable bowel syndrome patients, who a priori had significantly higher stress and anxiety scores. ANOVA analysis showed trends for effect of the scanner environment and subject group on endogenous pain modulation (p = 0.09 and p = 0.1, respectively), but not on somatic pain (p > 0.3). Conclusion The scanner environment significantly increased visceral, but not somatic, pain perception in irritable bowel syndrome patients and healthy controls in a protocol specifically aimed at investigating visceral pain. Psychological factors, including anxiety and stress, are the likely underlying causes, whereas classic endogenous pain modulation pathways activated by heterotopic stimulation play a lesser role. These results are highly relevant to a wide range of imaging applications and need to be taken into account in future pain research. Further controlled studies are indicated to clarify these findings. PMID:26966533

  16. Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome is associated with Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Population-based Study.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chun-Hou; Lin, Herng-Ching; Huang, Chao-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to examine this association by comparing the risk of prior irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) between patients with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) and matched controls in Taiwan. Data were retrieved from the Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2005. This study included 4870 cases with CP/CPPS and 4870 age-matched controls. Conditional logistic regressions were conducted to examine associations of CP/CPPS with previously diagnosed IBS. We found that a total of 753 (7.7%) of the 9740 sampled patients had IBS prior to the index date; IBS was found in 497 (10.2%) cases and in 256 (5.3%) controls. Conditional logistic regression revealed a higher odds ratio (OR) of prior IBS (OR 2.05, 95% CI = 1.75-2.40) for cases than controls. Furthermore, after adjusting for the patients' monthly income, geographical location, urbanization level, and hypertension and coronary heart disease, the conditional logistic regression analysis indicated that cases were more likely than controls to have prior IBS (OR = 1.96, 95% CI = 1.67-2.29). Furthermore, we found that CP/CPPS was consistently and significantly associated with prior IBS regardless of age group. We concluded that the diagnosis of CP/CPPS was associated with previously diagnosed IBS. Urologists should be aware of the association between CP/CPPS and IBS when treating patients. PMID:27225866

  17. Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome is associated with Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Population-based Study

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chun-Hou; Lin, Herng-Ching; Huang, Chao-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to examine this association by comparing the risk of prior irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) between patients with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) and matched controls in Taiwan. Data were retrieved from the Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2005. This study included 4870 cases with CP/CPPS and 4870 age-matched controls. Conditional logistic regressions were conducted to examine associations of CP/CPPS with previously diagnosed IBS. We found that a total of 753 (7.7%) of the 9740 sampled patients had IBS prior to the index date; IBS was found in 497 (10.2%) cases and in 256 (5.3%) controls. Conditional logistic regression revealed a higher odds ratio (OR) of prior IBS (OR 2.05, 95% CI = 1.75–2.40) for cases than controls. Furthermore, after adjusting for the patients’ monthly income, geographical location, urbanization level, and hypertension and coronary heart disease, the conditional logistic regression analysis indicated that cases were more likely than controls to have prior IBS (OR = 1.96, 95% CI = 1.67–2.29). Furthermore, we found that CP/CPPS was consistently and significantly associated with prior IBS regardless of age group. We concluded that the diagnosis of CP/CPPS was associated with previously diagnosed IBS. Urologists should be aware of the association between CP/CPPS and IBS when treating patients. PMID:27225866

  18. Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone Receptor 2 Gene Variants in Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Komuro, Hazuki; Sato, Naoko; Sasaki, Ayaka; Suzuki, Naoki; Kano, Michiko; Tanaka, Yukari; Yamaguchi-Kabata, Yumi; Kanazawa, Motoyori; Warita, Hitoshi; Aoki, Masashi; Fukudo, Shin

    2016-01-01

    Background Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) plays an important role in the pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and regulates the stress response through two CRH receptors (R1 and R2). Previously, we reported that a CRHR1 gene polymorphism (rs110402, rs242924, and rs7209436) and haplotypes were associated with IBS. However, the association between the CRHR2 gene and IBS was not investigated. We tested the hypothesis that genetic polymorphisms and haplotypes of CRHR2 are associated with IBS pathophysiology and negative emotion in IBS patients. Methods A total of 142 IBS patients and 142 healthy controls participated in this study. Seven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the CRHR2 gene (rs4722999, rs3779250, rs2240403, rs2267710, rs2190242, rs2284217, and rs2284220) were genotyped. Subjects' psychological states were evaluated using the Perceived-Stress Scale, the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, and the Self-Rating Depression Scale. Results We found that rs4722999 and rs3779250, located in intronic region, were associated with IBS in terms of genotype frequency (rs4722999: P = 0.037; rs3779250: P = 0.017) and that the distribution of the major allele was significantly different between patients and controls. There was a significant group effect (controls vs. IBS), and a CRHR2 genotype effect was observed for three psychological scores, but the interaction was not significant. We found a haplotype of four SNPs (rs4722999, rs3779250, rs2240403, and rs2267710) and two SNPs (rs2284217 and rs2284220) in strong linkage disequilibrium (D′ > 0.90). We also found that haplotypes of the CRHR2 gene were significantly different between IBS patients and controls and that they were associated with negative emotion. Conclusion Our findings support the hypothesis that genetic polymorphisms and haplotypes of CRHR2 are related to IBS. In addition, we found associations between CRHR2 genotypes and haplotypes and negative emotion in IBS patients and controls

  19. Moxibustion in the management of irritable bowel syndrome: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common functional gastrointestinal disorder. Many patients suffer from IBS that can be difficult to treat, thus complementary therapies which may be effective and have a lower likelihood of adverse effects are being sought. This systematic review and meta-analysis aimed at critically evaluating the current evidence on moxibustion for improving global symptoms of IBS. Methods We searched Medline, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, AMED, CINAHL, and CNKI databases for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of moxibustion comparing with sham moxibustion, pharmacological medications, and other active treatments in patients with IBS. Trials should report global symptom improvement as an outcome measure. Risk of bias for each RCT was assessed according to criteria by the Cochrane Collaboration, and the dichotomous data were pooled according to the control intervention to obtain a risk ratio (RR) of global symptom improvement after moxibustion, with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results A total of 20 RCTs were eligible for inclusion (n = 1625). The risk of bias was generally high. Compared with pharmacological medications, moxibustion significantly alleviated overall IBS symptoms but there was a moderate inconsistency among studies (7 RCTs, RR 1.33, 95% CI [1.15, 1.55], I2 = 46%). Moxibustion combined with acupuncture was more effective than pharmacological therapy but a moderate inconsistency among studies was found (4 RCTs, RR 1.24, 95% CI [1.09, 1.41], I2 = 36%). When moxibustion was added to pharmacological medications or herbal medicine, no additive benefit of moxibustion was shown compared with pharmacological medications or herbal medicine alone. One small sham-controlled trial found no difference between moxibustion and sham control in symptom severity (mean difference 0.35, 95% CI [−0.77, 1.47]). Moxibustion appears to be associated with few adverse events but the evidence is

  20. Electroacupuncture for patients with diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome or functional diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hui; Li, Ying; Zhang, Wei; Zeng, Fang; Zhou, Si-Yuan; Zheng, Hua-Bin; Zhu, Wen-Zeng; Jing, Xiang-Hong; Rong, Pei-Jing; Tang, Chun-Zhi; Wang, Fu-Chun; Liu, Zhi-Bin; Wang, Shi-Jun; Zhou, Mei-Qi; Liu, Zhi-Shun; Zhu, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D) and functional diarrhea (FD) are highly prevalent, and the effectiveness of acupuncture for managing IBS-D and FD is still unknown. The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of electroacupuncture with loperamide. It was a prospective, randomized, parallel group controlled trial. A total of 448 participants were randomly assigned to He electroacupuncture group (n = 113), Shu-Mu electroacupuncture group (n = 111), He-Shu-Mu electroacupuncture group (n = 112), or loperamide group (n = 112). Participants in the 3 acupuncture groups received 16 sessions of electroacupuncture during a 4-week treatment phase, whereas participants in the loperamide group received oral loperamide 2 mg thrice daily. The primary outcome was the change from baseline in stool frequency at the end of the 4-weeks treatment. The secondary outcomes were the Bristol scale, the MOS 36-item short form health survey (SF-36), the weekly average number of days with normal defecations and the proportion of adverse events. Stool frequency was significantly reduced at the end of the 4-week treatment in the 4 groups (mean change from baseline, 5.35 times/week). No significant difference was found between the 3 electroacupuncture groups and the loperamide group in the primary outcome (He vs. loperamide group [mean difference 0.6, 95% CI, –1.2 to 2.4]; Shu-Mu vs. loperamide group [0.4, 95% CI, –1.4 to 2.3]; He-Shu-Mu vs. loperamide group [0.0, 95% CI, –1.8 to 1.8]). Both electroacupuncture and loperamide significantly improved the mean score of Bristol scale and increased the weekly average number of days with normal defecations and the mean scores of SF-36; they were equivalent in these outcomes. However, the participants in electroacupuncture groups did not report fewer adverse events than those in the loperamide group. Similar results were found in a subgroup analysis of separating patients with IBS-D and FD patients

  1. Irritable Bowel Syndrome Increases the Risk of Epilepsy: A Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chien-Hua; Lin, Cheng-Li; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-09-01

    An abnormal interaction in the brain-gut axis is regarded as the cause of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). We attempted to determine the association between IBS and subsequent development of epilepsy.A total of 32,122 patients diagnosed with IBS between 2000 and 2011 were identified from the Longitudinal Health Insurance Database as the study cohort, and 63,295 controls were randomly selected from the insurants without IBS and frequency-matched according to age, sex, and index year as the comparison cohort. Both cohorts were followed up until the end of 2011 to measure the incidence of epilepsy. We analyzed the risks of epilepsy using Cox proportional hazards regression models.The IBS patients had greater cumulative incidence of epilepsy than the cohort without IBS (log-rank test, P < 0.001 and 2.54 versus 1.86 per 1000 person-years). The IBS cohort had a higher risk of epilepsy after adjusting for age, sex, diabetes, hypertension, stroke, coronary artery disease, head injury, depression, systemic lupus erythematosus, brain tumor, and antidepressants usage (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR]: 1.30, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.17-1.45). Stratified by the presence of other risk factors, the relative risk was also greater for patients with (aHR: 1.25, 95% CI: 1.10-1.41) or without other risk factors (aHR: 1.68, 95% CI: 1.35-2.10) in the IBS cohort than for those in the non-IBS cohort. The age-specific relative risk of epilepsy in the IBS cohort was greater than that in the non-IBS cohort for both 35 to 49 age group and 50 to 64 age group (age ≤ 34, aHR:1.31, 95% CI: 0.93-1.85; age 35-49, aHR: 1.43, 95% CI: 1.12-1.83; age 50-64, aHR: 1.56, 95% CI: 1.27-1.91). However, there was no difference between patients > 65 years with IBS and those without IBS (aHR: 1.11, 95% CI: 0.94-1.31).This population-based cohort study revealed that IBS increases the risk of developing epilepsy. However, IBS may be less influential than other risk factors. Further study is necessary to

  2. Rifaximin for Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Zhu, Wenhua; Liu, Wenhui; Wu, Yingqiao; Wu, Benyan

    2016-01-01

    The current treatments for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are suboptimal. The findings of previous studies of rifaximin treatment for IBS may have differed due to variations in study design. Our study aimed to determine the therapeutic and adverse effects of rifaximin treatment for IBS based on a meta-analysis of published randomized controlled trials (RCTs). We searched the MEDLINE, EMBASE, EBSCO, Springer, Ovid, and Cochrane Library databases for RCTs investigating the effects of rifaximin on IBS. Data from each selected RCT was evaluated individually based on an intention-to-treat analysis, and a meta-analysis was performed in which the odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of clinical outcomes and adverse events were calculated using fixed-effects models. Four eligible studies were identified. Overall relief of IBS symptoms in the rifaximin groups was greater than that in the placebo groups at the ends of both the treatment and follow-up periods (OR = 1.19; 95% CI: 1.08-1.32 and OR = 1.36; 95% CI: 1.18-1.58, respectively, P < 0.05 for both). Significant relief of abdominal distention was observed at the follow-up endpoint (OR = 1.69; 95% Cl: 1.27-2.23; P < 0.05), but not at the treatment endpoint (OR = 1.19; 95% CI: 0.96-1.49; P > 0.05). Abdominal pain (OR = 1.01; 95% CI: 0.98-1.03; P > 0.05), nausea (OR = 1.00; 95% CI: 0.98-1.02; P > 0.05), vomiting (OR: 0.99; 95% CI: 0.98-1.01; P > 0.05), and headache (OR = 1.01; 95% CI: 0.98-1.03; P > 0.05) did not differ significantly between the rifaximin and placebo groups. In the RCTs selected, our meta-analysis showed that the efficacy of rifaximin for the resolution of overall IBS symptoms was greater than that of the placebos, and that rifaximin was well-tolerated. The course of relief from abdominal distention in IBS patients treated with rifaximin may be delayed in some patients, compared with that of overall IBS symptom relief. PMID:26825893

  3. Perceived risk as a barrier to appropriate diagnosis of irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Eunmi; Son, Ki Young; Shin, Dong Wook; Han, Min Kyu; Lee, Hyejin; An, Ah Reum; Kim, Eun Ho; Cho, BeLong

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate perceived risk, diagnostic testing, and acceptance of a diagnosis of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) among the Korean laypersons. METHODS: We designed a conceptual framework to evaluate the health-seeking behavior of subjects based on a knowledge, attitude, and practice model. We developed a vignette-based questionnaire about IBS based on a literature review and focused group interviews. The vignette described a 40-year-old woman who meets the Rome III criteria for IBS without red-flag signs. It was followed by questions about demographic characteristics, health behaviors, IBS symptoms, risk perception, perceived need for diagnostic tests, and acceptance of a positive diagnosis of IBS. We planned a nationwide survey targeting laypersons without IBS and between the ages of 20 and 69 years. Survey participants were selected by quota sampling stratified by gender, age, and nationwide location. A multivariate logistic model was constructed based on literature reviews, univariate analysis, and a stepwise selection method to investigate correlations between the perceived risk, need for diagnostic tests, and acceptance of a positive diagnosis. RESULTS: Of 2354 eligible households, 1000 subjects completed the survey and 983 subjects were analyzed, excluding those who met symptom criteria for IBS. After reading the IBS vignette, the majority of subjects (86.8%) responded that the patient was at increased risk of severe disease. The most frequent concern was colon cancer (59.8%), followed by surgical condition (51.5%). Most subjects responded the patient needs diagnostic tests (97.2%). Colonoscopy was the most commonly required test (79.5%). Less than half of the respondents requested a stool examination (45.0%), blood test (40.7%), abdominal ultrasound (36.0%), or computed tomography (20.2%). The subjects who felt increased risk were more likely to see a need for colonoscopy [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 2.10, 95%CI: 1.38-3.18]. When asked about the positive

  4. Serological Screening for Celiac Disease in Adult Chinese Patients With Diarrhea Predominant Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongling; Zhou, Guoying; Luo, Linjie; Crusius, J Bart A; Yuan, Anlong; Kou, Jiguang; Yang, Guifang; Wang, Min; Wu, Jing; von Blomberg, B Mary E; Morré, Servaas A; Peña, A Salvador; Xia, Bing

    2015-10-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is common in Caucasians, but thought to be rare in Asians. Our aim was to determine the prevalence of CD in Chinese patients with chronic diarrhea predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D).From July 2010 to August 2012, 395 adult patients with IBS-D and 363 age and sex-matched healthy controls were recruited in Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University and Xiaogan Central Hospital in Hubei province, central China. Patients with IBS-D were diagnosed according to the Rome III criteria. Serum Immunoglobulin (IgA/IgG) anti-human tissue transglutaminase (anti-htTG)-deamidated gliadin peptide (DGP) antibodies were measured in a single ELISA (QUANTA Lite h-tTG/DGP Screen). Upper endoscopy with duodenal biopsies and HLA-DQA1 and HLA-DQB1 genotyping were performed in seropositive subjects and a gluten-free diet was prescribed.Seven IBS-D patients (7/395, 1.77%) and 2 healthy controls (2/363, 0.55%), were positive for anti-htTG/DGP antibodies. Of these 9 cases, 1 was lost to follow-up, 3 were suspected to have CD and 5 were eventually diagnosed as CD with intestinal histological lesions classified as Marsh Type II in 2 and Type III in 3. Of these 5 diagnosed CD patients, 4 (4/395, 1.01%) were from the IBS-D group and 1 (1/363, 0.28%) from the healthy control had asymptomatic CD. Two Type III CD patients with relatively high titers in the serologic assay were homozygous and heterozygous for haplotype HLA-DQA1*03-DQB1*03:03 (HLA-DQ9.3), respectively.In the present study, CD was present in 1.01% of patients with IBS-D and in 0.28% of the control group. We like to suggest that the haplotype HLA-DQA1*03-DQB1*03:03 (HLA-DQ9.3), which is common in Chinese, is a new susceptibility factor for CD in China. Larger screening and genetic studies are needed in the Chinese population of different regions. PMID:26496305

  5. The risk of ischaemic colitis in irritable bowel syndrome patients treated with serotonergic therapies.

    PubMed

    Lewis, James H

    2011-07-01

    Ischaemic colitis (IC) is the most common form of ischaemic injury to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. IC typically presents with the sudden onset of lower abdominal pain, cramping and rectal bleeding, and is usually self-limited with low morbidity, although it may cause gangrenous or fulminant colitis, especially when the right colon is involved. Multiple medical conditions, as well as several pharmacological agents, are associated with IC, including irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and drugs used for its treatment that act on gut serotonin 5-HT receptors. These include the selective 5-HT(3) receptor antagonist alosetron, currently approved for the treatment of severe diarrhoea-predominant IBS in women who fail to respond to conventional treatment, and cilansetron, another 5-HT(3) receptor antagonist that is no longer in clinical development. In addition, the 5-HT(4) receptor partial agonist tegaserod, which was approved for the treatment of constipation-predominant IBS in women, was associated with IC in the postmarketing setting, as was renzapride, a 5-HT(4) agonist/5-HT(3) antagonist. Although several hypotheses have been proposed, the pathophysiological basis for development of IC with 5-HT(3) receptor antagonists or 5-HT(4) receptor agonists remains unknown. Of interest, several population-based studies demonstrated that a diagnosis of IBS (independent of serotonergic therapies) increases the risk of developing IC 2- to 4-fold. As a result, IBS patients with the acute onset of abdominal pain, tenderness, diarrhoea or lower intestinal bleeding, especially those with predisposing conditions or medications, should be evaluated promptly for IC. The management of IC remains supportive; most cases of non-gangrenous IC, as seen in the alosetron and tegaserod databases, have been transient and have resolved spontaneously without complications or death. Despite the small number of deaths associated with alosetron in patients with complications of constipation and

  6. Dietary guidance normalizes large intestinal endocrine cell densities in patients with irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mazzawi, T; Hausken, T; Gundersen, D; El-Salhy, M

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objectives: To determine the large intestinal endocrine cell types affected following dietary guidance in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Subjects/Methods: The study included 13 IBS patients and 13 control subjects. The patients received three sessions of individualized dietary guidance. Both the control subjects and the patients were scheduled for colonoscopies at baseline and again for the patients at 3–9 months after dietary guidance. Biopsy samples were taken from the colon and rectum and were immunostained for all types of large intestinal endocrine cells. The endocrine cells were quantified using computerized image analysis. Results: The daily total consumption (mean±s.e.m. values) of fruits and vegetables rich in FODMAPs (fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols) decreased significantly from 16.2±5.3 g before receiving dietary guidance to 9.2±3.2 g after receiving dietary guidance (P=0.02). In the total colon, the densities of serotonin cells were 46.8±8.9, 10.5±2.1 and 22.6±3.2 cells/mm2 in control subjects and in IBS patients before and after receiving dietary guidance, respectively (P=0.007); the corresponding densities of peptide YY cells were 11.6±1.8, 10.8±1.7 and 16.8±2.1 cells/mm2, respectively (P=0.06). The cell densities for both serotonin and peptide YY did not change significantly in the rectum. The densities of somatostatin cells in the rectum were 13.5±3.0, 13.2±3.0, and 22.3±3.2 cells/mm2 for control subjects and for IBS patients before and after receiving dietary guidance, respectively (P=0.01). Conclusions: The densities of the large intestinal endocrine cells tend to normalize following dietary guidance that may have contributed to the improvement of the patients with IBS symptoms. PMID:26603880

  7. Serological Screening for Celiac Disease in Adult Chinese Patients With Diarrhea Predominant Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongling; Zhou, Guoying; Luo, Linjie; Crusius, J. Bart A.; Yuan, Anlong; Kou, Jiguang; Yang, Guifang; Wang, Min; Wu, Jing; von Blomberg, B. Mary E.; Morré, Servaas A.; Peña, A. Salvador; Xia, Bing

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Celiac disease (CD) is common in Caucasians, but thought to be rare in Asians. Our aim was to determine the prevalence of CD in Chinese patients with chronic diarrhea predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D). From July 2010 to August 2012, 395 adult patients with IBS-D and 363 age and sex-matched healthy controls were recruited in Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University and Xiaogan Central Hospital in Hubei province, central China. Patients with IBS-D were diagnosed according to the Rome III criteria. Serum Immunoglobulin (IgA/IgG) anti-human tissue transglutaminase (anti-htTG)-deamidated gliadin peptide (DGP) antibodies were measured in a single ELISA (QUANTA Lite h-tTG/DGP Screen). Upper endoscopy with duodenal biopsies and HLA-DQA1 and HLA-DQB1 genotyping were performed in seropositive subjects and a gluten-free diet was prescribed. Seven IBS-D patients (7/395, 1.77%) and 2 healthy controls (2/363, 0.55%), were positive for anti-htTG/DGP antibodies. Of these 9 cases, 1 was lost to follow-up, 3 were suspected to have CD and 5 were eventually diagnosed as CD with intestinal histological lesions classified as Marsh Type II in 2 and Type III in 3. Of these 5 diagnosed CD patients, 4 (4/395, 1.01%) were from the IBS-D group and 1 (1/363, 0.28%) from the healthy control had asymptomatic CD. Two Type III CD patients with relatively high titers in the serologic assay were homozygous and heterozygous for haplotype HLA-DQA1∗03-DQB1∗03:03 (HLA-DQ9.3), respectively. In the present study, CD was present in 1.01% of patients with IBS-D and in 0.28% of the control group. We like to suggest that the haplotype HLA-DQA1∗03-DQB1∗03:03 (HLA-DQ9.3), which is common in Chinese, is a new susceptibility factor for CD in China. Larger screening and genetic studies are needed in the Chinese population of different regions. PMID:26496305

  8. Effects of β-(1,3-1,6)-D-glucan on irritable bowel syndrome-related colonic hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Asano, Teita; Tanaka, Ken-ichiro; Suemasu, Shintaro; Ishihara, Tomoaki; Tahara, Kayoko; Suzuki, Toshio; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Fukudo, Shin; Mizushima, Tohru

    2012-04-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a gastrointestinal disorder characterized by chronic abdominal pain associated with altered bowel habits. Since the prevalence of IBS is very high and thus, involves elevated health-care costs, treatment of this condition by methods other than prescribed medicines could be beneficial. β-(1,3)-D-glucan with β-(1,6) branches (β-glucan) has been used as a nutritional supplement for many years. In this study, we examined the effect of β-glucan on fecal pellet output and visceral pain response in animal models of IBS. Oral administration of β-glucan suppressed the restraint stress- or drug-induced fecal pellet output. β-Glucan also suppressed the visceral pain response to colorectal distension. These results suggest that β-glucan could be beneficial for the treatment and prevention of IBS. PMID:22430139

  9. Ehealth monitoring in irritable bowel syndrome patients treated with low fermentable oligo-, di-, mono-saccharides and polyols diet.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Natalia; Vegh, Zsuzsanna; Burisch, Johan; Jensen, Lisbeth; Ankersen, Dorit Vedel; Felding, Maria; Andersen, Nynne Nyboe; Munkholm, Pia

    2014-06-01

    In the present study we report on changes in irritable bowel syndrome-severity scoring system (IBS-SSS) and irritable bowel syndrome-quality of life (IBS-QoL) in 19 IBS patients, aged 18 to 74 years (F/M: 14/5), during 12 wk registering their symptoms on the web-application (www.ibs.constant-care.dk). During a control period of the first 6-wk patients were asked to register their IBS-SSS and IBS-QoL on the web-application weekly without receiving any intervention. Thereafter, low fermentable oligo-, di-, mono-saccharides and polyols (FODMAP) diet (LFD) was introduced for the next 6 wk while continuing the registration. Though a small sample size a significant improvement in disease activity (IBS-SSS) was observed during both the control period, median: 278 (range: 122-377), P = 0.02, and subsequently during the LFD period, median: 151 (range: 29-334), P < 0.01. The IBS-QoL solely changed significantly during the LFD period, median: 67 (37-120), P < 0.01. The significant reduction in disease activity during the control period shows a positive effect of the web-application on IBS symptoms when presented as a "traffic light". However adding the diet reduced IBS-SSS to < 150, inactive to mild symptoms. In the future results from larger scale trials are awaited. PMID:24914395

  10. Ehealth monitoring in irritable bowel syndrome patients treated with low fermentable oligo-, di-, mono-saccharides and polyols diet

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Natalia; Vegh, Zsuzsanna; Burisch, Johan; Jensen, Lisbeth; Ankersen, Dorit Vedel; Felding, Maria; Andersen, Nynne Nyboe; Munkholm, Pia

    2014-01-01

    In the present study we report on changes in irritable bowel syndrome-severity scoring system (IBS-SSS) and irritable bowel syndrome-quality of life (IBS-QoL) in 19 IBS patients, aged 18 to 74 years (F/M: 14/5), during 12 wk registering their symptoms on the web-application (www.ibs.constant-care.dk). During a control period of the first 6-wk patients were asked to register their IBS-SSS and IBS-QoL on the web-application weekly without receiving any intervention. Thereafter, low fermentable oligo-, di-, mono-saccharides and polyols (FODMAP) diet (LFD) was introduced for the next 6 wk while continuing the registration. Though a small sample size a significant improvement in disease activity (IBS-SSS) was observed during both the control period, median: 278 (range: 122-377), P = 0.02, and subsequently during the LFD period, median: 151 (range: 29-334), P < 0.01. The IBS-QoL solely changed significantly during the LFD period, median: 67 (37-120), P < 0.01. The significant reduction in disease activity during the control period shows a positive effect of the web-application on IBS symptoms when presented as a “traffic light”. However adding the diet reduced IBS-SSS to < 150, inactive to mild symptoms. In the future results from larger scale trials are awaited. PMID:24914395

  11. Acupuncture for irritable bowel syndrome: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Manheimer, Eric; Wieland, L. Susan; Cheng, Ke; Li, Shih Min; Shen, Xueyong; Berman, Brian M.; Lao, Lixing

    2013-01-01

    Objective Evidence-based treatment guidelines have been unable to provide evidence-based guidance on the effects of acupuncture for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) because the only previous systematic review included only small, heterogeneous and methodologically unsound trials. We conducted a new systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to estimate the effects of acupuncture for treating IBS. Methods MEDLINE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, EMBASE, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health, and the Chinese databases Sino-Med, CNKI, and VIP were searched through November 2011. Eligible RCTs compared acupuncture with sham acupuncture, other active treatments, or no (specific) treatment, and evaluated acupuncture as an adjuvant to another treatment. Our outcomes were overall IBS symptom severity and health-related quality of life. Dichotomous data were pooled to provide a relative risk (RR) of substantial improvement after treatment, and continuous data were pooled to provide a standardized mean difference (SMD) in post-treatment scores between groups. Results Seventeen RCTs (N=1806) were included. We found no evidence of an improvement with acupuncture relative to sham acupuncture on symptom severity (SMD = −0.11, 95% confidence interval: −0.35 to 0.13; 4 RCTs) or quality of life (SMD = −0.03, −0.27 to 0.22; 3 RCTs). Because of the homogeneity of the results of the sham-controlled trials, results were unaffected by restriction to the 4 sham-controlled RCTs that used adequate randomization, blinding, and had few withdrawals/drop-outs. Among RCTs that did not use a placebo control, acupuncture was more effective than pharmacological therapy (RR of symptom improvement=1.28, 1.12 to 1.45; 5 RCTs) and no (specific) treatment (RR = 2.11, 1.18 to 3.79; 2 RCTs). There was no difference between acupuncture and Bifidobacterium (RR = 1.07, 0.90 to 1.27; 2 RCTs) or between acupuncture and psychotherapy (RR=1.05, 0

  12. Update on the Management of Diarrhea-Predominant Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Focus on Rifaximin and Eluxadoline.

    PubMed

    Rivkin, Anastasia; Rybalov, Sergey

    2016-03-01

    Diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D) is one of the most common diagnoses made by gastroenterologists. Current pharmacologic treatments for IBS-D include fiber supplements, antidiarrheal over-the-counter medications, probiotics, antispasmodics, antidepressants, and a 5-hydroxytryptophan 3 receptor antagonist. All of these options have limited efficacy in managing IBS-D. Rifaximin, a nonabsorbable antibiotic, has been evaluated in patients with IBS-D. In two randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase III trials evaluating rifaximin 550 mg by mouth 3 times/day for 14 days, the primary efficacy end point was achieved by 9% more patients randomized to the rifaximin group compared with placebo (40.7% vs 31.7%, p<0.001, number needed to treat ~11). The primary efficacy end point was defined as the proportion of patients having adequate relief of global IBS symptoms for at least 2 of the 4 weeks during the primary follow-up period (weeks 3-6). In the phase III trial examining the efficacy and safety of repeated courses of rifaximin in patients who responded to the initial 2-week course, rifaximin given for up to two additional courses provided a statistically significant incremental benefit (33% vs 25%, p=0.02). Eluxadoline is a gut-targeting μ and κ opioid receptor agonist and a δ opioid receptor antagonist. The dual mechanism of eluxadoline may explain the antidiarrheal and abdominal pain-modulating properties and lack of profound constipation. In two identically designed randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase III studies, 10.3% more patients in an eluxadoline 100 mg by mouth twice/day group met the primary efficacy end point during the follow-up 1-12 week period compared with placebo (p<0.001). The primary efficacy end point was a composite response, defined as improvement in worst abdominal pain and stool consistency at the same time on most (50% or more) days during the follow-up period. This review evaluates evidence for the

  13. Randomised clinical trial: Gut microbiome biomarkers are associated with clinical response to a low FODMAP diet in children with the irritable bowel syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A low fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols (FODMAP) diet can ameliorate symptoms in adult irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) within 48 h. To determine the efficacy of a low FODMAP diet in childhood IBS and whether gut microbial composition and/or metabolic capacity ar...

  14. Pain symptoms and stooling patterns do not drive diagnostic costs for children with functional abdominal pain and irritable bowel syndrome in primary or tertiary care

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objectives of this study were to (1) compare the cost of medical evaluation for children with functional abdominal pain or irritable bowel syndrome brought to a pediatric gastroenterologist versus children who remained in the care of their pediatrician, (2) compare symptom characteristics for th...

  15. The Irritable Bowel Syndrome Outcome Study (IBSOS): Rationale and design of a randomized, placebo-controlled trial with 12 month follow up of self- versus clinician-administered CBT for moderate to severe irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lackner, Jeffrey M.; Keefer, Laurie; Jaccard, James; Firth, Rebecca; Brenner, Darren; Bratten, Jason; Dunlap, Laura J.; Byroads, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome is a common, oftentimes disabling, gastrointestinal disorder whose full range of symptoms has no satisfactory medical or dietary treatment. One of the few empirically validated treatments includes a specific psychological therapy called cognitive behavior therapy which, if available, is typically administered over several months by trained practitioners in tertiary care settings. There is an urgent need to develop more efficient versions of CBT that require minimal professional assistance but retain the efficacy profile of clinic based CBT. The Irritable Bowel Syndrome Outcome Study (IBSOS) is a multicenter, placebo-controlled randomized trial to evaluate whether a self-administered version of CBT is, at least as efficacious as standard CBT and more efficacious than an attention control in reducing core GI symptoms of IBS and its burden (e.g. distress, quality of life impairment, etc) in moderately to severely affected IBS patients. Additional goals are to assess, at quarterly intervals, the durability of treatment response over a 12 month period; to identify clinically useful patient characteristics associated with outcome as a way of gaining an understanding of subgroups of participants for whom CBT is most beneficial; to identify theory-based change mechanisms (active ingredients) that explain how and why CBT works; and evaluate the economic costs and benefits of CBT. Between August 2010 when IBSOS began recruiting subjects and February 2012, the IBSOS randomized 171 of 480 patients. Findings have the potential to improve the health of IBS patients, reduce its social and economic costs, conserve scarce health care resources, and inform evidence-based practice guidelines. PMID:22846389

  16. The Irritable Bowel Syndrome Outcome Study (IBSOS): rationale and design of a randomized, placebo-controlled trial with 12 month follow up of self- versus clinician-administered CBT for moderate to severe irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lackner, Jeffrey M; Keefer, Laurie; Jaccard, James; Firth, Rebecca; Brenner, Darren; Bratten, Jason; Dunlap, Laura J; Ma, Changxing; Byroads, Mark

    2012-11-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome is a common, oftentimes disabling, gastrointestinal disorder whose full range of symptoms has no satisfactory medical or dietary treatment. One of the few empirically validated treatments includes a specific psychological therapy called cognitive behavior therapy which, if available, is typically administered over several months by trained practitioners in tertiary care settings. There is an urgent need to develop more efficient versions of CBT that require minimal professional assistance but retain the efficacy profile of clinic based CBT. The Irritable Bowel Syndrome Outcome Study (IBSOS) is a multicenter, placebo-controlled randomized trial to evaluate whether a self-administered version of CBT is, at least as efficacious as standard CBT and more efficacious than an attention control in reducing core GI symptoms of IBS and its burden (e.g. distress, quality of life impairment, etc.) in moderately to severely affected IBS patients. Additional goals are to assess, at quarterly intervals, the durability of treatment response over a 12 month period; to identify clinically useful patient characteristics associated with outcome as a way of gaining an understanding of subgroups of participants for whom CBT is most beneficial; to identify theory-based change mechanisms (active ingredients) that explain how and why CBT works; and evaluate the economic costs and benefits of CBT. Between August 2010 when IBSOS began recruiting subjects and February 2012, the IBSOS randomized 171 of 480 patients. Findings have the potential to improve the health of IBS patients, reduce its social and economic costs, conserve scarce health care resources, and inform evidence-based practice guidelines. PMID:22846389

  17. Rifaximin in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome: is there a high risk for development of antimicrobial resistance?

    PubMed

    Farrell, David J

    2013-03-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), a chronic, nonfatal illness is commonly encountered in clinical practice; however, treatment options are limited and often ineffectual. Despite this, there is increasing evidence that bacterial overgrowth in the bowel (dysbiosis) may be an etiological factor in IBS. This has lead to studies in which the antibiotic agent rifaximin has been used to reduce the microbial burden in the bowel, to some extent alleviating the symptoms of IBS. Rifaximin is a member of the rifamycin class of antibiotics, which when administered orally has the distinctions of being gut specific coupled with poor systemic absorption, characteristics that are suggested to limit the development of bacterial resistance. The rifamycins are currently used to treat serious human diseases including tuberculosis, meningococcal disease, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Clostridium difficile infections. The use of rifamycins in the treatment of these diseases is associated with the development of antibiotic resistance over time. When considering the importance of the rifamycins in the treatment of serious human diseases, the large number of patients affected by IBS, and the lack of scientific evidence available on the development of antibiotic resistance to rifaximin over the long-term when used in the gut, it is advisable that the use of rifaximin as a therapy for IBS should be limited to single, acute, short-term treatment. PMID:23340064

  18. A Pilot Study of the Effect of Daikenchuto on Rectal Sensation in Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Andres; Camilleri, Michael; Linker-Nord, Sara; Busciglio, Irene; Iturrino, Johanna; Szarka, Lawrence A; Zinsmeister, Alan R

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Daikenchuto (TU 100), a botanical agent that modulates gastrointestinal nerves, is used in the treatment of motility and functional disorders. Our aim was to study the effects of TU-100 on rectal compliance and sensation in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Methods In 20 patients per treatment arm, we conducted a single-center, randomized, parallel-group, double-blind, placebo-controlled, single-dose pharmacodynamics study evaluating the effects of TU-100, 15 g (5 g t.i.d. [means 3 times a day]), for 14–16 consecutive days on rectal compliance and rectal sensation (thresholds and sensation ratings), all measured at baseline and on the last day of medication treatment. The primary endpoint was rectal sensation thresholds and sensation ratings in response to balloon distension at 32 mmHg. Secondary endpoints were rectal compliance, sensation thresholds, ratings and tone (fasting and postprandial), bowel pattern, abdominal pain (average and worst severity) and bloating scores, IBS quality of life and safety profile. Results Rectal sensation ratings post-treatment were significantly associated with baseline (pre-treatment) ratings and with level of anxiety or stress recorded at the time of the sensation testing. There were no effects of TU-100 treatment on rectal sensation ratings, sensation thresholds, rectal fasting or postprandial tone, rectal compliance, bowel function, abdominal pain or bloating scores, or IBS quality of life. Conclusions TU-100 did not significantly affect rectal compliance and sensation in patients with IBS in this study. PMID:26486374

  19. Microbial signatures in post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome – toward patient stratification for improved diagnostics and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Jalanka, Jonna; Salonen, Anne; Fuentes, Susana; de Vos, Willem M

    2015-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a multifactorial and heterogeneous disorder estimated to affect over 10% of the Western population. A subset of the patients reports the start of the disease after an episode of gastroenteritis. The alterations in the intestinal microbiota of the post-infectious IBS (PI-IBS) patients were recently investigated in a British cohort and shown to differentiate from the healthy controls and resemble that of diarrhea-predominant IBS (IBS-D) patients. The altered 27 genus-like groups created a microbial signature, which could be used to objectively stratify patients and healthy controls. In this addendum, we combine the microbiota data derived from the British cohort with that of a recently reported Swedish PI-IBS cohort. Remarkably, robust and reproducible microbiota signatures were observed in these PI-IBS patients. We discuss these results with attention on the emerging role of microbiota in the classification, development and treatment of PI-IBS. PMID:26512631

  20. Alteration of the intestinal microbiota as a cause of and a potential therapeutic option in irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    König, J; Brummer, R J

    2014-09-01

    The intestinal microbiota forms a complex ecosystem that is in close contact with its host and has an important impact on health. An increasing number of disorders are associated with disturbances in this ecosystem. Also patients suffering from irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) show an altered composition of their gut microbiota. IBS is a multifactorial chronic disorder characterised by various abdominal complaints and a worldwide prevalence of 10-20%. Even though its aetiology and pathophysiology are complex and not well understood, it is widely accepted that aberrations along the microbe-gut-brain axis are involved. In this review, it will be discussed how exogenous factors, e.g. antibiotics, can cause disbalance in the intestinal microbiota and thereby contribute to the development of IBS. In addition, several new IBS treatment options that aim at re-establishing a healthy, beneficial ecosystem will be described. These include antibiotics, probiotics, prebiotics and faecal transplantation. PMID:24583610

  1. Deep Brain Stimulation for Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Reduces Symptoms of Irritable Bowel Syndrome in a Single Patient

    PubMed Central

    Langguth, Berthold; Sturm, Kornelia; Wetter, Thomas C.; Lange, Max; Gabriels, Loes; Mayer, Emeran A.; Schlaier, Juergen

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a frequent gastrointestinal disorder that is difficult to treat. We describe findings from evaluation of a woman (55 years old) with obsessive compulsive disorder, which was treated with bilateral deep brain stimulation in the anterior limb of the internal capsule, and IBS. After the brain stimulation treatment she reported substantial relief of her IBS symptoms. This reduction depended on specific stimulation parameters, was reproducible over time, and was not directly associated with improvements in obsessive compulsive disorder symptoms. These observations indicate a specific effect of deep brain stimulation on IBS. This observation confirms involvement of specific brain structures in the pathophysiology of IBS and shows that symptoms can be reduced through modulation of neuronal activity in the central nervous system. Further studies of the effects of brain stimulation on IBS are required. PMID:25638586

  2. Ambulatory electrogastrography in patients with sclerodermia, delayed gastric emptying, dyspepsia, and irritable bowel syndrome. Is there any clinical relevance?

    PubMed

    Hocke, M; Seidel, T; Sprott, H; Oelzner, P; Eitner, K; Bosseckert, H

    2001-07-01

    Background: Changes in electrogastrographic parameters are described in patients with irritable bowel syndrome, sclerodermia, dyspepsia, and delayed gastric emptying in static measurements. However, no information is available about changes in ambulatory measurements. The objective of this study was to find parameters that discriminate between these diseases using cutaneous 24-h-electrogastrography. Methods: Cutaneous 24-h electrogastrography (EGG) measurements were taken from 20 patients with dyspepsia, 10 patients with systemic sclerosis (sclerodermia, SSc), 7 patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), 7 patients with delayed gastric emptying, and 10 healthy volunteers. Measurements were made using a DIGITRAPPER EGG (Synectics Medical Inc., Stockholm, Sweden) and the accompanying computerized data analysis package (ElectroGastroGram Version 6.30, Gastrosoft Inc., Synectics Medical Inc., Stockholm, Sweden). Frequency and power were compared pre- and postprandially, as well as during the entire day of measurement. Results: The 24-h measurements in healthy volunteers revealed 45.00%+/-12.12% normal values (2.4-3.7 cpm), 30.10%+/-7.15% bradygastric values (<2.4 cpm), and 24.20%+/-7.76% tachygastric values (>3.7 cpm). There was no significant change in frequency between rest and motion, but there was a significant increase in power (P<0.05). There was significantly more bradygastria in patients with dyspepsia periprandially as well as after 24 h (P<0.01) than in healthy volunteers. The mean power of patients with dyspepsia was significantly higher than that of patients with IBS (P<0.05). Conclusion: Cutaneous 24-h-EGG may be used as an additional means of differentiating between dyspepsia and IBS. PMID:11395301

  3. [Physicochemical and pharmacological characteristic and clinical efficacy of an anti-irritable bowel syndrome agent, polycarbophil calcium (Polyful)].

    PubMed

    Iwanaga, Yuji

    2002-03-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional bowel disorder characterized by abdominal pain or discomfort and abnormal defecation. Polycarbophil calcium, a water-absorbing polymer, is expected to improve stool consistency. Polycarbophil calcium decalcified under the acidic condition and then absorbed 70 times its weight of water under the neutral condition. In in situ experiments using rat jejunum and colon, polycarbophil decreased water absorption by the intestine without affecting water secretion. Polycarbophil inhibited prostaglandin E2-, 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan- and castor oil-induced diarrhea in mice or rats. Polycarbophil calcium also inhibited sennoside-induced diarrhea in dogs. Polycarbophil increased the weight of feces in naive or low-fiber diet feeding rats. In naive dogs, polycarbophil calcium increased stool frequency, stool weight and moisture. Polycarbophil was not absorbed from the gastrointestine, not metabolized and eliminated into feces in rats and dogs. Polycarbophil calcium did not affect the absorption of coadministered drugs in dogs. In the dose-finding clinical study for IBS, polycarbophil calcium was effective both in diarrhea and constipation. In the Phase III study, polycarbophil calcium was superior to trimebutine maleate in efficacy and equal in safety. Emesis/vomiting and thirst were observed, but episodes of diarrhea or constipation by excessive action were few. Polycarbophil calcium seems promising as an anti-IBS agent. PMID:11915521

  4. A review of the role of the gut microflora in irritable bowel syndrome and the effects of probiotics.

    PubMed

    Madden, J A J; Hunter, J O

    2002-09-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a multi-factorial gastrointestinal condition affecting 8-22 % of the population with a higher prevalence in women and accounting for 20-50 % of referrals to gastroenterology clinics. It is characterised by abdominal pain, excessive flatus, variable bowel habit and abdominal bloating for which there is no evidence of detectable organic disease. Suggested aetiologies include gut motility and psychological disorders, psychophysiological phenomena and colonic malfermentation. The faecal microflora in IBS has been shown to be abnormal with higher numbers of facultative organisms and low numbers of lactobacilli and bifidobacteria. Although there is no evidence of food allergy in IBS, food intolerance has been identified and exclusion diets are beneficial to many IBS patients. Food intolerance may be due to abnormal fermentation of food residues in the colon, as a result of disruption of the normal flora. The role of probiotics in IBS has not been clearly defined. Some studies have shown improvements in pain and flatulence in response to probiotic administration, whilst others have shown no symptomatic improvement. It is possible that the future role of probiotics in IBS will lie in prevention, rather than cure. PMID:12215182

  5. Nerve growth factor and diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D): a potential therapeutic target?*

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiao-juan; Liu, Liang; Yao, Shu-kun

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common functional gastrointestinal disorder characterized by recurrent abdominal pain or discomfort associated with abnormal bowel habits. Diarrhea-predominant IBS (IBS-D) is a major subtype of IBS, the predominant manifestations of which are abdominal pain and diarrhea. The pathogenesis of IBS-D remained unknown until recently. The effects of psychosocial stress, central hypervigilance, neuroendocrine abnormality, disturbed gastrointestinal motility, mucosal immune activation, intestinal barrier dysfunction, visceral hypersensitivity (VH), altered gut flora, and genetic susceptibility may be involved in its development. Recently, increased attention has been placed on the neural-immune-endocrine network mechanism in IBS-D, especially the role of various neuroendocrine mediators. As a member of the neurotrophin family, nerve growth factor (NGF) has diverse biological effects, and participates in the pathogenesis of many diseases. Basic studies have demonstrated that NGF is associated with inflammatory- and stress-related VH, as well as stress-related intestinal barrier dysfunction. The aim of this study is to summarize recent literature and discuss the role of NGF in the pathophysiology of IBS-D, especially in VH and intestinal barrier dysfunction, as well as its potential as a therapeutic target in IBS-D. PMID:26739521

  6. Benefit of Aloe vera and Matricaria recutita mixture in rat irritable bowel syndrome: Combination of antioxidant and spasmolytic effects.

    PubMed

    Asadi-Shahmirzadi, Azar; Mozaffari, Shilan; Sanei, Yara; Baeeri, Maryam; Hajiaghaee, Reza; Monsef-Esfahani, Hamid Reza; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2012-12-21

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the beneficial effects of a mixture of Aloe vera (AV) and Matricaria recutita (German chamomile, GC) in an experimental model of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). METHODS: IBS was induced by a 5-day restraint stress in rats including the groups of control (water), GC (300 mg/kg), loperamide (10 mg/kg), mixed AV and GC (50: 50 at doses of 150, 300 or 450 mg/kg assigned as Mix-150, Mix-300 and Mix-450, respectively) and the sham group which did not receive any restraint stress and was fed with saline. All medications were administered intragastrically by gavage for 7 days, 2 days as pre-treatment followed by 5 days during induction of IBS every day before restraining. RESULTS: The increased tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, and lipid peroxidation (LPO) in colonic cells in the control group were significantly decreased in the treatment groups. GC inhibited only small bowel transit while the AV/GC mixture delayed gastric emptying at the doses of 150 and 300 mg/kg. The AV/GC mixture also reduced colonic transit and small bowel transit at the dose of 150 mg/kg. CONCLUSIONS: The severity of stress-induced IBS was diminished by the AV/GC mixture at all doses used but not dose-dependently, via inhibiting colonic MPO activity and improving oxidative stress status. The effect of the mixture was more effective than GC alone. The present results support effectiveness of the AV and GC combination in IBS. PMID:23263994

  7. A closer look at mucosal inflammation in irritable bowel syndrome: sex- and gender-related disparities--quantity, quality, or both?

    PubMed

    Alonso, Carmen; Santos, Javier

    2009-02-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome remains a bothersome and frustrating disorder that imposes a heavy and growing socio-economic toll on its sufferers, two-thirds of whom are women, and on health care systems. The biomedical community must take a giant step forward into the discipline of women's gastrointestinal health. Efforts and accomplishments, such as the one reported in this month's issue by Cremon et al., are certainly welcome. PMID:19174802

  8. Prevalence of gastrointestinal symptoms six months after bacterial gastroenteritis and risk factors for development of the irritable bowel syndrome: postal survey of patients.

    PubMed Central

    Neal, K. R.; Hebden, J.; Spiller, R.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To measure the prevalence of gastrointestinal symptoms six months after bacterial gastroenteritis and determine risk factors and associations with postdysenteric symptoms. DESIGN: Postal questionnaire. SETTING: Nottingham Health Authority. SUBJECTS: 544 people with microbiologically confirmed bacterial gastroenteritis between July 1994 and December 1994. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Prevalence of gastrointestinal symptoms and relative risks for development of the irritable bowel syndrome and self reported altered bowel habit. RESULTS: A quarter of subjects reported persistence of altered bowel habit six months after an episode of infective gastroenteritis. Increasing duration of diarrhoea, younger age, and female sex increased this risk, whereas vomiting as part of the illness reduced the risk. One in 14 developed the irritable bowel syndrome with an increased risk seen in women (relative risk 3.4: 95% confidence interval 1.2 to 9.8) and with duration of diarrhoea (6.5; 1.3 to 34 for 15-21 days). CONCLUSIONS: Persistence of bowel symptoms commonly occurs after bacterial gastroenteritis and is responsible for considerable morbidity and health care costs. PMID:9080994

  9. Long-term efficacy and safety of otilonium bromide in the management of irritable bowel syndrome: a literature review

    PubMed Central

    Triantafillidis, John K; Malgarinos, George

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a very common functional gastrointestinal disorder characterized by abdominal pain or discomfort and altered bowel habits. The disease affects a large part of the world population. The clinical course is mostly characterized by a cyclic recurrence of symptoms. Therefore, IBS patients should receive, as an initial therapeutic approach, a short course of treatment, and long-term treatment should be reserved for those patients with recurrent symptoms. The available clinical trials show that significant improvement of the symptoms over placebo could be achieved with various drugs, although this improvement is frequently time dependent and with high relapse rates after the cessation of the treatment. In a proportion of patients, clinically obvious relapse could appear long after stopping the treatment. Some of the available pharmacologic agents, including otilonium bromide (OB), are able to significantly prolong the time to the appearance of relapse, compared with placebo. As a consequence, some authors suggest that a cyclic treatment could be of benefit. Antispasmodic drugs have been used for many years in an effort to control the symptoms of IBS. OB is a poorly absorbed spasmolytic drug, exerting significantly greater control of the symptoms of IBS compared with placebo. Recent data suggest that the drug could effectively be used for the long-term management of patients with IBS. The aim of this review is to provide the reader with an evidence-based overview of the efficacy and tolerability of OB in the long-term management of IBS patients, based on the results of the clinical trials published so far. PMID:24741324

  10. Vitamin D associates with improved quality of life in participants with irritable bowel syndrome: outcomes from a pilot trial

    PubMed Central

    Tazzyman, Simon; Richards, Nicholas; Trueman, Andrew R; Evans, Amy L; Grant, Vicky A; Garaiova, Iveta; Plummer, Sue F; Williams, Elizabeth A; Corfe, Bernard M

    2015-01-01

    Background Vitamin D deficiency has been associated or implicated with the pathophysiology of the gastrointestinal conditions inflammatory bowel disease and colorectal cancer, as well as with depression. No trials or epidemiology studies to date have investigated a link with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). A single case report has suggested a benefit in IBS of vitamin D supplementation. We hypothesised that IBS participants with vitamin D insufficiency would benefit from repletion in terms of their IBS symptoms. We undertook a pilot trial to provide data to support a power calculation and to justify a full trial. Methods This was a randomised, double blinded, three-arm parallel design trial of vitamin D, placebo or a combination of vitamin D and probiotics. Participants were further stratified according to whether they were vitamin D replete or insufficient. Vitamin D status was determined by blood test at baseline and exit; IBS symptoms were assessed by validated questionnaire; dietary intakes were assessed by food frequency questionnaire. Results A significant proportion of the IBS population were vitamin D deficient, such that the replete stratum could not be adequately recruited. There was a significant association in the baseline data between circulating vitamin D level and quality of life (“How much has IBS affected your life?”). Supplementation significantly improved vitamin D level versus placebo. IBS symptoms were not significantly improved in this pilot, although a power calculation was enabled from the intervention data. Conclusions The IBS population exhibits significant levels of vitamin D insufficiency and would benefit from screening and possible supplementation. The impact of IBS on quality of life may be reduced by vitamin D level. Future trials should have a sample size of over 97. Trial registration number: ICTRN 6116003917. PMID:26719813

  11. Altered gastrointestinal microbiota in irritable bowel syndrome and its modification by diet: probiotics, prebiotics and the low FODMAP diet.

    PubMed

    Staudacher, Heidi M; Whelan, Kevin

    2016-08-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional bowel disorder characterised by abdominal pain or discomfort with disordered defecation. This review describes the role of the gastrointestinal (GI) microbiota in the pathogenesis of IBS and how dietary strategies to manage symptoms impact on the microbial community. Evidence suggests a dysbiosis of the luminal and mucosal colonic microbiota in IBS, frequently characterised by a reduction in species of Bifidobacteria which has been associated with worse symptom profile. Probiotic supplementation trials suggest intentional modulation of the GI microbiota may be effective in treating IBS. A smaller number of prebiotic supplementation studies have also demonstrated effectiveness in IBS whilst increasing Bifidobacteria. In contrast, a novel method of managing IBS symptoms is the restriction of short-chain fermentable carbohydrates (low fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols (FODMAP) diet). Studies consistently demonstrate clinical effectiveness of the low FODMAP diet in patients with IBS. However, one unintentional consequence of this dietary intervention is its impact on the microbiota. This leads to an interesting paradox; namely, increasing luminal Bifidobacteria through probiotic supplementation is associated with a reduction in IBS symptoms while in direct conflict to this, the low FODMAP diet has clinical efficacy but markedly reduces luminal Bifidobacteria concentration. Given the multifactorial aetiology of IBS, the heterogeneity of symptoms and the complex and diverse nature of the microbiome, it is probable that both interventions are effective in patient subgroups. However combination treatment has never been explored and as such, presents an exciting opportunity for optimising clinical management, whilst preventing potentially deleterious effects on the GI microbiota. PMID:26908093

  12. The clinical potential of ramosetron in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhea (IBS-D).

    PubMed

    Min, Yang Won; Rhee, Poong-Lyul

    2015-05-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a highly prevalent functional bowel disorder. Serotonin (5-HT) is known to play a physiological and pathophysiological role in the regulation of gastrointestinal function. In experimental studies, 5-HT3 receptor antagonists have been reported to slow colon transit, to blunt gastrocolonic reflex, and to reduce rectal sensitivity. Alosetron and cilansetron, potent and selective 5-HT3 receptor antagonists, have proven efficacy in the treatment of IBS with diarrhea (IBS-D). However, alosetron was voluntarily withdrawn due to postmarketing reports of ischemic colitis and complications of constipation, and cilansetron was never marketed. Currently alosetron is available under a risk management program for women with severe IBS-D. Ramosetron is another potent and selective 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, which has been marketed in Japan, South Korea, and Taiwan. In animal studies, ramosetron reduced defecation induced by corticotrophin-releasing hormone and had inhibitory effects on colonic nociception. In two randomized controlled studies including 957 patients with IBS-D, ramosetron increased monthly responder rates of patient-reported global assessment of IBS symptom relief compared with placebo. Ramosetron was also as effective as mebeverine in male patients with IBS-D. In a recent randomized controlled trial with 343 male patients with IBS-D, ramosetron has proved effective in improving stool consistency, relieving abdominal pain/discomfort, and improving health-related quality of life. Regarding safety, ramosetron is associated with a lower incidence of constipation compared with other 5-HT3 receptor antagonists and has not been associated with ischemic colitis. Although further large prospective studies are needed to assess whether ramosetron is effective for female patients with IBS-D and to evaluate its long-term safety, ramosetron appears to be one of the most promising agents for patients with IBS-D. PMID:25949526

  13. Four-sample lactose hydrogen breath test for diagnosis of lactose malabsorption in irritable bowel syndrome patients with diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jian-Feng; Fox, Mark; Chu, Hua; Zheng, Xia; Long, Yan-Qin; Pohl, Daniel; Fried, Michael; Dai, Ning

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To validate 4-sample lactose hydrogen breath testing (4SLHBT) compared to standard 13-sample LHBT in the clinical setting. METHODS: Irritable bowel syndrome patients with diarrhea (IBS-D) and healthy volunteers (HVs) were enrolled and received a 10 g, 20 g, or 40 g dose lactose hydrogen breath test (LHBT) in a randomized, double-blinded, controlled trial. The lactase gene promoter region was sequenced. Breath samples and symptoms were acquired at baseline and every 15 min for 3 h (13 measurements). The detection rates of lactose malabsorption (LM) and lactose intolerance (LI) for a 4SLHBT that acquired four measurements at 0, 90, 120, and 180 min from the same data set were compared with the results of standard LHBT. RESULTS: Sixty IBS-D patients and 60 HVs were studied. The genotype in all participants was C/C-13910. LM and LI detection rates increased with lactose dose from 10 g, 20 g to 40 g in both groups (P < 0.001). 4SLHBT showed excellent diagnostic concordance with standard LHBT (97%-100%, Kappa​​ 0.815-0.942) with high sensitivity (90%-100%) and specificity (100%) at all three lactose doses in both groups. CONCLUSION: Reducing the number of measurements from 13 to 4 samples did not significantly impact on the accuracy of LHBT in health and IBS-D. 4SLHBT is a valid test for assessment of LM and LI in clinical practice. PMID:26140004

  14. Visceral and somatic hypersensitivity, autonomic cardiovascular dysfunction and low-grade inflammation in a subset of irritable bowel syndrome patients*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Liang; Liu, Bei-ni; Chen, Shuo; Wang, Miao; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Yan-li; Yao, Shu-kun

    2014-01-01

    The pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is complex and not fully understood, so the aim of this study was to evaluate whether visceral and somatic hypersensitivity, autonomic cardiovascular dysfunction, and low-grade inflammation of the gut wall are associated with diarrhea-predominant IBS (D-IBS). Sixty-two patients with D-IBS and 20 control subjects participated in the study. Using the ascending method of limits (AML) protocol, we demonstrated that D-IBS patients had significantly lower sensory thresholds compared with healthy controls (P<0.001). Using diverse methods, especially the ischemic sensitivity test, for the first time in China, we confirmed that D-IBS patients have somatic hypersensitivity. They had a significantly higher systolic blood pressure and heart rate after a cold stimulus, indicative of autonomic cardiovascular dysfunction. Compared with the control group, D-IBS patients had a significantly higher level of calprotectin (P<0.001). We also found significant correlations between visceral and somatic hypersensitivity, visceral hypersensitivity and autonomic cardiovascular dysfunction, and somatic hypersensitivity and autonomic cardiovascular dysfunction. Our findings may provide valuable suggestions for the treatment of D-IBS. PMID:25294380

  15. Prevalence and predictors of irritable bowel syndrome among medical students and interns in King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Nahla Khamis Ragab; Battarjee, Wijdan Fahad; Almehmadi, Samia Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    Background Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a frequent, costly, and potentially disabling gastrointestinal disorder. Medical education is among the most challenging and the most stressful education, and this may predispose to high rates of IBS. Objective To determine the prevalence and predictors of IBS among medical students and interns in King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among 597 medical students and interns selected by multistage stratified random sample method in 2012. A confidential, anonymous, and self-administered questionnaire was used to collect personal and sociodemographic data, level of emotional stress, and food hypersensitivity during the past 6 months. Rome III Criteria and the Standardized Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale were also used. Results The prevalence of IBS was 31.8%. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that the first predictor of IBS was female gender (aOR=2.89; 95.0% CI: 1.65–5.05). The second predictor was presence of morbid anxiety (aOR=2.44; 95.0% CI: 1.30–4.55). Living in a school dormitory, emotional stress during 6 months preceding the study, and the academic year were the next predictors. Conclusions High prevalence of IBS prevailed among medical students and interns. Female gender, morbid anxiety, living in school dormitory, emotional stress, and higher educational level (grade) were the predictors of IBS. Screening of medical students for IBS, psychological problems, and reducing stress by stress management are recommended. PMID:24054184

  16. Microbiota-host interactions in irritable bowel syndrome: epithelial barrier, immune regulation and brain-gut interactions.

    PubMed

    Hyland, Niall P; Quigley, Eamonn M M; Brint, Elizabeth

    2014-07-21

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common, sometimes debilitating, gastrointestinal disorder worldwide. While altered gut motility and sensation, as well as aberrant brain perception of visceral events, are thought to contribute to the genesis of symptoms in IBS, a search for an underlying aetiology has, to date, proven unsuccessful. Recently, attention has been focused on the microbiota as a possible factor in the pathogenesis of IBS. Prompted by a number of clinical observations, such as the recognition of the de novo development of IBS following enteric infections, as well as descriptions of changes in colonic bacterial populations in IBS and supported by clinical responses to interventions, such as antibiotics and probiotics, that modify the microbiota, various approaches have been taken to investigating the microbiota-host response in IBS, as well as in animal models thereof. From such studies a considerable body of evidence has accumulated to indicate the activation or upregulation of both factors involved in bacterial engagement with the host as well host defence mechanisms against bacteria. Alterations in gut barrier function, occurring in response, or in parallel, to changes in the microbiota, have also been widely described and can be seen to play a pivotal role in generating and sustaining host immune responses both within and beyond the gut. In this manner a plausible hypothesis, based on an altered microbiota and/or an aberrant host response, for the pathogenesis, of at least some instances of IBS, can be generated. PMID:25083059

  17. Is ginger effective for the treatment of Irritable Bowel Syndrome? A double blind randomized controlled pilot trial

    PubMed Central

    VAN TILBURG, Miranda A.L.; PALSSON, Olafur S.; RINGEL, Yehuda; WHITEHEAD, William E

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Ginger is one of the most commonly used herbal medicine for Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) but no data exists about its effectiveness. Design Double blind randomized controlled trial Setting University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill North Carolina, USA Intervention Forty-five IBS patients were randomly assigned to three groups: placebo, one gram of ginger, and two grams of ginger daily for 28 days. Main outcome measures The IBS severity scale (IBS-SS) was administered, as well as adequate relief of symptoms scale. A responder was defined as having at least 25% reduction in IBS-SS post-treatment. Results There were 57.1% responders to placebo, 46.7% to one gram and 33.3% to two grams of ginger. Adequate relief was reported by 53.3% on placebo and 53.3% in both ginger groups combined. Side effects were mild and reported by 35.7% in the placebo and 16.7% in the ginger groups. Conclusions This double blind randomized controlled pilot study suggests ginger is well tolerated but did not perform better than placebo. Larger trials are needed before any definitive conclusions can be drawn. PMID:24559811

  18. Type, Rather than Number, of Mental and Physical Comorbidities Increases the Severity of Symptoms in Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lackner, Jeffrey M.; Ma, Chang-Xing; Keefer, Laurie A.; Brenner, Darren M.; Gudleski, Gregory D.; Satchidanand, Nikhil; Firth, Rebecca; Sitrin, Michael D.; Katz, Leonard; Krasner, Susan S.; Ballou, Sarah K; Naliboff, Bruce D.; Mayer, Emeran A.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) has significant mental and physical comorbidities. However, little is known about the day-to-day burden these comorbidities place on quality of life (QOL), physical and mental function, distress, and symptoms of patients. METHODS We collected cross sectional data from 175 patients with IBS, diagnosed based on Rome III criteria (median age, 41 y; 78% women), referred to 2 specialty care clinics. Patients completed psychiatric interviews, a physical comorbidity checklist, the IBS symptom severity scale, the IBS quality of life instrument, the brief symptom inventory, the abdominal pain intensity scale, and the SF-12 health survey. RESULTS Patients with IBS reported an average of 5 comorbidities (1 mental, 4 physical). Subjects with more comorbidities reported worse QOL after adjusting for confounding variables. Multiple linear regression analyses indicated that comorbidity type was more consistently and strongly associated with illness burden indicators than disease counts. Of 10, 296 possible physical–mental comorbidity pairs, 6 of the 10 most frequent dyads involved specific conditions (generalized anxiety, depression, back pain, agoraphobia, tension headache, insomnia). These combinations were consistently associated with greater illness and symptom burdens (QOL, mental and physical function, distress, more severe symptoms of IBS, pain). CONCLUSIONS Comorbidities are common among patients with IBS. They are associated with distress and reduced QOL. Specific comorbidities are associated with more severe symptoms of IBS. PMID:23524278

  19. Identification of E. dysenterica laxative peptide: a novel strategy in the treatment of chronic constipation and irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lima, T B; Silva, O N; Oliveira, J T A; Vasconcelos, I M; Scalabrin, F B; Rocha, T L; Grossi-de-Sá, M F; Silva, L P; Guadagnin, R V; Quirino, B F; Castro, C F S; Leonardecz, E; Franco, O L

    2010-08-01

    Plants have contributed over the years to the discovery of various pharmacological products. Amongst the enormous diversity of herbs with remarkable medicinal use and further pharmacological potential, here in this report we evaluated pulp extracts from Eugenia dysenterica fruits and further identified the active principle involved in such laxative activity in rats. For protein isolation, fruits were macerated with an extraction solution following precipitation with (NH(4))(2)SO(4) (100%). After dialysis, the peptide was applied onto a reversed-phase semi-preparative HPLC column, and the major fraction was eluted with 26% and 66% acetonitrile. The evaluation of molecular masses by MALDI-TOF and Tris/Tricine SDS-PAGE of HPLC fractions showed the presence of a major peptide with approximately 7 kDa. The N-terminal amino acid peptide sequence was determined and showed no similarity to other proteins deposited in the Data Bank. Peptide from E. dysenterica was able to enhance rats' intestinal motility by approximately 20.8%, probably being responsible for laxative activity. Moreover, these proteins were non-toxic to mammals, as observed in histopathology and hemolytic analyses. In conclusion, results here reported indicate that, in the near future, proteins synthesized by E. dysenterica fruits could be utilized in the development of novel biotechnological pharmaceutics with laxative properties for use in chronic constipation and irritable bowel syndrome treatment. PMID:20580653

  20. Balance of Autonomic Nervous System Predicts Who Benefits from a Self-management Intervention Program for Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jarrett, Monica E; Cain, Kevin C; Barney, Pamela G; Burr, Robert L; Naliboff, Bruce D; Shulman, Robert; Zia, Jasmine; Heitkemper, Margaret M

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims To determine if potential biomarkers can be used to identify subgroups of people with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) who will benefit the most or the least from a comprehensive self-management (CSM) intervention. Methods In a two-armed randomized controlled trial a CSM (n = 46) was compared to a usual care (n = 46) group with follow-up at 3 and 6 months post randomization. Biomarkers obtained at baseline included heart rate variability, salivary cortisol, interleukin-10 produced by unstimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and lactulose/mannitol ratio. Linear mixed models were used to test whether these biomarkers predicted improvements in the primary outcomes including daily abdominal pain, Gastrointestinal Symptom score and IBS-specific quality of life. Results The nurse-delivered 8-session CSM intervention is more effective than usual care in reducing abdominal pain, reducing Gastrointestinal Symptom score, and enhancing quality of life. Participants with lower nighttime high frequency heart rate variability (vagal modulation) and increased low frequency/high frequency ratio (sympathovagal balance) had less benefit from CSM on abdominal pain. Salivary cortisol, IL-10, and lactulose/mannitol ratio were not statistically significant in predicting CSM benefit. Baseline symptom severity interacts with treatment, namely the benefit of CSM is greater in those with higher baseline symptoms. Conclusions Cognitively-focused therapies may be less effective in reducing abdominal pain in IBS patients with higher sympathetic tone. Whether this a centrally-mediated patient characteristic or related to heightened arousal remains to be determined. PMID:26459461

  1. Lack of Association Found between Helicobacter pylori Infection and Diarrhea-Predominant Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Multicenter Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Feng; Xiong, Man; Ma, Zonghui; Huang, Senxiong; Li, Aimin

    2016-01-01

    Aims. The association between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D) is still controversial. Here we performed a retrospective study to explore this issue. Methods. A total of 502 inpatients with Rome III confirmed IBS-D and known H. pylori status from 8 hospitals were enrolled. H. pylori-positive patients, hospitalized in the recent year, were followed up to evaluate the effects of H. pylori eradication on IBS-D clinical course. Results. Of the 502 IBS-D patients, 206 were H. pylori-positive, with an infection rate that has no significant difference with that of the general population in Guangdong province (p = 0.348). For patients followed up, no significant differences were noted as to overall symptoms (p = 0.562), abdominal pain/discomfort (p = 0.777), bloating (p = 0.736), stool frequency (p = 0.835), or stool characteristics (p = 0.928) between the H. pylori-eradicated group and the control group. The results were the same in long-term follow-up patients except the improvement of bloating, which showed that the bloating score in the H. pylori-eradicated group was significantly lower (p = 0.047). Conclusions. No significant correlation between H. pylori infection and IBS-D was noted. Overall, IBS-D patients may not benefit from H. pylori eradication. PMID:27493660

  2. Associations between Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms in Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone-Related Genes and Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Ayaka; Sato, Naoko; Suzuki, Naoki; Kano, Michiko; Tanaka, Yukari; Kanazawa, Motoyori; Aoki, Masashi; Fukudo, Shin

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common functional disorder with distinct features of stress-related pathophysiology. A key mediator of the stress response is corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH). Although some candidate genes have been identified in stress-related disorders, few studies have examined CRH-related gene polymorphisms. Therefore, we tested our hypothesis that single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in CRH-related genes influence the features of IBS. Methods: In total, 253 individuals (123 men and 130 women) participated in this study. They comprised 111 IBS individuals and 142 healthy controls. The SNP genotypes in CRH (rs28364015 and rs6472258) and CRH-binding protein (CRH-BP) (rs10474485) were determined by direct sequencing and real-time polymerase chain reaction. The emotional states of the subjects were evaluated using the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, Perceived Stress Scale, and the Self-rating Depression Scale. Results: Direct sequencing of the rs28364015 SNP of CRH revealed no genetic variation among the study subjects. There was no difference in the genotype distributions and allele frequencies of rs6472258 and rs10474485 between IBS individuals and controls. However, IBS subjects with diarrhea symptoms without the rs10474485 A allele showed a significantly higher emotional state score than carriers. Conclusions: These results suggest that the CRH and CRH-BP genes have no direct effect on IBS status. However, the CRH-BP SNP rs10474485 has some effect on IBS-related emotional abnormalities and resistance to psychosocial stress. PMID:26882083

  3. Psychological Therapies in Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Altayar, Osama; Prokop, Larry J.; Sood, Amit; Murad, Mohammad Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Background. Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a poorly understood disease with few effective treatments. Psychosocial factors are believed to contribute to the pathogenesis of IBS. Objective. To evaluate the evidence for psychological therapies in IBS treatment. Methods. We searched six medical databases through February 6, 2014, for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of psychological therapies for the treatment of IBS. Two independent reviewers identified the RCTs, extracted the data, and assessed trial quality. We used the random-effect model to pool standardized mean difference (SMD) and 95% confidence interval (CI) across trials. Results. 15 RCTs that mostly evaluated cognitive behavioral therapy were included. Psychological therapies were associated with improvement in IBS symptoms severity scales (SMD −0.618; 95% CI: −0.853 to −0.383), IBS-Quality of Life (SMD 0.604; 95% CI: 0.440 to 0.768), and abdominal pain (SMD −0.282; 95% CI: −0.562 to −0.001). No statistically significant effect was observed on diarrhea or constipation. Limitations. The trials were at increased risk of bias and the overall sample size was small leading to imprecision. Conclusion. Psychological therapies may improve the quality of life and symptom severity in IBS. The effect size noted is moderate to large and is clinically meaningful. PMID:25802514

  4. Potential future therapies for irritable bowel syndrome: will disease modifying therapy as opposed to symptomatic control become a reality?

    PubMed

    Spiller, Robin C

    2005-06-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome can remit spontaneously, implying cure is possible. Predictors of good prognosis include a short history, acute onset(possibly postinfective origin), absence of psychological disorders, and resolution of chronic life stressors. Possible-disease modifying treatments with long-lasting effects include diet and anti-inflammatory and psychological treatments. Dietary modifications, which often involve excluding dairy and wheat products, are successful in some patients. Anti-inflammatory treatments have been subjected to one RCT in postinfective IBS without benefit. Probiotics may have benefit in altering bacterial flora and as anti-inflammatory agents, but further trials are needed before they can be recommended. Psychological treatments may produce long-lasting responses. Relaxation therapy appears to have a nonspecific benefit. Psychotherapy has been shown to have long-term benefit and is particularly acceptable to, and effective for, those with overt psychological distress. Hypnotherapy has been shown to be effective in randomized placebo controlled trials and has a sustained effect. PMID:15862939

  5. Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth in Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Clinical Characteristics, Psychological Factors, and Peripheral Cytokines.

    PubMed

    Chu, Hua; Fox, Mark; Zheng, Xia; Deng, Yanyong; Long, Yanqin; Huang, Zhihui; Du, Lijun; Xu, Fei; Dai, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Psychosocial factors and low-grade colonic mucosal immune activation have been suggested to play important roles in the pathophysiology of IBS. In total, 94 patients with IBS and 13 healthy volunteers underwent a 10 g lactulose hydrogen breath test (HBT) with concurrent (99m)Tc scintigraphy. All participants also completed a face-to-face questionnaire survey, including the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Life Event Stress (LES), and general information. Serum tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin- (IL-) 6, IL-8, and IL-10 levels were measured. The 89 enrolled patients with IBS and 13 healthy controls had no differences in baseline characteristics. The prevalence of SIBO in patients with IBS was higher than that in healthy controls (39% versus 8%, resp.; p = 0.026). Patients with IBS had higher anxiety, depression, and LES scores, but anxiety, depression, and LES scores were similar between the SIBO-positive and SIBO-negative groups. Psychological disorders were not associated with SIBO in patients with IBS. The serum IL-10 level was significantly lower in SIBO-positive than SIBO-negative patients with IBS. PMID:27379166

  6. Effectiveness of recruitment in clinical trials: an analysis of methods used in a trial for irritable bowel syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Chin Feman, Siu Ping; Nguyen, Long T; Quilty, Mary T; Kerr, Catherine E; Nam, Bong Hyun; Conboy, Lisa A; Singer, Joyce P; Park, Min; Lembo, Anthony J; Kaptchuk, Ted J; Davis, Roger B

    2008-03-01

    A successful clinical trial is dependent on recruitment. Between December 2003 and February 2006, our team successfully enrolled 289 participants in a large, single-center, randomized placebo-controlled trial (RCT) studying the impact of the patient-doctor relationship and acupuncture on irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients. This paper reports on the effectiveness of standard recruitment methods such as physician referral, newspaper advertisements, fliers, audio and video media (radio and television commercials) as well as relatively new methods not previously extensively reported on such as internet ads, ads in mass-transit vehicles and movie theater previews. We also report the fraction of cost each method consumed and fraction of recruitment each method generated. Our cost per call from potential participants varied from $3-$103 and cost per enrollment participant varied from $12-$584. Using a novel metric, the efficacy index, we found that physician referrals and flyers were the most effective recruitment method in our trial. Despite some methods being more efficient than others, all methods contributed to the successful recruitment. The iterative use of the efficacy index during a recruitment campaign may be helpful to calibrate and focus on the most effective recruitment methods. PMID:17919993

  7. Effect of autogenic training on general improvement in patients with irritable bowel syndrome: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Shinozaki, Masae; Kanazawa, Motoyori; Kano, Michiko; Endo, Yuka; Nakaya, Naoki; Hongo, Michio; Fukudo, Shin

    2010-09-01

    Autogenic training (AT) is a useful and comprehensive relaxation technique. However, no studies have investigated the effects of AT on irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). In this study we tested the hypothesis that AT improves symptoms of IBS. Twenty-one patients with IBS were randomly assigned to AT (n = 11, 5 male, 6 female) or control therapy (n = 10, 5 male, 5 female). AT patients were trained intensively, while the control therapy consisted of discussions about patients' meal habits and life styles. All patients answered a question related to adequate relief (AR) of IBS symptoms and four questionnaires: Self-induced IBS Questionnaire (SIBSQ), Self-reported Depression Scale (SDS), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), and Medical Outcome Short Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36). The proportion of AR in the last AT session in the AT group (9/11, 81.8%) was significantly higher than that in the controls (3/10, 30.0%, Chi-square test, p = 0.048). Two subscales of the SF-36, i.e., social functioning and bodily pain, were significantly improved in the AT group (p < 0.05) as compared to the control group. Role emotional (p = 0.051) and general health (p = 0.068) showed a tendency for improvement in the AT group. AT may be useful in the treatment of IBS by enhancing self-control. PMID:19997775

  8. The role of AST-120 and protein-bound uremic toxins in irritable bowel syndrome: a therapeutic perspective.

    PubMed

    Mosińska, Paula; Storr, Martin; Fichna, Jakub

    2015-09-01

    AST-120 (kremezin) exhibits its favourable effects in reducing the levels of renal toxins by selective adsorption of low molecular weight substances from the intestinal lumen. So far, a vast majority of studies were focused on the role of AST-120 in the treatment of chronic kidney diseases and cardiovascular disorders, and positive therapeutic effects of the agent have already been confirmed in clinical conditions. Up to the present, there are only a few studies regarding the role of AST-120 in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Compelling data suggest the ability of the compound to adsorb protein-bound uremic toxins and mast cell derived mediators and to modulate the farnesoid X receptor, which is a bile acid sensor indispensable for maintaining homeostasis in the intestine. In this review we focus on the actions of AST-120 on intestinal permeability, reduction of visceral sensitivity and alteration of gut motility. We also discuss whether AST-120 can mitigate common IBS symptoms, such as abdominal pain, bloating and malfunction of the colonic transit and thus improve the quality of life of patients with IBS. PMID:26327918

  9. Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth in Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Clinical Characteristics, Psychological Factors, and Peripheral Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Hua; Fox, Mark; Zheng, Xia; Deng, Yanyong; Long, Yanqin; Huang, Zhihui; Du, Lijun; Xu, Fei; Dai, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Psychosocial factors and low-grade colonic mucosal immune activation have been suggested to play important roles in the pathophysiology of IBS. In total, 94 patients with IBS and 13 healthy volunteers underwent a 10 g lactulose hydrogen breath test (HBT) with concurrent 99mTc scintigraphy. All participants also completed a face-to-face questionnaire survey, including the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Life Event Stress (LES), and general information. Serum tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin- (IL-) 6, IL-8, and IL-10 levels were measured. The 89 enrolled patients with IBS and 13 healthy controls had no differences in baseline characteristics. The prevalence of SIBO in patients with IBS was higher than that in healthy controls (39% versus 8%, resp.; p = 0.026). Patients with IBS had higher anxiety, depression, and LES scores, but anxiety, depression, and LES scores were similar between the SIBO-positive and SIBO-negative groups. Psychological disorders were not associated with SIBO in patients with IBS. The serum IL-10 level was significantly lower in SIBO-positive than SIBO-negative patients with IBS. PMID:27379166

  10. Moxibustion for Diarrhea-Predominant Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Bozong; Zhang, Jianliang; Yang, Zongguo; Lu, Yunfei; Xu, Qingnian; Chen, Xiaorong; Lin, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Background. The complementary and alternative medicines in treatment of diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D) are controversial. Methods. We searched PubMed, Ovid Embase, Web of Science, Cochrane Library databases, CNKI, Wanfang Database, CBM, VIP, and AMED for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of moxibustion compared with pharmacological medications in patients with IBS-D. A meta-analysis was performed using both fixed and random-effects models based on heterogeneity across studies. Results. In total, 568 patients in 7 randomized controlled trials were randomly treated with moxibustion and pharmacological medications. The improvement of global IBS-D symptoms and overall scores was significant (P = 0.0001 and P < 0.0001, resp.) in patients treated by moxibustion only compared to pharmacological medications. The specific IBS-D symptoms of abdominal pain, abdominal distension, abnormal stool, and defecation frequency were alleviated in patients treated by moxibustion compared to pharmacological medications, but no significance was found except for abdominal distension and defecation frequency (P = 0.03 and P = 0.02, resp.). There were no serious adverse events related to moxibustion. Conclusions. Moxibustion appears to be effective in treating IBS-D compared with pharmacological medications. However, further large, rigorously designed trials are warranted due to insufficient methodological rigor in the included trials. PMID:27293460

  11. A comparison of mebeverine with high-fibre dietary advice and mebeverine plus ispaghula in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome: an open, prospectively randomised, parallel group study.

    PubMed

    Chapman, N D; Grillage, M G; Mazumder, R; Atkinson, S N

    1990-11-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare the efficacy and acceptability of mebeverine and high-fibre dietary advice versus mebeverine and ispaghula in fixed combination in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome in adults. DESIGN Open, prospectively randomised, parallel group comparison of mebeverine/dietary advice and mebeverine/ispaghula during an eight-week study period. SETTING General practices in the UK. PATIENTS One hundred and eleven patients with irritable bowel syndrome diagnosed by symptom profile or negative investigations between the ages of 18 and 75 years were entered. All patients had a history of abdominal pain occurring at least once a week for a period of three months or more. INTERVENTION Dosage was 135 mg of mebeverine hydrochloride, three times daily before meals, together with advice on high-fibre dietary intake, or 135 mg of mebeverine hydrochloride plus 3.5 g of ispaghula husk twice or three times daily before meals. MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS Details of abdominal pain severity and frequency, bowel frequency and stool consistency were recorded by means of clinicians' assessments and patient diaries. Pre-treatment assessments revealed no significant differences between the two groups with respect to any of the parameters. Both treatment groups demonstrated highly significant improvements in the numbers of pain attacks and their severity; no statistically significant differences between the two groups were demonstrated. Five patients in the mebeverine/dietary advice group reported five concurrent effects and nine patients in the mebeverine/ispaghula group reported 13 concurrent effects. All of the mebeverine/dietary advice group found their treatment acceptable but up to 28% of the mebeverine/ispaghula group found their treatment unpalatable. CONCLUSION Both treatments are effective in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome in adults. The fixed combination of mebeverine/ispaghula, however, was found to be unpalatable by up to 28% of the patients in that group

  12. The effect of sex and irritable bowel syndrome on HPA axis response and peripheral glucocorticoid receptor expression

    PubMed Central

    Videlock, Elizabeth J.; Shih, Wendy; Adeyemo, Mopelola; Mahurkar-Joshi, Swapna; Presson, Angela P.; Polytarchou, Christos; Alberto, Melissa; Iliopoulos, Dimitrios; Mayer, Emeran A.; Chang, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims Dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis has been reported in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Enhanced HPA axis response has been associated with reduced glucocorticoid receptor (GR) mediated negative feedback inhibition. We aimed to study the effects of IBS status, sex, or presence of early adverse life events (EAL) on the cortisol response to corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), and on GR mRNA expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Methods Rome III+ IBS patients and healthy controls underwent CRF (1 μg/kg ovine) and ACTH (250 μg) stimulation tests with serial plasma ACTH and cortisol levels measured (n = 116). GR mRNA levels were measured using quantitative PCR (n = 143). Area under the curve (AUC) and linear mixed effects models were used to compare ACTH and cortisol response measured across time between groups. Results There were divergent effects of IBS on the cortisol response to ACTH by sex. In men, IBS was associated with an increased AUC (p = 0.009), but in women AUC was blunted in IBS (p = 0.006). Men also had reduced GR mRNA expression (p = 0.007). Cumulative exposure to EALs was associated with an increased HPA response. Lower GR mRNA was associated with increased pituitary HPA response and increased severity of overall symptoms and abdominal pain in IBS. Conclusion This study highlights the importance of considering sex in studies of IBS and the stress response in general. Our findings also provide support for PBMC GR mRNA expression as a peripheral marker of central HPA response. PMID:27038676

  13. Differentiating Coeliac Disease from Irritable Bowel Syndrome by Urinary Volatile Organic Compound Analysis – A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Arasaradnam, Ramesh P.; Westenbrink, Eric; McFarlane, Michael J.; Harbord, Ruth; Chambers, Samantha; O’Connell, Nicola; Bailey, Catherine; Nwokolo, Chuka U.; Bardhan, Karna D.; Savage, Richard; Covington, James A.

    2014-01-01

    Coeliac disease (CD), a T-cell-mediated gluten sensitive enteropathy, affects ∼1% of the UK population and can present with wide ranging clinical features, often being mistaken for Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS). Heightened clinical awareness and serological screening identifies those with potential coeliac disease; the diagnosis is confirmed with duodenal biopsies, and symptom improvement with a gluten-free diet. Limitations to diagnosis are false negative serology and reluctance to undergo biopsy. The gut microbiome is altered in several gastrointestinal disorders, causing altered gut fermentation patterns recognisable by volatile organic compounds (VOC) analysis in urine, breath and faeces. We aimed to determine if CD alters the urinary VOC pattern, distinguishing it from IBS. 47 patients were recruited, 27 with established CD, on gluten free diets, and 20 with diarrhoea-predominant IBS (D-IBS). Collected urine was stored frozen in 10 ml aliquots. For assay, the specimens were heated to 40±0.1°C and the headspace analysed by Field Asymmetric Ion Mobility Spectrometry (FAIMS). Machine learning algorithms were used for statistical evaluation. Samples were also analysed using Gas chromatography and mass spectroscopy (GC-MS). Sparse logistic regression showed that FAIMS distinguishes VOCs in CD vs D-IBS with ROC curve AUC of 0.91 (0.83–0.99), sensitivity and specificity of 85% respectively. GCMS showed a unique peak at 4′67 found only in CD, not D-IBS, which correlated with the compound 1,3,5,7 cyclooctatetraene. This study suggests that FAIMS offers a novel, non-invasive approach to identify those with possible CD, and distinguishes from D-IBS. It offers the potential for monitoring compliance with a gluten-free diet at home. The presence of cyclooctatetraene in CD specimens will need further validation. PMID:25330367

  14. Probiotic Therapy of the Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Why Is the Evidence Still Poor and What Can Be Done About It?

    PubMed Central

    Mazurak, Nazar; Broelz, Ellen; Storr, Martin; Enck, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Despite numerous randomized clinical trials and meta-analyses, there is no increased evidence for the efficacy of probiotics in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). We review this evidence, identify and analyse the reasons for this lack of evidence and propose methodological improvements for future studies. Methods Based on a literature search, we identified 56 papers that matched the purpose of our analyses. Twenty-seven studies used multi-species bacterial preparations and 29 used single-strain probiotics. They were analysed regarding patients included, treatment duration, probiotic dosage, and outcome measures. Results Trials in both groups suffered from heterogeneity with respect to probiotic concentration, duration of treatment, and other methodological issues (crossover design and underpowered studies). This heterogeneity did not allow the application of a meta-analytic approach and a systematic review was therefore performed instead. Multi-strain preparations combined 2 to 8 different bacterial subspecies, mostly lactobacilli or bifidobacteria, and used variable lengths of treatments. Overall, more than 50% of trials presented negative outcomes. The majority of the single-strain probiotic trials employing lactobacilli or Saccharomyces were negative, whereas trials employing bifidobacteria showed positive results. Conclusions The heterogeneity of the studies of probiotics in IBS questions the value of meta-analyses. The use of different bacterial strains and different mixtures of these strains, as well as different dosages, are the main contributors to this heterogeneity. Current data provides limited evidence for the efficacy of a small number of single-strain probiotics in IBS (mostly bifidobacteria) and sound studies following strict trial guidelines (Food and Drug Administration and European Medicines Agency guidelines for clinical trials) are needed. We summarised and proposed some methodological issues for future studies in

  15. Chronic bacterial prostatitis and irritable bowel syndrome: effectiveness of treatment with rifaximin followed by the probiotic VSL#3

    PubMed Central

    Vicari, Enzo; Vignera, La Sandro; Castiglione, Roberto; Condorelli, Rosita A; Vicari, Lucia O; Calogero, Aldo E

    2014-01-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the influence of treatment with rifaximin followed by the probiotic VSL#3 versus no treatment on the progression of chronic prostatitis toward chronic microbial prostate-vesiculitis (PV) or prostate-vesiculo-epididymitis (PVE). A total of 106 selected infertile male patients with bacteriologically cured chronic bacterial prostatitis (CBP) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) were randomly prescribed rifaximin (200 mg, 2 tablets bid, for 7 days monthly for 12 months) and probiotic containing multiple strains VSL#3 (450 × 109 CFU per day) or no treatment. Ninety-five of them (89.6%) complied with the therapeutic plan and were included in this study. Group A = “6Tx/6-”: treatment for the initial 6 and no treatment for the following 6 months (n = 26); Group B = “12Tx”: 12 months of treatment (n = 22); Group C = “6-/6Tx”: no treatment for the initial 6 months and treatment in the last 6 months (n = 23); Group D = “12-”: no treatment (n = 24). The patients of Groups A = “6Tx/6-” and B = “12Tx” had the highest frequency of chronic prostatitis (88.5% and 86.4%, respectively). In contrast, group “12-”: patients had the lowest frequency of prostatitis (33.4%). The progression of prostatitis into PV in groups “6Tx/6-” (15.5%) and “6-/6Tx” (13.6%) was lower than that found in the patients of group “12-” (45.8%). Finally, no patient of groups “6Tx/6-” and “6-/6Tx” had PVE, whereas it was diagnosed in 20.8% of group “12-” patients. Long-term treatment with rifaximin and the probiotic VSL#3 is effective in lowering the progression of prostatitis into more complicated forms of male accessory gland infections in infertile patients with bacteriologically cured CBP plus IBS. PMID:24969056

  16. Modulation of the gut microbiota composition by rifaximin in non-constipated irritable bowel syndrome patients: a molecular approach.

    PubMed

    Soldi, Sara; Vasileiadis, Sotirios; Uggeri, Francesca; Campanale, Mariachiara; Morelli, Lorenzo; Fogli, Maria Vittoria; Calanni, Fiorella; Grimaldi, Maria; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Rifaximin, with its low systemic absorption, may represent a treatment of choice for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), mainly due to its ability to act on IBS pathogenesis, through the influence on gut microbiota. The aim of the present study was to assess, by biomolecular tools, the rifaximin active modulation exerted on gut microbiota of non-constipated IBS patients. Fifteen non-constipated IBS subjects were treated with 550 mg rifaximin three times a day for 14 days. Stool samples were collected before starting the treatment, at the end of it, and after a 6-week washout period. Real-time polymerase chain reaction, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, and next-generation sequencing were applied to all the samples to verify and quantify possible microbial fluctuations. Rifaximin treatment did not affect the overall composition of the microbiota of the treated subjects, inducing fluctuations in few bacterial groups, balanced by the replacement of homologs or complementary bacterial groups. Rifaximin appeared to influence mainly potentially detrimental bacteria, such as Clostridium, but increasing the presence of some species, such as Faecalibacterium prausnitzii. A decrease in the Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio after 14 days of treatment and bacterial profiles with higher biodiversity were observed during the follow-up compared to baseline. Rifaximin treatment, although effective on IBS symptom relief and normalization of lactulose breath test, did not induce dramatic shifts in the microbiota composition of the subjects, stimulating microbial reorganization in some populations toward a more diverse composition. It was not possible to speculate on differences of fecal microbiota modification between responders vs nonresponders and to correlate the quali-/quantitative modification of upper gastrointestinal microbiota and clinical response. PMID:26673000

  17. Chronic bacterial prostatitis and irritable bowel syndrome: effectiveness of treatment with rifaximin followed by the probiotic VSL#3.

    PubMed

    Vicari, Enzo; La Vignera, Sandro; Castiglione, Roberto; Condorelli, Rosita A; Vicari, Lucia O; Calogero, Aldo E

    2014-01-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the influence of treatment with rifaximin followed by the probiotic VSL#3 versus no treatment on the progression of chronic prostatitis toward chronic microbial prostate-vesiculitis (PV) or prostate-vesiculo-epididymitis (PVE). A total of 106 selected infertile male patients with bacteriologically cured chronic bacterial prostatitis (CBP) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) were randomly prescribed rifaximin (200 mg, 2 tablets bid, for 7 days monthly for 12 months) and probiotic containing multiple strains VSL#3 (450 × 10(9) FU per day) or no treatment. Ninety-five of them (89.6%) complied with the therapeutic plan and were included in this study. Group A = "6Tx/6-": treatment for the initial 6 and no treatment for the following 6 months (n = 26); Group B = "12Tx": 12 months of treatment (n = 22); Group C = "6-/6Tx": no treatment for the initial 6 months and treatment in the last 6 months (n = 23); Group D = "12-": no treatment (n = 24). The patients of Groups A = "6Tx/6-" and B = "12Tx" had the highest frequency of chronic prostatitis (88.5% and 86.4%, respectively). In contrast, group "12-": patients had the lowest frequency of prostatitis (33.4%). The progression of prostatitis into PV in groups "6Tx/6-" (15.5%) and "6-/6Tx" (13.6%) was lower than that found in the patients of group "12-" (45.8%). Finally, no patient of groups "6Tx/6-" and "6-/6Tx" had PVE, whereas it was diagnosed in 20.8% of group "12-" patients. Long-term treatment with rifaximin and the probiotic VSL#3 is effective in lowering the progression of prostatitis into more complicated forms of male accessory gland infections in infertile patients with bacteriologically cured CBP plus IBS. PMID:24969056

  18. A cross-sectional study of the association between overnight call and irritable bowel syndrome in medical students

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Malcolm; Roth, Lee; McWilliam, Morgan; Thompson, Kim; Chande, Nilesh

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Shift work has been associated with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), which includes gastrointestinal symptoms such as abdominal pain, constipation and diarrhea. Overnight call shifts also lead to a disruption of the endogenous circadian rhythm. HYPOTHESIS: Medical students who perform intermittent overnight call shifts will demonstrate a higher prevalence of IBS symptoms when compared with medical students who perform no overnight call shifts. METHODS: First- and second-year (preclinical) medical students have no overnight call requirements, whereas third- and fourth-year medical (clerkship) students do have overnight call requirements. All medical students at the Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry (London, Ontario) were invited to complete an anonymous, web-based survey or an identical paper copy that included demographic data, the Rome III questionnaire and the IBS-Quality of Life measure (IBS-QOL). The prevalence of IBS symptoms and quality of life secondary to those symptoms were determined. RESULTS: Data were available for 247 medical students (110 pre-clinical students, 118 clerkship students and 19 excluded surveys). There was no significant difference in the presence of IBS between preclinical and clerkship students (21 of 110 [19.1%] versus 26 of 118 [22.0%]; P=0.58). The were no significant differences in mean (± SD) IBS-QOL score of those with IBS between preclinical (43.5±8.3) and clerkship students (45.7±13.8) (P=0.53). CONCLUSIONS: Participation in overnight call was not associated with the development of IBS or a lower quality of life secondary to IBS in medical students. PMID:22590702

  19. A meta-analysis and systematic review of the comorbidity between irritable bowel syndrome and bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Ping-Tao; Zeng, Bing-Syuan; Chen, Yen-Wen; Wu, Ming-Kung; Wu, Ching-Kuan; Lin, Pao-Yen

    2016-08-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and bipolar disorder (BD) are 2 distinct diseases but may share a similar pathophysiology. However, the comorbidity rate of these 2 diseases is unclear. Also, the current practice guidelines suggest prescribing antidepressants to IBS patients. However, this practice may increase the risk of phase-shift to manic episodes in IBS patients comorbid with BD.This study aimed to determine the relationship between IBS and BD through a meta-analysis.Electronic research through PubMed, Medline, ScienceDirect online, ClinicalTrials.gov, and additional resources.The inclusion criteria were studies investigating the prevalence rate of BD in subjects with IBS and control subjects; and articles on clinical trials on humans.Data from included studies were pooled by a random effects model, and possible confounding variables were examined by meta-regression and subgroup analysis.The current study consists of a total of 177,117 IBS patients and 192,092 control subjects extracted from 6 included studies. The prevalence rate of BD was significantly higher in the IBS patients than in the controls (odds ratio = 2.48, 95% confidence interval: 2.35-2.61, P < 0.001). However, the significance persists only in studies from database research, but not from primary studies. In addition, there was no significant association between the prevalence rate of BD in IBS and several clinical variables, including age, female proportion, prevalence of comorbid diabetes, or hypertension.The total number of included studies is small. Moreover, apparently different results from database research and primary research limit the generalization of our findings to a broad population. Also, we could only perform meta-regression on limited clinical variables.Our results support a significantly higher prevalence rate of BD in IBS patients than in controls. Clinicians should be cautious about the risk of phase-shift to manic episodes when prescribing antidepressants in IBS patients

  20. Lovastatin lactone may improve irritable bowel syndrome with constipation (IBS-C) by inhibiting enzymes in the archaeal methanogenesis pathway

    PubMed Central

    Muskal, Steven M.; Sliman, Joe; Kokai-Kun, John; Pimentel, Mark; Wacher, Vince; Gottlieb, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Methane produced by the methanoarchaeon Methanobrevibacter smithii ( M. smithii) has been linked to constipation, irritable bowel syndrome with constipation (IBS-C), and obesity. Lovastatin, which demonstrates a cholesterol-lowering effect by the inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase, may also have an anti-methanogenesis effect through direct inhibition of enzymes in the archaeal methanogenesis pathway. We conducted protein-ligand docking experiments to evaluate this possibility. Results are consistent with recent clinical findings. METHODS: F420-dependent methylenetetrahydromethanopterin dehydrogenase ( mtd), a key methanogenesis enzyme was modeled for two different methanogenic archaea: M. smithii and Methanopyrus kandleri. Once protein models were developed, ligand-binding sites were identified. Multiple ligands and their respective protonation, isomeric and tautomeric representations were docked into each site, including F420-coenzyme (natural ligand), lactone and β-hydroxyacid forms of lovastatin and simvastatin, and other co-complexed ligands found in related crystal structures. RESULTS: 1) Generally, for each modeled site the lactone form of the statins had more favorable site interactions compared to F420; 2) The statin lactone forms generally had the most favorable docking scores, even relative to the native template PDB ligands; and 3) The statin β-hydroxyacid forms had less favorable docking scores, typically scoring in the middle with some of the F420 tautomeric forms. Consistent with these computational results were those from a recent phase II clinical trial ( NCT02495623) with a proprietary, modified-release lovastatin-lactone (SYN-010) in patients with IBS-C, which showed a reduction in symptoms and breath methane levels, compared to placebo. CONCLUSION: The lactone form of lovastatin exhibits preferential binding over the native-F420 coenzyme ligand in silico and thus could inhibit the activity of the key M. smithii methanogenesis enzyme mtd in vivo

  1. Modulation of the gut microbiota composition by rifaximin in non-constipated irritable bowel syndrome patients: a molecular approach

    PubMed Central

    Soldi, Sara; Vasileiadis, Sotirios; Uggeri, Francesca; Campanale, Mariachiara; Morelli, Lorenzo; Fogli, Maria Vittoria; Calanni, Fiorella; Grimaldi, Maria; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Rifaximin, with its low systemic absorption, may represent a treatment of choice for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), mainly due to its ability to act on IBS pathogenesis, through the influence on gut microbiota. The aim of the present study was to assess, by biomolecular tools, the rifaximin active modulation exerted on gut microbiota of non-constipated IBS patients. Fifteen non-constipated IBS subjects were treated with 550 mg rifaximin three times a day for 14 days. Stool samples were collected before starting the treatment, at the end of it, and after a 6-week washout period. Real-time polymerase chain reaction, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, and next-generation sequencing were applied to all the samples to verify and quantify possible microbial fluctuations. Rifaximin treatment did not affect the overall composition of the microbiota of the treated subjects, inducing fluctuations in few bacterial groups, balanced by the replacement of homologs or complementary bacterial groups. Rifaximin appeared to influence mainly potentially detrimental bacteria, such as Clostridium, but increasing the presence of some species, such as Faecalibacterium prausnitzii. A decrease in the Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio after 14 days of treatment and bacterial profiles with higher biodiversity were observed during the follow-up compared to baseline. Rifaximin treatment, although effective on IBS symptom relief and normalization of lactulose breath test, did not induce dramatic shifts in the microbiota composition of the subjects, stimulating microbial reorganization in some populations toward a more diverse composition. It was not possible to speculate on differences of fecal microbiota modification between responders vs nonresponders and to correlate the quali-/quantitative modification of upper gastrointestinal microbiota and clinical response. PMID:26673000

  2. Tong Xie Yao Fang relieves irritable bowel syndrome in rats via mechanisms involving regulation of 5-hydroxytryptamine and substance P

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Yue; Zhong, Lei; Wang, Jian-Wei; Zhao, Xue-Ying; Zhao, Wen-Jing; Kuang, Hai-Xue

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether the Chinese medicine Tong Xie Yao Fang (TXYF) improves dysfunction in an irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) rat model. METHODS: Thirty baby rats for IBS modeling were separated from mother rats (1 h per day) from days 8 to 21, and the rectum was expanded by angioplasty from days 8 to 12. Ten normal rats were used as normal controls. We examined the effects of TXYF on defection frequency, colonic transit function and smooth muscle contraction, and the expression of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and substance P (SP) in colonic and hypothalamus tissues by Western blot and RT-PCT techniques in both normal rats and IBS model rats with characterized visceral hypersensitivity. RESULTS: Defecation frequency was 1.8 ± 1.03 in normal rats and 4.5 ± 1.58 in IBS model rats (P < 0.001). However, the defecation frequency was significantly decreased (3.0 ± 1.25 vs 4.5 ± 1.58, P < 0.05), while the time (in seconds) of colon transit function was significantly increased (256.88 ± 20.32 vs 93.36 ± 17.28, P < 0.001) in IBS + TXYF group rats than in IBS group rats. Increased colonic smooth muscle tension and contract frequency in IBS model rats were significantly decreased by administration of TXYF. Exogenous agonist stimulants increased spontaneous activity and elicited contractions of colon smooth muscle in IBS model rats, and all of these actions were significantly reduced by TXYF involving 5-HT and SP down-regulation. CONCLUSION: TXYF can modulate the activity of the enteric nervous system and alter 5-HT and SP activities, which may contribute to the symptoms of IBS. PMID:25914462

  3. Current and emerging treatments for irritable bowel syndrome with constipation and chronic idiopathic constipation: focus on prosecretory agents.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Rachel H; Luthin, David R

    2015-06-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome with constipation (IBS-C) and chronic idiopathic constipation (CIC) are two common functional gastrointestinal disorders that impair quality of life and pose a significant economic burden to the health care system. Current therapeutic options include lifestyle modifications, over-the-counter (OTC) agents, antispasmodics, serotonin agonists, and lubiprostone and linaclotide, two prosecretory prescription drugs approved for the treatment of IBS-C and CIC. This review discusses the efficacy and safety of current treatments and emerging therapies for the treatment of IBS-C and CIC, with a focus on the prosecretory agents. A search of the PubMed database (1966-November 2014) was performed to identify relevant articles; clinical trials on emerging agents were also identified by searching the ClinicalTrials.gov registry. OTC laxatives may relieve constipation but do not treat abdominal pain and discomfort. Antispasmodics may provide short-term relief in patients with IBS-C, but their utility is limited by anticholinergic adverse effects. Tricyclic antidepressants, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors have shown benefit in providing global symptom relief and in improving abdominal discomfort, but further research is needed. Phase III clinical trials have demonstrated the efficacy of lubiprostone and linaclotide relative to placebo for the short-term treatment of IBS-C and CIC, with improvements reported in stool frequency, perceived constipation severity, and abdominal pain and discomfort. Relatively small response rates, higher costs, and adverse effects associated with lubiprostone and linaclotide will likely render these agents suitable as second-line therapies in the treatment of IBS-C and CIC. Emerging potential treatment options include prucalopride, plecanatide, elobixibat, and tenapanor. Several of these emerging therapies have novel mechanisms of action and may show promise in patients

  4. Increased capsaicin receptor TRPV1-expressing sensory fibres in irritable bowel syndrome and their correlation with abdominal pain

    PubMed Central

    Akbar, A; Yiangou, Y; Facer, P; Walters, J R F; Anand, P; Ghosh, S

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The capsaicin receptor TRPV1 (transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1) may play an important role in visceral pain and hypersensitivity states. In irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), abdominal pain is a common and distressing symptom where the pathophysiology is still not clearly defined. TRPV1-immunoreactive nerve fibres were investigated in colonic biopsies from patients with IBS, and this was related to abdominal pain. Methods: Rectosigmoid biopsies were collected from 23 IBS patients fulfilling Rome II criteria, and from 22 controls. Abdominal pain scores were recorded using a validated questionnaire. TRPV1-, substance P- and neuronal marker protein gene product (PGP) 9.5-expressing nerve fibres, mast cells (c-kit) and lymphocytes (CD3 and CD4) were quantified, following immunohistochemistry with specific antibodies. The biopsy findings were related to the abdominal pain scores. Results: A significant 3.5-fold increase in median numbers of TRPV1-immunoreactive fibres was found in biopsies from IBS patients compared with controls (p<0.0001). Substance P-immunoreactive fibres (p = 0.01), total nerve fibres (PGP9.5) (p = 0.002), mast cells (c-kit) (p = 0.02) and lymphocytes (CD3) (p = 0.03) were also significantly increased in the IBS group. In multivariate regression analysis, only TRPV1-immuno-reactive fibres (p = 0.005) and mast cells (p = 0.008) were significantly related to the abdominal pain score. Conclusions: Increased TRPV1 nerve fibres are observed in IBS, together with a low-grade inflammatory response. The increased TRPV1 nerve fibres may contribute to visceral hypersensitivity and pain in IBS, and provide a novel therapeutic target. PMID:18252749

  5. Irritable Bowel Syndrome Is Associated with an Increased Risk of Dementia: A Nationwide Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chien-Hua; Lin, Cheng-Li; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Abnormal interaction in the brain–gut axis has emerged as one of the relevant pathophysiological mechanisms for the development of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Moreover, the brain–gut axis has recently been demonstrated to be crucial for the maintenance of cognitive performance. Therefore, we assessed the risk of dementia following diagnosis of IBS. Methods Using the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) to obtain medical claims data from 2000 to 2011, we employed a random sampling method to enroll32 298 adult patients with IBS and frequency-matched them according to sex, age, and baseline year with 129 192 patients without IBS. Results The patients with IBS exhibited an increased risk of dementia [adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) = 1.26, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.17–1.35]after adjustment for age, sex, diabetes, hypertension, stroke, coronary artery disease (CAD), head injury, depression, and epilepsy, and the overall incidence of dementia for the cohorts with and without IBS was 4.86 and 3.41 per 1000 person-years, respectively. IBS was associated with an increased risk of dementia in patients older than 50 years in both male and female, and in those with comorbidity or without comorbidity. After adjustment for age, sex, and comorbidity, patients with IBS were also more likely to develop either non- Alzheimer’s disease (AD) dementia (aHR = 1.24, 95% CI = 1.15–1.33) or AD (aHR = 1.76, 95% CI = 1.28–2.43). Conclusions IBS is associated with an increased risk of dementia, and this effect is obvious only in patients who are ≥50 years old. PMID:26731277

  6. Differentiating coeliac disease from irritable bowel syndrome by urinary volatile organic compound analysis--a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Arasaradnam, Ramesh P; Westenbrink, Eric; McFarlane, Michael J; Harbord, Ruth; Chambers, Samantha; O'Connell, Nicola; Bailey, Catherine; Nwokolo, Chuka U; Bardhan, Karna D; Savage, Richard; Covington, James A

    2014-01-01

    Coeliac disease (CD), a T-cell-mediated gluten sensitive enteropathy, affects ∼ 1% of the UK population and can present with wide ranging clinical features, often being mistaken for Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS). Heightened clinical awareness and serological screening identifies those with potential coeliac disease; the diagnosis is confirmed with duodenal biopsies, and symptom improvement with a gluten-free diet. Limitations to diagnosis are false negative serology and reluctance to undergo biopsy. The gut microbiome is altered in several gastrointestinal diso